(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"



♦? 



CITY OF CONCORD 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1917 



t 



t 



I 



*jT V V V V •♦* V V V V V *V* *♦* V V V *♦* V *♦* V V V V *V* V V *♦* V V V V V V V V* V V" V^J* V V V V *♦* *♦* V ♦ 



1917 
SIX'iY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 
AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 
AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCOED, N. H.: 

Evans Printing Company 

1918 



N 

1117 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment op Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should knoiv that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left wdth the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will he ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



MAYOR FRENCH'S FIFTH INAUGURAL 
ADDRESS. 



January 22, 1918. 



Ladies and Gentlemen: 

In reassuming the duties of mayor, I desire to express my 
deep appreciation of the honor conferred upon me by my 
selection, for a fifth term, as chief magistrate. 

During my past administrations, economy in the expendi- 
ture of the taxpayers' money has always been my watch- 
word, recognizing the fact that they should be relieved as 
much as possible from the burdens necessarily placed upon 
them. It is well not to forget that we are the city's serv- 
ants; that indifferent attention to the business affairs of 
the city will produce only indifferent results; that the city 
demands a thorough business administration economically 
managed as a good business man manages his ow^n private 
business affairs, being as careful as if we were working 
for ourselves and spending our own money instead of the 
money of others. By keeping these sentiments in mind and 
remembering that we do not represent any political parties 
in the transaction of our city affairs, I feel, as I have said 
before, that T have been fair and impartial to all in my 
conduct of city affairs. Striving always to do that which 
is for the best interests of all, I have been independent, all 
will admit, and I think that we all should retain all of our 
independence especially at this time. The fact that my 
recommendations have not generally been adopted and that 
I have been returned for the fifth time by the people, for 
which I thank them, bears me out when I say to you that 
the people of this city approved of the principles for which 



4 CITY OP CONCORD. 

I have stood and still desire my recommendations carried 
into effect. 

With war prices staring us in the face, labor of all kinds 
demands higher wages. I shall not promise you a loAver 
tax rate, but I will endeavor, if possible, not to have it any 
higher than the present rate. In supervising the expendi- 
tures of the people's money for municipal purposes, I 
would urge that we all gain as much personal knowledge 
as possible of the actual conditions and needs of the city. 
This course properly followed, I think, will be of great 
advantage to the taxpayers. I shall now take up the vari- 
ous departments of the city, making such recommendations 
as I think necessary. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

No city the size of Concord has a better fire department. 
The personnel of this department cannot be easily im- 
proved ; from the chief down the men are steady, honest 
and faithful in the discharge of their duties. In this de- 
partment I think the city gets the worth of its money. 
Horse-drawn tire apparatus has become almost a thing of 
the past. Our fire department has been motorized in the 
past few years to a larger extent than any other city of its 
size in New England. Recognizing this fact, I shall recom- 
mend that steps be taken to have the insurance companies 
doing business in our city give to the people a lower rate, 
instead of asking for more efficiency in this department 
when there is no occasion for an act of this kind. I am 
not in favor of the purchase of any more motor-driven fire 
apparatus at this time. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

An efficient police department is necessary in every city 
for the safety of individuals and for the protection of 
property. Experienced men are much more effective as 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 5 

police officers than new ones can be. The salaries of all the 
regular police officers are approximately one thousand dol- 
lars each per year and for this amount I think the city is 
entitled to the service of able-bodied men and to their en- 
tire attention to the duties of the work. I recommend that 
they be granted one day off in every fifteen. 

LIGHTING STREETS. 

Well lighted streets are a necessity for the safety and 
convenience of the public and I am pleased that I can say 
that our streets are as well lighted as any city of its size in 
New England without any additional expense to the tax- 
payers. The public service charge placed upon all gas 
meters owned by the Concord Light & Power Company is 
not accepted by those that use gas very cheerfully. This 
matter is now in the hands of the Public Service Commis- 
sion for further consideration. This is due to a protest 
by a petition sent them by the Central Labor Union oppos- 
ing the twenty-five cent charge. I think the rate on gas 
in Concord, N. H., is excessive. Why should the consumer 
be obliged to pay $1.25 per thousand feet for it? Just 
consider this proposition for a moment. Second only to a 
water i^lant, a gas plant is the greatest necessity in the line 
of public utilities. Many cities in this country and abroad 
own their gas plant, and the cost to the consumer has been 
cut in half. As I have said before, it would not be so diffi- 
cult a matter for the city of Concord to build a gas plant, 
or perhaps the present plant here situated might be taken 
over at a fair physical valuation, all consideration of the 
value of the franchise, which of course is the property of 
the city in the first instance, being eliminated. This mat- 
ter I think is worthy of your consideration. 

PARKS. 

Our parks are in excellent condition. For this our 
superintendent is deserving of much credit. Our public 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

playgrounds are in very good condition, and I recommend 
a sufficient sum of money be appropriated to make them 
up-to-date playgrounds. 

SCHOOLS. 

Too much good cannot be said in regard to our public 
schools. The education of the youth of the city is one of 
most importance of city administration. Much criticism 
has been expressed against the Board of Education in the 
method they have pursued in transporting scholars from 
the outlying districts on the ground that they will carry 
scholars to all grades except the High School. This mat- 
ter should be considered and acted upon at the next meet- 
ing of Union School District. 

HOSPITALS. 

It has been customary for years to make an annual appro- 
priation of $3,000 for the Margaret Pillsbury General Hos- 
pital. Since 1909 this hospital has had a restriction placed 
upon it which was a direct financial saving to the taxpayers 
of tliis municipality. During the past administration this 
restriction was removed to such an extent that the taxpay- 
ers suffered a financial loss. I recommend that this appro- 
priation continue with the same restriction that was upon 
it from 1909 to 1916. I also recommend that $1,000 be 
appropriated to aid the Memorial Hospital on South Street. 
Both of these hospitals are doing excellent work among our 
worthy poor and deserve all the financial aid that the city 
can afford them. 

PUBLIC COMFORT STATION. 

On several occasions my attention has been called to the 
fact that a public comfort station for men, women and chil- 
dren is greatly needed. Almost every city in the land 
maintains a station of this kind. I recommend for your 
approval the erection of a public comfort station. I think 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 7 

this would be a direct benefit to all and is worthy of your 
consideration. Five thousand dollars was appropriated 
for this purpose in my former administration, but the 
money as yet has not been expended. Where did this 
money go? 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

We all recognize the importance of this branch of the 
city government and its efficient management. Our city 
ranks second in health and cleanliness among the cities of 
the United States. I especially commend this department 
for its efforts to see that the inhabitants of the city are 
furnished with milk produced under sanitary conditions. 
I am glad to say that all plumbing is examined by and 
taken charge of by our sanitary officer. 

LABOR. 

The laborers of our city are all worthy of our considera- 
tion, and T think that they should be granted the same priv- 
ileges as our salaried officers. 

soldiers' relief. 

Those who have gone to war to fight for the establish- 
ment of universal peace throughout the land and left de- 
pendents to be cared for deserve the most generous treat- 
ment, and I trust all that is possible in this direction vsdll 
be freely done, and I trust that when a case of this nature 
presents itself to our overseers of the poor, it will receive 
prompt attention. 

As a people we are fond of speaking of the morale of our 
soldiers at home and abroad, and of doing so with a feeling 
of pride, and well w^e may. Every account, official and 
private, that comes from across the sea, where our regulars 
and many of our former National Guard are now close to 
the theatre of war, is to the same effect, that the boys who 
wear the uniform of Uncle Sam are in fine condition of 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

cheerfulness, and even thankfulness, that they are to be 
permitted to fight for the allied countries of democrac}^ 
against the allied countries of autocracy. Here in the 
United States the same remarkable spirit is rej^orted in 
every camp and cantonment from ocean to ocean. The 
men are full of enthusiasm, ready to train and train hard 
to become good soldiers and are inspired by a confidence 
that when their turn comes at the battle fronts they will 
give as good an account of themselves as American soldiers 
have lieen in the habit of giving. It is wonderful to con- 
template such a feeling on the part of men who but a few- 
months ago were all engaged in civilian pursuits and were 
taken aAvay from their usual lives whether they wished it 
or not. But the facts are as we say. The morale of our 
national army men is splendid. 

Is that all that is necessary for our effective part in a 
successful war? By no means. We, the people at home, 
the millions upon millions of men and women who cannot 
take a soldier's part in tlie war, must see to it that our own 
morale matches that of our defenders. For certainly there 
is a morale in every-day life as truly as among armies. 

Morale, according to one of the most ponderous of dic- 
tionaries, is the "moral or mental condition as regards 
courage, zeal, hope, confidence and the like, especially of a 
body of men engaged in a hazardous enterprise, as soldiers 
and sailors in time of w^ar." But the application should 
not and '^annot end there. We are all "engaged in a haz- 
ardous enterprise." We nmst look to our courage, zeal, 
hope and confidence. 

We are just nmv passing through some experien(e>,s that 
may well try our cheerfulness. But they will be overcome 
without serious disasters, let us hope. We have food 
enough, save sugar, and that famine will soon be broken. 
We are short of coal in a way that should never have been 
permitted, with no scarcity of the commodity at the mines. 
Unhappily there is suffering from this lack, but a few days 
should bring relief. Nature has been bitter and man's ef- 



MAYOR S ADDRESS. 9 

ficieney has failed to give satisfactory results; the combina- 
tion has been severe, indeed. But all the hardships have 
been as nothing compared to those of the troops in the 
trenches. Let us remember that, and take courage to press 
with vigor on. 

In a French cartoon two soldiers are talking together. 
One says: "If they hold out." The other asks: "If who 
hold out ? ' ' The first replies : ' ' The civilians. ' ' And there 
is infinite acumen in that reply, for, after all, it is usually 
peoples who are defeated rather than armies. Let us all 
do our share in upholding the morale of the American 
people. There lies victory. 

POOR DEPARTMENT. 

Our worthy poor are deserving of a great deal of our 
consideration. It costs the city approximately $20,000 per 
year to maintain this department. I think a big saving 
can be made in this department to the taxpayers. I recom- 
mend at this time for your consideration the need of a pur- 
chasing agent to purchase all goods for the several depart- 
ments within the limits of their appropriations. I also 
recommend that the City Hall basement be made a general 
store for the worthy poor and that a consignment of goods 
be placed therein known as the necessities of life and that 
our messenger and janitor distribute the same upon an 
order from the overseer of the poor ; applicant to be their 
own carrier, therefore giving to applicants their goods with- 
out profit to am^one. I think this would be a saving to the 
taxpayer, also to the worthy poor, and is worthy of your 
consideration. 

HIGHV^AY DEPARTMENT. 

In regard to the subject . of highways generally, I am 
sorry to say that the present condition of our streets is not 
as good as they should be with the large amount of money 
spent upon them. Too much money has been spent on per- 



10 CITY OP CONCORD, 

manent work and general maintenance has been neglected. 
This should not be so. The present tendency elsewhere is 
away from this course, and it is only by such action that 
we can save enormous expenditures in the future. I sug- 
gest for your consideration the advisability of concentrat- 
ing the highway and engineering department officers in 
one department. Have a civil engineer for superintendent 
of streets. By such action you will center responsibility, 
avoid conflict as to grades, save money and improve streets. 

CONTRACTS. 

I recommend that all work that is to be let out by con- 
tract be let to the lowest responsible bidder, and that resi- 
dents of Concord be given a preference, all other things 
being equal. 1 also recommend that all bids or contracts 
be opened in the presence of the mayor. I consider this a 
fair proposition. 

CONCLUSION. 

We are a corporation with a A-aluation of over 
$19,000,000. "We have been elected as a board of direct- 
ors to transact the business of this corporation and to 
give to the taxpayers the best returns for their money 
invested and that is the money raised by taxation. It is 
not my purpose, as I have stated above, to engage at this 
time in a lengthy discussion of every topic connected with 
your duties, but rather to impress upon your minds the 
necessity of giving to every subject which may be pre- 
sented that careful consideration and determination 
which will result in the greatest benefit to our munici- 
pality. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 14, 1918. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance pertaining to salaries of members of the police 

FORCE. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. Amend section 4 of chapter 41 of the Eevised Ordi- 
nances, 1912, by striking out the word "fifteen" in the second line 
and inserting in place thereof the word "seventeen," so that said 
section as amended shall read as follows: 

Sect. 4. The city marshal shall receive in full for his services 
the sum of seventeen hundred dollars per annum. 

Sect. 2. Amend section 5 of said chapter by striking out the 
word ' ' twelve ' ' in the second line and inserting in place thereof the 
word "fourteen," so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows : 

Sect. 5. The assistant city marshal shall receive in full for his 
services the sum of fourteen hundred dollars per annum. 

Sect. 3. Amend section 6 of said chapter by striking out the 
words "ten hundred and fifty" and inserting in place thereof the 
words ' ' twelve ' ' so that said section as amended shall read as fol- 
lows : 

Sect. 6. The captain of the night watch shall receive in full for 
his services the sum of twelve hundred dollars per annum. 

Sect. 4. Amend section 13 of said chapter to read as follows: 

Sect. 13. The sergeant of police shall receive in full for his serv- 
ices the sum of three dollars and five cents per day. Each regular 
policeman during the first year of services shall receive the sum of 
two dollars and seventy cents per day and for services thereafter the 
sum of three dollars per day which shall be in full for all services 
rendered by him as watchman and day police. Special police shall be 
paid two dollars and fifty cents for each day's services. The chauf- 
feur shall be paid two dollars and seventy-five cents for each day's 
service. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Passed February 12, 1917. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ax Ordinance amending section 28 of chapter 18 of the revised 

ORDINANCES RELATING TO THE SALARIES OF THE MEMBERS OF THE 
fire DEPARTMENT. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. Amend section 28 of chapter 18 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by striking out all the words in the third, fourth, fifth and 
sixth lines thereof and the words twelve dollars each in the seventh 
line tliereof and inserting in place thereof the words: Chief, twelve 
hundred and fifty dollars per annum, house rent, light and heat; per- 
manent force at Central Fire Station, at Good Will and Alert Hose 
houses, one thousand dollars each ; the captain and lieutenant of 
Combination Company No. ], ten hundred and fifty dollars each. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed. 

Passed Februarv 12. 1917. 



An Ordinance pertaining to salaries of members op the police 
department. 

Be it ordained iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord a^ 
follows: 

Section 1. That section 13 of chapter 41 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances, as amende<l, be further amended by striking out the word 
' ' fifty ' ' in the sixth line, and inserting in place thereof the word 
"seventy" so that said clause shall read as follows: "Special police 
shall be paid two dollars and seventy cents for each day's services." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March 19, 1917. 



An Ordinance pertaining to the salaries of city officials. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as> 
follows: 
Section 1. The city physicians, in addition to the amount received 
from the county for attendance on county paupers, shall receive in 
full for their services the following sums: city physician, six hundred 
dollars per annum; assistant city physician, one hundred dollars per 
annum. 



ORDINANCES. 13 

Sect. 2. The city engineer shall receive in full for his services the 
sum of two thousand dollars jier year, payable monthly. 

Sect. 3. The city clerk shall receive the sum of fourteen hundred 
dollars per annum in full for his services as city clerk and in lieu of 
all fees which he shall receive or be entitled to from any source by 
virtue of said office. 

Sect. 4. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March ]9, 1917. 



Ax Ordinance in amendment of section 2, chapter 36 of the re- 
vised ORDINANCES IN RELATION TO OVERTIME, CITY EMPLOYEES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concofd as 
follows: 

Section ]. Amend section 2 of chapter 36 of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by striking out all of said section after the word "hours" 
and insert in place thereof the following : ' ' City employees working 
by the day shall be paid for overtime at one and one-half times the 
per diem rate. Nine hours shall constitute a day's labor to be 
worked between the hours of 7 a. m. and .t p. m., Sundays and holi- 
days to be considered over time and paid for as such. This shall not 
apply to foremen, ' ' so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows : 

"Sect. 2. The minimum rate of wages to able-bodied city em- 
ployees working by the day shall be two dollars and twenty-five cents 
per day and the minimum rate to non-able-bodied, shall be one dollar 
and eighty-five cents per day of nine hours. City employees working 
by the day shall be paid for overtime at one and one-half times the 
l)er diem rate. Nine hours shall constitute a day's labor to be 
worked between the hours of 7 a. m. and 5 p. m., Sundays and holi- 
days to be considered overtime and paid for as such. This shall not 
apply to foremen." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March ]9, 1917. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment op an ordinance relating to the 
number of permanent patrolmen in the concord police 
department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord a» 
follows : 

Section 1. That chapter 5, section 1, relating to the iiersonnel of 
the police department be amended by striking out the word ' ' twelve ' ' 
in the first paragraph, and inserting instead thereof the word "thir- 
teen'' so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

The permanent police force shall consist of a city marshal, an as- 
sistant city marshal, a captain of the night watch, and thirteen regu- 
lar police and night watch. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March 19, 1917. 



An Ordinance relating to the salary of the sanitary officer. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord a9 
follows: 

Section 1. The sanitary officer of the board of health shall re- 
ceive in full for his services, including travel, the sum of sixteen hun- 
dred dollars ($1,600) per annum. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or jiarts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. ^ 

Passed April 9, 1917. 



An Ordinance relating to the planting, protection, regulation 

AND control of SHADE TREES PLANTED OR GROWING UPON THE 
PUBLIC HIGHWAYS OF THE CITY OP CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloics : 

Section 1. No individual or officer or employee of a corporation 
shall without the written permit of tlie tree warden cut, prune, break, 
climb, injure or remove any living tree in a public highway; or cut, 
disturb or interfere in any way with the roots of any tree on a pub- 
lic liighway; or spray with any chemicals or insecticides any tree in 
a public highway or place any rope, sign, poster or other fixture on 
a tree or guard in a public highway; or injure, misuse or remove any 
device placed to protect such tree on a public highway. 



ORDINANCES. , 15 

Sect. 2. No shade or ornamental tree or shrub shall be planted 
in any of the public highways of the city of Concord until such tree 
or shrub shall have first been approved and the place where it is to be 
planted designated by the tree warden and a permit granted therefor. 

Sect. 3. No person shall fasten a horse or other animal to a tree 
in a public highway in the city of Concord nor cause a horse or other 
animal to stand so that said horse or animal can injure such a tree. 

Sect. 4. No person shall, without the written permit of the tree 
warden, attach any electric wire, insulator or any device for the hold- 
ing of an electric wire to any tree growing or planted upon any pub- 
lic highway of the city of Concord. 

Sect. 5. Every person or corporation having any wire or wires 
charged with electricity running through a public highway, shall se- 
curely fasten such wire or wires so that they shall not come in con- 
tact with any tree therein. 

Sect. 6. Every person or corporation having any wire or wires 
charged with electricity running through a public highway, shall 
temporarily remove any such wire or wires or the electricity there- 
from when it sliall be necessary, in order to take down or prune any 
trees growing in a public highway, Avithin twenty-four hours after 
the service upon the owner of said wire or wires, or his agent, of a 
written notice to remove said wire or wires or the electricity there- 
from, signed by the tree warden. 

Sect. 7. Any person or corporation violating any of the provi- 
sions of this ordinance shall upon conviction thereof be fined not ex- 
ceeding twenty dollars for every violation thereof. 

Sect. 8. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 14, 1917. 



An OrdiNx\nce providing for the payment of bonds of the water- 
works SYSTEM. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. The board of water commissioners for the city of Con- 
cord as now or hereafter constituted be and hereby is authorized and 
empowered to invest and reinvest the net income derived from the 
operation of the water-works system of said city npon the following 
terms and conditions: 

(a) Said board of water commissioners is hereby authorized in 
its discretion to appropriate to said purpose any or all of the net 
income derived from the operation of said water-works system, and 
to deposit the same in New Hampshire savings banks, at the best 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

interest rates obtainable, or to pnrehase and liold for the purpose 
aforesaid, any national, state, county or municipal bonds, including 
those of the city of Concord. 

(b) Any and all sums of money and any and all bonds or other 
securities acquired or purchased as aforesaid and all income or in- 
terest derived therefrom shall be invested and reinvested by said 
board of water commissioners as may become necessary and it and 
they shall be held inviolate and shall not be used for extensions or 
maintenance of said water-works system. 

(c) Any deposits of money, bonds or other securities, when ac- 
quired as herein provided, shall immediately be placed in the custody 
of the city treasurer, who shall be held responsible therefor, and Avho 
shall convert the same into cash and apply the proceeds thereof in 
reduction of the bonded indebtedness of the water-works system 
when so directed by tlie board of water commissioners. And said 
city treasurer sliall on no pretext permit or allow any other persons 
to take control over the same, except ujion vote of said board of 
Avater commissioners, and the bond of said city treasurer, as now or 
hereafter furnished, shall cover and apply to the duties herein im- 
posed. 

(d) All interest or other income derived or received from any of 
said deposits, bonds or other securities, acquired as .herein provided, 
shall, upon receipt thereof, and without any reduction whatsoever, be 
invested and reinvested in the manner herein provided. 

(e) Said board of water commissioners shall annually make a full 
and explicit report to the board of mayor and aldermen of all mon- 
eys held as aforesaid on the 31st day of December of the preceding 
year, how and ^vhere invested and at what rate of interest. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hpreby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1917. 



An Ordixaxce prohibiting the discharge of air rifles in the city. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Coneord as 
follows: 

Section 1. No person shall discharge air rifles in the city. 
Sect. 2. No person shall carry loaded air rifles in the city. 
Sect. 3. Any person violating the provisions of this ordinance 
shall be punished by a fine of not more than twenty dollars. 
Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed June 11, 1917. 



ORDINANCES. 17 

An Ordinance relating to the pay for teams. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloios : 

Section 1. Heads of departments employing teams for the use of 
the city are authorized to pay for said teams a maximum price of 
six dollars and a minimum price of five dollars per day of nine hours 
or such proportionate part of said price paid as the time worked 
bears to nine hours for each two-horse team with driver, provided 
such driver be paid by the owner of said team not less than one 
dollar and seventy-five cents per day. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and part of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take eifect 
upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, ]917. 



An Ordinance in amendment of section 5, chapter 36 of the re- 
vised ordinances, as amended by the ordinance of march 27, 
1914, relative to hours of labor in city departments. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That section 5 of chapter 36 of the Revised Ordinances 
as amended by the ordinance of March 27, 1914, be amended by in- 
serting after the word ' ' labor ' ' in the first line of said amendment 
the words ' ' except on Saturdays, ' ' by striking out all after the 
word "departments'' in the second line of said amended section and 
by inserting thereafter the following: "five hours' labor shall consti- 
tute a day 's labor on each Saturday in the year and said five hours ' 
labor shall end at twelve noon of each Saturday, ' ' so that said sec- 
tion as amended shall read as follows : 

Sect. 5. Nine hours shall constitute a day's labor, except on 
Saturdays, in all departments of the city, except fire and police de- 
partments. Five hours' labor shall constitute a day's labor on each 
Saturday in the year and said five hours' labor shall end at twelve- 
noon of each Saturday with full day 's pay. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance sliall lake effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1917. 



18 CITY OP CONCORD. 

An Ordinance fixing the salary of the clerk of the mxjnicipai, 

COURT. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. The salary of the clerk of the municipal court shall 
be five hundred dollars ($500) per annum, payable monthly. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take ef- 
fect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1917. 



An Ordinance relating to the protection of minors. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. Tt shall be unlawful for any boy under the age of 
fourteen years and any girl under the age of sixteen years to be upon 
any public street, highway, square, lane, alley, park or in any other 
public way or place, after the hour of nine-thirty o 'clock in the even- 
ing of any day, unless such minor is accompanied by a parent, 
guardian or some other suitable adult person; or unless such minor 
is in the performance of some duty directed in writing by the parent, 
guardian or person in control of said minor; and no such minor 
while in the performance of such duty, shall loiter upon any such 
public way or place. 

Sect. 2. Any parent, guardian or other person having the custody 
and control of any such minor who shall permit such minor to be in 
any public way or place contrary to any provision of section 1 of 
this ordinance shall, upon conviction thereof, be pimished by a fine 
of not exceeding five dollars for each offense. 

Sect. 3. For the first violation of this ordinance by a child com- 
ing within its provisions, such child shall be taken to its home by the 
police officers and the parents or guardian of such child shall be noti- 
fied of the penalty for any subsequent violation. Upon any subse- 
quent violation of this ordinance by any child, said parents or guard- 
ian shall be subject to the provisions of section 2 of this ordinance. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 31, 1917. 



ORDINANCES. 19 

An Ordinance amending an ordinance passed july 14, 19] 3, relat- 
ing TO THE regulation OP STREET TRAFFIC. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. Amend section 13 of Article 2 of an ordinance passed 
July 14, 1913, relating to the regulation of street traffic by adding 
thereto the words "nor within twelve feet of a city stand-pipe," so 
that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

Sect. 13. No vehicle shall be allowed to stand within five feet of 
a fire hydrant nor within twelve feet of a city stand-pipe. 

Sect. 2. Amend said Article 2 by adding thereto section 1.5, as 
follows : 

Sect. 1.5. No vehicle shall stop for more than five minutes at a 
time on Warren Street between Green and Main streets, and then 
only for the purpose of taking on or setting down passengers, load- 
ing or unloading merchandise, and in no case shall a horse be hitched 
or tied, or a horse or vehicle backed up to the curb to load or un- 
load merchandise. 

Sect. 3. Amend said Article 2 by adding thereto section 16, as 
follows: 

Sect. 16. Whenever the driver of any motor vehicle intends to 
leave his seat or stops for more than five minutes on the east side 
of Main Street between Pleasant Street and a point opposite the 
south side of Center Street, and on the west side of Main ' Street 
between Center Street and a point opposite the south side of Depot 
Street, he shall back such motor vehicle until it shall stand with its 
right rear wheel as nearly as possible to the curbing and shall stand 
at an angle of 45° to the curbing. Delivery vehicles and trucks may, 
while actually loading or unloading goods or merchandise, back up to 
the curb in said parts of Main Street. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 13, 1917. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an Ordinance authorizing the 
board of assessors to employ clerical assistance. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord a» 
follows: 

That section 1 of said ordinance be and hereby is amended by 
striking out after the word ' ' exceed ' ' the words four hundred dol- 
lars and the figures $400, and inserting in place thereof the words 
eight hundred dollars and the figures $S00, so that said ordinance 
as amended shall read as follows : 



20 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Section ]. That the board of assessors are hereby authorized 
to employ additional clerical assistance in the office of said board, 
the expense of same not to exceed eight hundred dollars ($800) per 
annum, and to be charged to the account of incidentals and land 
damage. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 10, 1917. 



An Ordinance pertaining to the salary of the city messenger. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of ilie City of Concord as 
folloics: 

Section 1. The city messenger shall receive the sum of one thous- 
and dollars ($1,000) per annum in full for his services as city mes- 
senger. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed October 8, 1917. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 18 of the revised ordinances 
relating to steward of pioneer engine company at penacook. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. Amend section 1, chapter 18 of the Eevised Ordi- 
nances, by adding in the tenth line after the woi'd ' ' men ' ' the words 
"including driver" so that said section shall read as follows: 

Section 1. The fire department shall consist of a chief engineer, 
two assistants within tlie j)recinct, one engineer each from Ward 1, 
Ward 2, and Ward 3 ; two steamer and hose companies, one company 
to consist of thirteen men, including dri\er, and one comjiany to con- 
sist of fourteen men, including driver, one relief steamer (company) 
to consist of two men; two hose companies to consist of eleven men, 
including driver; a chemical engine company to consist of two men; 
a hook and ladder company to consist of twenty-one men, including 
driver; a house man at Central Fire Station; steamer Pioneer, not 
less than twenty nor more than forty men, including driver; hand en- 
gine companies No. 2 and No. 3, not less than twenty nor more than 
thirty men each. Each com])any shall l)e allowed three substitutes, 
except Hook and Ladder Company, No. 1, which shall have five, to 
be ap]iroved by the chief engineer. The engineers shall exercise the 



ORDINANCES. 21 

powers of fire wards, and those within the precinct shall constitute 
the board of engineers. 

Sect. 2. Amend section 28 as amended March 24, 1913, July 14, 
]913, and February 12, 1917, by inserting after the words "Alert 
hose houses" the words "and Pioneer fire station" so that said 
section as amended shall read as follows : Sect. 28. The annual 
pay of the members of the fire department shall be as follows, and in 
full for all services in said department: 

Chief, twelve hundred and fifty dollars per annum, house rent, 
light and heat; permanent force at Central fire station, at Good 
Will and Alert hose houses and Pioneer fire station, one thousand 
dollars each ; the captain and lieutenants of Combination No. 1, ten 
hundred and fifty dollars each per annum, payable semi-monthly; 
assistant engineers, within the precinct, one hundred and forty-five 
dollars each; engineers of steamers, within the precinct, one hun- 
dred and thirty-five dollars each; captains of companies, within the 
precinct, each one hundred and ten dollars per annum; lieutenants 
of companies, within the precinct, one hundred and five dollars per 
annum; members of steamer, hose, and hook and ladder companies, 
within the precinct, and house man at Central fire station, one hun- 
dred dollars per annum; outside the precinct, engine companies Nos. 
2 and 3, three hundred and forty dollars each, and Pioneer Steamer 
company No. 3, one thousand dollars, said sums to be divided among 
the members as each company shall direct; engineer of steamer at 
Penacook, seventy-five dollars per annum ; assistant engineer at Pen- 
aeook, seventy-five dollars; assistant engineer at East Concord, twenty 
dollars; and assistant engineer at West Concord, twenty dollars. 

Sect. 3. Amend section 30 by striking out in the first line the 
words "the Pioneer Steamer company and"; and strike out in the 
fourth line after the word "sums" the words "for Pioneer Steamer 
company, thirty dollars 2)er annum, and when performing the duties 
of janitor of the building an additional sum of forty-five dollars per 
annum; and," so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 
Sect. 30. Stewards for engine companies Nos. 2 and 3 shall be 
appointed by the mayor and aldermen, and shall receive for all serv- 
ives performed by them in that capacity the following sums: For 
stewards of engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, thirty dollars per an- 
num each. No steward shall be allowed to purchase supplies for 
such buildings, or for the department, unless by the authority and 
direction of the committee on fire department; and in no case shall 
he have any care or control of the building or its appurtenances 
occupied by the company of which he is member, except in the im- 
mediate service of the company, unless he shall be appointed janitor 
thereof, when he shall be under the direction of the engineer, as pro- 
vided in the foregoing section. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed December 28. 1917. 



22 CITY OP CONCORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment of section 2, chapter 36 of the re- 
vised ORDINANCES AS AMENDED MARCH 19, 1917, RELATIV'E TO 
WAGES AND OVERTIME OF CITY EMPLOYEES. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. Amend section 2, chapter 36, of the Revised Ordi- 
nances as amended March 19, ]917, by striking out the whole of said 
section and inserting in place thereof the following: 

Sect. 2. The minimum rate of wages to able-bodied city em- 
ployees Tsorking by the day shall be two dollars and fifty-two cents 
per day. City employees working by the day shall be paid for over- 
time on week days and holidays at one and one-half times the per 
diem rate; the holidays to be as follows: Memorial Day, July 4th, 
Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas. City employees working 
on Sunday shall be paid two times the per diem rate. Nine hours 
shall constitute a day's labor to be Avorked between the hours of 7 
a. m. and 5 p. m. This shall not apply to foremen. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
ujjon its passage. 

Passed December 28, 1917. 



An Ordinance extending the sewerage precinct. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sewerage precinct as defined by section 1 of 
chapter 23 of the ordinances of 1912 as amended by the ordinances 
of April 17, 1915, and June 14, 1915, be enlarged so as to include 
the following: Beginning at Noyes Street and extending two hun- 
dred feet on Princeton Street. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



An Ordinance enlarging the street sprinkling precinct for the 
city proper. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloics: 
Section 1. That the street sprinkling precinct as defined in sec- 
tion 1 of chapter 20 of the ordinances of 1912, as amended by the 



ORDENTANCES. 23 

ordinances of May 26, 19] 4, and March 29, 1916, be further ex- 
tended to include Hall Street from its present terminus on said street 
to Poplar Avenue. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



An Ordinance extending the garbage precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the garbage precinct as defined by section 2 of 
chapter 21 of the Revised Ordinances as amended by the ordinances 
of December 29, 1913, and December 14, 1914, be enlarged to include 
Clinton Street from Princeton Street to Dartmouth Street. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



An Ordinance providing for the term of office and salary of 

THE city sealer. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. The city sealer appointed by virtue of Laws of 1917, 
chapter 190, section 6, shall hold office until the second Monday in 
January, 1919, and shall be appointed biennially in January there- 
after. 

Sect. 2. The salary of the city sealer shall be three hundred fifty 
dollars per annum in full for all services rendered as such sealer. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Kesolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding one 
hundred thousand dollars ($100,000). 

Eesolved bi/ tlte Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That tlie Committee ou Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred thousand dol- 
lars for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1917 
upon such teiTiis and for such amounts as the committee shall deter- 
mine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal 
year. 

Passed January 29, 1917. 



EESOLUTION amending a RESOLUTION PASSED MAY 10, 1915, FOR THE 
PURCHASE OF LAND FOR THE USE OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSION- 
ERS. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the resolution, passed May 10, 1915, appropriating money 
for the purchase of land for the use of the cemetery commissioners, 
is hereby amended by inserting in the title thereof, between the 
words ' ' cemetery ' ' and ' ' commissioners, ' ' the words ' ' and park, ' ' 
so that the same shall read: 

" Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of land for the 
use of the cemetery and park commissioners. ' ' 

Passed February 12, 1917. 



EESOLUTION APPROPRIATING MONEY FOR IMPROVEMENTS AND REPAIRS 
ON THE POLICE PATROL AND AMBULANCE. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of ten hundred and fifty dollars ($1,050) be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, which together with the sum of eight 
hundred dollars ($800) received from the sale of the police patrol 



RESOLUTIONS. 25 

and ambulance Velie chassis to the highway department, shall be ex- 
pended under the direction of the finance committee for repairs on 
the body of said ambulance and the purchase of a new chassis for 
the same. 

Passed February ]9, 1917. 



Eesolutiox appropriating money for the purchase of a type- 
writer FOR THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Besolved bi/ the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the sum of sixty-five dollars ($65) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated for the purchase of a typewriter for the board of 
health. To be charged to incidentals and land damages. 

Passed March 12, ]917. 



EESOLUTION appropriating MONEY FOR WELCOMING THE SOLDIERS OF 
THE FIRST NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follotcs: 

That the sum of one hundred ninety-four and 15-100 dollars 
(,$194.15) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated to pay the ex- 
penses of welcoming and entertaining the soldiers of the First New 
Hampshire Eegiment on their return February 9tli from the Mexi- 
can border. Said sum to be ex-pended under the direction of the 
finance committee, and charged to the account of incidentals and 
land damages. 

Passed March 12, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of five dollars, to be paid to 

SETH R. dole, to CORRECT AN ERROR IN TAX SALE OP LAND OF 
NANCY E. WILKINS ESTATE TO WILLIAM W. SMITH. 

Besolved by tlw Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloivs : 

That the sum of five dollars be and the same is hereby appropri- 
ated to be paid to Seth R. Dole to correct an error in the tax sale 
of land of Nancy E. Wilkins estate to William W. Smith, and that 
the same be charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed March 12. 1917. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eesolutiox appropriating money for the payment of the motor 
pumping engine and hose wagon. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloics : 

That tlie sum of eighty-two hvmdred and fifty dollars ($8,250) be, 
and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated for the payment of the motor pumping en- 
gine and hose wagon, tlie purchase of which was authorized in 1916. 

Passed March 19, 1917. 



Resolution providing for the purchase op a horse for the fire 

department. 

Hcsnlred by tlie Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the sum of two hundred seventy-five dollars ($275) be and 
the same hereby is appropriated out of any money in the treasury, 
not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of a horse for the fire 
department. 

Passed April 4, 1917. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of the 

CITY. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum 
of seventy-two thousand dollars ($72,000) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, 
together with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads 
and from other sources shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $7,230.00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 1,000.00 

For ]iayment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,826.17 

For support of city poor 3,000.00 

For dependent soldiers, city 150.00 

For incidentals and land damages 9,000.00 

For salaries, board of aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 3,000.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 27 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital $3,000.00 

For aid, New Planipshire Memorial Hospital 1,000.00 

For aid. Concord District Nursing Association 300.00 

For aid. Concord Charity Organization Society 200.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. E 450.00 

For aid, military companies 250.00 

For open air concerts 325.00 

For public baths 325.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 1 ,800.00 

For Old North Cemetery 200.00 

For Maple Grove Cemetery 100.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 100.00 

For Old Fort Cemetery 30.00 

For Millville Cemetery 75.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 30.00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25.00 

For parks 4,000.00 

For Pecker athletic field 25.00 

For John Kimball playground 500.00 

For Eollins Park playground 500.00 

For Ward 8 playground 50.00 

For repairs, buildings 2,000.00 

For bridge bonds 4,000.00 



$46,866.17 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, sanitary officer $1,572.23 

Milk inspection 300.00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Incidentals 1,000.00 

Contagious diseases 500.00 



$3,472.23 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $21,798.56 

Fuel 600.00 

Horse hire, Penacook 25.00 

Helmets and buttons 50.00 

Lights 225.00 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Telephone, private line. $243.36 

Incidentals 1,000.00 

Supplies, patrol wagon 400.00 



$24,341.92 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries .$3,535.00 

Books and incidentals 2,350.00 



$5,885.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, engineer $1,958.90 

Salaries, assistants 2,200.00 

Supplies 125.00 

Eepairs 25.00 

Incidentals 200.00 



$4,508.90 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

General maintenance $45,000.00 

Catch basins 1,300.00 

Trees 2,500.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, new 750.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, repair 2,500.00 

Salary, superintendent 1,958.90 

Permanent work, Washington Street, Penaeook 500.00 

Permanent work. East Penaeook Street 500.00 

Permanent work, South Street 1,500.00 

Permanent work. South Main Street to West Street 350.00 

Permanent work, South State Street, Monroe to Perley 

Street 2,650.00 

Permanent work. North State Street to complete to Pena- 
eook Street, one side 1,600.00 

Permanent work, North Main Street, east side. Park to 

Center Street 2,250.00 

Permanent work. Auburn Street 1,000.00 

Permanent work, central state highway 2,500.00 

$66,858.90 



RESOLUTIONS. 29 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $13,654.74 

Salaries, senii-aninial 9,1 90.00 

Eent, Veterans' Association 150.00 

Forage 1 ,400.00 

Fuel and lights 2,200.00 

Fire alarm 1,000.00 

Horse hire and shoeing 1,000.00 

Washing 52.00 

Supplies, auto combination 250.00 

Penacook fire alarm 400.00 

Incidentals 2,403.26 

New hose 1,000.00 



$32,700.00 

Motor combination chemical and hose wagon. Ward One. . $3,500.00 

SALARIES. 

Mayor $1,500.00 

City clerk 1,358.90 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 200.00 • 

Overseers of the poor 390.00 

City solicitor 800.00 

City treasurer 1,225.00 

City messenger 900.00 

City physicians 658.90 

Care, city clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,000.00 

Moderators and ward clerks 360.00 

Supervisors and inspectors of elections 960.00 

Collector of taxes 2,400.00 

Building inspector 200.00 

Judge, police court 1,200.00 

Clerk, police court 350.00 



$15,612.80 



Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty- 
five thousand two hundred thirty-two and 50-100 dollars ($45,232.50) 
for the support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, to- 
gether with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropri- 
ated and divided among the several school districts according to the 
valuation thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the cemeteries of the city one-half of the income from the sale of 
lots and the income derived from the care of lots and grading, which 
sum shall be deposited by the superintendent, or others receiving 
them, in the city treasury. The care of lots for wliich the city holds 
trust funds shall l)e paid from the money appropriated for the care 
of cemeteries, and so much of the income of these trust funds as 
may be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at the 
close of the year and the remainder in each instance credited to the 
individual fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the use of the public library in the purchase of books, the amount 
collected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 9, 1917. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN 
THE LIMITS OF THE "WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Sesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord 
sewerage precinct the sum of six hundred forty-five and 50-100 dol- 
lars ($645.50) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows: 

For repairs $100.00 

For interest on bonds 45.50 

For payment of bond 500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
lilMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Eesolred by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the sewerage pre- 
cinct of said city the sum of eleven thousand one hundred fifty dol- 



RESOLUTIONS. 31 

lars ($11,150) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows: 

For repairs, construction and equipment $3,400.00 

For interest on bonds 2,750.00 

For bonds 5,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount op money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the penacook sewerage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Besolvcd bij the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folio IIS : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook sew- 
erage ])recinct the sum of thirteen hundred ninety dollars ($1,390) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs $300.00 

For payment of bonds 1,000.00 

For interest on bonds 90.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



Eesolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED ON the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OP THE GARBAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Besolved bi/ the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the garbage pre- 
cinct of said city the sum of nine thousand dollars ($9,000) to de- 
fray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said 

precinct $9,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



32 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Eesolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING 
FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Bcsolved by tJie Board of Aldermen of the Ciiy of Concord as 
follows: 

Section ]. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprink- 
ling precinct of said city, the siun of eight thousand five hundred 
dollars ($8,500) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated 
as follows; 

For sprinkling streets $8,500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the street sprinkling precincts in ward one fob 

THE ensuing financial YEAR. 

Eesolred by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloios: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling 
precinct in Ward One the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) to de- 
fray the necessary expenses and clrarges of said precinct for the 
ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $400.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing financial 
year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follov^s: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered toi 
be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the lighting pre- 
cinct of said city the sum of twenty thousand three hundred dollars 



RESOLUTIONS. 33 

($20,300) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said pre- 
cinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For lighting streets $20,300.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 9, 1917. 



Eesolution in relation to coal, wood and ice. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance be, and hereby is directed to ask 
for bids for supplying the city with coal, wood and ice for the en- 
suing year, and that said committee have full power to accept or 
reject any bids offered. 

Passed April 9, 1917. 



Eesolution providing for the purchase of a motor car for the 
use of the police department. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of two hundred fifty dollars ($250) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the purchase of a motor car for the use of the 
police department. The same to be expended under the direction of 
the mayor. 

Passed April 9, 1917. 



RESOLUTION APPROPRIATING MONEY TO PAY FOR THE EXPENSE OF EN- 
COURAGING AND PROMOTING THE CULTIVATION OF GARDENS. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of six hundred ($600) dollars be, and the same liere- 
by is, appropriated out of any sum of money in the treasury, not 
otherwise appropriated, to pay for the expense of encouraging and 
promoting the cultivation of gardens. The same to be expended 
under the direction of the mayor and Alderman Foster. 

Passed April 18, 1917. 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EKSOLUTION providing for the issuance of $20,000 OF BONDS TO 
REFUND OUTSTANDING INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY ON ACCOUNT OF 
THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT. 

Besolved iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the treasurer of said city is hereby authorized 
to procure by loan on the credit of the city the sum of twenty 
thousand dollars ($20,000) for the purpose of refunding in part an 
issue of sewerage bonds due July 1, 1917; that all money paid on 
account of said bonds, either as principal or interest, shall be 
charged to the sewerage precinct. 

Sect. 2. Bonds of said city shall be issued for said loan, signed 
by the mayor and countersigned by the city treasurer, and shall in 
all respects comi)ly witli the provisions of the municipal bonds act 
of 1895, as amended by an act of the legislature approved April 10, 
1917, entitled "An act relating to municipal finances, and to amend 
chapter 43, session Laws of 1895, authorizing municipal corporations 
to issue bonds." Said bonds shall be dated July 1, 1917, and shall 
be numbered consecutively from 1 to 20, and shall be for the sum of 
one thousand dollars ($1,000) each; four of said bonds, in their 
order as numbered, commencing with No. 1, shall become due and 
payable on the first day of July, 1919; four of said bonds, in their 
order as numbered, commencing with No. 5, shall become due and 
payable on the first day of July, 1920; four of said bonds, in their 
order as numbered, commencing with No. 9, shall become due and 
payable on the first day of July, 1921; four of said bonds, in their 
order as numbered, commencing with No. 13, shall become due and 
payable on the first day of July, 1922; four of said bonds, in their 
order as numbered, commencing with No. 17, shall become due and 
payable on the first day of July, 1923 ; said bonds shall be payable 
to the bearer, with interest at a rate not exceeding four per cent, per 
annum, payable semi-annually on the first day of January and July 
in each year, upon presentation of the coupons attached to said 
bonds respectively. 

Sect. 3. The treasurer, subject to the approval of the finance 
committee, is hereby authorized to procure proposals for the sale of 
bonds hereinbefore authorized, with the right to reject any and all 
bids, and if said bids are not satisfactory, said treasurer is hereby 
authorized to dispose of said bonds at public sale. 

Sect. 4. That all of said bonds shall be exempt from taxation, 
as provided by statute. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 14, 1917. 



RESOLUTIONS. 35 

Resolution providing for a discount on taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That a discount of two per cent, shall be allowed on all taxes as- 
sessed for the year 1917 which are paid on or before the sixteenth 
day of July, 1917. 

Passed May 14, 1917. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding pip- 
teen THOUSAND dollars ($15,000). 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloirs : 

That tlie Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bori'ow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifteen thousand dollars 
for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1917 
upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall deter- 
mine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal 
year. 

Passed .Juiie 11, 1917. 



Resolution donating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of the 

income from the DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloirs : 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollars ($2.5) be hereby 
donated out of the income from the David Osgood trust, to tiie poor 
children of the French Parochial school, who are inhabitants of the 
city of Concord, for the purpose of buying school books for said 
children. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be paid to 
and expended under the direction of the principal of said school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1917. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Resolution appropriating money in aid of the concord charity 
organization society. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of ihe City of Concord as 
folio ii:s : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for aid to the Concord Charity Organization So- 
ciety. 

Passed July 9, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating money for repairs to pioneer engine 
house, ward 1. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the simi of eight hundred dollars ($800) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for repairs to Pioneer engine house. Ward 1. 
Said appropriation to be expended under the direction of the Com- 
mittee on Lands and Buildings. 

Passed August 1.3, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollabs for 

THE PURPOSE of INSTALLING A BOILER IN THE POLICE STATION ON 
warren STREET. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the sum of one thousand ($1,000) dollars be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for the purpose of installing a larger boiler in 
the police station. Said sum to be expended under the direction of 
the Committee on Lands and Buildings. And said committee is in- 
structed to solicit sealed bids for the consummation of the work. 

Passed August 13, 1917. 



RESOLUTIONS. 37 

Eesolution appropriating the sum of six hundred dollars foe 
printing and stationery. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follotvs: 

That the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out o'f any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed August 13, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating five hundred nineteen and 09-100 dol- 
LAKs ($519.09) to pat for real estate SOLD to the city op 

CONCORD FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR THE YEAR. 1916. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord aS 
follows: 

That the sum of five hundred nineteen and 09-100 dollars ($519.09) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount due the city 
of Concord for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of real 
estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 1916. 

Passed August 13, 1917. 



Eesolution appropriating money for the repairing and painting 

OF the fence around WOODLAWN CEMETERY. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord aS' 
follows: 

That the sum of two hundred and forty ($240) dollars be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated for painting and repairing the 
fence around Woodland Cemetery. The same to be expended by the 
Committee on Lands and Buildings and charge^ to the account of 
incidentals and land damages. 

Passed August 13, 1917. 



38 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Eesolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1916 
ON property sold to the city for taxes in 1913, 1914 and 
1915. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of two hundred forty-three and 95-100 
dollars ($243.95) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes 
on property assessed in 1916 that was sold to the city for taxes in 
1913, 1914 and 1915. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of two hundred forty- three and 95-100 
dollars ($243.95). 

Sect. 3. This resohition shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 10, 1917. 



Eesolution appropriating money to pay tax assessed in 1917 on 

PROPERTY sold TO THE CITY FOR TAXES IN 1913 AND 1914. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred twenty-eight and 27-100 
dollars ($128.27) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes on 
property assessed in 1917 that was sold to the city for taxes in 1913 
and 1914. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of one hundred twenty-eight and 27-100 
dollars ($128.27). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take efPect upon its passage. 

Passed September 10, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of one hundred dollars for 
john kimball' playground. 

Eesolved iy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for John Kimball playground. 

Passed September 10, 1917. 



RESOLUTIONS. 39 

Eesolution appropriating money for repairs on the tomb in 
woodlawn cemetery. 

Eesolvcd by the Board of Aldermen of tJie City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of fifty dollars ($50) be appropriated for repairs on 
the tomb at Woodlawn Cemetery. The same to be expended under 
the direction of the mayor and city engineer and charged to the ac- 
count of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed October 8, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating money to pat taxes assessed in 1916 
ON non-resident property sold to the city in 1915. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of forty-eight and 27-100 dollars 
($48.27) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 
1915 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1915 for 1914 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to 
the collector of taxes said amount of forty-eight and 27-100 dollars 
($48.27). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 8, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating money for the east concord play- 
ground. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the sum of twenty-eight dollars and sixty cents ($28.60) be 
and the same hereby is appropriated for the East Concord play- 
ground. The same to be charged to the account of incidentals and 
land damages. 

Passed November 12, 1917. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eesolution appropriating money for the purchase of a combi- 
nation CHEMICAL FOR THE ALERT HOSE COMPANY. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follotvs: 

Section 1. That the sum of thirty-two hundred ($3,200) dollars 
be and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated for the purchase of a combina- 
tion motor chemical apparatus for the use of the Alert Hose Com- 
pany of Concord, same amount to be expended under the direction of 
the Committee on Fire Department. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 12, 3917. 



KESOLUTION appropriating money FOR REPAIRS ON HORSE HILL 
CEMETERY FENCE. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the sum of one hundred fifty-eight dollars and seventy-seven 
cents ($158.77) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated for repairs 
and painting the Horse Hill Cemetery fence. The same to be charged 
to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed November 13, 1917. 



Eesolution appropriating the sum of fifteen hundred dollaks 

FOR incidentals AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) be, and the same 
is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed November 13, 3917. 



RESOLUTIONS. 41 

Resolution appropriating the sum of four hundred dollars for 
repairs buildings. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for repairs buildings. 

Passed November 13, 1917. 



Resolution appropriating money for a municipal Christmas 

TREE. 

Besolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows: 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated for a municipal Christmas tree celebration on Decem- 
ber 24, 1917. Said sum to be expended under direction of a com- 
mittee consisting of the mayor. Aldermen Lee and Brunei and to be 
charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 10, 1917. 



Resolution app]|opriating money to reimburse the boston & 

MAINE railroad FOR TAXES ERRONEOUSLY ASSESSED IN THE YEAR 

1913. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
folloivs : 

That the sum of seven thousand three hundred seventy-three dol- 
lars and fifty-five cents be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out 
of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated to reim- 
burse the Boston & Maine Railroad for taxes erroneously assessed in 
the year 1913, including interest and costs, in accordance with the 
decree of the supreme court of June 6, 1916. 

Passed December 10, 1917. 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Eesolution appropriating money for the purchase of a motor 
car for the use of the police department. 

Hcsolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the sum of six hundred dollars ($600) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for the purchase of a motor car for the use of 
the police department. The same to be expended under the direc- 
tion of the Finance Committee. 

Passed December 10, 1917. 



Resolution exempting the new England cable company from 
taxation for the balance of the period op ten years from 

APRIL 1, 1914. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Whereas the New England Cable Company, a corporation organized 
and existing under and by virtue of the laws of Massachusetts, by 
vote of the board of aldermen of this city passed March 9, 1914, 
was exempted from taxation for a period of ten years from April 1, 
1914, and 

Whereas the stockholders of said company desire to have it more 
closely identified with the state of ISTew Hamjjshire and for that pur- 
pose have organized a New Hampshire corporatioii under the name 
of the New England Cable Company with the same capitalization to 
take over the business and assets of said Massachusetts corporation, 
and 

Whereas the board of aldermen has been requested to exempt said 
New Hampshire corporation from taxes for the balance of the period 
for which the Massachusetts corporation has been exempted. 

Eesolved by the board of aldermen of said city that if the New 
England Cable Company, a Massachusetts corporation, will trans- 
fer its property to the New England Cable Company, a New Hamp- 
shire corporation, the machinery and equipment of the latter com- 
pany and the capital necessary in conducting its business in said city 
shall be exempted from all taxation for a period which shall terminate 
ten years from April 1, 1914. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



RESOLUTIONS. 43 

Eesolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the several 
departments. 

Hesohcd by ihe Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of six thousand seventy-five and 6-100 
dollars ($6,075.06) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding claims 
as follows: 

Board of Health $472.06 

City Hall bonds 300.00 

City poor 264.71 

Fire department 179.27 

Incidentals and land damages 1,013.78 

Interest, temporary loans 985.28 

Police and watch 2,301.64 

Printing and stationery 159.92 

Repairs buildings 79.24 

Salaries 319.16 



$6,075.06 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for gar- 
bage for the year 1917 the sum of one hundred thirty-six and 3-100 
dollars ($136.03), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sew- 
ers for the year 1917 the sum of two dollars ($2), the same being 
the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for high- 
way department the sum of sixteen hundred eighty-three and 1-100 
dollars ($1,683.01), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding fifty 
thousand dollars ($50,000). 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

($50,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal 
year ]918 upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee 
shall determine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said 
municipal year. 

Passed January 14, 1918. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1917. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1916. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. NATHANIEL W. HOBBS. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 

Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1918. 

RICHARD A. BROWN. 55 Jackson Street 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 South State Street 

MICHAEL J. LEE, 59 South Main Street 

Term Expires January, 1920. 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penaeook 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Morton Street 



46 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

Ward Aldermen. 

Term Expires January, 1918. 



Ward 1- 
Ward 2- 
Ward 3- 
Ward 4- 
Ward 5- 

Ward 6- 
Ward 7- 
Ward 8- 
Ward 9- 



-FRED M. DODGE, 
-GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, 
-HENRY M. RICHARDSON, 
-FREDERICK H. HILL, 



Penacook 

East Concord 

West Concord 

97 Warren Street 



-GEORGE ARTHUR FOSTER, 

26 North Spring Street 
-THOMAS J. DYER, 30 South Main Street 

-SHUBAEL P. DEARBORN, 35 Clinton Street 
-WILLIAM L. REAGAN, 37 South Main Street 
-ROY W. ERASER, 4 Highland Street 



CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,400 per 

annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 
RICHARD A. BROWN, Term expires January, 1918 

1918 
1918 
1920 
1920 
1920 



ARTHUR F. STUREVANT, 
MICHAEL J. LEE. 
HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
FRED I. BLACKWOOD, 
EVERETT L. DAVIS, 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk. 



Salary, $200 per annum. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Brunei, Brown, Reagan. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Dyer, Dearborn, Robinson. 
On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen Reagan, Foster, Dyer. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Richardson, Dearborn, Hill. 
On Finance — 

The Mayor; Aldermen Sturtevant, Davis, Lee, Foster. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen Dodge, Robinson, Fraser. 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Lee, Richardson, Davis. 
On Police and License — Aldermen Blackwood, Hill, Dodge. 
On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Sturtevant, Blackwood, Fraser. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $25 
as Treasurer of Cemeteries. 

ISAAC HILL. 

Office: National State Capital Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per 

annum. 



WILL B. HOWE. 



Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,000 per 

annum. 



EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to 
. satisfaction of the board. Salary, live mills for each dollar of first $60,000; 
seven and one-half mills for each dollar over $60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office: Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1922 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1920 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " '' " 1918 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $2,000. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,600 per 

annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $600 per 

annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 

ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per 

annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office : Penaeook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per 

annum. 



ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward i— FRED M. DODGE, Penaeook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 5— GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, .9— HENRY E. CHAIUBERLIN, 

City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

A. CHESTER CLARK. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

DAVID F. DUDLEY. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Justice. Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOHN W. STANLEY. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $1,700 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 



Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,400 per 

annum. 



VICTOR I. MOORE. 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 
Term, unlimited. Salary, $2.70 per day for first year, and $3 per day 
thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $3.05 per day. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, Edward J. McGirr, 

Harry L. Woodward, Joseph E. Silva, 

Charles H. Guilbaiilt, Fred N. Marden, 

John B. Long, Frank B. McDaniels, 

James J. Halligan, Axel Swanson. 
Richard C. McGarev, Chauffeur. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



51 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 



W. A. Little, 
George G. Allen, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Frank S. Rogers, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Nelson Forest, 
Charles E. Kelley, 



Joseph A. Flanders, 
Arthur H. Rees, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
John McGirr, 
Willie A. Flanders, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
Walter H. Bean, 
Frank E. Brooks. 



SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS. 

Appointed by the City Marslial, subject to confirmation by the Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, $2.70 each per day of actual service. 



Almah C. Leavitt, 
George W. Waters, 
Henry A. Rowell, 
Edward M. Nason, 
William H. Hammond, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Edward A. Moulton, 
Charles Ada, 
Arthur J. Taylor, 
Alfred H. Walker, 
Charles E. Palmer, 
W. H. Meserve, 
Harry R. Sturm, 
William J. Ahern, 
Horace B. Annis, 
Albert P. Davis, 
Frank W. Johnson, 
John E. Gay, 



Edson J. Ormsbee, 
Judson F. Hoit, 
Fred S. Sargent, 
Milton Colby, 
Asbury F. Tandy, 
Edward M. Proctor, 
James F. Tabor, 
Clarence W. Brown, 
Edward H. Smart, 
James J. Collins, 
George N. Fellows, 
William A. Kelley, 
Henry C. Mace, 
Charles M. Norris, 
W. H. Bean, 
Frank T. Powell, 
Timothy P. Reardon, 
Thomas Harrison. 



52 CITY OP CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward ^—REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— EDSON J. HILL. 
Ward .9— EDWARD J. GALLAGHER. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary. $1,100 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $600 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Salary, $550 per annum. 

RUTH M. CHASE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



53 



CITY WATER WORKS. 

WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed anmijill.v in Mareli, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Office: Room 1, City Hall. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, IVIayor, ex-officio. 

N. E. MARTIN, 
H. H. DUDLEY, 
EDSON J. HILL, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
*SOLON A. CARTER, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
**JOHN B. ABBOTT. 

President — Edson J. Hill. 

Clerk — Burns P. Hodgman. 



Term 


expires 


March 31, 1918 


i i 










' 1918 
' 1919 
' 1919 












' 1920 












' 1920 












' 1921 












' 1921 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioner.s. Salary, $2,200 per annum. 
Term, unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, Term expires January, 1918 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, " " " 1919 

ISAAC HILL, " " " 1920 



* Resigned April 7, 1917. 
'* Appointed to fill vacancy. 



54 CITY OP CONCORD. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,250 per annum 
and rent of house, light and heat. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

rOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION. PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $75 per annum. 

JOHN B. DODGE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 55 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. SIBLEY G. MORRILL. 



56 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hail. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 



No salary. 



WILL B. HOWE, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in -January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

NATHANIEL W. IIOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 



BEN C. WHITE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 



Term expires January, 1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 57 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 



"Ward 1. 

D. WARREN FOX, Term expires January, 1918 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, " " " 1919 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1920 

Ward 2. 

C. A. CHA]\rBERLIN, Term expires January, 1918 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, " " " 1919 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1920 

Ward 3. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, Term expires January, 1918 
JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, " " " 1919 

ERVIN E. WEBBER, '' '' " 1920 

Ward 7. 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, Term expires January, 1918 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1919 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " " 1920 

Ward 8. 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT, Term expires January, 1918 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, " " " 1919 

NAHUM PRESCOTT, " " " 1920 



58 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 



FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
EDWARD A. MOULTON, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 



Term expires March, 1918 
1918 
1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY, 
FRANK J. KELLEY. 

for woodlawn cemetery, penacook. 
OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 59 

FOR EAST COXCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Pees, one-fourth cent per gallon for .inspection, paid by 
owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents 
each for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed aunually in January by Mayor, subject to contirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

I 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, for sealing each scale beam, steelyard, or scale, 25 
cents, and for each measure, 10 cents; five or more to one person, half 
price — paid by owners of scales or measures. 

WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed annually in January bv Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — 
paid by party for vrhom culling is done. 

GEORGE F. HAYWARD. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring 
service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, William H. IMeserve, 

Thomas Hill, John E. Rossell, 

John H. Mercer, David Rossell, 

Everett L. Davis, Nelson Forrest, 

Hallett E. Patten, George B. Whittredge, 

Arthur N. Day, Howard Perley, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



61 



James F. Fitzgerald, 
John H. Flanders, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Amos J. Peaslee, 
Mark M. Blanehard, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
Alphonse King, 
William Gooden, 
Harry Lee, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Arthur E. Rowell, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 
Frank Manning, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 
Archie Black, 
W. D. Stearns, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 



Fred I. Rolfe, 
William J. Mullen, 
Henr}^ A. Brown, 

F. H."^ Smith, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brown, 
William F. Cutting, 
E. F. Miller, 

Earl Woodbury, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
S. A. Clark, 
C. J. Roers, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
Leigh F. Woodman, 
Alvin B. Edmunds, 
Omar C. Allard, 
J. W. Currier. 



CITY WEIGHER. 

WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in .January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Edward A. Moulton, 
George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Moses E. Haines. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Pliimmer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per 
cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person 
employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Gilbert H. Berry, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
E. A.' Cole, 
William E. Virgin, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
0. B. Jerome, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
William F. Hoyt, 



I. A. Burbank, 
John Rolfe, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Oliver Reno, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Charles S. Robinson, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Richard E. Nelson, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
W. F. Frost, 
E. F. Miller, 
George Oakley, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



63 



Herbert W. Rolfe, 
N. B. Flanders, 
Charles C. Osgood, 
Oliver C. Diuiond, 
Hiram W. Drouin, 



Irving Burbank, 
Fred H. Walker, 
John E. Colton, 
Everett Runnells. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 



of Aldermen. 

William Rowell, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Patrick A. Clifford, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
Michael J. Lee, 
John E. Frye, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Bobbins, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Reagan, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
James H. Brannigan, 



No salary. 

Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols," 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Philip King, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
E. H. Smart. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-officio. 
ARTHUR W. ROBINSON. 



64 CITY OP CONCORD. 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
RICHARD McBRIDE, JR., 
ELI LAFLAM. 

Ward ^^— WILLIAM F. PAIGE, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
FRED J. CARTER. 

Ward .?— CARL A. EKSTROM, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
•GUY A. SWENSON. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 
J. WESLEY PLUMMER, 
FRED S. JOHNSON. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
FRANKLIN B. GORDON, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward 5— CHARLES DUNCAN, 
HARRY R. CRESS Y, 
NELSON M. KNOWLTON. 

Ward 7— CHARLES J. McKEE, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
HARRIS S. PARMENTER. 

Ward (5— FRED SMITH, 

FRANK W. ORDWAY, 
JAMES BRANNIGAN. 

Ward 9—R. E. DONOVAN, 

TIMOTHY J. O'BRIEN, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 65 



WARD CLERKS. 



y^ard i— LOUIS F. CORBETT. 
^'ard 5— HAROLD D. MERRILL. 
^\ard J— ROBERT HENRY. 
y^'ard 4— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
y^ard 5— RAY E. BURKETT. 
^Yard ^— LOUIS I. MOULTON. 
\Nard 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
^^^ard 6— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward .9— D. H. GANNON. 



MODERATORS. 

^Yard i— JOHN H. ROLPE. 
^Yard 5— HOWARD P. HOIT. 
Y^ard 5— CPIARLES B. CLARKE. 
^\Tard 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
T^^arrf 5— EDWARD C. NILES. 
^^^ard ff— ELMER H. FARRAR. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
y^ard S— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
^Yard .9— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 



66 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 

1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 
Under the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in 
December, 1910, for one year, and biennially thereafter in November, be- 
ginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

'' MOSES T. VviLLARD, 1859- '60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863- '64. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, • 1868- '69. 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870-'71. 

" JOHN Ki:\rBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876-'77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878- '79- '80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880-'81-'82. 

'' EDGAR H. WOODMAN, l»83-'84r-'85-'86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887-'88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891-'92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893-'94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895-'96. 

'' ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903- '08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- '15. 

" NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 1916-'17. 

* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1917-1918. 



Edward C. Niles, Esq. 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot 



President 

Secretary 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 



Edward C. Niles, Esq., 
Dr. Charles Duncan, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 



Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 
Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, 
Harry F. Lake, Esq., 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 
Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 



1918. 



119 School Street 

43 South Spring Street 

123 North State Street 



1919. 



89 North State Street 

Hiitchins St., West Concord 

29 Auburn Street 



1920. 



7 North State Street 

23 South State Street 

14 Auburn Street 



70 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



FINANCE. 

Dr. Sullivan. 

high school. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



grammar schools. 
Mb. Lake. 



Mrs. Shepabd, 



Mrs. Minot. 



primary schools. 
Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Morrill 



Mr. Swenson. 



kindergartens. 
Dr. Duncan. 

buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Dudley, 



Mrs. Shepard. 
Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Lake. 



discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



HYGIENE. 

Mrs. Morrill. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



manual TRAINING. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 

Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Shepard. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. ]\Iorrill. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
MUSIC. 

Mr. Swenson. 



71 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Minot. 



DRAWING. 

Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Niles. 



text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



training school. 
Mr. Lake. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



night school. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett, 

3 Pine Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours : 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 
1.30 to 6 p. m. TelephjDne, 55M. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 

6 Avon Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. ; summer 
vacation, 2 to 4 p. m. Telephone, 725M. 



72 CITY OF CONCORD. 

* CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 

Office hours : 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.30 p. m. 
Telephone, 702. 



SCHOOL ASSISTANT. 

Edna Florence Watson. 

117 South Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. Office hours; 
8.30 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Elizabeth Maria Murphy. 

442 North State Street, West Concord, N. H. 

Office hours: 4 to 5 p. m., Mondays and Thursdays, at 
Superintendent's office. Telephone, 321M. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill Moderator. 

Herbert W. Rainie Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalp and John P. George Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION. 



The past year has been one of unusual activity and 
anxiety in our schools, as elsewhere. The fuel shortage 
during this winter has compelled the closing for greater 
or less periods of public schools generally throughout New 
England, but in Concord we have so far maintained our 
usual schedule without interruption. Whatever criticism 
there may have been of the decision of the Board of Edu- 
cation to keep the schools open during the most acute 
stages of the coal shortage is fully answered by the fact 
that we are approaching spring with the certainty that we 
can now complete our full school year, and that no one in 
Concord has suffered for the lack of coal which could have 
been supplied by temporarily closing the schools. This 
result is certainly a cause for profound gratification for 
all of us. 

The standing rule forbidding the solicitation of money 
in the schools has been so far abrogated as to permit the 
receipt of contributions for refugees from pillaged coun- 
tries and the sale of thrift stamps. We have felt that in 
this most critical period in modern history our children 
should be given the opportunity to do their part, an oppor- 
tunity which they have embraced with most gratifying 
enthusiasm. The work of the Junior Red Cross has also 
been inaugurated in our schools, with such a modification 
of its terms as removes all unpleasant and undemocratic 
distinctions based on i^ecuniary considerations. In all these 
unwonted activities the teaching force have been of the 
greatest possible assistance, as they have also been in the 
difficult work of classifying the registrants under the se- 
lective draft act. Every additional burden has been 
cheerfully assumed by them and discharged with excep- 
tional zeal and efficiency. 

The manual training school has been utilized to a large 
extent in training men liable to call for service in various 



74 ' CITY OP CONCORD. 

branches of the mechanical arts, and in telegraphy. The 
principal of that school has been called upon to serve the 
nation in training instructors for workers in the shipyards, 
and has been given a leave of absence so long as his services 
are required for that purpose. 

The schools are not exempt from the effects of the gen- 
eral increase in prices. Salaries have necessarily been con- 
siderably increased. The cost of coal is of course abnor- 
mal, and in order to maintain a sufficient fuel supply it has 
been necessary to purchase considerable quantities of 
wood. All this of course will demand increased appro- 
priations for the coming years. But the situation is unfor- 
tunately rendered more difficult by an act passed at the 
last session of the legislature changing the fiscal school 
year so that hereafter it terminates on the thirty-first of 
August, and requiring that appropriations made at the 
spring district meeting shall cover the period to the first 
of September in the next succeeding year. It is accord- 
ingly incumbent upon us at the approaching district meet- 
ing to make appropriations for the period from April 1, 
1918, to September 1, 1919, which will necessarily amount 
to about $40,000 more than the appropriations for a normal 
school year. The change in the fiscal year is undoubtedly 
a change for tlie better, but its inauguration at this time 
lays upon our taxpayers a burden greatly to be deplored, 
but from which, by the mandatory terms of the law, there 
is no escape. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
OSMA C. MORRILL. 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
HARRY F. LAKE. 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN. 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 

Board of Education. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT OF UNION 
SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



March 20, 1917, to March 22, 1918. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 



RECEIVED, 




Balance on hand March 21, 1917, 


$4,315.98 


From city, appropriated by law. 


41,738.74 


Appropriated by Union School District, 


85,617.08 


Literary fund, 


2,269.55 


Dog licenses, 


1,268.51 


Abial Walker fund. 


36.91 


Special repairs. 


2,000.00 


Transferred athletic field fund. 


5,000.00 


Cash sales for text-books, 


116.07 


" " " manual training. 


1,679.70 


" " night school. 


5.00 


'' " " miscellaneous. 


69.10 


" " " repairs, 


21.46 


" " " light and power. 


2.06 


" " fuel, 


2.50 


Tuition, 


2,349.24 


From Treasurer of Town District, 


97.87 




$146,589.77 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EXPENDED. 

Administration — including salaries of school 
board, salary and expense of superintendent, 
attendance officer, census and other expenses 
of administration, $6,461.40 

Instruction — including salaries (teachers), su- 
pervisors, text-books, scholars' supplies, flags, 
graduation exercises, exhibits and other ex- 
penses of instruction, 103,998.62 

Operation and Maintfinance of School Plant — in- 
eluding janitors, engineers, fuel, water, light 
and power, repairs, and other expenses of 
operation and maintenance, 27,519.61 

Auxiliary Agencies and Special Activities — in- 
cluding libraries, medical inspection, trans- 
portation of pupils and other special activities, 5,181.49 

Fixed, Charges — including insurance and other 

fixed charges, 573.00 

Outlay for Construction and Equipment — in- 
cluding alteration of old buildings, lands and 
new equipment, 2,087.43 

Debt Service — including payment of notes and 

bonds and interest on same, 611.20 

Miscellaneous — all not included in the above 

headings, 76.47 

Balance on hand, 80.55 

$146,589.77 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



77 



Concord, N. H., March 22, 1918. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the financial agent of Union School District, 
and find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper 
voucher for each item. 

HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



COST per capita. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . $47.73 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, 
based on average membership .... 55.22 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, draw- 
ing, superintendent, etc. ..... 32.71 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 
drawing and superintendent .... 30.64 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 
drawing, superintendent, in all schools below 
the high school ....... 25.27 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of music, 

drawing, superintendent, in the high school . 39.21 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools 2.21 



78 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



TUITION RECEIPTS. 



High School, 






$2,156.10 


Eastman School 






.75 


Rnmford School 






72.48 


Kimball School 






43.65 


Penacook School . 






16.26 


Dewey School 






12.00 


Dewey Training School 






48.00 



$2,349.24 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
SCHOOLS. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

I have the honor to present for your consideration my 
thirty-third annual report upon the condition of the 
schools of the district with recommendations which I be- 
lieve to be of service in keeping pace with modern progress. 

The item of school expense is the largest in the public 
budget. In making up this item care has always been 
taken to keep within the limits of actual needs determined 
by rational expansion and progress. Public funds are gen- 
erally looked upon as something to which the rules of 
personal care need not apply, but i:i the expenditure of the 
public school money of this district the reverse has always 
been in force. However, we ought to bear in mind that a 
constant increase in the cost per capita should always have 
back of it a corresponding increase of educational oppor- 
tunity. It is by no means advisable that a city of the size 
of Concord should be carrying on any department of school 
work to an extent which may be justified only in cities 
much larger and wealthier. With a decreasing enrollment 
of pupils we cannot reasonably defend a cost per cajyita 
brought about by anything except necessary provisions. 

The fuel shortage of the past winter was met by the pur- 
chase of an additional supply of wood. By such means we 
were enabled to keep the schools in session the entire time. 
This, with the increased cost of all kinds of supplies and 
the raise of salaries, has been a severe drain upon the 
school revenue. 

I believe the school administration to be foresighted and 
resourceful enough to meet all conditions that may arise 
during the war period. No doubt variations from regular 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

routine work will occur and conveniences that existed be- 
fore may have to be denied now, but these lessons of denial, 
economy and patriotism which this war is bringing to the 
youth of our city are those that have long been needed to 
create a proper moral, patriotic fiber. 

Attendance. 

The number of children reported in attendance for the 
year ending June 16, 1917, showed a decrease over that of 
the year before. This indicates a loss of population in 
Concord. Questionable absences are carefully looked after 
by Mr. Taylor, the attendance officer, and by Miss Murphy, 
the school nurse, few being allowed to escape. The num- 
ber of labor certificates issued since the last annual report 
has been unusually large. This may be accounted for by 
a shortage of men for labor during the present war, which 
has caused bo3^s to leave school to go to work. Attend- 
ance in the rural schools is uneven on account of the long 
distances to be traveled and of transportation hindered by 
extreme weather conditions. The Mountain School and 
the Riverhill School were closed two and three days, respec- 
tively, on account of the drifting storm in January. The 
Eastman School and the rural schools were compelled to 
close 1)y the storm of March 10. One room was closed in 
the Penacook building at the beginning of the second 
semester, there being only enough pupils of these grades 
for two rooms in this part of the city. 

The Enlargement op the District. 

In April, 1917, the Town District of the city of Concord 
voted, in annual meeting, to unite with Union School Dis- 
trict, and a subsequent act of the state legislature, then in 
session, legalized the change. The Town District com- 
prised all of the town of Concord lying without the bounds 
of Union School District except that portion of Ward One 
which now belongs to Penacook Union District. In that 
part of Concord, which was known as the Town District, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



81 



there are at present twelve schoolhouses, but only five of 
these are in use. The following table may be interesting 
for reference. The valuation given was that handed in to 
the Tax Commission by the officials of the Town District. 



District No. — . Riverhill, in use $950 

Mountain, in use 1,]00 

Millville, in use 1,300 



16. 

8. 
10. 

9. 

4. 

5. 

7. 
12. 
15. 
14. 

6. 



Iron Works, in use 

Stickney Hill, in use 

Carter's Hill, not in use 

Ashville, not in use 

Near Dimond Hill, not in use. 

Break-O'-Day, not in use 

Snaptown, not in use 

Turtletown, not in use 

Ballard's Hill, not in use 



900 
300 
200 
100 
200 
400 
100 
200 
150 



Four of the five buildings in use have very small enroll- 
ments of pupils — Riverhill, Mountain, Iron Works and 
Stickney Hill. In none of these is there evidence of in- 
creasing numbers and the future will not probably produce 
any change for the better. The classes are small and first- 
year pupils are little in evidence. 

The Millville school has two rooms, both of wliieh are 
graded and largely attended. They are out of the class 
of rural schools. If the attendance increases more room 
will be necessary and can be furnished either by adding to 
the present building or by erecting a new one. 

The Stickney Hill school is conducted by the town of 
Hopkinton, under an agreement with the former Town 
District, by which Hopkinton furnishes the teacher and 
school supplies, and Union District the schoolhouse. The 
cost of repairs to the building is equally divided between 
the two towns. 

None of the buildings not in use are needed and prob- 
ably never will be, consequently they should be disposed 
of before decay impairs their value. 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In Appendix I to this report may be found a table giv- 
ing facts about the transportation routes as they are to- 
day. Problems arising from the transportation of pupils 
to the various schools are frequent and vexatious. Equal- 
ity of privilege, capable of much misconstruction, causes 
endless argument. The amount paid for transportation 
is large, but it is much less than that needed to open these 
schools for use. If it should be decided to carry pupils of 
all grades of school the cost would be very much increased. 
This would make it desirable for the district to own its 
vehicles and let the transportation privileges to the lowest 
bidder. Such a plan would be economical both in expense 
and in convenience. 

School Buildings. 

Concord has good school buildings and they are looked 
after by a capable sub-committee, corps of janitors and 
teachers. Within the past year extensive repairs have been 
made in the Penacook, Dewey, Riverhill and Iron Works 
schools. Many of the other schools need inside finishing. 
The light of a room is often spoiled by a ceiling that has 
become darkened through being left too long without re- 
pair. The policy of putting at least one building a year 
in good order is the best way to keep the plant from dete- 
riorating. The entire interior of the Dewey School has 
been refinished. The system of lighting in the Penacook 
School has been made to conform to modern requirements. 
The light now comes from the north side entirely. A new 
urinal was installed in the boys' basement and the entire 
basement made lighter by putting in more windows. The 
Riverhill School has been shingled, the Iron Works build- 
ing given new support underneath and the outside of the 
building painted. New valves have been installed in the 
high school boilers so that this building and the Morrill 
building can be heated separately, or together, as the case 
may require. The Chandler and the Parker buildings have 
been painted on the outside. The unusual cold weather 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

of January caused much freezing in nearly all of the build- 
ings. It would be good economy to have the piping looked 
over by an expert each summer. 

School Lunches. 

The history of school lunches in Union School District 
is varied. In early times a cold lunch, brought to school 
by the pupil, was thought to be a rational provision. Many 
who did that are in good health even today and loth to 
believe that it did them harm. Provision by the district 
began during the one-session plan of conducting the high 
school, when hot cocoa, coffee rolls, chocolate eclairs, can- 
dies, etc., were allowed to be sold to the pupils, in addition 
to some more nutritious things. The vendor was under 
the authority of the Board of Education, but the sale 
eventually resolved itself largely into one of sweets, the 
nutritious being somewhat side-tracked. Lunches served 
by a caterer under school authority and carried on with 
varying success in the Parker School and the High School 
followed the previous plan. Purchasing tickets were in the 
five-cent denominations, the amount bought being regu- 
lated by the appetite and the purse of the pupil. In a 
more limited way, hot cocoa and soups have been served 
pupils at cost in the following schools : Garrison, Eastman, 
Chandler, Walker and all the rural schools. Beginning 
with last fall term lunch in the Parker School was handled 
by the cooking department, and every girl has taken part 
in preparing meals. All this was done at the suggestion 
of Miss Diekerman and under the immediate direction of 
Miss Davis, Miss Watson assisting. Suitable apparatus, 
was purchased and other arrangements made to have the 
lunch served in a proper way by the cafeteria plan. The 
success wliich attended this innovation induced the com-^ 
mittee to try a similar arrangement in the senior high 
school, beginning December 31, 1917. Miss Davis has gen- 
eral charge of the lunches in both the Parker School and 
the High School, Mrs. Cobb assisting in the High School. 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The purchasing tickets are in the five-cent denominations 
and the lunches are finely cooked, palatable, nutritious, 
clean and well served. The patronage has been liberal. 
Actual food costs are more than met even in these times 
of high prices and I can see no reason why, in normal 
times, the entire cost of maintaining the lunches cannot 
be met by receipts from the actual food sales. 

The Senior High School. 

Mr. Cook's report will deal with the details of the work 
in this school. It has gone smoothly and quite effectively 
throughout the entire year. The work of all such schools 
fails in functional ideals by clinging too much to the dis- 
ciplinary side of teaching. However, secondary schools are 
becoming more identified with public needs each succeeding 
year and I believe that our senior high school is now serv- 
ing the general public better than ever before. This is a 
good sign. The giving up of the study of the so-called 
dead language grows to a great extent. I regret this ex- 
ceedingly because, for higher grades of mentality, I do not 
believe anything has yet been found that will fill its place, 
and I earnestly hope that Latin, at least, will continue to 
attract enough pupils so that former high standards of 
work may be maintained. The social standing of the 
school has been directed toward higher levels. Parents' 
days have been observed and a meeting of all the teachers 
of the district, irrespective of grade, was held in high 
school hall so that too much of class consciousness might 
not prevail in the corps. I believe this meeting was one 
of the most helpful of the entire year. The parents' days 
have served to promote an acquaintance between parents 
and teachers more extensively than ever before. From 
talks with many different parents I know these gatherings 
are keenly appreciated. The teaching corps has lost only 
a few teachers this year by resignation — Edward W. Ells- 
worth, Marion C. Hixson and Mary K. Taylor. I speak 
particularly of Miss Taylor because her career as a teacher 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

was begun and continued, up to the time of her resigna- 
tion, entirely in Concord schools. Miss Taylor was a tre- 
mendous power in this school. Her methods were formu- 
lateil in the Parker School and as time went on were ex- 
panded and strengthened to meet the requirements of older 
pupils. Teachers of her caliber are not common. The en- 
tire corps, from the principal down, have striven diligently 
for success, and deserve commendation for their good work. 

The Junior High Schools. 

A very superior grade of work is being done in these 
schools. Their place has been demonstrated beyond the 
possibility of a doubt. This is shown by the remarkable 
growth of the junior high school throughout the country. 

THE PARKER SCHOOL. 

So much has been said about the good work of tins school 
that it is difficult to find words for additional commenda- 
tion. It is admirably handled and its reputation for 
standard attainment extends beyond the limits of our 
state. There are few lines of regular work in which this 
school is not a pioneer as far as modern methods go. 

THE CHANDLER, WALKER, GARRISON AND EASTMAN SCHOOLS. 

It will be difficult to find better work of this grade than 
can be seen in these schools. Their subordinate positions 
in no wise determines their usefulness nor sterling char- 
acter. I would respectfully call the attention of the Board 
of Education to the lack of laboratory privileges in all of 
these buildings, and in the Chandler School there has never 
been room enough to do the work laid out as it should be 
done. 

The course of study has been revised so as to conform 
to state requirements. INTathematics now takes a review 
of arithmetic in class ]\I, followed by equations and meas- 
urements. Class N uses the entire time with concrete 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

geometry. The work in history has been lightened by 
transferring a part of it to classes K and L. Classes in 
community civics and in elouentary science were formed 
and all work made to function with real life as far as con- 
ditions will allow. 

Concord was the second city in the entire country to 
adopt the junior high school and the first city to put in 
practice the six, two, three plan. For eight years the dis- 
trict has maintained this grading with success beyond the 
earl}^ predictions. As now placed we have the following 
arrangement : 

First Year — Classes M and N. Chandler, Walker, Garri- 
son and Eastman schools. 

Second Year — Classes and P, Parker School. 

It may be seen easily that the unity of the first year is 
broken by apportioning the pupils among four different 
schools. This is a great hindrance to the most efficient 
work. If all the pupils belonging to these schools could 
be brought together in one building of sufficient capacity 
an impetus would be given the work that would mean 
much to them. They could remain under the same corps 
of teachers for two years. The best of laboratory privi- 
leges could be realized. The differentiation of courses 
could be begun in Class M instead of class 0. Systematic 
hygienic work could be put in practice. All social activi- 
ties could be guided along the same lines for a period of 
two years. Chorus and orchestra practice could be more 
effectively organized. Eventually the work of the senior 
high scnool could b(^ prolonged one year by giving addi- 
tional privileges to students along the following lines : 
College preparatory work by which a pupil might shorten 
his college course one year and also by which the child of 
the poor man would be enabled to work one year in college 
studies ; vocational education could be begun ea'rlier and 
continued for an extended period ; domestic arts courses 
might be more rationally carried out by supplementary 
home practice ; office practice in the senior high school 



SCHOOL REPORT. ' 87 

could be concretely applied, and there are many other 
things that would come up to place our schools on a higher 
plane than they are now. I hope the matter will be con- 
sidered carefully and that some means will be devised by 
which this unity of junior high work may be strength- 
ened, thus insuring the continuance of that educational 
progress which has always marked our city as a pioneer 
in the educational advancement of the state. 

Elementary Schools. 

The courses of the elementary schools have been revised 
in a few minor details to make the articulation with the 
junior high schools more reasonable. Departmental work 
in two studies has been instituted in the Garrison School. 
The course in mathematics in class L has been changed to 
meet the needs of the succeeding grades. History has been 
introduced into classes K and L to relieve the crowded 
curriculum in classes M and N. The results of definite 
method in spelling, geography, history and other minor 
studies show to good advantage. These will be still fur- 
ther extended and adjusted to the needs of the pupils. 

In General. 

The various activities so closely allied to the regular 
work as to become an almost necessary part of the school 
system are given detailed reports by the supervisors. The 
kindergartens have about held their attendance of former 
years. No new ones have been started, but a census taken 
at the south end shows that there are enough children of 
these ages who would .probably attend if they had the 
opportunity. We have one vacant room in the Penacook 
School and if conditions do not change we shall have ac- 
commodations for an additional kindergarten here next 
year. 

The sewing classes have done their usual good work and 
in addition have rendered valuable aid to the Charitable 
Society and to the Red Cross organizations. 



88 ■ CITY OF CONCORD. 

The several departments of night school work have fol- 
lowed their usual lines. The class of foreigners was small, 
but enthusiastic. The cooking class failed to equal its en- 
rollment of last year and was continued for but a short 
time. The class in mechanical drawing held its enrollment 
to the end of the course with eminent success. Even in this 
unusually troubled year a great amount of good was real- 
ized from these classes. I believe the committee in charge 
of these schools can make no mistake in enlarging the scope 
of the work and enough funds should be provided to make 
it more of a success than it is now. 

The manual training department has held to its former 
courses and reaped results commensurate with the energy 
shown by the teaching corps. Classes in radio work, ma- 
chine work and blacksmithing were formed and have been 
conducted with good enrollment and with notable success. 

The question of changing over the courses in mechanic 
arts to meet the requirements of the Smith-Hughes bill, in 
order that' we may get the benefits of its provisions, has 
been carefully considered but not accepted as feasible at 
the present time by Mr. French. The project work of the 
school has been more fully developed this year than ever 
before and its use to the schools in general has been clearly 
shown. 

The Dewey Training School graduated the largest class 
in its history last June. All secured places in different 
parts of the state without difficulty or delay. A shortage 
of teachers for public schools has manifested itself through- 
out the country and there is no question but that the gradu- 
ates of this school will be eagerly sought as they always 
have been. 

Capt. Morrill resigned the position of instructor of mil- 
itary drill to enter the United States service. His place 
was filled by the election of Arden F. Coulter, who, in 
turn, resigned for a like reason. His place was taken by 
Jonathan E. Ingersoll. He left to work in another state. 
Michael H. Mulligan now holds the position. 

The cooking school has done its work largely in eonnec- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

tion with the school lunches. For the first semester it was 
under the instruction and direction of Miss Davis. Miss 
Myrtle Farrar was chosen to fill the vacancy made by Miss 
Davis' promotion and affairs are progressing along the 
most modern lines. The course of the Dewey normal 
classes has been entirely rearranged to meet the demands 
of the state with regard to the needs of the rural schools. 

The special school in the Walker building has had its 
most prosperous experience. The attendance has been up 
to the limit throughout the year and the worth of the 
work accomplished here w'as shown by the display at the 
annual drawing exhibits of last June. 

The successful work in drawing was demonstrated at the 
annual exhibition in June. It excelled all previous ex- 
hibits in about every respect. The history of art has 
been begun again in the domestic arts course under the 
instruction of Miss Ford of the senior high school. 

Teachers. 

Even in these times of unrest the personnel of the teach- 
ing corps has suffered no great changes. The strength of 
the corps has been impaired by the resignation of several 
teachers and it has been no easy matter to fill the vacan- 
cies. Violation of the code of ethics adopted by the Edu- 
cational Council for the state of New Hampshire has not 
been encountered save in one instance. That case was the 
most flagrant one that has ever come to my notice and the 
Board of Education rightly refused to accept the resigna- 
tion of the teacher who ignored the terms of her contract. 

The patriotic spirit of the teachers has been manifest 
in many different ways. The spontaneous response of the 
entire corps to the request of the draft board for volun- 
tary assistance in tabulating the drafts leaves no doubt 
about the desire of all to do what little they may for their 
country's welfare in these critical times. 

As a general thing teachers have maintained the stand- 
ards of former years. I cannot speak too strongly about 



90 CITY OF CONCORD. 

keeping our efficient teachers at all hazards. I do not be- 
lieve we should allow a few dollars to attempt to offset 
services which are invaluable. If war conditions continue 
the matter of securing competent teachers will become more 
and more serious and the task of keeping school work up 
to the standard increasingly difficult. Teachers should 
retain their positions and not be led away from their pro- 
fession by the glamour of government service. 

Obituary. 

Miss Margaret Morrill died very suddenly September 2, 
1917. She had been assistant in the Merrimack and the 
Walker kindergartens and w^as in active service at the time 
of her death. Her life and work were model in all respects. 

Miss Margaret A. Donovan died at her home December 
8, 1917. Miss Donovan had been graduated from the 
Dewey Training School and had taught in the primary 
grades at the Kimball School. Her work was always 
marked by an enthusiasm which brings success. Failing 
health caused her to give up her school work. 

It seldom happens that the short space of one year re- 
moves by death two such fine teachers. Both were reared 
in Concord and educated in the public schools. Each was 
noted for her lovable disposition, fondness for .children, 
even temperament and tireless energy. Their associates 
and acquaintances will long remember their beauty of 
character and ^vholesome companionship. 

Hygiene. 

Physical education is not receiving the careful attention 
that it ought and I respectfully call your attention to the 
unsatisfactory results from tests that have been given at 
different times showing that there is urgent need of sys- 
tematic hygienic drill for pupils of all grades of school. 
The teachers do as well as they can, but wdth the great 
number of other things they are called upon to perform 



SCHOOL REPORT. 91 

they cannot give the physical growth of children the at- 
tention it needs. Recent tests given drafted men brought 
to light an alarming state of physical decay among them. 
New England stood particularly low in the list of sections 
compared for physical efficiency. The remarkable trans- 
formation wrought by six months' drill in cantonments 
ought to. open the eyes of all and set us to thinking what 
such methods might do in the public schools if applied by 
a skilled medical supervisor. The bent forms of young 
boys and girls suggest either prevalent or prospective dis- 
ease. I am writing this in the hope that it may engage the 
serious thought of people who hold the health of the rising 
generations in concern, and that we may have a medical 
supervisor who can not only inspect schools to forestall 
and stamp out disease, but also give children such physical 
training as will tend to prevent its gaining a hold among 
them. 

Work for the War. 

The schools are playing an important role in carrying 
on the war. The zeal of the teaching corps finds a reflec- 
tion in the eagerness of the student body to carry out the 
requests of the national government for various lines of 
work. 

