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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

1926 
SEVENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR THE 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1926 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 






EVANS PRINTING CO. 

CONCORD, N. H. 

1927 



C74 ' 

MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment of Bills Against the City 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to con- 
tract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or deliv- 
ered on city poor account, except on the written order of 
the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than until 
his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on county poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the person 
authorizing the charge; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



MAYOR MARDEN'S INAUGURAL ADDRESS 



January 26. 1926 



Gentlemen of the Board of Aldermen: 

We are now entering upon the 200th anniversary year 
of the settlement of Penny Cook, now Concord, upon 
cur 74th year as a city and upon the 51st term of our city 
government. And we are here assembled for the inaugura- 
tion of the city's 27th Mayor. To be that chosen one is an 
honor of which anyone might well be proud and I am no 
exception. But as proud as I am to be Mayor of our fair 
city, a thousand times more proud am I of your confidence 
in me which you have so generously expressed. I am grate- 
ful for it and I promise you it shall not be betrayed. 

As I look over the list of distinguished and honorable 
gentlemen who have filled this chair, it is with some feel- 
ing of trepidation that I assume its occupancy and yet, 
when I look into the faces of the men and women before me 
whom I know will at all times be willing to be consulted and 
glad to extend advice and counsel, those feelings disappear 
and I am immediately reassured. 

I fought my campaign upon the city charter. It is my 
desire that its provisions be carried out. Lest you may have 
forgotten from disuse what some of these provisions are, I 
quote therefrom. 

''The Mayor shall be the chief executive officer of the 
City and cause its laws and ordinances to be enforced. 
Shall exercise a general supervision over the conduct of all 
subordinate officers. 

"He shall be a member of the Board of Public Works 
for all purposes, including voting and the counting of a 



4 CITY OF CONCORD. 

quorum. Shall preside over all meetings of the Board of 
Aldermen and of the Board of Public Works and shall 
from time to time communicate to each of said Boards and 
to all subordinate officers such information and recom- 
mendations relative to matters within their respective juris- 
diction as in his judgment the interest of the city may 
require. 

"And shall have and perform such other powers and 
duties not inconsistent with the provisions of this act as 
now are or hereafter may be conferred or imposed upon 
him by municipal ordinance or upon Mayors of cities by 
general law." 

Will Perform Duties 

As far as I am able, the duties laid upon me I shall per- 
form. A verbiage of flowery, rhythmical, high-sounding 
words are pleasing to the eye and music to the ear, but 
without action become as sounding brass and tinkling 
cymbal. And while my words may sometimes seem harsh 
and drastic, it is not because I feel unpleasant or unkind 
toward those with whom I am dealing. But rather be- 
cause the exigencies of the occasion seem to demand these 
harsh measures. 

The surgeon 's knife sinks deep into the flesh of his 
patient, not because he dislikes the patient, but rather be- 
cause he wishes to save him further pain, annoyance and 
possibly death. As the budget of a family in ordinary 
circumstances is a serious and grave question, so to us is 
the budget of our city. Those of a family, who have come 
to the years of understanding, can sit in around the table 
and talk matters over and come to some conclusions as to 
the method to be followed. Our city is a great big fam- 
ily and they cannot all sit in around the table, so they have 
elected us to represent them at that table. Let us do this 
in spirit and in truth. Let us be true to ourselves and we 
must of necessity be true to them, for it has been said, ' ' To 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 5 

thine own self be true, and it must follow as the night the 
day, thou canst not then be false to any man. " So in mak- 
ing our budget for the coming year, let us practice economy 
without parsimony and in its expenditure, let us practice 
frugality and not prodigality. 

Must Apply Knife 

In places we must apply the surgeon's knife. Some 
pruning needs to be, must be done. At the election last 
passed two policies were presented to our electorate. One 
was the continuance of present methods, which some of our 
citizens have termed as a policy of prodigal extravagance. 
The other was a policy of governmental economy, which 
means the elimination of waste and a frugal expenditure 
of public funds, getting a dollar's worth for every dollar 
expended. The voters declared for the latter policy and 
it is up to us to put it into action. It is my desire — it is 
my aim — it is my purpose, and all the strength, and all the 
energy that is in me will be spent to the end that this policy 
may obtain. 

Struggling Under Debt 

' ' There are none so blind as those who will not see ; 
there are none so deaf as those who will not hear. ' ' "With 
the warning of November 3, given in no uncertain tones, 
still thundering in their ears, they refuse to hear. With the 
words, "Mene, mene, tekel, upharsin," boldly emblazoned 
upon the walls, they refuse to read, and unmindful of or 
ignoring the fact that public office is a public trust, with 
the city struggling under a debt well nigh unbearable, they 
rush blindly on and plunge us into another bond issue of 
$80,000, the interest on which will be approximately $45,- 
000 more for something which we do not need, the Fire 
and Police Signal System. 

I said, "This is something we do not need." In sub- 



6 CITY OF CONCORD. 

stantiation of this statement I quote from the inaugural 
address of Mayor Flint, delivered January, 1924, as fol- 
lows : 

"Our Fire Department is the finest in the country. 
Everything is up-to-date and it is kept in shape." 

I quote from Chief Green's report of the same year as 
follows : 

"The fire alarm systems of the precinct and Penacook 
are in good condition. I would recommend the purchase 
of 1,000 feet of hose during the coming year." 

I quote again from the report of Chief Green for 1924: 

"The apparatus is in good condition." And the only 
recommendation he makes is this : ' ' The purchase of 1,000 
feet of hose during the coming year." Now why is it if 
our fire alarm system is in such a deplorable condition as 
some people would have us believe it is, why has not the 
Mayor and the Chief of the Fire Department made some 
recommendations in relation thereto? 



Signal System 

Parties representing the Gamewell System came here and 
told the City Government what they ought to have for a 
fire and police signal system, with no one to represent the 
city and tell them what could be done to relieve the situa- 
tion. They say "Yes, Yes," and bond the city for $80,000 
in payment thereof. 

In regard to the police signal: It is not worth a cent to 
the city. In substantiation of this I quote from the report 
of City Marshal Kimball for the year 1923 as follows : 

"I respectfully submit my 15th report of the Police De- 
partment for the year ending December 31, 1923." 

After giving a detailed report of facts and figures, he 
winds up as follows : 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 7 

"I thank His Honor the Mayor and the Honorable 
Board of Aldermen, members of the department for the 
co-operation and support given throughout the year. Re- 
spectfully submitted. 

George A. S. Kimball, 

City Marshal." 

He does not say anything about needing a police signal 
system and makes no recommendation thereto. 



No Mention of Matter 

Again, January 1, 1925, he makes his report, and signs it 
''Respectfully submitted, George A. S. Kimball, City 
Marshal," with no recommendation whatsoever. Does this 
look as though we were in any dire need of a police signal 
system different from what we have? 

Under license, with 14 saloons in the city, with more than 
1 ,600 arrests per year, with one horse, a Concord wagon, a 
patrol wagon, with a patrolman called in from the street 
as driver, with a signal system not as good as it is now, 
police matters were as well taken care of as they are now 
with three automobiles and three chauffeurs and improved 
police signal system, with 600 or so arrests per year and a 
large percentage of these made for the State and Federal 
Prohibition officials. 



Rental for System 

It has been said we do not own our police signal system 
— that we are paying a rental of $1,000 per year to the 
New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., and under a 
new contract which must be made soon, we must pay $1,300. 
Let us grant this to be true — then let us ask, what will the 
cost of the upkeep of a new system be? The cost of the 
police signal is to be something like $25,000. The interest 
on this at 4 per cent would be $1,000 per year — that we are 



8 CITY OP CONCORD. 

paying — then there is the upkeep of the system and then 
add to this the wear and tear each year and the balance 
of $300 is more than gone. So you see there will be no 
saving and an added expense. The whole thing in a nut- 
shell is this : The Gamewell people came here with some- 
thing to sell and they sold it to the tune of $80,000 in bonds 
and something like $45,000 in interest which the bond 
holders get. Making a total of $125,000 which the system 
will cost the taxpayer during the next twenty years. Some- 
one has said if we did not buy the Gamewell system, our in- 
surance rate would go up. Is this a threat? Let us look into 
it a little and see how it works out. "Who owns the Gamewell 
system ? I am, as I think, reliably informed that the stock- 
holders and directors of the Gamewell system are also in- 
surance company stockholders. How does that look to you? 
And I boldly state, without fear of successful contradiction, 
that with an outlay not to exceed $2,500, the over-burdened 
circuits of the fire alarm system could have been relieved, a 
new relay installed at the Central Station, making the sys- 
tem we now have as good for the next ten years as it has 
been for the last ten years. 



Big Saving Each Year 

Now let me ask you, would it not have been better to 
have done this and then, instead of bonding the city for 
$80,000, to have laid away $6,500 per year, approximately 
what this bond issue will cost us per year, for the next ten 
years — and then if we want a system, put it in and pay 
for it ? My policy is a pay as you go policy, as far as pos- 
sible. Necessities we must have — luxuries we can do with- 
out. Let us as far as possible take care of ourselves and 
not burden our posterity. They will have plenty of trou- 
bles of their own. 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 9 

DEPARTMENTS 

Police Department — Upon an efficient, harmonious and 
well-regulated Police Department, the safety of our 
citizenry and property depends. Experience in service in 
all pursuits, industrial, financial and professional, better 
fits one for the solving of those problems which may con- 
front him in the performance of his duties. And those 
who have had that experience should be placed where 
those problems are most likely to be met. I recommend 
the re-establishment of this policy in this department. 

Fire Department — This department is indeed an im- 
portant one. That all of these characteristics are possessed 
in a large degree by our department from the Chief down, 
no one who has seen them in action can doubt. 

Each year from the very nature of things the duties and 
cares of the Chief become more arduous and extensive and 
I would recommend the appointment at an early date of an 
Assistant Chief. Not that the Chief may in any way be 
supplanted, but rather that he may be assisted and re- 
lieved in the performance of his duties. 

Labor — There is an ordinance of our city giving prefer- 
ence to the employment of American citizens in our several 
departments. I would recommend strict adherence to this 
policy. 

Parks and Playgrounds 

Here is an opportunity for the doing of much good. 
The child of today is the grown-up of tomorrow and in the 
public play-ground, properly equipped, we find a great 
power for good, in the healthy development of mind, muscle 
and limb. The parks are the breathing places of our popu- 
lace, and should be made as attractive and beautiful as our 



10 CITY OF CONCORD. 

resources will permit. Both parks and playgrounds are in 
the hands of a competent commission, and I have no doubt 
will receive deserved appropriations which will be wisely 
expended. 

Water Department 

Here we have an ably conducted department by business 
men on business principles, self-sustaining and paying off 
its own indebtedness, each year expanding and increasing 
its efficiency. 

Civil Engineering and Sewer Departments 

With Fred W. Lang at the head of these departments, 
that they are in able and efficient hands no one doubts. 

Health Department 

Since the establishment of this department some years 
ago, it has expanded and grown, until we now have a com- 
prehensive and well regulated Health Department, under 
the efficient and competent supervision of Health Officer 
Charles E. Palmer. 

Milk Inspection 

This branch of the Health Board under the direct super- 
vision of Austin B. Presby is accomplishing much good. 

Cemeteries 

Our cemeteries are in the hands of an able and com- 
petent commission, and under the wise supervision of 
Superintendent Hammond will, I am sure, be well cared 
for and receive the attention which they justly deserve. 

Schools 
Our schools rank A-l and are as good as the best. The 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 11 

school board ranks high and the teaching staff under the 
wise direction of Superintendent Rundlett, are doing work 
seldom equalled and never excelled. 



Hospitals 

We have two hospitals, each doing a good work. They 
become more and more useful each year and should receive 
our moral and financial support. 



Trees 

Many people visiting our city remark upon the beauty 
of our trees. They are dying out each year and are being 
taken down. They should be replaced and we should en- 
courage citizens to plant more trees that the beauty of 
our streets in this regard may be perpetuated. 

Highway Department 

The demand for good roads becomes more insistent each 
year. What to do is the question that confronts us. Our 
streets in the central parts of the city are in very good 
condition ; in the outlying districts, many of them are very 
bad. We have been spending enormous sums of money in 
this department and yet we have but little permanent road. 
I think a part of the appropriation each year should be 
used for permanent work. We have a good equipment for 
road building, well housed at the city sheds, and you, the 
people who own it, should take a trip to the sheds and look 
it over. You will be well repaid for the trouble on your 
trip. 

Just what has been accomplished in this department you 
will find fully set forth in the report of the Commissioner 
of Highways, Orrin W. Head. 



12 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Enormous Expenditures 

I said the expenditures in this department had been 
enormous. For your enlightenment I give you these 
figures : 

Roads and Bridges, Appropriation $170,000.00 

Resolutions No. 652 10,000.00 

Resolutions No. 677, Earnings 9,226.44 

Resolutions No. 677, Transfer of balances 1,121.55 

Resolutions No. 677, Deficit 6,267.70 

Winter Equipment 15,582.20 

Bond Appropriation and Interest 70,532.00 

Balance 1924 1,609.91 

Earnings Resolutions No. 677 4,183.19 

Garbage Appropriation 28,000.00 

Resolutions No. 677, Earnings 198.68 

Sprinkling Appropriation 8,000.00 

Resolutions No. 677, Earnings 147.90 

Trees Appropriation 4,500.00 

Sprayer 1,500.00 

Resolutions No. 677, Earnings 78.24 

Making a grand total of $329,826.26, which means more 
than $1,000 per day for every working day in the year, 
or $15 each for every man, woman and child in the city. 
Isn't it time, let me ask, to call a halt? Whither are we 
drifting? Who will pay the freight? We must apply the 
knife, or the patient is lost. And this is not the only de- 
partment in which the knife must be applied. 



TAXATION 



Since time began the tax gatherer has found little favor 
among men and no wonder, for he comes to us with ever- 
increasing demand. 

The policy of late has seemed to be when the rate has 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. ] 3 

reached the limit, to raise the valuation and when valua- 
tion has reached the limit, to issue bonds. For this con- 
dition the tax gatherer and those who make the assess- 
ment are in no wise to blame. 

From the City charter I quote: "The Board of Public 
Works shall as early as practicable in each year submit 
to the Board of Aldermen or its Committee on Finance, 
a detailed estimate in writing of the appropriation required 
for that year. The Board of Aldermen shall make no ap- 
propriation for any purposes other than fixed charges and 
general maintenance and repairs, unless an appropriation 
for that purpose has first been requested by the Board of 
Public Works." So you see the whole responsibility for 
high or low taxes rests with the Board of Public Works 
and not with the assessors or tax collector. I give this 
quotation that you may understand the situation. 

Indebtedness 

When the present administration took over the city's 
affairs January, 1924, the bonded indebtedness of the city 
was $684,300. The water bonds outstanding at that time 
and included in this amount were $267,000. Those have 
been reduced in the meantime, $51,000, which should leave 
our bonded indebtedness, if we had held our own, at this 
time $633,300. 

But what is the real condition? We have heard a lot 
lately about deficits being wiped out and large savings 
having been made. Let us see about this. Today we 
have a bonded indebtedness of $807,000, $80,000 for fire 
and police signal bond, $472,000 school bonds, voted but 
not yet issued, making a total of $1,359,000. We are all 
fully aware that public buildings are seldom, if ever, 
built within the appropriation. This means a further is- 
sue of bonds for its completion. Then we must have a 
county jail and about 50 per cent of this expense falls upon 
Concord. So, it is reasonable to suppose to carry out the 
program initiated during the last administration will 



14 CITY OF CONCORD. 

necessitate increasing the bonded indebtedness of the city 
more than a million dollars, making our total indebtedness 
well nigh $1,750,000. 

Ladies and gentlemen, remember this financial situation 
was brought about by those who have preceded us and is 
one over which we have no control. Under these condi- 
tions we cannot even hope for a lower tax rate. I promise 
you, the board co-operating, we will do everything in our 
power to keep it as low as possible. The time has come 
to call a halt on expenditure. I am sure in some depart- 
ments expenses can be reduced with no less efficiency. I 
feel confident every member of this board will do his part 
to keep within reasonable bounds. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

This year occurs the 200th anniversary of the settlement 
of Penny Cook plantation, now the City of Concord. It was 
here under the leadership of Enoch Coffin, preacher, the 
first recorded religious service in central New Hampshire 
was held. 

A granite memorial erected some years ago by the 
Concord Congregational Union upon the Sugar Ball Bluff 
overlooks the exact spot of such service. 

I would recommend an appropriation for the proper ob- 
servance of the anniversary. 

Public Comfort Station 

On September 13, 1915, the following resolution was 
passed by our Board of Aldermen : 

"Section 1. That the Board of Public Works and the 
City Engineer are authorized and directed to select a site 
and erect a public urinal for men, women and children at 
;i cost not to exceed five thousand dollars, the same to be 



INAUGURAL ADDRESS. 15 

paid out of any money in the treasury not otherwise ap- 
propriated. This resolution to take effect upon its pas- 
sage." Passed September 13, 1915. 

At various times since other resolutions and much talk 
has been made in relation to a public comfort station. I 
believe the time has arrived when such a station should be 
established and I would recommend its installation in the 
basement of the Police Station. There is plenty of unused 
room to accommodate, the heating plant is there, it is 
centrally located. Being in the police station would check 
those who would be inclined to make disturbance. 

The woman in attendance could be a special police officer 
and when a police woman was needed at the police station, 
as one sometimes is, she could be called in. 

Street Lighting 

I would also recommend a better lighted main street. At 
small expense the lights now used can be changed for more 
powerful ones, making our city not only more attractive but 
materially aiding its business interests. 

Parking System 

In relation to parking, something must be done to re- 
lieve congestion, and I recommend to you its early con- 
sideration. 

Business Zoning 

A business zoning system is also entitled to our atten- 
tion and the time is not far distant when something must, 
in this line, be done. 

Highway and Engineering Departments 

Concentration of authority is the order of the day every- 
where. Division of responsibility leads to inefficiency. The 
architect who draws the plans, superintends the putting 



16 CITY OF CONCORD. 

up of the building and he, alone, is responsible. The City 
Engineer lays out and grades the streets, sidewalks and 
bridges, and writes the specifications and should have full 
charge of the building of them and be wholly responsible 
for the right or wrong construction thereof. And I would 
respectfully recommend the office of City Engineer and 
Highway Commissioner be combined and placed under 
the supervision of a competent civil engineer. This would 
be the line of efficiency and economy. 

Gentlemen of the Board, in deciding any question that 
may come before us, let us not ask what is the most ex- 
pedient or easiest to do, rather let us decide what is just 
and right and pursue this course, remembering at all times 
we are servants and not masters ; that we have been elected 
to serve the people and when our terms of office have ex- 
pired, we must render to them an accounting of our 
stewardship. 

I desire at this time to thank His Honor, Mayor Flint, 
City Clerk Roby, and other heads of departments for in- 
formation furnished and courtesies extended. I thank you 
all for your kind attention. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 

Passed Diking the Year Ending January 10, 1927 



CITY OF CONCORD— ORDINANCES 



An Ordinance amending chapter 32 of the revised or- 
dinances RELATING TO THE TAX COLLECTOR. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 32 of the Revised Ordinances by 
renumbering section 6 as section 5 and renumbering section 
5 as section 6. 

Sect. 2. Amend Section 32 of the Revised Ordinances by 
adding thereto the following new section: Sec. 7. At the con- 
clusion of the' term of office of a tax collector and upon the 
happening of any vacancy in that office, the finance committee 
of the board of aldermen shall procure a thorough audit to be 
made of the doings of the collector whose term is expiring or 
whose office is vacant. Upon an accounting being had in ac- 
cordance with such audit, the bond of the collector may, upon 
the recommendation of the finance' committee and in the dis- 
cretion of the board of aldermen, be released. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent 
herewith are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect as of January 1, 1926, and shall be incorporated with the 
Revised Ordinances which took effect on that date. Passed 
January 26, 1926. 



An Ordinance amending section 20 of chapter xxii of the 
revised ordinances and relating to skating on forge 

POND. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 20, Chapter XXII of the Revised 
Ordinance's by substituting for the word "teams" in the next 
to the last line the word "vehicles" and adding thereto the follow- 
ing: "Provided, that a skating area may be established upon 
Forge Pond under regulations to be prescribed by the superin- 
tendent of the water works": so that said section as amended 



18 CITY OF CONCORD. 

shall read as follows: Section 20. No person shall swim, bathe,, 
or go into Penacook Lake, or put therein, or upon the ice thereof 
in the winter season, or upon the shores so near to the water 
thereof as to cause the defilement or pollution of said waters, 
any animal or vegetable matter, or any other substance that 
will defile or pollute said water. It shall be unlawful for any 
person to cut ice from Penacook Lake or for any person to go 
upon any ice that may have formed upon said lake, either 
personally or with vehicles or animals. Provided that a skating 
area may be established upon Forge Pond under regulations to 
be prescribed by the superintendent of the water works. 
Passed February 8, 1926. 



An Ordinance in amendment of section 34, chapter xviii 
of the revised ordinances, relating to rent for the. 
veteran firemen's association. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 
Section 1. Section 34 of Chapter XVIII of the Revised Or- 
dinances is hereby amended by striking out the words "two 
hundred and ten dollars a year" and substituting therefor the 
following: "such sum as may be approved by vote of the board 
of aldermen"; so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows: Sec. 34. The standing committee of the board of 
aldermen on fire department is authorized and directed to rent, 
at an expense not exceeding such sum as may be approved by 
vote of the board of aldermen, suitable rooms for the accommo- 
dation of said Veteran Firemen's Association, the same to be 
selected by said association, the same to be charged to the 
regular appropriation for the fire department. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent 
herewith are' hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect on its passage. 

Passed February 8, 1926. 



An Ordinance in amendment of article iv, section 4, of 
chapter xli of the revised ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Article IV, Section 3, Chapter XLI of 
the Revised Ordinances relating to Street Traffic by adding after 



ORDINANCES. 19 

the word "stop" in the first line the words "on the south side nor" 
and after the word "on" in the first line the words "the north 
side of" so said section as amended shall read as follows: 

Sect. 4. No vehicle shall stop on the south side nor more 
than fifteen minutes at a time on the' north side of Warren 
Street between Green and Main Streets, and then only for the 
purpose of taking on or setting down passengers, loading or 
unloading merchandise, and in no case shall a horse be hitched 
or tied or a horse or vehicle backed up to the curb to load or 
unload merchandise. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed March 8, 1926. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter xlii of the re- 
vised ORDINANCES RELATIVE TO SALARIES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 1, Clause V, of Chapter XLII 
by striking out the' words "twenty-four" and inserting in place 
thereof the words "twenty-six" so said clause shall read as 
follows: 

(v) Superintendent of cemeteries twenty-six hundred dollars 
per annum. 

Amend Section 2, clause d, of said chapter, by striking out 
the word "eighteen" and inserting in place thereof the word 
"twenty" so said clause shall read as follows: 

(d) Clerk in the office of the city engineer, twenty dollars 
per week. 

Amend Section 2, clause e, of said chapter, by striking out 
the whole of said clause and inserting the following: 

(e) Janitor, twenty-four dollars per week. 

Amend Section 2, clause f, of said chapter, by striking out 
the word "nineteen" and inserting in place thereof the word 
"twenty" so said clause shall read as follows: 

(f) Clerk in the office of the collector of taxes, twenty dollars 
per week. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect April 1, 1926; ex- 
cept, however, that the superintendent of cemeteries having 
performed additional duties from January 1, 1926, the increase 
herein provided as to that office shall be paid from January 1, 
1926. 

Passed April 12, 1926. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD. 

An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 22 of the revised 
ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 1 of Chapter 22 of the Revised 
Ordinances by striking out the clause "thence westerly by said 
Hopkinton Road to the road leading to Penacook Lake" and 
substituting in place thereof the following: "thence westerly 
by the southerly line of said Hopkinton Road to a point opposite 
the intersection of the' said road with the old Hopkinton Road; 
thence northerly crossing the said Hopkinton Road and the old 
Hopkinton Road through the intersection of the two to the 
northerly side of the old Hopkinton Road; thence' easterly by 
the northerly side of the Hopkinton Road to the road leading 
to Penacook Lake." 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent 
with this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall 
take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 10, 1926. 



An Ordinance amending chapter xiv of the revised or- 
dinances relative to plumbers, plumbing construction, 

ETC. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 
Section 1. Amend Chapter XIV of the Revised Ordinances 
relative to plumbers, plumbing construction, etc., by adding a 
new section to be numbered Section 7A, said section to read as 
follows: 

Sect. 7A. Soil pipe and fittings be either plain or tar- 
coated with the following exceptions: all soil pipe and fit- 
tings to be placed under ground shall be tar-coated on the 
outside. 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed June 21, 1926. 



An Ordinance amending chapter xl, section 2, of the re- 
vised ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 
Amend Chapter XL, Section 2, by adding in the fourth line 

after "department" the words "and the assistant city engi- 



RESOLUTIONS. 21 

neer," and changing the word "inspector" in the same line to 
"inspectors" so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows: The city engineer for the time being shall act as in- 
spector of buildings and shall have the duty of enforcing the 
provisions of this chapter. The chief engineer of the Fire 
Department and the assistant city engineer for the time being 
shall be assistant building inspectors for the purposes of con- 
sultation and such other duties as the inspector may require 
and in case of the absence or disability of the inspector of 
buildings shall act in that capacity. This ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 
Passed Nov. 29, 1926. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
four hundred thousand dollars ($400,000). 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the committee on finance is hereby authorized to borrow 
on the credit of the city the sum not to exceed four hundred 
thousand dollars ($400,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes 
for the' municipal year 1926 and to issue notes of the city there- 
for upon such terms and for such amounts as the committee 
shall determine. The said loan is to be payable from the taxes 
for the said municipal year, and the said committee on finance' 
is hereby authorized to refund all or any of the said notes at 
their maturity; provided, however, that the refunding notes 
shall be payable within one year after the date of the incurrence 
of the debt represented by the note or notes refunded. 

Passed January 26, 1926. 



Resolution asking for sealed proposals for printing and 
binding the annual city reports. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is instructed to ask for 
sealed proposals for printing and binding the city reports for 
the year 1925 and submit the same to the Finance' Committee, 
who shall have full power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 26, 1926. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution in relation to paying salaries, payrolls and 

RENTS. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to draw his 
warrant on the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, 
payrolls and rents as the same shall become due during the 
present municipal term, and all bills so paid shall be laid before 
the Committee' on Accounts and Claims at the next meeting. 

Passed January 26, 1926. 



Resolution providing for printing of the roster of the city 
government. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermten of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the 
present city government and cause copies to be printed, and 
that the expense of printing the same shall be charged to the 
account of printing and stationery. 

Passed January 26, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the appointment of a committee on 
public comfort station. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor, city engineer and three members of the 
Board of Aldermen, to be appointed by the mayor, are hereby 
authorized and directed to select a site and make preliminary 
plans for the erection of a public comfort station and submit 
a report to the Board of Aldermen for action. 

Passed February 8, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money to defray the expenses of 
the two hundredth anniversary of the settlement of 

CONCORD. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars ($2,500.00) be, 
and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 



RESOLUTIONS. 23 

treasury not otherwise appropriated for the purpose of defray- 
ing the expenses incident to the celebration of the' two hundredth 
anniversary of the settlement of Concord. 
Passed March 8, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the purchase of a national and 
city flag for the use of the city government. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to purchase for 
the use of the City Government, a national and city flag, said 
flags to be paid for out of the appropriation of Incidentals and 
Land Damages. 

Passed March 8, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for a public comfort 

STATION. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of sixty-five hundred dollars ($6,500.00) be, and 
the same' hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the erection of a public 
comfort station. Said appropriation to be expended under the 
direction of the Special Committee on Public Comfort Station. 

Passed February 23, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the purchase of additional land for 
the public library. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the trustees of the Public Library be au- 
thorized in behalf of the city to accept the offer of the heirs of 
Armenia S. White to sell to the City of Concord a strip of land 
more' particularly described in said offer dated February 15, 
1926, for the sum of $10,000.00. 

Sect. 2. That the sum of $8,886.27, being the amount of the 
income from the Samuel C. Eastman Trust Fund which has 
hitherto been added to the principal of said fund, be retrans- 



24 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ferred from principal to income and the same be and hereby is 
appropriated for the Public Library and the trustees of the 
Public Library are authorized to use the same in part payment 
of the purchase price of the strip of land authorized to be 
purchased by Section 1 of this resolution. The trustees of the' 
Public Library are authorized to pay the balance of said pur- 
chase price out of the 1926 income from the Samuel C. Eastman 
fund. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take' effect on its passage. 

Passed February 23, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to appoint a zoning 

commission. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. "Be it resolved, that in conformity with Chapter 
92, Laws of 1926, known as 'An act to empower municipali- 
ties to adopt zoning regulations,' and in order to make available 
to the City of Concord the powers conferred thereby, the mayor 
be and hereby is authorized to appoint a committee of five 
citizens, at least one to be a woman, to be known as the Concord 
Zoning Commission." 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed March 29, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the city clerk to destroy certain 
old bills. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, authorized to destroy 
all old city bills, coupons and cancelled bonds prior to the year 
1916. 

Passed March 29, 1926. 



Resolution relating to the discontinuance of a portion of 
the old pembroke road. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 

That the city solicitor be instructed in the name and behalf 

of the city to join with the town of Pembroke in a petition to 

the Superior Court for the discontinuance' of that portion of 



RESOLUTIONS. 25 

the highway from Concord to Pembroke Street, which prior to 
1923 lay in the route of the Daniel Webster Highway, including 
the old bridge, and described as follows: Beginning at a point 
in said old highway on the easterly line thereof at a point in 
said Concord located fifty feet northerly from the northerly 
abutment of the said old bridge'; thence southerly and south- 
easterly by the easterly line of the said old highway to the point 
where the said line intersects with the westerly line of the said 
new location of the Daniel Webster Highway, thence southerly 
by said new location to its intersection with the westerly line 
of the said old highway; thence northwesterly and northerly by 
the said westerly line of said old highway to a point in said 
Concord situated fifty feet northerly from the northerly abut- 
ment of said old bridge; thence easterly to the point of be- 
ginning. 

Passed April 12, 1926. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants 
within the limits of the sewerage precinct for the en- 
suing financial year. 
Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 
Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised" on the polls and ratable' estates within the sewer- 
age precinct of said city, the sum of eighteen hundred seventy- 
five dollars ($1,875.00) to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which 
shall be appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of interest that may become due on 

precinct bonds $1,875.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 12, 1926. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
to be raised for the ensuing financial year for the use 
of the city. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 
Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within said city, 
the sum of three hundred fifty-five thousand four hundred dol- 
lars ($355,400.00) to defray the necessary expense's and charges 
of the city for the ensuing financial year, which together with 



26 CITY OF CONCORD. 

the sums which may be raised by taxes on railroads and from 
other source's, shall be appropriated as follows: 

GENERAL 

Aid, city poor $5,000.00 

Aid, dependent soldiers, city 200.00 

Aid, county poor 15,000.00 

Aid, dependent soldiers, county 1,000.00 

Interest on cemetery trust funds 1,835.81 

Interest on bonds 10,825.00 

Interest on temporary loans 8,000.00 

Interest on Soucook River notes 300.00 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 5,000.00 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 1,500.00 

Memorial Day 460.00 

Concord Charity Organization 350.00 

Concord District Nursing Association 350.00 

Penacook District Nursing Association 50.00 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R. 450.00 

Clearing skating areas 500.00 

White Park ball ground 150.00 

Rollins Park ball ground 50.00 

Winter sports 250.00 

Open air concerts 650.00 

Toboggan chute's 150.00 

Municipal Christmas tree 125.00 

Revising ordinances 1,500.00 

Eradication White Pine Blister Rust 1,000.00 

Incidentals and land damages 13,000.00 

Printing and stationery 5,000.00 

Repairs buildings 850.00 

Auditorium exits 1,500.00 

Salary board of aldermen 1,905.00 



Bonds and Notes 



$76,950.81 



Highway bonds $10,000.00 

Public improvement bonds 14,000.00 

Bridge bonds 4,000.00 

City Hall bonds 10,000.00 

Cemetery trust notes 5,797.38 

Soucook River Project notes 3,000.00 



$46,797.c 



RESOLUTIONS. 

DEPARTMENTS 
City Hall 



Salaries 
Coal 

Lights 



Salaries 

Salary, Superintendent 
Completing toilets 
New shrubbery 
Fence, White Park 
Doyen Park walks 
Eastman Park 
Incidentals 



Parks 



Playground and Bath 



Salaries 
Upkeep of auto 
Incidentals 



27 



$6,900.00 
3,000.00 
1,000.00 

$10,900.00 

$4,500.00 
1,500.00 
200.00 
250.00 
500.00 
150.00 
200.00 
700.00 

$8,000.00 

$2,800.00 

150.00 

1,200.00 



Cemeteries 



Engineering Department 



Salary, engineer 

Salary, assistant engineer 

Salary, clerk 

Salary, rodman 

Extra clerk, vacation 

Upkeep of auto 

Incidentals 



$4,150.00 
$18,000.00 



$3,300.00 

1,800.00 

1,044.00 

900.00 

30.00 

400.00 

981.54 



Fire Department 



Salary, chief 
Salary, house' man 
Salaries, permanent men 



$8,455.54 



$2,600.00 

100.00 

27,100.00 



28 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Salaries, vacations $1,043.00 

Salaries, semi-annual 10,270.00 

Rent, veterans' association 300.00 

Fuel 2,500.00 

Lights 850.00 

Horse hire 500.00 

New equipment 200.00 

Laundry 100.00 

Fire inspection 630.00 

Fire alarm 1,500.00 

Penacook fire alarm 300.00 

Hose 2,000.00 

Upkeep motor vehicles 1,900.00 

Telephones 450.00 

Brush fires 500.00 

Repairs, fire stations 1,200.00 

Incidentals 2,657.00 



$56,700.00 



Board of Health 

Salary, sanitary officer $2,000.00 

Salary, milk inspector 1,500.00 

Fumigation supplies 100.00 

Contagious diseases 1,000.00 

Upkeep of auto, sanitary officer 400.00 

Upkeep of auto, milk inspector 400.00 

Incidentals 1,500.00 

Laboratory and incidentals 600.00 



$7,500.00 



Department of Public Works 

Roads and bridges $200,000.00 

Garbage 23,000.00 

Garbage, ward one 2,000.00 

Garbage, ward two 500.00 

Garbage, ward three 500.00 

Table garbage 5,100.00 

Sprinkling streets 7,000.00 

Lighting streets 32,000.00 

Trees 6,000.00 

Sewers 19,000.00 



$295,100.00 



RESOLUTIONS. 



29 



Police and Watch 



Salary, chief 

Salary, deputy 

Salary, captain 

Salary, sergeant 

Salaries, officers 

Salaries, specials 

Lights 

Autos 

Repairs, police stations 

Incidentals 



$2,600.00 
2,200.00 
2,000.00 
1,950.00 

27,950.00 

5,500.00 

350.00 

1,900.00 

700.00 

3,500.00 





$50,050.00 


Public Library 


$11,400.00 


Salaries 




Mayor 


$2,000.00 


City clerk 


1,950.00 


Clerk, board of public works 


200.00 


Overseers of Poor 


390.00 


Solicitor 


800.00 


Treasurer 


1,325.00 


Messenger 


1,300.00 


Physician 


700.00 


Care clocks 


110.00 


Assessors 


4,400.00 


Moderators and ward clerks, supervisors and inspec- 




tors of elections 


1,900.00 


Judge, police court 


1,200.00 


Clerk, police court 


600.00 


Sealer of weights and measures 


720.00 


Collector of taxes 


3,000.00 


Incidental salaries, tax office 


1,000.00 



$22,215.00 

Sect. 2. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be' raised, a tax of three and a half dollars ($3.50) on each 
thousand dollars of the value of the ratable estates taxable 
within said city for the support of the public schools which, 
together with the income of the Abial Walker fund, shall be 
appropriated and divided among the school districts according 
tc the valuation thereof. There shall also be raised a sum 
equal to two dollars ($2.00) for each child residing in the city 
who was enrolled in the public schools in the last preceding 
school year. 



30 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 
for the cemeteries of the city one-third of the income from the 
sale of lots and the income derived for the care of lots and 
grading, which sum shall be deposited by the superintendent, or 
others receiving them, in the city treasury. The care' of lots 
for which the city holds trust funds shall be paid from the 
money appropriated for the care of cemeteries, and so much 
of the income of these trust funds as may be thus expended 
shall be deposited in the city treasury at the close of the year, 
and the remainder in each instance credited to the individual 
fund. 

Passed April 12, 1926. 



Kesolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 
deed for land sold to the city for taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be authorized to execute a quitclaim deed for 
lots No. 4605 and 4522, Ward eight, Map C, sold to the city for 
taxes at a cost jto include all taxes and costs against said 
property. 

Passed May 10, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for auditing accounts of 
former tax collector w. e. hunt. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotvs : 

That the sum of $200 be, and hereby is, appropriated to pay 
for auditing the accounts of the former tax collector, W. E. 
Hunt, said sum to be paid from the appropriation of Inci- 
dentals and Land Damages. 

Passed May 10, 1926. 



Resolution releasing woodbury e. hunt from the office of 

TAX COLLECTOR. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That Woodbury E. Hunt, former tax collector of the city of 
Concord be, and hereby is, released from all liability on account 
of the collection of taxes for the said city. 

Passed May 10, 1926. 



resolutions. 31 

Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quit- 
claim DEED TO PROPERTY FORMERLY OWNED BY PAUL E. 
WEISLEDER. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim 
deed of property formerly belonging to Paul E. Weisleder, 
Ward eight, being Lot No. 4446, as shown on Map D, in the 
assessors' office, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include 
all taxes and costs assessed against said property. 

Passed May 10, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1925 ON non-resident real estate sold to the city of 

CONCORD IN 1920 FOR 1919 TAXES. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-six cents ($.26) be, 
and hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1925 on 
non-resident real estate sold to the city in 1920 for 1919 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the City Treasurer is hereby authorized to 
pay to the collector of taxes said amount of twenty-six cents 
($0.26). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 14, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1925 on real estate sold to the city of concord in 1922 
for 1921 taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of one hundred sixty-six and 
32 100 dollars ($166.32) be, and the same is, hereby appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise ap- 
propriated, to pay taxes assessed in 1925 on real estate sold 
to the city in 1922 for 1921 taxes. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
pay to the collector of taxes said amount of one hundred and 
sixty-six and 32/100 dollars ($166.32). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 14, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1925 on real estate sold to the city of concord in 1923 
for 1922 taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of thirty-seven and 70-100 dollars 
($37.70) be', and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes 
assessed in 1925 on real estate sold to the city in 1923 for 
1922 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
pay to the collector of taxes, said sum of thirty-seven and 
70/100 dollars ($37.70). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 14, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1925 on real estate sold to the CITY OF CONCORD IN 1924 
FOR 1923 TAXES. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of seventy-four and 54-100 dollars 
be, and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed 
in 1925 on real estate sold to the city in 1924 for 1923 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of seventy-four and 54-100 
dollars ($74.54). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 14, 1926. 



RESOLUTIONS. 33 

Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1925 on non-resident real estate sold to the city of 
concord in 1925 for 1924 taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of one and 95-100 dollars ($1.95) 
be, and the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in 
the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay taxes assessed 
in 1925 on non-resident real estate sold to the city in 1925 for 
1924 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to 
pay to the collector of taxes said amount of one and 95-100 
dollars ($1.95). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 14, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 
1925 on real estate sold to the city of concord in 1925 
for 1924 taxes. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of seven hundred fifty-five and 
90-100 dollars ($755.90) be, and the same is hereby, appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, 
to pay taxes assessed in 1925 on real estate sold to the city in 
1925 for 1924 taxes. 

Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to pay 
to the collector of taxes said amount of seven hundred fifty-five 
and 90-100 dollars ($755.90). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed June 21, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for band concerts july 

FOURTH. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the sum of one hundred and fifty dollars ($150.00) be, 
and the same is hereby, appropriated out of any money in the 



34 CITY OF CONCORD. 

treasury not otherwise appropriated for band concerts on July 
Fourth, said sum to be expended under the' supervision of a 
special committee to be appointed by the mayor. 
Passed June 21, 1926. 



