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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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SIXTY-i^lMIB 41^NUAL RKPORT 






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1921 
SIXTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THK 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1921 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCOED, N. H. 

Evans Printing Compant 

1922 



M 
1 '9^ I 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should k7ioiv that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS 

OF 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN 

January 24, 1922 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: 

We meet at this hour in accordance with the provisions 
of the city charter to take the oath of office for the faith- 
ful performance of duty and to assume the responsibili- 
ties intrusted to us by the people of Concord. 

I wish to express my deep appreciation of the honor 
conferred by my election to the office of mayor for a 
second term and I am aware of the great responsibility 
that rests upon me. It will be my endeavor to conduct 
the affairs of the office in such manner as to merit the 
confidence placed in me. 

Equal responsibility is yours in the conduct of munic- 
ipal affairs. The management of city business requires 
as careful consideration as that of any private enter- 
prise, for successful management carries with it difficul- 
ties which are unknown in private business. It is our 
duty to give to the city our full measure of thoughtful, 
energetic service, conducting the business on business 
principles, subordinating every partisan interest and re- 
fusing to give consideration to petty or sectional demands 
when not justified upon the ground of common welfare. 

I believe that one great factor in our success would be 
co-operation and confidence in the motives and principles 
of one another. I believe that the board of public works 
should keep in closer contact with the departments under 



4 CITY OP CONCORD. 

their supervision and obtain first-hand information in re- 
gard to them. 

In my inaugural of two years ago I hesitated to ex- 
press my views on certain municipal affairs which I had 
formed after serving two years as an alderman and 
seventeen years as city clerk, for the reason that I had 
not then studied them as mayor. During the past two 
years I have endeavored to study affairs from that angle 
also, and whatever opinions I have formed and whatever 
suggestions I may make are the result of careful con- 
sideration and not the result of favoritism or animosity 
toward any department of the city. 

We are living in a progressive age and the demand for 
modern methods is insistent, but w^e must be guarded in 
our expenditures and live within our reasonable means. 
Our taxpayers do not expect us to be niggardly, neither 
do they desire extravagance nor waste. In these times 
when Federal taxes are necessarily high it behooves us 
to strive in every way to lift all possible burdens from 
the tax and rent payer. I would not have you infer that 
I am inclined to be pessimistic, but I do believe that our 
city has been too optimistic and has permitted expendi- 
tures to increase out of all proportion to the increase 
of both population and valuations. For a period, at least, 
we should proceed more nearly on a pay-as-you-go plan, 
avoiding as much as possible any increase in our interest 
charges, especially at the present high rates. We cannot 
expect to draw new industries or solve the housing prob- 
lem unless we have an average tax rate which is at- 
tractive. 

The board of assessors is one of the most important 
departments of the city and they are subject to certain 
tax laws. To adjust real estate fairly and impartially 
requires good judgment, and I believe that the efficient 
work of our board of assessors has done much to keep 
our tax rate as low as it has been. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 

The municipal funded debt is as follows : 

City Hall bonds $67,000.00 

State Library bonds 15,000.00 

Bridge bonds 62,000.00 

Cemetery Trust Fund note 52,176.43 



-$196,176.43 



Precinct funded debt : 

Water Works bonds $335,000.00 

Sewer bonds 58,000.00 



393,000.00 



Union School District bonds $159,000.00 
School District No. 20 bonds 4,800.00 



163,800.00 



Total $752,976.43 

At the beginning of 1920 our total debt was $866,976.43, 
so the present debt shows a decrease of $114,000 in the 
last two years. The bonds to be paid in 1922 are as 
follows : 



City Hall 


.$7,000.00 


Bridge 


4,000.00 


Sewers 


4,000.00 


Union School District 


10,000.00 


School District No. 20 


500.00 



$25,500.00 

For the past few years we have been reducing our 
debt from $30,000 to $50,000 each year and I hope that 
we may continue to do this rather than increase the debt. 
To mortgage the future to pay for the present is a poor 
policy. Borrowing money with which to meet current 
expenses should be avoided and if we incur debt for 
improvements we should use wise discrimination when 
such is proposed. 



6 CITY OP CONCORD. 

We have a well regulated and well equipped police 
department. We do not have a force large enough to 
cover the whole territory of the city and I would recom- 
mend that the committee on police and license in con- 
junction with the city marshal devise some method of 
patroling whereby a larger territory might be covered, 
which I think could be done without impairing the pres- 
ent efficiency. I have found the police officers generally 
attentive to their duties and I think they may be depended 
upon to perform them without fear or favor and at the 
same time with an observance of courtesy and the con- 
sideration to which every citizen is entitled. I believe 
that all traffic laws should be enforced. As traffic regula- 
tions vary so widely in different cities and states, the en- 
forcement requires tact and good judgment on the part 
of the police officers and I trust that while requiring 
obedience to our laws, they may be enforced courteously 
for such conduct helps to establish the good name of our 
city. 

In regard to the fire department, I am still of the 
opinion that for a city of our population and area we 
have a modern department and one that is fairly well 
equipped. In the last few years we have had several serious 
fires which have apparently been efficiently managed, 
for if they had not been the fire loss would have been 
much greater. I think that the firemen are attentive to 
their duties and doing their work efficiently. I believe 
that a younger man should be in line for promotion and 
training so that in the event of the retirement of the 
present chief there would be some one familiar with the 
work of the department. He should understand the fire 
alarm system, the management of men, both in the sta- 
tions and at fires, and have knowledge of fire conditions 
in the business section, the various public buildings and 
school houses. Without doubt motor driven apparatus 
adds to the efficiency of the department and whenever 
more is purchased it should be of that type. Should con- 



INAUGURxVL ADDRESS. 7 

ditions require considering any reorganization of this 
department I will make it the subject of a special mes- 
sage to the board. 

Sanitary conditions in Concord compare favorably 
with those of other cities and the cost of maintaining the 
department is well under that of cities of similar size. 
We are fortunately situated in many ways for healthful 
living conditions. "We have a splendid supply of pure 
water and good milk and plenty of recreation spots, all 
of which contribute to the good health of the community. 
Fortunately we have had no serious epidemics during 
the last two years. We are still without a contagious 
disease hospital and I would recommend that arrange- 
ments be made with the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 
trustees for the enlargement of the Foster ward at that 
institution. The city might finance such undertaking, 
leaving the supervision with the hospital authorities, but 
I think that admission to the contagious ward should be 
through the board of health as they have control of com- 
municable diseases. I hope this matter may have early 
consideration from the board of aldermen. Tuberculosis 
and venereal disease clinics have been established in Con- 
cord by the Federal and State governments, the room be- 
ing furnished by the city. These clinics, together with 
the medical inspection in our schools, the co-operation of 
the Red Cross, District Nursing Association and Charity 
Organization Society, are of very great assistance to the 
sanitary officer in the work of his department. 

We are fortunate in the number, size and location of 
our public parks and playgrounds, for nearly every sec- 
tion of the city has an attractive recreation spot within 
a short distance. The beautiful lot of land of about 
twenty acres in Penacook which was presented to the 
city in 1921 by Mr. Abial W. Rolfe is a valuable addition 
to our city. This is named Rolfe Park to perpetuate the 
name of an early settler in that part of the city, adding 
another to our city memorials recalling such former citi- 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

zens as White, Rollins, West, Pecker, Doyen, Kimball, 
Kent and Fowler, besides those whose names are carried 
by our schools. Being the gift of a personal friend and 
acquaintance of many years it was with much pride that 
I could record the addition of this park during my first 
administration. I hope that some plan will be worked 
out by the committee on playgrounds whereby a begin- 
ning may be made toward permanent improvements on 
this piece of land. Having all the playgrounds under 
the supervision of one committee has been an advantage, 
both as regards permanent improvements and the results 
obtained in supervision. The creditable performance 
given at the end of the season indicates interested, care- 
ful work on the part of those in charge and there can be 
no doubt of the great benefit derived from the public 
playground. An increased appropriation would make 
it possible to provide a new bath house at the river if 
the public bath there is continued, and there should with- 
out doubt be an instructor for the safety of those using 
the public bath. 

The matter of a suitable memorial to the World War 
veterans has been discussed considerably and it seems 
to be the desire of the Legion and the citizens in general 
that the memorial be in the form of an athletic field. 
There is a possibility that the swimming pool proposition 
which was brought up last year might be considered in 
connection with the athletic field. While I believe that 
we should erect a memorial, I am of the opinion that we 
should proceed with caution and judgment in regard to 
it in order that the work may stand the test of time and 
forever remain a true memorial. With limited appropria- 
tions the park commissioners and the superintendent 
have kept our parks in a very creditable condition and 
they are an attractive feature of our city. 

During the past two years there has been nothing done 
in the way of permanent work by the city highway de- 
partment. The only pieces of permanent construction 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 9 

were a section of macadam on the Hopkinton road at 
Dimond Hill in 1920 and 962 feet of cement and 17,000 
feet of macadam roadway on the Loudon road during 
the past season, all of them being built by the state 
highway department. It is important to keep the roads 
that have been permanently improved in repair and I 
think it should be the policy of the department to do this 
and also to do something in the line of permanent con- 
struction each year. Even following such a policy it 
will be difficult to keep our highways in condition to 
meet the demands of traffic. I wish that there might be 
some solution of the sprinkling problem on Main street 
through the business section. The number of automo- 
biles parked at the curb and the traffic through the street 
make sprinkling impossible. I am not entirely satisfied 
with the material used as a dust layer. The condition of 
the street so treated after a rain is far from satisfactory 
and the work required to repair the surface apparently 
exceeds the cost of sprinkling with water. There is a 
movement being made by the state highway department 
to change the road at the Soucook river bridge where a 
number of accidents have occurred. The change would 
eliminate several bad curves and reduce the grade. It 
would require the construction of a new bridge and 
would probably cost the city about $15,000, the Federal and 
State governments also bearing a portion of the whole 
expense. The amount of garbage collected is increasing 
and the cost correspondingly. I have noticed that there 
is a tendency among the citizens to put out for collection 
by the department large quantities of brush. The ordi- 
nance says that "no brush, old lumber, or other similar 
things which cannot be placed in a receptacle shall be 
put into the highway." Either the ordinance should be 
amended or it should be enforced as it now stands. 

There is a petition before the board of public works 
for the extension of the sewer on Clinton street, which 
they have recommended to the full board should be 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

built. Petitions for sewer extensions in other localities have 
also been presented that for health and other benefits 
►should probably be granted. 

The water-works, one of our most valuable properties, 
is in excellent condition and well managed. It is steadily 
paying its indebtedness and also making the necessary 
improvements each year to keep it up to date. 

The appearance of all of the cemeteries in Concord shows 
that the money appropriated is wisely expended. Last 
year the construction of a new iron fence at the Old 
North cemetery on Bradley street was the beginning of 
an improvement that I hope may be continued another 
year. The heating plant installed in the waiting station 
at Blossom Hill has proved a great convenience, both to 
those visiting the cemetery and the superintendent, as 
it has made it possible for him to have an office there. 
The superintendent and his assistant are to be compli- 
mented on the well kept condition of Blossom Hill, which 
is a most beautiful spot. 

During the summer it w^as my privilege to view our 
city from the air and the first thing to attract my at- 
tention was the great number of trees in business and 
residential sections as well as in the outlying districts. 
Visitors to our city are impressed with the beauty of our 
shade trees and we should take reasonable pride in pre- 
serving any feature of our city that is a credit to it. 
"We expend in the care of trees less than many cities of 
smaller size having fewer trees. The tree warden has 
had many years' experience in caring for our trees, and 
their splendid condition indicates careful and judicious 
expenditure of the appropriation. 

In our public libraVy we have an example of an 
efficiently directed department, keeping within its appro- 
priation and at the same time serving the public well. 
This is to the great credit of the librarian and her as- 
sistants and also to the trustees who take much interest 
in the library. In the death of Judge Walker, who had 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 11 

served as president of the board of trustees for many 
years, the library lost a valuable friend. He was deeply 
interested in its welfare and gave much of his time to 
further its interests. He had hoped that at some time 
there might be a beginning made toward a new library 
building by setting aside a certain sum each year. We 
have outgrown our present library building and I hope 
that we may have a new one before many years. 

I would recommend that appropriations be made as 
usual for the hospitals, the Charity Organization Society, 
District Nursing Association, Memorial Day and band 
concerts. 

Taking all things into consideration, I think that the 
city departments are in general well managed. A former 
mayor expressed a thought in regard to them that I 
feel is worth repeating. "An unvarying courtesy toward 
one another and a generous hospitality toward strangers 
will be very helpful. Nothing characterizes a city more 
favorably than gentlemanly and obliging conduct in its 
officers and employees and I earnestly invoke the heads 
of all departments to insist upon decorum and politeness 
on the part of every employee of the city." 

I believe that we should have more community spirit. 
The work of the Concord Chamber of Commerce is along 
this very line and they are creating a spirit of co-opera- 
tion in this city whose value cannot be over-estimated. 
To have a municipal Christmas tree is a splendid custom, 
but we have gradually, year by year, lost interest until 
now only a few participate in the exercises. The Armis- 
tice Day service called forth a splendid audience to 
show their respect to the ideals and sacrifices of the man- 
hood of this country in the World War. It would indeed 
be a pity if we allow ourselves to forget the spirit that 
called us on that day. If we hope to ever return to the 
more normal life that we were living before interrupted 
by those few years of stress and strife, we need to pause 
and consider how we are living at the present time. I 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

believe we shall find that we need more co-operation in 
our business life, more thought for one another in our 
social life and more religion in our moral life. 

With us, as the servants of the people, rests the re- 
sponsibility of conducting the affairs of the city to the 
very best of our ability and the measure of success with 
which we meet will depend in a greater degree than the 
citizens of this community realize upon their co-operation 
and interest in the welfare of the city. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 9, 1922. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance providing for fire protection. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Alderrnen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. No person, firm, or corporation shall have in any 
building, or upon any premises or other place, or in or about 
any highway or v^^ay, whether used as a public or private 
thoroughfare, ;n close proximity to any building or buildings, 
any combustible or explosive matter or dangerous accumulation 
of rubbish, ashes, or accumulation of waste paper, boxes, shav- 
ings, or other inflammable material, which is so situated as to 
be a fire hazard. 

Sect. 2. No person, firm, or corporation, shall obstruct any 
fire escape, stairs, passageway, door, or window, of any build- 
ing, in such manner as to interfere with the operations of the 
Fire Department, or egress of occupants in case of fire. 

Sect. 3. No person, firm, or corporation shall place ashes 
in any wooden container, which is in contact with any wooden 
surface within any building. 

Sect. 4. No person, firm, or corporation, shall keep or per- 
mit to be kept, in or about any building, any oily waste or oily 
rags, unless, when not in actual use, such oily waste or oily 
rags are kept in a self closing metal container with riveted 
joints, no part of the body of said container to be within five 
inches of any inflammable surface. 

Sect. 5. It shall be the duty of the Chief of the Fire De- 
partment to inspect, or cause to be inspected by such officers 
or members of the Fire Department as he shall designate, as 
often as he shall deem necessary, all buildings, premises, and 
public and private thoroughfares, and cause to be corrected 
any conditions liable to cause fire, or any violations of the pro- 
visions of this ordinance; said inspection shall be made at least 
once each month within the limits beginning on the main track 
of the Southern Division of the Boston and Maine Railroad, at 
a point in the center line of Centre Street extended easterly; 



14 CITY OP CONCORD. 

thence westerly by the centre line of said Centre Street ex- 
tended and of said Centre Street, to the centre line of North 
State Street; thence southerly by the centre line of North 
and South State Streets to the centre line of Fayette Street; 
thence easterly by the centre line of said Fayette Street to the 
centre line of South Main Street; thence southerly by the cen- 
tre line of South Main Street, to the centre line of Concord 
Street; thence easterly by the centre line of Concord Street 
extended easterly, to the south bound track of the Southern 
Division of said Boston and Maine Railroad; thence northerly 
by said track to the point of beginning. 

Sect. 6. Whenever the Chief of the Fire Department or any 
officer or member of the Fire Department designated as afore- 
said, shall find any violation of the provisions of this ordinance, 
the Chief of the Fire Department shall by notice in writing, 
delivered to the tenant or occupant, and owner of such building 
or premises, immediately order the removal of the fire hazard, 
or the condition corrected, within such time as he shall desig- 
nate in said order and such order shall be complied with by such 
tenant or occupant, and owner. In case a condition contrary to 
the provisions of this ordinance is found in a public highway, 
alley or way, the Chief of the Fire Department shall imme- 
diately give written notice to the Superintendent of Streets, 
who shall forthwith remove such condition. 

Sect. 7. The service of any order of the Chief of the Fire 
Department upon any tenant or occupant, and owner of any 
building or premises to whom it is directed, shall be made, by 
delivering true copies of said order to such tenant or occupant, 
and owner, if within the jurisdiction of the officer making the 
order, otherwise, by mailing true copies of said order to the 
said tenant or occupant, and owner, at their last knowTi post 
office address. 

Sect. 8. All tenants, occupants, and owners of buildings or 
premises, shall permit the Chief of the Fire Department, or 
officers or members of said Department designated by him, to 
inspect at any reasonable time, their buildings or premises, 
for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this ordinance. 

Sect. 9. The Chief of the Fire Department shall keep a rec- 
ord of all inspections, and a copy of all orders issued by him, 
on forms provided for that purpose, which shall remain on file 
and of record, in the office of the Chief of the Fire Department. 
He shall also report monthly to the Board of Aldermen the 
street number, name, or location of the building inspected to- 
gether with the name of the person making the inspection. 



ORDINANCES. 15 

Sect. 10. Any person, firm, or corporation, failing to com- 
ply with the order of the Chief of the Fire Department, shall 
be fined not more than $20.00 for each offense, and each twenty- 
four hours of maintenance of prohibited conditions, shall con- 
stitute a separate off"ense. 

Sect. 11. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent 
with this ordinance, are hereby repealed. 

Sect. 12. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 14, 1921. 



An Ordinance relative to the salary of the city sealer. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 2 of "An Ordinance providing for 
the term of office and salary of the City Sealer" passed January 
14th, 1918, so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows : 

"Sect. 2. The salary of the city sealer shall be five 
hundred dollars per annum in full for all services 
rendered as such sealer." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent 
with this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance 
shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 28, 1921. 



An Ordinance amending section 12, of chapter 41, revised 
ordinances, relative to salaries of ward officers. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Ald\ermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 12, Chapter 41, Revised Ordi- 
nances by striking out the whole of said section and inserting 
in the place thereof the following: 

Sect. 12. The moderators shall each receive the 
sum of forty dollars per annum, the ward clerks shall 



16 CITY OF CONCORD, 

each receive the sum of forty dollars per annum, the 
supervisors of the check-list shall be paid as follows: 
Wards 1, 2, 3, 8 and 9, forty dollars per annum. 
Wards 4, 5, 6 and 7, fifty dollars per annum. 

The inspectors of election shall each receive 
the sum of eight dollars per day for each day's service. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect for and after the 
year 1921. 

Passed March 28, 1921. 



An Ordinance amending an ordinance relating to the 
regulation of street traffic. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Ald\erm,en of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 15 of Article 2 be amended by 
striking out all of said section after the words Main Streets, 
and by changing the word five in the first line to fifteen so that 
said section as amended will read as follows: 

Sect. 15. No vehicle shall stop for more than fifteen 
minutes at a time on Warren Street between Green and Main 
Streets. 

The City Marshal may grant special permits to stop longer 
than fifteen minutes whenever it is necessary. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter vi of the city 
ordinances relating to streets and public places and 
abuses therein. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Ald^ermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter VI, Section 12, by striking out 
the whole of said section and substituting therefor the follow- 
ing: 

Sect. 12. No person shall place or establish any awning 



ORDINANCES. 17 

or shade before his or her place of business or dwelling house, 
over any part of any street or sidewalk, unless the same shall 
be composed of cloth and safely fixed and supported by strong 
iron rods or railings, so as in no wise to incommode pedestrians, 
and so that the lowest part of the support or frame work of 
such awning or shade shall be at least seven feet above the 
sidewalk, and the lowest part of the cloth of such awning or 
shade shall be at least six feet six inches above the sidewalk, 
except in Ward One, wooden awnings at present established by 
permit of the Board of Public Works; nor shall any sign or 
other fixture or construction be placed on or supported from 
any sidewalk or street; nor shall any person establish or 
maintain any sign or advertisement over any part of any 
street, lane, alley, or sidewalk unless such sign or advertise- 
ment shall be safely and securely fixed and supported and the 
lowest part thereof at least eight feet above the sidewalk; nor 
shall any such sign or advertisement be established or main- 
tained without first having obtained a permit from the Board 
of Public Works (persons applying for a permit to erect a sign 
or advertisement shall state in writing its size and weight, 
the nature of the material of which it is to be constructed and 
the manner in which it is to be supported) ; nor shall any per- 
son encumber the street or sidewalk before his place of busi- 
ness, or elsewhere, with any boxes, shelves, stands, merchandise, 
or other things; nor shall any person use the sidewalk before 
his place of business for the sale of merchandise. The fore- 
going provisions shall not apply to gasoline pumps erected 
under a permit from the Board of Public Works. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances incon- 
sistent with this ordinance are hereby repealed and the pro- 
visions of this ordinance relating to signs and awnings shall 
take effect thirty days from the date of its passage and the 
remainder of this ordinance upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



An Ordinance extending the street sprinkling precinct in 
the city of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 1, Chapter 20, of the City Ordi- 
nances relating to the street sprinkling precinct be amended, by 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

adding thereto the following: "extending Southerly on Hall 
Street to Page Street, so called." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



An Ordinance extending the street sprinkling precinct in 
the city of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 2, Chapter 20, of the City Ordi- 
nances relating to the street sprinkling precinct be amended by 
adding thereto the following: "extending Southerly on West 
Main Street from the junction of Main and West Main Streets, 
a distance of about four hundred feet or to the southeasterly 
corner of the land of Fred H. Palm." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



An Ordinance extending the penacook sewerage precinct. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Alderynen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 3 of Chapter 23 of the Revised 
Ordinances be hereby amended by adding thereto the following: 

"Also the following described territory, to wit: Beginning 
at the northeasterly corner of land of the Martha J. Morrill 
estate on West Main Street, so called; thence running westerly, 
northerly, westerly and northwesterly by the easterly line 
of said Morrill land to the southeasterly corner of land 
of Oliver J. Fifield; thence northeasterly by the easterly line 
of said Fifield land to West Main Street; thence across 
West Main Street to the northwesterly corner of Wood- 
lawn Cemetery; thence southerly by the westerly line of 
said cemetery to land of Rose A. Keenan ; thence easterly by 
the northerly line of said Keenan land to its northeasterly 
corner; thence southerly by the easterly line of the Keenan 
land to its southeasterly corner ; thence easterly by the northerly 
line of land now or formerly of Roderick J. McNeil to the 
Fisherville Road; thence southerly by said McNeil land to his 



ORDINANCES. 19 

southerly line; thence westerly by his southerly line to land of 
Herbert O. Williams; thence southerly by the easterly line of 
said Williams land to his southerly line; thence westerly by his 
southerly line to West Main Street; thence northwesterly 
across West Main Street to the southeasterly corner of 
land of Otto Moody; thence westerly by said Moody's south- 
erly line to land of the heirs of Martha J. Morrill and to the 
old precinct line; thence northerly, easterly and northerly by 
the old precinct line to the point begun at." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



An Ordinance extending the sewerage precinct of the city 
of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 1 of Chapter 23 of the Revised 
Ordinances be hereby amended by adding thereto the following: 

"Also the following described territory, to wit: Beginning 
at the southerly line of the precinct as now established, and on 
the easterly line of Broadway; thence running southerly by 
the easterly line of Broadway to the northerly line of Wood 
Avenue, so called, extended easterly intersecting the easterly 
line of Broadway; thence across Broadway to the northwesterly 
corner of said Wood Avenue; thence westerly by the northerly 
line of said avenue one hundred feet; thence northerly parallel 
to Broadway and one hundred feet westerly therefrom to the 
northerly line of Rollins Park to the old precinct line." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter xix of the city 
ordinances, extending the lighting precinct of the 
city of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 1 of Chapter 19 of the Revised 
Ordinances be hereby amended by adding thereto the following: 



20 CITY OP C0NC30RD. 

"Also the following described territory: Westerly by the Hop- 
kinton road from the road leading to Penacook Lake to the 
Hopkinton town line on the Dimond Hill road." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



An Ordinance extending the lighting precinct of the city 
of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 19, Section 1 of the City Ordi- 
nances by adding thereto the following described territory: — 
Beginning at the property of Guy Holt on the South Pembroke 
Road and extending on said road a distance of about one-half 
mile to the corner of the road leading to Black Hill. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 12, 1921. 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1920 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1919 
for 1918 taxes. 

Resolved by >the Board of Alderrnen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of two and 1-100 dollars ($2.01) 
be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed 
in 1920 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1919 for 
1918 taxes. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 14, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1920 ON non-resident property sold to the city in 1920 

for 1919 TAXES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-eight cents ($.28) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 
1920 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 
taxes. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 14, 1921. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit claim 

deed to property formerly owned by GEORGE CORRIVEAU. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a 
quit claim deed of property formerly belonging to George Cor- 
riveau, being a lot of land known as No. 6350, Plan A, Assessor's 



22 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Map, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes 
and costs assessed against said property. 

Sect, 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed February 14, 1921, 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 

ONE hundred and FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS ($150,000), 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderrrven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
row on the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred 
and fifty thousand dollars ($150,000) for expenses in anticipa- 
tion of taxes for the municipal year 1921, upon such terms and 
for such amounts as the committee shall determine, said loan 
to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 

Passed February 14, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for a new clock for the 
board of trade building. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1500) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of a new tower 
clock for the Board of Trade building. Said sum to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings with the Mayor added. 

Passed February 14, 1921, 



Resolution to exempt from taxation for a period of ten 
years, certain new buildings and machinery of the 
perry brothers granite company, 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1, That the Perry Brothers Granite Company or 
its Successors is hereby exempted from taxation for a period 



RESOLUTIONS. 23 

of ten years from the date of the passage of this resolution, 
upon new buildings to be erected on land owned by said Perry 
Brothers situated in the rear of No. 216 North State St., and on 
their quarry land, and from taxation on new machinery to be 
installed therein, provided, however, that during said ten years, 
this Company or its successors shall pay taxes to be levied on 
the present assessment valuation. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 14, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the lighting precinct for the 
ensuing financial year. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the lighting 
precinct, the sum of twenty-one thousand five hundred dollars 
($21,500.00) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of 
said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $21,500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

within the limits of the STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by >the Board of Alderm^sn of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the limits 
of the street sprinkling precinct of said city, the sum of five 
thousand dollars ($5,000.00) to defray the necessary expenses 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and charges of said pi-ecinct for the ensuing financial year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows : 

For sprinkling streets $5,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
TO be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

WITHIN THE limits OF THE STREET SPRINKLING PRECINCT 
in ward one for the ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street 
sprinkling precinct in Ward One, the sum of four hundred 
seventy-five dollars ($475.00) to defray the necessary expenses 
and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $475.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
TO be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the garbage precinct for the en- 
suing financial year. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the gar- 
bage precinct of said city, the sum of sixteen thousand dollars 
($16,000.00) to defray the necessary expenses and charges 



RESOLUTIONS. 25 

of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in 

said precinct $16,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

within the limits of THE WEST CONCORD SEWERAGE PRE- 
CINCT FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West 
Concord sewerage precinct, the sum of fifty dollars ($50.00) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for 
the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as 
follows : 

For repairs $50.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE PENACOOK SEWERAGE PRECINCT 
FOR THE ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
'follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Pena- 
cook sewerage precinct, the sum of fifteen hundred dollars 
($1500.00) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of 



2© CITY OF CONCORD, 

said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be 
appropriated as follows: 

For construction and repairs $1,500.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 

TO BE raised on THE TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldernuen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the sewer- 
age precinct of said city, the sum of ninety-eight hundred fifty- 
five dollars ($9,855.00) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows: 

For construction and repairs $3,500.00 
For the payment of interest that may become due on 

precinct bonds 2,355.00 

For bonds 4,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised for the ensuing financial year for the 
use of the city. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldervmn of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city, 
the sum of one hundred fifty thousand dollars ($150,000) to 
defray the necessary expenses and charges of the city for the 



RESOLUTIONS, 27 

ensuing financial year, which together with the sums which 
may be raised by taxes on railroads and from other sources, 
shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds, $5,750.00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans, 3,000.00 

For payment of interest on cemetery trust funds, 1,826.17 

For support of city poor, 3,000.00 

For incidentals and land damages, 12,500.00 

For salaries, board of aldermen, 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery, 5,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 3,000.00 

For aid. New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 1,000.00 

For aid, Concord District Nursing Association, 350.00 

For aid, Concord Charity Organization Society, 350.00 

For Memorial Day, 460.00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 450.00 

For open air concerts, 550.00 

For playgrounds and bath, 1,500.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery, 8,000.00 

For Old North Cemetery, 500.00 

For Maple Grove Cemetery, 200.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery, 50.00 

For Millville Cemetery, 75.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery, 10.00 

For Soucook Cemetery, 30.00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery, 25.00 

Por parks, 4,500.00 

For White Park ball ground, 400.00 

For care of trees, 3,500.00 

For repairs buildings, 1,OCO.OO 

For bridge bonds, 4,000.00 

Por city hall bonds, 7,000.00 





$69,931.17 


BOARD OF HEALTH. 




Salary, sanitary officer. 


$2,000.00 


Up-keep of automobile. 


300.00 


Fumigation supplies, 


100.00 


Coniagious diseases. 


700.00 


Incidentals, 


1,200.00 



$4,300.00 



28 CITY OP CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries, $29,575.00 

Special and traffic officer, 2,800.00 

Fuel, 1,000.00 

Repairs buildings, 1,000.00 

Lights, 250.00 

Telephone, private line, 500.00 

Supplies, automobile, 500.00 

Incidentals, 1,500.00 

Motorcycle, 550.00" 

$37,675.00 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Salaries, $4,300.00 

Books and incidentals, 2,700.00 

$7,000.00 

ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, engineer, $2,400.00 

Salaries, assistants, 2,000.00 

Incidentals, 325.00 

$4,725.00 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, superintendent, $2,500.00 

General maintenance, 95,000.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, new, 1,500.00 

Sidewalks and crossings, repairs, 3,000.00 

Catch basins, 3,000.00 

$105,000.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries, $28,974.00 

Salaries, semi-annual, 10,245.00 

Rent, Veterans' Association, 210.00 

Forage, 1,200.00- 



RESOLUTIONS. 29 

Fuel and lights, $2,600.00 

Fire Alarm, 1,500.00 

Horse hire and shoeing, 1,500.00 

Washing, 100.00 

Supplies, auto combinations, 325.00 

Penacook fire alarm, 250.00 

Incidentals, 4,500.00 

New hose, 600.00 





$52,004.00 


SALARIES. 




Mayor, 


$2,000.00 


City Clerk, 


1,400.00 


Clerk, Board of Public Works, 


200.00 


Overseers of Poor, 


390.00 


Solicitor, 


800.00 


Treasurer, 


1,225.00 


Messenger, 


1,200.00 


City Physicians, 


700.00 


Care City Clocks, 


110.00 


Assessors, 


3,800.00 


Moderators and Ward Clerks, 


720.00 


Supervisors and Inspectors of Elections, 


2,064.00 


Judge, Police Court, 


1,200.00 


Clerk, Police Court, 


500.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures, 


500.00 


Collector of Taxes, 


4,000.00 



$20,809.00 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, a tax of three and 50-100 dollars ($3.50) on each 
thousand dollars of the value of the ratable estates taxable 
within said city for the support of the public schools which, 
together with the income of the Abial Walker fund shall be ap- 
propriated and divided among the school districts according to 
the valuation thereof. 

There shall also be raised a sum equal to two dollars ($2.00) 
for each child residing in the city who was enrolled in the public 
schools in the last preceding school year. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 
for the cemeteries of the city one-half of the income from the 
sale of lots and the income derived for the care of lots and 



30 CITY OF CONCORD, 

grading, which sums shall be deposited by the superintendent, 
or others receiving them, in the city treasury. The care of lots 
for which the city holds trust funds shall be paid from the 
money appropriated for the care of cemeteries, and so much 
of the income of these trust funds as may be thus expended 
shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close of the year 
and the remainder in each instance credited to the individual 
fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 
for the use of the public library in the purchase of books the 
amount collected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 28, 1921. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit claim 

DEED TO property FORMERLY OWNED BY WILLIAM L. COWIE. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quit claim deed of property formerly belonging to William 
L. Cowie, being a lot of land known as No. 4458, Block 10, Plan 
D, Engineer's Map, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to in- 
clude all taxes and costs assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This lesolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 11, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating five and 5-100 dollars ($5.05) 

TO PAY FOR non-resident REAL ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OF 
concord for unpaid taxes FOR THE YEAR 1920. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of five and 5-100 dollars ($5.05) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to pay the amount due the City of 
Concord for non-resident real estate purchased at the tax 
collector's sale of non-resident real estate for the unpaid taxes 
for the year 1920. 

Passed April 11, 1921. 



resolutions. 31 

Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit claim 

DEED to property FORMERLY OWNED BY ROBERT SAWYER. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quit claim deed of property formerly belonging to Robert 
Sawyer, being a lot of land known as No. 4479, Plan B, En- 
gineer's Map, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include 
all taxes and costs assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 9, 1921. 



Resolution releasing seth r. dole from all further obliga- 
tions ON account of his DUTIES AS TAX COLLECTOR. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That Seth R. Dole, formerly Tax Collector for 
the City of Concord, having collected all collectible taxes for 
which he held a warrant, and having turned the same into the 
City Treasury, that said Seth R. Dole be requested to turn 
over the papers, books, and records relating to the duties of his 
office, also all claims which the city may have on land sold for 
unpaid taxes and left in his hands for redemption, to Wood- 
bury E. Hunt, Tax Collector, and upon so doing, that the said 
Seth R. Dole be released from all further obligations on ac- 
count of the duties of his office. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 9, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for fire inspection as re- 
quired by ordinance. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of six hundred dollars be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of money in the City Treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, to be expended under the direction of 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the Fire Department Committee to cover the monthly inspection 
of certain streets and buildings, as required by ordinance. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 9, 1921. 



Resolution providing for a discount on taxes. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a discount of two per cent. (2%) shall be allowed on all 
taxes assessed for the year 1921, which are paid within ten days 
from the date of the tax bills. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



Resolution authorizing the committee on lands and build- 
ings with the mayor added to sell certain real estate. 

Resolved by ^the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Lands and Buildings with the Mayor 
added be authorized to sell at public auction two lots of land be- 
longing to the city located near Fort Eddy, from which the loam 
has been taken ; also six or more acres from the City Farm lot, 
so-called, at West Concord, if in their judgment a fair price is 
offered. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for the installing of the 
electric alarm siren at the west concord fire station. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of six hundred three and 24-100 f^oliars 
($603.24) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any '^ ax 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay for the i..^o?; 
ing of the electric alarm siren at the West Concord fire statioi. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



RESOLUTIONS. 33 

Resolution appropriating moiney io pay taxes assessed in 

1920 on real estate sold to the city in 1918 FOR 1917 

taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of sixty-two and 4-100 dollars 
($62.04) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes 
assessed in 1920 on real estate sold to the city in 1918 for 1917 
taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of sixty-two and 4-100 
dollars ($62.04.) 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1920 ON real estate sold to the city in 1919 for 1918 
taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldervmn of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of two hundred twenty-seven and 
15-100 dollars ($227.15) be, and the same is hereby, appropri- 
ated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay taxes assessed in 1920 on real estate sold to the 
city in 1919 for 1918 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of two hundred twenty- 
seven and 15-100 dollars ($227.15.) 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 

1920 ON REAL estate SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1920 FOR 1919 

taxes. 

■', by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
■ t/ws : 

Section 1. That the sum of ten hundred thirty-seven and 
74-100 dollars ($1,037.74) be, and the same is hereby, appro- 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay taxes assessed in 1920 on real estate sold to the 
city in 1920 for 1919' taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of ten hundred thirty-seven 
and 74-100 dollars ($1,037.74.) 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for a band concert on july 
4, 1921. 

Resolved by >t}ie Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of two hundred fifty dollars ($250) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for a band concert to be held on 
July 4, 1921. 

Passed June 13, 1921. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
one hundred and seventy-five thousand dollars ($175,- 
000.) 

Resolved by *the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
row on the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred 
and seventy-five thousand dollars ($175,000) for expenses in an- 
ticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1921, upon such terms 
and for such amounts as the committee shall determine, said 
loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 

Passed June 30, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for an iron fence, old north 
cemetery. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 



RESOLUTIONS. 35 

not otherwise appropriated, for an iron fence on the Bradley 
Street side of the Old North Cemetery; the money to be ex- 
pended by the Cemetery Commissioners. 
Passed June 30, 1921. 



Resolution providing for the appointment of a committee 
TO confer with the board of education. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a special Committee, consisting of the Mayor and two 
members of the Board of Aldermen be appointed to confer 
with the Board of Education of the Union School District in 
relation to the teaching of swimming in the public schools as a 
part of the educational system of the city. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



Resolution to exempt from taxation for a period of ten 
years, certain new buildings and machinery of the 
rumford printing company. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That, whereas, a resolution was passed March 29, 1916, by 
the Board of Aldermen exempting for a period of ten years 
certain new capital of the Rumford Printing Company, as fol- 
lows: 

"That the Rumford Printing Company is hereby exempted 
from taxation for a period of ten years from the date of the 
passage of this resolution upon new capital invested in an 
extension of its business to be carried on in the Prescott Piano 
Factory Building, so-called, located on North Main Street." 

And, whereas, another resolution was passed March 26, 1920, 
providing for further exemption as follows: 

"Section 1. That the Rumford Printing Company or its 
successors, is hereby exempted from taxation for a period of 
ten years from the date of the passage of this resolution, upon 
new buildings to be erected on land owned by said Company, 
bounded by North Main, Washington and Pearl Streets, and 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

from taxation on new machinery to be installed therein, and 
also upon new buildings to be erected for storage purposes on 
land of said Company, fronting the railroad, south of the 
Ford Foundry property: provided, however, that during said 
ten years, said Rumford Printing Company or its successors 
shall pay taxes, to be levied on the present assessment valua- 
tion, upon buildings which may be razed to provide for the 
erection of said new buildings." 

And, whereas, the greater portion of the former so-called 
Prescott Piano Factory, located on North Main Street, was 
destroyed by fire on June 23, 1921, necessitating radical changes 
in the building and extension plans of the Rumford Printing 
Company, and as future new buildings with necessary new 
mechanical equipment are to be erected on the site of the former 
Ford Foundry, now the property of the Rumford Printing Com- 
pany, located on Ferry Street, fronting the railroad, and also 
on land adjoining the former Ford Foundry property, known 
as the State Lot, fronting the railroad, the exemptions in- 
stanced above will become inoperative, therefore be it. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the Rumford Printing Company, or its 
successors, is hereby exempted from taxation for a period of 
ten years from the date of passage of this resolution upon new 
buildings to be erected on the Company property, formerly the 
site of the Ford Foundry Plant, and also on Company property 
formerly the State Hospital coal shed site, and from taxation 
on new machinery to be installed therein, together with such 
machinery as had been installed in the former so-called Prescott 
Piano Factory buildings on the North Main Street site as shall 
be moved to and become a part of the equipment of the new 
plant to be erected on the former Ford Foundry and State Lot 
sites fronting the railroad. 

Sect. 2. That nothing in the above exemption shall be 
construed to exempt from taxation the present mechanical 
equipment now located in the Depot Street plant now and here- 
tofore subject to taxation. 

Sect. 3. The resolutions passed March 29, 1916, and March 
26, 1920, relating to certain exemptions on property of the 
Rumford Printing Company are repealed upon the passage of 
this resolution. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



RESOLUTIONS. 37 

Resolution relative to taxes for 1912 for fred c. coates. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of thirty-one and thirty-three one hundredths 
dollars ($31.33) amount of taxes and charges for the year 
1912 and all charges accrued on said tax to July 11, 1921, on 
the property of Fred C. Coates, located at 54 Beacon Street, be 
and hereby are abated. 

Passed July 11, 1921. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
seventy-five thousand dollars ($75,000.) 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
rov;^ on the credit of the city a sum not to exceed seventy-five 
thousand dollars ($75,000) for expenses in anticipation of 
taxes for the municipal year 1921, upon such terms and for 
such amounts as the committee shall determine, said loan to 
be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 

Passed August 8, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a 

CLOCK FOR the CITY CLERK'S OFFICE. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of thirty-five dollars be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated for the purchase of a clock for the city clerk's office, 
said sum to be charged to the account of incidentals and land 
damages and expended under the direction of the Committee 
on Lands and Buildings. 

Passed August 8, 1921. 



38 city of concord. 

Resolution appropriating money for the purchase and in- 
stallation OF A SIREN FIRE ALARM SYSTEM FOR EAST CON- 
CORD, N. H. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of seven hundred dollars 
($700.00) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the pur- 
chase and installation of a Siren Fire Alarm System at East 
Concord, N. H., said sum to be expended by the Committee on 
Fire Department. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 8, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating twenty-four hundred sixteen and 
54-100 dollars ($2,416.54) to pay for real estate sold 

TO the city of concord for unpaid taxes for the YEIAR 

1920. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldernuen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of twenty-four hundred sixteen and 54-100 
dollars ($2,416.54) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to 
pay the amount due to the City of Concord for real estate pur- 
chased at the tax collector's sale of real estate for the unpaid 
taxes for the year 1920. 

Passed August 8, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of four thousand dollars 
for the highway department. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the highway department. 

Passed November 14, 1921. 



RESOLUTIONS. 39 

Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 

FIFTY thousand DOLLARS ($50,000.) 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
row on the credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand 
dollars ($50,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the 
principal year 1921, upon such terms and for such amounts 
as the Committee shall determine, said loan to be payable from 
the taxes of the said municipal year and to run not over thirty 
days. 

Passed November 14, 1921. 



Resolution authorizing the issue of two hundred seventy 

THOUSAND dollars OF CITY OF CONCORD, N. H., WATER BONDS 
TO REFUND TWO HUNDRED SEVENTY THOUSAND DOLLARS OF 
FOUR PER CENT. BONDS MATURING JANUARY 1, 1922. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That for the purpose of paying the two hundred seventy 
thousand dollars ($270,000) of water bonds of the City of Con- 
cord issued January 1, 1892, and to refund the same under au- 
thority of and in compliance with Chapter 129 of the Laws 
of 1917, the city borrow the sum of two hundred seventy thou- 
sand dollars ($270,000) and issue bonds therefor; that the mayor 
and city treasurer be, and hereby are, authorized and directed 
to make and execute, sign and affix the seal of said city thereto 
for the sum of two hundred seventy thousand dollars ($270,000) 
substantially in the form prescribed by Chapter 43 of the Laws 
of 1895. Said bonds to be two hundred seventy in number and 
for the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) each, to be dated 
January 1, 1922, and to be made payable to the bearer with in- 
terest coupons attached, bearing interest at a rate not to exceed 
five per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually on the first 
day of January and the first day of July in each year. The 
principal of said bonds and the interest coupons attached, to be 
made payable at maturity upon presentation to The National 
Shavraiut Bank of Boston, Massachusetts, or at the office of the 
city treasurer, Concord, N. H. Said bonds to become due and 



40 CITY OP CONCORD. 

payable serially, eighteen thousand dollars ($18,000) to be pay- 
able on the first day of January, 1923, and eighteen thousand 
dollars ($18,000) on the first day of January of each succeed- 
ing year until and including January 1, 1937. 

The city treasurer is hereby instructed and empowered to 
procure proposals for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, 
and whichever bid is for the best interest of the city shall be 
accepted by him, provided the same shall be approved by the 
Finance Committee, reserving to the Finance Committee the 
right of rejecting any or all bids. 

Passed November 14, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of three thousand dol- 
lars FOR the highway DEPARTMENT, 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermeyi of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for the Highway Department. 

Passed December 12, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 

1919 ON REAL estate SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1919 FOR 1918 
TAXES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred five and 9-100 
dollars ($105.09) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out 
of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay 
taxes assessed in 1919 on real estate sold to the city in 1919 for 
1918 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of one hundred five and 
9-100 dollars ($105.09.) 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 12, 1921. 



resolutions. 41 

Resolution appropriating money for a municipal Christ- 
mas TREE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concor'd, 
as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred fifty dollars ($150) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury, not 
otherwise appropriated, for a municipal Christmas Tree cele- 
bration ; said appropriation to be expended under the direction 
of the Mayor and the Committee on Lands and Buildings. 

Passed December 12, 1921. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit claim 

DEED to property FORMERLY OWNED BY ANDREW E. QUIMBY, 
A. G. G. DUSTIN AND GEORGE T. KILBURNE ESTATE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quit claim deed of property formerly belonging to Andrew E. 
Quimby, A. G. G. Dustin and George T. Kilburne Estate con- 
sisting of lots Nos. 4696 and 4697, Plan C, Engineer's Map, sold 
to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes and costs 
assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed December 12, 1921. 



Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the 

SEVERAL departments. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of ninety-five hundred fifty- 
two and 45-100 dollars ($9,552.45) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay outstanding claims as follows: 

Board of Health, $327.86 

City Poor, 528.55 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fire Department, $1,782.5» 

Incidentals and Land Damages, 2,080.77 

Interest, temporary loans, 2,047.78 

New Tower Clock, 113.75 

Parks, 92.28 

Police and Watch, 714.14 

Printing and Stationery, 447.86 

Salaries, 1,416.87 



$9,552.45 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
garbage for the year 1921, the sum of two hundred eighty-seven 
and 97-100 dollars ($287.97) the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
sewers for the year 1921, the sum of twenty-six dollars ($26.00), 
the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
trees for the year 1921, the sum of two hundred seventy-two 
and 83-100 dollars ($272.83), the same being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Highway Department for the year 1921, the sum of forty-seven 
hundred forty-eight and 18-100 dollars ($4748.18), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 6. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 9, 1922. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1921. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1920. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

HON. HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

jVldermen-at-Large. salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 

Aldennen-at-Large . 

Term Expires January, 1922. 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

MICHAEL J. LEE, 59 South Main Street 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 South State Street 

Term Expires January, 1924. 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Morton Street 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER, 150 South Main Street 



44 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Ward Aldermen. 

Ward J— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook 

Ward 5— GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, East Concord 

Ward 5— CARL A. ECKSTROM, West Concord 

Ward 4— CHARLES L. IVIASON, 46 Washington Street 
Ward 5— WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 84 School Street 

Ward ^— FRANK R. STRONG, 16 South Spring Street 
Ward 7— HARRIS S. PARMENTER, 5 Badger St. 

Ward <S— PERLEY B. PHILLIPS, R. F. D. 6 

Ward P— JAMES McGUIRE, JR., 212 No. State Street 



CITY CLERK. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

Office: City Hall, Room 3. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 



RICHARD A. BROWN, 
MICHAEL J. LEE, 
ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 
HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
FRED'K I. BLACKWOOD. 
ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER, 



Term expires January, 1922 
1922 
1922 
1924 
1924 
1924 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OP ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Pelissier, Mason, McGirr. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Stevens, Mason, Pelissier. 
On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen Parmenter, Blackwood, Robinson. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Blackwood, Brown, Eckstrom. 
On Finance — Mayor, 

Aldermen Stevens, Strong, Lee, Brunei. 
On Fire Department — 

Aldermen Strong, Eckstrom, McGuire, 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Brown, Robinson, Brunei. 
On Police and License — 

Aldermen Parmenter, McGirr, Phillips. 
On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Lee, Sturtevant, Phillips. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $25 
as Treasurer of Cemeteries. 

CARL H. FOSTER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 



Elected bienially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2 400 per 

annum. 

WILL B. HOWE. 

Office: City Hall. 



46 CITY OP CONCORD. 

CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary $1,200 per 

annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to 
satisfaction of the board. Salary, one-half of one per centum upon the first 
$100,000; three-fourths of one per centum upon all sums over $100,000. 

WOODBURY E. HUNT. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $1,000 per annum. Clerk, $1,800 per annum. 
Office: Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1922 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " '' ' 1926 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1924 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salary, $2,500. 

ORRIN W. HEAD. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per 

annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $600 per 

annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per 

annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per 

annum. 



J. JOSEPH DOHERTY. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward i— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 5— GEORGE 0. ROBINSON, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 5— ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HARRY J. BROWN. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS. 



CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Justice. Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOHN W. STANLEY. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $2,300 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 



Appointed by Board of .\ldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,000 per 

annam. 



VICTOR I. MOORE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 

REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 
Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,680 per annum for first year, and $1,800 per 
annum thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, Captain of Night "Watch. 

Salary, $1,850 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $1,825 per annum. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, J. Edward Silva, 

Harry L. Woodward, Fred N. Harden, 

John B. Long, P. Scott Rogers, 

James J. Halligan, Cleveland H. Curtis. 

John S. Chandler, Abraham D. Cushing, Chauffeurs. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 

W. A. Little, Joseph A, Flanders, 

Elmer Trombley, John McGirr, 

Jonas Welcome, Willie A. Flanders, 

Thomas M. Harrison, Walter H. Beane. 

Nelson Forest, Nelson E. Strong, 

George H. Abbott, Galen W. Hunter. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward ^—REUBEN E. WALKER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— PERLEY B. PHILLIPS. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM J. AHERN, JUNIOR. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary. $800 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Salary. $700 per annum. 

BERTHA N. CARR. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



51 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Oifice: Room 1, City Hall. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 
N. E. MARTIN, Term expires March 31, 1922 



H.H.DUDLEY, 


1922 


OLIVER J. PELREN, 


1923 


CHARLES R. WALKER, 


1923 


FRANK P. QUIMBY, 


1924 


GEORGE T. KENNEY, 


1924 


JOHN B. ABBOTT, 


1925 


BURNS P. HODGMAN, 


1925 



President — N. E. Martin. 
Clerk — Burns P. Hodgman. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $.3,600 per annum. 
Term unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, Term expires January, 1922 
CARL H. FOSTER, " '' " 1923 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, " '' " 1924 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,600 per annum. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

C. E. ROBINSON. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 53 

STEWARD FIRE STATION, WEST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $45 per annum. 

FRANK C. BLODGETT. 



SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 
"WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to conflrmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio, 
DR. SIBLEY G. MORRILL. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

Office: City Hall. 



&4 CITY OF CONCORD, 

BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 



No salary. 



WILL B. HOWE, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

HENRY E. CHAIViBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 



WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT, 
BEN C. WHITE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 



Term expires January, 1922 
1922 
1923 
1923 
1924 
1924 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 

FRANK ATKINSON. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 55 



CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 

One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, Term expires January, 1922 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, '' " " 1923 

WALLACE C. HOYT, " " ■ " 1924 

Ward 2. 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, Term expires January, 1922 
SCOTT FRENCH, " " " 1923 

C. A. CHAMBERLIN, " " " 1924 

Ward 3. 

ROYAL D. HOLDEN, Term expires January, 1922 

MATHEW H. PEABODY, " " " 1923 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, " " " 1924 

Ward 7. 

lALBERT S. TRASK, Term expires January, 1922 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " " " 1923 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, " " " 1924 

Ward 8. 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, Term expires January, 1922 
NAHUM PRESCOTT,* '' " " 1923 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT, " " " 1924 

BENJAMIN J. PRESCOTT,! 



♦Died January 7, 1921. 

t Appointed to fill vacancy March 4, 1921. 



56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part op Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, bj- Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 

FRED W. LANG, Term expires March, 1922 

CHARLES L. JACKMAN, " " " 1922 

CHARLES G. REMICK, " " " 1923 

JOHN P. GEORGE, " " " 1923 

HERBERT G. ABBOTT, " " " 1924 

MILAN D. CUMMINGS, " " " 1924 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY, 
FRANK J. KELLEY, 
WILLIAM H. HOYT. 
JOHN F. WATERS. 

for woodlawn cemetery, penacook. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 57 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

JOSEPH N. ABBOTT. ^ 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

BENJAMIN J. PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annnally in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by 
owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

FRED W. LANG, 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents 
each for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually iu January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, $350. 

JAMES P. FORSYTHE. 

Office: 10 1^ South Street. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — 
paid by party for whom culling is done. 

FRED H. PERLEY. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring 
service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Fred I. Rolfe, 

Everett L. Davis, William J. Mullen, 

Hallett E. Patten, Henry A. Brown, 

Arthur N. Day, Charles E. Hardy, 

James F. Fitzgerald, H. T. Ross, 

John H. Flanders, C. H. Staniels, 

Fred H. Perley, Frank J. Clancy, 

"William H. Meserve, Thomas Murphy, 

G. W. Lovejoy, J3. H. Cross, 

Alphonse King, W. J. Callahan, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



59 



William Gooden, 
Guy Rowell, 
Otis Lynch, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 
Archie Black, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
E. W. Saltmarsh, 
R. W. Gordon, 
Fred E. Wattles, 
Edward Watkins, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
J. A. Provost, 
John White, 
W. A. Flanders, 
Nelson Forrest, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 



T. Mulligan, 
C. H. Hanson, 

C. J. Roers. 
James B. Riley, 
Charles E. Cook, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brawn, 
Earl Woodbury, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 

S. A. Clark, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
J. W. Currier, 
G. W. Hunter, 
F. W. Morgan, 

D. C. Taylor, 
A. M. Follett. 
John E. Coulter, 
H. L. Barnard, 
Phillip Desmarais, 
Omar C. Allard. 



CITY WEIGHER. 

WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office : Bear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Moses E. Haines, 



60 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 
George Evans. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per 
cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person 
employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
William E. Virgin, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
Alfred D. Mayo, 
Louis F. Merrill, 
Joseph Messier, 
William F. Hoyt, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
Herman C. Colby, 
Edward L. Foster, 
C. H. Osgood, 



John Rolfe, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Oliver Reno, 
Silas Wiggin, 
F. E. Frost, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W, Lang, 
Richard E. Nelson, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
W. F. Frost, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Arthur R. Stewart, 
Edward R. Foster, 
Irving Burbank, 
John E. Colton, 
Everett Runnells, 
Clifford G. Culver, 
Horace B. Annis. 
Carl F. Mellin. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



61 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 



Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
William H. MeGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Francis W. Presby, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Ehner E. Babb, 
Clarence J. Spead, 
W. J. Sleeper, 
John W. McGowan, 
Henry Morrill, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Joseph A. Norma ndeau, 
Michael J. Lee, 



W. Arthur Bean, 
WiUis H. Robbins, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Charles H. Berry, 
Niram M. Kays, 
Wilfred H. Brennan, 
James H. Brannigan, 
E. H. Smart. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-officio. 
WILFRED BRENNAN. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 



WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
ELI LAFLAMME, 
GEORGE F. McGIRR. 

Ward 2—M. J. LACROIX, 

HAROLD W. RILEY, 
WYMAN D. STEARNS. 

Ward 5— LAWRENCE W. KNIGHT, 
HENRY F. HOBBS, 
J. HAROLD JOHNSON. 

Ward 4— ELWIN L. PAGE, 

NUTE B. FLANDERS, 
RICHARD T. LYFORD. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
FRANKLIN B. GORDON, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward ^—CHARLES DUNCAN, 
HARRY R. CRESSY, 
ERNEST W. SALTMARSH. 

Ward 7— CHARLES J. McKEE, 
WALDO S. ROUNDY, 
CLARENCE 0. PHILBRICK. 

Ward 5— FRED SMITH, 
C. C. STUART, 
SIMEON SHARAF. 

Ward 5-PATRICK J. GAVAGHAN, 
DENNIS J. KENNEY, 
FRANK J. SPAIN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 63 

WARD CLERKS. 



Ward J— JOHN B. DODGE. 

Ward 5— CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 

Ward .5— CHRISTY E. MULLAVEY. 

Ward 4— WILLIAM B. McINNIS. 

Ward 5— EDWARD A. DAME. 

Ward ^— GUY JEWETT. 

Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 

Ward S— LEON B. SIMPSON. 

Ward P— ANDREW E. SALTMARSH. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— ROSS W. CATE. 
Ward 5— ROBERT HENRY. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
Ward 5— WALTER L. JENKS. 
Ward ^—ARTHUR E. DOLE. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward <S— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward P— WILLIAM J. AHERN, JR. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 
Under the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in 
December, 1910, for one year, and biennially thereafter in November, be- 
ginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54. 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856- '57- '58. 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859- '60. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863-'64. 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868-'69. 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870- '71. 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75. 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876- '77. 

'' HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878-'79-'80. 