SCHOOL GARDENS. 

Last year many of the pupils maintained school gardens 
and increased the general food supply to quite an extent. 
This year a plan of campaign has been formulated to carry 
out the desires of the state to multiply the number for the 
coming summer. Exhibitions of food products were held 
in the Garrison, Rumford and Walker schools during the 
fall term. 

WAR SAVING STAMPS. 

The schools have been particularly active in this line of 
work and have made an enviable record in the purchase of 
thrift stamps. From the table given in Appendix we 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

find that up to March, 11,873 thrift stamps have been pur- 
chased, for which $3,024.12 was paid to the United States 
government. 

THE ARMENIAN RELIEF FUND. 

The pupils contributed to this fund freely until it was 
merged with the Junior Red Cross organization. 

RED CROSS WORK. 

The various activities of knitting, garment-making, 
trench candles, etc., have received their due attention and 
Concord schools will not be found wanting in rendering 
such aid. Some idea may be gained of the extent of this 
work from the record of the Parker School alone where 
190 pupils have worked at some form of Red Cross serv- 
ice and among other things have made 564 comfort pillows 
and 2,558 trench candles. 

WAR LITERATURE. 

The request of the national government for the study of 
war literature in the schools has been complied with. The 
senior high school now has embodied this in the English 
course. 

While all of these things are of great value and indicate 
loyalty to the government we must be extremely careful 
that school work is not Aveakened by demands from the 
outside. Nor must we warp our vision to such an extent 
as to be unable to see that patriotic duty lies more than 
ever before in the wholesome education of the youth. Cer- 
tain essential forces have been sorely neglected in our past 
period of prosperity, particularly vocational, physical and 
moral training. Tlie public school has all the elements for 
meeting such emergencies. It seems to have required a 
• cataclysm to reveal the unfitness of American institutions 
in these respects. It has shown that the needs of the com- 
mon man have not been given their due attention. Our 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

educational plan has been too one-sided and made for the 
limited few. This can be obviated only by dividing the 
pupil body into two classes. Those who will naturally fol- 
low out a plan of life which calls for the fullest develop- 
ment of intellectual power without intensive manual labor 
and those who will have to pursue a life in fields that re- 
quire manual dexterity and technical knowledge. The war 
thus far has revealed not so much a shortage of trained in- 
tellects as a shortage of skilled labor. The future will ask 
of us not a limited number of trained athletes from our 
public schools, but a physically fit student body so that 
not only the few but rather all may bring good bodily 
development to meet conditions which suddenly arise. It 
is sure to ask that people have moral stamina developed to 
such an extent that they will not waver under the unrea- 
sonable complaints of the discontented. It will also de- 
mand that the large per cent, of our population receive the 
corresponding per cent, of opportunity due them so that 
they can live more wholesome and profitable lives. In no 
other time in our history then should we be more careful 
that schools be not drawn aside from their allotted work. 
A work not calculated to foster merciless domination with 
a conception antagonistic to democratic ideals. Nor must 
we lose sight of the fact that the strength of our nation lies 
in our public schools. Therefore we must look at all times 
with questioning eye upon our ideals and doings so that 
the distractions of tumult, horror and chaos will not turn 
us aside from preparing the youth for present conditions 
and the possibilities of the unseen future. 

I have never before been so impressed with the great help 
given me, both from the Board of Education, the teachers 
and the public, as I have in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE HEADMASTER OF 
THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



Supt. L. J. Rundlett, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir : I am sending to j^ou a report of the work of 
the senior high school for the year February, 1917 -Febru- 
ary, 1918. 

Attendance. 

The total enrollment during the first semester of the 
present year was 485. This includes postgraduates and 
special students. The total enrollment outside of these 
two classes was 470. These figures show that the size of 
the school is practically the same as it was a year ago. 
The crowded condition of some of the divisions has made 
necessary the employment of an additional teacher. To 
make room for these extra classes we are now using a part 
of the assembly hall for recitation. 

Graduation. 

The class graduating June 15, 1917, numbered seventy- 
six. The class which graduated in January, 1917, num- 
bered fifty-one. This makes a total of one hundred twenty- 
seven for the school year ending June, 1917. The number 
graduating in January, 1918, was thirty-nine. A pleasing 
feature of recent graduations has been the presentation of 
a gift by members of the graduating class to the school. 
The class of June, 1917, gave a bust of Tennyson. The 
class of January, 1918, gave a service flag in honor of those 
who have entered the United States service from the 
school. 



school report. 95 

War Activities. 

The students of the school have all been very much inter- 
ested in the various forms of war work which they have 
been able to perform. Contributions have been made very 
generously to the various war funds. Individual members 
have done a great deal of work in connection with surgical 
dressings and the Red Cross. The school has applied for 
membership as a Junior chapter of the Red Cross. The 
home garden and "cut a cord" movements have been sup- 
ported by individual members of the school. The interest 
in this work has been stimulated, no doubt, by the fact that 
we have an honor roll including the names of all those 
graduates and non-graduates who have entered into any 
form of war service. This includes at the present time a 
list numbering 190. 

The Library. 

Last year I said in my report that the appointment of a 
regular librarian had been justified by the aid and addi- 
tional efficiency which this had given to the other depart- 
ments of the school. Another year's work has increased 
my opinion of the value of this appointment. There is 
need, however, of additional equipment if this department 
is to be kept up in the most efficient way. For several 
years we have had practically no additions to the library 
except w^hat have come through gifts. Many of our most 
valuable reference books are being used up and they need 
to be replaced. We also need each year to buy new books 
to add to the list which we already have. We ought fur- 
ther to have regular subscriptions to one or more daily 
papers and to several of the best magazines and periodicals. 
I am asking for an appropriation of at least $100 a year 
for this work and am confident that no part of the money 
spent for the high school will be used to better advantage. 



96 city of concord. 

School Events. 

On May 25, 1917, an entertainment was given in the 
assembly hall which consisted of scenes from "The Idylls 
of the King" by members of the senior English classes. 
The scenes were very effectively staged and reflect credit 
upon the work of the students. 

On June 8, 1917, occurred the first Albin prize medal 
contest. This contest was made possible by the gift to 
the school by Mrs. J. H. Albin in honor of the late Mr. 
Albin. Nine contestants participated and the medals were 
won by Mary E. Stearns and Hugh J. Cruikshank. 

During the fall term we had the annual meeting for the 
mothers of the district which was addressed by Dr. Marion 
L. Bugbee. There was a good attendance of the parents 
and the meeting was, I think, productive of much interest 
and benefit. 

School Work. 

In general the work of the school has been conducted as 
quietly and effectively as in former years with a steadfast 
effort to maintain a standard which will be respected by the 
community. The early closing of the building, made neces- 
sary by the coal shortage, has interfered with the meetings 
of the Lyceum and of the Girls' Club. This is to be re- 
gretted for these two organizations are very beneficial to 
the school. In all other respects the spirit of the school 
and the co-operation of the students and teachers has been 
very effective. 

The change made in the method of serving lunch which 
was inaugurated in January has been, from the viewpoint 
of the student, a decided benefit. The lunch, in quality, 
quantity and the manner of serving, is more satisfactory 
than anything we have had heretofore. 

There is only one change in our work which I wish to 
advocate and that is the taking up of the study of Spanish 
in our regular course. The increasing prominence that has 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

been given in recent years to the relations between this 
country and South America has made this language more 
important to us. The present war conditions will only 
serve to make the commercial and political relations be- 
tween these two countries even closer and more binding. I. 
think that we should arrange as soon as we can do so con- 
veniently to start this subject. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. COOK, 

Headmaster. 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING. 



February 26, 1918. 

Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools, Concord, 
N. H.: 

The drawing department has made few changes in its 
plan of work the past year. In the elementary schools it 
has seemed desirable to lay stress on the construction, 
measuring and those problems wiiich teach pupils the value 
of accuracy and neatness. 

The classes of the domestic arts course of the high school 
have accomplished more and the work is of a rather higher 
standard than in previous years. 

O'W'ing to the lack of free periods in the different courses 
and the limited time of the instructor the number of pupils 
taking drawing as an elective study is small. The elective 
pupils this year have given some attention to the rendering 
of landscapes in different mediums as a preparation for the 
sketching excursions to be taken later when the weather 
permits. 

The training classes have found their individual black- 
boards helpful. These have given the pupils an oppor- 
tunity to practice forms that would be needed in demon- 
stration before classes and the making of a blackboard 
calendar by each pupil proved to be of benefit to all. 

An exhibition of drawings from the elementary schools 
and classes of the high school domestic arts course and 
elective drawing pupils was held at the close of school in 
June. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FAITH C. STALKER, 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF SEWING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools, Union 
School District, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir : The sewing this year has been of an exceed- 
ingly practical and helpful nature and has proved its use- 
fulness, not only in teaching the girls to sew but also in 
giving aid to others. Until January 1, 1918, the work was 
mainly for the poor in Concord and the pupils made twenty 
boys' waists, ten children's dresses, fifty- four petticoats, 
three pairs of rompers, four night-dresses, four children's 
sleeping garments. 

For the Union School District they have made 208 tow- 
els for the cooking classes, thirteen aprons and three table 
covers for the manual training school, two dozen towels 
and two aprons for dental room and have repaired four 
flags. 

Since Januarj^ 1 the work has been for the Red Cross 
and consists of 100 bandages, three dozen towels, two dozen 
surgical shirts and one dozen dresses and petticoats. A 
great deal of interest is shown by all the girls over this 
opportunity to do Red Cross service. While the war con- 
tinues there is no reason why they cannot be regularly era- 
ployed in this phase of war work, as they are thereby 
making a practical as well as useful application of their 
daily lessons. 

The pupils of domestic arts course have to their credit 
132 finished garments and 92 unfinished garments. They 
also trimmed 47 hats. 

Forty-three girls from junior and senior high schools 
have this year elected sewing. This number is constantly 
increasing and is very gratifying, as more are choosing 
sewing as an elective than ever before. 

Respectively submitted, 

LOUISE C. HOWE. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
LUNCHES AND COOKING. 



Mr. L. J. RundleU, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir : By the decision, in September, 1917, to ex- 
tend the work of the domestic science department, both 
the cooking classes and the lunch room were greatly bene- 
fited. The necessary equipment was installed in the Par- 
ker School, and every girl is required to take cooking as 
part of her regular course. As in the past, the beginners' 
classes follow a regular outline, but work with larger quan- 
tities, while the others make whatever is necessary for the 
lunch counter, where is sold practically everything that is 
made. By so doing each student has an opportunity to 
work with larger quantities than formerly at less expense 
to the district, prices charged for the food being sufficient 
to cover the cost of materials. This has created much en- 
thusiasm in the class, as pupils naturally prefer making a 
whole recipe alone to making one-fourth the rule with an- 
other person. The girls now have the privilege of buying 
what they make to take home. The lunch counter is run 
on the cafeteria plan, and the students who assist in serv- 
ing have their lunches free. 

Owing to the great call for preservation of food a large 
amount of fruits and vegetables was canned, and much 
marmalade, jam and jelly was made in the fall. The stu- 
dents remarked that nothing was wasted. The pulp and 
skins of grapes were made into marmalade, and apple pulp 
and skins into apple butter. All of these were most ac- 
ceptable and useful later on in the year when sugar became 
so scarce. 

The lunch at the Parker School proved so satisfactory 
that in January new equipment was installed at the sen- 



SCHOOL EEPORT, 101 

ior high ; as nearly twice as many are served in this build- 
ing a competent cook was necessary, and we w^ere most 
fortunate in securing the services of Mrs. Cobb. Two elec- 
tive classes help with the cooking each day, one under 
Miss Ford and the other under my own direction. In 
January, Miss Myrtle Farrar took charge of the classes 
at the Parker, and I made my headquarters at the senior 
high, although still planning the class work and menus 
and buying the supplies for both high and Parker schools. 

It is quite difficult in these times of high prices and 
food scarcity to provide a satisfactory menu, but each day 
we serve some kind of soup and toast for 5 cents, a meat 
or meat substitute for 5 cents, sandwiches 5 cents, cocoa 
or milk, with choice of sandwich or muffin, 5 cents, mashed 
potato, gravy, muffin and butter 5 cents, and dessert 5 
cents. 

In addition to the regular work the Parker School en- 
tertained the superintendents at luncheon the day of their 
convention here. The high school elective classes helped 
prepare a part of the Y. M. C. A. "Father and Son" ban- 
quet. Some of the girls have assisted the state demon- 
strators. The students are all taught the aim of the food 
administration and ways in which they may help. 

Respectively submitted, 

HARRIET B. DAVIS. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlctt, Superintendent. 

Dear Sir: It is difficult for a school nurse to report si, 
year's work briefly. This year is to be known as "Chil- 
dren's Year" because the problem of child health is so 
serious. The condition of each child's health should be 
looked after by a medical inspector. Over half of the pub- 
lic school pupils are probably affected with some form of 
ailment. A combination of the work of a school physician 
followed up by that of a school nurse would work wonders. 

No one person should be expected to look after the health 
of the entire school population of a city like Concord. It 
is time for this city to awake to its responsibilities and 
appoint a competent school physician. 

More time ought to be given to practical health talks in 
the schools. If w^e wish to interest the communitj^ in mat- 
ters of public health, the message of hj^gienic living should 
be instilled into the minds of the children who in turn 
will carry the word home to the parents. 

Dui-ing the year the usual number of defects found have 
been corrected, and cases referred to parents have received 
prompt attention. Tlie hearty co-operation of the parents 
is most gratifying. 

Health day was observed with appropriate remarks by 
physicians and others. Twice during the year I have 
spoken on public health to the pupils in Miss Sargent's 
class in the high school. 

The dental clinic, now a year old, is no longer an experi- 
ment. Since its beginning it has been a pronounced suc- 
cess. The dentists manifest the same enthusiasm which 
marked the early days. Each in turn gives a Saturday 
afternoon without remuneration of any kind. It is pleas- 
ing to note that throughout the entire year every appoint- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 103 

ment has been faithfully kept. Aside from the time given 
on Saturday many of the dentists have treated children in 
their own offices, or have gone to the hospital to do work 
which could not be done in the clinic. The room is well 
equipped and the work done in a thoroughly satisfactory 
manner. We may all feel a just pride in the dental clinic, 
which is second to none in the state. 

Miss Anderson, who assists me, deserves special credit 
for her faithful, conscientious work. 

I sincerely appreciate the hearty co-operation which has 
been given me by the Board of Education, you and the 
teachers. 

I have made 400 home calls for the following conditions: 

Defective vision, 30 

Defective teeth, 80 

Throat and nose condition, 55 

Pediculosis, 45 

Uncleanliness, 20 

Malnutrition, 15 

Mentally retarded, 17 

Investigation for contagious disease, 45 

Disease of skin, 7 

Conjunctivitis, 7 

Oi'thopedic, 8 

Vaccination, 5 

Undiagnosed, 21 

Other causes, 51 

Number interviews with officials and others, 75 

Number children to physicians, 28 
In the dental clinic the following work has been done : 

Number cleanings, 122 
Number fillings — cement, silver, gutta percha, 

copper, cement, 284 

Extraction, 299 

Respectfully submitted, 
ELIZABETH M. MURPHY, R. N. 



w 



o 

o 
W 
o 

o 



T— I 

1-5 

G 

< 



Q 


W 


W 


>^ 


o 


1— 1 


y, 


H-( 


o 


H 


CJ 


Cd 


^ 


O 


H 


fe 


: ; 




1— 1 


rri 


« 


H 


H 


r-) 


f/; 


1— 1 


1— 1 


ta 


u 


fe 


, T 


O 






^2. 






55 • 

c c c 
5 =s o 



_-^ • 

C eg-— ' 

o£ o 

[£So 



"3 c ? 



e};f- 



•S|OOH0S 



■S[OoqDS 



■siooqos 
luiqoojtid 



■siooqos 



•siooqos 

I'BiqOOJBrf 



■S[uoqos 



•siooqos 
IBiqoojUcT 



siooqos 



•siooqos 

I'BUIOOJ'BJ 

•Siooqos 
A3!o 



•siooqos 
ITJiqoojBj 



•siooqos 



•siooqos 
IBiqoojBci 



•siooqos 
mo 



siooqos 

I'BiqOOI'Btl 



"Siooqos 



•siooqos 

I'BiqOOJ'Bd 



•siooqos 

Aid 



— 1 O Cl 



o o o o 



lO I^ CI 



lO o o o 



CO en lO 'N o in 



o 


o 


- 


- 


o 


o 


«5 


o 


!N 


o 


- 


o 


(M 


- 


CO 


CO 


^ 


- 


■n 


o 


" 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


« 


o 


s 


CO 
CO 


6i 


iC 


c-l 


3 


lO 


?5 


o 


o 



o o o o 



O O iH o o o 



-H — . O 



Ol o o o o o 



O O t-H o o o 



o o o o o o 



o o o o 



o o o o o o 



o o o o 



c o o o o o 



CO O CO 



GC lO t^ 





iC 


o 


IM 


2 


CO 


en 

CO 


o 


K 


12 




- 


o 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


«0 


o 


CO 


CO 


CO 
CO 


o 


c-l 


cl 


- 


CO 
CO 




s 



O 1-H o CO O CO 



O X -^ 



O l^ M* 1-^ O l^ 



^ p 



►^ fa^ s 



=. cS 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF MUSIC. 



3Ir. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent. 

De-Vr Sir: The work of the music department of the 
Concord schools is conducted along five different lines : 

First. Singing and sight reading in the primary and 
grammar grades. 

Second. Chorus work in the junior and senior high 
schools. 

Third. The various branches of music taught in the fifth 
course in the higli schools. 

Fourth. The work with the pupil-teachers in the Dewey 
Training School. 

Fifth. Orchestral work. 

Someone has said, "Be not the first by whom the new is 
tried, nor yet the last to lay the old aside." It is some- 
what in accord with this precept that we are conducting 
the work in singing. 

We are using the same text-books and practically the 
same methods as have been in use here for several years 
and we are doing this because the results, as a whole, have 
been satisfactory. 

Such a part of the rudiments of music as is necessary 
for intelligent sight singing is taught in all of the primary 
grades, and as a result we are getting good individual and 
class work there and most excellent chorus work in the 
higher grades. 

A careful use of the child-voice is insisted upon at all 
times and we are rewarded for this by an unusually large 
number of pure sopranos found in the high schools. 

A large part of the credit for our really excellent chorus 



106 CITY OP CONCORD. 

singing in the higher grades should be given to the lower 
grade teachers who have, without exception, done most 
painstaking and intelligent work. 

The director of music has been unable to visit regu- 
larly the school near Sewall's Falls or the one at Riverhill. 
The teachers there report music as a part of their weekly 
program. Visits are made , to the schools on the Iron 
"Works Road and at Millville every four weeks. 

The chorus singing in the high schools is very satis- 
factory. Especially noteworthy is that at the Parker 
School. 

Owing to the large number of boys who have employ- 
ment directly after school in the afternoon, it has not been 
possible to resume glee club work with them this winter. 

A large and remarkably good girls' glee club meets for 
weekly practice at the senior high. 

The work of the fifth high school course goes more 
smoothly each year. This includes rudiments of music, 
melody writing, elementary harmony, music history and 
music literature. We need a good encyclopedia of music 
as an aid to the proper preparation of the work of this 
course. 

The work with the members of the Dewey Training 
School has been conducted along lines similar to those of 
last year. A record is kept of each recitation and a writ- 
ten report is submitted to the principal of the school every 
ten weeks. Satisfactory progress is being made by all. 

The condition of a high school orchestra is, like New 
England weather, subject to sudden changes. Every grad- 
uation takes away a valued member and if that member 
has been playing some other instrument than the violin 
the vacancy is not always easily filled. Our orchestra is 
not as able an organization as it was two years ago but 
we hope for better things in the future. 

At the Chandler School an orchestra consisting of five 
violins, two cornets and a piano have met for weekly prac- 
tice during the past semester. The mid-year promotion 



SCHOOL REPORT. 107 

has taken away two of the violins and one of the cornets, 
but it has given us a drummer. 

At the Parker School we have recently organized an 
orchestra of five violins, a cornet, drums and piano. 

If these groups can be strengthened and maintained it 
will most certainly add to the etfectiveness of the senioi' 
organization. 

It has been difficult to interest pupils in the more unfa- 
miliar instruments of the orchestra. In vain we look for 
performers upon the 'cello, the trombone or upon any of 
the wood-wind instruments. 

Our bass player, who has rendered good service ever 
since the instrument was purchased, will probably leave us 
in June. If we could have another instrument for use at 
the Parker School it would greatly help the work there 
and also solve the problem of a bass player in the senior 
high. 

The annual concert was given last spring at a financial 
profit of $19.54. During the year repairs upon one of the 
timpani and the contra-bass, strings for the bass, and a pin 
given as a reward for regular attendance at orchestra prac- 
tice, have cost $26.75. The money for the payment of 
these bills was taken from the fund upon deposit to the 
credit of the high school chorus. This fund now^ amounts 
to about one hundred and sixty dollars. 

In closing I wish to again testify to the loyal service 
which is being rendered by the teachers in the Concord 
schools. They have, without exception, given me able and 
cheerful assistance, and whatever success has been gained 
in this department is due largely to them. 

I also desire to express my thanks to the superintendent 
and to the members of the Board of Education for the 
encouragement which has always been extended to me. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. S. CONANT. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF MANUAL 
TRAINING. 



Mr. L. J. B.undlett, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: I herewith submit my uiuth annual report 
of the work of the Morrill School. 

Early last year the school was registered with the State 
Committee on Safety to do war work and we have kept the 
equipment in good condition and the work well in hand 
with this in view. Some printing has been done for the 
Red Cross and other work would have been done if proper 
instructions could have been had. The lack of authority 
to go ahead with this work has made it quite impossible to 
do much. 

In November a radio class was organized for drafted 
men. Charles F. Archer, a local train despatcher, was se- 
cured as instructor. An advisory committee consisting of 
Arthur W. Perkins, chief train despatcher, Boston & Maine 
Eailroad, Earl F. Newton, division toll wire chief, New 
England Telephone & Telegraph Co., and Joseph D. Ken- 
nedy, Associated Press operator, was appointed and gave 
some valuable suggestions which have been followed. The 
class has enrolled a total of thirty-five men, some of whom 
are in France at the present time. Other classes are now 
being organized in machine shop practice, pattern making, 
forging and oxy-acetylene gas welding. 

The principal feature of the past year's work in high 
school classes has been the large number of shop visits 
made. An outline was made out at the beginning of the 
year for visits to practically all the large shops in to^vn, 
each class going to the shop that was doing work similar 
to that which it was doing in the school. After each shop 
visit written reports were handed in by the boys, which 
were corrected for their technical value at the Morrill 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

School and handed to the English teacher as a regular 
essay in high school. Among the places that have been 
visited are Concord Wood Working Co., New England Box 
Co., Monitor office, Rumford Press, Abbot & Downing Co., 
Ford & Kimball, Page Belting Co., Boston & Maine shops, 
Wm. B. Durgin Co. I wish to express my appreciation to 
these people for the liberties they have granted us in their 
plants. This work is of value from several standpoints 
outside of its educational worth which cannot be ques- 
tioned. It has a civic value in that it shows the boys what 
is being done in Concord and makes them better acquainted 
with the industries of their home city. 

The evening drawing class was opened November 5 and 
has been conducted two nights a week. The following list 
shows the occupations of the men seeking instruction. In 
every case a knowledge of mechanical drawing is of value 
to them in every-day work. 



Machinist apprentices, 


9 


Machinists, 


8 


Tool makers, 


2 


Shop laborers, 


2 


Blacksmiths, 


2 


Teachers, 


2 


Die cutter. 




Electrical instrument maker, 




Engraver, 




Repair man, 




Silver chaser. 




Woodworker, 





Total registration, 31 

January 10, 1918, Robert R. Stanley, factory inspector 
for the State Bureau of Labor, made a thorough inspec- 
tion of the building. Although schools do not come under 
the state law requiring inspection it is the policy of those 
in charge to have the school safe in every respect, in fact 
to make it a model shop. As a whole the shops are in ex- 



110 CITY OF CONCORD, 

eellent condition. Mr. Stanley offered a few valuable sug- 
gestions, several of which have been followed and the oth- 
ers are in i^rocess of being completed. Most of the im- 
provements can be made by the regular pupils with very 
little expense. 

During the year there were several changes in the staff 
of teachers. Mr. Johnson resigned in June and Mr. Roland 
G. HartAvell, of Pittsfield, was elected to fill the vacancy. 
Mr. HartAvell was not a stranger in the school as he had 
spent two summers here attending the summer school. 
Daniel Flint resigned in June as repair man and student 
assistant in order to take up war work and entered the 
employ of the government in the Portsmouth navy yard. 
In November, Mr. Harold Chamberlin enlisted with the 
colors and his place was filled by Mr. Eldon T. Alden. 

In the summer vacation a wash-room with twenty-four 
bowls connected with hot and cold water was installed in 
the basement. This was very much needed and was greatly 
appreciated by both teachers and pupils. Quite a little 
expense in soap and toAvels has been saved since this was 
installed. A sink was also connected in the print shop 
and it has proved a great convenience. 

"While the schools were closed during the winter vaca- 
tion the arrangement of the steam pipes on the high school 
boilers was changed and new valves added which made it 
possible to heat the JMorrill School without heating the 
high school. 

There are practically no repairs of any account that 
need to be done on the building another year. It is in 
excellent condition. No new equipment is needed for the 
regular work and that whicli is needed for the special war 
classes is already provided for. I suggest no new features 
for another year but would rather recommend adhering 
to the present policy of being ready to do whatever needs 
most to be done in the way of preparing both men and 
boys for their places in the nation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR W. FRENCH. 



REPORT OF INSTRUCTOR IN MILITARY 

DRILL. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir : The military drill at the high school is going 
very satisfactorily. 

We have a company of forty boys who drill every after- 
noon from 2.30 to 3.30. 

They are all very much interested in the subject, work 
hard and attend strictly to business. 

I hope in the future to have a larger company, as there 
are a number of boys who have come from the Parker 
School, and will no doubt join the company. 

Just as soon as the weather is favorable I intend to take 
the boys on the range and instruct them in the use of the 
rifle. 

In closing I wish to thank Mr. Cook for his earnest co- 
operation, and also Major Hammond for his kindness in 
allowing us the use of the armory. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MICHAEL H. MULLIGAN, 

Instructor Military Drill. 



APPENDIX I. 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Of Union School District, at High School Hall, Monday Evening, 
March 11, 1918, at Eight O 'Clock. 

PROGRAM. 

Selection, "Les Toreadors" (Carmen), Bizet 

High School Orchestra. 

Original Declamation — High School. 

1. "From a Maid of France to a Girl in America," 

Frances Louise Wason, Group 1, Class T. 

2. "The School Boys' Opportimity, " 

Edward William Coughlin, Group 1, Class Q. 

3. "A War Story," 

Bertha Mildred Eraser, Group 1, Class V. 

4. "How We Are Making History Today," 

Percival Howard Eveleth, Group 2, Class P. 

"Gleam, Gleam, O Silver Stream," P. de Faye, Arr. 

High School Girls' Glee Club, 

Forensic Declamation. 

1 . "A Plea for Patriotism, ' ' Harrison 

Clyde Hudson Gray, Chandler School. 

2. "Our Country's Call," Bryant 

Ralph Prescott Muzzey, Eastman School. 

3. "Devotion to Duty," Shelley 

Owen Thomas Lassonde, Garrison School. 

4. "Fear God and Take Your Own Part," Eooscvelt 

Philip Nelson Guyol, Walker School. 

Selection, "O Promise Me" (Robin Hood), De Koven 

Glee Club. 



116 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Miscellaneous Declamation. 

1. ''Babbits' and Other Eggs," Calhoun 

Mae Cochran, Walker School. 

2. ' ' Flash the Fireman 's Story, ' ' Carleton 

Helen Hutton, Chandler School. 

3. "Prompt Obedience, " Aldrich 

Helen Tera Eylander, Garrison School. 

March, ' ' Baron Munchausen, ' ' Bennett 

Orchestra. 

Award of Prizes. 

Original Declamation — High School, Groups 1 and 2 : 

First prize, $15, awarded to Edward William Coughlin, class Q. 
Second prize, $10, awarded to Frances Louise Wason, class T, and 
Percival Howard Eveleth, class P. 

Forensic Declamation — 

First prize, $6, awarded to Clyde Hudson Gray, Chandler School. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Ealph Preseott Muzzey, Eastman 
School. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — 

First prize, $6, awarded to Helen Hutton, Chandler School. 
Second prize, $4, awarded to Helen Tera Eylander, Garrison School. 

Bo.\KD of Judges. • 

Supt. Maro S. Brooks, Exeter, N. H. 

Prin. Albert S. Woodward, Penacook, N. H. 

Guy H. Hubbard, Penacook N. II. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 117 

PETZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

Eeceived. 

Balance from last year's account $2,947.49 

Interest on same for one year 109.94 

Sale of 413 tickets at 35c 144.55 



$3,201.98 



Expended. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services $50.00 

Prizes, including books 48.00 

English prize composition contest expense 74.00 

Miscellaneous expense, including expense of selling and 

taking tickets, music, ushers, judges, etc 22.20 

Cash on hand as a guaranty fund for future contests 3,007.78 

$3,201.98 



FIRST ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL CONTEST. 

HIGH SCHOOL HALL, JUNE 8, 1917, 8 P. M. 
Program. 



Overture, ' ' Spirit of the Winds, ' ' 

High School Orchestra. 

Order of speakers: 

Marion Vose 

Hugh Gilbert Cruikshank 
Dorothy Pierce Kendall 
Baniel John Byrne 
Mary Everett Stearns 
Lawrence Dana Kimball 
Eva Josephine Henneberry 
Harold Holmes Owen 
Miriam Batchelder 

Selection, ' ' Fads and Fancies, ' ' 

High School Orchestra. 

Announcement of awards. 



Bennett 



(rruenwald 



BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Prof. Francis Lane Childs, Hanover, N. H. 
Prof. Thomas W. D. Worthen, Hanover, N. F, 
Supt. George W. Sumner, Penacook, N. H. 

MEDAL WINNERS. 

Mary Everett Stearns. 
Hugh Gilbert Cruikshank. 



HIGH SCHOOL ENTERTAINMENT. 

ASSEMBLY HALL, FEIDAY, MAY 25, 1917, 8 P. M. 



Violin solo, ' ' Traumerei ' ' — Schumann 

' ' Flags, ' ' 

"The Modern Lighthouse," 



Martin Beggs 

Elizabeth Stearns 

Carmi Browne 



Vocal solo, "An English Love Song" — Stephen Adams 

Sidney CuUum 

Scenes from ' ' The Idylls of the King. ' ' 



I. Coming of Arthur. 
II. Gareth and Lynette. 



Arthur, 
Guinevere, 
Lancelot, 
Elaine, 
Bedivere, ] 
Gareth, ( 

Lynette, 
Sir Kay, 
Dubric, 
The Novice, 

Queens, 



Nuns, 



III. Lancelot and Elaine. 

IV. Guinevere. 



V. Passing of Arthur. 



CAST. 



Howard Ferrin 

Marian Vose 

Daniel Byrne 

Esther Holni_gi-en 

Harold Owen 

Miriam Batchelder 

Eeal Bourke 

Kussell Gushing 

Marian Cheney 

Eleanor Phelps 

Dorothy Brown 

Mildred Cheney 

Grace Coughlin, Anna Murphy 

Ruth Peckham, Nannie Dahlgren 

Dorothy Chase, Helen Barker 

Clara Burroughs 



STAMP SAVING SYSTEM. 



Saved, from Total amount 

March 1, 1917, saved since the 

to sj'stem was 

March 1, 1918. inaugurated. 

Cogswell School $19.43 $207.89 

Harriet P. Dame School 25.65 307.19 

Dewey School 13.57 923.46 

Eastman School 2.80 184.36 

Franklin School 592.94 

Garrison School 6.04 482.01 

Kimball School 9.87 1,010.41 

Penacook School 33.85 1,251.40 

Eumford School 112.83 3,000.91 

Walker School 5.67 732.87 



$229.71 $8,693.44 



MEMORIAL DAY OFFERING. 



High School $15.73 

Kimball School 12.18 

Eumford School 10.23 

Walker School 7.43 

Parker School 7.35 

Chandler School 5.94 

Garrison School 4.95 

Penacook School 4.90 

Dewev School 4.34 

Eastman School 2.76 

Franklin School 2.53 

Harriet P. Dame School 2.41 

Cogswell School 2.14 

Sacred Heart School 4.04 

St. John's School 1.22 

$88.15 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Held at the Parker School, Mat 5, 1917. 



Sdi ool . 

High J^chool Junior, Walker 
High School Junior, Parker 
High School Junior, Chandler 
High School Junior, Garrison 
High School Senior, 
High School Junior, Eastman 



Prizes. Awarded to 

First, $6 Miriam Batchekler 



No. Pupils 2so. PwpiU Per cent of 

Enrolled in Takina Pupils in 

Pari. 



the School . 

47 

215 

129 

6 

447 

9 



8 
31 
16 

1 
19 



Contest. 

17.00+ 
14.41+ 
12.40+ 
16.66+ 
4.02+ 
33.33+ 



Average 
Rank. 

451 

41fA 

42if 

71 

21 1 

511 



Average 
Per cent. 

6Ji 

6411 

60A 
52 
7411 
571- 



PEIZES. 
General Prizes. 
Class. 



V, Senior High 
Second, $4 Eric Martin Sandquist E, Senior High 

Classes U, V. 



Subject. 
Macbeth and Lady Mac- 
beth 
A Night Among the Pines 



First, $3 
Second, $2 



First, $3 
Second, .$2 



First, $3 
Second, $2 



First, $3 
Second, $2 



First, $3 
Second, $2 



Miriam Batchekler V, Senior High 

Florence Marion Cheney V, Senior High 



Classes S, T. 



Nina Grace Eamsay 
Philip Babcoek Gove 



T, Senior High 
T, Senior High 



Classes Q. E. 

Eric Martin Sandquist E, Senior High 

Mildred Augusta Patterson Q, Senior High 

Classes 0, P. 
Irma Elsa Davis 



Dorothy Mae Scott 



P, Junior High 
P, Junior High 



As above 
Sir Launcelot 



Why I Like Lorna Doone 
The Two Eaces of Men 



As above 

The Buffalo Hunt 



Eebeeca and Eowena 
The Lesson of Sir Launf al 



Classes M, N. 



Ursula Greeley Sanders N, Junior High Ellen 

(Walker) 

Helen Gladys Davis N, Junior High Ellen 

(Walker) 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, 
N. H., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, the fifth day of April, 
1917, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the fol- 
lowing subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of Edu- 
cation for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years to fill the vacancies arising 
from the expiration of the term of office of Dennis E. Sul- 
livan, Fanny E. Minot, and Omar S. Swenson, and to 
choose one member of the Board of Education for two years 
to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Charles A. 
"Wing. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise eind 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year, 
including industrial education, military drill and calis- 
thenics. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

8. To see what sum of inoiie}' the district will raise and 
appropriate for special repairs to the school buildings dur- 
ing the ensuing year. 

9. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this sixteenth day of March, 1917. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
CHARLES DUNCAN. 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
CHARLES A. WING, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the seventeenth day of March, 1917, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant, attested by the 
Board of Education of said district, at the place of meet- 
ing within named, and a like attested copy at the police 
station in the city of Concord, N. H., being a public place 
in said district. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



Concord, N. H., March 19, 1917. 

Then personally appeared before me, on this date, the 
said Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above cer- 
tificate by him signed is true. 

ISAAC HILL, 

Justice of the Peace. 



124 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant, a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium, on Prince Street, in Concord, on the evening 
of April 5, 1917, at 7.30 o'clock. 

The meeting was called to order by Louis C. Merrill, 
moderator. 

Article 1. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf the clerk 
was authorized to cast one ballot for Louis C. Merrill as 
moderator for the ensuing year and he was declared 
elected. He was sworn to the discharge of his duties by 
the clerk. 

Article 2. On motion of John P. George the moderator 
was authorized to cast one vote for Herbert "W. Rainie as 
clerk for the ensuing year and he was declared elected. 
The oath was administered by the moderator. 

Article 3. On motion of A. F. Sturtevant, duly sec- 
onded, the report of the Board of Education having been 
printed, was accepted and ordered on file without reading. 

Article 4. It was moved and unanimously carried 
that the district proceed to ballot on all the four vacancies 
on the Board of Education at once. It was also voted that 
the polls close at 8.15. On motion of H. H. Dudley, the 
meeting proceeded to consider the other articles until the 
closing of the polls. 

Article 5. On motion of W. J. Ahern, Henry H. Met- 
calf and John P. George were chosen auditors for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Article 6. On motion of H. H. Metcalf the following 
resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District, the sum of fifteen thousand two hundred 
ninety-five dollars ($15,295) of which sum, seven thousand 
two hundred ninety-five dollars ($7,295) shall be appro- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 125 

priated for the payment of the interest on its bonded in- 
debtedness accruing during the year, and eight thousand 
dollars ($8,000) for the payment of the bonds of the dis- 
trict maturing May 1, 1917. 

Article 7. On motion of G. Arthur Foster the follow- 
ing resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District for the support of schools for the ensuing 
year, such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned to the 
district by the city of Concord out of its appropriation 
for schools, wall amount to the sum of one hundred twenty- 
four thousand three hundred fifty-five and 82/100 dollars 
($124,355.82). 

Article 8. On motion of A. F. Sturtevant the follow- 
ing resolution was adopted : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District for special repairs to school buildings the 
sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000). 

Article 9. On motion of John P. George the following 
resolution was adopted: 

Whereas, the Union School District on the first day of 
April, 1915, voted to raise and appropriate the sum of five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) for purchasing, fitting up and 
equipping an athletic field, and 

Whereas, such action appears to have been beyond the 
powers of the district, and therefore illegal and void, there- 
fore 

Resolved, That said vote of the first day of April, 1915, 
is hereby rescinded and the Board of Education is hereby 
authorized to use said sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) 
for the general expenses of the district. 

The moderator appointed as tellers, A. F. Sturtevant, 
H. E. Chamber lin and C. F. Cook. 



126 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A. F. gturtevant moved reconsideration of Article 7 by 
reducing the amount named under that resolution by 
$5,000, the amount non-available to the board under Mr. 
George's resolution. The vote on the reconsideration was 
declared in the negative. 

Mr. Ahern moved the passage of the following resolution, 
which was duly seconded : 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting that the 
salaries of the teachers in the elementary schools of the 
district shall be raised $100 for the ensuing year. 

M. H. Donovan moved the amendment of the resolution 
by the insertion of the word " all " in the place of the word 
' ' elementary ' ' so that the resolution would read : 

Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting that the 
salaries of the teachers in all the schools of the district shall 
be raised $100 for the ensuing year. 

This amendment was duly seconded and upon vote was 
declared carried. 

Upon being put to the vote, the resolution as amended 
was declared carried. 

Article 7. It was moved and unanimously carried that 
Article 7 be reconsidered. 

Upon motion of ]Mr. Hanna it was voted that the amount 
of the appropriation named in Article 7 be made one hun- 
dred twenty-seven thousand three hundred fifty-five and 
82/100 dollars ($127,355.82) so that the appropriation 
resolution under Article 7 as amended and passed is as 
follows : 

Resolved, That there be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District for the support of schools for the ensuing 
year such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned to the 
district by the city of Concord out of its appropriation for 
schools will amount to the sum of one hundred twenty- 
seven thousand three hundred fifty-five and 82/100 dollars 
($127,355.82). 



SCHOOL REPORT. 127 

The vote for members of the Board of Education re- 
sulted as follows: 

Whole number of votes cast, 265 

Necessary for a choice, 133 

For three years : 

Charles L. Jackman, 3 

Joseph S. Otis, 1 

Dennis E. Sullivan, 247 

Omar S. Swenson, 255 

Fanny E. Minot, 261 

For two years : 

Harry F. Lake, 262 

and Dennis E. Sullivan, Omar S. Swenson and Fanny E. 
Minot were declared elected members of the Board of Edu- 
cation of Union School District to serve three years and 
Harry F. Lake to serve two years. 

There being no further business, it was voted to adjourn. 

A true record. Attest : 

HERBERT W. RAINIE, 

Clerk. 



SOME OF THE EVENTS OF THE YEAR. 



1917. 

March 14. — Parents' Day at the high school. 

March 31. — Town District votes to unite with Union Dis- 
trict. 

April 2. — Private lunches for teachers in high school dis- 
continued. 

April 2. — Banquet by literature class in the Parker 
School. 



128 CITY OP CONCORD. 

April 5.— Annual meeting of Union District. Raise in 
teachers' salaries voted. 

April 5. — Annual meeting of Union District votes $2,500 
for school lunches. 

April 6 to 16. — Franklin lower primary school closed on 
account of diphtheria. 

April 13. — Parents' Day at the Walker School. 

April 23 to 30. — Kimball kindergarten closed on ac- 
count of scarlet fever. 

May 5. — English Composition Contest at Parker School. 

May 18. — Dean Laycock presents the high school with 
plaque. 

May 18.- — Public notified by police about school gardens. 

May 21. — French class, exercises and banquet at Parker 
School. 

May 25. — English demonstration at high school. 

May 25. — Morrill School exhibition. 

June 8.— Albin Medal Contest. 

June 16, 17. — Exhibition of sewing, drawing, school for 
backward children. 

June 16. — Graduation at the high school. 

September 4.- — School year begins. 

September 4. — School lunches begun by district in Par- 
ker School. 

September 7. — School garden exhibit, Garrison School. 

September 14. — School garden exhibit, Rumford School. 

September 19. ^School garden exhibit. Walker School. 

December 31. — School lunches begun by district in high 
school. 

1918. 
March 11. — Annual prize speaking. 



APPENDIX II. 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR TH 



SCHOOLS. 



s . 

■S * 4> 



tS (. 3 QJ 
<C Oi 5 t< 






to ^ »< ij 

•« "^ 

t^ 00 C o 

•^ o -2 

s"> c e . 

- a 7: Oi 






— « o o~ 






•S o 

i c a> 

?^— =1; o-^ 

X— --; - a? o fcn 









01 =8 > S ST3 



•g^'Oaj'l 5 
';:i£ CO J3 5s. 

o« a; » ^ bD'' 
— C aj S o a I 



High Schools. 



High 

Parker.... 
Chandler . 
Walker, 1 
Walker, 2 
(4arrison.. 
Eastman . 



Total. 



Elementary Schools. 



Walker, l 

Walker, 2 

Walker,3 

Walker, 4 

Walker, 5 

Garrison, 1 

Garrison, 2 

Garrison, 3 

Garrison, 4 

Garrison, 5 

Garrison, 6 

Eastman, 1 

Ea.stman, 2 

Eastman, 3 

Rumford, I 

Rumford, 2 

Rumford, 3 

Rumford, 4 

Rumford, 5 

Rumford, 6 

Rumford, 7 

Kimhall, 1 

Kimball, 2 

Kimball, 3 

Kimball, 4 

Kimball, 5 

Kimball, 6 

Kimball, 7 

Penacook, 1 

Penacook, 2 

Penacook, 3 

Penacook, 4 

Franklin, 1 

Franklin. 2 

Franklin, 3 

Dewey, 1 

Dewey, 2 

Dewey, 3 

Harriet P. Dame, 1 
HaiTiet P. Dame, 2 
Harriet P. Dame, 3 

Coj^swell, 1 

Cogswell, 2 . . 



Total. 



34.5 

34.5 

34.5 

34.5 

34.3 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

37. 

37. 

37. 

38. 

38. 

38, 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

38. 

34.5 

34.5 

34.3 

38. 

38. 

^S. 

38. 

38. 

37.26 



21. 

15.5 

17.5 

17.5 

17.5 

16.5 

12.5 



12. 

12.5 

12.5 

12.5 

13.5 

16.3 

16.3 

16.5 

16.5 

16.5 

17.5 

12.5 

12. 

13.5 

16.5 

16.5 

16.5 

165 

16.5 

16.5 

18.5 

165 

16.5 

16.5 

10.5 

17.5 

18.5 

19. 

17.5 

17.5 

17.5 

18.5 

17.5 

17.5 

20.5 

17.5 

17.5 

18.5 

16.5 

16. 

16.5 

18.5 

18.5 



217 
149 
95 
18 
26 
16 
3 



340 
167 
125 
17 
23 



524 688 



24 
23 
26 
25 
34 

7 
19 
21 
26 
25 
23 

7 
13 
15 
34 
52 
40 
32 
33 
36 
32 
21 
30 
28 
27 
25 
43 
38 
34 
33 
31 
21 
18 
25 
26 
24 
21 
30 
12 
23 
19 
20 
29 



710. 1,131 1,051 2,182 



557 
316 
220 
35 
49 
25 
10 



1,212 



188 


293 


114 


129 


76 


96 


16 


16 


24 


22 


16 


9 


2 


7 


436 


572 



887 



22 
21 
23 
29 
18 
6 
16 
35 
13 
21 
23 
13 
10 
24 
21 
17 
25 
29 
28 
17 
16 
21 
17 
28 
25 
21 
15 
21 
17 
24 
20 
15 
18 
15 
24 
14 
17 
23 
11 
20 
16 
24 
32 



481 
243 
172 
32 
46 
25 
9 



1,008 



845 1,732 



188 
113 
73 
15 
23 
16 
2 



20 
20 
21 
19 
26 

7 
19 
21 
26 
25 
23 

7 
12 
13 
14 
27 
26 
30 
20 
26 
26 
11 
12 
23 
18 
18 
21 
34 
29 
33 
24 
12 
13 
19 
25 
19 
19 
28 
11 
20 
16 
20 
29 



293 


481 





128 


241 





95 


168 





16 


31 





22 


45 


1 


9 


25 





7 


9 


1 


570 


1,000 


2 



21 
20 
23 
28 
17 

6 
16 
15 
13 
21 
19 
12 

9 
23 
21 
17 
24 
29 
28 
17 
16 
21 
17 
27 
25 
21 
15 
20 
17 
24 
20 
14 
17 
15 
23 
14 
12 
23 
10 
20 
17 
24 
31 



41 

40 

44 

47 

42 

13 

36 

36 

39 

46 

42 

19 

21 

30 

35 

44 

50 

59 

48 

43 

42 

32 

29 

50 

43 

39 

36 

54 

46 

57 

44 

26 

30 

34 

48 

33 

31 

51 

21 

40 

33 

44 

60 



822 1,703 



32 36 



C 
2 
1 
2 

2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 


2 



3 
4 
1 
2 
1 

68 



AR 


ENDING JUNE 10 


, 1917. 


























8. 


9. 


10. 


11. 


12. 


1.3. 


14. 


15. 


16. 


17. 


18. 


19. 


20. 


21. 


22. 


23. 


24. 


QQ 

1 

0, 

a 

4) 
TS 
'S 
<1> 
!-• 

s 


o 

o 

3 


o 
a 
a 

a 
<v 

CS 

'S 

01 


6 
o 

S 

M 

a 

IE 


s 


ea 

aj— 

si 

«v- 4) 

o bi 
. w 

c ^ 


a; 

5 


a 

u 

O 
CD 

s 


V 

-a 
"a 

0, 

64-1 . 

C J) 

s c 


> 

z 

.a 


'S 

a 
a 

1 = 


t4 

o 

aj 
& 
to 

c 


a 
aj 
aj 

_>< 
'a 

-; aj 
S b« 

%^ 
c 


u 

a; 
P. 
3 

2 

>> 

.o 

OD 
'S 

'> 

*i^ +^ 

c c 

. 0^ 


o 

o 

a 

V 


"3 

s 

c3 

a 
>. 

cr ^ 


o 
a 

u 

o 
o 

o 
») 

<D 
CO 

ca 
u . 

'c ^ 


o 
a 

<D 

o a, 
CO "a 

Sl 

o ^ 


15 

c 
H 




bo 

> 
< 


be 

CS 

> 
< 


be 
> 

< 


CO 

o 


< 


^ > 




c 


is 




3jX a; — 


4^ rr 

S 0) 


1^ 


It 


36 


28. 


449. 


17. 


466. 


.96 


947 


1.69 








10 


242 


229 


56 


2 


27 





34 


33 


30. 


218. 


10. 


228. 


.93 


186 


.58 








103 


119 


21 


60 


6 


40 





34 


20 


13. 


140. 


5. 


145. 


.97 


31 


.14 








92 


74 


6 


29 





20 





11 





0. 


29.39 


1.84 


31 23 


.94 


3 


.09 








20 


12 





9 


2 


49 





8 


1 


I. 


37.22 


2 67 


39.89 


.93 


5 


.10 








30 


13 


3 


7 





31 





3 





0. 


22.60 


1.24 


23.80 


.94 


2 


.08 








16 


9 





5 





184 








1 


.84 


9.23 


.20 


9.44 


.97 


1 


.1 








7 


2 





4 





13 





2 


91 


72.84 


905.44 


37.95 


943.36 


.94 


1,174 


.397 








278 


471 


259 


170 


10 


364 





■ 92 





0. 


35.25 


2.58 


37.83 


.93 


15 


.30 








40 


2 





5 





43 





2 





0. 


.35.32 


2.65 


37.97 


.93 


6 


.12 








41 


1 





4 





34 





2 





0. 


32.52 


2 46 


34.86 


.92 


12 


.23 








44 








4 





35 





1 





0. 


37.38 


3 06 


41.04 


.91 


22 


.45 





13 


34 


1 





7 





27 





1 





0. 


36.63 


3.49 


40.12 


.91 


16 


.29 





42 


3 


1 





5 





63 





O' 





0. 


11.39 


1.15 


12.53 


.90 





.0 








10 


3 





5 





184 











0. 


20.43 


.94 


21.04 


.95 


10 


.28 








32 


3 





5 





4 





2 





0. 


22.21 


1.37 


23.58 


.94 


13 


.36 








32 


4 


•0 


5 





16 





2 





0. 


25.82 


1.57 


27.39 


.94 


15 


.37 








39 








5 





47 





1 


1 


1. 


25 53 


2.40 


27 93 


.91 


24 


.51 





9 


37 








6 





21 





4: 





0. 


27.12 


2.54 


29.66 


.90 


35 


.83 





29 


12 








6 





63 





1 


5 


3.12 


13.75 


.93 


14.68 


.93 


8 


.40 








17 


3 





4 





13 


1 


2 


2 


2. 


19.06 


.93 


19.99 


.95 


13 


.54 








21 


2 





4 





13 





1 


5 


3.8 


30.10 


2.74 


32.85 


.91 


25 


.60 





26 


U 








4 





52 





2 


2 


1. 


31 


2. 


33. 


.94 


6 


.09 








27 


8 





4 





50 





9 


2 


.04 


35.64 


1.'79 


37.34 


.95 


5 


.06 








36 


9 





4 





21 





7 


3 


3. 


42.61 


3.23 


45.84 


.92 


39 


.50 








47 


4 





4 





31 





6 





0. 


36.48 


1.76 


38.24 


.95 


16 


.41 








57 


2 





4 





15 





3 


1 


1. 


39 36 


3.70 


43.06 


.91 


22 


.31 





5 


43 








4 





20 











0. 


40. 


4 


42. 


.91 


18 


.33 





26 


17 








4 





29 





2 





0. 


31. 


3. 


34. 


.93 


25 


.48 





37 


5 








4 





41 





I 


3 


2. 


3(». 


2. 


32. 


.94 


12 


.20 








18 


)4 





9 





22 








3 


2. 


26. 


l' 


27. 


.96 


14 


.23 








21 


8 





9 





26 





2. 





0. 


38.36 


2.55 


40.91 


.93 


19 


.29 








48 


3 





5 





17 





l! 


I 


0. 


35.75 


3.28 


39.04 


.91 


9 


.15 








43 








5 





55 





2: 


o| 


0. 


32. 


1.91 


33.91 


.94 


14 


.26 








40 








5 





11 





1 


n; ^ 


.99 


31.24 


3.91 


35 15 


.88 


71 


.97 





16 


20 








6 





27 





Or 







36.77 


6.91 


43.68 


.83 


49 


.77 





47 


8 








8 





51 





0» 




.01 


39.92 


3.33 


43.25 


.92 


9 


.13 








42 


3 


1 


7 





23 





7 




.99 


34.28 


3.90 


38.18 


.95 


15 


.23 








56 


1 





7 





13 





1 




.39 


3'i 22 


2.41 


38.63 


.93 


17 


.28 





5 


37 


2 





5 





22 





0- 




0. 


21.24 


2. 


23.24 


.91 


20 


.41 





17 


11 








8 





14 





0- 




0. 


24.91 


1.24 


26 15 


.95 


6 


.15 


0" 





31 








6 





25 





2; 




0. 


30.94 


3.03 


33.97 


.91 


10 


.36 





7 


27 








4 





27 





1 




0. 


34.32 


4.44 


38.76 


.88 


24 


.48 





44 


5 








4 





45 





1 




0. 


28. 


2. 


30. 


.93 


U 


.29 





1 


31 


1 











17 





4 




2. 


26. 


2. 


28. 


.93 


18 


.45 





8 


29 








3 





32 





1 




1. 


. 43. 


5. 


48. 


89 


53 


.1 





46 


6 








6 





106 





2 




0. 


15.27 


2.31 


17.58 


.86 


4 


.17 








18 


4 





4 





31 





3; 




0. 


31.49 


5.32 


36.81 


.85 


21 


.45 





27 


13 








4 





31 





1 







21.83 


2.91 


24.74 


.88 


10 


.31 





2 


31 








5 


1 


32 





3 




0. 


37. 


4. 


41. 


.90 


37 


.67 





38 


6 








4 





73 





1 


1 


.97 
24.31 


33.76 


4 34 


38.10 


.88 


19 


.31 






61 

506 



1,146 








4 


V 


72 








>-iij 


1,316.90 


118.68 


1,433.05 


.910 


816 


.357 


79 


1 


227 


1 


1,594 


1 


82 



132 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR Tl 



SGHOOLS. 



1. 


2. 


a: 




<v 
as 


^ 


>. 


a 


■=*<« 








t- c« 


o 


03 


o 




CD 


J3-::: 






o 


s 


■5 "^ 


co2 

03 


III 

i< cS -J 




III 


^° 



4. 



Ill's 

'<- 4j O '-' 

t. - i g 

-2^03 = 



■Si j;^ 

03 D C3 ?^ 

S > J- ~ . 

S II—-. ^ !- 

c ^ JI^ ^ 

p. 7: 03 
J= 2 03 O J 



5. 



;! -C-tf 03 O >,(- g 
5; 03 - > S— 0' = 

'^ 03 ~ 1- il " cs 



O) ® 



— L ^ — ^ 1^ 



— 03 f_« — ^ ,.»i 

?:S5g*c-cf 2 

i; .55 =^ :c— .5 
[> vo oD ^ s fc. a'o 



O 



Ungraded School. 

Walker [37. 

Total I 37. 

District School. ' 

Millville, 1 I 35. 

Millville, 2 I 35. 

Mountain 35. 

Riverliill 35. 

Iron Works 34. 

Total I 34 8 

Kindergartens. 

Walker [35. 

Garrison 38. 

Rum ford 38. 

Kimball ! 38. 

Dewey 35. 



Total 36. S 

Grand total ' 37.09 



12. 
9. 
11.5 



56.5 



10. 
17. 

18. 
19. 
7.5 



ri.5 



980. 



1,829 



1,925 



204 



3,754 



95 
1,478 



70 



35 
13 
17 
21 
13 

99 

1,591 



53 
22 
33 
55 
31 

194 

3,069 



17 

9 

16 

34 

18 

94 
1,455 





X) 


. 


03 




0) 


cs 


> 


s 


St: 


.-H 


QJ 


^ 


T3 


13 





a 





03 


c 


.1. 


■^ 


03 as 


is 


03 




CO 


03 




i) 




J3 


X 




UJ 
















bi 






P 


77 


^ 


^H 


» 


a 


t. 






03 


^ 


>. 


F. 
















di 




\i 


^ 


Hoj 


s 


r. 


^ 


03.Q 





10 



50 
22 
33 
54 
31 

190 

3,006 



AR ENDING JUNE It 


SCHOOL REPORT. 

, \\)n .—Concluded. 










133 






r. 


8. 


9. 


10. 


11. 


12. 


13. 


14. 


15. 


16. 


17. 


18. 

o 

aj -; 
s « 

o „ 

c a^ 


19. 

c 
« 
aj 

.2 

u 

> 

o 

a) 

S i£ 
" c 

X aj 


20. 

Ui 

aj 
ft 
s 

X 

<D 

>. 
CO 

> . 

5.5 
z 


21. 




2 
>. 

> 


!B — 

r- C 
S £ 

iT 


23. 


23. 


24. 


1 « 

,0. 


c 

o 
s 

o 

1 

E'S. 

£^ 

^ a: 

<B m 
> t- 


o 

s 

'ci 
? 

> 


6 

O 

c 

a; 

a 
'S 
ta 

C3 
? 
< 


a; 
OS 

> 

< 


<a 

CO 

OS . 
CD'- 

is 

c he 
,.: ^ 


0) 

"o 

to 
O 


00 

aj 

-a 

aj 
3 . 

tc — 


a 

cc 

ft 

S 

a . 
;« aj 

aj=»- 
x: c 
S x 

- « 

= a; 
v>' 


> 

'■a 

a; 

2 c 


bD 
'S 

a 

<v 
;-i . 

" s 
'c'5 


CO 

cS 
ft 

"^ aj 

>1 

=" cS 

t^ c 

© .a; 

-2.- 
s"o 


1 


a 

ce 

a; 

c S 
s 

£-2 
1- 


c 

UTS 


'3 
o 


•2« 

3 

12; 


1 
1 

1 
> 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
) 
1 
) 
) 

) 

» 127 


0. 


15.68 


3.56 18.25 


.85 


18 


.69 





1 


8 


1 
1 

8 

1 

1 
1 












9 
9 



21 
16 
21 
24 


4 

4 

1 
1 
4 
1 
2 


3 








0. 

0. 
0. 
0. 
0. 

1. 


• 15.68 

22.07 

17.91 

10.83 

20.4 

17. 


3.56 

3.84 

3.83 

1.37 

3.1 

2. 


18.25 

25 91 
21.74 
12 20 
23.5 
19. 


.85 

.85 
.82 
.88 
.75 
.89 


18 

127 

104 

448 

66 

37 


.69 

3.43 

3.91 

28. 

2.64 

2. 











1 


12 
2 
8 
10 


8 

29 
16 
13 
13 
11 


3 

' ' ' 73 
47 
38 
18 








1 
1 




2 






1. 

0. 
0. 
0. 
0. 
0. 

0. 

98.15 


88.21 

32.81 
15.96 
24.65 
36.77 
25. 

135.19 

2,461.42 


14.14 

6.45 
2.89 
3. 

6 91 
2. 

21.25 

197.58 


102.35 

39.26 

18.85 
27. 
43.68 
27. 

155.79 

2,652.80 


.83 

.85 
.84 
.88 
.83 
.92 

.86 


782 

10 

\l 

49 

15 

95 


7.99 

.18 

.5 

.002 

.77 
.48 

.386 




12 
5 
6 


17 

40 


32 

41 
17 

27 
47 
14 

146 


82 





8 


8 


11 





















82 

12 
10 
8 
6 


36 


9 

1 
1 
2 
2 
3 

9 


176 

59 
73 
47 
51 
29 


2 








2 

1 






259 





1 


.90 


•2,885 


1.00 


40 


686 


1.522 


562 


260 


524 


33 


2,396 


3 


177 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 



Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1917-1918. 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 






M 


N 


0. 


P. 


i 
Q. R. 

1 


S. 


T. 


U 


V 


Spe 
cial. 


Post 
Grad 


o 
H 




114 


70 


144 


75 


13-i 


69 


72 


51 


91 


45 


6 




870 








29 


14 


33 

25 


S 
15 


30 

80 


12 
44 


14 

59 
3 


15 
23 
6 


16 

27 

2 

89 


6 
14 

7 

42 


2 


1 


178 




•ym 








18 




96 
103 


70 
70 










1 




256 
















215 




70 


40 
















110 












35 


24 






1 




59 


MediJBval and Modern History 










36 

1 


28 


65 






56 
143 


32 
69 










88 


Mathematics 


115 


70 


74 


4S 














519 








29 
32 


4 
9 






33 




















1 
1 
1 




42 
















32 


17 


50 












29 


27 


57 


















14 


14 




















27 
25 






^7 


Book-keeping 










44 
39 


14 


26 


15 


10 


2 




136 
3<» 












23 

23 
15 


IS 
19 
26 


18 
19 
16 


21 
20 

25 


7 

7 

10 


1 
2 


2 
2 


90 














92 




114 
47 


7U 
30 


56 


2S 


44 


228 








184 


The Mechanic Arts. 


21 


21 


23 
















142 


Forging 


8 














8 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABljFi.— Concluded. 



135 





Group II. 


Group I. 




SUBJECTS. 


Class. 


Class. 






M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


Spe- 
cial. 


Post 
Grad. 


3 

o 


Machine Shop 














8 
8 


9 
9 


13 
13 


12 
12 


1 
1 




43 


Mechanical Drawing 










23 


9 




Printing 






11 


15 
8 


17 


Domestic Aets. 






12 
12 
3 


8 
8 
4 


7 
7 
4 


17 
17 


13 
13 

7 
16 


3 
3 


1 
1 




80 


Art 






61 




68 
68 


40 
40 


11 
11 


8 
8 


146 


Cooking 


3 






146 


House Sanitation 




9 










9 


House Mechanical Apparatus. 










13 














13 


House Design 


















3 






3 


Nursing 
















14 








14 




























Freehand Drawing 


85 


56 






3 


2 


3 

11 
52 

1 




2 


1 






152 




1 




1'^ 


Music Chorus 


114 


78 


144 




78 
3 


62 

2 


42 
3 


48 


18 

1 


711 








11 




19 
19 












19 


























19 





























NIGHT SCHOOL. 



TABLE. 



Beginners in 


Whole number different 

pupils attending. 
Male. Female. Total. 


Average 
Membership. 


Average 
Absence. 


Av. Daily 

Attend- 
ance. 


English, 


14 




1 


15 


11.34 


1.42 


9.92 


Drawing, 


32 







32 


29.13 


4.20 


24.93 


Cooking, 







16 


16 


15.33 


1 


15 



NATIONALITIES. 

Beginners of English. 

Portuguese, 1; Turkish, 1; Greeks, 1; Spanish, 1; Canadian, 6; 
Italian, 2; United States, 3. 
Average age of men, 29 9-14. 
Average age of women, 14. 

Mechanical Drawing. 
French, 4 ; English, 2 ; Swedish, 2 ; American, 24. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



137 



SCHOLARSHIP TABLE. 



SCHOOL. 


e3 


0. 
3 
P. 


"o, 

11 


1 

"o 

"ft 


CO 

a 

If 


I 

n 
o 

£.2 


-a 


o 
o 

"o 


^1 
o 

o 
o 

jJ o 

;3S 


M 

o 

o 

S 


S 

ft 

o 

11 


|5 
o 

c 

<^ tn 


High 


V 

w 

T 
S 
R 
Q 


97 
83 
52 

109 
67 

117 


19 
4 
3 

1 

11 

6 


19.58 

4.81 

5.76 

.91 

16.41 
5.12 


97 
12 
45 
20 
37 
30 


100.0(1 
14.43 
86.53 
18.34 
55.22 
25.64 



2 
7 
6 

11 
6 


1 

6 

9 

7 

16 

21 



4 
7 
3 

15 
17 


25 
9 

18 
7 

12 

10 


100.00 
97.59 
86.53 
94.49 
83.58 
94.87 


0.00 

2.40 
13.46 

5.50 
16.41 

5.12 




Total 


P 




525 


44 


8.38 


241 


45.90 


32 


60 


46 


81 


93.90 


6.09 




1-10 
163 


22 

8 


15.71 
4.90 


93 
33 


63.57 
20.21 


6 
3 


11 

20 


7 
8 






95.71 
98.15 


4.28 


Group II 


1.84 


Total 




303 


30 


9.90 


126 


41.55 


9 


31 


15 





97.06 


2.93 




N 
M 


75 
54 


10 

8 


13.33 

14.81 


39 
31 

70 


52.00 
57.40 


10 
5 


8 
6 


8 
6 






86.66 
90.74 


13.33 


Group II 


9.25 


Total 




129 


18 


13.95 


54.26 


15 

2 
4 


14 


14 





88.37 


11.62 


Walker 


N 

U 


32 

19 


6 
2 


18.75 
10.52 


14 
12 

26 


43.75 
63.15 


4 
2 


3 
1 








93.75 
78.94 


6.25 


Group II 


21.05 






Total 




51 


8 


15.68 


50.98 


6 


6 


4 


88.21 


11.76 








N 
M 


6 

n 


2 
1 


33.33 
9.09 


5 

4 


83.33 
36.36 






1 
2 


1 
1 






100.00 
100.00 


0.00 




0.00 






Total 


17 


3 


17.64 


9 

7 



.52.94 





3 


2 





100.00 


0.00 






Eastman 


N 

M 


1 


1 



12.50 
0.00 


87.50 
0.00 


1 















87. .50 
100.00 


12. .50 
0.00 






Total . 




9 


1 


11.11 


7 


77.77 


1 











88.88 


11.11 


Grand H. S. Total 




1,034 


104 


10.05 


479 


46.32 


63 


114 


81 


81 


93.90 


6.09 



General average of high school entire, 79.98 per cent. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


135 


10 


7.40 


66 


48.88 


15 


1 


2 




88.88 


11.11 




K 


106 


13 


12.26 


44 


41.50 


8 


11 


1 




92.45 


7. .54 




J 


151 


16 


10.59 


69 


45.69 


9-) 


17 


3 




85.43 


14. .56 




I 


111 


1 


.90 


33 


29.72 


11 


8 


1 




90.09 


9.90 




H 


160 


13 


8.12 


59 


36.87 


16 


5 


1 




90.00 


10.00 




G 


89 


5 


5.61 


34 


38.20 


9 


5 


1 




89.89 


10.11 




P 


182 


21 


11.53 


69 


37.91 


24 


2 







86.81 


13.18 




E 


118 


6 


5.08 


37 


31.35 


20 


3 







83.05 


16.94 


Total elementary.. 




1,052 


85 


8.07 


411 


39.06 


125 


52 


9 




88.11 


11.88 


Grand Total — High 


























School and Elemen- 


























tary Schools 




2,086 


189 


9.06 


890 


42.66 


188 


166 


90 




90.98 


9.01 



Standards. 
Scholarship, 80%. 

Number of A — pupils, lO'/c of enrollment. 
Number of B — pupils, 50% of enrollment. 
Failures, 10% of enrollment. 



138 



CITY OP CONCORD. 





SCHOOL TABLE 






Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and sub.ie3ts 
taught. 


Salary. 


Residence ( ) Out of 
town. 


Group I. — High 

School. 

Charles F. Cook 


Headmaster 

Sub-Master, rm. 1 

Assistant, room 7 . 

" room 2 . 

room 9. 
" room 11 

" room 12 
room 3 . 

" room 13 
" room 8 . 

" room 5 . 

room 10 

" room 8. 

" room 6 . 

" room 4. 




$2,600 
1,900 
1,300 

1,300 
1,200 
1,100 

1,000 
1.000 
1,000 
1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

1,000 

950 

800 

950 

900 

750 

750 
500 

aoo 

1.500 
1,000 

1,000 

950 

1,000 

900 
700 
600 
700 

550 


114 School St. 

8 Liberty St. 

76 Pleasant St. (West Har- 
wich, Mass.) 

34 Thorndike St. 
13 Liberty St. 

20 Montgomery St. 

35 Perley St. 

66% North State St. 
101 Center St. 

20 Montgomery St. (Lancas- 
ter, N. H.) 

9 Holt St. (Dover, N. H.) 

140 Rumford St 


Charles E. Moors. . . . 
Robert S. Baker 

Ralph B. Young 

Frank L. Trafton. . . . 
Elisabeth Averill. . . . 
May B. McLam 


Mathematics. Chem- 
istry 

Bookkeeping.Econom- 
ics, Commercial Law 

Commercial Arithme- 
tic. Bookkeeping. . 

Physics, Mathematics 

French, German. . . . 

U. S. History, Eng- 
lish History 

English 


Elizabeth S. Sargent. 
Carrie E. Baker 

Marv E. Jenness. . . . 


Mathematics, Biologv 
French 

English 


Carrie A. Hood 


Stenography, Type- 


Abbie M. Sanger. . . . 


French 


(197 Bow St. , Franklin, N.H.) 


Katherine M. Quigley 

Helen W. Ford 

Reba E. Eaton 


Stenography, Type- 
writing 

Domestic Science.... 

English 


34 So. Spring St. (East Mil- 
ton, Mass.) 

4 North State St. (North Eas- 
ton, Mass.) 

10 Center St. (Wakefield, 
Mass.) 

(722 Pine St., Manchester, 
N. H.) 

76 Pleasant St. (North Ha- 
ven, Me.) 
51 Center St 


Helen J. Knox 


History. English. 


Marion E. Brown. . . 


French, English His- 








Clerk 




11 Green St 


Fannie E Ijineoln. . . 




Leave of absence. . . . 
Resigned at end of 

spring term 

Leave of absence .... 
Resigned at end of 

spring term 

Mathematics, English. 


IM 


Edward W. Ellsworth 




m 


Marv K. Taylor 




1 






■ 


Group II. — Parker 

School. 
Luella A. Diekerman. 


Principal 

Assistant, room 7. 
room 1 . 

" room 6 . 
" room 8. 
" room 5. 
" room 4 . 
room 2. 
Clerk 


M 
28 South Main St 


Mabel I. Durivage. . . 
Helen 0. Stephenson. 

Jessie H Nettleton.. . 


English 

Latin, Mathematics, 
Penman.ship 


40 North Spring St. 

40 North Spring St. (Lowell, 
Vt.) 

41 South St. (Pembroke, 
N. H.) 

(10 Webster St., Franklin, 
N. H.) 

7 Short St 


Mary W. Cross 

Kathryn B. White. . . 


Mathematics 

English, Penmanship, 


Mildred E. Rowe. . . . 
Helen L. Sawyer. . . . 
Alice M. Knowlton. . 

Julia M Melifant 


English, Mathematics 
History, Penmanship 
Commercial History. . 


85 South St. 

105 No. State St. 

88 No. State St. (Ashland, 

N. H.) 
36 South State St 


Gertrude Stone. 




Resigned at end of 
.S7)ring term 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Resigned at end of 1 
spring term 1 

Left without leave . . . 1 
1 




Vivia Stone. 






Grace E. Jefts 






Margaret G. Kennedy 











SCHOOL REPORT. 



139 



SCHOOL TABL^.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 


Position and room. 


Grades and sub,ie3ts 




Residence ( ) Out of 


and teachers. 


taught. 


Salary. 


town. 


Chandler School. 










Harriet S. Emmons. . 


Principal, room 1 


Mathematics, Music. 


$1,000 


6 South State St. 


Cora T. Fletcher 


Assistant, room 1 . 


History, Science. . . . 


900 


41 School St. (Lawrence, 

Mass.) 


Mary Flavin 


" room n . 


English, Latin, Civics 


900 


58 School St. 


Elizabeth J. Donovan 


" room 4. 


Latin, English 


900 


28 Thorndike St. 


Emma G. Nickerson. 


" room 2 . 


Mathematics, History, 










English 


900 


58 School St. (Gloucester, 
Mass.) 










Mary C. Caswell 


Clerk 




500 


121 Warren St 


W.^LKER School. 









J. Elizabeth Talpey. . 


Principal 


Latin, English, Sci- 










ence 


1.050 


41 Warren St. 


Viola J. Brock 


Assistant, room 7. 


History, Geography, 










Civics, Literature. 


900 


99 North State St. 


Florence A. Chandler 


" room 8. 


English, Mathematics, 










Music, Literature. . 


900 


(20 Winter St., Penacook, 
N. H.) 


G.^RRisoN School. 










Bertha L. Holbrook. . 


Principal, room 7 


H. S., Group II, M. . 


1,000 


542 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 


Eastman School. 










Florence E. George.. 


Principal, room 1 


H. S., Group II, M. . 


937.50 


9 Gladstone St. 



Walker School. 
J. Elizabeth Talpey. . 

Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler 



Mabel F. Lane 

A. Ruth Kellev 

Eva H. Tandy 

M. Gertrude Doherty 
Alice M. M. Phaneuf. 
Sara E. McClure. . . . 
Agnes V. Sullivan . . . 



Charlotte White. . 
Ada B. Martin . . . 
Margaret Morrill . 



Garrison School. 
Bertha L. Holbrook . . 

Kathleen M. Hickev. . 
Flossie L. Saltmarsh . 
Margaret T. Lynch. . . 



Louisa Herbert .... 
Hannah E. O'Brien. 
lyla Chamberlin.. . . 



Marion D. Shepard. 

A. Ruth Kelley 

May B. Thompson . . 
Charlotte White. . . . 



Eastman School. 
Florence E. George. 
Vivien R. Morgan. . 
Stella M. Frenjh. . . 



Principal ........ 

Assistant, room 7 . 
room 8. 

" room 11 

" room IC 

" room 5 . 

" room 4. 

" room .^ . 

" room 2 . 



Principal, room 7 

Assistant, room 5 . 
" room 6. 

" room 4. 

" room 3 . 

" room 2 . 

room 1 . 

" room 1. 



Principal, room 1 

Assistant, room 2. 

" room 4. 



High School 

High School 

High School Class L. 

Class K 

Classes I, .1 

Classes G, H 

Classes E, F 

Classes C, D 

Classes A, B 

Kindergarten and 

Primary 

Kindergarten 1 

Ungraded I 

Died at beginning of j 

fall term 

Class L 



Classes H, I . 
Classes K. L . 
Classes F, G. 



Classes C. E 

Classes A, B 

Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 

Transferred to Walker 
School 

Resigned at end of 
first sem.ester. . . .-. 

Transferred to Walker 
School 



1,050 
900 
900 

750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 

750 
500 
750 



1,000 

700 
750 
750 

750 
650 

750 
1.50 a 
day. 



Class K 

Grades 4, 5 . 
Grades 2, 3. 



937.50 
650 
750 



41 Warren St. 

99 North State St. 

(20 Winter St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 
105 North State St. 
12 Beacon St. 
66 High St. 
145 North State St. 
90 Rumford St. 
11 Cummings Ave. 

49 Lvndon St. 

118 North Main St. 

27 Warren St. 



542 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 

70 Rumford St. 

11 Chestnut St. 

446 No. State St., West Con- 
cord. N. H. 

3 Rollins St. 

60 Franklin St. 



2 View St.. W 
Pleasant St. 



Concord, N.H. 



9 Gladstone St. 

10 Avon St. 

East Concord, N. H. 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABh^.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 




Grades and subjests 




Residence ( ) Out of 


and teachers. 


Position and room. 


taught. 




town. 


RuMFORD School. 


— TI ■ "^ i" ■ i^ 








Jessie N. Stimson . . . 


Principal, room 8 


Class L 


$850 


9 Holt St. 


Anna M. Keenan. . . . 


Assistant, room 7. 


Class K 


750 


(93 High St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 
25 Green St. 


Annette Prescott. . . . 


" room 6. 


Classes I, J 


750 


.4nnie E. Saltmarsh.. 


" room 5 . 


Classes G, H 


750 


60 Beacon St. 


Abbie T. McDonald. . 


room 3 


Classes E, P 


750 


56 Rumford St. 


Marv M. Doherty .... 


" room 2. 


Classes C, D 


700 


11 Thorndike St. 


Gara E. McQuesten . . 


" room 1 


Classes A, B 


750 


9 Wall St. 


Katharine L. Remiek 


" room 4 . 


Kindergarten, Pri- 








" room 4. 




750 
550 


4 Fayette St. 


IVTaude B. Binet 


Kindergarten 


246 North Main St. 


Elizabeth M. McAfee. 


" room 9 . 


Spejial Teacher 


600 


57 Pleasant St. 


KiMB.ALL School. 










Mary E. Melifant. . . . 


Principal, room 6 


Class L 


850 


36 South State St. 


Marv A. McGuire.. . . 


.Assistant, room 5. 


Class K 


750 


77 South State St. 


Harriet L. Megrath. . 


" room 8 . 


Classes I, J 


750 


71 Warren St. (Hooksett, 

N. H.) 


Edna M. Kennedy. . . 


" room 7. 


Classes G, H 


750 


10 Blanchard St. 


Mary A. Coughlin . . . 


" room 4 . 


Classes E, F 


700 


22 Albin St. 


Helen K. Hallinan. . . 


" room 1 . 


Classes C, D 


750 


281 Pleasant St. 


Bernice L. Prescott. . 


" room 3 . 


Classes A, B 


650 


482 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 


Nellie T. Halloran . . . 


" room 2 . 


ECindergarten and Pri- 


I 










1 750 


30 Perley St. 


Myrta B. Loyce 


" room 2 . 


Kindergarten 


550 


60 North Spring St. 


Harriet C Kimball 


tt 


Special Teacher 

Resigned at end of 
first semester, 1917 


600 

j 


Hopkinton Road. 


Lottie E. Pearson. . . 












Penacook School. 










Annie M. Branon... 


Principal, room 4 


Classes I, J 


800 


55 Thorndike St. 


Clara E. Flanders. . . 


.Assistant, room 3 . 


Classes G, H ' 


750 


51 South St. 


Lillian M. Phaneuf . . 


room 2 . 


Classes E, F 


600 


90 Rumford St. 


Hannah B. O'Brien. . 




Transferred to Garri- 
son School at end 


1 
1 














of first semester . . 


1 




Franklin School. 






1 




Abbie A. Donoyan. . . 


Principal, room 3 


Classes I, J 


1 800 


84 Center St. 


Minnie E. Ladd 


Assistant, room 4 . 


Classes C, D 


! 750 


72 Washington St. 


Mabel Clark 


" room 1 . 


Classes A, B 


1 750 

1 


126 Warren St. 


Dewey School. 






1 




Addie P. Straw 


Principal, room C 


Training Teachers. . . 


1,200 


1J31 North State St. 


Helen L. Southgate. . 


Assistant, room 1 . 


Superyisor of Kinder- 








" room 5 . 




800 
1 750 


2 South Spring St. 


Susan M. Little 


Classes G, H 


90 School St. 


A. Delia Shaw 


room 4 . 


Classes E, P 


I 750 


72 School St. 


AV\ce M. Sargent. . . . 


" room 2 . 


Classes C, D 


1 750 


78 Warren St. 


Belle E. Shepard. . . . 


" room 2 . 


Classes A, B 


1 750 


J20 Montgomery St. 


Helen L. Gibbs 


" room 1. 


Kindergarten 


1 550 


j3 Liberty St. 



, TRAINING CLASSES. 
Seniors. 
(Graduates June, 1918.) 

Ellen C. Doherty 11 Thorndike St. 

Rose E. Donoyan 105 South Mam St. 

Julie A. Engel (53 Summer St., Penacook. N. H.) 

Margaretta B. Jackson 80 Allison St. 

Elsa R. Johnson Call St. 

Josephine Reynolds 28 South Main St. 

Winifred J. Welch 22 Church St. 

Jvniors. 
(Graduates June, 1919.) 

Dorothy M. Burnhara (34 High St., Penacook, N. H.) 

Nora A. Cotter 5 Engel St., West Concord N. H- 

Grace F. Coughlin 22 Albm bt. 

Eya J. Henneberrv H Perkins Court 

Catherine P. Hurley 45 Penacxjok b . 

Helen M. Johnston 10 Abbott St. 

Mary F. Mulligan 65 Penacook bt- 

Anna E. Murphy V N,;^^ §''"*'' ^'""m w" 

Florence M. Prescott 482 North State St., West Concord, NH. 

Anna J. Spearman (13 West Canal St., Penacook. N. H-i 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



141 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary. 



Residence ( ) Out of 
town. 



Harriet P. Dame 

School. 

Nettie M. Bowen . . . . 

Katherine W.Mannion 
Alice E. Jackson. . . . 
Kathleen M. Hickey. . 



Principal 

Assistant 



Bernice L. Prescott. 



Cogswell School. 
Fannie B. Lothrop. . . 
Cecilia P. Jones 



Millville School. 
Marion P. Callahan. . 

Mildred Cram 

Mabel Johnson 



Mountain School. 
Frances M. Twomev. . 
Isabel A. Call 



RivERHiLL School. 
M. Louise Havnes. . . 
Vivian E. Andrew. . . 



Iron Works School. 
Margaret A. Fanning 
Edna F. Watson. . . . 



Morrill School. 
Arthur W. French. . 



Raymond P. Oilman. 



C. Ellsworth Taylor. 
Jules Wiesmann, Jr. 



Holland R. Gove. 



Roland G. Hartwell. . 

Eldon T. Alden 

Harold C. Chnmbcrlin 
Harold P. .Johnson.. . 
Daniel H. Flint 



Principal 

Assistant 



Principal, room 1 
Assistant, room 2 . 



Principal' 



Principal 



Principal 



Principal, room 6 

Assistant, room 1 . 

" room 4 . 

" room 2 . 

" room 6. 

" rooms 3 



Assistant, rooms 2 
and 3 



Classes I, J 

Grades III, IV 

Grades I, II 

Transferred to Garri- 
son School 

Transferred to Kim- 
ball School 

Class D 

Classes A. B 

Grades V, VI, VII. . 

Grades I, II, III, IV 

Resigned at end of 

spring term 

Mixed Grades 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Mixed Grades 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Mixed Grades 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Supervision and lec- 
tures, D, S 

Machine shop prac- 
tice 

Drawing 

Joinery, molding, pat- 
tern-making, H, S. 

Printing, H; elemen- 
tary manual train- 
ing 

Blacksmithing, .ioin- 
erv, H. S.: D. S.. 
Elementary Manual 
Training 

Wood-turning, H. S. : 
Elementary Manual 
Training 

Resigned during fall 
term 

Resigned at end of 
snring term 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



650 
650 



600 
550 



550 



600 



2,100 



1,250 
1,200 



1,150 



1,000 



900 



(29 Center St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 

19 Walker St. 

80 Allison St. 



67 South St. (Bristol, N. H.) 
75 South St. 



14 Beacon St. 

Fiske Road (Antrim, N. H.) 



23 Forest St. 



40 Beacon St. 



26 Perley St. 



51 South Spring St. 

10 Maple St. 
56 Center St. 

31/2 Liberty St. (West Rox- 
bury, Mass.) 



291 Pleasant St. 



4 North State St. (Pittsfield, 

N, H.) 



8 Lincoln St. (Brockton, 
Mass.) 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Sewing. 
(Parker School). 
Louise C. Howe. . . . 
M. Hortense Berry.. 
M. Emma Parsons. . 
F. Mildred Phillips.. 

Cooking. 
Myrtle Farrar 



Harriet B. Davis. . . 



Music. 
Charles S. Conant. 



Drawing. 
Faith C. Stalker. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary. 



Principal, room 3 
.Assistant, room 3 . 

" room 3 . 

" room 3 . 



Principal 



Supervisor of 
Lunches . . . 



Mary A. Jones 

Military Drill. 
Michael H. Mulligan. 
George W. Morrill . . , 



Arden Coulter 

Jonathan E. Ingersoll 

Special Repair Man. 
Reuben L. Cate 



Janitors. 
Charles M. Thoma 
Frank J. Boyd. . . 

Charles Ada 

Arthur J. Taylor. 
Harry R. Sturm.. 
James W. Powers. 

Edgar D. Brown. 
Oland M. Blodgett 
Peter Halligan . . . 
Frank L. Dudley. 



Henry D. Robinson. . 

Mrs. H. D. Robinson. 
Albert W. Thompson. 



Director .. 
Assistant . 

Instructor 



High and Morrill. 



Parker . . 
Chandler 
Walker .. 
Garrison 



Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook and 
Cogswell 

Dewey and Frank- 
lin 

Harriet P. Dame. 



Sewing, Dressmaking 
Sewing, Dressmaking 
.Sewing. Dressmaking 
Millinery 



High School Classes 



of 



Resigned at end 
winter term . . . 

I^esigned at end 
spring term 

Resigned during fall 
term 



of 



Resigned 



$800 
650 
600 
500 



625 

900 

1,500 

1,000 
850 

JOO 



3.50 a 
day 



880 
724 

880 
400 
880 
724 

400 
750 
750 

750 

776 
328 



Residence ( ) Out of 
town. 



167 North Main St. 
32 South Spring St. 
88 North State St. 
148 Rumford St. 



11 Green St. (South Brook- 
line, N. H.) 

15 Rumford St. (Everett, 

Mass.) 

61 School St. 



28 South Main St. (Worces- 
ter, Mass.) 

(152 North Main St., Pena- 
cook, N. H.) 



East Concord. 



16 Gladstone St. 
46 Perley St. 

5 Chapel St. 

6 Avon St. 

15 Washington St. 

3 Fisher St., West Concord, 

N. H. 
Bast Concord, Route 5. 
22 Pillsburv St. 
48 Church St. 

20 Dakin St. 

Route 6. 
Route 6. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 143 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 
June 1G. 1917. 



SCHOOLS. 



Sewing. 






a> '^ oJ 



Cooking. 






c2i 



Mechanic Arts. 



1-^ 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame 

St. Mary's , 

St. John's 

Sacred Heart . . . 

Total 



39 


13 


26 


17 


9 


8 


142 


50 


20 


30 


' 45 


18 


27 


93 


116 


3S 


78 


116 


3S 


78 


1 95 


77 


12 


65 


23 


7 


16 


56 


27 


5 


22 


5 


2 


3 


22 


•24 


3 


21 


4 


1 


3 


i 9 


58 


4 


54 











1 «2 


C6 


10 


56 











41 


23 


2 


21 














17 





17 














21 





21 


21 





21 


21 


9 


2 


7 











6 


9 


1 


8 


9 





9 


6 


15* 


1 


14 


7 





7 


12 


16 





16 











22 


567 


111 


456 


247 


75 


172 


587 



55 
31 
39 
15 
6 
1 

13 
10 



2 
1 




180 



87 

62 

56 

41 

If. 

8 

49 

31 





21 

4 

5 

12 

15 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1917. 



SUMMARY OF WARDS. 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

Number of children enumerated 1,433 1,341 2,774 

Decrease since 1 916 .... 290 

Number attending school since 1916 68 64 132 

Number attending public schools 1,126 1,041 2,167 

Number attending parochial schools 271 254 525 

Number attending private schools 20 37 57 

Number 5 to 16 not attending regularly. . . 2 4 6 

Number 5 to 8 not attending regularly .... 1 2 3 

Number 8 to 14 not attending regularly. . . 6 6 

Number 14 to 16 not attending regularly. .0 2 2 

Moved into the district since 1916 23 28 51 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 

American born 1,050 

Foreign born 586 

Russia 17 

West Indies 2 

Italy 39 

New Brunswick 5 

England 43 

Poland 11 

Sweden 101 

Ireland 61 

Armenia 7 

French Canadian 205 

Denmark 2 

Turkey 1 

Germany 7 

Norway 4 

Nova Scotia 11 

Prince Edward Island 14 

Finland 35 

Scotland H 

Albania 4 

Austria 1 

Holland 1 

France 1 

Newfoundland 2 

India ' 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



145 



NATIVITY OF CHILD. 

Boys. 

American born 1,390 

Foreign born 43 

Eussia 4 

Italy 3 

England 7 

S^veden 3 

Ireland 2 

Armenia 1 

French Canadian lo 

Prince Edward Island 1 

Scotland 3 

Holland 2 

Newfoundland 1 

Germany 1 

Eoumania 



Girls. 


Total. 


1,289 


2,679 


52 


9.5 


6 


10 


2 


5 


6 


13 


4 


7 


2 


4 


1 


2 


20 


35 


2 


3 


7 


10 


1 


3 





1 





1 


1 


1 



TABLE OF TRANSPORTATION ROUTES. 



Name of Driver. 



Route. 



(~l 








^ 




p2 












tl* 


o 


■;:; 


c 








-l-> 






^ '^ 


Q 



Alfred Boulay 

Howard L. Denton . . 
Harry Diiiistane .. .. 

Judson Hoit 

George Jen n ess 

Edward King 

Frank Proctor 

Alfred Provo, Jr... . 



Break O'Day to H. P. Dame 

Turtletown to Eastman 

Dist. No;4 toMillville 

Snaptown to Mountain 

Plains to Chandler 

Mill ville to Chandler 

Dimond Hill to Millville . . . 

Broad Cove to Ri verhill 

Augustus Thompson.. Black Hill to H. P. Dame . .. 
Mrs. Ballard Ballard Hill to Dewey 



3 


14 m.' 


4 


7 m. 


6 


7V4m. 


5 


7 m. 


7 


5 m. 


14 


5 m. 


7 


9 m. 


6 


10 m. 


13 


7 m. 


2 


7 m. 



2 and motor 



Motor. 

1 

1 



Yes. 



No. 
Yes. 



No. 



146 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DRILLS, 1916-1917. 



PARKER SCHOOL. 

Oct. 25. 58 seconds. Mar. 30. 60 seconds. 

Nov. 9. 55 " May 25. 65 " 

Nov. 21. 55 " June 5. 50 " 

GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Sept. 19. 45 seconds. Mar. 27. 43 seconds. 

Oct. 27. 45 " Apr. 2. 45 " 

Dec. 8. 55 " May 18. 45 " 

Mar. 26. 45 " May 21. 44 

* 

KIMBALL SCHOOL. 

Oct. 3. 73 seconds. May 14. 63 seconds. 

Nov. 22. 65 " June 14. 65 " 

Feb. 27. 69 " 

PENACOOK SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


16. 


40 seconds. 


Mar. 


16. 


36 seconds. 


Nov. 


9. 


45 


May 


16. 


38 


Feb. 


27. 


38 


June 


13. 


34 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 

Oct. 24. 29 seconds. ing to deep snow pupils were not 

Nov. 23. 30 " asked to leave the building. 

Winter Term — Practice drills May 8. 31 seconds, 

were given in building but ow- .June 12. 31 " 

COGSWELL SCHOOL. 

Oct. 16. 40 seconds. Mar. 15. 35 seconds. 

Nov. 27. 45 " May 16. 34 " 

Feb. 28. 35 " June 7. 35 " 

CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Sept. 19. 


45 seconds. 


Mar. 2. 


45 seconds. 