Resolution confirming the sale of $160,000 bonds, part of 
an issue of $550,000 bonds authorized by an act ap- 
proved 26TH FEBRUARY, 1925, AND BY A RESOLUTION OF THE 
BOARD OF ALDERMEN PASSED 12TH OCTOBER, 1925. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldernven of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sale by the city treasurer to Merrill, 
Oldham & Co., at the price of $100.96 and accrued interest of 
$160,000 School Bonds of the city issued on account of Union 
School District, bearing interest at the rate of 4 1 / 4 per cent 
and maturing $5,000 thereof on the 1st day of December in 
each of the years 1927 to 1930, inclusive, $4,000 on December 1 
in each of the years 1931-1965, inclusive, being part of an issue 
of $550,000 bonds authorized by an Act approved 26th February, 
1925, and by a resolution of the Board passed the 12th October, 
1925, be and the same is hereby approved and confirmed. 

Passed June 21, 1926. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000.00) in addition 
to amount already authorized. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
row on the credit of the city the sum not to exceed one hun- 
dred thousand dollars in addition to the four hundred thousand 
dollars already authorized for expenses in anticipation of taxes 
for the municipal year 1926 and to issue notes of the city there- 
for upon such terms and for such amounts as the Committee 
shall determine. The said loan is to be payable from the taxes 
for the said municipal year, and the said Committee on Finance 
is hereby authorized to refund all or any of the said notes at 
their maturity; provided, however, that the refunding notes shall 
be payable within one year after date of the incurrence of the 
debt represented by the note or notes refunded. 

Passed July 7, 1926. 



RESOLUTIONS. 35 

Resolution appropriating sixteen hundred fifty-four and 
60-100 dollars ($1,654.60) to pay for real estate sold to 
the city of concord for unpaid taxes for the year 1925. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of sixteen hundred fifty-four and 60-100 dollars 
($1,654.60) be, and the same' hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the 
amount due to the city of Concord for real estate purchased 
at the tax collector's sale' of real estate for the unpaid taxes 
for the year 1925. 

Passed July 12, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for the sewer department. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of eleven hundred dollars ($1,100) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the' treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the sewer department. 

Passed July 12, 1926. 



Resolution providing for the payment for an overflow 
sewer through pleasant street extension and railroad 

SQUARE. 

Resolved by >the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated for the purpose of constructing an overflow 
spwer through Pleasant Street Extension and Railroad Square, 
connecting with the Main Street sewer at Pleasant Street Junc- 
tion and with the 28 inch by 48 inch outlet in Railroad Square 
at the north end of the train shed, and that the said sum of five 
thousand dollars ($5,000) be raised by the issue of two serial 
notes of the City of Concord for two thousand five hundred dol- 
lars ($2,500), one maturing one year after date of issue and the 
olher maturing two years after date of issue, with interest at 
such rate, not exceeding five per cent and payable at such place 
as the city treasurer with the approval of the Finance Commit- 
tee may determine, and the mayor and city treasurer are au- 



36 CITY OF CONCORD. 

thorized, with the approval of the Finance Committee, to ex- 
ecute, issue and sell said notes in behalf of the city. Said notes 
shall conform to the provisions of Chapter 59 of the Public 
Laws. 

Passed July 12, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for a memorial to the 
spanish war veterans, ward one. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00) be, and hereby 
ib, appropriated for a memorial to the Spanish War Veterans, in 
Ward One. Said sum to be charged to the appropriation for In- 
cidentals and Land Damages. 

Passed July 12, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for the reconstruction of 

the little pond in white park. 
Resolved by ■'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and hereby 
is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated for the reconstruction of the little pond in White 
Fark so that it may be made more sanitary as a wading pool for 
the small children, leaving the original design of the pond and 
depth about the same as present, relay the cobble stones in the 
wall set in cement, remove about a foot of bottom and fill in 
about the same of gravel. Said sum to be expended under the 
supervision of the Board of Park Commissioners. 

Passed July 12, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the purchase of the Armenia s. 

white property for city purposes. 
Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 
That the Finance Committee be and hereby is authorized in 
its discretion to bargain for the purchase, in behalf of the city 
and for the use of the city, of the property of the late Armenia 
S. White located on Capitol and School streets in Concord, New 
Hampshire, the price not to exceed the sum of $40,000 with the 
house, or not to exceed the sum of $38,000 without the house. 
And be it further resolved 



RESOLUTIONS. 37 

That the mayor and the city treasurer be authorized, with 
the approval of the Finance Committee, to sign, execute and de- 
liver in behalf of the city such contracts or other instruments 
as may be required to carry into effect any bargain made by the 
Finance Committee in pursuance of this resolution. 

Passed July 22, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

deed to property formerly owned by nellie thompson. 
Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim 
deed of property formerly belonging to Nellie Thompson, Ward 
Eight, being lots 51 and 52, as shown on Map C in the assessors' 
office, sold to the city for taxes at a price to include all taxes 
and costs assessed against said property. 

Passed August 9, 1926. 



Resolution accepting offer of allen hollis of an athletic 

FIELD. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the proposal of Allen Hollis to convey to the city for 
playground purposes a tract of land on Fruit street be accepted, 
and that the mayor with the advice of the city solicitor be 
authorized to accept a deed of said property in form satisfactory 
to him. 

Further resolved that the city solicitor be directed to pre- 
pare for consideration of this Board an ordinance establishing a 
recreation commission as provided in Chapter 42, Section 35, of 
the Public Laws, to which commission the management of said 
playground may be delegated 

Passed August 27, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating four hundred dollars for repairs 

buildings. 
Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 
That the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated for repairs buildings. 
Passed September 13, 1926. 



38 city op concord. 

Resolution appropriating one thousand dollars for inciden- 
tals AND LAND DAMAGES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed September 13, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating money for a typewriter for the 

tax collector's office. 
Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 
That the sum of seventy-five dollars ($75) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated for the purchase of a typewriter for the 
tax collector's office, said sum to be charged to the account of 
incidentals and land damages. 
Passed September 13, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating additional money for the audi- 
torium EXITS. 
Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 
That an additional sum of four hundred dollars ($400) be, 
t-.nd hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for the Auditorium exits. 
Passed September 13, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing an extension of the sewer on 
kensington road. 

Resolved by <the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 

Whereas the Board of Public Works has determined that it 

ii desirable to extend the sewer on Kensington road from the 

northerly terminus of the sewer as now laid, northerly to a 



RESOLUTIONS. 39 

point which will permit entrance to the said sewer from the 
houses now being constructed by John W. Pearson and Jonathan 
Piper; and 

Whereas it may be that the appropriation for sewers will be 
insufficient for the construction of the whole of the said ex- 
tension; and 

Whereas it is expected that the said houses will both be 
completed and occupied before the close of the present year; 
and 

Whereas the said John W. Pearson and the said Jonathan 
Piper are willing to furnish so much of the money as may be 
necessary for the said construction as may not be available for 
that purpose from the balance of the appropriation for sewers 
for 1926; 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That the mayor be authorized in the name of the city to 
make a contract with the said John W. Pearson and Jonathan 
Piper that the city shall on or about April 1, 1927, repay to 
the said John W. Pearson and Jonathan Piper such sum or 
sums of money as the said John W. Pearson and Jonathan 
Piper may furnish for the construction of said sewer. 

Passed September 13, 1926. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000.00) in addition 
to amount already authorized. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
row on the credit of the city the sum not to exceed one hun- 
dred thousand dollars in addition to the five hundred thousand 
collars already authorized for expenses in anticipation of taxes 
for the municipal year 1926 and to issue notes of the city there- 
for upon such terms and for such amounts as the Committee 
shall determine. The said loan is to be payable from the taxes 
for the said municipal year, and the said Committee on Finance 
i* hereby authorized to refund all or any of the said notes at 
their maturity; provided, however, that the refunding notes 
shall be payable within one year after the date of the incur- 
rence of the debt represented by the note or notes refunded. 

Passed October 11, 1926. 



40 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 
deed for land sold to george w. and gustie j. hanson. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be authorized to execute a quitclaim deed 
of a strip of land four feet wide on the northwest side of West 
Garden to George W. and Gustie J. Hanson in return for a 
deed from said Hansons to the City of Concord of a tract of 
land adjoining the West Garden, approximately twenty-five 
feet. 

Passed October 11, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 
deed to property formerly owned by david howe and 
edward s. lord. 

Resolved by 'the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim 
deed of property formerly belonging to David Howe and Ed- 
ward S. Lord, Ward Eight, being lots No. 4522 and 4526, as 
shown on Map C in the assessors' office, sold to the city for 
taxes, at a price to include all taxes and costs assessed against 
said property. 

Passed October 11, 1926. 



Resolution confirming the sale of $195,000 bonds, part of 
an issue of $550,000 bond authorized by an act ap- 
proved 26th february, 1925, and by a resolution of the 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN PASSED 12TH OCTOBER, 1925. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. That the sale by the city treasurer to Merrill, 
Oldham Co. at the price of $100.94 and accrued interest of 
$195,000 School Bonds of the city, issued on account of Union 
School District, bearing interest at the rate of 4*4 per cent and 
maturing $5,000 thereof in each of the years 1927 to 1965, in- 
clusive, being part of an issue of $550,000 bonds, authorized by 
an act approved 26th February, 1925, and by a resolution of 
the Board passed the 12th October, 1925, be and the same is 
hereby approved and confirmed. 

Passed October 18, 1926. 



RESOLUTIONS. 41 

Resolution appropriating the sum of twenty-five hundred 
dollars for incidentals and land damages. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars ($2,500) be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated, for incidentals and land 
damages. 

Passed November 8, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of fifteen hundred dol- 
lars FOR CITY POOR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 

That the sum of fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
rot otherwise appropriated, for city poor. 

Passed November 8, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of one thousand dollars 
for printing and stationery. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out .of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for printing and stationery. 

Passed November 8, 1926. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of twelve hundred dol- 
lars for trees. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated, for trees. 

Passed November 8, 1926. 



4'2 city of concord. 

Resolution relating to the taxes of clara e. sargent. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to make such 
disposition as he deems wise of the record claim of the city 
upon the property of Clara E. Sargent arising out of a sale on 
May 23, 1912, for unpaid taxes, and in making such adjustment 
tj give such certificate of redemption of her property from said 
sale or such quitclaim deed in the name of the city as he may 
deem circumstances to require. 

Passed November 8, 1926. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 
deed to property formerly owned by nellie t. thompson. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim 
deed of property formerly belonging to Nellie T. Thompson, 
Ward 8, being lots listed in the assessors' office as follows: 

Twenty-seven lots W-S South Pembroke road, 4680 Map C. 

Eleven lots W-S South Pembroke road, 4601 Map C. 

Eight lots W-S South Pembroke road, 4640 Map C. 

Forty-four lots E-S Canterbury road, 4601 Map C. 

Ten lots Lincoln Park, 4601 Map C. 
Sold to the city for taxes, at a price to include all taxes and 
costs assessed against said property. 

The deed to this property to be made out in the name of 
William E. Sleeper. 

Passed December 13, 1926. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
six hundred thousand dollars ($600,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to bor- 
row on the credit of the city the sum not to exceed six hundred 
thousand dollars ($600,000), for expenses in anticipation of 
taxes for the municipal year 1927, and to issue notes of the city 



RESOLUTIONS. 43 

therefor upon such terms and for such amounts as the com- 
mittee shall determine. The said loan is to be payable from 
the taxes for the said municipal year and the said Committee on 
Finance is hereby authorized to refund all or any of the said 
notes at their maturity; provided, however, that the refunding 
notes shall be payable within one year after the date of the 
incurrence of the debt represented by the note or notes re- 
funded. 

Passed January 10, 1927. 



Resolution authorizing the appropriation of income from 
the benjamin a. kimball fund and the henry a. kimball 
fund to building fund of the public library. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of twenty-eight hundred dollars, being a por- 
tion of the income of the Benjamin A. Kimball Fund for 1926, 
and the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars, being a portion 
of the income of the Henry A. Kimball Fund for 1926, be and 
the same hereby are appropriated to a fund for improvement 
of Public Library facilities, the same to be expended by the 
tiustees of the Public Library for additions or new construction 
or land or such other purpose as they may deem it best in con- 
nection with enlarging or improving Public Library facilities; 
and until the sums so appropriated are called for by the said 
trustees, they are to be invested by the Trustees of Trust Funds 
and the income allowed to accumulate. 

Passed January 10, 1927. 



Resolution asking for proposals for printing and binding 

THE ANNUAL CITY REPORTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

That the city clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for 
sealed proposals for printing and binding the city reports for 
the year 1926 and submit the same to the Finance Committee, 
who shall have full power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 10, 1927. 



44 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Resolution appropriating money for deficits in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. That the sum of ten thousand five hundred four- 
teen and 46-100 dollars ($10,514.46) be, and hereby is, appro- 
priated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay outstanding claims as follows: 

Auditorium Exits $14.39 

Board of Health 624.17 

County Poor 1,808.06 

Fire Department 797.43 

Garbage 2,431.92 

Interest *on Bonds 1,171.25 

Interest on Temporary Loans 3,286.57 

Salaries, City Hall 380.67 



$10,514.46 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Garbage for the year 1926, the sum of two hundred fifty-nine 
and 21-100 dollars ($259.21), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Police and Watch for the year 1926, the sum of six hundred 
forty and 12-100 dollars ($640.12), the same being the earnings 
of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Sewers for the year 1926, the sum of ten hundred thirteen and 
87-100 dollars ($1,013.87), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the appropriations for 
Roads and Bridges for the year 1926, the sum of forty-two hun- 
dred eighty-one and 63-100 dollars ($4,281.63), the same being 
the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 6. That the several departments be authorized to trans- 
fer any balances within their appropriation that may be neces- 
sary to balance the accounts. 

Sect. 7. This resolution to take effect upon its passage. 
. Passed January 10, 1927. 



CITY GOVERNMENT, 1926 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1926 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 



MAYOR 

Salary, $2,000 per annum 

HON. FRED N. MARDEN 

Office: City Hall, Room 4 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

AJdermen-at-Large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Aldermen, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 

Aldermen-at-Large 

Term Expires January, 1928 

HARRY C. BRUNEL, 8 Morton Street 

OLIN H. CHASE, 61 Rumford Street 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 84 School Street 

Term Expires January, 1930 

CHARLES H. ROWE, 38 South State Street 

ROBERT W. BROWN, 3 Cambridge Street 

WILLIAM W. KENNEDY, 67 Rumford Street 



46 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Ward Aldermen 

Ward 1— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook 

Ward 2— CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS, East Concord 
Ward 3— CLINTON 0. PARTRIDGE, West Concord 

Ward 4— GUY H. CUTTER, 18 Ridge Road 

Ward 5— CLARENCE J. WASHBURN, 57 Center Street 
Ward 6— LEVI L. HEATH, 16 South State Street 

Ward 7— CHARLES J. McKEE, 7 Badger Street 

Ward 8— EVERETT S. MAHONEY, R. F. D. 6 

Ward 9— JAMES McGUIRE, JR., 212 No. State Street 



CITY CLERK 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,950 per 
annum. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY 

Office: City Hall, Room 3 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

FRED N. MARDEN, Mayor, ex-officio 



HARRY C. BRUNEL. 
OLIN H. CHASE, 
WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 
CHARLES H. ROWE, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
WILLIAM W. KENNEDY 



Term expires Jan 



nary, 1928 
1928 
1928 
1930 
1930 
1930 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 47 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Chase, Heath, Kennedy 
On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Cutter, Stevens, Mahoney 
On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen Brunei, Mahoney, Rowe 
On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen Brown, Brunei, Kennedy 
On Finance — 

Mayor, Aldermen Cutter, Chase, Stevens, Brown 
On Fire Department — 

Aldermen Tebbetts, McGirr, McGuire 
On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Heath, McKee, McGuire 
On Police and License — 

Aldermen Rowe, McGirr, Partridge 
On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen McGuire, Partridge, Kennedy 
Committee on Playgrounds and Bath — 
Aldermen Washburn, McGirr, Tebbetts, Kennedy, Brunei, 
Mahoney, McGuire ; Mrs. Cora Sullivan, Miss Mary Salt- 
marsh, Mrs. Maude N. Blackwood, Mrs. Elisabeth R. 
Elkins, Richard T. Smith, Frank Nardini. Oscar Silver- 
man, Rev. Ralph L. Minker. 



CITY TREASURER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $26 
as Treasurer of Cemeteries. 

CARL H. FOSTER 

Office: First National Bank 



CITY ENGINEER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary. $3,300 per 
annum. 

FRED W. LANG 

Office: City Hall 



48 CITY OF CONCORD. 



CITY MESSENGER 

anuary by Board of Aldermi 
annum 

EDWARD M. PROCTOR 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,300 per 
annum 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to 

satisfaction of the board. Salary, $3,000 per annum. 

WOODBURY E. HUNT* 
AMOS B. MORRISON** 

Office: City Hall 



ASSESSORS 

Salary, $1,200 per annum. Clerk, $2,000 per annum. 
Office: Room 5, City Hall 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1928 

JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1932 

MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1930 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 

Salary, $3,500 

ORRIN W. HEAD 

Office: City Hall 



SANITARY OFFICER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per 
annum 

CHARLES E. PALMER 

Office: City Hall 



^Resigned March 8, 1926, effective March 31. 1020. 
: *Electf>d March 8, 1926, effective April 1, 1926. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 49 



MILK INSPECTOR 

d of Health. Term unliinil 
annum. 

AUSTIN B. PRESBY 



Appointed by the Board of Health. Term unlimited. .Salary $1,500 per 
annum. 



CITY PHYSICIAN 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $600 per 
annum 

DR. CHARLES H. COOK 

Office: 37 Green Street 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per 
annum 

DR. E. U. SARGENT 

Office: Penacook 



CITY SOLICITOR 



Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $800 per 
annum 



ELWIN L. PAGE 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen 

Ward 1— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook 

Salary, $30 per annum 

Ward 2— CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS, East Concord 

Salary, $10 per annum 

Wards .3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9— ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Hall 

Salary, $350 per annum. 



50 CITY OF CONCORD. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 



JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salary, $1,200 per annum. 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS 

Office: Police Station 



CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT 

Appointed by Justice. Salary $600 per annum. 

JOHN W. STANLEY 



CHIEF 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required. 
Salary, $2,600 per annum. 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL 

Office: Police Station 



DEPUTY CHIEF 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,200 per 
annum. 

VICTOR I. MOORE 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH 



51 



Appointed by Chief, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Term, 
unlimited. Salary, $1,650 per annum to $1,916, according to term of 
service. Police Station service, $1,000 to $1,300. 

J. Edward Silva, Captain of Night "Watch 

Salary, $2,000 per annum. 



Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant 

Salary, $1,950 per annum. 

Samuel L. Bachelder, George H. Silsby, 

Irving B. Robinson, 

House Officers 



Samuel Rodd, 
John B. Long, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
Arthur W. Mclsaac, 
Paul H. Moore, 
Merle F. Densmore, 
Joseph G. Andrews, 



F. Scott Rogers, 
Eugene G. Densmore, 
James J. Halligan, 
George M. Dooley, 
Abraham D. Cushing, 
Thomas M. Harrison, 



RESERVE OFFICERS 



George H. Abbott, Captain 



Joseph King, 
Harold B. Page, 
William E. White, 
Edward L. Howland, 
D. Otis Swain, 
Mark D. Casey, 
John P. Walsh. 
Nelson Forest, 
Nelson E. Strong, 
James M. Kent, 
Thomas Andrews, 



Frank Silva, 
Herbert E. Clark, 
Addison N. Martin, 
Joseph P. Morrill, 
Perley H. Morse, 
Hay ward C. Logan, 
Harry D. Long, 
Michael Mulligan, 
Homer B. Clough, 
John Kenney. 



52 CITY OF CONCORD. 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



TRUSTEES 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none 

Ward 1— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 2— OSCAR H. WOODWARD. 
Ward 3— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Ward 5— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward 6— THOMAS W. D. WORTHEN. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 8— PERLEY B. PHILLIPS. 
Ward 9— WILLIAM J. AHERN, JUNIOR. 



LIBRARIAN 

Elected annually by trustees of library 

GRACE BLANCHARD 



ASSISTANTS 

JOSEPHINE M. BROWN HELEN C. CLARKE 

MARY W. DENNETT BERTHA N. CARR 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 

CITY WATER WORKS 



53 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none 

Office: Room 1, City Hall 

FRED N. MARDEN, Mayor, ex-officio 

BENJAMIN H. ORR, Term expires March 21, 1927 

CARLOS H. FOSTER, " " " 1927 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, " " " 1928 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, " " " 1928 

PATRICK H. CAHILL, " " " 1929 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, " " " 1929 

N. E. MARTIN, " " " 1930 

H. H. DUDLEY, " " " 1930 

President — N. E. Martin 

Clerk — Burns P. Hodgman 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $3,800 per annum. 
Term unlimited 

PERCY R. SANDERS 

Office: City Hall 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

HARRY H. DUDLEY. Term expires January, 1927 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN. 
CARL H. FOSTER, 

4A 



1928 
1929 



54 CITY OP CONCORD. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 



CHIEF ENGINEER 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,600 per annum. 

WILLIAM C. GREEN 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited 

FOB PRECINCT 

Salary, $145 each per annum 

J. EDWARD MORRISON 
W. A. KING 

FOR PENACOOK 

Salary, $100 per annum. 

FRED M. DODGE 

FOR EAST CONCORD 
Salary, $20 per annum 

C. E. ROBINSON 

FOR WEST CONCORD 
Salary, $20 per annum 

GEORGE W. KEMP 



STEWARD FIRE STATION. EAST CONCORD 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annnm 

M. J. LACROIX 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 55, 

SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum 

FRED M. DODGE 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

FRED W. LANG, ex-officio 

Assistant Building Inspector 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, ex-officio 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $85 per annum 

MERVIN E. BANKS 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board, 
of Aldermen. Salary, none 

FRED N. MARDEN, Mayor, ex-officio 
DR. CHARLES H. COOK, ex-officio 
DR. DONALD G. McIVOR 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS 

ARTHUR E. ROBY 

Office: City Hall 



•56 CITY OF CONCORD. 

BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS 



No salary 



FRED W. LANG, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Supt. of the Water Works 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermen. No salary 

FRED N. MARDEN, Mayor, ex-officio 



B. C. WHITE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, JR. 
WILL J. DREW, 
GARDNER G. EMMONS, 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 



Term expires January, 1927 
1927 
1928 
1928 
1929 
1929 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS 

FRANK ATKINSON 

Salary $1,500 per annum. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 57 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES 



Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by Mayor, subject 
to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

FEED N. MARDEN, Mayor, ex-officio 



HERBERT G. ABBOTT, 


Term expires March, 1927 


HARRY G. EMMONS, 


1927 


FRED W. LANG, 


1928 


CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 


1928 


CHARLES G. REMICK, 


1929 


ALLEN HOLLIS, 


1929 



SUPERINTENDENT BLOSSOM HILL AND OLD 
NORTH CEMETERIES 

FRED N. HAMMOND. 

Salary $2,400 per annum. 



UNDERTAKERS 



Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject 1 
of Aldermen. Salary, none 



confirmation by Board 



HAMILTON A. KENDALL 
CARLOS H. FOSTER 
HIRAM G. KILKENNY 
FRANK J. KELLEY 
WILLIAM H. HOYT 
JOHN F. WATERS 
EMILE J. TURGEON 



58 CITY OF CONCORD. 

INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by 
owner of oiL 

CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS 



FENCE VIEWERS 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, $2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

FRED W. LANG 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS 
ALFRED CLARK 



POUND KEEPER 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents 
each for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE 
FRANK E. GALE 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. Salary, $720. 

FRED S. PENDLETON 

Office: 3 Merrimack Street. 



CULLER OF STAVES 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents; hhd. staves, 84 cents; pipe stares, 
40 cents; butt staves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 88 cents per M. — 
paid by party for whom culling is done. 

FRED H. PERLEY 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



59 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Hallett E. Patten, 
Arthur N. Day, 
James F. Fitzgerald, 
Fred H. Perley, 
Fred I. Rolfe, 
William J. Mullen, 
Henry A. Brown, 
Charles E. Hardy, 
Frank Jutras, 
Frank L. Smith, 
Charles J. Sawyer, 
E. E. Young, 
H. C. Morgan, 
R. J. Rowland, 
Archie Black, 
Charles H. Smith, 
Asher E. Ormsbee, 
E. W. Saltmarsh, 
R. W. Gordon, 
Fred E. Wattles, 
Edward Watkins, 
Frank E. Gale, 
Chester D. Parkhurst, 
J. A. Provost, 
John White, 
Nelson Forrest, 
George B. Whittredge, 
Howard Perley, 
W. A. Flanders, 
J. F. McCauley, 
J. S. Callahan, 



H. T. Ross, 
C. H. Staniels. 
Frank J. Clancy, 
G. W. Love joy, 
Alphonse King, 
John S. Chandler, 
R. E. Sanderson, 
William Gooden, 
Guy Rowell, 
Arthur F. Carr, 
Clarence S. Anderson, 
C. H. Hanson. 

C. J. Roers. 
Charles F. Jenks, 
Roger W. Fowler, 
Charles E. Cook, 
V. J. Bennett, 
Waldo A. Holmes, 
Joseph W. Brawn, 
Earl Woodbury, 
John Nyhan, 

S. A. Clark, 
G. F. Rogers, 
Herbert A. Stuart, 
J. W. Currier, 
G. W. Hunter, 

D. C. Taylor, 
A. M. Follett. 
Phillip Desmarais, 
Omar C. Allard, 
L. M. Quimby, 

T. F. O'Neil, 
J. T. Turcotte, 



60 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Harold C. Lee, 
T. Mulligan, 
C. E. Boardman, 
Frank Edmunds, 
William Arthur Stevens, 
Henry F. Sullivan, 
Algernon B. Tewksbury, 
Ellsworth A. White, 
Thomas Murphy, 
W. J. Callahan, 
W. L. Fenton, 
Robert E. Gordon, 
E. W. Nett, 
Duane E. Gordon, 
M. J. Moses, 
Frank R. Garland, 
Robert A. Ranson, 



C. G. Rowell, 
Thomas Harrison, 
Stillman H. Clough, 
Everett Gagnon. 
James S. Chalmers, 
C. E. Moulton, 
George T. Kenney, 
Robert J. Byrne, 
Mark D. Casey, 
Herbert J. Kennedy, 
George H. Abbott, 
Alfred T. Vezina, 
T. E. Kiley, 
George Peaslee, 
Owen E. Hilliard, 
Harold W. Howe. 



CITY WEIGHER 

CHARLES E. KELLEY 

Office: Rear of Police Station 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



George Abbott, Jr., 
Charles F. Mudgett, 



George Griffin, 
Moses E. Haines. 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer, 
Stephen H. Swain, 



William Rowell. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



61 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Pees, for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per 
cord or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person 
employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens, 
John A. Blackwood, 
Albert 0. Preston, 
Alfred Clark, 
Edgar D. Eastman, 
Harry Jones, 
George Darrah, 
Arthur N. Day, 
Frank E. Dimond, 
Henry Rolfe, 
William E. Virgin, 
John Rolfe, 
Fred G. Chandler, 
Fales P. Virgin, 
Clinton 0. Partridge, 
Harvey H. Hay ward, 
Alfred D. Mayo, 
Louis F. Merrill, 
Joseph Messier, 
Herbert W. Rolfe, 
Herman C. Colby, 
Edward L. Foster, 
C. H. Osgood, 
Richard J. Hennessey, 
Stacy E. Oliver, 
Harry Walsh, 
Charles A. Bartlett, 
Harry L. Billings, 
Guy F. Avery, 
E. D. Ashley, 
J. 0. Clark, 
Charles A. Wilkins, 
Earle F. Boutwell, 



Frank J. Giddis, 
Oliver Reno, 
Silas Wiggin, 
F. E. Frost, 
Irving T. Chesley, 
Arthur C. Stewart, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Everett L. Davis, 
Ezra B. Runnells, 
George W. Hanson, 
David L. Carson, 
Oliver J. Fifield, 
Hallett E. Patten. 
W. F. Frost, 
W. J. Mullen, 
Henry M. Richardson, 
Arthur R. Stewart, 
Edward R. Foster, 
Irving Burbank, 
John E. Colton, 
Everett Runnells, 
Clifford G. Culver, 
Horace B. Annis. 
Carl F. Mellin, 
S. 0. Daigneau, 
Henry J. McCrossan, 
Robert E. Philbrick, 
William T. Tippet, 
Algernon B. Tewksbury. 
Solon Colby, 
Roy C. Titus, 
Gerald M. Estell, 
George Thurber. 



62 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. No salary 



William Rowell, 
J. Henry Sanborn, 
Everett S. Mahoney, 
William H. McGuire, 
P. Henry D. Leary, 
William J. Bishop, 
William A. Lee, 
Richard J. Lee, 
Zeb F. Swain, 
Albert S. Trask, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
Elmer E. Babb, 
Clarence J. Spead, 
W. J. Sleeper, 
John W. McGowan, 
Henry Morrill, 
Harry H. Kennedy, 
John Sweeney, 
John R. Hall, 
Michael J. Lee, 
Arthur W. Brown, 
Edward E. Beane, 
Robert F. Keane, Jr., 
Victor T. Lauze, 
Joseph A. Normandeau, 
William H. Murphy, 
Malcolm Butler, 



W. Arthur Bean, 
Willis H. Robbins, 
Henry Rolfe, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Fred L. Plummer, 
John H. Clark, 
Ned J. Morrill, 
Seth R. Hood, 
William Stanley, 
George E. Robinson, 
Joseph J. Booth, 
Arthur W. Buntdn, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Manley W. Morgan, 
Henry Riley, 
Fred W. Lang, 
Charles H. Berry, 
Niram M. Kays, 
Wilfred H. Brennan, 
James H. Brannigan, 
E. H. Smart, 
John C. Smith, 
Walter Dow, 
I. J. Huneau, 
Joseph Morgan, 
Philip W. Clark. 



BOARD OP EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board of 
Aldermen. No salary 

CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., ex-officio. 
FRED W. LANG, ex-officio, 
ARTHUR W. BROWN. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 63 

WARD OFFICERS 

SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS 

Ward 1— ALFRED J. YORK, 
ELI LAFLAMME, 
GEORGE F.McGIRR. 

Ward 2— HAROLD A. CATE, 

HERBERT F. PIPER, 
CLEON E. PERRY. 

Ward 3— MYRA W. B. RICHARDSON, 
EDWARD P. ROBINSON, 
J. HAROLD JOHNSON. 

Ward 4— ESTHER CHENEY, 

B. J. HARRIOTT, 
HARRY D. CHALLIS. 

Ward 5— JOSEPH P. SARGENT, 
FRANKLIN B. GORDON, 
E. W. WALKER. 

Ward 6— CHARLES DUNCAN, 

ARTHUR W. STEVENS, 
ERNEST W. SALTMARSH. 

Ward 7— HAROLD M. FARRAR, 
WALDO S. ROUND Y, 
JAMES P. HAYWARD. 

Ward 8— FRED SMITH, 

C. C. STUART, 
ALBERT J. AYOTTE. 

Ward 9~ PATRICK J. GAVAGHAN, 
WILLIAM A. DREW, 
FRANK J. SPAIN. 



64 CITY OF CONCORD. 

WARD CLERKS 

Ward 1— ORION H. HARDY. 
Ward 2— WILLIS R. LYNA. 
Ward b— EARL N. WOODBURY. 
Ward 4— WILLIAM C. BRUNEL. 
Ward 5— EDWARD A. DAME. 
Ward 6— GUY JEWETT. 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE. 
Ward 8— HERBERT A. ROBINSON. 
Ward 9— ANDREW E. SALTMARSH. 



MODERATORS 

Ward 1— JOHN H. ROLFE. 
Ward 2— CHARLES A. MAXNER. 
Ward 3— FRANK C. BLODGETT. 
Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS. 
Ward 5— WILLIAM L. STEVENS. 
Ward 5— ARTHUR E. DOLE. 
Ward 7— ALBERT W. THOMPSON 
Ward 8— CORNELIUS McCORMICK. 
Ward 9— PAUL E. CASEY. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 



65 



MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD. 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853, and until 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the 
Mayor has been elected for two years at each biennial election in November. 
Under the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected in 
December, 1910, for one year, and biennially thereafter in November, be- 
ginning ii "•." year 1911. 



Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 

il HORACE A. BROWN,f 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 

11 HENRY W. CLAPP, 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 

" NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 

" HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 

" WILLIS H. FLINT, 

" FRED N. MARDEN. 



1853- '54. 
'55. 

1856-'57-'58. 
1859- '60. 

1861- '62. 

1863- '64. 
'65. 

1866- '67. 

1868-'69. 

1870- '71. 
1872- '73- '74- '75. 

1876-77. 

1878-'79-'80. 

1880-'81-'82. 

1883- '84- '85- '86. 

1887-'88. 

1889- '90. 

1891- '92. 

1893- '94. 

1895- '96. 

1897- '98. 
1899-1900. 

1901- '02. 

1903- '08. 

1909-15. 

1916- '17. 

1918- '19. 

1920- '23. 

1924- '25. 

1926- . 



* Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
t Term closed in November, 1880. 
t Term commenced in November, 1880. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 



SCHOOL REPORT 



Board of Education, 1926-1927 



Harry F. Lake, Esq., 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 



President 
Secretary 



MEMBERS 



TERM EXPIRES 
1927 



Rev. W. Stanley Emery, 
Mrs. Osma C. Morrill, 
Dr. Carleton R. Metcalf, 



110 North State Street 

123 North State Street 

Kensington Road 



1928 



Harry F. Lake, Esq., 
Mrs. Dorothy B. Jackson, 
Merton C. Knapp, 



29 Auburn Street 

111 Center Street 

60 Pillsbury Street 



1929 



Mr. Bennett Batchelder, 
Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins, 
Mr. Joseph S. Otis. 



103 Center Street 

24 Union Street 

26 Church Street 



70 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 



Mb. Batchelder 



FINANCE 

Dr. Metcalp 



Mr. Otis 



Mr. Emery 



high school 
Mr. Lake 



Dr. Metcalf 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 

ts. Elkins Mr. Knapp Mr. Batchelder 



elementary schools 
Mrs. Jackson Mr. Knapp 



Mr. Emery 



Mrs. Morrill 



kindergartens 
Mrs. Jackson 



Dr. Metcalf 



Mr. Otis 



rural schools 
Mrs. Elkins 



Mr. Emery 



buildings and repairs 
Mr. Batchelder Mr. Lake Mr. Otis 



Mr. Lake 



discipline 

Mrs. Morrill 



Mr. Emery 



Dr. Metcalf 



HYGIENE 

Mrs. Morrill 



Mr. Emery 



SCHOOL REPORT. 
.MANUAL TRAINING 

Wood and Iron 
Mr. Batchelder Mrs. Jackson 



71 



Mr. Otis 



Mrs. Jackson 



Sewing and Cooking 
Mrs. Morrill 



Mrs. Elktns 



Mrs. Morrill 



music 
Mr. Batchelder 



Mrs. Elkins 



Mrs. Elkins 



drawing 
Mr. Knapp 



Mrs. Jackson 



Mr. Emery 



text-books 
Mr. Lake 



Mrs. Elkins 



Mr. Otis 



training school 
Mrs. Jackson 



Mr. Knapp 



Mr. Knapp 



night school 
Mr. Otis 



Dr. Metcalp 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 



Louis John Rundlett 
15 Summit Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours : 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Office open 8 to 12. a. m. 
1.30 to 6 p.m. Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 603-R. 



72 CITY OP CONCORD. 

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Charles "Waterman Walker 
74 School Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours : 4 to 6 p. m., school days. Telephones : Office, 2360 
house, 1157-W. 



TREASURER 

Harry Lucius Alexander 
Meehanicks Bank. 12 Auburn Street. Telephone, 63. 



ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Arthur James Taylor 

6 Avon Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours : 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2, 4 to 5 p. m. ; summer 

vacation, 2 to 4 p. m. Telephones : Office, 2360 ; 

house, 2195-W. 



SECRETARIES 

Cyrene Sargent Farrar 
4 Rockingham Street. Telephone, 702. 

Celia Shufp 
7 Oak Street. Telephone, 1783-J. 

Madeleine Lumina Tetreault 
Suncook, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 73 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR 

Arthur Kehew Day, M. D. 

11 South Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., and 4 to 4.30 p. m. on school days. 
Telephones: Office, 2360; house, S87-W. 



SCHOOL NURSES 

Helen Young Upham, R. N. 

941/2 So. State Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours : 8.30 to 9 a. m. on school days. 
Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 1374-J. 

Georgena Campbell Mansur, R. N. 

9 Perry Avenue. Office: Parker School. 

Hours : 8.30 to 9 a. m. on school days. 
Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 405-R. 



CLERK 

Esther Augusta Magnuson 
50 West Street. Telephone, 203-J. 



• OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT 

Arthur P. Morrill Moderator 

Ray E. Burkett Clerk 

William C. Brunel and Clyde M. Davis Auditors 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



To the Voters of Union School District: 

At the last annual District meeting, the Board was in- 
structed by the District to investigate the need of a new- 
grade school in the south end of the city, and if advisable, 
to select a site for the same, and secure such site for the 
District by obtaining an option for its purchase. In ac- 
cordance with that vote, the Board has undertaken to 
make such examination of the needs of the District, so far 
as the south end is concerned, and to determine which site 
of those available seemed best for the purposes of the Dis- 
trict. The so-called south end of the city for school pur- 
poses may be regarded as that portion of the city south of 
Downing Street, and has within its territory the Penacook, 
Cogswell, Dunklee, and Iron Works Schools. The school 
population is now about as follows : 

The Penacook School, which is some 57 years old, a four- 
room building, has a population of 160 to 175 pupils; the 
Cogswell School, a two-room building, has a population of 
about 85 to 90 pupils ; the Iron Works School, about 31 ; 
and the Dunklee School, about 60. It has long been felt 
by the residents of this section that there should be one 
good new school building to serve the school needs of this 
rapidly growing part of the city. 

In accordance with the above mentioned vote, the School 
Board took measures to examine the entire territory to 
find a lot, if possible, of proper location, size and value. 
We considered that if a new building is erected, it should 
be one probably of twelve rooms, so constructed as to be 
most economically enlarged when necessary, and with a 
large enough area about it to provide for all recreational 
facilities for both boys and girls separately. Many parts 
of the south end are thickly populated, and this fact re- 
sulted finally in only four sites being critically examined. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 75 

They are: (1) The area, now partly occupied, bounded on 
the north by West Street, on the east by Glen Street, on 
the west by Dunklee Street and on the south by Allison 
Street, — our Dunklee Street Kindergarten is on this area. 
This whole area comprises some 4 and 6/10 acres, 
and has upon it twelve houses, some of them of the 
double-tenement type, and the assessed value is $44,050. 
If the property on this area which faces on Allison Street 
and West Street should not be considered, the assessed 
valuation would be $25,050, but the space available for 
school purposes would thereby be very considerably de- 
creased. 

(2) The property bounded by Clinton, South and Avon 
Streets, comprising an area of 2 and 3/10 acres, having two 
houses upon it and of an assessed value of $15,000. 

(3) What may be called the Broadway site, located on 
the east side of Broadway, south of McKinley Street and 
nearly opposite the Eollins Park playground. This area 
contains 5 and 6/10 acres of land, and has an assessed value 
of $3,500. 

(4) A site which is a part of the Frank W. Paige Farm, 
on the west side of South Street, and immediately north 
of the residence of Mr. Paige and south of Pillsbury Street. 
This site was most critically examined from the standpoint 
of all phases of school needs that occurred to us. It is a 
level area, beautifully located, the ravine that separates in 
part this area from the highway could easily be filled in, 
leaving an attractive pine growth upon the site that would 
make it a place unique for beauty and recreation. Mr. 
Paige will sell to the District an area of eight acres for 
the sum of $450 per acre, that is, for the total acreage, 
$3,600. This area would have a frontage on South Street 
of 800 feet. From the facts available to us, it seems that 
the growth in the south end is largely between Broadway 
and South Street and also to a considerable extent south 
of Clinton Street and west of South Street. On the whole, 



76 CITY OF CONCORD. 

from the standpoint of size, cost, a fair degree of centrality 
and the prospect of being in the line of future growth, this 
site proved to be the one most appealing to the Board. 

