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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"




Ifiarirttlturi 



M^echttologg 






PROPERTY OF 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

CONCORD, N. H. 

Wvision of (f^fl^^ 



1923 
SEVENTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1923 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




CONCORD. N. H. 
1924 



N 
352.07 
(L74 
(323 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS. 

For Payment of Bills Against the City. 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS OF THE 
MAYOR. 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: 

At this time I want to thank the citizens of Concord 
for the high honor conferred upon me. I am aware of 
the responsibility that the office of chief executive of so 
beautiful a city as Concord carries with it. I have always 
liked Concord and I am glad to say I like its citizens 
also. 

Our city has always enjoyed the reputation of being 
exceptionally clean and visitors invariably remark upon 
this. We should continue to make this reputation pos- 
sible. I believe that strangers within our gates should be 
shown every courtesy so that on leaving Concord they 
will remember the attention shown them and tell others 
about it. 

I have spent considerable time in looking over our 
various departments and I am sure that if our citizens 
would interest themselves sufficiently to do so there 
would be far less criticism. I am willing to admit that 
the entire board should work out its own course. 

Fire Department. 

Our fire department is one of the finest in the country. 
Everything is up to date and is kept in the best of shape. 
It is wholly motorized and under Chief Green who is 
recognized by everyone to be well qualified for the posi- 
tion. 



11 city of concord, 

Police Department. 

Our police department is in good working order but 
conditions vary each year and the time is not far distant 
when changes will be necessary to meet the additional 
demands. There is one thing that occurs to me in speak- 
ing of this department, namely the housing of women 
prisoners. At the present time there is no separate place 
for women prisoners. And unfortunate women should 
have proper care and consideration and I would suggest 
that something be done at once to provide suitable 
quarters for this class of prisoner. I notice that back 
in 1915 when the addition to the police station was built, 
Mayor Hobbs mentioned in his inaugural address that 
there was ample space for this improvement but to date 
nothing has materialized along this line. 

Highway Department. 

The Highway Department is in excellent condition and 
is one of the most complete organizations in the city. 
It is worth one's time to visit the city stable and yard. 
I believe that the time has come when we must do some- 
thing to take care of the snow in winter to make it possi- 
ble for the fire department to work more effectively in 
heavy storms. 

It is important that Concord should have good streets 
but it will be impossible to put them in good condition in 
one or even two years. Whatever work we may do in 
building new roads should be of a permanent nature 
but we must use good judgment in our expenditures. 

Parking. 

Automobiles are becoming so numerous that it is abso- 
lutely necessary to change our parking system. I believe 
it is up to the board to work this out. Many complaints 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. Ill 

have also been received in regard to the dust on Main 
street in the summer time. I believe this condition 
should also be remedied. 

Sewer Department. 

The Civil Engineering and Sewer Department is un- 
der the personal supervision of Mr. Lang, and I hear 
nothing but praise of this department. 

Health Department. 

The Health Department is under the supervision of a 
competent health officer, Mr. Palmer. 

Water Works. 

The City Water Works, as you are well aware, is a 
business proposition, and if you will read the annual 
report you will find that this department is in the hands 
of a competent commission. 

Your net bonded indebtedness in the Water Depart- 
ment on January first, 1920, was $384,000. On January 
first, 1924, this debt was $267,000, making a decrease for 
the four years of $117,000. 

Schools. 

The Schools of our city rank second to none. This T 
am told by outside parties who move here during the 
winter so that their children may attend our schools. 
There has been talk of a new high school building to 
relieve the congested situation. 

The school bonds on January first, 1920, were $185,800. 
On January first, 1924, they were $183,300, making a de- 
crease for the four years of $2,500, but there was $40,000 
in school bonds issued in 1922 so they really paid off" on 
the old bonds the amount of $42,500 in four years. 



iv city op concord. 

Trees. 

Each year the city appropriates a certain amount of 
money for the care of our trees. Recently a survey was 
made by the Chamber of Commerce of the condition of 
our trees. I understand this survey is to be turned over 
to the city. I believe this report should be carefully 
considered and some recommendation made by the board. 
I personally feel that this survey will be of much value 
to the city. 

In looking over our city buildings, it seems to me that 
they need some attention, especially city hall, which, 
to my mind, should always be in the pink of condition. 

It is the duty of each official and employee of the city 
to be courteous and obliging in his or her dealings with 
the public. When visitors come to city hall they should 
feel that they are in a friendly atmosphere, and this 
can be accomplished if each and every person will con- 
sider it a duty as well as a pleasure to see that they are 
made to feel at home. We should be as one large family, 
at the service of the public. There should be no place 
for grouches. We have a non-partisan charter, and I 
have no desire other than to serve my city with this 
board without fear or favor, and I know that every alder- 
man feels as I do, from conversations I have had with 
them. 

Finances. 

You all realize that to successfully manage any busi- 
ness the finances must be looked after carefully. I am 
going to give you briefly figures showing how your city 
stands today as compared with four years ago. 

On January first, 1919, the city of Concord net debt 
was $862,276.37. During the year 1919 it was decreased 
$53,127.25. In 1920 it was decreased $72,020.81. In 1921 
it was decreased $9,655.05. In 1922 it was decreased 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. V 

$11,750. I feel sure when we get the city report for 
1923 yon Avill find that the city's indebtedness was in- 
creased during that year. 

City reports for the last three years indicate that 
financial conditions have not been as satisfactory as they 
were before that time. It is a fact that there were some 
unusual and unexpected expenses to be met. I am not 
blaming anyone for this condition but in order to pro- 
tect the incoming administration I feel that this situation 
should be explained. The city belongs to the citizens 
of Concord, and it is their right to know how things are 
going. In the first place, I think you will agree with me 
when I say that "We should pay for what we have." By 
this I mean our current running expenses. This has 
not been done. In 1921 the tax rate was reduced and the 
city has an increase in its net municipal debt. 

In 1919 the net municipal debt was $204,460.42. It 
was decreased that year $20,992.62. In 1920 it was still 
further decreased $27,948.79. In 1921 it made an in- 
crease of $25,242.06. In 1922 it made a still further in- 
crease of $15,390.28 plus $18,826 due the State on the $2 
poll tax which was not set up as a liability. For Januarj^ 
first, 1924, the only figures that I can give you are that 
of a note which remains unpaid in the amount of $75,000, 
and approximately $65,000 which is due to the Union 
School District with about $84,000 in uncollected taxes to 
be credited to this amount. I find from the city reports 
that the municipal government has gone behind in its 
running expenses for the last three years nearly $125,000. 

The city charter provides that all city departments, 
except police and fire, shall work nine hours a day. At 
present city hall is open in the morning at nine o'clock, 
closed for lunch betAveen the hours of 12 and 2 P. M., and 
is then open until 5 P. M. One day recently I visited the 
city hall at 1.15 P. M. and found nine people in the 
corridors waiting to get into various departments. Of 
course they had 45 minutes to wait. I believe we should 



vi CITY OF CONCORD. 

be open continuously from 9 A. M. to 5 P. M. Why should 
we not be as conscientious in regard to the city's busi- 
ness as we are with our own? 

I hope and feel sure that we can work together har- 
moniously, and with this experienced board of aldermen 
we should be able to give the city a good administration. 

I want to thank Mayor Chamberlin and all others who 
so willingly co-operated to help me get started. 

WILLIS H. FLINT, Mayor. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS. 

Passed During the Year Ending January 14, 1924. 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES. 

An Ordinance in amendment of the Ordinance relating 
TO the regulation of street traffic. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That the first paragraph of Section 12, Article 
IV, of the ordinance relating to the regulation of street traffic 
be amended, by striking out said paragraph and inserting in 
place thereof the following: "No vehicle licensed to carry 
passengers under Chapter XXXIV, of the City Ordinances, 
shall park on Main Street, or Pleasant, Warren, School and 
Capitol Streets from Main to State Streets, between the hours 
of 7 A. M., and 11 P. M., longer than to discharge or take on 
passengers, unless in actual service, provided however, that 
the City Marshal may, upon notice to him by one or more owners 
or operators of said vehicles, that the designated parking space 
on Pleasant Street Extension is unsafe, by reason of ice, snow, 
or other conditions, permit said vehicles to park on Main 
Street, until in his judgment such unsafe condition is termi- 
nated," so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Section 12. No vehicle licensed to carry passengers under 
Chapter XXXIV, of the City Ordinances, shall park on Main 
Street, or Pleasant, Warren, School, and Capitol Streets from 
Main to State Streets, between the hours of 7 A. M., and 11 
P. M., longer than to discharge or take on passengers unless in 
actual service, provided however, that the City Marshal may, 
upon notice to him by one or more owners or operators of 
said vehicles, that the designated parking space on Pleasant 
Street Extension is unsafe, by reason of ice, snow, or other 
conditions, permit said vehicle to park on Main Street until 
in his judgment such unsafe condition is terminated. 

"Pleasant Street, beginning 10 feet east from the east line 
of Main Street and the south side of Park Street as far west 
as the prolongation of the east line of the lot of St. Paul's 
Church, are hereby designated as parking places for said 
vehicles, and reserved for such purpose." 

Sect. 2. The City Clerk shall publish the provisions of 
this ordinance in accordance with the requirements of Section 
14, Chapter 119, Laws of 1921. 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsis- 
tent herewith are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall 
take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 12, 1923. 



An Ordinance abolishing certain precincts. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. The Garbage Precinct, the City Street Light- 
ing Precinct, the Penacook or School District No. 20 Street 
Lighting Precinct, the West Concord Street Lighting Precinct, 
the City Sewer Precinct, the East Concord Sewer Precinct, 
the Penacook Sewer Precinct, the St. Paul's School Sewer 
Precinct, the West Concord Sewer Precinct, the City Street 
Sprinkling Precinct and the Penacook or Ward One Street 
Sprinkling Precinct are hereby abolished except in so far as 
it may be necessary to maintain the City Sewer Precinct for 
the purpose of liquidating the indebtedness of said City Sewer 
Precinct, Said City Sewer Precinct shall be definitely abol- 
ished when its present indebtedness is paid in full. 

Sect. 2. All of the activities of the said several precincts 
as heretofore maintained shall be continued at the expense 
of the city under the direction of the Board of Public Works. 

Sect. 3. The records of the several precincts hereby abol- 
ished shall all be deposited in the office of the City Clerk. 

Sect. 4. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsis- 
tent with this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordi- 
nance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 26, 1923. 



An Ordinance amending section 4 of chapter 32 of the 
Revised Ordinances relating to the collection op poll 

TAXES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chapter 32 by striking out 
the words "September 1st" so that said Section 4 shall read as 
follows : 



ORDINANCES. 5 

"Sect. 4. Poll taxes shall be paid to the collector on de- 
mand without previous notice, and if not paid on or before 
July 1st, twenty cents costs shall be added." 

Sect. 2. All ordinance^ or parts of ordinances inconsistent 
with this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall 
take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 23, 1923. 



An Ordinance amending section 3, chapter xl, of the 
Revised Ordinances, relating to fire precinct and 
regulations. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 3, Chapter XL, of the Revised 
Ordinances by adding after the word "proper" in the last line 
the following: "Provided, however, nothing in this section 
shall apply to the erection of dormer windows, bay windows, 
piazzas or porches on buildings already constructed." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1923. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter vi of the Revised 
Ordinances. 

Be it ordaiyied by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follotvs: 

Section 1. Amend Section 1 of Chapter VI of the Revised 
Ordinances by striking out of the same and inserting in place 
thereof the following: 

"Section 1. No person shall break or dig up the pavement, 
ground, or stones in any street, lane, alley, sidewalk or common 
in the city, or erect any staging for building; or place or 
deposit any stone, brick, timber, or other building materials 
thereon, without first obtaining a written license from the 
board of public works, or some person authorized by them to 
grant such license, and complying in all respects with the 
conditions of such license; provided, however, that as to the 
works and system of any gas company, such license shall be 
so obtained prior to any construction, or extension of mains; 
such license shall be obtained from the superintendent of 



6 CITY OP CONCORD. 

streets, or other official designated by the board of public works, 
prior to construction, reconstruction or repair of services; and 
no such license shall be required prior to any emergency work 
necessary to be done immediately to such works and system, 
and in every case of breaking and digging up the pavement, 
ground or stones such Gas Company, or their servants, shall 
not unnecessarily or unreasonably, nor for any unnecessary or 
unreasonable time, obstruct or encumber any street, lane, 
alley, sidewalk or common, and shall at all times be subject to 
the superintendent of streets or city marshal in regard thereto, 
and shall comply with the requirements of the third section of 
this Chapter." 

Sect. 2. Amend said Chapter VI of the Revised Ordi- 
nances by changing the number of section 20 to 21 and inserting 
the following: "Owners of land adjoining a public highway 
desiring to establish or repair any portion of a drive way 
giving access to their land but within the limits of the high- 
way shall petition the board of public works for consent to the 
establishment or repair of such portion of the driveway as lies 
within the limits of the highway. The board of public works 
may give a written license for the establishing or repair of the 
same, but the labor and materials used within the street line 
shall be furnished by the city under the direction of the board 
of public works and the expense thereof shall be paid by the 
petitioner to the city. As a condition of the giving of written 
consent to such work, the board of public works may require of 
the petitioner a deposit of the established cost of the labor and 
materials to be furnished by the city, such deposit to be paid 
to the city in advance of the doing of the work, any unex- 
pended balance to be returned to the petitioner by the city, or 
any deficiency to be paid by the petitioner to the city, upon 
the completion of the work." 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect January 1, 1924, 

Passed November 12, 1923. 



An Ordinance amending section 5 of an ordinance passed 
february 14, 1921, relative to fire protection. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 5 of an Ordinance Providing for 
Fire Protection by striking out the word "Center" wherever 
it appears and inserting the word "Court," and the word 



ORDINANCES. 7 

"Concord" wherever it appears and inserting the word "West" 
so said section as amended shall read as follows: 

"Sect. 5. It shall be the duty of the Chief of the Fire De- 
partment to inspect, or cause to be inspected by such officers 
or members of the Fire Department as he shall designate, as 
often as he shall deem necessary^ all buildings, premises, and 
public and private thoroughfares, and cause to be corrected 
any conditions liable to cause fire, or any violations of the 
provisions of this ordinance; said inspection shall be made at 
least once each month within the limits beginning on the 
main track of the Southern Division of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad at a point in the center line of Court Street extended 
easterly; thence westerly by the center line of said Court 
Street extended and of said Court Street, to the center 
line of North State Street; thence Southerly by the center 
line of North and South State Streets to the center line of 
Fayette Street; thence easterly by the center line of said 
Fayette Street to the center line of South Main Street; 
thence southerly by the center line of South Main Street, to 
the center line of West Street ; thence easterly by the center line 
of West Street extended easterly, to the south bound track of 
the Southern Division of said Boston and Maine Railroad; 
thence northerly by said track to the point of beginning." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 12, 1923. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter XXIII of the 
Revised Ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 11 of Chapter XXIII of the 
Revised Ordinances by striking out the whole thereof and 
inserting the following: 

"Sect. 11. Every person who may desire to enter his 
particular drain into any main or common sewer, may have 
permission to do so at his own expense on written petition to 
and receiving the written consent of the board of public works. 
The labor and materials for connecting such drain from the 
main or common sewer to the line of the public highway shall 
be furnished by the city under the direction of the board of 
public works and the expense thereof shall be paid by the 



8 CITY OF CONCORD. 

petitioner to the city. As a condition of the giving of written 
consent to such work, the board of public works may require of 
the petitioner a deposit of the estimated cost of the labor and 
materials to be furnished by the city, such deposit to be paid 
to the city in advance of the doing of the work, any unexpended 
balance to be returned to the petitioner by the city, or any 
deficiency to be paid by the petitioner to the city, upon the 
completion of the work." 

Sect. 2. Amend said Chapter XXIII by striking out the 
whole of section 12. 

Sect. 3. Amend Section 13 of said Chapter XXIII by strik- 
ing out the whole thereof and inserting the following: 

"Sect. 12. All private drains which are laid under ground 
to connect with the public sewers shall be built and connected 
by some suitable person, who shall have received a license 
from the mayor and aldermen as a layer of drains, and such 
drain layer shall be held responsible for such drains. He shall 
construct such drains in all cases water tight, of imperishable 
materials, and upon secure foundations, as that they shall not 
be liable to settle and crack. He shall make connections with 
the sewer at the points where the city lays the connecting drains 
at the line of the street and not elsewhere except by special 
permission of the board of public works, and such connections 
shall be made in a proper manner, according to instructions 
which may be given him from time to time by said board of 
public works, and in all cases subject to their approval. 

"All changes in direction of drain pipes shall be made grad- 
ually, using curves where necessary, and avoiding sharp angles, 
and the inside of every drain shall be left smooth from end 
to end, and perfectly clean. He shall give the greatest inclina- 
tion to such drain that the circumstances will permit, and in 
no case shall water-closet or kitchen drains be laid with an 
inclination less than one quarter of an inch to the foot, except 
by special permission of the board of public works and upon such 
conditions as they may prescribe. The ends of all pipes not 
to be immediately connected with water-closets, sinks, drain- 
spouts, or catch-basins, must be securely guarded against the 
introduction of sand or earth; and all pipes that must be left 
open to drain cellars, areas, yards, and gardens, must be 
connected with suitable catch-basins of brick, and properly and 
securely trapped. 

"Each licensed drain layer shall perform all work upon 
such drains in the most thorough and workmanlike manner, 
and employ suitable and proper materials and none other. 



ORDINANCES. 9 

and shall provide such drains with such suitable catch-basins, 
traps, and other appurtenances as are required by this chap- 
ter. His license which shall be issued annually may at any 
time be revoked by the mayor and aldermen in case of failure 
to comply with the provisions of this chapter, or whenever in 
their judgment the public interest may require it." 

Sect. 4. Sections 14, 15 and 16 of said Chapter XXIII shall 
be renumbered 13, 14 and 15 respectively. 

Sect. 5. Add to said Chapter XXIII the following: 

"Sect. 16. No repairing or relay of private drains shall 
be made except under the same terms as are herein prescribed 
for the original entrance." 

Sect. 6. Amend Chapter 17 of said Chapter XXIII by 
striking out the whole thereof and inserting the following: 

"Sect. 17. "If any person shall enter or cause to be entered 
any common sewer for the purpose of drainage, or for any other 
purpose, or shall repair or relay any private drain, without 
the permission in writing of the board of public works, or 
shall enter such sewer or drain in a manner different from that 
prescribed by this chapter, or shall obstruct or injure any 
common sewer, he shall, on conviction thereof, be fined not more 
than twenty dollars for each offence." 

Sect. 7. This ordinance shall take effect January 1, 1924. 

Passed November 12, 1923. 



An Ordinance regulating dances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Ald\ermen of the City of Concord, 
as foUovs: 

Section 1. Every person or organization holding a dance 
in this city where a fee or charge is made for dancing or 
admission to the place of dance, notwithstanding that admis- 
sion may be limited to those invited, or that women or certain 
classes of persons may be admitted free, or that the admission 
fee or charge is for a show, exhibition or entertainment fol- 
lowed by a dance with no extra charge for dancing, shall 
prior thereto obtain a written license therefor, from the mayor, 
city clerk, and city marshal who are hereby constituted a 
licensing board. 

Sect. 2. Such license shall specify the time and place of 
the dance. It shall not include more than one place, but may 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

include more than one time, and the times may be expressed 
in general terms such as "Every Tuesday Evening" or "Every 
Evening Except Sunday" or the like. It may be revoked at the 
pleasure of the licensing board. 

Sect. 3. A police officer to be designated by the city mar- 
shal and paid for by the persons or organization holding such 
dance, shall be in attendance at every such dance, unless the 
license expressly states that no police officer is required. 

Sect. 4. A police officer designated and attending such 
dance, or any police officer present, shall preserve order in the 
place or rooms used in connection with such dance, and shall 
stop any disorderly or improper dancing or disorderly conduct 
of any particular individual present, and shall order or remove 
from said place or rooms any person disregarding his in- 
junctions. 

Sect. 5. Minors under the age of eighteen years shall not 
be allovi^ed admittance to such place M^here a dance is being 
held, unless accompanied by parent, guardian, or suitable adult 
chaperone. 

Sect. 6. The license fee for each dance ending after 12 
o'clock midnight, shall be one dollar, and for each dance ending 
on or before 12 o'clock midnight, fifty cents. Said fee, to- 
gether with the fee for the police officer which shall be at 
the price per hour set by the city marshal, shall be paid in 
advance to said city marshal, said fees to be deposited in the 
city treasury and appropriated to the police department at the 
end of each year as earnings of that department. Said 
licensing board may in its discretion issue dance licenses free, 
to organizations, or societies for charitable, educational or other 
benefits. 

Sect. 7. The violation of any of the provisions of this ordi- 
nance shall be punished by a fine not exceeding ten dollars for 
each offence. 

Sect. 8. All ordinances or parts of ordinances inconsis- 
tent herewith are hereby revoked and this ordinance shall 
take effect February 1, 1924. 

Passed January 14, 1924. 



RESOLUTIONS. 11 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Resolution appropriating money for typewriters. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldertmen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of two hundred and twenty dollars ($220) be, 
and the sum hereby is, appropriated for the purchase of a type- 
writer for the assessors' office and one for the city clerk's office, 
said amount to be charged to the account of incidentals and 
land damages. 

Passed February 12, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1922 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1920 
for 1919 taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-two cents ($.22) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 
1922 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 
taxes. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 12, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1922 ON non-resident property sold to the city in 1921 

FOR 1920 TAXES. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of one and 19-100 dollars ($1.19) 
be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed 
in 1922 on non-resident property sold to the city in 1921 for 
1920 taxes. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 12, 1923. 



12 city op concord. 

Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 

within the LIMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby 
ordered to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the 
sewerage precinct of said city, the sum of six thousand thirty- 
five dollars ($6,035) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows: For the payment of interest 
that may become due on precinct bonds, $2,035.00. For bonds, 
$4,000.00. 

Sect. 2, This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 26, 1923. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised for the ensuing financial year for the 
use of the city. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, on the polls and ratable estates within said city, 
the sum of two hundred and sixty thousand dollars ($260,000.00) 
to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the city for 
the ensuing financial year, which, together with the sums 
which may be raised by taxes on railroads and from other 
sources, shall be appropriated as follows: 

For payment of interest on bonds $4,940.00 

For payment of interest on temporary loans 3,000.00 

For payment of interest on Cemetery Trust funds 1,826.17 
For payment of interest on Soucook River Improve- 
ment notes 750.00 

For City Hall bonds 5,000.00 

For Bridge bonds 4,000.00 

For Soucook River Improvement note 8,000.00 

For payment on Cemetery Trust fund note 5,000.00 

For support of city poor 3,000.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 13 

For incidentals and land damages $12,500.00 

For salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,905.00 

For printing and stationery 5,000.00 

For aid, Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 3,000.00 

For aid, New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 1,000.00 

For aid, Concord District Nursing Association .... 300.00 

For aid, Penacook District Nursing Association .... 50.00 

For aid. Concord Charity Organization Society.... 350.00 

For Memorial Day 460.00 

For aid, E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R 450.00 

For open air concerts 550.00 

For Blossom Hill Cemetery 14,000.00 

For Old North Cemetery 700.00 

For Maple Grove Cemetery 200.00 

For Pine Grove Cemetery 50.00 

For Millville Cemetery 125.00 

For Horse Hill Cemetery 10.00 

For Soucook Cemetery 30.00 

For Woodlawn Cemetery 25.00 

For parks 5,500.00 

For playgrounds and bath 2,800.00 

For care of trees 4,500.00 

For eradication of White Pine Blister 1,000.00 

For repairs of buildings 1,500.00 

For celebration of Ter-centenary of New Hampshire 1,200.00 



r,721.17 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Salary, sanitary officer $2,000.00 

Up-keep of automobile 400.00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Contagious diseases 1,000.00 

Incidentals 1,500.00 



$5,000.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $29,550.00 

Special and traffic officer 3,800.00 

Fuel 1,200.00 

Repairs buildings 500.00 

Lights 300.00 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Supplies automobile $1,135.00 

Motor cycle 245.00 

Incidentals 2,500.00 



$39,230.00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Salaries $4,300.00 

Incidentals 2,700.00 



$7,000.00 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 



Salary engineer $2,400.00 

Salary assistants 2,400.00 

Incidentals 325.00 



$5,125.00 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

General maintenance, roads and bridges $115,000.00 

Sprinkling streets 7,700.00 

Collection of garbage 24,000.00 

Lighting streets 26,400.00 

Sewers 10,870.60 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Salaries $28,974.00 

Salaries, semi-annual 10,245.00 

Rent Veterans' Association 210.00 

Forage 600.00 

Fuel and lights 3,050.00 

Horse hire and shoeing 1,600.00 

Horses and new equipment 500.00 

Fire alarm 1,500.00 

Fire alarm, Penacook 400.00 

Supplies auto combination 400.00 

Fire inspection 450.00 

Laundry 100.00 

New hose 2,600.00 

Incidentals 6,500.00 

$57,129.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 15 



SALARIES. 



Mayor $2,000.00 

City Clerk 1,400.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works 200.00 

Overseers of Poor 390.00 

Solicitor 800.00 

Treasurer 1,225.00 

Messenger 1,200.00 

City Physicians 700.00 

Care, City Clocks 110.00 

Assessors 3,800.00 

Supervisors and Inspectors of Elections 2,064.00 

Moderators and Ward Clerks 720.00 

Judge, Municipal Court 1,200.00 

Clerk, Municipal Court 500.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 720.00 

Collector of Taxes 4,000.00 



$21,029.00 



Sect. 2. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised, a tax of three and 50-100 dollars ($3.50) on each 
thousand dollars of the value of the ratable estates taxable w^ith- 
in said city for the support of the public schools, which, together 
vi^ith the income of the Abial Walker fund shall be appro- 
priated and divided among the school districts according to the 
valuation thereof. 

There shall also be raised a sum equal to two dollars ($2.00) 
for each child residing in the city who was enrolled in the 
public schools in the last preceding school year. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 
for the cemeteries of the city one-half of the income from the 
sale of lots and the income derived for the care of lots and 
grading, which sums shall be deposited by the superintendent, 
or others receiving them, in the city treasury. The care of lots 
for which the city holds trust funds shall be paid from the 
money appropriated for the care of cemeteries, and so much 
of the income of these trust funds as may be thus expended 
shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close of the year 
and the remainder in each instance credited to the individual 
fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

for the use of the public library in the purchase of books the 
amount collected for fines. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 9, 1923. 



Resolution transferring fifteen hundred fifty-seven and 
30-100 dollars of the income from the eastman li- 
brary fund to the principal of said fund for the 

LIBRARY. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldertiven of tlie City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of fifteen hundi-ed fifty-seven 
and 30-100 dollars ($1,557.30) of the income from the Eastman 
Library Fund, be and hereby is, transferred to the principal of 
said fund for the Library. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 9, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money for the purchase of hose 

FOR the fire department. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of tv(^enty-six hundred dollars ($2,600.00) be, 
and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of hose 
for the Fire Department, said sum to be expended under the 
direction of the Committee on Fire Department. 

Passed May 14, 1923. 



Resolution authorizing the purchase of an automobile for 
the use of the chief of the fire department. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of sixteen hundred dollars be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 



RESOLUTIONS. 17 

otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of an automobile for 
the use of the chief of the fire department, said sum to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the Committee on Fire Depart- 
ment. 

Passed May 14, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money for white park ball 

GROUND. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldervven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300.00) be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated for ball grounds, two hundred 
dollars ($200.00) to be used at White Park Ball Ground and 
one hundred dollars ($100.00) at Rollins Park Playground, 
said sums to be expended under the direction of the Committee 
on White Park Ball Ground. 

Passed May 14, 1923. 



Resolution providing for a discount on taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderm>eyi of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a discount of two per cent. (2%) shall be allowed on 
all taxes assessed for the year 1923, which are paid within 
ten days from the date of the tax bills. 

Passed May 14, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating $11,800 for highway department. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderrmen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That an additional sum of $11,800 be appropriated for the 
Highway Department to fulfill the contract with Colburn Con- 
struction Co., for the improvement of Washington Street, Ward 
One, at an estimated expense of $9,000, also for tar tops for 



18 CITY OP CONCORD. 

North State Street, Walker to Franklin Street, $500, South 
State Street, Perley to South Main Street, $600, East Penacook 
Street through East Concord Village, $1,700, caused by extra 
expense of snow removal. 
Passed June 11, 1923. 



Resolution in favor of leon f. savoy. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one hundred thirty-two dollars and eighty 
cents ($132.80) be and the same is hereby appropriated out 
of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for 
the benefit of Leon F. Savoy. 

Passed June 11, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to purchase additional 

LAND for WOODLAWN CEMETERY. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to purchase land for an addition 
to Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Passed June 11, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 

1922 ON REAL estate SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1922 FOR 1921 

taxes. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of nine hundred forty- three and 
28-100 dollars ($943.28) be, and the same is hereby, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
piated, to pay taxes assessed in 1922 on real estate sold to the 
city in 1922 for 1921 taxes. 



RESOLUTIONS. 19 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
pay to the collector of taxes said amount of nine hundred forty- 
three and 28-100 dollars ($943.28.) 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1922 on real estate sold to the city in 1921 for 1920 

TAXES. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of five hundred thirty-seven and 
64-100 dollars ($537.64) be, and the same is hereby appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay taxes assessed in 1922 on real estate sold to 
the city in 1921 for 1920 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of five hundred thirty- 
seven and 64-100 dollars ($537.64.) 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 

1922 ON REAL estate SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1920 FOR 1919 
TAXES. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred thirty-three and 
94-100 dollars ($133.94) be, and the same is hereby, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay taxes assessed in 1922 on real estate sold to the 
city in 1920 for 1919 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of one hundred thirty- 
three and 94-100 dollars ($133.94). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1923. 



20 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 

1922 ON REAL estate SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1919 FOR 1918 
TAXES. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderm^en of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of ninety-three and 54-100 dollars 
($93.54) be, and the same is hereby appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes 
assessed in 1922 on real estate sold to the city in 1919 for 1918 
taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of ninety-three and 54-100 
dollars ($93.54). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 

1922 ON REAL estate SOLD TO THE CITY IN 1918 FOR 1917 
TAXES. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldertrmn of the City of Coyicord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of forty-one and 44-100 dollars 
($41.44) be, and the same is hereby appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes 
assessed in 1922 on real estate sold to the city in 1918 for 1917 
taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
pay to the collector of taxes said amount of forty-one and 44- 
100 dollars ($41.44). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1923. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

deed to property formerly owned by fanny B. CAMPBELL. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermten of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quitclaim deed of property formerly belonging to Fanny B. 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 

Campbell on the Sheep Road, Ward 8, known as Lot No. 4724, 
Map C, Assessor's Map, sold to the city for taxes at a price 
to include all taxes and costs assessed against said property. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage 

Passed July 9, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of six thousand dollars 

FOR incidentals AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of six thousand dollars ($6,000) be and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed August 13, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 

FOR printing and STATIONERY. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed August 13, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money for sewers. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of three thousand dollars ($3,000) be and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for sewers. 

Passed August 27, 1923. 



22 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating eight hundred nineteen and 45-100 
dollars ($819.45) to pay for real estate sold to the city 
of concord for unpaid taxes for the year 1922. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
as follows: 

That the sum of eight hundred nineteen and 45-100 dollars 
($819.45) be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the 
amount due to the City of Concord for real estate purchased at 
the tax collector's sale of real estate for the unpaid taxes for the 
year 1922. 

Passed September 10, 1923. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a deed to 

LOUISE H. FOLSOM. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the mayor is authorized to execute and 
deliver to Louise H. Folsom a quitclaim deed of all the city's 
right, title and interest in the land lying between the new layout 
of Dunklee Street this day made and the land of the said Louise 
H. Folsom. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon receipt from 
the Henry P. Lamprey heirs of deeds on which the city holds 
an option. 

Passed September 10, 1923. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

DEED to PROPERTY FORMERLY OWNED BY JOHN M. CARTER. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quitclaim deed of property formerly belonging to John M. 
Carter, Ward 8, being lot No. 4726, as shown on Map C in the 



RESOLUTIONS. 23 

City Engineer's Office, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to 
include all taxes and costs assessed against said property. 
Passed September 10, 1923. 



Resolution authorizing the issue of $50,000 serial bonds 

FOR the permanent IMPROVEMENT OF CITY STREETS AND 
HIGHWAYS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That pursuant to the Municipal Bonds Act, 1895 and the 
Laws of 1917, Chapter 129, the city treasurer is hereby author- 
ized and directed to issue $50,000 Serial Bonds of the City of 
Concord for the purpose of constructing public improvements 
of a permanent nature consisting of the construction or recon- 
struction of streets and highways within the city. The said 
bonds shall be coupon bonds, shall be dated November 1, 1928, 
shall be paid in five equal annual payments the first payment 
to become due one year from the date of the bonds and shall 
bear such rate of interest and shall be payable at such place 
as shall be fixed by the city treasurer. The proceeds derived 
from the sale of the said bonds shall be expended under the 
supervision of the Board of Public Works. 

Passed October 16, 1923. 



Resolution for the appropriation of seven hundred dollars 

TO settle the claim of JOSEPH E. NORMANDEAU. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follotvs : 

That the sum of seven hundred dollars ($700) is hereby 
appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated for the purpose of paying the city's share of the 
judgment entered in the Superior Court in compromise of the 
suit of Joseph E. Normandeau against the Town of Pembroke 
and the City of Concord, said sum to be charged to the account 
of Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Passed November 12, 1923. 



24 city of concord. 

Resolution in favor of mattie e. drew. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one hundred and eighty-three dollars and 
thirty cents ($183.30) be and the same is hereby appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
for the benefit of Mattie E. Drew. 

Passed November 12, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money to provide suitable places 
for skating and ice sports, in concord, winter of 1923- 
1924. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of two hundred dollars be and 
the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of providing 
suitable places for skating and ice sport in Concord, during the 
Winter of 1923-1924, said money to be expended under the 
direction of the Committee on Playgrounds. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 13, 1923. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to sign a quitclaim 
deed for land sold to the city for taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the Mayor be authorized to execute a quitclaim deed 
for lots No. 29 and No. 40 Plan No. 12 Concord Land and Water 
Power Co., City Engineer's Plan No. 6285 and 6284, also lots 
Nos. 1, 2 and 3, plan, Merrimack County Records, Book No. 209, 
Page No. 519, sold to the city for taxes at a cost to include all 
taxes and costs against said property. 

Passed November 13, 1923. 



resolutions. 25 

Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
$300,000 OF the city of concord, n. h. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldervven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the resolution of the Board of Aldermen passed on the 
eighth of January, 1923, relating to a temporary loan not ex- 
ceeding $300,000 for the expense in anticipation of taxes for 
the municipal year, be and the same is hereby amended to read 
as follows: "That the Committee on Finance is hereby author- 
ized to borrow on the credit of the City, the sum not to exceed 
$300,000 for the expense in anticipation of the taxes for the 
municipal year 1923 and to issue notes of the City therefor, 
upon such terms and for such amount as the Committee shall 
determine, the said loan to be payable from the taxes for the 
said municipal year and the said Committee on Finance is 
hereby authorized to refund all or any of the said notes at 
their maturity, provided, however, that the refunding notes 
shall be payable within one year after the date of the incurrence 
of the debt represented by the note or notes refunded. 

Passed November 26, 1923. 



Resolution relating to the buildings on the land purchased 

FOR AN addition TO WOODLAWN CEMETERY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the Trustees of the Woodlawn Cemetery Association 
be and hereby are authorized to collect the rents already 
accrued and in the future to accrue from the buildings and 
land recently bought for an addition to Woodlawn Cemetery 
and to use the net proceeds thereof for the purposes of the said 
Cemetery; and that they further be and hereby are authorized 
in their discretion to make a sale of the said buildings at 
such price and at such time as they may deem best, and use 
the proceeds of such sale for the purposes of the said Cemetery. 

Passed December 28, 1923. 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating money for a municipal Christ- 
mas TREE. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125) be, 
and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for a municipal Christmas 
tree celebration; said appropriation to be expended under the 
direction of the mayor and the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings. 

Passed December 10, 1923. 



Resolution in favor of joseph d. Kennedy. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of thirteen dollars and sixty-one cents ($13.61) 
be and hereby is appropriated for the benefit of Joseph D. Ken- 
nedy in settlement of his claim for the refunding of a permit 
charge mistakenly paid by him in October, 1921, the same to 
be charged to the account of Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Passed December 28, 1923. 



Resolution appropriating money for deficiencies in the 
several departments. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of eleven thousand forty-two and 
50-100 dollars ($11,042.50) be, and hereby is, appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
to pay outstanding claims as follows: 

City Poor $822.27 

Fire Department 1,263.55 

Incidentals and Land Damages 2,508.50 

Police and Watch 169.91 

Printing and Stationery 357.61 



RESOLUTIONS. 27 , 

Salaries $1,522.18 

Interest, Temporary Loans 4,398.48 



$11,042.50 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Highway Department for the year 1923, the sum of thirty-six 
hundred ninety-two and 15-100 ($3,692.15) the same being the 
earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Fire Department for the year 1923, the sum of three hundred 
eighteen and 97-100 dollars ($318.97), the same being the earn- 
ings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Trees for the year 1923, the sum of four hundred three and 
92-100 dollars ($403.92), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1924. 



Resolution transferring the unexpended income of mill- 

VILLE cemetery FUND TO THE ACCOUNT OF SAID CEMETERY. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is authorized to trans- 
fer the sum of four hundred seventy-three and 40-100 dollars 
($473.40) from the unexpended income of Millville Cemetery 
Fund to the account of Millville Cemetery. 

Passed January 14, 1924. 



Resolution transferring the unexpended income of pine 

GROVE cemetery FUND TO THE ACCOUNT OF SAID CEMETERY. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Alderman of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is authorized to 
transfer the sum of three hundred eighty-two and 01-1010 
dollars ($382.01) from the unexpended income of Pine Grove 
Cemetery Fund to the account of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Passed January 14, 1924. 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution transferring the unexpended income of maple 

GROVE cemetery FUND TO THE ACCOUNT OF SAID CEMETERY. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldenmen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city treasurer be, and hereby is authorized to trans- 
fer the sum of three hundred ninety-nine and 89-100 dollars 
($399.89) from the unexpended income of Maple Grove Ceme- 
tery Fund to the account of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Passed January 14, 1924. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1923. 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January 1922. 



EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT. 

MAYOR. 

Salary, $2,000 per annum. 

HON. HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN. 

Office: City Hall, Room 4. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

Aldermenat-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Acccants 
and Claims. 

Aldermen-at-Large. 

Term Expires January, 1924. 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Morton Street 

FREDERICK I. BLACKWOOD, 94 South Street 

ARISTIDE L. PELTSSIER, 150 South Main Street 

Term Expires January, 1926. 

ROBERT W. BROWN, 3 Cambridge Street 

RICHARD A. BROWN, 55 Jackson Street 

FRANK R. STRONG, 16 South Spring Street 



30 



Ward 1- 
Ward 2- 
Ward 3- 
Ward 4- 

Ward 5- 
Ward 6- 
Ward 7- 
Ward 8- 
Ward 9- 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

Ward Aldermen. 

-HARRY F. JONES, Penacook 

-JOHN H. MORRILL, East Concord 

-OTTO ANDERSON, West Concord 

-*CHARLES L. MASON, 46 Washington Street 
**GEORGE G. PRESCOTT, 42 No. State Street 
-WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 84 School Street 

-GEORGE H. CORBETT, 20 Elm Street 

-CHARLES J. McKEE, 7 Badger Street 

-ADOLPHE BOISVERT, 93 So. Main Street 
-JAMES McGUIRE, JR., 212 No. State Street 



CITY CLERK. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

Office: City Hall, Room 3. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, Term expires January, 1924 

FRED'K L BLACKWOOD, '' " " 1924 

ARISTIDE L. PELISSIER, " " " 1924 

ROBERT W. BROWN, " '' " 1926 

RICHARD A. BROWN, " " " 1926 

FRANK R. STRONG, '' *' ** 1926 



*Died June 26, 1922. 
**Elected to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 31 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN. 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Brunei, Prescott, McKee. 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Stevens, Pelissier, Blackwood. 
On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen R. A. Brown, Boisvert, Morrill. 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Anderson, Boisvert, Brunei. 
On Finance — Mayor, 

Aldermen R. A, Brown, Stevens, Pelissier, Corbett. 
On Fire Department — 

Aldermen Strong, Anderson, McGuire. 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen R. W. Brown, McKee, Jones. 
On Police and License — 

Aldermen R. W. Brown, Morrill, Prescott. 
On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Blackwood, Strong, Jones. 
Committee on Playgrounds and Bath — 
Aldermen Brunei, Stevens, Jones, Morrill, Mrs. Cora M. 
Sullivan, Miss Elsie L. Johnson, Richard T. Smith. 



CITY TREASURER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $25 
as Treasurer of Cemeteries. 

•CARL H. FOSTER. 

Office: First National Bank. 



CITY ENGINEER. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,400 per 

annum. 

FRED W. LANG. 

Office: City Hall. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY MESSENGER. 

muary by Board of Aldermer 
annum. 

EDWAKD M. PROCTOR. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary $1,200 per 

annum. 



COLLECTOR OP TAXES. 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to 
satisfaction of the board. Salary, one-half of one per centum upon the first 
$100,000 : three-fourths of one per centum upon all sums over $100,000. 

WOODBURY E. HUNT. 

Office: City Hall. 



ASSESSORS. 

Salary, $1,200 per annum. Clerk, $2,000 per annum. 
Office: Room 5, City Hall. 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1928 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1926 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " '* " 1924 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 

Salary, $3,000. 

ORRIN W. HEAD. 

Office: City Hall. 



SANITARY OFFICER AND INSPECTOR OF 
PLUMBING. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per 

annum. 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Office: City Hall. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 33 

CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $600 per 

annum. 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK. 

Office: 37 Green Street. 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per 

annum. 

DR. E. U. SARGENT. 

Office: Penacook. 



CITY SOLICITOR. 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per 

annum. 



ELWIN L. PAGE. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. 

Ward :/— HARRY F. JONES, Penacook. 

Salary, $30 per annum. 

Ward 5— JOHN H. MORRILL, East Concord. 

Salary, $10 per annum. 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 5— ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Hall. 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

HARRY J. BROWN. 

Office: Police Station. 



SPECIAL POLICE JUSTICE. 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $3 per day of actual service. 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS. 



CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT. 

Appointed by Justice. Salary, $500 per annum. 

JOHN W. STANLEY. 



CITY MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $2,300 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL. 

Office: Police Station. 



ASSISTANT MARSHAL. 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,000 per 

annum. 

VICTOR I. MOORE. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 35 

REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH. 

Appointed by City Marshal, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. 
Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,680 per annum for first year, and $1,800 per 
annum thereafter. 

Samuel L. Bachelx»er, Captain of Night Watch. 

Salary, $1,850 per annum. 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant. 

Salary, $1,825 per annum. 

Irving B. Robinson, Samuel Redd, 

George H. Silsby, J. Edward Silva, 

John B. Long, Fred N. Harden, 

James J. Halligan, F. Scott Rogers, 

Arthur W. Mclsaac, Cleveland H. Curtis. 

Eugene G. Densmore, Abraham D. Cushing, Chauffeurs. 



SPECIAL RESERVE OFFICERS. 

Thomas P. Davis, Captain and Drill Master. 

W. A. Little, Joseph A. Flanders, 

Elmer Trombley, John McGirr, 

Jonas Welcome, Willie A. Flanders, 

Thomas M. Harrison, Walter H. Beane. 

Nelson Forest, Nelson E. Strong, 

George H. Abbott, Galen W. Hunter. 

George M. Dooley, John P. Walsh. 
Alfred J. Fraser, 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



TRUSTEES. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— *FRANK P. CURTIS. 

**OSCAR H. WOODWARD. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward e— THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward S— PERLEY B. PHILLIPS. 
Ward P— WILLIAM J. AHERN, JUNIOR. 



LIBRARIAN. 

Elected annually by trustees of library. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

GRACE BLANCHARD. 



ASSISTANTS. 

Salary, $800 per annum. 

CLARA F. BROWN. HELEN C. CLARKE. 

MARY W. DENNETT. 

Salary, $700 per annum. 

BERTHA N. CARR. 



"Died December 2, 1923. 
"*Appointed to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



37 



CITY WATER WORKS. 



WATER COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Office: Room 1, City Hall. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 

FRANK P. QUIIMBY, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
N. E. MARTIN, 
H. H. DUDLEY, 
OLIVER J. PELREN,* 
MELVIN L. TOWLE,** 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 

President — N. E. Martin. 

Clerk — Burns P. Hodgman 



Term expires 


March 31, 1924 




1924 




1925 




1925 




1926 




1926 




1927 




1927 




1927 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS. 



Appointed by Board of "Water Commissioners. Salary, 
Term tinlimited. 

PERCY R. SANDERS. 

Office: City Hall. 



5,800 per annum. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, Term expires January, 1924 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, " " " 1925 

CARL H. FOSTER, " " " 1926 



"Died June 3, 1923. 
"*Appointed to fill vacancy. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT, 



CHIEF ENGINEER. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,600 per annum. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN. 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT. 

Salary, $145 each per annum. 

WALTER J. COFFIN. 
SYLVESTER T. FORD. 

FOR PENACOOK. 

Salary, $75 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 

FOR EAST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

C. E. ROBINSON. 

FOR WEST CONCORD. 
Salary, $20 per annum. 

GEORGE W. KEMP. 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annam. 

M. J. LACROIX. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 39 

SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, Chief, ex-officio. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS. 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum. 

MERVIN E. BANKS. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio, 
DR. SIBLEY G. MORRILL. 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

Office: City Hall. 



40 cirr of concoed. 

BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS. 



No salary. 



FRED W. LANG, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 

BEN C. WHITE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, JR., 
GARDNER B. EMMONS,* 
WILL J. DREW,** 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 
CHARLES P. BANCROFT,! 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN,** 



Term expires 


January, 


1924 










1924 


1 








1925 










1925 










1925 










1926 




i i i 






1926 




i ( i 






1926 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS. 
FRANK ATKINSON. 



*Died September 22, 1923. 
tDied December 14, 1923. 
** Appointed to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 41 

CEMETERY COMMITTEES. 



One from each ward (except Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7, consoli- 
dated) appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward 1. 

WALLACE C. HOYT, Term expires January, 1924 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD, " " " 1925 

CHARLES H. SANDERS, " " " 1926 



Ward 2. 

C. A. CHAMBERLIN, Term expires January, 1924 

CHARLES T. STANIELS, " " " 1925 

SCOTT FRENCH, " '' '' 1926 



Ward 3. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER, Term expires January, 1924 
ROYAL D. HOLDEN, " " " 1925 

MATHEW H. PEABODY, " '' " 1926 



Ward 7. 

J. NEWTON ABBOTT, Term expires January, 1924 

ALBERT S. TRASK, " '' " 1925 

FRANK G. PROCTOR, " '' " 1926 



Ward 8. 

BENJAMIN J. PRESCOTT, Term expires January, 1924 
ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, " " " 1925 

ALMAH C. LEAVITT, " " " 1926 



42 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES. 

For Wards 4, 5, 6, 9, and part of Ward 7. 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 



HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio, 

HERBERT G. ABBOTT, 
MILAN D. CUMMINGS, 
FRED W. LANG, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 
CHARLES G. REMICK, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 



Term expires March, 1924 
1924 
1925 
1925 
1926 
1926 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES. 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 



UNDERTAKERS. 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FOR old north and BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERIES. 

GEORGE W. WATERS, 
HAMILTON A. KENDALL, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY, 
FRANK J. KELLEY, 
WILLIAM H. HOYT. 
JOHN F. WATERS. 



FOR WOODLAWN CEMETERY, PENACOOK. 

OLIVER J. FIFIELD. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 43 

FOR EAST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

SCOTT FRENCH. 

FOR WEST CONCORD CEMETERY. 

LEWIS S. PARMENTER. 

FOR MILLVILLE CEMETERY. 

JOSEPH N. ABBOTT. 

FOR SOUCOOK CEMETERY. 

BENJAMIN J. PRESCOTT. 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by 
owner of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TIBBETTS. 



FENCE VIEWERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

FRED W. LANG, 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS. 
ALFRED CLARK. 



POUND KEEPER. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents 
each for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



44 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SEALERS OF LEATHER. 

Appointed annually iu January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE, 
FRANK E. GALE. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, $720. 

FRED S. PENDLETON. 

OiRce: 11 Court Street. 



CULLER OF STAVES. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 34 cents; pipe staves, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — 
paid by party for whom culling is done. 

FRED H. PERLEY. 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring 
service. 

Arthur G. Stevens, Fred I. Rolfe, 

Everett L. Davis, "William J. Mullen, 

Hallett E. Patten, Henry A. Brown, 

Arthur N. Day, Charles E. Hardy, 

James F. Fitzgerald, H. T. Ross, 

John H. Flanders, C. H. Staniels, 

Fred H. Perley, Frank J. Clancy, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



45 



William H. Meserve, 
G. W. Love joy, 
Alphonse King, 
John S. Chandler, 
R, E. Sanderson, 
"William Gooden, 
Guy Rowell, 
Arthur F. Carr, 
Frank Jutras, 
Otis Lynch, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 
Archie Black, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
E. W. Saltmarsh, 
R. W. Gordon, 
Fred E. Wattles, 
Edward Watkins, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
J. A. Provost, 
John White, 
Nelson Forrest, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
W, A. Flanders, 
J. F. McCauley, 
J. S. Callahan, 
Harold C. Lee, 
T. Mulligan, 
C. E. Boardman, 
Frank Edmunds, 
William Arthur Stevens, 



Thomas Murphy, 
W. J. Callahan, 
W. L. Fenton, 
Clarence S. Anderson, 
C. H, Hanson, 

C. J. Roers. 
James B. Riley, 
Charles F. Jenks, 
Roger W. Fowler, 
Charles E. Cook, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brawn, 
Earl Woodbury, 
Robert C. Jewell, 
John Nyhan, 

S. A. Clark, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
J. W. Currier, 
G. W. Hunter, 
F. W. Morgan, 

D. C. Taylor, 
A. M. Follett. 
John E. Coulter, 
H. L. Barnard, 
Phillip Desmarais, 
Omar C. Allard, 
L. M. Quimby, 

T. F. O'Neil, 
J. T. Turcotte, 
C. G. Rowell, 
Robert A. Ranson, 
Thomas Harrison, 
Stillman H. Clough, 
Everett Gagnon, 



46 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



CITY WEIGHER. 

WILLIAM A. KELLEY. 

Office: Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Moses E. Haines. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per 
cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person 
employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
William Pierce, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
William E. Virgin, 



John Rolfe, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Oliver Reno, 
Silas Wiggin, 
F. E. Frost, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
B. J. Prescott, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Charles H. Swain, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



47 



Oliver J. Fifield, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Harvey H. Hayward, 
Alfred D. Mayo, 
Louis P. Merrill, 
Joseph Messier, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
Herman C. Colby, 
Edward L. Foster, 
C. H. Osgood, 
Richard J. Hennessey, 
Stacy E. Oliver, 
Harry Walsh, 
Charles A. Bartlett, 
Harry L. Billings, 
Guy F. Avery, 



E. D. Ashley, 
W. F. Frost, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Arthur R. SteM^art, 
Edward R. Foster, 
Irving Burbank, 
John E. Colton, 
Everett Runnells, 
Clifford G. Culver, 
Horace B. Annis. 
Carl F. Mellin, 
Guy F. Avery, 
S. 0. Daigneau, 
Henry J. McCrossan, 
Robert E. Philbrick, 
William T. Tippet, 
Algernon B. Tewksbury. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS. 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Ehner E. Babb, 



W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntin, 



48 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Clarence J. Spead, 
W. J. Sleeper, 
John W. McGowan, 
Henry Morrill, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Joseph A. Normandeau, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Arthur W. Brown, 
Edward E. Beane, 
Robert F. Keane, Jr., 
Victor T. Lauze, 



Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Charles H. Berry, 
Niram M. Kays, 
Wilfred H. Brennan, 
James H. Brannigan, 
E. H. Smart, 
John C. Smith, 
Walter Dow, 
I. J. Huneau, 
Philip W. Clark. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OP PLUMBERS. 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board Of 
Aldermen. No salary. 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
FRED W. LANG, ex-officio, 
WILFRED BRENNAN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 

WARD OFFICERS. 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS. 

Ward i— FRANK P. ROBERTSON, 
ELI LAFLAMME, 
GEORGE F. McGIRR. 

Ward 2—M. J. LACROIX, 

FRED J. CARTER, 
C. E. ROBINSON. 

Ward 5— LAWRENCE W. KNIGHT, 
MARGARET A. DIMOND, 
J. HAROLD JOHNSON. 

Ward 4— HAROLD CHENEY, 
NUTE B. FLANDERS, 
HARRY D. CHALLIS. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
FRANKLIN B. GORDON, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward ^—CHARLES DUNCAN, 

ARTHUR W. STEVENS, 
ERNEST W. SALTMARSH. 

Ward 7— FRANK I. MANNING, 
WALDO S. ROUNDY, 
CLARENCE 0. PHILBRICK. 

Ward 5— FRED SMITH, 
C. C. STUART, 
ALBERT J. AYOTTE. 

Ward 5— PATRICK J. GAVAGHAN, 
DENNIS J. KENNEY, 
FRANK J. SPAIN. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD CLERKS, 

Ward j!— JOHN B. DODGE. 

Ward 5— FRANK P. CURTIS. 

Ward 5— EARL N. WOODBURY. 

Ward 4— WILLIAM B. McINNIS. 

Ward 5— EDWARD A. DAME. 

Ward ^— GUY JEWETT. 

Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 

Ward S— GEORGE E. JACOBS. 

Ward P— ANDREW E. SALTMARSH. 



MODERATORS. 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 5— WARREN F. ESTY. 
Ward ^— FRANK C. BLODGETT. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM L. STEVENS. 
Ward ^—ARTHUR E. DOLE. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON. 
Ward S— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 5— PAUL E. CASEY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 51 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 
Under the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in 
December, 1910, for one year, and biennially thereafter in November, be- 
ginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54. 

KUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55. 

JOHN ABBOTT, 1856-'57-'58. 

MOSES T. WILLAED, 1859-'60. 

MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861- '62. 

BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863- '64. 

MOSES HUMPHREY, '65. 

JOHN ABBOTT, 1866-'67. 

LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868-'69. 

ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870- '71. 
JOHN KIMBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75. 

GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876- '77. 

HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878-'79-'80. 

GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880- '81- '82. 
EDGAR H. WOODIVIAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86. 

JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887-'88. 

STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90. 

HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891- '92. 

PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893- '94. 

HENRY ROBINSON, 1895-'96. 

ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900. 

HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02. 

CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903- '08. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- '15. 

NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 1916-'17. 

CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1918- '19. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 1920- '24. 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 

t Term closed in November, 1880. 

J Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1923—1924. 



Harry F. Lake, Esq. 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill 



President 
Secretary 



MEMBERS. 



TERM EXPIRES. 



1924. 



Rev. W, Stanley Emery, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 
Dr. Charles Duncan, 



1925. 



Harry F, Lake, Esq., 
Mrs. Dorothy B. Jackson, 
Mr. Carl H. Foster, 



1926. 



Mr. Bennett Batchelder, 
Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins, 
Mr. Joseph S. Otis. 



110 North State Street 
123 North State Street 
43 South Spring Street 



29 Auburn Street 

35 Liberty Street 

40 Rumford Street 



104 School Street 

24 Union Street 

26 Church Street 



56 



CITY OP CONCORD, 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 



Mr. Foster. 



Mr. Emery. 



Mrs. Elkins. 



Mrs. Jackson. 



Mrs. Morrill. 



Mr. Emery. 



Mr. Batchelder 



Mr. Lake. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Dr. Duncan. 



Mrs. Jackson. 



finance. 
Dr. Duncan. 

HIGH school. 
Dr. Duncan. 



Mr. Batchelder. 



Mr. Lake. 



junior high schools. 

Mr, Foster. ]Mr. Batchelder. 



elementary schools, 
Mr. Otis. 

kindergartens. 
Dr. Duncan. 

rural schools. 
Mrs. Elkins. 

buildings and repairs. 
Mr. Lake. 

discipline. 
Mrs. Morrill. 

HYGIENE. 

Mrs. Morrill. 

manual training. 

Wood and Iron. 

Mr, Batchelder. 

Sewing and Cooking. 
Mrs. Morrill. 



ilR. Emery. 

Mr>^. Jackson. 

Mrs. Jackson. 

Mr. Otis. 

Mr. Emery. 

Mr. Emery. 

Mr. Otis. 
Mrs. Elkins. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 57 

MUSIC. 

Mrs. Morrill. ]\Ir. Batchelder. Mrs. Elkins. 



]\Irs. Elkins. 



DRAWING. 

]Mr. Foster. 



Mrs. Jackson. 



]\[r. Emery. 



text-books. 
^Ir. Lake. 



Mrs. Elkins. 



Mr. Otis. 



training school. 
Mr. Foster. 



Mrs. Jackson. 



Mr. Lake. 



NIGHT school. 

Mr. Otis. 



Mr. Foster. 



building committee for millville school. 

Mr. Otis. Mr. Emery. Mr. Batchelder. 

Dr. Duncan. Mrs. Jackson. 

(Mr. Lake, ex-officio). 

building committee for manual training school. 

Dr. Duncan. ]\Ir. Foster. Mrs. Elkins. 

(Mr. Lake, ex-officio). 



CITIZENS committee. 



Mr. Harry F. Lake, 

Mrs. Dorothy B. Jackson. 

Rev. W. Stanley Emery. 

Mr. Joseph S. Otis. 

Mr. Bennett Batchelder. 



Dr. Samuel S. Drury. 
Mr. Burns P. Hodgman. 
Mr. John S. B. Davie. 
Mr. John D. Bridge. 
Mr. Fred C. Demond. 



58 CITT OF COXCOBD. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS AND FINANCIAL 

AGENT, 

LonS J0H2s RUXDLETT. 

15 Sunmiii Street. Omce : Parker School. 

Hours : 4 to 6 p. m.. school days. Omce open S to 12 a, m., 
1.30 to 6 p. m. Telephones : Office, 132-5 : house. 603K. 



ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Charles TVatermax Walker. 

74 School Street. Office: Parker School 

Hours: 3 to 5 p. m.. school days. Telephone: Office. 1325. 



TREASURER. 

Harbt Lucius Alexander. 

Meehanicks Bank. 12 Auburn Street. Telephone, 63. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER. 

Arthur James Taylor. 

6 Avon Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m.. 1.45 to 2. 4 to 5 p. m. : summer 
vacation. 2 to 4 p. m. Telephone. 1661M. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 59 

CLERKS. 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar. 

4 Rockingham Street. Telephone, 702. 

Erma Pearl Tabor. 

85 Hall Street. Telephone, 534Y. 

OfiSce of Financial Agent, Parker School. 
Office hours: 8.30 to 12 a. m., 1.30 to 5.00 p. m. 



MEDICAL INSPECTOR AND PHYSICAL DIRECTOR. 

Arthur Kehew Day, M. D. 

11 South Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., and 4 to 4.30 p. m. on school days. 
Telephones : Office, 1325 : house, 995W. 



SCHOOL NURSE. 

Helen Young Upham, R. X. 

941/2 South State Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours : 8.30 to 9 a. m., and 4 to 4.30 p. m. on school daj-s. 
Telephones: Office, 1325; house, 565-J. 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT. 

Arthur P. Morrill Moderator 

Ray E. Burkett ...... Clerk 

Henry H. jMetcalf and John P. George . .Auditors 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCA- 
TION. 



To THE Inhabitants of Union School District : 

There have been some changes in the district to which 
attention should be called. At the time of the death of 
Mr. Clayton, Assistant Superintendent of Schools, in the 
latter part of July, and before another assistant superin- 
tendent could be engaged to take up his work, it seemed 
wise to relieve Mr. Rundlett, our Superintendent of 
Schools, of such duties as was possible. For some years 
Mr. Rundlett, at the request of the Board of Education, 
and under its supervision, has acted as financial agent 
of the district, the principal duties of which, aside from 
those falling on all superintendents of schools, was the 
handling of the money of the district, and the paying of 
all bills. Disbursing about one quarter of a million of 
dollars a year mostly in small amounts is obviously no 
small task. 

The Board sought the advice of Elwin L. Page, city 
solicitor, as to its power to appoint an officer to perform 
the duties contemplated, and upon exhaustive and pains- 
taking examination of the matter, he advised the Board 
that it had the power under the special terms of the legis- 
lative enactments creating our school district, to appoint 
an officer to take over these duties, and further that the 
general law of the state providing for the election of a 
treasurer of school districts at their annual meeting as 
one of the usual officers thereof, did not apply to Union 
School District. Mr. Lake, Chairman of the Board, who 
considered the matter with Mr. Page, was in thorough 
accord with this opinion. In consequence thereof, Harry 
L. Alexander, Cashier of the Meehanicks National Bank, 
furnishing suitable bonds, was appointed treasurer of the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 61 

district under proper amendments to the by-laws which 
had formerly been adopted by the Board. Mr. Alexan- 
der is now acting as such treasurer and is performing 
this service for the district without compensation. 

Francis T. Clayton, Assistant Superintendent of our 
schools, died July 29, 1923. He had occupied this po- 
sition in the district for five years. Out of a broad cul- 
ture, remarkable mental attainments and deep earnestness, 
he had given the schools of Concord an unusual service. 
His interest in educational matters was extraordinary. 
This interest and his general ability were recognized by 
his associates of the New Hampshire Teachers' Associa- 
tion, whose representative he was on his uncompleted trip 
to California in the summer of 1923 to attend the meet- 
ings at San Francisco of the National Educational Asso- 
ciation. Being too ill to complete the journey, he turned 
back to Concord, only, by his own force of will, the minis- 
trations of medical attendants, and the aid of loving 
friends, to prolong a painful illness that proved fatal in 
the end. He was always composed and even cheerful 
in the most distressing pain, and possessed a faith 
triumphant over all doubts in the things material and 
spiritual for which he had lived and worked. Those who 
were at all close to him in the days of his last sickness 
knew that his was a rare soul indeed. His death is a 
distinct loss to the educational interests of New Hamp- 
shire. 

After the death of Mr. Clayton, we engaged Charles 
W. Walker, at that time Superintendent of Schools at 
Gorham, N. H., to become our assistant superintendent. 
Mr. Walker we found was well trained for the position, 
and though a young man, had already a record of un- 
broken successes in his work to this time. He began his 
work November 1st, 1923, and has fulfilled all our ex- 
pectations. We commend him to the goodwill and 
favorable attention of the community. We believe his 
work, begun under favorable auspices, will prove of great 
and lasting value to the school district. 



62 CITY OF CONCORD. 

When Dr. C. M. Kelley resigned the position of medi- 
cal inspector in the spring of 1923, we soon thereafter 
engaged Arthur EL Day. M. D.. of Concord, in his stead. 
Dr, Day did not need to become acquainted with this 
community for he had during many years been a phy- 
sician here in successful practice. He had long been 
particularly interested in our schools and has brought 
lo his work not only the training of a physician, but the 
interest of a loyal citizen and one devoted to the best 
interests of young life. "VTithout reservations we say 
that Union School District is fortunate in having Dr. 
Day for its medical inspector. 

With keenest regret we received some weeks ago notice 
from ^liss Luella A. Dickerman that she wished not to 
be re-elected next year principal of Parker School. Miss 
Dickerman has been, in addition to other services as 
teacher in the district for many years, principal of this 
building. The distinction tMs school has attained under 
her leadership, the potent impulses given large numbers 
of boys and girls through the years towards studious 
habits, right personal relations toward life, and the 
development of the proper ideals of citizenship, as testi- 
fied to by many who now occupy honorable and respon- 
sible positions in life, make the services of Miss Dicker- 
man to the district unique indeed. The members of 
this board have personally heretofore expressed their 
feelings of regard to Miss Dickerman in this matter. But 
we desire in this more formal manner and in our official 
report to convey to her again our own respect and genu- 
ine affection for what she has meant to Concord boys and 
girls as well as to convey the grateful appreciation of 
the entire city. 

La the early part of this year a request was received 
from the teachers of the district through the Teachers' 
Association, for a flat increase in salary to the amount of 
S200 a year, each, over existing schedules. At the Feb- 
ruarv meetins of the Board a special committee was 



SCHOOL BEPOBT. 63 

appointed to consider the matter, confer with a commit- 
tee from the Teachers' Association and report to the 
Board. 

Several meetings were held and all pertinent matters 
were gone into exhanstively. 

The last substantial increase in our teachers' salaries 
was in 1919-1920. This was after increased costs had 
entered into the expense of nearly all matters with which 
we are familiar. The teachers' salaries, as a fact, from 
1914 to 1918, were raised only the average sum of $100. 
Looking back now to this fact, it seems most amazing 
that our teachers receiving at that time salaries, not gen- 
erous even according to the standard of the times, exer- 
cised .so great a degree of restraint as not, under the 
pres.s"ure of their own needs and added costs of living, to 
make strenuous demands of the district for greatly in- 
creased salaries. "Vniile up to 1922 the cost of living 
had increased 1055^ as based upon the cost of 1914, our 
teachers' salaries during the same period for their living 
and the laying up of something for the support of later 
years had increased only 66%. 

A careful examination of salaries paid in the cities of 
New Hamp.shire shows that we are paying much less than 
many of them — ^not specifically to mention Manchester, 
which in practically all lines pays so much more than 
we that we cannot expect perhaps ever to equal their 
schedule of salaries. We do not compare favorably 
with other cities of our size in New England. For in- 
stance, English teachers in such cities in all New Eng- 
land States, except Vermont, are receiving from $50 to 
$250 more than our English teachers are receiving in 
Concord. Comparison between Concord and the cities 
throughout the country of our general size, as to teachers' 
salaries is unfavorable to us, for the teachers of both the 
elementary and advanced grades throughout the country 
are receiving salaries of from $200 to $250 on the average 
more than ours at the present time. On the whole show- 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ing we believe our teachers are entitled to an increase in 
salary to begin next school year. No group of citizens 
better than the School Board can know the loyalty and 
ability of our teachers. These characteristics, together 
with length of service and a genuine interest in the wel- 
fare of the community should be rewarded on a money 
basis. Such increase is necessary, because we have to 
meet competition with the other towns and cities in 
New Hampshire, and this general locality where salary 
schedules are advancing. This is especially important 
in the High School group, where in certain departments 
in the last few years an astonishing number of changes 
have been made on account of teachers leaving Concord 
for other places, in most instances on account of increase 
in salaries. Also, the demands made upon the teaching 
force are much greater now than formerly and appar- 
ently are increasing all the while, — among other things 
the regulations of the State Department in regard to 
certificates become increasingly stringent. All these de- 
mands call for a greater expenditure for magazines, 
books, and professional study at summer schools, and 
while there is obviously a benefit in all this to the 
schools and to the teachers, and primarily such benefit is 
the reason for such rules and regulations, nevertheless, 
we cannot close our eyes to the proposition that they all 
cost the teacher money. 

We believe that our teachers should receive increased 
salaries for the following purposes: 

To live on comfortably, to allow the expenditure of 
such sums as are necessary to keep abreast of the times 
in the teaching profession, and to lay by funds on which 
to retire at the proper time. 

We, ourselves, have agreed upon the sum of $150 by 
way of a flat increase to the teachers next year. To 
this, the teachers, after due consideration, have agreed, 
and without reservation we recommend the district to 
provide the necessary funds for the coming year. This 



SCHOOL REPORT. 65 

would involve an addition to the general appropriation 
of thirteen or fourteen thousand dollars. 

The special committee on housing conditions in the 
district asked for by the Board at the last annual meet- 
ing, has reported to the public and the conclusions and 
recommendations of their report have the fullest ap- 
proval of this Board. We do not here wish to review the 
facts found and reported by the joint committee but 
some facts in particular cannot escape attention. Our 
High School is not large enough for our present needs, 
and more crowded and unsatisfactory conditions in this 
respect are imminent. Likewise the Parker School is 
not large enough for our needs at the present time. It, 
too, is badly overcrowded. "We have to use one large 
room in the basement for recitation purposes. 

South of Pleasant Street the grade rooms are badly 
overcrowded, and relief from this condition must be had 
in the immediate future, for it is rapidly becoming in- 
tolerable. 

Additions, at large expense, could be made to the High 
School building, but this would relieve congestion there 
onl3^ Additions could be made at the Parker School, 
in view of the construction there, however, particularly 
costly, but these would only relieve congestion at the 
Parker School. If both these conditions were met, how- 
ever, provisions would need to be furnished the grade 
rooms south of Pleasant Street now, as already stated, 
badly overcrowded. 

We earnestly believe that the proper solution is build- 
ing a new high school building for high school purposes, 
the removal of the Junior High School into the present 
high school building all under one roof, and the use of 
the Parker School for grade purposes, which arrange- 
ment would take care of the overcrowding in the grade 
rooms at the South End of the city for some years to 
come, i. e., until the population of the South End should 
so largely increase as to make the building of another 
school house imperative. 



66 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Siieli an arrangement as is above set forth would be 
particularly beneficial to the Junior High School. 

At the present time the Parker School is the second 
year only of the Junior High School. The first year's 
work is being carried on in the Chandler, Walker and 
the Garrison Schools, and it is apparent that the con- 
ducting of Junior High School activities under these con- 
ditions is a decidedly weak feature in our school system. 

The first year of the Junior High is split up into three 
separate units in as many school rooms, widely separated, 
and with no contact whatever, and when the pupils 
enter the second year of the Junior High School in the 
Parker School from these three schools with dififerent 
corps of teachers, it takes practically one-half of the 
first semester for class unity and class spirit, always 
desirable, to manifest itself. The result is that the last 
few months of the second year in the Junior High School 
is the only time that the children of this school really 
form a unit before they enter the High School. If the 
entire Junior High School could be together in one 
building for two full years this unity and spirit could 
be extended over substantially a year and a half. 