Oct.. 24. 


50 


Mar. 14. 


45 


Dec. 12. 


45 


May 17. 


30 


Feb. 8. 


45 " 







SCHOOL REPORT. 



147 



Oct. 2. 
Feb. ]9. 



55 seconds. 
55 



WALKER SCHOOL. 

Mav 2. 50 seconds. 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


5. 


22 seconds. 


Apr. 


3. 


23 seconds. 


Nov. 


7. 


25 


May 


4. 


28 


Jan. 


8. 


25 


.June 


]5. 


23 " 



EUMFORD SCHOOL. 

Oct. 17. 70 seconds. All doors. Apr. 20. 68 seconds. All doors. 

Nov. 29. 65 ' ' All doors. May 2. 65 " All doors. 

Mar. 13. 120 " All going May 16. Practice, Room 8. 
out on south side. 

FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 



Sept. 27. 


45 


seconds. 


Apr. 25. 


45 seconds 


Dec. 13. 


43 


i i 


June 5. 


43 " 


Mar. 9. 


45 


I i 


June 13. 


40 " 



Sept. 22. 

Sept. 25. 

Sept. 25. 

Oct. 5. 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 
Room 2, practice, not Oct. 5. Rooms 3, 4, practice, 



timed. 

Room 2, practice, not Oct. 9 

timed. Oct. 30 

Room 2, practice, not Nov. 29 

timed. .lati. 29 

Room 2, practice, not Feb. 26 

timed. May 3 

May 18 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



not timed. 
60 seconds. 
50 
50 
60 
50 
55 
50 



Oct. 4. 
Dec. 8. 
Jan. 18. 



) seconds. All doors 
open. 



80 seconds. All doors Feb. 28. 

open. 

90 seconds. North door ]\Iar. 9. 90 seconds. Front door 

closed. closed. 

72 seconds. All doors Mar. 27. 80 seconds. South door 

open. closed. 

MORRILL SCHOOL. 



Sept. 29. 


53 seconds. 


Mar. 


16. 


50 seconds 


Feb. 19. 


66 


Apr. 


25. 


45 



148 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



TABLE OF PLEDGE CARDS. 

October 4, 1917. 



U. S. Food Conservation. 



High, 

Parker, 

Chandler, 

Walker, 

Garrison, 

Eastman, 

Rumford, 

Kimball, 

Penacook, 

Franklin, 

Dewey, 

Harriet P. Dame, 

Cogswell, 

Millville, 

Iron Works, 

Mountain, 

Riverhill, 



Fo. of different 
ilies represented. 


No. of pledge 
cards signed. 


424 


119 


201 


101 


126 


46 


222 


79 


72 


42 


44 


14 


198 


100 


200 


76 


112 


35 


66 


22 


105 


38 


47 


12 


60 


30 


25 


11 


11 


5 


6 





7 






1,926 



730 



SCHOOL REPORT. H9 

WAR SAVINGS STAMPS. 



Eecord of war stamps and thrift stamps sold to pupils of the public 
schools of Union Sohool District from January 5 to March 15, 191S: 





No. War Stamps. No. Thrift Stamps.* 


Amount Pai^V 


High School, 


38 


999 


$254.75 


Parker School, 


106 


2,111 


541.73 


Chandler School, 


49 


1,166 


297.77 


Walker School, 


30 


1,338 


338.50 


Garrison School, 


58 


1,260 


322.83 


Eastman School, 


8 


228 


58.02 


Rumford School, 


65 


1,710 


435.89 


Kimball School, 


18 


726 


183.84 


Penacook School, 


10 


637 


160.55 


Franklin School, 


7 


297 


75.18 


Dewey School, 


18 


624 


158.35 


H. P. Dame School, 


11 


243 


62.18 


Cogswell School, 


4 


301 


75.76 


Millville School, 


3 


180 


45.39 


Iron Works School, 


1 
426 


53 


13.38 




11,873 


$3,024.12 



* This includes the number of war stamps reduced to thrift stamps. 



150 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 



Kind'n. 



ELEMENTARY 



YEAR. 



Class. 



1 and 2. A. 



B. 



C. 



P. N.P. P. N.P. P. N.P 



P. N.P. P. N.P 



High 

Parker.. 
Chandler . 

Walker... 



Garrison .. 

Eastman .. 
Rum ford.. 

Kimball... 
Penacook. 
Franklin.. 



Dewey 

Harriet P. l)ame 

Cogswell 

Millville 

Mountain 

Riverhill 

Iron Works 



Total. 



45 


i 


15 


4 


s 




16 


1 


5 




12 


5 


16 


8 


1 


1 


2 





12 180 34 



Per cent, promoted. 



86.25 



78.86 



89.18 



84.11 



AVERAGE AGE 



Kind'n. 



D. 



High 

Parker. .. 
Chandler 

Walker .. 



Garrison.. 

Eastman . . 

Rum ford . 

Kimball . 
Penarook. 
Franklin . 



Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame. 

Cogswell 

Millville 

Mountain 

Riverhill 

Iron Works 



Average 



vr. 111 
1 



yr. m, 
3 



yr. 1 m 



8 yr. 2 m. 9 yr. 2 m. 
8 1 

It 8 

7 10 8 3 

7 10 9 



5 yr. 5 m. 



6 yr. 7 m. 7 yr. 



6 
1 m. 



7 yr.lO m. 



8 yr. 5 m. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1917. 



151 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. L. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P, 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


































































































16 
18 


4 
6 


21 

21 
11 


5 

9 
2 


9 
21 


2 

4 


19 

14 

12 

32 

16 
32 

9 
10 


1 

] 
2 

4 
4 

3 

1 


21 
20 


1 

1 


22 
12 

34 

14 

40 
9 


3 

1 
4 

2 



i 


17 
23 


I 


17 

13 

11 
36 

32 


5 

4 


36 


5 
1 

2 

2 


42 2 
19 

3ll 4 

li! 

19, 2 






39 

9 

34 
16 


6 

1 

1 
1 


31 
25 


4 
3 


Q 


11 
86 


16 
30 

14 


1 

1 

1 


4 


18 










1.T 
















4 


7 






6 




















8 


1 


1 


8 


::::: ::: 




14 




1 




5 








•> 






■2 

1 






1 






3: 








4 






3 















1 


















4 






























162 


22 


180 

i 


24 


98 


9 


147 


20 


153 


11 


146 


20 


101 


8 


119 


16 



88.04 



91.58 



88.02 



87.95 



PER CLASS. 



E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


















































lOyr.2 m. 
9 2 


9yr.Giii. 

9 11 

10 2 

9 1 

9 6 
8 9 


lOyr.Dm. 
10 


Uyr. 5m. 

11 1 

11 

10 

U 2 
11 2 


llyr.Sm. 

12 2 


Uyr.lOm. 

11 6 

11 3 

11 11 

U) 10 
11 9 

11 8 


12yr. 5 m. 
12 10 


13yr.4m. 

12 1 
12 11 


9 3 

9 3 
8 6 


10 8 

10 4 
10 4 


11 8 

10 9 

11 7 
11 6 


12 9 

12 7 


13 
13 1 


9 8 






9 9 


9 3 
10 7 


10 2 


10 5 

11 6 










13 11 




13 4 










9 8 




10 6 




12 4 




12 8 




10 6 




10 5 
9 6 


11 




7 4 
7 9 






10 






7 6 








11 4 
















9 yr.4m. 


9yr.2m. 


10 yr.4m. 


lOyr.lOm. 


llyr.Sm. 


11 yr. 8m. 


12 yr.8m. 


12yr.6m, 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD, 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 



HIGH 



YEAR. 












8 




Class. 


M. N. 1 0. 


P. 




P. 


N.P. 


p. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 
















Parker 








72 


3 


,131 


6 




o'.t 
14 

1) 

1 


4 


7(i, 10 
2li '^ 




Walker 












<> 














1 




































































Dewey .... 














































Millville 


,•^1 


- 


...... 


4 
'"l 










5 










Riverhill 






2 




117 








Total 


98 


9 


15 


77 


3 


131 


6 







Per cent, uromoted 



91.59 88.63 



9C.25 95.62 



AVERAGE AGE 





' M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


High 










Parker 






14 yr. 2 m. 


14yr. 6 m. 


Chandler 


Uyr.Oni. 
13 9 


14 yr. 1 ni. 

13 8 

11 10 
13 7 


Walker 






Garrison 








14 2 






























































Cog.swell 










Millville 


14 4 
12 




14 2 




Mountain . 






Riverhill 




10 8 






14 














Average 


13yr. 9m. 


13yr. 4m. 


13yr. Cm. 


14 y. 6 m. 





SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1911 .—Continued. 



153 



SCHOOL. 



9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


s. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


p. N.P. 


P. N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


78 


6 


75 


11 


53 


6 


91 


7 


36 


2 


76 


































• 
































































































































































































































































































































































78 


6 


75 


11 


53 


6 


91 


7 


36 


2 


76 




92.85 


87.20 


89.83 


92.85 


94.73 


100.00 



PER GLAS^.— Continued. 



Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


15 yr. 5 m. 


15 yr. 11 m, IG yr. 5 m. 


17 yr. 3 m. 


17 yr. 7 m. 


17 yr. 11 m. 




' 




















! 






















































































































1 










































15 yr. 5 m. 


15 yr. 11 m. 


16 yr. 5ni. 


17 yr. 3 m. 


17 yr. 7 m. 


17 yr. 11 m. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 



High School. — Dorothy Brown (3), Nannie Dahlgren (4), George 
Houston (4), Eebecca Merrill, Amelia Pollard, Marie Eoy (4), Helen 
Bunker (3), Ealph Weldon (2), Myra Woods (3), Elizabeth Chase 
(2), Irene Lord, Bernice Morrison, Eobert McCormiek, Wallace 
Stearns (2), Mildred Byers, Eachel George (2), Euby Lawrence (2), 
Altha Walker (8), Elizabeth Benton (3), Pauline Cutter (2), Edgar 
Hammond (2), William Odey (2), Corrinne Smith, Gordon Bartlett, 
Irene Clark, George Faucher, Emily Fulford, Ellen Grant, Helen 
Hadley, Glenda Merrill, Jennie Nute, Ellen Eeardon, Milton Shapiro, 
William Lloyd Straw. 

Parker School. — Doris A. Bachelder, John E. Branswell, Ethel M. 
Cate, Anna Chapman, Elsie Colby, K. Louise Collins, W. Edward 
Coughlin, Mary E. Crutchfield, Harold W. Cutter (2), Eobert But- 
ton, John Engel, Herbert Follansbee, Eva M. Eortin, Lawrence D. 
Gordon (2), Frank D. Harris, H. Gwendolyn Jones, Charles Kunber- 
ger (4), Wilfred Levesque, Stewart Lyford (2), Eose McCormiek, 
Thomas E. Mulligan, Eaymond C. Muttart, Maurice S. Nelson, Harold 
B. Paige, Martha Persons, E. Lillian Eauquist (4), Frederick Eobin- 
son (2), Euth Saltmarsh, Lottie Sargent, Morrell F. Shepard (2), 
Gertrude I. Smith, May E. Smith (2), Emma E. Tucker (2), Eliza- 
beth M. Twomey (2). 

Chandler School. — Mortimer Chandler, Emily Chase, Paul Crow- 
eU (1), Elinor Diversi (2), Adrien Dussault, Vivien Heath, Arlene 
Jellison, Lawrence Philbrick (1), Madeline Eoy (3), Charles Zambo 
(2), Esther Armstrong (4), Elizabeth Blake, Leo Boisvert (3), Ber- 
tha Carroll ( 1 ) , Janet Chalmers, Lena Corser, Percival Eveleth, Agnes 
Fen ton (1), Ethel Houston, Sheldon Ordway, Ealph Sargent (1), 
Eussell Sawyer, Emma Trudell, Wilbur Tucker (3), Lillian Unwin. 

Walker School.— Edward N. Lamprone, Viola Carlson, Lucy Gav- 
abedian, Dorothy L. Weathers, Charles E. Foster, Georgia Lamprone, 
Sarah J. Hill, Virginia Otis, Eebecca Chamberlain, Helen G. Davis, 
Arthur B. Holmgren, Dorothy E. Mannion, Paul S. Otis, Oramel W. 
Swain, Ada F. Smith, Paul E. Tracy, Beatrice Winch, Euth E. Ford, 
Leonard H. Smith, Clifton E. Wilcox. 

Garrison School. — Evert Persons, Paul E. Frost, Ida M. Davis, 
Clara J. Henry, Eobert Ecklund, Agnes V. Nelson, Martha Dahlgren, 
Corin Soderstrom. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 155 

Eastman School. — Sadie E. Brown, Barbara A. Field, Dana S. 
Morrison, Vesta P. Morrison (3), Frederick W. Page, Luella E. 
Powell (2), Dorotliy E. Staniels (3). 

KUMFORB School. — Muriel G. Cressy (1), Gladys I. Tucker (1), 
Eleanor M. Duttou (1), Letitia George (1), William J. Pluff (1), 
Lillian O. Cliandler (1), Alfred C. Kunberger (3), Martin Bengsch 
(1), Euth K. Lord (2), Alice M. Shepard (1), Laura Stevenson (1), 
Clark W. Aldricli (2), Rnel N. Colby (1), Harry F. Frost (1), 
Charles P. Houston (1), John W. Watts (2), Marie Morgan (1), 
Clara C. Page (1), Robert G. Crowell (1), Martin H. Gurley (2), 
Clarence S. Hoagland (1), Roland A. Smith (1), Bernard E. Towle 
(1), Gardner H. Wales (1), Jessie E. Cruikshank (1), Dorothy E. 
George (1), Lula E. Gordon (1), Dorothy G. Kiley. 

Kimball School. — Madeline Haggett (2), Everett C. Benton (4), 
Waldo M. Sanborn (1), Albert W. Barlow (1), Clarence Giguere (1). 

Penacook School. — Laura Tabor, Raymond McCaig, Leo Arell, 
Freeman Bachelder, Agnes Chalmers, Elinor Hoyt, Keith Oliver, 
Dorothea Wheeler, Harry Rosendale. 

Franklik School. — Louise E. Bartlett, Evelyn R. B^on, Robert 
J. Prowse (1), Winifred L. Wheeler (1). 

Deavey School. — Lawrence F. Clement (1), Gedeon Flamand (1), 
William Flamand (1), Harry W. Potter (1), Frederick R. Knox (1), 
Donald J. McFarland (1), M. Helene Wheeler (1), Thelma I. Wood- 
man (1), Harold G. Vitagliano (1). 

H. P. Dame School. — Robert D. Prescott (1), George Bailey (1), 
Gerald Drew (]), George Hillsgrove (6), Origen Phillips (1), Eva 
Haselton (1). 

Cogswell School. — None. 

MOiLviLLE School. — I^aura Chapman, Hazel Trozier. 

Mountain School. — Xoue. 

Riverhill School. — None. 

Iron Works School.- — None. 



HONOR LIST— HIGH SCHOOL. 

Pupils Who Have Attained an Average of A — in Their Studies 
FOR the Past Year. 

High School. — Miriam Batchelder, Hugh Cruikshank, Madelyn 
Georgi, Eebecca Merrill, Euth Peckhani, Amelia Pollard, Ruth Sexton, 
Helen Bunker, Marion Lithgow, Astrid Olson, Nora Reardon, Cornelia 
Kimball, Robert McCormick, Eva Hadley, Elizabeth Benton, Hazel 
Clement, Richard Henry, Ruth Lyford, Helen Morgan, John Peek- 
ham, Marie Trombly, Louise Timlin, Marie Turgeon, Bessie Wald- 
man, Mary Walker, Sadie Ash, Katherine Crabbe, Helen Hadley, 
Grace Haskell, Kathleen Heath, Mary Wood, Leota Colpitts. 

Parker School. — Elsie Colby, Janice Griffin, Pearl Parker, Ethel 
Ravitch, Ruth Saltmarsh, Leah Waldman, Ruth Whittier, Ruth 
Yeadon, John Allquist, Euphemia Bourne, Julia Degnan, Elsie Denis, 
Leslie Dixon, Linda Farnum, Elizabeth Gannon, George Gordon, 
Eunice Haven, Mildred Hutchins, Clarence Jesseman, Edmund La- 
port, Heleri Laurie, Wilfred Levesque, Elizabeth Morrill, Lillian Ran- 
quist, Eva Sanborn, Dorothy Scott, Morrill Shepard, May Smith, 
Marion White, Corinue Wilson. 

Chandler School. — Hilda Buchan, Janet Chalmers, Gertrude 
Champigny, Percival Eveleth, Leon Goldberg, Hugh Morrison, Agnes 
Ring, Donald Sampson, Allan Shapiro, Lillian Unwin, Dorothea 
Brown, Mary Dennett, Ernest Drapeau, Emma Flamand, Alice Has- 
kell, Alene Lowell, Madeline Roy, Edward Sanel. 

Walker School. — Douglas Everett, Marjorie Lowe, Paul Otis, 
Ursula Sanders, Oramel Swain, Beatrice Winch, Beatrice Tremblay, 
Paul Watson. 

Garrison School. — Helen E. Ryan, Mary J. Henry. 

Eastman School. — Earle R. Webber. 



I 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Pupils Who Have Attained a Mark of B — or Better for the 

Year. 

Walker School. — Pauline Ballard, Helen Burbank, Berniee Berry, 
Richard Datson, Philip Guyol, Doris Hayford, Ruth Swain, Signe 
Johnson, Flora Keniston, Berniee Reid, Edith Walker, Edward Mor- 
ton, Richard Morton, Dorothy Flanders, Eleanor Smith, Ernest Denis, 
Madeline Hobson, Frederick Daggett, Dorothy Willard, Mabel Stan- 
ley, Dorothy LaFleur, Samuel Powers, Murray Sawyer, Lawrence 
Ahern, Ada M. Brown, Pauline Dunstane, Gunnar Olson, Raymond 
Perkins, Margaret Rushlow, William Arehambault, E. Sawyer Cum- 
mings, Helen A. Colby, Durward Heathy Delma LaFleur, Georgia 
Lamfrone, Oscar Loven, Ruth Tyler, Sara Tousignant, Gertrude 
Weathers, Ethel M. Crowley, Alfred J. King, Marie R. LaPlante, 
Frances E. Morton, Virginia Otis, Avenire Paveglio, Engrid D. Rosen- 
dale, Edward D. Amsden, Rachel E. Bartlett, Mildred M. Darrah, 
Mary I. Fisher, Alexander P. Guyol, W. Bouton Guyol, Agastino 
Storti, Bertha M. • Tousignant, Thomas Adams, Dorothy Angwin, 
Alice Wilson, Anita Tousignant, Oscar Baker, Harold Bass, Ethelyn 
Blossom, Florida Belaire, Roland Robinson, Viola Carlson, Edward 
Lamprone, Robert Walker, Helen Cheney, Sarah J. Hill, Clyde E. 
Kimball. 

Garrison School. — Rita Bryant, Ella V. M. Anderson, Oscar F. 
Forsberg, John Kupsala, Marjorie Matheson, Fannie Matson, Doris 
Toone, Helen Rylander, Anna A. Anderson, H. Raymond Danforth, 
Hildegrade E. Rossell, Ernest E. Vinton, Ethel V. M. Johnson, Agnes 
V. Nelson, Chester G. Larson, Milo V. Lindgren, M. Esther Gushing, 
Louise D. Shepard, Pauline Cushnie, Elsa Olson, Anna M. L. Larson, 
Olga V. Swenson, Ruth T. Swensou, Morrill Dakin, Ida Davis, Henry 
Ekstrom, Clara J. Henry, Harry Olson, Doris L. Robinson, Paul 
Frost, Gerda Swanson, Leona Snow, Harry Persons, Carl Anderson, 
Arno Mauritson, Joy Mae Duncan, Alice Kalberg, Alice Erieson. 

Eastman School. — Mary E. Cate, Ethelyn G. Kelley, Bertha M. 
Laeroix, Mary E. Marcotte, Vera A. Maxner, Vesta G. Morrison, 
Elsie M. Shine, Dana S. Morrison, Leon S. Potter, Nellie J. French, 
Ruth A. Lewis, Doris E. Shine, C. Pauline Tebbetts, Robert Gushing, 
Chester D. Floyd, Guy W. Mann. Louise Muzzey, Arlene M. Stuart, 



158 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Elsie K. Webber, Sadie E. Brown, Mary C. Canney, Ethel G. Denton, 
Euth B. Huston, Euth Mnzzey, Stuart G. Potter, Lois B. Smith, Carrie 
E. Spencer, Sarah E. Tebbetts, M. Isadore Trembley. 

BUMFORD School. — Estelle F. Avery, Grace E. Bacheller, Abraham 
V. Baer, Jessie E. Cruikshank, Bruce Duncan, Clyde H. Gray, Alvin 
V. Hussey, Dorothy G. Kiley, Paul B. Leary, Euth J. Olson, Harry 
C. Parker, Eichard E. Sampson, Earl W. Sawyer, Frances Smythe, 
Bernard E. Towle, Gardner H. Wales, Lula E. Gordon, Martin H. 
Gurley, Helen Hutton, Euel Colby, Charles Brewster, Euth Jackman, 
Myrna Simpson, Stella Young, Euth Colby, Marjorie Ford, Louise 
Gifford, Harriet McLeod, Clark Aldrich, Henry Carpenter, Emile 
Dupuis, Ernest Taylor, Edwin Fortin, Harry Frost, Wallace Hall, 
Paul Holbrook, Dana Lee, Byrnes McCaffrey, Crosby Lewis, Law- 
rence Duncan, Martin Bengsch, Alice Levingston, Edith Cruikshank, 
Alice Shepard, Parker Hall, Herbert Geary, Fanny Sannel, Dorothy 
Powell, Frederiea Brew, Stanley Benson, Anna Clark, Lillian Chand- 
ler, Hazel Fifield, Louise Waite, Holten White, Harold Goodwin, 
Elizabeth A. Palmer, Kenneth Buekminster, Alice M. Powell, Letitia 
George, Danforth Gurley, Charles Davie, Archie Eabinovitz, Eleanor 
M. Dutton, Priscilla Proctor, Lottie Baer, Walter Hackshaw, Laura 
Gate, Charles Dixon, Alfred Hyland, Julia Trudell, Cyrene Lewis, 
Doris Lefebre, J. Kenneth McLeod, Margaret Abbott, Eose E. Has- 
kell, Alice L. Hoaglaud, Ellen C. Crockett, Eleanor Duncan, Evelyn 
E. Pluff, Marjorie P. Eowe, Anna M. Lefebvere, Ida B. Levingston, 
Louis F. Braley, Paul Davis, Lillian I. Wirrell, Martha Baer. 

Kimball School. — Mildred Dole. Helen Foster, Constance Wood- 
worth, Harry A. Bartlett, Doris E. Brown, Joyce L. Brown, Beatrice 
M. Fifield, Malcolm I^. Flanders, Hazel U. Fuller, Fay E. Harriman, 
Sara G. Jackman, Olive P. LaHar, Minnie E. Newton, Isabel M. 
Nichol, Florence E. Philbrick, Eeginald H. Eiee, Henry Saltmarsh, 
Constance Stewart, Edwin O. Walker, Esther A. Wohlstrom, Edwin 
L. Stackhouse, E. Frances Erskine, IvLnrjorie E. Tenney, Elma M. 
Wallace, Jack D. Mansur, Maurice A. Quinn, Everett C. Benton, 
Elizabeth Peckham, Hoyt M. Eeille, John F. Jones, Clifford H. 
Woodward, Merton D. Eumrill, Waldo M. Sanborn, Ethalind Cooper, 
Madeline Haggett, Moses Silverman, Charlotte Jackman, Svea Wohl- 
strom, Katherine Graves, Mary Home, Eobert Morrison, Sybil Eaw- 
cliffe, Isabel Batchelder, Leon Diversi, Delia Virgin, Ealph Carpen- 
ter, Elva Knights, Ann Stratton, Albert W. Barlow, Cyril P. Datson, 
Elizabeth S. Kimball, Theodore E. Smith, Farwell A. Brown, Eobert 
G. Hurd, Catherine A. Moore, Marion M. Brown, Benjamin S. Jewell 



SCHOOL REPORT. 159 

Paul II. Blaisdell, George Dane, Frederick P. Fisher, Sibley S. Mor- 
rill, Morris K. Burroughs, Elizabeth L. Dyer, Lydia B. Dyer, Mar- 
garet V. McGuire, Ruby Bartlett, Gertrude Lane, Hymie Silverman, 
Albert Baker, Eleanor Clarke, Helen Camp, Lawrence Leary, Frances 
Stratton, Helen 'SI. Barlow, Hazel Dyment, Eobert Diversi, Jane 
Graves, Carlos Sanborn, William Quinn, Lois Calkin, Asta Carlen, 
Osmond Strong, Edna Dunn, Harrison Leary, Miriam Spiller, Doro- 
thy Wilkins, Earle Goodwin, Myle Lockwood, Edith Virgin, Alden 
Heath, Thelma MacDonald, Virginia Davis. 

Penacook School. — Nelson Rogers, Eugene Olson, Alyrtle Moody, 
Kenneth Heath, Nathalie Kurd, David Ericson, Andrew Lane, Lloyd 
Simpson, Helen Belrose, Leon Calkins, Agnes Chalmers, Constance 
Dimick, Forres Forsyth, Irving Peabody, Pearl Tabor, Rachel Hall, 
Raymond Roers, Gertrude Roy, Evelyn Johnson, Gladys Smythe, Ray- 
mond McCaig, Paul Bergstrom, John Jackman, Dorothy Robinson, 
Warren Cutting, Cleon Roers, Wilbur Lobdell, George Lougee, Laura 
Mitchell, Walter Felker, Elmer Bergstrom, Dorothy Stickney, Flor- 
ence Coleman, Dorothy Dennerly, Chester Hadley, George Magnuson, 
Harvey Bachelder, Mary Olson, Harold Coleman, Beatrice Virgin, 
Elmer Bergstrom, Florence Oliver, Helen Rosendale, Arlene Royce, 
Laura Tabor, Richard Dunlap, William Vaern, John McLaughlin, 
Olive West, Paul Fortin, Roger Nelson. 

Franklin School. — Laura K. Moran, Pauline W. Oyston, Laura 
Plummer, Esther Thompson, V^era Anderson, Germaine K. Shannon, 
Alice IL Boroian, Maurice H. Conn, Ida Crossland, Lucille C. Hodge. 
Dorothy E. Plummer, Catherine Beane, Winifred L. Wheeler, Ed- 
ward F. Ritchie, Robert J. Prowse, Evelyn R. Bacon, Rosina Barasso, 
Otho C. Mcl^am, Chenard J. Mayo, Francis W. Westcott, Marjorie 
M. Tiayford. 

Dewey School. — Kinsley M. Batchelder, Miriam E. Callahan, Ed- 
ward E. Cheney, Annie B. Evans, Barbara E. Everett, Donald J. Mc- 
Farland, Thomas F. Mulligan, James H. Niles, Edson E. Phelps, 
Jacques Vandekieft, Harold G. Vitagliano, Marion E. Burleigh, 
Dorothy F. Hill, Mary E. Lake, Victor J. Martin, Dudley W. Orr, 
Winslow Melvin, M. Helene Wheeler, Mary L. Alexander, John G. 
Augat, John R. Ballard, J. Wilfred Bilodeau, Stephen K. Callahan, 
Florence M. Conn, Clara Cook, Helen M. George, Harold L. Stack- 
house, Elizabeth Woodworth. 

H. P. Dame School. — Eva Hasclton, Origen Phillips, George Thur- 
ber, Ola Ashland, Arthur Giddis, Edmund Parenteau, Rose Radieozo, 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

David Waldman, Gerald Drew, Louise Newton, Eodney Ashland, Euth 
Sweet, Clifford Savoy, Cecil Rowland, Leo Mayo, Leon Manchester, 
Carroll Ashland, Migilier Eadirozo, Helen Foote, Mary Thurber. 

MiLLViLLE School. — Bernard Eoach, Maurice Currier, David Her- 
ter, Ethel Tappan, Mildred Tappan, George White, Elsie Baker, 
Henry Fournier, Ellen Yeo, Myla Jesseman, Norman Jesseman, Euth 
Herter, Ealph Alger, Hazel Trozier, Helen Perry, Marion Tappan, 
Marie Parker, Hattie Marshey, Inez Moore, Kathryn McAuley, Shirza 
McAuley, Hilda Gustafson, Gladys Alexander, Eva Burrows, Frances 
Currier, Bernice Morrill, Eva Tappan. 

Mountain School. — Eddella Mayo, Dorothy Haddon, Lena Mayo, 
Eay I. Turner. 

EiVERHiLL School. — Norma Duustane, Nettie Brown, Fred Heath, 
Grace Andrews, Garold Brown, Van Heath. 

Iron Works School. — Marian E. Dow, Lillian L. Dow, Leonard 
B. Bushey, Kelsey W. Smith. 



GRADUATING CLASSES, JUNE 16, 1917. 



SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
Eedfield Alfred Anderson, 
Helen Jeannette Barker, 
Miriam Batchelder, 
Marion Elizabeth Baxter, 
Oscar Arthur Charles Benson, 
Dorothy Florence Booth, 
Dorothy Edward Brown, 
Emily Josephine Brunell, 
Aurilla Orissa Brusseau, 
Clara Irene Burroughs, 
Daniel John Byrne, 
Agnes Wilhelmina Carlson, 
Caroline Lucy Cassidy, 
Hugh Joseph Cassidy, 
Eaymond Edward Chamberlin, 
Dorothy Pingree Chase, 
Florence Marion Cheney, 
Mildred Agnes Cheney, 
Almeda Greeley Clough, 
Nora Agnes Cotter, 
Grace Frances Coughlin, 
Marion Doris Crabbe, 
Doris Edith Cree, 
Hugh Gilbert Cruikshank, 
Russell Emery Gushing, 
Nannie Marie Dahlgren, 
John Elro Davis, 
Golden Elizabeth Farmanian, 
Howard William Ferrin, 
Katherine Mary Gannon, 
Madeleine Althea Georgi, 
William Ezra Gordon, 
Eva Mae Haines, 
Margaret Theresa Halligan, 



Course. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Conunercial. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Academic. 

Academic. 

Classical. 

Academic. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Commercial. 

Domestic Arts. 

Commercial. 



162 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Name. Course. 

Eveleue Marion Haven, Commercial. 

Ruth Elizabeth Haynes, Domestic Arts. 

Eva Josephine Henneberry, Academic. 

Arthur F. Henry, Mechanic Arts. 
Esther Wilhelmina Elizabeth Holmgren, Classical. 

George Edwin Houston, Mechanic Arts. 

Arthur Alexander Jameson, Commercial-. 

Helen Marion Johnston, Classical. 

Mildred Margaret Kelly, Commercial. 

Lawrence Dana Kimball, Commercial. 

Ida Eleanor Larson, Classical. 

E. Parker Little, Academic. 

Eoss H. C. Lovejoy, Commercial. 

Helen Margaret Madison, Commercial. 

Ida Marie Marquis, Commercial. 

Elizabeth Severina McBain, Domestic Arts. 

Henry Michael ]McGoff, Commercial. 

Rebecca Kimball Merrill, Classical. 

Mary Frances Mulligan, Classical. 

Anna Elizabeth Murphy, Classical. 

Pauline Elizabeth Murphy, Commercial. 

Gladys Elizabeth Muzzey, Commercial. 

Harold Holmes Owen, Classical. 

Ruth Peckham. Classical. 

Eleanor May Phelps, Academic. 

Amelia Pollard, Commercial. 

]\Liry Helen Powers, Commercial. 

Florence Mary Prescott, Academic. 

Marie Lena "Roy, Commercial. 

Bella Esther Sanel, Commercial. 

Alfred Henderson Sawyer, Academic. 

Leonise Velma Scott, Domestic Arts. 

Ruth Madaline Sexton, Commercial. 

William Patrick Slattery, Commercial. 

Ruth Marie Ellen Swanson, Domestic Arts. 

John Barry Sullivan, Academic. 

Helen Elisabeth Tebeau, Conmiercial. 

Jane Tonkin, Domestic Arts. 

Rose Marie Valliere, Commercial. 

Marion Vose, Academic. 

Ralph Sharpies Weldon, Mechanic Arts. 

Lena May Winslow, Academic. 

George Edward Wooster Mechanic Arts. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



163 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. 



Chandler School. 



Delmas Robert Arell, 
Dorothy Batchelder, 
Lillie Eose Braley, 
Dorothea Eleanor Brown, 
Mortimer Ashton Chandler, 
Paul Gilman Crowell, 
Elizabeth Jeanette Dane, 
Percy Davis, 
Joseph William Demers, 
Mary Elizabeth Dennett, 
Elinor Mary Diversi, 
Ernest Edgar Drapeau, 
Eugene Adrien Dussault, 
Emma Mary Flamand, 
Robert Ellery Fogg, 
Catherine Ellen Giles, 
Isadora Goldman, 
Alice Frances Haskell, 
Vivien Louisa Heath, 
Elizabeth Maud Higgins, 
Arlene Cruse Jellison, 
Elmer Edward Johnson, 
Harold Corliss Johnson, 



Ruth Eleanor Johnson, 
Kenneth Robie Kimball, 
Laura Marion Lacaillade, 
Marion Agnes Langley, 
Jerome Rollins Leavitt, 
Alene Muriel Lowell, 
Margaret Kent Lowell, 
Paul Benjamin Maxham, 
Eleanor Beatrice McLarren, 
Grace Elizabeth Melvin, 
Florence Gertrude Newton, 
Evelyn Mary Parenteau, 
Oscar William Parenteau, 
Grace Myrtle Rice, 
Lena Belle Robinson, 
Madeline Emma Roy, 
Edward Isadore Sanel, 
Frances Mary Togus, 
Edmund Albert Trudell, 
Hazel Lord Tuttle, 
Dorothy Winnifred Twomey, 
Wilhelmena Zetta Wlieeler, 
Charles Robert Zambs. 



Walkee School. 



Grover C. Beane, 
Dominie Bianco, 
Marguerite E. Fernald, 
Ruth E. Ford, 
Frank E. George, 
Howard G. Hammar, 
Henry R. Kimball, 



Henry B. Koopman, 
Elizabeth Partridge, 
Leonard H. Smith, Jr., 
Ralph W. Walters, 
Clifton R. Wilcox, 
Paul E. Watson, 
Beatrice I. Tremblay. 



Eastman School. 
Philander L. Mann. 



II 



GRADUATING CLASSES, JANUARY 25, 1918. 



SENIOE HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
Marion Olive Abbott, 
Constance Kathleen Bateman, 
Josephine Ellen Belisle, 
Real N. Bourke, 
Helen Louise Bunker, 
Gladys Vivian Carroll, 
Marion Aristene Carroll, 
Ruth Ellen Chase, 
Fletcher Harvey Clough, 
Arthur Richmond Cole, 
Sydney Alfred CuUum, 
Dorothy Wing Daggett, 
James Joseph Ducey, 
Chandler Eastman, 
Carl Herbert Ekstrom, 
Gladys Susan Evans, 
Almeda Annie Fifield, 
Dean Kitteridge Foster, 
Evelyn Sara Fowler, 
Harold Emerson Eraser, 
Oscar Valdemar Hanson, 
Margaret Johnson, 
George Wesley Jones, 
Maurice Avery Jones, 
Agnes Amelia Levin, 
Marion Irene Lithgow, 
Beulah Rebecca Nash, 
Willard Harold Nute, 
Astrid Linnea Olson, 
Nora Agnes Reardon, 
Joseph Frederick Rossell, 
Dorothy Durgin Silver, 
Lora Ella Sleeper, 
Clara Elsie Smith, 
Carlton Mathew Strong, 



Course. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Domestic Arts. 

Academic. 

Academic. 

Commercial. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Academic. 

Academic. 

Classical. 

Commercial. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Classical. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Classical. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Classical. 

Commercial. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Classical. 

Classical. 

Mechanic Arts. 

Commercial. 

Domestic Arts. 

Academic. 

Mechanic Arts. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



165 



Name. 
Ethel Catherine Sullivan, 
Kuth Martha Tenney, 
Eleanor Winthrop Vinton, 
Myra Welton Woods, 



Course. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. 



Chandler School. 



Gladys Ellen Alexander, 

Estelle Frances Avery, 

Grace Edna Bacheller, 

Abraham Victor Baer, 

Robert Dudley Bailey, 

Harry Archer Bartlett, 

Weltha Louise Belrose, 

Charles Bernhardt Benson, Jr. 

Doris Elizabeth Brown, 

Margaret Mary Campbell, 

Marie Catellier, 

Laura Sanborn Chapman, 

Emily Chase, 

Frank Hadley Clark, 

Alice Marie Corriveau, 

Robert Granger Crowell, 

Jessie Ellen Cruikshank, 

Marian Davis, 

George John Dennerly, 

Mildred Dole, 

Beatrice Madeline Fifield, 

Malcolm Lawton Flanders, 

Lillian Grace Ford, 

Helen Foster, 

Marshall Delmont French, 

Mildred Ida French, 

Hazel Udora Fuller, 

Dorothy Ellen George, 

Lula Emma Gordon, 

Clyde Hudson Gray, 

Martin Henry Francis Gurley, 

Fay Richard Harriman, 



Eleanor Blanche Harris, 
Eva Mae Haselton, 
Charley Clarence Hoagland, 
Frank Wallace Hodgman, 
Alvin Reed Hussey, 
Helen Hutton, 
Sara Gwendolyn Jackman, 
Ethelyn Grace Kelley, 
Grace Louraine Kelly, 
Beatrice May Kendall, 
Olive Pauline LaHar, 
Paul Broderick Leary, 
Lottie Katie Levingston, 
Kathryn Josephine McAuley, 
Thirza Ellen McAuley, 
Marguerite Anna McDonnell, 
Inez Aurilla Moore, 
Isabel Mungall Nicoll, 
Harry Clinton Parker, 
Florence Edith Philbrick, 
Origen Robert Phillips, 
Edward Vaughan Putnam, 
Jacob Rabinowitz, 
Reginald Hill Rice, 
Henry Saltmarsh, 
Earl Woodbury Sawyer, 
Roland Albert Smith, 
Frances Dean Smythe, 
Constance Dorothy Stewart, 
George Wallace Thurber, Jr., 
Bernard Towle, 
Gladys Collins Towle, 



166 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Napoleon Arthur Tremblay, 
Beatrice Trudell, 
Richard Dickerson VanDemark, 
Gardner Howard Wales, 



Edwin Oliver Walker, 
Margaret Mill Watson, 
Esther Alice Wohlstrom. 



Walker School. 



Arthur James Adams, 
Beatrice Laura Arlin, 
Pauline Ruth Ballard, 
Douglas Beans, 
Bernice Berry, 
Mae Cochran, 
Clotilda Theresa Comi, 
Richard Datson, 
Ruth Elizabeth Ford, 



Philip Nelson Guyol, 
Doris Whitcomb Hayford, 
Reginald Dickerman Livingston, 
Minnie Edith Newton, 
Charles Laurence Paclat, 
Grover Harold Paclat, 
Hazel Erma Purrington, 
Ruth Swain, 
Evelyn Watkins. 



Garrison School. 



Carl A. Anderson, 
Rita Bryant, 
Oscar F. Forsberg, 
John F. Kupsals, 
Robert O. Lindstrom, 
Omer T. Lassonde, 



Fannie M. Matson, 
Helen T. Rylander, 
Doris E. Toone, 
S. Marjorie Matheson, 
Russell O. Shepard. 



Mary E. B. Gate, 
Bertha M. Laeroix, 
Vera A. Maxner, 



Eastman School. 



Dana S. Morrison, 
Leon S. Potter, 
Elsie M. Shine. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1917. 



Board op Water Commissioners. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex-officio. 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, to March 31, 1921. 

JOHN B. ABBOTT, to March 31, 1921. 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1920. 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, to March 31, 1920. 

EDSON J. HILL, to March 31, 1919. 

CHARLES R. WALKER, to March 31, 1919. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1918. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1918. 

EDSON J. HILL, President. 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk. 

SUPERINTENDENT, 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 

Abraham G. Jones,* ex officio, 1872 — three months. 

John M. Hill,* 1872-1878. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1872-1878. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

David A. Ward,* 1872-1874. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872-1873. 

John Kimball,* ex officio, 1 872-1 876. 

John Abbott,* 1873-1876. 

John S. Russ,* 1874-1877. 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874-1877. 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex officio, 1876-1878. 

Luther P. Durgin,* 1876-1885. 

John Kimball,* 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase, 1877.- Resigned July 1, 1891. 

Horace A. Brown,* ex officio, 1878-1880. 

James L. Mason,* 1878-1893. 

James R. Hill,* 3 878. Died in 1884. 

Geo. A. Cummings,* ex officio, 1880-1883. 

Edgar H.Woodman,*ea; o#iao, 1883-1887. 

Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884-1893. 

George A. Young,* 1885-] 894. 

John E. Robertson, ex officio, 1887-1889. 

StillmanHumphrey,*ea:;oj^C20,1889-1891. 

Henry W. Clapp,* ex officio, 1891-1893. 

Willis D. Thompson, 1891-1895. 

* Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 169 

William P. Fiske,* 1891-1902. 

James II. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* 1892. Died in 1903. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B.Cogswell,*(?x officio, 1893-1895. 

Solon A. Carter, 1893. Resigned April 9, 1917. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason.* 1893-1899. 

William E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Ro])inson, ex officio, 1895-1897. 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 

Edson J. Hill, 1895. Now in office. 

Albert B. Woodworth,* ex officio, 

1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E.Martin, exofficio, 1899-1901. 
Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 

Harry G. Sargent,* ex officio, 1901-1903. 
Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott,* 1901-1915. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 

Charles R. Corning, ex officio, 1903-1909. 
Henry C. Holbrook, 1903-1916. 

Harley B. Roby,* 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 

Charles J. French, ex officio, 1909-191 6. 
Nathan '1 W. Hobbs, ex officio, 1916. Now in office. 
Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Charles R. Walker, 1915. Now in office. 

George T. Kenney, 1916. Now in office. 

John B. Abbott, 1917. Now in office. 

* Deceased. 



170 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Presidents of the Board. 



Josiah Minot,* 
Benjamin A. Kimball, 
Edward L. Knowlton,* 
John Kimball,* 
Benjamin A. Kimball, 
John Kimball,* 
William P. Fiske,* 
Solon A. Carter, 
Edson J. Hill, 



1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

1874-1875. 

1875. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

1875-1876. 

1876-1878. 

1878. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

1891-1902. 

1902. Resigned April 7, 1917. 

1917. Now in office. 



V. C. Hastings, 
P. R. Sanders, 



Superintendents. 



1873. Died March 14, 1907. 
1907. Now in office. 



* Deceased. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 171 

CONSTRUCTION. 



CovSt of land damages, flowage and water rights : 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 5,000.00 

flowage rights around Pena- 

eook Lake, 4,375.61 

for land at Penacook Lake, 78,182.41 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house and appur- 
tenances, 35,546.05 

conduit and gate-houses, 29,818.94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire main through 
North and South Main 
Streets, and high service 
main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 

distribution pipe, 400,161.56 

service pipe, 67,000.00 

reservoir, including land, 45,044.09 



172 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cost of pumping station, shop, sta- 
ble and storehouse, includ- 
ing land, $29,265.35 
pumping machinery, 17,000.42 
engineering and superintend- 
ence, 14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,531.19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1918, $1,088,5^0.44 

Less amount received for lumber, land and 

buildings sold, 7,736.61 



$1,080,843.83 

Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 

When due. 

Jan. 1,1918, 
Jan. 1,1919, 
Nov. 1,1920, 
Nov. 1,1921, 
April 1, 1921, 
Jan. 1,1922, 
Jan. 1,1922, 
April 1, 1922, 
Jan. 1,1923, 
Jan. 1,1924. 



Rate. 


Amount. 


4, 


$10,000.00 


4, 


10,000.00 


3, 


4,000.00 


3, 


3,000.00 


31/2, 


5,000.00 


4, 


333,000.00 


31/2, 


8,000.00 


31/2, 


26,000.00 


31/2, 


3,000.00 


31/2, 


15,000.00 




$417,000.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 173 

REPORT OF BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS. 



Office of the Board of Water Commissioners, 

Concord, N. H., February 2, 1918. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners herewith transmits 
the report of Superintendent Percy R. Sanders, showing 
the operations of the department for the year 1917, and 
which report from its completeness seems to require no 
further comment. 

The board desires to express its appreciation of the serv- 
ices of its employees during the more than ordinary stress 
of the year, and especially the early months when trouble 
occasioned by the outbreak of the war was looked for, and 
at which time it was thought best to place guards about 
the dam at West Concord, at the pumping station and 
about the reservoir. The city was fortunate in having 
nothing develop to make it seem necessary to continue the 
guarding of the property, and in the latter part of May 
the guards were dispensed with. 

The board desires to return thanks to the Concord Elec- 
tric Company for its prompt co-operation in lighting the 
property during this period, immediate attention being 
given to the request for lights and the service being con- 
tinued as long as necessary. 

The last report called attention to the questions that had 
arisen in regard to the rights of the public to the use of 
the waters of Penacook Lake and the land about the same, 
the court having given its decree upholding in all respects 
the claims of the city; the public is to be congratulated 
that its drinking water is now secure from private con- 
tamination and the use of the shores of the lake from un- 
authorized occupation. 



174 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The board has during the year acquired the property of 
Robert Crowley at the head of the lake for $9,000, thus do- 
ing away with the stable, dwelling house and ice houses 
which might easily become a menace to the public health 
as well as being unsightly so near the water supply. 

What may be considered the most important purchase 
of the shores of the lake is that of the land of the State 
Hospital, comprising a frontage of upwards of 3,000 feet, 
and for which the sum of $15,000 was paid, only $5,000 of 
which appears in this year's accounts, the balance to be 
paid by March 1, 1918. The completion of this purchase 
gives the board control of 92% of the shore of the lake, and 
we desire to thank the Trustees of State Institutions for 
the fair oflFer made the board for the sale of the property. 

In June of this year the city council gave the board 
authority to establish a sinking fund for payment of bonds 
coming due in 1922, and it is proposed to devote any sur- 
plus earnings to such fund. The sum of $15,000 has been 
devoted to that purpose during the past year, as the report 
will show. 

It was with regret that the board accepted the resigna- 
tion of Col. Solon A. Carter as president, which his fail- 
ing health made necessary in the spring of the past year. 
Colonel Carter had been a member of the board for twenty- 
five years and its president for fifteen years. The remain- 
ing members will miss his wise counsel. 

In June, the state troops having been brought here and 
the suppl.v of water at the camp grounds being found in- 
sufficient, our superintendent was called upon to assist the 
state officials in procuring an adequate water supply, 
which he did, rendering a large amount of service without 
compensation. The board was glad to have him give all 
assistance possible. 

A new and modern spillway at the outlet of the lake has 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 175 

been built and the improvements in the appearance of the 
land about Forge Pond continued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDSON J. HILL, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, 

CHARLES R. WALKER, 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, 

JOHN B. ABBOTT, 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, ex-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



The following resolution was unanimously adopted by 
the Board of Water Commissioners, January 31, 1918 : 

Resolved, That there be spread upon the records of the 
board, an expression of the appreciation of the faithful, 
efficient and devoted service of 

Colonel Solon A. Carter. 

Elected member 1893 — Resigned 1917. 

President of the Board 1902-1917. 

Died January 30, 1918. 



176 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-sixth annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1917. 

Receipts. 

For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $11,160.66 

For Avater, from consumers by meter 

rates, 
From delinquents, 
For water for building purposes, 
pipe and stock sold and labor, 
old brass and iron sold, 
auto truck sold. 
From wood and farm lands, 
insurance refunded, 

Deduct abatements, 

Net receipts for 1917, 

There has also been furnished the city free of charge the 
following use of water : 

Public buildings, $179.50 
Parks and playgrounds, 60.00 
Cemeteries, 108.00 
Street department, 774.00 
Drinking fountains and water- 
ing troughs, 280.00 
Sewer flush tanks, 45.00 
457 fire hydrants at $25, 11,425.00 

$12,871.50 



64,001.59 






85.75 






19.00 






717.46 






60.00 






55.00 






991.32 






44.99 








$77 


,135.77 
43.67 




$77. 


,092.10 



water department. 177 

Expenditures. 



MAINTENANCE ACCOUNT. 

General care and maintenance: 



Salaries and labor, 


$6,706.97 




Maintenance of team. 


160.71 




Maintenance of autos, 


919.65 




Teaming and livery, 


58.88 




Miscellaneous supplies and 






repairs, 


421.07 




Repairs of buildings, 


15.18 




Telephones and lighting, 


87.19 




Insurance, 


398.50 




Incidentals, 


93.88 


$8,862.03 






Office expenses : 






Salaries, 


$1,018.68 




Postage and printing, 


277.86 




Miscellaneous supplies. 


134.52 




Telephone, 


35.44 


1,466.50 






Care and repair of hydrants 






Stock, 


$106.56 




Labor, 


272.02 


378.58 


Care and repair of meters : 


• 


Stock, 


$284.29 




Labor, 


525.25 


809.54 


Relaying service pipes : 




Stock, 


$85.72 




Labor, 


202.16 


987 88 



178 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Repairing leaks : 








Stock, 




$6.96 




Labor, 




180.87 


$187.83 








Work at lake. 






339.39 


Care of wood-lots, 






439.61 


Farm account, 






811.30 


Protection of water supply, 






2,207.76 


Peuacook Park, 






27.17 


Taxes, town of Webster, 






52.00 


Incidentals, 






1,028.74 


Pumping station : 








Salaries and labor. 


$2 


,084.38 




Fuel, 


2 


,096.20 




Supplies and repairs. 




321.04 




Telephone and lighting, 




53.59 




Insurance, 




7.00 


4,562.21 




mt 


> 


Total maintenance accoi 


$21,460.54 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 



Distribution pipes : 

Stock, 
Labor, 


$270.70 
24.99 


Service pipes: 

Stock, 
Labor, 


$555.11 
50.16 


Hydrants : 
Labor, 





$295.69 



605.27 



40.11 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 179 



Meters 



Stock, $1,031.21 

Labor, 51.65 

$1,082.86 

Cement overflow, 2,402.27 



Total construction account, $4,426.20 

LAND AT PENACOOK LAE:E. 

Kobert Crowley, $9,000.00 

State of New Haniiishire, on account, 5,000.00 
Recording deed, .92 

14,000.92 



Total expenditures for 1917, $39,887.66 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron distribution pipes have been laid and gates and 
hydrants set during the year as follows : 

In Dartmouth Street, 

extended south, 150 feet 6-inch pipe. 

On Injdrant 'brandies, 
29 feet 6-inch pipe. 

There has also been laid 14 feet of 1 14 -inch pipe. 
Total amount laid during the year, 193 feet. 
Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use^ 
374,550 feet, equal to 70.94 miles. 

There have been set during the year two gates. 
Total number of gates now in use, 1,049. 

12 



180 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Two new hydrants liave been set as follows : . 

On Dartmouth Street, at Noyes Street. 
On South Main Street, between McKinley and Rock- 
ingham Streets. 
Total number of hydrants now in use, 457. 

There have been laid during the year and connected with 
the main pipes, 13 service pipes consisting of 331 feet of 
%-inch pipe. There have been discontinued, 7 ; total num- 
ber of service pipes at the present time, 3,879 ; total length 
of service pipes, 91,690 feet or 17.36 miles. 

There have been relaid 23 services and 16 curbs have 
been placed on old services. 

We have set 35 meters during the yeai' ; removed, 5 ; total 
number now in use, 2,558. 

The following table shows the height of water in Pena- 
cook Lake on the first day of each month : 



January, 


184.90 


July, 


184.30 


February, 


184.80 


August, 


183.25 


March, 


184.70 


September, 


183.20 


April, 


185.60 


October, 


182.95 


May, 


185.10 


November, 


182.50 


June, 


184.80 


December. 


182.05 



The lowest point reached during the year was on Decem- 
ber 31, being 181.60; the highest was on April 4 and was 
185.75 ; mean height for the year was 183.81, which was .34 
foot lower than the mean height for 1916. "Water was run- 
ning over the overflow 50 days during the year. 

Total amount of water used by the city for the year as 
shown by the Venturi meter was 902,600,000 gallons ; aver- 
age per day, 2,445,400; percentage pumped, 31.1%. 

There has been but a very small amount of new con- 
struction in the distribution system, there having been but 
eight services laid to new houses and these were on streets 
having pipe lines of ample size to meet any requirements 
that might be made upon them. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 181 

We have rebuilt the overflow at Penaeook Lake with 
cement concrete, replacing the one laid with tar concrete 
in 1898 which had become badly in need of repairs. It is 
hoped that this one will prove durable and last indefinitely. 

In the latter part of July when the National Guard was 
called into service, this department was requested by Gov- 
ernor Keyes and Adjutant-General Howard to assist in se- 
• curing a supply of water for the camp. As the 2-inch 
pipe at present supplying the old grounds was not large 
enough and the expense of laying a larger main from the 
city to the new camp was greater than \\'ould be warranted, 
the state developed a new supply and was very fortunate 
in securing one from a spring near the Soucook River, 
flowing 50 gallons per minute, which proved ample for all 
needs. 

A well was built at the spring, 12 feet square and 6 feet 
deep ; sides and bottom planked and braced ; a pump house 
was constructed and an electrically-driven horizontal du- 
plex pump installed. From this pump, the water was 
forced into two 12,000-gallon tanks and then piped around 
the grounds. 

The work was done under the supervision of this depart- 
ment and we loaned the state 2,145 feet of 6-inch pipe which 
will be replaced this April. 

On account of the scarcity of labor and high prices of 
all materials, I would recommend that no new construc- 
tion work on our distribution system be undertaken in 
1918 unless absolutely necessary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



182 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord "Water-Works. 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent: 

Sir : I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station is in fair working condition. 

The boilers are in good condition, the fire boxes still need 
re-lining, and few other repairs. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies used 
at the pumping station during the year, Avitli a table show- 
ing the work for each mouth : 

Statement. 

211.98 tons of Beacon Smithing coal. 
20 tons of Broad Top coal. 
101 gallons valve oil. 
10 gallons engine oil. 

13 pounds of waste. 
12 pounds of grease. 

14 cords of wood. 

22 gallons of perolin boiler compound. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 
ENGINE RECORDS. 



183 



y 


bo 


bf! 


ft 


ft 


•^ 


s 


s 


p 


0. 

S . 




ft 

e 


ft 


3 
ft 


. 


3 
p. 




3 


:,!^ 


J?; 




3 






oj.S 


a 


O 


g, 


- 5 
6« 




IS 
c 


3^ 


2 Sii 


>5 


K^ 


H 


H 


< 



-5 



1^ 



« 


A 


cS 


o 




o 


o 




c3 


o 


o 


<»'« 


f-t 
CD 




by 


-Ss 


Si-; 


o 




O CO 

as 


^. ft 


^'d 


►v2 


o 


^3 


csg 


c^-g 


■r- 3 






-w o 


(dft 


og 


•ss 


o^ 


Q 


H 


Q 


H 



38 

ft o 

3 3 
O 3 
— O 
e8ft 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

Juue 

July 

August 

September. .. 

October 

November ... 
December 

Total 

Dailyaverage 



14 


17 


7 


21 


17 


14 


IS 


14 


17 


14 


17 


1.3 


15 


18 


20 


17 


14 


16 


18 


16 


17 


15 


17 


21 


191 


196 



H. M. 


H.M. 


279: 


9: 


262:30 


9:22 


295: 


9:30 


263 :30 


8:46 


252: 


8: 7 


244:30 


8: 9 


257: 


8:17 


294 :30 


9:30 


252: 


8:24 


277: 


8:56 [ 


247: 


8:14 


303: 


9:46 


,227: 






8:50 



24.416,113 
23,589,785 
24,884.166 
22,420,825 
22,594,060 
21.338,313 
22,700,657 
25,673,058 
22,188,765 
24,482,881 
'Jl,369,649 
25,447.208 



281,105,480 
770,152 



787,616 
842,49-< 
802,715 
747,360 
728,841 
711,277 
732,279 
828,163 
739,625 
789,770 
712,321 
820,877 



44,717 
43,202 
45,210 
39,801 
39,409 
39,314 
42,385 
46.379 
40,245 
43,044 
39,914 
47,552 



511,172 
1,400 



1,442 
1,542 
1,458 
1,326 
1,271 
1,310 
1,367 
1.496 
1,341 
1,388 
1,330 
1,533 



21,471 
195 
573 
720 
455 
597 
875 
298 



25,429 



546 
546 
550 
563 
573 
542 
535 
553 
551 
567 
535 
535 



549 



Coal consumed for the year, 228.20 tons. 

Pounds of wood consumed ^- 3 = equivalent amount of 
coal pounds, 8,476. 

Total equivalent coal consumed for the year includes 
that used for pumping, starting fires, banking fires and 
heating buildings, 239.98 tons. 

Amount of equivalent coal consumed per thousand gal- 
lons pumped, 1.84. 



184 CITY OP CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER- WORKS ACCOUNT. 



Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in aocoiint with Concord "Water- 
Works. 

Receipts, 

Balance on hand January 1, 1917, $19,096.37 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 77,092.10 

$96,188.47 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $16,377.50 

Bonds paid, 2,000.00 

Sinking fund, 15,000.00 

Orders paid, 39,902.66 

Cash on hand, 22,908.31 



$96,188.47 



APPENDIX. 



186 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



A. 

Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of the 

Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 


1874, 


$4,431.10 


For fifteen months ending April 1 


, 1875, 


17,535.00 


For the year ending April 1, 


1876, 


16,921.24 


( ( ( ( 11 


1877, 


19,001.07 


a 11 li 


1878, 


20,763.03 


a a (( 


1879, 


21,869.86 


a It li 


1880, 


22,451.53 


a li a 


1881, 


26,744.58 


For nine months ending December 


31, 1881, 


25,534.01 


For the year ending December 31 


1882, 


27,243.06 






1883, 


28,255.48 






1884, 


28,915.65 






1885, 


30,222.54 






1886, 


30,862.64 






1887, 


34,047.52 






1888, 


38,441.32 






1889, 


40,237.53 






1890, 


42.133.41 






1891, 


46,075.16 






1892, 


48,351.52 






1893, 


52,299.66 






1894, 


53,230.10 






1895, 


55,343.19 






1896, 


56,557.81 






1897, 


55,156.42 






1898, 


59,147.54 






1899, 


*53,953.13 






1900, 


*57,003.71 






1901, 


62,253.61 






1902, 


63,430.85 



No hydrant rental this year. 



WATEE DEPARTMENT. 



187 



For the year ending December 31, 1903, 

1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 

Total receipts for 45 years. 



$65,088.45 
68,570.48 
71,076.44 
73,063.45 
73,782.64 
71,362.67 

*67,307.84 
68,673.71 
71,881.34 
76,145.13 
76,154.45 
74,422.15 
78,940.06 
75,052.72 
77,092.10 

$2,227,026.90 



B. 





Mean Height 


OF Water 


Each Year. 


1873, 


175.86 


1885, 


176.80 


1874, 


179.50 


1886, 


178.10 


1875, 


180.00 


1887, 


179.04 


1876, 


180.28 


1888, 


181.96 


1877, 


176.46 


1889, 


180.91 


1878, 


179.50 


1890, 


181.90 


1879, 


179.74 


1891, 


180.00 


1880, 


175.30 


1892, 


174.32 


1881, 


174.70 


1893, 


173.38 


1882, 


179.15 


1894, 


172.81 


1883, 


176.40 


1895, 


171.15 


1884, 


178.18 


1896, 


178.96 



* No hydrant rental after 1908. 



188 CITY OF CONCORD. 



1897, 


183.33 


1908, 


183.41 


1898, 


184.31 


1909, 


181.40 


1899, 


183.49 


1910, 


180.22 


1900, 


183.09 


1911, 


177.60 


1901, 


183.86 


1912, 


178.86 


1902, 


184.98 


1913, 


179.20 


1903, 


184.75 


1914, 


179.55 


1904, 


184.40 


1915, 


. 180.00 


1905, 


183.37 


1916, 


184.15 


1906, 


183.94 


1917, 


183.81 


1907, 


183.59 







WATER DEPARTMENT. 189 

c. 

SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES AND 

GATES. 



STREETS. 


S ^ Hi 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


1 




30-in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


i;i2- 

iin. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
iu. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 




2220 


























282 


























331 
13598 


1905 

58 


75 
75 














7 








147 












g 


Gate-houses and layout 
















29 




240 


2962 




42 


20 












5 


Pumping station and 














a 

8 


Abbott 




















23 

458 


349 
. . . . 


2 






















1 


Albiu 
















785 




1 




















450 

2492 


505 


1 






















4 














2182 








1 




















724 

5 

2145 

265 

475 
1781 

590 


' 689 
"250 

"245 


2 






















1 






















3 


Blake 




















2 






















1 






















1 






















1 








































1577 

327 

2052 






3 
1 




















1123 


















2278 


3 

1 
6 
2 


















6 
763 
1077 


154 


Capitol 
















508 





































3529 


2690 


14 



















306 

585 


56 
516 

"547 






















2 






















1 






















265 
1600 

100 
1663 


1 




















21 


7 


Clarke 




































1942 


180 




3 














2100 




1 




















1593 
670 
422 
19 
414 
387 
456 
1977 
1195 
265 
400 
550 
270 
388 
587 


286 

"836 
242 
"92 

"460 
"607 


5 






















2 






















2 






















2 






















1 






















2 






















1 























4 






















3 






















1 






















1 






















1 


Elm 




















4 


Eiigel 




















1 






















2 

























190 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PlPES AND 

GATIl^.— Continued. 



STREETS. 




Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 






30-in. 


24- 20- 
iu. in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 14- 
in. in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
iu. 





E.ssex, North 

Fairbanks 

Fayette 

Ferrv 

Fisher 

Fiske 

Fiske Road 

Ford Place 

Forest 

Foster 

Franklin 

Freight 

Fremont 

Fruit, Nortli . 

Fruit, South 

FullHr 

Garden 

Gas 

Giles 

Glen 

Granite Avenue 

Green 

Grove 

Hall 

Hall's Court 

Hammond 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrod 

Harvard 

High 

Highland 

Hill's Avenue 

Holly 

Holt 

Home Avenue 

Hopkinton Road 

Humphrey 

Huntington 

Hutchius. W.Concord. 

Iron Works Road 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Kensington Road 

Kimball 

Knight. W. Concord. . 
Lake, W. Concord .. . 

Langdon 

Laurel 

Liberty 

Lincoln. 

Lyndon 

Main, North 

Main, South 

Main, W. Concord 

Maitland 

Maple 



381 



4209 
300 



2596 



2166 



120 



1373 



1546 
438 



1621 
905 



262 
74 

1187 



343 
750 



628 
180 
1317 
285 



1078 

2874 



194 



1068 



360 



5125 
5179 



88 
840 



1755 
1093 

875 



240 
4 



982 
99 
312 
710 
646 
362 
615 
498 
213 
589 
1332 
1576 



400 
350 
465 
358 
1550 



726 

38 

1260 



482 
430 



1066' 



225, 



590 



748 
600 
230 
329 
760 



367 
300 



5 
11 
36501 15 



382 : 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



191 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES AND 

GAT'ES.— Continued. 



STREETS. 


|5g 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


00 
S bo 




30-in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
ir.. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


3 
z 




















738 
1729 

124 
26 

860 
12S9 

700 

516 


330 

'2604 
1294 

"324 
305 
229 
814 

3446 

'460 
300 

"480 
"531 

"195 


1 




















2 






















6 


Mill Road S P School 


















750 


3 

4 


Mills . . 






































"> 






















2 






















2 






















1 


Myrtle 




















1 


Oak 






















1 




















19 






Old Hopkiiitoii Road.. 


















1 
2 
1 


Old S. MillRd, S. P. S. 
Orchard 




















6'.'0 
596 
601 
380 
584 

2295 
610 

2215 


Pahn 




















Park 













































Pearl 

Pen acook 












"360 




2457 




2 






































Perry Avenue 




















2 

1 


Pierce 










































2493 
985 


Pine 


















681 


1 


Pitman 


















6 

18 

1 

1 


Pleasant. 














10791 


3428 


292 


185 


Prince 














Princeton 




















658 

800 

584 

1012 

1320 




















' ■ 


Railroad 

Kidge Road 




















1 
1 

2 

t 


Rockingham 




















Rollins 




















Rowell 




















142 
















9 


15 
5202 


3502 
708 


"17 

10 

1 

1 
1 
1 
4 
12 
4 
6 
4 
2 


School . . 














575 
210 
1655 
210 


"223 

'388 


















Sewall's Falls Road. .. 








































Short 




















South .. . 














4036 


1072 
390 

"■31 
21 


■"26 
2391 


4585 
2629 


Spring, North.. 














Spring, Sontli 






5969 










State, North 
















3049 


839 








Stevens Avenue 












53 






















250 






Stone 


















1080 
19 


"376 
172 


1 
1 

1 
4 
4 
4 
4 
?, 


Summer 




















Summit 




















Tahanto 




















1015 
1380 


Thompson .... 
















38 
1898 


"326 
250 


Thorndike 
















Tremont 


















3931 7iQ 


Union 




















' 1005 



192 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES AND 
GATES. — Continued. 



STREETS. 


g o S Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 






30-in 


24- 
In. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
iu. 


14- 
iu. 


12- 
in. 


10- 1 8- 
in. in. 


! 6- 

in. 


4- 
in. 


io 


Vallev 




1 
















1 




View 




















25 


,!••• 




















705 ... . 




4 

2 

12 
9 


Wall 
















754 ... 


















454 425f 
1404 1116 
310 .... 






1 












124- 


t 

272 
.... 
202 

"137 
145 




































West 














1836 


661 




26( 
30C 
403 

23 

366 

220 

5072 

83 








































1 






















1 


































1 










I 


















177 
132 


158 


348 


















70 


Penacook. 
Penacookj high ser-.. 












10584 




s 
















225 


8 









Canal West 




















1 


















247 




467 




4 


















3 


Churcli .. .. 
























1 


















635 




58 




3 


















2 






















653 
476 
1300 






Elliott 
























Fowler 






















Hig-h 




















3 






















285 

150 

1678 

327 

1923 
364 
1846 




1 


Main 




















4 


Main, West 




















2 


Maple 






















1 










' 








70 


37 


5 





















Pine 






















Rolfe 












































Stark 


























Summer 
















54 






"26I 

"■4 
"16 






1 
















Walnut and Bye 




















884 
2205 
450 
542 




Washington 


















150 


4 


Winter 


















1 


Hydrant branches .... 


















27 


66 




1 
















12 








87951 


1963 


— 1 




4759^46778 i 


2836 1 






Totals 2220 522 r 


2788 19788|2 


15635 I 


51245' 1 


049 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



193 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED 
PIPES AND GAT:ES.— Concluded. 



STREETS. 


Length and Size of Cement-Lined 
Pipe in Feet. 




18-in. 


14-in . 


12-in. 


10-in. 


8-in. 


6-in. 


4-in. 


Old cement-lined main 




2230 












Low service main 


11391 






















373 
120 




Franklin 














Giles 












772 


High 












1218 




Main, W. Concord 






1764 








Perkins 













34 








5952 


1203 








South 








1229 
879 
U 
501 
312 




Valley 














Warren 














Washing'ton 


























88 


Blow-offs 












56 


Penacook. 
Penacook, high service main 




13110 


1221 










Canal, East 






628 
422 
479 






Canal West 














Centre 










245 
1777 
482 

"2160 




Charles 




































734 




Hifrh 


















2573 

57 








Merrim ack 








1181 
. 652 


2023 












Stark 








629 














1149 
1193 




276 














Hydrant branches 










689 
















55 




















11391 


15340 


11567 


1732 

1 


6438 


11959 


1281 







194 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



D. 

HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service ; L, Low Service. 




North Main. 



South Main . 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker 's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin 's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

Ea?t side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue. . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. .John's Church.... 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co. 's.. 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co. 's 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co.. . 



L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

RYDUANT^.— Continued. 



195 




South Main. 



Water. 
Hall.. 



Hammond. . 
Railroad. . . . 
Fiske 

Summer. . . . 

Durgin 

North State 



South State. 



Mills. 



Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops. . 

West side, at Lamprey 's 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side, near E. W. Robinson's 

West side, near W. A. Phillips' 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, opposite Roy's 

East side, near Rumford Field 

North side, near Bridge. . . .- 

East side, opposite Ford & Eamball's 

West side, near North State 

West side, south line of Walker School 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of W'alker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

Ea!-t side, opposite Laurel | 

Northeast corner of Downing | 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, near Levi Call 's | 

Northwest corner of Allison I 



H 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 



21 
1 



14 



13 



196 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

B.Y'DnANTQ.—ContimLed. 




Dakin. . . . 
Dunklee . . 

Broadway 



Donovan 
Green. . . 

South... 



Bradley 

Union 

Jackson 

Lyndon , 

North Spring . 



South Spring . 



West side, 
West side, 
Northwest 
Northwest 
West side. 
Northwest 
Northwest 
Northwest 
West side, 
West side. 
West side. 
Northeast 
Northwest 
East side. 
Northwest 
West srde, 
Northwest 
Northwest 
West side, 
West side. 
West side, 
West side, 
West side. 
West side, 
West side. 
West side, 
Northwest 
East side, 
West side. 
Southwest 
Northwest 
East side, 
Northwest 
Northwest 
Northeast 
Soutliwest 
East side, 
Northeast 
Southwest 
West side, 
East side, 
Soiithwest 
Southwest 
West side. 
West side, 



near C. E. Harriman's 

150 feet south of West 

corner of Allison 

corner of Pillsbury 

at H. H. Metcalf's 

corner of Allison 

corner of Carter 

corner of Stone 

at Rollins Park 

opposite McKinley 

between McKinley and Rockingham 

corner of Wiggin 

corner of Prince 

opposite Prince '. . 

corner of Warren 

opposite Wall 

corner of Fayette 

corner of Thompson 

opposite Monroe 

opposite Laurel 

below N. H. Memorial Hospital. . 

opposite Downing 

opposite Allison 

opposite Pillsbury 

near Paige 's 

opposite L W. Bushey's 

corner of Iron Works Road 

at Quint 's 

near Bow line 

corner of Penacook 

corner of Walker 

opposite Highland 

corner of Franklin 

corner of Maple 

corner of Cliurch 

corner of Tremont 

opposite Abbott 

corner of Maple 

corner of Centre 

at High School 

opposite High School 

corner of School 

corner of Oak 

opposite Thompson 

opposite Concord 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Cow^mted. 



197 




South Spring 
Academy. . . . 

Hanover 

Rumford. ... 



Huntington, 
Tahanto . . . , 
Pine 



West side, near Memorial Hospital. 

East side, at F. E. Hook's 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate . . 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Southeast corner of Walker 

Xortheast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge.... 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at Morrill School. 



Holt. 
High. 



Valley . . 
Auburn . 



Ridge Eoad. . . 
Westbourne Rd 
Dartmouth 



L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 

West side, at head of Short j H 

"" H 

H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



Princeton. 
Fruit 



Minot. 



Kensington Rd. 
Stevens Ave. . . 
Penacook 



Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

j East? side, at Nason 's 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest.. 

West side, opposite Mrs. .Jackman's 

North side, north of Mrs. F. P. Hallett's 

Southwest corner of Clinton | L 

Northwest corner of Noyes | L 

Southwest corner of Clinton I L 

I Northwest corner of Noyes L 

Northeast corner of Woodman H 

West side, near V. A. Dearborn 's L 

East side, opposite W. W. Critchett's L 

East side, opposite Kilburn 's 'I . . . | L 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home. . . . | H 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home....| H 

Northwest corner of Pleasant j H 

Northwest corner of Pleasant | H 

Northeast corner of Pleasant | H 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co | H 

South side, east of P. B. Co. 's storehouse. ..| L j 
South side, near P. B. Co. 's | H | 



11 
1 
1 

2 
1 



198 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

BYBUANT^.— Continued. 



Streets. 


Locations. 




e 


Penacook 


South side, near P. B. Co. 's office 


H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 






Southeast corner of North Main 






Southwest corner of Rumford 




Walker 


North side, opposite T. Hannigan 's 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 


8 


Albin 


South side, 500 feet west from Rumford. . . 

North side, near D. Weathers' 

North side, between Bradley and Rumford. . 


2 
1 


Church 


Northeast corner of Rumford 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford 


2 
3 


Franklin 


Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 






Southwest corner of Rumford 


H 1 





Chestnut . 
Tremont. 



Pearl . . 
Beacon. 



Rowell . . . . 
Blanchard. 
Ferry 



Washington. 



Chapel 

Montgomery. 
Centre 



South side, opposite W. J. Ahern's | H 

North side, between High and Auburn j H 

Northeast corner of Auburn | H 

Northwest corner of High j H 

North side, east of Harrod | L 

Southwest corner of Jackson I H 

North side, at Kimball Flanders' ( L 

North side, opposite Merrimack School | H 

Northwest corner of Jackson | H 

Southwest corner of Lyndon | H 

Worth side, opposite White | H 

South side, opposite Charles | H 

Northeast corner of White | H 

Northwest corner of Essex | H 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry | H 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works | H 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R | L 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue | H 

North side, opposite Rollins | L 

Soutliwest corner of Union | L 

Northeast corner of Lyndon | H 

Northwest corner of Rumford | H 

Northwest corner of North Essex j H 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue | H 

South side, near Methodist Church | L 

South side, opposite Minot's | L 

Northeast corner of North State | H 

Southwest corner of Green | L 

Northwest corner of Union I H 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 

HYDRANTS.— Cou^wwed. 



199 




Centre . 



Bridge. 



Park... 

Capitol . 

Garden . 
School. , 



Warren . 



i: 



Depot. 



Blake. .. 
Orchard . 
Pleasant . 



Northwest corner of North Spring L 

South side, opposite Essex H 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue H 

South side, on east line of Dewey School lot H 

Northeast corner of Ridge Eoad H 

South side, near easterly barn L 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co. 's.... H 

North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory. H 

North side, at St. Paul 's Church L 

North side, at south gate of State House yard H 

Northeast corner of North State H 

Northeast corner of Huntington | H 

South side, west of Durgin | H 

Northwest corner of North State I H 

Northeast corner of Green j H 

Northwest corner of Green I L 



Northwest corner of North Spring L 

Northwest corner of Rumford L 

Northwest corner of Merrimack H 

Northwest corner of Pine H 

Northeast corner of Liberty H 

North side, opposite E. B. Woodworth's. . . . H 

Southeast corner of Giles H 11 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue. ... H 

Southeast corner of Fremont L 

Northwest corner of North Spring L 

Northwest corner of Rumford HI 

Southwest corner of Merrimack H | 

Northwest corner of Tahanto | H 

Northeast corner of Liberty | H 

Northeast corner of Giles | H 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit | H ( 9 

South side, at north end of train shed | H j 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square | L I 2 

South side, at H. B. Boutwell's | L | 1 

South side, opposite Sherburne's | H ] 1 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square | H | 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square | L 

South side, at South Congregational Church. | L 

Southeast corner of South | L 

Northeast corner of Fremont | L 

Southwest corner of Spring | H 

South side, opposite Rumford | H 

South side, opposite Merrimack j H 

ISouth side, opposite Pine I H 



200 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— CoM/wwed. 




Pleasant . 



Fiske Eoad. . . 
Hopkinton Rd. 
Mill Road, 
St. P. School.. 



Old Hopkinton 

Road 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill 's Avenue . , 



South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's.... 
South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage. 

South side, at Lavery's 

South side, opposite No. 270 

North side, near James Lane's 

North side, opposite No. 291 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond's. 

South side, opposite Fiske Eoad 

Southwest corner of School Avenue. . 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School . . . 
South side, near new Upper School. 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 



East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home. 
! South side, at tenement No. 7. . 



Fayette . . . 
Thompson. 
Chandler. . 
Concord. . 



Monroe . . . 
Thorndike. 

Laurel . . . . 
Perley. . . . 



Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station 
Southwest corner of Railroad Square.... 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Runiford School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, near old brook 



WATER DEPARTMENT. • 

HYDRANT^.— Continued. 



201 




DovsTiing. 
Clinton. . 



West. 



Avon 

Harrison 

Humphrey. . . . 

Allison 

Pillsbury 

Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley 

Eoekingham. . . 

Iron Works Ed 
Prospect 

Curtice Ave . . , 
North State. . , 



South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Eedwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near Snell 's 

North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten'n, 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown 's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, near John C. Kenney's 

West, side, at Water-Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near W. H. Perry's 

East side, near Oliver Eacine's 

East side, near A. L. Colburn 's 

East side, near Thomas Fox's house 

West side, at south line of prison wall 

West side, at north line of prison wall 

East side, near Asa L. Gay's 



13 



202 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

KYDRANTS.—Conthiued. 




Palm 

North State. . . 



North State. 



Fisher. . 
View. . . 
Electric . 

Clarke. . 
Lake. . . 



Knight. . 
Hutchins. 



Second , 

Sewall's Falls 

Road 

Penacook Ed . . 



North side, west of Fairbanks 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. 

East side, near C. H. Farnum's 

East side, near Cyrus R. Farnum's 

East side, near John True's 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite John H. Flood's 

West side, opposite A. J. Abbott's 

East side, at A. J. Abbott's 



WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at George Partridge's 

East side, near engine house 

East side, opposite Hodgson's 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co 

East side, opposite Simeon Partridge's. 

East side, near Mr. Harrington's 

East side, opposite A. Hollis' 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road. . . . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom 's 

West side, near H. C. Holden 's 

West side, near Wilson's , 

East side, near H. C. Holden 's 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station. . . . 

South side, at Quaker 

North side, near B. T. Putney's 

North side, near C. & C. Railroad 

North side, at Turcotte's 

North side, near A. H. Knight's 



East side, at north line of cemetery. 

West side, opposite Frost's 

West side, opposite Blanchard 's. . . . 
West side, near Warner Road 



South Main. 



West Main, 
High 



Washington. 



Fowler . 



Electric Ave. 

Elliott 

Charles 



West Canal. 
East Canal. 



Crescent . . . 

Walnut 

Merrimack. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

KYBU ANTS. —Continued. 



203 




PENACOOK. 



West side, at Harriman 's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin 's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt 's garage 

West side, near Preseott's 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block.. 

Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Canal 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main . . . 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, opposite John Whitaker's 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolfe 's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

East side, near Elliott 's 

South side, junction of Washington 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue 

Southwest corner of Warren 

South side, at schoolhouse 

North side, near George W. Corey's 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal 

North side, at Bye ." 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue 

North side, opposite D. W. Fox's 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



15 
2 



204 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

KYDRANT^.— Continued. 




Merrimack . 



Summer. 



Spring. 
Maple . 
Winter , 
Centre. 

Ornss 



Rolfe 

Penacook. 



South side, opposite Eolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory. 

North side, near road to Island 

Xorthwest corner of Penacook 

Xorth side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, at Corbett 's 

Northwest corner of Spring 

Southwest corner of Summer 

North side, near James Corbett 's , 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe 's 

West side, at E. L. Davis' 

East side, at McGirr 's 



Whole number i^ublic hydrants. 
PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 



Abl)ot & Downing Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard. . . . 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Brampton Woolen Co 

Concord Gas Light Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Ford Foundry Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. II. Spinning Mill 

N. II. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School 

Water-works pumping station 



Whole number private hydrants. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 205 

E. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1917. 

In form recommended by the New England Water- 
Works Association. 

CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OP MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910 — 21,497. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N. J. 

2. Description of fuel used — a. Kind — bituminous. 

&. Brand of coal — Forge 
coal. 

c. Average price of coal per 

gross ton delivered, 
$7,953. 

d. Percentage ash, 7.26%. 

3. Coal consumed for year — 228.2 tons. 



206 CITY OP CONCORD. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed )^-3^eqmvalent amount 
of coal— 8,476 lbs. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 231.98 tons. 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 281,105,480 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal — 541. 

10. Duty= 

281,105,480 gallons pumped, X 8.34 (lbs.) x 100 X dynamic head, lOo ^4.7 oyn 000 
Total fuel consumed, 519,(548 pounds. ' ' 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses — 
$4,562.21. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $16,226. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,154. 

CONSUMPTION. 

1. Total population, estimated, 22,000. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe, 20,000, 

3. Estimated population supplied, 20,000. 

4. Total consumption for the year, 902,600,000 gallons. 

5. Passed through meters, gallons. 

6. Percentage of consumption metered, . 

7. Average daily consumption, 2,445,400 gallons. 

8. Gallons per day to each inhabitant (1), 111. 

9. Gallons per day to each consumer (3), 122. 

10. Gallons per day to each tap (taps in use), 680'. 

11. Cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured 
on total maintenance (Item CC), $23.77. 

12. Cost of supplying water per million gallons, figured 
on total maintenance plus interest on bonds (Items CC and 
DD), $41.92. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 207 

DISTRIBUTION. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — east iron and eement -lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-incli. 

3. Extended — 193 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 000' feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 000 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 70.94 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.31 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 2. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 457 ; pri- 
vate, 87. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 2. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,049. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 82. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 
IS. Extended— 331 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 226 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 91,690 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 13. 

22. Number now in use — 3,879. 

23. Average length of service — 23.64 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — $10.04. 

25. Number of meters added during year — 35. 

26. Number now in use — 2,558. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 65.94. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 85.16. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 44. 



208 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



o t- o o 

CD t~ O O 
tJI CO o o 



lO o 



lO lO OCI CM 
CO O C» o 

CO CO o ■* 



(B 



Q) 



l-H 



CS <D 

as S 



A1 o 

•T S ® ^ 

(5" ^ 



! CO i -tJ 

) ^ CO 



<^ r-c 



<m =H qn 



■•-^ p^" ^ o ^ 



d bxi ^ 



S S 22 ^ 

OJ oi aj o 

-t^ +j ^_, <D 

X X X & 



J i-ri 






o 



a « 

■^-^ 
w" .--OH 

,-H CS rt a C« r^ 

cc! 75 qj rt ce ,:0 

o a '^ ci 



+2 ^ 
a CO 









"* OS 

LO CO 

QO CO 
CO O 



a -1^ 

cS Oh 

•• s g 

'? a ?^ 

if >> 
-- ^- £ 

o ^ -|2 

^ J? !^ 
^ O o 

0) a a 

CS .:2 



-, -t-< 03 

c3 ^ 



•9.9 

o fM s a> ;;3 _r-a 
°*^ (>^ o -J3 a o ° 

^^ ^ en tc pLi-a ^1 
cS O --J 

o o o o o ^ 



•s ^ 

03 _ 

'a 5* 

'"' S 

^H a 

o <s 



- 3 pi 



oa 



« 



<ji pq d G W Ph 6 



r- I— I __, t< 

a ^ (i> 

o « s ^ 

^ ci o ^ 

"m -^J ^ O 

3 S S 3 

o 2 g 2 

rH Ph Pn Ph 

hJ 14 h4 ^] 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 209 



0. Net cost of works to date, $1,080,843.83. 
P. Bonded debt at date, $417,000. 
Q. Value of Sinking Fund at date, $15,000. 
Er. Average rate of interest, 3.89 per cent. 



INVENTORY 



Of the Property op the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1918. 



Water rights— la,nd, etc., $1,080,843.83 

Water office — furniture, etc., 1,219.50 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 2,100.00 
Shop at pumping station : 

Machinery, tools, meters, service pipe, etc., 5,282.55 
Service truck, runabout, horse, wagons and 

supplies, 2,355.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 3,338.89 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 6,405.57 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 111.85 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 



$1,101,697.19 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



EEPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1917. 

Tlie department responded to 30 bell alarms and 261 
still alarms. 

In addition, three fires occurred, entailing loss, for which 
no alarms were given, making a total of 294 for the year. 

Bell. Still. No alarm. Total. 

223 

3 46 

18 

7 



Precinct, 


17 


206 


Penacook, 


9 


34 


East Concord, 


2 


16 


West Concord, 


2 


5 



30 261 3 294 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, with the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each case. 

But one dangerous fire occurred during the year, that at 
the Concord Lumber Company plant March 27. 

On July 13, Lieut. Charles G. Pinkham, of Combination 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 211 

1, died. In his death the community and the department 
met witli a distinct loss. He was a good citizen, a good 
fireman and genial companion, and his loss was sincerely 
mourned. The i:)oliey of motorizing the apparatus was pur- 
sued to the extent of purchasing one Ahrens-Fox 750-gal- 
lon combination pump and hose, one Abbot & DoAvning 
combination double tank chemical and hose. A contract 
was also signed for one Abbot & Downing combination sin- 
gle tank chemical and hose which has not as yet been de- 
livered, the company, however, loaning a car during the 
interim. One thousand feet of hose was added to the com- 
plement on hand. As very little hose was condemned the 
purchase of more can be safely omitted during the coming 
year and the amount saved devoted to the purchase of tires, 
of which one piece of motor apparatus is in need. Seven 
horses were sold during the year and two purchased. 

The apparatus is in good condition, Combination 1 hav- 
ing been thoroughly overhauled and repaired. 

The tire alarm systems of the precinct and Penacook are 
in good condition. One box was added to the Penacook 
system. 

The duties incumbent upon the undersigned in the line 
of inspection of wires and buildings have been performed. 

The abnormal figure demanded for forage at present 
adds one more reason to the many already existing why 
motor-driven apparatus is preferable to horse-drawn. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



14 



3n illemoriam. 

LIEUT. CHARLES G. PINKHAM. 

Combination Co. No. i. 

Died July 13, 1917. 





FIRE DEPARTMENT 




213 




Appropriations. 






Appropriation, 






$32,700.00 


Resolution, oiitstand 


ing claims. 




179.27 


• 


$32,879.27 




Disbursements. 






Permanent men, 


$13,089.46 




Vacations, 




465.36 




Call men. 


• 


9,190.00 




House man, 




100.00 




Eent, Veterans' Association, 


150.00 




Forage, 




1,461.92 




Fuel, 




1,238.16 




Lights, 




636.09 




Incidentals, 




3,180.33 




Horse shoeing, 




193.75 




Horse hire. 




1,030.30 




Fire alarm. 




435.76 




Penacook fire alarm. 




392.04 




Supplies, auto combinations, 


264.10 




Hose, 




1,000.00 




Laundry, 




52.00 


$32,879.27 








ALARMS. 







Precinct. 

Still. January 1, 6.51 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
71 North State Street, owned and occupied by Mary M. 
Carter. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $40.00 $2,800.00 $40.00 

Still. January 3, 8.58 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. E. Normandeau, 9 Sexton Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1 . No loss. 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 8, 12.18 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Annie Jessenian, 4 West Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 6.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of D. W. Mahoney, 81 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 12, 6.35 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
overheated smoke jupe in basement of residence of Miss 
Agnes Mitcliell, 57 Rumford Street. Attended to by Com- 
bination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. January 12, 11.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. C. Abbott, 18 Walker Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1 . No loss. 

Still. January 13, 10.14 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
dry boiler in the W. W. Lee laundry, 5 Broadway. At- 
tended to by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Michael Ahearn, 18 Curtice Avenue. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 24. January 16, 3.53 p. m. Slight fire in block 
145-147 North Main Street, owned by Alice L. Marden. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. Cause unknown. Re- 
call, 4.32 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $5,000.00 $20.00 $3,500.00 $20.00 

Still. January 17, 12.14 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at residence of C. A. Tardif, 28 Perley Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded. No fire. 

Still. January 21, 11.05 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in the First Baptist Church, North State 
Street. Detail from Central Station responded. No fire. 

Still. January 23, 1.40 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Stickney Block, 136 North Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded. No fire. 

Still. January 24, 8.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Carl Ruth, 115 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 2] 5 

Still. January 25, 5.57 p. m. Fire in basement of resi- 
dence 92 School Street, owned and occupied by C. C. Cur- 
rier. Caused by spontaneous combustion in refuse. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $305.00 $2,500.00 $305.00 

Still. January 25, 8.30 p. m. Rekindling of preceding 
fire. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 27, 7.36 p. m. Fire in flooring of bath- 
room of residence, 86 Franklin Street, owned by Harold 
Hodge. Extinguished by Combination 1. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. ' Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $68.00 $1,000.00 $68.00 

Box 131. January 27, 7.39 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. Recall, 7.57 p. m. 

Still. January 28, 3.58 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. W. Crawford, 4 Mayo Court. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 30, 3.07 p. m. Fire in basement of 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. Caused by spontaneous com- 
bustion. Combination 1 responded but found on arrival 
that by good work the employees had extinguished it. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $75,000.00 $52.40 $25,000.00 $52.40 

Still. February 2, 5.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Michael Nichols, 3 Highland Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 1.20 a. m. Set of buildings on the 
Loudon Road, owned by Eugene King and occupied by 
Rose Miller, destroyed. Caused by overheated chimney. 
Combination 1 responded but could do little but assist in 
removal of contents. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, 


$500.00 


$500.00 


None. 


None. 


Contents, 


200.00 


100.00 


None. 


None. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 3, 2.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Dennerly, 3 Cottage Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 3, 11.03 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Reed, Jr., Fan Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 5, 11.57 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. Silverman, 15 Fremont Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 5, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Davis, 1 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

4. February 9, 9.30 a. m. Four blows announcing the 
departure from Nashua of train bearing troops returning 
home from border. 

Still. February 9, 9.20 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Button Block, 2 North Main Street. At- 
tended to by detail from Central Station. No fire. 

Still. February 12, 11.06 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. D. Thompson, 7 Pine Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 6.12 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
kettle of fat taking fire in Endicott Block, 1 South Main 
Street, owned by the John B. Smith estate. Fire orig- 
inated in room 85 occupied by Arthur Spiller. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, .$90,000.00 $8.00 $80,000.00 $8.00 

Still. February 13, 11.12 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Partridge, 15 Perkins Court. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 13, 2.34 p. m. Slight fire in Picker- 
ing Block, 12 Warren Street, owned by Mrs. Alice Picker- 
ing. Fire originated in room occupied by W. D. Hagan. 
Caused by matches or cigarette. Extinguished by Combi- 
nation 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $5,000.00 $15.00 $4,000.00 $15.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 

Still. February 14, 9.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Ralph McDonald, 6 Downing Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 14, 11.07 a. m. Fire in city scale shed, 
Odd Fellows Avenue. Caused by overheated stove. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. Loss, trifling. 

Still. February 15, 3.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. E. Pike, 4 Merrimack Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 8.36 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of W. R. Watts, 34 North 
Spring Street. Combination 1 responded but no assist- 
ance was required. No fire. 