It should be remembered that areas as large as herein 
discussed cannot be taken by the right of eminent domain ; 
— the property therefore must be obtained by negotiation. 

We have, therefore, under the authority set forth in the 
vote of the District, paid Mr. Paige the sum of $100 for 
the privilege of an option for the purchase of this area, the 
option to be exercised before May 1st, 1927. We believe 
this option should be exercised, and the District would then 
have a suitable site for its future school house. 

It may be that some other site will prove to be more de- 
sirable to the District than this one, — if so, we believe it 
should be acquired now, before the rapid building of 
homes and other improvements largely increase the cost. 
In this connection, it might be stated that the sites of the 
Cogswell and Penacook Schools cannot be economically en- 
larged, but the abandonment of these and the other school 
buildings named, with the tracts of land on which they 
stand, would mean a very considerable sum upon the sale 
of these properties. 

It will be noted that in this discussion we made no men- 
tion of the Hall Street section as related to this school 
site. There has been talk of direct access from Hall Street 
to such building as might be erected to the south end of 
the city to accommodate the children of the Hall Street 
neighborhood by means of an overhead bridge across the 
railroad tracks, — we believe this to be impracticable, and 
that the needs of the Hall Street section must be other- 
wise provided for. 

This leads us to offer a suggestion concerning the Hall 
Street School, which has been in operation since the first 
of the year in a building, the purchase of which was author- 
ized at the last District meeting. This school has had as 
high a population as 24 pupils, a much larger number than 
anticipated, and rather more than the capacity of the 
room in which the school is held. It comprises four grades. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 77 

The children of the Hall Street section have no Kinder- 
garten facilities. If this section of the city continues to 
grow, an adequate school building must soon be provided. 
We feel that the operation of this present school has been 
successful, in that it has met a real need. In the event 
that presently a larger school building should be neces- 
sary, the entire outlay for the property now in use could 
undoubtedly be recovered upon the occasion of its sale. 

We believe the time has come to consider the appoint- 
ment of a Dean for the boys of the High School. This sug- 
gestion in no way reflects upon the serious attempts con- 
stantly made by the teachers in the High School to direct 
and guide the boys properly along correct social and schol- 
astic lines at the present time, and to advise them as to 
their future work. However, we are convinced that such 
work as is now done cannot, in the nature of things, be 
adequate, in addition to the regular work of the teachers. 

Certain considerations bearing upon the matter of a dean 
may be noted. 

(a) Probably 50% of the boys in this or any high school 
are in need of sound advice in determining their life work ; 

(b) The number of boys who have an appreciation of 
post secondary education is surprisingly small ; 

(c) Organized school spirit among the boys in the High 
School leaves much to be desired ; 

(d) Intimate acquaintance with boys everywhere proves 
that even at the High School age a too large proportion 
of boys have been deprived of proper information of the 
most vital things of life — information not only necessary 
to their own welfare, but likewise necessary to the suc- 
cess and welfare of the school; 

(e) A more intimate understanding on the part of the 
parents of the boys as to school activities is desirable ; 

(f) The boys of the High School would without doubt 
welcome the idea; 



78 CITY OF CONCORD. 

(g) The logic that brought about the position of Dean 
for girls applies with equal force to the suggestion of a 
Dean for boys. 

It would seem obvious that such work can be better done 
when the obligation is in the hands of a single individual, 
whose time, except for a small amount of teaching, is all 
taken up with this character of work, than when done by 
several whose chief obligations are elsewhere. Our con- 
viction is, perhaps, based in part upon the fact that the 
work of Miss Anderson, Dean of Girls, has been attended 
with great success. 

While the new High School building is strictly under the 
direction of the Joint High School Building Committee, 
of which the Board of Education is a part, it will be proper, 
Ave feel sure, to announce at this time that there is some 
likelihood that the new High School building will not be 
ready for occupancy before January 1, 1928. We are satis- 
fied that the contractors have done all within reason to 
complete the building by September 1, 1927, but ordinary 
delays and bad building weather have retarded the work 
beyond usual expectations. That the building is being 
soundly constructed, in accordance with the spirit and the 
letter of the specifications, we feel assured. 

The Board has one representative, Dr. Metcalf, on a 
Citizens' Committee which has undertaken the task of 
building a Memorial Athletic Field. This committee has 
procured a tract 'of land, several acres in extent, on South 
Fruit Street, not far from the New High School and ex- 
pects to begin construction this year. 

When completed, the playground will have a football 
field, a baseball diamond, a quarter mile cinder track, 
tennis courts, bleachers and a locker building. The project 
has been greatly encouraged by a munificent initial gift 
of $10,000 from Hon. Allen Hollis. Money to complete the 
fund, about $40,000 more, is to be raised by subscription. 

We wish to say that the Board has watched with great 
interest the proposed legislation, and the changes made in 



SCHOOL REPORT. 79 

the same from time to time in the present Legislature, re- 
lating to the affairs of Union School District. We have, our- 
selves, taken no part in the matter, because of the fact that 
the proposed legislation vitally affected your School Board. 
We wish to say here, however, that the legislation now 
pending, providing for election of school board members 
by means of the Australian ballot somewhat modified, and 
further providing for the publication of the District's 
budget well in advance of the District meeting, permitting 
a full participation in the discussion or make-up of the 
same by the public, has our hearty and unqualified ap- 
proval. 

Of course, the outstanding matter of interest in the Dis- 
trict for the past year has been the survey authorized by 
the District two years ago. The material pertaining to 
this has been made a public record, and on this informa- 
tion the public opinion may be formed. The School Board, 
therefore, does not herein enter into any further discus- 
sion of the issues involved, nor does it offer any recom- 
mendations in reference to the same. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
W. STANLEY EMERY. 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
CARLETON R. METCALF, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
MERTON C. KNAPP, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 

Board of Education of Union School District. 



REPORT OF TREASURER 

Union School District 
March 16, 1926, to March 14, 1927 

H. L. Alexander, Treasurer 



APPROPRIATION 

Amount voted by District for general purposes $296,097.69" 

Amount voted for Hall Street School 4,000.00 

Received from Dog Licenses 2,438.51 

Received from Abial Walker Fund 40.97 

Amount voted for Teachers' Pension Fund 1,000.00 
Amount voted for option on site for South End 

School 500.00 



$304,077.17 

RECEIPTS 



Balance on hand March 16, 1926 


$3,121.32 


Drawn from City Treasurer 


304,077.17 


Received from tuition 


6,905.52 


Received from cash sales for school lunches 


5,089.09 


Received from cash sales for miscellaneous 


602.66 


Received from cash sales for text books 


112.80 


Received from cash sales for scholars' supplies' 


* 4,811.95 


(Manual Training) 




Received from cash sales for medical inspection 


20.35 


Received from cash sales for repairs 


2,576.00 


Received from cash sales for rent Hall Street 




house 


227.00 




$327,543.86 


♦Received from State of New Hampshire. $4,169.88 




" supplies, 642.07 





$4,811.95 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



SI 



EXPENDED 



1. 


Expenses of School Board and other district 






officers 


$321.00 


o 


Expenses of Superintendents 


4,500.00 


3. 


Truant Officer and census 


151.69 




Salary of Truant Officer 


800.00 


4. 


Other expenses of administration — 






Maintenance 


1,635.69 




Salaries 


2,619.71 


5. 


Salaries of principals and regular teachers 


166,796.61 


6. 


Salaries of supervisors of special subjects 


43,534.05 


7. 


Text books 


4,070.38 


8. 


Reference books, maps, apparatus, etc. 


434.43 


9. 


Scholars' supplies 


5,764.09 


10. 


Flags 


14.70 


11. 


Graduation exercises, exhibits, advertising 


920.12 


12. 


Other expenses of instruction 


1,366.86 


13. 


Janitors' salaries 


15,245.58 




Janitor and building supplies 


1,114.44 


14. 


Fuel 


14,222.26 


15. 


Water 


726.39 


16. 


Light and power 


2,601.27 


17. 


Repairs — maintenance 


13,470.89 




salaries 


1,520.06 


18. 


Other expenses of operation and main- 






tenance 


1,442.31 


19. 


Libraries 


15.00 


20. 


Medical inspection — maintenance 


1,702.73 




salaries 


6,426.84 


21. 


Transportation 


14,442.91 


22. 


Other special activities — maintenance 


4,106.45 




night school 


408.00 


23. 


Insurance 


2,065.75 


24. 


Rebate of tuition 


63.35 


25. 


Land and new buildings (Hall Street 






school) 


3,391.25 


26. 


New equipment 


764.63- 



82 CITY OF CONCORD. 

27. Miscellaneous — per capita tax $6,484.00 

Special appropriation for Teachers' Pension 
Fund deposited in Merrimack County 
Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Paid for option on site for South End school 100.00 



$324,243.44 
Balance on hand 3,300.42 



$327,543.86 
Balance in Hands of Treasurer, March 14, 1927 

Balance in general fund $2,900.42 

Balance appropriated for site for South End 

school 400.00 





$3,300.42 


Hall Street Building and Lot 




RECEIPTS 




ropriation 
dved for rent 


$4,000.00 
227.00 



L227.00 



EXPENDITURES 



Purchase price paid 

Bank 
Balance (included ii 

$2,900.42) 


New Hampshire Savings 
a general balance of 

H. L. ALEXA 


$3,391.25 
835.75 




$4,227.00 

NDER, 

Treasurer. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 83 

Concord, N. H., March 24, 1927. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the Treasurer of Union School District and 
find the expenditures correctly cast and a proper voucher 
for each item. 

CLYDE M. DAVIS, 
WILLIAM C. BRUNEI,. 

Auditors. 



84 CITY OF CONCORD. 

NEW HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING 

Bonds authorized March 26, 1925, for land 

and equipment $550,000.00 

Total bonds sold 433,000.00 

Amount received from sale of 

bonds $436,938.40 

Amount drawn against bonds sold 357,633.74 



Balance in hands of City 

Treasurer $79,304.66 

Amount drawn from City Treasurer $357,633.74 

Paid Merrimack County for build- 



ing site 


$70,000.00 


Paid Secretary of State, acct. copy 




of act authorizing issue of 




bonds 


1.50 


Paid National Shawmut Bank, 




acct. services in connection with 




preparation, sale and delivery 




of bonds 


572.00 


Paid New England Tel. & Tel. Co. 


2.13 


Paid Register of Deeds — recording 




deed 


2.07 


Paid L. J. Rundlett — expenses 




acct. trip to Worcester 


19.31 


Paid Monitor-Patriot Co. — adver- 




tising bonds 


29.60 


Paid Concord Telegram, advertis- 




ing bonds 


22.50 


Paid Union Leader Pub. Co., ad- 




vertising bonds 


28.00 


Paid Crystal I. Parsons — steno- 




graphic work 


25.00 


Paid Robbins Insurance Agency — 




surety bond for contractors 


6,133.74 



SCHOOL EEPORT. 85 



Paid W. E. Virgin $4.55 

Paid Celia Shuff — recording meet- 
ings 42.00 

Paid Charles Ada — services at 
Parker School for meetings 3.00 

Paid J. D. Leland & Co.— Archi- 
tects 22,781.40 

Paid L. H. Shattuck, Inc.— Gen- 
eral Contractors 247,386.55 



17,053.35 



Balance in hands of Treasurer $10,580.39 



H. L. ALEXANDER, 

Treasurer. 



Concord, N. H., March 24, 1927. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the Treasurer of Union School District for the 
New High School Building Account and find the expendi- 
tures correctly cast and a proper voucher for each item. 

CLYDE M. DAVIS, 
WILLIAM C. BRUNEL, 

Auditors. 



86 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

STATISTICS 



Valuation of Concord (1926) $30,242,550.00 

Valuation of Union School District (1926) 27,528,612.00 

Rate of taxation per $1000 28.23 

Average rate of assessed valuation 27.97 

Bonded indebtedness of City entire 923,000.00 

Bonded indebtedness of Union School District 569,000.00 

Number of public day schools 68 



Senior High 
Junior High 
Elementary 
Rural (mixed) 
Kindergartens 
Special 

Opportunity Class 
Mechanic Arts 
Home Economics 



Number of Evening Schools 
Number of Summer Schools 
Number of School Buildings 
Number of Teachers 



2 

4 

21 

144 



High School 

Junior High Schools 

Elementary Schools 

Rural Schools 

Kindergartens 

Special Class 

Evening Schools 

Summer Schools 

Mechanic Arts 

Home Economics 

Music 

Drawing 

Physical Culture 

Training Teacher 

Dean of Girls (High School ) 

Librarian (High School) 

Special Teachers 

Number of Janitors 
Special Repair Man 



SCHOOL REPORT. 87 

Medical Inspection 3 

Inspector 1 

Nurses 2 

Clerks 7 

Superintendents 3 

High School 1 

Parker School 1 

Chandler School 1 

Medical Inspection 1 

Average Salaries of Superintendents (paid by city) $2,250.00 

Average Salary of Headmaster (High School) 3,600.00 

Average Salary of Sub-master (High School) 2,000.00 

Average Salaries of Teachers (Men) 2,275.00 

Average Salaries of Teachers (Women) 1,406.41 

Average Salaries of High School (Men) $2,275.00 

Average Salaries of High School (Women) 1,476.66 

Average Salaries of High School (both) 1,704.75 

Average Salaries Junior High School 1,584.00 

Average Salaries Elementary School 1,309.82 

Average Salaries Kindergartens 1,212.50 

Average Salaries Clerks 731.42 

Average Salary Librarian 1,000.00 

Average Salary Dean of Girls 1,600.00 

Average Salaries Janitors 1,049.42 

Average Salaries Mechanic Arts Teachers 1,975.00 

Average Salaries Home Economics Teachers 1,550.00 

Average Salary Physical Director 1,350.00 

Average Salary Special Repair Man 1,716.00 

Average Salary Medical Inspector 2,800.00 

Average Salaries Nurses 1,400.00 

Average Salary Attendance Officer 800.00 



88 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Cost Per Capita 

Entire expense based on average membership=$10.7.03. 
Entire expense based on entire enrollment=$96.40. 
Senior high school based on average membership=$144.28. 
Senior high school based on entire enrollment=$138.64 
Junior high schools based on average membership=$153.3S 
Junior high schools based on entire enrollment=$141.74. 
Elementary schools based on average membership=$80.74. 
Elementary schools based on entire enrollment=$71.71. 
Rural schools based on average membership=$120.45. 
Rural schools based on entire enrollment=$112.39. 
Kindergartens based on average membership=$94.37. 
Kindergartens based on entire enrollment=$75.31 
Music based on average membership=$1.27. 
Music based on entire enrollment=$1.15. 
Drawing based on average membership=$.66. 
Drawing based on entire enrollmenfc=$.60. 
Manual training based on average membership=$53.54. 
Manual training based on entire enrollment=$46.41. 
Domestic arts based on average membership=$21.63. 
Domestic arts based on entire enrollment=$20.22. 
Text-books based on average membership=$1.45. 
Text-books based on entire enrollment=$1.32. 
Scholars' supplies based on average membership=$1.90. 
Scholars' supplies based on entire enrollment=$1.71. 



Tuition Receipts 

High School $6,646.10 

Garrison School 39.21 

Rumford School 75.00 

Kimball School 115.47 

Dewey Training School 19.74 

Summer School 10.00 



$6,905.52 
Less rebates 63.35 



Net receipts $6,842.17 



school report. 89 

For Every Dollar Expended 

1926-1927 

).6500 Teachers' salaries 

.0500 Janitors' salaries and supplies 

.0463 Repairs 

.0446 Transportation of pupils 

.0440 Fuel 

.0251 Medical inspection 

.0200 State per capita tax 

.0178 Scholars' supplies 

.0139 Other special activities 

.0136 Superintendents' salaries 

.0131 Other expenses of administration 

.0125 Text-books 

.0104 Lands and new buildings 

.0080 Light and power 

.0063 Insurance on buildings 

.0044 Other expenses of operation and maintenance 

.0042 Other expenses of instruction 

.0029 Truant Officer and expenses 

.0028 Graduations, exhibits, etc. 

.0023 New equipment 

.0022 Water 

.0012 Reference books, maps, etc. 

.0044 All other items 



90 CITY OF CONCORD. 

School Board Report of Estimated Financial Budget 
for 1927-1928 

Amount of money required by law ($3.50 on each $1,000 of the 
inventory) . 

Elementary High 
Schools Schools 

I — Budget (school money) : 

(a) For support of schools, $184,847.25 $104,130.31 

(b) For purchase of text-books and 

scholars' supplies, 4,797.44 2,702.56 

(c) For purchase of flags and appur- 

tenances, 15.99 9.01 

(d) For payment of tuitions in high 

schools, 

(e) Total amount required for the 

above items, 189,660.68 106,841.88 

(f) Estimate of $5 tax on 1926 in- 

ventory, 137,643.06 

II — Requirements to meet the Budget: 

(a) For support of elementary schools, 189,660.68 

(b) For support of high school and 

high school tuitions, 106,841.88 

Total support of all schools, 296,502.56 

III — School Board report of assessment 
required: 

(1) For the support of schools and the 

purchase of required books, 
supplies and flags, and the pay- 
ment of high school tuitions, 296,502.56 

Estimate of $3.50 tax on 1926 as- 
sessed valuation, 96,350.14 

Estimate of additional sums needed, 200,152.42 

(2) For the payment of per capita tax, 6,602.00 

(3) For the payment of debt (statutory), 52,000.00 

(4) For the payment of interest 

(statutory), 26,502.50 

(5) For the payment of other statutory 

requirements, 

(6) For the general administration of 

the schools, 9,570.00 

Total budget for 1927-1928, 391,177.06 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



To the Honorable Board of Education of Union School 
District, Supervisory Union No. 8: 

I am submitting for your consideration my forty-first 
report of the condition of the schools of this district, it 
being the sixty-ninth of its series. 

The year just passed has been filled with much of moment 
to education in this city, the State and the Nation. 

In the face of a great deal of disturbance of a varied 
character the progress of school work has been carried on 
with a definite degree of success both by a capable corps 
of faithful teachers and an interested, studious pupil body. 

It would be for the decided advantage of school work 
if it could be allowed to proceed without the unnecessary 
disturbance that has been in evidence for the past eight 
years. 

In this city the course of study, the methods used in 
carrying it out, and the means of improving the teaching 
corps have been in accord with the most approved modern 
educational ideas. 

In the State, nothing is being left undone to advance edu- 
cational standards in curricula requirements, in making the 
teaching corps more efficient, and in giving a better chance 
for education in the rural districts. The even distribution 
of educational opportunity among the youth of the State 
is a blessing too little realized outside of immediate edu- 
cational circles. 

In the Nation nothing is being left undone to promote 
the efficiency of public education. The National Organiza- 
tions were never more prosperous nor better organized. 

Prominent among the things that are receiving special 
attention are: 



92 CITY OF CONCORD. 

1 — Radical changes in the curricula for all grades of 
school. 

2 — A recently appointed commission with Dr. Charles 
H. Judd of the University of Chicago, as Chairman, is now 
making investigations to formulate a definite report on 
shortening the elementary curriculum. 

3 — The promotion of the idea of high school extension 
courses by which public school pupils can get, if they de- 
sire it, advanced work in Mechanic Arts, Domestic Arts 
and Commercial subjects, and additional work along the 
lines of college requirements, thereby saving one or two 
years' stay in college. 

4 — Health education including physical drill leads in 
curricula changes and will mean great progress in raising 
the standard of public school work all over the country. 

I ask your attention to these trends of educational thought 
to the end that the schools of this city may continue in the 
progressive educational current and not be turned into 
eddies through an improperly inflamed public mind. 

The accomplishment of the schools of this district may be 
determined from the part of this report that follows. 

Pupil Enrollment 

From the attendance tables one can see a slow gain in 
pupil enrollment each succeeding year. The past year 
shows quite an even distribution throughout the entire dis- 
trict. 

The rural schools are more than holding up to past 
records, the kindergartens are being more largely attended, 
the elementary grades are larger, the Junior High grades 
remain about the same and the Senior High School has 
grown perceptibly since last year. 

The increases will be well taken care of in all sections 
when the new high school building is occupied. Until 
then, some sections and various rooms will be overcrowded, 
teachers enforced to bear a teaching load that ought not to 



SCHOOL REPORT. G3 

exist, and parents confronted with the inconvenience of 
having their children transferred to various buildings. 

There are about one hundred seventy-five more pupils 
in the public schools than there were last year. The even 
distribution of this increase does not suggest the employ- 
ment of additional teachers. In the Harriet P. Dame 
School, however, the congestion called for one extra teacher. 
This section of the city is steadily growing and its con- 
tinued growth will call for the erection of another building 
farther to the east in the not too distant future. 

The senior high school attendance will, in a short time; 
reach a maximum of six hundred fifty. 

Buildings 

The school buildings are generally in good repair. I 
renew my former recommendation that a specific sum be 
appropriated each year to keep natural deterioration from 
gaining too much headway. 

The Hall Street building, originally a dwelling house, was 
bought by the district for school use. A room was fitted 
up with the necessary closet attachments to accommodate 
about twenty-five pupils. By careful planning the room 
has approximated the air space required for such a room, 
the lighting made sufficient, and the ventilation taken care 
of by an electric-fan attachment. The heating appears to 
be adequate and the yard room sufficient for playground 
privileges. Outside of the upper story, the building and 
garage have been rented and the revenue added to the 
general fund. 

The spare room in the Harriet P. Dame School was oc- 
cupied at the beginning of the fall term. 

The Practice House on "Warren Street was enlarged dur- 
ing the summer vacation by an addition on the east side. 
This furnished extra room in the basement, a new kitchen 
on the first floor and an enlarged sewing room in the second 
story. The working conditions have been greatly im- 
proved by this enlargement. 



94 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The upper corridor of the Kimball School was closed 
in by glass doors on each side thus insuring a limited hall 
space, well heated, that adds materially to the efficiency of 
the building. 

The Eastman School caught fire, in the roof, from burn- 
ing grass in the yard, on April 14, 1926, and the building 
was damaged to such an extent that school was suspended 
for two days before the vacation, the classes in the mean- 
time, being housed in one of the halls in the village. 

The Kimball, Eastman, and the Mountain Schools were 
fitted up with electric lights. These have proved a great 
convenience too long delayed. 

The inside of the machine room and the closets at the 
Morrill School were painted. 

There is pressing need that the City Water System be 
extended to East Concord and also to Concord Heights. 

It is difficult to see how the Harriet P. Dame School 
could be saved in case of fire with the present lack of 
facilities for extinguishing it. There are no adequate sani- 
tary conveniences in this building. 

Much difficulty was experienced last spring at the fire 
in the Eastman School owing to inadequate water supply 
and delay in getting the stream to the building. The pres- 
ent system for flushing the closets in this building is en- 
tirely inadequate and unreliable. 

Telephones are now installed in all the school buildings. 

The new High School building in process of construction 
will give ample room for relieving congestion in many 
sections of the city. It is hoped that this may be ready 
for occupancy by the beginning of the next fall term. 

The option on the lot at the South end of the City should 
be taken up. Its location is wisely selected. 

Summer School 

Free summer schools were instituted during the sum- 
mer of 1926. There were four rooms in the Kimball School 
devoted to this work. The first six grades of school were 



SCHOOL REPORT. 95 

conducted, the pupils being largely those who needed to 
make up back work. The results were very satisfactory, 
many pupils keeping grade and some advancing a grade. 
The teachers were: 

Grace B. Kelley, Classes K, L — 6th year. 
Margaret G. Mannion, Classes I, J — 5th year. 
Katharine E. Crabbe, Classes E, F, G, H— 3rd and 

4th years. 
Evelyn P. Blackwood, Classes A, B, C, D— 1st and 2nd 

years. 

The School Survey 

The survey of the schools of this district conducted by 
Dr. Frank E. Spaulding, Dean of the Graduate School of 
Education of Yale University, was completed and sub- 
mitted to the Board of Education last May. 

The three major recommendations; that of appointing 
three special teachers, of discontinuing the Dewey Training 
School, and of adding another Junior High School year 
were not adopted by a majority vote of the Board of 
Education. 

In the opinion of the superintendent these recommenda- 
tions were not warranted by the Surveyor's findings, inas- 
much as he acknowledged the superiority of the schools, 
could find no fault with school achievement, and thought 
that the present system could do much better work under 
the Reorganization Plan submitted by the superintendent 
than it is doing at present. 

It is indeed unfortunate that the schools of this city 
should be subjected to such a long period of unrest, for 
which, in the judgment of the superintendent, there was 
not the least need. They have lost perceptibly by this 
unwarranted interruption and a reasonably long period of 
uninterruption will be needed to bring them back into 
normal condition. 



96 CITY OP CONCORD. 

School Work 

The work of the High School, The Morrill School of 
Mechanic Arts, Home Economics, Music, Drawing, Physi- 
cal Education, Attendance Officer, Medical Inspection, and 
Kindergartens is fully set forth in the special reports to 
be found in this pamphlet. I commend them to your care- 
ful reading. 

The work of the Junior High Schools is definitely pro- 
gressive and up to date as far as housing limitations will 
permit. When these schools are located in one building 
you will note a very perceptible improvement in about all 
the lines that modern thought is assigning to such work. 
This will be evident in an expanded curriculum, including 
a more comprehensive course in social science, and a two- 
year course in modern language, and enlarged extra- 
curricula and social activities. 

This is an opportunity that the superintendent has 
looked forward to for the last seventeen years. Its realiza- 
tion will mean more thorough and more inclusive work for 
these schools. 

The work of the elementary grades is making progress 
along the most modern lines of educational thought and 
they invite your careful inspection. 

Definite progress has been made in the following various 
phases of school work. 

1 — The Dewey Training School maintains its former 
standard of successful, conscientious training of teachers. 
According to many of the superintendents of the State 
these standards are unsurpassed. 

2 — The completion of individual pupil records is at hand. 
This is being accomplished by Asst. Supt. Walker. He 
has also given much time to intelligence and achievement 
tests with the result that an accurate knowledge of pupil 
capacities is being methodically tabulated, and the relative 
standing of our schools is being definitely determined. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 97 

3 — The health of the children is receiving valuable meth- 
odical care from the Department of Medical Inspection and 
dental clinics. 

4 — Physical culture is given attention by the Physical Di- 
rector who also handles successfully the athletic teams. 

5 — The care of the houses is looked after by a capable 
corps of janitors. 

Recommendations 

1 — That a special appropriation for the upkeep of the 
school buildings be made each year. 

2 — That measures be taken to induce the city to extend its 
water supply to the Eastman and the Harriet P. Dame 
Schools. 

3 — That consideration be given to determining definite 
salary increments for teachers who take summer courses in 
standard summer schools. 

4 — That the curriculum of studies for the Junior High 
and the Senior High Schools be so changed as to provide 
for the more complete segregation of pupils by groups, thus 
insuring a more complete education for each group. 

5 — That music and drawing be granted more credits than 
are given them now. 

6 — That motion picture machines be provided for the 
Junior High Schools when consolidated in the present 
High School Building, and also for the new High School 
Building. 

7 — That opportunity classes be established in each of the 
larger school buildings when room is available. 

8 — That a department of automobile study be introduced 
into the Morrill School of Mechanic Arts. 

10 — That the summer schools be extended to include 
Junior High and Senior High classes. 



98 CITY OF CONCORD. 

11 — That the mid-year graduation from the High School 
be made as much of a public function as the graduation of 
June classes. 

The Teaching Corps 

The superintendent is glad to testify to the superiority 
of the teaching corps of the schools as regards capacity for 
teaching, energy, progressive thought, faithfulness, and 
loyalty to the interests of the pupils. 

It is earnestly hoped that such a spirit may always be 
characteristic of the teaching corps of your schools. It 
means everything to the success of school work. 

During the past three winters many teachers have availed 
themselves of college extension courses made possible 
through their own contributions. Such work is of great 
value to a teacher of any grade of school. 

I bring to your attention the need of an adopted plan 
that will offer special motive for a teacher to take advanced 
study through a scheme of salary increments. Some such 
inducement is necessary to save the corps from assuming a 
"dead level" and for keeping school work abreast of the 
times. 

A Reorganization Scheme 

This plan in definite form was submitted to the Board of 
Education during the year. 

The scheme embodies many things that the schools have 
never had as yet. It provides 

1 — Definite financial economy. 

2 — The unification of all the Junior High School activi- 
ties in one building, thus giving the pupils instruction by 
the same corps of teachers for two consecutive school years. 

3 — The better accomplishment of real Junior High ac- 
tivities and conditions : 

a — Better application of broadening and finding courses. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 99 

b — The more extensive realization of worth while club 
activities. 

c — The better assignment of such influences to each 
course. 

d — A better opportunity to discriminate in enriching the 
curriculum. 

4 — The immediate furnishing of more room below 
Pleasant Street. 

5 — The unification of sixth grade instruction in the cen- 
tral part of the city. 

6 — Additional schools for backward pupils. 

7 — One class to a room in the city proper from the fourth 
grade upward, thus insuring an advance in the amount and 
quality of the work done. 

A High School Extension Course 

In my report of 1918 I recommended the installation of 
extension courses to the High School curricula and re- 
newed it again in 1922. Recently a "sample copy" of the 
"School Review," a leading educational magazine, came to 
my office with an editorial recommending such courses. 
The editorial staff of this publication is one of commanding 
educational strength, having the confidence and the respect 
of the entire educational world. 

I again urge your Honorable Body to give serious thought 
to putting such courses into effect in the Senior High 
School. 

Such a plan would offer the following : 

In the Commercial Course 

Advanced stenography and typewriting. 

Secretarial work. 

Salesmanship. 

Elementary Accounting. 

Commercial Law. 

Advanced Economics. 



100 CITY OF CONCORD. 

In the Technical Course 

Training that would fit students admirably for the 
scientific and engineering courses of the leading technical 
schools. 

In the Vocational Course 

Vocational work including part-time courses in connec- 
tion with Concord industries. Half the cost of teachers' 
salaries would be assumed by the National Government. 

In the Academic Course 

Advanced credit for a degree from college or university 
or extended work in high school studies for those who wish 
to take another year but do not intend entering higher edu- 
cational institutions. 

While the per capita cost might be large at first, it would 
eventually assume lower levels. 

A course on these lines is in operation in some cities, 
Springfield, Mass., being a notable example. 

The Eleven Year System 

The schools of this district have been conducted under 
systems of fifteen, fourteen, thirteen, an abridged twelve. 
and eleven years in length during the last forty-two years. 

For the last seventeen years the eleven year system has 
been in force here and more effective and economical work 
has been done under this system than under any other. 

This has been made possible by more scientific teaching, 
by a more carefully prepared and adjusted curriculum of 
studies, by a more complete and rational employment of 
the pupil's school time and the elimination of those things 
from the curriculum that are in no way essential to the 
education of the child. 

Everything in quantity has been accomplished under 
stem that has been accomplished under the ordinary 
twelve year system. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 101 

The following accomplishments are fully vouched for 
by the superintendent. 

Scholarship 

Higher standards of scholarship have prevailed. 

The requirements have been made more rigid, the 
standard of promotion having been raised from 65% to 
70%. 

During the period of its existence one delegation of boys 
sent to Dartmouth College took the Dartmouth Plaque and 
another delegation came very near taking it. 

This year the four boys entering Dartmouth College 
freshman class had the second best standing in the class. 

The delegation sent to the New Hampshire State Uni- 
versity was the best that has been sent from our high school. 

Holding Power 

Out of every 100 children entering the first grade 37 may 
be expected to continue through the high school. 

This system holds the children of the masses much beyond 
the fifth year of school which is the limit in most cities. 

The percent of pupils in grade eight, in the last year 
when the twelve year system was in operation, was 6.80%. 
In the year 1925 under the eleven year system it was 9.2%. 
In the high school the percents were 18% and 24% re- 
spectively. 

Advantages for people who cannot give their children ex- 
tended education ' 

It has saved them the expense of an added year. 

It has saved them the expense of added taxation. 

It has given to many of their children one year of high 
school credit that they would not have gained under a. 
twelve year system. 



102 CITY OF CONCORD. 

School Morale 

The number of cases of corporal punishment have been 
practically eliminated while this system has been in opera- 
tion. 

Truancies have been greatly reduced. 

A wholesome attitude between teacher and pupil has 
been greatly promoted. 

It has permitted the divorcing of pupils from the social 
distractions of the Senior High School for one year longer. 
While these things may not have been due to the system, 
nevertheless they have come about during its operation. 

Financial Economy 

The system saves one year of school expense. 

In the last sixteen years it has saved the taxpayers of 
this district at least an average of $10,000 a year or an 
amount of $160,000. 

If the matter of extending the bond issue in 1910 had 
been compulsory the amount would have been increased 
by $60,350, making a total of $220,350. If a Junior High 
year should be added it would cost from $20,000 to $27,- 
000 a year more than it is costing to maintain the schools 
as they are now being conducted. 

This would have to be raised by direct taxation each year. 

The working of the system has been carefully watched 
by the superintendent for the last sixteen years, during 
which time he has made approximately 9,500 visits to the 
schools and he can substantiate these assertions with de- 
tailed facts when he advises the people regarding its con- 
tinuance. 

His ideas are in accord with and proposed by some of the 
the highest educational authorities in the country. 

The Pupil Health 

Under this system the pupil health has been the sub- 
ject of much care and thought. The result has been that 



SCHOOL REPORT. 103 

not so many cases of overstrain have been brought to the 
superintendent's notice as have been cited in the longer 
systems. 

That there has been no serious overstrain is subscribed 
to by 

Dr. Frank E. Spaulding, Surveyor. 
Dr. Arthur K. Day, Medical Inspector. 
Dr. Clarence M. Kelly, Psychiatrist. 

The superintendent commends this system to the Board 
of Education, to the people of this district, and advises 
other school boards and superintendents to look into its 
educational and financial economy. 



May Belle McLam passed from earth August 26, 1926. 

I had known Miss McLam as a pupil in the elementary 
grades, in the high school, and as a student in college, 
also throughout her long term of service as teacher. 

I sincerely bear testimony to her fine character, excellent 
scholarship, and success as a teacher. 

Her record is one of clean, conscientious, intellectual 
teaching that can be seldom equalled. 



The Old and the New 

An experience and a clear school perspective of forty- 
six years reveals to me the fact that school complaints in 
concrete form make their appearance in distinct, recurring 
cycles. 

Concord seems to be in one of those cycles at the present 
time but the extent of the complaining area and the inten- 
sity of complaint are no greater than in some previous 
times. 



104 CITY OP CONCORD. 

In character the complaints are identical with those of 
thirty, forty, fifty and sixty years ago. One fond mother 
is certain that her child is just as capable as the child of 
her neighbor on the opposite corner, another thinks her 
child crowded too much, another thinks that all school 
work should be done in school hours, and that time out of 
school hours should be given over to other things. What 
these things are about every teacher and superintendent 
knows. Still another, moriturus, thinks school work done 
in the modern way is all wrong because it is not conducted 
as it was when she went to school. 

The writer remembers every one of these and many other 
such complaints being made to him when he was teaching 
forty-four years ago. Search the old school reports and 
you will find them all mentioned. 

The period when ''hurry" in school work was criticized 
most was during the time when the school course was fifteen 
years in length. There were many more complaints of that 
nature then than there are now. 

As a matter of fact there has never been a time in the 
last forty years when such complaints were so infrequent 
as in the last fifteen years, even though the last eight of 
those years have been marked by forced unrest in school 
matters. 

There must be some good reason for such difference, such 
change. Doubtless the main cause is the surpassing ex- 
cellence of modern methods of teaching, the better regula- 
tion of school time, and closer supervision of school work. 

These things have followed rational state requirements 
for the certification of teachers, with the result that the 
efforts of the teacher are directed not only toward enabling 
the child to acquire knowledge but also, in increasing de- 
grees, toward developing in him the power to initiate, to 
develop a sense of justice, integrity of character, and to 
work for the common good of mankind. 

At the same time pupil scholarship has advanced so that, 
on the average, a thirteen year old child is, beyond ques- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 105 

tion, better educated, better prepared for living a clean, 
worthy life than the sixteen year old pupil of forty years 
ago. 

If people who are prone to find fault with the modern 
school would conscientiously ask themselves the following 
questions and answer them honestly, the cause of education 
not only in this city but everywhere would receive great 
impetus. 

1 — Am I a parent? If not, have I as good a right to 
complain as the one who has children in school? 

2 — Do I know definitely what the schools are doing ? 

3 — Do I know what studies my child is pursuing in 
school ? 

4 — Do I know what studies my child is excelling in, and 
what studies my child learns with difficulty? 

5 — Have I ever made the acquaintance of my child's 
teachers ? 

6 — Do I simply sign my child's report-card or do I read 
it carefully before signing it? 

7 — Do I keep my child at home nights and see that he 
gets the proper amount of sleep ? 

8 — Do I read the annual school reports faithfully ? 

9 — Have I visited the schools enough to form an intelli- 
gent opinion of their value? 

10 — Have I ever talked over school matters with the 
superintendent ? 

An honest asking and answering of these ten questions 
would avoid a deal of useless trouble. 

The schools have progressed measurably as have all other 
institutions, and one who expects them to be like the schools 
of old will be sadly disappointed if he makes an examina- 
tion of them. 



106 CITY OP CONCORD. 

The accomplishment of the schools of long ago as re- 
gards efficiency, are completely outclassed by the modern 
school. 

I acknowledge with gratitude the help I have received 
at the hands of all who have been associated with me in 
maintaining a high standard of school work during the past 
year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

L. J. RUNDLETT, 

Superintendent. 



REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT 
OF SCHOOLS, CONCORD, N. H. 



Superintendent L. J. Rundlett, Concord, N. H. 
Dear Sir: 

During the present year, detailed studies concerning the 
instructional staff, the classification and progress of pupils, 
the achievement of pupils, and the school curriculum have 
been made. These studies are being issued in mimeograph 
form, and are available upon request at the office of the 
superintendent of schools. Among the subjects treated 
under each heading are : 

I — The Instructional Staff. 

1. Are Concord teachers, teachers of experience? 

2. Is the Concord teaching staff a relatively permanent 
group ? 

3. Are the teachers of Concord a professionally-minded 
group ? 

4. Is the policy of advancing teachers from lower grade 
to upper grade work advantageous? 

5. What has been the influence of the Dewey Training 
School upon the teaching staff? 

6. Are the salaries of the Concord teachers average as 
compared with other cities? 

II — Classification and Progress of Pupils. 

1. Are Concord pupils too immature for the work of 
their grades? 



108 CITY OF CONCORD. 

2. Are Concord pupils progressing through the grades 
less rapidly than pupils in other cities? 

3. How is Concord looking out for its over-age pupils? 

4. Is the "Holding Power" of the Concord schools 
equal to the "Holding Power" of schools in other cities? 

5. Is the rate of non-promotion in Concord more than 
that existing in other cities and towns ? 

6. In what ways do the Concord schools meet the needs 
of the individual pupils? 

Ill — Achievement of Pupils. 

1. How many pupils graduating from Concord High 
School enter colleges, normal schools, and other post- 
secondary institutions? 

2. Are Concord pupils successful in passing the col- 
lege entrance requirements? 

3. What length of time has been found necessary to 
adequately prepare pupils for college? 

4. What quality of work do Concord pupils do after 
being admitted to colleges? 

5. Are Concord graduates successful in other lines of 
work? 

6. How do Concord pupils rate in achievement in the 
fundamental subjects? 

IV — Curriculum. 

1. What are the courses of study offered in the Con- 
cord schools? 

This annual report will treat briefly with the first of the 
major divisions, namely, the instructional staff. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 109 

The Teachers op Concord 

J — The Teachers of Concord are Teachers of Experience. 