" GEORGE A. CUM]\IINGS,t 1880-'81-'82. 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86. 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887- '88. 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891- '92. 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893- '94. 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895- '96. 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98. 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903- '08. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- '15. 

" NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 1916-'17. 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1918- '19. 

" HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 1920- 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1921-1922. 



Hon. Harry H. Dudley . 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill 



President 
Secretary 



MEMBERS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



1922. 



Hon. Harry H. Dudley, 
Mrs. Lillian R. Shepard, 
Harry F. Lake, Esq., 



89 North State Street 

Hutehins St., West Concord 

29 Auburn Street 



1923. 



Mr. Omar S. Swenson. 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Elkins, 
Mr. Joseph S. Otis, 



1924. 



Rev. W, Stanley Emery, 
Dr. Charles Duncan, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 



14 Auburn Street 

24 Union Street 

26 Church Street 



110 North State Street 
43 South Spring Street 
123 North State Street 



68 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Emery. 



Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Elkins. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Lake. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



CITY OF concord. 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

finance. 
Mr. Swenson. 

HIGH school. 
Dr. Duncan. 

grammar schools. 
Mrs. Shepard. 

PRIMARY schools. 

Mr. Otis. 

kindergartens. 
Mrs. Shepard. 

buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Dudley. 

discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

hygiene. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

MANUAL training. 

Wood and Iron. 
Mr. Swenson. 

Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Elkins, 

music. 
Mrs. Shepard. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Lake. 



Mrs. Elkins. 



Mr. Emery. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Otis. 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mr. Emery. 



Mr. Otis. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Swenson. 



Mr. Emery. 



Mrs. Shepard. 



Mr. Otis. 



SCHOOL report. 
DRAWING. 

Mrs. Elkins. 

text-books. 
Mr. Lake. 

training school. 
Mr. Lake. 

night school. 
Mr. Dudley. 



69 



Mr. Dudley. 



Mrs. Elkins. 



Mr. Otis. 



Mr. Emery. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

15 Summit Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12 a. m., 
1.30 to 6 p. m. Telephone, Office, 55M. House 603R. 



ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Francis Treadway Clayton. 

821/2 Warren Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 3 to 5 p. m., school days. Telephone, Office, 55M. 
House, 749X. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR. 

Dr. Clarence Moore Kelley. 

14 Centre Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., 4 to 5 p. m., school days. Telephone, 
Office, 55M. House, 1075R. 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL NURSE 

Helen Young Upham, R. N. 

25 Thorndike St. 

Office hours : 8.30 to 9 a. m., every school day ; 3 to 5 p. m., 

Mondays, at Superintendent's office. 

Telephone, Office, 55M. House, 712X. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 

6 Avon Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. ; summer 
vacation, 2 to 4 p. m. Telephone, 1661M. 



CLERK. 

Gyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 

Office hours: 8 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.00 p. m. 

Telephone, 702. 



STENOGRAPHER. 

Louise Mattie Stuart. 

18 No. Spring St. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. Office hours 

8.30 a. m. to 12.00 m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. 

Telephone, 1334W. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

!Louis C. Merrill ..... Moderator 

Earle C. Gordon ...... Clerk 

Henry H. Metcalf and John P. George . . Auditors 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



The Board of Education reports to Union School Dis- 
trict as follows: 

For some time past the citizens of the Millville and 
St. Paul's School District have been dissatisfied with the 
condition of the Millville School, and at the annual meet- 
ing of 1921, notice was given that at this year's annual 
meeting definite action would be asked for. During the 
past year, several visits to the Millville School have been 
made by Committees of the School Board, both when 
the schools were in session and when they were not. 
The Board believes that we should have a better build- 
ing at Millville, and has received a general estimate that 
a building either of brick or frame construction adequate 
to present needs and so constructed that additions in 
the future could be economically made, can be built 
for from $30,000 to $35,000. We recommend to the District 
that authority to the Board be given to construct such 
a school building. 

It is absolutely necessary to make an addition to the 
Morrill Manual Training School to accommodate the 
increasingly large amount of necessary work being done 
there. A frame structure built to the east of the present 
school building, to cost $6,000 to $8,000, seems at the 
present time to be the most practical thing to be done, 
and will be adequate for a good many years, and we 
recommend that authority be given to the School Board 
to construct such an addition. 

At the annual meeting two years ago, the District 
voted to have a medical inspector, and in compliance 
with this mandate of the District, Dr. C. M. Kelley was 
engaged in such capacity, and is now upon his second 
year of service. The benefit of his services is becoming 
increasingly apparent. We invite the closest exami- 



72 CITY OP CONCORD. 

nation of Dr. Kelley's report published herein. To have 
thoroughly examined 3,166 pupils, to have found 4,114 
health defects and to have reported and followed up a 
large proportion of these, to have taken from the schools 
temporarily, but promptly, 79 pupils having communi- 
cable diseases, to have made 218 special examinations 
with reference to mental development, together with a 
great many conferences with parents in groups and as 
individuals, to have inspected and advised concerning 
the sanitary and hygienic conditions of the schools, to 
oversee in a general way the physical education of the 
pupils in the schools, all this suggests something of the 
scope and something of the value of Dr. Kelley's work. 
Perhaps the most appealing feature of the medical in- 
spector's efforts, we feel, is in connection with the state 
of nutrition of the pupils, a feature which is being prac- 
tically developed at the Kimball, Rumford and Cogs- 
well Schools, where forenoon lunches of milk and crackers 
are had at a surprisingly low cost to the parents. 

The physical training at the High School under Mr. 
Quinn and Miss Ranney is being carried on satisfactorily. 

The work of the school nurse, Mrs. Helen Y. Upham, 
we believe, is very efficiently done. 

The District should know and recognize the value of 
the work, that is being done by Drs. Young, Albee, Mor- 
ton, "Washburn and Aldrich, dentists, w^ho have held 30 
clinics, at which 243 pupils have benefited, and 559 dental 
operations have been performed. 

The same appreciation is extended by the Board to 
the larger group of Concord physicians who, likewise 
without compensation, have performed a large amount 
of surgical and medical work for our pupils. 

Dr. Kelley has estimated that the loss in the District 
in school days on account of preventable illness is 1,117 
days a year. We believe that the services mentioned 
above will reduce the loss on account of such cause to a 
minimum. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

One word more should be said of Dr. Kelley. Under 
the law, he is a medical inspector only, — he is not a medi- 
cal practitioner, but is always glad to co-operate with the 
family physicians of the school children. 

The use of standardized tests and measurements is an 
important function in modern educational administration. 
During the past year, conservative use has been made 
of these measures in many of the grades and throughout 
the High Schools. The principal value of such tests is 
not that Concord pupils are shown to be normal or a 
little above normal in mental ability, but the fact that 
the findings of the tests are used to benefit the pupils 
more completely in class room work and to help the 
teacher to a more intelligent appreciation of the indi- 
vidual needs of the pupils. 

The Board of Education recognizes that a year ago there 
was some dissatisfaction and unrest in the District in 
reference to our schools and our school system. At that 
time, we suggested a survey of the schools, but received 
no response. This year, the Board took up of its own 
initiative the question of the practicability of a survey 
of our schools to determine whether improvements could 
be wisely introduced. The Board desired such a survey, 
if made at all, to be made by people outside the State. 
The question was very carefully considered by a com- 
mittee of the Board, Mr. Dudley, Mrs. Elkins, Mr. Emery, 
Dr. Duncan and Mr. Lake. The Board's decision upon 
the matter was that a survey at this time is imprac- 
ticable,— one principal reason being that such survey if 
thorough-going, as it should be, leads to a highly dis- 
turbed condition of the schools while it is being taken, 
which would be a considerable length of time. The 
Board is not hostile to such a survey. If the necessity 
therefor should arise in the future, or if the citizens 
of the District should desire one at the present time, ex- 
cept for the reason stated above, the School Board is 
sympathetic to the idea. 



74 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The School Board was the more ready to abandon at 
this time the consideration of a survey, in view of the 
changed and extended course suggested fully in the 
Superintendent's report, of which proposal the Board 
asks the District's careful consideration and adoption in 
the near future, if the District is willing to incur the cost. 
The information of the Board is that the definite drift 
in the country is towards a course of six years in the 
grades, three years in the Junior High, and three 
years in the Senior High School. The Board in- 
vites attention to the details of the proposal embracing 
the system as contained in the Superintendent's report. 
We understand that seldom, if ever, is such system 
changed when once adopted, and we believe its adoption 
in Concord would be in all respects a forward step. 
From the standpoint of our schools the Board recom- 
mends a change to such a system, — from the standpoint 
of finances the District must decide. 

Much sickness and frequent change in the teaching 
force has interfered with the schools this year, and it is 
only through the loyalty of our teachers and the untiring 
efforts of the Superintendents, upon whom continually 
added and more exacting duties are being imposed, that 
a satisfactory year's work has been accomplished. 

The financial affairs of the District have been adminis- 
tered economically, the Board feels confident, and money 
has not been spent except as it had been appropriated. 
There will be a balance on hand at the end of the year. 
Every financial transaction is open to the inspection of 
all interested persons. 

The resignation of Mr. Swenson from the Board of 
Education has been recently announced. His general 
interest and intelligence as applied to all school matters, 
and his particular knowledge of building and housing 
matters, have made his services quite invaluable. His 
resignation from the Board, we feel, is a distinct loss to 
the District. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

While the Board of Education knows and recognizes 
in our schools certain weaknesses, with which it is trying 
to deal in the manner that seems wisest, every member, 
without reservation, subscribes to the proposition that 
our schools are most excellent and a source of the great- 
est pride. We invite and genuinely want at all times 
the co-operation of all parents and the honest criticism 
and frank opinions of all persons interested in our schools. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
HARRY F. LAKE, 
OMAR S SWENSON, 
ELIZABETH R. ELKINS, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Board of Education. 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

March 25, 1921, to March 24, 1922. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 

RECEIVED. 

Cash on hand March 25, 1921, $6,894.70 

Received from: 

City, appropriated by law, 67,587.54 

City, appropriated by Union School District, 174,661.21 

City, dog licenses, 1,296.01 

City, Abial Walker fund, 36.20 

State of New Hampshire (Industrial fund), 2,513.25 

Cash sales of text-books, 171.00 

Cash sales of scholars' supplies, 4,485.23 

Cash sales of miscellaneous, 73.39 

Cash sales of repairs, 13.56 

Rebate of salary, Night School, 2.50 

Tuition, 2,669.71 



$260,404.30 



EXPENDED. 

Administration. 

Salaries of School Board, $250.00 

Expenses of School Board — auditors $20, sta- 
tionery $2, 22.00 
Salaries of Superintendents, 3,083.03 
Expenses of Superintendents — stamps, pos- 
tals, envelopes, hand stamps and other 
sundries, 51.28 
Salary of Truant Officer, 800.00 
Expenses of Truant Officer $39, cost of tak- 
ing census $137.25, 176.25 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

Other expenses of administration — salaries of 
bookkeeper and stenographer $1,843.44, 
printing $160, etc. $206.51, $2,209.95 

Instmction. 

Salaries of regular teachers and principals, 137,953.15 
Salaries of supervisors of special subjects, 28,740.26 

Text-books, 4,470.91 

Reference books, apparatus, maps, etc., 398.50 

Scholars' supplies including school lunches, 7,642.64 
Flags and other appurtenances, 13.81 

Graduation exercises, exhibits, advertising, 131.52 

Other expenses of instruction, printing $133, 
transportation of teachers $302, examina- 
tion papers $168.40, etc. $225.29, 828.69 

Operation and Maintenance of School Plant. 

Janitors' salaries, 12,049.64 

Janitors and building supplies, 1,571.45 

Fuel, 12,430.39 

Water, 498.00 

Light and power, 1,450.08 

Repairs, salary of special repair man 

$1,325.50, minor repairs $6,425.57, 7,751.07 

Other expenses of operation and maintenance, 
highway department $299.40; telephone 
$121.41, etc. $107, 527.81 

Auxiliary Agencies and Special Activities. 

Libraries, 11.86 

Medical inspection, inspector's salary $3,000, 
nurse's salary $1,300, scales $345.60, 
teams $69.93, etc. $111.32, 4,826.85 

Transportation of pupils, 10,448.38 

Other special activities, salaries of night 

school teachers, 816.50 



78 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Fixed Charges. 

Insurance, $1,028.90 

Extra Construction and Equipment. 
Lands and new buildings, 
Alteration of old buildings, 
New equipment, 169.92 

Miscellaneous Expense. 

State per capita tax, 5,744,00 

Other expenses of instruction, dances $110, 

tuning pianos $60, etc. $102.20, 272,20 

Balance carried to next year's account, 14,035,26 



$260,404.30 



Concord, N. H., March 21, 1922. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the financial agent of Union School District, 
and find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper 
voucher for each item. 

JOHN P. GEORGE, 
HENRY H. METCALF, 

Auditors. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



79 



COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses $84.54 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, 

based on average membership 92.42 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, 

drawing, superintendent, etc. 59.74 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent 47.34 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent, in all schools 

below the high school 36.96 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent, in the high 

school 70.01 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools 4.15 

TUITION RECEIPTS. 



High School 
Eastman School 
Rumford School 
Kimball School 
Harriet P. Dame School 
Dewey School 
Dewey Training School 



$2,528.55 
12.80 
41.68 
18.00 
5.68 
9.00 
54.00 



$2,669.71 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FOR EVERY DOLLAR OF CURRENT EXPENSES. 

1921-1922. 

For teachers' salaries $0.67 

For janitors' salaries and supplies ,055 

For fuel .05 

For transportation of pupils .042 

For repairs .031 

For scholars' supplies .031 

For state per capita tax .023 

For medical inspection .019 

For text-books .014 

For superintendents' salaries and expense .012 

For other expenses of administration .0089 

For light and power ,006 

For insurance on buildings .004 
For truant officer's salary and expense of census .004 

For other special activities .003 
For other expenses of operation and maintenance .0021 

For water .002 

For reference books .0016 

For salaries and expense of school board .0011 

For new equipment .0006 

For all other minor expenses .0197 



school report. 81 

School Board Report of Financial Budget 

FOR 1922-1923. 

Amount of money required by law ($3.50 on each $1,000 of 
the inventory) . 

Elementary High 
Schools. Schools. 
I — Budget (school money) : 

(a) For support of schools, $141,867.12 $77,453.91 

(b) For purchase of text-books and 

scholars' supplies, 6,468.47 3,531.53 

(c) For purchase of flags and appur- 

tenances, 16.17 8.8-3 

(d) For payment of tuitions in high 

schools, 

(e) Total amount required for the 

above items, $148,351.76 $80,994.27 

(f) Estimate of $5 tax on 1922 inven- 

tory, 96,553.63 

II — Requirements to meet the Budget: 

(a) For support of elementary schools, $148,351.76 

(b) For support of high school and 

high school tuitions, 80,994.27 

Total support of all schools, $229,346.03 

III — School Board report of assessment re- 
quired : 

(1) For the support of schools and the 

purchase of required books, sup- 
plies and flags, and the pay- 
ment of high school tuitions, $229,346.03^ 

Estimate of $3.50 tax on 1921 asses- 
sed valuation, $67,587.54 

Estimate of additional sums needed, 161,758.49 

(2) For the payment of per capita tax, 6,000.00 

(3) For the payment of debt (statu- 

tory), 10,000.00 

(4) For the payment of interest (statu- 

tory) , 5,675.00 

(5) For the payment of other statutory 

requirements, 

(6) For the general administration of 

the schools, 6,958.00 



Total budget for 1922-1923, $257,979.03 

c 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District, Super- 
visory Union No. 8: 

In submitting this, my thirty-sixth annual report, the 
sixty-second of its series, I am reminded of changes 
that are being made in general to meet requirements of 
modern schools. Ways, means, and methods, prevail- 
ing years ago, now are inadequate for meeting present 
conditions. The public school population of today is 
so unlike that of former days in character that methods 
of the ancient kind are not so effective. 

Education concerns itself more and more each suc- 
ceeding year about discovering the individual child both 
in his particular capacity for doing prescribed work and 
his probable relation to society after his period of public 
school life is ended. Such work calls for the best talent 
to determine the true measurement of intelligence and 
also a clear knowledge of the physical conditions of 
childhood. The "get-there-or-die" plan, bred and fos- 
tered by the old aristocratic idea of education, has given 
place in a great degree to the more rational plan of 
making the most of real child development. The people 
of the country are beginning to recognize, quite rapidly, 
the true function of the public school — the full develop- 
ment of individual capacity — and they are willing to 
accept a realization of this as a fair return for the money 
they spend to bring it about. Requirements for such 
results are the best supervision, tuition and housing con- 
ditions. 

In many places, some not far-removed from Concord, 
large sums of money are being expended in the erection 
of new buildings to accommodate rapidly growing stu- 
dent population. More children are going to school, 
children of many different nationalities, a large proper- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

tion of which are neither of English extraction nor of 
native parentage. The matter of educating them in 
our language, customs and ideals in addition to the 
routine of curriculum requirements presents a problem 
entirely different from that of earlier times when a large 
majority of the students had the benefits of a good 
home life conducted on traditional lines and of a com- 
mon language. 

In the country at large the awakening of the people 
to the value of education was never more apparent than 
now. 

The National Education Association has already 
appointed a committee of men to discover whether the 
large expenditure of money for secondary schools can 
be justified by the brand of education that is shown. 
The personnel of this committee is of such strong calibre 
as to strengthen the belief that the investigation will 
be intelligent, thorough, and of great value. 

There is a determined effort being made to have the 
educational interests of the country nationally repre- 
sented by a Bureau of Education. 

The measurement of pupil intelligence and the proper 
nourishment of all school children are movements rapidly 
growing in public favor. 

In our own city, child welfare is being looked after 
along the most approved lines by the Board of Education 
who have given freely of their time and effort to place 
our schools in the front rank. 

The new committee on education recently appointed 
by the Chamber of Commerce should be a power in bring- 
ing the excellence of Concord School System to the notice 
of other cities. 

Housing Accommodations. 

Congestion in pupil attendance has appeared in the 
middle grades, in the senior and the junior high schools, 
and in other isolated spots. A concrete problem is 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

offered for solution in meeting these conditions in the 
most economical way, without additional building con- 
struction, there being no vacant room south of School 
Street at the present time. Relief could be given the 
Kimball and the Rumford schools during the past year 
only by extraordinary transfers. This caused some dis- 
satisfaction among the parents. 

The Senior High School is taxed to its capacity. The 
maximum enrollment at the beginning of the second 
semester had increased to 510. It is probable that a 
larger attendance will have to be met next fall. 

The present Senior High School building was first 
occupied in 1906. At that time it was expected to pro- 
vide accommodations for a four-year high school for fifty 
years. In three years it had outgrown its capacity and 
in 1910 the freshman class was taken out and placed in 
the Parker School building. The grades that were sup- 
posed to be accommodated in the high school then, have 
reached an enrollment of 758. I think measures may 
be taken that will provide for the enrollment of next fall 
but if steady growth continues thereafter the erection 
of a new building must be considered. 

The attendance in the Parker School continues to grow. 
At the beginning of the next fall term it will probably be 
the largest in its history. Adequate additions to this 
building would solve all housing problems for a long time, 
giving four vacant rooms below School street. 

The High Schools, 

Senior High. 

The work of this school is confined to the last three years 
of pupil school life. Much effort has been made 
during the last year to raise the standard of work and en- 
force better discipline, and I feel that it has been accom- 
plished in a measure. Any school, whether elementary 
or secondary, will be no better than the spirit displayed 
"by the pupils. It is this that gives sufficient momentum to 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

all the various activities and creates an atmosphere of 
progress. Pupils come to this school finely prepared in 
both spirit and attainment to do the work. Compared 
with secondary schools of earlier times the present high 
school shows wide variations, making it much more of a 
public representative school. In the older school domestic 
arts and manual training were in their infancy, it not being 
fully determined as to their place in the school curriculum, 
and a department of commerce had not been established. 
The school was only one-third as large as it is now, with 
four years of grading. The number of teachers was cor- 
respondingly small. Then the school was mainly classi- 
cal in requirement and spirit. It is an educational axiom 
that the larger a school of this kind grows the less scholastic 
the students become because the increase is mainly of 
those who are interested in only a few of the activities. 

Now we find the following division: 

Classical, 87 ; Academic, 133 ; Commercial, 173 ; Manual 
Training, 172. 

The various courses so widely different in character can- 
not command the concentration of thought, teaching, effort, 
and atmosphere that was apparent in the old school, but 
the present day school is more distinctly public than ever 
before. 

The principal in his report to the superintendent, speaks 
of the probable crowded condition of the building next 
year, and the importance of the physical drill movement. 

He acknowledges with appreciation the services of the 
following people who have addressed the school : Miss 
Alice Bradley, of the Farmer Cooking School ; Mr. Ray- 
mond, of the Chamber of Commerce ; Mr. John S. Davie, 
Labor Commissioner; Colonel Aloe, Citizens' Training 
Camps : Mr. Walter M. May, Good English Week, and Mr. 
Clark Macomber. on College Work and Sports. 

He deplores the changes of teachers as making it im- 
possible to do standard work. He also says that the work 
done by the school is satisfactory, both in quantity and 
quality, and that the record of students entering colleges 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

other than N. H. State is as good as in other cities of the 
State, and that failures in the N. H. College is due to the 
fact that many of those who entered chose courses for 
which they were not fitted, nor recommended. 

A special prize of $20 has been offered by Mr. William 
W. Thayer to be awarded to that member of the school 
attaining the highest rank in scholarship among those whose 
athletic record during the same year entitles them to their 
"C." 

The Parker School. 

This school has been handicapped for the greater part of 
the year by the absence of Miss Dickerman on account of 
serious illness. Nevertheless, a superior grade of work 
has been done and the accomplishments of the pupils are 
reflected in the creditable standing of those who have 
entered high schools in various parts of the country. 
Schools of this grade need the services of teachers who have 
had full college training or its equivalent because the 
character of the work is essentially secondary. The Ter- 
man group tests have been applied to all of the pupils and 
the intelligence quotients average high, following with re- 
markable accuracy the pupil's record of school work. 

The Chandler School. 

That one hundred and fifty pupils and six teachers are 
cooped up in incommodious quarters for nine months of 
the year should be frowned upon by the parents. Teach- 
ers of such calibre and pupils of this age should be given 
accommodations comparable with those allowed such 
schools in other places. The record of the school is su- 
perior. 

The Walker School. 

The scholars in this school have made excellent record 
for the past year. The evenness of the work and the fine 
spirit displayed, commends the efforts of both teachers and 
pupils. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

The Eastman School. 

The classes of this school are small. It seems advisable 
that the Junior High pupils should be transferred to the 
schools of the city proper so that they may gain the ad- 
vantages of departmental instruction and the growing 
spirit of larger classes. 

The Garrison School. 

The classes in this school have the benefit of departmen- 
tal instruction and have done passing work in their studies. 
The teachers are faithful and the atmosphere of the school 
is first-class. 

Some alarm has been manifested at a lack of fundamen- 
tal knowledge which it is claimed that pupils have when 
they enter the freshman class of the high school. A com- 
parison of two classes thirty years apart should convince 
them that this is not the case, and that the fit of today is 
at least the equal of the fit of long ago. 

Comparative Table 

showing the work of the pupils during the first term in 
the freshman class. 

1891. 1921. 

No. pupils whose record is found 82 141 

No. of these attaining perfect term mark 
No. of these attaining a term mark : 

Between 90 and 100% 6= 7.3% 25=17.7%o 

Between 80 and 90 18=21.9 57=40.4 

Between 70 and 80 25=30.4 50=35.4 

Between 60 and 70 20=24.3 8= 5.7 

Between 50 and 60 7= 8.5 1= .75 

Between 40 and 50 2= 2.4 0= 

Between 30 and 40 2= 2.4 0= 

Between 20 and 30 2= 2.4 0= 

Below 20 per cent. 0^ 0^ 

No. pupils failing to pass 70 per cent. 33=40.1% 9^ 6.37% 

Average scholarship of class 72.2 82. 



88 CITY OF CON CORE 

About this time the principal of the school thirty years 
ago made this remark to the superintendent: "Either they 
(the entering freshmen) do not understand the situation 
or they are not properly prepared." I say this without 
the least fear of successful contradiction. The general 
work of the pupils of the Junior High Schools is of a high 
order of excellence and any delinquencies that may be dis- 
covered later is not to be borne by them. The pupils 
know the fundamentals and they are admirably fitted to 
take up the work of any high school freshman class. This 
is revealed in the daily classroom work and in the results 
of severe tests given at the close of each semester. 

The Elementary Schools. 

The elementary schools comprising the first six years 
have accomplished much. Rearrangements and closer 
adjustments in the curriculum and more definite cor- 
relations have brought better work in the various studies. 
The mid-year tests revealed a power and definite results 
that will stand the closest investigation. Special atten- 
tion has been given to penmanship the work in which, 
for the last few years, could be criticised with reason. 
English composition also is being supervised carefully 
showing to advantage in the following particulars: 

Oral and written English composition, formal grammar, 
penmanship, spelling and general neatness. Mr. Clay- 
ton's efforts in this direction have been invaluable. To 
summarize what has been done for the past year I give 
the following : 

1. Readjustment of the work in arithmetic. 

2. Closer correlation of English with other branches. 

3. More care given to legible writing. 

4. A new course of study in geography in the fifth and 

sixth years. 

5. Revision of the course in history in the fifth and 

sixth years. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

6. Scientific investigation in classes E and F to deter- 

mine the true value of silent reading. 

7. A new course in spelling for classes K, L. 

The work of these schools will bear close investigation 
and merit approval for the results attained and the 
methods of gaining them. Recent praise from people 
outside of the city, and also the state, ably qualified to 
judge in such matters should be reassuring to all. 

The Rural Schools, 

The attendance in the rural schools has increased. The 
course of study is arranged so as to fit the needs of pupils 
about to enter the Junior High grades. In the more re- 
mote schools the first year work of the Junior High School 
has been completed, thus enabling the pupils to enter the 
Parker School. In all cases the pupils have maintained 
a creditable standing. Mr. Nute has made frequent visits 
to the Mountain School for instructing the boys in the 
elements of wood-working. A carpenter's bench and 
tool equipment have been furnished. 

The usual visits of the other special teachers have brought 
forth good results. A certain vigor and natural indi- 
viduality marks the work of all these schools indicating a 
growth of self-responsibility in the pupils and also a power 
to do things without constant direction. 

Obituary. 

Miss Gara Elizabeth McQuesten died March 27, 1921, 
after a lingering illness. Miss McQuesten, who was a 
graduate of the city public schools and tbe normal train- 
ing class, had taught here for thirty-one years. Her work 
was always marked by sincerity, energy, originality and 
unqualified success. To those who knew her best she was 
an inspiration in both her public and private life. 

Miss Eva Alice Henneberry died July 7, 1921. Miss 



90 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Henneberry was a graduate of the local high school and 
the Dewey Training School. She had taught one year in 
the rural schools and in this short time showed professional 
strength. A promising career was cut short by her un- 
timely death. 

The Dewey Training School. 

The school has been conducted along former lines. The 
unusually large classes are due to the remuneration allowed 
during the training period, an expedient adopted during 
the late war. Its discontinuance after this year will 
probably result in smaller entering classes, I believe the 
greatest care should be exercised about retaining those 
teachers whose record during the first semester does not 
indicate future success in teaching. Before the next class 
enters, some specific rules should be made and a scheme 
adopted by which definite information can be gathered re- 
garding the probable professional success of each pupil 
teacher. 

Special Branches. 

MUSIC. 

The policies of previous years have prevailed. 
Five thousand ten individual tests in sight-singing have 
been given with excellent results. The chorus singing in 
the high school has been better than it was last year. The 
excellence of the instruction is revealed in the community 
singing of the Rumford School, the four-part songs of the 
Chandler School and the orchestra of the Garrison School 
where a live interest has been manifest. Five members 
of the high school orchestra were formerly pupils in the 
Garrison School. Class K, in the Kimball School, pre- 
pared and gave an operetta in a creditable manner during 
the winter term. The Parker School still maintains ex- 
cellent chorus work and its community songs are an in- 
spiration. The high school orchestra and the glee clubs 
flourish, but the class in music appreciation is small and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 91 

will be discontinued unless increase in membership is 
shown. 

COOKING. 

The schedule arranged for the first semester was very 
unsatisfactory. A change was made in February so that 
all girls in classes M and N receive an hour and three- 
quarters of work every other week. This schedule is 
progressing satisfactorily. 

The elective classes under Miss Davis have had the routine 
work of the curriculum supplemented by lectures and ex- 
cursions as follows: 

A demonstration lesson on carving, by Mr. La Har of St. 
Paul's School. 

A trip through The Durgin Silver Manufactory. 

An inspection of Wilson's Cold Storage Plant. 

A demonstration of the different kinds of fish and their 
preparation by Mr. Corrigan. 

The cutting up of a beef creature, by Mr. Nolan. 

The school lunches have been conducted aa before with 
a more varied menu. 

SEWING. 

The general efficiency of the pupils in this work was 
never better. The high school classes lose interest by 
being obliged to walk to the Parker School for their in- 
struction. If a room were available in the high school 
building, numbers and interest would increase. Project 
work has been done for the Charitable Society and for the 
Morrill School of Mechanic Arts. 

DRAWING. 

No radical changes have been made in the curriculum 
but too infrequent visits to the schools by the supervisor 
have held back the work to an appreciable extent, through 
no fault of hers. Visits to the elementary schools have 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

been made only once in four weeks. Two half -days are 
being given to high school electives. The combining of 
the Parker School and the High School electives has made 
the classes too large to do the best work, but the quality, 
nevertheless, is superior. The increasing number of 
special activities make it exceedingly difficult to arrange a 
curriculum giving the proper amount of time to each. 

The Morrill School of Mechanic Arts. 

The activities of this school have become so numerous 
and the institution such an important factor in the general 
scheme of education of this district that it deserves a more 
detailed report than is now being given. Little by little 
the school has grown to meet the popular demands for 
manual training and industrial work and the methods of 
instruction have undergone a corresponding change. The 
course is balanced so as to fulfil the fundamental aims of 
education especially as regards certain cultural and related 
subjects. Year by year this school is becoming more 
identified with the industrial activities of Concord. 

At the beginning of the school year the course was 
separated into four divisions: manual training, try-out 
work, pre-vocational, and vocational. This was done to 
clarify the course in respect to its aims and in response 
to constructive suggestions made by parents, business men, 
and prominent educators. This course develops for in- 
dustrial positions, business men, salesmen and teachers of 
mechanic arts. It also has an added value in preparing 
for the State College and other technical schools. 

The usual quantity and quality of work has been done 
and the principal and the teachers have again demonstrated 
their worth by general efficiency. 

A school for disabled World "War Veterans was held dur- 
ing July and August of last year at the Morrill School 
conducted by the Federal Board for Vocational Education. 
Seventy different men were enrolled. They were in- 
structed by Messrs. Hartwell, Oilman, Wilcox, Roundy, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

•Chamberlin, Paige, Andrews and Hall of the Morrill 
School, and Messrs. Clark, Sawyer, Lougee and Edmunds 
from other places. The courses of study comprised Ma- 
chine Shop Practice, Pattern-Making, Cabinet Making, 
Electricity, Mechanical Drawing and Printing. Among 
the different projects performed were the wiring of the 
Parker School and a part of the basement of the High 
School for electricity. The entire session was one of 
great value to all concerned. 

The Kindergartens. 

No new kindergartens have been established during the 
past year and the usual attendance has diminished. Miss 
Lowe of the Walker Kindergarten was transferred to the 
principalship of the Garrison Kindergarten, the position 
having been made vacant by the election of Miss Chamber- 
lin to the supervisorship of all this work. Miss Cham- 
berlin's efforts have been successful and it is with confi- 
dence that we expect that this department will continue 
to reflect her faithful work. 

Intelligence Tests. 

Activity in determining both the distinctive physical 
•qualities and the mental character of school children has 
"been revealed in the results gained through the untiring 
efforts of Mr. Clayton and Dr. Kelley. The tests, both 
-group and individual, while not a finality in themselves 
in arriving at conclusions, are highly suggestive and 
approach determination so nearly as to make them of the 
•greatest valuei in a system of education. Their peculiar 
functions include the proper adjustment of a course of 
•study to the pupil's capacity, the proper value of the con- 
tent of texts, the degree of application that a pupil could 
l)e expected to give reasonably, and the effectiveness of the 
methods of teaching in use. 



94 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The inclination of some to belittle the value of these 
things suggests at once a lack of progressive ideas, an 
inclination to remain in well-trodden paths because they 
are traditional, and an adherence to those things that have 
always tended to hold the world back instead of pushing 
it forward. The result of all this will be that methods 
of determining values of school efficiency that do not take 
into account the child in his entire capacity will soon be 
relegated to an inefficient past. The advance of civilization 
has resulted from just such scientific investigation and re- 
search. 

Recom mendations. 



That if the district can stand the expense, the prevailing 
scheme of grading the schools be expanded to provide for 
an ultimate gradation as follows: 

(a) A division of kindergartens embracing two years. 
The ages of pupils from 4 to 6 years. 

(b) A division of elementary schools embracing six 
years having a socialized curriculum specially adapted for 
stressing the fundamentals in all work. The ages of 
pupils from 6 to 12 years. 

(c) A division of intermediate or junior high schools 
having a socialized curriculum specially adapted for the 
need of adolescent pupils, extending the work of the fun- 
damentals of the elementary grades, varied by introducing 
the proper features of the secondary schools including the 
early beginning of modern languages, typewriting and 
other features of the commercial course, making it a defi- 
nite try-out period for the differentiated course of the 
senior high school. Ages of pupils from 12 to 15 years. 

(d) A division of senior high school grade with a dif- 
ferentiated curriculum so that specialized work may be 
done along the following lines : 

College Preparation, Commerce, Vocational and Personal 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

Guidance, Advanced work in the various curricula to pre- 
pare more thoroughly for the pupil's choice of life work, 
including junior college requirements. Ages of pupils 
from 15 to 18 years. 

2. 

That each of the following buildings may be provided 
with a supervising principal whose duties shall be mainly 
supervisory so that the requirements in all grades and all 
the special activities may be met more adequately. Rum- 
ford, Kimball, Garrison buildings. 



That the Junior High School classes of the Eastman 
School be transferred to the Walker School where the 
pupils can have the better care and advantages afforded 
by larger classes and by departmental instruction. 



That all the various branches of the domestic science de- 
partment be placed in charge of one responsible head un- 
der whose direction a more economic administration would 
result and objectives would be realized that we do not ob- 
tain now. 



That conditions in the Millville School be given imme- 
diate attention to secure their much needed improvement. 



That modern vehicles be purchased by the district to be 
used in transportation of pupils. 

School Conditions. 

Concord should be proud of its schools. They are not 
perfect, but they merit great praise for what they have 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

done, for what they are doing, and for what they plan to 
do in the future. 

Unusual care must be exercised that continued additions 
to the requirements and to the duties of the teachers are 
justified by additional time furnished. The financial ex- 
pense must be vouched for by positive results. 

The demands of the curriculum are such as are required 
of pupils in other cities. ■ They are reasonably well met, 
the pupil health carefully looked after, and the pupils, 
grade for grade, are over-age rather than under-age. When 
children leave our schools to live elsewhere they invariably 
maintain their grading and frequently enter ahead of the 
classes to which they would be assigned ordinarily. 

The ages of pupils in the high school are on the average 
about the same as those in other cities of the state. This 
refutes the statement that they are more immature than 
pupils in other cities. 

In all grades through the elementary and the junior 
high schools the pupils are industrious, well-disciplined, 
serious about their work, and happy in the performance 
of it. 

The call for another year in the grades is needless, but 
if the addition were to be made it should be as suggested 
in my previous report of 1918 and more definitely stated in 
this report. This year is to be of post-secondary grade 
as required of six year high school courses in the State 
Course of Study for Secondary Schools, P. 11. It must be 
borne in mind that such addition will result in increased 
expense. In any case the annual cost of running the 
schools will be enlarged by from three to five thousand 
dollars. In a short time, if not at once, it would require 
additional building construction at a cost of not less than 
$150,000. Unless more room could be secured it would 
place additional burdens upon the lowest grade teachers 
by increasing the number of classes to three and four in 
each room. There is nothing in the prevailing conditions 
now to warrant such an outlay. Build the schools up, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

graded as they are, strengthening certain weak 
places and utilize every reasonable expedient to house the 
pupils before increasing the bonded indebtedness of the 
district simply to supply another year's work. During 
the coming year the need of added building construction 
may be determined more definitely. A lack of room for 
housing the schools properly should be the sole cause of 
increasing the bonded indebtedness of the district. 

I congratulate the citizens of Concord upon maintaining 
such creditable schools. Let all unite in serious effort to 
make them still better, strengthening the weak depart- 
ments, spending the public money with the usual good 
judgment, and in spreading abroad their good features 
as well as offering reasonable criticism at home. 

To the Board of Education, the entire teaching corps, 
to Assistant Superintendent Clayton and all others who 
have aided me in trying to maintain and further build up 
the credit of our schools I extend my sincere appreciation. 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT, 



To Mr. Louis J. Rundett, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir: I am submitting herewith a report on the 
work of assistant superintendent for the year 1921-1922. 
This report will deal with adult educational activities and 
supervision in the elementary and secondary schools. 

There has been no marked change in the method of ad- 
ministration of the night schools. Following out the policy 
of preceding years we used Morrill School for the short 
vor^ational unit courses and the Senior High School for 
English classes for the foreign-born. Statistics of enroll- 
ment and attendance appear elsewhere. There was not 
so much sustained interest in the vocational work as in 
previous years, which was accounted for partly by the fact 
that employment conditions were not normal, and for many 
others an unusual interest in social and civic activities 
engaged their time. The English work was maintained 
at its usual level of interest. All courses were effectively 
taught by our regular vocational and substitute teachers. 
I greatly question the wisdom of demanding night-school 
service of day-school teachers even if we do pay extra for 
such service, and yet it would not be economical to employ 
full time teachers for this work with the comparatively 
small demand there is for it. 

The attempts to make better readjustments in courses 
of the Junior and Senior High Schools referred to in my 
last report, have been continued successfully. There is 
greater continuity between the lower and upper schools, 
notwithstanding the fact that the work of the low^er or 
Junior High Schools is impaired by the lack of adequate 
housing. A modern Junior High School building is 
greatly needed not only to meet the present congestion 
but for the inevitable increase of pupils in the near 
future. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

A study of four selected grades in the elementary schools 
was made with respect to the value of silent reading. It 
has been frequently contended that pupils are not taught 
how to read silently, in other words how to get the con- 
tent of a book or paper by themselves intelligently. It 
is further alleged that most of the reading done in after- 
school life is done silently : therefore, silent reading should 
be taught. The study referred to was made not because 
silent reading is untaught in our schools, but rather to 
develop a more effective method for teaching it. The re- 
sult of the study and experiment showed marked gains in 
the abilities of pupils to read silently with speed and com- 
prehension under the method employed by two of the 
teachers who took part in the experiment. This investi- 
gation will be continued in the higher grades and the 
method developed tried out still more completely. This 
kind of supervision applied to other forms of school activi- 
ties will produce similar improvement in teaching method, 
and the pupils and teachers both will be the gainers. 

Another single item of supervision has been a study of 
the classroom grades of our high school pupils, in other 
words the school success of pupils. This study covered 
the work of the Parker and the Senior High Schools. A 
careful study was made of the individual records, and then 
mentality tests were given to 661 pupils to ascertain, ap- 
proximately, the native mental ability of our high school 
pupils. A full report of this study has be^n presented 
to Headmaster Cook. Some items in this report may be 
of interest to parents. 

The first significant fact is that as a group of pupils, our 
pupils register, as we would have surmised, good average 
ability. In fact, about 20 per cent of the pupils would 
be considered of superior ability according to the Terman 
standards. 

In the second place, we find that in mental brightness or 
alertness the younger members of a class are superior to 
the older members in the same class. Or, in other <vords, 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the chronological age of a pupil is not a sign necessarily 
of greater mental maturity ; on the other hand the reverse 
seems to be true. The following data from one of the 
tables in the report referred to illustrate this point. The 
intelligence quotients — commonly abbreviated I. Q. — 
which indicate mental alertness or slowness are shown in 
the left hand column. The 80-89 group is the slowest men- 
tally; the 120-129 group is the most alert or the brightest 
mentally. If one reads downward he will find that the 
oldest pupils chronologically — i. e., oldest in years — have 
the lowest average mental age. This data is from Class Q 
(Grade 9B). 



I. Q. GROUP 


CHRONOLOGICAL AGE 


MENTAL AGE 


80- 89 


16 


yrs., 


10 mos. 


13 yrs., 5 mos. 


90- 99 


16 


> J 


1 " 


14 " 10 " 


100-109 


15 


> > 


5 " 


15 " 11 " 


110-119 


15 


7 > 


•" 


17 " " 


120-129 


14 


> > 


2 " 


17 " 8 " 



This situation throws light on the matter of a pupil's 
age in any grade. "We cannot say because a pupil is 
young in years that he is necessarily forced when placed 
in a grade with older pupils. He may be, so far as mental 
ability is concerned, much in advance of his classmates. 
I have known of pupils who have graduated from high 
school at the age of 20 years or more whose mental age 
was under fourteen years; and of freshmen in high school 
mentally 17 years of age but chronologically not over 13 
years of age. 

Another interesting observation resulting from this study 
is that our slower pupils mentally are making very credit- 
able progress in school success; their ranks show 
that they are making satisfactory use of their ability. On 
the other hand, the school success of many of the high 
average and superior pupils — i. e. in native ability — is 
conspicuously low. There appears to be no evidence, ex- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

cept possibly in the ease of an isolated pupil, where the 
grade of work required is too difficult: it is too difficult 
for the indolent. On the other hand, there is very- 
strong evidence that for the healthy-bodied and healthy- 
minded pupil the work is not difficult enough. 

I have cited these two items of supervision to indicate 
the kind of intensive study that is being made of our 
schools. Lack of clerical assistance limits the amount of 
work of this nature that can be done at present. Such 
studies as have been made present a more accurate view of 
our schools and give more trustworthy measures of their 
success and failure than second-hand reports. Many mu- 
nicipal school systems have inaugurated research depart- 
ments which handle all such matters. The results have 
permanent value in scientifically judging that city 's schools 
at their real value. Already we have taken steps designed 
to remedy revealed defects and to improve merits. The 
problems of school today cannot be treated as isolated 
problems in the community. Schools used to be as homo- 
geneous as the communities they served. Today they are 
subjected to all of the diverse influences of their complex 
modern environment. No panacea can cure our ills: only 
impartial and accurate observation of the facts can lead us 
to the actual situation, and then our diagnosis and treat- 
ment must be specific. 

I wish to make known at this time my appreciation of 
the unfailing co-operation of teachers and principals, even 
when co-operation meant the giving up of coveted leisure 
hours, whenever I have attempted to study their pupils 
and their classes. In particular I find the work of Doctor 
Kelley invaluable in diagnosing individual situations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. T. CLAYTON. 

Assistant Superintendent. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MEDICAL DIRECTOR. 



Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent , 

Dear Sir : Herewith I respectfully submit a, statistical 
report of the work accomplished by this department since 
February 15, 1921. 

Three thousand, one hundred and sixty-six pupils have 
been examined as carefully as circumstances permit and 
it has been the aim of the examiner to inform individual 
pupils in such matters of hygiene as appeared most appro- 
priate to their several needs. This has not been without 
response on the part of the pupils, many of whom have 
shown considerable interest in bettering their physical 
condition. The general routine of the department has 
been continued, involving an increasing amount of cleri- 
cal work. 

Following out the general plan of health development as 
an important function of the schools, physical training has 
been made a prescribed course in the Senior High School 
and has been carried on successfully by Miss Ranney and 
Mr. Quinn. The boys' drill has consisted of setting-up 
exercises as prescribed for the regular army as a basis, 
supplemented by calisthenics from the manual of Edmund 
D. Butts, U. S. Army, and by games. Concerted move- 
ments have been promoted by cornet music by two of the 
pupils, enabling the classes to perform the exercises rhyth- 
mically and without verbal command. Bar-bells, con- 
structed at the Morrill School, have been provided for fuller 
development of the exercises. Similarly, the girls' classes 
are given formal drills, supplemented by appropriate games 
and folk-dances. , Wands have been provided for these 
classes. 

The need of maintaining a high level of health among 
children may be shown from the report of absences for 
an average month. One thousand, three hundred and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 103 

ninety school days were lost in this district and, excluding 
unavoidable absences, 1,117 days were due to preventable 
illness. This is a retarding influence upon the children, 
as well as a very considerable economic loss. Much may 
be done in the homes by emphasizing the simple rules of 
health and by increasing the children's resistance to disease. 
To aid in raising or in maintaining the standard of health 
provision has recently been made in three of the schools 
for forenoon lunches. During the first week, 1,217 lunches 
were taken in a school population of 610, ■ Scales have 
been supplied to these schools and the children will be 
weighed each month, a report of which will be sent to the 
parents. This does not replace the valuable nutrition 
work of the Concord Charity Organization Society but is a 
development made possible by their pioneer work. 

The personnel of the Dental Clinic has been reorganized 
because of the withdrawal of eight of the staff after a 
generous and faithful service through five years. The 
clinic has been continued by Dr. Young, Dr. Albee, Dr. 
Morton, Dr. Washburn and, temporarily, Dr. Aldrich. 
During the year, two hundred and forty-three children 
have benefited by this work, which forms a most important 
part of the health program. 

Many children, also, have had the benefit of surgical and 
medical treatment generously given by physicians of the 
city. 

The Concord Female Charitable Association has again 
donated the sum of ten dollars for the purchase of glasses 
for needy children and the gift is appreciatively acknowl- 
edged. Dr. Thomas D. Wood, of Columbia University, 
has given to the schools a series of health charts which 
are proving valuable in stimulating the interest of the 
children. 

Although the nse of the Armory has been granted for 
physical training and the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation has afforded the use of its gymnasium for basket- 
ball, there is a growing need of a school gymnasium in 



104 CITY OF CONCORD. 

which classes could be conducted more frequently to the 
greater advantage of the pupils. The High School also 
lacks provision for track activities which could well be 
developed. 

Your attention is respectfully called to the reports of 
Mrs. Upham and Miss Elliott, which are enclosed and which 
can show only partially the effort and interest which they 
have contributed to the work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. M. KELLEr, 

Medical Inspector. 
February 24, 1922. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 105 

SUMMARY OF EXAMINATIONS FROM FEBRUARY 
14, 1921, TO FEBRUARY 24, 1922. 

Number of pupils examined, 3,166 

Number of notifications of defects sent to parents, 395 

Number of exclusions for communicable diseases, etc., 79 
Mental examinations, 32 

Summary of Health Defects. 



Vision, total. 




478 


Slight, 


272 




Marked, 


206 




Hearing, total. 




80 


Slight, 


51 




Marked, 


29 




Teeth, total, 




1,195 


Slight, 


297 




Marked, 


898 




Speech, 




34 


Defective nasal breathing. 




41 


Defective tonsils, total, 




531 


Slight enlargement, 


234 




Marked enlargement. 


289 , 




Acute inflammation, 


8 




Cervical adenitis, total, 




456 


Slight, 


158 




Marked, 


298 




Thyroid enlargement, simple, 




8 


Anemia, 




46 


Pulmonary disease, total, 




27 


Non-tubercular, 


8 




Tuberculosis or suspected tuberculosis, 


13 




Arrested tuberculosis, 


6 




Cardiac disease. 




74 


Chorea, 


. 


3 


Other nervous diseases. 




8 


Orthopedic defects. 




43 



106 CITY OP CONCORD. 



Skin diseases, total, 




202 


Trophic, 


1 




Inflammatory, 


34 




Parasitic, 


167 




Contagious diseases, not included elsewhere. 




8 


Nutrition, total, 




803 


Over- weight, more than 20%, 


55 




Under-weight, 






10%-15%, 


451 




more than 15%, 


297 




Mental deficiency. 




77 


Total number of health defects. 




4,114 



Exclusions Because of Communicable Disease and 
Other Conditions, 



Mumps, 


2 


Chicken-pox, 


2 


Suspected contagious disease and exposure. 


4 


Impetigo contagiosa, 


16 


Fever of unknown cause, 


3 


Tonsilitis, 


4 


Acute conjunctivitis. 


2 


Pediculosis, 


30 


Ring-worm, 


4 


Rachitis, 


1 


Bronchitis, 


4 


Uncleanliness, 


7 



Total, 79 



school report. 107 

Report of Helen Y. Upham, R. N., School Nurse. 
Home calls from September 6, 1921, to February 18, 1922. 



Defective teeth, 


84 


hearing. 


13 


vision, 


.78 


mentality, 


3 


nose and throat. 


e5 


skin disease, 


26 


venereal disease, 


6 


nutrition (under- weight), 


44 


pediculosis. 


28 


uncleanliness, 


3 


orthopedic, 


1 


other causes, 


24 


Total, 


375 


Interviews with physicians and officials, 


104 



Report of Nutrition and Dental Work and Special 

Cases. 

Visits at schools, 101 

Number of classes given talks on nutrition, 26 

Number of pupils weighed and measured, 610 

Number of weight reports sent to parents, 610 

Number of these 610 pupils talking milk at recess, 293 

Dental "Work. Number of pupils examined, 301 

Number of cases of defect found, 157 

Number of cases securing treatment, 148 

Number of cases treated at Dental Clinics, 99 

Dentists giving their services : 

Or. Young, Dr. Albee, Dr. Washburn, Dr. Mor- 
ton, Dr. Aldrich, 



108 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Dental Clinic: 

Cleanings, 76 

Fillings, 78 

Extractions, 165 

Report of Examinations. 

Assisted at examination of pupils, 849 

Number of notifications sent to parents, 171 
Number of treatments secured, 148 
Number of examinations secured, 13 
Number of cases where parents are unwilling to 

co-operate, 10 

Total, 171 

Report of Clarice M. Elliott, R. N., School Nurse. 
Jlome calls from February 21, 1921, to August 1, 1921. 

Fever, 2 

Defective teeth, 56 

throat or nose, 42 

vision, 52 

hearing or discharging ear, 15 

Uncleanliness, 5 

Defective nutrition, 59 

Pediculi, 6 

Skin eruption, 14 

Anemia, 3 

Orthopedic defect, 11 

Venereal disease, 3 

Pulmonary disease, 3 

Cardiac disease, 1 

Suspected contagious disease, 5 

Rachitis, 4 

Nervous disease, 2 

Neglect. 1 



SCHOOL REPORT, 109 

Chronic headache, 2 

Other causes, 14 



Total, 300 

(Home calls from September 7, 1920, to August 1, 1921, 

643) 

Visits to schools, 153 

Interviews with physicians or officials, 282 

Notifications Sent From February 21, 1921, to July, 

1921. 

Pediculi, 95 

Defective teeth, 17 

Skin eruption, 9 

Vision defect, 73 

Hearing defect, 8 

Nose and throat defect, 20 

Nutrition, 1 

Contagious disease, 1 



224 



"Work of the Dental Clinic, February to July, 1921. 

Cleanings, 95 

Extractions, 121 

Fillings, 117 

Treatments, 2 

Examinations, J 9 

Number of pupils treated, 144 





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UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 1921. 



Girls 


Total 


1,531 


3,102 




176 


95 


202 


1,206 


2,448 


278 


581 


43 


66 



SUMMARY OF WARDS. 

Boys 

Number of children enumerated 1,571 

Increase since 1920 

Number attending school since 1920 .... 107 

Number attending public schools 1,242 

Number attending parochial schools .... 303 

Number attending private schools 23 

Number of children enumerated between 

the ages of 5 and 16 inclusive 1,571 1,531 3,102 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere . . 2 4 6 

Number between the ages of 8 and 14 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere . . 

Number between the ages of 14 and 16 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere . . 4 2 6 

Number between 5 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 1 1 

Number between 5 and 8 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 8 and 14 not attending 

school regularly 1 1 

Number between 14 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 1 1 2 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write 

the English language correctly 

How many of these were born in New 

Hampshire 

Elsewhere in the United States 

In foreign countries 

Moved to the district since 1920 51 





















47 


98 



112 CITY OP CONCORD. 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 

American born 1,168 

Foreign born 470 

Russia 16 

West Indies 1 

Italy 57 

New Brunswick 6 

England 35 

Poland 1 

Sweden 69 

Roumania 1 

Ireland 44 

French Canadian 151 

English Canadian 11 

Denmark 2 

Germany 5 

Nova Scotia 12 

Prince Edward Island 8 

Finland 29 

Scotland 10 

Albania 1 

Austria 1 

Switzerland 1 

Greece 1 

Newfoundland 2 

Armenia 3 

France 1 

South America 1 

Bermuda 1 

NATIVITY OF CHILD. 

Boys Girls Total 

American born 1,528 1,489 3,017 

Foreign born 43 42 85 

Italy 7 1 8 

England 4 1 5 

Sweden 1 3 4 

Ireland 3 3 

Armenia 2 2 

French Canadian 20 16 36 

English Canadian 1 1 2 

Scotland 2 1 3 

Finland 4 5 9 

Newfoundland 2 3 5 

Nova Scotia 6 6 

Prince Edward Island 1 1 

Greece 1 1 



SCHOOL REPORT, 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



113 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and 
subjects taught. 



Residence ( )=out of 
town. 



Group I.— High 
School. 



Charles F.Cook .. 
Charles E. Moors. 



Roderic K. Stanley. . 



Edward C. Bader 

Harold W. Haggard. 



Elisabeth Arerill. 
May B. McLsm... 
Carrie E. Baker . . 
Abbie M. Sanger . 
Carrie A.Hood... 



Headmaster 

Submaster. room 1 



Assistant, room ' 



Assistant, lecture 

room 

Assistant, room 9.. 

" 11.. 

■' 3.. 

" 5.. 



Helen J. Knox. .. 
Grace E. Weston 



Margaret I. Marston 
MyraD.Gifford 



" 4.. 
" 10.. 



Assistant, Assem- 
bly Hall 



Frances D. Burns 

Elizabeth S. Sargent , 
Margaret E. Durgin. . 
Evelyn L. Moore 



Louise E. Des Marais. 



Assistant, room 12. 

" 13. 
library., 
room 8. 

Assistant, cooking 
room 



Cora M. Hassell 

Elizabeth D. Chalmers, 
Ralph B. Young 



Frederick E . Wilson . . . 
Robert E. Hodgdon . . . 

Mary E. Jenness 

Katherine M.Quigley. 

Marie H. Petersen 

Helen H. Young 

Oscar L. Garland 



Assistant, library. 
Clerk, oflBce 



Group H.— Parker 
School. 



Luella A . Dickerman . , 
Helen O. Stephenson.. 



Principal 

Assistant, room 1., 



Mary W. Cross. 
8 



Civics, U. S. History .. 

Mathematics, Chemis- 
try 

Bookkeeping, Econom- 
ics 



Bookkeeping . 



Physics, Mathematics. 

French, German 

History 

French, Spanish 

French, English 

Stenography, Type- 
writing 

English 

French, Latin 



English. 



Lati n 



Biology, Mathematics, 
English 

Mathematics, English. 

English 

Stenography, Type- 
writing . 

Physiology, Art Ai>pre- 
ciation. Household 
Organization, House- 
hold Physics 



Librarian. 



Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during spring 

term. 
Resigned during spring 

term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



English, Mathematics. 
Latin, English, Mathe 

matics 

Mathematics 



122 School St. 
21 Pine St. 

27 Elm St.. Penacook, N. H. 

(Islesford Me.) 
33 Elm St., Penacook, N. H. 
(Easthamptoii, Mass.) 

51 Center St. (Wolfeboro. N.H.> 

8 No. State St. 

35 Perley St. 

s No. State St. (Lancaster, N.H.) 

(Franklin, N.H.) 

140 Rumford St. 

(722 Pine St.. Manchester, N. H.) 

8 No. State St. (Westdale, 

Mass.) 
79 Pleasant St. (Portsmouth 

N.H.) 

76 Center St. (So. Westport. 
Mass.) 

18 Pearl St. (Plymouth, Mass.) 
101 Center St. 
13 Summit Ave. 

90 School St. (Maiden, Mass.) 



13 Summit Ave. (Somersworth, 

N. H.) 
12So.SpringSt. (Conway .Mass.) 
18 Mills St. 



50No. State St. 

7 Perry Ave. (Lowell. Vt.) 

(10 Webster St., Franklin. N.H.) 



114 



c:ty of concord. 
SCHOOL TABLE— Contimied. 



Names of buildings 
and teacliers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and 
subjects taught. 



Residence ( )— out of 
town. 



Group II.— Parker 
School. — Continued. 



Bernice M. Cummings 
Fannie E. Lincoln — 



Eva E. Eastman 

Rebecca K. Merrill .. 

