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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

^ 



City of Concord 



Annual Report 
1918 



llllllllllllllllllllllllllllillllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 



1918 
SIXTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1918 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD, N. H. 

THE RUMFORD PRESS 

1919 



N 

CI 4 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 
City Clerk, 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 13, 1919. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance extending the garbage precinct. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. The garbage precinct is hereby extended to include 
Harvard, Dartmouth, Princeton and Noyes Streets. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
with this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shaU take 
effect on its passage. 

Passed March 11. 



An Ordinance amending section 15 op chapter 18 relating to 

FIRE department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend the last sentence of section 15, chapter 18 of the 
Revised Ordinances, by striking out the last four words of said sentence 
and inserting in place thereof the words "disbursed to substitutes as 
the companies shall determine," so that said sentence as amended shall 
read as follows: "In cases where there were no substitutes the fines 
shall be disbursed to substitutes as the companies shall determine." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March 11. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance passed September 11, 
1916, relative to chauffeurs for the motor combination 
chemical and hose trucks used by old fort engine company 
NO. 2 and cataract engine company no. 3. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 2 of an ordinance providing for chauf- 
feurs for the motor combination chemical and hose trucks used by Old 
Fort Engine Company No. 2 and Cataract Engine Company No. 3, 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

passed September 11, 1916, by striking out the whole of said section 
and inserting in place thereof the following: 

"Sect. 2. The chauffeur for Old Fort Engine Company No. 2 shall 
receive the sum of one hundred dollars per annum and the chauffeur 
for Cataract Engine Company No. 3 shall receive the sum of one hun- 
dred dollars per annum to be paid semi-annually. In the absence of 
such chauffeurs other members of said companies shall be designated to 
serve in their stead by the engineers of said companies and shall receive 
such proportionate part of said above mentioned sums as the time served 
by him bears to the whole year." 

Sect 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect as of 
January 1, 1918. 

Passed March 28. 



An Ordinance amending section 28, chapter 18, of the revised 
ordinances of 1912 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend the first seven lines of Section 28 of Chapter 18 
of the Revised Ordinances of 1912, as amended through the word "semi- 
annually," to read as follows: 

1 Sect. 28. The annual pay for the members of the Fire Department 
shall be as follows, and in f uU for all services in said department : 

'Chief, fourteen hundred and fifty dollars per annum, house-rent, 
light and heat; permanent force at Central Fire Station, at Good WiU 
and Alert Hose Houses and Pioneer Fire Station, twelve hundred dol- 
lars each; the captain and lieutenant of Combination No. 1, twelve 
himdred and fifty dollars each, per annum, payable semi-monthly." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
as of January 1, 1918. 

Passed March 28. 



An Ordinance in relation to salaries of the members of the 
POLICE force. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chapter 41 of the Revised Ordinances 
of 1912 as amended February 12, 1917, to read as follows: "Sect. 4. 
The city marshal shall receive annually for his services the sum of 
nineteen hundred dollars per annmn." 

Sect. 2. Amend section 5 of said chapter as amended February 12, 
1917, to read as follows: "Sect. 5. The assistant city marshal shall 



ORDINANCES. 5 

receive in full for his services the sum of sixteen hundred dollars per 
annum." 

Sect. 3. Amend section 6 of said chapter as amended February 12, 
1917, to read as follows: "Sect. 6. The captain of the night watch 
shall receive in full for his services the sum of fourteen hundred doUars 
per annimi." 

Sect. 4. Amend section 13 of said chapter as amended February 12, 
1917, to read as follows: "Sect. 13. The sergeant of police shall 
receive in full for his services the sum of three dollars and fifty-five cents 
per day. Each regular poUceman during the first year^of service shall 
receive the sum of three dollars per day and for services thereafter the 
svun of three dollars and fifty cents per day, which shall be in full for all 
services rendered by him as watchman and day poUce. The special 
police shall be paid three dollars for each day's service. The chauffeurs 
shall be paid three dollars and fifty cents for each day's service. " 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
as of January 1, 1918. 

Passed March 28. 



An Ordinance relating to contracts for printing. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. AD printing required by the several departments of the 
city government and paid for out of the city treasury shall be contracted 
for by sealed bids or proposals, and all such contracts, when given, shall 
be given to the lowest responsible bidder. AH bids or proposals sub- 
mitted are to be opened at the same time. 

Sect. 2. AU persons, firms and corporations residing in Concord 
and engaged in the printing business shall be notified when such work 
is required and given an opportunity to bid on the work. 

Sect. 3. In case no bids or proposals are received, after the above 
section has been complied with, the work may be given to any person, 
firm or corporation willing to accept same and fitted to do the required 
work. 

Sect. 4. In the award of contracts for any printing, only Concord 
persons, firms or corporations submitting bids for the same be con- 
sidered. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed April 8. 



6 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance relating to the pay for teams. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chapter 36 of the Revised Or- 
dinances as amended July 10, 1916, and June 11, 1917, to read as follows: 
"Heads of departments employing teams for the use of the city are 
authorized to pay for said teams a maximum price of seven dollars for 
standard teams and a minimum price of six dollars per day of nine hours 
or such proportionate part of said price paid as the time worked bears 
to nine hours fer each two-horse team with driver, provided such driver 
be paid by the owner of said team not less than two dollars and fifty 
cents per day." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed April 8. 



An Ordinance in amendment of an ordinance relating to the 

regulation of street traffic, passed JULY 14, 1913. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 14 of Article 2, relating to "Vehicles in 
motion" by striking out of said section, the last two lines, and adding 
thereto the following: "The driver of every motor vehicle shall bring 
said vehicle to a full stop, " so that said section shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 14. In approaching or passing a street railway car, which 
has been stopped to allow passengers to alight or to embark, the driver 
of every motor vehicle shall bring said vehicle to a full stop " 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 10. 1918. 



An Ordinance requiring males between the ages of eighteen 
tears and sixty years to be usefully employed for thirty- 
six hours in each week during the war. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. All male persons between the ages of 18 years and 60 
years shall be employed usefully for at least 36 hours in each week 
during the war. 

Sect. 2. Any such person who violates the provisions of Section 1 
of this ordinance shall be fined not exceeding twenty dollars. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
on its passage. 

Passed August 12, 1918. 



ORDINANCES. 7 

An Ordinance amending section 6 of chapter 36 of the revised 
ordinances of 1912, relative to closing city hall saturday 
afternoons. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Section 6 of Chapter 36 of the Revised Ordinances is 
hereby amended by striking out all of said section after the word "noon" 
in the second line, so that said section as amended shall read as follows : 

"Sect. 6. The City Hall and all of the offices therein shall be closed 
Saturday at twelve o'clock noon." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed September 9, 1918. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 5, section 10, of the 
revised ordinances, relative to vacations and time off of 
the officers and members of the police force. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 5, Section 10, of the Revised Ordinances 
by adding after the word "pay" in the third line the following: "and 
in addition they shall be entitled to be off duty without loss of pay one 
day in each fifteen" also further amend said section by striking out all 
of said section after the word "vacation" in the fourth line, so that 
said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 10. Each ofiicer and member of the regular force shall be en- 
titled to two weeks' vacation in each year without deduction from his 
salary or pay and in addition they shall be entitled to be off duty with- 
out loss of pay one day in each fifteen. The city marshal shall designate 
the time at which each member of the pohce force shall take his vaca- 
tion." 

Passed October 14, 1918. 



An Ordinance amending section 13 of chapter 41 op the revised 
ordinances of 1912 relating to salaries of policemen. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. Section 13 of Chapter 41 of the Revised Ordinances of 
1912 is hereby amended to read as follows : " The sergeant of police shall 
receive in fuU for his services the sum of three dollars and fifty-five 
cents per day. Each regular policeman shall receive the sum of three 
dollars and fifty cents per day which shall be in full for all service 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

rendered by him. Special police shall be paid three dollars and fifty 
cents for each day's services. Chauffeurs shall be paid three dollars 
and fifty cents for each day's services." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed November 13, 1918. 



RESOLUTIONS. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution in relation to sifting ashes. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That, from and after Monday, January 28, 1918, no 
anthracite coal ashes shall be collected by the City from private homes 
and apartment houses within the limits of the garbage precinct, unless 
such ashes shall first have been sifted by the owner, lessee or occupant 
of such homes or apartment houses. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 22. 



Resolution providing for the printing of rosters op the city 
government. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present 
city government and cause copies thereof to be printed and that the 
expense of printing the same be charged to the account of printing and 
stationery. 

Passed January 22. 



Resolution providing for the printing of the mayor's inaugural 

ADDRESS. 

Resolied by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be authorized and instructed to have printed 
copies of the mayor's inaugural address; the expense of the same to be 
charged to the account of printing and stationery. 

Passed January 22. 



Resolution in relation to paying salaries, pay-rolls and rents. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant on 
the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and rents 
as the same shall become due during the present mimicipal term, and 
all bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and claims 
at their next meeting. 

Passed January 22. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and buildings 
TO make current repairs. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen oj the City of Concord as follows: 

That the committee on lands and buildings be authorized to expend 
such sums as may be necessary for current repairs, not exceeding three 
hundred dollars in any one month, the same to be charged to the ap- 
propriation for repairs to buildings. 

Passed January 22. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and bind- 
ing the annual city reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for scale d pro- 
posals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1917 and 
submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full power to 
act in the matter. 

Passed January 22. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding onk 
hundred thousand dollars. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred thousand doUars 
($100,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 
1918 upon such terms and for such amounts as the Committee shall 
determine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal 
year 

Passed February 11. 



Resolution appropriating one hundred dollars to purchase the 
scenery and other personal property in the auditorium 
belonging to the auditorium associates. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That one hundred dollars be and the same is hereby 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwi.se appro- 
priated to purchase the scenery and other personal property in the 
Auditorium belonging to the Auditorium Associates. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 11. 



RESOLUTIONS. 11 

RESOLtTTION APPROPRIATING MONEY FOR THE PURCHASE OF A VACUITM 
CLEANER FOR CITY HALL. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of forty dollars ($40) be, and the same hereby is, ap- 
propriated for the purchase of a vacuum cleaner for city hall; said 
sum to be charged to the account of incidentals and land damage. 

Passed March 11. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of twenty-one and 69-100 
dollars to seth r. dole, tax collector. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is, authorized to pay to Seth 
R. Dole, tax collector, the sum of twenty-one and 69-100 dollars ($21.69) 
it being an amount over paid on account of 1912 taxes. 

Passed March 11. 



Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and buildings 
to contract with the concord electric co., for the instal- 
ling and maintaining of electric lights in the board of trade 

CLOCK. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the Committee on Lands and Buildings is hereby 
authorized and in behalf of the city, to make and execute suitable con- 
tract with the Concord Electric Co., for the installation and main- 
tenance of electric lights in the Board of Trade clock. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 11. 



Resolution providing for expenditures for the mayor's office. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of two hundred dollars (S200) be and 
the same is hereby appropriated for the mayor's ofiBce, said sum of 
money to be spent for incidentals for the mayor's office also to be used 
in defraying expenses incurred in doing escort duty to our conscripts 
who go from our city to do service in the war. The same to be charged 
to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed March 28. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution providing for the purchasing of supplies for the 

SEALER of weights AND MEASURES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the smn of ($125) one hundred and twenty-five 
dollars be appropriated to purchase supplies for the city sealer of weights 
and measures. Said sum to be charged to the account of incidentals 
and land damages. 

Passed March 28, 1918. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of the 

CITY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section i. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city the sum of one 
hundred three thousand dollars ($103,000) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, 
together with the sum which may be raised for taxes on railroads and 
from other sources shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $7,150 .00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 4,211 .81 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds 1,826 . 17 

For support of city poor 3,300 . 00 

For incidentals and land damages 9,000 .00 

For salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,905 .00 

For printing and stationery 3,000 .00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000 .00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 1,000 .00 

For aid,. Concord District Nursing Association 300 . 00 

For aid, Concord Charity Organization Society 300 . 00 

For Memorial Day 460 .00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., rent 450 .00 

For open air concerts 450 . 00 

For public baths 300.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 3,845 .00 

For Old North Cemetery 200.00 

For Maple Grove Cemetery 100 .00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 100 .00 

For Millville Cemetery 75 .00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10 .00 

For Soucook Cemetery ■ 30 .00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25 .00 



RESOLUTIONS. 13 

For parks $4,000 .00 

For Pecker Athletic Field 25 .00 

For John Kimball Playground 500 .00 

For Rollins Park Playground 500 .00 

For repairs buildings 2,000 .00 

For Bridge Bonds 4,000 .00 

For City Hall Bonds 8,000 .00 

For Garden Culture 600 .00 

$60,662.98 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, Sanitary Officer $1,600 .00 

Milk Inspection 300 .00 

Fumigation SuppUes 100 . 00 

Contagious Diseases 700 . 00 

incidentals 1,000 .00 

$3,700 . 00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $24,893 .25 

Emergency Officer 500 . 00 

Fuel 700.00 

Horse Hire, Penacook 25 .00 

Helmets and Buttons 50 .00 

Lights 225 .00 

Telephone, Private Line 243 .36 

Incidentals 1,000 .00 

SuppUes, Patrol Wagon 600 .00 

$28,236.61 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Salaries $3,535 .00 

Books and Incidentals 2,350 .00 

$5,885.00 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, Engineer $2,000 .00 

Salary, Assistants 2,200.00 

SuppUes 125 .00 

Repairs 25 .00 

Incidentals 200.00 

$4,550.00 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, Superintendent of Streets $2,000 .00 

General Maintenance 55,000 .00 

Permanent Work, South Main Street 2,500 .00 

Catch Basins 1,300 .00 

Trees 1,500 .00 

New Concrete 750 .00 

Repairs Concrete 2,500 . 00 

$65,550.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Pay-RoUs $19,257 .76 

Pay-Rolls, Semi-Aiinual 9,115 .00 

Rent, Veterans' Association 150 .00 

Forage 1,500 .00 

Fuel and Lights 1,900 .00 

Fire Alarm 500 .00 

Horse Hire and Shoeing 1,160 .00 

Washing 60 .00 

SuppUes, Auto Combinatiom 300 . 00 

Penacook Fire Alarm 250 . 00 

Incidentals 3,000 .00 

Combination Chemical, Alert Hose 3,200 .00 

$40,392.76 

SALARIES. 

Mayor $1,500 .00 

City Clerk 1,400.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 200 .00 

Overseers of Poor 390 . 00 

Sohcitor 800 .00 

Treasurer 1,225 .00 

Messenger 1,000.00 

Building Inspector 200 .00 

City Physicians 700 .00 

Care City clocks 110 .00 

Assessors 3,000 .00 

Moderators and Ward Clerks 360 .00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of Election 960 . 00 

Judge, Pohce Court 1,200 .00 

Clerk, Pohce Court 500.00 

Collector of Taxes 2,400 .00 

$15,945.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 15 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised in like manner the sum of forty-five 
thousand two hundred thirty-two and 50-100 dollars ($45,232.50) for 
the support of schools for the ensuing financial year, which, together 
with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be appropriated and 
divided among the several school districts according to the valuation 
thereof. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots and 
grading, which smns shall be deposited by the superintendent, or others 
receiving them, in the city treasury. The care of lots for which the city 
holds trust funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for the care 
of cemeteries and so much of the income of these trust funds as may be 
thus expended shall be deposited ia the city treasury at the close of the 
year and the remainder in each instance credited to the individual fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the pubHc Hbrary in the purchase of books the amount collected 
for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 28. 



Resolution FrxiNO and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord a^ follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the sewerage precinct of 
said city the sum of three thousand six himdred seventy-five dollars 
($3,675) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs $1,000 

For the pajTnent of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds 2,675 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 28. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING 
FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook Sewerage 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Precinct the sum of twelve hundred fifty-five dollars ($1,255) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For repairs $200 

For the payment of bonds becoming due July 1 and October 1, 

1918 1,000 

For the payment of iaterest that may become due on precinct 

bonds 55 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the west concord sewerage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord Sewer- 
age Precinct the sum of six hundred twenty-eight dollars ($628) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as f oUows : 

For repairs $100 

For the payment of bond due October 1, 1918 500 

For the payment of interest that may become due on precinct 

bonds 28 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28. *. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN TELE 
limits of the GARBAGE PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL 
YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the garbage precinct of 
said city, the sum of eleven thousand dollars ($11,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 
For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said precinct . . .$11,000 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 28. 



RESOLUTIONS. 17 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 

RAISED on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS WITHIN THE 
LIMITS OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT FOR THE ENSUING 
FINANCIAL TEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the limits of the street 
sprinkling precinct of said city, the sum of seven thousand five hundred 
doUars ($7,500) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said 
precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
foUows: 

For sprinkling streets $7,500 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 

limits OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT IN WARD ONE FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkhng pre- 
cinct in ward one the sum of three hundred dollars (S300) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $300 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the poUs and ratable estates within the lighting precinct the 
sum of twenty thousand three hundred dollars ($20,300) to defray the 
2 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $20,300 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28. 



Resolution providing adequate means at the police station for 
putting to death dogs, cats and other animals in a humane 

WAT. 

Resolved by the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of twenty-five dollars be and the same is hereby appro- 
priated to pay expenses of putting to death dogs, cats and other animals 
in a humane way, the same to be done under the direction of the city 
marshal and charged to the account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed April 8. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1917 on 
non-resident property sold to the city in 1916. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of four and 38-100 dollars ($4.38) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes asseissed in 1917 on non-resident 
property sold to the city in 1916. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of four and 38-100 doUars ($4.38). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 8. 



Resolution appropriating fifteen and 25-100 dollars ($15.25) to 
pay for non-resident real estate sold to the city of concord 

FOR unpaid taxes FOR THE YEAR 1917. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of fifteen and 25-100 dollars ($15.25) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated to pay the amount due the City of Concord for non-resident 
real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of non-resident real 
estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 1917. 

Passed April 8. 



RESOLUTIONS. 19 

Resolution providing for a discount on taxes. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That a discount of two per cent shall be allowed on all taxes assessed 
for the year 1918 which are paid on or before the fifteenth day of July, 
1918. 

Passed May 13, 1918. 



Resolution appropriating money for a dehydrating plant. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and hereby is, 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purpose of establishing a dehydrating plant. Said sum of 
money to be expended under the direction of the finance committee and 
R. B. Emery, garden supervisor. 

Passed July 30, 1918. 



Resolution relative to the city lot on the plains. 

Section 1. Whereas a number of years ago an agreement was 
entered into between the State of New Hampshire and the City of Con- 
cord for the exchange of certain land on the Plains, and whereas this 
agreement was never carried into effect, and the state has lately com- 
menced condemnation proceedings for an extension of the camp grounds, 
Therefore be it. 

Resolved, by the board of Aldermen that the mayor be and hereby is 
authorized to sign the necessary papers in behalf of the City to give 
effect to the arrangement previously made, said papers to be signed by 
the mayor and to be subject to the approval of the city solicitor. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 12, 1918. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of one thous.and dollars for 
printing and stationery. 

Resolved by the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same is 
hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed August 12, 1918. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution relative to street railway fares. 

Resolved hij the Board oj Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Whereas it has come to the attention of the Board of Aldermen of 
Concord, that management of the Boston & Maine Railroad, has filed 
with the Public Service Commission a request for permission to advance 
the rates for car riding on the Concord & Manchester Electric Branch, 
which includes the electric branches in this city, and 

Whereas the said increase asked for is exorbitant and uncalled for, 
therefore, be it 

Resolved that it is the sense of the Board of Aldermen that formal 
protest be entered with the PubUc Service Commission against the 
granting of said petition for the abolition of free transfers. 

Passed August 12, 1918. 



Resolution appropriating money for garden culture. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars (.$200) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for garden culture, said sum to be expended under the direction 
of the Committee on Finance. 

Passed September 9, 1918. 



Resolution authorizing the purchase of a one piece motor 
driven apparatus. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1 . The Committee on Fire Department is hereby authorized 
to contract with the Abbott-Downing Truck & Body Company for the 
purchase of a one piece motor driven apparatus at an expense not to 
exceed thirty-five hundred dollars, said contract to provide that said 
apparatus shall be deHvered during the current year, but payment there- 
for to be deferred until a time to be agreed upon during the year 1919. 

Sect. 2. Tliis resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 14, 1918. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to sign a quit claim deed of 
the cohen property on mills street. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen oj the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the Mayor be and he hereby is authorized to sign 
under the seal of the City a quit claim deed of the Cohen property on 
Mills Street to Nathaniel E. Martin upon payment of all taxes due on 
said property. 

Passed October 14, 1918. 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 

Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1917 on 
resident property sold to the city in 1916. 

Resolved by the Board oj Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of eleven and 89-100 dollars ($11.89) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1917 on resident 
property sold to the city in 1916. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of eleven and 89-100 dollars ($11 .89). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 14, 1918. 



Resolution appropriating eight hundred sixty-five and 96-100 
DOLLARS ($865.96) to pay for real estate sold to the city op 
concord for unpaid taxes for the year 1917. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of eight hundred six-ty-five and 96-100 dollars ($865.96) 
be, and the same hereby is appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated to pay the amount due the City of Concord 
for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale of real estate for the 
unpaid taxes for the year 1917. 

Passed October 14, 1918. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding fifty 

THOUSAND dollars. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as jollows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars ($50,000) 
for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1918 upon 
such terms and for such amounts as the Committee shall determine, 
said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 

Passed October 25, 1918. 



Resolution appropriating money for a municipal Christmas tree. 
Resolved by the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred dollars ($100) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated for a municipal Christmas tree celebration on December 24, 1918, 
said sum to be expended under direction of a committee consisting of 
the IVIayor, Aldermen Blackwood and Lee and to be charged to the 
account of incidentals and land damages. 

Passed December 9, 1918. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit claim deed 

TO property formerly owned by MRS. C. E. BANFILL. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. The Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit claim 
deed of property formerly belonging to Mrs. C. E. Banfill, being a lot 
of land known as No. 4482 on the Assessors' map, sold to the city for 
taxes, at a price to include all taxes and costs assessed against said 
property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 9, 1918. 



Resolution donating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of the 

income from the DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be hereby 
donated out of the income from the David Osgood trust to the poor 
children of the French Parochial School, who are inhabitants of the 
City of Concord, for the purpose of buying school books for said cliildren. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be paid to and 
expended under the direction of the principal of said school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 9, 1918. 



Resolution changing the name of city hall park in said city to 
that of doyen park. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1 . That as an honor to one of Concord's distinguished sons, 
Brig. Gen. Charles A. Doyen, who led the American marines to the first 
fruits of victory at Chateau Tliierry in France, and that for his deed of 
valor there may always be a lasting reminder of his native city's pride 
and gratitude for his services to city, state and nation, — the City Coun- 
cil of Concord does hereby re-name the plot now known as City Hall 
Park, to be hereafter and forever known as Doyen Park and that a tablet 
suitably inscribed shall be placed in some appropriate place in the Park, 
the cost of the same not to exceed two hundred dollars. 

Passed December 30, 1918. 



RESOLUTIONS. 23 

Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of three thousand five hundred fifty-four 
and 97-100 ($3,554 . 97) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstanding claims 
as follows: 

Incidentals and Land Damages $2,859 . 72 

Interest, Temporary Loans 193 . 75 

John liimball Playground 35 . 02 

Repairs Buildings 17.18 

Salaries 449.30 



,554.97 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for garbage 
for the year 1918, the sum of one hundred eighty and 44-100 dollars 
($180.44), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 
for the year 1918, the sum of nine and 48-100 dollars ($9.48), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 13, 1919. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and binding 
the annual city reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows. • 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed pro- 
posals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1918 and 
submit the same to the finance committee, who shall have full power to 
act in the matter. 

Passed January 13, 1919. 



24 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Resolution providing for investigating the feasibility of grad- 
ing THE WHITE PARK BALL GROUNDS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the finance committee shall investigate the feasi- 
bility of grading and improving the White Park ball grounds, said com- 
mittee to secure the advice of the city engineer and superintendent of 
streets and report to the Board at its next regular meeting, with a 
recommendation relative to the amount which should be appropriated 
for said purpose. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 13, 1919. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1918. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1918. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
MAYOR. 

Salary, $1,500 per annum. 

HON. CHARLES J. FRENCH. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per annum, 
with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts and Claims. 



Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1920. 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Morton Street 

Term Expires January, 1922. 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 South State Street 
MICHAEL J. LEE, 59 South Main Street 



26 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Ward Aldermen. 
Term Expires January, 1920. 



Ward i— FRED M. DODGE, 
Ward .?— GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, 
Ward 5— CARL A. EKSTROM, 
Ward 4— ALFRED TONKIN, 
Ward 5— WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 
Ward ^—CLARENCE L. CLARK, 
Ward 7— HARRIS S. PARMENTER, 

1 Hutchinson Avenue 
Ward 5— WILLIAM L. REAGAN, 

37 South Main Street 
Ward P— TIMOTHY J. O'BRIEN, 11 Perkins Court 



Penacook 

East Concord 

West Concord 

6 Abbott Street 

84 School Street 

71 South Street 



CITY CLERK. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,400 per annum. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 



HARRY C. BRUNEL, 



Term expires January, 1920 



FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD,'' " " 1920 

EVERETT L. DAVIS, " " " 1920 

RICHARD A. BROWN, " " " 1922 

MICHAEL J. LEE, " " " 1922 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, " " " 1922 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Clerk. 



Salary, $200 per annum. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 27 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Blackwood, O'Brien, Brunei. 
On Bills, Second Reading — • » 

Aldermen Brown, Stevens, Lee. 
On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen Dodge, Robinson, Reagan. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Davis, Robinson, Parmenter. 
On Finance — 

The Mayor; Aldermen Sturtevant, Tonkin, Stevens, 
Blackwood. 
On Fire Department — Aldermen Lee, Davis, Clark. 

On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Blackwood, Ekstrom, Parmenter. 
On Police and License — 

Aldermen Stm-tevant, Regan, Brunei. 
On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Brown, Ekstrom, Tonkin. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $25 as Treasurer 
of Cemeteries. 

ISAAC HILL. 

Office: National State Capital Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, SI, 000 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to satis- 
faction of the board. Salary, five mills for each dollar of first $60,000; seven and 
one-half mills for each dollar over S60,000. 

SETH R. DOLE. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $750 per annum. Clerk, $1,500 per annum. 
Office: Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1922 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1920 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1924 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, 81,000. 
Salary, $2,000. 

ALFRED CLARK. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,600 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 29 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, S600 per annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, S800 per annum. 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward i— FRED M. DODGE, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward ^—GEORGE 0, ROBINSON, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, P— HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, SI, 200 per annum. 

A. CHESTER CLARK.* 

OflBce: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS. 



CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Justice. Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOHN W. STANLEY. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of Sl.OOO required. 
Salary, $1,900 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

OfiBce: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,600 per annum. 

VICTOR I. MOORE. 

* Died September 23, 1918. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



31 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Term, 
unlimited. Salary, $3.00 per day for first year, and $3.50 per day thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,400 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $3.55 per day. 



Irving B. Robinson, 
George H. Silsby, 
Harry L. Woodward, 
Charles H. Guilbault, 
John B. Long, 
James J. Halhgan, 



Samuel Rodd, 
Edward J. McGirr, 
Joseph E. Silva, 
Fred N. Harden, 
Frank B. McDaniels, 
Axel Swanson. 



Walter D. Gaskell. 
Richard C. McGarey, Chauffeur. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 



Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 



W. A. Little, 
George G. Allen, 
Elmer Trombley, 
Frank S. Rogers, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Nelson Forest, 
Charles A. Kelley, 



Joseph A. Flanders, 
Arthur H. Reese, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
John McGirr, 
Wilhe A. Flanders, 
Joseph Greenough, 
Walter H. Beane, 
Frank E. Brooks. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward ^—CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward ^— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward e— REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 5— EDSON J. HILL.* 

PERLEY B. PHILLIPS.t 
Ward 5— EDWARD J. GALLAGHER.! 

WILLIAM J. AHERN, JUNIOR.§ 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,100 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $600 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Salary, $550 per annum. 

RUTH M. CHASE. 

*DiedMay 18, 1918. 

t Appointed to fill vacancy. 

t Resigned. 

§ Appointed to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



33 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Salary, none. 

Office: Room 1, City Hall. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ea:-(#ao. 
EDSON J. HILL,* 
OLIVER J. PELREN,t 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
N. E. MARTIN, 
H. H. DUDLEY, 

President — N. E. Martin. 
Clerk— Burns P. Hodgman. 



Term 


expires 


March 31, 


1919 








1919 








a 








1920 








(( 








1921 








ii 








1922 








<( 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER-WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $2,200 per annum. Term, 

unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, Term expires January, 1919 
ISAAC HILL, " " '' 1920 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, '' '' " 1921 

* Died May 18, 1918. 

t Appointed to fill vacancy. 

3 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,450 per annum and rent 
of house, light and heat. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 
Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 
Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

ELBRIDGE EMERY. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 35 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 

Salary, $200 per annum. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio. 
DR. SIBLEY G. MORRILL. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 



No salary. 



WILL B. HOWE, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, Term expires January, 1919 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, " " " 1919 

JOHN P. GEORGE, " " " 1920 

CHARLES P. BANCROFT, " " " 1920 

BEN C. WHITE, " " " 1921 

ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON. " " " 1921 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 37 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consolidated) ap- 
pointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by 
Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, Term expires January, 1919 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1920 

D. WARREN FOX, " " " 1921 

Ward 2. 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, Term expires January, 1919 

SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1920 

C. A. CHAMBERLIN, " " " 1921 

Ward 3. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Term expires January, 1919 

ERVIN E. WEBBER, " " " 1920 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, " " " 1921 

Ward 7. 

ALBERT S. TRASK, Term expires January, 1919 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " " 1920 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, " " " 1921 

Ward 8. 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, Term expires January, 1919 

NAHUM PRESCOTT, " " " 1920 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT " " " 1921 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 



JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
EDWARD A. MOULTON. 



Term expires March, 1919 
1919 
1920 
1920 
1921 
1921 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY, 
FRANK J. KELLEY. 



FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 39 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

FRANK G. PROCTOR. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

NAHUM PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

IRVING T. CHESLEY, 
CHARLES P. ROWELL, 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each for all other 
creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRED S. JOHNSON, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, $350. 

CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed annuaUy in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; 
butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — ^paid by party for 
whom culling is done. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, William H. Meserve, 

Thomas Hill, John E. Rossell, 

John H. Mercer, David Rossell, 

Everett L. Davis, Nelson Forrest, 

Hallett E. Patten, George B. Whittredge, 

Arthur N. Day, Howard Perley, 

James F. Fitzgerald, Fred I. Rolfe, 

John H. Flanders, WiUiam J. Mullen, 

Fred H. Perley, Henry A. Brown, 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 



41 



Amos J. Peaslee, 
Mark M. Blanchard, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
Alphonse King, 
William Gooden, 
Harry Lee, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Arthur E. Rowell, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 
Frank Manning, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 
Archie Black, 
W. D. Stearns, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
E. W. Saltmarsh, 
R. W. Gordon, 



F. H. Smith, 
James B. Riley, 

G. N. Hills, 
Charles E. Cook, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brawn, 
WilHam F. Cutting, 
E. F. Miller, 

Earl Woodbury, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
S. A. Clark, 
C. J, Roers, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
Leigh F. Woodman, 
Alvin B. Edmunds, 
Omar C. Allard, 
J. W. Currier 
G. W. Hunter. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Edward A. Moulton, 
George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Moses E. Haines. 



42 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M ; boards and 
timber, 16 cents per M.; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents 
per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Wallace M. Howe, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert O. Preston, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Ernest C. Smith, 
Gilbert H. Berry, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
E. A. Cole, 
William E. Virgin, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
O. B. Jerome, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
Levi M. Shannon, 
Charles M. Brown, 
Frank L. Swett, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 



Hiram W. Drouin, 
John Rolfe, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Fred A. Eastman, 
Oliver Reno, 
Silas Wiggin, 
Daniel Griffiths, 
W. F. Hayward, 
F. E. Frost, 
Leonard H. Smith, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Charles S. Robinson, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Richard E. Nelson, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
George B. Little, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
W. F. Frost, 
E. F. Miller, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



43 



William F. Hoyt, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
N. B. Flanders, 
Charles C. Osgood, 
Oliver C. Dimond, 



Irving Burbank, 
Fred H. Walker, 
John E. Colton, 
Everett Runnells, 
Horace B. Annis. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to conhrmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 



WilHam Rowell, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
Michael J. Lee, 
W. Arthur Bean, 
WilHs H. Robbins, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
William L. Reagan, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
James H. Brannigan, 



Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
E. H. Smart. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
WILL B. ROWE, ex-officio. 
ARTHUR W. ROBINSON. 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward 1— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
RICHARD McBRIDE, JR., 
ELI LAFLAM. 

Ward ^—WILLIAM F. PAIGE, 
C. E. ROBINSON, 
FRED J. CARTER. 

Ward S— FRANK MATHESON, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
ABIAL ABBOTT. 

Ward 4— HARRY H. KENNEDY, 

CLARENCE J. WASHBURN, 
FRED S. JOHNSON. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 

FRANKLIN B. GORDON, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward ^—CHARLES DUNCAN, 
HARRY R. CRESSY, 
NELSON M. KNOWLTON. 

Ward 7— CHARLES J. McKEE, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
RAYMOND S. SIBLEY. 

Ward 5— FRED SMITH, 

FRANK W. ORDWAY, 
JAMES BRANNIGAN. 

Ward 9—R. E. DONOVAN, 

DENNIS J. KENNEY, 
JAMES J. REEN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

WARD CLERKS. 



Ward ;— LOUIS F. CORBETT. 
Ward ^—HAROLD D. MERRILL. 
Ward 5— ROBERT HENRY. 
Ward ^— LOUIS P. ELKINS. 
Ward 5— EARL F. NEWTON.- 
Ward ^— GUY JEWETT. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward 5— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 9—T>. H. GANNON. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward ^— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward ^—HOWARD F. HOIT. 
Ward 3— CHARLES B. CLARKE. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
Ward 5— BENJAMIN H. ORR. 
Ward <?— ELMER H. FARRAR. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward 5— MICHAEL MULCAHY. 
Ward P— BARTHOLOMEW COLLINS. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, and 

until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has been elected 

for two years at each biennial election in November. Under the City Charter, 
adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in December, 1910, for one year, and 

biennially thereafter in November, beginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, . 1853-'54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

'' MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859-'60. 

'' MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863-'64. 

'' MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

'' JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868-'69. 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870-'71. 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872-'73-'74-'75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876-'77. 

" HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878-'79-'80. 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,! 1880-'81-'82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883-'84-'85-'86. 

'' JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887-'88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, * 1889-'90. 

'' HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891-'92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893-'94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895-'96. 

" ALBERT B. WOOD WORTH, 1897-'98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901-'02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903-'08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909-'15. 

" NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 1916-'17. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1918- 

*Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
tTerm closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1918-1919. 



Hon. Harry H. Dudley Acting President 

Mrs. Fanny E. Minot Secretary 



MEMBERS. 

TERM EXPIRES. 
1919. 



Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 
Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, 
Harry F. Lake, Esq., 



89 North State Street 

Hutchins St., West Concord 

29 Auburn Street 



1920. 



Dr. Dennis E. Sullivan, 
Mrs. Fanny E. Minot, 
Mr. Omar S. Swenson, 



1921. 



Rev. W. Stanley Emery, 
Dr. Charles Duncan, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 



7 North State Street 

23 South State Street 

14 Auburn Street 



110 North State Street 
43 South Spring Street 
123 North State Street 



52 



Mr. Dudley. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

FINANCE. 

Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Emery. 



high school. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



grammar schools. 
Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Minot. 



primary SCHOOLS. 

Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



kindergartens. 
Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Swenson. Mr. Dudley. Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Lake. 



discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mrs. Minot. 



hygiene. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

manual training. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Dudley. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Shepard. Mrs. Morrill. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
MUSIC. 

Mr. Swenson. 



63 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Minot. 



DRAWING. 

Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Emery, 



text-books. 
Mrs. Minot. 



Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



training school. 
Mr. Lake. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



Dr. Sullivan. 



NIGHT school. 

Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Dudley. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 
3 Pine Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 
1.30 to 6 p. m. Telephone, Office, 55M. House, 749R. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 
6 Avon Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m.; summer 
vacation, 2 to 4 p. m. Telephone, 725M. 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERK. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 
4 Rockingham Street. 

Ofl&ce of Financial Agent, Parker School. 
Office hours: 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. 
Telephone, 702. 



SCHOOL ASSISTANT. 

Edna Florence Watson. 
117 South Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. Office hours: 
8.30 a. m. to 12.30 p. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Gladys Lloyd Morgan. 
52 North Spring Street. 

Office hours: 4 to 5 p. m., Mondays and Thursdays, at 
Superintendent's office. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill Moderator. 

Herbert W. Rainie Clerk. 

Henry H. Metcalf and John P. George . . Auditors. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



The Board of Education, in presenting its annual report, 
records with much regret the resignation of Hon. Edward C. 
Niles, a member of the board since July 6, 1909, and presi- 
dent of the board since April 8, 1913. 

For months the world has been and is now making his- 
tory rapidly, and we are living in a period of reconstruction, 
so-called, brought about by the ending of a World War. In 
a recent speech delivered in New York City by General 
Leonard Wood, his strong appeal was for one Flag and one 
Country, advocating that no tongue but English be taught 
in the elementary schools, and favoring nation-wide 
recognition of the need of higher salaries for teachers in our 
public schools, as the men and women teachers in our class 
rooms are responsible for moulding the thought and wel- 
fare of the future American citizen. 

At a recent meeting of the Board of Education, they 
voted unanimously to raise the pay of all teachers in Union 
School District $250 per annum, $100 of the increase to be 
paid this year. 

The large amount of sickness prevailing, from the influ- 
enza and other causes, necessitated the discontinuance of 
the schools for four weeks, A closing of such duration, 
which has not occurred for a number of years, placed upon 
the superintendent, teachers and pupils the responsibility of 
making up time lost, as far as possible, in order to complete 
the course of study for the year. 

Three weeks of the enforced vacation will be made up 
and, to help accomplish this, the Board of Education has 
voted to continue the schools an extra week in June, closing 
on June 27, 1919. 

There is now before the State Legislature a very impor- 
tant Educational Reform Bill, providing for central super- 
vision of all schools, the establishment of standards for 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

teachers, schoolhouses and school organizations, the estab- 
lishment of Americanization schools for the exclusive use of 
the English tongue. This is a broad and up-to-date edu- 
cational bill, the passing of which will place the burden of 
additional taxes on the cities and the larger communities. 
This increased financial burden will, no doubt, be met 
cheerfully by the taxpayer, as the American people are very 
generous in their support of the public schools. 

With larger salaries for the teachers, recommended by 
the Board, with the increase of the price of coal and the 
growing cost of all supplies, the amount of money to be 
raised at the coming annual school meeting will be about 
$20,000 over the budget of last year. The responsibility 
for good schools must be shared bj^ every taxpayer of 
Union School District. The Board of Education, as your 
representative, feels this responsibility and, consequently, 
is asking for larger appropriations, to enable them to hold 
the schools of Union School District up to the high stand- 
ard that has prevailed in the past, and keep pace with the 
progressive methods which are now demanded for the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
HARRY F. LAKE, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 

Board of Education. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT OF 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 



March 22, 1918, to March 22, 1919. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 



RECEIVED. 



Balance on hand March 22, 1918, 


$80.55 


From city, appropriated by law. 


41,396.74 


Appropriated by Union School District, 


111,393.76 


Literary fund. 


1,874.46 


Dog licenses. 


1,254.58 


Abial Walker fund, 


36.61 


Special repairs, 


2,000.00 


Cash sales for text-books, 


137.74 


" " " manual training. 


4,839.63 


" " " miscellaneous, 


51.36 


" " " repairs. 


60.08 


" " light and power. 


7.37 


State of New Hampshire (Salaries No. 6) 


891.00 


Tuition, 


2,400.86 




$166,424 . 74 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EXPENDED. 

Administration — including salaries of school 
board, salary and expense of superintendent, 
attendance officer, census and other expenses 
of administration, $5,882 . 18 

Instruction — including salaries (teachers), su- 
pervisors, text-books, scholars' supplies, flags, 
graduation exercises, exhibits and other ex- 
penses of instruction, 114,409.83 

Operation and Maintenance of School Plant — in- 
cluding janitors, engineers, fuel, water, light 
and power, repairs, and other expenses of 
operation and maintenance, 29,015.34 

Auxiliary Agencies and Special Activities — in- 
cluding libraries, medical inspection, trans- 
portation of pupils and other special activities, 4 ,295 . 60 

Fixed Charges — including insurance and other 

fixed charges, 408.90 

Outlay for Construction and Equipment — in- 
cluding alteration of old buildings, lands and 
new equipment, 27.00 

Miscellaneous — all not included in the above 

headings, 205 . 58 

Balance on hand, 12,180.31 

$166,424.74 



SCHOOL REPORT. 59 

Concord, N. H., March 22, 1919. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the financial agent of Union School District, 
and find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper 
voucher for each item. 

HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



60 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses $54 . 63 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, 

based on average membership . . . 60.97 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, draw- 
ing, superintendent, etc 37.35 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent . . 29 . 63 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 
teachers and superintendent, in all schools be- 
low the high school 21.07 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 
teachers and superintendent, in the high 



school .... 






. 




46.88 


Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 


schools 


3.75 


TUITION RECEIPTS. 




High School 


$2,256.71 


Eastman School 










6.00 


Rumford School 










65.56 


Kimball School . 










29.07 


Penacook School 










3.00 


Dewey School 










6.00 


Dewey Training School 










32.00 


Harriet P. Dame School 










1.26 


Cogswell School . 










1.26 



$2,400.86 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District: 

School history in Concord for the past year has been 
unusually varied. The continuation of the War taxed the 
resources of our schools but the demands have been met 
invariably with a free and loyal spirit by officials, teachers 
and pupils in a way second to that of no other public organ- 
ization. The coming of peace bids fair to call for revolutions 
and readjustments in former systems that must change their 
scope and purposes for the better. With confidence in 
continued prosperity I am submitting to you my thirty- 
fourth annual report which is also the fifty-ninth of its 
series. 

Educational forecast at the present time lies along con- 
structive lines. What are regarded as serious defects in 
school requirements have been laid bare by experiences and 
investigations growing out of the World War and they are to 
be met by remedial legislation. According to Charles W. 
Eliot these faults seem to converge to a centre in the inabil- 
ity of school graduates of all courses, more particularly the 
classical courses, to sense with the accuracy necessary for 
a clear description. The period just passed dwelt distinctly 
upon the strictly mental studies — history, literature, phi- 
losophy, and language. War reports show that many of those 
who confined their efforts to such studies were helpless before 
tasks which called for manual skill or the application of 
science and art. In an appreciable degree, and in the order 
named, the college, the secondary school, and the elemen- 
tary school have to bear this responsibility. It remains 
for the educators of this period and the next to find a 
remedy. The all-round education will seek bodily as well 
as mental vigor, bodily as well as mental skill. The sciences 
and the manual arts must get fuller recognition and better 
conveniences for carrying them out, while school officers 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

who fail to provide for such instruction for all pupils will 
be recognized as having passed their usefulness in educa- 
tional fields. The schools and administrators of the past 
have been too much impressed with ideality to be practical 
enough to meet the needs of a rapidly changing population. 

Divorcing the requirements of common life from the re- 
quirements of the so-called cultured courses is in conflict 
with the fundamental principles of democracy. 

The general inclination of parents to shield their children 
from even a reasonable amount of manual labor and severe 
application is often as disgusting as it is disastrous. 

There ought to be no good reason for not offering children 
the chance to attend school all the year round, it being far 
better that some should be in school advancing in their 
studies than inviting danger to life from accident and dis- 
ease in long enforced vacations. 

There ought to be no good reason why every girl attend- 
ing secondary schools should not be offered instruction 
throughout her course in the affairs and necessities of com- 
mon life embraced under Domestic Arts, and every boy in 
Mechanic Arts. 

A six-hour day for secondary school students is not too 
long, the time being divided between their chosen curric- 
ulum and Domestic Arts and Mechanic Arts in the ratio 
of about one and a half to one. 

I may call your attention to the trend of educational 
forces which is in evidence today — as marked in our own 
state as it is in the nation at large. The educational bill 
before the state legislature should be read by every one. 
Its excellent features have such a far-reaching influence that 
their object can merit no criticism. This also applies to 
the Smith-Bankhead bill now before Congress. 

Just as significant is the preliminary report of the com- 
mittee on College Entrance Requirements appointed by the 
New England Association of School Superintendents which 
strongly recommends a much larger freedom to secondary 
schools in planning their college preparatory courses and 
the modification of college entrance requirements so that a 



SCHOOL REPORT. 63 

fair measure of intellectual ability and maturity of purpose 
may be determining factors for entering these institutions. 
The National Bureau of Education is concerned with read- 
justments shown to be necessary by experiences in the war 
and we may confidently expect a more rational scheme of 
education than has been in practice before. 

Attendance. 

There have been fewer pupils in the public schools this 
year than last and without doubt the population of the city 
has decreased. When the tide will begin to turn the other 
way cannot be told but it may be predicted with some con- 
fidence that, with the return of peace conditions and better 
adjustments in the industrial world, a steady growth will 
come. All the usual means of keeping up the enrollment 
have been used. The loss has been most apparent in the 
higher grades. 

The schools have not been closed on account of bad 
weather but in October they were discontinued four weeks 
because of the epidemic of influenza then raging. All 
through the year there has been much absence on account 
of sickness. 

A large number of labor certificates have been taken out. 
The school census, which had been delayed in the taking by 
health and labor conditions, shows an increase in the num- 
ber of school children just under school age. 

The Work of the Schools. 

The Senior High School has suffered seriously from a 
changing corps of teachers; so seriously that it has been 
difficult to keep conditions normal. Although, in this per- 
plexity, it has been well nigh impossible to maintain the 
former standards of scholarship, we hope to return to them 
as soon as the country becomes used to changing conditions. 

Variation in the curricula of studies has been confined 
to the introduction of Spanish, the adoption of optionals in 
Domestic Arts, and to carrying out the requirements of the 
Smith-Hughes Act of Course IV. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The Parker School has suffered less from changes, the 
work being affected in a Uke degree. The new classes in 
elementary science and in Civics are interesting and do 
fine work. 

The Chandler, Walker, Garrison, and Eastman Junior 
High Schools retain their former standing. 

The two groups of high schools are in every way to be 
commended for their serious efforts and good results. 

The elementary schools have suffered by continued ab- 
sences of both pupils and teachers. These schools, furnish- 
ing the foundation for excellent work in the higher grades, 
are not taken seriously enough by the average citizen but to 
pass them and their teachers by without comment would be 
unjust and not in keeping with the importance of their 
part in our educational plan. They are strong in method 
and in effective work. The advance in every study is no- 
ticeable. Proficiency in reading even in the first year is 
quite surprising. It is not uncommon to find third grade 
children able to read intelligently the daily news and some- 
times this is true of second grade pupils. The course of 
study is being revised. One of the most important features 
will be more attention given to "Good Citizenship" which 
will begin in Class A and extend through the succeeding 
grades. 

The character and the scope of the requirements of the 
Morrill School of Mechanic Arts now conform to those of 
the Smith-Hughes Act as interpreted by the State De- 
partment of Pubhc Instruction. After vexatious delays, 
the course embracing electric wiring, motor construction, 
etc., has been installed and seems to be progressing satis- 
factorily. The installation of this course has been in ac- 
cord with the spirit of modern progress and the addi- 
tional cost is partly met by our proportional part of 
federal aid. The War classes were continued the required 
time and what they have done is fully set forth in the prin- 
cipal's report. 



school report. 65 

School Buildings. 

No repairs of an extensive nature have been made to the 
buildings for the past year. The larger items have been the 
re-tubing of the high school boilers, painting the rural school 
buildings, and a new coil for the Parker School. 

The usual plan of putting one building in first-class repair 
each successive year was omitted because of the scarcity of 
labor and the high cost of material. I believe this policy 
of putting off the needed repairs to be inadvisable because 
some buildings need them badly. Keeping the buildings 
warm at a reasonable cost is a difficult problem at the pre- 
vailing prices for fuel. The effect of an unusually mild 
winter has been of great help in keeping down the expense 
and much fuel will be left over for next year's supply. 

Transportation. 

This particular feature of school administration appears 
to be a distinct reality in this district, perhaps to a greater 
extent than in many other places. It has been quite care- 
fully carried out notwithstanding the fact that there is no 
mandatory legal statute governing it. The various routes 
have been maintained at a reasonable expense and as a 
general thing the people have been satisfied with the 
accommodations offered. If such conveniences have been 
withheld, it has been because nobody could be found to do 
the work except at rates which seemed extortionate. Dis- 
content has been manifested when pupils, who were being 
transported to Elementary Schools and the Junior High 
Schools, graduated, thus ending the privilege of being 
carried. Others evidently think that the teams should 
come to their doors else they are being discriminated against. 
Happily there are not many such cases and the large 
majority are reasonable and uncomplaining. 

The following changes in the routes have been made this 
year: 

Old Routes Discontinued. 

1. From "Break O'Day" to Harriet P. Dame School. 

5 



66 CITY OF CONCORD. 

2. From Broad Cove to Riverhill. 

3. From Black Hill to Harriet P. Dame. 

New Routes. 

1. From Iron Works District to Chandler School. 

2. From Black Hill to Penacook, Cogswell, Rumford 
and Chandler Schools. 

Rural Schools. 

The rural schools have not been so well attended as they 
were last year principally on account of regrading from eight 
to seven years. The shortage has been more apparent in 
the schools most remote from the city proper. There 
seems to be but little prospect of a larger enrollment either 
at Riverhill or at the Mountain. If decrease continues, 
the question of transporting the pupils to other centres will 
come up as an economic measure. 

The work of all these schools has shown a steady increase 
in power and when the lower classes have passed through 
the preparation given in the succeeding grades even better 
results will be gained. Six graduates of the Iron Works 
School and two from Riverhill entered the Chandler School 
in the fall. Sewing, drawing and music have been put in 
during the year thus giving these schools the benefit of 
special work they have not had before. Cooking is taken 
up in connection with the noonday meal. Boys from the 
Iron Works and the Millville schools take the woodworking 
course in the city proper. The rural schools need better 
heating facilities. Much inconvenience is experienced by 
smoke issuing from long, cold pipes. I also recommend 
that they be fitted up with movable school furniture so that 
spare room may be had for general exercises. The furniture 
now in use can be made available for rooms where such 
advantages are furnished by the school hall. 

Night Schools. 

Night schools have been conducted as usual. The class 
for Non-English speaking people has been in charge of Mrs. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 67 

Putnam a successful, experienced teacher. Unusual efforts 
were made this year to secure a better enrollment but to 
little avail. The mechanical drawing class under Mr. 
Taylor is made up of working people who represent staunch 
American citizenship. They are enthusiastic and studious. 
No tabulations are given because both schools are in ses-r 
sion at this writing. 

War Activities. 

Of the various organizations supported by the public, 
the schools seem to be called upon to the extent of their 
abihty about all the time. In time of war they are made 
use of by all the different agencies to help along the cause. 
They respond nobly and they ought to. In times of peace 
every variety of commercial enterprise is constantly seeking 
their strength as an advertizing medium. Often the 
methods used to circumvent the rules of the district are 
pernicious and persistent. It is always well to guard the 
schools against such encroachments else the standard of 
work will become so low as to fail of realizing on the time 
and money spent for their betterment. 

War Saving Stamps. 

Since January 5, 1919, the pupils of the schools have 
caused to be sold $11,441.16 in thrift stamps. The tabula- 
tion in the Appendix I speaks for itself. I am not aware 
that this record has been surpassed in the state. 

Patriotic Songs. 

All the schools were asked to incorporate in their usual 
morning exercise a song of decidedly patriotic flavor. This 
has resulted in a patriotic spirit revealed by song that has 
not been so apparent since the times of the Civil War. The 
songs most used are: "The Star Spangled Banner," 
"The Battle Hymn of the Republic," "America," "Kel- 
ler's American Hymn," "Keep the Home Fires Burning," 
"There's A Long, Long Trail," "Hurrah for Old New 
England," and others. 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In this particular I may refer to the work of the Parker 
School as model. Neither the loss of school time, extra 
effort, nor want of material has dampened ardor in this 
work, and the school, the city, the state and the country 
have been all the better for it. 

School Gardens. 

The call of the United States Government for school 
gardens was taken up by the pupils and the teachers with 
a vigorous and spirited response. The gratifying results 
reflect great credit upon all concerned. Exhibitions were 
conducted in various buildings giving additional evidence 
of the enthusiasm with which all phases of war work have 
been accepted by the schools. 

Obituary. 

Arthur Winkley French died at Wentworth Hospital, 
Dover, N. H., October 10, 1918, after an illness of short 
duration. Mr. French was called to the Morrill School of 
Mechanic Arts as an assistant instructor on May 10, 1909. 
Upon the resignation of Mr. Carroll, principal, he was chosen 
to fill his place, July 6, 1909, a position which he held up 
to the time of his death. On taking charge he set about 
raising the standard as well as the scope of the work and 
persevered until he brought it to such a state of per- 
fection that it was favorably known not only in New Hamp- 
shire but also throughout the country. He saw the school 
grow from one of three teachers and three hundred eighty- 
two students to one of seven teachers and four hundred 
fifty-six students. He spared no pains to fit himself for his 
position, attending the best University Summer Schools 
where he took courses in the various lines of work, even 
professional courses in the principles of teaching and ad- 
ministration. He conducted successful summer schools in 
our city, spoke at many of the Teachers' Institutes con- 
ducted by the State Department of Public Instruction and 
also Summer Schools at Plymouth, N. H. He found time 
to interest himself in the civic Hfe of our city to quite an 



SCHOOL REPORT. 69 

extent. In the early spring of 1918 he was given a leave of 
absence for a year to assist the United States Shipping 
Board as instructor of war classes in which he was emi- 
nently successful. His untimely death is mourned by 
many friends, his influence upon the rising generation of 
our city is sadly missed, and the school has lost the up- 
lifting influence of an energetic and unusually gifted young 
man. 

Physical Training. 

For a number of years I have recommended legislation 
regarding the better physical training of public school chil- 
dren in this city. To show you how this is being taken up 
in other places I may call your attention to the laws passed 
in the following states since 1915 : Illinois, New York, New 
Jersey, Nevada, Rhode Island, California, Maryland, and 
Delaware. Others are now giving it serious consideration. 