Table 1 

Distribution of Concord Teachers According to Total 

Years of Experience 

October 1, 1926 



Total Years of Senior Junior Elementary Kinder- Spec- 

Experience High High Schools garten ials 



40 or more 1 1 4 1 7 

37 1 1 

36 1 1 2 

33 2 2 

31 1 2 3 

30 1 1 

29 1 1 2 

28 1 1 

27 1 1 

26 2 2 

25 4 4 

24 2 2 

23 1 1 

22 2 2 

21 2 1 3 

20 1 1 2 4 

19 2 1 3 

18 1 1 

17 3 3 

16 1 1 2 

15 1 1 2 

14 2 2 

13 2 2 

12 1 2 1 4 

11 1 2 3 

10 2 2 

9 1 2 3 2 8 

8 1 3 2 6 

7 1 1 2 1 2 7 

6 1 2 2 5 



HO CITY OF CONCORD. 

Distribution of Concord Teachers — Concluded 



Total Years of 
Experience 



Senior Junior Elementary Kinder- Spec- 
High High Schools gartens ials Total 



5 2 2. 

4 3 2 8 2 15. 

3 3 3 2 2 10. 

2 2 2 1 3 8. 

1 3 1 1 2 2 9. 

1 1 1 1 4. 



Totals 


....22.. 


...23.. 


...57... 


..12... 


..22.. 


..136. 


Median Years 
Experience 


4... 


...20 .. 


...10... 


...7... 


...6.. 


....9. 



Interpretation and Comments 

Definitions: Senior High (grades 9-10-11). 

Junior High (grades 7-8). 

Elementary (grades 1-6). 

Special — Mechanic Arts, Home Econom- 
ics Teachers — Drawing and Music 
Supervisors — Physical Instructors — 
Dean of Girls — Principal of Dewey 
Training School. 

50 percent of the Senior High Teachers have taught 
four years or more. 

50 percent of the Junior High Teachers have taught 
20 years or more. 

50 percent of the Elementary Teachers have had 
more than ten years' experience. 

50 percent of the Kindergarten and Special Teach- 
ers have had more than seven years and six 
years of teaching experience respectively. 

50 percent of the entire teaching corps of 136 teach- 
ers have had nine or more years teaching ex- 
perience. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



Ill 



II — The Teachers of Concord Constitute an Unusually 
Stable and Permanent Grouy. 

Table 2 

Distribution of Concord Teachers According to Years of 

Teaching Experience in Union School District 

October 1, 1926 



Years in 
District 


Senior 
High 


Junior 
High 


Elementary 
Schools 


Kinder- 
garten 


Spec- 
ials 


Total 


40 or more 






3 




. .1. . 


...4. 


39 




1. 








. . .2. 


36 












...1. 


35 


1.. 










...2. 


32 












. . .1. 


31 












. . .1. 


30 






2 






2 


29 






9 






2 


28 








. .1 




. . .1. 


24 




. . .4. 








. . .4. 


22 




1 . 




2 




. . .3. 


20 


1. . 


2. 


4 






. . .7. 


19 






2 






. . .2. 


18 




1. 


1 


. .1 




...3. 


17 


1. . 


1 . 








9 


16 




1 . 


1 


. .1 




.. .3. 


15 


1. . 


. . .1 . 






. 1. . 


. .3 


13 




. . .1 . 


9 






, . .3. 


12 




1 . 


3 






. . .4. 


11 




...1. 


1 






2 


9 


1. . 




. . .3. . , 




. .3. . 


. . 7. 


8 












.. .8. 


7 


2.. 


1. 


2 






...5. 


6 




2 . 


2. . 




. .2. . 


. . .6. 


5 






2 






9 


4 


2. . 


...1 . 


5 


. .1 


2 


..11. 


o 


1. . 


. . .1 


9 


. .1. . 


. .1. . 


.. .6. 


2 


. . .3. . 




6 


9 


. .4. . 


. .15. 


1 


, .3. . 


. . .2 


. . .3 


2 


. . 5 . . 


. .15. 





K . . 




a 


. .1 




. . .9. 




Total 


...22.. 


...23. 


. . .57. . . . 


.12.... 


.22.. 


.136. 


Median Years in 


...S... 


IK. 


9 


. .4 


. .4.. 


. . .7. 





112 city of concord. 

Interpretation and Comments 

1. 50 percent of the entire teaching corps have taught 

in Concord seven years or more. 

2. The table reveals that more frequent changes occur 

in the Senior High Group than in any of the 
others. Out of a staff of 22 teachers Head- 
master Cook found it necessary to replace seven 
in September, 1926. Five of these replace- 
ments were secured from other systems, while 
the two others were transferred from Junior 
High to Senior High. 

3. The fact that a large proportion of teachers have 

been long in the service may have its disad- 
vantages as well as its advantages. Length of 
experience in any field is not necessarily a sign 
of efficiency. Experience may easily lead to. 
routine formalism, and a prejudice against 
change. This idea has been very aptly ex- 
pressed as follows: "The inertia of a prepon- 
derant older group may hold in check the pro- 
gressive elements that come with the younger 

blood The problem is to insure within 

the service these conditions that will make the 
most of experience and maturity and, at the 
same time, counteract the tendencies to stag- 
nation or arrested growth that increase with 
age." 

/// — The Teachers of Concord are a Progressive and Pro- 
fessionally Minded Group. 

One of the outstanding general characteristics of the 
Concord schools mentioned by Dr. Spaulding in his 
Original Report was the attitude of progressiveness. He 
says, "A third noteworthy characteristic of the system is 
the general spirit and attitude of progressiveness, which is 



SCHOOL REPORT. 113 

by no means inconsistent with the continued use for many 
years of the same general methods and the same basal texts 
in certain subjects, such as arithmetic and reading. Formal, 
thoughtless routine, mechanically repeated year after year, 
finds no encouragement. The system presents unusually 
few evidences of the spirit or activities of such routine. 

"The three general and comprehensive characteristics of 
the Concord school system, progressiveness, earnest work, 
and well-thought-out plans, are assets that cannot possibly 
be produced out of hand, in a day or a year. They are of 
slow growth, much easier to impair or destroy than to 
build up. They are invaluable to any school system. The 
Concord system has developed these assets to an unusually 
high degree; they should be cherished as beyond price." 

One of the specific duties of the Assistant Superintendent 
is to have general oversight of the professional training of 
teachers in service. As evidence of the professional minded- 
ness of the Concord teaching corps he presents the follow- 
ing: 

1. Seventy -two percent of all teachers engaged in Union 

School District for the year ending June 30, 
1926, were holders of the highest form of state 
approval, namely, the State Certificate. 
Concord ranks second of all cities in New Hamp- 
shire in the percentage of teachers holding State 
Certificates. The city that surpassed Concord 
has been offering special salary inducements to 
its staff for continued professional improve- 
ment. 

2. During the present winter 46 teachers were enrolled 

in the Harvard-Boston University Extension 
Course, each Monday afternoon for a period of 
15 weeks. The course this year was one in 
"Contemporary Literature," conducted by 
Doctor Franklin of Boston University. Dr. 
Bixby, Assistant Superintendent of Cleveland 



114 CITY OP CONCORD. 

schools, gave a course in "Elementary School 
Methods" during last winter and members from 
the Department of Educational Psychology of 
Harvard gave the course the previous year. 
These courses have been faithfully attended by 
many of our teachers. 

3. Twenty different teachers have been enrolled in 

group study in preparation for the state pro- 
fessional examinations. These groups, studying 
History of Education, Psychology and Peda- 
gogy, School Law, and School Program, were 
under the general direction of the Assistant 
Superintendent and met approximately four 
afternoons a week in November and December, 
and May and June. 

4. Faculty meetings are held on the average of twice a 

month by each principal. Many of these meet- 
ings during the past year have shown evidence 
of much thought. 

5. The professional library at the Parker School is used 

very extensively by many of our teachers. 

6. "The Annual Teachers' Survey" made in October, 

1926, for the State Board of Education gives 
the following information concerning the pro- 
fessional training of our Concord teachers dur- 
ing the past three years. All teachers whom 
the survey showed to be enrolled in either sum- 
mer school study or extension courses are listed 
in Table 3. 



school report. 115 

Table 3 

Number of Concord Teachers Who Have Continued Their 
Professional Training During the Last 3 Years. Data 
Tabulated for all Teachers in Service October, 1926. 



Ele- 

Sen. Jun. men- Kinder- Spec- To- 
High High tary garten ial tal 



Total number of teachers in 
service 22 23 57 12 22 136 

Total number of teachers con- 
tinuing professional training 13 17 37 3 19 89 



This table should be interpreted in terms of Table 1 
(showing the total number of years experience). Many 
teachers do not begin to attend summer school or do ex- 
tension work during the first two or three years after 
graduation from Normal School or College. Professional 
spirit, however, leads many teachers to attend a summer 
session at least once every three years. Many school boards 
have made this a compulsory requirement for their teachers. 

IV — The Concord Policy of Advancing Teachers From 
Lower Grade to Upper Grade Work is Decidedly 
Advantageous. 

It is axiomatic that to build efficiently one must know 
something concerning the foundation upon which one is to 
build. Many of our junior high school teachers have had 
experience in teaching in the elementary grades and know 
the work thoroughly. Many of our elementary school 
teachers have served an apprenticeship in rural schools be- 
fore entering the Concord system. 

At the present time, the senior high school staff has three 
teachers who are entirely conversant with the work of the 
junior high school as carried on in Concord. 



116 CITY OF CONCORD. 

V — Concord Has Been Fortunate in Having the Dewey 
Training School as a Source of Supply for Elemen- 
tary Teachers. 

Most of the elementary school teachers have been re- 
cruited from the Dewey Training School. AH of these 
teachers have passed the state examinations in professional 
subjects, and a majority have had experience in rural and 
village schools before entering the service of Union 
School District. Table 4 shows the number of teachers in 
service in Union School District, October, 1926, who were 
graduates of the Dewey Training School, and Table 5 
shows the number from each graduating class. 

Table 4 

Number of Dewey Training School Graduates Who Were 
in Service in Union School District, October, 1926 





.Inn. 
High 


Elemen- 
tary 


Kinder- 
garten 


Total 


Total number of teachers 


23 


57 


12 


92 


Number of Graduates of Dewey 










Training 


9 


52 


4 


65 



Table 5 

Year of Graduation of Graduates of Dewey Training 

School in Service in Union School District, 

October, 1926 

Year 

Gradu- No. in Year Xo. in Year No. in Year No. in 

ated Service Gmduated Service Graduated Service Graduated Service 



1S89 : 


L 1898 


1 


1909 


4 


1918 


2 


1891 ] 


L 1899 


1 


1911 


2 


1919 


3 


1892 I 


L 1901 


2 


1912 


1 


1921 


2 


1894 : 


L 1903 


3 


1913 


2 


1922 


7 


1895 


L 1904 


2 


1914 


1 


1923 


5 


1896 S 


> 1905 


1 


1915 


3 


1924 


2 


1897 


i 1906 


4 


1917 


5 


1926 


1 



Totals 11 14 18 22—65 



SCHOOL REPORT. 117 

In a check up on the success of Dewey Training girls 
in various schools outside of Union School District, the 
testimony from the superintendents, under whom they 
were teaching, was unanimous in praising their efficiency 
as school room teachers as well as their professional spirit. 
The graduates of the Dewey Training School have been an 
honor to their school and their chosen profession. 

VI — The Salaries of Concord Teachers are Fair but not 
High. 

Table 6 shows the salaries paid to Concord Teachers. 
October 1, 1926. 

Table 6 

Salaries Paid to Concord Teachers October 1, 1926 



Senior Junior Elemen- 

High High tary Kinder- Special Total 

(grades 9-11) (grades 7-8) (grades 1-6) garten 



$3600 1 1 

3000 1 1 

2400 1 1. 

2250 1 1. 

2200 1 2 3. 

2150 1 1 2. 

2100 • 

2050 1 1 2. 

2000 1 1 2. 

1950 2 2. 

1900 2 2. 

1800 1 1 2. 

1750 1 1 2 4. 

1725 1 1. 

1700 1 1 2 . 

1650 8 9 17. 

1600 2 1 3. 

1550 7 1 2 10. 

1500 2 1 3. 

1450 1 3 4. 

1425 2 2. 

1400 27 4 1 32.. 



118 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Salaries Paid to Teachers — Concluded 



Salary 



Senior Junior Elemen- 
High High tary Kinder- Special Total 

(grades 9-11) (grades 7-S) grades 1-6) garten 



$1350 1 1 1 3 . 

1300 1 1 2 . 

1250 

1200 2 2 1 5. 

1150 7 1 8. 

1100 1 6 1 2 10. 

1050 2 2 4. 

1000 1 2 3 . 

950 1 1 2. 

850 2 2. 



Totals 



.22. 



.2:! 



57, 






,22. 



136. 



Table 7 shows the Average Salary paid to Women 
Teachers in both secondary and elementary schools for 
the year ending June, 1926. 

Table 7 

Average Salary for "Women Teachers in Four New 
Hampshire Cities 



Secondary 
Teachers 



Elementary 
Teachers 



1 — Manchester 


$1990 


2 — Nashua 


1633 


3— Berlin 


1595 


4 — Concord 


1425 



$1382.49 
1334.68 
1322.36 
1313.64 



A large proportion of all our teachers are natives of the 
city or have taken up a residence here. The source of 
supply in the elementary grades has been the local train- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 119 

ing school. As a rule, it is true that the services of local 
teachers can be secured at a lower price than the services 
of teachers who come from other cities. 

The most difficult positions to fill are vacancies in the 
senior high school. Concord cannot afford to employ teach- 
ers who have had no experience, and yet to get suitable 
candidates for these vacancies is a hard task. The school 
authorities have been extremely fortunate in the past year 
in securing capable teachers for the senior high school, 
but in some cases it has been necessary to offer the maxi- 
mum salary in order to get candidates. Teachers, who 
begin at the maximum salary, do not often remain long. 

VII — Recom mendations. 

The following recommendations are offered for your con- 
sideration : 

1. The continuance of the Harvard-Boston University 

Extension Course. 

2. An appropriation of at least $50 to be used for the 

purchase of educational books and professional 
magazines for the teachers' library. 

3. The personal visitation in class rooms of all candi- 

dates for teaching positions in junior and 
senior high schools wherever this procedure 
is practical. 

4. A study of the salary schedule of Concord Teachers 

in the light of best educational practice. 

In conclusion, we have studied very carefully the recom- 
mendations concerning the Concord School System as made 
by Doctor Spaulding in his Original Report as well as in his 
Supplementary Report. 

In addition, the questionnaires returned from 475 fam- 
ilies as part of the Original Survey have been carefully 
read, and many of the commendations and criticisms have 
been discussed with our teachers. 



120 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Doctor Spaulding states in his Original Survey Report, 
"The returns from a questionnaire sent to all parents re- 
vealed comparatively little dissatisfaction with the school 
system as at present organized, and still less consensus of 
opinion respecting changes desired in the system." 

We have been extremely gratified at the interest shown 
by a great number of parents and citizens calling at the 
office, or at the various schools in order to discuss the prog- 
ress of their children, or to talk over matters of school in- 
terest. 

We wish to express our appreciation of the co-operative 
efforts of all who have striven to make the Concord Schools 
a success. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. W. WALKER, 

Assistant Superintendent of Schools. 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTOR 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my report of medical inspection in the 
schools of Union School District for the school year 1926- 
1927. 

Routine physical examination of every pupil in both 
public and parochial schools has been continued, with more 
efficient co-operation of medical inspector and nurses than 
ever before, thus requiring less time for both the pupils and 
examiners. The physical condition of the pupils as a whole 
is excellent. 

At the beginning of the fall term, twenty-five per cent of 
the High School pupils were more than ten per cent below 
the accepted standard of weight. Special examination, 
however, failed to show any serious physical defects to ex- 
plain this lack of weight, and three months later less than 
sixteen per cent of the school were found to be underweight. 
Investigation of other school systems, public and private, 
indicates a similar proportion elsewhere. In the opinion of 
the medical inspector, there is no need of anxiety in these 
cases. 

Milk Lunches. Improvements in the handling and in- 
spection of our milk supply have removed any previous 
causes of complaint, and the consumption of milk shows an 
increase of 7,067 bottles over the preceding year. 

Vaccinations. The system of recording vaccinations of 
school children has been modified during the year, with the 
consent of the City Board of Health and the School Board, 



122 CITY OF CONCORD. 

thus avoiding the inconvenience of vaccination cards — a 
saving of time for both parents and teachers. Practically 
every pupil has complied with the law in this matter. 

Contagious disease is comparatively rare in Concord, a 
fact due largely, I think, to superior housing conditions and 
the hearty co-operation of physicians and the Gity Board of 
Health. Diphtheria has caused one death in Concord dur- 
ing the last six years. Scarlet fever, although showing a 
larger number of cases, shows but one death. With this 
low mortality it is a question whether immunization from 
these diseases by toxin-antitoxin is advisable in Concord. 

Dental Clinic. If I were to select one department of 
medical inspection that shows the most striking results it 
would be the dental clinic. Yearly attention to the condi- 
tion of every pupil's teeth, with a report to the parents, of 
all defects, shows results when the pupils reach the high 
school that are truly wonderful. It is a pleasure to note 
the high degree of perfection in the teeth of high school 
pupils. 

Recommendations. 1. After a two years' trial of 
monthly weighing of every pupil, I am convinced that three 
weighings during the year (in September, January, and 
April) are quite as useful as more frequent ones, and will 
permit more thorough follow-up of cases of defects. 

2. A careful study of the weekly reports of the school 
nurses leads me to the following conclusions : There should 
be a complete separation of the department of medical in- 
spection and that of domestic science in the schools. At 
present the school nurses are at the call of the head of the 
domestic science department. This occupies much time 
that otherwise would be employed in health work. With 
this re -arrangement of the system, and the change recom- 
mended above regarding monthly weighing, it will be 
quite possible to conduct this department more economic- 



SCHOOL REPORT. 123 

ally than has been done heretofore. I know of no city where 
school nurses are required to do the work of high school 
teachers. 

In conclusion, I am pleased to acknowledge the hearty 
co-operation of all my associates in the district. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR K. DAY, M. D., 

Medical Inspector. 



124 CITY OP CONCORD. 

SUMMARY OF PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 

From February 1, 1926, to February 1, 1927 

Number of pupils examined 3,384 

Summary of Health Defects 

No. of Cases Corrections 
Malnutrition 
Defective teeth 
Defective vision 
Defective hearing 
Pediculosis 
Nits 

Hypertrophied tonsils 
Defective breathing 
Unvaccinated 
Skin Disease 
Goitre 
Hernia 
Scabies 
Otitis 
Eczema 

Eczema of scalp 
Strabismus 

Total 



659 




369 


1,121 




919 


157 




116 


2 




2 


22 




22 


40 




40 


35 




10 


1 







57 




50 


1 




1 


5 




4 


1 




1 


2 




2 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2,107 




1,540 


DR. ARTHUR 


K. 


DAY, 


Medical Inspector. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 125 

DETAILED REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSES 

February, 1926, to February, 1927 

Number of visits to schools 270 

Number of visits to homes for consultation with parents 105 
Assisted Medical Inspector at routine examination of pupils 
Number of interviews with officials and physicians to 

make arrangements for treatment 216 

Number of pupils accompanied to physician 10 

Number of corrections obtained 629 

Pupils weighed every month at Walker, Garrison, and Hall St. 

schools. 
Pupils weighed every other month at High, Parker, and Chand- 
ler schools. 
Health projects and talks on health subjects in all classes. 
Daily teaching of Home Nursing Class at High School, February 

to June, 1926. 
Ten demonstrations given for Home Nursing Class, September, 
1926, to February, 1927. 

Dental Clinic 

Number of clinics held 54 

Number of pupils treated 422 

Number of examinations 422 

Number of cleanings 399 

Number of fillings 589 

Amalgam 377 

Cement 212 

Number of extractions 555 

Number of treatments 2 

Total number of operations 1,967 

Respectfully submitted, 

HELEN Y. UPHAM, R. N. 



126 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Number of visits to schools 222 

Number of visits to homes for consultation with parents 169 
Assisted Medical Inspector at routine examination of pupils 
Number of interviews with officials and physicians to 

make arrangements for treatment 238 

Number of pupils accompanied to physicians 14 

Number of corrections obtained 542 

Number of pupils weighed each month (average) 1,536 

Number of health talks 38 

Eleven demonstrations given for Home Nursing Class, 

September, 1926, to February, 1927. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGENA C. MANSUR, R. N. 





Night School Enrollment 






1926-1927 






Men Women 


Total 


Class A 


10 5 


15 


Class B 


12 12 


24 



Total 



■2-2 



17 



39 



NATIONALITIES 



Albanian 2 

American 8 

Armenian 5 

Canadian 7 

Finnish 4 



Greek 5 

German 1 

Italian 3 

Swedish 3 

Syrian 1 



REPORT OF THE HEADMASTER OF THE 
HIGH SCHOOL 



February 23, 1927. 

Superintendent L. J. Rundlett, Concord, N. H.: 

Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit the annual report for the Senior High 
School : 

Enrollment and Graduation 

The total enrollment for the first semester was 610 under- 
graduates and five post graduates. The graduating classes 
for 1926 were : January, 46 ; June, 91 ; Total, 137. This 
constitutes the record. Of the above number twenty-two 
have entered college and eleven have entered Normal School 
of Dewey School. In addition ten other recent graduates 
have entered college this year and two the Dewey School. 
The success of the students who took College Board Ex- 
aminations last June was very gratifying. 

Miss McLam 

The death of Miss McLam deprived us of one of our 
strongest teachers. She had given twenty-five years of 
service to the school and each succeeding year made her 
work more valuable. Her exact scholarship, her high ideals 
of teaching, her willingness to assist and her appreciation 
of a student's needs combined to make her a teacher whose 
influence, though quiet and unobtrusive, was yet strong and 
effective. 

Changes 

In September we opened school with seven new teachers. 
This represents a change of over thirty per cent in our 
teaching staff. It is unfortunate that conditions compelled 
so large a change as steady growth in efficiency depends 



128 CITY OF CONCORD. 

on the retention of capable teachers. In another way our 
work this year has been made difficult in that five of our 
regular teachers have been forced through illness to be 
absent for periods ranging from two to nine weeks. While 
we have been fortunate in obtaining substitutes it still re- 
mains true that the work and responsibility of the other 
teachers has been increased in order that the general stand- 
ing of the school might be maintained. 

Dean of Girls 

Miss Anderson is now on her second year in this position. 
With the experience gained last year her work this year has 
been wider in range, more direct, positive, and beneficial to 
the school. She has taken entire charge of attendance of 
the girls and has supervision of physical drill for girls, 
girls' basketball and the Girls' Club. She has also co- 
operated with the School Nurse in following up cases which 
needed special attention. Much of the work of the Dean 
consists in personal conferences with the girls and their 
mothers on any matter pertaining to school work. Last 
spring Miss Anderson arranged a series of vocational talks 
for girls, closing with a talk to mothers and daughters. 
Again in December a talk on "Why Go to College?" was 
given to the girls by Dean Franklin of Boston University. 

Debating 

An important event has been the winning of the State 
Championship in debating in the New Hampshire Inter- 
scholastic Debating League. . The work of the debating 
squad under the direction of Mrs. Reed and Miss Richard- 
son deserves great credit. They fairly earned the honor 
which came to them and which they brought to the school. 

Recommendations 

1. Tn Course I allow Mathematics S and T to be post- 
poned until the senior year. At present the work for col- 
lege preparatory students is too heavy. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 129 

2. In Course III make Economics a semester subject 
and give advanced Bookkeeping in the other semester. 

3. Organize school work into departments with a recog- 
nized head in each department. 

4. Replace our present inter-room telephone system 
with a new one, as the one we now have is useless. 



Respectfully submitted, 



C. F. COOK, 

Headmaster. 



REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE MORRILL 
SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS 



To the President and Members of the Concord Board of 
Education: 

The past year in the Morrill School of Mechanic Arts 
has been a year notable for high morale, intensive service 
and constructive effort on the part of pupils and teachers. 

Until the close of the first semester, the personnel of 
the teaching staff remained unchanged from that of the 
preceding two years. In January, Mr. Arthur W. Andrews 
left the teaching profession to enter industrial life and the 
position vacated was filled by Mr. Paul A. Brazier. Mr. 
Brazier has a splendid background of academic training 
coupled with over ten years of practical experience as a 
machinist and machine designer. Because of his recent 
practical experience, he should bring to the school new 
ideas and materially assist in establishing closer relations 
between the school and industry. He appears to have 
already won the liking and respect of his pupils, and his 
character, habits and ideals are such as make him a man 
with whom it is well for boys to associate. 

Unfortunately, the required brevity of this report pre- 
vents me from describing in detail the work and methods of 
each teacher. Entitled though they are to this considera- 
tion, because of the excellence of their professional spirit 
in doing extra work, it will be necessary for them to reap 
the reward of their labors through the thought of work 
well done and the apparent appreciation of their efforts 
as manifested by their pupils. 

For the consideration of the Board of Education and 
the voters of Concord, I shall utilize the remainder of the 
space alloted to me by mentioning three phases of school 
life which have contributed greatly to the success of this 
department; guidance, placement, and co-operation. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 131 

Guidance : In this course, guidance is a major aim over 
a period of three and one-half years. The organization 
is as follows: the term "Manual Training" applies to grade 
work and is divided into one and one-half years of elemen- 
tary wood working and one-half year of try-out-work. 
" Mechanic Arts" is the term used to designate the type of 
work presented to high school boys and is divided into three 
years of pre-vocational and one year of vocational special- 
ization. 

In elementary wood working, the major aim may be 
concisely stated as the development of constructive think- 
ing. In the one-half year of try-out-work, each boy is given 
several lessons in the various trades represented in the 
school and conferences arranged between teachers and 
pupils. The major aim of this work is educational guid- 
ance. It precedes the pupil's choice of his high school 
course and it is found that through a better knowledge of 
the work ahead this choice may be more wisely made. A wise 
choice in selecting the high school course eliminates much 
changing from one course to another; thus increasing the 
efficiency of the school and adding to the happiness of the 
pupils. 

During the three years of pre-vocational work, the major 
aim is vocational guidance. The pupils attain a good 
working knowledge of many industrial processes, visits 
are made to manufacturing plants, and vocational guidance 
talks are given by the teachers and local business men. At 
the end of this time, in which the major aim is vocational 
guidance, boys are required to make definite plans for the 
work which they propose to do after leaving high school 
and in the last year of the course, by specialization, to 
specifically train for their chosen occupations. 

Placement: Placement of our. graduates in work, for 
which they are best equipped by nature and trained in 
school is rapidly becoming a very important part of our 
responsibility to the school system in which we are em- 
ployed. Although placement work is not officially a part 
of our duties, nevertheless, every good teacher is interested 

9 



132 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in the future welfare of his pupils, and knows that unless 
they are employed under favorable circumstances after 
leaving school, his teachings in the class-room or school 
shop will have been, to a great extent, in vain. 

During the past year, we have been very fortunate in 
advantageously placing our boys from the Mechanic Arts 
Course. There has, however, been very little organized 
effort along this line and such placement and follow-up- 
work as we have done has been accomplished through a 
desire to serve. It is my belief that the organization of a 
placement and follow-up -bureau should be started in the 
school system without delay. 

Through the efforts of such a bureau, the scientific place- 
ment and follow-up of our pupils would result in a closer 
correlation between the schools and the industrial and com- 
mercial life of the community. Because of this correlation, 
greater efficiency in the school system would be attained 
and new respect would be established for the schools in 
the public mind. Furthermore, the activity and helpful- 
ness of such a bureau would not be confined to one course 
but to every course, not to one school but to all schools, not 
alone to graduates but to all children leaving school to take 
up life's burdens. 

Co-operation: Probably no element has contributed to 
the success of the Morrill School as has the spirit of 
co-operation with which it has been so consistently sur- 
rounded. Especially valuable has been the co-operation 
of Concord parents and citizens ; many have visited the 
school and have made suggestions for its improvement. 
These suggestions have always been carefully considered 
and in many eases put into operation. We may truly 
say that the Morrill School is organized and conducted in 
accordance with the wishes of the people of Concord in 
so far as those wishes are clearly understood. Allow me 
to respectfully urge that Concord citizens continue to fre- 
quently visit the Morrill School. Opportunity will be given 
id meet the teachers and to talk with the boys as they 
are seen at work. Every person so visiting the school will 



SCHOOL REPORT. 133 

be treated with the utmost courtesy and all questions 
answered willingly and to the best of our ability. 

While I am not insensible to the co-operation and good- 
will of the Board of Education, my contact with that 
body has been largely through the Chairman of the 
Mechanic Arts Committee. He has visited the school many 
times, at my request, for the purpose of discussing imme- 
diate problems and I have been free to consult him in his 
place of business at all times. The value to a principal in 
having the privilege of going to a successful businessman 
for advice cannot be over estimated. 

Because of the relation this school bears to other schools 
and departments of the district, the co-operation of our 
associates is absolutely necessary. Without their friendly 
support, the life and work of a Morrill School Principal 
would be extremely unpleasant and difficult, and the 
efficiency of the school greatly impaired. For the co- 
operation of the headmaster and the principals of those 
schools, of which this school is a department, I am most 
grateful. 

In conclusion, Mr. President, I would consider myself 
an ingrate should I close this report without a word of 
appreciation for the co-operation and helpfulness of the 
Superintendent of Concord Schools. At no time since com- 
ing to this city have I had occasion to so fully respect the 
official, under whom I am privileged to teach, as during 
the past year. Burdened with extra work and under a 
mental strain, the severity of which few have realized, his 
visits to this school have been as numerous as ever, his in- 
terest in teachers and pupils as unfailing, and the written 
reports of his observations and suggestions as comprehen- 
sive. Not once when I have visited his office for help and 
counsel has he not laid aside his work and given his un- 
divided attention to the solution of my problems pertain- 
ing to the proper administration of the Morrill School. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROLAND G. HARTWELL, 

Principal. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF HOME 
ECONOMICS 



To Mr. Louis J. Bundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

I am submitting to you the report of Home Economics 
work for the past year. 

The new cooking laboratory and enlarged sewing room 
at the Practice House have made possible the admitting of 
more pupils into the house. 

The pupils have become a helpful factor in the com- 
munity as shown by the following contributions : Tea was 
served for the Woman's Club at the Education Meeting; 
a basket was prepared at Thanksgiving for the Charity 
Association ; a doll was dressed and sent to Japan ; Christ- 
mas gifts were sent to the children at Pembroke Sanatorium, 
and to the Charity Association. For the first time gar- 
ments made by members of the sewing classes were dis- 
played at Hopkinton Fair and won first prize. The Christ- 
mas Bazaar called "Treasure House," opened to the public 
December 2nd and 3rd, was a success. Noon lunch was 
served to 35 and afternoon tea to 50. Gifts made by the 
pupils brought a ready market. 

The Home Economics Club with a membership of 80 has 
been active and is now becoming affiliated with the National 
Association. It is the first club in New Hampshire to be 
represented. 

Successful work by 26 pupils in the Home Nursing Class 
won the certificates of the American Red Cross. 

An Opportunity Class has been organized which is filling 
a great need for backward pupils. 

The lunchrooms at Parker School and High School are 
functioning properly and capacity numbers are served. 

All phases of Home Making have been taught and next 



SCHOOL REPORT. 135 

June pupils will be graduated from the Home Economics 
course. 

I earnestly recommend that the following changes be 
made: 

1. That more time be allowed for Home Economics work 
in classes K, L, M, and N, preferably a double period twice 
a week. 

2. That one year in Home Economics work be required 
of all girls for graduation, such work to be elected during 
the four years; exception made for college entrance 
pupils unable to elect another subject. At present we are 
able to serve only a few fortunate to elect the work for four 
years. 

3. That a unit course in Art Appreciation and Music 
Appreciation be offered as an elective — and that all Home 
Economics work be counted as a whole point (classes 
meeting five times per week). 

4. That with so active an Home Economics Club 
the Practice House be opened as a Club House in which 
courses can be given that are not possible in school time, 
such as: recaning chairs, basketry, embroidery, lampshade 
making, and similar arts ; and serve as a community center 
for our future trained home-makers. 

I also recommend that the following changes be made in 
the lunchroom at the High School : 

1. Transparent glass replace the opaque glass windows 
in the lunchroom and cooking laboratory. 

2. A separate serving table be equipped for boys, per- 
mitting service to boys and girls at the same time. 

The recommended changes would mean increased ex- 
penses. I would like to have included in the budget, if 
possible : 



136 CITY OF CONCORD. 

A piano for the Practice House. 

An additional teacher. 

Two teachers at least needed at High School. 

Two teachers at least needed at Parker School. 

One teacher at least needed for Grade Work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE I. WALLACE, 

Supervisor of Home Economics. 
February 16, 1927. 



REPORT OF KINDERGARTEN SUPERVISOR 



Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: The following is a report of the kinder- 
garten department for the past year. 

In general, the work has been similar to that of the pre- 
vious year. Another set of "Hill" floor blocks has been 
bought and enlarged building blocks have been made by 
the Morrill School. According to a composite statement 
of survey findings of kindergartens in several cities, 
' ' Kindergarten equipment is not considered up to standard 
unless it includes some physical apparatus, large building 
materials and suitable tools and supplies for wood work, 
painting and modeling." We do not have any physical ap- 
paratus but the other requirements are met in some degree 
in most of our kindergartens. 

In September the enrollment in all kindergartens showed 
a big increase, especially at the Walker and Dunklee 
buildings where it has reached sixty -five or more. During 
the winter term the attendance is always lower, due to 
epidemics and bad weather. This irregular attendance 
has its effect on the work of the kindergarten and the 
child's progress, as frequent absences mean a "slowing up" 
in the daily work. 

The health department has charge of the physical ex- 
amination of each kindergarten child as well as the 
monthly weighing and measuring. In every kindergarten 
today, more time is given to health work than former^ ; 
in washing the hands before luncheon, in providing milk 
and in lengthening the resting period. In some kinder- 
gartens it is a common occurrence for two or three children 
to fall asleep during the fifteen-minute rest period. 

Because of an epidemic of measles there was no public 
Christmas tree party at the Dunklee kindergarten, but all 
the others were held as usual with many interested parents 
and friends present. The kindergarten children marched 
with the other grades in the school parade held last May. 



138 SCHOOL REPORT. 

In September, Miss Helen Stevens of the Walker kinder- 
garten was transferred to the Dewey in place of Miss Gould, 
resigned. Miss Dorothea Lamson of the Oberlin, Ohio, 
Training School was elected to fill the vacancy at the 
"Walker. 

Teachers' meetings for kindergartners are held every 
third Tuesday. Besides the usual routine business, we are 
reading this year "Unified Kindergarten and First Grade 
Teaching" by Parker and Temple, which gives the results 
accomplished in the University of Chicago in co-ordinating 
the work of these two grades. Last year we worked out a 
personality record which consists of a list of desirable habits 
for each child to acquire during his year in kindergarten. 
These records are of great help in checking up the child's 
progress. A report card, too, has been used this year for 
the first time, to show the parents the child's growth in 
various habits and attitudes that promote good citizenship, 
along with his progress in certain subject matter. 

As the work of a kindergarten year from September to 
June is a gradual growth in the child's development, I 
consider it better that he be allowed to remain in the 
kindergarten the entire year. The first part of the year is 
needed for the child's adjustment to an environment out- 
side the home, the second, in preparing him to meet the re- 
quirements of the first grade. 

Both this year and last, several of the kindergarten 
teachers have been members of the group taking College 
Extension work while a few have attended summer school 
within the last two years, both means of professional im- 
provement. • 

I wish to thank the Board of Education for its many 
courtesies and the group of kindergarten teachers for their 
splendid efforts and continued co-operation which have con- 
tributed to the growth of the kindergarten work. Your 
friendly interest and wise counsel have been helpful in a 
great degree. 

Respectfully yours, 

IYLA CHAMBERLIN, 

Supervisor of Kindergartens. 



REPORT OF THE DRAWING TEACHER 



Art Work 



During the past summer six hundred and forty lessons 
were planned for classes in the lower grades as may be 
shown by the printed courses distributed among the teach- 
ers of the elementary schools. 

The work of the lower grades has also been carried on by 
Teachers' Meetings, taking AB-CD one week; EF-GH an- 
other ; IJ-KL another ; and the rural schools another. These 
have been held usually on Wednesday nights at the Parker 
School from four until six, also by visits to the various 
rooms as often as possible to look over the work and to 
take lessons. 

The work in the Junior High is outlined as follows: 

From the inspiration of a flower, three units for a 
bisymmetrical design were worked out, one of which was 
chosen. 

A lesson on color appreciation was given. 

The designs were worked out according to a definite 
color scheme and made into an all-over pattern. 

A portfolio for their drawings was made and the all-over 
pattern applied. Art was lettered at the top. 

Japanese drawing of birds were made for agility of line 
and for quick and exact eye training. Also drawings of 
flowers for the same purpose and stressing the growth of 
them. 

Christmas cards from colored paper were made, stressing 
the reasons for cards at this season. Books in two classes 
have been made and the covers decorated in correlation 
with history stories written and favorite poems. 

Pose drawing has been taken up — first taking up quick 
poses, stressing proportion and form but no rendering. 
Hands and feet have been drawn separately to aid while 
drawing them in the whole pose. 



140 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Longer poses have been taken for more careful drawing. 

Pose drawing worked out as silhouette with environment 
has also been developed; also pose drawing with costume 
and worked in water color. 

Illustration work stressing • lettering imagination and 
good arrangement is to be developed. 

Perspective is to be taken, poster work, and finally a 
class project working out a scene of a play. 

The work in the Parker School is with the and P 
Domestic Art girls, meeting for one period per week with 
each class; as this period is shortened, the results are 
limited. However, portfolios were made and a design was 
applied in color with a certain color scheme having an 
understanding of the rudiments of color. Color wheels 
were painted; Christmas cards were designed from in- 
spiration received from the environment of the Parker 
School. These were worked out on linoleum and blocked 
on colored paper, where they were finished with tempera. 
A small project in decoration of tables was also carried 
out. 

The work for the remainder of the year is to be more 
appreciation of the beautiful through picture study and 
the lives of artists ; the principles of design and the appli- 
cation of designs to articles of use ; also by a field trip to 
the old and new Historical Buildings and by out-of-door 
sketching and drawing from nature. 

The work in the High School is two periods once a week 
with the Domestic Art Girls and Electives in the same 
group. 

Color has been studied. A plate consisting of a color 
wheel and color schemes as analogous, monochromatic, 
complementary, and split complementary was made. 

The lives of artists have been studied and notes have 
been kept of them and their works, also of the work taken 
throughout the course. 

Design principles have been studied and applied in 
work. 

A talk on homes, the arrangements of different rooms. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 141 

harmony, site and purpose were discussed. An arrange- 
ment for a bedroom was drawn and worked out in color. 
Pictures were mounted in their note books of good design 
in the various rooms. 

Notes were taken on the purpose and ideals of dress, 
showing to a small degree the development of dress 
throughout the ages. Dresses were designed for school 
and for sport. 

There has also been an Art Club meeting on Thursdays 
and Fridays from two-thirty to five for those interested in 
Art. Christmas cards were designed and color discussed 
and a few posters and a motto lettered for Girls' Club, 
but the greater part of their time has been spent in the 
development of a Marionette Play. 

A competition was held in the English Department for 
the writing of the play. After having chosen the play the 
heads were modeled to represent the various characters, the 
bodies constructed and costumes designed and worked out 
for the puppets. The stage has been built by the Morrill 
School, the back drops have been painted by the Art Club. 
The play will finally be given by the Club for the children 
all over the district. 

For the remainder of the year applied design in leather 
and cloth will be taken up, also etchings, also out-of-door 
sketching. 

The Dewey Training Girls have met once a week taking 
both Juniors and Seniors together. Portfolios were made 
and monograms applied. 

Color was studied. 

The Juniors took the study of circles, triangles, squares, 
etc., for form for lower grade work, while the Seniors ap- 
plied color schemes to drawings worked from nature. 

Lettering was taken up — also illustration work with 
lettering. 

Christmas problems for different grades were discussed. 

Designs applied in aurora cone to handkerchiefs for a 
Christmas problem was made by the Seniors. 

