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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

PROPERTY OF 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

CONCORD, N. H. 
Dmaono f (Of J^ 



1922 
SEVENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1922 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD. N. H. 

Rumford Printing Company 

1923 



-36X07 
C74- 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no- action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 8, 1923. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance extending the lighting precinct of the city op 

CONCORD 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter XIX, Section 1, of the City Ordinances, 
by adding thereto the following: "Also the following described territory: 
Beginning at the last light now located on the west end of Iron Works 
Road, thence along said road to the junction of said Iron Works Road 
and Albin Road, and from the said junction southerly on said Albin Road 
to the residence of George H. Whitcher, and from the said junction 
northerly on said Albin Road to Clinton Street." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 13, 1922. 



An Ordinance extending the lighting precinct op the city of 

CONCORD. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter XIX, Section 1, of the City Ordinances, 
by adding thereto the following : "Also the following described territory : 
Beginning at the Canterbury Road and running easterly on the Loudon 
Road to the Loudon Town Line." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 13, 1922. 



An Ordinance extending school district no. 20 lighting precinct. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, asfolloivs: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter XIX, Section 3, of the City Ordinances, 
by adding thereto the following: "Also the following described territory: 
Beginning on Elm Street at the residence of Ernest Baker and extending 
seventeen poles to the residence of H. G. Hardy." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 13, 1922. 

3 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance amending chapter xxxiv entitled: "licensing car- 
riages AND JOB TEAMS." 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Amend Section 10, Chapter XXXIV, striking out all of said section 
and inserting the following: 

"Section 3. Every licensee, granted a license as aforesaid, shall be 
subject to such restrictions and regulations as may be prescribed by the 
mayor and aldermen." 

Amend Section 10, Chapter XXXIV, by striking out the word " shall" 
in the seventh line and inserting the word "may." 

This ordinance shall take effect April 1, 1922. 

Passed March 30, 1922. 



An Ordinance extending the lighting precinct of the city of 

CONCORD. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
Section 1. That the lighting precinct of the City of Concord as 
heretofore existing be extended to embrace all the territory, together 
with the inhabitants, within the following described limits, to wit: 
"Beginning at a point on the top of Black Hill so called on the Pembroke 
Road at the location of the last electric light pole now located on said 
road, and extending along said road easterly and southerly to the line 
between the City of Concord and the town of Pembroke at the end of the 
Soucook River Bridge, so called." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 10, 1922. 



Duties of pedestrians. 

Pedestrians will aid traffic by avoiding careless walking and by observ- 
ing the following directions: 

Keep to the right on sidewalks and on crossings. 

Do not stand in the middle of sidewalks, but on one side, preferably at 
the curb. 

Do not obstruct crossings. 

Do not "cut" corners. 

Cross roadways at a right angle (never diagonally) and at crossings. 

Observe traffic before leaving the sidewalk. 

On alighting from a street car or other vehicle observe traffic before 
moving. 

"Safety First" 



ORDINANCES. 5 

An Ordinance in amendment to the ordinance relating to the 
regulation of street traffic. 

Amend the ordinance "Relating to the Regulation of Street Traffic" 
by striking out the whole of said ordinance and inserting the following : 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

ARTICLE I. 
Definitions. 

Section 1. The word "vehicle" herein shall include horses hitched 
to vehicles, horses ridden or led, motor vehicles of all kinds, bicycles, and 
everything on wheels or runners excepting street cars and light carriages 
for the conveyance of children. 

Sect. 2. The word "horse " herein shall include all domestic animals. 

Sect. 3. The word "driver" herein shall include the rider, driver or 
leader of a horse, the rider of wheels and the operator of a motor vehicle. 

Sect. 4. The word "curb" herein shall mean the lateral boundaries 
of that portion of a street designated for use of vehicles whether marked 
by curbstone or not so marked. 

Sect. 5. The words "intersecting way" herein shall mean any way 
which joins another at an angle whether or not it crosses the other. 

Sect. 6. The word "crossing" herein shall mean a way for pedes- 
trians to go from one side of a street to the other which is marked by a 
pavement or otherwise; also points bordering the intersection of streets 
not marked but which are commonly used to go from one side of a street 
to the other. 

Sect. 7. The words "Safety Zone" herein shall include any part of 
the highway established and marked by the Police Department as such, 
from travel of which vehicles may be restricted or excluded. 

ARTICLE II. 

Vehicles in Motion. 

Section 1. A vehicle, except when passing a vehicle ahead, shall 
keep to the right and as near the right curb as possible. 

Sect. 2. Vehicles meeting shall pass each other to the right. 

Sect. 3. A vehicle overtaking another vehicle shall, in passing, keep 
to the left, but it shall not leave the line on the right unless there is a 
clear way to advance on the left. 

Sect. 4. A vehicle turning to the right into another street shall turn 
the corner as near to the curb as possible. 

Sect. 5. A vehicle turning to the left into another street shall pass to 
the right of and beyond the center of the intersection of the street before 
turning. 

Sect. 6. A vehicle crossing from one side of the street to the other 
shall do so by turning to the left so as to head in the same direction as the 
traffic on that side of the street. 



b CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 7. Slow moving vehicles shall keep as close as possible to the 
curb on the right so as to allow faster moving vehicles free passage on the 
left. 

Sect. 8. No driver of a vehicle shall allow the same to come within 
ten feet of any vehicle in front of him when approaching and passing over 
a crossing. 

Sect. 9. The driver of any vehicle, before turning the corner of any 
street or turning out or starting from or stopping at the curb line of any 
street, shall first see that there is sufficient space free from other vehicles 
so that such turn, stop or start may be made safely, and shall then give a 
plainly visible or audible signal. 

Sect. 10. (Extract from Motor Vehicle Law, Section 13, Chapter 
119, Laws of 1921): 

"If any person shall operate a motor vehicle on any way at a rate of 
speed greater than is reasonable and proper, having regard to traffic and 
the use of the way, and the safety of the public, he shall be punished as 
provided in Section 15 of the Motor Vehicle Laws." "It shall be conclu- 
sive evidence of a rate of speed greater than is reasonable and proper as 
aforesaid if a motor vehicle is operated on any way inside the thickly 
settled or business part of a city or town at a Bate of speed exceeding 
fifteen miles per hour for a distance of one-eighth of a mile, or if a motor 
vehicle is operated on any way upon approaching an intersecting way, 
or in traversing a crossing or intersection of ways, or in going round a 
corner or curve in a street or way where the operator's view of the road 
traffic is obstructed, at a rate of speed exceeding ten miles per hour, 
provided, that the provisions of this section relating to speed shall not 
apply to motor vehicles of a fire department, motor police patrols, or 
motor ambulances, when in the emergency service of their respective 
departments." 

Sect. 11. Every bicycle operated during the period from one-half 
hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise shall display one lighted 
lamp on the front. 

ARTICLE III. 

Signals, Noises, Smoke and Traffic Signs. 

Section 1. Every driver of a vehicle shall, in slowing up, stopping, 
or backing, give a plainly visible or audible signal to show his intention. 

Sect. 2. In turning while in motion or in starting to turn from a 
standstill, a signal shall be given by the driver of the vehicle about to be 
turned by raising a whip or hand indicating the direction in which the 
turn is to be made. 

Sect. 3. (Extract from Motor Vehicle Law, Section 11, Chapter 119, 
Laws of 1921): 

"Upon approaching any intersecting way or a curve or corner in a way 
every person operating a motor vehicle shall slow down and give timely 



ORDINANCES. 7 

signal with his bell, horn or other device for signalling; provided, that in 
the thickly settled parts of a city or town no bell, horn or other device 
for signalling shall be sounded so as to make an unreasonable noise, 
except in case of fire and police department vehicles; and provided 
further, that no operator or chauffeur of any motor vehicle shall on any 
way permit any unreasonable amount of smoke to escape from said motor 
vehicle, nor shall any operator or chauffeur on any way permit said motor 
vehicle to make unnecessary noise, by cutting out the muffler, or other- 
wise." 

Sect. 4. The Police Department shall control all traffic in the streets 
or highways. Police officers may divert vehicular or pedestrian traffic 
when necessary to avoid congestion or to promote safety and conven- 
ience; and no person having charge of a vehicle shall refuse or neglect to 
stop or start or place the same as directed by a police officer. 

Sect. 5. No person shall break, deface or move any official sign, 
post or signalling device placed in a highway for direction of traffic. 

ARTICLE IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Turning. 

Section 1. No vehicle shall stop so as to interfere with or prevent 
the passage of pedestrians at crossings. 

Sect. 2. Whenever the driver of any motor vehicle intends to leave 
his seat or stops more than five minutes on the east side of Main Street, 
between Freight Street and a point opposite the south side of Center 
Street, and on the west side of Main Street, between Center Street and a 
point opposite the south side of Depot Street, he shall back such vehicle 
until it shall stand with its right rear wheel as nearly as possible to the 
curb and shall stand at an angle of forty-five degrees (45°) to the curb, 
and on the west side of Main Street from a point opposite the south side 
of Depot Street to a point opposite the north side of Freight Street he 
shall place such vehicle with its right to the curb. 

In Ward One (Penacook) on the west side of Main Street from the 
north side of Washington Street to the south end of the bridge, he shall 
back such vehicle until it shall stand with the right rear wheel as nearly 
as possible to the curb and shall stand at an angle of forty-five degrees 
(45°) to the curb. On the east side of Main Street from the north side 
of Merrimack Street to the south side of Electric Court, he shall head 
such vehicle to the curb until it shall stand with its right forward wheel 
as nearly as possible to the curb and shall stand at an angle of forty-five 
degrees (45°) to the curb. 

Sect. 3. No vehicle shall stop with its left side to the curb on Main 
Street between Freight and Center Streets, or on Pleasant, Warren, 
School, Capitol, Park and Center Streets between Main and State 
Streets, or on Depot Street. 

Sect. 4. No vehicle shall stop more than fifteen minutes at a time 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

on Warren Street between Green and Main Streets, and then only for 
the purpose of taking on or setting down passengers, loading or unloading 
merchandise, and in no case shall a horse be hitched or tied or a horse or 
vehicle backed up to the curb to load or unload merchandise. 

Sect. 5. No vehicle shall stand within the intersection of any street, 
nor within five feet of a fire hydrant, nor within ten feet of a curb street 
corner, nor within twelve feet of a city standpipe. 

Sect. 6. No vehicle shall stop or stand within fifty feet either side of 
the center point of the front wall of a fire station, theater or moving pic- 
ture house, except to let off or take on passengers or to receive or deliver 
goods or merchandise. 

Sect. 7. Except as provided in Section 9, unless in an emergency, or 
to allow another vehicle to cross its path, no vehicle shall stop in any 
public street except close to the curb line. 

Sect. 8. When a horse-drawn vehicle is backed up to the curb, the 
horse or horses shall be turned so as to stand as near parallel with the 
sidewalk as possible and headed in the general direction of traffic for the 
side of the street on which the vehicle is standing. 

Sect. 9. In approaching or passing a street railway car which has 
been stopped to take on or let off passengers the driver of every vehicle 
shall bring said vehicle to a full stop. 

Sect. 10. No vehicle incapable of being turned without backing 
shall be turned about in any of the following streets: Pleasant, Warren, 
School, Capitol, Park between Main and State Streets, nor on Depot 
Street. 

Sect. 11. No horse or vehicle shall be driven, backed, or allowed to 
stand on any sidewalk. 

Sect. 12. No vehicle licensed to carry passengers under Chapter 
XXXIV of the city ordinances, shall park on Main Street, nor on Pleas- 
ant, Warren, School and Capitol Streets between Main and State Streets 
longer than to discharge or take on passengers unless in actual service. 

Pleasant Street beginning ten feet east from the east line of Main 
Street and the south side of Park Street as far west as the prolongation of 
the east line of the lot of St. Paul's Church are hereby designated as 
parking places for said vehicles, and reserved for such purpose. 

ARTICLE V. 
Right of Way. 

Section 1. Police, fire department, United States mail vehicles, 
ambulances, funeral processions and emergency repair vehicles of public 
service corporations shall have the right of way in any street and through 
any procession. 

Sect. 2. A person driving or controlling a vehicle waiting at the 
curb shall promptly give place to a vehicle about to take on or let off 
passengers. 



ORDINANCES. 9 

Sect. 3. Subject to Section 1 of this article, street cars shall have 
the right of way between cross streets over all other vehicles; and the 
driver of any vehicle proceeding on the track in front of a street car shall 
immediately turn out on a signal by the motorman or conductor of the 
-car. 

Sect. 4. The driver of a vehicle, on approach of fire apparatus, shall 
immediately draw up said vehicle as near as practicable to the right- 
hand curb and parallel thereto, and bring it to a standstill. 

Sect. 5. The driver of a street car shall stop between intersecting 
streets and keep it stationary upon the approach of fire apparatus. 

Sect. 6. No vehicle or street car shall so occupy any street as to 
interfere with or interrupt the passage of other vehicles or street cars. 

ARTICLE VI. 
Care in Driving; Condition and Treatment of Horses. 

Section 1. No person shall drive or conduct any vehicle in such 
condition or so loaded as to be likely to cause delay in traffic, or accident 
or injury to man, beast or property. 

Sect. 2. No person shall carry or cause to be carried on in any public 
street the weight of which exceeds six tons, unless such load consist of an 
article which cannot be divided, and then only in accordance with a 
permit from the Police Department., 

Sect. 3. No person shall drive a horse not in every respect fit for use 
and capable for the work on which it is employed and free from lameness 
and sores and vices or disease likely to cause delay in traffic or accident 
or injury to persons or property. 

Sect. 4. No person shall illtreat, overload, overdrive or cruelly or 
unnecessarily beat any horse. 

Sect. 5. Any police officer, in his discretion, may remove any horse 
or vehicle left upon any street not in apparent charge of a driver or other 
person, or which is in violation of any of these regulations, to another 
place on said street, or from street to another street, or to the city yard, 
or to a garage or stable, and there leave the same. 

ARTICLE VII. 

Street Cars. 

Section 1. No street car shall stand in the intersection of streets. 

Sect. 2. Drivers of street cars shall not pass the intersection of 
State and Pleasant, Warren and Liberty, Warren and Merrimack, School 
and Merrimack, State and Center, and State and Franklin Streets with- 
out audible warning, nor at a speed which would prevent such driver from 
bringing his car to a full stop in emergency, before reaching the center 
line of intersection of said street. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ARTICLE VIII. 

Stealing Rides. 

Section 1. No person shall steal a ride upon any vehicle or street 
car, and no person shall ride upon the rear of any vehicle without the 
consent of the person in charge thereof. 

ARTICLE IX. 

Restricted Zones. 

Section 1. Subject to the approval of the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen, the Police Department may establish "Restricted Zones," 
"Safety Zones, " or "zones for the exclusive use of horse-drawn vehicles," 
or other purposes and all vehicles shall be restricted or excluded from any 
part of a street established and marked by the Police Department as such. 

ARTICLE X. 

Penalties for Violation. 

Section 1. Except as otherwise provided in the Motor Vehicle Law 
of the state, any person violating any of the provisions herein contained 
shall be liable to a penalty not to exceed ten dollars for the first offence, 
or not to exceed twenty dollars for any subsequent offence. 

Sect. 2. Complaints against any person violating any of the pro- 
visions herein contained may be made at police headquarters or to any 
police officer. 

Sect. 3. Copies of this ordinance may be obtained at police head- 
quarters. 

Sect. 4. The city clerk shall publish the provisions of this ordinance 
in accordance with the requirements of Section 14, Chapter 119, Laws 
of 1921. 

ARTICLE XL 

Previous Ordinances Repealed. 

Section 1. All ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed, 
and this ordinance shall take effect May 22, 1922. 
Passed May 8, 1922. 



An Ordinance amending section 4 of chapter 32 of the revised 
ordinances relating to collection of poll taxes. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chapter 32 by striking out the word 
"June 1st," so that said Section 4 shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 4. Poll taxes shall be paid to the collector on demand, with- 
out previous notice, and if not paid on or before September 1st, twenty 
cents costs shall be added." 



ORDINANCES. 11 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed June 12, 1922. 



An Ordinance relative to the salary of the city sealer. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 2 of "An Ordinance Providing for the 
term of office and salary of the City Sealer," passed January 14, 1918, 
and amended March 28, 1921, so that said section as amended shall read 
as follows: 

"Sect. 2. The salary of the city sealer shall be seven hundred 
twenty dollars per annum in full for all services rendered as such sealer." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsistent with this 
ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed August 14, 1922. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 13 relative to public 

HEALTH. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 13, Section 6, of the Revised Ordinances 
of the City of Concord, by striking out the whole of said section and in- 
serting in place thereof the following: 

"Sect. 6. The sanitary officer shall enforce the provisions of the 
city ordinances relating to the pollution of the water of Penacook Lake." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 13, 1922. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 23 relative to sewers and 

DRAINS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Chapter 23 of the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Concord by adding the following: 

"Sect. 18. The city engineer shall see that all the provisions of the 
ordinance regulating or relating to sewers or drains are enforced. He 
shall inspect all private drains laid by any licensed drain layer before the 
same are covered, and shall report annually to the Board of Aldermen 
the result of said inspection, giving the name of the owner and of the 
occupant of the premises, the street and number, the position of the inlet 
employed, the size of the drain, inclination of the same and the manner 



12 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in which it enters the main sewer, and shall perform such other duties in 
the enforcement of the provisions of said ordinance as may be authorized 
by the Board of Public Works." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 13, 1922. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution providing for the printing of the roster of the city 
government. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present 

city government and cause copies thereof to be printed, and that the 

expense of printing the same shall be charged to the account of printing 

and stationery. 

Passed January 24, 1922. 



Resolution in relation to paying salaries, payrolls and rents. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his warrant on 
the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, payrolls, and rents, 
as the same shall become due during the present municipal term, and all 
bills so paid shall be laid before the committee on accounts and claims 
at their next meeting. 

Passed January 24, 1922. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and binding 
the annual city reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed pro- 
posals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1921 and 
submit the same to the Finance Committee, who shall have full power to 
act in the matter. 

Passed January 24, 1922. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding one 
hundred fifty thousand dollars ($150,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred fifty thousand 



RESOLUTIONS. 13 

dollars ($150,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal 
year, 1922, upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee 
shall determine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said munic- 
ipal year. 

Passed January 24, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by andrew e. quimby, a. i. j. 
dustin, and george t. kilburne estate. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed of property formerly belonging to Andrew E. Quimby, A. I. 
J. Dustin, and George T. Kilburne Estate consisting of lots Nos. 4696 
and 4697, Plan C, Engineer's Map, sold to the city for taxes, at a price 
to include all taxes and costs assessed against said property. 
Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed January 24, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on non-resident property sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 

TAXES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-six cents ($.26) be, and the 
same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1921 on non-resident prop- 
erty sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 taxes. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 13, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on non-resident property sold to the city in 1919 for 1918 
taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
Section 1. That the sum of one and 87-100 dollars ($1.87) be, and 

the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 

otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1921 on non-resident 

property sold to the city in 1919 for 1918 taxes. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 13, 1922. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on non-resident property sold to the city in 1921 for 1920 

TAXES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one and 39-100 dollars ($1.39) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1921 on non- 
resident property sold to the city in 1921 for 1920 taxes. 
Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 13, 1922. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised for the ensuing financial year for the use of the 

CITY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city, the sum of one 
hundred sixty thousand dollars ($160,000) to defray the necessary ex- 
penses and charges of the city for the ensuing financial year, which, 
together with the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and 
from other sources, shall be appropriated as follows: 

City poor $3,000.00 

City Hall bonds 7,000.00 

Bridge bonds 4,000.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery 11,000.00 

Old North Cemetery 700.00 

Maple Grove Cemetery 200.00 

Pine Grove Cemetery 50 . 00 

Millville Cemetery 75 . 00 

Horse Hill Cemetery 10. 00 

Soucook Cemetery 30 . 00 

Woodlawn Cemetery 25 . 00 

Concord Charity Organization Society 350 . 00 

Concord District Nursing Association 350 . 00 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R 450.00 

Incidentals and land damages 12,500. 00 

Interest, Cemetery Trust funds 1,826. 17 

Account Cemetery Trust Fund Note 5,000.00 

Interest on bonds 5,345 . 00 

Interest, temporary loans 3,000.00 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

Memorial Day 460.00 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 1,000.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 15 

Open air concerts $550 . 00 

Playgrounds and bath 2,800.00 

Parks 4,500.00 

Trees 4,000.00 

Printing and stationery 5,000 . 00 

Repairs buildings 1,300 . 00 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,905 . 00 

White Park Ball Ground 200.00 

Aid New Hampshire National Guard 100.00 



$79,726.17 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Salary, sanitary officer $2,000.00 

Up-keep of automobile 400. 00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Incidentals 1,500.00 

Contagious diseases 1,000.00 



$5,000.00 



POLICE AND WATCH. 

Salaries $29,400.00 

Special and traffic officers 3,500 . 00 

Fuel 1,000.00 

Repairs buildings 700 . 00 

Lights 300.00 

Incidentals 2,500.00 

Auto supplies 900. 00 

New automobile 930.00 



$39,230.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Salaries $4,300.00 

Books and incidentals 2,700. 00 



$7,000.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, engineer $2,400 . 00 

Salary, assistants 2,000 . 00 

Assessor's map 400 . 00 

Incidentals 325.00 

$5,125.00 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Salary, superintendent $2,500 . 00 

General maintenance 90,000. 00 

Sidewalks and crossings, new 1,500.00 

Sidewalk and crossings, repair 3,000 . 00 

Catch basins 3,000.00 



$100,000.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Payrolls $28,974.00 

Payrolls, semi-annual 10,245 . 00 

Rent Veterans' Association • 210.00 

Forage 1,000.00 

Fuel and lights 3,650.00 

Fire alarm 1,500 . 00 

Horse hire and shoeing 1,000 . 00 

Washing 100.00 

Auto combination supplies 325 . 00 

Penacook Fire Alarm 350 . 00 

Incidentals 5,000.00 

New hose 1,200 . 00 

Fire inspection 500 . 00 



$54,054.00 

SALARIES. 

Mayor $2,000. 00 

City clerk 1,400.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 200. 00 

Overseers of the poor 390 . 00 

City solicitor 800. 00 

City treasurer 1,225 . 00 

City messenger ■ 1,200.00 

City physicians 700.00 

Care, city clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,800 . 00 

Moderators and ward clerks 720.00 

Supervisors and inspectors of elections 1,776.00 

Judge, police court 1,200 . 00 

Clerk, police court 500 . 00 

Sealer of weights and measures 500 . 00 

Collector of taxes 4,000.00 

$20,521.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 17 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, a tax of three and 50-100 dollars ($3.50) on each thousand dollars 
of the value of the ratable estate taxable within said city for the support 
of the public schools, which, together with the income of the Abial 
Walker Fund, shall be appropriated and divided among the school dis- 
tricts according to the valuation thereof. 

There shall also be raised a sum equal to two dollars ($2) for each child 
residing in the city who was enrolled in the public schools in the last 
preceding school year. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
cemeteries of the city one half of the income from the sale of lots and the 
income derived for the care of lots and grading, which sum shall be de- 
posited by the superintendent, or others receiving them, in the city 
treasury. The care of lots for which the city holds trust funds shall be 
paid from the money appropriated for the care of cemeteries, and so much 
of the income of these trust funds as may be thus expended shall be de- 
posited in the city treasury at the close of the year, and the remainder in 
each instance credited to the individual fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for the 
use of the public library in the purchase of books the amount collected 
for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the garbage precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the garbage precinct of 
said city, the sum of twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) to defray the 
necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial 
year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the collection of garbage and refuse matter in said pre- 
cinct $20,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the street sprinkling precinct in ward one for the 

ensuing financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling pre- 
cinct in Ward One, the sum of seven hundred dollars ($700) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $700 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the street sprinkling precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the street sprinkling pre- 
cinct of said city, the sum of seven thousand dollars ($7,000) to defray 
the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing 
financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For sprinkling streets $7,000 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the west concord sewerage precinct for the en- 
suing financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the West Concord Sewerage 
Precinct, the sum of two hundred dollars ($200) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For construction and repair $200 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



RESOLUTIONS. 19 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the penacook sewerage precinct for the ensuing 
financial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the Penacook Sewerage 
Precinct, the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) to defray the necessary 
expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For construction and repair 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the sewerage precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the sewerage precinct of 
said city, the sum of sixteen thousand six hundred forty-five dollars 
($16,645) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of said precinct 
for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For construction and repair $10,450.00 

For the payment of interest that may become due on pre- 
cinct bonds 2,195.00 

For bonds 4,000.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to be 
raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within the 
limits of the lighting precinct for the ensuing financial 

YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within the lighting precinct, the 
sum of twenty-three thousand dollars ($23,000) to defray the necessary 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

expenses and charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, 
which shall be appropriated as follows: 

For lighting streets $23,000 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution transferring two thousand dollars of the income 
from the eastman library fund to a permanent building fund 
for the library. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) of the income from the 

Eastman Library Fund be, and hereby is, transferred to a permanent 

building fund for the Library. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution repealing rules governing hackney carriages 
adopted by the board of mayor and aldermen. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
Section 1. Rules 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, established under 

Sections 1 and 6 of Chapter 34 of the City Ordinances, are hereby 

repealed. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect April 1, 1922. 
Passed March 30, 1922. 



Resolution repealing job team rules and establishing new rules. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Rules 1 and 2 established under Section 10, Chapter 34 of the City 
Ordinances, are hereby repealed and the following rules are substituted 
therefor, to take effect April 1, 1922: 

• Rule 1. No vehicle shall stand on Main Street or on any intersecting 
street between Center and Pleasant, and Bridge and Freight Streets, 
inclusive, for the purpose of soliciting teaming or trucking. 

Rule 2. The City Lot on Odd Fellows Avenue is hereby designated a 
job team and truck stand. 

Passed March 30, 1922. 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 

Resolution transferring two thousand dollars op the income 
from the eastman library fund to the principal of said fund 
for the library. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) of the 
income from the Eastman Library Fund be, and hereby is, transferred 
to the principal of said fund for the Library. 

Sect. 2. That the resolution passed March 30, 1922, transferring 
two thousand dollars of the income from the Eastman Library Fund, to 
a permanent building fund for the Library, is hereby repealed. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 10, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to replace the motor chemical 
trucks of the alert hose company and pioneer engine com- 
PANY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of four thousand dollars ($4,000) be, and hereby is, ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated 
to replace the motor chemical trucks of the Alert Hose Company and 
Pioneer Engine Company, Penacook; said sum to be expended under 
the direction of the Committee on Fire Department. 
Passed April 10, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the sale of certain parcels of land sold 
TO the city for non payment of taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed of property formerly owned by Joseph H. Defoe, Harriett F. 
Norwood, Russell C. Elliott, Josephine P. Haines, Lucius Merifield, 
consisting of lots numbered 4630, 4637, 4638, 4639 and 4679, Plan C, 
City Engineer's Map, sold to the city for taxes at a price to include all 
taxes and costs assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution to take effect on its passage. 
Passed May 8, 1922. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding one 
hundred fifty thousand dollars ($150,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred fifty thousand 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

dollars ($150,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal 
year 1922, upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal 
year. 

Passed May 24, 1922. 



Resolution providing for the payment by the city of concord of 
its share in the expense of the proposed soucook river 
bridge and road project. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the City of Concord accept the proposition as outlined by High- 
way Commissioner Everett and co-operated with the federal and state 
governments and the town of Pembroke in building the new road and 
bridge on the so-called Soucook River project at the agreed and under- 
stood total expense to the City of Concord of $15,000. 

That the said $15,000 be paid by the City of Concord by the issue of its 
serial notes of $3,000 each, maturing one, two, three, four and five years 
after date of issue of said serial notes, with interest, as provided for in 
Chapter 129 of the Laws of 1917, approved April 10, 1917. 
Passed June 12, 1922. 



Resolution providing for a discount on taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a discount of two per cent. (2%) shall be allowed on all taxes 
assessed for the year 1922, which are paid within ten days from the date 
of the tax bills. 

Passed June 12, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit deed to 
property formerly owned by peter tardif. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed of property formerly belonging to Peter Tardif, being lots of 
land known as 40 and 41, Prospect Park, No. 6340, Plan A, Engineer's 
Map, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes and costs 
assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 10, 1922. 



RESOLUTIONS. 23 

Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars for 
printing and stationery. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the same hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for printing and stationery. 
Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by ellen m. cleveland. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed of property formerly belonging to Ellen M. Cleveland con- 
sisting of Lot No. 80, Concord Land & Water Power Co. Plan, recorded 
Merrimack County Record, No. 12, Assessor's Map, No. 6291, Map A, 
Ward 3, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes and 
costs assessed against said property. 
Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 on 
real estate sold to the city in 1918 for 1917 taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of fifty-seven and 98-100 dollars ($57.98) 
be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1921 on real 
estate sold to the city in 1918 for 1917 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of fifty-seven and 98-100 dollars ($57.98). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on real estate sold to the city in 1919 for 1918 taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred nine and 41-100 dollars 
($109.41) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on real estate sold to the city in 1919 for 1918 taxes. 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of one hundred nine and 41-100 dollars 
($109.41). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on real estate sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of three hundred five and 40-100 dollars 
($305.40) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated, out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on real estate sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of three hundred five and 40-100 dollars 
($305.40). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1921 
on real estate sold to the city in 1921 for 1920 taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of six hundred twenty-eight and 25-100 
dollars ($628.25) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed 
in 1921 on real estate sold to the city in. 1921 for 1920 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay to the 
collector of taxes said amount of six hundred twenty-eight and 25-100 
dollars ($628.25). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating nineteen hundred eighty-six and 26- 
100 dollars ($1,986.26) to pay for real estate sold to the 
city of concord for unpaid taxes for the year 1921. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of nineteen hundred eighty-six and 26-100 dollars 
($1,986.26) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the amount due to 



RESOLUTIONS. 25 

the City of Concord for real estate purchased at the tax collector's sale 
of real estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 1921. 
Passed August 14, 1922. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding one 
hundred thousand dollars ($100,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city a sum not to exceed one hundred thousand dollars 
($100,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 
1922, upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal 
year. 

Passed August 22, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating thirty-five hundred dollars ($3,500) 
for purchase of automobile truck to replace combination 
no. 1 for the fire department. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of thirty-five hundred dollars ($3,500) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated for the purchase of an automobile truck to replace Combination 
No. 1 for the Fire Department, same to be expended under the direction 
of the Fire Department Committee. 
Passed September 11, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the city of concord to borrow money 
in aid of union school district in concord. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows : 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for the new Millville 
School Building and the addition to the Morrill Training School, the 
city borrow the sum of forty thousand dollars ($40,000) and issue bonds 
therefor as provided for in Chapter 89, of the Public Statutes, and 
Chapter 129, of the Laws of 1917; that the mayor and city treasurer be, 
and hereby are, authorized and directed to make and execute, sign and 
affix the seal of said city thereto for the sum of forty thousand dollars 
($40,000) in accordance with the request and upon the terms contained 
in the vote of the district passed at its annual meeting held April 6, 1922. 
Said bonds to be forty in number and of the denomination of one 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

thousand dollars ($1,000), each to be dated October 1, 1922, and to be 
made payable to bearer with interest coupons attached bearing interest 
at a rate not to exceed four and one half (4^) per cent per annum paj^able 
semi-annually on the first day of April and the first day of October in 
each year. Said bonds to become due and payable serially, two thousand 
dollars ($2,000) to be payable the first day of October, 1923, and two 
thousand dollars ($2,000) the first day of October of each succeeding 
year until and including October 1, 1942. 

The principal of said bonds and the interest coupons attached to be 
made payable at the National Shawmut Bank of Boston, Mass., or at 
the office of the city treasurer in Concord, N. H. 

Sect. 2. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to procure pro- 
posals for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and whichever bid 
seems for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, provided 
the same is approved by the Finance Committee. The right is reserved, 
however, to reject any or all bids. 

Sect. 3. The mayor and treasurer are authorized to execute in the 
name and behalf of the city, such agreements in writing between it and 
said district as they may deem necessary and advisable to protect the 
rights of the respective parties growing out of this transaction. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed September 11, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money for fire prevention week 
printing. 

That the sum of fifty dollars ($50) be taken from the appropriation of 
printing and stationery to pay for necessary printing, for Fire Prevention 
Week. 

Said sum to be expended under the direction of the Committee on 
Fire Department. 

Passed October 9, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating additional money for the new motor 
trucks for alert hose and pioneer engine companies. 

Section 1. That the sum of six hundred forty-four and 91-100 
dollars ($644.91) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the additional expense 
in the purchase of the new motor trucks for Alert Hose and Pioneer 
Engine companies. 

Sect. 2. That this resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed October 9, 1922. 



KESOLUTIONS. 27 

Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
fifty thousand dollars ($50,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on the 
credit of the city a sum not to exceed fifty thousand dollars (.$50,000) 
for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 1922, upon 
such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine, said 
loan to be payable from the taxes of the said municipal year. 
Passed October 28, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of twelve hundred dollars 
($1,200) for city poor. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the sum of twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) be, and the same 

hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 

appropriated, for city poor. 
Passed November 13, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by irving r. hamilton. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed of property formerly belonging to Irving R. Hamilton, Ward 
2, being lot No. 8064, as shown on Maps B and C in the City Engineer's 
Office, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes and costs 
assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed November 13, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by james f. doherty. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed of property formerly belonging to James F. Doherty, Church 
Street, Ward 1, being lot No. 7686 on Map A, in the City Engineer's 
Office, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes and costs 
assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed November 13, 1922. 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating the sum of thirty-six thousand dollars 
3,000) for incidentals and land damages. 



Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the sum of thirty-six thousand dollars ($36,000) be, and the same 

hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 

appropriated, for incidentals and land damages. 
Passed December 11, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of twelve hundred twenty- 
eight and 45-100 dollars ($1,228.45) to settle saint mary's 
school for girls appeal from the assessment of taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of twelve hundred twenty-eight and 45-100 dollars 
($1,228.45) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money 
in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to settle the appeal of Saint 
Mary's School for Girls from the assessment of taxes for the years 1920 
and 1921. 

Passed December 11, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money for a municipal Christmas tree. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated, for a municipal Christmas tree celebration; said ap- 
propriation to be expended under the direction of the mayor and the 
Committee on Lands and Buildings. 

Passed December 11, 1922. 



Resolution authorizing the board of public works to negotiate 
the terms of a lighting contract with the concord electric 
company. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Board of Public Works is hereby constituted a committee 
with power to negotiate the terms of a contract with the Concord Elec- 
tric Company for the lighting of the streets of the city by electric lights, 
the terms of said contract to be submitted to and passed upon by the 
full Board. 

Passed December 29, 1922. 



RESOLUTIONS. 29 

Resolution petitioning the 1923 legislature for certain relief. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord peti- 
tion the 1923 Legislature of the State of New Hampshire for relief from 
the financial burden placed upon the city during 1922, when by the 
provision of present existing state laws, the city paid for the maintenance 
of troops at the Boston & Maine shop yards the sum of $36,000. 

Because of the fact that Concord is a terminal yard and thus becomes 
a service station for the entire state and railroad system, we feel that 
maintenance of law and order along the railroad system and the protec- 
tion of railroad property is as much a state problem as it is a city problem. 

The Finance Committee of this Board, therefore, is requested to have 
drawn a proper bill petitioning the Legislature for financial relief to the 
extent of one half of the amount paid out by the city for the maintenance 
of troops. 

The Finance Committee is also requested to take the bill up with the 
Concord Delegation in the Legislature, with the request that they give 
it their support and urge its passage. 

Passed December 29, 1922. 



Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of fifteen thousand five hundred forty-five 
and 63-100 dollars ($15,545.63) be, and hereby is, appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay outstand- 
ing claims as follows : 

Fire Department $253 . 00 

Incidentals 836.73 

Interest, temporary loans 2,925.05 

Parks 108.18 

Playgrounds and bath 373 . 95 

Police and watch 9,999 . 43 

Printing and stationery 374.20 

Salaries 663 . 28 

White Park Ball Ground 11 . 81 



$15,545.63 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Highway 
Department for the year 1922, the sum of ten thousand six hundred 
sixty-nine and 96-100 ($10,669.96), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 



30 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for garbage 
for the year 1922, the sum of two hundred sixty-three and 89-100 dollars 
($263.89), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for sewers 
for the year 1922, the sum of eighteen and 50-100 dollars ($18.50), the 
same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the appropriation for trees for 
the year 1922, the sum of two hundred ninety and 6-100 dollars ($290.- 
06), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 6. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 8, 1923. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding three 
hundred thousand dollars ($300,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on the 
credit of the city a sum not to exceed three hundred thousand dollars 
($300,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the municipal year 
1923, upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine, said loan to be payable from the taxes of said municipal year. 
Passed January 8, 1923. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and binding 
the annual citt reports. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 

proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1922 and 

submit the same to the Finance Committee, who shall have full power to 

act in the matter. 

Passed January 8, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of a motorized 
hook and ladder truck for the fire department. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of ten thousand dollars ($10,000) be appropriated for 
the purchase of a motorized hook and ladder truck for the Fire Depart- 
ment, same to be expended under the direction of the Fire Department 
Committee, 

Passed January 8, 1923. 



RESOLUTIONS. 31 

Resolution appropriating money for clearing skating areas. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300) be, and hereby is, ap- 
propriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for clearing snow from skating areas, said sum to be expended under the 
supervision of the superintendent of streets. 

Passed January 8, 1923. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1922. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1922. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 
MAYOR. 

Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

HON. HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per annum, 
with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts and Claims. 



Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1924. 
HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Morton Street 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER, 150 South Main Street 

Term Expires January, 1926. 

ROBERT W. BROWN, 3 Cambridge Street 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

FRANK R. STRONG, 16 South Spring Street 

3 33 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward Aldermen. 
Ward 1— HARRY F. JONES, Penacook 

Ward 2— JOHN H. MORRILL, East Concord 

Ward 3— OTTO ANDERSON, West Concord 

Ward 4— CHARLES L. MASON, 46 Washington Street 
Ward 5— WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 84 School Street 

Ward S— GEORGE H. CORBETT, 20 Elm Street 

Ward 7— CHARLES J. McKEE, R. F. D. 3 

Ward 8— ADOLPHE BOISVERT, 93 South Main Street 
Ward 9— JAMES McGUIRE, JR., 212 North State Street 



CITY CLERK. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

Office: City Hall, Room 3. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 
FRED'K I. BLACKWOOD, 
ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
RICHARD A. BROWN, 
FRANK R. STRONG, 



Term expires January, 1924 
1924 
1924 
1926 
1926 
1926 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 35 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Brunei, Mason, McKee. 

On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Stevens, Pelissier, Blackwood. 

On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen R. A. Brown, Boisvert, Morrill. 

On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Anderson, Boisvert, Brunei. 

On Finance — Mayor, 

Aldermen R. A. Brown, Stevens, Pelissier, Corbett. 

On Fire Department — 

Aldermen Strong, Anderson, McGuire. 

On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen R. W. Brown, McKee, Jones. 

On Police and License — 

Aldermen Mason, R. W. Brown, Morrill. 

On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Blackwood, Strong, Jones. 

Committee on Playgrounds and Bath — 
Aldermen Brunei, Stevens, Jones, Morrill, Mrs. Cora M. 
Sullivan, Miss Elsie L. Johnson, Richard T. Smith. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance of the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and S25 as Treasurer 
of Cemeteries. 

CARL H. FOSTER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,400 per annum. 

WILL B. HOWE,* 
FRED W. LANG.f 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary $1,200 per annum. 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR, 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to satisfac- 
tion of the board. Salary, one-half of one per centum upon the first $100,000; three- 
fourths of one per centum upon all sums over $100,000. 

WOODBURY E. HUNT. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $1,000 per annum. Clerk, $1,800 per annum. 
Office: Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1928 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1926 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1924 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. Salary, 

$2,500. 

ORRIN W. HEAD. 

Office: City Hall. 
* Died April 1, 1922. 
t Elected to fill vacancy April 10, 1922. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 37 

SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

i Office: City Hall. 



CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $600 per annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per annum. 

J. JOSEPH DOHERTY. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Wardl— HARRY F. JONES, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 2— JOHN H. MORRILL, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9— ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HARRY J. BROWN. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS. 



CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Justice. Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOHN W. STANLEY. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $2,300 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

VICTOR I. MOORE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 39 

REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Term, 
unlimited. Salary, $1,680 per annum for first year, and $1,800 per annum thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,850 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $1,825 per annum. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Rodd, 

George H. Silsby, J. Edward Silva, 

John B. Long, Fred N. Marden, 

James J. Halligan, F. Scott Rogers, 

Arthur W. Mclsaac, Cleveland H. Curtis. 

Eugene G. Densmore, Abraham D. Cushing, Chauffeurs. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 

W. A. Little, Joseph A. Flanders, 

Elmer Trombley, John McGirr, 

Jonas Welcome, Willie A. Flanders, 

Thomas M. Harrison, Walter H. Beane, 

Nelson Forest, Nelson E. Strong, 

George H. Abbott, Galen W. Hunter, 

George M. Dooley, John P. Walsh. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, none. 

Wardl— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— FRANK P. CURTIS. 
Wards— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward 0— REUBEN E. WALKER.* 

THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN.f 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— PERLEY B. PHILLIPS. 
W ard 9— WILLIAM J. AHERN, JR. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $800 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Salary, $700 per annum. 

BERTHA N. CARR. 



*Died January 1, 1922. 

t Appointed to fill vacancy January 9, 1922. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



41 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and Aldermen- 
Salary, none. 

Office: Room 1, City Hall. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 

OLIVER J. PELREN, Term expires March 31, 1923 

1923 
1923 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1926 
1926 



CHARLES R, WALKER,* " 
CARLOS H. FOSTER,f 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
N. E. MARTIN, 
H. H. DUDLEY, 

President — N. E. Martin. 

Clerk — Burns P. Hodgman. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, S3, 600 per annum. Term 

unlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

CARL H. FOSTER, Term expires January, 1923 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, " " " 1924 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, " " " 1925 



* Died April 22, 1922. 

t Appointed to fill vacancy May 8, 1922. 



42 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,600 per annum. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN, 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

C. E. ROBINSON. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 

Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 43 

SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, none. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio, 
DR. SIBLEY G. MORRILL. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 
ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

Office: City Hall. 



44 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 

No salary. 

City Engineer 



WILL B. HOWE,* 
FRED W. LANG,f 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



Chief of the Fire Department 
Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 
JOHN P. GEORGE, Term expires January, 1923 

1923 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 



CHARLES P. BANCROFT, " 
BEN C. WHITE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, JR., 
GARDNER B. EMMONS, 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



* Died April 1, 1922. 
t April 10, 1922. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 45 

CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 



One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consolidated) appointed 
annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 



Ward 1. 
CHARLES H. SANDERS, Term expires January, 1923 
WALLACE C. HOYT, " " " 1924 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, " " " 1925 

Ward 2. 
SCOTT FRENCH, Term expires January, 1923 

C. A. CHAMBERLIN, " " " 1924 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, " " " 1925 

Ward 3. 
MATHEW H. PEABODY, Term expires January, 1923 
LEWIS S. PARMENTER, " " " 1924 

ROYAL D. HOLDEN, " " " 1925 

Ward 7. 
FRANK G. PROCTOR, Term expires January, 1923 
J. NEWTON ABBOTT, " " " 1924 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " " " 1925 

Ward 8. 
ALMAH C. LEAVITT, Term expires January, 1923 

BENJAMIN J. PRESCOTT, " " " 1924 

ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, " " " 1925 



46 CITY OF CONCORD. 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject to con- 
firmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 
CHARLES G. REMICK, Term expires March, 1923 



JOHN P. GEORGE, 
HERBERT G. ABBOTT, 
MILAN D. CUMMINGS, 
FRED W. LANG, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 



1923 
1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND 
OLD NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, none. 

FOR OLD NORTH AND BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY, 
FRANK J. KELLEY, 
WILLIAM H. HOYT, 
JOHN F. WATERS. 

FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

JOSEPH N. ABBOTT. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

BENJAMIN J. PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, $2, per day, paid by parties interested. 

FRED W. LANG, 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS, 
ALFRED CLARK. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each for all other 
creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Salary, $720. 

FRED S. PENDLETON. 

Office: 11 Court Street. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 40 cents; butt 
staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — paid by party for whom 
culling is done. 

FRED H. PERLEY. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Fred I. Rolfe, 

Everett L. Davis, William J. Mullen, 

Hallett E. Patten, Henry A. Brown, 

Arthur N. Day, Charles E. Hardy, 

James F. Fitzgerald, H. T. Ross, 

John H. Flanders, C. H. Staniels, 

Fred H. Perley, Frank J. Clancy, 

William H. Meserve, Thomas Murphy, 

G. W. Lovejoy, W. J. Callahan, 

Alphonse King, W. L. Fenton, 

John S. Chandler, Clarence S. Anderson, 

R. E. Sanderson, C. H. Hanson, 

William Gooden, C. J. Roers, 

Guy Rowell, James B. Riley, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



49 



Otis Lynch, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 
Archie Black, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
E. W. Saltmarsh, 
R. W. Gordon, 
Fred E. Wattles, 
Edward Watkins, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
J. A. Provost, 
John White, 
Nelson Forrest, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
W. A. Flanders, 
T. F. McCauley, 
J. S. Callahan, 
Harold C. Lee, 
T. Mulligan, 



Charles E. Cook, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brawn, 
Earl Woodbury, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 
S. A. Clark, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
J. W. Currier, 
G. W. Hunter, 
F. W. Morgan, 
D. C. Taylor, 
A. M. Follett, 
John E. Coulter, 
H. L. Barnard, 
Phillip Desmarais, 
Omar C. Allard, 
L. M. Quimby, 
T. F. O'Neil, 
J. T. Turcotte, 
C. G. Rowell, 
Robert A. Ranson. 



CITY WEIGHER. 
WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Moses E. Haines. 



50 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell, 
George Evans. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; boards and timber 
16 cents per M.; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord or load, or 40 cents per hour 
for over twenty cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
William E. Virgin, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
Harvey H. Hay ward, 
Alfred D. Mayo, 
Louis F. Merrill, 
Joseph Messier, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
Herman C. Colb} r , 
Edward L. Foster, 
C. H. Osgood, 
Richard J. Hennessey, 
Stacy E. Oliver, 
Harry Walsh, 



John Rolfe, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Oliver Reno, 
Silas Wiggin, 
F. E. Frost, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
E. D. Ashley, 
W. F. Frost, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Arthur R. Stewart, 
Edward R, Foster, 
Irving Burbank, 
John E. Colton, 
Everett Runnells, 
Clifford G. Culver, 
Horace B. Annis, 
Carl F. Mellin, 
Guy F. Avery, 
S. O. Daigneau. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



51 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Alder- 
men. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
Clarence J. Spead, 
W. J. Sleeper, 
John W. McGowan, 
Henry Morrill, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Joseph A. Normandeau, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Arthur W. Brown, 
Edward E. Beane, 



W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Charles H. Berry, 
Niram M. Kays, 
Wilfred H. Brennan, 
James H. Brannigan, 
E. H. Smart, 
John C. Smith, 
Walter Dow. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 

No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio, 
WILL B. HOWE, ex-officio, 
FRED W. LANG, 
WILFRED BRENNAN. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD OFFICERS. 



SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward 1— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
ELI LAFLAMME, 
GEORGE F. McGIRR. 

Ward 2—M. J. LACROIX, 

HAROLD W. RILEY, 
WYMAN D. STEARNS. 

Ward 3— LAWRENCE W. KNIGHT, 
HENRY F. HOBBS, 
J. HAROLD JOHNSON. 

Ward 4— ELWIN L. PAGE, 

NUTE B. FLANDERS, 
RICHARD T. LYFORD. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 

FRANKLIN B. GORDON, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward £— CHARLES DUNCAN, 
HARRY R. CRESSY, 
ERNEST W. SALTMARSH. 

Ward 7— FRANK I. MANNING, 
WALDO S. ROUNDY, 
CLARENCE 0. PHILBRICK. 

Ward 8— FRED SMITH, 
C. C. STUART, 
SIMEON SHARAF. 

Ward 9— PATRICK J. GAVAGHAN, 
DENNIS J. KENNEY, 
FRANK J. SPAIN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 53 

WARD CLERKS. 

Ward 1— JOHN B. DODGE. 

Ward 2— CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 

Ward 3— EARL N. WOODBURY. 

Ward 4— WILLIAM B. McINNIS. 

Ward 5— EDWARD A. DAME. 

Ward 6— GUY JEWETT. 

Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 

Ward S— FRANK W. ORDWAY. 

Ward 9— ANDREW E. SALTMARSH. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward 1— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 2— ROSS W. CATE. 
Ward 8— ROBERT HENRY. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
Ward 5— WALTER L. JENKS. 
Ward £— ARTHUR E. DOLE. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward 8— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 9— WILLIAM J. AHERN, JR. 



54 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 1853, and 
until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor has been elected 

for two years at each biennial election in November. Under the City Charter, 
adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in December, 1910, for one year, 
and biennially thereafter in November, beginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853-'54. 

RUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55. 

JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859-'60. 

MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861-'62. 

BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863-'64. 

MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868-'69. 

ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870-71. 

JOHN KIMBALL, 1872-73-74-75. 

GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876-77. 

HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878-79-'80. 

GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880-'81-'82. 

EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883-'84-'85-'86. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887-'88. 

STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889-'90. 

HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891-'92. 

PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893-'94. 

HENRY ROBINSON, 1895-'96. 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897-'98. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901-'02. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903-'08. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909-'15. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 1916-'17. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1918-'19. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 1920- 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1922-1923. 



Harry F. Lake, Esq. 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill 



President 
Secretary 



MEMBERS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



1923. 

Mr. Bennett Batchelder, 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Elkins, 
Mr. Joseph S. Otis, 

1924. 
Rev. W. Stanley Emery, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 
Dr. Charles Duncan, 

1925. 

Harry F. Lake, Esq., 

Mrs. Dorothy B. Jackson, 

Mr. Carl H. Foster, 

57 



104 School Street 

24 Union Street 

26 Church Street 

110 North State Street 
123 North State Street 
43 South Spring Street 

29 Auburn Street 

35 Liberty Street 

40 Rumford Street 



58 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Mr. Lake. 
Mr. Emery. 
Mrs. Elkins. 
Mrs. Jackson. 
Mrs. Morrill. 
Mr. Otis. 
Mr. Lake. 
Dr. Duncan. 

Dr. Duncan. 
Mrs. Jackson. 
Mrs. Morrill. 
Mrs. Elkins. 
Mr. Emery. 



finance. 
Dr. Duncan. 

high school. 
Dr. Duncan. 

grammar schools. 
Mr. Foster. 

primary schools. 
Mr. Otis. 

kindergartens. 
Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Foster. 

Mr. Lake. 

Mr. Batchelder. 

Mr. Emery. 

Mrs. Jackson. 



buildings and repairs. 

Mr. Lake. Mr. Batchelder. 



discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

HYGIENE. 

Mrs. Morrill. 

manual training. 

Wood and Iron. 

Mr. Batchelder. 

Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

music. 
Mr. Batchelder. 

drawing. 
Mr. Foster. 

text-books. 
Mr. Lake. 



Mr. Emery. 
Mr. Emery. 

Mr. Otis. 

Mrs. Elkins. 

Mrs. Elkins. 

Mrs. Jackson. 

Mrs. Elkins. 



school report. 59 

training school. 
Mr. Foster. Mr. Otis. Mrs. Jackson. 

night school. 
Mr. Batchelder. Mr. Otis. Mr. Foster. 

building committee for millville school. 
Mr. Otis. Mr. Emery. Mr. Batchelder. 

Dr. Duncan. Mrs. Jackson. (Mr. Lake, ex-officio.) 

building committee for manual training school. 
Dr. Duncan. Mr. Foster. Mrs. Elkins. 

(Mr. Lake, ex-officio.) 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT. 

Louis John Rundlett. 

15 Summit Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open, 8 to 12 a. m., 

1.30 to 6 p. m. Telephones: Office, 55M; house, 603R. 



ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

Francis Treadway Clayton. 

82^ Warren Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 3 to 5 p. m., school days. Telephones: Office, 55M; 

house, 749X. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 

6 Avon Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m.; summer 

vacation, 2 to 4 p. m. Telephone, 1661M. 



60 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CLERKS. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 
4 Rockingham Street. Telephone, 702. 

Louise Mattie Stuart. 

18 No. Spring Street. Telephone, 1334W. 

Office of Financial Agent, Parker School. 
Office hours: 8.30 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR AND PHYSICAL DIRECTOR. 

Clarence Moore Kelley, M.D. 

3 Humphrey Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., and 4 to 4.30 p. m. on school days. 
Telephones: Office, 55M; house, 654R. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Helen Young Upham, R.N. 

25 Thorndike Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m. on school days; 3 to 5 p. m. Mondays. 
Telephones: Office, 55M; house, 712X. 

Viola Alma Carlson. 

19 Center Street. Telephone, 1004M. 

Office of Medical Inspector, Parker School. 

Office hours: 8.30 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5 p. m. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Louis C. Merrill ..... Moderator 

Ray E. Burkett ..... Clerk 

Henry H. Metcalf and John P. George . Auditors 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



One year ago our report recommended that the district 
vote the money necessary to erect two new structures, one a 
new school building at Millville in place of the old building 
now in use, and the other an addition to the Morrill Training 
School. The amount voted at the annual school meeting 
for the Millville School was a sum not to exceed $30,000. 
Upon organization of the School Board at its meeting next 
after the annual meeting, the following members of the 
Board were appointed the special committee on the Millville 
School, viz., Messrs. Otis, Batchelder, Emery, Dr. Duncan 
and Mrs. Jackson, and upon the committee for the addition 
to the Morrill Training School were appointed Dr. Duncan, 
Mr. Foster and Mrs. Elkins. 

Immediately plans were asked for by the Millville School 
Committee from all architects interested in the matter, 
and a large number of meritorious plans were submitted, 
from which the Board finally selected that of C. R. 
Whitcher, of Manchester. In like manner, various con- 
tractors submitted bids for the work of construction, the 
general contract finally being let to Hutchinson Building 
Company, of Concord, for the sum of $26,597, they being 
the lowest bidder for the work by some $15,000. This firm 
has done all that could reasonably be expected to complete 
the building at an early day, and it will be ready for oc- 
cupancy at the beginning of the new school year. We feel 
sure that it will be adequate for the needs of the Millville 
District for a long time, and will, when completed, be a 
source of genuine pride to the whole district and the City 
of Concord. 

The district should know that the land on which this 
building is being placed has been donated for school pur- 
poses by St. Paul's School. 

61 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The addition to the Morrill Training School has been 
built according to plans drawn by Mr. George S. Forrest, 
H. K. Larsen being the general contractor, and is now 
occupied as the new quarters for the machine department. 
The total expense for building and equipment will be about 
$11,000. The greater conveniences and space gained by 
this addition well justify, we believe, the cost of the struc- 
ture. In this connection, we would add that the space at 
the west of the Morrill Training School building, where the 
Board had hoped to have the addition and where certain 
excavations were made before the special district meeting 
which acted adversely on the matter, has become utilized for 
a convenient and serviceable storage room much needed by 
the district. Lumber to be used in the school can advan- 
tageously be stored there, or certain other materials of the 
district, for which it is now difficult to find a proper place. 
This is a valuable addition to the equipment of the district. 

An unusual opportunity to meet the reasonable and grow- 
ing demands of the South End residents for a kindergarten 
in that vicinity presents itself in acquiring for school pur- 
poses the small Baptist Chapel on the east side of Dunklee 
Street, a structure unusually well built and easily possible of 
being made suitable for our purposes. We have an option 
on the property from John A. Cate, the owner, for $1,500. 
We hope the district will authorize its purchase at the 
coming annual meeting. 

On the matter of our physical equipment, we should add 
that as a part of the activities of Fire Prevention Week, the 
Underwriters' Association of New Hampshire, upon our 
application and through the kindness of Mr. Louis Clarner, 
Jr., made without expense to the district a detailed and 
thorough inspection of all our school buildings for the pur- 
pose of suggesting and recommending any matters that 
would further insure the safet3 r of the buildings and the 
occupants. We were grateful for a number of recommenda- 
tions, and substantially all have been complied with or will 
be at an early date. Our genuine appreciation is due Mr. 
Clarner for his services in this matter. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 63 

More repairs and refurnishing of the school buildings will 
have to be done this coming year than has been the case for 
some time past, especially at the Walker and High School 
buildings. Mr. George W. Griffin has been engaged to 
make a thorough inspection of all our school buildings and 
will soon submit to your Board a statement of the needs of 
the district in this respect, and the probable cost of doing 
the necessary things. On his report will be based the 
amount of the appropriations to be asked for at the annual 
meeting under the proper article inserted for that purpose 
in the warrant. 

The most serious financial matter which confronts the 
district is the necessity for a new high school building. The 
Parker School is overcrowded by about fifty pupils, and the 
high school building, already filled to capacity, will be over- 
crowded next September by about one hundred, in conse- 
quence of which double sessions per day will have to be 
inaugurated, an arrangement which is recognized every- 
where as being inefficient. To avoid too great loss from 
this cause, we should have the new building as soon as 
possible. In this connection we should take a long look 
ahead, and build adequately, not for fifteen, but for fifty 
years. We should make ultimate provisions easily possible 
for twice our present needs, — the experience of the past 
permits no other course. 

Cities around us are having to spend large sums of money 
for school purposes, — Manchester, $2,500,000; Laconia, 
8350,000; Berlin, $500,000; Greenfield, Mass., of 18,000 
inhabitants, $400,000 for a new high school building. We 
doubt not the citizens of the district are well aware of the 
necessity for a new high school, but there are several very 
important questions connected with the matter, and not 
altogether easy of solution, — how much the building shall 
cost, where it shall be located, whether on a lot large enough 
for an athletic field, whether this building may solve, as in 
some places, the problem of a suitable public auditorium, 
are some, but not all, the questions for careful consideration. 
We believe the appropriations should be made not later than 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the district annual meeting of 1924, and that detailed in- 
formation on all the above matters and all others necessarily 
involved should at an early date be submitted to the voters 
of the district. The work required will be great, — the 
matter, itself, is very important. The Board should have 
assistance, and we believe the citizens of the district, whose 
matter it really is, will gladly co-operate. We therefore 
now intend at the coming annual meeting to request that 
the district appoint a committee to assist the Board, or a 
committee of the Board, to make a thorough investigation 
of the housing conditions of the district as they relate to the 
schools, and make a report thereon not later than November 
1, 1923, in order that all citizens may be informed on the 
subject before the annual meeting of 1924. We believe 
that such a survey and investigation should include the 
question of the advisability of an intelligent building pro- 
gram in reference to new buildings for the lower grades in 
some sections of the city, particularly the south end, if not 
for the immediate future, then certainly not too long 
delayed. 

The work in the schools this year has been unusually 
satisfactory. No great amount of sickness among either 
teachers or pupils, no unusual interruptions of any kind have 
interfered with the school work. We are impressed anew 
with the loyalty of our teachers, as a class, to our schools, 
and by the almost prodigal expenditure of effort they make, 
inspired in most cases by a motive beyond the money return 
to make our schools the best possible. 

Of special activities in the schools, we can report that the 
work of Dr. Kelley and the school nurse, Mrs. Upham, has 
in our judgment justified the district in voting for medical 
inspection, as it did, some three years ago. The dental 
clinic carried on weekly at the Walker School is of the great- 
est importance in treating a vast number of cases among 
the children which otherwise probably would go without 
treatment, to the great physical injury of such children. 

In the death of Louis C. Merrill the district has suffered a 
genuine loss. He was moderator at the time of his death, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 65 

as he had been for many consecutive years. In his passing 
away, the schools have lost a loyal friend and the city a 
high-minded citizen. 

The financial report is given otherwise. We would add 
that the books are open to any interested voter. 

We desire at this time to express our appreciation of the 
increased interest in our schools taken by the parents of the 
district, and for the helpful criticism, suggestions and advice 
given by so many of them to individual members of the 
Board and in other ways. We hope such interest will 
increase and not diminish. 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
ELIZABETH R. ELKINS, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
CARL H. FOSTER. 



FINANCIAL REPORT. 