The aims and purposes of these laws vary in the different 
states but in general they aim : 

"To gain the development of organic vigor through 
nervo-muscular training. 

To promote mental and bodily poise. 

To correct postural defects. 

To secure co-ordination, strength and endurance. 

To promote the value of co-operation, self-subordina- 
tion and obedience to authority. 

To secure higher ideals, courage, and wholesome interest 
in recreation. 

To secure better hygienic conditions in the school and 
the house." 

In our city I call your attention to the poor results from 
tests given from time to time by Miss Dickerman in the 
Parker School; the testimony of the school nurse; my own 
observation of pupil violation of hygienic rules, the many 
bent forms and few examples of erect carriage as things to 
be directly touched upon by a course in physical training. 
Aside from these I should expect strong action to be taken 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

toward giving pupils clear ideas in regard to the following 
things about which they get no direction except from igno- 
rant and unthinking parents : 

The dangerous exposure to weather from scanty clothing 
most of which is caused by attempt to reaUze the extremes 
of modern fashion; the prevalence of high heels to shoes 
which must some day bring untold misery to the wearers; 
the steady stream of children attending the moving picture 
plays, many going there directly from school when they 
should be out in the open filling their lungs with fresh air 
instead of filling their young minds with situations and 
actions so extreme and vicious as to be frequently repulsive 
even to adults. 

In view of all these things I believe that some movement 
should be inaugurated to counteract such evils as much as 
possible in the rising generation and I feel this concern so 
strongly that I ask for a first class physical instructor who 
is professionally capable of looking after pupil health in all 
its various phases, and of administering a well-thought-out 
plan for the entire student body not the chosen few of 
athletic teams. If such a plan were in successful operation 
we should not only have healthier children but the problem 
of strong athletic teams would be much more easily solved. 
From such instruction I should expect : 

A better general scholarship. 

A more wholesome respect for authority, for religion and 

for the home life. 
A higher standard of morality. 
A quicker response in cases of national emergency. 

In conclusion I may say that the future of the public 
school was never brighter than it is today. Events of the 
last four years seem to have aroused the people of this 
country to a realization of the importance of maintaining 
a school system that has proved itself to be the foundation 
of national democracy and a true safeguard of personal 
liberty. 

The Americanization of our foreign population will mark 



SCHOOL REPORT. 71 

an advancement so beneficial that we are all wondering why- 
it was not done before. If the public school is to represent 
our national aspirations and guarantee our national security 
it must receive every incentive to become more effective. 
A part of the revenue which hitherto has been given to the 
debauchment of mankind through the use of liquor can well 
be used in giving poor boys and girls help in their endeavors 
to reach a higher plane of existence through the education 
given in advanced institutions of learning. It can be used 
to get better equipment for rooms, better salaries for teach- 
ers, better trained teachers for the poorer country districts 
and in improving the health conditions. The effects of 
teaching temperance and right living in the schools has been 
shown conclusively by our part in winning the World War 
and in the adoption of the eighteenth amendment to the 
Constitution. The frequent lessons in hygiene, which re- 
vealed the noxious effects of the misuse of alcoholic bever- 
ages upon mankind, given day after day in all grades of 
public schools throughout this country, was the factor 
which was needed to bring about the solution of the pro- 
hibition problem. This crystallized public opinion and 
created a sentiment against the evil. For this thing alone 
the schools should be given better privileges and the public 
school teacher should be accorded a place in society inferior 
to that of no other person. 

Still retaining a consciousness of the value of assistance in 
my work I extend cordial thanks to your honorable body, 
the teachers and all other citizens interested in public edu- 
cation, for the help given me during a trying year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT. 



REPORT OF THE HEADMASTER OF 
THE HIGH SCHOOL. 



Supt. L. J. Rundlett, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir: Enclosed you will find a report of the work 
of the Senior High School for the year, February, 1918 — 
February, 1919. 

Attendance. 

The attendance this year has been smaller than it was 
during the previous year. The total enrollment for the first 
semester was 461 which includes postgraduates and special 
students. Of the undergraduates in regular standing there 
were enrolled 456. 

Graduation. 

The two classes graduating in 1918 numbered 117. The 
class of January, 1918, had thirty-nine members and the 
class of June, 1918, had seventy-eight members. In this 
latter class diplomas were granted two young men who had 
entered the service of the United States before completing 
their courses. The class graduating in February, 1919, 
contained thirty-seven members. One diploma was granted 
a young man who had enlisted in the navy during the sum- 
mer. These classes have followed the custom established 
by previous classes of giving a present to the school before 
their graduation. The class of June, 1918, gave a picture 
of President Wilson and the class of February, 1919, gave a 
statue of an American soldier, entitled "Captured but not 
Conquered." 

Military Drill. 

Since the war opened many things have transpired to 
interfere with the work done in military drill. For one 
thing, we have lost several instructors and at times have 
been without an instructor at all. This has naturally inter- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

fered with the interest in the work. Another thing that has 
prevented enrollment has been the cost of the uniform. 
The gray uniform which has been worn by the cadet com- 
panies of the past has almost doubled in price. This has 
prevented some from joining the company. At the present 
time we are considering changing to a uniform more reason- 
able in price and hope to be able to bring the work in mili- 
tary drill back to its previous standing. On account of the 
crowded condition of our recitation program at present it 
is necessary to have military drill come after the close of 
the school session. I do not know whether under these 
conditions it would be possible to make drill compulsory 
again or not. If it can be done I think it would be better 
for the success of the department. The work in military 
drill is the only thing that we have in school approaching 
regular physical exercise which can be continued through- 
out the year. On that account I think it would be a good 
thing if all the boys were obliged to take part in it. 

The second annual Albin Prize Medal Contest was held 
on June 14, 1918. Sixteen students entered the contest 
and the medals were won by Nina G. Ramsaj^ and Haskell 
H. Cohn. 

During the fall term the usual Mothers' Meeting was 
held. The speaker for the afternoon was Dr. Marion Kerr 
of Boston. 

During the first semester of this year we have suffered 
many interruptions in the school work due partly to the 
influenza epidemic and also partly to sickness and loss of 
teachers. In some departments the interruptions for this 
reason have been considerable. This has naturally in- 
creased the work of the other teachers and has prevented 
us from accompHshing all that we had hoped to do during 
the year. I feel, though, that when all conditions are 
taken into consideration we can say that the work as a 
whole has been satisfactory. 

One new subject was started this year, the study of 
Spanish. We have now thirty-six students enrolled in this 
course with a prospect of an increase in another year. 



74 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Our Mechanic Arts course has been changed to meet the 
requirements of the Smith-Hughes act. This gives the 
boys more shop work and allows less time for academic 
subjects. 

In Courses I and II a little wider range of electives, 
particularly along the hne of household arts, has been 
allowed. These changes have been neither extensive nor 
radical and have only been made when it seemed that they 
would benefit the students. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES F. COOK, 
Headmaster. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
DRAWING. 



Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Union School 
District, Concord, N. H. 

Sir: An exhibition of drawing was held in June, 1918. 
The elementary classes showed excellent quahty in many 
varieties of work. Neatness and accuracy were noticeable. 
One of the best features of the exhibition was the lettering. 
Measuring exercises for use of the ruler are given in all 
grades. Classes of the High School Domestic Arts Course 
contributed drawings and designs similar to those which 
have been exhibited before. The house plans made by the 
girls of Class U under the instruction of Mr. Taylor and the 
books of illustrated compositions on house decoration with 
which Class V completed its course were very interesting. 
The number of High School pupils from other courses who 
could spare time for elective drawing was smaller than usual 
last year, so less of that kind of drawing could be exhibited. 

As part of the study of house furnishing, Class V of the 
Domestic Arts Course visited a furniture store and were 
shown examples of all kinds of floor-coverings and learned 
the differences in the weaves of carpets. 

Inspection of work at the end of the semester, February 
first, showed that the unusual number of absences of pupils 
and teachers since September first has had an effect on the 
work of this department. Some of the problems were 
omitted. The quahty of the work done is as good as usual. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FAITH C. STALKER. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
SEWING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of the Union School 
District, Concord, N. H. 

Following is a report of the work accomplished in the 
sewing department for the year 1918-1919. 

In September, 1918, a great change was made in the course 
and the methods of teaching it. The children have done 
well, both in adapting themselves to the change and the 
work accomplished. To begin with, all "model work" has 
been done away with, and the stitches are applied to some 
problem for the child's personal use. This, which is a 
necessary part of home-making to-day, arouses interest and 
enthusiasm in the work rather than a dislike for sewing, 

A very brief outline of the course may be of interest here : 

First Year. A knowledge of the stitches, their uses and 
how to do them. 

Second Year. Perfecting of stitches learned the jfirst 
year, simple cutting and garment construction with prob- 
lems such as (1) making a placket, (2) putting on a band, 
etc. 

Third Year. Machine stitching, instruction in the use of 
commercial patterns and more complex garment construction. 

Fourth Year. The fundamentals of sewing having been 
learned, the time is given over to the making of waists, 
skirts and dresses and simple millinery. The decoration or 
trimming receives much attention, that it may be simple, 
in good taste and conform to the color and lines of the gar- 
ment and the wearer. 

The practical side of the course, as such, ends here. 
Elective sewing is held in the Senior High School, but the 
class is a mixed one; that is, some have followed the work 
through the previous years and others have done practically 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

no sewing, consequently, a prescribed course cannot be 
followed. The fact that the only available time for this 
work is after school hours, is a great drawback to the size 
of the class. 

Work for the Charitable Society is done and furnishes 
problems otherwise not presented; such as, the making of 
a boy's blouse. 

Textile study, comparison of home-made and commercial 
garments, and talks on the manufacture of cloth fill in the 
course and teach the child how to buy cloth, so that full 
value of the money spent may be received. 

Respectfully submitted, 

B. LILLIAN BARKER. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
LUNCHES. 



Mr. L. J. RundleU, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: The work of the School Lunch Department 
has been much increased this year by the Food Conserva- 
tion Regulations, which necessitated the sending of reports 
to the State House, the use of wheat and meat substitutes, 
and the use of sugar certificates. The shortage of sugar 
was one of the most difficult problems to be met as children 
require more than older people. 

We were able to cope with the high prices of eggs through 
the purchase of a great many in April which were preserved 
in water glass. 

Although the prices of materials have increased to a great 
extent, the prices of the lunches have not been changed. For 
five cents one has a choice of soup with toast, two sandwiches, 
cocoa or milk with either a muffin or a sandwich, a meat or 
a meat substitute, mashed potato and muffin, salad or desert. 

The students worked under a great disadvantage owing 
to the epidemic, to war conditions and to the changing of 
teachers in this department. 

It has not been necessary to add a great deal to the gen- 
eral equipment this year. 

As special work, this department conducted a food sale 
for the benefit of the Red Cross at the Streeter Garden, 
prepared the refreshments for the parents' meetings and 
the lawn party which was given at the Parker School for 
the benefit of the Red Cross, and assisted the Girls' Club 
several times in a similar manner. 

The aim is to give the students a practical knowledge of 
cookery while furnishing a wholesome, nutritious, and well 
balanced lunch at the lowest possible cost. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRIET B. DAVIS. 



REPORT OF THE TEACHER OF 
COOKING. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools, Concord, N. H. 
Dear Sir : The work of the cooking department at the 
Parker School for the past year has been conducted along 
two lines: 

1. Preparation of the Lunches. The food for the school 
lunch has been prepared entirely by the students, the major 
part of the work having been done by the Parker School 
girls. Two classes for each morning in the week have been 
scheduled for cooking, each class having one and one-half 
hours for the work. 

2. Instruction of Elementary Classes. The work of the 
elementary classes has been divided into three parts: theory, 
practice, and recitation. These classes meet in the after- 
noon, and come from the Chandler, Walker, St. John, Sacred 
Heart, Eastman and Garrison Schools. 

The aim of the course is to give the students a knowledge 
of the simple foods, the general procedure for their prepara- 
tion, and the serving of them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MYRTLE FARRAR. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL NURSE. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent: 

Dear Sir: Dating from my appointment September 9, 
1918, as acting school nurse, during the leave of absence 
granted Miss Elizabeth Murphy, R. N., and handicapped 
at the beginning by the closing of schools during the epi- 
demic of influenza, I feel, in the comparatively short time 
I am not prepared to make a very extensive report. 

It has been most difficult to pick up the work which has 
been carried on for several years by one person, without 
making a material change which might seem more com- 
plicated to those in co-operation. 

The teachers have undoubtedly been called upon more 
often than usual this year, as it is mostly through co-opera- 
tion with them I have attained an insight into the routine 
of the work and I wish them to feel my indebtedness toward 
them. 

Child welfare today is a nation-wide problem and most 
interesting, but the school population of this city is too 
large for one to be expected to look after, going into detail 
as should be done. 

If a school physician, which to me seems the first solution 
of the welfare of the child, cannot be obtained, then at 
least an assistant would be most valuable. 

So far I have found no fund which is available in aiding 
those children from homes in straightened circumstances. 

The physicians have done a great deal of charity work 
in this line, but due to the fact that so many have entered 
the service since the outbreak of the war, the demand for 
those left, especially since the start of the epidemic, has 
been so great, that their physical endurance has been taxed 
nearly to the limit, and I have not felt like taking too much 
of their time from their much needed rest. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

Perhaps I might say that the cases I mostly refer to that 
need financial backing are the cases of crippled and de- 
formed children, which it takes a matter of months to cor- 
rect, but can be successfully done were there means of aid. 

I feel most grateful toward the parents in the interest 
and prompt response they have taken in defective vision of 
the child. 

Defective vision is the greatest drawback to the child. 
It cannot be expected to do the work the normal child is 
doing and then the question arises, "Why is not the child 
doing better work?" 

Again, a fund is needed from which we can draw to fur- 
nish glasses for the children who otherwise could not have 
them. 

Mr. Dexter deserves special credit for the interest he has 
taken in the children. A 10 per cent, discount has been 
allowed on each pair of glasses bought by the parents, with 
which I have already been able to furnish five pairs of 
glasses. 

The dental clinic has been carried on most successfully 
this year. Although the city has lost one of its dentists in 
the past year, the others most wilHngly substituted his 
Saturday afternoons. 

Miss Anderson is adding one more year of conscientious 
work, as assistant at the clinic. 

I greatly appreciate the co-operation which has been 
given by the Board of Education, you and the teachers. 

During the eighteen weeks of this school year I have 
made 162 home calls for the following conditions: 

Defective vision, 79 

Defective teeth, 52 

Throat and nose conditions, 12 

Pediculosis, 21 

Uncleanliness, 10 

Malnutrition, 3 

Tuberculosis, 2 

Mentally retarded, 3 
s 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Contagious diseases, 4 

Diseases of skin, 3 

Orthopedic, 3 

Vaccination, 6 

Other causes, 12 

Number interviews with ofl&cials and others, 37 

Number of children to physicians, 3 

In the dental clinic the following work has been done ; 

Number cleanings, 64 

Number fillings, cement, amalgam, 122 

Extractions, 40 

Respectfully submitted, 

GLADYS L. MORGAN, R. N. 



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REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF MUSIC. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent. 

Dear Sir: The abnormal conditions existing during 
the past year and especially during the last semester have 
made it difficult to maintain the usual standard of work. 
That we have been able to so nearly realize it is due to the 
earnest work of the teachers for which I wish to express my 
deep appreciation. 

A new rote-song book used in Classes A and B has 
aroused renewed interest in rote singing and given a better 
understanding of the correct use of the child voice. 

The individual sight singing in Classes E to L inclusive 
has taken on a higher standard of attainment. 

Chorus singing in the higher grades has been of an aver- 
age degree of merit. A cantata of High School grade has 
been successfully given by the Junior High School. 

The pupils in the Domestic Science and Arts Classes have 
taken up the work in music in a very satisfactory way. 

The High School Orchestra is more effective than it was 
last year and material in sight leads me to hope for con- 
tinued improvement. 

The demand for the services of the boys "after school" 
has prevented the formation of a Boys' Glee Club. The 
Girls' Club has done excellent work. 

The work of the Senior Class from the Dewey Training 
School has been badly interfered with by non-attendance. 

Again I thank the Superintendent and Board of Educa- 
tion for encouragement and support. 

Respectfully yours, 

CHARLES S. CONANT. 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF 
MANUAL TRAINING. 



Mr L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: In answer to your request, I submit here- 
with my first annual report of the work of the Morrill School 
of Mechanic Arts. 

The past year has been one of changes and readjustments 
in our school work as well as throughout the nation. As 
the months went by and the thought of the entire country 
became centered on "Winning the War," it became more 
and more a question of how we could best cooperate 
directly or indirectly to this end. When Mr. French left 
this school in March to enter the service of the United 
States Shipping Board, three war classes for training drafted 
men were well under way. The Radio class had been in 
session for nearly five months, the Machine Shop class 
about two, and the Forging-Acetylene Welding class a 
little less than that. The Radio class was continued until 
after the armistice was signed in November, though with 
several breaks in its sessions during the summer vacation 
and the influenza period. The first group of Machine Shop 
men finished their work early in June, and because of an 
insufficient number of new enrollments the class was dis- 
continued. Later in June the class in Forging-Acetylene 
Welding also finished its work. At this time it was decided 
that the school should purchase an acetylene welding outfit 
of its own, and that the next group of men should specialize 
in this branch of the work. This was done, and a second 
class, larger than the first, was organized early in July and 
continued into November, except for five or six weeks 
during the epidemic. 

These classes all worked under the handicap of having 
men enlisting and being drafted from their ranks before 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

completing the allotted unit of work. The fact that the 
sessions were held in the afternoon when many men could 
not leave their work also tended to prevent the largest 
number making use of the opportunities offered. Yet in 
spite of these things many of the men went into the branch 
of the service for which they had been trained, and suc- 
ceeded. It has been a source of great satisfaction to the 
instructors of these classes to talk with the men as they have 
been home from time to time, and hear their expression of 
the help which their training at the school has been to them. 

The evening drawing class which has been so successful 
the past two or three seasons has recently been organized 
for its winter term. The enrollment is at present 19, all 
of them being men from the industries of the city, who 
realize the value which a training in mechanical drawing, 
reading of blueprints, etc., will be to them in their work. 

During the spring vacation last April it was decided to 
reorganize the program of the Morrill School to conform 
with the new Federal program as laid out under the Smith- 
Hughes Act. As far as our school was concerned it meant 
this: The Smith-Hughes program recognises three classes 
of subjects for a mechanic arts course. (1) Shop or Voca- 
tional, (2) Related, (3) Non-related. The first two are to 
be taught in the shop by the shop instructors, and the third 
in the High School proper. In our school session of six 
periods per day, at least half of the time is to be spent in 
the shop or studying the related subjects. So that where 
our old program called for twelve periods per week of 
shopwork and drawing, under this new program the boys 
receive instruction in this school at least fifteen, and in 
most cases twenty periods per week. This necessitated 
adding to our course of study one new vocational subject, 
Electricity, which I will speak of later in the report, and 
two related subjects, Applied Physics, and Mechanics. 
The result of this additional time in the shop has had the 
following affect on the enrollment. One year ago there 
were 156 High and Parker School pupils, including 28 
specials, taking work in this building, for a total of 1,407 



SCHOOL REPORT. ' 87 

pupil-periods per week. At the beginning of this present 
semester there are 114 High and Parker School pupils, 
which includes a few specials, taking a total of 1,770 pupil- 
periods per week. 

Largely as a result of this new program it became neces- 
sary to move the woodworking equipment from Room 3 
to a new room in the basement of the Rumford School. 
This gives a room in the south end of the city for the 
Elementary Manual Training, and with the room in the 
Walker School, allows all the grammar school woodwork 
to be taken care of outside of our building. As the com- 
bination of high and grammar school classes in one building 
had never been ideal, this arrangement is from this point 
of view an improvement. Perhaps the most serious draw- 
back to this arrangement has been the fact that six different 
teachers have had classes at different periods through the 
week in the room in the Rumford School, with the con- 
sequent difficulty of keeping tools or suppUes in order. 
This number will be reduced to three this coming semester 
and the results should improve accordingly. 

In connection with the Elementary Woodwork a new 
course laid out by Mr. Hartwell is being tried out this year, 
which will it is hoped combine the advantages of the old 
blueprint system and the more recent project system, with 
none of the unsatisfactory aspects of the latter. 

A number of changes have taken place in the teaching 
force during the present year. Soon after Mr. French left 
to go into the service, Mr. Willard H. Nute, C. H. S. 1918 
(Jan.) was engaged to come in as an assistant in the machine 
shop and patternmaking departments. Mr. Wiesmann 
and Mr. Gove resigned in June to take positions elsewhere, 
and Mr. Alden resigned to go into the service. Their 
places were filled by Mr. Herbert C. Wilcox (pattern- 
making), Mr. Waldo S. Roundy (printing), and Mr. Harry 
R. Sturm (woodworking), all being residents of this city. 
The addition of the work in electricity called for an an- 
other instructor, though it was not until about the first 



88 ■ CITY OF CONCORD. 

of November that we secured Mr. Philip H. Pike to teach 
that branch of the work. 

For the coming year I would recommend the following 
additions to our equipment: The Electrical Course calls 
for theory and constructive work in a variety of electrical 
subjects, and practically all the equipment for this is yet 
to be purchased. To do the work we have laid out I should 
estimate that equipment to the value of about $350 will be 
required at once for this department. A very valuable 
accessory to this electrical work as it deals with the electrical 
equipment of automobiles and their repair would be a small 
building to be used as a garage, or in the coldest weather 
for lumber storage. This building could be constructed 
by the boys, and plans and specifications for it have been 
completed for some time. The estimated cost of such a 
building is about $200. Finally, it is probable that with 
continued large classes from the Parker School it will be 
necessary to add a new equipment of woodworking tools 
before next September to replace those which were taken 
to the Rumford School. In that case, Room 3 would be 
used for both electrical and woodworking classes, and the 
plans have been made with this in view. For the AppHed 
Physics work, the addition of an electric pyrometer is 
necessary in order to illustrate modern methods of heat 
treatment of iron and steel. 

These additions to and improvements in our equipment 
are only such as will enable us to carry out the spirit as 
well as the letter of the Smith-Hughes program, as it is 
outHned by the State Department of Public Instruction, 
and approved by the Federal Board for Vocational 
Education. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RAYMOND P. OILMAN. 



REPORT OF INSTRUCTOR IN 
MILITARY DRILL. 



Mr. Louis J. Rundleit, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir : Military drill at the High School went along 
in a very satisfactory manner until the signing of the armis- 
tice, November 11th, when a company of fifty dwindled 
down to about thirty and remained at that number until 
two weeks ago, when the old spirit seemed to be revived 
and most of the boys came back again. 

I hope we will be able to go on the range this summer and 
have target practice. 

In order to get the results desired and bring the cadets 
back to their old time form I would suggest that military 
drill be made compulsory. 

MICHAEL H. MULLIGAN, 

Instructor, Military Drill. 



APPENDIX I. 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST. 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Of Union School District, at High School Hall, Tuesday 
Evening, February 25, 1919, at Eight O'Clock. 



Selection — " Faust ' 



Gounod 



PROGRAM. 
High School Orchestra 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL. 

1. "Democracy Versus Autocracy" 

George H. E. Gordon, Group I, Class T 

2. "For Peace or War" 

Margaret Hilda Wall, Group I, Class V 

3. "A Few of Concord's Present Needs" 

Clyde Hudson Gray, Group II, Class P 

4. "The Horse and The Dog in War" 

Ethel Maude Brown, Group I, Class R 

Waltz— "Stars Brightly Shining" Emil Bronte 

Girls' Glee Clubs, High School 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION. 

1. "The Liberty Bell" Lippard 

Doris Ellen Abbott, Chandler School 

2. "America, The Land of Promise" Ingersoll 

PauUne Cushnie, Garrison School 

3 . " Americans All ' ' Marvin 

PhiUp Nelson Guyol, Walker School 

4. " Incentives to Patriotism " Burrill 

George CUnton Stuart, Eastman School 

Selection — A Bagatelle "Fads and Fancies" Gruenwald 

Orchestra 



94 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION. 



1. "The Owl Critic" Fields 

Vesta Pauline Morrison, Eastman School 

2. "How Jimmy Tended the Baby" Aldrich 

Mary Esther Gushing, Garrison School 

3. "Langemarck at Ypres" Campbell 

Ruth Herter, Chandler School 

4. "Midshipman Easy" Bates 

Laura Plummer, Walker School 

March—' ' Battleship Connecticut ' ' Fulton 

Orchestra 



AWARD OF PRIZES. 
Original Declamation — High School, Groups 1 and 2. 

First Prize, $15, awarded to Clyde Hudson Gray, Parker School, Class P. 
Second Prize, $10, awarded to Margaret Hilda Wall, High School, 
Class V. 

Forensic Declamation. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to PhiUp Nelson Guyol, Walker School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Doris Ellen Abbott, Chandler School. 

Miscellaneous Declamaiion. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Mary Esther Gushing, Garrison School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Vesta Pauline Morrison, Eastman School. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Prof. James A. Tufts, Exeter, N. H. 
William N. Rogers, Esq., Wakefield, N. H. 
Rev. Harold H. Niles, Concord, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 



RECEIVED. 



Balance from last year's account, $3,007 . 78 

Interest on the same, 112.85 

Sale of 393 tickets at 35 cents, 137 . 55 



$3,258.18 



EXPENDED. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional, $50.00 

Prizes, including books, 48.25 

English Prize Composition, expense, 93.00 
Miscellaneous expense, including printing, selling, taking 

tickets, music, ushers, janitor, etc., 19.50 

Cash on hand as a guaranty fund for future contests, 3,047.43 

$3,258.18 



SECOND ANNUAL ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL CONTEST. 
High School Hall. June 14, 1918, 8 p. m. 

PROGRAM. 

Violin Solo — "Melody in F" A. Rubinstein 

Martin Beggs 

Order of Speakers : 

Carmi Phelps Browne 

Nina Grace Ramsay 

Richard Libby Hurd 

Ruth Celia StanieLs 

Haskell Hieman Colin 

Eleanor EHzabeth Bailey 

Harold Emerson Eraser 

Mabel Amelia Downs 

Guy Ordway Edmunds 

Roger Moore Eastman 

Agnes Louise Johnston 

Robert Francis Anselm McCormick 

Elizabeth Sarah Chase 

Harry Edward Mclntire 

Mary Agnes Shannon ► 

Philip Babcock Gove 

Vocal Solo 

Melvin Crowell 

Announcement of Award 

JUDGES. 

Hon. Ernest W. Butterfield, Concord, N. H. 
Supt. Henry S. Roberts, Suncook, N. H. 
Rev. Elmer P. Blake, Pembroke, N. H. 

MEDAL WINNERS. 

Nina Grace Ramsay — "The Vision of World Peace" 
Haskell Hieman Cohn — "The Future of Young America" 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Held at the Parker School, May 4, 1918. 



School. 


No. Pupils 

Enrolled in 

School. 


No. Pupils 

Taking 

Part. 


Per cent of 
Pupils in 
Contest. 


Average 
Rank of 
Pupils. 


Average 
Per cent 
of Pupils. 


Garrison, Junior 


16 


7 


45.00 


70f 


53 


Walker, Junior 


32 


8 


25.00 


73f 


65i 


Parker, Junior 


194 


40 


20.61 


6I4V 


62 


Chandler, Junior 


134 


23 


17.16 


53|_^3 


72/5 


High, Senior 


444 


36 


7.87 


36fg 


77tV 


Eastman, Junior 


9 



PRIZES. 


0.00 








General Prizes. 






Prizes. 


Awarded to 


Class 




Subject. 





Senior High. 

First, $6 Ehzabeth S. Chase V "The Character of Jean Val- 

jean" 
Second, $4 Haskell H. Cohn V "Macbeth's Fatal Weakness" 

Class Prizes. 

Senior High. 
Classes U, V. 

First, $3 Elizabeth S. Chase V As above. 
Second, $2 Haskell H. Cohn V As above. 

Classes S, T. 

First, $3 Paul L. Bailey S "The Character of Jean Val- 

jean" 
Second, $2 Mildred A. Patterson S "Why I Should Have Liked to 

Serve King Arthur" 

Classes Q, R. 
Leshe J. Dixon R "The Story of Joseph" 



First, $3 

Second, $2 Dorothy M. Scott 



R A Stirring Ballad "Barbara 
Frietchie" 



98 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Parker School. 

Junior High. 

Classes 0, P. 

First, $3 Marjorie F. Lowe P "Eppie's Influence on Silas 

Marner" 

Second, $2 Lena B. Robinson O "Eppie's Influence on Silas 

Marner" 





Chandler School. 




Classes M, N. 


First, $3 


Lula E.Gordon N "The Combat" 


Second, $2 


Olive P. La Har N "The Combat" 



KINDERGARTEN SONGS AND GAMES. 

Phenix Hall, June 11, 1918, 

AT 

Three O' Clock p. m. 



PROGRAM. 



Greeting 

Prayer 

Mother Goose Melodies: 
"The Little Pig" 
"Bean Porridge Hot" 



Hymn 

"The Morning Sun" 
"PoUy Put the Kettle On" 
"Wee WnUe Winkie" 
"Little Boy Blue" 



"The Star" 
"Robin Redbreast' 
"My Pansies" 



"A Game for the Ring" 

"The Doll Game" 
"Bye Baby Bunting" 
"Dancing Game" 
"Kinder Polka" 
"The Muffin Man" 



Songs. 
"Baby's Boat" 
"The Blue Bird" 
"Two Little Roses" 

Games. 
"The Garden Game" 



"The Owl" 
"The Tulips" 
"The Gold Mine' 



"Soldier Game" 



"The Rocking Horse" 

(Rumford Kindergarten) 

(Ivimball Kindergarten) 

(Garrison Kindergarten) 

(Walker Kindergarten) 

(Dewey Kindergarten) 



LAWN PARTY. 

Parker School Playground, May 29, 1918, 4 to 6 p. m. 

Refreshments are served for the Benefit of the Red Cross. 

Selections, Parker School Orchestra 

French games and plays 

Folk dances 

Original song — "We're Concord Red Cross Jimiors" 

Calisthenics 

Patriotic play 

May pole dance 

Community singing at 5.30 p. m. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS 



Record of stamps sold by pupils of the public schools 


of Union School 


District from January 5, 


1918 to March 1, 


1919: 






War 


Thrift * 


Amount 




Stamps 


Stamps 


Paid 


High School, 


195 


3,866 


$995.24 


Parker School, 


378 


7,620 


1,961.77 


Chandler School, 


198 


3,610 


930.89 


Walker School, 


228 


4,855 


1,248.54 


Garrison School, 


228 


4,277 ■ 


1,103.42 


Eastman School, 


27 


709 


181.20 


Rumford School, 


334 


6.094 


1,576.55 


Kimball School, 


230 


5,612 


1,438.51 


Penacook School, 


99 


2,294 


588.67 


Franklin School, 


31 


777 


198.90 


Dewey School, 


9fi 


2,342 


599.40 


H. P. Dame School, 


3t) 


778 


199.80 


Cogswell School, 


25 


803 


204.46 


Millville School, 


21 


561 


143.17 


Iron Works School, 


17 


272 


70.64 



2,143 44,470 

' This includes the war stamps reduced to thrift stamps. 



Ll.441.16 



MEMORIAL DAY OFFERING. 



1918 

High School $21.52 

KimbaU School 16.08 

Rumford School 11 .46 

Walker School 10.02 

Chandler School 8. 71 

Garrison School 7 . 40 

Penacook School 5 . 85 

Parker School 5.81 

Dewey School 4 . 57 

Cogswell School 3.69 

Eastman School 2.85 

Harriet P. Dame School 2.77 



Franklin School 


. $2.40 


Millville School 


1.55 


Riverhill School 


1.60 


Iron Works School . . . . 


1.25 


Mountain School 


.83 


Sacred Heart School . . 


7.39 


St, John's School 


3.96 




$119.71 


Additional 


21 







$119.92 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING 
WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the fourth day of April, 
1918, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the follow- 
ing subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

4. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

5. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office three years, to fill the vacancies arising from 
the expiration of the term of office of Edward C. Niles, 
Osma C. Morrill, and Charles Duncan, and to fill any other 
vacancies that may occur in said Board. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools from April 4, 1918 
to September 1, 1919, including mihtary drill, manual 
training, night school, medical inspection, etc. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for special repairs to school buildings from 
April 4, 1918 to September 1, 1919. 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eighth day of March, 1918. 

EDWARD C. NILES, 
DENNIS E. SULLIVAN, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
HARRY F. LAKE, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
FANNY E. MINOT, 
LILLIAN P. SHEPARD, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the eighteenth day of March, 1918, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the Police Station in 
the city of Concord, N. H., being a pubHc place within said 
district. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 

March 20, 1918. 
Personally appeared before me, on this date the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

JOSIAH E. FERNALD, 

Justice of the Peace. 

A true copy of the warrant, return service, and certificate 
of oath. 

Attest: 

HERBERT W. RAINIE, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF ANNUAL MEETING. 



In accorda'iice with the foregoing warrant, a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
Auditorium on Prince Street in Concord, on the evening 
of April 4, 1918, at 7.30. 

The meeting was called to order by Louis C. Merrill, 
moderator. 

Article 1. On motion of Arthur F. Sturtevant the 
clerk was authorized to cast one ballot for Louis C . Merrill 
as moderator for the ensuing year and he was declared 
elected. He was sworn to the discharge of his duties by 
the clerk. 

Article 2. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf the mod- 
erator was authorized to cast one ballot for Herbert W. 
Rainie as clerk for the ensuing year and he was declared 
elected. The oath was administered by the moderator. 

Article 3. On motion of H. E. Chamberlain, John P. 
George and Henry H. Metcalf were" chosen auditors for 
the ensuing year. 

Article 4. On motion of A. F. Sturtevant, the report 
of the Board of Education as printed, was adopted and 
placed on file. 

Article 5. On motion of A. F. Sturtevant the meeting 
proceeded to the election of three members of the Board of 
Education for three years. It was unanimously voted 
that the polls be closed at 7.50 P. M. 

It was voted that the meeting proceed with its considera- 
tion of the articles of the warrant until the close of the polls. 



104 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Article 6. On motion of H. H. Metcalf, it was voted 
that there be raised and is hereby ordered to be raised on 
the polls and ratable estates within Union School District, 
the sum of fourteen thousand nine hundred ninety-five 
dollars ($14,995) of which sum six thousand nine hundred 
ninety-five dollars ($6,995) shall be appropriated for the 
payment of the interest on its bonded debt accruing during 
the year and eight thousand dollars ($8,000) for the pay- 
ment of the bonds of the district maturing July 1, 1918. 

Article 7. On motion of A. F. Sturtevant, it was 
voted that there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District for the support of schools for the ensuing year 
such a sum as in addition to the sum assigned to the district 
by the City of Concord out of its appropriation for schools, 
will amount to the sum of one hundred fifty-two thousand, 
seven hundred ninety dollars and fifty cents ($152,790.50) 
and that the raising of the additional amount needed for 
the period from the expiration of the ensuing year to 
September 1,1919 be deferred until the next annual meeting. 

Article 8. On motion of Henry E. Chamberlain, it 
was voted that there be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District for special repairs to school buildings the 
sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000). 

The polls closed at 7.50 and the vote was as follows: 

Whole number of votes cast 18. E. C. Niles, Osma C. 
Morrill, and Charles Duncan had each 18 and were declared 
elected members of the Board of Education of Union 
School District to serve three years. 

There being no further business, it was voted to adjourn. 

A true record. Attest: 

HERBERT W. RAINIE, 
Clerk. 



EVENTS OF THE YEAR. 



1918. 
April 25. — Fast Day. 

May 10.— Institute M. V. T. A. at Manchester. 

May 23. — General notice sent to all the teachers to use 
patriotic songs in school. 

May 29.^ — -Lawn party for Red Cross by pupils of the Parker 
School. 

May 30. — Memorial Day. 

June 11. — Exhibition of plays and games by the con- 
solidated kindergartens at Phenix Hall. 

June 8. — Albin Prize medal contest. 

June 14. — Schools closed for the year. 

September 3.^ — School year began. 

September 6. — Annual address to teachers by the superin- 
tendent. 

September 10-11. — School garden exhibit, Harriet P. 
Dame School. September 13. — Walker and Garrison 
Schools. September 17.^ — -Rumford and Penacook 
Schools. September 19. — Eastman School. Septem- 
ber 25.— Dewey School. September 2Q. — Cogswell 
School. September 27. — Kimball and Franklin Schools. 

September 20. — Superintendent Butterfield addressed the 
High School teachers on the "Marking System." 
Entertainment by the teachers of the Parker School. 

September 27. — ^Schools closed on account of the epidemic 
of influenza. 



106 CITY OF CONCORD. 

October 28. — Schools resumed work after four weeks. 

November 11. — Holiday — Signing of the Armistice. 

November 27. — Thanksgiving Recess. 

December 10. — ^Dr. Marion Kerr lectured to parents and 
high school teachers. 

December 20. — Schools closed for Christmas vacation, one 
week. 

December 30. — Schools began winter term. 

1919. 

January 1. — New Year's hohday. 

January 24.^ — -Merrimack Valley Teachers' Institute at 
Concord. 

February 14. — Semester closed. 

February 25. — Prize Speaking Contest. 



APPENDIX II. 











TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE 




1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


SCHOOLS. 


S 

a 
■3 

MS 



ll 

II. 

« S^ 

< 


Whole number of differ- 
ent pupils registered 
during the year (count 
every pupil registered). 


Whole number of pupils 
not previously regis- 
tered in any other 
school in town during 
the year. 


Whole number of differ- 
ent pupils registered 
during the current 
school year who have 
attended at least two 
weeks not previously 
registered in any other 
public school in town 
during the year. 


Whole number of differ- 
ent pupils who had 
been registered pre\'i- 
ously in some other 
town of the state dur- 
ing the year (marked 3 
in the register). 




1 


s 



"3 




•2 



1 


1 


3 


1 




Girls. 
Total. 


High Schools. 
High 


38. 

38. 

35.6 

38. 

38. 

38. 


11 
11. 

12. 
12. 
12. 
13.5 


221 
121 

97 
24 
11 
3 


330 

157 

110 

26 

9 

7 


551 

278 

207 

50 

20 

10 


196 
94 
57 
19 
11 
3 


291 

126 

90 

17 

9 

7 


487 

220 

147 

36 

20 

10 


191 
93 
57 
19 
11 
3 


290 

124 

90 

17 

8 
7 


481 

217 

147 

36 

19 

10 


1 
1 

1 







5 


1 


1 
1 
6 


1 






Walker 








Total 


37.6 

38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 
38. 


71.5 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12.5 

13.5 

13. 

14.5 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12.5 

12.5 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

12. 

11.5 

12.5 

12.5 

13. 

12.5 

12.5 

13. 

12.5 

12.5 


477 

19 
25 
26 
27 
33 
33 
25 
11 
21 
22 
15 
16 

5 
12 
17 
43 
37 
33 
30 
37 
24 
15 
28 
27 
33 
32 
41 
33 
27 
29 
29 
29 
17 
20 
15 
28 
37 
29 

8 
25 
18 
29 
36 


639 

22 
27 
27 
27 
31 
26 
24 

9 
15 
20 
23 
22 

9 
14 
18 
34 
43 
29 
30 
22 
23 
22 
30 
38 
39 
34 
22 
24 
15 
19 
24 
29 
16 
16 
18 
25 
26 
20 
17 
12 
29 
36 
22 


1,116 

41 
52 
53 
54 
64 
59 
49 
20 
36 
42 
38 
38 
14 
26 
35 
77 
80 
62 
60 
59 
47 
37 
58 
65 
72 
66 
63 
57 
42 
48 
53 
58 
33 
36 
33 
53 
63 
49 
25 
37 
47 
65 
58 


380 

8 
15 
21 
16 
23 
24 
20 
10 
20 
21 
15 
16 

5 
12 
15 
27 
24 
24 
10 
30 
19 

9 
21 
16 
26 
19 
22 
20 
26 
23 
27 
16 
11 
13 
10 
19 
27 
27 

8 
24 
18 
12 
32 


540 

10 
17 
20 
20 
21 
23 
21 

9 
14 
20 
23 
21 

9 
14 
16 
10 
27 
20 
16 
18 
20 
17 
13 
24 
21 
26 
13 
19 
13 
16 
23 
28 
12 
12 

8 
17 
20 
18 
15 
12 
27 
15 
20 


920 

18 
32 
41 
36 
44 
47 
41 
19 
34 
41 
38 
37 
14 
26 
31 
37 
51 
44 
26 
48 
39 
26 
34 
40 
47 
45 
35 
39 
39 
39 
50 
44 
23 
25 
18 
36 
47 
45 
23 
36 
45 
27 
52 


374 

8 
15 
21 
13 
23 
23 
20 
10 
20 
21 
15 
16 

5 
11 
15 
27 
21 
13 
10 
30 
19 

9 
21 
16 
26 
19 
22 
21 
25 
23 
26 
28 
11 
13 
10 
19 
22 
26 

8 
23 
16 
11 
32 


536 

10 
17 
20 
20 
21 
22 
20 

9 
14 
20 
23 
21 

9 
14 
16 
10 
24 
11 
16 
18 
20 
17 
13 
24 
21 
26 
13 
18 
13 
16 
22 
16 
12 
12 

8 
16 
19 
17 
14 
12 
27 
15 
20 


910 

18 
32 
41 
33 
44 
45 
40 
19 
34 
41 
38 
37 
14 
25 
31 
37 
45 
24 
26 
48 
39 
26 
34 
40 
47 
45 
35 
39 
38 
39 
48 
44 
23 
25 
18 
35 
41 
43 
22 
35 
43 
26 
52 


3 


2 

1 
1 

2 




1 
1 


1 

1 
2 
2 
1 

3 
2 
3 



1 
1 




3 




1 
2 
1 



6 


1 
2 

1 
2 




2 
2 


1 


1 






2 
1 
1 
1 



1 




1 
1 

2 
1 

1 



1 

1 






9 


3 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 



2 
3 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
'4 
3 
4 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 


1 
2 
2 
1 



Elementary Schools. 
Walker, 1 


Walker, 2 


Walker, 3 


Walker, 4 


Walker, 5 


Walker, 6 


Walker, 7 








Garrison, 5 






Eastman, 2 






RninfnrH, '). , 






Rumford ,5 




Rumford, 7 


Kimball, 1 


Kimball, 2 


Kimball, 3 


Kimball, 4 


Kimball, 5 




Kimball, 7 




Penacook, 2 




Faanklin, 1 . . ... 




Franklin, 3 




Dewey, 2 


Dewey, 3 


Harriet P. Dame, 1 

Harriet P. Dame, 2 

Harriet P. Dame, 3 

Cogswell, 1 


Cogswell, 2 




Total 


38. 


527.0 


1,096 


1,028 


2,124 


801 


758 


1,559 


783 


726 


1,509 


32 


26 


58 





TEAR ENDING JUNE 21, 1918. 



7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


■w 


a 
o 

a 








1 




c 


-a 
a 
a 


•a 
a 

83 


1 


a 


>> 


3 


1 


S 


"3 


s 

a 


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«*- 












•■6 


tn 


U3 


1 


•2 


g 


a> 




a 


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J 


a 


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S'^ 














a> 


.13 


JH 






A 






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a.B 






O. 






a 








a 






o. 




ea 






cal3 






3 














o. 


o 






a 














C 










>. 


>> 






O flS 


li 


1 

I.-3 
S o. 

aj, 


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a 
S 

« 

'5 

-a 


a 

>■ 
03 


d 
'■i 

a 


II 

w. a 
°& 

• 2 


i 

a 
■■B 


a 

°-o. 

p 

C3 rt 


'o jj 

Is 

>, 


1 
a 

JUJ3 


1 

H 


l§ 

a X 

■m 


> 

o 

1 
a ^ 


J2 

> 
o a 

1 s 


1^ 


>o 


|-a 






-2 "2 


^ "« 


§'i 








a 




S o 


"o > 


o.SP 


2 o 


"o a 




So 


a s 


a g 


a 2 


a a 


-t o 


S £ 








V ^ 




< 


J3ua 


ja a> 


JSt^ 


-a c3 


JH o 


3-S 


3-^ 


a-— 


3 O. 


s-S 


O H 


> 

< 


<1 


■< 


< 


Pi 




^ 


g: 


^ 


=^ 


^ 


z 


z 


•z 


z; 


■z 


, 10 35 


28. 


442. 


17. 


459. 


.96 


1,374 


2.7 








31 


200 


256 


61 


13 


56 





58 


; ti 12 


11. 


195. 


8. 


203. 


.97 


150 


.53 








78 


119 


23 


43 


8 


130 





31 


. 9 


14 


7.7 


130.7 


4.70 


135.4 


.96 


33 


.1 








85 


55 


7 


39 


1 


60 





13 


1 1 


1 


1. 


30.15 


1.76 


31.8 


.94 


4 


.08 








24 


12 





20 


1 


10 





3 


1 





0. 


18.12 


.66 


18.79 


.96 


9 


.45 








13 


7 





8 





85 





1 


1 
'35 





0. 


8.33 


.47 


8.80 


.94 


3 


.30 








6 


4 





9 





30 





1 


62 


47.7 


824.30 


32.59 


856.79 


.95 


1,573 


.69 








237 


397 


286 


180 


23 


371 





107 


1 





0. 


19.62 


.47 


20 09 


.97 


4 


.09 








14 


4 





8 





16 





2 








0. 


24.59 


2.33 


26.92 


.91 


4 


.77 








30 


2 





4 





11 





1 








0. 


33.87 


3.58 


37.45 


.90 


6 


.11 








39 


2 





8 





18 





2 








0. 


35.42 


3.25 


38.67 


.91 


10 


,18 








33 


3 





8 


• 


18 














0. 


37.20 


4.07 


41.27 


.90 


9 


.14 








44 








4 





14 





3 








0. 


32.50 


3 03 


35 53 


.91 


19 


.32 





16 


31 








11 





32 





1 


i 






0. 


27.42 


2.68 


30.10 


.91 


23 


.47 





35 


6 








7 





30 











0. 


16.83 


1.16 


18. 


.93 


24 


1.2 








18 


1 





5 





7 


1 











0. 


26. 


1.56 


27.62 


.94 


24 


.66 








33 


1 





6 





18 














0. 


25.05 


2 63 


27.68 


.85 


36 


.66 








41 








8 





9 





2 


i 





0. 


23.27 


3 01 


26.28 


.88 


28 


.73 





5 


33 








7 





10 








' 





0. 


25.25 


2.47 


27.72 


.90 


46 


1.21 





28 


9' 








9 





13 








1 





0. 


12.79 


.72 


13.51 


.92 


22 


1.57 








14 


• 





8 





30 


1 


2 








0. 


20.22 


1.72 


22.94 


,91 


7 


.26 








25 


1 





7 





24 





1 








0. 


26.01 


3.52 


29.53 


.88 


32 


.91 





21 


10 








7 





26 


2 


2 


1 


2 


1. 


36. 


2. 


38. 


.95 


5 


.06 








29 


8 





4 


2 


37 





4 


1 


2 


.005 


37.43 


1.92 


.39.35 


.95 


7 


.08 








44 


7 





5 




25 





8 


1 


1 


.99 


37.32 


2.76 


40.08 


.93 


20 


.32 








40 


4 





4 




46 





7 


8 


3 


3. 


37.68 


2.31 


39.99 


.94 


13 


.21 








25 


1 





6 




15 





3 


. 


1 


.99 


41.09 


2.27 


43.36 


.94 


34 


.57 





10 


38 








6 




38 





2 


'1 





0. 


31.21 


2.72 


33 93 


.94 


22 


.46 





18 


21 








6 




25 





4 


d 





0. 


20.63 


1.70 


22.33 


.91 


32 


.9 





26 











4 




35 





2 


1 


2 


1.5 


29. 


1. 


30. 


.96 


15 


.25 








29 


4 


1 


9 




18 





2 








0. 


32. 


2. 


34. 


.94 


18 


.27 








35 


5 





9 




20 





2 








0. 


39.79 


2.55 


42.34 


.93 


19 


.26 








43 


4 





11 




34 





2 





1 


.26 


41.02 


2.52 


43.54 


.94 


13 


.19 








45 








12 




47 


3 


4 








0. 


41.57 


1.78 


43.35 


.95 


36 


.56 








33 


1 


1 


7 




19 





1 


2 


2 


.99 


34.82 


3.54 


38.36 


.90 


67 


1.17 





8 


31 








8 




23 














0. 


24.61 


3.70 


28.31 


.86 


61 


1.45 





22 


17 








8 




22 









* 


1 


1.00 


33.78 


1.42 


35.20 


.96 


9 


.18 








37 


2 





7 




26 





9 


1 


1.00 


34.01 


2.76 


36.74 


.92 


24 


.46 








47 


3 





7 




18 





2 


1 





0. 


32.63 


1.99 


34.62 


.93 


14 


.24 





3 


41 








14 




27 





3 


1 





0. 


22.13 


1.5 


23.63 


.93 


7 


.21 








22 


1 





8 




19 





5 


1 





0. 


23. 


2. 


25. 


.92 


19 


.52 





7 


18 








8 




19 








1 





0. 


16.58 


2.91 


19.49 


.85 


46 


.94 





18 











8 




11 








1 





0. 


32. 


2. 


34. 


.94 


24 


.45 








36 








13 




19 





2 


1 





0. 


37. 


2. 


39, 


.95 


29 


.46 





5 


42 








6 





45 





2 


) 1 


1 


1. 


34. 


3. 


37. 


.92 


47 


.96 





34 


11 








8 


1 


78 





1 


) 





0. 


16.98 


1.86 


18.84 


.90 


10 


.4 


! 


19 


4 





7 





42 


1 


1 


1 





0. 


25.25 


1.82 


27.07 


.93 


13 


.35 





1 


36 








7 





16 





4 


) 1 


1 


.97 


32.93 


4.27 


37.20 


.88 


24 


.51 





26 


19 








7 





22 








! 


1 


1. 


28. 


3. 


31. 


.90 


29 


.4 





19 


8 








7 


1 


45 








) 

i 7 





0. 


34. 


5. 


40. 


.86 


34 


.6 





50 


2 








4 


1 


56 








19 


13.705 


1,272.50 


104.50 


1,379.04 


.917 


985 


.528 





351 


1,148 


58 


2 


324 


23 


1,123 


8 


86 



no 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE 





1 

1 

1 
a 

"o 

o 

"i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


SCHOOLS. 


Ms 


number of differ- 

pupils registered 

g the year (count 

pupil registered). 


number of pupils 

previously regis- 

in any other 

1 in town during 


3 


number of differ- 
pupila registered 
? the current 
1 year who have 
ded at least tivo 
not previously 
ered in any other 
c school in town 
g the year. 


number of differ- 

pupils who had 

registered previ- 

in some other 

of the state dur- 

ie year (marked 3 

5 register). 








dole 
ent 
durin 




hole 

not 

tered 

schoo 

they 


hole 

ent 

durin 

schoo 

atten 

weeks 

regist 

publi 

durin 


hole 

ent 

been 

ously 

town 

ing t 

intb 




g-o 


.2 gfe 


^ 




^ 




^ 


^ 






^g"S 


























■ 






- 






• 




"S'° 


1^1 


^ 


.3 

1- 


C3 


% 


J2 


eS 


1 


"m 


03 


>. 


•S 


"o 




■< 


■< 


m 


o 


H 


m 


o 


Eh 


m 


O 


H 


ea 


o 


H 


Ungraded School. 






























Walker 


38. 


12. 


22 


7 


29 


11 


6 


17 


11 


5 


16 


u 












Total 


38. 


12. 


22 


7 


29 


11 


6 


17 


11 


5 


16 











District School. 




Millville, 1 


38. 
38. 
38. 

38. 
38. 


12.5 
12.5 

18. 
12. 
20. 


13 
16 

7 
9 

7 


18 
18 
4 
11 
12 


31 
34 
11 
20 
19 


12 
16 

7 
8 
7 


16 
18 
4 
10 
12 


28 
34 
11 
18 
19 


12 

16 

7 

8 

6 


16 
18 
4 

10 
10 


28 
34 
11 
18 
16 







1 




1 



2 





Millville. 2 


1 














3 






Total 


38. 


75.0 


52 


63 


115 


50 


60 


110 


49 


58 


107 


1 


3 


4 


Kindergartens. 




Walker 


38. 
38. 
38. 
3S. 
38. 


12. 
12. 
U. 
13. 
12. 


27 
14 
21 
19 
20 


34 
20 
31 
24 
16 


61 
34 
52 
43 
36 


25 
14 
21 
18 
20 


33 
20 
28 
22 
16 


58 
34 
49 
40 
36 


23 
14 
21 
18 
20 


33 

20 
28 
22 
16 


56 
34 
49 
40 
36 





1 






















1 


Kimball 














Total 


38. 


62. 


101 


125 


226 


98 


119 


217 


96 


119 


215 


1 





1 






Grand Total 


37.9 


747.5 


1,748 


1,862 


3,610 


1,340 


1,483 


2,823 


1,313 


1,444 


2,754 


37 


35 


72 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

TEAR ENDING JUNE 21, 191S.— Concluded. 



Ill 



Ig. 



14 15 



16 17 18 



20 



22 



23 24 









o p 






18.94 



4.54 



23.48 



18.94 



22.74 

26.93 

10. 

16. 

17.5 



2.10 
3.77 
.76 
2. 
1.32 



23.48 



24.84 

30.70 

10.76 

18. 

18.82 



.80 



.27 



1.54 
1.41 

.18 
2. 

.94 



93.17 



34.62 
18.82 
34.93 
24.52 
29 

141.89 

2,350.80 



9.95 



8.41 

5.29 

4.13 

7 

1 

25.83 



103.12 



43.03 

24.11 

39.06 

31 

30 

167.20 

2,529.63 



.90 



.80 
.78 
.91 
.76 



.91 



163 



2,806 



1.21 



.16 

.5 

.026 
0. 
1. 

.337 



65 



524 



80 



1,476 



288 



59 



592 



55 



228 



80 
50 
94 
27 

335 

2,060 



195 



112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 

Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1918-1919. 



SUBJECTS. 



U. 



T. 



R. 



Postgraduate. 



Special. 



English 

Latin 

French 

German 

Spanish 

United States History. . 

Civics 

English History 

Mediffival and Modern 

History 

Mathematics 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Biology 

Bookkeeping 

Commercial Law 

Economics 

Stenography 

Typewriting 

Commercial Arithmetic. 
Commercial Geography. 

Machine Shop 

Mechanics 

Shop Physics 

Pattern-Making 

Forging 

Printing 



37 



38 



29 



35 



111 
25 
93 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE— Concluded. 