The building plan above recommended we believe 
is the most economical of any yet proposed and consid- 
ered. This will prove so, particularly if we seek and 
obtain authorization of the Legislature to incur debt 
beyond our present borrowing capacity as now limited 
by the general provisions of the law, the payment of 
such indebtedness, in the form of serial bonds, to be 
spread over a forty-year period. 

A cursory examination of the recent Session Laws 
shows that such a scheme seems in its general provis- 
ions to be a favorite method of procedure with New 
Hampshire municipalities in their school building pro- 
grams, as witness the following : Bristol, Claremont, 
Epping, Gorham, Hampton, Newmarket, Salem, New Cas- 
tle, Newington and Peterboro, all of which for school 



SCHOOL REPORT. 67 

purposes have received enabling acts from the Legisla- 
ture. 

We recommend that at the coming annual district 
meeting the Board should be authorized to obtain 
authority from the Legislature for the district to go 
beyond its present capacity to borrow money for school 
building purposes. This act should become law before 
the district meeting of 1925, at which time funds neces- 
sary for locating, building and equipping a new commo- 
dious high school building should be appropriated, 
and a special committee of the district empowered to 
carry these plans into effect. 

We desire to report to the district the facts that 
the Dunklee Street kindergarten for which money was 
appropriated at the last annual meeting, has been in 
successful operation through the year and accommodates 
nearly forty small pupils. Fire escapes have just been 
added at an expense of a little over $2,000 to the Dewey, 
Kimball, Penacook, and Chandler Schools. This was 
done in strict compliance with the recommendations of 
Chief Green of the Concord Fire Department. Also 
insurance to the extent of about $250,000 has been added 
to the amount already in force on the buildings and 
equipment of the district. This was done after a care- 
ful survey of the value of the property of the district — 
in which matter Mr. Charles S. Piper of the Hutchinson 
Building Company rendered his valuable services, with- 
out compensation, to the district. 

All the suggestions made by Mr. Griffin, Architect, 
who looked over our school properties, for the repairs 
and refurbishing, for which appropriation was made 
at the last annual meeting, have been complied with 
within the amount of the appropriation, and our build- 
ings are in better repair than for years. 

The Millville School has been in operation since the 
beginning of the school year, and has met our expecta- 
tions as to its cost, its appearance when completed, and 



68 CITY OF CONCORD. 

its efficiency and general tone when in use ; and the 
addition to the Morrill School, housing the machine 
shop, has proven its value in the increased efficiency of 
the work being done by this highly important part of 
our school system. 

Appreciation is due Drs. Young, Washburn and 
Morton for their painstaking work in connection with 
the dental clinic. The 344 pupils treated and 1,348 
operations performed indicate the value and amount of 
their work. If we have a new high school building, 
more satisfactory provisions should be made for their 
accommodation. 

More and more we realize that almost entirely the 
schools are depending for their best success upon the 
teachers of the district, and to them and Mr. Rundlett, 
our Superintendent, for their ability, their loyalty, their 
vision, and the flat drudgery they perform for our schools, 
we proffer the community's, and our own, grateful thanks. 

The more we become acquainted with our schools, the 
more we learn to appreciate them, and it is our profound 
conviction, in closing, that the schools of Union School 
District are doing today as good, if not better, work than 
at any time during our knowledge of them, and that they 
are schools of which the city of Concord should be most 
proud. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 69 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE FOR CONSTRUCTING 
THE MILLVILLE SCHOOL. 



The new school in the Millville District has been com- 
pleted and has been in use since the opening of school 
last fall. The grading is not yet fully done, but will be 
finished as soon as possible this spring. 

The building is located on a lot given to the district 
by St. Paul's School, and lying just north and adjoining 
the old lot, thereby leaving the old lot for a play ground, 
and giving a chance for enlargement of the present build- 
ing should the growth of the district ever demand it. 

The building is of brick and hollow tile construction, 
containing in the basement, toilet rooms, boiler room, and 
two rooms which might be used for manual training, 
domestic science, or any special work which is desired. 
On the main floor are three school rooms, teachers' room, 
lunch room, and janitor's room. The school rooms are 
constructed with sliding partitions between them, so that 
they may be thrown into one large assembly hall for 
special exercises of the school. 

The building would have been constructed within the 
appropriation made by the district, had not a spring de- 
veloped in the basement, which required special drainage 
work, and the laying of one hundred eighty feet of drain 
to get sufficient fall to insure no trouble from water in 
the basement: also a drainage pipe put in by the city 
some years ago which had to be relaid when excavating 
for the foundation. This work cost an extra $575.31 
which was not planned in the original cost, for which 
reason there is a small balance due the Hutchinson Build- 
ing Co., which, together with the cost of finishing the 
grading, Avill amount to just about this extra cost. 



70 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MiLLviLLE School Account. 
Receipts. 

Received from the City of Concord, appropri- 
ated by Union School District, $30,000.00 

Received from E. W. Gaige, sale of old build- 
ing, 110.00 

Received from G. W. Sumner, sale of Kaus- 

tine Toilets, 21.23 

Received from interest on bonds, 284.44 



$30,415 67 



Expenditures. 

Discount on sale of bonds, $626.80 
C. R. Whitcher, architect, 1,676.63 
Hutchinson Building Co., 27,910.24 
National Shawmut Bank, legal cer- 
tification of bonds, 135.00 
Geo. L. Lincoln Furniture Co., 

teachers' desks, 67.00 



$30,415.67 



Respectfully submitted, 



JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
Chairman of the Ruilding Committee. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 71 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE FOR BUILDING THE 
ADDITION TO THE MORRILL SCHOOL. 



Receipts. 



Received from the City of Concord, appropri- 
ated by Union School District, $10,000.00 

Received from Union School District regular 

account to balance, 1,669.88 



$11,669.88 



Expenditures. 

Hans K. Larsen, contract, $10,000.00 

George S. Forrest, architect, 850.00 

Lugg Construction Co., granite steps, 225.00 
Irving Chesley, grading, 176.45 

George F. Tandy, concreting, 412.13 

Thompson & Hoague, iron supplies, 6.30 

$11,669.88 

This addition meets the increased need for the work 
that is necessary to be done by this important school de- 
partment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES DUNCAN, 

Chairman of Building Committee. 



72 CITY OF CONCORD, 

REPORT OF SPECIAL REPAIR APPROPRIATION. 



Appropriated by the District in annual meet- 



ms'. 



$17,100.00 
$17,100.00 



Expended. 
Painting : 



High School Building, 


$3,402.28 




Morrill School Building, 


500.00 




Walker School Building, 


1,626.85 




Parker School Building, 


1,620.00 




Penacook School Building, 


590.00 




Kimball School Building, 


175.00 




Cogswell School Building, 


389.75 




H. P. Dame School Building, 


798.00 




Dewey School Building, 


860.00 




Signs for Cogswell and Dame Build- 




ings, 


40.00 




Rumford School Building, 


303.25 




Dunklee School Building, 


510.00 


.$10,815.13 






Plumbing : 






New pipes, High School, and 






Garrison School, 


.$765.78 




Heating at Parker School, 


337.00 




Plumbing at Walker School, 


65.15 




(r 




1 1 67 93 


Cementing basement floor Dunklee St 


. School. 


227.50 


Cornice work, Dewey School, 




334.95 


Metal ceilings in Penacook and Dewey Schools, 


1,057.00 


Water-proofing at Walker School, 




1,475.00 


Extra work at Walker School, 




335.74 


Iron for Morrill School, 




6.30 


General Repairs, 




1,095.20 


Architect's fees, 




496.00 


Balance, 




89.25 



$17,100.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

FINANCIAL REPORTS. 



REPORT OF FINANCIAL AGENT. 

Union School District. 

March 23, 1923 to October 3, 1923. 

Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 



RECEIVED. 




Balance on hand March 23, 1923, 


$4,458.86 


Drawn from City. 


121,000.00 


Received from State of New Hampshire, 


3,211.66 


cash sales for text-books. 


146.97 


scholars' supplief- 


;. 141.68 


miscellaneous, 


17.29 


school lunches, 


2,072.45 


medical inspectio 


n. 17.85 


Received from tuition, 


1,596.59 




$132,663.35 


EXPENDED. 





Expenses of school board and other district 

officers, $20.00 

Expenses of superintendents, 2.25 

Salary of tniant officer, 430.64 

Expenses of truant officer and census, 42.39 

Other expenses of administration — salaries, 1,086.28 

Other expenses of administration — maintenance, 66.94 

Salaries of principals and regular teachers, 60,053.55 

Salaries of supervisors of special subjects, 13,921.49 

Text-books, 2,886.05 

Reference books, maps, apparatus, etc., 142.76 

Scholars' supplies, 2,754.04 



74 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Graduation exercises, exhibits, advertising, 


$211.79 


Other expenses of instruction, 


522.32 


Janitors' salaries. 


6,935.04 


Janitor and building supplies. 


781.43 


Fuel, 


9,555.39 


Water, 


278.50 


Light and power, 


936.80 


Repairs — salaries. 


860.75 


Repairs — maintenance. 


3,147.41 


Other expenses of operation and maintenance, 


315.06 


Medical inspection — salaries, 


1,979.21 


Medical inspection — maintenance, 


309.81 


Transportation, 


4,915.42 


Other special activities (school lunches). 


1,521.44 


Insurance, 


277.28 


Lands and new buildings, 


1,451.50 


Alterations of old buildings, 


15,326.40 


New equipment. 


982.50 


Miscellaneous, 


140.72 


Balance, 


808.19 




$132,663.35 



Concord, N. H., October 8, 1923. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the Financial Agent of Union School District, 
and find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper 
voucher for each item. 

HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

REPORT OF TREASURER. 

Union School District. 

October 3, 1923, to March 25, 1924. 

H. L. Alexander, Treasurer. 

RECEI\^D. * 

Balance on hand October 3, 1923 : 

(Turned over by L. J. Rundlett, Fin. Agt.), .$808.19 

Drawn from city, 149,057.48 

Received from tuition, 3,943.06 

Received from cash sales for school lunches, 2,425.99 

Received from cash sales for instruction, 1.99 

Received from cash sales for miscellaneous, 32.40 

Received from cash sales for text books, 40.15 

Received from cash sales for supplies, 122.30 



$156,431.56 

EXPENDED. 

Expenses of school board and other district 

officers, $320.00 

Expenses of superintendent, 3,609.99 

Salary of truant officer, 369.36 

Expenses of truant officer and census, 104.79 

Other expenses of administration — salaries, 770.88 

Other expenses of administration — maintenance, 153.46 

Salaries of principals and regular teachers, 84,911.18 

Salaries of supervisors of special subjects, 20,249.35 

Text books, 1,779.51 

Reference books, maps, apparatus, etc., 206.41 

Scholars' supplies, 1,997.84 

Flags, 25.00 

Graduation exercises, exhibits, advertising, 235.95 

Other expenses of instruction, 1,009.38 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Janitors' salaries, 


$6,662.10 


Janitor and building supplies, 


496.23 


Fuel, 


4,088.60 


Water, 


245.50 


Light and power. 


1,075.19 


Repairs — salaries, 


709.50 


Repairs — maintenance. 


2,850.54 


Other expenses of operation and maintenance. 


246.05 


Libraries, 


39.09 


Medical inspection — salaries, 


2,287.64 


Medical inspection — maintenance, 


191.96 


Transportation, 


6,044.87 


Other special activities — school lunches, 


1,885.11 


Other special activities — night school, 


330.00 


Insurance, 


896.56 


Rebate of tuition, 


22.10 


Alteration of old buildings, 


2,056.32 


New equipment. 


4,441.08 


Miscellaneous, 


6,062.00 


Balance, 


58.02 




$156,431.56 



Concord, N. H., March 27, 1924. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the Treasurer of Union School District, and 
find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper voucher 
for each item. 

HENRY II. :\IETCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL REPORT. 

Union School District, 
March 23, 1923, to March 25, 1924. 

Louis J. Rundlett, Agent. 
and Harry L. Alexander, Treasurer. 

RECEIVED. 

Balance on hand March 23, 1923, $4,458.86 
Received from city, appropriated by Union 

School District, 249.960.69 

Received from city, appropriated by Union 

School District, special repairs, 17,100.00 
Received from city, appropriated by Union 

School District, purchase of lot and building, 1,500.00 

Received from city, dog licenses, 1,460.39 

Received from city, Abial "Walker Fund, 36.40 

Received from cash sale for text books, 187.12 

Received from cash sale for scholars' supplies, 263.98 

Received from cash sale for miscellaneous, 49.69 

Received from cash sale for school lunches. 4,498.44 

Received from cash sale for medical inspection, 17.85 

Received from cash sale for instruction, 1.99 

Received from tuition, 5,539.65 

Received from State of New Hampshire, 3,211.66 



$288,286.72 

expended. 
Administration : 

Salary and expense of School Board 
and other district officers: 

Salaries, school board, $300.00 

Paid auditors. 40.00 

$340.00 



78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Salaries and eg^penses of superintendents : 

Note books, $2.25 
Paid to State (excess salaries), 3,491.66 
Expenses to Chicago to superin- 
tendents' meeting, 118.33 



mt officer and census: 






Census, 




$111.48 


Transportation, truant 


officer, 


35.70 


Salary, truant officer, 




800.00 


3r expenses of administration: 




Stamps and envelopes, 




$116.18 


Binding school report. 




12.00 


Manila envelopes, 




7.56 


Rubber stamps, 




9.74 


Fasteners and staples, 




6.00 


Books for treasurer, 




39.09 


Repair typewriters, 




2.10 


Typewriting paper, 




21.12 


Ink, 




1.35 


Rubber bands. 




1.26 


Making negative for sc 


hool report. 


4.00 


Salaries of clerks in superinten- 




dent's office. 




1,857.16 



$3,612.24 



$947.18 



$2,077.56 

Instruction : 

Principals and regular teachers^ salaries, $144,964.73 

Salaries of supervisors of special 
subjects: 

Drawing, $1,804.36 

Music, 2,284.19 



SCHOOL REPORT. 




79 


Training teacher, 


$1,768.42 




Morrill School, 


17,796.31 




Physical drill. 


1,869.48 




Cadet teachers. 


1,505.28 




Domestic science and lunches, 


7.142.80 


$34,170.84 






Text-hooks, 




$4,665.56 


Reference looks, maps, apparatus, etc 


•) 




Reference books. 


$173.62 




Maps, 


175.55 


$349.17 






Scholars' supplies: 






Regular supplies, 


$2,858.33 




Manual training supplies, 


1,893.55 


$4,751.88 






Flags and other appurtenances: 






Flag pole, 




$25.00 


Graduation, exhihits, advertising : 






Engrossing diplomas. 


$26.60 




Chairs and trucking, 


34.00 




High School diplomas. 


288.80 




Advertising, 


3.75 




Ribbon for diplomas, 


33.41 




Expenses to Boston for new 






diplomas and plate, 


6.33 




Address at graduation. 


25.00 




Books for pageant. 


5.85 




Stage help for School Night, 


15.00 




Armory for School Night, 


9.00 


^AA7 7J. 



80 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Other expenses of instruction: 



Extra help at Parker School, 


•1^3.00 


Duplicator supplies, 


30.64 


Transportation, special teachers, 


477.45 


Postage, Mr. Cook, 


4.66 


New platens, typeAvriters, 


69.00 


Trucking, 


1.38 


Filing cards, 


9.18 


Neostyle supplies. 


45.00 


Clean and repair neostyle. 


6.86 


Examinations printed. 


143.90 


Armory, physical drill. 


166.00 


Duplicator rolls. 


16.85 


Telegrams, 


5.57 


Educational tests, 


38.74 


Number cards, 


20.00 


High School programs, 


60.00 


Tuning pianos, 


160.00 


Directories, 


160.00 


Basketball bladder. 


1.40 


Record of visits books. 


61.70 


Ink vents, 


2.46 


Expenses to Boston for drawing 




teacher, 


6.73 


Pitch pipes. 


5.88 


Rifles, high school, 


28.50 


Stencils, 


1.74 


Ink for stamp pads, 


5.06 



$1,531.70 



Operation and Maintenance of School Plant: 
Janitors' salaries and supplies: 

Salaries, $13,597.14 

Supplies, 1,152.51 

Extra help, cleaning, etc., 125.15 



$14,874.80 



SCHOOL REPORT. 81 

Fuel: 



Coal $13,003.74 

Wood, 640.25 



$13,643.99 



^ya^el■, $524.00 

Light and power: 



Gas, 






.$655.78 


Electricity, 






1,356.21 

(to 01 1 t)Q 




— ^ <p£jj\J J. L ,:' 'J 


Repairs: 








Repairs, 






$6,369.92 


Mr. Gate's salary. 






1,570.25 

4;7 940 17* 


Other expenses of operatioi 


1 and 




maintenance : 








Laundry, 






$14.15 


Removing ashes, 






316.23 


Telephones, 






119.52 


Garfares, janitor 


of 


Garrison 




School, 






12.91 


Trucking. 






97.90 


Express, 






.40 

$561.11 



Auxiliary Agencies and Other Special Activities : 

Libraries: 

Gards, $3.22 

Subscriptions, magazines, 11.00 

Books, High School library. 24.87 

$39.09 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Medical inspection: 

Salary, doctors, $2,657.90 

Salary, nurse, 1,540.95 

Salary, clerk, ' 70.00 

Laundry, clinic, 35.70 

Tongue depressors, 5.05 

Coupon book for gas, 28.50 

Transportation, nurse, 42.50 

File, clinic, 9.00 

Dental supplies, 51.54 

Salary, dentists, 216.82 

Girl at clinic, 12.00 

Office supplies, doctor, 1.75 

Supplies, medicine chests, 38.76 

Auto supplies, 25.75 

Scales, 32.40 



Transportation: 




Corser, Silverhill, 


$1,000.00 


Dunstane, Millville, 


210.00 


Taylor, Millville, 


377.00 


Mr. Hanson, 


368.00 


Hoit, Mountain, 


800.00 


Kaime, East Concord, 


2,075.00 


Kaime, Millville, 


1,400.00 


Kaime, Plains, 


1,680.00 


Kaime, Blackhill, 


1,000.00 


Kaime, Turtletown, 


468.00 


Keyes, East Concord, 


266.00 


Carfares, backward pupils. 




Walker School, 


81.81 


West Concord carfares, 


1,083.23 


West Concord carfares, sewing, 


15.26 


Carfares, White Gate, 


12.48 


Railroad fares, Riverhill, 


32.01 


Mrs. Boardman, 


91.50 



$4,768.62 



$10,960.29 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

Other special activities: 



Supplies, lunches, 


$3,405.15 




Advertising, Night School, 


1.40 




Salaries, Night School, 


330.00 


$3,736.55 


Fixed Charges: 






Insurance: 






Insurance, 


$1,173.84 




Rebate of tuition, 


22.10 


$1,195.94 






Lands and buildings: 






Building and lot. 


$1,450.00 




Revenue stamps. 


1.50 


$1,451.50 






Alterations of old buildings: 






Painting, High, 


$3,402.28 




Painting, Morrill, 


500.00 




Painting, Walker, 


1,626.85 




Cornice work, Dewey, 


334.95 




Painting and kalsomining, Rum- 






ford, 


303.25 




Painting, Parker, 


1,620.00 




Painting, Penacook, 


590.00 




Painting, Kimball, 


175.00 




Painting, Cogswell, 


389.75 




Painting, H. P. Dame, 


798.00 




Painting, Dewey, 


860.00 




Metal ceilings in Dewey and 






Penacook, 


1,057.00 




New pipes at High and 


705.00 




Garrison, 


60.78 





84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cementing basement floor, 

Dimklee St. school, $227.50 

Painting, Dunklee St. school, 510.00 

Heating at Parker, 337.00 

Plumbing at Walker, 65.15 
Painting signs for Cogswell and 

H. P. Dame, 40.00 

Water proofing, Walker, 1,475.00 

General repairs, 1,095.20 

Work at Walker school, 335.74 

Architect's fees, 496.00 

Iron used at Morrill school. 6.30 



-$17,010. 



t.y 



New equipment: 

Express, $4.86 

Electrical supplies, Morrill, 296.63 

Ford coupe, nurse, 590.00 

Desks, chairs, Garrison, 32.00 

Desks, Dunklee St., 22.00 

Stain, etc., for chairs, 5.13 

Pulleys, Morrill school, 3.49 

Trucking, 160.77 

Moving picture booth, 171.36 

Lettering auto, 10.00 
Desks, chairs, Millville, High, 

Dunklee St., 62.00 

Hotplate, H. P. Dame, 5.00 

Curtain rods, Millville, 1.40 

Clocks, High, 3.00 

Mirror, cabinet, Millville, 1.50 

Piano, Kimball, 188.00 

Desks, chairs, Millville, 1,450.49 
Cot, mattress, pillow, Cogswell 

school, 10.00 

Pianos, Garrison, Parker, 5§0.00 

Machinery, Morrill, 450.00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 85 

Interest on note for machinery, 

Morrill, $10.95 

Furniture, teachers' room at Mill- 
ville school, 195.00 

Linotype, Morrill school, 1,200.00 

$5,423.58 



Miscellaneous : 

Recording deeds, $7.37 

Chairs, Parker, 30.00 

Trucking, 9.64 

R-ugs, Parker school, 49.20 

Halftones, 4.06 

Sections for bookcase, Dewey, 40.00 

Advertising, .45 
State Treasurer, per capita tax, 6,062.00 



$6,202.72 

Balance, 58.02 



Total, $288,286.72 



*Two bills ($225.90 and $146.07) were transferred from 
alterations of old buildings account to repair account. 

COST PER CAPITA. 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses . $91.41 

Cost per pupil, including all current expenses, 

based on average membership . . . 101.79 

Cost per pupil for tuition, including music, 

drawing, superintendent, etc 59.27 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent .... 45.98 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 

teachers and superintendent, in all schools 

below the high school 36.21 



86 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Cost per pupil for tuition, exclusive of special 
teachers and superintendent, in the high 
school $65.59 

Cost per pupil for text-books and supplies in all 

schools 2.90 

TUITION RECEIPTS. 

High School $5,444.43 

Eastman School 9.00 

Rumford School 18.00 

Kimball School 58.27 

Franklin School 9.95 



$5,539.65 



FOR EVERY DOLLAR EXPENDED 

1923-1924. 

For teachers' salaries $0,621 

For alterations of old buildings .059 

For janitors' salaries and supplies .051 

For fuel .047 

For transportation of pupils .038 

For repairs to buildings .027 

For state per capita tax .021 

For new equipment .0188 

For medical inspection .017 

For scholars' supplies .0168 

For text-books .016 

For other special activities .0129 

For superintendents' salaries and expenses .0125 

For other expenses of administration .0072 

For light and power .0069 

For other expenses of instruction .0053 

For lands and buildings .005 

For insurance on buildings .0041 

For miscellaneous .003684 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



87 



For truant officer's salary and census $0.0032 

For other expenses of operation and maintenance .0019 

For water .0018 

For graduations, exhibits, etc. .0015 

For reference books, maps, etc. .0012 

For salaries and expenses of school board .0011 

For libraries .00013 

For flags .000086 



MILLVILLE SCHOOL ACCOUNT. 



RECEIVED. 



Received from city. 
Received from E. W. Gaige, 



$24,800.00 
110.00 





.$24,910.00 


EXPENDED. 




C. R. Whitcher, 


$1,468.66 


Hutchinson Building Co., 


22,141.88 


National Shawmut Bank, 


135.00 


George L. Lincoln Co., 


67.00 


Balance, 


1,097.46 



$24,910.00 



Approved Oct. 8, 1923. 



HENRY H. METCALF. 
JOHN P. GEORGE. 

Auditors. 



88 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MORRILL SCHOOL ACCOUNT. 

RECEIVED. 

Received from city, appropriated by Union 

School District, $10,000.00 

Received from Union School District (Regu- 
lar account), 200.00 



$10,200.00 



EXPENDED. 



Hans K. Larsen, $10,000.00 

George S. Forrest, 200.00 



$10,200.00 



Approved Oct. 8, 1923. 



HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 89 

REPORT OF TREASURER. 

Union School District. 

Millville School Account. 

H. L. Alexander, Treasurer. 

October 3, 1923, to March 25, 1924. 

RECEIVED, 

Balance October 10, 1923: 

Turned over by L. J. Rundlett, Fin. Agt., $1,097.46 

George W. Sumner, 21.23 

Drawn from city, 4,857.64 



$5,976.33 



EXPENDED, 



Hutchinson Building Company, $5,768.36 

C. R. Whitcher, 207.97 



$5,976.33 



Concord, N. H., March 27, 1924. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the Treasurer of Union School District (Mill- 
ville School account) and find the expenditures correctly 
cast and a proper voucher for each item. 

HENRY H. METCALF, 
JOHN P. GEORGE, 

Auditors. 



90 city of concord. 

School Board Report of Financial Budget 
FOR 1924-1925. 

Amount of money required by law ($3.50 on each $1,000 
of the inventory). 

Elementary High 

Schools. Schools. 

I — Budget (school money) : 

(a) For support of schools, $166,376.12 $93,647.25 

(b) For purchase of text-books 

and scholars' supplies, 4,478.95 2,521.05 

(c) For purchase of tiags and ap- 

purtenances, 16.00 9.00 

(d) For payment of tuitions in 

high schools, 

(e) Total amount required for 

the above items, 170,871.07 96,177.30 

(f) Estimate of $5 tax on 1923 

inventory, 111,737.84 

II — Requirements to meet the 
Budget : 

(a) For support of elementary 

schools, 170,871.07 

(b) For support of high school 

and high school tuitions, 96,177.30 

Total support of all schools, 267,048.37 

III — School Board report of as- 
sessment required : 
(1) For the support of schools 
and the purchase of re- 
quired books, supplies 
and flags, and the pay- 
ment of high school tui- 
tions, 267,048.37 
Estimate of $3.50 tax on 1923 

assessed valuation, 78,216.48 

Estimate of additional sums 

needed, 188,831.89 



SCHOOL REPORT, 91 

(2) For the payment of per 

capita tax, $6,220.00 

(3) For the payment of debt 

(statutory), 12,000.00 

(4) For the payment of interest 

(statutory), 6,665.00 

(5) For the payment of other 

statutory requirements, 

(6) For the general administra- 

tion of the schools, 10,540.00 

Total budget for 1924-1925, 302,473.37 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 

To the Board of Education of Union School District, 
Supervisory Unioii, No. 8: 

I am offering my thirty-eighth annual report, the sixty- 
fourth of its series, for your consideration. 

Education, as a national concern, is being reviewed 
from practically every angle with results that reveal its 
good and its bad features. Public school education is 
engaging the greatest consideration for the reason that 
it has direct relation to our democratic life. Its various 
activities are marked by energetic efforts of national, 
state, and municipal governments to improve conditions 
and to curb excessive costs. 

This national concern is revealed not only in the move- 
ment to justify the expense of public education but, from 
the strictly educational side, to emphasize those things 
that bear directly upon improvement in the life of the 
home-maker thus insuring the democratic flavor that is 
the foundation of popular government. 

From current publications and from national gather- 
ings we find that training for citizenship; equalizing 
school privileges so that the rural educational standards 
may be made somewhat more nearly equal to those of the 
urban communities ; the advancement of the superior 
child through enriched curricula; educational publicity; 
and a better definition of the arts and sciences as related 
to public education, are of vital interest. 

Public concern is also being manifested over the effects 
that modern social life is having on the young people of 
the land. The license of the modern dance ; the un- 
wholesome character of modern popular songs, and the 
lack of restraint shown by too many parents is fast turn- 
ing the youth into inert, passive, and purposeless young 
men and women. This is confined to no one part of the 
country. All educational journals mention its steady 
growth. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 93 

The increasing appreciation of public school educa- 
tion is clearly shown by the work of the National Bureau 
of Education; the enlarged pupil enrollment throughout 
the country; the adoption of rigid employment regula- 
tions; and the steady growth of parent-teachers' organi- 
zations. 

It is clearly demonstrated that the people are willing 
to pay the price if they can be shown a reasonable return 
for the money expended in educating their children. 

Our own schools, undisturbed by any unreasonable and 
unwarranted interference, have been at work quietly and 
effectively accomplishing much and accredited by all who 
have an intimate knowledge of their conduct. 

Through frequent reports you have been kept advised 
of the inside life of your schools and this policy will be 
continued. 

The greatest problem now confronting us is the fur- 
nishing of additional room for the growing pupil en- 
rollment. This is vital for two reasons that seriously 
affect the lives of the pupils. 

First — The added load that a teacher must carry in 
order to meet the requirements. 

Second — The curtailment of the recitation time that 
each pupil should have. 

The average enrollment to a room ought not to exceed 
thirty pupils to get the best results, but many of our 
schools have an enrollment of from forty to fifty. The 
prevailing troublesome conditions of pupil housing, may 
be summarized as follows : 

High School — Enrollment, 564, or 64 more than build- 
ing capacity. There is no room for the exclusive ac- 
commodation of the music classes, nor art, nor domestic 
science, nor physical drill. There is no provision for 
rooms exclusively devoted to supervised study. Lecture 
rooms, laboratories and the assembly hall are used now 
as recitation rooms. Next year conditions will be even 
worse. 



94 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Parker School — Enrollment, 254, or 54 beyond capacity. 
No room for music and drawing. No conveniences for 
physical training. Domestic Arts room used for various 
purposes. One recitation room in basement, assembly 
hall crowded to the limit with desks. 

Chandler School — No conveniences for the various ac- 
tivities of a junior high school. No hall for exercises, 
no laboratories. Fire risk serious. 

Iron Works School — Filled to capacity. More room 
must be provided next year. 

Rumford, Penacook, and Kimball Schools — Intermediate 
classes overcrowded. 

Harriet P. Dame School — Lowest primary much over- 
crowded. 

At the beginning of the first semester fifty new 
desks were put into the High School. A new room 
was opened in the Walker School to relieve the over- 
crowding at the Chandler School. Similar conditions 
called for employing assistants in the Kimball School, 
the Harriet P. Dame School, and the Cogswell Schools. 

School Buildings. 

Not for many years have the school buildings been in as 
good repair as they are at present. They cost a great 
deal for construction and much more now than they did 
fifty years ago. They cost more because labor is higher 
priced, and the construction more nearly fireproof. Not 
only these things but also people require more in every 
detail of building than in former years. Nearly all 
the added conveniences are furnished that the health of 
the children may be preserved and that they may have 
the best of educational training. These buildings, 
having been erected, need to be kept in good repair to 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

avoid premature, and constant depreciation. The peo- 
ple did a wise thing in the last annual meeting when they 
voted a large amount of money for repairs to school 
buildings. Additional sums of smaller proportions should 
be voted each year to apply in various places so that the 
work of years preceding may have its full effect. 

Supervision. 



Obituary. 

Francis Treadway Clayton, assistant superintendent of 
schools, passed from earth on Sunday, July 29, 1923. 

Mr. Clayton had been in failing health for many months 
but he attended faithfully to his duties until he was 
stricken. 

He was a man of scholarly instinct and attainment, 
sympathetic and obliging, a tireless worker, and intensely 
loyal to the schools and those who had them in charge. 

His ideals were refined and elevating, and his motives, 
honest and well-directed, were inspiring to all who 
worked with him. 

As a deep-thinking scholar he had few equals. Free 
from all pretense, careful in choosing his friends and as 
firm in retaining them, he was the embodiment of candor, 
honesty, courtesy, and gentlemanly bearing. 

An unusual power has been taken from the adminis- 
tration of our schools — one which will grow in apprecia- 
tion as time goes on. 



Mr. Charles W. Walker came from the superintendency 
in Gorham, N. H., to the assistant superintendency in 
Concord on Nov. 1, 1923. 

Mr. "Walker has brought to his work here a high de- 
gree of educational training and successful experience in 
the fields of teaching and school superintendency. His 



96 CITY OF CONCORD. 

energy, clear thinking, and serious application are al- 
ready making themselves apparent in improving the work 
of our schools. 

Senior High School. 

Little change has been noted in the conduct of this 
school. The general tone as reported last year is an 
improvement over that of former years. This is the one 
school in the system that suffers seriously each year from 
changes in the teaching force. "While it is better to re- 
tain teachers who have been in the service for a long 
time, nevertheless, it is not economy to retain those who 
have failed to keep pace with improved methods. It 
may be assumed that changes will continue to occur fre- 
quently and that the best remedy which can be applied 
is a strong central administration in discipline and the 
training of the teachers in effective methods of conduct- 
ing the various branches of study. 

In September, 1923, twenty-eight graduates of this 
school entered college : seventeen from the January and 
June classes of 1923, ten from the classes of 1922 and one 
from the class of 1920. 

They entered the following colleges: Dartmouth, New 
Hampshire, Harvard, Amherst, Mass. Inst. Technology, 
Weilesley, and Smith. 

Four students tried the Comprehensive Examinations 
of the College Entrance Board. Three entered college. 

Six students took the examinations in a total of nine- 
teen subjects. Eleven of these were passed successfully. 
Later four more passed and entered college. 

In connection with this it must be borne in mind that 
many of the best scholars are admitted to college on cer- 
tificate of the school and are not obliged to take the tests. 

The enrollment at the present time is 561, the largest 
in the history of the school, and there is no room for 
any increase. Working conditions are extremely poor 
and discipline correspondingly difficult. The headmaster 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

has done unusually well to maintain proper decorum in the 
face of these difficulties. 

Next fall the entering class should number at least 115, 
and conditions will become more complex and serious. 

There are now no rooms that can be set apart for the ex- 
clusive use of music, art, or domestic science and the 
Assembly Hall is not large enough. 

Next year it may be that a part of the Assembly Hall 
can be fitted up with desks and kept apart for a place 
devoted exclusively to supervised study. 

Junior High Schools. 

These schools are working on the same curricula of 
studies as last year and they have justified their right to 
warm praise for the character of the work accomplished. 

In the first-year schools we find the unity broken by 
being obliged to house the pupils in three different build- 
ings. We look forward to the time when they can be 
housed under one roof for two years. 

In the first year the work has been marked by attention 
given to silent reading, state-wide tests, readjustment of 
the work in arithmetic and revision of the course in his- 
tory. 

In the second year, state-wide tests have been given 
and also tests in silent reading. The results in music 
which had ebbed are now being improved rapidly, and 
the physical development of the pupils is better than ever 
before. 

The training of two cadet teachers for junior high 
school work has been conducted in the Parker School. 

The results of the annual English composition contest 
were strongly marked in these grades. 

Elementary Schools. 

The work of the elementary schools has changed little 
from that of the year preceding. Standards are being 



98 CITY OF CONCORD. 

determined and where improvement is found necessary 
it will be made. 

The work in standardized tests is being handled by 
Mr. Walker with results, as far as they have been de- 
termined, confirming the statement that your schools 
are efficient and up-to-date. 

The tests recently given by the State Department in 
spelling and arithmetic for high school classes were, out 
of curiosity, given to Class L, the last class in the elemen- 
tary grades, with the following results : 



Springfield, Mass., 


1846 


Concord, N. H. 
Sixth Year . 
Elementary Class 
Class L 


Spelling : 






Average of class, 40.6% 




19.32% 


Arithmetic : 

Average of class, 29.4% 




60.57% 



The Springfield class was a high school class three 
years older than the Concord class. 

The same test in arithmetic was given by one teacher 
to a fifth grade class, after eliminating the example in 
interest, a subject not taken in this grade. Three of 
the pupils gave perfect papers. 

The class J (5th grade) average was 66 2-3%. 

The class K (6th grade, first half year) average was 
57.14% on the examination entire. 

The test in spelling, given by the State to grade 
eight, was passed easily by our sixth grade pupils. 

The new geography is well-liked by teachers, pupils, 
and parents. The children are not spending a good part 
of their school life in bounding unimportant territory 
nor in memorizing the location of cities of little conse- 
quence, but they are storing their minds with facts 
about people, productions, commercial relations, regional 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

causes and effects, and the relation of geographical sur- 
roundings to human progress. I invite your serious 
inspection of the work of the grades. 

Kindergartens. 

A new kindergarten was inaugurated in the Dunklee 
Street building purchased last spring by the District 
for this purpose. It is one of the most cheerful, com- 
modious rooms in the District. The large number of 
children attending justify its institution. 

For further details of this work I refer you to the 
report of Miss Chamberlin under whose wise guidance, 
through frequent visits, careful planning, and regular 
meetings for discussion, the kindergartens have shown, 
in some cases, that they compare favorably with others 
in New England and the Middle West. 

The Dewey Training School. 

The enrollment in the training classes is unusually small. 
Only three pupil teachers are registered in the Senior 
class and two in the Junior class. Even though it has 
been decided to give remuneration for the last three 
semesters of their course, as yet, it is not apparent that 
many will enroll in the fall. 

These students, being acquainted with the require- 
ments of our schools, are a decided factor in contributing 
to their success both in substitutions and in regular 
positions. 

Music. 

May I call your attention to the value of music as 
a distinct part of public education? No branch is grow- 
ing more in public favor. The best regulated school 
systems have the various organizations of instrumental 
music as well as finely trained glee clubs and choruses. 

These schools are furnishing free instruction on many 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

of the instruments that are not widely known. Others 
buy the various instruments to hold as school property 
loaning them to students having enterprise enough to 
learn how to play upon them. If this were done in 
Concord a brass band could be started at once in our 
high school. 

Miss Eleanor S. Colburn was elected assistant to the 
director at the beginning of the second semester, her 
efforts being confined to elementary grades and rural 
schools. She also plays the piano for the two senior high 
school choruses. 

The director's report deals with the different features 
of this subject. 

Drawing. 

This work has been badly broken this year by the 
unfortunate illness of Miss Jones, who had been out since 
last September, and who passed away in March. Her place 
is being taken by Miss Helen C. Redfield of Bernardston, 
Mass. Miss Battilana has continued in the elementary 
work with growing success. Drawing has no home room 
now in any building. We cannot get results unless con- 
veniences are furnished. 

Medical Inspection. 

This department is doing solid sensible work and it 
should be considered an essential part of any school 
system. Both Dr. Day and Mrs. Upham know how to 
do the required work and daily prove their value to 
the schools. Their detailed reports should be read with 
care. 

Domestic Arts. 

The scheme of placing the entire subject of Domestic 
Arts under one supervisory head has been tried out this 
year with success. The position was given to Miss B. Lillian 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

Barker, for a number of years teacher of sewing in these 
schools. She has done creditable work and gives a 
report elsewhere. 

Morrill School of Mechanic Arts. 

This school is a very helpful and important feature 
in our system. It is comfortably equipped and, with 
the building extension, has room in which to make de- 
sired progress. I think an automobile repair department 
should be installed at an early date and that the present 
corps of instructors be retained if possible. Mr. Hart- 
well's report, printed herewith, gives more complete 
information. 

School Week. 

In common with those of many other cities the schools 
observed School Week in an extensive way. 

I take this occasion to express my cordial thanks to 
all the citizens who gave freely of their time and energy 
to make the affair the noteworthy success that it proved 
to be; to the Board of Education for their help and 
encouragement and to the teachers upon whom fell the 
brunt of the hard work. 

The program is printed in this report. 

Physical Training. 

Physical Training is regarded a necessary part of all 
well-regulated school systems. The Concord schools are 
not behind in this respect. Mr. Eugene M. Callahan was 
elected physical director last spring and his earnest 
efforts are being felt in raising the standard of physical 
culture. He gives instruction in all grades of school but 
his efforts are largely confined to the junior and senior 
high schools. He also has complete charge of the athletic 
teams. A plan of systematic drill in all athletic work is 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

being formulated and, in a few years, its value will be 
apparent. Such training includes baseball, foot-ball, 
hockey, basket-ball, track, boxing, and wrestling, march- 
ing and physical drill for the boys, as well as basket-ball, 
hockey, marching and physical drill for the girls. The 
boys of the senior high school take special drill once each 
week at the Armory under the direction of Mr. Callahan. 

Miss Emily B. Pease succeeded Miss Ranney as physi- 
cal instructor of the high school girls. Miss Pease 
easily demonstrates her worth but her work is badly 
handicapped through girls lea\dng on excuses by phys- 
icians. 

I wonder if it would be much worse for girls if they 
were to exchange dances, moving-pictures, and ice-cream 
cones for such healthful physical exercise. I suggest 
that each girl take two fifteen minute periods each week 
instead of one thirty minute period. "We need a gymna- 
sium and an athletic field where certain forms of physi- 
cal culture can be done to better advantage. 

Teachers. 

The success of any system of schools will be measured 
in a great degree by the intelligence, application, and the 
careful professional training of the teaching corps. The 
teachers of our schools as a whole can measure up to 
such a standard. 

However capable, conscientious and well-trained a 
teacher may be it is not economical for her nor for the 
city in which she works that she does not renew her 
professional training and spirit at least once in three 
years by attending the summer session of a normal school 
or equivalent. 

In a corps of teachers where some do this voluntarily 
and others have never done it, the matter of equity 
seems grossly violated and the amount and quality of 
service badly balanced. In some cities it is a requirement 
— in one not far from Concord. I think this is a matter that 
should 1)6 considered vital to the progress of our schools. 



school report. 103 

Cadet Teachers. 

The scheme of employing two cadet teachers in the 
junior and senior high schools received its initial trial 
in the fall. Two college graduates were employed, Miss 
Elizabeth Rogers and Miss Nina B. Stanchfield. Both 
have acquitted themselves w^ell outside of their daily 
occupation, and have filled all the substitutions with 
credit, adding materially to the effective operation of 
the schools, no time having been lost since September, 
nor have we been forced to seek substitutes from the out- 
side. The work of Miss Dickerman in formulating and con- 
ducting the training of these young women has been pains- 
taking, intelligent and invaluable. The success of the 
scheme would have been questionable without her services. 



Obituary. 
Miss Abbie May Sanger. 

Born June 26, 1872, died April 23, 1923. Began work 
in our schools September, 1914. Graduate of Franklin, 
N. H., High School, 1891. Graduate of Mt. Holyoke 
College, B. L., 1896. Taught French in our high school 
nine years. 

Miss Sanger's efforts here were always directed by 
fine scholarship, skill and sincerity. She was particularly 
proficient in the teaching of French. Her loss is dis- 
tinctly felt in connection with the advancement of our 
high school. 

Miss Mary Alice Jones. 

Born February 11, 1874, died March 14, 1924. Grad- 
uated from Penacook Academy, 1892. Graduated from 
Concord Training School, 1894. Taught in "West Concord 
N. H., Primary School one year. Taught in Garrison 



104 CITY OP CONCORD. 

School primary grades ten years. Elected Assistant 
Drawing Teacher June, 1913. Elected Supervisor of 
Drawing June, 1920. 

Miss Jones was a woman of sterling worth. Her 
work both as primary teacher and drawing teacher 
was marked by unusual sincerity, faithfulness and suc- 
cess. She never spared any effort to raise the standard 
of her work and at the time of her illness was making plans 
for the extension of her work in hand. She was liked by 
all with whom she was associated and in her death our 
schools have suffered severely. 



Recommendations. 

1 — A new high school with an adjoining athletic field. 

2 — That conversation classes in English, Spanish, 
French be inaugurated during the lunch hour in the 
Parker and High Schools. 

3 — That the dining hall in the high school be made 
more attractive and that table manners be improved by 
instruction in ethics. 

4 — That pupils intending to enter college be given 
over, for preparation, to selected teachers. 

5 — The consolidation of the junior high schools in one 
building. 

6 — Perfecting a consolidated junior high school or- 
chestra. 

7 — Perfecting consolidated junior high school glee 
clubs. 

8 — A brass band for the high school. 

9 — Advanced work in art for promising high school 
students. 

10— A parade of school children in June. 

11 — That a house be purchased or rented for classes in 
domestic arts, there being no school rooms available. 



school report. 105 

Educational Frills. 

The stock in trade of the pessimist is "frills and fads." 
His complaint is always made in generalizations and he 
does not single out any particular thing that could be 
classified under this heading. 

As a matter of fact there are no "frills" in the educa- 
tional plan of today. Every subject taught has a 
distinct value. All these things have been put in as a 
result of careful thought given by intelligent people of 
the past and every one is proving and has proved itself 
to be of advantage to the children, and people who stop, 
listen, and think can never be persuaded to take them 
out. They have distinctly taken the time that used to 
be given to corporal punishment and the general atti- 
tude of the children shows to advantage for this very 
reason. 

People of the past had their ideas of democracy, and 
their ideals in public education were formed accord- 
ingly. As time advanced, however, such ideas and ideals 
have undergone remarkable changes, that have suggested 
and demanded corresponding changes in the content of 
the public school curricula, the result being that those 
on the outside and those who had become wedded to 
the idea of secluding the highest forms of education 
began to shout "frills" and these cries came in as regu- 
larly as do some forms of human ailments. 

As a matter of fact our democratic life is not any 
more a unit, but economically, and socially divided, and 
having broken the bonds that preserved that unity, al- 
though progressing rapidly along several different lines, 
democracy still preserves its name and its purpose. The 
school is always a reflection of the wishes of those who 
support it. A people that is not a unit socially but com- 
posed of many races that have ideas and ideals of their 
own which are in no wise determined by our national 
traditions, must be recognized in the plan of public edu- 
cation. 



106 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The professional man thinks it wrong to teach stenog- 
raphy in school because it does not belong to the partic- 
ular kind of education which appeals to the more brainy 
element of human society, yet he is constantly seeking 
that kind of skill in furthering his own interests. 

The boy who learns the elements of any manual work 
is considered by them an unnecessary public expense. So 
it is with the girl who learns how to cook a meal, make a 
dress and trim her hat. The book-keeper is considered 
a mere instrument, a means to a given end. The boy who 
learns how to sing or to play in the school orchestra is 
declared to be without the pale of the intent of public 
education. Such things as these, they say, should have no 
place in the school curriculum. 

An intelligent democracy has decreed that the affairs 
of common life need more attention in the public school 
and that school money is appropriated for the benefit 
of the less gifted child as well as those who have been 
favored by the Almighty and by better life environments. 

This is one great factor in school expense and it is a 
paying investment for any community. The schools are 
not standing still but they are advancing only as fast as 
human life advances. When they cease to keep this pace 
they will not only fail, but their failure will bring about 
the decadence of our national democratic life. 

Just so long as expense for public schools is justi- 
fied by tangible evidence of progress, it will increase 
rather than diminish, but when this expense becomes 
extravagance then the schools will fail to hold together 
the civilization for which our forefathers prayed and 
fought, and the finer instincts of the people will be dulled 
in the same measure. 

Education then is costly and it will continue just so 
long as the variations of common life become more com- 
plex but it will be the result of a popular demand for the 
particular kind of education that leads the many to 
higher places of living rather than the few. The cost of 



SCHOOL REPORT. 107 

public education like the cost of any other municipal depart- 
ment is but a reflection of the public will. 

Again I am privileged to express my great obligation 
to your Honorable Body, Mr. Walker, the teachers and 
all others who have assisted me in my efforts to main- 
tain the standard of our schools. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

S'liperintendent. 



108 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT 
SUPERINTENDENT. 



To Mr. Louis J. Rundletf^ Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir : 

I am presenting herewith a report on the work of the 
assistant superintendent from November first to February 
first. 

Evening Schools. 

Two classes have been held in the high school building 
four nights a week under the direction of Mrs. Grace 
Putnam and Mrs. Grace Kelley. The beginners' class has 
an enrollment of 22 adults, 17 men and 5 women. Most of 
these students upon entrance were not able to speak, read 
or write English. It is very interesting to note that there 
are 14 of these beginners that come to the evening school 
even though they are over 21 years of age. The work taken 
up in class is based upon the conversational method. Mrs. 
Putnam has made extensive use of the Federal Citizenship 
Textbook as well as a primer on Americanization. 

The advanced class, in charge of Mrs. Kelley, has had a 
total registration of 27 adults, 23 men and 4 women. Sev- 
eral of these students attended the evening classes held 
last year and are now doing more advanced work in read- 
ing, spelling and arithmetic. The nationalities represented 
in these classes are French, Swedish, Greek, Italian, Portu- 
guese, Norwegian, Spanish, and American, 

The attendance in both classes has been very satisfactory, 
and great praise must be given to these students that report 
four evenings a week at the high school after a day's hard 
work in the quarries, workshops or stores. 

Educational Tests and Measurements. 

The most progressive schools are making w'ide use of 
standardized tests both for the purpose of finding out how 
well the schools are teaching the fundamental subjects and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

of making methods of instruction more helpful to the in- 
dividual child. Standardized tests vary chiefly from the 
ordinary examination given by teachers in that they have 
been much more carefully prepared and have been given 
to a very large number of children throughout the country. 
From a study of the results obtained on these tests, definite 
norms or standards are set for pupils in particular grades 
or at particular ages. 

It is stated in the Virginia Public School Survey that 
"a valid survey of any school must inquire how well the 
pupils are learning to read, how well they add, subtract, 
multiply and divide, how well they express their own ideas. 
Any interested parent will make these inquiries about the 
schooling of his own child. As an intelligent citizen he may 
ask these questions about other children than his own, 
and as a responsible public official he may demand to 
know in the most accurate possible terms just where the 
schools of his state stand in the service they are render- 
ing to the children of that state." 

For the purpose of answering these questions the use 
of standardized tests in arithmetic, spelling, oral reading, 
silent reading and handwriting is invaluable. Assistant 
Superintendent Clayton did very much helpful work along 
the lines of measuring the silent reading abilities of pupils 
in the various elementary schools. Using his results as a 
basis, I have endeavored to carry along the tests in oral 
and silent reading, spelling and arithmetic. Approxi- 
mately 2000 children in classes E through V have been 
given spelling and reading tests. The results, as a whole, 
were commendable and show that the Concord schools are 
up to standard in both spelling and silent reading. The 
tests have revealed to the teachers some weak spots in the 
grades as well as some of the strong points. About 100 
pupils in classes C and D were tested on their ability to 
read orally and the results secured show that the children 
in these particular classes are about a year ahead of the 
children in the same classes in numerous other cities. 

The primary value of these standardized tests, however, 



110 CITY OF CONCORD. 

is not to show how one grade or one school system compares 
with another grade or another school system but to reveal 
to the teacher just what points she needs to emphasize 
most. 

It is recommended that standardized tests be used more 
extensively and that the results of these tests be used in 
determining definite standards of achievement for each 
grade. 

The Concord High School. 

It is one of the duties of the assistant superintendent of 
schools to devote a large part of his time to supervision in 
the senior high school. The problems in this particular 
field are great. The frequent changes of teachers, the dif- 
ferent curricula, the fact that a large number of pupils 
come from surrounding towns, the congested conditions 
making it necessary to use the laboratories and the as- 
sembly hall for recitation purposes, all these create con- 
ditions that call forth the best efforts on the part of the 
headmaster and teachers if the standards of the school are 
to be maintained. 

During this semester the teachers in the junior high 
schools, the Parker school, and the senior high school are 
to work through committees with the definite purpose of 
revising and making more definite the courses of study in 
the high school. The English teachers have already started 
their task and it is hoped that within a short time the re- 
sults of their efforts and investigations will be put in 
print, not only that the school officials may know, but also 
that the students and parents may have at hand detailed 
knowledge of what is expected of pupils in the Concord 
high school. 

In conclusion I wish to express my appreciation of the 
co-operation of the teachers and of the helpful advice of 
the superintendent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. W. WALKER, 

Asst. Supt. of Schools. 



SCHOOL REPORT. Ill 

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTOR. 



Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent. 

Dear Sir : The work of medical inspection in the schools 
of Union School District for the first semester of 1923-1924 
may be summarized as follows: 

(1) Routine physical examination of 1974 pupils, 
carefully recorded, with notification of parents regarding 
all defects that demand the attention of their family 
physician. 

(2) Provision for daily milk lunches in the West Con- 
cord schools, in addition to those already served in the city. 
Arrangements have been made for more effective distri- 
bution of free milk to needy, undernourished children, at 
the discretion of the teachers — a plan that has proved most 
satisfactory to all concerned. In the rural schools, in which 
pupils are obliged to bring their noon lunches, facilities for 
hot cocoa or soup have been provided. 

(3) Sanitary inspection of all the school buildings in 
the district. Improvement in sanitary conditions is in 
progress, and plans are being made for putting all build- 
ings in up-to-date condition. 

(4) The dental clinic — The work of this department is 
highly satisfactory, and the physical examination of upper 
grade pupils shows extraordinary results of the early treat- 
ment of their teeth. A detailed report of this clinic is sub- 
mitted herewith. This work, as well as the large number 
of routine physical examinations during the semester, 
would have been impossible without the assistance of Mrs. 
Upham, the school nurse, who has taken an active interest 
in these activities. 

The one discouraging factor in the work of health in- 
spection is the reluctance on the part of many parents to 
heed suggestions as to correction of defects shown by 



112 CITY OF CONCORD. 

physical examinations. The pupils themselves, however, 
are developing a genuine interest in their health, which will 
have an important influence in that direction in the future. 
I wish to express my appreciation of the hearty co-opera- 
tion of the superintendent, the teachers, and associates in 
the office, which has made the work of the new medical in- 
spector, a most agreeable one. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR K. DAY, M.D., 

Medical Inspector. 



school report. 113 

Report of the School Nurse. 

February 1, 1923, to February 1, 1924. 

Assisted Medical Inspector at Routine Examination of 
pupils. 

Visits to schools and homes for consultation with pupils, 
teachers, and parents. 

Visits to officials, doctors, etc., to make arrangements 
for treatment. 

Report of Dental Clinic. 

February 1, 1923, to February 1, 1924. 

Number of clinics held -. 31 

Pupils treated 344 

Cleanings 256 

T-,.,,. Ajnal 253 ,„_ 

Fillings 365 

Cem 112 

Extractions 383 

Examinations 344 

Total number of operations 1348 

Dentists: Dr. Morton. Dr. Young. Dr. Washburn. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN Y. UPHAM, R.N. 



114 city op concord. 

Report of Physical Director. 
Mr. Louis J. Bundlett, Superintendent of Schools, 

Dear Sir: I am hereby presenting my report on the 
work of physical instructor for the year 1923-1924. This 
report deals briefly with instructions given, schools bene- 
fitted and recommendations for improvement. 

Instruction has been given in the following athletic 
exercises and games: football, baseball, basketball, track, 
hockey, boxing, wrestling, marching tactics and physical 
drills. 

The Senior High School and Junior High Schools (Par- 
ker, Walker, Garrison and Chandler) received the most 
benefit from these instructions. 

The greatest improvement shown was in the National 
Playground Association Tests given at the Parker School. 

There is a vital necessity for a gymnasium in our school 
system. 

"A close observer of youth cannot refrain from the 
belief that the softening influences of modern social life 
have already exercised a benumbing effect on youth." 

A suitable place where track athletics can be developed 
should be proposed and a committee appointed to inves- 
tigate the matter. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENE M. CALLAHAN. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



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Average number of pupils partici- 






















pating eacli day 


60 
















50 


50 




( 40 
I 15 


66 
20 


32 
16 


22 
10 


50 
20 
















30 


90 


150 


120 


120 


90 






15 









JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS. 
Parker School. 
Average number <if pupils partiei- 


240 












120 
25 


120 

25 






Participants ranging from 


(100 
( 80 

30 


25 
12 

60 


15 

8 

120 




30 

12 

90 






30 






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Chandler School. 
Average number of pupils partici- 


116 


40 


70 


30 


30 


20 










Partieipants ranging from 




Number of participants per week 


60 


80 


80 


80 


80 


80 




















Garrison School. 

Average number of pupils partici- 
pating each day 


50 


20 


20 


20 




10 










Participants ranging from 










Number of minutes per weelj 


60 


90 


90 


90 


90 


90 














Walker School. 

Average number of pupils partici- 
pating each day 


45 


45 


60 


45 


30 


15 










Participants ranging from 










Number of minutes per week 


75 


75 


75 


75 


75 


75 


















1 



116 CITY OF CONCORD. 

3Ir. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent. 

Dear Sir: A class for Physical Drill meets weekly 
from 2.30 to 3 o'clock, each day. 

Classes V and U (one half) Monday 

Classes T and U (other half) Tuesday 
Class S Wednesday 

Class R Thursday 

Class Q Friday 

The gymnastic movements are chosen and formed with 
the object of giving the body an all round harmonious 
development. Special stress has been laid on those exer- 
cises correcting round-shoulders and hollow-back, as the 
greatest need for these exercises has been found among the 
pupils. 

Each pupil is required to wear bloomers for the class, 
so that she may perform the exercises more easily and 
derive the greatest advantage from the work. 

A number have been given special corrective movements 
to do outside of their regular class time, the policy of 
the work in general being to bring all the pupils up to i 
standard form. 

The above individual efforts have added much in accom- 
plishing this end. 

EMILY B. PEASE. 





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118 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT CENSUS, 
1923. 



Boys 

Number of children enumerated 1,682 

Increase since 1922 

Number attending school since 1922 104 

Number attending public schools 1,330 

Number attending parochial schools 322 

Number attending private schools 31 

Number of children enumerated between the 

ages of 5 and 16 inclusive 1,682 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 not reg- 
istered in the district or elsewhere 12 

Number between the ages of 8 and 14 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 1 

Number between the ages of 14 and 16 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere 3 

Number between 5 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 5 and 8 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 8 and 14 not attending 

school regularly 2 

Number between 14 and 16 not attending 

school regularly q 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write 

the English language correctly 

How many of these were born in New Hamp- 
shire 

Elsewhere in the United States 

In foreign countries 

Moved to district since 1922 66 



Girls 


Total 


1,603 


3,285 




37 


114 


218 


1,308 


2,638 


263 


585 


31 


62 


1,603 


3,285 


8 


20 





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88 


154 



NATIVITY OF PARENT. 

American born 1,284 

Foreign born 456 

Russia 13 

West Indies 

Italy 59 

New Brunswick 7 



SCHOOL REPORT. 119 

England 32 

Poland 

Sweden 57 

Roumania 

Ireland 46 

Canada 147 

Denmark 1 

Germany 5 

Nova Scotia 10 

Prince Edward Island ; 17 ' 

Finland 30 

Scotland .... 13 

Albania 1 

Austria 2 

Switzerland 2 

Greece 5 

Newfoundland 1 

Armenia 3 

France 2 

South America 1 

Syria 1 

Cape Breton 1 

NATIVITY OF CHILD. 

Boys Girls Total 

American born 1,637 1,560 3,197 

Foreign born 45 43 88 

Russia 

Italy 5 3 8 

England 4 2 6 

Sweden 3 3 

Ireland 2 13 

Armenia 

Canada 21 23 44 

Scotland 3 2 5 

Finland 5 2 7 

Newfoundland (> 

Nova Scotia 1 3 4 

Albania 1 1 2 

Prince Edward Island 1 1 

New Brunswick 2 1 3 

Greece 1 1 2 



120 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE MORRILL 
SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS. 



Mr. Louis J. Rundletty Superintendent . 

Dear Sir : In submitting this brief outline of the activi- 
ties of the Morrill School for the past year, I am pleased 
to report a steady improvement in the work accomplished, 
methods of instruction, condition of equipment and general 
morale of teachers and pupils. It is worthy of note that 
while we, as a school unit, have performed our full share in 
the promotion of education during "School Week" and at 
other times, and have answered every call made upon us 
for assistance or co-operation, not a single teacher or pupil 
has been heard to complain. The action of the Board of 
Education in taking out Liability Insurance covering 
teachers and pupils has caused favorable comment from the 
press in all parts of the country. 

Teachers. 

For the first time since serving as the head of this depart- 
ment, I have had the satisfaction of working with a full 
staff of trained teachers. In my opinion, it is impossible 
to over-estimate the advisability of retaining teachers of 
proven worth. I feel sure that I second your own opinion 
when I say that the right kind of teacher becomes, through 
years of real service, a vital, loyal, and efficient power in 
a school system. It seems unnecessary to mention in de- 
tail the individual work of each teacher. They have all 
performed their respective duties efficiently and con- 
scientiously and I trust every reasonable effort will be made 
to keep the Morrill School staff intact for the year 1924-25. 

Equipment. 

The installation of a second-hand linotype machine to 
our printing department has added much to the educa- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 121 

tional scope of this department and to its efficiency in 
producing projects of value to the school district. 

The installation of an iron planer, surface-grinder, pro- 
filer, and bench-grinder, purchased of the Crawford 
Manufacturing Company, completes the equipment of this 
department. It may be desirable to add accessories or 
special attachments for the machines we already have, 
but on the whole I shall not recommend more equipment 
for this shop. 

The sink placed in Koom 5 has proved a real benefit to 
Mr. Wilcox. It has saved a great deal of time for the 
pupils and has been the direct cause of improvement in the 
discipline in this room. 

It seems fitting that I should mention the two wood-turn- 
ing lathes loaned indefinitely to the school by the Durgin 
Silver Manufacturing Company. 

Projects. 

Several large community projects have been completed 
this year, among which were the toboggan-slides and extra 
sections for the ''Gun Club Ground" bleachers. Our regu- 
lar school projects have been similar to those used in pre- 
vious years. 

Recommendations. 

The only expensive machine which I believe to be greatly 
needed is a surface-planer for the wood-working depart- 
ments. However, I shall not recommend its installation 
at this date. Nevertheless, I have three recommendations 
to make, which, if acted upon, will improve the efficiency of 
the school. 

First : A new teacher should be added to the staff, 
having the necessary qualifications to present the related 
and academic subjects. The Parker School classes have 
become so large that it is necessary to divide each of them 
into three parts for shop work and two for history, which 
you see presents new complications in making out our 
schedule. It is also desirable that we have at least one 



122 CITY OF CONCORD. 

class in English for such pupils as have failed and find it 
impossible to get into the regular fourth course English 
in the High School. The addition of this teacher would 
enable us to care for the Parker School pupils throughout 
the entire forenoon session, which would not only save 
each pupil nearly one-half hour per day, but would remedy 
the disadvantages manifested in passing between the 
Parker and Morrill Schools. The program for the Parker 
School pupils would then be something like this : 

A.M. Morrill School P.M. Parker School 

History, Shop, Study Assembly, Math., Eng. 

Second: To the staff should also be added a student 
assistant capable of assisting in the machine, wood-work- 
ing, and electrical laboratories. It is almost impossible at the 
present time for Mr. Wilcox with his full schedule and his 
large over-equipped room to keep his equipment and rec- 
ords in proper condition. It is nearly impossible, also, for 
us to do outside work for the District such as installing 
electric lights, putting up wall-board at the Garrison School, 
etc., because our classes are so large that it is impractical 
for a teacher to take his entire class with him on outside 
work. The classes in electricity are also too large to be 
handled efficiently, even in our well equipped electrical de- 
partment, without dividing each class into two groups. It 
has also become necessary to divide grade classes into two 
and three sections. Furthermore, if a teacher happens to 
be sick, in most cases, it is impossible to provide instructors 
for his classes while he is absent. Up to the present year 
I have been able to claim that regardless of extra work or 
the absence of teachers the school routine was continued 
without a break. 

Third : A clerk, preferably a young man from the com- 
mercial department, should be installed. If the records 
of this office and other routine clerical work were to be 
maintained as I would like to have them, it would be 
necessary for me to spend practically all my time at the 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

desk. With nearly five hundred boys to account for, the 
necessary state reports and other records required, and the 
great amount of equipment and supplies to check and 
record, it is at once evident that a clerk is as greatly needed 
in this school as in any other school in the district. A clerk 
in the office would not only give me more time to supervise 
the work of the school but would give me time to follow 
up pupils who leave the school, either before or after 
graduating. This phase of my work is becoming of great 
importance. Business men are asking for our boys and 
each year I am doing more placement and follow-up work. 
You will no doubt recall that my predecessors were al- 
lowed pupils from the commercial department for one 
week at a time which enabled these girls to be of great 
assistance to the Supervisor. Since I have had the school, 
however, I have been allowed a pupil from the commercial 
course for only a few periods at a time and rarely, if ever, 
two days in succession. You will see that outside of copy- 
ing or writing short letters, their services are of little use. 

In making the above recommendations, I wish to call to 
mind that when I assumed this work, it was required that I 
strive to improve the school and to increase its activities. 
I have bent every effort to do this and in making these sug- 
gestions I am but endeavoring to carry out requirements. 

Conclusion. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my sincere appreciation 
of the loyal and kindly support given me during the past 
six years by the Board of Education, and all others with 
whom I have been associated in maintaining the excellent 
standard of this school. 

Respectfully yours, 

ROLAND G. HARTWELL, 

Principal. 



124 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF HOME 
ECONOMICS. 



Concord. N. H.. Feb. 16, 1924. 
Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Supt. of Schools, Concord, N. H. 

Dear Sir: From February to June, 1923, the work of 
the Sewing Department only was under my supervision, 
and made progress which compared favorably with that 
of other years. The number of electives in the Parker and 
Senior High Schools showed a real desire for this work. 

In September, the Cookery and Sewing Departments 
were combined and the Fifth or Home Economics Course 
was again put into the school curriculum. Of the 27 
girls who elected this course, 21 are continuing the work ; 
four have left school, and two have changed to other courses. 
Eighteen pupils elected the course in February — this in- 
dicates that Home Economics is not only wanted, but 
needed by girls. 

Little change has been made in the Sewing Course for 
classes I, J, K, and L. 

Instead of alternating the sewing and cookery in classes 
M and N, cookery has been taught in class M, and sewing 
in class N, the unit system being used. The work of this 
year is so planned that the pupil may know whether or 
not she wishes to elect the Home Economics Course in the 
Parker School. 

The cookery in Class has been practically the same as 
that for Class M only more advanced and requiring more 
study. The practical work done has been on a much larger 
scale, as the lunch-room provides a market for the food. 
However, this "market" should not be used to such an 
extent that it hinders the progressive course mapped out. 
During Educational Week, the girls of this class served 
two dinners ; one to the Rotary Club and one to representa- 
tives of the various women's organizations in the city. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 125 

There was also an exhibit, or rather demonstration of work 
in the corridor of the City Hall on School Night. The 
serving of dinners is good practice for the girls and more 
such work could be done, but the present equipment is 
far too limited. 

The sewing of this class has included the making of a 
set of underwear, a woolen dress and the hemming of table 
linen and the study of cotton and wool from the cultivation 
of the fibre to the manufacture of cloth. Millinery is in- 
cluded in the spring term. This department is more for- 
tunate, in that the equipment needed to carry out a course 
is less than that required in the cookery department. 

The Art and Music were not included in the Course dur- 
ing the first semester ; the art, because of the illness of 
Miss Jones and the music for other reasons. 

The Household Management, Organization, etc., in the 
Senior High School have not been included in this depart- 
ment, but should be, in order that the work may be more 
closely connected. 

I sincerely hope that the Home Economics Course may 
become permanent, but suitable accommodations must be 
found if the interest of the girls is to be maintained until 
the new high school becomes a reality. There will be 21 
girls in Class Q, 18 in P class and, I feel very sure of an 
equally large class in the fall. Advanced work cannot 
be given with the present equipment. 

Very truly yours, 

B. LILLIAN BARKER, 

Supervisor of Home Economics. 



126 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent. 

Dear Sir : Two methods of teaching music in the pub- 
lic schools are advocated by leading educators at the present 
time. One is the so called Song Method, while the other 
places more emphasis upon sight reading. 

The Course of Study in music in the Concord schools 
has been arranged and conducted in the firm belief that 
every child should have the opportunity to learn to read 
music and that his enjoyment and appreciation of the art 
will be greatly increased by doing so. 

Rote singing is taught in the lower grades and songs 
are in use in all grades, but above the second year, all 
music sung by the pupils is taught by note, that is, by the 
use of the syllable names and the movable doh. A brief 
synopsis of the Course of Study for the Elementary Schools 
accompanies this report. 

Any method of teaching or course of study must, how- 
ever, be judged and its value determined by the result of 
its practical application. 

We have some excellent reading and singing in the 
elementary schools, much that is good and a little that 
is only fair. This estimate is based upon a comparison of 
the work here with that which I have heard in Boston, 
Hartford, Springfield, and in other Massachusetts cities. 

In the Massachusetts cities which I have visited, about 
thirty per cent more time is allowed for music in the schools 
than is allowed here. 

In the Kimball School Class K during last semester there 
was as good three part singing as I have ever heard in a 
like grade anywhere. 

In classes M and N in the Chandler and Walker Schools 
we have really creditable four part work. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 127 

Owing to conditions which do not now exist, the singing 
in the Parker school during last term was not up to its 
usual standard of excellence. 

The chorus singing in the Senior High School is better 
than for some time. One practice period of twenty-five 
minutes per week would not be enough to produce very 
good results even with a selected group of one hundred 
adult voices. The spirit of the school is good and they 
work willingly and do as well as they can under the cir- 
cumstances. 

During the last semester the H. S. Girls' Glee Club of 
fifty-five members was the largest in the history of the 
school. The Boys' Glee Club was small. Athletics and 
"work after school" kept many away. This term it is 
much larger and were it not for the scarcity of first tenors 
should do excellent work. 

The Senior High School Orchestra last term was as 
good as any that we have had. 

An orchestra made up of pupils from the Junior High 
schools has been organized and meets for practice weekly 
at the Parker School. 

A choir of mixed voices, for practice in part singing, 
has also been organized at the Parker School with a 
practice period of forty-five minutes on Tuesday after- 
noons after school. 

A small orchestra in the Garrison School is at work 
upon the Toy Symphony by Haydn, and a Girls' Glee Club 
has recently been formed for the practice of two and 
three part singing. Credit for this should be given to 
Miss Hickey, the very efficient principal. 

Miss Colburn, Assistant Teacher of Music, is taking 
charge of the work in classes A to H inclusive, which she 
visits weekly. Miss Colburn also plays the piano for two 
Senior High School choruses and visits the Riverhill and 
Mountain Schools once in two weeks. 

Her assistance is very greatly appreciated, as now, with 
the exception of the outlying schools, each room will be 



128 CITY OP CONCORD. 

visited at least weekly and more time will be given to the 
various musical activities in the high schools. 