Mary E. Willis 

Harriet M. Ford 



Julia M. Melifant . . . 

Mildred E. Rowe 

Constance.!. Timlin. 
Anne M. J. Chappell 



Chandler School. 

Harriet S. Emmons . . . 

CoraT. Fletcher 

Mary Flavin 

Elizabeth J. Donovan 
Emma G. Nickerson. . , 
Mary C. Caswell , 



Walker School. 

J. ElizaljethTalpey. .. 

Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler. 

Mabel F. Lane 

Garrison School. 

M. Kathleen Hickey .. 
Irene W. Hart 



Ea-stman School. 
Florence E. George . .. 



Assistant, room 5. 



6.. 



basement 
room 4 



Clerk . 



Principal. 
Assistant . 



Clerk . 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7.. 
" 8.. 
" 11.. 



Principal, room 7. , 
Assistant . " 6. , 



Principal. 



English 

English. Commercial 

Geography 

History. Literature ... 
French, Mathematics.. 
Mathematics 16 Court St. 



14CenterSt. (Littleton, X. H.) 

R. F.D. 3 

116 Clinton St. 
13 Maple St. 



Science . 



Leave of ab.sence. 
Leave of absence. 
Resigned at end 
spring term. 



of 



23 So. State St. 

N. H.) 
36 So. State St. 



(So. Danbury, 



Mathematics, Music. .. '6 So. State St. 

History Science |5So. State St. (Lawrence, Mass.) 

English, Latin ;51 South St. 

Latin, English ,2S Thorndike St. 

History, Mathematics. i3 Rumford St. 
121 Warren St. 



Latin. Elementary Sci 
ence 

Community Civics, Lit- 
erature 

Mathematics, Litera 
ture. Music . 

English 



H.S. Group II. M. N.. 
Mathematics, Science. 



H.S. Group II, M, N.. 



41 Warren St. 

99 No. State St. 

(20 Winter St., Penacook. N. H. 
105 No. State St. 



Rumford St. 
63 High St. 



9 Gladstone St. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 

J. Elizabeth Talpey... 

Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler. 

Mabel F. Lane 

Agnes R. Kelley 

Marion R. Stebbins . . . 

Eva H.Tandy 

Mary G. Doherty 

.\lice M. M. Phaneuf . . 

Sara E. McClure 

.\gnes V. Sullivan 

Myla B.Cavis 

Eleanor K. Meade 

Myrta B. Lowe 



Principal 

Assistant, room 7 
■• s 
" 11 
" 10 
•' 12 



room 6 
Tra nsferred toGar 
rison School. 



High School. 



Classes K, L .. 

Class J 

• I 

Classes G.H .. 

•• E.F.. 

CD.. 

A. B.. 

Kindergarten 

Ungraded . — 



41 Warren St. 

99 No. State St. 

(20 Winter St., Penacook. N. H.) 

105 No. State St. 

12 Beacon St. 

Iron Works Road. 

d6 High St. 

145 No. State St. 

90 Rumford St. 

11 Cummings Ave. 

49 Lyndon St. 

n Court St. (Bristol, N. H.) 

fiO So. Main St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



115 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and 
subjects taught. 



Residence ( )=:out of 
town. 



Garrison School. 

M. Kathleen Hickey . 

Irene W. Hart 

Harriet L. Megrath. . . 

Margaret T. Lynch 

Louisa Herbert 

Frances M. Twomey 

Myrta B. Lowe 

Mary J. Heald 

Violet L. Jackman . . 



Eastman School. 

Florence E. George.. 
MargueriteM.Tetreault 
Stella M. French ... 



RuMFORD School. 



Jessie N . Stimson 

Anna M. Keenan 

Annette Prescott 

Annie E. Saltmarsh. . 
AbbieT. McDonald .. 

Mary M . Doherty 

Cecilia P. Jones 

Elizabeth M. McAfee.. 
Katherine L. Remick. 

Maude B. Binet 

Gara E. McQuesten . . . 



Kimball School. 

Mary E. Melifant 

Mary A. McGuire 

Margaret A. Fanning.. 

Ruth M. McCaig 

Mary A. Coughlin 

Hannah E. O'Brien . . 

Edna M. Kennedy 

Nellie T. Halloran ... 

Gladys Dole 

Harriet C. Kimball... 

Penacook School. 

Annie M. Branon 

Clara E. Flanders 

Rose E. Donovan 

Marion F.Callahan.. 
Lillian M. Phaneuf . . . 



Franklin School. 

Abbie A. Donovan 

Minnie E. Ladd 

Mabel Clark 

Dewey School. 

Addie F. Straw 

lyla Chamberlin 

Susan M. Little 



Principal, room 7. . 
Assistant, " 6.. 

" 5.. 

" 4.. 

'■ 3.. 

" 2.. 

■' 1.. 

'■ 1.. 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



Principal 
Assistant 



Principal, rooms. 
Assistant, " 7. 

•' 6. 

'• 4. 

•' 3. 

'■ 2.. 

" 1.. 

" 9.. 

" 5.. 

" 4.. 
Died March 27, 1921 



Principal, room 6. . 

Assistant, " 5.. 

" 8.. 

■* 7.. 

" 4.. 

" 1.. 

•■ 3.. 

" 2.. 

!.' " 2.. 

Principal 

Assistant 

Resigned at end ol 
spring term 



Principal, room 3. 
Assistant, " 4. 
•' 1. 



High School. . . 
Classes K, L ... 

I, J.... 

F, G. H 

D,E... 

A, B, C 

Kindergarten . 

1 



Class K 

Grades IV, v.. . 
" I, II. Ill 

ClassL 

" K 

Classes I, J 

G,H.... 

E,F .... 

" CD.... 

A,B.... 

Special teacher. 

Kindergarten . . 



Class L 

" K 

Classes I, J 

'• Q.H... 

E,F... 

CD... 

A, B... 

Kindergarten.. 

Special teacher 

Classes I, J — 

G.H... 

E,F... 

'• A.C... 



Classes I, J 
CD 
" A, B 



Principal Training Teachers 

Assistant, room 1.. Kindergarten 

■' 5.. 'classes G, H 



70 Rumford St. 
63 High St. 

71 Warren St. (Hooksett, N.IH.). 
446 No. State St. W. Concord. 

3 Rollins St. 

23 Forest St. 

60 No. Spring St. 

U Court St. (Milford,N.H.}. 



9 Gladstone St. 

38 Concord St. 

Route 5, Concord, N. H. 



9 Holt St. 

(93 High St., Penacook, N. H.) 

82 School St. 

60 Beacon St. 

56 Rumford St. 

11 Thorndike St. 

75 South St. 

47 Pleasant St. 

4 Fayette St. 

7 Washington St. 



36 So. State St. 

77 So. State St. 

26 Perley St. 

13 Rockingham St. 

22AlbinSt. 

60 Franklin St. 

lOBlanchardSt. 

30 Perley St. 

6 Merrimack St. 

Hopkinton Road. 



55 Thorndike St. 
18 So. Stalest. 
105 So. Main St. 
11 Concord St. 



84 Center St. 

72 Washington St. 

126 Warren St. 



101 No. State St. 

(2 View St.. W. Concord.) 

90 School St. 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABhE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and 
room. 


Grades and 
subjects taught. 


Residence ( )=out of 
town. 


Dewey School.— 
Continufd. 


Assistant, room 4.. 
'• 2.. 
*• 2.. 
■' 1.. 


Classes E F 


72 School St. 


Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard 

Ruth N. Fanning 

Harriet P. Dame 
School. 

Nettie M. Bowen 

Gerda H. Ekstrom 

Ellen H.S.Anderson.. 

Cogswell School. 

Fannie D. Lothrop.... 

Edith C. Ericson 

Cecilia P.Jones 

Millville School. 


CD... 

A, B 


78 Warren St. 
8 No. State St. 


Kindergarten 


39 School St. (14 Middle St. 


ClassK. Grade V 

Grades III, IV 


Hingham Center, Mass.) 
(29 Center St., Penacook. N.H.) 




(16 Gladstone St., W. Concord.) 




1. 11 


1 View St.. W. Concord. 




Classes CD 

A, B 


67 South St. (Bristol, N. H.) 




226 No State St. 


Transferred t o 
Rumford School. 

Principal 

Assistant, room2.. 
Transferred t o 

Penacook School 
Transferred t o 

Cogswell School. 


Grades V. VI, VII.... 
I. II. Ill, IV... 

Mixed grades 

Mixed grades 


63 High St. 


Ellen C.Doherty 

Rose E. Donovan 

Edith C. Ericson 

Mountain School. 


11 Thorndike St. 

R. F.D. 5. E. Concord. (Dun 


Riverhill School. 

Agnes E . Callah an ... . 
Eva J. Henneberry — 

Iron Works School. 




barton.) 
23* Church St, 


Died July 7. 1921. 

Principal 

Transferred to 
Walker School. 

Principal 


Mixed grades 


Clinton St., R. F.D. 17. 


Marion R.Stebbins.... 

Morrill School. 

Roland G . Hartwell . . . 
Raymond P. Gilman . . 


Shop Organization 

Machine Shop Prac- 
tice. Shop Drawing, 
Machine Shop Lec- 
tures 


4 No. State St. 




10 Maple St. 




Pattern-making, Shop 
Drawing. Wood-turn- 
ing, Dewey Training 








229 No. Main St. 


Philip H.Pike 

Waldo S. Roundy 


Electricity . Mechan ics. 
Shop Mathematics, 
Economics and Busi- 
ness Practice 

Printing, Elementary 
Manual Training . . . 

Cabinet-making. Man- 
ual Training 






76 No. Spring St. 
10 West St. 






Shawmut St., E. Concord. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



117 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and 
room. 



Grades and 
subjects tauglit. 



Residence ( )=out of 
town. 



Morrill School.- 
Continued. 



WillardH. Nute. 
Arthur Q. Paige. 



Arthur W. Andrews ... 
Forrest J. Hall 



Sewing School. 



B. Lillian Barker . . . 
F. Mildred Phillips.. 



Cooking School. 



Harriet B. Davis 



Annie C. Cobb. 
Myrtle Farrar . 



Edna F. Watson... 

Music. 
Charles S. Conant . 

Drawing. 
Mary A. Jones 



Physical Drill. 



Capt. James J. Quinn. 
Dorothy E. Ranney. . 



Special Repairs. 



Reuben L. Cate 

Janitors. 

Charles M. Thomas 

Perley O. Farrar 

Charles Ada 

Arthur J. Taylor 

Frank J. Boyd 

Willis C. Prescott 

William D. Merrick ... 

Bernard H.Powell 

John P. Heath 

Frank L. Dudley , 



Assistant . 



Principal. 

Assistant . 



Fritz Herter 

Mrs. Henry D.Robinson 
Oland M. Blodgett 



Principal. 



Assistant . 
Principal . 



Assistant . 



Director . 



Director . 



Instructor (boys) . 
(girls). 



High and Morrill.. 

High and Morrill.. 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook and 
Cogswell 

Dewey and Frank- 
lin 

H. P. Dame School 

Leave of absence 
from Dec. 17 to 
June 19. 



Forging, Elementary 
Manual Training 
Supply Department. 

Mechanical Drawing, 
Shop Mathematics, 
Industrial Occupa 
tions 

Machine Shop Assist- 
ant, Elementary 
Manual Training. . 

Applied Physics, Ma- 
chine Shop Lectures 
Ancient History 
Commercial Geogra- 
phy and History 



Sewing, Dressmaking 



Supervisor of Lunch 
Cooking 



Supervisor of Lunch 
Cookery 



86 Kimball St. 

11 Humphrey St. 

12 Lyndon St. 

9 Humphrey St. 



15 Center St. (Waltham. Mass.) 
148 Rumford St. 



15 Rumford St. (12 Hampshire 

St., Everett.Mass.) ■ 
57 Pleasant St. (Marion, Mass.) 

15 Center St. (So. Brookline. 
N.H.) 

51 So. Spring St. 



61 School St. 



(152 No. Main St.. Penacook, 
N.H.) 



19 Montgomery St. 
(Penacook, N. H.) 



E.Concord. 



2 Wyman Ave. 

4 Rockingham St. 

5 Chapel St. 

6 Avon St. 

19 Franklin St. 

482 No. State St., W. Concord. 

E. Concord, Route 5. 

W. Concord, N. H, 

10 Wall St. 

20DakinSt. 

8 So. Spring St. 

Route 6, No. Pembroke Road. 



118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



TABULATION OF CLASS DATA FOR THE SEASON 1921-19J2— EVENING 

SCHOOLS. 



Whole number Aver, membership. 

dif . pupils 
Men. Women. No. P.O. 



Aver, nightly Aver, nightly 
absence. attendance. 
No. P. C. No. P. C. 



Mach. Shop Pr. 


13 





8.50 


65.38 


2.47 


29.05 


6.03 


70.95 


Mech. Drawing 


16 





10..50 


65.62 


3.97 


37.81 


6.53 


62.19 


Patt'n-making 


S 





4.80 


60.00 


0.60 


12.50 


4.20 


87.50 


Printing 


10 





7.11 


71.10 


1.93 


27.15 


5.18 


72.85 


Shop Math.* 


3 





2.50 


83.33 


0.70 


28.00 


l.SO 


72.00 


English A 


27 


7 


23.04 


67.64 


8.68 


37.83 


14.36 


62.17 


English B 


31 


4 


23.30 


66.57 


5.30 


22.75 


18.00 


77.25 



Total 119 

*Discontinued after five sessions. 



Nationalities Represented. 

American 52 

Italian 23 

Greek 19 

Finnish 8 

Albanian 4 

Russian 4 

Swedish 3 

Belgian 2 

Canadian iFrencli) 1 

French 1 

Korean 1 

Portuguese 1 



119 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 24, 1921. 



SCHOOLS. 


Ui 

1 


•^1 
l| 

-oh 
IJl 


1 


Number of tbose yrevi- 
ously registered in 
aome other school in 
the state durinE: the 
school year. 
(.Marked- b") 


Number of those previ- 
ously registered in 
some other public or 

Srivate school in town 
uring tliisschool year. 
(Marked "a") 


Whole number of diffei-- 
ent pupils registered 
not preyiously regis- 
tered in any other 
school, public or pri- 
vate, in the state dur- 
ing the school year. 


Ihl 


% 
1 


1 

1 

s 

1 


1 
1 


1 





1 

|i 

i 
11 


1 

It 

1 


1 


! 


£ 

s 

1 


1 


1 

i 

a 


1 
1 

a ^ 


s 


i 

1 
S 

3 

|0 


1 

2 


1 


2 

1 

% 

II 


1 


1 

S 




Irf 


£ 


S 


■3 


is 


■5 


S. 


i 


■3- 


.; 


-■ 3 1 


ji 


?, 




S 


n 


J 


S 


n 




-■ 


■3 


i 


S 


•5 


s 


i 


1? 




s^ 


B 




II 


n 


BS 


11 


































































































H 


a 1 a 


H 


0. 


£ 


t^ 







H = 








■^ 


H 


lU 




H 


















H 


< 






< 




B. 


X 




Z 


< 




■^ 


15 




2 


High Schools. 
















































































































































6,467 
4,203 










1.074 




31 

21 


24,46 


29 
39 




30 
60 








































































.396 














99 


108 




































































38 






53 


96 




6 


40 




















30 


11 


101 21 














17,296 


948 




2,28 


60.28 






.14 




,04 




3 










<, 














7 




































































































-rr" 


— — 






1,168 


— 












— 


— 




-- 


- 


— 


— 


— 








-- 










- 






300,146 










— 






- 


47.40 


175 


-16 


370 


85 





Elbmbntart 
















































































Schools. 


































































































60 


160 


173 333 






lb 


if 


J 


82 


•J' 


'm 


'in 






" 


27 


" 


79 


f> 


168 


•; 


4 


15 


1 




' 








71,643 


6,694 
6,033 
1,739 
5,813 


199.00 
135,62 
60.43 
266,72 


16.79 


214.77 


■qo 


"n 


•25 






32 
31 


6 


169 


13 
















38 
38 


30 
70 


237 






13 


127 


3 


133 


153 


32 61 
144 297 






26 


i 


57 




40 

228 




"4 


i? 














21,757 
92,242 


15'81 


66.26 
272.63 


.93 
,93 


166 


!34 









133 

172 


22 




Rumford 


■206 «3, s! 6 


120 


108 


6 


2,53 






38 


70 




177! 388! ! 








1 


11? 








































86,431 








254.05 
















































































































Franklin 


38 


32 6 












< 






46 








































2,54C 














1 


02 










































































37,648 
































38 


31.5 


















40 


42 














19 






,| 












































Cogswell 

MiTlville 




20 


5- 


46, 9! 


? 




1 




< 


II 


4( 






































23,709 


2,435 


66, 


6, 


72. 


,9) 


70 


,47 












1 






20 


39 


36l 75 







4 


5 





b 


3b 












7 






62 


2 


2 














20,229 


2,373 


56, 


6, 


62. 


.90 


134 


1.32 






18 


6 


85 







Total 


38 

38 
38 
38 

38 


«6 50 
10 

29 


1.153 

20 

11 

36 


1.082 

6 
H 

28 


2,235 

25 
13 

64 


37 
3 


43 

2 



80 

< 

5 


627 


16 


543 


18 

i 


780 

n 


22 






218 

3 

4 

8 


212 


430 580 

6 C 


533 

2 

1 


1,113 

14 
16 
11 

40 


3 





1 


r 


^ 


'^ 


- 




612.979 

6,305 
6.977 
4,174 


43,599 

785 
831 


1.425.72 

19! 
11.24 


117,19 
2. 


1.543.11 

17. 
12!65 


.90 

.88 
.9( 

.89 


1.093 

63 
35 

7 


.04 
2. 


12 


7.46 


299 

f 


19 


1.429 

68 
18 
97 


91 

.... 

1 




RURALS. 






1 
1 


1 






2 

1 

3 








2 
3 


















-- 


- 




Total... 






16.456 


2,134 


45 24 


50.65 


30 




1 


RiNDRROARTBNS. 


















38 
38 
38 
38 
38 


10 
10 
10 
10 


36 
If 

le 


24 
13 
30 

n 


60 
88 
6! 
33 
55 








4 






1 

"i 


36 

31 
16 


23 
IS 


59 

61 
32 


6 7 

7 1( 

5 6 


23 
17 

14 


•20 

23 
9 


16 

2S 
9 
16 


36 
1! 


























slooi 

7,708 
4.190 
4,890 


1,538 
1,371 

• 954 
1.765 


38 41 

16.67 

10. 

23. 

27. 


8.64 
S. 

w'. 


46.95 
24,31 
46. 

37'. 


.83 
.68 
,08 
,81 
.74 


7 
15 
62 


.88 
!02 






10 

1 
! 


6 


24 


2 































RSmtord:::.:::::".:::: 




























































?ii5i 






























































Total 


38 


50 


129 


108 


237 








7 





7 


1261 104 


230e 


2 38 


90 


74 


68 


140 


























26,704 


6,626 


145.08 


36,18 


181.26 


.62 


103 


.61 






40 


" 


412 


3 




School for Back- 
























































































































Walkor 


38 


10 


H 


7 


21 











4 


1 


6 


li 4 


16 












6 


4 


to 


6 


6 














465 


3,696 


12,92 


1,93 


14,85 


.86 


14 


.67 






6 


1 








Toul 


38 


616.6 


1.877 


1,848 


3.725 


49 


54 


103 


793 


18 


81. 


1,418 1.393 


2.8115 


238 


90 


300 


281 


531 


732 


673 


1,405 


235 


242 477 


124 


132 


256 


2 


° 


' 


856,749 


69.307 


2,467,84 


197.82 


2,666,66 


.84 


2,687 


.79 


76 


64,95 


649 


4,;2,3I4 


181 


1 



11 



Ma( 
Mec 
Pat 
Pri! 
She 
En? 
Enj 



Am 
Ita 
Gr€ 
Fin 
Alt 
Ru; 
Swi 
Bel 
Cai 
Fre 
Ko 
Poi 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOLARSHIP TABLE. 



119 



SCHOOLS. 


3 
3 


a, 
a 
a 

|1 
1^ 


P, 
3 . 

^ O 

B 1 


■< a 
o 

c 

0) 

o 

a, 


If 

3PQ 


o 

c 

u 


i 


o 

o 

o 


i 
1 


O 

u 

O 


s 

o 

GO 

s 


£ 

3 

a 

0) 
V 


High 


V 

u 

T 

S 
R 
Q 


29 
68 
51 
78 
62 
122 


4 
1 
2 
3 
5 



13.79 
1.41 
3.92 
3.84 
8.19 


22 
17 
28 
21 
47 
28 


79.23 
25.00 
54.90 
26.92 
75.80 
18.85 


2 
2 
3 
12 
16 
35 


1 
5 
6 
7 
12 
12 


1 

3 
4 

2 
4 

8 


6 
6 
13 
5 
24 
23 


93.10 
97.05 
94.11 
84.61 
74.19 
71.31 


6.89 




2.94 




5.88 
15.38 
25.80 
28.68 


Total 




410 


15 


3.65 


158 


38.-56 


70 


44 


22 


77 


82.92 


17.07 






Parker 


P 



154 
101 


25 
7 


16.23 
6.93 


82 
43 


53.24 
42.57 


14 
3 


10 
14 


8 
6 


36 
16 


90.90 
97.02 

93.33 


9.09 
2.97 






Total 


265 


32 


16.50 


125 


49.01 


17 


24 


14 


52 


6.66 






Chandler 


N 
M 


57 
86 

143 


3 

2 

5 


5.26 
2.32 

3.49 


41 
27 


71.92 
31.20 


5 
5 


3 
12 



6 




91.22 
94.18 


8.77 


Group II 


5.81 






Total 


68 


47.55 


10 

4 
5 


15 

3 

1 


6 




93.00 


6.99 






Walker 


N 
M 


28 
23 


2 
1 


7.14 
4.34 


13 
16 


46.42 
69.56 


3 
1 




85.71 
78.26 


14.28 


Group II 


21.73 






Total 




51 


3 


5.88 


29 


56.86 


9 


4 


4 




82.35 


17.64 






Garrison 


N 
M 


12 

7 


2 


16.66 


5 
1 


41.66 
14.28 


3 

1 


2 
2 

4 


2 

1 




75.00 

85.71 


25.00 


Group II 


14.28 










Total 




19 


2 


10.52 


S 


31.57 


4 


3 




78.94 


21.05 


Eastman ,. 


N 
M 


7 






4 


57.12 


1 


1 


1 




85.71 


14.28 


Group II 
































Total 




7 






4 


57.12 


1 


1 


1 




85.71 


14.28 










Grand H. S. Total.. 




885 


57 


6.44 


390 


44.06 


111 


92 


50 


129 


87.56 


12.54 



General average of high school entire, 82.66. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 
K 

J 
I 
H 
Q 
F 
E 


150 
96 
167 
108 
179 

no 

116 
115 


14 

6 
20 

5 
12 

6 
14 

4 


9.33 
6.25 

11.37 
4.69 
6.70 
5.45 

11.11 
3.47 


82 
38 
70 
40 
79 
32 
69 
30 


54.66 
39.58 
41.31 
37.03 
44.13 
29.09 
59.48 
26.08 


9 
12 
13 
28 
16 
10 
19 

6 


6 
4 
9 

1 


2 
2 

1 
1 




94.00 
87.50 
92.21 
74.07 
91.06 
90.90 
83.62 
94.73 


6.00 
12.50 

7.78 
25.92 

8.93 




2 
4 

1 






9.09 

16.37 

5.21 


Totals— Elementary. 




1.041 


81 


7.7S 


440 


42>25 


113 


27 


4 




89.14 


10.86 


Grand Totals-High 
and Elementary. 




1,926 


138 


7.15 


830 


43.09 


224 


119 


54 


129 


88.36 


11.63 



Standards. 



Scholarship, 80 per cent. 
Number of A— pupils, 10 per cent. 



Number of B — pupils, 50 per cent. 
Failures, 10 per cent. 



120 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 



Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1921-1922. 





Classes. 




M, 


N. 


0. P. 


Q. 


R. S. 


t. 


U. 


V. 


Post 
gradu- 
ate. 


Spe- 
cial. 


English 


149 


91 
29 


137 
39 
42 


78 
13 
10 


150 
27 
101 


85 
10 
53 


96 
20 
60 

7 
12 


45 
24 


79 
11 

27 


37 
5 
6 


3 

2 
3 
2 


1 










* 1 


























14 
79 


3 






149 
30 


94 
26 














Civics . . 














38 
















19 


12 








Mediaeval and Modern 










30 
108 


20 

47 












149 


94 


128 


77 






21 
17 


3 

11 


6 
7 
5 


2 


Chemistry 


1 


I'hysics 














41 


14 


1 












18 
45 


19 
43 














S3 


10 


21 










































29 
22 
23 


13 

11 
11 






Stenography 












50 

49 


28 
29 


12 
12 


3 

4 


























30 
33 






Commercial Geography. 
Machine Shop 


28 
























17 


14 


9 


5 










































10 


3 






Shop Physics 














15 








Pattern -making 












17 






1 






Forging . 








1 
32 


27 
3 

28 












Printing 








3 

17 


2 
1 


1 

1 


4 
2 


3 

3 


1 
2 




Mechanical Drawing 






35 





SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



121 





Classes. 




M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


Post 
gradu- 
ate. 


Spe- 
cial. 


Music , Applied 


41 


33 






1 

1 


2 

2 


5 
5 


2 

2 


2 
2 








Art, Applied 














65 


58 




















1 

19 

7 
3 
1 
98 
3 






1 








House Management and 
Organization 










30 










30 


26 






12 
4 

6 

84 
2 


I 
49 


5 

2 

1 

68 

1 














3 

2 

152 

5 


1 

1 

31 

1 






Freehand Drawing 

Music, Chorus 


138 
138 


68 

87 

2 

94 


137 

51 
54 


78 

35 
14 








1 






Elementary Science . . 


149 






Ancient History 


















History of Art 






















Electricity 














13 


12 

7 










Shop Mathematici 








28 














Occupation-Econ. and 
Business Practice 










15 












Manual Training 


84 


36 


35 


26 



































THIRTY-FOURTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Of Union School District, at High School Hall, Thursday 
Evening, March 2, 1922, at Eight O'Clock. 

PROGRAM. 

Selection, "Pensee" Manney 

High School Orchestra 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL. 

1. Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow! 

Sarah Marjorie Matheson, Class V 

2. The Eagle's Story 

Doris Lillian Robinson, Class R 

3. The Hope of America 

Osmond Robley Strong, Class P 

4. Our State 

Mary Teresa Collins, Class T 

"Beauteous Night" Offenbach Arr. by N. C. Page 

High School Girls' Glee Club 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION. 

1. "I Am An American" Liebermann 

Alfred Henrik Hermanson, Garrison School 

2. "Incentives to Patriotism" Burrill 

Harold Spencer Ramsey, Chandler School 

3. "Eternal Fidelity to the Cause of Liberty" Lincoln 

Juan Leese Gorrell, Walker School 

March, "Soldiers' Joy" Noumann 

High School Boys' Glee Club 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION. 

.. "Counting Eggs" Anon 

Martha Elizabeth Dahlgren, Garrison School 

!. "The Hero of the Hill" Cooke 

Virginia Woodward, Eastman School 

1. "The Light on Deadman's Bar" Bexford 

Florence Grace Coleman, Chandler School 

\. "Brier Rose" Boyeson 

Shirley Ruth Martin, Walker School 

*A Hunting Scene" F. Bucalossi 

High School Orchestra 

AWARD OF PRIZES. 
Original Declamation 
High School— Classes O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V 
First Prize, $15, Osmond Robley Strong. 
Second Prize, $10, Doris Lillian Robinson. 

Forensic Declamwtion 
Classes M, N 
First Prize, $6, Juan Leese Gorrell. 
Second Prize, $4, Alfred Henrik Hermanson. 

Miscellaneous Declamation » 

Classes M, N 

First Prize, $6, Shirley Ruth Martin. 

Second Prize, $4, Martha Elizabeth Dahlgren. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Supt. Henry S. Roberts, Suncook, N. H. 

Prof. John F. Kent, Concord, N. H. 

Headmaster, Harold M. Smith, Pembroke, N. H. 



124 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

RECEIVED. 



Balance from last year's account 
Interest on same 
Sale of 554 tickets 



$3,256.90 
136.15 
ld3.90 

$3,586.95 



EXPENDED. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services $60.00 

Prizes, including books 50.25 

English Prize Composition expense 97.69 
Miscellaneous expense, including printing, selling 

and taking tickets, music, judges, janitors, etc. 14.15 
Cash on deposit as a guaranty fund for future con- 
tests 3,364.86 

$3,586.95 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Held at the Parker School, May 1, 1921. 



School. 


No. Pupils No. Pupils 
Enrolled in Taking 
School. Part. 


Per cent of 
Pupils in 
Contest. 


Average 
Rank of 
Pupils. 


Average 

Per cent 

of Pupils. 


High, Senior 


452 


17 


3.73 


12 


84.51 


Parker, Junior 


219 


33 


15.06 


52 


65.92 


Chandler, Junior 


143 


36 


25.17 


59 


63.35 


Walker, Junior 


50 


10 


20.00 


61 


62.70 


Garrison, Junior 


16 


1 


6.25 


83 


54.50 


Eastman, Junior 


8 


2 
PRIZES. 


25.00 


72 


56.60 




General Prizes. 






Prizes Awarded 


to Class 




Subject 




First, $6 Doris 


Eileen Toone, T John Ridd 







High School 

Second, $4 Katharine Graves, R David's Childhood 
High School 

Third, $2 Laurence I. Duncan, R David's Childhood 
High School 

Class Prizes. 
Senior High. 
Classes U. V 

Prizes Awarded to Class Subject 

First, $3 Helen Evelyn Ryan, V "The Character of Lady 
High School Macbeth" 

Second, $2 Laura E. Parker, V "Why Burke's Arguments 
High School Are Convincing" 

Third, $1 Georgia M. Osgood, V "The Character of Lady 
High School Macbeth" 



126 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Classes S, T 
Prizes Awarded to Class Subject 

First, $3 Doris Eileen Toone, T John Ridd 
High School 

Second, $2 Ruel Newton Colby, S John Ridd 
High School 

Third, $1 Charles F. Brewster S John Ridd 
High School 

Classes Q, R 
Prizes Awarded to Class Subject 

First, $3 Katharine Graves, R David's Childhood 
High School 

Second, $2 Laurence I. Duncan, R David's Childhood 
High School 

Third, $1 Jean Gove, Q "Bill Sykes" 

High School 

Junior High 
Parker School. 
Classes O, P 
Prizes Awarded to Class Subject 

First, $3 Dudley W. Orr, "Was Brutus or Caesar the 

Parker School Nobler Man?" 

Second, $2 Mildred Densmon, O "The Village" 
Parker School 

Third, $1 Barbara Everett, P "The Village" 
Parker School 

Chandler, Walker, Garrison, Eastman Schools. 
Classes M, N 
Prizes Awarded to Class Subject 

First, $3 Lottie G. Braley, N "Ellen" 
Chandler School 

Second, $2 ' Lois L. Calkin, M "The Death of Sohrab" 
Chandler School 

Third, $1 Mary E. Galligan, M "Ellen" 
Chandler School 



FIFTH ANNUAL ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL CONTEST. 

High School Hall, June 16, 1921, 8 p. m. 
PROGRAM. 
Selection, "Awake! Awake!" 



High School Orchestra 

Order of Speakers: 

Clarence Harry Morgan 
Georgia Marioia Osgood 
Leon Joseph Goldberg 
Ursula Greeley Sanders 
Paul Stephen Otis 
Ethel Ravitch 
Guy Edward Durgin 
Helen Evelyn Ryan 
James Bernard Halligan 

Selection, "Yankee Pep" 

Mandolin Club 

Waltz, "Sparkling Sunlight" 

Girls' Glee Club 

Selection, "Underneath Hawaiian Skies" 
Mandolin Club 

Selection, "March of the Boy Scouts" 

High School Orchestra 

Announcement of Awards 



Cadman 



Odell 

Arditi Arr. 

Erdman 

Grant-Schaefer 



JUDGES. 

Miss Harriet L. Huntress 

Mr. John F. Kent 

Mr. Thomas K. Fisher 

MEDAL WINNERS. 
Ursula Greeley Sanders — What Are Good Manners? 
Paul Stephen Otis — Perspiration and Inspiration. 



WAR SAVINGS STAMPS. 

Record of stamps sold by pupils of the public schools of Union 
School District from January 5, 1918, to January 27, 1922: 



High School, 
Parker School, 
Chandler School, 
Walker School, 
Garrison School, 
Eastman School, 
Rumford School, 
Kimball School, 
Penacook School, 
Franklin School, 
Dewey School, 
H. P. Dame School, 
Cogswell School, 
Millville School, 
Iron Works School, 



Thrift Stamps 


: Amount 


6,860 


$1,799.47 


22,810 


5,700.08 


9,146 


2,389.21 


14,592 


3,825.68 


11,236 


2,919.88 


1,850 


483.04 


15,612 


4,065.32 


13,914 


3,478.50 


5,915 


1,539.16 


1,328 


340.02 


7,787 


2,152.15 


1,351 


351.00 


3,026 


781.36 


1,230 


316.67 


272 


170.64 



116,929 $30,312.18 



SCHOOL REPORT. 129 

TABLE OF TRANSPORTATION ROUTES. 



Name of driver. 



Route. 



33 2 



tap 



J.A.Clark ... 

H. R. Dunstane 
C. L. Hanson.. 
J.F.Hoit 

VV. S. Kaime. .. 

W. S. Kaime... 

W. S. Kaime. .. 

W. S. Kaime... 

Q. W. Keyes. .. 
B.J. Prescott... 
A. Prove, Jr 



Silver Hill to Iron Works Road, 
to Chandler, Parker and High 
Schools. 

Pagan's Corner to Millville 

Chateauguy to Penacook School 

Snaptown to Mountain School 
and Golf Siding 

East Concord to Parker and 
High Schools 

Millville to Chandler, Parker 
and High Schools 

Plains to Chandler, Parker and 
High Schools 

Black Hill— Top of Pembroke 
Hill to Penacook, Cogswell, 
Ruraford, Chandler, Parker 
and High Schools 

Mr. Maynard's, Turtletown, to 
Eastman School 

Loudon Line to Harriet P. Dame 
School 

Carter's Hill to Broad Cove and 
Ri verhill 



15 
4 
2 

11 

.SO 

25 

20 

28 
6 



14 


m. 


12 


m. 


10 


m. 


10 


m. 


6 


m. 


7 


m. 


6 


m. 


5 


m. 


7 


m. 


Vl 


m. 


8 


m. 



2 
2 
2 

2 and truck, 

4 

4 



4 
1—2 



Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



HONOR LIST, 1921. 



Pupils Who Have Attained a Mark of A — or Better for the 
Entire Year. 

High School. — Henry Clough, Janice GrifRn, Ethel Ravitch, 
Harold Perkins, Ursula Sanders, Frances Currier, Reginald 
Rice, Clifton Wilcox, Everett Benton, Charles Brewster, John 
Jones, Mary Collins, Esther Cushing, Lawrence Duncan, Pauline 
Oyston, lyla Tracy. 

Parker School. — Marion Bartlett, Kinsley Batchelder, 
Miriam Callahan, Leo Druin, Eleanor Button, Barbara Everett, 
George Freeman, Paul Frost, Clara Henry, Albert Jeannotte, 
Alexandra Lapierre, William Maginau, Mabel Maher, Pauline 
Mclsaac, Rose O'Malley, Dorothy Parker, Jeremiah Pitts, 
Archie Rabinovitz, Rose Raduazo, Doris Robinson, Alphonse 
Roy, Elinor Smith, Gladys Smythe, Alton Swett, Nathalie 
Towle. 

Chandler School. — Eleanor Duncan, Kenneth Lane, John 
Parker, Lois Calkin, Mary Galligan. 

Walker School. — Helen Cheney, Sarah Hill, Mary Fisher, 
Evelyn Periello, Robert Ritchie, Lawrence Tucker, Carl B. 
Evans, James Dougal, Katherine Mclnnis, Irene Lamprone, 
Dixon Turcott, Noel Wilcox. 

Garrison School. — Walter A. Felker, Alice D. Ericson, Lil- 
lian Shepard, Harriette Dakin. 

Eastman School. — Leon A. Osborne, Virginia Woodward, 
Helen F. Riley, Jennie E. Keyes, John G. Kirkpatrick, Ruth A. 
Perrin, Laura E. Smith. 

RuMFORD School. — Sara Brunei, Richard Butterfield, Agnes 
L. Smith, Lester Bullard, Rachel Hartford, Doris Tappan, 
Marion Holt, Lucy O'Malley, David DeMoulpied, Marjorie 
Wright, Ona Collins, Dean Williamson. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 131 

Kimball School. — Jerry F. H. Cook, Robert A, Foster, Juan 
L. Gorrell, Louisa M. Jackman, Helen M. Lowe, Shirley P. Mar- 
tin, Ruth L, Robinson, Sarah B. Jackson, William Saltmarsh, 
Louise Wilde, Robert H. Baker, Jans J. Carlen, Doris Fuller, 
Kenison M. Hill, Barbara K. Pearson, John Swenson, Irene 0. 
Barnes, Harry J. Crowley, Harry T. Dane, Janet Kennedy, Wil- 
liam Foster, Atwood Levensaler, James Nelson, Nyleen Newton^ 
Alice Baker. 

Penacook School. — Eva Carr, Helen Ericson, Rodney Strom, 
Robert Parker, Arthur Kelly, James Wason, George Wilcox. 

Franklin School. — Evelyn Foster, Martin Sandquist, Lester 
Billings. 

Dewey School. — Gladys L. Angwin, Donald J. Brunei, 
Louise F. Magenau, Elizabeth Cornette, H. Tilton Gorrell, 
Robert Leavitt, Mildred Knox. 

H. P. Dame School. — Mary Burnell, Evelyn Lougee, Viola 
Savoy, Kathleen Merrill, Carolino Rosso. 

Millville School. — Eleanor Clarke, Norma Dunstane, Ber- 
nard Roach, Raymond Proctor. 

Mountain School. — Eddella Mayo, Dorothy Haddon. 

Iron Works School. — Madeline B. Dunn. 

Riverhill School. — None. 



132 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





Sewing. 


Cooking. 


Mechanic Arts. 




it 


u 


11 






s5P 


a.S 




is 

— 3 


SCHOOLS. 


m 

1) H C 


o 

OS 

> 
i-i 

*^ c 




*- *" s 

» m ? 

3 25 
2£S 


O 

09 

(> 

1- 
O 

•M C 


Hi 

2.2 « 




o 

OS 

> 
o 


ic£ 

5 -as 


High 


3 


3 





100 


9 


91 


108 


6 


102 


Parker 


7 




7 


163 


61 


102 


77 


5 


72 


Chandler 


87 


32 


55 








73 


1 


72 


85 
36 


13 

2 


72 
34 








43 

23 


2 

2 


41 


Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 








21 


14 


1 


13 








9 


3 


6 


70 


23 


47 








44 


1 


43 


71 


IS 


53 








32 


2 


30 


Penacook 


40 


13 


27 














Franklin 


23 


5 


24 














Dewey Training. 


15 





15 


15 





15 


15 




15 


H. P. Dame .... 


7 





7 








7 




7 


Millvllle 


21 
3 


3 



18 
3 








8 


1 
















8 





8 








1 




1 


Riverhill 


6 


1 


5 














Sacred Heart 


37 


1 


36 








13 




13 




28 


1 


27 








21 




21 












Total 


567 


116 


451 


278 


70 


208 


474 


23 


451 



GRADUATING CLASSES OP THE CONCORD HIGH 

SCHOOL. 



CLASS OF JUNE 24, 1921. 



Name. 



Elizabeth Pollard Ashley 
Lucille Doe Adams 
Dorothy Barnard 
Bernice Madeline Bennett 
Nellie Elizabeth Blake 
Harry Horton Cameron 
Ethel Marjorie Carpenter 
Janet Goodhart Chalmers 
Gertrude Beatrice Champigny 
Ruth Emily Chappell 
Bernice Katherine Chase 
Ida May Cilley 
Paulita Ursula Clark 
Alvah Sterling Colby 
Helen Louise Corrigan 
Lena Elaine Corser 
Thelma Currier 
Carl Arvid Dahlgren 
Agnes Winifred Daley 
Irma Elsa Davis 
Mary Jane Degnan 
Alice Forsythe Drury 
Guy Edward Durgin 
Douglas Newton Everett 
Agnes Rose Fenton 
Lura Abigail French 
Miriam Eliza French 
Leon Joseph Goldberg 
Axel Conrad Gustafson 
James Bernard Halligan 
Elizabeth Mary Haynes 
Mary Jeannette Henry 
Gertrude May Hodge 
Ruth Marie Holt 
Margaret Sarah Jackman 
Martha Allison Lane 



Course. 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Classical 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Academic 

Classical 

Commercial 

Academic 

Classical 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Classical 

Academic 

Classical 

Commercial 

Academic 

Commercial 

Academic 

Classical 

Academic 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



Nayne. 
Margaret Helena Lovejoy 
Louise Bernadette Lovely 
Dorothy Rose Mannion 
Josephine Margaret Mannion 
Paul Raymond McMahon 
Merton William Messer 
Dorothy Ruth Moberg 
Clarence Harry Morgan 
Virginia Morrill 
Georgia Marion Osgood 
Paul Stephen Otis 
Harold Benjamin Paige 
Laura Evelyn Parker 
John Leonard Peckham 
Helen Evelyn Ryan 
Jessie Frances Sanborn 
Ursula Greeley Sanders 
Russell Dewight Sawyer 
Regis Eleanor Scully 
Allan Shapiro 
Dorothy Eva Staniels 
Oramel Walker Swain 
Merle Grace Tabor 
Emma Charlotte Trudell 
Wilbur B. Tucker 
Lillian Unwin 
Kathleen Wall 
Doris Josephine Williams 
Beatrice Winch 
James Joseph Reen 
Alphonse Andrew Normandeau 



Course. 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Classical 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Classical 
Classical 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



135 



CLASS OF JANUARY 27, 1922. 



Name. 
Myer George Baer 
Hilda A. Buchan 
Merle Winthrop Carleton 
Frances Elizabeth Currier 
Elizabeth Jeanette Dane 
John Eldred Davie 
James Hildreth Erickson 
Marguerite Ethel Fernald 
Emma Mary Flamand 
Charles Joseph Gannon 
David Lawrence Hammond 
Alice Frances Haskell 
Arnold Hill 

Arthur Benjamin Holmgren 
Ethel Evelyn Houston 
Arlene Cruse Jellison 
Elmer Edvv^ard Johnson 
Arnold Gove Lewis 
Paul Herbert Lewis 
Grace Elizabeth Melvin 
Bernice Cone Morrill 
Madeline Emma Roy 
Edward Sanel 
Gertrude Inez Smith 
Aline Marie Tardif 
Paul Emery Tracy 
Beatrice Irene Tremblay 
Edmund A, Trudell 
Hazel Lord Tuttle 
Dorothy Winifred Twomey 
Marion Elizabeth Wason 
Wilhelmena Zetta Wheeler 
Rose Lillian Wittenberg 



Course. 
Academic 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Mechanic Arts 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Classical 
Classical 
Classical 
Commercial 
Commercial 



FIRE DRILLS. 

1920-1921. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Date. 


Time of Day. 


going: out 


Oct. 


11. 


10.58 


A.M. 


60 


Seconds 


Nov. 


12. 


10.50 


A.M. 


50 


« 


Dec. 


16. 


10.45 


A.M. 


53 


« 


Mar. 


17. 


1.55 


P.M. 


63 


« 


Apr. 


26. 


10.40 


A.M. 


60 


« 


May 


26. 


11.00 


A.M. 


58 


<( 








PARKER 


SCHOO 


Oct. 


29. 


10.30 


A.M. 


70 


Seconds 


Nov. 


5. 


10.00 


A.M. 


62 


" 


Feb. 


23. 


1.15 


P.M. 


72 


« 


Mar. 


21. 


9.45 


A.M. 


48 


" 


Apr. 


7. 


10.30 


A.M. 


61 


« 


May 


17. 


1.15 


P.M. 


65 


« 



No. Minutes used from 

time of Signal until 

return to Work 



Oct. 


18. 


11.05 A.M. 


38 


Oct. 


26. 


8.40 A.M. 


35 


Nov. 


15. 


8.40 A. M. 


39 


Feb. 


23. 


8.40 A. M. 


39 


Apr. 


6 


11.20 A. M. 


38 


May 


4. 


8.35 A.M. 


30 


June 


7. 


11.15 A.M. 


40 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Seconds 



WALKER SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


5. 


9.13 A.M. 


45 


Seconds 


98 Seconds 


Nov. 


12. 


9.45 A.M. 


50 




98 


Dec. 


15. 


11.35 A.M. 


49 




100 


Apr. 


6. 


9.35 A. M. 


45 




95 


May 


4. 


1.40 P.M. 


47 




96 


June 


16. 


10.01 A.M. 


45 




98 



SCHOOL REPOBT. 



137 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 

Oct. 29. 10,00 A. M. 60 Seconds 120 Seconds 

Mar. 21. 9.15 A.M. 65 " 120 

Mar. 21. 9.30 A. M. 73 " 3 Minutes 

May 27. 10.55 A. M. 63 " 5 " 

EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


20. 


1.45 P.M. 


30 Seconds 


1^2 


Nov. 


15. 


1.25 P. M. 


25 


3 


Jan. 


17. 


10.50 A. M. 


25 


iy2 


Mar. 


23. 


10.52 A.M. 


25 


1 


*Apr. 


11. 


9.50 A.M. 


25 


1 


May 


3. 


1.25 P.M. 


25 


1% 


June 


15. 


8.53 A.M. 


25 


1 



"A practice drill. 



RUMFORD SCHOOL. 



Nov. 


8. 


8.45 A.M. 


2 


Minutes 


7 


Minutes 


Nov. 


30. 


11.08 A.M. 


2 


<< 


5 


« 




Jan. 


3. 


11.02 A.M. 


3 


« 


5 


<< 




Jan. 


20. 


9.30 A.M. 


2 


« 


4 


<< 




May 


26. 


11.10 A.M. 


70 


Seconds 


21/2 " 








KIMBALL 


SCHOOL. 








Oct. 


15. 


1.45 P.M. 


64 


Seconds 


2 


Min. 


8 Sec. 


Oct. 


24. 


2.45 P.M. 


64 


(( 


2 


Min. 


8 Sec. 


Dec. 


15. 


10.50 A.M. 


63 


« 


2 


Min. 


6 Sec. 


Mar. 


1. 


9.40 A. M. 


65 


« 


2 


Min. 


8 Sec. 


Mar. 


2. 


10.50 A.M. 


65 


« 


2 


Min. 


10 Sec 


May 


18. 


9.25 A. M. 


65 


« 


2 


Min. 


10 Sec 


Apr. 


29. 


10.50 A. M. 


65 


" 


2 


Min. 


5 Sec 






PENACOOK SCHOOL. 








Nov. 


3. 


2.30 P. M. 


40 


Seconds 




Min. 


45 Sec 


Nov. 


16. 


2.30 P.M. 


40 






Min. 


30 Sec. 


Mar. 


15 


2.30 P.M. 


45 






Min. 


45 Sec 


Apr. 


12. 


2.00 P.M. 


40 






Min. 


35 Sec 


May 


31. 


2.20 P.M. 


40 






Min. 


30 Sec. 


June 


16. 


2.20 P.M. 


38 






Min. 


25 Sec. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


18. 


1.35 P.M. 


45 


Seconds 


94 


Seconds 


Nov. 


1. 


9.10 A. M. 


43 




90 




Feb. 


16. 


1.35 P.M. 


60 




120 




Mar. 


10. 


1.35 P.M. 


55 




115 




Apr. 


25. 


1.35 P.M. 


55 




110 




May 


3. 


1.35 P.M. 


51 




104 




June 


2. 


1.35 P. M. 


45 




100 





DEWEY SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


15. 


9.25 A. M. 


Practice 


Sept. 


17. 


1.35 P. M. 




« 


Sept. 


20. 


11.10 A.M. 


70 


Seconds 


Oct. 


25. 


2.45 P.M. 


50 




( 


Jan. 


7. 


10.00 A. M. 


55 




< 


Feb. 


7. 


2.00 P. M. 


38 




< 


Mar. 


16. 


2.00 P. M. 


55 




< 


Mar. 


17. 


2.00 P. M. 


55 




( 


Apr. 


25. 


10.10 A. M. 


54 




( 


May 


3. 


10.05 A.M. 


53 




« 


May 


31. 


10.05 A.M. 


52 




< 



H. P. DAME SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


8. 


8.45 A.M. 


30 Seconds 


2 Minutes 


Nov. 


30. 


11.00 A.M. 


29 


2 


Apr. 


12. 


1.40 P. M. 


28 


2 


May 


26. 


8.54 A. M. 


25 


2 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


27. 


1.50 P. M. 


30 Seconds 


Nov. 


16. 


9.55 A. M. 


30 


Mar. 


17. 


9,45 A.M. 


35 


Apr. 


4. 


2.25 P. M. 


30 


May 


20. 


9.50 A. M. 


30 


June 


15. 


9.35 A.M. 


35 



Min. 
Min, 
Min. 
Min. 
Min. 
Min. 



10 Sec. 

5 Sec. 

10 Sec. 

5 Sec. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

MILLVILLE SCHOOL. 

Nov. 10. 9.30 A.M. 30 Seconds 2 Minutes 

Jan. 12. 2.15 P.M. 30 " 1% " 

Mar. 3. 11.00 A. M. 30 " 2 

May 27. 9.30 A. M. 30 " 2 



139 



IRONWORKS SCHOOL. 



Nov. 


2. 


11.49 A.M. 


Vi Minute 


1 Minute 


Jan. 


24. 


9.20 A.M. 


1/4 


¥2 


May 


2. 


8.42 A.M. 


V2 


1 


June 


17. 


8.40 A.M. 


V2 


1 


t 




MOUNTAIN SCHOOL. 




Oct. 


15. 


10.15 A. M. 


9 Seconds 


30 Seconds 


Dec. 


2. 


11.40 A.M. 


10 


25 


Jan. 


28. 


2.00 P. M. 


9 


25 


Mar. 


14. 


2.15 P.M. 


8 


20 


May 


12. 


11.00 A.M. 


8 


17 


June 


7. 


9.30 A. M. 


9 


17 



RIVERHILL SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


18. 


9.50 A.M. 






Jan. 


27. 


2.10 P.M. 


30 Seconds 


IVi Minutes 


Apr. 


12. 


2.20 P. M. 


45 


90 Seconds 



MORRILL SCHOOL. 

Oct. 23. 11.00 A.M. 55 Seconds 

Apr. 9. 11.30 A.M. 35 

Apr. 9. 2.05 P.M. 40 



ROLL OF HONOR. 

1921. 



High School. — Henry Clough, Hazel Roy, Ethel Carpenter, 
Katherine Chase, Carl Dahlgren, Mary Henry, Jessie Sanborn, 
Elizabeth Dane (2), Arthur Holmgren, Elmer Johnson, Jerome 
Leavitt, Madeline Roy, Pauline Ballard (2), Theresa Daley, 
Margaret Faucher (2), Vera Maxner, Thomas Pitts, Ruth 
Swain, Charles Brewster, Robert Ecklund, Ernest Levesque 
(2), Waldo Sanborn, Warren Butterfield, Mary Collins, Esther 
Cushing, Doris Dickey, Constance Dimick, Lawrence Duncan, 
Dorothy Gale, Irene Heartz, Melvin Davis, Hazel Fifield, Bertha 
Lacroix, Ruth Lane, Alice Perry, Pearl Tabor, Anais Boisvert, 
Una Dearborn, Ruth Gerald, Evelyn Johnson, Gertrude Roy, 
Thomas Rowell, Dorothy Wentworth, Dorothea Wheeler. 

Parker School. — Albert Barlow (2), Catherine Beane, Mabel 
Gate, Cyril Datson, Chas. Davie, Eleanor Dutton (2), Francis 
Foley, Robert Gervais (2), Roxie Jenness, Ruth O'Malley (2), 
Catherine Rodgers, Carleton White. 

Chandler School. — Harvey Bachelder, Albert Baker, Helen 
Barlow, Gordon Carpenter (2), Helen Curtis (4), Frederick 
Fisher (2), Rose Haskell, Doris Holland, Shirlie Hunt (2), 
Kenneth Lane, Elizabeth Palmer, William Quinn, Merlin Smith, 
Arthur Virgin, Edgar Winslow. 

Walker School. — Robert T. Bateman, Paul E. Murphy, 
Evelyn R. Messier, Philip Leacoyd, Margaret A. Welsh, Beryl 
W. Hooper, Esther Bjork, Earle Gordon, Dorothy Reed, Ellen 
Hoyt, Chenard Mayo, Joseph Messier, Louis Messier, Engrid 
Rosendale, Robert Fickett, Velina Ordway, Chester Chase, Win- 
ston Hodge, Robert Ritchie, Dorothy Scott. 

Garrison School. — George Anderson, Stanley Ekstrom, 
Helen Little, Alice W. Calberg, Claire Cushnie, Doris Makin, 
Doris Olson, Ida Peterson, Leonard Williams, Waino Peterson, 
Elma Ward, Alfred Hermanson, Olga E. Rooth, Helvi Halme, 
Adelaide Graves, John Hermanson, Walter Provo, William 
Woodcock, Esther Kellom, Fanny Hermanson, Harry Person, 
Holger Lehtinen, Harry O. Graves. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 141 

Eastman School. — John G. Kirkpatrick, Donna E. Morrison. 

RuMFORD School. — Dorothy Ash, Harry Barrett, Harlan L. 
Goodwin, Eben B. Hutton (3), Rudolph Lefebvre, Donald W. 
Saltmarsh (2), Allen I. Lewis, George Ash, Frank Palmer, 
Lena Roy (3), Alfred Rowell (4), Lillian Sandquist, Irene 
Hooper, Katharine Barlow, Ona Collins, Lloyd J. McClintock, 
Eleanor Tayjor, Karl E. Kunberger, Loren L. Putnam, Ethel 
M. Berry, Thelma Gilbert, Edward Roy, Norman Hutton, 
Charles Osborn. 

Kimball School. — Marjorie Badger, Katharine Foster, Harry 
Sundgren, Elizabeth P. Butterfield. 

Penacook School. — Robert Coleman, Margaret Johnson, 
Harold Ronn, Astrid Franzen, Lena Tabor, Junior Perry, 
Charlotte Chesley, Delia Gilpatrick, Elizabeth Maynard, Arthur 
Rowell, Kenneth Sherburne, Paul Silver, Luella Palmer, Gladys 
Tucker. 

Franklin School. — Lester Billings, Robert Potter, Edith 
Virgin, Ethel F. Gerrish. 

Dewey School. — Richard H. Berry, George W. Thompson 
(2), Jerome T. Paulin. 

H. P. Dame School. — Mary Burnell, Barbara St. Pierre, Paul 
St. Pierre, Mildred Savoy. 

Cogswell School. — None. 

Millville School. — None. 

Iron Works School. — None. 

Mountain School. — None. 

Riverhill School. — Goldie M. Auprey. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, 
N. R., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, the sixth day of April, 1921, 
at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the following 
subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years to fill the vacancies arising 
from the expiration of the term of office of W. Stanley 
Emery, Osma C. Morrill, and Charles Duncan. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise 
and appropriate for the payment of the debts of the 
district. 

7. To see what sum of money thqi district will raise 
and appropriate for the support of the schools for 
the ensuing year. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 143 

8. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 16th day of March, 1921, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
W, STANLEY EMERY, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
LILLIAN R. SHEPARD, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
HARRY F, LAKE, 
OMAR S. SWENSON, 
ELIZABETH R. ELKINS, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the 18th day of March, 1921, I posted 
a copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board of 
Education of said district, at the place of meeting within 
named and a like attested copy at the Police Station, in 
the city of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said 
district, 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 
Concord, N, H., March 18, 1921. 



Then personally appeared before me, on this date, the 
said Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath the above certifi- 
cate by him signed is true. 

BENJAMIN W. COUCH, 

Justice of the Peace. 



A true copy of the warrant, return of service, and cer- 
tificate of oath, 

EARLE C. GORDON, 

Clerk of Union School District. 



REPORT OF THE ANNUAL MEETING. 



In accordance with the foregoing warrant a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District No. 8 was held 
at the Auditorium on Prince Street, in Concord, N. H., on 
the evening of the sixth of April, 1921, at 7.30 o'clock. 

The meeting was called to order and the warrant read, 
by Louis C. Merrill, moderator. 