113 



SUBJECTS. 


Classes. 


V. 


U. T. 


S. 


R. 


Q. 


Postgraduate. 


Special. 




3 8 


8 
8 
8 
2 
2 


9 
5 
6 
9 


8 
5 
4 
2 

3 


17 
6 
5 
5 
9 








7 

1 
1 

6 


8 
8 
2 

1 

9 
4 






Art 


















House Management and 








12 


8 














4 

1 

33 


3 

1 

67 








1 
10 




2 


2 
(52 








35 SS 








2 


1 
2 3 























114 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOLARSHIP TABLE. 



SCHOOL. 




p. 

3 
O. 


•3 

'o. . 

ll 


1 

< 

o'n 

3 


If 


1 

e 

P-< 


-3 

'3 


o 


s 

"S 
o 

.a . 

!1 


i 
■3 

bD 

£ 


i 
0. 

a.2 
S-8 


3 
% 

1 


High 


V 

u 

T 

s 

R 
Q 


78 
37 
71 
68 
108 
70 


9 
2 
6 
2 
12 
3 


11.53 
5.40 
8.45 
2.94 

11.11 
4.28 


74 
15 
42 
24 
49 
26 


94.87 
40.54 
59.15 
35.29 
45.37 
37.14 



2 
5 
2 




5 
11 
8 
4 
14 
25 


5 
9 
8 
3 
11 
22 


20 
5 

10 
11 
22 
5 


100 

94.6 

92.96 

97.06 

89.71 

90.90 






5.40 




7.04 
2.94 


Total 




432 


34 


7.87 


230 


53.24 


9 


67 


58 


73 


97.98 


2.08 








P 



127 
65 


14 
4 


11.02 
6.15 


55 
30 


43.30 
46.07 


6 
3 


13 
10 


8 
6 


8 
4 


95.28 
95.39 


4.72 




4.61 






Total 




192 


18 


9 37 


85 


44.27 


9 


23 


14 


12 


95.32 


4.68 








N 
M 


67 
66 


2 
9 


2.98 
13.63 


37 
34 


55.22 
51.51 


3 


7 
8 


3 

6 




95 53 
100 


4.47 










Total 




133 


11 


8.27 


71 


53.38 3 


15 


9 




97.75 


2.25 






Walker 


N 
M 


17 
15 


2 



11 76 


10 

2 


58.82 
15 55 2 


4 
5 


1 
3 




100 

86.67 






13.33 






Total 




32 


2 


6.25 


12 


37.50 2 


9 


4 




93.76 


6.24 








N 
M 


8 
8 


2 



25.00 


6 


75.00 


4 



3 





100 
100 






02.50 











Total 




16 


2 


12.50 


11 


68.75 











100 
















N 
M 


5 
4 








3 
1 


60 00 
25.00 
















100 
100 












Total . 




9 






4 


44.44 













100 












Grand H. S. Total 




814 


67 


8.23 


413 


50.73 23 


114 


85 


85 


97.18 


2.82 



General Average of High Sohoo! entire, 78.63 per cent. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


189 


13 


6.82 


49 


25.92 


10 


2 


4 




94.70 


5.29 




K 


41 


4 


9.75 


29 


70.73 


8 


4 


2 




80.48 


19.51 




J 


193 


12 


6.21 


54 


27.97 


42 





1 




78.23 


21.70 




I 


61 


5 


8.19 


18 


29.50 


9 


1 







85.24 


14.75 




H 


200 


14 


7 


42 


21 


40 


6 


3 




SO 


20 




G 


109 


2 


1.83 


18 


16.. 52 


IH 


2 






83.48 


16.51 




F 


194 


21 


10.82 


55 


28.34 


19 


4 






90.20 


9.79 




E 


97 


2 


2.06 


29 


29.89 


25 


2 






74.22 


25.77 


Totals — Elementary. . 




1.084 


73 


6.73 


294 


27.12 


171 


21 


10 




84.22 


15.78 


Grand Totals— High 


























and Elementary 




1,898 


140 


7.37 


707 


37.24 


194 


135 


95 


85 


89.78 


10.22 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



115 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary. 



Residence ( )=outof 
town. 



Grotjp I— High 
School. 
Charles F.Cook.... 
Charles E. Moors . . , 

Ralph B. Young . . . 



Frank L. Trafton . . 
Francis G. Gleason 



Elisabeth AveriU. 
May B. McLam. 



Lillian Yeaton 

Elizabeth S. Sargent. 
Carrie E. Baker 



Mary E. Jenness. . . . . 
Margaret E. Durgin . . 
Katharine M. Quigley. 



Martha B. Mason. 

Helen J.Knox 

Grace E. Weston. . 
Harriet E. Staples. 



Margaret T. Marston . 

Abbie M. Sanger 

Cora M. Hassell 



Margaret T. Halligan . 
Fannie E. Lincoln . . . . 
Augustus R. Kelman. . 

Helen W. Fcrd 

Robert S. Baker 



Carrie A. Hood. 
Reba E. Eaton . 



Marion E. Browne. 
Elizabeth Fowler . . 
Alice M. Prescott . 
Grace Webster. . . . 



Group IL— Parker 

School. 

Luella A. Dickerman . . 

Helen 0. Stephenson . 



Kathryn B.White., 
•Tessie H. Nettleton . 
Mary W. Cross 



Mildred E. Rowe. . . . 
Helen L. Sawyer. . . . 
Constance J. Timlin. 



Julia M. Melifant . 
MabelL Durivage. 



.Mice M.Knowlton. 



Headmaster 

Submaster.room 1 

Assistant, room 7 . 



Librarian . 
Clerk. . . . 



Principal 

Assistant, room 1 . 

" 5 . 

"7 



Clerk. 



Civics 

Mathematics, Chemis- 
try 

Bookkeeping, Econom- 
ics, Commercial 
Law 

Physics, Mathematics 

Bookkeeping, Arith- 
metic 

French, German . . 

U. S. History, English 
History 

English 

Mathematics, Biology 

French, Spanish .... 



English 

Latin 

Stenography, Type- 
writing 



Domestic Arts. 



History, English. 
French, Latin . . . 



Stenography, Type- 
writing 

English 

French 



Leave of absence. 
Leave of absence. 
Leave of absence. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Leave of absence. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigued at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigued at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during fall 

term of 191S. 



English, Mathema,tic8 
Mathematics, Latin . . 



English 

French, English. .. 

Mathematics, English 

Mathematics, Science 

History, Civics 

Commercial Geogra- 
phy, Enghsh . . . 



$2,600.00 
2,000.00 



1,400.00 
1,400.00 
1,100. 00 

1,100.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 
1,000.00 

900.00 

800.00 

850.00 

800.00 

950.00 
900.00 
1,000.00 
700.00 
500.00 



Leave of absence for 

the year. 
Resigued at end of 

spring term. 



114 School St. 
8 Liberty St. 



34 Thomdike St. 
13 Liberty St. 

43 Warren St. CWorcester, 

Mass.) 
20 Montgomery St. 

35 Perley St. 

66J No. State St. 
101 Center St. 

20 Montgomery St. (Lan- 
caster, N. H.) 
9 Holt St. (Dover, N. H.) 
13 Summit Ave. 

34 So. Spring St. (East Mil- 
ton, Mass.) 

51 Rumford St. (Marble- 
head, Mass.) 

(722 Pine St., Manchester, 
N.H.) 

38 Rumford St. (Westdale, 
Mass.) 

76 Pleasant St. (Rockland, 

Mass.) 
79 Pleasant St. (Portsmouth, 

N.H.) 
1 So. State St. (Franklin, 

N.H.) 
12 So. Spring St. (Conway, 

Mass.) 
48 Church St. 



1,600.00 
1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

800.00 
700.00 

700.00 
550.00 



28 So. Main St. 

40 No. Spring St. (Lowell; 

Vt.) 
15 Center St. (Melrose, 

42 No. State St. (Pembroke, 

N.H.) 
(10 Webster St., Franklin, 

N.H.) 
85 South St. 
105 No. State St. 

30 Spring St. 
36 So. State St. 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary. 



Residence ( ) = outof 
town. 



Chandler School. 
Harriet S. Emmons. . . 
Cora T. Fletcher 



Mary Flavin 

Elizabeth J. Donovan. 
Emma G. Nickerson . . 



Mary C. Caswell. 



Walker School. 
Ehzabeth J. Talpey.. 



Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler 



Irene W. Hart. 
Mabel F.Lane. 



GarrisonTSchool. 
Bertha L. Holbrook . . 



Eastman School. 
Florence E.George. . 



Principal, room 1 
Assistant, room 1 



Clerk. 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7 , 



" 11 



Principal, room. . 



Principal, room . . . . 



Mathematics, Music. 
History, Science .... 



Latin, Civics, English 

Latin, English 

Mathematics, English, 
History 



Latin, Science, Litera- 
ture 

History, Geography, 
Civics, Literature . . 

Mathematics, EngUah, 
Literature, Civics . . 



English 

Leave of absence for 
the year. 



H. S. Group II, M, N , 



H. S. Group II, M . . 



Sl.OOO.OO 
900.00 

900.00 
900.00 

900 00 

500.00 

1,050.00 
900.00 
900.00 
550.00 

1,000.00 
937.50 



6 So. State St. 

41 School St. (Lawrence, 

Mass.) 
15 Rumford St. 
28 Thorndike St. 

3 Rumford St. (Gloucester, 

Mass.) 
121 Warren St. 



41 Warren St. 

99 No. State St. 

(20 Winter St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 
43 High St. 



542 No. State St., West 
Concord, N. H. 

9 Gladstone St. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 
J. Elizabeth Talpey... 

Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler 



Irene W. Hart 

Agnes R. Kelley 

Eva H.Tandy 

Mary G. Doherty 

Alice -M. M. Phaneuf . 

Sara E. McClure 

Agnes V. Sullivan . . . , 

MyrtaB. Lowe 

AdaB. Martin 

Charlotte White 



Alice G. Muldoon , 



Garrison School. 
Bertha L. Holbrook . 

Kathleen M.Hickey. 
Vivien R. Morgan. . . 
Margaret T.. Lynch. . 



Louisa Herbert 

Hannah E. O'Brien, 
lyla ChamberUn . . . 



Florence Clough . . . . 
Flossie L. Saltmarsh . 

Marion D. Shepard. . 

Eastman School. 
Florence E. George. . 
Marion F. Callahan . 

Stella M. French 

Vivien R. Morgan. . . 



Principal 

.\ssistant, room 7 . 
" 8 . 

" 11 

" 10 

" 5 . 

" 4 . 

" 3 . 

" 2 . 



Principal, 

.Assistant, 



room 7 . 
!! 6 . 

" 4 '. 
" 3 . 



Principal. 
.■Assistant. 



Transferred to Gar- 
rison School at end 
of spring term 



High School 

High School 

High School 

Classes K, L 

" I, J 

" G,H 

" E,F 

" CD 

" A,B 

Kindergarten 

Ungraded 

Resigned during spring 

term. 
Resigned during winter 

term, 1919. 

Classes K, L 

" K,L 

" H,I 

" F, G 

" D,E 

" A, B,C 

Kindergarten 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 

Class K 

Grades IV. V 

Grades I, II, III 



$1,050.00 
900.00 
900.00 

5.50.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
550.00 
850.00 



1,000.00 

750.00 
700.00 
750.00 

750.00 
700.00 
750.00 

1.50 a dy. 



937.50 
6.50.00 
750.00 



41 Warren St. 

99 No. State St. 

(20 Winter St., Penacook, 

N. H.) 
43 High St. 
12 Beacon St. 
66 High St. 
145 No. State St. 
90 Rumford St. 
11 Cunmiings Ave. 
49 Lyndon St. 

No. Spring St. 
27 Warren St. 



542 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 

70 Rumford St. 

12 Avon St. 

446 No. State St., West Con- 
cord, N. H. 

3 Rollins St. 

60 FrankUn St. 

2 View St., West Concord, 
N.H. 

46 Jackson St. 



9 Gladstone St. 

14 Beacon St. 

East Concord, N.H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— ContimiecL 



117 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 

taught. 



Salary. 



Residence ( )=outof 
town. 



Rtimpori) School. 
Jessie N. Stimson . . . . 
Anna M. Keenan 



Annette Prescott 

Annie E. Saltmarsh . , . 
Abbie T. McDonald . . 
Marj' M. Doherty. . . . 
Gara E. McQuesten . . 
Katharine L. Remick . 

Maude B. Binet 

Elizabeth M. McAfee. 

KiMB.iLL School. 
Mary E. Melifant. . . . 
Mary A. McGuire. . . . 
Margaret T. Fanning . 
Harriet L. Megrath . . . 



Mary A. Coughlin. . . . 
Helen K. Hallinan. . . , 
Edna M. Kennedy . . . 
NeUieT. Halloran.... 

Gladys Dole 

Harriet C. Kimball. . . 
Bernice L. Prescott. . . 



Myrta B. Lowe 

Pen.\cook School. 

Annie M. Branon 

Clara E. Flanders . . . . 
LiUian M. Phaneuf. . . 

Franklin School. 
Abbie A. Donovan . . . 

Minnie E. Ladd 

Mabel Clark 



Dewey School. 

Addie F. Straw 

Helen L. Southgate. . 



Susan M. Little. . 
Anna D. Shaw. . . 
Alice M. Sargent. 
Belle E.Shepard. 
Helen L. Gibbs. . 



Harriet P. Dame 

School. 

Nettie M. Bowen 



Katherine W. Maimion 
Frances M. Twomey. . . 
Alice E. Jackson 



Cogswell School. 
Fannie B. Lothrop . . . 
Cecilia P. Jones 



MiLLViLLE School. 
Marion L. Haynes. . . . 
Mildred Cram 



Marion F. Callahan 



Mountain School. 
Ellen H. S. Anderson . 

Frances M. Twomey. . 

Riverhill School. 
Gerda H. Ekstrom . . . 

Marion L. HajTies. . . . 



Principal, room 8 . 
Assistant, " 7 . 



Principal, room 6 , 
Assistant, " 5 



Principal. 

Assistant. 



Principal, room 3 . 

.Assistant, " 4 , 

" 1 . 



Principal, room 6 
Assistant, " 1 



Principal. 
Assistant. 



Principal . 

Assistant. 



Principal, room 1 . 
Assistant, " 2 , 



Principal. 



Principal. 



Class L . . 
•' K. 



Classes I, J 

" G,H 

" E, F 

" CD 

" A,B 

Kindergarten, Primary 

Kindergarten 

Special teacher 



Class L 

" K 

Classes L J- • 
" G, H. 



' E,F 

' CD 

* A,B.... 

Kindergarten, Primary 

Kindergarten 

Special teacher 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Transferred to Walker 
School 



Classes L J- ■ 
' G,H. 

• E, F. 



LJ.. 
CD. 
A, B. 



Training Teachers. . . . 
Supervisor of Kinder- 
gartens 

Classes G, H 

" E,F 

" CD 

" A,B, C 

Kindergarten 



ClaPsesK,L, Grade V, 

VI 
Grades in, IV 

" 1,11 

Resigned during fall 

term. 



Classes C,D. 
' A, B. 



Grades IV, V, VII . . 
' I, II, m..., 



Transferred to East- 
man School. 



Mixed Grades. 



Transferred to H. P. 
Dame School. 



Mixed Grades. 



Transferred to Millville 
School. 



$850.00 
750.00 

750.00 
750.00 
750. OD 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
550.50 
600.00 



850.00 
750.00 
650.00 
750.00 

7.50.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
500.00 
600.00 



800.00 
750.00 
650.00 



800.00 
750.00 
750.00 



1,200.00 

800.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
750.00 
550.00 



800.00 



700.00 
600.00 



775.00 
750.00 



600.00 
600.00 



550.00 



550.00 



9 Holt St. 

(93 High St., Penacook, 

N.H.) 
25 Green St. 
60 Beacon St. 
56 Rumford St. 
11 Thorndike St. 
9 Wall St. 
4 Favette St. 
246 No. Main St. 
40 No. Spring St. 



36 So. State St. 

77 So. State St. 

26 Perlev St. 

71 Warren St. (Hooksett, 

N.H.) 
22 Albin St. 
281 Pleasant St. 
10 Blanchard St. 
30 Perley St. 
6 Merrimack St. 
Hopkinton Road 



55 Thorndike St. 
51 South St. 
90 Rumford St. 



84 Center St. 

72 Washington St. 

126 Warren St. 



101 No. State St. 

2 So. Spring St. 
90 School St. 
72 School St. 
78 Warren St. 

20 Montgomery St. 

3 Liberty St. 



(29 Center St., Penacook, 

N.H.) 
19 Walker St. 
23 Forest St. 



67 South St. (Bristol, N. H.) 
75 South St. 



40 Beacon St. 

270 Pleasant St. (Antrun, 
N.H.) 



1 View St., West Concord, 
N.H. 



16 Gladstone St., West Con- 
cord, N.H. 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Conti7iued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary. 



Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 



Iron Works School. 

Ruth M. McCaig 

Irene W. Hart 



Margaret T. Fanning 



Morrill School. 
Raymond P. Oilman. 



Carl E.Taylor 

Roland G. Hartwell 
Herbert C. Wilcox. . 
Waldo S. Roundy . . 
Harry R.Sturm. . .. 
WillardN.Nute... 



Philip H.Pike.... 
Arthur J. Taylor.. 

Jules Wiesman, Jr. 

RoUand R.Gove. . 

Eldon T. Alden. . . 

Arthur W. French . 



Sewing School. 
B. Lilhan Barker. . . . 



M. Hortense Berry. 
M. Emma Parsons . 
F. Mildred PhilUps 
Louise C. Howe. . . 



Cooking School. 
Myrtle Farrar 

Harriet B. Davis. . . . 



Mrs. Annie C. Cobb 
Edna F. Watson 



Music. 
Charles S. Conant. 



Drawing. 
Faith C. Stalker. 
Mary A. Jones. . 



Principal Mixed Grades 

Transferred to Walker 

School. 
Transferred to Kimball 

School. 



Principal . 



Leave of absence for 
a year 



Principal . 

Assistant. 



Mechanics, Wood turn- 
ing, Machine Shop 
Practice 

Drawing, Wood turn 
ing 

Applied Physics, 
Blacksmi thing .... 

Joinery, Molding, 
Pattern-making. . . 

Printing, Elementary 
Manual Training 

Elementary Manual 
Training 

Machine Shop Prac 
tice, Pattern-making 

Electric Wiring. . . 

Elementary Manual 
Training 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Died in the service. 



$530.00 



1,650.00 

1,450.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

900.00 

900.00 

798.00 
900 00 



MiLiTART Drill. 
Michael H. Mulligan. . 



Special Repairs. . . 
Reuben L. Gate 



Principal .... 

Supervisor of 
lunches. . . . 



Director. 



Assistant . 



Instructor . 



Sewing, Dressmaking 



Millinery 

jsigned at end of 
spring term. 



High School Classes . 



13 Rockingham St. 



10 Maple St. 

50 Center St. 

4 No. State St. 

229 No. Main St. 

10 West St. 

15 Washington St. 

36 Kimball St. 
76 No. Spring St. 

6 Avon St. 



1,000.00 

700.00 
600.00 
500.00 



725.00 



15 Rumford St. (Waltham, 

Mass.^ 
32 So. Spring St. 
88 No. State St. 
148 Rumford St. 



15 Center St. (So. Brookline, 
N.H.) 



1,000.00 15 Rumford St. (Everett, 
532.00 57 Pleasant St. (Marion, 
550.00 117 South St. 



1,500.00 



1,000.00 
8.50.00 



100.00 



J25.00 a 
week. 



61 School St. 



28 So. Main St. 
(152 No. Main St., Pena- 
cook. N. H.) 



13 Walker St. 



East Concord, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



119 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Salary. 



Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 



Janitors. 
Charles M. Thomas . , 

Per!ey 0. Farrar 

Charles Ada 

Arthur J. Taylor 

Frank J. Boyd 

Willis D.Prescott. . . 



Edgar D. Brown. . . 
Oland M. Blodgett , 
John M . Heath . . . . 
Frank L. Dudley. . , 



Henry D. Robinson. . 
Mrs. H. D. Robinson 
Harry R. Sturm 



James W. Powers 
Peter Halligan. . . 



John N. Gay. . . . 
Woodbury Davis. 



High and Morril! . 
High and Morrill . 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 



Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook and Cogs- 
well 

Franklin and Dewey 
H. P. Dame 



Transferred to Morrill 

School. 
Resigned end of spring 

term. 
Resigned end of spring 

term. 

Resigned end of sprng 
Resigned during winter 

term. 



$980.00 
824.00 
980.00 
500.00 
900.00 
824.00 

500.00 
850.00 
850.00 

8.50.00 
876.00 
428.00 



16 Gladstone St. 

4 Rockingham St. 

5 Chapel St. 

6 Avon St. 

142 Rumford St. 

482 North State St., Wesi 

Concord, N.H. 
East Concord, N. H. 
3 Odd Fellows Ave. 
10 WaU St. 

20 Dakin St. 
Route 6. 
Route 6. 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 
June 21, 1918. 





Sewing. 


CooKmo. 


Mechanic Arts. 


SCHOOLS. 


'la 

•S3." 


3 

O 

1 

a 


B H £ 
<u * S 


° g a 

III 

<u o.S 


i 
.1 


Whole number of dif- 
ferent pupils attend- 
ing during the entire 
year. 


vJ."P 

-0773 o 

o £ = 


.2 

o . 

a 


Whole number of dif- 
ferent pupils attend- 
ing during the entire 
year. 


High . 


38 
25 
100 
81 
26 
20 
63 
65 
10 
10 
17 
15 


15 
6 
37 
15 
5 

3 
4 




1 


23 
19 
63 
66 
21 
20 
60 
61 
10 
10 
17 
14 


152 

104 

24 

9 

6 


45 

41 

6 

1 


107 
63 
18 
8 
6 


93 
49 
72 
39 
20 
8 
34 
29 


23 
4 
1 
2 



3 








1 


70 




45 




71 


Walker 


37 




20 




8 




34 


Kimball 








26 


Penacook 










Franklin 












Dewey 

H. P. Dame 


17 




17 


17 
3 
4 
2 
16 
16 
30 


17 
3 


Millville 








4 
















2 


St. John's 


17 
37 




1 


17 
36 


7 
17 




7 
17 


16 


Sacred Heart 


16 
29 


















Total 


524 


87 


437 


336 


93 


243 


432 


34 


398 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

CENSUS, 1918. 



SUMMARY OF WARDS. 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

Number of children enumerated 1,395 1,522 2,917 

Increase since 1917 14.3 

Number attending school since 1917 80 83 163 

Number attending public schools 1,107 1,106 2,213 

Number attending parochial schools 274 272 546 

Number attending private schools 7 26 33 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 not 
registered in any school in district or else- 
where 30 21 51 

Number between the ages of 8 and 14 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 
Number 5 to 16 not attending school reg- 
ularly 5 10 15 

Number 5 to 8 not attending school reg- 
ularly 2 12 14 

Number 8 to 14 not attending school reg- 
ularly 4 4 

Number 14 to 16 not attending regvilarly. .0 11 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write 

the English language correctly 

Moved into district since 1917 31 42 73 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 

American born 1,050 

Foreign born 532 

Russia 12 

West Indies 2 

Italy 36 

New Brunswick 14 

England 40 

Poland 2 

Sweden 74 

Roumania 1 

Ireland 64 

French Canadian 185 



122 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Denmark 4 

Turkey 1 

Germany 7 

Norway 2 

Nova Scotia 25 

Prince Edward Island 17 

Finland 12 

Scotland 16 

Albania 1 

India 1 

Switzerland 1 

Holland 1 

Greece 3 

Australia 1 

Newfoundland 2 

Armenia 6 

France 1 

South America 1 

NATIVITY OF CHILD. 

Boys. Girl.B. Total. 

American born 1,323 1,-160 2,783 

Foreign born 72 62 134 

Russia 3 6 9 

Italy 3 1 4 

England 10 13 23 

Sweden 6 5 11 

Ireland 2 3 5 

French Canadian 35 22 57 

Norway 1 1 

Prince Edward Island 1 1 

Scotland 2 2 4 

Nova Scotia 1 3 4 

HoUand 1 1 2 

Germany 1 1 

Labrador 1 1 2 

Greece 3 2 5 

Finland 2 1 3 

Newfoundland 2 2 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

TABLE OF TRANSPORTATION ROUTES. 




Howard L. Denton. 
Harry Dimstane. . . 

Judson Hoit 

George Jenneas .... 

Edward Kiag 

John H. Plummer. . 

H.A.Trudell 

Mrs. Ballard 

E.H. Bickford.... 



Turtletown to Eastman . . 
Dist.No. ItoMillville... 
Snaptown to Mountain. . . 

Plains to Chandler 

Mill ville to Chandler 

Dimond Hill to Mill viUe.. 
Black Hill to Chandler... 
Ballard Hill to Dewey... 
Albin Road to Chandler. . 



5 


5im. 


6 


6|m. 


4 


7Jm. 


6 


31 m. 


12 


6*m. 


11 


5 m. 




5Jm. 


2 


7 m. 


5 


6 m. 



2 and motor. 
2 and motor. 
1 
Motor. 

1 and motor. 

2 and motor. 
1 

1 



No. 
Yes. 
No. 



FIRE DRILLS, 1917-1918. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Sept. 27. 70 seconds. All doors open. 

Feb. 12. 70 " All doors open. 

May 15. 68 " All doors open. 

June 14. 53 " All doors open. 



Oct. 3. 60 seconds. 
Oct. 24. 52 
Nov. 8. 55 



PARKER SCHOOL. 



Apr. 4. 55 seconde. 
May 15. 50 
June 60 



Oct. 23. 
Dec. 5. 



Oct. 4. 
Jan. 22. 



45 seconds. 
40 



55 seconds. 
70 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 

May 16. 50 seconds. 

WALKER SCHOOL. 

Mar. 29. 58 seconds. 
May 16. 55 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 



Sept. 10. 
Sept. 17. 
Oct. 8. 
Apr. 1. 



Sept. 14. 
Oct. 31. 
Nov. 21. 



Oct. 31. 
Nov. 20. 
Dec. 6. 



45 seconds. 

44 

45 

45 



24 seconds. 

28 

28 



Not timed. 
(I It 

95 seconds. 



Apr. 2. 65* seconds. 

June 5. 48 

June 12. 65* " 

June 18. 48 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 

Mar. 28. 30 seconds. 
Apr. 24. 28 
May 27. 25 

RUMFORD SCHOOL. 

Jan. 24. 85 seconds. 

Feb. 13. 90 

Mar. 28. Not timed. 

•One entrance closed. 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 
KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



125 



Sept. 17. 


80 seconds. 


Feb. 12. 70 seconds. 


Oct. 18. 


72 


Mar. 20. 68 


Nov. 12. 


66 


May 8. 63 
PENACOOK SCHOOL. 


Oct. 2. 


36 seconds. 


Apr. 11. 40 seconds. 


Nov. 6. 


35 


May 22. 48 


Apr. 2. 


35 " 


June 4. 34 
FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 


Sept. 24. 


40 seconds. 


Apr. 2. 43 seconds. 


Oct. 17. 


40 


Apr. 26. 36 


Mar. 21. 


42 


June 6. 34 
DEWEY SCHOOL. 


Sept. 27. 


Not timed. 


Mar. 28. 65 seconds. 


Oct. 1. 


50 seconds. 


May 6. 50 " 


Oct. 22. 


55 " 


May 27. 40 " 


Jan. 


45 " 


H. P. DAME SCHOOL. 


Sept. 21. 


30 seconds. 


June 14. 29 seconds. 


Oct. 9. 


30 " 


June 19. 28 


May 17. 


30 


COGSWELL SCHOOL. 


Oct. 3. 


30 seconds. 


Apr. 10. 40 seconds. 


Dec. 5. 


30 " 


May 16. 36 


Mar. 29. 


30 


June 3. 35 
MILLVILLE SCHOOL. 


Mar. 6. 


IS seconds. 


June 20. 18 second.s. 


May 10. 


19 


MOUNTAIN SCHOOL. 
None. 




IRON WORKS SCHOOL. 






None. 






RIVERHILL SCHOOL. 






None. 



126 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





Kind'n. 


ELEMENTARY 


YEAR. 




1 
1 


Class. 


1 and 2. 


A. 


B. 


c- 


D. 




P. N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N. P. 


P. X. P. 


P. N.P. 


High 




















Parker 








































Walker 


41 
25 


4 
3 


23 


6 


21 
13 
8 
9 
12 


3 
3 

2 
2 

1 


13 
11 
7 
7 
13 


2 

'■'o' 


9 


31 
10 


3 




1 








11 1 




35 
33 


■■■3' 


8 
6 


3 



20 6 


Kimball 


17 1 












5 
25 


3 

1 


8 
7 

28 
23 

7 


2 

""2 
5 

1 


7 
11 





11 8 




11 




13 

11 

41 

6 

2 
2 
2 






1 








29 


5 


10 


2 


7 


Millville 



















1 






RiverhiU 










3 

1 
















1 






2 


















Total 


145 


10 


96 


18 


140 


22 


SO 


13 


177 


30 










93.54 


8 


i.21 


86.42 


86.02 


85.50 





















AVERAGE AGE 



Kind'n. A 



D. 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame. 

Cogswell 

Millville 

Mountain 

RiverhiU 

Iron Works 



Average. 



4 \T. 7 m, 
4 9 



6 vr. 6 m, 
5 S 



7yr. 5m.7yT. 7m.8yr. 7 m. 



5 yr. m. 



6 yr. 4m.7yr. 2m.l7jT. S m. 8 yr. 2 m 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES.— JUNE, 1918. 



127 



SCHOOLS. 



3 


4 


5 


6 


E. 


F. 


G. 


H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


P. 


N.P, 


P. 


N.P 


P. 


N.P. 


P. x\.P. 


P. 


N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 




























































































23 9 
6 2 


29 
17 
8 

26 
16 
25 


5 
2 

I 

1 
4 


15 
10 


2 
1 


27 
13 
10 

17 
23 

24 


3 


8 


3 


36 
17 
10 
16 
9 
32 
13 


4 

""2 
4 
6 
1 
3 


38 
9 





38 
9 
11 
40 
30 














3 


10 
17 
34 


4 
8 
5 


18 
14 
21 


4 
4 
2 


2 
4 
10 


16 
17 

28 
7 


1 
7 
2 



33 
19 


2 
6 




4 












15 


3 


18 
14 


2 
2 


11 


6 


16 
15 


2 
2 














10 


1 




5 




3 














2 


1 






8 
2 
3 


4 






2 


4 






8 
5 


1 




















? 
















5 










■5 














1 








2 






























105 31 


162 


21 


89 


19 


158 


27 


76 


23 


137 


29 


104 


8 


144 


10 


77.20 


88.52 


82.40 


85.40 


76.76 82.53 


92.85 93.. 50 



PER CLA>S. 



E. 


F. 


G 




H. 


I. 


J. 


K. 


L. 


















































8jT. 11m. 
9 5 


9 yr. 2 in. 
10 2 
10 2 

9 5 

9 7 

9 5 


10 vr. 
11 


11m. 
5 


11 yr. 6 m. 
10 8 
9 10 
10 3 

10 3 

11 2 


12 jT. 4 m. 


12 yr 

11 

11 

12 

11 

11 

11 


7 m. 

7 

1 

2 

9 

8 


12 yr. 11m. 
14 2 


12 yr. 5 m. 
12 1 






11 10 


8 6 

9 4 
8 6 


10 
10 
9 




2 


11 3 
11 4 
11 7 
10 10 


12 4 
12 9 


12 8 

13 4 








8 10 


10 4 
9 1 


10 





io ii 

10 6 










11 


10 


13 11 


i2 5 










9 6 
10 11 
9 9 
8 5 




10 3 
13 11 

10 S 


















10 10 






10 
11 


7 














12 2 














Syr. 11 m. 


9yr. 8 m. 


10 yr. 


4 m. 


10 yr. 11 m. 


11 yr. 5 m. 


11 yr 


7 m. 


13 yr. 2 m. 


12 yr. 2 m. 



128 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

MOVEMENT OF PUPILS THROUGH 





HIGH 


YEAR. 


7 


8 


Class. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 




P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. N. P. 


P. 


N.P. 


High 


















Parker 










62 


3 


120 


9 




61 

28 

8 

4 


5 
2 


118 

26 

8 

5 


3 





Walker 












































Kimball 












































































































Millville 






5 


1 
























Riverhill 


3 




















5 






























Total 


104 


7 


167 


4 


62 


3 


120 


9 









Per cent, promoted. 



93.69 97 



95.38 93.02 



AVERAGE AGE 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook 

Franklin 

Dewey 

Harriet P. Dame. 

Cogswell 

Millville 

Mountain 

Riverhill 

Iron Works 

Average 



14 jT. 4 m. 
13 6 

15 5 
13 



13 yr. 6 m. 
13 8 
13 1 
13 10 



14 yr. 7 m, 



15 yr. 1 m. 



13 yr. 1 m. 



12 7 

13 yr. 54 m, 



14 yr. 7 m. 



15 yr. 1 m. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

THE GRADES— JUNE, 1918.— Concluded. 



129 



SCHOOLS. 



9 


10 


11 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


P. 


N.P 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


P. 


N.P. 


60 


6 


96 


11 


63 


6 


70 


2 


38 


1 


78 































































































































































































































































































































































































60 


6 


96 


11 


63 


6 


70 


2 


38 


1 


78 





90.90 


89.71 


91.30 


97.22 97.43 


100 



PER CLASS.— Concluded. 



Q. 


R. 


s. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


14 yr. 10 m. 


15 yr. 1 m. 


15 yr. 10 m. 


16 yr. 3 m. 


16 yr. 8 m. 


17 yr. 4 m. 


































































































































































































14 yr. 10 m. 


15 yr. 1 m. 


15 yr. 10 ra. 


16 yr. 3 m. 


16 yr. 8 m. 


17 yr. 4 m. 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

June 21, 1918. 



High School. — Helen Bunker (4), Gladys Carroll, Fletcher Clough, 
George Jones, Maurice Jones, Agnes Levin, Marion Lithgow, Astrid 
Olson, Dorothy Silver, Lora Sleeper, Eleanor Vinton, Myra Woods (4), 
Carmi Browne, Marion Cochran, Mabel Downs, Clarence Hammond, 
Louise Home, Cornelia Kimball, Robert McCormick (2), Ethel Nudd, 
Altha Walker (9), Harriette Albee, Elizabeth Benton (4), Elizabeth 
Chalmers, Edgar Hammond (3), Helen Morgan, James O'Brien, John 
Peckham, Harold Runnells, Marie Trombly, Florence Fulford (2), 
Doris Batchelder (2), Horton Cameron, Francis ColUns, Aria Cooper, 
Wilham Coughhn (2), Harold Cutter (3), Linda Farnum, Gwendolyn 
Jones (2), Charles Kunberger (5), Dorilla Levesque, Rose McCormick 
(2), Nora Murphy, Edna Peterson, Lillian Ranquist (5), Emma Tucker 
(3), Perley Clough, Mary Crutchfield (2), Janice Griffin, Augustus 
Lawrence, Margaret Lovejoy, Alphons Normandeau, Pearl Parker, 
Roy Perry, Martha Persons (2), Earl Temple, Francis Wentworth, 
Ruth Yeadon. 

Parker School. — Esther S. Armstrong (4), Hilda A. Buchan (2), 
Ethel M. Carpenter, Janet G. Chalmers, Bernice K. Chase, Carl A. 
Dahlgren (2), Helen G. Davis, Douglas N. Everett, Miriam E. French, 
Lura A. French, Arthur J. Flamand (2), OUve V. Hartford (2), Elizabeth 
M. Haynes, Arthur B. Holmgren, Vinal R. Hurd (2), Marjorie Lowe, 
Lester A. Maynard, Vivien L. Moulton, Bertha M. Roy, Helen E. Ryan 
(2), Alonzo F. Saltmarsh, Russell D. Sawyer, Edward J. Shannon (2), 
Dorothy E. Staniels (2), Oramel W. Swain, Emma C. Trudell, Wilbur 
B. Tucker (3), Kathleen Wall, Daniel T. Wilkins, Beatrice Winch. 

Chandler School. — Marie Catellier, Alice Corriveau, Frances 
Erskine, Helen Foster, Eleanor Harris, Florence Philbrick, Napoleon 
Tremblay, Eva Haselton (2), Clarence Hoagland (2), Paul Holbrook 
(2), Beatrice Kendall (2), Martin Gurley (3), Everett Benton (5). 

Walker School. — Arthur F. Duckers, Ruth E. Ford, Hazel E. Pur- 
ington, George Reilly, Engrid Rosendale, Gertrude Weathers, Pauline 
Oyston, Germaine Shannon, Wibber Hunkins, Earl C. Gordon. 

Garrison School. — Robert A. Ecklund, Martha E. Dahlgren, Corin 
M. Soderstrom. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 131 

Eastman School. — Bernice C. Batchelder, Frances L. Robinson, 
Robert O. Gushing, Dana S. Morrison (2), Vesta P. Morrison (4), Fred- 
erick Paige (2). 

RuMFORD School. — Clara C. Page (2), Alice M. Shepard (2), E. 
Pearl Tabor, Arthur R. Lee, R. Stanley Benson, Lillian Chandler, Elinor 
Hoyt (2), Evelyn Johnson, Alfred Kunberger (4), Annie Palmer, Harry 
Rosendale (2), Gertrude Roy, Eleanor Button, Letitia George, Dan- 
forth Gurley, Ruth O'Malley, EUzabeth Palmer, Robert I. Hanson, 
Harry Leavitt, Carl Anderson, EvangeUne Corriveau, Earl HiUs, David 
Jutras, Allen I. Lewis, Marjorie E. Lowe, Muriel Cressy (2), Elsie Davie, 
Edward Lovejoy, Dorothy Moody, Donald McLeod, Albert Laflamme. 

Kimball School. — Idola Chapdelaine, Mary Peckham, Bradley 
Richardson, Edward F. Ritchie, Robert J. Prowse, Helen M. Barlow, 
Ruby A. Bartlett, Robert W. Diversi, Thelma H. MacDonald, Donald 
Shaw, Madeline Haggett, Irene D. Freeman. 

Penacook School. — ^Arthur Rowell, Alfred RoweU, Gladys Tucker, 
Robert TUton, Elmer Bergstrom, Lloyd Carpenter, Janette Grant, 
Rodney Levin, Thomas Angwin, Elsie Belrose, Paul Bergstrom, Lester 
Holt, Raymond McCaig, George Rice. 

Franklin School. — Cyril Datson, Albert Barlow, Harry Potter, 
Jacques Van de Kieft, Harold VitagUano. 

Dewey School. — Katharine Foster, Marjorie Hayford, Frederic R. 
Knox, Gertrude L. Shannon (2), LUUan I. Wirrell. 

Hakriet P. Dame School. — Charles Allen, John Allen, Robert Pres- 
cott, Helen Curtice, George Hillsgrove (6). 

Cogswell School. — None. 

MiLLViLLE School. — Bernard Roach. 

Mountain School. — None. 

Iron Works School. — None. 

RiVERHiLL School. — None. 



HONOR LIST. 

June 21, 1918. 



Pupils Who Have Attained an Average of A — or Better in Their 
Studies the Past Year. 

High School. — Helen Bunker, Marion Lithgow, Astrid Olson, Nora 
Reardon, Mabel Downs, Edith Gordon, Cornelia Kimball, Robert 
McCormick, May Robinson, Rachel George, Eva Hadley, Elizabeth 
Benton, Jeannette Ryan, Marie Turgeon, Bessie Waldman, Blanche 
Walker, Mary Walker, Leota Colpitts, Agnes Johnson, Aria Cooper, 
Juha Degnan, Leshe Dixon, Elizabeth Gannon, George Gordon, Mil- 
dred Hutchins, Neva Lingren, Elizabeth Morrill, LilUan Ranquist, 
Dorothy Scott, May Smith, Marion White, Henry Clough, Pearl Parker, 
Ethel Ravitch. 

Parker School. — Hilda Buchan, Janet Chalmers, Gertrude Cham- 
pigney, Katherine Chase, Guy Durgin, PercivalEveleth, Douglas Everett, 
Leon Goldberg, Marjorie Lowe, Josephine Mannion, Agnes Ring, Helen 
Ryan, Ursula Sanders, Allan Shapiro, Dorothy Brown, Frances Currier, 
Mary Dennett, Edward Sanel. 

Chandler School. — Martin Gurley, Helen Hutton, Everett Benton, 
Charles Brewster, Crosby Ford, Ruth Jackson, John Jones, Gladys 
Saltmarsh, Waldo Sanborn, Edwin Stackhouse, Stella Young. 

Walker School. — Pauhne Ballard, Clotilda Comi, Edward Lam- 
pron, Pauhne Oyston, Laura Plummer, Helen Cheney, Anna Clark, 
Sarah J. Hill, Marion Osgood, John Sanders. 

Garrison School. — Doris E. Toohe, Helen T. Rylander, Paul E. 
Frost, Harry W. I. Olson, Martha Dahlgren, Claire Cushnie, Lillian 
Shepard, Doris L. Robinson, AUce D. Ericson, Harry Person, Viola 
Olson. 

Eastman School. — Ruth A. Lewis, Hazel B. Maynard, Robert 
Gushing, Ruth Muzzey, Stuart Potter, Bernice C. Batchelder. 

RuMFORD School. — ^Laurence L Duncan, Lloyd A. Simpson, Myrtle 
H. Moody, Eleanor Dutton, Agnes Watson, Agnes L. Smith. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 133 

Kimball School. — Doris E. Abbott, Katherine Graves, M. Etha- 
lind Cooper, Mary Home, Stanley R. Pillsbui-y, Evelyn Whitney, Esther 
Thompson, Rachel P. Hall, Edward F. Ritchie, Robert J. Prowse, Marion 
Brown, Ivinsley Batchelder, James Niles, Winslow Melvin, Lois Calkin, 
Marion L. WhaUn, Edna M. Dunn, Jane P. Graves, James Tucker, 
Carroll Johnson, Ruth Robinson, Jerry Cook. 

Penacook School. — Gladys Smythe, Wilbur Lobdell, Cleon Roers, 
Robert Foster, Sliirley Martin, Sara Brunei, Richard Butterfield, Doro- 
thy Hadley, Lena Roy. 

Franklin School. — Thomas Mulhgan, Jacques Van de Kieft, Bar- 
bara Everett, Albert Barlow, Mary Lake, Helena Wheeler. 

Dewey School. — Mary L. Alexander, John G. Augat, Florence M. 
Conn, Clara E. Cook, Rose T. Niles, Rudolf Van de Kieft, J. Byron 

Stewart. 

Harriet P Dame School. — Harold Stackhouse, Ruth Sweet, Clara 
Piper, Hilda Rowland, Jacob Waldman, Roland Monast. 

MiLLViLLE School. — Marie L. Parker, Ruth Herter, Maurice A. 
Rice, Bernard Roach, Harriet Parker, David Herter, Doris Tanner. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 

Pupils Who Have Attained a Mark of B — or Better for the 

Past Year. 

Walker School. — Ida Crossland, Frederick Daggett, George Hodge, 
Lucille Hodge, Stanley Little, Richard Morton, Dorothy Plummer, 
Samuel Powers, Murray Sawyer, Germaine Shannon, Lawrence Tonkin, 
Robert Walker, Lawrence Ahern, Ada Brown, Pauline Dunstan, Ernest 
Denis, Dorothy Flanders, Frank Foucher, Madeline McGuire, Edward 
Odey, Gunnar Olson, Raymond Perkins, Edward Ploude, Theodore 
Reed, George Reilley, Elnor Smith, Rodney Ashland, Sawyer Cum- 
mings, Angela Delbianco, Manson Donaghey, Charles Foster, Delmar 
La Fleur, Georgiana Lamproon, Oscar Loven, Ruth Tyler, Gertrude 
Weathers, Ethel Crowley, Margaret McGuire, Virginia Otis, Avenire 
Paveglio, Engrid Rosendale, Edward Amsden, Rachel Bartlett, Clyde 
Kimball, Luella Keniston, NeUie Perriello, Robert Ritchie, Dorothy 
Weathers, Harold Ramsay, AUce Johnson, Dorothy O'Brien, Emily Fos- 
ter, Louis Clarner, Paul Wirrell. 

Garrison School. — Arnold Engel, Elsa Olson, Louise Shepard, M. 
Esther Gushing, PauUne Cushnie, Alfred Hendriclcson, Milo Lindgren, 
Olga Swenson, Edson Eastman, Robert Johnson, Arthur Nelson, Clara 
' J. Henry, Elvi W. Williams, Morrill Dakin, Henry W. Ekstrom, Mal- 
colm P. Toone, Leona D. Snow, Ida S. Peterson, Arnold O. Mauritson, 
Alice Kalberg, Wilma Peterson, Renaldo Mauritson, Astrid Swenson, 
Corin Soderstrom, John Hodgson, Alfred Hermanson, Selma Wester, 
Rachel Vinton, Walter Silver, Albin Nordstrom. 

Eastman School. — Hazel E. Blanchard, Ruth A. Lewis, Hazel B. 
Maynard, Vesta P. Morrison, Mildred G. Sanborn, Irving J. Sargent, 
Dorris E. Shine, George C. Stuart, C. Pauline Tebbetts, Guy Mann, 
Clarence Maynard, Arlene Stuart, Elsie Webber, Mildred Terrell, Mary 
Canney, Helen Maynard, Carrie Spencer, Omei* D. ElUs, Barbara A. 
Field, George C. Morrill, Marjorie A. Shattuck, Edward G. Spencer. 

Rtjmford School. — Laurence I. Duncan, Lloyd A. Simpson, M\Ttle 
H. Moody, Florence E. Bean, Helen J. Belrose, Martin Bengsch, Agnes 
McD. Chalmers, Edith Cruikshank, Constance M. Dimick, C. David 
Ericson, Parker W. Hall, NathaUe M. Hurd, Arthur R. Lee, Alice Lev- 
ingston, Esther A. Magnuson, Clara C. Page, Dorothy F. Powell, Annie 
R. Rabinovitz, Nelson S. Rogers, Fanny I. Sanel, Mildred E. Savage, 
Alice M. Shepard, Douglas M. Stevenson, Grace B. Stickney, E. Pearl 
Tabor, Mabel F. White, Herbert Geary, Frederica Brew, Lillian Chand- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 135 

ler, Mary Coleman, Hazel Fifield, Evelyn Freeman, Madeline Hilliard, 
Evelyn Johnson, Ruth Lord, Gertrude Roy, Thelma Silver, Louise 
Waite, Dorothea Wheeler, Helen Young, Helen Neddo, Holton White, 
Mary Rosendale, Raymond Rcers, Alfred Kiinberger, Harold Goodwin, 
Harold Cross, Kenneth Buckminster, Eleanor Dutton, Letitia George, 
Danforth Gurley, Doris Lefebvre, Xellie Moulton, Ruth O'Malley, 
Alice Powell, Archie Rabinovitz, Agnes Watson, Bernice Young, Lottie 
Baer, Charles Dixon, Walter Hackshaw, Robert Hanson, Alfred Hyland, 
Cyrene Lewis, Ceha Shuff, Julia Trudell, Carl Anderson, Evelyn Fluff, 
Kenneth McLeod, Eleanor Duncan, Margaret Duncan, Willy Hof- 
schneider, Maxine Stanley, Maurice Clough, Donald Gilford, Mae 
Landon, Marjorie Rowe, Anna Lefebvre, Martha Baer, Louis Braley, 
Rosie Sanel, Ida Levingston, Dorothea M. Goodwin, Harlan L. Good- 
win, Rudolph O. Lefebvre, Gladys L. Melvin, Lillian G. McAllister, 
Helen M. Lowe, Edwin F. Cloudman, Harriette Stewart, Frank E. 
Palmer, Eben B. Hutton, Allen I. Lewis, Agnes L. Smith, Frank A. 
Kenney, Marjorie F. Lowe, Earle W. Fluff. 

Kimball School.— Doris E. Abbott, Vera D. Anderson, Warren H. 
Butterfield, Ruth J. Cilley, M. Ethalind Cooper, Katherine Graves, 
Madeline Haggett, Mary Home, Ruth E. Knee, Miriam C. Lowell, 
Stanley R. Pillsbury, Sibyl Rawcliffe, Moses L. Silverman, Esther 
Thompson, Svea Wohlstrom, Evelyn Whitney, Jennie Rowell, Cath- 
erine F. Beane, John R. Gordon, Rachel P. Hall, Winnifred C. Leary, 
David R. Lockard, Robert J. Prowse, Edward F. Ritchie, Delia R. 
Virgin, Winnifred L. Wheeler, Farwell Brown, Donald Harriott, Donald 
McFarland, Marion Brown, Kinsley Batchelder, James Niles, Fred 
Brown, Phyllis Carter, Lydia Dyer, Harvey Brown, Elizabeth Dyer, 
Alice McNally, Mary Peckham, Winslow Melvin, Marion L. Allen, 
Helen M. Barlow,' Eleanor S. Clarke, Getrude L Lane, Osmond R. 
Strong, Albert N. Baker, Lois Calkins, Anna F. Danforth, Charles W. 
Sanborn, Ethel Tappan, Marion L. Whalen, Virginia R. Davis, Jane P. 
Graves, Frances Stratton, Edna M. Dunn, Alden S. Heath, Dorothy H. 
Wilkins, Margaret Eveleth, Ernest Augat, Florence Berminger, Alan 
Chase, Edwin Cadret, Pendele Joseph, Archie McDonald, Corinne 
Murphy, Hazel Tibbetts, James Moran, James Tucker, Carroll Johnson, 
Ruth Robinson, Jerry Cook, Harriett Bryant, Harry Carr, Henry Cil- 
eski, Emily Jewell, Marion Pike, Paul Robinson, Lillian Trombly, Ed- 
mund Trombly, Levi Wohlstrom. 

Penacook School.— Thomas Angwin, Elsie Belrose, Paul Berg- 
strom, Warren Cutting, Lester Holt, John Jackman, Genevieve Kelley, 
Edward Moulton, David Waldman, Gladys Smythe, Lloyd Carpenter, 
Elwood Davis, George Lougee, Wilbur Lobdell, Cleon Roers, Carl Ronn, 
Chester Hadley, Leona Carpenter, William Vaern, Earle Mudgett, 



136 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Richard Dunlap, Laura Taber, Myrle Chesley, Charles Freeman, Eva 
Carr, Helen Ericson, Sara Brunei, Estelle Charpentier, Alfred Rowell, 
Robert Foster, Shirley Martin, Richard Butterfield, Cora Cate, Doro- 
thy Hadley, Kelsey Smith, Hazel McLaughlin, Louise Curran, Evelyn 
Farrar, Francis Bolster, Pauhne Chandler, Hyman Wittenberg, Lena 
Roy, Alpheus Mahoney, Dorothy Neville, Harold Donovan, Bertha 
Holden, George Bachellor, Marjorie Wright. 

Franklin School. — Thomas Mulligan, Jacques Van de Kieft, Bar- 
bara Everett, Albert Barlow, Sybil Baxter, Harold VitagUano, Edson 
Phelps, Annie Evans, Cyril Datson, Mary Lake, Helene Wheeler, Grace 
Schou. 

Dewey School. — Isadore E. Taylor, Paul K. King, Stephen K. 
Callahan, J. Wilford Biledeau, Mary L. Alexander, John G. Augat, 
Florence M. Conn, Clara E. Cook, Evelyn R. Bacon, Henry W. Ken- 
nedy, Josef F. Sandquist, Olive M. Scott, Francis W. Wescott, Elizabeth 
Woodworth, Clara E. Dearborn, Leonard Frost, Frederick R. Knox, 
Barbara Leach, Gertrude Shannon, Rose T. Niles, Jeannette Swenson, 
Rudolf Van de Kieft, Alan Warren, Karl Corser, Kenneth Corser, Doro- 
thy L. Gaige, Sarah B. Jackson, Kathleen MulUgan, William Saltmarsh, 
Louise Wilde, J. Byron Stewart. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Gerald Drew, Rose Raduaze, Virginia 
Wentworth, Louise Newton, Dorothy Robinson, Vera Champigney, 
Mike Perrino, MadeUne Cass, Mary Shaw, George Hillsgrove, Arthur 
Giddis, Dorothy Wentworth, Migilier Radioze, Charles Allen, Leon 
Manchester, Clifford Savoy, Cecil Rowland, Harold Stackhouse, Ruth 
Sweet, Helen Foote, Helen Curtice, Frank Perrino, Clara Piper, George 
Shaw, Emery Pratt, Irving Jenson, Perley Savoy, Hilda Rowland, Jacob 
Waldman, Roland Monast, Robert Prescott, John Allen. 

Millville School. — Marie L. Parker, Ruth Merter, Harriet M. 
Marshey, Martin White, Maurice A. Rice, Helen Perry, Robert Hurd, 
Bernard Roach, Harriet Parker, David Merter, Leon Alexander, Walter 
Parker, Doris Tanner. 

MotFNTAiN School. — Lena Mayo, Ray Turner, Roy Turner, Dorothy 
Maddon, Eddella Mayo. 

Iron Works School. — Hazel M. Bean, Marion E. Dow, Hazel M. 
Emerson, Martha Whitcher, Pauhne B. Bean, Fannie M. Carleton, 
Leonard B. Bushey, Harris E. Wheeler. 

RivERHiLL School.— Nettie A. Brown, Fred A. Heath, Ehzabeth M. 
Guy, Goldie M. Auprey, Mildred L. Guy, Raymond T. Auprey, Albert 
L. Davis, Grace E. Andrews. 