Military bands have been organized in many city high 
schools, especially throughout the West. We have in our 
Senior High orchestra three cornets, two clarinets, one 
trombone and drums. This would give us a nucleus for 
such an organization here. We need, in addition to those 
mentioned, two melophones, one trombone, one baritone 
and one E-flat bass. 

One melophone has been bought and is in the hands of 
a Parker School student. The four instruments needed 
would cost, at second hand, about one hundred and sixty- 
five dollars. If new ones were bought, fifty to seventy- 
five per cent more. I wish very much that these instru- 
ments could be secured at once and put to immediate use. 

I cannot close this report without expressing my sin- 
cere appreciation of the very cordial attitude taken by 
all connected with our schools (from the Members of the 
Board of Education and Superintendents, down through 
the teachers and pupils of the various grades) towards 
that particular branch of the educational tree with which 
I am fortunate enough to be connected. To every one I 
extend my hearty thanks. 

Very respectfully, 

CHARLES S. CONANT. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 129 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF 
KINDERGARTENS. 



M7'. Louis J. Rmidlett, Superintendent of Schools. 

Dear Sir : I hereby submit my report as Supervisor of 
Kindergartens for the year ending February, 1924. 

In September, 1923, a new kindergarten was opened at 
the South End in the building on Dunklee Street recently 
purchased by the district. At no great expense in the 
matter of equipment this has been made into one of the 
most attractive kindergartens in the city. The school 
situation; attractive class of children; average number 
enrolled; large room, freedom of building and play- 
ground gives possibilities that might make conditions al- 
most ideal. 

During the last year many changes have been made in 
the equipment of the various kindergartens. In all 
kindergartens except the Kimball and the Walker, the 
long tables have been cut in two. The smaller table is 
easier to handle, a big item in small rooms where tables 
must be moved several times during the morning. 

Block boxes have been made for all kindergartens ex- 
cept the Dunklee and the Kimball. In these boxes the 
larger building blocks are kept. More and more the small 
individual boxes of Frobelian material are being dis- 
carded, the blocks being "dumped" into a large box to 
be used as the child wishes. This does away with the 
strain of opening boxes ; it also gives children more 
choice in selecting what they need. 

A set of Hill floor blocks has been added to the Dewey 
equipment. It has been interesting to watch the children 
working with these blocks. At first the pleasure in using 
the large blocks and experimenting with them satisfied. 
Since Christmas, however, the work is progressing. More 
definite ideas in building are being shown, more blocks 



130 CITY OF CONCORD. 

are being used, and the interest carries over to the next 
day. Before the year ends I hope for some project which 
will serve as a center for other group activities. 

While I appreciate the fact that Hill blocks are still a 
"luxury,"' I feel that larger building material should be 
put in all the other kindergartens. This added material 
calls for the use of the child's larger muscles and also 
gives chance for more worth while work. 

The tendency now is toward discarding all the finer 
"occupation" materials such as small pegs, card board 
sewing, paper weaving, etc., and using only those that 
will not cause strain to the nervous high strung child of 
today. Some of the discarded material at the Dewey has 
been loaned to Mrs. Lewis to use with her smaller chil- 
dren at play time, and to Mrs. Meade in her room at the 
Walker. 

The pianos in some of the kindergartens are very bad. 
As the "beginnings" of music start in the kindergarten, 
it is unfortunate to have such conditions. 

The suggestion was made in June that each kindergart- 
ner begin in the fall with an informal socially organized 
group. Definite directions were given to be tried out 
for a week or so, the result to be noted and discussed at 
the first Teachers' meeting in September when the course 
of action would be decided upon. This was done with 
the following outcome. 

The Dewey, Garrison, and Kimball have continued 
working along these same lines of "purposeful activity 
on the part of the child," using the project method as the 
method of teaching and child development. The Dunklee, 
Rumford, and Walker are using more conservative formal 
methods, although some choice is left to the chil- 
dren. The change in method was to be entirely volun- 
tary on each teacher's part, as lack of interest, unwilling- 
ness to cooperate and unfamiliarity with methods may 
lead to dangerous results. The teachers at the Garrison 
and Kimball agree that while this first year is hard and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 131 

discouraging they have faith to see that it tends to bring 
out the best in the child's development and the results 
gained fully repay the efforts made. 

Constant "checking up" on the part of the teacher is 
necessary to see that the children are progressing and 
in the right way. It is almost impossible to keep in- 
dividual daily records of forty children, but the little bit 
jotted down each day is surely better than no record at all. 

The number of visitors in each kindergarten is very 
gratifying. Opportunity to see the children working in 
their normal conditions counts for more than special 
days. 

The number of children enrolled was larger this fall 
than that of last year. 

Four new assistants were elected this fall. Each one 
is doing good work, and while inexperience is a handicap 
in some ways, this is offset by enthusiasm which is a 
valuable asset to any kindergarten. 

Milk lunches are served in every kindergarten with the 
exception of the Dunklee. I believe they are to be put 
in here later. 

Meetings of all the kindergartners are held on Tues- 
days at stated intervals. The number held last year 
was twelve. The number held this year to date, seven. 
At these meetings items of interest in kindergarten edu- 
cation, both practical and theoretical are discussed and 
kindergarten news both local and general are exchanged. 

Personal visiting in the various kindergartens is not an 
easy thing to bring about. With a large kindergarten 
of my own, the daily attendance good, an inexperienced 
assistant, frequent visitors, and special days it is hard 
to get away even for part of the morning. This fall I 
suggested that the kindergartners visit me, and so far 
four visits have been made. Discussions at teachers' 
meetings, informal conferences with individual teachers 
help to keep me in touch with the work being done. 



132 CITY OP CONCORD. 

In discussing the kindergarten situation of other 
places both in New England and the Middle West, I 
find our standards compare favorably. In some respects 
we have superior conditions, and in other ways we do not 
fare so well. 

I wish to acknowledge here my appreciation of the 
kindly spirit and friendly cooperation of the different 
kindergartners working with me, the courtesies shown by 
the Board of Education, and the interest and helpful ad- 
vice you have so generously given. 

Respectfully submitted, 

lYLA CHAMBERLIN, 

Kindergarten Supervisor. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



133 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 




Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 



Group I.— High 
School. 



Charles F. Cook . . 
Charles E. Moors. 
Edward C. Bader. 



Walter W. Powers . 



Robert H. Doran . 



Lester E. Richwagen.. 

■ Elisabeth A verill 

May B. McLam 

Carrie E . Baker 

Elizabeth S. Sargent .. 
Carrie A. Hood 

Helen J. Knox 

Grace E. Weston 

Charlotte M.Sawyer.. 

Dorothy P. Kendall... 
Rosamond Grant 

Beatrice E. Bowler — 
Myrtle Farrar 

Nora E. Lyons 

Mary V. Musk 

Stella M. Osgood 

Mary E. Melifant 

Elizabeth D.Chalmers 

Abbie M . Sanger 

Margaret L Marston... 

Myra D. Gifford 

Margaret E. Durgin... 

Gladys W. Marble 

Isabel Corey 



Group II.— Parker 
School. 

Luella A. Dickerman. 
Helen O. Stephenson. 
Mary W. Cross 

Mildred Rowe 

Constance J. Timlin. . 

Fannie E. Lincoln. . . . 



Headmaster 

Submaster, room 1.. 
Assistant, room 7 

Physical 
laboratory, Chem- 
istry laboratory. .. 

Assistant, room 2 



Art room. 



room 9 . . . 

" room 11... 

room 3... 

" room 12... 
room 8 , . . 

room 4... 
room 10 ... 
Lecture 

room 

Assistant, Library . 
room 8 . 



Mathematics 

Bookkeeping, Com- 
mercial Arithmetic. 



Physics, Chemistry 

Bookkeeping, Econom- 
ics 

English, Civics, Histo- 
ry, Economics 



room 5 . . . 
Cooking... 



Assistant, Assembly 
Hall 



Assistant, room 6 

"_ room 13 

Library 

Clerk, Office 

Died April 23. 1923 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Leave of absence. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



French 

History 

French, Spanish. 



Mathematics, Biology. 
Shorthand, Typewrit- 

ng 

English 

French 



English 

English, History 

Shorthand, Typewrit 

ing 

Latin, French 



Household Physics, 
Household Organiza- 
tion. Physiology, 
Home Nursing 



English , 



122 School St. 
21 Pine St. 



(Penacook, N. H.) 



6 Tahanto St. 
Mass.) 

18 Rumford St. 
N.H.) 



(Cambridge, 
(Littleton, 
(Needham. 



English ... 

Latin 

Librarian , 



18 Rumford St. 

Mass.) 
S North State St. 
3.5 Perley St. 
8 North State St. (Lancaster, 

N. H.) 
101 Center St. 

110 Rumford St. 

(722 Pine St.. Manchcster.N.H.) 

8 North State St. (Westdale. 

Mass.) 
221 No. Main St. 
60 Pleasant St. 

117 No. State St. (Boston, Mass.) 
13 Summit St. (Palermo, Me. ) 



15CenterSt. (Brookline. N.H.) 

13 Blake St. (.Jamaica Plains, 

Mass.). 
T-T Center St. (Lawrence, Mass.) 
21 Green St. (Medford. Mass.) 
36 So. State St. 
18 Mills St. 



Principal 






English Conferences... 


Assistant 


room 
room 

room 
room 

room 


5 ... 

8... 

2 ... 
A... 


Latin, Mathematics . . . 








Commercial Geogra- 
phy, History 

Science. Commercial 
Arithmetic, English. 



.50 No. State St. 

7 Perry Ave. (Lowell, Vt.) 

(10 Webster St., Franklin 

N.H.) 
8,5 South St. 

11 So. Spring St. 

R. F. D. No 3. Concord, N. H. 



134 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( ) 
town 


= out of 


Group II.— Parker 
School.— Co7iii7M(ed. 


Assistant, room 1... 

room 6... 

basement 

room 




14 No. State St. 
101 School St. 

15RumfordSt. (P 
36 So. State St. 

6 So. State St. 
5 So. State St. 
14 No. .State St. 
2S Thorndike St. 
3 Rum ford St. 

Mass.) 
121 Warren St. 

41 Warren St. 
99 No. State St. 

(20 Winter St., Pen 
105 No. State St.. 

70 Rumford St. 
63 High St. 




Miriam Batchelder 

Christine C. Petersen.. 


French , English 

Ancient History, En- 
glish 




Julia M. Melifant 


Clerk 


Drtland, Me.) 


EvaE. Eastman 

Chandler School. 
Harriet S. Emmons.... 


Resigned at end of 
spring term. 

Supervising Princi- 


Mathematics, Music ... 

History, Science 

English. Latin 

Latin, English 

History, Mathematics. 




Cora T.Fletcher 


Assistant, room 3 

room 1 

" room 4 

room 2.. . 

Clerk 




Elizabeth J. Donovan. 
Emma G. Nickerson. . . 

Mary C. Caswell 


(Gloucester. 


Walker School. 
Julia E. Talpey 


Supervising Princi- 
pal 


Latin, Elementary Sci- 






Assistant, room 7 

rooms 

room 9 — 
Resigned d u r i n g 
spring term. 

Supervising Princi- 






History, Literature 

Mathematics, Litera- 
ture, Music 




Florence A. Chandler.. 


acook, N.H.) 


Mabel F. Lane 


English, Literature — 

English, Music 

Science, Literature, 
Mathematics 




Mary E.Willis 




Garrison School. 
M. Kathleen Hickey... 




Irene W. Hart 


A.ssistant, room S 





ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 

Julia E. Talpey.. 

Viola J. Brock 

Florence A. Chandler 

Mabel F. Lane 

Edith C. Ericson 

Agnes R. Kelley 

Annie I. Hart 

Eva H. Tandy 

M. Gertrude Doherty 
Alice M. M. Phaneuf . 

Sarah E. McClure 

Agnes V. Sullivan 

Marion Silsby 

Eleanor K. Meade 

Mary E. Willis 

Marion R. Stebbins. . . 

My la B. Cavis 



Supervising Princi- 
pal 

Assistant, room 7 ... 
" room 8... 
" room 9... 
[] room 11 .. . 
'' room 10 ... 
" room 12 ... 
'[ room ^... 
'[ room 4... 
room 3... 
room 2... 



room 6... 

Resigned during 
spring tertn. 

Transferred to Kim- 
ball School. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



High School 

High School 

High School. 

High School 

Science 

Class K 

Classes I.J 

Classes G, H .• 

Classes E, F 

Classes C, D 

Classes A, B 

Kindergarten and Pri- 
mary 

Kindergarten 

Ungraded 



41 Warren St. 

99 No. State St. 

(20Winter St., Penacook, N.H.) 

lO.T No. State St. 

226 No. State St. 

12 Beacon St. 

63 High St. 

66 High St. 

145 No. State St. 

90 Rumford St. 

11 Cummings Ave. 

49 Lyndon St. 
51 Pleasant St. 
60 So. Main St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



135 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( ) = out of 
town . 


Garrison School. 
Mary K. Hickey 


Supervising Princi- 


English K,L 


70 Rumford St. 
6S High St. 
(Hooksett, N.H.) 
542 No. State St. 

5 Engel St. 
23 Forest St. 

10 Lyndon St. 
66i No. State St. 

60 No. Spring St. 

39 School St. (Milford , N 

R. F.D.5. 
R. F.D.5. 

3 Harrod St. 

9 Holt St, 

(93 High St., Penacook, N 

25 Green St. 
60 Beacon St. 

11 Thorndike St. 
56 Rumford St. 
11 Thorndike St. 
75 South St. 

47 Pleasant St. 

4 Fayette St. 

6 Court S t . (Franklin , N . 

51 Perley St. 
77 So. State St. 

26 Perley St. 

13 Rockingham St. 

38 Concord St. 
22 Albin St. 
60 Franklin St. 

10 Blanchard St. 

7 Washington St. 

5 So. State St. (Contooc 
N.H.) 

HopkintonRoad. 




Irene W. Hart 


Assistant, room 8 — 
room 1 .... 
room 6 — 
room 5 — 
rooms — 
room 4.... 

room 2 

rooml 

rooml — 
Leave of absence. 

Principal, room 3.... 

Assistant, room 2,... 

rooml — 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 

Supervising Princi- 


Arithmetic K. L 

Classes K, L 




Harriet L. Megrath — 
Mildred E. Holbrook.. 

Nora A. Cotter 

Frances M. Twomey... 
Katherine E.Crabbe.. 

Hannah E. Bourne 

Myrta B. Lowe 




Classes Q H 




Clasises C D 




Classes E F 




Classes A B 




Kindergarten and Pri- 




Mary E. Heald 

Margaret T. Lynch.... 

Eastman School. 

Elizabeth N.Merrill... 

Stella M. French 

Doris C. Saben 

Florence E . George .... 

RuMFORD School. 

Jessie N. Stlmson 




H.) 


GradesV.VI 

Grades III. IV 

Grades I II 




Arithmetic K,L 

Geography I, J, K, L, 




Anna M. Keenan 


Assistant, room 8.... 

room 7 — 

room 6.. : 
room 5 — 
rooms,... 
room 2 — 
" rooml.... 
room 5 — 
room 4 — 

" room 4 — 
Transferred to Kim- 
ball School. 

Supervising Princi- 


H.) 


Annette Prescott 


Class K, Language I, J. 
K L 




Annie E. Saltmarsh ... 

Ellen C. Doherty 

Abbie T. McDonald ... 

Mary M . Doherty 

Cecilia P. Jones 

Elizabeth M. McAfee.. 
Katharine L. Remick. . 


Classes I J 




Classes Q,H 

PI a s«ps F, F 




Classes C D 








Special Teacher 

Kindergarten and Pri- 




Pauline Q. Davenport. 
Maude B. Binet 

Kimball School. 

Marion R. Stebbins — 




H) 


Literature I, J, K, L 

Reading I, J, K. L... 

Class L, Arithmetic . . . 

Class K , Geography 




Mary A. McGuire 

Margaret A. Fanning.. 


Assistant, room 5.... 
room 6.. .. 

rooms.... 

room 7 

room 4 

rooml — 
rooms.... 
room 2.... 

room 2 




Ruth M. McCaig 


Classes I, J, Language 




Marguerite M. J. Tet- 


Classes G H 




Mary A. Coughlin 


(Classes E, F 








Edna M.Kennedy 

Maude B. Binet 






Kindergarten and Pri 








ook. 


Harriet C Kimball 


Special Teacher 




Mary E. Melifant 

Nellie T. Halloran ... 


Transferred to High 
School. 

Transferred to Dunk- 
lee Street School. 

Transferred to Walk- 
er School. 









136 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
SCHOOL TABLi:,.— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 


Penacook School. 


Principal, room 4 — 

Assistant, room 3.... 

room 2 — 

room 1 — 

Principal, room 3 

Assistant, room 4 — 
room 1 — 

Supervising Princi- 
pal, room 6 

Assistant, room 1 

room 5 

room 4.... 
room 2.... 

room 2 

room 1 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 

Principal 




55 Thorndike St. 
118 Pleasant St. 
105 So. Main St. 

11 Concord St. 

84 Center St. 

72 Washington St. 

(1 View St., W. Concord, 

101 No. State St. 

2 View St. 

90 School St. 

72 School St. 

78 Warren St. 

8 No. State St. 

61 Center St. (Exeter, N. 

(29 Center St., Penacook 
18 So. Fruit St. 
260 No. Main St. 
26 Maple St. 

67 South St. (Bristol, N 
126 Warren St. 

30 Perley St. 
60 Pillsbury St. (0 
Mass.) 

167 Rumford St. 
Fiske Road. 

12 Glen St. 

14 So. Spring St. 










Rose E. Donovan 


Classes E, F 

Classes A C 




Franklin School. 








Classes CD 






Classes A, B 


N. H.) 


Dewey School. 
Addie F. Straw 


Trainer for student 




lyla Chamberlin 


Kindergarten and Su- 
pervisor of Kinder- 




Susan M. Little 


ClassesQ,H 

Classes E, F 




Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard 

Antoinette Francis — 
Ruth N. Fanning 

Harriet P. Dame 
School. 












H.) 


Grades V, VI 

Grades III, IV 

Grades 1,11 


N.H.) 




Assistant 




Agnes E. Callahan 






Substitute Assistant. 
Transferred to Garri- 
son School. 


Grades I, II 




Katharine E. Crabbe. . 

Cogswell School. 

Fannie B. Lothrop 

Mabel Clark 


Classes CD 


H.) 




Classes A. B 




Edith C. Ericson 

DuNKLEE Street 
School. 


Transferred to Walk- 
er School. 


Kindergarten and Pri- 










Alice M.Reig 

Millville School. 
Orace M Haskpll 




range. 




Grades V, VI, VII 

GradesI,II. III.IV... 




Nora E. Murphy 






Transferred to Walk- 
er School. 




Mountain School. 

Ethel M. Carpenter 

Grace M. Haskell 

RivERHiLL School. 




Transferred to Mill- 
ville School. 


Mixed Grades 




Agnes E. Callahan 


Transferred to Har- 
riet P. Dame Scho'l. 







SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE.— Continued. 



137 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 



Iron Works School 

Delia I. Lewis 

Cadet Teachers 
IN Training. 

Elizabeth Rogers . ." — 

Nina B. Stanehfleld. .. 

Morrill School. 

Roland G. Hartwell ... 

Raymond P. Gilman .. 

Herbert C. Wilcox 

Philip H.Pike 

Ernest F. Haselton — 
Harold C. Chamberlin 

Willard H. Nute 

Arthur G. Paige , 

Arthur W. Andrews. . , 

Charles F. Dodge 

Domestic Science 
Department. 

B. Lillian Barker 

Dorothy A Higgins ... 

Miriam G. Cobb - 

Ruth M. Cutter 

Edna F. Watson 

Annie C. Cobb 

Mary E. Parsons 

F.Mildred Phillips..., 

Harriet B. Davis 

Myrtle Farrar 



Principal. 



Mixed Grades 



Teachers' Fellowship 
Teachers' Fellowship 



Principal, room 6A. . 
Assistant, room 1 — 



room 4 



room 8.. . . 
room 6.. .. 



room 3. 



room I 

room 1 



room J.. .. 



Shop Organization Oc- 
cupations 

Machine Shop Prac- 
tice, Shop Drawing. 

Pattern-making,Wood- 
turning.Dewey train- 
ing classes 

Electricity , Shop Math- 
ematics, Economics. 

Printing 

Cabinet Making, Shop 
Drawing, Manual 
Training 

Forging, Manu'l Train- 
ing at Walker Scho'l, 
Supply Department. 

Drafting 

Machine Shop Prac- 
tice, Manual Training 
at Rumford School .. 

Mathematics, Applied 
Physics. History, 
Commercial Geogra- 
phy 



Clinton St., R. F.D.2. 



4 No. State St. (Syracuse, 

N. Y.) 
127 Rumford St. (Bangor, Me.) 



4 No. State St., Suite 5. 
10 Maple St. 



229 No. Main St. 

107i No. State St. 
47 South St. 



East Concord, N.H. Route 5. 



Super, of Home Eco- 
nomics and Lunch 
Rooms 

Assistant 



Assistant 
Assistant 



Cookery , Parker Scho'l 
Sewing and Millinery. 
Sewing and Cookery . . 



315 So, Main St. 
19 Humphrey St. 



12 Lyndon St. 



14 Blake St. 



15 Center St. (Waltham.Mass.) 
64 No. State St. (Jamaica 

Plain, Mass.) 
13 Summit St. (Winchester, 

Mass.) 
37 Green St. (Antrim, N. H.) 



Lunch 
Parker 



Assistant ir 

Room at 

School 

Lunch Room at High 

School 

Assistant in Lunch 

Room at High 

School 

Resigned at end of 

spring term 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Transferred to High 

School. 



51 So. Spring St. 
57PleasantSt. (Marion. Mass.) 

8.S No. State St. 



138 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE —Concluded. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( ) = out of 
town . 



Music. 

Charles S . Conant 

Eleanor S . Colburn 

Drawing. 

Mary A. Jones 

Helen C. Redfield 



Ruth E. Battilana.. 
Physical Drill. 



Eugene M. Callahan... 
Emily B. Pease 



Capt. James J. Quinn. . 

Dorothy E. Ranney . . . 

Janitors. 

Charles M. Thomas 

Perley O. Farrar 

Charles Ada 

Fred O. Libbey 

Arthur J.Taylor 

Frank J. Boyd 

Willis C. Prescott 



William D.Merrick. 
Oland M. Blodgett . 

John P. Heath 

Frank L. Dudley . . . 



George A. Deumling. . . 

Mrs. Henry D. Robin- 
son 



George H. Greene , 
Edgar M. Royce .., 



Special Repairs. 
Reuben L. Gate 



Director . , 
Assistant 



Principal. Leave of 
absence 

Substitute for last 
semester 



Assistant . 



Director 

Instructor (Girls 

High School) 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



High and Morrill. 
High and Morrill. 

Parker School 

Parker School 

Chandler School . 

Walker School 

Garrison School. . 



Eastman School 

Rumf ord School 

Kimball School 

Penacook, Cogswell 
and Dunklee Street 
Schools 

Franklin and Dewey 
Schools 



Harriet P. Dame 
School 

Millville School 

Resigned during fall 
term. 



61 School St. 

Green St. (Westford, Mass.) 



(152 No. Main St., Penacook, 

N.H.) 
21 Pine St. (Bernardston, 

12 So. Spring St. (Duxbury, 
Mass.) 



'•3 Rumford St. 



32 So. Main St. (Thomaston, 
Me.) 



16i Gladstone St. 

4 Rockingham St. 

5 Chapel St. 
10 Glen St. 

6 Avon St. 

9 High St. Avenue. 

482 No. State St. West Con- 
cord, N. H. 
East Concord, R. F. D. -i. 
3 Odd Fellows Ave. 

10 Wall St. 



20DakinSt. 
6 Donovan St. 

Route 6, No. Pembroke Road. 
23 So. Spring St. 



East Concord. N. H.,R.F.D.5. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 139 



TABULATION OF CLASS DATA FOR NIGHT SCHOOLS, 1923-1924. 

Whole number Average Percent, of Percent, of 

of different nightly attendance, attendance 

pupils. attendance. 1923-1924. 1922-1923. 

Men Women 

English A 18 .5 12.66 84 75.34 

English B 25 7 12.13 78 68.53 

Total 43 12 

Different Nationalities Represented. 

1923-1924 1922-1923 

Italian 6 15 

Greek 5 10 

Portugese 1 5 

Swedish 12 4 

Russian . . 1 3 

Belgian 1 2 

Polish 2 

Finnish 1 1 

German 1 

Spanish 1 

Norwegian 2 

Canadian 20 

American 5 

Total 55 43 



140 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOLARSHIP TABLE. 



SCHOOLS. 


3 


3 M 

o c 

a s 


X!< 


1 

o 

a; a. 




1 

P3 

o 

0)" 


'6 

1 


o 
o 

o 

D 


1 

*i o 


o 

o 

o 
.5 a3 


2 

p. 


o 
c ^ 


High 

Group I 


V 

u 

T 

S 
R 
Q 


76 

58 
88 
82 
111 
99 


7 
1 
3 
3 
9 
4 


9.21 
1.72 
3.40 
3.65 
8.10 
4.04 


55 
25 
45 
37 
61 
38 


72.36 
43.10 
51.13 

45.12 
54.95 
3S.38 


3 

6 
9 

7 
20 
27 


5 
4 
8 
15 
11 
12 


3 

1 
4 
7 
4 
6 


17 
10 
21 
14 
33 
20 


96.05 
89.66 
89.77 
91.46 
81.98 
72.73 


3.95 
10.34 
10.23 

8.54 
18.02 
27.27 


Total 




514 

235 

255 


27 


5.25 


261 


50.77 


72 


55 


25 


115 


85.99 


14.01 


Parker 


P 

o 


23 
22 


9.78 
8.62 


132 
129 


56.17 
50.58 


9 
11 


15 
14 


12 

S 


132 
25 


96.17 
95.69 


3 83 


Group II 


4 31 






Total 




490 


45 


9.18 


261 


53.26 


20 


29 


20 


157 


95.92 


4.08 


Chandler 


N 
M 


139 

74 

213 


9 
3 


6.47 
4.05 


41 
23 


29.49 
31.08 


4 

10 


5 
9 


2 
3 




97.12 
86.49 


2 88 


Group II 


13 51 






Total 




12 


5.63 


64 


30.04 


14 


14 


5 




93.43 

96.36 
96.61 


6.57 






Walker 


N 
M 


55 
59 








23 
19 


41.81 
32.20 


2 

2 


3 

1 


3 
1 




3 64 




3 39 






Total 


114 







42 


36.84 


4 


4 


4 




96.49 


3 51 








N 
M 


21 

7 


2 



9.52 


8 
4 


38.09 
57.14 


2 

i 


2 

2 


2 
2 




90.48 
85.71 


9.52 


Group II 


14.29 






Total 


28 


2 


7.14 


12 


42.85 


3 
113 


4 


J 




89.29 


10.71 






Grand H. S. Total. 


1359 


86 


6.18 


640 


47.09 


106 


58 


272 


91.69 


8.31 



General average of High School entire 80.71 per cent. 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 





L 


220 


15 


6.72 


72 


32.72 


n 


7 


6 




95.00 


5.00 




K 


205 


9 


4.39 


36 


17.56 


12 


5 


4 




94.15 


5.85 




,T 


196 


22 


11.22 


89 


45.40 


7 


1 







96.43 


3.57 




I 


115 


6 


5.21 


43 


37.39 


10 


2 


1 




91.31 


8.69 




H 


ISO 


22 


12.22 


53 


29.50 


20 


8 


1 




88.89 


11.11 




G 


129 


8 


6.20 


37 


28. 68 


7 


2 







94.57 


5.43 




F 


166 


25 


15.06 


70 


42.16 


16 


5 







90.36 


9.64 




E 


123 


S 


2.43 


22 


17.88 


8 


3 







93.50 


6.50 


Total- -Elementary 




1,334 


110 


8.24 


422 


31.63 


91 


28 


T' 




93.18 


6.82 










Grand Totals, High 


























and Elementary. 




2.693 


196 


7.27 


1.062 


37.20 


204 


134 


70 


27.2 


92.42 


7,58 



Scholarship, 80 per cent. 
Number of A— pupils, 10 per cent. 



STANDARDS. 



Number of B— pupils. .50 per cent. 
Failures, 10 per cent. 



TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE 23, 1923. 





£ 




Of the pupils registered how many had 
prior to registration In this school, 
been registered during this school year. 


Whole number of different 
pupils registered, not pre- 
viously regii^tered in any 
other school, public or 
private, in the state dur- 
ing the school year. 




Of the pupils reported in 3 above how many o 
tember 1 (last) were 


n Sep- 




III 




1 


£ 














1 


i 




^ 




1 


S 



1 
£ 
S 


.=■ 


5 


SCHOOLS. 


ll 

if 

h 




II ^ 

If S 
° 3 

Un 

-2" ^9 


IPS 

sr.s -^ 
III s 


is: S 

.£3g 3 

Pill 


tJ 


1 


c 


i 

6 


1 
1 


O 


1 


|||J 

ill 




1 
1 


8 
1 

1 
S 


s 

c 

1 


1 
1 


1 
S 

B 

g 


1 

s 


1 

s 


1 

3 ^ 

a 'E 

- a 

3 ^ 


E 

s 

a 


1 

1 


1 

1 

1 


i 
c 
|. 

1 
1 


3 
S 
S 

1 

i 


I 

1 

C 


is 
1 

1 
1 


1 

1 






































































S . 




s 


i 




•^ 




i. 


i 


2 


£ 


i 


■5 




■s 


3 


>, 


i 


2 


S 


i 


1 


g 


i 


2 




i 


3 




■s 


3 


^ 


« 


i 




i 


3 


£ 


T. 


s 


i 1 


2 


J 




3 


u 




& 


s 


1 


i 


s s s 
a a g 




l| 


1 

e 


1 


1 


^1 


a 




B 




m 


o 


H 


a 


a 


H 




a 


El 







H 




b 






^ 


H 




O 


H 




o 


tH 


a 


a 


t< 




6 


^ 


w 


li 






- 


w 


^ 


H 














z z z 




Z 


z 


-« 


■< 






B 


^ 


HiQH Schools. 




































































1 
























1 


























619 


28 


44 


72 











2 


? 


266 


279 


645 














6 










217 


1.51 


162 


31.1 


2 


c 


2 


38 7 


f 




4 


14 


173.48S 


9.240 


498, 


26. 


.524. 


'15 


517 46.... 


10 


76 




.80 


38, 


,5,57 










160 

120 
S9 
12 


174 
10^2 
62 
23 


334 
222 
121 
35 


40 
3S 
30 

6 


47 
21 
32 
3 


87 
54 
62 

8 














119 

87 
28 
7 


128 
79 
29 
20 


247 
166 
57 
27 














40 
46 
14 
3 


48 
51 
19 
11 


88 
97 
33 
14 


65 
37 
12 
3 


79 
28 
10 
9 


144 
65 
22 
12 


11 
4 
2 

1 


4 





15 
4 
2 
1 








38 7 
38 7 
38 14 
38 7 


3 
3 
6 
3 




4 
4 

8 
4 


14 
14 
28 
14 


9.671 
52.217 
20.185 

7.663 


2.580 

1.811 

921 

463 


261. 
148. 

57.35 

22. 


10. 
5. 

2.60 
1. 


271. 
153. 
.59.9.5 

■a. 


.95 
.97 
.96 


125 26 .... 
43 5 ... 
6 1 ... 
13 


14 
8 
6 
4 


190 
37 
29 

256 


45 

23 
4 
2 


.37 
.19 
.10 
.37 


21. 
2. 
.02 


336 
165 
67 
30 


3,132 
4,092 
1,260 
800 


615 
672 
320 
150 










2 
1 


2 
1 












1 





I 
















































Totals 


645 


6S6 


1.331 


136 


147 


283 





3 


3 


1 


2 


3 


607 


535 


1,042 














109 


136 


245 


224 


236 


460 


169 


166 


335 


2 





2 


38 42 


18 




24 


84 


263.225 


15,005 


986.35 


44.60 


1,030.95 


.96 


704 78 .... 


42 


588 


123 


1.83 


S1.02 


1,165 


29,738 


4.675 






















200 

no 


ISO 
80 


170 


6U 
17 


64 
11 


124 


5 


3 
4 


10 
9 







1 
3 


3 


68 


HI 
62 


130 








33 

18 


16 

18 


49 

36 


96 
46 


88 
43 


184 

m 


10 
4 


8 

1 


18 
5 

























38 49 


21 

15 




28 
20 


98 
70 


76 463 
41 732 


5 046 
2 881 


216 2t 


14 


230 2n 
1 1 111 


93 
93 


105 
130 


.... 


1? 


267 
72 


23 
6 


1.97 
3 .56 




261 
156 


4,410 


980 
750 




OarrlBon 






49 
227 


42 
235 


462 




70 


2 

63 


2 
1.33 


7 


6 


1 
13 


1 






1 


149 


39 

166 


87 
315 








21 
41 


14 
37 


3d 
78 


26 
101 


■24 
120 


60 
221 


1 
8 


1 
7 


2 
16 



1 







1 














38 21 
38 19 


21 


3 


12 

28 


45 

98 


25 279 
91901 


2 208 
7 20'l 


' 


92 
92 


59 01.... 
104 3.... 


6 
15 


202 
202 


1 
13 


1.91 
1.70 


i!24 


114 
324 


2,531 
6,160 
6,101 
2.952 
2,664 


395 
1.723 














125 


111 


236 


29 


30 


59 


8 


5 


13 





3 




90 


71 


161 








24 


15 


39 


65 


55 


120 
36 
72 


1 


1 




2 




















38 28 
38 21 
38 21 


12 




16 


56 


49 939 


3 117 


U I IS 


94 


116 


.... 


9 


61 


7 


2.68 




184 


816 
498 








Dewey 


84 


69 


153 


2^2 


in 


32 


1 


2 


3 


n 








61 


.57 


US 










2.5 


46 


40 


32 























9 




1? 


42 


35 906 


3 098 


102 


9 


lU 


m 


77 oi::;: 


14 


116 


4 


1.46 




147 




Harriet P. Damo 


6( 


64 








2 




1 


3 


1 


f 


1 


.56 


62 


118 








W 


21 




26 


38 


64 


q 


4 


13 





(1 




II 








38 21 


a 




13 


43 


32 439 


3 967 


92 38 


11 31 


102 69 


111 


6S 




9 


16S 


4 


1,40 




78 




52! 




















































17 
51 




















38 14 
38 14 












2137 
1 640 


























1,664 
1,106 


352 
210 




Millvllle 


51 


35 


86 





2 


2 


4 


3 


7 


2 





2 


45 


30 


76 








11 


5 


16 


31 


20 


2 


5 


7 


1 





1 











6 




S 


28 


19 768 


o5 


4 


59 


91 


21 




4 


33 


2 


.41 




72 
































808 


1.716 


~ 


— 





275 




516 


683 


536 


1.119 


48 


31 


79 


— ;; 


— - 





— 


— 





38 322 


138 


— - 


185 


618 


508,060 


38,486 


1,437.39 


108. IS 


1,544.67 


.92 


S96 





113 


1,728 


74 


20.43 


4.19 


1.868 


36,447 


7.914 


- 


KuRAL Schools, 






















































22 
11 

6 

W 


10 
17 
10 

37 


32 
28 
16 

76 


5 
1 

1 

7 


3 
5 
2 

10 


8 
6 
3 

17 


2 


1 


3 








15 
10 
5 

30 


6 
12 
8 

26 


21 
22 
13 

66 


- 


- 


Z7. 


3 
3 

1 

7 


2 
5 

11 


6 
8 
5 

IS 


9 
4 
20 


4 
4 
15 


13 
14 
8 

35 


3 





3 














38 7 
38 7 
38 7 

38 21 


3 
3 
3 

9 



1 

5 


4 
4 

4 

12 


18 
14 
.15 

47 


6.730 
7.862 
4.250 


1..582 
1,196 
380 

3,168 


14. 
22. 
12. 


4. 
3. 
1. 

8. 


18. 
25. 
13. 


.78 
.88 
.92 

.89 


19 . 
33 . 
3 . 




1 
2 


3 
17 
46 


1 

2 

1 


1.00 
1.30 




24 
28 
20 








Mountain 




















457 


110 




RlverhlU 




































2 


1 


3 


— 








3 





3 


— 


— 





- 


- 


- 
















Totals 


17.848 


48. 


66. 


55 . 




3 


65 


4 


2.30 




72 


457 


110 




Unoradsd School. 
























1 


"" 


20 


6 


1 


7 














9 


4 


13 














6 


3 


" 


3 


1 


4 














38 7 


3 




4 


14 


4.736 


576 


13.53 


1.65 


15. IS 


..89 


18. 




7 


29 





.90 




18 


630 


140 




KlNOBRGARTENB. 










































2 
2t 
2 
2 


35 
11 
24 

23 
25 


59 
31 
62 
45 
47 




1 


1 














24 
20 
27 
22 
22 

115 


34 

11 
24 
23 
23 

115 


58 
31 
61 
45 
45 

230 


17 
9 
8 

13 
8 

.55 


17 
5 

14 
8 

11 

55 


34 

14 

22 
21 
19 

110 


7 
11 

18 

14 
60 


17 
6 
10 
15 
12 

60 


24 
17 
29 
24 
26 

120 


























38 7 
38 7 
38 7 
38 7 
38 7 

38 35 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 




1 
4 
4 
4 
4 


14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

70 


6,278 
3.514 
6,072 
4,977 
4.931 


1.458 
1,191 
632 
1,450 
2,069 

6,800 


35.62 

19.96 

34. 

28. 

28.58 


S.2S 
6.76 
4. 
8. 
11.75 

38.79 


43.90 

26.72 

3S. 

36. 

40.33 


.81 
.74 
.89 
.78 
.70 

.78 


4 . 
1 . 

28 '.'. 
76 . 

117 .. 




7 
6 
2 
3 

1 

19 


125 
133 
97 
76 
1.51 


2 
2 

1 


.07 
.03 
.02 
.62 
1.61 . 




59 
36 
45 
43 
40 

~223 


612 
736 
880 
896 
896 

3,920 


160 
166 
246 
171 
149 

892 




GarrlBon 










































1 




1 
















































































Dewey. 




2 


2 



















































— 

























— 


—^ 


illl 


- 


- 


- 


- 
















■ 






... 


.... 


.... 




























20 


25,772 


116.16 


184.9.1 




68_ u| 


2-^6 1 




Grand Totals 


2.05! 


1.966 


4.014 


444 


417 


861 


41 


40 


81 


6 


9 


15 


1.569 


1.488 


3.057 


55 


55 


110 


342 


312 


654 


718 


690 


1.408 


278 


268 


546 


171 


166 


337 


2 





2 


38 427 


183 


8 


245 


863 


819,631 


64,025 


2.631.43 


01.22 


2.831.65 


.92 


1.789 85 


966 


184 2.992! 206|27.8lJ65.2l| 


3,336 71,192|l3,73l| 





SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE. 



141 



Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study, 
First Semester, 1923-1924. 





Classes. 


SUBJECTS. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


|l 


English 


174 


97 

27 


173 
35 
36 


83 
19 
19 


144 

29 
65 


67 
19 
32 


109 
28 
63 


73 

9 

32 


107 
22 
44 


46 

8 

13 


_^ 







French . . 




2 










Spanish 














9 




17 
109 


5 


9 


United States History 


174 


97 












Civics 














49 


















28 


13 
















28 
109 


12 
45 








Mathematics 


174 


97 


168 


81 






27 
14 


8 


3 




4 


Physics 














34 


14 


1 


Biology 










26 














33 


39 


33 


13 






































30 

23 


17 
17 
17 


3 


Stenography 












43 
43 


31 

28 


22 

24 


5 
























20 


34 
31 










44 














Machine Shop 








17 


21 




10 


3 




Wood Turning 






43 
43 


24 
24 








Cabinet Making 




















Mechanics — Applied Mathematics 












16 


14 


10 




Shop Physics 














15 




Pattern Making . 












10 




2 






Forging 








32 
3 
32 








43 
43 


24 
24 


3 


2 
10 


3 


3 
4 


4 

4 




1 
Mechanical Drawing ' 







142 CITY OF CONCORD. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE— Concluded. 





Classes. 


SUBJECTS. 


M. 


N. 


0. 


P. 


Q. 


R. 


S. 


T. 


U. 


V. 


•6 


Music, Applied 
















3 


3 






Art, Applied 






27 
27 
91 

27 


2 

2 

43 

2 










Sewing 




47 


3 


3 


4 


3 








Cooking 


92 








Household Management and Or- 
ganization 


34 


29 












Physiology 








12 




3 




Household Physics 














21 




Freehand Drawing 


174 
174 


70 
97 
















Music, Chorus 


173 


83 


150 
3 


86 
3 


100 
6 


86 
6 


86 

1 


45 

1 




Music, Orchestra 


1 


Elementary Science 


174 


97 


44 

107 


22 

52 




















History of Art 




















Electricity 














16 


16 














43 

43 
43 


24 

24 
24 












Occupation— Economics and Busi- 








11 














82 


50 













































SCHOOL REPORT. 143 

THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST. 

BY THE PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

AT HIGH SCHOOL HALL 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 6, 1924 

AT EIGHT o'clock 

PROGRAM. 

March: "Home Guard" Mackie-Beyer 

High School Orchestra 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION— HIGH SCHOOL. 

1. "The Navy of The Future" 

Robert Adams Foster, High School 
"2. "Women in American History" 

Beulah Frances Clough, High School 

3. "Self Expression" 

Eleanor Duncan, High School 

4. "My Impressions of America" 

Thomas Costa Metro, Parker School 

^'The Owl and The Pussy Cat" Ingraham 

Boys' Glee Club, High School 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION. 

1. "Makers of The Flag" Lane 

Carl Rodney Strom, Chandler School 

'2. "The Duty and Value of Patriotism" Archbishop Ireland 
Donald James Brunei, Walker School 

3. "True Liberty" Robertson 

Albert Eli Mayo, Garrison School 
^*A Minuet at Marlay (Minuet in G)" Beethoven 

Girls' Glee Club, High School 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION. 

1. "Who's Afraid?" Cooke 

Hope Maria Rosell, Garrison School 

2. "The Gift of The Magi" O. Henry 

Dorris Marion Tilton, Chandler School 



144 CITY OF CONCORD. 

3. "The Kirby Wedding" Carrutk 

Gladys Lillian Angwin, Walker School 

"Fads and Fancies" Gruenwald 

High School Orchestra 

AWARD OF PRIZES. 
Original Declamation — High School, Groups 1 and 2. 

First Prize, $15, awarded to Thomas Costa Metro, Parker School. 
Second Prize, $10, awarded to Eleanor Duncan, High School. 

Forensic Declamation — Junior High Schools, Group 2. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Albert Eli Mayo, Garrison School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Carl Rodney Strom, Chandler 
School. 

Miscellaneous Declcmiation — Junior High Schools, Group 2. 

First Prize, $6, awarded to Hope Maria Resell, Garrison School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Dorris Marion Tilton, Chandler 
School. 

BOARD OF JUDGES. 

Prof. Beirne Lay, Concord, N. H. 

Prof. Henry C. Kittredge, Concord, N. H. 

Headmaster, Leonard S. Morrison, Penacook, N. H. 

PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT. 

Received. 

Balance from last year's account $3,476.62 

Interest on same for one year 140.26 

Sale of 424 tickets for 35c each 148.40 



$3,765.28 



Expended. 



Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services $60.00 

Prizes, including books 49.25 

English Prize Composition Contest, expense 93.50 
Miscellaneous expense including, selling and taking 

tickets, ushers, music, etc. 12.25 

Cash on hand as guaranty fund for future contests $3,550.28 

$3,765.28 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



145 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS. 



Held at the Parker School, May 5, 1923. 



School. 


No. Pupils 

E nrolled in 

School. 


No. Pupils 

Taking 

Part. 


Per cent of 
Pupils in 
Contest. 


Average 
Rank of 
Pupils. 


Average 

Per cent 

of Pupils. 


High 


543 


15 


2.76 


13.33 


82.79 


Parker 


231 


45 


19.48 


51.29 


66.34 


Chandler 


150 


30 


20.00 


61.13 


62.6 


Walker 


59 


11 


18.64 


71.27 


56.96 


Garrison 


20 



PRIZES. 









General Prizes. 



Class. 



Subject. 



First, $6 


Philip Nelson Guyol 


V 


Reasons for Mac- 
beth's Failure 


Second, $4 


Mary Teresa Collins 


V 


Why Burke's Argu 
ments are Con 
vincing 


Third, $2 


Lawrence Ilsley Duncan 

Class Prizes. 

Senior High. 
Classes U, V. 


V 


Reasons for Mac 
beth's Failure 


First, $3 


Philip Nelson Guyol 


V 


Reasons for Mac- 
beth's Failure 


Second, $2 


Mary Teresa Collins 


V 


Why Burke's Argu- 
ments are Con 
vincing 


Third, $1 


Lawrence Ilsley Duncan 


V 


Reasons for Mac- 
beth's Failure 



146 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Classes S, T. 
First, $3 Barbara Everett 



Second, $2 Beulah Frances Clough 
Third, $1 Doris Lillian Robinson 



T Life Among the 
Doones 

T Life Amon^ the 
Doones 

T Life Among the 
Doones 



Classes Q, R. 



First, $3 


Mary Elizabeth Galligan 


Q 


The Boar Hunt 


Second, $2 


Beatrice Alice Kennedy 


Q 


The Boar Hunt 


Third, $1 


Mary Elizabeth Clough 

Parker School. 
Junior High. 
Classes 0, P. 


R 


Why I Admire the 
Virginian 



First, $3 Shirley Ruth Martin P The Death of Mar- 

mion 

Second, $2 Grace Milton White P How the Curse was 

Fulfilled 

Third, $1 Ruth Louise Robinson P Life Among the 

Doones 



Chandler, Walker, Garrison Schools. 
Classes M, N. 



First, $3 Alvin Edward Simonds 
Chandler School 

Second, $2 Katherine Mclnnis 
Walker School 

Third, $1 Marjorie Louise Wright 
Chandler School 



N Why Daniel Failed 
to Win 

M Horatius' Escape 
from Death 

N The Chase 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SEVENTH ANNUAL ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL 
CONTEST. 



147 



High School Hall, June 8, 1923, 8 P. M. 

Selection: "Melody of Love" Engleman 

High School Orchestra 

Order of Speakers: 

lyla Kathleen Tracy 
Everett Chesley Benton 
Mary Esther Gushing 
Mary Teresa Collins 
Ruel Nevvrton Colby 
Dorothy Louise Gale 
Lawrence Ilsey Duncan 
Doris Ellen Abbott 

Violin Solo: "Slavonic Gradle Song" Neruda 

Jean Gove 

Selections : 

(a) March: "Prince Imperial" Duble 

(b) Waltz: "Underneath the Mellow Moon" Hall 

Mandolin Club 

Vocal Solo: "I Know Where a Garden Grows" Densmore 

Alice M. Shepard 

Selection: "Sextette from Lucia" Donizetti 

High School Orchestra 

Announcement of Award 



JUDGES. 

Supt. F. A. Morris 
Mr. J. W. Langley 
Rev. P. A. Kilmister 



MEDAL WINNERS 

Mary Esther Gushing — "Keeping One's Word" 
Lawrence Ilsey Duncan — "The Parallels and Meridians of Life" 



148 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL WEEK. 

November 18 to November 24, 1923. 

PROGRAM. 

Sunday, November 18. 
"FOR GOD AND COUNTRY DAY." 

Slogan — "A Godly Nation Cannot Fail." 

The pastors of all the different churches have been invited to 
preach about EDUCATION on this date. 

The various Fraternal Organizations have been asked to 
observe this week in their own way. 

Monday, November 19. 

"AMERICAN CONSTITUTION DAY." 

Slogans — "Visit the Schools Today." 
"Ballots, Not Bullets." 



SPEAKERS IN THE SCHOOLS. 



Cogswell School 8.30 A.M. 

Dewey School 8.30 A.M. 

Franklin School 8.30 A.M. 
Harriet P. Dame School 8.30 A.M. 

Rumford School 8.30 A.M. 

Dunklee St. School 8.30 A.M. 

Riverhill School 9.00 A.M. 

Iron Works School 10.00 A.M. 

Eastman School 10.00 A.M. 

Mountain School 11.00 A.M. 

Chandler School 11.00 A.M. 

Parker School 12.45 P.M. 

Millville School 2.00 P.M. 

Garrison School 2.3.0 P.M. 

Walker School 2.45 P.M. 

Kimball School 2.45 P.M. 

Penacook School 2.45 P.M. 



Mrs. Evelyn A. Knapp 
Mrs. Charles H. Carroll 
Mr. Amos Blandin, Jr. 
Mr. Ray Crowell 
Mrs. Robert Jackson 
Mrs. Nelson M. Knowlton 
Mr. Richard T. Smith 
Mrs. Robert Jackson 
Miss Myla Chamberlin 
Miss Myla Chamberlin 
Dr. Henry H. Amsden 
Mr. Andrew L. Felker 
Rev. Dr. Samuel S. Drury 
Mr. Ervin W. Porter 
Rev. Robbins W. Barstow 
Rev. W. Stanley Emery 
Rev. Percy A. Kilmister 



school report. 149 

Tuesday, November 20. 
"PATRIOTISM DAY." 

Slogans — "Visit the Schools Today." 
"America First." 

High School 8.30 A.M. Mr. Harry F. Lake 

Parker School 12.00 M. Concord Rotary Club 

The club will hold its regular weekly meeting and take lunch 
at the school. Patriotic exercises will be given by the pupils. 

At various times during the day all the other schools hold 
special exercises appropriate for the occasion. 



Wednesday, November 21. 
"ILLITERACY DAY." 

Slogans — "Visit the Schools Today." 
"America First." 

At various times during the day special exercises will be held 
in the various buildings. 

PRINTING HOUSE CRAFTSMEN. 

MORRILL SCHOOL. 

6.30 P.M. 

The Concord District Club of Printing House Craftsmen will 
hold its regular monthly meeting in the Morrill School of 
Mechanic Arts. Mr. E. K. Jenkins, Director of Vocational 
Education for the State of Maine, will address the Club and 
conduct a round table discussion. Following the meeting the 
members and their guests will inspect the equipment and school 
work. Lunch will be served in the High School by a class of 
girls from the Domestic Arts Department. 



11 



150 city of concord. 

Thursday, November 22. 
"SCHOOL AND TEACHERS' DAY." 

Slogans — "Visit the Schools Today.'' 

"Better Trained and Better Paid Teachers and 
More Adequate Buildings." 

Banquet of the different Women's Organizations at the Parker 
School at 11.45 A.M. 



SCHOOL NIGHT. 

City Axn)iTORiuM, Thursday Evening 
(Entrance through City Hall) 

IN THE CORRIDOR 

Demonstrations. 
6.30 to 7.00 

MORRILL SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS. 
Mechanical Drawing, Working Classes, Exhibits, Souvenirs 

DOMESTIC ARTS DEPARTMENT. 

Cookery — Making Biscuit, Preparing a Simple Dish for Supper 
Sewing — Cutting and Sewing Garments 

IN THE HALL 
7.00 to 9.30 
I. Selections by the High School Orchestra. 

II. Address — "The Interpretation of the Drama" 
Hon. Ernest W. Butterfield 
Commissioner of Education, State of New Hampshire 

III. Overture — "Medley of Patriotic Airs" 

Orchestra 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



151 



IV. "THE LIGHT" — An Educational Pageant by 
Catherine Bryce 



Prologue — "Education and Any City" 
First Glimmer — "Experience" 
Second Glimmer — "Tradition" 
Third Glimmer — "Invention" 
Fourth Glimmer — "Training" 
Fifth Glimmer — "Discipline" 



Senior High School 

Millville School 

Penacook School 

Walker School 

Kimball School 

Chandler School 



Sixth Glimmer — "A First Lesson in Democracy" 

Parker 

Seventh Glimmer — "The Book" Eastman 

Solo Dance Garrison 

Eighth Glimmer — "Force" Rumford 

Ninth Glimmer — "Democracy" 

A Modern School 

Class in Spelling 

Class in Sight Reading 

Class in Mental Arithmetic 

Class in Ethics 

Class in Hygiene 

Sewing and Cooking 

Mechanic Arts 
Tenth Glimmer — "A Warning" 



School 
School 
School 
School 



Eleventh Glimmer — "Education 



Dewey, Franklin Schools 

Eastman School 

Kimball School 

Walker School 

Cogswell School 

Harriet P. Dame School 

Home Economics Department 

Morrill School 

(With Dance) 

Garrison School 
a Dream" 



Kindergarten Through the High School 
'THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER" 



Friday, November 23. 

"COMMUNITY AND HEALTH DAY." 

Slogans — "Visit the Schools Today." 

"A Square Deal for the Country Boy and Girl." 
"An Equal Chance for All Children." 
"Playgrounds in Every Community." 
"A Sick Body Makes A Sick Mind." 
"Athletes All" 

The slogans mentioned in this program will be thrown upon 
the screens of the motion picture houses. 

We need a NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING located upon 
a large lot commodious enough to contain a field devoted to 
physical education and all kinds of athletic activity. 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SPEAKERS IN THE VARIOUS SCHOOLS 



Rumford School 8.30 A.M. 

Eastman School 8.30 A.M. 

High School 8.30 A.M. 

Iron Works School 9.00 A.M. 

Mountain School 9.15 A.M. 

Dunklee St. School 10.00 A.M. 

Millville School lO.OOA.M. 

Riverhill School 10.30 A.M. 

Garrison School 10.30 A.M. 

Dewey School 11.30 A.M. 

Franklin School 11.30 A.M. 

Kimball School 11.30 A.M. 

Parker School 2.00 P.M. 

Cogswell School 2.15 P.M. 

Walker School 2.30 P.M. 
Harriet P. Dame School 2.30 P.M. 

Chandler School 2.45 P.M. 

Penacook School 2.45 P.M. 



Dr. Robert O. Blood 
Mr. Eugene M. Callahan, 

Athletic Director 
Dr. Arthur K. Day, 

Medical Inspector 
Miss Myrtle Flanders, R. N. 
Mr. Eugene M. Callahan 
Dr. Arthur K. Day 
Miss Myrtle Flanders, R. N. 
Mrs. Helen Y. Upham, R. N. 
Miss Elena M. Crough 
Dr. Marion Bugbee 
Dr. John M. Murray 
Dr. Henry H. Amsden 
Dr. John M. Murray 
Miss Clara A. Mitchell, R. N. 
Dr. Charles Duncan 
Dr. Arthur K. Day 
Ouida M. Mackey, D. M. D. 
Miss Clara A. Mitchell, R. N. 



WALKER SCHOOL 

The Dental Clinic will be open all the afternoon. 
All citizens are invited to look at the work. 



To THE Citizens of Union School District: 

Will you please make it a point to visit the schools not only 
during this week but at all other convenient times so that you 
may see what the schools are doing and give added stimulus to 
the work? 



SCHOOL REPORT. 153 

TABLE OF TRANSPORTATION ROUTES. 



Name or Driver. 



Route. 



•6 




ea 














"a, 






S 




a 


-o 


p 




P. 


















o 






X! 


G 


s 


S 










z 


Q 



Bertha Boardman, 
Harry T. Corser ., 



C. L. Hanson 

Judson F. Hoit . . . 
William S. Kaime. 
William S. Kaime. 
William S. Kaime. 

William S. Kaime. 

William S. Kaime. 
Oscar H. Taylor... 



Birchdale Spring Road to Millville 
School 

Clinton Street and Albin Road to 
Iron Works, Chandler, Parker 
and High 

Old Turnpike Road to Penacook 
School 

Holt's to Fortier Place, to Moun- 
t*in School and Golf Siding 

East Concord to Walker, Chandler, 
Parker and High Schools 

Dimond Hill to Millville, Par- 
ker, Chandler and High Schools 

Loudon Line to Harriet P. Dame 

School 

Then to Chandler, Parker and 
High Schools 

Pembroke Road to Penacook. Cogs- 
well, Rumford, Chandler, Par- 
ker and High Schools 

Oak Hill to Eastman School 

Pagan's Comer to Millville School • 



2 


7m. 


18 


7 m. 


1 


10 m 


9 


10 m. 


40 


5 m. 


38 


10 ra. 


IS 


Sm. 


30 


6 m. 


6 


6m. 


7 


12 m. 


3 


7 m. 



or tr'ck 
■i 
4 



team 
and 
auto 



Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 

Yes 
Yes 



Yes 
Yes 



154 CITY OF CONCORD, 

HONOR LIST, 1923. 

Pupils Who Have Attained a Mark of A — or Better for the 
Entire Year. 

High School. — Mary Collins, Esther Gushing, Laurence Dun- 
can, Pauline Oyston, Eleanor Rowell, Lloyd Simpson, lyla Tracy, 
Jean Gove, Kinsley Batchelder, Paul Frost, Doris Robinson, 
Lottie Baer, Catherine Moore, Helene Wheeler, Helen Gheney, 
Natica Glayton, Eleanor Duncan, Theodore Elliott, Helen Gan- 
non, Leonard Hill, Kenneth Lane, John Parker, Madeline Ruiter, 
Mary Galligan, Eugene Magenau, Helen Perkins, Arlene Royce. 

Parker School. — Margaret Abbott, Harry Barrett, Josephine 
Boynton, Leon Brown, Richard Butterfield, Florence Coleman, 
Edward Cotter, Martha Dahlgren, Madeline Dunn, Robert Fos- 
ter, Juan Gorrell, William Jennings, Frederick Knox, Helen 
Lowe, Shirley Martin, Margaret Mclsaac, Gordon McRae, Viola 
Olson, Henry Phelps, John Sanders, Joseph Sandquist, Agnes 
Smith, Emily Sprague, Hazel Stewart, Catherine Sullivan, Rob- 
ert Wolfe, Virginia Woodward, Ruth Robinson, Lester Bullard, 
Rachel Hartford, Marjorie Lowe, Sarah Jackson, Eleanor Miller. 

Chandler School. — Jans Carlen, Helen Ericson, Kenison 
Hill, Marion Holt, Barbara Pearson, Martin Sandquist, Alvin 
Simonds, John Swenson, Doris Tappan, Dorothy Hadley, Rose 
Pelletier, Nathalie Scales. 

Walker School. — Lester Billings, Carl Evans, Evelyn Foster, 
Lawrence Tucker, Janet Kennedy, Robert Parker, Vernar 
Josephson, Barbara Butterfield, Elizabeth Butterfield, Tilton 
Gorrell, Irene Lampron, Jean Sanders, Noel Wilcox, Dixon Tur- 
cott, James Messier, Jane Chase, Ethel Gerrish, Elizabeth 
Grammont, Anne Hill, Pauline Rogers, Robert Hobart, Fzolouhi 
Ketchian, Evelyn Rosendale, John Walker, James Holmes. 

Garrison School. — Harriette Dakin, Hope Rosell, Waino 
Kupsala, Dana Bogart, Miriam Myllymaki, Viola Ayott, Elsa 
Paananen, Esther Kellom, Olari Waananen, Bernard Edmark, 
Mary Dakin, Flora Dimond. 

Eastman School. — Douglass Woodward, Everett Webber, 
Jennie Keyes, Laura Smith, Jeannette Saben, Doris Maynard, 
Richard Paige. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 155 

RuMFORD School. — Dorris Tilton, Ona Collins, Dean William- 
son, Rodney Strom, Jeanni McKenzie, Doris Wilson, Elizabeth 
Brower, Themia Apostal, Wayne Jordon, Marjorie Getchell, 
Hazel Jordon, Eleanor Crowley, Olnes Strom, Ralph Ashton, 
Eileen Palmer, Evelyn Emerson, Marion Young. 

Kimball School. — Louise Magenau, William H. Foster, 
Atwood Levensaler, William McRae, Viola Goodyear, Josephine 
Mooney, Janet Peaslee, Robert Leavitt, James Nelson, Donald 
Royce, Alice Baker, Temple Clayton, Dorothy Holmes, Edgar 
Rines, Helen Sanborn, Anne Ring, Guy Vitagliano, Winnifred 
Morrill, Ruth Stickney, Winnifred Goodwin, Isabel Jameson, 
Bertha Woodward, Sarah Smith, Alice Boutwell, Barbara Fuller, 
Howard Rines. 

Penacook School. — James Wason, Carolyn Fardon, George 
Wilcox, Arthur Kelley, John Hargen, Edwin Gale, Arnold Wald- 
man, Hazel Howe, Carolyn Brunei, Norman Messer, Olive 
Knapp, Beatrice Bourke, Evelyn Cling, Frances Hadley, Richard 
Jewell, Rachel Wilcox, Carrie Tabor, Bernice Baraby. 

Franklin School. — Richard Ahern, Morton Haskell. 

Dewey School. — Mildred H. S. Sandquist, Gerald M. Hall, 
Raymond S. Rawcliffe, N. Eleanor Orkins, Benjamin Halstead, 
Robert J. Mulligan, Ada H. Berry, M. Madeline Cusano, Chas. 
E. Moors, Jr., Joseph Comolli. 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Mary Burnell, Ernest Boulay, 
Robert St. Pierre, Doris Prescott. 

MiLLViLLE School. — A. Estes Clarke, William J. Galligan, 
Frank G. Taylor, Douglas Overton. 

Iron Works School. — Dorothy Batchelder, Norman Grover, 
Richard Upton. 

Mountain School. — Albert Mayo, Henry Nerbonne, Arthur 
Dame. 

RiVERHiLL School. — None. 



156 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE. 



SCHOOLS 



, 


, 






S'S 


2 






S3'0 


2 






-OS I-, 




^ p es 


f-> 


O Sh 0) 


o3 


.C>> 




O® s 




^«'£ 


^ 


0«*^ 




ot^5f 




j3 ».=; 


is 



Cooking. 



c t; 



02 QJ 



z.-^ -i; tr be 



• be S 

5.sS 

OS E 



Mechanic Arts. 



(h'O 



o§' 

:= P..i 



S bo 

Pig 
. bo <^ 

(D C ^1 

OJj g 

^ eg D 



High 

Parker 

Chandler , 

Walker 

Garrison 

Eastman 

Rumford , 

Kimball 

Penaeook 

Franklin , 

Dewey Training 
Harriet P. Dame 

Millville , 

Mountain 

Iron Works 

Riverhill 

Total 



19 

28 

102 

100 

45 

13 

90 

62 

21 

20 

13 

22 

16 

2 

8 

3 

564 



5 


14 


11 


17 


35 


67 


18 


82 


10 


35 





13 


34 


56 


22 


40 


7 


14 


9 


11 





13 


4 


18 


5 


11 





2 





8 


2 


1 


162 


402 



132 

169 

103 

47 

24 



119 



120 

115 

73 

33 

15 



127 
70 
83 
61 
15 
8 
39 
33 



13 



122 
65 
81 
59 
15 
8 
39 
33 



12 



455 



SCHOOL REPORT. 157 

GRADUATING EXERCISES, CONCORD HIGH 
SCHOOL. 

CLASS OF JUNE, 1923. 

AUDITORIUM, FRIDAY, JUNE 22, 1923, 2.30 P. M. 

PROGRAM 

March: "The Boys in Khaki" Bennett 

High School Orchestra 

Prayer 

Rev. W. Stanley Emery 

Essay: "Pasteur, The Master" First Honor 

Laurence Ilsey Duncan 

Essay: "The Ideal Worker" Second Honor 

Pauline Winifred Oyston 

Selection: "Morn-Rise" Alphonz Czibulka 

Girls' Glee Club 

Address: "Privilege and Purpose of a Liberal Education" 

Rev. Horace Blake Williams 
Manchester, N. H. 

Award of Prizes: 

Albin Medals 
Harvard Club Prize 
Woman's College Club Prize 
Thayer Athletic Prize 
Class of January 1922 Cup 

Presentation of Diplomas 

March: "Baron Munchausen" Bennett 

High School Orchestra 

CLASS OFFICERS 

President Richard A. Morton 

Vice-President Katharine Graves 

Secretary Arnold Engel 

Treasurer Laura Plummer 



158 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



GRADUATING CLASSES OF THE CONCORD HIGH 

SCHOOL. 



CLASS OF JUNE 22, 1923. 



Name. 



Doris Ellen Abbott 
Clark Winston Aldrich 
Vera Dagmar Anderson 
Grace Erma Andrews 
Robert Dudley Bailey 
George Albert Bartlett 
Laura Carr Batchelder 
Hazel May Bean 
Eleanor Elaine Blodgett 
Warren Hall Butterfield 
Marion Catherine Callahan 
Agnes McDougall Chalmers 
Merle Estelle Chase 
Ruth Helen Colby 
Mary Teresa Collins 
Alice Marie Corriveau 
Jessie Ellen Cruickshank 
Mary Esther Gushing 
Mabel Collins Degnan 
Doris Lillian Dickey 
Constance Margaret Dimick 
Laurence Ilsley Duncan 
Louis Arnold Engel, Jr. 
Dorothy Louise Gale 
Edward John Gannon 
Katharine Graves 
Philip Nelson Guyol 
Arthur David Hadley 
Ruth Herter 
Harry Eugene Hilliard 
Mildred Lucille Clarke Hodge 
Mary Home 
Nathalie Muriel Hurd 
Michael Angelo Jenovese 
Ethel Viola Mathilda Johnson 
Doris Mary Jolin 
Flora Emma Keniston 
Edward Napoleon Lamprone 



Course. 

Academic 

Classical 

Commercial 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Mechanic Arts 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Academic 

Commercial 

Classical 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Classical 

Mechanic Arts 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Classical 

Commercial 

Classical 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Commercial 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



159 



Iris Leila Leavitt 
Dana Huntley Lee 
Alice Levingston 
Crosby Holt Lewis 
Milo Vincent Lindgren 
Esther Mary Mannion 
Jack Dustin Mansur 
Lurline Leola Marshall 
Hazel Beatrice Maynard 
James Joseph McGoff 
Marguerite Mary McMahon 
Paul Milus 
Myrtle Helen Moody 
Ada Mae Noble 
Pauline Winifred Oyston 
Albert Barnett Page 
Alvin Norton Page 
Irving Chester Peabody 
Alice Jane Perry 
Hazel Alice Philbrick 
Laura Plummer 
Maurice Alton Quinn 
Eleanor Louise Rowell 
George Nathaniel Sanborn 
Frances Ida Sanel 
Germaine Kathleen Shannon 
Dorothy Shepard 
Doris Electa Shine 
Lloyd Atherton Simpson 
Louise Amelia Sprague 
Constance Dorothy Stewart 
Stowell S. St. Pierre 
Julia Rose Sullivan 
Erma Pearl Tabor 
Clara Pauline Tebbetts 
Esther Hazel Thompson 
lyla Kathleen Tracy 
Lena Mary Tranfaglia 
Robert Frederick Walker 
Helen Christina Ward 
Carl Gustav Wendelin 
Martha Whitcher 
Dorothy Ellen Willard 



Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 
Classical • 
Commercial 
Academic 
Classical 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Classical 
Commercial 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Commercial 



160 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



CLASS OF JANUARY 25, 1924. 



Name. 

Lawrence Francis Ahern 
Roy Stanley Benson 
Ruth Josephine Cilley 
Annabelle Clark 
Harold William Cross 
Doris Evelyn Currier 
Albert Frederick Daggett 
Una Gertrude Dearborn 
Hazel Wales Fifield 
Russell P. Fitts 
Harold Tuttle Goodwin 
Jean Gove 
Daniel M, Hargen 
Madeline Bruce Hilliard 
Russell Holden Romans 
Evelyn Meranda Johnson 
Teresa Catherine Johnston 
Alfred Clarence Kunberger 
Bertha Mary Lacroix 
Anna Marie Larson 
Ernest Louis Levesque 
Ruth Kimball Lord 
Hazel Rae Marshall 
Mary Agnes McCann 
Richard Adams Morton 
Dorothy Mary O'Brien 
Gunnar Theodore Olson 
Rodger Maynard Orkins 
Marie Louise Parker 
Helen Elizabeth Plankey 
George Mulick Reilly 
Nelson Scott Rogers 
Margaret Rushlow 
Edward Sanel 
Charles Redmond Scully 
Alice Marion Shepard 
Marjorie Elsie Tenney 
John William Watts 
Dorothea Leona Wheeler 
Holton Edwin White 



Course. 

Classical 

Academic 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts 

Mechanic Arts 

Classical 

Mechanic Arts 

Classical 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts 

Classical 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Academic 

Commercial 

Academic 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Classical 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Classical 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

FIRE DRILLS, 1922-1923. 



161 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Number minutes 
used from time of 
Number minutes signal until return to 



Date. 


Time of day. 


going out. 


u^ork. 


Oct. 2 


9.30 a. m. 


78 seconds 


2 minutes 


Nov. 1 


10.54 " 


65 




Mar. 15 


10.45 " 


60 




Apr. 19 


10.40 " 


60 




May 8 


8.40 " 


2 minutes 


(All students in 
Assembly Hall) 


June 11 


10.55 a. m. 


60 seconds 





PARKER SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


26 


10.15 a. m. 


65 seconds 


Nov. 


1 


9.40 " 


55 


Nov. 


8 


10.00 " 


55 


Apr, 


22 


11.10 " 


50 


May 


23 


10.15 " 


45 


May 


25 


11.00 " 


50 



CHANDLER SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


28 


9.20 a. m. 


45 seconds 


Oct. 


2 


8.40 " 


40 


Oct. 


30 


1.40 p. m. 


35 


Nov. 


6 


9.45 a. m 


35 


Apr. 


18 


1.40 p. m. 


40 


May 


23 


10.00 a. m. 


35 



WALKER SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


26 


8.45 a. m. 


65 seconds 


95 seconds 


Oct. 


2 


8.45 " 


35 


75 


Nov. 


8 


9.25 " 


45 


85 


Apr. 


20 


10.00 " 


55 


90 


May 


23 


9.15 " 


59 


100 


June 


22 


2.35 p. m. 