A project, to show how work of this kind may be taken 



142 CITY OF CONCORD. 

in a class, was made. The working out of Hiawatha for 
the small children was done by the Juniors, and by the 
Seniors the cave scene from Macbeth. 

Perspective work is being taken for the rudiments of 
elementary drawing. And the grouping of objects for ob- 
ject drawing which will lead up to poster work represent- 
ing fine arrangement and simplicity. 

Painting, showing the development through the grades, 
is to be taken, also construction problems showing this 
same development are to be worked out. 

Lessons by Juniors and Seniors will be given and criti- 
cised. 

My aim in teaching Art has been to help children gain 
an appreciation of the finer things of life, to see and note 
more keenly the beauty around them and to learn the joy 
of creating. Also I have tried to interest those with 
natural ability to develop further their talent to become 
producers of art that their lives may be fuller and make 
richer those with whom they may come in contact. 

Stating in my report last year that for effective work 
two teachers were necessary, I now am more firmly con- 
vinced than ever that the work cannot be carried on by one 
teacher. 

IDA M. MAGOON, 
Supervisor of Draiving* 



REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent: 

Dear Sir : To carry on the work so ably directed for the 
long term of thirty-seven years by the late Charles 
Sumner Conant, is a task which no man would care to 
treat lightly. It was therefore with some trepidation that 
I embarked on this important work in September, 1925. 
From every one, from you, sir, and from all the princi- 
pals and various members of the faculty with whom my 
work has brought me in contact I have met with nothing 
but sympathy and co-operation. I desire to voice my deep 
appreciation at this time. 

The work in the rural schools and classes A to J in 
the city schools has been faithfully and skilfully watched 
over by my assistant, Miss Johnson. 

The new Music Education Series of Songs published by 
Ginn has been introduced into one school for observa- 
tion and the success expected from such a series in the 
hands of the children has been fully demonstrated, and 
it is hoped to extend the same gradually into the whole 
system. 

Good three-part singing has been done the past year in 
classes M and N in the Garrison, Chandler and Walker 
schools. The Parker School chorus has given two public 
performances ably assisted by the Junior High Orchestra, 
and exhibited a high standing of excellence. 

Three High School choruses have been held each week. 

The Girls' Glee Club, limited to forty in number, and 
showing marked reading ability and splendid spirit, is 
doing some exceptionally good work. The Boys' Glee Club, 
although naturally smaller in numbers, is working well and 
enthusiastically. 

The High School Orchestra of 38 members is studying 
some worth-while compositions, and the High School Band 
is busy extending its repertoire. 



144 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Through the munificence of the Kiwanis Club the pro- 
ceeds from a concert given by Sousa's band were donated 
to the instrument fund. The sum of one hundred dollars 
so provided was expended on a baritone and an alto horn. 
From the concert fund of the High School I bought a silver 
flute and a clarinet. 

Whilst all these instruments are in the hands of pupils, 
yet I think time will prove that the most efficient way of 
building up and maintaining a band such as is found in 
some localities is by pupil ownership of the instrument, 
coupled with class instruction, sponsored by the education 
authorities. I am studying this situation and hope to be 
able to submit some concrete plan ere another year comes 
round. 

Respectfully yours, 

H. MAITLAND BARNES, 

Supervisor of Music. 



REPORT OF PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 



Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent, Concord, N. H.: 

Dear Sir: I submit my report as Physical Director and 
Coach of Athletic Teams. This report deals briefly with 
instruction given, schools benefited and recommendations 
for improvements. 

Our program of physical education is being developed 
from year to year with good results. The High School. 
Junior High Schools, and some of the Elementary Schools, 
are receiving the benefit of this system. These schools are 
now doing the drills and exercises on a regular schedule. 

In some of the schools the exercises and drills are being 
presented with music which has added much interest and 
rhythm to the exercises. Nearly all of the exercises are 
being controlled by student leaders who are being developed 
from year to year. They are now beginning to realize the 
importance of their position as leaders and of obtaining 
better discipline and promptness in the performance of the 
exercises. 

The development of our athletic teams has shown an im- 
provement during the year. Our football team had a very 
good season. The baseball team tied for the State cham- 
pionship. The girls' basket ball team has made a very 
respectable showing this season. 

This development, without doubt, is due to the work 
we are doing in the Junior High Schools. We have leagues 
in baseball, hockey and basket ball. Instruction is given 
in football but no games are played. Lectures are given in 
the different sports and with blackboard talks and demon- 
strations, giving them a foundation to go ahead when they 
get to the High School. An athletic field is a real necessity 
for the proper development of an all round athletic pro- 
gram. Boys interested in track athletics are working 
under a handicap, without a proper place on which to 



146 CITY OP CONCORD. 

train. If we can in an}' way help the athletic field proposi- 
tion that has been started by some of our patriotic citizens, 
we should do so, for the future development of our young 
athletes may mean much to the welfare of our city in years 
to come. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENE M. CALLAHAN, 

Physical Director. 






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CENSUS, 1926 



Girls 


Total 


1,687 


3,407 




64 


87 


151 


1,269 


2,625 


262 


513 


42 


62 



SUMMARY 

Boys 

Number of children enumerated 1,720 

Increase since 1925 

Number attending school since 1925 64 

Number attending public schools ■ 1,356 

Number attending parochial schools 251 

Number attending private schools 20 

Number of children enumerated between the 

ages of 5 and 16 1,720 1,687 3,407 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere... 23 18 41 
Number between the ages of 8 and 14 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 3 3 

Number between the ages of 14 and 16 not 

registered in the district or elsewhere .... 3 3 6 

Number between 5 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 5 and 8 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 8 and 14 not attending 

school regularly 3 3 6 

Number between 14 and 16 not attending 

school regularly 1 1 

Number 10 to 16 not able to read and write 

the English language correctly 

How many of these were born in New 

Hampshire 

Elsewhere in the United States 

In foreign countries 

Moved to the district since 1925 38 29 67 



NATIVITY OF PARENT 

American born 1,286 New Brunswick .... 2 

Foreign born 391 England 23 

Russia 15 Poland 1 

West Indies Sweden 24 

Italy 53 Roumania 3 



SCHOOL REPORT. 149 

Ireland 46 Hungary 1 

Canada 137 Switzerland 2 

Denmark 2 Norway 1 

Germany 2 Greece 6 

Nova Scotia 4 Holland 

Prince Edward Island 6 Armenia 2 

Finland 28 France 4 

Scotland 14 Austria 1 

Albania 4 

NATIVITY OF CHILD 

Boys Girls Total 

American born 1,682 1,653 3,335 

Foreign born 38 34 72 

Russia 2 2 4 

Italy 2 1 3 

England 2 1 3 

Sweden 1 1 

Ireland 1 3 4 

Armenia 1 1 

Canada 17 18 35 

Scotland 1 1 

Finland 3 2 5 

Newfoundland 0' 

Nova Scotia 2 2 4 

Albania 1 1 

P. E. Island 

Greece 2 2 

New Brunswick 5 3 8 



150 



CITY OP CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and Subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( ) = out of 
town . 


Group I— High 
School. 

Charles F. Cook 

RuelE. Tucker 

SethG.Twitchell 

Henry W. Pope 

JohnT. Waldron 

Thomas G. Walters . . . 

Katharine L. Anderson 








Submaster, room 1.. 

Assistant, Chemical 
Laboratory, Phys- 
ical Laboratory . . . 

Assistant, room 7 

Dean of Girls, Dean's 
Office 

Assistant, room 9 

" 4... 

" 10.... 

Lectur e 


English History, Civics 

Chemistry, Physics ... 

Bookkeeping. Econom- 
ics 

Bookkeeping, Type- 
writing 

Commercial Arithme- 
tic. Mathematics .... 

Physical Education 
(Girls) 


45 Thompson St. 

(Saylesville, R. I.) 

28 Thompson St. (Fitchburg, 
Mass.) 

4 North Spring St. 

15 Green St. (Peabody, Mass.) 

18 Rumford St. (No. Cam- 
bridge, Mass.) 






Mass.) 


Carrie E. Baker 

Carrie A. Hood 


French, Spanish 

Shorthand, Typewrit- 


8 No. State St. (Lancaster, N .H . 












N. H.) 


Charlotte M. Sawyer . . 




Mass.) 
221 No. Main St. 




Assistant, room 12... 
" 13... 

8... 

Assembly 
Hall 

Assistant, Library. . 

Art room. 

room 12. . . 

" 11... 

Library... 




60 Pleasant St. 


Stella M. Osgood 

Agnes I. Moberg 






Shorthand, Typewrit- 
ing 


169 Pleasant St. 


Elizabeth T. Williams. 

Marion Dwinnell 

Helen H. Richardson . 


English History, Mod- 
ern European His- 
tory 

Mathematics, Latin . . 
English, French 


18 Rumford St. (Needham, 

5i )'( hurch St. (Ayer, Mass.) 
126 Warren St. (Sabattus, 

Maine.) 
6S Warren St. 


Audrey A. Davis 

Hazel H. Peterson 


Biology, English 

American and English 


(Contoocook, N. H.) 






Mass.) 
36 So. state St. 






22 South St. 


Morris H. Hewitt 

May B. McLam 

M. Virginia Musk 

Lois A. Bannister 

Elvira P. Dillon 

Ruth Lyford 


Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Died Aug. 26, 1926. 
Leave of absence. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 

Supervising Prin- 
cipal 






Grace B. Holton 

Mildred V. Colby 

Group II— Parker 

School. 

Harriet S. Emmons . .. 


6 So. state St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



151 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( ) 
town. 



Group II— Parkep. 
Schools— Continued. 



Helen O. Stephenson.. 
Mary W. Cross 



Assistant, room 5. 



Latin. Mathematics... 
Mathematics 



Constance J. Timlin .. 



Bernice M. Cummings 
Christine C. Petersen . 

Cora T. Fletcher 

Elizabeth J. Donovan. 

Mary Flavin 

Julia M. Degnan 

Bertha F. Osterheld... 

Julia M. Melifant 

Mildred E.Rowe 

Florence A. Chandler 

Chandler School. 

Anna M. Keenan 

Grace M. Haskell 

Mary A. McGuire 

Edith C. Ericson 

Harriet L. Megrath .... 

Charlotte W. Bagley . . 
Rhoda C. Reilly 

Walker School. 

Julia E. Talpey 

Viola J. Brock 

Mabel F. Lane 

Agnes R.Kelley 

Garrison School. 

Mary K. Hickey 

Irene W. Hart 

Anne M. Branon 

Harriet L. Megrath . . . 



Commercial Geogra- 
phy, Ancient History, 
Commercial Arith- 
metic 

English 

English, Ancient His- 
tory 



10. . 

Clerk 

Transferred to High 

School 

Leave of absence 



Supervising Princi- 
pal 

Assistant 



General Science 

English 

English, History... . 
French, Mathematics 
Mathematics 



Latin. Science 

English 

Mathematics, English. 

Science, History 

English. History 



Clerk 

Resigned at end of 
spring term 



Supervising Princi- 
pal 

Assistant, room 7... 



Supervising Princi- 
pal 

Assistant, room 8... 



Latin. Mathematics .. 
History, Literature, 

Mathematics 

English, Elementary 

Science 

English 



Transferred to 

Chandler School 



English 

Mathematics, Litera- 
ture. Science 

History 



7 So. State St. (Lowell. Vt.) 
(10 Webster St.. Franklin, 
N. H.) 



11 So. Spring St. 
20 Pine St. 

15 Rumford St. (Portland, 

Me.) 
5 So. State St. 
28 Thorndike St. 
2 No. Spring St. 
20 Bradley St. 
105 Pleasant St. 
36 So. State St. 



c.'::iliffhSt.,Penacook,N.H.) 

167 Rumford St. 

77 So. State St. 

Box 14. 

71 Warren St. (Hooksett, 

N.H.) 
14 No. State St. 



41 Warren St. 
So. State St. 



105 No. State St. 
12 Beacon St. 



Rumford St. 



J3 High St. 

•»5 Thorndike St. 



ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. 



Walker School. 
Julia A. Talpey 



Viola J. Brock 

Mabel F. Lane .... 



Supervising Princi 

pal 

Assistant, room 7 



High School 
High School 
High School 



41 Warren St. 
99 No. State St. 
105 No. State St. 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Walker School— Con 

timit (I . 



Agnes R. Kelley 

Anne I. Hart 

Rose E. Donovan 

Eva H. Tandy 

Mary G. Doherty 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf .. 

Sara E. McClure 

Agnes V. Sullivan 



Position and room. 



Assistant, room 10. 
" 11. 



Dorothea Lamson. 



Eleanor K. Meade... 
Ethel M. Carpenter.. 



Helen F. Stevens. 



Garrison School. 
Mary K. Hickey 



Irene W. Hart 

Anne M. Branon ... 
Hannah E. Bourne 
Nora A. Cotter — 



Katherine E. Crabbe. 
Frances M. Twomey . 

InaL.Tebbetts 

Myrta B. Lowe 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



I, J 

G,H 

E, F 

C, D 

A, B 

Kindergarten and Pri 

mary 

Kindergarten and Pri 
mary 



Assistant, room 6. . . . Ungraded 

Resigned duri n g win- 
ter term. 

Transferred to Dew- 
ey School.' 



Supervising Princi- 
pal 

Assistant, rooms.... 



English, K. L 

Mathematics, K. L 

History K, L 

Classes I. J 

G, H 



Sally Clement 

Harriet L. Megrath . . . 
Mildred E. Holbrook.. 

Eastman School. 
Elizabeth N. Merrill . 
Stella M. French .. .. 
Doris C. Saben 

Rumford School. 
Jessie N. Stimson 



Annette Prescott 

Annie E. Saltmarsh.. 
Rose C. McCormick . . 

Ellen ('. Doherty 

Abbie T. McDonald.. 

Mary M. Doherty 

Cecelia P. Jones 

Katharine L. Kemick. 



Pauline G. Davenport . 
Elizabeth M. McAfee . 



1.... 

Transferred to 

Chandler School 
Transferred to Pena 
cook School. 



Principal, room 3 — 
Assistant, " 2.... 

" 1... 



Supervising Princi 

pal, room 9 ... 

Assistant, room 8 



5... 
3... 
2... 
1... 
4... 

4... 



Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 



E, F 

C, D 

A. B 

Kindergarten and Pri 

mary 

Kindergarten and Pri 
mary 



Beacon St. 

High St. 
105 So. Main St. 
66 High St. 
145 No. State St. 
90 Rumford St. 
11 Cummings Ave. 

49 Lyndon St. 

56 Beacon St. (New London, 

N. H.) 
60 So. Main St. 



70 Rumford St. 

68 High St. 

55 Thorndike St. 

664 No. State St. 

5 Engel St., We3t Concord, 

N. H. 
10 Lyndon St. 
•23 Forest St. 
East Concord. N, H. 



60 No. Spring St. 
44 Merrimack St. 



Grades V, VI R. F. D, 5, East Concord, 

N.H. 

Ill, IV R. F. D. 5, East Concord, 

N.H. 
I, II SHarrodSt. 



Arithmetic, K, L 
Language L — 
Arithmetic, Hygiene K 



11 Holt St. 
>r> Green St. 
60 Beacon St. 



(';.■( >graphy' I, J 1 21 Broadway 



Classes G 

E, F 

C, D 

A, B ... 
Kindergarten and Pri 

mary 

Kindergarten and Pri 

mary 

Special work in classes 
I to L inclusive 



11 Thorndike St. 
56 Rumford St. 
11 Thorndike St. 
75 South St . 

3 Elm St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



153 



Names of buildings 

and teachers. 



Kimball School. 

Susan M. Little . 

Margaret A. Fanning. 

Ruth M. McOaig 

Charlotte A. Norris 

Marguerite M. J. Tet 

reault 

Mary A. Coughlin 

Hannah E. O'Brien . .. 
Edna M. Kennedy — 
Maude B.Binet 

Lucy B. Howard 

Harriet C.Kimball.... 
Marion R. Stebbins . . . 

Penacook School. 

Mildred E. Holbrook. 

Regis E. Scully 

F. Alice Haskell 

Marion F. Callahan . . . 
Annie M. Branon . ... 

Clara E. Flanders 

Rose E. Donovan 

Franklin School. 

Abbie A. Donovan 

Ellen H. S. Anderson . 

Mabel Clark 

Dewey School. 

AddieF. Straw 

Iyla Chamberlin 

Anna D . Shaw 

Clara E. Flanders 

Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard 

Helen F.Stevens 

Susan M. Little. 

Jessie Gould 

Harriet P. Dame 
School. 

Nettie M. Bo wen 

Mary J. Degnan 

Esther M. Mannion ... 
Catherine F. Hurley .. 
Agnes E. Callahan 



Position and room. 



Supervising Princi- 
pal 

Assistant, room 5 

'• 6.... 



-1 . . . . 
1.... 
3.... 
•2.... 



Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Principal, room 4 

Assistant, " 3 

;; ;; 2.... 

Transferred to Gar- 
rison School. 

Transferred to Dew- 
ey School. 

Transferred to Walk- 
er School. 



Principal, room 3. 
Assistant, " 4. 



Supervising Princi 

pal, room 6 

Assistant, room 1 



' 1.... 

Transferred to Kim- 
ball School. 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Principal 

Assistant 

Resigned d u r ing 
fall term. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Geography, K, L 

Language. J, K.. 
Mathematics, I 



Classes G,H 

" E, F 

'• C, D 

" A. B 

Kindergarten and Pri 

mary 

Kindergarten and Pri 

mary 

Special Teacher 



Classes I, J 
- G, H 
" E, F 
" A, B 



Classes I, J 
" C, D 



Trainer for student 
teachers 

Kindergarten and Su- 
pervisor of Kinder- 
gartens 

Classes G, H 



" C, D 

" A, B 

Kindergarten and Pri 
mary 



V, VI. 
Ill, IV 

II, III 



Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 



•.'0 School St. 
DO Rumford St. 
13 Rockingham St. 
(20 Summer St., Penacook, 
N. H.) 

38 Concord St. 
22 Albin St. 
60 Franklin St. 
10 Blanchard St. 

7 Washington St. 

31 Auburn St. 
Hopkinton Road. 



53 Hall St. 
6 Walker St. 
167 Rumford St. 
11 Concord St. 



^4 Center St. 

1 View St.. West Concord. 

N.H. 
126 Warren St. 



101 No. State St. 



2 View St. , West Concord, N. H . 
72 School St. 
1 18 Pleasant St. 
23 Lyndon St. 
s No. State St. 



i South St. 



(29 Center St., Pena- 
cook, N. H.) 
20 Bradley St. 
19 Walker St. 
45 Penacook St. 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 

Cogswell School. 

Fannie B. Lothrop — 
Anna E. Murphy 

Dunk lee Street 
School. 

Marion Silsby 

Mildred Dole 

Hall Street School. 

Gladys Morrill 

Millville School. 

Frances E. Currier — 
Nora E. Murphy 

Iron Works School. 

Delia I. Lewis 

IdaM. Cilley 

Mountain School. 

Dorothy W. Twomey. 
InaL. Tebbetts 

Riverhill School. 

Margaret G. Mannion 
Regis E.Scully 

Cadet Teachers 

in Training. 

Marion Dwinnell 

Elizabeth T. Williams 

Morrill School. 

Roland G. Hartwell. . 

Raymond P. Gilman . 
Herbert C. Wilcox ... 

Philip H. Pike 

Harold C. Chamberlin 

Willard H.Nute.... 

Arthur <;. Paige. .. 
Charles F. Dodge... 

Lawrence H. Woods 



Position and room. 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Residence ( ) — out of 
town . 



Principal, Room 2... 
Assistant, ' 1... 



Principal 

Assistant 

Principal 

Principal 

Assistant 

Principal 

Assistant 

Principal 

Transferred to Garri 
son School 

Principal 

Transferred to Pena 
cook School. 

Transferred to High 

School. 
Transferred to High 

School. 

Principal, rooms 1A 
6A 

Assistant, room 1 . . . 

" 5 .. 
" 4... 
" 6... 



("'lasses C, D 

" A, B 

Kindergarten and Pri 
mary 

Kindergarten and Pri 
mary 

Classes A, B, C, D 

Grades V. VI, VII.... 
1,11,111,1V... 

Grades IV, V, VI, VII 
I, II, III 

Mixed Grades 

Mixed Grades 



167 South St. (Bristol, N. H.) 
IS So. Fruit St. 



51 Pleasant St. 
6 Merrimack St. 



23 No. Stat.' St. 



Route 1, Concord, N. 
Fiske Road. 



Clinton St., R. F. D. 2. 
Iron Works Road, R. F. D. 3. 



27 Lyndon St. 



Occupations, Dewey 
Seniors 

Machine shop prac 
tice, shop drawing .. 

Pattern-making, wood 
turning, Dewey Jun- 
iors 

Electricity, appliec 
mathematics, history, 
economics 

Cabinet-making, re 
pairs, manual train 
ing 

Forging, manual train 
rngat WalkerSchool 
stock and supplies. .. 

Mechanical drawing.. 

Mathematics, applied 
physics, history. coin 
mercial geography.. 

Printing 



4 No. State St., Suite 5. 
10 Maple St. 

229 No. Main St. 

13 Summer St. 

East Concord, N . H. , Route ■ 



315 So Main St. 

'.) Humphrey St. 



28 Beacon St. 
25 Clinton St. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Continued. 



155 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 



Morrill School— C< 
United. 



George A. Bartlett 
Earl S. Temple.... 



Paul A. Brazier — 
Arthur W. Andrews 



Home Economics 
Department. 



Grace I. Wallace 



Ruth M. Cutter.... 
Dorothy Barnard. 
Ethel H. Piper .... 



Annie C. Cobb 
M. Emma Parsons 



EdnaF. Watson 

Belle C. Lyons 

Norma E. Gardner . . 

Music. 

H. Maitland Barnes. . 
Rachael H. Johnson 

Drawing. 

Ida M. Magoon 

Physical Drill. 
Eugene M. Callahan . 

Janitors. 
Charles M. Thomas... 

Charles Scherig 

Charles Ada 



John McKenzie . . 
Arthur S.Taylor. 
Frank J. Boyd ... 
Willis C. Prescott. 
Park French 



Position and room. 



A.~.-istHnt,room 8. 



George A. Duemling • 
John P. Heath 



Resigned during fall 
term. 



Supervisor of Home 
Economics 



Grades and subjects 
taught. 



Bookbinding, manual 
training at Walker 
School 

Hi story /study periods, 
manual training at 
Walkerand Rumford 
Schools 

Machine shop practice 
and study period 



Residence ( ) : 
town. 



51 No. Main St. 
55 So. State St. 



Lunch Room at High 
School 



Lunch Room at High 
School 

Lunch Room at Par- 
ker School 

Lunch Room at Par 
ker School 

Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Director . 
Assistant 



Morrill 

Morrill 



High and 
Schools.. 

High and 
Schools 

Custodian of school 
books and general 
supplies, Practice 
House 

Parker School 

Chandler School 

Walker 

Garrison " 



Eastman 
Rumford 
Kimball 



Sewing, Nursing 

ooking. Sewing 

ooking, Sewing. Par 
ker Lunch Room 



6 So. State St. (Manchester, 

N. H.) 
6 Rumford St. (Antrim, N. H.) 
36 Pine St. 

15 Valley St. 

38 No, Spring St.(Marion, 
Mass.) 

88 No. State St. 

51 So. Spring St. 

47 So. Spring St. 



lit', School St. 

11 No. Spring St. (Hopkinton, 
N.H.) 



l:> Summit St. (Richford, Vt.) 



M Rumford St. 



16$ Gladstone St. 
64 So. Spring St. 



5 Chapel St. 

57 So. State St. 

6 Avon St. 

140 Rumford St. 
482 No. State St. 

West Concord, N. H. 

ist Concord, N. H. 
6 Donovan St. 
10 Wall St. 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

SCHOOL TABLE— Concluded. 



Names of buildings 
and teachers. 


Position and room. 


Grades and subjects 
taught. 


Residence ( ) = out of 
town. 


Janitors— Continued. 
Harvey B. Fowler 


Penaeook, Cogswell, 
Dunklee Street 






George F. Beiuis 


Franklin and Dewey 






Benjamin F. Robinson 


Harriet P. Dame 








Millville School 




R. F. D. 2. 


Perley 0. Farrar 

FredO. Libbey 

Special Repairs. 


Died May 20, 1926. 
Resigned during win- 
ter term. 















SCHOOL REPORT. 

HIGH SCHOOL TABLE 



157 



Showing the Number op Students Taking Each Study 
First Semester, 1926-1927 





Classes. 


SUBJECTS. 


M N 

1 





P 


Q 


R 


S 


T 


U 


V 


Post 
Qrad. 


English 


135 


£ 


199 
41 
24 


74 

l:: 


172 
31 

si 


81 
9 
44 


159 
24 
62 


59 
8 

15 


96 

14 
36 


39 
6 
18 




































10 
113 


"35 






135 


99 














































56 


26 






Mediaeval and Modern His- 










46 

HI 


33 
57 






135 


99 


197 


76 


36 


16 


13 

17 

"26 


17 

12 

'ii 






















22 


13 














44 


2U 














.-, 












71 


25 
29 

29 


41 
38 

42 


18 

15 
15 














28 


9 
9 
























"50 


16 


33 




Commercial Geography . . . 




"si 


'ii 

20 


'is 

L< 

6 

4 


"'s 
9 

1 






























1 


'ii 


2 


























36 




















37 
33 


14 






























62 


28 


36 


11 

16 




5 


1 




Economics and Business 














































































































































3 




























135 


99 












6 

197 
6 

140 


5 
4 
72 
1 

60 


""8 
13S 
13 


6 
66 
5 


'_ 




















135 


'. 


L02 

7 


47 
3 


68 

E 


4 




Music, Orchestra 

Elementary Science 








































65 


4C 

51 






14 






1 








Shop Practice Tryout 
















4 


- 


4 


1 


-1 


2 










og 








• 















158 CITY OP CONCORD. 

MANUAL TRAINING— TABLE OF ATTENDANCE 





Sew i no. 


Cooking. 


Mechanic Arts. 


Schools. 


a 

lis 

B to 03 
03 'p/,5 

"o => a 


n 

03 

sa 

o 
o 

'S 

o 


P<<D 

s^ 

§ Ml 

10 "i s' 

O « 0) 


"S ® 

03 +i 
03 M 

^ s 

°'0 

_03 

a a 2? 

3 03 t>. 

S Pm3 

o a a 

.4 P. « 


03 
to 

o 

'£ 

CO 

o 


CO .i3 

to a 
ll 

sg 

p 60 

©'i ^ 

o S » 


3.3 

03 *- 

jh a 

^— . 

So* 

O 2 c 
J3 P. a 


c3 

=) 
O 

c3 

!- 
O 

0) 


^ 03 

to a 
•gg. 

a a . 
"aS 


High 


35 
12 


1 



34 
12 


27 
24 
104 
45 
12 


4 



25 

100 
40 
12 


184 
86 

70 
21 
1 
■45 
30 


40 
9 
5 
6 




4 

5 




Parker 


77 
71 


Walker 

Garrison 


41 
18 
4 

60 
37 


3 
1 
1 

5 
4 


38 

3 

55 
33 


G4 
21 










41 


Kimball 








25 






















Dewey Train- 


17 

10 
1 
3 


1 

2 






16 

5 
10 

1 


17 


1 


16 


17 

7 


1 

1 





Harriet P. 




Millville 




























3 





3 


























9 


3 


6 


















Totals 


245 


18 


227 


229 


13 


216 


5,0 


74 


482 







TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR ENDING JUNE. 1926. 





j? 


Of the pupils registered how many hac 
prior to registration in this schoo 
been registered dnring this schoo 




Istis 


Of the pupils reported in 3 above how many on 
September 1 (last) were 


j 

I 
1 

i 




Igf 


1 




I 

2 

s 

8 


1 


1 


i 

i 

•5 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

-5 


i 


1 

| 

i 
1 

SB 


i 1 
; | 

'Z i. 
1 = 


1 

| 
•A 


1 

y. 


1 

■s 

1 

P 


B 
S 

li 

11 
a, 


5 


SCHOOLS. 




id 

fpff 


ii' 2 s 

•Hi ■s 

3 B 


!FI;i 
JflJIf 


1 1 

S I s 


| 


i 


| 


O , 


•gS.-f 

llrff 

llil 


i 
| 

s 
S 

1 


1 
1 


I 
* 




I 


1 


3 

1 


I 




l 


» 


5 




S 


e 


I 


i 


25 


3 r 

& a 


! 

i 11 i 


i 


1 


t 


i 


H 


g 


| 

3 


1 


£ 


25 

5 


3 


i 


25 


1 1 

« e* 2 


1 


1 

r 


! 

I s 




1 


| 


Hioh Schools. 


827 

194 

111 

14 
362 

221 
100 

00 
260 
245 
138 

63 

8! 

ID 
12 

:l'.i 

29 

20 

21 

iai 


365 

193 
104 

12 

3.54 

172 
72 

228 
226 
116 
67 
68 

57 
85 

1,149 

16 
11 

40 

19 
29 
22 
21 

'is 

169 


682 

881 

89 
26 

7 If, 

401 
172 
101 

488 
471 
249 
180 
146 
i:ik 
117 
61 

2,180 

86 

17 
19 

71 

69 
60 
42 
42 

286 

17 


45 
31 

ICi 

98 

80 
2 

84 

88 

34 
13 

12 

1 

846 




« 

1 

i 
n 


88 

2J 
10 
6 

69 
60 

5 
2 

299 



3 




1 

6 


74 
56 
26 

167 

140 
40 

158 
106 
68 
29 

17 

22 

6 

644 




4 

x 

2 

899 




. 3 

11 
3 

8 

3 
6 
6 

80 

2 





1 
1 

97 




1 




o 



1 


i 
t 

2 
2 




1 
1 




3 


1 




1 
1 

2 
U 



II 


285 

149 
73 
26 

H 

256 

140 

56 
169 
147 
98 
48 
65 
66 
49 
25 

942 

18 
12 

Be 

28 
14 
20 

21 

211 

122 

5 

1 .CIS 


310 

16( 

"l 

1W 

3f 

150 

138 
85 

6C 
61 

22 

HOI 

15 
5 

11 

19 

21 
21 
27 

164 

1,5X9 


601 ( 

309 . 
151 . 
69 . 

534 

246 .. 

130 . 

94 .. 
319 .. 
285 .. 
183 .. 

98 .. 
125 .. 
127 .. 

89 . 

47 .. 

1.743 

33 .. 
17 .. 
19 .. 

65 16 
33 8 
49 7 

42 I 

276 46 

14 

3.237 46 












47 
46 

5 

101 

11 
117 
99 
78 
24 
43 
43 
5 
18 

10 

5 
5 

20 


54 

54 

22 
5 

135 

71 
42 
21 
103 
ln7 
60 
23 
31 
31 
11 
17 

517 
23 


12 
101 

38 

10 

21! 

172 

9S 

■Vir 

47 
74 

74 
16 

1.135 

21 

12 
13 


102 

21 
10 

3 

122 

12 

; 
is 

E 

i 

2 


v. 
ii 

122 

( 

E 
C 



1 


240 

175 

211 
5 

244 

3 

18 
10 



61 

1 

5 


175 

11 

1 


174 
li 

1 


349 
32 

1 








3 

1 3 

.. : 
.. : 


8 6 

8 f 

8 5 
8 5 

8 B 

a 2i 

8 3: 
8 31 

i 15 

< 35 
8 37 

i 20 

i 15 

15 

15 

10 

235 

5 

5 
5 


i 

i 
i' 

12 
6 
14 

U 

( 




















2 


2 

24 

? 

24 

171 
15 

s! 

10 

7> 

71 
7} 
5 
5 

1 


91 

9 

9 

38 

661 
57 

24 

% 

2,81 
19 
19 

446) 

94 

ni 

9'. 


198,686 ll .811 

97.877 5.444 
49.199 3.064 
20.184 1,168 
6.085 245 


550.37 

271. 

55 ill 
16.85 


30.04 
15. 

8.48 
3.2' 


580.41 

286. 
144.68 

59 11 
17.52 


.9482 

.948 

.91 

.9284 

.9617 


734 57 56 

182 30 19 

2 ii 29 
4 19 


36 

7 

21 
15 


30 
48 

38 


10 

1 

2 


200 

22 
309 

561 






2 

7 
1 
2 

11 

2 
1 

8 

5 
41 







1 

68 


l 

: 

: 

1 

4 

e 

2 
8 
3 

8 

89 





44 


19 
12 
12 


































b o 





19 35 
12 211 
12 19 
9 17 

ii ii 
77 12;: 


27 
21 
H' 

22 

11 

2*4 

7 
6 

14 

12 
6 
13 
11 
16 

76 


28 

lo 

2] 

29 
28 

29 
5 

261 

3 

7 

18 

7 
17 

12 
12 
11 

77 
ill', 


66 

35 
32 

69 

11 

51 
48 
73 
11 

515 

11 
6 
4 

21 


20 


21 


Hi 





1 


1 




Totals 

Elementary Schools. 


173.345 

80,246 
41 ,503 

311,12. 
95,811 
87.107 
60,159 
: il,9 II 
38.123 
111.208 
25.091 
10.168 

545.510 

10.559 

5,102 
6.316 


9,921 

.5,707 
2,18) 
2. SO 
8,802 
6,83'. 
5,17' 
2,711 
3.203 
3,320 
2,805 
1 ,294 

I 192', 

628 
826 


479. 96 

222.24 
114.94 

83.44 
265,44 
2 10 . 89 
166.61', 

85.71 
105.59 
111.37 

60.73 


27.38 

15.71 
6.01 

7 91 
24.12 

18.74 
13.76 
7 58 

9. 19 

7.74 

3.58 


507.34 

i'io'95 
91.34 
289.80 
259.63 
1.SO.I2 
93.29 
114.46 
120.50 
74.47 
48.30 


.9445 

.9343 

!ilUx 

!9280 
.9100 
.91,50 
9217 
.92 
.895 


172 3 

45 

36 

23 
105 
173 
129 

30 

89 

64 

25 

10 


2 ,81 
1 22 

1 35 
1 22 

: 17 
: .) 

1 25 
J 18 

) 14 

15 
9 

ill 

8 


53 
30 

140 

112 

52 

59 

24 
2 

1 

3 
11 
211 

4 


142 

74 

228 
27 
231 

116 
64 

50 

22 


15 

5 
7 
2 
14 


,895 

114 

68 
142 
75 

285 
59 

81 
231 

57 


46 




































1 


1 


2 






- : 








































































Cogswell 
































1 


1 


" 





"• 


03 




Totals 






6 


1.507.79 

29.24 
11.4.5 
17.49 


123 52 

1.71 
2.31 

1.05 


1,031 31 

30.95 
16.76 
18,54 


.9198 

.9197 
.8619 
.94 


729 
25 


1,368 

15 
12 
12 

39 
2 

38 

64 
16 

1711 
7 


46 

1 
4 

3 

2 


1.210 

27 
1.5 

123. 

1.50 
146 
110 
109 
128 
166 


68 


Rural Sohools. 

Iron Works 

Mountain 

Riverhill 


















~ 


~a 


-- 


- 


II 


. 3 
II 3 





T t 1 


16 

5 
.5 
5 

5 
5 
6 


6 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 





II 
II 


7+ 

2 
2 
2 

2 


304 

9 
9 


22.037 

7.036 

3.371 
6,247 
1 ,87 1 
4.665 
5,584 


1 82', 

2.07O 
788 

688 
862 

1.21,9 
1.458 


61.18 

39.52 
18.6 
31.51 
26.92 
25.77 
30.85 


5.07 

16.90 
1.3 
3.80 

T ! /■ l' 

8.05 


00.25 

56.48 
•22.9 

58.31 

32 '.78 
38.90 


9172 

.770 
.81 
.90 

.849 
. 78|,1 
79 


41 28 

3 8 
2 3 
8 2 
1 8 
87 1 
19 2 




Kindergartens. 












13 

311 
23 

29 

153 

1 























































































































Dunklee St 


• 




1 


II 

18 




a 

70", 




6 

686 






285 


4 

551 


190 


a 


° 





II 
1 


.. ii 

3 

3! 
188 


1 


Totals 







30 
5 






12 

2J 


.54 
94 


31.779 
4.098 


470 


176.17 14.88 

11.85 1.30 

2.786.82 232.19| 


2-21.05 

12.65 

3.019.01 


8 185 

.897 


117 3 


14 
2 


18 808 
8 14 
87 3.111 




Ungraded. 


9 2 


2 


1 




121 








Grand Totals 


2,191 


2,060 


4.251 


1ST 


412 


1,448 


209 


2 


52 588 


975.485 


"5.131 


90111 


1 ,804 99 


417 696 


1.756 


59 



THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 
OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

HIGH SCHOOL HALL 
THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 3, 1927 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK 

PROGRAM 

March: "Under the Double Eagle" Wagner 

High School Band 

ORIGINAL DECLAMATION 

1. "Endowments" 

Muriel Gladys Cressy, High School, Class V 

2. "The Ideal American" 

Richard Francis Upton, Parker School, Class P 

3. "Poetry" 

Viola Johanna Goodyear, High School, Class R 

4. "Words" 

Dorris Marion Tilton, High School, Class T 
Part Songs: (a) "Danny Boy" Irish Folk Song 

(b) "Daffodils A Blowing" Edward German 
Girls' High School Glee Club 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION 

1. "The Return of Regulus" Kellogg 

Robert Edward Hobart, Walker School 

2. "Our Flag" Walsh 

Nathaniel Martin Mudgett, Chandler School* 

3. "Our Country" Joseph Story 

Walter Hjalmar Carlson, Garrison School 

Serenade: "Dreams of Love" Fulton 

Trumpet Solo, George Cate 

High School Band 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION 

1. "Aunty Doleful's Visit" Dallas 

Frances Lillian Prentiss, Garrison School 

2. "Old Jim" Knibbs 

Evelyn Matilda Rosendale, Walker School 



160 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



3. "The Busybody" Anon 

Lucy Ann Tsarides, Chandler School 

March: "Bombasto" Farrar 

High School Band 

AWARD OF PRIZES 

Original Declamation — High School, Groups 1 and 2 
First Prize, $15, awarded to Dorris Marion Tilton, High School. 
Second Prize, $10, awarded to Viola Johanna Goodyear, High 

School. 

Forensic Declamation — Junior High Schools, Group 2 
First Prize, $6, awarded to Robert Edward Hobart, Walker 

School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Walter Hjalmar Carlson, Garrison 

School. 
Miscellaneous Declamation — Junior High School, Group 2 
First Prize, $6, awarded to Evelyn Matilda Rosendale, Walker 

School. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Lucy Ann Tsarides, Chandler 

School. 

*Did not speak on account of illness. 

BOARD OF JUDGES 

George H. Duncan, Esq., Jaffrey, N. H. 
John G. Marston, Suncook, N. H. 
Hon. Eliot A. Carter, Nashua, N. H. 



PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT 

Received 

Balance from last year's account 
Interest accruing on same during the year 
Sale of 429 tickets at 35 cents 

Expended 

Henrietta C. Bemis, professional services 

Prizes, including books 

English Prize Composition, expense 

Miscellaneous expense, including selling and taking 

tickets, judges, ushers, music, etc. 
Cash on hand as a guarantee fund for future contests 



$3,783.43 
160.28 
150.15 

$4,093.86 

$65.00 

49.50 

138.00 

17.15 
3,824.21 



$4,093.86 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
FOR HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS 

Held at the Parker School, May 1, 1926 



High 

Parker 

Chandler 

Walker 

Garrison 



No. pupils No. pupils Per cent Average 
enrolled taking of pupils rank of 



600 

279 

152 

61 

20 



part, in contest. 
52 
40 
33 
15 
5 



8.6+ 
14.5+ 
21.7+ 
24.5+ 
25. 