GRADUATING CLASSES, JUNE ^21, 1918. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
Gladys R. Avery, 
Eleanor E. Bailey, 
Rachel S. Barker, 
Albert W. Blake, 
Josephine E. Boland, 
Louise B. Boland, 
Carmi P. Browne, 
Bertha G. Burton, 
Agnes P. Callahan, 
Henry P. Callahan, 
Margaret L. Callahan, 
Doris E. Carleton, 
Ida C. Carlson, 
James H. Casey, 
Mary E. Casey, 
Mary I. Champigny, 
Elizabeth S. Chase, 
Marjorie G. Cheney, 
Leah M. Clark, 
Stanley L. Clark, 
Marion S. Cochran, 
Haskell H. Cohn, 
Elsie P. Colby, 
George L. Colby, 
Solon B. Colby, 
Wendell F. ColUns, 
Aimee M. Corriveau, 
Nora E. Cotter, 
Madeleine M. Curran, 
Paul O. Davis, 
Mabel A. Downs, 
Louise A. Durrell, 
Roger M. Eastman, 
Guy O. Edmunds, 
Harold H. Ericson, 
Jeanette M. Fish, 
Luella F. Fogg, 



Course. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Name. 
Bertha M. Fraser, 
Gladys P. French, 
Edith M. Gordon, 
Alice M. Gourley, 
Philip B. Gove, 
Fritz H. Gustafson, 
Ellen E. Hackett, 
Clarence H. Hammond, 
Myrtle A. Hartford, 
Esther S. Haselton, 
Eldon W. Heartz, 
Orrin C. Hodgdon, 
HUma Hokenson, 
Louise Home, 
Richard L. Hurd, 
Agnes L. Johnston, 
Ruth H. Kibby, 
Cornelia H. Kimball, 
Arthur E. Kunberger, 
Ellen M, Lamprey, 
Emma I. Lord, 
Robert F. A. McCormick, 
Harry E. Mclntire, 
Ida Mclntyre, 
Berniece E. Morrison, 
AUce M. Newbold, 
Grace M. Patch, 
Nina G. Ramsay, 
Helen H. Rhodes, 
Mary E. Robinson, 
Mary A. Shannon, 
Oney P. Smith, 
Ruth C. Staniels, 
Hazel I. Sutton, 
Guy E. Tabor, 
Gladys H. Towle, 
Margaret J. Veasey, 
Herbert Walker, 
Ruth M. West, 
Donald J. White, 



Course. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Commercial 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Domestic Arts. 
Mechanic Arts. 



SCHOOL REPORT 



139 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 
Chandler School — Class M. 



Claire W. Aldrich 
Carl A. Augat 
George A. Bartlett 
Harold E. Beliveau 
Everett C. Benton 
Gertrude Bolton 
Charles F. Brewster 
Joyce L. Brown 
Kenneth N. Brown 
Ernest R. Carpenter 
Henry W. Carpenter 
Hiram W. Cate 
Ruel N. Colby 
Ruth H. Colby 
Harry R. Danforth 
Paul L. DuBois, Jr. 
Ella F. Duemling 
Emile B. Dupuis 
Eleanor F. Erskine 
Crosby D. Ford 
Marjorie H. Ford 
Edwin J. Fortin 
Harry F. Frost 
Louise C. Gifford 
Wallace W. Gooden 
Wallace E. Hall 
Harry E. Hilliard 
Mary E. L. Hodgman 
Paul R. Holbrook 
Charles P. Houston 
Ruth L Jaclonan 



John F. Jones 
George H. Kayes 
LesUe C. Knowlton 
Dana H. Lee 
Crosby H. Lewis 
Jack D. Mansur 
John B. McCaffrey 
Harriet McLeod 
Clara D. Minor 
Ethel E. Newton 
Elizabeth Peckham 
Maurice A. Quinn 
Earle C. Robinson 
Marion F. Robinson 
Eleanor L. Powell 
Merton D. Rumrill 
Martha G. Saltmarsh 
Waldo M. Sanborn 
Stalla M. Santy 
Myrna L. Simpson 
Etta T. Smith 
Edwin L. Stackhouse 
Philip E. Stohrer • 
Ernest D. Taylor 
John W. Watts 
Linnie O. Wilcox 
Clifford H. Woodward 
Leila R. Young 
Stella H. Young 
Hilda A. Gustafson 



RoUand H. Bourke 
Viola A. Carlson 
Fred A. Duckers 
L:ene M. Heartz 
Harry N. Hobson 
Flora E. Keniston 



Walkek School — Class M. 

Ernest L. Levesque 
Eugene H. Mayo 
Ada M. Noble 
Bernice L. Reid 
Roland C. Robinson 
Glynn K. Young 
Edith L. Walker 



140 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Garrison School. 

Anna A. Anderson Robert A. Ecklund 

Ethel V. Johnson Chester G. Larson 

Hildegarde E. Rossell Amos A. Turner 

Agnes V. Nelson Ernest E. Vinton 

Eastman School. 

Bertha M. Lacroix Ralph P. Muzzey 

Mary E. Marcotte Madeline S. Sargent 



GRADUATING CLASSES, FEBRUARY 
14, 1919. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Name. 
Lillian E. Berry, 
Marion Briggs, 
Henry K. Bugbee, 
Alice V. Carlson, 
James P. Cassidy, 
Abbott A. Clark, 
Hazel B. Clement, 
John S. Clinton, 
Marion Colby, 
Mildred N. Dunsford, 
Majel E. Evans, 
Harley J. Ford, 
Rachel R. George, 
Eva A. Hadley, 
Julian J. Hickey, 
Emma C. Jones, 
Marjorie Knight, 
Ruby W. Lawrence, 
James M. Maloney, 
Margaret G. Mannion, 
Thomas J. McCann, 
Lucile L Nelson, 
Marjorie J. Newbold, 
Charlotte E. Noyes, 
Ethel M. Nudd, 
M. Charlene L. Pettengill, 
Laura D. Phillips, 
Eunice E. Quinn, 
Winnie I. Ramsay, 
Gertrude Ravitch, 
Leola G. Robinson, 
Charles E. Roche, 
Martha V. Scully, 
Cora A. M. Chapdelaine, 
Altha E. Walker, 
Rose T. Welch, 
Clara G. West, 
Francis I. Wood, 



Course. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Mechanic Arts. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Academic. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Academic. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Domestic Arts. 
Classical. 
Classical. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 
Domestic Arts. 
Commercial. 
Classical. 



142 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 
Chandler School. 



Doris E. Abbott 
Vera D. Anderson 
Grace E. Andrews 
Carl Badger 
Hazel M. Bean 
Helen J. Belrose 
Martin Bengsch 
Theresa I. Bombard 
Warren H. Butterfield 
Agnes McD. Chalmers 
Ruth J. Cilley 
Maurice H. Conn 
Fred L. Copp 
Edith Cruikshank 
Eva M. Dearborn 
Una G. Dearborn 
Ellen M. Dennerly 
Doris L. Dickey 
Constance M. Dimick 
Laurence I. Duncan 
Frederick W. Fernside 
Russell P. Fitts 
Forres M. Forsyth 
Herbert Geary 
Arthur Giddis 
Katharine Graves 
Madeline Haggett 
Parker W. Hall 
Laura C. Harvey 
Kenneth L. Heath 
Ruth Herter 
Marjorie E. Hill 
Fred K. Hodgman 
Gladys E. Home 
Mary Home 
Nathalie M. Hurd 
Signe A. Johnson 
Vearlan P. Knowlton 
Ruth M. Lane 
John W. Law 
Arthur R. Lee 
Alice Levingston 



Esther A. Magnuson 
Mildred E. McFarland 
Francis T. Megrath 
Myrtle H. Moody 
Lenwood E. Moulton 
Clara C. Page 
Irving C. Peabody 
Hazel A. PhUbrick 
Dorothy F. Powell 
Sibyl RawcUffe 
Hoyt M. Reille 
Nelson S. Rogers 
Jennie Rowell 
George N. Sanborn 
Oscar T. Sandquist 
Fannie L Sanel 
Mildred E. Savage 
Alice M. Shepard 
Dorothy Shepard 
Moses S. Silverman 
Lloyd A. Simpson 
Neal K. Sleeper 
Raymond D. Small 
Edna M. Smith 
Douglas McL. Stevenson 
Laura Stevenson 
Stowell St. Pierre 
Louise A. Strausser 
Emma P. Tabor 
Marjorie E. Tenney 
Freda A. Thayer 
Esther H. Thompson 
Leon W. Towle 
Elma M. Wallace 
Dorothy E. Wentworth 
Gladys M. Whalen 
Martha Whitcher 
Mabel F. White 
Martin E. White 
Evelyn M. Whitney 
Svea Wohlstrom 



SCHOOL REPORT 



143 



Walker School. 



Ernest J. Aranosian 
Ida Crossland 
Albert F. Daggett 
Philip N. Guyol 
Madeline Hobson 
George W. Hodge 
Mildred L. C. Hodge 
Alice M. Hyland 
Ruth E. Kjiee 
Dorothy M. La Fleur 
Edward N. Lamprone 
Stanley F. Little 
Mattie L Moore 



Mildred H. Morrill 
Richard A. Morton 
Pauline W. Oyston 
Laura Plummer 
Samuel E. Powers 
Edward C. Robinson 
Nora A. Roy 
Charles M. Sawyer 
Germaine K. Shannon 
Lawrence Tonjiin 
Robert F. Walker 
Dorothy E. Willard 



M. Esther Gushing 
Pauline Cushnie 
Elsa G. K. Olson 
Louise D. Shepard 
Ellen E. Turnquist 



Garrison School. 



L. Arnold Engel 
Alfred Hendrickson 
Wilho A. Kupsalo 
MOo V. Lindgren 



Hazel E. Blanchard 
Ruth A. Lewis 
Hazel B. Maynard 
Vesta P. Morrison 



Eastman School. 



Irving J. Sargent 
Doris E. Shine 
George C. Stuart 
C. Pauline Tebbetts 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1918. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 



HARRY H. DUDLEY, 


to March 31 


1922 


NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 


to March 31 


1922 


BURNS P. HODGMAN, 


to March 31 


1921 


JOHN B. ABBOTT, 


to March 31 


1921 


FRANK P. QUIMBY, 


to March 31 


1920 


GEORGE T. KENNEY. 


to March 31 


1920 


EDSON J. HILL, 


to May 18 


1918 


OLIVER J. PELREN, 


to March 31 


1919 


CHARLES R. WALKER, 


to March 31 


1919 



EDSON J. HILL, President to May 18, 1918. 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, President 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk. . 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

INSPECTOR. 

HARRY E. STEVENS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 

10 



146 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY WATER BOARD. 



Date of election and length of service of members. 

Abraham G. Jones,* 

ex-officio, 1872-three months. 

John M. Hill,* 1872-1878. 

Benjamin A. Kimball, 1872-1878. 

Josiah Minot,* 1872. Resigned Jan. 10, 1874. 

David A. Ward,* 1872-1874. 

Edward L. Knowlton,* 1872. Resigned Sept. 25, 1875. 

Benjamin S. Warren,* 1872-1873. 

John Kimball,* ex-officio, 1872-1876. 

John Abbott,* 1873-1876. 

John S. Russ,* 1874-1877. 

Abel B. Holt,* 1874-1877. 

Samuel S. Kimball,* 1875. Resigned July 1, 1891. 
Geo. A. Pillsbury,* ex-officio, 1876-1878. 

Luther P. Durgin,* 1876-1885. 

John Kimball,* 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 

William M. Chase,* 1877. Resigned July 1, 1891. 
Horace A.Brow a,* ex-officio, 1878-1880. 

James L. Mason,* 1878-1893. 

James R. Hill,* 1878. Died in 1884. 
Geo. A. Cummings,* 

ex-officio, 1880-1883. 
Edgar H. Woodman,* 

ex-officio, 1883-1887. 

Joseph H. Abbot,* 1884-1893. 

George A. Young,* 1885-1894. 
John E. Robertson, 

ex-officio, 1887-1889. 
Stillman Humphrey,* 

ex-officio, 1889-1891. 
Henry W. Clapp,* ex-officio, 1891-1893. 

Willis D. Thompson, 1891-1895. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 147 

William P. Fiske,* 1891-1902. 

James H. Chase,* 1891. Died in 1893. 

John Whitaker,* 1892. Died in 1903. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1892. Resigned Jan. 8, 1895. 

Parsons B. Cogswell,* 

ex-officio, 1893-1895. 

Solon A Carter,* 1893. Resigned April 9, 1917. 

Frank D. Abbot, 1893-1901. 

William M. Mason,* 1893-1899. 

WiUiam E. Hood, 1894-1902. 

Henry Robinson, ex-officio, 1895-1897. 

Ebenezer B. Hutchinson,* 1895. Resigned Jan. 10, 1899. 

Edson J. Hill,* 1895. Died in 1918. 
Albert B. Woodworth,* 

ex-officio, 1897-1899. 
Nathaniel E. Martin, 

ex-officio, 1899-1901. 

Henry E. Conant,* 1899. Died in 1911. 

Timothy P. Sullivan, 1899. Resigned May 14, 1901. 
Harry G. Sargent,* ex-officio, 1901-1903. 

Obadiah Morrill, 1901-1905. 

George D. B. Prescott,* 1901-1915. 

Harry H. Dudley, 1902. Now in office. 

Nathaniel E. Martin, 1902. Now in office. 
Charles R. Corning, ex-officio, 1903-1909. 

Henry C. Holbrook, 1903-1916. 

Harley B. Roby,* 1905. Resigned Jan. 24, 1911. 
Charles J. French, ex-officio, 1909-1916. 
Nathan'lW.Hobbs, ex-officio, 1916-1918. 

Burns P. Hodgman, 1911. Now in office. 

Frank P. Quimby, 1911. Now in office. 

Charles R. Walker, 1915. Now in office. 

George T. Kenney, 1916. Now in office. 

John B. Abbott, 1917. Now in office. 
Charles J. French, ex-officio, 1918. Now in office. 

Oliver J. Pelren, 1918. Now in office. 

'Deceased. 



148 city of concord. 

Presidents of the Board. 



Josiah Minot,* 


1872. 


Resigned Jan. 10, 1874, 


Benjamin A. Kimball, 


1874- 


-1875. 


Edward L. Knowlton,* 


1875. 


Resigned Sept. 25, 1875, 


John Kimball,* 


1875- 


■1876. 


Benjamin A. Kimball, 


1876- 


-1878. 


John Kimball,* 


1878. 


Resigned July 1, 1891. 


Wilham P. Fiske,* 


1891- 


-1902. 


Solon A. Carter,* 


1902. 


Resigned April 7, 1917. 


Edson J Hill,* 


1917. 


Died May 18, 1918. 


Nathaniel E. Martin, 


1918. 


Now in office. 


Superintendents. 


V. C. Hastings,* 


1873. 


Died March 14, 1907. 


P. R. Sanders, 


1907. 


Now in office. 


•Deceased. 







WATEK DEPARTMENT. 149 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights: 


Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 




rights, 1 


$60,000.00 


Concord Manufacturing Co.. 




for water rights, 


83,000.00 


W. P. Cooledge, for mill 




privilege and land, 


5,500.00 


Humphrey & Farnum, for 




kit-shop privilege, 


5,000.00 


flowage rights around Pena- 




cook Lake, 


4,375.61 


for land at Penacook Lake, 


88,182.41 


C. H. Amsden, water and 




flowage rights, 


5,000.00 


Cost of property and rights of 




Torrent Aqueduct Asso- 




ciation, 


20,000.00 


dam, gate-house and appur- 




tenances. 


35,546.05 


conduit and gate-houses, 


29,818.94 


mains (low service main and 




pump main from the dam 




to Penacook Street, force 




main from the pump to 




the reservoir, fire main 




through North and South 




Main Streets and high 




service main from Pena- 




cook .Street to Stark 




Street, Penacook), 


182,241.70 


distribution pipe. 


400,305.56 


service pipe. 


67,538.00 


reservoir, including land, 


45,044.09 



150 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cost of pumping station, shop, 
stable and storehouse, in- 
cluding land, $29,743 . 35 

pumping machinery, 17,000 . 42 

engineering and superin- 
tendence, 14,913.12 

incidentals, 6,531 . 19 



Cost of works, January 1, 1919, 
Less amount received for lumber, land and 
buildings sold. 



1,099,740.44 
7,736.61 
$1,092,003.83 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 



Whenc 


lue. 


Jan. 1, 


1919, 


Nov. 1, 


1920, 


Nov. 1, 


1921, 


April 1, 


1921, 


Jan. 1, 


1922, 


Jan. 1, 


1922, 


April 1, 


1922, 


Jan. 1, 


1923, 


Jan. 1, 


1924, 



Rate. 


Amount. 


4, 


$10,000.00 


3, 


4,000.00 


3, 


3,000.00 


02, 


5,000.00 


4, 


333,000.00 


02, 


8,000.00 


02, 


26,000.00 


02, 


3,000 . 00 


02, 


15,000.00 




$407,000.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 151 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 



Concord, N. H., February 1, 1919. 
To His Honor, the Mayor, and Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners herewith transmits 
the annual report of the superintendent for the year 1918. 
His report as usual is so full and complete that no ex- 
tended report of the Board is necessary. 

The water system of the city is in a thorough and satis- 
factory condition. The watershed of Penacook Lake ad- 
joining the water, with the exception of a small water front, 
is now owned by the city, and the public use of the surface 
of the lake is practically ended, so that there is slight danger 
of contamination of the water. 

The financial condition of the city water works from its 
beginning to January 1, 1919, in brief is as follows: 

Construction account, $1,092,003.83 

Total bonds issued, 710,000 . 00 

Bonds paid, 303,000.00 

Bonds outstanding, 407,000.00 

Interest account in 1895, 27,425.00 

Interest account in 1918, 16,325.00 

Of the total construction account of $1,092,003.83 only 
$407,000 remains unpaid. 

Net Income is invested as follows : 

Capital. 
CapitalJanuary 1, 1918: 

City of Concord 4% Sewer 
Bonds, $5,000.00 

U. S. First Liberty Bond of 1917, 

converted, 4^% bonds, 10,000 . 00 

$15,000.00 



152 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Added from Water Works income: 
U. S. Third Liberty Loan of 

1918, 41% bonds, $10,000 . 00 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan of 

1918, 41% bonds, 10,000 . 00 

U, S. War Savings Certificates, 

par $1,000, 846.00 



20,846.00 
$35,846.00 



Income. 
Capital, January 1, 1918, $267.16 

Income received 1918, 457.45 



$724.61 



Invested in: 

U. S. Second Liberty Loan oi 

1917, converted, 4|% bonds, 

two at 100, $193 . 52 

U. S. Third Liberty Loan of 

1918, 41% bonds, three at 

$100, 288.69 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan of 

1918,41% bonds, two at $100, 200.00 
Deposited in Loan & Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 42.40 



$724.61 

The Board of Water Commissioners desires to record at 
this time its deep sorrow occasioned by the death of one of 
its oldest associates in service, Edson J. Hill. 

Mr. Hill served as clerk of the Board for many years, 
and at the resignation of Col. Solon A. Carter, was the unan- 
imous choice of the Board as president. 

Mr. Hill possessed rare business judgment and ability; 
and he gave his best in service in filling the many positions 
of trust that he held. His death is keenly felt by his as- 
sociates, as indeed the whole community mourns the loss 
of a valued and respected citizen. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 153 

Mr. Hill was first elected a member of the Board in 1895 
and served continuously until his death on Maj^ 18, 1918. 
He served as clerk of the Board from April 5, 1902, to April 
7, 1917, and as president of the Board from April 7, 1917, 
to May 18, 1918. 

The following resolution was passed July 10, 1918, by 
the Board : 

Resolved, That this Board will officially place upon its 
records this testimony to a faithful public servant and a 
warm and devoted friend; and that the Board respectfully 
tenders its heartfelt sympathy to Mrs. Hill and other mem- 
bers of the family in this season of their bereavement and 
affliction. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
OLIVER J. PELREN, 
CHARLES J. FRENCH, ex-offido, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



154 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the forty-seventh annual 
report of the operations of this department, showing the 
receipts, expenditures and abatements, together with a 
statement of the extensions and improvements made 
during the year ending December 31, 1918. 

Receipts. 
For water, from consumers by fixed 

rates, $10,705.67 

For water, from consumers by meter 

rates, 64,498 . 78 

From delinquents, 78.30 

For water for building purposes, 28 . 54 

pipe and stock sold and labor, 1 ,249 . 2 1 



old brass and iron sold. 


98.12 


old lumber and slate sold. 


27.00 


cement bags returned. 


44.30 


From wood and farm lands, 


1,269.00 


freight refund, 


122.02 


coal refund, 


7.22 


telephone refund, 


.60 

«7Q 1 OQ 'ja 




Kt>i a, i^o . 1 


Deduct abatements, 


51.61 


Net receipts for 1918, 


$78,077.15 


There has also been furnished the city free of charge the 


following use of water: 




Pubhc buildings, 


$179.50 


Parks and playgrounds. 


60.00 


Cemeteries, 


108.00 


Street department, 


774.00 


Drinking fountains and watering 




troughs, 


280.00 


Sewer flush tanks, 


45.00 


457 fire hydrants at $25, 


11,425.00 

$12,871.50 



water department. 155 

Expenditures. 
maintenance account. 

General care and maintenance: 

Salaries and labor, $7,241 . 23 
Maintenance of team, 189.91 
Maintenance of autos, 877 . 56 
Teaming and livery, 159.00 
Miscellaneous supplies and re- 
pairs, 370.17 
Tools, 116.94 
Repairs of buildings, 96 . 36 
Telephones and lighting, 118.49 
Insurance, 342 . 10 
Incidentals, 81.79 

),593.55 



Office expenses: 






Salaries, 




$1,124.95 


Postage anc 


I printing. 


514.58 


Miscellaneous supplies. 


32.29 


Telephone, 




37.15 


• 

Care and repair 


of hydrants: 




Stock, 




$48.39 


Labor, 




170.88 


Care and repair 


of meters : 




Stock, 




$128.46 


Labor, 




276.63 



1,708.97 



219.27 



405.09 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Relaying service pipes : 






Stock, 


$14.25 




Labor, 


110.82 


$125.07 


Repairing leaks: 




Stock, 


$3.80 




Labor, 


83.82 


87.62 
278.23 


Care of wood-lots, 




Farm account, 




450.64 


Penacook Park, 




66.88 


Taxes, town of Webster, 




56.00 


Pumping Station : 






Salaries and labor, 


$2,236.39 




Fuel, 


1,705.72 




Supplies and repairs, 


709.98 




Telephone and lighting. 


57.91 




Insurance, 


95.90 


4,805.90 




^ 


Total maintenance account, 


517,797.22 



CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 

Distribution pipes: 

Stock, $982 . 95 

Labor, 49 . 75 

Service pipes: 

Stock, $41.25 

Labor, 55 . 97 



L, 032. 70 



97.22 



Hydrants: 

Labor, 14.59 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 157 

Meters: 

Stock, $75.00 

Labor, 34.86 

S109.86 



Addition to coal shed, 478.28 



Total construction account, $1 ,732 . 65 



LAND AT PENACOOK LAKE. 



State of New Hampshire, final pay- 
ment, $10,000.00 
Recording deed, 1 . 52 



10,001.52 



Total expenditures for 1918, $29,531 . 39 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Cast-iron distribution pipe has been laid during the year 
as follows: 

In Clarke Street, 

Extended north, 96 feet 6-inch pipe, in place of 1^-inch 
pipe discontinued. 

Total amount laid during the year, 96 feet. 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in 
use, 374,550 feet, equal to 70 . 94 miles. 

Total number of gates now in use, 1,048. 

There have been laid during the year and connected with 
the main pipes, 5 service pipes consisting of 126 feet of 
f-inch pipe and 48 feet of 2-inch pipe. There have been 
discontinued, 2; total number of service pipes at the present 
time, 3,882; total length of service pipes, 91,844 feet or 
17.39 miles. 



158 CITY OF CONCORD. 

There have been relaid 12 services and 14 curbs have 
been placed on old services. 

We have set 21 meters during the year; removed, 3; 
total number now in use, 2,576. 

The following table shows the height of water in Pena- 
cook Lake on the first day of each month : 



January, 


181.50 


July, 


182.55 


February, 


181.30 


August, 


181.90 


March, 


181.00 


September, 


181.35 


April, 


182.00 


October, 


181.60 


May, 


183.25 


November, 


181.20 


June, 


183 . 05 


December, 


181.15 



The lowest point reached during the year was 181, on 
March 1 and on November 16; the highest was 183.35, 
on May 5; mean height for the year was 181.84, which was 
1.97 feet lower than the mean height for 1917. 

Water has been supplied to four community war gardens 
for spraying purposes only, free of charge, by vote of the 
Board of Water Commissioners and were located as fol- 
lows: 

Hall Street, at ball grounds. 
Ridge Road, near Rev. Lorin Webster residence, 
South Street, opposite I. W. Bushey residence. 
West Concord, at Eastman field. 

After twenty-six years of operating the pumping station 
by steam, it has been decided to install an electrically 
operated centrifugal pump. The present pumps, one of 
which was installed in 1893 and the other in 1904, are to be 
kept in good condition in readiness for any emergency. 

A contract has been made with the Worthington Pump 
and Machinery Corporation for one Worthington 8 inch 
type 'BS' slow speed horizontally split casing volute centrif- 
ugal pump, to be operated by a 100-horse power A. C. 
motor. A satisfactory contract has been made with the 
Concord Electric Company for all power and it is hoped 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 159 

that the unit will prove a success. A Venturi meter will 
be installed which will measure all water pumped and also 
check the performance of the pump and show the efficiency 
of the present pumps. 

I wish to express my thanks to the members of the Board 
for their interest and support in the conduct of the affairs 
of the department and my appreciation of the faithful 
services of the employees. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 

P. R. Sanders, Superintendent: 

Sir: I would report that the pumping machinery at 
the pumping station is in good working condition. 

The boilers are in good condition, the fire boxes need 
some repairs. 

Following is a statement of coal and other supplies used 
at the pumping station during the year, with a table show- 
ing the work for each month. 

Statement. 

230.70 tons Beacon Smithing coal. 
99 gallons valve oil. 
10 gallons engine oil. 

39 pounds of waste. 
14 pounds of grease. 
5| cords of wood. 

40 gallons of perohne boiler compound. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 
ENGINE RECORD, 1918. 



161 



Months. 



-a a 



T3 a 
o'3) 



a 







8 


1 


eg 






"o 


a 


•S^ 










>-o 








>>S 


•sS 


••3S 


^y 


Q 


H 



75 o. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September . . . 

October 

November . . . 
December . . . 

Total . . . 

Daily average 









H.M. 


H.M. 


10 


.■?1 


31 


318: 


10:15 


11 


28 


28 


294:30 


10:31 


8 


29 


31 


291: 


9:23 


11 


19 


28 


264: 


8:48 


12 


20 


27 


266: 


8:.34 


1.5 


14 


2,') 


252: 


8:24 


17 


16 


27 


229: 


7:23 


16 


16 


27 


249:30 


8: 2 


16 


14 


25 


230: 


7:40 


16 


16 


27 


237: 


7:38 


17 


13 


25 


231: 


7:42 


15 


16 


25 


270:30 


8:43 


164 


232 


326 


3.132:30 


8:34 



28,376,755 
27,130,007 
26.799,181 
23,265,484 
23,682,088 
21,936,906 
23,376,329 
22,390,333 
20,116,646 
21,103.736 
20,156,890 
23,298,485 



281.632,840 
771,596 



915,379 
951,071 
864,489 
775,516 
763,938 
731,230 
754,075 
722,268 
670,554 
680.765 
671,896 
751, .564 



52,072 
50,694 
49,311 
41,931 
42,589 
38,852 
41,890 
40.922 
37.579 
39,845 
38,575 
42,522 



516.782 
1,415 



1,679 
1,810 
1,590 
1,397 
1,373 
1,295 
1,351 
1,320 
1,252 
1,285 
1,285 
1,371 



378 
469 

572 
582 
894 

1,760 
789 

1,029 
833 

1,067 

1,292 



9,665 



544 
535 
543 
554 
556 
564 
558 
547 
535 
529 
522 
547 



Coal consumed for the year, 230.70 tons. 

Pounds of wood consumed -t-3= equivalent amount of 
coal, 3,221 pounds. 

Total equivalent coal consumed for the year includes that 
used for pumping, starting fires, banking fires and heating 
building, 232.14 tons. 

Amount of equivalent coal consumed per thousand gal- 
lons pumped, .184. 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



11 



162 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 



Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1918, $22,908 .31 
P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 78,077 . 15 

$100,985.46 



Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $16,230 . 00 

Bonds paid, 10,000.00 

Income investment, 20,846 . 00 

Orders paid, 29,531.39 

Cash on hand, 24,378.07 



$100,985.46 



APPENDIX. 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



A. 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of 

THE Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 
For fifteen months ending April 1 
For the year ending April 1, 



For nine months ending December 
For the year ending December 31, 



1874, 


$4,431.10 


, 1875, 


17,535.00 


1876, 


16,921.24 


1877, 


19,001.07" 


1878, 


20,763 . 03 


1879, 


21,869.86 


1880, 


22,451.53 


1881, 


26,744.58 


31,1881, 


25,534.01 


1882, 


27,243.06 


1883, 


28,255.48 


1884, 


28,915.65 


1885, 


30,222.54 


1886, 


30,862.64 


1887, 


34,047.52 


1888, 


38,441.32 


1889, 


40,237.53 


1890, 


42,133.41 


1891, 


46,075.16 


1892, 


48,351.52 


1893, 


52,299.66 


1894, 


53,230.10 


1895, 


55,343.19 


1896, 


56,557.81 


1897, 


55,156.42 


1898, 


59,147.54 


1899, 


*53,953.13 


1900, 


♦57,003.71 


1901, 


62,253.61 


1902, 


63,430.85 



* No hydraat rental this year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



165 



For the year ending December 31, 



Total receipts for 46 years, 



1903. 


$65,088.45 


1904, 


68,570.48 


1905, 


71,076.44 


1906, 


73,063.45 


1907, 


73,782.64 


1908, 


71,362.67 


1909, 


*67,307.84 


1910, 


68,673.71 


1911, 


71,881.34 


1912, 


76,145.13 


1913, 


76,154.45 


1914, 


74,422.15 


1915, 


78,940.06 


1916, 


75,052.72 


1917, 


77,092.10 


1918, 


78,077.15 




$2,305,104.05 



B. 



Mean Height of Water Each Year. 



1873, 


175.86 


1885, 


176.80 


1874, 


179.50 


1886, 


178.10 


1875, 


180.00 


1887, 


179.04 


1876, 


180.28 


1888, 


181.96 


1877, 


176.46 


1889, 


180.91 


1878, 


179.50 


1890, 


181.90 


1879, 


179.74 


1891, 


180.00 


1880, 


175.30 


1892, 


174.32 


1881, 


174.70 


1893, 


173.38 


1882, 


179.15 


1894, 


172.81 


1883, 


176.40 


1895, 


171.15 


1884, 


178.18 


1896, 


178.96 



* No hydrant rental after 1908. 



166 CITY OF CONCORD. 



1897, 


183.33 


1908, 


183.41 


1898, 


184.31 


1909, 


181.40 


1899, 


183.49 


1910, 


180.22 


1900, 


183.09 


1911, 


177.60 


1901, 


183.86 


1912, 


178.86 


1902, 


184.98 


1913, 


179.20 


1903, 


184.75 


1914, 


179.55 


1904, 


184.40 


1915, 


180.00 


1905, 


183.37 


1916, 


184.15 


1906, 


183.94 


1917, 


183.81 


1907, 


183.59 


1918, 


181.84 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 167 

c. 

SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES. 



Streets. 


B IE £ 
OJ O p 


Length and Size op Iron Pipe in Feet. 


1 


30-in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


z 




2220 


























282 


























331 
13598 


1905 

58 


75 
75 














7 








147 












fi 


















29 






240 


2962 




42 


20 












5 


Pumping station and lay- 














8 


Abbott 




















23 
458 


349 


? 






















1 


Albin 
















785 




1 




















450 
2492 


505 


1 






















4 














2182 








1 




















724 

5 

2145 

265 

475 
1781 

590 


"689 
"250 

"245 


2 






















1 






















3 


Blake 




















2 






















1 


Blossom Hill . 




















1 


Bow 




















1 








































1577 

327 

2052 






3 




















1123 




1 
















2278 


3 


















6 
763 
1077 


154 


1 


















SOS 




5 


















2 


















3529 


2690 


14 


















306 
585 


"56 
516 

"547 


1 






















2 






















1 






















265 
1600 

196 
1663 


1 


Church . . . 


















21 


7 


Clarke 




































1942 


180 




3 














2100 




1 




















15P3 


286 

"836 

"242 

"92 

400 
"607 


5 






















670 

422 

19 

414 

387 
456 
1977 
1195 
265 
400 
550 
270 
388 
587 


2 






















2 


Dakin 




















2 






















1 






















2 






















1 






















4 






















3 






















I 






















1 


Electric 




















1 


Elm . . 




















4 


Engel 




















1 


Essex 




















2 



168 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATE^.— Continued. 



Streets. 


OS O p 

«0 a 


Length and Size op Iron Pipe in Feet. 


1 
3 


30-in. 


24- 20- 
in. in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 
























262 

74 

1187 

"343 




1 
























Fayette . 




















ioea 


3 




















1000 


4 


Fisher 




















Fiske. . 






1045 
















1 




















750 


"225 

"590 

"'88 


1 


Ford Place 





















1 


Forest 




















628 
180 


?, 


Fostw 




















1 


Franklin 














2166 


1546 
438 




1317 

285 


1? 


Freight 














^ 


Fremont 
















?, 


Fruit, North 




















1078 

2874 


1 


Fruit, South. 




















3 


Fuller 






















Garden 




















194 


1 


Gas 
















550 




1 


Giles 
















300 


88 
840 


"210 


3 


Glen 


















?. 


Granite Avenue 






































431 




1755 
1093 
875 


7 


Grove 
















4 


Hall 
















1621 
905 


1068 


?, 


Hall's Court 
















1 





















748 
600 
230 
329 
760 

"793 

"m 




Hanover. ... 






















?. 


Harrison 




















240 

4 


1 






















1 






















1 


High 
















27 




982 
99 
312 
710 
646 
362 
615 
498 
213 
589 
1332 
1576 


5 



















?, 




















69 


?. 


Holly.. 


















1 


Holt 




















1 






















1 






















1 






















?, 






















1 








381 








120 






1 


Iron Works Road 
















1 


Jackson 




















3 






















1 


Kensington Road 


















207 




1 


Kimball 


















400 
350 
465 
358 
1550 


334 
"357 




Knight, W. Concord 




















1 


Lake, W. Concord .... 


















1216 


1 


Langdon 














360 


4 


















?, 


Liberty 












380 


1311 






3 


Lincoln 


















367 
300 

3650 

"382 


?, 




















508 


726 
38 
1260 
482 
430 


5 


Main, North 






4209 
300 










5125 
5179 


11 


Main, South 








2596 


1026 


1373 


I.") 








1 


Maple 




















2 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



169 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATES— Continued. 



Streets. 


« O p 

mo a 


Length and Size op Iron Pipe in Feet. 


J 

60 


30-in. 


24- 

in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


B 
s 
Z 
























330 

2604 
1294 

324 
305 
229 
814 
3446 

"460 
300 

"480 
"531 


1 






















738 
1729 

124 
26 

860 
1289 

700 

516 


?, 






















6 


MillRoad,S. P. School.. . 


















750 


3 


Mills 


















4 






















?. 






















?. 






















9. 






















1 


Myrtle 




















1 


Oak 






















1 




















19 
























1 


Old S. Mill R'd, S. P. S. . 






















? 






















620 
596 
601 
380 
584 

2295 
616 

2215 


1 


Palm 




















1 


Park 




















?, 






















1 


Pearl 




















2 














300 




2457 




9 














3 






















4 






















?, 
























1 






















2493 
985 


1 


Pine 


















681 


4 


Pitman 


















6 


Pleasant 














10791 


3428 


292 


185 


IS 
















1 


Princeton 




















658 
800 
584 
1012 
1320 


1 












































"i95 


1 






















1 






















?. 


Rollins 




















1 


Rowell 




















142 


















9 


15 

5202 


3502 

708 




17 
















575 
210 
1655 
210 


"223 
"388 


10 


Second, W. Concord 
















1 


Sewall's Falls Road 




















1 






















1 


Short 




















1 


South 














4036 


1072 
390 


"26 
2391 


4585 
2629 


4 
















^?. 


Spring, South 
















a 


State, North 






5969 










31 
21 


6 


State, South 










^3049 


839 








,S 














53 






1 


















250 








Stone 


















1080 
19 


"370 
172 
















































Tahanto 




















.1015 




Thompson 
















38 
1898 


326 
250 
823 


1380 




Thomdike 


















Tremont 
















748 
.1005 






Union 


















2 



170 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 


CQO O 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


1 


30-in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 6- 
in. in. 


4- 
in. 


a 


VaUey 
























1 


View 




















256 
648 
754 
514 
1244 






Walker 
















705 




639 


4 


Wall 
















2 


Warren 
















454 
1404 
310 


4258 
1118 


P 


Washington 
















9 


Water 


















Waverly 




















272 
"202 


I 


West 














1836 


661 




266 
300 
403 

23 

366 

220 

5072 

83 


4 
















1 


Wiggin 




















1 


Winter 




















1 
























Wyman 




















"137 
145 


1 


Hydrant branches 
















177 
132 


158 


348 


Blow-offs 
















70 


Penacook. 

Penacook, high service 
main 












10584 




s 


Canal, East 














225 


8 






? 


Canal, West 




















1 


Centre 
















247 




467 




4 


















3 


Church 
























1 


















635 




58 




■^ 


Cross 
















? 


Electric Avenue 




















653 
476 
1300 






Elliott 
























Fowler 
























High 






















3 


Lindon 




















285 
150 
1678 
327 




1 


Main 




















4 






















? 


Maple 




















1 


Merrimack 
















70 


37 


<; 


















1923 
364 
1846 




fi 


Pine 






















Rolfe 






















1 


Spring 




















1 


Stark 
























1 


Summer 
















54 








4 


Union 




















261 
■■■■4 

"io 


1 


Walnut and Bye 




















884 

2205 

450 

542 


1 


Washington 


















150 


4 


Winter 


















1 


Hydrant branches . . . 


















27 


66 


Blow-offs 


















1? 


























Totals 


2220 


522 


28795 


1963 


2788 


19788 


24759 


46778 


22836 


115731 


31245 


1048 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



171 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATES.— Concluded. 





Lengih and Size of Cement-L 
IN Feet. 


NEB Pipe 




18-in. 


14-in. 


12-in. 


10-in. 


8-in. 


6-in. 


4-in. 






2230 














11391 






















373 
120 


















Giles 












772 


High 












1218 
















34 








5952 


1203 








South 








1229 




State, North 






1764 








Valley 










879 

11 

501 

312 












































88 














56 


Pbnacook. 




13110 


1221 
















628 
422 
479 






Canal, West .... 
























245 

1777 
482 
















Church 
























734 




High 










2100 










2573 

57 
















1181 
652 


2023 












Stark 








529 














1149 
1193 




276 
























689 
















55 


















Totals 


11391 


15340 


11567 


1732 


6438 


11959 


1281 







172 CITY OF CONCORD. 

D. 

HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service; L, Low Service. 




North Main . 



South Main . 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Wallcer's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin's store 

Northwest corner of FrankUn 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Mongtomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, in rear Eagle Hotel 

East side, in rear Woodward Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast, corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue . . . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner of Parley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co.'s . . . 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co. . . . 



L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Con^i/merf. 



173 




South Main . 



Water , 
Hall . . 



Hammond . 
Railroad . . . 
Fiske 

Summer . . . 
Durgin .... 
North State 



South State . 



Mills. 



Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops 

West side, 110 feet north of McEanley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockini 

ham 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side, below No. 18 

West side, at No. 32 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, at No. 85 

East side, near Rumford Field 

North side, near Bridge 

East side, oppo.site Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

West side, south line of Walker School 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin , 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, at No. 22 

Northwest corner of Allison 



H 




L 




H 




H 




L 




L 




L 


21 


L 


1 


L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 


7 


L 


1 


L 


1 


H 




H 


2 


L 


1 


L 


1 


H 




H 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




H 




L 


14 


H 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 


9 


L 




L 


2 



174 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

UYBRANTS— Continued. 




Dakin . . . 
Dunklee . . 

Broadway 



Donovan 
Green . . . 

South . . . 



Bradley ... 

Union 

Jackson ... 
Lyndon ... 

North Sprm 



South Spring . 



West side, 220 feet north of AlUson 

West side, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner of AUison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, 80 feet north of Humphrey 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter , 

Northwest corner of Stone , 

West side, at Rollins Park , 

West side, opposite McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rocking 

ham 

Northeast corner of Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital. 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige's 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS. —Continued. 



175 



Streets. 


Locations. 


1 


(J 


Academy 

Hanover 

Rumford 


East side, at No. 10 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Southeast corner of Walker 


H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 


1 
1 




Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at Morrill School 


11 


Huntington .... 
Tahanto 


West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of School 


1 
1 


Pine 


Southwest corner of Centre 




Holt 


Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at No. 10 


2 
1 


High 


Northwest corner of Auburn 






Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 


4 


Valley 


Northeast corner of Forest 


1 


Auburn 


Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 




Ridge Road .... 


North side, between Centre and Forest 

West side, between Nos. 11 and 13 


3 
1 


Westbourne Rd. 
Dartmouth .... 


North side, 135 feet north of Centre 

Southwest corner of Clinton 


1 




Northwest corner of Noyes 


?, 


Princeton 


Southwest corner of Clinton 






Northwest corner of Noyes 


?, 


Fruit 


Northeast corner of Woodman 






West side, 700 feet south of Pleasant 

East side, opposite No. 70 






East side, opposite No. 114 


4 


Minot 


West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home 

West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 






3 


Kensington Rd. 


Northwest corner of Pleasant 


1 


Stevens Ave. . . . 


Northeast corner of Pleasant 


1 


Penacook 


South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side, east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse. . . . 
South side, near P. B. Co.'s 






South side, near P. B. Co.'s office 






Southeast corner of North Main 






Southwest corner of Rumford 





176 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Penacook 

Walker . . 

Albin . . . 
Highland 

Church. . 
Franklin . 



Chestnut 
Tremont 

Pearl ... 
Beacon . . 



Rowell . . . 
Blanchard 
Ferry. . . . 



Washington 



Chapel 

Montgomery . 
Centre 



North side, opposite No. 69 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 

South side, 500 feet west from Rumford 

North side, 160 feet west of Bradley 

North side, at No. 22 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

South side, opposite No. 64 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at No. 14 

North side, opposite Merrimack School 

Northwest corner* of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 

South side, opposite No. 18 

Northeast corner of North State 

Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

South side, on east line of Dewey School lot 
Northeast corner of Ridge Road 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Confinwed. 



177 



Streets. 


Locations. 


.1 

> 


i 

Si. 


Bridge 

Park 


South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s .... 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory 

North side, at St. Paul's Church 

North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, at No. 106 

Southeast corner of Giles 


L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 


3 
1 


Capitol 

Garden 

School 


2 
1 




11 


Warren 


Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue .... 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 






Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 




Depot 


Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, opposite No. 8-10 


9 


Blake 


2 
1 


Orchard 


South side, opposite No. 8 


1 


Pleasant 


Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church . 
Southeast corner of South 






Northeast corner of Fremont 






Southwest corner of Spring 






South side, opposite Rumford 






South side, opposite Merrimack 






South side, opposite Pine 






South side, opposite Liberty 






North side, near city stable 






South side, near Gale 






South side, opposite Mrs. Aiken's 






South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

South side, at Lavery's 






South side, opposite No. 270 





12 



178 



CITY or CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Pleasant . 



Fiske Road . . . 
Hopkinton Rd . 
MUl Road, 
St. P. School . . 



Old Hopkinton 

Road 

WaU 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue . 

Fayette 

Thompson . . . . 

Chandler 

Concord 

Monroe 

Thorndike . . . . 



Laurel . . 
Perley . . 

Downing 
Clinton . 



North side, near E. B. Chesley's 

North side, opposite No. 291 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond's 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School 

South side, near new Upper School 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 

East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home 

South side, at tenement No. 7 

Junction of Hopkinton Road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station. . 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Rumford School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, at No. 75 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Redwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near No. 108 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Con^z/med. 



179 




Clinton . 
West . . . 



Avon 

Harrison 

Humphrey . . . . 

Allison 

Pillsbury 

Carter 

Stone 

HoUy 

McKinley . . . . 
Rockingham . . 

Iron Works Rd 
Prospect 

Curtice Ave. . . 

North State . . . 



Palm 

North State . 



North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten'n. 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, 230 feet E. of North State 

West side, at Water- Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue . . 

East side, near north entrance Blossom HiU 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

East side, near No. 226 

East side, near No. 252 

East side, near No. 262 

East side, near No. 272 

West side, at south line of prison wall 

West side, at north line of prison wall 

East side, near No. 296 

North side, west of Fairbanks 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. . . 

East side, near No. 312 

East side, near No. 324 

East side, near No. 330 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite No. 362 

West side, opposite No. 382 

East side, at No. 382 



13 
1 



180 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

RYDRAlSiTS.— Continued. 




North State , 



Fisher . 
View . . 
Electric 

Clarke . 
Lake . . 



Knight 

Hutchins . . . 

First 

SewaU's Falls 

Road 

Penacook Rd 



South Main . 



WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at No. 426 

East side, near engine house 

East side, at No. 464 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co. . . 

East side, at No. 498 

East side, at No. 516 

East side, opposite No. 533 

East side, near SewaU's Falls Road . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State . . . 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side, at No. 13 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, at No. 33 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station . 

South side, at Quaker 

North side, near No. 22 

North side, near C. & C. Railroad. . 

North side, at No. 40 

North side, near A. H. Knight's . . . . 



East side, at north line of cemetery . 

West side, opposite Frost's 

West side, opposite Blanchard's . . . . 
West side, near Warner Road 



PENACOOK. 

West side, at Harriman's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt's garage 

West side, near No. 88 

Southwest corner of Union 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYBRA'^TS.— Continued. 



181 




South Main. 

West Main . 
High 



Washington . 



Fowler . . . . 

Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles .... 



West Canal . 
East Canal , 

Crescent . . . 

Walnut 

Merrimack . 



Summer 

Spring. . 
Maple . . 
Winter . 
Centre . 

Cross. . 

Rolfe . . . 



Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block . 

Northwest corner of Charles , 

North side, opposite East Canal , 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple , 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, at No. 41 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

East f ide, near Elliott's 

South side, junction of Washington 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue 

Southwest corner of Warren 

South side, at schoolhouse 

North side, near No. 36 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal , 

North side, at Bye 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue . . 

North side, opposite No. 3&-38-40 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 

South side, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory . . . . 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, opposite No. 47 

Northwest corner of Spring 

Southwest corner of Summer 

North side, near angle of street 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



15 



182 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

RYDRA'^TS.— Concluded. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



Rolf e 

Penacook . 



Northwest corner of Penacook 

West side, opposite A. W. RoKe's 

West side, at No. 35 

East side, at No. 41 

Whole number public hydrants 

PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Abbot & Downing Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Brampton Woolen Co 

Concord Gas Light Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Ford Foundry Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School 

Water-works pumping station 

Whole number private hydrants 



H 


2 


H 




H 




H 


3 




457 


H 


6 


L 


4 


H 


15 


H 


1 


H 


3 


L 


1 


H 


1 


H 


2 


H 


1 


L 


1 


L 


1 


H 


3 


H 


6 


H 


12 


H 


4 


L 


2 


H 


9 


L 


1 


H 


14 


H 


1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 183 

E. 
SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 

In form recommended by the New England Water 
Works Association. 



CONCORD WATER WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1910 — 21,497. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING. 

1. Builders of pumping machinery — Henry R. Worthing- 

ton, Harrison, N.J. 

2. Description of fuel used — a. Kind — bituminous. 

h. Brand of coal — Beacon 
Forge coal. 

c. Average price of coal per 

gross ton delivered, 
$8,059. 

d. Percentage ash, 9.4%. 

3. Coal consumed for year — 230.7 tons. 



184 CITY OF CONCORD. 

4. (Pounds of wood consumed) 4- 3= equivalent amount 
of coal— 3,221 lbs. 

5. Total equivalent coal consumed for the year for 
pumping purposes — 232.14 tons. 

6. Total pumpage for the year without allowance for 
slip— 281,632,840 gallons. 

7. Average static head against which pump works — 
103.84 feet. 

8. Average dynamic head against which pump works — 
105 feet. 

9. Number of gallons pumped per pound of equivalent 
coal — 541.6. 

10. Duty = 

281.632,840 gallons pumped. X 8.34 (lbs.) X 100 X dynamic head, 105 _ ^y o-.^ qqq 
Total fuel consumed 520,000 pounds. ' ' 

Cost of pumping figured on pumping station expenses — 
$4,805.90. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $17,064. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,162. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 96 feet during year. 

4. Renewed — 000 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 96 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 70.94 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.29 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 0. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — pubHc, 457; priv- 
ate, 88. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 186 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 0. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,048. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 82. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88. 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 174 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 20 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 91,884 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 5. 

22. Number now in use — 3,882. 

23. Average length of service — 23.65 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — $28.02. 

25. Number of meters added during year — 21. 

26. Number now in use — 2,576. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 66.33. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 85.66. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering^44. 



186 



CITY OF CONCORD. 






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WATER DEPARTMENT. 187 

O. Net cost of works to date, $1,092,003.83. 
P. Bonded debt at date, $407,000. 
Q. Value of investment of net income, $36,570.61. 
R. Average rate of interest, 3.89 per cent. 



188 CITY OF CONCORD. 

INVENTORY. 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1919. 

Water rights— land, etc., $1,092,003 . 83 

Water office — furniture, etc., 1,100.00 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 2,000.00 
Shop at pumping station: 

Machinery, tools, meters, service pipe, etc., 5,500.00 
Service truck, runabout, horse, wagons and 

supplies, 2,500.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 3,467.56 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 7,440 . 00 

Shop at Penacook — pipe, etc., 100.00 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 40.00 

$1,114,151.39 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



Still. 


No alarm . 


Total. 


150 




170 


39 


2 


54 


4 




13 


5 




6 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1918. 

The department responded to 43 bell alarms and 198 
still alarms. 

In addition, two fires occurred, entaihng loss, for which 
no alarms were given, making a total of 243 for the year. 

Bell. 

Precinct, 20 

Penacook, 13 

East Concord, 9 

West Concord, 1 

43 198 2 243 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, with the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each case. 

Of the aggregate loss entailed by fire during the year 
more than eighty per cent resulted from four fires, two oc- 
curring in the precinct and one each at Penacook and East 
Concord. 

The apparatus is in good condition. 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

One motor-driven combination chemical and hose car 
was added to the equipment and another contracted for but 
not yet deHvered. 

Combination 1 was provided with a new set of tires at an 
expense of $363.00. 

The fire alarm systems of the precinct and Penacook are 
in good condition. 

One six-inch mechanical tapper was added to the Pena- 
cook system. 

The plates in the precinct storage battery are now well 
along on the fourth year of service. 

As in theory the tenure of usefulness is but three years 
necessity for renewal cannot be far off. 

As no hose was purchased during the year I respectfully 
recommend the purchase of five hundred to one thousand 
feet depending largely upon return of price to normal con- 
dition. 

Provision should also be made for relining approximately 
one thousand feet. 

The duties incumbent upon the undersigned in the line of 
inspection of wires and buildings have been performed. 

The constantly diminishing forage, horse shoeing and 
veterinary bills bear ample evidence of the wisdom of the 
policy of motorizing the apparatus. 

During the month of June I had the pleasure of attending 
the convention of the International Association of Fire 
Engineers held at Chicago, 111., a report of which I ren- 
dered at that time. 

I wish again to take occasion to thank your honorable 
body for the opportunity afforded me to attend. 
Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 
Chief Engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 191 

APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 



Appropriation, 




$40,392.76 


Disbursements : 






Permanent men, 


$17,150.00 




Vacations, 


603.81 




Call men, 


9,215.00 




House man, 


100.00 




Rent Veteran's Association, 


150.00 




Forage, 


1,309.53 




Fuel, 


2,401.48 




Lights, 


701.60 




Incidentals 


3,255.65 




Horse shoeing. 


157.25 




Horse hire, 


980.90 




Fire alarm, 


535.65 




Penacook fire alarm, 


161.46 




Supplies auto combinations, 


296.00 




Laundry, 


60.00 




Auto combination, Alert, 


3,200.00 


40,278.33 







Balance unexpended, $114.43 



ALARMS. 
Precinct. 

Box 28. January 1, 1.08 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
glare of plumber's torches being mistaken for fire. Recall 
1.27 a. m. 

Still. January 1, 4.27 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Moran, 137 School Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 7.17 a. m. Burning rags in residence 
of J. A. Corriveau, 13 Harvard Street. Cause unknown. 
Extinguished by Combination 3. No loss. 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 2, 10.17 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. J. McCIure, 20 Holt Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still, January 2, 11 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Welcome, 4 Monroe Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 11.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. H. Potter, 9 Granite Avenue. Combination 2 re- 
sponded. See next alarm. 

Still. January 2, 11.29 a. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by Combina- 
tions 1 and 2. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 12.33 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Thomas Nawn, 41 No. Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 3, 8.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Goodwin, 37 Thorndike Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 3, 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Diffley, 154 No. Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 4, 4.50 p. m. Fire in basement of resi- 
dence 5 Summer Street, owned by the Anne Morris Estate, 
and occupied by James Morris. Cause unknown. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ina. Paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $75.00 $700.00 $75.00 

Still. January 5, 7.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Wells, 27 HoUj^ Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 5, 12.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Camolli, 171 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 6, 1.53 a. m. Fire in basement of resi- 
dence 76 Allison Street, owned by George Forrest and occu- 
pied by James Lanigan. Caused by felt on steam pipes 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 193 

taking fire and dropping into barrels of refuse. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $100.00 $2,000.00 $100.00 

Still. January 6,11 .52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. F. Brown, 1 Wall Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. January 9, 4.14 p. m. Fire in pan of scraps in 
restaurant, 168 No. Main Street, conducted by Mrs. Mary 
Taylor. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 9.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. B. Abbott, 236 No. Main Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

2-2-2. January 15, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. January 17, 12.31 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Pillsbury, 111 No. State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 23, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Blanche O. Jarts, 38^ Walker Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 23, 10.26 p. m. Fire in residence 217 
No. Main Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. Lucy Griffin. 
Caused by upsetting oil stove. Combination 1 responded 
but had hardly started when a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 15. January 23, 10.27 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 11.03 
p. m. 

Value. Loaa. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $86.00 $2,000.00 $86.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 60.00 1,500.00 60.00 

Still. January 24, 7.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Machello, 40 Tremont Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but was disabled en route. Extinguished 
by Combination 2. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 12.54 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Horace Olson, 197 No. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

18 



Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


$100.00 


None 


None 


15.00 


None 


None 



194 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 29, 9.40 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Mrs. Grace Waldron, 39 
School Street. Detail sent from Central Station. 

Stili^. January 30, 9.55 a. m. Same as preceding call. 

Still. January 31, 7.48 a. m. Fire in residence 16 
Washington Street, owned by the Gilbert Foster Estate. 
Caused by overheated furnace. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $7,000.00 $25.00 $3,000.00 $25.00 

Box 471. January 31, 9.54 a. m. Fire in blacksmith 
shop, owned and occupied by W. C. Jones, rear 59 CHnton 
Street. Cause unknown. Seven hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 11.25 a. m. 