Still. February 17, 11.24 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Clancy, 2 Summer Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 6.14 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in the R. F. Robinson store, 70 North Main 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 

Still. February 18, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. A. Hanson, 105 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 21. 10.34 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. C. Hirst, 8214 Warren Street. Extinguished 
'by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 9.04 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. C. A. Duncklee, 9 Green Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 11.29 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William P. Ballard, Long Pond Road. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but before arrival received word that it 
had been extinguished. No loss. 

2-2-2. February 26, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. February 28, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Kenney, 13 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. March 2, 9.45 p. in. Cliimney fire in residence 
of John Clinton, 34 South Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 37. March 4, 11.41 a. ni. Fire in residence 13 
Tuttle Street, owned and occupied by A. Cote. Caused by 
overheated chimney. Two thousand and fifty feet of hose 
wxt. Kecall, 1.02 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,200.0(3 


$838.00 


$800.00 


$800.00 


Contents, 


$500.00 


100.00 


None. 


None, 



Still. March 5, 6.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Kenney, Loudon Road near Loudon line. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

2-2-2. March 5, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. March 6, 9.57 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. M. Johnson, 141 Dunklee Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. March 10, 10.28 a. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence, 29 Washington Street, owned by Mrs. C. E. Sar- 
gent. Caused by sparks from chimney. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $27.30 $1,000.00 $27.30 

Box 24. March 12, 8.43 a. m. Slight fire on second 
floor of the Commercial House, 143 North Main Street, 
owned and occupied by D. J. O'Brien. Caused by cur- 
tains coming in contact with alcohol heater. Extinguished 
by occupants. Recall, 8.49 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$5,000.00 


$10.00 


$5,000.00 


$10.00 


Contents, 


5,000.00 


15.00 


5,000.00 


15.00 



Still. March 12, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Connor, 55 South State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Still. March 16, 5.23 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. Kellichay, 137 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 17, 8.42 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. S. B. Davie, 39 Laurel Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 20, 8.52 a. ni. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles C. Moore, 95 Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 9.04 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. H. Randlett, 20 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 3.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. J. Chadbourne, 3 Hanover Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 11.31. p. m. Information received by 
telephone from the passenger station that evidently a fire 
of some magnitude was raging at the north end. 

Combination 1 sent out to investigate. Three minutes 
later a bell alarm from box 8 was received for one of the 
most dangerous fires occurring in this city for a long time. 

The fire i3roved to be in the heart of the plant of the 
Concord Lumber Co., East Penacook Street. Storehouse 
and mill, with contents, destroyed. These buildings were 
surrounded by numerous other structures, lumber piles and 
oil tanks. That the principal loss was confined to the two 
buildings destroyed Avas indeed most fortunate. Cause of 
fire unknown. 

Standard Oil Co., B. & M. R. R. and W. U. Telegraph 
Co. suffered slight exposure losses. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings : 
Concord Lumber 

Co., $9,500.00 $9,500.00 $6,000.00 $6,000.00 

Standard Oil Co., 208.75 208.75 None. None. 

B. & M. R. R., 

cars, 700.00 94.06 500.00 None. 

W. U. Tel Co., poles, etc., Trifling. 



220 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Value. Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Contents : 






Concord Lumber 






Co., $12,000.00 $12,000.00 


$6,000.00 


$6,000.00 


Standard Oil Co., 280.71 250.00 


None. 


None. 



Box 8. March 27, 11.34 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Three thousand eight hundred fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 7.32 a. m., 28th inst. 

Still. March 29, 11.39 a. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence 34 Jackson Street, owned by Margaret Conway. 
Caused probably by men smoking who were engaged in re- 
pairing roof. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Lo.ss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $4.00 $2,Q00.00 $4.00 

Still. March 30, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. W. Knee, 95 Franklin Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 5.01 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Worthen, Haynes Road, Plains District. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 11.35 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 28 
Hall Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 10.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Sarah F. Sanborn, 54 Center Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 11.56 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. J. McFarland, 109 South Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No lo.ss. 

Still. April 10, 7.25 p. m. Grass fire near Foster 
Street, Claremont railroad. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 8.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Seymour, 55 South State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 
' Still. April 11, 12.18 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. W. Tuttle, 1 Cedar Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. Ii21 

Box 53. April 11, 11.56 p. m. Unoccupied house on 
Page Street, owned by Alphonse Belleveau, destroyed. 
Cause, unknown. Seven hundred feet of hose wet. Re- 
call, 1.37 a. m., 12th inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $500.00 $500.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Still. April 14, 3.11 p. m. Slight fire in clothes press 
in Eagle Hotel, 110 North Main Street. Cause unknown. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. April 14, 4.58 p. m. Grass fire on the Penacook 
road near the Annis farm. Combination 1 responded but 
no assistance was required as apparatus had been sum- 
moned from Penacook and West Concord. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 6.55 a. m. Riverside Inn at Hooksett 
destroyed. In response to a call for assistance Combination 
1 responded but could do little outside of protecting nearby 
buildings. See Hooksett report. 

Still. April 17, 2.44 p. m. Grass fire on North Pem- 
broke Road, Plains district. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 2.14 p. ra. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. Beaudette, 3 Mayo Court, owned by Frank Mayo. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$4,000.00 


$6.00 


$3,000.00 


.$6.00 


Contents, 


600.00 


40.00 


300.00 


40.00 



Still. April 19, 8.55 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 73 
Franklin Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. April 19, 10.58 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 52 
Franklin Street. Combination 1 rasponded but no assist- 
ance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 19, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Tony Faretra, 107 Franklin Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



222 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. April 19, 8.19 p. m. Unoccupied cottage on the 
Long Pond road near Little Pond destroyed. Owned by 
John Jordan. Cause unknown. Combination 1 responded 
but could do little save j^reventing a forest fire. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $500.00 $500.00 $250.00 $250.00 

Still. April 22, 4.27 p. m. Grass fire on Walker Street 
Extension. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 10.04 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 180 
Rumford Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. April 24, 10.27 p. m. Slight fire in automobile 
in front of 127 North Main Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 25, 10.44 p. m. Chimney fire in residence- 
of Mary Dooley, 121 South State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 2.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. H. Curtis, 20 Pillsbury Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Byrne, 11 Washington Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 3.27 p. m. Grass fire on Gully Hill. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
Extinguished by local residents. No loss. 

Still. May ] , 8.25 a. m. A call to investigate cause of 
smoke in residence of W. C. Brunei, 22 Union Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. May 1, 11.33 a. m. Fire in residence 33 Merri- 
mack Street, owned and occupied by Freeman T. Jackman, 
Caused by child and matches. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $150.00 $10,000.00 $150.00 

Contents, 6,000.00 127.50 4,000.00 127.50 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

Still. May 3, 7.44 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 72 Hall 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 5.14 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. M. Howe, 18 South State Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 7.30 p. m. Alarm occasioned by gas be- 
ing left burning in shop on second floor of building 165 
North Main Street. Combination 1 responded but no as- 
sistance was required save shutting off of gas. No loss. 

Still. May 9, 11.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. G. Howser, 17 Green Street. Extinguished by de- 
tail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. May 12, 10.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss E. A. Shaw, 60 Downing Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 14, 11.44 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. R. Morey, 14 Clinton Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 14, 10.12 p. m. Fire in residence 13 Glad- 
stone Street, owned and occupied by G. M. Kirk. Caused 
by leaving current on electric flat iron. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 $30.00 $4,000.00 $30.00 

Contents, 1.000.00 22.95 400.00 22.95 

Still. May 15, 7.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Abbie Staniels, Pembroke Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 15, 6.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
G. E. Roth well, 216 South Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 16, 7.53 a. m. Fire on roof of building 32 
Bridge Street, owned by George R. Taylor & Co., and occu- 
pied as blacksmith and paint shop. Cause unknown. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $5.00 None. Nona 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. May 19, 9.46 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. F. Temple, 58 Hall Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 21, 12.51 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. H. Petting-ill, 21 Beacon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 21, 1.41 p. m. Brush fire on the Dunbar- 
ton Road near the Lute Hodgman place. Combination 1 
responded. See next alarm. 

4-4-4. May 21, 2.09 p. m. Alarm given in response to 
call for assistance from Combination 1. Details sent in 
autos. Labored two hours. Detail left to watch. Ten 
acres burned over. No loss. 

Still. May 22, 11.20 a. m. Fire in residence 40 Bridge 
Street, owned by Mrs. Zelphene Archambeault and occu- 
pied by Fred Langley and Henry Langley. Caused by 
overheated chimney. Combination 1 responded but the 
fire had assumed such proportions that a bell alarm was 
sent in. 

Box 24. May 22, 11.24 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Two thousand three hundred fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall, 12.39 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,300.00 Jf^900.00 $900.00 $900.00 

Contents : 

F. Langley. 2,500.00 317.00 800.00 317.00 

H. Langley, 800.00 300.00 None. None. 

Still. May 23, 2.25 p. m. Fire in bags of sugar in 
grocery store of C. C. Schoolcraft, 36 Pleasant Street. 
Caused by candle flame coming in contact with bags. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $6,500.00 $190.35 $5,000.00 $190.35 

Still. May 28, 3.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Louis Cantin, 71 South Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

Still. May 28, 5.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
W. Gay, 3 McKinley Street. Extingiiished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. May 30, 9.10 a. m. Alarm occasioned by smoke 
issuing from underneath electric street car. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 31, 4.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Louise H. P^olsoni, Loudon Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 31, 7.46 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mary Pierce, 19 North State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 3, 3.44 p. m. Alarm occasioned by light- 
ning striking residence 112 Pleasant Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. June 4, 8.15 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Hooksett. Tenement block damaged. Two motor-driven 
pieces of apparatus, Combination 1 and Engine 1, sent. 
Labored one and one-half hours. Five hundred feet of 
hose wet. See Hooksett report. 

Still. June 5, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. B. Marshall, 112 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

3-7-5-5. — June 11, 8.00 a. m. Liberty Bond signal. 

Still. June 12, 7.19 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Otis "Whittin, 1 Charles Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

3-7-5-5. June 12, 8.00 a. m. Liberty Bond signal. 

Still. June 12, 3.52 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the Marden block, 147 North Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. June 12, 7.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. James Smith, 64 South State Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

3-7-5-5. June 13, 8.00 a. m. Liberty Bond signal. 

3-7-5-5. June 14, 8.00 a. m. Liberty Bond signal. 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. June 29, 6.45 a. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. A. E. Atwood, 50' North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 2, 12.36 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. A. Carr, 9 Chestnut Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. July 8, 9.20 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 7 Lee Avenue. Combination 1 responded but 
no assistance was required. Fumigating. No loss. 

Still. July 8, 6.15 p. m. Chinmey fire in residence of 
M. Blake, 20 Thompson Street. Extinguished by Combi- 
nation 3. No loss. 

Still. July 10, 11.39 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Reed, Fan Road. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. July 11, 2.24 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Clorister Gould, 2 Chandler Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No lass. 

Box 24. July 24, 10.54 a. m. Fire on roof of residence 
16 Center Street, owned by Elmer Trombly. Caused prob- 
ably by men, M^ho were repairing roof, smoking. Extin- 
guished with chemicals. Recall, 11.30 a. m. Loss trifling. 
Still. July 26, 10.19 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the Marden block, 147 North Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. July 28, 2.44 p. m. Brush fire on South Pem- 
broke Street near Pembroke Road, on land o^vued by Waldo 
White. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 31, 10.21 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Roswell, 216 South IMain Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 2, 10.28 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Exchange Block, 98 North Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. August 6, 2.45 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 23 North Main Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

4-4-4. August 7, 1.18 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by W. W. Flint near Stickney Hill. Details sent in autos 
and barge. Labored three hours. Detail left to watch 
through the night. Cause unknown. Loss $200 in young 
pine. No insurance. 

4-4-4. August 8, 8.47 a. m. Rekindling of preceding 
fire. Details sent in autos and barge. Labored two hours. 
No additional loss. 

Stk.l. August 9, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Ira Arlin, South Pembroke Street. Extinguished by 
Lieut. D. J. Adams. No loss. 

Still. August 12, 5.15 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Exchange Block, 98 North Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. No loss. 

Still. August 16, 11.20 a. m. Alarm occasioned by fire, 
in wood box in residence of Mrs. G. E. Amidon, 178 North 
Main Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. Extinguished by neighbors. No loss. 

Still. September 2, 1.38 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
boiling over of kettle of fat in Lenox Hotel, 115 North Main 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. September 6, 12.25 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in St. Mary's School, 32 South Main Street. 
Combination 3 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. September 7, 8.41 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. Coulombe, 87 Runiford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1 . No loss. 

Still. September 8, 7.15 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Mrs. Nancy Dutton, 21 Lyn- 
don Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. No fire. 

Still. September 9, 3.47 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
of Karl. Selma, west of Penacook Lake. Combination 1 
responded but found that Engine 3 of West Concord had 
the situation well in hand. See West Concord report. 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 10, 12.22 p. m. Residence and barn 
owned by Charles E. Palmer and occupied by Frank Green 
on Greeley Street, Plains district, destroyed. Caused by 
sparks from chimney. Combinations 3 and 1 sent. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ills. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildiiigs, 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$800.00 


$800.00 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


600.00 


700.00 


600.00 



11-11. September 10, 12.41 p. m. Alarm given in re- 
sponse to call for assistance from scene of preceding fire. 
Details sent in aiitos. No water being available little could 
be done save to protect neighboring houses, which was suc- 
cessfuly done. 

Still. September 11, 2.19 p. m. Slight fire in old un- 
occupied house, 57 Concord Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 18, 6.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Pierce, 64 Perley Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 21, 7.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. W. Crawford, rear of 141 North State Street. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 22, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. C. Smith, 4 Fuller Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 23, 12.20 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by the Concord Lumber Company near the Charles 
Desmond place, Sugar Ball road. Extinguished by Old 
Fort and Combination 1 companies. Labored four hours. 
Detail left to watch. See East Concord report. 

Still. September 27, 11.22 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Mrs. J. A. Cheney, 65 South 
State Street. Combination 3 responded but no assistance 
was required. No fire. 

Still. October 1, 1.25 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of L. C. French, 21 School Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

Still. October 1, 9.45 p. m. Fire in dump at -Wliite 
Park. Extinguished bj' Combination 1. Four hundred 
feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. October 3, 12.17 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. B. Flint, 9 Wiggin Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 4, 7.17 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of N. ^1. Keyes. Princeton Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 8, 12.30 p. m. Fire in Orphans' Home 
building, Millville. The fire was first discovered on the 
roof and there being a private hydrant and hose close by 
it was thought that with the aid of Combination 1 the local 
firemen could easily extinguish it. The pressure, however, 
was insufficient for efficient work and as it became appar- 
ent that additional help was needed arrangement was made 
with St. Paul's School officials to keep in touch with the 
situation and call for assistance as needed. 

Still. October 8, 12.41 p. m. Orphans' Home. En- 
gine 1 sent. 

Box 56. October 8, 12.46 p. m. Orphans' Home. 
Truck 1 and details sent. Recall, 4.11 p. m. 

Still. October 8, 1.36 p. m. Orphans' Home. Combi- 
nation 3 sent to lay line from larger main on main road. 

Still. October 8, 1.47 p. m. Orphans' Home. Engine 
2 sent. Played through 1,600 feet of hose. Two thousand 
two hundred feet of city base wet. Building owned by 
Tlie Or]ihans' Home. 

Girls" Home: 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $10,000.00 $9,000.00 $9,000.00 $9,000.00 

Contents. 1,500.00 1,000.00 600.00 600.00 

Boys' Home: 

Building, 11,000.00 10.00 9,000.00 10.00 

Still. October 13, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alphoce Lapierre, Long Pond road. Extinguished 
bv Combination 1. No loss. 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 13, 6.53 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of C. W. Bateman, 151 North 
State Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. No fire. 

Still. October 15 , 3.50 a. m. Fire in building 43 
North Main Street owned by the Lee Associates and occu- 
pied by John Lee as a bowling alley. Cause unknown. 
Combination 1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm 
was sent in. 

Box 35. October 15, 3.51 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Three hundred feet of hose wet, but no water 
used in building. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall, 
4.36 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


.^20,000.00 


$275.00 


$13,000.(K3 


$275.00 


Contents, 


4.000.00 


903.80 


3,000.00 


903.80 



Still. October 19, 2.53 a. m. A call for assistance at 
fire in buildings owned by Charles R. Whittemore, Pem- 
broke Street. Combination 1 responded. One thousand 
feet of hose wet. See Pembroke report. 

Still. October 19, 4.09 a. m. Fire on roof of shed at 
the Holt brickyard, South Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. Loss trifiing. 

Still. October 19, 9.58 a. m. Fire in automobile in 
garage at 46 Pleasant Street, owned and occupied by G. L. 
Stratton. Extinguished by Combination 1. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,500.00 


$70.00 


$1 50.00 


$70.00 


Contents, 


1 ,000.00 


79.79 


700.00 


79.79 



Still. October 22, 5.16 p. m. Chimney fire in Smith 
Block. 32 North Main Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. October 23, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. A. Home, 17 Highland Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 

Still. October 24, 8.31 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Richard Bourne, Intervale Road, East Concord. 
Extin^ished by Combination 1 . No loss. 

Still. October 24, 7.05 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
fallen wire at North Main and Chapel Streets. Combina- 
tion 1 responded. 

Still. October 29, S.H a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Ct. Ericcson, 7 Wiggin Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 29, 9.01 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in the T. W. Williams shop, 21 North Main 
Street. Attended to by detail from Central Station. No 
fire. 

Box 28. November 1, 5.32 p. m. Fire in wooden ash 
barrel in residence of R. F. Brown, 73 School Street. Need- 
less alarm. Recall, 5.45 p. m. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 2.36 p. m. Grass fire East Pena- 
cook Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 7, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. A. Davis, 7 Noyes Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

11-11. November 7, 6.42 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Loudon. Combination 1 and Engine 1 sent. Both 
motor driven. Run made in twenty minutes. Combina- 
tion 3, Good Will, transferred to Central Station. 

Still. November 7, 7.23 p. m. A call for further as- 
sistance from Loudon. Combination 3, Good Will, sent. 
Run made in fifteen minutes. Combination 3, Cataract, 
transferred from West Concord to Central Station. Motor- 
driven pumping engine sent from Manchester with 16 men, 
on request, to Central Station to cover. Engine 1 worked 
at Loudon fire three and one-half hours, forcing water 
through 1,900 feet of hose. Two valuable sets of buildings 
destroyed. Others damaged. See Loudon report. 

Still. November 10, 4.04 p. m. Brush fire on Dunbar- 
toii Road near Turkey Pond. Extinguished by detail. No 
loss. 



282 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. November 11, 1.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Benson, 41 Perley Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. November 12, 12.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. M. Cogswell, The Pines, Hall Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 12, 5.36 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. L. Richardson, 11 Holly Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 16, 2.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. E. Blair, 106 School Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 16, 8.01 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. E. Blair, 105 School Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 11.53 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 
30 Hall Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 24. November 22, 6.18 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 2 Montgomery Street, owned by ]\Irs. A. W. Hill. 
Needless alarm. Recall, 6.42 a. m. No loss. 

Still. November 24, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alvah Sprague, 10 Prince Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Everett Hammond, Bow Mills. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 12.46 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. A. W. Corser, 21 Tahanto Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 2.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. J. Franzezen, 22 Hammond Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 27, 8.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. Cote, 82 South Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1 . No loss. 

Still. November 29. 8.09 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. L. W. Reaole, 6 Jackson Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 233 

Still. November 29, 2.38 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. L. Tandy, 714 Charles Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 12.18 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Roland Gilpatrick, Garvin's Falls road. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 9.15 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. Needless alarm. 

Still. December 7, 5.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Howard, 23 Union Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 7, 6.18 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dr. C. E. Butterfield, 17 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 8.54 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. P. Sandquist, 19 Hammond Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 10.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Tuttle, 1 Cedar Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 9.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Lamere, 10 Montgomery Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 10.05 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in resi- 
dence of John Manonian, 27 Lyndon Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 2. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 11.30 a. m. Slight fire in State 
Hospital coal pocket. Bridge Street. Spontaneous combus- 
tion. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 3.58 p. m. Fire in partition in 
residence 9 Allison Street, owned by Mrs. Charles Gay and 
occupied by R. L. Albee. Caused by attempt to thaw 
water pipe. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,600.00 $28.21 $2,000.00 $28.21 

Still. December 13, 6.53 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



234 CITY OP CONCORD. 

denee of Mrs. Joseph Aljorie, 38^/. Walker Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. December 13. 5.08 p. m. Automobile damaged 
by fire at corner of School and North Fruit Streets. Ma- 
chine owned by Thompson & Hoague Co. Caused by back- 
fire. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. Fire extinguished by driver with snow. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Auto, il>300.00 .^73.04 None. None. 

Still. December 14, 1.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Irving Robinson, 22 ]\Ionroe Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 7.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. J. Merrill, 114 Clinton Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 7.10 a. m. Combination 3 called 
to scene of preceding fire by mistake of tenant. 

Still. December 15, 12.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Samuel Jeanau, 16 Highland Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 17, 7.08 a. m. Fire in kitchen of resi- 
dence 49 Laurel Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Hat- 
tie Wyatt. Caused probably by dropping of lighted lamp. 
The unfortunate woman was burned to death. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$181.20 


$1,000.00 


$181.20 


Contents. 


100.00 


10.00 


None. 


None. 



Still. December 18, 12.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Rockwell, 9 Lee Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 7.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles N. Hall, Westbourne Road. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 4.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 



FIRE DEl'AHTiMENT. 235 

dence of George P. Tanner, Silk Farm Road. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 4.27 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. ]\I. Davis, f) Lincoln Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 23, 2.47 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Woorfbui-y, 170 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 25, 6.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. S. Emery, 110 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 5.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. C. H. Day, 194 North Main Street. Combi- 
nation 1 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. December 27, 6!05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Alfred Gessner, 197 North Main Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. December 28, 8.31 p. m. Chiuuiey fire in resi- 
dence of Cyrus Nicolas, 12 Montgomery Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 8.45 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
burning felt on steam pipe in residence of W. S. Rossiter, 
4 Court Street. Extinguished by Combination 3. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. December 28, 10.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Angelo Useus, 10 Montgomery Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 12.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Eddie Nedeau, 22 Thorndike Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 4.55 a. m. A call for assistance 
from Suncook. Combination 1 sent. The run was made 
with the temperature eighteen degrees below zero. Upon 
arrival the Pembroke department had the situation well in 
hand and no assistance was required. Opera House 
destroyed. See Pembroke report. 



236 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. December 30, 10.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Adele Mercier, Curtice Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 10.34 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Gen. J. N. Patterson, 35 Penacook Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 12.02 p. m. , Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Tliomas Harrison, 73 Franklin Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 12.07 p. m. Fire in basement of 
the Pleasant Street Baptist Church. Caused by over- 
heated furnace pipe. 

Still. December 30, 12.36 p. m. Combination 3 sum- 
moned to assist Combination 1 in extinguishing preceding 
fire. Eight hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Fire ex- 
tinguished by Combinations 1 and 3 and volunteers from 
the call force of the department. 

A'alue. Loss. lus. Ins. Paid. 

Building, .$22,000.00 $1,476.00 $7,000.00 $1,476.00 

Contents, 4,000.00 230.00 2,150.00 230.00 

Still. December 31, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Batchelder, 20 Pierce Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire in Colo- 
nial Block, South Main Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 3. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 5.14 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. Oleiate, 381/0 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 2. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 7.47 p. m. Chimney fire in. resi- 
dence of Howard Kimball, 69 Pleasant Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 31, 9.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. C. Marden, 38 Thompson Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 



fire department. 237 

Penacook. 

Still. January 19, 1.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Robert Gordon, 36 Charles Street. No loss. 

No Alarm. January 19, 2.30 p. m. Slight fire on roof 
of the Rolfe sawmill at the Borough. Caused by spark 
from chimney. Extinguished by emploj^ees. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence owned, by Miss Lizzie Rolfe, 106 ]\Ierrimack Street. 
No loss. 

Box 46. January 26, 10.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence owned by C. Chickles, Merrimack Street. Recall, 
10.35 p. ra. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in Creaser 
Block, South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 8.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Royce, 60 High Street. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Coveney, 9 Bye Street. No loss. 

Still. February 13, 11.18 a. m. Chimney fire in 
Creaser Block, South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. February 27, 12.50 p. m. Fire in electric car, 
Washington Square. Extinguished with chemicals. No 
loss. 

Still. March 12, 12.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 16 Penacook Street, owned by C. M. and A. W. 
Rolfe. No loss. 

Still. March 12, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in Little 
Block, "Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 3.50 p. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Block, "Washington Square. No loss. 

No Alarm. March 15, 1.30 p. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Sebra, 14 Church Street. Oil stove in 
shed caught fire. Loss confined to stove which was thrown 
out of doors. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $500.00 $9.00 $300.00 $9.00 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 47. March 23, 11.58 a. m. Fire on roof of coal 

shed owned and occupied by E. L. Davis near depot. 

Caused by spark from locomotive. Seven hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall, 1.00 p. ni. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building. .^500.00 ^\00m $200.00 $100.00 

Still. April 2, 7.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
102 Washing-ton Street, owned by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe. 
No loss. 

Still. April 4, 1.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. James Garvey, 96 South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 2.00 p. m. (chimney fire in residence 
11 Merrimack Street, owned by C. H. Barnet. No loss. 

Still. April 14, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by J. M. Vezina, Fowler Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 14, 4.55 p. m. Brush fire on Penacook 
Road. Recall, 6.00 p. m. Seven hundred feet of hose wet. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Charles Brackett, 20 Washington Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 19, 2.07 p. m. Grass fire near residence of 
E. Ormsbee, South Main Street. One thousand feet of 
hose wet. Recall, 3.17 p. n\. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 6.00 a. m. Chimney fire in Washing- 
ton House, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. May 17, 2.00 p. m. Grass fire near the electric 
light station at the Borough. No loss. 

Box 35. June 20, 4.05 p. ra. Fire on roof of blacksmith 
shop, rear of 62 South Main Street, owned by S. G. San- 
born and occupied by Jasper Brown. Caused by spark 
from chimney. Two hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 
4.25 p. m. 

A'alue. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $400.00 $47.46 $200.00 $47.46 

Still. June 26, 2.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
3 5 Union Street, owned by S. G. Sanborn. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 239 

Still. July 5, 10.00 a. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of JMrs. John C. Linehan, 11 Charles Street. No loss. 

Box 36. July 6, 1.25 p. m. Wagon repair shop at the 
Borough, owned by Harry Iluff and occupied by Charles 
Holmes, practically destroyed. Cause unknown. One 
thousand, one hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 3.30 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, .4^300.00 .^250.00 $100.00 $100.00 

Contents, 400.00 300.00 None. None. 

Box 37. July 6, 1.30 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire to call steamer. 

No Alarm. July S, 10.00 a. m. Fire in Brockway 
lunch cart, Washington Square. Gasoline in coffee tank 
caught fire. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Cart, .$250.00 $27.00 $250.00 $27.00 

Still. September 12, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Horace B. Sherburne, 34 Cross Street. No loss. 

Still. September 22, 9.20 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Webster. Combination chemical and detail under 
command of Engineer F. M. Dodge responded. The Frank 
Brackett buildings destroyed. See Webster report. 

Still. September 26, 12.00 m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of David J. Driscoll, 11 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. November 9, 12.10 p. m. Brush fire at Broad 
Cove. Recall, 1.55 p. m. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 2. 00 p. m. Chimney fire in Little 
Block, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 1.20 p. m. Brush fire on Elm 
Street near the Henry Hardy place. No loss. 

Still. November 23, 9.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harry Gray, 13 T'nion Street. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 9.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Royce, 60 High Street. No loss. 

Still. November 25. 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Jerold, 14 Penacook Street. No loss. 



240 CITY OF COKCOIU). 

Still. November 25, 5.30 p. ni. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Jed Banker, Elm Stret. No loss. 

Box 25. November 30, 1.05 p. m. Fire in the black- 
smithing department of the Hoyt Electrical Instrument 
Works. Fire caught from oil-burning furnace. Eight- 
een hundred feet of hose wet. Recall, 2.30 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$750.00 


.$450.00 


$350.00 


$350.00 


Stock, 


880.00 


190.00 


None. 


None. 


Equipment. 


2,800.00 


339.33 


None. 


None. 



Still. December 22, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Gilbert Berry, 27 Church Street. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Murdock, Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Block, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 1.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John H. Rolfe, 22 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 10.25 a. m. Chiimiey fire in Wash- 
ington House stable, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. F. Jones, 5 Washington Street. No loss. 

East Concord. 

Still. January 1, 12.00 m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Alvin Smith, East Clinton Street. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Daniel Lewis, Shawmut Street. 

"\'alne. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $5.00 $500.00 $5.00 

Still. February 26. 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in switch- 
man's shanty at railroad bridge. No loss. 

Still. March 1, 8.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Fred Farnum, Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. March 19, 1.55 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Harrv Merrill, Shaker Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 241 

Still. ]\Iarch 20, 8.00 p. lu. Chimney fire in residence 
of George 0. Robinson, East Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. March 22, 6.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of ]\Irs. Piper, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Still. April 10. 4.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of ]\Ir. Denton, Potter Street. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Powell, East Clinton ^street. No loss. 

Still. May 9, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Lauren Clough, Shawinut Street. No loss. 

Still. May 15, 8.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles T. Staniels, Shawmut Street. No loss. 

Still. June 11, 4.30 p. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edgar Brown, Shawmut Street. No loss. 

Still. September 5, 11.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William P. Curtis, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Bell. September 23, 12.30 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by the Concord Lumber Co., Plains district. No 
loss. 

Still. October 24, 8.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence owned by the Concord Electric Co., at Sewall's 
Falls. No loss. 

Still. November 8, 1.15 p. in. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Fred Fariium, East Penacook Street. No 
loss. 

Bell. November 9, 12.30 p. m. Grass fire on land 
owned by James Hussey near railroad. No loss. 

Still. November 28, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur McAlpine, East Penacook Street. No loss. 

West Concord. 

Bell. April 14, 5.00 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by Mrs. Growen on Penacook Road, Penacook. On arrival 
it was found that the Penacook department had been sum- 
moned and had the situation well in hand. No assistance 
required. 

Still. May 15, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire in rear of John 
Swenson Granite Co. quarry. Labored one hour and 
twentv minutes. No loss. 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 9, 3.15 p. m. Fire in closet of resi- 
dence on Long Pond road owned by Karl Selma. Cause, 
unknomi. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $52.00 $3,000.00 $52.00 

Still. November 6, 5.30 p. m. Grass fire on land owned 
by the Concord Electric Company. No loss. 

Still. November 7, 7.55 p. m. Combination car and 
four men called to Central Station to cover in on account 
of Loudon fire. 

Bell. November 9, 12.15 p. m. Brush fire at Broad 
Cove on lantl owned by George Patch and others. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. November 24, 2.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. Koski, 454 North State Street. No loss. 





Summary. 






Buildings: Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Net Loss. 


Precinct, $303,208.7.5 


$26,094.96 


$194,400.00 


. $20,726.11 


$5,368.85 


Penacook, 2,200.00 


874.46 


1,100.00 


624.46 


250.00 


East Concord, 1,000.00 


5.00 


500.00 


5.00 




West Concord, 4,000.00 


52.00 


3,000.00 


52.00 





$310,408.75 $27,026.42 $199,000.00 $21,407.57 $5,618.85 
Contents : 

Precinct, $46,980.71 $16,286.39 $28,650.00 $9,126.39 $7,160.00 

Penacook, 4,580.00 838.33 300.00 9.00 829.33 



$51,560.71 $17,124.72 $28,950.00 $9,135.39 $7,989.33 
Buildings, 310,408.75 27.026.42 199,000.00 21,407.57 5,618.85 



Buildings and 

contents, $361,969.46 $44,151.14 $227,950.00 $30,542.96 $13,608.18 

Apparatus and BY)rce. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as fol- 
lows : 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine and 
hose car, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company 
(15 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kear- 
sarge," and modern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 243 

Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; one second-class 
Amoskeag engine, ' ' Governor Hill, ' ' relief engine, in 
charge of an engineer and fireman; and one auto-combina- 
tion car in charge of four permanent men ; one ladder 
truck, "City of Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder 
Company (21 men) ; one house man at Central Fire Sta- 
tion. There are six horses kept at this station. There 
are eleven permanent men located at the Central Fire Sta- 
tion and one permanent man at each fire station within the 
precinct. 

The Alert Hose Comi^any (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has a *motor-driven hose car, with perma- 
nent man. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one chemical engine, one 
hand engine and three wagons in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Fjugine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons and one auto-combination car. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
an auto-combination car and a modern hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4i/2-inch cylin- 
der Hunneraan hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-draAvn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 

Hose. 

Precinct, 11,450 feet cotton, rubber lined. 
Penacook, 3,200 " " " 

West Concord, 1,400 " 

East Concord, 500 " 



16,550 



* Loaned by contractor jiending completion of contract calling for anto-com- 
bination car. 

16 



244 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1917: 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 60 Pleasant Street. 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2cL Asst., Holder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 
Elbeidge Emery, 
George W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 

Electrical Inst, maker, 61 Merrimack Street. 



Potter St., East Concord. 



WARD 2. 
Butcher, 

WARD 3. 

Overseer, 16 Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 Thomas J. Morrison, 

5 George B. Davis, 

6 Herbert M. Sanders, 

7 Harry P. Blake, 

8 Harry L. Messer, 

9 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

10 George L. Livingston, 

11 Harry C. Taylor, 

12 George H. Abbott, 

13 Daniel F. Murphy. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter, 
Carriage painter, 
Collector, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage Trimmer, 
Gas inspector. 
Machinist, 
Shipping clerk, 
Permanent Driver, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Downing Street. 
32 Pleasant Street. 
35 Warren Street. 
12 Hanover Street. 
3 Broadway. 
154 North Main Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
109 South State Street. 
63 School Street. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



245 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



J. C. McGiLVRAY, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 Charles H. Sanders, 

23 John M. Inman, 

24 John B. McLeod, 

26 Charles W. Bateman, 

28 Frank H. Fowler. 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 
22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

27 Philip J. OX'onnell. 

21 Charles W. Downing, 

29 Fred J. Johnston, 

28 James H. Brannigan, 
13 H. E. Drew, 

30 C. Cunningham, 



OFFICERS. 

D. J. 

MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Jig-sawyer, 
Janitor, 
Machinist, 
Custodian, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Electrician, 
Machinist, 
Painter, 
Silversmith, 
Clerk, 
Gas fitter. 
Car worker, 
Chauflfeur, 
Chautfeur, 



Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Residences. 

9 Pearl Street. 

107 North Main Street. 

11 Chapel Street. 
16 Wall Street. 

5 Rumford Street. 
151 North State Street. 
88 North Main Street. 
102 South State Street. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
38 North Spring Street. 

12 South Street. 

10 Abbott Street. 

37 South Main Street. 
Central Fire Station. 
Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



Badge RELIEF ENGINE. 

Nos. Names. Occupations. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
81 South State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



OFFICERS. 



C. C. Chksley, Captain. 



J. M. Davis, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



E. E. Bartlett, Treasurer. 



Badge 


MEMBERS. 




Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 C. C. Chesley, 


Carpenter, 


11 Prince Street. 


37 J. M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, 


4 Tahanto Street. 


39 C. J. French, 


Stone-cutter, 


5 Perkins Street. 


40 C. H. Rowell, 


Carpenter, 


5 Abbott Court. 


45 M. G. Davis, 


Carpenter, 


6 Beacon Street. 


41 J. E. Ploward, 


Painter, 


31 Union Street. 


38 E. E. Bartlett, 


Carpenter, 


13 Prince Street. 


42 T. S. Pillsbury, 


Printer, 


Ill North State Street. 


44 E. W. Zambs, 


Lineman, 


95 Rumford Street. 


43 F. G. White, 


Laborer, 


12 Montgomery Street. 


46 F. H. Silver, 


Chauffeur, 


Alert Station. 



246 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 
Hiram T. Dickerman, Captain. Frank S. Putnam, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

50 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

51 Frank S. Putnam, 

54 Jasper R. Mudgett, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

57 Albert W. Thompson, 

58 Harry L. Peacock, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 
53 John W. McGowan, 

52 E. W. Burgess,* 

56 M. C. Dower,** 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Painter, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Painter, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Barber, 
Foundryman, 
Chauffeur, 



* Acting for G. H. Sawyer, 
''* Acting for J. E. Cochran. 



Residences. 
36 Broadway. 
15 Per ley Street. 
93 South State Street. 
23^/2 Perley Street. 
74 Allison Street. 
36 Warren Street. 
104 South State Street. 
Good Will Station. 
71 North State Street. 
8 Myrtle Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



Will A. King, Captain. 

Badije 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

66 Prank T. Bean, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

76 D. Charles Parker, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 William H. Reagan, 

83 Harry Leary, 

78 Fred J. Langley, 

84 Oscar E. Eastman, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Woodworker, 
Woodworker, 
Wood- worker. 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Renovater, 
Carpenter, 
Carjienter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Steam fitter, 
Plumber, 
Stone-cutter, 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
16 Avon Street. 
10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 
10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 

30 Green Street. 
63 South Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street. 
34 Downing Street. 
71 South Street. 
25 Wa.shington Street. 
37 South Main Street. 
22 Fremont Street. 
40 Bridge Street. 
Central Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



247 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



M. S. Wakefield, Captain. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 M. J. Martin, 

93 M. R. Piper, 

94 J. H. Brunei, 

95 C. G. Howser, 

96 H. E. Kendall, 



OFFICERS. 

M. J. Maetin, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

Spare Men. 



House Man, 
A. L. Downing 



Resid'Cnces. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henry Rolfe, Captain. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer 



OFFICERS. 

Frank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treat. 
John B. Dodge, Steward. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 

111 Edmond Banker, 

110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

123 William Corbett, 

103 Frank D. O'Brien, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

119 Wil'iam H. Holbrook, 

116 Loren H. Emerson, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassavaugh, 
105 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

115 Carl G. Holmes, 

112 Richard McBride, 

122 George L. Messer. 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 
Stationary engine 
Teamster, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker. 
Painter, 
Axle-maker, 
Teamster, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Laborer, 
Miller, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Hotel clerk, 
Spinner, 
Miller, 
Clerk, 
Electrician, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
39 Centre Street. 
44 Elm Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
Elm Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 

92 High Street. 

Cross Street. 

44 Centre Street. 

17 Washington Street. 

123 Merrimack Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
10 Church Street. 
110 Merrimack Street. 
6 Union Street. 

9 Union Street. 

43 South Main Street. 
Merrimack Street. 

42 Spring Street. 

10 Union Street. 
High Street. 



248 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
C. E. Robinson, Lieut, and Clerk. 



John C. Hutchins. Treasurer. 
Michael L.\crois, Steward 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

120 George O. Robinson, 

121 C. E. Robinson, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 William E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Gate, 

129 Ross W. Gate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

134 Walter C. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Clarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Gate, 

135 John T. Gate, 

140 C. A. Chamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

145 John Ganney, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Carter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 
142 William E. Batchelder, 

141 Herbert F. Piper, 

124 William Gate, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Clerk, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Parmer, 
Hurseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Wood-worker, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith, 
Carpenter, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stone-cutter, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penajook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 



FIRE DErARTMENT. 



249 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 
West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Alfred J. Frasee, Captain. 

Abram D. Gushing, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 
Frank C. Blodgett, Steward. 



Names. 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
A. D. Gushing, 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Gotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Edward Levering, 
Joseph Daly, 
Robert Henry, 
Benjamin Kemp, 
Frank Peterson, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 

Carl A. Eckstrom, 

Oscar Johnson, 

Axel Swanson. 

Henry Richardson, 

William Nelson, 

Frank G. Blodgett, 



MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Silversmith, 
Laborer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Paving-cutter, 
Foreman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 



Residences. 
10 River Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
490 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 
5 Engel Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
455 North State Street. 
513 North State Street. 
3 River Street. 
346 North State Street. 
14 View Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 
434 North State Street. 
6 Dam Street. 
556 North State Street. 
436 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 

Frank F. Morse, Captain. S. S. Upham, First Lieutenant. 

Eben F. Richardson, Second Lieutenant. 



Dennis Holloran, 
Albert P. Davis, 
Edward D. Ashley, 
Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 
F. W. Camp, 



MEMBERS. 

Earl C. Bodwell, 
D. P. "Wheeler, 
Henry Tucker, 
W. K. Wingate, 
Fred L. Johnson, 
L. S. Richardson, 



Fred O. Libby, 
M. F. Thompson, 
E. J. Brown. 
A. L. Dickerman, 
H. W. Hillson, 
Charles C. Moore. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of 
Concord: 

The trustees of the Public Library herewith transmit 
the annual report of the librarian, showing in a general 
way what has been accomplished during the past year. 

At the last annual meeting of the trustees a vote was 
passed requesting an appropriation for the ensuing year 
equal to that of last year ($5,885). As the salaries of 
the four assistants were increased to nearly three hun- 
dred dollars in the aggregate, and as the usual expenses 
of maintaining the library cannot be substantially de- 
creased without endangering its efficiency, the appropria- 
tion asked for is deemed to be as small as is consistent 
with a reasonable economy in the administration of the 
library. 

REUBEN E. WALKER, 

President of Board of Trustees. 

Concord, N. H., February 12, 1918. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1917. 



To the Board of Trustees of tJie Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen : This year has led everybody to use a new 
measuring stick. We have lived in an atmosphere of such 
momentous events that the doings of a small institution 
have, rightfully, come to look^ — small. Yet though the 
facts about the library may not be imprCvSsive, this is the 
time to state them. 

The war has had the effect of lessening desk circulation ; 
ours has fallen off 2,300 and reached only 85,830 during 
1917. This decrease was to be expected, for those who 
used to read voraciously are busy, women are working for 
the Red Cross, girls are knitting and men have been called 
to the colors. The reference room also has had less cus- 
tom, 5,164 inquiries being made there as against 6,752 in 
the previous twelve months ; 660 new borrowers have ap- 
plied ; the usual number is a hundred more than that. 

The activities of the library have, however, not been 
feAver than heretofore; they have merely been different. 
Like all librarians throughout the country, we have packed 
for soldiers' camps many boxes filled with books readily 
contributed by citizens. "We have displayed posters and 
distributed pamphlets of those government departments 
which are trying so hard to develop in our nation traits 
required by present exigencies. We have taken part in 
the campaign, which resulted most creditably in Concord, 
for raising money to enable the American Library Associa- 
tion to build and maintain libraries in all the cantonments. 
We liave felt as if we could well abandon many of our old 
ways and most of our dead books, and rest the library's 
right to exist upon it^ ability to make people see 
straighter. 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Our purchases have been pertinent to the times, espe- 
cially in the live and rapidly growing collection of war 
books which we have placed where the public enjoys free 
and frequent access to them; even the books in French on 
the Avar have been snapped up at once. The accession 
record for the year runs : 

86 duplicate volumes ; 

65 bindery volumes; 
128 replacements ; 
671 new publications ; 

making a total of 950 volumes. 

There is a memorandum of 298 volumes removed from 
the shelves in 1917, but in the ''drives" when I have 
thrown away outgrown non-fiction and the ephemeral fic- 
tion of yester-year, made consignments to the basement and 
other rearrangements, I may have lost exact count of dis- 
cards, and a new inventory will be needed to determine 
whether my figure of 30,832 volumes on our shelves is cor- 
rect. At the Millville Orphans' Home we had a deposit of 
fifty books when the fire occurred there last October, but 
the books were not destroyed. 

To our Concord collection Mr. Montgomery Eollins has 
contributed his story, "The A^illage Pest." We are now on 
volume four of the scrap-books we are filling with the let- 
ters of Mr. Will Cressy. The reference room has been 
given by Mrs. William G. Robertson, in memory of her 
husband, a set of "The International Librar}^ of Famous 
Literature. ' ' 

We have always bought a good supply of fiction, provid- 
ing it more amply than many a larger library; and this 
custom comes in well now, when bright and cheery reading 
is the due of the men and women who are under an anxious 
strain. We can offer to our customers the soldier-poets 
and the statesmen, but on principle we buy also books of 
kindly humor and diverting plot.' With the interest on the 
Cogswell fund, given for the purchase of works of biogra- 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 253 

pliy, geography, history and science, and on the Hazeltine- 
Ela fund, given for ''high-class literature," we have had 
the means to make some excellent additions. The latest 
edition of The New International Encyclopedia, Miss 
Brown, the reference librarian, reports has already proved 
a blessing. The set of Luther Burbank's "Methods and 
Discoveries ' ' has such a wealth of colored illustrations that 
when an important grange meeting was held in town, we 
took the twelve volumes to show the members present. The 
season has been rich in notable biographies, and we have 
bought those of Keats, Audubon, John Fiske, Edward 
Everett Hale, Richard Harding Davis, "The Little Grand- 
mother of the Russian Revolution," &c., &c. 

I had a thrill of literary delight when I took up our local 
paper and read tliat the Atlantic Monthly was soon to be 
printed in Concord. Inquiry at the Rumford Printing 
Company brought out the fact that that firm is already 
issuing the Yale Review, Smith College, Welleslcy and 3It. 
Holyoke Quarterlies, The House Beautiful, The American 
Journal of Archaeology , The Annals of the American Acad- 
emy of Political and Social Science, &c. It is not an af- 
fectation but a genuine feeling with me that the public 
library in the city which contains sucli a publishing house 
ouglit to see to it that its own library rank does not become 
low. 

There has ])een vouchsafed in 1917 the privilege dear to 
librarians of seeing authors. Baroness Huard, Countess 
Turczynowicz, Major Ian Hay Beith and Capt. Louis 
Keene have spoken to Concord audiences which had been 
eagerly reading their books of war experiences. Janet 
McKenzie Hill has come and demonstrated that she can 
cook as well as compile cook-books. Mr. A. T. Dudley, a 
favorite writer for boys, spoke at a neighborhood library 
meeting we held in October. The mention of Mr. Dudley, 
who is secretary of the new New Hampshire Library Com- 
mission, leads me to say it is already evident that through 
this l)oard the libraries in the state will be helped and will 
in turn become more helpful. 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In August, upon the death of Mr. Samuel C. Eastman, 
this library was, by his will, given some of his books and 
some shares of stock and was made residuary legatee to 
one-fourth of his estate. Later on we shall know to what 
sum of money this entitles us, but we need not Avait till 
then to acknowledge his kind and generous thought for 
this institution. I can testify, though, that any bequest 
of appreciable amount could not be spent suitably upon 
the library as now housed, but should be directed toward 
the providing of ampler quarters. There does not remain 
now mucli "weeding" to do and we buy about 1,000 vol- 
umes annually, therefore it can be seen that the shelving 
problem is becoming serious; it seems to me inevitable 
that we shall have to floor over the space above the cata- 
logue table and thus gain room for stacking, even though 
the interior appearance of the building and its ventilation 
suffer thereby. 

The presence of a policeman on duty recent Sundays 
has remedied the disorder which is always sure to arise 
through the winter months on Sunday afternoons when 
gangs of boys resort to the library, not to read, but to make 
trouble for the attendant in charge. When fifty-two per- 
sons are in, and only thirty-five can be seated, the dis- 
turbance of adults by uneasy youngsters can be prevented 
only by the arm of the law. 

The librarian has talked to some schoolrooms and clubs 
about new books, feeling this a legitimate part of her duty, 
in that it makes her hearers realize that a public library 
has wonderfully interesting additions which are not novels 
and that it keeps abreast of masculine needs, buying works 
on radio-telegraphy or on Christian socialism, for instance, 
as soon as they are off the press. In the hope of brighten- 
ing the winter and of furthering the usefulness of the li- 
brary, I had thought to have a morning story-hour again 
for children, and to petition that the Shakespeare room be 
used occasionally for civic work in urgent causes; but the 
fuel situation has obliged us to heat less space and for 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 255 

fewer hours than ordinarily, and some projects must be 
postponed. But the library shall not stand still (even 
though in this changing world it might be a relief to feel 
that some institutions remain the same), for while an ark 
is a good place for safety, to be down in the turbulent 
waters chasing something which needs to be chased is what 
we prefer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Lihr avian. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1917. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The twenty-fifth annual report to your board is here- 
with submitted. 

The expenses of this department for the year 1917 were 
as follows : 

Paid engineer and assistants, $3,876.90 

for supplies, 146.73 

telephone, 22.10 

express, 1.74 

transportation, 60.00 

real estate transfers, 14.31 

repairs, 5.61 



Total expenditures, $4,127.39 

Appropriation, $4,508.90 

Expended, 4,127.39 



Ilnexi^ended balance, $381.51 

Sewers. 

The work done under this appropriation is detailed in 
the report of this department to the Board of Public 
Works. 



report of the city engineer. 257 

Water-Works. 

Some surveys were made for the superintendent of the 
works, near the head of Penacook Lake, plans made and 
turned over to him. 

A complete set of plans sliowing the pipe-lines and ap- 
purtenances are nearly completed and ready for delivery. 

Fire Department. 

Plans and specifications were made for changes in the 
Ward One station to provide quarters for the new appara- 
tus to be placed therein. The floor under the old appara- 
tus room in this station righted and made secvire for any 
machine likely to be located there. 

The floor of the Alert Hose house was put in shape for 
new apparatus of greater weight than the old hose wagon 
stationed there in years past. 

The plans showing the location of all the fire-alarm boxes 
and public hydrants have been corrected to date and cop- 
ies of them delivered to the chief of the department. 

Building Petitions. 

In company with the chief of the fire department twenty- 
two hearings have been attended on petitions for new build- 
ings or additions to old ones within the fire precinct. 

All petitions have been granted and returns made as 
required by ordinance. 

Cemeteries. 

We have re-laid out portions of Woodlawn Cemetery, 
Pine Grove Cemetery and Maple Grove Cemetery during 
the past season. Have made plans for proposed changes 
in the tomb at Woodlawn Cemetery and turned them over 
to the committee having this cemetery in charge. 

We have been trying for several years to get a topograph- 
ical survev of the "Bradlev" addition to Blossom Hill 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cemetery. The past season we were able to do the neces- 
sary field work, have plotted this section and have two 
plans for future development well under way. It is not 
expected that this portion of the cemetery can be devel- 
oped, as a whole, at one time, but any work done in this 
section of the enclosure will have to be started with some 
definite plan in view as to permanent improvement, owing 
to the contour of the land and the large gravel pit, at its 
southeasterly corner, excavated by the city some years ago 
while the land was in the hands of private parties. 

This pit and the ravine can be filled, to a certain height, 
with ashes or any clean non-decaying waste material, at a 
nominal cost to the city, much cheaper than by any other 
method, leaving the earth to be moved from many places 
therein to some point on the lot where it can be profitably 
used to bring the land into the market for burial pur- 
poses. There is not sufficient material on the lot to prop- 
erly grade it without filling material from other sources, 
and the scarcity of good dumping places for ashes and 
other suitable waste materials makes this available spot of 
value to the city for this purpose. 

A practical working layout can be made and a beautiful 
addition to this cemetery secured at a reasonable expense, 
and if conservatively handled provide funds for the future 
care of the cemetery when it becomes filled. 

Two new blocks have been graded and wnll be ready for 
lotting next spring. 

The building of the culvert in the northw^esterly section 
of the enclosure has progressed so far as to bring two more 
desirable blocks into condition for final grading. 

Plans for a proposed layout of the entire northwesterly 
portion of Blossom Hill Cemetery have been made and 
turned over to the superintendent. 

Sur^^eys were made for the proposed fence and retain- 
ing wall on the Bradley Street side of the Old North Ceme- 
tery. 

The deed book of Blossom Hill Cemetery has been 
brought up to date. 



report of the city engineer. 259 

Assessors' Maps. 

Practically no field work was done for these maps during 
the past season, but the property transfers have been kept 
up to date from the monthly statements furnished us by 
the register of deeds. 

The annual lists of real estate owners were prepared and 
turned over to the board of assessors. 

Miscellaneous. 

The heating plants at the Ward One police station and 
at the city station on Warren Street were too small for the 
duty required of them. The heating surfaces were com- 
puted and new boilers of sufficient capacity to care for the 
radiating surfaces attached were installed by the committee 
on lands and buildings. 

Information to private individuals regarding street lines, 
grades, etc., and the ownership of property within the city 
limits has been given so far as our records covered their 
requirements. 

The employees of this department during the year were 
as follows: 

Fred W. Lang, principal assistant, Orion H. Hardy, 
transitman, and Carroll D. Hardy, rodman, whose services 
have been of value to the city in their respective positions. 

For the interest taken in and the many courtesies shown 
this department, by your board, I wish to express my ap- 
preciation. 

Itespectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer, 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT COM- 
MISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1917. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen : 

The twelfth annual report of this board, for the year 
1917, is herewith submitted. 

At a meeting April 2d it was voted to recommend the 
placing of a hydrant on Glen Street midway between Al- 
lison Street and West Street. 

At a later meeting it was voted to recommend the in- 
stallation of one hydrant at the junction of Dartmouth and 
Noyes Streets. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1917. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The eighteenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The membership of the board at the beginning of the 
year was: Frederick F. Converse, journeyman plumber, 
Charles H. Cook, M. D., and Will B. Howe, city engineer. 
Mr. Converse left town and on September 10 Mr. Arthur 
W. Robinson w^as appointed to fill the vacancy. 

The board as now constituted is as follows : Mr. Arthur 
W. Robinson, chairman, Charles H. Cook, M. D., and Will 
B. Howe, city engineer, clerk. 

No new applications for licenses were received during 
the year. 

The making out of licenses and certificates, signing and 
delivering the same, constituted the work of the board. 

The attached table gives the names of all plumbers reg- 
istered by this board, their grades and the amounts paid, 
with dates of payments and the date of expiration of li- 
censes and certificates. 

The total receipts of the board were $26. There was 
expended the sum of $1.08 for postage. 



262 



CITY OF CONC(JRD. 



1—1 
en 



Q 
Q 

JZ2 



"q3 



oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 



^.t^t^^-l>.t--t^t--t--^-t^t^^^I>■^-^^t^t^^-^-t^t^l^t--lr^l^^-^-^-l>■^>^-r-t- 



P, TO pi ra Ct! 



a, :; a ^ 






a,c; CCS 



C/2 



O 
O 



O} 

w 






«z; 



a> ;; 0) -- 

=^ - ^ s 









— • -f-r 












C-) 






^ 00 


JlOrf 












2:^.5-; = l. - =■-- 5 5 S o-l? ^'^^c-",^,"^:^ ci cc a. <B SJ; = °^ 



EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 



263 



ooooooooooooooooo 






aj >-i 




b 


<a. 


Ui 




urn 
aste 
urn 



to' 


3 


05- - 


►^S 




s 


i-s 


s 





lO 


05 M • 












- i ' 



IM t- ^ -" ^ OJ O 
lO t- 1-1 rt -H in ;0 



's C.2M :^ f •= = = r:f-5-i-=Ji'«- 

y, oa: i- 1- 'S— — ^— -■- - in cs c o 



O 

m 
o 

re P^ 

I * 

> w 

B ^ 

9 P:? 

P^ 



O 

■ ^ 

K O 

H • 

3 « 






^ 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

To the Board of Puhlic Works: 

Gentlemen : In submitting- the annual report of the 
highway department for 1917, I must say that most of the 
work this year was along the line of general repairing. 
Early in the springy the work of plowing gardens was 
placed under this department and it was necessary to 
give so much time to that work that the usual spring 
repairs on the highways were delayed and neglected. It 
is easy to see why the work was delayed when you con- 
sider that the work of plowing gardens covered a period 
from April 24th to June 9th and that during that time 
from eleven to fifteen teams were employed in plowing 
and harrowing the 1,070 gardens it cost the city $2,457.63 
to do. While there may be no question as to the advis- 
ability of the city doing the work there should be some 
changes made in the system and free plowing given only 
to those who cannot afford to hire the work done and 
those able to pay should be charged a reasonable amount 
for the same. Furthermore, there should be a limit to 
the time for making application for plowing. Last year 
the plowing in one section of the city would be completed 
only to be followed in a day or two by more orders, which 
made it necessary to go all over the same section again, 
causing delay and expense and hindering any plans that 
the department might make for carrying on the work. A 
time limit for making application for plowing should be 
insisted on if plowing is done by the city another season. 

By the time that the plowing and the usual spring work 
on the highways was completed the shortage of labor was 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 265 

apparent and it was impossible to find suitable labor to 
do any great amount of permanent work, and transporta- 
tion difficulties further hindered construction work. It 
Avas impossible to get trap rock and there was delay in 
obtaining other road materials. It is more important to 
keep in good repair those streets where permanent im- 
provements have been made than to build new ones, and 
I would again recommend, as I did in my report for 1916, 
that more be appropriated for general maintenance. 

The permanent improvements for which appropriations 
were made and on which work was not undertaken were 
Washington Street in Penacook, South Street, South 
Main Street, Aubvirn Street and Central state highway, 
and I think we should do the work on those streets the 
coming summer. 

Macadam was put in on East Penacook Street, South 
State from Monroe to Perley, North State on the east 
side from Blossom Hill Cemetery to Penacook Street, and 
the east side of North Main Street from Park to Center 
was concreted. As usual, nearly all the macadam was re- 
surfaced and the state paid one-half of the expense on 
the trunk lines. 

No great amount of work was done on bridges except- 
ing that the Loudon bridge was re-planked. Several of 
the bridges need painting badly. 

This year the department continued putting up new 
street signs and have succeeded in getting a good part of 
the streets properly marked. 

About the same amount of work was done on concrete 
walks and catch basins as in other years. 

In the fall of 1916 some fifty trees were set out and 
nearly all of them came out well in the spring. This 
year we tried planting larger trees in the spring, about 
one hundred being set out. Another season will show 
which is the better time for planting and then more can 
be put out where they are needed. The ordinance passed 
during the year in regard to shade trees was a step in 
the right direction, especially in regard to the planting 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of poplar trees. While such trees grow very fast they 
do not live long and are the cause of much trouble with 
sewer and water pipes. The brown-tail moths were not 
as numerous last summer, but the number of gypsy moth 
nests is increasing rapidly each year and the}' are very 
destructive. It is hard to find suitable climbers and it 
may be necessary to do a great deal of the work against 
this pest by spraying in the spring. 

Oil was used for dust laying last summer, although but 
one application was made on account of the heavy rains. 
I would recommend that if it is possible to obtain the oil 
that more of it be used next summer as it gives more 
lasting and satisfactory results than water. 

The precinct for the collection of garbage was again 
extended last year and the amount to be collected has 
also increased. It would be impossible to collect it sat- 
isfactorily, since the territory has been enlarged so much, 
without the -garbage truck. 

The same recommendations that I made in my last re- 
port still hold good in regard to equipment for the high- 
way department, and I would also recommend two trucks 
for use in the department, one for hauling gravel and 
another for collecting street sweepings. The Velie truck 
which was transferred from the police to the highway 
department, and for which a new body was built, proved 
that a truck of that type would be very useful for high- 
way work. However, the motive power was no more sat- 
isfactory to this department than it had been to the 
police department and it was constantly in need of repair 
and proved very expensive to keep in running order. 

I appreciate the interest which the board has taken in 
all the work of the highway de])artment and wish to thank 
them for many courtesies received. 

Respectfully submitted, 

AliFRED CLARK, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 267 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $45,000.00 
Transferred from catch basins, 121.58 
trees, 1,276.18 
sidewalks and cross- 
ings, new, 85.79 
sidewalks and cross- 
ings, repair, 160.77 
permanent work. No. 

Main Street, 14-t.08 
permanent work. No. 

State Street, 181.98 
permanent work. Au- 
burn Street, 993.21 
By Joint Resolution No. 311, 1,683.01 



-$49,646.60 



EXPENDITURES. 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $15,504.40 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 10,911.49 
Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 410.45 
Supplies, culverts, 67.68 
Labor pay-rolls, sidewalks, 286.72 
signs, .90 
Supplies, signs, 295.04 
Labor pay-rolls, watering troughs and 

drinking fountains, 13.34 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Supplies, watering troughs and drink- 
ing fountains, , .$99.12 
Labor paj^-rolls, cleaning gutters, 3,514.72 

repairing and paving 

gutters, 92.52 

bridges, 843.11 

Supplies, bridges, 1,671.97 

Labor pay-rolls, fences, 24.49 

Supplies, fences, 24.69 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 144.00 

resurfacing macadam, 1,251.86 

Supplies, repairing macadam, 47.50 

resurfacing macadam, 1,617.14 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 4,380.84 

Supplies, winter expense, 52.00 



-$41,258.98 



50.54 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $1,807.54 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair. 

Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 45.19 

sidewalks, 113.71 
watering troughs and 

drinking fountains, 1.40 
Supplies, watering troughs and drink- 
ing fountains, 6.56 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 519.22 
bridges, 121.80 
Supplies, bridges, 178.59 
Labor pay-rolls, fences, 93.93 
Supplies, fences, 10.65 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 98.86 
winter expense, 808.65 



3,856.64 



board of public works. 269 

West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $1,013.99 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 25.75 
Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 98.66 
sidewalks, 24.81 
winter expense, 485.84 

.$1,649.05 



East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, .$1,057.87 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 76.85 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 278.43 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $238,00 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 8.30 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 103.23 



HoiT District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $71.16 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 



pair, 



3.00 



Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 40.37 



1,413.15 



349.58 



114.53 



270 city op concord. 

Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $171.74 

Supplies, general maintenance and re- 
pair, 3.00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 60.43 



$235.17 



Sanborn District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair. $144.88 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 13.38 



158.26 



Number Four District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $316.96 

Supplies, genera] maintenance and re- 
pair, 16.60 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 282.73 



616.29 



Total expenditures, $49,646.60 

CATCH BASINS. 

Appropriation, $1,300.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, $763.64 

repairing, 85.45 

building, 38.27 

Supplies, 131.22 

$1,018.58 



board of public works. 271 

Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, . .$117.82 

repairing, 7.86 

.$125.68 

West Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 34.16 

Total expenditures, $1,178.42 

Transferred to general maintenance, 121.58 

« 

$1,300.00 

TREES. 

Appropriation, .$2,500.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $209.44 
Labor pay-rolls, setting out trees, 84.00 
care of moth pests, 245.34 
Supplies, 461.70 

$1,000.48 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and remov- 
ing trees, $80.81 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, 71.40 
Supplies, 10.40 



162.61 



272 city of concord. 

West Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, trinmiing trees, $1.90 

East Concord District. 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, 58.83 



Total expenditures, $1,223.82 

Transferred to general maintenance, 1,276.18 



$2,500.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation, $750.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District, 

Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, etc., $143.18 
Edgestone, 276.50 

Concrete, 189.86 

$609.54 

Penacook District. '* 

Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, etc., $6.03 
Concrete, 48.64 

54.67 



Total expenditures, $664.21 

Transferred to general maintenance, 85.79 

$750.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 273 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,500.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, $80.90 

Concrete, 2,243.33 

Edgestone, 15.00 



Total expenditures, $2,339.23 

Transferred to general maintenance, 3 60.77 



$2,500.00 



PERMANENT WORK. 

Washington Street — Penacook. 

Appropriation, $500.00 

Unexpended balance, $500.00 

East Penacook Street. 

Appropriation, $500.00 

Transferred from permanent work, 

North Main Street, 18.01 



Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls. 
Supplies, 


$282.04 
235.97 


South Street. 

Appropriation, 
Unexpended balance. 


$1,500.00 
$1,500.00 



274 CITy OF CONCORD. 

South Main Street to "'^est Street. 

Appropriation, $350.00 

Unexpended balance, $350.00 

South State Street — Monroe to Perley. 

Appropriation, $2,650.00 

Transferred from permanent work, 

North Main Street, 546.02 

$3,196.02 

Expenditures — 

Labor pay-rolls, • $2,505.84 

Supplies, 690.18 

$3,196.02 

North State Street — Blossom Hill Cemetery to Pena- 
cooK Street, East Side. 

Appropriation, $1,600.00 

Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls, $543.17 

Supplies, 874.85 



Total expenditures, $1,418.02 

Transferred to general maintenance, 181.98 



$1,600.00 

North Main Street — East Side from Park to Center. 

Appropriation, $2,250.00 

Expenditures — 
Labor pay-rolls, $719.59 

Concrete and supplies, 822.30 



Total expenditures, $1,541.89 

Transferred to permanent work. East Penacook 

Street, 18.01 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 275 

Transferred to permanent work, South State 

Street, $546.02 

Transferred to general maintenance, 144.08 



$2,250.00 



Auburn Street. 

Appropriation, .$1,000.00 

Expenditures — 
Transferred to general maintenance, $993.21 

Unexpended balance, 6.79 



$1,000.00 



Central State Highway. 



Appropriation, $2,500.00 

Unexpended balance, $2,500.00 

SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 



Appropriation, 


$1,958.90 


Expenditures — 




Salary, 


$1,958.90 


GARBAGE. 




Balance from 1916, 


$870.18 


Appropriation, 


9,000.00 


By Joint Resolution No. 311, 


136.03 


Deficiency to 1918, 


20.09 




4^10 O'^fi 30 




'^i L\j j\j ^\j .*jy 


Expenditures — 




Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage. 


$4,870.70' 


collecting paper, 


879.27 


burning paper, 


18.08 


leveling ashes. 


785.14 


patrol carts. 


2,362.65 


Supplies, 


1,110.46 




$10,026.30 



18 



276 CITY OP CONCORD. 






SPRINKLING. 






Balance from 1916, 


$1,239.22 




Appropriation, 


8,500.00 


$9,739.22 






Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, repairing carts. 


$169.68 




repairing stand pipes, 


25.15 




sprinkling with water 


, 4,738.15 




sprinkling with oil. 


44.57 




Oil, 


2,406.81 




Supplies, 


276.86 


$7,661.22 






Balance to 1918, 




2,078.00 




$9,739.22 


PENACOOK SPRINKLING 


PRECINCT. 


Balance from 1916, 


$131.09 




Appropriation, 


400.00 


$531.09 






Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, repairing standpipes, 


$7.02 




sprinkling streets, 


320.78 




Supplies, 


21.78 


$349.58 






Balance to 1918, 




181.51 



$531.09 



Deposited with the City Treasurer as follows : 

State aid, highways, $926.61 

Garbage, 136.03 

Concrete, 305.86 

Trees, 171.70 

Labor, etc., 278.84 



$1,819.04 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



277 



To the Board of Public Works: 

The seventh annual report to your board, showing work 
done under the supervision of the engineering department, 
for your board, is herewith submitted: 

Sewers. 

The conii)laint of the previous year, shortage of labor, 
was a great handicap during the season just passed. The 
price set for labor by this board would not permit the em- 
ployment of an,y number of ofificient laborers for the work 
on hand, with higher prices being paid in nearby locali- 
ties. If work is to be continued on the Beacon Street 
sewer during the coming season prices for labor will have 
to be materially increased to meet those paid in other 
places. 

The purchase or lease of machinery would enable us to 
complete this much-needed line of sewer with wages ad- 
vanced to meet present conditions. 

Realizing conditions in the labor market, bids were asked 
for constructing the Beacon Street sewer, which bids cov- 
ered the laying of 1,554 feet of 33-inch segmental block, 
the building of eight manholes and the re-connecting of all 
houses and catch-basins now in the old sewer, also the care 
of the sewage flowing at any and all times in the present 
sewer during the replacement of the 12-inch pipe with the 
33-inch one. 

Bids were received as follows: 





^ *^ u 


U ' ' 




t. * ' 






IV o o 


C - G 


a:, t. « 


c S2 o 


o * 




_ ® 


So . 


^ih 


'*' o a) 


D. 




rice 
inea 
or s 
aid. 


■r d 0.2 


"C =, o g 


rice 
ach 
on 
ion. 


® S -■ 




0,-*- — 


a;o.sa 


£ O !- > 


3_^aio« 


QO- 


Susi & Williams... 


$10.00 


$125.00 


$13.00 


$5.00 


Sept. 15, 1917 


Thomas Bruno 


9.65 


60.00 


6.08 


3.00 


Sept. 1, 1917 


Dadflario & Bootli.. 


7.00 


115.00 


8.00 


2.00 


Augr. 15. 1917 


Susi & Petricia 


7.00 


100.00 


10.00 


2.00 


Sept. 1, 1917 



278 CITY OF CO]S[CORD. 

City to furnish the segmental block only. The contractor 
to furnish all other materials, labor and machinery neces- 
sary to complete the work at the time set in their respective 
bids. Work to commence on or before May 15, 1917. 

These bids gave prices from .$12,000 to .$17,000 for the 
work, an amount from fifty to one hundred per cent, above 
what the work should cost, and were rejected by your 
board on the reconnnendation of your engineer. 

We laid on this sewer, with a very small force of men, 211 
feet of the segmental block, made connections with the 
Washington Street sewers, built three manholes and got 
into Beacon Street ready for the straightaway work. The 
most difficult and trying portion of this line is now in, and 
l)arring unforeseen obstructions the work should proceed 
more rapidly with an adequate working force. The ledge 
encountered near Beacon Street added about $300 to the 
cost of the section laid. It is hardly probable that we shall 
encounter more ledge on this line. 

The conditions existing in the section of the city served 
by this line of sewer are too well known to your board to 
need any further comment from me. 

Three breaks in the old cement pipe laid in Concord 
Street in 1873, between South State Street and South Main 
Street, revealed the fact that the old pipe was so nearly 
worn out at the invert that renewal was necessary at once. 
We accordingly replaced with 10-inch Akron pipe this line, 
remade all house connections and cared for the tiow of 
sewage in the old line during the relaying. 

A new sewer was laid in Stevens Avenue and Kent 
Street, to take the house sewage only, as the Pleasant 
Street uiain has not sufficient capacity to carry surface 
drainage. The surface water in this section can be easily 
carried into the brook lying westerly from Stevens Avenue, 
thus saving enlarged mains to the Merrimack River. 

But seven permits for sewer connections were issued dur- 
ing the year, but the report of the inspector gives nineteen 
new entries. The use of the Y's provided for house con- 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 279 

noctions, where they are installed, should be required and 
the practice of making square entries to the small sewers 
should be stopped. 

STEVENS AVENUE AND KENT STREET. 



457 feet of 6-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid. 


Stevens 


Avenue. 


163 feet of 6-inch Akron 


pipe 


laid, 


Kent Street. 




Paid for labor, 










$672.34 


pipe. 










123.04 


cement. 










25.05 


brick, 










66.30 


trucking. 










22.00 


castings, 










49.00 


wrought-iron. 










2.89 


oil, 










1.95 


sand. 










6.00 


blacksmith, 










6.85 



Material excavated, gravel and hardpan. 
Average cost per lineal foot. $1.573-|-. 



Material excavated, sand, gravel and clay. 
Average cost per lineal foot, $1.628-|-. 



$975.42 



CONCORD 


STREET 


, RELAY. 




354 feet of 10-inch Akron pipe 


laid. 




Paid for labor, 






$818.54 


castings, 






22.00 


pipe. 






159.04 


trucking. 






26.60 


cement. 






16.50 


wrought-iron, 






1.26 


sand, 






.50 


brick, 






29.16 


coal-tar concrete, 






2.21 


oil. 






.65 



$576.40 



280 CITY OF CONCORD, 

BEACON STREET. 

211 feet of 33-inch segmental block laid. 
3 manholes built. 



id for labor, 


$1,300.50 


brick, 


100.30 


cement, 


66.00 


sand, 


4.00 


oil. 


3.25 


lumber, 


20.48 


hardware, 


3.84 


blacksmith. 


22.85 


trucking. 


93.25 


castings, 


32.50 


dynamite. 


18.48 


freight. 


3.63 


steel. 


2.43 


crushed stone, 


2.50 


coal-tar concrete, 


9.01 


typing contract and specifications. 


10.00 



Material excavated, sand, gravel and ledge. 
Average cost per lineal foot, $8.023-f-. 



$1,693.02 



REPAIRS. 

Sargent sewer, $5.30 

Ferry Street, sand from catch-basins, 13.16 

Dakin Street, brick (1916 bill), 10.00 

Walker Street, brick (1916 bill), 10.00 

Park Street, brick (1916 bill), 12.40 

Concord Street, 41.14 

East of Main Street, lamphole, 7.06 

Noyes Street, 20.96 

McKinley Street (1916 bill), " 12.50 

Albin Street, sand from catch-basins, 31.41 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 281 

Hill's Avenue, manhole, $16.55 
Durgiu Street, account of concreting roadway, 8.28 
Prospect Street, sand from catch-basins, 2.78 
South State Street, account of macadam, 18.25 
Rumford Street, sand, wood and gravel from catch- 
basins, 82.59 
Downing Street, sticks from catch-basin, 7.94 
Bradley Street, sand from catch-basins, 56.78 
Tremont Street, stoppage, 4.33 
Princeton Street, 6.11 



$377.54 



Paid for flushing, $374.03 

tools, 46.65 

Paid Manchester Safe Deposit and Trust Company, 

expense incurred in bond issue, 105.00 



$525.68 

New sewers laid, 1917, 831 feet 

Sewer pipe renewals, 354 " 



Total pipe laid, 1,185 feet 

Sewers built in city precinct to December 31, 1917 : 

6-inch Akron pipe, 2,974 feet. 

8-inch Akron pipe, 25,657 

10-inch Akron pipe, 55,307 

12-inch Akron pipe, 39,663 

12-inch cement pipe, 415 

15-inch Akron pipe, 11,646 

18-inch Akron pipe, 7,134 

20-inch Akron pipe, 5,029 

24-inch Akron pipe, 4,064 

30-inch Akron pipe, 1,780.5 

Brick. 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 

14-inch X 22-inch, 350 



282 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Brick, 16-mch x 24-inch, 1,848 feet. 

20-inch x 32-inch, 2,527 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 

30-inch circular, 402 

38-inch circular, 4,080 

24-inch cast-iron, 1,576 

30-inch cast-iron, 1,054.5 

33-inch segmental block, 211 

42-inch segmental block, 1,055 

42-inch brick and concrete, 246 

60-inch brick and concrete, 1,450 



191,562.5 feet. 



Total miles in city precinct, 36.281 -[-. 

Funds available for construction and repairs, $6,524.73 
Expended, 4,148.06 



Unexpended balance December 31, 1917, $2,376.67 

West Concord Sewer Precinct. 

The entire sewer system in this precinct was cleaned and 
flushed in the spring and fall and minor repairs were made 
on all the outlets. 

Expenditures were as follows: 

Paid for flushing, 
repairs, 



Funds available. 
Expended, 

Unexpended balance, $5.71 



$23.96 
92.24 


$116.20 

$121.91 
116.20 



board of public works. 283 

East Concord Sewer Precinct. 

No expenditures were made in this precinct during the 
season and the balance remains as on December 31, 1916, 
viz. : .^127.58. 

Saint Paul's School Precinct. 

No expense was incurred for maintenance or repairs 
during the year ; the balance available for these purposes 
remains as one year ago, viz. : 5^^94.55. 

Monthly statements of coal-tar concrete laid in the streets 
and on the sidewalks have been made, showing the num- 
ber of square yards in place, the cost and location of same 
shown and these statements turned over to the departments 
or committees ordering the work to be done. 

Lines and grades have been given the street department 
for their work when requested. 

In company with one or both of the other members of 
the committee for location of poles, I have attended to 
that duty when possible, any hearings or meetings of your 
board when requested, and furnished such information as 
called for from this department. 

For the courtesies extended this department by your 
board. I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

We beg to submit the following report of the Board of 
Health for the year endiug December 31, 1917. 
The board was organized as follows : 

Mayor Hobbs, ex-officio, chairman; 
Dr. Charles H. Cook, secretary ; 
Dr. Sibley Morrill, member. 

Dr. Charles Duncan has again served as milk inspector 
and Mr. Charles E. Palmer was sanitary officer. 

Regular meetings were held at 4 p. m. on the first Mon- 
day of each month. 

Diphtheria. 

You will note that there has been an unusually large 
number of eases of diphtheria during the past year. Many 
of these cases occurred in the families of people lacking the 
means for the proper care of such cases at home. 

This has necessitated the removal of many cases to the 
Foster ward of the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. This was 
frequently done as much in the interest of the community 
at large as in the interest of the patient. Many progres- 
sive communities require that all cases of diphtheria, scar- 
let fever, smallpox, and some other diseases shall be treated 
in a hospital. It is thought that in this manner the com- 
munity is best protected from the spread of the disease. 
This is so without doubt where a ease occurs in a family of 
small means with many children. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 285 

Thus fairness to all concerned compels lis to send many 
eases to the hospital in spite of the fact that by so doing 
we are compelled to over-expend our appropriation. 

During the height of the epidemic the city physician ex- 
amined many children (1,279) and took 897 cultures in 
searching for mild and carrier cases of the malady. 

Most of this work was done in the schools. In the fall, 
however, the whole Fosterville district was combed over, a 
house to house canvass being made and cultures taken from 
the nose and throats of all the children. This field work 
disclosed many mild cases of diphtheria. Others were thus 
shown to be "carriers" of the disease. These cases were 
either quarantined or sent to hospital and as a result the 
epidemic rapidly declined. 

Many of the mild cases appeared to have the infection in 
the nose only and were thought to have simple "colds" by 
the parents. No physician was called and the children' 
were allowed to go about and to school and church, thus 
spreading the disease to others. 

Had the type of disease been more severe an early diag- 
nosis would have resulted in early isolation and served to 
check the spread of the disease. 

Antitoxin has been freely used both as a cure for those 
already sick and as a preventative for those who have been 
exposed. We believe it has saved many lives in Concord 
during the past year. 

We wish to express our approval of the state law provid- 
ing for the free distribution of this marvelous product of 
modern medical research. 

Smallpox. 

One case of smallpox was reported during the year. 

This case was removed to the detention hospital on the 
plains. Recovery was complete in four weeks and the pa- 
tient was released from quarantine at the end of that 
period. 

The detention hospital or "pest house," as it was for- 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

nierly called, has without doubt served a very useful pur- 
pose in the past. However, it is inaccessible. It is used so 
infrequently and is closed for such long i)eriods of time that 
it becomes damp and musty and is hardly suitable for use 
in cold weather. It is so lonely as to be hardly safe for 
occupancy by women. It has no modern conveniences and 
is at best a makeshift. 

We believe it should be disposed of and some other ar- 
rangement made for caring for the very infrequent cases 
of smallpox. 

Water Supply. 

Concord is very fortunate in having a plentiful supply 
of pure water delivered to consumers largely by gravita- 
tion. Penacook Lake, or Long Pond, is a perfect gem of a 
body of water, fed largely by springs. 

The catchment area is remarkably free from possible 
sources of pollution. 

The gradual acquisition of the land around the shore and 
the reforestation of the same will serve to insure posterity 
a copious and clean supply of water. 

It may become advisable some time in the near future 
to install a chlorination plant for the purpose of taking 
care of any chaiwc pollution. 

Milk Supply. 

The report of the milk inspector is transmitted here- 
with and made a part of this report. It is very important 
that we have a plentiful supply of good clean milk. It is 
of vital importance in the dietary of children. It has been 
shown that milk contains certain j^rinciples very necessary 
to the growth of the young. 

It is therefore hoped that the high price of feeds and 
scarcity of agricultural labor will not result in a material 
lessening of the supply of this very important food. 



health department. 287 

Appropriation. 

The appropriation for the Board of Health for the year 
1917 was $3,472.23 or 15.78 cents per capita. 

There was expended $3,944.29 or 17.9 cents per capita. 

Fnniigation supplies have cost more; in fact all supplies 
have cost more, but the main factor in accounting for the 
excess amount expended is the increased cost of hospital 
care for contagious diseases. Even so, Ave do not think 
that the total amount expended will be thought excessive. 

Surgeon Paul Preble, of the U. S. Public Health Serv- 
ice, has lately summarized the expenditures of 330 cities 
in the central and eastern United States for public health 
work. It appears from his statistics that the annual aver- 
age per capita expenditures for the 330 cities was 27.2 
cents. 

Tims our 17.9 cents will be seen to be within the average. 

The report of the sanitary officer is appended and you 
are referred to the tables in same for details of the depart- 
ment activities. 

In closing this report the Board of Health wishes to 
record its appreciation of the long and faithful services of 
Miss Helen O. Monier, who has for some years past served 
as clerk in the office of the board but who is at present on 
leave of absence due to illness. And we wish to express, 
both as a board and as individuals, our sincere hope that 
her (juest of health may speedily prove successful and that 
we shall shortly welcome back our courteous, capable, and 
faithful fellow-worker. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 
CHARLES H. COOK, 
S. G. MORRILL, 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR. 



The examinations made by the milk inspector appear 
in another part of the health department report. 

The milk industry, as all others during these times, has 
had its share of troubles. The great changes in the price 
of grain and other supplies, such as liottles, caps, etc., 
have resulted in the higher price of milk to the consumer, 
a price of twelve (12) cents being now generally charged, 
although milk may be obtained at from ten to eleven 
cents. 

As happened last year, again this year many of the 
routes have been sold and resold many times. These con- 
stant changes increase the difficulties in keeping up equip- 
ment to the required standards ; also, the Concord Milk- 
men 's Association, because of these changes, has lost some 
of its past ardor for organization and discussion of the 
best interests of the business ; this does not mean, how- 
ever, that there are not among them men of good ability 
who could handle any situation in an emergency. 

The supply of milk for the city, though below normal, 
seems at the present time adequate. The scarcity of 
sugar and the twelve (12) cent price has made a greater 
market for the condensed and evaporated milk. 

If under war conditions the price of milk increases 
some new^ delivery plan might become an economic neces- 
sity to keep the price within reach of the poor. 

The present plan where each route crosses and inter- 
laces every other route must mean a great loss of time 
and money. 

At this time the importance of milk to the children of 
the poor should not be lost sight of. Milk is the last 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 289 

food, under any condition, especially where there are 
children in the family, that the poor should be forced to 
curtail on, and if the city takes any action on food con- 
servation and distribution, milk should be the very first 
to receive attention. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen .- I herewith submit the report of the sani- 
tary officer for the year ending December 31, 1917, calling 
your attention to the tables which show the work done by 
this department. 

Returns were made of 509 deaths for the year 1917, 42 
more than in 1916. One hundred fifty-seven non-resi- 
dents and 19 still-births were excluded from this number 
in reckoning the death rate, which, based on the popula- 
tion of 22,000, was 14.40 compared with 12.81 in 1916. 
There were 231 deatlis at the six public institutions and 
278 in the nine wards of the city. The bodies of 124 
persons dying in other places were brought here to be in- 
terred, and 191 bodies were removed from Concord to 
other places for burial. 

Samples of water w^ere analyzed by the state chemist 
at different times during the year and found to be satis- 
factory. In company w4th the superintendent of the 
w^ater-works, I have made several inspections of the lake 
shore and found conditions good. 

Water tests were made of new plumbing and 138 per- 
mits were issued during the year. Peppermint tests were 
made of the old work whenever requests Avere received. 

The inspection of dwelling houses and blocks has been 
made thoroughly. This work has been made Avhere the 
inspections were most needed, and also of all premises 
complained of. 

Inspections were made of nearly all the barber shops 
in the city, which were found to be in good sanitary 
condition. 

In company with Dr. Duncan, T have made such in- 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 291 

spections of milk farms as time would permit, but with 
the inspection of sewers, plumbing, nuisances and com- 
plaints, the care of contagious diseases and the increasing 
demand for fumigation, we have not been able to accom- 
plish as much as should be done along this line, but during 
the year we were able to inspect 82 farms and found them 
to be in good condition. 

The total number of cases of contagious diseases reported 
was 610, with three deaths. This number was larger than in 
previous years and necessitated a large amount of extra 
work. There were 1,323 visits made to contagious disease 
cases. 

There were 138 eases of diphtheria reported, with three 
deaths, the largest number ever reported in one year. 
Medical inspections were made and cultures taken from 
the throats of all the pupils in the schoolrooms where pu- 
pils reported as having the disease had attended, and a 
number of mild and unrecognized cases of the disease 
were discovered. One case of smallpox occurred in May, 
the patient contracting the disease in an adjoining state. 
As soon as the same was discovered the patient was re- 
moved to the detention hospital on the Plains, there re- 
maining until complete recovery ; and in this connection 
I would say that while our building there is inade com- 
fortable for the summer use it is unfit for winter occu- 
pancy. I therefore recommend that the city dispose of 
this hospital and either arrange with the Margaret Pills- 
bury Hospital or the purchase of some other suitable 
building easy of access in the city proper. 

In closing my report I wish to thank the members of 
the Board of Health and the members of the city govern- 
ment for their assistance during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PAL^MER. 

Sanitary Officrr. 



19 



292 city of concord. 

Financial Statement of the Board of Health for the 

Year Ending December 31, 1917. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $1,572.23 

Salary, milk inspector, 300.00 

Fumigation supplies, 100.00 

Incidental expenses, 1,000.00 

Contagious diseases, 500.00 

Resolution No. 311, 472.06 



Total, 


$3,944.29 


expenditures. 




Salary, sanitary officer, 


$1,572.23 


Salary, milk inspector. 


300.00 


Fumigation supplies. 


140.90 


Incidental expenses. 


957.82 


Contagious diseases. 


973.34 



Total, $3,944.29 
receipts for the year 1917. 

Milk license fees, $201.50 

Sale of fumigation supplies, 3.85 

Total, $205.35 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



293 



The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during the year, and the deaths result- 
ing therefrom : 





Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Small- 
pox. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Whooping 
cough. 


MONTHS. 


M 
C 

S 
O 




6 


03 

Q 


to 

■8 


CO 

.a 
<o 


(V 

a: 
a 


Q 


05 

ca 
O 




K 

0) 

O 


03 


January . 


12 
11 
13* 
24* 

6 

4 

4 

2 
27 
18 

9 

8* 












1 




7 

5 

8 

76 

118 

128 

55 

9 








February 

March 




2 
11 
6 

4 






























April 


















May 




1 














June 








July 


1 
1 
1 


1 
9 
1 
7 
6 
3 



















August 








1 
2 
1 










September . . 




5 












4 
3 

1 




















































Total .... 


138* 


3 


47 




1 




5 




414 . 




5 











* Including 24 carriers. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES BY WARDS. 



WARDS. 



o ® 



K 




SP.a 


O 








(C 


0.3 


"rt 


•« 


©o 


g 


« 


.G 


CO 


^. 


^ 



Ward 1 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 



Total 138 



47 



30 

4 

2 
62 
70 
96 
112* 
25 
13 



414 



35 
6 
14 
98 
82 
131 
147 
30 
67 



610 



* Nineteen cases at St. Paul's School. 



594 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



The following table contains the number of eases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom 
for the years since and including 1890 : 



I 


Opthal- 
nia neona- 
torum. 


Whoop- 
ing- 
cough. 


In fan- 1 
tile pa- 
ralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typlioid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 


YEARS. 




.a 

0) 

Q 


01 

o 


aj 


03 

o 


Is 

Q 


CO 

cS 


a; 
Q 


CO 

<o 

CO 

CS 


3 

Q 


•A 

o 




CO 

in 
es 
O 




03 
0) 
CO 
CS 
O 


CO 

Q 


to 

o 


to 

Q 
















6 

12 

13 

48 

17 

35 

55 

13 
4 
9 

29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 

131 
30 
51 
17 
33 
3C 
21 
54 

136 


2 
3 
3 

7 

8 

8 
1 

5 
5 
5 

2 
4 
3 

1 
2 
2 
4 
6 
1 
2 

1 
3 



3 
3 


9 
7 

37 
41 

113 

44 

4 

22 

8 

99 
39 
11 
6 
39 
18 
80 
27 

•:6 

7 
23 
10 
8 
7 
28 
28 
26 
16 
4' 


3 

6 

8 

1 
1 

1 

1 
1 



.... 


17 

14 
7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 
S 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 
6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 
7 
8 
8 
5 


5 
6 

1 
2 

3 
3 

5 
2 

4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

1 
4 

3 
4 
1 

2 

1 
1 


6 

2 

300 

21 

15S 

452 

138 

126 

299 

476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

1168 

143 

26 

321 

GS7 

6 

9 

382 

414 




j 


38 7 






















35 

59 
402 
164 
258 
526 
190 
146 
421 
562 
130 

87 
6S2 
116 
299 

175 
218 

157 
1350 

199 
95 

362 

763 
74 
94 

468 

610 


9 
















7 






















9 
















12 


1895 














19 
13 
















4 
















1 
4 


1 

2 

2 


1 


4 
















7 


1900 














7 
9 
















5 
















11 
















4 


1905 














1 
1 


1 




5 


1906 














6 
















3 






















5 


1909 .... 














1 






11 












2 






















6 


1912 . 








2 
5 
3 

1 


1 
1 

1 


2 






8 












5 


















2 


1915 

1916 


1 




25 
5 
5 


1 

1 




4 




Z 

7 


1917 






3 























health department. 295 

Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions. 



Ward 1, 


27 


Ward 2, 


14 


Ward 3, 


10 


Ward 4, 


56 


Ward 5, 


45 


Ward 6, 


89 


Ward 7, 


45 


Ward 8, 


20 


Ward 9, 


22 


New Hampshire State Hospital, 


144 


Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 


56 


New Hampshire Memorial, 


20 


New Hampshire Odd Fellows ' Home, 


4 


New Hampshire State Prison, 





New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 


7 


Deaths by Age, 1917. 




*Under 1 year. 


57 


From 1 year to 5 years, 


13 


From 5 to 10 years, 


1 


From 10 to 15 years. 


2 


From 15 to 20 years. 


2 


From 20 to 30 years, 


24 


From 30 to 40 years. 


34 


From 40 to 50 years. 


39 


From 50 to 60 years. 


69 


From 60 to 70 years, 


90 


From 70 to 80 years. 


114 


From 80 to 90 years. 


54 


From 90 to 100 years. 


9 


Not stated. 


1 



Total number of deaths, 509 



Inchuling 19 still-borns. 



296 city op concord. 

Deaths During 1917 by Sex, Condition and Nativity. 



Sex 



Males, 270 

Females, 239 

Condition : 

Married, 197 

Single, 157 

Widowed, 131 

Divorced, 14 

Not stated, 10 

Nativity : 

Concord, 126 

New Hampshire, 180 

Other states, 96 

Foreign, 96 

Not stated, 11 

Causes of Death for the Year Ending December 31, 

1917. 