Aeticle 1. On motion of Hon. Henry E. Chamberlin, 
duly seconded, the clerk was ordered to cast one ballot 
for Louis C. Merrill for moderator for the ensuing year. 
Mr. Merrill was duly elected and sworn. 

Article 2. On motion of Fred I. Blackwood, duly 
seconded, the moderator was ordered to cast one ballot 
for Earle C. Gordon for clerk for the ensuing year. Mr. 
Gordon was duly elected and sworn. 

Article 3. On motion of Hon. Henry H. Metcalf, duly 
seconded, the report of the Board of Education as printed, 
was accepted and placed on file. 



Article 4. On motion of Hon. Henry H. Metcalf, duly 
seconded, it was voted to proceed to the election of three 
members of the Board of Education to fill the vacancies 
arising from the expiration of term of officQ. 

It was declared polls would close at 8.45 P. M. 

On motion of Hon. Henry H. Metcalf, duly seconded, the 
moderator was instructed to name three tellers. The 
moderator named : Ernest R. Roberts, Dr. Dennis E. Sul- 
livan and Carl H. Foster. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 145 

On motion of Hon. Henry H. Metcalf, the meeting pro- 
ceeded to the consideration of the remaining articles of 
the warrant. 

Article 5. On motion of Dr. Charles Duncan, duly 
seconded, Henry H. Metcalf and John P. George were 
nominated for auditors for the ensuing year. Mr. Met- 
calf and Mr. George were duly elected. 

Article 6. On motion of Dr. Charles Duncan the fol- 
lowing resolution was adopted: Resolved, That there be 
raised and is hereby ordered to be raised on the polls and 
ratable estates within Union School District the sum of 
sixteen thousand, thirty-five dollars ($16,035) of which 
sum ten thousand dollars ($10,000) shall be appropriated 
for the payment of the bonds of the district maturing on 
May 1, and July 1, 1921, and six thousand, thirty-five dol- 
lars ($6,035) for the payment of the interest on its bonded 
indebtedness accruing during the year. 

Article 7. On motion of Dr. Charles Duncan the fol- 
lowing resolution was adopted : Resolved, That there be 
raised and is hereby ordered to be raised on the polls and 
ratable estates within Union School District for the sup- 
port of schools for the ensuing year, such a sum, as in addi- 
tion to the sum assigned to the district by the city of Con- 
cord out of its appropriation for schools, will amount to 
the sum of two hundred forty-two thousand, two hundred 
forty-eight dollars and seventy-five cents ($242,248.75). 

Article 8. Dr. Drury spoke briefly concerning "Mill- 
ville" school. Harold Cheney offered the following reso- 
lution : Resolved, That it is the sense of this meeting 
that one year more of time be added to the grades below 
Junior High School, or the present seventh grade, and that 
it is understood that the added time shall include no extra 
work, but shall be devoted to the work now being covered 
in the six lower grades. 



146 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The question being stated : 

Shall the resolution be adopted? Discussion ensued. 
The negative prevailed on a viva voce vote, and the reso- 
lution was not adopted. 

At 8,45 o'clock the polls were declared closed by the 
moderator. Result of the voting was as follows: 

For members of the school board: 

Whole number votes cast, 1,048 

Necessary for a choice, 525 

Mrs. Grace Amsden, had 1 

Florence P. Morrill, had 1 

Henry H. Metcalf, had 2 

Wallace F. Purington, had 305 

Harry C. Brunei, had 311 

Mrs. Charles L. Jackman, had 312 

Dr. Charles Duncan, had 677 

Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, had 739 

Rev. W. Stanley Emery, had 758 

and Dr. Charles Duncan, Mrs. Osma C. Morrill and Rev. 
W. Stanley Emery, having a majority of all the votes cast 
were declared elected. 

There being no further business, on motion of Dr. 
Charles Duncan the meeting adjourned. 

A true record. Attest: 

EARLE C. GORDON, 

Clerk. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1921. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, to March 31, 1925. 

JOHN B. ABBOTT, to March 31, 1925. 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1924. 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, to March 31, 1924. 

OLIVER J. PELREN, to March 31, 1923. 

CHARLES R. WALKER, to March 31, 1923. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1922. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1922. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, President. 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



148 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights : 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 5,000.00 

flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 

for land at Penacook Lake, 94,184.95 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-house and appur- 
tenances, 39,267.74 

conduit and gate-houses, 29,818.94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to the 
reservoir, fire main through 
North and South ]\Iain 
Streets, and high service 
main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 

distribution pipe, 416,501.50 

service pipe, 73,715.42 

reservoir, including land, 45,044.09 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 149 

Cost of pumping station, shop, 
stable and storehouse, in- 
cluding land, $29,743.35 

pumping machinery, 20,706.72 

engineering and superintend- 
ence, 14,913.12 

incidentals, 6,875.97 



Cost of works, January 1, 1922, $1,135,889.11 

Less amount received for lumber, land and 

buildings sold, 7,919.11 



$1,127,970.00 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding : 

When due. 

Jan. 1,1922, 
Jan. 1,1922, 
April 1, 1922, 
Jan. 1,1923, 
Jan. 1,1924, 



Rate. 


Amount. 


4, 


$284,000.00 


3y2, 


8,000.00 


3y2, 


25,000.00 


31/2, 


3,000.00 


31/2, 


15,000.00 




$335,000.00 



150 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS INCOME. 

INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $34,000.00 

Invested in 

City of Concord, N. H,, 4% sewer 

refunding bonds, $1,000.00 

U.S. First Liberty Loan, converted 

414% bonds, 10,000.00 

U. S. Third Liberty Loan, 4l^% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan, 4l^% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

U. S. Victory Loan, 4%% notes, 3,000.00 

$34,000.00 



Proceeds from $4,000 matured 4% sewer refunding 
bonds, and redemption of $846 "War Savings Stamps, de- 
posited in General Account by direction of the Board of 
Water Commissioners, to be used in the reduction of the 
bonded indebtedness of the water system. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 151 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS PROFIT. 

INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Balance of income, 1920, $4,261.67 

Income received, 1921, 2,059.56 

$6,321.23 

Transferred to General Account Water Depart- 
ment by order of the Board of Water Com- 
missioners, to be used in the reduction of the 
bonded indebtedness of the water system, $6,321.23 



152 CITY- OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

"We herewith submit the annual report of the Superin- 
tendent of the water system. 

Very little comment in addition thereto is required, — 
his report being full and comprehensive. 

The water system of the city is in the best of condition. 
The outstanding water bonds April 1, 1922, are $288,000, 
of which $270,000 bearing interest at 4 1-2 per cent per 
annum were refunded. The $270,000 bonds were sold for 
$1,007.80 for each $1,000.00 bond, showing the high stand- 
ing of the city financially. These bonds are dated January 
1, 1922, payment being arranged yearly, so that the income 
from the water rates will pay both interest and principal 
in fifteen years. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 

CHARLES R. WALKER, 

JOHN B. ABBOTT, 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, 

OLIVER J. PELREN, 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, ex-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 153 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the fiftieth annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1921. 

Receipts. 

For water from consumers by fixed 

rates, $10,683.89 

For water from consumers by meter 

rates, 65,576.49 

From delinquents, 87.86 

For water for building purposes, 71.15 

From wood and farm lands, 207.25 

For labor and materials furnished on 

private fire lines, 246.57 

For pipe and stock sold and labor, 252.58 

For turning on water shut off for 

non-payment, 2.00 

From Penacook and Boscawen "Water 

Precinct, 221.29 

From telephone refund, .35 

$77,349.43 

Deduct abatements, 25.65 



Net receipts for 1921, " $77,323.78 

There has also been furnished the city free of charge 
the following use of water : 

Public buildings, $179.50 

Parks and playgrounds, 60.00 

Cemeteries, 108.00 

Street department, 774.00 



154 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Drinking fountains and watering 

troughs, $280.00 

Sewer flush tanks, 45.00 

469 fire hydrants at $25, 11,725.00 



$13,721.50 



Expenditures. 

maintenance account. 

General care and maintenance : 

Salaries and labor, $8,686.91 

Team account, 144,21 

Automobile account, 1,351.55 

Miscellaneous supplies, 641.48 

Tools, 376.41 

Repairs of buildings, 40.56 

Telephones and lighting, 90.11 

Insurance, 780.97 

Incidentals, 94.13 



Office expenses: 



$12,206.33 



Salary and clerical work. 


$1,275.13 




Postage and printing. 


459.68 




Miscellanous supplies, 


147.53 




Repairs, 


159.28 




Telephone, 


33.96 


2,075.58 






i and repair of hydrants: 






Stock, 


$223.58 




Labor, 


462.84 


fi8fi4.9 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



155 



Care and repair of meters 

Stock, 
Labor, 

Relaying service pipes: 

Stock, 
Labor, 



$196.08 
1,081.61 



$195.00 
522.72 



$1,277.69 



717.72 



Repairing leaks: 

Stock, 
Labor, 

Work at lake. 
Care of wood-lots, 
Penacook Park, 
Taxes, town of Webster, 
Expense of bond issue, 

Pumping station: 

Salaries and labor. 
General supplies and repairs. 
Telephone and lighting. 
Steam pump : 

Supplies and repairs. 

Electric pump : 

Power, $1,730.80 

Supplies and repairs, 96.13 



$31.78 
410.41 



$1,948.56 
39.14 
61.86 

80.35 



1,826.93 



442.19 

418.55 
35.75 

257.58 
100.00 
575.00 



3,956.84 



Total maintenance account. 



$22,749.65 



156 CITY OP CONCORD. 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 

Distribution pipes: 

Stock, $5,974.75 

Labor, 5,402.29 

$11,377.04 

Service pipes : 

Stock, $1,110.49 



Labor, 717.15 



Hydrants 



Meters 



1,827.64 



Stock, $1,512.45 

Labor, 252.00 



1,764.45 



Stock, $2,200.69 

Labor, 225.33 



2,426.02 



Wall at dam, 3,721.69 



Total construction account, $21,116.84 

Total expenditures for 1921, $43,866.49 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 157 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 
Distribution pipes laid in 1921 : 

South Street, from Bow Street to Bushey's Farm, 1,350 
feet of 10-inch cast iron pipe, replacing cement-lined. 

Passway between Phenix Block and Phenix Hotel, high 
service line, 180 feet of 10-inch pipe. 

Alleyway east of North Main Street, from said passway 
to rear of Eagle Hotel, high service line, 596 feet of 10-inch 
pipe. 

Pleasant Street at St. Paul's School, extended west from 
New Upper School, 118 feet of 10-inch pipe. 

Noyes Street, from Harvard to Yale Street, 1,016 feet 
of 8-inch pipe ; 392 feet of 1-ineh pipe discontinued. 

Hall Street, extended south from Rumford Field. 1.500 
feet of 6-inch pipe. 

Stevens Avenue, north from Pleasant Street, 385 feet 
of 6-inch pipe. 

Kent Street, east from Stevens Avenue, 165 feet of 6-inch 
pipe. 

Wiggin Street, east from Donovan Street, 322 feet of 
6-inch pipe. 

Dunklee Street, south from Pillsbury Street, 260 feet of 
6-inch pipe, replacing 1-inch pipe. 

Harvard, Princeton and Dartmouth Streets, on con- 
nections at Noyes Street, 44 feet of 6-inch pipe. 

Hammond Street, extended east at Water Street, 37 feet 
of 4-inch pipe. 

Bridge Street, extended east from Stickney Field, 295 
feet of 2-inch pipe ; 223 feet of 1-mch pipe discontinued. 

Water Street, extended north from Hammond Street, 293 
feet of 2-inch pipe. 

Church Lane, north from Park Street, 124 feet of 2-ineh 
pipe; 114 feet of 3-4 inch pipe discontinued. 

Also 717 feet of 1-inch pipe; 222 feet discontinued. 

On hydrant branches, 81 feet of 8-inch and 87 feet of 6- 
inch pipe; 14 feet of 6-inch cement-lined pipe discontin- 
ued. 



168 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
382,075 feet or 72.36 miles. 

Fourteen gates were added during the year ; 3 were dis- 
continued. 

Total number of gates now in use, 1,067. 

Nine new hydrants have been set as follows : 

On alleyway east of North Main Street. 

East side, near Eagle Garage. 

East side, rear Robinson's store. 

East side, rear of Phenix Block. 
On Noyes Street, 

Northwest corner of Harvard Street. 

Northwest corner of Yale Street. 
On Hall Street, 

West side, near Nylen's. 

West side, near Thompson's. 

West side, at Oilman's. 
On Kent Street, north side, at Stevens Avenue. 

Two have been discontinued ; total number now in 
use, 469. 

Thirty-nine services have been laid, consisting of 792 
feet of 3-4 inch, 37 feet of 1-inch and 40 feet of 2-inch 
cement-lined pipe, and 17 feet of 8-inch cast-iron pipe. 
One 6-inch high service connection and one 6-inch low 
service connection have been made for Rumford Printing 
Co., hydrant and sprinkler service. 

Nine services have been discontinued. 

Total number in use, 3,924. 

Total length of service pipes, 92,863 feet or 17.58 miles. 

Forty-one services have been relaid and curb valves 
placed on 49 old services. 

Sixty-six new meters have been set and 3 meters have 
been removed, making total now in use, 2,710. 

The height and temperature of the water in Penacook 
Lake are shown by the following tables: 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



159 







HEIGHT. 






January 




185.00 


July 




184.35 


February 




184.70 


August 




184.25 


March 




184.60 


September 




183.00 


April 




185.00 


October 




182.60 


May 




185.20 


November 




182.00 


June 




185.15 


December 




182.60 



The lowest point in the height of the water was 182.00 
on November 1, the highest was 185.50 on March 10, mean 
height for the year was 183.96 which was .32 foot lower 
that the mean height for 1920. 



January 


1, 


41 


August 2, 


78 




12, 


42 


9, 


80 




31, 


43 


30, 


78 


February 


2, 


42 


September 4, 


76 




28, 


43 


7, 


74 


March 


2, 


42 


19, 


72 




23, 


43 


30, 


68 


April 


4, 


44 


October 5, 


66 




9, 


46 


10, 


62 




26, 


47 


29, 


58 


May 


5, 


48 


November 4, 


54 




17, 


52 


5, 


52 


June 


3, 


56 


9, 


50 




22, 


60 


16, 


48 


July 


1, 


66 


22, 


44 




16, 


68 


December 2, 


42 




31, 


72 


31, 


42 



One of the most important pieces of construction work 
for this year was the extension of a 10-inch main for high 
service fire protection and the installation of three 8-inch 
four-way independent nozzle valve hydrants in the alley- 
way east of North Main Street. This extension has already 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

shown its value in two fires that might have assumed 
serious proportions but for its use. 

An 8-inch pipe has been laid on Noyes Street from Har- 
vard to Yale Streets with the intent of furnishing an ample 
supply to the section west of South Street and south of 
Clinton Street. This pipe was not connected to the South 
Street main on account of the condition of the street be- 
tween South and Harvard Streets, the grade being about 
four feet lower. "When this part of Noyes Street is filled, 
the line should Ive connected through to South Street. 

The 6-incli cement-lined main on South Street from Bow 
Street to Bushey's Farm, laid in 1882, was relaid with 
10-inch cast iron pipe. There had been several bad leaks 
on this pipe in the last few years and its condition as 
shown when uncovered in the work of relaying made it 
evident that it was time to discontinue it. 

The residents on the lower end of Hall Street have been 
given a supply of water for both fire protection and do- 
mestic use, by the extension of the 6-inch main. 

The location of all new hydrants which have been set 
in connection with these extensions, has been determined 
by the Hydrant Board comprising the City Engineer, the 
Chief of the Fire Department and the Superintendent of 
the "Water "Works. 

At "West Concord, north of Hutchins Street near the 
dam and gate houses, there has long been an unsightly and 
unsanitary condition caused by the flowing back of Forge 
Pond over a swampy area which also received more or less 
drainage from a set of buildings near by. 

This has now been remedied by the construction of a 
rubble wall laid in concrete on the south side of the high- 
way which prevents the water from the Pond from flowing 
back over this swamp, and a twelve-inch pipe was laid 
in back of the wall to carry water from the swamp and 
drainage to the overflow. The highway is greatly improved 
by this wall and the purity of the drinking water further 
safeguarded by it. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 161 

There have not been many new services laid this year 
as we have had few new buildings in the city. Meters 
have been set on most of the new services and on many 
old ones. It is planned to continue placing meters on all 
supplies whenever the schedule rate for fixtures installed 
shall equal or exceed the minimum meter rate. 

All hydrants have been regularly tested and inspected 
during the winter and kept in good working condition. 

The quality of our supply continues to hold its high 
standard as shown by the tests of the State Chemist. The 
shores have been policed and the rules regarding boating 
enforced. 

I would recommend the relaying of the following streets 
in 1922: 

Martin Street from Albin to Walker Streets with 280 
feet of 6-inch pipe. 

Bradley Street north from Perkins to Penacook Streets, 
400 feet of 6-inch pipe. 

"Washington Street from Rumford to Essex Streets, 375 
feet of 6-inch replacing 6-inch cement-lined. 

Giles Street from Warren to School Streets, 772 feet of 
6-inch pipe replacing 4-inch cement-lined. 

Hammond Street east from Hall Street, 500 feet of 6- 
inch iron pipe replacing 4-inch iron. 

I wish in closing this report to thank the members of 
the Board for their advice and support during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



11 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent, 

Sir : I would report that the pumping machinery at 
the pumping station, including boilers is in good working 
condition. 

Both steam pumps have been turned over every two 
weeks by high service pressure to see that they were in 
good working order. 



RECORD OF motor DRIVEN CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS. 



Months. 



B 
'S 


c 
'a 




o 




a 


-a 




bo 


M 


> 


afi 


"5 


"3 


CD 


^ 


>. 


?;s 


o 


o 


> 




* 








< 


bd 


a 


^ 



•;3 

TO © 



H 





bo 

c 


aj 




.« 


s§ 


^ 




p: 




«« p, 






O 


o 


O 






•o 


•^ 










^ 


^ 


a 


c 


— 


E 


CU 


i 



*.-a 



January 
February 
March 
April . 
May .. 
June . 
July .. 
August 
September 
October . . . 
November 
December. 

Total . . 



Daily average 5:9 



H. M. 

140:20 
140:55 
140:40 
128:25 
140: 5 
198:30 
174:10 
214:45 
147:50 
149:50 
43:15 
43:25 

1,662:10 



H. M. 
4:31 
5: 2 
4:30 
4: 8 
4:31 
6:37 
5:37 
6:58 
4:55 
4:50 
4:48 
4:97 



11.380 


367 


11.490 


410 


1 1 ,660 


376 


10,500 


350 


11,480 


370 


15,880 


526 


13,990 


451 


17,140 


552 


11,710 


390 


11,900 


383 


3 450 


383 


3,580 


397 


134.160 






416 



494 22, 

499 23 
498 23, 

500 20 
520, 22 
496 32 
499! 28 
504 34 
509 23 
495' 24 



497 
500 



850,000 
075,000 
407,000 
,968,000 
,838,000 
,268,000 
299,000 
705,000i 
,296,000 
067,000 
935,000 
150 000 



269,858,000 
838,068 



6,019 
4.420 
4,673 
4,405 
3,423 



1,198 

1.162 

640 

25,946 

123 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



163 



RECORD OF STEAM PUMPS. 



Months. 


c 
a 
g 

s 
d* 


be 
a 
■ft 

1-: 

fto 

^.s 

c 
d® 


be 
a 
'S 
S 
p. 

O 

H 


P. 

£ 
ft 

£ 
o 

11 


ft 

E 

ft 

a 

•i-i 

i 

<p c 


o 

be . 

_ ® 

is 

Oft 

H 


be 
« 

>.| 

'Sa 

Q 


o 
o 

o 
« 


c 
o 
o 

s> 

be 

2 

> . 

^a 

Q 


o 

4 

O no 

ac 
o 
o 

« o 

0& 

H 


o 

ft 

S O 
OS 

ia 


January 

February 


1 


2 


3 


H. M. 

16: 


H. M. 

5:20 


1,185,866 


395,288 


1 
2,127 709 


608 


557 
















656,436 


2,722 












1 


2 


14:30 


7:15 


1.312,873 


1 3fi1 


612 


200 


May 






























July 
























August 
























September . . . 








































1 


864 

770 

2 854 




November.... 
December 


11 
6 

19 


16 
20 

39 


17 
21 

43 


185:50 
203: 

419:20 


10:69 
9;40 


15.735,190 
18,724,701 


925,599 
891,652 


33.771 
36.632 


1.986 
1.744 


214 
195 


Total 

Daily average 


9:45 


36,958,629 
859,50:1 


75,252 

1 ^^!i 


203 
















' 





Coal consumed for the year, 16.49 tons. 

Pounds of wood consumed -f- S^equivalent amount of 
coal 2854 pounds. 

Total equivalent coal consumed for the year includes 
that used for pumping, starting fires, banking fires and 
heating building, 17.76 tons. 

Amount of equivalent coal consumed per thousand gal- 
lons pumped, 2.06. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. ROWELL, Engineer. 



APPENDIX. 



166 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of the 

Works, 



For the year ending January 31, 1874, 


$4,431.10 


For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 


17,535.00 


For the year ending April 1, 1876, 


16,921.24 








1877, 


19,001.07 








1878, 


20,763.03 








1879, 


21,869.86 








1880, 


22,451.53 








1881, 


26,744.58 


For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 


25,534.01 


For the year ending December 31, 1882, 


27,243.06 








1883, 


28,255.48 








1884, 


28,915.65 








1885, 


30,222.54 








1886, 


30,862.64 








1887, 


34,047.52 








1888, 


38,441.32 








1889, 


40,237.53 








1890, 


42,133.41 








1891, 


46,075.16 








1892, 


48,351.52 








1893, 


52,299.66 








1894, 


53,230.10 








1895, 


55,343.19 








1896, 


56,557.81 








1897, 


55,156.42 








1898, 


59.147.54 








1899, 


*53.953.13 








1900, 


*57,003.71 








1901, 


62,253.61 








1902, 


63,430.85 



* No hydrant rental this year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



167 



For the year ending December 31, 



Total receipts for 49 years, 



1903, 


$65,088.45 


1904, 


68,570.48 


1905, 


71,076.44 


1906, 


73,063.45 


1907, 


73,782.64 


1908, 


71,362.67 


1909, 


*67,307.84 


1910, 


68,673.71 


1911, 


71,881.34 


1912, 


76,145.13 


1913, 


76,154.45 


1914, 


74,422.15 


1915, 


78,940.06 


1916, 


75,052.72 


1917, 


77,092.10 


1918, 


78,077.15 


1919, 


73,671.71 


1920, 


78,589.63 


1921, 


77,323.78 




$2,534,689.17 



Mean Height of Water •Each Year. 



1873, 


175.86 


1882, 


179.15 


1874, 


179.50 


1883, 


176.40 


1875, 


180.00 


1884, 


178.18 


1876, 


180.28 


1885, 


176.80 


1877, 


176.46 


1886, 


178.10 


1878, 


179.50 


1887, 


179.04 


1879, 


179.74 


1888, 


181.96 


1880, 


175.30 


1889, 


180.91 


1881, 


174.70 


1890, 


181.90 



'■No hydrant rental after 1908. 



168 CITY OP CONCORD. 



1891, 


180.00 


1907, 


183.59 


1892, 


174.32 


1908, 


183.41 


1893, 


173.38 


1909, 


181.40 


1894, 


172.81 


1910, 


180.22 


1895, 


171.15 


1911, 


177.60 


1896, 


178.96 


1912, 


178.86 


1897, 


183.33 


1913, 


179.20 


1898, 


184.31 


1914, 


179.55 


1899, 


183.49 


1915, 


180.00 


1900, 


183.09 


1916, 


184.15 


1901, 


183.86 


1917, 


183.81 


1902, 


184.98 


1918, 


181.84 


1903, 


184.75 


1919, 


183.32 


1904, 


184.40 


1920, 


184.28 


1905, 


183.37 


1921, 


183.96 


1906, 


183.94 







WATER DEPARTMENT. 



169 



HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service ; L, Low Service. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



North Main. 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin 's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, near Eagle Garage 

East side, in rear Robinson's Store. . 

East side, in rear Phenix Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Fi'eight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue. . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church.... 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co.'s.. 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co... 



L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 



28 



170 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Con^wwed. 




South Main . . 



Water . 
Hall.. 



South State. 



Hammond . . , 
Railroad. . . . 
Fiske 

Summer. . . . 

Durgin 

North State 



Southwest corner of South State 

N^orthwest corner of Pillsbury. 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops. . 

West side, 110 feet north of McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side, below No. 18 

West side, at No. 32 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, at No. 85 

East side, near Rumford Field 

West side, near Nylen's 

West side, near Thompson's 

West side, at Oilman's 

North side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

West side, south line of Walker School 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 



H 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 



21 
1 



10 
1 



14 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

BYDnANTQ.— Continued. 



171 




Mills 

Dakin. . . . 

Glen 

Duriklee. . 

Broadway 



Donovan 
Oreen. . . 

tSouth . . . 



Bradley 

Union 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

North Spring. 



West side, at No. 22 

North wes*^ corner of Allison 

West side, 220 feet north of Allison 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, 80 feet north of Humphrey 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone 

West side, at Rollins Park 

West side, opposite McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

Northeast corner of "Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital . . 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige 's 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey 's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road 

East side, at Quint 's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penaeook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 



14 



172 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Cow^inwed. 









u 


Streets. 


Locations. 


.2 
'> 

u 
<s 
CO 


,0 

S 



South Spring. 



Academy 
Hanover . 
Rum ford 



Huntington 
Tahanto. . . 
Pine 

Holt 

High 



Gladstone. 

Valley 

Auburn . . . . 



Ridge Road. . . 
Westbourne Rd 
Dartmouth .... 



Princeton. 
Fruit 



Minot . 



Kensington Rd . 
Stevens Ave. . . 



Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 

East side, at No. 10 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Southeast comer of Walker 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Mortheast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at Morrill School 

West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at No. 10 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

West side, at No. 13 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest. . 

West side, between Nos. 11 and 13 

North side, 135 feet north of Centre.... 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, 700 feet south of Pleasant. . . 

East side, opposite No. 70 

East side, opposite No. 1 14 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home. 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home. 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 



L 1 




L 1 




L 1 




L 


4 


H 


1 


L 


1 


H 




L 




L 




L 




L 




H 




L 




L 




H 




L 




L 


11 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 




11 


2 


H 


1 


H 




H 




H 




H 


4 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 




H 




H 


3 


H 


1 


H 


1 


L 




L 


2 


L 




L 


2 


H 




L 




T. 




L 


4 


H 




H 




H 


3 


U 


1 1 


n 


1 1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

UYDRAWr^.— Continued. 



173 




Penacook . 



Walker. 



Albin.... 

Highland . 

Church . . . 
Franklin , 



Chestnut . 
Tremont. 



Pearl.. 
Beacon . 



Rowell . . . . 
Blanchard . 
Ferry 



Washington . 



Chapel . 



South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side, east of P. B. Co. 's storehouse. . . 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

North side, opposite No. 69 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 

South side, 500 feet west from Rumford... 

North side, 160 feet west of Bradley 

North side, at No. 22 

Northeast corner of Rumford 

South side, east of Bradley 

NTorth side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford •. . . 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

South side, opposite No. 64 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at No. 14 

North side, opp. Merrimack Apartments 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

North side, opposite Alert Hose House 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 



H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 



1=74 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Con^mwed. 




Montgomery. 
Centre 



Centre. 



Bridge. 



Park . . . 

Capitol . 

Garden . 
School . 



Warren . 



Depot . 



Blake. i. 
Orchard. 
Pleasant . 



South side, opposite No. 18 

Northeast corner of North State. . 

Southwest corner of Green. . .". 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

South side, on east line of Dewey School lot 

Northeast corner of Eidge Road 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co. 's.... 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory. 

North side, at St. Paul's Church 

North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, at No. ]06 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue. . . . 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

■Tunction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, opposite Nos. 8-10 

South side, opposite No. 8 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church. 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 



L 1 


1 


H 1 




L 1 




H 1 




L 




H 




H 




H 




H 


8 


L 




H 




H 


3 


L 


1 


H 




H 


2 


H 


1 


H 




H 




H 




L 




L 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


11 


H 




L 




L 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


9 


H 




L 


2 


L 


1 


H 


1 


H 




L 




L 




L 




L 





WATER DEPARTMENT. 

B.YBRANTB.— Continued. 



175 




-Pleasant. 



Kent. .. 
Pleasant. 



Fiske Road. . . 
Hopkinton Ed. 
Mill Eoad, 
St. P. School.. 



Old Hopkinton 

Road 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. 

Fayette 

Thompson .... 

Chandler 

Concord. . . .^ . 

Monroe. ...... 

Thorndike. , . . 



Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

iSTorth side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite No. 220 

North side, at Stevens Ave I 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage [ 

South side, at Lavery 's I 

South side, opposite No. 270 ] 

North side, near E. B. Chesley 's | 

North side, opposite No. 291 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond 's | 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School 

South side, near new Upper School 

East side, at Trask 's 

South side, near new infirmary 



East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home. 
South side, at tenement No. 7 . . 



Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station. 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm .-.'.... 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State ,.* 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Rumford School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 

H 
H 
H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L, 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 



13 
1 



11 

1 

,1 



176 



Laurel . 
Perley. 



Downing. 
Clinton. . 



West. 



Avon . . 
Noyes . 



Harrison. . 
Humphrey. 
Allison. . . . 
Pillsbury. . 



Carter 

Stone , 

Holly 

McKinley. . . 
Rockingham. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

UYBKANTS.— Continued. 




Iron Works Ed 
Prospect 



Curtice Ave.. 
North State. . 



Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, at No. 75 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Eedwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near No. 108 

North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Harvard 

Northwest corner of Yale 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten 'n . 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown 's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, 230 feet east of North State 

West side, at Water- Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 



L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 

H 
L 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

BYDRANTS.— Continued. 



177 




North State. 



Palm 

North State. 



North State. . 



Fisher. . 
View. . . 
Electric. 



Clarke. 
Lake . . 



Knight. . 
Hutchins. 



East side, near No. 226 | H 

East side, near No. 252 1 H 

East side, near No. 262 L 

East side, near No. 272 ( H 

West side, at south line of prison wail i L 



West side, at north line of prison wall. 

East side, near No. 296 

North side, west of Fairbanks 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. 

East side, near No. 312 

East side, near No. 324 

East side, near No. 330 

East side, opposite Dolan | L 

East side, opposite No. 362 1 H 

West side, opposite No. 382 L 

East side, at No. 382 | H 

I 
WEST CONCORD. I 



L 




L 


13 


H 


1 


H 




L 




L 




H 
L 





Southeast corner of K | 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at No. 426 

East side, near engine house 

East side, at No. 464 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co 

East side, at No. 498 

East side, at No. 516 

East side, opposite No. 533 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kelloni 's 

West side, at No. 13 

West side, near Wilson 's .... 

East side, at No. 33 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station 

South side, at Quaker 

North side, near No. 22 

North side, near C. & C. Railroad 

North side, at No. 40 



H 

L 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


10 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 




L 


2 


L 


1 


L 




n 




H 




L 




H 


5 


H 




L 


2 


H 




H 1 




H 1 


3 



12 



178 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




First 

Sewall's Falls 

Road 

Penacook Rd . . 



South Main. 



West Main. 
High 



Washington . . 



Fowler 

Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles 



West Canal. 



North side, near A. H. Knight's 

East side, at north line of cemetery | H 

West side, opposite Frost's [ H 

Wiest side, opposite Blanehard 's | H 

West side, near Warner Road | H 



PENACOOK. 



West side, at Harriman 's 

West side, at Annis 's 

West side, at Garvin 's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt 's garage 

West side, near Xo. fS. ., 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block. . 

Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Canal 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, at No. 41 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes ' 

East side, near Elliott 's 

South side, junction of Washington 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue 

Southw^est corner of Warren 

South side, at schoolhouse 

North side, near No. 36 

Southeast corner of Warren 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 

n 

H I 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H I 

H ! 

H I 

H I 

H I 
H 

H I 
H I 
H I 
H 
H 



15 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

BYTf-RANT^.— Continued. 



179 




East Canal. 

Crescent . . . 

Walnut 

Merrimack. 



Summer. 

Spring. . 
Maple. . . 
Summit, 
Winter. . 
Centre. . . 

Cross. . . . 

Rolfe.... 

Penaco.ok 



North side, near Contooeook Mfg. Co H 

North side, near Crescent H 2 

West side, north of Canal ". . . . H 1 

North side, at Bye H 1 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue H 

North side, opposite Nos. 36-38-40 H 

North side, opposite Cross H 

South side, opposite Bye H 

North side, opposite D. W. Fox's H 

South side, opposite Rolfe 's shop H 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory H 

North side, near road to Island H 

Northwest corner of Penacook H 

North side, opposite High H 

Northeast corner of Centre H 

North side, opposite Church H 3 

Northeast corner of Church H 1 

Northeast corner of Pleasant H 1 

Southeast corner of Pleasant H 1 

North side, near Pleasant H 1 

Northwest corner of Spring H 

West side, opposite No. 47 H 

Northwest corner of Spring H 

Southwest corner of Summer H 

North side, near angle of street | H 

South side, at No. 38 | H 

Northwest corner of Penacook | H 

West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe's | H 

West side, at No. 35 

East side, at No. 41 



Whole niunber public hydrants. 
PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 



Abbot & Downing Co | H 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard | L 



round 



Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 
Boston & Maine Railroad, new 

house 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Standish Worsted Co 

Concord Gas Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 



H 
H 

H 
H 
L 
H 



1469 



6 
4 

15 



180 



CITY OP CONCORD, 

HYDRANTS.— Concluded. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



m 



Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Rumford Printing Co 

Rumford Printing Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul 's School 

John Swenson Granite Co 

Water-works pumping station 

Whole number private hydrants 



H 
II 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
L 
H 
H 
I H 



2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
() 

16 
4 
2 
9 
1 

14 
2 
1 

j'lOl 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



181 



SCHEDULE OF 



IRON AND CEMENT-LINED 
AND GATES. 



PIPES 



Streets. 


O ' H 

IH » l-l 

cQao 


Length and Size of 


Iron Pipe in 


Feet. 


CO 

si 


30- 
in. 


24- 
iu. 


20 
iu. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
iu. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


3 




2220 








1 


















282 






1 




















331 
13598 


1905 

58 


75 
75 














7 








147 












6 


Gate-houses and 
















29 
5 

8 
2 

1 
1 
2 
4 






240 


2962 




42 


20 












Pumping station 














Abbott 




















23 

458 


349 






















Albin 
















785 
776 






















450 505 
2492 1 






























2182 
































724 
5 


689 














































2145 ' 


3 

2 

1 


Blake 




















265 
475 
1781 
590 


250 
"245 






































































































1577 

327 

2052 






3 

2 




















1123 


















2278 


3 
1 


















6 

763 
1077 

306 

585 


154 

"56 
516 

"547 


















508 




5 

2 


















Centre 
















3529 


2690 


14 


Chandler 
















1 


Chapel 




















2 


Charles 




















1 


Chestnut ... 




















265 
1600 

196 
1663 


1 




















21 


7 


Clarke 




















Clinton 
















1942 


180 


3 














2100 




1 


Concord 


















1593 

670 

422 

19 

590 

387 

456 

1977 

1455 

265 

400 

550 

270 

388 

587 

262 

16E 

1187 


286 

836 
' '242 
"92 

"466 
607 


5 


Court . 




















2 


Curtice Avenue . 




















2 


Dakin 




















2 






















2 


Depot 




















2 


Donovan 




















1 


Downing 




















4 


Dunklee 




















4 


Durgin 




















1 


Eastman 




















1 


Electric 




















1 


Elm 




















4 


Engel 




















1 


Essex 




















2 


Essex, North 




















1 
























Fayette 






















3 


Ferry ' 




1 . ■ • • 


' 




lOOC 


....' 1066' 4 



182 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 























1 


as o p 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


moo 




so- 


24- 


20- 


18- 


16- 


14- 


12- 


lo- 


8- 


6- 


4- 


Ill. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


m. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


lU. 



^ o 

S 



Fisher 

Fiske 

Fiske Road 

Ford Place 

Forest 

Foster 

Franklin 

Freight 

Fremont 

Fruit, North 

Fruit, South 

Fuller 

Garden 

Gas 

Giles 

Gladstone 

Glen 

Granite Avenue . 

Green 

Grove 

Hall 

Hall's Court 

Hammond 

Hanover 

Harrison 

Harrod 

Harvard 

High 

Highland 

Hill's Avenue .. . 

Holly 

Holt 

Home Avenue . . . 
Hopkinton Road. 

Humphrey 

Huntington [cord 

Hutcliins, W. Con- 
Iron Works Road. 

Jackson 

Jefferson 

Kensington Road. 

Kent 

Kimball 

Knight, W.Concord 
Lake. W. Concord 

Langdon 

Laurel 

Liberty 

Lincoln 

Lyndon 

Main, North 

Main, South 

Maitland 

Maple 

Marshall 



1045 



381 



4209 
300 



.2596 



380 



2166 



1311 



1373 



1546 
438 



55J 



300 



431 



1621 1068 
905 



69 



1216 



360 



5125 
5179 



343 
'756 
628 



1317 

285 



1078 
2874 



194 



709 
840 



1755 
1093 
2375 



240 
4 

15 
982 
99 
312 
710 
646 
362 
615 
498 
213 
589 
1332 
1576 



165 
400 
350 
465 
358 
1550 



726 
38 
1260 
482 
430 



225 



590 



785 
600 
230 
329 
760 



334 



357 



3C7 
300 



382 
330 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



183 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATES.— Continued. 





*^ ^ M 

moo 

30- 
in. 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in 


Feet. 


CO 

u be 




24- 
in. 


20- 
iu. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
iu. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


■2e 
a 
s 
25 






















738 
1729 

124 
26 

860 
1289 

700 

516 


2604 
1294 

"324 





Merrimack.. [School 
Mill Road, 8. P 




















6 


















750 


3 


Mills 


















4 






















? 






















?. 






















9, 


Mortou 




















I 






















1 




















1016 
19 






Oak 




















305 

229 

814 

3446 

460 
300 

"480 
"531 

195 

"223 
388 


1 






















Old HopkintouRoad 
OldS.MiilR'd.S.P.S. 



















1 






















?. 






















620 
596 
601 
380 
584 

2295 
616 

2215 


1 


Palm 




















1 


Park 




















? 






















1 


Pearl 




















2 














300 




2457 




9 




































4 






















2 
























1 






















2493 
985 


1 


Pine 


















681 


4 




















6 
















10791 


3516 


292 


185 


18 
















1 






















661 
800 
584 
1012 
1320 


2 












































1 


Ridge Road 




















1 






















2 


Rollin.s . 




















1 


Rowell .. . 




















142 

"575 
210 
1655 
210 




Rumford 














9 


l."i 
5202 


3502 
708 


17 


School 














10 


Second, W. Concord 
















1 


Sewall's Falls Koad. 




















1 






















1 


Short 




















1 


South 














4036 


2422 
390 


■■'26 
2391 


4585 
2629 


4 
















12 


Spring, South 
















5 


State, North 






5969 










31 
21 


6 


State, South . 










3049 


839 








5 


Stevens Avenue ... 












53 


385 




1 


















250 




Stone 




' 














1080 
19 


"376 
172 


1 






















1 


Summit 




















1 


Tahanto 




















1015 
1380 

"748 
1005 


4 


Thompson . . . 
















38 
1898 


326 
250 
823 


4 


















4 


Tremont 
















4 


Union 






















184 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPE 
AND GATE^.—Continued. 



Streets. 



•^ *C| I-H 

Bios 

so- 
il]. 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
iu. 


18- 
iii. 


16- 
iii. 


14- 

ii). 


12- 
iu. 


10- 8- 
iu. ill. 


6- 

in. 


4- 
in. 



Valley 

View 

Walker 

Wall 

Warren 

Washintjton 

Water 

Waverly 

West 

Westbourne Road. 

Wiggin 

Winter 

Woodman 

Wyman 

Hydrant branches. 
Blow-offs 



Penacook. 



Penacook, high ser- 
vice main 

Canal, East 

Canal, West 

Centre 

Charles 

Church 

Crescent 

Cross 

Electric Avenue.. .. 

Elliott 

Fowler 

High 

Linden 

Main 

Main, West 

Maple 

Merrimack 

Penacook 

Pine 

Rolfe 

Spring 

Stark 

Summer 

Summit 

Union 

Walnut and Bye 

Washington 

Winter 

Hydrant branches.. 
Blow-offs 



Totals 2220 522 28795 1963 2788 19788 24759 49022 23933 



10584 



705 



454 
1404 
31J 



1836 661 



428 



256 

648 639 

754 

514 



1118 1244 



1771 239 
132 



247 



635 



54 



150 
"27 



58 



653 

476 
1300 
252 
285 
150 
1678 
327 



1923 
364 
1346 



423 



884 

2205 

450 

542 



272 



266 ..... 

300 

725 

23 202 

366 

220 

5198 137 

83 145 



261 



1 

359 

70 



10 



120049 31282 1067 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 



185 



SCBEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES -Concluded. 





Length and Size of Cement-Lined 
Pipe in Feet. 


Streets. 


18 ii). 14-in. 


12-in. 


10-in. 


8-in. 


6-m. 


4-in. 






2230 














11391 






















373 
120 




Franklin 














Giles 












772 


High 












1218 


Perkins 












34 


Runiford 






5952 
17G4 


1203 






State, North 












Valley 










879 

11 

501 

298 




Warren 












Washington 













Hydrant branches 










88 


Blow-offs 













44 


Penacook. 




13110 


1221 










Canal, East 






628 
422 

479 






Canal, West 














Centre 










245 
1777 
482 

2100 




Charles 












Church 














Cross 










734 




High 












Main 






2573 
57 








Merrimack 








1181 
652 


2023 




Soring 








Stark 








529 






Summer 








1149 
1193 


689 


276 


Washington 
























Blow-oifs 












55 


















Totals 


11391 


15340 


11567 


1732 


643S 


10716 


1269 







186 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1921, 
CONCORD WATER-WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1920—22,167. 

Date of construction — 1872. 

By whom owned — City of Concord. 

Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING. 

Builders of pumping machinery — Worthington Pump and 

Machinery Corporation. 
1 triple expansion horizontal engine, capacity, 2,000,000 

gallons per 24 hours, 1893. 
1 triple expansion horizontal engine, capacity, 2,000,000 

gallons per 24 hours, 1904. 
1 Worthington 8", type "BS", slow speed, horizontal 

split casing, volute, centrifugal pump, capacity 

3,500,000 gallons per 24 hours, 1919. 
Motor, G. E., 100 H. P., A. C. 



water department, 187 

Electric Pump. 

1. Description of power: 

a. Alternating, 3 piiase. 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,800 

R. P. M. 

b. Price per K. W. H., $0.01 1/3, 8 p. m. to 6 a.m.; 

maximum, $1,800 per year, 300,000,000 gal- 
lons; $6.00 per 1,000,000 gallons, over 300,000,- 
000. 

2. K. W. H. used for year, 134,160. 

3. Total piimpage, by Venturi meter, 269,858,000 gallons. 

4. Average static head against which pump works, 90 
feet. 

5. Average dynamic head against which pump works, 
120 feet. 

6. Gallons pumped per K. W. H., 2,011+. 

7. K. W. H. used per 1,000,000 gallons pumped, 497. 

8. Efficiency of pump, 

269.858.000 (gallons pumped) X 8.34 (lbs.) X 120 (dynamic head) 

134,160 (K. W. H ) X 33,000 X 60 x 1.34 X 88.2 (efficiency motor = 86.3 % 

and switch board.) 

9. Total pumping for year, steam and electric pumps, 
306,816,629 gallons. 

10. Cost of total pumping figured on pumping station 
expenses— $3,956.84. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $12,896. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,107. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 5,801 feet during year. 

4. Relaid — 2,769 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 837 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 72.36 miles. 



188 CITY OF CONCORD, 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.44. 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 7. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 469 ; pri- 
vate, 95. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 11. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,067. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 81. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 886 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 153 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 92,863 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 30. 

22. Number now in use — 3,924. 

23. Average length of service — 23.66. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — 

25. Number of meters added during year — 63. 

26. Number now in use — 2,710. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 69.06. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 85.88. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 44. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



189 



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190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

INVENTORY 

Of the Property of the Water Department, Including 
THE Plant and Water Rights, and all the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in their Possession, 
January 1, 1922. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,127,070.00 

Water office — furniture, etc., 1,156.00 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 2,000.00 
Shop : 

Machinery, tools, meters, service pipe, etc., 4,535.89 
Trucks, roadster, horse, wagons and 

supplies, 3,200.00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 4,825.30 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 6,592.40 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 50.00 



$1,149,429.59 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1921. 

The department responded to 62 bell alarms and 302 
still alarms. 

In addition, two fires occurred, entailing loss, for which 
no alarms were given, making a total of 366 for the year. 

Bell Still No alarm Total 



Precinct, 


38 


228 


1 


267 


Penacook, 


13 


51 


1 


65 


East Concord, 


9 


7 




16 


West Concord, 


2 


16 




18 



62 302 2 366 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, with the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each case. 

The number of alarms responded to by the depart- 
ment during the year exceeded all previous records and 
the monetary loss was far heavier than usual. Extensive 
repairs were made on Combinations 1 and 3, — the wheels 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of the latter being cut down and cord tires provided. 
The condition of the stable flooring made thorough repairs 
imperative. The apparatus in the main is in good con- 
dition, but Combination 2 (Alert) and Engine 3 car 
(Penacook) are sadly lacking in power and remedial steps 
should be taken. The ladder truck should be motorized. 
1000 feet of hose should be purchased and 1000 feet re- 
lined. The precinct fire alarm system, as regards con- 
struction, is in good condition, but vastly overloaded, ab- 
normal areas being without protection in case of open cir- 
cuit. One alarm box was purchased late in the year but 
not installed. Approximately 10 miles of new wire was 
used in replacing the same amount of old wire. 

The fire alarm system at Penacook is in good condition. 
It will be necessary, however, to renew the battery plates 
during the coming year. The installation of an alarm 
box has been requested at West ]\Iain and Pine Streets. 

East and West Concord were provided with electric 
siren fire alarm horns which are working satisfactorily. 
The duties incumbent on the undersigned in the line of 
inspection of wires and buildings have been performed. 

In March, a monthly system of inspection of buildings 
in the business section was inaugurated and has proved 
beneficial. 

During the month of October I had the pleasure of at- 
tending the Convention of the International Association 
of Fire Engineers held at Atlanta, Georgia, a report of 
which I rendered at that time. 

I wish again to take occasion to thank your honorable 
body for the opportunity afforded me to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 193 



IN MEMORIAM. 

Charles H. Sanders 

Engineer, Eagle Co, No. 1 

Died March 30th, 1921 



HosEA M. Batchelder 

Substitute, Good Will No. 3 

Died May 14th, 1921 



Charles H. Rowell 

Alert Co. No. 2 

Died August 19th, 1921 

Howard E. Kendall 

Spare man, permanent force 

Died December 25th, 1921 



13 



194 CITY OF CONCORD. 

APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS. 





Appropriations. 






Appropriation, 






$52,004.00 


Resolution, outs 


tanding claims, 




1,782.59 




$53,786.59 




Disbursements. 






Permanent men, 




$27,900.00 




Vacations, 




973.06 




Call men, 




10,245.00 




House man, 




100.00 




Rent, Veterans' 


Association, 


210.00 




Forage, 




957.17 




Fuel, 




3,231.85 




Lights, 




727.10 




Incidentals, 




5,808.46 




Horse shoeing, 




155.75 




Horse hire. 




574.75 




Fire alarm, 




1,789.24 




Penacook fire alarm. 


125.85 




Supplies, auto combinations, 


304.41 




Hose, 




600.00 




Laundry, 




83.95 


$53,786.59 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 195 

1921 

ALARMS. 

Precinct. 

Still. January 6, 12.42 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. M. Reister, Grant Street, Plains District. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. Januairy 7, 7.46 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred B. Powell, 19 1-2 Merrimack Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 9, 9.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Harold Gay, 17 Green Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 10.43 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas McWaters, 12 Clinton Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 9.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Prank Chandler, 68 High Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 56. January 13, 12,17 p. m. Fire in building 
owned and occupied by St. Paul's School as a dormitory. 
Probably caught from fire-place. One thousand eight hun- 
dred feet of city hose and 500 feet of school hose wet. Re- 
call 2.19 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $20,000.00 $6,451.66 $18,000.00 $6,451.66 
Contents, 5,000.00 729.78 Blanket 729.78 

Still. January 13, 12.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Addie Kelley, 25 Union Street. Extinguished 
by Engine 2. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 1.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence owned and occupied by Mary S. Morrill on the 
Hopkinton Road. Extinguished by Combination 1. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$60.00 


$1,000.00 


$60.00 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


20.00 


300.00 


20.00 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 16, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of I\Irs. Charles Langley, 40 Bridge Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 16, 2.12 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Bow. Acetylene gas explosion in residence owned 
and occupied by Arthur Curtis practically demolished the 
building, killing three people and seriously injuring three 
others. Fire immediately followed the explosion destroy- 
ing what was left of the house, together with barn and 
shed. Combination 1 responded but could do but little 
outside of helping care for the injured. See Bow report. 

Still. January 17, 10.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Bruton, Loudon Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 17, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. L. Marden, 34 West Street. Extinguished by 
Engine 2. No loss. 

Still. January 17, 3.08 p. m. Small shack in rear of 
173 Rumford Street used by boys as a club house destroyed. 
Caused by overheated stove. Combination 1 extinguished 
fire in debris. Loss trifling. 

Still. January 17, 7.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Fagan, 52 Franklin Street Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 18, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. C. Reed, 19 Union Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 18, 1.40 p. m. Fire in residence, 15 
Noyes Street, owned and occupied by Isaac Cohen, 
Caused by overheated stove. Combination 1 responded 
but the fire had gained such headway that a bell alarm 
was sent in. 

Box 47. January 18, 1.46 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand six hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. Recall 3.01 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. las. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 .$1,950.00 $2,000.00 $1,950.00 

Contents, 3,000.00 900.00 2,000.00 900.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 197 

Still. January 18, 4.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Provencel, Grant Street, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 18, 7.34 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Paveglio, 14 Albin Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 6.44 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W, R. Peaslee, 23 1-2 Pine Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 12.58 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. L. Maher, 106 South State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 19, 1.25 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. C. Marden, 3 Broadway. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. January 22, 4.22 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George McBain, 11 Bowery Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

No Alarm. January 23, 4.30 p. m. Fire in residence, 
10 Pine Street, owned and occupied by Mrs. J. C. Derby, 
caused by head of match flying into basket of clothing. 
Extinguished by occupants. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$10,000.00 


$200.00 


$5,000.00 


$200.00 


Contents, 


10,000.00 


348.00 


5,000.00 


348.00 



Still. January 24, 5.24 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Coleman, 27 Perley Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 6.56 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Michael Bedik, 11 Center Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1, Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Wallace Dunn, 87 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Comlvination 1, Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 9.54 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Drake, 49 Thorndike Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1, Engine 2 car. No loss. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 25, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank W. Marsha, 90 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1, Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 10.55 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
blowing up of stove in residence of Silas Bernard, 45 Con- 
cord Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. Frozen water front. No fire. Run made 
with Engine 2 car. No. 1 laid up for repairs. 

Still. February 1, 5.20 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
in residence of G. G. Shaw, 23 Pine Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. February 1, 10.15 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in Phenix Hall. Combination 1 responded 
but found no cause for alarm. No fire. 

Still. February 2, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. A. Pillsbury, 28 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 2. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 12.59 p. m. Slight awning fire at 
18 Pleasant Street. Combination 1 responded but no as- 
sistance was required. Extinguished by occupants of 
building. Loss trifling. First run of Combination 1 car 
since being repaired. 

Still. February 8, 1.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. L, Harden, 34 "West Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 4.56 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. H. Leary, 21 Fayette Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Box 51. February 10, 1.11 p. m. Fire in freight car 
shop of B. & M. R. R. plant. South Main Street. Caused 
'by oil heater. Two thousand eight hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet in addition to that used by the local brigade. 
Recall 2.24 p. m. 

Value. Loss. 

Building, $116,000.00 $26,247.88 
Contents, Mach. and Tools, 

17,004.40 2,748.88 
Roll. Stock, 40,000.00 6,037.85 



Ins. Ins. Paid. 

^42,000.00 $26,247.88 


8,800.00 
20,400.00 


2,748.88 
6,037.85 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 199 

Box 51. February 11, 3.59 a. m. Rekindling' of fire 
in debris of preceding fire. Alarm needless. Recall 4.38 
a. m. No loss. 

Still. February 13, 7.31 a. m. Reported chimney fire 
in residence of John B. Jameson, 76 Center Street. Proved 
to be escaping coal gas from furnace. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. February 14, 6.22 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. F. Robinson, No. Pembroke Road, Plains Dis- 
trict. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 15, 5.39 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. C. Baker, Bridge Street, near Gully Hill. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still, February 17, 11.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. Kenna, 13 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J, R, Huntley, 541/^ So, Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 20, 11.40 a. m. A call for assistance 
from West Concord. Fire in residence of Charles H. 
Farniim, 312 No. State Street. Combination 1 sent. 

Still. February 24, 11.43 a. m. In response to an- 
other call for help from West Concord, Ahrens-Fox motor- 
driven pump sent. Engine worked one and one-half hours. 

Box 9, February 20, 11.51 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand nine hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 2.28 p. m. See West Concord report. 

Still. February 20, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of 0, A. Marsh, 59 So. Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 3, No loss. 

Still. February 20, 5.50 p, m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick McCami, 4 Noyes Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1, No loss. 

Still. February 20, 7.12 p, m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A, L. Potter, 12 Perkins Court, Extinguished by 
Combination 1, No loss. 

Still. February 22, 1,55 p. m. Fire in dump on Allison 



200 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Street in rear of residence of H. V. Tittemore. Extin- 
guished by detail. Three hundred and fifty feet of hose 
wet. No loss. 

February 26, 10.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John Aranosian, 173 No. State St. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 10.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. J. Perry, 296 No. State St. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 28, 9.00 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. B. Blake, Wheeler's Corner. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 28, 5.46 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
pair of horses attached to dumj) cart containing a small 
quantity of hay running away and coming in contact with 
a gasoline pump on the sidewalk at 109 No. Main Street. 
The pump was broken off and the hay strewn over the 
ground. The electric wires leading to a lamp on the pump 
were short-circuited setting fire to what little gasoline 
there was in the pump which communicated to the hay. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Box 25. February 28, 5.47 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. Recall 6.00 p. m. 

Still. March 2, 5.39 p. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. B. Fortin, 19 Home avenue. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 4, 10.14 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Henry Giddis, Loudon Road. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but became disabled at Gully Hill, and Engine 
2 was sent to continue the run. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1 crew. No loss. 

Still. March 4, 11.41 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Jessie Goodwin, Stickney Hill. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1 crew using Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 4.19 a. m. A call to the residence of 
Arthur P. Morrill, 106 School Street to investigate con- 
ditions. Alarm occasioned by over-heated hot water tank. 
Combination 1 responded. No loss. 



FIRE DEPAETMENT. 201 

Still. March 5, 9.16 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Scott Rogers, Garvins Falls Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 11.46 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Roy Braley, 6 Wentworth avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 4.37 p. m. A call to the residence of 
Peter Drouin, 171 Pleasant Street. Mrs. Drouin fatally 
burned while lighting a fire in kitchen stove. Combination 
1 responded and assisted the police in the removal of the 
unfortunate woman to the hospital. 

Still. March 7, 7.23 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. L. Duprey, 33 Harvard Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 7, 8.20 p. m. Fire in residence, 36 
Walker Street, owned by Mrs. Marion A. Powell and 
occupied by Gionan Paglia and Frank Cenderelli. Caused 
probably by overheated stove. Combination 1 responded 
but had not proceeded far before a bell alarm was sent in 
for the same fire. 

Box 14. March 7, 8.21 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. One thousand feet of hose wet. Recall 10.02 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $2,700.00 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Contents : 

G. Paglia, 1,500.00 428.00 a,000.00 428.00 

F. Cenderelli, 1,500.00 855.75 1,200.00 855.75 

Still. March 9, 11.56 p. m. Fire on electric light 
pole, No. Main Street, opposite Pearl Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded. 

Still. March 10, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Roy Braley, 6 "Wentworth Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. March 14, 8.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Blodgett, junction of Loudon and No. Pembroke 
Roads. Extinguished by Combination 1. No. loss. 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. March 18, 9.08 a. m. A call to investigrate cause 
of smoke in residence of Z. Truteer, 21 Prospect Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. March 19, 12.59 a, m. A call for assistance from 
E. Concord. The McKeage buildings on the Oak Hill 
Road destroyed. Combination 1 sent. See East Concord 
report. 