Value. 

Building, $300.00 

Contents, 100.00 

Still. January 31, 9.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Rochwell, 9 Lee Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

. Still. February 2, 6.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. K. Ford, 9 Humphrey Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 8.28 a. m. Chimney fire in the 
W. S. Dole grain store, rear of 42 No. Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 4, 5.54 p. m. Fire in mattress in resi- 
dence of Leo Martel, 26 Clinton Street. Caused probably 
by cigarette. Extinguished by Combination 1. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. February 5, 9.20 p. m. Fire in partition of resi- 
dence 7 Pearl Street, owned by Joshua P. Merrill and occu- 
pied by John Cable. Caused by thawing water pipes with 
gasoline torch. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $10.00 $2,000.00 $10.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 195 

Still, February 6, 6 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
A. W. Braley, 52 So. Main Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 6, 9.16 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. F. Jordan, 136 So. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 11.27 a. m. Fire in First National 
Bank Building, 18 No. Main Street, owned by W. K. and 
A. M. McFarland and occupied by various parties. Fire 
originated in waste basket in office of Metropolitan Insur- 
ance Co., probably from cigarette. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $30,000.00 $175.00 $12,000.00 $175.00 

Still. February 9, 6.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. Annis, 5 Merrimack Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 3.55 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Henry W. Stevens, 73 Warren 
Street. Combination 1 responded. No fire. 

Still. February 14, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of R. M. Clark, 7 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 3.32 p. m. Fire in basement of 
building, Railroad Square, owned by Stratton & Co., and 
occupied by owner and Swift & Co. Fire originated in 
basement of Swift & Co. plant from explosion of hot water 
heater. Combination 1 responded but later a bell alarm 
was sent in. See next alarm. 

Box 5. February 18, 3.55 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 
6.01 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$11,000.00 


$650.00 


None 


None 


Contents, 


20,000.00 


None 


None 


None 



Repairs made by occupants who carry own risk. 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 20, 11.31 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. C. Jones, 59 Clinton Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 20, 3.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Harriman, 12 Blake Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 23, 4.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. A. Drew, 5 Albin Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 11.56 a. m. Fire in residence 67 
Washington Street, owned by George Goodhue and occu- 
pied by James McNally. Caused by upsetting of oil stove. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ina. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 S25.00 $1,500.00 $25.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 30.00 1,000.00 30.00 

Still. March 2, 7.14 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of WilUam Johnson, 18 Donovan Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. W. R. Struthers, 35 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 7.38 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in building 78 No. Main Street. Detail from 
Central Station sent. Fire located in ash can in closet. 
No loss. 

Still. March 10, 8.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Walter Hackshaw, 36 Mills Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 8.53 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of M. B. Braley, 77 No. Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 15, 2.36 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. M. McKenna, 24 Jackson Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 197 

Still. March 21, 5.36 p. m. Awning on Board of Trade 
building destroyed. Caused probably by cigarette thrown 
from above. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $10,000.00 $22.00 $5,000.00 $22.00 

Still. March 23, 4.40 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 127 
Rumford Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. March 25, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. J. McFarland, 109 South Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. A. Morey, 14 Chnton Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

4-4-4. March 31, 1.47 p. m. Brush fire on Kearsarge 
Club grounds. Details about to start by barge and elec- 
tric car when word was received that assistance was not 
needed. Needless alarm. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 12.24 a. m. A call to Phenix Hall for 
slight fire in fire exit. Caused probably by cigarette. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. April 6, 3.14 p. m. Grass fire corner No. State 
and Penacook Streets. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. April 7, 5.10 p. m. Grass fire in rear of the 
Ralph Benjamin place Loudon Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1 and Plains volunteers. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 11.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. T. Upham, 27^ Grove Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 2.33 p. m. Grass fire, corner Valley 
and High Streets. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. April 11, 5.14 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
13 Waverly Street, owned by Margaret Casey and occupied 
by J. M. Morrison. Extinguished by Combination 1. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Ina. Ina.PMd, 

Building, $1,200.00 $20.38 $1,500.00 $20.38 

Box 12. April 11, 5.23 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Needless alarm. Recall 5.48 p. m. 

Still. April 15, 3.02 p. m. Grass fire on city lot, Bridge 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 12.19 a. m. Slight fire in McShane 
Block, Odd Fellows Avenue, owned by the James McShane 
Estate and occupied by Welch & Sullivan. Caused proba- 
bly by cigarette. Extinguished by Combination 1. Loss 
trifiing. 

Still. April 16, 3.38 p. m. Grass fire in rear of the 
D. J. Adams place. So. Pembroke Street. Extinguished 
by Combination I. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 9.23 p. m. Dump fire near 20 Forest 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 8.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. J. Knuckey, 91 Franklin Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 8.30 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 58 
Hall Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. Extinguished by B. & M. R. R. employees. 
No loss. 

Still. April 25, 2.40 p. m. Brush fire Plains District 
near Soucook River on land owned by Charles Thompson 
and others. Twenty acres burned over on the Concord 
side of the river, far larger area on the Pembroke side. Com- 
bination 1 responded. See next alarm. 

4-4-4. April 25, 2.43 p. m. Alarm given for preceding 
fire. Details sent in autos. Labored two hours. No loss 
on Concord side of river. 

Still. April 26, 8.33 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. S. Brooks, 40 Monroe Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 12.24 p. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. W. Chandler, 8 Wheaton Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 199 

Still. April 26, 3,31 p. m. Grass fire on Fan Road. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 27, 7.34 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. O. Martin, 45 Center Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

4.-4-4, May 5, 12.57 p. m. A call for assistance from 
West Concord at scene of forest fire near Sewalls Falls 
Road. Detail sent in barge but before arrival word was 
received that the fire was under control. See West Con- 
cord report. 

Still. May 8, 7.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. M. Welch, 37| Thorndike Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 8, 2.27 p. m. Forest fire on land owned by 
St. Paul's School, Hopkinton Road. Combination 1 re- 
sponded and laid out one thousand feet of hose from hydrant. 

4-4-4. May 8, 2.34 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Details sent in autos, generously 
furnished by St. Paul's School and others. 

Still. May 8, 3.11 p. m. Another call for help from 
scene of preceding fire. Motor-driven Engine 1 sent, and 
line laid by Combination 1 spliced. Engine worked two 
hours saving a large quantity of cord wood and young pine. 
Twelve hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 

Value. lioes. Ins. los. Paid. 

Cord wood, $84 . 00 None None 

Young pine, 66 . 00 None None 

Still. May 9, 6.28 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
A. D. Piggott, 38 Perley Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 10, 12.16 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. H. Reed, Fan Road. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 7.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Louis Edmonds, 2 Chandler Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. May 13, 2.36 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. L. Rollins, 37 Fayette Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 13, 6.52 p. m. Grass fire on bluff west of 
So. Pembroke Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. May 16, 3.32 p. m. Slight fire in residence 28 
Merrimack Street, owned by W. S. Baker and occupied by 
W. S. Baker. Caused by hot ashes in wooden box. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $5,000.00 $12.80 $2,000*00 $12.80 

Box 24. May 22, 6.54 p. m. Slight fire in building 119 
No. Main Street, owned by H. Livingston and occupied by 
W. Thompson as a pool room. Cause unknown. Recall 
7.31 p. m. Extinguished with chemicals. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $150.00 $8,000.00 $150.00 

Still. May 28, 4.40 p. m. Slight fire in moving picture 
out-fit while being demonstrated at Walker School. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. May 30, 12.44 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
James O. Lyford, 11 Pitman Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 30, 6.37 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
121 No. State Street, owned by Mrs. J. C. Ordway and 
occupied by Charles E. Morton. Combination 1 responded. 
Horse drawn engine. 

Still. May 30, 6.39 p. m. Combination 2 sent to assist 
at scene of preceding fire. 

Still. May 30, 6.41 p. m. Combination 3 sent to 
assist at scene of preceding fire. Extinguished with chem- 
icals. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Pwd. 

Building, $3,500.00 $176.25 $3,000.00 $176.25 

Contents, 2,500.00 225.00 1,500.00 195.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 201 

Still. June 1, 4.15 p. m. Alarm occasioned by oil 
stove taking fire in residence of George G. Jenness on Loudon 
Road, Plains District. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. June 1, 6.25 p. m. Fire in electric car on Broad- 
way near Rollins Park. Caused by short circuiting of 
wires. Extinguished by Combination L Loss trifling. 

Still. June 6, 6.57 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George A. Wright, 41 Thorndike Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 13, 6.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Charles Byrne, 11 Washington Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 2. No loss. 

Box 51. June 21, 7.03 p. m. Fire in machine and 
boiler shop, So. Main Street, owned and occupied by B. & 
M. R. R. Caused by overfeeding oil heater. Extinguished 
by shop department. Recall 7.13 p. m. 

Value. Loss Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $75,000.00 $200.00 $54,000.00 $200.00 

Still. June 28, 11.29 p. m. Fire in building 84 So. 
State Street, owned by Hon. N. E. Martin and occupied by 
C. W. Nelson as a grocery store. Caused by ashes in 
wooden receptacle. Combination 1 responded but before 
arrival a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 414. June 28, 11.30 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. One hundred and fifty feet of hose wet but no 
water used in the building. Extinguished with chemicals. 
Recall 12.07 a. m., 29th inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Pud. 

Building, $1,000.00 $60.00 $1,000.00 $60.00 

Contents, 1,500.00 115.00 1,000.00 115.00 

Still. June 30, 7.11 a. m. Fire in stove pipe in resi- 
dence of J. Mechello, 40 Tremont Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. June 30, 12.40 p. m. Reported brush fire on 
Auburn Street. Combination 1 responded but could locate 
no fire. 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. July 4, 2.14 a. m. Alarm occasioned by burning 
tar barrel near Kimball play ground, Rumford Street. Set 
by boys. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 4, 6.50 p. m. Fire on roof of residence 123 
So. State Street, owned by Jeremiah Foley and occupied by 
Ulric Maher. Caused probably by sparks from chimney. 
Combination 3 responded but a bell alarm followed the 
still alarm almost immediately. See next alarm. 

Box 414. July 4, 6.51 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Needless alarm. Recall 7.03 p. m. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. 

Value. Loas. I113. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $30.00 $1,300.00 $30.00 

Still. July 4, 9.45 'p. m. Fire in dump 129 So. Main 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 4, 10.46 p. m. Bonfire near Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. No loss. 

2-2. July 14, 2.30 p. m. Signal informing the public 
that church services would not be held in the parks on 
account of rain. 

2-2-2-2-2-2. July 19, 6.40 p. m. Sounded in connec- 
tion with the church bells to celebrate the second victory of 
the Marne. 

Still. July 27, 2.19 p. m. Incipient brush fire on land 
owned by Wilfred Bourke east of Black Hill. Extinguished 
by residents of summer cottages and Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. August 10, 6.01 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 5 Pleasant Street extension. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. August 11, 9.28 a. m. Auto fire near 51 School 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

2-2. August 11, 2.30 p. m. Signal informing the pubUc 
that church services would not be held in the parks on 
account of rain. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 203 

Still. August 12, 9.20 a. m. Auto fire, Durgin Lane. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

11-11. August 18, 1.06 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Bradford. Combination 1 car with fourteen men and priv- 
ate car with six men sent. Detail returned at 8 a. m. 

Still. August 18, 11.36 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Hitchcock, 18 Walker Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 51. August 28, 12.38 a. m. Slight fire in flooring 
of machine and boiler shop at B. & M. R. R. plant, So. 
Main Street. Caused probably by hot rivet. Three hun- 
dred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 1.44 a. m. 

Value. Lo88. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $75,000.00 $200.00 $54,000.00 $200.00 

2-2-2-2-2-2. August 28, 1 p. m. Sounded to call 
attention of the pubHc to the fact that the date of the field 
day to be given by the Boys' City Club in aid of the Con- 
cord soldiers had arrived. 

Still. August 29, 9.50 p. m. Slight fire in basement of 
Dustin Block, 26 Warren Street. Caused by spontaneous 
combustion in refuse under shoe finishing machine. Extin- 
guished by detail from Central Station, No loss. 

2-2. September 8, 2.30 p. m. Signal informing the 
public that church services would not be held in the parks 
on account of rain. 

Still. September 10, 1.50 p. m. Refuse burning on 
the Silk Farm, Silver Hill. Combination 1 responded but 
no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 11, 9.18 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Bennett, 7 Maple Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 11, 10.30 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Grimes restaurant, 16 No. Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 15, 5.13 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Brickett Hill, Pembroke. Set of buildings threatened. 
Ell of bouse destroyed. Combination 1 responded and 
with the help of a combination crew from Suncook the other 
buildings were saved. See Pembroke report. 

Still. September 17, 4.56 p. m. Cross-arms on high 
tension line from Franklin burning. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 3, after current had been shut off. Loss trifling. 

Still. September 19, 4.41 p. m. Slight fire in auto- 
mobile corner Main and Warren Streets. Combination 3 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 20, 8.38 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of James Remick, 21 Merri- 
mack Street. Combination 3 responded but no assistance 
was required. No loss. 

Still. September 21, 12.46 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Joseph La Flamme, 128 Pleasant Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 3. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $10.00 $2,500.00 $10.00 

Still. September 22, 10.20 a. m. Awning over window 
of Grand LTnion Tea Co. store, 23 No. Main Street, prac- 
tically destroyed. Caused probably by cigarette. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 3. 

Value. Loss. Ids. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $16,000.00 $10.00 $8,000.00 $10.00 

Awning and signs, 100.00 40.00 None None 
Building owned by Sibley G. Morrill. 

Still. September 24, 8.30 p. m. SHght fire in hallway 
of residence 76 No. State Street, owned and occupied by 
Mrs. Thomas Elwell. Caused by gas jet coming in con- 
tact with clothing on hat tree. Extinguished by Combi- 
nation 2. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $500.00 $35.00 $200.00 $35.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 205 

2-2-2. September 26, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

September 28,. 12.30 p. m. to 12.45 p. m. Fire alarm 
bells hand tolled in conjunction with church bells and 
whistles to call attention of the public to the fact that the 
Fourth Liberty Bond sale was on. 

2-2-2. September 30, 8 a. m. School signal. 

Still. September 30, 10.08 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. C. B. Davie, 39 Laurel Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 1, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. M. Quiet, 42 Thorndike Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 1, 10.33 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Asa Gee, 196 No. State Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 9, 4.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of R. G. Deary, 74 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 10, 11.10 a. m. Chimney fire in Stick- 
ney Block, 154 No. Main Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 11.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. E. W. Zambs, 95 Rumford Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. October 15, 9.54 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Martha Burke, 14U No. State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 15, 4.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Elmer Quimby, 1 Summer Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 6.32 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Clark, 25 Bradley Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 22, 10.18 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. H. Carpenter, 55 Dunklee Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 



206 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 30, 3.57 a. m. Fire in frame building 
on Ferry Street, owned by A. J. Boutwell.and occupied by 
the W. B. Durgin Co. in the plating and packing of culinary 
articles for the Government. Caused by overheated smoke 
pipe. Extinguished by Combination 1, watchman and 
railroad employee. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,800.00 $19.00 $1,800.00 $19.00 

Still. November 1, 2.14 p. m. Grass fire at corner of 
Dunklee and McKinley Streets. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 10.16 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. M. Tappan, 8 No. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 1.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Rowe, 85 South Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 7.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Hill, St. Paul's School. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 6, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. E. Woods, 3 Grove Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 3.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Abbott, 44 Bradley Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 12.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. W. Mitchell, 27 Pierce Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

November 11, 2.55 a. m. Bells hand tolled in joy at 
signing of armistice terms. 

Still. November 11, 5.50 a. m. Bonfire, Pleasant 
Street Extension. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Box 35. November 11, 5.59 a. m. False alarm. Re- 
call 6.14 a. m. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 20T 

Still. November 11, 7.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. Sehinella, 45 Bradley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

2-2-2. November 11, 8 a. m. School signal. 

Still. November 13, 10.59 a. m. Fire in Lenox Hotel, 
115 No. Main Street, owned by E. G. Leach and occupied 
by John Cadret. Combination 1 responded but the fire 
had assumed such proportions that a bell alarm was sent 
in. Cause of fire unknown. 

Box 24. November 13, 11.07 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand three hundred and fifty feet 
of hose wet. Recall 12.09 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $16,500.00 $1,091.50 $10,000.00 $1,091.50 

Contents: 

E. G. Leach, 2,000.00 500.00 1,200.00 500.00 

J. Cadret, 500.00 100.00 None None 

Still. November 15, 3.33 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of R. G. Garvis, 227 No. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 15, 5.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. W. Fitzpatrick, 145 So. Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 15, 7.45 p. m. Fire in residence 3 
Monroe Street, owned by Eugene Savage and occupied by 
E. A. Collupy. Cause unknown. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 3. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Piud. 

Building, $3,000.00 $100.00 $1,800.00 $100.00 

Contents, 500.00 12.00 None None 

Still. November 16, 10.18 p. m. Shght fire in block 
34 Warren Street, owned by The Home Realty Co. and 
occupied by E. S. Billings as a furniture store. Fire orig- 
inated in garbage can probably from cigarette butt. Loss 
confined to front door, broken in forcing entrance. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 



208 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Lis. Ina. Pud, 

Building, $22,900.00 $2.25 $10,000.00 $2.25 

Still. November 16, 10.23 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. C. Bartlett, 32 Green Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 24, 11.40 a. m. A call to the W. B. 
Durgin plant, Beacon Street. Alarm occasioned by kettle 
of paint which was being warmed up boiling over. Com- 
bination 2 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. November 24, 10.42 p. m. SHght fire in flooring 
at the W. B. Durgin plant, Ferry Street. Fire originated 
under melting furnace. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. November 25, 7.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. F. Walker, 220 No. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 26, 3.11 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of 0. N. Batchelder, 84 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 28, 8.31 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Archie Morrill, 30 Grove Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 29, 9.50 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in State Block, 77 No. Main St. Detail 
responded from Central Station. No fire. 

Still. December 1, 2.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. W. Dadmun, 36 Warren Street. Extinguished 
by detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. December 6, 5.17 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. Papazean, 197 No. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 14. December 9, 8.56 p. m. Fire in residence 24 
Penacook Street, owned and occupied by James R. Taylor. 
Cause unknown. One thousand one hundred feet of hose 
wet. Recall 10.36 p. m. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 209 





Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


S461.00 $1,500.00 


$461.00 


Contents, 


1,200.00 


400.00 800.00 


400.00 



Still. December 10, 11.50 p. m. Fire in residence on 
South Pembroke Street, Plains District, owned and occu- 
pied by D. J. Adams. Caused by overheated stove. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $75.00 $2,000.00 $75.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 166.00 1,500.00 166.00 

Still. December 13, 8.48 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. John Stanley, 7 Perkins Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 51. December 19, 6.46 a. m. Fire in small build- 
ing in B. & M. R. R. yard used as a blacksmith shop. Cause 
unknown. Needless alarm. Extinguished by local brigade. 
Recall 7.10 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $200.00 $150.00 $200.00 $150.00 

Still. December 21, 7.59 a. m. Fire in apartment 
building 23 Merrimack Street, owned by Harry Shapiro 
and occupied by owner, Mrs. Sara E. Pike, Mrs. L. E. 
Cooper, Miss Blanche T. Perry and Richard W. Husband. 
Fire originated in basement from cause unknown. Com- 
bination 1 responded and on arrival sent in a bell alarm. 

Box 27. December 21, 8.02 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Two thousand seven hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. Recall 2.19 p. m. 





Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$13,000.00 $9,500.00 $6,000.00 $6,000.00 


Contents: 




H. Shapiro, 


4,500.00 2,497.50 3,000.00 2,497.50 


S. E. Pike, 


3,000.00 2,500.00 2,000.00 1,900.00 



L.E.Cooper, 2.000.00 1,800.00 500.00 500.00 

B.T.Perry, 500.00 400.00 200.00 200.00 

R.W. Husband, 2,500.00 500.00 None None 

14 



21G CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. December 21, 5.25 p. m. Slight fire in ruins of 
the Shapiro building, 23 Merrimack Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 9.32 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Eastman, 93 No. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 9.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Ash, 23| Perley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 24, 2 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of R. M. Clark, 7 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 3. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 6.38 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
steam employed to dry out the Shapiro building, 23 Merri- 
mack Street being mistaken for smoke. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Penacook. 

Still. January 4, 8.30 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in residence 
48 Elm Street, owned by D. Warren Fox. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. S. Hadley, 57 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. January 30, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Isaac Tetreault, 16 West Main Street. No 
loss. 

Box 35. January 30, 2.42 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 62 So. Main Street, owned by S. G. Sanborn and occu- 
pied by Mrs. Ida Vinica. Extinguished with chemicals. 
Recall 3.20 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $16.85 $1,000.00 $16.85 

Still. February 1, 12.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Richard Gahagan, 22 High Street. No loss. 

Box 35. February 4, 11.17 p. m. Fire in lunch cart 
owned by N. R. Brockway, Washington Square. Caused by 
ignition of gasoHne in tank. Extinguished by owner before 
arrival of apparatus. Recall 11.24 p. m. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 211 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Cart, $250.00 $20.00 $250.00 $20.00 

Still. February 12, 10.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Blake, 8 Maple Street. No loss. 

Still. February 22, 9.13 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 42 Merrimack Street, owned by William Garland. 
No loss. 

Still. February 26, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in har- 
ness shop, W. F. Hoyt proprietor, 10 So. Main Street. No 
loss. 

Still. February 27, 6.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 34 West Main Street, owned by the William Quimby 
heirs. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 6 a. m. Chimnej'' fire in residence of 
Andrew Foley, 58 Centre Street. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 8 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Dr. A. J. Rowe, 58 So. Main Street. No loss. 

Box 45. March 12, 3 a. m. Fire in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, corner of Summer and Centre Streets. 
Fire originated in flooring of store room, in rear of organ. 
Cause unknown. One thousand three hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet. Recall 5.37 a. m. 





Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Pjud. 


Building, 


$15,000.00 $2,767.49 $6,500.00 $2,767.49 


Contents, 


3,000.00 1,150.00 1,550.00 1,150.00 



Still. March 14, 12.30 a. m. A call to G. E. Farrand's 
store, Eagle Block. Kettle containing towels left on stove 
to boil. Water boiling away towels took fire. No loss. 

Box 47. March 23, 1.40 p. m. Slight fire on roof of 
glazing shop connected with sash and blind plant of C. M. 
and A. W. Rolfe Co., Merrimack Street. Caused probably 
by spark from chimney. Recall 1.55 p. m. No loss. 

Box 42. March 23, 10.08 p. m. Fire in residence of 
Fred Burnham, 34 High Street. Caused by upsetting of 
oil stove. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 10.26 
p. m. 



212 CITY OF CONCORD. 





Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,500.00 


$45.00 $1,500.00 


$45.00 


Contents, 


800.00 


75.00 500.00 


75.00 



Box 35. March 28, 4.55 p. m. Fire in Central House, 
So. Main Street. Building owned by the Isaac Baty heirs 
and occupied by O. C. Hodgdon as a hotel. Fire originated 
in flooring of attic from unknown cause. Seven hundred 
feet of hose wet. Recall 5.28 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. Ina. 


Ins. Paid. 


ilding, 


$7,000.00 


$168.00 $3,000.00 


$168.00 


ntents. 


2,500.00 


250.00 2,000.00 


*None 



Still. March 28, 8 p. m. Detail sent with pony ex- 
tinguisher to attend to slight fire in closet at scene of pre- 
ceding fire. No loss. 

Box 35. April 2, 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
owned by E. D. Clough, Borough Road. Recall 5.07 p. m. 
No loss. 

Still. April 3, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Michael Corbett, 44 Centre Street. No loss. 

Still. April 6, 1.05 p. m. Grass fire on Rolfe Street. 
Extinguished by detail. No loss. 

Still. April 13, 7 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
A. W. Rolfe, 11 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 8 p. m. Grass fire on Rolfe Street. 
Extinguished by detail. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 5.15 p. m. Slight fire in lumber pile 
in yard of the Symonds Table Co. plant, Merrimack Street. 
Caught from burning brush near by. No loss. 

Box 39. April 20, 2.06 p. m. Grass fire, Woodlawn 
Cemetery. Recall 2.17 p. m. No loss. 

Still. May 2, 2.02 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Dr. A. C. Alexander, 52 No. Main Street, Boscawen side. 
No loss. 

Still. May 10, 3.40 p. m. Grass fire on Borough 
Road on land owned by Reed Merrill. No loss. 

No insurance on articles destroyed. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 213 

A-4-A. May 10, 6.47 p. m. Brush fire on wood lot 
owned by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe between River Hill and 
Mast Yard. Labored two hours. Recall 8.47 p. m. Loss 
$125.00. No insurance. 

Box 35. May 20, 9.25 a. m. Fire in lunch cart owned 
by Bert Hunt, Washington Square. Caused by ignition of 
gasoUne in tank. Recall 9.34 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ids. 


Ins. Paid. 


Cart, 


$250.00 


.$7.50 


$250.00 


$7 . 50 


Contents, 


150.00 


7.50 


150.00 


7.50 



Box 37. May 23, 6.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. James Garvey, So. Main Street. Recall 6.55 p. m. 
No loss. 

Still. June 11, 1 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. John Harris, 37 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. June 21, 4.30 p. m. Brush fire near Mast Yard 
depot. Detail sent. No loss. 

Still. June 24, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in George E. 
Farrand's store, Eagle Block, Washington Square. No 
loss. 

No Alarm. July 31, 4.50 p. m. Summer cottage owned 
and occupied by Edward J. Leary on River Road struck by 
lightning. 

Value. Lops. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $18.00 $800.00 $18.00 

Contents, 500.00 42.00 200.00 42.00 

No Alarm. July 31, 4.50 p. m. Residence of J. Albert 
Massie, Hardy Avenue, struck by lightning. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $15.00 $2,000.00 $15.00 

Still. July 31, 4.50 p. m. Hen house owned by George 
Blake, Maple Street, struck by lightning. No loss. 

Box 35. August 9, 8.55 p. m. Fire in lunch cart owned 
and occupied by Bert Hunt, Washington Square. Extin- 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

guished with chemicals. Recall 9.05 p. m. Caused by 
gasoline in stove igniting. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Cart, S250.00 $200.00 None None 

Still, August 11, 11.50 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house corner of High and Summer Streets. No loss. 

Still. August 20, 10.30 a. m. Slight fire in automobile, 
Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. September 11, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in ten- 
ement house, 17 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. September 12, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house, 22 Spring Street. No loss. 

Still. September 12, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Elmer Welch, 90 Borough Road. No loss. 

Still. September 15, 10.30 p. m. Fire in coal in shed 
of N. H. Spinning Mills plant. No loss. 

Still. September 27, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Edward York, 45 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. September 27, 6.50 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
oil stove taking fire in Hunt's lunch cart, Washington Street. 
Extinguished with chemicals. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 6.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of P. Simoneau, 7 Bye Street. No loss. 

Box 47. October 24, 10.30 a. m. Slight fire in residence, 
Merrimack Street, owned by J. E. Symonds. Caused by 
overheated smoke pipe. Loss trifling. No claim for insur- 
ance filed. Recall 10.40 a. m. 

Still. October 26, 7.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Ralph Sherburne, 40 Elm Street. No loss. 

Still. November 1, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Garland, 42 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 7.30 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Mrs. Charles Brackett, 20 
Washington Street. Plugged chimney. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 9.30 p. m. Slight fire in auto- 
mobile owned by Erman Clark, near Pioneer Station, Wash- 
ington Street. Loss trifling. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 215 

Still, November 27, 3.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Lawrence Keenan, 11 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 2.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Julia Boliss, Borough Road. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 1.10 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
pan of fat on stove taking fire in residence, 24 Summer 
Street. No loss. 

East Concord. 

Bell. April 1, 1.30 p. m. Grass fire on land owned by 
Jed Carter. No loss. 

Bell. April 8, 4.30 p. m. Brush fire on the Intervale. 
No loss. 

Bell. April 10, 9.30 a. m. Brush fire on Oak Hill on 
land owned by Hiram Gate. No loss. 

Bell. April 17, 6.20 p. m. Brush fire on Plains on land 
owned by the Batchelder Estate. Labored five hours. 
Detail left on guard. No loss. 

Bell. April 26, 3 p. m. Grass fire on land owned by 
Frank Kilburn. No loss. 

Bell. April 28, 2.50 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by the Concord Electric Co. 

Still. May 6, 10 a. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Edwin Burroughs. No loss. 

Bell. May 8, 12.50 p. m. Brush fire on Mountain on 
land owned by David Morrill. No loss. 

Bell. July 28, 7.20 p. m. Set of buildings owned and 
occupied by Fales P. Virgin. Snaptown struck by Hght- 
ning. Barn totally destroyed. 

Value. Loss. Ina. las. Paid. 

Buildings, $5,000.00 $3,000.00 $2,100.00 $1,091.00 

Contents, 4,000.00 3,000.00 700.00 299.00 

Still. July 29, 9 p. m. Rebuilding of fire in debris of 
preceding fire. No loss. 

Still. September 22, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William P. Curtis, Pembroke Street. No loss. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 26, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Mary F. Robinson, East Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. December 11, 7.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Locke Bullock, on the Mountain. No loss. 

West Concord. 

Still. February 16, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Davis, 505 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 4.40 p. m. Grass fire on Rogers Avenue 
on land owned by Edgar D. Eastman. No loss. 

Still. April 8, 9.00 p. m. Fire in garbage pile near 
B. & M. R. R. depot. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 4.45 p. m. Brush fire near Bog Road 
on land owned by Edgar D. Eastman. Labored one and 
one-half hours. Loss $100.00, no insurance. 

Bell. May 6, 12.45 p. m. Brush fire near Sewalls Falls 
on land owned by the Concord Electric Co. Labored one 
and three-quarter hours. Loss $100.00, no insurance. 

Still. June 2, 12.45 p. m. Grass fire on land owned by 
the Concord Woodworking Co. Caused by over-turned 
lantern. No loss. 

SUMMARY, 1919. 

BumDiNGS. Value. Loss. Insurance. ^°^^d*^' Net Lobs. 

Precinct $317,900.00 $13,664.18 $191,800 00 $9,264.18 $4,400.00 

Penacook 31,250.00 3,382.84 15,300.00 3,057.84 325.00 

East Concord 5,000.00 3,000.00 2,100.00 1,091.00 1,909.00 

West Concord 200.00 200.00 

Total $354,150.00 $20,247.02 $209,200 00 $13,413.02 $6,834.00 

Contents. 
Precinct $56,900.00 $8,967.50 $19,400.00 $6,620.50 $2,347.00 

Penacook 6,950.00 1,524.50 4,400.00 1,274.50 250.00 

EastConcord 4,000.00 3,000.00 700.00 299.00 2,701.00 

Total $67,850.00 $13,492.00 $24,500.00 $8,194.00 $5,298.00 

Buildings 354,150.00 20,247.02 209,200.00 13,413.02 6,834.00 

BuiUing and Contents.... $422,000.00 $33,739.02 $233,700.00 $21,607.02 $12,132.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 



Apparatus and Force. 



The apparatus and force of the department is as follows: 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine and 
hose car, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company 
(15 men); one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kear- 
sarge," and modern hose wagon, attached to the Kearsarge 
Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; one second-class 
Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in charge 
of an engineer and fireman; and one auto-combination car 
in charge of four permanent men; one ladder truck, "City 
of Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder Company 
(21 men) ; one house man at Central Fire Station. There 
are six horses kept at this station. There are eleven per- 
manent men located at the Central Fire Station, one per- 
manent man at each fire station within the precinct and 
one permanent man at Pioneer Station, Penacook. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has an auto-combination car, with perma- 
nent man. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hook and ladder truck, one chemical engine, one 
hand engine and three wagons in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons and one auto-combination car with permanent 
man. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
an auto-combination car and a modern hose wagon. 

Old Fort (30 men). East Concord, has a 4^-inch cyhn- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 



218 city of concord. 

Hose. 
Precinct, 11,450 feet cotton, rubber lined. 

Penacook, 3,200 

West Concord, 1,400 " " 

East Concord, 500 " " 

16,550 " " 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



219 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 191 8. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Geeen, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 



PRECINCT. 

WiLTER J. Coffin, Ist A3st., Shipping clerk, 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst., Holder, 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



60 Pleasant Street. 
41 So. Main Street. 





WARD 1. 




Fred M. Dodge, 


Electrician, 

WARD 2. 


61 Merrimack Street. 


C. E. Robinson, 


Clerk, 

WARD 3. 


Penacook St., East Concord. 


George W. Kemp, 


Overseer, 


16 Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 
J. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 

MEMBERS. 



Koa. Namei 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles PoweU. 

3 James H. Sanders, 

4 George B. Davis, 

5 Herbert M. Sanders, 

6 Harry P. Blake, 

7 Harry B. Messer, 

8 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

9 George L. Lcvingston, 

10 Everett D. Davis, 

11 Frank E. Hudson, 

12 Roger E. Strong, 

13 Daniel F. Murphy, 



Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter. 
Carriage painter, 
Cashier, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage trimmer. 
Gas inspector. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Printer, 
Permanent driver. 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Pleasant Street. 
35 Warren Street. 
12 Hanover Street. 
3 Broadway. 
154 No. Main Street. 
38 Jackson Street. 
61 Washington Street. 
90 Warren Street. 
11 So. Spring Street. 
Central Station. 



220 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 1. 





OFFICERS. 




J. C. McGiLVRAT, Captain. 


MEMBERS. 


D. J. Adams, Lieutenant and 


Badge 






Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


18 John C. McGilvray, 


Jig-sawyer, 


9 Pearl Street. 


19 David J. Adams, 


Janitor, 


107 North Main Street. 


20 Charles H. Sanders, 


Machinist, 


11 Chapel Street. 


23 John M. Inman, 


Custodian, 


16 Wall Street. 


24 John B. McLeod, 


Electrician, 


5 Rumford Street. 


25 Willis J. Sawyer, 


Machinist, 


102 South State Street. 


22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 


Painter, 


5 Perry Avenue. 


27 Philip J. O'Connell, 


Silversmith, 


38 North Spring Street. 


21 Charles W. Downing, 


Clerk, 


12 South Street. 


29 Fred J. Johnston, 


Gas fitter. 


10 Abbott Street. 


28 James H. Brannigan, 


Car worker. 


24 West Street. 


26 Raymond L. Galfetti, 


Gas fitter. 


1 Walker Avenue. 


13 H. E. Drew, 


Chauffeur, 


Central Fire Station. 


30 C. Cunningham, 


Chauffeur, 


Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 

RELIEF ENGINE. 
Badte 



Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Reddences. 


34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, 


Machinist, 


78 South State Street. 


35 H^nry 0. Powell, Fireman, 


Blacksmith, 


81 South State Street. 


ALERT 


HOSE COMPANY, 

OFFICERS. 


NO. 2. 


C. C. Cheslet, Captain. 


■ J. M. Davis, Lieutenant and 




E. E. Bartlett, Treasurer. 






MEMBERS. 




Bait* 






Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 C.C.Chesley, 


Carpenter, 


11 Prince Street. 


37 J. M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, 


4 Tahanto Street. 


39 C. J. French, 


Mayor, 


5 Perkins Street. 


40 C. H. Rowel). 


Carpenter, 


5 Abbott Court. 


45 M. G. Davis, 


Carpenter, 


6 Beacon Street. 


41 J. E. Howard, 


Painter, 


31 Union Street. 


38 E. E. Bartlett, 


Carpenter, 


13 Prince Street. 


42 T. S. Pillsbury, 


Printer, 


HI North State Street. 


43 F. G. White, 


Laborer, 


12 Montgomery Street. 


44 H. D. Gay, 


Tinsmith, 


1 Bowery Avenue. 


46 F. H. Silver, 


Chauffeur, 


Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 
Hiram T. Dickerman, Captain. Frane S. Putnam, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. 





MEMBERS. 




Badge 






ffos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


50 H.T. Dickerman, 


Foreman, 


36 Broadway. 


51 F. S. Putnam, 


Carpenter, 


IS Perley Street. 


53 J. R. Mudgett, 


Carpenter, 


98 So. State Street. 


55 H. H. Ash, 


Machinist, 


23^ Perley Street. 


57 A. W. Thompson, 


Janitor, 


74 Allison Street 


58 H. L. Peacock, 


Carriage painter, 


36 Warren Street. 


59 H. F. Ferrin, 


Electrician, 


104 So. State Street. 


56 J. E. Cochrane, 


Molder, 


38 Downing Street. 


52 B. W. Burgess, 


Barber, 


71 No. State Street. 


54 P. H. Flanders, 


Carpenter, 


7i Depot Street. 


60 W. T. Happny, 


Chauffeur, 


Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER 
COMPANY, NO. L 





OFFICERS. 




Wat. A. Kino, Captain. 


MEMBERS. 


Eo. E. Lanb, Lieutenant and 


Badge 






Not. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


64 Will A. King, 


Machinist, 


38 Franklin Street. 


65 Ed. E. Lane, 


Wood-worker, 


5 Fremont Street. 


67 Benjamin Ouillette, 


Wood-worker, 


10 Jefferson Street. 


68 Henry V. Tittemore, 


Teamster, 


57 Dunklee Street. 


69 Lucius D.Caldon, 


Wood-worker, 


13 West Street. 


70 George W. Grover, 


Wood-worker, 


29 Thorndike Street. 


71 Daniel Crowley, 


Coachman, 


130 Warren Street. 


72 Stephen P. Foster, 


Wood-worker, 


14 Wall Street. 


73 Sam B. Morgan, 


Wood-worker, 


10 Avon Street. 


74 Bion W. Hail, 


Carpenter, 


15 Humphrey Street. 


75 Edwin H. Freneh, 


Wood-worker, 


30 Green Street. 


77 Ned E. Herrin, 


Carpenter, 


Ins. Blk., School Street. 


79 Louis Cote, 


Carpenter, 


34 Downing Street. 


80 Clarence L. Clark, 


Clerk, 


71 South Street. 


81 Bert J. Heath, 


Wood-worker, 


25 Washington Street. 


82 William H. Reagan, 


Steam fitter, 


37 South Main Street. 


83 Harry Leary, 


Plumber, 


22 Fremont Street. 


76 Bert T. Upham, 


Machinist, 


27i Grove Street. 


78 Earl W. Gage. 


Carpenter, 


8 Charles Street. 


84 A. J. Ladd, 


Permanent driver. 


Central Station. 



222 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1 

OFFICERS. 
M. S. Wakefield, Captain. 

MEMBERS. 



Nos. Names. 

91 M.S.Wakefield, 

92 M. J. Martin, 

93 J. H. Brunei, 

94 H. E. Kendall, 



95 George H. Eastman, 

96 C. W. Downing,* 



Occupations. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

Spare Men. 



M. J. Martin, Lievienanl and Clerk. 



• Acting for M. R. Piper, in service of Government, oversi 

House Man. 
A. L. Downing. 



Residences. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 



Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henkt Rolfe, Captain. 
Walter H. Rolfe, Engineer. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henr>- Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Walter H. Rolfe, 

109 Alfred Beddow, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 

111 Edmond Banker, 

110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

123 WiUiam Corbett, 

124 Dehnar R. Jones, 

114 Henry E. Templeton, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 

116 Loren H. Emerson, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassavaugh, 
105 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

115 Carl G. Hohnes, 

112 Richard McBride, 

122 George L. Messer, 

103 F. D. O'Brien, 



OFFICERS. 

Frank P. Robertson, Lieut., Clerk and Treas. 
John B. Dodge, Steward. 
MEMBERS. 



Occupations. 
Highway agent. 
Machinist, 
Foreman, 

Stationary engineer, 
Teamster, 
Machinist, 
Janitor, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Axle-maker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Laborer, 
Miller, 
Teamster, 
Table-maker, 
Hotel clerk. 
Spinner, 
MiUer, 
Clerk, 
Electrician. 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 
39 Centre Street. 
44 Elm Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
Elm Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 
92 High Street. 
Cross Street. 
44 Centre Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 

41 Washington Street. 
10 Church Street. 
110 Merrimack Street. 
6 Union Street. 

9 Union Street. 

43 South Main Street. 
Merrimack Street. 

42 Spring Street. 

10 Union Street. 
High Street. 
Pioneer Station. 



FIEE DEPARTMENT. 



223 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 
East Concord. 



George 0. Robinson, Captain. 
Walter C. Sanborn, Lieui. and Cierk. 



OFFICERS. 



MEMBERS. 



Badae 

Nos. Names. 

120 George 0. RobinsoD, 

121 Walter C. Sanborn, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 William E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Gate, 

129 Ross W. Gate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Glarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Gate, 
135 John T. Gate, 

140 G. A. Ghamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

145 John Ganney, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Garter, 

148 Glaude H. Swain, 

142 WiUiam E. Batchelder, 

141 Herbert F. Piper, 

124 William Gate, 

134 Ernest W. Gate, 



Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Wood-worker, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Garpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Fanner, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith, 
Garpenter, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stone-cutter, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Garpenter, 
Farmer, 
Garpenter, 



John C. Hdtchins, Treaturer. 
Michael Lacroix, Steward. 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Eearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Shawmut Street. 



224 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 
West Concord. 



OFFICERS 



Alpred J. Fraser, Captain. 

Abram D. Cushinq, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
A. D. Gushing. 
Hiram E. Quimby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abiel C. Abbott, 
Edward Levering, 
Joseph Daly, 
Robert Henry, 
Frank Peterson, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Eckstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 
Ascl Swanson, 
Henry Richardson, 
Frank C.Blodgett. 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Silversmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stationary engineer. 
Stationary engineer. 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Paving-cutter, 
Foreman, 
Stone-cutter, 



Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer. 
Frank C. Blodqett, Steward. 



Residences. 
10 River Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
490 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 

5 Engel Street. 

50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
455 North State Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
14 View Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 
434 North State Street. 

6 Dam Street. 

436 North State Street. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



OFFICERS. 



Frank F. Morse, Captain. 



Dennis HoUoran, 
Albert P. Davis. 
Edward D. Ashley, 
Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 
F. W. Camp, 



S. S. Upham, First Lieutenant. 



Eben F. Richardson, Second Lieutenant. 



MEMBERS. 

Earl C. Bodwell, 
D. P. Wheeler, 
Henry Tucker, 
W. K. Wingate, 
Fred L. Johnson, 
L. S. Richardson, 



Fred 0. Libby, 
M. F. Thompson, 
E. J. Brown. 
A. L. Dickerman, 
H. W. Hillson, 
Charles C. Moore. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen of the City of Concord: 

The trustees of the Pubhc Library herewith file the 
annual report of the librarian, which covers in a compre- 
hensive way the results accomplished during the past year. 
As suggested therein the need of more adequate accom- 
modations is constantly becoming more and more apparent. 
A new and larger library building is demanded. 

The trustees recommend that the amount of the appro- 
priation for library purposes for the current year be the 
same as was appropriated last year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

REUBEN" E. WALKER, 

President, Board of Trustees. 



15 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1918. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen: Perhaps it is admissible to make a report 
an account not only of work done, but of unusual cir- 
cumstances under which it has been done? Then I should 
Hke to call attention to the fact that during this year we 
have had the interesting experience of being pulled out of 
our rut and told by Government to do certain things. In 
several ways we have been used as part of the educational 
apparatus of the country. Though not rescinding our 
refusal to display printed matter advertising private causes, 
we have, for the benefit of national drives, of Red Cross 
needs, of patriotic lectures, etc., etc., papered our walls 
with posters and proclamations. The Food Administration 
in particular has requested our collaboration, requiring us 
to get over to the public facts relating to over-fed and 
under-fed nations. 

As library publicity director appointed by Mr. Huntley 
Spaulding, it has been my job to try to see that Mr. Hoover's 
recommendations were brought to the notice of every 
borrower at every library in the state. I could not have 
performed this task at all if the local Food Administration's 
office in the State House had not kindly done for me the 
mimeographing of circular letters and the mailing of the 
same to the two hundred and twenty public libraries in 
New Hampshire. 

I have heard of one town's library which, given by a rich 
man, is wholly under his control, and he has not allowed it 
to display Government propaganda because that would 
disfigure the artistic interior. We have willingly had our 
wall-space resemble a billboard, seeing that by so looking 
it drew notice to what an anxious Government was en- 
deavoring to get into the consciousness of an easy-going 
people. Not a month passed in 1918 without the privilege 
of being called to some little public service, Uke talking 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 227 

to Other librarians to reconcile them to the flood from the 
government presses or telling children in primary schools 
that to be wasteful was to be naughty. 

All this has made the past year as important as any I have 
ever recorded, but, however, rather in the kind of work 
done than in the volume of it. 

For our desk circulation dropped to 82,739 volumes, and 
our reference inquirers numbered only 4,045. Not merely 
were persons preoccupied with the war, but there are two 
other reasons why our patronage decreased. In the winter 
there was apprehension of a shortage of coal, and to avoid 
all-day closing, later on, the President of this Board in 
agreement with several members of it authorized the 
library not to keep open during the forenoon, from Janu- 
ary 16 to March 26. Again, in the autumn the serious 
prevalence of influenza led Mayor French to close all places 
frequented by crowds, and the library shut its doors for 
the first time since it was established in 1855. It remained 
closed from October 8 to October 28. 

It was an item of our 1917 Report that in the nation- 
wide appeal for a million dollars to help the American 
Library Association's war work. Concord responded finely, 
giving over a thousand, and we are gratefully preserving 
a record of the donors and their contributions. 

In 1918 the national hbrary association asked for books 
rather than money, and the drive in April secured over 
half a million volumes for the use of soldiers and sailors. 
In Concord fully two thousand books were brought in by 
two hundred persons whose names we have on file, and we 
have sent twenty boxfuls of capital reading matter to can- 
tonments and ports of embarkation. More magazines 
were offered than we could forward; from these the staff, 
at odd moments, have culled dozens of good short stories 
which they have made into very attractive booklets that 
can be enjoyed by men too sick to handle anything heavier. 

This library was the medium through which Miss C. 
Azella Hood, a Concord High School teacher loaned to 
Plattsburg Barracks, was granted her desire for a victrola 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and records to help in her reconstruction work. Imme- 
diately upon the library's stating it would receive gifts for 
the purpose, the instrument itself was given by a Concord 
lady who asked that it be considered a reminder of Lieu- 
tenant Raymond Thompson, for whom flies a flag with the 
golden star. 

This is not the place to describe the growth of the Amer- 
ican Library Association ; suffice it to say that by last Nov- 
ember it had proved itself such an agency for good that 
it was harnessed with six other national organizations and 
made the successful seven-fold campaign for $170,500,000, 
of which $3,500,000 is being expended admirably by 
the A. L. A. 

The necessity for our library to do its bit along the lines 
of war work may be over now, but I think that no institution 
which has once felt the uplift of such service, should ever 
relapse into a petty or provincial point of view. 

Fortunately there is no need for the Concord Public 
Library to be unqualified for a high order of usefulness. 
Again a citizen has died leaving us money to be spent other- 
wise than for fiction. Last February Judge William M. 
Chase passed away and in his will was this generous item 
graciously expressed: "To said City of Concord, the 
further sum of One Thousand Dollars, to be held in trust 
forever, the annual income thereof to be used for the 
benefit of its Public Library, in the purchase of books on 
historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational 
subjects. I make this bequest as a slight token of my grat- 
itude for the kindness and encouragement I have uni- 
formly received from the citizens of Concord, while I have 
been a resident among them." 

You will recall that Mr. P. B. Cogswell specified that the 
interest on his bequest should be spent for ''biographical, 
geographical, historical and scientific books." Mrs. Ela, in 
establishing the Hazeltine fund, requested that it go toward 
buying "high-class literature." Mr. S. C. Eastman, who 
at his death in 1917 was found to have had this hbrary 
down in several ways as a beneficiary, stated that the 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 229 

income from twenty-five shares of stock be used for the 
purchase of books in foreign languages. 

Now I would that each of these benefactors could, by- 
legal means, have given us not only worth-while books, but 
readers for them! 

I think we face a problem. If we buy in strict accordance 
with the terms of these four wills, there will accrue a library 
which could be boasted of as fine but which would be 
scarcely read. Possibly the Wonolancet Club knows 
somewhat of this experience. I fear it is beyond the power 
of advertising or of persuasion to get the non-fiction of a 
public library read to a due degree. Many persons, pressed 
for time, are satisfied with the information afforded by mov- 
ing pictures and monthly and weekly periodicals. You 
must recognize that Concord, through not being a manu- 
facturing city, furnishes almost no clientele eager for the 
latest scientific works. I am not saying that in sociology 
and pedagogy there is not much solid reading done here. 
The leaders along these and similar lines in Concord are not 
behind anybody in being posted in their work; but the books 
they read are often those which they must own themselves 
to refer to constantly. I wish every professional man 
would treat us as does Rev. George H. Reed. He will 
telephone, "Have you such and such a book?" "No; 
ought we to get it?" "Well, my friend on the faculty at 
Columbia says it is the best new work on that topic." "All 
right, we'll buy it." And we do and through Dr. Reed's 
use of it, the gist of the book is got over to many minds. 

Of course to acquire historical and political matter is the 
province of the Historical Society and the State Library; 
and is it too much to say that it would be a wicked waste of 
public money and of shelf-room for the three libraries so 
near together to duplicate one another's material? As to 
books in other languages than English, we already add 
enough to keep up with the demand made by our small 
foreign population. 

Aided by my Book Committee and by recommendations 
experts would kindly make, I can buy books to satisfy the 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

requirements of the bequests; but will they be adequately 
read before they in turn cease to be authoritative works? 

Any highly specialized book we can and do borrow from 
the Boston Public Library; and possibly, if the Concord 
Public Library is to acquire annually a larger proportion than 
heretofore of rather weighty non-fiction we can, by the grow- 
ing system of inter-library loans, make these books serve 
more than the residents of Concord. It was probably no 
such use that the testators had in mind, however. 

It has seemed to me that the province of this homey, 
cheery, unpretentious Public Library was especially to take 
care of the book work with schools and clubs; to help ambi- 
tious youth and to entertain their tired elders. If, though, 
our library is scheduled to attract a greater number of 
mature readers to the examination of a superior quality of 
books, will not that require a new building suitable in 
appearance and accommodations? 

Since the last calling together of this Board Mr. Edson J. 
Hill has been taken from your company. In his death 
which occurred on May 18, many like myself lost a life- 
long friend ; but here it is of him as a trustee that I wish to 
speak. He was almost invariably present at your councils, 
and by that steadfast attendance and in other ways he 
proved his interest in all matters relating to the Hbrary. 
Indeed, he manifested exceptionally faitliful concern for 
everything with which he was officially connected. He had 
had long experience in affairs affecting the city and great 
confidence was felt in his good judgment. This first annual 
meeting since his death brings a keen realization of the loss 
this institution has sustained. 

1918 has seen repeated the devoted work of my assistants; 
their loyal spirit finds illustration in the fact that though 
they were legally entitled to Election Day and Victory Day, 
they heartily agreed that, seeing the library had been closed 
in the earlier fall, it better be kept open on these two holi- 
days so as to give a good measure of service to the pleasant 
Concord public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Librarian. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



City Engineer's Office, City Hall, 
Concord, N. H., December 31, 1918. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The twenty-sixth annual report to your board is herewith 
submitted. 

The expenses of this department for the year were as 
follows : 



Paid engineer and assistants, 


$3,362.00 


for supplies, 


44.04 


telephone rental and tolls, 


22.25 


express, 


.35 


transportation. 


40.50 


real estate transfers, 


9.90 


incidentals. 


65.28 


repairs, 


4.58 




$3,548.90 


Appropriation, 


$4,550.00 


Expended, 


3,548.90 


Unexpended balance, 


$1,001.10 


Sewers. 





The work done under this appropriation is detailed in 
the report of this department to the Board of Public Works. 

Water Works. 

A complete set of plans showing the pipe hues and appur- 
tenances of the system were completed, tracings made and 
a volume of blueprints of same consisting of 225 sheets, 
bound in book form, turned over to the superintendent of 
the works. 



232 city of concord. 

Fire Department. 

The plans showing the location of hydrants and fire-alarm 
boxes were brought up to date arid blueprints of the city 
and Penacook districts furnished the chief of the department. 

Building Petitions. 

Twenty-seven petitions for new buildings or for altera- 
tions in existing structures were presented to the chief of 
the fire department and your city engineer. Together we 
have attended the hearings upon them and granted the 
petitions with such restrictions as seemed proper for the 
case under consideration. 

All petitions have been filed with the city clerk with our 
action endorsed upon them. 

Cemeteries. 

One new block has been laid out in lots in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. A plan showing dimensions of lots and their 
areas was made and turned over to the superintendent. 

One new block has been laid out and graded on the front 
of this cemetery and will be ready for dividing into lots in 
1919. 

Further studies on the ''Bradley" addition to this ceme- 
tery have been made and data secured for future use in its 
development. 

Much additional land can be easily made available in the 
old portion by building a culvert in the ravine just west of 
Rumford Street, and filling it to a suitable height for burial 
purposes. Much of this fill can be made with ashes, or 
any non-decayable materials which may become available 
in near-by sections of the city. 

That portion of Blossom Hill Cemetery lying just west of 
block "M" is too wet for burial purposes. This condition 
can be overcome by removing the pond now at the southerly 
end of the cemetery and carrying the under-drains to the 
culvert below the pond. 

The sale book of Blossom Hill Cemetery has been brought 
up to date from the deed stubs. 



report of the city engineer. 233 

Assessors' Maps. 

Little field work was required the past season for the maps. 

The property transfers were kept up to date from the 
monthly reports furnished this office by the register of deeds, 
showing sales as indicated by the deeds recorded. 

A map of the entire city, showing the various sewer, 
lighting, and garbage precincts and the two school districts, 
was made and delivered to the board of assessors. 

The lists of real estate owners in the city, as shown by 
deeds, were made for the assessors as soon after April 1st as 
we were able to get the March transfers. 

Miscellaneous. 

Considerable time was spent in lajdng out and plotting 
the " War Gardens " for the committee in charge. Fourteen 
parcels of land were divided into 495 lots of various dimen- 
sions, and plans furnished the committee to aid them in 
allotting the same. 

The bridge over the canal in Main Street, Ward 1, which 
was built by the New Hampshire Spinning Mills, and turned 
over to the cit}^ for future maintenance, removes from this 
street a menace to heavy trucking. The new structure was 
built on specifications and plans submitted by the Spinning 
Mills. 

Someone from this office saw the reinforcement placed, 
the concrete poured and that the general requirements of 
the specifications were adhered to. The finished bridge 
should be free from expense to the city excepting the resur- 
facing of the roadway and the occasional replacement of 
the guardrail on its upstream side. 