65 


105 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GARRISON SCHOOL. 



Date 




Time of day. 


Number minutes 
used from time of 
Number minutes signal until return to 
going out. work. 


May 


8 


8.55 a. m. 


40 seconds 2 minutes 


May 


9 


9.00 " 


70 " 4 

(All pupils in the 
building at one door — 
all others blocked ) 


May 


24 


2.50 p. m. 


50 seconds 5 minutes 


Oct. 


2 


9.10 a. m. 


50 " U " 


Oct. 


3 


11.00 " 


57 " 2 " 



(All main doors blocked 
with one exception) 



EASTMAN SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


13 


11.00 a. m. 


Oct. 


2 


9.00 " 


Dec. 


11 


9.00 " 


Mar. 


2 


11.00 " 


Apr. 


23 


1.30 p. m. 


May. 


11 


1.40 " 


May 


25 


1.40 " 



30 seconds 


2 minutes 


32 


2 




32 


2 




30 


If 




30 


If 




25 


u 




1^ minutes 


(Went down fire 




escapes- 


-both doors 




locked) 





RUMFORD SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


26 


8.40 a. m. 


75 


seconds 


3 min. 


Sept. 


27 


9.35 " 


75 


( ( 


3^ " 


Sept. 


28 


10.00 " 


75 


I i 


3* " 


Oct. 


2 


9.40 " 


75 


" 


si " 


Oct. 


3 


9.35 " 


70 


" 


2 " 


Feb. 


26 


10.50 " 


practice not timed 


Feb. 


26 


11.15 " 


1 


minute 


2 min. 



25 sec. 



40 sec. 



KIMBALL SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


2 


9.55 a. m. 


64 


seconds 


128 seconds 


Nov. 


6 


9.25 " 


62 


" 


124 


Feb. 


27 


1.45 p. m. 


62 


( I 


124 


Mar. 


28 


9.50 a. m. 


64 


" 


128 


May 


3 


9.35 " 


62 


" 


124 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



163 



PENACOOK SCHOOL. 



Number minutes 
used from time of 
Number minutes signal until return to 



Date. 


Time of day. 


going out. 




ivork. 


Sept. 29 


9.15 a. m. 


40 seconds 




min. 30 sec 


Oct. 2 


9.00 " 


35 




" 25 ." 


Apr. 3 


9.30 " 


40 




" 30 " 


Apr. 18 


9.45 " 


40 




" 25 " 


May 28 


9.15 " 


40 




" 20 " 


June 11 


9.15 " 


38 




" 20 '■ 



FRANKLIN SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


12 


1.33 p. m. 


45 seconds 


95 secon 


Sept. 


27 


9.20 a. m. 


45 


90 


Oct. 


2 


9.15 " 


46 


90 


Nov. 


21 


1.35 p. m. 


35 


80 


Jan. 


5 


9.40 a. m. 


40 


85 


May 


3 


9.10 " 


45 


90 



DEWEY SCHOOL. 



Sept. 


21 


9.45 a. 


m. 


Sept. 


21 


10.00 ' 




Sept. 


21 


9.25 ' 




Sept. 


22 


9.25 ' 




Sept. 


27 


10.50 ' 




Oct. 


2 


8.45 ' 




Oct. 


26 


2.21 p. 


m. 


Jan. 


5 


10.02 a. 


m. 


Jan. 


22 


1.51 p. 


m. 


Mar. 


21 


2.05 ' 


' 


June 


1 


10.00 a. 


m. 



Practice (Room 4) 



ti 




( " 
( " 
( ' 


5) 
2) 
2) 


1 min. 


2 


sec. 




48 seconds 






43 






1 n 


75 






2 


45 






1 


50 






2 


50 






2 



55 sec. 
35 " 
45 " 



HARRIET P. DAME SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


2 


9.36 a. m. 


30 seconds 


Not timed 


May 


8 


8.43 " 


30 


2 minutes 


June 


21 


8.50 " 


30 


2 " 



164 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COGSWELL SCHOOL. 









Number minutes 


Date. 


Time of day. 


Number minutes 
going out. 


used from time of 

signal until return to 

work. 


Oct. 2 


9.40 a. m. 


25 seconds 


60 seconds 


Jan. 3 


10.00 " 


30 


60 


Apr. 3 


10.00 " 


35 


80 


Apr. 17 


10.45 " 


25 


55 


May 28 


10.05 " 


30 


80 


June 11 


9.30 " 


20 


45 



MILLVILLE SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


2 


9.45 a. m. 


25 seconds 


58 seconds 


Dec. 


4 


2.00 p. m. 


26 


60 



IRON WORKS SCHOOL. 



Oct. 


5 


2.00 p. m. 


Practice 


Not timed 


Oct. 
Mar. 


6 
26 


2.15 " 
9.45 a. m. 


1 minute 


1| minutes 
1 


May 
May 


7 
29 


10.00 " 
10.20 " 







MOUNTAIN SCHOOL. 



Apr. 


10 


2.00 p. m. 


10 seconds 


40 seconds 


May 


7 


2.00 ' ' 


11 


38 



RIVERHILL SCHOOL. 



Oct. 9 

Apr. 16 

May 2 

May 14 

May 15 

June 1 



p. m. 



^ minute 


1^ minutes 


i 


^ minute 


\ " 


h " 


4 


i " 


i 


i 


I " 


i " 



SCHOOL REPORT. 165 

ROLL OF HONOR, 1923. 

High School. — Anna Anderson, Mary Gate, Waldo Sanborn, 
Doris Abbott, George Bartlett, Doris Dickey (3), Lucille Hodge 
(2), Ethel Johnson, Myrtle Moody, Albert Page, Alvin Page, 
Hazel Philbrick, Evelyn Johnson (2), Teresa Johnston, Anna 
Larson, Henry Ekstrom (2), Paul Frost, Edson Phelps, Robert 
Gervais (2), Letitia George, Elizabeth Hanson, Chester Hadley 
(2), Pauline Maclaren (2), Catherine Moore (2), Carl Anderson, 
Rachel Bartlett, Arline Crane, Elmer Bergstrom, David Herter, 
Isabel MacGibbon, Hazel Maclaren, Raymond McCaig (2), Eliza- 
beth Palmer, Charlotte Pitts, Engrid Rosendale, Beatrice Smith, 
Merlin Smith, Edgar Winslow, Virginia Davis, Ruth Dennerly, 
Marion Donovan, Dorothy French, Mary Galligan, Marjorie 
Row^e, Earle Mudgett, Paul Mudgett, Harold Robinson, Pauline 
Saltmarsh, Mildred Towle. 

Parker School. — Harry Barrett (4), Marion Burleigh, 
Leonard Bushey, Agnes Carlson, Jerry Cook, Edward Cotter, 
Robert Foster (2), Juan Gorrell (2), Earle Hills (4), Wins- 
ton Hodge (2), Wm. Jennings, Alice Long, Helen Lowe (2), 
Gordon McRae (2), Miriam Marsh, Agnes Rowan, Mary Rush- 
low, Mildred Savoy, Frances Tarrant, Dorothy Weathers (3), 
Lillian Wirrell. 

Chandler School. — Marjorie Badger, Angeline Crossley, 
Frank S. Knox, Frances E. Reid, Kenneth A. Sherburne (2), 
Thomas H. Sherman, Jr., Alvin Simonds (2), Harry Sund- 
gren (2), Mabel Virgin, Marjorie Wright. 

Walker School. — Webber Hunkins, A. Irene Taylor, Helen 
L. Walker, Margaret Welch, Brian Maclaren, Alice Hoadley, 
Janet Kennedy, Pansy Papazian, Hilda Loven, Beatrice I. 
Barton (2), Ralph Barton, Sarah Murphy, Philip Learoyd, Sam- 
uel Gushing, Chester Bailey, Lester Billings, Joseph Cerriello, 
Lois Holmes, James Messier, Thomas Clark, Mary Paveglio. 

Garrison School. — Alcide Dubois (2), Elna Bjork, Miriam 
Myllymaki (2) , Lillian Peterson, Mary Lindgren, Louise Stod- 
dard, Esther M. Bjork, Signie Carlson. 

Eastman School. — Miriam E. Mann. 

RuMFORD School. — Alva Bergstrom, Astrid E. Franzen, Ken- 
neth N. Peabody, Rodney Strom, G. Ernest Tetreault, Dean P. 



166 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Williamson, Themia Apostal (3), Randolph Brown, Charles 
Virgin, Karl Kunberger (3), Edward H. Ash, Eileen Pal- 
mer (2), Andrew L. Wallace, Alice Osborn. 

Kimball School. — Wendell Palmer, Sarah Smith, George 
R. Gordon, Eva M. Spiller (2), Whitman Levensaler, Elizabeth 
Butterfield, Margaret Bernard, Howard Dyment, Louis Diversi, 
Mildred Fitzgerald, Clarence Thompson, Alyce Gorham. 

Penacook School. — Malcolm Donovan, Edward Cirves, Thel- 
ma Gilbert, Dorothy Kenniston, Margaret Johnson, John Hig- 
gins, Harold Ronn. 

Franklin School. — Louise Bartlett, Winifred Higgins. 

Dewey School. — Rebecca Bailey, Ruth E. Hoadley, Robert J. 
Mulligan, George W. Thompson (4). 

Harriet P. Dame School. — Marion Philbrick, Mildred St. 
Pierre, Arthur Gagnon, Vera Robinson. 

Cogswell School. — Esther Emery, Ralph Keniston, Evelyn 
M. Home, 

Millville School. — Russell Miner, Ida R. Chapman. 

Iron Works School. — Doris Aldrich, Charles Bean, 

Mountain School. — None. 

RiVERHiLL School. — Perley Auprey. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 167 

ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT. 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, 
N. H., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the fifth day of April, 
1923, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the fol- 
lowing subjects : 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Educatioii 
to serve three years to fill the vacancies arising from the 
expiration of the term of office of Bennett Batchelder, 
Elisabeth R. Elkins, and Joseph S. Otis. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year, 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise 
and appropriate for the payment of the debts of the 
district. 

7. To see what sum of money thei district will raise 
and appropriate for the support of the schools for 
the ensuing year. 

8. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for special repairs and general upkeep of the 
school buildings of the district. 



168 CITY OF CONCORD. 

9. To see if the district will authorize the Board of 
Education to sell the Millville school buildings to be made 
vacant by the occupation of the new buildings. 

10. To see if the district will authorize the Board of 
Education to purchase the lot and building located on 
the east side of Dunklee Street and now owned by John 
A. Gate, raise and appropriate money for the same, which 
is to be used for kindergartens and other public school 
purposes. 

11. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this fifth day of March, 1923. 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
C. H. FOSTER, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 

A true copy of the original warrant. Attest : 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
CHARLES DUNCAN, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
C. H. FOSTER, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 169 

RECORD OF ANNUAL MEETING. 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant a meeting 
of the legal voters of Union School District was held at 
the City Auditorium in Concord, N. H., on Thursday, 
April 5, 1923, at 7.30 o'clock p. m. 

Because of a vacancy in the office of moderator due to 
the death of Louis C. Merrill, the meeting was called to 
order and the warrant read by Ray E. Burkett, clerk of 
the district. 

Article 1. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf the clerk 
was instructed to cast one ballot for Arthur P. Morrill for 
moderator of the district for the ensuing year, and he was 
declared duly elected moderator and took the oath of 
office before Ray E. Burkett, Justice of the Peace. 

Art. 2. On motion of Rev. W. Stanley Emery the mod- 
erator was instructed to cast one ballot for Ray E. Burkett 
for clerk of the district for the ensuing year, and he was 
declared duly elected and took the oath of office before 
the moderator. 

Art. 3. On motion of Henry E. Chamberlin it was 
unanimously 

Voted: That the reading of the report of the Board of 
Education be dispensed with, and that the report as 
printed be accepted and placed on file. 

Art. 4. On motion of Henry H. Metcalf it was unani- 
mously 

Voted: To proceed to the election by ballot of three 
members of the Board of Education to serve for a term 
of three years and that the polls remain open for the 
reception of ballots until 8.15 o'clock; and that the mod- 
lerator appoint tliree tellers to sort and count the ballots. 



170 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The moderator appointed as tellers Ernest P. Roberts, 
Frank W. Brown, and INIiss Elisabeth Parker. 

At 8.15 o'clock the moderator declared the polls closed, 
and announced the result of the vote as follows : 

Total number of ballots cast 342 

Necessary for a choice 172 

Dr. E. S. Sullivan had 1 

Persis Metcalf had 1 

James M, Langley had 1 

Grace P. Amsden had 1 

E. K. Woodworth had 2 

W. L. Stevens had 3 

Bennett Batchelder had 334 

Joseph S. Otis had 337 

Elisabeth R. Elkins had 338 

and Bennett Batchelder, Joseph S. Otis, and Elisabeth 
R. Elkins were declared duly elected members of the 
Board of Education for a term of three years. 

Art. 5. On motion of Burns P. Hodgman, duly sec- 
onded, Henry H. Metcalf, and John P. George were 
unanimously elected auditors of the district for the en- 
suing year. 

Art. 6. On motion of Harry F. Lake, duly seconded, it 
was unanimously 

Voted: That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, Supervisory Union No. 8, the sum 
of Nineteen Thousand Ninety-Five Dollars ($19,095), 
of which sum Twelve Thousand Dollars ($12,000) shall be 
appropriated for the payment of the bonds maturing 
July 1, 1923, and October 1, 1923, and Seven Thousand 
Ninety-Five Dollars ($7,095) for the payment of the in- 
terest on its bonded debt accruing during the year. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 171 

Art. 7. On motion of Carl H. Foster, duly seconded, it 
was unanimously 

Voted: That there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
Union School District, Supervisory Union No. 8, and ap- 
propriated for the support and the general administra- 
tion of the public schools for the ensuing year, such a sum 
as, in addition to the amount required by law, will amount 
to the sum of Two Hundred Forty-Nine Thousand, Nine 
Hundred Sixty and 69/100 Dollars ($249,960.69). 

Art. 8. Bennett Batchelder read a detailed statement 
of estimated amounts required for repairs to the property 
of the district during the coming year, and on his motion, 
duly seconded, it was 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union 
School District and appropriated for special repairs to 
school buildings the sum of Seventeen Thousand One 
Hundred Dollars ($17,100). 

Art. 9. On motion of Joseph S. Otis, duly seconded, it 
was unanimously 

Voted: That the Board of Education be authorized to 
sell by public auction, or to the highest bidder in private 
sale, the buildings to be made vacant by the occupation 
of the new school buildings at Millville, and directed to 
enter the sum received by the sale to the credit of Union 
School District. 

Art. 10. On motion of Dorothy B. Jackson it was 

Voted: That the Board of Education be authorized to 
purchase of John A, Gate his lot on the east side of Dunk- 
lee Street held under option of purchase by Union School 
District, and that the sum of Fifteen Hundred Dollars 



172 CITY OF CONCORD. 

($1500) be raised and is hereby ordered to be raised on 
the polls and ratable estates within Union School Dis- 
trict and appropriated for the purchase of said lot. 

Art. 11. On motion of Ira Leon Evans it was unani- 
mously 

Voted: That Dr. Samuel S. Drury, John D. Bridge, 
Fred C. Demond, Burns P. Hodgman, and John S. B. 
Davie be appointed a committee of citizens to assist the 
Board of Education, or a committee thereof, to make an 
investigation of housing conditions in Concord so far 
as such conditions relate to the schools thereof, and report 
to the District not later than November first, 1923, with 
any recommendations that to them seem wise on the facts 
disclosed, particularly as to a new High School building, 
or any other school buildings, or any school building pro- 
gram, and any other matters relating thereto. 

On motion of Harry F. Lake the meeting adjourned. 

A true record. Attest: 

RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



A true copy of the record. Attest 



RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

1923. 



Board of Water Commissioners. 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, ex-officio. 

CARLOS H. FOSTER, to March 31, 1927. 

:\[ELVIN L. TOWLE, to March 31, 1927. 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1926. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, to March 31, 1926. 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, to March 31, 1925. 

JOHN B. ABBOTT, to March 31, 1925. 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1924. 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, to March 31, 1924. 

OLIVER J. PELREN, to June 3, 1923. 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, President. 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk. 

SUPERINTENDENT. 

P. R. SANDERS. 

CLERK. 

ALICE G. COCHRAN. 

FOREMAN. 

JAMES T. DAVIS. 

ENGINEER. 

HENRY A. ROWELL. 



174 CITY OP CONCORD, 

CONSTRUCTION. 



Cost of land damages, flowage and water rights 

Paid B. F. & D. Holden, for water 

rights, $60,000.00 

Concord Manufacturing Co., 

for water rights, 83,000.00 

W. P. Cooledge, for mill 

privilege and land, 5,500.00 

Humphrey & Farnum, for 

kit-shop privilege, 5,000.00 

flowage rights around Pena- 

cook Lake, 4,375.61 

for land at Penacook Lake, 94,184.95 

C. H. Amsden, water and 
flowage rights, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of 
Torrent Aqueduct Asso- 
ciation, 20,000.00 

dam, gate-houses and ap- 
purtenances, 39,267.74 

conduit and upper gate- 
house, 29,818.94 

mains (low service main and 
pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street, force 
main from the pump to 
the reservoir, fire main 
through North and South 
Main Streets, and high 
service main from Pena- 
cook Street to Stark 
Street, Penacook), 182,241.70 

distribution pipe, 427,574.00 

service pipe, 78,900.59 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



175 



Cost of reservoir, including land, $45,044.09 

pumping station, shop, 
stable and storehouse, in- 
cluding land, 29,743.35 

pumping machinery, 20,706.72 

engineering and superin- 
tendence, 14,913.12 

incidentals, 6,875.97 



Cost of works, January 1, 1924, .$1,152,146.78 

Less amount received for Imnber, land and 

buildings sold, 7,919.11 



$1,144,227.67 



Bonds of the city have been issued to pay a part of said 
cost, of which the following are still outstanding : 



Due. 



Rate. 



Amount. 



January 1 


1924, 


31/2, 


$15,000.00 


January 1 


1924, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1925, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


Januray 1 


1926, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1927, 


41/0, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1928, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1929, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1930, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1931, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1932, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1933, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


, 1934, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1935, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1936, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1 


1937, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 




$267,000.00 



176 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME. 



Investment Account. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1924, $25,000.0') 

Invested in 

U. S. First Liberty Loan, eon- 
verted, 414% bonds, $5,000.00 
U. S. Third Liberty Loan, 41^% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan, 414% 
bonds, 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS PROFIT. 



Income Account. 

Income received, 1922, $1,207.54 

Income received, 1923, 1,127.07 

$2,334.61 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 177 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., February 7, 1924. 

To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of 
Concord: 

We hereby submit the annual report of the Superinten- 
dent of the Water Works for the year ending December 31, 
1923. 

The report is in detail, giving full and complete infor- 
mation of the standing of the Water Works at the end 
of the year. 

You will notice that the bonded debt has been reduced 
from $575,000— January 1, 1911, to $234,000— January 1, 
1924. 

The receipts from the Water Department hereafter will 
be sufficient or more than sufficient to meet annually the 
bonds which become due each year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 
JOHN B. ABBOTT, 
GEORGE T. KENNEY, 
CARLOS H. FOSTER, 
MELVIN L. TOWLE, 
HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, ex-officio, 
Board of Water Commissioners. 



178 CITY OF CONCORD. 



IN MEMORIAM 

OLIVER J. PELREN 
Born at Concord, N. H., January 8, 1856 
Died at Concord, N. H., June 3, 1923 



Member of the Board of Water 
Commissioners, 1918-1923 



Resolved: That the Board of Water 
Commissioners at this time record their 
appreciation of the faithful services of 
OLIVER J. PELREN, who held it an 
honor to serve his native city as a member 
of the Board of Water Commissioners. 

They also desire to express their deep 
sense of loss by his death, of a valued friend 
and wise counsellor. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 179 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT. 



To the Board of Water Commissioners : 

I herewith present to you the fifty-second annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1923. 

Receipts, 

For water from consumers at fixed 

rates, $9,907.42 
For water from consumers by meter 

rates, 75,455.80 

From delinquents, 116.75 

For water for building purposes, 53.00 

For wood and farm lands, 235.00 
For labor and materials funished on 

private fire lines, 865.94 

For pipe and stock sold and labor, 782.34 

For old iron and brass, 28.40 
For shutting off and turning on 

water, non-payment of bill, 2.00 
For repairs of automobile on account 

of collision, 33.00 

Rebate on insurance, 6.55 

$87,486.20 

Deduct abatements, 16.09 



Net receipts for 1923, $87,470.11 



180 city of concord. 

Expenditures, 
maintenance account. 
General care and maintenance : 

Salaries and labor, $11,954.24 



Team account, 


122.64 


Automobile account. 


1,296.82 


Miscellaneous supplies and 




repairs, 


624.90 


Tools, 


281.06 


Repair of buildings. 


104.57 


Telephones and lighting. 


89.64 


Insurance, 


547.66 


Incidentals, 


647.48 




*ip; fifio 01 




KpXOyUUZ/ ,\J L 


Ofifice expenses: 




Salaries and clerical work, 


$1,803.50 


Postage and printing. 


494.78 


Miscellaneous supplies. 


91.41 


Repairs, 


8.92 


Telephone, 


42.55 



2,441.16 



Care and repair of hydrants: 

Stock, $26.25 

Labor, 475.34 



501.59 



Care and repair of meters: 

Stock, $262.32 

Labor, 1,266.58 



1,528.90 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



181 



Relaying service pipes: 

Stock, 
Labor, 

Repairing leaks, labor. 

Work at Lake, 

Care of wood-lots, 

Penacook Park, 

Taxes, town of Webster, 

Incidentals, 

Repairs to cottage at Lake, 

Pumping station: 

Salaries, 

General supplies and repairs, 

Telephone and lighting. 

Steam pump, supplies and repairs. 

Electric pump : 

Power, $1,910.64 

Supplies and repairs, 10.52 

Heating, 357.00 



$402.68 
1,647.56 



$1,657.00 
10.41 
50.6;^ 
28.60 



2,278.16 



$2,050.24 

488.17 

128.30 

244.19 

74.19 

96.00 

15.40 

645.10 



4,024.80 



Total maintenance account, 

CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT. 

Distribution pipes : 

Stock, $3,509.52 



$27,907.05 



Labor, 

Service pipes : 

Stock, 
Labor, 

18 



2,008.05 



$2,018.43 
1,245.97 



$5,517.57 



3,264.40 



182 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Hydrants : 

Stock, $707.62 

Labor, 214.59 

$922.21 

Meters : 

Stock, $1,244.82 

Labor, 320.30 

1,565.12 



Total construction account, $11,269.30 

Settlement of claim of John J. McLaughlin and 

expenses, $2,495.11 

Total expenditures, 1923, $41,671.46 



EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS. 

Distribution pipes laid in 1923 : 

Bridge Street, east from North Main Street, 195 feet of 
8-inch pipe. 

Rumford Avenue, east from Hall Street, 875 feet of 6- 
inch pipe. 

Broad Avenue, west from Broadway, 812 feet of 6-inch 
pipe. 

Wood Avenue, west from Broadway, 289 feet of 6-inch 
pipe. 

Dunklee Street, extended south to Holly Street, 415 feet 
of 6-inch pipe. 

Holly Street, extended west to Dunklee Street, 30 feet 
of 6-inch pipe. 

Clarke Street, West Concord, extended east, 118 feet of 
6-inch pipe, replacing 1^/4 -inch pipe. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 183 

Also 215 feet of liy4-iiich and 655 feet of 1-inch pipe. 

On hydrant branches, 10 feet of 8-inch and 45 feet of 6- 
inch pipe. 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
386,205 feet, or 73.15 miles. 

Seven gates were added during the year; total number 
now in use, 1,082. 

Four new hydrants have been set as follows : On Bridge 
Street, high service, on north side at Carpenter's paint 
shop ; on Broad Avenue, 500 feet from Broadway ; on 
Kumford Avenue, at east end; on Clarke Street, West 
Concord, at east end. 

Total number of hydrants now in use, 475. 

Ninety-one services have been laid, consisting of 1,708 
feet of 34 -inch; 388 feet of 1-inch; 120 feet of li^-inch; 
and 120 feet of 2-inch pipe. 

Three 6-inch high service connections have been made 
for sprinkler service for the following premises: Hoyt 
Electrical Instrument Works, Harry G. Enmions, and 
Phenix Hotel. 

Fourteen services have been discontinued. Total num- 
ber now in use, 4,038. 

Total length of service pipes, 95,731 feet or 18.13 miles. 

Eighty-four services have been relaid and curb valves 
placed on 43 old services. 

Seventy-eight new meters have been set and 2 meters 
have been removed, making total now in use, 2,843. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 8upt. 



184 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEER AT PUMPING STATION. 



Pumping Station, Concord Water Works. 
P. B. Sanders, Superintendent : 

Sir : I would report that the pumping machinery at the 
pumping station, including boilers is in good working 
condition. 

Both steam pumps have been turned over every two 
weeks by high service pressure to see that they were in 
good working order. 



RECORD OF motor-driven CENTRIFUGAL PUMP. 



Months. 


g 

'S 

s 

^* 

■a 


b* 

a 
"S 

si 


bi) 

u 

bs 

a 


a 
o 


K 

OS . 

> 




bi> 


o 

O 


bii 
a 

1 

K 

■a 
a 


a5 

O 

tn 

a 

si 


bi 

a 

• 




O 


o 


> 




«« 




® aa 




o 


o 


o 




H 


H 


< 


« 


« 


« 


H 


P^ 


Oh 


a^ 


(1< 


January 


31 


175:25 


5:39 


14,170 


457 


511 


27,680.000 


4 


4 


5 


8,500 


February 


28 


166: 


5:26 


13.260 


473 


508 


25,200,000 


4 


4 


4 


8,060 




31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 


180:35 
155:45 
173:40 
202 :35 
178:15 
167:30 


5:43 
5:11 
5:36 
6:45 
5:44 
5:24 


14,380 
12,350 
13.860 
16,170 
14,200 
13,290 


463 
411 

447 
539 
4,58 
428 


512 
503 
500 
501 
501 
501 


28,075,000 
24,526,000 
27,674,000 
32,275,000 
28,341,000 
26,500,000 


7 
9 
6 
6 
6 
6 


4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
6 


3 
4 
2 
2 
3 
3 


8,095 




4,887 










July 




August 




September. ... 


30 


154 :''6 


5: 8 


12,330 


411 


504 


24^446,000 


8 


6 


3 




October 


31 


166:25 


5:22 


13,670 


440 


501 


27.238,000 


3 


3 


3 


1,666 


November 


30 


150: 5 


5: 5 


11,990 


399 


504 


23,789,000 


6 


4 


4 


800 


December . ... 


30 


138; 50 


4:28 


11,050 


356 


503 


21,944,000 


V 


4 


5 


4,826 


Total 


364 


2,009:31 




160,720 






317,745,000 


72 


50 


41 


36,168 


Daily ave.. 






5:33 




441 


505 


870,534 








171 



There were also pumped by steam pumps 1,472,312 gallons. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY A. ROWELL, Engineer. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 185 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT. 

C. H. Foster, Treasurer, in account with Concord Water 

Works. 

Receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1923, $25,059.07 
Interest on investments, 2,334.61 

Receipts, P. R. Sanders, Superin- 
tendent, 87,470.11 

$114,863.79 

Expenditures. 

Orders paid, $41,649.55 

Bonds paid, 21,000.00 

Interest on bonds, 12,322.50 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1924, 39,891.74 

$114,863.79 



Bonded Indebtedness of Water Precinct. 



Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


January 1, 1924, 


41/2, 


$18,000.00 


January 1, 1925, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


Januaiy 1, 1926, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1927, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1928, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1929, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1930, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1931, 


41/0, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1932, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1933, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 



186 CITY OP CONCORD. 

January 1, 1934, 41/2, $18,000.00 

January 1, 1935, 41/2, 18,000.00 

January 1, 1936, 41/2, 18,000.00 

January 1, 1937, 41/2, 18,000.00 

January 1, 1924, 31/2, 15,000.00 



$267,000.00 



Statement of Coupon Account of the Water Precinct. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1923, 

and not presented, $146.00 

To coupons due, 1923, 12,375.00 



$12,521.00 



Cr. 



By coupons paid, 1923, $12,322.50 

By coupons due and not presented, 198.50 

$12,521.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



187 



Receipts for Each Year Since the Construction of the 

Works. 



For the year ending January 31, 1874, 


$4,431.10 


For fifteen months ending April 1, 1875, 


17,535.00 


For the year ending April 1, 1876, 


16,921.24 






1877, 


19,001.07 






1878, 


20,763.03 






1879, 


21,869.86 






1880, 


22,451.53 






1881, 


26,744.58 


For nine months ending December 31, 1881, 


25,534.01 


For the year ending December 31, 1882, 


27,243.06 






1883, 


28.255.48 






1884, 


28,915.65 






1885, 


30,222.54 






1886, 


30,862.64 






1887, 


34,047.52 






1888, 


, 38,441.32 






1889, 


40,237.53 






1890, 


42,133.41 






1891, 


46,075.16 






1892, 


48,351.52 






1893, 


52,299.66 






1894, 


53,230.10 






1895, 


55,343.19 






1896, 


56,557.81 






1897, 


55,156.42 






1898, 


59,147.54 






1899, 


*53,953.13 






1900, 


*57,003.71 






1901, 


62.253.61 






1902, 


63,430.85 



* No hydrant rental this year. 



188 


CITY OF CONCORD. 




For the year ending December 31, 1903, 


$65,088.45 






1904, 


68,570.48 






1905, 


71,076.44 






1906, 


73,063.45 






1907, 


73,782.64 






1908, 


71,362.67 






1909, 


*67,307.84 






1910, 


68,673.71 






1911, 


71,881.34 






1912, 


76,145.13 






1913, 


76,154.45 






1914, 


74,422.15 






1915, 


78,940.06 






1916, 


75,052.72 






1917, 


77,092.10 






1918, 


78,077.15 






1919, 


73,671.71 






1920, . 


78,589.63 






1921, 


77,323.78 






1922, 


82,090.42 






1923, 


87,470.11 


Total receipts for 51 years, 


$2,704,249.70 





Mean Height of Water Each 


Year. 


1873, 


175.86 


1879, 


179.74 


1874, 


179.50 


1880, 


175.30 


1875, 


180.00 


1881, 


174.70 


1876, 


180.28 


1882, 


179.15 


1877, 


176.46 


1883, 


176.40 


1878, 


179.50 


1884, 


178.18 



*No hydrant rental after 1908. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 189 



1885, 


176.80 


1905, 


183.37 


1886, 


178.10 


1906, 


183.94 


1887, 


179.04 


1907, 


183.59 


1888, 


181.96 


1908, 


183.41 


1889, 


180.91 


1909, 


181.40 


1890, 


181.90 


1910, 


180.22 


1891, 


180.00 


1911, 


177.60 


1892, 


174.32 


1912, 


178.86 


1893, 


173.38 


1913, 


179.20 


1894, 


172.81 


1914, 


179.55 


1895, 


171.15 


1915, 


180.00 


1896, 


178.96 


1916, 


184.15 


1897, 


183.33 


1917, 


183.81 


1898, 


184.31 


1918, 


181.84 


1899, 


183.49 


1919, 


183.32 


1900, 


183.09 


1920, 


184.28 


1901, 


183.86 


1921, 


183.96 


1902, 


184.98 


1922, 


183.98 


1903, 


184.75 


1923, 


182.92 


1904, 


184.40 







190 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES. 



Streets. 



M - 

rt O t3 


Length and Size of 


Iron Pipe in 


Feet. 


paoQ 




30- 


24- 


20- 


18- 


16- 


14- 


12- 


10- 


8- 


6- 


4- 


in. 


in. 


in. 


m. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


lU. 


in. 


in. 


in. 






Conduit 

Reserve main 

Low service main.. 

Pump main 

Gate-house s and 

layout 

Force main 

Pumping station 

and layout 

Abbott 

Academy 

Albin 

Alleyways 

Alii 



2220 



Auburn 

Avon 

Badger 

Beacon 

Blake 

Blanchard 

Blossom Hill . 
Bovc. 



Bradley 

Bridge 

Broad Ave.. 
Broadway . . 
Cambridge . 

Capitol 

Carter 

Centre , 

Chandler .., 
Chapel. 



Charles 

Chestnut 

Church 

Clarke 

Clinton 

Columbus Avenue. 

Concord 

Court 

Curtice Avenue 

Dakin 

Dartmouth 

Depot 

Donovan 

Downing 

Dunklee 

Durgin 

Eastman 

Electric 

Elm 

Engel 

Essex 

Essex, North 

Fairbanks 

Fayette 

Ferry 



331 
13598 



2962 



1905 

58 



147 
"26 



2182 



2278 



2100 



785 
776 



1577 
327 



2052 
508 



3529 



1942 



195 



2690 



21 
180 



23 
458 



450 

2492 



724 
5 

2145 
265 
475 

1781 
590 
260 

1123 
812 



6 
763 
1077 



306 
585 



265 
1600 

350 
1663 



1000 



1593 
670 
422 
19 
590 
387 
456 

1977 

2063 
265 
400 
550 
270 
388 
587 
262 
165 

1187 



689 



56 
516 



547 



286 



836 



92 



607 



1066 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 



191 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED 

AND GATES.— Continued. 



PIPES 



Streets. 


W ■ 
ci o & 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


9} 


30- 

in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 4- 
in. in. 
























343 






Fiske 






1045 
















1 




















750 


"225 

"596 

' "88 


1 






















X 






















628 

180 

1317 

285 
























1 
















2166 


1546 
438 




12 
















3 


















2 


Fruit, North 




















1078 

2874 


1 


Fruit, South 




















3 


Fuller 






















Garden 




















194 


1 


Gas 
















550 




1 


Giles 
















300 


858 
709 




4 




















1 


Glea 




















840 


2 
























210 
"245 




















431 




1755 


7 








































1093 


4 


Hall 
















1621 
905 


1068 


2375 


:< 


Hall's Court 










■ 










1 




















498 


287 
600 
230 
329 
760 

79.^ 


I 






















9 






















240 
4 

15 
982 

99 


1 






















1 






















? 


High 
















27 




5 


















?. 




















69 


312 

740 

646 ... . 

362 

615 

498: 

213 

589 

13321 


■> 


Holly . 


















1 


Holt . 





















1 






















1 






















1 






















?. 


Huutingrton. . . .[cord 
Hutchins, W. Con- 


















1 






381 








120 






1 


Iron Works Road . . 
















1 


Jackson 




















1576 




311 


3 






















1 




















207 




1 


Kent 


















165 
400 
360 
465 






Kimball 




















334 




Knight, W. Concord 




















T 


Lake. W. Concord 


















1216 


1 


Langdon 
















360 


358 i 357 
1550 


4 


Laurel 
















2 


Liberty 












380 


1311 










3 


Lincoln 


















3C7 
300 

3650 

382 
330 


?. 


Lyndon . . . 


















508 


726 
38 
1260 
482 
430 


5 


Main, North 






4209 
300 










5125 
5179 


11 


Main, South 

Maitland . 




.2596 


1026 


1373 


15 

1 






















2 


Marshall 




















1 



192 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND 
AND GATES.- 



CEMENT-LINED 

-Continued. 



PIPES 



Streets. 



w 

S30D 
PQOO 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in 


Feet. 


30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
iu. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 12- 
in. in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 

in. 



Martin 

McKinley 

Merrimack. . [School 
Mill Road. S. P. . 

Mills 

Minot 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morton 

Myrtle 

Noyes 

Oak 

Odd Fell'ws Avenue 
Old HopkintouRoad 
OldS.MillR'd.S.P.S. 

Orchard 

Palm 

Park 

Peabody 

Pearl 

Penacook 

Perkins 

Perley 

Perry Avenue 

Pierce 

Pillsbury 

Pine 

Pitman 

Pleasant 

Prince 

Princeton 

Prospect 

Railroad 

Ridge Road 

Rockingham 

Rollins 

Rowell 

Rumford 

Rumf ord Avenue . . . 

School 

Second, W. Concord 
Sewall's Falls Road. 

Sexton Avenue 

Short 

South 

Spring. North 

Spring. South 

State, North 

State, South 

Stevens Avenue 

Stickney Avenue. .. 

Stone 

Summer 

Summit 

Tahanto 

Thompson 

Thorndike 

Tremont 

Union 



750 



1016 



300 



10791 



62 



2457 



3646 



15 
5202 



2422 
390 



5969 



3049 



839 



250 



38 
1898 



400 
738 

1729 
124 
26 
860 

1289 
700 
516 



292 



3502 
■708 



26 
2391 



63 



326 
250 
823 



2604 
1294 



620 
596 
601 
380 
584 

2448' 
616 

2215 



2493 
985 

"185 

"661 
800 
684 
1012 
1320 

"176 

'875 . 
575 
210 
1655 
210 

"4585 
2629 



324 

.305 

229 

814 

3446 



385 



1080 
19 



1015 
1380 



748 
1005 



460 
300 



480 



196 



388 



370 
172 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



193 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPE 

AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 



w . 

M ^ S 

PJ o & 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


30- 






24- 


20- 


18- 


16- 


14- 


12- 


10- 


8- 


6- 


4- 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


111. 


in. 


in. 


in. 



Valley 
























1 






















256 
6.18 
754 

514 
1484 


"589 




Walker 
















705 




4 


Wall .. .. 
















2 


















454 
1404 
310 


42:.8 
1118 


12 


















9 


Water 






































272 

'262 

"254 

126 
145 


1 


West 














1836 


661 




266 
300 

186 
725 

23 

289 

366 

220 

5280 

83 


4 
















1 


White 










































I 






















I 






















1 






















1 






















1 


Hydrant branches.. 
















177 
132 


239 
10 


361 










69 


Penacook. 
Penacook, high ser- 












10584 




8 


Canal East 
















225 


8 






2 


Canal' West 




















1 


















247 




467 




4 


















3 


























I 


















635 




58 




3 


















2 






















653 
476 

1300 
252 
285 
150 

1678 
327 






Elliott 
















































High 






















4 


Linden 




















1 


Main 




















4 


Main. West 




















2 


Maple 





















1 


















70 


37 


5 


Penacook 

















1923 
364 
1346 




2 


Pine 






















Rolfe 






















1 






















1 


Stark 














. 










1 


















54 








4 


Summit 


















423 


"261 

"io 

30977 


1 






















1 


Walnut and Bye. . . 




















884 

2205 

450 

583 


1 




















150 


4 


Winter 


















1 


Hydrant branches 


















41 


69 


Blow-offs 


















1? 


























Totals 


2220 


522 


28795 


1963 


2788 


19788 


24759 


49084 


24152 


125454 


1082 



194 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES- Concluded. 





Length and Size of Cement-Lined 
Pipe in Feet. 


Streets. 


18-in. 14-in. 


12-in. 


10-in. 


8-in. 


6-in. 


4-in. 






2230 


1 










11391 













Chestnut 










373 

120 

1218 
















Hitrli 


























34 








5952 
1764 


1203 




















Valley 










675 

11 

298 






























88 














44 


Penacook. 




13110 


1221 
















628 
422 
479 






























245 
1777 
482 

2100 








































734 




Hio-li 


















2573 
57 
















1181 
652 


2023 




















529 














1149 
1193 


675 


276 






































55 


















11391 


15340 


11567 


1732 


6438 


10201 


497 







WATER DEPARTMENT. 



195 



HYDRANTS. 
H, High Service ; L, Low Service. 




North Main. 



South Main. 



Southwest corner of Penacook 

East side, near J. B. Walker's , 

Junction of Fiske 

East side, near Larkin 's store 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

East side, opposite Pearl 

Northwest corner of Washington 

West side, at West Garden 

East side, opposite Chapel 

Northwest corner of Court 

Northwest corner of Pitman 

Northwest corner of Montgomery 

East side, opposite Montgomery 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Bridge 

Southwest corner of Park 

East side, opposite Park 

Northwest corner of Capitol 

Northwest corner of School 

West side, at Centennial Block 

East side, opposite Centennial Block 

East side, near Eagle Garage 

East side, in rear Robinson's Store. . . 

East side, in rear Phenix Block 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, at Central Block 

Northwest corner of Depot 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

Northeast corner of Fieight 

East side, opposite Fayette 

East side, opposite Thompson 

Southeast corner of Chandler 

Northwest corner of Wentworth Avenue... 

Northwest corner of Thorndike 

East side, opposite St. John's Church 

Northwest corner of Perley 

West side, near Abbot & Downing Co. 's... 

East side, opposite Abbot & Downing Co. 's. 

East side, near West 

Northeast corner of Gas 

West side, opposite Holt Bros. Mfg. Co.. .. 

Southwest corner of South State 



L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 
H 

L 
H 

L 

H 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 



28 



196 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Con^mwed. 




South Main. 



Water . 
Hall.. 



Hammond. . 

Railroad . . . . 
Fiske 

Summer. . . . 

Durgin 

North State 



South State. 



Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

East side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, opposite entrance to R. R. shops. . 

West side, 110 feet north of McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Roekiigham 

West side, below Wiggin 

West side, below Bridge 

West side, opp. Rolfe and Rumford Asylum. 

West side, below No. 18 

West side, at No. 32 

West side, opposite Hammond 

West side, opposite Home Avenue 

East side, at No. 85 

East side, near Rumford Field 

West side, near Nylen's 

West side, near Thompson's 

West side, at Gilman's 

North side, near Bridge 

Rumford Ave 

East side, opposite Ford & Kimball's 

West side, near North State 

West side, south line of Walker School 

Northeast corner of Pitman 

East side, opposite Toof 's laundry 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

Northwest corner of Church 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Tremont 

Northeast corner of Washington 

West aide, opposite Court 

Southwest corner of Maple 

Southeast corner of Centre 

Southeast corner of Park 

Southwest corner of School 

Southeast corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Warren 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Southeast corner of Pleasant 

East side, opposite Wall 

Southeast corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

Southwest corner of Monroe 

East side, opposite Laurel 

Northeast corner of Downing 

Northeast corner of West 

Southwest corner of Harrison 



L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 



21 
1 



10 
1 
1 
1 

2 

1 
1 



14 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



197 




Mills 

Dakin. . . . 
Glen 

Dunklee. . 

Broadway 



Donovan 
Green. . . 

South . . . 



Bradley 

Union 

Jackson 

Lyndon 

North Spring 



14 



West side, at No. 22 

Norih\Te3'' corner of Allison 

West side, 220 feet north of Allison 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, 150 feet south of West 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Pillsbury 

West side, 80 feet north of Humphrey. . . 

Northwest corner of Allison 

Northwest corner of Carter 

Northwest corner of Stone 

West side, at Rollins Park 

West side, opposite McKinley 

West side, between McKinley and Rockingham 

Northeast corner of Wiggin 

Northwest corner of Prince 

East side, opposite Prince 

Northwest corner of Warren 

West side, opposite Wall 

Northwest corner of Fayette 

Northwest corner of Thompson 

West side, opposite Monroe 

West side, opposite Laurel 

West side, below N. H. Memorial Hospital 

West side, opposite Downing 

West side, opposite Allison 

West side, opposite Pillsbury 

West side, near Paige 's 

West side, opposite I. W. Bushey's 

Northwest corner of Iron Works Road. . . 

East side, at Quint's 

West side, near Bow line 

Southwest corner of Penacook 

Northwest corner of Walker 

East side, opposite Highland 

Northwest corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northeast corner of Church 

North corner of Cole Court 

Southwest corner of Tremont 

East side, opposite Abbott 

Northeast corner of Maple 

Southwest corner of Centre 

West side, at High School 

East side, opposite High School 

Southwest corner of School 



L 


1 


L 


1 2 


L 


1 1 


L 


1 


L 




L 




L 


8 


L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 


7 


L 


1 


H 




L 




L 


3 


L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 




L 


14 


H 




L 




L 




L 


4 


L 


1 


H 




L 


2 


H 




H 


2 


L 




H 




H 




L 




H 


5 



198 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Con^mwed. 




South Spring. 



Academy 
Hanover . 
Rumford 



Huntington 
Tahanto. . . 
Pine 

Holt 

High 



Gladstone. 

Valley 

Auburn . . . . , 



Ridge Road. . . 
Westbourne Rd 
Dartmoutli. . . . 



Princeton. 
Fruit 



Minot. 



Kensington Rd. 
Stevens Ave . . . 



Southwest corner of Oak 

West side, opposite Thompson 

West side, opposite Coucord 

West side, near Memorial Hospital 

East side, at No. 10 

West side, at No. 10 

West side, south of cemetery gate 

West side, opposite Perkins 

Southeast comer of Walker 

Northeast corner of Albin 

Northeast corner of Franklin 

Northwest corner of Beacon 

Northeast corner of Abbott 

Northeast corner of Cambridge 

Northwest corner of Centre 

Northeast corner of School 

West side, at Morrill School 

West side, at head of Short 

Northwest corner of School 

Southwest corner of Centre 

Southwest corner of Warren 

East side, at No. 10 

Northwest corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of Valley 

East side, opposite Forest 

Southwest corner of Franklin 

West side, at No. 13 

Northeast corner of Forest 

Northeast corner of Chestnut 

Northeast corner of Forest 

North side, between Centre and Forest.. 

West side, between Nos. 11 and 13 

North side, 135 feet north of Centre. . . . 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Southwest corner of Clinton 

Northwest corner of Noyes 

Northeast corner of Woodman 

West side, 700 feet south of Pleasant. . . 

East side, opposite No. 70 

East side, opposite No. 114 

West side, north of Odd Fellows' Home. 
West side, south of Odd Fellows' Home. 

Northwest corner of Pleasant 

Northwest corner of Plensant 

Northeast corner of Pleasant 



L 1 




L 1 




L 1 




L 


4 


H 


1 


L 


1 


H 




L 




L 




L 




L 




H 




L 




L 




H 




L 




L 


11 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 




H 


2 


H 


1 


H 




H 




H 




H 


4 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 




H 




H 


3 


H 


1 


H 


1 


L 




L 


2 


L 




I. 


2 


H 




L 




L 




L 


4 


11 




H 




H 


3 


H 


1 


H 


1 



Penaeook. 



Chestnut . 
Tremont. 

Pearl 

Beacon. . 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Confirmed. 



199 




Walker. . 

Albin,.., 

Highland 

Church. . 
Franklin . 



Rowell. . . 
Blanchard 
Ferry. . . . 



Washington . 



Chapel . 



South side, near Concord Lumber Co 

South side; east of P. B. Co.'s storehouse, . 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's 

South side, near P. B. Co. 's office 

Southeast corner of North Main 

Southwest corner of Rumford 

North side, opposite No. 69 

Southeast corner of Columbus Avenue 

Southwest corner of Martin 

South side, 500 feet west from Rumford. . 

North side, 160 feet west of Bradley 

North side, at No. 22 , 

Northeast corner of Rumford , 

South side, east of Bradley , 

North side, opposite Lyndon 

Northeast corner of Rumford , 

Northwest corner of Jackson , 

Northeast corner of Lyndon , 

Southwest corner of Rumford , 

South side, opposite No. 64 

North side, between High and Auburn 

Northeast corner of Auburn 

Northwest corner of High 

North side, east of Harrod 

Southwest corner of Jackson 

North side, at No. 14 

North side, opp. Merrimack Apartments 

Northwest corner of Jackson 

Southwest corner of Lyndon 

North side, opposite White 

South side, opposite Charles 

Northeast corner of White 

Northwest corner of Essex 

North side, opposite Ford's foundry 

North side, near N. E. Granite Works 

North side, east of C. & M. R. R 

Northwest corner of Huntoon Avenue 

North side, opposite Rollins 

North side, opposite Alert Hose House 

Southwest corner of Union 

Northeast corner of Lyndon 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of North Essex 

North side, opposite Perry Avenue 

South side, near Methodist Church 



H 




L 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


8 


L 




L 


r 


L 


] 


L 




L 


2 


L 




H 




H 


3 


H 




H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


6 


H 


1 


L 




H 


2 


L 


1 


H 




H 




H 




H 




H 


5 


H 


1 


H 


1 


H 




H 




L 




H 


4 


L 




L 




L 1 




H 1 




H 1 




H 1 




H 1 


7 


L 


1 



200 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

HYDRANTS.— Cow^fH ued. 




Montgomery. 
Centre 



Bridge. 

Park. . 

Capitol 

Garden 
School. 



Warren. 



Depot. . 

Blake . . . 
Orchard . 
Pleasant 



South side, opposite No. 18 

Northeast corner of North State 

Southwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Union 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

South side, opposite Essex 

Southwest corner of Summit Avenue.... 
South side, on east line of Dewey School lot 

Northeast corner of Eidge Eoad 

North side, at Carpenter's shop 

South side, near easterly barn 

North side, opposite Concord Coal Co. 's.... 
North side, opp. Concord Shoe Factory. 

North side, at St. Paul 's Church 

North side, at south gate of State House yard 

Northeast corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Huntington 

South side, west of Durgin 

Northwest corner of North State 

Northeast corner of Green 

Northwest corner of Green 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Northwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Pine 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

North side, at No. 106 

Southeast corner of Giles 

Southeast corner of Odd Fellows Avenue. 

Southeast corner of Fremont 

Northwest corner of North Spring 

Northwest corner of Rumford 

Southwest corner of Merrimack 

Northwest corner of Tahanto 

Northeast corner of Liberty 

Northeast corner of Giles 

Junction of Pleasant, near Fruit 

South side, at north end of train shed | H 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square I L 

South side, opposite Nos. 8-10 J L 

South side, opposite No. 8 H 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 1 H 

Northwest corner of Railroad Square | L 

South side, at South Congregational Church, j L 

Southeast corner of South j L 

Northeast corner of Fremont | L 



L 

H 

L 

H 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

L 

L 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 

H 



11 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Cow^wwed. 



201 




Pleasant . 



Kent... 

Pleasant. 



Fiske "Road. . . 
Hopkinton Bd.. 
Mill Eoad, 
St. P. School . . 



Old Hopkinton 

Boad 

Wall 

Marshall 

Freight 

Hill's Avenue. 

Fayette 

Thompson 

Chandler 

Concord 

Monroe 

Thorndike 



Southwest corner of Spring 

South side, opposite Rumf ord 

South side, opposite Merrimack 

South side, opposite Pine 

South side, opposite Liberty 

North side, near city stable 

South side, near Gale 

South side, opposite No. 220. ... 

North side, at Stevens Ave 

South side, near Mrs. Eddy's cottage. 

South side, at Lavery 's 

South side, opposite No. 270 

North side, near E. B. Chesley's 

North side, opposite No. 291 

North side, near J. McC. Hammond 's . 

South side, opposite Fiske Road 

Southwest corner of School Avenue. . 

North side, at chapel 

South side, opposite Lower School. . . 
South side, near new Upper School.. 

East side, at Trask 's 

South side, near new infirmary 



East side, near laboratory 

North side, at Orphans' Home. 
South side, at tenement No. 7 . . 



Junction of Hopkinton road 

Northeast corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Fuller 

No. side, at southwest corner pass, station.. 

Southwest corner of Railroad Square 

Northeast corner of South Main 

Northwest corner of Elm 

North side, opposite Jefferson 

South side, opposite Railroad 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Jefferson 

Northeast corner of South 

North side, opposite Grove 

South side, at Bumf ord School 

North side, between So. Main and So. State 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northeast corner of Grove 

North side, opposite Pierce 

Northeast comer of South Spring 



H 
H 
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H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 

H 
H 
H 

H 
L 
L 
H 
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L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 



13 
1 



11 
1 
1 



202 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

BYBR ANTS. —Continued. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



Laurel. 
Perley . 



Downing. 
Clinton. . 



West. 



Avon . . 
Noyes . 



Harrison. . 
Humphrey. 
Allison . . . . 
Pillsbury. . 



Carter . 
Stone . 
Holly. 



McKinley. . . 
Broad Ave. 
Rockingham. 



Iron Works Ed 
Prospect 



Curtice Ave . . . 
North State . . . 



Northwest corner of Grove 

Northwest corner of Pierce 

Southwest corner of South State 

Northwest corner of Grove 

Northeast corner of Pierce 

South side, at No. 75 , 

South side, opposite Grove 

Southeast corner of Mills 

Southwest corner of Eedwood Avenue 

North side, opposite Harvard 

North side, opposite Avon , 

Northeast corner of Fruit 

North side, near No. 108 

North side, at State Fair grounds 

North side, near South Main 

North side, near Badger 

Northeast corner of Mills , 

North side, opposite Dakin , 

Northwest corner of Broadway 

Northwest corner of South 

Northw^est corner of Harvard 

Northwest corner of Yale 

Northwest corner of Morton - 

North side, near Kimball 

Northeast corner of Badger 

North side, opposite Foster Ward , 

Northeast corner of Broadway , 

Northwest corner of Kimball 

Northeast corner of Eastman , 

North side, 300 feet from Bow 

North side, west of South Main , 

Southeast corner of Dunklee , 

North side, at Dunklee St. proposed exten'n, 



Northeast corner of Broadway 

North side, at Donovan 

South side, at Brown 's 

Northwest corner of Granite Avenue 

East side, north of Granite Avenue 

North side, 230 feet east of North State 

West side, at Water- Works storehouse 

Northeast corner of Foster 

East side, at Tahanto School 

Northeast corner of Curtice Avenue 

East side, near north entrance Blossom Hill 

Cemetery 

West side, near Calvary Cemetery 



L 
L 

L I 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

L 

h 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 
L 

H 
L 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

HYDRANTS.— Continued. 



203 




North State. 



Palm 

North State. 



North State. . 



East side, near No. 226 

East side, near No. 252 

East side, near No. 262 

East side, near No. 272 

Wiest side, at south line of prison wall. . . . 
West side, at north line of prison wall . . . . 

East side, near No. 296 

North side, west of Fairbanks 

Northwest corner of Palm 

West side, near Concord Woodworking Co. 

East side, near No. 312 

East side, near No. 324 

East side, near No. 330 

East side, opposite Dolan 

East side, opposite No. 362 

West side, opposite No. 382 

East side, at No. 382 



WEST CONCORD. 



Fisher . . 
View. . . 
Electric 

Clarke. 

Lake . . . 



Knight. . 
Hutchins . 



Southeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of Peabody 

East side, at No. 426 

East side, near engine house 

East side, at No. 464 

West side, near Crescent Mfg. Co. . . 

East side, at No. 498 

East side, at No. 516 

East side, opposite No. 533 

East side, near Sewall's Falls Road. 

Southwest corner of Engel 

Northeast corner of K 

Northeast corner of North State . . . . 

North side, near power station 

Northeast corner of Fisher 

North side, at east end 

East side, near S. W. Kellom's 

West side, at No. 13 

West side, near Wilson's 

East side, at No. 33 

South side, near Quaker 

South side, opposite railroad station . 

South side, at Quaker 

North side, near No. 22 

North side, near C. & C. Railroad. . . 
North side, at No. 40 



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L 
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13 

1 



10 
1 



204 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

UYBRANTS.— Continued. 




First 

Sewall 's 
Road . . 
Penacook 



Falls 



Rd. 



South Main. 



West Main. 
High 



East side, at north line of cemetery. 

West side, opposite Frost's 

Wtest side, opposite Blanchard's. . . . 
West side, near Warner Road 



PENACOOK. 



Washington . 



Fowler 

Electric Ave 

Elliott 

Charles 



West Canal. 



West side, at Empey's 

West side, at Heath's 

West side, at Garvin 's 

West side, south of Willow Hollow 

West side, north of Willow Hollow 

West side, at south end of Woodlawn Cem'y 
West side, at north end of Woodlawn Cem'y 

West side, opposite Stark 

West side, near Hoyt 's garage 

West side, near No. 88 

Southwest corner of Union 

Washington Square, opp. Exchange Block. . 

Northwest corner of Charles 

North side, opposite East Canal 

North side, near iron bridge 

West side, opposite cemetery 

West side, at Pine 

Northwest corner of Stark 

East side, opposite Summit 

Northwest corner of Maple 

Northwest corner of Spring 

South side, near South Main 

Southeast corner of Union 

South side, at No. 41 j 

South side, opposite Charles 

South side, near Contoocook bridge 

North side, at Rolf e 's savsTnill 

West side, at Charles Holmes' 

East side, near Elliott 's 

South side, junction of Washington 1 

Northeast corner of Electric Avenue | 

Southwest corner of Warren j 

South side, at pchoolhouse 

North side, near No. 36 1 

Southeast corner of Warren 



H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
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H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
F 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 



15 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 

KYDRANT^.— Continued. 



205 




East Canal. 

Crescent . . . 

Walnut 

Merrimack . 



Summer . 



Spring. . . 
Maple. . . 
Summit . 

Winter . . 
Centre . . . 



Cross. 
Rolfe. 



Penacook . 



North side, near N. H. Spinning Mills • • H 

North side, near Crescent H 

West side, north of Canal H 

North side, at Bye H 

South side, opposite Merrimack Avenue H 

North side, opposite Nos. 36-38-40 H 

North side, opposite Cross H 

South side, opposite Bye H 

South side, opposite Rolfe 's shop H 

South side, opposite Symonds' factory H 

North side, near road to Island H 

Northwest corner of Penacook H 

North side, opposite High H 

Northeast corner of Centre H 

North side, opposite Church H 

Northeast corner of Church H 

Northeast corner of Pleasant H 

Southeast corner of Pleasant H 

North side, near Pleasant H 

Northwest corner of Spring H 

West side, opposite No. 47 H 

Northwest corner of Spring I H 

Southwest corner of Summer | H 

North side, near angle of street | H 

South side, at No. 38 | H 

Northwest corner of Penacook. . j H 

West side, opposite A. W. Rolfe 's | H 

West side, at No. 35 1 H 

East side, at No. 41 H 

Whole number public hydrants ] 



PRIVATE HYDRANTS. | 

I 

Abbot & Downing Co | H 

Boston & Maine Railroad, upper yard. . .| L 

Boston & Maine Railroad, shops | H 

Boston & Maine Railroad, new round | 

house I H 

Boston & Maine Railroad, power house, West] 

Concord I H 

Standish Worsted Co | H 

Concord Gas Co | L 

Concord Shoe Factory | H 



3 

I 3 

1475 



6 

3 

17 



206 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

KYDRANT^.— Concluded. 



Streets. 



Locations. 



w 



Concord Worsted Mills 

Wm. B. Diirgin Co 

Crawford Manufacturing Co.. . . 

Rumford Printing Co 

N. E. Box Co 

N. H. Spinning Mill 

N. H. State Hospital 

N. H. State Prison 

Page Belting Co 

Page Belting Co 

St. Paul's School 

John Swenson Granite Co 

Water-works pumping station 

Whole number private hydrants 



H 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
H 
L 
H 
H 
H 



1 
1 
1 
3 
6 

16 
4 
9 
1 

11 
2 
1 

96 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 207 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1923. 
CONCORD WATER WORKS. 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OP MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE. 



GENERAL STATISTICS. 

Population by census of 1920 — 22,167. 

Date of construction — 1872. 

By whom owned — City of Concord. 

Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING. 

Builders of pumping machinery — Worthington Pump and 

Machinery Corporation. 
1 triple expansion horizontal engine, capacity, 2,000,000 

gallons per 24 hours, 1893. 
1 triple expansion horizontal engine, capacity, 2,000,000 

gallons per 24 hours, 1904. 
1 Worthington 8'', type "BS", slow speed, horizontal 

split casing, volute, centrifugal pump, capacity 

3,500,000 gaUons per 24 hours, 1919. 
Motor, G. E., 100 H. P., A. C. 



208 city of concord. 

Electric Pump. 

1. Description of power: 

a. Alternating, 3 phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,800 

E. P. M. 

b. Price per K. W. H., $0.01 1/3, 8 p. m. to 6 a. m. ; 

maximum, $1,800 per year, 300,000,000 gal- 
lons ; $6.00 per 1,000,000 gallons, over 300,000,- 
000. 

2. K. W. H. used for year, 160,720. 

3. Total pumpage, by Venturi meter, 317,745,000 gallons. 

4. Average static head against which pump works, 90 
feet. 

5. Average dynamic head against which pump works, 
120 feet. 

6. Gallons pumped per K. W. H., 1,977. 

7. K. W. H. used per 1,000,000 gallons pumped, 505.8. 

8. EfSciency of pump, 

317.745.000 (gallons pumped) x 8.34 (lbs.) x 120 (dynamic head) 
160.720 (K. W. H.) X 3.3,000 X 60 x 1.34 x 88.2 (efficiency motor = 84.5 % 

and switch board.) 

9. Total pumping for year, steam and electric pumps, 
319,217,000 gallons. 

10. Cost of total pumping figured on pumping station 
expenses — $4,024.80. 

11. Per million gallons pumped — $12,607. 

12. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0,105. 

DISTRIBUTION. 

MAINS. 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — from two-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 3,659 feet during year. 

4. Relaid — feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 118 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 73.15 miles. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 209 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 3.51 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 4. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use— public, 475; 
private, 96. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 7, 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,082. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 81. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

SERVICES. 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Exter^ded— 2,362 feet. 

. 19. Discontinued — 381 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 95,731 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 77, 

22. Number now in use — 4,038. 

23. Average length of service — 23.68. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — . 

25. Number of meters added during year — 76. 

26. Number now in use — 2,843. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 70.40. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 87.72. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 44. 



210 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



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FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the re- 
port of the Fire Department for the year 1923 : 

The department responded to 56 bell alarms and 327 
still alarms. 

In addition two fires entailing loss occurred for which 
no alarms were given, accounts of which will be found in 
the order of occurrence. 





Bell 


Still 


No Alarm 


Tot a 


Precinct, 


31 


255 


2 


288 


Penacook, 


12 


60 




72 


East Concord, 


7 


3 




10 


"West Concord, 


fci 


9 , 




15 



56 327 2 385 

This report will be found to contain statements in de- 
tail embracing the amount of expenditures, a complete 
roll of the department with residence and occupation 
of each member, a record of all fires and alarms which 
have occurred during the year and the causes thereof 
as nearly as could be ascertained, wdth the names of 
the owners or occupants and the value, loss, insurance, 
and insurance recovered in each case. 

While the loss entailed by fire was considerably less 
than that of the previous year, still it was heavy. 



212 CITY OF CONCORD, 

The apparatus is in good condition. The rear wheels 
of Combination Engine 2 were cut down and single tires 
substituted for the dual type. In addition the machine 
was overhauled, retouched and varnished. 

All four wheels of Combination Engine 1 were cut 
down and solid tires displaced by pneumatics of larger 
type. 

In August a new double bank Seagrave ladder truck 
was placed in commission and two horses turned over 
to the Highway Department. 

A new Buick Chief's car was also placed in commission. 

A building fifty feet by fifteen feet for storing the old 
ladder truck and one reserve hose wagon was erected by the 
permanent men, on the Central Station lot. 

Four thousand feet of hose was purchased during the 
year. 

I would respectfully recommend the purchase of one 
thousand feet during the coming year. 

The fire alarm systems of the Precinct and Penacook 
are in good condition. In the precinct system the loca- 
tion of several boxes was changed and four siren horns 
were placed at convenient localities in the business sec- 
tion for the purpose of clearing the streets in case of fire. 

One private box was also added to the system. 

The Superintendent of Fire Alarm at Penacook recom- 
mends the addition of two boxes to that system. 

During the month of October I attended the conven- 
tion of the International Association of Fire Engineers 
held at Richmond, Va., a report of which I rendered at 
that time. I wish again to thank your honorable body 
for the privilege afforded me to leai-n. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN. 

Chief Engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 213 

APPROPRIATION AND DISBURSEMENTS. 

Appropriation, $59,729.00 

Resolution, outstanding claims, 1,582.52 



$61,311.52 
Disbursement;^. 



Permanent men, 


$27,900.00 


Vacations, 


973.06 


Call men, 


10.245.00 


House man, 


100.00 


Rent, Veterans" Association. 


210.00 


Forage, 


630.89 


Fuel, 


2,770.63 


Lights, 


828.34 


Incidentals. 


7,083.91 


Horse shoeing, 


78.75 


Horse hire, 


1,679.36 


New equipment. 


685.55 


Fire alarm, 


1,971.91 


Penacook fire alarm, 


159.92 


Supplies auto combinations, 


288.92 


Hose, 


5,200.00 


Laundry, 


81.85 


Fire inspections, 


423.13 




$61,311.52 



1923. 
ALARMS. 

Precincts. 

Still. January 5, 6.17 a. m. Slight fire in the United 
Bank Building, 18 North Main Street, owned by W. K. 
and A. A. MacFarland and occupied by various parties. 
Fire originated in office of the Metropolitan Life In- 

15 



214 CITY OF CONCORD. 

surance Co. Caused by spontaneous combustion in oily 
rags which had been used to treat floor and then placed 
in closet. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $42,000.00 $12.85 $25,000.00 $12.85 

Still. January 6, 6.31 a.m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Joseph Doherty, 6 Perley 
Street. Combination 1 responded and found the trouble 
to lay in plugged smoke pipe. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 10.50 a.m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. F. Bolton, 32 Maple Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 7, 12.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. H. B. Quint, 136 North Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 8, 9.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Rockwell, 9 Lee Ave. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 2-2-2. January 8, 11.30 a.m. School signal. 

Stili,. January 10, 5.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Ola Anderson, 256 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 13, 7.51 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. A. E. Rowe, 85 South Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 15, 2.31 a.m. Fire in building, 22 
Bridge Street, owned and occupied by the New England 
Cable Co. Caused by spontaneous combustion in oily 
rags which painters had left in closet. Combination 1 
responded but found that the fire had been practically 
extinguished by the automatic sprinklers. Loss trifling- 
no claim filed. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 215 

Still. January 16, 2.31 P. M, Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. L. Maher, 106 South State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 16, 9.49 p. m. Slight fire in moving 
picture booth at the Auditorium. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. Extinguished 
by operator. Loss trifling. 

Still. January 17, 2.05 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 55 North Main Street. Detail sent from 
Central Station located smouldering broom in basement. 
No loss. 

Still. January 17, 5.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. E. F. Hastings, 155 South State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 18, 7.21 a. m. Fire in barn attached 
to residence 25 Fayette Street, owned by Arthur LaPlante 
and occupied by owner and Wilson & Co. Cause un- 
known. Combination 1 responded but before arrival a 
bell alarm was sent in. See next alarm. 



Box 412. January 18, 7. 


22 a. m. Box pulled 


for pre- 


ceding fire. 1800 feet hose 


wet. Recall 9.14 a. 


m. 


Value. 


Loss. Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, $3,000.00 


$525.00 $2,000.00 


$525.00 


Contents : 






A. LaPlante, 12.00 


9.00 None 


None 


Wilson & Co., 800.00 


143.91 143.91 


*143.91 


*Floater policy. 





Still. January 20, 6.29 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. L. Cossett, 77 Center Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 23, 9.57 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Warren Foote, South Pembroke Street, Plains 
District. Extinguished by Combination L No loss. 



216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 12. Januan^ 24, (i.5f) a. m. Slight fire in resident*.' 
4 Foster Street. Owned by Krepor Sumpadian. Caused 
by overheated chimney. Extinguished with chemicals. 
Recall 7.21) a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $2,300.00 $20.05 $1,900.00 $20.05 

Still. January 24, 9.30 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Martha Noyes. 26 Union 
Street. Detail from Alert Company responded. No as- 
sistance required. No fire. 

No Alarm. January 24, 2.30 p. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence, 49 Church Street, owned by and occupied by J. B. 
Larkin. Caused by short circuit of electric wires in elec- 
tric heater. Extinguished by permanent man F. P. 
]\IcKenna who happened to be passing building on day 
off. 

Value Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings. $8,000.00 $100.00 $6,500.00 $100.00 

Contents, 2,500.00 250.00 2,500.00 250.00 

Still. January 24, 5.28 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. J. Welch, 22 Church Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 25, 9.14 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Andrew Saltmarsh, 60 Beacon Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 27, 8.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. K. Woodworth, 117 School Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 28, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. A. Belliveau, 46 Laurel Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 30, 3.50 a.m. A call from Penacook for 
assistance. Combination 1 sent. See Penacook report. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 217 

Still. January 30, 8.59 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. L. Pool, 67 North State Street. , Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 30, 9.06 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. F. Sullivan, 81 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished b}' Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. January 31, 8.32 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of D. D. Pillsbury, 14 Thompson Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 413. January 31, 11.10 p. m. Fire in the office 
building of the G. N. Bartemus Co. plant, R. R. Square. 
Cause incendiary. 1800 feet hose wet. Recall 12.52 
a. m., February 1st. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $5,000.00 $3,300.00 $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Contents, 1,500.00 600.00 500.00 500.00 

Box 11-11. February 2, 4.26 a. m. A call for assist- 
ance from Lebanon. Steamer and hose wagon were loaded 
on flat car, when word was received that fire was under 
control. 

Still. February 6, 9.11 a. m. Chimney fire at State 
Garage rear of Eagle Hotel. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. February 8, 7.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Henry Hodgraan, 196 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 9, 8.52 p. m. A call to examine hot 
chimney in K. of P. Hall, 27 North ]\lain Street. Detail 
sent from Central Fire Station. No fire. 

Still. February 10, 11.26 a. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Dr. Dodge, 14 North State 
Street. Detail from Central Station sent. No fire. 



218 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 11, 6.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Robert Clark, 5 Monroe Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 11-11. February 13, 5.5(j a. m. A call for assist- 
ance from Franklin. Orphans' Home destroyed. Detail 
with apparatus proceeded as far as Penacook by train 
when word was received that the fire w^as under control. 

Still. February 14, 10.14 a. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence 41 Concord Street, owned by Niram Keyes and oc- 
cupied by Leon Parker. Fire originated in pantry from 
some unknow^n cause. Extinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $45.00 $2,000.00 $45.00 

Still. February 14, 1.10 p. m. Slight fire in stairway 
in residence of Dr. Sullivan, 7 North State Street. Detail 
from Central Station responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. Loss confined to a few brooms. Extinguished by 
occupants. Caused probably by carelessness of workmen 
employed in the basement. Loss tritiing. 