Still. March 19, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Cochran, Loudon Road. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 22, 7.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. L. Bean, Garvins Falls Road. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 22, 11.42 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 25 
Albin Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 22, 3.41 p. m. Grass fire on lot owned 
by Mrs. C. H. Gay, South Street, near the David E. Murphy 
place. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still, March 22, 6.04 p. m. Reported brush fire on 
Auburn Street. Combination 1 responded but no assist- 
ance was required. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 3.07 p. m. Brush fire on Aviation 
Field, Black Hill. Extinguished by Combination 1, and 
volunteers. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 3.28 p. m. Brush fire near reservoir 
Penacook Street. Engine 2 and detail sent. 

111 . March 23, 3.34 p. m. Alarm given for preced- 
ing fire. Detail sent in auto. No loss. 

Still. March 23, 4.04 p. ni. Brush fire reported in 
rear of 109 Franklin Street. Detail sent. No fire. 

Still. March 23, 6.30 p. m. Reported rekindling of 
brush fire near reservoir, Penacook Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 1.46 j). m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. F. Gillette, 11 Wall Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 



FIKE DEPARTMENT. 203 

Box 57. March 25, 12.37 p. m. Fire in barn, 4 Kent 
Street, owned and occupied by Charles E. Palmer, Con- 
cord. Caused by short-circuiting of wires in automobile 
which stood in building. One thousand two hundred feet 
of hose wet. Recall 1.15 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Automobile, $500.00 $340.00 $340.00 $340.00 

Still, March 28, 4.44 p. m. Grass fire on the Matthews 
Place near the Silk Farm Road. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Box 12. March 29, 8.18 a. m. Slight fire on roof of 
stone shed owned and occupied by John Henneberry, Pros- 
pect Street. Extinguished by employees. Recall 8.27 
a. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 29, 4.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. F. Gross, 10 Kimball Street Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 30, 4.06 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Lizzie H. Mclntire, 77 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Stell. March 31, 7.12 p. m. Fire in residence in rear 
of 11 Franklin Street, owned by Samuel L. French and 
occupied by Edwin Titus. Combination 1 responded but 
as the fire originated and was working through the parti- 
tions, several calls for assistance were sent in before it was 
subdued. 

Still. March 31, 7.16 p. m. Combination 2 sent. 

Still. March 31, 7.18 p. m. Engine 1 sent. 

Still. March 31, 7.25 p. m. Combination 2 (Kear- 
sarge) sent. 

Box 15. March 31, 7.26 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire as a precautionary measure. Six hundred and fifty 
feet of hose wet but no water used in building. Recall 
8.16 p. m. 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,200.00 $219.13 $3,200.00 $219.13 

Contents : 

S. L. French, 1,500.00 10.00 1,000.00 10.00 

E. Titiis, 1,000.00 37.00 1,000.00 37.00 

Still. April 2, 11.34 a. m. Grass fire on the Thomas 
Degnan lot, corner Church and Bradley Streets. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 3.23 p. m. Brush fire north of Pena- 
cook Street near reservoir. Combination 1 and detail sent. 
No loss. 

April 4, 1.17 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 102 Hall Street. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 5, 11.54 a. m. Grass fire at 191 No. Main 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 6, 4.54 p. m. Brush fire Penacook Street, 
near reservoir. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 6, 6.41 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. F. Terrill, 45 Downing Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 10.21 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Agnard Tansignont, 94 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 3.30 p. m. Brush fire on Gully Hill. 
Extinguished b,y Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 11, 4.17 a. m. Brush fire on Gully Hill. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 12, 12.44 p. m. Brush fire on State Camp 
Ground on South Pembroke Street side. Combination 1 
responded. 

Still, April 12, 12.55 p. m. Detail sent in auto to 
assist at scene of preceding fire. Extinguished by firemen 
and nearby residents. No loss. 

Still. April 12, 6.21 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Benj. Leighton, 101 Rumford Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No. loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 205 

Box 35. April 12, 11.39 p. m. Fire in Diitton Block, 
corner of No. Main Street and Pleasant Street Extension. 
Building owned by Nancy L. Button Estate and occupied 
by the Rexall Drug Co., rooms, offices, etc., also Postal 
Telegraph Co, and G. Nardini Co. Fire originated in the 
basement in store-room of the G. Nardini Co., from cause 
unknown and was confined there. One thousand and fifty 
feet of hose wet. Recall 12.41 a. m. 13th inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $30,000.00 $1,965.00 $10,000.00 $1,965.00 

Contents : 
G. Nardini Co., 7,200.00 4,169.57 6,700.00 4,169.57 

Still. April 13, 1.35 p. m. Grass fire on North Pem- 
broke Road near State Camp Grounds. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 12. April 13, 11.44 p. m. False alarm. Recall 
11.55 p. m. 

Still. April 14, 11.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. W. Jones, 59 Clinton Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 14, 5.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. J. C. Miller, 18 Maple Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

April 19, 7.58 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of L. 
Looberlis, 10 Montgomery Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 3.33 p. m. Brush fire on the Fiske 
Road. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Extinguished by the St. Paul's School students. 
No loss. 

Still. April 21, 7.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Spofford, Silk Farm Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 2.27 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Pembroke. Combination 1 responded but on arrival found 
that the Pembroke Department had the situation well in 



206 CITY OP CONCORD. 

hand. No assistance was required. Fire occurred in the 
Ellsworth buildings, Pembroke Street. Barn destroyed, 
house saved. See Pembroke report. 

Still. April 22, 10.35 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of P. G. Morgan, Bow Mills. Combination 1 responded but 
no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 6.22 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. H. Smith, 52 Concord Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 25, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Malties, 76 1-3 South Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 7.06 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Margaret Kelliher, 5 Water Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 6.11 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Wesley Wheeler, Bow Mills. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 2.29 p. m. Brush fire on Lightning 
Hill. Extinguished by Combination 1. Labored one hour. 
No loss. 

Still. May 2, 1.30 p. m. Grass fire on Gully Hill, 
Bridge Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. No loss. 

Still. May 3, 12.56 p. m. Brush fire on Gully Hill, 
Bridge Street. Run made way of Black Hill, a section 
of Bridge Street being closed to traffic. Extinguished by 
Combination 1 and nearby residents. No loss. 

Still. May 5, 7.16 a. m. A call to investigate cause of 
smoke in residence 172 No. Main Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. May 5, 3.31 p. m. Brush fire opposite 56 Stone 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Bridget Vesie, 19 Monroe Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 19, 4.56 p. m. Barn at lower end of Hall 



PffiE DEPARTMENT. 207 

Street, owned by Mabel A. Phiramer and occupied by "W. 
A, Plummer and G. G. Lee. Cause unknown. Combina- 
tion 1 responded. House north of barn, owned and oc- 
cupied by Axel P. Nylen slightly damaged by flying sparks. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building : 
M. A. Plummer, $700.00 $700.00 $700.00 $700.00 

Contents : 
W. A. Plummer, 100.00 100.00 None None 

G. G. Lee, 150.00 150.00 None None 

Building : 
A. P. Nylen, i2,500.00 ■ 100.00 1,500.00 100.00 

Box 53. May 19, 5.13 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. One thousand and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 6.13 
p. m. Detail left with line of hose to wet down ruins. 

Still. May 20, 10.50 a. m. Brush fire on So. Pembroke 
Street, Plains District. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. May 20, 6.20 p. m. Auto fire in road at 298 
No. State Street. Combination 1 responded but no assist- 
ance was required. Massachusetts car owned by A. N. 
Morgan. Loss unknown. 

Still. May 21, 11.32 a. m. Brush fire in rear of Blos- 
som Hill Cemetery. Combination 1 responded. See next 
alarm. 

4-4^. May 21, 11.58 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Detail sent in Combination 1 car. Labored one hour. 
No loss. 

V Still. May 21, 1.14 p. m. Brush fire in rear of Cal- 
vary Cemetery, Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 22, 9.16 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Pearl, 7 Lincoln Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 24, 4.59 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Joseph LaFlamme, 128 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



208 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still, May 24, 8.37 p. m. Auto fire at foot of Black 

Hill. Machine owned by Edward Johnson. Combination 

1 responded but the car was practically destroyed on 
arrival. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Car, 


$200.00 


$200.00 


None 


None 


Contents, 


50.00 


50.00 


None 


None 



Still. May 25, 10.32 a. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. L. Dubois, 33 Harvard Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 28, 11.53 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Penacook. Engine 1, motor driven, sent, but no assistance 
was required as the Penacook and Boscawen companies 
had the situation well in hand. Call came from some un- 
authorized source. 

Box 14. June 2, 1.14 p. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence, 36 Walker Street. Caused probably by careless- 
ness of men smoking while repairing roof. Extinguished 
by workmen before arrival of department. Recall 1.25 
p. m. No loss. 

Still. June 2, 5.48 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. L. Corrigan, 11 Chapel Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 3, 5.00 p. m. Brush fire Black Hill. Com- 
bination 1 responded. See next alarm. 

1 1 4. June 3, 5.33 p. m. In response to a call for 
assistance, a bell alarm was given for preceding fire. De- 
tail and barge sent. Labored two hours. Caused by care- 
lessness of smoker while setting fence posts. No loss. 

Still. June 6, 12.52 p. m. Grass fire corner of Mc- 
Kinley Street and Broadway. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. June 6, 7.47 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Penacook. Combination 1 sent. No assistance required. 
Call came from unauthorized person. See Penacook report. 

Still. June 7, 3.34 p. m. Brush fire near stone crusher, 



FIRK DEPARTMENT. 209 

Rumford Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 
Box 55. June 10, 5.22 p. m. Fire in round house 
owned and occupied by the B. & M. R. R. Cause, back-fire 
from locomotive. Three thousand one hundred feet of 
hose wet. Recall 7.56 p. m. Detail with lines of hose left 
to watch through the night. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $115,000.00 $15,324.00 $51,000.00 $15,324.00 
Contents, 500,000.00 15,407.00 15,407.00 *15,407.00 

Still. June 13, 2.29 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
H. H. Kelley, 5 Depot Street. Rags ignited by gas stove. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. June 13, 4.14 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of L. F. Gillette, 11 Wall Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 

Still. June 21, 1.45 p. m. Fire in dump on the Old 
Turnpike. Engine 2 sent. Worked two hours. Two hun- 
dred feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Box 23. June 23, 10.02 p. ra. Fire in brick building, 
No. Main Street, owned and occupied by the Rumford 
Printing Company. Cause unknown. Four thousand feet 
of hose wet. Recall 5.49 a. m. the 24th inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $35,000.00 $17,500.00 $10,000.00 $10,000.00 

Contents : 
Rumford Printing Co., 

125,537,51 81,530,25 68,500.00 42,097.18 
No. American Review Co., 

2,000.00 106.68 10,000.00t 106.68 

The Century Co., 

17,732.43 4,779.02 235,000.00t 4,779.02 
American Guernsey Cattle Club, 

10,336.00 10,336.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 



* Blanket 

tGeneral Floater Policy. 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Ronald Pre.ss Co., 

$3,945.92 $3,945.92 $5,000.00 $2,699.00 
Atlantic Monthly Co., 

1,249.41 1,249.41 None None 

Atlantic Monthly Press, Inc., 

45,787.40 1,496.11 15,000.00 544.59 

House Beautiful Co., 

7,500.00 4,588.04 7,500.00 4,391.18 
Asia Publishing Co., 

9,318.13 4,232.20 10,000.00 4,232.20 

Still. June 24, 5.24 p. m. Frame building owned and 
occupied by the Kearsarge Club destroyed with contents. 
Cause unknown. Building located near Bow line, Garvins 
Falls Road, far from fire protection. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but failed to arrive on the scene, becoming stalled 
in the sand. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


Contents, 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


None 


None 



Still. June 26, 1.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George E. Rothwell, 9 Lee Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. Jul.y 3, 10.28 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 16 Pleasant Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. July 10, 1.52 a. m. Barn at Wheeler's Corner, 
owned by J. H. Hinds, and occupied by William Marden. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. House adjoining saved. 
Four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $2,000.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 $1,500.00 

Contents, 300.00 300.00 None None 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 211 

Still. July 10, 1.50 p. m. Fire in soft coal at Page 
Belting Co. plant. Combination 1 responded but no as- 
sistance was required. Extinguished by employees. No 
loss. 

Still. July 11, 2.08 p. ra. Fire around gasoline pump 
at Gray's Garage, 180 No. Main Street. Responding, 
Combination 1 collided with car at Eagle Garage driveway. 
Fire Department chauffeur blameless. 

Still. July 11, 2.09 p. m. Combination 2 summoned 
to scene of preceding fire on account of accident. 

Still. July 11, 2.10 p. m. Combination 3 summoned 
to scene of preceding fire on account of accident. No 
assistance required from department. No loss. 

Still. July 19, 3.57 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at People's Market, 95 No. Main Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
Smoke caused by meat boiling dry. No loss. 

Still. July 25, 11.07 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of L. D. Brown, 17 Morton Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. July 25, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Quinn, 37 Fayette Street. Combination 3 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. July 29, 2.55 p. m. Capital Apartment build- 
ing, corner No. State and Center Streets, flooded by cloud- 
burst. Combination 1 responded to call for help but little 
could be done. 

Box 24. August 1, 7.52 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
curtain coming in contact with oil stove in Marden Block, 
No. Main Street. Recall 7.56 a. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. Augvist 2, 11.03 a. m. Slight fire on roof of 
residence, 105 School Street, owned by Joseph Phaneuf 
and occupied by Emma E. Blair, caused by sparks from 
chimney. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,375.00 $30.00 $2,000.00 $30.00 



212 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Still. August 4, 9.15 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in plant of White Mountain Candy Co., rear of 
Sterling Theatre. Combination 1 responded but no as- 
sistance was required. No fire. 

Still. August 6, 9.31 p. m. Slight fire in auto near 31 
So. Main Street. Machine owned by Ed. Palmer of Bow. 
Cause, short-circuiting of wires. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 9, 8.55 p. m. Alarm occasioned by ket- 
tle of fat taking fire in Nardini's restaurant, 6 No. Main 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 9, 9.15 p. m. Fire in moving picture 
booth in the Auditorium. Booth owned by D. J. Adams. 
Cause of fire carelessness of operator. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $4,390.00 $600.00 None None 

Still. August 15, 12.19 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. J. Comey, 39 Walker Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. August 19, 10.32 a. m. Fire in coal pocket of 
N. H. State Hospital, Bridge Street. Cause, spontaneous 
combustion. Combination 1 responded laying line of hose 
from hj^drant and leaving same to be used by employees as 
occasion required. Line taken up September 1st when 
most of the coal had been removed. 

Still.. August 22, 7.28 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of C. W. Braley, 5 Wentworth 
Avenue. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 

Still. August 23, 3.14 p. m. Fire in dry room at N. H. 
State Prison, Caused by spontaneous combustion in com- 
bination of sawdust, bark chips, oil and steam pipes around 
blower. Building owned by State of New Hampshire. 
Contents owned by Granite State Mfg. Co. Extinguished 
by Combination 1 and inmates of prison. Loss trifling. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 213 

4-4-4. August 27, 3.16 p. m. Alarm given for dan- 
gerous brush fire at Loudon in response to a call for as- 
sistance. Combination 1 and detail sent. No buildings de- 
stroyed. 

Still. August 27, 7.50 p. m. Fire in coal pocket of 
New Hampshire State Hospital, Pleasant Street. Detail 
sent with cellar pipe, they having hose line of their own 
laid. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 28, 12.28 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 117 No. Main Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. Fumigating. 

Still. August 28, 1.10 p. m. Grass fire on the Baker 
lot, Bridge Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. September 7, 12.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J, F. Parraenter, 40 South Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 12, 10.02 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Wm. Hunneman, 224 No. State St. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 15, 4.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. W. Lundovall, 2 Railroad Square. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 16, 4.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Cilley, Iron Works Road. No loss. 

Still. September 20, 1.29 p. m. Fire in auto No. 
Main Street, front of State House. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. New York Car. Loss trifling. 

Box 25. September 20, 1 .31 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. Recall 1.42 p. m. 

Still. September 21, 11.07 a. m. Smoke from tar ket- 
tle in rear of F. W. Woolworth store mistaken for fire. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 

Still. September 24, 4.29 p. m. Slight fire on flow 
of railroad bridge. Bridge Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 27, 4.18 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in the Abbott-Downing plant, So. Main 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No fire. 

Box 24. September 28, 5.03 p. m. Box pulled for 
smoke seen issuing from Parish House, Center Street. 
Needless alarm. Building new fire in boiler. Recall 5.20 
p. m. 

Still. October 5, 2.24 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
burning of rags in basement of residence of W. P. Miner, 
93 "Warren Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Box 6. October 8, 4.47 a. m. Slight fire in boiler room 
of Abbott-Downing plant. So. Main Street. Six hundred 
feet of hose wet. Recall 5.07 a. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. October 15, 12.13 a. m. A call for assistance 
from Hopkinton. Combination 1 being in the paint shop. 
Engine 2 Combination was sent, but becoming disabled 
near St. Paul's School was replaced by Combination 3. 

Still. October 15, 12.30 a. m. Combination 3 replaces 
Engine 2 car. 

Still. October 15, 12.47 a. m. Another call for as- 
sistance from Hopkinton. Engine 1, motor-driven, sent. 
One thousand feet of hose wet. Succeeded in saving ad- 
joining building on one side, while local apparatus saved 
building on the other side. Building in w^hich the fire 
originated owned by Mrs. Ellen Roberts, destroyed. See 
Hopkinton rej^ort. 

Box 24. October 15, 11.58 a. m. Box pulled for smoke 
seen to issue from Marden Block, No. Main Street. Need- 
less alarm. No fire. Recall 12.08 p. m. 

Still. October 15, 12.28 p. m. A call for assistance 
from E. Concord. George M. Sanborn buildings destroyed. 
No pumping engine sent as buildings were located far out- 
side village and no water available. Engine 2 Combina- 
tion car sent. See E. Concord report. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 215 

Still. October 15, 4.05 p. m. Brush fire on Aviation 
Field, Black Hill. Extinguished by Combination 1 crew 
using Engine 2 car for transportation. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 9.10 a. m. Fire in city dump, 
Bridge Street. Kearsarge steamer and details from Fire 
and Highway Departments sent. Eight hundred feet of 
hose wet. Engine worked 17 hours. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 2.40 p. m. Chimney fire in Stickncy 
Barn, 136 No. Main Street. Extinguished by Combination 
1 crew using Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Box 25. October 18, 9.07 a .m Fire in auto truck in 
rear of Eagle Hotel. On arrival of department, no assist- 
ance was required. Recall 9.11 a. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. October 19, 1.10 p. m. Fire in city dump, 
Bridge Street. Kearsarge Steamer and details from Fire 
and Highway Departments sent. Six hundred feet of iiose 
wet. Engine worked 13 hours. No loss. 

Still. October 21, 2.40 p. m. Reported fire in office of 
American Express Co., Passenger Station. Engine 2 car 
responded. No fire. 

Still. October 22, 10.50 p. m. Grass fire corner of 
Monroe and Grove Streets. Extinguished by Combination 
3. No loss. 

Still. October 23, 7.15 p. m. Auto fire, 182 No. Main 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1 crew, Engine 2 
car. Slight loss. 

Still. October 24, 2.10 p. m. Fire in coal pocket of 
N. H. State Hospital, Bridge Street, Line of hose laid from 
hydrant and left for use of employees as occasion re- 
quired. Cause, spontaneous combustion. A similar fire 
occurred here on August 19th, and on each occasion as the 
coal was removed the trestle supports in places were found 
burned off. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $5,000.00 $115.00 None None 

Contents, 25,000.00 1,000.00 None None 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 25, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Rothwell, 9 Lee avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. October 27, 7.26 a. m. Slight fire in restaurant, 

1 Depot Street. Fat on range taking fire. Extinguished 
by Combination 1 crew and Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Still. October 27, 8.09 a. m. Slight fire on roof of 
Perry Bros.' stone shed. No. State Street. Engine 2 car 
responded but no assistance was required. Loss trifling. 

Still. October 30, 7.17 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
141/2 Lyndon Street, owned by Fred H. Doloff and Mrs. 
Vina D. Proctor, and occupied by H. T. Muzzey. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1 crew and Engine 2 car. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, .*3,5G0.00 .^^40.00 $2,000.00 $40.00 

Still October 30, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Max Antone, 3 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 3. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 8.02 p. m. Fire in leaves, 13 So. 
Spring Street. Extinguished by Combination 1 crew and 
Engine 2 car. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 8.17 p. m. Fire in leaves, 221/2 
Perley Street. Engine 2 car responded but no assistance 
was required. No loss. 

Still. October 31, 9.54 p. m. Fire in leaves, Doyen 
Park. Extinguished by Combination 1 crew and Engine 

2 car. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 5.39 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Patrick Donovan, 57 So. Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 4, 10.18 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Otis Reister, Grant Street, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 11.44 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. L. Runnells, 7 Jackson Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 

Still. November 5, 4.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George H. Cilley, Iron Works Road. Extingiiislied 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 10.52 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harold Hall, 112 South Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 7, 5.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. A. Watson, 11 Clinton Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 7, 9.47 p. m. Fire in residence, 17 
Kimball Street, owned and occupied by J. C. McLaughlin. 
Cause unknown. Combination 1 responded but the fire had 
assumed such proportions that a bell alarm was sent in. 
See next alarm. 

Box 54. November 7, 9.54 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Seven hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 11.00 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,000.00 


$766.75 


$1,400.00 


$766.75 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


300.00 


None 


None 



Still. November 8, 4.22 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Northwood Narrows. Engine 2 car sent with detail. 
On arrival it was found that the Pittsfield apparatus 
which had been summoned had the situation well in hand 
and no assistance was required. Several buildings de- 
stroyed. Run made in forty minutes. 

Still. November 8, 4.41 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Gilbert Young, 15 Perkins Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 2, No loss. 

Still. November 13, 5.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of G. H. Wilcox, 11 Hammond Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 14, 7.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. D. McGuire, 17 Fremont Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 51. November 16, 12.25 a. m. Fire in box car in 
B. & M. R. R. Yard, So. Main Street. This ear had been 
converted into kind of a rest room for employes during 
the dinner hour and was provided with lockers, etc. Cause 
unknown. Eight hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 1.51 
a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Car, $250.00 $150.00 None None 

Still. November 16, 9.28 a. m. Fire in garage, south 
of lower bridge, owned by the Harry Cling Estate and 
occupied by Sandquist & Peets. Caused by overturned 
blow-torch. Combination 1 responded but the fire had 
assumed such proportions that a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 53. November 16, 9,30 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Garage destroyed. Adjacent buildings saved. 
One thousand five hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Re 
call 10.58 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $2,500,00 $1,600.00 $1,600.00 

Contents, 2,220.00 2,200.00 1,500.00 575.00 

Still. November 17, 9.13 a. m. Fire in residence, 19 
Water Street, owned and occupied by James H. Welch. 
Caused by defective chimney. Combination 1 responded 
but fire had attained such headway that a bell alarm was 
sent in. 

Box 45. November 17, 9.19 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand three hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. Recall 10.24 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $1,500.00 $2,500.00 $1,276.00 

Contents, 2,000.00 600.00 1,500.00 600.00 

Still. November 17, 7.08 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. H. Carpentier, 162 So. Main Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Still. November 17, 7.34 p. ni. A call to investigate 
supposed smoke at 83 No. Main Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. Steam mistaken 
for smoke. No fire. 

Still. November 18, 6.42 p. m. Slight fire in flooring 
of dry bridge, Bridge Street, caused probably by cigar- 
ette stub. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 21, 3.34 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
36 Auburn Street, owned by Gertrude A. Pinsonneault and 
occupied by Joseph Lucier. Cause, ember flying into wood 
box. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. i.oss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 $25.00 $5,000.00 $25.00 

Still. November 21, 5.53 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. S. Wright, 8 Pierce Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 23, 7,27 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of S. "W. Saltmarsh, 17 Laurel Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 5. November 23, 7.56 p. m. Alarm occasioned by 
lamp in baggage car at passenger station. Recall 8.05 
p. m. Needless alarm. Extinguished by trainmen. No 
loss. 

Still. November 24, 10.36 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in rear of Sterling Theatre, School Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Still. November 28, 8.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of P. K. Taylor, 60 No. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 1, 10.21 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Reed Messer, 10 Downing Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 5.06 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Archie Turgeon, 7 Chandler Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



220 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. December 8, 8.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Matthews, 207 No. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 4.18 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
of Herbert Melvin, 7 Beacon Street. Caused by electric 
flat-iron. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Extinguished by neighbors. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $1,800.00 $50.00 $1,000.00 $50.00 

Still. December 9, 3.19 p. m. Slight fire in residence 
of W, H. Lenton, 5 Leighton Avenue, owned by Lydia \. 
Leighton Estate. Caused by child and matches. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$3,000.00 


$28.79 


$1,800.00 


$28.79 


Contents, 


3,000.00 


50.00 


None 


None 



Still. December 9, 6.10 p. m. Slight fire on roof of 
residence, 134 So, Main Street. Caused by sparks from 
chimney. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Extinguished by occupants and neighbors. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. December 13, 9.24 p. m. Slight fire in debris in 
Rumford Press building. Ferry Street, in course of erec- 
tion. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 11.47 p. m. Auto truck owned by 
Joseph P. Collins took fire while standing at 23 School 
Street from unknown cause. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Truck, $4,000.00 $1,435.00 $2,380.00 $1,435.00 

Contents, 100.00 85.00 None None 

Still. December 16, 2.20 a. m. A call to freight house, 
R. R. Square. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. No fire. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

Still. December 16, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. E. Stevens, 121 So, Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 12.27. Chimney fire in residence 
of Maria Putnam, 82 South Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 1.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Antonio Piferon, 38 Walker Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 9.24 p. m. Chimney fire in old 
building, Ferry Street, being used as an office by construc- 
tion company erecting Rumford Press building. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 20, 9.48 p. m. Fire in can of rubbish 
in front of 70 No. Main Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 10.26 a. m. Slight fire in barn 
owned by George L. Theobald at foot of Black Hill, Caused 
probably by tramps. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. December 21, 12.46 p. m. Reported chimney 
fire at Rumford and Walker Streets. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. December 21, 1.48 p, m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George H. Abbott, 63 School Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Box 47. December 22, 6.02 a. m. Fire in residence, 
71 Downing Street, owned by M. Isabel, and occupied by 
H. P. Newton. Caused by overheated chimney. Extin- 
guished with chemicals. Recall 6.53 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $30,00 $1,000.00 $30.00 

Still. December 22, 7.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Ash, 231/2 Perley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1, No loss. 



222 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. December 22, 7.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Robert Dame, 208 No. Main Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1, No loss. 

Still. December 22, 8.45 p. m. Chimney fire in Pleas- 
ant Street Baptist Church. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Box 43. December 23, 12.53 p. m. Fire in building, 43 
So. Main Street, owned by Ford & Kimball, and occupied 
by the Cushman Electric Company. Caused by overheated 
oven used for baking enamel on motors. One thousand 
four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 1.28 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$15,000.00 


$28.00 $10,000.00 


$28.00 


Contents, 


9,000.00 


184.75 5,000.00 


184.75 



Still. December 23, 4.34 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 203 So. Main Street, owned by P. B. Taylor and 
J. F. Durrell and occupied by William Spaulding. Com- 
bination 1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm was 
sent in. 

Box 52. December 23, 4.35 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Extinguished wnth chemicals. Recall 5.09 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $3,000.00 $75.00 $2,000.00 $75.50 

Contents, 10,000.00 25.00 3,000.00 25.00 

Still. December 23, 6.34 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
lience of 0. H. Goodsell, Iron Works Road. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 35. December 24, 8.48 p. m. Fire in building, 11 
Depot Street, owned by Welch & Sullivan, and occupied 
by the Eatwell Candy Co. Fire originated in basement. 
Cause unknown. One thousand eight hundred feet of hose 
wet. Recall 10.12 p. m. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $1,315.80 $6,000.00 $1,315.80 

Contents, 79,800.00 14,054.25 34,000.00 14,054.25 

Still. December 25, 1.17 a. m. Fire in basement of 
Eagle Hotel building, 104-114 No. Main Street, owned by 
the Eagle & Phenix Hotel Co., and occupied by owner as 
hotel. In addition first floor was occupied by several 
stores. Fire originated under the barber shop, No. 112, 
conducted by John B. Maye, who suffered slight loss. 
Cause unknown. Combination 1 responded but the fire had 
assumed such proportions that a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 25, December 25, 1.20 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. One thousand seven hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 3.08 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid, 

Building, $100,000.00 $3,750.00 $50,000.00 $3,750.00 

Contents : 
E. & P. Hotel Co., 

20,000.00 1,178.00 13,000.00 1,178.00 
J. B. Maye, 1,000.00 165.00 1,000.00 165.00 

Still. December 25, 5.50 a. m. Rekindling of fire in 
debris at Eagle Hotel. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. December 26, 1.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Julia Dee, 11 Short Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still, December 30, 9,05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Edward Mercier, 65 Penacook Street, Extin- 
guished by Combination 1, No loss. 

Combination 1 was out of commission from October 10 
to November 10 for painting and from November 16 to 
December 14 did not respond to still alarms for same rea- 
son. Scorched at garage fire of the 16th. Engine 2 car 
and horse-drawn hose wagon used as required. 



224 city of concord. 

Penacook. 

Still. January 10, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Andrew Foley, 58 Center Street. No loss. 

Still, January 17, 6,50 p. m. Chimney fire in Hay- 
ward Block, 20 E. Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. January 22, 1.35 p. m. Chimney fire in Chad- 
wick Block, 24 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Jerrold, 16 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still, January 26, 6.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Howard Moore, 5 Elm Street. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 12.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Long, 99 High Street. No loss. 

Still. February 7, 5.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Beauchesne, 20 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. February 14, 5.20 a. m. Chimne}' fire in tene- 
ment block, 30 Summer Street, owned by Daniel Savage. 
No loss. 

Still. February 17, 11.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of David Carney, 54 W, Main Street, No loss. 

Still. February 24, 1^.30 p, m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Felix 'Clair, 20 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 2,25 p. m. Chimney fire in Hayward 
Block, 22 E, Canal Street, No loss. 

Still. March 23, 10.15 a. m. Grass fire on land of J. 
A, Massie, 31 Pleasant Street. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Lavoie, 27 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 10.35 a. m. Grass fire on land of 
'Joseph Jackman, 15 Pleasant Street. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 2.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Foley, 43 Spring Street. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Wilson, No loss. 

Still. March 29, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 8 High Street, owned by D. Walter Fox. No loss. 



riRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

Still. April 1, 5.00 p. m. Chimney fire in Varney 
House, 17 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. April 2, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred White, 60 High Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 5, 4.15 p. m. Brush fire in No. Boscawen. 
A call for help from Muchido Hose Company. Fire under 
control when truck and detail arrived. Recall 5 :15 p. m. 

Still. April 6, 7.45 p. m. Grass fire on land of W. H. 
Gile, 42 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 4.06 a. m. Telephone call for fire in 
residence of C. Withington, 135 Washington Street. Truck 
responded and on arrival sent in bell alarm. 

Box 36. April 24, 4.10 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. House caught afire from brooder on back porch. 
Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 4.50 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, !i(3,000.00 $124.00 $900.00 $124.00 

Box 62. April 26, 8.10 p. m. Brush fire in Boscawen 
District near Concord Axle Works. Recall 8.20 p. m. No 
loss. 

Still. April 28, 4.10 p. m. Brush fire near 160 No. 
Main Street, Boscawen District. 

Still. May 5, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in Quimby 
Block, 28 E. Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. May 10, 12.05 p. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Block, Main Street, occupied by Peter Duclos. No loss. 

Still. May 11, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Mrs. Beaubien, 34 West Main Street. No loss. 

Still. May 12, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Frank Morse, 70 So. Main Street. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $20.00 $2,200.00 $20.U0 

Still. May 21, 3.10 p. m. Grass fire. New Hampshire 
Electric Light Company land, So. Main Street. No loss. 

15 



226 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. May 28, 11.25 a. m. Call to residence of George 
Sumner, Prospect Street, Boscawen side. Truck responded. 
See Boscawen report. 

Box 35. May 28, 11.30 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Steamer and horse-drawn hose wagon responded. 
Recall 12.40 p. m. Wet one thousand four hundred feet of 
hose. See Boscawen report. 

Still. June 6, 7.40 p. m. Log cabin used for refresh- 
ment purposes at Contoocook River Park caught fire from 
corn-popping apparatus. Combination truck responded. 
See next alarm. 

Box 37. June 6, 7.45 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Pioneer Steamer, hose wagon and Torrent truck re- 
sponded. Wet one thousand eight hundred feet of hose. 
Reaall 8.33 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$100.00 


$100.00 


None 


None 


Contents, 


75.00 


75.00 


None 


None 



Building owned by B. & M. R. R. and occupied by H. 
W. Taylor. 

Still. June 6, 8.45 p. m. Fire on electric light pole at 
Contoocook River Park. Combination car and detail re- 
sponded. No loss. 

Still. June 6, 9.50 p. m. Slight fire in lunch cart, 
corner Main and Washington Streets. Oil stove fire. No 
loss. 

4-4-4. June 16, 2.30 p. m. Set of buildings at Ma.st 
Yard near R. R. Station, owned and occupied by Thomas 
Spaulding destroyed. Pioneer and Torrent combination 
cars responded with large details. On arrival the build- 
ings were practically destroyed. Alleged cause, sparks 
from locomotive. Loss not adjusted — in litigation. Fire 
jumped across railroad tracks into the wood lot. After 
a hard fight it was controlled. Recall 5.45 p. m. Labored 
3I/4 hours. All buildings and contents were destroyed. 
Loss unknown. Not included in summary. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

Still. June 23, 6.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. Albert Massie, 7 Summer Street. No loss. 

4 14. June 27, 7.25 p. m. Brush fire near railroad 
track between River Hill and State Road, Fire out on ar- 
rival of detail. Recall 8.20 p. m. No loss. 

Box 35. June 30, 11.05 a. m. Oil stove fire in lunch 
cart, corner Main and Washington Streets. Recall 11.10 
a. m. No loss. 

Box 37. July 8, 9.45 p. m. Alarm occasioned by tree 
falling across electric wires on Electric Avenue. Fire in 
tree extinguished by chemical. Recall 10.00 p. m. No 
loss. 

Still. July 19, 5.28 p. m. Fire in electric street rail- 
way car, in front of Pioneer Station, Extinguished with 
chemicals. No loss. 

Still. July 20, 6.38 p. m. Fire in residence of Fred 
Ormsby, Center Street. Combination car responded. See 
next alarm. 

Box 42. July 20, 6,40 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Cause unknown. 

Box 39. July 20, 6.45 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Needless alarm. Recall 7.04 p. m. Wet five hundred 
feet of hose. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, 


$500.00 


$150.00 


None 


None 


Contents : 










Barn, 


$300.00 


300.00 


None 


None 



July 25, 11.55 a. m. Bell alarm on Boscawen side. Com- 
bination car responded. Chimney fire in residence of 
Perley Perkins, 22 Jackson Street. 

Still. August 28. 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. Cassaveaugh, 106 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. September 5, 5.50 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block owned by Fred Blanchard, 11 West Canal 
Street. No loss. 

Box 38. September 6, 7.00 p. m. Automobile on fire 



228 CITY OF CONCORD, 

at Hoyt's Garage, caused by owner lighting match while 
filling tank with gasoline. Car somewhat damaged but 
flames were extinguished with chemicals and car continued 
on its journey north. 

Still. September 8, 1.05 p. m. Gasoline torch ex- 
plosion in garage at the Ranney Printing office, 1 No. Main 
Street. Loss trifling. 

Still. September 12, 4.30 a. ni. Fire in residence, 159 
So. Main Street, owned by Mrs. Stephen Hanson and oc- 
cupied by owner and Verney Santos. See next alarm. 

Box 35. September 12, 4.32 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. 

Box 39. September 12, 4.36 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Needless alarm. Fire started in barn. C-ause 
unknown. Barn and shed complete loss. Ell of house badly 
damaged by fire — main house Ivy smoke and water. Wet 
two thousand feet of hose. Recall 6.30 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings. $2,500.00 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 $1,400.00 

Contents : 

Mrs. S. Hanson, 800.00 400.00 400.00 400.00 

D. Santos, 1,000.00 975.00 None None 

Still. October 4, 6.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Irving Burbank, 13 Elm Street. No loss. 

Still. October 5, 5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. N. Henneberry, 69 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 8.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Nahuni Abbott, 51 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 12.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Hayward, 126 So. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 10,15 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house owned by Mrs. Jennie Hayward, 22 E, Canal 
Street, No loss. 

Still. November 14, 8.00 p. m. Oil stove fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Blanchard, 61 Washington Street. Loss 
trifling. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

No alarm. November 15, 1.00 a. m. Summer cottage 
owned and occupied by John J. Lee near River Hill de- 
stroyed. Cause unknown. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$1,500.00 




Contents, 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


1,000.00 





Loss not adjusted, figured as net loss. 

Still. November 22, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Ferrin, 17 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. December 21, 5.20 p. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Block, Washington Square. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in Alexan- 
der Block, So. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. December 23, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in Long 
Block, 8 Walnut Street. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 11.53 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Ed. Hadley, 57 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 3.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Percy Morrill, 11 Tremont Street, Boscawen side. 

Still. December 30, 12.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Phillip Cournoyer, 17 Bye Street. 

East Concord. 

Still. January 19, 12.00 noon. Chimney fire at fac- 
tory of Samuel Eastman Co., Depot Street. No loss. 

Bell. February 4, 5.00 p. ra. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. J. E. Frye, E. Clinton Street. No loss. 

Bell. March 19, 1.00 a. m. Buildings owned and oc- 
cupied by James McKeage, Potter Street, caused by de- 
fective chimney. Buildings totally destroyed. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, 


$3,000.00 


$3,000.00 


$2,700.00 


$2,700.00 


Contents, 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 



Bell. March 19, 11.40 a. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by Adelard LaRochelle, Pecker Street. No loss. 



230 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Bell. April 3, 1.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Locke Bullock. E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. April 3, 12.30 p. m. Chimney fire at E. Con- 
gregational Church, E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 10, 6.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. Charles Potter, Potter Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 1, 9.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Howard Potter, Potter Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 21, 1.30 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
George Cate, Shaker Street. Needless alarm. 

Still. May 31, 11.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Warren Estes, E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. June 10, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. E. Copeland, Appleton Street. No loss. 

Still. August 21, 3.20 p. m. Brush fire on Plains on 
land of C. E. Staniels. No loss. 

Still. September 14, 3.00 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by the Fernald Estate, E. Kimball Street. No loss. 

Still. November 5, 11,40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Abraham Cushing, E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bet J;. October 15, 12.30 p, m. Buildings owned by 
George McC. Sanborn, and occupied by Percy Sanborn, E. 
Penacook Street, destroyed. Cause of fire unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $8,000,00 $8,000.00 $3,500.00 $3,500.00 

Contents, 3,000.00 2,000.00 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Still. December 2, 8.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Latouche, Shaker Street. No loss. 

West Concord. 

Still. January 17, 2.15 p, m. Fire on roof of building 
near Sewall's Falls, owned by Concord Electric Co., and 
occupied by Charles George. Caused by sparks from 
chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000,00 $151,00 $600.00 $151.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT, 231 

Still. January 19, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Omar L. Shepard. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 4.20 p. m. Slight fire in electric car 
at Golf Siding. Loss trifling. 

Still. February 14, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Zorsten Lindgren, 11 Abbottville. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 11.58 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph B. Turcotte, 40 Hutchins Street. No loss. 

Bell. February 20, 11.45 a. m. Fire in residence, 312 
No. State Street, owned and occupied by Charles H. Far- 
num. Overheated chimney. Nine hundred feet of hose 
wet by Cataract Company. Aid summoned from precinct. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$7,500.00 


$4,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


Contents, 


1,500.00 


1,000.00 


400.00 


400.00 



Still. February 22, 10.50 p. m. Automobile owned by 
Arthur M. Crowley, damaged by fire on Bog Road, near 
River Hill. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Car, $2,500.00 $2,000.00 $1,000.00 $1,600.00 

Still. March 18, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joel D. Kellum, 420 No. State Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 3, 7.17 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
N. E. Granite Co., south of Quarry. Labored 31/2 hours. 
No loss. 

Still. April 12, 3.00 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by City Water Works near the Garrison school house. No 
loss. 

Still. April 27, 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Andrew Koski, 452 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 4.35 p. m. Fire in dump in rear of 
Shepard Bros. Store, 494 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. June 27, 7.30 p. m. Grass fire near railroad 
track in the bog. No loss. 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. July 16, 5.40 p. m. Alarm occasioned by smoke 
from oil stove in residence of Royal B. Holden, 33 Lake 
Street. No fire. No loss. 

Still. July 27, 8.55 p. m. Grass fire at Golf Siding, 
Penacook Road, No loss. 

Still. September 8, 5.40 p. m. Grass fire in the bog. 
No loss. 

Still. October 18, 3.20 p. m. Slight fire in building, 
394 No. State St., owned by 13. & M. R. R., and occupied by 
J. Russ Sullivan, as a grocery store. Cause unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $2,000.00 $37.00 $2,000.00 $37.00 

Still. November 7, 3.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Wester, 9 Abbottville. No loss. 





SUMM.VRY. 






Buildings: Value 


Loss 


Ins. 


Ins. Pd. 


Net Loss 


Precint-t $499,725.00 


$89,947.01 


$239,020.00 


$80,158.51 


$9,788.50 


Penacook 11,600.00 


4,294.00 


6,000.00 


1,544.00 


2,750.00 


E. Concord 11,000.00 


11,000.00 


6,200.00 


6,200.00 


4.800.00 


W. Concord 11,000.00 


6,651.00 


4,700.00 


4.251.00 


2,400.00 


$533,325.00 


$111,892.01 


$255,920.00 


$92,153.51 


$19,738.50 


Contents : 










Precinct $973,501.20 


$166,557.46 


$479,536.78 


$112,883.68 


$53,673.78 


Penacook 3,675.00 


3,250.00 


1,400.00 


400.00 


2.850.00 


E. Concord 4,800.00 


3,800.00 


2,700.00 


2.700.00 


1,100.00 


W. Concord 3,500.00 


1,037.00 


2,400.00 


437.00 


600.00 


$985,476.20 


$174,644.46 


$486,036.78 


$116,420.68 


$58,223.78 


BuOdings 533,325.00 


111,892.01 


255,920.00 


92,153,51 


19,738.50 



Bld&Con $1,518,801.20 $286,536.47 $741,956.78 $208,574.19 $77,962.28 

Summary does not include figures pertaining to de- 
struction of buildings and contents at Mast Yard, June 
16th. Cause, alleged to be spark from locomotive. 
Not adjusted. In litigation. 



fire department. 233 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as fol- 
lows : 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine 
and hose ca,r, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Com- 
pany (15 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, 
"Kearsarge, " and auto-combination car, attached to the 
Kearsarge Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) one 
second-class Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief 
engine, in charge of an engineer and fireman ; and one 
auto-combination car in charge of four permanent men ; 
one ladder truck, "City of Concord," attached to Hook 
and Ladder Company (21 men) ; one house man at Cen- 
tral Fire Station. There are six horses kept at this 
fetation. There are eleven permanent men located at the 
Central Fire Station, one permanent man at each fire 
fetation within the precinct, one permanent man at Pio- 
neer Station, Penacook, and one permanent man at 
Cataract Station, West Concord. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has an auto-combination car, with perma- 
nent man. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on 
the corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an 
auto-combination car, with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men.) 

One chemical engine, one hand engine and four 
wagons in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with 
two hose wagons and one auto-combination car with per- 
manent man. 

The Cata,ract Company (30 men), at West Concord, 
has a modern hose wagon and auto-combination car 
with permanent man. 



234 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4yo-incli cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



Hose. 

10,650 feet cotton, rubber lined. 

3,200 " 

1,400 " 

500 " 



15,750 '• 
Public Reservoir.s. 



No. Main St., rear Court House, 
No. State St., comer of Washington St., 
Orchard St., corner of Pine St., 
School St., corner of Summit St., 



Capacity- 
Cubic Feet 
2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
3,500 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



235 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1921. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

WiLLiAU C. Geken, Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walteb J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 11 Beacon Street. 

Sylvester T. Foed, 2d Asst., Holder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 
C. E. Robinson, 
Geoboe W. Kemp, 



WARD 1. 
Electrician, 



61 Merrimack Street. 



WARD 2. 
Clerk, Penacook St., East Concord. 

WARD 3. 
Overseer, 16 Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Gaptain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

James H. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Namei. 

1 J. Edward Morrison, 

2 Charles Powell, 

8 James H. Sanders, 

4 George B. Davis, 

5 Herbert M. Sanders, 

6 Harry P. Blake, 

7 Harry B. Messer, 

8 W. C. B. Saltmarsh, 

9 George L. Livingston, 
10 Everett D. Davis, 

1 I Frank E. Hudson, 

12 Roger E. Strong, 

13 Daniel F. Murphy, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Carriage painter, 
Carriage paintei 
Cashier, 
IVfachinist, 
Machinist, 
Bookbinder, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Printer, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
45 Perley Street. 
32 Pleasant Street. 
34 Franklin S'treet. 
17 Albin Street. 
3 Broadway. 
37 Thorndike Street. 
57 Franklin Street. 
61 Washington Street. 
90 Warren Street. 
40 1/2 Franklin Street. 
Central Station. 



236 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 

OFFICERS. 

J. C. McGiLVRAY, Captain. D. J. Adams, Lieutenant. 

Willis J. Sawver, Clerk. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 John M. Inman 

24 John B. McLeod, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

22 Eli Langlois, Jr., 

27 Philip J. O'Connell. 

21 Charles W. Downing, 

29 Fred J. Johnston, 

28 James H. Brannigan, 

26 Raymond L. Galfetti, 

23 Clarence G. Howser, 
13 Henry E. Drew, 

30 Christopher Cunningham, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Chauffeur, 
The't Manager, 
Custodian, 
Electrician, 
Machinist, 
Painter, 
Clerk, 
Clerk 
Gas fitter, 
Car worker. 
Gas fitter. 
Truckman, 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
35 Washington Street. 
9 Thompson S'treet. 

16 Wall Street. 

11 Green Street. 
102 So. State Street. 
5 Perry Avenue. 

5 Vi Perry Avenue. 

12 South Street. 
10 Abbott Street. 
172 So. Main Street. 
130 RumfoPd Street. 

17 Dartmouth Street. 
Central Fire Station. 
Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



„ , RELIEF ENGINE. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. Occupations. 

84 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
81 South State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



OFFICERS. 
E. E. Bartlett, Treasurer. 



C. C. Chkslet, Captain. 



J. M. Davis, Lieutenant and Clerk. 







MEMBERS. 




Badge 








Nos. 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 C. 


C. Chesley, 


Carpenter, 


11 Prince Street. 


37 J. 


M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, 


112 Center S'treet. 


45 M 


. G. Davis, 


Carpenter, 


6 Beacon Street. 


41 J. 


E. Howard, 


Painter, 


171 No. State Street. 


38 E. 


E. Bartlett, 


Carpenter, 


13 Prince Street. 


43 F. 


G. White, 


Laborer, 


12 Montgomery Street. 


44 H. 


D. Gay, 


Sheet Metal Worker, 


17 Green Street. 


42 F. 


C. Young, 


Printer, 


109 Rumford Street. 


39 H. 


Walker, 


Chauffeur, 


34 Jackson Street. 


40 J. 


E. Murphy, 


Printer, 


171 No. State Street. 


46 F. 


H. Silver, 


Chauffeur 


Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



237 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 
HiBAM T. DiCKERMAN, Captain. Harry L. Peacock, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
Albket W. Thompson, Treasurer. 



Badge 

No». Names. 

50 Hiram T. Dickerman, 

51 Harry L. Peacock, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

57 Albert W. Thompson, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 
54 John W. McGowan, 

56 Jerry E. Co:hran, 

52 Edw. W. Burgess 

53 Percy H. Flanders, 

58 Willis S. Ash, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Painter, 

Auto Painter, 

Car Worker, 

Janitor 

Electrician, 

Plumber, 

Brass Holder, 

Barber, 

Carpenter, 

Auto Trimmer, 

Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
36 Broadway. 
36 Warren Street. 
231/2 Perley Street. 
74 Allison Street. 
104 South State Street. 
Fowler Block. 
36 Downing Street. 
71 North State Street. 
52 So. Main S'treet. 
231/2 Perley Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OP CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



Will A. Kino, Captain. 

Badge 

N08. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Ed. E. Lane, 

67 Benjamin Ouillette, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

73 Sam B. Morgan, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 

82 Perley S. Badger 

83 Harry Leary, 

76 Bert T. Upham, 

78 Earl W. Gage, 

66 James F. Byrns, 

84 A. J. Ladd, 



OFFICERS. 

Ed. E. Lane, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood- worker. 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Woodworker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood- worker. 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Machinist, 
Plumber, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Gas fitter. 
Permanent driver, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
5 Fremont Street. 
10 Jefferson Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 

13 West Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 
10 Avon Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 

30 Green Street. 

Ins. Blk., School Street. 
34 Downing Street. 
71 South Street. 
100 So. Fruit Street. 
13 Holt Street. 
22 Fremont Street. 
25 Thorndike Street. 
8 Charles Street. 
105 So. Main Street. 
Central Station. 



238 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



M. S. Wakefield, Captain. 



Badge 

Noa. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 M. J. Martin, 

93 M. R. Piper, 

94 J. H. Brunei, 

95 F. P. McKenna, 

96 George H. Eastman, 



OFFICERS. 

M. J. Martin, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupatio US. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

Spare Men. 
"hauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

House Man, 
A. L. Downing. 



Residences. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 

Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



OFFICERS. 

Henry Rolfe, Captain. Frank P. Robertson, Lieut. Clerk and Treas. 
Alfred Beddow, Engineer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Alfred Beddow, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 

111 Edmund Banker, 
110 John B. Dodge, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin, 

123 William Corbett, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 
117 Guy B. Chase, 

121 Albert Cassaveaugh, 
105 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

112 Richard McBride, 

122 George L. Miner, 

125 George D. Dowd, 

114 William H. Mc-Girr, 
116 Harvey Matott, 

103 Frank D. O'Brien, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Highway agent, 
Machinist, 
Stationary engin 
Teamster, 
Machinist, 
Glazier, 
Table-maker, 
Painter, 
Second hand. 
Miller, 
Miller, 
Miller, 

Table-maker, 
Mill hand. 
Spinner, 
Clerk, 
Electrician. 
Clerk, 
Foreman, 
Teamster, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 

17 South Main Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
Elm Street. 

59 Merrimack Street. 
92 High Street. 
3 Spring Street. 
44 Centre Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 
10 Church Street. 

6 Union Street. 

9 Union Street. 

43 South Main Street. 

7 Church Street. 

10 Union Street. 
High Street. 

24 Charles Street. 
12 Summer Street. 
Washington Street. 
Pioneer Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



239 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 
East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



George O. Robinson, Captain. 
Walter C. Sanborn, Lieut, and Clerk. 



JOHX C. HuTCHlNS. Treasurer. 
Michael Lacroix, Steward. 



Badge 

No». Names. 

120 George O. Robinson, 

121 Walter C, Sanborn, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 William E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Gate, 

129 Ross W. Gate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Clarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Gate, 
135 John T. Gate, 

140 C. A. Ghamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Carter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 
142 William E. Batchelder, 

141 Herbert F. Piper, 

124 William Gate, 

134 Ernest W. Gate, 

145 George E. Robinson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Wood-worker, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith. 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Painter, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stone-cutter, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Farmer, 
Carpenter, 
Plumber, 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 



240 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 

ALrRED J. Fraser, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer 

Jeremiah Cotter, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
Alfred J. Praser, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Hiram E. Quitnby, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Edward Lovering, 
Joseph Daly, 
Robert Henry, 
Frank Peterson, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Eckstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 
Henry Richardson, 
Prank C. Blodgett, 
John H. Cushnie, 
Arthur B. Spead, 
Eric D. Johnson, 
Axel S. Swanson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Stonecutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Farmer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stonecutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Silversmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Foreman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Silver spinner. 
Stationary engineer. 
Quarryman, 
Chauflfeur, 



Residences. 
10 River Street. 

5 Engel Street. 

490 North State Street. 
382 North State Street. 
50 Hutchins Street. 
513 North State Street. 
1 Clark Street. 
455 North State Street. 
513 North State Street. 
346 North State Street. 
9 Knight Street. 
9 Lake Street. 
Gladstone Avenue. 
516 North State Street. 

6 Dam Street. 

436 North State Street. 
543 North State Street. 
441 North State Street. 
406 North State Street. 
Cataract Station. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 

Prank F. Morse, Captain. S. S. Upham. Fiml Lieutenant. 

Eben F. Richardson, Second Lieutenant. 



Dennis Holloran, 
T. J. Morrison, 
Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 
O. C. Hodgdon 
W. D. Hut-hinson, 



MEMBERS. 

J. G. McQuilkin, 
A. B. Morrison, 
D. P. Wheeler, 
Henry Tucker, 
W. K. Wingate, 
L. S. Richardson, 
H. C. Taylor, 



Fred O. Libby. 
M. P. Thompson, 
E. J. Brown, 
A. L. Dickerman, 
H. P. Bowers, 
Charles C. Moore. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Con- 
cord, Neiv Hampshire: 

The Trustees of the Public Library herewith transmit 
the annual report of the librarian, showing in outline the 
work of the year. 

It is evident on inspection of the working conditions 
that the library is operated with the utmost economy and 
efficiency. 

For several years prior to 1920 the number of books 
added ranged from 885 to 1,125, but the number added 
in 1920 was only 717, and in 1921 only 500. The number 
should be brought up to 900 or more in 1922. 

The general upkeep and care of the rooms and books has 
been kept at the lower limit of cost during the period of 
the high cost of living, and some additional expense is 
necessary during the present year. 

In view of these conditions, the trustees voted to ask the 
Mayor and Board of Aldermen to appropriate the sum of 
$7,500 for the support of the library for the present year, 
instead of $7,000 which was appropriated for the year 
1921. The trustees feel that this sum, with an additional 
income from the Benjamin Kimball Fund of from $200 
to $300, is the smallest amount possible for creditable and 
efficient conduct of the library. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 
February 7, 1922. 

16 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1921. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord PuhJic Library: 

Gentlemen : My annual report, which is now chiefly a 
matter of statistics made out according to the recommenda- 
tion of the New Hampshire Library Commission, is here- 
with presented. 

The financial statement is as follow^s: 

Receipts and Expenditures, 1921. 
receipts. 



Balance from last year, 




$14.83 


Appropriation, 




7,000.00 


Interest : 






Cogswell, 


$85.90 




Lyon, 


40.00 




Pierce, 


40.00 




Valpey,. 


20.00 




Hazeltine, 


133.00 




Jones, 


22.00 




S. C. Eastman, 


50.00 




Chase, 


42.50 








433.95 


Fines, 


- 


376.00 




$7,824.78 


expenditures. 






Salaries and labor, 




$4,853.72 


Books and periodicals, 




1,265.37 


Binding. 




323.00 


Fuel and light. 




869.84 


Printing, 




110.50 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 243 

Incidentals, $381.96 

Balance on hand, 20.39 



$7,824.78 



Next to this statement as to what money we have had 
and what money we have spent, comes, logically, a para- 
graph as to our supply of books. First, let it be realized 
that their continued high cost makes it impossible to buy 
all the desirable new books or to replace worn-out ones. 
During 1921 we have added only 600 volumes. 

At the beginning of 1921, in library, 33,154 vols. 

Added by purchase, 500 

Added by gift, 64 

Added magazines, 36 

600 

Discarded, 95 



Net additions 505 vols. 



Now in library, 33,659 vols. 

The fact that so many books are no longer in the library, 
because they have become out of print or because they have 
become prohibitive in price, makes our shelves much de- 
pleted, especially in the line of fiction, and our staff find 
it increasingly difficult to fill borrowers' cards. In a 
modern library building, access to the stack-room is ac- 
corded patrons who then take what they find, and the 
assistants' time and strength have not been wasted in 
hunting for volumes with which the library is no longer 
supplied. 

Eight hundred and four new borrowers have registered 
in the past twelve months, but of course customers are 
continually slipping away from us through death, removal 
from town or absorption in other things. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

It is now generally conceded that statistics of circulation 
are not the chief thing by which to estimate a library's value 
to the community; still, it is gratifying that in 1921 we 
gained a few hundred, the number of volumes given out 
being 78,367. For the first time in half-a-dozen years, we 
have estimated our circulation by classes, and we find that 
the reading taste in Concord has not altered appreciably. 
Magazines are next to story-books in popularity. We 
have noticed that we give out more books in modern Greek 
and in Italian than formerly ; we are not daunted by a re- 
quest for works in foreign languages, however, as we can 
(acquire them by means of Mr. S. C. Eastman's bequest for 
that purpose. 