March 24, 1922, to March 23, 1923. 
Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 

RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand March 24, 1922, $14,035 . 26 
Received from city, appropriated by Union 

School District, 233,698.03 

Received from city, dog licenses, 1 ,543 . 42 

Received from city, Abial Walker Fund, 36 . 23 
Received from State of New Hampshire (Smith 

Hughes Fund), 2,640.34 

Received from service Summer School balance, 907 . 84 

Received from cash sales for text-books, 130 . 65 

Received from cash sales for scholars' supplies, 268 . 66 

Received from cash sales for miscellaneous, 41 . 76 

Received from cash sales for repairs, . 60 

Received from cash sales for school lunches 4,158 . 78 

Received from tuition, 3,234.17 



$260,695.74 



expended. 
Administration : 
Salary and expense of School Board 
and other district officers: 

Salary of Board, $300.00 

Auditors, 20.00 

Postals, 5.00 

$325.00 

66 



SCHOOL REPORT. 67 

Salary and expense of superintendents: 

Amount paid to state, $4,200.00 

Hand stamps, rubber bands, 

tape, postal scales, paper, 1 7 . 24 

$4,217.24 



Salary and expense of truant officer: 

Salary, $800.00 

Census enumeration, 107.37 

Transportation, 35 . 63 

Census folders, 35 . 00 

Hand stamp, 3 . 67 



Other expense of administration: 

Salaries of bookkeeper and 

stenographer, $1 ,873 . 44 

Postage and envelopes, 85 . 76 

City Directory, 7.00 

School reports, 23 . 50 

Letter files, 3.00 

Account book, 2.00 

Express, . 65 

Ink, paper, sundry supplies, 39 . 68 



$981.67 



$2,035.03 

Instruction : 
Salaries of regular teachers and principals, $139,603 .49 

Salaries of supervisors of special 
subjects: 

Morrill School, $16,942 . 76 

Physical drill, 1,029.52 

Sewing, 2,500.00 

Cooking and lunch rooms, 4,532 . 00 

Music, 2,000.00 

Drawing, 2,005.26 

Trainer for student teachers, 1 ,700 . 00 

,709.54 



Text-books, 6,302.15 

Reference books, maps, apparatus, etc., 183 .41 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Scholars' supplies: 

Pens, $47.00 

Pencils, 152.15 

Paper, 156.82 

Sewing supplies, 174 . 15 

Cooking supplies, 11 . 50 

Manual training supplies, 1,768.11 

Kindergarten supplies, 97 . 58 

Other supplies, 1,441 .09 



Flags and other appurtenances, 




Graduation, exhibits, advertising, etc.: 




Diplomas and ribbon, 


$74.03 


Engraving diplomas, 


19.80 


Blotters, paper, wiring supplies, 




trucking for "School Night," 


39.40 


Cardboard for exhibits, 


4.50 


Trucking, 


22.00 


Other expenses of instruction: 




Tests, 


$73.92 


Transportation of special 




teachers, 


368.72 


Daily record books, 


114.00 


Plan books, 


109.78 


Programs, 


90.00 


School directories, 


160.00 


Typewriter paper, 


17.46 


Neostyle supplies, 


67.24 


Repairs to typewriters, 


45.48 


Examination papers printed, 


167.95 


Duplicator roll and paper, 


71.00 


Trip to Boston to interview 




new teachers, 


9.64 


Paper cutter, 


4.71 


Freight, 


1.99 


Postage, 


1.56 


Thumb tacks, 


.85 



,848.40 
$12.00 



$159.73 



$1,304.30 



school report. 69 

Operation and Maintenance of School Plant: 
Janitors' salaries and building sup- 
plies: 

Salaries of regular janitors, $12,152.18 
Salaries for extra help, 438 . 09 

Building supplies, 1,186.69 



Fuel: 




tiP-L<_>,« 1 V . VU 


Wood, 


$2,581.42 




Coal, 


8,289.32 


$10,870.74 






Water, 




498.00 


Light and power: 






Electricity, power, 


$400.03 




Electricity, lighting, 


602.11 




Gas, 


540.91 


$1,543.05 






Repairs: 






Salary of repair man, 


$1,383.25 




Repairs, 


7,121.03 


«fi £flA OQ 



Other expenses of operation and 
maintenance: 

Removing ashes, city, $146.52 

Trucking, 54.13 

Telephones, 119.60 

$320.26 

Auxiliary Agencies and Special Activities: 
Libraries: 

Magazines, $6 . 00 



70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Medical inspection: 

Salary of medical inspector, $3,000.00 

Salary of school nurse, 1,161 . 69 

Salary of clerk, 261.00 

Salary of girl at clinic, 28 . 00 

Paper, guide for files, 4 . 35 

Laundry-clinic, 26 . 50 

Music for physical drills, 42.40 
Amount paid to janitor at 

armory for drills, 235 . 00 

Medical supplies, 49 . 53 

Transportation for nurse, 1 1 2 . 70 

Transportation for doctor, 313.40 

Supplies for clinic, 60.31 

Services for dentists, 383.18 



Transportation: 




Blackhill Route, 


$990.00 


Millville Route, 


1,880.00 


Silverhill Route, 


975.00 


East Concord to City Route, 


1,646.00 


Eastman School Route, 


741.00 


Harriet P. Dame School Route, 


434.10 


Plains to City Route, 


1,110.00 


Mountain Route 


781.68 


Mr. Hanson's Route, 


356.00 


Railroad fares (Riverhill, Mast- 




yard), 


145.51 


Carfares for pupils in special 




room at Walker school, 


71.20 


Transportation of East Con- 




cord pupils to city for cooking 




classes, 


10.00 


Riverhill Route, 


90.00 


West Concord carfares, 


959.44 



$5,678.06 



$10,189.93 



SCHOOL REPORT. 




Other special activities: 






Supplies for school lunches, 


$2,955.36 


Salaries for Night School, 


320 


.50 


Fixed Charges: 






Insurance, 






Extra Construction and New Equipment 


Lands and new buildings, alterations 






of old buildings, new equipment: 






Blackboards, 


$100.00 


Trucking, 


66 


.28 


Files, 


109 


.25 


Teachers' desks, 


51 


.00 


Radiant fire, 


12 


.00 


Pupils' desks and chairs, 


632 


60 


Equipment for Morrill School, 


3,998, 


,74 



71 



5,275.86 



$723.00 



$4,969.87 

Miscellaneous: 

State, per capita tax, $5,814.00 
High School dances, 132.00 
Transportation for book ac- 
counts, „ 8 . 50 
Doctor's bills, 30.00 
Rebate of tuition, 23 . 16 
Negatives for papers, 4.00 
Rug for Dewey School, 65.00 
Sundry bills, * 122.26 

$6,198.92 

Balance, 4,458.86 

Total, $260,695.74 



72 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . $84.31 
Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, 

based on average membership . . . 93 . 95 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, 

drawing, superintendent, etc 58.88 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent . . . . 45 . 93 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent, in all schools 

below the high school 36 . 29 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent, in the high 



school 


66.04 


Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 




schools 


3.34 


TUITION RECEIPTS. 




High School 


$3,119.07 


Eastman School 


9.00 


Rumford School 


36.00 


Kimball School 


49.73 


Walker School 


2.37 


Dewey Training School 


18.00 



,234.17 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



73 



FOR EVERY DOLLAR OF CURRENT EXPENSES 

1922-1923. 

For teachers' salaries $0 . 664 

For janitors' salaries and supplies .053 

For fuel .042 

For transportation of pupils .039 

For repairs .033 

For text-books .0245 

For medical inspection .022 

For state per capita tax .021 

For new equipment .019 

For superintendents' salaries and expenses .0164 

For scholars supplies .015 

For other special activities .0127 

For other expenses of administration .00794 

For light & power . 006 

For other expenses of instruction . 0059 

For truant officer's salary & expense of census . 00383 

For insurance of buildings . 0028 

For water .0019 

For salaries & expenses of school board .00126 
For other expenses of operation and maintenance . 00125 

For reference books, maps, apparatus, etc. .00071 

For graduation, exhibits, advertising, etc. . 000623 

For flags .000056 

For libraries .000028 

For miscellaneous .006103 



74 city of concord. 

School Board Report of Financial Budget 
for 1923-1924. 



Amount of money required by law ($3.50 or 


. each $1,000 of 


the inventory). 










Elementary 


High 




Schools 


3. 


Schools. 


I — Budget (school money) : 








(a) For support of schools, ! 


£143,200.74 


$83,884.95 


(b) For purchase of text-books 








and scholars' supplies, 


5,675.42 


3,324.58 


(c) For purchase of flags and ap- 








purtenances, 


15. 


77 


9.23 


(d) For payment of tuitions in 








high schools, 








(e) Total amount required for 








the above items, 


148,891. 


93 


87,218.76 


(f) Estimate of $5 tax on 1922 








inventory, 


107,375. 


09 




II- — Requirements to meet the 








Budget: 








(a) For support of elementary 








schools, 






148,891.93 


(b) For support of high school 








and high school tuitions, 






87,218.76 


Total support of all schools, 






236,110.69 


III — School Board report of as- 








sessment required : 








(1) For the support of schools 








and the purchase of re- 








quired books, supplies 








and flags, and the pay- 








ment of high school tui- 








tions, 






236,110. 69 


Estimate of $3.50 tax on 1922 








assessed valuation, 


75,162. 


56 




Estimate of additional sums 








needed, 


160,948. 


13 





» 

SCHOOL REPORT. 


75 


(2) For the payment of per 




capita tax, 


$6,142.00 


(3) For the payment of debt 




(statutory), 


12,000.00 


(4) For the payment of interest 




(statutory), 


7,095.00 


(5) For the payment of other 




statutory requirements, 




(6) For the general administra- 




tion of the schools, 


7,708.00 


Total budget for 1923-1924, 


269,055.69 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Education of Union School District, Super- 
visory Union No. 8, Concord, N. H. 

This report, my thirty-seventh in succession, and the 
sixty-third of its series, invites your careful reading. 

The national field of public education grows in importance 
each year. This is true of education not only as a source 
of democratic strength, not only as an opportunity to be 
enjoyed by all, but as an economic factor in promoting a 
wholesome national life. 

Even in the face of keen criticism the cause of education 
still keeps its onward march stronger, because it is consider- 
ing the present and future needs of the people who maintain 
it. 

One of the most notable advances made in recent years is 
the active work done in the measurement of pupil-intelligence, 
the importance of which becomes increasingly apparent. 
This is made evident by such things as the establishment of 
mental clinic schools for backward children, and the main- 
tenance of a Bureau of Mental Hygiene and Diagnosis by 
the Department of Education for the state of New York. 

We also note thought along the following lines: Better 
civic training, more comfortable homes for teachers, build- 
ing programs for school buildings under the direction of the 
most skilled architects, the rapid growth of the junior high 
school idea, a national scheme for more effective teaching 
of the English language in public schools, and an interna- 
tional agitation for educational co-operation. In addition 
to these things and many others the cost of public education 
is being thoughtfully considered, as it should be, before 
public expenditures assume bankrupt proportions. 

Some of the less conspicuous ways that make for the 
increase of school expenditures are : The unduly long term of 

7G 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

public education, badly proportioned curricula of studies, 
the prevalent idea that education is something that can be 
acquired simply by "passing through" a course of study, 
the admission and retention of many pupils in high schools 
and colleges who are ill-fitted for the higher education. 

Such expressions as these appear frequently in the public 
press: "There is a prodigal waste of time in college." 
"Fifty per cent of the work done in colleges of arts and 
sciences rightfully belongs in the secondary schools." 
"Secondary education begins too late and ends too early; it 
is therefore too diffuse and superficial." (Dr. Samuel B. 
Capen, director of the American Council of Education.) 

"There is a widespread notion that formal education is 
not only the one way to advancement, but that it is also the 
panacea for all social and political disorders." "The ad- 
mission of great numbers of pupils, ill-fitted for the higher 
education and the more expensive schools, such as high 
schools and colleges * * * ." (Dr. Henry S. Pritchett, 
Carnegie Foundation.) 

"Public education is faulty in that it wastes from five to 
ten years spent in the schoolroom. The time is coming when 
boys and girls will go through from kindergarten to high 
school and be ready for service at fifteen years of age." 
(Norbert J. Baumer, a business man.) 

"No nation can continue to offer sixteen years of pre- 
paratory education to its students of this superficial sort, 
and meet its needs in educational training. If the work 
of educational training were rightly done, no such time 
ought to be required and no nation can afford to turn its 
trained men into their profession so late in life as we are 
coming to do. Without question jour years can be drop- 
ped out of this program with advantage to the cause of 
education and to the interest of the people and their chil- 
dren." (Dr. Henry S. Pritchett, President of the Carnegie 
Foundation for Advancement of Teaching.) 

These quotations are taken from public writings of dis- 
tinguished men of brains. One the chancellor of a great 
university, one the president of a branch of a noted Founda- 



78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tion, and the other a keen, practical, business man. They 
are not idle words. They mean something. They are 
alarming, but they reveal huge leaks in the dike of educa- 
tional expense. 

Every child retarded a year in his school work means 
doubling the cost of his schooling for that year. Every child 
held in school by law against his best interests by simply 
compelling him to exist in school until the law becomes 
inoperative, is a public expense that ought not to be borne. 
Every child who stays in school or is kept in school by his 
parents because they think it is "the thing to do," not 
having seriously consulted the child's best interests, is a 
financial burden on the public. 

We have such children in our schools and they appear 
to be as numerous in other cities. It is well for us all to 
think carefully and take accurate measure in determining 
the value that the public is getting for the money expended 
in attempting to educate youth hampered by such condi- 
tions. They compel new school buildings. They increase 
the burden of taxation by clogging the progress of the 
interested pupils and they hold back the advancement of 
efficient teaching as well as the progress of society. 

All such things are civic problems worthy of the best 
thought of all people and economically important for the 
interests of any community. 

Attendance. 

The enrollment of pupils in the public schools has varied 
little in the last ten years, the average net increase being 
about fifteen pupils per year. From 1921 to 1922 the gain 
was 155. Ordinarily, this would mean four extra rooms 
but, the pupils being distributed over the entire district, we 
have been able to house them without extra provision. 
Additional enrollment in the southern part of the city will 
make more room necessarj^. 

The increase of pupils in the High School is all out of 
proportion to the gain in the general enrollment of the 
schools. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 79 

The transportation of pupils has been done economically 
and with as little friction as can be expected. One route at 
Riverhill was discontinued. The rates of transportation 
conform to the standards set by the state. 

The continued cold of a long, hard, winter made it difficult 
to continue school but this has been done with the loss of 
only one-half day in the city proper, and two days at the 
Mountain. The supply of coal was so uncertain that it 
was deemed wise to lengthen the vacation in February by 
one week. With the consumption of soft coal in the place 
of anthracite, we have been able to keep the schools open. 

A New High School Building Needed. 

In my last report the matter of building a new high school 
was suggested but not elaborated. In view of the growing 
pupil enrollment, and its inevitable increase next year, more 
room is needed at once. 

The following statistics show that the demand is justified: 

Per cent of gain in pupil enrollment for the last ten years: 

Senior High School 71.2+% 

Parker Junior High School 27.9+% 

Chandler Junior High School 57.5+% 

Present Forecasted 

Built for enrollment, for 192 1^. 

Senior High School .... 500 pupils 549 pupils 630 pupils 
Parker Junior High 

School 180 " 238 " 250 " 

Chandler Junior High 

School 120 " 156 " 160 " 

The Chandler building never was intended for junior 
high school accommodations and it furnishes none of the 
conveniences that such a school needs. There is no assem- 
bly hall, no room that can be devoted exclusively to the 
study period, no gymnasium, no science laboratory, no suit- 
able conditions for demonstrating the practical things of 
life. All these and others are necessary if the schools of 
Concord are to maintain their high rating. 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The Parker School is badly overcrowded. No longer can 
the pupils assemble in the study hall without much incon- 
venience. Two rooms are now used for permanent seating 
representing the excess that cannot be accommodated in 
the assembly hall. One room in the basement is fitted up 
with radiant-fire heaters, and window-boards for ventilators. 
It is located so near the closets that it has to be screened off. 
The air is correspondingly vitiated and pupils ought not to 
be compelled to sit in it. 

The Senior High School now has forty-nine pupils more 
than the number for which it was built. Next fall the over- 
flow will reach one hundred or more and probably force the 
two-session plan, one half of the pupils coming in the fore- 
noon and the remaining half in the afternoon. Such a 
scheme is undesirable never having given full satisfaction 
wherever tried. 

The lecture room has been fitted up with desks, and the 
physical and chemical laboratories have to be used for reci- 
tation rooms. In addition, the art room, cooking room, and 
assembly hall are used for regular periods. All these things 
interfere with the carrying out of general school activities. 

The real solution of the entire situation lies in the erection 
of a new building upon a lot spacious enough to realize all 
the demands of the modern high school. The occupation 
of such a building would release the present high school 
building for the junior high schools so that they could be 
brought up to standard, ranking with the best in the coun- 
try. This would open the Parker School for classes K and 
L and still give room for the enlargement of the adminis- 
tration offices. 

Such an arrangement would release two rooms in the 
Kimball building, two in the Rumford building, and four 
in the Chandler building for the use of the elementary grades, 
thus taking care of any increase that would appear for 
many years. 

The Concord school system is one of the efficient ones in 
the country. It is not being given the building accommoda- 
tions that it needs and deserves. 



school report. 81 

Kindergartens. 

No new kindergartens have been established. The en- 
rollment has gained and the general work has been good. 
There is need of a new kindergarten in the southern part of 
the city. It should be established as soon as a suitable lot 
can be secured. The Rumford kindergarten has been 
changed from the second floor to the first floor to insure the 
safety of the children in case of fire. 

The Elementary Schools. 

The elementary schools have shown themselves to be 
particularly strong in grammar, history, spelling and arith- 
metic. The courses are workable and effective. 

The Human Geography adopted by the Board of Educa- 
tion is now in use in all the classes except Class L, which 
will begin it next fall. These books, in favor with 
pupils, parents and teachers, are working out to advantage. 
The mid-winter tests in spelling, history, language and 
hygiene were unusually successful. Recent cases of pupils 
taking their tests for admission to schools in other places 
prove the excellence of our work. 

The High Schools. 

Junior High. 

The work of these schools is of high calibre. The results 
of tests recently given and surveys made prove this con- 
clusively, which is all the more remarkable in view of the 
poor housing conditions that they are obliged to endure. 

The results in arithmetic, grammar, spelling, history and 
elementary science show the pupils to be well prepared to 
meet the requirements of high school work. This can be 
proved by actual facts, figures, and written testimony from 
various sources, high school and otherwise, now on file. 
The work invites your close investigation. It was quite 
reassuring to have such an authority as Professor Childs of 
Dartmouth College remark in his last report upon the 
annual prize-essay contest that: 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

"I have been greatly pleased with the excellence of the 
results, and have only complimentary words for the work 
your English teachers are doing. If you chance to have 
in your city any carping critic, let him read this group of 107 
essays produced by your pupils — and thereafter hold his 



peace 



Similar commendations on other lines of work are at hand. 
This is true of the even, excellent work done in the Parker, 
Chandler, Walker, and Garrison Schools. 

Senior High. 

Strict attention to the better discipline and scholastic 
standing of this school has begun to bring results. The 
crowded condition of the building, spoken of elsewhere, 
really complicates matters so that the best work cannot be 
accomplished. 

Improvement has been noticeable in the following par- 
ticulars: Better general discipline, more serious attention 
to school work, reduction of tardy marks, and a somewhat 
more wholesome school spirit. The school has been for- 
tunate in having outside speakers address the students: 
Rev. Mr. Dallas of Hanover, N. H.; Miss Wooster, Franklin 
Square House, Boston, Mass.; Mrs. Lucia Ames Mead; 
Rev. Dr. King; Col. J. T. Geary; Rev. R. W. Barstow; 
Dr. H. H. Amsden; Mrs. LaMance, National W. C. T. U.; 
Maj. Robert C. Murchie; Rev. H. H. Niles. Talks to the 
commercial classes have been given by Miss Whitaker of 
the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital and Mr. Carl Holmgren. 

Among the more important activities are the renewal of 
interest in the Lyceum, variations in conducting the morn- 
ing opening exercises, the institution of a traffic squad, and 
signs of renewed school activities in general. 

College preparation is not now considered the prime 
function of any modern mixed high school, but to show that 
our Senior High School is not lacking in this respect, I 
submit the following: 

Last June five students took the College Board examina- 
tions in twenty-one different subjects. Passing averages 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

were secured in nineteen. All, who were recommended 
by the teaching staff to take the examinations, passed. 

One took the comprehensive examinations required by 
Mt. Holyoke — passed. 

One took the comprehensive examinations required by 
Smith — passed. 

One took the examinations for Middlebury College — 
passed. 

The annual ranking of this school last June by the State 
Department of Education showed it to be ahead of the other 
large cities of the state. Of the cities, Somersworth was 
the only one ranking ahead of it. It may be worth while to 
note that Concord was represented by a larger number of 
pupils, which might account for the lower ranking. 

The records of the school show that twenty-six of its 
graduates entered college in September, nine entered normal 
schools, and one a special school for optometry. Complete 
records of the work of the first semester are not yet in, but 
so far as they have been received they are commendable. 

The reports received from graduates of the Commercial 
Course are creditable and in many cases flattering. 

The Rural Schools. 

Rural schools are necessarily complex in the matter of 
class regulation, which has been made more difficult this year 
by larger pupil enrollment. Nevertheless, despite the fact 
that the attendance has been irregular during the remarkably 
severe winter, results accomplished are reassuring. The 
discipline has been good and pupil interest keen. 

These schools are in need of more extensive school libra- 
ries, victrolas, stereopticons and other illustrative apparatus 
to aid in class work. But little time has been lost on ac- 
count of no school resulting from the impossibilities of 
travel in the severe winter months. On such days the 
teachers use their time visiting schools in the city proper. 

The matter of securing boarding-places for the teachers 
has reached an acute stage. The teachers at the Mountain 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

and the Riverhill Schools have been obliged to room in the 
city proper, going to and from their work at great incon- 
venience, because no accommodations could be found 
within reasonable distance from the schools. If this situa- 
tion is not improved then teachers cannot be found to make 
such sacrifices of inconvenience and possible injury to 
health, the result being that the pupils will have to be 
transported to the nearest city school, and the two build- 
ings closed. 

The Dewey Training School. 

The entering class of this year was small, probably owing 
to the withdrawal of the daily wage adopted during the 
late war but discontinued this year. The record of the 
graduates still continues favorable. I believe some scheme 
should be adopted for determining whether it is wise 
for some of the candidates to continue training if they 
give evidence of being better fitted for some other work 
than the professional life of the teacher. It is also advisable 
that graduates be required to pass the state examinations 
before being eligible for positions in the schools of the dis- 
trict. The previous success of the instruction is being 
maintained. 

Drawing. 

The increased amount of work called for an assistant 
teacher. Miss Ruth Battilana has filled the position since 
the beginning of the year. Her work has been energetic 
and shows signs of eventually becoming successful. 

There being no accommodations furnished in the Parker 
School, pupils from the classes and P are compelled to go 
to the studio in the high school building to pursue this 
work. Some are compelled to stay until four o'clock in the 
afternoon, and the arrangement is unsatisfactory. No 
relief can be had until ample room accommodations are 
furnished. The usual routine work of the course has been 
accomplished, but the best results in the High School cannot 
be had in its present crowded condition. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

General exhibitions of work were shown on Parents' 
Nights and at the close of the spring term. 

Sewing. 

The usual courses having been followed, I am simply 
stating the new features: 

Class L — Instruction in the use of sewing-machines. 

Class M — The making of simple cotton dresses. 

Garment Making — Brown velour wrap with collar, hand- 
embroidered serge dresses, semi-formal silk dress, spring suits. 

Dewey Training classes — Taking up of the more advanced 
problems of garment instruction. 

Exhibitions were held on Parents' Days and at the 
various schools. The department needs a room in the 
Senior High School to serve the best interests of those 
electing this branch. 

The results in sewing are creditable to both teachers 
and pupils. 

Cooking. 

Cooking remains about the same as for a number of years 
past. 

In February, classes M and N began alternating their 
work with sewing, which seems better than the former plan, 
although it were still better if both sewing and cooking 
could be taken each week throughout the year. 

The girls at the Parker School get only one lesson in cook- 
ing every four weeks. This is in connection with the school 
lunches. The time of the beginners' classes is divided be- 
tween instruction, recitation and kitchen work. 

Extra work has been done in the serving of lunches on 
"School Night" and at the meeting of the State English 
Teachers' Club. 

Lunches have been improved by introducing meat dishes 
more frequently, also various kinds of stews and chowders, 
and they are popular with the students. The sale of tickets 
has been increased by advertising the menus a day ahead 
of time. 



86 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Music. 

The work of this department has been kept up as well as 
time, material, and close application to work would permit. 
It has been marked by individual sight singing in classes E 
to L, four-part chorus singing in classes M, N, 0, P, and 
better chorus singing in the High School. The glee clubs 
and orchestra are larger than for many years. The music 
appreciation classes also have a large membership and show 
good results. The system now used should be revised and 
brought up-to-date. 

The Morrill School of Mechanic Arts. 

This school, one of the most noted of its size in the coun- 
try, is ever on the progressive side and with a live corps of 
teachers it is accomplishing real results. The discipline 
has been strong even under the adverse conditions prevailing 
throughout the year. The project work, more compre- 
hensive than ever before, has shown splendid results, while 
the work of each particular department has borne up won- 
derfully well during the period of building reconstruction. 

A partial enumeration of the projects that have been done : 

1. Reinstalling the equipment in the cabinet room. 

2. Rearrangement of woodworking machinery in rooms 
2 and 3. 

3. Excavating and building cement forms for the west 
side addition. 

4. Installing clutch on forge shop. 

5. Assembling and finishing 60 tablet-chairs. 

6. Building and installing toboggan slides and ski take-off 
at Eddy Field for -the Chamber of Commerce. 

7. Installing and operating school printing plant on 
"School Night." 

8. Wiring, installing equipment, and general fitting up of 
new electrical room. 

9. Wiring, planning layout, and instahing equipment 
for new machine shop. 

10. Rearranging print shop, painting walls and ceilings. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

Suggestions for Next Year. 

1. Rearrangement of time for classes to V inclusive. 

2. Direct drive surface planer. 

3. An iron planer. 

4. An automatic riling and setting-machine for rooms 2 
and 3. 

5. Rearrangement of rooms for the better accommoda- 
tion of the printing department. 

6. A blind drain under the floor on the west side. 

7. That the roof of the new machine shop be tinned. 

8. New sinks for rooms 2 and 4. 

Recommendations. 

That a new high school building having a seating capacity 
for a large number of pupils be erected upon a lot big 
enough to carry out properly all forms of athletic contests. 

That my recommendation of last year for an advanced 
high school grade be considered carefully and givem; a 
trial. 

That an additional kindergarten be established in the 
southern part of the city. 

That provision be made for the employment of two college 
graduates for teacher training and availability in general 
substitution. 

That an instructor be employed for the entire year to 
have charge of all forms of athletics and to assist in general 
physical training. 

That high school graduation be restored to its former 
standing as an annual event in June. 

That "School Night" be continued annually. 

That a complete course in Domestic Arts be instituted 
and that the working out of such a course, including cooking, 
sewing and the administration of school lunches, be placed 
in charge of one competent head who shall be held respon- 
sible for its success. 

That a special sum of money be appropriated each year 
for the general upkeep of the school plant. 



88 CITY OF CONCORD. 

That at least one of the superintendents be sent to the 
National Meeting of Superintendents each year. 

That passing the state examinations be made a require- 
ment for a graduate of the Dewey Training School to secure 
positions in the schools of this district. 

That another system of penmanship replace the one now 
in use. 

Accomplished. 

The introduction of the Human Geography into classes 
E to L inclusive. 

Rearrangement of the course in history for the elementary 
grades. 

New course in memorization for all grades (Mr. Clayton). 

Rearrangement of the courses in physical drill for classes 
A, B, C, D (Dr. Kelley). 

A new spelling book for classes M, N, L, K. 

Change in the literature course, classes M, N (Mr. 
Clayton) . 

Survey of arithmetic, classes I, J, in one school. Results 
found to be above the median for the standard tests. (Mr. 
Clayton) . 

Introduction of milk and cracker lunches in many schools 
(Dr. Kelley). 

The printing and the publication of "School News." 

Transfer of the Eastman School junior high classes to the 
schools of the city proper. 

New dictionaries for classes E to N inclusive. 

Instructions regarding the prevention of fire, submitted 
by the Board of Fire Underwriters, carried out. 

A new lumber room, and a new addition to the Morrill 
School on the east side for the machine shop. 

Rearrangement of work in arithmetic in classes G, H, L, 
M, N. 

The Point System. 

One of the harmful things found connected with the 
modern high school is the so-called "Point System," 
adopted by the secondary schools from colleges where it had 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

its birth in the convenience of professors. It has become so 
firmly rooted in public systems of education that students 
are obsessed with the idea of winning points enough to "get 

by." 

Not long ago a valedictorian in her essay at graduation 
stated, without a trace of shame, that pupils entered sec- 
ondary schools with ambition to keep up and retain their 
former standing, but gradually became one of those who 
cared more for pleasure and were content simply to get a 
passing mark which, of course, means "points enough to get 
by." This reveals a condition in schools that is deplorable 
to say the least. It may account for the student attitude 
toward study and even the prevalent lack of an English 
style in writing. 

The deterioration of modern teaching into a dry drive- 
method may be directly traced to this way of valuing pupil 
attainment, the goal being not to get out of a subject the 
real meat, but to so fix certain things that the pupil may get 
enough points to be able to pass on to higher work. 

Masters, principals, and teachers are not to blame. Their 
complaints have been heard for a long time. The effect 
upon the true value of a subject is disastrous. In literature 
the beauty of the selection is blurred by the distraction of 
marks. Mathematics, a dry subject, loses whatever vitality 
it has, and the languages are robbed of their peculiar literary 
value and poetic sentiment. 

I have seen teacher and pupil scheme for a long time to 
arrange studies so as to make the required number of points 
the inherent value of any one of the subjects never even 
being touched upon. This one is substituted for that 
because it is surer of its points. 

How long educators and intelligent citizens will withhold 
revolt at such practices is a matter of conjecture, but I am 
glad to register my emphatic disapproval. 

The pupil of today needs to be brought to a realizing sense 
that schools are being maintained to educate him, to make 
him do exacting, intelligent, profitable work, not to protect 
him and urge him on in efforts to camouflage with an array 



90 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of points. When he is taught to go to his task as a joy and 
with a wholesome purpose, when he knows his work will be 
judged by his actual knowledge of the subject as revealed in 
the classroom, when he has been required to meet and con- 
quer a difficult subject for the good that he can get out of it 
rather than "point" valuation, then we may tell the public 
that education is taking on a new lease of life, that teachers 
are progressing in professional standing and that society is 
being elevated to more wholesome levels through public 
schools purged of the baneful influence of "The Point 
System." 

In closing this report I wish to subscribe to the valuable 
work of all the teachers and other employees of the district 
and to their commendable spirit and attention to duty, to 
Assistant Superintendent Clayton; and to the Board of 
Education for its efforts in making the schools a credit to 
the city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT SUPER- 
INTENDENT. 



To Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools, 

Dear Sir: I am presenting herewith a report on the 
work of assistant superintendent for the year 1922-23. 
This report will deal briefly with night schools for adults, 
supervision in the elementary and secondary schools, and 
certain recommendations. 

In view of the alterations that are being made at the 
Morrill School, it was considered inexpedient to open eve- 
ning vocational courses for adults as had been done previously 
for several years. The evening school activities for adults 
have been limited to two classes in English for the foreign- 
born. These classes have been taught by Mrs. Putnam and 
Miss Clark. At the beginning of the term, Mrs. Gauthier 
substituted for Mrs. Putnam who, on account of illness, was 
unable to commence work. The statistics bearing upon 
the work of these two teachers appear elsewhere in this 
report and are complete up to the first of March of the 
current year. 

Following out the desires and with the co-operation of 
the Board of Education, I have endeavored to keep the 
public informed with respect to the regular and special 
activities in the schools. In this attempt to keep the 
public informed, I found very ready co-operation on the 
part of many local agencies and interested individuals. We 
were fortunate in having as our guest during the early part 
of November the United States Commissioner of Education, 
the Honorable John J. Tigert, and by careful planning 
prepared a special school night at the Auditorium. The 
success of this meeting was secured by the untiring support 
of principals, teachers, and pupils. In developing a more 

91 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

intimate contact between the schools of the District and 
the public, the local newspapers, the Monitor and the 
Patriot, have been most generous in the amount of space 
they have placed at our service. In calling attention to the 
schools during American Education Week by means of 
slides, and at other times also, the local moving picture 
theaters have gladly co-operated. The Chamber of Com- 
merce has done much to stimulate a wholesome interest in 
the schools. Under its auspices prizes for essays were 
offered during Fire Prevention Week, and the schools 
generously accepted the challenge. Local organizations 
have responded to the Board's invitation to visit schools, 
and it is to be earnestly hoped that this kind of school 
visiting will be continued. 

During the greater part of last year an extensive ques- 
tionnaire bearing upon the teaching of English was circu- 
lated among all the teachers of Union School District. A 
vast amount of valuable opinion was secured. During the 
summer and since then I have tabulated much of this data 
and from it obtained helpful suggestions in the general 
reorganization of English teaching throughout the grades. 
It is our purpose to have available for all teachers a definite 
body of data bearing upon the teaching of the English lan- 
guage and literature. Teachers in the most elementary 
grades should be able to see the whole English situation and 
those in the higher grades should know what has preceded 
in the English course and how much advancement to 
expect from their pupils. The segmentation of public 
school systems into grades has a tendency, unless checked, 
either to retard or to hasten the natural sequence of growth 
of pupils from the lowest to the highest grades. There is 
often much overlapping and unnecessary review. In no 
part of the program is this more apparent than in the teach- 
ing of English. This effort in reorganizing the English work 
is part of the larger purpose to secure for children a natural 
development from the kindergarten through the high 
school, unimpeded by the administratively necessary 
graded system. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

In working out this plan for the reorganization of English 
I have formed a class in English composition of an advanced 
grade. The class is conducted primarily for the benefit of 
seniors in the Dewey Training School and for graduates of 
the High School who wish advanced work in English. The 
course is designed to extend through the second semestej 
only. By securing actual contact with pupils I believe I 
can more effectively work out teaching methods and make 
available for English teachers a sort of workshop in com- 
position methods. The present class enrolls twenty-three 
pupils. 

The congested conditions in both the Parker and the 
Senior High schools increasingly impede effective work 
with classes by the teachers. Conference work with pupils, 
an important method in modern secondary school procedure 
— a procedure designed to overcome some of the limitations 
of mass instruction and to secure greater individual develop- 
ment — is becoming almost impossible for many of the 
teachers. I see no alternative for next semester but to have 
two sessions a day in the Senior High School. This will 
necessitate the curtailing of choral work, gymnasium drill, 
and extra-curricula musical activities. There is likelihood 
also in such an arrangement that the Smith-Hughes program 
in the Morrill School will be affected. The two-session 
plan is an extra burden upon the teaching staff. 

The teaching in the high schools frequently surfers from 
the fact that in case of illness or resignation of a teacher 
there are not available properly qualified substitutes. The 
elementary schools can in most cases call upon the force in 
training at the Dewey School. The high schools have no 
such resource. We are compelled to consult agencies in 
Boston and elsewhere, and for the brief period for which 
substitutes are needed it is impossible to secure suitable 
candidates. This situation in our high schools could be 
more completely provided for if we had one or two appren- 
tice teachers doing part-time service in Parker School, 
occasionally substituting in the Senior High School, under 
the direct supervision of the Superintendent. These ap- 



94 CITY OF CONCORD. 

prentice teachers would be given sufficient time to observe 
effective teaching, to acquire an understanding of secondary 
school methods of teaching, and to pursue the study of 
problems bearing directly upon modern high school practice. 
They would be in line for permanent positions in the junior 
and senior high schools. It is very rarely that college grad- 
uates presenting themselves as candidates for teaching 
positions in our high schools have had any training whatever 
in the art of teaching. Modern high school teaching is as 
distinctively a specialized profession as is that of the 
teacher in the kindergarten or in the elementary grades. 
The employment of one or two apprentice teachers as here 
suggested would greatly improve the prospect for better 
secondary school teaching and meet the need of an occasional 
substitute. 

As at present organized and conducted the work in home 
economics or domestic arts lacks well-defined objectives 
and adequate co-ordination. The excellent work that is 
being done by individual teachers would secure more lasting 
results for the pupils if the entire work from the grades 
through the high school could be gradually reorganized 
into a progressive, unitary course. We have already many 
elements of an effective home economics course. Broadly 
conceived, a home economics course should help both girls 
and boys to regard intelligently the home as a basic factor 
in their present and future well-being. During the last two 
years of high school there should be provided a home 
economics course for girls as efficiently conducted and as 
adequately equipped as is the vocational work for boys in 
the present Morrill School. We are not doing our whole 
duty in providing educational advantages for our children 
if we stress merely the academic, commercial, and voca- 
tional, and slight the home. As rightly administered, a 
constructive course such as I have suggested, would require 
a supervisor who would ultimately give her entire time to 
the supervision of the course. 

In closing this report I wish to summarize its items in 
the form of five recommendations. I would recommend: 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

1. The continuance of the policy to keep the public fully 
informed with respect to school activities and progress; 

2. The continuance of the reorganization of school sub- 
jects with a view towards the better distribution of subject 
matter; 

3. The early provision of adequate housing facilities for 
the senior and junior high schools; 

4. The appointment of two apprentice teachers in the 
junior high schools; 

5. The appointment of a supervisor, and that immediate 
steps be taken to organize gradually an adequate course in 
home economics extending from the grades through the 
high school. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. T. CLAYTON, 
A ssistant Superintendent. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE MEDICAL 
DIRECTOR. 

Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent, 

Dear Sir: In general the work of this department has 
continued as during the previous year, but with an increased 
effectiveness, particularly in the activity of the Dental 
Clinic and in physical training. I am enclosing herewith 
the reports of the school nurse and the physical instructors. 

Medical inspection has included 2,526 routine examina- 
tions, starting with pupils in the lowest grades, 57 individ- 
ual mental examinations, 320 physical examinations for 
special reasons, and numerous other inspections for symp- 
toms of contagious disease. It may be stated that through- 
out the district there is a definite decrease in 
the communicable conditions common among school 
children, and an appreciable number of pupils have bene- 
fited by the correction of conditions to which attention has 
been called. The forenoon lunches have been extended so 
that they are available for all the elementary schools within 
the area of delivery and, during the last semester, 32,504 
such lunches were served, attended by a marked increase 
in the number of children taking lunches from home. 
Already, in some instances, the teachers have noted an 
improvement in the well-being and the school work of 
pupils which may be attributed to the lunches. 

A program of physical education has been adapted for 
the first three grades. This provides for suitable exercises 
in the classroom and for appropriate training in health 
habits. More attention should be given to these exercises, 
with extension of the program into the upper grades. 

The physical drills in the High School have been con- 
ducted effectively by Mr. Quinn and Miss Ranney, all the 
more creditably because of the obvious limitations of room 
and equipment. 

96 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

Appreciative acknowledgment is again made to the 
Concord Female Charitable Association for the gift of ten 
dollars for the benefit of needy children. 

Your attention is respectfully called especially to the 
increased work of the Dental Clinic, due to the enthusiasm 
of the staff, consisting of Dr. Young, Dr. Albee, Dr. Morton 
and Dr. Washburn, and of Mrs. Upham. Since February 
18, 1922, 375 pupils have been afforded 1,400 dental opera- 
tions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE M. KELLEY, 

Medical Inspector. 



98 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SUMMARY OF PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS FROM 
FEBRUARY 25, 1922 TO FEBRUARY 21, 1923. 

Number of routine examinations, 2,526 

Number of notifications of defects, 358 

Number of exclusions for communicable disease, etc., 81 
Number of notifications resulting in treatment, etc., 185 

Summary of Health Defects. 

Vision, total, 278 

Slight, 126 

Marked, 152 

Hearing, total, 55 

Slight, 47 

Marked, 8 

Teeth, total, 742 

Slight, 253 

Marked, 489 

Speech, 12 

Defective nasal breathing, 42 

Defective tonsils, total, 554 

Acute inflammation, 9 

Slight hypertrophy, 276 

Marked hypertrophy, 269 

Cervical adenitis, total, 328 

Slight, 288 

Marked, 40 

Thyroid enlargement, simple, 4 

Anemic condition, 78 

Pulmonary disease, total, 12 

Non-tubercular, 9 

Suspected tuberculosis, 3 

Cardiac defects, 41 

Nervous diseases, 17 

Skin diseases, total, 94 

Inflammatory, 19 

Parasitic, 75 

Contagious diseases not included elsewhere, 5 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

Nutrition, total, - 734 

Overweight, more than 20 per cent, 58 

Underweight, 10 per cent to 15 per cent, 460 

more than 15 per cent, 216 



Total, 2,996 

Report of the School Nurse. 

Home Calls from February 18, 1922, to February 1, 1923. 

Defective teeth, 156 

hearing, 18 

vision, 108 

nose and throat, 91 

skin, 22 

venereal, 2 

underweight, 18 

pediculosis, 41 

uncleanliness, 23 

cardiac, 2 

pulmonary, 17 

other illness, 34 

To obtain case history, 10 

To obtain reason for absence, 27 



Total, 569 

Visits to schools, 205 

Interviews with physicians and officials, 144 

Periodic weighing and measuring of pupils in elementary 

grades. 
Health talks to pupils in elementary grades. 
Assisted at dental clinics, 29 

Pupils treated, 375 

Cleanings 254 

_.„. ( Cement 111 

FlllmgS l Amalgam, 239 

350 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Extractions, 419 

Examinations, 375 



Total number of operations, 1,400 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN Y. UPHAM, R.N. 

School Nurse. 



Report of Physical Instructor. 

Concord, N. H., February 22, 1923. 
Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent, 

Dear Sir: I hereby submit my report as Physical In- 
structor of Boj r s in the High School for the year ending 
February 21, 1923. 

The instruction has been along the same lines as last year. 
The exercises taken up this year, however, have been taken 
from the latest available manuals issued for the physical 
instruction of the United States Army, the exercises being 
selected which seemed most suitable for growing boys. To 
the exercises which were done to music last year have been 
added three entirely new sets, for which it was necessary to 
select and adapt music. This has been done with good 
success. 

In addition to physical exercises I have instructed in the 
simpler marching movements. 

I have endeavored to inculcate the idea of discipline, 
steadiness in ranks, and promptness of execution. Consid- 
ering that the drill comes but once a week while school is in 
session and does not last more than half an hour, I think 
that good results have been obtained. All of the drills have 
been held in the State Armory, which is well adapted, of 
course, for the work, although the fact that the students 
have to come from the High School takes time and is but 
one more argument for a suitable high school building. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

Considering the handicaps under which the work is 
carried on, I consider the results obtained very satisfactory. 

Respectfully submitted, 

JAMES J. QUINN, 

Physical Instructor. 

Report of Physical Drill. 

The order of drill this year has been much the same as 
last year, owing to the fact that we have no apparatus. We 
have, of course, done some more advanced work this year, 
— for example, the advanced marching, but the amount 
was limited due to lack of space. 

The general attitude toward the drill has been better this 
year. We have not had so many absences, and many show 
the result of last year's training in muscular control and 
ability to think and act more quickly. If we could only have 
more space, more time, and some apparatus, I am sure we 
could make Physical Drill a big factor in the life at Concord 
High School and the results would be very far-reaching. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DOROTHY E. RANNEY. 
February 14, 1923. 



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UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

CENSUS, 1922. 



Girls. 


Total. 


1,558 


3,248 




146 


86 


184 


1,228 


2,600 


302 


601 


28 


47 



SUMMARY OF WARDS. 

Boys. 

Number of children enumerated 1,690 

Increase since 1921 

Number attending school since 1921 98 

Number attending public schools 1,372 

Number attending parochial schools 299 

Number attending private schools 19 

Number of children enumerated between 

the ages of 5 and 16 inclusive 1,690 1,558 3,248 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 14 15 29 

Number between the ages of 8 and 14 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 2 1 3 

Number between the ages of 14 and 16 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 2 2 

Number between 5 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 5 and 8 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 8 and 14 not attending 

school regularly 2 3 5 

Number between 14 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 1 1 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and 

write the English language correctly 

How many of these were born in New 

Hampshire 

Elsewhere in the United States 

In foreign countries 

Moved to the district since 1921 60 





















39 


99 



103 



104 CITY OF CONCORD. 

NATIVITY OF PARENT. 

American born 1,218 

Foreign born 515 

Russia 15 

West Indies 1 

Italy 59 

New Brunswick .> 4 

England 40 

Poland 20 

Sweden 66 

Roumania 13 

Ireland 51 

French Canadian 165 

Denmark 2 

Germany 8 

Nova Scotia 9 

Prince Edward Island 9 

Finland 27 

Scotland 11 

Albania 1 

Austria 2 

Switzerland 1 

Greece 4 

Newfoundland 1 

Armenia 1 

France 2 

South America 2 

Norway 1 

NATIVITY OF CHILD. 

Boys. Girls. Total. 

American born 1,665 1,531 3,196 

Foreign born 28 2S 56 

Italy 4 1 5 

England 5 2 7 

Sweden 1 1 

Ireland 3 3 

French Canadian 14 18 32 

Scotland 1 1 

Finland 1 1 

Newfoundland 1 1 

Nova Scotia 2 2 

Greece 1 1 

Prince Edward Island 2 2 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



105 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( )=out of 
town. 


Group I — High 

School. 

Charles F. Cook 


Submaster, room 1 . 
Assistant, " 7... 

" " 2. . . 

" Lecture Room 

" Library. . . 

" room 9. . . 
" 11.. 
"3... 

" 5... 
" 8... 

"4... 
" 10.. 

" 6... 

" Library... 

" room 12. . 
" 13.. 
" 8... 

" Assembly 
Hall 


Civics, U. S. History.. 

Mathematics 

Bookkeeping, Commer- 
cial Arithmetic 

Bookkeeping, Econom- 


122 School St. 
21 Pine St. 






Robert H. Doran 


(21 High St., Penacook, N. H.) 
64 Warren St. (Littleton, N.H.) 


Walter W. Powers 

Lester E. Richwagen. . . 


Physics, Chemistry . . . 
Civics, Economics, 


G Tahanto St. (Cambridge, 
Mass.) 

18 Rumford St. (Needham, 




French, German 


Mass.) 
8 No. State St. 
35 Perlev St. 


Carrie E. Baker 

Abbie M. Sanger 

Carrie A. Hood 


French, Spanish 

French, English 

Stenography, Type- 


8 No. State St. (Lancaster, 

N.H.) 
(Franklin, N. H.) 

140 Rumford St. 












8 No State St. (Westdale, 




English 


Mass.) 


Myra D. Gifford 




N.H.) 
75 Center St. (So. Westport 


Elizabeth S. Sargent. . . 
Margaret E. Durgin. . . 
Rosamond Grant 


Mathematics, Biology . 

English, Latin 

Stenography, Type- 


Mass.) 
101 Center St. 
13 Summit St. 

117 No. State St. (Boston, 


Charlotte M. Sawyer . . 




Mass.) 
221 No. Main St. 


Gladys W. Marble 


Assistant, Cooking 


Home Nursing, Art Ap- 
preciation, House- 
hold Organization. 
Household Physics. 

English, History 




Dorothy P. Kendall . . . 


Assistant. Lecture 


61J School St. (Whitman, 

Mass.) 

60 Pleasant St. 








Elizabeth D. Chalmers. 






Mass.) 
18 Mills St. 


Roderic K. Stanley. . . . 
Harold W. Haggard . . . 

Frances D. Burns 

Louise E. DesMarais.. . 

Evelyn L. Moore 

Edna G. Messer 

Group II — Parker 
School. 


Resigned during win- 
ter term. 

Resigned during win- 
ter term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Resigned at end of 
fall term. 

Resigned during win- 
ter term. 




50 No. State St. 


Helen 0. Stephenson. . . 
Mary W. Cross 


Assistant, room 1.. . 
" 8... 
" 5... 

"4... 


Latin, Mathematics.. . 
Mathematics 


7 Perry Ave. (Lowell, Vt.) 

(Franklin, N. H.) 


Fannie E. Lincoln 


Science, Commercial 
Arithmetic 


N.H.) 
R. F. D. No. 2. 



106 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( )=outof 
town. 



Eva E. Eastman. . . . 
Mildred E. Rowe. . . . 
Constance J. Timlin . 



Miriam Batchelder . 

Julia M. Melifant. . 
Rebecca K. Merrill . 

Mary E.Willis 

Harriet M. Ford. . . 



Chandler School. 
Harriet S. Emmons. . . 

Cora T. Fletcher 

Mary Flavin 

Elizabeth J. Donovan 
Emma G. Nickerson. . 



Mary C. Caswell 

Walker School. 
Julia E. Talpey 



Viola J. Brock 

Mabel F. Lane 

Mary E. Willis 

Florence A. Chandler. 
Garrison School 

Mary K. Hickey 

Irene W. Hart 



Assistant, room 6. 
7. 
" 2. 



" basement 

room 

Clerk 

Resigned on account 

of illness. 
Transferred to 

Walker School. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



History, English. ... 

Mathematics 

Commercial Geogra 
phy, English, Mathe- 
matics 



French, English. 



Principal 

Assistant, room 3. 
" 1. 



Clerk . 



Mathematics, Music. . 

History, Science 

English, Latin 

Latin, English 

History, Mathematics 



Supervising Principal 



" 10. 
Leave of absence. . 

Principal, room 7. . 
Assistant, " C. 



Latin, Elementary Sci- 
ence 

History, Literature. . . 
English Literature. . . . 
Mathematics 



English, Music 

Science, Mathematics. 



116 Clinton St. 
85 South St. 



11 So. Spring St. 

104 School St. 
36 So. State St. 



So. State St. 
5 So. State St. 
51 South St. 
2S Thorndike St. 
3 Rumford St. 

Mass.) 
121 Warren St. 



41 Warren St. 
99 No. State St. 
105 No. State St. 
6 Court St. 



70 Rumford St. 
63 High St. 



(Gloucester, 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 

Julia E. Talpey 

Viola J. Brock 

Mabel F. Lane 

Mary E.Willis 

Agnes R. Kellcy 

Marion R. Stcbbins. . . 

Eva H.Tandy 

Mary G. Doherty .... 
Alice M. M. Phaneuf.. 

SaraE. McCIure 

Agnes V. Sullivan. . . . 

Myla B. Cavis 

Eleanor K. Meade 

Florence A. Chandler. . 

Garrison School 

Mary K. Hickey 

Irene W. Hart 

Harriet L. Megrath. . . . 

Margaret T. Lynch. . . . 
Kathleen Mullen, sub- 
stitute 

Frances M. Twoomey. . 
Myrta B. Lowe 

Mary E. Heald 

Louisa Herbert 



Supervising principal 
Assistant, room 7. . 
" 8.. 
" 11 
" 10 
" 12 
" 5.. 
" 4.. 
" 3.. 
" 2.. 



room 6. . 
Leave of absence... 



Principal, room 7. 
Assistant, " 6. 
" 5. 



Resigned during fall 
term. 



High School. 



Mathematics 

Class K 

Classes I, J 

" G, H 

" E, F 

" CD 

" A, B 

Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 

Ungraded 



High School... 
Classes K, L. . 
' H,I,J. 

' F,G... 



' D,E 

' A, B,C 

Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 



41 Warren St. 
99 No. State St. 
105 No. State St. 
6 Court St. 
12 Beacon St. 
Iron Works Road. 
66 High St. 
145 No. State St. 
90 Rumford St. 
1 1 Cummings Ave. 

49 Lvndon St. 

11 Court St. (Bristol, N.H.) 

60 So. Main St. 



70 Rumford St. 
63 High St. 

71 Warren St. (Hooksett, 
N.H.) 

446 No. State St. 

4 Perley St. 
23 Forest St. 

60 No. Spring St. 

11 Court St. (Milford, N. H.) 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



107 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( )«=outof 
town. 



Eastman School 
Elizabeth K. Merrill 
Stella M.French... 
Doris C. Saben .... 
Florence E. George . 
Marguerite M.Tetreault 



RtmFORn School. 
Jessie N. Stimson 



Principal 

Assistant 

Leave of absence. 
Transferred to Kim- 
ball School. 



Supervising Princi- 
pal, room 9 



Grades V. VI. . 
" III, IV 
" I, II... 



Anna M. Keenan. 
Annette Prescott . 



Assistant, room 8.. 



Annie E. Saltmarsh. . . 

Ellen C. Doherty 

AbbieT. McDonald. . 
Mary M. Doherty. . . . 

Cecilia P. Jones 

Elizabeth M. McAfee. 

Katharine L. Remick . 



Maude B. Binet 

Lillian M. Phaneuf . . . 



Kimball School. 
Mary E. Melifant. . . , 

Mary A. McGuire. . . . 



Resigned during fall 
term. 



SupervisingPrincipal 
Assistant, room 5. 



Margaret A. Fanning. 
Ruth M. McCaig 



Marguerite M. J. Tet- 

reault 

Mary A. Coughlin 

Hannah E. O'Brien.. . . 

Edna M. Kennedy 

Nellie T. Halloran 



Classes K, L, Arithme- 
tic 

" I, J, K, L, 
Geography 

Classes I, J, K, L, Lan 
guage 

Classes I.J 

" G,H 

" E,F 

" CD 

" A,B 

Special Teacher 

Kindergarten and 
Primary 

Kindergarten 



Classes K, L, Lan 
guage 

Class L, Arithmetic, 
Literature, Spelling. 
Penmanship 

Class K, Geography, 
History, Literature . 

Classes I, J, Language, 
Literature, Penman- 
ship, Spelling. . . 



R. F. D. 5 
R. F. D. 5 

3 Harrod St. 



9 Holt St. 



Marion Silsby 

Harriet C. Kimball. 
Gladys Dole 



2.. 



Classes G, H 

' E,F 

' CD 

' A,B 

Kindergarten and Pri- 



(93 High St., Penacook, N. H.) 

32 School St. 
60 Beacon St. 
11 ThorndikeSt. 
56 Rumford St. 
11 ThorndikeSt. 
75 South St. 

47 Pleasant St. (Manchester, 
N. H.) 

4 Fayette St. 
7 Washington St. 



36 So. State St. 

77 So. State St. 
26 Perley St. 

13 Rockingham St. 

38 Concord St. 
22 Albin St. 
60 Franklin St. 
10 Blanchard St. 



Penacook School. 
Annie M. Branon. . . . 
Clara E. Flanders. . . . 
Rose E. Donovan .... 
Marion F. Callahan. . . 

Franklin School. 
Abbie A. Donovan . . . 

Minnie E. Ladd 

Ellen H. S. Anderson . 
Mabel Clark 



Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Principal, room 4. 
Assistant, " 3. 



Kindergarten. . . 
Special Teacher . 



30 Perley St. 
51 Pleasant St. 
Hopkinton Road 



Dewey School. 
AddieF. Straw 



" 1... 

Principal, room 3. . . 

Assistant, " 4.. . 

" 1... 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 

Supervising Princi- 
pal, room 6 



Classes I. J 

' G. H... 
' E, F.... 
' A.B.C. 



Classes I. J. . 
' CD. 
' A,B. 



Iyla Chamberlin . 



Assistant, room 1. 



Trainer for student 
teachers 

Kindergarten and Su- 
pervisor of Kinder- 
gartens 



55 Thorndike St. 
18 So. State St. 
105 So. Main St. 
11 Concord St, 



84 Center St. 

72 Washington St. 

(1 View St., W. Concord) 



101 No. State St. 
2 View St. 



108 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 


Susan M. Little 




5.. . 

4... 

2. 

2.'.'. 

1... 


Classes G, H 

E, F 


90 School St. 
72 School St. 


Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard 


" CD 

" A, B 


78 Warren St. 
8 No. State St. 






39 School St. (Hingham 


Harriet P. Dame 
School. 


Class K, Grade V 

Grades III, IV 

•' I, II 

Classes CD 

" A,B 


Centre, Mass.) 
(29 Center St.,Penacook,N.H.) 












18 So. Fruit St. 


Ellen H. S. Anderson . . 
Lillian M. Phaneuf . . . . 
Gerda H. Ekstrom 

Cogswell School. 


TransferredtoFrank- 
lin School. 

Transferred to Rum- 
ford School. 

Resigned during win- 
ter term. 


67 South St. 






226 No. State St. 


Millville School. 


Principal, room 1. . . 

Assistant, " 2. . . 
Transferred to Rum- 
ford School. 


Grades V, VI, VII... 
" 1, 11,111,1V.. 

Mixed grades 

Mixed grades 

Shop Organization. . . . 

Machine Shop Prac- 
tice, Shop Drawing. 

Pattern Making, Wood 
Turning, Dewey 
Training Classes. . . . 

Electricity .Shop Math- 
ematics, Economics . 


63 High St. 


Nora E. Murphy 

Ellen C. Doherty. 

Mountain School. 


Fiske Rd. 

167 Rumford St. 


Eva A. Hadley 

Riverhtll School. 


Resigned at end of 
spring term. 


23£ Church St. 


Iron Works School. 




Clinton St., R. F. D. 17. 


Morrill School. 
Roland G. Hartwell.... 
Raymond P. Gilman. . . 

Herbert C. Wilcox. 

Philip H.Pike 

Ernest F. Haselton .... 


Principal, room 6.. . 
Assistant, " 1... 

" " 2.. . 

" 5... 
" 8... 
" 3... 

" A.. 

" 4... 
" B.. 

" 1... 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. ' 


4 No. State St., Suite 5 
10 Maple St. 

229 No. Main St. 

107§ No. Main St. 

39 Green St. (Manchester, 


Harold C. Chamberlin . 


Cabinet-making, Shop 
Drawing, Manual 


N. H.) 


Willard H. Nute 


Forging, Manual Train- 
ing at Walker School, 
Supply Department. 


N.H.) 

315 So. Main St. 
19 Humphrey St. 


Charles F. Dodge 


Mathematics, Applied 
Physics, History. 
Commercial Gcogra- 


14 Blake St. 


Arthur W. Andrews. . . . 

Waldo S. Roundy 
Forrest J. Hall 


Machine Shop Practice, 
Manual Training at 
Rumford School. . . . 


12 Lyndon St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



109 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( ) =oat of 
town. 



Sewing School. 

B. Lillian Barker 

F. Mildred Phillips... 

Cooking School. 
Harriet B. Davis 



Annie C. Cobb. 
Myrtle Farrar . 



Edna F. Watson . 



Music. 
Charles S. Conant . 



Drawing. 
Mary A. Jones. . 



Ruth E. Battilana. 



Physical Drill. 
Capt. James J. Quinn. 
Dorothy E. Ranney . . 

Special Repairs. 
Reuben L. Cate 



Janitors. 
Charles M. Thomas. 
Perley 0. Farrar 

Charles Ada 

Fred 0. Libbey 

Arthur J. Taylor. . . 

Frank J. Boyd 

Willis C.Prescott.., 
William D. Merrick. 
OlandM.Blodgett.. 

John P. Heath 

Frank L. Dudley. . . 



Principal . 
Assistant . 



Principal . 

Assistant . 
Principal . 

Assistant . 



Sewing, Dressmaking 



Supervisor of Lunch, 
Cookery 



Supervisor of Lunch 
Cookery 



Director . 



Principal . 

Assistant . 



Instructor (boys), 
(girls) . 



Edgar M. Royce. . . 
Mrs. Henry D. Robinson 
Fritz Herter 



Bernard H. Powell. . . 



High and Morrill 
High and Morrill 

Parker 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford 

Kimball 

Penacook and 

Cogswell 

Dewey and Franklin 
H. P. Dame. . .. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during fall 

term. 



15 Center St. (Waltham.Mass.) 
148 Rumford St. 



5 Rumford St. (Everett, 
Mass.) 
51 Pleasant St. (Marion, 

Mass.) 

15 Center St. (So. Brookline, 

N.H.) 
51 So. Spring St. 



61 School St. 



(152 No. Main St., Penacook, 

N.H.) 
12 So. Spring St. (Duxbury, 

Mass.) 

19 Montgomery St. 
(Penacook, N. H.) 



E. Concord, N.H..R.F.D. 5 



16J Gladstone St. 

4 Rockingham St. 

5 Chapel St. 

84 Pillsbury St. 

6 Avon St. 

9 High St. 

482 No. State St.,W. Concord 
E. Concord, N.H., R.F.D.5 
3 Odd Fellows Ave. 

10 Wall St. 

20 Dakin St. 

100 Warren St. 

Route 6, No. Pembroke Rd. 



110 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TABULATION OF CLASS DATA FOR NIGHT SCHOOLS, 1922-1923. 

Report from October 23, 1922, to February 28, 1923. 

Whole number Aver, membership. Aver, nightly Aver, nightly 

diff. pupils. absence. attendance. 

Men. Women. No. P. C. No. P. C. No. P. C. 

English A 15 4 12.81 67.42 3.16 24.66 9.65 75.34 

EnglishB 22 2 14.14 58.91 4.45 31.47 9.69 68.63 

37 6 

Total 43 

Different Nationalities Represented. 

Italian 15 

Greek 10 

Portuguese 5 

Swedish 4 

Russian 3 

Belgian 2 

Polish 2 

Finnish 1 

German 1 

43 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 23, 1922. 



- ■ — 




jr 




Of the pupils registered how many had prior 
to registration in this school, been regis- 
tered during this school year. 


if 






Of the pupils reported in 3 above how many 
(last) were 


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20,454 

3,223 
4,092 
1,260 
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§ 


High Schools. 


380 

145 
ion 
55 
13 
5 


297 
w< 

112 
48 
16 
5 


577 
313 
221 
1113 
29 
10 


38 

34 

29 
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! 




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1 





1 


13 
12 
11 
11 

22! 
11 


162,985 
73,465 
51,036 
8,761 
6,561 
2,943 


7,659 
2,813 
1,808 
493 
273 
140 


463 02 

206 

143. 
48.7 
8.37 
8.22 


21 75 
8. 
6 
87 
.76 
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484 77 

214. 

149 
50.44 
19.13 
8.61 


9551 
962 

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749 
130 
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2.918 
615 
672 
320 
150 
132 



























807 

194 

go 
10 
251 
2S1 
119 
73 
III! 
53 
53 
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1,240 

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35 

13 

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1" 

25 
16 

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'.Ill 


646 

ISO 
91 

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1,86 


1,232 

374 
181 

81 

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429 
214 
141 
159 
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98 
72 

2,332 

23 
23 
20 

in 

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28 
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286 



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145 
44 
32 
32 

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6 

8 
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2 

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1 




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473 

137 
74 
37 
175 
161 
80 
58 
f,4 
42 
42 
30 

900 

12 
8 
8 

23 

9 

30 
17 
24 
16 
25 

112 
1,522 


5011 

113 
SI 
33 
151 
122 
84 
49 
58 
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37 
31 

son 

10 
10 

25 

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26 
11 
30 
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155 
75 
326 
283 
164 
107 
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71 
61 

1,709 

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IS 

1: 

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197 

4 
3 
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12 



23 
10 
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117 

S4 
40 
21.1 
115 
115 
57 

23 

29 
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20 

500 

8 

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13 

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38 
38 

38 

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33 

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62 
43 

20 
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275 
27 

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3ii; 

77 
57 
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77 
SO! 
44 
34 
37! 
33 
23 
22 


305,751 

78,762 
46,276 
23,149 
95,337 
87,652 
46,111 
34,155 
3S.O1I0 
27,919 
22,"35 
20,155 


13,186 

5,765 
3,619 
1,780 
5,930 
5,584 
2.887 
2.250 
2,063 
2.005 

1,939 

1,814 


887.31 

219.34 
130.97 

64.76 
259.65 
242.32 
128 94 

93.21 
108. 

78,26 

64 96 

57. 


38.64 

15 69 
10 09 

4.97 
15.13 
14.79 

8.47 

6.52 

6. 

7.42 

5,74 

5. 


925 95 

235.03 
141 06 

69 73 
274 78 
257.11 
137.41 

99.73 
114. 

»5.6S 

70.7 

62. 


90 

.93 
.93 
93 
94 
.94 
.95 
.93 
.05 
.91 
92 
.91 


937 

106 
109 
86 
103 
117 
93 
74 
86 
62 
36 
101 


04 




(1 

4 
1 





II 




5 


II 
II 

o 











09 


— 


27 

24 

11) 


10 
3 
3 
4 
9 


10 
9 

38 



1 


331 

130 
34 
75 
169 
343 
29 
69 
101 
253 
154 
23 

1,335 

52 
24 
42 


99 

14 
3 
5 
20 
10 
11 
11 
5 
4 



8.5 

II 
2 
1 


2.77 

2 02 

3 67 

4 3 

1 74 

2 09 
1.77 
1 62 
1.6 

1 81 

74 

4 11 

25 47 

1. 