Still. Februarj^ 14, 6.04 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of A. N. Geary, 10 Pierce Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 47. February 14, 8.26 p. m. Fire in building, 81 
South Street owned by Mrs. Fred I. Blackwood and oc- 
cupied by Mrs. A. Gilford as a grocery store. Cause un- 
known. 300 feet of hose wet. Recall 9.05 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$2,800.00 


$671.00 


$1,000.00 


$671.00 


Contents, 


4,000.00 


3,384.00 


3,000.00 


2,200.00 



Still. February 15, 1.12 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Emma Clay, 42 South Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 219 

Still. February 15, 8.29 p. m. Chiiuney fire in resi- 
dence 61 South Main Street, owned by Stanley Goodrich 
and occupied by E. 0. Swain. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid- 

Buildings, $2,000.00 $45.00 $1,150.00 $45.00 

Still. February 16, 6.33 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William McKenzie, 18 Walker Street. Extin- 
guished bj' Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 9.31 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. P. Young, 47 Laurel Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 1.42 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Cilley, Iron Works Road. On account 
of condition of the roads the run was made with sleigh. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 1.03 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mary A. Philips, 148 Rumford Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 19, 8.31 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Daly, 11 Whittredge Avenue. Extin- 
guished b}" Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 20. 8.49 a. m. Chimney fire in the 
Hans Larsen carpenter shop. Hall's Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 21, 6.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. M. Sanders, 34 Franklin Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 23, 10.36 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. S. Anderson, 8 Maple Street. Extinguished 
bv Combination 1. No loss. 



220 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. February 23, 6.24 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of R. F. Walker, 5 Pearl Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 23, 7.17 p. m. Chimney lire in resi- 
dence of M. J. Sullivan, 46 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 25, 8.05 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Begin, 9 Holly Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. February 25, 8.07 p.m. Slight fire in residence 
43 Penacook Street, owned and occupied by Edgar Pelky. 
Caused by explosion of kerosene lamp. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. Extinguished 
by occupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Contents, .+1,000.00 $150.00 $1,000.00 $150.00 

Box 24. February 28, 8.07 p. m. Fire in blacksmith 
shop in rear of the Commercial House, Center Street, 
owned by Otto J. Carlen and occupied by A. F. Gross. 
Cause unknown. 1550 feet hose wet. Recall 9.11 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$1,000.00 


$300.00 


None 


None 


Contents, 


600.00 


300.00 


None 


None 



February 28, 9.22 p. m. A call to the scene of preced- 
ing fire. Steam mistaken for smoke Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. March 1, 1.30 p. m. Fire in residence 115 Rum- 
ford Street, ow^ned by ]\Irs. Gladys Hoit and occupied by 
Charles C. Sargent, Fred R. Walker, and Henry F. 
Robinson. Cause unknown. Combination 1 responded 
but on arrival sent in a bell alarm. See next alarm. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 221 

Box 13. March 1, 1.34 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. 1600 feet of hose wet. Recall 3.14 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,700.00 .$2,000.00 $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

Contents : 

H. F. Robinson, 1,000.00 325.00 600.00 325.00 

C. C. Sargent, 1,000.00 300.00 200.00 300.00 

No Alarm. March 1, 1.40 p. m. Fire in residence 35 
South Main Street, owned by Lewis Crowell. Caused by 
hot ashes in wooden box. Extinguished by occupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $8,000.00 $75.00 $6,000.00 $75.00 

Still. ]\Iarch 3, 3 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of S. A. Johnson, 4 Myrtle Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
Back draft. No loss. 

Box 25. March 3, 10.34 p. m. Fire in basement of Hill 
Block, 58 North Main Street, owned by the Eagle & 
Phenix Hotel Co., and occupied by Capital Hardware Co., 
Harry G. Emmons, Cudworth & Parlow, millinery, Mrs. 
Mabel Hutchinson, specialty shop, Brotherhood of Loco- 
motive Engineers, law offices, club rooms, etc. Before 
this fire had been extinguished it had worked its way 
into the adjoining block owned and occupied by Harry 
G. Emmons, dry goods store on first, second floor and 
basement. Upper floor occupied as tenements, club 
rooms, etc. Cash Outlet clothing on south side of scene 
of fire suffered loss by smoke, Merrimack County 
Farmers' Exchange, Inc., in rear of building afire suffered 
loss by flow of water across driveway into basement, 
wetting a large quantity of grain. Cause of fire unknown. 
Ten high-service hydrant streams used. 2200 feet of hose 
wet. Recall 2.39 a. m., 4th inst. Detail left to watch. 



222 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings : 
E.&P.HotelCo., $40,000.00 $12,107.62 $22,000.00 $12,107.62 

H. G. Emmons, 50,000.00 6,383.27 50,000.00 6,383.27 

Contents : 

Cap. Hdw. Co., 18,154.54 13,404.54 20,500.00 13,404.54 

H. G. Emmons, 106,504.00 57,621.16 100,000.00 57,621.16 
Cudworth & 

Parlow, 4,000.00 1,500.00 1,000.00 925.00 

MabelHutchinson, 6,000.00 3,000.00 5,000.00 2,424.06 

Cash Outlet Co., 19,000.00 1,710.00 10,000.00 1,710.00 
Merrimack Farmers' 

Exchange, 28,446.84 1,433.08 22,000.00 1,300.00 

Still. March 4, 5.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Miss Mary Pierce, 19 North State Street. Extinguished 
by detail from Central Station. No loss. 

Still. March 5, 5.47 a. m. Chimney fire in Board of 
Trade Block, 83 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 11.39 a. m. Chimney fire in State 
Garage rear of Eagle Hotel. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 11.47 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edgar Wells, 13 Fayette Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 2. No loss. 

Still. March 6, 2.10 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 140 North Main Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. March 8, 5.55 a. m. Chimney fire in Board of 
Trade Block, 83 North Main Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 9, 3.49 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Board of Trade Block, 83 North Main Street. 
Combination 1 responded. Dampers of boiler closed. 
Smoke escaping. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 223 

Still. March 9, 1.42 p. in. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in White Block, 15 Capitol Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. Back draft. 

Still. March 10, 10.34 p. m. Fire in Fellows' Block, 
4 North State Street, owned by the Concord Realty Co. 
and occupied by various parties as offices, tenements, etc. 
Fire originated in the basement fi-om some cause un- 
known. Combination 1 responded but it soon became ap- 
parent that assistance was needed and a bell alarm was 
sent in. See next alarm. 

Box 33. March 10, 10.40 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. 2100 feet of hose wet. Recall 12.28 a. m. the 
nth inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $22,000.00 $6,322.00 $25,000.00 $6,322.00 

Contents : 

Edw. E. Brown, 4,000.00 296.00 2,000.00 296.00 

C. L. Brown, 1,000.00 135.00 500.00 107.20 

R. G. Hartwell, 1,200.00 190.00 800.00 190.00 

H. H. Ring, 2,000.00 125.00 2,000.00 125.00 

N. A. Dwyer, 2,000.00 100.00 500.00 100.00 

Mrs.C.G.iPinkham, 800.00 85.20 250.00 82.50 

T. H. Sherman, 750.00 65.65 500.00 65.65 

Box 35. March 11, 5.38 a. m. Fire in basement of 
Block, 16 North Main Street, owned by First National 
Bank and occupied by Kokaras & Matzouros, as restau- 
rant on the hrst floor and basement, tenements and offices 
above. Caused by boiling over of kettle of fat. 1700 feet 
of hose wet. Recall 7.16 a. m. 



Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. Ins. Paid. 


Building, $40,000.00 


$4,787.57 


$3,000.00 $4,787.57 


Contents : 






Kokaras & 






Matzouros, 12,000.00 


3,500.00 


10,000.00 3,500.00 


E. P. Shurtleff, 1,500.00 


50.00 


1,000.00 50.00 


F. S. Plummer, 1,500.00 


50.00 


700.00 50.00 


J. M. Stark, 1,500.00 


25.00 


800.00 25.00 



224 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Still. March 11, 10.08 a. in. Small shack built by 
boys for club house on Walker Street destroyed. Caused 
by overheated stove. Combination 1 responded but could 
do nothing toward saving it. Loss trifling. 

Still. March 11, 10.33 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Wilde, 220 Pleasant Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 14, 12.28 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of steam in residence of J. J. Lee, 24 South State 
Street. Combination 1 responded. Dry hot water heater. 
No loss. 

Still. March 15, 5.46 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of F. W. Bullock, 46 South Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iareh 15, 8.11 p. m. Barn owned and occupied 
by Ernest E. Brew destroyed with contents. Building 
located near Rumford Field, Hall Street. Three horses 
perished. Cause of fire unknown. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but had not proceeded far when a bell alarm was 
sent in. See next alarm. 

Box 53. March 15, 8.12 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. 950 feet hose wet. Recall 11.18 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 None None 

Contents, 800.00 800.00 None None 

Box 2-2-2. March 16, 11.30 a. m. School signal. 

Still. JMarch 19, 12.44 p. m. Slight fire in basement 
of residence of James 0. Lyford. 11 Pitman Street. Wrap- 
ping on steam pipes ignited. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion ]. Ijoss trifiing. 

Still. :\Iarch 20, 3.31 P. M. Fire in smoke pipe in 
basement of the Colburn restaurant. 32 Nortli "Slain 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 225 

Still. March 25, !).15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of R. M. Clarlv, 5 ^Monroe Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 3. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 7.03 p. m. Chimney fire in the Lenox 
Hotel, 115 North Main Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 8.48 p. m. Fire in store house, South 
Main Street, owned and occupied by the Hutchinson 
Building Co. Cause unknown. Combination 1 responded 
but had not proceeded far when a bell alarm was sent in. 
See next alarm. 

Box 62. March 27, 8.49 p. m. Box pulled for preced- 
ing fire. 2600 feet of hose wet. Recall 12.08 a. m. the 
28th inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $500.00 $500.00 $350.00 $350.00 

Contents, 4,000.00 3,000.00 2,072.36 2,072.36 

Still. March 28 12.13 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Perley Badger, 13 Holt Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 28, 3.03 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph LaFlamme, 128 Pleasant Street, Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. ]\Iarch 28, 7.33 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. F. Wells, 6 Clinton Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 31, 7.24 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of B. N. Stevens, 7 Jackson Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. March 31, 9.11 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. S. Berry, 27 Franklin Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 



226 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Still. April 5, 1.30 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of A. E. Bean, 11 Blake Street. At- 
tended to by detail from Central Station. Caused by 
spontaneous combustion in oily rags under piazza. No 
loss. 

Still. April 5, 11.52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. A. Plummer, Hall St. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. April 6, 10.23 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. J. Fletcher, 63 Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 6, 4.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mary Scannel, 12 Montgomery Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 7, 8.24 a. m. Chimney fire 21 North Main 
Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 7.35 p. m. Chimney fire in Dudley 
Bros. Garage, Liberty Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. April 9, 8.35 p. m. Fire in basement of build- 
ing 121 North Main Street, owned by the Hyman Leving- 
ston Est., and occupied by owner and J. J. Crowley. Com- 
bination 1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm had 
been sent in. See next alarm. 

Box 24. April 9, 8.36 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. 2000 feet hose wet. Recall 9.34 p. m. Cause of fire 
unknown. 

Still. April 9, 9.41 p. m. A call to the scene of pre- 
ceding fire followed by bell alarm. Slight fire in parti- 
tion. No increase in loss by rekindling. See next alarm. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 227 

Box 24. April 9, 9.42 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. 1150 feet hose wet. Recall 10.58 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $1,080.00 $12,000.00 $1,080.00 

Contents : 
Levingston 

& Co., 33,803.38 7,593.89 15,000.00 7,593.89 
J. J. Crowley, 4,000.00 374.15 1,500.00 374.15 

Still. April 10, 6.56 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of C. 0. Bosner, 29 Franklin Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 13, 8.39 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of A. P. Blodgett, 4 High Street extension. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 13, 9.52 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Arthur Nevers, 78 North Spring Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 15, 10.57 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Alvin Prescott, east of camp grounds. Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 15, 8.22 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Arthur Clark, 297 Pleasant Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. April 17, 12.01 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Thomas Cilley, 26 Essex Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 18, 10.15 a. m. Slight fire in flooring in 
dry room, basement of Eagle Hotel. Caused by contact 
of steam pipe and wood. Extinguished by Combination 
1. Loss trifling. 



228 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. April 20, 7.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Fred Wells, 15 Fayette Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 10.30 a. m. Grass fire at 193 South 
Main Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 20, 11.55 a. m. Fire in residence 31 
Allison Street, owned and occupied by E. H. Cheney. 
Caused by grass fire running underneath. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building. ^2,000.00 $80.00 $1,500.00 $80.00 

Still. April 20, 6.17 p. m. Dump fire on Bow Street. 
Combination 1 responded but later assistance was sent. 

Still. April 20, 6.55 p. m. A call for assistance from 
scene of preceding fire. Engine 1, motor-driven, sent. Set 
at brook on Rockingham Street. 1200 feet hose wet. En- 
gine Avorked one hour. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 9.40 a. m. Fire in dump. Bow Street. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 21, 1.10 p. m. Fire in city dump. Bridge 
Street. Engine 2, steamer, sent. 700 feet hose wet. En- 
gine worked two hours. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 10.34 a. m. Grass fire in rear of 
Kimball play ground, North State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 22, 11.13 a. m. Brush fire on the Joseph 
Boulay lot, Plains District. Combination 1 responded. 

Box 4-4-4. April 22, 11.15 a. m. Alarm given in re- 
sponse to urgent call for help from preceding fire. De- 
tails sent in autos and barge. Situation not as bad as 
described. Labored less than one hour. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 229 

Still. April 23, 7.2.3 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Austin, 25 Concord Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 24, 9.18 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Joseph Provost, 6 ^Monroe Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 26, 2.45 p. m. Dump fire at 148 South 
Main Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. April 29, 5.55 p. m. Grass fire at 53 Downing 
'Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. ^Nlay 1, 7.58 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
C. W. Barnard, 14 Center Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

« 

Still. May 4, 5.28 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
B. L. Blackwood, 29 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 4, 8.13 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Hugh Tallant, 17 Auburn Street. 
Combination 1 responded but no assistance was required. 
Back draft. No loss. 

Still. JMay 5, 6.19 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
B. L. Blackwood, 29 Lyndon Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 7, 8.18 p. m. Brush fire on the Plains near 
Sugar Ball. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 8th, 2.20 p. m. Brush fire on the Plains 
near the Folsom place. Combination 1 responded but as- 
sistance being required a bell alarm was given. See next • 
alarm. 

Box 4-4-4. May 8, 2.32 p. m. Alarm given in response 
to a call for assistance from scene of preceding fire. De- 
is 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

tail sent in autos and St. Paul's School bus labored one 
hour. One man left to watch. Loss trifling. 

Still. May 10, 5.28 p. m. Chimney fire in block, 29 
Warren Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. May 15, 11.35 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Sanborn, 16 Merrimack Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 2. May 15, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Box 2. May 16, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. May 19, 2.43 p. m. Slight fire in auto near 82 
Warren Street. Combination 1 responded but no assist- 
ance was required. No loss. 

Still. May 19, 4.26 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the Granite State Candy Co. plant, rear of 100 
North Main Street. Combination 1 responded but no as- 
sistance was required. Stove filled with rubbish, dampers 
closed. No loss. 

Still. May 21, 8.24 p. m. Alarm occasioned by short- 
circuit of wires in gasoline pump at 127 South Main 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. No loss. 

Still. May 22, 7.15 p. m. Reported chimney fire in 
residence of Emma Clay, 42 South Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. May 24, 10.28 a. m. Fire in rubbish under 
shed at 322 South Main Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 24, 3.59 p. m. Slight fire in auto near the 
Bartemus grain plant. Combination 1 responded but no 
assistance was required. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 231 

Still. May 25, 10.46 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in basement of block, 5 Depot Street. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but no assistance was required. Rubbish 
in stove, dampers closed. No loss. 

Still. May 25, 7.20 p. m. Reported roof fire corner 
of Beacon and Lyndon Streets. Proved to be the burn- 
ing of brown-tail moth nests with torch. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

May 27, 1.37 p. m. Awning fire at 72 North ]\Iain 
Street. Caused probably by cigarette stub thrown from 
above. Building owned by W. J. Drew, Trustee. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $40,000.00 $38.49 $23,500.00 $38.49 

Still. May 29, 3.07 p. m. Brush fire on cross road 
between the Hart and Burroughs places. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. May 29, 3.36 p. m. Tree fire at 73 Rumford 
Street. Engine 2 responded but no assistance was re- 
quired. Attended to by the Concord Electric Co. No 
loss. 

Still. May 30, 5.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of John Coburn, 126 North State Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. As a token of appreciation of good 
work Mr. Coburn presented the crew with $5.00. No loss. 

Still. May 30, 6.30 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. E. Lovely, 65 Downing Street. Extinguished by En- 
gine 2. No loss. 

Still. May 31, 6.30 p. m. Fire in city dump, Bridge 
Street. Engine 4 worked 8 hours. 450 feet of hose wet. 
No loss. 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Box 11-11. June 2, 12.08 p. m. Alarm given in response 
to call for assistance from Canaan. Engine 4 and reserve 
hose wagon with detail sent under command of Capt. 
W. A. King. Apparatus not unloaded. 

Still. June -4, 2.50 p. ni. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke, at 21 North Main Street. Detail from Central 
Station responded. No lire. 

Still. June 4, 5.08 p. m. Slight fire in auto at Gray's 
Garage, North Main Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. June 4, 5.51 p. m. Brush fire north of Rumford 
Street near the stone crusher. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. Extinguished by near-by 
residents. No loss. 

Still. June 6, 3.10 p. m. Fire in city dump Bridge 
Street. Engine 2 worked 8 hours. 650 feet of hose w^et. 
No loss. 

Box 2. June 6, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 
Box 2. June 7, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 
Box 2. June 8, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. June 9, 9.51 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 3 Marshall Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. Fumigating. No loss. 

Still. June 9, 5.01 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Gilpatrick, Black Hill. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. June 14, 4.50 p. m. Slight fire in dry bridge, 
Bridge Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 233 

Still. June 15, 8.01 p. m. Brush fire on the W. P. 
Ballard place, Long Pond Road. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1 and near-by residents. No loss. Owner pre- 
sented $10.00 to Combination 1. 

Box 4-4-4. June 15, 3.25 p. m. A call for assistance 
from scene of preceding fire. Detail sent. Fire out on 
arrival. Needless alarm. 

Still. June 16, 2.40 p. m. Slight fire in auto, South 
State Street near Thompson Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 3. Loss trifling. 

Still. June 17, 4.48 p. ra. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke at 119 North State Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. I\leat burning 
on stove. No loss. 

Still. June 19, 2.10 p. m. Slight fire in residence of 
Arthur Morgan, 44 South State Street. Electric flat-iron. 
Extinguished by Combination 3. No loss. 

Still. June 22, 1.02 p. m. Slight fire in closet in 
building 6 South Main Street owned by Harry Shapiro. 
Combination 1 responded but before arrival a bell alarm 
had been sent in. See next alarm. 

Box 35. June 22, 1.03 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. Extinguished with chemicals. Cause of fire spon- 
taneous combustion. Loss trifling. No claim filed. Recall 
1.12 p. m. 

Box 5. June 26, 10.27 p. m. Fire in freight ear at 
passenger station. Cause unknown. 250 feet of hose 
wet. Recall 10.56 p. m. 



Value. Loss. Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Car, ' $2,500.00 $60.00 Blanket 


No claim 


Car owned by Central Vermont R. R. 


filed 



234 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Box 35, June 28, 8.23 p. m. Fire in boiler room of the 
Keed Laundry plant, Odd Fellows Avenue. Building 
owned by Mary E. Reed. Cause of fire, spontaneous com- 
bustion. 2250 feet of hose wet. Recall 9.13 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$17,000.00 


$906.08 


$14,000.00 


$906.08 


Contents, 


12,000.00 


346.00 


10,000.00 


346.00 



Still. July 2, 5.45 p. m. Fire in garage connected 
with residence 10 South State Street, owned by Dr. F. 
B. Taylor, and occupied by the owner and Walter A. 
Brown. Combination 1 responded but before arrival a 
bell alarm was sent in. See next alarm. Cause unknown. 

Box 412. July 2, 5.47 p. m. Box pulled for preceding 
fire. 1300 feet of hose wet. Recall 6.20 p. m. Cause of 
fire unknown. 



Building, 

Contents : 
F. B. Taylor, 
W. A. Brown, 



Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

$6,500.00 $1,350.00 $3,850.00 $1,350.00 

1,950.00 1,700.00 None None 

2,000.00 25.00 1,000.00 25.00 



Still. July 2, 6.37 p. m. Reported re-kindling of fire 
in the Taylor Garage. Combination 1 and 3 responded 
but no assistance was required. Needless alarm. 

Box 471. July 4, 1.45 a. m. False alarm. Recall 
1.53 a. m. 



Still. July 4, 2.43 a. 
Street and "West Street. 
1. No loss. 



m. Bonfire corner South Main 
Extinguished bv Combination 



Still. July 4, 3.03 a. m. Fire in rubbish in ash can 
corner of South State and Pleasant Streets. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



FraE DEPARTMENT. 235 

Still. July 5, 12.29 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of E. E. Cutting, 19 Thompson Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 10, 8.53 a. m. Brush fire in rear of Bow 
Brook Club House, Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 10, 6.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of W. F. Spain, 65 School Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. July 11, 11.29 a. m. Dump fire in rear of 54 
"Walker Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still, July 11, 11.58 a. m. Brush fire on Penacook 
Street west of Rumford Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tions 1 and 2. No loss. 

Still. July 11, 4.53 p. m. Brush fire near the Bow 
Brook Club House, Warren Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 11, 5.45 p. m. Slight fire on railroad 
bridge at Bow crossing. Combination 1 responded but 
no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. July 12, 10.10 a. m. Fire in hay field on Breezy 
Hill, Bow. Combination 1 responded and assistance in 
protecting near-by houses was rendered. See Bow re- 
port. 

Still. July 13, 10.50 a. m. Fire in hay field on Dimond 
Hill. Combination 1 responded and assisted employees 
in extinguishing same. Loss trifling. 

Still. July 14, 11.04 p. m. Farm buildings, barn and 
shed owned and occupied by George Watkins destroyed. 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cause unknown. Buildings located on the Saltmarsh 
Road. Combination 1 responded but to no avail. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$500.00 


•toOO.OO 


None 


None 


Contents, 


200.00 


200.00 


None 


None 



Box 2. July 16, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. July 18, 10.01 p. m. A call for assistance from 
East Concord. Combination 1 sent. 

Still. July 18, 10.04 p. m. Second call for help from 
East Concord. As it was stated that water was available 
Engine 1, motor driven, was sent. 1550 feet of hose wet. 
Engine worked 2 hours. See East Concord report. 

Still. July 19, 11.25 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mary Dearborn, 33 Union Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. July 23, 9.55 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Dunbarton. The George R. Wyman buildings destroyed. 
No water being available Combination 1 only was sent. 
Buildings destroyed on arrival. See Dunbarton report. 

Still. July 24, 1.23 p. m. A call for assistance from 
West Hopkinton. Paper mill property destroyed. Engine 
1, motor driven, sent. 800 feet of hose wet. Engine worked 
3 hours. See Hopkinton report. 

Still. July 26, 2.23 p. m. Brush fire on the W. P. 
Ballard lot, Long Pond Road. Combination 1 responded 
and assisted near-by residents. No loss. 

Still. July 27, 11.12 a. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the Avery Music Store, 18 Pleasant Street. 
Detail from Central Station sent. No fire. 

Still. August 1, 3.30 p. m. Fire in city dump near 
lower bridge. Engine 2 worked 4 hours. 200 feet hose 
wet. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 237 

Still. August 2, 7.58 a. m. Slight fire in out-building 
in rear of 7 Bridge Street. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. Extinguished by dis- 
coverers. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 2, 3.00 p. m. Fire in city dump near 
lower bridge. Engine worked 4 hours. 300 feet hose wet. 

No loss. 

Box 58. August 2, 11.35 p. m. President Harding's 
age tolled on the Central Fire Station bell on receipt of 
news of his death. 

Box 2. August 3, 5.15 p. m. No ball game. 

Still. August 5, 11.05 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 13 South State Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. August 7, 9.56 a. m. Curtain fire in residence 
30 Walker Street, owned by Hugh Tallant and occupied 
by J. D. Francis. Cause unknown. Extinguished by 
occupants. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $25.00 $2,000.00 $25.00 

Contents, 500.00 5.00 None None 

Still. August 7, 7.05 p. m. Fire in soft coal in pocket 
of Concord Lumber Co., E. Penacook treet. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. Extinguished 
by employees. No loss. 

Still. August 9, 2.45 a. m. Slight fire in dry bridge, 
Bridge Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 10, 7.03 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the Martin Block, Depot Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. August 10, 7.44 p. m. Fire in cinders in rail- 
road yard near the N. E. Cable Co. plant. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. 100 feet hose wet. No loss. 



238 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. August 12, 9.29 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of J. M. Lacasse, 10 Foster Street. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 13, 2.01 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Warren Foote, South Pembroke Street, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 13, 9.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William Greely, 17 Fremont Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. August 14, 8.25 p. m. Auto fire at 69 Rumford 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 22, 9.31 a. m. Summer cottage owned 
by Eugene Gale, located on shore of Penacook Lake de- 
stroyed. Unoccupied. Cause of fire unknown. Combina- 
tion 1 responded but could do little save preventing a 
forest fire. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Contents, 500.00 500.00 500.00 500.00 

Still. August 24, 3.31 p. m.. Brush fire on the Bur- 
roughs Farm, Dunbarton Road. Fire reported by look- 
out on Kearsarge Mountain. Combination 1 responded 
but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. August 27, 12.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. P. Monahan, 54 Center Street. Combination 1 
responded but no assistance was required. No loss. 

Still. August 31, 6.08 p. m, A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in the United Life & Accident Insurance Com- 
pany building, 24 South Main Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. Back draft. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 239 

Still. September 2, 1.35 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke at 4 School Street. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but no assistance was required. Potatoes boiled 
dry. No loss. 

Still. September 2, 4.25 p. m. Fire in dump near lower 
bridge. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 3, 10.36 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Johnson, 60 North Spring Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 5, 7.54 a. m. Slight fire in automo- 
bile at 35 Downing Street. Combination 1 responded but 
no assistance was required. Loss trifling. 

Still. September 8, 8.21 a. m. Fire in pile of oily 
waste outside of Lenox Garage rear of 10 Park Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 15, 7.58 a. m. Slight fire in draperies 
in residence of Mary Beggs, 11 Montgomery Street. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistance was required. Ex- 
tinguished by occupants. Probably caused by cigarette. 
Loss trifling. 

Still. September 15, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. C. Hoague, 12 Tahanto Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 17, 12.32 a. m. Fire in dump near 
lower bridge. Combination 1 responded but could do little 
but check it somewhat. 

Still. September 17, 10.30 a. m. Fire in dump near 
lower bridge. Steamer 1 sent but the river being ab- 
normally low engine failed to draft. Steamer 2 sent with 
like result. Steamer 2 then set at Hammond Street hy- 
drant. Engine worked 8 hours. 2300 feet hose wet. No 
loss. 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. September 17, 2.15 p. m. Engine 2 Combination 
car sent to scene of preceding fire to splice line of hose. 

Still, September 22, 5.24 p. m. Slight gasoline fire 
at Hall Bros, garage, 31 South Main Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. Extinguished 
by occupants. No loss. 

Still. September 26, 6.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. E. Cutting, 19 Thompson Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance Avas required. No loss. 

Still. September 26, 6.27 p. m. Slight fire in auto, 
Bridge Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. No loss. 

Still. September 27, 6.48 p. m. Reported chimney 
fire on Grant Street, Plains District. Combination 1 re- 
sponded but could locate no fire. 

Still. September 30, 5.50 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Jennings, 3 Waverly Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. September 30, 6.11 p. m. Combination 2 sent to 
assist at scene of preceding fire. 

Still. September 30, 6.32 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Herbert C. Wilcox, 229 North Main Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Engine 2. No loss. 

Still. October 1, 12.31 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Colombe, North Pembroke Road, Plains District. 
Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 4, 12.13 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. S. Chase, 30 1-2 Mills Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 6, 6.03 p. m. A call for help from 
Putney Hill, Hopkinton. Combination 1 responded and 
assisted in saving the house owned by George Ford. Barn 
and shed destroyed. See Hopkinton report. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 241 

Still. October 7, 8.11 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Homer W. Edson. 54 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still, October 8, 2.09 p. m. Brush fire on the Albin 
Road on land owned by Isaac Bullock. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 8, 6.39 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of P. Lane, St. Paul's School. Cause 
proved to be burning rags in stove in near-by house. Com- 
bination 1 responded but no assistaiice was required. 

Still. October 12, 4.30 p. m. Fire in dump. Bridge 
Street. Kearsarge Engine sent. Engine worked until the 
following morning when, owing to low water in the river, 
it was deemed advisable to lay a line of hose from a high- 
pressure hydrant, thus releasing the engine. Detail worked 
until 9 A. M. the 14th inst. 2600 feet hose wet. Engine 
worked 13 hours. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 1 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Dr. D. E. Sullivan, 7 North State 
Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance was 
required. Back draft. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 1.15 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in residence of Miss Mary Pierce, 19 North 
State Street. Combination 1 responded but no assistance 
was required. Back draft. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 3.25 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. A. C. Melendy, 1 Cedar Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 14, 8.14 p. m. Slight fire in auto near 
St. Paul's School. Extinguished by Combination 1. Loss 
trifling. 

Still. October 15, 9.12 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. C. T. Donovan, 57 South Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. October 17, 2.58 p. m. Brush fire opposite the 
Ballard Place, Long Por.d Road. Combination 1 crew sent 
in Engine 2 car. 

Box 4-4-4. October 17, 3.05 p. m. Alarm given for 
preceding fire. Details sent in autos. Labored two hours. 
Detail left through the night. No loss. 

Still. October 17, 6.02 p. m. A call for help from 
detail left at scene of preceding fire. Detail sent. 

Still. October 22, 5.21 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Drew, 15 Highland Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 22, 5.26 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 72 North State Street. Combination 2 responded but no 
assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. October 23, 6.13 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of L. E. Prentiss, 12 Perkins Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 26, 7 a. m. Dump fire Bridge Street. 
Steamer 2 worked 10 hours. No loss. 

Still. October 27, 7.30 a. m. Dump fire. Bridge Street, 
Steamer 4 worked 10 hours. No loss. 

Still. October 27, 9.03 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Mrs. E. R. Parsons, 112 North State Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. October 28, 7.09 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
in residence of Geo. Ash, 40 Concord Street. Combination 
1 responded but no assistance was required. No fire. 

Still. October 29, 7.15 a. m. Dump fire Bridge Street. 
Steamer 4 worked 5 hours. No loss. 

Still. October 30, 7 a. m. Dump fire Bridge Street. 
Steamer 4 worked 10 hours. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 243 

Box 35. October 30, 11.55 p. m. Fire in brick block, 
11 Depot Street, owned and occupied by Treisman Bros. 
& Diversi Co., as a candy factory. Cause unknown. 2700 
feet hose wet. Kecall 2.59 a. m. 31st inst. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, .$30,000.00 $10,889.00 $18,000.00 $10,889.00 

Contents, 65,000.00 41,750.00 58,000.00 41,750.00 

Connecting block owned by Abbie H. Atkins slightly 
damaged by smoke and water. Exposure loss. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $10,000.00 $169.50 $8,000.00 $169.50 

Still. October 31, 6.54 p. m. Fire in leaves at White 
Park. Boys' work. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Box 15. October 31, 8.19 p. m. False alarm. Recall 
8.25 p. m. 

Still. October 31, 9.20 p. m. Fire in leaves at White 
Park. Boys' work. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 

loss. 

Box 46. October 31, 11.15 p. m. False alarm. Recall 
11.23 p. m. 

Still, November 1. 12.35 p. m. Grass fire at 66 Wash- 
ington Street. Extinguished by Combination 2. No loss. 

Still. November 1, 8.01 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 19 Green Street. Combination 1 responded but no as- 
sistance was required. No fire. 

Still. November 3, 5.35 p. m. A call to investigate 
cause of smoke in the Martin Block, Depot Street. De- 
tail from Central Station sent. Found ashes in wooden 
receptacle. No loss. 

Still. November 4, 12.26 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of J. M. Isabelle, 18 Thompson Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Still. November 7, 9.44 a. in. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Gotchee, 58 Downing St. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 131. November 7, 7.14 p. m. Fire in residence, 
89 Franklin Street owned by Mrs. L. j\I. Pettengill and 
occupied by owner and Robert Ransom. Caused by over- 
heated chimney. 1450 feet hose wet. Recall 8.08 p. m. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$4,000.00 


$485.00 


$3,000.00 


$485.00 


Contents : 










L. M. Pettengill, 


2,000.00 


160.00 


1,000.00 


160.00 


R. Ransom, 


1,000.00 


150.00 


500.00 


150.00 



Still. November 8, 8.51 p. m. Chimney fire in Lenox 
Hotel, 115 North Main Street. Extinguished by Combina- 
tion 1. No loss. 

Still. November 10, 2.32 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of C. H. Blake, 21 Concord Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 11, 5.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Peter Drouin, 171 Pleasant Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 14, 6.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of L. W. Sargent, 31 Washington Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 14, 12.25 p. m. Grass fire in rear of 
19 Clinton Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No 
loss. 

Still. November 14, 1.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence 50 Center Street, owned by Mrs. E. B. Niles. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins Paid. 

Building, $3,600.00 $56.21 $3,000.00 $56.21 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 245 

Still. November 14, 3.32 p. m. Second call to resi- 
dence 50 Center Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. 
No loss. 

Still. November 14, 5.34 p. m. Slight fire in auto at 
91 Rumford Street. Combination 1 responded but no 
assistance was required. Loss trifling. 

Still. Chimney fire in the Levingston Block, 123 North 
Main Street. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 16, 8.33 a. m. Chimney fire in Eagle 
Garage. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 5.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George Hall, 10 North Spring Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 18, 6.48 p. m. Grass fire corner of 
Rumford and Highland Streets. Extinguished by Com- 
bination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 19, 5.36 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dance of James Woodridge, 3 Marshall Street. Extin- 
guished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 20, 1.53 p. m. Fire in leaves at 20 
Forest Street. Boys' work. Extinguished by Combination 
1. No loss. 

Still. November 20, 4.55 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of W. J. Simpson, Black Hill. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 20, 7.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of D. H. LaFleur, South Pembroke Street, Plains 
District. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

17 



246 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. November 21, 6.19 p. m. Fire in electric street 
railway car at the corner of "Washington and White 
Streets. Cause, short-circuit of wires. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. Loss trifling. 

Still. November 27, 5.30 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Oliver Racine, 252 North State Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 29, 10.27 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of D. B. Merrill, 3 Tremblay Court. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. November 30, 11.25 p. m. Cliimney fire in 
residence of Fred S. Hill, South Street, below Wheeler's 
Corner. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Box 131. December 9, 10.33 a. m. Slight fire in resi- 
dence of William F. Mueser, 21 Charles Street. Fire 
originated in small box in room used as a shop. Caused 
probably by cigarette stub. Extinguished by occupants. 
Recall 10.40 a. m. No loss. 

Box 35. December 10, 4.01 a. m. Alarm occasioned by 
kettle of fat boiling over in restaurant, 7 Pleasant Street 
Extension. Extinguished with chemicals. Recall 4.07 
a. m. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 6.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Perley S. Badger, 3 Holt Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 14, 6.09 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of T. P. Higgins, 26 Lyndon Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 7.07 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of P. J. Corbett, 10 Wheaton avenue. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 



PIKE DEPARTMENT. 247 

Still. December 15, 9.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Mahoney, South Pembroke Street, Plains 
District. Extinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 12.35 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Moses, 10 Montgomery Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 10.16 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John Sweet, 20 Walker Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 25, 5.11 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Luther Robinson, 47 Center Street. Extinguished 
by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 11 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Napoleon Pelky, 7 Myrtle Street. Combination 
3 responded. 

Still. December 26, 11.17 a. m. Same as preceding 
fire. Combination sent to assist. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 5.47 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of William E. Dexter, 210 Pleasant Street. Ex- 
tinguished by Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 26, 6.48 p. m. Chimney fire in Baker 
Memorial Church, corner North State and Warren Streets. 
Extinguished by Engine 2. No loss. 

Still. December 27, 5.32 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of R. W. Colby, 11 Myrtle Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 9.19 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of H. C. Robbins, 4 Foster Street. Extinguished by 
Combination 1. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 5.48 p. m. Reported chimney fire 
at 9 Pleasant Street. Combination 1 responded but could 
discover no fire. 



248 city of concord. 

Penacook. 

Still. January 13, 1.15 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of E. N. Roy, 26 East Canal Street. No loss. 

Box 41. January 13, 11.00 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block owned by Mrs. Jennie Hayward, East Canal 
Street. Recall 11.30 p. m. No loss. 

Box 25. January 20, 4.20 a. m. Fire in the Hoyt 
Electrical Instrument Works plant. Washington Street. 
Caused by overheated furnace. Wet 1300 feet of hose. 
Recall 5.31 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $25,000.00 $151.43 $20,000.00 $151.43 

Stock & supplies, 30,000.00 22.00 30,000.00 22.00 

Machinery, 16,000.00 238.00 16,000.00 238.00 

Box 25, January 25, 12.40 p, m. Slight fire in enamel- 
ing building of the Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works 
plant. Wet 1000 feet of hose. Recall 1.10 p. m. Loss 
trifling. No claim filed. 

Still. January 27, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Ormsbee, 170 South Main Street. 

Box 35. January 30, 3.25 a. m. Fire in Spicer Block 
and Strand Theatre, Main Street. These buildings were 
connected, were practically one building, owned by 
George Beede and were insured as one building. 

Fire caught probably from furnace in the basement. 
On arrival of the apparatus both buildings were thoroughly 
afire and soon enveloped the Rivers Block, the next build- 
ing south. 

The buildings in which the fire originated were totally 
consumed and the Rivers Block was a total loss. 

The Concord Electric Co. plant in the rear suffered 
some loss and the plate glass windows in' the Fifield Block 
were all broken by the heat. 

Combination 1 with detail was sent from the city proper 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 249 

to cover the district while the local brigade was engaged 

in extinguishing the tire. 3550 feet of hose wet, 10 lines 
laid. Recall 3.37 p. m. the 31st inst. 

Value. Lobs. Ins. Ins. Paid. 



Buildings : 






Spicer-Strand, $20,000.00 $20,000.00 $14,000.00 .$1 4,000.00 


Contents : 






Atlantic- 
Pacific Co., 3,000.00 


3,000.00 


None None 


Henry Dube, 1,300.00 


1,300.00 


None None 


Richard 






Fairhurst, 1,000.00 


1,000.00 


None None 


Strand Theatre, 9,500.00 


9,500.00 


7,000.00 6,750.00 


Rivers 


: Block. 





Owned by Joseph La Rivers and occupied by owner as 
residence and store and by various parties, stores, tene- 
ments, etc. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Buildings, 


$5,000.00 


$5,000.00 


$3,000.00 


$3,000.00 


Contents : 










J. La Rivers, 


5,500.00 


5,500.00 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


Bert Huckins, 


4,600.00 


4,600.00 


4,000.00 


3,800.00 


Lewis Whittier, 


1,100.00 


1.100.00 


500.00 


500.00 


Ella M. Carter, 


500.00 


500.00 


200.00 


200.00 


Josephine S. Hall, 200.00 


200.00 


None 


None 


Mary White, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 


200.00 


200.00 



Fifield Block. 

Owned by Oliver J. Fifield and occupied by Stewart G. 
Fifield, dry goods, and others. Damaged by heat. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


Ins. Paid. 


Building, 


$10,000.00 


$600.00 


$8,000.00 


$600.00- 


Contents : 










S. G. Fifield : 










Stock, 


10,000.00 


5.00 


8,000.00 


5.00 


Fixtures, 


600.00 


50.00 


500.00 


50.00 



250 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Concord Electric Co. Suh-station. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $3,000.00 $1,485.00 $2,500.00 $1,485.00 

Still. January 31, 6.40 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Frank Beede, 7 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. February 5, 12.15 p. m. Chimney fire in Wash- 
ington House. No loss. 

Box 35. February 10, 1.20 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of George MeSanborn, East Concord District. No 
loss. 

Still. February 13, 12.10 p. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, 9 Bye Street. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 10.40 a. m. Chimney fire in 
Greaser Block, 23 South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. February 16, 2.20 p. m. Fire in smoke pipe of 
furnace in residence of Howard Moore, 5 Elm Street. 

Still. February 17, 8.50 a. m. Chimney fire in 
Lambrukos Block, 52 South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. February 18, 3.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dr. E. U. Sargent, 22 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. February 20, 6.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Walter Gregg, 89 High Street. No loss. 

Still. February 22, 6.50 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of James Coveney, 1 Bye Street. No loss. 

Still. February 23, 9.10 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Sarah Farrand, 18 Cross Street. No loss. 

Still. March 3, 10.20 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Peter Osborne, 48 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. March 8, 2.05 a. m. A call for assistance from 
Canterbury. Fire in grocery store owned by Stanley Clark. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 251 

Detail responded with team and chemicals. See Canter- 
bury report. 

Still. March 10, 8.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Emerson, 56 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. March 13, 11.55 a. m. Slight fire in pail in shed 
attached to residence of George Annis, 56 South Main 
Street, No loss. 

Still. March 15, 6.32 p. m. Fire in smoke pipe in 
Eagle Block. No loss. 

Still, March 17, 11.55 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
20 Cross Street, owned by Mrs, Sarah Farrand, No loss. 

Still, March 24, 9.32 a. m. Chimney fire in residence, 
88 Merrimack Street, owned by E. S. Davis. No loss. 

Still. March 24, 11.46 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Edward McGirr, 46 Charles Street. No loss. 

Still. March 25, 12.10 p, m. Chimney fire in residence, 
39 Summer Street, owned by Alfred Belisle. No loss. 

Still. March 27, 2.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Frank Frisbee, 48 Summer Street. No loss. 

Box 35, March 28, 8.20 a. m. Fire in Graphic Block, 
owned by the Frank E. Bean Estate, and occupied on first 
floor by I. Saidel, meat market, Dunham and Keenan, 
bakers, the only occupants to suffer loss. The fire started 
in an ante-room of Graphic Hall on the upper floor and 
confined to partitions and flooring of upper story. Loss 
to occupants resulted largely from water. Cause of fire 
unknown, 1650 feet of hose wet. Recall 10.40 a. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $12,000.00 $2,000.00 $5,000.00 $1,500.00 

Contents : 
I. Saidel, 1,500.00 300.00 1,500.00 200.00 

Dunham 

& Keenan, 3.000.00 1,500.00 1,800.00 1,147.00 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Still. March 28, 4.05 p. in. Chimney fire in residence 
of Richard Gahagan, 26 High Street. 

Still. March 28, 4.15 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Justin Clark, River Hill. Detail with team and 
chemicals responded. No loss. 

Box 32. March 30, 5.55 p. m. Fire in residence, Elm 
Street, owned and occupied by Justin Banker. Sparks 
from stove set wood-box afire. Fire worked into partition 
around chimney on lower floor. 1350 feet of hose wet. Re- 
call 6.45 p. m. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $2,000.00 $300.00 $1,100.00 $300.00 

Contents, 500.00 200.00 300.00 100.00 

Still. April 3, 9.00 a. m. Fire in smoke pipe in resi- 
dence of Mrs. Sarah Farrand, 20 Cross Street. No loss. 

Still. April 14, 2.10 p. m. Grass fire at Birchcroft, 
Penacook Road. Assisted by West Concord contingent. 
700 feet of hose wet. No loss. 

Still. May 8, 11.35 a. m. Grass fire on South Main 
Street. No loss. 

Still. May 12, 9.37 a. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
J. E. Marden, 62 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. May 16, 2.28 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in residence of Glen Shattuck, 42 Merrimack 
Street. Back draft. No fire. 

Still. May 20, 2.20 p. m. Brush fire on West Main 
Street on land owned by George H. Provost. Labored one 
half hour. No loss. 

Still. May 24, 1.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
OAvned by Fred Blanchard, 14 Crescent Street. Boscawen 
side. No loss. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 253 

Box 4-4-4. May 27, 12.57 p. ni. Brush fire near Boyce 
station on land owned by George MeSanborn. Labored one 
hour. Canterbury district. No loss. 

Still. May 27, 2.00 p. m. A call for assistance from 
Canterbury. Brush fire near depot. Detail sent. Labored 
two and one half hours. Loss unknown. 

Still. May 29, 7.40 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Paul Perry, 15 Union Street. No loss. 

Still. June 5, 6.15 p. m. Grass fire on South Main 
Street near WilloAv Hollow. No loss. 

Still. June 9, 3.12 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Eli Lamoire, 37 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. June 9, 4.20 p. iii. Chimney fire in residence of 
Eli Lamoire, 37 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. June 18, 1.21 p. m. A call to investigate cause 
of smoke in Creaser Block. 21 South Main Street. Back 
draft. No fire. 

Box 31. June 19, 9.55 p. m. Fire in garage owned and 
occupied by William 'Clair. Cause unknown. 400 feet 
of hose wet. Recall 10.21 p. m. 

Ins. Paid. 

None 
None 

Still. June 22, 5.42 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Joseph Bassett, 30 East Canal Street. No loss. 

Still. July 2, 11.56 p. m. Pop-corn tent afire at Con- 
toocook River Park. Detail responded. Loss trifling. 

Still. July 8, 11.50 a. m. Oil stove fire in residence of 
Samuel Case, 31 Washington Street. No loss. 

Still. July 9, 9.55 a. m. Chimney fire in tenement 
block. 2 Electric Court. No loss. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Ins. 


ilding, 


.$250.00 


$100.00 


None 


to, 


350.00 


150.00 


None 



254 CITY OF CONCORD. 

July 10, 9.00 p. m. Bell alarm from Torrent Station, 
Boseawen side. Fire in lumber, Ellsworth's saw mill. De- 
tail responded. 

Still. July 13, 3.10 p. m. Chimney fire in residence of 
Arthur W. Ayer, 7 Fowler Street. No loss. 

Box 4-4-4. July 14, 11.03 p. m. Reported brush fire at 
River Hill. Detail responded but on arrival ascertained 
that the fire was near Penacook Lake, West Concord. Re- 
turned to quarters. 

Still. July 18th, 9.20 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Glen W. Shattuck, 42 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Still. August 16, 2.40 p. m. Slight fire on roof of 
store house, owned and occupied by C. M. & A. W. Rolfe. 
Caused by sparks from locomotive. Loss trifling. 

Still. August 31, 9.00 a. m. Slight fire in auto at 
Keenan's stable. Caused by short circuit of wires. No 
loss. 

Still. September 30, 8,55 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dr. C. F. True, 23 Merrimack Street. No loss. 

Box 11-11. October 3, 7.20 p. m. A call for assistance 
from Canterbury. Buildings owned by Bert Savage de- 
stroyed. Detail sent with auto combination. Recall 8TD7 
p. m. 

Still. October 19, 6.55 p. m. Bed fire in residence of 
Eugene Preve, 5 Warren Street. Cause unknown. Loss 
trifling. No claim filed. 

Still. October 26th, 6.15 p. m. Chimney fire in Little 
Block, Main Street. 

Still. October 29th, 10.35 p. m. Fire in shed in rear 
of summer cottage owned by George Jacobs. Detail re- 
sponded. See next alarm. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 255 

Box 11-11. October 29, 10.55 p. m. Alarm given for 
preceding fire. Shed and contents a total loss. Cause 
unknown. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $400.00 $400.00 $200.00 $200.00 

Contents, 300.00 300.00 None None 

Still. November 8, 6.00 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Andrew Felker, 5 Webster Street. No loss. 

Still. November 20, 11.45 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment house owned by Martha Rowe, Washington Street. 
No loss. 

Still. November 21, 5.27 a. m. Chimney fire in tene- 
ment block, Walnut Street. No loss. 

Still. December 8, 2.05 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Fred Barker, 137 South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. December 12, 6.25 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Deeato, 112 South Main Street. No loss. 

Still. December 14, 5.43 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Joseph Lavoie, 12 Rolfe Street. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 5.10 p. m. Brush fire on land 
owned by Concord Street R. R. Co. on Penacook Street. 
Truck responded. Labored one half hour. No loss. 

Still. December 18, 5.15 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Dennis O'Brien, 19 Church Street. No loss. 

Still. December 30, 6.40 a. m. Chimney fire in the 
Hoyt Electrical Instrument Works plant, 47 Washington 
Street. No loss. 

Still. December 30th, 8.20 a. m. Chimney fire in 
residence of Philip Cornoyer, 17 Bye Street. No loss. 



256 city of concord. 

East Concord. 

Still. January 6, 7.15 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Harry Terrill, Shaker Street. No loss. 

Still. March 2, 11.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of William P. Curtis, Pembroke Street. No loss. 

Still. March 18, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Howard Potter, Oak Hill Road. No loss. 

Bell. March 31, 6.45 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
on Portsmouth Street owned by Jedeon Carter and oc- 
cupied by Walter Smith. 

Bell. March 31, 8.15 a. m. Second alarm for preced- 
ing fire. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $1,500.00 $35.00 $1,000.00 $35.00 

Bell. July 18, 9.59 p. m. Set of buildings owned and 
occupied by James R. Riley on East Penacook Street badly 
damaged. Barn destroyed, house gutted. Fire caught in 
barn. Cause unknown. Assistance summoned from city 
proper. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Buildings, $2,200.00 $1,700.00 $1,100.00 $1,100.00 

Contents, 1,200.00 368.00 750.00 368.00 

Building adjoining owned and occupied by Ross W. 
Cate somewhat damaged. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $4,000.00 $160.00 $3,500.00 $160.00 

Bell. July 22, 12.45 p. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Arthur Powell, Mill Street. No loss. 

Bell. August 22, 10.00 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of Locke Bullock, East Penacook Street. No loss. 

Bell. August 27, 5.25 p. m. Called to residence of 
Mrs. Mary Gatherum, Pecker Street. No fire. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 257 

Bell. November 14, 9.30 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Arthur Latouche, Mill Street. 

West Concord, 

Still. February 7, 2.15 a. m. Slight fire in residence 
of Mrs. Florence Dimond, 442 North State Street. Caught 
from boiler. No loss. 

Still. March 29, 8.50 a. m. Slight fire in store owned 
by James H. Harrington, 531 North State Street. Caused 
by defective chimney. ^ 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building, $600.00 $10.00 $600.00 $10.00 

Bell. April 11, 4.00 p. m. Brush fire near Sewalls 
Falls. Labored two hours. No loss. 

Bell. April 14, 3.10 p. m. Brush fire on land owned 
by Henry Fredette and C. H. Hyman, Penacook Road. 
Labored one hour. No loss. 

Bell. April 21, 4.50 p. m. Brush fire in the bog near 
the B. & M. R. R. Extinguished by section men. No loss. 

Still. April 23, 11.50 a. m. Chimney fire in residence 
of George Spofford, Hutchins Street. No loss. 

Bell. April 29, 4.30 p. m. Fire in hen house owned 
by Charles Olson, 49 Lake Street. Building and contents 
destroyed. 350 feet of hose wet. 

Value. Loss. Ins. Ins. Paid. 

Building and 

Contents, $75.00 $75.00 None None 

Bell. April 30, 4.30 p. m. Brush fire in the bog on 
land owned by C. 0. Partridge. Labored one hour. No 
loss. 

Still. July 2, 6.42 p. m. Slight fire in electric street 
ear. No loss. 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Bell. July 13, 1.14 p. m. Brush fire in the bog on land 
owned by Chas. Murphy. Labored one hour. No loss. 

Still. October 29, 3.15 p. m. Slight fire in automobile, 
934 North State Street. No assistance required. No loss. 

Still. November 3, 10.54 a. m. Fire in old couch in 
hen house on Penacook Road, owned by Anthony Miller. 
No loss. 

Still. December 11, 4.45 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of Leon Tewksbury, 4 Dolan Street. No loss. 

Still. December 15, 5.10 p. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John H. Crowley, 514 No. State Street. No loss. 

Still. December 17, 11.35 a. m. Chimney fire in resi- 
dence of John G. Dimond, 19 Clark Street. No loss. 



Summary, 1923. 

Buildings: Value Loss Ins. Ins. Pd. Net Loss 

Precinct $366,400.00 $55,833.64 $247,750.00 $52,533.64 $3,300.00 

Penacook 77,650.00 30,036.43 53,800.00 21,236.43 8,800.00 

E. Concord 7,700.00 1,895.00 5,600.00 1,295.00 600.00 

W. Concord 675.00 85.00 600.00 10.00 75.00 



$452,425.00 $87,850.07 $307,750.00 $75,075.07 $12,775.00 

Contents : 

Precinct $350,520.76 $145,356.58 $275,166.27 $138,819.12 $6,537.46 

Penacook 90.950.00 31,465.00 71,300.00 14,412.00 17,053.00 



Concord 1,200.00 368.00 750.00 368.00 



$442,670.76 $177,189.58 $347,116.27 $153,599.12 $23,590.46 
Buildings 452,425.00 87,850.07 307,750.00 75,075.07 12,775.00 



Bld.&Con. $895,095.76 $265,039.65 $654,866.27 $228,674.19 $36,365.46 



FraE DEPARTMENT. 259 

Apparatus and Force. 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 

Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine 
and hose car, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Com- 
pany (15 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, 
"Kearsarge, " and auto-combination car, attached to 
the Kearsarge Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; 
one second-class Amoskeag engine, ' ' Governor Hill, ' ' relief 
engine, in charge of an engineer and fireman, one auto- 
combination car in charge of four permanent men ; one 
motor-driven ladder truck, "City of Concord," attached 
to Hook and Ladder Company (21 men) ; one house man 
at Central Fire Station. There is but one horse kept at 
this station. There are eleven permanent men located at 
the Central Fire Station, one permanent man at each fire 
station within the precinct, one permanent man at Pioneer 
Station, Penacook, and one permanent man at Cataract 
Station, "West Concord. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has an auto-combination car, with permanent 
man. 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car, with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hand engine and three wagons and one ladder truck 
in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons and one auto-combination car with perma- 
nent man. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
a modern hose wagon and auto-combination car with per- 
manent man. 



260 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Old Port (30 men), East Concord, has a 4 1-2-inch cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



Hose. 

11,400 feet cotton, rubber lined 
3,200 " 
1,400 " 
500 " 



16,500 



Capacity, cubic feet. 

No. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 

No. State Street, corner of Washington Street, 2,000 

Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street, 4,000 

School Street, corner of Summit Street, 3,500 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



261 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1923. 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

WilliamJC. Green Office, Central Fire Station. 

Assistant Engineers. 

PRECINCT. 

Walter J. Coffin, 1st Asst., Shipping clerk, 11 Beacon Street. 

Sylvester T. Foed, 2(i Asst., Holder, 41 So. Main Street. 

Walter J. Coffin, Clerk of the Board. 



Fred M. Dodge, 
C. E. Robinson, 
George W. Kemp, 



61 Merrimack Street. 



WARD 1. 

Electrician, 

WARD 2. 

Clerk, Penacook St., East Concord. 

WARD 3. 
Overseer, 16 Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEA^I FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2. 

OFFICERS. 

.T. Edward Morrison, Captain. Charles Powell, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Herbert M. Sanders. Engineer and Treasurer. 

MEMBERS. 



Residences. 
8 Thorndike Street. 
75 Centre Street. 
83 Washington Street. 
32 Pleasant Street. 
3 Broadway. 
37 Thorndike Street. 
.57 Franklin Street. 
13 Essex Street. 
90 Warren Street. 
7^2 Lyndon Street. 
16 So. Spring Street. 
58 Warren Street. 
Central Fire Station. 



Badge 




Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


1 J. Edward Morrison, 


Machinist, 


2 Charles Powell, 


Machinist, 


3 Herbert M. Sanders, 


Cashier, 


4 George B. Davis, 


Carriage painter. 


5 Harry L. Messer, 


Machinist. 


6 W. C. B. Saltmarsh. 


Carriage trimmer. 


7 George L. Livingston. 


Machinist. 


8 Everett D. Davis 


Machinist, 


9 Frank E. Hudson, 


•Machinist, 


10 Roger F. Strong, 


Printer. 


11 Nelson E. Strong, 


Printer. 


12 William P. Baxter. 


Printer, 


13#Daniel F. Murphy, 


Chauffeur. 



18 



262 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 



J. C. McGii.VRAY, Captain. 

Badge 

No8. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 John M. Inman, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

22 Eli Langlois, 

29 Philip J. O'Connell, 

21 Charles W. Downing, 
2 7 Fred J. Johnston 

28 James H. Brannigan, 

26 Raymond L. Galfetti, 

23 Clarence G. Howser, 

24 Raymond W. Colby, 
14 Henry E. Drew, 

30 Christopher Cunningham, 



OFFICERS. 

D. J. Adams, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Chauffeur, 

Theatre manager. 

Custodian, 

Machinist, 

Painter, 

Clerk, 

Clerk, 

Gas fitter. 

Plumber, 

Gas fitter, 

Electrician, 

Teamster, 

Chauffeur, 

Chauffeur, 



Residences. 

35 Washington Street. 

9 Thompson Street. 

16 WaU Street. 

102 So. State Street. 
5 Perry Avenue. 
bVz Perry Avenue. 
12 South Street. 

10 Abbott Street. 

11 Princeton Street. 
130 Rumford Street. 

17 Dartmouth Street. 
111/2 Myrtle Street. 
Central Fire Station. 
Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4. 



„ , RELIEF ENGINE. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. Occupations. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
81 South State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2. 



OFFICERS. 



John M. Davis, Captain. 



MiLO G. Davis, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



F. C. Young, Treasurer. 



Badge 




MJliM£ 


si-jKa. 




Nos. 


Names. 


Occupations. 


Residences. 


36 J. 


M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, 




5 Cambridge Street. 


37 M. 


G. Davis, 


Builder, 




6 Beacon Street. 


43 F. 


G. White, 


Laborer, 




12 Montgomery Street. 


44 H. 


D. Gay, 


Tinsmith, 




6 Prince Street. 


42 F. 


C. Young, 


Printer, 




109 Rumford Street. 


39 H. 


F. Walker, 


Chauffeur 




34 Jackson Street. 


40 J. 


E. Murphy, 


Printer, 




171 No. State Street. 


45 M. 


H. Mulligan, 


Insurance 


Agent 


6V2 Walker Street. 


41 T. 


S. Pillsbury, 


Printer, 




Ill No. State Street. 


38 A. 


E. Hardy, 


Clerk, 




12 Charles Street. 


46 F. 


H. Silver, 


Chauffeur, 




Alert Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



263 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3. 

OFFICERS. 

Harey L. Peacock, Captain. Albert W. Thompson, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Albert W. Thompson, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

50 Harry L. Peacock. 

51 Albert W. Thompson, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 
54 John W. McGowan, 

56 Jerry E. Coohran, 
53 Percy H. Flanders, 
58 Wmis S. Ash, 

57 Harry C. Lou^ee, 

52 Martin L. Quimby, 

60 William T. Happiiy, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Carriage painter. 
Janitor 
Machinist, 
Electrician, 
Plumber, 
Molder, 
Carpenter, 
Carriage trimmer. 
Painter, 
Painter, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 

36 "Warren Street. 
12 Allison Street. 
231/2 Perley Street. 
104 South State Street. 
244 No. Main Street. 
36 Downing Street. 
32 West Street. 
2314 Perley Street. 
16 Pillsbury Street. 
64 No. Spring Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1. 

OFFICERS. 

Will A. King, Captain. Sam B. Morgan, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

Ned Herein, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

64 Will A. King, 

65 Sam B. Morgan, 
77 Ned E. Herrin, 

73 H. W. French, 

69 Lucius D. Caldon, 
68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

70 George W. Grover, 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 Stephen P. Foster, 

74 Bion W. Hall, 

75 Edwin H. French, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 Clarence L. Clark, 

81 Bert J. Heath, 
83 Harry Leary, 
76 Bert T. Upham, 
78 Earl W. Gage, 

66 James F. Byrne. 
82 Perley S. Badper. 

67 Shirley C. Clark, 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Coachman, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Carpenter, 
Clerk, 

Woodworker, 
Plumber, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Gas fitter, 
Auto repair, 
R. R. Shop, 



Residences. 
38 Franklin Street. 
10 Avon Street. 
18 School Street. 
43 Thorndike Street. 

13 West Street. 

57 Dunklee Street. 

29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Wall Street. 

15 Humphrey Street. 

30 Green Street. 

34 Downing Street. 
71 South Street. 
100 So. Fruit Street. 
22 Fremont Street. 
25 Thorndike Street. 
5 Charles Street. 

32 Water Street. 
45 Tremont Street. 

33 Thorndike Street. 



264 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1. 



M. S. WAKEriELD, Captain. 

Badge 

Nes. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 M. J. Martin, 

93 M. R. Piper, 

94 J. H. Brunei, 

95 F. P. McKenna, 

96 George H. Eastman, 



OFFICERS. 

M. J. Martin, Lieutenant and Olerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 

Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

Spare Men. 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

House Man, 
A. L. Downing. 



Residences. 

Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 
Central Station. 

Central Station. 
Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 
Penacook. 



OFFICERS. 

Henry Rolfe, Captain. Frank P. Robertson, Lietit. 
Alfred Beddow, Engine-er. 



Clerk and Treas. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Henry Rolfe, 

101 Frank P. Robertson, 

102 Alfred Beddow, 

120 Harry F. Jones, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

105 Cornelius "W. O'Brien, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

118 George A. Griffin. 

123 William Corbett, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 

121 Albert Cassaveaugh, 
112 Richard McBride, 
117 Guy B. Chase. 

122 George L. Miner, 

125 George D. Dovvd. 

114 William H. MeGirr, 
116 Harry Matott, 

11(1 Greiiville Dndaje. 
Ill Eugene Gebo. 

103 Frank D. O'Brien, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Highway agent. 
Machinist, 

Stationary engineer. 
Machine operator. 
Spinner, 
Mill operative. 
Mill operative. 
Painter, 
Second hand. 
Miller, 
Miller, 

Mill operative. 
Mill operative. 
Miller, 
Electrician. 
Drug clerk, 
Foreman, 
Mill operative. 
Electrician, 
Mill operative, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
26 Penacook Street. 

6 Church Street. 

17 South Main Street. 

7 Washington Street. 
7 Church Street. 

43 South Main Street. 
92 High Street. 
3 Spring Street. 
47 Centre Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 
10 Church Street. 

9 Union Street. 

10 Union Street. 
6 Union Street. 
Stark Street. 

24 Charles Street. 
12 Summer Street. 
Washington Street. 

61 Merrimack Street. 
Pioneer Station. 

Pioneer Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



265 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2. 
East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 



Oeoboe O. Robinson, Captain. 
Waltee C. Sanborn, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Claeence Tibbetts, Treasurer. 
Michael Lacroix, Steward. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

120 George 0. Robinson, 

121 Walter C. Sanborn, 

122 John C. Hutchins, 

125 Samuel G. Potter, 

126 WiUiam E. Virgin, 

127 Rufus C. Boynton, 

128 Shad Gate, 

129 Ross W. Gate, 

130 Herbert Knowles, 

131 Parker French, 

132 Westley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

137 Clarence Tibbetts, 

138 Reuben L. Gate, 
135 John T. Gate, 

140 C. A. Chamberlin, 

139 William F. Paige, 

143 H. A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram Gardner, 

146 Thomas Morrison, 

147 Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Carter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 
142 William E. Batchelder. 

141 Herbert F. Piper, 

124 William Gate, 

134 Ernest W. Gate, 

145 George E. Robinson, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Water-dealer, 
Wood-worker, 
Engineer, 
Milk-dealer, 
Carpenter, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Horseshoer, 
Carpenter, 
Janitor, 
Milkman, 
Farmer, 
Moulder, 
Blacksmith. 
Clerk, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 
Parmer, 
Painter, 
Storekeeper, 
Blacksmith, 
Machinist, 
Wood-worker, 
Stone-cutter, 
Clerk, 
Machinist, 
Carpenter, 
Parmer, 
Carpenter, 
Plumber, 



Residences. 
Penacook Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Appleton Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 



266 



CITT OF CONCORD. 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3. 
West Concord. 



OFFICERS. 

Alfred J. Feaser, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treaturtr. 

Jeremiah Cotter, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 
Alfred J. Fraser, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Patrick Ryan, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Edward Lovering, 
Robert Henry, 
Frank Peterson, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Eckstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 
Henry Richardson, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Arthur B. Spead, 
Eric H. Johnson, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
Clifford G. Davis, 
Addison N. Martin, 
Oscar W. Anderson, 
Harold E. Wakefield, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Stone-cutter, 
Blacksmith, 
Farmer, 
Stone-cutter, 
Quarryman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Silversmith, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stationary engineer, 
Stationary engineer. 
Stone-cutter, 
Stone-cutter, 
Foreman, 
Stone-cutter, 
Stationary engineer, 
Quarryman, 
Chauffeur, 
Blacksmith. 
Quarryman, 
Quarryman, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 

10 River Street. 

5 Engel Street. 

382 North State Street. 

50 Hutchins Street. 

513 North State Streev 

1 Clark Street. 

513 North State Street. 

346 North State Street. 

9 Knight Street. 

9 Lake Street. 

Gladstone Avenue. 

516 North State Street. 

6 Dam Street. 

436 North State Street. 
441 North State Street. 
406 North State Street. 
426 North State Street. 
439 North State Street. 
402 North State Street. 
4991/2 No. State Street. 
Cataract Station. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY. 



S. S. Upham, Captain. 

A. L. 



Dennis Holloran, 
T. J. Morrison. 
Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 
O. C. Hodgdon 
W. D. Hutchinson, 
Geo. F. Smith, 



OFFICERS. 

H. T. Dickerman, First Lieutenant. 
DiCKERMAN, Second Lieutenant. 



MEMBERS. 

J. G. McQuilkin, 
A. B. Morrison, 
D. P. Wheeler, 
Henry Tucker, 
W. K. Wingate, 
L. S. Richardson, 
H, C. Taylor, 



Fred O. Libby. 
M. F. Thompson, 
E. J. Brown, 
H. P. Blake. 
Charles C. Moore. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
CITY MARSHAL. 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1924. 

To His Honor, Henry E. Chamherlin, Mayor of the City of 
Concord, and the Honorable Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: — I respectfully submit my fifteenth report 
of the Police Department for the year ending December 
31, 1923 : 

ROSTER. 

City Marshal, 
Geo. A. S. Kimball. 

Assistant Marshal. 
Victor I. Moore. 

Captain, 
Samuel L. Bachelder. 

Sergeant, 
Christopher T. Wallace. 

Patrolmen. 

Samuel Rodd, John B. Long, 

Geo. H. Silsby, James J. Halligan, 

Irving B. Robinson, F. Scott Rogers, 

J. Edward Silva, Cleveland H. Curtis. 

Fred N. Marden, Arthur W. Mclsaac. 

Chauffeurs. 
Abraham D. Cushing. Eugene G. Densmore. 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Reserve Officers. 

Captain, 
Thomas P. Davis, 



Willie A. Little, 
Joseph A. Flanders, 
Jonas Welcome, 
Willie A. Flanders, 
Nelson Forest, 
Geo. H. Abbott, 
Elmer Trombly, 



Walter H. Bean, 
George M. Dooley, 
John MeGirr, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 
Nelson E. Strong, 
Galen W. Hunter, 
John T. Walsh, 
Alfred J. Fraser. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



Appropriation, 
Special Appropriation, 



$39,230.00 
169.91 





$39,399.91 


disbursements. 




Salaries, 


$29,475.00 


Salaries, specials. 


3,978.75 


Fuel, city, 


987.10 


Fuel, Penacook, 


310.31 


Automobiles, 


1,311.73 


Lights, city, 


284.42 


Lights, Penacook, 


44.64 


Incidentals, 


2,726.63 


Repairs, 


36.33 


Motor cycle exchange 


245.00 



$39,399.91 



Officers' fees and miscellaneous cash received and 
paid to city treasurer, 



$503.38 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 269 



ARRESTS. 


1909, 


281 


1910, 


586 


1911, 


1,076 


1912, 


1,366 


1913, 


1,556 


1914, 


1,850 


1915, 


1,599 


1916, 


1,106 


1917, 


1,003 


1918, 


493 


1919, 


350 


1920, 


471 


1921, 


552 


1922, 


663 


1923, 


708 



I Whole Number of Arrests and Causes, 1923. 