48.4 
77.3+ 
102.8 + 
94.8+ 
31.2 



of pupils 

72.6+ 
65.3+ 
56.7+ 
59.1+ 
75.8 



Prizes 



PRIZES 
General Prizes 



Awarded to 



Class Subject 



First, $6 Marjorie Frances Lowe U 
Second, $4 Edward March Cummings R 
Third, $3 Beatrice Elizabeth Hewitt P 



Fourth, $2 Robert Whittier Parker 



The Guillotine 
David's Childhood 
What Rip Would 
Have Seen Had 
He Slept Until 
1926 
King Lewis 



Class Prizes 

Senior High School 

Classes U, V 

First, $4 Marjorie Louise Lowe U 

Second, $3 William Louis Jennings V 

Third, $2 Louise Wilde U 

Fourth, $1 Lillian Oberlin Trombly U 



The Guillotine 
The Duty of Ameri- 
cans 
Dream Children 
The Guillotine 



Classes S, T 

First, $4 Lester Kenison Billings T 

Second, $3 Dorothy Marie Hadley S 

Third, $2 Dorothy Deborah Nash T 

Fourth, $1 Marjorie Louise Wright T 



The Guillotine 

Guinevere 

The Guillotine 

Why I Like 
Poetry of 
Present Day 



the 

the 



162 



CITY OP CONCORD. 



Classes Q, R 

Prizes Awarded to Class Subject 

First, $4 Edward March Cummings R David's Childhood 

Second, $3 Robert Whittier Parker Q King Lewis 

Third, $2 William Houghton Foster R David's Childhood 

Fourth, $1 Janet Grace Kennedy R David's Childhood 



Junior High Schools 

Parker School 

Classes O, P 



First, $4 


Beatrice Elizabeth Hewitt 


P 


What Rip Would 
Have Seen Had 
He Slept Until 
1926 


Second, $3 


Hilda Constance Salter 


P 


What Rip Would 
Have Seen Had 
He Slept Until 
1926 


Third, $2 


Jane Clare Peaslee 


P 


Shylock 


Fourth, $1 


Harold Edgett Kimble 


P 


The Tournament 




Chandler, Walker and Garrison Schools 




Classes M, N 






First, $4 


Jean Elizabeth Robinson 
(Garrison) 


N 


The Combat 


Second, $3 


Ralph Andrew Ashton, Jr. 


N 


How Lucknow Was 




(Chandler) 




Saved 


Third, $2 


Laura Virginia Morrison 
(Walker) 


N 


The Mutiny 


Fourth, $1 


Dana Crawford Bogart 
1 (Garrison) 


N 


The Combat 



TENTH ANNUAL ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL 
CONTEST 

High School Hall, June 11, 1926 
PROGRAM 



Violin Solo: 



'Salute d'Amour" 

Helen Hilliard 



Order of Speakers: 



John Henry Sanders 
Richard David Butterfield 
Eugene French Magenau 
Robert B. Coulahan 
Grace Milton 'White 
Virginia Woodward 
Winnifred Pingree Chase 
Helen Marie Lowe 
Shirley Ruth Martin 
Ruth Louise Robinson 



Elwin 



Ingle 



Part Song: "Knocked 'em in the Old Kent Road" 

Boys' Glee Club 
Song: "Sing! Sing! Birds on the Wing" 
Shirley Martin 
Selections: (a) "Columbia Waltz" 
(b) "The Field Ensign" 

Mandolin Club 

Sextet: "Beauteous Morn" German 

Doris Fuller, Grace Cullum, Louise Kelliher, 

Muriel Cressy, Fannie Carlton, Dorothy Nash 

Announcement of Award: 



Nutting 

Foden 
Goggin 



Willoughby Colby 



JUDGES 
Rev. W. Stanley Emery 



Robert B. Day 



MEDAL WINNERS 

Shirley Ruth Martin— "Wealth" 
Eugene French Magenau — "Careers" 



GRADUATION EXERCISES, CONCORD HIGH 
SCHOOL 

AUDITORIUM, FRIDAY, JUNE 25, 1926, 2.30 P. M. 
PROGRAM 

Overture, "Poet and Peasant" Suppe 

High School Orchestra 

Prayer, 

Rev. W. Stanley Emery 

Essay, "New Hampshire" 

Virginia Woodward (First Honor) 

Essay, "Opportunity" 

Ruth Louise Robinson (Second Honor) 

Address, "Great Moral Lessons from the Great Book of Nature" 
Bishop William Franklin Anderson, D.D., L.L.D., Boston 

Award of Prizes: 

Albin Medals 
Harvard Club Prize 
Woman's College Club Prize 
Chandler Commercial Club Prize 
Thayer Athletic Prize 
Class of January 1922 Cup 
Class of June 1925 Cup 
Hi-Y Cup 

Award of Diplomas 

Superintendent Louis J. Rundlett 

Cantata, "The Village Blacksmith" Samuel Richard Gaines 

High School Glee Clubs 

Soloists, Shirley Martin, Samuel Cushing 

Coronation March from "The Prophet" Meyerbeer 

High School Orchestra 

CLASS OFFICERS 

President Frederick R. Knox 

Vice-President Agnes L. Smith 

Secretary Catherine J. Sullivan 

Treasurer Harry E. Barrett 



GRADUATING EXERCISES, CONCORD HIGH 
SCHOOL 

HIGH SCHOOL HALL, FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1927 
10.00 A. M. 



March, 



'Marche Militaire" 

High School Orchestra 



Shubert 



Opening Exercises 

Part Song, "March of The Guard" Geibel 

Boys' Glee Club 
Essay, "Utopia" 

Marion Louise Whalin (First Honor) 

Essay, "The Ideal Student and Citizen" 

Louise Kathleen Wilde (Second Honor) 

Selection, "Spanish Dance" Moskowski 

High School Orchestra 

Senior Gift to the School, 

Marjorie Frances Lowe 
Acceptance, 

Lester Kenison Billings 

March, "Harmony" Smith 

Banjo Club 
Award of Prizes, 

Woman's College Club Prize 
Chandler Commercial Club Prize 
Class of January 1922 Cup 
Class of June 1925 Cup 
Hi-Y Cup 
Alumni Prizes 
Part Song, "Sparkling Sunlight" Arditi 

Girls' Glee Club 
Award of Diplomas, 

Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins 

March, "Under the Double Eagle" Wagner 

High School Band 

CLASS OFFICERS 
President, Louise K. Wilde 

Vice-President, Marjorie F. Lowe 

Secretary, Lillian O. Trombly 

Treasurer, William R. Saltmarsh 



GRADUATING CLASS OF JUNE 25, 1926 



Name 
Margaret Abbott 
Howard R. Arey 
Harry Earle Barrett 
Ruby Arlene Bartlett 
Bernice Clough Batchelder 
Josephine Louisa Boynton 
Leon Alvah Brown 
Sadie Elizabeth Brown 
Sara Louise Brunei 
Mary Laura Bullock 
Morris Russell Burroughs 
Leonard B. Bushey 
Richard David Butterfield 
Helen Katherine Camp 
Agnes Marie Carlson 
Winnifred Pingree Chase 
Eleanor Spiller Clarke 
Edward William Cotter 
Robert B. Coulahan 
Maurice Hiram Currier 
Martha Elizabeth Dahlgren 
George Dane 
Mary DelBianco 
Pauline Dow 
William Haskell DuBois 
Richard George Dunlap 
Edna May Dunn 
Madeline Beatrice Dunn 
Norma Evangeline Dunstane 
Clyde Ellisworth Fitts 
Ruth Elizabeth Foote 
Robert Adams Foster 
Leonard Rodolph Frost 
Mary Elizabeth Galligan 
Earle Hobert Goodwin 
Harlan Leighton Goodwin 
Raymond Francis Hannaford 
Helen Hersey Hilliard 
Alyce Lenea Hoagland 
James Winston Hodge 
Claude Harold Huckins 
Shirlie Perkins Hunt 
William Louis Jennings 
Carroll Paul Johnson 
Louise Mary Kelliher 
Henry Wadsworth Kennedy 
Frederick Roy Knox 



Course 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Classical 
Classical 
Classical 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Academic 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



167 



Name 
Allen Ingalls Lewis 
Alice Irene Long 
Helen Marie Lowe 
George Adolf Magnuson 
Shirley Ruth Martin 
Margaret Rodriguez Mclsaac 
Alice Addie Merrill 
Louis Francis Messier 
Warren David Miller 
Esther Mae Morrison 
Mary Alice Mulligan 
Mary Josephine Murphy 
Edward Lawrence O'Brien 
Florence May Oliver 
Viola Alma Olson 
Thomas Stanley Osgood 
Henry Maynard Phelps 
Walter Alfred Provo 
William Edwin Quinn 
Woodbury Lindquist Rand 
Helen Elizabeth Reen 
Ruth Louise Robinson 
Agnes Patricia Rowan 
Arthur Harry Roy 
Mary Louise Rushlow 
John Henry Sanders 
Mildred Ruth Savoy 
Olive M. Scott 
Saul Shuff 
Agnes Louise Smith 
Hazel Albertina Stewart 
Dorothy Ethelyn Stickney 
Paul Herbert St. Pierre 
Arlene Mae Stuart 
Catherine Josephine Sullivan 
Isadore E. Taylor 
Sarah Elizabeth Tebbetts 
Mildred Pearl Towle 
James William Tucker, Jr. 
Mary Beatrice Virgin 
Jacob Daniel Waldman 
Marjorie Eleanor Wheeler 
Grace Milton White 
Virginia Woodward 



Course 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Classical 
Mechanic Arts 
Classical 
Commercial 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Academic 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Classical 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Academic 
Commercial 
Mechanic Arts 
Commercial 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Academic 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Commercial 
Classical 
Classical 



GRADUATING CLASS, JANUARY 28, 1927 



Name 

John Stevens Bartlett 
Bessie Emma Amelia Bengsch 
Marian Chesley 
Myrle Olive Chesley 
Nathalie Bradish Christman 
Kathleen Agnes Degnan 
Olive Roxanna Foss 
Emily Wallace Foster 
Lenora Gilford 
Harry Olin Graves 
Harold Winston Griffin 
Paul William Haskell 
Earl George Hills 
John Supplee Hobson 
Eben Bradbury Hutton 
Louisa May Jackman 
Judith Ingeborg Johnson 
Alice Eugenia King 
Holger Gustav Lehtinen 
Henry Locke 
Marjorie Frances Lowe 
Evelyn Mabelle Mahoney 
James William Moran 
Kathleen Louise Mulligan 
Harold Spencer Ramsay 
Robert Alfred Ritchie 
Bernard Laurence Roach 
Gordon Cedric Ruiter 
Eleanor Russell 
William Rollins Saltmarsh 
Lilian Eastman Shepard 
Richard Lantry Smith 
Robert Edward Tilton 
Lillian Oberlin Trombly 
Marie Christina Turnquist 
William Frederick Wall 
Alan Edward Warren 
Dorothy Lillian Weathers 
Marion Louise Whalin 
Louise Kathleen Wilde 



Course 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Classical 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Mechanic Arts 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Mechanic Arts 

Academic 

Academic 

Commercial 

Commercial 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Classical 

Academic 

Academic 

Classical 

Academic 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Academic 

Commercial 

Academic 

Commercial 

Mechanic Arts 

Mechanic Arts 

Classical 

Academic 

Mechanic Arts 

Mechanic Arts 

Commercial 

Classical 

Classical 



ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT 



STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, 
N. H., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street, in said district, on the first day of April, 
1926, at 7.30 o'clock in the evening, to act upon the follow- 
ing subjects: 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years, to fill the vacancies arising 
from the expiration of the term of office of Bennett 
Batchelder, Elisabeth R. Elkins, and Joseph S. Otis. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing 
year. 

8. To see if the district will vote to erect a grade school 
in the vicinity of Hall St., appropriate money for the same, 
and authorize the Board of Education to purchase land, 
and do all other things to carry this vote into full effect. 

9. To see if the voters of the Union School District will 
instruct the Board of Education to investigate the need of 



170 CITY OF CONCORD. 

a new grade school in the South End of the City, and, if 
advisable, to select a site for the same, and secure said site 
for the District by obtaining an option for the purchase of 
the same, and to see what sum of money the District will 
vote to raise and appropriate for said option. 

10. To see if the District will authorize the Board of 
Education to establish a pension system in co-operation 
with the teachers and to raise and appropriate money for 
the same. 

11. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 12th day of March, 1926. 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
CARLETON R. METCALF, 
MERTON C. KNAPP, 
W. STANLEY EMERY, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
OSMA C. MORRILL, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



I certify that on the 15th of March, 1926, I posted a copy 
of the written warrant, attested by the Board of Education 
of said district, at the place of meeting within named, and 
a like attested copy at the police station in the City of Con- 
cord, N. H., being a public place in said district. 

LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 171 

Concord, N. H., March 15, 1926. 

Then personally appeared before me, on this date, the 
said Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above 
certificate by him signed is true. 

I. REED GOURLEY, 

Justice of the Peace. 



RECORD OF ANNUAL MEETING 1926 

In accordance with the foregoing warrant, a meeting of 
the legal voters of Union School District was held at the 
City Auditorium in Concord, N. H., April 1, 1926, at 7.30 
o 'clock. 

The moderator called the meeting to order and read the 
warrant. 

Article 1. On motion of Henry E. Chamberlin, duly 
seconded, the clerk was instructed to cast one ballot for 
Arthur P. Morrill as moderator of the District for the en- 
suing year, and he was declared unanimously elected and 
took the oath prescribed by law before Ray E. Burkett, 
Justice of the Peace. 

Art. 2. On motion of James Maguire, duly seconded, 
the moderator was instructed to cast one ballot for Ray E. 
Burkett for clerk of the District for the ensuing year, and 
he was declared unanimously elected, and took the oath 
prescribed by law before the moderator. 

Art. 3. On motion of Alpheus M. Johnson, it was 
Voted: That the report of the Board of Education having 
been printed in the annual school report, the reading of the 
same be dispensed with and the report as printed be ac- 
cepted and placed on file. 

Art. 4. On motion of T. W. D. Worthen, it was unani- 
mously 



172 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Voted: That the meeting proceed to ballot for three mem- 
bers of the Board of Education to serve for three years and 
that the polls be kept open for the reception of ballots until 
8.00 P. M. On motion of George N. Woodward, the moder- 
ator was instructed to appoint three tellers to sort and 
count the ballots. The moderator appointed as tellers 
George N. Woodward, Harold Cheney, and Mrs. C. R. 
Metcalf. 

At eight o'clock, the moderator declared the polls closed 
and announced the result of the ballot as follows : 

Total number of ballots cast 163 

Necessary for choice 82 

J. M. Langley had 1 

Dr. Edward Sullivan had 1 

Earl Newton had 1 

Mrs. Grace P. Amsden had 1 

Bennett Batchelder had 161 

Elisabeth R. Elkins had 161 

Joseph S. Otis had 161 

and Bennett Batchelder, Elisabeth R. Elkins, and Joseph 
S. Otis were declared duly elected members of the Board 
of Education for a term of three years. 

Art. 5. On motion of Elwin L. Page, duly seconded, it 
was 

Voted: That the Clerk be instructed to cast one ballot 
for William C. Brunei and Clyde M. Davis as Auditors of 
the District for the ensuing year and they were declared 
duly elected to such office. 

Art. 6. On motion of Dr. C. R. Metcalf, duly seconded, 
it was 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District the sum of Twenty-seven Thousand Seven Hun- 
dred Fifty-eight and 13/100 Dollars ($27,758.13) of which 
sum Fifteen Thousand Seven Hundred Fifty-eight and 



SCHOOL REPORT. 173 

13/100 Dollars ($15,758.13) shall be appropriated for the 
payment of the interest on its bonded indebtedness accru- 
ing during the year, and Twelve Thousand Dollars ($12,- 
000) for the payment of the bonds maturing during the 
year. 

Art. 7. On motion of Bennett Batchelder, duly sec- 
onded, it was 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District for the support of schools for the ensuing year 
such a sum as in addition to the sum required by law will 
amount to the sum of Two Hundred Ninety-six Thousand, 
Ninety-seven and 69/100 Dollars ($296,097.69). 

Art. 8. On motion of Harry F. Lake, duly seconded, 
and after discussion by Mayor Marden, A. M. Johnson, 
Harry F. Lake, George W. Parker, and Willis H. Flint, it 
was 

Voted: That the Board of Education be and hereby is 
authorized to purchase the property at No. 38 Hall Street 
from the New Hampshire Savings Bank, and remodel the 
same, so far as necessary, for a grade school to accommo- 
date pupils of the Hall Street section, and that the sum of 
Four Thousand Dollars ($4,000) be raised and appro- 
priated for the purposes herein stated. 

Art. 9. On motion of Merton C. Knapp, duly seconded, 
it was 

Voted: That the Board of Education is hereby instructed 
to investigate the need of a new Grade School in the South 
End of the City, and if advisable, to select a site for the 
same, and secure said site for the District by obtaining an 
option for the purchase of the same, and that the District 
raise and appropriate the sum of Five Hundred Dollars 
($500) for the purpose of taking such option. 

Art. 10. On motion of Rev. W. S. Emery, duly sec- 
onded, it was 



174 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Voted: That the Board of Education be authorized to es- 
tablish a pension system in co-operation with the teachers 
in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 337, Laws of 
1925, and that there shall be raised and is hereby ordered 
to be raised by tax on the polls and ratable estates within 
the Union School District, Supervisory Union No. 8, the 
sum of One Thousand Dollars ($1,000) and that the same 
be appropriated for the purposes of this system during 
the ensuing year. 

On motion of Harry F. Lake, the meeting adjourned. 

A true copy of record. Attest : 

RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



A true copy of record. Attest : 



RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk, 



SCHOOL REPORT. 175 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 







Yearly 


Total 


Date of 


Building 


amount 


indebted- 


payment 




due 


ness 


1927 








July 1 


H. G 


$35,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


12,000 


$569,000 


192S 








May 1 


W. 


6,000 




July 1 


H. G 


4,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


12,000 




1929 








July 1 


H. G 


10,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


12,000 




1930 








July 1 


H. G 


10,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


12,000 




1931 








July 1 


H. G 


9,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1932 








May 1 


W. 


10>000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1933 








May 1 


W. 


10,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1934 








May 1 


W. 


10,000 




Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1935 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 





176 CITY OP CONCOED. 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS- Continued 







Yearly 


Total 


Date of 


Building 


amount 


indebted- 


payment 




due 


ness 


1936 








Oct. 1 


M. 


$2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1937 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1938 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1939 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1940 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1941 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1942 








Oct. 1 


M. 


2,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1943 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1944 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1945 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1946 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1947 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1948 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1949 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1950 




11,000 




Dec. 1 


N. H. 







SCHOOL REPORT. 177 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS— Continued 







Yearly 


Total 


Date of 


Building 


amount 


indebted- 


payment 




due 


ness 


1951 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


$11;000 




1952 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1953 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1954 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1955 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1956 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1957 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1958 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1959 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1960 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1961 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1962 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1963 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1964 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 




1965 








Dec. 1 


N. H. 


11,000 





Legend. H=High; G=Garrison; N. H.=New High; W= 
Walker; M=Morrill. 

The bond payments printed herewith are based on the amount 
already floated, and do not include the $117,000 to be floated 
later. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

1926 



Board of Water Commissioners 
FRED N. HARDEN, Mayor, ex-officio 



HARRY H. DUDLEY, 


to March 31, 


1930 


NATHANIEL E. MARTIN. 


to March 31, 


1930 


BURNS P. HODGMAN, 


to March 31, 


1929 


PATRICK H. CAHILL, 


to March 31, 


1929 


FRANK P. QUIMBY, 


to March 31, 


1928 


GEORGE T. KENNEY. 


to March 31, 


1928 


CARLOS H. FOSTER. 


to March 31, 


1927 


BENJAMIN H. ORR, 


to March 31, 


1927 



NATHANIEL E, MARTIN, President 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk 

SUPERINTENDENT 

P. R. SANDERS 

CLERK 

ALICE G. COCHRAN 

FOREMAN 

JAMES T. DAVIS 

ENGINEER 

HENRY A. ROWELL 



CONSTRUCTION 



Cost of land and water and tiowage rights : 
Penacook Lake, +256,514.56 

Lake Winnepocket, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of 

Torrent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 

Cost of dam, gate-houses and 
appurtenances, 69,086.68 

Cost of mains (low service main 
and pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street), force main 
from the pump to the reservoir, 
fire main through North and 
South Main Street and high 
service main from Penacook 
Street to Stark Street, Pena- 
cook, 182,241.70 

Cost of distribution pipe, 465,595.57 

Cost of service pipe, 96,874.33 

Cost of reservoir, including land, 45,044.09 

Cost of pumping station, shop, 
stable and storehouse, includ- 
ing land, 29,743.35 

Cost of pumping machinery. 2 ;, S S1.06 

Cost of engineering and superin- 
tendence, 14,913.12 

Cost of incidentals, 8,237.98 



Cost of works, January 1, 1927, $1,217,132.44 

Less amount received for lumber, land and 

buildings sold, 7,919.11 



$1,200,21:;.::: 



REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of 
Concord: 

The Board of Water Commissioners hereby submits the 
annual report of the Superintendent of the Water Works 
for the year ending December 31, 1926, showing the re- 
ceipts and disbursements for the year and a detailed ac- 
count of the extensions and improvements made during 
the year. 

The Water Board has received in the past year three 
petitions, from residents and property owners of the 
Plains district and of East Concord for extension of the 
water system to those sections, and of that portion of the 
city known at the West End for improved service. On 
advice of the superintendent and approval of the Board, 
there has been engaged a firm of well known and com- 
petent engineers to make a survey of our water system, 
more particularly to investigate and report on the nearby 
resources of additional supply, and to submit figures of 
the cost of furnishing the Plains and East Concord with 
water for domestic purposes and fire protection; and also 
for the purpose of submitting some plan and the cost of 
furnishing additional high pressure service for that por- 
tion of the city located on Auburn Street, and the resi- 
dential section of the city known as Lightning Hill. As 
soon as satisfactory information is obtained by the Board, 
the same will be reported to your honorable body. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, FRANK P. QUIMBY, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, GEORGE T. KENNEY, 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, CARLOS H. FOSTER, 

PATRICK H. CAHILL, BENJAMIN H. ORR, 

FRED N. MARDEN, ex-officio. 

Board of Water Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 



To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the fifty-fifth annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures, and abatements, together with a statement 
of the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1926. 

Receipts 

For water from consumers at fixed 

rates, $9,134.61 

For water from consumers at meter 

rates, 77,405.98 

From delinquents, 154.17 

For water for building purposes, 207.03 

From wood and farm lands, 230.00 

For labor and materials furnished 

on private fire lines, 816.44 

For pipe and stock sold and labor, 1,410.24 

For old brass and iron, 69.80 

For shutting off and turning on 

water, non-payment of bill, 8.00 

For water furnished Penacook and 

Boscawen Water Precinct, 320.00 

$89,756.30 

Deduct abatements, 25.08 

$89,731.22 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 183 



Expenditures 
Maintenance Account 
General care and maintenance : 



Salaries and labor, 




$12,338.74 




Automobile account, 




1,268.99 




Supplies and repairs, 




1,483.43 




Incidental expenses, 




1,325.01 


$16,416.17 






Office expenses, 






3,706.13 


Care and repair of hydrants, 






652.55 


Care and repair of meters, 






2,655.80 


Relaying service pipes, 






4,030.81 


Leak account, 






675.50 


Penacook Park account, 






19.64 


Taxes, town of Webster, 






82.00 


New Dodge truck, 






936.00 


Pumping Station : 








Salaries, 




$1,599.96 




General expenses, 




116.06 




Electric pumps: 








Power, $2,353.83 






Supplies and repairs. 


8.85 






Heating, 


222.25 


2,584.93 










4 300 95 






A,tJ \J\J. UKJ 


Total maintenance account, 


$33,475.55 


Construction Account 




Distribution pipes, 






$22,928.86 


Service pipes, 






3,092.38 


Hydrants, 






970.57 


Meters. 






2,725.07 


Total construction account, 


$29,716.88 


Land at Penacook Lake, 






$4,454.31 


Total expenditures, 1926, 






$67,646.74 



184 CITY OF CONCORD. 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS 

Distribution pipes laid in 1926 : 
10-inch : 

Rumford Street, from junction with North State to 
Albin Street, 2,100 feet, replacing 12-inch cement-lined. 

Rumford Street, from School to Pleasant Street. 1,187 
feet, replacing 10-inch cement-lined. 

8-inch : 

Rumford Street, from Albin to Highland Street, 324 
feet, replacing 12-inch cement-lined. 

High Street, from Valley to Auburn Street, 691 feet, 
replacing 6-inch cement-lined. 

High Street, from Franklin to Chestnut Street, 400 feet, 
replacing 6-inch cement-lined. 

Valley Street, from Chestnut to High Street, 905 feet, 
replacing 6-inch cement-lined. 

Chestnut Street, from High to Valley Street, 375 feet, 
replacing 6-inch cement-lined. 

6-inch : 

Ridge Road, extended north, 585 feet. 

Kensington Road, extended north, 506 feet. 

Franklin Street Extension, from Auburn Street to Ridge 
Road, 342 feet. 

Westbourne Road, extended north 292 feet. 

K Street, West Concord, from North State to View 
Street, 283 feet. 

View Street, West Concord, on connection at K Street, 
23 feet. 

Highland Street, east from Rumford Street, 47 feet, re- 
placing 4-inch. 

Walker Street, east from Rumford Street, 12 feet, re- 
placing 4-inch. 

Short Street, east from Rumford Street, 9 feet, replac- 
ing 4-inch. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 185 

Pleasant Street, Penacook, south from Maple Street, 
242 feet. 

Summit Street, Penacook, extended west to Pleasant 
Street, 41 feet. 

Maple Street. Penacook, extended west to Pleasant 
Street, 29 feet. 

Borough Road, Penacook, extended west, 197 feet. 

2-inch : 

Hopkinton Road, extended west, 1,448 feet. 

Borough Road East, Penacook, extended east, 653 feet. 

Abbott Road, Penacook, extended east, 600 feet. 

114-inch: 231 feet; 1-inch: 697 feet. 

On hydrant branches : 90 feet of 6-inch ; 26 feet of 6-inch 
ceiiK-nt-lined discontinued. 

There was also discontinued on Rumford Street from 
Highland to Franklin Street, 850 feet of 12-inch cement- 
lined pipe. 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use, 
402,554 feet or 76.24 miles. 

Seventeen gates were set during the year ; twelve were 
discontinued ; total number now in use, 1,115. 

One new hydrant has been set as follows : 

Kensington Road, opposite Pearson residence. 

Total number of hydrants now in use, 489 ; private 101. 

Ninety-one services have been laid consisting of 1,811 
feet of ^4-inch, 196 feet of 1-inch, 44 feet of 2-ineh and 30 
feet of 4-inch pipe. 

Eighteen services were discontinued of which eleven 
were replaced by new ones and seven discontinued per- 
manently. 

Total number now in use, 4,233 ; length of service pipes, 
100,636 feet or 19.06 miles. 

Connections for sprinkler service were made: 6-inch 
for New Hampshire Memorial Hospital and 4-inch for A. 
C. Purington and Cushman Electric Co. 



186 CITY OF CONCORD. 

One hundred and forty-six services have been relaid and 
curb valves placed on 70 old services. 

One hundred and twenty-four new meters have been 
set and 10 have been removed ; total now in use, 3,141. 

The total consumption of water during the year as 
shown by the Venturi meter is as follows : 

January, 83,046,000 gallons 

February, 74,466,000 

March, 84,134,000 

April, 84,082,000 

May, 76,998,000 

June, 79,482,000 

July, 88,750,000 

August, 98,729,000 

September, 91,920,000 

October, 82,383,000 

November, 83,118,000 

December, 92,403,000 



1,019,511,000 gallons 



Respectfully submitted, 



PERCY R, SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 
RECORD OF ELECTRIC PUMPS. 



187 



Months. 


.9 

a 

o 
'— 


11 

(BO 
1% 

£° 

<- 


>> 

a 
o 

n 


n 
8£ 


00 .fH 

o S.S 
H 


i. 

Q 


January 


31 
28 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 


5 :52 

6:5 

5:54 

6:12 
5:28 
8:5 
10:3 
6:58 
6:24 
6:35 
6:56 


1-1.790 
12.820 
15,000 
13,640 
14,790 
16,680 
19,080 
24,340 
17,010 
15.780 
15,160 
16,450 


477 
457 
483 
454 
477 
556 
615 
785 
597 
509 
505 
530 


29,715.000 
26,185,000 
30,103,000 
27,420.000 
29,828,000 
33,625,000 
39,490,000 
48,665,000 
32,275,000 
32.310,000 
31,080,000 
33,695,000 


958,548 
935,178 




971,064 


April 


914,000 
962,193 


June 

July ... 


1,121,166 
1,273,870 




1,569.898 




1,075,833 




1,042,264 


November 

December 


1,036,000 
1,086,935 


Total 


365 




196,440 




394,401,000 








6:56 




538 




l,080,55fl 







188 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT 



In account with Concord Water Works 

Carl H. Foster, Treasurer, 

Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1926, $34,212.93 
Receipts, P. R. Sanders, superin- 
tendent, 89,731.22 



$123,911.15 



Expenditures 

Orders paid, $67,646.74 

Bonds paid, 18,000.00 

Interest on bonds, 9,315.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1927, 28.990.41 



$123,952.15 
Less outstanding orders unpaid 

January 1, 1927, 8.00 



5123,944.15 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME 

Investment Account 



Amount of capital, January 1, 1927, 
Invested in U. S. First Liberty 

Loan converted 4*4% bonds, $5,000.00 

Invested in Third Liberty Loan 

414%, 10,000.00 

Invested in U. S. Fourth Liberty 

Loan 414%, 10,000.00 



Income Account 

Balance of income, January, 1926, $2,200.94 
Income received, 1926. 1.167.84 



Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 



$2.3.(100.00 



$25,000.00 



$3,36S.7b 
$3,368.78 



Due 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS 

Rate 



Amount 



January 1, 1927. 


41/2, 


$18,000.00 


January 1, 1928, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1929, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1930, 


4y 2 , 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1931, 


4%, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1932, 


4%, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1933, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1934, 


4y 2 , 


'18,000.00 


January 1, 1935, 


4y 2 , 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1936, 


4y 2 , 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1937, 


4y 2 , 


18,000.00 




$198,000.00 



SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1926 
CONCORD WATER WORKS 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OP MERRIMACK, STATE OF NEW 
HAMPSHIRE 



GENERAL STATISTICS 

Population by census of 1920—22,167. 

Date of construction — 1872. 

By whom owned — City of Concord. 

Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING 

Builders of pumping machinery — Worthington Pump and 

Machinery Corporation and DeLaval Steam Turbine Co. 

Electric Pumps 

1. Description of power : 

a. Alternating, 3 phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,800 

R. P. M. 

b. Price per K. W. H., $0.01 1/3, 8 p. m. to 6 a. m. ; 

maximum, $1,800 per year, 300,000,000 gal- 
lons; $6.00 per 1,000,000 gallons, over 300,000,- 
000. 

2. K. W. H. used for year, 196,440. 



WATER DEPARTMENT. I'll 

3. Total pumpage, by Venturi meter, 394,401,000 gallons. 

4. Average static head against which pump works, 90 
feet. 

5. Average dynamic head against which pump works, 
115.2 feet. 

6. Gallons pumped per K. W. H., 2,007.7. 

7. K. W. H. used per 1,000,000 gallons pumped, 538. 

8. Cost of total pumping figured on pumping station 
-expenses — $4,300.95. 

9. Per million gallons pumped — $10,905. 

10. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — $0,095. 



DISTRIBUTION. 

Mains 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — four-inch to twenty -four-inch. 

3. Extended — 2,606 feet during year. 

4. Relaid — 6,076 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — 1,240 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 71.56 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 4.68 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 1. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 489, private, 
96. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 5. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1,115. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 80. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 



192 city op concord. 

Services 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-ineh to ten-inch. 

18. Extended— 2,081 feet. 

19. Discontinued— 400 feet. 

20. Total now in use— 100,636 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 73. 

22. Number now in use — 4,233. 

23. Average length of service — 23.77. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — . 

25. Number of meters added during year — 114. 

26. Number now in use — 3,141. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 74.2. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 88.88. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of standpipes for street watering — 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



193 









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Water-Works Constr 
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194 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES. 



Streets. 


30- 
in. 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 




24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


£0 

a 

55 




2220 








1 
















282 






1 
















331 

13598 


1905 
58 


75 

75 














7 








147 












6 


Gate-house s and 






1 


















240 


2962 




42 20 












5 


Pumping station 


















8 






















23 
458 


349 


2 























1 


Albin 
















785 
776 




2 




















450 
L>4!)2 
508 
724 
423 
2145 
265 
475 
1781 
590 
260 
1123 
1074 


505 

595 
"256 


2 


















4 














2182 








2 




















2 


Badger 





















2 


















* 3 


Blake . . . 




















2 












































1 






















1 


















1577 
327 


"195 


4 


















2 


















1 
















2278 


2052 




3 


















6 
763 
1077 


154 


1 


















508 




5 


















2 


















3529 


2690 




















306 
585 


"56 
516 

"547 


1 












































1 




















375 

21 


265 
1600 

350 
1663 


2 




















7 






































1942 


180 


















2100 
























1593 

422 
19 
500 
387 
456 

2063 


286 

836 
242 


5 






















2 






















2 






















2 




















2 




















2 








































































































265 
400 
550 
270 
700 
587 
262 
165 
1187 


"466 
"607 
















































Elm . 












































HNsfx 


.... 




















::::::i::::: 




















i 
















10G6 




















1000 

















WATER DEPARTMENT. 



195 



SCHEDULE 



OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 


« o c 


Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


- 
r u 


30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 

in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 

in. 


12- 

in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 




Fisher 






.... 









.... 


.... 


343 ... . 




Fiske 




















•,.o : 


1 
























22E 
























roi. 
























180 

1659 


- 
















2166 


1546 
438 




13 

3 

2 


































| 590 


Fruit, North 




















1078 
2874 






















' "88 


3 


Fuller 








































194 


i 


















55 




7 


Giles 
















300 


858 
709 
840 


::::: 

210 
' '245 


4 

1 
2 




















Gleu 
























































431 




1755 


7 






































1093 
2375 


4 
3 


Hall 
















1621 
905 


1C68 




































498 


287 
600 
230 
329 
760 

"746 


1 
2 










































240 

4 
15 

312 
740 
646 
362 






















| 






















2 
4 

2 
2 


High 






















































69 


Hollv 


















Holt 






















Home Avenue 




















1 










































213 










































1332 
1576 


"266 
















































K 












































207 


506 
165 

465 
358 
1550 


••;•■ 

"334 

"357 




Kent 


















































































1216 


















































































367 
300 

3650 

382 
330 
























38 
1260 
482 
430 




Main. North 
















51*>f> 


11 
















15 




























Marshall 




— i 1 










1 



196 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND 
AND GATES.- 



CEMENT-LINED 

-Continued. 



PIPES 





w 

*o3 


Length and Size of 


Iron Pipe in 


Feet. 






30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 

in. 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


10- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 

in. 












I 










400 












1 










73S 
1729 

124 
26 

860 
1289 

700 

516 


1378 

1294 

"324 

' ' 305 

229 
814 

460 
546 

"480 
"531 




Merrimack.. [School 





































750 























4 


































































































































1016 
163 


























Odd Fell'ws Avenue 
Old HopkintouRoad 
























































620 
596 
601 
380 
584 

2448 
616 

2215 


























Park 
















62 


























































300 




2457 








































































































2 985 




Pine 


















681 


4 




































10791 


4159 292 


185 


18 
















1 




















661 
800 
584 

1713 
182 

1320 
218 




Prospect 


























































































"320 


9, 




















1 


Rollins 


















1 




















176 






















17 
















875 

"575 
210 
1655 
210 
9 
45S5 
2629 


2951 

"214 

"388 


1 


Saw Mill R'd, S.P.S 


















495 
708 


3 


















5202 


11 






















1 










































1 






















1 


South 




















4 
















390 26 


n 




















2391 


5 








5969 










31 


6 






















5 














53 


385 




1 








































1080 
19 




37C 
172 

.... 


1 






















1 






















1 






















138C 


4 


















3« 


250 


4 


















4 












' 


■ 






823 74f 


4 


Union 
















100E 


2 



WATER DEPARTMENT. 



197 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPE 
AND GATES.— Continued. 



Streets. 


30- 
in. 


Length a 


*jd Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 


S 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 


18- 
m. 


16- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


10- 

in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 
in. 


4- 
in. 


- 

g 

2 


Valley 


















905 
























279 






















705 




' k-i 


4 


Wall 
















754 

514 


















454 
1404 
310 


4258 
1118 


12 
9 


































320 




















272 


















1836 


661 






4 
1 


















White 




















186 
725 

23 
895 
366 
220 
5554 

83 
























"202 

"254 

'"87 
145 
























1 


































































Hydrant branches. 
















177 
132 


257 
10 












68 
8 


Penacook. 
Penacook, high ser- 












11340 




Penacook Road un- 
der cement, not 

connected : 

Borough Road E. 


































































25 
641 














































225 


8 










































247 




467 




4 
3 






























































58 
461 
653 
476 
1300 
252 
285 
150 

356 
139 

1923 
364 
242 

1846 
53 




3 
























































































High 

































































































































70 


37 




































































Rolfe 




































































Stark 
























































464 
258 


'*26i 




































































884 
2205 
450 
624 
14 

134717 






















150 






















1 




















11 




















"io 13 


















5298 I 


28730 


Totals 


2220 



















198 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES.- Concluded. 





Length and Size of Cement-Lined 
Pipe in Feet. 


Streets. 


18-iu . 


H-in. 


12-iu. 


10-in. 


8-iu. 


6-in. 


4-in. 






2230 














11391 






















120 
















34 








3528 
1764 
































11 
272 
















88 
44 














Penacook. 




12354 


1221 














628 
422 
479 






























245 
1777 
482 

2100 








































734 




High 


















2573 
57 
















1181 
652 


1884 




















529 














1149 
1193 


675 


276 


































































7566 









FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF ENGINEER 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1926. 

The department responded to 44 bell alarms and 431 
still alarms. 

Alarms 





Bell 


Still 


Total 


Precinct, 


25 


312 


337 


Penacook, 


14 


87 


101 


East Concord, 


1 


20 


21 


West Concord, 


4 


12 


16 



44 431 475 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, and a complete roll 
of the department with residence and occupation of each 
member. 

Although the number of alarms during the year ex- 
ceeded all previous records, there was a gratifying decrease 
in loss in comparison with the annual loss of the past few 
years. Of the aggregate loss, $64,400.00 was accounted 
for by three fires, — the Camann building January 25th, 
Phenix Hall January 26th, and the Acquilla Building 
March 26th. 

The major part of the apparatus is in good condition, 
but Engine 2 has become a continual source of expendi- 



200 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ture, and I respectfully recommend that the body be pro- 
vided with a new Abbot-Downing chassis. 

Sixteen hundred feet of hose was added to the com- 
plement during the year, and I recommend the purchase 
of one thousand feet during the coming year. 

The installation of the new fire and police alarm sys- 
tems now in progress will supply a long felt want, carry- 
ing with it, upon completion, the assurance that thereafter 
there will be no large areas without fire protection in case 
of an open circuit. 

Repairs on the Precinct and Penacook alarm systems 
were attended to as occasion required. Extensive repairs 
and replacements were made necessary in the precinct 
system by the tornado which visited the city on July 22ncl, 
felling trees across the wires, mixing fire alarm wires with 
high tension lines, burning out boxes and tappers. 

Fortunately no lives were lost and the property loss was 
confined to the instruments destroyed, although several 
incipient fires occurred in houses in which tappers were 
located. 

Basement fires in business establishments, formerly so 
numerous, have become conspicuous by their absence, ow- 
ing to the system of inspection now in vogue. 

During the month of October I was privileged by your 
honorable body to attend the Convention of the Interna- 
tional Association of Fire Chiefs held at New Orleans, La., 
a report of which I rendered at that time. 

I wish again to return my thanks for the opportunity 
afforded me to learn. 

Respectfully submitted. 

W. C. GREEN. 

Chief Engineer, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 201 

APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Appropriations.. 




$56,700.0(1 


Joint resolution. 




797.43 




$57,497.43 


Chief's salary, 


$2,600.00 




Permanent men, 


28,825.00 




Vacations. 