47 


55.29 

.53 
1. 


1,028 

263 
173 
10s 
310 
320 
187 
129 
147 
94 
84 
68 

1.391 

20 

23 
20 


30,681 

4,410 

4,000 
2,530 
0,128 
6,163 
3,414 
2,664 
2. 633 
2.16S 
1,664 
1,079 

36.90S 

490 
457 
439 


4,807 

980 

750 
395 
1,706 
1.229 
732 
492 
414 
522 
352 
205 





ElEMXNT4RT SCHOOLS. 







II 




1 




I) 




II 




II 




1 




4 


Harriet P. Dame 


1 






II 






Totab 

Rural Schools. 


1 




9! 




(1 


519 

12 
11 
13 


520,591 

4,618 
5,433 
4.787 


36,352 

644 
985 
565 


1.447 41 

13, 
15. 
14. 


99,82 

3. 
2. 


1.547.23 

15 
18. 
16. 


93 

87 

84 
.88 


973 

32 

11 



1 53 


124 
110 
439 


. 
















27 

9 

9 
9 
8 

li 

41 

550, 


6 
2 

2 

I 
11 
124 


3 









o 


12j 














13, 


30 
11 

11 

11 

111 
11 

11 

54 


14,838 

5,054 

6,350 
3,224 
6,649 
4,187 
4,774 


2,194 

548 

1,335 
965 
809 
953 
878 

4,940 


42, 

14.11 

35.47 
35.4 
37. 
23. 

26.67 


7. 

1.53 

7.46 
10 5 

4. 
5 
4 9 

31 86 

178 85 


49. 

15 64 

42.93 

45.9 

41. 

28. 

31.57 


86 

902 

.826 
.72 

11302 
3117 
8440 

03S5 

9113 


43 

12 

7 
3 
14 

50 

90 

164 

2.12'. 




1 


3 
1 
3 


113 
21 

78 

102 

79 
95 
155 


3 





1 

o 
1 


1 47 
54 

.12 

1 
.02 

1 34 
2.4 




03 
18 

59 

30 
45 
43 
40 


1,386 

630 

1,512 
736 

884 
896 
896 


673 

140 

160 
166 
283 
171 
148 




Ungraded School. 




Kindergartens. 
















Dewey 







ol 


25,184 


157.54 


189.4 


1.101. 


15 

130 


489 
2,367 


2 
189 


3 93 

54 23, 




223 

.1,223 


4,924 


928 
14.325 


















Grand Totals 


2.96 


52 


8 100 


331 


021 


703 


710 


1,413 


26: 


260523 


154 154 


700l| 871,418 


57,220 


2.548.37 


2,727 22 


56 82 


74.529 


7 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOLARSHIP TABLE. 



Ill 



SCHOOLS. 


O 


,3 

'3, 

o.9 

a a 

2; 






C u 
3_K 

'o.a 
If 

z 


1 

m 

'o 

as 

° 3 
Ph 


'3 


5 


•3 

"o 
o 

J3 . 
ra o 
+* O 


5b 
"o 

o 
.9 
E 


3 
S a 


Is 

i- 


High 


V 
U 
T 
S 
R 
Q 


59 
48 
81 
71 
122 
99 




2 
5 
2 
2 
3 


4.16 

6.17 
2.82 
1.64 
3.03 


37 
23 
48 
21 
50 
38 


62.71 
47.92 
59.26 
29.57 
40.98 
38.38 


3 
4 
3 
8 
25 
21 



3 
5 

5 
15 

18 



1 


2 
8 
10 


18 
9 

14 
1 

29 

16 


94.91 
91.67 
97.53 
88.73 
79.50 
78.79 


5 08 




8 33 




3.70 
11.27 
20.49 
21.33 


Total 




480 


14 


2.92 


217 


45.21 


64 


46 


21 


87 


86.87 


13.33 




P 



133 

86 


19 

7 


14.28 

8.14 


74 
22 


55.64 
25.58 


6 

7 


12 
12 


12 
6 


54 
26 


95.49 
91.86 


4 51 




8 14 






Total 




219 


26 


11.87 


96 


43.83 


13 


24 


18 


80 


94.06 


5 93 








N 
M 


138 
69 


8 
6 


5.71 
8.69 


41 
29 


29.71 
42.02 


4 
3 


9 

7 


6 

7 




97.10 
95.65 


2 89 




4 06 






Total 




207 


14 


6.76 


70 


33.33 


7 


16 


13 




96.62 


3 38 






Walker 

Group II 


N 
M 


50 

48 


5 
2 


10.00 

4.17 


20 
13 


40.00 
27.08 


2 
1 


2 



2 

1 




96.00 
98.00 


4.00 
2.08 


Total 




98 


7 


7.14 


33 


33.67 


3 


2 


3 




96.94 


3.06 


Garrison 


N 
M 


8 
10 


2 
3 


2.5.00 
30.00 


2 

4 


25.00 
40.00 



1 


1 
3 


1 

1 






100.00 
90.00 


10 00 






Total 




18 


5 


27.78 


6 


33.33 


1 


4 


2 





94.44 


5 55 








N 
M 


6 
2 


1 




16.67 


4 



66.67 












100.00 
100.00 






1 


1 










Total 




8 


1 


12.50 


4 


50.00 





1 


1 




100.00 








Grand H. S. Total. . 




1,030 


67 


5.53 


426 


41.36 


88 


93 


58 


167 


91.55' 


8.54 



General Average of High School entire, 80.50 per cent. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


206 


24 


11.60 


79 


38.35 


12 


2 


2 




94.17 


5.82 




K 


133 


6 


4.51 


39 


29.32 


11 


4 


1 




91.73 


8.27 




J 


227 


20 


8.99 


73 


32.16 


16 


7 


4 




92.95 


7.04 




I 


93 


9 


9.68 


33 


35.48 


9 










90.32 


9.68 




H 


175 


18 


10.29 


60 


34.29 


7 


2 


1 




96.00 


4.00 




G 


126 


i 


5.55 


32 


25.40 


10 










92.00 


7.94 




F 


196 


22 


11.22 


77 


39.28 


11 


4 


1 




94.39 


5.61 




E 


123 


3 


2.44 


46 


37.40 


8 


3 







93.50 


6.50 


Total — Elemen t ary 




1,279 


109 


8.52 


439 


34.32 


84 


24 


9 




93.35 


6.57 


Grand Totals— High 


























and Elementary 




2,309 


176 


7.62 


865 


37.46 


172 


117 


67 


167 


92.55 


7.45 



STANDARDS. 



Scholarship, 80 per cent. 
Number of A — pupils, 10 per cent. 



Number of B — pupils, 50 per cent. 
Failures, 10 per cent. 



112 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 



Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study,. 
First Semester, 1922-1923. 





Classes. 


SUBJECTS. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


u. 


V. 


Post- 
graduate. 


Special. 




150 


97 
33 


158 
33 
48 


84 
21 

15 


132 
34 

80 


86 
11 
39 


113 

24 

65 


66 

9 

40 


91 

15 

34 

5 

7 
99 


35 

5 

8 


7 
6 
7 


1 




1 






1 
























25 


8 










150 
32 


97 
25 










27 


1 


1 




























28 


19 




1 




Medieval and Modern 










19 

95 












150 


97 


151 


84 


59 






23 
18 


4 
7 


8 

1 


1 
























39 


12 














18 
47 


17 

22 




















36 


28 














































25 
24 
24 


11 
9 
9 


1 
1 
1 
















35 
35 


37 
39 


23 

24 
























25 
25 


21 

1 


52 

20 
































28 


10 


11 


2 














19 
19 


















































17 


8 




















16 
14 










52 




6 




22 




2 


1 

















SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE.— Concluded. 



113 





Classes. 


SUBJECTS. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


Post- 
graduate. 


Special. 






52 
52 
52 






20 
20 




















13 
51 


7 


22 
1 
1 
1 

15 

o 

7 

9S 
2 


11 
8 

3 


3 
3 


1 
o 
3 
3 


3 
5 
1 
1 








































76 
76 


49 
49 


74 


S 
48 


13 

4 

29 








1 

4 
1 
7 
1 
101 
5 












House Management and 


3 
4 
1 
1 
64 


4 
3 
8 
6 
80 
1 










32 


25 








1 
















150 
150 


64 

97 


13 
15 


13 

84 


147 

4 










36 














150 


97 


49 
92 


37 
47 






























































23 


10 
10 


















22 














Occupation-Economic 






51 




22 














56 


52 


















9 











































THIRTY-FIFTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST. 

BY THE 

PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

Of Union School District, at High School Hall, Tuesday Evening, 
March 6, 1923, at Eight o'Clock. 



"Spring Song" 



PROGRAM. 
High School Orchestra 



Mendelssohn 



ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL. 

1. "The Italian Immigrant" 

Dorothy Louise Parker, Class T 



2. "Whither?" 



Grace Milton White, Class P 



3. "My Ideal Concord" 

Nathaniel Bouton Guyol, Class R 

4. "The Need of A New High School in Concord" 

Mary Esther Cushing, Class V 

"Merrily Goes the Mill" 

Boys' Glee Club, High School 



Myois 



FORENSIC DECLAMATION. 

1. "Defence of Hofer, The Tyrolese Patriot" 

Lawrence Henry Tucker, Walker School 

2. "You Are The Hope of The World" 

Kenison Melville Hill, Chandler School 

3. "The Mission of America" 

Ernest Robert Turnquist, Garrison School 

Gavotte "The Dawn Is Breaking" 

Girls' Glee Club, High School 
114 



Hagedorn 
Wilson 
Parlow 



SCHOOL REPORT. 115 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION. 

1. "Spreading The News" Harbour 

Esther Marie Bjork, Garrison School 

2. "Ole Mistis" Moore 

EVelyn Mae Foster, Walker School 

3. "The Lie" Donnell 

Doris Julia Fuller, Chandler School 

"Cavatina" Raff 

High School Orchestra 

AWARD OF PRIZES. 
Original Declamation — High School, Classes O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V. 
First Prize, $15, Mary Esther Cushing. 
Second Prize, $10, Nathaniel Bouton Guyol. 

Forensic Declamation — Classes M, N. 
First Prize, $6, Kenison Melville Hill. 
Second Prize, $4, Lawrence Henry Tucker. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — Classes M, N. 
First Prize, $6, Esther Marie Bjork. 
Second Prize, $4, Evelyn Mae Foster. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 
Hon. Frederick W. Branch, Manchester, N. H. 
Col. Oscar P. Cole, Berlin, N. H. 
Mr. George A. Wood, Portsmouth, N. H. 



116 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 
Received. 

Balance from last year's account, $3,364 . 86 

Interest on same, 140.86 

Sale of 549 tickets at 35 cents, 192 . 15 



5,697.87 



Expended. 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services, $60.00 

Prizes, including books, 51.00 

English Prize Composition, expense, 96.00 
Miscellaneous expense, including selling and taking tickets, 

music, judges, etc., 14.25 

Cash on deposit as a guaranty fund for future contests, 3,476 . 62 

$3,697.87 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 

Held at the Parker School, May 6, 1922. 



School. 


No. Pupils 

Enrolled in 

School. 


No. Pupils 
Taking 
Part. 


Per cent of 
Pupils in 
Contest. 


Average 
Rank of 
Pupils. 


Average 
Per cent 
of Pupils. 


High, Senior 


508 


16 


3.1 + 


15 


.46 


83.27 


Parker, Junior 


220 


43 


19.5 + 


51 


,4 


67.69 


Chandler, Junior 


141 


42 


29.7 + 


68 


.4 


61.61 


Walker, Junior 


47 


7 


14.8 + 


52 


71 


67.44 


Garrison, Junior 


21 

8 





PRIZES. 










Eastman, Junior 


















General Prizes. 









Prizes. Awarded to. 

First, $6 Ruel N. Colby 
Second, $4 Katharine Graves 

Third, $2 Laurence I. Duncan 



of 



Class. Subject. 

V The Three Spirits 
T Roosevelt's Ideals 

Manhood 
T Why I should Have Liked 
to Have Lived in Ivan- 
hoe's Time 



Class Prizes. 

Senior High. 

Classes U, V. 

First, $3 Ruel N. Colby V The Three Spirits 

Second, $2 Sarah M. Matheson V Laertes 

Third, $1 Ruth I. Jackman U Roosevelt's Ideals of 

Manhood 

Classes S, T. 
First, $3 Katharine Graves T Roosevelt's Ideals of 

Manhood 
Second, $2 Laurence I. Duncan T Why I Should Have 

Liked to Have Lived in 
Ivanhoe's Time 
Third, $1 Doris E. Abbott T Roosevelt's Ideals of 

Manhood 
117 



118 CITY OF CONCORD. 


Classes Q, R. 




First, $3 Margaret M. Champigny R 


Perseverance as a Neces- 




sary Element of Suc- 




cess 


Second, $2 Holbrook L. Horton Q 


The Dwellers on Olympus 


Third, $1 Rosalind P. McLaren Q 


The Most Exciting Inci- 




dent in Oliver Twist 


Parker School. 




Junior High. 




Classes 0, P. 




First, $3 Helen E. Cheney P 


Miss Matty 


Second, $2 Mary E. Clough P 


Miss Matty 


Third, $1 Osmond R. Strong P 


Why I Should Have 



Liked to Have Lived 
in Ivanhoe's Time 



Chandler, Walker, Garrison, Eastman Schools. 
Classes M, N. 



First, $3 Marjorie F. Lowe 


M 


Life in the Village of 


Walker School 




Grand Pre 


Second, $2 Dorothea M. Goodwin 


M 


The Battlefield 


Chandler School 






Third, $1 Agnes L. Smith 


N 


The Gathering of the 


Chandler School 




Clansmen 



SIXTH ANNUAL ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL CONTEST. 

High School Hall, June 9, at 8 o'clock p. m. 

PROGRAM. 

March — " Kings and Queens " Losch 

Mandolin Club 
Order of Speakers: 

Frances Elizabeth Currier 
Martin H. Gurley 
Minette Alice Woodcock 
Sarah Marjorie Matheson 
Edward Sanel 
Doris Eileen Toone 
Edward Mahoney 
Helen Hutton 



Piano Solo — "Polonaise, Opus 53" 

Hilda Buchan 

Selection — "Melody of Love" 

West Concord Orchestra 



Selection — " April Showers ' ' 



Mandolin Club 



Announcement of Award 



JUDGES. 

Rev. George F. Patterson 

Mr. Beirne Lay 

Miss Mary G. H. Short 

MEDAL WINNERS. 

Doris Eileen Toone — "The Art of Service" 
Edward Mahoney— "Good! Better! Best!" 



Chopin 

Englemann 

Silvers 



119 



120 CITY OF CONCORD. 

TABLE OF TRANSPORTATION ROUTES. 



Name of driver. 



Harry T. Corser 

Harry R. Dunstane . . 

C. L. Hanson 

Judson F. Hoit 

William S. Kaime. . . . 
George A. Keyes 



Route. 



Silver Hill to Iron Works, Chandler, 
Parker and High Schools 

Fagan's Corner to Millville 

Clinton Street to Penacook School. 

Snaptown to Mountain School and 
Golf Siding 

Loudon Line to H. P. Dame School. . . 

Dimond Hill to Millville, Chandler 
and Parker 

Drew's Corner to Chandler, Parker 
and High 

Pembroke Road to Penacook, Cog 
well, Rumford, Chandler, Parker 
and High 

East Concord to Walker, Chandler, 
Parker and High 

Maynard's to Eastman School . 



cr> 






■i, 


Q. 


c. 




£ 










S. . 






_= 


S'B 


c;-0 
o a 






= rt 






a 








3 


Z 


Q 




z 


16 


7m. 


2 




4 


7 m. 


2 




1 


10 m. 


2 




13 


12 m. 






19 


8 m. 


4 




26 


8 m. 


2 




25 


5 m. 


4 




18 


6 m. 


2 




37 


5 m. 


i 


or auto 


8 


7 m. 


2 





Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 

Truck. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 

Yes. 
Yes. 
Yes. 



HONOR LIST, 1922. 



Pupils Who Have Attained a Mark op A— or Better for the 
Entire Year. 

High School. — Everett Benton, John Jones, Esther Cushing, Law- 
rence Duncan, Pauline Oyston, Eleanor Rowell, Iyla Tracy, Jean Gove, 
Marie Parker, Kinsley Batchelder, Barbara Everett, Catherine Moore, 
Dudley Orr, Helene Wheeler. 

Parker School. — Carl Anderson, Elmer Bergstrom, Helen Cheney, 
Natica Clayton, James Collins, Robert Diversi, Eleanor Duncan, Alice 
Ericson, Helen Gannon, Bouton Guyol, Sarah Hill, Leonard Hill, 
Kenneth Lane, Theresa Liberty, Kenneth McLeod, John Parker, 
Madeline Ruiter, Osmond Strong, Sherburne Tilton, Mary Alexander, 
Halstead Colby, Marion Donovan, Mary Galligan, Eugene Maginau, 
Harry Makin, Helen Perkins. 

Chandler School. — Lester Bullard, Charles Chandler, Rachel 
Hartford, Sarah Jackson, Lillian Sandquist, Louise Wilde, Margaret 
Abbott, Sara Brunei, Richard Butterfield, Eleanor Clarke, Florence 
Coleman, Robert Foster, Gordon McRae, Ruth Robinson. 

Walker School. — Juan Gorrell, Helen Lowe, Shirley Martin, John 
Sanders, James Tucker, Marjorie Lowe, Cedric Ruiter, Lester Billings, 
Carl Evans, Evelyn Foster, James Dougal, Vernon Josephson, Dixon 
H. Turcott, Noel H. Wilcox, Jane Chase, Anne Hill, Elizabeth M. 
Grammont, Ethel F. Gerrish, Roland H. Perry, Plunty Sanders. 

Garrison School. — Martha E. Dahlgren, Viola A. Olson, Lilian E. 
Shepard, Esther Bjork, Elma Ward, Harriette Dakin, Hope Rosell, 
Bernard Crowley, Doris Olson, Stanley Ekstrom, John Holden, Miriam 
Myllymaki, Bernard Edmark. 

Eastman School. — Virginia Woodward, Barbara Field, Helen Riley, 
Douglass Woodward, Donna E. Morrison, Jeanette Saben. 

Rumford School. — Doris A. Tappan, David DeMoulpied, Marion 
F. Holt, Lucy D. O'Malley, Roy C. Sandquist, Dorothy Hadley, 
Angeline Crossly, Nathalie Scales, Ona Collins, Dean Williamson, 
Elizabeth Brower, Eleanor Taylor, Shirley Berry, Eileen Palmer, 
Marion Young. 

121 



122 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Kimball School. — Jans Carlen, Doris Fuller, Dorothy Gaige, Ken- 
ison M. Hill, Barbara K. Pearson, W. Herbert Potter, Clara L. Prowse, 
Harry E. Sundgren, Lawrence H. Tucker, Martin Sandquist, John 
Swenson, Alvin Simonds, Gertrude E. Saltmarsh, Dorothy Walker, 
William Foster, Louise Magenau, Atwood Levansaler, William D. 
McRae, David H. Stevens, James Nelson, Harriet Eger, Richard 
Hammond, Eleanor Crowley, Alice Baker, Betty Palmer, Irene Freeman, 
John Mayo, Dorothy Holmes, Pauline Rogers, Helen Sanborn. 

Penacook School. — Dorris Tilton, Rodney Strom, Paul Silver, 
Randolph Brown, Harriet Sherburne, Donald Royce, Arthur Kelley, 
Carolyn Pardon, George Wilcox, James Wason, Arnold Waldman, 
Alnes Strom, Arlene Isabelle, Rita Lebrun, Catherine Rosendale. 

Franklin School. — Gladys Angwin, Alice Hoadley, Janet Kennedy, 
Lynda Waldron, Loviise Saltmarsh, Wendell Ellis, Robert Parker. 

Dewey School. — Frederick A. Nightingale, Gerald M. Hall, Mildred 
H. Sandquist, M. Eleanor Orkins. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Kathleen Merrill, Ernest Boulay. 

Millville School. — Nettie May Willard, Arthur Estes Clark, 
Marjorie Du Bois, Lydia Moses, Raymond Proctor, Thomas Manley, 
Richard Roach. 

Iron Works School. — Fannie N. Carleton, Elizabeth H. Frost, 
Richard F. Upton. 

Mountain School. — Harold Sanborn, Albert Mayo. 

Riverhill School. — Raymond Auprey, Rebecca Chamberlin, Eme- 
line Spaulding, Ralph Holland. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 





Sewing. 


Cooking. 


Mechanic Arts. 


SCHOOLS. 


■3 S3 

^ o . 

° S g 

G " 60 
„fl.S 

j3«St3 
5 


O 

> 

£ ° 

►3 


ft "E 

ta 3 

^ bO C3 

Sag 
° « c 

Ml 


■J.T3 

o 

■§'3.« 

a s -s 

3 O.*^ 

a -, so 

„|.g 


OS 

3 

£ ° 

►3 


3 g> 
a 'E 
o-a 

t. 60 

a t - 
att. 2 

"o:3_e 


' 60 

D.-S 

<_3 
o-a 

2 C a 
-a 0,53 


eJ 

3 

.2 

ci 
> 

O . 

a 
3 


i 6C 

3 £- 

*! 

. 60 C3 

a |_g 

c « g 


High 








168 
155 
67 
21 
12 
4 


12 

30 

4 



2 



156 
125 
63 
21 
10 
4 


122 
60 
83 
45 
17 
11 
33 
54 


7 
4 
3 
1 

1 

2 


115 


Parker 

Chandler 


40 
95 

7S 
37 
15 
64 
57 
33 
26 
21 
15 
21 
1 
9 
2 

23 
24 


24 
33 
15 
4 
1 
22 
13 
10 
5 





1 




16 
62 
63 
33 
14 
42 
44 
23 
21 
21 
15 
19 
1 
9 
1 
23 
24 


56 
80 
44 




17 




10 




33 










52 


































21 

8 
9 




1 


21 










8 


Millville 








8 








































Sacred Heart 


8 

7 






S 
7 


17 

21 


1 
2 


16 
19 






Total 


561 


130 


431 


442 


48 


394 


501 


22 


479 



GRADUATING CLASSES OF THE CONCORD 
HIGH SCHOOL. 



CLASS OF JUNE 23, 1922. 



Name. 
Grace Edna Bacheller 
Pauline Ruth Ballard 
Abraham Victor Baer 
Harry Archer Bartlett 
Grover Cleveland Beane 
Martin Francis Beggs 
Willard Earl Bennett 
Doris Elizabeth Brown 
Ethel Maude Cate 
Merle Winthrop Carle ton 
Mortimer Ashton Chandler 
Laura Sanborn Chapman 
Grace Mabelle Chase 
James Whitney Corrigan 
Robert Greenyer Crowell 
Marian Davis 
Elinor Mary Diversi 
Mildred Dole 
Katherine E. Faucher 
Margaret Agnes Faucher 
Oscar Theodore Forsberg 
Helen Foster 

Marshall Delmont French 
Hazel Udora Fuller 
Lillian Irene Garey 
Lula Emma Gordon 
Martin H. Gurley 
Olive Vera Hartford 
Alvin Reed Hussey 
Helen Hutton 
Grace Louraine Kelly 
George Channing Kimball 
Olive LaHar 
Marion Agnes Langley 



Course. 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Classical 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Classical 
Commercial 
Academic 
Classical 
Commercial 



124 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



125 



Name. 
Jerome Rollins Leavitt 
Edward Mahoney 
Margaret M. Martin 
Sarah Marjorie Matheson 
Vera Agnes Maxner 
John Alexander Mclsaac 
Flora Jeannette McLeod 
Horace Truman McRae 
Ruth Anna Morrow 
Isabel Mungall Nicoll 
Florence Edith Philbrick 
Origen Robert Phillips 
Hazelle Erma Purington 
Edward V. Putnam 
Jacob Rabinovitz 
Reginald Hill Rice 
Agnes Ring 

Fredric Wesley Robinson, 
Helen Rylander 
Germaine Beatrice Scully 
Roland Albert Smith 
Frances Deane Smythe 
Rita Mary Spaulding 
Ruth Swain 
Doris Eileen Toone 
Bernard E. Towle 
Gardner Howard Wales 
Evelyn Watkins 
George Henry Wendolin 
Elizabeth Helen Whalen 
Clifton Raymond Wilcox 
Minette Alice Woodcock 



Jr. 



Course. 
Academic 
Classical 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 



CLASS OF JANUARY 26, 1923. 
Name. Course. 

Gladys Ellen Alexander Academic 

Anna Amelia Anderson Commercial 

Everett Chesley Benton Classical 

Mabel Pauline Boland Commercial 

Viola Alma Carlson Commercial 

Hiram Wayland Cate Mechanic Arts 

Mary Ellen Beatrice Cate Commercial 

Ruel Newton Colby Academic 

Paul Gilman Crowell Academic 



126 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Name. 
Katherine Teresa Daley 
Emile Bennett Dupuis 
Frederick Abel Eastman 
Robert Ecklund 
Marshall Delmont French 
Dorothy Ellen George 
Howard Gustaf Hammar 
Charles Parker Houston 
Ruth Irene Jackman 
John Franklin Jones 
Kenneth Robie Kimball 
Chester Gustuf Larson 
Marguerite Vianne McDonnell 
Alice Anna Nelson 
Elizabeth Peckham 
Thomas Michael Pitts 
Merton Dickerman Rumrill 
Waldo Moseley Sanborn 
Myrna Leona Simpson 
Etta True Smith 
Roland Albert Smith 
Napoleon Arthur Trombly 
Clifford Harvey Woodward 
Stella Harriet Young 



Course. 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Classical 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 



FIRE DRILLS, 1921-1922. 





HIGH 


SCHOOL. 


Number minutes 
used from time of 


Date. 


Time of day. 


Number minutes 


signal until return 






going out. 


to work. 


Sept. 22 


2.10 p. m. 


60 seconds 




Nov. 16 


11.03 a. in. 


58 " 




Mar. 24 


10.05 " 


65 




Apr. 26 


2.05 p. m. 


62 




May 26 


9.30 a. m. 


60 




June 16 


9.25 " 


65 " 






PARKER SCHOOL. 




Oct. 19 


10.00 a. m. 


60 seconds 




Nov. 16 


1.30 p. m. 


50 




Nov. 21 


10.30 a. m. 


52 




Apr. 16 


9.00 " 


48 




Apr. 26 


10.00 " 


50 




June 8 


1.20 p. m. 


45 






CHANDLER SCHOOL. 




Oct. 17 


11.32 a. m. 


35 seconds 




Nov. 15 


11.20 " 


40 " 




Feb. 10 


11.50 " 


47 " 




Feb. 24 


2.30 p. m. 


35 




Apr. 10 


2.35 " 


35 




May 2 


2.57 " 


35 




June 6 


10.15 a.m. 


38 




June 14 


11.30 " 


35 






WALKER SCHOOL. 




Sept. 26 


1.15 p. m. 


63 seconds 


93 seconds 


Oct. 10 


8.40 a. m. 


55 " 


85 " 


Nov. 17 


9.15 " 


75 " 


175 " 


Apr. 13 


10.45 " 


65 " 


85 


May 10 


2.40 p. m. 


50 


80 


June 1 


9.45 a. m. 


60 


90 " 



127 



128 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 











Number minutes- 










used from lime of 


Date. 


Time of day. Number minutes 


signal until return 








going out. 


to work. 


Oct. 




9.00 a. m. 


70 seconds 


180 seconds 


Mar. 


29 


2.30 p. m. 


55 


120 


June 


7 


10.00 a. m. 

EASTMAN 


50 " 
SCHOOL. 


90 " 


Sept. 


14 


8.45 a. m. 


25 seconds 


60 seconds 


Dec. 


2 


1.25 p. m. 


30 " 


120 


Jan. 


6 


1.25 " 


30 


120 


Mar. 


3 


11.50 a.m. 


30 


120 


Apr. 


24 


1.15 p. m. 


30 


120 


June 


7 


1.40 " 

RUMFORD 


25 
SCHOOL. 


120 


Dec. 


6 


9.00 a. m. 


95 secomds 


4 minutes 


Jan. 


17 


8.45 " 


90 


3 


Mar. 


31 


9.30 " 


70 " 


3 


June 


9 


9.35 " 

KIMBALL 


70 " 
SCHOOL. 


3 


Oct. 


31 


1.50 p.m. 


64 seconds 


128 seconds 


Dec. 


1 


2.30 " 


64 " 


128 


Feb. 


28 


8.45 a. m. 


66 


132 


Apr. 


26 


2.30 p. m. 


62 


124 


June 


1 


10.50 a. m. 


63 " 


126 " 






PENACOOK SCHOOL. 




Nov. 


4 


9.30 a. m. 


40 seconds 


1 min. 30 sec. 


Nov. 


7 


2.30 p. m. 


40 


1 " 20 " 


Mar. 


24 


9.30 a. m. 


40 


1 " 30 " 


Apr. 


14 


9.30 " 


35 " 


1 " 35 " 


May 


19 


2.15 p.m. 


35 " 


1 " 25 " 


June 


13 


9.45 a. m. 


35 " 


1 " 25 " 






FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 




Sept. 


19 


1.35 p. m. 


43 seconds 


90 seconds 


Oct. 


10 


1.40 " 


41 


86 " 


Jan. 


4 


1.40 " 


40 


85 " 


Mar. 


14 


1.35 " 


45 " 


95 " 


Apr. 


5 


1.35 " 


43 " 


90 " 


Apr. 


25 


9.25 a. m. 


45 " 


95 " 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



129 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 











Number minutes 










used from time of 


Date. 


Time of day 


Number minutes 


signal until return 








going out. 


to work. 


Sept. 


19 


9.20 a. m. 


Practice 




Sept. 


22 


9.45 " (room 4) 




Sept. 


22 


10.00 " ( 


" 2) 




Sept. 


26 


2.00 p. m. 


45 seconds 


Not reported 


Sept. 


29 


10.05 a. m. 


49 




Oct. 


26 


2.08 p. m. 


38 " 




Jan. 


6 


2.35 " 


40 " 




Jan. 


10 


2.05 " 


60 " 




Feb. 


9 


2.20 " 


63 




Feb. 


27 


2.20 " 


60 " 




Apr. 


26 


10.05 a. m. 


60 " 




May 


8 


2.20 p. m. 
H. P. 


43 
DAME SCHOOL. 




Oct. 


10 


Morning 


Practice 


Not timed 


Nov. 


22 


8.45 a. m. 


30 seconds 


2 or 3 minutes 


Jan. 


10 


8.36 " 


30 " 


2 minutes 


June 


7 


8.45 " 


30 " 


2 






COGSWELL SCHOOL. 




Nov. 


16 


2.05 p. m. 


30 seconds 


1 min. 5 sec. 


Dec. 


7 


1.40 " 


30 


1 ti 


Mar. 


22 


9.45 a. m. 


35 " 


1 " 


Apr. 


10 


9.15 " 


30 


1 "5 " 


May 


25 


9.30 " 


30 " 


1 tc 


June 


20 


9.30 " 


25 


1 " 






MILLVILLE SCHOOL. 




Oct. 


10 


2.15 p.m. 


35 seconds 


If minutes 


Apr. 


25 


2.30 " 


30 " 


60 seconds 


May 


24 


9.45 a. m. 
IRON 


29 
WORKS SCHOOL. 


58 " 


Oct. 


25 


11.15 a. m. 


1 minute 


Several-practicing 


Nov. 


8 


11.30 " 


1 


3 minutes 


Mar. 


23 


11.00 " 


2 


x 2 


May 


2 


1.45 p. m. 


I " 
2 


2 


June 


21 


9.00 a. m. 


1 it 
2 


H " 



130 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



MOUNTAIN SCHOOL. 









Number minutes 








used from time of 


Date. 


Time of day. 


Number minutes 


signal until return 






going out. 


to work. 


Nov. 8 


11.05 a. m. 


10 seconds 


22 seconds 


Dec. 13 


2.10 p.m. 


9 " 


23 


Jan. 16 


11.25 a.m. 


10 


20 " 


Mar. 27 


11.35 " 


8 


17 


May 31 


9.22 " 


9 " 


21 


June 14 


9.17 " 


9 


22 




RIVERHILL SCHOOL. 




Mar. 24 


10.10 a. m. 


30 seconds 


90 seconds 


May 18 


10.10 " 


35 


2 minutes 


May 24 


2.30 p. m. 


40 


90 seconds 


June 16 


11.15 a. m. 


60 


80 



ROLL OF HONOR, 1922. 



High School. — Martin Gurley, Florence Philbrick, Robert Ecklund, 
Origen Phillips, Thomas Pitts, Doris Dickey, Florence Hall, Ruth 
Herter, Lucille Hodge, Nathalie Hurd, Pauline Oyston, Louise Sprague, 
Warren Butterfield, Agnes Chalmers, Elizabeth Crosby, Evelyn John- 
son, Ruth Lord, Edward Robinson, Mildred Colby, Freeman Bachelder, 
Eva Dearborn, Angelo Delbianco, Leo Drouin, Harrison Duffy, Edith 
Ecklund, Henry Ekstrom, Robert Gervais, Mabel Hebert, Lester Holt, 
Haven Huckins, Albert Jeannotte, Roxie Jenness, Mary Kenney, Louise 
Muzzey, Alphonse Roy, Thelma Silver. 

Parker School. — Marion Allen, Carl Anderson, Bertil Carlson, 
Gordon Carpenter, Natica Clayton, Helen Curtis (4), Elmer Bergstrom, 
Robert Diversi, David Herter, Pauline Halligan, Myla Jesseman, 
Catherine Lyons, Hazel Maclaren, Thelma McDonald, Elizabeth 
Palmer, Stanley Osgood, Helen Quinn, Carl Ronn, Engred Rosendale, 
Pauline Roy, Lois Smith, Lawrence Spaulding. 

Chandler School. — Harry Barrett (3), Richard Butterfield, Harold 
Donovan (1-i), Edna Dunn Earl Hills, Carroll Johnson, Joseph Jones 
(3), Harrison Leary (3), Nyle Lockwood, Bradley Richardson, Alfred 
Rowell (5), Lena Roy (4), Lillian Sandquist (2), Pauline Savage, Paul 
St. Pierre (2), Louise Wilde, Lillian Wirrell. 

Walker School. — David N. Taylor, Joseph Grennough, Frances 
Pilsbury, Velina M. Ordway, Theresa San Sousso, Arthur Frary, Arthur 
Rowell (3), Irene A. Hodgman, Emma Levesque, Lawrence Rowe, 
Angelica Rufo, J. Constance Angwin, Arthur Josephson, Winston 
Hodge, Robert Ritchie, Dorothy Weathers. 

Garrison School. — Elma Ward, Adelaide M. Graves, Fanny 
Hermanson, Judith Johnson, Holger G. Lehtenin, Laura A. Kupsola, 
John Ward, Russell Keefe. 

Eastman School. — Donna Morrison (2), Richard L. Paige, Robert 
E. Paige, Jeannette Saben. 

Rumford School. — Charles Osbon, Themia Apostal, Thelma 
Parmenter, Ellen Grace, Adin M. Noyes, Eileen P. Palmer, Anna W. 

131 



132 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sargent, Nathaniel M. Mudgett, James Anton, Melba Stevenson, 
Norma Roy, Chester W. Geary, Dorothy E. Kennedy, Leonard P. 
Colgan, Roy Sandquist, Cleston R. Spaulding (2|), Clara E. Dearborn, 
Marion F. Holt (1|), Lucy D. O'Malley (2$), Doris A. Tappan, Iva E. 
Tuttle, Karl Kunberger (2), Henry Osbon. 

Kimball School. — Earl Cass, Woodrow Bartlett, Helen Sanborn, 
James Nelson, Alice Hook, Elizabeth Patten, Arthur D. Lockwood, 
Melvin W. Chase, Alvin Simonds, Harry E. Sundgren, Robert Potter. 

Penacook School. — Robert E. Coleman (2), J. Edward Cirves, 
Richard S. Parker, Barbara V. Peabody, Wilfred Mercier, Margaret 
Johnson (2), John Higgins, Richard Brunei, Beatrice Lewis, Josephine 
Roy, Paul Silver. 

Franklin School. — Alice Gorham, Robert Gorham, Alice Hoadley, 
Janet Kennedy, Earl Craft, Ada H. Berry, Margaret R. Fitzgerald, 
Hazel J. Paulin. 

Dewey School. — Victor Flamand, Charles E. Moors, Jr., George 
W. Thompson (3), F. Evelyn Chase. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Muriel P. Giguere, Evelyn Giguere, 
Hazel G. Curtis (1$). 

Cogswell School. — None. 

Millville School. — None. 

Iron Works School. — Hazel Barnes, Howard Oakes. 

Mountain School. — None. 

Riverhill School. — Rebecca Chamberlin. 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the sixth day of April, 1922, 
at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the following 
subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years, to fill the vacancies arising 
from the expiration of the term of office of Harry H. Dudley, 
Lillian R. Shepard, and Harry F. Lake, and to choose one 
member to hold office for one year, to fill the vacancy arising 
from the resignation of Omar S. Swenson. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year. 

8. To see if the district will vote to erect a suitable build- 
ing on the Millville School lot to take the place of the present 

133 



134 CITY OF CONCORD. 

two-room building thereon, known as the Millville School, 
raise and appropriate money, appoint a committee with 
power to erect the same and authorize a contract with the 
City of Concord for its credit as contemplated by the laws 
of the State of New Hampshire and take such other and 
further action as may be necessary to the completion of the 
premises. 

9. To see if the district will vote to erect a frame addition 
to the building of the Morrill School of Mechanic Arts on 
the east side thereof, raise and appropriate money and 
further provide for the erection of the same. 

10. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this eighth day of March, 1922. 

H. H. DUDLEY, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
HARRY F. LAKE, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the sixteenth day of March, 1922, I 
posted a copy of the written warrant attested by the Board 
of Education of said district, at the Police Station in the 
City of Concord, N. H., being a public place within said 
district, and a like attested copy at the place of meeting 
within named. 

(Signed) LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 135 

March 29, 1922. 

Personally appeared before me, on this date, the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
signed by him is true. 

(Signed) ISAAC HILL, 

Justice of the Peace. 



A true copy of the warrant, return of service, and certif- 
icate of oath. 

Attest: 

RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



RECORD OF ANNUAL MEETING 



In accordance with the foregoing warrant a meeting of the 
legal voters of Union School District was held at the City 
Auditorium in Concord, N. H., on Thursday, April 6, 1922, 
at 7.30 o'clock p. m. 

The meeting was called to order and the warrant read by 
Louis C. Merrill, moderator. 

On motion of Dr. Charles Duncan the moderator was in- 
structed to cast one ballot for Ray Burkett for temporary 
clerk, and he was declared duly elected and took the oath 
of office as temporary clerk before Louis C. Merrill, Justice 
of the Peace. 

Article 1. On motion of Harry F. Lake the temporary 
clerk was instructed to cast one ballot for Louis C. Merrill 
for moderator for the ensuing year, and he was declared 
duly elected and took the oath of office before Harry F. 
Lake, Esq., Justice of the Peace. 

Article 2. On motion of Dr. Charles Duncan the 
moderator was instructed to cast one ballot for Ray E. 
Burkett for clerk of the district for the ensuing year, and he 
was declared duly elected and took the oath of office before 
Harry F. Lake, Esq., Justice of the Peace. 

Article 3. On motion of John P. George it was unan- 
imously 

Voted: That the report of the Board of Education as 
printed be accepted and placed on file. 

Article 4. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf it was 

Voted: To proceed to the election by ballot of three mem- 
bers of the Board of Education to serve for a term of three 

136 



SCHOOL REPORT. 137 

years to fill vacancies arising from expirations of terms of 
office, and the election of one member to serve for one year 
to fill the unexpired term of Omar S. Swenson, resigned; 
that the polls remain open for the reception of ballots until 
8.45 o'clock; and that the moderator appoint three tellers 
to sort and count the ballots. 

The moderator appointed as tellers Messrs. Thomas Fox, 
Harry R. Cressey and William H. Foster. 

On motion of Henry H. Metcalf the meeting proceeded to 
the consideration of the remaining articles of the warrant. 

Article 5. On motion of Henry E. Chamberlin, duly 
seconded, Henry H. Metcalf and John P. George were 
unanimously elected auditors of the district for the ensuing 
year. 

Article 6. On motion of Joseph S. Otis, duly seconded, 
it was unanimously 

Voted: That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, Supervisory Union No. 8, the sum of 
fifteen thousand six hundred seventy-five dollars ($15,675), 
of which sum ten thousand dollars ($10,000) shall be appro- 
priated for the pay ment of the bonds maturing May 1, 1922, 
and July 1, 1922, and five thousand six hundred seventy-five 
dollars ($5,675) for the payment of the interest on its bonded 
debt accruing during the year. 

Article 7. On motion of Rev. W. Stanley Emery, duly 
seconded, it was unanimously 

Voted: That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, Supervisory Union No. 8, and appro- 
priated for the support and the general administration of 
the public schools for the ensuing year, such a sum as in 
addition to the amount required by law, will amount to the 
sum of two hundred thirty-three thousand, six hundred 
ninety-eight and 03/100 dollars ($233,698.03). 



138 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Article 8. On motion of Harry F. Lake, duly seconded, 
it was unanimously 

Voted: That a school building be erected and equipped 
upon the Millville School lot with accommodations for at 
least one hundred twenty pupils in place of the building now 
standing on said lot and that the Board of Education of 
Union School District be and hereby are appointed a com- 
mittee with authority to determine the location of said school 
building upon said Millville School lot, to erect and furnish 
said building, to employ architects, agents and such other 
assistants as they may require and in the name and on be- 
half of Union School District to do such other acts and enter 
into such contracts and agreements as may be necessary to 
carry this vote into effect ; that the sum of thirty thousand 
dollars ($30,000) be and hereby is appropriated for the 
erection and completion of said building; that the indebted- 
ness of the district arising from the erection, equipment, 
and completion of said building be funded at a rate of inter- 
est not exceeding four and one-half per cent (4|%) per 
annum and that a sufficient sum of money be assessed upon 
the polls and ratable estates within Union School District 
on the first day of April in each year thereafter to meet the 
payments of the interest and the principal of said indebted- 
ness at the date or dates of maturity of principal and interest 
as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter provided; and that 
the money obtained by said assessments be and hereby is 
appropriated to make said payments; that the district 
request the City of Concord to aid in funding the indebted- 
ness of the district arising from the construction and furnish- 
ing of said school building as the city is authorized to do by 
law, provided said city will borrow the money necessary for 
the purpose set forth in this vote and will allow the district 
to have the use of the money so borrowed, and further, that, 
if this request is complied with, the district will seasonably 
pay the city sufficient sums of money to enable the city to 
meet the payments of the principal and interest upon this 
indebtedness so created, as the same may fall clue, and all 



SCHOOL REPORT. 139 

incidental expenses, and will apply the money to be raised as 
herein provided to the payments aforesaid; and said com- 
mittee is hereby further authorized to make and request of 
the city the date or dates when the principal of said indebt- 
edness and the interest thereon shall mature and do all 
other acts and things necessary to carry this vote into 
effect. 

Article 9. On motion of Ernest P. Roberts, duly 
seconded, and after discussion it was unanimously 

Voted: That a permanent brick building be erected on 
the east side of and contiguous to the Morrill School of 
Mechanic Arts for the better accommodation of the pupils; 
that the Board of Education of Union School District be and 
hereby are appointed a committee with authority to erect 
and furnish said building, to employ architects, agents and 
such other assistants as they may require and in the name 
and on behalf of Union School District to do such other acts 
and enter into such contracts and agreements as may be 
necessary to carry this vote into effect ; that the sum of ten 
thousand dollars ($10,000) be and hereby is appropriated 
for the erection and completion of said building; that the 
indebtedness of the district arising from the erection, equip- 
ment, and completion of said building be funded at a rate of 
interest not exceeding four and one-half per cent (4|%) per 
annum and that a sufficient sum of money be assessed upon 
the polls and ratable estates within Union School District 
on the first day of April in each year thereafter to meet the 
paj r ments of the interest and the principal of said indebted- 
ness at the date or dates of maturity of principal and interest 
as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter provided; and that 
the money obtained by said assessments be and hereby is 
appropriated to make said payments; that the district re- 
quest the City of Concord to aid in funding the indebtedness 
of the district arising from the construction and furnishing 
of said school building as the city is authorized to do by law, 
provided said city will borrow the money necessary for the 
purpose set forth in this vote and will allow the district to 



140 CITY OF CONCORD. 

have the use of the money so borrowed, and further, that, if 
this request is complied with, the district will seasonably- 
pay the city sufficient sums of money to enable the city to 
meet the payments of the principal and interest upon this 
indebtedness so created, as the same may fall due, and all 
incidental expenses, and will apply the money to be raised 
as herein provided to the payments aforesaid; and said 
committee is hereby further authorized to make and request 
of the city the date or dates when the principal of said in- 
debtedness and the interest thereon shall mature and do 
all other acts and things necessary to carry this vote into 
effect. 

At 8.45 p. m. the polls were declared closed, and the 
moderator announced the result of the votes for members of 
the Board of Education as follows: 

For three years: 

Total number of ballots cast, 419 

Necessary for a choice, 210 

Bierne Lay had 1 

Mrs. Arthur P. Morrill had 1 

Miss Grace Morrill " 1 

Mrs. Amsden " 2 

Mrs. Bancroft " 2 

Dorothy B. Jackson 381 

Harry F. Lake " 411 

Carl H. Foster " 419 

and Dorothy B. Jackson, Harry F. Lake and Carl H. 
Foster were declared duly elected members of the Board of 
Education for a term of three years. 

For one year: 

Total number of ballots cast, 416 

Necessary for a choice, 209 

Bennett Batchelder had 416 

and was declared duly elected a member of the Board of 
Education for a term of one year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 141 

Article 10. Rev. R. W. Barstow offered the following 
resolution and moved its adoption: 

Resolved, That it is the opinion of this meeting that the 
present eleven-year system be terminated at the end of the 
current school year, or as soon thereafter as possible, and 
that the Board of Education be requested forthwith to put 
into operation a twelve-year course which shall consist of 
an eight year's Elementary Course (excluding the Kinder- 
garten Course) and an additional four years' High School 
Course; the additional year to be added below the present 
Grade Seven. 

James W. Tucker moved that the resolution be amended 
by adding at the end thereof the following: "Provided that 
such a course is deemed advisable by the Board of Educa- 
tion after a careful study of the existing local school system." 

On a viva voce vote the moderator declared the amend- 
ment rejected. 

After discussion of the resolution a ballot was taken and 
the moderator announced the result as follows: 

Total number of ballots cast, 739 

In favor of the resolution, 359 

Against the resolution, 380 

and the moderator declared the resolution not adopted. 

On motion of Harry F. Lake the meeting adjourned. 

A true record. Attest: 

RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



SPECIAL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the 27th day of July, at 7 
o'clock in the evening, to act upon the following subjects: 

1. To see if the district will vote to amend the vote, called 
for under Article 9 of the annual school meeting warrant 
posted March 16, 1922, and voted at the annual school 
meeting held April 6, 1922, by striking out the words "east" 
and "contiguous" and substituting in place thereof the 
words "west" and "joined" respectively so that the vote 
thus amended shall read as follows : 

Voted: That a permanent brick building be erected on 
the west side of and joined to the Morrill School of Mechanic 
Arts for the better accommodation of the pupils; that the 
Board of Education of Union School District be and hereby 
are appointed a committee with authority to erect and 
furnish said building, to employ architects, agents and such 
other assistants as they may require and in the name and on 
behalf of Union School District to do such other acts and 
enter into such contracts and agreements as may be nec- 
essary to carry this vote into effect; that the sum of ten 
thousand dollars ($10,000) be and hereby is appropriated 
for the erection and completion of said building; that the 
indebtedness of the district arising from the erection, equip- 
ment, and completion of said building, be funded at a rate 
of interest not exceeding four and one-half per cent (4|%) 
per annum and that a sufficient sum of money be assessed 
upon the polls and ratable estates within Union School 

142 



SCHOOL REPORT. 143 

District on the first day of April in each year thereafter to 
meet the payments of the interest and the principal of said 
indebtedness at the date or dates of maturity of principal 
and interest as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter pro- 
vided ; and that the money obtained by said assessments be 
and hereby is appropriated to make said payments; that 
the district request the City of Concord to aid in funding 
the indebtedness of the district arising from the construction 
and furnishing of said school building as the city is author- 
ized to do by law, provided said city will borrow the money 
necessary for the purpose set forth in this vote and will 
allow the district to have the use of the money so borrowed, 
and further, that, if this request is complied with, the dis- 
trict will seasonably pay the city sufficient sums of money 
to enable the city to meet the payments of the principal and 
interest upon this indebtedness so created as the same may 
fall clue, and all incidental expenses, and will apply the 
money to be raised as herein provided to the payments 
aforesaid; and said committee is hereby further authorized 
to make and request of the city the date or dates when the 
principal of said indebtedness and the interest thereon shall 
mature and do all other acts and things necessary to carry 
this vote into effect. 

2. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 11th day of July, 1922. 

JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
C. H. FOSTER, 
HARRY F. LAKE, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the 12th day of July, 1922, I posted a 
copy of the written warrant attested by the Board of Edu- 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

cation of said district at a place of meeting within named, 
and a like attested copy at the Police Station, in the City of 
Concord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



Concord, N. H., July 12, 1922. 

Then personally appeared before me, on this date, the 
said Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

I. REED GOURLEY, 

Justice of the Peace. 



RECORD OF SPECIAL MEETING. 



In accordance with the foregoing warrant a special meet- 
ing of the legal voters of Union School District was held at 
the City Auditorium in Concord, N. H., on Thursday, July 
27, 1922, at 7 o'clock p. m. 

In the absence of the clerk, on motion of Mr. Carl H. 
Foster, the moderator was instructed to cast one ballot for 
Mr. Francis T. Clayton for clerk pro tern of the meeting, 
and he was declared duly elected and took the oath of office 
as clerk pro tern before Louis C. Merrill, Justice of the 
Peace. 

The moderator then read the warrant for the meeting. 

Harry F. Lake, Esq., moved that the vote adopted under 
article 9 of the warrant for the meeting of the School Dis- 
trict held April 6, 1922, be amended by striking out the 
words "east" and "contiguous" and substituting in place 
thereof the words "west" and "joined" respectively, so 
that the vote thus amended shall read as follows: 

Voted: That a permanent brick building be erected on 
the west side of and joined to the Morrill School of Mechanic 
Arts for the better accommodation of the pupils; that the 
Board of Education of Union School District be and hereby 
are appointed a committee with authority to erect and 
furnish said building, to employ architects, agents and such 
other assistants as they may require and in the name and 
on behalf of Union School District to do such other acts 
and enter into such contracts and agreements as may be 
necessary to carry this vote into effect; that the sum of ten 
thousand dollars (810,000) be and hereby is appropriated 
for the erection and completion of said building; that the 
10 145 



146 CITY OF CONCORD. 

indebtedness of the district arising from the erection, equip- 
ment, and completion of said building, be funded at a rate 
of interest not exceeding four and one-half per cent (4|%) 
per annum and that a sufficient sum of money be assessed 
upon the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District on the first day of April in each year thereafter to 
meet the payments of the interest and the principal of said 
indebtedness at the date or dates of maturity of principal 
and interest as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter pro- 
vided ; and that the money obtained by said assessments be 
and hereby is appropriated to make said payments; that 
the district request the City of Concord to aid in funding the 
indebtedness of the district arising from the construction 
and furnishing of said school building as the city is author- 
ized to do by law, provided said city will borrow the money 
necessary for the purpose set forth in this vote and will 
allow the district to have the use of the money so borrowed, 
and further, that, if this request is complied with, the dis- 
trict will seasonably pay the city sufficient sums of money 
to enable the city to meet the payments of the principal and 
interest upon this indebtedness so created, as the same may 
fall due, and all incidental expenses, and will apply the 
money to be raised as herein provided to the payments 
aforesaid; and said committee is hereby further authorized 
to make and request of the city the date or dates when the 
principal of said indebtedness and the interest thereon shall 
mature and do all other acts and things necessary to carry 
this vote into effect. 

After discussion by Hon. N. E. Martin and Hon. James 
W. Remick in support of a petition presented by Mr. Martin 
in opposition to the proposed change, and explanations and 
discussion by Mr. Lake and Mr. Rundlett, Mr. Martin 
moved that the motion of Mr. Lake be indefinitely post- 
poned, which motion was seconded. 

The moderator called for a rising vote, and appointed 
Hon. Henry E. Chamberlin to count the votes. The result 
showed 87 in favor of indefinite postponement and 24 



SCHOOL REPORT. 147 

against, and the motion to indefinitely postpone was de- 
clared adopted. 

On motion of Hon. N. E. Martin, duly seconded, it was 
voted to adjourn. 

A true record. Attest: 

FRANCIS T. CLAYTON, 

Clerk -pro tern. 



SPECIAL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, N. H., 
qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet in the Parker School Hall 
on School Street, in said district, on the twenty-ninth day 
of November, 1922, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act 
upon the following subjects: 

1 . To see if the district will ratify and confirm the agree- 
ment dated November 13, 1922, between the City of Con- 
cord and the Board of Education of Union School District 
relating to the issue of forty thousand dollars ($40,000) 
bonds of the City of Concord, the proceeds of which are to 
be used by the district in erecting and completing a new 
school building upon the Millville School lot and the addi- 
tion to the Morrill School building on the east side and to 
ratify and confirm all other acts of the Board of Education 
taken with reference to the said bonds. 

2. To transact any other business that may legally come 
before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this fourteenth day of November, 
1922. 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 
148 



SCHOOL REPORT. 149 

I certify that on the fourteenth day of November, 1922, 
I posted a copy of the written warrant attested by the 
Board of Education of said district at the place of meeting 
within named, and a like attested copy at the Police Station 
in the City of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said 
district. 

(Signed) LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



Concord, N. H., Nov. 20, 1922. 

Personally appeared before me, on this date, the said 
Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above certificate 
by him signed is true. 

(Signed) WM. S. HUNTINGTON, 

Justice of the Peace. 



RECORD OF SPECIAL MEETING. 



A special meeting of Union School District was held in 
Parker School Hall in Concord, N. H., on Wednesday, 
November 29, 1922, at 7.30 p. m., in accordance with the 
foregoing warrant. 

The moderator read the warrant for the meeting, and 
stated that the proceedings of previous meetings would be 
published in the annual report and their reading would be 
dispensed with unless there was objection. 

Article 1. Mr. Harry F. Lake offered the following 
vote and moved its adoption: 

Voted: That the agreement dated November 13, 1922, 
between the City of Concord and Union School District 
acting through the properly qualified members of the Board 
of Education, relating to the issue of forty thousand dollars 
($40,000) of bonds of the City of Concord, the proceeds of 
which are to be used by said Union School District to the 
extent of thirty thousand dollars ($30,000) in erecting the 
new school building in the Millville District, so called, and 
ten thousand dollars ($10,000)in building the annex to the 
Morrill Training School building, and all other actions of 
the Board of Education and its respective building com- 
mittees taken in reference to the said bonds, be and the same 
are hereby ratified, approved and confirmed as the acts of 
the district, said contract being as follows: 

Whereas, Union School District in the City of Concord, 
New Hampshire, at a meeting duly called and held at the 
Auditorium, in the City of Concord, on the evening of 
Thursday, April 6, 1922, passed votes of which the following 
are copies. 

150 



SCHOOL REPORT. 151 

(1) Voted: That a school building be erected and equipped 
upon the Millville School lot with accommodations for at 
least one hundred twenty pupils in place of the building now 
standing on said lot and that the Board of Education of 
Union School District be and hereby are appointed a com- 
mittee with authority to determine the location of said 
school building upon said Millville School lot, to erect and 
furnish said building, to employ architects, agents and such 
other assistants as they may require and in the name and 
on behalf of Union School District to do such other acts and 
enter into such contracts and agreements as may be nec- 
essary to carry this vote into effect; that the sum of thirty 
thousand dollars ($30,000) be and hereby is appropriated 
for the erection and completion of said building; that the 
indebtedness of the district arising from the erection, equip- 
ment, and completion of said building, be funded at a rate 
of interest not exceeding four and one-half per cent (4|%) 
per annum and that a sufficient sum of money be assessed 
upon the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District on the first day of April in each year thereafter to 
meet the payments of the interest and the principal of said 
indebtedness at the date or dates of maturity of principal 
and interest as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter pro- 
vided; and that the money obtained by said assessments be 
and hereby is appropriated to make said payments; that 
the district request the City of Concord to aid in funding 
the indebtedness of the district arising from the construction 
and furnishing of said school building as the city is author- 
ized to do by law, provided said city will borrow the money 
necessary for the purpose set forth in this vote and will 
allow the district to have the use of the money so borrowed, 
and further, that, if this request is complied with, the dis- 
trict will seasonably pay the city sufficient sums of money 
to enable the city to meet the payments of the principal and 
interest upon this indebtedness so created, as the same may 
fall due, and all incidental expenses, and will apply the 
money to be raised as herein provided to the payments 
aforesaid; and said committee is hereby further authorized 



152 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to make and request of the city the date or dates when the 
principal of said indebtedness and the interest thereon shall 
mature and do all other acts and things necessary to carry 
this vote into effect. 

(2) Voted: That a permanent brick building be erected 
on the east side of and contiguous to the Morrill School of 
Mechanic Arts for the better accommodation of the pupils; 
that the Board of Education of Union School District be and 
hereby are appointed a committee with authority to erect 
and furnish said building, to employ architects, agents and 
such other assistants as they may require and in the name 
and on behalf of Union School District to do such other acts 
and enter into such contracts and agreements as may be 
necessary to carry this vote into effect; that the sum of ten 
thousand dollars ($10,000) be and hereby is appropriated 
for the erection and completion of said building; that the 
indebtedness of the district arising from the erection, equip- 
ment, and completion of said building, be funded at a rate 
of interest not exceeding four and one-half per cent (4f%) 
per annum and that a sufficient sum of money be assessed 
upon the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District on the first day of April in each year thereafter 
to meet the payments of the interest and the principal of 
said indebtedness at the date or dates of maturity of prin- 
cipal and interest as the same may be fixed, as hereinafter 
provided; and that the money obtained by said assessments 
be and hereby is appropriated to make said payments; that 
the district request the City of Concord to aid in funding 
the indebtedness of the district arising from the construction 
and furnishing of said school building as the city is author- 
ized to do by law, provided said city will borrow the money 
necessary for the purpose set forth in this vote and will 
allow the district to have the use of the money so borrowed, 
and further, that, if this request is complied with, the dis- 
trict will seasonably pay the city sufficient sums of money 
to enable the city to meet the payments of the principal and 
interest upon this indebtedness so created, as the same may 



SCHOOL REPORT. 153 

fall due, and all incidental expenses, and will apply the 
money to be raised as herein provided to the payments 
aforesaid; and said committee is hereby further authorized 
to make and request of the city the date or dates when the 
principal of said indebtedness and the interest thereon shall 
mature, and do all other acts and things necessary to carry 
this vote into effect. 

And Whereas, the Board of Aldermen of the City of 
Concord, in compliance with requests contained in the 
votes above copied, on Monday, the 11th day of September, 
1922, passed an ordnance for the issue of city bonds to raise 
the money Required by said district as above said, said 
ordnance being as follows: 

Resolution, Authorizing the City of Concord to borrow 
money in aid of Union School District, in said Concord. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for the new 
Millville School building and the addition to the Manual 
Training School, the city borrow the sum of forty thousand 
dollars ($40,000) and issue bonds therefor, as provided in 
Chapter 89 of the Public Statutes and Chapter 129 of the 
Laws of 1917, and that the mayor and city treasurer be and 
hereby are authorized to make and execute, sign and affix 
the seal of said city thereto, bonds for the sum of forty 
thousand dollars ($40,000), in accordance with the request 
and upon the terms contained in the vote of the district 
passed at its annual meeting held April 6, 1922, — said bonds 
to be forty in number, and of the denomination of one 
thousand dollars ($1,000) each, to be dated October 1, 1922, 
and payable to bearer, with interest coupons attached, bear- 
ing interest at a rate not in excess of four and one-quarter 
per cent (4|%) per annum, payable semi-annually, on the 
first day of April and the first day of October in each year ; 
said bonds to become due and payable serially, $2,000 to be 



154 CITY OF CONCORD. 

payable the first day of October, 1923, and $2,000 on the 
first day of October of each succeeding year until and in- 
cluding October 1, 1942; the principal of said bonds and 
the interest coupons attached to be made payable at the 
National Shawmut Bank of Boston, Massachusetts, or at 
the office of the city treasurer, in Concord, New Hampshire. 

Section 2. The city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
procure proposals for the sale of the bonds hereby author- 
ized, and whichever bid seems for the best interest of the 
city shall be accepted by him, provided the same is approved 
by the Finance Committee. The right is reserved, however, 
to reject any and all bids. 

Section 3. The mayor and city treasurer are hereby 
authorized to execute in the name and on behalf of the city 
such agreements in writing between it and said district as 
they may deem necessary and advisable to protect the rights 
of the respective parties growing out of this transaction. 

Section 4- This Resolution shall take effect upon its 
passage. Now, Therefore, this is to witness: 

First: That in accordance with the said Resolution the 
City of Concord will issue and deliver to said district its 
bonds to the amount of forty thousand dollars ($40,000), in 
the denomination of one thousand dollars ($1,000), dated 
October 1, 1922, drawing interest at a rate not to exceed 
four and one-half per cent (4|%) per annum, payable semi- 
annually, on the first day of April and the first day of 
October of each year. 

Second: That said district is to have the use of the money 
received from the sale of said bonds until said bonds become 
due. 

Third: That said district will seasonably pay to said city 
sufficient sums of money to enable the city to meet the pay- 
ments of principal and interest of said bonds as the same 
become due, and incidental expenses growing out of their 



SCHOOL REPORT. 155 

issue;' and will apply the money to be raised under said 
votes to said payments. 

Fourth: That said district will indemnify the said city 
and save the same from all loss, costs, and expenses to which 
it may be subjected by reason of making and issuing said 
bonds. 

Fifth : That when said district has fulfilled its agreements 
contained in Articles 3 and 4 above, it shall be discharged 
from all further liability to said city by virtue of this trans- 
action within referred to. 

In witness whereof, the said parties have set their 
corporate names to this agreement in duplicate and inter- 
changeably delivered the same this 13th day of November, 
1922, by their respective agents duly authorized. 