We do a creditable amount of inter-loan business, send- 
ing a good number of volumes to smaller libraries and ask- 
ing for a few from Manchester and Boston for our own 
borrowers. 

To have our School Street hall continuously beautified 
by exhibits from the Library Art Club is now a regular 
part of our program. 

The deposit stations continue in East Concord, West 
Concord and Penacook. In addition we have placed, at 
the request of teachers and librarian at the Senior High 
School, 75 books in the Spring Street building, for the 
convenient use of its pupils. This experiment is reported 
as having worked beneficially enough to make it worth 
repeating the next semester. 

This brief account of the past year at the library gives 
no idea of the countless interesting things which happen 
within its walls to put fresh zest into those who have 
long done its work. 

During last July and August we tried a Vacation Read- 
ing Club for boys and girls from eight to fourteen years 
of age. This closed with a party, and with prizes for those 
who had read the most books and reported upon them in- 
telligently. 



PUBLIC LIBBARY. 245 

Your librarian has spoken at library meetings and in- 
stitutes in Massachusetts and Vermont, and at Women's 
Clubs, usually on some topic connected with recent publi- 
cations, and her aim is to stimulate acquaintance with 
worth-while literature. 

The library has lost the valued president of its Board 
of Trustees in the passing away of Judge R. E. Walker, 
who held that ofifice from 1903 to January 1, 1922, when 
his death occurred. Prior to being its head, he was a 
member of the board for two years. There have been so 
many tributes to his uprightness, to his fine judicial mind 
and to his sterling worth, that little remains to be said 
now ; but I want to add that our staff had every reason 
to like and respect him. He was a man loyal to any cause 
with which he had connected himself ; he responded readily 
and ably when turned to for advice, and looking back 
through the years I recall how he always spoke the wise 
word when, at any of our slight troubles, he was called, 
in consultation. We felt that, in his quiet way, he really 
eared for the library and had its prosperity at heart. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Lihrarian. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The twenty-ninth consecutive annual re- 
port of this department is herewith submitted. 

The expenses of this department for the year 1921 were 
as follows : 

Paid engineer and assistants, $4,204.50 

for supplies, 100.77 

transportation, 52.41 

real estate transfers, 25.95 

telephone service, 36.85 

incidentals, 4.17 



Total, $4,424.65 

Appropriation, $4,725.00 

Expended, 4,424.65 



Unexpended balance, $300.35 

Sewers. 

The work done on sewers will be found in detail in the 
report of this department to the Board of Public Works, 
and published as a portion of their report. 

Water-Works. 

Elevations were taken and batters sat for a retaining 
wall on Hutchins Street, West Concord. 

Two skeleton maps showing the pipe lines, gates, hy- 
drants, branches and other underground construction of 
the works were made on mounted paper for the superin- 
tendent of the works. Blue prints of the Penacook sec- 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 247 

tion were made and delivered to the superintendent. The 
sheet plans of pipe lines and appurtenances were brought 
up to date, and a mounted paper plan of Penacook Lake 
and land adjoining, owned by the city, was made for the 
superintendent. 

Fire Department. 

The fire-alarm and hydrant maps were brought up to 
date and prints furnished for the various fire stations in 
the city, also the Penacook district. 

Building Petitions. 

Ninety-three petitions were presented to the chief of 
the fire department and myself. Hearings were had on all 
petitions and our action recorded upon the original peti- 
tions, which petitions are on file with the city clerk. 

One petition was referred to the Board of Aldermen, but 
the petitioner changed his plans and told us that he would 
build of brick. 

Cemeteries. 

Considerable time was spent in preparing plans for a 
cement wall, a stone wall and an iron fence on the Bradley 
Street side of the Old North Cemetery. The bids received 
for both the cement and stone walls were much higher 
than they should have been and were promptly rejected 
by the cemetery commissioners. The final adoption of an 
iron fence, with one gateway and stone posts at each side 
of the gate and at each end of the cemetery, brought the 
cost to a point that the commissioners were willing to ac- 
cept. A contract was made for the fence and it was erected 
and painted by the contractor. 

The deed book for Blossom Hill Cemetery has been 
brought up to date from the deed stubs. 



248 city op concord. 

Assessors' Maps. 

The unusual amount of real estate changes during the 
past year added much to the work of keeping the maps 
up to date, but it was done and the lists of owners cor- 
rected to April 1, 1921, for the assessors. 

The property taken by the Boston & Maine Railroad, 
for the construction of its round house and appurtenances, 
made it necessary to change the Ward 7 sheets in that local- 
ity. The railroad gave us copies of their plans showing land 
taken, which materially aided us in properly covering the 
changes made. 

Miscellaneous. 

Nine prints of a small outline map of the city were 
made and delivered to the superintendent of schools. 

A print of the compact portion of the city was made for 
the Board of Health, 

Plans and sections were made for the suit against the 
city by the executor of Mrs. Norris' estate. 

Prints for the use of the Board of Examiners of Plumb- 
ers were made and turned over to them. 

A plan showing the proposed extension of the Penacook 
Sewer Precinct, covering a portion of West Main Street 
and Pine Street, was made for use of the Board of Alder- 
men. 

A print of Tenney Street layout was made for filing 
with the city clerk. 

Surveys covering the land sold from the old City Farm 
pasture to E. E. Webber were made, plans plotted, areas 
figured and the plans filed in this office for future use. 

A plan showing the South Main Street line at the 
building of the Norris Baking Company was made and 
delivered to Mr. George S. Forrest, 

Prints of the plan of Rolfe Park, Penacook, were made 
and given to the city solicitor to aid him in making a 
conveyance to the city. 



REPORT OF THE CITY ENGINEER. 249 

Surveys were made and plans and estimates prepared 
for a proposed swimming pool at White Park, and the 
plans given the committee having this matter in charge. 

Prints covering the West Concord and Penacook dis- 
tricts, showing the roads, were made for the superintend- 
ent of streets. 

Baseball grounds were laid out at Rollins Park and also 
at White Park for the Play-ground committee, and a foot- 
ball field laid out at White Park. 

At Rolfe Park a diamond was laid out and levels given 
for grading the same. 

The town lines between Hopkinton and Bow were per- 
ambulated with one or more of the selectmen of those towns. 

For the support and co-operation of your board I wish 
to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1921. 
To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The sixteenth annual report of this 
board, for the year 1921, is herewith submitted. 

On April 11th the full board met and recommended the 
installation of the following hydrants : 
High service, one at the junction of Stevens Avenue and 

Kent Street. 
Low service, on the north side of Noyes Street, just west 

of Harvard Street. 
Low service, on west side of Hall Street, on south line of 

No. 12. 
Low service, on west side of Hall Street, near Albert 

Thompson's. 
Low service, on west side of Hall Street, near Batchelder 

bill-board. 
High service, 4-way on Pearl Street, at west line of No. 12. 
High service, 4-way in rear of Eagle Hotel where the low 

service hydrant now stands. 
High service, in rear of Woodward block, where the low 

service hydrant now stands. 
High service, in rear of Phenix Hotel, on easterly side of 

passway. 
On May 25th we met on Noyes Street and recommended 
the installation of a hydrant on the north side of Noyes 
Street at "Yale Street," so called. 

No other sessions were held during the year. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WILL B. HOWE, 
W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 
PUBLIC WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



To the Board of Puhlic Works: 

My report for the year ending December 31, 1921, is 
herewith submitted. 

During the past year no addition has been made to the 
improved surface of our city street system. The bad 
drainage condition on a number of streets has been im- 
proved, allowing, in years to come, the hard surface to be 
laid thus having many streets of improved pavement to 
show in part for this year's activities. 

The amount expended under General Maintenance has 
been, in the main, for the upkeep of all classes of streets 
and roads, but quite a sum has been spent which possibly 
does not show clearly in the financial report and is as 
follows : 

$17,151.80 has been spent for the improvement of the 
Loudon Road and the concrete pavement on Bridge Street 
under the supervision of the State Highway Department. 

Rubble drains have been constructed upon a portion of 
Rumford and South Spring Streets to take care of the 
bad drainage condition on these streets. 

All steel bridges have been cleaned and painted one 
coat. 

Resurfacing of our dirt and gravel streets with crushed 
screened gravel ; improved pavements repaired ; country 
roads drained, reshaped and ditched ; roads and streets 
dragged and driveway construction has been continued 
as in the past year. 

$7,887.32 has been expended on trunk line maintenance, 
this includes seal coats of tar and asphalt. 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

We have spent $6,636,70 for sanding walks and sweep- 
ing pavements. 

There has been 5,405.92 square yards of tar walks relaid 
during the year. 

We have collected 20,150 cubic yards of ashes and 3,630 
cubic yards of paper. 

Calcium chloride has been used on 10.5 miles or 130,000 
square yards of street surface. 

Automobile sprinklers used to drag streets when not 
sprinkling. 

The streets in the business section have been flushed 
once each week. 

I wish to thank the Mayor and all the members of the 
Board for their support during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

0. W. HEAD, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 253 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 

GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $95,000.00 

By Resolution 473, 4,000.00 

By Resolution 476, 3,000.00 

Transferred from sidewalks and 

crossings — new, 1,468.54 

By Joint Resolution No. 480, 2,758.90 

$106,227.44 



EXPENDITURES. 
Central District. 



Breaking roads, labor, 


$28.02 


Bridges : 




Labor, snowing, 


48.79 


Hauling lumber. 


13.50 


Repairing Soucook bridge, 


98.47 


Iron Works bridge, 


97.02 


Richardson Mills bridge, 


59.34 


Turkey River, 


25.28 


Supplies: Lumber, 


1,030.23 


Nails, 


24.45 


Labor painting: 




Portsmouth bridge. 


520.76 


Loudon, 


581.46 


Federal, 


539.00 


Sewall's Falls, 


352.67 


Twin, 


171.94 


Riverliill, 


199.50 


Borough, 


73.00 


Main Street, 


191.61 


Richardson's Mill, 


69.50 


Miscellaneous labor. 


40.27 



254 CITY OF CONCORD, 



Supplies : Paint, 


$1,246.50 


Freight on paint, 


35.05 


Brushes, 


35.01 


Block and rope, 


10.00 


Ladders, 


30.00 


Labor painting, 


8.00 


Miscellaneous supplies. 


142.25 


Liability insurance. 


618.00 


Bridge Street, Normandeau contract. 


5,232.88 


Buiek Roadster : 




Labor repairing, 


36.88 


Supplies : Tires, 


142.49 


Brake lining, 


18.69 


Chains, 


10.50 


Battery, 


12.50 


IMiscellaneous, 


69.03 


Insurance, 


39.00 


Calcium chloride, 


1,523.20 


PVeight on, 


252.86 


Labor unloadir;g, 


10.00 


Lime sower. 


88.40 


Car fare, 


.16 


City stables: 




Labor, 


2,922.21 


Labor repairing gutter. 


11.20 


Painting, 


40.35 


Paint, 


20.79 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


26.11 


Repairing stall. 


5.61 


Repairing door, 


10.43 


Floor, 


17.08 


Repairing, water system. 


226.92 


Supplies, 


136.18 


Lights, 


79.70 


Telephone, 


20.06 


Coal, 


220.00 


Shingles, 


36.25 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


40.76 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 255 



City teams : 




Labor repairing sleds, 


$45.38 


Repairing carts, 


218.84 


Painting carts, 


55.39 


Building carts, 


107.07 


Building stone drag, 


12.52 


Miscellaneous, 


53.57 


Supplies, 


27.71 


Milling, 


14.50 


Axle boxes, 


5.60 


Paint, 


43.36 


Grain, 


1,421.79 


Hay, 


1,664.57 


Horses, 


100.00 


Shoeing, 


216.95 


Labor, 


19.68 


Shavings, 


78.55 


Veterinary, 


26.50 


Medicine, 


10.15 


Harnesses: new and repair, 


211.90 


Harness oil and soap. 


26.34 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


148.13 


Cleaning rear of Police Station, 


32.87 


River Beach, 


13.50 


Bow Brook, 


8.10 


Cleaning Crossings, lab^r. 


1,253.56 


Concord Truck : 




Labor repairing. 


193.90 


Painting, 


14.33 


Welding, 


14.75 


Insurance, 


70.00 


Gasoline and oil, 


705.24 


Tires, 


122.00 


Miscellaneous supplies. 


374.05 


Concreting, G. V. Tandy, 


221.06 



256 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Crusher : 




Labor boxing up, 


$2.22 


Repairing, 


438.78 


Repairing road, 


13.32 


At bank, 


3,938.34 


Miscellaneous, 


48.19 


Power, 


368.38 


Supplies : oil, 


25.10 


Castings, 


2.10 


Phone, 


.85 


Belts, 


21.23 


New parts, 


1,438.07 


_^ Freight on. 


2.65 


Miscellaneous, 


35.84 


Culverts : 




Labor cleaning and repairing. 


309.99 


Supplies, 


17.64 


Cutting bushes, labor, 


112.65 


Cutting grass, labor, 


25.60 


Dragging streets: 




Labor, 


1,216.95 


Building drag. 


95.72 


Repairing drag. 


5.00 


Milling, 


4.25 


Gasoline, 


85.32 


Supplies, , 


190.32 


Drinking fountains: 




Labor repairing. 


40.80 


Supplies and repairs, 


7.46 


Driveways : 
Labor, 


676.90 


Supplies, pipe, 


63.02 


Cement, 


2.85 


Tar macadam, 


193.42 


Fences : 

Labor building. 


111.93 


Supplies, 


76.12 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 257 



Cutting posts, 


$53.34 


Repairing, 


35.33 


Supplies, 


13.95 


Making braces. 


20.72 


Supplies, 


4.29 


Painting, 


137.00 


Supplies, 


30.31 


Ford truck : 




Labor repairing. 


15.16 


Supplies, 


56.83 


Garage : 




Labor, 


776.39 


Coal, 


128.88 


Supplies, 


124.42 


General repairs. 


120.56 


Grading walks, labor, 


42.03 


Gutters : 




Labor cleaning, 


3,984.99 


Supplies, 


18.35 


Paving, 


177.31 


Draining and plowing. 


312.72 


Insurance on trucks. 


280.00 


International truck : 




Labor repairing. 


144.42 


Painting, 


30.34 


Welding, 


1.75 


Repairs to radiator, 


10.46 


Supplies for, 


6.25 


Gasoline and oil, 


726.93 


Insurance, 


62.00 


Tires, 


300.80 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


117.72 


Leveling snow, labor. 


576.25 


Medical services, 


7.00 


Miscellaneous supplies, boots, 


8.92 


Lumber, 


55.65 


Paint, 


15.50 


Tools, 


206.17 



17 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Office: 




Adding; machine, 


$240.10 


Clerical expenses, 


1,346.00 


Envelopes and printing, 


89.15 


Filing cases, 


10.13 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


22.20 


Order books, 


18.25 


Postage, 


15.00 


Repairs to typewriter. 


2.40 


Rubber stamps. 


17.70 


Telephone, 


21.89 


Time slips, 


107.90 


Playground committees, labor for, 


352.34 


Plowing walks : 




Labor, 


636.53 


Repairing plows. 


152.17 


Building plows. 


58.34 


Painting plows. 


10.41 


Castings, 


3.15 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


17.03 


Removing hitching posts, labor. 


20.28 


Repairing macadam: 




Labor repairing. 


4,856.02 


Hauling gravel. 


56.64 


Mixing K. P., 


14.06 


Unloading car K. P., 


11.61 


Oiling barrels, 


11.63 


Supplies : 




K. P. 


2,411.16 


Asphalt, 


117.94 


Freight on. 


187.68 


Demurrage, 


43.00 


Stone, 


102.41 


Labor unloading. 


7.50 


Freight on, 


67.12 


Telephone, 


.55 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 259 



Resurfacing streets: 






Labor, 




$3,894.08 


Supplies, gravel, 




10.70 


Road machine: 






Labor repairing. 




117.42 


Painting, 




44.91 


Running, 




4,425.42 


Mending chains. 




1.67 


New parts. 




132.90 


Express on. 




1.08 


Miscellaneous repairs ; 


and supplies, 


37.15 


Rolling snow : 






Labor, 




128.00 


Making roller. 




43.50 


Lumber, 




63.30 


Miscellaneous supplies. 




7.20 


Rubble drain for Rumford Street, labor, 792.60 


Pipe, 




297.36 


Hauling pipe. 




5.56 


Rubble drain for Spring 


Street, labor. 


922.69 


Pipe, 




187.20 


Sanding walks: 






Labor, 




2,033.67 


Making sand boxes. 




14.00 


Supplies, 




.28 


Filling sand house. 




432.32 


Rent of sand shed, 




7.00 


Salt, 




5.75 


Sawing wood, labor. 




31.00 


Shop, addition to : 






Labor, 




135.77 


Lumber, 




283.31 


Shingles, 




3.01 


Wiring, 




12.32 


Glass, 




9.00 


Cement and pipe. 




6.00 


Miscellaneous labor ir 


I shop, 


1,138.55 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Coal, 


$21.17 


Supplies used in shop, 


377.22 


Signs : 




Labor painting. 


14.00 


Painting traffic signs. 


72.54 


Supplies : paint, 


69.50 


Installing beacons, 


26.48 


Repairing beacons, 


21.18 


Supplies installing beacons. 


16.10 


Automatic signals. 


150.00 


Express on. 


13.13 


Miscellaneous supplies. 


13.33 


State Aid : 




Labor on Loudon Road, 


10,860.92 


Supplies for Loudon Road, 


1,058.00 


Steam roller: 




Labor, repairing, 


63.39 


Coal, 


154.31 


New parts, 


13.25 


Express on, 


2.63 


Grate, 


13.00 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


119.88 


Sweeping pavement: 




Labor, 


3,992.49 


Repairing sweeper, 


8.61 


Refilling broom, 


34.00 


Brooms, 


71.08 


Cans, 


37.50 


Telephone service. 


31.49 


Tractors : 




Labor repairing, 


240.98 


Repairing wheels. 


88.94 


Painting, 


12.52 


Rigging for drags, 


23.11 


Welding, 


7.50 


Tractor, 


1,155.00 


New parts, 


228.62 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 261 



Express and freight, 


$2.47 


Oil, 


426.96 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


18.74 


Watering trough, labor repairing: 




Warren and Pleasant Street, 


24.81 


Supplies, 


8.59 


Franklin Street, 


123.37 


Supplies, 


28.14 


Gully Hill, 


1.95 


Supplies, 


9.05 


Washington Street, 


19.70 


Supplies sent to West Concord, 


7.43 


Supplies sent to East Concord, 


2.69 


Use of troughs. 


21.00 



Penacook District. 



$89,267.19 



General maintenance: 




Labor, 


$79.56 


Repairing tools, 


1.00 


Cutting bushes, 


5.64 


Raking rocks. 


5.54 


Repairing wall, 


12.01 


Building shed, 


12.68 


Supplies, 


15.10 


Fences : 




Labor repairing rail. 


8.90 


Supplies, 


.98 


Repairing macadam, labor, 


354.21 


Resurfacing streets, labor. 


2,455.65 


Supplies, gravel. 


145.25 


Dragging streets, labor. 


310.47 


Road machine : 




Labor running. 


213.26 


Repairing, 


4.08 


Playground committee, labor, 


61.63 



262 CITY OF CONCORD, 



Rolling snow, labor, 


$24.00 




Labor repairing roller, 


10.00 




Bridges : 






Labor repairing, 


273.12 




Repairing railing, 


22.50 




Cleaning, 


8.04 




Draining, 


4.50 




Supplies, lumber, 


233.55 




Nails, 


11.39 




Culverts : 






Labor cleaning, 


16.86 




Repairing, 


166.33 




Thawing, 


9.86 




Fountains and watering trough : 






Labor, 


6.12 




Supplies, 


4.90 




Use of, 


6.00 




Plowing walks, labor. 


224.04 




Breaking roads, labor, 


68.76 




Leveling sno^v, labor, 


128.69 




Sanding walks, labor. 


335.32 




Filling sand house, 


118.74 




Gutters : 






Labor plowing. 


101.66 




Cleaning, 


250.80 




Repairing, 


63.04 




Crossings, labor cleaning. 


122.40 




Cleaning streets, labor, 


1,373.15 




Driveways : 






Labor installing. 


29.49 




Cleaning pipe, 


4.32 


$7,303.54 



West Concord District. 

General maintenance : 

Labor, filling holes, $86.61 



150ARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 263 



Bridges, labor repairing, 


$11.22 


Supplies, 


2.63 


Cutting bushes, labor, 


87.38 


Culverts, labor cleaning and 


repairing, 96.99 


Fences, labor building, 


73.78 


Labor, cutting posts, 


23.00 


Gutters: Labor cleaning, 


463.12 


Resurfacing streets, labor, 


1,527.95 


Supplies, gravel, 


30.27 


Breaking roads, labor, 


122.05 


Plowing walks, labor, 


84.00 


Sanding walks: 




Labor, 


96.46 


Filling sand house, 


49.67 


Leveling snow, labor, 


25.45 


Dragging, labor, 


484.61 


Labor building. 


18.88 


Raking rocks, labor, 


22.22 


Road machine, labor running. 


358.28 


Miscellaneous supplies. 


3.55 



East Concord District. 

Resurfacing streets and roads, labor, .$2,071.85 

Supplies, gravel, 14.80 
Watering trough : 

Use of, 23.00 

Labor repairing, 9.73 

Supplies and repairs 164.60 

New tools, 3.00 

Bridges, labor repairing, 48.44 

Cutting bushes, labor, 120.00 

Culverts, labor repairing, 48.76 

Gutters; labor cleaning, 160.71 

Dragging roads, labor, 19.97 

Breaking roads, labor, 12.44 

Plowing walks, labor, 41.22 



$3,668.12 



264 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Leveling snow, labor, $7.68 

Sanding walks, labor, 14.93 

Road machine, labor, 68.78 

Grading w^alks, labor, 19.18 



DiMOND AND Silver Hill District. 



Breaking roads, labor, 


$26.23 


Bridges, labor repairing. 


8.67 


Culverts, labor repairing, 


4.44 


Dragging roads, labor, 


354.30 


Resurfacing roads, labor, 


504.08 


Supplies, gravel, 


18.30 



Plains and Egypt District. 



General maintenance, labor, 


$18.17 


Breaking roads, labor. 


6.67 


Leveling snow, labor, 


4,28 


Culverts, labor repairing. 


2,33 


Opening, 


46.05 


Gutters, labor plowing. 


56.00 


Sanding, labor, 


1.67 


Patrol, labor. 


964.62 


Supplies, gravel, 


20.90 


HoiT District, 




Breaking roads, labor, 


$14.77 


Dragging roads, labor. 


90.62 


Resurfacing roads, labor. 


232.15 


Supplies, 


2.50 



$2,849,09 



916,02 



1,120.69 



340,04 

Jordan District. 
Breaking roads, labor, 21.00 



board of public works. 265 

Pine Hill District, 



Breaking roads, labor, $20.46 

Resurfacing roads, labor, 5.12 



$25.58 



Sanborn District. 



General maintenance: 

Labor, 

Supplies, 
Breaking roads, labor, 
Resurfacing roads, labor. 



Total expenditures, 

CATCH BASINS 



$268.34 




.75 




38.83 




408.25 






716 17 






$106,227.44 



Appropriation, 


$3,000.00 




By Joint Resolution No. 480, 


365.84 


$3,365.84 






Expenditures — 






Central District 






Labor cleaning. 


$1,935.34 




Building, 


208.36 




Flushing, 


80.31 




Repairing, 


100.54 




Thawing, 


154.72 




Supplies : 






Bases, traps, weights, etc., 


179.01 




Cement, 


47.15 




Pipe, 


145.73 




Rubber boots, 


29.94 




Wood, 


5.26 


2,886.36 



6 


CITY 


OP 


CONCORD. 






Penacook 


District. 




ibor building, 








$79.98 


Supplies, 








8.10 


Cleaning, 








280.07 


Repairing, 








28.65 


Thawing, 








13.97 



$410.77 



West Concord District. 

Labor building, $14.77 

Supplies, 3.50 

Cleaning, 50.44 



68.71 



Total expenditures, $3,365.84 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS— NEW. 



Appropriation, 


$1,500.00 


Expenditures — 




Central District. 




Laying edgestone, labor. 


$31.46 


Total expenditures, 


$31.46 


Transferred to General Maintenance, 


1,468.54 



$1,500.00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSING— REPAIR 

Appropriation, $3,000.00 

By Joint Resolution No. 480, 1,623.49 

$4,623.49 



Expenditures- 



BOABD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



Central District. 



267 



Repairing walks, labor, 


$441.56 


Repairing crossings. 


labor, 


136.56 


Resetting edgestone, 


, labor, 


39.44 


George F. Tandy: 






Relaying walks, 




3,103.50 


Relaying crossings, 




337.44 


Relaying gutters. 




2.49 



Penacook District. 



Grading walks, labor, 
Laying pipe, labor, 



$403.79 
3.39 



West Concord District. 
Grading walks, labor, 

Plains District. 
Grading w^alks, labor, 

Total expenditures. 



$4,060.99 



407.18 



152.54 



2.78 



$4,623.49 



GARBAGE, 




Appropriation, 


$16,000.00 


By Resolution No. 480, 


287.97 


Deficiency to 1921, 


2,706.07 




4?1 8 99^ Oi 




<pj.\j.*JtJ^»\J^: 


Expenditures — 




Deficiency from 1920, 


$1,751.72 


Collecting garbage, labor, 


9,035.57 


Collecting paper, labor. 


1,215.01 


Picking up paper, labor. 


157.08 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Leveling ashes, labor, 


$2,057.01 


Patrol carts, labor, 


2,713.54 


Covering garbage, labor, 


11.56 


Fighting fire, labor, 


98.87 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


10.45 


Express, 


1.89 


Peerless truck : 




Labor repairing, 


114.00 


Grinding valves. 


2.50 


Repairing magneto, 


51.77 


Supplies, 


15.10 


Painting, 


8.17 


Supplies, 


18.34 


Mending canvas, 


8.74 


Supplies, 


23.08 


Beacon Motor Car Co., 


new parts, 279.48 


Express, 


3.02 


Telephone, 


2.50 


Insurance, 


70.00 


Gasoline and oil, 


1,272.42 


New hoist, 


35.00 


Supplies to manifold, 


2.50 


Supplies to radiator, 


8.75 


Supplies, miscellaneous. 


25.97 




$18,994.04 



PENACOOK SPRINKLING PRECINCT. 



Balance from 1920, 
Appropriation, 
Deficiency to 1922, 

Expenditures — 
Sprinkling streets, labor. 
Repairing standpipes, labor, 

Supplies, 



$7.26 
475.00 
123.88 



$567.18 

10.37 

1.00 



$606.14 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS, 269 

Repairing carts, labor, $8.38 

Supplies, 7.21 

Boseawen Water Precinct, water, 12.00 

$606.14 



SPRINKLING. 

Balance from' 1920, $1,926.74 

Appropriation, 5,000.00 



$6,926.74 

Expenditures — 

Sprinkling streets, labor, $1,573.79 

Flushing streets, labor, 479.25 

Building truck for hose, labor, 27.50 

Supplies, 1.75 

Standpipes, labor repairing, 54.12 

Labor closing, 12.81 

Labor, painting and repairing carts, 37.50 

Calcium chloride, 3,046.40 

Freight on, 505.72 

Labor applying, 163.05 

Supplies: Paint and brushes, 8.33 

Nozzle, 10.16 

Hose, 62.00 

Miscellaneous supplies, 21.45 

Trucks, labor repairing, 150.65 

Milling and welding, 2.75 

Gasoline and oil, 750.37 

$6,907.60 

Balance to 1922, 19.14 

$6,926.74 



270 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SALARY OF SUPERINTENDENT. 



Appropriation, 




$2,500.00 


Expenditures — 






Salary, 




$2,500.00 


Deposited with the city treasurer: 






State Aid, highways, 


$3,010.91 




Labor and crushed stone. 


1,625.94 




Sidewalks and crossings, new, 


47.92 




Sidewalks and crossings, repair, 


71.95 




Catch basins. 


8.30 




Garbage, 


287.97 


.4;F; 0.fS9 QQ 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 271 

REPORT OF CITY ENGINEER. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1921. 

To the Board of Piiblic Works: 

Gentlemen : The eleventh annual report to your board 
showing the work done under the supervision of the En- 
gineering Department, for your board, is herewith sub- 
mitted. 

SEWERS. 

There were laid during the past season 473.5 feet of 
33-inch segmental block sewer in Beacon Street, replacing 
the old 12-inch pipe, and 222 feet of 12-inch pipe in 
Broadway below McKinley Street. 

The Beacon Street sewer is now completed to Rumford 
Street, as originally planned. The Rumford Street sewer, 
from Beacon Street to Franklin Street, is too small for 
the demands made upon it, and the Franklin Street sewer 
from Rumford Street westerly about 160 feet is also too 
small for the territory it serves. 

These streets should receive your immediate attention, 
that the flooding of premises in this section may be avoided 
and the expense of upkeep materially reduced. 

The Beacon Street sewer was delayed by the ledge and 
large boulders encountered west of Lyndon Street. The 
blasting required to bring the ditch to the required grade 
was accomplished, and the deep cutting completed without 
injury to the workmen engaged upon it, or to the public. 
A few panes of glass in adjacent houses were broken and 
immediately reset. 

A great source of trouble on this work was caused by 
the maintenance of the flow of the old sewer while con- 
structing the new one. This was also a great hindrance to 
the necessary blasting operations. 



272 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The sewer system was thoroughly flushed and cleaned in 
the spring. 

There was expended for new work the following 
amounts : 



Beacon Street. 




Paid for labor, 


$6,803.57 


brick, 


57.36 


cement, 


54.00 


castings, 


16.00 


pipe fittings, 


8.40 


hardware, 


79.25 


blacksmith, 


72.70 


dynamite. 


94.80 


air compresser, drills, etc., 


810.00 


lumber. 


227.56 


rubber boots, 


30.26 


kerosene oil. 


14.55 


gasoline and oil,^ 


60.75 


filing saws, 


.75 


trucking, 


245.00 


center. 


11.69 



Total expenditure, $8,586.64 

Average cost per foot, $18.134-|- 

Material excavated, sand, gravel, hardpan, clay, ledge, and 
large boulders. 

Broadvv^ay. 

Paid for labor, $140.78 

pipe, 198.48 

cement, 2.00 

trucking, 2.50 

kerosene oil, .95 



Total expenditure, $344.71 

Average cost per foot, $1,552-1- 
Material excavated, sand. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 273 

The following amounts were expended for repairs in the 
streets named below : 

Carter Street, ^9M 

Ferry Street, 152.07 

Prospect Street, 12.17 

Badger Street, 36.65 

Hall Street, 7.22 

Albin Street, 6.22 

Harrison Street, 9.00 

Dickerman sewer, 28.84 

Thorndike Street, 4.61 

Tremont Street, 2.50 

Essex Street, 10.84 

Downing Street, 2.34 

Highland Street, 23.00 

Rumford Street, 99.99 



Total, • $405.39 
Funds expended : 

For new work, $8,931.35 

repairs, 405.39 

tools, 66.81 

flushing, 622.55 

1920 bill for castings, 38.99 



Total, $10,065.09 

Appropriation and balance, $9,750.06 

Expended, 10,065.09 

Overdraft, $315.03 



18 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sewers built in the City Precinct to December 31, 1921: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 3,088 feet. 

8-inch Akron pipe, 25,657 ' 

10-inch Akron pipe, 55,870 ' 

12-inch Akron pipe. 38,628 ' 

12-inch cement pipe, 415 ' 

15-inch Akron pipe, 11,646 ' 

18-inch Akron pipe, 7,134 ' 

20-inch Akron pipe, 5,029 ' 

24-inch Akron pipe, 4,064 ' 

30-inch Akron pipe, 1,780.5' 

Brick. 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 ' 

14-inch X 22-inch, 350 ' 

16-inch X 24-inch, 1,848 ' 

20-inch x 32-inch, 2,527 ' 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 ' 

28-inch x 48-inch, 883 ' 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 ' 

30-inch circular, 402 ' 

38-inch circular, 4,080 ' 

24-inch cast-iron, 1,576 ' 

30-inch east-iron, 1,054.5' 

33-ineh segmental block, 1,536.5' 

42-inch segmental block, 1,055 ' 

42-inch brick and concrete, 246 ' 

'60-inch brick and concrete, 1,450 ' 



A total of, 192,530 feet. 

Total miles in City Precinct, 36.464+ 



board of public works. 275 
West Concord Precinct. 

There was expended in this precinct in 1921, for flush- 
ing, $24.56. 

Funds available, $105.58 

Expended, 24.56 



Unexpended balance, $80.72 

Sewers built in this precinct to date; 

8-inch Akron pipe, 342 ieet. 

10-inch Akron pipe, 7,210 

12-inch Akron pipe, 6,622 

15-inch Akron pipe, 2,155 

20-inch Akron pipe, 1,403 



Total, 17,732 feet. 

Total miles in precinct, 3.358+ 

Saint Paul's School Precinct. 

There was expended in this precinct in 1921 the follow- 
ing sum : 

For repairs, $22.68 

Funds available, 56.12 

Expended, 22.68 

Balance on hand, $33.44 

There have been built to date the following lengths and 
sizes of pipe sewers: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 3,008 feet. 

8-inch Akron pipe, 448 

10-inch Akron pipe, 2,868 

Total, 6,318 feet. 

Total miles in precinct, 1.196+. 



276 city op concord. 

East Concord Precinct. 

No money was expended in this precinct during 1921, 
and the balance on hand remains as of January 1, 1921, 
viz: $137.86. 

There is laid in this precinct, to date, the following size 
and length of pipe: 

10-inch Akron pipe, 1,766 feet. 

Total miles in precinct, 0.333-]-. 

Penacook Precinct. 

No extensions were built in this precinct in 1921. There 
was expended for repairs, flushing and pipe for the West 
Main Street sewer, the following amounts : 

Pipe for West Main Street sewer, $353.82 

Trucking same, 23.80 

Main Street repairs, 33.91 

Merrimack Street repairs, 172.58 

Flushing, 74.68 

Kerosene oil, .24 



Total, $659.03 

1920 overdraft, 761.88 



Total expended, $1,420.91 

Appropriation, $1,500.00 

Expended, 1,420.91 



Unexpended balance, $79.09 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 277 

The following sizes and lengths cover the sewers laid in 
this precinct to date : 

6-inch Akron pipe, 160 feet. 

8-inch Akron pipe, 7,083 

10-inch Akron pipe, 8,976 

10-inch cast-iron pipe, 76 

12-inch Akron pipe, 4,124 

15-inch Akron pipe, 2,263 

18-inch Akron pipe, 2,437 

24-inch Akron pipe, 726 



Total, 25,845 feet. 

Total miles in this precinct, 4,894-)-. 

Miscellaneous. 

Monthly statements of coal-tar sidewalks, etc., were 
made showing the location, quantities laid and the prices 
for same and turned over to the departments or com- 
mittees having the work in charge. 

In company with one or both of the other members of 
the committee for locating poles, I have attended to that 
duty, attended hearings and meetings of your board 
and furnished such information from this department 
as was called for. 

For the courtesies extended to this department by your 
board, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILL B. HOWE, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1921 



The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1921. 

From fees of all kinds, $831.40 

house rent, fire chief, 250.00 

bowling alley and pool table licenses, 380.00 

junk dealers' licenses, 130.00 

job team and passenger carriage licenses, 78.00 

dog licenses, 1,740.56 

county poor, Merrimack County, 13,805.21 

dependent soldiers, Merrimack County, 891.07 

sale of histories and maps, 22,75 

municipal primary fees, 86.00 

tree sold on City Lot, West Concord, 3.00 

standing grass, sold city lot, 2.00 

land sold, Mary Cowie, 6.69 

land sold, Irving Atherton, 7.50 

land sold, George R. Bunker, 15.00 

druggist permits, to sell li(iuor, 4.00 

employment bureau license, 5.00 

sale of old tower clock, 50.00 

sale of junk, • .90 

plowing garden, 1918, 4.64 

bounty on wild cat, 10.00 



$18,323.72 

The foregoing amount has been paid into the city treas- 
ury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FIFTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1921. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the fifty-fourth an- 
nual report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards 
One and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1921 : 

City Poor. 



Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Resolution No. 480, 528.55 



Paid groceries, 


$481.16 


fuel. 


258.00 


rents. 


321.00 


care children, 


552.00 


board and care. 


1,822.80 


medicine. 


11.60 


milk. 


51.99 


medical examinations, 


30.00 



$3,528.55 



$3,528.55 



280 city of concord. 

County Poor. 



Paid groceries, 


$2,349.16 




milk. 


180.41 




fuel, 


2,020.40 




rents, 


2,284.73 




care children. 


3,666.45 




board and care, 


2,744.00 




shoes and clothing, 


255.18 




burials, 


50.00 




miscellaneous, 


9.50 




transient account, 


15.56 


$13,575.39 




oor, 


Total amount paid for aid to p 


$17,103.94 



Dependent Soldiers, County. 

Paid groceries, $88.00 

fuel, 185.25 

rents, 148.50 

board and care, 651.50 



$1,073.25 



Respectfully submitted, 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES. 



Concord, N. H., January 20th, 1922. 

To the Honorable Henry E. Chamherlin, 

Mayor of Concord. 

Sir : I have the honor to submit to you a report of 
the work done as city sealer during the year 1921. 

I am glad to state that there has been no need of taking 
any cases to court this year. 
Scales, tested and sealed, 241 ; adjusted and sealed, 71 ; 

condemned, 3 ; total, 315. 
Weights, avoirdupois, tested and sealed, 517 ; adjusted and 

sealed, 97; destroyed, 1; total, 615. 
Automatic pumps, tested and sealed, 61 ; adjusted and 

sealed, 17 ; total, 78. 
Dry measures, tested and sealed, 13 ; destroyed, 1 ; total, 14, 
Liquid measures, tested and sealed, 74. 
Cart bodies, measured, 14, 
Estimates on coal in bins, 7. 
Wood measured, 3. 
Coal reweighing, 39. 
Package reweighing, 49, 

J. P. FORSYTH, 

City Sealer. 



REPORT OF HISTORY COMMISSION. 



January 9, 1922. 
To the Board of Aldermen: 

The History Commission hereby submits the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1921 : 

Number of Half Leather Bound Copies on hand 

January 1, 1921, 48 

Number of Half Leather Bound Copies sold 1921, 7 



Number of Half Leather Bound Copies on hand 

January 1, 1922, 41 

Number of Cloth Bound Copies on hand January 

1, 1921, 539 

Number of Cloth Bound Copies sold 1921, None 



Number of Cloth Bound Copies on hand January 

1, 1922, 539 

Number of Maps on hand January 1, 1921, 872 

Number of Maps given out with Histories sold, 

one to each set, 7 

Number of Maps sold separate, 7 

14 



858 



Number of Histories Sold, 1921. 

Seven copies. Half Leather Binding @ $3.00 per 

set. (Two volumes to a set), $21.00 

Number of maps sold separate, 7 @ 25c each, 1.75 

Total, $22.75 



HISTORY COMMISSION. 283 

Deposited with the City Treasurer, amount re- 
ceived from sale of Histories and Maps, 1921 : 

Treasurer's Receipt dated December 30, 1921, 

No. 349, $22.75 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, 
WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 
ARTHUR E. ROBY, Citij Clerk, 

History Commission. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Following is the report of the Board of Health for the 
year ending December 31, 1921 : 

The first meeting of the board was held in February 
when the following organization was effected : 

Mayor Henry E. Chamberlin, Chairman. 
Charles E. Cook, M. D., Secretary. 
Sibley G. Morrill, M. D., Member. 

Subsequent meetings were held on the first Monday 
of each month. 

In the absence of emergencies the business transacted 
at these meetings was largely of a routine nature, but the 
attendance was good and interest was sustained through- 
out the year. Our city has not been visited by any severe 
and devastating epidemic during the year. In fact, with 
the exception of a moderate epidemic of a very mild form of 
scarlet fever, the city has been unusually free from con- 
tagious disease. This light form of scarlatina prevailed 
throughout most sections of the country and in the case 
of our city was unattended with mortality. "We believe 
that the mild nature of the malady plays an important 
part in effecting its widespread distribution, as many cases 
are so mild as to be unrecognized. These cases are, there- 
fore, not reported and consequently not quarantined. Be- 
ing at large these eases serve as ready carriers of the 
disease and thus serve to help keep up a high incidence of 
morbidity. We believe that not only are many of these 
mild eases as stated not recognized, but that some of 
them are, moreover, in the present status of medical 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 285 

knowledge, unrecognizable. Indeed it is a matter of 
perennial regret that we do not possess for scarlet fever 
some simple and definite method for its recognition such 
as we have in the cultural method for diphtheria. Recent 
developments in the allied sciences of serology, immuno- 
logy, and bacteriology make it seem not unreasonable to 
hope that we may be given this boon in the not distant 
future. 

We have every reason to believe that our water supply 
is unexcelled by very few in the country; and by reason 
of the wise foresight of those having the matter in charge, 
it is growing better and safer year by year by reason 
of the removal of possible sources of contamination from 
the drainage area. Nearly all the land around the shores 
has been acquired and in the course of time the shores 
will be entirely reforested. 

Our information leads us to believe that our milk supply 
is, in general, quite satisfactory as to quality and clean- 
liness. The examination made at the state laboratory of 
samples collected from the dealers and the publishing of 
the results of these examinations as a bulletin in the daily 
newspapers has doubtless exerted a stimulating effect look- 
ing toward improvements along this line. 

Some of the volunteer organizations that are now work- 
ing in the medical vineyard are doubtless doing good work. 
Their activities will, without doubt, exert a beneficial and 
stimulating influence on the medical profession in general 
and upon public health administration in particular. It 
seems quite likely that in time much of the work now 
leing done by these organizations will be taken over as 
a part of the regular work of the official public health 
authorities. 

We believe that the employment by the Board of Edu- 
cation of a school physician giving full time to the work 
was a step in the right direction, and that in Dr. Kelley, 
they have secured the right man for the place. It would 
seem to be a not unreasonable expectation that the efforts 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of this conscientious worker seconded by the able school 
nurse will soon show tangible results in the right direction. 

The lack of adequate hospital facilities for the care of 
contagious diseases has been forcibly pointed out in sev- 
eral previous reports of this board. Something should 
be done looking toward a solution of this problem. We 
believe that the city should co-operate with the Margaret 
Pillsbury Hospital in providing and maintaining such 
hospital facilities as are needed for the care of this class 
of cases. 

Mr. Charles E. Palmer has served as sanitary officer for 
many years in the past. His annual report to the board 
of health is attached to and made a part of this report. 
You are respectfully referred to this report for some 
valuable suggestions, as well as for a detailed account 
of the activities of the health department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, 
CHARLES H. COOK, 
SIBLEY G. MORRILL, 

Board of Health. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 287 

REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted the report of the 
sanitary officer for the year ending December 31, 1921, 

The deaths for the past year number 432, which is 53 
less than in 1920, sclerosis-arterio claiming 36, the largest 
number from any one cause. Estimating the population 
at 23,000 and excluding the non-resident deaths, 153, and 
the stillbirths, 8, the yearly death rate for Concord was 
11.78 per cent. There were 233 deaths at the six public in- 
stitutions and 199 in the nine wards of the city. 

Scarlet fever has been prevalent through the country, 
becoming epidemic in many cities. Fifty-four cases were 
reported to the board of health; with no deaths. While 
this is the largest number of cases occurring in Concord 
since 1905 from this disease, it is comparatively few, when 
we consider the number of cases quarantined in some of 
our neighboring towns. There were also nine cases of 
diphtheria, thirty-one cases of measles, twenty cases of 
tuberculosis, with thirteen deaths resulting, two cases of 
typhoid fever, nine cases of whooping cough, w^ith one 
death, and one hundred two cases of venereal disease. 

The work of the Merrimack County Tuberculosis Clinic 
has been very successful and much benefit has been de- 
rived by the community at large. This has been of great 
assistance to this department in caring for many of the 
patients reported to this office. In these rooms are also 
held venereal clinics twice each week. Many of the cases 
that have been referred to me have come here from other 
cities and states, and I have been obliged to force patients 
to have treatment. These cases have been taken care of by 
the clinic, which has greatly facilitated the work in this 
branch of our department. 



288 CITY OP CONCORD. 

For the third time I again wish to call the attention of 
the citizens of Concord to the fact that we are still without 
an isolation hospital of any description. We are allowed 
to use the Foster Ward of the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 
when there are no other diseases in quarantine there. 
When both wards are occupied to their full capacity, I am 
obliged to care for patients wherever they may be found, 
and in many places the arrangements necessary to care 
for a patient at home cause great inconvenience to the 
family, as well as undue exposure to the disease. For- 
tunately we have had no small pox since the sale of the 
old pest house two years ago. As I stated last year, should 
a case develop I should be obliged to quarantine and care 
for it wherever it might be found. Since the enactment 
of the law obliging the board of health to care for venereal 
disease, many cases have come to my attention of people 
w^ho, on account of their condition, are a menace to the 
public and I have been requested by the State and Federal 
officers to quarantine such people for treatment. As I 
have no quarters in which to detain these patients, I have 
in some instances been able to take them to the County 
Farm at Grasmere, which involves heavy financial loss, as 
these patients could be cared for in our own venereal 
clinics. This arrangement is also uncertain as the County 
Commissioners must look after their own needs first. I 
feel very strongly that the time has come when we must 
have an isolation hospital under the direction of the board 
of health, as the demands of such cases are constantly 
increasing. 

The milk supply has been carried on as in former years. 
Seventy-six of the one hundred milk farms that I in- 
spected during the year were found in very good condi- 
tion. Twenty-one were fair, and in the other three in- 
stances, I requested the owners to put the farms in more 
sanitary condition at once, which was done. Each month 
I have submitted samples of milk from the various supplies 
sold in the city to the State Laboratory for examination. 
Of the one hundred thirty-three samples examined seventy- 



HEALTH DEa?ARTMENT. 289 

one were above standard. The board of health voted to 
publish a quarterly bulletin of the result of each examina- 
tion in the two local papers ; this was done and has proved 
to be a great stimulus to the producers, as a marked im- 
provement was noted in the conditions of the milk sub- 
mitted. 

One of the new institutions in the city is the Concord 
Dairy Co. This plant has a thoroughly up-to-date and 
sanitary equipment for pasteuring milk and making but- 
ter. Concord is indeed fortunate in having a plant of 
this kind and it is hoped that the citizens will co-operate 
in supporting it. 

Within the past year the price of live weight hogs has 
dropped to such a low figure that very few farmers are 
keeping pigs and there is no demand for house offal. The 
complaints from this source are almost daily. It is im- 
possible for each family to dispose of its own garbage and 
I would recommend that the city follow the course of pro- 
cedure adopted in many cities the size of Concord, namely, 
to let the contract to collect all the city garbage to one 
person or firm by the year. This method has proven very 
satisfactory wherever it has been adopted. 

There have been the usual number of complaints and 
nuisances to be inspected and disposed of. These came 
chiefly from dead animals, odors from pigs, stables and 
rubbish, unsanitary plumbing, refuse in yards and general 
conditions of premises. The weekly inspection of alley- 
ways in the rear of the business blocks has avoided any 
accumulation of rubbish. 

While there is very little building in the city, our rec- 
ords show a slight increase. Twenty new sewers were 
connected and I made 135 inspections of plumbing this 
year, 36 more than in 1920. 

The city water supply at Penacook Lake has been in- 
spected regularly and I have found it to be in most ex- 
cellent condition. Analysis shows the water to be of the 
usual fine quality. 

19 



290 riTY OP CONCORD. 

The appropriation of $4,300 for the year was overdrawn 
$327.86, making the total expenditures $4,627.86. Antici- 
pating the high price of fumigation supplies, I bought two 
years' supply in 1919 which was sufficient to meet the de- 
mands. The over draft came chiefly on contagious disease, 
for which $903.65 was expended ; most cases requiring as- 
sistance by this department during quarantine were cared 
for at the Foster Ward, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 
$171.00 was received from milk licenses. 

The following tables show in detail the work of the de- 
partment : 

Financial Statement op the Board op Health por the 
Year Ending December 31, 1921. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $2,000.00 

Upkeep of automobile, 300.00 

Fumigation supplies, 100.00 

Contagious diseases, 700.00 

Incidental expenses, 1,200.00 

Resolution No. 480, 327.86 



Total, $4,627.86 

expenditures. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $2,000.00 

Upkeep of automobile, 300.00 

Fumigation supplies, 8.30 

Contagious diseases, 903.65 

Incidental expenses, 1,415.91 

Total, $4,627.86 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR. 

Milk license fees, $171.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT, 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



291 



The following table shows the number of contagious dis- 
eases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom: 



Months. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Influenza. 


Measles. 


Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum , 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubercu- 
losis. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Vene- 
real dis- 
eases. 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 






0) 

O 




1 

03 


el 
P 


o 

03 

O 


i 


a 


J3 






6 


a> 

P 


0) 


la 
o 

P 


1 

33 


03 
P 


January 


1 








8 

10 
3 

10 
1 
4 








1 

2 
10 
5 
2 
2 
2 

3 

6 
8 
11 
2 




2 
4 








7 

9 

7 

7 

3 

13 

6 

3 

7 

11 

20 

9 








February.. . . 






1 




















March 














2 

1 
1 

2 
2 


1 










April 


1 




















6 




May 
















2 
3 
3 
2 
2 








June 
















1 






July 


















2 
1 




August 


3 




















1 


September. . . 
















2 
1 

1 
1 








October 


1 
3 






















November. . . 


















1 
1 












December . . . 


















































Total .... 


9 






1 


31 








54 




20 


13 


2 




102 




9 


1 

















292 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890 : 



Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 



Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 



Infan- 
tile pa- 
ralysis. 



Diph- 
theria. 



Sea 


rlet 


Typhoid 


fever. 


fever. 




s 




.a 


a> 


<6 


« 


=s 


c« 


<u 


03 


0) 


O 


U 


O 


U 



Measles. 



Small- 


pox. 




m 


Vi 


A 


11 


d 


03 


S. 


W 


M 



Total. 



1890.. 
1891.. 
1892.. 
1893.. 
1894.. 
1895.. 
1896.. 
1897. . 
1898.. 
1899.. 
1900. . 
1901.. 
1902. . 
1903.. 
1904.. 
1905.. 
1906.. 
1907.. 
1908.. 
1909.. 
1910.. 
1911.. 
1912.. 
1913.. 
1914.. 
1915.. 
1916.. 
1917.. 
1918.. 
1919.. 
1920.. 
1921.. 



6 
12 
13 
■18 
17 
35 
55 
13 
4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
■12 
55 
15 
14 
63 
44 
131 
30 
51 
17 
33 
30 
21 
54 
138 
22 
28 
13 
9 



17 
14 

13 
13 
21 
15 
17 

8 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 

6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 

7 



6 

2 
2 

300 

21 
158 
452 
138 
126 
299 
476 

40 

27 
582 

31 
181 
101 
118 
100 
1168 
143 

26 

321 

687 

6 

9 
382 
414 
112 

7 
805 
31 



38 

35 

59 

402 

164 

258 

526 

190 

146 

421 

562 

130 

87 

682 

116 

299 

175 

218 

157 

1350 

199 

95 

362 

763 

74 

94 

468 

610 

206 

128 

879 

107 



health department. 298 
Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions. 

Ward 1, 26 

Ward 2, 8 

Ward 3, 9 

Ward 4, 33 

Ward 5, 17 

Ward 6, 38 

Ward 7, 36 

Ward 8, 17 

Ward 9, 15 

New Hampshire State Hospital, 142 

Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital, 55 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 27 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 3 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 6 
New Hampshire State Prison, 

Deaths Reported by Age. 

*Under 1 year, 47 

From 1 to 5 years, 9 

From 5 to 10 years, 2 

From 10 to 15 years, 1 

From 15 to 20 years, 5 

From 20 to 30 years, 21 

From 30 to 40 years, 26 

From 40 to 50 years, 41 

From 50 to 60 years, 54 

From 60 to 70 years, 73 

From 70 to 80 years, 85 

From 80 to 90 years, 63 

From 90 to 100 years, 5 



Total number of deaths, 432 



♦Including 8 Stillbirths. 



294 city op concord. 

Deaths During 1921 by Sex, Condition and Nativity. 

Sex: 

Males, 205 

Females, 227 

Condition : 

Married, 171 

Single, 121 

Widowed, 122 

Divorced, 11 

Not stated, 7 

Nativity : 

Concord, 93 

New Hampshire, 146 

Other states, 92 

Foreign, 86 

Not stated, 15 

Total number of deaths for the year 1921, 432, compared 
with 485 in 1920. 

Average death-rate for the year 1921, 11.78, compared 
with 12.43 in 1920. 

Total number of births for the year 1921, 430, compared 
with 428 in 1920. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1921, 229, com- 
pared with 255 in 1920. 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection 
OF Milk Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 133 

Number of examinations above standard, 71 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 100 

Conditions good, 76 

Conditions fair, 21 

Conditions poor, 3 

Improvements suggested, 24 



health department. 295 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 375 

Burial permits issued, 545 

Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 113 

Transit permits issued, 180 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 237 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 36 

Number of reports of contagious disease sent to State 

Board of Health, 52 

Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general. Public 

Health and Marine Hospital Service, 52 

Number of samples of water and ice collected for 

analysis, 12 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 166 
Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 213 

Number of plumbing permits granted, 82 

Number of inspections of plumbing, 135 

Number of sewers connected, 20 

Number of barber shops inspected, 21 

Number of public halls inspected, 20 

Number of restaurants and bakeries inspected, 15 

Number of school buildings inspected, 25 

I wish to express my thanks to the Mayor and the other 
members of the Board of Health, the Aldermen and all the 
city officials for their co-operation with me in the work of 
this department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



296 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Causes of Death, 



Cause. 
Accident, 

asphyxiation, 
drowning, 
Acidosis, 

Anemia and old age, 
Angina pectoris, 
Apoplexy, 

Asphyxia neonatorum, 
Ataxia, locomotor, 
Atheroma, 
Birth, difficult, 
Bright 's disease, 
Bronchitis, 
Burns, 
Cancer, 

of brain, 

face, 

intestines, 

liver, 

lungs, 

rectum, 

stomach, 

tongue, 

uterus, 
Cardiac dilatation acute, 
Cardio-renal, 
Cholecystitis, 
Convulsions, 
Cystitis, 
Dementia, 
Diabetes, 

mellitus. 
Diarrhea and enteritis, 
Dysentery, 
Eclampsia (pregnancy), 



No. 



of deaths. 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
5 
17 
1 
2 
1 

1 . 
1 
8 
1 
4 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
8 
1 
3 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
6 
1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 297 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Edema of glottis, 1 

lungs, 2 

Embolism, 3 



coronary, 



1 



cerebral, 1 

pulmonary, 2 

Empyema, 1 

Encephalitis, 4 

Endocarditis, 3 

Enteritis, 3 

gastro, 2 

Epilepsy, 2 

Erysipelas, 3 

Exhaustion, 6 

Fracture of spine, 1 

skull, 3 

Gangrene senile, 1 

Gastric carcinoma, 1 

Heart, disease of, 27 

Hemiplegia, 4 

Hemorrhage, 2 

cerebral, 30 

pulmonary, 1 

Hernia, strangulated, 1 

Homicide, by firearms, 1 

Hydroencephalis, 2 

Inanition, 6 

Indigestion, 2 

Infarction, pulmonary, 1 

Influenza, 1 

Intestinal obstruction, 4 

LaGrippe, 3 

Liver, cirrhosis of, 3 

Mania, 4 

Marasmus, 1 

Malnutrition, 4 

Meningitis, pneumococcus, 1 

tubercular, 1 



298 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Methemoglobinemia, 1 

Myelitis, 1 

Myocarditis, 27 

Nephritis, 17 

interstitial, 8 

parenchymatous, 1 

Pancreas, 1 

Paralysis of insane, 8 

Paresis, 3 

Pemphigus neonatorum, 1 

Peritonitis, 5 

appendicitis, 2 

Pneumonia, 16 

broncho, 17 

hypostatic, 1 

lobar, 7 

Premature birth, 7 

Psychosis, 2 

Sarcoma melano of eye, 1 

Sclerosis-arterio, 36 

Senility, 3 

Senile debility, 1 

Septic absorption, 1 

Septicemia, 4 

Stillborn, 8 

iSuicide, illuminating gas, 1 

hanging, 2 



poisoning. 



2 



shooting, 1 

Tetanus, 1 

Thrombosis cerebral, 1 

Tuberculosis pulmonary, 13 

Uraemia, 5 

Whooping cough, 1 



432 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1921. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The twenty-second annual report of this 
board is herewith submitted. 