Accident, drowning, 3 

asphyxiation, 3 

automobile, 2 

hit by locomotive, 1 

railroad, 2 

electrocution, 2 

kicked by horse, 1 

fire, 1 

Anemia, pernicious, 5 

and old age, 1 

Angina pectoris, 7 

Apoplexy, 14 

Arthritis, Deformans, 1 

Autointoxication, 1 

Brain tumor, 1 

Bright 's disease, 4 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 297 

Bronchitis. ' 5 

Cancer of bowels, 3 

breast, 2 

colon, 1 

ear, 1 

face, 3 

intestines, 5 

lip, 1 

liver, 4 

ovary, 3 

rectum, 1 

stomach, 4 

uterus, 5 

gall bladder, 2 

thyroid, 1 

Child birth, 1 

Cholera infantum, 1 

Coletes, 2 

Congenital debility, 4 

Congestion of brain, 1 

Convulsions ( uremic), 2 

Cystitis, 1 

Debility (general exhaustion), 1 

Dementia, 3 

Diabetes, 4 

Diarrhoea and enteritis, 1 

Diphtheria, 3 

Dj^sentery, 8 

Eclampsie (pregnancy), ' 1 

Edema of lungs, 4 

Embolism, cerebral, 5 

pulmonary, 2 

Endocarditis, 14 

Endarteritis, cerebral, 1 

Enteritis, 6 

gastro, 4 

Epilepsy, 4 

Erysipelas, 1 



298 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Gangrene, from embolism, 


1 


of right foot and leg. 


1 


Gastric ulcer, perforation, 


1 


Heart diseases. 


69 


Hemiplegia, 


1 


Hemorrhage, cerebral, 


32 


pulmonary, 


1 


post partum, 


1 


Influenza, 


1 


Injury from delivery, 


1 


Infection, left leg by bacillus aergenous capsilatus. 


1 


Intestinal obstruction, 


6 


La grippe. 


2 


Liver, acute yellow atrophy of. 


1 


cirrhosis of. 


4 


sclerosis of. 


1 


Meningitis, eneephalo. 


1 


infected. 


1 


probably pneumococcus, 


1 


Mitral regurgitation. 


1 


insufficiency. 


3 


Myocarditis, 


17 


Nephritis, 


9 


diffuse, 


2 


interstitial, 


13 


parenchymatous, 


1 


Paralysis and spasm. 


1 


(not insane). 


4 


of insane, 


1 


agitans, 


1 


Paresis, 


17 


Pellagra, 


2 


Perityphlitis, 


1 


Peritonitis (acute spectic gall bladder). 


1 


puerperal. 


1 


appendicitis. 


1 


(perforating ulcer of rectum), 


1 


Pleurisy, 


1 



HEALTH DEPAETMENT. 



299 



Pneumonia, 15 

broncho-, 9 

lobar, 10 

hypostatic, 2 

Premature birth, 13 

Prostate enlarged, 1 

Pyelonephritis, 1 

Pyloric ulcer, 1 

Pyelitis, 1 

Salpingoophoritis, 1 

Sarcoma, spine, 1 

Sclerosis, arterio-, 19 

Senile debility, 7 

Senility, 1 

Septicemia, 2 

Status lymphaticus, 1 

Still-born, 18 

Suicide, 4 

Surgical shock, 1 

Tabes dorsalis, 1 

Thrombosis, cerebral, 3 

pulmonary, 1 

Tuberculosis, meningitis, 4 

pulmonary, 19 

Vovulus. 1 

Uterus, fibroids of, 1 

Ulcer of stomach, 1 



509 



Total number of deaths for the year 1917, 509, compared 
Avith 467 in 1916. 

Average death-rate for the year 1917. 14.40, compared 
with 12.81 in 1916. 

Total number of births for the year 1917, 407, compared 
with 377 in 1916. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1917, 200, com- 
pared with 187 in 1916. 



300 city of concord. 

Report of Milk Examination and Inspection of Milk 

Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 122 

Number of milk examinations above standard, 122 

Number of examinations below standard, 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 82 

Conditions good, . 64 

Conditions fair, 12 

Conditions poor, 4 

Improvements suggested, 4 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 1,323 

Burial permits issued, 509 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 124 

Transit permits issued, 191 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 230 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 50 
Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to the 

State Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, public 

health and marine hospital services, 52 
Number of samples of water and ice collected for 

analysis, 12 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 136 

Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 700 

Number of plumbing permits granted, 69 

Number of inspections of plumbing, 138 

Number of sewers connected, 19 

Number of public halls inspected, 10 

Number of stone sheds inspected, 2 

Number of barber shops inspected, 24 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



REPORT OF THE JOHN KIMBALL 
PLAYGROUND. 



The period of instruction and organized play on the John 
Kimball Playground began with the last week in June and 
continued through August. The girls' department was in 
charge of Miss Mabel Durivage, while Mr. Harold Fraser 
was instructor for the boys. 

The activities of the playground were not confined to 
play alone, as the patriotic young people who attended its 
sessions so faithfully were also doing their "bit" for the 
soldiers. Through the kindness of interested friends knit- 
ting cotton and yarn were provided, and one hundred knit- 
ted articles, as well as twenty-two ambulance pillows, were 
turned in to the Red Cross by the children, who have also 
made garments for themselves which were cut from rem- 
nants obtained at the Red Cross headquarters. 

It would have been impossible for the instructor to have 
carried on this work had it not been for the volunteer 
workers, composed of high school girls and young women 
of the city, who so generously gave of their time and as- 
sistance that the work planned might be accomplished. 

Through the kindness of the grocers of the city over two 
hundred children were given an automobile ride, which is 
still one of the talked-of events of the summer. 

During the past year the playground has been much im- 
proved by the addition of one of the best tennis courts in 
the city, as well as by a sand-box which has given much 
pleasure to the little tots. 

A gift of money from Mrs. Ayers, daughter of the 
founder of the playground, has been used to provide 
teeters. A generous supply of Victrola records from Mrs. 
Harry Emmons has given much pleasure to the group who 



302 CITY OF CONCORD. 

congregated each afternoon to listen to the music and watch 
the folk dancing. 

A cement wading tank for the little ones who are too 
young to go to the swimming pool is much needed, and it 
is hoped that by another year one may be provided. 

The average attendance during the summer was one hun- 
dred and twenty-seven. The least number present any day, 
sixty-five. The largest attendance, two hundred and one. 

Under the leadership of Harold Fraser the boys took 
several long hikes into the country. These, as well as the 
swimming and athletics, did much toward their physical 
development, for the John Kimball Playground stands for 
"A trained mind in a sound body." 



JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 303 

JOHN KIMBALL PLAYGROUND. 

Expenditures. 

1917. 

June. Isaac Hill, pay-roll, $10.00 

July. Pay-roll, 20.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., 4.00 

Tenney's Specialty Store, 10.14 

Irving T. Chesley, for tennis court, 115.15 

Aug. Pay-roll, 20.00 

Sept. Pay-roll, 135.00 

Miss Luella A. Dickerman, supplies, 7.81 

Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, 29.45 

Orr & Rolfe,- lal)or and supplies, 15.02 

J. M. Stewart & Sons Co., supplies, 2.50 

Capital Hardware Co., supplies, .25 

Concord Wiring Co., supplies, 1.10 

Oct. H. B. Lindgren, labor and supplies, 223.35 

Nov. Thompson & Hoague Co., supplies, .45 

W. Carpenter, labor and supplies, 3.81 



$598.03 



Appropriation, ^ $600.00 

Expenditures, 598.03 



Balance, $1.97 

ROY W. FRASER. 

R. A. BROWN, 

LUELLA A. DICKERMAN, 

John Kimhall Playground Committee. 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON THE 
SOUTH END PLAYGROUND. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen : 

The committee on the South End playground respect- 
fully submits the following report for the year 1917 : 

The year's work has been carried on the same lines as 
in previous years, a large part of our appropriation being 
spent upon educational work. Special attention was given 
the garden work and the results obtained were far beyond 
our expectations. Our usual field day exhibition gave very 
satisfactory evidence of the garden yield, as well as of the 
handy work of the girls in embroidery, knitting and can- 
ning. The mufflers and face cloths knitted were delivered 
to the Red Cross. 

Our appropriation of $500 has been spent as follows: 

Permanent equipment, $107.08 

Upkeep, supplies, etc., 208.92 

Paid instructors, 169.65 



$485.65 
Unexpended balance, 14.35 



$500.00 



HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
SHUBAEL P. DEARBORN, 
ELSIE L. JOHNSON. 



REPORT OF PUBLIC BATHS. 



Concord, N. H., October 1, 1917. 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The summer of 1917 was a most successful season at the 
public bath. The pool besides being a source of amuse- 
ment for the boys and girls was made use of by the soldiers, 
who were compelled to visit the bath at least twice a week, 
special afternoons being assigned them. 

The annual carnival was held at the close of the season, 
prizes being awarded, donated by the merchants of the city. 

Record op Attendance. 

Average daily attendance, boys, 225 

Average daily attendance, girls, 150 

Largest number present on one day, 800 

Total number of boys and girls for season, 17,500 

Number of boys saved from probable drowning, 6 

Number of girls, 2 

Number of boys who have. learned to swim, 54 

Number of girls who have learned to swim, 28 

Recommendations. 

1. A much larger and better bath house should be built. 

2. The appropriation should be increased. 

CHARLES E. REARDON, 

Swimming Instructor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The following is a report of the work of the city physi- 
cian for the year ending December 31, 1917 : 

House calls on city poor, 55 

Office calls on city poor, 28 

House calls, Board of Health work, 117 

Office calls, Board of Health work, 99 

Cultures taken in diphtheria epidemic work, 897 

School children inspected, 1,279 

Calls at police station, 32 

Vaccinations and examinations made for issuance of 

certificates, 212 

Tlie city physician as an ex-officio member of the Board 
of Health has attended all the meetings of the board, serv- 
ing in the capacity of secretary. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. COOK, 

City Physician. 
Concord, N. H., January 21, 1918. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Concord, N. H., February 19, 1918. 

To ilic Board of Aldermen: 

I desire to make the following report to the board of the 
progress of litigation during the past year to which the city 
has been a party. 

Boston cO Maine Railroael v. Concord, a petition for the 
abatement of taxes assessed upon personal prop'erty at the 
railroad shops, has been fijially terminated. In my last 
report I gave an outline of the points decided by the su- 
preme court and stated that at that time the attorney-gen- 
eral had intervened in behalf of the state. In the inter- 
vention proceeding the supreme court held that the prop- 
erty should have been taxed, but should have been included 
in the general railroad valuation and taxed by the state. 
However, the court held that the state was not in a position 
to intervene and thus require the railroad to pay the tax 
over to it. So for the year 1913 the city has reimbursed 
the railroad. The tax was levied for the years 1914 and 
1915 as well and collected by the city. No appeals were 
taken in behalf of the railroad for those two years, so that 
the city collected $6,291.60 for the year 1914, and $3,981.25 
for the year 1915, making a total of $10,272.85 which the 
city collected as a result of these proceedings. As the de- 
cision of the court now stands the state itself will hereafter 
collect the tax on this property. 

Ward V. Concord at the time of my last report was pend- 
ing in the superior court on a motion filed by me for con- 
firmation of the master's report and dismissal of the peti- 
tion. This motion to confirm and dismiss was granted by 
the court and the city definitely won the Ward case. 

20 



308 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Tilton V. Co))cord, a test case to determine whether the 
city of Concord was liable for the support of certain pau- 
pers living in Tilton, was before the supreme court at the 
time of ray last report. The question was whether a city or 
town is liable for the support of paupers for a period 
greater than ten years from the time such people com- 
menced to gain their settlement in such city or town. The 
case was argued in the supreme court by me last spring 
and the court handed down a decision in favor of Concord. 

Concord Manufacturing Company v. Concord is a peti- 
tion for an abatement of taxes on plaintiff's- mill, situated 
in Ward 1. This case was referred to the tax commission 
and I endeavored to get a hearing for a long time. After- 
wards the case was returned to the superior court without 
having been heard by the commission. Since that time 
counsel for the petitioner have shown no desire for a trial. 
My latest information with regard to the case is that there 
is a likelihood that the petition will be withdrawn. 

Hammer v. Concord is a petition for the abatement of 
taxes filed at the October term of court and it has been 
referred to the tax commission for hearing. Collins v. 
Concord is a similar case and it has taken a similar course. 
Hearings will probably be given in both cases within a 
short time. 

Acting under instructions from the board I have been 
representing the city in the gas rate hearings. After a 
preliminary investigation I made a report to this board 
which is on file. After that I was present at various 
meetings of the gas company and labor unions at the 
Central Labor Union hall. Since then I have been pres- 
ent at tw^o hearings given by the Public Service Commis- 
sion and I have also, in the presence of labor union of- 
ficials, gone over the records of the company. The in- 
formation that I have been able to get as a result of these 
hearings has not led me to change the opinion given in 
the special report on the gas rate case given to this board. 
I am still of the opinion that it is a bad time for the city, 



REPORT OP CITY SOLICITOR. 309 

state and gas company to expend some $20,000 — the esti- 
mated cost of a rate case. There are undoubtedly some 
things about the organization of the gas company which 
need explanation, but according to the testimony at the 
hearings, public service companies are finding it neces- 
sary all over the country to raise rates. The raise is of 
course but temporary and the Public Service Commission 
assures us that with the return of normal conditions it 
will make a thorough investigation of the local com- 
pany. At the present time the commission states that its 
investigation will be limited to the following inquiries : 
(1) Is an increase in rates needed in order to assure the 
utility an income reasonably approximating its income in 
the last year before the war, (2) What increase in in- 
come will result from the proposed increase in rates, and 
(3) Is the method by which it is proposed to increase the 
company's income fair as between the utility and its cus- 
tomers and between the various classes of customers ? 

The commission states that it will not investigate the 
question whether before the war the company was earning 
more than an adequate return. 

In addition to the foregoing the usual routine business 
has been attended to. During the legislature I represented 
the city in various matters concerning trust funds and 
water-works and co-operated with the other city officials 
in opposition to a bill which would have removed a large 
part of the powers of the city over its own water-works. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 

Solicitor. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The board of assessors submit to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and its school districts and special precincts, with the 
amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the tax col- 
lector for collection. 

The appeal of the Boston & Maine Railroad from the 
taxation of materials which were to be used in the shops in 
this city (the shops being taxed and not included in the 
matter of appeal) was decided adversely to the city, and 
the tax for the year 1913, with interest, amounting to 
$7,373.55, has been repaid to tlie Boston & Maine Railroad. 

No appeal was taken by the Boston & Maine Railroad on 
the question of the taxation of said materials for the two 
succeeding years, and the taxes for the years 1914 and 
1915, amounting to .$10,482.50, have been paid and are re- 
tained by the city of Concord. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
for the years from 1907 to the present time, which shows 
the increased amount spent by the city and the reason for 
an increased tax. 



ASSESSORS REPORT. 



311 



Tabulation op Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuation op City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1917. 



warrant. 



Amoixut 

of 
warrants. 



Tax 

rate per 

$1,000. 



Assessed 
valuation 
ofcity and 
precincts. 



Penacook 



State 

State (N. H. N. G. in Mexico) . 

County 

School required by law 

City 

Extra for schools : 

Union 

I No. 20 

Union* 

Precincts: 

Sprinkling ' 

Garbage , 

Sewer , 

Lights , 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights 

West Concord sewer 



$45, 

6, 

33, 

45, 

72, 

102, 
1, 
10, 



,232.50 1 
,031.00 
,907.76 h 
,232.50 
,000.00 J 

,912.08 
,005.50 
,950.00 

,500.00 
,O0O.C0 
,150.00 
,300.00 
,625 00 
400.00 
,390.00 
800.00 
645.50 



$10.00 



5.50 

.50 

5.50 

.55 
.65 
.70 

1.20 

1.00 
.35 

1.10 
.80 

1.80 



$20,110,995 



18,557,620 
1,553,375 
2,067.425 

14,561,905 

13,922,500 

15,415,250 

16,530,490 

1,584,620 

1,111,160 

1,235,455 

. 989,030 

49.960 



* Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



312 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city : 



RAILROAD. 



1914. 



1915. 



1916. 



Boston & Maine 

Concord & Montreal 

Concord ife Portsmouth 

Connecticut River 

Dover. Somersworth & Rochester Street. 

Fitchburg 

Manchester <& Lawrence 

Nashua & Lowell 

Nashua Street 

New Boston 

Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemigewasset Valley 

Suncook Valley 

Wilton 



379 

9,866 

124 

342 



27 

371 

16 

488 

72 

1,137 

8 

133 

46 

5 



3S0 

9,935 

107 

342 

468 

27 

373 

6 

477 

72 

1,236 

8 

168 

51 

4 



357 

9,614 

107 



468 

27 

378 

6 

484 



168 

49 

4 



361 

8,991 

107 

468 

41 

378 

5 

444 

52 

1,316 

8 

168 

49 

3 



assessors' report. 



Inventory of the City op Concord. 



813 









No. 


N'aliiatioii. 


Polls, 






6,185 


$12,370 


Improved and unimproved 


land 


and 






buildings, 








16,360,260 


Horses, 






1,136 


128,655 


Oxen, 






22 


2,475 


Cows, 






1,186 


64,185 


Other neat stock. 






177 


7,240 


Sheep, 






75 


645 


Hogs, 






85 


1,560 


Fowls, 








1,265 


Carriages and automobiles, 








415,605 


Portable mills. 








1,325 


Fur-bearing animals. 








7,500 


Boats and launches. 








2,050 


Wood and lumber. 








32,390 


Stock in public funds. 








603,260 


Stock in banks, 








287,860 


Money on hand, at interest. 


or on 


. deposit. 


552,160 


Stock in trade. 








1,523,290 


Milling, carding machines, 


and 


factories 




and their machinery, 








119,270 



Total, $20,110,995 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector, $377,326.81 
Average rate per cent, of taxation for all purposes, $1.81+ 



314 city of concord. 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on the real and 
personal estate of Concord since 1 907 : 

Valuation. Tax. 

$12,114,322 $273,045.74 

12,342,190 277,469.52 

12,405,465 301,281.72 

12,543,822 278,464.77 

12,507,847 296,074.27 

18,701,591 316,117.69 

20,842,846 305,460.56 

19,177,428 316,447.67 

20,086,789 339,781.64 

19,803,275 382,352.47 

$1,644,235 $29,558.17 

549,285 9,053.83 

1,285,830 21,349.87 

3,459,200 63,817.61 

4,464,455 83,028.45 

2,432,180 45,239.01 

2,905,490 51,350.85 

2,625,450 47,437.01 

744,870 13,437.41 



Year. 




Polls. 


1907 




5,757 


1908 




5,289 


1909 




5,442 


]910 




5,576 


1911 




5,784 


1912 




5,691 


1913 




5,687 


1914 




5,735 


1915 




5,806 


1916 




5,779 


19Vt 






Ward 


1, 


603 




2, 


199 




3, 


367 




4, 


1,125 




5, 


801 




6, 


971 




7, 


1,084 




8, 


467 




9, 


568 




6,185 


Non-r 


esident 


? 



$20,110,995 $364,272.21 

684.60 

$364,956.81 



ASSESSORS REPORT. 



315 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in Each 
Ward, 1916 and 1917. 





Polls. 


Valuation. 


Resident tax assessed . 




1916. 


1917. 


1916. 


1917. 


1916. 


1917. 


Ward 1 


592 
211 
3r)9 

1,050 
670 
916 

1,097 
351 
533 


603 
199 
367 

1,125 
801 
971 

1,084 
467 
568 


$1,597,140 
555,670 
1,275,510 
3,338,350 
4,4.59,230 
2,467,195 
2.817,000 
2,567,085 
726,095 


$1,644,235 
549,285 
1,285,830 
3,459,200 
4,461,455 
2,432,180 
2.905,490 
2,625,450 
744,870 


$28,975.09 
8,888.93 
21,375.57 
64,106.86 
86,276.98 
47,741.37 
.51,145.34 
48,002.76 
13,516.72 


$29,558.17 


Ward 2 


9,053.83 


Ward 3 


21,349.87 


Ward 4 


63,817.61 


Ward 5 


83,028.45 


Ward 6 


45,239.01 


Ward 7 


51.350.85 


Ward 8 


47,437.01 


Ward 9 


13.437.41 






Totals 


5,779 


6.185 


119.803,275 


$20,110,995 


$370,029.62 


$364,272.21 



Totals submitted to tax collector : 
In 1916 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list. 
Polls, 

Total, 

In 1917 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 



Total, 



.$370,029.62 

764.85 

11,558.00 

$382,352.47 

$364,272.21 

684.60 

12,370.00 

$377,326.81 



Respectfully submitted. 



JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report of 
the Collector of Taxes to the close of business December 
31, 1917: 

Tax Lew, 1912. 

Resident list, $315,382.43 

Additions and corrections, 2,171.-16 

— $317,553.89 

Non-resident list, 735.26 

Received collection for moths, 172.50 

Received interest, 661.02 

Received from city treasurer for over-joajanent, 21.69 



$319,144.36 
Cash paid treasurer, $311,861.93 

Abatements, ' 7,263.24 

Amount refunded, 19.19 

$319,144.36 

Tax Levy, 1913. 

Resident list, $304,820.42 

Additions and corrections, 1.212.41 

$306,032.83 

Non-resident list, 640.16 

Received collections, moths, 157.45 

Received interest, 1,017.76 



$307,848.20 
Cash paid treasurer, .$299,873.37 

Discounts, 3,123.68 

Abatements, 4,851.15 

$307,848.20 



TAX collector's REPORT. 317 

Tax Levy, 1914. 



Resident list, 


$315,833.74 




Additions and corrections, 


940.33 


$316,774.07 
613.93 


Non-resident list. 




Collected, moth account, , 




154.95 


Collected, interest. 




1,066.88 




$318,609.83 


Cash paid treasurer. 


$310,295.94 




Amount of discount. 


8,409.39 




abated. 


4,551.41 




refunded, 


10.02 




Uncollected, 


343.07 


$31 8,609.83 



Tax Levy, 1915. 

Resident list, $339,215.46 

Additions and corrections, 715.41 

$339,930.87 

Non-resident list, 566.18 

Collected, moth account, 193.93 

Collected, interest, 1,129.76 



$341,820.74 



Cash paid treasurer, $317,255.47 

Amount of discount, 3,126.97 

Amount of abatements : 

Ordinary, $3,157.92 

By order of court. 16,662.76 

19,820.68 

Uncollected, 1,617.62 



$341,820.74 



318 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Tax Levy, 1916. 



Resident list, 
Amount of poll taxes, 
Additions and corrections, 

Non-resident list, 
Collected, moth account. 
Collected, interest. 



Cash paid treasurer, 
Amount of discount, 
Amount abated, 
Uncollected, 



$370,029.62 
11,558.00 

382.78 



$381,970.40 

764.85 

277.90 

1,025.78 

$384,038.93 



$371,618.47 
3,887.86 
3,187.63 
5,344.97 



$384,038.93 



Tax Levy, 1917. 



Resident list, 
Amount of poll taxes, 
Additions and corrections, 

Non-resident list, 
Collected, moth account. 
Collected, interest, 



Cash paid treasurer. 
Amount of discount, 

abated, 

of cash on hand. 
Uncollected . 



$364,272.21 

12,370.00 

263.49 



$376,905.70 

684.60 

119.05 

62.97 

$377,772.32 



$328,900.00 

3.753.29 

1,667.21 

402.55 

43,049.27 



$377,772.32 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT. 



319 



Taxes sold the City of Concord in the office of the Col- 
lector for redemption : 

1912. 

Amount, $1,186.96 Paid treasurer, ' $975.06 

Interest, 123.92 Deeded, 45.31 

Uncollected, 290.51 



$1,310.88 



1913. 



Amount, $1,811.71 Paid treasurer, 
Interest, 124.77 Deeded, 

Uncollected, 



$1,936.48 



1914. 



Amount, $1,228.92 Paid treasurer. 
Interest, 50.56 Deeded, 

Uncollected, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



$1,279.48 

1915. 
$687.48 Paid treasurer, 
31.51 Uncollected, 



$718.99 

1916. 
$519.09 Paid treasurer, 
.92 Uncollected, 



$520.01 



$1,310.88 

$1,533.68 

35.21 

367.59 

$1,936.48 

$689.06 

514.52 

75.90 

$1,279.48 

$577.09 
141.90 

$718.99 

.$103.60 
416.41 

$520.01 



Taxes sold the City of Concord, N. H., for redemption 
as turned over hy iNIr. Ladd, former collector: 

There has been no change on these since my last report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SETH R. DOLE, 

Collector. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHAL. 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1918. 

To His Honor the Mayor and Honorable Board of 
Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : I have the honor to submit to your hon- 
orable board my ninth annual report of the police depart- 
ment for the year ending December 31, 1917. I wish to 
state that owing to the war many emergencies have arisen 
that were not thought of when our appropriation was 
made ; consequently our expenditures have been larger 
than they would have been under ordinary conditions. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 
George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant City Marshal. 

Victor I. Moore. , 

Captain. 
Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant. 
Christopher T. Wallace. 



police department. 
Regular Patrolmen. 



321 



Samuel Eodd, 
Irving B. Robinson. 
George H. Silsby, 
Edward J. McGirr, 
Joseph E. Silva, 



Harry L. Woodward, 
Fred N. Harden, 
Charles H. Guilbault, 
Frank B. McDaniels, 
John B. Long, 



James J. Halligan. 

Axel Swanson, Chauffeur. 
Frank B. McKenna, Chauffeur. 

Speclvl Reserve Officers. 

Captain. 

Thomas P. Davis. 



Willie A. Little, 
Charles E. Kelley, 
George G. Allen, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
John McGirr, 
Nelson Forest, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Walter H. Beane, 



Willie A. Flanders, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
Elmer Tremblay, 
Earl D. Gaskell, 
Frank S. Rogers, 
Arthur H. Rees, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Frank E. Brooks. 



Financial Report. 



Total appropriation for 1917, 
Special appropriation, 



$24,341.92 
2,301.64 



Total expenditures for 1917, 



$26,643.56 



322 city of concord. 

Disbursements. 

Fuel, city police station, $836.48 

Fuel, Penacook police station, 78.15 

Helmets and buttons, 62.52 

Horse-hire, Penacook, 24.00 

Auto-combination, 510.06 

Lights, city, 246.50 

Incidentals, 2,241.39 

Salaries, regulars, 19,166.79 

Salaries, specials, 3,234.31 

Police signal system, 243.36 



Total, $26,643.56 

Number of Arrests. 

1909, 281 

1910, 586 

1911, 1,076 

1912, 1,366 

1913, 1,556 

1914, ],850 

1915, 1,599 

1916, 1,106 

Whole Nttmber of Arrests and Causes for the Year 

1917. 

Whole number of arrests, 1,003 

Brought before the court, » 583 

Discharged by the court, 5 

Released, 420 

Assault, 13 

Aggravated assault, 1 

Assault with intent to kill, 1 

Assault on officer, 1 

Breaking and enteriug, 6 

Drunkenness (including Penacook), 562 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 323 

Escaped from House of Correction, 1 

Evading railroad fare. 4 

Arrests *f or ont of town officers, 22 

Insane, 27 

Larceny (simple), 21 

Larceny (grand), 4 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 4 

Safe keeping, 200 

Obtaining money under false pretence, 1 

Resisting an officer, 1 

Bound over to high court, 22 

Committed to jail, 19 

Committed to House of Correction, 245 

Conuuitted to N. H. State Hospital, 22 

Number paid fines, 189 

Appealed to Superior Court. 3 

Nol-prossed, 3 

Sentence suspended, 81 

Mittimus called for, 4 

Fighting, 5 

Begging, 5 

Non-support, • 11 

Carrying concealed weapons, 1 
Operating an automobile while under the influence of 

lif|uor, 7 

Overspeeding auto, 20 

Overspeeding motorcycle, 7 

Idle person, 1 

Fornication, 10 

Placed on file. 7 

Taking team without consent of owner, 1 

Using horse unfit for labor, 2 

Continued for sentence. 12 

Embezzlement, 2 

Esca])ed from Industrial School, 1 

Selling lottery tickets. 3 

Shooting pheasants, 1 

Larceny from the i)erson, 2 



324 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Obtaining liquor for a minor, 1 

Discharging firearms in compact part of the city, 2 

Forgery, • 3 

Continued nisi, 2 
Disorderly conduct, ■ 1 

Doing work without a plumber's license, 1 

Runaway boys (out of town), 11 

Abandonment, 1 

Breach of peace, 1 

Rape, 1 

Escai)ed from House of Correction, 1 

Desertion, 1 

Selling cider, 1 

Manslaughter, 2 

Keeping a disorderly house, 1 

Escaped from the State Hospital, 1 

Firing a cannon, 1 

Carrying concealed weapons, 2 

Defacing buildings. 3 

Cruelty to minor children, 1 

Using obscene language, 1 

Cruelty of animals, 1 

Operating auto without lights, 7 

Out on bail, 1 

Pandering, 1 

Prostitute, 1 

Procuring liquor for IT. S. sailor, ' 1 

Procuring liquor for U. S. soldier, 1 

Violating pawn-broker's license, 1 

Practicing medicine without a license, 2 

Swapping a horse unfit for labor, 3 

Disturbance of peace, 1 

Miscellaneous. 

Closed houses looked after during summer months, 42 

Windows found open, 56 

People given medical aid at tlie station, 4 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 325 

Doors found unlocked at niglit, 635 
Number of times doors of business places tried, 842,660 

Lodger, 740 

Called to quell disturbances, 59 

Stray teams found, 6 

Ambulance calls, 141 

Emergency calls for pulmotor, 3 
Calls over police signal, 62,418 

Dead i:)eople taken from the river, 4 

Injured people cared for at the station, 3 

Fires reported to fire station, 5 

Complaints about roosters crowing at night, 3 

Dogs run over by autos and killed, 5 

Complaints about cows and horses in the street, 2 

Complaints about boys sliding on sidewalks, 7 

Complaints about breaking windows, 15 

Animals reported to the S. P. C. A., 6 

Officers assisted in drowning accidents, 7 

People found destitute, " 2 

Lights found out and reported, 437 

Merchants notified of trouble in their store at night, 8 

Fire alarms rung in by police, 2 

Attempts at suicide, 3 

Juveniles taken home after 9.30 p. m., 14 

Teams struck by autos, 4 
Undesirable women railroaded from city during camp, 8 

Runaway horses caught, 3 

Complaints about boys sliding across railroad track, 21 

Old people strayed away from home and taken back, 2 

Runaway children found, 4 

Officers attending fires, 65 

Fires found by police, 3 

Complaints about dogs, 14 

Unlicensed dogs killed, 6 

Dangerous wires reported, 13 

Officers called to remove dead people, 16 

Officers called to remove people injured, 15 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Lost children found and taken home, 24 

Holes in bridges reported to street department, 4 

Holes in street reported to street department, 5 

Holes in sideAvalks reported to street department, 11 

Insane people fonnd on the streets, 3 

Person as.phyxiated by gas, 1 

Shooting, 1 

Burned to death, 1 

People killed in auto accidents, 1 

People found dead in their rooms, 4 

People found dead in the streets, 3 

People injured in auto accidents, 16 

People run over by autos and injured, 4 

Complaints about auto lights and running too fast, 86 

Complaints investigated, 395 

Accidents investigated, 30 

Complaints about boys riding on sidewalks, 18 

Dangerous limbs reported to street department, 4 

Burst water pi])es reported to tenants, 3 

Fires investigated, 2 

Leak in gas pipes reported, 1 

Water pijies reported burst, 6 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 

South ]\Iain and West Streets. 

South ]\Iain and Concord Streets. 

South Main and Pleasant Streets. 

North Main and School Streets. 

North Main and Park Streets. 

Washington, between North Main and State 

Streets. 
North Main and Church Streets. 
North State and Penacook Streets. 
Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 
Box 11. West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 



Box 


1. 


Box 


2 


Box 


3. 


Box 


4. 


Box 


5. 


Box 


6. 


Box 


7. 


Box 


8. 


Box 


9. 


Box 


10. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 827 

Box 12. Peiiacook (square). 

Box 13. Center, opposite Union Street. 

Box 14. South and Perley Streets. 

Box 15. Broadway, corner Carter Street. 

Box 16. Center and Pine Streets. 

Box 17. Pleasant and South Streets. 

Box 18. School and Giles Streets. 

Box 19. Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

Recommendations. 

I renew my recommendation that a suitable room be con- 
structed for the detention of women and juveniles, and that 
the old ward room be remodeled into a guard-room for the 
officers. 

I wish to thank His Honor, Mayor Nathaniel W. Hobbs, 
and the Honorable Board of Aldermen for their courteous 
treatment and support. I desire to thank His Honor' Judge 
Clark, City Solicitor Alexander Murchie, County Solicitor 
W. W. Thayer, Clerk of the Court John Stanley, and all 
others who have assisted this department during the year. 
To the officers of the department, I extend my appreciation 
for their hearty co-operation and faithfulness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

Citij Marshal. 



REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

I am transmitting herewith a statement of the receipts 
and expenditures of the municipal court for the year end- 
ing December 31, 1917, the same being prepared by Mrs. 
Henrietta P. Stanley, clerk pro tern of the court. An item- 
ized monthly statement of the financial transactions of the 
court has been filed both with the city clerk and city treas- 
urer, and may be seen at either of these offices, or at the 
office of the justice of the municipal court, by any inter- 
ested citizen. 

Non-Support. 

The amount of money received and expended in non- 
support and kindred matters shows an increase over any 
previous year and the general result appears to justify 
the expenditure of time and labor on the part of the court 
in handling these cases in the manner adopted several 
years ago. The records of the court do not, hoAvever, show 
the entire results along this line, as in some cases money 
ordered to be paid has been handled by some party directly 
interested instead of being paid into court. 

The following is a statement of the cash which has actu- 
ally passed through the court in these matters: 

RECEIPTS. 

Received from Allen H. Robinson, clerk, $4.46 

in No. 454 (District Court Docket), 197.38 

No. 503 (District Court Docket), 7.00 

Juvenile Court matter by agreement, 47.50 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 329 



'eceived from No. 2297, 






$33.00 


No. 1721, 






19.00 


No. 765, 






307.00 


No. 1902, 






28.00 


]\Iunicipal Court matter 


by 


agreement, 85.00 


No. 1972, 






83.00 


No. 2029, 






55.00 


No. 1507, 






49.00 


No. 1785, 






53.00 


No. 2148, 






2.00 


No. 2203, 






75.00 


Total, 


$1,045.34 


EXPENDITURES 







Paid Mrs. Reuben Gate, board, $80.00 
Mrs. U. E. Lewis, board, 88.00 
R. F. Robinson, clothing, 1.55 
Allen Shoe Store, shoes, 1.25 
D. E. Murphy, clothing, 9.69 
Thorne Shoe Store, shoes, 7.35 
W. A. Thompson, shoes, 3.00 
Hardy & McSwiney, clothing, 6.00 
Harry G. Emmons, clothing, 1.00 
William P. Craig, M. D., medical attendance, 24.00 
wife of respondent in No. 503, 7.00 
Millville Orphans' Home, board, 47.50 
wife of respondent in No. 2297, 33.00 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, account hos- 
pital bill. 10.00 
Mrs. Warren Hall, board, 307.00 
St. Joseph's Orphans' Home, board, 24.00 
Mrs. A. J. Curtis, board, 6.25 
Mrs. Mabelle Spofford, board and supplies, 82.05 
• wife of respondent in No. 1972, 66.00 
Mrs. G. A. Amidon, board, 4.00 



$55.00 


49.00 


77.50 


2.00 


48.00 


5.20 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid wife of respondent in No. 2029, 

wife of respondent in No. 1507, 

Rev. Rufus P. Gardner, siipt., board, 

wife of respondent in No. 2148, 

Rev. Rnfus P. Gardner, supt., board, 
Net balance on hand. 

Total, .$1,045.34 

]\Iiss Elizabeth G. Lincoln, who was appointed probation 
officer at the beginning of the year, to succeed Harry F. 
Lake, resigned, has continued in that position. John W. 
Stanley, who began his term of service as clerk of court at 
the same time, was called to the colors November 3. Be- 
lieving that the burdens of the war should be made to fall 
as lightly as possible upon those required to make such 
sacrifices, Mr. Stanley was granted a leave of absence from 
his duties, and his wife, Mrs. Henrietta P. Stanley, was 
appointed clerk pro tern. Mrs. Stanlej^ has proven a faith- 
ful and competent officer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. CHESTER CLARK, 

Justice. 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 331 

REPORT OF HENRIETTA P. STANLEY, CLERK PRO 
TEM. MUNICIPAL COURT. 



Receipts. 



Received for fines and costs, $2,753.47 

sundry fees, 44.20 



Total, $2,797.67 

Expenditures. 

Paid for probation officer, services and expenses, $123.56 
acting justices, 42.00 
postage, printing, and other supplies, 93.51 
fees of oificers and witnesses, and com- 
plaints and warrants, 734.34 
clerk's bond, " 3.00 
State of New Hampshire, fish and game 

fines, 15.00 
Olin H. Chase, commissioner, motor ve- 
hicle fines, 600.00 
Mrs. Fred Lapierre, non-support fine, 10.00 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, non-sup- 
port fine, 5.00 
H. H. Dudley, treasurer S. P. C. A., 

cruelty to animals fines, 60.00 

services as interpreters, 3.00 

Balance paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, 1,108.26 



Total, .$2,797.67 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRIETTA P. STANLEY, 

Clerk pro tern. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMIS- 
SIONERS. 



To tlic Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

The appropriation, income from trust and permanent 
funds, collect"ions, one-half sale of lots and annual care of 
lots have given a total of .$7,416, the income for the year. 

The expenses, pay-rolls and supplies have been $9,858.91, 
leaving a deficit of $2,442.91. 

Two new blocks have been graded, and about 250 feet of 
covered water-course has been finished to take care of the 
large flow of water in the spring, also to drain a section 
where burials have been made. 

The whole cemetery has been finely cared for and is in 
excellent condition. 

A larger appropriation is much needed as the work in- 
creases every year, as there is more surface to be kept in 
good condition during the season. 

The burials have been 196, the chapel used 17 times. 

The Old North Cemetery 

has never been in better condition than the last year. The 
income has been from appropriations, collections, income 
from trust and permanent funds, $810.53. The expenses 
have been $782.09, leaving a surplus of $28.44. Five lots 
have been put under perpetual care. The condition of the 
fence grows worse every year, and if a small appropriation 
could be made this year, that a beginning could be made 
looking towards its completion in a few years, it would be 
a wise investment. 

N. W. HOBBS, Mayor, 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
CHARLES G. REMTCK, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 
E. A. MOULTON, Clerk. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The park commissioners present herewith their report 
for the year ending December 31, 1917 : 

Receipts. 

General appropriation, $4,000.00 

Less unexpended, 41.36 



Total receipts, $3,958.64 

Expenditures. 
Salary of superintendent, twelve months, $1,180.00 



WHITE PARK. 




'aid for labor, 


$926.77 


labor removing gypsy moths. 


64.13 


labor on ice, 


121.89 


cash paid Mr. Atkinson, 


32.00 


Thompson & Hoague Co., 




power lawn mower, 


250.00 


Thompson & Hoague Co., 




hardware and supplies. 


10.15 


Home & Hall, lumber and 




supplies, 


25.48 


Mrs. Annie Trenoweth, sand. 


1.80 


Dr. E. J. Delaney, services J. 




Naughton, 


7.00 


advertising in Monitor and 




Statesman, 


1.20 


advertising in N. H. Patriot, 


.50 



334 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid for advertising in Union-Leader, $0.81 
mason work and supplies, 

Mr. Lugg, 34.25 
Rowell & Plninmer, cement 

and trucking, 7.65 

M. E. Clifford, labor, 20.61 

W. L. Riford, horse hire, 74.25 

E. H. Runnells, teaming, 96.52 

Walter Dole, grain, 84.54 



1,759.55 



ROLLINS PARK. 

Paid for labor, $615.50 

labor removing gypsy moths, 9.00 

Thompson & Hoague Co., 

hardware and supplies, 14.69 

Thompson & Hoague Co., 



hardware and supplies. 


27.80 




W. Bailey, plants, 


4.88 




Walter Dole, grain. 


169.65 




Dr. Burchsted, 


4.00 


$845.52 






SMALL PARKS. 






Fiske Park, 


$33.76 




Bradley Park, 


36.02 




Court House Park, 


46.13 




Ridge Park, 


18.46 




Pecker Park, 


16.88 




State Street Park, 


4.50 




West Garden, 


2.82 




Horse hoist at Pecker Park, 


15.00 


173.57 









$3,958.64 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 385 

No new features, with the exception of a few swings and 
small athletic apparatus, have been added to the parks in 
the past year. The dumping of ashes has been continued 
on the ball ground and by another season the grade should 
be well established. 

We are not able to make extensive improvements, as the 
maintenance of the parks in their present condition seems 
to absorb all of the appropriation. 

The West Garden, given the city by the late Hon. Frank 
W. Rollins, is a fine addition to our park system, and we 
hope the remodeling can be accomplished the coming sea- 
son, as we have a gift of $900 from his estate for this pur- 
pose. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, Mayor, ex officio, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

GARDNER B. EMMONS, 

BENJAMIN C. WHITE. 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 

ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 

Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1917. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1917 : 

From fees of all kinds, $487.20 
hack and job team licenses, 146.50 
bowling alley and pool table licenses, 390.00 
pawnbroker's license, 25.00 
employment bureau license, 5.00 
junk dealers' licenses, 170.00 
dog licenses, 1,535.49 
boiler, police station, 25.00 
city primary, 80.00 
grass sold by M. J. Lee, account 1916, 10.00 
M. J. Lee, old iron, police station, 2.75 
E. L. Davis, boiler, engine house, 3.00 
proceeds city lot. Ward 3, 30.05 
theatre licenses, 557.00 
Merrimack County, aid to dependent sol- 
diers, 1,523.11 
Merrimack County, aid to county poor, 14,767.86 
Manchester, aid, L. E. Boardman, 35.00 
Littleton, aid, Matilda Plante, 32.00 
Bradford, aid, Mrs. A. Bailey, 45.00 
Loudon, aid, Mrs. Newton, • 30.00 



$19,899.96 



The foregoing amount has been paid into the city treas- 
ury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FIFTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVERSEER 
OF THE POOR. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1917. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the fiftieth annual 
report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards One 
and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1917 : 





City 


Poor. 






Appropriation, 






$3,000.00 




Resolution No. 311, 






264.71 


$3,264.71 






Paid groceries, 






$965.88 




fuel, 






343.51 




rents. 






462.00 




care, children. 






248.00 




board and care, . 






924.57 




medicine, 






14.85 




shoes and clothing, 




107.67 




burials, 






72.00 




miscellaneous. 






128.23 


$3,266.71 






"Wood, city wood yard 


) 






122.00 




$3,388.71 




County Poor. 






Paid groceries, 






$2,921.16 




milk, 






492.60 




fuel. 






1,492.60 





338 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid rents, 

care, children, 
board and care, 
shoes and clothing, 
burials, 
miscellaneous, 
transient account. 

Wood, city wood .yard, 



$4,025.95 

2,563.50 

2,420.00 

362.56 

141.00 

19.85 

15.80 



Total amount paid for aid to poor, 

Dependent Soldiers, City. 
Appropriation, 
Paid care, sickness. 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 



$14,455.02 
504.00 

$14,959.02 

$18,347.73 

$150.00 
$102.00 



Paid groceries, 
milk, 
fuel, 
rents, 

board and care, 
clothing, 
miscellaneous. 



$344.32 

86.46 

302.04 

270.00 

340.00 

6.30 

2.00 



$1,351.12 
87.00 



Wood, city wood yard, 

$1,438.12 
Total amount paid for aid to dependent soldiers, $1,540.12 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, \ 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, [ Trustees. 

ISAAC HILL, ) 



Receipts. 
1917. 
Jan. 1. To balance from 1916, 

Income Mary D. Hart Trust, 

George G. Fogg Trust, 
Setli Eastman Trust, 
Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 
J. W. & E. J. Little Trust, 
Hiram B. Tebbetts Trust, 
Note, City of Concord, N. H., 

$52,176.43 at 31/2%, 
Seth K. Jones Trust, 
J. Eastman Pecker Trust, 
Sundry trust funds deposited 
in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank— $7,521.61, 
P. B. Cogswell Public Library 

Trust, 
Abial Walker Trust, 
David Osgood Trust withdraw 
G. Parker Lyon Public Li- 
brary Trust, 
Franklin Pierce Public Li- 
brary Trust, 
Thomas G. Valpey Public Li- 
brary Trust, 
Joseph Hazeltine Public Li- 
brary Trust, 
22 



$2,689.28 


12.00 


12.00 


5.00 


7.00 


6.00 


18.00 


1,826.17 


12.00 


8.00 



168.03 

85.90 

40.00 

n, 25.00 

40.00 

40.00 

20.00 

133.34 



340 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Jan. 1. To income Countess of Rnmford Trust, $80.00 

Seth K. Jones Trust, 23.00 



$5,250.72 



Expenditures. 
1917. 
Jan. 20. By paid Mary E. Bourne, account income 

Richard Collins Trust, 1916, $1.75 

City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
of lots Pine Grove Cemetery, 111.37 

City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
of lots Old Fort Cemetery, 11.75 

City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
• ' of lots Millville Cemetery, 54.00 

City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
of lots West Concord Ceme- 
tery. 33.50 

City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
of lots Blossom Hill Ceme- 
tery, 1,337.75 
1 City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
of lots Old North Cemetery, 263.25 

City Treasurer, income sundry 
trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care 
of lots Soucook Cemetery, 5.00 



TRUSTESS OP TRUST FUNDS. 341 

Jan. 20. By paid E. 11. Brown, secretary account 
of labor, trust lots Woodlawn 
Cemetery, $148.70 

George W. Waters, superin- 
tendent, account of labor, 
trust lots Calvary Cemetery, 96.16 

Income Minot Enclosure Trust 
Fund, paid to H. H. Dudley, 
treasurer, 105.00 

Mary E. Bourne, income Rich- 
ard Collins Trust, 1917, 1.75 

Income P. B. Cogswell Trust 

Fund, paid to city treasurer, 85.90 

Income Abial Walker Trust, 

paid to city treasurer, 40.00 

Income David Osgood Trust, 
paid to Rev. George A. De- 
mers, 25.00 

Income G. Parker Lyon Trust, 

paid to city treasurer, 40.00 

Income Franklin Pierce Trust, 

paid to city treasurer, 40.00 

Income Thomas G. Valpey 

Trust, paid to city treasurer, 20.00 

Income Joseph Hazeltine Trust, 

paid to city treasurer, 133.34 

Income Countess of Rumford 
Trust, paid to Margaretta L. 
Blake, treasurer, 80.00 

Income Seth K. Jones Fund, 

paid to city treasurer, 17.00 

Income Seth K. Jones Trust, 
paid to Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, account monument 
fund, 6.00 

By balance, 2,593.50 

$5,250.72 



TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1917, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in ]\Ierrimaek County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to ba 
applied to the charitable uses and ptirposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1917, 80.00 

Paid ^largaretta L. Blake, treasurer of the society, 80.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 



Capital, 




$200.00 


Balance income from last year, 


$396.95 




Income received, 1917, 


23.88 


$420.83 



Paid Rev. George A. Demers, treasurer, $25.00 
Income on hand, January 1, 1918, 395.83 

$420.83 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank. 

Income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



TRUST FUNDS. 343 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, geographical, historical and scientific char- 
acter, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the latest 
developments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1917, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85.90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, iai7, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1917, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasuiy, 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1917, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1917, 133.34 

Paid into the city treasury, 133.34 



344 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city 
bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping 
lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each 
year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund; 
and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books 
for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1917, 35.00 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu 

ment fund, $6.00 

Paid to city treasurer for public 

library, 17.00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$35.00 



Capital invested in City of Concord 31/0 per cent. bond. 

SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1917, $490.95 

Prom S. K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1917, 19.46 

$516.41 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abby P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly appointed officials, or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1917, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at Sy^ per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 



TRUST FUNDS. 345 

JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows: So much of income as is necessary to be used 
for the care of burial lot numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, East Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be 
added to principal till same amounts to $10,000, then the balance of income 
accruing each year after paying for care of said lot and monument, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the mayor for the general care and improvement 
of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Amouiit of capital, January 1, 1917, $5,046.66 
Received from income of fund, 1917, 191.74 

$5,238.40 

Paid for care of lot, 1917, $8.00 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, 5,230.40 

$5,238.40 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $2,107.60 
Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 1,542.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,580.80 

KATHARINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST. 
Income to be used for the care of West Garden. 

Capital, January 1, 1918, $1,500.00 

Invested in U. S. Second Liberty Loan of 1917, $1,500.00 



I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the hands 
of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find such 
trust funds invested and the income thereof for the year 
1917 accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees 
kept for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



348 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



m 

H 
E-i 

H 
!^ 
W 

o 



•8IGI 'I Ajb 
-nniBf 'puBq uo 
atiioont JO 8onB[Bg 



•iI6I 'papnadxg 



•iI6l 
'p8Apoa.t aiuoouj 



■SJBgA 

SnOIA8Jd JO 811X00 
-ni " p9piI9ClX8UQ 



•IBJlCl-BO 












ft 


: 


- 


i 


: 


: 


C 


o 


: 


: 




: 


: 


: 


: 


Q 














G 
















^ 


U5 


o 


o 


^ 












-* 




^ 




^ 










^" 








« 


LO 


LO 


c^ 


CO 


C5 


CO 


«^ 


« 


t~ 


l-O 










in 




10 


,^ 




in 




■I© 






















«o 








!2 


O 


o 


o 


o 


c 






o 






o 


10 




o 


















o 


c- 




o 


t^ 


o 


•o 


5& 


,_ 


CO 


t. 


M 


c 






^ 


^^ 




^ 




CO 


<* 






















c^ 






c» 


iO 


lO 


o 


^ 


O 


c 




,^ 


o 




o 


o 


C^l 


o 


o 












u. 






o 


I- 






o 


o 


lO 


— 


*— 1 


n 


t^ 


CO 






*-i 




,_, 




o 


*) 




^ 






























(N 



-^ CO U'^ 



'-' CI — I ^ I— 



^ ■;; 



- ce 






j2 c3 ;3 ,- 



^ >> c3 -^ 



^ S 



CO w 






^ ^ ^ j^ ^ 



<J <1 -< 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



349 



a> ;=; - 



G O 









^ 












CO 


„ 


00 


in 


in 


^ 


in 


00 


CO 


o 


<Ti 


lO CI 


o 




o 




o 


C-. 


CO 


o 


o 


-f 


tc 


CO 




Cl 












CI -^ 


" 








« 




'^ 


"^ 






^ 




-t< 


^" 


'^ 






•^ 


•*< 












o 






o 


o 


„ 


o 


in 


in 


s 


o 


in 


o 


o 






in in 


in 


t- 




t- 












o 




c- 






t" 










CC M 


n 


■" 


'^ 


^~* 


in 


CO 




CO 


CO 


^J 


CO 


'"' 


" 


e^ 


-dl 


i~t 


CI 


I- 








o 




o 


in 


o 


o 


c- 


o 


o 


•n 


o 


in 


LO 


o 


o 


in 


in 


o 


9. 


in in 








t^ 






c- 




in 














t^ 








n n 


CO 


" 


" 


"" 


n 


CO 


"■ 


n 


CO 


" 


CO 


*" 


^^ 


CO 


CO 


" 


^ 


^* 


CO 








^ 










o 






00 


in 


lO 


^ 


in 


00 


00 


o 


25 


in ci 


o 




o 




-r 


o 










to 


CD 


to 






QO 








<M -- 


" 








12 






"^ 






'■' 




■* 




^ 






■* 


? 


? 



5^5^ 



■■- -^ .« 



<<<<;<<;« 



O t) o 



iS bB ^ o 

a; rrt ■« n2 



HH l-l (^ 



w :n -*^ 



Oj 03 .p3 p: e 



<^ S ^ 



s s 



W W M fQ 



350 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



H 

m 

Eh 

Eh 

H 
O 



•8I6I 'I XaiJ 
-nuBf 'piivq 110 

8UIO0UI JO 80U'B['Bg 



"2,161 'papuadxa 



■iT6l 

'p8AiaD8J 91UO0UI 



siioiAajd J0 81UOO 
•u i" p9pu9dx8uj;i 



•l^^idBO 






o 














p 


o 












t 


„ 


_^ 


00 


o 


„ 


lO 




1« 














»-' 
















o 




00 


o 


«5 




,_^ 




t-H 




CI 


t- 




lO 


-f 


_l 


^H 


ts 


CI 


m 





























s 


s 


•o 


in 


« 


s 


§ 


o 


in 


o 


t2 


s 


s 


s 




'^ 


^ 


^ 


CO 


M 


'^ 


t- 


CO 


CO 


00 


"^ 


CO 


c- 




CO 


•* 


CD 


i§ 


g 


C-l 


§ 


o 


z 


^ 


s 


g 


«5 




'^ 


^" 


in 






CO 


OtJ 


«5 


•* 


^ 


IN 


lO 


« 









c 




a 
i 
cfl 


C 


s 


"a 


■J 

"5 


1— 



CI 


ft. 

S 


CO 



^ Ivl 



J tf 






^ ^- „- 






p3oqecaW««mK«papaw oaoa 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



351 









C5 


in 


UO 


■» 


o 


o 


^ 


CO 


lO 


1.0 




o 


C2 


IC 










in 


o 


<~i 


<N 






>n 




CO 


o 


■o 






in 


o 


CO 


C-l 




Til 




Ti< 








M 


-H 


^H 


.-, 


CO 


,_ 


«a 


^^ 


o 


—J 




CN 


in 




^^ 




,_, 








^H 
















" 


























" 


O 


O 


g 


o 


o 




o 


o 


o 


in 






(-, 




















o 




in 


lO 




o 








O 


o 




m 




s 


o 


m 


o 


lO 


IN 


o 




M 


N 


CO 


c^ 


CO 








" 


00 




'' 


" 


c<5 


o 


rj* 


o 


C<I 


o 


in 


lO 


O 


o 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


in 


r> 


u^ 




























lO 






^^ 




c-i 




b- 


o 


t^ 


t^ 






t- 


in 


lO 


in 


M 


lO 




CO 


CO 


CO 


l> 


CO 


CO 


in 




" 


t^ 


" 


'' 


" 


n 


00 


CO 


CO 


CO 


Ci 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


„ 


o 


o 


in 




„ 


^, 


in 






'-I 


^ 












tij 




C-J 


CO 




T 














C-. 


•rP 


m 




o 


in 


in 


•— ■ 


^^ 


*-« 


.— 


t^ 


^- 


o 


00 


*^ 


in 




c^ 


o 






M 


,— I 


in 


Tj< 


10 


O 














" 




" 



























C-l " " rt 



iz; '^ 2 1^ 






a a 



O o K ^q M 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ c 



!2; ft ? c- 

53 ^' ^ -^ 

■^ ^- a' £ 

c g 2 J 

■■5 ^ ? "F 



«cQcqDa«mmp3«P3«a«eQepa 



s ^ 



^ CJ ^^ 



2 d a -s 

ra c^ c^ eS 

o o o o 



352 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 

H 
CQ 

\^ 
P5 
H 
Eh 
W 

O 



•8161 'I ^XTJ 
-nii'Bp 'piiFq uo 
auiooiu JO doa^ivq 



•il6l 

'P8A1809J 91UO0UJ 



•SJT38iC 
SnOIA8J(i JO 8UIOD 

-ui ' papiiadxanf) 



•IBltd-BO 



•il6l 'papnadxa ci 



lO o — 



^ m — 



O O 



^ n W iz; = 



o o o o o o 



< 5 






Q 








Q 


C 














O 


Q 










o 






o 


« 


00 


LO 


^ 




(» 




Cl 


o 


lO 




t- 


C-l 


05 




CO 


»-• 








^ 




I" 


^« 


o 


,-* 


I" 




r« 


^ 


T-> 


C-J 




00 


Vf 





























■^ 








rt 








;- 
















- 








f^ 1 











^ 




M 


£<_ 


"a 


K 


— 



-a a 



u O a 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



353 






o — ' 
o S 



Q Q 



(N Iffl «0 



■M in eo 



CO M CO « 



-H 00 -H — 




IQ lO ^ O Ci lO 
CO CO c-i <N CO CO 



lO lO tr- l~ 



t- lO I- 









.. 




CO 


lO 


e^ 


en 




M 


in 


00 


-H 


m 


c^ 


t- 


CO 


in 


<n 


21 




cs 




T-« 


Tf 




!N 




Tt> 


»-■ 


05 








t— 


t^ 






»~ 






Tf 


c^ 




'^ 


CD 












» 










'^ 


CO 


.to 




t-^ 





^ i-H ffj 





c 


p: 


„ 


& 


.i2 





O K (i< ^- 



5 a 

« S 



[X, o ;^ 



^ k5 



.a S c 






i; £ jS £ 5 



2 -2 w 



^ <i 



^, -S = -r 



O o 



ooooooooo 



354 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



O 
I 

m 

m 

P 

Eh 

H 
Eh 

H 
O 







a 
















"g 




■g 




"5 










o 


































<! 












K 




<; 


w 


< 


M 


<J 










, 
















— 




,„ 




,„_ 










cS 












2; 




cr 


^' 


cS 


:3 


rt 


^ 


^ 






^ 


































<u 




















H^ 














a 












'C 




c; 


'w 




■p 


s 










<u 












;- 








c 














o 












c 




c; 


c 


c 


o 


O 










n 












o 




^ 


c 


c 


~ 


j; 










"^ 












O 




■~ 


o 


■" 


c 












-o 












,- 




r^' 


,- 


rj 


^" 


-a 
































^ 










c 




















C 
































c: 


c; 




c 










o 












ffl 




C 


« 


c 


m 


o 










O 












b'l 




o 


S 


o 


si 


O 






Q 




«4H 






























W 




o 












•^ 




~ 


"^ 


c 


■^ 


o 






H 




> 












ci 




> 


:i 


> 


s 


> 






02 
















cc 




■^ 


K' 


-^ 


K 


.■^ 






W 




5 












,^ 




b 


.^^ 


C 


P^ 


O 






> 




_j- 


:: 


: 


; 


; 


* 


"2 


: 


^ 


t; 


^ 


"S 


^ 


; 


: 


g 




."t 












2 




.^ 


5 


-■^ 


p 


.■t; 










t 

u 












1 




a 


c 


t- 


o 
Q 


S 










ft :: 


- 


: 


: 


: 




= 


J 


s 


CD 

P 




p. 


: 


: 






;:?! 












-: 




-i 


j: 


;:?• 


g 


^ 










CO 












'— 




co 


•^ 


CO 


.r- 


CO 






















r:i 




^ 


"S 


^ 


-c 


^ 










c; 












'V 




^ 


_^ 


ci 


dj 


C3 
























































































o 






c 




c 












p 


^ 


* 


„ 


^ 


. 




^ 


a 




ci p 


P 


« 


d 






0) 
















CD 


c 






QJ 










Q 












Q 




Q 


o 


Q 


o 


O 






•81GI 'Ajt! 




JH 


cc 


-1> 


CO 


c 


s 




CO 




S 


S 


S 


Cl 


§ 


-miBf 'pu'B 


q no 


CC 


t- 


T)< 




CO 


':*' 




CI 


CO 




IC 


c 


C 


rt 




eiuooui JO 90un[i;g 


1=^ T 


































o 


o 


lO 


>c 


O 


o 


o 


o 








o 


K 


in 








o 


o 


r- 


c^ 


O 


o 


o 










in 


r- 




■ITGI 'pap 


nadxa 






t> 


CO 


CO 


in 


CO 


IC 


•* 








in 


'^ 


'' 






o 


Q 


o 


o 


o 


!P 


o 


o 


o 




in 


o 


CO 


IC 


m 




■iX6l 


o 


c 


o 


>n 


o 




o 


o 


lO 






o 


in 


l-^ 


'^ 


'p8AI80a.I 8 


UIOOUJ 


s 


CO 


'^ 


CO 


CO 


in 


" 


■* 


CO 






IM 


in 








sjBaX 


CO 


^^ 


CO 


o 


00 


t- 


o 


c 


CO 




c 




H 


t: 


2 






w 


t- 




t- 


C-: 




lO 


o 






ir 




IC 


c^ 


o 


siioiAaad jo 


a moo 


CO 


t- 


-*l 




CO 


la 




CO 


-t 




c 




c 






-ui ■ papttadxaufi 


Sfe 


Tf 
































o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


c 


o 


c 


C 


oc 




o 






o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


<= 


c 


o 


c 


C 






o 


•[^atduO 




1 


s 

CI 


o 
o 


I 


o 
in 


s 




1 


8 


c 


5 


11- 


g 


d 






f@ 


-^ 








































• 






















55 








PC 
!- 




c 


1^ 




^ 




3 


cS 


c- 


C 
a 


V 


.2 
^1 




> 




1 




c 


c- 


r 






t^ 


H 




C 


<s 






i 


b 


; b 


c 
















_ X 


s. 


J 






c 


c 














fcjc 


? 




















s- 




t 








■ C 




"t 


"t 


^1 








- 'i 


'i 


a 








_a 




c 


c 


c 


c 


^ 






& 


•r 














c 














E 


£ 


i- 


J^ 








X 


"m 


ta 


1 tJ 


c c 


E 


*e 






c 
;- 


C 




c 


c 


c 


5_ 


C 


c 


O 




ct 




c 





CEMETERY FUNDS. 



355 



III < 



P3 B 



<« j= 



s - 



Q Q 



o o Q 



§ 8 



5 


o 


s 


ss 


s 




s 


OS 




8 


s 




8 


8 


S 


8 




g 


g 


s 






« 


C<1 


« 


■<*l 




00 




;o 




S 


« 




«s 


e^ 


•* 


Oi 




t- 










§ 


8 


s 


8 


s 


8 


8 


8 


g 


8 


g 


g 






8 


8 


S 


8 


g 


g 


g 


00 


n 


CO 


^5 


CO 


CO 


<N 


■«• 




OS 


CO 


CO 






- 


to 


'^ 


'ji 


•* 


CO 


CO 


s 


o 


s 


CO 

CO 


g 


g 


■* 


g 


00 


8 


g 


g 


8 


s 


8 


§ 




g 


g 


g 


g 


CO 


CJ 


CO 


N 


CO 


CO 




CO 




t^ 


CO 


CO 


■* 


c 


t- 


lO 


*" 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


g 


o 


to 


■* 


o 


-fl 


00 


CT> 


o 


o 






o 




lO 


8 
















la 


o 










(N 


(O 




■a 






r^ 




t~ 




to 






t^ 


CO 


CO 


in 




" 




(D 


" 


t^ 


N 




N 




00 


© 




t- 


^^ 









m H 



•Sow 



Q Q Q a 

23 



-^ § S 



^ ^ ^ 



■5 S ^ « 



Q Q Q C 



= 3 



■J; J- cc w a 



" t; Q 



QHHKKHHHa 



356 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



O 
I 

m 

£-1 

D 

£h 
>^ 

Eh 
O 






O G 



•8161 'I LXQ 
-tiu'Bp 'put'q no 
atnooni jo aou'Bi'Ba 



OS ^ T-< CO 



"2,161 'papnadxg 



•il6I 
'P8AI908J atnooui 



CO CO ^ O CO CO c^ 






OJ CO O lO 

CO oi CO eo 



snoiA8a(J JO omoo 
-ui ' p9puaclx8U£[ 



IC CO CO CO O 00 00 
t- «. CO CO LO » to 



■[BJldBO 



^:j g 



_2 w w ^' 5 



-^ Cs « 



^ S 



O « 






W H W W H 



a 


a 


a 


a 


a 


w 


w 


w 


w 


w 



W W W fe 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



357 



< K 



C "3 C 



C « tS 
o "^ 

Sis'" 



rt 00 



w 



Iz ? 



.:i 


:S 


^ 


ti 


^ 


-fj 







^ 


^ 





1= 




fl 


0. 








^ 


a3 


iJ 








<^ 






M 


;S 






CO 





Q Q 



O Q 













_p 







^ 


-c 


to 


00 





t- 


Oi 





CO 


CO 









05 




-f 


in 










I- 










10 


04 


CO 




(N 


■Xi 


'^ 


'^ 










00 


Tf 






" 


g 


Tt< 


<N 


CO 


" 


t^ 



l-H rt Tj< 



10 t^ lO »o 



OJ CO O CO 



0000 o 10 
10 o to o o c^ 



■*< .-I CO >-l »i( 




^ ^ e^i — 



^ « (N •- '-< '-' 



S - 



^ W 3 ^>^ 

a s' a "f 



a r 



t:(&Hfe[i,fe[X4[X(fe&,&,fclpi| 



ii -S i '^ 
^ g vT M 



s a .^ O 



■- ^ ^ — ■ o 



!h O <) 



5*^0 



0) ^ ^ 



[^[^[^C^P^t^^P:, 



358 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



m 

Eh 
CQ 

Eh 
H 
% 
H 
D 







c 


















_i 














« 


















J 












ffi 


■< 














K 


< 












Z 




. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


. 


td 




, 


, 


. 


, 






« 


















1^ 












t) 


a 














•o 


















e 














u 
















o 


o 














o 


o 












o 


a 














c 
o 




. 












O 


"" 














o 




" 












^' 
















^ 














c 


o 














c 


O ; 












cs 


u 














ce 














pa 


a 
o 
O 














« 


C 
O 










Q 


















M 

C 












H 


'> 


O 














'> 


o 










H 




>. 














cS 


^_ 










CO 


CO 


-tS 














i» 


.■^' 










H 


J^_ 


U 














;»_ 


O 










t> 


c 


^ 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


a 


■f " 


: 


r 


; 


r 


iTq 


3 


."t^ 














3 
















o 


^ 














O 


'it 












O 
















o 
















^ 
















,M 
















o 
















c 














ce 


a 














n 


a 












a 
















a 
































b> 














A 


: 


- 


- 


z 


z 


' 


at 


P- ; 


: 


z 


: 


: 




^c 


;f? 














c 


;^ 














CO 
















CO 












73 
















•o 


_^ 












» 


cs 














0) 


ce 


























































in 
















C 
















a 
















a 


P. 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


& 


P. - 


< 


« 


, 


< 




(L 
















tij 


a 














Q 


Q 














a 


C 












•8161 'I S.xe 




§ 




S 




irj 


to 

o 


00 

CO 


■* 




lO 

IN 


8 


g 


(O 

°5 


g 


-TiuBp 'puBij no 




w^ 




o 




t-^ 


N 


ej 


cj 




. CO 


r4 


^ 




,4 


araooui /o aouBi'cg 




m 






















^ 










g 


If 
t- 


8 




' {2 


8 


8 


C4 


c 


s 


g 


g 


^ 


g 


•iI6l 'papnedxg 






^ 


00 




"^ 


IC 


00 


CO 


c 


CO 


■* 


t-" 


'^ 


CO 






o 


IT 


8 


IC 


IC 


o 


o 


8 


c 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


o 


■iI6I 




IS 


t- 


o 




lO 


o 


IT 


iq 


lO 


lO 


b- 


lO 


'paAiaoaj acaooai 




CO 




t-^ 




" 


CO 


t^ 


■>J< 


P- 


CO 


eo 


t-: 




CO 


sjijaX 




o 




-f 




t- 


CD 


00 


CO 




lO 


o 


00 


co 


o 




o 




t-; 




(M 


>n 


cc 


;o 




(M 


lO 


(N 


°i 


lO 


SllOlA9Jd }0 81UO0 












t-^ 


c<i 


CO 






CO 










-ui ' papiisdxaun 




s 






















rf 








§ 


8 


8 


8 




O 
O 


8 


8 


o 


8 


o 
o 


8 


8 


8 


o 
o 


IBjid'BO 


in 


8 


g 


8 


1 


g 


§ 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


g 


g 


8 




S 






C<1 






•^ 


cs 








"^ 


»o 




"^ 



•:;^ Q 



h3 -^ 



g « fi 



O O O C5 C3 



O O O C) O c5 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



359 



ffi < 



ffi < 






2 « 



Q a 



Q Q 



CO 


3 


g 


g 


s 


S 


2 


SS 


§ 


§ 


to 
eo 


lO 


S 


to 


s 


s 


s 


s 


8 




•^ 


Ul 




■^ 


"^ 


■* 


<N 


e^ 


c^ 




(M 


'^ 


•* 


QO 




" 


'^ 


(N 


ei 





g S f2 

M N >-c 



•o eo (N 



8 8 



rl *1 CO 00 



S S O 

eo -ei -" 



« t-i — (M 



8 8 



CO »< -- 



8 8 



8 8 



2 S 



CO m CO CO 



Sio o 
« lO 

'H ci ei 



§ 8 



8 8 8 8 8 8 



8 8 8 8 



^ cj >-i rt lo 



CO o o 8 p 
CO o o o o 
0)0 10 10 



0) Q 



W M 



t > > 



"Boo 



« a 



« O 



c a p;; " ^. "^ r ^ „- s s (5 

3 2 iJ g a a ^ ® 2 



55-~~~~'"-- 



360 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 

m 

m 

P3 
Eh 

H 
Eh 
H 

O 





^ 


























^ 






o 


























a 




o 


























;; 




< 










^ 














— 


< ■ 




,_, 










^ 
















„ 






C3 










:: 






_^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


S^ 


=3 i. 




;m 






























(U 
































a 










^ 














"^ 


a 




<0 
























1^ 








O 










o 














£ 


o . 




a 










_ 














s 


; 














































,^ 
















^ 








-a" 
u 
o 






















■^' 


S 






" 


" 


■* 




a 


■• 


" 


" 


" 


' 


* 


r; 


a 




a 








•tJ c 














« 


C 






o 








K. 


o 
















o 




O 








o a 














■jj 


Q - 


Q 










;- 


^ 














M 






H 


o 






















1 


o 




3 








& 5 














a 


'C 




> . 


J3 


; 


; 


: 


"ti — 


r 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


" 


^ 


: 


g 


-h^ 








> 


."ti: 














5 


.^ 














* 

a 


s 














c- 








h 








.y t- 














'C 
















"e 


3; 


^ 




_ 


_ 


. 


_ 


o 


; 






" 




" 




~ 


■* 


* 


' 


' 


' 


" 


s 


" 






;fJ 








*~ 


S- 














_ 


^ ■ 




CtO 








c 


m 














•- 


cr 






^ 








^ 


_ 














-3 


^ 






CS 








^ 


ci 














J^ 


r 






■"' 








a 


^^ 














'i^ 


^ 






d 


^ 


. 


, 


c 


£ 


. 


, 


_ 


. 


^ 


. 


5. 


- 


. . 




o 








^^ 
























Q 










a 














^ 


c 




'8161 't ^^-IB 


o 




• •* O CS -H 


to 




U3 -H lO o 


00 o 




S 




t- in - 


^ cc 


cq 




C^l C'- CO CO 


\a o 


-tiU'Bf' puBq no 








-H t-^ CO 






^ >- 




c-i 


CO -H 


atnooni jo 80U'E['Bg 


۩ 






























O 


~ 


^ m o o o 


o c 


c 


LO o o o 


o o 




o 






- >o o o 


la ic 




IM O O O 


o o 


•ilGi 'papnodxa 


ci 




H « CO 5^ o 


-f- c 


cy 


- 


-)> e^ CO 


t-; cq 




€fi« 








*" 
























U5 




5 O O O O 


o c 


C 


O O lO o 


2 "5 


•2,161 
'paAiaoaj emoani 


r-; 


t- 


t^ »0 O lO 


lO IC 




m lo i> o 


o r-; 


£ 




i «■ ro c^ 


« 


oi c- 


C 


CO CO ■- 


00 


t>; .-< 


•sa^aX 


>o 




• -»l O <N 


^ 


lO 




c 


^ 




CO 


oc 


o 


t>; 




• I- m ^ 




Cs 






c 


IM 




CO 




CO 


SnOIA8JCl JO9UTO0 








i-< r-. 


CO 


Cv 






lO CT 






M -H 


-ui ' papuadxaufi 


s 
































Q 


C 


o o o 


^ 


o c 


C 


o c 


o o 


o o 




o 


c 


o o o 


o 




c 




o c 


c 


o 


o o 


•[B^KlBO 


o 


c 


o o o 


o 


o c 


^ 


d o o o 


d d 


to 


IC 


lO o o 


o 


« - 


c 


o o ir 


p 


§ ^ 








d 














<; 












fii 


CQ 






s 


s 


K 








< 

c 

"a 







■^ 








OJ 


NAM 




sa 

o 
o 

a 
s 


ill 

c 
a. 

61 

; 
•j 

S 




> 




> 

.c 
c 

E 

c 


6 

"a 


> 

s 


n 
c 


£ 

a 


tl 


a 

o 

*-5 


o 
u 


' 






s 


w 




[X 


!:; 


a 


w 


M 


K 


(— 1 


K 


KH 


^ 


s 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



361 






ffl s 



02 .t; M .t; 



0; a^ ^ O 

G Q C C 



U5 


in 


t- 


t- 


o 




CO 




-c 


Hi 


o 


in 


o 


-fl 


in 


co 




o 


o 


t- 


•* 








to 




!M 






IC 








in 




05 


CO 


■* 










» 


IM 


IM 




'^1 






o 




m 


M 


^H 






in 


,-« 




<M 




IN 


to 












































O 


o 


o 










^ 


o 












o 


o 


in 


o 




o 


8 




lO 


lO 


lO 


o 


lO 


lO 


o 


o 


<N 


^5 


o 


in 






o 










05 


" 


05 


CO 


■«< 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


in 


rt< 


^~' 


CO 


"^ 


in 


CO 


^. 


■* 




eo 


•>j" 


O 


lO 


O 


o 


s 


o 




o 


o 


in 




in 


o 




o 


o 


in 


o 


c 


o 


o 














la 






lO 


c^ 






in 




t~ 










t- 


" 


M 


CO 


^ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


in 


CO 


" 


CO 


" 


CO 


T)< 




f 




CO 


CO 


o 


o 




t- 


o 




CO 






in 


in 


in 


o 


•* 


in 


«o 


t- 


o 




t> 


rt< 




to 


o 


<o 






















"* 




T»< 


o 








in 


IN 






IN 






o 


■* 


in 


CO 


^ 






t- 






IN 




IN 


<o 
















"^ 





























K S 



=3 i :- 



— _ « _ tj 















- 


. 








£ 








K 




§ 






.2 






H 


? 


^ 


tj) 






^ 




c« 


t^ 



B "5 



^S" 






02 ,a 

o 



WEtcKWWKWW 



362 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CQ 
Eh 
CQ 

P5 
pq 

Eh 
H 

!^ 
o 





ti 








■g' 
























c 
































•^ 






X 


<; 




















w 




^B 








_^ 
























a 


_ 


^ 


? 


a 




. 


, 




^ 


^ 


. 


, 


, 


z 




































« 
































C 








c 




















•r) 




« 






ti 






















ki 




O 




c 


O 

























a 




c 


a 

























"* 




c 


■~ 

























>« 
h 






^ 


"S 




















^ 




c 








o 




















a 




t 


• 


■" 


cS 


o 


• 


* 


■• 


■• 


• 


• 


■• 


' 


• 


a 




B 
C 






(S 


c 
o 




















fQ 




o 






O 




















00 


Q 


•s. 





























s 


o 




> 


o 




















"> 


H 


!>> 




c: 


;*, 




















01 


CQ 


■«j 






o; 


*-' 




















OS 


H 


5 






. Q 




















> 


> 


X 


: 


r 


c: 


j= 


: 


: 


■z 


: 


; 


; 


: 


I 


; 


c 


2; 


^ 








.t^ 




















3 


i-i 


^ 






^ 































C 






















a 








































^ 


. 




















M 




B 






c 




















03 




9 




1 


o 




















a 




p. : 


: 


t. 

S 




: 


: 


• 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 


z 






;? 




c 


;f 




















s 




er 








CO 




















"^ 










a 


a 




















a 








































































c 



























d. - 




P. P. 




















a 




a 






1 


1. 




















0) 











c 


Q 




















Q 


•gI6X 'I iSJ« 


« 
t- 


o 


S 


8 


S 3 


s 


-H « O •- 

o t- t- e> 


S 


- 


^ 


-nuBf 'pa«n no 


— 


M 




rt 


<r 




IC 




» ^ « ffJ 


■* 




eraooni jo 9oaB(«a 


^ 






























^ 


S f: 






s 


8 


g 


K § 8 § S g 


§ 


•itei 'papuadxa 


rt •* f 
0» 






t- 


t-^ 


t 




i>^ ei e> 


i» 


IC 


^^ 


'p8Ai8D8a atnooui 


S 


g S 




to 


i 


8 


§ 




g 


s g s 


? 


8 


— CO — 






t' 


t^ 


c^ 




10 e< eo c 


c 


ei 


•SIV9S. 


IC 


la c<i 






c 


■* 


o- 




M 00 - 


d 


.^ 


-r 


t- 


M C 






oc 


lO 


p 


u 


C^ 


t- 




«£ 


N 


snoiAQJd JO acaoo 




■« 


cc 






« 




;s 




_ 


CJ — 


c 


IC 




-ni ■ papuadxanfi 


S 
















" 














g 


g 






8 


g 


8 


g 


s 


g 


8 g 


= 


g 


8 


•IBjid-BO 




g 


§ 


8 


1 


- 


s 


c 


! 


10 c 
t- c 


g 


8 


g 
















< 


























|t 






a 


























£ 

c 


'^ 




a 


























t-' 




03 




























a 




'c 


















CQ 




a 

a 




s 


, 5 


p. 


« 


cc 


ff 














^. 


(£ 


(i 


c 




. " 


c 


03 


J= 


c 


1 




S 




^ 




•< 


1 


_« 
'E 


c 
E 
■t: 

6- 




5 


< 


C 

O 
1-5 


c 


5: 


E 
.2 


■5 

•< 


< 


1 


1 * 




^ 


^ 




? 


H 










c 

c 


1 


> 




£ 






• > 


> 


s 


; >, 


"J 


"3 


"« 


1 






s 










1 


1 


p 


_a 


_* 


.c 


J2 


j: 


%. 


t: 


.i 


a 


■ t« 


i ei 




( 




c: 


T 


fcN 


£ 


a 


E 


t 


c 


■c 


•n 




c 


c 




c 


*( 




a 


a. 










c 


ce 


c; 





a 


ta 




t»: 


U 


ti 


W 


12 


12 


S 


12 


ic 




^ 






h4 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



363 



< X 



X < 



u .^o 



« = 



O O Q Q Q 



Q C 



c a - 



0> 


00 


»c 


lO 


„ 


CO Q 


« 




00 


s 


^ 




eo 


00 


(N 




in 


^ 












lO 










o 








o 


■* 


-i> 


CO 


t~ 




liH 


o 




m -v 




m. 




<N 


^ 


1-1 




^^ 


1^ 


fM 


t^ 


(M 


O 


CO 














" 






























s 


s 


s 


8 


§ 




s 






2 


8 


g 


s 


8 


8 


8 


g 


8 


s 


8 




•0 


« 


n 


CO 


CI 




00 


Cl 




CJ 


•* 


CO 


CI 


t- 


CO 


•* 


eo 


OJ. 


eo 


00 


lO 


8 


lO 


s 


8 


s 


? 


s 


^ 


s? 


lO 


g 


g 


c< 


«o 


8 


g 


g 


8 


g 


8 


g 


m 




M 


lO 


<M 


f 


ca 








CO 


CO 


e» 


<M 


■«• 


CO 


CO 


t-^ 


CO 


^^ 


o 


o> 


m 


lO 


o 


OS 




s 


eo 




OJ 








in 












^ 
























lO 


a> 


■* 


eo 




t- 


o 


Tt" 


tC 


00 


t- 




'^ 


o 






u> 


^ 






CO 


•»• 


'^ 


o 




<M 


^^ 


OS 


IN 


^ 


CI 



8 8 S 8 8 8 8 

8 g 8 g t> o o 



88888888 

010I.OOC>000 

ot~-t-ooooo 



8 8 



8 8 

CI CO 



<1 o 



m t< 



i w 



= = = Ji ^ 



^ ^ ^ 



a = 



c" .a -"^O-s^^^ 

c8ceSr2.5.-.1io ooo oo <5 3iJ"iii; 



?« 
s 



s a 



364 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



I 

Eh 
CQ 

E-< 

IX 
P3 
H 
H 
H 

O 



■il6l 'I Ane 
-nn^f 'puxtq no 
ainooui JO 8oaB[Ba 



■il6i 'papuadxa 



■iiei 
'paAtaoaj auioouj 



snoiAaacI jo sraoo 
-ni ■ papnadxauQ 



"I'B^ld'BQ 



N — « 1< -H 



<D ?) CC IM 

-H lO -r in 

r^ ^ id •*! 



in "-I M CO « CO 



co-Hcocieicococo 



t^ LO lO l^ lO 
«' C<5 CO CO CO 



m M CO CJ 



-^ 1-1 rt (N 



2 W 



o K 



a n3 ::: 






CEMETERY FUNDS. 



365 



00 00 ITS C^ l^ ^ 



— in 00 



M " rt CJ 



c~ o 




<N CO 00 CO 



t^ to CI U5 « 1-" O 

" c<3 la pi oi (N t-^ 



IC lO in lO 



MoomdO'-Hcsiom 
^oiiMCJin-HOOf^o 



-« lO CO 



« -< T(< 



s s 






(M — « 



N "-I -" « -H 



H ® 



s s a s § g 



w 5 



<i « 



o g a 



S S r: S <„• a." i' to J c ,2 Ss" 
t, t. t, t. M M a. (pT'o — "S-S 



^ -S ^ 



366 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 

03 
Eh 

m 

P5 
Eh 

pq 

H 
O 



•8I6I 'I UV 
-nuBf puBq no 
aoiooui JO aou'c^'ng 



•iI6I 'papaadxa 



'paAiaoaj atuooui 



snoi Aaid jo ainoo 
-ui ' papnartxanfi 



0. 


: 


- 


: 


: 




: 


' 


i 


• 


: 


' 


: 


• 


: 


O 


































s 


S 


s 










o> 


00 


o 


o» 


t~ 


o 






















■» 




lO 








M 


^H 


^^ 


,~t 


e^ 


.»< 








M 


f-4 


«» 































S 8 g S § 



S 8 



«0 (N « 



.-I eo « n •-> 



S ^ 8 

eo — c^ 



la 


O 


o 


n 


o 


la 


>o 


o 


O 


in 


lO 


t^ 


o 


■a 


o 












o 




lO 












t^ 


•^ 


la 


CO 


« 


N 


t- 


la 


,^ 


M 


eo 


^^ 


1-H 




« 


i-« 


n 


€& 































.-I « O) C<1 



05 t- O 

t-. •* o 



•[BaidB9 



§88 



8 8 8 

ui o o 
t^ o in 



8 8 8 8 8 8 



~ -r a 



^ a 



WW'-' 



^ ^ ^ 



fi. t^ O 



.-OS 



^ O fe 



OOOOOoP<Ph(1<PhPL((1h(^ 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



367 



K < 



a Q 



S ^ S 

to ■^ ^ 



lO rt -H 



lO ^ m o 



lO Q 



-^ >-i eo 



—I « « 



s s 



O O lO 

Tf ci ri 



8 8 g 



00 CO M i-H 



lO -H — ;d 

to « »H ^ 



lO «D « 00 05 00 O 
-H ■ CJ -H « (N t-^ 



8 8 



8 8 



— — -< <N « 



— — CJ IN « 






^ ^ -^ 



Cli Ph Oi (^ ^ 



^ s 



•?'-?-£ b 



fe rt 



S iJ 



S ^5 w 



■^ n ti^ 



fc£ 


> 




13 














^ 
^ 




a 

p 


!=^ 


S 

a 


~ 






_>< 


^ 



P^fL|P^A^^MPL^P-lPH"•P^P^e4fl^P^ 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 
Eh 

m 

Eh 
Q 







^ 




















- 












o 






























o 






























<! 


















K <: 




It-. 






"S 


















z i . 




:z;'' 






a) 


" 


" 




- 


' 


" 


* 


" 




0^ 


■" 








a 


















■^ ; 






"w 






v 






























O 


















c O 










































a 


















^ 








— " 






*'" 


















C " 






c 






t3 
































u 


















^ 1 






^ 






o 




















: o - 










o 
























03 






O 
















-;; 


ra = 




« ■ 






o 
















■•■ 


=« o 




y, ^• 






»4-( 
O 


















> * 




bi . 


H 
































CO 




."ti 


















CB .t 






a: 


W 




o 


















;,. O 




-^ 


> 




^ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


<■ 


■* 


■^ , 


. 


« 


H^ 


z; 




■^ 


















* 






s 


*"* 




^ 














































































M 






^ 






fi 




























OJ 
































o 


















B o 




-H ■ 






h 


















;■ 


^ 






^ 






QJ 






























a 


: 


; 


: 


= 


- 


: 


: 


- 


<1^ P; . 


: 


g 






^ 


















S ^ 




^ 






00 


















•' 


CO 




'" 






^ 


















-d ^ 






-c 






C3 


















i s 




Oj 
























































X 






M 






































fi 


















a ;2. - 




























•3j X - 




i 






Q 


















O G 




p 


■8I6T 'T J?J« 


CO 


in t- lO iM 00 00 r 


00 CO (N 


o CO 








l> <M t- CO lO Cs 


CO in CO •* 


CO CD 


-naBf 'puBi[ no 
araooni joaouBfBg 






I-.' •*■ »h' d 




n" CO 




lO — 






Q 


lO o o o o m c 


o 


O IT 


o 




■iI6l 'papugclxji 


"^ 


t- O lO O lO t^ 


in in 


t>- l> 


o 








•t 




C-l -t> CO 1< — 


t^ 


eo 






oi 








f» 


































o 


u3 m o <o o IT 


c 


o f 


LO IG 


O CD 




"itei 


in 




f- in CD in t~ 


ir 


in CI- 


f, t> 


O CD 


'paAiaoai 


auiooiq 


M 
m 




^ CO CO CO -- 


t' 


'^ 


c^ 


*" 


*" 


l> M 




•si^aX 


o 


in ? 


in CO oo oc 


c^ 


cr 




Cs 




c 






snoiAajd jo siuoo 


CO 


t-- 


m t> CO in c- 


cc 


"^ 




•* 




CO 




-ui ' papuadxaiifi 


d 






in 


t- 


?: 


e<i 








t^ 










o 


c 


c c 


o c 




^ 


o 


o 


^ 


c 


c 


o 






o 


c 


c 


o in c 




c 


c 


o 


C 


o 


c 


o 




[Bjid^O 


o 


o 


c 


o -* 


c 


o 


Q 


^ 


o 


^ 


c 


c 


d 




o 


IT 


ir 


c 


o c 


in 


i? 


s 


o 


IT 




c 


o 






m 




































t=^ 




































>. 




































o 




































PI 




































03 




































;z; 




































T3 














■< 




tn 


1 








c/5 
2; 




o 

'A 


d 

-a 


4 


> 

;- 
C 


1 c 

c 




c 


S 

!- 




-j: 


E 

oi 


03 


c 


03 

5 
o 






a 




S 


a 


c 


U 


tE 


c 
c 

n2 


c 
c 


c 


1 
. HI 


o 








.j: 






c 




J, 


;~ 


;- 




> 












a 




t 

c 


'i 


i- 


i a. 


1 


cc 


c. 


0- 




6 
1 s 


° 1 


.- 






i^ 


03 •" 






c 


) a 














c 


o 






fi- 




« 


a 


; p: 


D: 


" p: 


5 


e: 


s 


S 


s 


s 


tf 


tf 





CEMETERY FUNDS. 



369 



1^' ? 



e Q 



o 


m 


•+< 


CO 


o 


in 


CO 


in 


00 


in 


IM 


or 


C-l 


o 


„ 


o 








o 






03 






in 




00 




Tf 


. °° 




a. 




o 


-*• 










Tl< 




CO 


(M 


in 


'^ 


C'J 


t~ 


CO 


CO 


§ 


§ 


(N 


t- 




in 




in 


c^ 


C- 


CO 


•^ 


^^ 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


o 


o 


„ 


o 


o 


s 


O 




lO 


„ 


o 


o 


o 










o 












o 












o 


in 


o 


o 


lO 


O 


o 


o 


t- 


■* 


ea 




>* 


c^ 


t- 


c^ 


CO 


<N 


■* 






" 


CO 


in 


M 


lO 


^ 


00 


CO 


o 


o 


o 


in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


ir 




















o 


















o 




i^ 


t^ 




in 


o 


t- 


in 


in 


o 


o 


t- 


m 


o 




CO 


CO 


I- 


n 


l>; 


^ 


m 


" 


" 


t- 


n 


CO 


*"* 


n 


CO 


'~ 


CO 


o 


Cl 


-p 


ro 


o 


in 


CO 


in 


00 


in 


C<I 


c 




o 


^ 


o 






ir. 








-f 


03 








00 




•* 




o 








f 










■* 




m 


M 


lb 


"^ 


CO 


to 


CO 


in 


in 


CO 


CO 


CO 




in 




<* 


<N 


C5 


CO 


00 


'^ 



.-■ — <M -" !N 



C^ -1 rt 



— Tl C^ 



fi p^ 



o o o 
Di tf 03 



o o 



<1 < 



S O 






^ ^ 



a ^ 



« 2 -a 



^ -^ 



tin fR 



tt bt 



>ffi 



QSKtfSSSipHS^oQCOMcoiaicowwa; 



370 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



I 

Eh 
CQ 

Eh 
H 

W 
O 



•8I6I 'I &iv 
-naBf 'puBq no 
atuoonijoaonBiBa 



X < 



ffi < 



a Q 



Q Q 



•iI6l 'papnadxa 



>o >a la la 



g g 



•iiei 
'P8AI808J ainooui 



O m U3 U3 >o lO 



w CO CO eo cc ^^ '^ 



snoiA8Jd JO 8tnoo 
-ui ' papu9dxaufi 



t^jid'BO 



g g 



« « — (M -< 



2 S 

1(5 S 



< C 






fe m a 



^ a ^ S S 



^ /= ^ 



cs t8 .y -rt -^ — ;7 rr 
M CO a: M M X a; tc 



^a -3 i "i 



-/: CO cc CO w 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



371 



<5 W 



a - •= 



ft p. r ft 



<D aj 


3^ 






' 


■* 


- 


' 


* 


^ 


' 


* 




" 


- 


- 


■* 


- 


- 


- 


D Q 


Q 






















Q 




o 












eo : 


; o> 


_j 


rj 


^ 


t- 


Tt< 


lO 


o 


-r 


M 


o 


CO CO 






lO 














t* 




-r 




r^ 




Oi 


CO CO 


CI 




00 






^^ 


• 1—1 


^^ 


ic 


,_, 


-t* 


« 




,_, 


j^ 


o 




CO -H 


^« 




C) 


c^ 


i> in 








































'^ 


9 • 


• o 


O 




o 


o 


in 


in 


o 


^, 


o 






o 


^ 
















LO 


o 


o 


















o 


o 




in 


o 




o 


(N . 