We have made for the use of the Board of Public Works a 
mounted paper map of the entire city, showing the streets 
and highways. This map is hung in the office of the mayor. 

Owing to the small demand of other departments for 
services during the past season we have been able to do much 
needed plan work to keep up to date. Our force has been 
unusually small but the work accomplished has been of 
importance to our plans and records. 



234 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The demands for information from private individuals is 
constantly increasing, regarding the ownership of lands in 
the city, and we have been able to aid many of them from 
our assessors' maps and other data in this office. 

For the privilege of attending the annual meeting of the 
American Society of Municipal Improvements, held in 
Buffalo, N. Y., early in October, I am grateful, as it was a 
source of much profit to all who were present at its sessions, 
where municipal service in its many phases was openly 
discussed. 

The employees of this department during the year were 
as follows: Fred W. Lang, principal assistant, and Herbert 
Walker, rodman, who have rendered good service to the 
city. 

For the interest taken in this department, and the many 
courtesies extended to it by your board, I wish to express 
my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1918. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The nineteenth annual report of this board is herewith 
submitted. 

The membership of the board is as follows: Arthur W. 
Robinson, journeyman plumber, Charles H. Cook, M. D., 
and Will B. Howe, city engineer. 

The board organized with Arthur W. Robinson, chairman, 
and Will B. Howe, clerk. 

Two applicants for journeyman's licenses were received 
and the parties examined. Both passed their examinations 
and were granted licenses. 

Two meetings were held during the year for the purpose 
of organization and the examination of the two applicants 
mentioned above. 

Licenses and certificates were issued to the men named 
in the attached list. This list shows the date of issue and 
the amounts paid by each man. 

The total receipts of the board were $27.50. The 
expenditure for postage was $1 .43. 



236 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1918. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The thirteenth annual report of this board, for the year 
1918, is herewith submitted. 

No meetings of this board were held during the year, and 
no recommendations were made to the water board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY A. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners, 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The amount of work done by the Highway 
Department dming the year 1918 was less than usual as no 
permanent improvements were made and on account of the 
shortage in labor it was possible to accomphsh only a small 
amount of repair work. 

In the early spring when we had a number of able-bodied 
men the work of plowing gardens was placed under this 
department. While I was thoroughly in sympathy with the 
movement to increase the number of gardens to help win 
the war, I realized from the experience of the previous year 
that it entailed a large amount of work at a time when 
the highways needed repairing and it did not seem right to 
neglect them. We had passed through an unusually severe 
winter that had left the highways both in the city and on 
the outskirts in very bad condition and much in need of 
repair. Certain kinds of road work can be done more easily 
in the spring but in spite of the good weather conditions 
for doing some of this work we were obliged to spend about 
six weeks of that time in plowing gardens which required 
a number of teams and a large number of our able-bodied 
laborers. Last year the plowing was done free but this 
year the board decided to charge those able to pay for the 
work. A very small per cent of those agreeing to pay have 
done so and the amount collected is small. The following 
shows the cost of the work for 1917-1918: 

1917. Cost of free plowing, $2,457.63 

1918. Cost of plowing, 2,866.82 
1918. Bills sent out by department, $1,292.06 

Bills sent to garden committee, 1,603.03 

2,895.09 



240 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Amount collected from depart- 
ment bills, $582 . 38 

Amount received from garden 

committee bills, 132.50 

$714.88 

Next spring will probably find our highways in much 
worse condition than for a number of years due to the fact 
that so httle repairing was done on them last year and that 
the truck traffic increased to a considerable extent. The 
main thoroughfares receive most of the pleasure riding but 
there is hardly a street in the city that is not used by auto 
trucks for commerical purposes. Traffic of this kind has 
increased rapidly in the last few years and probably the 
limit of development in the commercial line has not been 
reached. Such traffic demands good roads and we should 
have them but at the present time and until we are a little 
more certain just how great this development is to be it 
would seem wiser to spend more in maintaining the roads 
that we have already improved than to expend large sums 
in new construction. Roads that were improved a few years 
ago, owing to the great increase in truck traffic are getting 
in bad condition. There are a number of streets in our city, 
some of which have never been permanently improved that 
are completely worn out. While they cannot all be macad- 
amized many of them should be regraded and put in better 
shape. Instead of appropriating money for permanent 
work I earnestly hope more may be appropriated for general 
maintenance and a portion of it expended on such streets as 
South Main, Pleasant, Warren, Washington and others 
that are very much in need of repair. 

To do this work a new crusher is needed. The old plant 
has been in use about twenty years and has become expen- 
sive to keep in repair and we do not get good results when 
operating it. There should be a new crusher, storage bins, 
etc., and electric power installed to run the plant. There is 
much wasted time in starting up the present plant when only 
a few loads of stone are needed. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 241 

With the large amount of work ahead for the coming 
summer it is imperative that something be done in regard to 
a new crusher. Another matter that I have brought to 
your attention in several past reports is the condition of the 
sheds on the city lot. There is neither suitable nor sufficient 
shed room to properly house the tools and machinery of the 
department. Since the two new trucks have been added to 
our equipment it will be necessary to enlarge the garage but 
this can be done easily as it was built with the idea of 
enlarging it as needed. 

Very few petitions for new concrete walks were presented 
last summer and therefore little work was done in that line. 
Many of the old concrete walks were repaired and there is 
great demand for that work each season. Tree roots have 
thrown the walks out of shape in many places and made 
repairs necessary. 

The trees set out by the department in the last two seasons 
have done remarkably well. A large per cent of them show 
a healthy growth but considerable damage has been done to 
them in some places by boys. Quite a number of dead 
trees have been removed and I think it would be well to 
continue the planting of trees each year. The brown-tail 
moth was not numerous last season but the gypsy moth was 
found in large numbers in all parts of the city and a few trees 
were affected by the elm tree beetle. 

We were not able to purchase oil for second application 
as a dust layer owing to government restrictions. The 
advantages of using oil as a dust layer are many and I 
would recommend its use another year. 

The garbage truck has been in use since July, 1914, and 
excepting a few repairs has been no expense to the depart- 
ment and proved its efficiency in collecting garbage. It now 
needs considerable repairing and the machine is being 
throughly overhauled during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Superintendent. 

16 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 
Appropriation, $55,000 . 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Central District. 

Labor pay- rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $13,427 . 10 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 13,990.20 

Labor pay-rolls, plowing gardens, 2,236 . 89 

Supplies, plowing gardens, 1,925.86 

Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 23 . 02 

Labor pay-rolls, sidewalks, 131.71 

Supplies, signs, 65.24 
Labor pay-rolls, watering troughs 

and drinking fountains, 29 . 22 
Supplies, watering troughs and drink- 
ing fountains, 19.80 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 2,595 . 88 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing and pav- 
ing gutters, 103.89 
Labor pay-rolls, bridges, 15.11 
Supplies, bridges, 138.09 
Labor pay-rolls, fences, 34.31 
Supphes, fences, 122.95 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 794 . 09 
Supplies, repairing macadam, 2,702 . 88 
Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 4,677 . 00 
Supplies, winter expense, 12.00 

J,045.24 



boabd of public works. 243 

Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $1,603.21 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 58.17 

Labor pay-rolls, plowing gardens, 37 . 76 

Labor pay-rolls, culverts, 53 . 74 

Labor pay-rolls, sidewalks, 179.60 

Labor pay-rolls, watering troughs and 

drinking fountains, 15.52 

Supplies, watering troughs and 

drinking fountains. 
Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 
Labor pay-rolls, bridges, 
Supplies, bridges, 
Labor pay-rolls, fences, 
Labor pay-rolls, signs. 
Supplies, signs, 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 
Labor pay-rolls, winter expense. 



9. 


,26 


863, 


.58 


292 


.91 


259 


.86 


8 


.20 


7 


.34 




.60 


191 


.65 


1,056 


.11 



$4,637.51 



West Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

arid repair, $414 . 38 
Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 1 . 60 

Labor pay-rolls, plowing gardens, 114.97 

Labor pay-rolls, cleaning gutters, 131.41 

Labor pay-rolls, sidewalks, 136.88 

Labor pay-rolls, repairing macadam, 23.00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 558 . 75 



1,380.99 



244 city of concord. 

East Concord District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $684 . 53 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 57 . 60 

Labor pay-rolls, plowing gardens, 69.41 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 518.78 



$1,330.32 



Egypt District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $14.00 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 3 . 00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 169 . 44 



HoiT District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $61.73 

Supplies, general maintenance and 
repair, 3 . 00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 80.82 



Virgin District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, $9 . 25 

Supplies, general maintenance and 

repair, 6 . 00 

Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 144.19 



186 . 44 



145.55 



159.44 



Sanborn District. 
Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 52.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



245 



Number Four District. 

Labor pay-rolls, general maintenance 

and repair, 
Labor pay-rolls, winter expense, 



242 



.53 

,89 



$527.42 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance. 



$51,464.91 
3,535.09 

$55,000.00 



CATCH-BASINS. 



Appropriation, 

Expenditures — 



Central District. 



$1,300.00 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing. 
Supplies, 



$476. 
10 
37. 



96 
38 
66 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning, 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing 
Labor pay-rolls, building. 
Supplies, 



Penacook District. 



$149. 

20. 

59. 

107, 



65 
67 
34 
93 



525.00 



337.59 



West Concord District. 



Labor pay-rolls, cleaning. 
Labor pay-rolls, repairing. 



93 

67 



12.60 



Total expenditures, 
Unexpended balance, 



$875.19 
424.81 



$1,300.00 



246 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TREES. 
Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $283.52 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, 326 . 07 
Supplies, 230.41 



840.00 



Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, trimming and re- 
moving trees, $91.43 
Labor pay-rolls, care of moth pests, 116.70 
Supplies, 13.19 



221.32 



Total expenditures, $1,061 . 32 

Unexpended balance, 438.68 



$1,500.00 
SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 



Appropriation, 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 
Concrete, $79.12 


$750.00 

$79.12 

292.19 
378.69 


Total expenditures, 
Transferred to sidewalks and cross- 
ings repair, 
Unexpended balance, 



$750.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 247 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $2,500.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and 

crossings, new, 292.19 

$2,792.19 

Expenditures — 

Central District. 

Labor pay-rolls, setting edgestone, $4 . 79 

Concrete, 2,159.99 

2,164.78 

Penacook District. 

Labor pay-rolls, grading walks, $17 . 86 

Concrete, 250.51 

268.37 

West Concord District. 
Concrete, 359.04 



Total expenditures, $2,792 . 19 



PERMANENT WORK. 

South Main Street. 
Appropriation, 

Expenditures — 
Supplies, $745 . 64 
Unexpended balance, 1 , 754 . 36 


$2,500.00 
$2,500.00 



SALARY SUPERINTENDENT. 

Appropriation, $2,000.00 

Expenditures — 
Salary, $2,000.00 



248 CITY OF CONCORD. 

GARBAGE. 

Appropriation, $1 1,000 . 00 

By Joint Resolution No. 352, 180 . 44 

$11,180.44 

Expenditures — 
Deficiency from 1917, $20 . 09 

Labor pay-rolls, collecting garbage, 5,650 . 69 
Labor pay-rolls, collecting paper, 597 . 44 

Labor pay-rolls, burning paper and 

leveling ashes, 902 . 40 

Labor pay-rolls, patrol carts, 2, 147 . 19 

Supplies, 1,007.50 

$10,325.31 

Balance to 1919, 855.13 



11,180.44 



SPRINKLING. 






Balance from 1917, 


$2,078.00 




Appropriation, 


7,500.00 


$9,578.00 






Expenditures — 






Labor pay-rolls, repairing carts, 


$137.83 




Labor pay-rolls, repairing stand- 






pipes, 


45.55 




Labor pay-rolU, sprinkling with 






water, 


3,777.57 




Labor pay-rolls, sprinkling with oil, 


53.99 




Oil, 


2,824.51 




Supplies, 


524.60 


$7,364.05 






Balance to 1919, 




2,213.95 



$9,578.00 



board of public works. 249 

Penacook Sprinkling Precinct, 



Balance from 1917, 


$181.51 






Appropriation, 


300.00 










$481, 


,51 






Expenditures — 








Labor pay-rolls, repairing stand- 








pipes, 


$32.35 






Labor pay-rolls, sprinkling streets, 


322.45 






Supplies, 


26.78 










$381 


.58 






Balance to 1919, 




99 


,93 



$481.51 
Deposited with the City Treasurer as follows : 
State aid, highways, $1,033.59 

Trees, 24.86 

Labor, old iron, etc., 904.35 

Plowing gardens, 714.88 

Garbage, 180.44 

$2,858.12 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Public Works: 

The eighth annual report to your board showing the work 
done under the supervision of the Engineering Department, 
for your board, is herewith submitted: 

SEWERS. 

For the first time since this department was created no 
sewers were extended and no new sewers were laid during the 
past season. 

The cause is well known to your board and the public, 
viz., the shortage of labor and our inability to secure laborers 
in competition with government prices. 

Practically the whole season was spent, with a very small 
gang, in repairing the old sewers, building much needed 
manholes on various streets and the cleaning of 10,070 feet 
of sewers. In many sewers we found a large growth of 
roots from adjacent shade trees, which emphasizes the 
necessity of changing the material used for joining the 
pipes in future construction. 

The unusual amount of sand and gravel removed from the 
sewers was the result of overflowing catch-basins, which 
should be more thoroughly and regularly cleaned. The sand 
and gravel can be much more easily and cheaply removed 
from the basins than the sewers. 

But one permit for new sewer connections has been issued 
during the past season, although the report of the sanitary 
oflEicer shows five new connections made. 

In our cleaning operations we found house connections 
run into an eight-inch pipe from two inches to six inches. 
This should be remedied by a more careful inspection of all 
connections as they cause unnecessary expense and trouble 
in the mains and poor service to the premises so connected. 

The sewer cleaning machine purchased last spring is a 
valuable addition to our outfit. Without it we should have 
been obliged to dig up and relay two miles of sewers, at a 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 251 

cost of many thousands of dollars in excess of the amount 
expended with the machine. 

The need of relaying Beacon street was well illustrated 
last winter, when we found about 60 feet of 12-inch pipe 
solid full of sticks and sand from the catch-basins. It is a 
line which needs relief at the earhest possible moment. It 
is hoped that the coming season will be such that labor can 
be secured and this much needed improvement made. The 
material for the pipe is on the ground and should be laid 
before further damage is done to it. The full benefit of this 
change will not be reached until the sewer in Rumford 
street and a portion of Franklin street are relaid with larger 
pipes. 

There has been expended for flushing, repairs, cleaning, 
and new manholes the following amounts : 

Broadway, $10.44 

Center street, 54 . 27 

Bradley street 74 . 68 

Prospect street 140 . 33 

Badger street, 156.50 

Martin street, . 86 

Albin street, 106.70 

South Spring street, 78 . 48 

Eastman street, 63.65 

Rumford street, 4 . 64 

Dakin street, 62.07 

South State street, 63 . 37 

Perkins street, 28.42 

Waverly street, 6 . 00 

Stone street, 126.82 

Valley street, 140.99 

Kimball street, 14 . 67 

Pillsbury street, 166.94 

Carter street, 73 . 08 

Morton street, 16.58 

Beacon street, 90.32 

Total, $1,479.81 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid for sewer cleaning machine, $633 . 00 

Paid for tools, 180.11 

Paid for flushing, 444 . 90 



Amount expended, S2,737.82 

Funds available, $3,386 . 15 

Expended, 2,737.82 



Unexpended balance, $648.33 

Sewers built in City Precinct to December 31, 1918: 



6-inch Akron pipe. 


2,974 feet. 


8-inch Akron pipe. 


25,657 




10-inch Akron pipe. 


55,307 




12-inch Akron pipe. 


39,663 




12-inch cement pipe, 


415 




15-inch Akron pipe. 


11,646 




18-inch Akron pipe, 


7,134 




20-inch Akron pipe, 


5,029 




24-inch Akron pipe. 


4,064 




30-inch Akron pipe. 


1,780.5 ' 




Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 


2,758 




14-inch X 22-inch, 


350 




16-inch X 24-inch, 


1,848 




20-inch x 32-inch, 


2,527 




24-inch x 36-inch, 


17,937 




28-inch x 48-inch, 


883 




24-inch circular. 


1,515.5 ' 




30-inch circular. 


402 




38-inch circular, 


4,080 




24-inch cast-iron. 


1,576 




30-inch cast-iron. 


1,054.5 ' 




33-inch segmental block, 


211 




42-inch segmental block. 


1,055 




42-inch brick and concrete, 


246 




60-inch brick and concrete, 


1,450 




Total, 


191,562.5 fe< 


it. 



Total miles in City Precinct, 36.281+. 



board of public works. 253 

West Concord Precinct. 
Paid out for flushing, $26 . 20 

Funds available, - $105.71 

Expended, 26 . 20 

Balance on hand, $79.51 

East Concord Precinct. 

No repairs were made in this precinct during the season, 
leaving the balance on hand $195 . 91. 

Saint Paul's School Precinct. 

No expenditures were made for this precinct in 1918, 
leaving a balance on hand of $94 . 55. 

The usual monthly statements of coal-tar concrete laid 
in the streets and on the sidewalks have been made, and the 
statements turned over to the department or committee 
ordering the work done. These statements show the yards 
laid, the price charged, and the location of the particular 
piece of work. 

Grade stakes were set for one piece of street work on 
South Main street, for the street department. 

In company with one or both of the other members of 
the committee for locating poles, I have attended to that 
duty when notified, any hearings or meetings of your board 
when requested, and furnished such information from this 
department as called for. 

For the courtesies extended this department by your 
board, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Following is the report of the Board of Health for the 
year ending December 31, 1918: 

The board held its first meeting February 4, 1918 with 
Mayor French in the chair. Regular monthly meetings 
were held thereafter and numerous special meetings were 
found to be necessary especially during the prevalence of 
influenza in the fall. At this time the members of the board 
were in almost daily conference and rules and regulations 
were adopted with respect to public gatherings of all kinds 
in the hope of stopping the spread of the scourge. Generally 
speaking these rules and regulations were favorably received 
and the board had the cooperation of aU those concerned in 
their effort to minimize the spread of the malady. In spite 
of all precautions a very considerable proportion of all the 
population had the influenza. 

It is impossible to say with anything like exactness just 
how many have had it. This ambiguity is due to several 
reasons. First in importance perhaps, is the failure of 
physicians to report all the cases in their care. Many have 
the disease, especially in the mild form, who never employ 
a physician and as a consequence such cases do not become 
a matter of record. It is also difficult to ascertain exactly 
how many deaths are due to influenza. 

Only eighteen deaths are reported as caused by influenza 
but as is well known, most of the mortality of this disease 
is due to some form of complicating pneumonia, usually 
of a bronchial type. Consequently many of the mortalities 
reported as due to pneumonia are undoubtedly primarily 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 255 

due to influenza. Is there any way of estimating how 
many? 

In 1917 there were 36 deaths reported from pneumonia. 
This was more than the average for some years past. How- 
ever, assuming this to be the normal mortality from pneu- 
monia let us deduct this number from our 1918 total deaths 
from pneumonia. This number is found to be 186 and 
deducting 36 leaves 150 deaths from pneumonia that may 
fairly be assumed to have primarily been caused by in- 
fluenza. Adding now our 18 deaths reported as due to 
influenza we have a total of 168 mortalities from influenza. 
This total is, of course, only an estimate but is unquestion- 
ably somewhere near the truth. 

If a case mortality of 4 per cent is assumed this would 
give a total of 4,200 cases or about one in every five of our 
population. Be that as it may, it is very certain that this 
plague has taken an awful toll of lives not only from our own 
community but from all over the world. It is truly a 
pandemic. It still rages in a virulent form in many far 
scattered places on the globe, although happily now with 
us only in the scattered or sporadic form. 

Reports of its ravages come concurrently from such 
antipodal points as Archangel on the White Sea and from 
Apia in Samoa; from Seattle, Oregon and from Cape Town 
in South Africa. It is truly a pest and much remains to be 
learned as to its cause and of the manner in which it spreads. 
Authorities nearly all agree that it is most probably spread 
by droplets from the upper air passages. Such droplets are 
thrown out in coughing or sneezing and experiment has 
shown that they may be projected a distance of eight to ten 
feet. Therefore those attending cases of epidemic influenza 
should wear a mask. 

While it is felt that so far as Concord is concerned we are 
over the worst of the epidemic it must be borne in mind 
that certain sequellae are yet to be feared, namely: tuber- 
culosis and certain psychoses (mental diseases). These 
must be given the benefit of early recognition that proper 
treatment may be given before the disease advances to the 



256 CITY OF CONCORD. 

incurable stage. Fortunately the state is well equipped 
with institutions for handling these cases. In November 
an "Emergency Health Committee" was formed as an 
adjunct to the City Board of Health. On this board 
representation was given to those agencies and institutions 
which had rendered such valuable volunteer service when 
the epidemic was at its height. It is the expectation that 
this committee may serve a useful purpose in some future 
emergency. 

With respect to contagious diseases other than influenza, 
the city has been quite fortunate during the past year. This 
is especially true in regard to diphtheria, only 22 cases having 
been reported. 

A new regulation requiring the reporting of venereal 
diseases has thus far brought reports of only 14 cases. 
Several of these cases were reported by the United States 
and State of New Hampshire officials. It is obvious that 
reports are being withheld. This board asks for the cooper- 
ation of physicians in the effort to stamp out these terrible 
diseases. 

Dr. Charles Duncan, who has for many years held the 
position of milk inspector, tendered his resignation to take 
effect September 1, 1918. Up to the end of the period 
covered by this report no arrangements had been com- 
pleted for carrying on the work. However, in December, a 
committee was appointed to look into the matter with a 
view to an early settlement of the question. 

The report of the sanitary officer is transmitted herewith 
and made a part of this report. It should be referred to for 
a more detailed account of the Health Department's 
activities. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAYOR CHAS. J. FRENCH, 
CHAS. H. COOK, 
S. G. MORRILL, 

Board of Health, 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 257 

REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR. 



Concord, N. H., November 6, 1918. 
To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: I herein tender my resignation as milk 
inspector for Concord to take effect September 1, 1918. 

I have property of the department which I shall be pleased 
to turn over to my successor. 

I thank the Board of Health for the confidence they have 
placed in me since I took up the work in 1910. The 
Concord milk supply is as good as any, and better than in 
most cities in the state. I say this not to receive any credit 
for my part in the work, but as praise for the methods 
used by the department with a hope for continuance. I 
feel that inspection is a very important part of the work 
for clean milk, and that all effort spent on this work nets 
the very best results. 

It would be a paying proposition if material for this work 
could sometime be made a part of the equipment of the 
Board of Health. The work requires a trained assistant, 
but such could be trained by the State Board of Health, 
and their endorsement would assure the party a state 
license necessary for milk inspection for the one taking up 
the work. 

I had hoped by this time that the State Board of Health 
Laboratory might be sufficiently organized to be able to do 
milk inspection periodically for the cities, and such may 
be a plan for the future. 

This would not relieve the city from the responsibility 
of having a milk inspector, but would be an important 
adjunct for clean milk. 

I am sure the Concord milk producers, as a class, will 
assist your board in any plan devised. 

I assure you that my interest and help will be freely given 
to whoever becomes my successor. 

Very truly yours, 

CHARLES DUNCAN. 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: Herewith is submitted the report of the 
sanitary officer for the year ending December 31, 1918: 

There were 693 deaths during the year, 84 more than in 
1917, and pneumonia caused the largest number of deaths, 
186, or27.19percentof the total number excluding stillbirths. 
Estimating the population at 22,000 and excluding the 
non-resident deaths, 245, and the stillbirths, 10, this gave 
a death-rate of 19.90. There were 342 deaths at the six 
public institutions and 351 in the nine wards of the city. 

There has been a marked decrease in contagious disease, 
especially during the present epidemic of influenza, as 
only 228 cases have been reported to this office with four 
deaths. The duties of this department have been greatly 
increased since venereal diseases were made reportable as a 
War measure and a nation wide movement has been started 
to stamp out this menace, the effects of which are already 
becoming noticeable. 

Only 1,331 cases of influenza were reported, but there 
was scarcely a family in Concord who escaped this dreadful 
malady. The calls for nurses and first aid workers were 
so numerous, that at times it seemed impossible to find 
anyone to send out, however we were. fortunate in being 
able to answer the large majority of calls. In many in- 
stances I found some deplorable conditions where five and 
six people were sick at the same time with practically no 
care; in these cases it was necessary to set up beds, separate 
the patients and make them as comfortable as possible 
which I was able to do with the aid of the district nurses. 

When it became necessary to open an emergency hospital 
the use of the Elks' Club was given and a very sanitary, 
comfortable, and convenient hospital was equipped by the 
Red Cross. The hospital under the direction of the Dis- 
trict Nursing Association and the Board of Health proved 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 259 

a very efficient way of caring for many cases during the 
shortage of nurses. 

An emergency health committee, adjunct to the Concord 
Board of Health, has been formed and organized of citizens 
who did such efficient work during the epidemic, in order 
that we may be ready to cope with whatever health emer- 
gency may arise in the future. 

In compliance with the request of the Government and 
as a War measure the privilege of keeping a pig was allowed 
in the compact parts of the city. There were comparatively 
few complaints from the large number that were kept and 
upon inspection I found the use of a disinfectant advisable. 

The usual number of complaints and nuisances were 
received, inspected and conditions relieved. These com- 
plaints were largely due to dead animals, odors from pigs, 
stables and rubbish, throwing out of slops; insanitary 
plumbing, refuse and ashes in yards and general condition 
of premises. The usual weekly inspection of alley- ways 
in the rear of the business blocks has kept them free from 
objectional rubbish. 

Ninety-four milk farms were inspected and the majority 
were found in excellent condition. When necessary, im- 
provements were suggested and on second inspection I 
found the requests were complied with. 

There has been practically no building during the year 
as only thirty plumbing permits were granted and fifty- 
eight water tests were made. 

Upon inspection of the public halls it was requested that 
the toilet rooms and halls be kept in a sanitary condition. 

The water supply at Long Pond has been inspected from 
time to time and conditions were found to be excellent. 
Analysis shows the city's water to be very satisfactory. 

The appropriation for the year was $3,700 and the total 
expenditures were $3,446.82 leaving a balance of $253.18. 
The price of fumigation supplies again shows a material 
advance. During the epidemic there was a shortage owing 
to the unusual demand but we were very fortunate in having 
sufficient supply on hand to meet our needs. In the care 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of contagious disease $594.22 was expended; most cases 
requiring assistance by this department during quarantine 
were cared for at the Foster Ward, Margaret Pillsbury 
Hospital. 

One hundred and eighty dollars was received from milk 
license fees and $24.75 from the sale of fumigation supplies. 

The following tables show in detail the work of the 
department. 



health department. 261 

Financial Statement of the Board of Health 

FOR the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $1,600.00 

Salary, milk inspector, 300.00 

Fumigation supplies, 100.00 

Contagious diseases, 700.00 

Incidental expenses, 1 ,000 . 00 



Total, 


$3,700.00 


expenditures. 




Salary, sanitary officer, 


$1,600.00 


Salary, milk inspector. 


225.00 


Fumigation supplies, 


129.45 


Contagious diseases. 


594.22 


Incidental expenses. 


898.15 


Balance, 


253.18 



Total, $3,700.00 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR 1918. 

Milk license fees, $180 . 00 

Sale of fumigation supplies, 24 . 75 

Total, $204.75 



262 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom: 



«i 


Diphthe- 
ria. 


Influenza. 


Measles. 


Ophthal- 
mia neona- 
torum. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubercu- 
losis. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Venereal 
diseases. 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 


1 


1 


1 
Q 


o 


1 
Q 


i 


1 


J 




J 


Q 


1 


Q 


1 


1 


i 


2 
Q 




1 

Q 


January 


2 
4 
1 

1 
2 
1 
6 

1 

3 








4 
4 
4 
10 

20 
47 
12 






7 
3 


. 


2 
2 
2 

1 














February 


2 














2 














March. . 
























April. . . . 


















1 
1 
2 












































June . . . 


















2 

2 
2 

2 
2 

4 

4 


1 
2 
3 

3 

1 








12 
21 
5 

2 
4 




July.... 
























August . 


1 


























Septem- 
ber... 


427 
521 

241 

142 


1 

9 

2 
6 








1 














October. 
















2 

7 
5 






Novem- 
ber... 


1 












1 




4 
6 




Decem- 
ber... 






1 










5 
























Total. 


22 


3 


1331 


18 


112 1 


1 




12 




18 


25 


10 




14 




49 





HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



263 



The following table contains the number of cases of 
contagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for 
the years since and including 1890: 



s 


Ophthal- 
mia neona- 
tonim. 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 


Infan- 
tile pa- 
ralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Totals. 




6 


1 
Q 


6 


i 
1 

Q 


s 


Q 


O 


1 

Q 


o 


s 

1 

Q 


1 

o 


1 


J 


1 


S 1 

6 i 


6 


"i 

a 


1890. . 














6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
35 
55 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 
131 
30 
51 
17 
33 
30 
21 
54 
138 
22 


2 
3 
3 

7 
3 
8 
8 
1 

5 
5 
5 
2 
4 
3 
1 
2 
2 
4 
6 
1 
2 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3 


9 

7 
37 
41 
113 
44 

4 
22 

8 
99 
39 
11 

6 
39 
18 
80 
27 
26 

7 
23 
10 

8 

7 

28 
28 
26 
18 
47 
12 


3 

6 

8 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 


17 
14 
7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 
8 
14 
IS 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 
6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 
7 
8 
8 
5 
10 


5 
6 

1 
2 
3 
3 
5 
2 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 

1 
4 

3 
4 
1 
2 

1 
1 


6 

2 

2 

300 

21 

158 

452 

138 

126 

299 

476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

1168 

143 

26 

321 

687 

6 

9 

382 

414 

112 








38 

35 

59 

402 

164 

258 

526 

190 

146 

421 

562 

130 

87 

682 

116 

299 

175 

218 

157 

1350 

199 

95 

362 

763 

74 

94 

468 

610 

206 


7 


1891.. 




















9 


1892.. 




















7 


1893.. 




















q 


1894.. 




















12 


1895.. 




















19 


1896. . 




















n 


1897. . 




















4 


1898. . 




















4 


1899.. 




















7 


1900.. 














1 
4 






7 


1901.. 














1 

2 
2 




9 


1902.. 














5 


1903.. 














11 


1904.. 














4 


1905. . 














1 
1 






5 


1906. . 














1 




6 


1907. . 














3 


1908. . 




















5 


1909.. 














1 






11 


1910. . 


















2 


1911.. 




















6 


1912.. 










2 
5 
3 


1 
1 


2 






g 


1913.. 














5 


1914.. 
















2 


1915 






25 
5 
5 

49 


1 
1 




4 




9 


1916. . 


1 


1 


7 


1917. . 












3 


1918.. 


1 










1 






4 










1 





264 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Deaths Reported by Wards and Public 




Institutions. 




Ward 1, 


44 


Ward 2, 


11 


Ward 3, 


17 


Ward 4, 


55 


Ward 5, 


38 


Ward 6, 


48 


Ward 7, 


86 


Ward 8, 


22 


Ward 9, 


30 


New Hampshire State Hospital, 


216 


Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, 


74 


New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 


29 


New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 


9 


New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 


10 


New Hampshire State Prison 


4 


Emergency Hospital, (Included in Ward 4) 


7 


Deaths by Age. 




*Under 1 year, 


36 


From 1 to 5 years, 


12 


From 5 to 10 years. 


9 


From 10 to 15 years, 


5 


From 15 to 20 years, 


18 


From 20 to 30 years, 


72 


From 30 to 40 years, 


80 


From 40 to 50 years. 


83 


From 50 to 60 years. 


81 


From 60 to 70 years, 


115 


From 70 to 80 years, 


113 


From 80 to 90 years. 


58 


From 90 to 100 years, 


7 


Unknown, 


4 



Total number of deaths, 693 

'Including 10 stillbirths. 



health depaktment. 265 

Deaths During 1918 by Sex, Condition 
AND Nativity. 

Sex: 

Males, 339 

Females, 354 

Condition : 

Married, 296 

Single, 206 

Widowed, 162 

Divorced, 12 

Not stated, 17 
Nativity : 

Concord, 155 

New Hampshire, 224 

Other states, 127 

Foreign, 156 

Not stated, 31 

Causes of Death for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1918. 



Cause. 


No. of deaths. 


Accident, asphyxiation, 


3 


burns. 


1 


drowning. 


1 


probably hit by locomotive, 


1 


run over by vehicle. 


1 


smothering, 


1 


Anemia, pernicious, 


6 


Angina pectoris, 


3 


Anuria, 


1 


Aortis insufficiency. 


2 


Apoplexy, 


28 


Appendicitis, 


1 


Arthritis deformas, 


1 


Ascites, 


1 


Asthma, 


1 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cause, No. of deaths. 

Brain, 

concussion of, ^ 

Bright's disease, ^ 

Bronchitis, ^ 

1 
Cancer, 

of bowels, ^ 

breast, ^ 

colon, ^ 

duodenum, 1 

gall bladder, 1 

larynx, . ^ 

liver 2 

neck, ^ 

1 

ovary, ^ 

rectum, ^ 

skin, , ^ 

stomach, ^ 

' uterus, ° 

Cardiac dilatation, ^ 

Cholelithiasis, ^ 



Congestion of lungs, 



1 

Convulsions, 

1 

Cystitis, 

Dementia, 

Dementia, senile, 

7 
Diabetes, 

• • 1 

Diarrhea and enteritis, ^ 

o 

Diphtheria, 
Dysentery, 
Edema of brain, ^ 

lungs, ■'■ 

Embolism, 

cerebral, ^ 



pulmonary, '* 

Empyema, 
Endocarditis 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 267 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Enteritis, gastro, 3 

Epilepsy, 10 

Erysipelas, 2 

Gangrene, 2 

diabetic, 1 

Gastric ulcer, perforation of, 1 

Gumma of spinal cord, 1 

Heart, diseases of 60 

Hemiplegia, 3 

Hemorrhage of bladder, 1 

bowels, 1 

cerebral, 35 

internal, 1 

intestinal, 2 

post operative, 1 

pulmonary, 2 

Hepatitis, 1 

Hung for murder, 1 

Icterus neonatorum, 1 

Inanition, 4 

Influenza, 18 

Intestinal obstructions, 3 

Kidney disease, 1 

LaGrippe, 2 

Liver, abscess, 1 

cirrhosis, 1 

sclerosis, 1 

Lipoma retroperitoneal, 1 

Mania, 2 

Measles, 1 

Melancholia, 1 

Meningitis, acute, 3 

Meningitis, cerebral, 1 

Mitral insufficiency, 7 

Mitral regurgitation, 10 

Myocarditis, 21 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cause. 


No. of deaths. 


Nephritis, 


8 


interstitial, 


13 


parenchymatous, 


2 


Oedema pulmonary, 


1 


Paralysis, not insane. 


1 


of insane. 


12 


Paresis, 


11 


Pellagra, 


1 


Pericarditis, 


2 


Peritonitis, appendicitis, 


2 


perforating ulcer of rectum, 


1 


ulcer of stomach, 


1 


Pleurisy, 


1 


Pneumonia, 


93 


broncho, 


56 


croupons, 


1 


lobar, 


35 


hypostatic, 


1 


Ptomaine poisoning, 


1 


Premature birth. 


11 


Pyelonephritis, 


1 


Sclerosis, arterio, 


28 


Senility, 


4 


Septicemia, 


13 


Spine, concussion of, 


1 


paralysis of. 


1 


Stillborn, 


10 


Suicide, 


9 


Surgical shock, 


2 


Tabes dorsales, 


1 


Thrombosis, cerebral, 


1 


misentine, 


1 


Traumatism, 


1 


Tuberculosis, pulmonary, 


25 


Tumor, abdominal, 


1 


Uremia, 


1 



Total, 693 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 269 

Total number of deaths for the year 1918, 693, compared 
with 509 in 1917. 

Average death-rate for the year 1918, 19.90, compared 
with 15.13 in 1917. 

Total nmnber of births for the year 1918, 432, compared 
with 407 in 1917. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1918, 146, com- 
pared with 200 in 1917. 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection 
OF Milk Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 67 

Number of examinations above standard, 67 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 94 

Conditions good, 69 

Conditions fair, 17 

Conditions poor, 8 

Improvements suggested, 5 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 243 

Burial permits issued, 693 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 162 

Transit permits issued, 267 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 223 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 44 
Number of reports of contagious disease sent to State 

Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, Public 

Health and Marine Hospital Service, 52 
Number of samples of water and ice collected for 

analysis, 5 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 137 

Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 315 

Number of plumbing permits granted, 30 



270 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Number of inspections of plumbing, 58 

Number of sewers connected, 5 

Number of barber shops inspected, 21 

Number of public halls inspected, 20 

Number of stone sheds inspected, 6 

I wish to express my thanks to the Mayor and the other 
members of the Board of Health, the Aldermen and all 
the city ofl&cials for their cooperation with me in the work 
of this department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



REPORT OF JOHN KIMBALL 
PLAYGROUND. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The season of 1918 has been unusually successful on the 
John Kimball Playground. A visit to the playground on 
any Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday or Friday afternoons 
in July or August will verify this statement. The children 
of that neighborhood enjoy fully the privileges of the vic- 
trola, the folk dancing in the little pavilion, the games, the 
dressing the doll, the Red Cross work, the volley ball games, 
the sand pile for the little ones and the tennis court for the 
older ones. Miss Marion Silsby presided over the varied 
interests of the playground most acceptably, preserving 
discipline with ease and efficiency. It is remarkable what 
harmony prevails during these afternoon classes and a more 
orderly group of children would be hard to find. The doll, 
named Elizabeth Kimball, and her dainty outfit were given 
to the children at the Bethesda Home at Rumney, N. H. 

Francis O'Brien had the care of the grounds and the 
general supervision of the apparatus. 

It would be a great benefit to the playground if more 
apparatus could be purchased, if a wading pool could be 
built and more seats and awnings for the hot summer days. 
More supervision in sewing, basketry and sloyd would be 
beneficial. In fact, the establishment of a summer school 
for vocational training could be well undertaken on the 
playground. 

Appropriation, $500.00 

Expended, 500.11 



Over-appropriation, $.11 

Respectfully submitted, 

T. J. O'BRIEN, 
R. A. BROWN, 
LUELLA A. DICKERMAN. 



REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON THE SOUTH 
END PLAYGROUND. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The committee respectfully submits the following report 
for the year 1918. 

The $500 appropriated for the current expenses of the 
playground has been expended by your committee with an 
aim to give a variety of interests to the community which 
might be shared by a large number. 

The tennis court which has been in constant use was 
repaired and a second one started. 

Miss Marion Shepard, our efficient supervisor, was with 
us again this season and her services are highly appreciated 
by this committee as well as by the children. 

We paid special attention to our war gardens this year 
and placed this department in charge of Miss Luna Burbank 
During July and August, canning classes were held twice a 
week for a period of two hours; 106 quarts of vegetables 
from the gardens were canned. 

The Fourth of July parade and sports, and the exhibition 
held on the grounds on Field Day proved the interesting 
features of the season. 



south end playground. 273 

Financial Statement. 

$500.00 



Bceipts — Account of appropriation 




icpenditures: 




Salaries paid instructors, 


$145.00 


Gardens and canning, 


11.16 


Repairs to drinking fountain, 


7.10 


Repairs — courts. 


32.05 


Fourth of July and Field Day, 


49.02 


Paid on account of new tennis court, 


166.00 


Miscellaneous, 


81.91 



$492 . 24 

Balance — appropriation not expended, $7 . 76 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
ELSIE L. JOHNSON, 
FRED I. BLACKWOOD. 



18 



REPORT OF CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
work of the city physician for the year ending December 31, 
1918: 

House calls on citj^ poor, 155 

Office calls on city poor, 36 

House calls. Board of Health, 32 

Office calls. Board of Health, 17 

Vaccinations and Examinations, 145 

Operations performed, 2 

Cultures taken, 65 

Times antitoxine given, 4 

School children inspected, 200 

Calls at police station, 11 

Investigation trips taken with police, 1 

In addition to above the city physician has served as 
secretary of the Board of Health, attending practically all 
of the meetings of the board. He has also been in frequent 
conference with the sanitary officer and the other members 
of the Board of Health. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. COOK, 

City Physician. 
Concord, N. H., January 29, 1919. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 
MEASURES. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The following is a report of sealer of weights and meas- 
ures for the year ending December 31, 1918: 

Scales tested and sealed, 240 

Scales tested and condemned, 12 

Scales tested and condemned for repairs, 8 

Scales adjusted, 59 

Weights tested and sealed, 957 

Weights tested and condemned, 6 

Weights tested and condemned for repairs, 15 

Weights adjusted, 20 

Dry measures tested and sealed, 27 

Liquid measures tested and sealed, 96 

Liquid measures tested and condemned, 5 

Tape measures tested and sealed, 1 

Yard sticks tested and sealed, 6 

Gasoline pumps tested and sealed, 3 

Gasoline pumps adjusted, 1 

Note. — The reason this report shows so few gasoline 
pumps tested is because all of these pumps were tested by 
the state of New Hampshire officials in 1918. 

In many cases the local sealer was present and assisted in 

the work 

Berry baskets tested and found correct, 34 

Packages weighed, 89 

Found correct, 58 

Found overweight, 30 

Found underweight, . 1 

Piles of wood measured on request, 3 

Found correct, 1 

Found overmeasure, 1 

Found undermeasure, 1 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 

This last mentioned pile of wood was bought for one 
cord. On measurement it was found to contain 67| cubic 
feet instead of the 128 cubic feet it was supposed to contaia. 
The seller of the wood was prosecuted for violation of the 
weights and measures law. A conviction was secured in 
the Municipal Court. An appeal resulted in the case being 
tried before a jury. The jury brought in a verdict of guilt J^ 
The local sealer appeared as a witness in both of these trials. 

Twenty-six loads of coal were stopped on the street 
and asked to go to a scales (usually the City Scales) for 
reweighing. 

Of these 26 loads 12 were found to be correct weight, 8 
were overweight, and 6 were underweight. 

The overweights ranged from 20 to 160 pounds with a 
total of 480 pounds. That is, these eight buyers received 
480 pounds of coal more than they paid for. The under- 
weights ranged from 20 to 50 pounds with a total of 170 
pounds. That is, these six buyers received 170 pounds less 
than they paid for. 

On the whole it would seem that these figures tend to 
show that our coal dealers intend to give correct weight. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES H. COOK, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Concord, N. H., January 17, 1919. 
To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

I submit herewith my report to the board relative to legal 
matters in which the city was concerned during the past 
year. 

Concord Manufacturing Company v. Concord was a 
petition for the abatement of taxes on plaintiff's mill, 
situated in Ward 1. In my last report I reviewed the 
progress of the case before the Tax Commission and Supe- 
rior Court and stated that there was a likelihood that the 
petition would be withdrawn. That has subsequently been 
the case and I have had the action dismissed in the Superior 
Court. The original petition claimed that the property of 
the plaintiff was overvalued for the purposes of taxation 
more than $50,000. The petition for abatement had refer- 
ence to the tax assessed in 1914. That tax was paid under 
protest so that the city has had the use of the money. Since 
the year 1914 the company has paid on the Valuation fixed 
by the Board of Assessors. 

Hammer v. Concord was a petition for the abatement of 
taxes assessed upon the plaintiff's residence, as was Collins 
V. Coyicord. Hearings were had in these two cases before 
the Tax Commission and rulings were made in both cases 
by the Tax Commission in favor of the city. Subsequently 
I had the cases dismissed in the Superior Court. 

In my last report I outlined the proceedings in the gas rate 
case up to that time. Since then the Gas Company has 
secured certain increases with which the board is familiar. 

Another matter before the Public Service Commission in 
which I represented the city was the matter of increasing 
the rates of fares on the street railway. On the showing 
made by the company I recognized that additional revenue 
was needed by the company to pay fair wages in addition 



278 CITY OF CONCOED. 

to its fixed charges. I did oppose, however, the charging 
of two cents for transfers and in a measure was successful 
before the commission in this contention. While two cents 
is to be charged for transfers in certain cases the largest 
number of people having occasion to call for transfers will 
not be obliged to pay the additional two cents for them. 

Frank E. Tyrell has brought suit against the city for the 
death of a horse which he alleged was injured by reason 
of a defective bridge on the Shaker Road. The amount 
claimed is $400, and the case will be in order for trial at the 
spring term. 

Herbert A. Goodwin through his counsel, Nathaniel E. 
Martin, has presented a claim against the city for $392 . 90 
for injuries to his automobile at a culvert on the South Pem- 
broke Road, July 28, 1917. When Mr. Martin spoke to 
me about this matter I asked him to furnish me an item- 
ized bill which I would send to the board. This was done 
and I arranged with the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims to proceed to the place where the culvert was 
located for an inspection. The date was set for the in- 
spection but before that date arrived a considerable fall of 
snow had covered the location and made it inadvisable to 
make the inspection until spring. 

During the first part of last year in accordance with the 
ordinance prescribing my duties I revised the ordinances 
up to date and furnished the members of the board with 
annotations to be inserted in their copies of the 1912 
ordinances. 

The Legislature is now in session and I shall enter my 
name as a legislative agent for the city and inspect all bills 
introduced in the Legislature to see if the city is in any way 
concerned. I will report to the board from time to time 
any bills that have been introduced if it seems necessary to 
bring such bills to the attention of the board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALEXANDER MURCHIE, 

Solicitor. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
city and its school districts and special precincts, with the 
amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the tax 
collector for collection. 

There are no matters of appeal from taxation by this 
board now pending before the court. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
for the years from 1908 to the present time, which shows the 
increased amount spent by the city and the reason for an 
increased tax. 



280 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tabulation of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuation of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1918. 



Wahrant. 



Amount of 
warrants. 



Tax rate 
per $1,000. 



valuation of 
city and 
precincts. 



Penacook { 



State 

County 

School required by law 

City 

Extra for schools: 

Union 

[ No. 20 
[ Union* 
Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

Sewer 

Lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling. 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights. 

West Concord sewer. 




128,388.76 
1,098.25 
16,075.93 

7,500.00 

11,000.00 

3,675.00 

20,300.00 

2.200 00 

300 00 

1,255.00 

800.00 

628.00 



$12.00 



6.90 

.60 

7.40 



.24 
1.23 
1.30 

.25 
1.00 

.80 
1.80 



$20,440,315 



18,706,955 
1,733,360 
2,268,390 

14,562,810 

13,959,925 

15,476,570 

16,593.695 

1,769.865 

1,235,720 

1,298,815 

992,675 

352,525 



' Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



ASSESSORS REPORT. 



281 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city : 



Railroad. 


1915. 


1916. 


1917. 


1918. 




380 

9,935 

107 

342 

468 

27 

373 

6 

477 

72 

1,236 

8 

168 

51 

4 


357 

9,614 

107 


361 

8,991 

107 


354 




8,983 




67 






Dover, Somersworth & Rochester Street. . 
Fitchburg 


468 

27 

378 

6 

484 

72 

1,239 

8 

168 

49 

4 


468 

41 

378 

5 

444 

52 

1,316 

8 

168 

49 

3 


468 
56 




247 




18 


Nashua Street 


387 




64 




1,194 


Peterborough 


8 




166 


Suncook Valley 


49 


Wilton 


4 







282 city of concord. 

Inventory of the City of Concord. 









No. 


Valaation. 


Improved and unimproved 


land 


and 






buildings, 








$16,501,735 


Horses, 






1,068 


123,140 


Oxen, 






14 


2,100 


Cows, 






1,200 


91,890 


Other neat stock, 






207 


11,910 


Sheep, 






84 


1,045 


Hogs, 






131 


3,895 


Fowls, 






1,275 


1,140 


Carriages and automobiles, 








482,840 


Portable mills, 








2,050 


Fur-bearing animals, 








7,500 


Boats and launches, 








1,575 


Wood and lumber, 








61,350 


Stock in pubhc funds, 








458,940 


Stock in banks, 








183,425 


Money on hand, at interest, 


or OE 


L de- 






posit, 








470,460 


Stock in trade, 








1,900,550 


Milling, carding machines, and factories 






and their machinery, 








134,770 



Total, $20,440,315 

Polls, 5,485, $10,970 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector, $447,484 . 47 
Average rate per cent of taxation for all purposes, $2,135+ 



assessors' report. 283 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed, 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and on 
the real and personal estate of Concord since 1908 : 



Year. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1908 




5,289 


$12,342,190 


$277,469.52 


1909 




5,442 


12,405,465 


301,281.72 


1910 




5,576 


12,543,822 


278,464.77 


1911 




5,784 • 


12,507,847 


296,074.27 


1912 




5,691 


18,701,591 


316,117.69 


1913 




5,687 


20,842,846 


305,460.56 


1914 




5,735 


19,177,428 


316,447.67 


1915 




5,806 


20,086,789 


339,781.64 


1916 




5,779 


19,803,275 


382,352.47 


1917 




6,185 


20,110,995 


377,326.81 


1918. 

Ward 


1 


560 


$1,819,875 


$41,256.42 




2 


182 


579,775 


11,928.67 




3 


310 


1,327,540 


27,214.72 




4 


980 


3,640,165 


80,314.90 




5 


682 


4,136,430 


91,053.24 




6 


880 


2,432,865 


54,553.36 




7 


1,008 


2,959,405 


64,125.71 




8 


390 


2,751,380 


59,273.28 




9 


493 


792,880 


17,764.17 




5,485 


$20,440,315 


$447,484.47 



284 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1917 and 1918. 





Polls. 


Valuation. 


Total tax assessed. 


Wards. 
















1917. 


1918. 


1917. 


1918. 


1917. 


1918. 


Wardl 


603 


560 


$1,644,235 


$1,819,875 


$30,764.17 


$41,256.42 


Ward 2 


199 


182 


549,285 


579,775 


9,471.04 


11,928.67 


Wards 


367 


310 


1,285,830 


1,327,540 


22,163.57 


27,214.72 


Ward 4 


1,125 


980 


3,459,200 


3,640,165 


66,067.61 


80,314.90 


Wards 


801 


682 


4,464,455 


4,136,430 


84,630.45 


91,053.24 


Ward 6 


971 


880 


2,432,180 


2,432,865 


47,181.01 


54,553.36 


Ward? 


1,084 


1,008 


2,905,490 


2,959.405 


53,959.00 


64,125.71 


Wards 


467 


390 


2,625,450 


2,751,380 


48,516.55 


59,273.28 


Ward 9 


568 


493 


744,870 


792,880 


14,573.41 


17,764.17 


Totals 


6,185 


5,485 


$20,110,995 


$20,440,315 


$377,326.81 


$447,484.47 



Total warrants submitted to tax collector: 
In 1917 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list. 
Polls, 

Total, 

Iq 1918— Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 



Total, 



,272.21 

684.60 

12,370.00 

$377,326.81 

$435,671.29 

843.18 

10,970.00 

$447,484.47 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report of 
the collector of taxes to the close of business December 31, 
1918. 

Tax Levy, 1914. 

Resident hst, S315,833.74 

Additions and corrections, 1,264.43 



$317,098.17 

Non-resident list, 613 . 93 

Collected, moth account, 154.95 

Collected, interest, 1 ,092 . 53 



Cash paid treasurer, $310,459.97 

Amount of discount, 3,409.39 

Amount of abatements, 4,521 . 69 

Uncollected, 568 . 53 



$318,959.58 



$318,959.58 

Tax Levy, 1915. 
Resident hst, $339,215 . 46 

Additions and corrections, 715.41 

$339,930.87 

Non-resident list, 566 . 18 

Collected, moth account, 193 . 93 

Collected, interest, 1,176.98 



$341,867.96 
Cash paid treasurer, $317,745.31 

Amount of discount, 3,126.97 

Amount of abatements: 

Ordinary, $3,274.71 

By order of court, 16,662.76 



19,937.47 

Uncollected, 1,058.21 

$341,867.96 



286 city of concord. 

Tax Levy, 1916. 

Resident list, $370,029 . 62 

Amount of poll taxes, 11,558.00 

Additions and corrections^ 386 . 78 



$381,974.40 

Non-resident list, 764 . 85 

Collected, moth account, 281.05 

Collected, interest, 1,289 . 15 



$384,309.45 



Cash paid treasurer, $375,013.09 

Amount of discount, 3,887.86 

Amount of abatements, 3,667.76 

Uncollected, 1,740.74 



$384,309.45 



Tax Levy, 1917. 

Resident list, $364,272 . 21 

Amount of poll taxes, 12,370.00 

Additions and corrections, 289.49 



$376,931.70 

Non-resident list, 684 . 60 

Collected, moth account, 157.00 

Collected, interest, 1,162.77 



$378,936.07 



Cash paid treasurer, $367,872. 15 

Amount of discount, 3,753.29 

Amount of abatements, 2,615 . 24 

Uncollected, 4,695.39 



$378,936.07 



TAX collector's REPORT. 



287 



Tax Levy, 1918. 

Resident list, $435,671 . 29 

Amount of poll taxes, 10,970 . 00 

Additions and corrections, 468.41 





$447,109.70 


Non-resident list, 


843 . 18 


Collected, interest, 


102.25 




$448,055 . 13 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$396,900.00 


Amount of discount, 


4,098.59 


Amount of abatements 


1,616.65 


Cash on hand. 


833.51 


Uncollected, 


44,606.38 




•ffiAjiQ nf\f\ 1 "^ 




^^'±o,U00 . lo 


Taxes sold the City 


of Concord in the office of the col- 



lector for redemption: 

1912. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



$1,186.96 Paid treasurer, 

123.92 Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



$1,310.88 



1913. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1,811.71 Paid treasurer, 

130.94 Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



[,942.65 



1914. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



[,228.92 Paid treasurer, 

50.56 Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



$975.06 

45.31 

290.51 

$1,310.88 

$1,563.51 

35.21 

343.93 

$1,942.65 

$698.09 

514.52 

75.90 



[,279.48 



[,279.48 



288 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Taxes sold the City of Concord, N. H., for redemption 
as turned over by Mr. Ladd, former collector: 



For the years 1902 and 1903, 
For the year 1904, 
For the year 1905, 
For the year 1906, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1907. 



$539.65 
39.36 

S579.01 



Paid treasurer. 
Uncollected, 



$134.34 
129.45 
207.96 
210.53 



$91.15 

487.86 

$579.01 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1908. 



$258.14 
34.12 

$292.26 



Paid treasurer, 
Uncollected, 



51 
205.75 

$292.26 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1909. 

$402.20 Paid treasurer, 
29.90 Uncollected, 



$432.10 



$168.05 
264.05 



$432.10 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1910. 

$837 . 17 Paid treasurer, 
40.77 Uncollected, 



$877.94 



$128.74 
749 . 20 

$877.94 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1911. 