CITY OF CONCORD, N. H., 

By Henry E. Chamberlin, Mayor. 
By Carl H. Foster, Treasurer. 

UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT, 

By Joseph S. Otis, 

Chairman Millville School 
Building Committee. 
Harry F. Lake, 

Chairman School Board. 
Charles Duncan, 

Chairman Morrill School Annex 
Building Committee. 

The motion being duly seconded, on a viva voce vote the 
motion was declared unanimously adopted. 

On motion duly made and seconded it was 

Voted: To adjourn. 

A true record. Attest: 

RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



156 CITY OF CONCORD. 



IN MEMORIAM 

DR. CHARLES R. WALKER 

Born at Concord, N. H., February 13, 1852 

Died at Concord, N. H., April 22, 1922 



Member of the Board of Water Commis- 
sioners, 1915-1922 



Resolved: That the Board of Water 
Commissioners at this time record their 
appreciation of the faithful services of Dr. 
Charles R. Walker, who held it an honor to 
serve his native city as a member of the 
Board of Water Commissioners. 

They also desire to express their deep 
sense of loss by his death, of a valued friend 
and wise counsellor. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1922. 



to March 31 


1926 


to March 31 


1926 


to March 31 


1925 


to March 31 


1925 


to March 31 


1924 


to March 31 


1924 


to March 31 


1923 


to April 22 


1922 


to March 31 


1923 



Board of Water Commissioners. 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
OLIVER J. PELREN, 
CHARLES R. WALKER, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, President. 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 
157 



158 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights 
Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000 . 00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 5,000.00 

flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 

for land at Penacook Lake, 94,184.95 

C. H. Amsden, water and 

flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of Tor- 
rent Aqueduct Associa- 
tion, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-houses and appur- 
tenances, 39,267.74 

conduit and upper gate- 
house, 29,818.94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to 
the reservoir, fire main 
through North and South 
Main Streets, and high 
service main from Pena- 
cook Street to Stark 
Street, Penacook) , 182,241 . 70 

distribution pipe, 421,134.20 

service pipe, 75,636.19 

reservoir, including land, 45,044 . 09 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



159 



Cost of pumping station, shop, 

stable and storehouse, in- 
cluding land, $29,743 . 35 
pumping machinery, 20,706 . 72 
engineering and superintend- 
ence, 14,913.12 
incidentals, 6,875.97 



Cost of works, January 


1, 1923, 


$1,142,442.58 


Less amount received for lumber, land and 




building- 


s sold, 




7,919.11 




$1,134,523.47 


Bonds of the city have been issued to pay 


a part of said 


cost, of which the following are still outstanding: 


Due. 




Rate. 


Amount. 


January 1 


1923, 


3*, 


$3,000.00 


January 1 


1923, 


4| 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1924, 


3£ 




15,000.00 


January 1 


1924, 


4| 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1925, 


4* 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1926, 


^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1927, 


^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1928, 


4i 

^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1929, 


4i 

*2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1930, 


4 1 

^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1931, 


4i 

^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1932, 


4 1 

^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1933, 


4i 
^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1934, 


4| 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1935, 


4§ 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1936, 


4i 

^2 




18,000.00 


January 1 


1937, 


4i 

^2 




18,000.00 






$288,000.00 



160 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY OF CONCORD, WATER WORKS INCOME. 



Investment Account. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, $25,000.00 

Invested in: 

U. S. First Liberty Loan, con- 
verted, 4|% bonds, $5,000 . 00 
U. S. Third Liberty Loan, 4\% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan, \\% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 



CITY OF CONCORD, WATER WORKS PROFIT. 



Income Account. 
Income received, 1922, $1,207.54 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 161 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., February 24, 1923. 
To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord: 

We hereby submit the annual report of the superintendent 
for the year 1922 of the condition of the water system of the 
city. 

The report shows the financial condition of the system and 
work done during the past year and many other details, and 
is so complete that nothing remains to be added. 

The water system is in its usual first-class condition and 
giving perfect satisfaction. 

Respectfully submitted, 
NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
OLIVER J. PELREN, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, ex-officio, 

Board of Water Commissioners* 



162 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the fifty-first annual report of 
the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1922. 



Receipts. 




For water from consumers at fixed 




rates, 


$10,314.41 


For water from consumers by meter 




rates, 


69,469.02 


From delinquents, 


96.65 


For water for building purposes, 


233 . 97 


For wood and farm lands, 


294.00 


For labor and materials furnished on 




private fire lines, 


1,090.12 


For pipe and stock sold and labor, 


615.36 


For old iron and rubber, 


25.04 


From refund on bill, 


1.75 

too i ift qo 




tJPO^, iTtU . 0£ 


Deduct abatements, 


49.90 


Net receipts for 1922, 


$82,090.42 


There has also been furnished the city free of charge the 


following use of water: 




Public buildings, 


$179.50 


Parks and playgrounds, 


60.00 


Cemeteries, 


108.00 


Street department, 


774 . 00 


Drinking fountains and watering 




troughs, 


280.00 


Sewer flush tanks, 


45.00 


470 fire hydrants at $25, 


11,750.00 




$13,196.50 



water department. 163 

Expenditures, 
maintenance account. 
General care and maintenance: 

Salaries and labor, $8,947 . 76 
Team account, 129.79 
Automobile account, 1,318.64 
Miscellaneous supplies and re- 
pairs, 560.23 
Tools, 435.76 
Repair of buildings, 22.66 
Telephone and lighting, 77.15 
Insurance, 540 . 53 
Repairs to sidetrack, 125.53 
Incidentals, 249 . 63 



Office expenses: 

Salaries and clerical work, 
Postage and printing, 
Miscellaneous supplies, 
Repairs, 
Telephone, 

Care and repair of hydrants: 
Stock, 
Labor, 

Care and repair of meters: 
Stock, 
Labor, 

Relaying service pipes: 
Stock, 
Labor, 



$1,626.84 


ilAj^KJI . UO 


359.54 




234.45 




9.40 




32.59 






2,262.82 




$82.44 




581.27 






663.71 


$259.45 


1,229.63 






1,489.08 




$330.64 




1,559.63 


1 QQO 97 



164 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Repairing leaks, labor, 








$338.46 


Work at head of lake, 








2,996.47 


Care of wood-lots, 








551.43 


Penacook Park, 








91.66 


Taxes, town of Webster, 








90.16 


Dodge service truck, 








950.00 


Ford truck chassis, 








"399.38 


Pumping station: 










Salaries, 






$1,619.00 




General supplies and 


repairs, 




120.56 




Telephone and lightir 


'g, 




59.96 




Electric pump: 










Power, 


$1,951 


.60 






Supplies and repairs, 202. 


28 






Heating, 


49 


.80 


2,203 . 68 










4,003 . 20 






Total maintenance account, 




< 


$28,134.32 


CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 




Distribution pipes: 










Stock, 






$3,761.90 




Labor, 






3,037.60 


$6,799.50 






Service pipes: 










Stock, 






$920.33 




Labor, 






1,000.44 


1,920.77 






Hydrants : 










Stock, 






$107.40 




Labor, 






102.98 


210.38 


Meters: 








Stock, 






$1,489.30 




Labor, 






168.46 





1,657.76 

Total construction account, $10,588.41 

Total expenditures 1922, $38,722 . 73 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 165 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Distribution pipes laid in 1922: 

Park Street, extended west from North Main Street, 62 
feet of 10-inch pipe. 

Hammond Street, east from Hall Street, 498 feet of 6-inch 
pipe, replacing 4-inch iron pipe. 

Giles Street, Warren to School Street, 770 feet of 6-inch 
pipe, replacing 770 feet of 4-inch cement-lined pipe. 

Dunklee Street, extended south from Pillsbury Street, 
193 feet of 6-inch pipe, replacing 93 feet of f-ihch. 

White Street, north from Rowell Street, 180 feet of 6-inch 
pipe, and south from Blanchard Street, 6 feet of 6-inch pipe; 
300 feet of 1-inch discontinued. 

Rowell Street, extended to White Street, 34 feet of 6-inch 
pipe. 

Bradley Street, Perkins to Penacook Street, 260 feet of 
6-inch pipe; 260 feet of 1-inch discontinued. 

Penacook Street, east from Bradley Street, 153 feet of 
6-inch pipe; 153 feet of 1-inch discontinued. 

Martin Street, Albin to Walker Street, 400 feet of 6-inch 
pipe; 182 feet discontinued. 

Walker Street, at Albin Street, 50 feet of 6-inch pipe, re- 
placing 50 feet of 4-inch. 

Washington Street, Rumford to Essex Street, 240 feet of 
6-inch pipe; 501 feet of 6-inch cement-lined pipe discon- 
tinued. 

Woodman Street, east from North Fruit Street, 254 feet 
of 4-inch pipe and 96 feet of 2-inch pipe, replacing 1-inch. 

Also 230 feet of 1-inch pipe. 

On hydrant branches, 14 feet of 8-inch pipe and 37 feet 
of 6-inch pipe; 11 feet of 4-inch iron and 14 feet of 6-inch ce- 
ment-lined pipe discontinued. 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
382,628 feet, or 72.50 miles. 

Nine gates were added during the year; one was dis- 
continued. 

Total number of gates now in use, 1,075. 



166 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Two new hydrants have been set as follows: On Holly 
Street, at southeast corner of Dunklee Street; on South 
Main Street, Penacook, near East Canal Street. 

One hydrant has been discontinued. Total number now 
in use, 471. 

Fifty-three services have been laid, consisting of 772 feet 
of f-inch; 357 feet of. 1-inch; 22 feet of It-inch; 40 feet of 
2-inch galvanized iron pipe; and 192 feet of 4-inch cast iron 
pipe. 

Four 6-inch high service connections have been made for 
hydrant and sprinkler service for the following premises: 
Eagle Hotel, Patriot Building, Boston Store and Concord 
Lumber Co. 

Sixteen services have been discontinued. Total number 
in use, 3,961. 

Total length of service pipes, 93,750 feet, or 17.75 miles. 

Eighty-five services have been relaid and curb valves 
placed on 43 old services. 

Sixty -six new meters have been set and 9 meters have 
been removed, making total now in use 2,767. 

The height of the water in Penacook Lake is shown by 
the following table : 

Height. 



January 


1, 


182.35 


July 1, 


185.55 


February 


1, 


182.60 


August 1 , 


185.00 


March 


1, 


182 . 50 


September 1, 


184.00 


April 


1, 


185.20 


October 1, 


183.00 


May 


1, 


185.30 


November 1, 


182.65 


June 


1, 


185.00 


December 1, 


182.20 



The lowest point in the height of the water was 181.85 
on December 31, the highest was 185.80 on June 25, mean 
height for the year was 183.98, which was .02 feet higher 
than the mean height for 1921. 

During the winter of 1921 and 1922 an inspection by the 
state forester of the white pine plantation and native growth 
on the Water Works property at Penacook Lake disclosed 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 167 

the fact that there was some infection of the white pine 
blister rust. The fact has been established that the blister 
rust is spread by traveling from pine to the gooseberry and 
currant bushes, and back from the gooseberry and currant 
bushes to the pine. In order to prevent further spread of 
the disease it is necessary to remove the currant and goose- 
berry bushes from the infected areas. This method was 
followed over the land in control of the Water Works, cover- 
ing an area of nearly 400 acres, and on a protective area of 
700 acres on land adjoining the Water Works property. 
The state furnished a foreman and five men, who went care- 
fully over the ground and removed 6,256 wild currant and 
gooseberry bushes. The cost of the foreman was borne by 
the state and the cost of men by the Water Works. The 
expense to the Water Works for the removal of these bushes 
was $174.05, at an average cost per acre of 22.3 cents. 

The highway at the head of the lake, which divides the 
small pond from the lake, has been raised about one foot 
and widened nearly ten feet. The embankments were 
rubbled with large field stones and a fence similar to that in 
use by the Highway Department was built on both sides of 
the road. 

It is planned to plant the adjoining land purchased from 
Mr. Robert Crowley to Norway pines this coming spring. 

I wish to make special mention of one branch of our 
work that is beginning to require a great deal of attention, 
and that is the relaying of service pipes. The condition of 
the pipes thus far removed would indicate that it would 
have been unwise to continue the services any longer. 

In conclusion I wish to express to the members of the 
board my thanks for their advice and hearty co-operation 
during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



168 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING 
STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 
P. R. Sanders, Superintendent: 

Sir: I would report that the pumping machinery at 
the pumping station, including boilers is in good working 
condition. 

Both steam pumps have been turned over every two 
weeks by high service pressure to see that they were in good 
working order. 

RECORD OF MOTOR-DRIVEN CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS. 



Months. 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July ,.. 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 

Daily average 



166 

154:50 

184:38 

148:20 

188:20 

151:15 

151:50 

157: 5 

156:25 

166 

153:40 

166:45 



1,945: 8 



5:21 
5:31 
5:57 
4:56 
6: 4 
5: 2 
4:53 
5: 4 
5:12 
5:11 
5: 7 
5:22 



5:19 



ate 
>> . 

Q 



13,400 
12,370 
14,260 
11,650 
14,840 
11,840 
11,940 
12,420 
12,370 
13,310 
12,280 
13,370 



154,080 



<= 8 
_2._ 

ti-3 
_ e 

■§> 



s,s:-i,(Hl(l 
893,000 
6S7.0III) 
,970,000 
,000,000 
,131,000 
,096,000 
,369,000 
,592,000 
,420,000 
,413,000 



307,116,000 
841,413 



100 



6,288 
4,742 
4,740 
3.772 
982 



801 
2,002 
5,290 



28,617 
127 



Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. ROWELL, 

Engineer. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 169 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 

C. H. Foster, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water 

Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1922, $19,307.52 

P. R. Sanders, superintendent, 82,090.42 

$270,000 City of Concord, N. H., 
4|s, due Jan. 1, 1923, to Jan. 1, 
1937, at 100.78, 272,106.00 

Interest, two da}\s, 67.50 

$3,000 Victory 4f notes at 100.82, 3,024.60 

Interest, 41 . 69 

$5,000 First Liberty Loan con- 
verted 41s bonds, at 100.16, 5,008.00 

Interest, 12.84 

$1,000 City of Concord, N. H., 4% 

sewer refunding bond, matured, 1,000.00 

Transferred from income and in- 
vestment account by order of 
water commissioners, 11,167.23 

$393,825 . 80 

Expenditures. 

Interest on bonds, $13,022 . 50 

Bonds paid, $317,000, 317,000.00 

Orders paid, 38,744 . 23 

Cash on hand, 25,059 . 07 

$393,825 . 80 



170 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of the 

Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 
For fifteen months ending April 1, 
For the year ending April 1, 



For nine months ending December 31, 
For the year ending December 31, 



1874, 
1875, 
1876, 
1877, 
1878, 
1879, 
1880, 
1881, 
1881, 
1882, 
1883, 
1884, 
1885, 
1886, 
1887, 
1888, 
1889, 
1890, 
1891, 
1892, 
1893, 
1894, 
1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 



$4,431.10 
17,535.00 
16,921.24 
19,001.07 
20,763.03 
21,869.86 
22,451.53 
26,744.58 
25,534.01 
27,243.06 
28,255.48 
28,915.65 
30,222.54 
30,862.64 
34,047 . 52 
38,441.32 
40,237.53 
42,133.41 
46,075.16 
48,351.52 
52,299.66 
53,230.10 
55,343.19 
56,557.81 
55,156.42 
59,147.54 
*53,953.13 
*57,003.71 
62,253.61 
63,430.85 
65,088.45 
68,570.48 
71,076.44 
73,063.45 



* No hydrant rental this year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



171 



For the year ending December 31, 



1907, 
1908, 
1909, 
1910, 
1911, 
1912, 
1913, 
1914, 
1915, 
1916, 
1917, 
1918, 
1919, 
1920, 
1921, 
1922, 



Total receipts for 50 years, 



$73,782 . 64 
71,362.67 

*67,307.84 
68,673.71 
71,881.34 
76,145.13 
76,154.45 
74,422.15 
78,940.06 
75,052.72 
77,092.10 
78,077.15 
73,671.71 
78,589.63 
77,323.78 
82,090.42 

5,616,779.59 



Mean Height of Water Each Year. 



1873, 


175.86 


1887, 


179.04 


1874, 


179.50 


1888, 


181.96 


1875, 


180.00 


1889, 


180.91 


1876, 


180.28 


1890, 


181.90 


1877, 


176.46 


1891, 


180.00 


1878, 


179.50 


1892, 


174.32 


1879, 


179.74 


1893, 


173.38 


1880, 


175.30 


1894, 


172.81 


1881, 


174.70 


1895, 


171.15 


1882, 


179.15 


1896, 


178.96 


1883, 


176.40 


1897, 


183.33 


1884, 


178.18 


1898, 


184.31 


1885, 


176.80 


1899, 


183.49 


1886, 


178.10 


1900, 


183.09 



* No hydrant rental after 190S. 



172 CITY OF CONCORD. 



1901, 


183.86 


1912, 


178.86 


1902, 


184.98 


1913, 


179.20 


1903, 


184.75 


1914, 


179.55 


1904, 


184.40 


1915, 


180.00 


1905, 


183.37 


1916, 


184.15 


1906, 


183.94 


1917, 


183.81 


1907, 


183.59 


1918, 


181.84 


1908, 


183.41 


1919, 


183.32 


1909, 


181.40 


1920, 


184.28 


1910, 


180.22 


1921, 


183.96 


1911, 


177.60 


1922, 


183.98 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



173 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES. 



Streets. 


.5 o - 
— _ - 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


i. $ 


30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 

in. 


12- 
in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


fr- 
ill. 


4- 
in 


1*8 




2220 


























282 


























331 

13598 


1905 
58 


75 

75 














7 








147 












fi 


Gate-houses and layout 
















29 




240 


2902* 




42 


20 












5 


Pumping station and 














8 


Abbott 




















23 
458 


349 

























1 


Albin 
















785 
776 




1 




















450 
2492 


505 


2 


















4 














2182 








1 




















724 

5 

2145 

265 

475 
1781 

590 


689 
250 

245 


2 






















1 






















3 


Blake 




















2 






















1 






















1 






















1 








































1577 
327 

2052 




260 
1123 


4 


















1 
















2278 


3 


















6 
763 
1077 


154 


1 


















508 




5 


















2 


















3529 


2690 


14 


















306 
585 


56 
516 

547 


1 






















2 






















1 






















265 
1600 

196 
1663 


1 




















21 


7 


Clarke 




































1942 


180 




3 














2100 




1 




















1593 
670 
422 
19 
590 
387 
456 

1977 

1648 
265 
400 
550 
270 
388 
587 
262 
165 

1187 

343 


286 

836 

242 

92 

400 
607 


5 






















2 






















2 






















2 






















2 






















2 






















1 






















4 






















4 






















1 






















1 






















1 


Elm 




















4 






















1 






















2 






















1 












































1066 


3 




















1000 


4 




























1045 
















1 


Fiske Road 


















750 




1 



174 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 


us , . 

OS O ^ 

mo a 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 




30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


is 
























225 

590 

88 


1 






















628 

180 

1317 

285 

























1 
















2166 


1546 

438 




12 
















3 


















2 






















1078 
2874 


1 






















3 


Fuller 










































194 


1 


Gas 
















550 




1 


Giles 
















300 


858 
709 
840 


210 


4 




















1 


Glen 




















?, 








































431 




1755 
1093 
2375 


7 


















4 


Hall 
















1621 
905 


1068 


3 


Hall's Court 
















1 




















498 


287 
600 
230 
329 
760 

793 
311 


1 






















?, 






















240 
4 

15 
982 
99 
312 
710 
646 
362 
615 
498 
213 
589 
1332 
1576 


1 






















1 






















9 


High 
















27 




5 


















2 




















69 


?, 


Holly- 


















1 


Holt 




















1 






















1 






















1 













































1 








381 








120 






1 


















1 






















3 






















1 




















207 




1 




















165 
400 
350 
465 
358 
1550 


























334 
357 
























1 




















1216 


1 


















•360 


4 


















2 














380 


1311 






3 




















367 
300 

3650 

3S2 
330 


2 




















508 


726 

38 

1260 

482 

430 


S 








4209 
300 










5125 
5179 


11 










2596 


1026 


1373 


15 








1 






















2 






















1 






















400 

738 
1729 

124 
26 

860 
1289 
























2604 
1294 


•i 






















6 


Mill Road, S. P. School 


















750 


3 


















4 






















■> 






















2 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



175 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 


* . • 

MO o 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 




30- 

in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
lii. 


-O bC 
2 






















700 
516 


324 


f, 






















1 






















1 




















1016 






Oak 




















305 

229 

814 

3446 

460 
300 

"480 
531 


1 




















19 
























1 


OldS.MillR'd.S.P.S. 






















9 






















620 
596 
601 
380 
584 

2448 
616 

2215 


1 


Palm 




















1 


Park 
















62 




3 


















1 


Pearl 




















2 














300 




2457 




9 














3 






















4 






















?, 
























1 






















2493 
985 


1 




















681 


4 




















6 
















10791 


3546 


292 


185 


18 
















1 






















661 
800 
584 
1012 
1320 


? 












































195 


1 






















1 













































1 






















176 


1 
















9 


15 
5202 


3502 
708 


17 
















575 
210 
1655 
210 


223 

388 


10 


















1 






















1 






















1 


Short 




















1 


South 














4036 


2422 
390 


26 
2391 


4585 
2629 


4 
















n 


















5 








5969 










31 
21 


6 












3049 


839 








5 














53 


385 




1 


















250 






















1080 
19 


370 
172 


1 






















1 






















1 






















1015 
1380 


4 


















38 
1898 


326 

250 
823 


4 


















4 


















748 
1005 




4 




















?, 


Valley 




















1 






















256 
698 
754 
514 
1484 






Walker 
















705 




589 


4 


Wall . . . 
















2 


















454 
1404 
310 


4258 
1118 


12 


















9 


Water 






































272 


1 



176 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 


as , . 

Big 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


, i 


30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 

in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 

in. 


12- 

in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 

in. 


4- 

in. 




West 














1836 


661 




266 
300 
186 
725 

23 
366 
220 
5235 

83 




4 
















1 


White . . 










































202 

254 

126 
145 


1 






















1 






















1 






















1 


















177 
132 


239 


358 


















69 


Penacook. 
Penacook, high service 












10584 




8 
















225 


8 






?, 


Canal, West 




















1 


















247 




467 




4 


















3 


























1 


















635 




58 




3 


















?, 






















653 
476 

1300 
252 
285 
150 

1678 
327 






Elliott 
















































High. . . 






















4 






















1 






















4 






















2 






















1 


















70 


37 


5 


















1923 
364 
1846 




?, 


Pine . . 






















Rolfe . 






















1 






















1 


Stark . . 
























1 


















54 








4 




















423 


261 
10 


1 






















1 






















884 
2205 
450 

583 


1 




















150 


4 




















1 




















41 


69 




















1? 


























Totals 


2220 


522 


28795 


1963 


2788 


19788 


24759 


490S4 


23947 


122S70 


30977 


1075 







WATER DEPARTMENT. 



177 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES.— Concluded. 



Streets. 


Length and Size of Cement-Lined Pipe 
in Feet. 




18-in. 


14-in. 


12-in. 


10-in. 


S-in. 


6-in. 


4-in. 






2230 














11391 






















373 
120 
1218 


















High 


























34 








5952 
1764 


1203 








State, North 












Valley 










879 

11 

298 






























88 














44 


Penacook. 




13110 


1221 
















628 
422 
479 






























245 

1777 
482 








































734 




High 










2100 










2573 
57 
















1181 
652 


2023 












Stark 








529 














1149 
1193 




276 
























675 
















55 




















11391 


15340 


11567 


1732 


6438 


10201 


497 













12 



178 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service; L, Low Service. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, near Eagle Garage 

East side, in rear Robinson's Store 

East side, in rear Phenix Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Freight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue. . . 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co.'s. . . 
East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co.'s 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co... . 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 



28 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



179 



Streets. 



South Main. 



Water . 
Hall. . 



Hammond . 
Railroad. . . 
Fiske 

Summer. . . 
Durgin. . . . 

North State 



South State. 



Locations. 



Mills. 



East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops. 

West side, 110 feet north of McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum 

West side, below No. 18 

West side, at No. 32 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, at No. 85 

East side, near Rumford Field 

West side, near Nylen's 

West side, near Thompson's 

West side, at Gilman's 

North side, near Bridge 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

West side, south line of Walker School .... 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West side, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant. ." 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 

West side, at No. 22 



21 

1 



10 

1 
1 

2 
1 
1 



14 



180 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Mills 
Dakin. . . 

Glen 

Dunklee . 

Broadway 



Donovan 
Green. . . 

South . . . 



Bradley. . . . 

Union 

Jackson. . . . 

Lyndon. . . . 

North Sprin 



South Spring. 



Northwest corner of Allison 

West side, 220 feet north of Allison 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, 80 feet north of Humphrey .... 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone 

West side, at Rollins Park 

West side, opposite McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

Northeast corner of Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital. 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige's ■ 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road .... 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

North corner of Cole Court 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Oak 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



181 



Streets. 



South Spring. 



Academy 
Hanover . 
Rumford. 



Huntington 
Tahanto. . . 
Pine 

Holt 

High 

Gladstone . . 

Valley 

Auburn 



Ridge Road 
Westbourne Rd 
Dartmouth 

Princeton 

Fruit 

Minot 



Kensington Rd. 
Stevens Ave. . . 
Penacook 



Locations. 



West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Concord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital .... 

East side, at No. 10 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Southeast corner of Walker 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at Morrill School 

West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at No. 10 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

West side, at No. 13 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest. 
West side, between Nos. 11 and 13. . . . 
North side, 135 feet north of Centre. . . 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, 700 feet south of Pleasant . . . 

East side, opposite No. 70 

East side, opposite No. 114 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home . 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home . 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

South side, near Concord Lumber Co. . . 



L 
L 

L 
H 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
L 
L 
L 
H 
L 
L 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



11 
1 
1 

2 
1 



182 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Penacook 



Walker. . 

Albin. . . 
Highland 

Church. . 
Franklin . 



Chestnut 
Tremont 

Pearl . . . 
Beacon. . 



Rowell. . . 
Blanchard 
Ferry. . . . 



Washington . 



Chapel 

Montgomery . 
Centre 



South side, east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse. 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s 

South side, near P. B. Co.'s office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Rumf ord 

North side, opposite No. 69 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue . . . 

Southwest corner of Martin 

South side, 500 feet west from Rumf ord . . 

North side, 160 feet west of Bradley 

North side, at No. 22 

Northeast corner of Rumf ord 

South side, east of Bradley 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumf ord 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Southwest corner of Rumf ord 

South side, opposite No. 64 

North side, between High and Auburn . . . 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at No. 14 

North side, opp. Merrimack Apartments. 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works. . . 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue . . . 

North side, opposite Rollins 

North side, opposite Alert Hose House. . . 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumf ord 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 

South side, opposite No. 18 

Northeast corner of North State 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



183 




Centre . 



Bridge . 

Park. . 

Capitol 

Garden 
School . 



Warren . 



Depot. . 

Blake. . 
Orchard 
Pleasant 



Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue 

South side, on east line of Dewey School lot 

Northeast corner of Ridge Road 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co.'s. . . 
North side, opposite Concord Shoe Factory 

North side, at St. Paul's Church 

North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, at No. 106 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue . . . 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, opposite Nos. 8-10 

South side, opposite No. 8 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square 

South side, at South Congregational Church 

Southeast corner of South 

Northeast corner of Fremont 

Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumford 

South side, opposite Merrimack 



L 

H 
L 

II 
H 

II 
H 
L 

11 
11 
L 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
H 
L 
L 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
L 
L 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
11 
L 
L 
11 
II 
L 
L 
L 
L 
II 
II 
II 



11 



184 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




Pleasant . 



Kent. . . 

Pleasant . 



Fiske Road. . . . 
Hopkinton Rd. 
Mill Road, 
St. P. School. . 



Old Hopkinton 

Road 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. . 

Fayette 

Thompson. . . . 

Chandler 

Concord 

Monroe 

Thorndike. . . . 



Laurel . 
Perley . 



South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite No. 220 

North side, at Stevens Avenue 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage 

South side, at Lavery's 

South side, opposite No. 270 

North side, near E. B. Chesley's 

North side, opposite No. 291 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond's 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School 

South side, near new Upper School 

East side, at Trask's 

South side, near new infirmary 

East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home 

South side, at tenement No. 7 

Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station.. 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Rumf ord School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast corner of South Spring 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 



B 

II 
II 
B 
11 
11 
II 
11 
II 
11 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
II 
B 

11 
11 
II 

II 
L 
L 
II 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
I. 



13 

1 



11 

1 
1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



185 




Perley. . 
Downing 
Clinton . 

West. .. 



Avon 

Noyes 

Harrison 

Humphrey. . . . 

Allison 

Pillsbury 

Carter 

Stone 

Holly 

McKinley 

Rockingham. . . 

Iron Works Rd 
Prospect 

Curtice Ave . . . 
North State . . . 



Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, at No. 75 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Redwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near No. 108 

North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills 

North side, opposite Dakin 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northwest corner of Harvard 

Northwest corner of Yale 

Northwest corner of Morton 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main 

Southeast corner of Dunklee ". 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten'n 

Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, 230 feet east of North State 

West side, at Water-Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 

Easl side, near No. 226 * 

East side, near No. 252 

East side, near No. 262 



186 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 




North State. 



Palm 

North State. 



North State. 



Fisher. . 
View. . 
Electric 

Clarke . 
Lake. . 



Knight 

Hutchins. . . . 

First 

Sewall's Falls 
Road 



East side, near No. 272 

West side, at south line of prison wall 

West side, at north line of prison wall . . . . 

East side, near No. 296 

North side, west of Fairbanks 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co 

East side, near No. 312 

East side, near No. 324 

East side, near No. 330 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite No. 362 

West side, opposite No. 382 

East side, at No. 3S2 



WEST CONCORD. 

Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at No. 426 

East side, near engine house 

East side, at No. 464 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co. . 

East side, at No. 498 

East side, at No. 516 

East side, opposite No. 533 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road . 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State . . . 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

East side, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side, at No. 13 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, at No. 33 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station 

South side, at Quaker 

North side, near No. 22 

North side, mar C. & C. Railroad. . 

North side, at No. 40 

North side, near A. H. Knight's. . . 

East side, at north line of cemetery . 



13 
1 



H 




L 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


10 


L 


1 


L 


1 


L 




L 


2 


L 


1 


L 




H 




H 




L 




H 


5 


H 




L 


2 


H 




H 




H 


3 


H 


1 



H 1 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



187 




Penacook Rd . 



South Main. 



West Main. 
High 



Washington . 



Fowler 

Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles. . . . 

West Canal. 
East Canal . 

Crescent . . . 
Walnut. . . . 



West side, opposite Frost's. . . . 
West side, opposite Blanchard's 
West side, near Warner Road . . 



PENACOOK. 

West side, at Harriman's 

West side, at Annis's 

West side, at Garvin's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt's garage 

West side, near No. 88 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block. . 

Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Canal 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, at No. 41 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolfe's sawmill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

East side, near Elliott's 

South side, junction of Washington 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue 

Southwest corner of Warren 

South side, at schoolhouse 

North side, near No. 36 

Southeast corner of Warren 

North side, near Contoocook Mfg. Co 

North side, near Crescent 

West side, north of Canal 

North side, at Bye 



188 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS— Continued. 




Merrimack . 



Summer . 

Spring. . . 
Maple . . . 
Summit . 
Winter. . 
Centre. . 

Cross. . . 

Rolf e 

Penacook 



Smith side, opposite Merrimack Avenue 
North side, opposite Nos. 36-38-40 

North side, opposite Cross 

South side, opposite Bye 

South side, opposite Rolfe's shop 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory . . 

North side, near road to Island 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

North side, opposite High 

Northeast corner of Centre 

North side, opposite Church 

Northeast corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

North side, near Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Spring 

West side, opposite No. 47 

Northwest corner of Spring 

Southwest corner of Summer 

North side, near angle of street 

South side, at No. 38 

Northwest corner of Penacook 

West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe's 

West side, at No. 35 

East side, at No. 41 

Whole number public hydrants 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. 

Abbott & Downing Co 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops 

Boston & Maine Railroad, new round house. 
Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West 

Concord 

Standish Worsted Co 

Concord Gas Co 

Concord Shoe Factory 

Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Durgin Co 

Crawford Mfg. Co 

Rumford Printing Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 



471 



H 


6 


L 


3 


H 


17 


H 


6 


H 


1 


H 


3 


L 


1 


H 


1 


H 


2 


H 


1 


L 


1 


11 


1 


H 


3 


H 


6 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Concluded, 



189 



Streets. 



Locations. 



N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School 

John Swenson Granite Co 

Water- Works pumping station 

Whole number private hydrants 



■> 


a 

3 


w. 


£ 


H 


16 


H 


4 


H 


9 


L 


1 


H 


11 


H 


2 


H 


1 



96 



190 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1922. 
CONCORD WATER WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1920—22,167. 

Date of construction — 1872. 

By whom owned — City of Concord. 

Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 



PUMPING. 

Builders of pumping machinery — Worthington Pump and 

Machinery Corporation. 

1 triple expansion horizontal engine, capacity, 2,000,000 
gallons per 24 hours, 1893. 

1 triple expansion horizontal engine, capacity, 2,000,000 
gallons per 24 hours, 1904. 

1 Worthington 8", type "BS, " slow speed, horizontal 
split casing, volute, centrifugal pump, capacity 
3,500,000 gallons per 24 hours, 1919. 

Motor, G. E., 100 H. P., A. C. 



water department. 191 

Electric Pump. 

1. Description of power: 

a. Alternating, 3 phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,800 

R. P. M. 

b. Price per K. W. H., $0.01$, 8 p. m. to 6 a. m.; 

maximum, $1,800 per year, 300,000,000 gal- 
lons; $6.00 per 1,000,000 gallons, over 300,000,- 
000. 

2. K. W. H. used for year, 154,080. 

3. Total pumpage, by Venturi meter, 307,116,000 gallons. 

4. Average static head against which pump works, 90 
feet. 

5. Average dynamic head against which pump works, 
120 feet. 

6. Gallons pumped per K. W. H., 1,993+. 

7. K. W. H. used per 1,000,000 gallons pumped, 501. 

8. Efficiency of pump, 

307,116,000 (gallons pumped) X8.34 (lbs.)X120 (dynamic head) = 8^ 9 0/ 

154,080 (K. W. H.)X33,000X60X1.34X88.2 (efficiency motor and switch board) ~~ " ° 0,Z /O 

9. Total pumping for year, steam and electric pumps, 
307,116,000 gallons. 

10. Cost of total pumping figured on pumping station 
expenses— $4,003.20. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $13,034. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — $0,109. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

Mains. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 1,905 feet during year. 

4. Relaid — 1,574 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 1,350 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 72.50 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.39 
miles. 



192 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 1. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 471; pri- 
vate, 96. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 8. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,075. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 81. 

15. Range of' pressure on mains at center of city— 8S 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

Services. % 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 1,383 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 496 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 93,750 feet, 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 37. 

22. Number now in use — 3,961. 

23. Average length of service — 23.66. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — 

25. Number of meters added during year — 57. 

26. Number now in use — 2,767. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 69.85. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 86.81. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use— 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 44. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



193 



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194 CITY OF CONCORD. 

INVENTORY. 



Or the Property of the Water Department, Including 
the Plant and Water Rights, and All the Real 
Estate and Personal Property in Their Possession, 
January 1, 1923. 



Water rights— land, etc., $1,142,442.58 

Water office — furniture, etc., 1,156.00 

Pumping station — furniture, supplies, etc., 2,000.00 
Shop : 

Machinery, tools, meters, service pipe, etc., 4,661.09 

Trucks, roadster, wagons and supplies, 2,600 . 00 
Storehouse — hydrants, water gates, special 

castings, etc., 5,018.70 

Pipe yard — cast-iron pipe, 3,977. 10 

Shop at West Concord — pipe, etc., 50.00 

$1,161,855.47 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



Still. 


Total. 


240 


289 


65 


83 


5 


13 


13 


19 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1922. 

The department responded to 81- bell alarms and 323 
still alarms. 

Bell. 
Precinct, 49 

Penacook, 18 

East Concord, 8 

West Concord, 6 

81 323 404 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete roll of 
the department with residence and occupation of each mem- 
ber, a record of all fires and alarms which have occurred 
during the year and the causes thereof as nearly as could 
be ascertained, with the names of the owners or occupants 
and the value, loss, insurance, and insurance recovered in 
each case. 

Again, as was the case in 1921, the number of fires and the 
monetary loss exceeds all previous records. The apparatus 
is in good condition. The bodies of three combination 
pieces were transferred to new chassis during the year. 

The fire alarm system of the precinct and Penacook arc 
in good condition, but, as is generally known, some circuits 
in the precinct are abnormally large. 

195 



196 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Two alarm boxes, one public and one private, were added 
to the precinct system. 

One thousand feet of hose were added to the complement, 
but failed to cover the amount condemned for fire purposes. 
Frequent and strenuous use of hose has made serious in- 
roads in the complement, a condition which should be 
overcome at once. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 
Chief Engineer. 



IN MEMORIAM. 

CHARLES C. CHESLEY 

Captain Alert Hose Co., No. 2 

Died March 10, 1922 

JAMES H. SANDERS 

Engineer Kearsarge Engine Co., No. 2 
Died April 2G, 1922 

JOHN E. HOWARD 

Hoseman Alert Hose Co., No. 2 

Died October 30, 1922 

HIRAM E. QUIMBY 
Hoseman Cataract Hose Co., No. 3 
Died November 22, 1922 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 197 

APPROPRIATION AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

Appropriation. 
Appropriation, $54,054.00 

Resolution, outstanding claims, 253 . 00 





$54,307.00 


Disbursements. 


Permanent men, 


$27,900.00 


Vacations, 


973.06 


Call men, 


10,245.00 


House man, 


100 . 00 


Rent, Veterans' Association, 


210.00 


Forage, 


849.99 


Fuel, 


2,293 . 66 


Lights, 


740.73 


Incidentals, 


6,074.66 


Horse shoeing, 


150.75 


Horse hire, 


605 . 00 


Fire alarm, 


1,746.55 


Penacook fire alarm, 


345.67 


Supplies auto combinations, 


347.31 


Hose, 


1,200.00 


Laundry, 


83.35 


Fire inspections, 


441.27 




^1 ^n? on 


f 


<Jp<J*±,OU i . \}\) 


1922. 




ALARMS. 





Precincts. 

Still. January-2, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of S. S. Richardson, 15 West Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. January 2, 1.58 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Mary Gardner, 12 Park Street. 
Detail from Combination responded. Slight fire in cover- 
ing of steam pipe. No loss. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. January 2, 5.30 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Memorial Hospital Nurses' Home, 66 South 
Street. Detail from Combination 1 responded. Slight 
fire in dry room of laundry. Caused by overheated furnace. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. January 2, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Dunn, South Street, below Wheeler's Corner. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dora Sennott, 76 South Street. Extinguished by Engine 
2. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 7.43 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Olsen Feusien, 256 No. State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 24. January 3, 7.27 p. m. Slight fire in Elm Wood 
Hotel, Center Street. Caused by matches in clothing. 
Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 7.45 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid 

Building, $15,000.00 $10.00 $9,000.00 $10.00 
Building owned and occupied by Morris Bedick. 

Box 23. January 4, 12.35 a. m. Shack near the new 
Rumford Press building damaged. Caught from boiler 
being in temporary use during construction of building. 
Four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 1.05 a. m. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. January 4, 2.54 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
N. S. Croteau, 86 West Street. Caused by oil stove. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No loss. 

Still. January 7, 10.16 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. A. Lane, 66 Bridge Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 3.24 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mack Boardman, 8 Foster Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 199 

Still. January 8, 8.32 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of S. M. Pantis, 12 Perkins Court. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 8, 12.52 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. C. Hanson, 13i Dakin Street. Extinguished by 

Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 11 , 3.53 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of H. S. Hall, 21 School Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. January 11, 4.05 p. m. A call to 97 No. State 
Street. Combination 1 being engaged, Combination 2 
sent. See next alarm. 

Box 21. January 11, 4.11 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. House owned by Mary J. Maye and occupied by 
owner. Cause unknown. Five hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 5.02 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $500.00 $4,000.00 $500.00 

Still. January 11, 5.19 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. S. Hall, 21 School Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 14, 7.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. H. Foote, So. Pembroke Street, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 16, 12.46 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 44 So. Main Street. Combination 1 responded but no 
assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. January 17, 7.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of T. J. Moran, 58 Perley Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 22, 11.52 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. A. Cutting, 36 Mills Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 22, 6.38 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Dow, Clinton Street. This entailed a run of three 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

miles into the suburbs. Engine 2 attempted to drive 
through but was stalled by snow on the Silk Farm road. 
In the meantime word had been received at the Central 
that the fire was out. Word was conveyed by telephone to 
the engine crew to return home. Xo loss. 

Still. January 22, 8.03 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 23| Pierce Street. Combination 1 responded but no 
assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. January 23, 10.33 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Bresnahan, 14 Curtice Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 16. January 23, 3.46 p. m. Fire in frame building, 
32-34 Jackson Street, owned by Miss Margaret Conway 
and occupied by Harry F. Walker, S. E. Gray, Carl Soran- 
son and John Wright. Cause unknown. Three hundred 
and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 4.29 p. m. 

Value. 

Building, $3,500.00 

Contents: 

H.F.Walker, 800.00 

S.E.Gray, 1,000.00 

C. Soranson, 1,200.00 

J.Wright, 1,200.00 

Still. January 23, 6.00 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Chandler, 68 High Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 23, 6.29 p. m. Slight fire around smoke 
pipe in Memorial Hospital Nurses' Home. Detail from 
Central Station sent. Loss trifling. 

Still. January 23, 8.14 d. m. Slight fire in coal pocket 
at the State Hospital. Cause, spontaneous combustion. 
Extinguished by Combination 1 and local brigade. Three 
hundred and fifty feet of hose wet by the city department 
and the same amount by the local brigade. Loss trifling. 

Still. January 24, 6.19 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of K. Belair, 28 Walker Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 



Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


$510.00 


$2,500.00 


$510.00 


229.35 


500 . 00 


129.35 


180.00 


1,000.00 


ISO. 00 


75 7.1 


1,200.00 


7.1 . 75 


100.00 


None 


None 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 201 

Still. January 24, 4.46 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Geo. J. Dennerly, 3 Cottage Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 24, 6.20 p. m. Fire in residence, 178 
No. Main Street, owned by I. E. Gray and occupied by 
Mrs. Georgia Amidon. Cause, overheated chimney. Com- 
bination 1 responded but it soon became apparent that 
assistance was necessary and a bell alarm was sent in. 

Box 24. January 24, 6.34 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Sixteen hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 9.11 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paul. 

Building, s7.000.00 $3,000.00 $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Contents, 2,500.00 1,000.00 None None 

Still. January 26, 6.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. H. Bean, 2 Foster Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. January 20, 8.38 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Louise Folsom, Loudon Road, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 26, 2.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles Byrne, 11 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by detail from Alert Station. No loss. 

Still. January 29, 11.26 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Fox, 272 No. State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 7.00 p. m. Slight fire in electric 
street railway car, No. State Street, near Call Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 4, 4.00 p. m. Slight fire in electric 
street railway car at Pleasant Street Junction. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 4, 7.09 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. E. Lewis, 22 So. State Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 



202 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 8, 10.24 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Jerry Cochrane, Loudon Road, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 12.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Minnie MeShane, 11 Warren Street. Extin- 
guished by detail from Central vStation. No loss. 

Still. February 10, 5.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Oscar Carlson, 179 No. State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 11, 10.13 a. m. Fire in hollow tree at 
192 No. Main Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. February 14, 11.46 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. Palisi, 15 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 14, 9.55 p. m. A call to B. & M. R. R. 
yard, near depot, to extinguish fire in fire box of locomotive 
which on account of wreck could not be dumped. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. Four hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 6.35 a. m. Slight fire in basement 
of grocery store conducted by K. Sumpuma, 20 Walker 
Street. Caused by attempt to thaw pipe with torch. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. February 17, 10.03 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of T. J. Mulligan, 28 Essex Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 17, 4.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Rose Philips, 50 So. State Street. Building owned 
by Eugene Savage. Extinguished by Combination 3. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. February 17, 7.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of P. H. Gendron, 134 So. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 203 

Still. February 18, 9.08 p. m. Slight fire in closet in 
residence of Elmer Quimby, 5 Freight Street. Building 
owned by Harry Shapiro. Cause unknown. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $9,500.00 $40.00 $5,000.00 $40.00 

Still. February 18, 11.09 a. m. Fire in residence, 19 
Water Street, owned and occupied by James H. Welch. 
Combination 1 responded but the fire had assumed such 
proportions that a bell alarm was sent in. Cause of fire, 
defective chimney. See next alarm. 

Box 45. February 18, 11.14 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Twelve hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 12.42 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,300.00 $2,300.00 $2,300.00 $2,300.00 

Contents, 1,500.00 954.75 1,500.00 954.75 

Still. February 18, 3.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of F. D. Shattuck, 44 Laurel Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 38. February 20, 6.42 p. m. Auto truck loaded 
with packing cases and loose hay damaged by fire at 8 
Merrimack Street. Cause of fire, fumes of gasoline coming 
in contact with lighted lantern. Owned by H. Diversi & 
Co. Fourteen hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 7.14 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Auto, S4,000.00 8497.00 $4,000.00 $497.00 

Still. February 25, 7.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. E. Cunningham, 54 Church Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 8.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. A. Dennett, 91 Center Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 8.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harry A. Tuttle, 60 Perley Street. Extinguished 
by Engine 2. No loss. 



204 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 27, 11.09 a. m. Reported chimney 
fire at 27 School Street. Combination 1 responded but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. Februar}" 28, 12.53 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. S. Duprey, 33 Harvard Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 7.00 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of F. P. Johnson, 39 Washington 
Street. Attended to by detail from Alert Co. No fire. 

Still. March 6, 7.38 p. m. Buildings owned and 
occupied by Simeon Waldman destroyed. Cause unknown. 
Combination 1 responded, but did little but assist in remov- 
ing contents. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 
Contents, 3,000.00 3,000.00 None None 

Still. March 13, 4.39 a. m. Slight fire in dresser in 
Elm Wood Hotel, 11 Center Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. Extinguished by 
occupants. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 14, 6.52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. S. Sweatt, 75 Hall Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 16, 2.05 p. in. Fire in piggery, 6 Donovan 
Street, owned by John Dummerling. Caused by over- 
heated stove. Extinguished by Combination 1. Four 
hundred feet of hose wet. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $25.00 $25.00 None None 

Contents, 30.00 30.00 None None 

Still. March 16, 7.11 p. m. Slight fire in waste paper 
in Rumford Press building, Ferry Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. Extinguished 
by occupants. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 7.43 a. m. Fire in bed in residence, 5 
Gallinger Court, owned by S. Tremblay and occupied by 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 205 

Antonio Pereno. Cause unknown. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but assistance being required a bell alarm was sent 
in. See next alarm. 

Box 14: March 18, 7.58 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Four hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 8.29 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $100.00 $1,000.00 $100.00 

Contents, 1,200.00 276.35 1,000.00 276.35 

Still. March 18, 10.28 a. m. Fire in smoke pipe of 
furnace in residence of Carl Aiken, 19 Albin Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 11.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. W. Braley, 5 Wentworth Avenue. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 21, 8.10 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence, 56| Warren Street. Attended to by 
detail from Central Station. No fire. 

Still. March 24, 4.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. Siliski, 94 Rumford Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 5.51 p. m. Slight fire in debris in 
dump cart at Concord Ice Co. plant, Bridge Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination' 1. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 7.10 p. m. Brush fire on Beach Hill 
in rear of summer cottage on the bluff. Extinguished by 
detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. March 26, 2.38 a. m. Fire in bathroom in resi- 
dence, 224 No. Main Street, owned and occupied by Thomas 
G. and Mary Martin. Cause unknown. Combination 1 
responded. See next alarm. 

Box 23. March 26, 2.42 a. m. Box pulled for preceding- 
fire. Recall 3.17 a. m. Extinguished with chemicals. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, 810,000.00 $157.00 $7,000.00 $157.00 
Contents, 3,000.00 310.00 None None 



206 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. March 31, 5.59 p. m. Fire in N. H. State Prison 
shop. Building owned by the state and occupied by the 
W. F. Whitney Co. Cause unknown. Combination 1 
responded but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. See 
next alarm. 

Box 9. March 31, 6.01 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Four hundred feet of hose wet in addition to that wet. 
by the local brigade. Recall 7.03 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $200,000.00 $617.38 $168,000.00 S617.38 

Still. April 10, 8.27 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Bert Burroughs, 43 Penacook Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 11.37 a. m. Grass fire on the Baker lot, 
Bridge Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 3.46 p. m. Brush fire, corner of Pena- 
cook and Rumford Streets. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Still. April 10, 7.07 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Seldon Locke, 42 Church Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 13, 2.08 p. m. Reported chimney fire at 9 
Park Ridge. Combination 1 responded. No such number. 

Still. April 16, 11.49 a. m." Slight fire in basement of 
club house, 20 So. Main Street. Fire in pile of burlap. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 16, 5.00 p. m. Barn on Pembroke Road 
near the lower bridge owned and occupied by Wilbur A. 
Chase destroyed. Cause unknown. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. See 
next alarm. 

Box 53. April 16, 5.03 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Ten hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 6.00 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $800.00 $800.00 $400.00 $400.00 

Contents, 350.00 350.00 210.00 210.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 207 

Still. April 19, ,1.35 p. m. Brush fire in rear of the 
Mahoney place, So. Pembroke Street. Cause unknown. 
Labored two hours. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 19, 2.04 p. m. Alarm given for preceding 
fire. Extinguished by Combination 1 and detail from the 
department under the command of Engineer W. J. Coffin. 
No loss. 

Still. April 19, 4.07 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 19, 6.45 p. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. Four runs to 
same locality same day. 

Still. April 20, 7.40 p. m. Slight fire in debris of barn 
on Pembroke Road burned on the 16th instant. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 8.02 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
P. Martel, 2 Shapiro Block, Freight Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 8.25 a. m. Slight fire in debris of barn 
burned on the 16th instant on Pembroke Road. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 10.33 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Gillis, 23 Bridge Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. E. Stanley, 40 Concord Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 2.19 p. m. Chimney fire in' residence of 
C. W. Staniels, 30 Hall Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 5.17 p. m. Brooder building owned by 
J. H. Plummer on Dimond Hill destroyed. Caught from 
lamp. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, si^.OO $35.00 None None 

Contents, 50.00 50.00 None None 



208 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 48. April 23, 10.54 a. m. Fire on roof of building 
in rear of 55 Thorndike Street owned and occupied by Geo. 
S. Theobald as barn and garage. Caused by sparks from 
chimney. Extinguished with chemicals. Loss trifling. 
Recall 11.03 a. m. 

4-4-4. April 23, 1.56 p. m. Brush fire in rear of the 
Mahoney place, So. Pembroke Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1 and detail from the department. Labored 
three hours. Fifty acres burned over. Capt. E. J. Morri- 
son in charge of detail. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 24, 10.00 a. m. Brush fire on Black Hill 
near race track. Combination 1 and detail sent. Labored 
seven hours. 

Still. April 24, 10.53 a. m. The Mahoney place, So. 
Pembroke Street, reported in danger from preceding fire. 
Engine 2 car and detail sent. Needless alarm. 

4-4-4. April 24, 12.10 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Detail from the department sent. 
Labored five hours. Detail left to watch through the night. 
Two hundred acres burned over. Engineer S. F. Ford, 
Lieut. D. J. Adams in charge of details. Capt. M. S. Wake- 
field in charge of Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 7.31 p. m. Brush fire on Long Pond 

road near the John Jordan place. Combination 1 responded 

but became disabled en route. Extinguished by near-by 
residents. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 11.57 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Peter Drouin, Tuttle Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 10.15 p. m. Brush fire at White Park. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 27, 9.23 a. m. Reported chimney fire at 
21 Walker Street. Combination 1 responded but could 
locate no fire. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 209 

Still. April 29, 10.16 a. m. Brush fire in rear of 64 
Franklin Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 6.16 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
G. N. Bartemus, 3 Pine Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 30, 10.02 a. m. Brush fire on Pembroke 
Road near Soucook River bridge on the John J. Dooning lot. 
Burned over ten acres. Labored two hours. Extinguished 
by Combination 1 and Pembroke force. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 30, 12.50 p. m. Brush fire on the Loudon 
Road. This was the beginning of one of the most dangerous 
forest fires visiting this city for years. Fire originated on 
the Allard lot and, driven by a high wind, traveled like a 
race horse. Before extinguishment it had crossed the No. 
Pembroke Road and extended to the Soucook River, even 
jumping that stream in three places. Conservative esti- 
mate of area burned, over 1,200 acres. That no buildings 
were destroyed was most fortunate and was due to intelligent 
work in the lines of back-firing, ploughing, etc. Fire not 
officially declared out until 5.00 p. m., May 1. 

Pembroke force materially assisted the Concord con- 
tingent in mastering the situation. Loss unknown, but very 
little valuable timber land was within the scope of the blaze. 
Details conveyed as occasion required by Combination 1 
car, taxis, etc. Details in command of 1st Asst. Engineer 
W. J. Coffin and Fire Warden A. Chickering, Pembroke. 

Still. April 30, 3.15 p. m. Information received that 
the fire on the Dooning lot which had received atten- 
tion in the morning was again burning. As the Concord 
force had been considerably weakened by drafts made upon 
it on account of the Plains fire, arrangements were made 
with the Pembroke authorities to look after it. Extin- 
guished by Pembroke force. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 3.42 p. m. Brush fire on Lightning Hill. 
Engine 2 car and detail sent. 

14 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

4-4-4. April 30, 3.54 p. m. Alarm given in response to 
call for assistance from scene of preceding fire. Barge and 
detail sent in command of 2nd Asst. Engineer S. T. Ford. 
Labored three hours. Four acres burned over. Detail left 
to watch through the night. No loss. Six men from 
Cataract Co., drafted to city proper. 

Still. April 30, 5.15 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Loudon Road contingent. Taxi and detail sent. 

Still. May 1, 10.11 a. m. Brush fire on Plains near the 
Cherette place. Rekindling of fire of preceding day. 
Beyond control of detail left to watch. Extinguished by 
Combination 1 and detail. No loss. 

Still. May 3, 7.48 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Emery Clay, 42 South Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. May 3, 4.28 p. m. Fire in residence, 53 Penacook 
Street, owned by James Powers and occupied by J. Fagan. 
Combination 1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm 
was sent in. Hydrant opposite building useless, being filled 
with stones by children. Building and contents destroyed. 

Box 14. May 3, 4.31 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Twenty-two hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 6.07 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $700.00 $700.00 

Contents, 200.00 200.00 None None 

Still. May 3, 6.26 p. m. Brush fire opposite 53 
Penacook Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. May 3, 9.45 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Penacook. Engine 1, motor-driver, sent. 

Still. May 3, 10.40 p. m. Second call for assistance 
from Penacook. Detail sent by autos. 

11-11. May 3, 10.43 p. m. Another detail sent to 
Penacook. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 211 

Still. May 3, 10.50 p. m. Motor bus sent with detail 
to Penacook. 

Still. May 3, 10.57 p. m. Combination 1 sent to 
Penacook. Engine 1 worked seven hours and fifteen min- 
utes. Eleven hundred feet of precinct hose wet. See 
Penacook report. 

Still. May 8, 9.15 a. m. A call to investigate cause of 
smoke in residence, 61 South Street. Combination 3 re- 
sponded. No fire. 

Still. May 11, 2.33 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
John B. Maye, 97 No. State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 16, 2.10 p. m. Brush fire west of Valley 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

2. May 18, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

2. May 19, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. May 21, 10.08 a. m. Chimnej^ fire in residence 
of George Angwin, East Penacook Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 22, 10.39 p. m. A call for assistance from 
East Concord. Combination 1 sent. 

Still. May 22, 10.40 p. m. Engine 1, motor-driver, 
sent. Engine worked one hour and fifty minutes. Eleven 
hundred feet of precinct hose wet. See East Concord 
report. 

2. May 25, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. May 27, 10.33 a. m. Slight fire in residence, 10 
Stone Street occupied by Augustus Ericson. Rags under 
stairway. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. May 27, 8.02 p. m. Club house owned and 
occupied by the Passaconaway Club on Garvin's Falls 
Road damaged by fire caused by sparks from chimney 



212 CITY OF CONCORD. 

falling on roof. Extinguished by Combination 1 and 
occupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $350.00 $2,000.00 $350.00 

2. June 5, 7.52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of John 
Blake, South Street, near Wheeler's Corner. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 8, 1.35 p. m. Brush fire on South Pem- 
broke Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 12, 7.20 p. m. Slight fire in building, 60 

No. Main Street, owned by the Eagle and Phenix Hotel 

Co. Fire was confined to closet in quarters of the Beaver 

, Meadow Golf Club. Cause unknown. Extinguished by 

Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $40,000.00 $111.05 $20,000.00 $111.05 
Contents, 1,000.00 5.00 500.00 5.00 

Still. June 13, 3.36 a. m. Slight fire in railroad bridge, 
Bridge Street. Caused probably by cigarette stub. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. June 13, 8.43 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Nelson Dunan, 20 Stone Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

2. June 15, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. June 16, 1.25 a. m. House and barn owned by 
Joseph Boulay, on the Loudon Road, destroyed. Cause 
unknown. Buildings unoccupied. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but could do little toward saving buildings. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $3,000.00 $3,000.00 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Still. June 19, 4.34 p. m. Slight gasoline fire in State 
Garage near Eagle Hotel. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Box 13. June 24, 4.46 p. m. Slight fire in electric 
street railway car on Franklin Street, near Charles Street. 
Box not pulled until car employees had made three ineffec- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 213 

tual attempts to reach telephones in near-by residences. 
Everybody out. Recall 5.06 p. m. Extinguished with 
chemicals. Loss trifling. 

2. June 29, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

2. July 5, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. July 8, 7.43 a. m. Slight fire in residence, 27 
Washington Street, owned and occupied by Edward A. 
Moulton. Cause unknown. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 2. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $3,000.00 $126.50 $2,200.00 $126.50 

Still. July 8, 10.04 a. m. Small house and shed near the 
new roundhouse on Hall Street owned by the B. & M. R. R. 
and occupied by owner destroyed. Cause, spontaneous 
combustion. Combination 1 responded but the fire had 
assumed such proportions on arrival that a bell alarm was 
sent in. 

Box 53. July 8, 10.12 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Twelve hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 
11.46 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $3,293.00 $3,293.00 $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Still. July 9, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Arthur Abbott, 6 Foster Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. July 15, 1.34 p. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence on the Plains owned and occupied by Sophia Jensen. 
Caused by sparks from chimney. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. 

Still. July 18, 9.39 p. m. Fire in basement of store, 
61 North Main Street. Building owned by the Hill Asso- 
ciates and occupied by Proctor & O'Kelley, in whose base- 
ment the fire originated, The Elite Shoe Co. and the Star 
Confectionery Co. Cause unknown. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but it soon became apparent that help was needed 
and a bell alarm was sent in. 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 25. July 18, 9.47 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Seven hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 10.43 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 



Building, 


$48,000.00 


$1,887.20 


$20,000.00 


$1,887.20 


Contents : 










Elite Shoe Store, 


16,000.00 


1,739.17 


15,500.00 


1,739.17 


Proctor & O'Kelley, 


14,119.43 


5,569.89 


13,000.00 


4,031.58 


Star Confectionery Co., 


17,000.00 


450.00 


12,000.00 


450.00 



Still. July 20, 1.30 p. m. Fire in city dump, Bridge 
Street. Three hundred feet of hose wet. Engine 4 worked 
three and one-half hours. No loss. 

2. July 24, 5.15 p. ra. No-ball game. 

Still. July 29, 12.42 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Elric Cass, 30 Tremont Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 1, 3.59 a. m. Fire in auto at Lenox 
Garage, rear 10 Park Street. Caused by match and gaso- 
line. Extinguished by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 3, 11.27 p. m. Slight fire in dry bridge, 
Bridge Street. Caused probably by cigarette. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. Extin- 
guished by police officer. No loss. 

Still. August 9, 3.00 p. m. Fire in tar shed owned and 
occupied by Geo. F. Tandy, Ahern Court. Caused by 
sparks from chimney. This still alarm was immediately 
followed by a bell alarm. 

Box 13. August 9, 3.01 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Eleven hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 
3.41 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $300.00 $50.00 $200.00 $50.00 

Still. August 12, 7.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Halpin, 20 Monroe Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 13, 12.55 p. m. Fire in pile of rubbish 
near the Gulf Refining plant, Bridge Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 215 

Still. August 14, 10.11 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in store, 61 No. Main Street. Combination 
1 responded but located no fire. Back draft. 

Still. August 14, 7.57 p. m. A call to Holly Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no fire could be located. 

Box 24. August 19, 9.44 p. m. Slight fire in auto at 
Gray's Garage, 180 No. Main Street. Extinguished by 
employees. Needless alarm. Recall 9.49 p. m. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. August 22, 6.38 p. m. Slight fire in garage owned 
and occupied S. R. Putney, Rollins Street. Combination 1 
responded but before arrival a bell alarm had been sent in. 

Box 23. August 22, 6.40 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 6.54 p. m. Loss 
trifling, no claim filed. 

Box 51. August 23, 9.19 p. m. Slight fire in pit of the 
erecting shop, B. & M. R. R. plant, So. Main Street. 
Caught from acetyline torch. No hose wet by the city de- 
partment. Loss trifling. Recall 9.44 p. m. 

Still. September 1, 5.34 p. m. A call to help rescue a 
horse which had fallen into river at city dump, Bridge 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required, as the rescue had been accomplished on arrival. 

Still. September 3, 1.17 p. m. Slight fire in dry bridge, 
Bridge Street. Caused probably by cigarette stub. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 11, 9.27 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of J. Halpin, 20 Monroe Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
Back draft. 

Still. September 12, 10.42 a. m. Slight fire in dry 
bridge, Bridge Street. Caused probably by cigarette stub. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

11-11. September 14, 3.01 p. m. A call for help from 
Penacook. Fire in Farrand Block. Combination 1 and 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Engine 1, motor-driver, sent with details. Combination 1 
laid one line; pump not used. Three hundred and fifty 
feet of precinct hose wet. See Penacook report. 

Still. September 16, 1.40 p. m. Fire in electric light 
globe over door at Walker School. Bird's nest in globe had 
ignited from short circuit. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Still. September 17, 6.57 p. m. Slight fire between 
ceiling and floor above in residence of Benjamin Sanel, 20 
Clinton Street. Caused by gas jet too near ceiling. Com- 
bination 1 responded. See next alarm. 