1,042.29 




Call men, 


10,270.00 




House man, 


100.00 




Rent Veterans Association, 


300.00 




Fuel, 


2,222.92 




Lights, 


830.41 




Incidentals, 


2,396.65 




Horse hire. 


343.55 




Fire alarm, 


1,879.98 




Penacook fire alarm, 


235.03 




Fire inspections, 


625.70 




Telephones, 


391.18 




Laundry, 


76.03 




Upkeep motor vehicles, 


1,895.69 




Hose, 


1,760.00 




Repairs fire stations, 


1,699.00 




Brush fires, 


4.00 


$57,497.43 



202 CITY OP CONCORD. 

SUMMARY 
Buildings: Value Loss Insurance Ins.Pd. Net Loss 

Precinct $450,850.00 $53,618.34 $286,650.00 $49,028.34 $4,590.00 

Penacook 14,550.00 6,442.50 11,850.00 6,006.50 436.00 

EastConcord 14,000.00 2,473.00 13,500.00 2.473.00 

West Concord 1,700.00 1,450.00 600.00 600.00 850.00 

$481,100.00 $63,983.84 $312,600.00 $58,107. ,84 $5,876.00 

Contents : 

Precinct $328,378.55 $29,918.10 $247,050.00 $25,285.45 $4.63^.65 

Penacook 9,200.00 4,925.00 7,000.00 4.125.00 800.00 

EastConcord 1,000.00 125.00 500.00 125.00 

West Concord 1.150.00 825.00 300.00 300.00 525.00 

$339,728.55 $35,793.10 $254,850.00 $29,835.45 $5,957.65 
Buildings 481,100.00 63,983.84 312,600.00 58.107.84 5,876.00 

Buildings and con... $820,828.55 $99,776.94 $567,450.00 $87,943.29 $11,833.65 

*2,200.00 *2,200.00 

$90,143.29 $9,633.65 

•Paid by the B. & M. R. R. on building and contents upon which there was no in- 
surance. West Concord. 

Apparatus and Force 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine 
and hose car, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Com- 
pany (15 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kear- 
sarge," and auto-combination car, attached to the Kear- 
sarge Steam Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; one second- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in 
charge of an engineer and fireman, one auto-combination 
car in charge of four permanent men; one motor-driven 
ladder truck, "City of Concord," attached to Hook and 
Ladder Company (21 men) ; one Reo fire alarm repair 
truck; one house man at Central Fire Station. There are 
twelve permanent men at the Central Fire Station, one per- 
manent man at each other fire station within the precinct, 
one permanent man at Pioneer Station, Penacook, and one 
permanent man at Cataract Station, West Concord. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has an auto-combination car, with permanent 
man. 



PIKE DEPARTMENT. 203 

The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car, with permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

One hand engine and three wagons and one ladder truck 
in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, with two 
hose wagons and one auto-combination car with perma- 
nent man. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
a modern hose wagon and auto-combination car with per- 
manent man. 

Old Fort (30 men), East Concord, has a 4 1-2-inch cylin- 
der Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, and 
one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon. single tank, 
and one auto-combination car. 

Rose 

Precinct, 9,450 feet cotton, rubber lined 

Penacook, 3,350 " 

West Concord, 1,400 " 

East Concord, 500 " " " " 



14.700 
Reservoirs 



Capacity 
Cubic Feet 



No. Main Street, rear Court House, 2,000 

No. State Street, corner of Washington Street, 2,000 

Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street, 4,000 

School Street, corner of Summit Street, 3,500 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1926 



Permanent Chief Engineer. 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station. 



Assistant Engineers. 



PRECINCT. 



W. A. King, 1st Asst., 

J. Edward Morrison, 2d Asst. 



Machinist, 38 Franklin Street 

Machinist. 8 Thorndike Street 



Fred M. Dodge, 



C. E. Robinson, 



61 Merrimack Street. 



WARD 1. 
Electrician, 

WARD 2. 
Clerk, Penacook St., East Concord. 



George W. Kemp. 



WARD 3. 

Overseer, lb Fisher St., West Concord. 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2 



Charles Powell, Captain. George L. Livingston, Lieutenant and Cleric. 
Herbert M. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer. 



Nos. 



Names. 



1 Charles Powell, 

2 George L. Livingstoi 

3 Herbert M. Sanders, 

4 George B. Davis, 

5 Harry L. Messer, 

6 W. 0. B. Saltmareh, 

7 Frank E. Hudson, 

8 Roger F. Strong, 

9 Nelson E. Strong, 

10 William P. Baxter, 

11 Luther E. Rowe, 

12 John H. Cushnie. 

13 Daniel F. Murphy, 



Occupations. 
Machinist, 
Machinist, 
Cashier, 

Carriage painter, 
Machinist, 
Book binder, 
Machinist, 
Pressman, 
Machinist, 
Pressman, 
Painter, 
Silversmith, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
75 Centre Street. 

57 Franklin Street. 
35 Warren Street. 
32 Pleasant Street. 

3 Broadway. 

31 South Street. 
90 Warren Street. 

4 Perry Avenue. 

16 So. Spring Street. 

58 Warren Street. 
38 Franklin Street. 
64 Rumford Street. 
Central Fire Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



205 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE COM- 
PANY, NO. 1 



J. C. McGilvrai , Captain 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

18 John C. McGilvray, 

19 David J. Adams, 

20 John M. Inman, 

25 Willis J. Sawyer, 

29 Philip J. O'OonneU, 

21 Charles W. Downing, 

27 Fred J. Johnston 

26 Raymond M. Galfetti, 
24 Raymond W. Colby, 

28 William C. WiUard, 
23 Clarence H. Green, 

22 Arthur J. Landry, 
14 Henry E. Drew, 

30 George H. Eastman. 



OFFICERS. 

D. J. ADAMS, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Chauffeur, 
Theatre manager 
Custodian, 
Machinist, 
Clerk, 
Clerk, 
Gas fitter, 
Gas fitter, 
Teamster. 
Teamster, 
Silverworker, 
Garage man. 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur. 



Residences. 
35 Washington Street. 

9 Thompson Street. 

16 Wall Street. 

102 So. State Street. 
5V 2 Perry Avenue. 

17 Capitol Street. 

10 Abbott Street. 
130 Rumford Street. 
12 Myrtle Street. 

6 Fremont Street. 
22 So. State Street. 
9 \k Perkins Street. 
Central Fire Station. 
Central Fire Station. 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4 



D . RELIEF ENGINE. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. Occupations. 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, Engineer, Machinist, 

35 Henry' O. Powell, F.ireman, Blacksmith, 



Residences. 
78 South State Street. 
81 South State Street. 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 2 



John M. Davis, Captain. 



Milo G. Davis, Lieutenant and Clerk. 



A. C. Hardy, Treasurer. 



Badge 


J3a.rji!a.r>iii a. 


Nos. Names. 


Occupations. 


36 J. M. Davis, 


Blacksmith, 


37 M. G. Davis, 


Builder, 


43 F. G. White, 


Laborer, 


39 H. F. Walker, 


Chauffeur 


40 J. E. Murphy, 


Printer, 


38 A. C. Hardy, 


Clerk. 


41 R. W. Scott, 


Carpenter. 


42 M. J. Gorhain, 


Carpenter. 


45 G. H. McGilvray. 


Chauffeur, 


4 4 R. R. Mosher, 


Electrician, 


4(i A. B. Smart. Mil,.. 


Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
5 Cambridge Street. 
2 Beacon Street. 
14 Montgomery Street. 
34 Jackson Street. 
171 No. State Street. 
12 Charles Street. 
21 Highland Street. 
86 2 2 No. Spring Street. 
65 No. State Street. 
26 Summit Ave. 
Alert Station. 



206 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3 

OFFICERS. 

Harry L. Peacock, Captain. Albert W. Thompson. Lieutenant and Clerk, 

H. F. Ferrin, Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

50 Harry L. Peacock. 

51 Albert W. Thompson, 

55 Henry H. Ash, 

59 Herbert F. Ferrin, 
54 John W. McG.owan, 
53 Percy H. Flanders, 

57 Harry C. Lougee, 

58 Frank I. Manning, 

52 Arthur R. Murdock, 

56 George H. Houston, 

60 William T. Happny, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Painter, 
Janitor, 

Machinist, 

Electrician, 

Plumber, 

Carpenter, 

Painter, 

Clerk, 

Chauffeur, 

Blasksmith, 

Chauffeur. 



Residences. 
36 Warren Street. 
12 Allison Street. 
23% Perley Street. 
104 South State Street. 
43 Center Street. 
32 West Street. 

3 Odd Fellows Avenue. 

4 Hutchinson Avenue. 
141 Rumford Street. 
22 Perley Street. 
Good Will Station. 



CITY 



OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER COM- 
PANY, NO. 1 



Sam B. Morgan, Captain. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

65 Sam B. Morgan, 

77 Ned E. Herrin, 

69 L. D. Caldon, 

68 Henry V. Tittemore, 

70 George W. Grover. 

71 Daniel Crowley, 

72 S. P. Foster, 

74 B. W. Hall, 

79 Louis Cote, 

80 C. L. Clark,. 

81 B. J. Heath, 

83 Harry Leary, 

78 E. W. Gaige, 
76 B. T. Upham, 

66 J. F. Byrne, 

82 P. S. Badger, 

67 S. C. Clark, 

73 H. W. French, 
77. R. H. McDonald, 

75 R. S. Badger, 

84 A. J. Ladd, 



OFFICERS. 

Ned E. Herrin, Lieutenant and Clerk. 
Ned Herrin, Treasurer. 

MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Wood- worker, 
Carpenter, 
Wood-worker, 
Teamster, 
Wood-worker, 
Janitor, 
Wood- worker, 
Carpenter, 
Roofer, 
Clerk, 
Janitor, 
Gas fitter, 
Carpenter, 
Electrician, 
Gas fitter, 
An to repairer, 
Auto repairer, 
Chauffeur, 
Electrician, 
Machinist, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
10 Avon Street. 
18 School Street. 

13 West Street. 
57 Dunklee Street. 
29 Thorndike Street. 
130 Warren Street. 

14 Hall Street. 
12 South Street. 

4 No. State Street. 
71 South Street. 
100 So. Fruit Street. 
22 Fremont Street. 

8 Charles Street. 
94% So. State Street. 

5 Sexton Avenue. 
189 No. Main Street. 
33 Thorndike Street. 

9 So. Spring Street. 
41 Franklin Street. 
189 No. Main Street. 
Central Fire Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



207 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1 



M. S. Wakefield, Captain. 

Badge 

Nos. Names. 

91 M. S. Wakefield, 

92 M. J. Martin, 

93 M. R. Piper, 

94 J. H. Brunei, 



OFFICERS. 

M. J. MABTIN, Lieutenant and Olerk. 



MEMBERS. 
Occupations. 
Captain, 
Lieutenant, 
Chauffeur, 
Chauffeur, 

Spare Men. 



95 C. E. Huggins, Jr., Chauffeur, 
9G E. J. Brunei, Chauffeur, 

33 J. L. Alarie, Chauffeur, 



Residences. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 

Central Station. 



General Utility Man. 



C. G. Howser, Central Station. 



Fire Inspector. 
C. W. Downing, 17 Capitol- Street 



House Man. 
L. Downing, Central Station. 



PIONEER STEAM FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3 
Penacook. 

OFFICERS. 

Cornelius W. O'Brien, Captain. William H. Holbrook, Lieutenant. 

Richard McBride, Clerk and Treasurer. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

100 Cornelius W. O'Brien, 

119 William H. Holbrook, 

112 Richard McBride, 
102 Alfred Beddow, 
108 Alfred J. York, 

113 Peter A. Keenan, 

123 William Corbett, 

124 Delmar R. Jones, 

121 Albert Cassaveaugh, 

117 Guy B. Chase, 

122 George L. Miner. 

125 George D. Dowd. 

114 William H. McGirr, 
116 Harry Matott. 

110 Grenville Dodge, 
ill Eugene Gebo, 

115 Raymond J. Cassavaugh 
128 James A. Miller, 

118 Edward York, 

119 Perley A. Ketchum, 
103 Frank D. O'Brien, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Mill operative. 
Miller, 

Mill operative, 
Stationary engineer, 
Spinner, 
Mill operative, 
Second hand, 
Miller, 
Teamster, 
Miller, 
Electrician, 
Drug clerk, 
Foreman, 
Teamster, 
Electrician. 
Mill operative, 
, Mill operative, 
Electrician, 
Second hand. 
Miller. 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 
43 South Main Street. 

10 Church Street. 
10 Union Street. 
50 Elm Street. 
7 Church Street. 
42 High Street, 
47 Centre Street. 
123 Merrimack Street. 
9 Union Street. 
Elm Street. 
Stark Street. 
High Street. 
Summer Street. 
Washington Street. 

61 Merrimack Street. 

Pioneer Station. 
9 Union Street. 
High Street. 
Summer Street. 
Merrimack Street. 
Pioneer Station. 



208 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2 

East Concord. 



OFFICERS. 

William E. Virgin, Captain. Herbert F. Piper, Treasurer.. 

Clarence I. Tebbetts, Lieutenant and Clerk. 

M. J. Lacroix, Chauffeur and Janitor. 



Badge 

Nos. Names. 

120 William E. Virgin, 

121 Clarence I. Tebbetts, 

128 Shadrach M. Gate, 

129 Ross W. Cate, 

130 Herbert L. Knowles, 

131 Park French, 

132 Wesley Field, 

133 John W. Sanborn, 

135 John T. Cate, 

136 Arthur P. Swain, 

123 Michael Lacroix, 

138 Reuben' L. Cate, 

139 William F. Paige, 

140 Curtis A. Chamberlin, 

143 Herbert A. Stuart, 

144 Hiram E. Gardner, Jr., 

146 Thomas D. Morrison, 

147 J. Fred Gardner, 
149 Fred J. Carter, 

148 Claude H. Swain, 

141 Herbert F. Piper, 

124 William F. Cate, 

134 Ernest W. Cate, 

145 Harold D. Merrill, 

125 Dana S. Morrison, 

126 Harold A. Cate, 

127 Charles A. Maxner, 

137 Herbert W. Gardner, 

142 George G. Stuart, 



MEMBERS. 

Occupations. 
Contractor, 
Foreman, 
Farmer, 
Blacksmith. 
Farmer, 
Clerk, 
Clerk, 
Farmer, 
Contractor, 
Crossing tender, 
Blacksmith, 
Carpenter, 
Watchman, 
Farmer, 
Switch tender, 
Blacksmith, 
Clerk, 

Wood-worker, 
Stone-cutter, 
Clerk, 
Belt-maker, 
Farmer, 
Clerk, 
Painter, 
Plumber, 
Carpenter, 
Laborer, 
Carpenter, 
Carpenter, 



Residences. 
East Penacook .Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street 
East Penacook Street. 
Potter Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
Mountain Road. 
Shawmut Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
Cemetery Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Portsmouth Street. 
Kearsarge Street. 
Shawmut Street. 
East Penacook Street. 
Pembroke Street. 
East Penacook Street. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 209 

CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3 
West Concord. 



Alfred J. Fraseb, Captain. Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer 

Jeremiah Cotter, Lieut, and Clerk. 



Names. 

Alfred J. Fraser, 
Jeremiah Cotter, 
Andrew J. Abbott, 
Abial C. Abbott, 
Edward Lovering, 
Robert Henry, 
Frank Peterson, 
Matthew H. Peabody, 
Carl A. Anderson, 
Carl A. Eckstrom, 
Oscar Johnson, 
Henry Richardson, 
Frank C. Blodgett, 
Arthur B. Spead, 
Eric H. Johnson, 
Clinton O. Partridge, 
Clifford G. Davis, 
Oscar W. Anderson, 
Ernest W. Noonan, 
Clyde B. Loiselle, 
Harold E. Wakefield, 



Occupations. 

Stone-cutter, 

Blacksmith, 

Farmer, 

Quarryman, 

Stone-cutter, 

Silversmith, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stationary engineer, 

Stationary engineer, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stone-cutter, 

Foreman, 

Stone-cutter, 

Stationary engineer, 

Quarryman, 

Chauffeur, 

Blacksmith, 

Quarryman, 

Expressman, 

ician, 
Chauffeur, 



Residences. 

10 River Street. 

5 Engel Street. 

382 North State Street. 

513 North State Stree*. 

1 Clark Street. 

513 North State Street. 

346 North State Street. 

9 Knight Street. 

359 North State Street. 

Gladstone Avenue. 

516 North State Street. 

6 Dam Street. 

436 North State Street. 

280 North State Street. 

406 North State Street. 

426 North State Street. 

280 North State Street. 

499% No. State Street. 

4 Peabody Street. 

9 Hutchins Street. 

Cataract Station. 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY 



3. S. Upham, Captain. 

A. L. Dickermax. 



H. T. Dickerman, First Lieutenant^ 
Second Lieutenant. 



T. J. Morrison, 
Elba F. Home, 
Arthur H. Britton, 
W. D. Hutchinson, 
F. W. Sanborn, 
C. A. Milton, 
H. C. Houston, 



MEMBERS. 

George F. Smith, 
J. G. McQuilkin, 
A. B. Morrison, 
D. P. Wheeler, 
W. K. Wingate, 
L. S. Richardson, 
John Knowlton, 



H. C. Taylor, 
Fred O. Libby, 
M. F. Thompson, 
E. J. Brown, 
H. P. Blake, 
Charles C. Moore. 



210 CITY OF CONCORD. 

RELOCATION OF CONCORD FIRE ALARM 
SYSTEM 

Box Numbers 
The new list of numbers and boxes is as follows : 

21 No. Main and Warren 

23 No. Main and School 

24 No. Main and Park 

25 Bridge at Concord Electric Co. 

26 No. Main and Center 

27 No. Main opp. Pitman 

28 No. Main and Chapel 
*29 Rumford Press 

212 Ferry and Ferry Ave. 

213 No. Main and Pearl 

214 Fiske and Church 
*216 Page Belting Co. 

31 Pleasant and Main 

*32 B. & M. Passenger Depot 

33 So. Main opp. Fayette 

35 So. Main opp. Thorndike 

*36 Abbot-Downing Co. 

37 So. Main and West 

38 So. Main and Gas 

39 Hall and Water 
312 Hall opp. Hammond 

*313 B. & M. Engine House 

314 Hall and Rumford Ave. 

*41 State and Capitol 

42 No. State and Winter 

43 Washington at Hose 2 

45 Washington opp. Academy 

46 Beacon and Lyndon 

412 Franklin and Jackson 

413 Franklin and Rumford 

414 Rumford and Highland 

415 Franklin and Charles 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 211 



416 Bradley and Walker 

421 No. State and Curtice Ave. 

422 No. State opp. Cemetery Rd. 
*423 New England Box Co. 

*424 New Hampshire State Prison 

425 No. State opp. Palm 

5 Fire Department Headquarters 

52 Elm and Fayette 

53 So. State and Concord 

54 Thorndike and Grove 
57 So. State and West 

512 West and Mills 

513 So. Main and Allison 
*516 B. & M. Repair Shops 

517 So. Main and Holly 

6 Green opp. City Hall 

61 No. Spring and School 

62 No. Spring and Cambridge 

64 Orchard and Merrimack 

65 Center and Essex 

G6 Merrimack and School 

68 Warren and Pine 

*69 Board of Public Works, City Stable 

612 School and Giles 

613 Center and High 
615 Auburn and Granite 

*616 Pleasant and So. Fruit 

;; 621 Odd Fellows' Home 

622 Pleasant opp. Grand View Ave. 

624 St. Paul's School 

7 New Hampshire State Hospital 

72 Pleasant and So. Spring 

73 South and Thompson 
75 South and Thorndike 

712 South opp. Clinton 

713 Clinton and So. Fruit 
715 Noyes and Harvard 
721 South and Eastman 



212 CITY OP CONCORD. 

722 Broadway and Pillsbury 

723 Broadway and Stone 

724 Broadway and Broad Ave. 
732 Rockingham and Broadway 

West Concord District 

431 No. State opp. Swenson Granite Co. 

432 No. State and Peabody 

433 West Concord Fire Station 

434 No. State and Knight 

435 Lake and Gay 

436 No. State and Sewall's Falls Road 

Special Signals 

1-1-1 Recall 

2-2-2 Closing Schools 

4-4-4 Brush Fire 

11-11 Out of Town 

11-11-2 East Concord 

3-3-3 Military Call 



"Private boxes. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



EIGHTEENTH REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1927. 

To His Honor Fred N. Harden, Mayor, and the Honorable 
Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, N. H.: 

Gentlemen : I respectfully submit my eighteenth annual 
report of the Police Department for the year ending 
December 31, 1926. 



ROSTER 

Geo. A. S. Kimball, Chief of Police 
Victor I. Moore, Deputy Chief 
J. Edward Silva, Captain 
Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant 



House Officers 

Samuel L. Bachelder Geo. H. Silsby 

Irving B. Robinson 



Patrolmen 

Samuel Rodd James J. Halligan 

John B. Long F. Scott Rogers 

C. H. Curtis E. G. Densmore 

A. W. Mclsaac G. M. Doolrw 

Paul H. Moore M. F. Densmoro 

A. D. Cushing J. G. Andrews 
T. M. Harrison 



214 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Reserve Officers 



Capt. Geo. H. Abbott 



Joseph King 
Harold B. Page 
William E. White 
Edward L. Howland 
D. Otis Swain 
Mark D. Casey 
John P. Walsh 
Nelson Forest 
Perley H. Morse 
Michael Mulligan 
Nelson E. Strong 



Frank Silva 
Herbert E. Clark 
Addison N. Martin 
Perley H. Morse 
Hay ward C. Logan 
Harry D. Long 
Homer B. Clough 
James M. Kent 
John Kenney 
Thomas Andrews 



Special Officers 



Willie A. Little 
Joseph A. Flanders 
Willie A. Flanders 
Elmer Trombley 
Geo. Chase 
Geo. A. Griffin 



Walter H. Bean 
Jonas R. Welcome 
Galen W. Hunter 
Alfred J. Fraser 
Fred S. Pendleton 
Matthew Peabodv 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Total appropriation 


$50,050.00 


Department earnings 


644.00 




$50,694.00 


Expended 




Salaries, regular officers 


$36,665.11 


Salaries, specials 


5,381.43 


Fuel, City 


1.003.40 


Fuel, Penacook 


225.58 


Automobile upkeep 


2,045.79 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 215 

Lights, City $384.25 

Lights, Penacook 24.80 

Incidentals 4,454.77 

Repairs 494.99 

$50,690.12 



Balance $3.8S 

Explanatory 

The comfort station having been opened late in the year, 
there was no appropriation provided to pay the salaries 
of the Matron and Janitor. Arrangements were made by 
the committee to pay them from the incidental appropria- 
tion of this Department. There has been $600 taken from 
this appropriation for that purpose, otherwise we would 
have had a balance of $603.88. 



492 
350 
471 
553 
663 
708 
813 
699 



768 
3 

188 
2 
3 
4 
1 





ARRESTS 


1909 


281 


1918 


1910 


586 


1919 


1911 


1,076 


1920 


1912 


1,366 


1921 


1913 


1,556 


1922 


1914 


1,850 


1923 


1915 


1,599 


1924 


1916 


1,106 


1925 


1917 


1,003 




Total Arrests and 


Causes 


Brought before the Court 




Discharged by the 


Court 




Released 






Adultery 






Arson 






Assault 






Aggravated assault 







216 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Assault on an officer 1 

Breaking and entering 3 

Bastardy 5 

Drunkenness 180 

Deserters 11 

Escaped from House of Correction 4 

Arrests for out of town officers 36 

Fraud 11 

Phony checks 3 

Gambling 20 

Insane 16 

Simple larceny 27 

Grand larceny 10 

Attempted larceny 2 

Rude and disorderly conduct 67 

Safe keeping 99 

Bound over to Superior Court 12 

Committed to Jail 17 

Committed to House of Correction 94 

Committed to State Hospital 18 

Committed to Industrial School 1 

Paid fines 489 

Mittimus not to issue till called for 150 

Appealed to Superior Court 11 

Nol prossed 37 

Sentences suspended 193 

Mittimus called for 4 

Jumping bail 2 

False pretense 3 

Fighting 1 

Failure to send children to school 1 

Runaways 1 

Embezzlement 2 

Non-support 14 

Carrying concealed weapons 2 

Receiving stolen property 4 

Fornication 6 

Operating auto while under influence of liquor 31 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 217 

Overspeeding auto 68 

Overspeeding motorcycle 3 

Traffic violations 54 

Reckless driving 29 

Inadequate brakes 1 

Violation auto laws 84 

Failing to stop auto at command of an officer 2 

Excessive loading of trucks 2 

Cruelty to animals 32 

Vagrants 4 

Open and gross lewdness 1 

Rape 2 

Idle persons 2 

Exposing person 3 

Keeping liquor for sale 42 

Illegal possession of liquor 47 

Illegal transportation 25 

Manufacturing liquor 7 

Common seller of liquor 3 

Loaning gambling machine 1 

Keeping a gambling house 2 

Keeping unlicensed dogs 3 

Material witness 1 

Violation of milk law 1 

Conversion of money 1 

Employing child under 14 years old 1 

Exhibiting child under 14 years old 1 

Miscellaneous 

I 

Auto collisions reported 263 

Auto accidents reported 86 

Auto accidents (coasting) 4 

Autos in collision with teams 10 

Autos in collision with electric cars 6 

Persons injured by autos 16 

Persons run over by autos not injured 14 

Autos abandoned and found 26 



218 CITY OP CONCORD. 



Autos stolen in city and recovered 


23 


Ambulance calls 


328 


Ambulance emergency calls 


50 


Touring car used to carry sick 


11 


Breaking and entering 


29 


Attempted breaks 


32 


Complaints investigated 


375 


Doors tried each night 


907 


Doors and windows found open 


604 


Persons drowned 


3 


Disturbances quelled 


64 


Dogs reported lost 


65 


Dogs found 


44 


Dogs run over by autos (not killed) 


16 


Dogs run over by autos and killed 


23 


Dogs killed by police 


1 


Dogs killed by railroad train 


1 


Escaped from institutions in New Hampshire 


50 


Found dead, natural causes 


1 


Fires — officers attending 


98 


Fires discovered 


6 


Fires — still alarms sent to Fire Station 


9 


Fires — false alarms 


3 


Horses reported lost and found 


2 


Hold-ups 


2 


Lost articles reported 


96 


Lost children found 


45 


Leaks in water pipes reported 


5 


Leaks, gas, reported 


3 


Lights left burning in stores 


7 


Lights reported out in stores 


15 


Lights reported out in streets 


1,138 


Lights on R. R. bridge reported to R. R. 


5 


Lodgers 


1,102 


Missing people in city, found 


7 


Persons notified of trouble in stores 


11 


Persons injured in accidents 


8 


Persons found sick on streets 


3 



POLICE DEPARTMENT. 2 1 9 

Persons injured and sick treated at Police Station 11 

Persons killed in accidents 2 

Persons bitten by dogs 8 

Runaways 8 

Stolen articles reported 91 

Streets, boles reported 11 

Streets, dangerous trees or limbs 5 

Streets, broken nigger heads 9 

Streets, wires down 12 

Suicides 5 

Suicides, attempt 1 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. A. S. KIMBALL, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1926. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: Herewith is submitted the thirty-fourth 
annual report of the Engineering Department. 

Financial Statement 
Appropriation : 

Engineer $3,300.00 

Assistant engineer 1,800.00 

Clerk, and rodman 1,974.00 

Incidentals 981.54 

Upkeep of auto . 400.00 

$8,455.54 



Disbursements 
Salaries and supplies $8,455.44 



Balance $0.10 

The work of construction and maintenance of the sewers 
is handled by this department for the Board of Public 
Works. 

This department has done whatever work was asked of 
it by the several departments, committees and city govern- 
ment. 

Your engineer has attended building hearings and ac- 
companied the city government on their hearings, as well 
as attended all meetings of the city government and Board 
of Public Works. 

All sewer connections were inspected and recorded. 

Grade stakes were set for 7,475.60 feet of sidewalks. 

Sidewalk grades were established for 6.115.00 feet. 



REPORT OP ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT. 221 

Plans and blue prints were made when requested. The 
assessors' maps were kept up to date. There were 700 
transfers of property during the year. 

Streets Laid Out 

Elijah Street, 200 feet. 
Ferrin Road, 2513 feet. 

Total length of streets laid out in 1926, 2,713 ft., or 
0.513+ miles. 

Total mileage of streets and roads, 175.436. 

Total mileage in compact part of city, 47.443. 

Total mileage in outlying portion of the city, 127.993. 

Streets Widened 

Concord Street on north side from South Main Street, 
westerly 278.50 ft. 

Pleasant Street on south side at Christian Science 
Pleasant View Home for a distance of 1,669.53 feet. 

Buildings 

Plans and specifications were made and work supervised 
on the comfort station; battery house at the ce'ntral fire 
station; police station garage and central fire station 
garage. 

The new exits at the Auditorium were made under the 
supervision of your engineer. 

The records in this department are kept on a card system 
which gives in detail the expenditures and entire work of 
the year, which we will be pleased to show anyone who is 
interested. 

We have handled practically every phase of municipal 
engineering for citizens and out-of-town people, as well 
as the city's work, all of which has been cheerfully done by 
the employees of this department, who are: Mr. Edward 
E. Beane, assistant engineer; C. Fred Moulton and Alan 



222 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Gordon, rodmen; Miss Frances Ashley, clerk, all of whom 
have rendered valuable service to the city. 

I have attended the meetings of the city government, 
hearings, and also committee meetings, when requested by 
said committees. 

I deeply appreciate your giving me an opportunity to 
attend the meeting of the American Society for Municipal 
Improvements held in Washington, D. C, in November, 
but owing to poor health and by advice of my physician, 
I did not attend. 

For the support and co-operation of your board, the 
heads of departments, and the citizens of the city, I wish 
to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1926. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The twenty-first annual report of this 
board, for the year 1926, is herewith submitted. 

On June 28, 1926, Commissioners Sanders and Lang met 
at 552 North State Street, and recommended moving the 
present hydrant to a point 50 feet southerly of its present 
location. 

On September 1, 1926, Commissioners Sanders and Lang 
met at the corner of Walker and Rumford Streets, and 
recommended that the hydrant at the corner of Walker 
and Rumford Streets be moved to the westerly side of 
Rumford Street opposite present location. 

On December 2, 1926, Commissioners Sanders and Green 
met on Kensington Road and recommended that a hydrant 
be placed on the easterly side of Kensington Road opposite 
the premises of John Pearson. 

No other sessions were held during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG. 
W. C. GREEN. 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1926. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The twenty -seventh annual report of this 
board is herewith submitted. 

The membership of the present board is as follows: 
Arthur "W. Brown, an examined master plumber ; Charles 
H. Cook, M. D. ; and Fred W. Lang, city engineer. Mr. 
Brown is chairman of the board, and Fred W. Lang, clerk. 

Four applications for journeyman's license, and five for 
a master's license were received. 

Nine meetings of the board were held, all of the appli- 
cants were examined and six passed the required examina- 
tion. Three failed to pass. 

There are four classes of plumbers on the register: reg- 
istered master, examined master, registered journeyman, 
and examined journeyman. 

The following paid for their 1926 license and are classi- 
fied as follows: 





Registered 


Masters 








Arthur W. Bean, 




License number 


1 


Mary E. Clifford, 










14 


Seth R. Hood, 










2 


Michael J. Lee, 










10 


William A. Lee, 










4 


Richard J. Lee, 










6 


Benjamin H. Orr, 










5 


Willis H. Robbins, 










3 


Albert S. Trask, 






' ' 




11 



EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS. 



225 



Examined Masters 



Elmer E. Babb, 
Charles W. Bateman, 
William J. Bishop, 
Arthur W. Brown, 
Louis J. Cherrier, 
Philip W. Clark, 
Frederick F. Converse, 
Edward F. Donovan, 
Edward F. Edgeworth, 
John L. Fahey, 
William Johns, 
Thomas J. Johnson, 
John C. Keenan, 
Robert F. Keane, Jr., 
Manley W. Morgan, 
G. Arthur Nichols, 
Richard O'Brien, 
Harris S. Parmenter, 
Albert E. Roberts, 
Geo. E. Robinson, 
George L. Small, 
John C. Smith, 
Joseph B. Spear, 
William Trottier, 
Wilfred W. Brennan, 



Registered Journeymen 



P. Harrison D. Leary, 
Harry H. Kennedv, 



License 


number 


13 

3 

27 
40 
23 
34 
35 
18 
30 
28 
37 
26 
15 
38 
16 
2 

29 
24 


• 


t i 


11 
33 
31 


< i 


i i 


11 


t i 


" 


41 

7 
39 


:en 

License numbei 


• 12 


i i 


" 


11 



Charles H. Berry, 
Archie D. Brannen, 
Stanley A. Buchanan 
Arthur W. Bunten, 



Examined Journeymen 

License number 



226 CITY OF CONCORD. 




Warren S. Collings, License number 92 


Nelson Dane, " 


' 79 


C. Nelson Griffin. 


' 62 


Chas. D. Hall 


• 93 


Victor T. Lauze, " 


' 78 


Adelard J. Leniire. " 


' 64 


Everett S. Mahoney, 


• 72 


John J. Maloney, 


• 90 


John W. McGowan, " 


• 80 


William H. Stanley, 


• 59 


Clarence J. Speed, 


' 60 


George E. Towne, " 


' 87 


Franklin H. Nutter, " 


' 88 


Malcolm S. Butler. 


• 89 


Joseph C. Roy, " 


• 94 


Total number registered masters, 


9 


Total number registered journeymen, 


2 


Total number examined masters, 


25 


Total number examined journeymen, 


19 


Cash Receipts 




For licenses, 


$24.50 


For examinations, 


9.00 


Total receipts, 


$33.50 


Paid out for stamps and supplies. 


26.37 



Balance, $7.13 

The clerk of the board holds receipts from the city 
treasurer for $7.13. 

Respectfully submitted, 



ARTHUR W. BROWN, 
CHAS. H. COOK, M. D., 
FRED W. LANG, 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



REPORT OF THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 



Concord, N. H., December 31. 1926. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The second annual report of the plumbing 
inspections in the city of Concord, is herewith submitted : 

There have been 210 permits issued for new work, against 
156 permits for the year 1925. 

There were 445 inspections made. 

It is pleasing to the inspector to report that there have 
been but two complaints of evasions of the plumbing rules, 
and these being of a minor nature. 

A record is kept in the office of the city engineer of the 
various plumbing jobs, showing the layout of the work, 
date of completion and the names of the parties doing the 
work. 

The plumbers of Concord, taken as a whole, are expert 
Avorkmen, and are producing today, in many instances, 
better work than the plumbing laws require, and it has 
been a great pleasure to your inspector to work with them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC 
WORKS 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Public Works: 

The following is submitted as my annual report of the 
Highway Department for. the year ending December 31, 
1926. 

The work of this department embraces the construction 
and maintenance of streets, the collection of garbage, the 
sprinkling of streets and the construction of bridges and 
sidewalks. 

In the superintendent's office a complete record of all 
purchases, expenditures and detailed costs is maintained 
for reference. 

Finance 

Funds for the work of the department have all been re- 
ceived during the past year from the annual budget; no 
bonds having been issued. 





Appropriations 








Appr's Earnings 


Expended 


Balance 


Gen. Main. 


$200,000.00 $5,779.50 $204,281.63 


$1,497.87 


Garbage 


33,531.92 259.21 


33,791.13 




Sprinkling 


7,000.00 422.66 


6,902.41 


520.25 


Trees 


7,200.00 260.33 
Construction 


6,998.15 


462.18 



The heating plant at the garage and stables, started last 
year, has boon completed. 



BOARD OP PUBLIC WORKS. 229 

The east side of North Main Street, between Depot and 
Pleasant, was resurfaced with asphalt and the small gap 
at Willow Hollow, on the Trunk line, was completed with 
concrete. 

Hackett Brook Bridge was constructed with reinforced 
concrete and several tile pipes and wooden box culverts 
were replaced with corrugated iron culvert pipe. 

The wading pool at White Park was constructed for the 
Playgrounds Committee. 

Sidewalks, both concrete and tar, were laid in various 
parts of the city. 

Maintenance 
Bridges 

The floor system of the river bridge on Bridge Street was 
completed, as well as minor repairs on several bridges. 
Nine bridges were painted in the past year. 

Bituminous Surface 

Finding that a satisfactory maintenance program has 
been worked out in surface treating our existing roads, we 
have given our reconstructed gravel streets a surface treat- 
ment with tar or asphalt. They should be good for three 
years unless the frost action makes it necessary, in some 
cases, to treat them at shorter intervals. 

Oarage and Stables 

One patrol road machine, one tractor road machine, one 
concrete mixer, one tractor and plow, six truck plows and 
four horses have been added to our equipment. 

Snow Removal 

We have followed the same program as last year believ- 
ing that to best serve the public it is necessary to remove 
snow from the highways. We have made an earnest attempt 
to give highway service every day in the year. While snow 



230 CITY OF CONCORD. 

removal is expensive, we think the expense is more than 
justified, as it permits uninterrupted traffic; business and 
ordinary pursuits can be carried on with a minimum of in- 
convenience. 

Marking and Signs 

We have placed direction signs on most of our roads. 
Warning signs have been placed at dangerous points and 
warning and traffic lanes have been painted directly on the 
pavements in some locations. 

Sprinkling 

The motor driven flusher and sprinkler has done all the 
work in this direction with the exception of the calcium 
chloride used in the outside districts. 

Garbage 

The collection of table garbage, ashes and rubbish was 
made as usual. The service was extended to East Con- 
cord and Penacook during the past year, and land pur- 
chased for a garbage dump at East Concord. 

Trees 

The tree work in the past year was carried out under the 
supervision of a commission. However, on account of the 
high wind storm of July a considerable amount of money 
was spent in this department. 

Conclusion 

I wish to thank Mayor Marden and members of the 
Board for their interest and assistance in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORRIN W. HEAD, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



REPORT OF THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1926. 
To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The sixteenth annual report to your 
board, showing work done under the supervision of the 
Engineering Department, for your board, for the fiscal 
year ending December 31, 1926, is herewith submitted. 

In this report I shall make no recommendations, believ- 
ing it to be more appropriate to make them to your board 
at your regular sessions, when the opportunity is always 
open. 



Financial Statement 

Appropriation for construction and repairs, 
Appropriation July 12, 1926, special, 
Appropriation September 13, 1926, special, 
Earnings of department, 



Funds available, 




Disbursements 




lid for liability insurance, 


$120.37 


sewer pipe, 


1,197.20 


castings, 


360.75 


brick, 


138.50 


Ford truck account, 


193.03 


Reo truck account, 


609.50 


main line plugs, labor, 


438.58 


manholes built, labor, 


23.10 


construction, labor, 


1,043.27 


flushing, labor, 


1,345.80 


private pipe plugs, labor, 


611.54 


raising manholes, labor, 


420.95 


main line repairs, labor, 


33.56 


private pipes laid, labor, 


72.91 



$19,000.00 
1,100.00 
5,000.00 
1,013.87 

$26,113.87 



232 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Paid for general repairs, labor, $2,664.23 

catch basins built, labor, 4.60 

sewer plan work, labor. 45.00 

accident case, labor, 54.00 

inspector on contract, labor, 762.00 
West Garden, labor, 56.44 

The Gamewell Co., labor, 151.96 

Concord Electric Co., labor, 18.00 
Comfort station, labor, 24.03 

supplies, 724.77 

Connolly Bros., balance due 

on 1925 contract. 300.00 

Connolly Bros., 1926 con- 
tracts, 14,799.70 

$26,113.79 

Balance, $0.08 

There was laid 5,608 feet of sewer in 1926. 
Ninety plugs in house sewers were removed. 
Manholes were raised to fit road improvements. 
One new manhole was built other than those on con- 
struction jobs. 

There were 19 main sewer plugs. 
Miles of main line sewers. 

City proper, 39.732+ 

East Concord, 0.333+ 

Penacook, 5.268+ 

West Concord, 3.627+ 

St. Paul's School, 1.197+ 



Total, 50.157+ 

An itemized account of transactions of the sewer de- 
partment is kept in the office of the city engineer, and in- 
formation as to the same can be had by interested parties 
at that office. 