. eo 


eo 


00 


t^ 


lO 


'^ 


'^ 


CJ 


00 


1^ 


'"' 




■* 


" 




■ CO 


•^ 




o 


15 • 


'• o 


o 


o 


o 


lO 


112 


in 


in 


CO 


o 




CO o 






o 


^ 


























lO 






t- 




in 


o 




<s 


^ 


• M 


c^ 


"^ 


t- 


o 


^ 


"^ 


""^ 


I- 


w 


fH 


c<- 


"* 


"^ 


CO 


CO 


t- 


c^ 


-f 


00 '• 


■ 05 


^ 


CJ 


_ 


IM 




in 


in 




















^ 






^" 






T 






Tjl 




o 


00 


(N 




CO 


^ 


(N 


00 


o 


o 


in 


^ 


*"* 


"^ 


» 


^^ 


tC 


M 




" 


00 


C5 






" 


'"' 


(N 


c^ 


c^ 


■* 


o 



« C-1 IM — 



in in in in 



— -^ (M rt « 



W "S 



rf. ^ -^ O 






a oj >-• 

^ Ph M 






5 ^ fo 



24 



a « 



C3 ■ 

Id 



CO CG 00 OQ 



372 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



I 

m 

H 

m 



Eh 

Eh 

H 
O 



■8161 'r Xj-B 
-nn«£> pimq no 
amooni joaonBiBfi 



"iiei 'papuaclxg 



•iI6i 
'p8Aiao3j amooui 



■SivaS. 
snoiAaad jo giuoo 
-ui ■ papiiadxaufi 



•{'BjidBO 



Co- 



Q 


s 


%- 


'5 


=« 


W 


■r; 




©■ 




H 


C3 


>., 




> 


CC 


M 


.ti 


=*3 




W 


^ 


^ 




o 


> 


s 


;5 = 


: o 
"So 


5 


^M 


o 


fi 


c 


is 



Q Q 



5 ;#-' 



O Q 



05 00 lO CO lO 01 



■-I O -H 



-C « M 1-I 



o t- 



omoioOLiifflio 

M r-< CO m' CO -H ,^ rH 



CO IC ^ lO (M 00 



— CI M CD rH rt 



•-I CI rt 





ca CO 


a 


w 






o 


a 
o 

1-5 


CI 


o 





Qj ^«l 



CJ ffi 



ts '^ 



— O ^H 



3 ^ 



J3 G 



„■ H 



•a o o 
-13 S ii 



«2C0E-it-iEHEHtiE-iEHEHe^E-iEHtH^ 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



373 






« s 



o 








































c 


Q 






O 






o 






in 


<n 






o 












I- 








o 


Ol 


lO 




in 


(N 


o 


o 




o 




CO 


•* 


in 




t~ 


00 


CO 


e 


t- 






'»' 




e-) 


(M 


^ 




t^ 


CO 


«o 


CO 




"N 


(N 


in 








o 


(N 


l> 




'■' 


o 


o 


o 


O 




in 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


r- 


in 


^ 


o 


o 




^ 


o 












t- 




in 




o 














O 








o 


o 


CO 


c^ 


eo 


t~ 




'" 


o 


CO 


t- 


t- 


C-1 


(M 


IM 


CO 


r 


'^ 


03 


o> 


CO 




? 


o 






o 








-^ 


o 


o 


o 




in 




o 


c 




O 


^ 




\r 






>o 


t^ 


o 


o 


in 


■* 






o 








t^ 


in 






O 


o 


in 


a 


c 


t- 


M 


"^ 


CO 


■^ 


n 


^^ 


" 


CO 


'' 


t- 


IM 


'"' 


"^ 


« 


c 


*^ 


•^ 


^ 


CO 


m 


<: 


'"' 




-* 






r<l 


m 










^ 
























O 


<M 


lO 


t- 


O 


in 


o 


o 


CO 


o 


rt^ 


in 


CO 


in 




t- 


00 


CO 


o 


-rf 




[- 


■* 


"^ 


(N 


s 


CO 




a> 


CO 


CO 


CD 




cq 


<N 


m 






s 


c» 


(N 


eo 




^ 



1-< C-l .-H 



C-> ^ " 



£? P^ 



- O S 



o =3 ^ 

.1 ^ .a 



; < 


Pi 


1 




K 


c- 


M 


E^ 



c PM 



qj ,« ^ 



H C2 > 



ti ^3 s s s 



^^^^^^^^^^^^ 



374 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 
CQ 

H 

m 

H 
Eh 
H 

H 
O 



snoiAajd jo aiuoo 
-ni papaadxaufi 



"8161 'I Aa'B 
-noBf 'puBii no 
araooui JO aDnBCBg 



•ZI61 'papuadxa 



ilGT 
'p3Apo8J einooiii 



•[■BlUlBQ 



5 -a^ 
2: 1« 



^ < K 



y, 


c:) 


hr 




^ 


t4-4 












> 


C/J 




■^ 


u 



T O T 



a Q 



-< O OO in 05 M 



CD —■ M -f> 



o o in o o o r 

>n o r- o o lo IS 


8 




§ s s s 


n in — 1 "!)< e^ « m 


'* 




CO C*3 C^ CO 



rt TO e« CO 



in 


o 

00 


«-) 


m 


CO 


K 






00 






CO 


•* 


CO 


o 
m 


CD 


C-. 




-f 




CO 


01 




CO 






in 


CO 


C-1 


'^ 


O 

o 


o 
o 


s 


8 


8 


8 


8 


g 


8 


8 


c 


8 


8 


8 


8 


§ 


o 


o 
in 


8 


g 


i 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


o 
o 


8 


8 


o 

o 


8 


8 


<* 































.:: <j cs 



-5 & iJ .S 



c ra o 



B S 



o -J" S 



C ,C .13 

_ -2 H 02 



^ ^ 



^ I 



^ ^ ?: ^ 



^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



375 






oj ;^ « 



c 
























0) 


a. 
















CO 


00 


CO 


1 9 


^ 


o 


"= 




<a 






■ en 
1 "=- 

IS 


o" 


o 


in 


CO 


o 


in 


t^ 


o; 


ei 


ec 


ci 


1 

CM 


o 


o 


m 


1 "= 


o 


in 


CO 


"^. 


tf 


M 


<N 


ci 








1 s 


« 




in 


1 «> 


CD 


C 


CO 


<N 


<N 






Is 

1 «© 


8 




§ 


q 


o 


1 


in 


CO 


o 


t- 


C5 


•«> 






la 










c 








,c 








< 


(s: 


£ 




> 


•. e 


£ 




c 








^ 


< 


1 




C 




. 




E 


b 


' 1 






3 r 




^ 




> a 





TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 

City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Special 

Funds. 

blossom hill cemetery fund. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amoimt of capital, January 1, 1917, $33,896.06 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1917, 1,571.70 

Received from income of fund, 1917, 1,453.06 

$36,920.82 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1,453.06 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, 35,467.76 

$36,920.82 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds, $2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 12,370.85 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 7,096.91 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 10,000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 4,000.00 

$35,467.76 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 377 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an in- 
crease of the fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of caj)ital, January, 1, 1917, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 32.60 

$847.60 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $32.60 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, 815.00 



$847.60 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, $661.11 
Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1917, 399.89 
Received from income of fund, 1917, 42.38 

$1,103.38 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $42.38 

Amount of capital, January ], 1918, 661.11 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1918, 399.89 



$1,103.38 



Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year hy the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, $335.00 

Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1917, 382.01 

Received from income of fund, 1917, 28.66 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1917, 2.50 

$748.17 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $28.66 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1918, 382.01 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, 337.50 

$748.17 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
interested parties, and by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
Millville Cemetry. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, $2,143.40 
Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1917, 473.40 
Received from income, 1917, 105.63 

$2,722.43 



Capital, January 1, 1918, $2,143.40 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1918, 473.40 



Capital and income, January 1, 1918, $2,616.80 
Credited city of Concord, general 
account, 105.63 

$2,722.43 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,345.99 
Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,270.81 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 379 

SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Soucook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1917, $13.88 
Received from income of fund, 1917, .22 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1917, 13.00 

$27.10 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $0.22 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, 26.88 



$27.10 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $26.88 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund, the conditions of which have already been fulfilled. There are 
still outstanding one bond of $500 and one of $300. The $500 bond matures 
October 1, 1918, and the $300 bond October 1, 1919. The . presumption is 
that these bonds will be paid each year from taxes assessed upon the property 
of the precinct. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1917, 
Income received, 1917. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1918, 
Deposited in Union Trust Company. 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking 
fund, which provided that the following amounts should be raised annually 
upon the taxable property of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds 
as they mature, viz. : 

$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 
$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 



$26.86 




1.04 






$27.90 
$27.90 





380 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1917, $423.17 

Income received, 1917, 16.92 

$440.09 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1918, $440.09 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 

CITY OF COKCORD WATER-WORKS SINKING FUND. 

Established by authority of an ordinance of the Board of Aldermen passed 
June 11, 1917. Principal and interest to be used in the reduction of the 
bonded indebtedness of the water-works system at the discretion of the Board 
of Water Commissioners. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $15,000.00 

Invested in City of Concord, N. H., 4% sewer 

refunding bonds, $5,000.00 

Invested in U. S. First Liberty Loan of 1917 

converted 4:% bonds, 10,000.00 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS SINKING FUND INCOME 
ACCOUNT. 

Income received in 1917, $279.10 

Paid P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 

accrued interest, $11.94 

Balance of income, 1917, 267.16 

$279.10 



Income invested in U. S. Second Lib- 
erty Loan of 1917, two at $100 each, $193.52 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 73.64 



$267.16 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 381 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the per- 
manent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading ol 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and in- 
come of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the 
mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that 
purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 

1917. 

Alice H. Stevens estate, burial, $12.00 

Eliza J. Clough estate, burial, 11.00 

Mildred B. Chase, burial, 3.00 

Charles H. Leavitt estate, burial, 6.00 

Hosea L. Bickford estate, burial, 7.00 

Mark R. Holt estate, burial, 4.00 

Marie E. Gilmore estate, burial, 4.00 

Sabina A. Hill estate, burial, 7.00 

Fred M. Boardmau, care, 3.00 

Mrs. J. S. Button, care, 1.50 

George H. Huntley, care, 1.50 

Ada Aspimvall, care, 1.00 

Charles F. Forsyth, care, 2.00 

William P. Fiske estate, care, 2.00 

Mrs. George Downing, care, 2.00 

Mrs. R. C. Gay, care, 3.00 

Mrs. J. H. Dearborn, care, 1.50 

Harry Parmenter, care, 1.50 

Henry F. Piper, repairs, 12.00 

Ernest S. Chase, lot 37, block Y, 42.00 

Mary F. Leavitt, lot 26, block BB, 30.00 
Mary J. Angwin Gomeringer, lot 84, 

block Y, 30.00 

Charles C. Hill, lot 7, block AA, 64.80 

Helen R. Johnson, lot 48, block AA, 68.40 

Elbridge F. Copp, lot 49, block BB, 54.00 

Nellie S. Keeler, lot 13, block AA, 72.00 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Frank J. Pillsbmy and heirs, lot 42, 

block Z, * $170.00 

George W. Keeler estate, burial, 7.00 

Hattie S. Copp estate, burial, 6.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 6.00 

J. E. Normandeau, labor, 2.00 

G. B. Lauder, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Keniston, care, 2.00 

Joseph E. Mayo, wood sold, 7.00 

Davidson (infant), burial, .50 

Cutting (infant), burial, .50 

D. L. Pratt (child), burial, 2.00 
Eoland Rhodes estate, burial, 4.00 
Charles H. Hodge estate, burial, 8.00 
Earl D. Carr estate, burial, 8.00 
Mary H. Freeman estate, burial. 7.00 
Oscar Madison estate, burial, 3.00 
Addie L. Wright estate, burial, 7.00 
"W. G. C. Kimball estate, burial, 7.00 
Nathan Dunbar estate, burial, 7.00 
Freeman J. Nelson estate, burial, 7.00 
Anson S. Marshall estate, burial, 8.00 
Elizabeth S. Hall, burial, 7.00 
William B. Tebbetts estate, burial, 9.00 
Estelle Holt estate, burial, 7.00 
Carrie S. Walbridge estate, burial, 5.00 

E. L. Farnsworth estate, care, 3.00 
D. G. Lowell estate, care, 1.00 
Isaac Hill estate, care, 3.00 
Frigid Fluid Co. (rebate on freight), 1.54 
Charles W. Marsh, lot 120, block W, 93.15 
Edward C. Frost, lot 7iyo, block Z. 60.00 
Mabel A. Hammond, lot 37, block BB, 30.00 
Ella F. Tarleton, lot 7, block BB, 42.00 
James Harriott, lot 80, block BB, 35.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 
Finnittea M. Richardson estate, burial, 14.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 
Peter Sanborn, care, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 383 

Caroline A. Libbey estate, burial, $5.00 

Charles V. dishing, burial, 5.00 

Howard C. Yeadon, burial, 5.00 

Ralph Home (infant), burial, 1.00 

Wood sold, 5.00 

Ella F. Tarleton estate, burial, 8.00 

Arthur W. Dow (child), burial, 2.00 

Phebe B. Sargent estate, burial, 5.00 

H. B. Hardy, shrubs, 2.00 

James W. Mc]\Iurphy estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. E. N. Spencer, care, 1.50 

Selma Yettekoski estate, burial, 10.00 

Isaac F. Mooney, care, 1.50 

Aurant Betham estate, burial, 10.00 

Eastman (infant), burial, .50 

Charles A. Yeadon, lot 140, block Y, 67.20 

Frank P. Andrews, lot 2, block AA, 159.00 

James C. Manning, lot 82, block BB, 30.00 

George E. Jacobs, lot 23, block BB, 48.65 

Leland E-. Ramsey, lot 36, block BB, 58.10 

Perley B. Phillips, lot 12, block BB, 44.80 

Abbie W. Haskell estate, burial, 5.00 

Betsey A. Parker estate, burial, 5.00 

Guy S. Rix estate, burial, 5.00 
Bessie D. Fredette estate, burial, . • 8.00 

William Richards estate, burial, 10.00 

Rosa Virgin estate, burial, 7.00 

Nancy V. Libby estate, burial, 4.00 

Mary Rowell estate, burial, 7.00 

Carrie Johnson estate, burial, 7.00 

Lucy Moore estate, burial, 15.00 

Frank Messe estate, burial, 7.00 

Alice D. Olmstead estate, burial, 5.00 

Kenerson (infant), burial, .50 

Charles Ash estate, burial, 7.00 

Mary Johnson estate, burial, 5.00 

Sumpadian (infant), burial, .50 

Earl Struthers estate, burial, 6.00 



384 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Frank Kelley. labor, $1.50 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

Lane & Co., labor, 2.00 

J. 0. Lyford, care, 5.00 

H. E. Gale, care, 4.00 

Mrs. Bergholtz, care, 1.00 

A. B. Batchelder, care, 2.00 

C. F. Chase estate, care, 4.25 

Mrs. Johnson, care, .50 

George Clark, foundation, 30.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 38.00 

Kendall & Foster, use of tomb, 4.50 
Frank W. Johnson, lot 161, block W. 101.25 

Louis L. Lull, lot 21, block BB, 30.00 

Frank L. Lane, lot 49, block Z, 96.00 

Alexander Murehie, lot 78, block Z, 121.68 

A. Murehie (infant), burial, 1.00 

Sarah F. Simpson estate, burial, 4.00 

"William Tresidder estate, burial, 7.00 

Augustine R. Avers estate, burial, 12.00 

L. Kristo Trebiska estate, burial, 15.00 

J. S. Farnsworth estate, burial, 7.00 

Andrew B. Carter estate, burial, 7.00 

E. B. Craddock estate, burial, 1.00 

Gertrude E. Gould estate, burial, 5.00 

Mary B. Clement estate, burial, 5.00 

Samuel F. Patterson estate, burial, 7.00 

Carrie J. Blanchard estate, burial, 5.00 

Laura A. Ramsey estate, burial, 5.00 

Alfred J. Mixer estate, burial, 5.00 

Julia A. Thompson estate, burial, 5.00 

Rowland Carter estate, burial, 5.00 

Preston Smith estate, burial, 5.00 

Sarah Neal Harris estate, burial, 5.00 

Susan E. Sleeper estate, burial, 7.00 

Osgood (infant), burial, .50 

Mary E. Baker estate, burial, 5.00 

John Lamprey estate, burial, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 385 

Ilartwell Knight estate, burial, $7.00 

Edwin Fisher estate, burial, 5.00 

John Gove estate, burial, 7.00 

James Hustis estate, burial, 6.00 

Martha Moore estate, burial, 5.00 

Ella Leete estate, burial, 5.00 

Carlson (infant), burial, .50 

Stevens (child), burial, 2.00 

Savola E. Severance estate, burial, 5.00 

William S. Hooper estate, burial, 6.00 

Arthur W. Corser estate, burial, 5.00 

Daniel B. Newhall estate, burial, 7.00 

Kendall & Foster, use of tomb, 1.00 

Jennie D. Clough, care, 3.00 

Charles A. Yeadon, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Hansen, care, 1.00 

E. S. George, care, 1.00 

Mrs. W. H. Gould, care, 1.00 

George W. Worth, care, 4.00 

L. D. Caldon, care, 2.00 

L. E. Ramsey, care, 3.00 

E. C. Lyons, care, 2.00 

Charles W. Simpson, care, 4.00 

Herman J. Sanborn, care, 3.50 
John Swenson Granite Co., foundation, 13.00 

Frank W. Johnson, labor, 10.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 3.00 

Mrs. Oscar Holt, labor. 2.33 

Carl E. Carlson, lot 104, block BB, 42.00 

Hiram Severance, lot 53, block BB, 50.40 

Emma R. Johnson, lot 22, block BB, 30.00 

Mrs. Rose Newhall, lot 56, block BB, 63.00 

Walter H. Bugbee, lot 44, block Z, 96.00 
Lilla A. Osgood, north half lot 159, 

block W, 86.00 

George Goodhue, lot 14, block AA, 72.00 

Walter F. Lane, lot 24, block BB, 51.28 
Mrs. George A. Ordway, lot 59, block M, 30.00 



386 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John B. Crosby, lot 98, block BB, i^6o.98 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 6.00 

Merrimack Granite Co., foundation, 51.00 

Cnmmiugs Bros., foundation, 20.00 

Perry Bros., foundation. 3.75 

Carlson & Larsen, foundation, 11.50 

H. Annis, hay sold, 7.00 

George W. Dudley, burial, 7.00 

William Moody, labor, .85 

Mrs. H. Mclntire, care, 1.50 

Mrs. E. A. Clark, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Frank Messe, care, 5.50 

A. G. McAlpine & Co., foundation, 85.50 

Miss Ida Dodge, care, 6.00 

Frank B. Gordon, care, 2.50 

John S. Blanchard estate, burial, 5.00 

Ann M. Mason estate, burial, 10.00 

Charles W. Eastman estate, burial, 5.00 

Mary J. Ray estate, burial, 5.00 

Frank W. Nik estate, burial, 10.00 

Ferdinand A. Stillings estate, burial, 12.00 

Frank A. Sargent estate, burial, 5.00 

Georgie Bean estate, burial, 7.00 

Lucinda H. Brown estate, burial, 5.00 

August Anderson estate, burial, 12.00 

Winnifred E. Lane estate, burial, 5.00 

Susan J. Collins estate, burial, 5.00 

Kendall & Foster, labor, 3.10 

Charles E. Scorer, care, 3.28 

Curtis E. Dearborn estate, burial, 8.00 

Helen M. Thompson estate, burial, 14.00 

William L. Hillard estate, burial, 5.00 

Emma Bugbee estate, burial, 7.00 

Martha Woodfork estate, burial, 12.00 

Margaret Foote estate, burial, 10.00 

Roscoe Gay (child), burial, 2.00 

King G. Streeter estate, burial, 5.00 

W. Hagan (infant), burial, .50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 387 

A. J. Mitchell (infant), burial, $0.50 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

W. E. Hunt, care, 7.00 

Zack Farmanian estate, burial, 5.00 

Sampson (infant), burial, .50 

James C. Eeid estate, burial, • 5.00 

Mrs. E. Morrill, repairs, 6.00 

J. H. Flood, repairs, 8.00 

Charles J. French, foundation, 5.00 

Mrs. Hodgman, care, 1.50 

Abram Muntter estate, burial, 30.00 

C. Eldredge, foundation, 4.00 

Leslie H. Tucker, lot 55, block BB, 63.00 

Ellen M. Reid, lot 43, block BB, 30.00 

Smith Beck, lot 45, block Y, 25.00 

Ralph E. Hill, lot 78, block BB, 30.00 
Franklin B. Reed, Henry 0. "Williams, 

Rebecca H. Farrar, lot 48, block Z, 80.00 

Charles A. Burroughs estate, burial, 5.00 

Susan L. Clough estate, burial, 12.00 

Mary T. Hoague estate, burial, 12.00 

Clara F. Woodworth estate, burial, 14.00 

Harlan C. Sargent estate, burial, 6.00 

George W. J. Colby estate, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. L. D. Jones, repairs, 8.00 

Hattie Fellows, repairs, 5.50 

Mrs. F. E. Brown, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Isabelle F. Nutter, care, 5.00 

George W. Brown, labor, 2.50 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

Frank J. Kelley, labor, 3.00 

A. Jenkins, labor, 11.00 

Albert W. Bailey estate, burial, 12.00 

Mary Augat estate, burial, 10.00 

Edith E. Persons estate, burial, 5.00 

John Stanley estate, burial, 7.00 

Amos Chapman estate, burial, 5.00 



388 CITY OF CONCORD. 

DeWitt C. Everett estate, burial, $5.00 

Sarah J. Hamilton estate, burial, 5.00 

Trenoweth (infant), burial, .50 

Charles G. Pinkham estate, burial, 7.00 

Paul Chandler (child), burial, 2.00 

Ralph H. Thompson estate, burial, 5.00 

William P. Blake estate, burial, 5.00 

Heathco (infant), burial, .50 

Eliza A. Cole estate, burial, 5.00 

Louis Kelley estate, burial, 5.00 

W. A. Willard (child), burial, 1.00 

Oliver Thompson estate, burial, 5.00 

Agnes K. Dwinnells estate, burial, 7.00 

Frank E. Child estate, burial. 5.00 

Emeline B. Colby estate, burial, 5.00 

Albert E. Perkins estate, burial, 7.00 

Grammount (child), burial, 1.50 

Albert J. Mathew estate, burial, 5.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 63.00 

J. C. French estate, care, 1.00 

Oswell Allen, care, 5.00 

N. J. Millette, care, 1.00 

Lane & Co., labor, 2.0O 

Kendall & Co., labor, 3.00 

E. J. Knuekey, labor, 3.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

Cash, .18 

Harriett N. Brown estate, burial, 7.00 
Arthur J. Adams, lot 1, south half, 

block P, 45.00 

Abbie F. Thompson, lot 85, block BB, 30.00 

Thomas Newbold, lot 52, block BB, 50.40 
Frank E. Child estate, lot 56, block W, 123.50 

Mary E. Colby, lot 76, block BB, 30.00 

Walter T. McLam, lot 6, block AA, 111.60 
Mary C. Marsh estate, lot 97, block BB, 30.00 
Adrian A. Allen, lot 204, north half, 

block M, 28.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



889 



Nellie S. Woods, lot 60, block AA, $72.00 

William A. Young, care, 1.50 

I. A. Watson, care, 2.00 

George H. Russ, care, 2.00 

George M. Kimball, care, 5.00 

Annie M. Stratton, care, 2.00 

J. H. Gallinger, care, 3.00 

William K. McFarland, care, 3.00 

William M. Chase, care, 2.00 

J. B. Hussey, care, 1.50 

Addie F. Straw, care, 1.50 

H. Maria Woods, care, 3.00 

William E. Hood, care, 1.50 

George W. Carter, care, . 3.00 

Frank Morrill, repairs, 4.00 

Rev. C. W. Bradlee, care, 1.50 

Fred A. Colton, care, 2.50 

E. N. Pearson, care, 2.00 

Mrs. H. G. Sargent, care, 1.50 

Dr. E. G. Cummings, care, 2.00 

Henneberry & Co., labor, 1.00 

Adelaide Merrill, care, 5.00 

George Woodward, care, 1.50 

Mrs. A. S. Marshall, care, 2.00 

Annie M. Kendall, care, 1.50 

E. M. Willis, care, 3.50 

George H. Marston estate, care, 3.00 

George B. Lauder, care, 8.00 

Dr. C. P. Bancroft, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Clara N. Ayers, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Jennie B. Roby, care, 1.50 

E. S. Tenney, care, 2.00 

Mrs. James Minot, care, 1.50 

Burleigh estate, care, 1.50 

E. B. Hutchinson estate, care, 7.00 

Miss Helen M. Thompson, care, 3.50 

A. E. Mixer estate, care, 4.00 

John Swenson, care, 3.50 



390 CITY OP CONCORD. 

C. W. Lynam, care, $1.00 

G. S. Foster estate, care, 1.00 

Mark N. Blauchard, care, 2.00 

Edson J. Hill, care, 8.00 

Ella S. Albin, care, 3.00 

L. S. Bean, care, 2.00 

Hutchins & Schutz, care, 6.00 

H. F. Wight, care, 1.00 

J. S. Mathews, care, 2.50 

Sarah F. Dearborn, care, 2.00 

Harry P. Hammond, care, 1.50 

Fred E. Nelson, care, 2.50 

George H. Patterson, care, 8.00 

Annah Kimball, care, 2.00 

L. A. Sanders, care, 2.00 

B. W. Couch, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Mary P. Woodworth, care, 3.00 
George H. Silsby, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Noah Moses, care, 2.19 
L. W. James, care, 1.50 
J. B. Palmer, care, 2.00 
J. F. Webster, care, 4.00 
G. P. Conn estate, care, 4.00 
G. W. Waters, labor, 2.00 
William E. Chandler, care, 5.00 
W. S. Blanchard, care, 1.50 
H. F. Durgin, care, 2.00 
F. Streeter, care, 2.85 
A. P. Carpenter estate, care, 2.85 
Miss Lucy Poore, care, 1.50 
R. E. Walker, care. 2.00 
Miss Carrie Todd, care, 2.00 
Miss Grace Hubbard, care, 2.00 
Solon A. Carter, care, 4.00 
James McLaughlin, care, 2.40 
H. L. Smith, care, 1.50 

C. F. Batehelder, care, 1.00 
C. C. Schoolcraft, care, 3.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 391 

Mrs. H. Brooks Day. care, $3.00 

W. W. Flint, care, 1.50 

Ola Anderson, care, 1.50 

Mrs. H. Mclntire, care, 1.50 

H. A. Rowell, care, 1.50 

J. H. Hobson. care, 1.00 

John W. Ford, care, 2.00 

Frank Piper, care, 1.00 

C. R. Dame, care, 1.50 
Mrs. J. McDaniels, eare, 1.00 

E. H. Runnells, care, 1.50 

D. G. Lowell, care, 1.00 
Mrs. P. B. Cogswell, care, 1.00 
Mrs. Annie Flanders, care, 1.00 
Walter L. Jenks, care, 1.50 
T. B. Little, care, 1.00 
Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 2.50 
L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 
David Young, Jr., care, 1.00 
Mrs. R. M. Morgan, care, 2.00 
A. B. Batchelder, care, 2.00 
Mrs. N. A. Dunklee, care, 1.00 
W. A. Chesley, care, 1.50 
J. R. H. Da\ds, care, 1.50 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care. 1.00 
W. F. Gay, care, 1.00 
C. Newman Hall, care, 1.00 
G. N. Bartemus, care, 1.50 
N. H. Shattuck, care, 1.50 
George Bnshwell, care. 1.50 
Mrs. J. B. Abbott, repairs, 11.00 

F. J. Sulloway, eare, 2.00 
J. E. Morrison, care, . 1.50 
R. Harvey, rent, 24.00 
A. D. Fosgate, care, 1.50' 
Fred W. Boardman. care, 3.00 
Joseph Pearce, care, 3.00 
Fred Colburn, care, 1.50 



392 CITY OF CONCORD. 

R. F. Robinson, care, $1.50 

Mrs. George W. Crockett, care, 1.50 

Alvah Sprague, care, 1.00 

C. E. Palmer, care, 1.25 

Mrs. E. N. Spencer, care, 1.50 

S. R. Dole, care, 2.00 

H. H. Kennedy, care, 2.00 

Diinlap & Jeffers, care, 4.00 

Fred Ladd, care, 3.50 

George Connell, care, 2.00 

Isaac Hill, care, 3.00 

J. E. Fernald, care, 2.00 

Mrs. H. C. Stnrtevant, care, 1.50 

C. H. Sinclair, care, 1.50 

D. D. Taylor, care, 4.50 
Charlotte Merrill, care, 2.00 
Freeman Crosby, care, 1.50 
W. F. Thayer, care, 2.00 
i\Iiss Emma J. Cochran, care, 4.50 
S. C. Eastman estate, burial, 16.00 
Adams (infant), burial, .50 
Joseph T. Sleeper estate, burial, 12.00 
Helen A. Gray estate, burial, 5.00 
Margaret Morrill estate, burial, 10.00 
Clarence S. Woods estate, burial, 13.00 
Alfred D. Burroughs estate, burial, 7.00 
Pluma A. Eaton estate, burial, 7.00 
Mary A. Marsh estate, burial, 6.00 
Sandquist (infant), burial, ' .50 
Prentiss Kent estate, burial, 12.00 
Rosetta C. Brown estate, burial, 7.00 
Ralph R. Harriman estate, burial, 5.00 
Lilla Carter estate, burial, 6.00 
Rollins Robinson, burial, 12.00 
Mrs. S. F. Morrill, care, 1.50 
W. Carpenter, care, 1.00 
M. Colby, care, 2.00 
J. Sanders, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 393 

E. :\I. Shannon, care, $1.00 

Mrs. D. Knssell, labor, 10.00 

T. R. Parker, labor, 7.60 

Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 2.00 

Mary I. French, care, 1.50 

Mary F. Buzzell, care, 1.50 

Miss A. D. Shaw, care, 2.00 

Mrs. B. P. Hodgman, care, 1.50 

W. J. Green, care, 2.00 

C. P. Tucker, care, 4.00 

Anna G. Hosking, lot 12, block E, 25.00 
George L. Theobald, lot 1, block AA, 202.80 
T. R. Parker, east half lot 68, block P, 32.40 

E. E. Lewis, labor, 7.00 

F. J. Batehelder, care, 1.50 
H. Dolloff, care, 1.50 
J. A. Cochran estate, care, 1.50 
E. W. Hapgood, care, 2.00 
H. A. Dodge, care, 1.50 
Miss E. E. Blodgett, care, 1.50 
Mary E. Hoyt, care, 1.50 
Fred Lang, care, 2.00. 
Mrs. Ida C. Hiimi^hrey, care, 2.50 
Cnmmings Bros., labor, 3.50 
Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 6.50 
Mrs. Susan A. Lyford, care, 2.00 
Mrs. H. D. Hammond, care, 1.50 
Mrs. A. S. Temple, care, 2.00 
0. B. Douglas, care, 1.50 
Arthur G. Harris estate, burial, 10.00 
J. S. Otis, care, 1.50 

G. Worth, care, 1.00 
W. P. Fiske estate, care, 2.50 
Mrs. 0. Pearl, care, 1.00 
John Durgin, care, 1.00 
Fred W. Lovering, care, 1.00 
W. E. Hunt, care, 7.00 
Mrs. A. F. Holt, care, 2.00 



394 CITY OF CONCORD. 

F. L. Johnson, care, $3.20 

J. F. Wilson, care, 1.00 

Laura P. Downing estate, burial. 8.00 

Mrs. Ida Saben, repairs. 4.25 

I. W. Bushey, care, 1.00 

C. G. Blanchard, care, 2.00 

A. J. Souza, care, 2.00 

J. E. Dwight, care, 3.00 

Laura A. Clifford estate, burial. 5.00 

Brodin (infant), burial, .50 

A. P. Fitch estate, burial, 15.00 

W. W. Critchett estate, burial, 6.00 

Dora Hunt estate, burial, 5.00 

Kendall and Foster, labor, 3.00 

George W. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1.75 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 2.75 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 8.00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust. 24.50 

Allen, Smith and Dimond, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Allison, trust, 3.50 

Mary B. Allison, trust, 1.75 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 1.75 

Sarah S. Ash, trust, 1.75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 5.00 

T. D. Avery, trust, 3.50 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 3.50 

Abbie L. Sanborn Bailey, trust. 3.50' 

Oliver Ballon, trust, 2.00 

Harry C. Barrett, trust, 1.75 

Charles Barker, trust, 3.50 

George W. Barnes, trust, 1.75 

James W. Barton, trust, 4.00 

Horace B. Bartlett, trust, 2.00 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 1.75 

Robert Bell, trust, 1.75 

Matilda Benson, trust, 2.00 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 395 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, $3.50 

James M. Blake, trust, 8.00 

William Blakeley, trust, 4.00 

Emily P. Blauchard, trust, 9.00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 7.00 

Charles S. Boardman, trust. 2.0O 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 3.50 

Charles L. Brown, trust, 7.00 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 8.00 

Andrew' Bunker, trust, 2.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1.75 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 3.50 

Mary A. Burnham, trust, 1.75 

Frank A. Burnham, trust, 1.50 

Benjamin F. Caldwell, trust, 10.00 

Levi Call, trust, 4.50 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 2.50 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 4.00 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 5!00 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 1.75 

Harry M. Cavis, trust, 3.50 

Levi G. Chase, trust, 3.50 

A. P. and K. P. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Caroline Clark, trust, 4.00 

Allen P. Clark, trust, 3.50 

Fannie 0. Clark, trust, 2.75 

Mary B. Clement, trust, 2.00 

Eufus Clement, trust, 4.00 

William W. Cloud, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Clough, trust, 3.50 

George Clough, trust, • 3.50 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 2.00 

Sarah L. Cloutman, trust, 1.75 

Weston Cofran, trust, 8.00 

Amos «L. Colburn, trust, 1.75 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, 3.50 

Charles A. Cooke, trust, 3.50 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust, $2.50 

Mary Crow, trust, 7.00 

Charles H. Cummings, trust, 35.00 

Mary R. Cummings, trust, 7.0O 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 5.50 

Silas Curtis, trust, 4.50 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 5.50 

Charles S. Danforth, trust, 1.75 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 1.75 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 3.00 

Emma J. Dearborn, trust, 3.00 

Edward Dow, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 2.00 

Charles Y. Dudley, trust, 4.00 

William B. Durgin, trust, 9.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 3.50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 11.00 

Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 4.00 

Clara E. Edgerly, trust, 4.50 

Lydia F. Edgeriy, trust, 3.50 

Georgianna P. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Ella M. Elliott, trust, 1.75 

Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 3.50 

Lydia J. Emerson, trust, 3.00 

George H. Emery, trust, 3.50 

David E. Everett, trust, 3.00 

Lydia A. Parley, trust, 3.50 

Mary M. Farnum, trust, 3.50 

Josiah Farrar, trust, 1.75 

Alvah C. Ferrin, trust, 3.50 

Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 1.75 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 1.75 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Flanders, trust, 3.50 

George C. Fogg, trust, 17.50 

Alice T. Ford, trust, 9.00 

Jerome Ford, trust, 3.50 

Asa Fowler, trust, 17.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



397 



Mary A. Gage, trust, $8.00 

Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 1.75 

John D. Gale, trust, 8.00 

John Gear, trust, 3.50 

Sarah L. Gear, trust, 4.00 

Caroline L. George, trust, 17.50 

Enoch Gerrish, trust, 3.50 

S. K. Gill, trust, 4.00 

G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust, 1.75 

Loren W. Glysson, trust, 2.75 

James T. Gordon, trust, 3.50 

Hannah J. and Fannie A. Goss, trust, 8.00 

Frank Grafton, trust, 4.00 

George N. Greeley, trust, 17.50 

Jessie B. Green, trust, 1.75 

John B. Green, trust, 3.50 

William E. Green, trust, 4.50 

Betsey Hadley, trust, 3.50 

George M. Harding, trust, 1.75 

Mary D. Hart, trust, 12.00 

Timothy Haynes, trust, 4.50 

Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 4.00 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 2.00 

George W. Hill, trust, 6.00 

John M. Hill, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 2.00 

J. Frank Hoit, trust, 9.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 3.50 

Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 3.50 

Sam Holt, trust, 4.00 

Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 3.50 

George M. Hutton, trust, 1.75 

Sarah E. Irish, trust, 3.50 

Henry Ivy, trust, 1.75 

E. A. Jameson, trust, 5.00 

Harriet S. and Robert L. Jenks, trust, 3.00 

Herman E. Jewell, trust, 1.75 

Julia A. Jones, trust, 4.00 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John F. Jones, trust, $3.50 
Seth K. Jones, trust, ' 12.00 

F. M. and S. I. Johnson and C. M. 
Boynton, trust, 4.00 

John and Benjamin A. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 1.75 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 47.50 

William Ladd, trust, 3.00 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 4.00 

Eliza P. Lang, trust, 1.50 

Leete and Newman, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 6.00 

Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 2.50 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 8.00 

William I. Lovely, trust, 2.75 

George H. Lull, trust, 3.00 

John McCauley, trust, 4.00 

Henry McFarland, trust, 9.00 

G. and E. McQuesten, trust, 3.50 
James McQuesten, trust, 8.00 
Henry A. Mann, trust, 5.50 
Martin and Brown, trust, 3.50 
Jennie P. Martin, trust, 3.50 
Phebe E. Mason, trust. 2.75 
H. W. and H. 0. Matthews, trust. 3.50 
Charles S. Mellen, trust, 8.50 
Horace Merrill, trust, 1.75 
J. B. Merrill, trust, 4.00 
Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 4.00 
S. F. Merrill, trust, 4.00 
David E. Miller, trust, 4.00 
Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 7.00 
Charles Moody, trust, 4.50 
Charles W. Moore, trust, 4.00 
George H. Moore, trust, 4.00 
Morgan and Colby, trust, 5.50 
Alice Morrill, trust, 4.50 
C. B. and A. F. Moselev, trust, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



399 



Mary J. Moses, trust, $4.50 

Caroline B. Mnrdock, trust, 3.50 

David L. Neal, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 8.00 

E. S. Nutter, trust, 3.50 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3.50 

Eugene Ordway, trust, 2.50 

H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgley, trust, 13.00 

George B. Packer, trust, • 3.50 

George P. Page, trust, 2.00 

Moses W. and Mary W. Page, trust, 1.75 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3.50 

Francis J. Paige, trust, 1.75 

John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 1.75 

Felicite Pengeault, trust, 3.50 

.Hamilton Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, 1.50 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 14.00 

Isabelle Perry, trust, 2.00 

Hattie J. W. Peters, trust, 3.50 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 3.50 

Eliza A. Pickering, trust, 7.00 

Irving L. Pickering, trust, 33.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 3.00 

Edwin F. Plumraer, trust, 1.75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 4.00 

D. 0. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1.75 
James E. Rand, trust, 2.00 
Henry W. Ranlett, trust, 4.50 
George L. Reed, trust, 4.50 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 3.50 
Mrs. James H. Rigney, trust, 1.75 
Francis K. Roberts, trust, 9.00 
Helen E. Robinson, trust, 7.00 
Moses F. Rogers, trust, 4.00 

E. PI. Rollins, trust, 12.00 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

David D. Rowe, trust, $1.75 

James H. Rowell, trust, 7.00 

Moses W. Russell, trust, 12.00 

Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3.50 

Richard P. Sanborn, trust, 5.00 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 5.50 

John B. Sargent, trust, 4.00 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 8.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 3.50 

A. E. Savage and Joe Healey, trust, 3.00 

Gilbert H. Seavey, trust, 3.50 

Shackford and Dame, trust, 3.50 

Leland A. Smith, trust, 7.00 

William Smith, trust, 1.75 

Mary W. Smith, trust, 8.0O 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 2.25 

J. L. Sinclair, trust, 1.75 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust, 2.00 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 3.50 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 8.00 

Prescott F. Stevens, trust, 5.00 

Mary L. Stevenson, trust, 1.75 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 2.00 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 8.00 

Cora Fuller Straw, trust, 4.00 

John W. Straw, trust, 2.00 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3.50 

E. E. Sturevant Post, G. A. R., trust, 7.00 

Charles L. Tappen. trust, 2.75 

Hiram B. Tebbetts, trust, 10.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 2.00 

John S. Thompson, trust, 3.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 3.50 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 1.75 

J. L. Tilton and A. D. Locke, trust, 2.00 

John H. Toof, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 401 

S. D. Tnissell. trust, $2.00 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 17.00 

C. P. Virgin, trust, 1.75 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 3.50 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 7.00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 2.50 

Eliza A. Wason, trust, 2.00 

B. F. and Frank L. Watson, trust, 2.00 

Pauline E. Wells, trust, 1.75 

Mary E. West, trust, 9.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 2.00 

George P. Whittemore, trust, 3.50 

Mary Williams, trust, 1.75 

William Williamson, trust, 2.00 

Sarah A. Williams, trust, 4.00 

Georgianna M. F. Wood, trust, 3.50 

Belinda D. Woods, trust, 7.00 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 8.00 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 3.50 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 3.50 

Mary Abbott Wyman, trust, 12.00 

William Yeaton, trust, 2.75 

Mrs. Armenia A. White, trust, 20.00 

$6,569.76 



Credits. 

1917. 
December. One-half sale lots added to 

permanent fund, $1,571.70 

Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to city 
of Concord general ac- 
count, 1,337.75 

Transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 3,660.31 



$6,569.76 



402 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
are added to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds 

are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of individual 

deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Benjamin F. Hardy estate, burial, $6.00 

Helen G. Evans estate, burial, 5.00 

Luella Webster estate, burial, 7.00 

Thomas Robinson, care, 1.00 

Cavis S. Hill estate, burial, 5.00 

L. Tebeau, care, 2.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

Clara V. S. Glidden estate, burial, 7.00 

Charles G. Coffin estate, burial, 5.00 

Annie Farnum estate, burial, 5.00 

Henry Fisk estate, burial, 5.00 

Charles Horner estate, burial, 5.00 

Frank B. Gordon, care, 2.50 

Jessie P. Eastman estate, burial, 10.00 

Miss Lena Minot, labor, 13.50 

Allen H. Robinson estate, burial, 12.00 

Mrs. Staples, care, 2.50 

James M. Barton estate, burial, 5.00 

Salina Stevens estate, burial, 6.00 

Emma W. Stearns estate, burial, 7.00 

Ellen D. Hill estate, burial, 15.00 

Ann Merrill estate, care, 1.00 

B. F. Hardy estate, care, 2.00 

H. C. Blakely, care, 1.50 

H. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 

Mary "W. Prescott estate, burial, ' 5.00 

]\Iinot Cemetery Association, 118.03 

William Abbott, trust, 22.00 

Clara A. Abbott, trust, 1.75 . 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 403 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, $3.50 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, , 9.00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 3.50 

Johu F. Chaffin, trust, 1.75 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 3.50 

Seth Eastman, trust, 6.00 

Samuel Evans, trust, 4.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3.50 

S. N. Farnsworth, trust, 1.00 

Miles F. Farmer, trust, i 3.50 ^ 

Hosea Fessenden, trust, 4.00 

John Flanders, trust, 1.75 

Lucia A. Flanders, trust, 3.50 

Eleanor E. Foster, trust, 3.0O 

Theodore French, trust, 3.50 

Moses CTcrould, trust, 1.75 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 1.75 

Mitchell Gilmore, trust, 3.50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 2.50 

Betsey J. Gale, trust, 1.75 

Pamela L. Hall, trust, 2.00 

Frank S. Harraden, trust, 3.50 

William H. and Etta B. Horner, trust, 3.50 

L. Louisa Hoyt, trust, 5.25 

William T. Locke, trust, 3.50 

Asa McFarland, trust, 3.50 

Ida Moore, trust, 1.75 

Mary Ann ]\Iorrill, trust, ' 2.00 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 8.00 

Samuel and David L. ]Morrill, trust, 5.00 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 7.00 

True Osgood, trust, . 3.50 

Wesley B. Palmer, Harriet and Susan 

B. Savory, trust, 3.50 

Alice W. Parker, trust, 3.50 

Asa Parker, trust, 1.75 

Samuel G. Parker, trust, 1.75 

26 



404 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pearson, White, Savory, trust, 
Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 
Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 
Hiram Richardson, trust, 
Lyman Stevens, trust, 
Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 
Joseph Stickney, trust, 
Nathan Sticknej^ trust, 
Abigail Sweetser, trust, 
Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 
Thomas W. Thompson, trust, 
Jane R. Twombly, trust, 
Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 
Timothy and Abigail Walker, trust, 
Albert Webster, trust, 
Paul Wentworth, trust, 
Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 
Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 
• Charlotte H. Woolson, trust. 



$3.50 
7.00 
1.75 

17.50 
7.00 
1.75 

17.50 
1.75 
7.00 
1.75 
1.75 
3.50 
9.00 
7.00 
3.50 
9.00 
3.50 
3.50 
3.50 



$524.28 



Credits. 

1917. 
December. Income from sundry trust 
funds as charged to this 
account transferred to 
city of. Concord general 
account. 
Transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 



$263.25 



261.03 



$524.28 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 405 

MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

Mrs. Simeon Partridg'e, burial, $5.50 
Mrs. Jennie Ryan, burial, ' 5.00 

Albert Hobbs, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Willey, care, 1.50 

Mrs. F. Wolfe, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Ella A. Murray, burial, 6.00 

Edgar S. Hathorne, repairing lot, 2.25 

Mr. Burbank, filling graves, 1.50 

Mrs. Alvin Powell, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Alvin Powell, foundation, 3.50 

Henry Richardson, care, 2.00 

Mrs. G. R. Parmenter, care. 1.50 

Abijali Hollis, care, 1.00 

Mrs. James Grossman, care, 4.55 

J. D. Ryan, care, 2.30 

George Carter, care, 2.30 

Mrs. Ernest Anderson, care, 1.00 
Henry Peterson (infant), burial, , 2.50 

Mrs. Walter Annis, care, 1.30 

Henry Chase, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Nellie Durham, repairs, 3.00 
Mrs. Hannah Holden, repairs and care, 5.00 

Jeremiah Quinn, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Mary Barrett, care, 1.80 

Prank Dimond, care, 2.00 

Miss Arzelia Abbott, care, ~ 2.00 

Abial Abbott, care, 1.50 

Justin 0. Clark, care, 2.00 

Frank Matheson, care, 1.80 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. Mary Barrett estate, burial, $4.50 

C. W. ^forse, care, 1.80 

Mrs. Hoyt Robinson, care, 1.50 

AVilliam Gile, repairing and care, 1.00 

Oliver C. Dimond, lot 64, 30.00 

George Andrews, grading, 12.00 

Mrs. Cleveland Curtis, care, 3.00 

]\rrs. Grace Day, care, 1.30 

George Fellows, care, 2.00 

jMrs. George Austin, care, 1.75 

Russell Shepard, care, 1.30 

Mrs. Bickford, care, 1.50 

Fred Peabody, care, 2.30 

Charles Sanders, care, 2.00 

]\Irs. James Foote, repairs, 3.80 

A. G. ]\IcAlpine, repairs, 6.50 

Mrs. Julia Anderson, care, 1.50 

George Smith, care, 1.00 

Edgar Eastman, care, 1.80 

William Little, repairs, 2.25 

George Anderson, care, 1.50 

Cyrus Farnum, care, 2.00 

Matthew Peabody, repairs and care, 7.00 

John Kemp, burial and care, 3.50 

Mrs. William Webster, care. 1.30 

Jed Gile, care, 1.00 

]\rrs. Hoyt Robinson, repairs, 4.00 

Horace Annis, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Linguine, care, 1.00 

William Annis, care, 1.00 

Leon H. Emerson, care, - 2.30 

]\[iss Mary K. Abbott, care, 2.30 

]\rrs. Florence Hanson, care, 1.00 

Abial Abbott, care, 1.50 

Victor Angell, care, 1.75 

Hazen E. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

R. S. Emery, trust, 2.50 

Augustus C. Carter, trust, 2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 407 

Stephen Carleton, trust, $2.50 
Asa L. Gay, trust, 3.50 

Marshall P. Hall, trust, 1.50 

Mary P. Hatch, trust, 6.00 

James Bradford, trust, 1.50 

George Partridge, trust, 3.50 

Ira Rowell, trust, 2.50 

Mary A. Rowell, trust, . 2.50 

Caleb M. Holden, trust, 1.50 

$219.25 



Credits. 
1917. 
December. Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to city 
of Concord general ac- 
count, $33.50 
Transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 185.75 



$219.25 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income 
of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor 
from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, 
said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each 
trust. 

Receipts. 

George P. Chase, lot 45, block P, $5.00 

Ruth K. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

E. A. Batchelder, trust, 2.00 

0. W. Coon, trust, 3.00 

Ann Emery, trust, 2.50 

Daniel E. Gale, trust, 5.00 



408 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



George Graham, trust, 


$3.50 


Crosby K. Haines, trust, 


2.50 


Jacob Hoyt, trust. 


3.00 


Samuel Hutchins, trust, 


4.35 


Lucille P. Kelley, trust, 


4.25 


Addie J. P. Kimball, trust. 


7.00 


Joseph S. Kimball, trust. 


4.00 


B. L. Larkin, trust, 


2.00 


A. A. Locke, trust, 


2.25 


J. S. Locke, trust. 


2.15 


R. B. Locke, trust, 


4.00 


B. A. Harden, trust. 


1.75 


J. H. Maynard, trust. 


4.25 


F. V. Osgood, trust, 


1.75 


F. P. and L. P. Potter, trust, 


8.75 


Issora H. Ring, trust, 


1.75 


C. D. Rowell, trust. 


4.50 


J. B. Sanborn, trust, 


7.00 


H. B. Sanders, trust. 


2.00 


G. M. and F. E. Tallant, trust. 


4.00 


Harriet N. Tenney, trust, 


4.75 


A. B. Young, trust. 


3.50 


William Page, trust. 


.87 


Eastman Pecker, trust, 


8.00 



$116.37 



1917. 
December. 



Credits. 

One-half sale lots added 
to permanent fund, $2.50 

Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to city 
of Concord general ac- 
count, 111.37 

Transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 2.50 



$116.37 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 409 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 

G. H. Baker, care, $4.00 

Mrs. F. E. Pike, care, 4.00 

Lottie A. Bodwell, care, 2.00 

Eddie Sornberger, care, 2.00 

Charles H. Merrill, trust, 1.75 

Andrew S. Smith, trust, 3.50 

Cynthia A. Weeks, trust, 3.50 

Martha R. Jones, trust, 1.75 

I. N. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

John Corliss, trust, 3.50 

Annie Eaton, trust, 1.75 

C. E. H. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Charles Fisk, trust, 3.50 

Oliver P. Fowler, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Frye, trust, 1.75 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 1.75 

Moses Hall, trust, 5.00 ' 

Robert Hall, trust, 7.00 

John McHammond, trust, 1,75 

Ann A. Hazeltine, trust, 3.50 ■ 

Augusta A. Hazeltine, trust, 3.50 

$66.00 



410 CIT!ir OF CONCORD. 

Credits. 

1917. 
December. Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to city 
of Concord general ac- 
count, $54.00 
Transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 12.00 



$66.00 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundi'y collections and income 
of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor 
from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, 
said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each 
trust. 

Receipts. 

Mrs. Josephine Gove, lot 89, $9.00 

Heirs of John J. Richardson, 11 feet 

of south side of lot 50, 11.00 

George H. Kenney, lot 77, 6.00 

Nancy Bradeen, trust, 5.00 

$31.00 



treasury department. 411 

Credits. 

1017. 
December. Oue-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $13.00 

Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to city 
of Concord general ac- 
count, 5.00 
Transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 13.00 

$31.00 



OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 
Receipts. 

Abigail W. Lang, trust, $5.00 

Nelson Tenney, trust, 1:75 

A. L. Williams, trust, 5.00 

$11.75 

Credits. 

1017. 
December. Income sundry trust funds 
as charged to this ac- 
count transferred to city 
of Concord general ac- 
count, $11.75 



412 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 







Municipal. 






Bonds. 


D 


ue. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


City Hall Building, Sept. 




1918 


31/2, 


$8,000 




i i I 


Sept. 




, 1919 


, 31/2, 


8,000 




11 I 


Sept. 




, 1920 


, 31/2, 


8,000 




< ( i 


Sept. 




. 1921 


, 31/2, 


7,000 




< ( i 


Sept. 




1922 


. 31/2, 


7,000 




1 1 I 


Sept. 




1923 


31/0, 


5,000 




I ■ i 


July 




1924 


31/0, 


10,000 




C '■ i 


July 




1925 


31/2, 


10,000 




<■ < ( 


July 




1926 


31/2, 


10,000 




« . ( 


' July 




1927 


31/0, 


10,000 




( ; I 


* July 




1928 


31/2. 


10,000 


i . i 


July 




1929 


3y2, 


5,000 


Public Park, Dec. 




1931 


4, 


10,000 


Dec. 




1933 


4, 


5,000 


Bridge, June 




1918 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1919 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1920 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1921 


4, 


4,000 




* June 




1922 


4, 


4,000 




* June 




1923 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1924 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1925 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1926 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1927 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1928 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1929 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1930 


4, 


4.000 




' June 




1931 


4, 


4,000 




* June 




1932 


4, 


4,000 




' June 




1933 


4, 


4,000 




* June 




1934 


4, 


4,000 






June 




1935 


4, 


10,000 



$191,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



413 



Bonds. 



Sewer, 



Bo 

Union Sc 



ds. 

hool 





Precinct. 








Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


July 


1, 1919, 


4, 


$4,000 


July 


1, 1920, 


4, 


4,000 


July 


1, 1921, 


4, 


4,000 


July 


1, 1922, 


4, 


4,000 


July 


1, 1923, 


4, 


4,000 


May 


1, 1928, 


31/2, 


25,000 


Dec. 


1, 1930, 


4, 


5,000 


Dee. 


1, 1932, 


4, 


10,000 


Dec. 


1, 1934, 

Due. 


4, 

Rate. 


10,000 




Amount. 


District, July 


1, 1918, 


31/2, 


$8,000 




July 


1, 1919, 


31/2, 


8,000 




' May 


1, 1920, 


4, 


2,000 




July 


1, 1920, 


31/2, 


8,000 




' May 


1, 1921, 


4, 


2,000 




July 


1, 1921, 


31/2, 


8,000 




' May 


1, 1922, 


4, 


2,000 




July 


1, 1922, 


314 


8,000 




' July 


1, 1923, 


31/2, 


10,000 




May 


1, 1924, 


4, 


5,000 




July 


1, 1924, 


31/2, 


5,000 




' May 


1, 1925, 


4, 


10,000 




' July 


1, 1925, 


31/2, 


5,000 




May 


1, 1926, 


4, 


5,000 




' July 


1, 1926, 


31/2, 


5,000 




' July 


1, 1927, 


31/2, 


35,000 




May 


1, 1928, 


4, 


6,000 




' July 


1, 1928, 


3y2, 


4.000 




' July 


1, 1929, 


31/2, 


10,000 




' July 


1, 1930, 


31/2, 


10,000 




' July 


1, 1931, 


31/2, 


9,000 



$70,000 



414 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. Due. Rate. Amount. 

Union School District, May 1, 1932, 4, $10,000 

May 1, 1933, 4, 10,000 

May 1, 1934, 4, 10,000 



Bond.s. 



School District No. 20, Sept 





Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Sept. 


1, 


1918. 


31/2, 


$500 


Sept. 


1, 


1919, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1920, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1921, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1922, 


31/2, 


500 


Sept. 


1, 


1924, 


3V2, 


4,300 



$195,000 



$6,800 



Bonds. Due. Rate. Amount. 

West Concord Sewer, Oct. 1, 1918, 31/0, $500 
Oct. 1, 1919, 31/2, 300 





Bonds. 




Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


lac 


ook Sewer, 


July 


1, 1918, 


4, 


$500 


( ( 


( i 


Oct. 


1, 1918, 


3, 


500 


(( 


I i 


July 


1, 1919, 


4, 


500 



$800 



$1,500 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, ex- 
clusive of water department. 



$465,100 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



415 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 

Dr. 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1917, 

municipal, $217.25 
Due and . unj^aid January 1, 1917, 

precinct, 272.50 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1917, 

Union School District, 410.00 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1917, 

West Concord sewer, 8.75 

Due in 1917, municipal, 7,230.00 

" " precinct, sewer, 2,750.00 

" " Union School District, 7,295.00 

" " Penacook sewer, 90.00 

" " West Concord sewer, 45.50 

" " School District No. 20, 255.50 



$18,574.50 



Cr. 

Municipal, paid, $7,302.75 
Precinct, sewer, paid,. 2,910.00 
Union School District, paid, 7,565.00 
Penacook sewer, paid, 80.00 
West Concord sewer, paid, 49.00 
School District No. 20, paid, 255.50 
Municipal due, not presented, 144.50 
Precinct due, not presented, 112.50 
Union School District due, not pre- 
sented, 140.00 
West Concord sewer due, not presented, 5.25 
Penacook sewer due, not presented, 10.00 



$18,574.50 



416 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OP 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in Account with Concord Water- 
Works. 

receipts. v 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1917, $19,096.37 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 77,092.10 

$96,188.47 



expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $16,377.50 

Bonds paid, 2,000.00 

Sinking fund, 15,000.00 

Orders paid, 39,902.66 

Cash on hand, * 22,908.31 



$96,188.47 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 1918, 


4, 


$10,000 


Jan. 1, 1922, 


4, 


$333,000 


Jan. 1, 1919, 


4, 


10,000 


Mar. 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


8,000 


Nov. 1, 1920, 


3, 


4,000 


April 1, 1922, 


31/2, 


26,000 


April 1, 1921, 


31/2, 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 1923, 


31/2, 


3,000 


Nov. 1, 1921, 


3, 


3,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


31/2, 


15,000 



$417,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 417 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1917, 

and not presented, $286.00 

To coupons due, 1917, 16,417.00 

$16,703.50 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1917, $16,377.50 

By coupons due and not presented, 326.00 



$16,703.50 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing- 
account of Isaac Hill, city treasurer, for the year 1917, 
and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein prop- 
erly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouch- 
ers, and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance 
to be twenty-seven thousand eight hundred seventy-nine 
dollars and six cents ($27,879.06), and as treasurer of the 
city water department, cash balance to be twenty-two 
thousand, nine hundred eight dollars and thirty-one cents 
($22,908.31). 

I have also verified the account of the special funds and 
sinking funds of the city in the hands of the city treas- 
urer, and find such special and sinking funds invested, 
and the income thereof for the year 1917 accounted for, 
as shown by the book of the city treasurer kept for that 
purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



418 



CITY OF CONCORD. 









a 




Di 




o 


H 


o 


^ 


o 


l—l 




o 


o 


<. ; 








w- 


H 


< 


^ 


J 


w 


< 


Eh 


^ 


^ 


W 


EH 


^ 






o 




'^ 


o 


2 


H 




:2^ 




t^ 




I^H 




f^ 




t:^ 




H 




^ 




H 




m 




Q 




W 




J/; 




^ 




&q 




Q 




^ 




O 




O 




m 




Qi 








01 


— . 


o 


^^ 


ro 


O 


ro 


o 


o 


l-O 


^' 


CC. 


o 


r-, 


r^ 


CO 


C5 


t- 


— 1 


o 


o 


Ci 




o 


r^ 


o 


o 


LO 


CM 


Ci 


o 


o 


crj 


t- 


O 


CM 


, — 1 


o 


^— ^ 


Tn 


^ 


lO 


o 


o 


o 


ro 


fM 


CD 


o 


o 


r— 


t^ 


<£> 


l>. 


lO 


lO 


LO 


lO 


O 


'M 


lO 




o 


r^ 




O 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


C4 


05 


CO 


^ 


"M 


i;r) 




CO 


■J.I 


cc 




cc 


CM 


•o 


CO 


CO 


T— 


Oi 


I-H 








































^H 






~ 


-f 








-f 


t^ 


Cfj 


-* 








CO 


Tt< 


(M 







<D 


;>^ 


-4-S 












'TS 


>!. 


'Ji 


s 


cS 


o 




o 


o 


^ 


■*j 


o 


-fj 


Qi 


Z, 


aj 


+2 


_« 


+3 


32 




«M 


^ 


■m 




CJ 


O 


ni 


o 

H-> 


UJ 


-^ 


3 




3 


W 


o 


O 




o 


o 



•^ - M 



<1 



C ^ 



C5 3 



2 j= S ~ -^ •:: -T HJ 






_ 3 "» X, 



=• O • -H - 



O O r- 



._.-!■:; o 



^ ,^^ *r, ^ 



?►, 


bX) 


C3 






s 


03 




O 


bJO 


+3 


"5 


^, 


o 


O 


a 


Q 


s 


C3 




5 


tT 


oT 




o 


^ 


o 


o 




C 


s 




o 


o 


32 

o 


^ 

3 


o 


JO 




fcx 

o 









O C; O LO o o 
LO -f -* O O O 



^ 


^ 


o 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


1^ 


1^ 




o 


TtH 


to 


eg 


lO 


to 


C^l 


o 


CO 


t~ 


LO 


LO 



«0 LO CO' O LO 

Th CC Tt< CO 



IB 03 j3 



— gi 



- "^ 'H - r-^ 

dj — O r^ O 









.3-5 .2 



O 0^ -C ^ 



Oj s -- — 



173 "^ r— j '^ 



^ r^ 



c3 



cS 



9 >< 



oj a> oi 



§ I a M i 

a- 2:5 -4H o a 3 

5 S .wtqa saw 

13 S .-5^ • • ■ " • • 







03 





CO 









•x. 

aj 


+3^ 










a, 


., 


=H 


>^ 


h-! 


<o 


7; 






+J 
















•/) 









c 





5 


S 


73 


?-, 


=H 




"r^ 


■^ 


CI 





71 





bfi 


CJC 


:j 



~ 


cS 












s 


bc 


cS 


^ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


.^ 


^ 


;^ 


S 


^ 


^ 


^ 


a 














































OJ 


0) 


cu 


,:: 


r— ' 








rO 



- ■_§ 5 J g 73" g » J ^ S 2 2 J 
-^;:'3oa|5|uOQo55 ., 

I rq g a H H [vj H a I 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



419 



CCOOrCl000t~05-<*OOOOOlCC>OCOr0CilCOOO 



CC C O O O t^ OO 



OOOOO^^C'OOOOOtOOOO 



O >0 O LO M (M to C3 iO IC O 

O t^ T- 1 00 C' t^ <M T— -^ [- O 

<© (M lo ro C 00 >ra ro, w_^ OD 

^" r>^ C-f r^ O !-^ 



o o o o o --^ 

00 iO O LO O --^ 
r- 00 lO (M O ^ 





^ 


ctf 


i^ 


dl 


Oj 


'-J 


5 


a> 


O; 






cpl 





Q CS 3 






be c 



cS 


a> 


m 


<i) 


^ 


't- 


»j 


OJ 










cfi 


is 






r*: 


c: 


; 1 


~ 



xTi m !fi xn 



O U 



C " Qi OJ i, <» 
- — -1^ o S QJ 

S O r- =^ 






o § 









t.' -M -1^ +-• ~ bjCi M be 53 



?i 03 03 o 

?* > i: o 

c3 £ " o 

S ^ § S 



i^ >. 



■^ ft o o i 



P^ ft ft 

U f- Si 

-g ^ ^ 

,— 03 Q) 

^ riS Jd 



^ ^ 03 



03 >■ oT QJ o o 
'^ ^ ^ ^ tfi o3 



g g ^ S c P^ 



o o o « 2 



(1- Oh 



5 ^ 



■^ h-1 S 



•S ^ -5 -5 -5 "^ -S ^ .2 
'"S ^" ■? ,/■■ ■?, "? CQ "5, S i: 



o 


o 


o 


CO 


r-1 C-l eg 

o cc 1— 


CO 




CO 






7^ 


cc 


CO 
00 


re 


00 


T-n ^ lO 

T— CO' ^ 


CO 


C5 


03 
O 
CI 


00 

CO 


00 


CO 

to 



=4H == ~ 



UU I— ( 1—1 



.,03 
CO Sh rh 



!- >o~ 



- 9 



^ 05 



^ .s "*' 



S +i g « c C 

O .2 O J O O 

^ -K ^ M 



t« -^ i: 



cfi ."^ 03 



-C ^ OJ .C +J j; 

^^ - i: o "" - 






ri- m LU 



(V) ft^ fto3 fto^ fto3 ft03 

xgxp>^pxg><£i< 
+i ft+^ ft+j ft+j ft+i ft+j. 

0r"03O>O3 0303or^ 03*^ 03 03^ 

-o SciJo'o'o'o'o'o'o'o'o'o'o'o 

^ o S £ pq p4 oi f4 K* p^ p^ p4 p-' p4 p^i 



■= E -5 -a £ bb 



-o > -bs .i^: 
3 . =S =S 



|zl ^ S^ r^ ^ j:^ <, < m m rr^ tj rr^ m tj) m ai ai rj}. 



27 



420 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



-^ 






o 

Q 
Q 



Q 



J 
^ 


o 


« 




H 


^ 


:z; 


% 


H 


1— 1 


o 




fe 




o 




H 




^ 




W 




§ 




w 




H 




< 




H 




02 




Q 




W 




w 




^ 




W 




Q 




;z: 




o 




o 






I, 


rn 






^ 


<A 


w 


W 


1~ 


W 


es 


e/2 


i-:r 
,1 


<1 


1— 1 


H 


w 


P^ 


Q 


Fh 


< 




< 


>^ 


ai 


H 





o 



Oi I- LO O 

-f rt Oi lO 
•^ (M to 00 



05 05 00 lo ^ r^ o CO c; 

lOOOiOOCOCOOt-r-i 
l>-CCL'5-*(M-t<00'+lO 



io in o o lo 00 CO 
o t- w o kn "* CO 

Oi O Cvl lO Cl r-- (M 



lO C] CO CO 



'^ s S 



5 


s 


"S 


-a 
c5 


2 
O 
-a 


a 
o 


s 
.2 

<A 
-(J 




a 
"o 


5 




bjo 


C8 

GO 


a; 

b£ 




2 

O 




t No. 20, s 
t No, 20, \ 
t No. 20, i 










CS 






o 

.9 




>> ^ 


u; 




.-H 


Oj 


• i-l 




— 








1^ 






o 
o 


> 

o 


is 


o 

Eh 


[S 

CO 

fl 

'S 




;h 


g 
p 

0^ 


a 
o 

b£ 


2 




O 

00 
■.H 

03 


,^2 
S 

5 


.2 


a: 
O 


o 


S 

'o 
o 


en 

Q 
o 


+3 

K 
ft 

o 




i 


d^ 




























« 


cr 














(^ 


,-Lh 


^^ 


^ 


l-u 


tin 


Ph 


l-M 


H^ 


^1h 


w 


W 


w 


72 


GC 


CK 


Ti 


m 


cc 


m 


m 


>^ 












































m 












































o 


o 


o 


o 


r~. 


o 


^ 


«3 




o 


lO 


00 




— 


,_ 


o 


r-^ 


lO 




o 




(M 


^. 


o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o 


t-- 




o 


^. 


o 




CO 


o 


■-; 


io_ 


cc 




Oj 




oq 



CM CO OQ 



OO 00 " CO 

oq oq c-^T ^ 
oq »o 



ro CD oi .— CO 



^ fa 












5ti 



rr o o 





o 


— ^ 


a 


^ 


cS 


ci 


a 


-M 


-1-:' 


0) 


a 



^ 53 % ^ '-^ 
&^ ■& ^ .2 a 



cS g 



-a >" 



S QJ ?! 



cs " !» -e 



.5 r:2 



*^ a 



'^ O 



•^ =w -J? 



S=»S^^S^^5r:S 



^ o o o 



a a 
a> a; 



cs 03 



^H a a; 
rQ a 



'^^ *^ rn f— ^ -»— 

tt O ^ S C ^ ^ 

.^ 1^ "^ •'-' ^"^j cS r; 



^ '^ — ^ 



0^ 


(ll f^ 


Ph 


0) 


S 


§ 


§ g 


S 


£ 




w" 


H W 


UJ 


&H 


^ 



5C '^ O 



^ 



O 



^ 1 


(J2 

a 




13 


a 




sf =5" 


C3 


a> oj oi 


s 


a 






=4H 


£ g s 


s 


Ph 





















WK^^ 


fu 


^ 


tT 


Q 


?H 


mwpj 


w 


a 


■^ 


^^ 




^^d 


d 




1-5 





P-. "S 

en 

^1 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



421 



00 1-1 05 Ovl 

■^ to -* t~ 

CO CO 00 



t^ooooooco 
oioooocaoo 



Tfl O «3 O 






O) r^^ i" 







c3 


>^ 


i-i 






C 


."tH 


-M 






<K 


'o 


a 


^ 




^ 


r3 


m 


t^ 










<B 


^ 


bJo 




9 


a> 


"rH 


'B, 


r- 


T 


(D 


a 


-^ 


r§ 


5 


O 


• r-t 






" 




O^ 


Ph 


c 


r^ 


^ 


CO 


Ttl 


o 


o 


o 

Q 


-fj 


+i 


73 


t/3 


C^ 


<u 


OJ 


<u 


Q; 




CD 


CD 


X 


X 


o 


-C 


^ 


C3 


CS 


m 


02 


m 


tH 


Eh 



CK a; -*J -i^ 4_s 



oj a a a 



r^ .S OJ Ji Qi 

-i-T 4j" Gi Oh a. 

■S; .a ^ ^ ^ >; 

^ ^ a; o oj ^ 

-u -iJ ^ > £ oj 

ai DC 1> ^ ;s 43 

._, .rt OJ 0) O) m r^ 

P Q tn M CO r- s 

^ ^ 'a ^ f^ s ?s 

o o o o o ^ • 

^ ^ S 2 " 



o 


o 


^ 


CJ 


O 


<s, 


.^ 




^ 








0) 


OJ 


o 


> 


^ 


t> 






CO o 
CO C-] 

oi CO 



CO lO CO Cvl lO Od 00 
Tjt O lO CO O rt* (M 
l^ GO -rjl r-l 



03 S^"" ^ 



00 C4_i a r^ .^ 

<u g s^ 03 

_J2 -M -^ " to 

CD a P ?" oT 

-u O .3 .rt " 

rt <i> /5 ^ ■" 

ti 5^ 73 CO "^ 

Of ^ cd c3 c^ 

5= .a> H M HH 



PL, • 



a ^ 5: 

o 05 a> 

CO 

•2 =*H =M 

a o o 

a 03 03 

O -k^ -t^ 

o o3 o3 

a> 02 






PQ a 



;:: a c3 S - — 






3 a jh ■ 



-:: =H <u 



9 


oT 




,12 
03^ 




3 


o 

r2 


03 
CO 


03 


'^ 


"5 




*^ 




'a 


13 
CO 


0O~ 


CO 


73 


'^ 


^ 


73 
G, 




a 




M 
^ 


oo' 

a 




5 




5 


c3 


a 


o 

a 


o 


o 

CO 


> 

OJ 


03 


a 


03 


a 
o 


a 

03 


o 




CO 

_a 


^ 


!z; 


a 

=H 


Z 


'43 

c3 


OQ 


d 


^ 


'o 


o 

OJ 
03 


=1-1 

o 

03 

03 


o 
<v 

CO 


O 

03 
C3 


■ »-< 

o 

CO 
73 
03 


a 


03 

o 


^3 
O 

a 










-tJ 




'o 


03 


o 




^ 


^ 




02 




i-s 


o 


O 


W 



!L. a ^ 



Q p oj >» a S 



03 ^ , 03 a ^^ 



^ o 



^ ffi .a a 









;h 


03 








& 




r-"" 


frf 




03 


be 


a 


a 




p: 


00 


a 













«4H 




00 





t>i 


t>> T5 


r— 


1 


03 

OJ 


03 


a 
=4-1 







a 


a3 


03 


t^ 









^ 





^ 




c« 









0) 

g 


73 

03 


a 

=tH 



« ° O J4 



o s O o o P 

7; T^ o ."^ 



73 ^^ 



3 I o 2 .-^ 

'^ n^ ,— 1 



S O § ^ H 



a a a a 



73030303030303^ 



03 O O O O O O 
+J 13 O C3 - 



422 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



-^ 



H 


ij 


Z 


>< 
R 





o 


O 




o 




o 




< 


■^ 




H 


<< 


o 


-v* 


o 


i-!h 




R 


< 


^ 


Z 


H 


M 


o 




fe 




o 




^1 




^ 




w 




I^H 




<^ 




w 




H 




<! 




H 




JC 




Q 




R 




CZ2 




Z 




K 




P 




:^ 




c 




o 




iX' 


^ 






P5 


2 


&^ 


S 


^ 


c-^ 




h-f 


< 




W 


►^ 


P^ 


O 


r" 


<rj 




-< 




X 



£ g 






— fc-i 5h 



ii- =^ 2 ^4 



o r" 3 






re 2 '^ 2 





C:^ 




r-^ 


^w 


,' 


r^ 


^ 


t^ 


nS 


=f-l 






o 




S 


^ 


s 


g 




S 


C 










<^H 


o 


2 


«Jh 


5 


« 


«iH 


OJ 






5 




-M 


c- 


to 


o 
c 


g 




o 


b 




L-J 




g 


cS 




^ 


cS 


O 




5 


a> 




.s 




+3 


c5 




+= 


rt 


r;; 


+3 


c5 


1 


^-^ 


s 




r^ 


p^. 


s 


r^ 


>^ 


O 


1^ 


t»^ 




;::; 


c5 




~ 


0) 




^' 


QJ 


c 


^ 


aj 


-ij 


^ 






^ 


c 


^ 


»H 


P 


o 


^ 


C 






.. 


X 

^ 


o 


s 


IK' 

2 


o 


O 


2 


o 

s 


o 


J/1 














X 










^ 


^ 


j:; 


J_, 


d 


^ 


i_, 


Oi 


;2 


^ 


■^ 


^ 


o 


=4-, 


o 


_o 


s 


p 


o 


^ 


o 


o 


O 



o 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



423 



<u S 



'P £ "is 



CC 


^ 




Oi 


>. 


4-> 


OJ 


!-i 






O 5" 



4j r^ JB +j 



ci Q 



o 






CO 


o 






o 
5 


02 


o 
5 




2, 


5 

2 




-t-> 




o 




o 
tn 

cc 
O 




o 
o 




O 


^ 


-(J 


o 


s 


4^ 
■Jl 




t^. 


% 


£ 




^ 




O 




s 




o 

J/2 


+2 


c5 




3 


> 


s 


-t3 


5 


IB 
g 
1) 


o 


o 




S 




o 




o 

=4-1 




a 
p 


a 


2 


a 


^ 


>! 

« 


^ 


c 




o 


r- 


r-; 




r_. 




r— 




'C 




rr- 




O 


^ 


p 




a 


JsJ 


OJ 


£ 




5 


n 


i 




Oi 


'^ 


QJ 




o 






o 


o 




o 










-4^ 






^ 


-4-3 


^ 


O! 






OJ 




1^ 


QQ 




o 








>H 


a 


























o 


<o 


OJ 


+i 


o 


a 
o 

OS 


« 


4J 


'Oi 


a 
o 
o 


tU 


0) 




j^ 


Oj 






<u 




lij 


'■^ 


=+-! 


a 


"^ 


q-i 


a 


=M 


«*H 


o 


o 


i 


5 
o 


O 


T3 

o 


o 


o 


o 

m 


m 

a 

c3 


5 


a 
o 
o 




on 

a 


a 
o 


CO 

a 


CO 

a 


I— 1 












1— I 
















;« 




;-• 










1— 1 










H 


H 




H 




H 




^ 




Bh 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY OF 
CONCORD. 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1917. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, City Poor, $3,000.00 

Eesolution No. 311, 264.71 .$3,266.71 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, City, $150.00 $102.00 $48.00 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County, $1,351.12 

Aid, County Poor, $14,455.02 

Boston & Maine E. E. Taxes, 

Eesolution No. 308, $7,373.55 $7,373,55 



$8,251.12 $10,594.27 

Old North, $200.00 

Balance, 1916, 46.57 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 261.03 $782.09 



Bonds, City Hall, Eesolution 

No. 311, $300.00 $300.00 

Bridge Bonds, $4,000.00 $4,000.00 

Boiler, Police Station, 

Eesolution No. 293, $1,000.00 $850.13 $149.87 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, $1,800.00 $9,858.91 

Debit Balance, 1916, 735.36 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 3,660.31 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,453.06 

Income Trust Funds, 1,337.75 



Income Cemetery Fund 
Income Trust Funds, 



Maple Grove, 

Balance, 1916, 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 

Income Trust Funds, 

Income Cemetery Fund, 



Pine Grove, 

Balance, 1916, 

Transferred Cemetery Account 

Income Trust Funds, 

Income Cemetery Fund, 



Old Fort, 
Balance, 1916, 
Income Trust Funds, 



Millville. 

Balance, 1916, 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 

Income Trust Funds, 

Income Cemetery Fund, 



Horse Hill, 

Soucook, 

Balance, 1916, 

Transferred Cemetery Account 

Income Trust Funds, 

Income Cemetery Fund, 



Woodlawn, 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 425 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

$32.60 

263.25 

$803.45 $782.09 $21.36 

$100.00 $411.03 

41.62 

185.75 

33.50 

42.38 

$403.25 $411.03 

$100.00 $217.30 

28.89 

2.50 

111.37 

28.66 

$271.42 $217.30 $54.12 

$30.00 

6.24 

11.75 

$47.99 $47.99 

$75.00 $180.65 

49.96 

12.00 

54.00 

105.63 

$296.59 $180.65 $115.94 

$10.00 $10.00 

$30.00 $48.00 

13.87 

13.00 

5.00 

22 

$62.09 $48.00 $14.09 

$25.00 $25.00 



426 CITY OF CONCORD. 





Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Coucord Charity Organization 








Society, 


$200.00 






Eesolution No. 291, 


100.00 


$300.00 




Concord District Nursing- 








Association, 


.$300.00 


$300.00 




Dog Licenses, 




$160.80 




Engineering Department: 








Salary Engineer, 


$1,958.90 


$1,958.90 




Salary Assistants, 


2,200.00 


1,918.00 




Supplies, 


125.00 


148.39 




Eepairs, 


25.00 


.70 




Incidentals, 


200.00 


101.40 






$4,508.90 


$4,127.39 


$381.51 



E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R.. 

Aid, $450.00 $450.00 

Fire Department: 

Pay-EoUs, $13,654.74 $13,654.82 

Pay-Rolls, Semi-annual, 9,190.00 9,190.00 

Eent Veterans' Association, 150.00 150.00 

Forage, 1,400.00 1,461.92 

Fuel and Lights, 2,200.00 1,874.25 

Fire Alarm, 1,000.00 435.76 

Horse Hire and Shoeing, 1,000.00 1,224.05 

Washing, 52.00 52.00 

Supplies, Auto Combination, 250.00 264.10 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 400.00 392.04 

Incidentals, 2,403.26 3,180.33 

New Hose, 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Eesolution No. 311, 179.27 

$32,879.27 $32,879.27 

Motor Chemical and Hose Wagon, 

Ward 1, $3,500.00 $3,500.00 

Motor Pumping Engine and Hose 

Wagon, Eesolution No. 274, 8,250.00 8,250.00 

Horse, Fire Department, Resolu- 
tion No. 275, 275.00 275.00 



FINANCIx^L STATEMENT. 427 

Aijpropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Garden Culture: 

Resolution No. 286, $600.00 $600.00 

Health, Board of: 

Salary Sanitary Officer, $1,572.23 $1,572.23 

Milk Inspection, 300.00 300.00 

Fumigation Supplies, 100.00 140.90 

Incidentals, 1,000.00 957.82 

Contagious Diseases, 500.00 973.34 

Resolution No. 311, 472.06 

$3,944.29 $3,944.29 

Highway Department : 

Salary, Supt. of Streets, $1,958.90 $1,958.90 

General Maintenance and Re- 
pair, 45,000.00 49,646.60 

Permanent Work, South Main 

Street, complete to West, 350.00 

Permanent Work, South Street, 1.500.00 

Permanent Work, North Main 

Street, East Side, Park to 

Center, 2,250.00 1,541.89 

Permanent Work, North State 

Street, to complete to Pena- 

cook, 1,600.00 1,418.02 

Permanent Work, Central State 

Highway, 2,500.00 

Permanent Work, Auburn 

Street, 1 ,000.00 

Permanent Work, South State 

Street, Monroe to Perley, 2,650.00 3,196.02 

Permanent W^ork, East Pena- 

cook Street, 500.00 518.01 

Permanent Work, Washington 

Street, Penacook, 500.00 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New, 750.00 664.21 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Repair, 2,500.00 2,339.23 

Catch Basins, 1,300.00 1,178.42 

Care of Trees, 2,500.00 1,223.82 

Resolution No. 311, Earnings, 1,683.01 



$68,541.91 $63,685.12 $4,856.79 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Incidentals and Land Damages, $9,000.00 ) 

Eesolution No. 305, 1,500.00 (. $11,513.78 

Eesolution No. 311, 1,013.78 j 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, $1,826.17 $1,826.17 

Interest, Bonds, $7,230.00 $7,302.75 



Interest, Temporary Loan, $1,000.00 



"•^^ I $2,072. 
5.28 f 



Eesolution No. 311, 98 

Land Sold for Taxes: 

Eesolution No. 295, $519.09 .$519.09 •. 

Taxes on Land Sold City: 

Eesolution No. 297, $243.95 ) 

Eesolution No. 298, 128.27 j * ' 

Taxes on Non-Resident Property 
Sold City: 
Resolution No. 301, $48.27 $48.27 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Memorial Day, $460.00 $460.00 

Military Companies, Aid of, $250.00 $250.00 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Open Air Concerts: $325.00 $325.00 

Ward 8 Playground, 50.00 $50.00 

John Kimball Playground, 500.00 ) _ 

Resolution No. 299, 100.00 '' ^98.03 1.97 



I 

Eollins Park Playground, 500.00 485.65 14.35 



Parks, $4,000.00 $3,958.64 $41.36 

Pecker Athletic Field, $25.00 $25.00 

Motor Car, Police Department: 

Eesolution No. 285, $250.00 ") 

Eesolution No. 309, 600.00 \ $So0.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 429 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 
Police Patrol and Ambulance: 

Eesolution No. 270, $1,850.00 .$1,850.00 



Police and Watch : 

Salaries, $21,798.56 $22,401.10 

Fuel, 600.00 914.63 

Horse Hire, Penacook, 25.00 24.00 

Helmets and Buttons, 50.00 62.52 

Lights, 225.00 270.20 

Telephone, Private Line, 243.36 243.36 

Incidentals, 1,000.00 2,205.27 

Supplies, Patrol Wagon, 400.00 522.48 

Eesolution No. 313, 2,301.64 



$26,643.56 $26,643.56 

Precinct Garbage, $9,000.00 ^ 
Balance, 1916, 870.18 I 
Eesolution, No. 311, Account |> $10,026.30 

Earnings, 136.03 J 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, City. $20,300.00 ) 

Balan;e, 1916, 178.38 } ^^0,315.14 $163.24 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, Pena- 
cook, $1,625.00 ) 
Balance, 1916, ' 375.00 \ ^"''575.00 $425.00 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, West 

Concord, $800.00 $800.00 



Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Construetion and Eepairs, $3,400.00 l 

Balance, 1916, 3,122.73 ) ^^'148.06 

Interest, Bonds, 2,750.00 ) 

u ^ -,mp ri- -A r 2,910.00 

Balance, 1916, 54 /..dO j ' 

Eesolution No. 311, Earnings, 2.00 

Bonds, 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Sale of Bonds, 19,743.52 20,000.00 



$34,505.75 $32,058.06 $2,507.69 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Precinct, Sewer, East Concord : 
Construction and Eepairs, 
Balance, 1916, 
From Sinking Fund Account, 

Precinct, Sewer, Penaeook : 
Construction and Eepairs, 
Debit Balance, 1916, 
Interest on Bonds, 
Bond, 

$1,390.00 $1,143.20 $246.80 

Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School: 
Construction and Eepairs, 
Balance, 1916, $94.55 $94.55 

Precinct, Sewer, West Concord : 

Construction and Eepairs, $100.00 | 

Balance, 1916, 21.91 (" 

Interest on Bond, 45.50 ) 

Balance, 1916, 8.75 [ 

Bonds, 500.00 



I 



$127.53 

68.38 


f 




$195.91 


$300.00 




$49.81 1 
13.39 [ 


$236.80 


90.00 




80.00 


10.00 


1 ,000.00 




1,000.00 





$116.20 


$5.71 


49.00 


5.25 


500.00 





$676.16 $665.20 $10.96 

P„ci„ct, Spn„kH„, Sheets, ♦8,500.00 , ^, „.^ ^^ 

Balance, 1916, 1,239.22 j 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, Pen- 
aeook, $400.00 ) 

T^ 1 loir imoct [ $349.58 $181.51 

Balance, 1916, 131.09 ^ 

Printing and Stationery, $3,000.00 \ 

Eesolution No. 294, 600.00 v $3,759.92 

Eesolution No. 311, 159.92 ^ 

Public Baths, $325.00 $231.50 $93.50 

Public Library: 

Salaries, ' $3,535.00 $3,448.20 

Incidentals, 2,350.00 2,876.23 

Balance, 1916, 95.12 '■■ 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



431 



Trust Funds, 
Fines, 



Appropriation. 
$336.24 
214.00 



Expended. 



.$6,530.36 $6,324.43 



Balance. 



$205.93 



Repairs of Buildings, 
Resolution No. 306, 
Resolution No. 311, 

Repairs, Pioneer Engine House, 
Ward 1 : 



^2,000.00 

400.00 y $2,479.24 
79.24 



Resolution No. 292, 


$800.00 


$800.00 




Salaries : 








Mayor, 


$1,500.00 


$1,500.00 




•City Clerk, 


1,358.90 


1,358.90 




Clerk, Board of Public Works, 


200.00 


200.00 




Overseers of Poor, 


390.00 


390.00 




Solicitor, 


800.00 


800.00 




Treasurer, 


1,225.00 


1,225.00 




Messenger, 


900.00 


922.47 




Building Inspector, 


200.00 


200.00 




City Physicians, 


658.90 


658.90 




Ca-re City Clocks, 


110.00 


110.00 




Assessors, 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 




Moderators, Ward Clerks, 


360.00 


360.00 




Supervisors and Inspectors of 








Election, 


960.00 


950.00 




Judge, Police Court, 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 




Clerk, Police Court, 


350.00 


420.94 


Tax levy. 






48.17^ 


1914 


Collector of Taxes, 


2,400.00 


114.08 1^^ 
448.50 < 


1915 






1916 


Resolution No. 311, 


319.16 


2,025.00 J 


1917 



$15,931.96 $15,931.96 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, $1,905.00 $1,905.00 

Schools : 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1916, .$35,290.02 $134,490.02 

Appropriation, 41,738.74 

Amount Voted by District, 85,617.08 



432 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Literary Fuud, $2,269.55 

Dog Licenses, ], 268.51 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 36.91 

Repairs, 2,000.00 

Transferred Atheltic Field, ' 5,000.00 

Bonds, 8,000.00 $8,000.00 

Interest, 7,295.00 | 

Balance, 1916, 2,737.50 j" ^'^65.00 

$191,253.31 $150,055.02 $41,198.29 

Town District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1916, $1,04-7.98 $1,047.98 

Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1916, $4,037.13 $13,537.13 

Appropriation, 3,493.76 

Literary Fund, 189.97 

Dog Licenses, 106.18 

Amount Voted by District, 8,227.36 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3.09 

One-half Salary Superintendent, 700.00 

$16,757.49 $13,537.13 $3,220.36 

School District No. 20 : 

Interest, $255.50 $255.50 

Bonds, .500.00 500.00 

Sinking Fund, 250.00 250.00 

$1,005.50 $1,005.50 



Temporary Loan: 

Resolution No. 268, $100,000.00 

Resolution No. 289, 



00,000.00 ) 

1.5,000.00 [ $115,000.00 



County Tax, $33,907.76 

State Tax, $51,263.50 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 433 

RECEIPTS. 

Eeceipts of the city for the year ending December 31, 1917: 

To Balance on hand, January 1, 1917, $31,674.92 

Taxes, 1912. 81.32 

1913, 34.82 

" 1914, 473.13 

" 1915, 2,909.85 

" 1916, 34,718.47 

" 1917, 328,900.00 

Library Fines, 214.00 

Municipal Court Fees, 1,108.26 

Amusement Licenses, 778.00 

Eent, Auditorium, 1,042.00 

Eent, Piano, 46.00 

County Paupers off Farm, 14,767.86 

Dependent Soldiers, County, 1,523.11 

Proceeds, City Wood Lot, 30.05 

Temporary Loans, 145,000.00 

Highway Department, 1,683.01 

Garbage Precinct, 136.03 

Dog Licenses, 1,535.49 

Dog License Fees, 143.40 

Junk Dealers' Licenses, 170.00 

Hack and Job Team Licenses, 146.50 

Pool Table Licenses, ' 390.00 

Fees, City Clerk, 343.80 

Employment Office License, 5.00 

Milk License Fees, 201.50 

Sale of Horses, 666.15 

Sale of Sewer Bonds, 19,743.52 

Excise Commission Fees, 8,200.95 

Forestry Commission, Fire Bills, 40.20 

Fines, etc.. City Marshal, 543.76 

Taxes Sold City and Eedeemed, 1912, 11.01 

" '' " " " 1913, 165.12 

" " " " " 1914, 269.47 

" " " "■ " 1915, 387.45 

" " " " " 1916, 163.11 

Declarations of Candidacy, City Primary, 80.00 

Insurance Tax, 2,575.68 

Eailroad Tax, 45,059.04 

Savings Bank Tax, 65,204.41 

Literary Fund, 2,459.52 



434 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Proportion School Fund, 

Building and Loan Association Tax, 

Income, Seth K. Jones Public Library Trust Fund, 
' ' G. Parker Lyon Public Library Trust Fund, 
' ' Thomas G. Valpey Public Library Trust Fund, 
" P. B. Cogswell Public Library Trust Fund, 
' ' Franklin Pierce Public Library Trust Fund, 
" Joseph Hazeltine Public Library Trust Fund, 
' ' Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 
" Old North Cemetery Fund, 
' * Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund, 
' ' Maple Grove Cemetery Fund, 
" Millville Cemetery Fund, 
" Pine Grove Cemetery Fund, 
' ' Soucook Cemetery Fund, 

Transferred, Old North Cemetery Account, 
' ' Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 

" Millville Cemetery Account, 

" Pine Grove Cemetery Account, 

" Maple Grove Cemetery Account, 

' ' Soucook Cemetery Account, 

Income Trust Funds, Maple Grove Cemetery, 
" " " Old Fort Cemetery, 

" " " Pine Grove Cemetery, 

" " . " Millville Cemetery, 

" " " Soucook Cemetery, 

" " " Old North Cemetery, 

" " " Blossom Hill Cemetery, 

Interest, National State Capital Bank, 

East Concord Sinking Fund, closing account, 

Eeimbursements from tOTvns, account of aid furiiished 
their poor. 