Total arrests, including Penacook, 708 

Brought before the court, 527 

Discharged by the court, 7 

Released, 178 

Adultery, 7 

Assault, 9 

Aggravated assault, 2 

Assault with intent to kill, 1 

Assault on an officer, 1 

Breaking and entering, 6 

Bastardy, 2 

Drunkenness, 184 

Arrests for out of town officers, 39 

Insane, 7 

Larceny (simple), 14 

Larceny (grand), 4 

Rude and disorderly conduct, 20 

Bound over to the Superior Court, 26 



270 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Committed to Jail, 20 

Committed to House of Correction, 15 

Committed to N. H. State Hospital for Insane, 15 

Number paid fines, 357 

Mittimus not to issue till called for, 19 

Appealed to Superior Court, 13 

Nol-prossed, 10 

Sentences suspended, 40 

Mittimus called for, 6 

Fighting, 6 

Failure to send children to school, 1 

Non-support, 10 

Carrying concealed weapons, 1 
Operating an auto while under the influence of liquor, 18 

Overspeeding auto 49 

Obstructing an officer, 1 

Highway robbery, 7 

Murder, 1 

Idle person, 1 

Fornication, 3 

Illegal possession of liquor, 104 

Violation of the motor vehicle laws, 33 

Gambling, 14 

Auto not registered, 5 

Keeping a gambling house, 1 

Forgery, 1 

Escaped from the State Hospital, 3 

Operating motor cycle without a license, 3 

Illegal transportation of liquor, 6 

Operating, not licensed, 7 

Fraud, 1 

Obscene language, 3 

Violation of state board of health laws, 1 

Transferring of number plates, 2 

Violation of traffic laws, 10 

Throwing glass in the street, 1 

Cruelty to animals, 1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 271 

Reckless driving of autos, 2 

Perjury, 1 

Failure to stop autos after an accident, 2 

Runaway children, 2 

Selling mortgaged property, 1 

Evading railroad fare, o 

Manufacturing intoxicating liquor, 6 

Firing cannon in the street, 1 

Selling intoxicating liquor, 3 

Jumping board bill, 1 

Selling horse unfit for labor, 1 

Operating without proper brakes, 3 

Operating auto without a license, 4 

Failure to stop auto on command of an officer, 1 

No mirror on truck, 1 

Committed to Industrial School, 2 

Open gross lewdness, 2 

Rape, ■ 1 

Plain lens on auto, 2 

Keeping unlicensed dog, 1 

Having intoxicating liquor in possession, 5 

Violation of Weights and Measures, 1 

Keeping a gambling device, 1 

Violation of Volstead Act, 1 

Keeping liquor for sale, 1 

Illegal cohabitation, 1 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Number times doors tried, 853,005 

Number of times doors found open, 692 

Windows found open, 18 

Lights reported to Electric Co., 722 

Lodgers put up at the station, 588 

Autos stolen, 14 

Autos recovered, 14 

Persons injured in auto accidents, 45 

Complaints about autos, 127 



272 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Teams run into by autos, 2 

Autos run into electric cars, 2 

Auto accidents investigated, 134 

Motor cycle accidents (5 people injured), 5 

Disturbances quelled, 90 

Runaway and stray teams found and cared for, 10 

Ambulance calls, 344 

Emergency ambulance calls, 11 

Touring car used to remove sick people, 19 

Murders, 1 

Suicides, 1 

Fires reported to the Fire Station, 6 

Complaints about children, 145 

Complaints about riding bicycles on sidewalk, 9 

Complaints about sliding on sidewalk, 2 

Animals reported to the S. P. C. A., 25 

Destitute people cared for at the Station, 1 

Merchants notified of trouble at their stores, 10 

Horses stolen, 1 

Found stolen horses, 1 

Complaint about dogs, 65 

Dogs killed by autos, 14 

Dangerous wires reported to the proper parties, 4 

Dead people removed by Police, 2 

Holes in the street reported, 14 

Attempted suicide by gas, later died, 1 

Teams removed on account of bad weather, 1 

Children lost, 52 

Children found, 52 

Escaped from the State Hospital, 35 

Officers discovered buildings on fire, 4 
Broken glass in Fire Alarm Boxes (reported 

to Fire Station), 17 

Officers attending to fires, 105 

Leaking water pipes reported, 3 

Missing people lost, 23 

Missing people found, 19 

Buildings broke and entered, 56 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 273 

Minors taken home after 9.30 P. M., 3 

Complaints investigated, 492 
Police boxes reported out of order on different dates : 
6 6 6 14 14 U 2 14 14 319 3 4 13 13 2 13 2 13 
2 13 12 12 655554454542 11 4444 
10 4 12 4 4 4 14 15 12 1 2 3 6 7 14 18 19 6 12 

10 1 2 3 16 18 19 Total, 67 

Dangerous holes reported to Highway, 3 
Complaints investigated of people setting brush 

fires in the city, 10 

Hydrants found open, 2 

People bitten by dogs, 9 

Broken windows found, 19 

Keys left in store doors and found by police, 5 

Found dead, natural causes, 2 

People electrocuted, 1 

Band of Gypsies driven out of town (number) 16 
People removed in police boat on account of 

high water, 21 
Cattle removed in police boat on account of 

high water, 8 
Pigs removed in police boat on account of 

high water, 5 
$5,000 worth of live stock removed in police boat 

on account of high water. 

Broken nigger heads reported, 1 

Man holes found open, 3 

Complaint of bears — investigated, • 1 

Shooting firearms in the city, 9 

Runaway children, 6 

Runaway children found, 6 

Dogs killing sheep, 1 

Teams run into autos, '3 

Parties notified to take down advertising matter, 4 

Leaking drinking fountains reported, 2 

People shot in the woods (while hunting), 2 

People killed in the woods (while hunting), 1 

People hit by electric cars, 1 



274 CITT OF CONCORD. 

Persons lost their way and taken home, 1 
Holdups, 4 
Accidents by falling from bridge, 1 
Washouts reported, 1 
Break and entering a show case, 1 
Watering troughs reported to Highway Depart- 
ment, 3 

Arrests in Penacook. 

Ward 1. 

Whole number of arrests, 31 

Drunkenness, 11 

For out of town departments, 1 

Illegal possession of liquor, 4 

Gambling, 9 

Concealed weapons, 1 

Larceny, 1 

Safekeeping, 4 

Miscellaneous. 

Number of lodgers, 92 

Doors found open, 20 

Horses taken care of, 3 

Officers attending fires, 12 
Doors tried, 54,150 

Conclusion. 

I thank His Honor, the Mayor, and the Honorable 
Board of Aldermen, Judge Harry J. Brown, County So- 
licitor Herbert W. Rainie, Clerk of Court John W. 
Stanley, and the members of the department for the co- 
operation and support given throughout the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

City Marshal. 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT. 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1924. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: Herewith is submitted the thirty-first an- 
nual report of the Engineering Department. 

This report shows the financial statement and in brief 
form under separate headings the work of the past year. 

Appropriation, $5,125.00 

Disbursements. 

Paid Engineer, $2,400.00 

Paid Assistants, 2,272.68 

Telephone and tolls, 48.95 

Assessors' cards, 33.80 

Blue print paper, 17.46 

Stakes, 16.25 

Express, .58 

Envelopes, 6.00 

Car fares, 71.69 

Wire desk baskets, .60 

Engineering books, 9.75 

Postage, 6.15 

Typewriter keys, 4.00 

Typewriter paper, 6.72 

Carbon paper, 4.00 

Typewriter ribbons, 3.00 

Camera, 15.00 

Camera supplies, • 6.70 

Lumber crayons, 1.00 

Engineers' scales, 2.00 



276 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Ruling pen handle, 




$0.25 


Visi signal guides, 




2.50 


Pencils, 




4.26 


Auto hire. 




5.00 


Duster, 




1.50 


Engineering News Record, 


5.00 


Phillip slide rule. 




6.25 


Team hire, 




3.50 


Labor setting stone bounds, 


4.50 


Erasers, 




1.00 


Metallic tape, 




5.80 


Bostitch fastener, 




6.00 


Pen holders, 




.88 


Hermatos, 




.25 


Convention expenses, 




150.83 


Ink, 




.45 


Paste, 




.70 

ifcc; 1 0f; Of) 




*ptJ^±.LjO,\J\J 



Balance, $0.00 

Sewers. 

The construction and repair statement will be found 
in detail in the report of this department to the Board of 
Public Works and published as a portion of their report. 

Water Works. 

The sheet plans of pipe lines and appurtenances were 
brought up to date and blue prints made of same. 

Fire Department. 

The fire-alarm and hydrant maps were corrected by 
adding new hydrants ; blue prints of same were furnished 
the chief of the Fire Department. Plans were made for 
a house to store the horse drawn ladder truck and batters 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 277 

set for construction. Plan was made to re-inforce that 
portion of the floor system at the Central Station where 
the new motor driven ladder truck stands. 

Building Petitions. 

One hundred and seventeen petitions were presented to 
the chief of the Fire Department and myself. Hearings 
were held on the premises of all petitioners and our ac- 
tion recorded upon the original petition, which petitions 
are on file with the city clerk. Statement of the disposi- 
tion of the petitions was sent to the petitioners and a 
copy of the same given the Board of Assessors, this office 
also retaining a copy of all transactions. 

One hundred and sixteen petitions were granted and 
one denied for the reason that no one appeared to show 
location of proposed building. 

The petitions called for 24 enlargements, 2 hen houses, 
3 store houses, 82 garages, 1 store and IS dwellings. 

Cemeteries. 
Blossom Hill : 

Batters set for new garage. 
Layout of block "N" into lots. 
Survey of Legion lot. 
Survey of lot No. 25, Block "G." 
Plan for new garage. 

The deed book showing transfers of lots was brought 
up to January 1, 1924. 

Woodlawn : 

Survey of addition for proposed development. 

Play Grounds. 

Plans of the city were made for Mr. Cohn, play ground 
instructor, also detail work in the matter of layout of 
play grounds. 



278 city of concord. 

Assessors' Maps. 

During the year we have made a survey of the resi- 
dential portion of the city in the matter of new structures. 
The plans in this office have been brought up to date and 
during the winter months the work will be undertaken 
to furnish new plans for the assessors but as this en- 
tails a large amount of work it is impossible to determine 
just how far we can go. "We hope, however, to complete 
the work. 

The areas of the outlying districts have been computed 
and statement given the assessors. 

The real estate transfers have been kept up to date 
and the necessary map changes made. Total number of 
transfers recorded, 678. 

Highway Work. 

Grades were given for 2,081 feet of road improvements, 
on Washington Street, Ward 1, and on South Street from 
Laurel to Clinton Streets. 

Survey of culvert at Holden's Mill, North State Street, 
Ward 3. 

Survey for driveway at junction of North State and 
Rumford Streets. 

Survey and cross sections. Pleasant Street, South to 
South Spring Street. 

Survey and cross sections, South Main Street, State 
Street to Margaret Pillsbury Hospital. 

Survey and cross sections. South Main Street, Water 
Street to Sexton's Avenue. 

Survey and cross sections, South Street, Clinton Street 
to West Street. 

Survey and cross sections. Auburn Street, Franklin 
Street to Center Street. 

Survey Curtis Avenue for drainage. 

Profile center line. Wood Avenue. 



REPORT OF KNGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 279 

Levels for catch basin pipes South Street and Broad- 
way near Gifford's Store. 

Profile for walk, East Penacook Street opposite Page 
Belting Company. 

Survey and cross sections Gulf Street. 

Gutter grades, South Main Street, east side, Pleasant 
Street to Freight Street. 

Survey and cross sections. South Main Street, east side, 
Bartemus driveway to Sexton 's Avenue. 

Profile, Maitland Street. 

Survey, North Main Street at Church Street for widen- 
ing roadway. 

Batters set for the metal building on city shed lot. 

Location of all new catch-basins. 

Sidewalks. 

Grade stakes set as follows : 

Ferry Street, south walk, 296 feet. 
North Fruit Street, west walk, 280 feet. 
Highand Street, south walk, 594 feet. 
Pillsbury Street, north walk, 154 feet. 
Clinton Street, north walk, 100 feet. 
South Spring Street, east walk, 100 feet. 
Harrison Street, north walk, 109 feet. 
Washington Street, south walk, 132 feet. 
Liberty Street, west walk, 96 feet. 
Thompson Street, north walk, 133 feet. 
Washington Street, south walk, 175 feet. 
Curtis Avenue, north walk, 140 feet. 
Prospect Street, east walk, 227 feet. 
Dunklee Street, west walk, 352 feet. 

Sidewalk Grades EstaMisJied. 

High Street, opposite No. 54-58, 100 feet. 
Washington Street, opposite Paine and Sanders lots, 
175 feet. 



280 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Curtis Avenue, north walk, Prospect Street, east, 140 
feet. 

Prospect Street, east walk, Curtis Avenue, north, 227 
feet. 

North Fruit Street, west walk, Woodman Street to 
School Street, 250 feet. 

Thompson Street, north walk. Elm Street, west 133 feet. 

Highland Street, south walk, Jackson Street to Rum- 
ford Street, 594 feet. 

Gulf Street, north walk, Water Street, east 157 feet. 

Dunklee Street, west walk, Gray's line south 352 feet. 

Bridges. 

Batters set for Ash Brook bridge on Hopkinton road 
and the Hackett Brook bridge in East Concord on the 
Mountain Road. 

Survey of sites of Hackett Brook bridge on the Canter- 
bury Road and Burnham Brook bridge on the Mountain 
Road. 

Street Layouts. 

Center Street Extension, Ward 1, 997.08 feet. 
Spicer Street, Ward 1, 269.35 feet. 
River Street, Ward 3, 399.40 feet. 
Wood Avenue, 254 feet. 
Broad Avenue, 1,086.71 feet. 
Dunklee Street Extension, 351.66 feet. 
Rumford Avenue, 1,214.82 feet. 

Total length of streets laid out, 4,573.02 feet or 0.966 
miles. 

Total mileage of streets and roads, 173.93. 
Total mileage in compact part of city, 46.55. 
Total mileage in outlying portions of city, 127.38. 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 281 

Plans Made. 

City, 800 feet to the inch, for Highway Department. 

Thirty-three catch-basin connections. 

Leased land, Ward 3. 

Proposed standard concrete bridge for short spans. 

Proposed standard wood bridges for short spans. 

Map showing location of bridges. 

Plan of portion of sewer system. 

Spicer Street, Ward 1. 

Center Street Extension, Ward 1. 

South Street for road improvement. 

Washington Street, Ward 1, for road improvement. 

Garage, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

City, for Post Office. 

Profile, White Street. 

Profile, Broadway. 

Profile, Harrison Street. 

Profile, Rowell Street. 

Cross sections, Pleasant Street. 

Cross sections. South Main Street. 

River Street, Ward 3. 

Proposed wall, West Garden. 

Cement concrete bridge, Hackett Brook, Mountain 
Road. 

Cement concrete bridge, Burnham Brook, Mountain 
Road. 

Cement bridges concrete, Hackett Brook, Canterbury 
Road. 

South Main Street layout below McKinley Street. 

jMounted paper of City, 1600 feet to the inch. 

Profile and cross sections. Gulf Street. 

North Main Street at Church Street. 

Penacook Union School District. 

Block "N" Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Block "G" lot No. 25, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 



282 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Two hundred and forty blue prints of various sizes. 

Curtis Avenue drainage. 

Fisk Road drainage. ' 

Sewer Connections Inspected. 

During the year there have been sixty-two new sewer 
connections, all of which have been laid in conformity 
to the plumbing laws, inspected and recorded by your 
engineer. 

The past season has been a busy one for this office and 
work was carried on with a small corps of assistants. 
The personnel of the Engineering Department is as fol- 
lows: Clerk, Miss Grace L. Hubbard; Edward E. Beane, 
assistant engineer, and Joseph A. Clement, who came to 
us through the United States Veterans' Bureau, Rehabili- 
tation Division, to secure training in mapping and survey- 
ing. He receives his compensation from the United States 
Government, and the City has his services free of any 
expense. All of these have rendered valuable services to 
the city. 

I deeply appreciated your courtesj- in allowing me to 
attend the American Society of Municipal Improvements, 
held at Atlanta, Georgia, in November. 

For the support and co-operation of your board I wish 
to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1923. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The eighteenth annual report of this 
board, for the year 1923, is herewith submitted. 

On August 10, the full board met and recommended 
the installation of a low service hydrant to be set on 
Broad Avenue 500 feet west of west line of Broadway. 

No other sessions were held during the year. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 
FRED W. LANG, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1923. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The twenty-fourth annual report of this 
board is herewith submitted. 

The membership of the present board is as follows : 
Wilfred W. Brennan, a licensed journeyman plumber, 
Charles H. Cook, M.D., and Fred W. Lang, city engineer. 
Mr. Brennan is chairman of the board and Fred W. Lang, 
clerk. 

Four applications for journeyman's license were re- 
ceived. 

Two meetings of the board were held, two of the appli- 
cants were examined and failed to pass the required ex- 
aminations. 

Two applicants have as yet failed to appear for ex- 
amination. 

There are four classes of plumbers on the register : 
Registered Master; Examined Master; Registered Jour- 
neyman; and Examined Journeyman. 

The following paid for their 1923 license, and are classi- 
fied as follows : 

Registered Masters. 

Arthur W. Bean, License number 1 

Mary C. Clifford, " " 14 

Seth R. Hood, " " 2 

Michael J. Lee, " " 10 

William A. Lee, " " 4 



EXAMINERS OP PLUMBERS. 



285 



Richard J. Lee, 
Benjamin H. Orr, 
Willis H. Roberts, 
Albert S. Trask, 



License number 6 
5 

11 



Examined Masters. 



Charles W. Bateman, 
William J. Bishop, 
CTeo. A. Bisson, 
W. A. Carlton, 
Louis J. Cherrier, 
Philip W. Clark, 
Frederick F. Converse, 
Edward F. Donovan, 
Edward F. Edgeworth, 
John L. Faliey, 
William Johns, 
Thomas J. Johnson, 
John C. Keenan, 
Robert J. Keane, Jr., 
Manley W. ^Morgan, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Richard O'Brien, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Albert E. Roberts, 
Geo. E. Robinson, 
George L. Small, 
John C. Smith, 
Fred B. Thissell, 
William Trottier, 



icense 


numb' 


er 3 




i i 


27 




i i 


21 




i i 


32 




i i 


23 




i c 


34 




i I 


35 




i i 


18 




i ( 


30 




( ( 


28 




i i 


37 




i I 


26 




i i 


15 




i i 


38 




i i 


16 




i I 


2 




i i 


29 




i I 


24 




i i 


11 




i i 


52 




i i 


31 




i c 


11 




i < 


36 




( i 


7 



Registered Journeymen. 



P. Harrison D. Leary, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 



License number 12 
11 



286 



CITT OF CONCORD. 



Examined Journeymen. 



Charles H. Berry, License number 3 

Wilfred W. Brenixan, " "71 

Arthur W. Brown, 

Stanley A. Buchanan, 

Arthur W. Bunten, 

Nelson Dane, 

C. Nelson Griffin, 

Victor T. Lauze, 

Adelard J. Lemire, 

Everett S. ^lahoney, 

John W. McGowan, 

William H. Stanley, 

Clarence J. Spead, 

Arthur W. Robinson, 

Total number Registered Masters, 9. 
Total number Registered Journeymen, 2. 
Total number Examined Masters, 24. 
Total number Examined Journeymen, 14. 



70 
86 
20 
79 
62 
78 
64 
72 
80 
59 
60 
52 



Cash Receipts. 



For licenses, 
For examinations, 

Total receipts. 
Paid out for stamps, 



$24.50 
4.00 

$28.50 
.50 



The clerk of the board holds receipts from the city 
treasurer for $28.50. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. H. COOK, 
WILFRED W. BRENNAN, 
FRED W. LANG, 
Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS. 



REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 



To the Board of Public Works: 

The annual report for the year ending December 31st, 
1923, is herewith presented for your information. 

During the year improvements have been made on our 
Trunk Line roads by laying "A Modified Asphalt" top 
on the East side of South Main Street, north of West 
Street, and several stretches between the City proper and 
Penacook, as well as on Washington Street, Penacook. 

North and South State Streets and the road to East 
Concord have been given an application of tar, and Pleasant 
Street has been improved by a gravel constructed street 
with tar application; South Street on the East side, 
Laurel to Clinton, has been constructed by the Asphalt 
penetration method: Dimond Hill, from a point near 
School House to improvement made last year, has been 
resurfaced with gravel and tar top : the Loudon road was 
given an application of Asphalt, from Merrimack river to 
Pembroke-Concord Town Line. 

The past year we have constructed reinforced concrete 
bridges on the Dimond Hill road, and over the Hackett 
Brook on the Penacook-East Concord road, as well as re- 
placing the floor system on the Eiver Hill Bridge, replank- 
ing the Twin Bridge and replacing all broken tile culverts 
with corrugated iron culverts. 

The past year we have erected new sheds at the City 
Stable's lot, painted and shingled paint shop, painted 
stables, garage and blacksmith shop. 



288 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The garbage collection is increasing each year, the addi- 
tion of the two Ford trucks, however, is taking care of the 
collection in a satisfactory manner. The cost to this De- 
partment for the collection of table garbage for the year 
amounted to $5,329.38. 

Approximately the same amount has been expended for 
concrete and tar walks as in preceding years. 

The marking of streets, flushing pavements in business 
district and painting of bridges has been carried on the 
past year as usual. 

The general upkeep of our country roads is taken care 
of by road machine and dragging, with the assistance of 
local agents in each district, but with the increased auto 
traffic this is demanding a larger sum from our appropria- 
tion each year. 

I wish to thank Mayor Chamberlin and the members of 
the Board for their kindness and assistance the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORRIN W. HEAD, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF THE HIGHWAY 
DEPARTMENT. 



SUMMARY. 

Central District, $134,753.79 

Suburban Districts, 33,878.03 

Transferred to Sidew^alks and Crossing repair, 1,021.49 
Transferred to Garbage, 2,281.30 

Transferred to Sprinkling, 66.28 

Balance year ending December 31, 1923, 5,011.33 

$177,012.22 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 289 

Deposited with City Treasurer. 

Garbage, $252.05 

Sidewalks and Crossings — new, 559.07 

Ball Ground, 9.66 

Fire Department, 133.60 

Playground Committee, 75.84 

State Aid Highways, 8,118.00 

Ward 7 Ward House, 205.88 

Labor, 969.24 



$10,323.34 



GENERAL MAINTENANCE. 

Appropriation, $104,500.00 

Transferred from Catch Basins, 679.87 
Transferred from Sidewalks and Crossings — new, 141.06 

Bonds, 49,820.00 

Earnings for 1923, 10,071.29 

Resolution No. 543, 11,800.00 



$177,012.22 



EXPENDITURES. 



Ball Ground, labor, $8.10 

Breaking roads : 



2,051.67 



Labor, 




$1,288.98 


State Highway, use of ti 


:'actor, 


538.23 


Repairs to plow, 




20.86 


Gas and oil. 




203.60 


Bridges : 




Labor : 






Removing snow. 




11.58 


Cleaning bridges, 




16.18 


Repairing, 




485.16 


Painting, 




607.32 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Hackett bridge, $3,091.21 

River Hill bridge, 2,007.41 

Mixers, new, 695.80 

Freight, 26.53 

Repairs and supplies, 13.96 

Miscellaneous supplies, 598.94 

Telephone, 1.45 

Paint, 209.37 



Cleaning crossings. 




Concord Electric Railway, labor, 


39.50 


Asphalt, 


62.25 


Concord truck : 




Labor, repairing. 


188.98 


Gas and oil, 


138.91 


Insurance, 


65.00 


Repairs and supplies. 


197.46 


Concrete mixer : 




Labor repairing, 


103.81 


Express, 


2.18 


Telephone, 


.65 


Repairs and supplies. 


22.82 


Crusher : 




Electricity, 


330.61 


Labor, 


93.36 


New parts. 


433.95 


Freight, 


3.15 


Repairs and supplies. 


128.98 


Culverts : 




Labor, cleaning, 


44.00 


Labor, repairing, 


34.57 


Supplies, 


389.85 



$7,764.91 
1,240.78 



101.75 



590.35 



129.46 



990.05 



468.42 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 291 

Dragging streets : 

Labor, $368.17 

Repairs and supplies, 69.60 

$437.77 

65.66 



531.70 



Drinking fountains : 




Labor, repairing. 




Driveways : 




Labor, building, 


477.16 


Supplies, 


54.54 


Fences : 




Labor, repairing. 


36.74 


Supplies, 


132.53 


Fire Department: 




Labor, 


14.34 


Supplies, 


112.50 


Parade, 


12.48 


Ford trucks : 




New trucks, 


1,390.00 


Insurance, 


104.00 


Labor, repairing, 


249.98 


Repairs and supplies. 


237.11 


Tires, 


402.58 


Gas and oil. 


292.67 


Garage : 




Building, 


37.36 


Labor, repairing. 


307.22 


Labor, cleaning, 


9.39 


Electricity, 


4.68 


Coal, 


117.23 


Gas and oil, 


35.76 


Supplies, 


549.75 


Express, 


11.53 


Vulcanizing, 


102.69 


Labor on air compressor. 


17.53 



169.27 



139.32 



2,676.34 



1,193.14 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

General expenses : 

Advertising, $9.34 

Ambulance, repairs, 40.00 

Supplies for ambulance, 2.02 

Ash gravel spreader, 46.00 

Freight, .81 

Boiler, labor, repairing, 80.69 

Cleaning, Lane property, 7.50 

Cutting grass and bushes, 24.93 

Concord, Pembroke road, 44.00 

Express and car fare, 3.10 

Expense on trip, 139.75 

Grinder, 34.04 

Cartage, 25.35 

Insurance on Peerless truck, 65.00 

Oiler, 16.00 

Pictures, 22.00 
Road machine to Penacook and 

Dimond Hill, 14.46 

Steps repaired, 10.80 

Supplies for steps, 7.35 

Store house, labor on floor, 68.05 

Supplies for store house floor, 9.00 

Supplies for general repairs, 80.07 



Gutters : 




Cleaning, 


3,142.61 


Ditching, 


1,005.11 


Opening, 


33.55 


Paving, 


21.28 


Repairing, 


66.45 


Supplies, 


16.20 



International truck : 

Labor, repairing, 216.42 

Insurance, 104.00 

Gas and oil, 117.20 



$750.26 



4,285.20 



BOARD OF PUBLIC 


WORKS. 


Repairs and supplies, 


$307.55 


Express, 


2.82 


Tires, 


84.50 


Leveling and removing suow : 




Labor, 


3,187.58 


Supplies, 


32.90 


Freight, 


.50 


Lime sower : 




Repairs and supplies, 


36.88 


New parts, 


16.17 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


90.05 


New tools. 


148.42 


Express, 


4.24 


Rubber boots, 


27.88 


Nash truck : 




Supplies, 


61.16 


Express, 


.73 


Office: 




Clerical expenses. 


1,512.71 


Timekeeper, 


584.50 


Telephone, 


26.59 


Supplies, 


281.78 


Car fare, 


.72 


Patching : 




Labor, 


4,283.29 


Freight on tar barrels, 


41.30 


Playground committee : 




Labor on playgrounds, 


69.58 


Labor on bath houses. 


18.00 


Labor removing bath houses, 


10.33 



293 



$832.49 



3,220.98 



53.05 



270.59 



61.89 



2,406.30 



4,324.59 



97.91 



20 



294 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Pleasant Street : 




Excavating, 


$718.99 


Resurfacing, 


898.29 


Grading, 


3,768.09 


Gutters, 


1,923.51 


Getting sand, 


57.10 


Coal, 


175.12 


Tarvia, 


2,220.00 


Telephone, 


9.20 


Cement, 


643.50 


Stone, 


294.84 


Supplies, 


3.54 




$10,712.18 


Plowing walks : 




Labor, 


1,103.10 


Repairs and supplies, 


92.03 


Painting plows. 


4.50 

1 -\qq CO 




±j±Oo.VO 


Police Department : 




Labor, cleaning yard. 


6.12 


Cement and rails, 


189.12 




inc o/\ 


Repairing macadam: 


-Lc'O.^'l 


K. P., 


• 1,018.41 


Freight, 


72.60 


Unloading car. 


15.00 


Loading barrels. 


8.52 


Hauling stone. 


2.00 


Mixing, 


49.50 


Labor laying. 


1,502.16 


Labor sand. 


106.41 


Stone, 


64.51 


Tarvia, 


1,769.04 


Miscellaneous supplies, 


19.65 




A fi07 on 




rtj\j^ 1 ,0\J 


Reo roadster : 




Labor, painting. 


125.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 295 

Labor, repairing, $38.02 

Insurance, 39.00 

Tires, 153.75 

Gas and oil, 68.06 

Repairs, 28.09 

.H51.92 



Reo Speechvagon : 






Labor, repairing. 




137.58 


Insurance, 




65.0U 


Gas and oil. 




209.40 


Tires, 




124.88 


Repairs and supplies. 




99.80 


Road machine : 




Labor, 




1,260.24 


New parts. 




178.91 


Express and freight. 




1.57 


Supplies, 




21.28 


Sanding walks: 




Labor, 




864.43 


Filling sand house, 




511.51 


Supplies, 




1.70 


Sawing wood : 




Labor, sawing old hnn 


ber. 


77.00 


Repairs to sawing machine. 


15.20 



Shop : 

Labor at shop, 75.00 

Supplies, 309.76 

Shingling and painting, 283.67 

Shingles, 46.11 

New motor, 55.20 

Rigging motor, 34.98 

Repairing chains and picks, 65.72 

Painting wheel barrows, 4.50 



636.66 



1,462.00 



1,377.64 



92.20 



296 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Repairs to tools, 


$45.00 




Repairs to shop. 


10.00 


$929.94 






Shed : 






Clearing ground, 


35.74 




Removing old shed, 


17.29 




Foundation, 


135.01 




Supplies, 


561.88 




Express, 


91.65 




New shed. 


4,700.00 




Unloading shed, 


62.33 




Erecting shed. 


635.87 




Labor, Penn Metal Company, 


170.00 




"Wiring, 


140.73 




Sewer shed department, 


370.56 








6,921.06 


Signs and beacons: 






Coasting signs. 


26.92 




Painting streets, 


230.86 




Paint for streets, 


75.65 




Freight, 


10.88 




Street signs, 


382.22 




Marking signs. 


62.47 




Putting up signs, 


28.00 




Supplies, 


93.85 




Beacons, 


530.00 


• 


Installing and repairing, 


37.68 


1,473.53 






South Street: 






Excavating, 


590.35 




Hauling, 


34.50 




Curbing, 


543.38 




Asphalt, 


1,152.06 




Unloading car. 


8.00 




Coal, 


123.45 




Gas, 


66.44 




Cement, 


297.90 





BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 297 



Stone, 


$808.82 




Miscellaneous supplies, 


126.34 




Telephone, 


.55 




Macadam, 


2,859.22 


$6,611.00 






So. Main Street: 






Labor repairing, 


396.65 




Coal, 


8.45 


40,1 1 


Stables : 




^\J*J t -L \j 


Labor at stables, 


3,063.26 




Labor at store sheds. 


71.52 




Wiring, 


137.71 




Cleaning yard, 


135.19 




Sawing wood. 


22.59 




Repairs to furnace. 


48.55 




Telephone, 


32.15 




Electricity, 


105.48 




Supplies, 


364.23 


3,980.68 






Steam roller : 






Repairs and supplies. 




248.13 


Sweeping pavements : 






Labor, 


4,393.51 




Repairs and supplies to carts, 


69.50 





Teams : 

Carts, new, 162.21 

Labor, repairing, 146.20 

Labor, painting, 301.66 

Repairs and supplies, 247.89 

Sleds, new, 84.74 

Labor, repairing, 450.16 

Labor, painting, 173.76 

Supplies, 185.65 

Hay and grain, 2,972.53 

Labor, repairing harness, 48.05 



4,463.01 



298 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Shavings, 


$10.74 




Calling for shavings. 


19.25 




Supplies, 


712.00 




Horses, new, 


232.10 




Shoeing, 


339.75 




Doctor and medicine. 


72.65 


$6,159.34 
26.65 


Telephone service. 




Tractor : 






Labor, repairing, 


307.13 




Insurance, 


138.00 




Oil and gas. 


308.95 




New parts. 


172.42 




Express, 


11.84 




Repairs and supplies, 


72.26 


1,010.60 






Trunk Line : 






Labor, 


7,420.89 




Patching, 


583.94 




Repairs, 


25,391.02 




Culverts, 


99.16 




Supplies, 


1,599.80 




Labor B. and M. railroad, 


61.31 




Asphalt, 


1,581.62 




Freight, 


282.30 




Inspection', 


289.25 




Repairs, Gully Hill, 


682.20 




Freight, 


68.31 




Repairs, Black Hill, 


174.69 




Repairs, Loudon road. 


1,469.39 




Repairs, Dimond Hill, 


4,990.42 




Repairs, Dimond Hill bridge. 


1,869.69 


46,563.99 


Ward 7, Ward House : 






Labor repairing, 


155.02 




Supplies, 


5.12 


160.14 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 299 



Water Department, 


$10.33 


Water Pump, new, 


$89.05 


Freight, 


1.29 




on '^d 


Watering troughs : 


OKJ.O^ 


Maintenance, 


26.00 


Labor, repairing, 


27.44 


Repairs and supplies, 


29.29 




CO 7^ 




Oij. 1 o 


• 


$134,753.79 



Penacook District. 

Bridges : 

Labor, repairing, $685.37 

Removing snow, 9.82 

Labor, repairing walks, 167.18 

. Labor, repairing fences, 4.39 

Supplies, 739.75 

1,606.51 

Breaking roads, labor, 1,467.50 

Cleaning crossings, 74.83 
Culverts : 

Repairing, 23.58 

Cleaning, 1.11 

Supplies, 35.22 

59.91 



Dragging, 192.39 

Supplies, 1.20 



193.59 

Fences, labor, repairing, 38.18 

General repairs, labor, 187.05 



Repairs and supplies, 77.20 

Repairing tools, 30.39 

Gutters : 

Ditching, 243.78 



294.64 



300 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cleaning, 


$1,695.64 




Repairing, 


2.52 


$1,941.94 






Leveling snow, 




1,053.76 


Patching, labor, 


2,470.47 




Supplies, 


107.50 


2,577.97 






Plowing walks, labor, 


276.50 




Repairs on plows, 


3.50 




Supplies, 


.18 


99,0 1 8 


Playground committee. 




7.25 


Sanding walks, labor, 


176.12 




Sand, 


26.S9 


'^0^ m 


Repairs on shoulders, 




.^^ '»j .yj X 

29.37 


Washington street. 




6,472.22 


Watering trough, 




9.00 




$16,309.86 


East Concord 


District. 




Breaking roads. 


$493.50 




Bridges, labor, repairing. 


5.56 




Culverts, labor, repairing, 


53.85 




Labor, cleaning, 


3.00 




Dragging, 


45.43 




Gutters, labor, cleaning, 


230.21 




Fences, labor, repairing. 


10.00 




Supplies, 


3.30 




General repairs and supplies, 


15.27 




Leveling snow, 


251.89 




Patching, labor, 


767.09 




Supplies, 


9.50 




Plowing walks, 


56.27 




Sanding walks, 


3.11 




Sand, 


23.77 





BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 301 



Shoveling snoAv, $'50.76 

Watering trough, 9.00 



West Concord District. 



Breaking roads, 


$1,572.35 


Culverts, labor, repairing, 


31.57 


Cutting bushes, 


53.88 


Supplies, 


5.29 


Dragging, 


279.05 


Driveways, labor, repairing, 


36.84 


Fences, labor, repairing, 


38.78 


Supplies, 


18.74 


Gutters, labor, cleaning. 


362.40 


Labor, ditching. 


168.86 


Supplies, 


101.45 


Leveling snow, labor. 


751.12 


Supplies, 


12.15 


Patching, labor, 


1,789.09 


Supplies, 


6.86 


Picking paper, 


56.67 


Plowing walks, 


140.00 


Removing stone, 


10.11 


Road machine. 


251.28 


Sanding walks, 


91.51 


Rolling snow, 


75.45 



DiMOND AND Silver Hill. 

Breaking roads, $572.51 

Bridges, labor, repairing, 10.00 

Dragging, 203.00 

Driveways, labor, repairing, 7.00 

General repairs, 7.67 

Leveling snow, 357.93 



$2,031.51 



$5,853.45 



302 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Patching, $271.89 

Repairs and supplies, ' 228.70 





District No. 4. 




Breaking roads. 




$487.77 


Leveling snow, 




17.50 


Shoveling snow. 




34.50 



Egypt and Plains District. 



Breaking roads, 




$670.57 


Culverts, labor, repairing, 


43.50 


Dragging, 




79.11 


Fences, labor, repairing. 


168.89 


General repairs and 


supplies, 


297.79 


Leveling snow, 




974.44 


Patching, labor, 




548.32 


Supplies, 




32.70 


Plowing, 




124.67 


Sand, 




10.00 


Labor and supplies. 




629.41 


Watering trough, 




3.00 




HoiT District. 




Breaking roads, 




$378.77 


Bridges, labor, repairing. 


5.56 


Dragging, 




45.00 


Leveling snow. 




108.66 


Patching, 




146.78 


Shoveling snow. 




19.33 


Supplies, 




1.50 



$1,658.70 



$539.77 



$3,582.40 



$705.60 



board of public works. 
Iron Works District. 



Shoveling snow, 



303 



$220.67 



Breaking roads, 
Shoveling snow, 



Jordan District. 



$242.97 
216.02 



$458.99 



Breaking roads, 



Oak Hill District. 



$45.00 



Breaking roads. 
Dragging, 
Leveling snow. 



Pine Hill District. 



$169.70 
3.11 
1.67 



$174.48 



Sanborn District. 



Breaking roads, labor, 


$803.44 


Supplies, 


6.35 


Cutting bushes, 


81.84 


Culverts, labor, repairing, 


7.72 


Dragging, 


3.89 


Gutters, labor, repairing. 


32.78 


Supplies, 


45.45 


Leveling snow, 


197.02 


Patching, 


1,090.61 


Shoveling snow, 


22.50 


Watering trough. 


6.00 



$2,297.60 



304 CITY OF CONCORD. 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, NEW. 



Appropriation, 








$1,500.00 


Expenditures : 










Central 


District. 






Labor, 






$308.33 




Grading, 






110.24 




Setting edge stones, 






35.89 




Ferry street, 






531.39 




Cement, 






345.32 




Gravel, 






1.25 




Lumber, 






19.00 




Nails and rope. 






7.52 


1,358.94 






Transferred to general 


maintenance, 




141.06 



$1,500.00 

SIDEWALKS AND CROSSINGS, REPAIR. 

Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Transferred from General Maintenance, 1,021.49 

$4,021.49 

Expenditures : 

Central District. 



Repairing walks. 


$180.59 




Repairing crossings, 


45.66 




Repairing edgestones, 


67.06 




Removing gutter, 


22.50 




G. F. Tandy: 






Repairing walks. 


2,862.22 




Repairing crossings, 


95.48 




Repairing driveways. 


245.28 


3,518.79 



board of public works. 805 

Penacook District. 

Repairing walks, $132.56 

Repairing walks, G. F. Tandy, 147.98 

$280.54 

East Concord District. 
Repairing walks, 13.77 

West Concord District. 
Repairing walks, 145.39 

Egypt and Plains District. 
Repairing walks, 63.00 



$4,021.49 



GARBAGE. 




Appropriation, 




$24,000.00 


Earnings for 1923. 




252.05 


Transferred from General 


Main- 




tenance, 




2,281.30 

*'>6 533 35 




— tp ^\J ^tJ tj tj ,*J '-/ 


Expenditures : 






Collecting garbage, 




$9,936.44 


Collecting table garbage, 




5,329.38 


Collecting paper. 




1,725.98 


Picking paper, 




60.83 


Leveling ashes, 




1,432.43 


Patrol carts: 






Labor, 




2,331.69 


Repairs and painting, 




44.70 


Supplies, 




61.96 


Repairs to paper wagon. 




15.00 


Repairs to Peerless truck. 




233.50 



306 CITY OF CONCORD. 



Cleaning river bank, 


$58.50 


Repairing Rifle Range road, 


28.35 


Removing chimney at Rifle Range, 


5.28 


Fighting fires at Rifle Range, 


812.19 


Ford Trucks: 




Exchange, 


400.00 


Insurance, 


104.00 


Labor repairing. 


317.56 


Repairs and supplies, 


243.42 


New Parts, 


170.05 


Gas and oil, 


1,084.31 


Tires, 


357.17 


Deficit from 1922, 


1,780.61 




diOfi f;QQ qf; 




'P^yJ^OOOwOO 


SPRINKLING. 




Appropriation, 


$7,000.00 


Balance from 1922, 


105.70 


Appropriation, Penacook. 


700.00 


Balance from Penacook, 1922, 


94.93 


Transferred from General ]\Iaintenan< 


'6, 66.28 




4;7 966 91 


Expenditures : 




Sprinkling, labor. 


$490.66 


Flushing, labor, 


494.50 


Oiling, labor, 


52.10 


Dusterine, 


609.25 


Freight, 


101.27 


Calcium chloride, 


3,989.07 


Freight, 


795.06 


Unloading, 


43.13 


Labor applying. 


279.43 


Supplies, 


25.75 


Penacook, Boscawen Water Works, 


12.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



307 



Repairs and cleaning stand 


pipe. 


$40.99 


Repairs flushing trucks, 




264.71 


Repairs to sprinkler, 




44.42 


Supplies, 




35.53 


Repairs to oiler. 




2.54 


Concord Fire Department 


hose, 


70.00 


Gas and oil. 




486.50 


Insurance, 




130.00 



$7,966.91 



CATCH BASINS. 



Appropriation, 

Expenditures : 



Central District. 



Labor : 

Building, 

Cleaning, 

Flushing, 

Repairing, 

Thawing, 
Supplies : 

Boiler, 

Boiler supplies, 

Hose, 

Spoons, 

Couplings, 

Pipe, 

Cement, 

Grates, 

Wood, 



$294.32 
539.47 
167.75 
190.17 
164.09 

85.00 

68.74 

68.00 

15.00 

2.16 

228.18 

9.00 

54.00 

37.53 



$3,000.00 



1,923.41 



308 city of concord, 

Penacook District. 

Labor : 

Cleaning, $218.05 

Repairing, 37.89 

Thawing, 28.70 

Supplies : 

Brick, 7.79 

Cement, 4.60 

Grates, 18.00 

Pipe, 12.15 

— $327.18 

East Concord District. 
Labor, cleaning, 18.54 

West Concord District. 
Labor, cleaning, 41.00 

Egypt and Plains District. 
Labor, cleaning, 10.00 



Total expenditures, $2,320.13 

Transferred to General Maintenance, 679.87 



$3,000.00 



SUPERINTENDENT'S SALARY. 

Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Expended, 3,000.00 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 309 

REPORT OF THE SEWER DEPARTMENT. 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1923. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen: The thirteenth annual report to your 
board showing work done under the supervision of the 
Engineering Department, for your board, for the fiscal 
year ending December 31, 1923, is herewith submitted. 

This report is written with the idea that it is useful, 
principally as a record of facts pertaining to the amount 
of work done, and to the costs, given' in such form as will 
permit comparison with costs of previous years, thereby 
furnishing a check on relative efficiency, etc. 

In this report I shall make no recommendations, be- 
lieving it to be more appropriate to make them to your 
board at your regular sessions, when the opportunity is 
always open. 

SEWERS. 

There were laid during the year 1923, 3,072 feet of 
Akron pipe, or 0.5818 miles, subdivided as follows : 

Holly Street : 135 feet of 10-inch. 

Dunklee Street, from Holly Street, north: 253 feet of 
8-inch. 

Princeton Street : 210 feet of 10-inch. 

Rowell Street : 172 feet of 8-inch. 

White Street : 110 feet of 8-ineh. 

Broadway, opposite Wood Avenue: 68 feet of 12-inch, 
110 feet of 10-inch. 

Broadway, north of McKinley Street : 210 feet of 10-inch. 

Water and Hall Streets : 109 feet of 8-inch. 

Broad Avenue: 338 feet of 12-ineh, 487 feet of 10-inch. 

Depot Street: 94 feet of 24-inch, double strength, 190 
feet of 18-ineh. 

Harrison Street : 60 feet of 8-inch. 

21 



310 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Dunklee Street, south of Allison Street: 134 feet of 
10-inch. 

Dunklee Street, north of Allison Street: 94 feet of 
10-ineh. 

Wood Avenue: 8 feet of 10-inch, 290 feet of 12-ineh. 

Holly Street Extension and Dunklee Street. 

North of HoUij Street. 

Paid for labor, $893.33 

trucking, 47.89 

pipe, 130.73 

cement, 7.20 

insurance, 24.12 

kerosene oil, 5.00 

brick, 10.00 

casting, 15.75 



Total cost, .$1,134.02 

Pipe laid : 

10-inch Akron, 135 feet 

8-inch Akron, 253 feet 



Total length, 388 feet 

Cost per foot, $2.922-f . 
Material excavated, sand and clay. 



Princeton Street. 




North from Noyes Street. 




Paid for labor, 


$151.33 


trucking, 


17.00 


pipe, 


90.41 


cement, 


1.80 


insurance, 


4.07 



Total expenditure, $264.61 



BOARD OF PUBUC WORKS. 311 

Pipe laid: 210 feet of 10-inch Akron. 
Cost per foot, $1,260+. 
Material excavated, sand. 

ROWELL AND WhITE STREETS. 

Paid for labor, $220.97 

trucking, 26.89 

pipe, 80.93 

cement, 8.55 

brick, 15.00 

castings, 31.50 

Total expenditure, $383.84 

Pipe laid : 282 feet of 8-inch Akron. 

Cost per foot, $1,361 + . 

Material excavated, gravel, sand and hard-pan. 

Broadway Extension. 

Opposite Wood Avenue. 

Paid for labor, $140.20 

cement, 7.60 

casting, 15.75 

brick, 10.00 

pipe, 84.99 

trucking, 8.00 

Total expenditure, $266.54 

Pipe laid : 
12-inch Akron, 68 feet 

10-inch Akron, 110 feet 



Total length, 178 feet 

Cost per foot, $1,497+. 
Material excavated, sand. 



312 CITY OP CONCORD. 




Broadway Extension. 




North of McKinley Street. 




Paid for labor, 


$195.96 


trucking. 


14.94 


pipe, 


90.41 


cement. 


1.90 



Total expenditure, $303.21 

Pipe laid: 210 feet of 10-inch Akron. 

Cost per foot, $1,448+. 

Material excavated, gravel and running sand. 

Sewer from Water Street to Hall Street 





across 


land of. 




Rolfe 


and 


Rumford 


Asylum. 




Paid for labor. 










$256.99 


trucking, 
pipe, 










1.78 
36.62 


cement, 










.90 


kerosene oil 


■) 








1.00 


insurance. 










6.94 



Total expenditure, $304.23 

Pipe laid : 109 feet of 8-inch Akron. 
Cost per foot, $2,791+. 

Material excavated, sand, gravel, hard-pan, boulders, and 
ledge. 





Broad Avenue. 




Paid for labor. 




$632.67 


trucking. 




25.50 


pipe. 




396.73 


cement, 




9.00 


insurance, 




17.07 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



313 



Paid for brick, 

eastings, 
oil, 

Total expenditure, 

Pipe laid : 
12-inch Akron, 
10-incli Akron, 

Total length, 

Cost per foot, $1,369+. 

Material excavated, loam and sand. 



$15.00 

31.50 

2.00 

$1,129.47 

338 feet 
487 feet 

825 feet 



Depot 


Street. 




Overflow from North 


Main Street. 




Paid for labor. 






$1,115.11 


trucking. 






43.17 


pipe. 






368.18 


cement, 






16.20 


brick, 






12.00 


hardware, 






4.97 


kerosene oil, 






3.00 


casting. 






15.75 


coal tar concrete, 






78.05 


insurance, 






27.89 


Total expenditure. 


$1,684.32 


Pipe laid : 








24-inch Akron, 






94 feet 


18-inch Akron, 






190 feet 


Total length. 


284 feet 



Cost per foot, $5,930+. 

Material excavated, sand, gravel, boulders, and hard-pan. 



$43.33 


17.22 


.95 


1.94 



314 city of concord. 

Harrison Street Extension. 

West of Morton Street. 
Paid for labor, 
pipe, 
cement, 
trucking, 

Total expenditure, $63.44 

Pipe laid : 60 feet of 8-inch Akron. 

Cost per foot, $1,057+. 

Material excavated, gravel, muck, and running sand. 

DuNKLEE Street. 
South of Allison Street. 

Paid for labor, $103.24 

trucking, 1.56 

pipe, 67.54 

cement, .90 

insurance, 2.79 



Total expenditure, $176.03 

Pipe laid : 134 feet of lO-inch Akron. 



Cost per foot, $1,313+. 




Material excavated, sand. 




DuNKLEE Street. 




North of Allison Street. 




Paid for labor. 


$63.76 


trucking, 


7.78 


pipe. 


47.38 


cement. 


.90 


insurance, 


1.72 



Total expenditure, $121.54 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 

Pipe laid : 94 feet of 10-inch Akron. 
Cost per foot, $1,293+. 
Material excavated, sand. 



315 



Wood Avenue. 




Paid for labor, 


$196.67 


trucking, 


18.33 


brick, 


5.00 


pipe. 


163.96 


cement. 


3.60 


castings, 


15.75 


insurance, 


5.30 


Total expenditure, 


$408.61 


Pipe laid: 




10-inch Akron, 


8 feet 


12-inch Akron, 


290 feet 


Total length. 


298 feet 



Cost per foot, $1,371+. 
Material excavated, sand. 

Saint Paul's School Sewers. 

No extensions were built in 1923. 

The flush-tank pipe on Hopkinton Road became filled 
with roots, and as this trouble had occurred before, it 
seemed wise to build a manhole just south of the flush- 
tank to replace the existing lamp-hole. This was done and 
in the future any trouble from stoppage can be relieved at 
small cost. 



Cost of removing roots : 
Labor. Trucking. 

$38.38 $2.94 



Total. 
$41.32 



316 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cost of building manhole : 

Labor. Trucking. Cement. Brick. Casting. Total. 
$33.28 $9.72 $7.60 $7.50 $15.75 $73.85 

East Concord Sewers. 
No extensions or repairs were made in 1923. 

West Concord Sewers. 

No extensions were built in 1923. 

There was a break in the main line in North State 
Street opposite the mill, causing the relaying of 8 feet of 
10-inch pipe at the following cost : 

Labor. Trucking. Pipe. Cement. Insurance. Total. 
$9.55 $3.50 $3.44 $0.90 $0.26 $17.65 

Repairs were made on the 20-inch outlet, costing: 

Labor. Trucking. Cement. Total. 

$6.50 $1.17 $0.90 $8.57 

Repairs were made to manholes in North State Street 
opposite mill, costing : 

Labor. Cement. Total. 

$12.00 $0.90 $12.90 

On account of road improvement, manholes were raised 
to street level at the following cost: 

Labor. Trucking. Cement. Casting. Insurance. Total. 
$79.10 $17.49 $1.80 $15.75 $2.14 $116.28 

The entire system was flushed at a cost of : 

Labor. Trucking. Total. 

$26.83 $6.61 $33.44 



board of public works. 317 

Penacook Sewers. 

No extensions were built in 1923. 

The cost of flushing the system was as follows : 
Labor Trucking. Insurance. Total. 

$116.00 $22.94 $2.57 $141.51 

During the year there were three main line plugs, 
namely : 

Overflow at Merrimack Street : 
Labor. Trucking. Insurance. Total. 

$14.00 $3.11 $0.38 $17.49 

Bye Street at Merrimack Street : 
Labor. Trucking. Cement. Insurance. Total. 

$42.00 $1.56 $1.13 $1.20 $45.89 

Bye Street : 
Labor Trucking. Insurance. Total. 

$9.67 $1.56 $0.21 $11.44 

The improved roadway on Washington Street made it 
necessary to raise manholes to street level at the following 
cost: 

Labor. Trucking. Cement, Castings. Insurance. Total. 
$46.67 $9.45 $3.40 $26.75 $0.54 $86.81 

Sewers built in the City Proper to December 31, 1923: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 3,088 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe, 26,361 

10-inch Akron pipe, 58,052 

12-inch Akron pipe, 40,436 ' 
12-inch cement pipe, 415 

15-inch Akron pipe, 13,640 
18-inch Akron pipe, 7,324 

20-inch Akron pipe, 5,029 

24-inch Akron pipe, 4,792 

30-inch Akron pipe, 1,780.5 



Brick, 12-incli 


X 14-ineh, 


14-inch 


X 22-inch, 


16-inch 


X 24-inch, 


20-inch 


X 32-inch, 


24-inch 


X 36-inch, 


28-inch 


X 48-inch, 


• 24-inch 


circular. 


30-inch 


circular, 


38-inch 


circular. 


24-inch cast-iron, 


30-inch cast-iron. 


33-inch segmental block, 


42-inch segmental block. 


42-inch brick 


and concrete 


60-inch brick 


and concrete 



318 CITY OP CONCORD. 

2,758 feet 

350 

1,848 

2,527 

17,937 

883 
1,515.5 

402 
4,080 
1,576 
1,054.5 
1,536.5 
1,055 

246. 
1,450 

A total of, 200,136 feet 

Total miles in City Proper, 37.904-|-. 

Sewers built in East Concord to December 31, 1923 : 
10-inch Akron pipe, 1,766 feet 

Total miles, 0.3334-. 

Sewers built in Penacook to December 31, 1923. 

6-inch Akron pipe, 160 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe, 7,083 

10-inch Akron pipe, 8,976 

10-inch cast-iron pipe, 76 

12-inch Akron pipe, 4,124 

15-inch Akron pipe, 2,263 

18-inch Akron pipe, 2,437 

24-inch Akron pipe, 726 



Total, 25,845 feet 

Total miles, 4.894+. 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 319 

Sewers built in West Concord to December 31, 1923 : 

8-incli Akron pipe, 
10-inch Akron pipe, 
12-ineh Akron pipe, 
15-inch Akron pipe, 
20-inch Akron pipe. 

Total, 
Total miles, 3.358+. 

Sewers built at St. Paul's School to December 31, 1923: 

6-inch Akron pipe, 3,008 feet 

8-inch Akron pipe, 448 " 

10-inch Akron pipe, 2,868 " 



342 


feet 


7,210 


( i 


6,622 


i i 


2,155 


" 


1,403 


( i 


17,732 


feet 



Total, 6,324 feet 

Total miles, 1.197+. 
Total number of miles built by City, 47.686+. 



IManholes. — Raised and Repaired. 

Manholes raised on account of road improvements : 

Location. Labor. Trucking. Cement. Casting. Ins. Total. 
No. Spring and 

Rumford Sts. . . . $8.67 $1.94 $0.90 $33.00 $0.23 $44.74 

Pleasant St 11.66 1.00 0.90 22.00 0.29 35.85 

Pleasant St 18.00 .... 0.90 0.49 19.36 

No. State St., 

opp. Prison .... 18.00 7.00 0.90 0.49 26.39 



Main Line Repairs, City Proper. 

Location. Labor. Pipe. Trucking. Ins. Total. 

Prince St. Outlet . . $6.50 $2.58 $1.17 $0.18 $10.43 



320 city of concord. 

Manholes Repaired. 

Location. Labor. Casting. Ins. Cement. Trucking. TotaL 

Harrison St. 

opp. Morton ... $10.17 $15.75 

Prospect St 20.33 31.50 

Franklin St. 

at Rumford 10.94 15. 75 

No. Main St. 

at Center 4.50 $0.12 

Clinton St. at 

So. Spring 1.00 7.85 0.02 



$0.90 


... $26.82 


3.80 


.... 55.63 


0.90 


.... 27.89 


0.45 


5.07 




$0.78 9.65 



Manholes Built. 
Other than those on Construction Jobs. 

Location. Labor. Trucking. Brick. Cement. Casting. Total. 
0pp. No. 3, 

Broadway $38.44 $7.72 $7.00 $3.80 $15.75 $72.71 

0pp. 73 So. St. .. . 33.12 3.44 8.00 3 80 15.75 64.11 



0pp. 71 So. St 

Morton St. , north 
end of • 


38.00 
24.33 
27.17 


2.67 
2.94 
].00 


7.00 
13.54 
13.54 


3. SO 
3.40 
3.40 


15.75 
15.75 
15.75 


67.22 
59.96 


Morton St. opp. 
No. 8 


60.86 


Badger St. , north 
end of 


36.17 


3.50 


10.00 


3.40 


15.75 


68.82 


Thorndike St. at 














State St 


39.00 
49.67 


1.94 


8.57 
9.00 


3.40 
4.75 


15.75 
15.75 


68.66 


Curtis Ave. , opp. 
No. 6 


79.17 


Granite Ave. , 














west end 


26.00 


1.94 


9.00 


2.85 


15.75 


55.54 


Curtis Ave. , opp. 
No. 14 


42.67 




10.00 


5.70 


15.75 


74.12 


Waverly St., at 
State St 


42.00 
56.34 


5.44 

4.28 


5.00 
10.00 


4.75 
7.60 


15.75 
15.75 


72.94 


Dunklee St., opp. 
No. 8 


93.97 


Tremont St. , near 
No. State St 


44.33 


5.44 


5.00 


7.60 


15.75 


78.12 


Downing St. , at 
So. State St 


33.67 


3.50 


7.50 


4.75 


15.75 


65. 17 


West St. , at So. 














State St 


56.17 


5.83 


10.00 


7.60 


15.75 


95.35 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 



321 



Location. Labor. Truck- Brick. Cement. Cast- Insur- Total, 

ing. ing. ance. 

Pleasant St. , west 

of Liberty St. ... $34.00 $1.94 $10.00 $7.20 $15.75 $0.92 $69.81 

Holly St 81.33 8.17 13.00 9.00 15.75 2.19 129.44 

Laurel St., opp. 

Store 53.83 7.78 10.00 5.40 15.75 1.45 94.21 

Laurel St., opp. 

Fiercest 41.00 5.44 10.00 5.40 15.75 1.10 78.69 

Highland St 38.00 7.00 10.00 5.40 15.75 1.03 77.18 

No. Main St., opp. 

Bridge St 114.67 14.00 12.00 7.20 15.75 3.10 166.72 



Main Line Plugs. 



Location. 


Labor. 


Truck- 
ing. 

$2.00 


Oil. Ins. 


Total . 


Cause. 


Curtis Ave 


$10.00 




$12.00 


Sand, sticks, 












paper and wire 


Curtis Ave 


, 23.00 


3.00 


.$1.40 .... 


27.40 


Sand, bottle, 
doorknob 


Parley 


. 37.34 


1.56 




38.90 


Sand 


Badger 


, 10.85 






10.83 


Roots 


Dunklee 


. 16.50 


3.50 




20.00 


Roots 


Walker 


10.00 


1.50 




11.50 


Sticks and roots 


Tremont 


4.00 


1.56 




5.56 


Sticks 


Hall 


, 15.00 


1.94 




16.94 


Sticks 


Albin 


7.33 

, 13.67 


1.56 
2.33 


§;o. 20 

37 


9.07 
16.37 


Roots 


Jackson 


Sand 


Police Station 












Sewer , 


, 10.83 


1.94 


24 


13.01 


Grease 


Thorndike 


14.00 


2.00 


31 


16.31 


Roots and sticks 


Lyndon 


.50 


.39 


01 


.90 


Sand and leaves 


Harvard 


11.50 


1.94 


25 


13.69 


Sand 


Highland ..... 


7.00 


2.72 


15 


9.87 


Sand 


Badger 


6.67 


1.56 


15 


8.38 


Roots 


Police Sta 


, 18.00 


1.17 


.40 4.50 


24.07 


Burlap 








(Concrete) 




Carter St 


4.75 


1.00 


10 


0.85 


Sand 


Lyndon 


2.64 




06 


2.70 


Sand 


Total cost of cleaning main 


lines 1 


i)263.37 





322 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Lateral Pipes. 

There have been 82 complaints in the city proper of 
plugs in pipes from main sewers to street lines. 

All cases were immediately investigated and obstruction 
removed. 

Only cases where expenditures were made will be given 
in this report. 

Total cost of cleaning lateral pipes, $435.10. 

Itemized as follows : 





Labor. 


Truck- 
ing. 


Ins. 


Total . 


Cause. 


American House 


$42.17 


$1.17 


$0.93 


$44.27 


Sticks and barn 

dressing 


8^ Curtis Ave. . . 


3.00 


2.33 


.06 


5.39 


Roots on priv. lands 


51 Thorndike . . . 


6.00 


.78 


.13 


6.91 


Roots 


192 So. Main . . . 


2.00 


.78 


.04 


2.82 


Roots and rags 


14 Curtis Ave. . . 


1.00 


1.00 


.02 


2.02 


Roots on priv. lands 


15 Curtis Ave. . . 


1.00 


1.00 


.02 


2,02 


No trouble found 


81 Pleasant St... 


2.64 




.06 


2.70 


Roots 



Location. 
17 Tahanto St. . 

32 Hall St 

174 No. State St 
Parochial Sch'l 

Thorndike St 
121 Broadway . 
35 Bradley St. . 
10 Walker St. . 
19 Eastman St. 
8 Liberty St. . . . 
Gifford's Store, 

Broadway . . . 

33 Broadway . . 
4 Orchard St. . . 



Cleaned and Repaired 
Cost. 

Labor. Truck- Ins. Oil. Con- Total, 
ing. Crete. 

$18.00 $3.00 $21.00 

14.00 2.00 16.00 

5.00 2.00 7.00 

11.00 2.00 ... $1.40 14.40 

16.00 2.00 ... 1.40 19.40 

5.00 2.00 7.00 

14.00 2.00 16.00 

6.50 2.00 ... 1.40 9.90 

22.50 2.00 $2.42 26.92 

9.00 2.00 ... 0.95 11.95 

4.00 2.00 6.00 

4.50 4.50 



Cause. 

Grease in 

trap 
Roots 
Paper 

Roots 

Broken pipe 

Grease 

Grease 

Roots 

Roots 

Roots 
Roots 

Not con'c'd 
with sewer 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 



323 



Location. Labor. Truck- Ins. Oil. Con- Total, 
ing. Crete. 

3 Broadway ... . $6.23 $6.23 

8 Kimball St. .. . 10.88 10.88 

Railr'dSt.,Ford 

&KimballF'dry 3.11 3.11 

57 Downing St. . 10.89 10.89 

82 School St 5.34 $1 56 6.90 

14-16 Perley St. . 4.44 4.44 

8 Morton St 0.89 0.89 

10 Morton St. .. . 2.66 2.66 



Roots 
Roots 

Paper 

Roots 

Roots 

Pipe clear, 
had been 
plugged 

Clear 

Clear 







Lateral Pipes. 








Cleaned and Repaired. 








( 


Cost. 






Location. 


Labor. 


Truck- 
ing. 


Ins. Pipe. 


Total. 


Cause. 


7 Laurel St 


$8.00 






$8.00 


Roots 


28 Pierce St 


2.00 






2.00 


Roots and grease 


7 Thorndike St. 


3.00 






3.00 


Paper and rags 


7 Green St 


5.00 






5.00 


Grease 


50 So. Spring St. 


4.00 






4.00 


On private land 
poor plumb' g 


30 Stone St 


2.00 


$2.00 




4.00 


Cement in joints 


6 Tremont St. . . 


8.67 


1.50 





10.17 


Roots and paper 


8 Park Ridge... 


8.67 


1.56 




10.23 


Roots 


21 No. State St. . 


18.50 


1.17 


$2.36 


22.03 


12 ft. cement 
pipe broken 


8 Dunklee St. . . . 


9.00 






9.00 


Roots 


22 Walker St. . . . 


7.00 


2.33 




9.33 


Roots 


24-26 Lyndon St. 


2.85 




$0.08 


2.93 


Sand 


93 School St. ... 


8.33 


1.94 


0.24i 


10.49 


Roots 


17 Tahanto St. . . 


8.33 


1.94 


0. 22 


10.49 


Roots 


19 Tahanto St. . . 


5.00 




0.11 


5.00 


Roots 


95 Broadway 


0.67 


1.94 


0.12 


7.73 


Roots 


46 Allison St. . . . 


9.33 


1.94 


0.20 


11.47 


Roots 


5 Harvard St. . . 


8.67 


1.56 


0.19 


10.42 


Grease 


5 Harvard St. . . 


5.00 


1.94 


0.11 


7.05 


Roots 


12 Badger St.... 


8.33 


1.94 


0.18 


10.45 


Roots 



324 city of concord. 

Financial Statement. 

Appropriation for construction and repairs, $10,870.60 

Special appropriation for construction, 3,000.00 

1922 balance from precincts, 452.09 

1923 earnings of department, 59.15 



Funds available, $14,381.84 

Disbursements. ■ 

1922 debit balance, $2,547.14 

Expended for construction and 

repairs. 11,505.68 $14,052.82 



Balance, $329.02 

Expenditures Itemized. 

Labor, $7,296.40 

Pipe, 1,673.35 

Cement, , 188.00 

Brick, 241.25 

Castings, 754.95 

Trucking, 659.73 

K. Oil, 18.25 

Lanterns, 11.50 

Ruby lantern globes, 1.40 

Coal tar concrete, 84.97 

Danger signs, 7.25 

Manila rope, 4.16 

Iron rods, 2.37 

Hand drills, 3.57 

Shims and Avedges, 2.64 

Steel clamps, .60 

Hammer handles, 3.30 

Rubber boots. 9-90 

Anvil and tongs, 5.00 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 325 

Cold chisels, $1.70 

Steel wheelbarrow, 6.50 

Brick hammer, 1.25 

Time book, 1.20 

Paint, 3.70 

Old fire hose, 60.00 

Insurance, 136.57 

Nails, 1.16 

Screws, .24 

Shovels, 9.00 

Pails, 1..30 

Pick Handles, 3.25 

Brick trowel, 1.50 

Axe, . 2.00 

Lumber, 120.46 

Repairs rubber boots, .50 

Vice signals, 1.00 

Folders, 2.50 

Sewer rods, 40,00 

Index cards and guides, 19.50 

Bolt, .04 

Flash light, 3.25 

Ball twine, .40 

Express on sewer rods, 3.89 

Light city sheds, 36.17 

Freight, 1.11 

Repair chain rope, .25 

Suction hose, 37.00 

Salamander, 8.25 

Lead ladle, .70 

Asbestos jointer, 2.20 

Lead pot and hooks, 4.00 

No. 3 diaphragm, 2.00 

Battery, .50 

Record book, 24.00 

Total, $11,505.68 



326 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The sewer system appears at present to be in good con- 
dition except on streets where poplar trees exist ; the 
list of main line pings shows this to be trne and no dam- 
age has been done to private property. 

One problem that will have to be solved if street sur- 
faces are to be made of material other than gravel in its 
natural state, namely, the run off of surface water; this 
can be partially met b}^ connecting all catch-basins outlet 
pipes into manholes and if there are no manholes where 
catch-basins now exist they should be built. 

Labor. 

This department is handicapped, especially in the win- 
ter and early spring by not having a permanent organiza- 
tion of workmen, it being about impossible to hire one or 
two men to go out on sewer plugs in the winter months 
for only a few hours work, in the water and filth. 

This year, thanks to the untiring efforts of Mr. John 
S. B. Davie and :Mr. William H. Riley of the State Board 
of Labor, we were able to obtain a sufficient number of 
high grade workmen to complete all the construction jobs 
that we were instructed to build. 

As a check on the efficiency of this year's working 
force the following facts will be of interest. 

In 1922 the department laid 4,964 feet of pipe at a 
labor cost of $6,756.62 or an average cost of $1.361-f- per 
foot, wages were $3.00 for workmen and $6.00 for fore- 
man for a nine hour day. 

In 1923 the department laid 3,072 feet of pipe at a labor 
cost of $4,013.56 or an average of $1.274-|- per foot, wages 
were $4.00 and $4.50 for workmen, and $6.00 for foreman 
for a nine hour day. 

The character of the work and material excavated were, 
from a construction standpoint, substantially the same 
both years and although the wages for workmen were 
increased from 33 1-3 to 50% over 1922 wages, the depart- 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 327 

ment was able to complete the year's construction at 
practically the same cost per foot as in 1922. 

I find that the better the men are paid, the more work 
is done in the same number of hours. The above proves 
this to be true as the quality of labor was of the same 
high standard in both years. 

The maintenance of the sewer system has been carried 
on with Mr. John Henry Sanborn as foreman, who has 
at the close of this season's work, completed fifty years 
of service for the City of Concord on sewer work, during 
which time he has rendered a service that probably can- 
not be equaled by any man, always working for the in- 
terest of the City and safety of his workmen. 

The employees working under Mr. Sanborn this season 
were William H. ^Murphy, Walter S. Dow, and Michael 
Donahue, all of whom have rendered valuable service to 
the department. During the year new sheds, made of 
metal, were erected at the City Shed site, thus relieving 
a long needed requirement. We are now able to store 
our equipment under cover and thus prolong its useful- 
ness. 

The pipe for the year's work was furnished by Thomp- 
son and Hoague Company, agents for the Eastern Clay 
Goods Company at a discount of 59% off of list. 

Cement was purchased of the Concord Lumber Com- 
pany and Walter S. Dole. 

Tools and hardware were purchased from A. H. 
Britton & Co., Thompson & Hoague Co., and The Bond 
Company of Boston, Mass. 

Oil was purchased from the stores nearest to the jobs. 

Lumber was purchased of the Concord Lumber Co. 

The heavy trucking was done by George L. Theobald 
and ]\I. J. Gorham. 

Notes on Construction. 

The foregoing data shows that the major portion of 
construction was in the southerly section of the city, 



328 CITY OF CONCORD. 

where the excavation' was mostly sand. Except on Water, 
Holly, and Dunklee Streets, in every ease we were obliged 
to brace and curb the ditch for safety. 

Depot Street construction was the most difficult job, 
as we had to contend with so many old ditches and pipes. 
This line as constructed will tend to relieve the congestion 
in North Main Street line during showers. The easterly 
side of North Main Street was closed to traffic for seven 
days at a period when travel was at its highest and yet 
no accident occurred, either to the traveling public or 
workmen, owing to the hearty co-operation of the Police 
Department and the efficiency of the police officers sta- 
tioned in that vicinity. 

Monthly statements of coal tar side-walks, etc., were 
made, showing the location, quantities laid, price for 
same, and given to the department or committees having 
the work done. 

In company with one or both of the three members of 
the committee on locating poles, I have attended to that 
duty, attended hearings and meetings of your board and 
furnished such information from this department as was 
called for. 

For the many courtesies extended to me by your board, 
I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES. 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of Con- 
cord, Neiv Hampshire: 

The Trustees of the Public Library herewith transmit 
the annual report of the librarian containing a brief ac- 
count of the work of the year 1923. 

At the annual meeting of the Trustees held on Jan- 
uary 28, 1924, Levin J. Chase, Willis D. Thompson, and 
T. W. D. Worthen were appointed a committee to make 
a survey of the public library facilities as found in the 
Cit,v, State, and Historical Society libraries, for the pur- 
pose of determining what additional library service ought 
to be provided for the City and of avoiding any duplication 
in the service of the three independently operated libraries, 
especially when the time comes that any extension of 
the work of the City library is found to be practicable. 
It is understood that this committee will welcome heartily 
any suggestions from persons or organizations willing to 
co-operate in this most important public work. 