34 Paid treasurer, $162.40 

43.00 Uncollected, 363.94 



$526.34 



$526.34 





TAX collector's REPORT. 


289 




1915. 




Amount, 


$687 . 48 Paid treasurer, 


$744.41 


Interest, 


56.93 






$744.41 


$744.41 




1916. 




Amount, 


$5 1 9 . 09 Paid treasurer, 


$491.81 


Interest, 


24.05 Unsettled, 


51.33 



Amount, 
Interest, 



$543.14 

1917. 

. 76 Paid treasurer, 
10.17 Unsettled, 



$548 . 14 



?379 . 24 
521.69 



$900.93 $900.93 

Respectfully submitted, 

SETH R. DOLE, 

Collector. 



10 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY MARSHALL. 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Honorable Board of 
Aldermen: 
Gentlemen: I hereby submit to your honorable board 
my tenth annual report of the police department for the 
year ending December 31, 1918. 

ROSTER. 

City Maeshal, 

George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant City Marshal, 
Victor I. Moore. 

Captain, 
Samuel L. Bacheider. 

Sergeant, 
Christopher T. Wallace. 

Regular Patrolmen. 

Samuel Rodd, Harry L. Woodward, 

Irving B. Robinson, Fred N. Marden, 

Geo. H. Silsby, Charles H. Guilbault, 

Edward J. McGirr, Frank B. McDaniels, 

Joseph E. Silva, John B. Long, 

James J. Halligan, Axel Swanson, 
Walter D. Gaskell. 

Chauffeurs. 
Earl B. Gaskell. 
Frank B. McKenna. Suspended April 4, discharged May 

17. 
G. Cleveland Percy. Resigned December 30, 1918. 



police department. 291 

Patrolmen Resigned. 
Edward J. McGirr, January 29, 1918. 

Frank B. McDaniels, July 25, 1918. 
Charles H. Guilbault, September 21, 1918. 

Special Reserve Officers. 

CAPTAIN. 

Thomas P. Davis. 

Willie A. Little, Wilhe A. Flanders, 

Charles A. Kelley, Cleveland H. Curtis, 

*George G. Allen, Elmer Tremblay, 

Joseph A. Flanders, John McGirr, 

Frank S. Rogers, Nelson Forest, 

Arthur H. Reese, Thomas M. Harrison, 

Jonas Welcome, Walter H. Beane, 

Frank E. Brooks, Joseph Greenough. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Total appropriation for 1918, $28,236 . 61 

Total expenditures for 1918, 26,775 . 07 



Unexpended balance, 


$1,461.54 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




Salaries, regulars, 


$21,998.18 


Salaries, specials, 


973 . 15 


Fuel, city. 


914.53 


Fuel, Penacook, 


218.45 


Horse-hire, Penacook, 


7.50 


Helmets and buttons. 


41.31 


Lights, city, 


297.20 


Lights, Penacook, 


29.61 


Police telephone signal 


243.36 


Incidentals, 


1,270.94 


Automobile supplies, 


780.84 



),775.07 
•Resigned. 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cash received for ofl&cers fees, etc., and paid 

to City Treasurer, $1,320 . 12 

ARRESTS. 

1909, 281 

1910, 586 

1911, 1076 

1912, 1366 

1914, 1556 

1915, 1850 

1916, 1599 

1917, 1106 

Whole Number of Arrests and Causes for the 

Year 1918. 

Total, 493 

Brought before the court, 289 

Discharged by the court, 1 

Released, 203 

Adultery, 2 

Assault, 9 

Aggravated assault, 2 

Breaking, entering and larceny, 15 

Bastardy, 2 

Drunkenness, 208 

Deserters, 3 

Escapes from State Hospital, 4 

Arrests for out-of-town police, 31 

Insane, 6 

Simple larceny, - 19 

Grand larceny, 2 

Safe keeping, 103 

Bound over to Superior Court, 13 

Committed to jail, 4 

Committed to House of Correction, 92 

Committed to State Hospital, 7 

Fines paid, 115 

Mittimus not to issue till called for, 14 



POLICE DEPARTMENT, 293 

Appealed, 5 

Nol pressed, 5 

Sentence suspended, 39 

Fighting, 2 

Non support, 16 

Operating automobile while drunk, 3 

Overspeeding automobile, 6 

Cruelty to animals, 1 

Idle persons, 3 

Fornication, 8 

Forgery, 4 

Hunting without a license, 5 

Suspicious persons, 1 

Held for U. S. Department of Justice, 1 

Cases continued nisi, 2 

Fugitives from justice, 1 

Selling renovated butter, 1 

Selling cider, 1 

Catching short fish, 2 

Keeping liquor for sale, 3 

Drinking liquor on train, 1 

Dog running at large, 21 

Cruelty to children, 1 

Desertion, 1 

Firing cannon in street, 9 

Bringing liquor into the state, 10 
Employing boy under 16 j^ears to work after 

7 p. m., 3 
Slackers, 

Having a still in his possession. 
Selling wood (short measure). 
Gambling, 
Runaway girl, 
Calling offensive names, 
Violating the pure food law. 
Taking an automobile without leave, 

Held for U. S. Marshal, 6 

Vagrancy, 1 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number of store windows found open, 41 

Persons given medical aid at station, 7 

Doors found unlocked at night, 615 
Times doors tried at night, 842,660 

Lodgers, 319 

Called to quell disturbances, 38 

Stray teams found, 13 

Ambulance calls, 316 

Emergency calls for ambulance, 22 

Emergency calls for pulmotor, 2 
Calls on police signal, 60,418 

Corpses taken from the river, 2 

Fires reported to jBre station, 7 

Dogs run over by automobiles, 5 

Complaints of dogs and horses in streets, 21 

Complaints of boys riding wheels on sidewalks, 21 

Complaints of boys coasting on sidewalks, 16 

Complaints of boys breaking windows, 31 

Complaints of boys breaking electric lights, 11 

Complaints of animals reported to S. P. C. A.. 13 

Officers assisting at drowning accidents, 5 

Destitute persons picked up, 2 

Lights found out and reported to Electric Co., 629 

Merchants notified of trouble in stores at night, 23 

Complaints of glass in fire alarm boxes broken, 17 

Fire alarms rung in by police, 2 

Suicides, 3 

Juveniles taken home after 9.30 p. m.. 8 

Teams run into by automobiles, 3 

Runaway horses caught, 1 
Old people strayed away from home and taken home, 2 

Runaway children caught, 3 

Officers attending fires, 52 

Complaints about dogs, 21 

Unlicensed dogs killed, 30 

Investigations damage done by dogs, 5 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 295 

Automobile accidents investigated, 7 

Dangerous wires reported, 13 

Officers called to remove sick persons, 7 

Officers called to remove dead persons, 14 

Officers called to remove injured persons, 30 

Lost children found and taken home, 18 

Holes in bridges reported to highway department, 11 

Persons asphyxiated by gas, 2 

Persons injured by automobiles, 9 

Persons found dead in their rooms, 8 

Persons found dead in the streets, 2 

Persons injured in auto accidents, 5 

Complaints about auto lights, 18 

Persons killed in railroad yard, 1 

Complaints investigated, 495 

Accidents investigated, 6 

Dangerous limbs reported to highway department, 8 

Burst water pipes reported to tenants, 1 

Leaks in water pipes reported to water department, 6 

Leaks in gas pipes investigated, 5 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge and Stickney Avenue. 

South Main and West Streets. 

South Main and Concord Streets. 

South Main and Pleasant Streets. 

North Main and School Streets. 

North Main and Park Streets. 

Washington, between North Main and State 

Streets. 

North Main and Church Streets. 

North State and Penacook Streets. 

Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 

West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 

Penacook (square). 

Center, opposite Union Street. 

South and Perlej^ Streets. 

Broadway, corner Carter Street. 



Box 1. 


Box 2. 


Box 3. 


Box 4. 


Box 5. 


Box 6. 


Box 7. 


Box 8. 


Box 9. 


Box 10. 


Box 11. 


Box 12. 


Box 13. 


Box 14. 


Box 15. 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 16. Center and Pine Streets. 

Box 17. Pleasant and South Streets. 

Box 18. School and Giles Streets. 

Box 19. Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

CONCLUSION. 

I wish to thank His Honor, the Mayor, and the Honorable 
Board of Aldermen for their courteous treatment and sup- 
port. I also extend my thanks to all others who have 
assisted us during the past year. To the officers of the 
department I extend my appreciation for their hearty co- 
operation and faithfulness. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 297 



In Memoriam 

JUDGE ALLEN CHESTER CLARK 

Died September 23, 1918. 



REPORT OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT. 



To His Honor, the Mayor, and the Board of Aldermen: 

I am transmitting herewith a statement of the receipts 
and disbursements of the Municipal Court for the year 
ending December 31, 1918, prepared by Mrs. Henrietta P. 
Stanley, clerk pro tem of the court. 

This statement, however, does not include money re- 
ceived by the court in non-support cases and disbursements 
for the benefit of dependents, and the importance which 
that work assumed, under the direction of the late Judge 
Clark, renders a detailed statement of such receipts and 
disbursements of interest. 

The following figures show the amount of money handled 
by the court, in this way, during the current year to have 
been nearly double that of the preceding year. 





Non-Support. 












Receipts. 










ived from 1917 balance. 








S5 


.20 


In No. 454 


(District Court Docket), 


145, 


.00 


Juvenile 


Court 


matter 


by 


agree- 






ment, 










90 


.00 


District ' 


Court 


matter 


by 


agree- 






ment, 










24 


.00 


Municipal Court matter by 


agree- 






ment, 










85 


.00 


No. 765, 










123 


.00 


No. 1721, 










12 


.00 


No. 1785, 










149 


.50 


No. 1902, 










114 


.00 


No. 1972, 










15 


.00 


No. 2203, 










245 


,00 


No. 2297, 










559 


.35 



MUNICIPAL COURT, 299 

No. 2326, $35.00 

No. 2426, 390 . 00 

No. 2486, 135.00 



Total, $2,127.05 
Expenditures. 

Paid Mrs. Fred Spoffard, board, $81 . 00 

Wife of respondent in No. 2486, 105 . 00 

John Roach, rent, 9 . 00 

Mrs. Warren Hall, board, 123 . 00 

Wife of respondent in No. 2297, 559 . 35 

Mrs. Bert Brown, board, 21 .00 

Arthur H. Britton, commissioner, 25.00 
Rev. Rufus P. Gardner, superintendent, 

board, 238.00 

William W. FHnt, treasurer, board, 90 . 00 

Wife of respondent in No. 1972, 28 . 00 

Wife of respondent in No. 2326, 14 . 00 

Mrs. Anna Tarrant, board, 21 .00 

Mrs. Reuben Gate, board, 76.50 

Mrs. D. E. Lewis, board, 68.50 

St. Joseph's Boys' Home, board, 118.00 
Rev. Rufus P. Gardner, superintendent, 

board, 137.00 

Wife of respondent in No. 2426, 378 . 00 
Edward S. Cummings, D.D.S., dental 

treatment, 12.00 

Net balance on hand, 22.70 



Total, $2,127.05 

In the untimely death of Judge Clark the community has 
lost a loyal citizen, the bar of the city a useful and respected 
member and the Municipal Court a painstaking and con- 
scientious justice. He administered the affairs of the court 
with absolute impartiality and fairness, and gave much of 
his time and thought in dealing with the problems which 



300 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



arise out of the domestic relation. He was a close student 
of criminology and was ever ready to render assistance to 
the unfortunates who came before him. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY J. BROWN, 
Justice. 



MUNICIPAL COURT. 301 

REPORT OF HENRIETTA P. STANLEY, CLERK PRO 
TEM, MUNICIPAL COURT. 



Receipts. 




Received for fines and costs, 


$2,038.36 


sundry fees, 


30.76 


Total. 




Expenditures. 




Paid for fees of officers and witnesses, 




and complaints and 




warrants, 


$558.03 


State of New Hampshire, 




fines: 




G. A. Mclntire, commis- 




sioner, fish and game, 


150.00 


OHn H. Chase, commis- 




sioner, motor vehicles, 


270.00 


postage, printing, and other 




supplies, 


44.00 


clerk's bond. 


3.00 


annotations, 


11.50 


probation officer, services 




and expenses, 


125.62 


special justices, 


168.00 


Balance paid Isaac Hill, treasurer, 


738.97 



},069.12 



Total, $2,069.12 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRIETTA P. STANLEY, 

Clerk, pro tern. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY 
COMMISSIONERS. 



The work at the cemeteries varies but little each year — 
care of the grounds — grading new sections as needed, mak- 
ing the interments as they come. The interments have 
been 270, the largest of any single year. The chapel has 
been used 12 times. No new sections have been graded. 
One section has been regraded to be known as the "Perpet- 
ual Care Block" the price of lots as sold to be sufficient to 
make them for ''Perpetual Care Lots." A larger appro- 
priation is needed for Blossom Hill Cemetery, as the work 
increases each year, and the increased cost of labor and 
materials add largely to the year expenses, and the income 
has been very prudently used the last year. 

The cemetery has been presented with a beautiful granite 
monument with a statue by Mrs. Mary C. Cummings, as a 
memorial for her late husband, Hon. George A. Cummings, 
who was for several years mayor of the city, and with the 
desire to add to the beautifying of the cemetery. 

The expenses for the year have been $12,109.80. The 
income from the various sources has been $11,259.20, 
leaving a deficit of $850.60. The Old North and Minot 
cemeteries have both been kept in their usual excellent con- 
dition. There have been 18 burials the past year. The 
income from the various sources has been $767.21 and the 
expenses $753.19, leaving a surplus of $14.02. The building 
of a new fence is a matter that cannot much longer be 
delayed with safety. 

HON. CHAS. J. FRENCH, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
FRANK J. PILLSBURY, 
C. G. REMICK, 
J. E. ROBERTSON, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 
E. A. MOULTON, Secretary. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



303 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Superintendent's financial statement for year ending 
December 31, 1918. 

Receipts. 



Appropriation for 1918, 


$3,845.00 




Income permanent fund, 


1,283.28 




Income trust fund, 


1,431.50 




One-half sale of lots, 


1,781.12 


$8,340.90 






Collections : 




Burials, 


$1,484.82 




Care of lots, 


475.05 




Labor, 


430.18 




Foundations, 


484.25 




Rent, 


44.00 


$2,918.30 






Total receipts, 


$11,259.20 


Dishursementi: 


!. 




Deficit 1916 and 1917, 


$2,343.15 




Pay-rolls, 


8,928.52 




Supplies, 


813.13 




Salary of secretary, 


25.00 


$12,109.80 







Deficit oft'set by new work ordered by 

commissioners, $850 . 60 

Miscellaneous Data. 
Total receipts for sale of lots, $3,562.25. 
Total number of burials for year 1918 was 270. 
Total number of times the tomb was used during the year, 

96. 
Total number of times the chapel was used during the year, 
12. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. N. HAMMOND, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



To the City Council: 

The park commissioners present herewith their report for 
the year ending December 31, 1918. 

Receipts. 

General appropriation, $4,000 . 00 
Less unexpended, 2 . 56 

Total receipts, $3,997.44 

Expenditures. 
Salary of superintendent, twelve months, $1,300.00 



W^HITE S PARK. 




Paid for labor, 


$854.42 


labor on ice, 


128.75 


labor on gypsy moths, 


150.00 


W. S. Dole, grain, 


62.90 


E. H. Runnells, teaming. 


72.55 


H. A. Trojano, teaming. 


7.00 


M. E. Clifford & Co., labor and 


supplies, 


55.79 


Standard Oil Co., gasoline.. 


7.55 


Thompson & Hoague, 


250.81 


money paid out by Mr 


'. 


Atkinson, 


34.20 


E. C. Paige, use of horse, 


24.00 


Home & Hall, 


1.10 


ROLLINS PARK. 




Paid for labor, 


$584.75 


W. S. Dole, grain, 


146.88 


Thompson & Hoague, 


27.46 



1,649.07 



759.08 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 305 





SMALL 


PARKS. 




Fiske Park, 






$44.39 


Bradley Park, 






48.03 


Court House Park, 






24.43 


Ridge Park, 






24.74 


Pecker Park, 






66.38 


West Garden, 






61.19 


State Street Park, 






15.13 


J. E. Quimby, taking 


down ti 


•ee, 


5.00 



$289.29 
$3,997.44 

The appropriation is just about enough to keep the parks 
in order without attempting to make many improvements. 
The gasoHne lawn mower purchased was quite a help, as 
labor was scarce. 

Nothing has been done towards remodeling the West 
Garden. This ought to come before the park commissioners 
this season. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, Mayor, ex-officio. 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
' GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 

Commissioners. 



20 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, hcenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1918: 

From fees of all kinds, $415.85 

hack and job team licenses, 92.50 

employment bureau license, 10 . 00 

pawnbroker's license, 25 . 00 

bowling alley and pool table licenses, 350 . 00 

theatre licenses, 7 . 00 

dog licenses, 1,504.58 

county poor, Merrimack County, 14,218 . 95 
dependent soldiers, Merrimack County, 1,885.58 

refund, treasurer's bond, 75.00 

junk dealers' licenses, 160.00 

druggist's permits to sell liquors, 7 . 00 

state primary, 104.00 

rent, Bektash Temple, 25 . 00 

land sold Mrs. A. C. Banfill, 11 . 25 

old junk sold, 10.73 

dogs and cats, humane disposal, 8 . 75 

old lumber. Cooper place, 2 . 00 

Loudon, aid Cora Newton, 10.00 

Bradford, aid Mrs. A. Bailey, 27 . 20 

Littleton, aid Matilda Plante, 56.00 

Pembroke, aid M. Jenness, 319.05 



$19,325.44 

The foregoing amount has been paid into the city treasury. 
Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FIFTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVERSEER 
OF THE POOR. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the fifty-first annual 
report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards^One 
and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1918: 





City 


Poor. 






Appropriation, 










$3,300.00 


Paid groceries. 








$558.60 




fuel. 








236.99 




rents, 








308.00 




care children. 








488.00 




board and care. 








1,018.70 




medicine. 








30.55 




shoes and clothing. 






83.45 




miscellaneous. 


• 






27.57 


$2,751.86 






Wood, city wood yard. 










257.50 




$3,009.36 




County 


Poor 


, 




Paid groceries, 








$3,177.67 




milk, 








452.20 




fuel. 








825.35 




rents, 








3,401.50 




care children. 








2,024.50 




board and care, 








2,116.00 




shoes and clothing. 






430.10 





308 CITY OF CONCORD, 



Paid burials, 

miscellaneous, 
transient account. 






$194.00 
17.20 
16.55 


$12,655.07 
1,528.50 


Wood, city wood yard. 










$14,183.57 


Total amount paid for 


aid to poor, 






117,192.93 


Dependent Soldiers, 


County 


■, 




Paid groceries, 
milk, 
fuel, 
rents, 

board and care, 
miscellaneous, 






$260.89 

57.42 

224.09 

270.00 

590.00 

2.28 


$1,404.68 
301.50 


Wood, city wood yard, 







$1,706.18 
Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF TRUST 
FUNDS. 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, )■ Trustees. 

ISAAC HILL, J 



Receipts. 




1918. 




Jan. 1. To balance from 1917, 


$2,593.50 


Dec. 31. ^Income Mary D. Hart Trust, 


12.00 


George G. Fogg Trust, 


12.00 


Seth Eastman Trust, 


5.00 


Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 


7.00 


Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 


35.00 


J. W. & E. J. Little Trust, 


6.00 


Hiram B. Tebbits Trust, 


8.00 


J. B. & Olivia B. Abbott 




Trust, 


7.00 


L. W. James Trust, 


1.06 


George S. Little Trust, 


1.49 


C. E. Scorer Trust, 


2.12 


Seth K. Jones Trust, 


12.00 


J. Eastman Pecker Trust, 


14.00 


Note, City of Concord, 




N. H., $52,176.43 at 




3^%, 


1,826.17 


Sundry trust funds de- 




posited in Merrimack 




County Savings Bank — 




$11,271.61, 


375.55 


P. B. Cogswell Public Li- 




brary Trust, 


85.90 


Thomas G. Valpey Public 




Library Trust, 


20.00 



40 


.00 


40 


.00 


133 


.54 


23 


.00 


61 


.87 


125 


.00 


25 


.00 


.St, 80 


.00 



310 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dec. 31. Income G. Parker Lyon Public 

Library Trust, $40.00 

Franklin Pierce Public Li- 
brary Trust, 
Abial Walker Trust, 
Joseph Hazeltine Public 

Library Trust, 
Seth K. Jones Trust, 
Katharine P. & Douglas 

Rollins Trust, 
Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 
David Osgood Trust, 
Countess of Rumford Trust, 

$5,592.20 

Expenditures. 
1918. 
Mar. 26. By paid Julia Dagnon Income Trust, $7.25 

Edmund H. Brown, treasurer, 4 . 00 

Edmund H. Brown, account 

Woodlawn Cemetery, 106 . 75 

H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 
account Minot Enclosure 
Trust Funds, 105.00 

City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for 
care of lots in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, 1,430.94 

City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for 
care of lots in Old North 
Cemetery, 283.25 

City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for 
care of lots in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, 102.25 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 311 

Mar. 26. By paid City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced 
for care of lots in Old Fort 
Cemetery, $5 . 50 

City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for 
care of lots in Millville 
Cemetery, 46 . 50 

City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for 
care of lots in West Concord 
Cemetery, 36.00 

City Treasurer, income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for 
care of lots in Soucook 
Cemetery, 6 . 50 

George W. Waters, account of 
labor, trust lots Calvary 
Cemetery, 72 . 62 

City Treasurer, income P. B. 

Cogswell Trust, 85 . 90 

City Treasurer, income 

Thomas G . Valpey Trust, 20 . 00 

City Treasurer, income G. 

Parker Lyon Trust, 40.00 

City Treasurer, income Frank- 
lin Pierce Trust, 40.00 

City Treasurer, income Abial 

Walker Trust, 40.00 

City Treasurer, income Joseph 

Hazeltine Trust, 133 . 54 

City Treasurer, income Seth 

K. Jones Trust, 17.00 



312 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mar. 26. By paid City Treasurer, inconie Kath- 
arine P. & Douglas Rollins 
Trust, $61.87 

City Treasurer, income Sam- 
uel C. Eastman Trust, 125 . 00 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 
account of Seth K. Jones 
Monument Fund, 6 . 00 

Dec. 31. By paid Rev. George A. Demers, treas- 
urer, income David Osgood 
Trust, 25.00 

Margaretta L. Blake, treas- 
urer, income Countess of 
Rumford Trust, 80.00 

By balance, 2,711.33 

$5,592.20 



TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 



Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1918, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied to 
the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1918, 80.00 

Paid Margaretta L, Blake, treasurer of the 

society, 80 . 00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200 . 00 

Balance income from last year, $395 . 79 

Income received, 1918, 23.80 

$419.59 



Paid Rev. George A. Demers, treas- 
urer, $25.00 
Income on hand, January 1, 1919, 394.59 



$419.59 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank; income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



314 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogawell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase of books 
of a biographical, historical and scientific character, and the books relating to science 
shall be those that give the latest developments and discoveries by scientific persons 
from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1918, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85 . 90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500 . 00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145 . 00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1918, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40 . 00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1918, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500 . 00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500 . 00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1918, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20 . 00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent, bond, 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1918, 133 . 54 

Paid into the cit}^ treasury, 133 . 54 



TRUST FUNDS. 315 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the City of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, the 
income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery in neat and orderly condition; six dollars each year to be deposited in some 
savings institution to create a monument fund; and the balance of the income to be 
expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord Public Library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1918, 35.00 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6 . 00 

Paid to City Treasurer for Public 

Library, 17.00 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$35 . 00 

Capital invested in City of Concord 3^ per cent. bond. 

SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones Trust. The 
entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new monument on 
his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1918, $516.41 
From S. K. Jones Trust, 6 . 00 

I ncome received , 1918, 20 . 52 

$542.93 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abbic P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by the 
superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of the burial 
lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of the duly appointed officials, 
or members of the Minot Cemetery Association. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1918, 105 . 00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 3| per cent.) with City of Concord, in 
general account. 



316 CITY OF CONCORD. 

JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows; So much of income as is necessary to be used for the 
care of burial lot numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove Cemetery, East 
Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be added to piincipal till same 
amounts to $10,000, then the balance of income accruing each year after paying for 
care of said lot and monument, to be expended under the direction of the mayor for the 
general care and improvement of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $5,230.40 
Keceived from income of fund, 1918, 209.32 

$5,439.72 



Paid for care of lot, $14.00 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1919, 5,425.72 



,439.72 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $2,191 . 88 
Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 1,589.84 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,644.00 

KATHERINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST. 
Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital, $1,500.00 

Income received, 1918, 61.87 

Paid Isaac Hill, city treasurer, 61.87 

Invested in second converted U. S. Liberty Loan 4j per 
cent, bonds. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN TRUST. 

Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign languages for the Public 
Library. 

Capital, $1,250.00 

Income received, 1918, 125.00 

Paid Isaac Hill, city treasurer, 125.00 

Invested in twenty-five shares United Gas Improvement 
Company stock, par value $50 per share. 

WILLIAM M. CHASE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the purchase of books 
on historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational subjects. 

Capital, January 1, 1919, $1,000.00 

Invested in Fourth IT. g. Liberty Loan 4j per cent. bond. 



TRUST FUNDS. 317 

I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the 
hands of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find 
such trust funds invested and the income thereof for the 
year 1918 accounted for as shown by the books of the 
trustees kept for that purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



337 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts As Custodian of Special 

Funds. 

blossom hill cemetery fund. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $35,467.76 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1918, 1,781.12 

Received from income of fund, 1918, 1,296 . 62 

$38,545.50 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $1,296.62 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1919 . 37,248 . 88 



,545.50 



Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds, $2,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 14,151.97 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 7,096.91 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings 

Bank, 10,000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 4,000.00 



$37,248.88 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 351 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase of the 
fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old North 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $815 . 00 
Received from income of fund, 32 . 60 » 

$847.60 



Credited City of Concord, general ac- 
count, $32 . 60 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, 815.00 



$847 . 60 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



WEST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation of 
West Concord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $661.11 
Unexpended income on hand, January 

1, 1918, 399.89 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1918, 12.50 

Received from income of fund, 1918, 42.44 

$1,115.94 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $42.44 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1919, 673.61 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1919, 399 . 89 



.,115.94 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 



352 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of East Con- 
cord Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $337 .50 
Unexpended income on hand, January 

1, 1918, 382.01 

Received from income of fund, 1918, 28.75 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1918, 10.00 

$758.26 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $28 . 75 

Unexpended income, January 1, 

1919, 382.01 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1919, 347.50 



$758.26 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New 
Hampshire Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of interested 
parties, and by the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale of lots. 
Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $2,143 .40 

Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1918, 473.40 

Received from income of fund, 1918, 105.69 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1918, 7.50 

$2,729.99 



Capital, January 1, 1919, $2,150.90 

Unexpended income, January 1, 

1919, ^ 473.40 



Capital and income, January 1, 1919, $2,624.30 
Credited City of Concord, general 

account, 105.69 



,729.99 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,345.99 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,278.31 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 353 

SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 
This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation of 
Soucook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $26.88 
Received from income of fund, 1918, .74 

$27.62 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account, $ . 74 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1919, 26.88 



$27.62 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and authorizing 
loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, 
the conditions of which have already been fulfilled. There is still outstanding one bond 
of $300 which matures October 1, 1919. The presumption is that this bond will be 
paid from taxes assessed upon the property of the precinct. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1918, $27.90 

Income received, 1918, 1.08 

$28.98 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1919, $28.98 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 

PENACOOK SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the Penacook sewer precinct, and authorizing loans 
on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, which pro- 
vided that the following amounts should be raised annually upon the taxable property 
of the precinct for the purpose of paying the bonds as they mature, viz. : 

$500 annually for six years from July 1, 1914. 

$500 annually for three years from October 1, 1915. 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1918, $440.09 

Income received, 1918, 17.60 

$457.69 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1919, $457.69 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 

23 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS SINKING FUND. 

Established by authority of an ordinance of the Board of Aldermen passed June 11, 
1917. Principal and interest to be used in the reduction of the bonded indebtedness of 
the water-works system at the discretion of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1918, $15,000.00 
Added to fund, 1918, 20,846 . 00 

$35,846.00 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1919, $35,846.00 

Invested in City of Concord, N. H., 

4% sewer refunding bonds, $5,000 . 00 

Invested in U. S. First Liberty Loan 

converted 4i% bonds, 10,000 . 00 

Invested in U. S. Third Liberty 

Loan 41 % bonds, 10,000 . 00 

Invested in U. S. Fourth Liberty 

Loan 4J% bonds, 10,000 . 00 

Invested in U.S. War Savings Certif- 
icates, issue of 1918, 846 . 00 

$35,846 . 00 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS SINKING FUND INCOME ACCOUNT. 



Balance of income, 1917, $267.16 

Income received, 1918, 457.45 



$724.61 



Invested in U. S. Second Liberty 
Loan, converted, 4j% bonds, two 
at $100 each, $193.52 

Invested in U. S. Third Liberty 
Loan 4i% bonds, three at $100 
each, 288.69 

Invested in U. S. Fourth Liberty 

Loan 4i% bonds, 200.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 42.40 



$724.61 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 355 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are 
paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made 
with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
8p>ecified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1918. 

William R. Dudley estate, burial $5 . 00 

Mary R. Cummings estate, burial, 5.00 

J, W. Drew estate, care, 4.00 

LaForest C. Perry estate, burial, 5 . 00 

J. R. Caswell, care, 1 . 50 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 10.00 

C. W. Lane, care, 1.50 

E. D. Clough, care, 5.50 

Mary E. Rankin, care, 2.00 

Mrs. J. C. Ordway, care, 2.00 

Mrs. V. C. Hastings, care, 1.00 

George H. Wilkins estate, burial, 5 . 00 

A. N. Lehtinan estate, burial, 13.00 

E. Carter estate, burial, 5.00 

Sigrid A. Kirkland estate, burial, 11.00 

Adelia F. Tenney estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Alice Newbold estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Robbins (infant), burial, .50 

Sarah J. Harriott estate, burial, 9.00 

Emma F. Jacobs estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Ingar Hokinson estate, burial, 8.00 

Irene Dudley estate, burial, 4.00 

Annie Bowman estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Harold Cheney, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. 0. W. Durrell, care, 1.50 

Herbert Bowman, lot 15, block BB, 30 . 00 

Mary R. Cummings, lot 43, block Y, 54 . 00 
Johanna C. Madisen, lot 17, block 

BB, 42.00 



356 CITY OF CONCORD, 

A. F. Tandy, care, $2.00 

Frank J. Kelley, labor, 35.90 

George W. Waters, labor, 2 . 00 

J. A. Dahlfred, care, 1.00 

Ada Aspinwall, care, 1.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

E. K. George, care, 2.00 

John Swenson estate, burial, 12.00 

Mary J . Lake, lot 69, block AA, 79 . 20 

Arthur W. Dow, lot 79, block BB, 30.00 

William M. Sewell, care, 8.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

George Lincoln, care, 2.00 

Helen H. Coffin, care, 2.00 

Newbold, care, 1.00 

T. H. Dunstane, rent, 20.00 

G. W. Waters, labor, 5.00 

J. Normandeau, labor, 3.00 

Ada Fuller, care, 1 . 50 

C W. Bunker, care, 1 . 50 

Mary N. Giles estate, burial, 7.00 

Maria Merrill estate, burial, 7.00 

Ida P. Hammill estate, burial, 6.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

J. Normandeau, labor, 1.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

A. G. McAlpine, foundation, 68.10 

H. Chaplin, care, 1.00 

Christina McBain estate, burial, 6.00 

William Fraser estate, burial, 10 . 00 

Sarah J. Fraser estate, burial, 10.00 

Georgiana S. Caverly estate, burial, 8.00 

Alice E. Locke estate, burial, 6.00 

Richard C. Fellows (infant), burial, 1.50 
Michael Joseph (infant), grave and 

burial, 7 . 00 

William H. Kittrell estate, burial, 7.00 

Marshall C. Evans estate, burial, 6 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 357 

Alfred P. Lake estate, burial, $6.00 
Delmar S. Follansbee estate, burial, 6.00 
Lucretia A. Danforth estate, burial, 6.00 
New England Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 20.00 
Lula E. Hooper estate, burial, 6.00 
Frank Moulton, care, 2.50 
James W. Hammill and Ellis C. Page, 

lot 59, block Z, 96.00 

Ferdinand D. Giles, lot 29, block BB, 42.00 
Alexander H. Matson, west half lot 

69, block V, 100.00 

Albert M. Gorham, lot 83, block BB, 30.00 
Georgiana P. Kittrell, lot 88, block 

BB, 30.00 

Walter W. Caverly, lot 42, block BB, 42 . 00 

Ernest A. Hartford, lot 102, block BB, 54 . 00 
Charles H. Baker, addition to lot 98, 

north side, block P, 14 . 40 

Joseph A. Miller, lot 41, block BB, 42.00 

Ada J. Zambs, lot 86, block BB, 77.40 

Eugene M. Hinds, lot 5, block AA, 147 . 60 
Melvin D. and Anna M. Olmstead, 

lot 46, block Z, 104.00 
Margaret R. and James Martin and 

John Pascoe, lot 66, block W, 142 . 50 

Charles W. Wall, lot 68, block BB, 42.00 

Mr. Huntley, care, 1 . 50 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

Laura A. Dow estate, burial, 6.00 

Harold Phillips, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. Amy Batchelder, care, 5 . 00 

George W. Brown estate, burial, 6.00 

J. Normandeau, labor, 10.00 

Arthur W. Bassett, burial, 6.00 

Rosanna Chase estate, burial, 6.00 

Joseph A. Miller, labor, 2.00 

Kate Robinson estate, burial, 6 . 00 



358 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Henry Matthews estate, burial, $6.00 

Mary A. Matthews estate, burial, 6.00 

Emeline C. Cole estate, burial, 6.00 

Elizabeth M. Briggs estate, burial, 6.00 

H. N. Davis, foundation, 4.00 

Francis W. Tewksbury estate, burial, 6 . 00 

William E. Chandler estate, burial, 15.00 

Clara V. Noyes estate, burial, 7.00 

Frank W. Johnson estate, burial, 12.00 

Jeannette Allison estate, burial, 8.00 

Lelah S. Proctor estate, burial, 10.00 

Carrie A. Gordon estate, burial, 5.00 

Florence I. Hill estate, burial, 5.00 

Adele H. Porter estate, burial, 7.00 

George A. Ordway estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Kendall & Foster, labor, 2.00 

Anna A. Van Cor estate, burial, 12.00 

Abbie W. Griffin estate, burial, 8.00 

Susie Trask estate, burial, 5 . 00 

Ellen E. Morrison estate, burial, 6.00 

Frances L. Bartlett estate, burial, 15.00 

Ellen M. Lewis estate, burial, 6.00 

Carrie D. Sargent estate, burial, 11.00 

I. A. Watson estate, burial, 9.00 

William C. Betts estate, burial, 9.00 

Mary S. Leland estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Arthur W. Head estate, burial, 6.00 

Albert W. Watson estate, burial, 6.00 

Maria F. Nelson estate, burial, 10 . 00 

Elizabeth Carlton estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Mary J. Marshall estate, burial, 6.00 

Lizzie C. Clifford estate, burial, 6.00 

Amy L. Tucker estate, burial, 6.00 

Emma J. Chesley estate, burial, 6.00 

William M. Chase estate, burial, 10.00 

Ellen S. Chase estate, burial, 9.00 

Augustus E. Hartford estate, burial, 7.00 
Edward W. Richardson estate, burial, 18.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 359 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb, $15.00 

Mrs. W. H. Gould, care, 3.00 

Hattie Marcy, care, 1 . 00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

John C. Tippet estate, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. Sanders, care, 1 . 00 

J. W. Brooks, care, 2.00 

Mrs. A. W. Austin, care, 2.00 

C. W. Clarke, care, 2.00 

Cash, .50 

Nazarus, Saltus lot 35, block BB, 54.60 

Mrs. AUc8 M. Moore, lot 54, block V, 67 . 50 

Almira A. Lamprey estate, burial, 9.00 

Raymond Tonkin, labor, 2.00 

Hattie Wyatt estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Emma J. Gorham estate, burial, 6 . 00 

J. Bean, care, 3.00 

Miss R. Cole, care, 2.00 

William Bishop, care, 1 . 50 

Mabel M. Russell, care, 3.00 

Homer Van Cor, care, 3 . 00 

Mrs. Oscar Holt, labor, 7 . 20 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 46.00 

Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 49.75 

Mary Hoitt, care, 1 . 00 

Mrs. G. E. Fifield, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Forrest Kibbee, care, 2.50 

A. Jenkins, foundation, 7.00 

H. F. Clifford, burial, 6.00 

H. T. Norwell, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. E. L. Farnsworth, care, 1 . 60 

Vivian Vansickle, care, 4 . 00 

George Matson estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Margaret I. Matson, burial, 4.00 

Ida F. Moore estate, burial, 6.00 

Clarence Batchelder, burial, 3 . 00 

Robert W. Harrington, care, 150 

Orin S. Bean, care, 1-50 



360 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John T. Martin estate, care, $6 . 00 

Margaret Martin, labor, 4.50 

Mrs. S. C. Morrill, labor, 2.00 

W. R. C— G. A. R., care, 2.50 

Ethel P. Cutting estate, burial, 10.00 

H. O. Sargent, lot 206, block M, 27 . 00 

Frank Green, lot 62, block Y, 30.00 
George A. Dearborn, lot 54, block AA, 72.00 

Edith A. Evans, lot 84, block BB, 30 . 00 

Frank C. Dunklee, lot 53, block AA, 72.00 
New England Granite Co., foundation, 17.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 4.00 

James P. Madisen estate, burial, 6 . 00 

W. C. Brunei (child) , burial, 6 . 00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 19.50 

George W. Waters, tomb fees, 12.00 

A. A. Allen estate, burial, 6 . 00 

George W. Waters, single grave, 7 . 00 

David G. Lowell estate, burial, 6.00 

Jessie P. Hammond estate, burial, 6.00 

Solon A. Carter estate, burial, 11.50 

Adelaide C. Heath estate, burial, 6.00 

Rachel Yeaton estate, burial, 6.00 

Faany H. Pinkham estate, burial, 10.00 

Margaret Mozee estate, burial, 11.00 

Mary H. Adams estate, burial, 12.32 

Hattie E. Webster estate, burial, 6.00 

Bertha Boettcher estate, burial, 6.00 

Hilmar Carlson estate, burial, 6.00 

Esther J. Tucker estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Georgiana L. Wilson estate, burial, 7.00 

Estelle B. Harris estate, burial, 6.00 

Nylan (infant), burial, .50 

Emeline A. Richardson estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Ellen S. Dutton estate, burial, 14 . 00 

Edson J. Hill estate, burial, 14.00 

Moses A. Holt estate, burial, . 6.00 

Uriah C. Rowen estate, burial, 6.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 361 

Henry W. Hansen estate, burial, $10 . 00 

Martha J. Everett estate, burial, 7.00 

Mary A. Paro estate, burial, 6 . 00 

H. W. Tebbits estate, burial, 2.00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb 

fees, 7.00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, labor, 17 . 85 

Mrs. A. C. Leavitt, care, 1.00 

J. Normandeau, labor, 4.00 

C. F. Forsyth, labor, 5.85 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 43 . 75 
Fred Reed estate, burial, 16.00 
Aurilla Clifford estate, burial, 6.00 
Emmy Bergholtz, care, 1 . 00 
George W. Fletcher, lot 52, block W, 125 . 50 
Fred H. Clifford, lot 18, block BB, 42 . 00 
Frank H. Cprson estate, lot 93, 

block BB, 35.00 

Elizabeth M. Libby, lot 44 and walk 

between 44 and 45, block BB, 
James E. Tucker, lot 90, block BB 
John P. Paige, lot 143, block W, 
Lucian Pickering estate, lot 100, 

block BB, 
William A. Willard, lot 16, block BB, 
Isaac Heath, labor, 
F. W. Lovejoy, care, 
Albert F. Batchelder estate, burial, 
Thomas McG. Leaver estate, burial, 
Charles E. Scorer, care, 
William F. Cutting (child), burial, 
Frank H. Corson, burial, 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 
Olivia B. Abbott, labor, 
Mrs. Jessie G. Killeen, care, 
Ella T. Marsh estate, burial, 



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5 


.00 


10 


.00 


15.00 


2 


.75 


4 


,00 


6 


.00 


5 


.00 


10 


.00 


5 


.00 


10 


.00 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

James Hill estate, burial, $6.00 

John Lyna estate, burial, 11.00 

John P. Page (child), burial, 2.00 

Fred A. Allen (child), burial, 1.00 

Martha D. Randall estate, burial, 6.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 6.00 

Susah G. Bath estate, burial, 10.00 

Sarah F. Ballard estate, burial, 6.00 

E. M. Shannon, labor, 10.00 

Augusta C. Webster estate, burial, 6.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

Luther B. Blanchard estate, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. Frank Whitaker, labor, 1 . 50 

Mary J. Lake estate, burial, 6 . 00 

William H. Horner estate, burial, 6.00 

Mary J. Jay estate, burial, 6.00 

John H. Caswell estate, burial, 6.00 

Lucian Pickering estate, burial, 7 . 00 

Clara A. Sargent estate, burial, 6.j00 

Mrs. M. A. Drew estate, burial, 6.00 

Charles H. Dudley estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Etta B. Pickering estate, burial, 6.00 

Henry A. Colby estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Jacob H. Gallinger estate, burial, 25.00 

Wilham F. Stone estate, burial, 11.00 

George W. Bailey estate, burial, 10.00 

Hannah E. Young estate, burial, 6.00 

Flora McNeal estate, burial, 5.00 

Charles P. Smith estate, burial, 7.00 

Carl Sanquist estate, burial, 15.00 

Wood (infant), burial, .50 

Albert B. Sargent estate, burial, 7 . 00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

Lloyd M. Chamberlin estate, burial, 6.00 

J. H. Labonte, lot 139, block Y, 73.50 

Walter S. Jones, lot 106, block BB, 63.00 
Harold A. Cushman and James E. 

Gage, lot 187, block W, 1 14 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 363 

Walter T. Taylor, lot 51, block BB, $54.00 
Hiram Gordon estate, lot 8, block W, 35.00 
Emil A. Peterson, lot 63, block BB, 73 . 50 
John R. Andrews and Harry D. Hutch- 
inson, lot 61, block BB, 95 . 34 
E. C. Lyons, care, 2.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 
Sarah A. Clifford estate, burial, 6 . 00 
James E. Hobson estate, burial, 8.00 
Hiram Gordon estate, burial, 6.00 
J. Normandeau, labor, 5.00 
0. L. Hazelton, labor, 1.00 
Thomas Fox, foundation, 5 . 00 
Cummings Bros., foundation, 47.40 
Lawrence W. Smith estate, burial, 6.00 
Mary A. Rowen estate, burial, 5.00 
Weston P. Fellows estate, burial, 5.00 
Henry E. Chandler, labor, 3.00 
Mrs. F. E. Brown, care, 1.50 
Harry Phillips estate, burial, 6 . 00 
Florence Potter, burial, 6 . 00 
Mrs. Jasper D. Smith, lot 96, block 

BB, 30.00 

Anna W. Nelson, lot 64, block BB, 36.00 

L T. Chesley, labor, 8.00 

George H. Russ, care, 3.00 

B. P. Hodgman, care, 1.50 

J. S. Matthews, care, 2.50 

H. F. Wight, care, 1.00 

J. Follansbee, care, " 1 . 50 

Mrs. H. D. Hammond, care, 1.50 

Mary P. Woodworth, care, 3.00 

E. M. Willis, care, 4.00 
William K. McFarland, care, 3.00 
E.J. Hill estate, care, 8.00 
J. O. Lyford, care, 2.50 

F. S. Streeter, care, 3.00 
T. J. Carpenter estate, care, 3.00 



364 CITY OF CONCORD. 

F. E. Nelson, care, $2.50 
A. H. Chase, care, 5.00 
J. W. Lund, care, 5.00 

E. S. Tenney, care, 2.00 
Mrs. J. H. Dearborn, care, 2.00 
Mrs. C. A. Kendall, care, 2.00 
C. W. Bradlee, care, 1 . 50 
I. Bushey, care, 1.00 
George M. Kimball, care, 6.00 
J. B, Hussey, care, 1.50 
James McLaughlin, care, 2.90 
Mrs. J. H. Albin, care, 4.00 
Miss H. M. Woods, care, 4.00 
I. T. Chesley, care, 2.00 
O. B. Douglas, care, 2.00 
Sarah F. Thompson, care, 2.50 
Mrs. James Minot, care, 3 . 00 
H. Thompson estate, care, 4.00 
Susan Leighton estate, burial, 6 . 00 
J. F. Webster, care, . 4.00 
R. E. Walker, care, 3.00 

G. P. Conn estate, care, 4 . 00 
Bertha Watson, care, 2 . 00 
C. W. Lane, care, 2.00 
C. P. Bancroft, care, 2.50 
C. A. Dadmun, labor, 2.50 
W. E. Hood, care, 1 . 50 

F. L. Johnson, care, 1 . 50 
Clara M. Ayers, care, 2.50 
J. H. Gallinger estate, care, 6.00 
L. W. James, care, 1 . 50 
E. P. Schutz, care, 6.00 
Mrs. Ida C. Humphrey, care, 2.50 
Mrs. W. A. Thompson, care, 4.50 
Mrs. S. F. Morrill, care, 2.00 
J. E. Dwight, care, 2.00 
Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 5.00 
Mrs. H. G. Sargent, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



365 



Mrs. Ellen Crockett estate, care, $2 . 00 

H. B. Day, care, 3.00 

Solon A. Carter estate, care, 4 . 00 

Mrs. H. B. Roby, care, 1.50 

Miss Carrie Todd, care, 2 . 00 

C. R. Dame, care, 2.00 
Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 4 . 00 
George Marston estate, care, 3 . 00 
Fred Colton, care, 4.50 
George Connell, care, 2.00 
Fred Ladd, care, 5.00 

E. P. Burroughs, labor, 2.50 
Isaac Hill, care, 3.00 
J. E. Fernald, care, 2.00 
B. Billsborough estate, care, 2.00 
Mrs. Annie Flanders, care, 1.00 
Fred Lang, care, 2 . 00 
J. A. Cochran estate, care, 2.00 
W. Carpenter, care, 1.50 
George N. Woodward, care, 1.50 
B. Couch, care, 2.00 
R. F. Robinson, care, 1.50 
H. C. Sturtevant, care, 1.50 
Lillie D. Blaisdell, labor, 27.00 
Richard Harvey, rent, 24.00 
A. Martin, labor, 8.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 

D. C. Parker, labor, 10.00 
L. D. Clough estate, care, 3.00 

F. J. Sulloway, care, 2.00 
Henry N. Woodbury estate, burial, 6.00 
Margaret Wall estate, burial, 6 . 00 
Helen E. Moore estate, burial, 6.00 
Frank E. Stokes estate, burial, 6.00 
Lydia B. Holt estate, burial, 6.00 
William Bishop estate, burial, 6 . 00 
Fidelia F. Adams estate, burial, 6 . 00 
Nettie English estate, burial, 11 .00 



366 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Annie B. Jacobson estate, burial, $7.00 

Ernest Zambs estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Wesley F. Dow estate, burial, 6.00 

William Nelson estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Dudley B. Andrews estate, burial, 7.00 

Maria L. Smith estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Carl M. Wilhelmsen estate, burial, 11 .00 

Annie S. Kendall estate, burial, 6.00 

Lucy M. Spaulding estate, burial, 7.00 

Dora M. Mills estate, burial, 6.00 
Raymond W. Thompson estate, burial, 15.00 

Charles H. Ash estate, burial, 6.00 

Ellen G. Crockett estate, burial, 6.00 

Helen E. Jones estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Charles L. Marshall estate, burial, 8.00 

Catherine B. MacHarg estate, burial, 6.00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, labor, 12 . 00 

D. G. Lowell estate, care, 1.00 
Mrs. J. H. Chase, care, 8.00 
A. J. Souza, care, 2.00 
Arthur E. Rowell, care, 1.00 
Ben Dodge, care, 2 . 00 
Charles W. Marsh estate, burial, 10.00 
J. Normandeau, labor, 2.00 
A. G. McAlpine & Co., foundation, 86.00 
T. H. Dunstane, rent, 20.00 
C. P. Tucker, care, 1 . 50 

E. C. Niles, care, 2.00 
L T. Chesley, labor, 6.00 
Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 2.00 
Lucia Clement, care, 3 . 00 
H. A. Rowell, care, 1.50 
Mrs. V. C. Hastings, care, 1.00 
E. R. Newbold, care, 1 . 00 
J. S. Otis, care, 1 . 50 
J. W. Ford, care, 2.00 
Mrs. J. S. Dutton, care, 1 . 50 
Everett Runnells, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



367 



Ada Aspinwall, care, $1.00 
C. W. Lynam, care, 1.50 
J. S. Foster estate, care, 1.00 
Mrs. J. K. Woodward, care, 1 . 50 
E. D. Clough, care, 2.00 
Walter Jenks, care, 1 . 50 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 2.00 
Mrs. D. Lyons, labor, 5.00 
John Burroughs, care, 4 . 00 
Emma Shaw, care, 1 . 00 
Sibley G. Morrill, lot 33, block Z, 135.00 
Arthur S. Waite, lot 66, block BB, 36.00 
William W. Kennedy, lot 65, block W, 120.00 
Lillie D. Blaisdeil, lot 99, block BB, 67 . 20 
William A. Kelley and Carrie C. Mar- 
shall, lot 25, block AA, 72.00 
Thomas A. McCarthy, lot 90, block W, 35 . 00 
Leo B. Mills, lot 2, block BB, 83.48 
Ernest E. Lewis, lot 87, block BB, 64.93 
Byron W. Berry, lot 59, block AA, 72 . 00 
Hilda and Ada Matthews, lot 89, 

block BB, 30.00 
Harold E. Roby, lot 99, south half, 

block P, 38.50 

Elmer J. MacHarg, lot 40, block BB, 30.00 

Mary L. Fletcher estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Robert B. Zambs estate, burial, 8.00 

Clarence L. Mills, burial, 5 . 00 

G. B. Sanders, care, 2.50 

George W. Worth, care, 2 . 50 

W. S. Silver, care, 2.00 

Fred M. Boardman, care, 3.00 

J. B. Palmer, care, 2.00 

L. A. Sanders, care, 2.00 

Carrie F. Porter, care, 2 . 00 

Asa C. Batchelder estate, burial, 10.00 

Arlette E. Dunsford estate, burial, 10.00 

Omar Swenson, care, 2.50 



368 CITY OF CONCORD. 

J. E. Morrison, care, $2.00 

F. D. Abbott, care, 2.00 
Anna Kimball, care, 1 . 00 
Harry Dolioff , care, 1 . 50 
Mrs. H. Mclntire, care, 1 . 50 
George I. Oakley estate, burial, 7.00 
Miss Emma Blodgett, care, 1 . 50 
Mrs. J. C. Ordway, care, 2.00 
Ola Anderson, care, 1 . 50 
Cummings Bros., fomidation, 13.75 
Carl Carlson estate, burials, 10 . 00 
J. R. H. Davis, care, 1 . 50 
H. S. Smith, care, 1.50 
Mrs. H. S. Webster, care, 1.00 
W. F. Gay, care, 2 . 00 
E. B. Hutchinsoa estate, care, 7.00 
Mrs. N. Moses, care, 2.95 
Mrs. Annie Walker, care, 3 . 60 
Mrs. A. F. Holt, care, 3 . 00 
Mrs. O. V. Pearl, care, 1 . 00 
C. F. Bunker, care, 1 . 50 

G. N. Bartemus, care, 1 . 50 
W. S. Blanchard, care, 2.50 
J. H. Sanders, care, 1 . 50 
Nellie B. Brainerd estate, burial, 6.00 
Helen F. Wall estate, burial, 11 .00 
Mildred F. Waite estate, burial, 6 . 00 
Burton C. Roby estate, burial, 10.00 
Ernest Leavitt estate, burial, 6 . 00 
Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, labor, 6.00 
Susan H. Hurd estate, burial, 8.00 
George H. Hatch estate, burial, 6.00 
Dorothy M. Morrill estate, burial, 6.00 
Fred E. Woodbury estate, burial, 6.00 
Lula M. Berry estate, burial, 7.00 
Ajalion D. Jones estate, burial, 6.00 
Woodbury E. Hunt, care, 5.00 
Ethel Tracy, care, 1 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



369 



George W. Waters, labor, S89 . 88 

Mrs. Davis estate, burial, 10 . 00 

Arthur H. Meronitz estate, burial, 11.00 

Freeman (infant), burial, 1.00 

Mrs. John Drew, care, 2.00 

Larsen & Carlson, foundation, 34.00 

Solomon Heath estate, care, 8 . 00 

C. B. Blanchard, care, 2.00 
Oscar A. Johnson, labor, 1 . 50 
W. W. Flint, care, 1.50 
Mrs. Jessie Killeen, care, 5.00 
Frank L. Lane, care, 1 . 50 
A. Sprague, care, 1 . 00 

D. Young, Jr., care, 1.00 
George L. Stratton, care, 3 . 00 
L. H. Carroll, care, 2.00 
W. J. Green, care, 2.00 
Mrs. R. A. Morgan, care, 2.00 
Mary E. Hoit, care, 2 . 00 
N. A. Dunklee, care, 1 .00 
W. A. Chesley, care, 1 . 50 
Fred Straw, care, 1 . 50 
William Jones estate, burial, 8.00 
Lucy Poore, care, 1 . 50 
A. D. Fosgate, care, 1.50 
C. C. Schoolcraft, care, 3.75 
Frank J. Batchelder, care, 2 . 50 
George Silsby, care, 2 . 00 
L. S. Bean, care, 2.00 
John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 20.50 

Margaret A. Howe, lot 75, block 

CC, 27.10 

Joseph R. Nelson, lot 135, block Q, 12.00 
Mrs. Mattie S. Berry, lot 58, block 

AA, 72.00 

Anders G . Wester, lot 105, block BB , 63 . 00 

Samuel Dunsford, lot 135, block AA, 90 . 00 

24 



370 CITY OF CONCORD. 

George W. Abbott, trust, $8 , 00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1.75 

J. A. and Olivia B, Abbott, trust, 4.00 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 2 . 50 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 7 . 00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 24.50 
Allen, Smith & Dimond, trust, • 4 . 00 

Frederick AlHson, trust, 3 . 50 

Mary B. Allison, trust, 1.75 

Frank P. Andrews, trust, 6 . 00 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 1.75 

Sarah S. Ash, trust, 1 . 75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 5.00 

T. D. Avery, trust, 3.50 

Rev. F. D. Ayer, trust, 3.50 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 3 . 50 

Abbie L. Sanborn Bailey, trust, 3 . 50 

Oliver Ballou, trust, 1 . 75 

Harry C. Barrett, trust, 1 . 75 

Charles Barker, trust, 4 . 00 

George W. Barnes, trust, 2 . 00 

James W. Barton, trust, 3 . 50 

Horace B. Bartlett, trust, 3.00 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 2.00 

Robert Bell, trust, 2 . 50 

Matilda Benson, trust, 1 . 75 

Ellen C . Bixby , trust, 3 . 50 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, 3.50 

James M. Blake, trust, 7.00 

William Blakeley, trust, 4.00 

Emily P. Blanchard, trust, 11 . 00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 7.00 

Charles S. Boardman, trust, 1 . 75 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 3.50 

Charles L. Brown, trust, 7 . 00 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 7.00 

Andrew Bunker, trust, 2.50 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1 . 75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 371 



Harriet W. Butters, trust, 


$4.00 


Mary A. Burnham, trust. 