Box 47. September 17, 7.15 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 7.35 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $170.00 $1,500.00 $170.00 

Contents, 700.00 15.00 700.00 15.00 

Still. September 20, 11.32 a. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence of H. J. Carpenter, 55 Dunklee Street. Hot ashes in 
wooden receptacle filled cellar with smoke. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 20, 1.06 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of C. H. Sawyer, 55 Pleasant 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Back draft. 

Still. September 22, 12.23 a. m. Slight fire in dry 
bridge, Bridge Street. Caused probably by cigarette stub. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 22, 5.46 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of B. F. Robinson, No. Pembroke Road, Plains Dis- 
trict. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 25, 6.02 p. m. Fire in attic of Phenix 
Hotel, No. Main Street. Cause unknown. Combination 
1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. 
Extinguished with chemicals. See next alarm. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 

Box 25. September 25, 6.03 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Recall 6.24 p. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. September 26, 9.33 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. D. Dolloff, 64 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 26, 1.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. E. Tabor, 85 Hall Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 27, 10.41 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of A. R. Hood, 140 Rumford Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 27, 7.23 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Charles "Wheeler, 32 Beacon Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 28, 6.27 p. m. Slight fire in dry 
bridge, Bridge Street. Caused probably by cigarette stub. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 29, 10.43 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of F. D. Challis, 77 No. State 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. No fire. 

Still. September 29, 12.19 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of E. H. Cross, 113 Rumford Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 30, 10.54 a. m. Slight fire in closet 
in residence of H. B. Tuttle, 60 Perley Street. Caused by 
child and matches. Combination 1 responded but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. September 30, 2.03 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Leon Smyth, 18 West Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
No fire. 

Box 9. September 30, 7.44 p. m. Fire in N. H. State 
Prison shop. Building owned by the state of New Hamp- 
shire and occupied by the W. F. Whitney Co., chair manu- 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

facturers. Cause unknown. Ten hundred and fifty feet 
of hose wet. Recall 9.08 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, $175,000.00 $336.41 $167,483.74 $336.41 

Still. October 1, 2.46 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Gannon, 206 No. State Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 3, 9.51 a. m. Building on the Plains 
used as barn, garage and henhouse, owned and occupied by 
Lillia B. Shaw, destroyed. Caused probably by sponta- 
neous combustion in greasy rags. Combination 1 responded. 
See next alarm. 

Still. October 3, 10.03 a. m. Combination 3 called to 
scene of preceding fire. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $200.00 $200.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Still. October 3, 8.58 p. m. Fire in ice house, East 
Penacook Street, owned and occupied by the Concord Ice Co. 
Combination 1 responded but it soon became apparent that 
assistance was required and a bell alarm was sent in. See 
next alarm. 

Box 15. October 3, 9.07 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Thirty-four hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 11.35 p. m. Cause of fire unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $3,220.00 $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Box 8. October 3, 9.21 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire by some excited individual. Needless alarm. 

Still. October 3, 9.43 p. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence, 231 No. Main Street, owned by John Coburn. Caused 
by sparks from the ice house fire. Exposure loss. Ex- 
tinguished by detail from Central Station. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $7.00 $700.00 $7.00 

Still. October 3,11 .49 p. m. Fire in pile of old sleepers 
on East Penacook Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Still. October 4, 4.24 a. m. Rekindling of fire in debris 
of ice house. Extinguished by Combination 1. Three 
hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. No loss. Detail 
watched during the day. 

Still. October 5, 7.32 p. m. A call to a presumed fire 
on So. Main Street near the brick yard. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. Party found 
enjoying a corn roast. No loss. 

Still. October 5, 8.43 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Geo. O. Pillsbury, 75 Franklin Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 6, 4.22 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Wingate, 14 Prince Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. October 10, 9.47 a. m. Fire in basement of the 
Fowler Block, corner of State and Pleasant Streets. Build- 
ing owned by Mrs. Susan F. Fowler and occupied by Walter 
H. Bugbee, grocer, F. L. Kibbee, druggist, S. P. Parker, 
Florist, and the Geo. L. Lincoln Furniture Co., on the first 
floor, and various occupants of suites on the remaining floors, 
the names of those only who suffered loss being given. Fire 
originated in the basement of the Kibbee Drug Store from 
contact of fuel and smoke pipe of boiler. Combination 1 
responded but it was immediately seen that a bell alarm was 
imperative. See next alarm. 

Box 34. October 10, 9.50 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Nineteen hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 11.21 a. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$45,000.00 


$2,940.00 


$30,000.00 


$2,940.00 


Contents : 










W. H. Bugbee, 


6,500.00 


739.47 


6,500.00 


739.47 


F. L. Kibbee, 


10,575.00 


2,550.10 


11,000.00 


2,550.10 


Geo. L. Lincoln Co., 


24,000.00 


1,957.75 


14,250.00 


1,957.75 


D. F. Murphy, 


1,000.00 


160.00 


500.00 


160.00 


M. Felteaut, 


1,000.00 


25.00 


500.00 


25.00 



220 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 11, 1.30 p. m. A call to investigate 
source of smell of burning rubber at 88 No. Main Street. 
Detail from Central Station sent. Emanated from heated 
electric fan. No fire. 

Still. October 11, 6.48 p. m. A call for assistance from 
East Concord. Combination 1 sent. See East Concord 
report. 

Still. October 11, 7.03 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 40 No. Main Street. Detail from Cen- 
tral Station sent. No fire. 

Still. October 12, 12.03 p. m. Chimney fire at 32 No. 
Main Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 12, 6.40 p. m. Fire in smoke pipe in 
residence of M. L. Quimby, 64 No. Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 12, 8.29 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Webster, 116 School Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 13, 11.14 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Grace Reister, Grant Street, Plains District. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 13, 5.08 p. m. Chimney fire at 13 
Summer Street, Plains District. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 5.09 p. m. Barn on Long Pond 
Road owned by John Jordan and occupied by owner and 
George Watkins, Jr., destroyed. Cause unknown. Com- 
bination 1 responded but could do little but guard against 
forest fire. 



Value. 


LOS3. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, $2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


Contents : 








J.Jordan, 600.00 


400.00 


None 


None 


G. Watkins, Jr., 150.00 


150.00 


None 


None 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

Still. October 17, 5.55 p. m. Tree fire at 71 South 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Electric wire. No loss. 

Still. October 18, 2.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Louis Emmons, 2 Chandler Street. Combination 1 
responded. Building owned by Mary A. and Kate G. Lee. 
See next alarm. 

Box 413. October 18, 2.26 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 2.41 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $40.00 $1,000.00 $40.00 

Still. October 18, 3.21 p. m. Fire in leaves on grounds 
of E. J. Gallagher, 161 No. State Street. Caused probably 
by cigarette stub. Fence slightly burned. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Box 24. October 19, 8.59 p. m. Fire in building in rear 
of 122 No. Main Street owned by The Furniture Shop, Inc., 
and occupied by owner and Cutting Bros., ice cream makers. 
Cause unknown. Twenty-eight hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 10.24 p. m. Detail left to watch through the night. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$38,000.00 


$2,575.50 


$31,000.00 


$2,575.50 


Contents: 










Furniture Shop, 


18,000.00 


2,200.00 


16,200.00 


1,980.00 


Cutting Bros., 


4,500.00 


115.00 


4,500.00 


115.00 


Still. October 21, 12.50 p. 


m. Fire 


in leaves 


on Fiske 



Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 22, 4.33 a. m. Building on Ferry Street 
used as a stable, blacksmith shop and horse hospital badly 
damaged by fire. Seven horses perished. Cause of fire 
unknown. Combination 1 responded but before arrival a 
bell alarm had been sent in. See next alarm. Building 
owned and occupied by the Tenney Coal Co. 

Box 23. October 22, 4.34 a. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Eleven hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 6.59 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $1,000.00 $400.00 $400.00 

Contents, 2,500.00 2,300.00 2,200.00 2,025.00 



222 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 23, 9.11 p. m. Slight fire in residence, 
12 Prospect Street, occupied by Simon Bogasian. Cause, 
gas jet too near ceiling. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. October 24, 8.38 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Batchelder, 20 Pine Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 24, 10.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Emma Clay, 42 South Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 24, 12.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. N. A. McGrath, 8 No. Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 26, 4.34 p. m. Fire in smoke pipe in 
residence of Michael Mayo, 8 Woodman Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 28, 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of G. A. Noyes, 98 So. Main Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

" Still. October 29, 4.26 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of M. D. Chase, Dimond Hill, over Hopkinton line. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. As a token of 
appreciation Mr. Chase sent check for $25 to Combination 
Co., No. 1. 

Still. October 29, 8.07 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Griffin, Long Pond Road. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 29, 11.43 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Reed, East Penacook Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 29, 6.54 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Adelson Brocher, 35 No. Fruit Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

Still. October 31, 7.05 p. m. Reported fire in leaves, 
corner Beacon and Rumford Streets. Combination 2 
responded. No fire. 

Box 12. October .31, 8.10 p. m. Fire in East Concord 
which could be plainly seen from this side of the river 
afforded a pretext for pulling in an alarm. Equivalent to a 
false alarm. 

Box 15. October 31, 8.14 p. m. Same as preceding 
alarm. Recall 8.16 p. m. for both alarms. 

Still. October 31, 8.24 p. m. A call for assistance from 
East Concord. Engine 1 and Combination 1 sent. No 
assistance required. See East Concord report. 

Still. November 8, 2.50 p. m. Auto truck owned by 
W. J. Shine loaded with lumber owned by Boutwell, Upton 
& Boutwell, tipped over on lumber lot near the Burroughs 
place on the Dunbarton Road and took fire. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Auto, $1,500.00 $750.00 $900.00 $750.00 

Contents, 75.00 75.00 75.00 75.00 

Still. November 9, 4.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. H. Gates, 23 Fayette Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 11.17a.m. Slight fire in the Holt 
Bros. Mfg. Co. plant, 159 So. Main Street. Cause, prob- 
ably short circuit of electric wires. Combination 1 responded 
but before arrival a bell alarm had been sent in. See next 
alarm. 

Box 62. November 11, 11.19 a. m. Box pulled for 
preceding fire. Two hundred and fifty feet of hose wet, 
but not used in the building. Extinguished with shop line 
by employees. Recall 11.40 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ids. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $25,000.00 $75.89 $15,000.00 $75.89 
•Contents, 15,000.00 271.69 15,000.00 271.69 



224 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. November 13, 6.48 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of M. J. Roy, 80 Hall Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. A. Bartlett, 13 Jackson Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 13, 10.50 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Geo. F. Smythe, 112 Rumford Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 6. November 14, 8.24 a. m. Slight fire in the 
Abbott-Downing Co. plant. Extinguished by employees. 
Recall 8.30 a. m. No loss. 

Still. November 14, 11.10 a. m. A call for assistance 
from West Concord. Combination 1 sent. See West 
Concord report. 

Box 25. November 15, 11.05 a. m. Slight gasoline 
fire in State Garage, rear Eagle Hotel. Extinguished by 
employees. Recall 11.09 a. m. No loss. 

Still. November 15, 2.10 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of John Murphy, 18 So. Fruit Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 16, 8.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of S. B. Pedeare, No. Pembroke Road. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 16, 10.28 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Dennis Houle, 154 No. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 19, 12.19 p. m. Brush fire in Rollins 
Park. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 23, 3.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. E. Carr, 87 Broadway. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 8.31 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of S. R. Simpson, Black Hill. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

Still. November 25, 10.12 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of L. V. Stevens, 121 So. Main Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 11.42 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of P. H. Flanders, 32 West Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 5.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Carlson, 36 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 26, 1.29 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. M. Tappan, 36 Laurel Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 27, 1.00 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of John Stanley, 74 School Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 27, 7.19 p. m. Reported chimney 
fire in residence of P. S. Pettengill, 80 Broadwaj^. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. No 
loss. 

Still. December 1, 7.17 p. m. Slight fire in cellar of 
residence of A. King, 80 Water Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 8.52 a. m. A call for a chimney 
fire in residence of A. F. Cheney, Pembroke Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded but upon arrival found the Suncook 
apparatus there, and returned. 

Still. December 2, 11.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. Belleveau, 11 Pleasant Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 5, 9.14 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Samuel Geeno, 69 Washington Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 5, 8.30 p. m. Fire in building in rear 

of the Eagle Hotel, owned by the New Industries Corpora- 
is 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tion and occupied by the Leopold Morse Co. as a clothing 
manufactory. Cause unknown. Combination 1 responded 
but before arrival a bell alarm had been sent in. See next 
alarm. First run of Combination 1 on new chassis. 

Box 25. December 5, 8.31 p. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 8.45 
p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $14,000.00 $50.32 $14,000.00 $50.32 
Contents, 15,000.00 1,447.53 14,000.00 1,447.53 

Still. December 6, 3.28 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. A. Kendall, 22 Mills Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. K. Barstow, Loudon Road. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 4.49 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. E. C. Ramsey, 20 Prospect Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 1.36 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John A. Pilsbury, 28 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 10, 11.48 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of A. J. Copp, 10 Wheaton Avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 11, 8.44 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. E. Hardy, 42 Beacon Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 4.29 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Pedrick, 4 Foster Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 23. December 13, 6.36 p. m. Chimnej^ fire in 
residence of Shirley Morgan, 208 No. Main Street. Need- 
less alarm. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

Still. December 15, 6.57 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William Leanvales, 11 Montgomery Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 16, 5.27 a. m. Fire in the Theobald 
Apartment Building, 51 South Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but before arrival a bell alarm had been sent in. 
Fire originated in the basement and ran throughout the 
building. Cause of fire unknown. See next alarm. 

Box 48. December 16, 5.29 a. m. Box pulled for pre- 
ceding fire. Thirty-one hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. 
Recall 11.20 a. m. 

Still. Steamer 4 called to assist at preceding fire. 
Engine worked three and one-half hours. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $45,000 . 00 $22,248 . 00 $25,000 . 00 $22,248.00 
Contents: 

Mrs. W. N. Rogers, 1,500.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 

H. F. Flye, 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Elizabeth Murphy, 1,200.00 800.00 800.00 800.00 

C.F.Archer, 2,500.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 2,000.00 

R.Lindsay, 1,000.00 450.00 450.00 450.00 
Margaret and Mary 

Flavin, 2,000.00 1,156.50 1,200.00 1,156.50 

J. H. Wason, 2,500.00 200.00 None None 

Mrs. F. B. Flanders, 1,000.00 400.00 None None 

Still. December 19, 8.02 a. m. A call to the damaged 
Theobald Apartment Building, 51 South Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded. Steam mistaken for smoke. No fire. 

Still. December 19, 12.13 p. m. A call to 5 No. Main 
Street. Steam mistaken for smoke. Combination 1 re- 
sponded. No fire. 

Still. December 20, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of H. H. Webber, 9 Concord Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. December 22, 9.04 a. m. Slight fire in soot 
around boiler in basement of building, 70 No. Main Street. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. December 24, 12.32 a. m. Fire in the Optima 
Building, 7 Pleasant Street, owned by Chas. C. Schoolcraft 
and occupied by the A. Perley Fitch Co., drugs, and Eva 
Dupuis, milliner. Cause unknown. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. See 
next alarm. 

Box 35. December 24, 12.33 a. m. Box pulled for 
preceding fire. Twenty-eight hundred and fifty feet of 
hose wet. Recall 1.48 a. m. 

Box 35. December 24, 12.35 a. m. Box needlessly 
pulled again for same fire. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $25,000.00 $7,960.00 $9,500.00 $7,960.00 

Contents: 

A. Perley Fitch Co., 10,000.00 9,000.00 9,500.00 9,000.00 

Eva A. Dupuis, 7,600.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Still. December 24, 11.08 a. m. A call to 135 So. 
Spring Street for a chimney fire by mistake. Should have 
been 135 So. State Street. Combination 1 responded. No 
fire. See next alarm. 

Still. December 24, 11.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. E. Ferrin, 135 So. State Street. Engine 2 
responded. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 3.45 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 92 No. Main Street. Steam pipe covering 
found afire in basement. Extinguished by detail sent from 
Central Station. No loss. 

Still. December 28, 5.12 p. m. Same as preceding call. 
More covering removed from steam pipes b}' detail from 

( Vntral Station. No loss. 

Still. December 29, 2.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Emil Seymour, 46 Stone Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 11.03 a. m. Fire in building, 26 
Bridge Street, owned by C. H. Swain & Co. and occupied 
by owner for machining, finishing and milling of lumber. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

Caused by flare-back from boiler into shavings. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm was sent in. 
See next alarm. 

Box 242. December 30, 11.05 a. m. Box pulled for 
preceding fire. Fourteen hundred feet of hose wet. Recall 
11.59 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $8,000.00 $1,248.00 $3,500.00 $1,248.00 

Contents, 400.00 400.00 None None 

Still. December 30, 2.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harold Gilmore, Stickney Hill. Extinguished by 
Combination 1, using pair horses and sleigh from St. Paul's 
School. No loss. 

Penacook. 

Still. January 2, 10.35 a. m. Chimney fire in Little 
Block, corner Summer and Main Streets. No loss. 

Still. January 2, 6.28 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Ernest Barker, Elm Street. 

Box 32. January 2, 6.30 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 6.53 p. m. 
No loss. 

Still. January 22, 12.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Beede, 7 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. January 22, 12.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Nelson Jemery, Burrough Road. No loss. 

Box 31. January 22, 10.58 p. m. Fire in residence, 
Elm Street, owned and occupied by William O'Clair. 
Caused by overheated chimney. Extinguished with chem- 
icals. Recall 12.05 a. m., 23d instant. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,500.00 $200.00 $2,700.00 $200.00 

Contents, 800.00 50.00 700.00 50.00 

Still. January 25, 3.10 a. m. Fire in residence, 8 
Union Street, owned by Mrs. James Bowers and occupied 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

by Larry Eisenheur. Caused by overheated chimney. 
Extinguished with chemicals. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,200.00 $87.80 $800.00 $87.80 

Still. January 25, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 159 No. Main Street, Boscawen side. 

Still. January 28, 4.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of James Freeman, 6 Rolfe Street. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buikling, $2,500.00 $25.00 $975.00 $25.00 

Still. January 31, 12.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. H. Hoyt, 12 Summit Street. No loss. 

Still. February 1, 8.10 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
16 Center Street, owned by Mrs. George Marsh. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 8.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dr. C. L. True, 23 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 9.58 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Charles Duchaime, 17 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. February 12, 4.20 p. m. Slight fire in store in 
basement of the Washington House, Main Street. Hay 
in back store caught fire from unknown cause. No damage 
to contents of store or hotel, but main building slightly 
damaged by smoke. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $35.00 $10,000.00 $35.00 

Box 31. February 17, 6.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Rheaumen, Chandler Street. Extinguished 
with chemicals. Recall 7.23 p. m. No loss. 

Still. February 26, 6.55 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Alexander Block, So. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. February 27, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. Duclos, 9 Bye Street. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Eli Laflamme, 125 So. Main Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 

Box 35. March 22, 6.35 a. m. Slight fire in lunch cart 
at Washington Street. Gasoline ignited near stove. Re- 
call 6.45 a. m. No loss. 

Still. March 29, 4.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Alex LaCoy, 10 Pine Street. No loss. 

Still. April 4, 7.35 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle Block, 
Main Street. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 6.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
16 Penacook Street, owned by A. W. Rolfe. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 3.35 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Dudley Smith, 20 High Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. April 24, 3.50 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by George Runnells, near the Mast Yard depot. Labored 
two hours. Recall 5.38 p. m. 

Still. April 25, 11.05 a. m. Brush fire on the A. Hib- 
bard lot, So. Main Street. Party burning brush lost con- 
trol. Fire communicated to lumber pile in rear of residence 
of Mrs. Stephen Hanson. Labored two hours. Wet 500 
feet of hose and used two chemical tanks. Loss trifling. 

Still. April 25, 3.00 p. m. Grass fire in rear of resi- 
dence of John Sessions, 75 High Street. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 2.30 p. m. Grass fire in rear of resi- 
dence of Wynn Fowler, 55 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 7.00 p. m. Grass fire, corner So. Main 
and West Main Streets. No loss. 

Still. April 30, 8.37 a. m. Fire on roof of residence of 
Fred Frechette, No. Main Street, Boscawen side. Com- 
bination responded. 

Box 35. April 30, 8.45 a. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Steamer and hose wagon responded. Six hundred 
feet of hose wet. Recall 9.33 a. m. See Boscawen report. 

4-4-4. April 30, 3.05 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by George Brockway, Boscawen side. Combination with 
detail responded. 



232 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Box 47. May 3, 9.25 p. m. Fire in factory owned and 
occupied by the J. E. Symonds Table Co., Symonds Court. 
Combination car, steamer and hose wagon responded, as 
did Torrent Hose Co. from Boscawen side, and quickly had 
three hydrant and two steamer streams on the fire. Motor- 
driven pumping engine with detail were sent from the pre- 
cinct and had two more lines. The fire started in the boiler 
room from flare-back of fire in boiler after it had been banked 
for the night, quickly igniting the sawdust and shavings in a 
room next to the boiler room and rapidly extending the 
whole length of the building, evidently following the pipes 
used to convey sawdust and shavings to the boiler room. 
The main shop, store houses, dry house and office were a 
complete loss. A large amount of lumber in the yard was 
burned and a dwelling house owned by the company and 
occupied by Louis Dione was badly damaged, and it was 
only by keeping the building thoroughly wet that the CM. 
and A. W. Rolfe plant and the George R. Bean residence 
were prevented from burning. During the fire, two em- 
ployees, John Amor and Arthur Couch entered the shop, 
were overcome with smoke and perished, their bodies being 
found the next morning. Pioneer Engine worked thirteen 
'consecutive hours. Eagle Engine worked seven hours and 
fifteen minutes. Forty-five hundred feet of hose wet. 
Recall 4.35 p. m., 4th instant. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, 


$53,600. 55 $52,400. 55 


$32,000.00131,700.00 


Residence, 


2,500.00 


572.65 


1,000.00 


572.65 


Contents : 










Symonds Co., 


93,112.89 


89,753 . 69 


78,000.00 


78,000.00 


Concord Electric Co., 


800.00 


800.00 


None 


None 


Louis Dione, 


700 . 00 


125.00 


None 


None 


George Currier, 


200.00 


200.00 


100.00 


100.00 


Residence of George R. 










Bean damaged by 










water. 










Building, 


1,000.00 


125.00 


S00.00 


125 . 00 



Still. May 3, 10.00 p. m. Fire on roof of barn owned 
by Felico Engie, 53 Summer Street. Caused by sparks from 
the Symonds Co. fire. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 233 

Box 35. May 3, 10.47 p. m. Fire on roof of residence 
of Charles Barnett, 9 Merrimack Street. Caused by sparks 
from the Symonds Co. fire. Recall 11.15 p. m. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. May 5, 1.00 p. m. Fire in smoke pipe in resi- 
dence of Harry Jerrold, 48 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. May 8, 6.45 p. m. A call to wet down the ruins 
of the Symonds Co. fire. 

Still. May 12, 11.15 p. m. Fire in tenement house, 
Boscawen side. Combination responded. 

Box 35. May 12, 11.20 p. m. Box pulled for preceding- 
fire. Steamer and hose wagon responded. Seventeen 
hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 12.55 a. m., 13th 
instant. See Boscawen report. 

Box 35. May 17, 11.59 p. m. Fire in the Strand Mov- 
ing Picture Theatre, No. Main Street, owned and occupied 
by George Beede. Fire started under the floor near the 
stage from some unknown cause. Not much damage by 
fire but considerable by smoke and water. Theatre building , 
built against the Spicer Block, and both insured as one 
building. No damage outside the theatre part of building. 
Seven hundred and fifty feet of hose wet. Recall 12.55 
a. m., 18th instant. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ius. Paid. 

Building, $16,000.00 $1,500.00 $14,000.00 $1,160.00 
Contents, 5,000.00 2,600.00 14,000.00 2,600.00 

Still. May 28, 3.58 p. m. A call to the Washington 
House to investigate cause of smoke. Furnace full of 
rubbish afire. House full of smoke. No loss. 

Still. May 31, 7.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block, 6 Summer Street, owned by Carl G. Holmes. No 
loss. 

Still. June 8, 11.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
James Coveney, 3 Bye Street. No loss. 



234 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. June 14, 8.55 p. m. Fire in pile of rubbish near 
the Congregational Chapel, Merrimack Avenue. No loss. 

Still. June 30, 7.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
George Gage, 41 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. June 26, 8.35 p. m. Slight fire on roof of Ex- 
change Block. No loss. 

Box 35. July 7, 7.00 a. m. Slight fire in building on 
W. Canal Street owned and occupied by Walter Beede as 
an electrical instrument shop. Clothing hanging behind 
oil stove caught fire. Recall 7.05 a. m. No loss. 

Still. July 14, 8.12 a. m. Slight fire on roof of resi- 
dence, 26 Summer Street, owned by Nelson Matott. Caused 
by spark from chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $10.00 $1,500.00 $10.00 

Still. July 30, 3.30 p. m. Grass fire on main road to 
Concord. No loss. 

Still. July 30, 4.00 p. m. Grass fire on Penacook 
Road. No loss. 

Still. July 31, 5.40 a. m. Tar kettle afire at the E. L. 
Davis gravel bank, Boscawen side. Kettle owned by the 
Colburn Construction Co. See Boscawen report. 

Still. August 6, 11.40 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Roberts, 127 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. August 10, 9.12 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Lanoix, 87 High Street. No loss. 

Still. August 11, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. Fournier, So. Main Street. No loss. 

Box 37. August 15, 2.05 a. m. Fire in pile of slabs at 
the Davis wood yard, Washington Street. Wet 1,050 feet 
of hose. Recall 2.48 a. m. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 18, 5.35 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
E. L. Davis, 35 Penacook Street. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



235 



Still. September 12, 6.30 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of F. W. Sargent, 28 Penacook Street. No loss. 

Box 35. September 14, 2.50 p. m. Fire in Eagle Block, 
So. Main Street, owned by Farrand & Chandler and occu- 
pied b} r George E. Farrand. Groceries and four-tenement 
residence. Fire originated in the attic from an unknown 
cause. This building being of wood and located in a hazard- 
ous district, all of the Penacook apparatus was utilized. 
Torrent Hose Co. of Boscawen also responded. Combina- 
tion and motor-driven pumping engine sent from the city 
proper. Pumping engine not used, but Combination 1 
crew laid one hydrant line. Two thousand feet of hose wet. 
Recall 4.49 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$5,000.00 


$3,500.00 


$2,500.00 


$2,500.00 


Contents : 










George E. Farrand, 


4,500.00 


1,600.00 


3,250.00 


1,600.00 


Nelson Case, 


750.00 


100.00 


None 


None 


C. Robichaud, 


550.00 


200.00 


300.00 


200.00 


Arthur Fournier, 


700.00 


400.00 


350.00 


350.00 


Levi Chevrette, 


750.00 


200.00 


None 


None 



Still. September 16, 8.50 a. m. Electric car, Wash- 
ington Street. Wire down. No loss. 

Box 39. September 17, 3.30 a. m. Slight fire on roof of 
shed at Farrand's wood yard, incendiary. Four hundred 
feet of hose wet. Recall 3.50 a. m. Loss trifling. 

Box 39. September 17, 3.57 a. m. Fire in waste paper 
receptacle in office in building of the Black Fox Farm, 
incendiary. Extinguished with chemical. Recall 4.24 
a. m. No loss. 

Still. September 19, 11.18 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of C. H. Barrett, 4 Washington 
Street. Fire just built in furnace. 

Still. September 25, 6.25 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block owned by Walter Fox. 8 High Street. No loss. 

Still. September 29, 7.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Carl Parker, 36 Summer Street. No loss. 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 13, 6.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Thomas Tierney, 36 Center Street. No loss. 

Still. October 18, 4.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Sarah Eaton, 30 High Street. No loss. 

Still. October 20, 3.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of David Wood, 25 Fremont Street, Boscawen side. No 
loss. 

Still. October 24. Chimney fire in residence of Harry 
Jerrold, 48 Summer Street. No loss. 

4-4-4. October 31, 1.40 p. m. In response to call for 
assistance in extinguishing a brush fire at Canterbury 
Depot, detail sent with motor-driven combination car. 
From there went to brush fire near the railroad station at 
Boise. Recall 4.15 p. m. 

Box 37. November 1, 1.10 p. m. Brush fire in rear of 
residence of E. Puliot, Electric Avenue. Recall 1.26 p. m. 

Still. November 5, 1.40 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. S. Putney, 31 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 6.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Howard Moore, 5 Elm Street. No loss. 

Still. November 22, 4.40 p. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Fred Wilson, 109 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. November 25, 3.25 a. m. Grass fire on land 
owned by Charles Wiggin, Boscawen side. See Boscawen 
report. 

Still. November 25, - 5.45 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Creaser Block, 19 So. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. November 26, 8.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence, 57 So. Main Street, owned by Catherine Connelly. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $10.00 $1,200.00 $10.00 

Still. November 28, 4.40 p. m. Grass fire on Pleasant 
Street opposite the Dr. Holbrook residence. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 237 

Still. December 2, 10.35 a.m. Grass fire near slaughter 
house owned by Henry Sewall, Boscawen side. 

Still. December 7, 10.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Bassett, 30 E. Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 8.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Howard Moore, 5 Elm Street. No loss. 

Still. December 19, 8.15 p. m. Chimney fire in 
Exchange Block, So. Main Street. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 7.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Archie Preve, 54 Summer Street. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. James Garvey, 96 So. Main Street. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,500.00 $12.00 $1,500.00 $12.00 

Still. December 26, 8.55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. H. Garvin, Penacook Road. No loss. 

East Concord. 

Still. February 8, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Harry Terrill, Shaker Street. No loss. 

Bell. May 22, 10.30 p. m. Set of buildings on Depot 
Street owned by James Hussey and occupied by Arthur 
Gagnon and Louis Moulton destroyed. Section house 
owned and occupied by the B. & M. R. R. also destroyed. 
Cause of fire unknown. Assistance summoned from 
precinct. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 



Buildings: 










J. Hussey, 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


Contents: 










A. Gagnon, 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


None 


None 


L. Moulton, 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


None 


None 


Building: 










*B. & M. R. R. 


, 2,000.00 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


*Contents, 


800.00 


576.73 


600.00 


576.73 


* Exposure loss. 





238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. June 8, 7.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Harold Chamberlin, Portsmouth Street. No loss. 

Still. June 20, 12.05 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Albert Morrill, E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. September 6, 6.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Arthur Powell, Shawmut Street. No loss. 

Bell. September 15, 5.45 p. m. Barn on Depot Street 
owned and occupied by R. W. Weir destroyed. Struck by 
lightning. Total loss. Five hundred feet of hose wet. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $700.00 $700.00 $100.00 $100.00 

Contents, 250.00 250.00 None None 

Bell. September 15, 7.15 p. m. Tool house on Parker 
Street owned by Adelaide LaRochelle destroyed. Lighted 
lantern too near gasoline. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $300.00 $300.00 None None 

Contents, 150.00 150.00 None None 

Bell. October 31, 12.45 p. m. Brush fire on the Inter- 
vale. No loss. 

Bell. October 31, 1.45 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by John Sanborn and John Morrill on the Mountain Road. 
No loss. 

Bell. October 31, 6.04 p. m. Barn on Depot Street 
owned by Mary F. Robinson destroyed with contents. 
Cause unknown. Occupied by Geo. O. Robinson. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$900.00 


$900.00 


$400.00 


$400.00 


Contents, 


800.00 


800.00 


500.00 


500.00 



Bell. November 1, 2.15 a. m. Needless alarm for 
preceding fire. 

Still. November 13, 1.30 p. m. Grass fire on land 
owned by Sophia Fernald on E. Penacook Street. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 4.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Andrew Beauchesne, Mill Street. No loss. 



fire department. 239 

West Concord. 

Still. January 2, 5.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. E. Lynch, 446 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. January 18, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Engstrom, Sewell's Falls Road. No loss. 

Still. February 2, 9.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Eino Helen, 453 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. April 28, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Alfred Abbott, Penacook Road. No loss. 

Bell. April 30, 3.40 p. m. Brush fire on Lightning Hill, 
Concord. Detail sent to assist. Labored three hours. 

Bell. May 16, 4.15 p. m. Brush fire on land owned by 
Carter and Griffin, Parsonage Hollow. Labored one hour. 

Still. May 26, 10.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. F. Spofford, Hutchins Street. No loss. 

Still. July 3, 11.50 p. m. Slight fire in engine room of 
building owned by the John Swenson Granite Co. Building 
located in the city quarry. Extinguished with chemicals. 
No loss. 

Bell. July 4, 12.03 a. m. Same as preceding fire. 
Boy's work. 

Still. July 12, 10.57 a. m. Fire in pile of old sleepers 
owned by the B. & M. R. R., on the bog. No loss. 

Still. August 31, 8.50 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Arthur Olkroness, 15 Knight Street. No loss. 

Still. October 13, 8.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Albert Johnson, 462 No. State Street. No loss. 

Bell. November 14, 10.55 a. m. House on the West 
Parish Road owned by Leonard R. Carter and occupied by 
Edwin Abbott destroyed. Caused by defective chimney. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $500.00 $500.00 None None 

Contents, 100.00 100.00 None None 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bell. November 14, 11.00 a. m. Second call for pre- 
ceding fire. 

Still. November 16, 2.45 p. m. Grass fire by the side 
of railroad track, in the bog. No loss. 

Still. December 2, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Anna Nelson, 556 No. State Street. No loss. 

Bell. December 4, 6.00 a. m. Fire in power station, 
Electric Avenue, owned and occupied by the Concord 
Electric Railway. Cause unknown. Five hundred and 
fifty feet of hose wet. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $6,000.00 $1,800.00 $1,800.00 $1,800.00 

Contents, 40,000.00 28,200.00 27,200.00 27,200.00 

Still. December 20, 6.00 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
kettle of lard taking fire on stove in residence of E. Peck- 
amer, 488 No. State Street. . No loss. 

Bell. December 22, 9.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. F. Noonan, Long Pond Road. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 241 

SUMMARY, 1922. 

Insurance 

Buildings. Value. Loss. Insurance. Paid. Net Loss. 

Precinct $384,453.00 $6.5,649.96 $224,800.00 $60,276.96 $5,373.00 

Peuacook 104,300.55 58,478.00 68,975.00 36,437.45 22,040.55 

East Concord 5,900.00 5,900.00 4,500.00 1,500.00 1,400.00 

West Concord 6,500 . 00 2,300 . 00 1,800 . 00 1 ,800 . 00 500 . 00 

Total $501,153.55 $132,327.96 $300,075.00 $103,014.41 $29,313.55 

Contents. 

Precinct $573,449.97 $49,595.59 $491,468.74 $41,1S2.2S $8,413.31 

Penacook 102,862.89 93,428.69 82,700.00 80,300.00 13,128.69 

East Concord 4,000.00 3,776.73 1,100.00 1,076.73 2,700.00 

West Concord 40,100.00 2S,300.00 27,200.00 27,200.00 1,100.00 



Total $720,412.86 $175,101.01 $602,468.74 $149,759.01 $25,342.00 

Buildings 501,153.55 132,327.96 300,075.00 103,014.41 29,313.55 



Buildings and Contents. .. . $1,221,566.41 $307,428.97 $902,543.74 $252,773 42 $54,655.55 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as fol- 
lows: 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, ''Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine 
and hose car, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine. Com- 
pany (15 men); one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kear- 
sarge," and auto-combination car, attached to the Kearsarge 
Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men); one second-class 
Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in charge 
of an engineer and fireman, one auto-combination car 
in charge of four permanent men; one ladder truck, "City 
of Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder Company (21 
men); one house man at Central Fire Station. There are 
four horses kept at this station. There are eleven permanent 
men located at the Central Fire Station, one permanent man 
at each fire station within the precinct, one permanent man 
at Pioneer Station, Penacook, and one permanent man at 
Cataract Station, West Concord. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has an auto-combination car, with permanent 
man. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car, with permanent man. 

16 



242 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One chemical engine, one hand engine and four wagons in 
reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons and one auto-combination car with permanent 
man. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, 
has a modern hose wagon and auto-combination car with 
permanent man. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4^-inch cylinder 
Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and one 
hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, and 
one auto-combination car. 



Hose. 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



8,000 feet cotton, rubber lined 
3,200 " 
1,400 " 
500 " 



13,100 



No. Main Street, rear Court House, 
No. State Street, corner of Washington Street, 
Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street, 
School Street, corner of Summit Street, 



Capacity 
Cubic Feet. 

2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
3,500 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



243 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1922. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green Office, Central Fire Station 



Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst. Shipping clerk 

Sylvester T. Ford, 2d Asst. Molder 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge 



C. E. Robinson 



George W. Kemp 



WARD 1. 
Electrician 



WARD 2. 



Clerk 



WARD 3. 



Overseer 



1 1 Beacon Street 
41 So. Main Street 



61 Merrimack Street 



Penacook St., East Concord 



16 Fisher St., West Concord 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

J. Edward Morrison, Captain Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk 

Herbert M. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

1 J. Edward Morrison 

2 Charles Powell 

3 Herbert M. Sanders 

4 George B. Davis 

5 Harry P. Blake 

6 Harry L. Messer 

7 W. C. B. Saltmarsh 

8 George L. Livingston 

9 Everett D. Davis 

10 Frank E. Hudson 

11 Roger F. Strong 

12 Nelson E. Strong 

13 Daniel F. Murphy 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist 
Machinist 
Cashier 

Carriage painter 
Machinist 
Machinist 
Carriage trimmer 
Machinist 
Machinist 
Machinist 
Printer 
Printer 
Chauffeur 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street 
75 Center Street 
34 Franklin Street 
32 Pleasant Street 
17 Albin Street 
3 Broadway 
37 Thorndike Street. 
57 Franklin Street 
61 Washington Street 
90 Warren Street 
"\ Lyndon Street. 
16i So. Spring Street 
Central Fire Station. 



244 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 1. 





OFFICERS. 


J. C. McGilvray, Captain 






MEMBERS 


Badge 




Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


18, John C. McGilvray 


Chauffeur 


19 David J. Adams 


Theatre manager 


20 John M. Inman 


Custodian 


24 John B. McLeod 


Electrician 


25 Willis J. Sawyer 


Machinist 


22 Eli Langlois 


Painter 


29 Philip J. O'Connell 


Clerk 


21 Charles W. Downing 


Clerk 


27 Fred J. Johnston 


Gas fitter 


28 James H. Brannigan 


Plumber 


26 Raymond L. Galfetti 


Gas fitter 


23 Clarence G. Howsser 


Electrician 


14 Henry E. Drew 


Chauffeur 


30 Christopher Cunningham 


Chauffeur 



D. J. Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk 



Residences. 
35 Washington Street 

9 Thompson Street 

16 WaU Street 

11 Green Street 
102 So. State Street 
5 Perry Avenue 

5§ Perry Avenue 

12 South Street 

10 Abbott Street 

11 Princeton Street 
130 Rumford Street 

17 Dartmouth Street 
Central Fire Station 
Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



Nos. Names. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman 



RELIEF ENGINE. 

Occupations. 
Machinist 
Blacksmith 



Residences. 
78 So. State Street 
81 So. State Street 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 



John M. Davis, Captain 



Milo G. Davis, Lieutenant and Clerk 



F. C. Young, Treasurer 



* 


MEMBERS. 




Badge 






Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 J. M. Davis 


Blacksmith 


5 Cambridge Street 


37 M. G. Davis 


Builder 


6 Beacon Street 


43 F. G. White 


Laborer 


12 Montgomery Street 


44 H. D. Gay 


Tinsmith 


17 Green Street 


42 F. C. Young 


Printer 


109 Rumford Street 


39 H. F. Walker 


Chauffeur 


34 Jackson Street 


40 J. E. Murphy 


Printer 


171 No. State Street 


45 M. H. Mulligan 


Insurance agent 


6* Walker Street 


41 T. S. Pillsbury 


Printer 


111 No. State Street 


38 A. E. Hardy 


Clerk 


12 Charles Street 


46 F. H. Silver 


Chauffeur 


Alert Station 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



245 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

Hiram T. Dickerman, Captain Harry L. Peacock, Lieutenint and Clerk 

A. W. Thompson, Treasurer 





MEMBERS. 




Badge 






Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


50 H. T. Dickerman 


Master painter i 


36 Broadway 


51 Harry L. Peacock 


Painter 


36 Warren Street 


55 Harry H. Ash 


Machinist 


23£ Perley Street 


57 Albert W. Thompson 


Janitor 


12 Allison Street 


59 Albert F. Ferrin 


Electrician 


104 So. State Street 


54 John W. McGowan 


Plumber 


248 No. State Street 


56 Jerry E. Cochrane 


Molder 


36 Downing Street 


52 Edward W. Burgess 


Barber 


7l| No. State Street 


53 Percy H. Flanders 


Carpenter 


32 West Street 


58 Willis S. Ash 


Auto trimmer 


23| Perley Street 


60 W. H. Happney 


Chauffeur 


Good Will Station 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 

OFFICERS. 



Will A. King, Captain 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King 

65 Sam B. Morgan 

77 Ned E. Herrin 

73 Ed. E. Lane 

69 Lucius D. Caldon 
68 Henry V. Tittemore 

70 George W. Grover 

71 Daniel Crowley 

72 Stephen P. Foster 

74 Bion W. Hall 

75 Edwin H. French 

79 Louis Cote 

80 Clarence L. Clark 

81 Bert J. Heath 

83 Harry Leary 

76 Bert T. Upham 

78 Earl W. Gaige 

66 James F. Byrne 

82 Perley S. Badger 

67 Shirley C. Clark 

84 A. J. Ladd 



Sam B. Morgan, Lieutenant and Clerk 



Ned Herrin, Treasurer 
MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Machinist 
Woodworker 
Carpenter 
Woodworker 
Woodworker 
Teamster 
Woodworker 
Coachman 
Woodworker 
Carpenter 
Woodworker 
Carpenter 
Clerk 

Woodworker 
Plumber 
Machinist 
Carpenter 
Gas fitter 
Auto repairer 

R. R. shop 

Driver 



38 Franklin Street 
10 Avon Street 
18 School Street 
5 Fremont Street 

13 West Street 

57 Dunklee Street 

29 Thorndike Street 
130 Warren Street 

14 Wall Street 

15 Humphrey Street 

30 Green Street 
34 Downing Street 
71 South Street 
100 So. Fruit Street 
22 Fremont Street 
25 Thorndike Street 
5 Charles Street 

32 Water Street 
45 Tremont Street 

33 Thorndike Street 
Central Fire Station 



246 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 





OFFICERS. 




M. S. Wakefield, Captain 


MEMBERS. 


M. J. Martin, Lieutei 


Badge 






Not. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


91 M. S. Wakefield 


Captain 


Central Station 


92 M. J. Martin 


Lieutenant 


Central Station 


93 M. R. Piper 


Chauffeur 


Central Station 


94 J. H. Brunei 


Chauffeur 

Spare Men. 


Central Station 


95 F. P. McKenna 


Chauffeur 


Central Station 


96 George H. Eastman 


Chauffeur 

House Man. 
A. L. Downing 


Central Station 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

Penacook. 



Henry Rolfe, Captain 



Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe 

101 Frank P. Robertson 

102 Alfred Beddow 

120 Harry F. Jones 

111 Edmund Banker 
110 JohnB. Dodge 

113 Peter A. Keenan 

118 George A. Griffin 

123 William Corbett 

124 Delmar R. Jones 

119 William H. Holbrook 
117 Guy B. Chase 

121 Albert Cassaveaugh 
105 Cornelius W. O'Brien 
108 Alfred J. York 

112 Richard McBride 

122 George L. Miner 

125 George D. Dowd 

114 William H. McGirr 
116 Harvey Matott 

103 Frank D. O'Brien 



OFFICERS. 




Frank P. Robertson, Lieut. 


, Clerk and Treasurer 


Alfred Beddow, Engineer 




MEMBERS. 




Occupations. 


Residences. 


Highway agent 


26 Penacook Street 


Machinist 


6 Church Street 


Stationary engineer 


17 South Main Street 


Teamster 


7 Washington Street 


Machinist 


Elm Street 


Glazier 


59 Merrimack Street 


Table maker 


92 High Street 


Painter 


3 Spring Street 


Second hand 


44 Centre Street 


Miller 


123 Merrimack Street 


Miller 


10 Church Street 


Miller 


6 Union Street 


Table maker 


9 Union Street 


Mill hand 


43 South Main Street 


Spinner 


7 Church Street 


Clerk 


10 Union Street 


Electrician 


High Street 


Clerk 


24 Charles Street 


Foreman 


12 Summer Street 


Teamster 


Washington Street 


Chauffeur 


Pioneer Station 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



247 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 
East Concord. 





OFFICERS. 




George 0. Robinson, Captain 




John C. Hutchinb 


Walter C. Sanborn, Lieutenant and Clerk 


Michael Lacroi 




MEMBERS. 




Badge 






Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


120 George 0. Robinson 


Water dealer 


Penacook Street 


121 Walter C. Sanborn 


Woodworker 


Portsmouth Street 


122 John C. Hutchins 


Engineer 


Penacook Street 


125 Samuel G. Potter 


Milk dealer 


Appleton Street 


126 William E. Virgin 


Carpenter 


Penacook Street 


127 Rufus C. Boynton 


Belt maker 


Penacook Street 


128 Shad Cate 


Farmer 


Pembroke Street 


129 Ross W. Cate 


Horseshoer 


Penacook Street 


130 Herbert Knowles 


Carpenter 


Penacook Street 


131 Parker French 


Janitor 


Penacook Street 


132 Westley Field 


Milkman 


Penacook Street 


133 John W. Sanborn 


Farmer 


Penacook Street 


136 Arthur P. Swain 


Molder 


Penacook Street 


123 Michael Lacroix 


Blacksmith 


Penacook Street 


137 Clarence Tibbetts 


Clerk 


Penacook Street 


138 Reuben L. Cate 


Carpenter 


Cemetery Street 


135 John T. Cate 


Carpenter 


Shawmut Street 


140 C. A. Chamberlin 


Farmer 


Shawmut Street 


139 William F. Paige 


Painter 


Shawmut Street 


143 H. A. Stuart 


Storekeeper 


Penacook Street 


144 Hiram Gardner 


Blacksmith 


Pembroke Street 


146 Thomas Morrison 


Machinist 


Kearsarge Street 


147 Fred Gardner 


Woodworker 


Pembroke Street 


149 Fred J. Carter 


Stonecutter 


Penacook Street 


148 Claude H. Swain 


Clerk 


Penacook Street 


142 William E. Batchelder 


Machinist 


Penacook Street 


141 Herbert F. Piper 


Carpenter 


Pembroke Street 


124 William Cate 


Farmer 


Pembroke Street 


134 Ernest W. Cate 


Carpenter 


Shawmut Street 


145 George E. Robinson 


Plumber 


Portsmouth Street 



248 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

West Concord. 

OFFICERS. 



Alfred J. Fraser, Captain 



Names. 
Alfred J. Fraser 
Jeremiah Cotter 
Andrew J. Abbott 
Patrick Ryan 
Abial C. Abbott 
Edward Lovering 
Joseph Daly 
Robert Henry 
Frank Peterson 
Matthew H. Peabody 
Carl A. Anderson 
Carl A. Eckstrom 
Oscar Johnson 
Henry Richardson 
Frank C. Blodgett 
John H. Cushnie 
Arthur B. Spead 
Eric D. Johnson 
Axel S. Swanson 



Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer 



Jeremiah Cotter, Lieutenant and Clerk 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Stonecutter 
Blacksmith 
Farmer 
Stonecutter 
Quarryman 
Stonecutter 
Blacksmith 
Silversmith 
Stonecutter 
Stationary engineer 
Stationary engineer 
Stonecutter 
Stonecutter 
Foreman 
Stonecutter 
Silver spinner 
Stationary engineer 
Quarryman 
Chauffeur 



Residences. 
10 River Street 

5 Engel Street 

382 North State Street 
50 Hutchins Street 
513 North State Street 
1 Clark Street 
455 North State Street 
513 North State Street 
346 North State Street 
9 Knight Street 
9 Lake Street 
Gladstone Avenue 
516 North State Street 

6 Dam Street 

436 North State Street 
543 North State Street 
441 North State Street 
406 North State Street 
Cataract Station 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 

OFFICERS. 



Frank F. Morse, Captain 



Dennis Holloran 
T. J. Morrison 
Elba F. Home 
Arthur H. Britton 
O. C. Hodgdon 
W. D. Hutchinson 
E. F. Richardson 



S. S. Upham, First Lieutenant 
H. T. Dickerman, Second Lieutenant 



MEMBERS. 
J. G. McQuilkin 
A. B. Morrison 
D. P. Wheeler 
Henry Tucker 
W. K. Wingate 
L. S. Richardson 
H. C. Taylor 



Fred 0. Libby 
M. F. Thompson 
E. J. Brown 
A. L. Dickerman 
Charles C. Moore 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
N. H.: 

The Trustees of the Public Library herewith transmit 
the annual report of the librarian, showing in outline the 
work of the year, which compares favorably with that of 
recent years. 

During the year 1922 the City of Concord has been most 
fortunate in having the same faithful and efficient servants 
in charge of its library as in years past, whereby a maximum 
of service has been maintained at a minimum of cost. 

The trustees find it necessary to make some increases in 
salaries in order to bring them more nearly in line with those 
attached to library service in the other cities of the state 
and with the salaries in other important branches of public 
service. This increase will be met by the income from the 
Benjamin Kimball Fund, which has become available during 
the present year. 

There should be a somewhat larger expenditure for books, 
and for the care and upkeep of the building and grounds 
during the coming year. 

In view of these conditions the trustees voted to ask the 
Mayor and Board of Aldermen to appropriate the sum of 
$7,000, the same as last year, for the support of the library 
for the year 1923, believing this to be the smallest amount 
possible for the creditable and efficient conduct of the 
library. This appropriation is requested on the under- 
standing that the income from the Samuel C. Eastman 
Fund is to be added to the principal as a permanent fund 

249 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

available for additional or adequate building accommoda- 
tions whenever it may seem best to undertake such im- 
provements. 

Respectfully submitted, 



February 15, 1923. 



THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1922. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 
Gentlemen: The annual report is herewith submitted: 

Receipts. 
Balance from last year, $20 . 39 

Appropriation, 7,000.00 

Interests: 

Cogswell, $85.90 

Lyon, 40.00 

Pierce, 40.00 

Valpey, 20 . 00 

Hazeltine, 133 . 54 

Jones, 25.08 

Eastman, 50 . 00 

Chase, 42.50 

Savings bank, 121.60 

Ridgwood Ld., 102.00 

Kimball, 425.00 

187.50 
25.00 

1,298.12 

Fines, 385.00 

$8,703.51 



PUBLIC 


LIBRARY. 


251 


Expenditures. 




Salaries and labor, 




$4,876 . 72 


Books and periodicals, 




1,526.60 


Binding, 




426 . 10 


Fuel and light, 




643.84 


Printing, 




117.75 


Incidentals, 




602.91 


Balance on hand, 




509.59 



$8,703.51 

In the matter of service, there are these figures: 

Number of volumes of non-fiction lent in 1922, 11,794 

Number of volumes of fiction lent, 59,581 

Number of periodicals lent, 4,824 



Total circulation, 76,199 

In regard to the present size of the library, the following: 
Number of bound volumes at beginning of year, 33,659 
Number added by purchase and by binding material 

not otherwise counted, 604 

Number of bound volumes added by gift, 96 



34,359 
Discarded, 313 



Total number owned at end of year, 34,046 

The number of volumes discarded seems large ; our annual 
net gain is small, and the library has only a few more thou- 
sands than it had a quarter of a century ago. That is 
because it has been weeded again and again. My first 
cleaning out consisted of sending back to Washington sacks 
of government documents, because all files of these could be 
found across the square at the State Library, and our own 
stack rooms were crowded. Soon we gave up the wasteful 
purchase of genealogies and town histories — both expensive 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

lines of publications — as the N. H. Historical Society buys 
those. From time to time we take from our congested 
shelves the works on natural science and the useful arts which 
have become hopelessly antiquated. And hardly a week 
passes without our culling wornout volumes of fiction or 
duplicate copies of magazines to give to sanatoriums, the 
jail, or other institutions; or to borrowers who live far from 
the library and who do not want to get storm-bound in their 
homes without anything to read. 

In these various ways we relieve our shelves; also, we 
continually move little-used non-fiction to our basement. 
When we can no longer squeeze and readjust our volumes, 
if nobody has given Concord a new and admirable library 
building by that time, perhaps we can enlarge our shelving 
and acquire a children's room besides, by running out the 
library on the east to the fence which is our boundary in 
that direction. Possibly by then our building fund will 
have been enriched by some bequests. 

It is odd that every year brings us practically the same 
number of new borrowers; 709 registered the past year; of 
these 372 were of school age. 

It grieves us deeply that our circulation seems an ebbing 
tide, having reached high-water mark in 1908, when it was 
over 96,000. In 1922 it was not much more than 76,000. 
But in the intervening years, automobiles and moving pic- 
tures have cut in as competitors to a library's attractions; 
the High School has installed a library of 2,300 volumes 
and has a librarian of its own; at the Walker School the 
children have a library of around 400 volumes; the State 
Library seems to have taken a new interest in buying gen- 
eral material and loaning it; and now, winter sports have 
arisen to rob us of our customers in the very season and on 
the Saturday afternoons when we used to have our heaviest 
custom. 

These facts and trends stare our library in the face. It 
is not likely that we shall regain our former enviably large 
circulation unless Concord has a marked increase in popula- 
tion. It seems to me that, therefore, this library's duty is 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 253 

not to try to become a large and loosely-knit-together one, 
nor to allow itself to go to seed, but that it should endeavor 
to be abreast of the times and to keep tidied up in its ma- 
terial, able to put hand on the book or article wanted by 
live and inquiring minds. 

Even with this modest aspiration as to its field of action, 
the library needs better accommodations inside it, both for 
the public and for the working staff. We lack almost every 
feature which a modern library has, though we have the 
fundamental advantage of being on a corner lot in a central 
location. A little lecture hall would be generally used and 
appreciated — that is, in a winter when there was not a coal 
shortage. As it is, this season, the Trustees of the Shake- 
speare Room kindly voted to omit meeting there during the 
extremely cold months, so as to aid the library in conserving 
fuel. It is a pity to have only an unsupervised alcove for 
the children, as the little readers there walk off with many 
a book, and it is too bad to give them so easy an opportunity 
to pilfer. Speaking of their possibly unwitting depredations 
reminds me of the worse and increasing scissoring by adults 
of pictures and pages from the magazines in the reading 
room. 

It is not every year that our so-called Concord Collection 
receives an addition, but in 1922, the following (auto- 
graphed) new books by local authors have been put into 
that locked case in the reference room: Steel, by Charles 
Rumford Walker; New Hampshire in History, by Henry 
H. Metcalf; Barefoot Days and Sundown Songs, by Ray- 
mond H. Huse; The Thoughts of Youth, by Samuel S. 
Drury; Songs of Home and Others, by Martha S. Baker; 
Vacation Days, by Willis G. Buxton; The Island Cure, by 
Grace Blanchard; A small compilation of verses by pupils 
in the Chandler School; A Memorial to Joseph W. Lund; 
and the admirable illustrated booklet on Concord, issued by 
the Chamber of Commerce. 

Last April occurred the ninetieth birthday of our West 
Concord borrower, who for at least twenty years has taken 
care, at her house, of the box of books sent every few months 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

to that ward. Enjoying them herself, Mrs. Sarah Quimby 
has for love, 'and not for money, seen accurately to the charg- 
ing out and calling in of the volumes. Neither in West 
Concord, East Concord or Penacook is there an appreciable 
desire for anything except stories to be supplied our deposit 
stations; although Penacook customers, being fitted out 
with regular cards and having at Mr. Parker's store a card 
catalog to consult of our monthly additions, call for some 
non-fiction. And always when a student has to work up his 
side of a debate, or a woman has to write a paper, or a 
teacher to rise to a new position, or a busy lawyer to wax 
eloquent on some public occasion, or a minister to observe 
this or that Sunday, then our library becomes invaluable. 
All these types of people and many more turn to it as nat- 
urally as a small boy goes to his father with a question. 

We are fortunate in being able to have Mrs. Grace 
Farnum help us through extra busy hours or clays; and it is 
she who takes charge of the library on Sundays, when the 
reading room is open from 2 to 5 o'clock. What she smil- 
ingly calls herself, our "Prop," she indeed is. 

I cannot omit mention of the benefit our library has 
derived from the presence in town during the past three and 
a half years, of Miss Grace Kingsland, Secretary of the 
N. H. Library Commission. She leaves now to take a better 
position, and out entire staff feel that we shall miss unspeak- 
ably her wise counsel in library matters and her good 
fellowship. She has quickened us, along with all other 
librarians in the state, to new efforts and made suggestions 
we were glad to follow. 

Such incitation led to our first observance of what has 
come to be a national Children's Book Week, in November. 
For each of the six days we had a programme which mingled 
pleasure and instruction for the little folks, and though 
greatly hampered by having no real children's room, we 
managed to wake, in many juveniles and a few parents 
interest in books of more than ordinary literary value. Mrs. 
M. C. Knapp and Mrs. Nelson Knowlton obligingly told 
stories one afternoon to the sixty assembled. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 255 

In the December North American, one of the big-brained 
librarians, John Cotton Dana of New Jersey, has an article 
entitled, "Changes in Reading," which is, on the whole, 
encouraging. He acknowledges: 

"As the movie became popular, the number of books lent 
by public libraries decreased. This decrease was accom- 
panied by a slightly increased demand for those novels 
chiefly of the baser sort, which were pictured in local movie 
theatres. Evidence is entirely lacking that what are called 
' educational films ' aroused any demand whatever for books 
on the countries, cities, processes or histories depicted by 
them." 

But, Mr. Dana proceeds, "Print is used more than ever, 
and we are forming the habit of depending upon it for a 
certain type of facts. Take, for a simple example, the boy 
who hears of radio apparatus. He straightway wishes to 
make one. He reads directions in books — he follows them 
and gets results. He now realizes the value of print and — 
note this — he has subjected himself, with happy results, to 
the authority of experts. Are his mental qualities and 
habits such as to make it possible for him to be led to read, 
and to trust in the words of experts in other lines — in the 
lines, for example, of eugenics, education and enlightened 
effort? The widespreading, the superficially effective and 
the penetrating extension of the printed page and its use, 
open to us the possibility of an affirmative answer.'" 

More encouraging even is the dictum of the magistrate 
who lately, in passing sentence upon a book thief, said, "A 
book is a family utensil like furniture and is necessary for 
the welfare of the family"; for what the single volume is to 
the single home, the public library is to the welfare of the 
town — necessary ! 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian. 



256 CITY OF CONCOKD. 



IN MEMORIAM 



MR. WILL B. HOWE 
Born July 3, 1859 
Died April 1, 1922 



Appointed City Engineer 

of the 

City of Concord, N. H. 

March 2.1, 1893 



Mr. Howe was an outstanding figure in the 
field of municipal engineering. The accom- 
plishment of the Engineering Department is a 
tribute to his leadership. 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT. 

Concord, N. H., January 1, 1923. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted the thirtieth annual 
report of the Engineering Department. 

This report shows the financial statement and in brief form 
under separate headings the work of the past year. 

>,125.00 



Appropriation, 




Paid engineer, 


$2,400.00 


Paid assistants, 


2,281.60 


Paid for supplies and incidentals, 


300.32 


Assessors' Map, 


140.82 



Total expenditure, $5, 122 . 74 



Unexpended balance, $2.26 

Sewers. 

The construction and repair statement will be found in 
detail in the report of this department to the Board of Pub- 
lic Works, and published as a portion of their report. 

Water Works. 

The sheet plans of pipe lines and appurtenances were 
brought up to date and blue prints made of same. 

Grades were given for road improvements at the head of 
Penacook Lake and levels given for fencing. 

Fire Department. 

The fire-alarm and hydrant maps were corrected by add- 
ing new hydrants; blue prints of same were furnished the 
chief of the Fire Department. 
17 257 



258 city of concord. 

Building Petitions. 

One hundred and twenty-three petitions were presented 
to the chief of the Fire Department and myself. . Hearings 
were held on the premises of all petitioners and our action 
recorded upon the original petition, which petitions are on 
file with the city clerk. 

Two of the petitions were referred to the Board of Alder- 
men, the remainder being granted as petitioned for. 

Cemeteries. 

Levels given for grading block south of block D-D. 

Levels for culvert, block N to brook. 

Survey of block E-E and layout of southerly portion into 
lots. 

Plans made for new garage. 

The deed book showing transfers of lots was brought up to 
January 1, 1923. 

Assessors' Maps. 

It was the intention of this department to locate all new 
structures built in the city since the last survey was made, 
but the activities of the other departments required our 
assistance to such an extent that there was no time for this 
work. It is hoped that in 1923 this work can be done as 
there are many additions to be made to the maps. 

The real estate transfers have been kept up to date and 
the necessary map changes made. Total number of trans- 
fers recorded, eight hundred and nine. 

We are now replotting some of the larger maps so that 
they will be more convenient for field work for the assessors. 

Playgrounds. 

Plans of the city were made for Mr. Bruce, playground 
instructor, also detail work in the matter of bathhouses and 
layout of playgrounds. 



report of engineering department. 259 

Accidents. 

Survey and plan made of Clough's Mills Bridge on ac- 
count of J. E. Normandeau truck accident. 

Parks. 

Levels given for skating rink at White Park. 
Survey of entrance of West Garden. 

Highway Work. 

Cross sections and grades for Ferry ' Street ; roadway, 
gutters and curb from North Main Street to Boston and 
Maine Railroad. 

Cross sections and grades for Park Street; roadway, and 
gutter from North State Street to Green Street. 

Cross sections and grades for Green Street; roadway, 
curb and gutter from Centre Street to Pleasant Street. 

Cross sections and grades for School Street; roadway, 
gutter and curb from North State Street to Green Street. 

Cross sections and grades for Centre Street; roadway, 
gutters and curb from North State Street to west line of 
Union Street. 

Cross sections and grades for Union Street; roadway, 
gutters and curb from Centre Street, north. 

Grade stakes set for grading Broad Avenue (so called) 
from Broadway to Bow Street, 1,080 feet. 

Cross sections Jackson Street at Mason's Court. 

Cross sections and grades for Washington Street; road- 
way (Ward 1) from South Main Street, west 800 feet. 

Railroad Square. 
Survey and cross sections for automobile parking area. 

Gutters. 