The Trustees request that the appropriation for 1924 
be $7,000, which is the same as for the last five years, this 
being the smallest sum rendering possible reasonably 
adequate service, with the same extreme economy and 
faithful service on the part of the librarian and her as- 
sistants, which have been so conspicuous in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 
February 29, 1924. 



330 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1923. 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Piiblic Library: 
Gentlemen : The annual report is herewith submitted : 





Receipts. 






Adjusted balance from 


last year, 




$508.05 


Appropriation, 






7,000.00 


Interests : 








Cogswell, 




$85.90 




Lyon, 




40.00 




Pierce, 




40.00 




Valpey, 




20.00 




Haseltine, 




133.54 




Jones, 




25.14 




Eastman, 




75.00 




Chase, 




42.50 




B. A. Kimball, 




1,000.00 




H. A. Kimball, 




100.00 


1,562.08 






Fines, 




- 


375.00 




$9,445.13 


Expenditures. 






Salaries and labor, 






$5,176.84 


Books and periodicals. 






2,071.84 


Binding, 






374.90 


Fuel and light. 






978.50 


Printing, 






76.65 


Incidentals, 






589.84 


Balance on hand, 






176.56 



,445.13 



public library. 331 

Statistics of Circulation. 

No. of bound volumes of fiction lent in 1923, 54,149 

No. of volumes of non-fiction, 12,099 

No. of periodicals lent, 4,559 



Total circulation, 70,807 

(These figures gratifyingly show that the proportion 
of non-fiction read was larger than in 1922.) 

Statistics of Additions. 

No. of bound volumes at beginning of year, 34,046 
No. added by purchase and by binding material 

not otherwise counted, 979 

No. of volumes added by gift, 36 

Discarded, 243 

Total number owned at end of year, 34,818 

Turning from statistics to remarks, there is almost 
nothing new to be said, but some old points will bear 
stressing ; for instance, in 1922 I enumerated six formid- 
able things which have sprung up to interfere with a 
public library's popular patronage. I can now mention 
a seventh, — radio. Although our competition with the 
movies is an old story, it having been for a good many 
years that I have heard pupils rush from school calling, 
^'Come on! Let's go to the pictures!" instead of "Let's 
go to the Library!" hroadcasting is a new rival; it was 
only last week that a citizen of brains said to me, 

"After my supper, I take up the receiver and listen in; 
if it is not working well, I put it down and take up a 
book." You note — the book has the second place in 
his affections. 

With this additional competitor in the field, there is 
small prospect of a library again being the attraction 
it once was. All I can say is, when in the not distant 



332 CITY OF CONCORD. 

future, film production is eclipsed by an invention which 
will enable a stay-at-home to see as well as hear, and 
when motor-cars contest popularity with air-planes, they 
may see how they like it, to have their business taken 
away from them ! Of course, I am half-laughing as I thus 
rail, for a public library will always be a prime necessity 
— our daily reference work alone proves that. And let 
it be clearly understood, this Concord Library is not 
unique, for an ex-president of the American Library 
Association recently alluded, as to a well-known fact, to 
"the drop in the circulation of books"; and the last 
Library Journal has two pages on the "increase of 
recreational opportunities as felt by public libraries." 

It may strike you as inconsistent to report in the same 
breath less custom and yet ask for better quarters ; but 
we realize as never before, how crowded and old-fashioned 
our building is. There is a tiresomeness in having no- 
where a margin of space. You, in your business, gentle- 
men of this Board, have seen three clerks needed where 
one used to suffice, big filing-cabinets installed where a 
drawer used to answer, telephone extensions where one 
receiver formerly did well enough — and so on. Well, the 
years have brought to our little Library also, an increase 
in tempo; the days never seemed so full of rush and in- 
terruptions ; and to cope with these modern ways of a 
modern public, we have only our old equipment. 

From the figures given at the beginning of this Report, 
you will see that we have been able to buy more than the 
usual number of volumes the past year, though the trend 
of prices is still upLW;"!rd ; our increased purchasing power 
was due to larger interests accruing on our trust funds. 

Of the thirty-six books given to the Library, it is not 
possible to enumerate here the names of the donors ; but 
it may be said that they have been not so often individ- 
uals as organizations, such as the Carnegie Endowment 
for International Peace, and the Rockefeller Foundation. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 333 

Our reading room is indebted to the Young People's 
Christian Union of the Universalist Church for the 
periodical, "Onward", and to its adult Unity Circle for 
the Universalist Leader; to the Unitarian Alliance for 
the "Christian Eegister"; to the Christian Science Pub- 
lishing Society for their "Sentinel" and "Journal"; 
"Everyland" comes from the Federation of Women's 
Mission Societies in the city, and "The Watchman" from 
a Baptist friend; "The Union Signal" from the state W. 
C. T. U., and the national D. A. R. magazine from the 
local Chapter. 

To the new Junior High School Library in Penacook we 
have contributed about seventy-five volumes (many of 
them duplicates we owned), which will aid considerably 
the teachers and pupils there, as they were books selected 
with that end carefully in view. 

There are two points on which we are not satisfied. 
First, we ought and would like to do more with the 
schools ; and second, we would like to have deposit sta- 
tions in outlying Avards. Delaying the first of these 
cherished schemes, is the feeling, based upon experience, 
that in the busy teacher's life, there is hardly a craving, 
though there is always a willingness, for more book-tools 
to work with, if that entails responsibility for volumes 
used freely by pupils. Before the realization of the sec- 
ond project, some way must be found to make our books, 
displayed in an agency such as a store, safe from removal 
by customers who take them off without having them 
charged. Penacook and East Concord are temporarily 
without a library branch supplied wdth books from which 
residents could choose, because it is difficult to find 
a person who wants, for merely nominal pay, the job of 
keeping sharp track of deposited volumes and of making 
record of their circulation. 

During the past year we have lost by death the Trustee 
from Ward 2, JMr. Frank P. Curtis. My memory of him 



334 CITY OF CONCORD. 

will be of an interested member of your Board who made 
great efforts to get over to the annual meetings, though 
often defeated by the condition of weather or roads. 

In November, Miss Clara F. Brown, who began to work 
for the Library soon after it was moved into this Fowler 
Building, and who has for these thirty-five years acted 
as reference librarian, sent in her resignation, to take 
effect at the close of 1923. Identified as she has been with 
the Library to which she has devoted most of her life, 
serving it always to the best of her ability and letting no 
other interests compare with it, her honorable place in 
the history of the institution is secure. 

Though Mrs. Grace M. Farnum was not a regular mem- 
ber of our staff, she had assisted us so many hours and 
always so gladly and pleasantly, that we felt deeply her 
death which occurred in January of 1924. 

In closing, let me quote that while the Library is use- 
ful and helpful, it has not reached its maximum of 
helpfulness or usefulness, and it cannot do so until the 
people themselves realize what it has to give them. We 
wish everybody would read our monthly lists in the 
Monitor-Patriot, and note especially the variety of sub- 
jects covered by our non-fiction additions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Librarian. 



POOR DEPARTMENT. 



FIFTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
OVERSEER OF THE POOR. 



Fob the Year Ending December 31, 1923. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the fifty-sixth an- 
nual report of expenditures for the poor, including 
Wards One and Two, for the j^ear ending December 31, 
1923: 

City Poor. 



Appropriation, $3,000.00 

Resolution No. 568, 822.27 



Paid groceries, 


$238.74 


fuel. 


200.25 


rents, 


256.00 


board and care. 


2,893.38 


medicine. 


18.10 


milk, 


105.36 


shoes. 


36.44 


burial. 


65.00 


miscellaneous, 


9.00 



$3,822.27 



$3,822.27 



336 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Paid 



COUN' 


TY Poor. 


groceries, 


$2,250.97 


milk. 


310.74 


fuel, 


1,704.05 


rents, 


2,130.00 


care children, 


4,006.52 


board and care. 


2,947.71 


shoes and clothing, 


214.72 


burials. 


120.50 


transient account. 


41.60 


miscellaneous. 


13.40 



$13,740.21 

Total amount paid for aid to poor, $17,562.48 

Dependent Soldiers, County. 



Paid groceries, 
fuel, 
rents, 
board and care. 



$112.00 

153.00 

96.00 

574.55 



$935.55 



Respectfully submitted, 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

Overseer of the Poor, 



REPORT OF HISTORY COMMISSION. 

January 1, 1924. 
To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The History Commission hereby submits the following 
report for the year ending December 31, 1923 : 
Number of half-leather-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 

1923, 33 

Number of half-leather-bound copies sold, 2 



Number of half-leather-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 

1924, 31 

Number of cloth-bound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 1923, 527 
Number of cloth-bound copies sold, 3 



Number of cloth-liound copies on hand, Jan. 1, 1924, 524 
Number of maps on hand, Jan. 1, 1923, 830 

Number of maps given out with histories sold (one to 

each set), 5 

Number of maps sold separately, 5 

— 10 



Number of maps on hand, Jan. 1, 1924, 820 

Receipts from Sale of Histories, 1923. 

Two copies, half Jeather binding, at $3,00, $6.00 

Three copies, cloth binding, at $2.00, 6.00 

Five maps sold separately, at $.25, 1.25 



Total, $13.25 

Deposited with the city treasurer, amount received 
from sale of histories and maps, 1923, treas- 
urer's receipt, number 396, $13.25 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, 
WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 
ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Clerk, 

History Commission. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses, and other sources 
for the year ending December 31, 1923: 

Marriage licenses, ■■ $198.00 

Dog license fees, 155.80 

Recording mortgages, 181.25 

Recording conditional sales, 637.85 

Recording mortgage discharges, 40.75 

Recording assignment of wages, .75 

Recording writs, 9.40 

Billiard and pool table license fees, 3.50 

Certificate of record and miscellaneous fee, 12.75 

House rent, fire chief, 250.00 
Bowling alley, billiard and pool table licenses, 300.00 

Junk dealers' licenses, 120.00 

Job team and passenger carriage licenses, 100.50 

Dog licenses, 1,780.77 

County poor, Merrimack County, 13,699.21 

Dependent soldiers, Merrimack County, 935.55 

Municipal primary fees, 68.00 

Sale of city histories, 13.25 

Druggists' permits to sell liquor, 6.00 

Town of Pembroke, aid poor, 70.00 

Lease of land, Frank Clark, 100.00 

Lease of land, C. S. Piper, 50.00 

Refund, printing Pinsouneault ease, 12.00 

Rebate, Hose Fire Chief, 400.00 

Refund, assessors' typewriter, 5.00 

Land sold Bertha Palmer, 38.61 

Land sold E. C. Durgin, 65.25 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK, 339 

Land sold Jos. Hunneyman, $9.00 

Land sold Concord Electric Co., 88.66 

Work, White Park ball ground, Park Dept., 44.00 

Witness fee, J. H. Morris, 2.12 

Estate of Jos. W. Elliott, 235.98 

List of dog owners, W. S. Dole, 6.00 

A. 0, Preston, account of M. J. Preston, 111.00 

Bounty hedgehogs, .40 

Bounty wildcats, 40.00 

Sale of desks, 70.00 



$19,811.35 
Motor vehicle permits, 1923, 56.02 

Motor vehicle permits, 1924, 11,417.60 



$31,284.97 



The foregoing amounts have been paid into the City 
Treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerl-. 



REPORT OF CITY SEALER. 

Covering the Period January 1, 1923, to January 1, 1924. 



To His Honor Henry E. Chamherlin^ Mayor, and the 
Board of Aldermen: 

Four hundred and forty-two (442) scales were tested 
and sealed, four (4) were confiscated and twenty (20) 
condemned for repairs which were later reinspected and 
sealed; forty-two (42) wood carts were measured and 
marked; five (5) reweighings of coal were made and six 
(6) coal bins estimated. Thirty-two (32) five-gallon cans 
were tested and sealed; seventy-five (75) packages con- 
taining beans, potatoes, etc., were rew^eighed; one hun- 
dred and ninety-two (192) tests of automatic pumps were 
made, many of which needed adjustments, ten (10) were 
condemned for repairs and one (1) completely con- 
demned. All liquid and dry measures were found correct. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED S. PENDLETON, 

City Sealer. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR. 

Concord, N. H., January 9, 1924. 
To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The routine work of the City Solicitor during the last 
year has been of considerable volume and it would be im- 
possible to detail it all in this report. This work con- 
sists of numerous opinions to the full board of public 
works and various officials, attention to the drawing of 
petitions, resolutions and ordinances, of the notification 
of mortgagees in the case of tax sales and such matters, 
all of which take considerable time. During the year the 
Solicitor has had occasion to clean up a number of long 
pending matters of detail and is aware, at the present 
time, of only one matter which is not out of the way but 
which is nearly concluded. 

Cases in Court have been disposed of as follows : 

Elgland v. City of Concord. 

This case was tried before a jury in the United States 
District Court in the early part of the year and resulted 
in a verdict for the City. A motion for a new trial was 
filed and after hearing was denied. 

McLaughlin v. City of Concord. 

This was really a Water Works case and the Water. 
Board commissioned Nathaniel E. Martin, Esq., to work 
with the City Solicitor. As result the case was settled 
outside of court for $2,400.00. 

23 



342 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Normandeau v. City of Concord. 

This was an appeal from award of damages for the 
laying out of the new Soueook River cut off. The trial 
by jury at the April Term of the Superior Court resulted 
in the astonishing verdict of $4,700.00 for the plaintiff. 
The Solicitor moved to set this aside and the plaintiff 
was ordered to remit $2,200.00 of the verdict or the case 
to go to new trial. This resulted in the payment of 
$2,500.00 and some interest in settlement. 

At the October Term of the Superior Court the case 
of Normandeau v. City of Concord, arising out of the 
accident at the Clough Hill Bridge, the town of Pembroke 
being a co-defendant with the City, was settled by the 
payment of $700.00 by each defendant. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELWIN L. PAGE, 

City Solicitor, 



REPORT OF THE DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC 
PLAYGROUNDS AND BATH. 



Following is a report of the Municipal Playground and 
Bath Department for the season of 1923: 

The instruction in the many forms of athletic exercises 
and games has been along the same lines as last year, 
with a few exceptions. There was less stress placed on 
strenuous athletic sports, and more attention given to 
games that embrace mass athletics. One of the tests 
given throughout the entire season was the all round 
test for all the boys and girls, in three classes : Midgets, 
Juniors, and Seniors. Silver and bronze badges, with 
diplomas, from the Playground and Recreation Associa- 
tion of America, were issued to all passing tests. 

Aquatic sports, and the teaching of swimming was held 
daily at the Baths. The past season saw the Baths opened 
for the first time daily for the girls as well as the boys, 
with two very capable instructors in Mr. Webster Bridges 
and ]\Iiss Ellen Reardon. 

Rolfe Park Playground, in Penacook, was opened for 
the first time and athletic equipment furnished, with Miss 
Dorothy Flanders, Instructor, in attendance three days 
each week. 

The Playground in East Concord was also furnished 
with new equipment, and Miss Flanders was in attendance 
twice each week. 

The John Kimball Playground had the largest daily 
attendance, and carried off the majority of the athletic 
honors, under the able direction of Mr. Wm. E. Coughlin 
and Miss Paulita Clark. 

The South End Playground children responded favor- 
ably to the efforts of their instructors, Mr. James Cassidy 
and Miss Madeline Vose. 



344 CITY OF CONCORD. 

At the close of the season the annual pageant was held 
in White Park, where all the children from the various 
playgrounds met and gave a fine exhibition of their work 
during the past season, the program consisting of mass 
games — mass athletics, inter-playground contests, in- 
dividual acts and plays. This program started at two 
P. M., and ended with refreshments at five-thirty. Through 
the kindness of Nardini's Restaurant, seven hundred 
servings of ice cream were issued. 

I submit the following recommendations to the Play- 
ground and Bath Department : 

A small portion of White Park should be reserved as 
a playground. This Park is centrally located, and with 
its ideal ground conditions would make an excellent 
playground ; a man and woman instructor to be in daily 
attendance. 

Rolfe's Playground, in Penacook, should have a man 
and woman instructor daily, and at East Concord, a 
woman instructor on full time. The past season, one in- 
structor had to devote her time between these two play- 
grounds, which is not satisfactory. 

Two extra bath houses should be erected at the bathing- 
beach. Arc lights for night swimming, and a telephone 
and pulmotor should be installed for emergency purposes. 
This matter has been investigated and could be done, but 
the great objection to these last three propositions is 
the vandalism which has been shown, not only at the 
beach, where on several occasions during the past sea- 
son the bath houses have been broken into, flooring 
ripped up and equipment stolen; but the equipment 
houses at the playgrounds have also been t)roken open, 
equipment taken and apparatus destroyed. It is wath 
great reluctance that I have to report this matter, as it 
casts a reflection on a great majority of innocent children 
who have to suffer for a few boys who should know 
better. Actions like these only keep the Committee on 
Playgrounds and the Director from going ahead and 



REPORT ON PUBLIC PLAYGROUNDS AND BATH. 345 

furnishing playgrounds with much needed equipment. 
Over two hundred dollars was expended the past season 
for damages and equipment taken. 

The financial report, after paying a few unpaid bills 
of the previous year, shows a small balance inside the 
appropriation. 

The kind assistance I have received from Mayor 
Chamberlin, Mr. Head of the Highway Department, Mr. 
Lang, the City Engineer, Mr. Sanders of the Water 
Works Department, and the Committee on Playgrounds 
and Baths, consisting of Aldermen Brunei, Stevens, Jones, 
Morrill, Mrs. Cora Sullivan, Miss Elsie L. Johnson, and 
Richard Smith, has added greatly in making the past 
season a success. It has been a pleasure to have worked 
with them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARVEY W. COHN, 

Supervisor of Playgrounds. 



Appropriation, $2,800.00 

Disbursements, 2,633.34 



Unexpended balance, $166.66 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Board of Mayor amd Aldermen: 

Following is the report of the Board of Health for the 
year ending December 31, 1923. 

The board was organized as follows: Mayor Henr}' 
Chamberlin, ex-offieio chairman, Doctor Charles H. Cook, 
ex-officio member, was elected secretary, and Doctor 
Sibley Morrill w^as the third member. Meetings were 
held from time to time throughout the year for the 
transaction of special and routine busness. 

The report of the Sanitary Officer to the Board of 
Health is transmitted herewith and hereby approved 
and adopted as a part of this report. It is thought that 
this document covers the ground of the department's 
activities so fully and in such detail as to render super- 
fluous a lengthy supplementary report from this board. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, Mayor, 
CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., 
S. G. MORRILL, 

Board of Health. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 347 

REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER. 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: The annual report of the Sanitary Officer 
for the year ending December 31, 1923, is herewith sub- 
mitted. 

There were during the past year 490 deaths, which is 
9 more than in 1922, heart disease causing 50, the largest 
number from any one cause. Estimating the population 
at 23,000 and excluding the non-resident deaths, 193, and 
the stillbirths, 11, the yearly death rate for Concord was 
12.43%. There were 268 deaths in the public institutions, 
and 222 in the nine wards of the city. 

Of the contagious diseases, measles have been the most 
prevalent and three hundred and sixty-nine cases were 
reported with no fatalities. Nine cases of diphtheria, 
twenty-six cases of tuberculosis with twenty-two deaths, 
nineteen of which were at the State Hospital, one case 
of typhoid fever and forty-six cases of venereal disease 
were reported. The Venereal Disease Clinic has done 
excellent work. Sixty-four different cases have been 
under observation and approximately 400 treatments have 
been administered. This work is helping to check the 
menace from this disease and is a most important factor 
in the community. As was the case last year there has 
been more or less scarlet fever throughout the year, the 
total number of cases was seventy-three, exceeding 1922 
by thirty-two cases with no deaths. 

In answer to the demands of the citizens for the proper 
collection of table garbage, a new department was added 
to the Health Department in 1922. This branch of the 
work has proved to be quite a problem. It has rapidly 
grown from the few hundred on the first list, until today, 
collection is made once each week from between four and 
five thousand families. J. A. Cochrane is in charge of this 



348 CITY OF CONCORD. 

work and it is being well taken care of at the present 
time. Twenty-one licenses for the collection of garbage 
were issued but most of these men have discontinued, as 
live weight hogs sell at such a low figure, it does not pay 
to expend time making collections in the city. 

In attempting to impress upon you the extreme need 
of an isolation hospital, should an epidemic of small pox 
break out in our midst, in the report of 1922 I cited 
statistics of the epidemic in Denver, Colorado. No doubt 
Denver seemed so far distant the statistics did not make 
the desired impression as no action was taken. However, 
the recent outbreak in New Hampshire, where we have 
had thirty-nine cases in the towns of Wakefield, Lincoln, 
Hinsdale, and Rochester should make us realize that we 
may be called upon at any time to cope with a similar 
situation. Should a case develop in one of the hotels or 
in any of the institutions, we would be obliged to hold 
it in quarantine, wherever it might be. 

The State Laboratory has examined eighty-one samples 
of milk for this department with the result that sixty-six 
of these samples were above the minimum required stand- 
ard. I examined forty-one milk farms and found 
twenty-eight to be in very good condition, all being 
clean and sanitary ; improvements necessary to put the 
remaining eleven in good sanitary condition were ad- 
vised. 

There has been an increase in building during the past 
. year and many new houses have been built, quite a num- 
ber now being in the process of construction. Two hun- 
dred and forty-one plumbing inspections have been made. 

One hundred and forty-three complaints of nuisances 
have been inspected and the cause eliminated. These 
were largely from dead animals, odors from pigs, rubbish, 
unsanitary plumbing, refuse in yards and general con- 
dition of premises. The weekly inspection of alleyways 
in the rear of the business blocks has avoided any ac- 
cumulation of rubbish. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 349 

The water analysis shows that our supply from Pena- 
cook Lake maintains its usual superior quality. Regular 
inspection of the shores of the lake keep it free from con- 
tamination of any sort. 

The appropriation for the year was $5,000, and the 
total expenditures were $4,359.33, leaving a balance of 
$640.67. Although we had quite a large number of cases 
of contagious disease, we were fortunate in having very 
few cases needing financial aid, which is largely re- 
sponsible for the balance left from our appropriation. 
$187.75 was received from milk license fees. 

The following tables show in detail the work of the 
department : 

Financial Statement of the Board of Health for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1923. 

appropriation. 

Salary, sanitary officer, $2,000.00 

Upkeep of automobile, 400.00 

Fumigation supplies, 100.00 

Contagious diseases, 1,000.00 

Incidental expenses, 1,500.00 



Total, 


$5,000.00 


expenditures. 




Salary, sanitary officer, 


$2,000.00 


Upkeep of automobile. 


400.00 


Fumigation supplies. 


79.90 


Contagious diseases, 


507.05 


Incidental expenses, 


1,372.38 


Balance, 


640.67 



Total, $5,000.00 



350 



CITY OF CONCORD, 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The following table shows the number of contagious dis- 
eases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom: 



Months. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Influenza. 


Measles. 


Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubercu- 
losis. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Vene- 
real dis- 
eases. 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 


i 


J3 
Q 


a> 

00 

si 

O 


Q 


ai i S 

O Q 


0) 

8 




1 


.a 
Q 


i 


5 


I 


Q 


IS 

o 






Q 


January . .. 


















6 
3 
8 
20 
15 
5 
2 
6 
1 
3 
4 










5 
2 
4 
1 








February . . . 






1 
3 


1 
3 


1 

8 

8 

10 

52 

26 

4 

39 

101 

60 

60 










2 
3 

1 
4 
3 
4 
2 
1 
3 
2 
1 


4 

1 
3 
1 








March 


















April 














May 


















5 




June 


1 
6 
1 


















2 
5 
4 

7 
13 

1 
2 






July 








4 
1 
1 
3 
2 
1 












August 
























September . 




















October 
















November 


1 














1 










December . . 






















9 





























Total 


4 


4 


?fi9 








73 




26 


21 


1 




46 




5 



















COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890 : 



Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 



Whoop- Infan- 
ing I tile pa- 
cough. ; ralysis. 



Diph- 


Scarlet 


theria. 


fever. 




i 


. 


x: 


















03 


01 


cS 


a> 


O 


Q 


'_> 


d 



Typhoid 
fever. 



Measles 



o 



PS 


Small- 




pox. 


rXi 


m 


J3 


m ^ 






fll 


tk d 


<u 


03 <t> 


O 


O Q 



Total. 



6 


2 


9 


12 


3 


7 


13 


3 


37 


48 


7 


41 


17 


3 


113 


35 


8 


44 


55 


8 


4 


13 


1 


22 


4 




8 


9 


5 


99 


29 


5 


39 


65 


5 


11 


29 

» t 
42 


2 
4 


6 
39 


55 


3 


18 


15 
14 


1 
2 


80 

27 


63 


2 


26 


44 


4 


7 


131 


6 


23 


30 


1 


10 


51 


2 


8 


17 


1 


7 


33 


3 


28 


30 




28 


21 




26 


54 


3 


18 


138 


3 


47 


22 


3 


12 


28 




33 


13 




38 


9 




54 


11 




41 


9 




73 



17 
14 

7 
13 
13 
21 
15 
17 

8 
14 
18 
13 
23 
17 
12 
23 
32 
11 

6 
28 
16 
10 
15 
10 

7 



6 

2 

2 

300 

21 

158 

452 

138 

126 

299 

476 

40 

27 

582 

31 

181 

101 

118 

100 

1168 

143 

26 

321 

687 

6 

9 

382 

414 

112 

7 

805 

31 

101 

369 



352 uity of concord, 

Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions. 

Ward 1, 26 

Ward 2, 9 

Ward 3, 7 

Ward 4, 49 

Ward 5, 26 

Ward 6, 40 

Ward 7, 31 

Ward 8, 20 

Ward 9, 14 

New Hampshire State Hospital, 159 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 76 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 20 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 6 

New Hampshire State Prison, 1 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 6 

Deaths Reported by Age. 

*Under 1 year, 44 

From 1 year to 5 years, 9 

From 5 to 10 years, 3 
From 10 to 15 years. 

From 15 to 20 years, 6 

From 20 to 30 years, 11 

From 30 to 40 years, 29 

From 40 to 50 years, 46 

From 50 to 60 years, 48 

From 60 to 70 years, 101 

From 70 to 80 years, 132 

From 80 to 90 years, 52 

From 90 to 100 years, 6 

Not stated, 3 



Total number of deaths, 490 



^Including 11 stillborns. 



health department. 353 

Deaths During 1923 by Seix, Condition and Nativity. 

Sex: 

Males, 245 

Females, 245 

Condition : 

Married, 190 

Single, 146 

Widowed, 137 

Divorced, 10 

Not stated, 7 

Nativity : 

Concord, 98 

New Hampshire, 178 

Other states, 87 

Foreign, 114 

Not stated. 13 

Causes of Death. 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Accident, 1 

automobile. 1 

electrocution, 1 

run over by vehicle, 1 

shooting, 1 

Addison's Disease, 1 

Anemia pernicious, 3 

Angina pectoris, 10 

Aortic regurgitation, 2 

Apoplexy, 20 

Asphyxiation, 1 

Banti's Disease, 1 

Birth, difficult, 1 

Bronchitis, 5 



354 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Cancer, 4 

bowles, 3 

breast, 2 

colon, 3 

duodenum, 2 

face, 1 

intestines, 3 

larynx, 1 

lips, 1 

liver, 1 

pancreas, 1 

rectum, 3 

stomach, 3 

uterus, 5 

Cardio-renal, 1 

Child birth, 1 

Congestion of lungs, 2 

Cyanosis, 1 

Cystitis, 1 

Dementia senile, 1 

Diabetes, 1 

mellitus, 4 

Diarrhea and enteritis, 1 

Edema of lungs, 4 

Embolism, 1 

pulmonary, 4 

Endocarditis, 8 

Enteritis, 1 

Epilepsy, 3 

Erysipelas, 4 

Exhaustion, 3 

Foramen Ovule, nonclosure of, 2 

Gangrene senile, 1 

Gastric ulcer, perforation of, 1 

Heart, disease of, 50 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 355 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Hemorrhage, 1 

cerebral, 30 

internal, 1 

Hydrocephalis, 1 

Inanition, 1 

Indigestion, 1 

Infarction, pulmonary, 1 

Influenza, 4 

Intestinal obstruction, 5 

Jaundice, 1 

La Grippe, 2 

Laryngitis, 1 

Liver, cirrhosis of, 1 

Malnutrition, . 1 

Mania, 3 

Marasmus, 2 

Meningitis, acute, 4 

tubercular, 1 

Mitral, regurgitation, 4 

Myocarditis, 27 

Nephritis, 14 

diffuse, 1 

interstitial, 4 

parenchymatous, 1 

Paralysis agitans, 1 , 

Paresis, 12 

Pellagra, ' 1 

Pemphigus Neonatorum, 1 

Peritonitis, 5 

tubercular, 3 

Pleurisy, 1 

Pneumonia, 11 

broncho, 28 

hypostatic, 1 

lobar, 23 



356 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cause. No. of deaths. 

Premature birth, 7 

Psychosis, 1 

Rheumatism, 1 

Sarcoma fibroid, 1 

Sclerosis-arterio, 35 

Senility, 6 

Septicemia, 8 

Stenosis, 2 

of pylorus, 1 

Stillborn, 11 

Stomach, dilatation of, 1 

Suicide, poisoning, 1 

strangulation, 3 

Surgical shock, • 1 

Syphilis, 1 

Thrombosis cerebral, ' 5 

Toxemia, 1 

Tuberculosis, abdominal, 1 

intestinal, 1 

pulmonary, 21 

Urgemia, 4 

Whooping cough, 1 



490 



Total number of deaths for the year 1923, 490, compared 
with 481 in 1922. 

Average death-rate for the year 1923, 12.43, compared 
with 11.95 in 1922. 

Total number of births for the year 1923, 398, compared 
with 455 in 1922. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1923, 187, com- 
pared with 231 in 1922. 



health department. 357 

Report of Milk Examinations and Inspection op 
Milk Farms. 

Number of milk examinations made, 81 

Number of examinations above standard, 66 

Number of milk farms and milk rooms inspected, 41 

Conditions good, 28 

Conditions fair, 11 

Conditions poor, 2 

Improvements suggested, 13 

Summary. 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 1124 

Burial permits issued, 605 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 115 

Transit permits issued, 203 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were issued, 214 
Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 22 
Number of reports of contagious disease sent to State 

Board of Health, 52 
Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, Public 

Health and Marine Hospital Service, 52 
Number of samples of water and ice collected for 

analysis, 12 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 143 

Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 270 

Number of plumbing permits granted, 124 

Number of inspections of plumbing, 241 

Number of barber shops inspected, 25 

Number of public halls inspected, 20 

Number of restaurants and bakeries inspected, 28" 

Number of school buildings inspected, 25 



358 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I wish to express my thanks to the Mayor and the other 
members of the Board of Health, tlie aldermen and all the 
city officials for their co-operation with me in the work of 
this department during the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHAS. E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF THE 
MUNICIPAL COURT. 



Receipts. 
Received for fines, costs and sundry fees, $11,079.08 

Expenditures. 

Paid for fees of oflficers, witnesses and com- 
plaints and warrants, $1,629.48 

State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of 
Motor Vehicles, 

Postage, printing and otlier supplies. 

Clerk's bond, 

Probation officer, services and expenses. 

Special justices. 

Concord Society S. P. C. A. fines, 

Treasurer Merrimack County, 

Balance paid city treasurer, 

$11,079.08 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOHN W. STANLEY, 

Clerk. 



1,962.00 


37.50 


3.00 


120.00 


156.00 


15.00 


1.185.00 


5,971.10 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration 
the following facts and figures showing the valuation of 
the city and its school districts and special precinct, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

The various precincts formerly existing were abolished 
by an act of the legislature amending the charter of the 
city of Concord, at the 1923 session. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
by direct taxation for the years from 1913 to the present 
time, which shows the increased amount spent by the 
city. 



assessors' report. 



361 



Tabulations of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 
Valuation of City and Precincts with Rate for 
Each in 1923. 



Warrant. 


Amount of 
warrants. 


Tax rate 
per $1,000. 


Assessed 

valuation of 

city and 

precincts. 




$00,294.50 

48,525.59 

260,000.00 

287,656.69 

650.50 

32,486.38 

6,035.00 








$12.70 


$24,553,173.00 


City Budget 
Schools : 








13.50 
.30 

11.19 
.30 


22,349,768.00 




{ No 20 


2,203,4(>5.00 


Penacook 


( Union .. 


2,926,236.00 
19,054,378.00 







362 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Number of Shares of Railroad Stock Held Here on 
Which the Tax Was Assessed and Collected by 
State of New Hampshire and Credited to the Citv. 



1920. 



Boston & Maine 

Concord & Montreal 

Concord & Portsmouth 

Dover, Somersworth & Rochester 
Street 

Fitchburg 

Manchester & Lawrence 

Nashua & Lowell 

New Boston 

Northern 

Peterborough 

Pemige wasset Valley 

Suncook Valley 

Wilton 

Connecticut River 

Laconia Street Railway 

Nashua Street Railway 

Boston & Lowell 



362 


307 


s.6:32 


6.172 


72 


67 





468 


77 


87 


203 


199 


18 


13 


66 


66 


1,295 


1 ,216 


8 


s 


152 


so 


19 


41 


9 


11 


5 
























258 


240 


8,201 


5,9.59 


72 


71 








97 


86 


193 


140 


6 


8 


70 


64 


1.377 


l,2is 


8 


11 


160 


160 


46 


46 


13 


13 


5 


5 


24 





349 


434 


168 






assessors' report. 363 

Inventory of the City of Concord. 









No. 


Valuation . 


Improved and unimproved land and 






buildings, 








$20,347,125.00 


Horses, 






825 


93.765.0n 


Oxen, 






6 


705.00 


Cows, 






1,337 


71,325.00 


Other neat stock. 






180 


■5,560.00 


Sheep, 






92 


920.00 


Fur-bearing animals. 






12 


15.00 


Hogs, 






56 


1,035.00 


Fowls, 








5,610.00 


Vehicles, 








12,865.00 


Portable mills, 








2,850.00 


Boats and launches, 








400.00 


Wood and lumber. 








17,600.00 


Money on hand, at inter 


■est, 


or on deposit. 


474,721.00 


Stock in trade, 








3,097,680.00 


^Machinery, 








355,505.00 



Total, $24,553,173.00 

Polls, 12,862, 62,984.00 

Amount of taxes committd to tax collector, $715,511.93. 
Average rate per cent of taxation for all purposes, 2.64-|- 



364 city of concord. 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed. 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and 
on the real and personal estate of Concord since 1913: 



Year. 




Polls. 


Valuation. 


Tax. 


1913 




5,687 


$20,842,846 


$305,400.56 


1914 




5,735 


19.177,428 


316,447.67 


1915 




5,806 


20,086,789 


339,781.64 


1916 




5,779 


19,803,275 


382,352.47 


1917 




6,185 


20,110,995 


377,326.81 


1918 




5,485 


20,440,315 


447,484.47 


1919 




5,662 


20,370,605 


578,633.66 


1920 




6,071 


20,501,778 


647,009.63 


1921 




12,540 


21,341,061 


664,864.83 


1922 




13,011 


23,710,108 


645,035.10 


1923 










Ward 1, 


1,240 


$2,317,960 


$63,379.02 




2, 


362 


635,445 


18,395.67 




3, 


682 


1,522,925 


43,296.21 




4, 


2,500 


4,296,100 


126,072.00 




5, 


1,642 


4,424,000 


125,306.36 




6, 


2,113 


2,564,690 


80,170.91 




7, 


2,446 


. 3,711,783 


110,651.43 




8, 


774 


3,821,310 


109,499.43 




9, 


1,103 


1,258,960 


38,740.90 




12,862 


$24,553,173 


$715,511.93 



assessors' report. 



365 



List of Polls, Valuations, and the Tax Assessed in 
Each Ward, 1922 and 1923. 





Polls. 


Valuation . 


Total tax assessed. 


Wards. 


1922. 


1923. 


1922. 


1923. 


1922. 


1923. 


Ward 1 


1.247 


1,240 


$2,340,605 


$2,317,960 


$56,209.65 


$63,379.02 


Ward 2 


372 


362 


610,206 


635,445 


15,617.23 


18,395.67 


Ward 3 


704 


682 


1,506,214 


1,522,925 


37.281.17 


43.296.21 


Ward 4 


2,710 


2,500 


4,288.288 


4,296,100 


122,023.16 


126,072.00 


Ward 5 


1,870 


1,642 


4,457,383 


4,424,000 


122,626.88 


125,306.36 


Ward 6 


2,113 


2,113 


2,452,573 


2,564,690 


72,876.54 


80,170.91 


Ward 7 


2,374 


2,446 


3,480,402 


3.711,783 


96,643.12 


110,651.43 


Ward 8 


521 


774 


3,546,512 


3,821,310 


91,060.16 


109,499.43 


Ward 9 


1.100 


1,103 


1,027,025 


•1,268,960 


30,697.19 


38.740,90 




13,011 


12,862 


$23,710,108 


$24,563,173 


$645,035.10 


$715,511.93 



Total warrants submitted to tax collectors 

In 1922— Resident tax list, 

Non-resident tax list, 
Polls, 



In 1923— Resident tax list, 

Non-resident tax list, 
Polls, 



Total, 



Respectfully submitted. 



$580,540.26 

735.84 

63,759.00 

$645,035.10 

$651,696.46 

828.47 

62,987.00 

$715,511.93 



JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the annual report to 
the close of business, December 31, 1923, on tax lists of 
Seth R. Dole: 



T-\x Levy, 


1916. 


Resident list, 


$370,029.62 


Poll tax lists. 


11,558.00 


Non-resident list, 


764.85 


Additions and corrections. 


391.53 




$382,744.00 


Collected, moth account, 


282.05 


Collected, interest. 


1,387.28 




(bQQ/l /lis 3^ 




' — tpOOTTjTiXO.OO 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$376,102.34 


Amount of discount, 


3,888.83 


Amount of abatements, 


4,374.12 


Uncollected, 


48.04 




4i381 113 33 




^potj^jTrxu.fjt-' 


Tax Levy, 


1917. 


Resident list, 


$364,272.21 


Poll tax lists. 


12,370.00 


Non-resident list, 


684.60 


Additions and corrections, 


305.49 




$377,632.30 


Collected, moth account, 


158.00 


Collected, interest. 


1,482.22 




$379,272.52 



TAX COLLECTOR S REPORT, 



367 



Cash paid treasurer, 


$371,675.35 


Amount of discount, 


3,753.29 


Amount of abatements, 


3,764.21 


Uncollected, 


79.67 




i-QTO 070 I^O 






Tax Levy, 


1918. 


Kesident list, 


$435,671.29 


Poll tax lists, 


10,970.00 


Non-resident list, 


843.18 


Additions and corrections, 


527.26 




$448,011.73 


Collected, interest. 


1,670.01 




il 10 fiQI 71 




*p attCjUl? X , 1 t: 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$441,436.71 


Amount of discount, 


4,099.95 


Amount of abatements, 


4,047.47 


Uncollected, 


97.61 




$449,681.74 



Taxes sold the city of Concord in the office of the col- 
lector for redemption : 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest. 



1912. 

$1,186.96 Paid treasurer, 
127.29 Deeded, 

Unsettled, 



$1,314.25 



1913. 



$981.41 

45.31 

287.53 

$1,314.25 



$1,811.71 Paid treasurer, $1,655.57 

171.71 Deeded, 35.21 

Unsettled. 292.64 



$1,983.42 



$1,983.42 



368 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount, 
Interest, 



Amount 
Interest. 



Amount, 
Interest, 



1914. 

$1,228.92 Paid treasurer, $698.31 

54.06 Deeded, 514.52 

Unsettled, 70.15 



$1,282.98 



$1,282.98 



1915. 

$687.48 Paid treasurer, $744.41 
56.93 



$744.41 



$744.41 



1916. 

$519.09 Paid treasurer, $491.81 
24.05 Deeded, 51.33 



$543.14 



$543.14 



1917. 



$890.76 Paid treasurer, $808.62 

61.04 Deeded, 79.97 

Unsettled, 63.21 



$951.80 



$951.80 



1918. 

2,046.98 Paid treasurer, $2,030.56 

138.10 Deeded, 117.73 

Unsettled, 36.79 



$2,185.08 



$2,185.08 



There has 
Concord for 
Mr. Ladd, a 



been no change on taxes sold the city of 
redemption, as turned over to Mr. Dole by 
former collector. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MAUDE C. BRADLEY. 



TAX collector's REPORT. 369 

REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business, December 31st, 
1923. 

Tax Levy, 1919. 

Resident list, $560,553.51 

Poll taxes, 16,986.00 

Additions and cemeteries, 439.87 

$577,979.38 



Non-resident list, 1,094.15 

Collected, interest, 1,788.68 



$580,862.21 

Cash paid treasurer, $568,229.02 

Amount discount, 5,183.29 

abatements, 5,654.52 

Cash on hand, 34.15 



$579,100.98 
Uncollected, 1,761.23 

$580,862.21 

Taxes sold city of Concord in office of collector for 
redemption : 



Non-resident list 
Resident list. 


;, $28.55 
3,271.16 


Paid treasurer. 
Deeded, 

submitted, 
►HN A. BLACK\^ 


$3,347.78 
185.93 


Interest, 


$3,299.71 
234.00 






$3,533.71 
Respectfully 
JC 


$3,533.71 

rooD, 



Collector 



370 CITY OF CONCORD. 

REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The undersigned hereby submits the report of the 
collector of taxes to the close of business, December 30, 
1923: 

Tax Levy for 1920. 

Resident list, $616,789.11 

Poll tax lists, 29,031.00 

Non-resident list, 1,189.52 



$647,009.63 
Additions and corrections, 1,156.29 

Interest collected, 2,208.56 



-$650,374.48 



Cash paid treasurer, i$635,839.54 

Discounts, 8,197.22 

Abatements, 6,260.96 

Uncollected, 76.76 



-$650,374.48 



Tax Levy for 1921. 

Resident list, $602,280.14 

Poll tax lists, 61,520.00 

Non-resident list, 1.064.00 



$664,864.83 
Additions and corrections, 9,517.78 

Interest collected, 2,596.35 



-$676,978.96 



Cash paid treasurer, $653,584.20 

Discounts, 6,888.84 

Abatements, 14,855.71 

Uncollected, 1,650.21 



-$676,978.96 



TAX collector's REPORT, 371 



Tax Levy for 1922. 



Resident list, $580,540.26 

Poll tax lists, 63,759.00 

Non-resident lists, 735.84 



$645,035.10 
Additions and corrections, 3,080.93 

Interest collected, 2,467.78 



■4$650,583.81 



Cash paid treasurer, $620,054.93 

Discounts, 6,856.85 

Abatements, 14,437.08 

Cash on hand, 3.00 

Uncollected, 9,231.95 



->$650,583.81 



Tax Levy for 1923. 

Resident list, $651,696.46 

Poll tax lists, 62,987.00 

Non-resident list, 828.47 

Bank stock, 3.709.07 



$719,221.00 
Additions and corrections, 2,829.41 

Interest collected. 154.40 



-$722,204.81 



Cash paid treasurer, $611,849.91 

Discount, 6,877.47 

Abatements, 18,547.49 

Cash on hand, 161.60 

Uncollected, 84,768.34 



-$722,204.81 



372 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Taxes sold the city of Concord in the office of the Col- 
lector for redemption: 



1920. 



Resident list, $2,416.54 
Non-resident list, 5.05 



Interest, 



161.15 



$2,582.74 



Paid treasurer 


(last 


report), 


$1,665.78 


Paid treasurer, 




1923, 


314.93 


Unredeemed, 


602.03 



$2,582.74 



1921. 



Resident list, 


$1,986.26 


Paid treasurer (last 


Interest, 


104.45 


report), $1,048.09 
Paid treasurer, 

1923, 859.26 
Unredeemed, 183.36 



$2,090.71 



$2,090.71 



1922. 



Resident list, 


$819.45 


Paid treasurer, 


$619.26 


Non-resident list, 


7.96 


Unredeemed, 


220.61 


Interest, 


9.71 






Expense, 


2.75 








$839.87 


$839.87 




Reimbursements. 




For 1920 taxes paid 


Paid treasurer. 


$135.18 


by city, 


$119.63 






Interest, 


15.55 







$135.18 



$135.18 



For 1921 taxes paid 

by city, $254.05 

Interest. 32.01 



TAX collector's REPORT, 373 

Paid treasurer, $286.06 



$286.06 

For 1922 taxes paid 

by city, $718.83 
Interest, 65.13 


Paid treasurer, 


$286.06 

$783.96 



$783.96 



$783.96 



Motor Vehicle Permit Account. 

Paid treasurer, $35,113.73 



Balance cash on 

hand, $57.51 

1923 permits is- 
sued, 33,746.33 

1924 permits is- 
sued, 1,309.89 



$35,113.73 



$35,113.73 



Respectfully submitted. 



WOODBURY E. HUNT, 

Collector. 



January 19, 1924. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OF TRUST 
FUNDS. 



NATHANIEL E. MAETIN, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, C Trustees. 

CARL H. FOSTER, 



Receipts. 




1923. 




Jan. 1. To balance from 1022, 


$3,634.42 


Dec. 31. Income, Harper Allen, trust, 


2.12 


J. B. & Olivia B. Abbott, tn 


Qst, 5.00 


Wm. E. Chandler, trust. 


12.48 


Wm. M. Chase, trust. 


12.75 


F. H. Corson, trust. 


2.12 


Eliza A. Cole, trust, 


4.25 


Calvin P. Couch, trust, 


2.12 


Jacob C. Dunklee, trust, 


8.32 


Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 


35.00 


Seth Eastman, trust. 


5.00 


Sarah E. Farrand, trust, 


8.50 


Geo. G. Fogg-, trust. 


12.00 


Leverett N. Freeman, trust. 


4.25 


Jacob H. Gallinger, trust, 


8.32 


Heber B. Hardy, trust, 


4.25 


Mary D. Hart, trust, 


12.00 


Loren W. James, trust, 


2.12 


Sarah H. James, trust, 


2.12 


"William H. Johns, trust, 


4.24: 


Mary J. Jones, trust, 


4.25 


Ebenezer Lane, trust. 


4.16 


George S. Little, trust, 


4.25 


J. W. & E. J. Little, trust. 


6.00 


Lydia F. Lund, trust, 


12.48 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 375 

Dec. 31. Income, Chas. W. Morse, trust, $4.16 

Lucy M. Roach, trust, 2.12 

Elizabeth P. Schutz, trust, 12.75 

Charles E. Scorer, trust, 4.25 

Antonio J. Sousa, trust, 2.12 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 13.20 

Interest, note of city of Concord, 

$52,176.42 at SVo, 1,826.17 
Trust funds, Merrimack Co. 

Savings Bank, 632.04 

Trust funds, Union Trust Co., 599.25 
Trust funds, N. H. Sav. Bank, 20.08 

Income, Seth K. Jones, trust, 12.00 

J. Eastman Pecker, trust, 20.00 
Levi C. Heath, trust. Loan & 

Trust Sav. Bank, 5.10 
Henry Burleigh, trust, Merri- 
mack Co. Sav, Bank, 6.80 
Abial Walker, trust, 40.00 
Countess of Rumford, trust, 80.00 
David Osgood, trust, 25.00 
P. B, Cogswell, trust, 85.90 
G. Parker Lyon, trust, 40.00 
Frankin Pierce, trust, 40.00 
Thomas G. Valpey, trust, 20.00 
■Jos. Hazeltine, trust, 133.54 
Seth Jones, trust, 25.14 
K. P. & D. Rollins, trust, 63.75 
Samuel C. Eastman, trust, 75.00 
Samuel C. Eastman trust, 1,694.15 
Wm. M. Chase trust, 42.50 
Benjamin A. Kimball, trust, 1,000.00 
H. A. Kimball, trust, 100.00 

Interest, unexpended balance ceme- 
tery trust funds, 141.09 

$10,578.63 



376 CITY OP CONCORD. 

ExPEaSTDITURES. 

1923. 
Dec. 31. Rev. Geo. A. Demers, account David 

Osgood, trust, $25.00 

E. H. Brown, treasurer, account labor, 

trust lots, Woodlawn cemetery, 299.50 

Rev. Dennis C. Ling, account labor, 

trust lots, Calvary Cemetery, 126.00 

Caroline Stewart, treasurer, income 

Countess of Rumford, trust, 80.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of lots 
in Blossom Hill Cemetery, 1,892.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of lots 
in Old North Cemetery, 300.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of lots 
in Maple Grove Cemetery, 100.50 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of lots 
in Pine Grove Cemetery, " 137.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of lots 
in Old Fort Cemetery, 5.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of lots 
in Millville Cemetery, 79.00 

City treasurer, income Thomas G. 

Valpey trust, 20.00 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 377 

Dee. 31. City treasurer, income G. Parker 

Lyon, trust, $40.00 

City treasurer, income Seth K. Jones, 

trust, 25.14 

City treasurer, income Katherine P. & 

Douglas Rollins, trust, 63.75 

City treasurer, income Samuel C. 

Eastman, trust, 1,769.15 

City treasurer, income P. B. Cogswell, 

trust, 85.90 

City treasurer, income Franklin 

Pierce, trust, 40.00 

City treasurer, income Abial Walker, 

trust, 40.00 

City treasurer, income Joseph Hazel- 
tine, trust, 133.34 
City treasurer, income William ]\I. 

Chase, trust, 42.50 

City treasurer, income Benjamin A. 

Kimball, trust, 1,000.00 

City treasurer, income Henry A. 

Kimball, trust, 100.00 

H. H. Dudley, treasurer, account 

Minot Enclosure, 105.00 

By balance, 4,069.65 

$10,578.63 



TRUST FUNDS. 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Uapital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 40.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OP RUMFORD TRUST. 

Per the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to bt 
applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 80.00 

Paid Caroline Stewart, treasurer of the society, 80.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 



Capital, 




$200.00 


Balance, income last year, 


$389.35 




Income received, 1923, 


23.56 


412.91 



Paid Rev. George A. Demers, treasurer, $25.00 
Income on hand, January 1, 1924, 387.91 

412.91 

Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank ; income deposited in the Union Trust Company. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 379 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OP THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, historical and scientific character, and the 
books relating to science shall be those that give the latest developments and 
discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1923, 85.90 

Paid into the city treasury, 85.90 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 



G. PARKER LYON TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 40.00 

Paid into the city treasury. 40.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1923, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 



380 CITY OP CONCORD. 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1923, 133.54 

Paid into the city treasury, 133.54 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000,00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city 
bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keep- 
ing lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition; six dollars 
each year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument 
fund ; and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing 
books for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 43.14 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Paid to city treasurer for puDlic 

library, 25.14 

Paid for care of lot, 12.00 

43.14 



Invested in City of Hartford, Conn., 4 per cent. 

bond due June 1, 1934, $922.60 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 77.40 

SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1923, $659.93 
From Seth K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1923, 26.20 

$692.13 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 381 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 

Donated to the city by Abbie P. Minot. the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly appointed officials. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 105.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 105.00 

Deposited (at 31/0 per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 

JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows: So much of income as is necessary to be used 
for the care of burial lot numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, East Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be 
added to principal till same amounts to $10,000; then the balance of income 
accruing each year after paying for care of said lot and monument, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the mayor for the general care and improvement 
of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Capital, January 1, 1923, $6,277.72 

Received from income of fund, 1923, 251.52 

$6,529.24 



Paid for care of lot, $20.00 

Capital, January 1, 1924, 6,509.24 

$6,529.24 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, $2,666.64 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 1,842.48 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 2,000.12 



KATHARINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST. 
Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital, $1,500.00 

Income received, 1923, 63.75 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 63.75 

Invested in Second converted IT. S. Liberty Loan, 414 
per cent, bonds. 



382 CITY OP CONCORD. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN TRUST. 

Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign laneuages for the 
Public Library. 

Capital, $1,250.00 

Income received, 1923, 75.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 75.00 

Invested in twenty-five sliares United Gas Improvement 
Company stock, par value $50 per share. 



WILLIAM M. CHASE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the pur- 
chase of books on historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational 
subjects. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1923, 42.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 42.50 

Invested in Fourth U. S. Liberty Loan 4% per cent. bond. 



SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, January 1, 1923, $31,962.70 

Received from income account as per 

resolution of Board of Aldermen, 1,557.30 
Capital, December 31, 1923, $33,520.00 

Invested in $5,700 First Liberty Loan bonds, $4,914.20 

Invested in $7,000 Second Liberty Loan bonds, 6,308.75 
Invested in $13,500 U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 

414 per cent, bonds, 12,376.00 
Invested in $3,000 Treasury 41/4 per cent. 

notes, 1952, 2,960.63 

Twelve shares Concord Gas Co., common, 1,020.00 

Five shares, par value $100 per share, Boston 
& Maine R. R., 1st preferred. Class D. 

Seventeen shares, Ridgewood Land & Im- 
provement Co. 



TRUSTEES OP TRUST FUNDS. 383 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $218.42 

Deposited in Union Trust Co., 5,722.00 

$1,557.30 transferred from income account, 
also included. 

Income received, 1923, $1,694.15 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 1,694.15 



BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Income received, 1923, $1,000.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 1,000.00 



HENRY A, KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Income received, 1923. $100.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 100.00 

I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the 
hands of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find 
such trust funds invested, and the income thereof for 
the year 1923 accounted for as shown by the books of 
the trustees kept for that purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



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i 


12 


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^ 


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12 


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Ss 


12 


S 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



415 



ffi «) 



a ^ 



& : 



Q 


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Q 




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p 


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o 


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m 


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„, 


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f 


























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C5 


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lO 


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^ 




ti 


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00 


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lo in m in in o 
CO eo CO CO CO CO 



in m in lo 






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in 




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CO 


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in 


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CO 


00 


CI 




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416 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



I 

Eh 

H 
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Qinooni joaouBiBfi 



•£C6I 'papuadxg 



•£Z6I 
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snoiAaacI jo amoo 
-ni ' pepuedxaufi 



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< W 






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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



417 




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c^ 


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^^ 


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418 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



m 

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Trust Co., C 

int.) with Cit; 

Hampshire Sa 
Trust Co., C 


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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



419 



W <! 



'^ -z 



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W) ^ 



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a ^ 

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CO 


g 


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^^ 


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t> 


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420 



CITY OF CONCOEID. 



O 
I 

Eh 
CQ 

H 

H 
H 

O 



-nu'Bf 'poBq uo 
aniooui JO 8on'B[«g 



§ ^ 



Q 




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la 


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•S261 'papuadxa 



es6i 
'paAi80»j ainooui 



•sj'caiC 
snoiAajd jo ainoo 
ui papuadxaofi 



in 00 rt o 



t- rH CO •- 




^ (N CN C-1 (N ^ 



IM -- •-■ 



h4 O 



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a o ^ 

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P P C M 00 C3 

3^3:-. 

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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



421 



- K 



K -= 






a ^ 



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t* 2.f^;:i-C:.C:-P--; 



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c/2 03 CC OQ 



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if. m ui ui m m -f. m in m m xfi xn ui m 



422 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



O 
1 

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MCOS (BCCaoQK'KCOtBMM 



CEMETERY FUNDS. 



423 



W •= 15 



o 2 



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— IM (N — 



lo lo m lo CH 






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•-> !z; £ 



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MccaawMWMwa-aioQcoaiccwKWiBWKtBM 



424 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



W -s 



5 O 



^ ^ 



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.9 w 



& p, . 2. p. 

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C 



-nnBf- 'puBq no 
ainooui JO 9DnB['Bg 



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1< M IN (N 00 



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CEMETERY FUNDS. 



425 



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t._i' 



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M M ^ 



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SPECIAL FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of Special 

Funds. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, $44,223.02 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1923, 1,305.65 

Received from income of fund, 1923, 1,775.89 

$47,304.56 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1,775.89 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1924, 45,528.67 

.$47,304.56 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 
bonds, $1,000.00 

Invested in U. S. Third Liberty Loan. 990.22 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 15,937.01 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 13,592.44 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 10,000.00 

Deposited in ]\Ierrimack County 
Savings Bank, 4,000.00 

$45,528.67 



430 CITY OF CONCORD. 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

As the lots in this cemetery are all sold, there is no provision for an in- 
crease of the fund. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamenta- 
tion of Old North Cemetery. 

Amoimt of capital, January 1, 1923, $815.00 
Received from income of fund, 32.60 

$847.60 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $32.60 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1924, 815.00 



$847.60 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, $846.11 

Unexpended income on hand, Decem- 
ber 31, 1923, 399.89 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1923, 20.00 

Received from income of fund, 1923, 49.84 

$1,315.84 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $49.84 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1924, 866.11 
Unexpended income, transferred to 
general account by joint resolution 
dated January 14, 1924, 399.89 



$1,315.84 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 431 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, $372.50 
Unexpended income on hand, Decem- 
ber 31, 1923, 382.01 
Received from income of fund, 1923, 30.15 
Received from one-half sale of lots, 7.50 

$792.16 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $30.15 

Unexpended income, transferred to 
general account by joint resolu- 
tion dated January 11, 1924, 382.01 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1921, 380.00 



$792.16 



Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 
interested parties, and by the addition of one-half the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1923, $2,167.15 

Unexpended income on hand, Decem- 
ber 31, 1923, 473.40 

Received from one-half sale of lots, 

1923, 22.50 

Received from income of fund, 1923, 106.67 

$2,769.72 



432 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $106.67 

Ainoimt of capital, January 1, 1924, 2,189.65 

Unexpended income, transferred to 
general account by joint reso- 
lution dated January 14, 1924, 473.40 

$2,769.72 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 872.59 

Deposited in Merrimack Co. Savings Bank, 1,317.06 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-half the amount re- 
eeived from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Soucook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1923, $31.38 

Received from income of fund, 1923, 1.26 

$32.64 



Credited city of Concord, general 
account, $1.26 

Amount of capital, Jaimary 1, 1924, 31.38 



■ $32.64 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $31.38 



WEST CONCORD SEWER PRECINCT SINKING FUND. 

The city ordinance establishing the West Concord sewer precinct and author- 
izing loans on the credit of the city to construct the system, also created a 
sinking fund, the conditions of which have already been fulfilled. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1923, $33.82 

Received, income, 1923, 1.32 

$35.14 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1924, $35.14 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 433 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS INCOME INVESTMENT ACCOUNT. 

Established by authority of an ordinance of the Board of Aldermen passed 
June 11, 1917. Principal and interest to be used in the reduction of the 
bonded indebtedness of the waterworks system at the discretion of the Board 
of Water Commissioners. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1924, $25,000.00 

Invested in U. S. First Liberty Loan 

converted 41^% bonds, $5,000.00 

Invested in Third Liberty Loan 41/4% 

bonds, 10,000.00 

Invested in U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 

414% bonds, ' 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER-WORKS INCOME ACCOUNT. 

Balance of income, 1923, $1,207.54 

Income received, 1923, 1,127.07 

■ $2,334.61 

Transferred to general account Water Depart- 
ment of Board of Water Commissioners, $2,334.61 



434 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the per- 
manent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of 
lots sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and in- 
come of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. 
The amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from th« 
mayor from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that 
purpose, said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified 
in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1923. 

Isabel A. Batchelder, lot 59, block CC, $57.60 
Edward M. and Isabel Parker, lot 110, 

block AA, 125.00 

Geo. F. Smith, lot 23, block EB, 65.00 

Ella A. Davis, lot 44, block EE, 45.00 

Ivar Halure (infant), burial, 10.00 

Jessie W. Allen estate, burial, 8.00 

Severance (infant), burial, 1.00 

Antonio J. Souza estate, burial, 8.00 

Eliza M. Hardy estate, burial, 8.00 

Florence B. T. Walker estate, burial, 8.00 

Hodgson (infant), burial, 2.00 

Wing (infant), burial, 1.00 

Milton Colby estate, burial, 13.00 

Walter L. Jenks estate, burial, 8.00 

Lars B. Elbie estate, burial, 16.00 

Elizabeth Woodworth estate, burial, 12.00 

Sumner H. Lawrence estate, burial 8.00 

Frank W. Presby estate, burial, 8.00 

Mont H. Kaith estate, burial, 8.00 

Frank 0. Green estate, burial, 15.00 

Gilmore (infant), burial, 1.00 

Frank H. Burleigh estate, burial, 8.00 

Walter H. Sargent estate, burial, 8.00 

Gustaf Carlson estate, burial, 15.00 

Esther J. Moulton estate, burial, 8.00 

J. H. Lavery, labor, 2.00 

George Marston estate, care, 5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 435 

E. C. Hoague, care, $4.00 
Mrs. J. H. Albin, care, 4.00 
Miss B. Watson, care, 2.50 

F. A. Straw, care, 4.00 

G. M. Kimball, care, 6.00 
J. E. Fernald, care, 3.00 
Wm. Moody, care, 4.00 
Wm. C. Silver, care, 2.00 
Home of Aged, labor, 602.90 
H. Maria Wood, care, 4.50 
Ella M. Gay, care, 7.00 
Fred Carr, care, 2.50 
Larson & Carlson, care, 70.75 
Bertha Watson, care, 3.00 
C. Forsyth, care, 4.00 
Margaret Martin, care, 2.00 
J. E. Morrison, care, 2.00 
A. B. Batchelder, care, 2.00 
Mrs. C. A. Kendall, care, 3.00 
W. C. Green, care, 2.00 
Mrs. R. A. Morgan, care, 3.00 
N. J. Millette, care, 1.00 
Miss L. Clement, care, 4.00 
Mrs. H. E. Webster, care, 2.00 
Mrs. N. Moses, care, 3.02 
N. H. Shattuck, care, 2.00 
Fred Ladd, care, 5.00 
George Connell, care, 3.00 
Isaac Hill, care, 3.5Q 
C. Merrill, care, 2.00 
F. E. Colburn, care, 2.00 
E. Cochran, care, 1.50 
E. K. George, care, 2.00 
R. F. Robinson, care, 2.00 
Dunlap & Jeffers, care, 3.00 
H. H. Kennedy, care, 1.00 
C. R. Dame, care, 2.00 



436 CITY OF CONCORD. 

W. Carpenter, care, $1.50 

J. R. H. Davis, care, 1.50 

Miss Alice Cochran, care, 2.00 

Charles E. Palmer, care, 1.25 

W. S. Hunt, care, 5.00 

Grace Hubbard, care, 2.50 

Alva Sprague, care, 1.50 

0. G. Hammond, care, 2.00 

G. L. Lincoln, care, 3.00 

E. H. Tucker, care, 2.00 

G. N. Bartemus, care, 1.50 

B. P. Hodgman, care, 2.00 
Mrs. H. G. Sargent, care, 1.50 
J. 0. Lyford, care, 4.50 
William H. Laws, lot 38, block EE, 45.00 
Lloyd E. Hayes, lot 66, block AA, 79.20 
E. L. Fellows, care, 4.00 
Georgie Ring, care, 4.00 
L. A. Sanders, care, 2.50 
Ann Kimball, care, 1.00 
L. S. Bean, care, 2.00 
H. L. Smith, care, 2.00 
W. W. Thayer, care, ' 4.00 

C. N. Hall, care, 1.00 
C. E. Lyons, care, 2.00 
A. D. Fosgate, care, 2.50 
Fred Rowell, care, 1.50 
Mrs. H. B. Roby, care, 2.00 
Mrs. G. K. Crowell, care, 4.00 
Fred E. Cummings, care, 3.50 
W. S. Davis estate, burial, 15.00 
Fred W. Dudley estate, burial, 19.00 
AV. A. Whitney estate, burial, 10.00 
Edna A. B. Cochran estate, burial, 11.00 
Emma A. Baldwin estate, burial, 8.00 
Mary A. Corey estate, burial, 8.00 
Sarah Davis estate, burial, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 437 

Frank H. Smith estate, burial, $10.00 

Hattie C. Fletcher estate, burial, 10.00 

F. S. Streeter estate, burial, 25.00' 
Emma C. Lang estate, burial, 8.00 
James Little estate, burial, 8.00 
Annette C. D. Tucker estate, burial, 15.00 
Josiah E. Dwight estate, burial, 28.00 
Walter Bergeron estate, burial, 5.00 
Robert Fellows (child), burial, 5.00 
Cash, tomb fee, 1.00 
Henry A. Rowell, care, 1.50 
E. R. Newbold, care, 3.00 
J. S. Otis, care, 1.50 

G. Hobson, care, 1.00 
J. Ford, care, 2.00 
E. Runnells, care, 1.50 

B. Bilsboro estate, care, 1.00 
Mrs. E. A. Griffin, care, 1.50 
Mrs. W. J. Fernald, care, 2.50 
]\Irs. F. E. Brown, care, 2.00 

E. Pearson, care, 2.50 
G. H. Silsby, care, 3.00 

F. Piper, care, 2.00 
Mrs. D. C. Humphrey, care, 2.50 
Mrs. C. H. Sinclair, care, 2.00 
Howard A. Gale, care, 2.00 
John True Tucker, lot 15, block Y, 80.00 
Wm. P. Danforth, lot 65, block AA, 75.00 
Isabel Laraba, lot 21, block EE, 30.00 
Mrs. Jessie Hawey, lot 124, block AA, 70.00 
Benjamin F. Duffy, lot 35, So. half, 

block EE, 30.00 

James M. Duell, lot 46, block EE, 65.00 
Clara May West Seavey, lot 65, block V, 200.00 

John F. Waters, supplies, 40.30 

C. E. Smith estate, burial, 9.00 
C. Ramsay estate, burial, 8.00 

29 



438 CITY OP CONCORD. 

H. p. Bowers estate, burial, $10.00 
Sarah Ann Saltmarsh estate, burial, 8.00 
Isaac Proud, rent, 24.00 
Mrs. Annie Flanders, care, 1.00 
Mrs. Mary E. Hoit, care, 6.00 
E. P. Burroughs, care, 4.00 
A. H. Matson, care, 4.50 
James Thompson, care, 4.00 
Thomas C. Bethune estate, burial, 78.50 
Elfrida C. Grell, lot 117, block AA, 75.00 
Leon B. Simpson, Lot 11, Block EE 50.00 
E. W. Hapgood, care, 3.00 
Mrs. A. F. Holt, care, 3.50 
Robert A. Gstettner estate, burial, 8.00 
Hannah Patten estate, burial, 8.00 
Harry G. Hall estate, burial, 10.00 
Austin Noble estate, burial, 8.00 
Elizabeth Northcott estate, burial, 8.00 
Hattie T. Gee estate, burial, 8.00 
Clara E. Dickerman estate, burial, 8.00 
Myron E. Morse estate, burial, 14.00 
George A. Laraba estate, burial, 16.00 
Addie L. Fuller, care, 3.00 
John Henneberry, foundation, 1.50 
Walter S. Blanchard, care, 2.50 
I. F. Mooney, care, 2.00 
Cash, labor, 2.00 
George Waters, labor, 2.00 
Mary A. Holbrook estate, burial, 10.00 
Edwin G. Annable estate, burial, 19.00 
John A. Tuck estate, burial, 15.00 
Robbins T. Orr estate, burial, 8.00 
Rev. Chas. E. Harrington estate, bu- 
rial, 10.00 
James R. Taylor estate, burial, 8.00 
Martha C. Taylor estate, burial, 8.00 
Louis C. Merrill estate, burial, 48.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT, 439 

Walter S. Jones estate, burial, $8.00 

Bessie S. Macey estate, burial, 60.00 

Vilas E. Bryant estate, burial, 10.00 

Edwin P. Blood estate, burial, 17.00 

Emma A. Berry estate, burial, 30.00 

Kendall, Fogter & Kilkenny, labor, 50.00 

George Duell estate, burial, 8.00 

Raymond H. LaDuke estate, burial, 7.00 

Richard Harvey estate, burial, 8.00 
Caroline Elbie, No. half lot 35, 

block EE, 30.00 
Comstock Alumnae Assoc, So. half lot 

25, block EE, 40.00 

Sophia J. Ericson, lot 26, block EE, 65.00 

Frank Manning, lot 48, block CC, 48.00 

Gertrude Dickerman, care, 7.00 

L. P. Adams, care, 7.00 

L. B. Blanchard, care, 4.00 

Lucy Poore, care, 3.50 

Mr. Harringlon, care, 1.50 

A. E. Rowell, care, 2.00 

A. E. Fox, care, 5.00 

A. McDonald, care, 2.00 

L. Hayes, care, 2.00 

Ellen C. Wright estate, burial, 10.00 

Frank J. Garland estate, burial, 8.00 

Ernest Wood (infant), burial, 7.00 

Lillian M. C. Morrill estate, burial, 8.00 

Ira B. Moore estate, burial, 10.00 

Glenville D. Reynolds estate, burial, 8.00 

Ella M. Simpson estate, burial, 8.00 

F. H. Feathers (infant), burial, 8.00 

F. I. Manning (infant), burial, 5.00 

W. F. Cook, foundation, 20.00 

Elizabeth Norris, lot 34, block EE, 65.00 

Lois H. Albee, lot 43, block AA 75.00 

Thos. Hodgson, lot 27, block CC, 90.00 



440 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Fred'k E. & Thos. C. Cilley, lot 42, 

block AA, $75.00 

Fannie G. J. Gordon estate, burial, 15.00 

Florence A. Roby estate, burial, 12.00 

Mary Miner estate, burial, 10.00 

Ernest G. Schumway estate, burial, 15.00 

Gustave Grell estate, burial, 20.00 

John H. Sanborn estate, burial, 10.00 

Emma G. Burgum estate, burial, 10.00 

Lydia D. Day estate, burial, 10.00 

Lyman Sanborn estate, burial, 10.00 

Gertrude B. Royee estate, burial, 10.00 

Arthur R. Clarke estate, burial, 16.00 

Edmund H. Albee estate, burial, 8.00 

May L. Blanchard estate, burial, 10.00 

May E. L. Nelson estate, burial, 10.00 

Joseph J. Dearborn estate, burial, 14.00 

Gertrude J. M. Elkins estate, burial, 10.00 

Louise S. Bean estate, burial, 8.00 

Emma A W. Tucker estate, burial, 8.00 

Edwin C. Hussey estate, burial, 22.00 

Willie E. Seavey estate, burial, 8.00 

Minnie M. Conn estate, burial, 14.00 

Eric Ericson estate, burial, 12.00 

Burk L. Hills estate, burial, 12.00 

Peter A. Soini (infant), burial, 10.00 

Hattie L. G. Carter estate, burial, 44.00 

Albert Taylor estate, burial, 9.00 

James G. Dimond estate, burial, 10.00 

Charles M. Norris estate, burial, 8.00 

Annie C. Geddes estate, burial, 8.00 

Eben J, Eraser estate, burial, 8.00 

Susan C. Dodge estate, burial, 10.00 

Grace A. E. Adams estate, burial, 10.00 

Addie L. Cushman estate, burial, 24.00 

John "W. Rand estate, burial, 38.00 

Charles F. Swain estate, burial, 8.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 441 