The membership of the present board is as follows: 
Wilfred W. Brennan, a licensed journeyman plumber, 
Charles H. Cook, M. D., and Will B. Howe, City Engineer. 
Mr. Brennan is chairman of the board and Will B. Howe, 
clerk. 

Two applications for journeymen's licenses were re- 
ceived, and three applications for master plumbers' licenses. 

Four meetings were held, the applicants examined, and 
one journeyman was licensed. The other applicant has 
never completed his examination. The three applicants for 
master's licenses were examined, two passed and were 
licensed, the other one failed to pass and was denied a 
license. 

Licenses and certificates were issued to the parties named 
in the attached list. This list also shows the date of issue 
and the amount paid by each one. 

The total receipts of the board were $30.00, for which 
amount the clerk of the board holds receipts from the city 
treasurer. 



300 



CITY OP CONCORD. 






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April 1 

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March 16 

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April 13 

Nov. 15 


April 1 

March 24 

24 

23 

23 

April 6 

March 28 

22 

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April 4 

March 24 

April 23 

March 28 

April 1 

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March 30 

23 

April 1 

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March 22 

April 1 

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June 21 



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EXAMINERS OP PLUMBERS. 



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May 20 

April 14 

Aug. 11 

April 2 

March 25 

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May 3 


April 9 
2 
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March 25 
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May 2 


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Journeyman 
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REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Following is the report of the city physician for the 
year ending December 31, 1921 : 

Number of patients examined for commitment to the 

State Hospital, 3 

Number of house calls on city poor, 74 

Number of office calls on city poor, 41 

Consultations for the diagnosis of contagious disease, 7 

Number of house calls board of health, 41 

Number of office calls board of health, 50 

Number of calls at police station, 12 

Number of vaccinations and examinations for same, 127 

As an ex-officio member of the board of health the city 
physician has attended the meetings of that board acting 
as its secretary. He has also given medical service and 
advice to other city departments when called upon to do so. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK, 

City Physician, 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Concord, N. H., January 3, 1922. 
To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

I herewith submit my annual report relative to the legal 
matters in which the City has been interested during the 
past year. 

In the case of Leon F. Savoy v. Concord, a petition for 
leave to file a statement of a claim for damages, the peti- 
tion has been granted by the court. 

Philippe St. Pierre v. Concord, a suit for damages for 
the destruction of an automobile, is still pending in the 
Superior Court for the County of Merrimack. 

The action of DeWitt C. Howe, Executor of the Estate 
of Mary A. Norris, v. Concord, Herbert G. Sargent and 
Thomas W. Cragg, a suit to recover damages for the death 
of Mary A. Norris resulting from an accident on the high- 
way between Concord and Peuacook, was tried by jury at 
the October Term of the Superior Court, and resulted in 
a verdict in favor of the City of Concord. 

Mae E. Cragg v. Concord is a petition to the Superior 
Court for leave to file a statement of claim for damages 
for injuries alleged to have been received in the same acci- 
dent which caused the death of Mary A. Norris, referred 
to above. This petition is now pending. 

St. Mary's School for Girls v. Concord, a petition for 
abatement of taxes assessed upon real estate of the school 
corporation, has been transferred to the Supreme Court 
for the determination of questions of law raised. 

Gertrude Pinsonneault v. Concord is a suit claiming 
$2,000 — damages for the destruction of merchandise and 
fixtures alleged to have been caused by reason of the care- 



304 CITY OP CONCOED. 

lessness and negligence of the City on the 29th day of July, 
1921, causing the basement of the store of the plaintiff 
to be flooded with water, and will be in order for trial at 
the April, 1922, term. 

I wish to thank His Honor, the Mayor, the members of 
the Board of Aldermen, and the heads of the various de- 
partments for their courtesy and co-operation during my 
first year in the office of solicitor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. JOSEPH DOHERTY, 

City Solicitor. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY 
MARSHAL. 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1922. 

To His Honor, Henry E. Chamherlin, Mayor of the City of 
Concord, and the Honorable Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: I respectfully submit my thirteenth an- 
nual report of the Concord Police Department for the 
year ending December 31, 1921 : 

ORGANIZATION. 

City Marshal, 
Geo. A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Victor I. Moore, 

Captain, 
Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant, 
Christopher T. Wallace, 

Patrolmen, 

Samuel Rodd, Fred N. Marden, 

Geo. H. Silsby, John B. Long, 

Irving B. Robinson, James J. Halligan, 

*Harry L, Woodward, F, Scott Rogers, 

J, Edward Silva, Cleveland H, Curtis. 

Chauffeurs, 
John S, Chandler, Abraham D. Gushing. 



* Resigned Feb. 2, 1922. 
20 



306 



city op concord. 
Reserve Officers. 

Captain, 
Thomas P. Davis, 



Willie A. Little, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Willie A. Flanders, 
Nelson Forest, 
Geo. H. Abbott, 
Elmer Trombly, 



Walter H. Bean, 
John McGirr, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Nelson E. Strong, 
Galen W. Hunter, 
Arthur W. Mclsaac. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Appropriation, 
Special appropriation, 



$37,675.00 
714.14 





$38,389.14 


expenditures. 


Salaries, 
Fuel, 


$31,950.06 

988.56 


Caps and buttons, 
Automobiles, 


97.86 
804.06 


Lights, 


294.33 


Incidentals, 
Signal, 
Repairs, 
Motorcycle, 


2,253.77 
151.77 

1,319.48 
529.25 



$38,389.14 
Officers' fees received and paid to city treasurer, $422.04 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 307 



1909, 


281 


1910, 


586 


1911, 


1,076 


1912, 


1,366 


1913, 


1,556 


1914, 


1,850 


1915, 


1,599 


1916, 


1,106 


1917, 


1,003 


1918, 


493 


1919, 


350 


1920, 


471 



Whole Number of Arrests and Causes, 1921. 

Arrests, City and Penacook, 552 

Brought before the court, 366 

Released, 186 

Adultery, 4 

Assault, 21 

Breaking and entering, 12 

Bastardy, ' 3 

Drunkenness, 130 

Deserters, 1 

Escapes from House of Correction, 1 

Arrests for other departments, 18 

Insane, 13 

Simple larceny, 12 

Grand larceny, 8 

Disorderly conduct, 26 

Safe keeping, 95 

Bound over to Superior Court, 30 

Committed to jail, 5 

Committed to House of Correction, 10 

Committed to State Hospital, 12 

Number fines paid, 265 



308 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appealed cases. 


4 


Nol-prossed, 


18 


Sentences suspended, 


32 


False pretense, 


1 


Fighting, 


1 


Non-support, 


4 


Concealed weapons, 


1 


Operating auto when under influence of liquor. 


8 


Overspeeding autos. 


54 


Cruelty to animals. 


1 


Idle persons, 


3 


Fornication, 


3 


Having liquor in possession. 


17 


Forgery, 


2 


Receiving stolen goods, 


1 


Selling wood, short measure. 


1 


Manufacturing liquor. 


3 


Transporting liquor. 


11 


Arson, 


1 


Fraud, 


5 


Unlawful cohabitation, 


1 


Operating auto recklessly. 


6 


Eunaway boys. 


1 


Operating auto without a license, 


3 


Having narcotics in possession. 


1 


Abusing a horse. 


1 


Bigamy, 


1 


Gambling, 


28 


Failing to stop auto when passengers were getting on 




and off electric cars. 


3 


Violating traffic laws. 


13 


Violating fish and game laws, 


6 


False oath, 


1 


Giving away cider. 


1 


Running pawn shop without a license. 


2 


Disturbing the peace. 


4 


Riding bicycles on sidewalk, 


1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 309 

Selling adulterated milk, 1 

Disorderly house, 1 

Committing an unnatural act, 4 

Highway robbery, 2 

Keeping liquor for sale, 10 

Perjury, 1 

Fugitive from justice, 1 

Passing worthless checks, 1 

Transferring number plates, 1 

Setting fires, 2 

Present where others were gambling, 2 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number of times doors tried during year. 263,165 

Doors found unlocked, 706 

Windows found open, 10 

Lodgers put up at station, 1055 

Automobiles stolen, 7 

Stolen autos recovered, 7 

Auto stolen in Brookline found on Hill's avenue, 1 

Persons killed by autos, 1 

Persons injured in auto accidents, 36 

Complaints about autos, 267 

Teams run into by autos, 3 

Autos run into electric cars, 4 

Auto accidents investigated, 58 

Disturbances quelled, 53 

Stray teams found and cared for, 3 

Ambulance calls, 236 

Emergency calls for ambulance, 33 

Murders, 1 

Suicides, 9 

Fires reported to Central Fire Station, 8 

Complaints, boys riding wheels on sidewalks, 12 

Complaints, children breaking windows, 21 

Complaints, children coasting on sidewalks, 6 



310 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dumb animal cases reported to S. P. C. A., 7 

Destitute persons cared for at the station, 14 

Street lights out, reported to Electric Co.. 602 

Merchants notified of trouble in stores, 21 

Fires* discovered by patrolmen, 6 

Juveniles taken home after 9.30 p. m. 19 

Runaway horses caught, 3 

Runaway children apprehended, 4 

Officers attending fires, 139 

Unlicensed dogs killed, 62 

Investigations, damage done by dogs, 6 

Dangerous wires reported to Electric Co., 12 

Dead persons removed by the police, 7 

Holes in streets reported to Highway Department, 22 

Dangerous limbs reported to tree warden, 7 

Persons asphyxiated by gas, 4 

Persons found dead (natural causes), 1 

Complaints investigated, 911 
Leaks in water pipes reported to Water Department, 18 

Property owners notified of locked fire escapes, 2 

Dangerous fences, notified Highway Department, 3 

Merchants notified to remove rubbish, 9 

Accidental drowning cases, 3 

Dead animals reported to health officer, 7 
Obstructions in streets, Highway Department, 

notified, 1 

Stolen teams, 2 

Rubbish fires in streets, 9 

PENACOOK. 

Ward One Police Report. 
ARRESTS, 1921. 

Keeping liquor for sale, 1 

Non-support, 2 

Larceny, 2 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 311 

Grand larceny, 3 

Drunkenness, 11 

Stubborn child, 1 

Gambling, 2 

Disturbing the peace, 1 

Carrying concealed weapons, 2 

Deserters U, S. Army, 1 

Safe-keeping, 2 



28 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Lodgers, 193 

Doors found open, 28 

Runaway horses caught, 2 

Stray horses cared for, 2 

Complaints investigated, 125 

Officers attending fires, 14 

Doors tried, 54,750 

Location of Police Signal Boxes. 

Bridge Street and Stickney Avenue. 

South Main and West Streets. 

South Main and Concord Streets. 

South Main and Pleasant Streets. 

North Main and School Streets. 

North Main and Wallace Drug Store. 

Washington, between North Main and State 

Streets. 
North Main and Church Streets. 
North State and Penacook Streets. 
Curtice Avenue and North State Street. 
West Concord, opposite Shepard's store. 
Penacook (square). 
Center, opposite Union Street. 



Box 


1. 


Box 


2. 


Box 


3. 


Box 


4. 


Box 


5. 


Box 


6. 


Box 


7. 


Box 


8. 


Box 


9. 


Box 


10. 


Box 


11. 


Box 


12. 


Box 


13. 



312 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 14. South and Perley Streets. 

Box 15. Broadway, corner Carter Street. 

Box 16. Center and Pine Streets. 

Box 17. Pleasant and South Streets. 

Box 18. School and Giles Streets. 

Box 19. Beacon and Rumford Streets. 

EQUIPMENT. 

The department is well equipped with motor apparatus. 
The Packard ambulance has been thoroughly overhauled 
by Chauffeur Cushing. I would recommend that the am- 
bulance be touched up and varnished, and the Buick tour- 
ing car, which has been run two years, be turned in in the 
spring for a new one ; this is an economical measure. The 
motorcycle purchased last spring has proved to be a good 
asset for the department, and is in good condition. 

CONCLUSION. 

I desire to thank His Honor, the Mayor, and the Honor- 
able Board of Aldermen, Judge Harry J. Brown, County 
Solicitor Herbert W. Rainie, Clerk of Court John W. 
Stanley and the members of the department for the co- 
operation and support given throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 



GEO. A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF THE 
MUNICIPAL COURT. 



Receipts. 
Received for fines, costs and sundry fees, $5,578.63 

Expenditures. 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses and 

complaints and warrants, $826.19 

State of New Hampshire : 

Mott L. Bartlett, Commissioner of 

Fish and Game, 85.00 

Olin H. Chase, Commissioner of 

Motor Vehicles, 1,477.40 

Postage, printing and other supplies, 31.75 
Clerk's bond, 3.00 

Probation officer, services and expenses, 120.00 
Special justices, 66.00 

Treasurer of Merrimack County, 775.00 

Concord Society, S. P. C. A., fines, 25.00 

Balance paid City Treasurer, 2,169.29 



$5,578.63 



Respectfully submitted, 



JOHN W. STANLEY, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : I would submit the following report of 
the work of the tree warden for the year ending December 
31, 1921. 

The greater part of the appropriation of $3,500 for 
trees was expended in caring for gypsy moths. There were 
no elm tree beetles or brown-tail moths, but there was a 
large amount of work necessary on account of the gypsy 
moth both in painting the nests and in spraying. 

There was a constant demand to have trees removed, 
but it was impossible to do so only where the trees were 
dangerous. There are still about thirty-five large trees 
which should be taken down, and when they are removed 
new ones should be set out in their place. If a fair amount 
of planting could be done each year it would help to keep 
the streets properly shaded and attractive, but if nothing 
is done toward replacing those removed the beauty of 
some of our streets will soon be destroyed. 

There have been a large number of poplar trees re- 
moved, mostly in places where they were found to be dam- 
aging sewers and there should be more of them removed 
as they are not a proper tree for city streets. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Tree Warden. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration 
the following facts and figures showing the valuation of 
the city and its school districts and special precincts, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

The right to tax the land owned by St. Mary's School 
for Girls, on Ridge Road, on which an exemption from tax- 
ation is claimed, is now before the courts. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
for the years from 1911 to the present time, which shows 
the increased amount spent by the city. 



316 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Tabulations of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 

Valuation of City and Precincts with 

Rate for Each in 1921. 



Warrant. 



Amount 

of 
warrants. 



Tax 

rate per 

$1,000. 



State 

State war bonus 

County 

City 

Extra for schools : 

Union 

f No.20 ... 
Penacookj 

( Union*.. 

Precincts : 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

Sewer 

Lights 

Penacook lights 

Penacook sprinkling 

Penacook sewer 

West Concord lights. 

West Concord sewer. 



186.683.00"! 

22.945.50 I 
} 
44.331.53 

150.000.00 J 

258.283.75 

926.75 

28,508.06 

5,000.00 

16.000.00 

9,855.00 

21,500.00 

2,425.00 

475.00 

1.500.00 

800.00 

50.00 



112.30 



13.40 

.46 

11.55 

.35 
1.10 

.65 
1.30 
1.20 

.33 
1.00 

.80 

.10 



Assessed 

valuation of 

city and 

precincts. 



121.341.661 



19.310.726 
2,030,235 
2.596,589 

14,871.231 

14.26'J.227 

15.907.407 

17,055.540 

2.011,380 

1.464.762 

1.467,230 

1,037.231 

401.481 



I 



* Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



assessors' report. 



317 



Number of shares of railroad stock held here on which 
the tax was assessed and collected by state of New Hamp- 
shire and credited to this city: 



Railroad. 



1918. 



1919. 



1920. 



1921. 



Boston & Maine 

Concord & Montreal 

Concord & Portsmouth 

Dover, Somersworth&RochesterStreet 

Fitchburg 

Manchester & Lawrence 

Nashua & Lowell 

Nashua Street 

New Boston 

Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemigewasset Valley 

Suncook Valley 

Wilton 

Connecticut River 



354 

8,983 

67 

468 

56 

247 

18 

387 

64 

1,194 

8 

166 

49 

4 



353 

9,019 

69 

468 

56 

313 

16 

373 

66 

1,249 

8 

171 

49 

6 



362 

8,632 

72 



77 

203 

18 



66 

1,295 

8 

152 

49 

9 

5 



307 

6,172 

67 

468 

87 

199 

13 



66 

1,216 

8 

80 

44 

11 





318 city of concord. 

Inventory of the City of Concord. 





No. 


Valuation 


Improved and unimproved 


land and 




buildings, 




$17,721,835.00 


Horses, 


885 


102,805.00 


Oxen, 


14 


1,680.00 


Cows, 


1,314 


87,035.00 


Other neat stock, 


196 


8,350.00 


Sheep, 


52 


430.00 


Fur-bearing animals, 


58 


10,000.00 


Hogs, 


72 


1,675.00 


Fowls, 




3,995.00 


Vehicles, 




12,500.00 


Portable mills, 


15 


3,275.00 


Boats and launches, 




5,800.00 


Wood and lumber, 




21,730.00 


Stock in publie funds, 




247,855.00 


Stock in banks. 




146,531.00 


Money on hand, at interest. 


, or on deposit. 


455,525.00 


Stock in trade, 




2,286,725.00 


Machinery, 




223,315.00 



Total, $21,341,061.00 

Polls, 12,540, $61,711.00 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector, $664,864.83 
Average rate per cent, of taxation for all purposes, $2.82-|- 



assessors' report. 319 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and 
on the real and personal estate of Concord since 1911 : 



Year. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1911 




5,784 


$12,507,847 


$296,074.27 


1912 




5,691 


18,701,591 


316,117.69 


1913 




5,687 


20,842,846 


305,460.56 


1914 




5,735 


19,177,428 


31G.447.67 


1915 




5,806 


20.086,789 


339,781.64 


1916 




5,779 


19,803,275 


382,352.47 


1917 




6,185 - 


20,110,995 


377,326.81 


1918 




5,485 


20,440,315 


447,484.47 


1919 




5,662 


20,370,605 


578,633.66 


1920 




6,071 


20,501,778 


647,009.63 


1921. 










Ward 1, 


1,275 


$2,123,490 


$61,380.88 




2, 


375 


587,010 


17,460.78 




3, 


681 


1,420,650 


40,793.18 




4, 


2,365 


3,884,745 


124,005.87 




5, 


1,669 


4,025,660 


124,890.36 




6, 


2,038 


2,239,444 


75,757.94 




7, 


2,387 


3,140,702 


100,875.07 




8, 


652 


3,093,015 


90,712.33 




9, 


1,098 


826,345 


28,988.42 




12,540 


$21,341,061 


$664,864.83 



320 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in Each 
Ward, 1920 and 1921. 



Wards. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Total tax assessed. 






1 










1920. 


1921. 


1920. 


1921. 


1920. 


1921. 


Ward 1 


630 


1.275 


$1,909,285 


$2,123,490 


$55,622.41 


$61,380.88 


Wards 


201 


375 


572,630 


587,010 


17,569.31 


17.460.78 


Wards".... 


350 


681 


1.370.845 


1.420.650 


40,509.21 


40.793 18 


Ward 4 


1.141 


2,365 


3,562,547 


3,884.745 


115.955.81 


124,005.87 


Ward 5 


788 


1,669 


3.926,684 


4,025,660 


126,870.07 


124,890 36 


Ward 6 


910 


2.038 


2,321.502 


2,239.444 


76,830.31 


75.757 94 


Ward? 


1.109 


2,387 


3,089.035 


3 140,702 


93,947.94 


100,875.07 


Ward 8 


391 


652 


2,975,310 


3,093,015 


93.347.39 


90.712 33 


Ward 9 


551 


1,098 


773,940 


826.345 


26,357.18 


28,988.42 


Totals 


8,071 


12.540 


$20,501,778 


$21,341,061 


$647,009.63 


$664,864.83 



Total warrants submitted to tax collector : 

In 1920 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 

Total, 

In 1921 — Resident tax-list, 

Non-resident tax-list, 
Polls, 



Total, 



Respectfully submitted. 



$616,789.11 

1,189.52 

29,031.00 

$647,009.63 

$602,280.14 

1,064.69 

61,520.00 

$664,864.83 



JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report to 
the close of business December 31, 1921, on tax lists of 
Seth R. Dole : 

Tax Levy, 1916. 

Resident list, $370,029.62 

Poll tax lists, 11,558.00 

Non-resident list, 764.85 

Additions and corrections, 391.53 



Collected, moth account, 
Collected, interest, 



$382,741.00 

282.05 

1,387.28 



-$384,413.33 



Cash paid treasurer, 
Amount of discount, 
Amount of abatements, 
Uncollected, 



$376,102.34 

3,888.83 

4,374.12 

48.04 



$384,413.33 



Tax Levy, 1917. 



Resident list. 
Poll tax lists. 
Non-resident list. 
Additions and corrections, 



Collected, moth account. 
Collected, interest. 



$364,272.21 

12,370.00 

684.60 

305.49 

$377,632.30 
158.00 

1,482.22 



-$379,272.52 



322 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cash paid treasurer, 


$371,675.35 


Amount of discount, 


8,753.29 


Amount of abatements, 


3,764.21 


Uncollected, 


79.67 




(tQ7Q 070 p;o 




^iO 1 1^,^ • ^,oci 


T.\x Levy, 


1918. 


Resident list, 


$435,671.29 


Poll tax lists. 


10,970.00 


Non-resident list. 


843.18 


Additions and corrections. 


527.26 




$448,011.73 


Collected, interest, 


1,654.81 




4i'1'19 666 5i 




*p^Ti: t7 J U U U . 0^ 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$441,404.71 


Amount of discount, 


4,099.95 


Amount of abatements, 


4,047.47 


Uncollected, 


114.41 




$449,666.54 



Taxes sold the City of Concord in the office of the col- 
lector for redemption : 



Amount 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest. 



1912. 



$1,186.96 
123.92 



$1,310.88 



$1,811.71 
151.37 



Paid treasurer. 

Deeded, 

Unsettled. 



1913. 



Paid treasurer. 
Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



$975.06 

45.31 

290.51 

$1,310.88 



$1,613.36 

35.21 

314.51 



$1,963.08 



$1,963.08 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



TAX collector's REPORT. 

1914. 



$1,228.92 
54.06 



Paid treasurer. 

Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



$1,282.98 

1915. 
$687.48 Paid treasurer, 

56.93 



$744.41 



1916. 
$519.09 Paid treasurer, 

24.05 Deeded, 



$543.14 



1917. 

$890.76 Paid treasurer, 

61.04 Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



$951.80 



1918. 
$2,046.98 Paid treasurer, 

138.10 Unsettled, 



$2,185.08 



323 

$698.31 

514.52 

70.15 

$1,282.98. 
$744.41 

$744.41 



$491.81 
51.33 

$543.14 



$808.62 

24.80 

118.38 

$951.80 



$2,030.56 
154.52 

$2,185.08 



There has been no change on taxes sold the city of Con- 
cord for redemption, as turned over to Mr. Dole by Mr. 
Ladd, a former collector. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE C. BRADLEY. 



324 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business, December 31, 1921. 



Tax Levy, 1919. 



Resident list, 
Amount poll taxes, 
Additions and corrections. 

Non-resident list. 
Collected interest. 



Cash paid treasurer, 
Amount of discount. 
Amount of abatements, 
Cash on hand. 



$560,553.51 

16,986.00 
439.87 



-$577,979.38 
1,094.15 
1,515.18 



$580,588.71 



$567,130.97 

5,179.97 

4,306.46 

429.39 



Uncollected, 



-$577,046.79 
3,541.92 



$580,588.71 

Taxes sold city of Concord in office of collector for re- 
demption : 



Non-resident, 
Resident, 



Interest, 



Paid treasurer, 
Unsettled, 



$28.55 
3,271.16 

$3,299.71 
69.14 



$3,368.85 
Respectfully submitted. 



$1,139.79 
2,229.06 



$3,368.85 



JOHN A. BLACKWOOD, 

Collector. 



TAX collector's REPORT. 325 

REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business, December 31, 
1921. 

Tax Levy, 1920. 

Resident list, $616,789.11 
Poll tax lists, 29,031.00 
Non-resident list, 1,189.52 





$647,009.63 


Additions and 


cor- 




rections. 




1.156.29 


Interest collected. 


2,147.63 


Paid treasurer, 


$635,177.49 


Discounts, 




8,197.22 


Abatements, 




5,992.38 


Cash on hand. 




48.47 


Uncollected, 




897.99 



$650,313.55 



$650,313.55 



Tax Levy, 1921. 

Resident list, $602,280.14 
Poll tax lists, 61,520.00 
Non-resident list, 1,064.69 



$664,864.83 
Additions and cor- 
rections, 8,228.10 
Interest collected, 99.57 



Paid treasurer, $584,630.50 
Discount, 6,888.84 

Abatements, 9,669.02 

Cash on hand, 422.24 

Uncollected, 71,581.90 



$673,192.50 



$673,192.50 



326 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Taxes sold the City of Concord in the office of the col- 
lector for redemption : 

Resident list, $2,416.54 Paid treasurer. $848.35 
Non-resident list, 5.05 Not redeemed, 1,587.32 

Interest, 14.08 





$2,435.67 




Taxes. 


On acct. 1918 re- 


P 


demptions. 


$115.60 


Interest, 


11.50 


On acet. 1919 re- 




demptions, 


467.81 


Interest, 


31.80 



$2,435.67 
Paid treasurer. $626.71 



$626.71 $626.71 

Motor Vehicle Permit Account. 

Permits issued, $27,675.26 Paid treasurer, $27,430.65 

Cash on hand, 244.61 



$27,675.26 $27,675.26 

Respectfully submitted, 

WOODBURY E. HUNT, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF TRUST 
FUNDS. 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, ) 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, [ Trustees. 

CARL H. FOSTER, 



S 



Receipts. 



1921. 

Jan. 1. To balance from 1920, $3,067.52 

Dee. 31. Income Harper Allen Trust, 2.12 
J. B. & Olivia B. Abbott Trust, 7.00 

William E. Chandler Trust, 14.25 

William M. Chase Trust, 12.75 

F. H. Corson Trust, 2.12 

Eliza A. Cole Trust, 2.12 

Calvin P. Couch Trust, 2.38 

Jacob C. Dunklee Trust, 9.50 

Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 35.00 

Seth Eastman Trust, 5.00 

Sarah E. Farrand Trust, 8.50 

George G. Fogg Trust, 12.00 

Leverett N. Freeman Trust, 2.13 

Jacob H. Gallinger Trust, 9.50 

Heber B. Hardy Trust, 4.25 

Mary D. Hart Trust, 12.00 

Loren W. James Trust, 2.12 

Sarah H. James Trust, 1.06 

William H. Johns Trust, 4.24 

Mary J. Jones Trust, 4.25 

Ebenezer Lane Trust, 4.75 

George S. Little Trust, 4.25 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dec. 31. Income J. W. & E. J. Little Trust, $6.00 

Lj^dia F. Lund Trust, 14.25 

Charles W. Morse Trust, 4.75 

Lucy M. Roach Trust, 2.12 

Charles E. Scorer Trust, 4.25 

Antonio J, Souza Trust, 2.12 

Hiram B. Tebbitts Trust, 27.00 
Interest, note, City of Concord, 

$52,176.42 at 31/2%, 1,826.17 
Interest, Trust funds, Merrimack 

County Savings Bank, 632.04 
Interest Trust funds. Union Trust 

Company, 248.32 

Income Seth K. Jones Trust, 12.00 

J. Eastman Pecker Trust, 15.00 
Liva C. Heath Trust, Loan 

and Trust Savings Bank, 5.10 
Henry Burleigh Trust, 
Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank, 6.80* 
Abial Walker Trust, 40.00 
Countess of Rumford Trust, 80.00 
David Osgood Trust, 25.00 
P. B. Cogswell Trust, 85.90 
G. Parker Lyon Trust, 40.00 
Franklin Pierce Trust, 40.00 
Thomas G. Valpey Trust, 20.00 
Jos. Hazeltine Trust, 133.54 
Seth Jones Trust, 25.10 
K. P. and D. Rollins Trust, 63.75 
Samuel C. Eastman Trust, 1,390.47 
William M. Chase Trust, 42.50 

$8,020.99 



trustees op trust funds. 329 

Expenditures. 
1921. 

Feb. 28. By paid Sarah L. Kimball, account 
of Samuel G. Sanborn 
Trust, $2.00 

Mar. 25. Edmund H. Brown, treas- 

urer, account labor, trust 
lots, Woodlawn Cemetery, 67.00 

Dec. 31. , Rev. George A. Demers, 

account David Osgood 
Trust, 25.00 

Mary E. Bourne, account 

of Richard Collins Trust, 1.75 

Edmund H. Brown, treas- 
urer, account labor, trust 
lots, Woodlawn Cemetery, 179.25 
John F. Waters, account 
labor, trust lots. Calvary 
Cemetery, . 114.85 

Benj. J. Prescott, account 

of Nancy Bradeen Trust, 10.00 

Margaretta L. Blake, treas- 
urer, income Countess of 
Rumford Trust, 80.00 

City Treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds 
to reimburse city for 
money advanced for care 
of lots in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, 1,799.00 

City Treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds 
to reimburse city for 
money advanced for care 
of lots in Old North 
Cemetery, 312.25 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dec. 31. By paid City Treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds 
to reimburse city for 
money advanced for care 
of lots in Maple Grove 
Cemetery, $75.85 

City Treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds 
to reimburse city for 
money advanced for care 
of lots in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, 118.75 

City Treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds 
to reimburse city for 
money advanced for care 
of lots in Old Fort Ceme- 
tery, . 2.50 

City Treasurer, income 

Thomas G. Valpey Trust, 20.00 

City Treasurer, income G. 

Parker Lyon Trust, 40.00 

City Treasurer, income 

Seth K. Jones Trust, 25.10 

City Treasurer, income 
Katharine P. & Douglas 
Rollins Trust, 63.75 

City Treasurer, income 
Samuel C. Eastman 
Trust, 1,390.47 

City Treasurer, income P. 

B. Cogswell Trust, 85.90 

City Treasurer, income 

Franklin Pierce Trust, 40.00 

City Treasurer, income 

Abial Walker Trust, 40.00 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 331 

Dec. 31. By paid City Treasurer, income 

Joseph Hazeltine Trust, $133.54 
City Treasurer, income 

Wm. M. Chase Trust, 42.50 
H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 

account Minot Enclosure, 105.00 

By balance, 3,246.53 

$8,020.99 



TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

lucome received, 1921, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST. ' 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to b« 
applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1921, 80.00 

Paid Margaretta L. Blake, treasurer of the society, 80.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income last year, $392.07 

Income received, 1921, 23.68 

415.75 



Paid Rev. George A. Demers, treasurer, $25.00 
Income on hand, January 1, 1922, 390.75 



415.75 



Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank ; income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



TRUST FUNDS. 333 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, historical and scientific character, and the 
books relating to science shall be those that give the latest developments and 
discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1921, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85.90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1921, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1921, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1921, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1921, 133.54 

Paid into the city treasury, 133.54 



334 CITY OF CONCX)BD. 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city 
bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping 
lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each 
year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund; 
and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books 
for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1921, 43.10 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Paid to city treasurer for public 

library, 25.10 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

$43.10 



Invested in City of Hartford, Conn., 4 per cent. 

bond due June 1, 1934, $922.60 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 77.40 

SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1921, $599.13 

From Seth K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1921, 23.82 



$628.95 
Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



TRUST FUNDS. 335 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abbie P. Minot, the income to be expended annunlly 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly appointed ofScials, 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1921, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 314 per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 



JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows: So much of income as is necessary to be used 
for the care of burial lot numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, East Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be 
added to principal till same amounts to $10,000; then the balance of income 
accruing each year after paying for care of said lot and monument, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the mayor for the general care and improvement 
of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, $5,838.30 
Received from income of fund, 1921, 233.83 



Paid for care of lot, $15.00 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, 6,057.13 



$6,072.13 



$6,072.13 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $2,465.48 
Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 1,742.41 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,849.24 

KATHARINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST. 

Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital, $1,500.00 

Income received, 1921, 63.75 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 63.75 

Invested in second converted U. S. Liberty Loan, 4i/4 per 
cent, bonds. 



336 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN TRUST. 

Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign languages for the 
Public Library. 

Capital, $1,250.00 

Income received, 1921, 50.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 50.00 

Invested in twenty-five shares United Gas Improvement 
Company stock, par value $50 per share. 

WILLIAM M. CHASE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the pur- 
chase of books on historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational 
subjects. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1921, 42.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 42.50 

Invested in Fourth U. S. Liberty Loan 4^4 per cent. bond. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $28,028.00 

Income received, 1921, 1,340.47 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 1,340.47 

Invested in $5700 First Liberty Loan bonds, 4,914.20 
Invested in $7,000 Second Liberty Loan bonds, 6,308.75 
Invested in $3,000 U. S. Victory Loan 4% per 

cent, notes, 3,000.00 

Invested in $13,500 U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 

414 per cent, bonds, 12,376.00 

Five shares, par value $100 per share. 
Boston & Maine R. R. first preferred, Class D. 
Twelve shares, par value $100 per share. 
Concord Gas Co., common. 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 179.05 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 1,250.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 337 

I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the hands 
of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find such 
trust funds invested and the income thereof for the year 
1921 accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees 
kept for that purpose. 

AUTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



340 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



349 



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350 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



351 



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352 



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23 



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CITY OP CONCORD. 



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356 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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362 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



369 



« . la . 



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370 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



O 



•j;26l 'I ^JB 
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aoioDiii JO eoti'BiBa 



■IS61 'papnadxg 



•IS61 
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ccoaaiM QQjncQMcQMMwcoa. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



371 



W -s 



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a - 



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ft p* p* -• 
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372 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 
CQ 

Eh 

m 

p 

Eh 

Eh 
H 



-noBf 'puBq no 
ainooui JO aouuiBg 



1161 'papnadxa 



'p9Ai8oaa aiuoonj 



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-hi papnadxanfi 



I a I 5 

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t) S 



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2 


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GQ 




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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



373 









W -S 



8 .9 



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cj -t< -r -^ 



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o 
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H H H 






374 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 

m 

E-i 

H 
Eh 
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•Z361 'X jtJB 
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1561 'pgpnadxa 



•1261 
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•siv^S. sno 
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■hi papnadxauQ 



•{'B^Jld'BO 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



375 



w ^ 



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t- c He 



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o e 



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o 


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t^ 


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m 


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376 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



I 

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311 






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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Special 

Funds. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, $41,208.66 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1921, 1,478.48 

Received from income of fund, 1921, 1,650.17 

$44,337.31 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1,650.17 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, 42,687.14 

$44,337.31 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 
bonds, $1,000.00 

Proceeds from matured bond, 1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 15,937.01 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 10,750.13 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 10,000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 4,000.00 

$42,687.14 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an in- 
crease of the fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January ], li)21, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 32.60 

$847.60 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $32.60 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922. 815.00 

$847.60 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is in^-reased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protectioa 
and ornamentation of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, $766.11 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1921, 399.89 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1921, 50.00 

Received from income of fund, 1921, 46.47 

$1,262.47 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $46.47 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, 816.11 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1922, 399.89 



$1,262.47 



Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank, 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 379 

EAST CONCORD CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of East Concord Cemetery, 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, $352.50 

Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1921, 382.01 

Received from income of fund, 1921, 29.36 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1921, 17.50 

$781.37 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $29.36 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1922, 382.01 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, 370.00 



$781.37 



Capital and unexpended income deposited in New Hamp- 
shire Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY POND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
interested parties, and by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, $2,157.15 
Unexpended income on hand, Janu- 
ary 1, 1921, 473.40 
Received from income of fund, 1921, 106.26 

$2,736.81 



Capital, January 1, 1922, $2,157.15 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1922, 473.40 



Capital and income, January 1, 1922, $2,630.55 
Credited city of Concord, general 

account, 106.26 

$2,736.81 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 1,345.99 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,284.56 



380 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Soucook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, $31.38 
Received from income of fund, 1921, 1.26 

$32.64 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1.26 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, 31.38 

$32.64 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $31.38 

WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund, the conditions of which have already been fulfilled. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1921, $31.30 

Income received, 1921, 1.24 

$32.54 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1922, $32,54 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS INCOME INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Established by authority of an ordinance of the Board of Aldermen passed 
June 11, 1917. Principal and interest to be used in the reduction of the 
bonded indebtedness of the water-works system at the discretion of the Board 
of Water Commissioners. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $34,000.00 

Invested in 

City of Concord, N. H., 4% sewer 

refunding bonds, $1,000.00 

U. S. First Liberty Loan con- 
verted 414% bonds, 10,000.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 381 

U. S. Third Liberty Loan 414% 

bonds, $10,000.00 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 414% 
bonds, ■ 10,000.00 

U. S. Victory Loan 4^% notes, 3,000.00 

$34,000.00 

Proceeds from $4,000 matured 4 per cent, sewer re- 
funding bonds, and redemption of $846 War Savings 
Stamps, deposited in General Account by direction of the 
Board of Water Commissioners, to be used in the reduction 
'of the bonded indebtedness of the water system. 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS PROFIT INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Balance of income, 1920, $4,261.67 

Income received, 1921, 2,059.56 

$6,321.23 

Transferred to General Account, Water De- 
partment, by order of the Board of Water 
Commissioners, to be used in the reduction of 
the bonded indebtedness of the water system, $6,321.23 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the per- 
manent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and in- 
come of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the 
mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that 
purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1921. 

Mrs. Noah Moses, care, $2.50 

C. W. Clarke, care, 2.50 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 2.50 

Joseph Cummolli (infant burial), 10.00 

Fred Lovering, care. 2.00 

G. N. Bart emus, care, 1.50 

W. E. Hunt, care, 5.00 

W. D. Chandler, labor, 28.50 

Stuart P. Chandler, burial, 7.00 

A. B. Batchelder, care, 2.00 

Ardella Shaw, care, 3.50 

Larson and Carlson, foundation, 10.00 

L. A. Sanders, care, 2.50 

Nellie S. Chesley, care, 2.00 

Perley Flanders estate, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. 0. W. Durrell, care, 2.00 

Thomas Dunstane, rent, 20.00 

E. D. Clough, care, 3.00 

Wm. Silver, care, 4.00 

Fred Powell, care, 1.50 

Dr. J. B. Brainard, labor, 26.00 

Geo. B. Wright estate, burial, 12.00 

Joseph J. Comi, foundation, 10.00 

Mrs. Chas. Carter, care, 4.00 

Wm. E. Sleeper, lot 62, block W, 140.00 

Ray L. Knox, lot 15, block CC, 96.00 
Leverett N. Freeman, lot 52, block AA, 79.20 

Harriet Sturgeon, lot 76, block CC, 39.20 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 383 

Joseph G. Jones estate, lot 43, block CC, $51.00 
Earl "Walbridge, south half lot 8, block 

BB, 19.00 

Geo. F. Ordway, lot 45, block CC, 31.68 

Edw. A. Freeman estate, burial, 16.00 

Frank H. Whitney estate, burial, 8.00 

Emma D. Virgin estate, burial, 10.00 

Bessie A. Savage estate, burial, 8.00 

Catherine A. Watton estate, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. R. F. Morgan, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Herman Webster, care, 2.00 

(Mr. Wilson, care, 1.00 

F. E. Cummings, care, 3.50 

Geo. B. Lauder, care, 2.50 

James S. Kerr, lot 66, block CC, 50.40 

Frank A. Rosell, lot 69, block CC, 50.40 

Ward A. Aseltine, lot 85, block CC, 57.60 
David L. and Fred L. Brown, lot 1, 

block DD, 109.88 

Mr. Datson, labor, 3.00 

Kendall, Foster and Kilkenny', labor, 7.00 

Fred Carr, care, 2.50 

Mrs. A. S. Temple, care, 4.00 

Frank A. Opie estate, burial, 10.00 

Lutie B. Powell estate, burial, 8.00 

Ida A. S. Grover estate, burial, 14.00 

Henry W. Hilson estate, burial, 9.00 

Ella Willey estate, burial, 8.00 

Vivian P. Helin, burial, 12.00 

H. Peter Hansen estate, burial, 9.00 

Nettie F. Morgan estate, burial, 9.00 

Joseph G. Jones estate, burial, 14.00 

Annie P. Dimond estate, burial, 10.00 

Walter A. Emery estate, burial, 12.00 

Frank W. Sargent estate, burial, 10.00 

Enoch A. Morgan estate, burial, 9.00 

Orlando B. Douglas estate, burial, 9.00 



384 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary M. Buckland estate, burial, $9.00 

Ann M. Ordway estate, burial, 12.00 

Alice Edmunds estate, burial, 12.00 

Emma A. Brown estate, burial, 14.00 

Edgar C. Rines estate, burial, 14.00 

Ledore E. Alexander estate, burial, 18.00 

Geo. B. Baker estate, burial, 6.00 

John B. Baiker estate, burial, 14.00 

Geo. H. Cox (infant), burial, 1.00 

Fred S. Hill, lot 30, block DD, 91.26 
Mrs. Guy A. Adams, lot 8, No. half, 

block BB, 15.00 

Fred 0. Libbey, lot 12, block CO, 96.00 
W. Preston Beauclerk estate, lot 31, 

block AA, 79.20 

Mary 0. Dearborn, lot 38, block AA, 72.00 

Leadward (infant), burial, 1.00 

W. Preston Beauclerk estate, burial, 15.00 

Emily H. Matthews estate, burial, 15.00 

Charles H. Maderson estate, burial, 7.00 

Kate M. French estate, burial, 8.00 

Clarkson Dearborn estate, burial, 8.00 
T. Peterson (grave and burial infant), 

burial, 7.00 

Benjamin Sturgeon estate, burial, 8.00 

Frank K. Tweedie estate, burial, 8.00 

L. F. Graves, (infant), burial, 3.00 

John H. Dudley estate, burial, 8.00 

Edna Watson, foundation, 12.00 

JNIr. Harrington, care, 1.50 

j\Irs. Mclntire, care, 1.50 

Frank Gordon, care, 5.00 

Miss Fuller, care, 1.50 

Lucy Poore, care, 2.50 

Mrs. E. G. Lang, care, 9.00 

Cash (rebate on freight) freight, 2.61 

Mrs. M. J. Gould, care, 3.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 385 

Mrs. C. A. Sabin, labor, $2.00 

Arthur H. Davidson, lot 62, block CC, 50.40 

Wm. W. Elkin, lot 30, block AA, 72.00 

Carrie E. Somers, lot 68, block CC, 57.60 
Lowell H. Hartshorn, south part lot 11, 

block BB, 41.73 

Etta E. Compton, lot 61, block CC, 50.40 

E. C. Niles, ca,re, ' 3.00 
Roseanna Dowe, care, 4.00 

F. J. Kelley, care, 2.00 
W. A. Aseltine, burial, 3.00 
Rachel K. Worth estate, burial, 8.00 
Ellen L. Young estate, burial, 8.00 
Alice P. Howard (infant), burial, 4.00 
Gara E. McQuesten estate, burial, 9.00 
Annie Kirby estate, burial, 8.00 
Jessie L. Hill estate, burial, 12.00 
Sarah J. P. W. Mitchell estate, burial, 8.00 
Caroline J. L. Elkins estate, burial, 8.00 
Charles H. Sanders estate, burial, 15.00 
Florence A. F. Gordon estate, burial, 8.00 
Arthur Booth estate, burial, 8.00 
Luther "W. Durgin estate, burial, 12.00 
Charles G. Blanchard estate, burial, 12.00 
Margaret J. D. Kimball estate, burial, 9.00 
Alpheus E. Smith estate, burial, 12.00 
Kate L. Oakes estate, burial, 10.00 
Ellen Hill estate, burial, 9.00 
Harrison "W. Dwight estate, burial, 18.50 
Charles M. Mitchell estate, burial, 9.00 
Betsy J. Watson estate, burial, 8.00 
Frank L. Putnam estate, burial, 8.00 
Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, fees, 8.00 
Abbie Batchelder, labor, 6.00 
Mrs. Harvey Hevenor, care, 5,00 

G. W. Waters, fees, 4.50 
F. J. Kelley, fees, 3.00 
W. Ludlow, labor, 11.00 

26 



386 CITY OF CONCORD. 

John C. Mclnnis estate, burial, $8.00 

Jas. Gordon estate, burial. 4.00 

Heath (infant), 1.00 

John Flood estate, burial, 9.00 

I\Ir. Calderara estate, burial, 14.00 

Lare (infant), burial, 1.00 

Mabel T. Foote estate, burial, 8.00 

F. P. Underbill esta,te, burial, 9.00 

Annie L. Rand estate, burial, 12.00 

Betsey A. Cooper estate, burial, 5.00 

J. R. H. Davis, care, 1.50 

j\Iary Coleman, care, 2.00 

J. Durgin, care, 1.00 

Brown & Cushing, labor, 1.00 

Miss G. L. Ring, labor, 7.00 

J. Normandeau, labor, 2.00 

Annie M. Mclnnis, lot 119, block AA, 79.20 

Charles H. Osgood, lot 81, block CC, 57.60 

Telvena E. Kilburn, lot 67, block CC, 57.60 
Frank P., F. Roger, Nelson, Carleton M, 

and Osmond Strong, lot 1, block BB, 123.41 

James A. Knight, lot 74, block CC, 50.40 

William A. Townes, lot 80, block "SI, 25.00 

Loring D. Brown, lot 27, block DD, 57.60 

Maude L. Parker estate, burial, 8.00 

Annie A. Theobald estate, burial, 10.00 

Nathaniel Southard estate, burial, 8.00 

Wm. A. Towne (child), burial, 5.00 

Ruth A. Marcotte, burial, 7.00 

Perry Bros., foundation, 25.00 

Larson and Carlson, foundation, 6.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 59.25 
John Swenson Granite Co., foundation, 26.25 

E. ^I. Shannon, care, 3.00 

Etta Dodge, care, 4.00 

A. F. Elwell, care, 40.00 

Mrs. W. C. Batchelder, care, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 387 

Mrs. A. C. Clarke, care, $8.00 

Frank Peterson, labor, 2.00 

J. P. Airth, labor, 2.00 

Nellie A. McPherson, labor, 2.00 

H. B. Cheney, labor, 3.00 

D. C. Newton, labor, 8.00 

H. A. Piper, labor, 10.00 

J. S. K. Hubbard estate, burial, 9.00 

Regina 0. Rossell estate, burial, 10.00 

Mabel I. Andrews estate, burial, 8.00 

A. Evada Elliott estate, burial, 8.00 

Anna Nelson estate, burial, 15.00 

W. Ford Compton estate, burial, 12.00 

Oretta E. B. Barrett estate, burial, 10.00 

Fred A. Kent estate, burial, 8.00 

Ellen Sears estate, burial, 8.00 

Augusta S. Chase estate, burial, 10.00 

John F. Webster estate, burial, 21.00 

George Goodhue estate, burial, 10.00 

Frank B. Kilburn estate, burial, 8.00 

Merrill (infant), burial, 2.00 

Brown (infant), burial, 2.00 

McKay (infant), burial, 1.00 

Gallant (infant), burial, 1.00 

Charles E. McLam estate, burial, 12.00 

Marion Colby estate, burial, 8.00 

Frank J. Bean estate, burial, 8.00 

Augustus E. Potter estate, burial, 8.00 

Susan B. M. Johnson estate, burial, 8.00 

Charles A. Cook estate, burial, 8.00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb fees, 14.00 

0. T. Fox, care, 5.00 

Mrs. Burgholtz, care, 1.00 
Fay French Bickford, Louman A, French, 

lot 18, block DD, 72.00 

Margaret D. Haines, lot 28, block DD, 57.60 

Frank I. Dunsmoore, lot 181, block Y, 25.00 



388 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Clymena J. Arlin, lot 88, block CC, $47.25 

Joseph G. Jones, lot 2, block V, 149.00 

L. C. Johnson, care, 2.00 

S. J. Carlson, care, 4.00 

F. E. Hook, care, 1.00 

E. H. Lane, labor, 3.00 

W. H. Robbins, labor, 6.00 

Martha A. Kelley, labor, 3.00 

JMrs. Sarah E. Irish, labor, 16.00 

J. Normandeaii, labor, 1.00 

W. H. Hoyt, tomb fees, 9.00 

Joseph Casno & Co., foundation, 16.00 

George Clarke, foundation, 26.00 

D. Dufraine, foundation, 21.00 

Frank Weatherdale estate, burial, 10.00 

Geo. Waters (infant), burial, 1.00 

Lewis E. Haines estate, burial, 8.00 

Elisi Solena estate, burial, 4.00 

Adelaide M. Osgood estate, burial, 8.00 
Cutting and Maxwell (infant), burial, 12.00 

John W. Pitman estate, burial, 9.00 

Alexander Paxton estate, burial, 9.00 

Emily Seymour estate, burial, 9.00 

Ervin J. Thayer (infant), burial, 8.00 

John W. Prowse, care, 4.00 

Mr. Rowell, care, 1.00 

Emma L. Ford estate, burial, 8.00 

Walter J. Bourdon, lot 58, block CC, 50.40 

Mary E. Rowell, lot 55, block CC, 43.26 
Mrs. Alice R. Wiggin, lot 27, block AA, 72.00 

Charles Bunker, care, 2.00 

Richard Collins, care, 4.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 73.00 

C. A. Bailey, foundation, 11.00 

Kendall, Foster and Kilkenny, labor, 1.00 

Wm. D. Young, labor, 1.25 

Mrs. G. A. Adams, labor, 1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 389 

Laura T. Lull, labor, $24.00 

Helen D. Jones, labor, 21.00 

Walter J. Bourdon, labor, 15.00 

Mr. Jenkins, labor, .50 

Susan A. H. Lyford estate, burial, 8.00 

Geo. S. Houston estate, burial, 15.00 

Thomas F. Abbott estate, burial, 10,00 

Jessie F. Johnson estate, burial, 8.00 

Isa,belle F. Nutter estate, burial, 8.00 

Raymond H. Fellows estate, burial, 9.00 

Grove (child), burial, 2.00 

Susan R. Dole estate, burial, 14.00 

Mary R. Harriman estate, burial, 8.00 

Harry B. Day estate, burial, 9.00 

Chas. F. Batchelder estate, burial, 14.00 

Clarence B. Rundlett estate, burial, 8.00 

Hattie E. Brown estate, burial, 8.00 

James L. Adams, lot 16, block DD, 72.00 

Ned J. Morrill, lot 5, block CC, 96.00 
Mrs. Leonard W. Bean, lot 17, block DD, 72.00 

Jennie V. Goodrich, lot 29, block AA, 72.00 

W. H. Peacock, care, 4.00 

F. N. Hammond, care, 2.49 

Frank D. Abbott, ca,re, 2.00 

Helen H. Coffin, care, 2.00 

Sylvanus Smith estate, care, 8.00 

Eva Adams estate, care, 8.00 

Fred C. Morrill estate, care, 8.00 

Frank G. Hammond, care, 10.00 

Cornelia H. Marsh estate, care, 5.00 

R. P. Stevens, foundation, 10,50 

J. Matthews, labor, 7.00 

J. T. Chesley, labor, 40.00 

Mrs. L. W. Bean, labor, 15.00 

Susie I. Carter, lot 42, block CC, 46,90 

Charles Ada, lot 39, block AA, 79.20 

Harold L. Eastman, lot 10, block DD, 72.00 



390 CITY OF CONCORD. 

C. E. Blake, care, $5.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 32.00 

Ralph Tuttle, foundation. 7.00 

Wm. K. McFarland, care, 4.00 

E. N. Pearson, care, 2.00 

Chas. R. Webber, labor, 54.00 

E. Lake, care, 2.00 
Cummings Bros., foundation, 33.50 
Perry Bros., foundation, 57.00 

B. P. Hodgman, care, 2.00 
I. Bushey, care, 1.00 
Frank Morrill, ca.re, 1.50 
A. P. Carpenter estate, care, 4.25 

F. S. Streeter, care, 4.25 

F. J. Sulloway, care, 2.00 
Bertha Watson, care, 2.50 
Edith Carter, care, 4.00 
H. E. Dwight, care, 2.00 
L. S. Bean, care, 2.00 
Elizabeth Schutz, care, 6.00 
Mao-y E. Carter, care, 3.00 
Mrs. B. C. White, care, 9.70 
Fred French, care, 2.00 
Mrs. A, R. Ayers, care, 3.50 
George Bruce estate, burial, . 14.00 
J. H. Sanders, care, 2.00 
Dt. G. E. Clarke, care, 3.00 
Dr. G. M. Kimball, care, 6.00 
Mrs. E. J. Hill, care, 8.00 
Emma Cochran, care, 1.50 
Carrie Todd, care, 4.00 
Mrs. J. W. Drew, care, 2.00 
Mrs. C. H. Gay, care, 7.00 

C. P. Bancroft, care, 3.00 
H. F. Wight, care, 1.00 

G. A, Foster, care, 4.00 
Mrs. E. M. Willis, care, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 391 

James G. McGloughlin, care, $5.10 

James 0. Lyford, care, ^.50 

Fred A. Straw, care, 4.00 

Mrs. H. G. Sargent, care, 1.50 

G. N. Woodward, care, 1.50 

Emma Blodgett estate, care, 2.50 

Emma Blodgett estate, burial, 8.00 

0. B. Douglas estate, care, 2.50 

C. W. Lane, care, 2.00 

Mrs. C. A. Kendall, care, 3.00 

E. H. Tucker, caj-e, 2.00 

W. W. Flint, care, 2.00 

Chas. F. Conn, care, 4.00 

J. B. Hussey, care, 2.50 

Mrs. J. H. Albin, care, 4.00 

Chas. C. Schoolcraft, care, 5.50 

Fred L. Johnson, care, 3.00 

Mrs. S. F. Morrill, care, 3.00 

Mrs. F. E. Brown, care, 2.00 

Mrs. H. B. Roby, care, 4.00 
John Swenson Granite Co., foundation, 14.00 

Anna Hodgman, care, 1.50 

Mrs. J. Tebeau, ca^re, 2.00 

H. J. Tebeau, labor, 2.00 

W. E. Hood, care, 2.00 

Fred A. Carr, care, 2.50 

Mrs. R. Hutchins, labor, 5.00 

Otis G. Hammond, care, 2.00 

Mary Etta Burroughs estate, burial, 8.00 

Fred N. Nelson, care, 4.00 

E. S. Tenney, care, 2.50 

Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 3.00 

J. F. Webster, care, 5.00 

Hosea B. Quint estate, burial, 10.00 

Fifield and Hubbard, labor, 3.00 

Frank S. Moulton, care, 2.50 

Fannie B. Robinson estate, burial, 8.00 



392 CITY OF CONCORD. 

R. F. Robinson, care, $2.00 

Mrs. D. G. Lowell, care, 2.00 

Mrs. H. B. Day, care, 3.00 

George H. Silsby, care, 3.00 

D. Dufraine, foundation, 43.00 
W. P. Fiske estate, care, 2.50 
Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 4.00 
C. N. Hall, care, 1.00 
Mrs. V. C, Hastings, care, 1.50 
Miss A. Kimball, care, 1.00 
I. 0. 0. F. Home, care, 6.00 
Charles H. Rowell estate, burial, 8.00 