Grades given for coal tar concrete, North Main Street, 
Capitol Street to Freight Street. 

Grades given for Jackson Street, west side, north from 
Franklin Street, 150 feet. 



260 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sidewalks. 

Grade stakes set as follows: 

Highland Street, north walk, 225 feet. 

Washington Street, south walk, 132 feet. 

Concord Street, south walk, 132 feet. 

Chestnut Street, south walk, 343 feet. 

Dunklee Street, west walk, 308 feet. 

South Main Street, east walk opposite Gas Co., 248 feet. 

Jackson Street, west walk, 150 feet. 

South Spring Street, west walk, 429 feet. 

Pine Street, east walk, 280 feet. 

Park Street, north walk, 84.22 feet. 

North Main Street, west walk, 76.92 feet. 

Freight Street, north walk, 127 feet. 

South Spring Street, east walk, 256 feet. 

Carter Street, north walk, 70 feet. 

Kimball Street, west walk, 65.50 feet. 

South Main Street, east walk, opposite Shapiro Block. 

Dunklee Street, east walk, 150 feet. 

Pillsbury Street, north walk, 150 feet. 

Sidewalk Grades Established. 

Washington Street, opposite No. 87-89, 132 feet. 

Chestnut Street, south walk, Valley to High Street, 343 
feet. 

Dunklee Street, west walk at southerly end, 308.14 feet. 

South Main Street, east walk, opposite Gas Co., 248 feet. 

Kensington Road, east walk, Pleasant Street, north, 250 
feet. 

Broad Avenue, north and south walks, Broadway to Bow 
Street, 1,080 feet. 

Pine Street, east walk, School Street, south, 280 feet. 

South Spring Street, opposite Hospital lot, 256 feet. 

Centre Street (Ward 1), Rolfe Park, north, 200 feet. 

Bridges. 
Twenty-four bridges were inspected and report made to 
the Board of Public Works. 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 261 

Street Layouts. 

Addition of 6 feet in width on southerly side of Ferry 
Street. 

Cottage Court, 186.65 feet. 
Mason's Court, 181.65 feet. 
Patterson Street, 434.06 feet. 

Pembroke Road on Daniel Webster Road, Soucook River 
cut-off, 2667 feet. 

Total mileage of street and road — 173.06. 

Total mileage in compact part of city — -45.68. 

Total mileage in outlying portion of city — 127.38. 

Pla7is Made. 

Nineteen tracings and blue prints of water-pipe locations. 

Four prints of fire-alarm system. 

One plan of St. Mary's School land. 

Twenty-four sewer plans. 

Plan layout for winter sports, Eddy estate. 

Map of city for Gamewell System. 

One small tracing of city proper. 

Twenty-four blue prints of tracing of city proper. 

Parking area for automobiles, Railroad Square. 

Block A-A, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Wall for West Garden. 

East Concord Cemetery. 

Ferry Street, North Main Street to railroad track. 

Profile Highland Street, for curbing. 

Profile Clinton Street, for sewer. 

Park, Centre, Union, Green and School Streets, for 
improvement. 

Foster Ward, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 

Cottage Court. 

Mason Court. 

Proposed street leading off North State Street just north 
of Penacook Street. 

Penacook Lake. 

Typical section of roadway, Ferry Street. 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Block E-E, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Clough's Mills Bridge, floor system. 

Bridge over penstock at St. Paul's School, Millville Road. 

Two hundred and ten blue prints of various plans. 

New sheds, city lot on Warren Street. 

Sewer Connections Inspected. 

On November 13 the work of inspecting sewer pipes from 
houses to main sewers, formerly done by the sanitary 
officer, was turned over to the city engineer. 

There have been eight connections made since November 
13, all of which were inspected and recorded by me; all were 
laid in conformity to the plumbing laws. 

The past season has been a busy one for this office and 
work was carried on with a small corp of assistants. 

The personnel of the Engineering Department is as fol- 
lows: Chief clerk, Miss Grace L. Hubbard, who commenced 
work on April 24. 

Mr. Edward E. Beane, assistant engineer, who entered 
the employ of the city April 20. 

Mr. Arthur McCauley, rodman, who worked during May, 
June, July and August; all of whom have rendered splendid 
assistance and deserve praise for the work done. 

For the support and co-operation of your board I wish to 
express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1922. 
To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The seventeenth annual report of this 
board, for the year 1922, is herewith submitted. 

On July 26, the full board met and recommended the in- 
stallation of the following hydrants : 

Low service at west end of Holly Street on southerly side. 

High service on northerly side of Bridge Street at east 
line of Carpenter Paint Shop, this hydrant to be set in 1923. 

On October 6 we recommended the installation of a four- 
way hydrant at the southwest corner of South Main and 
Freight Streets, said hydrant to be set in 1923. 

No other sessions were held during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 
W. G. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



263 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



To the Board of Public Works: 

My report for the year ending December 31, 1922, is 
herewith submitted. 

During the past year progress has been made on Green 
Street and parts of Center, Park and School Streets, of a 
more permanent type of street construction which I believe 
should be carried out in the future. This type of road has 
also been laid on the main highway from the bridge in Pena- 
cook to the Boscawen town line and a contract has been let 
for the same construction on Washington Street, Ward One. 

The general upkeep of our streets and roads, caused by 
increased traffic, demands a large sum of our appropriation, 
however. Ferry Street, for so many years in need of atten- 
tion, has been rebuilt with gravel and concrete gutters. 
The wooden bridges crossing the Soucook River known as 
the "Clough Mills" and the "Sheep Davis" have been re- 
built in cooperation with the town of Pembroke. 

The use of the drag as well as calcium chloride, for dust 
laying, has been continued. 

$7,584.54 has been used for concrete and tar walks, new 
and repair. 

$13,124.29 was spent on trunk line maintenance. 

The Peerless truck was replaced with two Ford trucks. 
Approximately 21,500 cubic yards of garbage and 5,200 
cubic yards of paper have been collected. 

The collection of table garbage, under the supervision of 
the sanitary officer, has cost this department for seven 
months $1,935.47. 

264 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 265 

I wish to thank the Mayor and the members of the Board 
for their assistance during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORRIN W. HEAD, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $90,000.00 

Transferred from catch basins, 1,128.21 

By Resolution No. 528, 7,585.42 



EXPENDITURES 




Central 


District. 




Breaking roads, labor, 




$337.19 


Bridges: 






Labor: 






Draining, 




6.08 


Snowing, 




12.51 


. Repairing Clough 


Mill's 




and Sheep Davis 


bridges, 


347.44 


Toll calls, 




.70 


Lumber, 




1,060.43 


Nails, 




49.04 


Repairing, general, 




18.29 


Supplies: 






Lumber, 




837.03 


Nails, 




4.38 


Replanking walks, labor 




53.41 


Supplies : 






Lumber, 




23.98 


Nails, 




3.75 



,713.63 



266 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Buick roadster: 

Labor, repairing, $2.37 

Supplies, tires, 5.00 

Repairs to battery, 1 . 00 

Gasoline and oil, 44 . 16 

Insurance, 39.00 
Cementing lanterns: 

Labor, 2.18 

Supplies, cement, .90 

Cement mixer, 340.00 

Freight on, 12.05 

Supplies and repairs, 6 . 28 

Center, Park, School and Green 

Streets improvement: Labor: 

On streets, 5,153.82 

At hot plant, 1,437.74 

Setting up plant, 63 . 16 

Unloading asphalt, 44 . 37 

Asphalt, 1,834.26 

Demurrage on, 12.00 

Lumber, 245 . 27 

Cement, 2,404 . 35 

Sand and stone, 128.18 

Coal, 19.60 

Miscellaneous supplies, 22 . 1 5 

Use of plant and roller, 2,920.00 

Testing material, 29.00 

Supplies at plant: 

Oil, 465.35 

Coal, 140.15 

Lumber and slab wood, 217.54 

Belt, 2.75 

Miscellaneous, 227 . 30 

Accident claim, 125.00 
City stables: 

Labor, 2,923.16 

Painting, 84.00 

Paint, 34 . 65 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 267 

Cleaning yard, $38.51 

Repairing stalls, 16.25 

Building door, 13.50 

New floor and gutters, 125 . 79 
Supplies: 

Lumber, 151.95 

Nails, 4.75 

Cement, 21 . 60 

Repairing water system, 3 . 30 

Lights, 72 . 36 

Wiring, 14.87 

Bulbs, 11.57 

» Telephone, 34.11 

Coal, 315.52 

Lumber, 20 . 49 

Brooms, 21 . 80 

Miscellaneous supplies, 5 . 29 

City teams: 

Labor: 

Repairing sleds, 219 . 16 

Supplies, 52 . 70 

Repairing carts, 372.43 

Supplies, 29 . 39 

Painting carts, 45 . 61 

Paint, 51.00 

Miscellaneous supplies, 37 . 32 

Repairing spreader, 1.11 

Grain, 1,445.45 

Hay, 1,091.11 

Horses : 

New one, 250.00 

Labor, shoeing, 167.05 

Supplies, 125.82 

Labor, carting shavings, 34 . 05 

Shavings, 13.95 

Veterinary, 29 . 50 
Harnesses : 

New and repair, 174.65 



268 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Harness oil, 


$10.00 


Blankets, 


66.50 


Freight on, 


1.47 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


36.80 


Cleaning field on Bridge Street, 


9.75 


Cleaning rear of Police Station, 


6.21 


Cleaning river beach, 


7.03 


Cleaning crossings, winter, 


888.64 


Concord Street Railway, labor on So. 




Main Street and Electric Avenue, 


25.52 


Concord truck: 




Labor, repairing, 


122.53 


Labor, repairing, spring, 


4.50 


Welding, 


6.50 


Insurance, 


95.28 


Gasoline and oil, 


341.11 


Tires, 


226 . 20 


Chains, 


10.56 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


31.37 


New parts, 


264.81 


Crusher : 




Labor, repairing, 


92.47 


Welding, 


7.00 


Labor at bank, 


1,139.56 


Power, 


375.55 


Supplies, oil, 


16.00 


Telephone, 


2.10 


New parts, 


333.72 


Express on, 


8.45 


Miscellaneous, 


22.86 


Culverts : 




Labor, cleaning and repairing, 


72.29 


Labor, building, 


29.97 


Supplies, 


6.84 


Cutting grass, city stable lot: 




Labor, 


24.66 


Supplies, 


1.33 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 269 



Dragging streets: 




Labor, 


$702.49 


Labor, building drag, 


109.62 


Labor, repairing drag, 


14.09 


Lumber, 


20.40 


Supplies, 


36.67 


Drinking fountains: 




Labor, repairing, 


22.06 


Supplies, 


1.51 


Repairs, 


35.10 


Driveways : 

Labor, installing, 


425.38 


Labor, repairing, 


1.00 


Supplies, 


18.15 


Cutting paving blocks, labor, 


853.05 


Tools, 


5.00 


Fences, repairing, 


10.90 


Ferry Street: 




Labor, repairing, 


863.26 


Supplies : 




Cement, 


522.50 


Sand and gravel, 


73.30 


Lumber, 


17.46 


Ford truck, state: 




Labor, repairing, 


10.68 


Supplies and repairs, 


17.51 


Garage : 




General labor on trucks, 


862.63 


Labor : 




Making bench draws, 


22.26 


Supplies, 


10.15 


Building cupboards, 


32.18 


Supplies, 


8.95 


Building Reo stall, 


34.96 


Supplies, 


11.10 


Building chimney, 


17.50 


Supplies, 


1.78 



270 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Painting, 


$52.49 


Supplies, 


6.68 


Coal, 


154.07 


Supplies, 


180.72 


Gutters : 




Labor : 




Cleaning, 


2,948.72 


Repairing, 


68.11 


Paving 


5.46 


Repaying, 


18.20 


Draining and plowing, 


601.65 


Supplies, 


11.59 


International truck : 




Labor : 




Repairing, 


208.25 


Painting, 


9.84 


Welding, 


1.50 


Repairs to magneto, 


7.30 


Express on, 


.47 


Repairs to spring, 


7.50 


Gasoline and oil, 


261.07 


Insurance, 


62.00 


Odometer, 


20.00 


Repairing tires and tubes, 


6.90 


Curtains, 


2.25 


Windshield glass, 


6.50 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


18.55 


New parts, 


241.86 


Express on, 


2.33 


Leveling snow, labor, 


1,017.67 


Lunches, draining gutters, 


3.35 


Medical services, employees, 


47.00 


Miscellaneous supplies : 




Boots, 


66.00 


Express on, 


1.68 


Paint, 


18.05 


Tools, 


229.20 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 271 



Brick, 


$159.30 


Labor, hauling, 


4.22 


Labor, cleaning, 


9.33 


Pictures, 


10.00 


Office: 




Adding machine paper, 


. 4.15 


Clerical expenses, 


1,397.86 


Envelopes, printing, etc., 


144.32 


Foreman's books, 


13.40 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


27.33 


Order books, 


15.75 


Postage, 


10.00 


Repairs to typewriter, 


7.50 


Telephone, 


26.04 


Patriot Building, labor, 


1.88 


Peerless truck: 




Repairs and supplies, 


4.25 


Gasoline and oil, 


80.00 


Playground committees : 




Labor for, 


198.30 


Supplies, 


32.92 


Plowing walks: 




Labor, 


543 . 76 


Labor, repairing plows, 


40.56 


Supplies, 


3.62 


Railroad Square improvement, 


34.99 


Repairing macadam : 




Labor, 


429.31 


Hauling gravel, 


31.98 


Mixing K. P., 


38.96 


Unloading car K. P., 


3.33 


Loading barrels, 


10.79 


Supplies, K. P., 


577.28 


Freight on, 


138.46 


Stone, 


142.98 


Reo roadster, 


1,080.00 


Labor, repairing, 


62.52 


Accelerator, 


3.00 



272 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tires, 


$36.75 


Gasoline and oil, 


83.78 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


.34 


Reo Speedwagon, 


1,482.75 


Labor, repairing, 


7.55 


Repairs, 


28.59 


Tires, 


54.10 


Curtain, 


18.15 


Chains, 


21.27 


Insurance, 


70.00 


Gasoline and oil, 


138.36 


Resurfacing streets: 




Labor, 


5,524.08 


Supplies, gravel, 


75.67 


Road machine: 




Labor: 




Repairing, 


108.27 


Painting, 


7.06 


Running, 


1,160.35 


Milling, 


.75 


New parts, 


146.25 


Freight and express on, 


8.51 


Miscellaneous repairs and sup- 




plies, 


104.85 


Rolling snow: 




Labor, 


180.00 


Labor, building roller, 


288.80 


Lumber, 


16.40 


Sawing and milling, 


38.00 


Castings, 


11.60 


Supplies, 


25.71 


St. Paul School, labor, 


22.50 


Sanding walks: 




Labor, 


1,784.63 


Labor, filling sand house, 


537.29 


Sawing wood, labor, 


6.67 


Sewer Department, labor, 


4.30 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 273 



Shop : 




Labor, 


$724 . 57 


Repairing picks, 


29.34 


Sharpening tools, 


5.56 


Shingling, 


242.78 


On windows, 


83.45 


Supplies, 


11.64 


Mending chains, 


4.44 


New tool box, 


7.75 


Supplies: 




Lumber, 


217.88 


Nails, 


11.63 


Steel, 


30.09 


Paint, 


5.08 


Coal, 


14.30 


Cartage, 


.50 


Used in shop, 


172.28 


Shoveling walks, labor, 


15.94 


Signs, new, 


119.14 


Paint, 


33.35 


Freight on, 


.78 


Labor: 




Installing Beacons, 


3.12 


Marking streets, 


19.27 


Supplies, 


2.25 


Line-o-graph, 


40.00 


Freight on, 


.87 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


2.00 


State aid, labor on trunk lines, 


13,124.29 


State trucks, use of, 


750.00 


Steam roller: 




Labor, repairing, 


36.81 


Coal, 


197.30 


Repairs and supplies, 


33.10 


Sweeping pavement : 




Labor, 


3,876.40 


Repairing sweeper, 


43.87 


Refilling broom, 


30.00 



274 CITY OF CONCORD. 



New carts, 


$38.00 


Freight on, 


1.58 


Painting, 


9.92 


Supplies, 


3.00 


Telephone service, 


26.09 


Tractors : 




Labor, repairing, 


269.86 


Labor, rigging for drags, 


17.86 


Welding, 


7.00 


New parts, 


234.09 


Freight on, 


6.81 


Cover, 


8.00 


Insurance, 


140.00 


Oil, 


288.79 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


18.42 


Washout at West Concord, 


148.93 


Watering trough: 




Labor, repairing, 


30 . 75 


Labor, thawing, 


15.26 


Repairs and supplies, 


5.63 


Use of troughs, 


12.00 



Penacook District. 



Breaking roads, labor, 


$578.56 


Bridges : 




Labor: 




Cleaning, 


3.34 


Repairing railing, 


55.97 


Lumber, 


19.84 


Nails, 


1.50 


Repairing, 


169.34 


Lumber, 


140.70 


Nails, 


3.84 


Cleaning crossings, labor, 


75.88 


Cleaning streets, labor, 


1,474.16 



,542.30 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 275 



Culverts: Labor: 




Building, 


$11.16 


Cleaning, 


9.67 


Repairing, 


38.48 


Cutting bushes, labor, 


15.50 


Dragging : 




Labor, 


281.16 


Labor, repairing drag, 


2.00 


Labor, building drag, 


5.50 


Lumber, 


3.65 


Driveways : 




Labor: 




Cleaning pipe, 


10.80 


Building, 


40.42 


Supplies, 


1.80 


Repairing, 


13.20 


General repair, 


230.76 


Gutters, labor, cleaning, 


221 . 53 


Leveling and removing snow, 


311.19 


Marking streets, labor, 


5.74 


New tools, 


8.88 


North Main Street, resurfaced, 


674.24 


Picking up limbs, 


2.97 


Plowing walks, labor, 


202.84 


Playground committee, labor, 


70.33 


Repairing tools, 


21.38 


Resurfacing streets: 




Labor, 


2,530.54 


Gravel, 


99.10 


Road machine, labor, 


164.18 


Sanding walks: 




Labor, 


282.12 


Labor, filling sand house, 


77.95 


Sharpening picks, bars, etc., 


7.40 


Rolling snow, labor, 


16.00 


Washington Street Improvement, 


448.25 


Watering trough, labor, cleaning, 


1.00 



5,332.87 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 



West Concord 


District. 


Breaking roads, labor, 


$532.98 


Cement, 


.45 


Cleaning streets, labor, 


327.68 


Culverts : 




Labor, cleaning, 


20.99 


Labor, repairing, 


8.63 


Cutting bushes, labor, 


52.33 


Driveway : 




Labor, building, 


19.59 


Supplies, 


3.24 


Dragging, labor, 


467.80 


Fences : 




Labor, cutting posts, 


12.50 


Labor, repairing, 


14.05 


Gutters : 




Labor, draining, 


21.42 


Labor, cleaning, 


201.86 


Leveling snow, labor, 


86.50 


Plowing walks, labor, 


100.25 


Raking rocks, labor, 


57.94 


Resurfacing streets: 




Labor, 


1,241.81 


Gravel, 


138.75 


Rolling snow: 




Labor, 


14.00 


Labor, painting roller, 


6.00 


Sanding walks : 




Labor, 


104.70 


Labor, filling sand house, 


38.86 


Labor, repairing roof, 


2.70 


Supplies, paper, 


4.28 



East Concord District. 

Breaking roads, labor, $99 . 62 

Bridges : 

Labor, repairing, 20.54 

Supplies, posts, 13.25 



5,479.31 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 277 



Cleaning brook, labor, 


$7.54 


( 'ulverts, labor, repairing, 


94.33 


Cutting bushes : 




Labor, 


26.67 


Supplies, 


5.00 


Dragging roads, labor, 


110.90 


General repairs, 


166.82 


Gutters : 




Labor, cleaning, 


177.92 


Labor, draining, 


11.86 


Leveling snow, labor, 


56.55 


Plowing walks, labor, 


38.92 


Raking rocks, labor, 


53.31 


Repairing tools, 


26.40 


Resurfacing streets: 




Labor, 


887.83 


Gravel, 


31.50 


Sanding walks, labor, 


19.36 


Watering trough, use of, 


23.00 



Dimond and Silver Hill District. 

Breaking roads, labor, $137.14 

Bridges, labor, repairing, 31.12 

Culverts, labor, repairing, 4.89 

Cutting bushes, labor, 32.10 

Dragging roads, labor, 316.00 

Leveling snow, labor, 19.67 
Resurfacing roads: 

Labor, 433.97 

Gravel, 50 . 60 



Egypt and Plains District. 

Breaking roads, labor, $392 . 92 

Bridges: 

Labor, repairing, 43.33 

Supplies, posts, 1 . 60 



,871.32 



1,025.49 



278 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Dragging roads, labor, 


$90.68 


Driveway, building, 


7.00 


Gutters, labor, draining, 


74.47 


Leveling snow: 




Labor, 


142.69 


Supplies, shovels, 


2.80 


Plowing walks, labor, 


111.73 


Resurfacing roads: 




Labor, 


561.67 


Gravel, 


7.50 


Sanding walks, labor, 


14.67 


Watering trough, use of, 


13.50 


Hoit District. 




Breaking roads, labor, 


$116.25 


Culverts : 




Labor, repairing, 


14.22 


Supplies, 


10.83 


Cutting bushes, labor, 


27.11 


Dragging roads, labor, 


25.66 


General repair, labor, 


104.11 


Leveling snow, labor, 


20.60 



Jordan District. 

Breaking roads, labor, $133.40 

Gutters, labor, draining, 15.56 

Leveling snow, labor, 14 . 78 



Pine Hill District. 

Breaking roads, labor, $48 . 23 

Resurfacing roads, labor, 38. 12 



$1,464.56 



318.78 



163.74 



86.35 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



279 



Sanborn District. 

Breaking roads, labor, $612 . 89 

Cutting bushes, labor, 72 . 33 

General repair, labor, 680.01 

Gutters, labor, draining, 56.33 

Supplies, 4.35 

Watering trough, use of, 3 . 00 



Total expenditures, 



,428.91 
,713.63 



CATCH BASINS. 



Appropriation, 
Expenditures- 



$3,000.00 



Central District. 



Labor: 

Building, 

Cleaning, 

Flushing, 

Moving and piling brick, 

Repairing, 

Sawing wood, 

Thawing, 
Supplies: 

Bases and covers, 

Cement, 

Pipe, 

Miscellaneous, 

Slab wood, 

Hose, 

For steamer, 



$115. 


28 


549. 


30 


31. 


27 


77. 


38 


27. 


51 


30. 


24 


278. 


01 


294 


00 


1 


.80 


8 


.18 


28 


00 


23 


.81 


14 


80 


2 


.15 



1,481.73 



280 


CITY 


of 


CONCORD. 






Penacook 


District 




Labor: 










Cleaning, 








$223.43 


Repairing, 








28.02 


Thawing, 








68.22 


Supplies, cement, 








1.10 



$320.77 



West Concord District. 

Labor, building, $14.33 

Supplies: 

Cement, . 90 

Pipe, 4.00 

Labor, cleaning, 50 . 06 



69.29 



Total expenditures, $1,871 . 79 

Transferred to general maintenance, 1,128.21 



$3,000 . 00 



SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 

Appropriation, $1 ,500 . 00 

By Resolution No. 528, 873 . 34 



Expenditures — 






O^.O 1 <J • *->•*. 


Central 


District. 






Labor, 




$680.57 




Laying edgestone, labor, 




314.80 




George F. Tandy, 




539.97 




Edgestone, 




402.00 




Lumber, 




48.00 




Cement, 




388.00 


2.373.34 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 281 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $3,000 . 00 

By Resolution No. 528, 2,211 . 20 

$5,211.20 



Expenditures — 




Central 


District. 


Repairing walks, labor, 


$172. 12 


George F. Tandy: 




Relaying driveway, 


5.00 


Relaying crossings, 


27.42 


Relaying gutters, 


2,903.67 


Relaying roadway, 


96.30 


Relaying walks, 


1,668.14 



4,872.65 
Pexacook District. 
Grading walks, labor, 260.87 

West Concord District. 

Grading walks, labor, 77.68 



Total expenditures, $5,2 1 1 . 20 



GARBAGE. 

Appropriation, $20,000 . 00 

By Resolution No. 528, 263 . 89 

Deficiency to 1923, 1,780.61 

$22,044.50 



Expenditures — 

Deficiency from 1921, $2,706 . 07 

Collecting garbage, labor, 8,792. 33 

Collecting table garbage, labor, 1,935.47 

Collecting paper, labor, 1,535.27 

Repairing paper wagon, labor, 54.44 

Picking up paper, labor, 95.66 



282 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Leveling ashes, labor, 


$1,657.65 


Patrol carts: 




Labor, 


1,779.42 


Labor, repairing, 


21.60 


Supplies, brooms, 


26.80 


Fighting fire, labor, 


20.40 


Medical services, 


4.00 


Ford trucks, 


1,570.00 


Labor, repairing, 


151.28 


Repairs and supplies, 


267.91 


Labor, making sideboards, 


36.00 


Supplies, 


3.00 


Tires, 


153.25 


Insurance, 


207.80 


Gasoline and oil, 


935.41 


Repairs to springs, 


22.75 


Welding, 


9.75 


Repairs to radiator, 


4.00 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


54.24 




^$22,044.50 



PENACOOK SPRINKLING PRECINCT. 

Appropriation , $700 . 00 

Expenditures — 

Deficiency from 1921, $123 . 88 

Sprinkling streets, labor, 398 . 48 

Repairing standpipes, labor, 14 . 46 

Miscellaneous labor on standpipes, 9 . 00 

Labor, repairing and storing carts, 19.67 

Supplies and repairs to carts, 27. 58 

Boscawen Water Precinct, water, 12.00 

605.07 

Balance to 1923, 94.93 



$700.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 283 



SPRINKLING. 








Balance from 1921, 


$19.14 






Appropriation, 


7,000.00 










$7,019. 


14 






Expenditures — 








Sprinkling streets, labor, 


$784.10 






Flushing streets, labor, 


333.74 






Repairing hose truck for hose, labor, 


17.68 






Standpipes: 








Labor, repairing, 


15.33 






Supplies, 


1.43 






Repairing carts, labor, 


17.42 






Calcium chloride, 


3,088.79 






Freight on, 


593.60 






Demurrage, 


16.00 






Labor, unloading, 


39.67 






Labor, applying, 


216.26 






Miscellaneous supplies, 


5.12 






Trucks: 








Labor, repairing, 


13.42 






Use of, 


600.00 






Repairs, 


38.25 






Gasoline and oil, 


992.61 






Insurance, 


140.00 










6,913. 


44 






Balance to 1923, 




105. 


70 



r ,019.14 



284 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SALARY OF SUPERINTENDENT. 
Appropriation, $2,500.00 

2,500.00 



Expenditures — 




Salary, 




Deposited with the city treasurer: 




State aid, highways, 


$6,996.70 


Labor and crushed stone, 


2,322.99 


Sidewalks and crossings, new, 


1,321.15 


Catch basins, 


42.73 


Garbage, 


263.89 



10,947.46 



REPORT OF THE SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1922. 

To the Board qj Public Works: 

Gentlemen: The twelfth annual report to. your board 
showing work done under the supervision of the Engineering 
Department, for your board, is herewith submitted. 

SEWERS. 

There were laid during the year 1922, 4,964 feet of Akron 
pipe, or 0.94 miles, subdivided as follows: 

Broadway: 256 feet of 12-inch. 

Noyes Street: 502 feet of 15-inch. 

Clinton Street: 691 feet of 15-inch, 659 feet of 12-inch, 
794 feet of 10-inch. 

Rumford. and Franklin Street: 634 feet of 24-inch, 849 
feet of 15-inch, 109 feet of 12-inch, 470 feet of 8-inch. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 285 



Broadway Extension. 




South of McKinley Street. 




Paid for labor, 


$395.35 


cement, 


6.40 


pipe, 


119.80 


brick, 


12.00 


trucking, 


13.00 


castings, 


15.75 



Total expenditure, $562.30 

Pipe laid: 256 feet of 12-inch Akron. 
Cost per foot, $2,196+. 
Material excavated, sand. 



NOYES 


Street 


Extension. 




Dart 


mouth 


Street, 


West. 




Paid for labor, 










$430.11 


cement, 










16.00 


pipe, 










303.55 


brick, 










14.00 


castings, 










15.75 


trucking, 










30.60 


hardware, 










.35 


lumber, 










1.44 



Total expenditure, $81 1 . 80 

Pipe laid: 502 feet of 15-inch Akron. 
Cost per foot, $1,617+. 
Material excavated, sand. 



Clinton Street Extension. 




Paid for labor, 


$2,772.29 


pipe, 


848.51 


cement, 


39.10 


brick, 


85.00 


castings, 


123.37 



286 CITY OF CONCORD. 

hardware, $2 . 72 

oil, 5 . 90 

trucking, 146.35 



Total expenditure, $4,023 . 24 

Pipe laid : 
15-inch Akron, 
12-inch Akron, 
10-inch Akron, 

Total length, 2,144 feet 

Cost per foot, $1,876 + . 

Material excavated, sand, running sand, gravel, clay, muck, 
logs, and railroad ties. 



691 feet 


659 


u 


794 


it 



RUMFORD 


and Franklin Street. 
Storm Sewer. 




Paid for labor, 




$2,878.63 


cement, 




59.15 


kerosene oil, 




4.75 


trucking, 




248.86 


pipe, 




1,424.49 


castings, 




30.00 


brick, 




60.30 



Total expenditure, $4,706 . 18 

Pipe laid: 

24-inch Akron, 634 feet 

15-inch Akron, 801 " 



Total length, 1,435 feet 

Cost per foot, $3,279 + . 

Material excavated, gravel, boulder, ledge, clay and sand. 



board of public works. 287 

Catch Basin. 

Connection with Franklin and Rumford Street- Storm Sewer. 

Paid for labor, $280 . 24 

pipe, 191 . 27 

cement, 8.65 

brick, 7 . 20 

castings, 10.00 

trucking, 15. 53 



48 feet 


109 


u 


570 


cc 



Total expenditure, $512.89 

Pipe laid: 
15-inch Akron, 
12-inch Akron, 
8-inch Akron, 

Total length, 627 feet 
Cost per foot, $0,818 + . 
Material excavated, gravel, sand, boulders, and muck. 

Sewers built in the City Precinct to December 1922: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 3,088 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe, 25,657 " 

10-inch Akron pipe, 56,664 ' : 

12-inch Akron pipe, 39,543 " 

12-inch cement pipe, 415 " 

15-inch Akron pipe, 13,640 " 

18-inch Akron pipe, 7,134 " 

20-inch Akron pipe, 5,029 " 

24-inch Akron pipe, 4,698 " 

30-inch Akron pipe, 1,780.5 " 

Brick, 12-inch x 14-inch, 2,758 " 

14-inch x 22-inch, 350 " 

16-inch x 24-inch, 1,848 " 

20-inch x 32-inch, 2,527 " 

24-inch x 36-inch, 17,937 " 

28-inch x 48-inch, • 883 " 

24-inch circular, 1,515.5 " 



288 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Brick, 30-inch circular, 402 feet 

38-inch circular, 4,080 

24-inch cast-iron, 1,576 

30-inch cast-iron, 1 ,054 . 5 

33-inch segmental block, 1,536.5 

42-inch segmental block, 1,055 
42-inch brick and concrete, 246 

60-inch brick and concrete, 1,450 



Total, 196,867 feet 

Total miles in City Precinct, 37.285+. 

Penacook Precinct. 

No extensions were built in the precinct in 1922. 
Appropriation, $500 . 00 

Balance, 79 . 09 



"Funds available, $579.09 

Expended as follows: 

Sharpening tools, 1921 bill, $10.30 
W. B. Howe, expenses to Providence, R. I., 10.28 
Flushing, 272 . 73 
Washington Street, on account of improved road- 
way, raising manhole, 31.39 
Clearing private pipe at 63 South Main, in street, 3 . 00 



Total expended, $327 . 70 

Unexpended balance, $251 . 39 

West Concord Precinct. 

The expenditures in the precinct are larger than usual 
owing to the repairs to the 20-inch and 12-inch outlets. 

Expenditures: 
Repairs Hutchins Street, ' $6.22 

Repairing 20-inch outlet, 150.66 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



289 



Cleaning 12-inch outlet, 
Flushing sewer system, 

Total expenditure, 

Plugs in private pipes (so called) : 
Location. Cost. 

1 Engel Street, $2.34 

17 Clark Street, 18.50 



$20.84 



$44.83 
28.77 

$230.48 



Cause. 
Roots 
Roots 



1.72 
251.32 

$29.40 



Funds available, 
Expended, 

Unexpended balance, 

Sewers built in this precinct to date: 
8-inch Akron pipe, 
10-inch Akron pipe, 
12-inch Akron pipe, 
15-inch Akron pipe, 
20-inch Akron pipe, 

Total, 
Total miles in precinct, 3.358 + . 

East Concord Precinct. 

No expenditures were made in this precinct during 1922, 
and there remains a balance on hand of $137.86. 

There is laid in the precinct to date, the following size 
and length of pipe: 1,766 feet, 10-inch Akron pipe; total 
miles, 0.333 + . 



342 feet 


7,210 " 


6,622 " 


2,155 " 


1,403 " 


17,732 feet 



Saint Paul's School Precinct. 

No expenditures were made in this precinct during 1922. 
Funds available, $33 . 44 

Unexpended balance, $33.44 



19 



290 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



There have been built to date the following lengths and 
sizes of pipe sewers: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 3,008 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe, 448 " 

10-inch Akron pipe, 2,868 " 



Total, 
Total miles in precinct, 1.196 + . 



6,318 feet 



The following amounts were expended for repairs on main 
sewers in the streets named below: 

Essex Street, $2 . 33 

North Spring Street, 21 . 77 

West Street, 8.23 

Dunklee Street, 60.69 

Humphrey Street, 58.66 

Beacon Street, 19 . 20 

South End Sewer manhole, 4.11 



$174.99 



Main Sewers Cleaned Out on Account of Plugs. 



Location. 


Cost. 


Cause. 


Jefferson Street, 


$9.11 


Rags and sticks 


South Street, 


4.22 


Roots 


Walker Street, 


11.33 


Sand, sticks and rags 


Centre Street, 


12.39 


Sand 


Prospect Street, 


148.28 


Sand, wheat, rags, bottles, 
overalls, woman's skirt, 
roots and sticks 



$185.33 

Flushing — Spring and Fall. 
Paid for labor, 
Paid for trucking, 

Total, 



.29 
185.86 

,069.15 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



291 



Tool Account. 
Paid out for new, and repairs on old tools, $206 . 07. 

Lateral Pipes. 
On May 3, 1922, I was instructed by your board to clean 
out plugs in lateral pipes from main sewer to street line. 
We have had 73 complaints in the City Precinct; each case 
was investigated. Twenty-nine cases were handled by the 
Engineering Department at no cost to Sewer Department; 
44 required the services of the Sewer Department, and the 
following gives in detail the location, cost for cleaning and 
cause of stoppage: 



Location. 


Cost. 


Cause. 


C. J. Sennott, Noyes Street, 


$11.67 


Roots 


6 Tremont Street, 


19.00 


Roots 


23 Jackson Street, 


6.00 


Roots 


96 North State Street, 


.68 


Trap full of grease 


51 West Street, 


4.66 


Sticks 


4 Kent Street, 


2.22 


Plaster of Paris 


8 Dunklee Street, 


7.23 


Roots 


West End Garage, 


5.42 


Sand 


92 Centre Street, 


5.55 


Sand 


2 Foster Street, 


.89 


Rags 


22 Walker Street, 


10.00 


Roots 


121 Rumford Street, 


1.00 


Roots 


Silas W. Jameson, Auburn 






Street, 


3.11 


Roots 


32 Hall Street, 


11.50 


Roots 


92 Warren Street, 


19.27 


Roots 


121 Rumford Street, 


12.00 


Roots 


24-26 Albin Street, 


10.00 


Sand 


19 Tahanto Street, 


7.00 


Roots 


19| Merrimack Street, 


12.89 


Roots 


Mary E. Yeaton, Tahanto 






Street, 


12.50 


Roots 


10 Liberty Street, 


1.67 


Roots 


16 Grove Street, 


4.11 


Trouble in trap 
cellar 



in 



292 CITY OF 


CONCORD. 


15 Valley Street, 


$6.17 


Roots 


8 Orchard Street, 


8.23 


Roots 


6 Thorndike Street-, 


5.99 


Trouble in trap in 
cellar 


32 Hall Street, 


2.00 


Roots and sticks 


9 Gladstone Street, 


4.01 


Trouble in cellar 


90 Centre Street, 


1.17 


Roots 


8| Prospect Street, 


8.33 


Roots 


30 Tremont Street, 


3.34 


Roots on private land 


State Hospital, west cot- 






tage, Pleasant Street, 


2.06 


Trap under piazza 


Lee Block, Railroad Square, 


6.16 


Cement at joints and 
newspapers 


28 Pierce Street, 


2.78 


Grease 


9| Curtis Avenue, 


5.11 


Clear 


20 Badger Street, 


10.27 


Roots 


7 Prospect Street, 


3.67 


Roots 


61 Washington Street, 


8.33 


Cement in joint 


5 Gordon Court, 


12.50 


Roots 


2-4 Foster Street, 


3.78 


Sticks 


82 Allison Street, 


14.00 


Roots, pair men's 
socks, napkin 


149 North Main Street, 


3.00 


Grease 


61 Washington Street, 


1.50 


Cement and paper 


15 Valley Street, 


13.00 


Roots 


118 South Main Street, 


3.00 


Newspaper 



$296.77 

The sewer pipe line in Bridge Street was changed, taking 
sewage from catch basin, at a cost of $12.96. 



Summary. 

Appropriation for construction and repairs, 
Earning, 

Deficit for 1921, 



$10,450.00 

18.50 

$10,468.50 

453.96 

$10,014.54 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 293 

Expended as follows: 
Broadway, construction, $562.30 
Noyes Street, construction, 811.80 
Clinton Street, construction, 4,023 . 24 
Rumford and Franklin Streets, construction, 4,706 . 18 
Rumford and Franklin Streets, catch basin con- 
nection, 512.89 
Main sewer cleaned on account of plugs, 185 . 33 
Main sewer repaired, 174.99 
Bridge Street, changes in sewer pipe line, 12.96 
Tool account, 206 . 07 
Clearing pipes from main sewer to street line, 296.77 
Spring and fall flushing, 1,069.15 

Total, $12,561.68 

Overdrawn, $2,547.14. 

The Sewer Department is at times greatly handicapped 
by not having a permanent organization, but fortunately 
this season labor was plentiful and of the best quality, and 
by taking advantage of same the department was able to 
function to a high degree of efficiency. 

On the Broadway job nothing was encountered to retard 
construction, and the same could be said of Noyes Street, 
with the exception of water. 

On the Clinton Street job bids were asked for excavating, 
laying pipe and back filling for a distance of 1,000 feet, and 
building three manholes, the city to furnish pipe, cement, 
castings, brick and hardware, delivered on the work. 

Three bids were received as follows : 

• Laying Pipe. Manholes. Rock. 
John Williams Co., $4.75 pr. lin. ft. $35 each $10 pr. yd. 

N. H. Cement & Cons. Co., $4.85 pr. lin. ft. $45 each $12 pr. yd. 
Colburn Cons. Co., $10.00 pr. lin. ft. $75 each S 5 pr. yd. 

These bids were rejected by your board on recommenda- 
tion of your engineer, which action appears to be well taken, 
as the entire work of laying entire length of 2,144 feet com- 
plete was $4,023.24, or $1,876+ per foot. 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 

On this work we were obliged to tight curb the ditch for 
one-half the entire length, owing to the running sand in the 
bottom of the trench. 

On the Rumford and Franklin Street drain we encoun- 
tered some very hard digging, and also excavated large 
quantities of boulders varying in size from a one-man stone 
to a yard size. This work required great care as we had to 
contend with gas main, two water-pipe mains and main 
sewer, also house connections from these mains. 

This drain serves to carry surface water from Beacon 
Street to High Street via Rumford and Franklin Streets. 

This department also connected all catch basins on this 
line with manholes, also in Tremont Street, west of Lyndon 
Street. 

The sewer system of Concord, taken as a whole, is in fair 
condition, but to make it good from a sanitary view, a 
season's work should be given to clearing main free from 
roots; on streets where poplar trees exist the pipes are in 
some instances nearly closed. This condition should be 
remedied, and I would recommend that all poplar trees be 
cut down in streets where sewer systems exist. 

When catch basins are built to connect with mains they 
should empty into manholes, and as funds are available 
those now built should have outlet pipes connected into 
manholes. 

The condition at Prospect Street is bad, and something 
should be done to relieve it, either by laying a storm sewer or 
enlarging the present main. 

I would recommend that only lateral sewers that are 
absolutely necessary be built in 1923 and that the energies 
of the Sewer Department be exerted in putting the present 
system into working order. 

Monthly statements of coal tar sidewalks, etc., were 
made, showing the location, quantities laid, price for same, 
and given to the departments or committees having the 
work done. 

In company with one or both of the other members of the 
committee on locating poles, I have attended to that duty, 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 295 

attended hearings and meetings of your board and furnished 
such information from this department as was called for. 

For the many courtesies extended to me by your board, I 
wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 

amount received from fees, licenses, and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1922: 

Marriage licenses, $240 . 00 

Dog license fees, 152.40 

Recording mortgages, 102.00 

Recording conditional sales, etc., 366.80 

Mortgage discharges, 28.00 

Writs, 12.60 

Billiard and pool table license fees, 4 . 50 

Certificate of records, 11 . 75 

House rent, fire chief, 250 . 00 

Bowling alley, billiard and pool table licenses, 360.00 

Junk dealers' licenses, 100.00 

Job team and passenger carriage licenses, 102 . 00 

Dog licenses, 1 ,748 . 48 

County poor, Merrimack County, 18,903.42 

Dependent soldiers, Merrimack County, 1,728.50 

State primary fees, 119.00 

Sale of histories and maps, 50 . 00 

Druggists' permits to sell liquor, 4 . 00 

Town of Pembroke, aid poor, 160.28 

Town of Tilton, aid poor, 37.00 

Land sold W. H. Reed, 210.00 

" John G. Blodgett, 27.22 

" Arthur N.Day, 25.00 

Concord Electric Co., 34.99 

" RoseLessard, 10.14 

" Beaver Meadow Golf Club, 9.02 

Building sold Henry T. Bean, 20.00 

296 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 297 

Wood sold R. S. Emery, $5 . 00 

Secondhand motor, sold Mr. Boutvvell, 75 . 00 

Rent of land, Bridge Street, to F. A. Lane, 10.00 

Bounty on hedgehogs, .40 

Bounty on wildcats, 20 . 00 

Sale of wood, dump cart, White Park, 27.00 



$24,954.50 
The foregoing amount has been paid into the city treasury. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVERSEER 
OF THE POOR. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1922. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the fifty-fifth annual 
report of expenditures for the poor, including Wards One 
and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1922: 

City Poor. 
Appropriation, $3,000 . 00 

Resolution No. 520, 1 ,200 . 00 

$4,200.00 



Paid groceries, 


$430.97 


fuel, 


175.75 


rents, 


237.00 


care children, 


792.00 


board and care, 


2,335.09 


medicine, 


3.15 


milk, 


103.00 


medical examinations, 


10.00 


shoes, 


7.50 



t,094.46 



298 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



299 



County Poor. 




Paid groceries, 


$2,135.71 


milk, 


175.36 


fuel, 


1,446.38 


Tents, 


2,078.00 


care children, 


3,662.70 


board and care, 


2,777.00 


shoes and clothing, 


169.08 


burials, 


75.00 


miscellaneous, 


42.00 


transient account, 


37.56 

ft 1 o rno 7Q 




ipl^jOVO . 1 V 



Total amount paid for aid to poor, $16,693 . 25 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 

Paid groceries, $88.00 

fuel, 215.75 

rents, 96.00 

board and care, 668.00 

$1,067.75 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: In submitting a report of the work of the 
tree warden for the year of 1922 I can only say that as in 
other years the greater part of the appropriation was ex- 
pended in caring for the gypsy moths. There were but few 
brown-tail moths, those being mostly on fruit trees on pri- 
vate property, and there were no elm tree beetles. 

After removing the dangerous trees and the poplars 
where they have caused trouble with the sewers there is but 
a small part of the appropriation left, which makes it im- 
possible to do anything in the waj r of planting new trees. 
So many have been removed in the last few years that the 
beauty of the streets in many places will be spoiled if some- 
thing is not done to replace them. I would recommend 
that more money be appropriated so that some new trees 
could be set out. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ALFRED CLARK, 

Tree Warden. 



300 



REPORT OF HISTORY COMMISSION. 

January 8, 1923. 
To the Board of Aldermen: 

The History Commission hereby submits the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1922: 
Number of half -leather-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 

1922, 41 
Number of half -leather-bound copies sold, Jan. 1, 1922, 8 

Number of half-leather-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 

1923, 33 
Number of cloth-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 1922, 539 
Number of cloth-bound copies sold, Jan. 1, 1922, 12 

Number of cloth-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 1923, 527 
Number of maps on hand, Jan. 1, 1922, 858 

Number of maps given out with histories sold (one to 

each set), 20 

Number of maps sold separately, 8 

— 28 
Number of maps on hand, Jan. 1, 1923, 830 

Receipts from Sale of Histories, 1922. 

Eight copies, half -leather binding, at $3.00, $24.00 

Twelve copies, cloth binding, at $2.00, 24.00 

Eight maps sold separately, at $.25, 2.00 



Total, $50.00 

Deposited with the city treasurer, amount received 
from sale of histories and maps, 1922, treasurer's 
receipt, number 373, $50 . 00 

Respectfully submitted, 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, 
WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 
ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Clerk, 

History Commission. 
301 



REPORT OF CITY SEALER. 



Covering the Period February 1, 1922, to January 

1, 1923. 



To His Honor, Henry E. Chamberli7i, Mayor, and the Board 

of Aldermen: 

Three prosecutions have been made during the past year: 
one for short weight on bread, one for short measure on 
berries, and one for short weight on hams. In each instance 
the offender was found guilty and fined. 

Three hundred and ninety-two (392) scales were tested 
and sealed; six (6) scales were confiscated and fourteen (14) 
condemned for repairs, which were later reinspected and 
sealed. Two hundred and twenty-eight (228) weights were 
tested and sealed; forty-nine (49) wood carts were measured 
and marked; eighteen (18) re weighings of coal were made, 
and your sealer has estimated also seven coal bins. Twenty- 
six (26) five-gallon cans were tested and sealed; two hun- 
dred and eight (208) packages containing beans, potatoes, 
sugar, etc., were reweighed; one hundred and twenty-four 
(124) tests of automatic pumps were made, four (4) of which 
were condemned for repairs and one completely condemned. 
All liquid and dry measures were found correct. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED S. PENDLETON, 

City Sealer. 



302 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Following is the report of the Board of Health for the year 
ending December 31, 1922: 

Mayor Henry E. Chamberlin was ex-officio chairman, 
Dr. Charles H. Cook was ex-officio secretary and Dr. 
Sibley G. Morrill was the third member of the body. 
Meetings were held from time to time throughout the year 
whenever such meetings were deemed necessary or advisable. 
In the absence of any great emergencies, such as a severe 
epidemic of any of the great contagious diseases, such meet- 
ings have not seemed to be needed as frequently as formerly, 
all matters of a routine nature and most of the minor 
emergencies being handled by the sanitary officer and his 
assistant. This centralization of authority, so far as is 
practicable, is felt to be a step in the right direction as it 
makes for more prompt and efficient service. 

For a detailed account of the work of the sanitary office 
you are referred to the report of the sanitary officer, which 
is hereby transmitted and made a part of this report. In 
this report you will note that Mr. Palmer calls attention to 
the fact that the city has no detention hospital for the 
proper segregation and care of such cases of smallpox as 
the health officials may be called upon to handle at any time. 
It is true that we have been fortunately free from this 
disease for some years past. This immunity is quite un- 
likely to be anything like a permanent one, and as already 
indicated is largely fortuitous. There are, at the present 
time, many cases of smallpox scattered throughout the 

303 



304 CITY OF CONCORD. 

United States as well as in foreign countries. Furthermore, 
the incidence of the disease seems to be increasing, and it 
also seems to be increasing in virulence with a correspond- 
ingly enhanced mortality. 

With the above in mind, together with the facts concern- 
ing the increasing facility of intercommunication afforded 
by our modern methods of travel, it seems almost inevitable 
that cases of this kind will be encountered sooner or later. 
Thus it would seem to be the part of wisdom to settle upon 
some course of action in advance of its necessity. 

As stated in several previous reports of this board, we are 
of the opinion that it ought to be possible to effect some 
arrangement with the Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, looking 
toward the solution of this problem as well as other prob- 
lems with respect to the care of contagious diseases, that are 
confronting the community. 

This board feels that there can be no reasonable doubt 
about the value of vaccination as a preventative measure 
against smallpox. We believe that it is our best, and for 
that matter, at present, our only safeguard against this 
dreadful scourge of humanity. In spite of a considerable 
amount of propaganda favoring the abolition of compulsory 
vaccination we believe that the majority of our thoughtful, 
intelligent and informed people are impressed with the logic 
of the case for vaccination and are thus favorably disposed 
toward this measure irrespective of the law. As for the 
others who constitute "the anti's" it may very well be con- 
ceded that a campaign of education is in order for their 
benefit and enlightenment. It is conceivable that they may 
easily be led where it would be found very difficult to drive 
them. 

In any case, whatever may be the course of events, legis- 
lative, judicial or educational, it should be borne in mind by 
the individual that in recent successful vaccination he has a 
means of acquiring practically certain immunity from this 
malady. 

In this connection, as tending to show how a firm of in- 
surance underwriters, well known throughout the civilized 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 305 

world, views this matter, may be mentioned the fact that 
Lloyd's of London has been insuring against death from 
smallpox due to the prevalence of that disease throughout 
the British Isles. The premium charged unvaccinatcd 
persons being twice that charged those who have been 
vaccinated. This differential applies to all vaccinated 
persons irrespective of the time that may have elapsed 
since the operation was performed. In case it should have 
been found feasible to establish a rate for those who had 
been very recently vaccinated there would doubtless have 
been a much greater difference in the premiums charged. 

Thus it will be seen that the propaganda for the abolition 
of vaccination, which may be said to have had its inception 
and headquarters in England, has thus far failed to shake 
the faith of this association of underwriters whose policies, 
we may safely assume, are determined by hard-headed 
business men and not by moon-eyed sentimentalists or 
designing charlatans. 

It is an indubitable fact that no responsible medical man 
has any doubt as to the protection afforded against smallpox 
by vaccination. With such a ready means at hand for 
preventing the spread of the disease it would hardly seem 
to be justifiable to expend large sums of money in providing 
a building or buildings to be used solely for a detention 
hospital for this disease. We believe that some way ought 
to be worked out that would permit the use of the present 
Foster Ward in case of an emergency. It is thought that 
this could be done with entire safety and to the advantage 
of all concerned. 

Our city has a pure and abundant water supply, well 
paved and clean streets, an efficient sewage disposal system, 
fine parks and playgrounds, comfortable and sanitary 
schoolhouses, a supply of pure milk thoroughly inspected 
as to its sources, as well as many other favoring factors 
which contribute a share toward our general welfare from 
the public health point of view. As a recent addition to 
this ever-growing list of such factors should be mentioned 
the collection of table refuse under the auspices of the 
20 



306 CITY OF CONCORD. 

sanitary office. We think that this is a forward step and 
one that is justified, notwithstanding the not inconsiderable 
expense involved in the undertaking. 

In conclusion it may not be thought out of place to call 
your attention to the fact that the maintenance of this 
office with its manifold activities has cost the people of 
Concord less than twenty cents per capita for the entire 
year. We believe that no thoughtful person will consider 
this trifling sum too much to contribute toward maintaining 
such an undeniably fruitful form of public service. 

Respectfully submitted, 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, 
CHARLES H. COOK, 
SIBLEY G. MORRILL. 

Board of Health. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 307 

REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: The annual report of the sanitary officer 
for the year ending December 31, 1922, is herewith submit- 
ted. 

The deaths for the past year were 481, which is 49 more 
than in 1921, arteriosclerosis claiming 49, the largest num- 
ber from any one cause. Estimating the population at 
23,000 and excluding the non-resident deaths, 192, and the 
stillbirths, 14, the yearly death rate for Concord was 11.95 
per cent. There were 255 deaths at the six public institu- 
tions and 226 in the nine wards of the city. 

None of the contagious diseases have been epidemic in 
Concord, but scarlet fever has again been prevalent during 
the entire year. We have been fortunate in having had 
only forty-one cases with no deaths, which is thirteen less 
than in 1921. There were eleven cases of diphtheria with 
one death, one hundred and one cases of measles, thirty- 
seven cases of tuberculosis with twenty-seven deaths. 
Twenty-three of the thirty-seven cases of tuberculosis were 
from the State Hospital. There were also reported eighty- 
two cases of venereal disease. 

The price of live-weight hogs continued to remain at such 
a low figure that nearly all of the licensed garbage men gave 
up the collection of table garbage early in the season. 
Complaints came pouring into this office that households 
were unable to dispose of their garbage and it became a 
general nuisance. As the situation became more acute it 
was voted at the May meeting of the Board of Public 
Works to call for bids for the collection of table garbage, 
and the contract was awarded to John A. Cochran, thereby 
adding a new department to the Board of Health. The 
first collection started with a list of one hundred names, and 
has gradually increased until seventeen hundred families 
were being taken care of at the end of the year. Two 
collections per week were made during the summer and one 



308 <ITY OF CONCOED. 

collection in winter. There was some difficulty in getting 
started, but the men in charge are faithful and competent, 
and the work is being efficiently handled at present. The 
board had supposed it would be a simple matter to make the 
winter collections, but the extremely deep snow has proved 
a great handicap, which necessitated the putting on of two- 
horse teams with two men to a team, thereby increasing 
the cost of the weekly collection during the winter to nearly 
double the cost of two collections per week in summer, for 
the same number of families. This branch of our work is 
increasing daily and no doubt the demands will be much 
greater as the warm weather approaches, but I feel that we 
have taken care of a serious nuisance in establishing this 
department. 

It again becomes necessary, as it has for the past three 
years, for me to call the attention of the public to the fact 
that no definite steps have been taken regarding an isolation 
hospital. Concord has been extremely fortunate in not 
having had a case of smallpox, but should an epidemic 
break out of such intensity as the city of Denver and many 
cities has had, the Board of Health would be absolutely 
unable to cope with the situation. From September 1 to 
December 1, 1922, there were 444 cases of smallpox in 
Denver, with a total of 140 deaths. Because we have been 
free from smallpox is no sign that we must not be prepared 
to take care of it should there be an outbreak of this dreaded 
disease, and I sincerely hope some place will be provided 
during the coming year. 

It is also interesting to note at this time, notwithstanding 
the propaganda against vaccination, issued by the so-called 
Medical Liberty League, advising people to resist vaccina- 
tion, that of the total of 444 cases, 359 victims were not 
vaccinated, and of the 140 total deaths, 130 had never been 
vaccinated. The morbidity and mortality of school children 
was exceedingly small as vaccination was compulsory and 
was strictly enforced. I know of no better argument for 
vaccination, in which I firmly believe, than the above state- 
ment of facts. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 309 

During the year I submitted sixty-nine samples of milk 
to the State Laboratory for examination, and it is very 
gratifying that all but four samples of the total number 
submitted were up to or above the minimum required 
standard, which is a much higher average than in former 
years. Of the forty-one milk farms inspected, twenty-two 
were in good condition, seventeen were fairly good and two 
were in poor condition. The owners were requested to 
clean up the barns at once and make the necessary improve- 
ments required by law, which was done. 

There have been the usual number of complaints and 
nuisances to be inspected and disposed of. These came 
largely from dead animals, odors from pigs, stables, rubbish, 
unsanitary plumbing, refuse in yards and general conditions 
of premises. The weekly inspection of alleyways in the rear of 
the business blocks has avoided any accumulation of rubbish. 

While there has not been as much construction in the 
city, it is being resumed gradually, and 217 plumbing 
inspections were made this year compared with the 135 of 
1921. I inspected forty-two sewer connections up to 
November 13, at which time the Board of Aldermen voted 
to amend the city ordinance and give the inspection of 
sewers to the city engineer. By having all the records in 
charge of the Engineering Department, the public will be 
served much more efficiently than under the former arrange- 
ment, when it was necessary to consult plans in one depart- 
ment and records in another. 

Regular inspection of the shores of Penacook Lake, which 
furnishes the water supply for the city, has shown it to be 
in excellent condition. Analysis of the water also shows it 
to be of the usual fine quality. 

The appropriation for the year was $5,000 and the total 
expenditures were $4,288.49, leaving a balance of $711.51. 
This balance was due to the fact that we had very little 
contagious disease that needed financial assistance, which 
is very unusual, as this appropriation was overdrawn in 
1921. One hundred and sixty-nine dollars was received 
from milk license fees. 



310 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The following tables show in detail the work of the 
department : 

Financial Statement of the Board of Health for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1922. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $2,000.00 

Upkeep of automobile, 400 . 00 

Fumigation supplies, 100 . 00 

Contagious disease, 1,000.00 

Incidental expenses, 1,500.00 



Total, 


$5,000.00 


EXPENDITURES. 




.Salary, sanitary officer, 


$2,000.00 


Upkeep of automobile, 


400.00 


Fumigation supplies, 


94.69 


Incidental expenses, 


1,323.72 


Balance, 


711.51 



Total, $5,000.00 

RECEIPTS FOR THE YEAR. 

Milk license fees, $169.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



311 



The following table shows the number of contagious dis- 
eases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom . 





Diph- 
theria. 


Influenza. 


Measles. 


Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubercu- 
losis. 


Typhoid 

fever. 


Vene- 
real dis- 
eases. 


Whoop- 
ing 

cough. 


Months. 




03 

Q 


c 


Q 


03 


a 


O 


-a 
P 


O 


~C3 

Q 


C3 


Q 


O 


a 


o 


Q 


O 


C3 

Q 




1 
2 








1 








6 






3 






5 

19 
12 

4 
4 
6 
11 
6 
3 
3 
3 










1 














3 
o 
1 
1 
1 
3 














5 
5 
25 
53 
10 
o 








10 
5 
2 




2 
1 
7 
4 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
1 


















































1 

8 
2 
3 

2 


l 
l 

l 




2 
3 






































3 

5 
1 






August. . . . 


1 
2 


















9 
















4 
19 
1 

2 
































3 
2 
















6 
3 


























































Total 


11 


1 






101 








41 




37 


27 


16 


3 


S2 




5 


2 

















COMPARATIVE TABLE. 



The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890. 





Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 


Infan- 
tile pa- 
ralysis. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Measles. 


Small- 
pox. 


Total. 


a 
>* 


C3 

o 


a 


O 


"3 


c 


Q 


a 


Q 




C3 

Q 


3 




O 


x: 
3 
Q 


A 


"3 
Q 


=3 


"3 
Q 


1890.. 














6 
12 
13 
48 
17 
35 
55 
13 
. 4 
9 
29 
65 
29 
42 
55 
15 
14 
63 
41 
131 
30 
51 
17 
33 
30 
21 
54 
138 
22 
28 
i: 
i 
11 


2 
3 
3 

7 
3 
8 
8 
1 

5 
5 
5 
o 
4 
3 
1 
2 

4 
6 
1 

2 
1 
3 

3 
3 
3 

1 

1 


9 .. 


17 

14 

7 

13 

13 

21 

15 

17 

8 

14 

18 

13 

23 

17 

12 

23 

32 

11 

6 

28 

16 

10 

15 

10 

7 

8 

8 

5 

10 

12 

1 

2 

16 


5 
6 
1 
2 
3 
3 
5 
2 
4 
1 
1 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3 

1 

4 

3 

4 
1 
2 
1 

1 

2 
3 

3 


6 

2 

2 

300 

21 

158 

452 

138 

126 

299 

476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

116S 

143 

26 

321 

687 

6 

9 

382 

414 

112 

805 

31 
101 








38 
35 
59 
402 
164 
258 
526 
190 
146 
421 
562 
130 

87 
682 
116 
299 
175 
218 
157 
1350 
199 

95 
362 
763 

74 

94 
468 
610 
206 
128 
879 
107 
174 


7 


1891.. 














7 
37 
41 
113 
44 

4 
22 

8 

99 
39 
11 

6 
39 
18 
80 
27 
26 

23 

10 
' S 

28 
28 
26 
18 
47 
12 
33 
38 
54 
41 


3 

6 

8 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 








9 


1892.. 




















7 


1893.. 




















9 


1894.. 




















12 


1895.. 




















19 


1896.. 




















13 


1897.. 




















4 


1898.. 




















4 


1899. . 






















1900.. 














1 
4 






7 


1901.. 














1 
2 
2 


1 


9 


1902.. 














5 


1903.. 














11 


1904 . 














4 


1905.. 














1 
1 






5 


1906. . 














1 




fi 


1907.. 














3 


1908.. 




















5 


1909.. 














1 






11 


1910.. 


















2 


1911. . 




















6 


1912.. 










2 
5 
3 


1 
1 


2 






8 


1913. . 














5 


1911. 
















2 


1915.. 


1 




25 
5 
5 
49 
48 
9 
9 
5 


1 
1 




4 




2 


1916. . 


1 


1 


7 


1917. 












3 


1918.. 


1 










1 






4 


1919. 












2 


1 920 


2 




1 

2 


1 










4 


1921 








1 


1922 












fi 





















health department. 313 

Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions. 

Ward 1, 38 

Ward 2, 9 

Ward 3, 20 

Ward 4, 31 

Ward 5, 29 

Ward 6, 37 

Ward 7, 35 

Ward 8, 6 

Ward 9, 21 

New Hampshire State Hospital, 162 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 61 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 22 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 5 

New Hampshire State Prison, 1 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 4 



Deaths Reported by Age. 

*Under 1 year, 47 

From 1 j'ear to 5 years, 12 

From 5 to 10 years, 1 

From 10 to 15 years, 2 

From 15 to 20 years, 6 

From 20 to 30 years, 15 

From 30 to 40 years, 38 

From 40 to 50 years, 55 

From 50 to 60 years, 51 

From 60 to 70 years, 86 

From 70 to 80 years, 109 

From 80 to 90 years, 52 

From 90 to 100 years, 3 

Not stated, 4 

Total number of deaths, 481 



♦Including 14 stillborns. 



314 city of concord. 

Deaths During 1922 by Sex, Condition- and Nativity. 