Sale of Police Chassis, 

Miscellaneous, 



$700.00 

312.33 

17.00 

40.00 

20.00 

85.90 

40.00 

133.34 

40.00 

32.60 

1,453.06 

42.38 

105.63 

28.66 

.22 

261.03 

3,660.31 

12.00 

2.50 

185.75 

13.00 

33.50 

11.75 

111.37 

54.00 

5.00 

263.25 

1,337.75 

805.02 

68.38 

142.00 

800.00 
206.34 

.$724,649.98 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Disbursements: 
City Departments, 
City Poor and Soldiers, 
Coimty Poor and Soldiers, 
City Notes, 



$221,559.82 

3,368.71 

15,806.14 

115,000.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



435 



City Bonds, 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 

Schools, 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 

School Bonds, 

School District No. 20, Sinking Fund, 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 

' ' Sprinkling Streets, Penacook, 

" Lighting Streets, City, 

" Lighting Streets, Penacook, 

' ' Lighting Streets, West Concord, 

' ' Garbage, 

' ' Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 

' ' Repairs and Extensions, 

' ' Bonds, 

County Tax, 

State Tax, 

Paid Outstanding Orders, 
Treasury balance, January ], 1918, 
To be adjusted in 1918, 



Less outstanding orders unpaid January 1, 1917, 



$4,300.00 

9,375.63 

1,826.17 

149,075.13 

7,820.50 

8,500.00 

250.00 

7,661,22 

349.58 

20,315.14 

1,575.00 

800.00 

10,026.30 

3,039.00 

4,314.07 

26,500.00 

33,907.76 

51,263.50 

756.14 

27,879.06 

22.00 

$725,290.87 
640.89 

$724,649.98 



CONCOED WATER- WORKS. 

Rt'ceiDts. Expenditures. 

Cash balance January 1, 1917, $19,096.37 

Receipts deposited with Treasurer, 77,092.10 

Expended per orders, $39,887.66 

Sinking Fund, • . 15,000.00 

Bonds, 2,000.00 

Interest, 16,377.50 

Paid Outstanding Order, 1916, 15.00 

Treasury balance .Tanuary 1, 1918, 22,908.31 



$96,188.47 $96,188.47 

HENRY E. C.HAMBERLIN, 

City Clerl: 



28 



436 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $98,000.00 

State Library bonds, 15,000.00 

Bridge bonds, 78,000.00 

Cemetery trust fund note, 52,176.43 

$243,176.43 

Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1918, $640.89 
Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 
nicipal bonds, 1,774.17 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 144.50 
Due school districts, 44,418.65 
public library, account trust 

funds, 205.93 
precinct sewer. East Concord, 195.91 
precinct sewer, city, 2,507.69 
precinct sewer, St. Paul's School, 94.55 
precinct sewer, Penacook, 246.80 
precinct sewer. West Concord, 10.96 
precinct lighting streets, city, 163.24 
precinct lighting streets, Pena- 
cook, ^ 425.00 
precinct sprinkling streets, city, 2,078.00 
precinct sprinkling streets. Pena- 
cook, 181.51 
cemeteries, 253.50 



Total debt not funded, 53,341.30 



Total city indebtedness, $296,517.73 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 437 

AvAiLABi>E Assets. 

Treasurer's t-asli balance January 1, 

1918, $27,879.06 
Taxes, 1914, imeollected, 343.07 
Taxes, 1915, imeollected, 1,617.62 
Taxes, 1916, uncollected, 5,344.97 
Taxes, 1917, uncollected, 43,049.27 
Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan- 
uary 1, 1918, 402.55 
Taxes bid in by city, 4,045.39 
Due ciuarry rent, 125.00 
Due fire department, 201.00 
Due highway department, 340.48 
Due Merrimack County, county poor, 6,869.72 
Due Merrimack County, dependent 

soldiers, ' 858.69 
Due from towns, account of aid to 

their poor, 175.25 

Overdraft, garbage precinct, 20.09 

Overdraft, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 2,343.15 

Overdraft, Maple Grove Cemetery, 7.78 

$93,623.09 

Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1918, $202,894.64 
Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1917, 213,506.45 



Decrease for the year, $10,611.81 



438 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT DEBT. 
Funded Debt. 

Water-works bonds, .+41 7.000.00 

Sewer bonds, 70,000.00 

$487,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Interest accrued, not yet due, sewer 

bonds, ' $630.83 

Interest accrued, not yet due, water 

bonds, 7,774.58 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

sewer bonds, 112.50 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

water bonds, 326.00 

8.843.91 



$495,843.91 



Available Assets. 



Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1918, $22,908.31 

Due garbage precinct, 201.07 

$23,109.38 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1918, $472,734.53 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1917, 483,807.35 



Decrease for the year, $11,072.82 



financial statement. 439 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 



Union School District bonds, $195,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,740.83 



-$197,740.83 



Penacook School District bonds, $6,800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 79.33 



6,879.33 



Net liability of school districts, $204,620.16 



West Concord sewer bonds, $800.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 7.00 



Penacook sewer bonds, $1,500.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 23.75 



$807.00 
$1,523.75 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $202,894.64 

precinct debt, 472,734.53 

school districts, 204,620.16 

West Concord sewer debt, 807.00 

Penacook sewer debt, 1,523.75 

$882,580.08 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets 

January 1, 1918, $882,580.08 

Aggregate indebtedness over available assets 

Januarv 1, 1917, 914,342.01 



Decrease for the year, $31,761.93 



CITY PROPERTY 

Having Value but Not Considered Available Assets. 



Water department, $1,101,697.19 

Fire department, 158,437.50 

Highway department, 33,200.00 

Engineering department, 997.00 

Sewer department, 609.50 

Penacook sewer, 40.15 

West Concord sewer, 23.65 

Health department, 940.00 

Police department, 40,681.65 

City clerk's office, 1,150.00 

Commissioner's office, 140.3 7 

Mayor's office, 250.00 

Assessors' office, 600.00 

Tax collector's office, 296.00 

Sealer of weights and measnres, 200.00 

City messenger's department, 2,250.00 

Park commissioners' department, 225.00 
Cemetery commissioners' department, 250.00 

Pnblie library, 10,000.00 

Milk inspection, 25.00 

City history commission, 10.00 

Real estate, 338,382.50 

$1,690,405.31 



1917. 
Population of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $20,110,995 

Tax assessed for the year, $364,272.21 

Rate of taxation, $10 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $5.50. 
Rate for precinct, $3.10. 
Total rate. $18.60 per $1,000. 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



r-l 



00 

o 

fit 




o 

<D 
P 

bo 

'•B 
a 

u 

a 



CO 

U 




H-« 





H 


^ 


O) 


-tJ 




^ 


H 


.y 


< 


T) 


H 

C/D 


o 
o 


U 


o 


< 


O 




o 



o 

5 




u 

-p 

09 

• rH 

bD 


P3 

CO 

u 



1-3 












• • c3 o C C c 

c3 <u "5 c 



:^o 



6-0 rJOOHCCWOE-OW 



-jBd JO JOioo 



Co 
2 



JOIOO 



019 'P2 nsi 
'pijqojo-Oii 



•ujoqinis 

JO SUIAll 



•axuraaj 



•ai^K 



0) 



<p 



-^W^WB^W^WW 

; ; ; : : i^ : ; I ; --s §:§ :^ I i ; : 

~ §S :°ci5o -s^o Sj3o55o®§ 

:::::::::: u ::: t: :•.::: : 

•^ : : : : :SJ 'I i^is : : : 

• 4-. • • • !h ti ■■"'-''"■■" c 1' ^< • 

o2o :>o.S ?^-c S.S o2 S.S g : o-. -go 



• -^ • • • • : ^ 

-a • o-c t^-o o 

o : u o 2 o o 

o : m o ^ o (C 

-PhO ^o ft^ 

pci^: ::::::::::::::::: : 

: ■.;::: c ::: 2 :.:::::: : 
.^...■aj-.-c: 

: f- :;■■.'«: S ■- =3 ■: 5f ;": M •• • 

01 • ■^'■«S^i^^ :t;"§ :■! : § S ►^ ^ 

«?^gsiso2§g^^2gsS£^S« 

o o o i-ti-^-;^^ S^ S ^ o-crr o-cs-^ ''^ 
O O Z hJ > w cc 03 w ?? J c» tf -li J jwSww^ 






S^^ rags .««^ =o«''^(g;^^(;e 



ISWH 






= -^^_-.?^„ 



t/3 en 



•ii6i— sii'a 



:S -S- 



UC 



fatHp'S C3 t; g ' " 



•o t^ 5o£3^>. -SCO 



•-a • • • : 




■•i5 S J -bo 


• ■ c 


• — ^ c8 • tT 


■ C S 


las A 
h Ro 
Viol 
Viae 
I Geo 








- O l^ L^ t^ CC' O^ O O O r^ Cl 



1 <I> o 



■5 '^ O • n 



2^ 









g-iss 



; i-.0 tl> 



•^ ilia's "SPo 
oog^£§3o.S 



■ c 
: eS 






. 1 OJ ® ^ t-( 



' " 2-- 



■«1o :h :b^2 



"^ Oh E-t ^ M D- J C 



ti O tH 
O U O 

o: cs o: 



:* c e 

O 0) o 






: c 



be • hi 



• • • • C iS 

: . I, . « : o 

-^ c3 fc^ -^ CC ^ "^ 
"S 0) ^ ^ '^- 'S "J 

Z J g S H M g^ 



:2 : :d -M :i 



(D 



C C3 






•^ o o ' -So • • -.^ ^ ^ s " • 



£1 j:x3 



■IS- 



• o ■ 
:a : 

: =« 2 

O jiJ i-i 

t>j » S 5 

"^ O"^ (-1 



'2© 



W o 



;§: : : 



•S= ■ 









:^^ 



S r^ rt rt 2J I'? 19 It ^ '^ '-0 ^' '^ ^ «^ -^c oi 

Cl Tl *) ri CJ C-l ^1 !N C-1 C^ C^ C-l (M C-l (M CI C^ 






(M CI !N CO CO 



t^Scc5siHa9'Cg--«C'-3. 






O-r.' 

O^ I 

oS0h3 



, — C3x: fc^ ^ „ 
O-D t« O K O 

"S =s c =i ° =- 



;;s 



'3 S aj 









ft^ e a; OJ g p. 









- ^ c 

QJ O 



Sel-k 









: 5 2-^ ^ 
3 ^ ii E '■-'^ 5 i <« 

[x,camfcSa)P3g 



: : : i-S : : : : 


: : : i-o 






• ... Q ... ■ 

3 cj-a 


o 


■c 


•4>! 


:? C S 




o 


5 O Ci 


- - - c . 




, o 






. o o 

WCQO 



•11, 

1 03 . 



5 cST3-a! MCS Sfil'" 

a S S w a: w tfi (/) S Q 









S := OJ <» 

e5.= t;a:.: „ 

M c ^-S^c cS 

" /l^ L O t*: fi r- 



m 



c J » 

-.-> C 60 

ii !- c — 



o 2 



g ® C O 

5aj S ^ rt 
, 01 "C^ C.Q 






'^Si c 



Ego 

■ C-- t^ o 



. — ^ ^ C-l 'X' -M C-l 1-1 X 'J2 -JS ,-1 



: 1^: 



^ : ? ' 



: : :S :s: 



).£ *- 



i: = -r o "^ Si's t- ^ 
S^>KdSZ:^0 



Cj 



Sp a aJ-< 3 

^ C 22 ^ '-' 
Cd C •- .C 4j 



.^ lO t^ X CO cr- Ci o o i-H 



I 

< 

PQ 
I 

W 
I— I 

m 































1 




o 


cs cs • -g a 




5^2 






11 






M 


J*So5 g; c 5 c = ci:-^= c c 




o 






e . 


. " ^ 




o n 


:| : -E? : ■S' ■•••••• —^ 




e3 <B 




»5 


■ < : S>S : : 5 o : : : 5 ' : J^ 










09 


Italy. 
Harpo 
Sunco 
Mancl 
Orang 
Newbi 
Irelan 
Lynde 
Mancl 
Conco 
Engla 

W. Lei 

Ply mo 
.'^cotla 
Bostoi 








i '■ -J. '■ '■ ■ . 

o • • • • 














o 




:'=«'::<-• 














a . 




t< . !r • . . c 














O U 




o ■ ^ - ■ • o 

Si^-c p. : : » 


<^ fc. ■ 






o • 












u^ 




f3<M 




,A ..£ a 0, • -Si 








t, c •- f — .2 s- g 


" s^ il.S r be • 




o 


S c.j= st/i"^ S t: 


S.:: bo^- fc c.^ 










a> 




















S i 










• C • 










a^=w S 


r-- ^ — 




'Co* 








o 5 c 




"^ a 


■ o ^ c 




•SJII9 




-j'Bd JO Jopo 


p:: :::::::::::::: ; 










o 






03 


: d is ". > I o' : : 2 : - £ : : : 




11 

S 


^|c-ES'^y^o'a'S2t;aJ : S 


1 


S 


no^Ssji^gEzSs 






^ 
















•t: 


'■■% : 














. Vj 


■ ■ f-^ 


'^ . J^ . 1 


















.4^ 


o 




0) -CrC^O * •P.^— ' 1> ' 




o 


o eS 






0) 

2;, 




^: :::::::::::::: : 


c 
o 


•JOIOQ 






'S 




Tp C-i X CC 1— ' ^ C^l ^ 1— — ^ C^ ^ lO .— 1 I-" !M 


o 




^: :::::::::::::: : 


•u.ioq[[i'}s 




JO SiiiAiq 


■8IBuia^ 


&;::::&!;::: jfe- : : jf^' 
















02 


•aiBK 




;§: : : 






;s ! ^- ■ 






-a 


























^ 










0) 




































































«^ 










^ 


ci • 






















S '^ 










^ a 






• 0) 


^ 


S5c • 


^c/g 












^ o ^ 0^ *r a. 


£! O O ^ 


to C 3 <D 

3 t^ tH 2 




g 

12; 




(h 




O C P £ 

^-: c " 

C C J= s 














•iiei— a^lUQ 


I:; 


:5 


-J5 


;= 


-^ X 


ii 




c^i c* 


?.s 




?i 


?i?i 


1 



C t^ - !-i S O 

0) c • oJ2 S 
^: : ; : : 




C.2 



,_( _; r— CO CO lO 



: 5 ^ 

.0- be 









5' '5 

I o 



O >— 0) s «- 



o— - 



o ^ 






o: 



o p: 



.r:,-; .■-:'=i; a-. 






o-j, 



)Sh:j o<!-^am<o>i 



itHGOOiC— 'COOOojO^^cBOsO 



> 



O S3 



•2 •■f ' 









oa2«^Cbcl^5cC-S£S- 



:5s2 = o^i3 = oc5cOo5 



:!z;S 







2o 



c - 

O S C O o 
rt ii « >t o c: o : 
c C C^ c c c 
^ C OJ - O O) o 
Cu C Cl, a O Q- C^ 



C h ci !h 

O O C>: O 

oi - c u: 
!= ECS 5 



m^- 



cs :::::: : 



o " 9^ 









5&C 



i? "3 "5 03 C 1-1 

-^ ^ •= " 'E cs 
•/■- - — ■ sj ii 



if- 









5 






: f p: X S -J -^ - sZ S :!: S 



1-1 cS 

0^2 







CS 2: a iS .M o ^ 



^ r: ;:::..:-:::::::::-.: r .:: r r :::: : 


-T CO -1 


■Sr 


'S. 




5 


~t^ 




TT-a 


+i 


oi 


H 


C^ CO CO i-i 


-c 


jq: 


£ 


£ 


tCCCCO 


>-.(M 


■4J 


13 

CO 




hj: - 


: ■ 




: 


- 


CO 




j: 






- 






: 






: 


: : : 






- 





:&: :fn :&^': : : : 



ai3 csi^ ; 

»££« 
ic o i^ cc o . 



:2- 



:s- 






35 'CJ OJ • ^ • ^ ■ 

*-H M IJQ . iJ • K - 

I c I TO CO CO rc ' 



:s :s : 



2-1 



-5^ i-s'^ 



0) o 

S o 



2 a; i?' 



-B tH _5 N o jj 






2 « ( 
— ^ 












P5 





I ii r"i ci -1 ci ri c-i ri c-i c-) co 



»- £ O 
ca fe o 



0) S"^ 



■43 3 n 



^: : 






S 53 03 
o <f > 










fc «« b.^ 1'5 n 5 o ;_: I 



"1' Q C« ^- ( 
> ». t. P tt^ 1 






S^. 



fcc 















l^ g O^.g 5 3 5 =:S 3 S * £* §5 



S o ^ 



o 



Oh 

I 

W 

H 

I— I 
pq 



: o 



• OJ 



2 :«S . :^ 

o :bi° : -^J ■ 
■-=■ : - oj • o t< • 

c o_g c s c-s 






S^i 



:- , , GJ oj t^ 
u •— .t^ Sd s_ 



. •— O Q> ^-1 o ' 






O «i.S.i;-:i 






sooc? 




•jo[oo 



'piiqojo-o^ 



•ujoqims 

JO SUtAlq 



•9[Bai8J 



•9IBI\[ 



•iI61— aiBQ 



• • ■p's -2 J • -is -ej : :dc : -^o 

:_: a; g 8S >..■-: ^, : iSg-roti -c-^^ • -^S 

•Ji§i-^SS^= • « tu E O S 04 •22 3'^ "mS 

■Pfcr>-;ftco.~^3<^>ioS3 :S^£c I'^t- 
— 5 o S*"S CM 5;^, S^tii trS^5 / S S c o--^- <" 

?t;wcg§i£i^Sg-;tl&Dico|t"§S 

^: :::::: r ::. r :: r :::::: : 



^ - -- ^s: ^ 52-ww.u.C*:) 







f-t 




n^ 
















P 




c. 




;3S 


£ 


p 




c 


T"^ 


h-H 


<a 


a 


CS 


c 


r-; 


'±, 












o 


4J 


^ 


_z 


-*■ 




:^ 


i_ 


. 


r 


H 


/. 


K 


i-LI 








:'W^£. 



: K S H X'. ii K ^J -^ 03 H f 



■pQ tH OS 



:S^ : 

• ,- ^ "K 



c be 
, s> P 



• ^ :c lO iC '— X X X w r 



H c^i c^i c» [M rj cj c^j CO 









o o 

O o 



; - 0) O . , 









■CO-JPoSOOo^^SOOcSSOojOSOcSO.-mOcSOcS^OC 



Sis- 



^^.SOOcSSOoSOSOcSO.SmOcjOcS^OC 

3 o a >=; m o w o H o M 1-1 fe o fa fc ^ o cj o Z; m w 






•s ■■ 



SScuo 



t- q3 ^ a V 



loojocoSiJ-S-r, ©"Co, 



O g^-^•;: rf -■ rf 



• c <i^ c--^ ffs r- ^ - r: c C G I 
; o 5: o £ S,- S^ Q cjs p o o 



~ -'^i' ^^wt. --« 

o-goS^ : o 00 o ^ a. fc K cB hJouoWSL 



e-S 



:S 



'tH~q 



ItTcDCTi :f^S 



hHiJ 






* O) ^ c3 



O «S tc , 

i r^ s * ' 



OOS^&nf 



3^- 



. - , ^ 3 so ■ 



» .^ S P Ijii § o^ P.J= ^S. o^ 



O <u o 
OPhQ 


o o 

cQoao 


j: o 






j;: : : 




*""**"''"•■**'- 





• :i: • • cs • : *; 






S eq CQ S h^ w w S tc H J w J q-^wwoaj5_ 



^►3 



-< 



^-i ffl m 



Www 



.b a) t> cs Qj 

.i; a ^ 1^ ^ 






S Oi 



«C 






CO -O >► 















S.S i-3i^^' 5 1 s-s fell 



S .5 .S "3 % 3 
s5,r-^ i o cs £^: 






'S-^r- -^-^r 



- -rrl CO :D "^ CI C-4 - 



: -ca U2 "C 13 -o ; 



-.f^ : :^ :fo :fa •f^- 



: : :&:,: :fa; :fa 



s -s^ ;s ;s ;s 



:S IS 



:^ ; .--■ 



O eS 



a> 0) £« : 



2tn5 



c r^-'-^^.a^ 



:«-";; 



• ;:: a--„ 



■ >*> On 



6 :'"^ g« c 







5:(§2£5^-2^-<wPo«wW0S 



"^■^^'^Si^SJiJSSSSSSSSJjflJJSSSSSSSS^.f.SS 



; a • ^- = p OS . c= 

! "C '7. -5 -^ ^ rt ^ 

i ,x (5 £ :^ S 5 ^ 2 



o s 



50 .ti. 



^ >i ^ ^ ^ -^ ';Z <^ ■y -1^ '^ K >■ ^^ 
C - :£ H 7-. K. C C =: K 'J C Q- O 



02 



J^ o 

: o «j 03 c cs cii^: 

) o S :^ S o a ■::; 



: j: >v^44 t>-.-r 



O CO - 



55 i: Z Eh ^ <-. >'. 



£J: o^ o 



£ C 03 
O oSTJ 

03 03: 

C tH c 

C O c4 



H 

P 

1-3 

I 

cn 

Eh 

P5 
I— ( 



-iBd JO JO[oo 



a o 



•JOfOQ 



'piupjo-o^ 



•uj[om[ns 
10 sniAn 



•81'Bttiaj 



•9I«K 



•ii6i— 91'Ba 



■-St^iJos'-'-'oS'-'S" 

>^ K< Oi f-' S C S-^ S S aj' 
D-iCQQ9c»<ifaO-iMW&HiJai 



: ^ 

o : t- 3 

. o ^ 

■ ^a 

Mi: i • <d;2 

■C C O OJ t- *-' c 

lllslJl 

H g ta 0-. J X < : 



^"■2 2 22 2 
bog o S S 



C O ^1 

•r: o o 

KQhQ 



S 2o 









ioi 






►^003 






oo«ijZ3tnag<icapHNC 






O <1> 



^1? 



^2 



>•» s.5-^ 






"3 id'; 



j" o t^ *^ ►^ ^ ^ ^ 



0^5 









03 o 03 -3 -<*^ 

id-r c !-, ce g 
ti^ S C ->" ^ a i^ .:; -^ fc. r -^ <: J i — — r- L ■'_ — ^ • fc. .2 :2 5 is £ 



.«.-;- o s !>,^ 



^: ::::::::::::::::::;::::::: : 


j:2 




■(^ 


■M C^ CC 


4th 
10th 
8th 
2(1 




::^ 


3 


^ 


i 


CO 


+^ 




(N ci 


j= 


^-w 


-4-3 


j: :::::::::::::::::::::::::: : 




: •'^ 




:^ : 


:fe :&^ 












fe 




:f^ 


: :&' 




:'^' 





1^: - \%- :s: ;s 



^^^ 









^fciWaifflryiJC^QjMO 



tH ca CJ d CO CO c 



^ o o X cc a; ' 



C a; t- 
>•. S g 
t^ O =* 

SShCO 



:s ;:§• ;s= ;s 



• o 



^, ,£r3 c3^'a 






H .-J 1-4 T-^ 01 IM 



Pembroke. 

Chelsea, Vt 

Crambouri 

Salisbury. 

Concord. 

Manchestei 

Ireland. 


Canada. 
Bow. 
Concord. 
Canada. 


^ OS 

PQoW 




: r- ■ 




Canada 

Norwich, Vt.. 
Concord 

Nova Scotia .. 

Hooksett 

Chelsea, Mass. 


Canada 

Reading, Mass 
Pembroke .... 
Canada 


: ^ aJ . 



►" s cs btt; 

^ tH -g a> .2 5 ,5 - 

f; >-■ t- cs 5j =e S 

* (S cS t^— '^ ■" 



a) Q. ^-i 



o) O 



J s h o t, a5 
p. ft a o .« OJ — "O 





:'«:•■ 


: : : '. g : I : : : ; 


-a o'c 


■ -.ii - 


o 5 o 




«"£ o 


: : a Z •^'. . - • '. 


S<^ C 




o • o 


c^ 5 


cwo 


2-:20 




^ - 




: ^ ::::::::::.:: ; 












0^^ ^.a — 

hr n -— "tit -^ 






_ O p i!^ O S 



N D .LJ t., 1-, OJ '' J-J !.• h« «v — 





M • • ■ 




• • C3 • 

; ; c : 




















Iff i^s-. 


■ . C ; 


s 




£g-£&ll11iPi. 




■^ 


George J. H. 
William I. A 
Joseph A. Co 
Harry J. Per 
Ralph McDo 
Walter E. W 
Frank P. Cat 
Frank P. Cat 
.Joseph Narb 
Harold T. N( 
l^enjamin F. 
Joseph Good 
Henry Dero 
Walter A. Fb 
Evans King 
FredL.H.B 


& 




. . 









§ ;s- ;s- 



Kn.5^ a 



: £ ■£ ^ S 2; 2 : § 
: "- :^ u: ^. .^ -ji -1-3 

) -r -r 'O lO ic o -^ 1 ~ x -x — . o o 

1 T-J C^l C^ CI Ol O) C-) C^ C-1 rl O^ CO CT3 



:o o ; 

q on 



;.2 'Si3 ^ 



5 ."« --^-g-Cl 
ci -jj tm <u S h c -t-- 

J"* '-. — :l^ /,^ r^ — -f- 



. o OJ a -c 

k-. o a, £ OS 



:'o 
. o 

. o 



5ag^ 



O 3 C ^ o © 5 



• I*. w-C i:^ =S 
■-S C 05 C C 
■ « O ^1 O cS 



^ : ij 



" ^ St!, ' A 

-■ (-. ^ CD S OJ Jr; ■■ 
OS cS c5 c5 c; cS O I 



S P " • 
•" • S '^ s &=<! 

cs :5-- f^ ts • 

a. .ccfe.eCh-]W 



S5 



M 



cS 



>,ffl.« 



S°£i:;-£c'g-'cs£K^f2r7»"''SocBf=^s 
tJ-c cjS o"^ i: c . ceg o ^,.^ ..-I, cs'^SwS 









t- c c c t: ■ 






■ o 6£ : 

;£ ^ ■ 
::=c'; 

a > 



OS- 
es 

tPCO 
li o 



.— c ..c . 

mil 

5^'S^ 3 
Cr^ia4 s o 

c OS 5 ..5 



tC CCM CM O Tj< t^ O Tl i^ O CO O CO T 



3^4.j^.a.c 



S :^. 






OS 



• oS HJ ^ 

- cS^, ' 



p o 



cg.= cs^-^ = = e.;rCl2SSgl.^ 



cs :i5 



c^x 



' lO ut X o ic lc ^ o t^ r^ i^ cc 



P 

S'S, 

C-. o 



I 

tD 

1-3 
I 

cd 

W 

Eh 
I— I 

pq 





•M 
















1 




o 


• t>i • m 1 




® t^ 






J^ 


nt. 
. Y. 
ter. 

Mas 
Fer 
Mas 

. M 

t. 




^s 


laremo 

ssex, N 
anches 
eland. 

ourne, 
artin's 
verett, 
oxburj 
arre, V 




B 






OWSw WSKKW 1 






















o 


















® . 








^ ' 








U t4 








cS t J3 


























O X S 


o 




P3 
























o 




' +^ 














j3 




. C 












O tn' 




• be 






Q) 






t«4a 








1^:^03 






&t? 




"£?, 




2cs^ 






O 


Lawyer 
P. 0. cle 
Insuran 
Moulder 
Laborer 
Compos 
Meehan 
Repairn 
Granite 
Baker . 




« 


''.''.'.'.'•'.'. r/, 










a B 






1 i 


Concord 
Waltham 




■S^U9 




-a'Gd JO Joioo 




















e*H 














o 


























cS CD 


• ■ .a 3 o ., « c 


G 1 






Clara Holt ... 
Ruth Matott. . 
Laura La Roc 
Winifred E, D 
Abbie McNich 
Lucy P. Pierce 
Leila L. Stock 
Carrie E. Spin 
Alice Miniutti 
Leila R. Marti 




b< 








• a 


























1 


.c . ■ 

■f • tn 
^ • 0) 


> 








o 

s 


Voodwc 
S.Carr 

Gardu 
. Geary 
. Heale 

L.Rob 
n R. W 
r B. Je\ 
Miniutt 
J.Trenc 




C3 




1^ 












w^c^^^S^S^S 


§ 


•JGIOQ 


^: :::::: : 




■3 


•oi8'p;;'»si 


^-^^.cjz^^s:^^ 


8 


'Pl!qo;o-ojv[ 


lOf-fCC-n-OCOCCTt*^^ 




•njoqi[HS 
JO SaJAiT 


f^J- : : ^J: : - 




13 


K^- w^ 1 




• < • . . 1 


c3 
0) 


•aiBoiaj 


fe 


: : : Ife :&.: : 








OJ 


•ai^H 




■.^■' - :s 




S 




13 










































































































ce-a 




ai-r~ 




. • HI 




1— 'A 




5a 




. ''iH 


• f, aj '5 c 








^i^S • 


•.n-^-a 














9J^ 




:S^ ■ 




a 




:o 2 


:'n t^'E o 








Jules 
Eugei 
John 

Frede 
Marg« 
Cathe 
Raym 




iiei-a^BQ 


o 


^ CO -t- 


CI 


?5? 


?5 


M 


CO 


1 



Eh 

m 



S5 






£^■5 5 



Crjj eS 



kS • O c3 .° O U" o o ts c 



■ r-i i^ n '■^■' ^^ ^ JB 



"C S c 



o'H'^ c 5 cs 

^ ^ :^ rt» .a TL 



0) O I 



2 <- eS oj a> 
.9. j= s. ■^ a '^ 



" c3 

is: 



; cs oi 



3 :.2.S 



i; c t< 
3 be !> 



^: : : 



>. OJ fe 

*i5 



.S'S 



1^« 



i-]JcoSMoS^wmeag>^ 






a3^ bi)_: - ~ - 
■g''^;! £ o cs-S 

•^S ^ il' l! z! --^ 

= P t, a> o *j=r: 



3 X_j -u.i3-u.fl,. 

.,. w ^. .,0 -*-> 'O tn -u r/j -t_. '^_ _ 

^^di-HCO^^O0CO»-HCD,-<CCC^CO 



a'O r«t:?0 cK-u'C tn-u r/j-t-.TJ'C 



el^: :fe :6i: ifc, :fe :ut 



: :S :s : iS :;§ ;S :s 







.2 


T! 


.2 






o 


C 


% 


w 


Soi 


S^ 


Oi 


> 



• -^ ~ iJ 1 "-^ 

• r I ' — >.— K M C 

^cocC't*ioi/^«or^cociT-"Mco 



.Sj=' 






o'O « o o 

3 03 3^ O 



>s 



"OrH 












icS 









:-^ 






byg 



■5 f; ?? ?s fi 



u^ u/ r»i I" Oi >-- r^ *"• -- J-J ''* CC "^ 

^^ -K i_J C ^ ^ "^ CO • ^ ^ 

^ W . '^' '-1 .S ., Q c ^ °S S '^ 









Q 6c 






:f^: Ifa tfe: 



•"5'o 2 ' 

* e «> !* 3-7^1- 

-^mSc-.s o C.5W u 



w^. 



> os;: 



CjcST^tHS^aj'S^g 



cS c 



^h: 



K=S.t!~^ Sis S . 

i^ t^ I - o: C5 o -r -1^ ■■ 



So! 



( (M C) C^ C^ <M M Ca CO 



P3 

w 

PQ 

H 
Eh 






-Ph 
03 . 

/o •?: 03 

03 .Sc 

■^ "^-Si 2 

"C o3 



S c a • <= 



i" cS 



^ «=- 



. ca^ c4 • o £ « =5 £ 



:s^: 



C 03 



^,w 



!^(5K0 ISCU 



E^: 






C^^ o ^o o B o fi 
"^ri j: '^ S u o3:r; o o 

gp^PJooogugoH 






>= «j 0:^ • X o: 



r-' O S 

It: w 



^I !h S s ^ -2 tH a* 



c6 



.-o^» .ao, 

i2-^';;^Mt..Oo3-^^;;m>-' 
^ =^5 0_- C3 03 OJ cS*^ ® ce„ 



O t" o '-' 

O O o o 

03 C - - 

c c 

0) o o o 






o: 'a>< t: 



Swo 



t> O t' 

S " °. 

• ID C 

Ed 0.0 






j= -T^-c: Q 



C3 


■5^6 

ee 




^ 0J= 


Q 


--SH 














H) 


-a^ 


^ 


S 


log 






Cd 


w^S 



■^ o 



: -o s a) '^ ~ 



c°'S§£^ 






CS 03fH 

^^ f^ 

^^ O o3 '-' O 

•<^ lA . a 0) 

o3 o -S p O) 

= C C S-^ 

■C M C C =2 



q: ci <p D 
1-1 pass 



o c 



bog 
o o 



oSt,2Q = Ste ^Q- o oS;=;- » c = a^. 

El. ^, c ,^ rfi iJ ^ n '-" '— Cl i_J 

C8 c B.Siix: p 3 S P § ? 5;-^^ OS <"^ Sic S 
ojyco^^'^aSjr-^S— S°c a:=: c3 c t- 03 ca 

KW5oOD;EH-i;cHS^Sfr.Cri?:h=EL,OCiic5 






iW^ 



^: 



4J x:^j3j=. 
'O '/i t:? +j +j *j -tJ 

C-l .— I CO O '^ •<». »0 r 



J'Co'SS'SS'SSSm'C'I 



s= 



a; a; ' 
Eh n 






S: 



is: : : : : : 



J St 3 

.■c o 



:=: o 






3i3 S 



i i-J a 






C3 £ cSX'C 



iMe5:^^JW 



3£K>..W 

QiStftncdPiPJM 






I 

Eh 

02 

I 

m 

W 

Eh 

P5 
n 

m 





o 


O c 








ftif 






"^ S 






P9 


a 0) c :; a 










o 






OJ u 






O 0^ 












I"! 


: ; : . c 






















w 


O K .X i-:i 




o 




; tH 






S . 




. ^ 






.2§ 




. o 






^■3 
ftts 




j_, a) t^ 






sc • = S = 1 






.t o S cite 




o 


Bank 
Farm 
Merc 
Insur 
Chau 




® ■ . 






O M 






2o£ 


^ 




5R «8 






® P. 


o 




•SJ08 




-J^d JO JOJOQ 


^: : : : 
































o 


































S2 






-73 13 






a' - 0^ o '^ 




S 


Elizal 
Bessie 
Mary 
Ingeb 
Ida M 




;-i 










<u 


























=2 


.Sis 






o 


S£|«£ 




;1 


w ^. -^ . 






Louis P. 
Benjami 
George N 
Richard 
Henry E 


a 
o 


•aoioo 


^'- : : : 






.■^ 


•oja'ps'jsi 






•p[iqojooj^ 


r; -C -C •/: -c 

^1 CO Ol r- C-1 


o 


•tuoqnus 






JO SuiAiq 




•Gl-Binaj 












•ai^M 


IS'- : - • 




ri 






























<J . 






2'S 


.>!... 






11^ ••? 




o^ 
«*,:i 


gS^^ :h 




a 


O (i oj : f:; 




cS 


J, ^ bo • cS 




12; 


aj o 0) --^ 




"ii6i— o^^a 


IM C 


ISi^; 


5 1 



P3 

H 

m 
o 

o 
o 



>2 ^ 



S^ E 5 ? O t' O O-^ OJ ci o C ct — -? C M 



£:■ :^ .Jl G P3 O Q- ^' J &■ V. ^ 7: ■ 



■.^o 



i:-'^ p c :^, i^ tc oy 'j: o f bn c r: ^ ff 

diS cS O— Oc&"Sa;cc d^ O 

a3Sooc!zKc/iCix!z;HK^ccO 



>^ ojj; a K IB ' 



» -J S <i -^ CO CL 



: <u t, 

*- . . . .Cu p, C . 



eg 






2g p i;^ i c-;;: 



a 



tai is ;2 " ■ ^ p: 5 ■ 



^ - o c _g cS o 



_• ■^ ■^ -^ c: -^^ -^ c c3 o 



i: t: 5 " i .S = = S •- a : 



S Q be S ; 



:.^KfflDS ct 



ag 



^ a; ; • 

: ■ : : '■'^ : 2 P ■ • 
•- «^" : : g S ■ g S : : 

"S >5 ' : o S >, be g • ■ 

B § h'S S s "^ ^ ■^ = ^ ^ ^' £ ? i -r 2 .5 



^,3^r;^r--/-=.^>: 



^: ::.:::::::::::-: : 


C-l 30 -r -H CO — 1.0 -^ « .0 M ^J iC rl TT CO 


^: ::::::: :..::::::: 


:&:^ : : : "fc: ^ : : : .'fc-' :&:] jfi^ 


S ;s: ^ ^ : : i i^: : : :s ;s j 





'•S "^ 



-c ^ -, "- S K -" T-! • iJ o; 



2 s • '^ o cs 



=3 cS 



O^ O O J 



(MCOCOTj^cCCi--.-^' 



S5 ^'^ m« 

o g O.C4 -.oi g £ g;3 



• (U 

• o 

• a) 

• o 

I ^ 4- 

. w c 

: -c 

: eS P 




•7- 


- a 

s 





: <: o IK -J S o EC 03 ; 



(p 



:£ ;ii 



4J O 



.;: . o.; 






C C G 
O 0) o 

ocmo 



: : M : 

» ^-^ ■ 

S 0^ t^ . . _ , 

-^ s J i; j-> -• ^-"a^ "^ 2 



: o : : : : ■ : 

S 5 1.1111 = 5 






:s: 



• • t« '^ CD »>'^''^ 

: :trl'-'.o |t^g 

-^ -^ -r >o to i^ cc o o »-^ 



P3 
H 
pq 

o 













T 


































shua. 

ncord. 

eden. 

well.M 

nada. 

rthwoo 

ncord. 

ly. 

ton. 

shua. 

rn stead 

ncord. 

ncord. 

eden. 

nada. 

ncord. 

ly. 

ncord. 

nacook 

nada. 

ngston. 

\v York 

dford. 

nacook 

liana. 

ncord. 


0:o5OcS.^OS-'-""CO|ScJsO SOa'oj— 'ajoJOJeO 




G 














rt 






















T- 














, 






^ 




'f^ '■ 












./■: 


5 






• ■ cS 


i 




^ 


z 




'^ ^ 


c 


f-" 






03 


= CB 


^■:'s:-:i^ 


c 


r-i a 


£ 




OJ-c M-o iD-C ■ 










.2 is ■- S «S 5 ft . ffi=:a;3a;ra,a)Scocuo3oP 




COCO&H C^ 


GOCCpJcCw^cBKaiZh^pHKffCKO G?0 <1 


ID 


























So : 


I ^ ^ 








G 


























. . a> 




















^ 
















































i' a 




























OiT^ • 


^/5 
S 5 !- 


a 




-., 


a 1 


i.s 


.-i ^ 


a 


J .' «.£ 

'E 3j 5 Ej -2: 




f- 

a 


44.2 : 




£g 






















-d ; '. 










■^o 


44 




















f-i : t> 










-C-^TJO-O E'^C'C 




o-p g ^ g 5 c u c 


C^hCCC o-££ 


OOJOCUO .o»o 


0C30&<Q filOO-O 


^: :::::::::::::::::::::::: r 






n 


















■j: 




%■ 






(L 

s 
p 

c 


a 

c 


C J; 


f|S5 


-^ X K £ 


2 

c 

"5 r- 

ll 


: S c 

.5-0 £: 

X 3 -5 ? 


: ;_: : N s fc£ : : 

■ • •- ■ 4- 9 -c cr -r; 

X 't^ c i: ;-- S i' ^ 5 






















C 








: : 4> 












^1 

























. . fi 










a) 






m 




^ 




bo 0) 


::!>>.-::: 5 










S tn >> 




IM.S 


Id Lyman 
eric M.Gar 
n Sandqui 
1 A.Meatle 

A. Forcier 
lesD.Robt 
ck H. Cahi 
Minneche 
F. Hamni( 

este^ Whal 
kG. Bartle 
ace F. Purr 
^rd T. Gigi 
L. Anders 
Harrinian 
urE. Hard 
lond G. De 
mio Sartor 
k Tyrrell. 

B. Planke 
prick C. Rl 
ur D. Corbi 

B. .lameso 

« T, T.nll 


■r'i c 

C -OJ 
0. fS 




^: :::::::::::::-.:::::::::: : 


"^'O+^T^+j'C^TSw^j'O'C'Co+jgc c«'C'C+j ^ cA'C*J4^'d r« 


^C^ia5'M.OCOiOC^.-HLOCO'M03.--.^^H,-HC^COI^.-' — CO^^'TC^i— 1 


«^: :: «^: :::::::::::::::::: : 




fa: :Ei, : : • ^fa • • -f^- - - '• \ '■^' '•^'- \^ • 






's 


:S- - - is— 




: : ig: : ' :s 




^ 


S 


























d 
c 

c3 








s 






























































0) 








-C 


























no 






a.<5 








0) 








. :S : 


c 




» 


: : ^ 


.S>. 


ti 




















(T 
























. +2 


■ J' 

. ho 


.a^tSs 


'St 




^SC^S 




ll 


\ X 


^ 2 


• a^^£ 

.5 o_ S 

^ — ri^il-V 

: 3-2 ^ cs~, d 

• C = cS C 

• DS ««; "S; Q Q tt: 




I-^c-^? 


ac 


S'; 


[^.^ 




3U 


>l^c/ 


- 


5 a 


^ 


c 


33?: 


r- 


"i^ 


oc cr c 

T-lt-IC 


s 


0. 




01 



H 
ffl 

l> 
O 

iz; 
I 

w 

P3 

l-H 









1 




o 






4> fc.' 


oi 




O UJ 






C« S 


CS 










-« 


•<5 










^'^ 1 


85 




« § 


= s 




3 O 




o 


JP3 




o 








® . : 








«,■ >- 






























irth 
fa 

da. 


P 




« g 


jj > 




c« 


CJ^ 






yj^; 




t4H 








O 








a . : 








O u 


















1 h 




S*^ 0) 


^ >. 




« XJ 






O 7= 


>. o 




o g 


^§ 




&4 


-IK 






® : 








§ i 








®^ a -o 






So® g 






55 e8 <^ 






03 o 






O 






■sjua ■ 




-svd JO JO^ool 5^ 


* 






•J2 






■ O 




(4-1 


-0 ^ 




o 














2^ 




t^ 




c« 0) 0) 


S5 




aJ3 .s 


A<- 




13 a C 


«s 




z p 
















s ^ 


-i^g 






03 O 










o 


Ofc 




fcj 








c 








M 
















«« : 






6,^ ;.i 
O ^ 


II 




Name 
n Morin 


OS ^ 




cS 


^ 0) 




^ 


-<J 


ta 


•loioo ^ 










« 


•0J8 'pS'^SX 


43 


c 
o 
o 


•pnqo jooM 1 


?2 


•ujoqnus 




-c 


JO SuiAiq iJ 




g 






e3 


•ai^raa^ f^; 








CO 


•ai«W : 


;:s 




tj : 








































" . 0. 








2>; -2 








of tl 
f an 








• J 




Name 
(i 

arv Ida 


• 3 

■r- O 




f^ 


■2h 




•ii6i— »iTja § 


°f 


? 1 



c - :; 
-■ o = a 



S£ 



e c tli^^ r ?; b a 5 = i^ £7^ % c S'^ c 






o S — .^E «^^ o5 S cs c ° ^ 5 ©"S c 






jC O O 03 ® o J. 



•— • o 



:>■? 



O t: ° a ceC^= &: OS o • o 



;^ ^s&di 



: c M : 

• C 03 • 



2hrG O": 



(-•<—' bCi — I a) c ^ 1^ ^ ""■ 'rr —-' t-" c3 ' 

0SS~S>-^'^°Scefeo3c3t,.! 

tL,SKSD->^&HP3KQ-a)0-oH{ 



OS S- 






O O 



pi^: 



;i • . • * S : —, 



feor.« oosB 



"_0— • m — 



^11 



c ■ ** 



!-S£x-Sf,| 



0) 01 ^ ^ 



*^ ^^ '^ ;^ w :^ 
C .5 r -H S <l> £ 









— ^ ci.-l 



!? TtT r-r. -f* m l^Tt'' 









s^ii^c- 



<1o 



^ ?S 1 



3^ 



03 ■•g 

£ • ^ 

t^ q; ^^ ^i.' ^^ u^ • *rf 



I'D C 



OS 






^: 


: : : 


: : 


: 






K^: 








-• : 




: : 


« .-1 c^; ic CI 


is 


le 


2 


T 




i? 




^ 


Si?: 


^ 


COO) 



:&; : :fa :&, : :&H : :&h 



S-- 



0),— I 



S^ 



S- 



:S ::s: 



0) C 2 °^ S 

£, >. i» »: ^ 



3 : OS ci 
E • 03 a I 






O 0) 

SP5 



:;5K 






C-lC'ldCOCO"^":'iOiOirtOeDl>t^^^OO^CO^ 






.rt _ >1 1, 



S CV ___ . _ ^ 






.0 (»o g 2 o o © o o e 
"3 o fe o S.E o a>3S'3 o £ 



ca-g 



V J.'^,\j' -TT , 



:S 



ex 1 






:t: g. :s : 

«s ^ r ' " " 






:gS&HfeaiJw«JfaOfc!2; 



h o— < >-> 

o eS ? «: 

C c ? 13 

O (D O O 



o3: o: : : : : 



o o 



- - 50 

C B S C 
4) O 00 



• :S o 



:Ph to: 






: cs OS ' 






~ •— t bo . ^ 

M>-i; a c S 



> o c 



ESS 



»^ oS-S c > c 0) ■« c -JO. csr — = c;r 
SSfc.fa<;W'<:PQW<gtr!i-):g«i;OHH 






c :^ :og-S .- 

i-i — DOO'saS-— 

° '^ ►^ ^ .— \ J!- w ,-.-. ^ 



^>^<1Q:;ffi.: 



<;&ho:?:S^h::;^ 



: SS 
" c'o ' 






Cl^CO-l'^.-l^T-Hr-lt^,-! 



C-l CI CO r-t C^ if^ -"- C^ CO 



w tK'C'C'c^'a'wm'C'a 



J- - - - Wj 

^' '- I :fe ::::::::: :pl; lEci : 

; ; N- js- - - - - : — : ; s :s 

: iji^ ;J§^ ; U^i ; : is; ^ 

t'-'C ?/5 ^ : = ot^ :-^ o 'SS fe-^ S2 •" 
StUl, — :'-'S-c :>.^EHj20<-.2'2 :o 

<< ai Cti .l::^ Q :WOg&H.xOOg^M>^aM ^H 

"^ rr lO '^O O 1^ O O O CI (M O -^' CO cc c o o o --^ 
iH rt .H ^ 1-1 i-H CI C-1 CJ C^ C-1 CI O CI C-) CM CO CO CO CO 






CO 
t-l 

CD 

a 

<D 

o 

Q 

fcD 

s 

• rH 

a 

a 

O 
O 

a 
o 
o 

o 
o 

+3 



(^ 

-P 
OQ 

• fH 

bo 

<D 
P^ 

03 

O 

bs 

08 

• iH 





t i ^ i ^ 


"s ^ "s i 


'6 « 


'i 


-a c 








: o 


O 


o 


O X 


o ■- 


o 


ft c 






(^ o S o 0) 


H 5 a <-^Ph a c a 


2^ 




s .ssa 


S S o ^ o o o 
,- hS a • 


pac 

o 




fl OS* 


tH (H 




.J 




0) 

s 




.1-^ 


tH tH 














SJb 




go 


a S 


a> 


(U 




Uh 


« 


« 




« 


W 


pi 


OS 




■aSuu 


73 m T 


^ 




















-j'Bin TBiiAi 


5 r2 - 






- 






- 




- 




a 
























' * ^ • * 






o 






• 'O • 






; tH •. 










; • (D • • 






"5 




• o 


ajj= aj 


O) .' 


0^ 


aj £ 0; h 0; 


• 01 




•'Si'c 


^ a) • o 


a; 


c^ 








, t_H Jh «*-- t^ 
























: .^ -^ .^ oj 




















Pi 
s 
o 
o 
O 


0^ J^ Sx: S " S S 


sSaasa^gs 
oSoooqooO 


; ;^>a>^j:^ 

; :.e|&^aS|^ 
: :§ 5^ c ^ o S o 




_Skk 


KfaW.i;Ko 


UfaM-y 


KcoWfaW 


: :aifficQKfaK 


^^W 


«t-i 










:^ 


:r' 




















o 


























ti 1 






<£ 09 








0? 


:z 


:^ 


^ 






rjl 












O-w 
























(3 






aa 


■S '■ 


• cSi! 


: (4 

OS 


• c 


'li 




,a 


^ 




. -^ ' ' . 






&£ 


'j-. • 


:S.r^ 


■ c 


a' 




a 


s 


is ^o : 






r2 X 


-co-c 




-3^ t- X! 


^ J 




o 




:B- o r-'O 




^O- 




&~c E 


.i«i a 


Is! 

o£ o 




M 


j5 c t* .See cacS? — 
^oc ac3(c ^S^g? 


• a- ^ S *: 






<;o&- 


O'Qo mo;- 


fa>: 




a.«? 


a3 


. O ^ iJ O 




i 




























! s 




^ 




c 




o 


-^ 


: J 


}p 




: ' >. • 






. '-Sir 






^ 


a 
o 


a 


1 




a S 
^ a 


5? 


^ &2:r^ cs an _. •.!:•&. • .^_.o^a^ 


ll 




c 


'^^ 


'^f' 


<l 


CD o 


a-'f- 






c3 






2 e 




I« 0) 


■O 0. 


a C >■• r; 




■■ -.Z-^.t-^ o'^ 


ft*r- 

oj be 


12; 


_l 


11 


Sj 


cs-5 




s — 


^HSi 




^ 
































u 
































i ^7^ 




« 
























& 


1 oS 




a 






^ 










n 


P 




^ 


P-i 






c. 


c 
c 


c 

"a 


o 


c 

c 
c 








c 
c 




c 
c 


s 
i 

o 


-2 




< 


a. 


c 


C 


c 






Z 


§ 


c 


c 


03 


J 


r--^ 






b 


] 
























l§ 






c 








^ 


u 










■c 












E 




^ 






p 

a 

0. 

1 






a 






h 




ia-^ 


f- 
c 




"Z 





. 0) 

g 


1 


c 


^ 


,7 


'>" 


0. 


O 


0) 

s 


o=s 






< 


i 


fa 


c 

tc 




c 




;z 


a 


c 


O 


ft 


•jo[oo 


^ :::::::::::: : 


•aSv 


<N 


-rf 




-r 


lO 


oc 


ir 


«: 


.^ 


cc 


,_, 


1^ 


o 


O 


"^ 


cc 


P 


C^ 


C<1 




rs 


cs 


<M 


cs 


c 




CJ 


21 


•m"© 
































® aj-,- 


















V 


















.5 
























a 






o 


ci 


c 












t 




o 






cS 




o 

c 
o 




c 












o 




a 

o 




" 


o 


o 


o 


5 


a 












^ 




o 






CQ 






























St3 


c 


p 


o 


^ 


is; 


— p 






^ 




.5 ^ 


p 


H a 


a 


cS'S 


u 


p 


c. 


5 




;:: 


D3 


£5 


■^ 




' — '^ 


rt 


=« 


3 


15 




s 

1 




a, 


p 




b 
a 
o 


hJ- 


a 
o 


t-l 

a. 
■is! 
C3 


t-. 


"3 




P 

.2 

cS 


a; o 


6 


o 


< 
C 


01 


o 


5 
S 

g 


> 


a 


03 

a 


O 
c 


< 


.i4 


*tH 


s 


"a 


s 


53 


"3 


CS 




a 




6 


■£ 


CS 


£ 


o 


fa 


K 


fa 


1-^ 


52 


5 


H 


fa 


^ 


■< 


o 


es 


fa 


fa 
































g-c 


-o 




























4553 


c 




























PhS 


c 
c 
Q 




























•i,l6r-a!>Ba 






f" 




^ 




c 




S 






o 











H-p ^ V 






M (5 E 






:S > 



50 



^ ■ ^ ^ 5= 



i-'S ^h' V J; > ^ s g '? 5 ^ ^ K- - ^ 
(2 a S K H a a a KKxssa£K_ 



: :k» : :p^ : 

o'C.S'S c cj-c 

o c3 c ra i^-^ ''^ 
S G E C C o c 

o ce o ci s sfl 



.0. >^ ti 



. C5 ^"C 









■ <^ ^ 'p h • 

• • > ai 5, o ^ 



c 




c 


^ 





C3 







iH - ^-i 




■•^ 


^ u 


5 5 g 5 


— 


m 


^ 


^cS 


0.5B 


S 

CS 


u 


? ^ 






•< ^ 






si 


SS SOS 


JZ 




S5 


« « 


c^ 


a; 


■s - - - 






c-i ■ 


•"' 














: : : : G '• 


. . . . p . . 






; * G ' c3 " 


an .. 
wife 
r — 
wife 
ma so 
wife 
Iter 




t, 5 » S aj 


Forem 

House 

Fa rme 

House 

Stone 

House 

( 'arpei 


^■p ^ ^ 


0) 




c3 a 


§ 


^oicgo 




Ji'^X 


Ca^^ffipK 
















'■<y 


















>'• : :f 




>- 


: : i'^ 


c S 


c : 




"Ph 


j; C r- t; 


tH = S M 


S| 


lilill 


'•« C CU C C -^ 

- ; ^c C ^ -A 


g_cS g J; 


^ X 




c = ^ _c 


C cS 


c;- 05 i; <1> a 


^ Cat; i — 


es 


a j: - '- 2: m 


:i; ; 














: :'3 



^•S-S.5 5 



;SSS=: 



c5 o o's^^ a 







■-= o ;=: 



S ^, 



ID 



IH O 

°i O 



(N Ol 1^ Ci CO gi 20 1"^ 
c-i ■•-I Oi -N rT< (N CJ ^^ 



F-4 

























1 




* 






c 
















c 



















• c 


r 









^ J, i- 


> 


^ 






;i 








c5 




•^ 





u 






bCoSc^ 


^ 




'^ 









"o ^ 


^ 


















be 


s 


ci 


« 


0) 


t-i 


t£ 


^ 





t< 


n3 


a 


a; 


-'. 


W 


-S 

£ 








•r 






;h 


ll 











^_ 


3 




s 




C 


r; 


c 





r^ 


'— 









•^ 


t-i 


." 


w 


a; 





<1 


tu 


faj 


<C 


I? 










fH 
















a 
























Tl 








s 





























: 





















-i 


a 


m 


a 


0^ 


^ 


c- 


K 


M 




g; :::::::: : 


?3 


(N 


^ 




Oi 


S 


?5 


S 


<N 


s 



05! 



S w 



ss 



=s -:; o _ 

a a -Q- j; — 



0-= rj 

00. 
fei — I S 



^ W £ 



J= cS ^ 



bi S o 3 



a 



I 

< 
P^ 

m 

H 

I 

02 

pc] 

<j 
1^ 



_ o a 
® o— • 



S " s 
12; Oft 



•83BU 




.2S . 

ft©.- 

ES o s- 
o t.^ 



•jopo 



«w O 
(B r? i^. 









7,161— a^BQ 



o o„-o o 



^ -P 



o. o 
c « 



o -c K 



"i5 



.»-. ^1, 



^" 


CD — 




0; 


S" 


(S 


bM 

K 


" 


4J 






S : 






^ 


^ 


-2 - 




" 


- 




Z; 


O 


+j ^ 


^ 




m 


(_ 




Ij 


B: cc 


c 


J 


tH 


























be 














•y' 










^ 


C3 




^ 




<D 


^ 




a. 
o 


p. 








43 


t3 














O) 








cj 


^ 


'2 




^ 


a 




• 


^ 


c 




h 





K hJ W 



.-H ^ t-- 



tC CQ K E W &^ 



0:1 CO i-H t^ GC 

1-' CJ <M d — 



fi "S 



Q S 



^ K -a 



W 5 --: 



-< -r ~ 



rt <1 Oh 1^ 



3 ® w 



oj Z o S ^ kJ 



— o 

So 







c s 2 c o S 
oj o " « oi^r 



; >>!= 



»H 2 I' • .E — • 5 t- 4= 
iSi— 'x: E — ^ (-,?>^^ 

o ^ ;?: a! H-1 s ►; ^ fa h-i a H 



k5 O Z 0_^_ij 



s 




Q 


EC 


O 


tc 




^ 










- 




s 


00 


CO 


o 


o3 


§ 





Sis'-- 



^ > 



^ ;n > 



tc ij 



o 



o c 



:= o 








o = 


M ' 


op 




o 


O 


-J 


jP 


'■J 


'^ 






•T 


jas 


C£ 


M 



i : :e, 

_ - _ C (>i • o I 
oi • aj-5 0) 5g « s CI— ■ >, ai T ( 

:= |iJ a. i 1. j: ,3., 1. 1 1, «.t;_ r-a- : 



"a. c 









' :: o t. 'O'T^'O £• 



ililipilf I 6| 



Kp^caj: 



^-o 






'i: Sftn H c « - 



5»fa .C.'* -.'^ oj -fa—. 



J O - 



^«, 









c a) 



O !-. 



^ ^ o 



ci 






O -- C 



ffi M > 



n =?■' = 



-fltf a 



S 



so o 



03 cS 



a 


a: 


fe 


S 


CQ 


cc 





K 


^ : : : : : : : 


to 

CO 


50 


S 


S 


?! 


c^ 


CO 


?i 






■^ 


Ti; 


/- 


— 


-^-T- 








c 






o 


■^ 


^ c 


;-< 


o 


^ 


'^ 














p!^ 


c 






== c 


C5 


'*^' 






rX' Cj 



S "C w 



- o 



P5 

I 

w 
o 



•aSBu 






0-- 



■J"IoD 



•^.8v 



25 3 






:« oi 


o bt 


«.S 


O tH 


«« s- 


— t« 


eufl 





b£ S 3 3 > . 






a 02 i:. m o a; ^ 









n . rv - ;_, - ^ 



XS C C C a nj: (S =--S 



. c : 

'ti o • 









O .(- 



!Cr' 



,o^5^2 







'J' T . .... . . . ; 

:^ j3 ::::::::•: ■^ : : 
^^:;;j:-:::z:: 

S^ : : '. "^ X. '■ '■ ^ :i,tt' ; 








c 


p 


;z 


f 


p 


^ 


™ 


:;^ 


■1> 


c 

O 


^ 




;: 




-• 
























• S 




































^• 




^ 






'^ 


O 


^ 








o 


. T -X 


































































„ 




- 


^ 


— 


r| 


r: 


^ 




: c 




CC 


r'. .^ 






zj. 




7- 


~ 


^ 


■^. 


"- 


t* 




j:^ 




7" 


r— ,~ 









H 


X 


X 


a: 


a 


■2 


c 


~ 




x 


~ 




^ 


S 


O 


^ :::::::::::::: : 


CO 
CO 


^1 


C-) 


£; 


;; 


'-:; 


?! 


'-', 


T^ 


Zl 


?l 


u 


Lr 


fo 


:;^ 


?i 


i 

































^ g p r S 


-3 p 








c s 




CC — 


■H £; 'C .y; 


X-^ 



~ ^ M _ 



,5 !^ 



£ — ^ Q' ;£ .5 'C 

ii ^ :z; PS S - S 



i I Gl— ajBQ 



a o 



S "O ?• 





o 


^ o 


cc c 


c 


,; 


a o 


.o 


>1 




^ ^ 


a 


03 a> 






!_; 


■ 3 




. ^ 




ii;« 




> o 


> 








Qi 




03 


oi 



?? u __ 



< ^ 


S 
















^ 


'^hn 


^ 


. *-■ 




>5 


> <-• 



- _ o 



^ O 



05 


03 


03 


03 


03 


03 


-V 


03 


=3 


03 




03 


2 : 




: : 


- - 


: : 




: : 


: : 




V 




Ia 





























5^ 

O; 3 W H 









irrr:;; fr— H~ -^-^ '^~ '^'^ 5^ "^ 



c r- c 



'r P = '-^ 



iSE- 



i= C 3 L 

feKoK Efcffi ;i.ffi cuffi offi t^K mffi hW xffi a:ti; <^K c,ffi offi is coffi fe-K fcS t-S fcffi [iffi Hffi 






- . o 






• • f" G 4- 

. s cs c . 



■^ ■« ;, P3 O O -X 









o&J-ili-r^- '■.^~ 



a 



. 'cS^I 



mwc^^":: 



?'. ^ cc ^ 



: 6h < H^j C ; 



pC^KBM-; 



' . — > , " ." ^ K 



-.."-=• >.<:x ^/ 



<o^ 



<;u;,5Ki-^j::-^K^i: 



: < -^ ^ < ^ O X t- ■ 






s < = c 



■5 c 



■= o S -s 



IS 


cc 


-J. 


EC 


O 


K 


£ 


K 


O 


tc 


C3 


a 


s 


K 


ao 


a 


X 


X 


J 


K 


P5 


w 


^ :::::::::::::::::::: : 


CJ 


CO 


s 


o 


<M 


2 


!?i 


S 


TC 


?1 


c^ 


CO 


c^ 


?v! 




o: 




?s 


CO 


CO 


!M 





S ^ -< E 



p ^ o 



^ £ 



aj . 




u , a) 


C ■ 






^■l^o 




£,P 2 






(So-S 


ScQ 




!> t^ 0) 


"Z aj 


33 


Ci^ 










S 03 





• 0) 




:'o 








*i ffi 






-^ 


£c o 


s 


-^"H 


h 


J>2: >- 


G 


^'--t1 






;■--'!-' ;;? ci 



£ S < 



b. — l2 u3 

&: H •T' ;S 



_^ O) c3 



«! 03 



-, CC ^ M li] 3 






CJ 



05 

< 

I 

m 

H 
O 

I— I 



1 IE 


c P 


^ 




r- 




t^ 




t: 




►J 




_■ 




r: 




r: 


>. 


M 










"d 


1 


OJ 


c^ . 


-^ £ '^^ £ -c S 1 £ 






111 

o S - 

Is 


25" ogS~c 


m c * o 






5-^ ^ 


k; 




cs a: cc iji 


K K 




•8SBU 


w 




c 
o 


— 


. 






















O) • 1^ 






































-*^ 










•r- ai bo ail » 0) i 


















> •>n-s^|Sci;cs?,-|5'^S 


'C:^:^???^^ 












o 
O 








ncsooo'"SciOoS.i:£SS 


o S c c-s cE o 






SS SS fcS ctffi SK fc-ffi JS i-X 


:;;as:Xs:ScM 
















•^ • ^ • : • • • 














































c 












:z :?!,;" : 


















Si 


> : ; ; 

O a> P ^ ^H 
K'5 c S C 


'S^5^->Ey|"s" 


5: 






rj • • ■ 
■ 0) !h."S 






a3Ei.waoco[aE:a3aja;KCW</J 


6 w^jWh-i 1 


















2 ■ 


'■^ '. 










? 






'a 




?J 




1 • :il = ^5i: 




(3 -o 1 




S. 

o 


tt^: <^ 5 J, 

^ = O t; c 


xS ~ 














><•••• 










— 








^; : »; : : 










.s _• 








be « 'i : ^ 




























o 






li J: "' : ;z 




_; 






C OJ 




— ' - "* e' ,T- J 


t: 9 ^ -C 






r- i^ O -- C - c: 

1 i ^ 1 2 1 § s 

.2 o s ° =* C' <3 






§* 


5 5 c o 
o £ cs o 




Ph 


O O Oi o 






sj o :S m H o X' 


O CO hJ o 




-— 




















S c^ 












tc 


u 






O cS 












« ; 


^ 






"2 S aj 
S O t- 


5 


4>1 


^ c 




t-, 

c 

> u 


J S 




UfcD 


1 c ^: -1 J 1 g s 


c c > e 

5 a 'J: o 






ffiffiOnCBQSHZ 


:S X C ts 


•joioo 


^ :::::::::: : 




•aSV 


-" 1- O ^ ^ C-. l^ M 












<« 


















<M O 












































g 






















































1^1 

<E— £ 


P . . . t; . <= . 
5 5 5 






05 


o H a 






«(]> 


-^^ : : t2 S S . ;/ 




• be >= 

.£ c OS 




® o 


■g : i: 3 oE^ £ '£ 

■r ■ t £ m'-^=: == ■= 
t : o g ~ 5= -c ^ 
-^ : tn OJ s t. ■< 5 
:= . c -c «« <" c s« 
S g g -5 5 ^ 5 -^ 

^ O M 3 '" -s. -^ K 

c -^ B 5 s s ^ i 


!- 
C 

>* 


C O Q 

5 c S 
^ s ^ 

-^ ^ w 
£ "c .- 

!* c ^ 

= o S 

2 E B 




l^c 




0) * cS ra 1 

ti. 0. M S 1 




<M <S 


















o be 


•z 


3 




















(St. 









r- cS 




oj • o 




■^s 


c 


c c 




o 


a, o 






o 


Oh O 


7,161— a?«a 


,7- 


i 






c- 


1 






? 


1 






c 






c 








C 









s 


^ 


C? "C ^ C N-C 




-c -S 




5. 


tr 


r; 


CC 




-c 


> 


"P 


^ 


"2 








i- ra n -»- t^ 








c 






tH 




^ 




^ 


o 


c o > ;i W o 




o ^ 




c 






c 


B 





"i 





«■ o 


CS C fli f^ . o 




o ,_ 1; 




c 






a 


s 


u 


ID 


c« C 


•2 c -S 


- 9 E^ C 


c 




r? a 


a 
E 
s 


3 


bo 


C 




B 


"c 


C 


i^5 

H to 


M C 03 -D5 " O 




6 = ►?■ 


-C 


(■ 




c 


Cf 















03 
B 
CD 


c 
a; 


■c 


C 







-< 
0:3 









So 


0) 


a 


b 




> 

a 


2 

(5 


a. 


IP 

M 




> 

0. 


s 


> 

0) 




» 


3 


M 


« 


a 




Di ■ 


a; 




Qi 






Cd 




03 




1n 










,_ 4J 




. 


. 




r- 




If 




. 


. 


. 


. r^ • 




" 






C4 T- 












c- 




'~ 












_o -^ 


a 


oj 5 


_o 




J 


^ 




T" ^ 




J 


^ 


17 




n^ a 


a 


i- 


il 


•r "^ 


•r 3 


■ (- 

it 


•£ 


t< s S s 




'> f 


■> ;- 


> ^ 


S t. s SI 




> 


"i. u>"i 


p.i; 


> £ 


5 z 


> 


'' 


'> c 


^ c 


^ is 


i. '- ~ '- 




,- - 


y - 


7 = 


7 J 7. 0. 5-' 1 


5; 


O C J. •; 


V ~ 


■7 -^ 


X i 


~ 


t 


X ^ 


S a 


x ^ 


s « s 


^ 3 far ^ 




"Z - 


^ = 


^ r 


— -- 5 ^ 


— — 


- ^ 


3';: 3 c 


3 ^ 


3 ^ 


3 r 


'~ 


;^ 


•" ^ 


3 ? 


- 3 a> 3 3 3 


« = = - 




c ~ 


' C c 


c ^ 


o ?; o o o ;; 


c 


c 5 = 


c - 


c e: 


; 





:; 


c ? 


° s 


- 


000 


_7 


Ka: 


ffi- 


ffii 


KttKa 


23 c 


ffi 


tct 


ffi^ 


tdC 


tJCHtCC 


tCo 


ffifcKmtU 
































j= 


j 


; a 










s 










^ 






■^ 


> 
















J 


be 





■ S 


> 








s 






a 


iS 


i-z 


•c 


C n 




fc,' 
: <u 


•S&'t 


T 




ci 


^ 


C S-' 
II 






3 

p 


1- 


■r 


• c 






bco" c 




CL-C 


t^ 


OJ 


■^ 5. ? 






'C 


Ctt 


c 


■^ O-Ct 





* 





- M 


>! r 


^. 


p « ^ ;. 






: *^ 












o > 


"C > 


. c 


Cwf^ 






c: 


s 




eS = X ;: 


fcl 


oj c 


c 


CJ , — 


S t^' c 






Q 




C-- 


? e 


3 T- 


c 


^ 3 


' &0 fc $P 


t^ rt -; "" 




^ K 




"SE 


So; C 








C 1 


>•■ ?= 


« c 


CS-- 











^ ^ ^ 


OOO^ 




cfiC_ 


E- 




'S.XD <- 


^ 




&^ 


czj^ 


5SOOCQO 


l5 





tl 


pa^ w 


■ ; ^ 
















^ 










• i- 


■ c 












'e ; OJ 


:e A . Heath . . . 
D.(Caldbeck) 
ini E. Callaha 


cc 






".s 

■ca: 


2 

c > 

5 K 


c 
it 




O !; 

£1 


11 


c 
2: 


.5 • 

3 3 =: 
■^ > 


' C 

: t» 
b 

1^ 


•Be 


- £ 3 & = 




-p • 5 • 3 
c; ~ ^ -i "^ 


ot ^ ^ ^ 




=_! 


^ S 


|f 


?4 £1 


■5 - 


^z 


5 5S'^ 


g-f 


'-'• J 


=i 


1 


£ 


's ^ 


?- "^ 




3^ « 


j^^ > ^ 


j; 


<< 


5x 


Sz 


^ _- ci .- 


< £ 


ikB. 


U K -/ — 


C^ 


c- — 


<is 


a. 


j: 


<£ 


" '-' 


'►^i 


a^S 








G 


. 










































^ 














.^ 














n 












"C 










•c 






c 




3 










fe 






C 






c 


ti 




1 1 


_£ 




^ g i 


C 


c 


"bi 

3 




c 


c 

c. 


c 

a. 




c 




C 











t^ c 


H 


c — 


"^ 


c 


.4- 




3 






>' 


3 


c 




c 




a- C 




a 


o '-^ 


a 


c 


C 




C 


c 


C 


c 





o 




a; 


E 


£ 


O C 


Cu 


h 


o & 


Z 


c- 


!z 




c. 


c 


CC 


1^ 


C 






















^' 








































S. 
















4i 
















4i: 


■g 






*t^ 










4i 






e: 
















t- 








^ 






u 




t- 






















C 


1 


e 




^ eg 


;- 




c 




c 




















(- 






(- 


V 


a 














^ 






-£ S 


"Z 


^ 

»- 


\ 


c 


t; a 


c 
a 






tc 


a 
£ 


a 

e 




1 


■£ 


a 


a 


id 


Oj o 


c 


c 


"^ 


c 


— c 


J: 


c 


■s 5 


0; 


c 


c; 




c 


a 


c 


s 


0; 


o K 






ul 


tr 


'to tr 


< 




J c 


C 


^ 


C 




tl 


C_ 


ti 


C 


5 


^ :::::::::::::::::: : 


^H C/l 


r^ 


c 


^ 


[^ 


in - 


^ 


oc 


ira oc 


c 


^ 


«: 




c- 


cr 


cc 


s ss 


_£? ^ 


K. 




(N 


^ 


TP c 


CS 


s 


(M -- 


c< 


c- 


>r 




e~ 


O. 




<N Cn 








































C5 
















c 






















c 


a 




-3 










t- t: 




















4 




-o 


^ 










o t 




















g 


a 


u 


O 










X: C 




















C! 


X 





o : 










11 t 






















t 





C 

o 










S c 




















C 


c 





o 










->: c 




















CC 


C 





:ii 




.^ 








> 


^ 


■ S 


u 


u 








:= 3 




3 
c 


d. 


5^5 




_n 


5 
C 












.5 «; a 


3 


bti 
bo ;: 


'^ X 






J_i5 




c 





^ -5 




c 

a: 


a 


il 


cj "a 




> 




'E 


^ E 


0. 2 




c 


c 






(3 


0) OS 


c 


a 


> 
5 


K -2 


c 
c 


1. 5> 


tic '^ 

3 1 
f^ .= 

bo «- 


1 


a 
c 


a: 




c 
c 
a: 


a. 


3 
C 


3 

a 


>• 




i 1 


c 

X 

c 


a 
t 


c 
c 


c 




< 

a 
c 


c 

c 


X. 


a 






> 


c 


5 
> 


i 


3 
B 


w s 


S! 


E- 


< 


C£ DC 


a 




W C 


■< 


C 


c 




§ 


^ 


< 


K 


< 


1 




















K 




C 


















o 






CC 


5 


O 






3 


c 


















o 






e 




o 






J= 




























c 








c 


















S 









J 


o 






03 


c 


















o 






:z 




o 






Z 


c 


















c 


■J 




~7 


^ 


ii 


^ 


t 


t 




I 


^ 




c 







D 


c 


1 




T 







3 








m 

H 



O OS 




r^ 


K 


"i 


a c2 


t/ ,r- 


<B o — 






H ,5 i P 


(- a "^-^ E 


w s - 


a oSs 


Ph 9 


!25 o a 




•aSBu 


^ ^ 


-J B m ^Bq^v^ 


^ - - C^4 


jj 




• • • • • t- • 


o 






rt 






Occup 


!r - c = ^ =5 ' 


c«-l 








gs 


: :z :cS • • 


03 a 


: : _- i- :; ^ 


0.2 


^ : ~ ^ :; -^ a 


^ cS 


^ ' pl^ - 1^ c ^ 


"S "^ 


= -3=.^j<£: 


M 


%-t S5 S|g 




^; aa ?; S'. S 0- 


a5 




::::::: [ 




















ffii 




• c,^ : ■ :^ 


0, 




lllJ^iS 







;5 


SIIKIt 




































.^-a 












og 


^ J^ u "-x. 


§° 


c q > S 


Ph 








-C 






















.2^3 . 






■^ 


^a-2 






- 'i 


no-^ 




Ph — 




a S i S 

3 ° aS £ 




E& w Si a) 


•joioo 


>,'.:: 


•aSy 


cj 1- ;t 


ef-1 

























o2« 








<D a bii 
























cc-a a 





DO" 




P^S 










2® 

S'2 


>. '■ -r- '■ 


eS-C 


^ 2 ;5 >, 


a'2 


1 { S S 






ra«s 




sa 


2 ii S 3 


S® 


t!^ "^ K S 




"r/j C° ^ ^ 


3 bo 


*'"' r* S 'i^H 


;5o 


n: ^ =3 " 

s 6 £ ^ 


oS 






0) fA 


,- 


^S 





^a 


: 

a 








?5 « 


ii6i-9jBa 



1-3 



■= $ a X oj $ S 7; i 5^ a -^ * 5: o '" 



•^ •?= c Sa : 
^ o 5r! *- ojX-o 



.ace. 






S-i F ^-^z: Sac 



be ! 









--.2 
— c^i^ "^ ^.a ^^'"ai 



s 


a) 


s 


K 




M 


s 


a; 


^ :::::: : 


s 


S' 


■N 





s 


?I 


S; 


?^ 



^ la -"(jii 3^ — ^.a 



a - 1 -■ 



r ja >> 



a bid 



■ ? -c 



S ? 



« - 


™ 


c 


o c 


S 3 






O O 




o 


o 


< 


r-< c3 


^ 




■ 



X V 



a -g J? 'g K 



« : : : 




3 




- r^ '■ 


■ V 


-D 




_2 : : : 






















! ! ! ! ^ ! ! 






'.'. ^ '.'.'. '. 









Oi -a; • 0. 



r .- ;=; 0/ p o , 



I §1 § p § i il i g i i i I i 1 1 ; I-eJI 1 1 i s ii i i 1 1 i £ g i §1 5 N - i 

fcS -5k S,X i^X -Ik SK i^K^K^CK :ffi£K^Kfe:K^K:i.Kxag:K^K^KfeK^KS:.K 



Z; 

bi. 
— a 

i; - P - - -^ 



c 5 5 



-J- 5 2'= p2;=5<='«-5 

- O £ cS; ^ S -f* 'X "C -*-* ^ ; 



55 






:2. ja- n: 





.^ 


C 


^ 




^ 


- 


? 




S' 












s 




■^ 


b. 


■J-; 












< 


;_; 


0^ 






o 


c; 


'^ 


^ 


^ 


2;K 


-< 


•/; 


t; 



5 o 2 iJ 

£, bt--:- 

K =: a: ^' U! ± ► 







(^ 






O 


:5 




0) 


— . 




- 


^ 


o 


tj 


^ 


._ 


i; 


tN 


- 


= c 


3 








ii 


<5 




i?; 


•^ 




O < 






~ 


< 


isi 


K 


:c 


^ 


:_ — 


< 






1 












u 










^ 
o 






























































2 

c 


S 


C3 




1 




0) 

bo 








^Cj 




.2 


a 


S 




o 

o 






: b. 







(-; £a X 



o Q <; z: 



t ^ ^ 2 ^ s 

c- — ^ u o ^ 

oj ; a o) t-i m 

'-r M ►^ ±e 'rr ~' 



oj 3 0) 



Z o z; 



rJ 0-' CO i-H 



-T yj r- 



S c 



S M 



■^— — c 



3 ^ z :. i 



2i ~ >. 



O S 



^ K 



<D ^ — — 



= i Q El. S: C 



K K -< 



-i •-= >> _ 

a 5 S <: 



<J .S 



cq K 



I 

I 

w 

< 
I— I 

<1 



o OS 
OJ c— • 

2 .5 of 



«s 



.5§ 






o 

*? C3 
O ill 

CL, 



.si . 

5 —13 

ao-- 

S C t; 



■joioo 



•aSV 



_— SB 



s-s 



(D o 



K O 



S o 



W 







s 




"Cm: - : : 


' a; ^ .jj 


:.o 


• dj 


• 0^ 


iti 



SmC .jK ^K ^3h oE 'j-E 



z 



c — 



■ ~ « > 



c.;5' 






a T^ a; ~ -r ^ >■. s' , - 
o tH >; ^ ? n _2 H :s g S 



o; ^ ^ 



c — -h 



^ « C Q p^ ^ 

aa. S w K w o 



o .t; :;^ o 



►-? 


^ 


C 


X 


fe. 


K 


>::::: 


ci 


g 


oc 


a: 


?' 


c. 



bs 

T^ TO 


•:i6i— 9?'Ba 



M ® C ;'- ~ 



■cap 



Q .S = 



=s w 



•:;:—, C 









rt ® 









■= o = S-c ^: 



!h —a 



p t^~,~ c 






X' ^ 

^ o 



o)' :-^ fc, a fc< 
tH a,.C oi M o 



^; S 



^ > -i- 



H 







z 


CO 


w 


^ : : : : : 


8 


S 


CO 


^ 


(M 


t~ 



























* 


c 






































. 




1^ 








c 




c 






ui 


tS 




;■ 






^ 





5 j: 


d 





03 
Pi 


C 
1 


0) 

ca 

oi 




i ^ 
1 1 


55 

53 
a 


s 


td 


U 


< 


C 


} c» 


I-] 


■O 





























c 













t 








C 




c 








c 




c 












L 








CI 




c 




^ 





at >i 



p> o 

O o 

Jr ^ 

m c 

- Oi 



= w ^ ■ 



M o 



o -' 



^ < 






c 5 






■5oSogoiio5jO:;^cSoSccc 
cK ti.ffl offi wK tnW Sffi '*,W &Hffi .xffi 



tH Q> o a>^ 0^ • ;^ • 0^ ■ w • 






s : s? s= s gs £ s 2 s i s o s ° s g i &s 1 1' 



.ro S o5 <=: 



— ^ Q ;j O' ;^ G^ 



C^ O „ O 5j o 



a-K offi KK S53 oB yjS affi &. W kK hJffifcWoffiHK 






•- ^'j^ "^ s ~ • 
S K K ?^< X — W ; 



C CO 



•c c 2,- 









■ c S. 



- r- S ^ a^ 
<x t^ (D c^ -^ 

Z x &. ?^ 1-1 



CS^ 


• .r- 




■" C 


HiL, 


c>r) 




o^ 


O 1) 


K^ 




t*i - 


g_0 


O o 


o o 


WjWK 



O be 3 
- ° S »! so C g X s C o 0-- 

g:<;B&jK;QOSHacu<pHZa<; 



e; ~i ^ " -^ i — ^ '^. c o K ,— ' - •:= tH 



•<;a- 









Si;^?^: 



3ZS 



^r o c s 

Q^ C^ O !-.'■/' 11^ 

So-<0-^tffaSfai^coa:Hfe-<M.^O>-J 



.,'C.i<..;=7:c-^ 



t;^cooC::£>. !:;--■ 



£s^ = 



o^T- oj:; c°^ 






W -< O CJ 



s 

^ is 



H « 



< s 



►2 « 



— 5 4, 



is E K cn K S W 



rtj r;^ C ^ ^ ^ C 
H 03 tC J IS S K 



ri CM c^ — 



c<i -^ CM ^ 



i-( :0 .-■ 



CM CO Otl 1— 









^ 






Qj 
























1 

CE 


O 
W 

3 
cS 




< 


1 

O 

o 


a 

1 
c 
a 


< 


c 
c 
_i 
o 
a 

Z 


^ 1 


e 


B 






2 


"a 

T 




o 


2 5 


< 


> 


tL. 


o 


C 




-< Q 



— -? t: ^ 



= K 






^ -^ S 



w ;2 



a. ^ M 



I 



►-3 

I 

I— I 
<1 





Q 




tr 




jii^ 


-C 




1 


a a9 


. o ^ o 


« c— • 


0) S h 

gf o ^ o 


2 3§a 


O "2 


OJ2 ^ . 


Nan 
offic 






« « 


•aSeu 


Tn - • "C 


-mm ?BqAV 
















a.' • 








o 




. . C3 




•r^ 


- dJ CD ■ o P 0) 










a 


-^trsiisCj: 


s 


c oj 3 oj 2 o'C o) 




llllllll 


O 














o 
























05 s 






O ' ' 






0.? 






.ja_ ,- • 1 




a p c; = 




'C " C d 


5 


i' ' 11' f 




O ^ ^ c/. 


1 


M 
















































































^ 


" K S 


~ ^ 


- 


p. 


lli^^l.l 








H ~^ --t 5 s <;' S S 




^a>.-So^^^ 


^ 


g c 0) sir- OS'S .2 




















































r^ — 




























oS 


r^ ■ ■ S 


«=« 


^° 


o S. 


o ; : o 


Cl, 


ci 




'-' *— J 1 


























.2g 






/a; 


"SSie 






o 


Ss-s 


- > 


8 5i^ 


1 1 g § 




:; C <u O 










•.io[oo 


^ : : : 


•aSv 


?i -■ fJ ?i 


=M 










=*H O 










^ojaj 










2.1 1 














0^^ JH 


-c 


~ rt b 








0^ o s 




Q3rt 


o 


4) 


" 






2® 


o fc ^ 




ST3 


— r ^ 




ci-r 






c-^ 


P.. Z < 






-i - & 












« o 


"H S a m 


a t- 


S 'OJ C3 J3 


5^ 


p a — 3 




^o 


w -<! :? cB 


«- aJ 








o be 








».5 


-a 


iSS 


o 


Oi g 


c 




o 




o 


iiei— aj^a 


^ 








P 






1 






73 


^ 


tH 








;^ 


T- 


s 


^ 




CS 





-2 





^ 











^ 





— 





^ 


<y 


.^ 


c 








c 


ffi 


B 


O 







^0. 






^o: 












<: 



















Bj 






!- ^ 




C=^ 








a.:: 

(D — 














a 




i — 




rf — 




w 




tri 




K 




l-ri 




*j 
















'- 




* 










• 










• f^ • 
























































































!.^ 


S's i 


«; 




" S 


- 


:" s r 


::. :r 




































1- c 


-1 c 








c S c 


"~ 


b 


Kfe5K 


<! 


s 


ffioW 




'xK 
























C? 


• <' 












> 


'' ■ 




























r 














7 


oR 




























i- 


'tis;^= 


c 
1 




















'^ 


^ ^ 


u 


U- 


32; 


2:: 


ffli-^ 


a! — 












' j= : 
















'-, 




. 
















_a. 




(B l^ • 












.--- 1^'^ 






c 












c 


!r, ^ ^ 
■2 £.5 a- 

5 2 ? 

■2 5It 


1^ 






S c c^ 


cc:2 
$.0 


^ 


■<az 


5 j=: 


1 


COS 


fi 


^ r- ^ 


■^ a 


43: 














Vv 








































^ 












c 
























p 














be 




Eh 


'C 


^ 


■c 


" 


^ 


'^-■ 




p^ 


3 


r-^ 




5 


^ 


p 




j; 


i; 


03 


c 


'S 


r 


't:: 











c 


OJ 


;. 














c 




















;-! 












0/ 






^ 










t- 








cS 




3 






1 












.«^ 






^. 


.^ 






" 




to 








c 




E 
c 


■5 




5 


c 



^^ 








. 




. 




•^ 
















,^ 




L^ 


,'- 




-J 


_- 


— 


■> 




"M 






'.' 


n 


"1 
















'f' 


















r^ 














m 




S 
































s 


> 


t« 




r^ 
















































c 
















c 














































r 








." 


■» 


'^ 




(_ 











— 



























































0- 












^ 
> 


^ 






' s 




o:e 




^ 






03 

"3 


Q 






1 ; ^ 


s 

Q 


£ 


c 



a 
S 


Q 
'a 


C 


, 5 




1^ 

5 


0) 


< 


03 

c2 







5 


a 








3 
































C 


> 














i 
















c 
















c 
















c. 


) 














I' 




^ 


1 






-^ 




-r 







Qj O 


& o 






■S c 


■S c 


cc c 


cc o 






-F K 









gOsjcp •as -oJcSo) -0) 



OS Oj 0) , 



> 9"? 



2 fH.^ I 

.^ . .:5 a^ .-, CO ~ a; .; 



£ 3 pSg = g s-^3 gSg 3g5p=^ = ? S'a'SgsoS ^sSSk^-S g SgSrtpgs 

3ogo3o2ogor!oSc^oj;o2o'qo-o3opoEoaog'c-^oSo3o .ogo 
jK cbM ii.til ^W xffi aoK Si W s^iffi »K uffi ►jK wW feW S^ffi Cffi SW oM ccffi feK cffi Pdffi oK 












45 !; S ^ »' S5 
'^ p.:2 oj-c -"o 



5 ^j3 . 
©■iip : 



.G ^.S. • i; 



ii t> 



^'c::. S ^ 9 ^ > 5 '" 






■c S £ 3 g S:2 
wcs- o — — z 









esJ 






c ~ ^ J ~ -r 



5 >=~ 



?^l' 















: "^ c to- o 
- .is o S &■ <« 

■~ 5! ' -. i; Si i; ;; S 



• I. 














c • 

.' — p. ^ 

H £ ^ .S 


:' ^ 




ci C 


; ; • >- 

0) ? "5 :£ c 


2 i 


• ■ > • 

: : >. . 

1 - 1 1 



Q 2: c: 2: 



o o t. i. 



£ o. 



t i 2 a 

J c o o 



g 5 I ^ 
" I 5 § 



a '^ X ^ s, 



^ :::::::::::::::::::: : 




ci 


C-) 


2 


CI 


z5 


■^ 


CO 




CO 





OC 


:; 


CO 


i:; 


p 


2 


64 


::; 


CO 
CM 


5 


CO 


CM 




































•J: 












































^ 












































If' 




Zj 







- >-. 


S 


, 


tet: 




s; 


tis 


CS 


£ ^S 


s 




'^ > c 


K^s 




^^ 


>,'-^,s 










'i'-'.Q 




n 


se 2 


"f^ N 




a; H 


ei — 




ti) 


cs ^ 






*-r^ 


0- .:; 


.c = 




^ 


^ c= 


a ai 




^ 




•-; 







S 5 



c J3 "■ 



s w 2 



.^ * ^ "o Ci " b 



<■ ;= 



-< 5 



t^ ci "; g cc 



a ;s !-i 



S S 



o ^ S 



c; u- z -. K 



I 

E-I 
CQ 

o 

I 

(x) 

o 

1—1 



s 


c:2 








.2 ^-c 










.5oS 


ji 


o fi 


c8 

12; 


i0 ® 
o a 




•aSBij 


-J ■BUI 1BI1;\\^ 



(U 



cS j5 






s'2 
.2 i 

ao2 
s c a 

o Em 
0>: 



•joioo 



•aSy 









'^ c3 





Oi 


o 


bn 


® 


cS 


o 


^ 


cS 








3h 


S 






iiei- 


-3*^0 



^-.^---^C^ ^0),^ _■_: 



5 P a 



— c 



-i ? 



« 


« 


ci 


« 


oi 


a:: 




,J_, 




























"^ 





















a; ; 

fflb 
as 



^i: -SLIt-^: lis? 



S C s Oi ; 



cs 3J c m 




w 


a 


Q. 


tc 


s 


K 


s 


K 


a. 


w 


s 


tn 


>::::::::::: 


Tf 


cc 

CO 


s 


■Xl 


o 




o 


30 


3C 

C-l 


ri 


t^- 


S 



£,"« 












c s -r o — 



3s ^ 



S '5 = 



p^ 


T- 


— ' T-^ 


^ 




i 


„ 


_; 


> 


^' 






-• 




„" 


►_■ 




^ 


."O i':: 


^'r-' 










u 






— O t- 






c 


O 


-yJO 




D 


ac c 


a; 'o 
j_ ^J 5 


ag 

e 


^ s 




." '~ 


< 


O 




h-^8 


S c 




5 


X. s S c 


op 


o o 


o 




„ 0) o ••U 


^ c "-io 


.0 


ffi£ 


0) 


K 


o 




- "^ — C 


w - ^ -< 


< 


















E 


. K 


^ 


^ u 




.►J 


^ '' "" 


X. 