E. C. Hoague, care, 4.00 
B. W. Couch, care, 3.00 
Walter T. Drew estate, burial, 15.00 
Maud E. Hemminger estate, burial, 8.00 
Elisi Salini estate, burial, 4.00 
Harry C. Thurston, care, 2.00 
Ned Morrill, labor, 2.00 
Mrs. 0. Morrill, labor, 2.00 
Chas. T. Forsyth, care, 4.00 
Miss Maria Woods, care, 4.50 
Mary A. and Helga E. Erickson, lot 35, 

block AA, • 72.00 
Mary L. Ga.therum, lot 33, block DD, 57.60 

E. Burroughs, care, 4.00 

Harold Cheney, care, 3.00 

Lawrence F. Piper, labor, 2.00 

Mrs. A. S. Temple, care, 2.00 

Geo. H. Marston estate, care, 5.00 

Ann Merrill, care, 1.00 

A. D. Fosgate, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Noah Moses, care, 2.50 

Miss Lucia Clement, care, 4.00 

Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Rufus Morgaiu, care, 3.00 

William J. Green, care, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 393 

N. H. Shattuck estate, care, $2.00 

Charlotte Merrill, care, 2.00 

'Fred Colburn, care, 2.00 

J. E. Fernald, care, 3.00 

Isaac Hill, care, 3.50 

George R. Connell, care, 3.00 

Fred N. Ladd, caxe, 5.00 

Fred Powell, care, 1.50 

B. Bilsborough estate, care, 1.00 

H. H. Kennedy, care, 1.00 

W. H. Dunlap, care, 3.00 

Ernest Roberts, care, 4.00 

•Jessie G. Killeen, care, 5.00 

Charles R. Dame, care, 2.00 

W. E. Carpenter, care, 4.50 

Frank Lane, care, 2.00 

Miss Alice Cochran, care, 2.00 

Charles E. Palmer, care, 1.25 

Mrs. Annie Flanders, care, 1.00 

Alvah Sprague, care, 1.50 

Dr. L. A. Sanders, care, 2.50 

J. Edward Morrison, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Nancy Dutton estate, care, 3.00 

Miss Grace Colby, care, 2.00 

J. S. Matthews, care, 2.50 

W. W. Thayer, care, 4.00 

Mrs. P. F. Smith, care, 4.00 

Clara L. Clark estate, burial, 8.00 

Clara L. Clark estate, labor, 1.00 

Henry A. Rowell, care, 1.50 

George H. Hobson, care, 1.00 

John W. Ford, care, 2.00 

Henry F. Piper, care, 2.00 

Everett Runnells, care, 1.50 

Walter Jenks, care, 2.00 

Joseph R. Pearce, care, 2.00 

James R. H. Davis, care, 1.50 



394 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, $2.50 

Miss Nellie Cheslev, care, 2.00 

Richard Harvey, rent, 24.00 

H. L. Smith, care, 2.00 

Katharine W. Rollins estate, l-urial, 49.00 

Ida Humphrey, care, 2.50 

Minot Cemetery Assoc, labor, 109.00 

Ira Matxfield, care, 1.50 

Mrs. E. A. Griffin, care, 1.50 

A. H. Matson, care, 4.50 

Allen Hollis, care, 5.00 

W. A. Greenough estate, burial, 14.00 

Alfred H. Brown estate, burial, 14.00 

Ernest E. Lewis estate, burial, 14.00 

Irvin E. Lull estate, burial, 11.00 

Everett J. Bourdon estate, burial, 12.00 

Ira W. Arlin estate, burial, 8.00 

Frank A. Drew estate, burial, 12.00 

George W. Barnes estate, burial, 9.00 

John Gatherum estate, burial, 8.00 

Eric A. Carlson estate, burial, 10.00 

Charles P. Webster estate, burial, 8.00 

Emily A. Clark estate, burial. 8.00 

Orin H. Bean estate, burial,. 8.00 

Joseph F. Headey estate, burial, 10.00 

Mary A. Norris estate, burial, 12.00 

James C. Moore estate, burial, 12.00 

Ellen A. Byron estate, burial, 9.00 

Albert P. Davis estate, burial, 8.00 

Henry W. Greenough estate, burial, 8.00 

Seth R. Dole estate, burial, 15.00 
Kendall, Foster and Kilkenny, labor, 11.00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 28.00 

John Brooks, care, 6.00 

Mrs. A. D. Crowell, care, 4.00 

]Mrs. H. D. Hammond, care, 1.50 

G. N. Bartemus, care, 1.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 395 

Jennie D. Cloiigh, care, $3.00 

John C. Tilton, care, 2.50 

F. W. Boardman, care, 3.00 

H. Dolloff, care, 1.50 

Beatrice Sargent, care, 2.00 

N. C. Nelson estate, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Margaret Martin, care, 2.00 

Arthur F. Sturtevant, care, 2.00 

Geo. W. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1.75 

John B. and Olivia B. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 2.50 

Sarah M. K. Adajns, trust, 24.50 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 8.00 

Ellen E. Allen, trust, 2.00 

Smith and Dimond Allen, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Allison, trust, 3.50 

Mary B. Allison, trust, 1.75 

Frank P. Andrews, trust, 12.00 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 1.75 

Sarah S. Ash, trust, 1.75 

Alonzo Atherton, trust, 6.00 

F. D. Avery, trust. 3.50 

Rev. A, D. Ayer, trust. 4.00 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 3.50 

Wm. Badger, trust, 3.00 

Abbie L. S. Bailey, trust, 3.50 

Oliver Ballou, trust, 1.75 

H. C. Barrett, trust, 1.75 

Charles Barker, trust, 3.50 

Geo. W. Barnes, trust, 1.75 

James W. Barton, trust, 3.50 

Horace B. Bartlett, trust, 3.00 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 1.75 

A. F. Batchelder, trust, 2.00 

Frank J. Batchelder, trust, 7.00 

Robert Bell, trust, 1.75 



396 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Matilda Benson, trust, $2.50 

Anna M. Bickford, trust, 2.00 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3.50 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, . 3.50 

James M. Blake, trust, 7.00 

William Blakely, trust, 4.00 

Emily P. Blanchard, trust, 9.00 

Charles S. Boardman, trust, 2.00 

Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 7.00 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 3.50 

Charles Brown, trust, 7.00 

Jennie E. Brown, trust, 8.00 

Samuel Brunei, trust, 2.00 

Andrew Bunker, trust, 2.00 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 9.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1.75 

Frank A. Burnham, trust, 2.00 

Mary A. Burnham, trust, 1.75 

Alfred D. Burroughs, trust, 2.00 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 3.50 

M. F. and P. M. Eaton Buzzell, trust, 4.00 

Henry F. Burleigh, trust, 7.00 

Benj. F. Caldwell, trust, 9.00 

Levi Call, trust, 3.50 

Wm. L. Carlton, trust, 9.00 

Lysander H. Carroll, trust, 3.00 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 5.00 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 3.50 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 2.00 

Harry M. Cavis, trust, 4.00 

Levi G. Call, trust, 3.50 

Wm. M. Chase, trust, 12.00 

Wm. E. Chandler, trust, 14.00 

A. P. aind Kate P. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Wm. C. Chesley, trust, 7.00 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Frank E. Child, trust, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 397 

Caroline Clarke, trust, $4.00 

Ellen P. Clark, trust, 4.50 

Fannie 0. Clark, trust, 2.50 

Herman W. Clay, trust, 2.00 

Mary B. Clement, trust, 2.00 

Rufus Clement, trust, 4.00 

Wm. W. Cloud, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Clough, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 1.75 

George Clough, trust, 3.50 

Sarah L. Cloutman, trust, 1.75 

Weston Cofran, trust, 8.00 

Helen B. P. Cogswell, trust, 4.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 1.75 

Henry A. Colby, trust, 4.00 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, 3.50 

Charles A. Cook, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust, 2.50 

F. H. Corson, trust, 2.00 

Calvin P. Couch, trust, 2.00 

Mary Crow, trust, 7.00 

Charles H. Cummings, trust, 35.00 

George A. Cummings, trust, 12.00 

Mary R. Cummings, trust, 7.00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 6.00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 4.00 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 2.50 

Chas. C. Danforth, trust, 7.00 

Chas. S. Danforth, trust, 2.00 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 2.00 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 3.00 

Walter J. Davis, trust, 4.00 

Emma J. Dearborn, trust, 3.00 

Curtis C. Dearborn, trust, 3.00 

Edward Dow, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 1.25 

Jacob C. Dunklee, trust, 12.00 



398 CITY OP CONCORD. 

John W. Dunklee, trust, $8.00 

C. V. Dudley, trust, 5.00 

Martha E. Durgin, trust, 12.00 

William B. Durgin, trust, 9.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 4.50 

'Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 3.50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 7.00 

Saanuel C. Eastman, trust, 20.00 

Stephen B. Easton, trust, 5.00 

Clara E. Edgerly, trust, 3.50 

Lydia F. Edgerly, trust, 3.50 

Georgianna P. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Ella M. Elliott, trust, 1.75 

Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 3.50 

Lydia J. Emerson, trust, 4.00 

Geo. H. Emery, trust, . 3.50 

Ira Leon Evans, trust, 4.00 

David E. Everett, trust, 2.50 

Lydia A. Farley, trust, 3.50 

Andrew S. Farnum, trust, 4.00 

Mary M. Farnum, trust, 3.50 

Josiah Farrar, trust, 1.75 

Alvah C. Ferrin, trust, 3.50 

Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 1.75 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 1.75 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Flanders, trust, 3.50 

Jerry Follansbee, trust, 4.00 

Flora Follansbee, trust, 4.00 

George G. Fogg, trust, 17.50 

Alice T. Ford, trust, 7.00 

Jerome Ford, trust, 3.50 

Asa Fowler, trust, 17.50 

Mary L. French, trust, 1.00 

Mary A. Gage, trust, ^ 7.00 

John D. Gale, trust, ' 8.50 

Jacob H. Gallinger, trust, 9.00 

James A. Gates, trust, 1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 399 

John Gear, trust, $3.50 

Sarah L. Gear, trust, 3.50 

Caroline L. George, trust, 17.50 

Enoch Gerrish, trust, 4.00 

S. K. Gill, trust, 4.50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 3.00 
G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust, 1.75 

Loren "W. Glyson, trust, 3.00 

James T. Gordon, trust, 4.50 

Hiram Gordon, trust, 4.00 

Hannah and Fannie Goss, trust, 9.00 

Fra,nk W. Grafton, trust, 4.00 

George N. Greeley, trust, 17.50 

Jennie E. Green, trust, 1.75 

John B. Green, trust, 4.00 

Benjamin Green, trust, 3.00 

William E. Green, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 1.75 

Betsey Hadley, trust, 3.50 

Francis P. Hallett, trust, 7.00 

George M. Harding, trust, 1.75 

Heber B. Hardy, trust, 4.00 

Mary D. Hart, trust. 12.00 

Timothy Haynes, trust, 3.50 

Levi C. Heath, trust, 4.00 

Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 3.50 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 1.75 

George W. Hill, trust, 10.00 

John M. Hill, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 1.75 

J. Frank Hoit, trust, 7.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 3.50 

Elizabeh F. Holt, trust, 3.50 

Samuel Holt, trust, 4.00 

Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 3.50 

George M. Hutton, trust, 2.00 

Sarah E. Irish, trust, 3.50 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Henry Ivey, trust, $1.75 

Loren W. James, trust, 2.00 

E. 0. Jameson, trust, 5.00 

Harriet and Robert 0. Jenks, trust, 4.00 

Herman E. Jewell, trust, 1.75 
Sadie I. Johnson and F. M. and C. M. 

Boynton, trust, 4.00 

Frank W. Johnson, trust, 2.00 

Susan B. Johnson, trust, 3.00 

Joel D. Johnson, trust, 4.00 

John F. Jones, trust. 4.00 

Julia A. Jones, trust, 3.50 

Seth K. Jones, trust, 12.00 

Prentiss M. Kent, trust, 8.00 

Timothy Kerley, trust, 4.00 

John and Benjamin A. Kiinljall, trust, 7.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 2.00 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 35.00 

Wm. Ladd, trust, 3.00 

Ebenezer Lane, trust, 5.00 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 3.50 

Eliza P. Lang, trust, 2.00 

Leete and Newman, trust, 4.00 

Ellen M. Lewis, trust, 2.00 

Williaim MaeC. Leaver, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 7.00 

Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 2.50 

Bertha M. Little, trust, 4.00 

J. W. & E. J. Little, trust. 7.00 

William I. Lovely, trust, 2.50 

George H. Lull, trust, 4.00 

Lydia F. Lund, trust, 14.00 

John McCauley, trust, 3.50 

Henry McFarland, trust, 7.00 

G. and E. McQuesten, trust, 4.00 

James McQuesten, trust, 8.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 401 

Charles W. Marsh, trust, $2.00 

Martin and Brown, trust, 4.50 

Jennie P. Martin, trust, 4.00 

Phebe C. Mason, trust, 3.00 

H. A. and H. 0. Ma.thews, trust, 3.50 

Charles L. Mellen, trust, 9.00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 2.00 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

J. S. Merrill, trust, 2.00 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 4.50 

Sarah F. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

David E. Miller, trust, 3.50 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 8.00 

Alfred Mixer, trust, 4.00 

Charles Moody, trust, 4.00 

Charles W. Moore, trust, 3.50 

George H. Moore, trust, 3.50 

•Joseph A. Moore, trust, 3.00 

Morgan and Colby, trust, 6.00 

Alice Morrill, trust, 5.00 

C. B. and Abbie F. Moseley, trust, 9.00 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 4.00 

Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 3.50 

David L. Neal, trust, 4.00 
J. W. Nelson and George H. Sawyer, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 7.00 

Eliphalet S. Nutter, trust, 4.00 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3.50 

Eugene Ordway, trust, 3.00 
H. S. and J. Sedgerly Ordway, trust, 7.00 

Charles F. Osgood, trust, 3.00 

George B. Packer, trust, 4.50 

George F. Page, trust, 1.75 

M. W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 1.75 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3.50 

Francis J. Paige, trust, 2.00 

John B. Palmer, trust, 3.00 



402 CITY OF CONCORD. 

William H. Palmer, trust, $2.00 

D. Charles Parker, trust, 4.00 

Samuel F. Patterson, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 7.00 

Felieite Pengault, trust, 4.00 

Hamilton E. Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, 1.50 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 10.50 

Isabella Perry, trust, 1.75 

Hattie J. W. Peters, trust, 4.00 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 4.50 

Eliza A. Pickering, trust, 7.00 

Hazen Pickering, trust, 4.00 

Irvin L. Pickering, trust, 9.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 2.50 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1.75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3.50 

D. 0. Rand and Nancy V. Libby, trust, 1.75 
James E. Rand, trust, 1.75 
Henry W. Ranlett, trust, 4.50 
.Mary E. Rankin, trust, 2.00 
Hiram "SI. Ray, trust, 4.00 
George L. Reed, trust, 4.50 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 4.00 
L. S. Richardson, trust, 4.00 
^Irs. James H. Rigney, trust, 1.75 
Lucy M. Roach, trust, 2.00 
Francis K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 
Helen E. Robinson, trust, 7.00 
Moses T. Rogers, trust, 4.50 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 12.00 
David D. Rowe, trust, 1.75 
James H. Rowell, trust, 7.U0 
Frances L. Runals, trust, 8.00 
J. S. and George H. Russ, trust, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 403 

Moses W. Russell, trust, $8.00 

John Quimby, trust, -1.00 

Nazarus Sajtus, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. I. S. B. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3.50 

Sarah F. Sanborn, trust, 3.00 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 3.50 

Fred Sargent, trust, 4.00 i 

Albert B. Sargent, trust, 4.00 

John B. Sargent, trust, 5.00 

Johnathan E. Sargent, trust, 8.00 j 

Richard P. Sanborn, trust, 6.00 

A. E. Savage and J. F. Healey, trust, 3.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 3.50 

Charles E. Scorer, trust, 4.00 

Gilbert H. Seavey, trust, 3.50 

James E. Sewell, trust, ' 2.00 

Shackford and Dame, trust, 3.50 

John L. Sinclair, trust, 1.75 

J. T. Sleeper and S. R. Dole, trust, 4.00 

Frederick P. Smith, trust, 4.00 

L. A. Smith, trust, 9.00 

Mary W. Smith, trust, 6.00 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 1.75 

William Smith, trust, 1.75 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust, 1.75 

Selina A. Staniels, trust, 10.00 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 3.50 

Charles Stewart, trust, 2.00 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 8.00 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 8.00 

Prescott F. Stevens, trust, 6.00 

iNIary L. Stephenson, trust, 1.75 

Ferdinand A. Stillings, trust, 8.00 

Mary L. Stokes and J. C. Ordway, trust, 2.00 



404 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cora Fuller Straw, trust, $4.00 

John W. Straw, trust, 1.75 

Laura A. Streeter, trust, 2.00 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 3.50 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3.50 

Ella Louise Sturtevant, trust, 4.00 
E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., trust, 7.00 

John Swenson, trust, 4.00 

Charles L. Tappan, trust, 3.00 

David D. Taylor, trust, 9.00 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 8.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 1.75 

Horace Thompson, trust, 4.00 

John S. Thompson, trust, 3.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 4.00 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 1.75 

J. L. Tilton and H. D. Locke, trust, 1.75 

John H. Toof, trust, 4.50 

Samuel D. Trussell, trust, 2.00 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 8.00 

C. P. Virgin, trust, 1.50 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 4.50 

i\Iary E. Walker, trust, 7.00 

Charles W. Wall, trust, 2.00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 3.00 

Eliza A. Wason, trust, 2.00 

B. F. and Frank L. Watson, trust, 2.00 

Webster and Little, trust, 2.00 

Pauline E. Wells, trust, 1.75 

Mary E. West, trust, 8.00 

Armenia S. White, trust, 40.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1.75 

George P. Whittredge, trust, 4.50 

Mary Williams, trust, 1.75 

Sarah Williams, trust, 3.50 

William Williamson, trust, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 405 

Georgianna M. F. Wood, trust, $3.50 

Belinda D. Woods, trust, 7.00 

Clairence S. Woods, trust, 4.00 

Helen P. Woods, trust, 4.00 

John A. Woods, trust, 4.00 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 9.00 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 4.00 

Mary P. Woodworth, trust, 4.00 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Mary Abbott Wyman, trust, 16.00 

Jane K. Wyman, trust, 8.00 

Webster F. and Hattie Wyatt, trust, 6.00 
Ellen T. Wentworth and Susan J. 

Woodward, trust, 9.00 

William Yeaton, trust, 3.00 

Mitchell G. Gilmore, trust, 3.50 

$7,953.87 



Credits. 

One-half sale lots added to per- 
manent fund, $1,478.48 

Income sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account trans- 
ferred to City of Concord gen- 
eral account, 1,799.00 

Transferred to City of Concord 

general account, 4,676.39 



$7,953.87 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
are added to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds 
are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts 

Jennie S. Harlow estate, burial, $10.00 

Edwin E. Clarke estate, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. G. E. Tngalls, labor. 4.00 

H. E. Fisher, junk, 4.00 

M. A. Randall, care, 2.00 

C. C. Titcomb, care, 3.00 

Anna J. 0. Lund estate, burial, 10.00 

]\Irs. H. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 

J. B. Palmer, care, 2.00 

B. F. Hardy, care, 2.00 

A. E. Blodgett, care, 2.00 

Mrs. H. C. Blakely, care, 1.50 

Amanda J. Lund, burial, 8.00 

Minot Cemetery, loan and labor, 266.50 

Bertha INI. S. Farmer, burial, 8.00 

Clara A. Abbott, trust, 1.75 

William Abbott, trust, 10.50 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 3.50 

James M. Barton, trust, 3.50 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 3.50 

Timothy R. Blaisdell, trust, 9.00 

Samuel Blake, trust, 4.00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 4.00 

Newell R. Brown, trust, 2.00 

John F. Chaffin, trust, 1.75 

Samuel T. A. Cushing, trust, 4.00 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 3.50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 10.00 

Seth Eastman, trust, 5.00 

Lydia A. Eastman, trust, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 407 

Catherine R. Eaton, trust, $2.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Samuel Evans, trust, 4.00 

Miles F. Farmer, trust, 3.50 

Hosea, Fessenden, trust, 5.00 

John Flanders, trust, 1.75 

Lucia A. Flanders, trust, 3.50 

Eleanor E. Foster, trust, 4.00 

Theodore French, trust, 3.50 

Lucy J. H. Frost, trust, 4.00 

Betsy Gale, trust, 3.00 

Moses Gerould, trust, 1.75 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 1.75 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 3.50 
Pamela Hall, trust, • 1.75 

Frank S. Harraden, trust, 3.50 

W. H. and Etta B. Horner, 3.50 

L. Louisa Hoyt, trust, 5.50 

Joseph L. Jackson, trust, 4.00 

Mary B. Knight, trust, 3.00 

George S. Little, trust, 4.25 

William T. Locke, trust, 5.00 

John McDaniel, trust, 4.00 

Asa McFarland, trust, 3.50 

Ida Moore, trust, 1.75 

Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 2.50 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 8.00 

Samuel and David Morrill, trust, 6.00 

Nichols and Pettengill, trust, 2.00 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 8.00 

True Osgood, trust, 3.50 
W. B. and H. Palmer and S. B. Savory, 

trust, 3.50 

Alice W. Parker, trust, 3.50 

Asa Parker, trust, 1.75 

Samuel G. Parker, trust, 1.75 

Pearson, White and Savory, trust, 3.50 



408 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Harry J. Rhodes, trust, $1.75 

Hiram Richardson, trust, 17.50 

Isa,ac B. Shute, trust, 2.50 

Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 7.00 

Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 1.75 

Joseph Stickney, trust, 17.50 

Abigail Sweetser, trust, 7.00 

Nathan Stickney, trust, 1.75 

Thomas Thompson, trust, 1.75 

Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 1.75 

Jane R. Twombly, trust, 3.50 

Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 7.00 
Timothy and Abigail B. Walker, trust, 7.00 

Albert Webster, trust, 6.00 

Paul Wentworth. trust, 14.00 

Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 3.50 

Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 3.50 

Helen E. R. Woodbury, trust, 4.00 

Chaxlotte H. Woolson, trust, 3.50 

S. N. Farnsworth, trust, 1.50 



Credits. 



$646.25 



Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account trans- 
ferred to City of Concord general 
account, 

Transferred to City of Concord 
general account, 



$312.25 



334.00 



$646.25 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 409 

MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots Is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

■ Receipts. 

Luville Blanchard, care, $2.50 

Mrs. Cotterell, burial, 8.00 

Mr. Smith, burial, 8.00 

Robert Upton, care, 1.50 

Jed Gile, care, 2.50 

Major Hollis, care, 1.75 

Justin 0. Clark, care, 2.50 

John D. Ryan, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Albert Hobbs estate, burial, 8.00 

Carrie A. Wright, care, 1.75 

Mrs. John E. Coulter, lot 118, 40.00 

Gus Peterson, west half, lot 130, 20.00 

Mrs. Florence Hanson, care, 3.25 

Mrs. Florence J. Dimond, care, 1.50 

Mrs. D. B. Webber, care, 1.75 

Andrew Abbott, labor, 4.00 

Mrs. Geo. H. McAlpine, care, 2.00 

Fred D. Drew, burial, 8.00 

Walter Annis, care, 4.50 

Leon H. Emerson, care, 3.00 

Arthur Hawthorne, care, 4.50 

W. H. Hoyt, burial, 7.00 

Horatio Abbott, care, 1.50 

Luther Rowe, care, 1.50 

Smith (infant), burial, 3.00 

Mrs. George Parmenter, care, 2.00 

Wm. H. Drew, burial, 8.00 

Geo. B. Little, repairs on lot, 3.50 



410 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



John Waters, burial, $2.00 

Gust Peterson, burial, 6.00 
J. E. McAlpine, repairs on John H. 

Kellom lot, 25.00 

Nellie Webster, care, 1.50 

Gertrude Sawyer, care, 1.50 

John Carlson, burial, 9;00 

Fred D. Drew, repairs on lots, 24.25 

Fifield & Hubbard, burial, 6.00 

Howard F. Hunt, lot 42, 40.00 

Ralph Marden, care, 2.00 

Cyrus Farnum, care, 3.00 

Frank A. Putney, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Gust Anderson, repairs, 10.00 

Mrs. Ida P. Johnson, care, 2.00 

Albert Hobbs, care, 2.50 

Katherine Quinn, care, 2.75 

Cyrus Farnum, care, 3.00 

Carrie A. Wright, care, 1.75 

Mrs. Hoyt Robinson, care, 1.75 

Ella M. Abbott estate, care, 4.00 

Frank Mattheson, care, 1.00 

Geo. Anderson, care, 2.00 

Alfaratia C. Danforth, burial, 9.00 

Victor Engel, care, 2.50 

Miss Betty Anderson, care, 1.75 

Mrs. M. E. Atkinson, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Oliver Dimond, care, 1.50 

Frank Dimond, care, 5.50 

Andie Koski, care, 1.50 

John C. Thorne, repairs, 8.00 

John Kemp, care, 1.25 

Mrs. A. Powell, care, 2.25 

Mrs. P. Lindgren, care and repairs, 3.75 

Frank Holt, care and repairs, 4.00 
Mrs. Juliette McAlpine, care and repairs, 2.50 

Mrs. Edw. Farnum, care and repairs, 2.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 411 

Jed Gile, care and repairs, $2.50 

Mrs, Chas. Blake, care and repairs, 2.00 

Ernest Carlson, care and repairs, 1.50 

Mr. Geo. Berry, care and repairs, 3.50 

Geo. A, Carter, care and repairs, 4,50 

W. H. Kellom, care and repairs, 1.50 

John Carlson estate, burial, 9.00 

Abial C. Abbott, care, 2.50 

Mrs, Daniel Webber, care, 1.75 

Mrs. Nellie Parmenter, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Richard Clark, care, 2.00 

Robert W, Upton, care, 1.50 

Gust Smart, care and repairs, 5.00 

C. Elmer Huggins, care, 1.75 

Alfred Johnson estate, burial, 9.00 

Geo. Andrews, care, 2.00 

Nath, Haseall, care, 2.00 

C, 0, Partridge, care, 3.25 

Justin 0. Clark, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Will Little, care, 1.75 

L. H. Emerson, care, 3.00 

Hazen Abbott, trust, 3.50 

E. S. and Mary Barrett, trust, 4.00 

James Bradford, trust, 3.50 

Carter and Rolfe, trust, 5.00 

Stephen Carleton, trust, 7.00 

Augustus Carter, trust, 3.50 

Richard Emery, trust, . 2.50 

Henry Farnum, trust, 4.00 

Asa Gay, trust, 3.75 

W. A. Gile trust, 7.00 

Timothy Green, trust, 2.50 

Marshall P. Hall, trust, 2.00 

Mary P. Hatch, trust, 3.25 

George Partridge, trust, 3.50 

Charles W. Morse, trust, 3.00 

Frederick W. Peabody, trust, 6.50 



412 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Caleb Holden, trust, $3.85 

Ira Rowell, trust, 4.50 

Mary Rowell, trust, 3.00 

$499.10 



Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to perma- 
nent funds, $50.00 

Income sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account trans- 
ferred to City of Concord General 
Account, 75.85 

Transferred to City of Concord 

General Account, 373.25 



— $499.10 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income 
of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor 
from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, 
said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each 
trust. 

Receipts. 

Mrs. Robert Potter, burial, $8.00 

David A. Morrill, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. Mary E. Walker, burial, 8.00 

Dean C. Lewis, burial, 6.50 

Wm. Batehelder (infant), burial, 1.50 

Bombard children, burial, 2.00 

Arthur Abbott, lot No. 6, block K, 5.00 

Alvin N. Smith, lot 21, block K, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 413 

George A. Keyes, lot 12, block I, $5.00 
Miss Helen Eastman Melendy, lot 

34 and 36, block R, 10.00 

Fred Abbott, burial, 7.00 

Mrs. Baker Carter, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. N. J. Coon, burial, 8.00 

Arthur Bachelder, removal, 1.50 

Sophia J, Fernald, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Minnie G. Lewis, lot 3, block I, 5.00 

Sherman W. Lewis, lot 6, block I, 5.00 

Daniel C. Lewis, burial, 8.00 

C. E. Banfill (child), burial, 5.00 

Nancy M. Smith, burial, 6.00 

Lester Fletcher, burial, 6.00 

Thomas Spaulding, biirial, 8.00 

Ruth K. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Elizabeth A. Batchelder, trust, 1.75 

Orlando W. Coon, trust, 3.00 

Ann Emery, trust, 3.00 

Daniel E. Gale, trust, 3.00 

George Graham, trust, 2.00 

Crosby K. Haines, trust, 3.00 

Jacob Hoyt, trust, 3.00 

Mrs. Samuel Hutchins, trust, 2,50 

Lucilla Pierce Kelley, trust, 3.00 

Addie J. P. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Joseph S. Kimball, trust, 3.00 

B. L. Larkin, trust, 1.75 

A. Augusta Locke, trust, 2.00 

George Locke, trust, 3,50 

Josiah S. Locke, trust, 1.00 

Reuben B. Locke, trust, 3.00 

Burleigh A. Marden, trust, 1.50 

John H. Maynard, trust, 5.00 

David A. Morrill, trust, 3.00 

Frank V, Osgood, trust, 1.50 



I 



414 CITY OP CONCORD. 

William Page, trust, $0.75 
Frank P. Potter and Lizzie Potter 

Perry, trust, 7.00 

Issora Hutchins Ring, trust, 1.75 

Clara E. Robinson, trust, 3.00 

Charles D. Rowell, trust, 3.00 

John B, Sanborn, trust, 7.00 

Harriet B. Sanders, trust, 1.75 

G. M. and F. S. Tallant, trust, 3.50 

Harriet N. Tenney, trust, 3.50 

Leodore E. Alexander, trust, 3.00 

Helen Eastman Melendy, trust, 5.00 

Sarah H. James, trust, 1.00 

J. E. Pecker, trust, 15.00 



Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to per- 
manent fund, $17.50 

Income sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account trans- 
ferred to City of Concord General 
Account, 118.75 

Transferred to City of Concord Gen- 
eral Account, 113.50 



$249.75 



$249.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



415 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 



Receipts. 



Julia A. Hancock, care, 
Mrs. L. A. Bodwell, care, 



$6.00 
1.00 



$7.00 



Credits. 

Transferred to the City of Concord 
General Account, 



$7.00 



OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 
Receipts. 



Abigail W. Lang, trust. 
Nelson Tenney, trust, 
A. L. Williams, trust, 



$1.00 

.50 

1.00 



$2.50 



Credits. 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account, transferred to City 
of Concord, 



$2.50 



416 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 





Municipal. 








Bonds. Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


City 


Hall Building, Sept. 1, 1922, 31/2, 


$7,000 




Sept. 1, 


1923, 


31/2, 


5,000 




July 1, 


1924, 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1, 


1925 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1, 


1926, 


31/2, 


10,000 




July 1 


1927, 


31/2, 


10,000 




'' " July 1, 


1928 


31/2. 


10,000 




'• " July 1 


1929 


3y2, 


5,000 


Pub] 


ic Park, Dec. 1 


1931 


4, 


10,000 


1 1 


Dec. 1 


1933 


4, 


5,000 


Brid 


ge, June 1 


1922 


4, 


4,000 




' June 1 


1923 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1924 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1925 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1926 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1927 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1928 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1929 


,4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1930 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1931 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1932 


,4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


1933 


4, 


4,000 




* June 1 


, 1934 


, 4, 


4,000 




' June 1 


, 1935 


, 4, 


10,000 



$144,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



417 





Precinct. 




Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Sewer, 


July 


1, 


1922, 4, 


$4,000 




July 


1, 


1923, 4, 


4,000 




May 


1, 


1928, 31/2, 


25,000 




Dec. 


1, 


1930, 4, 


5,000 




Dec. 


1, 


1932, 4, 


10,000 




Dec. 


1, 


1934, 4, 


10,000 


Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Union School I 


)istrict, May 


1, 


1922, 4, 


$2,000 




' ' July 


1, 


1922, 31/2, 


8,000 




- July 


1, 


1923, 31/2, 


10,000 




May 


1, 


1924, 4, 


5,000 




July 


1, 


1924, 31/2, 


5,000 




" May 


1, 


1925, 4, 


10,000 




' ' July 


1, 


1925, 31/2, 


5,000 




" May 


1, 


1926, 4, 


5,000 




' ' July 


1, 


1926, 31/2, 


5,000 




' ' July 


1, 


1927, 31/2, 


35,000 




May 


1, 


1928, 4, 


6,000 




" July 


1, 


1928, 31/2, 


4,000 




July 


1, 


1929, 31/2, 


10,000 




July 


1, 


1930, 31/2, 


10,000 




' ' July 


1, 


1931, 31/2, 


9,000 




May 


1, 


1932, 4, 


10,000 




" May 


1, 


1933, 4, 


10,000 




' ' May 


1, 


1934, 4, 


10,000 



$58,000 



$159,000 



27 



418 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bonds. Due. Rate. Amount. 

School District No. 20, Sept. 1, 1922, 31/2, $500 
Sept. 1, 1924, 31/2, 4,300 

$4,800 

Total bonded indebtedness of the city, ex- 
clusive of water department, $365,800 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 419 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 



Due and unpaid January 1, 1921, 




municipal, 


$105.00 


Due and unpaid January 1, 1921, 




precinct, 


192.150 


Due and unpaid January 1, 1921, 




Union School District, 


200.00 


Due in 1921, municipal, 


5,225.00 


" " " precinct, sewer, 


2,355.00 


" " " Union School District, 


6,175.00 


" " " School District No. 20, 


185.50 



$14,438.00 



Or. 

Municipal, paid, $5,115.00 

Precinct, sewer, paid, 2,380.00 

Union School District, paid, 6,167.50 

School District No. 20, paid, 185.50 

Municipal due, not presented, 215.00 

Precinct due, not presented, 167.50 
Union School District due, not presented, 207,50 



$14,438.00 



420 CITY OP CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Carl H. Foster, Treasurer, in Account with Concord 
Water Works. 

receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1921. $18,455.83 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent, 77,323.78 

$95,779.61 

expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $13,697.50 

Bonds paid, $19,000, 18,827.50 

Interest, 109.10 

Orders paid, 43,837.99 

Cash on hand, 19,307.52 

$95,779.61 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 

When due. Rate. Amount. When due. Rate. Amnnnt. 

Jan. 1, 1922, 4, $284,000 Jan. 1, 1923, 31/2, $3,000 
Jan. 1, 1922, 31/2, 8.000 Jan. 1, 1924, 31/2, 15,000 

April 1, 1922, 31/2, 25,000 

$335,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 421 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1921, 

and not presented, $166.00 

To coupons due, 1921, 13,737.50 

$13,903.50 

Cr. 



By coupons paid, 1921, $13,697.50 

By coupons due and not presented, 206.00 



$13,903.50 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing ac- 
count of Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, for the year 1921, 
and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein prop- 
erly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, 
and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance 
to be sixteen thousand four hundred sixty dollars 
and sixty-six cents ($16,460.66), and as treasurer of 
the city water department, cash balance to be nineteen 
thousand three hundred seven dollars fifty-two cents 
($19,307.52). 

I have also verified the account of the special funds and 
sinking funds of the city in the hands of the city treas- 
urer, and find such special and sinking funds invested, and 
the income thereof for the year 1921 accounted for, as 
shown b}^ the book of the city treasurer kept for the pur- 
pose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



422 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



423 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1921. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, City Poor, $3,000.00 / 

Resolution No. 480, 528.55 ) $3'528.55 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, 

County, $1,073.25 

Aid, County Poor, $13,575.39 

Bonds, City Hall, $7,000.00 $7,000.00 

Bridge Bonds, $4,000.00 $4,000.00 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, $8,000.00 $16,137.39 

Balance, 1920, 146.58 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 4,676.39 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,650.17 

Income Trust Funds, 1,799.00 



Old North, $500.00 $1,191.43 

Balance, 1920, 28.82 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 334.00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 32.60 

Income Trust Funds, 312.25 



Maple Grove, $200.00 $862.54 

Balance, 1920, 142.66 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 373.25 

Income Trust Funds, 75.85 

Income Cemetery Fund, 46.47 

$838.23 $862.54 



$16,272.14 $16,137.39 $134.76 



$1,207.67 $1,191.43 $16.24 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Pine Grove, $50.00 $355.45 

Balance, 1920, 72.80 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 113.50 

Income Trust Funds, 118.75 

Income Cemetery Fund, 29.36 

$384.41 $355.45 $28.96 

Old Fort, 

Balance, 1920, $13.24 

Income Trust Funds, 2.50 

$15.74 $15.74 

Millville, $75.00 $328.36 

Debit Balance, 1920, 111.55 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 7.00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 106.26 

$188.26 $439.91 

Horse Hill, $10.00 $10.00 

SoucQok, 30.00 30.00 

Balance, 1920, 11.69 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1.26 

$42.95 $30.00 $12.95 

Woodlawn, $25.00 $25.00 

Concord Charity Organization 

Society, $350.00 $350.00 

Concord District Nursing As- 
sociation, $350.00 $350.00 

Dog Licenses, $308.29 

Engineering Department : 

Salary Engineer, $2,400.00 $2,400.00 

Salary Assistants, 2,000.00 1,804.50 

Incidentals, 325.00 220.15 

$4,725.00 $4,424.65 $300.35 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 431 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 

Aid, $450.00 $450.00 

Fire Department: 

Pay-Rolls, $28,974.00 $28,973.06 

Pay-Rolls, Semi-Annual, 10,245.00 10,245.00 

Rent Veterans' Association, 210.00 210.00 

Forage, 1,200.00 957.17 

Fuel and Lights, 2,600.00 3,958.95 

Fire Alarm, 1,500.00 1,789.24 

Horse Hire and Shoeing, 1,500.00 730.50 

Washing, 100.00 83.95 

Supplies, Auto Combination, 325.00 304.41 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 250.00 125.85 

Incidentals, 4,500.00 5,808.46 

New Hose, 600.00 600.00 

Resolution No. 480, 1,782.59 

$53,786.59 $53,786.59 

Fire Inspection: 

Resolution No. 456, $600.00 $339.27 $260.73 

Health, Board of: 

Salary Sanitary Officer, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Up-Keep of Automobile, 300.00 300.00 

Fumigation Supplies, 100.00 8.30 

Incidentals, 1,200.00 1,415.91 

Contagious Diseases, 700.00 903.65 

Resolution No. 480, 327.86 

$4,627.86 $4,627.86 

Highway Department: 

Salary, Supt. of Streets, $2,500.00 $2,500.00 

General Maintenance, 95,000.00 106,227.44 

Sidewalks and Crossings, 

New, 1,500.00 31.46 

Sidewalks and Crossings, 

Repair, 3,000.00 4,623.49 

Catch Basins, 3,000.00 3,365.84 

Resolution No. 473, 4,000.00 

" 476, 3,000.00 

" 480, 4,748.23 



$116,748.23 $116,748.23 



432 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 



Incidentals and Land Dam- 
ages, S 
Resolution No. 480, 2,080.77 



ages, $12,500.00 > 

^ ' [$14,580.77 



Interest, Cemetery Trust 

Funds, $1,826.17 $1,826.17 

Interest, Bonds, $5,750.00 $5,640.00 $110.00 

Interest, Temporary Loan, $3,000.00 I ^ 

Resolution No. 480, 2,047.78 ) *^'^47. /8 

Iron Fence, Old North Cemetery: 

Resolution No. 465, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Land Sold for Taxes: 

Resolution No. 453, $5.05 1 

Resolution No. 472, 2,416.54 ) ^-.^^-^-^^ 

Taxes on Land Sold City: 

Resolution No. 438, $2.01' 

Resolution No. 439, .28; 

Resolution No. 460, 62.041 ^^^ ^^ 

Resolution No. 461, 227.15/* ' '^ ' 

Resolution No. 462, 1,037.741 

Resolution No. 477, 105.09^ 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Memorial Day, $460.00 $460.00 

Municipal Christmas Tree: 

Resolution No. 478, $150.00 $113.00 $37.00 

New Tower Clock: 

Resolution No. 442, $1,500.00 ) 

Resolution No. 480, 113.75 ^^'^^"-'^ 

Electric Alarm Siren, West Concord: 

Resolution No. 459, $603.24 $603.24 

Electric Alarm Siren, East Concord: 

Resolution No. 471, $700.00 $618.98 $81.02 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 



Open Air Concerts, 

Open Air Concerts, July 4: 
Resolution No. 463, 

Playgrounds, and Baths, 

Parks, 

Resolution No. 480, 

Trees, Care of. 
Resolution No. 480, 
Account Earnings, 

White Park Ball Ground, 

Police and Watch: 
Salaries, 

Special and Traffic Officer, 
Fuel, 

Repairs Buildings, 
Lights, 

Telephone, Private Line, 
Incidentals, 
Supplies, Auto, 
Motorcycle, 
Resolution No. 480, 



Precinct, Garbage, 

Debit Balance, 1&20, 
Resolution No. 480, 
Account Earnings, 



Precinct, Lighting Streets, 
City, 
Balance, 1920, 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, 
Penacook, 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT, 433 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

$550.00 $550.00 

$250.00 $250.00 

$1,500.00 $1,500.00 

$4,500.00 ) 

92.28 I $4,592.28 

$3,500.00 ) 

272.83 I $3,772.83 

$400.00 $376.46 $23.54 

$29,575.00 $28,941.00 

2,800.00 3,009.06 

1,000.00 964.56 

1,000.00 1,474.63 

250.00 315.73 

500.00 423.27 

1,500.00 1,907.56 

500.00 813.98 

550.00 539.25 

714.14 

$38,389.14 $38,389.14 

$16,000.00 $17,242:32 

1,751.72 

287.97 

$16,287.97 $18,994.04 

$21,500.00 ( ^ 

ggQg -^ $21,139.97 $426.11 

$2,425.00 $1,800.00 $625.00 



28 



434 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Precinct, Lighting Streets, 

West Concord, $800.00 $800.00 

Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Construction and Repairs, $3,500.00 [^.^.f^^p-^Q 

Balance, 1920, 6,085.13 ( *ll>'0b5.0y 

Interest, Bonds, 2,355.00 ) 

Balance, 1920, 20.00 j ^'^^^-^^ 

Bonds, 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Resolution No. 480, Earnings, 26.00 

$15,986.13 $16,445.09 

Precinct, Sewer, East Concord: 
Construction and Repairs, 
Balance, 1920, $137.86 $137.86 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 

Construction and Repairs, $1,500.00 $659.03 ) 

Debit Balance, 1920, 761.88 | ^^^-^^ 

Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School: 
Construction and Repairs, 
Balance, 1920, $56.12 $22.68 $44.33 

Precinct, Sewer, West Concord : 

Construction and Repair, $50.00 ) 

Balance, 1920, 55.28 | ^'^^'^^ ^^"'^^ 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, $5,000.00 > 

Balance, 1920, 1,926.74 \ $6,907.60 $19.14 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 

Penacook, $475.00 ) ^... ,. 
Balance, 1920, 7.26 \ ^^^^'^^ 

Printing and Stationery, $5,000.00 ) 

Resolution No. 480, 447.86 j" 'f^'**'-»'' 

Public Library: 

Salaries, $4,300.00 $4,749.72 

Incidentals, . 2,700.00 3,054.67 

Balance, 1920, 891.51 

Trust Funds, 1,777.51 

Fines, 376.00 

$10,045.02 $7,804.39 $2,240.63 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



435 



Repairs of Buildings, 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

$1,000.00 $941.57 58.43 



Salaries : 
Mayor, 
City Clerk, 

Clerk, Board of Public Works, 
Overseers of Poor, 
Solicitor, 
Treasurer, 
Messenger, 
City Physicians, 
Care City Clocks, 
Assessors, 

Moderators, Ward Clerks, 
Supervisors and Inspectors 

of Election, 
Judge, Police Court, 
Clerk, Police Court, 
Sealer of Weights and 

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Collector of Taxes, 



$2,000.00 

1,400.00 

200.00 

390.00 

800.00 

1,225.00 

1,200.00 

700.00 

110.00 

3,800.00 

720.00 

2,064.00 

1,200.00 

500.00 

500.00 
4,000.00 



$2,000.00 

1,400.00 

200.00 

390.00 

800.00 

1,225.00 

1,200.00 

700.00 

110.00 

3,800.00 

720.00 

2,344.00 

1,200.00 

500.00 

500.00 

195.07—1912-13- 

14-15-16- 

17-18 levy 

450.00—1919 levy 

991.80—1920 levy 

3,500.00—1921 levy 



Resolution No. 480, 



1,416.87 



$22,225.87 $22,225.87 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, $1,905.00 $1,905.00 

Schools : 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1920, $66,066.53 $232,366.53 

Amount Voted by District, 242,248.75 

Dog Licenses, 1,296.01 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 36.20 

Bonds, 10,000.00 10,000.0€ 

Interest, 6,035.00 ) 

Balance, 1920, 2,107.50 j ^'167.50 

$327,789.99 $248,534.03 $79,255.96 



436 CITY OP CONCORD. 





Appropriation. Expended. 


Balance. 


Penacook District: 
General Fund, Balance, 1920, $4,751.61 $15,251.61 

Dog Licenses, 136.26 

Amount Voted by District, 22,290.04 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3.80 






$27,181.71 $15,251.61 


$11,930.10 


Schools : 

School District No. 20: 
Interest, 
Balance, 1920, 
Bonds, 
Sinking Fund, 


$176.75) 

92.75 \ ^^^^-^^ 
500.00 500.00 
250.00 250.00 






$1,019.50 $935.50 


$84.00 


Temporary Loan: 

Resolution No. 441, $150,000.00 j 
Resolution No. 464, 175,000.00 1 „,,^^^^^^ 
Resolution No. 469, 75,000.00 ( ?440,000.00 
Resolution No. 474, 50,000.00 ) 




County Tax, 


$44,331.53 




State Tax, 


$109,628.50 




State of New Hampshire, 
$2.00 Poll Tax, 


$27,562.00 





RECEIPTS. 

Receipts of the City for the Year ending December 31, 1921: 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1921, $43,920.02 

Taxes, 1916, 2.00 

1917, 25.80 

1918, 54.55 

1919, 1,965.86 

1920, 68,777.13 

1921, 584,630.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 437 

Municipal Court Fees, $2,169.28 

Library Fines, 376.00 

Dependent Soldiers, County, 891.07 

County Poor, 13,805.21 

Temporary Loans, 440,000.00 

Fees, City Clerk, 679.00 

Garbage Precinct, 287.97 

Highway Department, 4,765.02 

Dog Licenses, 1,740.56 

Dog License Fees, 152.40 

Amusement Licenses, 925.00 

Rent, Auditorium, 1,200.00 

Real Estate, Redeemed, 1914, 9.25 

" 1917, 4.81 

" " ," 1918, 192.51 

" " " 1920, 848.35 

" Tax Paid by City, 1918, 1.16 

Redemptions and Interest, 1918 and 1919, 626.71 

Rent, Chief's House, 250.00 

Motor Vehicle Tax, ^ 27,430.65 

Passenger Carriage and Job Team Licenses, 78.00 

Pool Table Licenses, 380.00 

Junk Dealers' Licenses, 130.00 

Trees, 297.95 

Sewers, 26.00 

Rent of Rooms, City Hall, 387.50- 

Dover, Somersworth & Rochester R. R. Tax, 276.12 

Druggists' Permits, 4.00 

Land Sold, 385.50 

Milk Licenses, 156.00 

Forest Fires, 15.35 

Employment Bureau License, 5.00 

Declarations of Candidacy, City Primary, 86.00 

Histories and Maps, City of Concord, 22.75 

Interest on Daily Balances, 1,943.14 

Fines, etc., City Marshal, 422.04 

Insurance Tax, 3,563.25 

Railroad Tax, 48,909.67 

Savings Bank Tax, 61,847.51 

Building and Loan Association Tax, 362.07 

Transferred Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 4,676.39 

" Old North Cemetery Account, 334.00 

" Maple Grove Cemetery Account, 373.25 

" Pine Grove Cemetery Account, 113.50 

" Millville Cemetery Account, 7.00 



438 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Income Trust Funds, Blossom Hill Cemetery, $1,799.00 

Old North Cemetery, 312.25 

" " Maple Grove Cemetery, 75.85 

Old Fort Cemetery, 2.50 

" " Pine Grove Cemetery, 118.75 
Permanent Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,650.17 

Old North Cemetery, 32.60 

Millville Cemetery, 106.26 

" " Pine Grove Cemetery, 29.36 

" " Maple Grove Cemetery, 46.47 

" " Soucook Cemetery, 1.26 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 40.00 

P. B. Cogswell Trust Fund, Public Library, 85.90 

G. Parker Lyon Trust Fund, Public Library, 40.00 

Franklin Pierce Trust Fund, Public Library, 40.00 

Thos. Valpey Trust Fund, Public Library, 20.00 

Joseph Hazeltine Trust Fund, Public Library, 133.54 

Seth K. Jones Trust Fund, Public Library, 25.10 

K. P. & D. Rollins Trust Fund, West Garden, 63.75 

Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library, 50.00 
Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library, 1,340.47 

Wm. Chase Trust Fund, Public Library, 42.50 

Deposit, N. H. Savings Bank, account of parks, 110.26 

Town of Hopkinton, sheep claim, 123.52 

Miscellaneous, 223.05 



$1,327,045.36 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements : 

City Departments, $316,926.00 

City Poor, 3,528.55 

County Poor and Soldiers, 14,648.64 

City Notes, 440,000.00 

City Bonds, 11,000.00 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 10,687.78 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 1,826.17 

Schools, 247,618.14 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 6,353.00 

School Bonds, 10,500.00 

School Sinking Fund, District No. 20, 250.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 439 

Precinct Sprinkling Streets, $6,&07.60 

" Sprinkling Streets, Penacook, 606.14 

Lighting Streets, City, 21,139.97 

Lighting Streets, Penacook, 1,800.00 

Lighting Streets, West Concord, 800.00 

Garbage, 17,242.32 

Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 2,380.00 

Sewer Repairs, 10,771.36 

Sewer, Bonds, 4,000.00 

County Tax, 44,331.53 

State Tax, 109,628.50 

State of New Hampshire, $2.00 Poll Tax, 27,562.00 

Paid Outstanding Orders, 834.01 

Treasury Balance, January 1, 1922, 16,460.66 



$1,327,802.37 
Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid January 1, 1922, 757.01 



$1,327,045.36 

CONCORD WATER WORKS. 

^ Receipts. Expenditures. 

Cash Balance, January 1, 1921, $18,455.83 

Receipts Deposited with Treasurer, 77,323.78 

Expended Per Orders, $43,866.49 

Bonds, Paid, $19,000, 18,827.50 

Interest, 109.10 

Interest on Bonds, 13,697.50 

Paid Outstanding Order, 10.00 

Treasury Balance, January 1, 1922, 19,307.52 



$95,779.61 $95,818.11 
Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid, January 1, 1922, 88.50 



$95,779.61 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



440 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $67,000.00 

State Library bonds, 15,000.00 

Bridge bonds, 62,000.00 

Cemetery trust fund note, 52,176.43 



-^$196,176.43 



Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1922, $757.01 
Interest accrued, not yet due, muni- 
cipal bonds, 1,359.27 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 215.00 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

Union School Districts bonds, 207.50 
Due school districts, 91,186.06 

school district No. 20, 84.00 
public library, account trUst 

funds, 2,240.63 

precinct lighting streets, 426.11 
precinct sewer, St. Paul's 

School, 44.33 

precinct sewer, East Concord, 137.86 

precinct sewer, Penacook, 79.09 
precinct lighting streets, 

Penacook, 625.00 

precinct sewer. West Concord, 80.72 

precinct sprinkling streets, city, 19.14 

cemeteries, 208.64 



Total debt not funded, $97,670.36 

Total city indebtedness, $293,846.79 



financial statement. 441 

Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance, January 1, 

1922, $16,460.66 

Taxes, 1916, uncollected, 48.04 

Taxes, 1917, uncollected, 79.67 

Taxes, 1918, uncollected, 114.41 

Taxes, 1919, uncollected, 3,541.92 

Taxes, 1920, uncollected, 897.99 

Taxes, 1921, uncollected, 71,581.90 

Cash in hands of tax collectors, 

January 1, 1922, 900.10 

Cash in hands of tax collector, Jan- 
uary 1, 1922, account motor ve- 
hicle permits, 244.61 
Taxes bid in by city, 7,517.53 
Due highway department, 917.86 
Due Merrimack County, county poor, 6,555.41 
Due Merrimack County, dependent 

soldiers, 660.75 

Overdraft Maple Grove Cemetery, 24.31 

Overdraft, Millville Cemetery, 251.65 

Overdraft, sprinkling streets, Penacook, 123.88 
Overdraft, sewers, 458.96 

Overdraft garbage precinct, 2,706.07 

$113,085.72 

Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1922, $180,761.07 
Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1921, $155,519.01 



Increase for the year, $25,242.06 



442 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

Water works bonds, $335,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 58,000.00 

$398,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Interest accrued, not yet due, sewer 

bonds, $389.16 

Interest accrued, not yet due, water 

bonds, 6,353.75 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

sewer bonds, 167.50 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

water bonds, 206.00 

$7,116.41 



$400,116.41 
Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1922, $19,307.52 

Due garbage precinct, 106.87 

$19,414.39 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1922, $380,702.02 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1921, $404,939.97 



Decrease for the year, $24,237".95 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, $159,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,154.17 

$161,154.17 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 443 

Penacook School District bonds, $4,800.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 56.00 

$4,856.00 



Net liability of school districts, $166,010.17 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $180,761.07 

precinct debt, 380,702.02 

school districts, 166,010.17 

$727,473.26 

Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1922, $727,473.26 
Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1921, 737,128.31 



Decrease for the year, $9,655.05 



CITY PROPERTY. 

Having Value But Not Considered Available Assets. 



Water department. 


$1,149,429.59 




Fire department, 




165,937.00 




Highway department, 




48,218.50 




Engineering department, 




997.00 




Sewer department, 




1,272.00 




Penaeook sewer, 




40.15 




West Concord sewer. 




23.65 




Health department, 




940.00 




Police department. 




42,300.00 




City clerk's office, 




1,150.00 




Commissioner's office, 




140.17 




Mayor's office. 




250.00 




Assessors' office. 




622.00 




Tax collector's office. 




296.00 




Sealer of weights and measures, 


325.00 




City messenger's department, 


2,250.00 




Park commissioners' department, 


225.00 




Cemetery commissioners' 


depart- 




• 


ment. 




2,900.00 




Public library. 




11,000.00 




Milk inspection. 




25.00 




City history commission. 




10.00 




Real estate. 




338,382.50 








$1,766,733.56 



1921. 

Population of city (census 1920), 22,167 

Valuation of city, $21,341,061.00 

Tax assessed for the year, $664,864.83 

Rate of taxation, $12.30 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $13.40. 
Rate for precinct, $3.40. 
Total rate, $29.10 per $1,000. 



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INDEX. 



PAGE 

Assessors, board of, report of 315 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 382 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 416 

City clerk, report of 278 

government, departments, personnel of, 1921 43 

assessors 46 

board of aldermen 43 

board of public works 44 

building inspector 53 

cemetery committees 55 

clerk 44 

collector of taxes 46 

commissioners of cemeteries 56 

committees of board of aldermen 45 

culler of staves 58 

drain layers 61 

engineer 45 

fence-vievi^ers 57 

fire department, officers of 52 

health officers 53 

hydrant commissioners 54 

inspector of petroleum 57 

mayor 43 

messenger 46 

overseers of poor 47 

park commissioners 54 

physician, city and assistant 47 

plumbers, board of examiners of 61 

pound-keeper 57 

police department officers and members of police force 48 

public library, trustees of 50 

librarian and assistants 50 

registrar of vital statistics 53 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 46 

sealers of leather 58 

sealer of weights and measures 58 



504 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 

City solicitor 47 

street department, superintendent of streets 46 

superintendent Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 56 

superintendent of clocks 53 

superintendent of parks 54 

surveyors of painting 59 

masonry 60 

wood, lumber and bark 60 

treasurer 45 

trustees of trust funds 51 

undertakers 56 

ward officers 62 

water-works, city, commissioners 51 

superintendent 51 

weigher 59 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 58 

Coupon account, statement of 419 

Debts, recapitulation 443 

Engineer, city, report of 246 

Financial statement 429 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 191 

fire-alarms 195 

roll of members 235 

Highways, report of 251 

History commission 282 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 250 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 409 

Mayor's address 3 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 64 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 415 

Municipal debt 440 

regulations 2 

Court, report of 313 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 415 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 406 

Ordinances and resolutions 13 

Physician, city, report of 302 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 412 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 299 

Police department, report of city marshal 305 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1911 319 

Poor department, report of overseer 279 

Population 444 



INDEX. 505 

PAGE 

Precincts, debts of 442 

Property, city, inventory of 444 

Public library, report of trustees 241 

librarian 242 

Public Works, board of, report of 251 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 284 

contagious diseases 291 

milk inspection, report of 294 

sanitary officer, report of 287 

School reports 67 

Union School District, Albin Prize Medal contest 127 

annual school meeting warrant. . 142 

annual school meeting 144 

attendance officer 70 

attendance officer, report of .... 110 

board of education 67 

board of education, report of . . . 71 

census, 1921 Ill 

clerk 70 

elocutionary contest 122 

English prize essay contest .... 123 

financial agent, report of 76 

fire drills 136 

graduating classes 133 

high school table of 120 

honor list 130 

honor, roll of 140 

medical inspector 69 

medical inspector, report of .... 102 

manual training, report of 132 

officers of the district 70 

school nurse 70 

school nurse, report of 107 

superintendent 69 

superintendent, report of 82 

superkitendent, assistant, report of 98 

teachers, list of 113 

transportation routes 129 

war saving stamps 128 

Sealer of weights and measures, report of 281 

Sewer department, report of 271 

Solicitor, report of 303 

Tax collectors, report of 321 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 422 



506 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 

Treasury department, report of 377 

Tree warden 314 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 327 

Trust funds 332 

Trusts, individual, cemetery 340 

Vital statistics, tables of 445 

Water department, report of 147 

commissioners, report of 152 

coupon, account of 421 

engineer's report 162 

fire hydrants 169 

investment account 150 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of .... 420 

receipts for each year 166 

schedule of pipes and gates 181 

summary of statistics 186 

superintendent, report of 153 



'Va; 



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