Sex: 

Males, 268 

Females, 213 

Condition: 

Married, 183 

Single, 137 

Widowed, 137 

Divorced, 14 

Not stated, 10 

Nativity: 

Concord, 121 

New Hampshire, 171 

Other states, 105 

Foreign, 74 

Not stated, 10 

Causes of Death. 

Causes. No. of Deaths. 

Abscess, 3 

Accident, 1 

automobile, 2 

burns, 2 

drowning, 3 

electrocution, 1 

shooting, 1 

Acidosis, 1 

Alcoholism, 2 

Anemia, pernicious, 7 

Angina pectoris, 8 

Aortic regurgitation, 3 

Apoplexy, 22 

Appendicitis, 1 

Atelectasis, 1 

Brain, concussion of, 1 

tumor, 1 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 315 

Causes. No. of Deaths. 

Bright's Disease, 1 

Bronchitis, 2 

Cancer, 7 

bowels, 1 

breast, 3 

face, 2 

lips, 1 

liver, 2 

stomach, 6 

uterus, 2 

vulva, 1 

Compression cerebral, 1 

Congenital debility, 2 

Congestion of lungs, 1 

Convulsions, 2 

Cysts, ovarian, 1 

Cystitis, 2 

Dementia, senile, 1 

Diabetes, 1 

mellitus, 3 

Diarrhea and enteritis, 1 

Diphtheria, 1 

Edema of lungs, 2 

Embolism, 4 

cerebral, 1 

pulmonary, 1 

Endocarditis, 5 

Enteritis, 3 

gastro, 2 

Epilepsy, 2 

Erysipelas, 2 

Exhaustion, 4 

Fracture of skull, 1 

spine, 1 

Gangrene, 1 

Gastric ulcer, perforation of, 1 

Heart, disease of, 42 



316 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Causes. No. of Deaths. 

Hemiplegia, 2 

Hemorrhage, 1 

cerebral, 38 

Hemorrhagica purpura, 1 

Hydrocephalis, 1 

Icterus neonatorum, 1 

Inanition, 3 

Indigestion, 1 

Injury by animal, gored, 1 

Intestinal obstruction, 6 

La Grippe, 2 

Malnutrition, 1 

Mania, 2 

Marasmus, 1 

Meningitis, acute, 4 

pneumococcus, 1 

tubercular, 1 

Mitral regurgitation, 4 

Myocarditis, 18 

Nephritis, 1 1 

interstitial, 1 1 

Paralysis, agitans, 3 

of insane, 3 

Paresis, 15 

Pellagra, 2 

Pericarditis, 3 

Peritonitis, 4 

appendicitis, 2 

Poliomyelitis, anterior, 1 

Pneumonia, 5 

broncho, 15 

croupons, 1 

hypostatic, 2 

lobar, 16 

traumatic, 1 

Premature birth, 6 

Psychosis, 5 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 317 

Causes. No. of Deaths. 

Rheumatism 1 

Arteriosclerosis, 49 

Senility, 1 

Septicemia, 4 

Stillborn, 14 

Suicide, illuminating gas, 2 

shooting, 1 

Surgical shock, 2 

Syphilis, 1 

Tetanus, 1 

Tuberculosis, miliary 1 

pulmonary, 26 

Typhoid fever, 3 

Uraemia, 2 

Whooping cough, 2 

Total, 481 

Total number of deaths for the year 1922, 481, compared 
with 432 in 1921. 

Average death-rate for the year 1922, 11.95, compared 
with 11.78 in 1921. 

Total number of births for the year 1922, 455, compared 
with 430 in 1921. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1922, 231, com- 
pared with 229 in 1921. 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection 
of Milk Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 69 

Number of examinations above standard, 65 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected. 41 

Conditions good, 22 

Conditions fair, 17 

Conditions poor, 2 

Improvements suggested, 19 



318 city of concord. 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 325 

Burial permits issued, 595 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 114 

Transit permits issued, 215 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 226 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 37 
Number of reports of contagious disease sent to State 

Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, Public 

Health and Marine Hospital Service, 52 
Number of samples of water and ice collected for 

analysis, 12 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 195 

Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 237 

Number of plumbing permits granted, 115 

Number of inspections of plumbing, , 217 

Number of sewers connected, 42 

Number of barber shops inspected, 25 

Number of public halls inspected, 20 

Number of restaurants and bakeries inspected, 18 

Number of school buildings inspected, 25 

I wish to express my thanks to the Mayor and the other 
members of the Board of Health, the aldermen and all the 
city officials for their co-operation with me in the work of 
this department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1922. 
To the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The twenty-third annual report of this 
board is herewith submitted. 

The membership of the present board is as follows: Wil- 
fred W. Brennan, a licensed journeyman plumber, Charles 
H. Cook, M.D., and Fred W. Lang, city engineer. Mr. 
Brennan is chairman of the board and Fred W. Lang, clerk. 

Two applications for master's licenses were received, and 
one application for journeyman's plumber license. 

Three meetings were held, the applicants examined and 
the two master applicants passed the required examination 
and licenses were issued to them. 

The applicant for journeyman's license failed to pass the 
examination and was denied a license. 

There are four classes of plumbers on the register: Reg- 
istered Master; Examined Master; Registered Journeyman; 
and Examined Journeyman. 

The following paid for their 1922 license, and are classified 
as follows: 

Registered Masters. 
Arthur W. Bean, License number 1 



Mary L. Clifford, 
Seth R. Hood, 
Michael J. Lee, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Benjamin H. Orr, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
Albert S. Trask, 

319 



14 
2 

10 
4 
6 
5 
3 

11 



320 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Examined Masters. 

Charles W. Batcman, License 

William J. Bishop, 

Louis J. Cherrier, 

Philip W. Clark, 

Frederick F. Converse, " 

Edward F. Donovan, " 

Edward F. Edgeworth, 

John L. Fahey, " 

William Johns, " 

Thomas J. Johnson, 

John C. Keenan, 

Robert J. Keane, Jr., 

Manley W. Morgan, " 

G. Arthur Nichols, 

Richard O'Brien, 

Harris S. Parmenter, 

Albert E. Roberts, 

George L. Small, 

John C. Smith, 

Fred B. Thissell, 

William Trottier, 

Registered Journeymen. 

P. Harrison D. Leary, License 

Harry H. Kennedy, 



Examined Journeymen. 



.( !harles H. Berry, 
Wilfred J. Brennan, 
Arthur W. Brown, 
Stanley A. Buchanan, 
Arthur W. Bunten, 
Nelson Dane, 
Franklin F. Donovan, 
Merton D. Farrar, 
C. Nelson Griffin, 



License 



number 


3 


u 


27 


tt 


23 


u 


34 


It 


35 


tt 


18 


it 


30 


it 


28 


a 


37 


tt 


26 


it 


15 


a 


38 


a 


16 


a 


2 


a 


29 


it 


24 


a 


11 


a 


31 


a 


11 


a 


36 


a 


7 


numbei 


■ 12 


a 


11 


numbei 


• 3 


a 


71 


a 


70 


a 


86 


n 


20 


a 


79 


it 


81 


a 


63 


tt 


62 



EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 



321 



Victor T. Lauze, 



License number 78 



Adelard J. Lemire, 

Everett S. Mahoney, 

John W. McGowan, " 

William H. Stanley, 

Clarence J. Spead, 

Arthur W. Robinson, " 

Total number Registered Masters, 9. 
Total number Registered Journeymen, 2. 
Total number Examined Masters, 21. 
Total number Examined Journeymen, 16. 



64 
72 
80 
59 
60 
52 



Cash Receipts. 

For licenses, 

For examinations, 


$24 . 00 
3.00 


Total receipts, 
Paid out for stamp, 


$27.00 
1.00 



Balance, 



$26.00 



The clerk of the board holds receipts from the city treas- 
urer for $26. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. W. BRENNAN, 
CHAS. H. COOK, 
FRED W. LANG, 
Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



21 



REPORT OF THE CITY PHYSICIAN. 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Following is the report of the City Physician for the year 
ending December 31, 1922: 
Number of house calls, City poor and Board of Health 

cases, 57 

Number of office calls, City poor and Board of Health 

cases, 63 

Number of surgical dressings, 34 

Number of cases examined for insanity, 2 

Number of times serum given, 25 

Number of school children examined for vaccination, 37 

Number of school children vaccinated, 85 

Number of calls at Police Station, 9 

The City Physician has served as ex-officio secretary of 
the Board of Health and has attended the meetings of this 
board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK, 

City Physician. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 



Concord, N. H., January 5, 1923. 
To his Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: I beg to submit herewith my annual report 
of the legal matters in which the city of Concord was in- 
terested during the past year. 

John J. McLaughlin v. City of Concord is an action brought 
against the Concord Water Works for damages for injuries, 
claimed to have been received by falling into a hole at the 
new Patriot Building while a sprinkler system was being 
installed by the Water Works in the new building. 

Joseph E. Normandeau v. City of Concord (1) is an appeal 
from an award made to Mr. Normandeau by the Board of 
Aldermen for land taken to be used in the construction of 
the new road known as the "Soucook Cut-off." This ap- 
peal is now pending in the Superior Court. 

Joseph E. Normandeau v. City of Concord (2) is a claim 
against the city for damages to a truck and contents owned 
by the plaintiff which went through the Clough's Mills 
Bridge so called. This bridge lies partly in Concord and 
partly in Pembroke and is now a joint bridge. A similar 
claim has been filed against the town of Pembroke. 

Percy Ploude v. City of Concord is a claim for personal 
injuries alleged to have happened in connection with the 
above accident at Clough's Mills Bridge. The plaintiff was 
an employee of Mr. Normandeau and driving a truck at 
the time of the accident. 

Isreal Smith v. City of Concord is a suit for injury alleged 
to have occurred to a horse while being driven on the Loudon 
Road, and was settled out of court by a payment to the 
plaintiff of twenty-five ($25) dollars. 

The case of Mae E. Cragg and Thomas W. Cragg v. 

323 



324 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Herbert Sargent, Boston & Maine Railroad and the City of 
Concord, we settled by the payment of $5,750, of which sum 
the city of Concord contributed seven hundred ($700) 
dollars as its share. 

Charles Elgand v. City of Concord is a claim for damages 
presented by Mr. Elgand, who alleges that his property was 
damaged because of a defective culvert adjoining his prem- 
ises. This case is in order for trial at the present term of 
United States Court at Concord. 

At the beginning of the year I started a custom of re- 
porting all accidents involving any of the employees of the 
city, and also any accidents which might happen upon high- 
ways and which were, or might be attributed to defective 
condition of highways, reports thereof being made immedi- 
ately. With the assistance of the Police Department, the 
city engineer and the superintendent of streets, a complete 
investigation of such accidents and all the connecting cir- 
cumstances has been made immediately, and it occurs to me 
that this practice has in many instances saved the city from 
the trouble of defending claims which were groundless. It 
is my recommendation that this matter be given more 
attention, because in my opinion, an immediate and com- 
plete investigation of these accidents is very necessary to 
adequately protect the rights of the city. 

I wish to thank the Mayor, Board of Aldermen and the 
heads of the different departments for their kind coopera- 
tion and courtesies extended to me during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. JOSEPH DOHERTY. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



FOURTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CITY 
MARSHAL. 



Concord, N. H., Jan. 1, 1923. 

To His Honor, Henry E. Chamberlin, Mayor of the City of 
Concord, and the Honorable Board of Aldermen: 
Gentlemen: I respectfully submit my fourteenth 
annual report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1922. 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal. 
George A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Victor I. Moore. 

Captain. 
Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant. 
Christopher T. Wallace. 

Patrolmen. 
Samuel Rodd, John B. Long, 

George H. Silsby, James J. Halligan, 

Irving B. Robinson, F. Scott Rogers, 

J. Edward Silva, Cleveland H. Curtis, 

Fred N. Marden, Arthur W. Mclsaac. 

Chauffeurs. 
Abraham D. Cushing, Eugene G. Densmore. 

325 



326 city of concord. 

Reserve Officers. 

captain. 
Thomas P. Davis. 

Willie A. Little, Walter H. Bean, 

Joseph A. Flanders, George M. Dooley, 

Jonas Welcome, John McGirr, 

Willie A. Flanders, Thomas M. Harrison, 

Nelson Forest, Nelson E. Strong, 

George H. Abbott, Galen W. Hunter, 

Elmer Trombly, John P. Walsh. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Appropriation, $39,230.00 

Special Appropriation, 9,999.43 



Total expended, $49,229 . 43 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

Salaries, regulars, $29,306 . 76 

Salaries, specials, 11,184.75 

Fuel, city, 1,061.17 

Fuel, Penacook, 148.93 

Automobiles, 1 ,756 . 40 

Lights, city, 243 . 30 

Lights, Penacook, 64.32 

Incidentals, 4,690.48 

Repairs, building, 773.32 



$49,229.43 



Total expense of special police officers detailed for duty at 
the Boston & Maine Railroad Yard during July, August, 
September, October, November, December, $10,061.32. 
This amount is included in the total expenditures. 

Officers' fees and miscellaneous cash received and 

paid to the city treasurer, $437 . 75 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



327 



ARRESTS. 






1909, 


281 




1910, 


586 




1911, 


1,076 




1912, 


1,366 




1913, 


1,556 




1914, 


1,850 




1915, 


1,599 




1916, 


1,106 




1917, 


1,003 




1918, 


493 




1919, 


350 




1920, 


471 




1921, 


552 




Total Arrests and Causes for 


the Year 


1922. 


Brought before the court, 




467 


Discharged by the court, 




9 


Released, 




197 


Adultery, 




4 


Assault, 




24 


Aggravated assault, 




4 


Breaking and entering, 




5 


Bastardy, 




3 


Drunkenness, city and Penacook, 




187 


Escapes from House of Correction, 




1 


Hunting without a license, 




1 


Arrests for other departments, 




27 


Insane, 




9 


Larceny, 




12 


Grand larceny, 




6 


Rude and disorderly conduct, 




11 


Safe-keeping, 




64 


Indecent conduct, 




5 


Resisting an officer, 




1 


Bound over to Superior Court, 




15 


Committed to jail, 




6 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Committed to House of Correction, 


3 


Committed to N. H. State Hospital, 


10 


Number paid fines, 


363 


Appeals, 


5 


Nol-prossed, 


26 


Sentence suspended, 


40 


Mittimusses called for, 


1 


False pretenses, 


2 


Fighting, 


4 


Violating parking ordinance, 


2 


Non-support, 


17 


Operating automobiles while under the influence of 




liquor, 


22 


Overspeeding, 


27 


Cruelty to animals, 


1 


Stubborn child, 


1 


Obstructing an officer, 


1 


Unlicensed dogs, 


3 


Idle persons, 


1 


Fornication, 


4 


Disturbing a religious meeting, 


o 


Gambling, 


14 


Illegal possession of liquor, 


56 


Fishing without a license, 


1 


Catching short trout, 


1 


Rape, 


3 


Selling wood, short measure, 


4 


Illegal possession of cider, 


3 


Trespassing, 


1 


Unnatural act, 


3 


Escapes from State Hospital, 


4 


Perjury, 


2 


Violations of motor vehicle laws, 


19 


Operating autos recklessly, 


6 


False weighing scales, 


2 


Violating vendors' laws, 


1 


Keeping liquor for sale, 


4 


Manslaughter, 


1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 329 

Transferring number plates, 10 

Operating taxi without a license, 4 

Soliciting taxi business,- 1 
Failure to stop auto when commanded by an officer, 5 

Playing ball on the Lord's Day, 16 

Operating auto without a license, 23 

Riding bicycle on sidewalk, 1 

Playing cards on the Lord's Day, 6 

Manufacturing liquor, 4 

Arson, 1 

Failure to send children to school, 2 

Runaway children, 1 
Failure to stop auto when passengers were getting on 

and off electric cars, . 1 

Transporting liquor, 3 

Selling mortgaged property, 1 

Fraud, 1 

Giving away intoxicating liquor, 1 

Shooting deer out of season, 1 

Self-hunting dogs, 2 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number of times doors tried, 853,005 

Doors found unlocked, 520 

Windows found open, 28 
Lodgers, 1,043 

Autos stolen, 10 

Autos recovered, 10 

Motor cycles stolen, 1 

Motor cycles recovered, 1 

Persons killed in auto accidents, 4 

Persons injured in auto accidents, 34 

Auto accidents investigated, 64 

Disturbances quelled, 75 

Stray teams cared for, 17 

Emergency ambulance calls, 17 

Total ambulance calls, 355 

Fires reported to the Fire Department, 5 



330 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dogs killed by autos, 8 

Complaints about dogs, 14 

Complaints of riding wheels on sidewalks, 10 

Cases reported to the S. P. C. A., 8 

Destitute persons cared for at station, 6 

Lights reported to Concord Electric Co., 601 

Merchants notified of trouble in stores, 31 

Fire alarms rung in by police, 2 

Suicides, 1 

Juveniles taken to their homes after 9.30 p. m., 12 

Runaway horses caught, 4 

Stray children found, 14 

Police officers attending fires, 157 

Unlicensed dogs killed, . 22 

Investigation of dogs doing damage, 3 

Dangerous wires reported, 4 

Sick persons cared for by the police, 13 

Dead persons found by the police, 8 

Injured persons cared for by the police, 4 

Lost children found, 29 

Holes reported to the Highway Department, 16 

Asphyxiated by gas, 2 

Complaints investigated, 423 

Vacant houses looked after, 20 

Leaky water pipes reported, 6 

Notified to put out rubbish fires, 10 

Dangerous limbs reported, 3 

Bitten by dogs, 3 

Dead persons removed from the river, 4 

Dead animals reported to the Health Department, 2 

Bridges reported in a dangerous condition, 1 

Complaint of obstruction on car tracks, 3 

Revolver shots investigated, 5 

Destitute children, 2 

CONCLUSION. 

I thank His Honor, the Mayor, and the Honorable 
Board of Aldermen, Judge Harry J. Brown, County Solicitor 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 331 

Herbert W. Rainie, Clerk of Court John W. Stanley, and 
the members of the department for the co-operation and 
support given throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF THE 
MUNICIPAL COURT. 



Receipts. 

Received for fines, costs and sundry fees, $9,357 . 40 

Expenditures. 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses, complaints and 

warrants , $1,126.63 
State of New Hampshire, fines: 

Mott L. Bartlett, commissioner of fish and game, 88 . 95 

J. F. Griffin, commissioner of motor vehicles, 2,420.40 

J. W. Plummer, state treasurer, 180.00 

Clerk's bond, 3 . 00 

Probation officer (services), 120.00 

Postage, printing and other supplies, 95 . 75 

Treasurer of Merrimack County, 725 . 00 

Concord S. P. C. A., 25.00 

B. Kravit, return of bail State v. Boardman, 500.00 

Special justices, 260.00 

Balance paid city treasurer, 3,812.67 



),357.40 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. STANLEY, 

Clerk. 



332 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration 
the following facts and figures showing the valuation of 
the city and its school districts and special precincts, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
for the years from 1912 to the present time, which shows 
the increased amount spent by the city. 



333 



334 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tabulations of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 
Valuation of City and Precincts with Rate for 
Each in 1922. 



Warrant. 



State 

County 

City 

Extra for schools: 

Union 

[No. 20.. 
Penacook I 

[ Union* 

Precincts: 

Sprinkling 

Garbage 

Sewer 

Lights 

Penacook lights .... 

Penacook sprinkling 

Penacook sewer .... 

West Concord lights 

West Concord sewer 



Amount of 
warrants. 



$76,485.00] 
47,479.33 
160,000.00) 

249,373.03 

909.25 

26,000.00 

7,000.00 

20,000.00 

16,645.00 

23,000.00 

2,575.00 

700.00 

500.00 

820.00 

200.00 



Tax rate 
per $1,000. 



$10.10 



valuation of 
city and 
precincts. 



$23,710,108 



1.10 


21,475,018 


.40 


2,234,090 


9 50 


2,977,062 


.41 


16,707,748 


1.24 


16,034,036 


.93 


17,889,281 


1.20 


19,267,894 


1.12 


2,208,915 


.46 


1,520,655 


.30 


1,688,665 


.75 


1,091.080 


.45 


437,755 



' Penacook Union School paid in part by town of Boscawen. 



REPORT OF THE ASSESSORS. 



335 



Number of Shares of Railroad Stock Held Here on 
Which the Tax Was Assessed and Collected by 
State of New Hampshire and Credited to the 
City. 



Railroad. 


1919. 


1920. 


1921. 


1922. 




353 

9,019 

69 

468 

56 

313 

16 

373 

66 

1.249 

8 

171 

49 

6 


362 

8,632 

72 



77 

203 

18 



66 

1,295 

8 

152 

49 

9 

5 


307 

6,172 

67 

468 

87 

199 

13 



66 

1.216 

8 

80 

44 

11 




258 




8,201 




72 


Dover, Somersworth & Rochester Street. . 



97 




193 




6 








70 




1,377 




8 




160 




46 


Wilton 


13 




5 




24 


Nashua Street Railway 


349 

168 







336 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Inventory of 


THE 


C: 


[TY 


of Concord. 












No. 


Valuation 




Improved and unimproved land and 








buildings, 










$19,450,685.00 


Horses, 








758 


87,150. 


00 


Oxen, 








10 


1,105. 


00 


Cows, 








1,252 


66,615 


00 


Other neat stock, 








175 


5,770. 


00 


Sheep, 








67 


350 


00 


Fur-bearing animals, 














Hogs, 








92 


1,570 


00 


Fowls, 










5,455 


00 


Vehicles, 










12,075 


.00 


Portable mills, 








15 


4,150 


,00 


Boats and launches, 










400 


.00 


Wood and lumber, 










2,450 


.00 


Stock in public funds, 










173,398.00 


Stock in banks, 










152,450 


.00 


Money on hand, at interest, 


or 


on 








deposit, 










640,269 


.00 


Stock in trade, 










2,877,406 


.00 


Machinery, 










228,810 


.00 



Total, $23,710,108.00 

Polls, 13,011, $63,914.00 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector, $645,035 . 10 
Average rate per cent of taxation for all purposes, 2.41 + 



report of the assessors. 337 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and 
on the real and personal estate of Concord since 1912: 



Year. 


Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1912 


5,691 


$18,701,591 


$316,117.69 


1913 


5,687 


20,842,846 


305,460 . 56 


1914 


5,735 


19,177,428 


316,447.67 


1915 


5,806 


20,086,789 


339,781.64 


1916 


5,779 


19,803,275 


382,352.47 


1917 


6,185 


20,110,995 


377,326.81 


1918 


5,485 


20,440,315 


447,484.47 


1919 


5,662 


20,370,605 


578,633.66 


1920 


6,071 


20,501,778 


647,009.63 


1921 


12,540 


21,341,061 


664,864.83 


1922. 

Wardl, 


1,247 


$2,340,605 


$56,209.65 


2, 


372 


610,206 


15,617.23 


3, 


704 


1,506,214 


37,281.17 


4, 


2,710 


4,288,288 


122,023.16 


5, 


1,870 


4,457,383 


122,626.88 


6, 


2,113 


2,452,573 


72,876.54 


7, 


2,374 


3,480,402 


96,643.12 


8, 


521 


3,546,512 


91,060.16 


9, 


1,100 


1,027,925 


30,697.19 




13,011 


$23,710,108 


$645,035.10 



338 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



List of Polls, Valuations and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1921 and 1922. 



Wards. 


Polls. 


, Valuation. 


Total tax assessed. 


1921. 


1922. 


1921. 


1922. 


1921. 


1922. 


Ward 1 

Ward 2 

Ward 3 

W T ard 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7.-. 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 


1,275 

375 

681 

2,365 

1,669 

2,038 

" 2,387 

652 

1,098 


1,247 

372 

704 

2,710 

1,870 

2,113 

2,374 

521 

1,100 


$2,123,490 

587,010 
1,420,650 
3,884,745 
4,025,660 
2,239,444 
3,140,702 
3,093,015 

826,345 


$2,340,605 
610,206 
1,506,214 
4,288,288 
4,457,383 
2,452,573 
3,480,402 
3,546,512 
1,027,925 


SO 1.380. 88 
17,460.78 
40,793.18 

124,005.87 

124,890.36 

75,757.94 
100,875.07 
90,712.33 
28,988.42 


$56,209.65 
15,617.23 
37,281.17 
122,023.16 
122,626.88 
72,876.54 
96,643.12 
91,060.16 
30,697.19 


Totals. ... 


12,540 


13,011 


$2 1,34 1,061 


$23,710,108 


$664,864.83 


$645,035.10 



Total warrants submitted to tax collector: 
In 1921— Resident tax list, 

Non-resident tax list, 
Polls, 

Total, 



,280.14 
1,064.69 
61,520.00 

$664,864.83 



In 1922— Resident tax list, 

Non-resident tax list, 
Polls, 



,540.26 
735.84 
63,759.00 



Total, 



$645,035.10 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report to 
the close of business, December 31, 1922, on tax lists of 
Seth R. Dole: 

Tax Levy, 1916. 



Resident list, 
Poll tax lists, 
Non-resident list, 
Additions and corrections, 



Collected, moth account, 
Collected, interest, 



Cash paid treasurer, 
Amount of discount, 
Amount of abatements, 
Uncollected, 



$370,029.62 

11,558.00 

764.85 

391.53 

$382,744.00 

282.05 

1,387.28 



$376,102.34 

3,888.83 

4,374.12 

48.04 



,413.33 



$384,413.33 



Tax Levy, 1917. 

Resident list, $364,272.21 

Poll tax lists, 12,370.00 

Non-resident list, 684 . 60 

Additions and corrections, 305.49 



Collected, moth account, 
Collected, interest, 



77,632.30 

158.00 

1,482.22 



$379,272.52 



339 



340 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cash paid treasurer, 


$371,675.35 




Amount of discount, 


3,753.29 




Amount of abatements, 


3,764.21 




Uncollected, 


79.67 






CQ70 070 


52 




•JO ( Vj^d 1 A . 


Tax Levy, 


1918. 




Resident list, 


$435,671.29 




Poll tax lists, 


10,970.00 




Non-resident list, 


843.18 




Additions and corrections, 


527.26 






$448,011.73 




Collected, interest, 


1,658.01 


74 




tt(>T:-±C7,Uuy 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$441,424.71 




Amount of discount, 


4,099.95 




Amount of abatements, 


4,047.47 




Uncollected, 


97.61 






$449,669 


.74 



Taxes sold the city of Concord in the office of the collector 
for redemption : 

1912. 

Amount, $1,186.96 Paid treasurer, $981.41 

Interest, 127.29 Deeded, 45.31 

Unsettled, 287.53 



L,314.25 



L,314.25 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1913. 

L,811 .71 Paid treasurer, $1,655.57 

171.71 Deeded, 35.21 

Unsettled, . 292.64 



1,983.42 



L,983.42 



KEPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR. 



341 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1914. 
,228.92 Paid treasurer, 
54.06 Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



,282.98 



$698.31 


514 


.52 


70 


.15 



1915. 
$687.48 Paid treasurer, 
56.93 



$744.41 



,282.98 



$744.41 



.41 



1916. 



Amount, 


$519.09 


Paid treasurer, 


$491.81 


Interest, 


24.05 


Deeded, 


51.33 




$543.14 


$543 . 14 




1917. 




Amount, 


$890.76 


Paid treasurer, 


$808 . 62 


Interest, 


61.04 


Deeded, 


79.97 






Unsettled, 


63.21 




$951.80 


$951.80 




1918. 




Amount, 


$2,046 . 98 


Paid treasurer, 


$2,030.56 


Interest, 


138.10 


Deeded, 


117.73 






Unsettled, 


36.79 



5,185.08 



$2,185.08 



There has been no change on taxes sold the city of Con- 
cord for redemption, as turned over to Mr. Dole by Mr. 
Ladd, a former collector. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE C. BRADLEY. 



342 ' CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business, December 31, 1922. 

Tax Levy, 1919. 

Resident list, $560,553 . 51 

Amount of poll taxes, 16,986.00 

Additions and corrections, 439 . 87 



-$577,979.38 
Non-resident list, 1,094 . 15 

Collected, interest, 1,645.15 



$580,718.68 
Cash paid treasurer, $568, 1 70 . 22 

Amount of discount, 5,179.97 

Amount of abatements, 4,806 . 46 

Cash on hand, 68 . 00 



-$578,224.65 
Uncollected, 2,494.03 



,718.68 



Taxes sold city of Concord in office of collector for 
redemption : 

Non-resident list, $28.55 Paid treasurer, $3,310.91 
Resident list, 3,271.16 Unsettled, 214.91 



$3,299.71 $3,525.82 

Interest, 226.11 



5,525.82 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN A. BLACKWOOD, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR. 343 

REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business, December 30, 1922. 

Tax Levy, 1920. 

Resident list, $616,789.11 

Poll tax lists, 29,031.00 

Non-resident list, 1,189.52 



$647,009.63 
Additions and corrections, 1,156.29 

Interest collected, 2,201 . 15 



550,367.07 



Cash paid treasurer, $635,775.58 

Discounts, 8,197.22 

Abatements, 6,223.91 

Uncollected, 170.36 



$650,367.07 



Tax Levy, 1921. 

Resident list, $602,280.14 

Poll tax lists, 61,520.00 

Non-resident list, 1,064.69 



$664,864.83 
Additions and corrections, 9,512.78 

Interest collected, 2,515.28 



)76,892.89 



Cash paid treasurer, $652,7(15 . 27 

Discounts, 6,888 . 84 

Abatements, 14,598.77 

Cash on hand, 124.74 

Uncollected, 2,515 . 27 



$676,892.89 



344 CITY OF COiXCORD. 

Tax Levy, 1922. 

Resident list, $580,540 . 26 

Poll tax lists, 63,759.00 

Non-resident list, 735 . 84 



15,035.10 

Additions and corrections, 2,748.13 

Interest collected, 133.05 



$647,916.28 



( 'ash paid treasurer, $544,865 . 26 

Discounts, 6,856.85 

Abatements, 9,132.59 

Cash on hand, 471.66 

Uncollected, 86,589.92 



-$647,916.28 

Taxes sold the city of Concord in the office of the collector 
for redemption: 

1920. 
Resident list, $2,416.54 Paid treasurer, $1,665.78 
Non-resident list, 5.05 Unredeemed, 845.80 

Interest, 89 . 99 



$2,511.58 * $2,511.58 

1921. 

Resident list, $1,986.26 Paid treasurer, $1,048.09 

Interest, 2.24 Unredeemed, 940.41 



$1,988.50 $1,988.50 

Reimbursements to city for 1920 taxes: 

On account 1919 

tax sale, $357 . 43 Paid treasurer, $414 . 79 

Interest, 57 . 36 

$414.79 $414.79 



REPORT OF THE TAX COLLECTOR. 345 

Reimbursements to city for 1921 taxes: 
On account 1919 

tax sale, $83 . 40 Paid treasurer, $225 . 57 

Interest, 5 . 07 
On account 1920 

tax sale, 124.19 

Interest, 12.91 



$225.57 $225.57 

Motor vehicle permit account: 
Balance cash on 

hand, $244.61 Paid treasurer, $36,237.30 

Permits issued, 36,050.20 Cash on hand, 57.51 



,294.81 $36,294.81 

Respectfully submitted, 

WOODBURY E. HUNT, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, ] 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, \ Trustees. 

CARL H. FOSTER, J 

Receipts. 
1922. 
Jan. 1. To balance from 1921, $3,246.53 

Dec. 31. Income, Harper Allen, trust, 2.13 
J. B. and Olivia B. Abbott, trust, 5 . 25 

William E. Chandler, trust 14. 25 

William M. Chase, trust, 12. 75 

F. H. Corson, trust, 2.13 

Eliza A. Cole, trust, 4.25 

Calvin P. Couch, trust, 2.37 

Jacob C. Dunklee, trust, 9.50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 35.00 

Seth Eastman, trust, 5.00 

Sarah E. Farrand, trust, 8.50 

George G. Fogg, trust, 12.00 

Leverett N. Freeman, trust, 4.25 

Jacob H. Gallinger, trust, 9.50 

Heber B. Hardy, trust, 4.25 

Mary D. Hart, trust, . 12 . 00 

Loren W. James, trust, 2. 13 

Sarah H. James, trust, 2. 13 

William H. Johns, trust, 4.26 

Mary J. Jon.es, trust, 4.25 

Ebenezer Lane, trust, 4.75 

George S. Little, trust, 4.25 

J. W. and 10. J. Little, trust. 6.00 

Lydia F. Lund, trust, 14.25 
346 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 347 

Dec. 31. Income, Charles W. Morse, trust, $4.75 

Lucy M. Roach, trust, 2. 13 

Charles E. Scorer, trust, 4.25 

Antonio J. Souza, trust, 2. 13 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 12.66 
Interest, note of city of Concord, 

$52,176.42 at 3|%, 1,826.17 
Interest, trust funds, Merrimack 

County Savings Bank, 632 . 04 
Interest, trust funds, Union Trust 

Company, 444 . 04 

Income, Seth K. Jones, trust, 12 . 00 

J. Eastman Pecker, trust, 22.00 
Liva C. Heath, trust, Loan & 

Trust Savings Bank, 5. 12 
Henry Burleigh, trust, Merri- 
mack County Savings Bank, 6.80 
Abial Walker, trust, 40.00 
Countess of Rumford, trust, 80.00 
David Osgood, trust, 25.00 
P. B. Cogswell, trust, 85.92 
G. Parker Lyon, trust, 40.00 
Franklin Pierce, trust, 40.00 
Thomas G. Valpey, trust, 20.00 
Joseph Hazeltine, trust, 133.72 
Seth Jones, trust, 25. 15 
K. P. and D. Rollins, trust, 63.75 
Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 1,608 . 85 
William M. Chase, trust, 42.50 
Benjamin A. Kimball, trust, 587.50 
H. A. Kimball, trust, 50.00 
Interest, unexpended balance ceme- 
tery trust funds, 83.80 

$9,331.96 



348 city of concord. 

Expenditures. 
1922. 
May 17. By Paid Edmund H. Brown, treasurer, 
account labor, trust lots, 
Woodlawn Cemetery, $3 . 50 

Dec. 31. Rev. George A. Demers, account 

David Osgood, trust, 25.00 

Edmund H. Brown, treasurer, 
account labor, trust lots, 
Woodlawn Cemetery, 267 . 25 

Rev. Dennis C. Ling, ac- 
count labor, trust lots, 
Calvary Cemetery, 129 . 50 

Margaretta L. Blake, treas- 
urer, income Countess of 
Rumford, trust, 80.00 

City treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds 
to reimburse city for 
money advanced for care 
of lots in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, 1,808.40 

City treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds to 
reimburse city for money 
advanced for care of lots in 
Old North Cemetery, 308 . 00 

City treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds to 
reimburse city for money 
advanced for care of lots in 
Maple Grove Cemetery, 79 . 75 

City treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds to 
reimburse city for money 
advanced for care of lots in 
Pine Grove Cemetery, 146 . 00 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 349 

Dec. 31. By Paid City treasurer, account in- 
come sundry trust funds to 
reimburse city for money 
advanced for care of lots in 
Old Fort Cemetery, $7 . 75 

City treasurer, income Thomas 

G. Valpey, trust, 20.00 

City treasurer, income G. 

Parker Lyon, trust, 40 . 00 

City treasurer, income Seth K. 

Jones, trust, 25.15 

City treasurer, income Kath- 
arine P. and Douglas 
Rollins, trust, 63 . 75 

City treasurer, income Sam- 
uel C. Eastman, trust, 1,608.85 

City treasurer, income P. B. 

Cogswell, trust, 85 . 92 

City treasurer, income Frank- 
lin Pierce, trust, 40 . 00 

City treasurer, income Abial 

Walker, trust, 40.00 

City treasurer, income Joseph 

Hazeltine, trust, 133.72 

City treasurer, income Wil- 
liam M. Chase, trust, 42.50 

City treasurer, income Ben- 
jamin A. Kimball, trust, 587.50 

City treasurer, income Henry 

A. Kimball, trust, 50.00 

H. H. Dudley, treasurer, ac- 
count Minot Enclosure, 105.00 
By balance, 3,634.42 

$9,331.96 



TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital $1,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST.- 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied to the charitable 
uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 80.00 

Paid Margaretta L. Blake, treasurer of the society, 80 . 00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school books for poor children. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance income last year, $390 . 75 

Income received, 1922, 23.60 

$414.35 

Paid Rev. George A. Demers, treas- 
urer, $25.00 
Income on hand, January 1, 1923, 389.35 

— $414.35 

Capital $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank; 
income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 

350 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 351 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase of books of a biographi- 
cal, historical and scientific character, and the books relating to science shall be those that give the 
latest developments and discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1922, 85.92 

Paid into the city treasury, 85 . 92 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 

G. PARKER LYON TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40.00 

Invested in city of Concord 4% bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40 . 00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1922, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20 . 00 

Invested in city of Concord 4% bond. 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1922, 133.72 

Paid into the city treasury, 133.72 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 



352 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, the income to be 
applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and 
orderly condition; six dollars each year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monu- 
ment fund; and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord 
public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 43.15 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Paid to city treasurer for public 

library, 25.15 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

43.15 



Invested in city of Hartford, Conn., 4% bond, 

due June 1, 1934, $922.60 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 77.40 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. The entire accumulation 
to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1922, $628.95 

From Seth K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1922, 24.98 

$659.93 



(Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank.) 



MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abbie P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by the superintendent 
of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of the burial lots known as the Minot en- 
closure, under the direction of the duly appointed officials. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 3|%) with city of Concord, in general 
account. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 353 

JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows: So much of income as is necessary to be used for the care of burial lot 
numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord, the balance of income not 
used as aforesaid to be added to principal till same amounts to $10,000; then the balance of income 
accruing each year after paying for care of said lot and monument, to be expended under the direction 
of the mayor for the general care and improvement of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $6,057.13 
Received from income of fund, 1922, 242.59 

$6,299.72 



Paid for care of lot, $22 . 00 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, 6,277.72 

• $6,299.72 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $2,564.08 
Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 1,790.44 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,923.20 

KATHEPJNE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST. 
Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital, $1,500.00 

Income received, 1922, 63.75 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 63 . 75 

Invested in second converted U. S. Liberty Loan 4|% 
bonds. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign languages for the Public Library. 

Capital, $1,250.00 

Income received, 1922, 50.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 50.00 

Invested in twenty-five shares L^nited Gas Improvement 
Company stock, par value $50 per share. 

WILLIAM M. CHASE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the purchase of books on historical, 
political, sociological, scientific and educational subjects. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1922, 42.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 42.50 

Invested in Fourth U. S. Liberty Loan 4|% bond. 

23 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, January 1, 1922, $28,028.00 

Received from income account as per 

resolution of Board of Aldermen, 2,000 . 00 
Payment from estate of Samuel C. 

Eastman, 914.70 
Capital, December 31, 1922, $30,942.70 

Invested in $5,700 First Liberty Loan bonds, $4,914.20 

Invested in $7,000 Second Liberty Loan bonds, 6,308.75 

Invested in $3,000 U. S. Victory 4f% notes, 3,000.00 
Invested in $13,500 U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 

4£% bonds, 12,376.00 

Five shares, par value $100 per share. 

Boston & Maine R. R. first preferred, Class D. 

Twelve shares, par value $100 per share. 

Concord Gas Co. common. 

Seventeen shares Ridgewood Land & Improvement Co. 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, $179.05 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 4,164.70 

$2,000 transferred from income account, also included. 

Income received, 1922, $1,558.85 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 1,558.85 

BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Income received, 1922, $587.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 587 . 50 

HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Income received, 1922, $50.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 50.00 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 355 

I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the hands 
of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find such 
trust funds invested and the income thereof for the year 
1922 accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees 
kept for that purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



358 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Special 

Funds. 

blossom hill cemetery fund. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale of 
lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $42,687 . 14 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1922, 1,535.88 

Received from income of fund, 1922, 1,715 . 78 

$45,938.80 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1,715.78 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, 44,223 . 02 

$45,938.80 

Invested in city of Concord 4% 

bonds, $1,000.00 

Invested in U. S. Third Liberty 

Loan, 999.22 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 15,937.01 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 12,286 . 79 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank, 10,000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 4,000.00 

$44,223 . 02 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 397 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an increase of the fund. Income 
devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $815.00 
Received from income of funds, 32 . 60 

$847 . 60 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $32 . 60 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, 815.00 



$847.60 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale of lots- 
The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $816.11 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1922, 399.89 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1922, 30.00 

Received from income of fund, 1922, 48.62 

$1,294.62 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $48 . 62 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, 846.11 
Unexpended income, January 1, 

1923, 399.89 



$1,294.62 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in Merrimack 
County Savings Bank. 



398 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale 
of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $370.00 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1922, 382.01 

Received from income of fund, 1922, 30 . 12 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1922, 2.50 

$784.63 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $30.12 

Unexpended income, January 1, 1923, 382 . 01 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, 372.50 

$784.63 

Capital and unexpended income deposited in New 
Hampshire Savings Bank. 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of interested parties and by 
the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, pro- 
tection and ornamentation of Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $2,157 . 15 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1922, 473.40 

Received from income of fund, 1922, 106.42 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1922, 10.00 

$2,746.97 



Capital, January 1, 1923, $2,167.15 

Unexpended income, January 1 , 1 923, 473 . 40 



Capital and income, January 1, 1923, $2,640 . 55 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, 106.42 



*,746.97 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 399 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank, $1,345.99 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank, 1,294.56 

SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount received from the sale of lots. 
The income is used for the care, protection and ornamentation of Soueook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1922, $31 . 38 

Received from income of fund, 1922, 1 .26 

$32.64 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1.26 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, 31.38 



.64 
Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, $31 . 38 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and authorizing loans on the credit 
of the city to construct the system, also created a sinking fund, the conditions of which have already 
been fulfilled. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1922, $32.54 

Income received, 1922, 1.28 

.82 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1923, $33.82 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



400 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Established by authority of an ordinance of the Board of Aldermen passed June 11, 1917. Principal 
and interest to be used in the reduction of the bonded indebtedness of the water-works system at the 
discretion of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, $25,000.00 

Invested in U. S. First Liberty Loan 

converted 4|% bonds, $5,000 . 00 

Invested in Third Liberty Loan 4j% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

Invested in U. S. Fourth Liberty 

Loan 4£% bonds, 10,000 . 00 

$25,000.00 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS PROFIT INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Income received, 1922, $1,207.54 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



401 



BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. The remaining 
half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the amounts received from 
sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of 
individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the 
care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1922. 

G. S. Foster estate, care, $2.00 

Harriet A. Lyman, care, 2 . 00 

Sarah J. Brown, care, 3.00 

George L. Lincoln, care, 3.00 

W. E. Hunt, care, 5.00 

T. H. Dunstane, rent, 16.67 

Marie Blanchard, care, 2.50 

E. K. Woodworth, care, 4.00 

G. Eleanor Thompson, care, 4.00 

Mary O. Morton, care, 3.00 

J. H. Burroughs, care, 4.50 

Mrs. W. C. Batchelder, care, 4.00 

Fred Cummings, care, 3.50 

Larson & Carlson, foundation, 101 .25 

A. B. Batchelder, care, 2.00 

O. W. Durrell, care, 2.00 

R. E. Walker estate, care, 3.00 

E. C. Lyon, care, 4.00 

W. A. Wilson, care, 1.00 

Arabella Kittredge estate, burial, 19.00 

William J. Carroll, lot No. 72, block CC, 57.60 
Galen W. Hunter, Adm., lot No. 23, 

block DD, 57.60 

Walter Hackshaw, lot No. 46, block CC, 42.00 

E. C. Hapgood, care, 3.00 

J. S. Otis, care, 1 .50 

Florence M. Smith, care, 2.00 

E. K. George, care, 2.00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb fees, 17.00 

Eric G. Erickson estate, burial, 10.00 

26 



402 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Frederick R. Roberts estate, burial, $8.00 

Asenette J. M. Goodhue estate, burial, 14.00 

Mary A. Call estate, burial, 8.00 

John H. Dickerson estate, burial, 11.00 

( Jarrie B. Carroll estate, burial, 8.00 

Saiah H. S. Carter estate, burial, 8.00 

Alonzo L. Garvin estate, burial, 12.00 

Lyman R. Goodrich estate, burial, 10.00 

Mary J. Sanborn estate, burial, 8.00 

George L. Johnson estate, burial, 10.00 

Hill (infant), burial, 1.00 

Amy P. Batchelder estate, burial, 19.00 

William H. Johns estate, burial, 8.00 

Alfred E. Hackshaw estate, burial, 5.00 

Nathaniel W. Hobbs estate, burial, 12.00 

Anson H. Carpenter estate, burial, 14.00 

Pauline S. B. Evans estate, burial, 10.00 

Elizabeth A. Fenner estate, burial, 10.00 
Medford M. McLean, lot No. 28, block 

AA, 72.00 

Samuel Brooks, labor, 6 . 00 

I. F. Mooney, care, 2.00 

Rosetta Davie, care, 4.00 

Mrs. A. S. Holt, care, 3.50 

Sophia Elia estate, burial, , 14.00 

John Walker, lot No. 57, block CC, 50.40 

John Clements, lot No. 26, block DD, 57.60 

Ellen B. Oleson, lot No. 25, block DD, 57.60 
Mary L. Stoneham, south part lot No. 44, 

block CC, 25.00 

Ervie J. Jesseman (infant), burial, 8.00 

Martha J. Clements estate, burial, 8.00 

James M. Blake estate, burial, 19.00 

Martha Craigue estate, burial, 12.00 

Myra T. E. Kimball estate, burial, 76 . 00 

Annie B. P. Batchelder estate, burial, 11 .00 

Catherine McLean estate, burial, 12.00 

Willis L. Flanders estate, burial, 12.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 403 

Annie M. Watson estate, burial, $8.00 

Tom Pillsbury (infant) , burial, 1 . 50 

John H. McClintock estate, burial, 8.00 

Vina D. Proctor estate, burial, 8.00 

Charles H. Prescott estate, burial, 8.00 

Charles S. Flanders, estate, burial, 8.00 

Charles H. Hunter estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Bessie L. Lawton estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb fees, 21 .00 

Mrs. A. C. Fuller, care, 1 . 50 

E. N. Mason, care, 1.50 

George Lauder, care, 2.50 

W. A. Silver, care, 2.00 

Mrs. George A. Huntley, care, 2 . 00 

Salari & Bricchi, labor, 3 . 00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 8.00 

Carl S. Harris, lot No. 9, block CC, 142.80 
Alice E. McClintock, lot No. 34, block 

DD, 57.60 

William J. Dean, lot No. 89A, block P, 54 . 00 

Mabel A. Noble, lot No. 14, block DD, 72 . 00 
William J. McFarland, lot No. 23, block 

CC, 96.00 
Arthur L. Hayward, south half lot No. 24, 

block CC, 48.00 
George A. Robinson, north half lot No. 24, 

block CC, 48.00 

Levi L. Randall, lot No. 43, block CC, 51 .00 
Abbie R. York, north half lot No. 44, 

block CC, 25.00 
James L. Stiles estate, lot No. 8, block CC, 102 . 80 

John H. Collins, lot No. 74, block M, 36.00 
Joseph C. Burleigh, lot No. 71, block CC, 57.60 

Ralph C, Gilman, lot No. 34, block AA, 72.00 
Charles E. and Susie J. Hardy, lot No. 

77, block CC, 57.33 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Weathdale, lot No. 

24, block DD, 57.60 



404 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Thomas Hodgson, lot No. 26, block CC, $96.00 
James R. Taylor estate, lot No. 15, block 

DD, 72.00 
Bertha M. Houston, lot No. 5, block BB, 123.38 
Martin W. Coleman estate, lot No. 12, 

block DD, 72.00 

James L. Stiles estate, burial, 8.00 

Harry T. Davis estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Edward P. Main estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Lovina Brunei estate, burial, 8.00 

Emily A. Martin estate, burial, 8.00 

H. E. Gale, care, 2.00 

G. E. Little, burial, 7.00 

Lenora E. Spaulding estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Ada Aspinwall, care, 1 . 00 

Nellie A. McPherson, care, 5 . 00 

Ruth G. A. Brunei estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Julia A. Ashcroft estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Charles Hutchings estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Adeline T. Hardy estate, burial, 8 . 00 

L. Tebeau, labor, 4 . 00 

William J. McFarland, care, 2.00 

Lucy M. Poor, care, 3.50 

C. C. Titcomb, care, 3.00 

Oriva Vincette, burial, 3.00 

Reuben E. Walker estate, burial, 20.00 

George C. W T iggin estate, burial, 10.00 

Ellen Bradish Clark estate, burial, 40.00 

Frank B. Flanders estate, burial, 12.00 

George F. Simonds estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Sarah M. Elwell estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Emmie E. Allen estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Carrie E. Drake estate, burial, 8.00 

Lillian F. Downing estate, burial, 8.00 

John L. Stanyan estate, burial, 8.00 

Annie L. Rand, labor, 2.00 

Daniel K. Richardson estate, burial, 8.00 
Mary F. (Davis) Mclntire estate, burial, 12.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



405 



Elizabeth C. Davis estate, burial, $8.00 

Ella A. Prince estate, burial, 8.00 

Dora R. Hammond estate, burial, 8.00 

Dorothy W. (Sims) Colby estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Lizzie A. Hill estate, burial, 10.00 

Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb fees, 8 . 00 

Pi. W. Harrington, care, 1 . 50 

Minnie (Tandy) Chase estate, burial, 8 . 00 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 38.00 

Charles Bergstrom, labor, 4.00 

Larson & Carlson, foundation, 6.00 

Wasto, care, 2.70 

L. French, care, 2.00 

O. F. Fox, care, 5.00 

Jonathan L. Durgin, care, 1 . 00 

Mrs. W. Upton, care, 1.00 

Mrs. Fred Price, labor, 5.00 

Mrs. L. M. Perkins, labor, 3.50 

William King, care, 2.00 

C. A. Ashland, labor, 6.00 
Alfred H. Walker, lot No. 69, block BB, 42.00 
Bernard S. Reed, west part lot No. 48, 

block CC, 50.00 

Harry T. Corser, lot No. 125, block AA, 72.00 

William R . Burke, lot No. 118, block AA, 79 . 20 

Edgar N. Morse, lot No. 60, block CC, 57.60 
Elisha and Emma Clarke, lot No. 41, 

block AA, 79.20 

George W. Atwood, lot No. 36, block AA, 72 . 00 
Charles and Lottie Rowell, lot No. 32, 

block DD, 57.60 

D. Dufresne, foundation, 13.50 
Lilla B. Shaw, labor, 2.00 
Arthur M. Stearns, labor, 8.00 
J. R. Taylor, foundation, 9.00 
Martin W. Coleman estate, burial, 8.00 
Jessie A. Irvin estate, burial, 14.00 
Irving J. Farley estate, burial, 8.00 



406 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fred W. Burnham estate, burial, $10.00 

Caroline S. Hill estate, burial, 8.00 

Hall (infant), burial, 1 .00 

Ash (infant), burial, 1.00 

Richard Patten estate, burial, 12.00 

Jane S. Davis estate, burial, 8.00 

Annie Taylor estate, burial, 8 . 00 

M. Emma Parsons, care, 2.00 

A. Delia Shaw, care, 3.50 

W. S. Jones, care, 5.00 

Jeb. Swain, labor, 8.00 

John Yule, labor, 2 . 00 

Woman's Relief Corps, labor, 2.50 

W. A. Aseltine, labor, 2.00 

Daniel Parpon estate, burial, 8 . 00 
John Swenson Granite Co., labor, • 2.50 

Mrs. L. C. Tippett, labor, 2.00 

Larson & Carlson, foundation, 19.75 

Perry Bros., foundation, 34.50 

Charles P. Norton, labor, 6 . 00 

Mrs. F. H. Clifford, care, 4.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 24.00 

J. Comi, foundation, 10.00 
Elizabeth Northcott estate, foundation, 11 .00 

Robert Kimball, labor, 14.50 

Campton W. Jones estate, burial, 8 . 00 

John K. Woodward, care, 4.50 

Edwin O. Batchelder estate, burial, 8.00 

Jane L. B. Fogg estate, burial, 12.00 
Archibald R. Kendall, lot No. 37, block 

AA, 72.00 
Winnie E. Dearborn, lot No. 54, block 

CC, 63.84 

Flora L. Hall, lot No. 11, block DD, 72.00 

Charles L. Mason estate, burial, 16.00 

Mary D. Kendall estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Paul A. Holden estate, burial, 2 . 00 

Hayes (infant), burial, 1.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 407 

Van A. Dearborn estate, burial, $8 . 00 

Bertha Morse estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Emma S. C. West estate, burial, 8.00 

J. Mansur, labor, 3 . 00 
Frank O. Brown, lot No. 44, block AA, 79.20 
Ernest H. Taylor, lot No. 68, block AA, 79 . 20 

Alexander McDonald estate, burial, 23 . 00 

Thomas Struthers estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Charles W. Wall estate, burial, 8.00 

Gilbert A. Berry, labor, 40 . 00 

I. Ploude, labor, 1.50 

Mrs. O. V. Pearl, care, 1.50 

R. Collins, care, 4.00 

Mrs. A. M. Follette, care, 4.00 

Miss Grace Hubbard, care, 5 . 00 
Cheney A. Ashland, lot No. 13, block DD, 72 . 00 

John F. Knight, lot No. 19, block CC, 96.00 

Caroline Ferrin estate, burial, 10.00 

Bernice E. Morrison estate, burial, 8.00 

Joseph W. Lund estate, burial, 20.00 

Oliver Blanchette estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Ida M. Corbett estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Mary F. Barron estate, burial, 16.00 

Charles C. Jones estate, burial, 8.00 

Harriet E. Avery, burial, 6.00 

Sumpadian (infant), burial, 1 .00 

Mary E. T. Doyen estate, burial, 8.00 

Arthur W. Jenks estate, burial, 8.00 

Annie L. Perkins estate, burial, 16.00 

Harriet B. Streeter estate, burial, 10.00 

William S. Henry estate, burial, 10.00 

Daniel W. Gray estate, burial, 8 . 00 

George W. Atwood estate, burial, 12.00 

Joseph A. Garney estate, burial, 8.00 

Clara A. Chesley estate, burial, 8.00 

Ellen P. Mansfield estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Otis W. York estate, burial, 8.00 

James H. Sanders estate, burial, 15.00 



408 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Georgianna D. Adams estate, burial, $10.00 

Maude L. W. Burke estate, burial, 10.00 

Elizabeth P. Schultz estate, burial, 8.00 

Loren E. Currier estate, burial, 8 . 00 

James O. Gates estate, burial, 16.00 

Harry Roby estate, burial, 8.00 

Ann J. Beers estate, burial, 8.00 

Arthur L. Copp estate, burial, 9 . 00 

William D. Wallace estate, burial, 8.00 

Ellen M. French estate, burial, 8.00 

Elbridge M. Shannon estate, burial, 9.00 

Mary C. B. Walker estate, burial 10.00 

George A. Cook estate, burial, 12.00 

Thomas J. Dyer estate, burial, 8.00 

Henrietta S. Clark estate, burial, 8.00 

Joseph G. Wright estate, burial, 14.00 

Abbie E. McQuilken estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Mrs. S. B. Bickford, labor, 14.00 

W. H. Jaquith, labor, 20.00 

John Collins, labor, 2.00 
Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, tomb fees, 17.00 

Mrs. George Huntley, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Howard A. Dodge, care, 5 . 00 

Marianna Adams estate, burial, 8 . 00 

Asa M. Gee, lot No. 100, block W, 42.00 
John F. and Clara B. Harriman, lot No. 

30, block EE, 30.00 
Amos L. Dickerman, lot No. 47, block AA, 75 . 00 

Mabel C. White, care, 7.00 

William P. Fiske estate, care, 2.50 

Charles C. Schoolcraft, care, 5.00 

E. Lake, care, 2.00 

Jessie M. Webster, care, 5.00 

C. W. Clarke, care, 2.50 

William McFarland, care, 4.00 

George A. Foster, care, 4.00 

Mrs. Clara Ayers, care, 3.50 

C. F. Conn, care, 4.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 409 



J. S. Matthews, care, 


$2.50 


F. J. Sulloway, care, 


2.00 


Miss Edith Carter, care, 


4.00 


Etta M. Dodge, care, 


2.00 


E. J. Hill estate, care, 


8.00 


Mrs. M. J. Gould, care, 


3.00 


Mrs. D. J. Lowell, care, 


1.00 


H. F. Wright, care, 


1.00 


Mrs. W. Jenks, care, 


2.00 


Mrs. J. Tebeau, care, 


2.00 


E. P. Roberts, care, 


4.00 


C. W. Lynam, care, 


2.00 


C. P. Bancroft, care, 


4.00 


Viola Weeks estate, burial, 


16.00 


Walter I. Blanchette estate, burial, 


8.00 


Miss A. L. Merrill, care, 


4.00 


Miss Carrie Todd, care, 


4.00 


Mrs. Caleb Little, care, 


2.00 


F. S. Streeter, care, 


4.25 


A. P. Carpenter estate, care, 


4.25 


Mrs. H. C. Thurston, care, 


2.00 


Mrs. W. Wallace, care, 


4.00 


Hutchins & Schutz, care, 


6.00 


C. W. Lane, care, 


2.00 


Clarence E. Blake, care, 


5.00 


Fred L. Johnson, care, 


3.00 


Nellie E. Chesley, care, 


2.00 


H. E. Hussey, care, 


2.50 


Beatrice Sargent, care, 


2.00 


George H. Mills, care. 