£« 


> 


0) G 




0) 0)0 




> 

Ol 


W 


« 


« 


a 




M OS 


K « a 


« 


'O • 










. 




■0 "O 


c^ 






































; : 












. 






: oi : aj S d 






































































Q^ g^ 


'3^ J. ^ ' 




o 


Ol 


. o 


a ^^ 'Z^ '^ Zj 


a;53aJCa^-iHc:io 


Iplss 


SSrt 












oogo£o 




;2 - ^ ■" 


^ 2 p J^ 


2 


;2 


2 




n O 


o S o ■£ 


: c c S 





O 


• C 


jj !5 


fcK oiffi <iK kW Sli! falK 


ffi 


:ffi 


Sffif^ffili-ffi 


[L.ati-Ma.K 






• '• • es 








d 
























• -S : : ■ 












: "S 












































:«s^- 




















'J 












: oi - " a! • 


Cn : 










: 5^' 5 o 




1 
























0»-n,?? .-1— 






1^ 








??? = 


• CS tu C3 




t.Ss.i:S^'^' 




Ss 


■S' c 


: >2 ;, 

o o ^ 

ti fc. <u 


o c^ 


^ S Ic 


k: 

rt 




:; a; t, Ji'o 

3t; ID- o!S 


W a 




owe 


WoPhO 


c-^o oo 


















.-p • 




• ■ ^fJ. 


X • • ■ 




.^-^ 


o ^. : : 




* ^' * 














• ^ 




: : : £1 : 


3 ■ — ■ ' ' 




; e 


> 

: > 

^ c 


'-^^ '. '. 
: o • • 

:« : : 

mi 


I.el 


J 

; a 
: t 

i s 
--J 


: c 


? ■ 

2 '3 


- c 
go. 


a 

E 

a 






Jl 

-03 
:'7 ^ 


■-7 


>51 

. OJ ■ 

: ■ -^P 


; • • 'JS 53 • ; =^^ ■ ■ ■ ; 






■^ 'C - 2 



'■B<^S 



— ■" tH 



Z o O CO o 



O Z ^ Q 



















































^ 








j3 






F-i 






tj-O 


; ^ I 


: 
> 4- 


&4 


: .2 


■a 
c 


« 


r: 


t. 


p. 


X 


beg 


s s bo 

C 03 S 'J 


•• ft : 


0) 


c 




J. 


— 




D 


C 


l s 


•— ' — '^ c 


D ^ 



"Z T. <^ 



ffi Q !^ 



■5 s 

o o 



■S ci 4<s -r 



S 03 03 S £ m S 



M IM C^ C^ 



Ol I^ !N 01 W) 






Ts C -S 



. s ^ . 


^.- 


^:\c i <= >> 




. 5§ ^1 


P C =3 


C.i=: 




c--^ 








• ■S'^-^ * 


c= t: 



s < 



s ^ s 



S ^ ffl 



-- o — 



o S Ci ^ S 



o 

I 

H 
pq 

m 

I 

w 
o 
< 

<1 



§ oS 



a 


c 


'O 


■S^r^ 


CO- 


W M >,4) 


t 


S W-S'S 






a 


ga 


cs 


S« 


12; 


00. 




■aSBia 


-.n3in 


^^tlAi 



^ ^ 



•<-^ ;^ «5 



<*:^ 




c 


<x> 


> 


%» 


« 


OS 



^* o S .^ 01 01 ^ i. ^ oj £ <p 



CS CO 


:«■ 


6 


S 








s: 


, — < 


^ 


MS 




-) 


— 


c 




-n 


^'t: 


cc 


^ 






llllilf 

z; jj uj c w I-:; c 



.;" . . . ^ cs : : 

c 5?-= ?:■'-'■= o o 

^ » :- .X :S K C fM 















0,3.3 



tx) r, -5 .« 



•JO[oo 



•8Sv 






_a. 5 o 5 C o c 



;2 O 3i 



<u 0." — ; 

X X ^ 



^ h:| 



o ^ z; 



-3 ci 


^ 


X 






~ 




^ 


rS 


- 


c5 


-:; 


:i 


c 


"^ 




: i-i 


5 S 




1) 


>; 




:^ 




►d 


— 




;: 


a: 





«a 




^■' i 




1 


'fc.. 


cs 

a 



2 


CS 

c 


OJ 

1 


0) 
3 


-3 


<; 
c 




p 


c 

ci 

c 


M 
1 


cS 

u 

c 



5 »^ 

■5 o> 
ft 

a) ^ 
X <! 
































































































a; 








il 














<D 

















■c 

^ 




S!i 















■3 













'S 





c; 




s 


c 














CS 




c 
c 









cS 




C 





•il6l— ai'Ba 


;: 




c^ 




12 




iC 




JI; 




t:; 




§ 




CI 
OJ 





s: o 
ac 
o u 

P3 S 



W -E 






^ > CJ > 



a) o 5 o (- o eg c 






^ 



Oj fH q; 






c 5 o o 



ooc'-o.''c'^c.Soiio 



(Saaa£a£a5B£a««>3a£:a£as:«sa.^aKgaMoa 



g"S„-c S _, 



9'C! (i £. S -a 

ir :, '5 o 3 M z 



^. ^. c3. ^. 



tJ K 



O M ft £ 2 > C 

ttJ|a;ga5oF. 



bo'" - -' 



o1 







^ S o ^ 



0) o 



T^ 3 '^ 



o 


tn 


^ 


^ 


cu 


a 


03 


H 


S 


H 


^ 


M 


i: 


O 


O 


w 


^ :::::::::::::: : 


-* 


(M 

CO 


o:. 


OS 


g 




oo 


to 


CO 
(M 


en 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


S 


(N 



:2 o 



o -ft > 



^ 'S cn :S 



3 c? 



-g ^ :^ 



rH 


_^ 


'^ 


H 


) >J 




K 












E^ 




s 


O 


5 W 


-^ 


<! 


W 




.i<! 







g 


Si 


Ph 












tH 


o 


a 


•i 


to 


y 


a1 








a 


o 


O 


-c 


CD 


c 



« Q = 



H 
pq 
O 
H 
U 
O 



S <i 



M o 



tf 




S tH '"^ *^ nj £i ^ 

r '— r^ "^ +-' Q C3 



D-, 


cc 


Eb 


a 


^ : - : 


CO 
CO 




o 
o 


en 



-^ ^ (1 



® eS s a 

a.is o a 



O di 






- -2 tn 



. OS 

few 



S "»! 



p: Q 



6JI O H^p^O 






^& 



0:5 


« 


K 


H 




M 




P5 


M 


« 


rH 


'd - 


r£ - 


: 


nd 


■s 






: : 


: : 
















. 01 









(P 



Ol • OJ 



a; 



Q^ a; Q> , 



a> 



ooo?o^ocso^CooSo5cSo"c^c-r;ci;OcsO 






6Hac5wgiijE^a "asaoBu.ffifca;j.ffioacaKKo-tiiK!x;Hiii 



H 

m 
o 

o 
o 

I 

m 

H 
O 
<1 

n 



a'2 
Wo 



C 13 
C a; 
ODh 



6h :W 



S c a^ -^ o '^ 
o cs X 5 '^ =^ 

c o w K^ a -X' 







K o 



pation 
om and 
ide. 














a 
c 




aj 




a 
2 




12 


1^ 

a 


- S 










■if 


: 


a 


a. 


c. 


a 


<D 


aj 


a 


a. 






0) 

a 


O"" 




a 




r 




c 




c 


O 


r 


r 


a. 


a 


a 


a> 


o 


o 




C 




H 


C 


t 




E 


t 


P 


e: 


s 


cr 


w 


W 


•joioo 


^ :::::::::::::: : 


■aSV 




c- 


^^ 


-^ 


y 


J, 


r 


C' 


ict 


r^ 




^ 


f 


„ 


.—. 


rsi 








-r 




r- 




CO 


00 






Cn 






Ol 




<(-i 
































m 


tw O 
































d 


Residence o 

each at time 

marriage. 


c 
c 

c 


, 






c 
c 

C 

c 


, 


. aj 
~ aJ 


O 

c 
c 






a 
a 
c 




o 
o 

5 




IS 


"3 

c 
o 


<_ 








o 






^ 








u 




J 


o 




._ 


^ 


^ 


^ 


K^ 
















. 1 


^ 






OS'S 


c 


T 


C 


C 

a 

T 


'p. 


S 


3 "ci 


p 


t- 








« 
c 






1" 

OJ o 


a 
5 
5^ 


El, ^ 
d 


PC 

a 
c 
c- 

C 




c 


1 

a 


be 

c 


> 

CO 

2 


c 

;- 
C 
;- 
a 


a 

i 
c 

c. 


& 

C 

a 

c 

c 


p.. 
s 

0) 


% 

o 

Di 

E 


s- 
a 
C 
C 






c 




i 




a 


^ 


W Ed 


>< 


> 

^ 

1 


-< 


"5 

< 


aj 


a 

£ 




o 

03 
























;- 








































































-d 








Is 


c 
























o 








p.a 






















1 




5 








- 


•ii6i-9'}t!a 


c 


) 


CO 




TJ 




'^ 




OO 




c- 




<N 




« 








^5 



02 



-5 I 



p:^ 


ffj 


03 


« 




eS 


K 


rt 


oi 


rt 


Di 


M ; 


: : 






to 


: : 


: : 






: - 





Jj^O.^jjOJ^S? '^ "I* 






__^ _ .-^ _. ,^_ ^ ^^ _ ^-^^ _ __ i 0-= i 5 ^ 2 ^ s 



S .Z c S o 5 o cs c S _ „ ^^ „ 

a _5 a hw fc<s &hI1 £^23 i.a js :S3 SK Ei-K t^w 






• 3; o ; 



6S6 



i^ 0/ J: 0) 
n C a b, a 



•°S = S 5 S S Je o£o S 
:a E-M hB fc^a fa-g xM b- 






:^ :S 

ix^ S "^ - r5 ii -M' ■ 



S in :j < « a :? : 



<5 



.5 -Ca 



5 '"^ 

t-_t; 2-; 
a>T . S 5 S a a; 



.2 -^ 0) J ^3 'S 
O = J a = -i 






' ^ S ? tH I 







































' C <I> 




";:'c-^ 




>.2 -- 




o^-. 






" — -f. 



G^ oj oj * t- 



5S 



'i « 






y ^ -r .i^ « 



o o w is 



C; OD O Z tl3 O 






tl ^ 



s 


ca 


o 


K 


5 


w 


c 


H 


►J 


W 


s 




« 


w 


o 


OJ 


o 


< 


s 


tc 


^ :::::::::::::::::: : 


?3 


?! 


d 


Tj< 


CO 


to 


CO 


? 


c^ 


CO 
CO 


s 


CO 


s 


(N 


2 


2 


?? 


C-1 


c^ 


;:: 



O O § O CQ g: O 



•SS ci 



r^ fe o ^ 



: c 








-/I cS c 


•5 


C 



"3 


c^-c 


oS 








<D CS 


C2 


tH 


S 


fa /3 


cS 


-O 



W H 



1^ o c 



S O 



^ 


< 





ij 








J 


g 





H 


(i3 


W 


<J 


U 


;h 


W 


fc 


CO P 


H — 









































P3 

> 
O 

I 

H 

l-H 



esidence 
id 

tation of 
y wliom 
ried. 


w -S ^ 

o 


1 ? 


-C >= -C 'rH 
O '* O 





cord . 

pitts, 
cord. 


"5 ^ 


p o -5 


o "tc 


a =^ a ci 
o t^ o a 
O f; O o . 


^ 

:o 


a a 
00 
.0 


^ s 

1 '-> 


Name, r 

a 

officials 

person I 

mar 


O - 


lyt; 


j; 




"5 


hS 


0) 






< 




Oi 


C3 


-< 


§" 


• '-ft 

a; <P 


a; 
.J 


T3 


tf 


< a 


« 


K 




K 




03 


W 




p; 




M 


K 


■aScij 


*^ 
























C-) r-i 


-jBiu ^^MM. 








* 


* 






* 


* 








" 


_o 


a^ '•■'.'.'.'.: '. 

^ : : ; : : ^ : : 

." a> a oJ • a5 2 o) • 








(S 
















































■" ;S f 


i^ '" ■p- tl '^ ''* 


> - 


^ t 


'^t^s-^t^sSs 




' > !r j; h s 


£^?r^ 


o 


.go^CiigO^Oi 


7 - 


-/ ^ -7' ': 


2 c 


t. - .^ _- 


- -3; 5 ii S S 


M$^g 


o 


2 o."S 5 E 


C O rt 


c - c "■ 


; c a 5 ^ c 


is^'sii'ioHs 


t. a a 3 




hffi^mecn 


y 


W:^ 


IJ? 


33 E^ 


ffife.K6a: 


j/ 


KKtr 


KKn-iWfeti: 


^ffid-K 


































o 




'. a- '■ 




















! ' y r^ '. 






Si 


"a 
c 

0. 

a. 


a-i 11 
■5 Q, o = 




t-- ^ 

£■3 
ia 




: ^ r- ; : ; 

c 5 5 s 
•^■"^ 5 £ 

O-Oh-I w 


: : : £ 

c a 03- 

C; n = c 

J' 'i' s 


■ :^^ a 
: -.'6^2 


-c^ a !h 
c2:;=o 




C 


-i:t» Z:S 




'X O 




c 


;:mc 


cQ IS Z; X 


a-OOO 


t^ 






2 : 




r-^ ' 
















• ■ ;X : 










ft : 
SB 






X r 


U O (X) 

•111 

S! 3 — '^ 

ECaJ 








o 


;- 

c 

hj^ 

2 


: a 


" S a 
» a a 


a 
C 

z 

a 
c 




C3 E !^ 


a E ? ■- 


Oh <pO--- 

^Sfe a t. 

^ i ^ c 


^ c 0) a 
;::qcq 

- - M - 
.£ a 2 




i^s 


S-l- 


^ 


-«H 


< i- 


w<:<i — 


— 


KC <- 




..^^ ii -t; ^ _: 


i;fe.cW 


^ 


s 






























■*^ 
























-J 






3j 
=«2 


c 


> 










3 




CB 








C3 1 


OJ 




°=2 




2, ,.: 


o 


C 


C5 


a 
c 


i 


i 1 


5 


c 


1 


c 


t.1 


5 S 

a 


P-. 






a 




a 








j^ 


c 






-S s 


■2 c 










r 






i- 


< f 


cS 


c 






a 




2 


-7 


" Q 


C 






a. 


h- 







c 


c: 


rs 


< 


Occupation 

of groom and 

bride. 


!- 

a 

c 

a 


1 

1 


< 


r 

T 

C 

a 


C3 


1 


c 


c 

a 
C 


a 
a; 

jj a 

C cS 

S^ 

— 1J 


0. 

c 

g 
s 

c 

a 


' .5 
— 


a 

5 
c 

7^ 


i, ■ ;- 


0) 

c 




•jo[oo 


1^ :::::::::::::: : 


•aSy 






























c^ 




.— . 




6i 


c 


C" 


C" 






C-l 






-J. TJI 


CM 

<« o 




rr 




























°2d 


















ir: 














ill 




:c 


o 












5i 













^ 


































f^S 


c 


'5 


a 
o 










t! 


s 











S 






cc 


a 










0-( 


Q 











a, 


c-2 




1 


5 


O 

z; 


o 
o 

.S 


? 


c 




"a 




a 
Q 

a 

s 

< 


oJ 
"3 



c 
Ph 


• a 

: .-a 








« 


2^ 


►3 


^ 






K 


^ 


a 





-^ 


5 S 


-< .2 


03 o 


^ 


;-< 


a 




^ 


<D 


a 


tH 


a 


.S S 

Ed C 


S -«J 


k5 o 


<: 


tt 


> 






-a 

o 
55 









3 




s 
































O bfl 






























®.2 


■o 


























t». 






























A 
































^a 


a 
o 
o 


























a 



•il6l— a^BQ 


-< 




ir; 




S 




r^ 




cc 




0-. 




ct c 


-r 





K -g K 



W % 



H^;- 



K^ 



;.0 S.^ S^ 






_c ^ a. J; -^ -j; 



rt • • 








■ ■ • : • i^ si 
















S : : 




















>• 


























c . : 








: !^ s : S ^' t^ 




^ 








y- 


d 


p. : • 
e-3 : 


c: 

a 


C 

: t 

c 

c 


li 


Mancheste 
Warwick, 
Littleton . 
Boston, M 
Beachmon 
Mancheste 


■3; 3 d 


c 
c 


oscawen 
enton . .. 
oncoi'd . . 
rooklyn, 


5 



C 


ouo 


<; CQ iJ X K C « 


ffi 






>=_ n,-^ 



■ cS-^ii 



0) 01 



Oi2 ^ Ist: SS 



-■^ ttr 









-C sj c 






cH 



►^ u; i- ^ a- J ■ 



H < -. -1 -^ ^ r s:: IS :_■ -' < a < c ►-: K w 






■S S ^ ^ 



&:< o o a 



« ci 



cs t; c 



ft -^ 



m 


^ 


J 


s 


5 


a 







H 


X 





m 


ta 


a 


^ :::::::::::: : 


S 


CO 


s 


cc 


to 


S 


to 


Si 


CO 




« 


CN 




01 



.C? :•— 'O pq ii c 



3-' r:>~Fi ' 



W S C! W 5:. 



a H 



5 5 9 a 2 



-C ^ "C f- 



pq 

o 

H 
Q 



rri 


'6 


6 


-d 


■a 





ca 











C 


^ c 


ti 







►^'O 


>i 








c3 






c 


OJ 


(K 














^ 


a 


c 
a 


9; 


« 




a 




-*-i 








^ 


" 


"* 


" 




0- • c 




OJ (H 1) 








nn ic: 










^ 1- p 








o) Ji a 




0) 5 <D 




i^E 




2 c, 2 




ci ;:^ f^ ::^ 


. 


afc:,a 




aoffi 


r^ 




-M I ' I 

> : : ' 










'A 


r^ 


!>,... 


>, 


Zs 


S^^.- 


M 


C CD c 


5 c S^ 







mi 


r- 


ct v~ ^ ,;" OS >. 


-J 5: C CC ?- 1-3 




















' '■'■/ 




: : 


^ 


• c - 




* i~> '. 








'-iS'Z^ 






■^, 






s 


Spam 


c 


2 cs S 






c 


cz :^ .";:: 


r 






a:s>- 


2: 


1 0-^ 


>< 








li 




















C 





bt 




S 


3 


c 


















P 





t^ 


&:< 


o3 


a> 




jii 


fci 


^ 




^ 


0) 


C 














Cw 


nS 






cc 


C 


f- 




> 






ce 
















H 


H 


c 


w 


> 




. 












to 


oc 














>< 








^ 


■a 














c 



















§ 


c 










. tr 


, 


c 






;. 













£*"' 











c 




0) 


C 


:s 





p 


is 


n 


z 











> 








a> 


3 


% 


^ 


i-l 





tf 





P 
S 


> 


.2 
"3 


Cu 


Z 


[xj 


Z 


"C 


































c 








c 

















'-' 




00 





o 

I 

pd 

H 
pq 

H 
O 
H 
Q 
I 

H 

I— I 

<1 



® 


"Sg 


a 


c2 


<0 


o-r 


13 


•5^-c 


a)T3 t« >,4) 




11 

a 




c« 


13 


ca 




bSbu 


-j'Bin 


I'BllA^ 



a -^ 



q ^r^q ^ 



o >r 
So 



S K 



« 


03 




(S 


K 


« 


i Qi 




K 


2 = 


■73 


■S 




Cl 


2 • ■ 


: : 


- 


¥\ ' 


















; cs 





„ oj ^ p 3 ^^ S -iJ S * £ ^ S p 2 ?^ 3 Ji '^ ,'^ S ^ S ^ "^ " ^' " "" 



S3?; 



W ri" h-! r? it! " rn :i! m r^' W £ W £ rrl t; ►■ 



5 = 5^5 






o "^ 



fto-S 

!3 O >H 

o bo 



•jo[oo 







:^ 


2; 


CO 


s?; 


2 


Cm 


CQ 


w 


H 


o 


Q 


w 


en 


tn 


Cm 


tn 


^ :::::::::::::: : 




c5 


g? 




o 


05 


CO 


<M 


g5 


(M 
CM 


c-] 


CO 


S 




CM 


to 



•aSy 



o aj . 



S * 



a 


ja 


^ 


TU 


M 


a 


T3 


CS 


a 

c3 


a 
o 




o 


a 

C3 


bo 


Iz; 


o 



^ H- Qi OJ 

w W >> i. 






: c ft 
; c;a 



cS 



CS 






> W S &: 3 






,iS H ^ 



w ^ Ed p; S ^ S 



iiei— 8*'Ba 



'2 K -g 






e -: 



.1-1 
go 









« 




OS 


^ 


« 


M 




OS 


« 


2 


-a 


M : 


- = 




: 


13 

(M 


s = 


: : 



silSi 



S 2 o 






o'^ t^'^ 5'^ t^'^ 






lo) -<D Ifl) I(dC© -O) -oj 

:S3 :^ :~ :.2 osis :.'s ■.'2 

• ^ • ^ tn ii t- ?: S fe-c ^ S ? 












[> TO --- .r-B 03 









C ?^ 






•r o o I' 



c.y o 



O eS 
sc o 

15 si 

'S o I-. g 
o 0) s a 






r cs c >i c c a 

?;;::; Q ^1 o; OJ 0; 









-^ S^i^ o^'O. S,;>,- 






C3 ? '^ S^ rt 



s > 



a E 






o o w ■< 



S S 



ij 


w 


s 


tn 





m 


H 




(5 


p 


ci 


trl 





m 


^ 


: 


: 


: 


: 


: 




: 




: 


: 






: 


CO 


CO 


(M 


§ 


S 


S 




CO 


?3 





•* 





c^ 


CO 


g5 



£ o ^ J2 



a ^ 



^ i2 3 



2 & 



|J1 g iJ1 > «ii gfa<;-!jKHtElEdH 



1> 



CO 



<D 
O 
O 

Q 
a 

H 

® 



o 
o 

o 
o 

o 
t>> 

O 

<D 







0) 
Q 



"-3 





« 



















































<^-2 






" . C ■" 




a^ 


oa: ^ .S-S -t^So t:£?. (>i2Ji rt 




|a 


Venize Lecler 
Mary Turcot t 
Edla Dow. 

Hulda Kimba 
Sally Trask. 
Myra Clifford 
Lucinda Bow 
Annie Good-sv 

Zelma . 

Ella M Brales 
Livonia Potte 
Landia Le Bl 
Caroline E. C 
Sarah Hatch. 
Lottie Chase. 
Nora Boucha 
Adaline Cawl 
Hannah Dow 
Mary Corliss. 
Rebecca Cille 
Cezarie Pa tor 
Margaret Bro 

Katherine Pr 








































«1H 

B 


0) 

1-1 
a) 

c 




ci 
a; 


.John F. Nelson. 
Amos Prentiss . 

David Gove 

.James W. Walke 
Richard Kelley. 
Freeman Cox . . 
Merton C. Horn 
Ezras. Walker. 
Henry M. Laflan 
Thomas W. Can 

.John Harringtoi 
Lewis Dionne . . 
Thomas Hook. . 
Levi Brown .... 
Thomas C. Cape 

Jacob Fretz 

Philip Roy 

Alexander Gilso 

Emond Evans.. 




.a 










s 

S 






























c 



o-^. t; 


^ aJ 


3 



t, : 




„ 












.a 
IS 





cS 

cS 

a 



2 



Gilmant 

Plymout 

Wen two 

Antrim 

Mereditl 

Holdern 


Connect 
Suncook 
Hennike 

Concord 
Suncook 
Haverhi 

Concord 
Hebron . 
Canada. 














'fi 


















C 






0^ 


















. ^_j 










> 








Em 




.2 

•a 

c 




5 


"S 


- c 


• a;''^^ - ^ C-G 


CS 






cS 


5 


:SScS£ 


C 


. S cs-3 E > ^ CS 


^ 









= 53 

00 cc 


■ a) c.S s:'^ C 
• c8 .C a. a; a; 5g 

. M -_' P K K 






d 









s- 

a 
















■ fc 






! ■ f- 








• 

c : 

<B . 
'0 t^ 

rn aj 




4^ 








ca 








u £ 




'. ai : 














es 






p . 






(D C3 




. a . 




cD . a 











a 




T dj • 




>2l J= 




■ <v 
'.■^ : 










Co 




=1 








w^ - 








T^.SS 




§1 




?; 2 




: 3 : 




0) ; aj 










CS 
















oj j: p 






ffi J 


iloca 


ShMX 




:M : 




a :« 




Qio 


a 
. 

130 


•p^AvoptA^ jo 
paujiJiu'aiSnis 


;§■:::::: ^: : 


> i^;^ 




:§>'- = 


^S 


•joioo 


£^: ::::::::::::::::::;:: : 


««:s 






CO 


•9l«ma^ 


fe : : : : :&H : : : :&^ :fL;: ::&:;::::: : 


•3IBH 




g': : : : 


s= ■• - is 


•S- 










•S' 




.s 


















J 












































































E 


tut; 
2c 


: 1 ^1 

: . 

• • t.. 
: ■ « 

.-■arc 


13 
c 


2n 


3 : 

a • 

^£2 




a. 
c 


£S 


c 


n 
c 





1- 






Ck 


c c 


sa£i32HS^=|S^^ sSS|S5i 






o3 





fan 


■SiiBa 


TO .CO 


°'S?i?i'^?; i'^^'?;^' • 




. to ^' • 


-TOi 


•sqinojvr 


Zi -.^ 


.C .-H ..^ ^ Cl -.£ X l^ CO — • 




I-.^UO . 


TT 


•sjBa^ 


oi^iOGCOTOa:ccc-jx .oi .ccr— • 




c-1 .ci^ . 


CC — 


















a • 












































eS'^ 






























TS ■ ■ 












S 






























t-. • • 












to 

a:: 

cS 


c 

c 

c 

< 


bo j 

C 

s — 

_ <p 




0) 




2 '^ ■ 

"ai'^" 
a).a.o 


5 


_aj : 

W : 

- p 


a 


K 


p 

5 

< 


1^ 
6« 

r- a) 

s c 
=a;n 
;s c 


• c • 
: : 

lis 

m 

<iKP 

>) 



"c 
K 

aj 

4^ 

d 
iJ 


C.S • 

CQOh 
c3/: a; 
;q cs c 

-t;PH 



ttS 


.14 

2 

1 


C! 

= 
g 






iiei— a^BQ 




■^ 


^ 


TO 


CO 


OJ 





CO 


2r= 


S 


X 


v: 


5 


53 


§ 


?. 


6) 


c5 


?i 


<N 


•N 


CO 
(N 





ti 



I i 



as 03 



c c 
. ^ g 

1^ tl^ £"2 
■jh"' eS s o) 
Pi c3 oj I 



i^S_ 



::: o ci i-v 



S4 



= =os 






)'3 d ^ 

■ O L- S! 

IP oi. 



r- O M. r- -r- 





>i 




c 


c 


S: 






^ 


o 




i-^ 


c 






0) 


o 


Oi 




O 


p 


c 


:d 




o 



Si 5: 5 



giOO 



« a>- Si <p J-: cu 
0) m " 






W 



^Ksa 



&:S^S- 



:&H 



:s: 



(-1 a 

cs 

O 33 



•S5 c:5 


o6 : 


(M . Oi -H l- 


(M " • " 


U-. .C^-fZn 


-HO .X 


\- rjj M [;- pC 


3 -3 -io lo 







§ if p O 
(N <N C-1 CI CO CO CO CO CC 












IT? OJ 

- ^^ 



B C! CS CS C 


















,5'-i 



O' f' f .-■ ^ hr 



;<:-upoS 






■ :ii t« 



!>. 






S mS-^ G ?- CC r- 

^ 5 K .2 ~ k.^ .5 
.^ ^ ^ . -*- ^^ 0^ ^ 



^ " ,— 'r ^ "H. ^ oJ 



--0 



^ :5:W 



&;SS:E 






.S5 ft- § cs oo o £ 



o :W 



^S- 



:S^: 















O a) 



"3 ^ 
•c; cs 
o o 



5 c o 

3^o 



O 3 

a:trl 



o c 



I'c = = " 
i c - c i? 



5 «'te 

30W 



rxIS: 



- is: 



s : •■:§ 



16^ :&< rfc,: - i&h" ifci 



:s ::s IS ; ; ::s 



J 3 






feoS^mS 



bo— <scft5o£Sc^ 



aS:Hq[doc 






• to cr. o o 



^ 00 CO Cl l^ rH 



ICOCO -COCMiO-^ .»CCOi-OOiC 



•M cc a-, o 31 lO (N «> — I o CI CO t — I- cC' en c/!' "-I C) ic 
1^ X CD 1-^ ic -r cc GO i^ c^ "^ 1^ i^ as t^ t-- to c/T' i^ 'TT 



* ■ =s *^ — 



a: ^ : a) 2 -;« 









X r-H O -i-H X O 



C) CO CI Ol lO Tf* f^ 
>0 «CX t^ X' CO <o 



I Tl^ iC ■ ^j f^- l^ l^ Ci ■• 



"3 p 









- :? j: - = X a: J K 






( ^ ,-H >-, r-< -H ,-H -H CJ Cl CJ C^ C 



o 



m 

Eh 
<1 
H 
Q 






3 


O . 


^a 


^3 O 








^'^ 


« 


(U 


CO 



paAiOpiAi 



•joioo 



•eiumaj 



•8[BM 



•SjiBQ 



•sqiuoH 



•SJB3X 



O) 



p r/ a c3 ■ rr 
'^< g . CrH^ beg 

Jj tn^Pn^T' oj S * ^ 



o O 



KW 



C c C X ^ S 1 










ago 



:i O '-' a^ S ■» 



« ^ ^ 
ci o o 

? wi=^ n > » 
; o c^ o o o 



- 2 C O tH 

c 5 S o o ^ 

— C 60c s P O 

£ =; = 5oco 






S^- S 









oi o'S gp; o s CB <^ 



«J 



'5'. S^l' 






2; 

cS c'C ** 









Q a> Q-' 0^ 






=:- S: 



:kS- = &::S- 



^S 



S: :s :s : : :s: - iS 



: o oi 



. r^ 1^ cc . T-i o 



. Cl CC C^l CTi "^ 



^ g C £ ; 



r- OD GC »o 



• C^ r-< CC- iC 01 • CD r 



CO C^J O O I-^ CO -^ GC O iC 1-^ r^ en lO 
1^ r- CO -^ ^ CO t^ o 1^ CO o r- iC' 1^ 



«3 S 



e3^ 






•iiGi-aTBa 



O M«^ 

tH--- CD OS 

■13 2 M C 
O g-C C 

o o^-r ^ 

t-H ^ Cl CO 



<1> t- 0) o 
>r 2 =« S -^ 






~ c s s : ■^■^■^B. 



;!DeHc5-«^x:S 



ci^ t^ 0-. cr. c 



.o o o — I — o 



H (N C1(M CO 



j2 c O O — 



S -i o C o ~ Oj 






^ cS 1 



•S-iSf^.ftS 






f) c^ ^ ^ 






t^ o 

pa o 



CC! C 






mSSSn-l- 



* o ! 



p; -^.y si 









c <1> 

on 









■Ceo 2"^ 
5 g oS cs 



o : 3 o 



'03 'CQ 



: c : :s <i> 



''■?;: . • ci g .«^ ^ 



:Q5r. ??-^"«" 



oO 






:r>"r r.aa 6^ 



^ a; O 



o^rij^^ 



w<:ho I ".^<C!i-X<o< 



t-i '^ u 

CC O 

o a o 

C C C 



S ^oJSw -S '^'' s 



^: : : : : : 



=2 a. o a 0'-3 
i;*^ o <t o o 






n3 rri.^.'^ a; 



:e cS^S 



S ;s:: 



:s : :s— : ;s 



^ n ^ ' 



L'^ 



fez 



"o s o 2 CO 
cs'3 o H o cs 

ca.S o'^ o cs 



o o ; 



a> CO o ^ . CO o --o 

(M IM C-l C-l • rt — I M 



. c ^ 



C >v cs : 



t^ i-H Oi CO lO CO CO C^ 



X y? x - iO T-t i^ 35 1^ 



o c; I 

c o I 



«b&c'a|g3|M^^^ 






rt . -TCO 



3i 






«r^w 



-;a. 



.W~ oo;2>-=.^K-; 

Sgc3f;5^i3-S-!3Gb^:Ot£n 

^^OQcu<lS^SZS%cuSaocdo 



^r-t'^LOCOO^aiOC'lCl 



lO CC' C^' CC— -* CO -r 11" o 1 



^ ,1h ^ ^ ^ ^ rH ^ c-i c I n ci c-i c^ 



<1 



-O t>i cS 



--O <D aj ■;: n3 <i L, S 
bHP a KC 53 o «« 



c 
: o . . 

:.S.-o 



*H _, Q; 






§1 ■ P — a< 

^w^isSg^Mo-s 

fe=:2<u*KS5:x«i3 
= 13 o 5?l5 t-^ cS s5 



o =■=:« =s 




ffia;- 


;m .'CHo^w : :o 


s"'^ 


■ ^- Sa'Sw^- 


^■: : 




^ : 




:S= 


= \\^' i :^ 


;;;;:>:;;:: 







:?2 :g : : : : :0 : 

. oj . . ■ 4) . • . . • 

^OooJOitleiO OJO 

gcsoo-ia.c»cgo Zo 

05 ^ l^ CC . CC . l^ -f iC CC 

r^ ci • • -co • ^ ^H o OJ 

r- ^ . X' O CC CC CT. ^ — t- 

: ^ g : : '■ A i^ a '• '• 

■g.^ : : :o2o : : 

<^ CU<0 • ■ • S iH ^ • • 

* c3,5 :« >-..s =?.Sj3 : 
j^H<l[^S< ; ai J S ►^ 



I 
>^ 

I 

m 

W 

Eh 
< 

Q 



Or 



05! G (- CS 






►-, h:i O ;^ W K te <l 



■ 5 • ■= 






St 






■? ^' a^ g ;i , ou 




«^ r- G tH ."c oj ez: ■=: 
_^_W^^J^£_l<fa C H Q « ^ K ?: < 









K 2. HJ Q cc 






•pOMOpiAV 

JO ' pau 
-.reta'gfsiiig 


^ 
"2.2 


Moioo 




•8[BOTaj 


02 


•9IBW 



.\ii ■ "^ . 0) r^ ^ 



: 0) : " 

. Oj =^r:' 



:trlcSffitf 



•Sii'Pd 



]'^^- 


■Mx^- - 


1 :^- s^ 


£^: ::::::::::::: : 




:eiJ: •■ • 


• -aJ • "r" 


• • • • ' ^*^ 








- - :»Si- 






■ ■:•.:.■.:::, :^ ':': a 



'P <^'p 



-fTcs : 5^ 



1 cK c-S 5 ^ 



-c o "^ h 



•stnuoj\[ 



■sjKa^ 



•iter— 9»TJ(T 



OS CC o , „, 
o > c eS o- ^2 

C o = C S' C S— fe ..„„ 

01- ■ _^ ■ ^ ,M . . ^ . ^1 . ^ A, ^, 



• C^ -co •■MM 



■X • >-H^ CO 



• CO ^ O ■ O ^ 00 !C o 



^ 1'^ to CO • db I 



I ^ "u O I ^ b c .i 3 ~" ^ S tc ai 

jo^ I a,y>s;^c — t-; .^ K :^ c 






C-c !-■ >- C ^. 

CC OJ CC ^ OJ cfi 



4^e 






o O) t, ■ ,- • O 

O f-i c.~ 



be 



O 



> C ct 


> 5 






? ^J 




OJ-C 3 




ti ?■' S 


rV sr 




5 ? oi C 3 
1? M 03 << 








i^ 






:!5 






•Tl 






• a 


073 ca 


^ 


■ 
: 0) 


C 0- c 






s cS 


<D C 




OaOZfiq 


CO 











: c :~ 

. OS • ^ 

• s'g o 



:'/:':s- ^ 



C0-.S<iCCCC00)OMC0-q-Ti.LO-vC^05 — 
.-lT-l>-li-(iHr-(MlMCmM(MC^IM^OJM 



>': 




















fe.' 


fc: 




fe 


::s 






S- 








c 















































"C „• 




c 


cs _■ 














c 


T- 




■J. 








rf 




■4-> 


C IS 




CL 


6C 


CS 


--/.' 


1^ 


-<» 


CL, 


1^ • 




1^ 










• 01 


T-H 


CO . 


^ 


-T 


:il- 


t^ 


iC 








■.3^ 










c ; 










: 





: ^ -i-^ 



c:^_c 



: c^ 






i- O 4) g- \2 

-< b. 5J ^ C O >J 

I— I "^ ID «D CC GO CO 



^ o 



irgent 
F.Ke 
th. 


tu ;:: t- 




CJ 1 >. 


S Ca= 




n 3 03 

.So-? 



■ o" • '-' - _ 

o ^"/^^ = o c 
N ^ /. rn ^ fcd - 



-t;;s-:?^j-;Gja3 :;:?s! 




o a 



^ * O J 

•^ H a "^ •— '^ 



>^^ 1) 



S'-fr o =a g 



5 £ i 



•gJ22x§?.S • fi- 
ts g.ti:-^— oli^ 'Os?^ 



.2 a^ 
O-ffi 



a o 



:aJ jS 



S 2. rS - 









M^:s^s -'s'^Sa^s^ : :;§■ 



:S ;s :s- 



:s \^^■ 



2 :^ : 



'.'^ 






0J&.^?.0 ^aQa>^PHO 



- --^ o CCiO c-i O) ■ c^ C-l C'J .-H 



cc -;?* ::ri c^ o 









;^ JhnCu •n:'"^''^ c" '3 ^el<f■^t- 



c> O". o ri ci -T ' 



; iC i-t' O Tl -f i-O lO :D O «0 t^ Oi 



H^rHi— ii-Hr-ii— ..— IC^)CJC^1C^C^I{M(N<N<N<M 



t-3 






o_- -■ o b s 






;::: i-.-rr— o '-' "2;=; 



— '^ a 



o S 



-t; S S yj tJ S <; 73 eg O CJ P^ - <g 



:i cS t< 
"== S 



••;'cS;g-;o' ; 

: h.s H " oj^j) : : 2 • cs :-?, , 
z -13 • r/j'c!^;- 0-0 G"'- ci^ i 

,<"^'i-3ai'-icaii-''^'=Jii-)si 



^ „ ^h^ 

"S . c S E ° - c 









:0K^-5gS-.SgSE: g 






cj C ^ ^' ■ OS = S 






• f_. l^ w ^ w 

.ii X c a. c 
: u a o s o 



C a* 



SWcuOh 



. . O . . a; . 

iJ ^ q -co • 



c/r'S^Qx'^: a';g: cc'^ 



SS 






.2 8 

-O IT 



^'/^^ 



S [IS- 



IS J^ 



o o" 
9 f= 



5? o s-y sw 



■'S is 



:e:^ 



S: 



^-C 5,:i C-C O • c-C 



Wo 



C". 1^ o ic t^ y3 CO 1^ o i^ r-^ 



HCOCTiOCO^Oil^TMi-H' 



1^ -Tf CC' cc 



to O -.0 lO 1^ 'rf 1-- 



5 02 ^ OJ CO =0 -r ■-! 



c8 a3 P ce£- 



c C. > ^^ .S - 



rf : 3 <u' 

:'E, £;''^'r;.; 



- -c S c 2; S - 
: o ^ es .~ rr ■ 



■5 I OS Sh S 

=0 ^ ,t! — 



eci • 



o) >o t^ oc cC' X X r.H CO CO' -7< 01 o o o to t^ 1^ 05 o 



C^l CT 0» CI C4 C-l O CO 



5*^ 



E-1 
CQ 



<j 
I 

m 

ffl 

Eh 
P 





«M 






























I 




o 








s> 


J3 


t.1 




Su 


^^ r^ ./ - 

o.S sSii 






a ® 




P o 




_: . cs^ o ^ c 
~ S^ OS c sE 




13 a 












'C a S ^ c 'Z £ 




g 


c&fcfc: 






g 03 OS OS 






(H* 






0) 






















m 














tH 












.a 
+3 


g : 




d 




. w 0.. c 
"C P. 




; : 1 




ea 


-S 0) 


;n j^ 










^ C.^H „ O O 








o 
® 


Milton Bing 
Jacob Fento 
0. Edward F 
Daniel Shine 
Benjamin R 
Elijah T. Lo 


James Keid. 
Bryant Sym 
Nehemiah S 
John Richar 
John Duff . . 


(2 2 

£1 
























^ 












aj 




cn 
















<l 












o 


^1 • ■ 


S> 


13 




•c 






13 




s 




cc 


o"^ 


C t. 




S2Sgg^ 


a: ;:: 


■C cS 


■r; o 


,a 




S S 5 £ os 


o-j 


2£ 


5: O 


Ul 




JSHCwsao 


rxS 


OfO 














OJ 






• 


























O 
































C! 






crt 


























































Ph 


« 






0) 




















































fa 


|2 

hJrH 


VV inchest 
Ireland . 
Rumford 
Loudon . 


cc 

_eS c 

o-j 

.^1 




a 
c 


■C 

1 




a 

■c 

a 


O 

g 




a 
































o 
































































































si 










0) 


£ 


















S 
























o 












rfi t^ ' ^ 


■o 


S 




a 










Si 


^ 2J fe S 


^ 


















.— cS cS 08 


(D 


cS 








H 






Wv- 


o-jeHfo 


cd 


^ 




•pSAiOptM. 










a 
o . 


JO p 8 I J 


pj: 


:a'=:S- 


- : &:S^- 


^ 


-jBra'atSuig 














•o o 


•joioo 


^-. : : : : : 










«^ 


•811!IU9J 


fiH :&:,:: : 


::::&,: : : 




















• . 1 




•aiisH 




S 








s 






^= 1 




^" 
































































t-i 
































































-Q 
































ttH 






























o 




-r 




>> 






^ - • 












fe:^r 


^. 


-r C 




• 5 ■ ® 

C E IJ Org 


^ : : 

p-H 




&I 


S2S- S^ 


5i5-2i|£: 






C 3 C C 3 
(XI U O CS o 


Solsiis 






i-IHO OJ 


a K -< t- ^ o o 


ai 

SB 


•bXT!a 


S'^'^S -rS. 


61 gi^*^ isJ^'-S 


•sinuoxv 


o • 


o^r.-^i- 


lO l~ cc (N -to 


'"' 


•SJU9^ 


CCi-o' 


-■ -^ lO t^ CO 
C~l 0> 'O lO 


1^ 1- c) -f o en . 
oo in CO [^ 00 oo 


? 




«w 














• • c • 












o 
















: : o . 












<D 
















: t-S : 










































3^ 


C 




L. 




■o • cS 




Pl 1 




SI 

00 o 


^§2 


pq«H 


"2 

2 


■CO > 








W ii fe a;' C r i i^ 


JSaPo:St?3 






Mar 
Leai 
Mar 
Mar 
Har 
Ella 
Wal 






'A 


Spc^^^^l 




•ii6i— 8i«a 


rH 


COi 


^OO 


cc 


cc 


O 


CO 


C(- 


0-. 


c^ 


ci 


C4 


c^ 


CO 


1 







. u 










nowles 
illivan 

Baker 
leelock 

VVaIke 
hute. 
uchon. 
ireau. 
rother. 


lief K 
Hie Si 
ma C 
cy Wl 
3an B 
ncy S 
ry Tr 
uise J 
B 


Oj OJ rr, 3 3 03 K o 


K^^C-^crj^iS^-) 1 










: c— : 








C '. 


.s : 


a^s •££>: 


cw 


oj^ feuj''. >-.>^i2 


Jo.sepl 
Howa 
Shadr 
Lewis 
Charl 
Georg 
Elisee 
Anthr 
Peter 


































a 
























t-..5 


lA 










■^ -s 












^ Ot3 ii-C „ 








S ■ o ffl o -o 


.S oi o o o: s:: : 


c rr c c c c 


cS O O 03 O oS 


O^OJO o 






cS 




























^ 
























^ 




c 










3 


■ o_ 






S c o go V 








cs £ o a) o 03 






























































t^ 0) 
















w> J 


'SS 






<D tH 












■■^Xi 




._ O a; 


'^ rf. 




na oi 


MhJ 


^ 


M^'SJS 


S'=» 


.^- 


'' 


fc ifci: : : :fa i 


■^S' 




s- ;s 












<y '■ 












^& 


>1 










U^ 


j;^ 










•— cS 










IS::::: S.S 


So SJ 


^.— iCic-Mcr -^ccco 




. rCl- ^ 3-. C :c O ^ 








'^B '■ '■ • r„ 








2 S- • a; c : 






tche 
McL 
orril 
1 .. 
.Dal 
Vilki 




cs • s -^ a -* P c o 




D:r^ = — tt'-cScs 


a :S S W K C -^ H 


w 


C4 !M 


C-l 


CI Cl 


-r 


-3- 


cc 



5S 

O (3 



;5g -5 . bi^.^ 



»:;$ s w -^ o w ■< a s cc : 



Harvey H. Colby 

Arthur Banks 

John I. Woods 

W.Stanley 

Andrew C.Thompson. 

Gilman Bickford 

David Clifford 

George P. ('hase 

David Mardcn 

William B, Nichols.... 

Charles B. Berry 

Horace Moore 

Thomas Cm its 

William G. Flanders .. 
Joseph Le Moine 


:::::.:::::: bi : : 
::: 'i :::::: :k :-^ 






•^^ c o ^ 5 o 



• ^ CD C o C— X 

: W M ►_;>'. K - •_ ; 






c --^ : 

c o t- £;=:.=: 









c-5: 
^ s i 

x5: 



O 03 O 
02=2 



^-^ 



5 -^ o '^ r 



; o 



O OJ 5 



j; .;; O 3 c 
— ffl OS o 






Charlotte Nason. 
Lucy A. Gove. 

Nelson. 

.iudith P. Johnson 
Hannah M. Georg 
Mary J.Ferguson. 
Eliza Kimball. 


Olive W. Wallace. 
Eunice Sargent. 

Jane . 

Rosalie Gervais. 






Ige 

orse 

Willard 

1 

th 

Healey.. 
h 


: : : :'o 

- • • • c 

C;-2 '■ "S 





05H 


Retired 
Farmer 
Brake m 

Housew 


S^S': 


: - 


M- 


5^S«;C:§': : 


^: :::::::::::: : | 


jfe : 




ii : 


f^; : :fc- - : 


s ;s 




:S 


■:s= i ; :s 












:::::::::... &i . : 
: ■.::::::: : >:5 : : 


0) - si 

^ CO 


fcc§ E 
a ^ -s 
M '-^ t 


■S 
Jo 


• - s -■ c '^ s 

iliilil 


S^^ 


3 ■. - 


^r CO 


ij'fiz; :cl?i : 


Oil- rH 


3: ■ -r 


t--^ 


— — ut . ^, . -M 


S?5.>il 


X C-l — 


i^ CI 


X I^ O X O iC CO 
1~- O -M -^ -^ [- 







1 -^ 1^ I^ .— lO O I 



I C-1 C) C-l O C^ CJ CI OT 






.S.c-!i •'C'C 



S ^ " S o bo 






2 ? -*-' '^ ^ *— • - V. - -n 5 
.2 o •« :s =3 c • : .t; = ; ci 

_c :::::::;:: . 

a :::::::::: : 

r« (!>••• 

0/ 0) ■ " • 

S oj O . aj ■ 

. . . a, . . a— . J- o 

c ■ • --r^ '^Sm 5> 

gS • t; c = -5 o . S 5 o 

Hoj :Q:ag-o.ap::p.xa 



:s :s= 



■ W O 



1 tH-C r- 



c_2 o c 









Q 


a: 


:j 




> 


s 


H J 


5: 


K<JO 


- 


IM 




^ 


n: 


'C 


'^ — 


M 


. X -r 


X 


CI 


Cl 


CI 


X 


;: 


C CO 


— 


. «M 


.? 


CO 


_ 


p: 


X 


9 


w?? 


;? 


ir: r- lO 





















O 5 



J= « 



; ; ! be a; ! .in ■ ; ' I 

:^ -.S bo ••^■^ rS : 

i^ c 'O ic o -r -r- .c ^ 

^ ^ ^ rt rt Cl CI Cl CO 



P3 

O 



^11 

5 fc. c -.S 

C Oj 3 c *^ 
"1 'Fc CC •" ►< 



o » S H-l H 



■ a; 



O) 



■^3 p fc, 5 d 

^ C cc ?^ s 

£ ^£: So 
S W o cc ^ 



<U ? ^ ."O 
aj be t-c— a 

K M ?■. B o 



C ;: C 
a> rt C 
"S f- O c3 
OJ be c— s 

MpdoWO 



s ;s 



S ^S :S 



c 
ce 






6^ 







a) 


(D 
J2 


c 


•cS 





-^-*i 


<H 





CI CO 'j'1' m 



I 

H 
pq 

> 
O 

I 

K 

Eh 
< 

Q 







Abigail Roberts. 
Margaret De.sniond. 
Aram'ntiaE.Philbrick 

Laura . 

.'^arah Eastman. 
Rebecca Perkins. 
(Uara E. Woolridge. 
VenaE. Holt. 
Susan Sanborn. 
Alniira Haskell. 

Charlotte A. West. 
Margaret Herring. 
Mary A. Tucker. 


1 


'.a '■ '. • "5 .^' , ' • • '■ '■ ' ? 

? o «^ c = '^— "- S ^^ C '^ « - 


1 

o 
<» 
o 
cS 


o 


•••••■• 0; ••••• i 

;- : : :-« :>-^ : : : : :| 
^' : : . o : - c :^; ^h : : : = 

cs-c • =* S g 5 i S S : : : « 
•^ c j-^o o o^^ o . . :© 

.^i'5s nSSO c o j 1 i g 




z : : 1 ■ i'^- • 2 : : : : : 

cst: -St; = fe ?- o ^ ■ • ■ u 

•c = <"Sc°°?;c=s : : :o 
<l^S<p_iW<:Sw : : :o 


_o 

ft 

o 
O 


: ; ! : ! 1 I ! : ; : : ! to 

•■;■••••••;;;£ 

'.'.:'. .;■.■.:::'. S 
.2 ■::!::*-'::'*-in 


o 
o . 


•pe.ttopiAi 

J O '\>9U 
-.I'BlU'3[3(llg 

■jopo 


s^ - jss i lis— - = ^ 


^: :::::::: r :: : 


•aitjinaj 


fe: :::::&:;:::::: 


•ai^M 


: ig: : : : ig: : = - = 


O 

m 
o 


f^ ig --g : ij : i : i^ i 

.. ii . o ••«••••■ ■ 

i: P 6 ° = : c '^. ?- - >^- o ^ o 
<5 .r X S :^ _ _ Y. :. u: ^ :a cK o 


a5 

< 


■SJiVQ 


g : JJS"^^ •'rl'i-lri-^ :^ 


•sq!;uoi\[ 


:rv . X o •■': uo . r-i t — — x^ ■ -^ 


■S.IB8A 


?SS :t5S :'"Sf2i^Kf-!S 


O 

ii 

CO o 


'. '. '. I . '. 'n '■ • *^ . * . i-t 

3-;,Ph- r-t-^ 1—'"* C3|-, 




•iI6i— a^BQ 1 


,-1 rt ^ f-H C~l C-I C-J CI (M C-l (N CJ CO CO 



P3 

O 
Q 






5 hoc S*^ . 

C K^~^ " N S-l 

K 55 "; o K w w i«=i 



: : -^ :S -J-g 
S .^. SwcSiroo 
•£cz«§ .«£^ 

■5 o=p J— u S SB 



: -r o M o .; 



:5 c^i; o 






•a 



ii i, .7 h =5 

.^:: 5 ■" o cs ^ o a; 
fa » < O U IZ B Oh 



o ® 
o g 



ccSco- S 



o ij o 



IS^S 



■.Of 



:fc( 



^^2 c 2 1 S |. 

.5 S'S 55 o cj 
fa -/. <; ^ «^ c — 



rC^,"^ 






tM » 



3il°&illl 

-I* :<Dfa*^^CL 
■J^ rn^ a$ , a Si r3 

OJ Cl ^0 X GC O ^- CO CO 



> tn 
O M, 



■ i2 O S ^ 0) 0-' 






S > .i? « W W <! S hJ S <! 



>=c 



-c^ '^ 't;; ^ C' 5 
a^ 1=^ c c -tt 2 
sh o; E a. ." -5; 
O 2^ t. t^Pn 3 
g^^Ofa » O 

W kJ S -o _g ^^ 

^ o) fS .5 ;i -^ 

S 5 O 3 C C 







■ <D 


c 










fi^T^ 


OS G 


■ ■o 

■ c 




i5SS 


M 

n 0) 




Vn 








?-:; a? 




14 


s s 

5.S 




ffl 


1 m^'$ 



-i; : c= 



• • -2 • • • 



•r ^ g r- S E 



• • S « • -S^^ i 

^"CTS bo U p r; U.H r- < 

1> cc CQ <; o > CK K H c 



■ Elh . . . 

'M : : ': ': 
;&^ ; : : 

:.3^^ : : 

: S c 8 c : 
: a. s o g 



: cs 



- S c ti 

I.U &< i-j o 



ij 5:^ 8 S.S t^ * S o o r^SoSii 













:2a 


• CD • ■ • 






: ; i> 


.2 

3 



Granite cutt 
Housewife . 
Granite cutt 
Qen'l Agt. I 
Housewife. 


' u ^ '■ 

<dS .■ 
3 ^l-Ci 

S ^, £ 

is oS 

oKcd 


i * 

: <i> 

: 
:M 


. . M 

• • C 

: • 0) 

;.££ 

:cd« 



:S '■%■ ^- S- ^Ss: :&: '"S.- 



^: ::::::: i ::.::::: : 


^ : 


fa 


-- - 




^ : 


jfc: 




fe: 




fc]: 




■S 






:^' 


•S' 




:^" 




:S' 




■:s: 






cc 



















05 '■'A '•2> 



MU 2 fc, •/! QJ X 

K o <! o S c ffi c B^ : 



UJ 



oco 


IOC) 


. CTl I> CO X j^ ■ 1.0 « C^l •£> • --^ f- 


. 


;:i;=i 


. CT. r-J M 31 . r- . OC GC. rH r-. . tC "S" 


g 


en r- 


• O' -r (M "X CO C^ -f iC T-i . r- iC' 

• iC iC 1^ i-t t^ I^ iC t^ ■ X cc e^ 



:::::: t.; c i:"-: S 0) :: : 

tS 2s^ « os= g c SI'S S^ l^g-c 
►2KW| I £Hg£>gSM JMtf^g4 £ 

coco I' l^"[--"^ ^ OJ *1 Ctiib lO t- r- OC' CC' O O r-( 
,_-(^^^^C^(MC^C^]C-lC<IC^IC^!N(NC^COCOCO 






CO 







^ 




a 




<i) 




o 

<D 
P 


H 


^n 


1— 1 


a 


M^ 


73 

ri 





<D 


W 


U 


H 


fi 


H 


>* 


<1 


T) 


H 


^ 


yj 


-P 




O 


w 


PC! 


<1H 


HH 


m 


ffi 


d 


02 


o 


^ 


-43 


^ 


<j 


■id 

CO 


ffl 


fl. 

I-I 


^ 





H 


2 


^ 


tf 




PL4 















c 
c 












OS 

J3 


>; 






c 

c 






« 




a 








C^ 






C • cu «■ 


[1. 


.S Q.i=i '- 


■J-l 






Co 






be 


-^8 ?| 


K C t- fe 

5^^ 


< 


p 

CS 

5 




J3 






: 




; OJ 














"oj 







1; 




: is 








g 
S 




O4io 













:1J 


:o : 
:a; : 




Z; 




£ 5 S 


: ffl !-. p > .5 


;h 








S c 


■ i 


:5 : 








C^ in 


:°^|3e^ 






-^ 


OHC 


\^ 


:^ • 




































:£ •• 








































h 










,G 


















■> 


• x: • 


































































. a 




































J3 


S 




X : 




: a 










b. 




^ 


; ',- 


. 03 ; 






























(4 










• -■ ^ 
















• ^ » 









• 




• ri <lj 




^ 









aJ cor 




. ts ■ 






^ : 




:kz 










Q 


WoS 




:z : 




































cS 














^ 


























































PL, 














C 




















• j: . 




Ol 




.£ ; 






s.- 










oJ 


>> 


C 
C 


'■> ■ ft • 








• 
■ 
vj : 

cs : 












a 










• 




• c3 0) OJ ;> 


^^• 






/: 


ee cS 


• cs • 0) • 








;z; : 




:Kz >^ 


C 






cu 


WHZ 


:q :z : 




d 
































^ 





















































OS 
























• 


"t 




03 






■ 0) C 


• ■ 












^ 














? <E C ' 
!D C S <1 


« 5 c S 


1 








• C ryj m ^ 

1.2 a p fa q 
x: t. s: t^ c 




























K'S.5ti 


XKJfc-Q 


P 




: :o^j 


ffi :fc:a 


-1;^ 


Cii- J 


5 


■p8A\OpiAi 10 


Ox5:S 


rn- s>- ty 




: : S': a^: ^• 


x'^: co: 




















c 



'S 

CO 




jotoo 


>-• : : 








: : 


• ■ = 


■aiuniajj 


&.': :& 


^ : : Ifc: : 




Ifi^: :&;: : : 




'.'i^ : 


■^i^n 




: -^ 


:S'' = 








:s : 


;s 


• : -S: 




:2' 




J3 










is J 












:j-i 




£ 










































.■-c 


■ • p^ ""■ 












r- . . 




'~ 
































«+-i 














• C^H 


3 ^ 


ft 











:|i 








£ :? 


(J'' 


;: 











^r.t 


c • « 2 Ox, 
m-C Q,CQ c3 ; 


c- 

T 


3 ' cS fc 


^.:s- 


i- 


: :S ■'O 




s 




>•- ' 1 


-.E > P >'i^ ; 




- • oS K ? 






> ?-i5 








C ^ 1^ ^ 


^ C^ ^ C r^ :- 




S • 3- 5 c 




^ "" 










:zS«z 


isztczt:^ 




[i. :::c-ZLiH:= 


'_ - 


ZCfc 


bo 


•SjS13(I 




;0 ... ?0 ■••;•■; • 


•sqiuoj^ 






TT . . . . . . 






nr 


•sjBa.\ 






" 




t-H •- 






-r Tf oci 


; f- « •^^ cc ti 








i^ r~ 



































a 








a 




























j= 








^ . 








f ^ • 


















bo 








eS'C 






'■*^ 2 *"' 










CD ^ 


t:j= 


c 






en 1^ 




8 ;5| 


c S'S 


C 




t 
c 
a: 


-St 




111 




22 : 
;J°b. 




S 

55 




f^ a - i. 
'32 > _ 

5? « a •> 


|l^-S^c- 


■> 


■? . ^ .- . t^ 0) QJ ,,- 


c c 
a; c 


DCS Pl-l 








,_ ^ 1^ ,, 






i^i^i- — — —.-- — — 


— ir 


-^ I^ -H 














^ ^ CI ?? M ^ 


^H ^H 


T— > r— 




•itei- 


-ajua 


c 






.^ 




^ 

S 








« 
























fe 










s 



Lf ,-03 go Mo 

i S I a; o3 c3 • °S 

-^ '^'^ it ^ O >: '^ 



5"W 



be c 
C-- . 



• tJ, C o t, be 



1* .^ M " 






2 o-S S CSS c'Si^ 



to 





fH 


h o3 




0) 


aj > . 




TD 




II 


0) 


3 O Oi 


o 


P3Q M 


t/,'cn 




«tS- 






.2 be c 



hJW 






5 :^||h5| 
o :oh^hw ^o 

S : C-= O Ow O; 
&H . p-H W -5 '-5 I* -5 s 



OS 



. a; a: 
■ Oh g -.' 









>* cr • -^^ .t; r- ^ — 






55e :£ 



^►?«5 



--^a)5Mofafe:'^cS 






O R 

s s 

4 2 
CO CO 



ZP!mE£° 



on 

O CD 

>z 



O X o — ?^ 



E5 



-XI ^ « T.rr>, 



'C2 



„ Cj be E- . _ ■ ^ 



611 cui; '"O 
■43 .a- > o_5 
O S a^ cS £ 



: . >. 

■ S g o 
••3 tH o 



3S>-H 



c ; -^r 5 c -S _^ o .5 J « 
Sic S.BSgoagS 




■ •- ■ .t: cu 



ffili: 



_ a 2 a^ S c 

— 2.^ O !h s 
S M J '/i El, O 



.^ o » o c Is 3 •- S £ ^ 



be o s- 

t- eS cS 



aiS>-- - S': S::S": «^: S> :SQM:^>K^St^^:S>Sw 



S^ - oiQ: t/:'S" " ^<^'S 



: :^ : : 


: :fa :fa : : 


ifc': : : 


ifa : ."fe: 






::&;::&; :fa : : 


s": ;s- - 


= :^ ;s: 


: : :^: 


- '■:^'- : • 


:S- - - 




: : :s: :^ ;§: 




: : : : • :g 






'. . . . 


. . . c . . 


oJ : : : : : p : : : 



•,M •i;.;^ a 



31 



cS'OWO'S'OajSH'^^Oc'SWa' 



do 



Q 't: :,■ z -^ 2: C ". -^ ^ -i o C .:: si z i:; C C S q :s 



; ^ oj c; w cS O - 






: : : : fS 


• (u ; 


■Xi J= • 


a 

bury 
. Ma 


:g : 


amps 
nt .. 
ton . 

?y . 

ster. 
amps 


v; cS^ -t 


■ a> a- 


? fc. r; v. cS - ^ ;, 




1/ •« S S ^ a- C 


C ■:_ <-. Q — 


■ \j '~J 


Z>SpiacZC 



3'3 



COiCC/JO*X)'MI>I>aiOOcDCCCCOcCiOOOa:^l-^l-*--f^ClC 



to lO -^ 00 to - 



</:ooiccir^ccocioy3r^iOocci--T'ai 



1-- ^ iC CO 1^ 1^ CO t^ t-- iQ 'TT' ^ CO t^ CO f^ gp -M i030r--l>^aOU7'iOcOt^'^iOCOt^Tj*'^tOt-^l-^ 



•5.2 
c *- 



be a a^ • 

CuM • 

OM =« 

> H5 

-^ • &-I 

<; ^M . 

3j <:<z 



■ «.— 

; >>.c o; 



■s .•;ii :•!: 






55 so 5"? 



*^£ C 



= sSt:S^- 



a-''PI, 

fax: 



isj-g 

0.5.5 



be tH.,-.i3 






>>~sS ■;? 



c.2i 



;a;^ 



x5:°s'S^S:^-g5KcS 



:S^^^^faoQ- -^^ 



c3« 



r=s:iSr=bi' 



5 bt 



/:; t^j3 c ,^ o 



£i-<:[a^j[x;S^ScdccKZ 



^ CO ic -43 cc o c: CO '^ I ^ X a-. : 

.-H rH r^ ^ cm (M C4 CI CI C4 



1- CO -r to -r cr o .^ rH CI CO -f ■>j' 1^ cr. 

rH i-t rH CJ .C4 CO CO 



O Oj 
i-:i- 3 
— CO 



o 

I 

hi 
<1 

Eh 
I— I 

CQ 
O 

w 

H 

<J 
Eh 
CQ 

H 
I— i 

I 

02 

w 

H 


H 
P 





SH 






















































S> 




O 






c 






A ^J '/^ 


c 


^ 




CO 
'3 


ry E. Smith. 
— Bourey. 
ra Bonner, 
nila Harrisoi 
zie Ouyer. 
ah Maxwell. 

ry . 

na Benson, 
ephine Varet 

ry A. Flande 
ry Robbins. 
ry Austras. 
ry Clarke. 
3y Finch. 

ry Richardso 
bie Murray. 

lla . 

ry Corliss. 

n Campbell. 

ra . 

en Mills, 
an Cooper. 

ma C. . 

die Adams, 
zabeth H.To 




csl eSS'^pcScS eoneicci 


= .0 i; n 








S<; aS 


<5KaW<W 




:-< 
























C 
















C 




'■ 




o 

s 


T -7 

c _ 


f= S oj H 


eorge I.cavitt. 
eals Anderson 
hillip Marcoux 

aac Vytli 

'illiam Straw . 

. Lester 

dward Kenisto 
sborne Marsh. 


:« 

■■n 

: c cs 


fa 

c 


ir 
5 

s 


tiristopher Eat 
ihn Severance 
obert Rodger . 
iles Moorecock 
[artin V. Thurs 
imes F. Hobbs 






■Srs^^o-^xOZo-MS^uiWOPi. 


:<W 


►^Z 


:cco>^DCC<5-, 






























■ oi 




<D 




Oj 


































r- 




















































































•x: 




■■^ G 


.C 














® 























■ a 


Z 


• a "^ 


a 




a 






■~ '■ 




^ 


/4 








S 


^ t>3 


-23 


T 


• S -^ 


E 






o 


S 


O 
1 


tS C OS 

a.a c 


a. 


Sweden 
Vermon 
(lerman 
Weare . 
New Yo 
New Ha 


c 

c 
z 


'zS 


in 
z 


New Ha 
Bosca w 
Scot lan 
Engl an 
Nova Sc 
Westfor 








































































(H 








;-. ^ 




ti:.« 






'~ 


























■^ 




* ')- 




•~ rt 




"^ > 






4I. 


Ph 


Ph 
























■j\ 




• '•J' 




V} ^^ 










— 




Is 


c 


c 


-c 




a: 






Z 




-ill 








Si 

c3 a 




aS 






s 








£^S=a>S 




: -x.S 


feE 


• £ <^ <D -lS 






O 01 ? O cS 


ni: S oS 0) ° I) K 




• 0) * 


0; s 






o>^3:3 


oxScffizz 




:zs 


Zee 


:i:zcMfaSZ 




a 
















S 
















■ (1) 


CJ 










o 






























• > 


















































































































• o3 


o!*J t^J 






a 

O 
O 

O 


mestic 
usewit 
mestic 

rpente 


Eh 

a 


c 




.* ^ 

- E 


■« 






= 511 

= <^ C fc 






O C O :^ 


ca :« • s 0.-, 


■ aS =s 




•~ csr-£ cc a 






CX=> a 'El-H -ffiMZMG 


•fain J 




•SfaSSjfa 




•pgMopiAv 












o 

r3 o 


JO 'psu 


s- • 0--- SS^^S- - 


Kp: 


Sg:S 


a;? 


rs^xs: k: 


-JBtn'8[gUIS 












•joioo 


^: :::::::::::: : 
















CD 


•at-Binaj 


fa: : : .'fa : :fc :fa Ifa': : 


: :^ :^ 


: : :fa' :fa : . 


















•8IBW 










s 


S: 


S 


S 






5; = 


s 


S 


::::;§ 


%■■ 




5 










• r 






s 




r 






? 


• a 


a 
• c 




£ 








.c 




''.a 






o iJ > 


> 

- a 




a 
x: 
a 


averhill 
ermany 
opkinto 
chenecta 
ewmark 
ermont 


on way . 
nuthbroc 
arsonsvi 
nglantj. 
ew Ham 


•' s 

'■J 


c 
c 

c- 


enter Sa 
cotland 
ngland 
rownfiel 
orth Ha 






C'>--JG^j:ra!E^ExZ>- 


i;'xa.faZC 


^-J 


'^ ZIj fa EC Z 


6 
be 


•stnuop\[ 


2S 


'£ :~ 


Si : : : 2 : : 


. . rj iC • . 




■ JS -CN • « 


_,,.- 


: :■-' 


;i. :2 :"^ : : 


;;="';;• 




. . CO .f. 


•8.IB9j^ 


coo r- 


M^ 65 1^ 5r 


-X> T M Ct ~ 
iC C-) l^ 1^ '.O iC i~ ■> 


uc :^ 01 c^i cr c^ 


^»ou- 


Sg5i?iS 




"o 


































: i g c i 










— . . . 


























• • 5c • 








































5 ^ 


< 

3: 

'5 

c 
'. 


3 5 


Martha .1. Dickiiis 
Kliza A. Dustiii . . . 
Lewis .Jacques. .. . 
Carrie A. (Jarland 




> 
£ 

a 


, a 
• 1- 

-_Q 


a 
> 1 

a 


1 

c 
c 
c 


t- 


c 
p: 

1 > 






: c 
' t 

P b 


c 


Kva Severance .. . 
Ro1)ert M. Rodger 
Margaret Hutchii 
Clayton W. Thurs 
Philii) Hobbs 








*) ir ^ 


^- ,__,._ ^j — ^ 


f^ ~. ~ '-C v. ^ I^ c^ 










.-H r- C I - ) - 1 C'O 




■Il6l—Q%v.(j 


i 


tf 












•5 
3 
















5 


« 


















4J 

a 

CD 




=s g d 0) 






o-c-^ = - cS 
cS 03 J- -£ ., S g 

a,aSwz>o 






oi ?J a; o 



&. » ■" 



• s o 
:zffi 






c-i^ 



a).J. 

■3 o'" 



in-c 



a:' O 

3k 



lc^S~r2£K5;^£rx?y 



~ o , 
2 i o s 

■ C C 5j -s 

:!i:iili-3fa 



KS-' 



^S :Q^-xSxS: ^ ;5:Sk: :cS&S 



:§: : =:a;S5:7;:Sa;Q; 



:::&:.: 




s ■■s. 



^■ 



5S 

'r-t P bo • 



Hs 



o o^'^ ti"^ 2 '5^ ^5l 



^ •v. :i c c 5 oj 



S S S o o 3^ p.-;; S 3 3 OS '^ S^£ -S^' -"S o x^'S S? Sm SS i c =3 o'S c 0? 

• * • r-- . . . cr. Oi . . -TO . . . . -f . - . • c^ . . -T -^ CO LT^ i-^ c^ • c. . . 



id c-. -y. -f y. 



_ O -f lO lO 1-- O C-- o — 

-'r :o -^ ijo 1- i^ CO lO cc ^" 



CC O C^ -Xl M 



a. 01 CO -M o CI v^ oi CO o — r 



-J3 1~ Cl -i t~ I - vC -T O 






' ^ O CC' »C ^ Oi 



■£! 0) O „ J3^ 






sO ^ 



s 5 1, ^ ji: 






ca cs 3 

5ia 



O' o OJ t; '^ "^ " =^ « tn o.'S'v) £ &: 



1— I .-I rH C-I CJ C^ C^I OJ : 



• O O '-O to O r-~ Tt^ :0 OS CO -t< *0 O O O — " 



i-l i-H rH ,— I C-l CI M ■>] CI CO CO 



:'O-HC0t0OOC00CCCi0'X'X.— tr- 4-=t^tO^ 



^ ^ ^ .-( CI CI CI 



r-1 1— ' i-H CI CI C? C'l 



< 

E-i 
I— I 

02 

o 

tn 

w 
iz; 

H 
O 

!>* 

m 



Eh 
H 



E-t 
Q 



































*^ 


























OJ 




O 


^ _. d . E c 




CO 


Mary C. Tyler. 
Mary A. Wright. 
Marion Bean. 
Elizabeth Laliber 
Mary A. Weeks. 
Dorothy Emmons 
Leocarde Auger. 
Nellie Crosby. 
Sarah Whittier. 
Mary Syminton. 
Anne M. Dearbor 
Eskson Tekla. 
Cynthia G. Davis 
Jane Felch. 
Ludie A. Norton. 
Marie Ouilette. 
DeodolindaGioco 
Sarah F. Pierce. 
Edith E. Davidso 

Alice Attarian. 
Ellen Kiley. 

Eliza Brown. 

Flora Saunders. 

Josephine Luntta 
Elivira Hubbard 














; >-. 
























"ffi 








aj 


• ^ 


oj : 












Cy 


'."S 


'■ m : 




C 








^ 




■*-' . 












• c • 




r; 










gSjS \^f5 ;^Sg 

o^;:^^ .bcS^ -a-t-^? 


ams 
rgen 
onoh 
line 
Wells 
Kenc 


iVi 




b 


c 







o 

a 


an W. 
el W. I 
y Bow 
cois L 
Hill . 
Hasti 
k.A. F 
y L. R 
- Jamp 
am Rj 
rt Swe 
E.Car 
Cate 
L. Ad 

k B.D 
Santc 
ew J. 
ur M. 
Walsl 
impad 
s C. M 

Horn 
Brotz 
ael J. 
logers 
Samp 
llTay 




;z 


Nath 
Dani 
Henr 
Fran 
Levi 
John 
Fran 
Harr 

Willi 
Albe 
Carl 
Jesse 
John 
Amo 
Fran 
Tony 
Andi 
Wilb 
John 
K. .Si 
Jame 

Elias 
Otto 
Mich 

Jpff T 


4^ O) 






• n 






































: 




















































;.4 




ne . . . . 
a Scot 
iklin . 
ada . . . 
imond 


t: 


c 




ogl 


thwoo 
cord . 
tria... 
er — 
ada . . 
and . . 
lenia . 
cord .. 

Wood 
many 
. Islan 


^.2 


^ 






<u ^2 


■oosoSgEo :cS. 


cS 


S4-I 




Szifcaenm^^caQ 


>a;« 


Zo-ilCOt^^o -^oPh 


E5 


o 


a) 






:> 










c 
















c 




















En 


Hi -; 


ada. 
nard 
tol . 
ada. 
cord 
rfield 
tBos 


o3 ^ 


don. 
cord 
tria . 
f Lon 
don. 
and. 
lenia 
Isea, 

mont 
nany 
ter. 


oi 








c u.:^ a c oj 'Ji 




• s c -A =i c 'T c 03 • t< t. jj 






6^ 


cS cS t. fS O 0^ cS 




^:; C < Iz iJ .S <!; ■>OM 








ooapauoGw 


ccK 


feh-I 






oj 




• in 






















0.' 




















dj 




■ C 






















01 




















t>) 








































o 




■ ^ ^ 



































oj 










03 




















03 








































o 




(- a iH 




t; 




s^^ 


s 


?! • 


'C ^ ^ 


•O 




o 


K.S 








Es.bo 


tf 


c . 


.beg- " 








ci£ 


cS OS eii 

J c & o 


ffi 






oi 


=3 : 
J : 


03 So 


S 




•paMopiAi 
















-a 
a 
o 
w ^ 

-a© 

i'^ 

X 
<s 
CO 


JO p8U 

•jBia'ajSuis 


:s.x 


SC^S 


s: «; 


S: k: 


S 


s ;-^'s«-'s- ?: 


Q 


•joioo 


^: :::::::::::::::::::::::::: : 


•aiBuaa^ 


::::::::&: :: :&h' :fe ::::•&:;::&; rt :plJ 


■Qivyi 


g: :::::: 




s': = 


S 


s- = - - 


S': 


s 


^ : 




o 

o 

c« 


rn r- 


c 


. o 
■ a 

1I7 


a 

s 

c 

c 


r 


0. 


c 

c 

0: 


c 
c 


c 


a 


c 


S 








r 


c 


c 




1 = 


> 
C 
C! 


• c 

c 


c 
c 


•c 

;- 
C 
<:, 
C 
C 
C 


C 







oi;«-' = r-t;-rU!HW<iJO-5_^o: ; -pocso 


c g 05 'C«^ 




Pm 


C O o 03 cS t; 0) O a ni K o ° = O scgo 


= C S C 3 «; S 






•c: 0. 03 o^a 






< 


•sXbq; 

•siijno}^ 


CO • 
CI • 


'X 05 CO m 


ic cr- • C-. TP CO 


; ; t^ • C-. TT . . 


05 


COX' 


-:>< iC' l^ 


iC' r-i r- CD . Tf 0^ 




• 'CO . -^ CO (N • 


00 


•sj'cax 


— ,_! 






0-- 








JOO 


:0«5 I^ W 


CO "Tf CD 


iC CO 




lO • CM CC Ir^ CO CJ ^T* 






O 
















































2® 


! K 


m 




t< 




^i 






^ 


03 





: • si : 

: c c : 










m 






cii 




lllssiiiE^^l^llis 




03 P 




s 

c« 

12; 


'-'-' E 35 
ci|= 


Francois Lap 
Ben.iamin F. 
John F. Hast 
George J. Fa 

Rollin 

Ella F. Tarle 
Gertrude E. ( 
S. Daniel Sw 
Carl R. Carls 
George A. Ca 
Susan E. Slee 
Frank A. Sar 
Esther L. Do 

Santol 

Frank J. We 
Allan D. Ken 
Patrick Wals 

Sumpa 

Annie G. Ma 
Israel L. Ada 
CUiarles Hon 
Mary Aueat. 


Annie I. Ash 
Lizzie J. Gilb 

Samps 

Maria T. Noi 






iCcooco^(Mu^occo»oc^ccicr^cc^<oc^av.--^^i^t-^-roci^-*?^ 










•ilGT— a^-ea 


d 
















J2 

Oj 


















'E 

p. 

< 




>3 










c 

3 

■-5 



: oj o ■ 






Wo. 



ki- 
ts ' 






S a 



O a> 



.3 a3 — S c^ S C.S i 



: .2 a S c3 

- t." OJ fcH ;n 






S tl o 

Wo • 

^? >= 
> OD =5 






bo 



r-c 



^ c 



O 0) 



.^ :.c 



So be 






Pn-Eai r-OjOjB'^aja) &„ O i C g b J; p 



t- o 



-c 



=S S ® i^-S 

2 =s c « 3 



E h 



0;^; 



*^So30 
cS cs OJ Ot3 

O ai C =S O 
aOHMi-J 



CC§M 



cS^ 



O (X' fe< O I* 



-of? 



•o o 

83 o s o 

— ID cS'C 



. o O ■- 

S ?^ ? 

? §.'3 5 * S 






.0 



■ s ts ^ S g 
PigSHW 



p c o 

OS .S .? 03 r- . 

zi-s-o: 



•- M'c c c ffl c H ■::'■« ' 



S- : 



P3>: 



fe :&-: ::::(!< ifo ; tfe ifiH : 



;s : ;s- 



S :s- :s :s= • • 



orogsg g oi 






cs 2 a) a^-e- 



o c 



5^0-' 



fi <i> O '^ 

►f>:z;owKQj»o,!:5o 



=c s o 



CO .Ti(M .TTOcnr^ .icoi 



• ^ C^ C-l i-H 



CO l^ -^ cc 01 
l^ CO lO cc 10 



J3 

t.-^ 5 O^ cffl£ ' 

a^SO© •5*'-' 
t; caOoWw J J i 

.:= > c t-::; g 5S g ' 



. lO cc t^ t^ 



CO -^ c^^ »c 



bt c c « 

Ceo® 



CJ — T 



iOt-j C^iO 



T3 S 
O =* 



3 c«.:n 



fl at • 
a> c >= 
o. o 1) 

Oc^ao 



be 

3 

f= 2 

5S -.2 

= 3 M V. 

aca c — 

OS .- OJ 



S-- 



^ at 

3 s" 



CS t, ! 

3 — 



O 
. a) 

am 
. O 



3— S O 
aii-<<oo*oaiOT-icococOTj<iocoocot^fM^— *r 



Si "W 

^ OS I £- g o M-c 2 30 



HC<l<MCOCJ'M'^'-li-trH.-l(N(N ^i-^- 



»0 lO r- ^ O t^ 



CO .-IIN 



H 
P5 
Q 

w 
o 

Q 

<^ 
iz; 

o 
o 

<l 

Eh 
I— I 
Oh 
02 
O 

w 



l-H 

o 

H 
!^ 

I— I 

w 

PU 



12; 



c 


A P 






E 








bo;^^ ?? 05 . 


IJ ft 


C 3^5 C3 !- C3-- 


r^ >H 


«s 




0; g 

Is 


^ «'5'5- c:^"^ 


s^ 


>i ra 3 0) bt ci;j:;.c cB 


P3 S W « <; ;> in U 




G ; 


3=§S":-c^ 


So 


g^a-jiBg.S 


^ 03 * a ^J"c ^ C 


0= 3 
WO 


AlbinC 

Harry 

Oscar ( 

Walter 

Michae 

Waldo 

Bryant 

Gilbert 


a, c 

J3 3 




cc 
















S 








r' „ 


m 1 




^> 






^.11 


0: ; 


oncorc 
arnsta 
lymou 
oil don 
eland 
eorgia 
pringfl 
oston. 


o£ 


omoHj.S';:iajm^-ii-( 




















".'C 






'^ m 








<a 






, 'J 










_Q. 




■CO 
03 


fc ?:j == - i M3 

E-O « bt— o^'S ^ 


S'6. 


rtuOco-SaC 


n U 


Ss?sw.:;oMmow 








Eh 
















0) 
















a 


<P 




































Ss 




^ 


^ 








in 




0) 










■1 




3 


3 

























a 




a 


a 








s 




^ 


s 


CO : 


'?• --:■ — " = - 


,6^: :fL; :fti: : : 


s : 


S 


S 










a 




































<5 








>^ 








D 








>- 




















^1^ 


k'S 




12 














gfe 




omo 


CBL. 






CO 


iC . 




^H 




c^ 


tH • 




»o 


OCO 




OS . 











<%1 • 




(M 














<s 
























>j 








3 










r/ 


CJ 






S 3 


3.5s>;s, 






"n 


— John so 
L. Hark 

1 Eastma 
uel J. Ta 
garet A. 

— Adam 
a C. Roy 

— TihhPt 


.2S 


Etta 
Rutl 
Sam 
Mar 

Juli 






r^QO 


,-MC^ ^rH(NP- 




a 












' 


a 





o 

I 

P3 
P 

I— I 

o 

Q 
< 

O 

O 

<1 
•— I 

m 
O 

W 

<1 
I— ( 

P5 

o 



m 



















phy 

n. 
Iter 

ren. 










n^ 


^sS!.§^li, 




fl o 






Catherine 
Hazel Fra 
Leila R. R 
Florence 
Charlotte 
Ingeborg 
Alice E. T 
Mary Per 
Jane Gan 


















■ o^ : : : 






<c 


• S OJ • • :.j • d ■ 




«8 


. Conro 
H.Gran 
Treno\ 
.Hill. 
Walter 
Brodin 
P. Clou 
in key . 

Bean.. 




<I) 




a 


•"5 ^'WG'TSrr. — 'Cr/l 




:5 


Su.2!^'P.X.''l~~-{i 




3S'3'3?-2^-§-2g 






-Coa.oi=:aio °!^K 






• ••••••■•; 

; '. ^ : ■ '. : .iij ■ ■. 


^ 


o 


S O a, O 5i.a; . " c3 ■ 












^ct^Stic<u ■c'* • 


,a 




£o = c = S ■ '^- : 


o 
® 
o 




^QXoW'-c :a.K : | 














s 


h 
5 


:::::: ;^ : : 1 




d 

fe 


gland, 
mney . 
icord . 

gland 
eden . 
icord . 
ams. N 
gland, 
islniry 










C 3 O ■ C ? 0"^ C ci 






K«o :h.xC'<kco 1 




d 










o 
















• • i . 








• : :S : 






p 




. . . jj • 






o 






■ 1 2^ ; 














o 




: : : o ■ 
: : :» : 


: ■£ : 




■paAvopiAA 








t3 


JO paij 




• • -S ■ 


a :x>: 


a 
o 

rS o 


-jBtn'aiSais 








•jo[oo 


>::::::::: 


•a['Bra8j 


fe: : :fc IsJ: : : 






CC 


•8[«W 


— 


:s 


- :S 






h 












^ 


















• •,— • 












■ • ::■" 


C 








Om 


c" ' " ' 


'-■ K '^ 














o : 


o a.< 


be 


S1T3Q 




~' : :6i^ :^ : : 


i • -sqinoTC 




o . . to . 


... 33 


1 -sjBa^ 




.^ : :S : 


00 . lO 3> 
OT -COCO 








• -x: • • • 






« 










a 

03 . 




1^ 










>=5 5 




• >■ • • 




t:® 


o = s; : ■ • 


^ OJ t*s 






gSH •= ■ 


^.a C « 




^r^ 


onica C. Co 
ranees M. G 
aymond A. 
alph E. Hill 
lorence I. H 

Brodin 

eilaC. Robe 
rilla M. Pla 
nnie Bovvm 
lien A. Ordi 










Si-oiccfc 1 hJO<W 






X ,-H r- l^ l~ X X -W '-0 3-. 










•ii6i-9i^a 








►^ 


5^ 


VI 


OZ Q ) 



Q 
H 

<j 
H 

Eh 

P5 
O 

K 

O 
W 

<i 
I— I 

"A 

H 

Eh 

iz; 

H 

o 
w 

I— I 

w 

Pu 



! g 5 X g "C o 



pS 



Q<;Wx5>Ji-l 



•"On • s c — 
• fc. N • C CQ 

■ cs c OJ U Oj o 






•^S 



o s 

ZQ- 



:5a 





* ^H 








. 0) 
























































■ br 








• c- 








: r. 






















ai- 


■ w 






. 


'■'■r,'- 


Q 








« 


^• 








''' 








fci: : : : : : 













" ■ ^' ' o Z ° 
P ,2 — a.' H ^ 



cc 


ai:;K 


?^ 


a- 


X 


M 


-r l^ o 


;:; 


■^ 


ut 


in 


00 tO" 


X CV 


X 


X 


in -P O (M 
to X t^ l^ 


S 




c 

o 









". "S c j(i = £ ." 

^ 03 > t.. ^ 

':3 E — ■ r- r c » 



c, I- -T r ^ :o -- 



O 
m 



l^ O CO rH TT 
O O 1^ CO Ci 
T C< C) c^ rt 



9 

< 

o 
H 

« 



O 
H 

P 
Q 
O 

P5 

I— I 

PL. 






^: : : 



^^ 



<1 



P 
M 



Is 






o £? 



•C t^ ■;; ±3 



O o o O ^ 

t- t. fcn tH t^ 



s s 



Cw ^ C3 cj cS 

o o c o o 
H H E-1 H H 



1-1(5 c^ 

c ^ c ^ 
S <" ^--^ 
r/^ z a ti. 



cccc 1— a> 



hSqS 



Sea" 



INDEX. 



Assessors, board of, report of 310 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 381 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 412 

Cemetery department, reports of 332 

City clerk, report of 336 

government, departments, personnel of, 1917 45 

assessors 48 

board of aldermen 45 

board of public works 46 

building inspector 55 

cemetery committees 57 

clerk 46 

collector of taxes 48 

commissioners of cemeteries 58 

committees of board of aldermen 47 

culler of staves 60 

drain layers 63 

engineer 47 

fence- viewers 59 

fire department, officers of 54 

health officers ' 55 

hydrant commissioners ' 50 

inspector of petroleum 59 

mayor 45 

messenger 47 

overseers of poor 49 

park commissioners 56 

physician, city and assistant 48 

plumbers, board of examiners of t 63 

pound-keeper 59 

police department officers and members of police force 49 

public library, trustees of 52 

librarian and assistants 52 

registrar of vital statistics ',. ... 56 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 48 

sealers of leather 60 

sealer of weights and measures 60 

solicitor 49 

street department, superintendent of streets 48 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 58 

superintendent of clocks 55 



502 CITY OP CONCORD. 



City superintendent of parks 56 

surveyors of painting 61 

masonry 62 

wood, lumber and bark 62 

treasurer 47 

trustees of trust funds 53 

undertakers 58 

ward officers 64 

water- works, city, commissioners 53 

superintendent 53 

weigher .^ 61 

weighers of hay. coal, etc 60 

Coupon account, statement of 415 

Debts, recapitulation 439 

Engineer, city, report of 256 

Financial statement 424 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 210 

fire-alarms 213 

roll of members 244 

Highways, financial statement of 267 

department, report of superintendent 264 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of : 260 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 301 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 405 

Mayors of the City of Concord, li.st of 66 

Mayor's inaugural address 3 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 409 

Municipal debt 436 

regulations 2 

Court, report of 328 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 411 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 402 

Ordinances and resolutions 11 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 333 

Physician, city, report of 306 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 407 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 261 

Police department, report of city marshal 320 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1907 314 

Poor department, report of overseer 337 

Population 441 

Precincts, debts of 438 

Property, city, inventory of 440 

Public bath, report of 305 

Public library, report of trustees 250 

librarian 251 

Public Works, board of, report of 264 

Rollins Park Playground, report of committee on 304 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 281 

contagious diseases 293 

milk inspector, report of 288 

sanitary officer, report of 290 



INDEX. 503 

PAGE. 

School reports ^^ 

Union School District. Albin Prize Medal contest 118 

annual school meeting warrant 122 

annual school meeting 124 

attendance oiificer '''I 

attendance officer, report of 104 

attendance, tables of 129 

board of education 69 

board of education, report of 7.3 

census, 1917 144 

clerk 72 

cooking, report of 100 

drawing, report -of 98 

elocutionary contest 115 

events of the year 127 

English prize essay contest 121 

financial agent, report of 75 

fire drills 146 

graduating classes 161 

high school entertainment 119 

high school, report of 94 

honor, roll of 154 

Memorial Day offering 120 

military drill, report of Ill 

manual training, report of 108 

movement of pupils through grades. . . . 150 

music, report of 105 

officers of the district 72 

school assistant 72 

school nurse 72 

school nurse, report of . . . ■ 102 

sewing, report of 99 

stamp saving system 120 

superintendent 71 

superintendent, report of 79 

teachers, list of 138 

war saving stamps 149 

Sewer department, report of 277 

Solicitor, report of 307 

Souoook Cemetery, receipts of 410 

Tax collector, report of 316 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 418 

Treasury, report of 376 

Trustees,, trust funds, report of 339 

Trust funds 342 

Trvists, individual cemetery 348 

Vital statistics, tables of 443 

Water department, report of 167 

commissioners, report of 173 

coupon, account of 417 

engineer's report 182 



504 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PAGE. 

Water depai'tment, fire hydrants 194 

inventory 209 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 416 

receipts for each year 186 

schedule of pipes and gates 189 

summary of statistics 205 

superintendent, report of 176 

treasurer's report 184, 416