2.00 


Frank A. Burnham, trust, 


1.75 


Alfred D. Burroughs, trust, 


1.50 


Benjamin F. Caldwell, trust, 


9.00 


Levi Call, trust, 


3.50 


Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 


2.50 


Hiram J. Carter, trust. 


3.50 


Nathan F. Carter, trust, 


4.50 


Lizzie Gate, trust. 


2.25 


Harry M. Gavis, trust. 


3.50 


Levi G. Chase, trust. 


3.50 


Frank E. Child, trust, 


1.50 


Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 


4.00 


A. P. and K. P. Chesley, trust. 


3.50 


Caroline Clark, trust. 


4.50 


Ellen P. Clark, trust, 


4.00 


Fannie 0. Clark, trust 


3.00 


Mary A. Clement, trust, 


2.00 


Rufus Clement, trust, 


4.50 


William W. Cloud, trust, 


3.50 


Frederick Clough, trust. 


3.50 


George Clough, trust. 


3.50 


Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 


1.75 


Sarah L . Cloutman, trust, 


2.00 


Weston Cofran, trust, 


7.00 


Amos L. Colburn, trust, 


1.75 


Sarah T. Colby, trust. 


3.50 


Charles A. Cooke, trust, 


4.00 


Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust. 


3.00 


Mary Crow, trust. 


8.00 


Charles H. Cummings, trust, 


35.00 


Mary R. Cummings, trust, 


7.00 


Lucretia R. Currier, trust. 


5.25 


Silas Curtis, trust. 


3.50 


Charles G. Danforth, trust. 


7.00 


Charles S. Danforth, trust, 


2.25 


Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 


2.00 



372 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 


$2.00 


Emma J. Dearborn, trust, 


3.00 


Edward Dow, trust, 


4.50 


S. R. Dole and J. T. Sleeper, trust, 


3.00 


Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 


1.50 


Charles V. Dudley, trust, 


3.50 


William B. Durgin, trust, 


7.00 


Martha E. Durgin, trust. 


6.00 


J, B. Dyer, trust. 


4.00 


Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 


4.00 


".Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 


7.00 


Stephen B. Eaton, trust. 


4.50 


Clara E. Edgerly, trust, 


3.50 


Lydia F. Edgerly, trust. 


3.50 


Georgianna P. Ela, trust. 


3.50 


Ella M. Elliott, trust, 


2.00 


EHzabeth G. Emerson, trust. 


5.00 


Lydia J. Emerson, trust. 


4.00 


George H. Emery, trust. 


4.50 


David E. Everett, trust, 


2.50 


Andrew S. Farnum, trust, 


4.00 


Mary M. Farnum, trust. 


4.00 


Lydia A. Farley, trust, 


3.50 


Alvah E. Ferrin, trust, 


3.50 


Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 


1.75 


J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust. 


1.75 


Josiah Farrar, trust. 


1.75 


Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Flanders, trust, 


3.50 


■George G. Fogg, trust. 


21.50 


Alice T. Ford, trust, 


9.00 


Jerome Ford, trust. 


4.00 


Asa Fowler, trust. 


17.50 


Mary A. Gage, trust. 


15.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 


1.75 


John D. Gale, trust, 


7.00 


John Gear, trust. 


4.00 


Sarah L. Gear, trust, 


3.50 


Caroline L. George, trust, 


19.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 37S 



Enoch Gerrish, trust, 


$4.00 


S. K. Gill, trust, 


3.50 


G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust. 


1.75 


Clara V. S. Glidden, trust. 


3.00 


Loren W. Glysson, trust, 


4.00 


James T. Gordon, trust. 


4.00 


Hannah J. and Fannie A. Goss, trust. 


9.50 


Frank Grafton, trust. 


4.00 


George N. Greeley, trust, 


19.00 


Jessie E. Green, trust, 


2.50 


John B. Green, trust, 


4.50 


William E. Green, trust, 


3.50 


Betsey Hadley, trust, 


3.50 


George M. Harding, trust. 


1.75 


Mary D. Hart, trust, 


12.00 


Timothy Haynes, trust, 


4.00 


Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 


3.50 


Emma J. Hill, trust. 


1.75 


George W. Hill, trust. 


6.00 


John M. Hill, trust, 


7.00 


Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 


1.75 


J. Frank Hoit, trust. 


9.00 


Harriet F. Holman, trust, 


4.00 


Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 


3.50 


Sam Holt, trust. 


4.00 


Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 


3.50 


George Hutton, trust, 


2.00 


Sarah E. Irish, trust, 


3.50 


Henry Ivey, trust, 


2.00 


E. A, Jameson, trust, 


3.50 


Harriet S. and Robert L. Jenks, trust. 


4.00 


Herman E. Jewell, trust. 


1.75 


Julia A. Jones, trust, 


5.00 


John F. Jones, trust, 


4.00 


Seth K. Jones, trust, 


12.00 


F. M. and S. I. Johnson and C. M. 




Boynton, trust. 


4.00 


Timothy Kerley, trust, 


4.00 



374 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John and Benjamin A. Kimball, 

trust, S7 . 00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 1.75 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 38.40 

William Ladd, trust, 2 . 50 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 4.00 

Eliza P. Lang, trust, 1 . 50 

Leete and Newman, trust, 4 . 00 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 5 . 25 

Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 2 . 50 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 9.00 

Bertha M. Little, trust, 4.00 

William L Lovely, trust, 2.50 

George H. Lull, trust, 3 . 00 

John McCauley, trust, 3 . 50 

Henry McFarland, trust, 11.00 

G. and E. McQuesten, trust, 4.00 

James McQuesten, trust, 8.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 5.00 

Martin and Brown, trust, 3 . 50 

Jennie P. Martin, trust, 3.50 

Phebe E. Mason, trust, 2 . 50 

H. W. and H. O. Matthews, trust, 4.00 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 9.00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 1 . 75 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 3 . 50 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

S. F. Merrill, trust, 4.00 

David E. Miller, trust, 3 . 50 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 8.00 

Charles Moody, trust, 4 . 00 

Charles W. Moore, trust, 3 . 50 

George H. Moore, trust, 3.50 

Morgan and Colby, trust, 5.00 

AHce Morrill, trust, 4 . 00 

C. B. and A. F. Moseley, trust, 11.00 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 4 . 00 

Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 375 

David L. Neal, trust, $3 . 50 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 9.00 

E. S. Nutter, trust, 3.50 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3 . 50 

Eugene Ordway, trust, 2 . 50 

H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgely, trust, 9.50 

George B. Packer, trust, 3.50 

George F. Page, trust, 1 . 75 

Moses W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 2.00 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3 . 50 

Francis J. Paige, trust, 2.50 

John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

William H. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

Felicite Pengault, trust, 4 . 50 

Hamilton Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, . 94 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 16.00 

Isabelle Perry, trust, 2 . 00 

Hattie J. W. Peters, trust, 3.50 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 4.00 

Eliza A. Pickering, trust, .- 7.00 

Irving L. Pickering, trust, 9 . 00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 2 . 50 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, ' 1 . 75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 9.00 

Samuel F. Patterson, trust, 4 . 00 

D. 0. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1 . 75 

James E. Rand, trust, 2.50 

Henry W. Ranlett, trust, 5.00 

George L. Reed, trust, 4 . 50 

Judith A. Richardson, trust, 3 . 50 

Loren A. Richardson, trust, 4 . 00 

Mrs. James H. Rigney, trust, 1 • 75 

Francis K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 

Helen E. Robinson, trust, 7.00 

Moses F. Rogers, trust, 3 . 50 



376 CITY OF CONCORD. 

E. H. Rollins, trust, $12.00 

David D. Rowe, trust, 2.50 

James H. Rowell, trust, 8.00 

Francis L. Runnells, trust, 6 . 00 

Moses W. Russell, trust, 9 . 00 

Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1 . 75 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3 . 50 

Richard P. Sanborn, trust, 5 . 50 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 7.00 

John B. Sargent, trust, 3 . 50 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 7.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 5 . 00 

A. E. Savage and Joe Healey, trust, 3.00 

Gilbert H. Seavey, trust, 4.00 

Shackford and Dame, trust, 3 . 50 

Leland A. Smith, trust, 7 . 00 

William Smith, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary W. Smith, trust, 8 . 00 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 1 . 75 

J. L. Sinclair, trust, 2.00 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust, 1.75 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3 . 50 

Selina Staniels, trust, 4 . 00 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 4.00 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 7 . 00 

Prescott F. Stevens, trust, 5 . 00 

Mary L. Stevenson, trust, 1 . 75 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 1 . 75 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 8.00 

Ferdinand A. Stillings, trust, 6 . 00 

Cora Fuller Straw, trust, 4 . 00 

John W. Straw, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 3 . 50 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3 . 50 
E. E. Sturtevant Post G. A. R., trust, 7.00 

Charles L. Tappen, trust, 3.00 

Hiram B. Tebbetts, trust, 12 . 60 

John H. Teel, trust, 1.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



377 



John S. Thompson, trust, $4.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 4 . 00 

PHny Tidd, trust, 1.75 

J. L. Tilton and A. D. Locke, trust, 1.75 

John H. Toof, trust, 4.50 

S. D. Trussell, trust, 2.00 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 11.00 

C. P. Virgin, trust, 1 . 25 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 3 . 50 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 7.00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 2 . 50 

EHza A. Wason, trust, 1 . 75 

B. F. and Frank L. Watson, trust, 3.00 

PauUne E. Welles, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary E. West, trust, 9 . 00 

Mrs. Armenia S. White, trust, 35.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1 . 75 

George F. Whittredge, trust, 4 . 50 

Mary L. Williams, trust, 1 . 75 

WiUiam Williamson, trust, 2 . 00 

Sarah A. WiUiams, trust, 3.50 

Georgiana M. F. Wood, trust, 4.50 

Clarence Woods, trust, 3 . 00 

Belinda D. Woods, trust, 7.00 

J. Q. Woods, trust, 4.00 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 8.00 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 4.00 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 3 . 50 

Mary Abbott Wyman, trust, 16.00 

William Yeaton, trust, 3 . 50 



^911. 49 



1918. 
December. 



Credits. 

One-half sale lots 
added to permanent 
fund. 



L,781.12 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. 

December. Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, $1,430.94 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 4,699 . 43 



^911.49 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds are added 

to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a 
special order from the mayor, from the income of individual deposits made with the city 

for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in 
each trust. 

Receipts. 
1918. 

L. Tebeau, care, $2 . 00 

Helen E. Fox estate, burial, 6.00 

Ruth A. Mason estate, burial, 9.00 

Helen G. Stickney, care, 1 . 50 

Sara Hartwell estate, burial, 10.00 

E. A. Moulton, labor, 5.00 

Susan S. Bunker estate, burial, 13.00 

Margaret W. Godfrey estate, burial, 6.00 

Eunice C. Gordon estate, burial, 7.00 

George H. A. Williams, labor, 3.00 

Maria Morse estate, burial, 6.00 

Henry C. Blakely estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Harold E. Colby estate, burial, 5.00 

James F. Goss estate, 10 . 00 

Horace Beal estate, burial, 6.00 

H. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 

James A. Johnson estate, burial, 6 . 00 

Edward Ford estate, burial, 10 . 00 

Joseph H. Ford estate, burial, 6.00 

B. F. Hardy estate, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Henry Blakely, care, 1 . 50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



379 



Minot Cemetery Association, care, 


$106.00 


Clara A. Abbott, trust, 


1.75 


William Abbott, trust. 


15.00 


Samuel Alexander, trust, 


3.50 


L. Bell, Jr., trust. 


3.50 


Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 


10.75 


Richard Bradley, trust. 


3.50 


John F. Chaffin, trust, 


1.75 


Samuel T. A. Gushing, trust. 


3.00 


Charles C. Dearborn, trust. 


4.00 


Lydia A. Eastman, trust, 


4.00 


Seth Eastman, trust, 


5.00 


Samuel Evans, trust. 


4.50 


Robert Ela, trust. 


3.50 


Miles F. Farmer, trust. 


3.50 


Hosea Fessenden, trust. 


3.50 


Lucia A. Flanders, trust. 


3.50 


John Flanders, trust. 


1.75 


Eleanor E. Foster, trust, 


4.00 


Theodore French, trust. 


3.50 


Moses Gerould, trust. 


1.75 


Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 


1.75 


Mitchell Gilmore, trust. 


3.50 


Clara V. S. Glidden, trust. 


2.75 


Betsey J. Gale, trust, 


3.75 


Pamela L. Hall, trust. 


1.75 


Frank S. Harraden, trust. 


3.50 


William H. and Etta B. Horner, trust, 


3.50 


L. Louisa Hoyt, trust. 


6.00 


Joseph S. Jackson, trust. 


3.00 


Wilham T. Locke, trust. 


4.50 


S. Blake, trust. 


3.00 


Asa McFarland, trust. 


3.50 


Ida Moore, trust. 


1.75 


Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 


2.50 


Mary R. Morrill, trust. 


7.00 


Samuel and David L. Morrill, trust. 


5.50 


Isaac H. Ordway, trust. 


7.00 



380 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



True Osgood, trust, 

Wesley B. Palmer and Harriet and 

Susan B. Savory, trust, 
Alice W. Parker, trust, 
Asa Parker, trust, 
Samuel G. Parker, trust, 
Pearson, White and Savory, trust, 
Hiram Richardson, trust, 
Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 
Isaac B. Shute, trust, 
Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 
Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 
Joseph Stickney, trust, 
Nathan Stickney, trust, 
Abigail Sweetser, trust, 
Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 
Thomas W. Thompson, trust, 
Jane R. Twombly, trust, 
Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 
Timothy and Abigail Walker, trust, 
Albert Webster, trust, 
Paul Wentworth, trust, 
Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 
Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 
Helen N. R. Woodbury, trust, 
Charlotte H. Woolson, trust, 



$3.50 



3. 


50 


3. 


50 




75 




75 


3. 


50 


21. 


00 




75 


2 


.00 




.00 




.75 


22 


.00 




.75 




.00 




.75 




.75 




.50 




.00 


11 


.00 


4 


.50 


8.00 


3 


.50 


3 


.50 


4 


.00 


3 


.50 



$513.25 



1918. 
December. 



Credits. 

Income from sundry 
trust funds as charged 
to this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, 

Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count. 



$283.25 



230.00 



$513.25 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 381 

MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund- 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are 
paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made 
with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
apecified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1918. 

Anna M. L. Clough, burial, $7.00 

Carrie Wright, care and repairs, 5 . 70 

Oliver Dimond, grading, 5 . 00 

Isaac Johnson, burial, 5 . 00 

Mrs. Robert Hersey, burial, 6 . 00 

Edward Farnum, burial, 6 . 00 

Mrs. Josephine Bartholomew, burial, 9 . 00 

Mrs. John Sanell, burial, 8 . 00 

John E. Davis, burial, 5.00 

Mrs. J. E. Willey, grading lot, 4.00 

Mrs. Fred Wolf, care of lot, 1 . 00 

Mrs. J. E. Willey, care of lot, 1 . 75 

Edward Farnum, repairing lot, 5.00 

John W. Johnson, lot 30, west half, 25.00 

Mrs. Alvin Powell, care, 1 . 75 

Henry Holden, care and repairs, 3.25 

Mrs. George Parmenter, care, 1 . 75 

Mrs. James Grossman, care, 3 . 75 

J. D. Ryan, care, 2.50 

Abijah Hollis, care, 1 . 25 

Abial Abbott, care, 2 . 00 

Edgar Eastman, care, 2 . 00 

Jeremiah Quinn, care, 2 . 25 

Matthew Peabody, care, 3 . 50 

Andrew Kaski, burial, 5 . 00 

Peter Johnson, burial, 5.00 

Paul Johnson, burial and care, 6 . 50 

Frank Putney, care, 1 . 50 

Robert Hersey, repairs, 1 . 00 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Jed Gile, care, $1 . 00 

Mrs. Peter Linguine, care, 1 . 00 

William Gile, care, 7 . 00 

Fred Peabody, care, 2 . 50 

Mrs. George Austin, care, 2 . 00 

Horatio Abbott, burial, 6 . 00 

George Smith, care, 1 . 25 

Miss Gertrude Sawyer, care, 1 . 50 

Albert McAlpine, care, 2 . 25 

Henry Chase, care, 2 . 50 

George Fellows, care, 2 . 00 

Mrs. Nellie Duschan, care, 2 . 25 

Edward Haskell, care, 2.25 

Mrs. Hoyt Robinson, care, 1 . 75 

George Carter, care, 2 . 25 

Frank Dimond, care, 2 . 25 

George Hosmer, burial, 2.25 

George Anderson, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Grace Day, care, 1 . 50 

Miss Arzelia Abbott, care, 1 . 75 

C. W. Morse, care, 1.80 

Miss Carrie A. Wright, care, 1.40 

Ernest Anderson, care, 1.00 

Victor Engel, care, 1 . 50 

Walter Annis, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Julia Anderson, care, 1 . 50 

George Andrews, care, 2 . 00 

Mary K. Abbott, care, 2.25 

George Berry, care, 2.00 

John Kemp, care, 1.25 

John Dimond, care, 2.25 

Hazen E. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

R. S. Emery, trust, 2.50 

Augustine C. Carter, trust, 2.50 

Stephen Carleton, trust, 2.50 

Asa L. Gay, trust, 3.50 

Marshall P. Hall, trust, 1 . 50 

Mary P. Hatch, trust, 6.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



383 



James Bradford, trust, 
George Partridge, trust, 
Ira Rowell, trust, 
Mary A. Rowell, trust, 
Caleb M. Holden, trust. 
Carter and Rolfe, trust. 



1918. 
December. 



Credits. 



$1.50 
3.50 
2.50 
2.50 
1.50 
2.50 



One-half sale lots added 
to permanent fund, $12.50 

Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to Citj^ of Con- 
cord general account, 36 . 00 

Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 189.15 



$237.65 



$237.65 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid 
on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with 
the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1918. 
H. F. Fletcher, lot 13, block K, $5 . 00 

Mrs. Fred B. Clark, lot 15, block K, 5 . 00 

Mrs. Willard H. Frost, lot 14, block 

K, 5.00 

Scott French, grading John E. Frye, 

lot, 9.75 

Arthur Tsarides, lot 9, block I, 5.00 



384 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Mrs. Frank Gallup, burial, 


$5.00 


Earl Webber, burial. 


4.50 


Mrs. Violet Marden, burial. 


5.00 


Ruth K. Abbott, trust, 


7.00 


Elizabeth A. Batchelder, trust, 


1.75 


Orlando W. Coon, trust. 


2.00 


Ann Emery, trust, 


2.50 


Daniel E. Gale, trust. 


2.50 


George Graham, trust. 


3.00 


Crosby K. Haines, trust, 


2.00 


Jacob Hoyt, trust, 


3.50 


Mrs. Samuel Hutchins, trust, 


3.00 


Lucilla Pierce Kelley, trust, 


3.00 


Addie J. P. Kimball, trust. 


6.00 


Joseph S. Kimball, trust, 


3.00 


B. L. Larkin, trust, 


1.75 


A. Augusta Locke, trust, 


1.75 


George Locke, trust, 


2.50 


Josiah S. Locke, trust, 


1.75 


Reuben B. Locke, trust. 


2.50 


Burleigh A. Marden, trust, 


1.50 


John H. Maynard, trust. 


3.50 


Frank V. Osgood, trust. 


1.50 


William Page, trust. 


.75 


Frank P. Potter and Lydia Potter 




Perry, trust. 


7.00 


Issora Hutchins Ring, trust, 


1.75 


Clara E. Robinson, trust. 


1.00 


Charles D. Rowell, trust. 


3.50 


John B. Sanborn, trust, 


7.00 


Harriet B. Sanders, trust, 


1.75 


G. M. and F. E.Tallant, trust, 


2.50 


Harriet N. Tenney, 


3.50 


Aaron B. Young, trust. 


3.50 


J. E. Pecker, trust, 


14.00 



$146.50 



treasury department. 385 

Credits. 
1918. 
December. One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $10.00 
Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, 102.25 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 34.25 

$146.50 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid 
on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the 
city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1918. 

Arthur R. Frye, lot 157, south half, $15 . 00 

Richard R. Frye, burial, 5.00 

Jesse Goodwin, burial, 5 . 00 

Lumber sold, 14 . 00 

J. F. Currier, burial, 5.00 

Eddie Sornberger, care, 2.00 

Mrs. F. E. Pike, care, 2.00 

Charles H. Merrill, trust, 1 . 75 

Andrew S. Smith, trust, 3.50 

Cynthia A. Weeks, trust, 3.50 

Martha R. Jones, trust, 1 . 75 

I. N. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

John Corliss, trust, 3 . 50 

Annie E. Eaton, trust, 1.75 

C. E. H. Ela, trust, 3.00 

Charles Fisk, trust, 3 . 00 

25 



$3 


.50 


1 


.75 


1 


.75 


4 


,00 


4 


.00 


1 


.75 


2 


00 


2, 


,50 



386 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Oliver P. Fowler, trust, 
Julia F. Frye, trust, 
Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 
Moses Hall, trust, 
Robert Hall, trust, 
John McC. Hammond, trust, 
Ann A. Hazeltine, trust, 
Augusta A. Hazeltine, trust. 



Credits. 
1918. 
December. One-half sale lots added 

to permanent fund, $7.50 

Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, 46.50 
Transferred to City of 
Concord general ac- 
count, 40.50 



$94.50 



$94.50 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 



One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. 
The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the 
amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added 
each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid 
on a special order from the mayor from the income of individual deposits made with 
the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot 
specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1918. 
Nancy Bradeen, trust, $6.50 

Credits. 
1918. 
December. Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, $6.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 387 

OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Receipts. 
1918. 
Abigail W. Lang, trust, $2 . 50 

Nelson Tenney, trust, 1 . 00 

A. L. Williams, trust, 2.00 

$5.50 



Credits. 
1918. 
December. Income sundry trust 
funds as charged to 
this account trans- 
ferred to City of Con- 
cord general account, $5.50 



388 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 







Municipal. 




Bonds. 


Due. Rate 


Amount. 


City Hall Building, Sept. 1, 


1918, 3i 


$200 


({ I 




Sept. 1, 


1919, 3i 


8,000 


(C c 




Sept. 1, 


1920, 3i 


8,000 


*l i 




Sept. 1, 


1921, 3i 


7,000 


il I 




Sept. 1, 


1922, 3i 


7,000 


il c 




Sept. 1, 


1923, 3i 


5,000 


i( i 




July 1, 


1924, 3|, 


10,000 


a i 




July 1, 


1925, 31 


10,000 


ti i 




July 1, 


1926, 3i 


10,000 


(I I 




July 1, 


1927, 3|, 


10,000 


ti i 




July 1, 


1928, 3i, 


10,000 


<i i 




July 1, 


1929, 31, 


5,000 


Public Park, 


Dec. 1, 


1931, 4, 


10,000 


i( a 


Dec. 1, 


1933, 4, 


5,000 


Bridge, 


June 1, 


1919, 4, 


4,000 


<< 


June 1, 


1920, 4, 


4,000 


11 


June 1, 


1921, 4, 


4,000 


11 


June 1, 


1922, 4, 


4,000 


11 


June 1, 


1923, 4, 


4,000 


K 


June 1, 


1924, 4, 


4,000 


(( 


June 1, 


1925, 4, 


4,000 


(( 


June 1, 


1926, 4, 


4,000 


il 


June 1, 


1927, 4, 


4,000 


It 


June 1, 


1928, 4, 


4,000 


tl 


June 1, 


1929, 4, 


4,000 


tt 


June 1, 


1930, 4, 


4,000 


It 


June 1, 


1931, 4, 


4,000 


tt 


June 1, 


1932, 4, 


4,000 


tt 


June 1, 


1933, 4, 


4,000 


tt 


June 1, 


1934, 4, 


4,000 


XI 


June 1, 


1935, 4, 


10,000 










$179,200 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



389 



Bonds. 

Sewer, 



Precinct. 

Due. 



Rate. 



July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July 1 
July, 1 
May 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 
Dec. 1 



1919, 4, 

1920, 4, 
1971, 4, 

1922, 4, 

1923, 4, 
1928, 3i. 
1930, 4, 
1932, 4, 
1934, 4, 



Amount. 

$4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 

25,000 
5,000 

10,000 

10,000 



Union 



Bonds. 




Due 


Rate. 


Amount. 


School District, 


July 1, 


1919, 3i 


$8,000 


<( 


11 


May 1, 


1920, 4, 


2,000 


11 


11 


July 1 


1920, 3i 


8,000 


Cl 


ii 


May 1, 


1921, 4, 


2,000 


l( 


a 


July 1 


1921, 3i 


8,000 


(C 


a 


May 1, 


1922, 4, 


2,000 


it 


a 


July 1 


1922, 3i 


8,000 


n 


a 


July 1 


1923, 3i 


10,000 


n 


it 


May 1 


1924, 4, 


5,000 


ii 


li 


July 1 


1924, 3i, 


5,000 


11 


a 


May 1 


1925, 4, 


10,000 


ii 


ii 


July 1 


1925, 3i 


5,000 


ii 


ii 


May 1 


1926, 4, 


5,000 


(I 


it 


July 1 


1926, 3i 


5,000 


it 


(( 


July 1 


, 1927, 3i 


35,000 


ii 


it 


May 1 


, 1928, 4, 


6,000 


ii 


ii 


July 1 


, 1928, 3i 


4,000 


l( 


a 


July 1 


, 1929, 3i 


10,000 


ii 


ii 


July 1 


, 1930, Zh 


10,000 


ii 


ii 


July 1 


, 1931, 3i 


9,000 


ii 


ii 


May 1 


, 1932, 4, 


10,000 


ii 


ii 


May 1 


, 1933, 4, 


10,000 


ii 


a 


May 1 


, 1934, 4, 


10,000 



$70,000 



$187,000 



390 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. 


Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




School District No. 20, 


Sept. 1, 1919, 


3^, 


$500 




(I a it 


Sept. 1, 1920, 


3|, 


500 




tt le <i 


Sept. 1, 1921, 


3^, 


500 




{( 11 ii 


Sept. 1, 1922, 


3i 


500 




tl 11 K 


Sept. 1, 1924, 


3i 


4,300 


$6,300 






Bonds. 


Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




West Concord Sewer, 


Oct. 1, 1919, 


3i, 


$300 


$300 


Bonds. 


Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 




Penacook Sewer, 


July 1, 1919, 


4, 


$500 


$500 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, 
exclusive of water department, $443,300 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 391 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1918, 

municipal , $ 144 . 50 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1918, 

precinct, 112.50 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1918, 

Union School District, 140 . 00 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1918, 

West Concord sewer, 5 . 25 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1918, 



Penacook sewer, 


10.00 


Due in 1918, municipal, 


7,070.00 


" " " precinct, sewer, 


2,675.00 


u u a Union School District, 


7,135.00 


" " " West Concord sewer. 


28.00 


" '' " Penacook sewer, 


55.00 


" " " School District No. 20, 


238.00 




<in 7 fii "^ <^=; 




tlpi/,DiO . ^0 


Cr. 




Municipal, paid. 


$6,983 . 50 


Precinct, sewer, paid, 


2,695.00 


Union School District, paid, 


7,147.50 


West Concord sewer, paid. 


28.00 


Penacook sewer, paid. 


65.00 


School District No. 20, paid. 


238.00 


Municipal due, not presented, 


231.00 


Precinct due, not presented. 


92.50 


Union School District due, not pre- 




sented. 


127.50 


West Concord sewer due, not pre- 




sented. 


5.25 



$17,613.25 



392 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Isaac Hill, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water 
Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1918, $22,908.31 
P. R. Saunders, superintendent, 78,077.15 

$100,985.46 



Interest on bonds, 
Bonds paid, 
Income investment. 
Orders paid. 
Cash on hand, 



Expenditures. 

$16,230.00 
10,000.00 
20,846.00 
29,531.39 
24,378.07 



$100,985.46 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 



When 


due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 


1919, 


4, 


$10,000 


Mar. 1, 1922, 


32, 


$8,000 


Nov. 1, 


1920, 


3, 


4,000 


Apr. 1, 1922, 


31, 


26,000 


Apr. 1, 


1921, 


31, 


5,000 


Jan. 1, 1923, 


02, 


3,000 


Nov. 1, 


1921, 


3, 


3,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


3|, 


15,000 


Jan. 1, 


1922, 


4, 


333,000 











$407,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 393 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1918, 

and not presented, $326 . 00 

To coupons due, 1918, 16,125.00 

$16,451.00 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1918, $16,230.00 

By coupons due and not presented, 221 .00 

$16,451.00 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of Isaac Hill, city treasurer, for the year 1918, and 
find all items of receipt and expenditure therein properly 
recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, and 
the several items correctly cast, and cash balance to be 
twenty-seven thousand one hundred eighty-two dollars and 
sixty-four cents ($27,182.64), and as treasurer of the city 
water department, cash balance to be twenty-four thousand, 
three hundred seventy-eight dollars and seven cents 
($24,378.07). 

I have also verified the account of the special funds and 
sinking funds of the city in the hands of the city treasurer, 
and find such special and sinking funds invested, and the 
income thereof for the year 1918 accounted for, as shown by 
the book of the city treasurer kept for the purpose. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

City Clerk. 



394 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



399 




FIHANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY 
OF CONCORD. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1918. 





Appropriations. 


Expended. 


Aid, City Poor, 


$3,300.00 


$2,751.86 


Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County, 




1,404.68 


Aid, County Poor, 




12,655.07 


Bonds, City HaU, 


8,000.00 


7,800.00 


Bridge Bonds, 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 



Balance. 



Cemeteries: 

Blossom HiU, 3, 845 . 00 9, 766 . 65 

Debit Balance, 1917, 2,343 . 15 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 4,699 .43 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,296.62 

Income Trust Funds, 1,430 . 94 



$11,271.99 $12,109.80 

Old North, 200.00 

Balance, 1917, 21.36 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 230 . 00 753 . 19 

Income Cemetery Fund, 32 . 60 

Income Trust Funds, 283 .25 



$367.59 $377.88 

Pine Grove, 100 . 00 333 . 50 
Balance, 1917, 54.12 



200.00 



$767.21 $753.19 $14.02 

Maple Grove, 100 . 00 370 . 10 

Debit Balance, 1917, 7.78 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 189 . 15 

Income Trust Funds, 36 . 00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 42 . 44 



FINANCIAL 



Transferred Cemetery Account, 
Income Trust Funds, 
Income Cemetery Fund, 



Old Fort, 
Balance, 1917, 
Income Trust Funds, 



MiUviUe, 

Balance, 1917, 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 

Income Trust Funds, 

Income Cemetery Fund, 



Horse Hill, 

Soucook, 
Balance, 1917, 
Income Trust Funds, 
Income Cemetery Fund, 



Woodlawn, 

Concord Charity Organization So 

ciety, 
Concord District Nursing Asso 

ciation. 

Dehydrating Plant: 
Resolution No. 338, 

Dog Licenses, 

Engineering Department: 
Salary Engineer, 
Salary Assistants, 
Supplies, 
26 



STATEMENT. 401 

Appropriations. Expended. Balance. 

$34.25 

102.25 

28.75 

$319.37 $333.50 

47.99 29.75 

5.50 

$53.49 $29.75 $23.74 

75.00 337.35 

115.94 

40.50 

46.50 

105.69 

$383.63 $337.35 $46.28 

10.00 4.50 5.50 

30.00 36.50 

14.09 

6.50 

.74 

$51.33 $36.50 $14.83 

25.00 25.00 

300.00 300.00 

300.00 300.00 

1,000.00 964.66 35.34 
133.75 

2,000.00 2,000.00 

2,200.00 1,362.00 

125.00 43.44 



402 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Appropriations. Expended. Balance. 

Repairs, $25.00 

Incidentals, 200.00 $143.46 

$4,550.00 $3,548.90 $1,001.10 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 

Aid, 450.00 450.00 

Fire Department: 

Pay-RoUs, 19,257 . 76 17,853 .81 

Pay-Rolls, Semi-Annual, 9,115.00 9,215.00 

Rent Veterans' Association, 150.00 150.00 

Forage, 1,500 . 00 1,309 .53 

Fuel and Lights, 1 ,900 . 00 3, 103 . 08 

Fire Alarm, 500.00 535.65 

Horse Hire and Shoeing, 1,160 . 00 1,138 . 15 

Washing, 60.00 60.00 

SuppUes, Auto Combination, 300 . 00 296 . 00 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 250 . 00 161 . 46 

Incidentals, 3,000.00 3,255.65 

Motor Combination Chemical, 

Alert Hose, 3,200 . 00 3,200 .00 



$40,392.76 $40,278.33 $114.43 
Garden Culture, 600.00 



T, w XT o.o onn nn • 735.90 64.10 

Resolution No. 342, 200 . 00 

Health, Board of: 

Salary Sanitary Officer, 1,600.00 1,600.00 

Milk Inspection, 300.00 225.00 

Fumigation Supplies, 100.00 129.45 

Incidentals, 1,000.00 898.15 

Contagious Diseases, 700.00 594.22 



$3,700.00 $3,446.82 $253.18 

Highway Department: 

Salary, Supt. of Streets, 2,000.00 2,000.00 

General Maintenance and Re- 
pairs, 55,000 . 00 51,464 .91 

Permanent Work, South Main 

Street, to complete to West, 2,500 .00 745 . 64 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New, 750 .00 79 . 12 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Repair, 2,500.00 2,792.19 



Catch Basins, 
Care of Trees, 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 
Appropriations. 

$1,300.00 
1,500.00 



Incidentals and Land Damages, 
Resolution Xo. 352, 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, 

Interest, Bonds, 

Interest, Temporary Loan, 
Resolution No. 352, 

Land Sold for Taxes: 
Resolution No. 336, 
" 346, 

Taxes on Land Sold City: 
Resolution No. 335, 
" 345, 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 

Memorial Day, 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, 

Open Air Concerts, 

John Kimball Playground, 
Resolution No. 352, 
Rollins Park Playground, 

Parks, 

Pecker Athletic Field, 

Police and Watch: 
Salaries, 

Emergency Officer, 
Fuel, 

Horse Hire, Penacook, 
Helmets and Buttons, 
Lights, 



$65,550.00 $59 



9,000.00 
2,859.71 

1,826.17 

7,150.00 

4,211.81 
193.75 



15.25 
865.96 



4.38 
11.89 

3,000.00 

460.00 

1,000.00 

450.00 

500.00 

35.02 

500.00 

4,000.00 

25.00 



24,893.25 

500.00 

700.00 

25.00 

50.00 

225.00 



403 

Expended. Balance. 

$875 .19 

1,061.32 

,018.37 $6,531.63 

11,859.71 

1,826.17 

6,983.50 166.50 

4,405.56 

881.21 

16.27 

3,000.00 

460.00 

1,000.00 

450.00 „ 

535.02 

492.24 7.76 

3,997.44 2.5a 

4.00 21. oa 



22,088.63 

882.70 

1,132.98 

7.50 

41.31 

326.81 



404 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriations. Expeneed. Balance. 

Telephone, Private Line, $243 . 36 $243 .36 

Incidentals, 1,000.00 1,270.94 

Supplies, Patrol Wagon, 600.00 780.84 



$28,236.61 $26,775.07 $1,461.54 

Precinct Garbage, 11,000.00 10,305.22 

Debit Balance, 1917, 20.09 

Resolution No. 352, Account 

Earnings, 180.44 



$11,180.44 $10,325.31 $855.13 
Precinct, Lighting Streets, City, 20,300 . 00 



, 90 689 14 

Balance, 1917, 163.24' -"'"-^-^* 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, Pena- 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, West 

Concord, 800.00 400.00 400.00 

Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Construction and Repairs, 1,000 . 00 2,737 .82 

Balance, 1917, 2,376.67 

Interest, Bonds, 2,675.00 2,695.00 

Balance, 1917, 387 . 50 

Resolution No. 352, Earnings, 9 . 48 



Balance, 1917, 236.80 

Interest on Bonds, 55 . 00 65 . 00 

Balance, 1917, 10.00 

Bond, 1,000.00 1,000.00 



$6,448.65 $5,432.82 $1,015.83 

Precinct, Sewer, East Concord: 
Construction and Repairs, Bal- 
ance, 1917, 195.91 195.91 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 

Construction and Repairs, 200.00 203.29 



$1,501.80 $1,268.29 $233.51 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 


405 


Appropriations. Expended. 


Balance. 


Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School : 




Construction and Repairs, 




Balance, 1917, $94.55 


$94.55 



Precinct, Sewer, West Concord : 
Construction and Repair, 
Balance, 1917, 
Interest on Bond, 
Balance, 1917, 
Bonds, 



Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 
Balance, 1917, 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, Pena- 
cook. 
Balance, 1917, 

Printing and Stationery, 
Resolution No. 340, 

Public Baths, 

Pubhc Library: 
Salaries, 
Balance, 1917, 
Incidentals, 
Balance, 1917, 
Trust Funds, 
Fines, 



Repairs of Buildings, 
Resolution No. 352, 

Salaries: 
Mayor, 
City Clerk, 

Clerk, Board of PubUc Works, 
Overseers of Poor, 
Sohcitor, 
Treasurer, 



100.00 $26.20 

5.71 

28.00 28.00 

5.25 

500.00 500.00 

$638.96 $554.20 $84.76 



300 

181. n 



oo\ 

■=.1/ 



3,000.00 
1,000.00 

300.00 



381.58 

3,818.33 
215.64 



99.93 

181.67 
84.36 



3,535.00 3,744.92 

86.80 

2,350.00 2,696.93 

119.13 

461.44 

180.00 

$6, 732 . 37 $6,441 . 85 $290 . 52 

'•TtT,} '•""■'' 

1,500.00 1,500.00 

1,400.00 1,400.00 

200.00 200.00 

390.00 390.00 

800.00 800.00 

1,225.00 1,225.00 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriations. Expended. Balance 

Messenger, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Building Inspector, 200 . 00 200 . 00 

City Physicians, 700.00 700.00 

Care City Clocks, 110.00 110.00 

Assessors, 3,000 . 00 3,000 00 

Moderators, Ward Clerks, 360 . 00 360 00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of 

Election, 960 . 00 960 . 00 

Judge, Police Court, 1 ,200 . 00 900 . 00 

Clerk, Police Court, 500 . 00 500 . 00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures, 336 . 80 Tax Levy 

Collector of Taxes, 2,400.00 82.50 1916 

555.00 1917 

Resolution, No. 352, 449.30 2,175.00 1918 



$16,394.30 $16,-394. 30 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,905 . 00 1,905 . 00 

Schools: 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1917, 38, 730 . 79 145, 530 . 79 

Appropriation, 41,396.74 

Amount Voted by District, 1 1 1 ,393 . 76 

Literary Fund, 1,874.46 

Dog Licenses, 1,254.58 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 36 . 61 

Repairs, 2,000.00 

Bonds, 8,000.00 8,000.00 

Interest 6,995.00 7,147. 50 

Balance, 1917, 2,467.50 



$214,149.44 $160,678.29 $53,471.15 

Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1917, 3,220 . 36 13,720 .36 

Appropriation, 3,835.76 

Literary Fund, 173 .69 

Dog Licenses, 116.25 

Amount Voted by District, 12,284 .21 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3.39 

One-half Salary Superintendent, 700.00 



$20,333.66 $13,720.36 $6,613.30 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 407 

Appropriations. Expended. Balance. 



School District No. 20: 






Interest, 


$.348.25 


$238.00 $110.25 


Bonds, 


500.00 


500.00 


Sinking Fund, 


250.00 


250.00 




$1,098.25 


$988.00 $110.25 


Theatre Property: 






Resolution No. 320, 


100.00 


100.00 


Temporary Loan: 






Resolution No. 312, 


50,000 00 " 




" 319, 


100,000.00 


■175,000.00 


" 347, 


25,000.00 _ 




Coimty Tax, 




45,.546.36 


State Tax, 




48.248.00 


RECEIPTS. 




Receipts of the city for the year ending December 31, 1918: 


To Balance on hand, January 


1, 1918, 


.$27,879.06 


Taxes, 1914, 




164.03 


" 1915, 




636.02 


" 1916, 




3,707.72 


" 1917, 




39,208.19 


" 1918, 




396,900.00 


Library Fines, 




180.00 


Municipal Court Fees, 




738.97 


Amusement Licenses, 




574.00 


Rent, Auditorium, 




444.00 


Rents, City Hall 




205.00 


County Paupers off Farm, 




14,218.95 


Dependent Soldiers, County, 




1,885.58 


Temporary Loans, 




145,000.00 


Highway Department, 




2,677.68 


Garbage Precinct, 




180.44 


Dog Licenses, 




1,504.58 


Dog License Fees, 




134.40 


Junk Dealers' Licenses, 




160.00 


Hack and Job Team Licenses, 




92.50 


Pool Table Licenses, 




350.00 


Fees, City Clerk, 




281.45 


Employment Office License, 




10.00 



408 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Milk License Fees, $180 . 00 

Sale of Horses, junk, etc. 233.21 

Pawnbroker's License, 25 . 00 

Balance Excise Commission Fees, 322 . 96 

Forestry Commission, Fire Bills, 31 . 60 

Fines, etc., City Marshall, 461 .09 

Taxes Sold City and Redeemed, 1913, 29.83 

" " " 1914, 24.12 

" " " 1915, 45.78 

" " " 1916, 156.39 

" " " 1917, 148.21 

Declarations of Candidacy, State Primary, 104.00 

Insurance Tax, 2,619.75 

Railroad Tax, 45,418.56 

Savings Bank Tax, 62,090 . 71 

Literary Fund, . 2,048 . 15 

Proportion School Fund, 700.00 

Building and Loan Association Tax, 294 . 38 

Income, Seth K. Jones, Public Library Trust Fimd, 17.00 

" G. Parker Lyon, PubUc Library Trust Fund, 40 . 00 

" Thos. G. Valpey, PubUc Library Trust Fund, 20 . 00 

" P. B. Cogswell, PubUc Library Trust Fund, 85 . 90 

" Franlilin Pierce, Public Library Trust Fund, 40 . 00 

" Joseph Hazeltine, Public Library Trust Fund, 133.54 

" Abial Walker Trust Fimd, Schools, 40.00 

" Samuel C. Eastman Trust Fund, 125.00 

" Katherine P. and Douglas Rollins Trust Fund, 61 . 87 

" Old North Cemetery Fund, 32.60 

" Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund, 1,296.62 

" Maple Grove Cemetery Fund, 42.44 

" Millville Cemetery Fund, 105.69 

" Pine Grove Cemetery Fund, 28.75 

" Sou cook Cemetery Fimd, .74 

Transferred, Old North Cemetery Account, 230 . 00 

" Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 4,699 43 

" Millville Cemetery Account, 40.50 

" Pine Grove Cemetery Account, 34 . 25 

" Maple Grove Cemetery Account, 189.15 

Income Trust Funds, Maple Grove Cemetery, 36.00 

" " " Old Fort Cemetery, 5.50 

" Pine Grove Cemetery, 102.25 

" Millville Cemetery, 46.50 

" " " Soucook Cemetery, 6.50 

" Old North Cemetery, 283.25 

" Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,430.94 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 409 



Interest, National State Capital Bank, 

Refund on account of G. C. Percy, 

Reimbursements from towns, account of aid furnished 

their poor, 
Dehydrating Plant, 
Miscellaneous, 



$1,049.42 


105 00 


412.25 


167.00 


210.21 


$763,184.61 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements : 

City Departments, $201,196 . 53 

City Poor, 2,751.86 

County Poor and Soldiers, 14,059 . 75 

City Notes, 175,000.00 

City Bonds, 11,800.00 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 11,389.06 

Interest Cemetery Trust Fvmds, 1,826.17 

Schools, 159,251.15 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 7,385 . 50 

School Bonds, 8,500.00 

School District No. 20, Sinking Fund, 250.00 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 7,364 . 05 

Penacook, 381.58 

" Lighting Streets, City, 20,689.14 

" " Penacook, 2,025.00 

" West Concord, 400.00 

" Garbage, 10,305.22 

Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 2,788.00 

Repairs, 2,967.31 

Bonds, 1,500.00 

County Tax, 45,546.36 

State Tax, 48,248.00 

Paid Outstanding Orders, 646.29 

Treasury' balance, January 1, 1919, 27,182.64 



$763,453.61 
Less outstanding orders unpaid Januarj' 1, 1919, 269.00 

$763,184.61 



410 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONCORD WATER WORKS. 





Receipts. 


Expenditures. 


Cash balance January 1, 1918, 


$22,908.31 




Receipts deposited with Treasurer, 


78,077.15 




Expended per orders. 




S29,53i.39 


Investment net income, 




20,846.00 


Bonds, 
Interest, 




10,000.00 
16,230.00 


Treasury balance January 1, 1919, 




24,378.07 




S100,98.5.46 


$100,98.5.46 



HENRY E. CIL\MBERLAIN, 

City Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $90,000 . 00 

State Library bonds, 15,000 . 00 

Bridge bonds, 74,000.00 

Cemetery trust fund note, 52,176.43 



$231,176.43 



Debt Not Funded. 



Orders outstanding January 1, 1919, 


$269.00 


Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 




nicipal bonds, 


1,667.50 


Coupons overdue, not presented. 




municipal bonds, 


231.00 


Coupons overdue, not presented. 




Union School District bonds, 


127.50 


Due school districts. 


60,084.45 


school district No. 20, 


110.25 


public library, account trust 




funds. 


290.52 


precinct, garbage. 


855.13 


precinct sewer. East Con- 




cord, 


• 195.91 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 411 



Due precinct sewer, city. 


$1,015.83 




precinct sewer, St. Paul's 






School, 


94.55 




precinct sewer, Penacook, 


233.51 




precinct sewer. West Con- 






cord, 


84.76 




precinct lighting streets. 




\ 


West Concord, 


400.00 




precinct lighting streets, Pen- 






acook, 


600.00 




precinct sprinkling streets. 






city. 


2,213.95 




precinct sprinkling streets, 






Penacook, 


99.93 




cemeteries. 


98.87 




Total debt not funded, 




$68,672.66 


Total city indebtedness. 


$299,849.09 



Available Assets. 
Treasurer's cash balance, Januaiy 



1, 1919, 


$27,182.64 


Taxes, 1914, uncollected. 


568.53 


Taxes, 1915, uncollected, 


1,058.21 


Taxes, 1916, uncollected. 


1,740.74 


Taxes, 1917, uncollected. 


4,695.39 


Taxes, 1918, uncollected, 


44,606.38 


Cash in hands of tax collector, 




January 1, 1919, 


833.51 


Taxes bid in by city, 


4,036.44 


Due quarry rent. 


150.00 


Due highway department. 


2,092.37 


Due Merrimack County, county 




poor. 


6,489.04 


Due Merrimack County, depend- 




ent soldiers, 


679.29 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Due from towns, account of aid to 

their poor, $168.00 

Overdraft, lighting streets, city, 225 . 90 

Overdraft, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 837 . 8 1 

verdraf t, Maple Grove Cemetery, 10 . 29 

Overdraft, Pine Grove Cemetery, 14 . 13 



,388.67 

Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1919, $204,460 . 42 
Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1918, 202,894 . 64 



Increase for the year, $1,565 . 7& 



PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

Water works bonds, $407,000 . 00 

Sewer bonds, 70,000.00 



$477,000.00 



Debt Not Funded. 

Interest accrued, not yet due, sewer 

bonds, $630.83 

Interest accrued, not j'et due, 

water bonds, 7,574 . 58 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

sewer bonds, 92 . 50 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

water bonds, 221.00 



8,518.91 
$485,518.91 



financial statement. 413 

Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1919, $24,378.07 

Due garbage precinct, 121.85 



124,499.92 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1919, $461,018. 99 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1918, 472,734 . 53 



Decrease for the year, $ 1 1 , 7 1 5 . 54 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $187,000.00 
Interest accrued, not 3'et due, 2,600 . 83 



$189,600.83 



Penacook School District bonds, $6,300 . 00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 73 . 50 



6,373.50 

Net hability of school districts, $195,984 . 33 

West Concord sewer bonds, $300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2 . 63 



$302.63 



Penacook sewer bonds, $500 . 00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 10 . 00 



$510.00 



414 CITY OF CONCORD. 

RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $204,460.42 

precinct debt, 461,018.99 

school districts, 195,984.33 

West Concord sewer debt, 302 . 63 

Penacook sewer debt, 510.00 



$862,276.37 



Aggregate indebtedness over 

available assets January 1, 

1919, $862,276.37 

Aggregate indebtedness over 

available assets January 1, 

1918, $882,580.08 



Decrease for the year, $20,303.71 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Having Value but not Considered Available Assets. 



Water department, $1,114,151 .39 




Fire department, 


161,537.50 




Highway department, 


37,200.00 




Engineering department, 


997.00 




Sewer department, 


1,272.00 




Penaeook sewer. 


40.15 




West Concord sewer. 


23 . 65 




Health department, 


940.00 




PoHce department. 


40,681.65 




City clerk's office, 


1,150.00 




Commissioner's office, 


140.17 




Mayor's office, 


250.00 




Assessors' office, 


622.00 




Tax collector's office. 


296.00 




Sealer of weights and measures. 


325.00 




City messenger's department, 


2,250.00 




Park commissioner's depart- 






ment. 


225.00 




Cemetery commissioner's de- 






partment. 


250.00 




Public library, 


11,000.00 




Milk inspection, 


25.00 




City history commission, 


10.00 




Real estate, 


338,382.50 






$1,711,769, 


,01 



1918. 
Population of city (census 1910), 21,497 

Valuation of city, $20,440,315 . 00 

Tax assessed for the year, $447,484 . 47 

Rate of taxation, $12 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $6.90. 
Rate for precinct, $2.80. 
Total rate, $21.70 per $1,000. 



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INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Assessors, board of, report of 279 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 335 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 38S 

Cemetery department, reports of 302 

City'clerk, report of 306 

government, departments, personnel of, 1918 23 

assessors 28 

board of aldermen 23 

board of public works 26 

building inspector 35 

cemetery committees 37 

clerk 26 

collector of taxes 28 

commissioners of cemeteries 38 

committees of board of aldermen 27 

drain layers 43 

engineer 27 

fence-viewers 39 

fire department, ofl&cers of 34 

health officers 35 

hydrant commissioners 36 

inspector of petroleum 39 

mayor 25 

messenger 28 

overseers of poor 29 

park commissioner 36 

physician, city and assistant 29 

plumbers, board of examiners of 43 

pound-keeper 39 

police department officers and members of police force 30 

public library, trustees of 32 

librarian and assistants 32 

registrar of vital statistics 35 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 28 

sealers of leather 40 

sealer of weights and measures 40 

solicitor 29 

street department, superintendent of streets 28 

superintendent of Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 38 

superintendent of clocks 35 



476 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE. 

City superintendent of parks 36 

surveyors of painting 41 

masonry 42 

wood, lumber and bark 42 

treasurer 27 

trustees of trust funds 33 

undertakers 38 

ward officers 44 

water-works, city, commissioners 33 

superintendent 33 

weigher 41 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 40 

Coupon account, statement of 391 

Debts, recapitulation 414 

Engineer, city, report of 231 

Financial statement 400 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 189 

fire-alarms 191 

roll of members 21^ 

Highways, financial statement of 242 

department, report of superintendent 239 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 238 

John Kimball Playground, report of committee on 271 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 381 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 46 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 385 

Municipal debt 410 

regulations 2 

Court, report of 298 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 387 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 378 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Parks, public, report of commissioners 304 

Physician, city, report of '. 274 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 383 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 235 

Police department, report of city marshal 290 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1908 283 

Poor department, report of overseer 307 

Population 416 

Precincts, debts of 412 

Property, city, inventory of 415 

Public library, report of trustees 225 

librarian 226 

Public Works, board of, report of 239 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 254 

contagious diseases 262 

milk inspector, report of 257 

sanitary oflBcer, report of 258 



INDEX. 477 

PAGE. 

School reports 51 

Union School District, Albin Prize Medal contest 96 

annual school meeting warrant 101 

annual school meeting 103 

attendance officer 53 

attendance officer, report of 83 

attendance, tables of 108 

board of education 51 

board of education, report of 55 

census, 1918 121 

clerk 54 

cooking, report of 73 

drawing, report of 75 

elocutionary contest 93 

events of the year 105 

English prize essay contest 97 

financial agent, report of 57 

fire drills 124 

graduating classes 137 

high school, report of 72 

honor, roll of 130 

Kindergarten songs & games 99 

Memorial Day offering 100 

military drill, report of 89 

manual training, report of 85 

movement of pupils through grades 126 

music, report of 84 

officers of the district 54 

school assistant 54 

school nurse 54 

school nurse, report of 80 

sewing, report of 76 

superintendent 53 

superintendent, report of 61 

teachers, list of 115 

transportation routes 123 

war saving stamps 100 

Sealer of^Weights & Measures, Report of 275 

Sewer department, report of 250 

Solicitor, report of 277 

Soucook Cemetery, receipts of 386 

South End Playground 272 

Tax collector, report of 285 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 394 

Treasury, report of 350 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 309 

Trust funds 313 

Trusts, individual cenetery 320 

Vital statistics, tables of 418 

Water department, report of 145 

commissioners, report of 151 

coupon, account of 393 

engineer's report 160 



478 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE. 

Water department, fire hydrants 172 

inventory 188 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 392 

receipts for each year 164 

schedule of pipes and gates 167 

summary of statistics 183 

superintendent, report of 154 

treasurer's report 162-392