2.00 


H. H. D wight, care, 


3.00 


Mrs. F. H. Clifford, care, 


4.00 


J. W. McLaughlin, care, 


5.10 


Mrs. Eben Willis, care, 


4.00 


W. W. Flint, care, 


2.00 


Mrs. J. D. Clough, care, 


7.50 


William E. Hood, care, 


2.00 


Mrs. F. P. Virgin, care, 


3.00 



410 CITY OF CONCORD. 

L. J. Brown, care, $2.00 

Viola H. Brown, care, 4.00 

Mrs. P. S. Smith, care, 4.00 

0. W. Durrell, care, 2.00 
Mrs. I. F. Abbott, care, 4.00 

1. O. O. F. Home Association, care, 6.00 
Charles C. Chesley estate, burial, 8.00 
Charles L. Worthen estate, burial, 10.00 
Charles Wright estate, burial, 8.00 
Bradford Stetson estate, burial, 8.00 
George P. Chickering estate, burial, 10.00 
T. Fox, foundation, 10.00 
O. T. Chesley, labor, 40.00 

C. H. Loveland, labor, 4.00 
Piper & Hodge, labor, 3 . 50 
Mary M. Flanders, labor, 4.00 
F. Ritchie, labor, 3.50 
Edw. C. Frost, lot No. 56, block Z, 120.00 
Justin L. Moore estate, burial, 15.00 

D. Dufresne, foundation, 30.00 
Peny Bros., foundation, 15.50 
Cummings Bros., foundation, 22.00 
Mrs. H. B. Day, care, 3.00 

E. S. Tenney, care 4 . 50 
E. B. Palmer, care, 2.00 
Fred W. Boardman, care, 3 . 00 
Jennie M. Adams, care, 2.00 
J. Pearce, care, 2.00 
George Lauder, care, 2.50 
E. K. Woodworth, care, 4 . 00 
Larson & Carlson, labor, 2 . 00 
Allen Hollis, care, 4.00 
Gertrude Sawyer, care, 2 . 50 
George W. Abbott, trust, 7 . 00 
Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1 . 75 
John B. and Olivia B. Abbott, trust, 7.00 
Charles Ada, trust, 2.00 
Fidelia Adams, trust, 2 . 50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



411 



Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 


$24.50 


Sarah J. Adams, trust, 


7.00 


Ellen E. Allen, trust, 


2.00 


Allen, Smith and Dimond, trust, 


3.50 


Frederick Allison, trust, 


3.50 


Mary B. Allison, trust, 


1.75 


Frank P. Andrews, trust, 


12.00 


Lavinia Arlin, trust, 


1.75 


Sarah S. Ash, trust, 


1.75 


Alonzo Atherton, trust, 


3.50 


F. D. Avery, trust, 


3.50 


Rev. A. D. Ayer, trust, 


4.00 


Lizzie K. Badger, trust, 


3.50 


William Badger, trust, 


3.00 


Abbie L. S. Bailey, trust, 


3.50 


Oliver Ballou, trust, 


1.75 


H. C. Barrett, trust, 


1.75 


Charles Barker, trust, 


3.50 


George W. Barnes, trust, 


1.75 


James W. Barton, trust, 


3.50 


Horace B. Bartlett, trust, 


3.00 


Mary A. Bass, trust, 


1.75 


A. F. Batchelder, trust, 


2.00 


Frank J. Batchelder, trust, 


7.00 


Robert Bell, trust, 


1.75 


Matilda Benson, trust, 


1.75 


Anna M. Bickford, trust, 


2.00 


Leodore E. Alexander, trust, 


8.00 


Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 


3.00 


James D. Blaisdell, trust, 


3.50 


James M. Blake, trust, 


7.00 


William Blakeley, trust, 


3.50 


Emily P. Blanchard, trust, 


8.50 


Charles S. Boardman, trust, 


1.75 


Sarah L. and James W. Bourlet, trust, 


4.00 


Nathaniel Bouton, trust, 


7.00 


Annie L. Brown, trust, 


3.50 


Charles L. Brown, trust, 


7.00 



412 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Jennie E. Brown, trust, $8 . 00 

Samuel Brunei, trust, 1 . 50 

Andrew Bunker, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 7.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1 . 75 

Frank A. Burnham, trust, 1 .75 

Mary A. Burnham, trust, 1 . 75 

Alfred D. Burroughs, trust, 2 . 00 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 3 . 50 

M. F. Buzzell and P. E. Eaton, trust, 4.00 

Henry F. Burleigh, trust, 6 . 50 

Levi CaU, trust, 3.50 

Benjamin F. Caldwell, trust, 8.50 

William L. Carleton, trust, 9 . 00 

Lysander H. Carroll, trust, 3.00 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 3 . 50 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 3 . 50 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 1 . 75 

Harry M. Cavis, trust, 3 . 50 

Sarah Clifford, trust, 3 . 50 

William M. Chase, trust, 12 . 00 

William E. Chandler, trust, 14 . 00 

Levi G. Chase, trust, 3.50 

K. P. and A. P. Chesley, trust, 3 . 50 

William C. Chesley, trust, 8.00 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 3 . 50 

Frank E. Child, trust, 2.00 

Caroline Clark, trust, 3 . 50 

Ellen P. Clark, trust, 3 . 50 

Fannie R. Clark, trust, 2 . 50 

Herman W. Clay, trust, 2 . 00 

Mary B . Clement, trust, 2 . 00 

Rufus Clement, trust, 4 . 00 

William W. Cloud, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Clough, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. N. P. Clough, trust, 1 - 75 

George Clough, trust, 3 . 50 

Sarah L. Cloutman, trust, 1 • 75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 413 

Weston Cofran, trust, $7.00 

Helen B. P. Cogswell, trust, 4.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 1 . 75 

Henry A. Colby, trust, 4.00 

Sarah T. Colby, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles A. Cook, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. Josiah Cooper, trust, 2 . 50 

F. H. Corson, trust, 2.00 

Calvin P. Couch, trust, 2.00 

Mary Crow, trust, 7 . 00 

Charles H. Cummings, trust, 35.00 

George A. Cummings, trust, 12.00 

Mary R. Cummings, trust, 7.00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 5 . 00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 3 . 50 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 2.50 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 5.50 

Charles S. Danforth, trust, 1.75 

Cordilia A. Danforth, trust, 1 . 75 

Benjamin B. Davis, trust, 2.00 

Walter J. Davis, trust, 4.00 

Emma J. Dearborn, trust, 2.50 

Curtis C. Dearborn, trust, 2.00 

Margaret W. Dodge, trust, 4 . 00 

Edward Dow, trust, 3 . 50 

Mrs. Charles Dudley, trust, 1 . 50 

C. V. Dudley, trust, 3 . 50 

Jacob C. Dunklee, trust, 9.00 

John W. Dunklee, trust, 8 . 00 

N orris D. Dunklee, trust, 4.00 

Martha E. Durgin, trust, 12 . 00 

William B. Durgin, trust, 7.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 3.50 

Samuel Eastman, trust, 25.00 

Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 3.50 

Clara E. Edgerly, trust, 3.50 

Lydia F. Edgerly, trust, 3 . 50 



414 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Georgianna P. Ela, trust, $3 . 50 

Ella M. Elliott, trust, 1 . 75 

Elizabeth G. Emerson, trust, 3 . 50 

Lydia J. Emerson, trust, 4 . 00 

George H. Emery, trust, 3.50 

Ira Leon Evans, trust, 4 . 00 

David E. Everett, trust, 2 . 50 

Lydia A. Farley, trust, 3 . 50 

Andrew S. Farnum, trust, 4 . 00 

Mary M. Farnum, trust, 3 . 50 

Josiah Farrar, trust, 1 . 75 

Alvah C. Ferrin, trust, 3 . 50 

Hiram W. Ferrin, trust, 1 . 75 

J. W. Ferrin and S. C. French, trust, 1 .75 

Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Flanders, trust, 3 . 50 

Jerry Follansbee, trust, 4 . 00 

Flora Follansbee, trust, 4 . 00 

George D. Fogg, trust, 15.50 

Alice T. Ford, trust, 7 . 00 

Jerome Ford, trust, 3.50 

Asa Fowler, trust, 17.50 

Leverett N. Freeman, trust, 4 . 00 

Mary L. French, trust, 1 . 00 

Mary A. Gage, trust, 7 . 00 

John D. Gale, trust, 7 . 00 

Jacob H. Gallinger, trust, 9.00 

James A. Gates, trust, 1 . 00 

John Gear, trust, 3 . 50 

Caroline L. George, trust, 17.50 

Enoch Gerrish, trust, 3 . 50 

S. K. Gill, trust, 3.50 

Mitchell Gilmore, trust, 3 . 50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 3 . 00 

G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust, 1 . 75 

Loren W. Glyson, trust, 2 . 50 

James T. Gordon, trust, 3 . 50 

Hiram Gordon, trust, 4 . 00 

Hannah and Fannie Goss, trust, 7 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 415 



Frank W. Grafton, trust, 


$4 . 00 


John B. Greene, trust, 


3.50 


William Green, trust, 


3.50 


George N. Greeley, trust, 


17.50 


Jennie E. Green, trust, 


1.75 


Benjamin Green trust, 


4.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 


1.75 


Sarah L. Gear, trust, 


3.50 


Betsey Hadley, trust, 


3.50 


Frances P. Hallett, trust, 


8.00 


George M. Harding, trust, 


1.75 


Heber B. Hardy, trust, 


4.00 


Mary D. Hart, trust, 


12.00 


Timothy Haynes, trust, 


3.00 


Liva C. Heath, trust, 


5.00 


Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 


3.50 


Emma J. Hill, trust, 


1.75 


George W. Hill, trust, 


8.00 


John M. Hill, trust, 


7.00 


Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 


1.75 


J. Frank Hoit, trust, 


7.00 


Harriet F. Holman, trust, 


3.50 


Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 


3.50 


Samuel Holt, trust, 


4.00 


Mrs. James Hook, trust, 


2.00 


Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 


3.50 


George M. Hutton, trust, 


1.75 


Sarah E. Irish, trust, 


3.50 


Henry Ivey, trust, 


1.75 


Loren W. James, trust, 


2.00 


E. A. Jameson, trust, 


3.50 


Herman E. Jewell, trust, 


1.75 


Harriet and Robert 0. Jenks, trust, 


4.00 


William H. Johns, trust, 


4.00 


S. I. and F. M. Johnson and C. M. Boyn- 




ton, trust, 


4.00 


Frank^W. Johnson, trust, 


2.00 


Susan B. Johnson, trust, 


3.00 



416 CITY OF CONCOED. 

Joel D. Johnson, trust, $4.00 

John F. Jones, trust, 3.50 

Julia A. Jones, trust, 3 . 50 

Seth K. Jones, trust, 12 . 00 

H. A. Kendall, trust, 4.00 

Prentiss M. Kent, trust, 8 . 00 

Timothy Kerley, trust, 4.00 

John and B. A. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 1.75 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 35 . 00 

William Ladd, trust, 2 . 50 

Ebenezer Lane, trust, 4 . 50 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 3 . 50 

Eliza P. Lang, trust, 2.00 

Leete & Newman, trust, 3 . 50 

Ellen M. Lewis, trust, 2.00 

William McC. Leaver, trust, 4 . 00 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 5 . 25 

Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 2 . 50 

John G. Lincoln, trust, 8 . 00 

Bertha M. Little, trust, 4 . 00 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 6.00 

William I. Lovely, trust, 2.50 

George Lull, trust, 4.00 

Laura Lull, trust, 4.00 

Lydia F. Lund, trust, 14 . 00 

John McCauley, trust, 3.50 

Henry McFarland, trust, 7.00 

G. and E. McQuesten, trust, 3.50 

James McQuesten, trust, 7.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles W. Marsh, trust, 2 . 00 

Martin and Brown, trust, 3 . 50 

Jennie P. Martin, trust, 3 . 50 

Phebe C. Mason, trust, 2.50 

H. A. and H. O. Mathews, trust, 3.50 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 8 . 00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 1 . 75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



417 



J. B. Merrill, trust, $3.50 

George H. Moore, trust, 3 . 50 

J. S. Merrill, trust, 3.00 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

Sarah F. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

David E. Miller, trust, 3 . 50 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 7.00 

Alfred Mixer, trust, 4 . 00 

Charles Moody, trust, 3.50 

Charles W. Moore, trust, 3.50 

Joseph A. Moore, trust, 4.00 

Morgan and Colby, trust, 5.25 

Alice Morrill, trust, 3 . 50 

C. B. and A. F. Moseley, trust, 7.00 
L. H. and J. F. and C. B. Moseley, trust, 6 . 00 
Mary J. Moses, trust, 3.50 
Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 3.50 
David L. Neal, trust, 3 . 50 
J. W. Nelson and G. H. Sawyer, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 6.00 
Eliphalet S. Nutter, trust, 3.50 
Mary E. Nelson, trust, 4 . 00 
Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3.50 
Eugene Ordway, trust, 2 . 50 
H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgerly, trust, 7.00 
Charles F. Osgood, trust, 4 . 00 
Charles H. Osgood, trust, 2 . 00 
George B. Packer, trust, 3.50 
George F. Page, trust, 1 . 75 
M. W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 1 . 75 
Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3 . 50 
Frank S. Putnam, trust, 4.00 
Frances J. Page, trust, 1 . 75 
John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 
William H. Palmer, trust, 1.75 

D. Charles Parker, trust, 4.00 
Samuel F. Patterson, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 7.00 

27 



418 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Felicite Pengault, trust, $3 . 50 

Hamilton E. Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Mary N. Perley, trust, 10.50 

Isabella Perry, trust, 1 . 75 

Hattie J. W. Peters, trust, 3.50 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 3.50 

Eliza A. Pickering, trust, 7 . 00 

Hazen Pickering, trust, 4.00 

Irving L. Pickering, trust, 9.00 

Lucien Pickering, trust, 4.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 4.00 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1 . 75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3 . 50 

D. O. Rand and N. V. Libby, trust, 1 . 75 
James E. Rand, trust, 1 . 75 
Henry W. Ranlett, trust, 3 . 50 
Mary E. Rankin, trust, 2.00 
Hiram M. Ray, trust, 4.00 
George L. Reed, trust, 3.50 
Judith A. Richardson, trust, 3.50 
L. S. Richardson, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. J. H. Rigney, trust, 1.75 
Lucy M. Roach, trust, 2.00 
Frances K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 
Helen E. Robinson, trust, 7 . 00 
Moses T. Rogers, trust, 3.50 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 10.50 
David D. Rowe, trust, 1 . 75 
James H. Rowell, trust, 7.00 
Frances L. Runals, trust, 8 . 00 
J. S. and George H. Russ, trust, 8.00 
Moses W. Russell, trust, 7 . 00 
John Quimby, trust, 6.00 
A. A. and G. B. Quimby, trust, 4.00 
Nazarus Saltus, trust, 4.00 
Mrs. I. S. B. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 
Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3 . 50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 419 

Sarah Sanborn, trust, $4 . 00 

Richard P. Sanborn, trust, 6.00 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 3.50 

Fred Sargent, trust, 4.00 

Albert B. Sargent, trust, 4.00 

John B. Sargent, trust, 3.50 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 7.00 

A. E. Savage and J. F. Healey, trust, 3.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles E. Scorer, trust, 4.00 

Gilbert H. Seavey, trust, 3 . 50 

James E. Sewall, trust, 2 . 00 

Shackford and Dame, trust, 3 . 50 

John L. Sinclair, trust, 1 . 75 

J. T. Sleeper and S. R. Dole, trust, 4 . 00 

Frederick P. Smith, trust, 4.00 

L. A. Smith, trust, 7.00 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary W. Smith, trust, 5 . 00 

William Smith, trust, 1.75 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust, 1 . 75 

Selina A. Staniels, trust, 10.00 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Stark, trust, 3 . 50 

Charles Stewart, trust, 1 . 75 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 7.50 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 7 . 00 

Prescott F. Stevens, trust, 5 . 25 

Mary L. Stephenson, trust, 1 . 75 

Ferdinand A. Stillings, trust, 8.00 
Mary L. Stokes and J. C. Ordway, trust, 2.00 

G. L. Stratton, trust, 10.00 

A. J. Souza, trust, 2.00 

Cora Fuller Straw, trust, 4 . 00 

John W. Straw, trust, 1 . 75 

Laura A. Streeter, trust, 2 . 00 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 3.50 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3 . 50 



420 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ella L. Sturtevant, trust, $3 . 50 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., trust, 7.00 

John Swenson, trust, 4.00 

Charles Tappen, trust, 2.50 

C. W. Tarlton and E. F. Tarlton, trust, 2.00 

D. D. Taylor, trust, 8.00 

Hiram B. Tibbetts, trust, 8.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 1 . 75 

Horace A. Thompson, trust, 4.00 

John S. Thompson, trust, 3.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 3.50 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 1 . 75 

J. L. Tilton and H. D. Locke, trust, 1.75 

John H. Toof, trust, 3.50 

Samuel D. Trussell, trust, 1 . 75 

Eliza W. Upham, trust, 7 . 00 

C. P. Virgin, trust, 1.40 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 3 . 50 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 7 . 00 

Charles W. Wall, trust, 2 . 00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 2.50 

Eliza A. Wason, trust, 1 . 75 

B. F. and F. L. Watson, trust, 1 . 75 

Webster and Little, trust, 2 . 00 

Pauline E. Welles, trust, 1 . 75 

Mary E. West, trust, 7.00 

Armenia S. White, trust, 40.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1 . 75 

George P. Whittredge, trust, 3.50 

Mary Williams trust, 1 . 75 

Sarah A. Williams, trust, 3.50 

William Williamson, trust, 2 . 00 

Georgianna M. F. Wood, trust, 3.50 

Belinda Woods, trust, 7 . 00 

Clarence S. Woods, trust, 4 . 00 

Helen P. Woods, trust, 4 . 00 

John Q. Woods, trust, 4 . 00 

Robert Woodruff, trust, 7 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 421 

E. W. Woodward, trust, S3 . 50 

Mary P. Woodworth, trust, 4 . 00 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 3.50 

Mary Abbott Wyman, trust, 16.00 

Jane R. Wyman, trust, 8.00 

W. F. and Hattie M. Wyatt, trust, 8.00 
E. T. Wentworth and S. J. Woodward, 

trust, 9.00 

William Yeaton, trust, 2.50 
Sarah Spargo, trust, 4.00 

$7,278.62 



Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to permanent 

fund, $1,535.88 

Income sundry trust funds as charged to 
this account transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 1,808.40 

Transferred to city of Concord general 

account, 3,934.34 

$7,278.62 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds are added to the annual 
appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor, from 
the income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
sively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1922. 

Carrie E. Evans estate, burial, $17.50 

Charles H. Johnson estate, burial, 7.00 

Annie B. George estate, burial, 8.00 

Charles R. Walker estate, burial, 16.00 

M. A. Randall, care, 2.00 

Frank W. Ripley, care, 4 . 00 

Olive L. Hill estate, burial, 8.00 

Mr. Chickering, labor, 4 . 00 

Clara Johnson estate, burial, 9.00 



422 CITY OF CONCORD. 

F. A. G. Merrill, labor, $30.00 

H. E. Fisher & Co., old iron, 16.60 

Fred French, care, 2 . 00 

W. J. Alexander, care, 3.00 

W. H. Merrill, care, 2.00 

Mrs. M. A. Mason, labor, 6.00 

J. N. Dearborn, care, 6.00 

Clara A. Abbott, trust, 1 . 75 

William Abbott, trust, 10.50 

Samuel Alexander, trust, 3 . 50 

James M. Barton, trust, 3.50 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 3.50 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 7.00 

Samuel Blake, trust, 4 . 00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 3 . 50 

Newell Brown, trust, 2.00 

Sarah F. Butters, trust, 2 . 00 

John F. Chaffin, trust, 1 . 75 

Samuel T. A. Cushing, trust, 4.00 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 3 . 50 

Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 10.00 

Seth Eastman, trust, 5 . 00 

Lydia A. Eastman, trust, 4 . 00 

Catherine R. Eaton, trust, 2.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3 . 50 

Samuel Evans, trust, 3.50 

Miles F. Farmer, trust, 3 . 50 

Hosea Fessenden, trust, 3 . 50 

John Flanders, trust, 1 .00 

Lucia A. Flanders, trust, 3.00 

Eleanor E. Foster, trust, 4 . 00 

Theodore French, trust, 3 . 50 

Lucy J. H. Frost, trust, 4.00 

Betsey J. Gale, trust, 1 . 75 

Moses Gerould, trust, 1 .50 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 1 .50 

Clara V. Stevens Glidden, trust, 2.50 

Margaret W. Godfrey, trust, 2 . 00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



423 



Pamela L. Hall, trust, 

Jennie L. Harlow, trust, 

Frank S. Harraden, trust, 

William H. and Etta Boyce Horner, trust, 

L. Louisa Hoyt, trust, 

Anna C. Hughes, trust, 

Joseph L. Jackson, trust, 

Mary B. Knight, trust, 

George S. Little, trust, 

William T. Locke, trust, 

John McDaniel, trust, 

Asa McFarland, trust, 

Ida Moore, trust, 

Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 

Samuel and David L. Morrill, trust, 

Nichols and Pettengill, trust, 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 

True Osgood, trust, 

Wesley and Harriet Palmer and S. B. 

Savory, trust, 
Alice W. Parker, trust, 
Asa Parker, trust, 
Samuel G. Parker, trust, 
Pearson, White and Savory, trust, 
Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 
Hiram Richardson, trust, 
Isaac B. Shute, trust, 
Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 
Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 
Joseph Stickney, trust, 
Nathan Stickney, trust, 
Abigail Sweetser, trust, 
Thomas W. Thompson, trust, 
Mrs. James M. Tilton, trust, 
Jane R. Twombly, trust, 
Sarah M. Wadleigh, trust, 
Timothy and Abigail B. Walker, trust, 



$1 


.75 


8 


.00 


3 


.50 


3 


.50 


5 


.00 


8 


.00 


4 


.00 


3 


.50 


4 


.25 


3 


.50 


4 


.00 


3 


.50 


1 


.75 


2 


.00 


7 


.00 


5 


.00 


2 


.00 


5 


.25 


3 


.50 


3 


.50 


3 


,50 


1 


75 


1 


.75 


3 


50 


1. 


75 


17. 


50 


2. 


50 


7. 


00 


1. 


75 


17. 


50 


1. 


75 


7. 


00 


1. 


75 


1. 


75 


3. 


50 


7. 


00 


7. 


00 



424 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Albert Webster, trust, $3 . 50 

Paul Wentworth, trust, 7 . 00 

Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 3 . 50 

Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 3 . 50 

Louis A. Woodbury, trust, 4.00 

Charlotte H. Woolson, trust, 3.50 

Louis Tebeau, trust, 2 . 00 



$449 . 10 



Credits. 

Income from sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account transferred to city of 
Concord general account, $308 . 00 

Transferred to city of Concord general 

account, 141.10 



$449.10 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. The remaining 
half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the amounts received from 
sundry collections and income of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of 
individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the 
care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1922. 

Major Abijah Hollis, care, $1.75 

Horace Annis, burial and care, 12.00 

Mrs. J. M. Crossman, care, 4.00 

Mrs. Nellie Webster, care, 3 . 00 

Arthur Davis, care, 1 . 75 

Fred Besse, care, 3.00 

Grace Crosby Day, care, 1 . 50 

L. O. Blanchard, care, 5.50 

Russell P. Shepard, burial, 9.00 

William Annis, care, 2 . 00 

John D. Ryan, care, 2 . 50 

Mrs. George H. McAlpine, care, 2.00 

Charles Rossell, care, 6 . 50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 425 

Walter Annis, care, $1 . 50 

Mrs. Frank Ferrin, care, 5.00 

Mrs. Hannah Holden, care, 9.00 

C. D. and G. Stevens, repairs, 17.50 
Gertrude Sawyer, care, 1 . 50 
John Waters, burial, 2 . 00 
John Carlson estate, repairs, 25 . 00 
Mrs. William Burnett, care, 2.50 
Mrs. Carleton, removal, 4.00 
Arthur Hawthorne, care, 4.00 
Albert W. Hobbs, care, 3 . 00 
Mrs. Josephine Huopila, burial, 16.00 
H. H. Chase, care, 4.75 
Mrs. Willis S. Kellom, west half lot No. 

108, 20.00 

Kendall & Foster, burial, 7 . 50 

Charles Roberts, burial, 8.00 

Frank A. Putney, care, 1 . 50 

George A. Carter, care, 3 . 00 

Ella M. Abbott, care, 2.00 

J. O. Clarke, care, 2.00 

Katherine I. Quinn, care, 2.75 

George Anderson, care, 2 . 00 

Robert Upton, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. M. E. Atkinson, care, 2.00 

Frank E. Dimond, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Walter Fuller, care, .50 

Mrs. Betty Anderson, care, 3 . 75 

Omar L. Shepard, care, 10.00 

Mrs. Gus Anderson, care, 1.00 

Andre Koski, care, 2.50 

Mrs. P. Lindgren, care, 1 . 25 

Mrs. Ida C. Johnson, care, 3.50 

Mrs. George Parmenter, care, 2.00 

Jed Gile, care, 2 . 00 

Arthur Hathorne, care, 2.50 

Mrs. John Gustafson, burial, 10.75 

D. Dufresne, repairs, 2.00 



426 CITY OF CONCORD. 

W. H. Kellom, Sr., care, SI. 50 

Dr. C. H. Quinn, care, 6.00 

Mrs. Alvin Powell, care, 2 . 25 

Abial C. Abbott, care, 2.50 

Victor Engel, care, 2 . 50 

Mrs. Richard Clark, care, 2.00 

Cyrus Farnum, care, 4.50 

Russell P. Shepard, care, 1 . 50 

Mrs. Ben Kemp, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Hoyt Robinson, care, 1 . 75 

Miss Gertrude Sawyer, care, 1.50 

Mrs. W. H. Kellom, Jr., burial, 7.50 

Mrs. D. B. Webber, care, 1 .75 

Arthur Davis, care, 1 . 75 

Mrs. Carrie A. Wright, care, 1 . 75 

Frank Holt, care, 4.00 

Walter Annis, care, 1 . 50 

S. F. Holden estate, lot No. 90, 40.00 

S. F. Holden estate, burial, 9.00 

S. F. Holden estate, removal, 13.50 

Ralph I. Marden, care, 7.50 

Ernest Carlson, care, 1.50 

Frank Matheson, care, 2.00 

John Berry estate, care, 3.50 

Fred Besse, care, 4 . 00 

Will Little, care, 4.75 

Major Hollis, care, 1.75 

Henry Farnum, care, 1 . 75 

Andrew J. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

Hazen E. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

Edw. S. Barrett, trust, 2 . 50 

James Bradford, trust, 1 .50 

Stephen Carleton, trust, 3 . 50 

Augustine C. Carter, trust, 3 . 50 

Carter and Rolf e, trust, 3 . 50 

Oliver C. Dimond, trust, 1 . 50 

Fred D. Drew, trust, 4.00 

R. S. Emery, trust, 2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 427 



Henry Farnum, trust, 


$4.00 


Asa L. Gay, trust, 


3.50 


William H. Gile, trust, 


7.00 


Timothy Green, trust, 


2.50 


Marshall P. Hall, trust, 


2.00 


Mary T. Hatch, trust, 


3.00 


Caleb M. Holden, trust, 


1.75 


Charlotte Lovejoy, trust, 


2.00 


Juliette E. McAlpine, trust, 


7.50 


Charles W. Morse, trust, 


3.00 


George Partridge, trust, 


3.00 


Frederick W. Peabody, trust, 


5.00 


Ira Rowell, trust, 


3.00 


Mary Rowell, trust, 


3.00 



Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to permanent 

funds, $30.00 

Income sundry trust funds as charged to 
this account transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 79 . 75 

Transferred to city of Concord general 

account, 353.75 



$463 . 50 



$463.50 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fond. The remaining 
half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry 
collections and income of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of indi- 
vidual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of 
the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1922. 

Thomas Smith, burial, $10 . 00 

Daniel Pettingill, burial, 10.00 

Daniel Pettingill, labor, 30 . 00 

C. E. Banfill, burial, 9.00 



428 CITY OF CONCORD. 

B. L. Eastman, lot No. 7, block I, S5.00 

Robert Hancock, labor, 30.00 

Mary L. Potter, burial, 8 . 00 

Clara Sanders, burial, 6 . 00 

John A. Sennington, removal, 10.00 

Ruth K. Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Leodore E. Alexander, trust, 4 . 00 

Elizabeth A. Batchelder, trust, 1.75 

Orlando W. Coon, trust, 4.00 

Ann Emery, trust, 3.50 

Daniel E. Gale, trust, 4.50 

George Graham, trust, 2 . 00 

Crosby K. Haines, trust, 2.00 

Jacob Hoyt, trust, 3.50 

Mrs. Samuel Hutchins, trust, 3.50 

Sarah H. James, trust, 2.00 

Lucilla Pierce Kelley, trust, 5 . 00 

Addie J. P. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Joseph S. Kimball, trust, 3 . 00 

B. L. Larkin, trust, 1 . 75 

A. Augusta Locke, trust, 1 . 75 

George Locke, trust, 3.50 

Josiah S. Locke, trust, 2.50 

Reuben B. Locke, trust, 5.00 

Burleigh A. Marden, trust, 1.50 

John H. Maynard, trust, 2.50 

Helen Eastman Melendy, trust, 8 . 00 

David A. Morrill, trust, 4 . 00 

Frank V. Osgood, trust, 1 . 50 

William Page, trust, . 75 
Frank P. Potter and Lydia P. Perry, 

trust, 9.00 

Issora Hutchins Ring, trust, 1 . 75 

Clara E. Robinson, trust, 3 . 00 

Charles D. Rowell, trust, 3 . 50 

John B. Sanborn, trust, 7.00 

Harriet B. Sanders, trust, 1 . 75 

William Smith, trust, 2.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 429 

G. M. and F. E. Tallant, trust, $3.50 

Harriet N. Tenney, trust, 3 . 50 

Aaron B. Young, trust, 3.50 

J. E. Pecker, trust, 22.00 

$264.00 



Credits. 

One-half of sale of lot added to permanent 

fund, $2.50 

Income sundry trust funds as charged to 
this account transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 146.00 

Transferred to city of Concord general 

account, 115.50 



$264.00 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the permanent fund. The remaining 
half, with the amount received for grading of lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry 
collections and income of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the income of indi- 
vidual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of 
the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1922. 
Elizabeth L. Baker, lot No. 136, $20.00 

Credits. 

One-half sale of lot added to permanent 

funds, $10.00 

Transferred to city of Concord general 

account, 10.00 

$20.00 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 



Receipts. 



1922. 
Abigail W. Lang, trust, 
Nelson Tenney, trust, 
A. L. Williams, trust, 



Credits. 



Income sundry trust funds as charged to 
this account transferred to city of Con- 
cord general account, 



$3.00 
1.75 

3.00 



$7 . 75 



$7.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



431 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Bonds. 

City Hall Building, 



Municipal. 

Due. 

1 



Public Park, 
Bridge, 



Bonds. 



Sewer, 



Sept 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
July 
Dec. 
Dec. 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 
June 1 



1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1931 
1933 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 



Rate. 

si 

°2> 
"2 l 
°2> 
°2> 
°2> 

4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 



Amount. 

$5,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

10,000 



Precinct. 






Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


July 1, 1923, 


4, 


$4,000 


May 1, 1928, 


3i 


25,000 


Dec. 1, 1930, 


4, 


5,000 


Dec. 1, 1932, 


4, 


10,000 


Dec. 1, 1934, 


4, 


10,000 



$133,000 



$54,000 



Union School District, July 1, 1923, 3^ $10,000 
May 1, 1924, 4, 5,000 
July 1, 1924, 3J, 5,000 



432 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds. Due, 

Union School District, May 
July 
May 
July 
July 
May 
July 
July 
July 
July 
May 
May 
May 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



Rate 

1925, 4, 

1925, 3§ 

1926, 4, 

1926, 3| 

1927, 3£ 

1928, 4, 

1928, 3£ 

1929, 3| 

1930, 3| 

1931, 3f 

1932, 4 

1933, 4 

1934, 4 

1923, 4 

1924, 4 

1925, 4 

1926, 4 

1927, 4 

1928, 4 

1929, 4 

1930, 4 

1931, 4 

1932, 4 

1933, 4 

1934, 4 

1935, 4 

1936, 4 

1937, 4 

1938, 4 

1939, 4 

1940, 4 

1941, 4 

1942, 4 



Amount. 

$10,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

35,000 

6,000 

, 4,000 

, 10,000 

, 10,000 

, 9,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 



$189,000 



School District No. 20, Sept. 1, 1924, 3|, $4,300 



$4,300 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 433 

Note— Soucook River Imp., Dec. 12, 1923, $3,000 

Sept. 9, 1924, 3,000 
Nov. 14, 1925, 3,000 
Aug. 23, 1926, 3,000 
Aug. 23, 1927, 3,000 



$15,000 

Total bonded indebtedness of the city, 

exclusive of water department, $395,300 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 

Dr. * 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1922, 

municipal, $215.00 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1922, 

precinct, 167.50 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1922, 

Union School District, 207 . 50 

Due in 1922, municipal, 5,345.00 

Due in 1922, precinct, sewer, 2,195.00 

Due in 1922, Union School District, 5,815.00 

Due in 1922, School District No. 20, 168.00 

$14,113.00 



Cr. 




Municipal, paid, 


$5,450.00 


Precinct, sewer, paid, 


2,270.00 


Union School District, paid, 


5,982.50 


SchooJ District No. 20, paid, 


168.00 


Municipal due, not presented, 


110.00 


Precinct due, not presented, 


92.50 


Union School District due, not pre- 


sented, 


40.00 



$14,113.00 



28 



434 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 

C. H. Foster, Treasurer, in account with Concord 
Water Works. 

Receipts. 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1922, $19,307.52 



Sale of bonds, 




272,173.50 




Sinking fund, 




20,254.36 




Receipts, P. R. 


Sanders, 


superin- 




tendent, 




82,090.42 


3,825.80 




ijpoy 




Expenditures. 




Orders paid, 




$38,744.23 




Bonds refunded, 




270,000.00 




Bonds paid, 




47,000.00 




Interest on bonds 


i 


13,022.50 




Balance on hand, 


January 1 


1923, 25,059.07 

f°,0 


q cos en 




<$>OVk) ,OiU . <JV/ 


BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 


Due. Rate 


Amount. 


Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 1, 1923, 4| 


$18,000 


Jan. 1, 1932, 4|, 


$18,000 


Jan. 1 


1924, 4| 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1933, 4^ 


18,000 


Jan. 1 


1925, 4£ 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1934, 4|, 


18,000 


Jan. 1 


1926, 4^ 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1935, 4|, 


18,000 


Jan. 1 


1927, 4i 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1936, 4^ 


18,000 


Jan. 1 


1928, 4^ 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1937, 4|, 


18,000 


Jan. 1 


1929, 4^ 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1923, 3|, 


3,000 


Jan. 1 


1930, 4| 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 2>h, 


15,000 


Jan. 1 


1931, 4i 


18,000 







$288,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 435 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1922, 

and not presented, $206 . 00 

To coupons due, 1922, 12,962.50 

$13,168.50 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1922, $13,022.50 

By coupons due and not presented, 146.00 

$13,168.50 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
account of Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, for the year 1922 
and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein prop- 
erly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, 
and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance to be 
eight thousand one hundred ninety-eight dollars and 
seventy-two cents ($8,198.72), and as treasurer of the city 
water department, cash balance to be twenty-five thousand 
fifty-nine dollars and seven cents ($25,059.07). 

I have also verified the account of the special funds and 
sinking funds of the city in the hands of the city treasurer, 
and find such special and sinking funds invested, and the 
income thereof for the year 1922 accounted for, as shown by 
the book of the city treasurer kept for the purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



436 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY 
OF CONCORD. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1922. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, $1,067.75 

Aid, City Poor, $3,000.00 1 . „ J ._ », ne . _. 

■r. ix- tvt tnfl -, o^n ™ r 4,094.46 $105.54 
Resolution No. 520, 1,200.00] 

Aid, County Poor, 12,598.79 

Bonds, City Hall, 7,000.00 7,000.00 

Bridge Bonds, 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, 11,000.00 18,332.88 

Balance, 1921, 134 . 75 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 3,934.34 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,715.78 

Income Trust Funds, 1,808.40 

$18,593.27 $18,332.88 $260.39 

Old North, 700.00 1,195.48 

Balance, 1921, 16.24 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 141 . 10 

Income Cemetery Fund, 32.60 

Income Trust Funds, 308.00 



$1,197.94 $1,195.48 $2.46 

Maple Grove, 200 . 00 824 . 39 

Debit Balance, 1921, 24 . 31 

Transferred Cemetery Account, 353 .75 

Income Trust Funds, 79 . 75 

Income Cemetery Fund, 48 . 62 



$682.12 $848.70 



444 CITY OF 


CONCORD. 








Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Pine Grove, 


$50 . 00 


$538.59 




Balance, 1921, 


28.96 






Transferred Cemetery Account, 


115.50 






Income Trust Funds, 


146.00 






Income Cemetery Fund, 


30.12 








$370.58 


$538.59 




Old Fort, 








Balance, 1921, 


15 . 74 


16.00 




Income Trust Funds, 


7.75 








$23.49 


$16.00 


$7.49 


Millville, 


75.00 


251.70 




Debit Balance, 1921, 




251.65 




Transferred Cemetery Account, 


10.00 






Income Cemetery Fund, 


106.42 








$191.42 


$503.35 




Horse Hill, 


10.00 




$10.00 


Soucook, 


30.00 


30.00 




Balance, 1921, 


12.95 






Income Cemetery Fund, 


1.26 








$44.21 


$30.00 


$14.21 


Woodlawn, 


25.00 


25.00 




Concord Charity Organization 








Society, 


350.00 


350.00 




Concord District Nursing Asso- 








ciation, 


350.00 


350.00 




Dog Licenses, 




44.50 




Engineering Department: 








Salary, Engineer, 


2,400.00 


2,400.00 




Salaries, Assistants, 


2,000.00 


2,281.60 




Incidentals, 


325.00 


300.32 




Assessor's Map, 


400.00 


140.82 






$5,125.00 


$5,122.74 


$2.26 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 445 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 

Aid, $450.00 $450.00 

Fire Department: 

Pay-Rolls, 28,974 . 00 28,973 .06 

Pay-Rolls, Semi-Annual, 10,245.00 10,245.00 

Rent Veterans' Association, 210.00 210.00 

Forage, 1,000.00. 849.99 

Fuel and Lights, 3,650.00 3,034.39 

Fire Alarm, 1,500.00 1,746.55 

Horse Hire and Shoeing, 1,000 .00 755 . 75 

Washing, 100.00 83.35 

Supplies, Auto Combination, 325 . 00 347 . 31 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 350 . 00 345 . 67 

Incidentals, 5,000.00 6,074.66 

New Hose, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Fire Inspection, 500.00 441 .27 

Resolution No. 528, 253 .00 



$54,307.00 $54,307.00 

Motor Trucks, Alert Hose and 
Pioneer Engine Companies: 

Resolution No. 501, 4,000.00 1 , ... M 

« « 518, 644.91/ 4 ' 64491 

Fire Department Auto Truck: 

Resolution No. 515, 3,500.00 3,492.50 $7.50 

Health, Board of: 

Salary, Sanitary Officer, 2,000 . 00 2,000 .00 

Upkeep of Automobile, 400.00 400.00 

Fumigation Supplies, 100.00 94.69 

Incidentals, 1,500.00 1,323.72 

Contagious Diseases, 1,000.00 470.08 



$5,000.00 $4,288.49 $711.51 
Highway Department: 

Salary, Supt. of Streets, 2,500.00 2,500.00 

General Maintenance, 90,000.00 98,713.63 

Sidewalks and Crossings, New, 1,500.00 2,373.34 

Sidewalks and Crossings, Re- 
pair, 3,000.00 5,211.20 

Catch Basins, 3,000.00 1,871.79 

Resolution No. 528, Account 

Earnings, 10,669 .96 

$110,669.96 $110,669.96 



446 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Incidentals and Land Damages, 
Resolution No. 523, 

" 528, 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, 

Interest, Bonds, 

Interest, Temporary Loan, 
Resolution No. 528, 

Land Sold for Taxes : 
Resolution No. 513, 



Taxes 


on Land Sold City 


Resolution No. 486, 




i 


' 487, 




i 


' 488, 




< 


' 509, 




t 


' 510, 




i 


' 511, 




i 


' 512, 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 

Memorial Day, 

Municipal Christmas Tree: 
Resolution No. 525, 

National Guards, Aid, 

Rebate Taxes, St. Mary's School: 
Resolution No. 524, 

Soucook River Improvement: 
Resolution No. 504, Serial 
Notes, 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, 

Open Air Concerts, 

Playgrounds and Baths, 
Resolution No. 528, 



Appropriation. 

$12,500.00 

36,000.00 

836.73 

1,826.17 

5,345.00 

3,000.00 
2,925.05 

1,986.26 

.26] 

1.87 

1.39 

57.98 } 

109.41 

305.40 

628.25 

3,000.00 

460.00 

125.00 
100.00 

1,228.45 



15,000.00 

1,000.00 

550.00 

2,800.00 
373.95 



Expended. Balance. 

149,395.23 

1,826.17 

5,450.00 

5,925.05 

1,986.26 

1,104.56 

3,000.00 

460.00 

23.90 $101.10 

100.00 

1,228.45 

14,656.00 344.00 

1,000.00 

550.00 

3,173.95 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 


.447 




Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Parks, 

Resolution No. 528, 


$4,500.00 1 
108.18 J 


$4,608.18 




Trees, Care of, 


4,000.00] 






Resolution No. 528, Account 




4,290.06 




Earnings, 


290.06 J 






White Park Ball Ground, 


200.00 1 






Resolution No. 528, 


11.81 /' 


211 .81 




Police and Watch: 








Salaries, 


29,400.00 


29,304.76 




Special and Traffic Officer, 


3,500.00 


11,186.75 




Fuel, 


1,000.00 


1,210.10 




Repairs, Buildings, 


700.00 


812.25 




Lights, 


300.00 


334.47 




Incidentals, 


2,500.00 


4,660 30 




Supplies, Auto, 


900.00 


790.80 




Motor Car, 


930.00 


930.00 




Resolution No. 528, 


9,999.43 









$49,229.43 


$49,229.43 




Precinct, Garbage, 


20,000.00 


19,338.43 




Debit Balance, 1921, 




2,706.07 




Resolution No. 528, Account 








Earnings, 


263.89 








$20,263.89 


$22,044.50 




Precinct, Lighting Streets, City, 
Balance, 1921, 


23,000.00 1 
426.11 J 


16,427.46 


$6,998.65 


Precinct, Lighting Streets, Pena- 


) 






cook, 


2,575.00 > 


2,525.00 


675.00 


Balance, 1921, 


625.00 J 






Precinct, Lighting Streets, West 








Concord, 


820 00 


400 . 00 


420.00 


Precinct, Sewer, City: 








Construction and Repairs, 


10,450.00 


12,561.68 




Debit Balance, 1921, 




453.96 




Interest, Bonds, 


2,195.00 


2,270.00 




Bonds, 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 




Resolution No. 528, Earnings, 


18.50 








$16,663.50 


$19,285.64 





448 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. 



Expended. Balance. 



Precinct, Sewer, East Concord: 

Construction and Repairs, 

Balance, 1921, $137.86 

Precinct, Sewer, Penacook: 

Construction and Repairs, 500.00 

Balance, 1921, 79.09 

Precinct, Sewer, St. Paul's School: 
Construction and Repairs, 
Balance, 1921, 33.44 

Precinct, Sewer, West Concord : 

Construction and Repairs, 200.00 

Balance, 1921, 80.72 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 7,000 . 00 

Balance, 1921, 19.14 

Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, Pena- 
cook, 700 . 00 



481.19 
123.88 



$137.86 



$327.70 251.39 



33.44 



251.32 29.40 



6,913.44 105.70 



94.93 



Printing and Stationery, 




5,000.00] 






Resolution No. 507, 




1,000.00 [ 


6,374.20 




" 528, 




374.20 j 






Public Library: 










Salaries, 




4,300.00 


4,749.72 




Incidentals, 




2,700.00 


3,444.20 




Balance, 1921, 




2,240.63 






Trust Funds, 




2,633.64 






Fines, 




385.00 






Income, Eastman Fund, t 


rans- 








ferred to Principal of 


said 








Fund, 






2,000.00 






$12,259.27 


$10,193.92 


$2,065.35 


Repairs of Buildings, 




1,300.00 


1,047.79 


252.21 


Salaries : 










Mayor, 




2,000 00 


2,000.00 




City Clerk, 




1,400.00 


1,400.00 




Clerk, Board of Public Works, 


200.00 


200.00 





FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 449 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Overseers of Poor, $390 . 00 $390 .00 

Solicitor, 800.00 800.00 

Treasurer, 1,225.00 1,225.00 

Messenger, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

City Physicians, 700 . 00 700 . 00 

Care City Clocks, 110.00 110.00 

Assessors, 3,800 . 00 3,800 .00 

Moderators, Ward Clerks, 720 . 00 720 . 00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of 

Election, 1,776 . 00 1,776 .00 

Judge, Police Court, 1,200 . 00 1,200 .00 

Clerk, Police Court, 500 . 00 500 . 00 

Sealer of Weights and Meas- 
ures, 500.00 538.28 

Collector of Taxes, 4,000.00 1,125.00 1921 levy 

3,500.00 1922 levy 

Resolution No. 528, 663 .28 

$21,184.28 $21,184.28 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,905 00 1,905 .00 

Schools: 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1921, 77,280.96 250,330.96 

Amount Voted by District, 233,698 .03 

Dog Licenses, 1,543.42 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 36.23 

Bonds, 39,373.20 

Interest, 284.44 

Bonds, 10,000 . 00 10,000 .00 

Interest, 5,675 . 00 5,982 . 50 

Balance, 1921, 1,975.00 



$369,866 . 28 $266,313 . 46 $103,552 . 82 

Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance, 1921, 11,930.10 24,930.10 

Dog Licenses, 160 .56 

Amount Voted by District, 19,511 .30 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3 . 77 

$31,605.73 $24,930.10 $6,675.63 
29 



450 CITY OF CONCORD 










Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


School District No. 20: 












Interest, 




$159.25 


$168.00 




Balance, 1921, 




84 


00 






Bonds, 




500 


00 


500.00 




Sinking Fund, 




250 


00 


250.00 






$993.25 


$918.00 


$75.25 


Temporary Loan: 












Resolution No. 484, 




150,000. 


00 ' 






" 503, 
" 514, 




150,000 
100,000 


00 
00 


• 450,000.00 




" 519, 




50,000 


00 






County Tax, 








47,479 . 33 




State Tax, 








76,485.00 






RECEIPTS 








Receipts of the city for the 


year ending December 31, 1922: 




Balance on Hand, January 1, 


1922, 






$16,460.66 


Taxes, 1919, 










709.37 


" 1920, 










598.09 


" 1921, 










68,134.77 


" 1922, 










544,865.26 


Municipal Court Fees, 










3)812.67 


Library Fines, 










385.00 


Dependent Soldiers, County, 








1,728.50 


County Poor, 










18,903.42 


Temporary Loans, 










450,000.00 


Fees, City .Clerk, 










765.65 


Garbage Precinct, 










263.89 


Highway Department, 










10,683.57 


Dog Licenses, 










1,748.48 


Dog License Fees, 










152.40 


Amusement Licenses, 










1,076.00 


Rent, Auditorium, 










1,200.00 


Real Estate, Redeemed 


1912, 








6.35 


(t a Si 


1913, 








42.21 


a (i a 
(i it ti 


1918, 
1919, 








20.00 
2,094.08 


it U it 


1920, 








817.43 


a a a 


1921, 








1,048.09 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



451 



Real Estate Tax, Paid by City, 1920, $414. 79 

" " " " 1921, 225.57 

Rent, Chief's House, 250.00 

Motor Vehicle Tax, 1922, 26,642.99 

" 1923, 9,594.31 

Passenger Carriage and Job Team Licenses, 102 . 00 

Pool Table and Bowling Alley Licenses, 360 . 00 

Junk Dealers' Licenses, 100.00 

Trees, 320.70 

Sewers, 18 . 50 

Rent of Rooms, City Hall, 90.00 

Soucook River Improvement, Serial Notes, 15,000 . 00 

Druggists' Permits, 4.00 

Land Sold, 316.37 

Milk Licenses, 184 . 00 

Forest Fires, 182 . 97 

$40,000 Union School District Bonds and Interest, 39,657 . 64 

Declarations of Candidacy, State Primary, 119.00 

Histories and Maps, City of Concord, 50 . 00 

Interest on Daily Balances, 1,567.89 

Fines, etc., City Marshal, 437.75 

Insurance Tax, 3,654 . 38 

Railroad Tax, 63,254.95 

Savings Bank Tax, 62,822 . 94 

Building and Loan Association Tax, 232 . 50 

Transferred Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 3,934 . 34 

Old North " " 141.10 

" Maple Grove " " 353.75 

" Pine Grove " " 115.50 

Millville " " 10.00 

Income Trust Funds, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,808.40 

Old North " 308.00 

" " Maple Grove " 79.75 

Old Fort " 7.75 

" " Pine Grove " 146.00 

Permanent Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,715.78 

Old North " 32.60 

" " Millville " 106.42 

" " Pine Grove " 30.12 

" " Maple Grove " 48.62 

" " Soucook " 1.26 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 40 . 00 

P. B. Cogswell Trust Fund, Public Library, 85.92 

G. Parker Lyon Trust Fund, Public Library, 40 . 00 

Franklin Pierce Trust Fund, Public Library, 40.00 

Thomas Valpey Trust Fund, Public Library 20 . 00 



452 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Income Joseph Hazeltine Trust Fund, Public Library, $133.72 

" Seth K. Jones Trust Fund, Public Library, 25. 15 

" Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library, 50.00 

" Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library, 1,558.85 

" William Chase Trust Fund, Public Library, 42.50 

" B. A. Kimball Trust Fund, Public Library, 637.50 

" K. P. and D. Rollins Trust Fund, West Garden, 63.75 

Towns of Pembroke and Tilton, Aid to Poor, 197 . 28 

Bounty on Wild Cats and Hedgehogs, 20 . 40 

Miscellaneous, 218.11 





$1,363,131.71 


DISBURSEMENTS. 




Disbursements: 




City Departments, 


$380,657.16 


City Poor, 


4,094.46 


County Poor and Soldiers, 


13,666.54 


City Notes, 


450,000.00 


City Bonds, 


11,000.00 


City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 


11,375.05 


Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, 


1,826.17 


Schools, 


275,261.06 


Schools, Interest on Bonds, 


6,150.50 


School Bonds, 


10,500.00 


School Sinking Fund, District No. 20, 


250.00 


Precinct, Sprinkling Streets, 


6,913.44 


" " " Penacook, 


481 . 19 


" Lighting Streets, City, 


16,427.46 


" " " Penacook, 


2,525.00 


" West Concord, 


400.00 


" Garbage, 


19,338.43 


" Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 


2,270.00 


" " Repairs, 


13,140.70 


11 " Bonds, 


4,000.00 


County Tax, 


47,479.33 


State Tax, 


76,485.00 


Paid Outstanding Orders, 


741.11 


Treasury Balance, January 1, 1923, 


8,198.72 




$1,363,181.32 


Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid January 1, 1923, 


49.61 



$1,363,131.71 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 453 

CONCORD WATER WORKS. 

Receipts. Expenditures. 

Cash balance, January 1, 1922, $19,307.52 
Receipts deposited with treasurer, 82,090.42 
Sale of bonds, 272,173.50 

Sinking fund, 20,254.36 

Expended per orders, $38,722 . 73 

Bonds, paid, 47,000.00 

Interest, 13,022.50 

Bonds refunded, 270,000.00 

Paid outstanding order, 21 .50 

Treasury balance, January 1, 1923, 25,059.07 



$393,825.80 $393,825.80 



MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $60,000.00 

State Library bonds, 15,000 . 00 

Bridge bonds, 58,000.00 

Cemetery trust fund note, 52,176.43 

$185,176.43 

Debt Not Funded. 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1923, $49 . 61 
Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 
nicipal bonds, 1,267 . 14 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 110.00 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

Union School District bonds, 40 . 00 
Due school districts, 1 10,228 . 45 

School district No. 20, 75 . 25 
public library, account trust 

funds, 2,065.35 

precinct, lighting streets, 6,998.65 



454 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Due precinct, sewer, St. Paul's 




School, 


$33.44 


precinct, sewer, East Con- 




cord, 


137.86 


precinct, sewer, Penacook, 


251.39 


precinct, lighting streets, 




Penacook, 


675.00 


precinct, lighting streets, West 




Concord, 


420.00 


precinct, sewer, West Con- 




cord, 


29.40 


precinct, sprinkling streets, 




city, 


105.70 


precinct, sprinkling streets, 




Penacook, 


94.93 


cemeteries, 


284.55 


Total debt not funded, 


$122,866.72 



Total city indebtedness, $308,043 . 15 

Available Assets. 

Treasurer's cash balance, January 

1, 1923, $8,198.72 

Taxes, 1916, uncollected, 48.04 

Taxes, 1917, uncollected, 79.67 

Taxes, 1918, uncollected, 97.61 

Taxes, 1919, uncollected, 2,494.03 

Taxes, 1920, uncollected, 170.36 

Taxes, 1921, uncollected, 2,515.27 

Taxes, 1922, uncollected, 86,589.92 
Cash in hands of tax collectors, 

January 1, 1923, 664.40 

Cash in hands of tax collector, 

January 1, 1923, account motor 

vehicle permits, 57 . 51 

Taxes bid in by city, 4,737 . 70 

Due Highway Department, 1,189.30 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 455 

Overdraft, Maple Grove Cemetery, $166.58 
Overdraft, Millville Cemetery, 311 .93 

Overdraft, Pine Grove Cemetery, 168.01 

Overdraft, sewers, 2,622.14 

Overdraft, garbage precinct, 1,780.61 

$111,891.80 



Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1923, $196,151.35 
Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1922, 180,761.07 



Increase for the year, $15,390.28 



PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

Water Works bonds, $288,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 54,000.00 





Debt Not Funded. 




Interest accrued, 


not yet due, 




sewer bonds, 


$309.17 




Interest accrued, 


not yet due, 




water bonds, 


6,390.00 




Coupons overdue, 


not presented, 




sewer bonds, 


92.50 




Coupons overdue, 


not presented, 




water bonds, 


146.00 


6,937.67 




( 




1348,937.67 




Available Assets. 




Cash on hand, water department, 




January 1, 1923, 


$25,059.07 




Due garbage precinct, 58.19 


«oe; 117 oft 



456 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Net precinct debt, January 1 , 1923, $323,820 . 41 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1922, 380,702 .02 



Decrease for the year, $56,881 . 61 

Other Precinct Liabilities. 

Union School District bonds, ■ $189,000.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 2,400 . 83 

$191,400.83 

Penacook School District bonds, $4,300.00 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 50.17 

4,350.17 



Net liability of school districts, $195,751 .00 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular municipal debt, $196,151 .35 

precinct debt, 323,820 . 41 

school districts, 195,751.00 

$715,722 . 76 

Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1923, $715,722.76 
Aggregate indebtedness, over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1922, 727,473.26 



Decrease for the year, $11,750.50 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC 
PLAYGROUNDS AND BATH. 

For the Season of 1922. 



The municipal Playground and Bath Department for 
1922 comprised one director and seven field supervisors, and 
the public play centers numbered five, namely, Kimball 
Playground, South End Playground, East Concord, Pena- 
cook, and the Bath House. 

The system aimed to promote healthful outdoor educa- 
tional recreation, which was made up of recreative play, 
physical education, mass games, athletics, aquatics, kinder- 
garten work and folk dancing. The work was planned to 
cover a season of ten weeks, starting June 22 and ending 
September 1. 

During the first week of the playground work all the 
children of both sexes were registered and a method of 
classification was instituted which divided the children in 
groups, or sections, according to their ages. A daily pro- 
gram was introduced, starting at one o'clock and lasting 
until five o'clock, except Saturdays and holidays. The 
daily order of events systematized the playground activities 
by dividing the hours into different play periods. In all 
the work the educational aspect was emphasized ; recreative 
exercises were devised for the development of the mind as 
well as the body. 

The fundamental idea of the daily program was system- 
atic, graded progression. All the play centers followed the 
same day's order. Aquatic sports and the teaching of swim- 
ming played an important part in the season's work. In- 
struction in swimming occupied a prominent place in our 
weekly program, and inter-playground competition was pro- 
moted in the form of dual swimming meets. 

Regular sessions or weekly conferences for the teaching 
corps were conducted by the director in the playground 



458 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



office at City Hall. These morning sessions encouraged 
suggestions and familiarized the instruction corps with all 
problems in connection with playground work. 

As an example the daily program for the week of July 16 
was as follows: 



Boys 
1.00 to 2.45 p. m. 

Track and Field 
2.45 to 3.15 p. m. 

Field Hockey 
3.15 to 3.30 p. m. 

Physical Education 

Mass Exercise 
3.30 to 4.00 p. m. 

Boxing and Wrestling 
4.00 to 5.00 p. m. 

Pyramid Building 

Substitute Tuesdays and 
Thursdays — Six-Inning 
Baseball Games in place 
of Pyramid Building 



Girls 
1.00 to 2.45 p. m. 

Baseball 
2.45 to 3.15 p. m. 

Track and Field 
3.15 to 4.00 p. m. 

Folk Dancing or Passive 

Work 
4.00 to 4.30 p. m. 

Field Hockey or Archery 
4.30 to 5.00 p. m. 

Physical Education 

Mass Exercise 

Substitute Tuesdays and 
Thursdays — Volley Ball, 
Center Ball, Straddle 
Ball in place of Baseball 
or Field Hockev 



The boys' department indulged in the following sports 
and pastimes: Swedish mass drills, pyramid building, track 
and field athletics, cross country running, baseball, swim- 
ming and water sports, wrestling, boxing, quoit games, and 
kite flying. 

In the girls' department attention was given to Swedish 
mass drills, track and field athletics, baseball, folk dancing, 
swimming and water sports, volley ball, center ball, straddle 
ball, field hockey, quoit games, tennis, and archery. 

The physical training of the little children consisted of 
mass Swedish drills, folk dancing, story telling, dramatiza- 
tion of stories, paper cutting, ring mass, and singing games. 

In all branches of athletics the so-called major sports such 



REPORT ON PUBLIC PLAYGROUNDS AND BATH. 459 

as track and field athletics, cross country running, baseball, 
volley, center and straddle ball, field hockey, and archery, 
leagues were formed, made up of the teams representing the 
various playgrounds, and they played a series of contests 
leading to a championship. The inter-playground contests 
were held on Tuesdays and Thursdays of each week on all 
the playgrounds. 

On Wednesday afternoons the girls' department from 
the various play centers were transported in auto trucks to 
the bath houses for instruction in swimming and water 
sports. 

Honors were distributed in the form of ribbon badges to 
the individual winners in the various championship contests. 

The playground exhibition consisted of one for each play- 
ground for the season and a grand final exhibition which was 
held on Wednesday, August 23, at White Park. Several 
thousand people witnessed the mixed program of recrea- 
tional and physical activities which marked the final exhibit. 

The classification of both the boys and the girls was 
divided into senior, junior, intermediate, and midgets, and 
no boy or girl over seventeen years of age was permitted to 
participate in any of the daily work of the playground or in 
the exhibition. 

Industrial work was introduced during the season, but 
limited to basketry, sewing and clay moulding, the latter 
for the little tots of the kindergarten age. The development 
physically of the youth was kept foremost in the minds of 
the instructors, and for this reason no particular attention 
was given to any industrial work which would have any 
tendency to discourage physical exercise and recreation. 

The achievements of the season were notable in several 
instances; the most important was the development of the 
amateur spirit in competitive play and the cultivation of 
sport for sport's sake. Another important feature which 
brought excellent results was the attention paid to character 
building by means of the development of patriotism and by 
special exercises, saluting of the flag, singing of patriotic 
songs, etc. To sum up, the chief aim of the playground 



460 CITY OF CONCORD. 

work was the development of activities having an educa- 
tional as well as a recreative value, and this object seems to 
have been attained. 

A compilation of statistics discloses the fact that of the 
entire registration of both boys and girls the predominating 
nationality seemed to be of French origin; the second na- 
tionality in numbers was of Irish origin of American parent- 
age; the third in numbers were Americans; other nationali- 
ties were about even for fourth place. 

The registration for the department for the entire season 
showed a report to the effect that over ten thousand children, 
both boys and girls, were given instruction. 

Improvements were made at the public baths by the 
purchase of two galvanized automobile garages. These 
portable houses were built as bath houses and were much 
more hygienic than the old wooden structures. 

The following recommendations for the future should be 
helpful in improving the Playground and Bath Department. 

1. Handball courts should be erected on all playgrounds; 
this is an inexpensive innovation, requiring very little 
lumber and carpentry work. 

2. A quarter of a mile running track with the accom- 
panying jumping pit should be layed out at White's Park. 

3. White's Park should be developed as a play center and 
arrangements should be made whereby funds could be pro- 
vided for both a man and a woman instructor at this ex- 
cellent spot. 

4. Funds should be provided for the development of the 
East Concord and Penacook playgrounds, and a man and 
a woman instructor should be employed at these centers. 
The results from these playgrounds last season fully war- 
rant these play centers as being recognized by the Play- 
ground Department. 

5. Four new bath houses should be purchased and erected 
at the bathing beach. This in addition to the two bath 
houses purchased last season would make it possible for 
boys and girls to visit the bathing beach daily. 

6. Two arc lights should be installed at the bathing beach 



REPORT ON PUBLIC PLAYGROUNDS AND BATH. 461 

and a night instructor placed in charge of the bath houses 
for the benefit of adults. 

7. A small running track with the accompanying jumping 
pits should be built at both the North and South End play- 
grounds. Both these centers warrant the expenditure for 
this addition. 

In conclusion I take this opportunity of congratulating 
publicly the corps of instructors, namely, Miss Marian Vose, 
Miss Myrta Lowe, Miss Ruth Fanning, Mr. Webster 
Bridges, Mr. Edward Coughlin, Mr. Ray Dimond, Mr. 
Andrew Nicol, and Miss Madeline Vose, the last named our 
one volunteer assistant, for the excellency of their work as 
teachers in the Playground Department for the season of 
1922. 

HAROLD ANSON BRUCE, 

Director. 

Aldermen BRUNEL, STEVENS, JONES, MORRILL, 
MRS. CORA M. SULLIVAN, 
MISS ELSIE L. JOHNSON, 
RICHARD T. SMITH, 

Committee on Playgrounds and Bath. 



CITY PROPERTY. 



Having Value But Not Considered Available Assets. 


Water Department, $1,161,855.47 


Fire Department, 


164,987.00 


Highway Department, 


48,218.50 


Engineering Department, 


995.50 


Sewer Department, 


1,206.00 


Penacook Sewer, 


40.15 


Health Department, 


940.00 


Police Department, 


42,300.00 


City Clerk's Office, 


1,150.00 


Commissioner's Office, 


140.17 


Mayor's Office, 


250.00 


Assessors' Office, 


622.00 


Tax Collector's Office, 


296.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures, 


325.00 


City Messenger's Department, 


2,250.00 


Park Commissioners' Depart- 




ment, 


225.00 


Cemetery Commissioners' De- 




partment, 


3,500.00 


Public Library, 


11,000.00 


Milk Inspection, 


25.00 


City History Commission- 


10.00 


Real Estate, 


338,382.50 


— 


$1,778,718.29 



1922. 
Population of city (census 1920), 22,167 

Valuation of city, $23,710,108.00 

Tax assessed for the year, $645,035 . 10 

Rate of taxation, $10.10 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $11.60. 
Rate for precinct, $3.78. 
Total rate, $25.48 per $1,000. 



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522 CITY OF CONCORD. 



SUMMARY. 

Total number of births returned for the year 455 

Total number of marriages returned for the year 231 

Total number of deaths in the different wards 226 

Total number of deaths in the public institutions 255 

Total number brought to the city for burial 114 

I hereby certify that the foregoing is a transcript from the records of said city of Concord. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY 
City Clerk. 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Assessors, board of, report of 333 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 401 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 431 

City clerk, report of 296 

government, departments, personnel of, 1922 33 

assessors 36 

board of aldermen 33 

board of public works 34 

building inspector 43 

cemetery committees 45 

clerk 34 

collector of taxes 36 

commissioners of cemeteries 46 

committees of board of aldermen 35 

culler of staves 48 

drain layers 51 

engineer 36 

fence- viewers 47 

fire department, officers of 42 

health officers 43 

hydrant commissioners 44 

inspector of petroleum 47 

mayor 33 

messenger 36 

overseers of poor 37 

park commissioners 44 

physician, city and assistant 37 

plumbers, board of examiners of 51 

pound-keeper 47 

police department officers and members of police force 38 

public library, trustees of 40 

librarian and assistants 40 

registrar of vital statistics 43 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 37 

sealers of leather 48 

sealer of weights and measures 48 

solicitor 37 

street department, superintendent of streets 36 



524 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 

City superintendent Blossom Hill and Old North cemeteries 46 

superintendent of clocks 43 

superintendent of parks 44 

surveyors of painting 49 

masonry 50 

wood, lumber and bark 50 

treasurer 35 

trustees of trust funds 41 

undertakers 46 

ward officers 52 

water-works, city, commissioners 41 

superintendent 41 

weigher 49 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 48 

Coupon account, statement of * 433 

Debts, recapitulation 456 

Engineer, city, report of 256 

Financial statement 443 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 195 

fire-alarms 197 

roll of members 243 

Highways, report of 264 

History commission report of 301 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 263 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 424 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 54 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 429 

Municipal debt 453 

regulations 2 

Court, report of 332 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 430 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 421 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Physician, city, report of 322 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 427 

Playgrounds and bath 457 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 319 

Police department, report of city marshal 325 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1912 337 

Poor department, report of overseer 298 

Population 463 

Precincts, debts of 455 

Property, city, inventory of 462 

Public library, report of trustees 249 

librarian 250 



INDEX. 525 

PAGE 

Public Works, board of, report of 264 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 303 

contagious diseases 311 

milk inspection, report of 317 

sanitary officer, report of 307 

School reports 57 

Union School District, Albin Prize Medal contest 119 

annual school meeting warrant 133 

annual school meeting 136 

attendance officer 59 

attendance officer, report of 102 

board of education 57 

board of education, report of 61 

census, 1922 103 

clerk 60 

elocutionary contest 114 

English prize essay contest 117 

financial agent, report of 66 

fire drills 127 

graduating classes 124 

high school table of 112 

honor list 121 

honor, roll of 131 

medical inspector 60 

medical inspector, report of 96 

manual training, report of 123 

officers of the district 60 

school nurse 60 

school nurse, report of 99 

scholarship table Ill 

superintendents 59 

superintendent, report of 76 

superintendent, assistant, report of 91 

teachers, list of 105 

transportation routes 120 

Sealer of weights and measures, report of 302 

Sewer department, report of 284 

Solicitor, report of 323 

Tax collectors, report of 339 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 436 

Treasury department, report of 396 

Tree warden 300 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 346 

Trust funds 350 

Trusts, individual, cemetery 358 



526 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 

Vital statistics, tables of 465 

Water department, report of 156 

commissioners, report of 161 

coupon, account of 433 

engineer's report 168 

fire hydrants 178 

investment account 160 

inventory 194 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of 434 

receipts for each year 170 

schedule of pipes and gates 173 

summary of statistics 190 

superintendent, report of 162 

treasurer's condensed statement 169