Elizabeth M. G. Cogswell estate, burial, $8.00 
Edna B. Cogswell estate, burial, 8.00 
C. L. Piper, foundation, 19.00 
Larson & Carlson, foundation, 38.50 
Perry Bros., foundation, 24.50 
John Swenson Granite Co., founda- 
tion, 54.00 
W. F. Burnham, care, 2.00 
Leun Stewartson, care, 2.00 
i\Irs. W. Upton, care, .90 
Relief Corps, G. A. R., care, 2.50 
Kendall, Foster & Kilkenny, labor, 25.00 
Adam Holden, labor, 25.00 
Eben J. Fraser estate, labor, 2.00 
G. Flanders, labor, 1.00 
Charles W. Lane estate, burial, 10.00 
Amelia Bilotti, lot 122, block AA, 70.00 
Orah M. Hammond, lot 189, block W, 97.50 
Annie L. Forsberg, lot 116, block AA, 75.00 
Anna B. Purdy, No. half lot 25, 

block EE, 30.00 

Mr. French, foundation, 16.00 

Mr. French, labor, 2.00 

George W. Fletcher, labor, 10.00 

George M. West estate, burial, 20.00 

Stephen Christo (infant), burial, 8.00 

George H. Morey estate, burial, 20.00 

Sarah N. Towle estate, burial, 10.00 

Vernon T. Atkins estate, burial, 15.00 

Ellen N. Payson estate, burial, 10.00 

Newton A. Willis estate, burial, 8.00 

John R. Martin estate, burial, 10.00 

Frances J. Paige estate, burial, 10.00 

Edwin J. Hearson estate, burial, 10.00 

William Andrews estate, burial, 10.00 

George Evans estate, burial, 10.00 

Francis T. Clayton estate, burial, 10.00 



442 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Clarence S. McCauley (child), burial, $6.00 
Fannie E. Sawyer estate, labor, 2.00 
Lyman Lane estate, burial, 10.00 
H. S. Elkin, foundation, 12.00 
Mr. 0. L. Hazelton, foundation, 32.00 
Mrs, Edward P. Bunker, foundation, 10.00 
Mrs. Edward P. Bunker, labor, 12.00 
Mrs. Mary E. Hodges, care, 4.00 
Mrs. J. G. Flynn, care, 2.00 
Parker H. "Watson, care, 2.00 
Leon W. Batchelder, labor, 4.00 
I. T. Chesley, labor, 40.00 
John Blackwood, labor, 4.00 
I\rrs. A. W. Head, labor, 3.00 
Mrs. L. M. Perkins, labor, 6.00 
W. F. Cook Granite Co., labor, 4.00 
Mrs. E. A. Clark, care, 4.00 
Geo. W. Dame, care 3.00 
Frank L. Abbott, care, 1.00 
E. N. Nason, care, 1.50 
Sadie A. Goodsell, care, 6.00 
J. 0. Gate estate, burial, 10.00 
Jessie L. Wood estate, burial, 8.00 
Philip Flanders estate, burial, 3.00 
Thomas Dunstane estate, burial, 8.00 
John B. Bilotti estate, burial, 8.00 
Charles E. Forsberg estate, burial, 10.00 
Rebecca Farrar estate, burial, 8.00 
Mary Hartigan estate, burial, 10.00 
John C. Moody estate, burial, 8.00 
Warren S. Purdy estate, burial, 10.00 
Thomas Dunstane estate, foundation, 6.00 
Cummings Bros., foundation, 85.50 
A. Rufo, foundation, 8.00 
Lowell Monumental Works, foun- 
dation, 16.00 
Walter L. Senter, lot 129, block AA, 75.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 443 

Dorothy A. Hearson lot 33, block EE, $65.00 ' 

Emma Evans, lot 41, block EE, 100.00 
IMargaret A. Andrews, lot 43, So. half, 

block EE, 35.00 

Caroline Nelson lot 19, block EE, 65.00 

Arthur R. Griffin, lot 115, block AA, 75.00 

Walter L. Senter estate, burial, 12.00 

E. M. Hinds (infant), burial, 6.00 
A. F. Tandy estate, burial, 10.00 
L. G. Taylor estate, burial, 8.00 
Horace B. Bartlett estate, burial, 8.00 
Amelia H. Hill estate, burial, 10.00 
Wni. Watkins estate, burial, 12.00 
Maria F. Putnam estate, burial, 8.00 
Wm. King, care, 2.00 
J. C. Manning, care, 1.50 

F. J. Kelley, tomb fees, 6.50 
E. H. Johnson, labor, 1.00 
C. Johnson, foundation, 10.00 
Ellen E. Mitchell, foundation, 10.00 
John E. Hutchinson, lot 103 block AA, 75.00 
Warren J. Hall, lot 70, block M, 54.00 
Annie T. White, lot 114, block AA, 75.00 
Charles H. Rowe, lot 32, block EE, 75.00 
Mrs. Edith M. Webster, lot 14, 

block EE, 65.00 

Lucinda A. Drake estate, burial, 10.00 

Herbert E. Hall estate, burial, 8.00 

Pauline E. Wells estate, burial, 20.00 

Hattie M. Pettengill estate, liurial, 10.00 

Hattie Tripp Gee estate, burial, 20.00 

James L. Stearns estate, burial, 18.00 

Matilda B. Cole estate, burial, 8.00 

Albert J. Abbott estate, burial, 8.00 

Almira E. S. Whitaker estate, burial, 8.00 

Wate (infant), burial, 1.00 

Carl J. Larson estate, burial, 8.00 



444 CITY OP CONCORD, 

Godbout (infant), Inu-ial, $1.00 

Lizzie M. K. Merrill estate, burial, 12.00 

Elmer W. Olson, foundation, 10.00 

Elmer W. Olson, labor, 5.00 

F. R. Adams, labor, 6.00 

Henry Prentiss, labor, 6.00 

Cash, labor, 1.00 

W. H. Hoyt, labor, 22.00 

Mrs. Geo. D. Huntley, care, 2.00 

Mrs. William Wallace, care, 4.00 

Mrs. Geo. L. Hodgman, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Guy Adams, care, 2.00 

Frank Moulton, care, 5.00 

Sarah J. Brown, care, 3.00 

Beatrice L. Sargent, care, 2.00 

Geo. A. Cooper, care, 4.00 

Richard Collins, care, 4.00 

Mrs. G. W. Barnes, labor, 1.50 

N. Audette, labor, 1.95 

Cash, labor, 2.65 

I. T. Chesley, labor, 38.00 

F. E. Cilley, labor, 2.00 

Cummings Bros., foundation, 58.75 

Oliver T. Fox estate, burial, 10.00 

Elmore Webster estate, burial, 10.00 

George Abbott, trust, 7.00 

John B. and Olivia B. Abbott, trust, 5.00 

Mary Ann Abbott, trust, 1.75 

Charles Ada, trust, 2.00 

Fidelia F. Adams, trust, 2.50 

Sarah J. Adams, trust, 7.00 

Sarah M. K. Adams, trust, 24.50 

Leodora E. Alexander, trust, 8.00 

Ellen E. Allen, trust, 2.00 

Osro M. Allen, trust, 3.00 

Smith & Dimond Allen, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Allison, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 445 

Mary B. Allison, trust, $1.50 

Frank P. Andrews, trust, 12.00 

Lavinia Arlin, trust, 1.50 

Sarah S. Ash, trust, 1.50 

Alonso Atherton, trust, 3.50 

Thomas D. Avery, trust, 3.50 

Kev. F. D. Ayer, trust, 4.00 

Lizzie Knight Badger, trust, 3.50 

William Badger, trust, 3.25 

Oliver Ballow, trust, 1.75 

Charles Barker, trust, 3.50 

Geo. W. Barnes, trust, 1.75 

Harry C. Barrett, trust, 2.00 

John W. Barron, trust, 4.00 

Horace B. Bartlett, trust, 3.00 

James W. Barton, trust, 1.75 

Mary A. Bass, trust, 1.50 

Albert F. Batchelder, trust, 2.00 

Annie M. Batchelder, trust, 6.00 

Charles F. Batchelder, trust, 6.00 

Frank J. Batchelder, trust, 8.00 

Robert Bell, trust, 1.50 

Matilda Benson, trust, 1.50 

Anna M. Bickford, trust, 2.00 

Edna E. Billings, trust, 1.50 

Ellen C. Bixby, trust, 3.00 

James D. Blaisdell, trust, 3.50 

James M. Blake, trust, 7.00 

William J. Blakely, trust, 3.50 

Emily P. Blanchard, trust, 8.50 

Charles S. Boardman, trust, 1.75 
Sarah L. and James W. Bourlet, trust, 4.00 

Nathaniel Bouton. trust, 7.00 

Annie L. Brown, trust, 3.50 

Charles L. Brown, trust, 7.00 

Frank 0. Brown, trust, 1.50 

Jennie E. Brown, trust, 8.00 



446 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Samuel Brunei, trust, $1.50 

Andrew Bunker, trust, 1.50 

Mary N. P. Buntin, trust, 7.00 

W. P. Burbank, trust, 1.75 

Henry Burleigh, trust, 6.50 

Joseph Burleigh, trust, 2.00 

Frank A. Burnham, trust, 1.75 

Mary A. Burnham, trust, 1.75 

Alfred D. Burroughs, trust, 2.00 

Harriet W. Butters, trust, 3.50 

Mary F. Buzzell and P. M. Eaton, trust, 4.00 

Benj. F. Caldwell, trust, 8.50 

Levi Call, trust, 3.50 

William L. Carlton, trust, 10.00 

Lysander Carroll, trust, 4.00 

Bradbury G. Carter, trust, 2.50 

Hiram J. Carter, trust, 8.50 

Nathan F. Carter, trust, 3.50 

Lizzie Cate, trust, 1.75 

Harry M. Cavis, trust, 3.50 

Wm. E. Chandler, trust, 14.00 

Levi G. Chase, trust, 3.50 

Wm. M. Chase, trust, 12.00 

Andros P. and Kate P. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Samuel M. Chesley, trust, 3.50 

Wm. C. Chesley, trust, 8.00 

Frank E. Child, trust, 2.00 

Caroline Clark, trust, 3.50 

Ellen P. Clark, trust, 3.50 

Elisha and Emma Clarke, trust, 2.00 

Fannie 0. Clark, trust, 2.50 

Herman W. Clay, trust, 2.00 

Mary B. Clement, trust, 2.00 

Rufus Clement, trust, 4.00 

Sarah A. Clifford, trust, 4.00 

Wm. W. Cloud, trust, 3.50 

Frederick Clough, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 447 

George Clougli, trust, $3.50 

Mrs. N. P. Cloiigh, trust, 1.75 

Sarah L. Cloutman, trust, 1.75 

Weston Cofran, trust, 7.00 

Helen B. P. Cogswell, trust, 4.00 

Amos L. Colburn, trust, 1.75 

Henry A. Colby, trust, 4.00 

Sarah I. Colby, trust, 3.50 

IMartin W. Coleman, trust, 2.00 

Eliza A. Cole, trust, 4.25 

Charles A. Cooke, trust, 3.50 

Josiali Cooper, trust, 2.50 

F. H. Corson, trust, 2.00 

Calvin P. Couch, trust, 2.00 

Mary Crow, trust, 7.00 

Chas. H. Cummings, trust, 35.00 

George A. Cummings, trust, 12.00 

IMar}' R. Cummings, trust, 7.00 

Lucretia R. Currier, trust, 5.00 

Silas Curtis, trust, 3.50 

Charles C. Danforth, trust, 5.50' 

Charles S. Danforth, trust, 1.75 

Cordelia A. Danforth, trust, 1.75 

Benj. B. Davis, trust, 2.00 

Walter J. Davis, trust, 4.00 

Curtis C. Dearborn, trust, 2.00 

Emma J. Dearborn, trust, 2.50 

Wm. E. and 0. K. Dexter, trust, 8.00 

Margaret W. Dodge, trust, 4.00 

Edward Dow, trust, 3.50 

C. V. Dudley, trust, 3.50 

Jacob C. Dunklee, trust, 9.00 

John W. Dunklee, trust, 8.00 

Norris A. Dunklee, trust, 4.00 

Martha E. Durgin, trust, 12.00 

Wra. B. Durgin, trust, 7.00 

J. B. Dyer, trust, 3.50 



448 CITY OF CONCORD. 



F. W. Diiiismoor, trust, 


$2.00 


Nancy L. Button, trust. 


8.00 


Mrs. E. J. Eastman, trust, 


3.50 


Samuel C. Eastman, trust. 


35.00 


Stephen B. Eaton, trust, 


3.50 


Clara E. Edgerly, trust. 


3.50 


Lydia F. Edgerly, trust. 


3.50 


Georgianna P. Ela, trust. 


3.50 


Ella M. Elliott, trust, 


1.75 


Lydia J. Emerson, trust, 


4.00 


George H. Emery, trust, 


3.50 


Ira Leon Evans, trust, 


4.00 


Bavid E. Everett, trust, 


2.50 


Lydia A. Farley, trust, 


3.50 


Andrew S. Farnum, trust, 


4.00 


Mary M. Farnum, trust, 


3.50 


Josiah Farrar, trust. 


1.75 


Alvah C. Ferrin, trust, 


3.50 


Hiram W. Ferrin, trust. 


1.75 


J. W. Ferrin and Samuel S. French, trust, 1.75 


Mr. and Mrs. Harlan Flanders, trust. 


3.50 


George G. Fogg, trust. 


15.50 


Flora Palmer Follansbee, trust, 


4.00 


Jerry Follansbee, trust. 


4.00 


Alice T. Ford, trust. 


7.00 


Jerome Ford, trust. 


3.50 


Asa Fowler, trust, 


17.50 


Leverett N. Freeman, trust, 


4.00 


Mary French, trust. 


1.00 


Mary A. Gage, trust, 


7.00 


Wm. T. Gage, trust. 


2.00 


Mrs. A. W. Gale, trust, 


1.50 


John B. Gale, trust, 


7.00 


Jacob H. Gallinger, trust, 


9.00 


James A. Gates, trust, 


1.00 


John Gear, trust. 


3.50 


Sarah L. Gear, trust, 


3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 449 

Caroline L. George, trust, $17.50 

Enoch Gerrish, trust. 3.50 

S. K. Gill, trust, 3.50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 3.00 
G. A. Glover and C. A. Osgood, trust, 1.75 

Loren "W. Glyson, trust, 2.50 

Hiram Gordon, trust, 4.00 

James T, Gordon, trust, 3.50 
Hannah A. and Fannie A. Goss, trust, 7.00 

Frank W. Grafton, trust, 4.00 

George N. Greeley, trust, 17.50 

Benj. Green, trust, 4.00 

Jennie E. Green, trust, 1.75 

John B. Green trust, 3.50 

Wm. E. Green trust, 3.50 

Betsy Hadley, trust, 3.50 

Frances Pearson Hallet, trust, 8.00 

George M. Harding, trust, 1.75 

Heber B. Hardy, trust, 4.25 

Mary D. Hart, trust, 12.00 

Timothy Hayes, trust, 3.50 

Liva C. Heath, trust, 5.00 

A. W. Hevenor, trust, 3.00 

Charles F. Hildreth, trust, 3.50 

Emma J. Hill, trust, 1.75 

George W. Hill, trust, 8.00 

John M. Hill, trust, 7.00 

Mrs. S. F. Hillsgrove, trust, 1.75 

Thomas Hodgson, trust, 4.00 

J. Frank Hoit, trust, 7.00 

Harriet F. Holman, trust, 3.50 

Elizabeth F. Holt, trust, 3.50 

Samuel Holt, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. James P. Hook, trust, 2.00 

Hoyt and Stetson, trust, 3.50 

Wm. Horner and Etta Boyce, trust, 3.50 

George M. Hutton, trust, 1.50 



450 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Charles Henry Hunter, trust, $2.00 

Henry Ivey, trust, 1.75 

Sarah E. Irish, trust, 3.50 

Seth K. Jones, trust, 12.00 

Lorren W. James, trust, 2.00 

E. 0. Jameson, trust, 3.50 
Harriet and Robert I. Jenks, trust, 4.00 
Walter L. Jenks, trust, 4.00 
Herman E. Jewell, trust, 1.75 
William H. Johns, trust, 4.00 

F. M. and S. I. Johnson and C. M. 
Boynton, trust, 4.00 

Fraak W. Johnson, trust, 2.00 

Joel D. Johnson, trust, 4.00 

Susan B. Johnson, trust, 3.00 

John F. Jones, trust, 3.50 

Julia A, Jones, trust, 3.50 

Hamilton A. Kendall, trust, 4.00 

Prentiss M. Kent, trust, 8.00 

Timothy Kerley, trust, 4.00 

John and Benj. A. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Ellen B. Kittredge, trust, 1.75 

Edward L. Knowlton, trust, 35.00 

Wm. Ladd, trust, 2.50 

-Ebenezer Lane, trust, 4.50 

Lydia A. Lane, trust, 3.50 

Eliza P. Lang, trust, 2.00 

Wm. McC. Leaver, trust, 4.00 

Leete and Newman, trust, 3.50 

James H. Leighton, trust, 3.00 

Ellen M. Lewis, trust, 2.00 

Mrs. Charles Libby, trust, 5.25 

Lincoln and Forrester, trust, 2.50 

John G. Lincoln, trust, 8.00 

Bertha M. Little, trust, 4.00 

J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 6.00 

Wm. I. Lovely, trust, 2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 451 

Geo. H. Lull, trust, $4.00 

Laura T. Lull, trust, 5.00 

Lydia F. Lund, trust, 12.00 

John McCauley, trust, 3.50 

Henry McFarland, trust, 7.00 

James McCloughlin, trust, 5.00 

G. and E. McQuestion, trust, 3.50 

James McQueston, trust, 7.00 

Henry A. Mann, trust, 3.50 

Charles W. Marsh, trust, 2.00 

Martin and Brown, trust, 3.50 

Jennie P. ]\Iartin, trust, 3.50 

Phebe E. Mason, trust, 2.50 

H. W. and H. 0. Mathews, trust, 3.50 

Charles S. Mellen, trust, 8.00 

Horace Merrill, trust, 1.75 

J. B. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

Joseph S. Merrill, trust, 3.00 

Sarah A. D. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

Sarah F. Merrill, trust, 3.50 

David E. Miller, trust, 3.50 

Sullivan G. Mills, trust, 7.00 

Alfred Mixer, trust, 4.00 

Charles Moody, trust, 3.50 

Charles W. Moore, trust, 3.50 

George H. Moore, trust, 3.50 

Joseph A. Moore, trust, 4.00 

Morgan & Colby, trust, 5.25 

Alice Morrill, trust, 3.50 
C. B., A. F., L. H. and J. T. Mosely, trust, 12.00 

Mary J. Moses, trust, 3.50 

Caroline B. Murdock, trust, 3.50 

David L. Neal, trust, 3.50 
J. W. Nelson and George H. Sawyer, 

trust, 4.00 

Mary E. Nelson, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. C. H. Newhall, trust, 6.00 



452 CITY OP CONCORD. 

E. S. Nutter, trust, $3.50 

Woodbridge Odlin, trust, 3.50 

Eugene A. Ordway, trust, 2.50 

H. S. Ordway and J. Sedgeley, trust, 7.00 

Charles F. Osgood, trust, 4.00 

Charles H. Osgood, trust, 2.00 

George B. Packer, trust, 3.50 

George F. Page, trust, 1.75 

M. W. and Mary A. Page, trust, 1.75 

Cyrus W. Paige, trust, 3.50 

Francis J. Paige, trust, 1.75 

John B. Palmer, trust, 2.00 

Wm. H. Palmer, trust, 1.75 

D. Charles Parker, trust, 4.00 

Samuel Patterson, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. E. A. Pecker, trust, 7.00 

Felicite M. Pengault, trust, 3.50 

Hamilton E. Perkins, trust, 7.00 

Lucy J. Perkins, trust, 1.00 

I\Iary N. Perley, trust, 10.50 

Isabella Perry, trust, 1.75 

Hattie J, W. Peters, trust, 3.50 

Hannah E. Phipps, trust, 3.50 

Eliza A. Pickering, trust, 7.00 

Hazen Pickering, trust, 4.00 

Lucien Pickering, trust, 4.00 

W. H. Pitman, trust, 3.50 

S. Lizzie Pixley, trust, 4.00 

Edwin F. Plummer, trust, 1.75 

Prescott and Noyes, trust, 3.50 

Frank S. Putnam, trust, 4.00 

Anna A. and Geo. B. Quimby, trust, 4.00 

John Quimby, trust, 8.00 
D. 0. Rand and Mary Y. Libbey, trust, 1.75 

James E. Rand, trust, 1.75 

Mary E. Rankin, trust, 2.00 

Henry W. Randlett, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMEINT. 453 

Hiram W. Ray, trust, $4.00 

Barnard S. Reed, trust, 1.00 

George L. Reed, trust, 3.50 

Judith A. Richardson, trust, 3.50 

Loren S. Richardson, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. James H. Rignev, trust, 1.75 

Lucy M. Roach, trust, 2.00 

Frances K. Roberts, trust, 7.00 

Helen E. Robinson, trust, 7.00 

Moses F. Rogers, trust, 3.50 

E. H. Rollins, trust, 10.50 

David D. Rowe, trust, 1.75 

James H. Rowell, trust, 7.00 

Frances L. Runals, trust, 8.00 

J. S. and Geo. H. Russ, trust, 8.00 

Moses W. Russell, trust, 7.00 

Nazarus Saltus, trust, 4.00 

Mrs. Isaac S. R. Sanborn, trust, 1.75 

Jonathan Sanborn, trust, 3.50 

Richard P. Sanborn, trust, 6.00 

Sarah F. Sanborn, trust, 4.00 

Albert B. Sargent, trust, 4.00 

Frank A. Sargent, trust, 3.50 

Fred Sargent, trust, 4.00 

John B. Sargent, trust, 3.50 

Jonathan E. Sargent, trust, 7.00 
A. E. Savage and Joseph F. Healey, trust, 3.00 

Edward Sawyer, trust, 3.50 

Charles E. Scorer, trust, 4.00 

Gilbert H. Seavey, trust, 3.50 

James E. Sewall, trust, 2.00 

Lulu Sewall, trust, 2.00 

Shackford & Dame, trust, 3.50 

John L. Sinclair, trust, 1.75 

J. T. Sleeper and Seth R. Dole, trust, 4.00 

Frederick P. Smith, trust, 4.00 

Leland A. Smith, trust, 7.00 



454 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mary W. Smith, trust, $5.25 

Moses B. Smith, trust, 1.75 

William Smith, trust, 1.75 

Hattie R. Southmaid, trust, 1.75 

Antonio J. Souza, trust, 2.00 

Sarah Spargo, trust, 4.00 

Selina A. Staniels, trust, 10.00 

Hiram Stanyan, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Stack, trust, 3.50 

Onslow Stearns, trust, 7.00 

Prescott F. Stevens, trust, 5.25 

Mary L. Stephenson, trust, 1.75 

Charles F. Stewart, trust, 1.75 

J. M. and M. E. Stewart, trust, 7.50 

Ferdinand A. Stillings, trust, 8.00 
Mary L. Stokes and J. C. Ordway, trust, 2.00 

George L. Stratton, trust, 12.00 

Cora Fuller Straw, trust, 4.00 

John W. Straw, trust, 1.75 

Laura A. Streeter, trust, 2.00 

Mary J. Streeter, trust, 3.50 

Thomas Stuart, trust, 3.50 

Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., trust, 7.00 

Ella Louisa Sturtevant, trust, 3.50 

John Swenson, trust, 4.00 

Charles L. Tappan, trust, 2.50 

Chas. W. and Ella F. Tarlton, trust, 2.00 

David D. Taylor, trust, 8.00 

Hiram B. Tebbitts, trust, 12.00 

John H. Teel, trust, 1.75 

Horace Thompson, trust, 4.00 

John S. Thompson, trust, 3.50 

John C. Thorne, trust, 3.50 

Pliny Tidd, trust, 1.75 

J. L. Tilton and H. D. Locke, trust, 1.75 

John H. Toof, trust, 3.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 455 

Susie M. Trask, trust, $8.00 

Samuel D. Trussell, trust, 1.75 

Eliza W. Upton, trust, 7.00 

Charles P. Virgin, trust, 1.00 

Gustavus Walker, trust, 3.50 

Mary E. Walker, trust, 7.00 

Charles W. Wall, trust, 2.00 

Mary J. Wardwell, trust, 2.50 

B. F. and Frank L. Watson, trust, 1.75 

Webster and Little, trust, 2.00 

Pauline E. Welles, trust, 1.75 
E. T. Wentworth and S. J. Woodward, 

trust, 12.00 

Mary E. West, trust, 7.00 

Armenia White, trust, 40.00 

Albert T. Whittemore, trust, 1.75 

George F. Whittredge, trust, 3.50 

Mary Williams, trust, 1.75 

Sarah A. Williams, trust, 3.50 

William Williamson, trust, 2.00 

Georgianna M. F. Wood, trust, 3.50 

Belinda D. Woods, trust, 7.00 

Clarence S. Woods, trust, 4.00 

Helen P. Woods, trust, 4.00 

John I. Woods, trust, 4.00 

Robert WoodrufiP, trust, 7.00 

E. W. Woodward, trust, 3.50 

Mary P. Woodworth, trust, 4.00 

Sarah F. Woodworth, trust, 3.50 

Hattie and Webster F. Wyatt, trust, 8.00 

Jane R. Wyman, trust, 8.00 

Mary Abbot Wyman, trust, 16.00 

William Yeaton, trust, 2,50 

$8,179.27 



456 city of concord. 

Credits, 

One half sale of lots added to perma- 
nent fund, $1,305.65 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account transferred to City of 
Concord general account, 1,892.00 

Transferred to City of Concord general 
account, 4,981.62 

$8,179.27 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Amounts received from sundry collections and income of permanent funds 
»re added to the annual appropriation. The amounts expended on trust funds 
are paid on a special order from the mayor, from the income of individual 
deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income being used exclu- 
lively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts 

1923. 

Ella B. Johnson estate, burial, $8.00 

Ann Merrill, care, 1.00 

Mrs. A. Blodgett, care, 2.00 

Mrs. H. C. Blakely, care, 1.50 

Minot Cemetery Assoc, care, 140.50 

Lizzie M. Curtis estate, burial, 8.00 

Elizabeth D. Evans estate, burial, 8.00 

George H. Hastings estate, burial, 10.00 

C. C. Titcomb, care, 3.00 

H. E. Doyen, care, 6.00 

M. A. Randall, care, 2.00 

Miss Lucy Kimball, care, 4.00 

Augusta Flanders, labor, 4.00 

Clara A. Abbott, trust, 1.75 

William Abbott, trust, 10.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 457 

Samuel Alexander, trust, $4.50 

James M. Barton, trust, 3.50 

L. Bell, Jr., trust, 3.50 

Timothy K. Blaisdell, trust, 9.00 

Samuel Blake, trust, 4.00 

Richard Bradley, trust, 3.50 

Newell R. Brown, trust, 2.00 

Sarah F. Butters, trust, 2.00 

John F. Chaffin, trust, 1.75 

Samuel J. A. Gushing, trust, 4.00 

Charles C. Dearborn, trust, 3.50 

Lydia A. Eastman, trust, 4.00 

Carrie E. Evans, trust, 6.00 

Samuel Evans, trust, 3.50 

Seth Eastman, trust, 5.00 

Catherine Eaton, trust, 2.00 

Robert L. Ela, trust, 3.50 

Theodore French, trust, 4.00 

Miles F. Farmer, trust, 3.50 

Samuel N. Farnsworth, trust, 1.50 

Hosea Fessendon, trust, 3.50 

John Flanders, trust, 1.50 

Lucia A. Flanders, trust, 3.50 

Eleanor E. Foster, trust, 4.00 

Betsey Gale, trust, 2.00 

Moses Gerould, trust, 1.75 

Harvey J. Gilbert, trust, 1.75 

Mitchell Gilmore, trust, 3.50 

Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 2.50 

Margaret W. Godfrey, trust, 1.00 

Pamelia L. Hall, trust, 1.50 

Jennie L. Harlow, trust, 8.00 

Frank S. Harraden, trust, 3.50 

L. Louisa Hoyt, trust, 5.00 

Anna C. Hughes, trust, 8.00 

Joseph L. Jackson, trust, 4.00 

Mary B. Knight, trust, 4.00 



458 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Geo. S. Little, trust, $4.00 

William T. Locke, trust, 3.50 

S. and David L. l\Iorrill, trust, 5.00 

Mary Ann Morrill, trust, 2.00 

Mary R. Morrill, trust, 7.00 

Ida Moore, trust, 1.50 

John McDaniel, trust, 4.00 

Asa McFarland, trust, 3.50 

Nichols and Pettengill, trust, 2.00 

Isaac H. Ordway, trust, 5.00 

True Osgood, trust, 3.50 
W. B. Palmer and Harriet S. B. Savory, 

trust, 3.50 

Henry J. Rhodes, trust, 1.50 

Hiram Richardson, trust, 17.50 

Samuel Shute, trust, 5.00 

Lyman D. Stevens, trust, 7.00 

Sarah A. Stevens, trust, 1.75 

Joseph Stickney, trust, 17.50 

Nathan Stickney, trust, 1.75 

Abigail Sweetser, trust, 7.00 

Louis Tebeau, trust, 2.00 

Thomas W. Thompson, trust, 1.50 

Mrs. Jas. IVI. Tilton, trust, 1.50 

Jane R. Twombly, trust", 3.50 
Timothy and Abigail B. Walker, trust, 7.00 

Albert Webster, trust, 3.50 

Paul Wentworth, trust, 7.00 

Harriet E. Wheeler, trust, 3.50 

Sylvia A. Wolcott, trust, 3.50 

Louis A. Woodbury, trust, 4.00 

Charlotte H. Woolson, trust, 3.50 

Asa Parker, trust, 1.75 

Alice W. Parker, trust, 3.50 

Samuel G. Parker, trust, 1.75 

Pearson, White and Savory, trust, 3.50 



$498.00 



treasury department. 459 

Credits. 

Income from sundry trust funds as 
charged to this account transferred 
to city of Concord general account, $300.00 

Transferred to city of Concord general 
account, 198.00 

$498.00 



MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
Bold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1923. 

Fred J. AVolfe, lot 84, $40.00 

Charles Rossell, care, 3.00 

Mrs. Edw. Farnum, care, 4.25 

Mrs. Geo. Parmenter, care, 3.00 

Mrs. J. M. Crossman, care, 4.50 

Edward Haskell, care, 2.00 

Geo. B. Little estate, burial, 15.00 

Nellie Webster, care, 1.50 

Hiram Quimby estate, burial, 7.50 

John D. Ryan, care, 2.50 

Peterson estate, burial, 7.50 

Gust Smart, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Inez Spooner, repairs, 14.50 

Lizzie Carter estate, burial, 8.00 

Leon Emerson, care, 3.00 

William Annis, care, 3.50 

Mrs. Peter Johnson, repairs, 5.00 



460 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Mrs. J. E. Willey, repairs, $5.25 

Mrs. Fred J. Wolfe estate, burial, 9.00 

iMrs. Fred J. Wolfe estate, care, 3.50 

Lnville 0. Blanchard, care, 3.00 

Chester Piper, repairs, 3.00 

Alfred Carlson estate, burial, 8.00 

Chas. Rossell, care, 3.00 

Lizzie Thurber estate, burial, 8.00 

Harold Johnson, repairs, 17.50 

Carrie A. Wright, care, 1.75 

Ella M. Abbott, care, 2.00 

Jed Gile, care, 2.00 

John Gustafson estate, care, 1.75 

Mrs. Willis S. Kellom, repairs, 12.00 

Jedd Quinn, care, 2.75 

Mrs. Ida P. Johnson, care, 2.00 

Victor Engel, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Chas. Blake, care, 4.00 

Charles Roberts, repairs, 15.00 

Frank A. Putney, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Geo. B. Little, care, 1.50 

Geo. A. Carter, care, 3.00 

M. E. Atkinson, care, 2.00 

Frank Dimond, care, 3.00 

Geo. Anderson, care, 2.00 

Ernest Carlson, care, 1.50 

Robert Upton, care, 1.50 

Mrs. John E. Coulter, care, 1.00 

Wm. Kellom, care, 1.50 

Mrs. Julius Anderson, care, 1.75 

Ralph Marden, care, 2.50 

Henry Farnum, care, 1.75 

Everett H. Farnum, care, 2.75 

Mrs. P. Lindgren, care, 1.25 

Russell P. Shepard, care, 1.50 

Nellie J. Webster, regrading lot, 12.00 

Mrs. D. Webber, care, 1.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 461 

Mrs. Richard Clarke, care, $2.00 

Mrs. Giis Anderson, care, 2.00 

Enoch Gray estate, care, 2.50 

Fred Besse, repairs, 4.50 

0. L. Shepard, repairs, 13.50 

Mrs. Geo. Parmenter, care, 2.00 

Harley Thompson, repairs, 10.00 

Mrs. Hoyt Robinson, care, 1.75 

Abijah Hollis, care, 1.75 

Walter Annis, care, 1.50 

Andrew J. Abbott, trust, 3.50 
Abial C. Abbott and James Francis, trust, 2.00 

Hazen E. Abbott, trust, 3.50 

Edw. S. Barrett, trust, 2.50 

Martha A. Boyce, trust, 4.00 

James Bradford, trust, 1.50 

Stephen Carleton, trust, 3.50 

Augustine C. Carter, trust, 3.50 

Carter and Rolfe, trust, 3.50 

J. 0. Clark trust, 2.00 

Oliver C. Dimond, trust, 2.50 

Fred D. DreAv, trust, 4.00 

R. S. Emery, trust, 3.00 

Henry Farnum, trust, 4.00 

Asa L. Gay, trust, 3.50 

Wm. H. Gile, trust, 10.00 

Henry H. Gill, trust, 4.00 

Timothy Green, trust, 2.50 

Marshall P. Hall, trust, 2.00 

Mary T. Hatch, trust, 3.50 

Caleb M. Holden, trust, 1.50 

Andre Koski, trust, 1.00 

Charlotte Lovejoy, trust, 2.00 

Juliette E. Mc Alpine, trust, 7.50 

Charles W. Morse, trust, 3.00 

Geo. Partridge, trust, 3.00 



462 CITY OF CONCORD, 

Frederick W. Peabody, trust, $5.00 

Ira Rowell, trust, 3.00 

Mary A. Rowell, trust, 3.00 

Albert Hobbs, trust, 3.00 



$418.50 



Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to perma- 
nent fund, $20.00 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account transferred to city 
of Concord, 100.50 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account, 298.00 



$418.50 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annually to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
•old, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income 
of permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The 
amounts expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor 
from the income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, 
said income being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each 
trust. 

Receipts. 

1923. 

Herbert S. Brown, care, $2.50 

J. L. T. Shaw, care, 2.50 

Chas. H. Cook, care, 3.50 

Julian F. Bailey, care, 5.00 

Ross W. Cate, care, 2.50 

Mrs. Ross W. Cate, care, 5.00 

Mrs. Emraeline P. Sanborn, care, 2.50 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



463 



Mrs. Walter S. Sanborn, care, $5.00 

Robert K. Loiigee estate, burial, 6.00 

Mrs. Chas. Rand, burial, 6.00 

Sophia J. Fernald, care, 7.00 

IMrs. Geo. W. Brown, care, 2.50 

Major L. Rodd, lot 51, block 0, 5.00 

Harold Eastman, burial, 6.00 

Eben Stuart, burial, 3.00 

Alvin Stuart, burial, 2.00 

Keyes (infant), 3.00 

Leland King, burial, ■ 8.00 

Mary Gendron, burial, 6.00 

Caroline Hutchins, burial, 6.00 

John E. Cole, burial, 7.00 

]Mrs. Georgia Rowe, care, 2.00 

Mrs. E. J. Lyle, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Jane T. Foster, care, 2.00 

Mrs. Grace Farnum, care, 2.00 

William D. Stevens, care, 4.00 

Ami Dubia, care, 2.50 

Katheryn Wiggin, care, 2.50 

Eddie Potter, regrading lot, 12.00 

Mrs. Annie Marden, burial, 10.00 

Mrs. Ellen R. Sherman estate, burial, 8.00 

Mrs. Lucy Gate estate, burial, 10.00 

E. L. Sherman, lot 9, block N, 5.00 

Charles Peaslee, burial, 10.00 

Robert Jacques, burial, 2.00 

Mrs. Mary F. Robinson, burial, 10.00 

Martha Colby, lot 40, block R, 5.00 

Martha Colby, burial, 8.00 

Emma Fletcher, burial, 8.00 

Ruth Abbott, trust, 7.00 

Leodore E. Alexander, trust, 4.00 

Elizabeth A. Batchelder, trust, 1.75 

Orlando W. Coon, trust, 2.50 



464 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Hattie M. Douglas, trust, $4.00 

Ann Emery, trust, 4.00 

Daniel E. Gale, trust, 3.00 

George Graham, trust, 2.00 

Crosby H. Haines, trust, 1.75 

Jacob Hoyt, trust, 2.50 

Mrs. Samuel Hutchins, trust, 3.00 

Sarah H. James, trust, 2.00 

Lucilla Pierce Kelley. trust, 3.00 

Addie J. P. Kimball, trust, 7.00 

Joseph S. Kimball, trust, 3.00 

B. L. Larkin, trust, 1.75 

A. Augusta Locke, trust, 1.75 

George Locke, trust, 3.00 

Josiah S. Locke, trust, 2.00 

Reuben B. Locke, trust, 3.00 

Burleigh A. Marden, trust, 1.50 

John H. Maynard, trust, 3.00 

Helen Eastman Melendy, trust, 8.00 

David A. Morrill, trust, 3.50 

Frank V. Osgood, trust, 1.50 

William Page, trust, 1.00 
Frank P. Potter and Lydia Potter 

Perry, trust, 7,00 

Isora Hutchins Ring, trust, 1.75 

Clara E. Robinson, trust, 3.00 

Charles D. Rowell, trust, 3.50 

John B. Sanborn, trust, 7.00 

Harriet B, Sanders, trust, 1.75 

William Smith, trust, 2.00 

G. M. and F. E. Tallant, trust, 3.00 

Harriet N. Tenney, trust, 2.50 

Aaron B. Young, trust, 5.00 

J. E, Pecker, trust, 20.00 



$338,00 



treasury department. 465 

Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to perma- 
nent fund, $7.50 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account transferred to city 
of Concord general account, 137.00 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account, 193.50 

$338.00 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

One-half of the receipts for the sale of lots is added annuall.v to the perma- 
nent fund. The remaining half, with the amount received for grading of lots 
sold, together with the amounts received from sundry collections and income of 
permanent fund, are added each year to the annual appropriation. The amounts 
expended on trust funds are paid on a special order from the mayor from the 
income of individual deposits made with the city for that purpose, said income 
being used exclusively for the care of the lot specified in each trust. 

Receipts. 
1923. 

Arvin R. Mills, lot 118, $10.00 

Perley S. Badger, lot 119, 10.00 

Arthur T. Brown, lot 121, 25.00 

Charles H. Merrill, trust, 4.00 

S. Andrew Smith, trust, 5.00 

Cynthia A. Weeks, trust, 4.50 

Martha R. Jones, trust, 3.50 

Isaac N. Abbott, trust, 5.00 

John Corliss, trust, 4.00 

Annie E. Eaton, trust, 2.50 

C. E. H. Ela, trust, 4.00 

Charles Fiske, trust, 4.50 

Olivia P. Fowler, trust, 3.50 

Julia F. Frye, trust, 2.50 



466 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Clara V. S. Glidden, trust, 
Moses Hall, trust, 
Robert Hall, trust, 
John McHammond, trust, 
Ann A. Hazeltine, trust, 
Augusta A. Hazeltine, trust, 
Lucinda C. Parmenter, trust, 
Emma Saltmarsh, trust, 
Mary B. Goodwin, trust. 



$2.00 
10.00 
7.00 
2.50 
5.00 
5.00 
3.00 
1.00 
.50 



Credits. 

One-half sale of lots added to perma- 
nent fund, $22.50 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account transferred to city 
of Concord general account, 79.00 

Transferred to city of Concord gen- 
eral account, 22.50 



$124.00 



$124.00 



OLD FORT CEMETERY RECEIPTS. 

Receipts. 



1923. 




Abigail W. Lang, trust, 


$2.00 


Nelson Tenney, trust, 


1.00 


A. L. Williams, trust. 


2.00 



Credits. 

Income sundry trust funds as charged 
to this account, transferred to City 
of city of Concord general account. 



$5.00 



$5.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



467 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY. 



Bonds. 



Municipal, 

Due. 



City Hall Building, 



Publ 



Bridge, 



c Park, 



July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Dec. 

Dee. 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 

June 



1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1931 
1933 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 



Rate. 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 
31/2, 

4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 
4, 



Amount. 

$10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

5,000 

10,000 

5,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

4,000 

10,000 



City of Concord 












Street Bonds 


Nov. 


1, 


1924, 


41/2, 


$10,000 


a a 


Nov. 


1, 


1925, 


41/2, 


10,000 


C( i i , 


Nov. 


1, 


1926, 


41/2, 


10,000 


li I ( 


Nov. 


1, 


1927, 


41/2, 


10,000 


t i a 


Nov. 


1, 


1928, 


41/2, 


10,000 



$124,000 



$50,000 



Bonds. 



Sewer, 



Precinct. 

Due. Rate. Amount. 

May 1, 1928, 31/2, $25,000 

Dec. 1, 1930, 4, 5,000 

Dec. 1, 1932, 4, 10,000 

Dee. 1, 1934, 4, 10,000 



$50,000 



468 



CITY OF CONCORD. 





Be 


nda. Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


UnionSchoolDistrict, May 1, 1924, 4, 


$5,000 






'' July 1 


1924 


31/2, 


5,000 






" May 1 


1925 


4, 


10,000 






'' July 1 


, 1925 


, 3y2, 


5,000 






" May 1 


1926 


4, 


5,000 






" July 1 


1926 


31/2, 


5,000 






" July 1 


1927 


31/2, 


35,000 






" May 1 


1928 


4, 


6,000 






" July 1 


1928 


31/2, 


4.000 






" July 1 


1929 


31/2, 


10,000 






" July 1 


1930 


31/2, 


10,000 






" July 1 


1931 


31/2, 


9,000 






" May 1 


1932 


4, 


10,000 






'' May 1 


1933 


4, 


10,000 






'• May 1 


1934 


4, 


10,000 






" Oct. 1 


1924 


4, 


2,000 






Oct. 1 


1925 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1926 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1927 


4. 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1928 


4, 


2,000 






Oct. 1 


1929 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1930 


4, 


2,000 






'' Oct. 1 


1931 


4, 


2,000 






Oct. 1 


1932 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1933 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1, 


1934 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1935 


4. 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1936 


4, 


2,000 






Oct. 1 


1937 


4, 


2,000 






Oct. 1, 


1938, 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1, 


1939 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1940 


4, 


2,000 






" Oct. 1 


1941 


4, 


2,000 






Oct. 1, 


1942, 


4, 


2,000 


School L 


)istrict No. 20, Sept. 1, 1924, 31/2, 


$4,300 



$177,000 



$4,300 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 469 

Note— Soucook River Imp., Sept. 9, 1924, $3,000 

Nov. 14, 1925, 3,000 
Aug. 23, 1926, 3,000 
Aug 23, 1927, 3,000 

$12,000 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, 

exclusive of water department, $417,300 

Note in anticipation of taxes, due Janu- 
ary 30, 1924, $75,000 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT. 
Dr. 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1923, 

municipal, $110.00 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1923, 

precinct, 92.50 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1923, 

Union School District, 40.00 

Due in 1923, municipal, 4,940.00 

Due in 1923, precinct sewer, 2,035.00 

Due in 1923, Union School District, 7,095.00 

Due in 1923, School District No. 20. 150.50 

$14,463.00 



Or. 

Municipal, paid, 
Precinct, sewer, paid. 
Union School District, paid. 
School District No. 20, paid, 
IVIunicipal due, not presented. 
Precinct due, not presented. 
Union School District due, not pre- 
sented. 



$4,860.00 




2,017.50 




7,085.00 




150.50 




190.00 




110.00 




50.00 






$14,463.00 



470 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER-WORKS ACCOUNT. 

Carl H. Foster, Treasurer, in Account with Concord 
Water Works. 

receipts. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1923, $25,059.07 
Interest on investments, 2,334.61 

Receipts, P. R. Sanders, superin- 
tendent, 87,470.11 

$114,863.79 



expenditures. 



Orders paid, $41,649.55 

Bonds paid, 21,000.00 

Interest on bonds, 12,322.50 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1924, 39,891.74 



-$114,863.79 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF WATER PRECINCT. 





When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


When due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


Jan. 


1, 1924, 


4y2, 


$18,000 


Jan. 1, 1932, 


41/2, 


$18,000 


Jan. 


1, 1925, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1933, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 1926, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1934, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 1927, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1935, 


4%, 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 1928, 


414, 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1936, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 1929, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1937, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 1930, 


41/2, 


18,000 


Jan. 1, 1924, 


31/2, 


15,000 


Jan. 


1, 1931, 


41/2, 


18,000 









$267,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 471 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT. 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1923, 

and not presented, $146.00 

To coupons due, 1923, 12,375.00 

$12,521.00 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1923, $12,322.50 

By coupons due and not presented, 198.50 



$12,521.00 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
account of Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, for the year 1923 
and find all items of receipt and expenditure therein prop- 
erly recorded and authenticated by appropriate vouchers, 
and the several items correctly cast, and cash balance to 
be seventeen thousand nine hundred and ninety-six dol- 
lars and thirty-seven cents ($17,996.37), and as the treas- 
urer of the city w^ater department, cash balance to be 
thirty-nine thousand eight hundred ninety-one dollars 
and seventy-four cents ($39,891.74). 

I have also verified the account of the special funds and 
sinking funds of the city in the hands of the city treas- 
urer, and find such special and sinking funds invested, 
and the income thereof for the year 1923 accounted for, 
as shown by the book of the city treasurer kept for the 
purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



472 



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TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 479 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY 
OF CONCORD. 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1923. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, $935.55 

Aid, City Poor: $3,000.00) 

Resolution No. 568, 822.27 j o,»zz.z< 

Aid, County Poor, 13,740.21 

Bonds, City Hall, 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Bridge Bonds, 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Cemeteries : 

Blossom Hill, 14,000.00 21,789.58 

Balance, 1922, 260.39 

Transferred Cemetery 

Account, 4,981.62 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1,775.89 

Income Trust Funds, 1,892.00 



$22,909.90 $21,789.58 $1,120.32 

Old North, 700.00 1,194.50 

Balance, 1922, 2.46 

Transferred Cemetery 

Account, 198.00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 32.60 

Income Trust Funds, 300.00 



$1,233.06 $1,194.50 $38.56 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 481 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Maple Grove, $200.00 $789.78 

Debit Balance, 1922, 166.58 

Transferred Cemetery 

Account, 298.00 

Income Trust Funds, 100.50 

Income Cemetery Funds, 49.84 

Unexpended Income Perma- 
nent Fund, 399.89 



Old Fort, 

Balance, 1922, 7.49 12.50 
Income Trust Funds, 5.00 



$12.49 $12.50 

Millville, 125.00 180.19 

Debit Balance, 1922 311.93 

Transferred Cemetery 

Account, 22.50 

Income Cemetery Fund, 106.67 

Income Trust Funds, 79.00 

Unexpended Income Perma- 
nent Fund, 473.40 



Horse Hill, 10.00 20.00 

Soucook, 30.00 30.00 

Balance, 1922, 14.21 

Income Cemetery Fund, 1.26 



$1,048.23 $956.36 $91.87 

Pine Grove, 50.00 381.00 

Debit Balance, 1922, 168.01 

Transferred Cemetery 

Account, 193.50 

Income Trust Funds, 137.00 

Income Cemetery Fund, 30.15 

Unexpended Income Perma- 
nent Fund, 382.01 



$792.66 $549.01 $243.65 



$806.57 $492.12 $314.45 



15.47 $30.00 $15.47 



482 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Woodlawn, $25.00 $25.00 

Woodlawn Cemetery, Purchase 
Additional Land: 
Resolution No. 545, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Concord Charity Organization 

Society, 350.00 350.00 

Concord District Nursing As- 
sociation, 300.00 300.00 

Penacook District Nursing As- 
sociation, 50.00 50.00 

Dog Licenses, 176.25 

Engineering Department : 

Salary, Engineer, 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Salary, Assistants, 2,400.00 2,280.68 

Incidentals, 325.00 444.32 



$5,125.00 $5,125.00 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R. 

Aid, 450.00 450.00 

Fire Department: 

Pay-Roils, 28,974.00 28,973.06 

Pay-Roils, Semi-Annual, 10,245.00 10,245.00 

Rent Veterans' Association, 210.00 210.00 

Forage, 600.00 630.89 

Fuel and Lights, 3,050.00 3,598.97 

Fire Alarm, 1,500.00 1,971.91 

Horse Hire and Shoeing, 1,600.00 1,758.11 

Washing, 100.00 81.85 

Supplies, Auto Combination, 400.00 288.92 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 400.00 159.92 

Incidentals, 6,500.00 7,083.91 

New Hose, 2,600.00 2,600.00 

Fire Inspection, 450.00 423.43 

Horses and New Equipment, 500.00 685.55 

New Hose, 

Resolution No. 539, 2,600.00 2,600.00 



Resolution No. 568, 
Resolution No. 568 acct 
earnings, 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 483 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

$1,263.55 

318.97 

$61,311.52 $61,311.52 



Automobile, Chief, Fire Dept. 



Resolution No. 540, 


1,600.00 


1,463.00 


$137.00 


Hook and Ladder Truck: 








Resolution No. 531, 


10,000.00 


8,000.00 


2,000.00 


Health, Board of: 








Salary, Sanitary Officer, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 




Up-Keep of Automobile, 


400.00 


400.00 




Fumigation Supplies, 


100.00 


79.90 




Incidentals, 


1,500.00 


1,372.38 




Contagious Diseases, 


1,000.00 


507.05 





$5,000.00 $4,359.33 $640.67 



Department of Public Works: 

Roads and Bridges, 115,000.00" 

Resolution No. 543, 11,800.00 

Bonds and Interest, 49,820.00 

Resolution No. 568, acct. 
earnings, 



Garbage, 

Debit Balance, 1922, 

Sprinkling Streets, 
Balances, 1922, 

Lighting Streets, 
Balances, 1922, 

Sewers, 

Balances, 1922, 
Debit Balance, 1922, 
Resolution No. 555, 



3,692.15 
24,000.00 



7,700.00^ 
200.63] 

26,400.00^ 
8,093.65j 

10,870.60] 
452.09 

3,000.00J 



179,332.38 



24,752.74] 
1,780.61] 

7,966.91 



33,143.66 



11,505.68] 

I. 
2,547.141 



$261,029.12 $261,029.12 



484 



CITY OF CONCOED. 



Appropriation. 

Incidentals and Land Damages, $12,500,001 

Resolution No. 552, 6,000.00 I 

Resolution No. 568, 2,508.5oJ 

Interest, Cemetery Trust 

Funds, 1,826.17 

Interest, Bonds, 4,940.00 

Interest, Temporary Loan, 3,000.00] 

Resolution No. 568, 4,398.38 [ 

Rebate on $75,000, 26 days [ 

@ 41/2 %, 243.75J 

Land Sold for Taxes, 

Resolution No. 556, 819.45 



Taxes on Land Sold City, 

Resolution No. 534, .221 

" 535, 1.19 

" 546, 943.28 

" " 547, 537.64 ;> 

" 548, 133.94 

" 549, 93.54 

" " 550, 41.44 



Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 3,000.00 

Memorial Day, 460.00 

Municipal Christmas Tree: 

Resolution No. 566, 125.00 



In Favor of Leon F. Savoy: 
Resolution No. 544, 



132.80 



Winter Sports: 

Resolution No. 562, 



200.00 



Soucook River Project: 
Notes, 
Interest on Notes, 



3,000.00 
750.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 485 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Eradication White Pine Blister, $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Clearing Skating Areas: 

Resolution No. 532, 300.00 141.50 158.50 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Open Air Concerts, 550.00 550.00 

Playgrounds, and Baths, 2,800.00 2,633.34 166.66 

Parks, 5,500.00 4,604.55 895.45 

Trees, Care of: 4,500.00] 

Resolution No. 568, \ 4,903.92 

Account Earnings, 403. 92J 

White Park Ball Grounds: 

Resolution No. 541, 300.00 149.16 150.84 

Police and Watch: 

Salaries, 29,550.00 29,475.00 

Special and Traffic Officer, 3,800.00 3,978.75 

Fuel, 1,200.00 1,297.41 

Repairs Buildings, 500.00 39.83 

Lights, 300.00 305.86 

Incidentals, 2,500.00 2,751.08 

Supplies Auto, 1,135.00 1,306.98 

Motor Cycle, 245.00 245.00 

Resolution No. 568, 169.91 

$39,399.91 $39,399.91 

Precinct, Sewer, City: 

Interest, Bonds, 2,035.00 2,017.50 17.50 

Bonds, 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Printing and Stationery, 5,000.00] 

Resolution No. 553, 1,000.00 1 6,357.61 

Resolution No. 568, 357.61 J 



486 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expeuded. Balance. 

Public Library: 

Salaries, $4,300.00 $5,049.84 

Incidentals, 2,700.00 4,228.38 

Balance, 1922, 2,065.35 

Trust Funds, 3,256.23 . 

Fines, 375.00 

Income, Eastman Fund 
transferred to Princi- 
pal of said Fund, 1,557.30 

$12,696.58 $10,835.52 $1,861.06 

Repairs of Buildings, 1,500.00 1,306.07 193.93 

Salaries: 

Mayor, 2,000.00 2,000.00 

City Clerk, 1,400.00 1,400.00 

Clerk, Board of Public 

Works, 200.00 200.00 

Overseers of Poor, 390.00 390.00 

Solicitor, 800.00 800.00 

Treasurer, 1,225.00 1,225.00 

Messenger, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

City Physicians, 700.00 700.00 

Care City Clocks, 110.00 110.00 

Assessors, 3,800.00 4,399.90 

Moderators, Ward Clerks, 720.00 720.00 

Supervisors and Inspectors 

of Election, 2,064.00 2,008.00 

Judge, Police Court, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Clerk, Police Court, 500.00 500.00 

Sealer of Weights and 

Measures, 720.00 720.00 

Collector of Taxes, 4,000.00 878.28—1922 levy 

4,100.00—1923 levy 
Resolution No. 568, 1,522.18 

$22,551.18 $22,551.18 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,905.00 1,905.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 487 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Schools : 

Union School District: 
General Fund, Balance, 

1922, $101,885.32 $306,827.68 

Amount Voted by 

District, 249,960.69 

Repairs Buildings, 17,100.00 

Purchase Dunklee Street 

Lot, 1,500.00 

Dog Licenses, 1,460.39 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 36.40 

Bonds, 12,000.00 12,000.00 



Interest, 7,095.00) 

Balance, 1922, 1,667.50^ 7,085.00 



$392,705.30 $325,912.68 $66,792.62 



Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance, 

1922, 6,675.63 27,412.76 

Dog Licenses, 144.13 

Amount Voted by District, 24,467.72 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 3.60 





$31,291.08 


$27,412.76 


School District No. 20: 






Interest, 


150.50) 

75.25 j 


150.50 


Balance, 1922, 




Sinking Fund, 


500.00 


500.00 


County Tax, 




48,525.59 


State Tax, 




60,294.50 


State of New Hampshire 






$2.00 Poll Tax, 




37,992.00 



75.25 



488 CITY OF CONCORD. 

RECEIPTS. 

Receipts of the city for the year ending December 31, 1923 : 

Balance on Hand, January 1, 1923, $8,198.72 

Taxes, 1918, 12.00 

Taxes, 1919, 383.99 

Taxes, 1920, 63.96 

Taxes, 1921, 818.93 

Taxes, 1922, 75,189.67 

Taxes, 1923, 611,849.91 

Municipal Court Fees, 5,971.10 

Library Fines, 375.00 

Dependent Soldiers, County, 935.55 

County Poor, 13,699.21 

Temporary Loans, 525,000.00 

Rebate on $75,000 Notes, 26 days, 243.75 

Fees, City Clerk, 1,034.25 

Garbage Precinct, 252.05 

Highway Department, 10,071.29 

Dog Licenses, 1,780.77 

Dog License Fees, 155.80 

Amusement Licenses, 790.00 

Rent, Auditorium, 1,200.00 

Real Estate Redeemed, 1919, 163.28 

1920, 314.93 

1921, 859.26 

1922, 619.26 
Tax Paid by City, 1920, 135.18 

" " " 1921, 286.06 

" " " 1922, 783.96 

Rent, Chief's House, 250.00 

Motor Vehicle Tax, 46,587.35 

Passenger Carriage and Job Team Licenses, 100.50 

Pool Table Licenses, 300.00 

Junk Dealers' Licenses, 120.00 

Trees, 425.90 

Sewer Department, 59.15 

Rent of Rooms and Storage, City Hall, 125.00 

Bounty on Wild Animals, 40.40 

Druggists' Permits, 6.00 

Land Sold, 201.52 

Milk Licenses, 166.50 

Foi-est Fires, 9.80 

Reimbursement, Aid, J. W. Elliott, 235.98 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



489 



Declaration of Candidacy, City Primary, 
Histories and Maps, City of Concord, 
Interest on Daily Balances, 
Fines, City Marshal, 
Witness Fees, City Marshal, 
Aid, M. J. Preston, 
Aid, Poor, Town of Pembroke, 
Rebate Fire Hose, 
Lease of Land, 

W. C. Green, Sale of Sundries, 
Board of Examiners of Plumbers, 
Insurance Tax, 
Railroad Tax, 
Savings Bank Tax, 
Building and Loan Association Tax, 
Transferred Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 
Old North 
" Maple Grove " " 

" Pine Grove " " 

Millville 
Income Trust Funds, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 
Old North 
" " Maple Grove 

" " Old Fort 

" " Pine Grove 

Millville 
Permanent Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 
Old North 
Millville 
" Pine Grove 
" Maple Grove 
" Soucook 
Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools 
P. B. Cogswell " " Public Library 

G. Parker Lyon " 
Franklin Pierce " 
Thos. Valpey " 

Joseph Hazeltine " 
Seth K. Jones " 

K. P. & D. Rollins " " West Garden, 
Samuel Eastman " " Public Library 
Samuel Eastman " 
Wm. Chase 
Henry Kimball 
Benjamin Kimball " 



$68.00 

13.25 

1,222.35 

255.34 

160.04 

111.00 

70.00 

400.00 

150.00 

312.37 

28.50 

4,180.87 

63,411.15 

65,032.44 

232.50 

4,981.62 

198.00 

298.00 

193.50 

22.50 

1,892.00 

300.00 

100.50 

5.00 

137.00 

79.00 

1,775.89 

32.60 

106.67 

30.15 

49.84 

1.26 

40.00 

85.90 

40.00 

40.00 

20.00 

133.54 

25.14 

63.75 

75.00 

1,694.15 

42.50 

100.00 

1,000.00 



490 CITY OP CONCORD. 

$50,000 City of Concord Street Bonds and Interest, $49,820.00 
Unexpended Income Permanent Fund, Millville 

Cemetery, 473.40 

Unexpended Income Permanent Fund, Pine Grove 

Cemetery, 382.01 

Unexpended Income Permanent Fund, Maple Grove 

Cemetery, 399.89 

Miscellaneous, 254.57 



$1,510,357.17 



DISBURSEMENTS. 

Disbursements : 

City Departments, $490,341.62 

City Poor, 3,822.27 

County Poor and Soldiers, 14,675.76 

City Notes, 453,000.00 

City Bonds, 9,000.00 

City Interest on Notes and Bonds, 13,252.13 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 1,826.17 

Schools, 334,240.44 

Schools, Interest on Bonds, 7,235.50 

School Bonds, 12,000.00 

School Sinking Fund, District No. 20, 500.00 

Precinct Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 2,017.50 

Precinct Sewer, Bonds, 4,000.00 

County Tax, 48,525.59 

State Tax, 60,294.50 

State of New Hampshire, $2.00 Poll Tax, 37,992.00 

Paid Outstanding Orders, 43.50 

Treasury Balance, January 1, 1924, 17,996.37 



$1,510,763.35 
Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid January 1, 1924, 406.18 



$1,510,357.17 



Receipts. Expenditures. 

Temporary Loan, $525,000.00 $450,000.00 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 491 

CONCORD WATER WORKS. 





Receipts. 


Expenditures. 


Cash Balance, January 1, 1923, 


$25,059.07 




Receipts Deposited with Treasurer, 


87,470.11 




Sinking Fund, 


2,234.61 




Expended per Orders, 




$41,671.46 


Bonds, 




21,000.00 


Interest on Bonds, 




12,322.50 


Treasury Balance, January 1, 1924, 




39,891.74 



$114,863.79 $114,885.70 

Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid 

January 1, 1924, 21.91 



$114,863.79 
ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

City Hall bonds, $55,000.00 

State Library bonds, 15,000.00 

Bridge bonds, 54,000.00 

Street bonds, 50,000.00 

Cemeterj' trust fund note, 52,176.43 

Soueook River improvement note, 12,000.00 



■^238,176.43 



Debt Not Funded. 

Note in anticipation of taxes, $75,000.00 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1924, 406.18 

Interest accrued, not yet due, mu- 
nicipal bonds, 1,567.50 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds, 190.00 

Coupons overdue, not presented. 

Union School District bonds, 50.00 



492 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Due School Districts, 




$70,670.94 


School District No. 20, 




75.25 


Public Library, account 


trust 




funds. 




1,861.06 


Precinct, sewer, 




17.50 


Cemeteries, 


- 


1,824.32 


Total debt not funded. 


$151,662.75 


Total city indebtedness, 


$389,839.18 



Available Assets. 



Treasurer's cash balance, January 
1, 1924, 

Taxes, 1916, uncollected, 

Taxes, 1917, uncollected. 

Taxes, 1918, uncollected, 

Taxes, 1919, uncollected, 

Taxes, 1920, uncollected. 

Taxes, 1921, uncollected, 

Taxes, 1922, uncollected, 

Taxes, 1923, uncollected, 

Cash in hands of tax collectors, 
January 1, 1924, 

Cash in hands of tax collector, 
January 1, 1924, account motor 
vehicle permits. 

Cash in hands of city clerk, Janu- 
ary 1, 1924, account motor vehicle 
permits. 

Taxes bid in by city. 

Due Highway Department, 



$17,996.37 

48.04 

79.67 

97.61 

1,761.23 

76.76 

1,650.21 

9,231.95 

84,768.34 

198.75 



57.51 



4.97 
1,756.32 
4,999.25 



-$122,726.98 



Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1924, $267,112.20 
Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 1923, 196,151.35 



Increase for the year, 



$70,960.85 



FINANCIAL S^TATEMENT. 493 

PRECINCT DEBT. 

Funded Debt. 

Water Works bonds, $267,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 50,000.00 

$317,000.00 

Debt Not Funded. 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 

sewer bonds, $229.17 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 

water bonds, 5,932.50 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 

sewer bonds, 110.00 

Coupons overdue not presented, 

water bonds, 198.50 

$6,470.17 



$323,470.17 



Available Assets. 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1924, $39,891.74 

Due garbage precinct, 41.31 



$39,933.05 



Net precinct debt, January 1, 1924, $283,537.12 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1923, 323,820.41 



Decrease for the year, $40,283.29 



33 



494 city op concord. 

Other Precinct Liabilitiks. 

Union School District bonds, $177,000.00 

Interest accrued, not vet due, 2,205.84 

$179,205.84 

Penacook School District bonds, $4,300.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 50.17 

$4,350.17 



Net liability of school districts, $183,556.01 



RECAPITULATION. 

Net regular debt, $267,112.20 

precinct debt, 283,537.12 

school districts, 183,556.01 

$734,205.33 

Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1924, $734,205.33 
Aggregate indebtedness over avail- 
able assets, January 1, 1923, 715,722.76 



Increase for the year, $18,484.57 



CITY PROPERTY. 



Having Vai^ue But Not Considered Available Assets. 



Water Department, 


.^,173,357.79 


Fire Department, 


176,041.00 


Highway Department, 


48,218.50 


Engineering- Department, 


895.00 


Sewer Department, 


1,352.50 


Health Department, 


940.00 


Police Department, 


42,300.00 


City Clerk's Office, 


1,150.00 


Commissioner's Office, 


140.17 


Mayor's Office, 


250.00 


Assessor's Office, 


622.00 


Tax Collector's Office, 


296.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures, 325.00 


City Messenger's Department, 


2,250.00 


Park Commissioners' Departni 


Lent, 225.00 


Public Library, 


17,500.00 


City History Commission, 


10.00 


Cemetery Commissioners' De- 


, 


partment, 


3,500.00 


Real Estate, 


350,000.00 




$1,819,400.46 



1924. 

Population of city (census 1920), 22,167 

Valuation of city, $24,553,173.00 

Tax assessed for the year, $715,511.93 

Rate of taxation, $12.70 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District, $13.50. 
Rate for sewer precinct, $.30. 
Total rate, $26.50 per $1,000. 



VITAL STATISTICS. 



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INDEX. 



PAGE 

Assessors, board of, report of 360 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, receipts of 434 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 467 

City clerk, report of 338 

government, departments, personnel of, 1923 29 

assessors ". 32 

board of aldermen 29 

board of public works 30 

building inspector 39 

cemetery committees 41 

clerk 30 

collector of taxes 32 

commissioners of cemeteries 42 

committees of board of aldermen 31 

culler of staves 44 

drain layers 47 

engineer 31 

fence-viewers 43 

fire department, officers of 38 

health officers 39 

hydrant commissioners 40 

inspector of petroleum 43 

mayor 29 

messenger , 32 

overseers of poor 33 

park commissioners 40 

physician, city and assistant 33 

plumbers, board of examiners of 48 

pound-keeper 43 

police department officers and members of police force 34 

public library, trustees of 36 

librarian and assistants 36 

registrar of vital statistics 39 

sanitary officer and inspector of plumbing 32 

sealers of leather 44 

sealer of weights and measures 44 



552 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 

City solicitor 33 

street department, superintendent of streets 32 

superintendent Blossom Hill and Old North ceme- 
teries , 42 

superintendent of clocks 39 

superintendent of parks 40 

surveyors of painting 46 

masonry 46 

wood, lumber and bark 46 

treasui-er 31 

trustees of trust funds 37 

undertakers 42 

ward officers 49 

water-works, city, commissioners 37 

superintendent 37 

weigher 46 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 44 

Coupon account, statement of 469 

Debts, recapitulation 494 

Engineer, city, report of 275 

Financial statement 480 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 211 

fire-alarms 213 

roll of members 261 

Highways, report of 287 

History commission, report of 336 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 283 

Maple Grove Cemetery, receipts of 459 

Mayor's Inaugural Address i 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 51 

Millville Cemetery, receipts of 465 

Municipal debt 491 

regulations 2 

Court, report of 359 

Old Fort Cemetery, receipts of 466 

Old North Cemetery, receipts of 456 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Pine Grove Cemetery, receipts of 462 

Playgrounds and bath 343 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 284 

Police department, report of city marshal 267 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1913 364 

Poor department, report of overseer 335 

Population 496 



INDEX. 553 

PAGE 

Precincts, debts of 493 

Property, city, inventory of 495 

Public library, report of trustees 329 

librarian 330 

Public Works, board of, report of 287 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 346 

contagious diseases 350 

milk inspection, report of 357 

sanitary officer, report of 347 

School reports 55 

Union School District, Albin Prize Medal contest 147 

annual school meeting warrant 167 

annual school meeting 169 

attendance officer 58 

attendance officer, report of 117 

board of education 55 

board of education, report of . . . . 60 

building committee's reports.... 69 

census, 1923 118 

clerk 59 

economics, report of supervisor.. 124 

elocutionary contest 143 

English prize essay contest 145 

financial agent, report of 73 

fire drills 161 

graduating classes 157 

high school table of 141 

honor list 154 

honor, roll of 165 

kindergarten, report of super- 
visor 129 

medical inspector 59 

medical inspector, report of Ill 

manual training, report of... 120, 156 

music, report of supervisor 126 

officers of the district 59 

physical director, report of 114 

school nurse 59 

school nurse, report of 113 

school week 148 

scholarship table 140 

superintendents 58 

superintendent, report of 92 



554 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PAGE 
School reports — continued : 

Union School District, superintendent, assistant, report 

of 108 

teachers, list of 133, 153 

transportation routes 58 

treasurer's report 75 

Sealer of weights and measures, report of 340 

Sewer department, report of 309 

Solicitor, report of 341 

Tax collectors, report of 366 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 472 

Treasury department, report of 429 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 374 

Trust funds 378 

Trusts, individual, cemetery 385 

Vital statistics, tables of 497 

Water department, report of 173 

commissioners, report of 177 

coupon, account of 471 

engineer's report 184 

fire hydrants 195 

Investment account 176 

precinct, bounded indebtedness of.... 470 

receipts for each year 187 

schedule of pipes and gates 190 

summary of statistics 207 

superintendent, report of 179 

treasurer's condensed statement 185