Sewer pipe was purchased of Wm. S. Simpson, Inc., 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS. 233 

through their agent, A. H. Britton & Co., at 67 per cent 
off of list under contract for year. 

Cement was purchased of Concord Lumber Company 
and Boutwell Lumber Company. 

Lumber was purchased of Concord Lumber Company 
and Boutwell Lumber Co. 

Supplies were purchased locally when possible. 

Monthly statements of coal tar walk were given to the 
departments or committees having the work done. 

In company with one or both of the three members of 
the committee on location of poles, I have attended to the 
duty, attended hearings and meetings of your board and 
furnished such information as was called for. 

Owing to the large number of sewer petitions granted. 
and being able to get an extremely reasonable figure from 
Connolly Brothers of Beverly Farms, Mass., several of 
the sewers were constructed by them, and I am pleased 
to report that the work was done in an acceptable man- 
ner and engineering department employees were cour- 
teously treated. 

The construction work, other than that done by 
Connolly Brothers, repairs and maintenance of the sewer 
systems was done by a very small force, namely : "William 
H. Murphy, foreman; Joseph Morgan, assistant foreman, 
with James J. Berryman, Richard Morrill, and John 
Peterson as co-workers. These men have proven to be 
skilled and loyal workmen, and it is through them that I 
am able to report a vast amount of work done at a low 
cost. 

I wish to thank the citizens, policemen, firemen, plumbers 
and heads of departments for the courtesy extended me 
and employees of this department. 

For the many courtesies extended me by your board, 
I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1926. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The third annual report of your building 
inspector is herewith submitted. 

Permits Issued 

25 one car garages. 

22 two car garages. 

7 three car garages. 

9 four car garages. 

5 public garages. 
9 dwellings. 

1 wood shed. 

1 boiler room. 

1 ash hoist. 

4 blocks to contain three stores each. 

1 carpenter shop. 

1 sun porch. 

2 store houses. 

1 oil house. 

2 two tenement houses. 
Christian Science Home. 

4 school dormitories. 

1 entrance changed. 

3 buildings moved. 

2 fire wall openings. 

1 alteration for foundry. 

1 enlargement for bowling alley. 

6 additions to garages. 

2 additions to dwellings. 

5 alterations to dwellings. 
1 alteration to dairy. 

1 alteration to apartment house. 

2 alterations to office buildings. 

3 alterations to stores. 



board of public works. 235 

Buildings Completed in 1926 



25 one car garages. 


19 two car garages. 


9 three car garages. 


5 four car garages. 


11 public garages. 


1 generation plant. 


1 oil house. 


2 openings in fire wall. 


2 roofs raised. 


2 storage sheds. 


1 wood shed. 


1 boiler room. 


1 bowling alley. 


2 buildings moved. 


1 carpenter shop. 


1 dairy. 


1 foundry. 


1 ash hoist. 


2 three store buildings. 


5 alterations to dwellings. 


2 additions to dwellings. 


6 additions to garages. 


1 alteration to apartment house, 


2 alterations to office buildings. 


3 alterations to stores. 


1 alteration in bank. 


1 entrance changed. 



Signs 

There have been 32 signs erected during the year, all of 
which have been erected in a substantial manner. 



236 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Buildings Built by the City 

Comfort station. 

Addition to police station garage. 
Two exits to the auditorium. 

Building remodeled at central fire station to hold the 
batteries of the Gamewell fire alarm system. 
Central fire station stable rebuilt into a garage. 

Union School District 

Practice house on Warren street, remodeled. 

The building of a new high school is under way. 

The major portion of construction during the past year 
has been outside the fire limits, and according to the build- 
ing code, your inspector has no jurisdiction over the con- 
struction of these buildings. 

The inspections have taken a great amount of time, and 
I feel that the code has been lived up to cheerfully by the 
contractors, with the exception of a few cases, where it 
looked like a clear case of ignoring the provisions of the 
code, but after considerable argument they made the neces- 
sary changes that the inspector required. 

On November 29, 1926, assistant city engineer Edward 
E. Beane was made assistant building inspector, and as 
soon as he learns the working of the building code, he will 
be a great assistance to the inspector. 

For the courtesy extended me by your board, the con- 
tractors and citizens, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 



FRED W. LANG, 

Building Inspector. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen of the City of 
Concord, New Hampshire: 

The Trustees of the Public Library herewith transmit 
the annual report of the Librarian, which treats briefly of 
the work of the year and present library conditions. 

Our committee is continuing its attention to the problem 
of securing adequate library facilities for the City. 

On January 1. 1927, the funds available for a new library 
building amounted to $39,067, and $15,000 will eventually 
be received from the Judge Corning estate. 

The amount of the William W. Thayer bequest has not 
been determined. 

The appropriation for 1927 should not be less than 
$7,000 — the same as for the last seven years — plus the in- 
come from the trust funds. 

Respectfully submitted, 

THOMAS W. D. WORTHEX. 

President of the Board of Trustees. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT FOR 1926 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library: 

Gentlemen : It has become customary to give Library 
statistics somewhat after this order: 





Expenditures 




Salaries and labor 




$5,776.84 


Books and periodicals 




1,849.24 


Binding 




512.10 


Printing 




65.20 


Fuel and light 




815.60 


Incidentals 




1,224.46 


Total 


$10,243.44 



The incidental item is so much larger this year than 
usual because the building, especially the roof, needed 
$700 in the way of repairs. 

At the beginning of 1926 we had in the Library, 36,383 
volumes. 

There have been added by purchase 827 

added by gift 37 

added by binding magazines 36 

discarded 444 

Now in the Library 36,839 vols. 

You will note that we discard many outworn or out- 
grown books; we seem to have this one trait in common 
with Henry Ford, of whom it is said, "His willingness to 
scrap is notorious." 

It is gratifying that the circulation has increased 2,681, 
making a total of 76,924. As usual, March, the month of 
bad weather, saw the most books given out. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 239 

To say that in the reference room 3,189 persons have 
applied for information gives no idea of the difficulty 
Miss Dennett and Miss Clarke sometimes encounter in 
finding the desired facts. This man asks for and gets 
data on Viking ships which will enable him to make a 
model of one. That woman comes to seek interpretation of 
a dream which she is convinced was more than a dream. 
A boy propounds a poser: he wants a picture of the 
statue at whose base Caesar was assassinated. At present, 
a picture contest is sending many in for biographies of 
the Ladies of the White House. But of course most of 
the reference work is done for and with school children. 
The High School debating team labored long and earn- 
estly to acquire the material which helped them to win 
both at Manchester and in Concord in the opening de- 
bates on the topic : "Resolved, that the United States 
should cancel all of the European War Debts contracted 
prior to the Armistice by her former associate nations in 
the World War." 

The number of new borrowers runs with a uniformity 
which proves that Concord does not have sudden influxes 
of population. Last year 700, this year 699 new names 
were registered; divided almost evenly, as previously, be- 
tween adults and those of school age. 

Another thing which varies but little is the sum of 
money taken in from fines on overdue books, — $400 an- 
nually. 

Our work and our opportunities are much the same as 
during the last few years, and with those you are familiar 
through my recent reports. It is hard to keep an institu- 
tion from backsliding if it is not actively progressing. 
Perhaps our faith in the need of the Library to the com- 
munity has been upheld by that one of the placards in 
the neighboring Wayside Pulpit which said : ' ' Let us 
spread enlightenment, for on that the safety of the nation 
depends." 

The children's alcove continues to be a nursery of 
•crime rather than an uplifting influence, for it does not 



240 CITY OF CONCORD. 

seem to be frequented so much by appreciative boys and 
girls as by "the gang" who come in not to read but to 
annoy or possibly purloin. 

The present president of the American Library Asso- 
ciation stated in an address, "A community is known by 
the library it maintains as much as by its schools and 
churches." What an opinion, then, must be held by those 
who compare this demoded building with an adequate and 
modern one! You have doubtless heard, as I have fre- 
quently, surprise expressed by other towns that Concord, 
regarded as rich and "highbrow," allows its library to trail 
along at the shabby end of its public institutions. 

I will not close on a pessimistic note, however, for, al- 
though 1926 has not brought us any noticeable advance, it 
has not taken from us the President of this Board, and 
any year is to be considered a good year which sees the 
Library still the object of his interest and care. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

City Librarian. 



POOR DEPARTMENT 



FIFTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
OVERSEER OF THE POOR 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1926 
To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the fifty-ninth an- 
nual report of the expenditures for the poor, including 
Wards One and Two, for the year ending December 31, 
1926. 

City Poor 



Appropriation, 


$5,000.00 


Resolution No. 724, 


1,500.00 


Paid groceries, 


$730.41 


fuel, 


250.75 


rents, 


219.00 


board and care, 


3,918.39 


care, children, 


1,082.40 


transportation, 


40.06 


medicine, 


9.70 


shoes and clothing, 


62.86 


burial, 


35.00 


transient account, 


4.25 


County Poor 




Paid groceries, 


$3,442.63 


milk, 


191.64 


fuel, 


2,133.00 


rents, 


2,923.32 



,500.00 



,352.82 



242 CITY OF CONCORD. 



aid care, children. 


$3,220.90 


board and care, 


3,960.35 


shoes and clothing, 


194.65 


burials, 


220.00 


transient account, 


110.06 


services, doctors, 


83.86 


hospital, care, 


309.05 


miscellaneous, 


18.60 




<b1 fi Qf)S flfi 




'-p.LUjOUO.UU 


Total amount paid for aid to p 


oor, $23,160.88 



Dependent Soldiers, City 

Appropriation, $200.00 

Paid groceries, $28.09 

fuel, 21.00 

rent, 11.25 

care, 80.00 



$140.34 



Dependent Soldiers, County 



id groceries, 


$277.23 




fuel, 


232.65 




rents, 


96.00 




board and care, 


315.00 




miscellaneous, 


13.00 


$933.88 







Total amount paid for aid to soldiers, $1,074.22 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses, and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1926 : 

Marriage licenses. $237.00 

Dog license fees, 237.60 

Recording mortgages, 174.75 

Recording conditional sales, 1.068.10 

Recording mortgage discharges. 47.25 

Recording writs. 6.00 

Recording assignment of wages. 1.00 

Public garage permits, 3.00 

Pool table and bowling alley license fees, 2.50 

Certificates of record, 36.10 

Sale of waste paper, 2.66 



Total amount, city clerk fees, $1,815.96 

House rent, fire chief, $250.00 

Concord Battery Station, rent, 350.00 

Bowling alley and pool table licenses, 280.00 

Junk dealers' licenses. 110.00 

Job team and passenger carriage licenses, 102.50 

Dog licenses, 2,747.91 

County poor, Merrimack County. 16,808.06 

Dependent soldiers, 933.88 

Sale of histories and maps. 20.25 

Druggists' permits to sell liquor. 6.00 

Refund, Allen vs. City. 15.05 

State primary fees, 125.00 

Circus license, 50.00 

Carnival license, 21.00 

Circus stand concessions. 10.00 



244 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Employment Bureau license, $5.00 

A. 0. Preston, account M. J. Preston, 30.00 

Penacook School District, refund, 729.22 

Sale of grass, Little field, 50.00 

Sale of grass, A. N. Day, 5.00 

Lease of land, C. L. Piper, 25.00 

Land sold, Edward J. Benson, 23.66 

Land sold, Samuel Mitchell, 11.13 

Land sold, E. E. Plummer, 27.81 

Sale of City Ordinances, 4.00 

Comfort Station, earnings, 20.61 

Theatre licenses, 1,123.00 



Motor Vehicle Permits, 1926, $27,073.28 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1927, 17,240.18 



$25,700.04 



44,313.46 

$70,013.50 

The foregoing amounts have been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 
MEASURES 



For the City of Concord 

Covering the Period January 1, 1926, to 

January 1, 1927 

To His Honor Fred N. Harden, Mayor, and the Board of 
Aldermen: 

During the past year there were four hundred and fifty- 
six (456) scales tested which were found correct and were 
sealed; one hundred and thirteen (113) were adjusted 
before being sealed; three (3) were confiscated; twelve 
(12) were condemned for repairs and were later rein- 
spected and sealed. Five hundred and eleven (511) 
weights were tested, found correct and were sealed ; eleven 
(11) were adjusted before being sealed and three (3) con- 
demned. There were two hundred and ninety-nine (299) 
liquid measures tested and sealed. Two hundred and 
thirty-two (232) tests of gasoline pumps were made, three 
(3) of which were condemned for use and thirty-five (35) 
condemned for repairs, later these being reinspected and 
sealed. There were twenty (20) cart bodies used in wood 
deliveries measured; four (4) reweighings of coal made 
and two hundred and twelve (212) packages put up in 
advance of sale were reweighed. 

Respectfully submitted. 

F. S. PENDLETON, 

City Sealer, 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR 



To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

While the year 1926 was somewhat more than commonly 
active for the city solicitor in connection with miscella- 
neous matters, it was a quiet year so far as court proceed- 
ings were concerned. During the year, at the direction of 
the board, a petition, in which the Town of Pembroke 
joined, was presented to the Superior Court praying for 
the discontinuance of a portion of the old state highway 
across the Soucook Kiver. This petition was referred to 
the board of county commissioners, of which, owing to the 
disqualification of the Concord commissioners, former com- 
missioners Frank L. Gerrish and Herbert W. Dustin made 
a part. The hearing was held on December 30 and re- 
sulted in a unanimous report favoring the discontinuance 
of the highway and awarding no damages. This report is 
now in order for a decree by the court. 

As soon as the decree is made and the highway is discon- 
tinued it will be for the board in conjunction with the' 
Town of Pembroke to raise proper barriers at the two 
ends of the discontinued highway, and it will be further 
desirable for the city to take precaution that, by means of 
signs or otherwise, proper warning shall be given to travel- 
lers in the highway that the road in question comes to a 
blind end. 

One suit against the city was filed at the October Term 
of court in behalf of Frank H. Silver, who seeks to re- 
cover salary as a permanent member of the fire depart- 
ment for the period subsequent to his dismissal from the 
service. 

The year has brought an unusual number of highway 
layouts, real estate transactions and similar matters re- 
nin ring the attention of the solicit or. and has been marked 
by the first hearing by the board of review upon an appeal 



REPORT OP CITY SOLICITOR. 247 

on a decision from the building inspector, at which hear- 
ing the city solicitor sat, and which resulted in an adjust- 
ment satisfactory to all concerned, this resulting from the 
diplomacy of his Honor the Mayor. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELWIN L. PAGE, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF THE PARK COMMISSIONERS 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

Work on the city parks for the past year has been mainly 
of routine character. At White Park a new swan was 
secured to replace one that died during the summer. The 
upper pool, under the direction of the playground com- 
mittee, was enlarged and walled in, and the bottom was 
cleaned up. This pool is to be given over to the younger 
children for swimming and wading. Along White Street a 
section of iron fence was built, and the entire length of the 
fence was repainted. 

At Rollins Park a new line of water pipe was laid, and 
the work of cutting out the underbrush was continued. 
This latter will be finished the coming summer, and more 
of the dead trees will be removed. The rustic shelter was 
blown down during the summer. This should be rebuilt, 
as shelter of some kind is absolutely necessary. A small 
cyclone in passing demolished several of the tall pine trees. 

The pergola at the West Garden was removed. It was in 
bad repair, and the expense of maintenance was entirely 
out of proportion to its value. The removal of this lattice 
work has opened up the Garden to a surprising degree, and 
has been much appreciated by the public. The northwest 
corner has been enlarged by acquiring more land, thus 
straightening out the boundaries and giving more oppor- 
tunities for ornamental planting. 

The cross walks at Doyen Park were relaid with gravel, 
making a much needed improvement. 

In East Concord, Pecker Park was graded, new loam 
added and made ready for seeding the coming spring. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS. 249 

The expenses of the parks were kept within the appro- 
priations. 

FRED N. HARDEN, Mayor, 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, JR., 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN. 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE, 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 
WILL J. DREW, 
GARDNER G. EMMONS, 

Pa rk Co mmissioners. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

The reports of the Sanitary Officer and the Milk Inspec- 
tor are transmitted herewith. These documents will be 
found to contain much detailed information concerning the 
activities of the health department. These reports are 
hereby approved and submitted as the annual report of the 
Board of Health for the year ending December 31, 1926. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED N. MARDEN, 
CHARLES H. COOK, M. D., 
DONALD G. McIVOR, M. D., 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF SANITARY OFFICER 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : My 34th annual report as Sanitary Officer 
for the year ending December 31, 1926, is herewith sub- 
mitted, showing in detail the work of this department, 

There were 554 deaths during the year, 234 of which 
were non-residents and not included in the death rate. Es- 
timating the population at 23,000, the death rate for the 
year was 13.9 per cent. There were 326 deaths in the 
public institutions and 228 in the nine wards of the city. 

There have been the usual number of contagious diseases 
reported to this department, measles being the most pre- 
valent, 231 cases being reported. There were also 53 cases 
of scarlet fever, 12 of diphtheria, six of tuberculosis, 67 of 
venereal diseases, 10 of whooping cough, one of infantile 
paralysis, and two of typhoid fever. 

The Venereal Clinic maintained by the State and local 
Boards of Health and the Concord Red Cross, is in charge 
of Dr. John M. Murray, who reports that during the past 
twelve months, 87 individuals have been treated or tested 
and a total of 410 treatments of Salvarsan given. 

Many minor complaints have been attended to and 148 
complaints and nuisances investigated and disposed of. 
Alleyways about the city have been inspected and found 
to be kept in a much better condition than formerly. 
Two hundred and twenty-nine rooms, halls and cellars have 
been fumigated for various causes. 

All of the schools in the city have been inspected and 
were in very good condition. Thirty-seven houses outside 
the sewer precinct as well as restaurants, markets, barber 
shops, beauty parlors and children's boarding houses have 
been inspected and found satisfactory. 

The shores of Penacook Lake are regularly looked after 
and reports of tests of the drinking water show a high 
standard of quality. 



252 CITY OF CONCORD. 

The total appropriations and expenditures for the year 
are as follows: 



FINANCIAL REPORT OF SANITARY OFFICER 



Appropriations 




Salary, Sanitary Officer, 


$2,000.00 


Upkeep of automobile, 


400.00 


Fumigation supplies, 


100.00 


Contagious diseases, 


1,000.00 


Incidental expenses, 


1,500.00 




$5,000.00 


Resolution No. 732, 


624.17 


To balance account transferred from milk 




inspection, 


.40 




$5,624.57 


Expenditures 




Salary, Sanitary Officer, 


$2,000.00 


Upkeep of automobile, 


400.00 


Fumigation supplies, 


66.69 


Contagious diseases, 


1,725.92 


Incidental expenses, 


1,431.96 



$5,624.57 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 253 

FINANCIAL REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR 



Appropriations 






Salary, Milk Inspector, 
Upkeep of automobile, 
Laboratory and supplies. 




$1,500.00 
400.00 
600.00 




$2,500.00 


Expenditures 






Salary, Milk Inspector, 
Upkeep of automobile, 
Laboratory and supplies, 
Balance, 




$1,500.00 

400.00 

599.60 

.40 




$2,500.00 


Received from milk license fees, 


$326.50 




Received from fumigation. 


9.45 





254 



CITY OF CONCORD. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 



The following table shows the number of contagious dis- 
eases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 



Months. 


Diph- 
theria. 


Influenza. 


Measles. 


Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 


Scarlet 
fever. 


Tubercu- 
losis. 


Typhoid 
fever. 


Vene- 
real dis 
eases. 


Whoop- 
ing 
cough. 


O 


03 

P 


o 


OJ 

P 


1 

O 


— 

OJ 

P 


03 
O 


j3 

03 

P 


8 


C3 

P 


c3 
O 


03 

p 


03 
O 


p 


i 

03 
O 


P 


oi 


.2 
p 1 




2 
5 






1 


9 

58 
10 
2 
1 
4 
15 
5 
3 
1 
4 
111 














1 

3 






6 
3 

7 
6 
6 

5 
6 
8 
7 
2 
4 
7 

67 


1 








































4 

13 
9 

9 
3 














1 
















2 
1 


4 
5 
4 
4 

2 

2 
1 
5 

32 


1 




T 








1 












1 










... 








2 
3 
1 
4 






1 






August 
















1 
1 

1 

1-' 












7 
3 

. 

53 




■ 1 
6 


























1 
































2 




1 


10 





























COMPARATIVE TABLE. 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1890 : 



Ophthal- 
mia neo- 
natorum. 



Whoop- Infan- 
ing tile pa- 

cough, ralysis. 



Diph- 
theria. 



•Scarlet 
fever. 



Typhoid MeagleSi 
fever. 



Small- 
pox. 



I 
9 ... 



37 3 

T" 

113 C 
44 S 
4 •• , 





■x 


3 


18 


3 


47 


3 


12 




33 


■ 


38 




54 




41 




73 




12 




63 




53 



256 city of concord. 

Causes of Death 
1 — Epidemic, Endemic and Infectious diseases. 

9 Whooping cough, 1 
11 Influenza, 

(a) with pulmonary complications specified, 3 

(b) without pulmonary complications specified, 5 
21 Erysipelas, 5 

31 Tuberculosis of the respiratory system, 29 

32 Tuberculosis of the meninges and central 

nervous system, 2 

33 Tuberculosis of the intestines and peritoneum, 4 
38 Syphilis, 1 
41 Purulent, infection, septicemia, 8 

2 — General Diseases not included in above. 

43 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

buccal cavity, 1 

44 Cancer and other malignant tumors of 

the stomach and liver, 7 

45 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

peritoneum, intestines and rectum, 15 

46 Cancer and other malignant tumors of 

the female genital organs, 6 

47 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

breast, 4 

48 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

skin, 2 

49 Cancer and other malignant tumors of other 

or unspecified organs, 9 

51 Acute rheumatic fever, 1 

52 Chronic rheumatism, osteoarthritis, gout, 2 
54 Pellagra, 1 

57 Diabetes mellitus, 5 

58 Anemia, chlorosis, 

(a) Pernicious anemia, 1 

59 Diseases of the pituitary gland, 1 
63 Diseases of the adrenals, 1 
69 Other general diseases, 2 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 257 

3 — Diseases of the Nervous System and of the Organs 
of Special Sense 

73 Other diseases of the spinal cord, 1 

74 Cerebral hemorrhage, apoplexy 

(a) Cerebral hemorrhage, 48 

(b) Cerebral thrombosis and embolism, 8 

76 General paralysis of the insane, 12 

77 Other forms of mental alienation, 5 

78 Epilepsy, 6 
84 Other diseases of the nervous system, 3 

4 — Diseases of the Circulatory System 

88 Endocarditis and myocarditis (acute), 2 

89 Angina pectoris, 10 

90 Other diseases of the heart, 78 

91 Diseases of the arteries, 

(b) Arteriosclerosis, 51 

92 Embolism and thrombosis (not cerebral), 6 
95 Hemorrhage without specified cause, 1 

5 — Diseases of the Respiratory System 
99 Bronchitis 

(a) Acute, 2 

(b) Chronic, 1 

(c) not otherwise defined under 5 years, 1 

100 Bronchopneumonia (including capillary bronchitis) 

(a) Bronchopneumonia, 54 

(b) Capillary bronchitis, 1 

101 Pneumonia 

(a) Lobar, 19 

(b) Not otherwise defined, 6 

102 Pleurisy, 3 

103 Congestion and hemorrhage infarct of the lung, 3 
107 Other diseases of the respiratory system 

(T. B. excepted) 
(a) Chronic interstitial pneumonia including 

occupational diseases of the lungs, 1 

(c) Others under this title, 2 



258 CITY OF CONCORD. 

6 — Diseases of the Digestive System 

111 Ulcer of the stomach and duodenum 

(a) Ulcer of the stomach, 2 

112 Other diseases of the stomach (cancer excepted) 1 

113 Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years), 1 

117 Appendicitis and typhlitis, 4 

118 Hernia, intestinal obstruction 

(a) Hernia, 1 

(b) Intestinal obstruction, 5 

119 Other diseases of the intestines, - 
122 Cirrhosis of the liver, 

(b) not specified as alcoholic, 1 

121 Other diseases of the liver, 1 

126 Peritonitis without specified cause, 6 

7 — Non-Venereal Diseases of the Genitourinary System and 
Annexa 

128 Acute nephritis (including unspecified under 

10 years of age), 8 

129 Acute nephritis (including unspecified 10 years 

and over), 12 

131 Other diseases of the kidneys and annexa 

(diseases of the kidneys in pregnancy excepted 1 . 2 
134 Diseases of the urethra, urinary abscess, etc. 

(a) Stricture of the urethra, 1 
137 Cysts and other benign tumors of the ovary. 1 

8— The Puerpural State 

143 Accidents of pregnancy 

(b) Ectopic gestation, 1 

(c) Others under this title, 1 

147 Puerpural phlegmasia, alba dolens, embolus. 

sudden death, 3 

148 Puerpural albuminuria and convulsions. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 259 

9 — Diseases of the Skin and of the Cellular Tissue 

151 Gangrene, 2 

154 Other diseases of the skin and annexa, 1 

10 — Diseases of the Bones and of the Organs of 
Locomotion 

156 Diseases of the Joints (tuberculosis and 

rheumatism excepted), 1 

11 — Malformations 

159 Congenital malformations (still births not 

included) 

(a) Hydrocephalus, 1 

(b) Congenital malformations of the heart, 2 

12 — Early Infancy 

160 Congenital debility, icterus and sclerema, 4 

161 Premature birth, injury at birth. 

(a) Premature birth, 6 

(b) Injury at birth, 2 

162 Other diseases peculiar to early infancy, 7 

13— Old Age 

164 Senility, 7 

14 — External Causes 

167 Suicide by poisonous gas, I 

168 Suicide by hanging or strangulation, 4 
170 Suicide by firearms, 1 
177 Other acute accidental poisonings ( gas excepted 1 ), 1 
179 Accidental burns (conflagration excepted). 

182 Accidental drowning, 3 

183 Accidental traumatism by firearms (wounds 

of war excepted), 1 



260 CITY OP CONCORD. 

185 Accidental traumatism by fall, 1 

187 Accidental traumatism by machines, 1 

188 Accidental traumatism by other crushing 

vehicles 

(a) Railroad accident, 1 

(c) Automobile accident, 2 

(g) Landslides and other crushing, 2 

202 Other external violence (cause specified), 1 

15 — Ill-defined Diseases. 

205 Cause of death not specified or ill-defined 

(a) Ill-defined, 4 

Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions 

Ward 1, 44 

Ward 2, 6 

Ward 3, 13 

Ward 4, 43 

Ward 5, 30 

Ward 6, 32 

Ward 7, 33 

Ward 8, 10 

Ward 9, 17 

New Hampshire State Hospital, 193 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 81 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital, 35 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home, 11 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged, 5 

St. Paul's School Infirmary, 1 

Deaths Reported by Age 

Under 1 year, 25 

From 1 year to 5 years, 16 

From 5 to 10 years, 2 

From 10 to 15 years, 4 

From 15 to 20 years, 10 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT. 261 

From 20 to 30 years, 15 

From 30 to 40 years, 34 

From 40 to 50 years, 47 

From 50 to 60 years, 78 

From 60 to 70 years, 108 

From 70 to 80 years, 121 

From 80 to 90 years, 80 

From 90 to 100 years, 11 

Not stated, 3 

Total number of deaths, 554 

Total number of stillbirths not included in deaths, 22 

Deaths During 1926 by Sex, Condition and Nativity 

Sex: 

Males, 290 

Females, 264 

Condition : 

Married, 237 

Single, 143 

Widowed, 152 

Divorced, 15 

Not stated, 7 

Nativity: 

Concord, 95 

New Hampshire. 192 

Other states. 122 

Foreign, 124 

Not stated, 21 

Total number of deaths for the year 1926, 554, com- 
pared with 487 in 1925. 

Average death-rate for the year 1926, 13.9 per cent, 
compared with 12.2 in 1925. 



262 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Total number of births for the year 1926, 453. com- 
pared with 429 in 1925. 

Total number of marriages for the year 1926, 221 com- 
pared with 226 in 1925. 



Summary 

Visits made to contagious diseases, 712 

Burial permits issued, 687 

Burial permits issued for interment of bodies brought 

here, 109 

Transit permits issued, 242 

Number of persons to whom milk licenses were 

issued, 249 

Number of persons to whom garbage licenses were 

issued, 12 

Number of reports of contagious diseases sent to 

the State Board of Health, 52 

Number of reports sent to the surgeon-general, Public 

Health and Marine Hospital Service, 52 

Number of samples of water collected for analysis, 5 

Number of nuisances, complaints and inspections, 148 
Number of rooms, etc., fumigated, 229 

Number of barber shops and beauty parlors inspected, 30 
Number of public halls inspected, 12 

Number of restaurants and bakeries inspected, 30 

Number of school buildings inspected, 14 

To the Mayor and members of the Board of Health, the 
Aldermen and all City officials for their hearty support 
in the work of this department, I wish to express my 
thanks. 



Respectfully submitted, 



CHARLES E. PALMER. 

Sanitary Officer. 



REPORT OF THE MILK INSPECTOR 



To the Board of Health: 

Herewith is submitted a report of the milk inspector for 
the year 1926. 

This is the first time that the whole year has been avail- 
able, and the results show more work accomplished. 

The process of changing over to meet the requirements 
of either tuberculin-tested herds or pasteurized milk went 
over the top one hundred per cent with no friction or 
prosecution. 

A considerable amount of rebuilding, improving and en- 
larging of dairy farms was accomplished this year. A 
steady improvement in the milk supply continues. Most 
particularly is a decided improvement noted in the visible 
dirt content of the milk. 

This year has seen a marked change in the method of 
producing pasteurized milk in Concord, and those who do 
pasteurize are putting out an excellent product. Many 
of the dealers who market raw milk have steadily improved 
the quality of their milk supply. It has been the aim to 
co-operate with all milk producers and dealers, to advise 
and assist in any way consistent with official duties. 

There are 179 dairy farms producing and selling their 
milk supply in Concord. This represents approximately 
1912 cows. 

It might be of interest to know the average daily receipt 
of milk in 1926 for this city was 3,358.5 gallons. The aver- 
age daily receipt of 35% cream was 74.56 gallons. 

Last summer 36 samples of ice cream of various manu- 
factures were collected. A number of these samples were 
found to be below butter-fat standard. As most of the 
companies represented were located outside of Concord 
the matter was referred to the State Board of Health for 
disposal. 



264 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Summary of Work 



Number of milk licenses issued, 


281 


Notices issued, 


654 


Complaints investigated, 


17 


New milk rooms and houses, 


42 


New steam boilers, 


4 


Number of producers who whitewashed stables, 


98 


Herd tests conducted, 


9 


Inspected : 




Dairy Farms, 


144 


Milk Plants, 


10 


Stores and eating places, 


53 


Reinspections, 


371 


Prosecutions, 


1 


Collected : 




Number milk samples tested, 


552 


Number milk samples above standard, 


362 


Number milk samples below standard, 


190 


Number cream samples tested, 


8 


Miscellaneous laboratory analyses, 


6 



AUSTIN B. PRESBY, 

Milk Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF MUNICIPAL 
COURT 



Receipts 

Received for fines, costs and sundry fees $17,450.72 

Expenditures 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses and com- 
plaints and warrants $3,260.76 

State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of 
Vehicles 

Postage, printing and other supplies 

Clerk's bond 

Probation Officer, services and expenses 

Paid for counsel fees in Juvenile cases 

Restitution money paid from money paid into 
Court 

Paid for meals furnished, from costs 

Concord Society S. P. C. A., fines 

Special Justices 

Treasurer Merrimack County 

Balance paid City Treasurer 



Respectfully submitted, 



3,968.20 


159.00 


6.00 


120.00 


60.00 


20.00 


52.00 


75.00 


303.00 


2,300.00 


7,126.76 



$17,450.72 



JOHN W. STANLEY, 

Clerk. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration 
the following facts and figures showing the valuation of 
the city and its school districts and special precinct, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
by direct taxation for the years from 1916 to the present 
time, which shows the increased amount spent by the 
city. 



Tabulations of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 
Valuation of City and Precincts, with Rate for 
Each in 1926. 



Warrant. 


Amount of 
warrants. 


Tax rate 
per $1,000. 


Assessed 

valuation of 

city and 

precincts. 




$85,380.00 1 
50,535.57 J 
355,400.00 

329,355.82 


$4.49 

11.70 

11. 9G 






$30,242,550.00 




30,242,550.00 


Schools: 


27,528,612.00 




2,713,938.00 








1,046,785.00 


Penacook and Boscawen Union 
School 


34,380.00 

1,875.00 


9.50 

.08 


$3,760,723.00 
23,190,907X0 







assessors' report. 



267 



Number of Shares of Railroad Stock Held Here ox 
Which the Tax Was Assessed and Collected by 
State of New Hampshire and Credited to the City. 



Railroad. 


1923. 


1924. 


1925. 


26 




240 

5,959 

71 

86 

140 

64 

1,248 

8 

11 

160 

46 

13 

5 

434 




208 

6,140 

70 

57 

120 

64 

1.227 

6 



160 

40 

12 

479 



191 

5,324 

64 

62 

115 

61 

1,382 



8 

160 

16 

13 



567 




108 




4,025 




34 


Fitchburg 


42 
86 




64 




1,377 




6 




8 




175 




46 


Wilton 


13 




5 




588 




141 







268 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Inventory of the City of Concord 





No. 


Valuation. 


Improved and unimproved land and 






buildings, 




$26,540,806.00 


Camps on leased land, 




1,450.00 


Horses, 


534 


58,330.00 


Oxen, 


7 


500.00 


Cows, 


1,077 


74.065.00 


Neat, 


172 


5,505.00 


Sheep, 


79 


842.00 


Hogs, 


20 


475.00 


Fowls, 




6,855.00. 


Fur-bearing animals, 


54 


10,800.00 


Vehicles, 




11,700.00 


Portable mills, 




1,625.00 


Boats and launches, 




25.00 


Wood and lumber, 




9,550.00 


Gas tanks and pumps, 




26,310.00 


Stock in trade, 




3,143,691.00 


Machinery, 




350,021.00 



Total, $30,242,550.00 

Polls, 12,043, $24,086.00 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector, $875,330.07 

Average rate per cent of taxation for all purposes, 2.81+ 



assessors' report. 269 

Polls. Valuation, and Taxes Assessed 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and 

on the real and personal estate of Concord since 1916 : 

Year. Polls. Valuation. Tax. 

1916 5,779 $19,803,275 $382,352.47 

1917 6,185 20,110,995 377,326.81 

1918 5,185 20,440,315 447,484.47 

1919 5.662 20,370,605 578,633.66 

1920 6.071 20.501,778 647,009.63 

1921 12.540 21,341.061 664.864.83 

1922 13,011 23,710.108 645,035.10 

1923 12,862 24,553.173 715.511.93 

1924 12.004 27,173,636 871,458.09 

1925 12,213 28,465,631 781,289.87 

1926 12,043 30.242.550 875,330.07 



List of Polls, Valuations, and Tax Assessed in 
1925 and 1926 



Polls. 




Valuation. 


Total tax assessed. 


1925 


1926 


1925. 1926. 


1925. 1926. 


12,213 


12.043 


$28,465,631 $30,242,550 


$781,289.87 $875,330.07 



Total warrants submitted to tax collector: 

In 1925— Resident tax list, $740,548.77 

Non-resident tax list, 886.29 

Polls, 36,639.00 

Bank stock, 3,215.81 

Total, $781,289.87 



!70 CITY OF CONCORD. 

n 1926 — Resident tax list, 

Non-resident tax list, 

Polls, 

Bank stock, 


$845,055.15 

901.05 

24,086.00 

5,287.87 


Total, 


$875,330.07 



Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, 
JAMES H. MORRIS, 
MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned hereby submits the report of the Col- 
lector of Taxes to the close of business, December 31, 1926. 

Tax Levy for 1920 



Kesident list. 




$616,789.11 


Poll tax lists. 




29,031.00 


Non-resident list. 




1.189.52 




$647,009.63 


Additions and corrections. 


1.156.29 


Interest, 




2,211.06 


Costs, 




.60 

$6^)0 377 ^S 




♦IpUtJVjO 1 I ,oo 


Cash paid treasurer. 




$635,881.90 


Discount, 




8,197.22 


Abatements, 




6,298.46 

$6^0 377 "ifi 






Tax 


Levy for 


1921 


Resident list, 




$602,280.14 


Poll tax lists. 




61,520.00 


Non-resident list, 




1,064.69 




$664,864.83 


Additions and corrections, 


9,520.78 


Interest, 




2,608.90 


Costs, 




3.40 

4^676 997 °1 


Cash paid treasurer. 




$653,868.69 


Discount, 




6.888.85 


Abatements. 




15,313.97 


Uncollected. 




926.40 

$676,997.91 



272 city of concord. 

Tax Levy for 1922 

Resident list, $580,540.26 

Poll tax lists, 63,759.00 

Non-resident list, 735.S4 



$645,035.10 



Additions and corrections, 3,096.93 

Interest, 2,649.91 

Costs, 22.20 



-$650,804.14 



Cash paid treasurer, $623,786.77 

Discount, 6,856.85 

Abatements, 17,182.72 

Uncollected, 2,977.80 



-$650,804.14 



Tax Levy for 1923 

Resident list, $651,696.46 

Poll tax lists, 62,987.00 

Non-resident list, 828.47 

Bank stock, 3.709.07 



$719,221.00 



Additions and corrections, 3,254.54 

Interest, 2.350.96 

Costs, 33.60 



-$724,860.10 



Cash paid treasurer, $687,582.96 

Discount, 6 ^77.47 

Abatements, 26.111.90 

Uncollected, 4,287.77 



-$724,860.10 



tax collector's report. 273 

Tax Levy for 1924 

Resident list, $810,651.04 

Poll tax lists, 59,888.00 

Non-resident list, 919.05 

Bank stock, 3,304.29 





$874,762.38 


Additions and corrections, 


1,924.35 


Interest, 


3,320.11 


Costs, 


344.79 


Cash paid treasurer, 


$849,506.13 


Discount, 


10,225.55 


Abatements, 


13,953.20 


Uncollected, 


6,666.75 



351.63 



$880,351.63 



Tax Levy for 1925 

Resident list, $740,548.77 

Poll tax lists, 36,639.00 

Non-resident list, 886.29 

Bank stock, 3,215.81 



$781,289.87 



Additions and corrections, 3,575.12 

Interest, 2,821.98 

Costs, 854.69 



-$788,541.66 



( 'ash paid treasurer, $ ( 68,4 15. i 3 

Discount, 8,664.16 

Abatements, 6.410.64 

Uncollected. 5,021.13 



-$788,541.66 



274 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Tax Levy for 1926 



Resident list. 
Poll tax lists, 
Non-resident list, 
Bank stock, 



$845,055.15 

24,086.00 

901.05 

5,287.87 





$875,330.07 


Additions and corrections, 


2,733.40 


Interest, 


199.67 


Costs, 


396.80 


Cash paid treasurer. 


$782,631.72 


Abatements, 


3,954.68 


Cash on hand, 


240.79 


Uncollected, 


91,832.75 

.4 



F8.659.94 



$878,659.94 



Taxes sold the city of Concord et als in the office of the 
Collector for redemption : 

1920 



Resident list, 


$2,416.54 


Paid treasurer. $2,706.12 


Non-resident list, 


5.05 


(last report) 


Interest, 


347.56 


Paid treasurer 1926, 26.76 


(last report) 




Deeded, 15.38 


Interest 1926. 


9.67 


Paid reg. of deeds, .50 


Fees, 


1.00 


Unredeemed, 31.06 



79.82 



$2,779.82 



1921 



Resident list, 


$1,986.26 


Paid treasurer. $1,918.33 


Interest, 


106.45 


(last report) 


(last report) 




Paid treasurer 1926, 173.24 


Interest 1926, 


5.38 


Deeded, 6.52 



$2,098.00 



$2,098.00 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 



275 





1922 




Resident list, 


$819.45 


Paid treasurer, 


$787.88 


ft on-resident list, 


7.96 


(last report) 




Interest, 


28.22 


Deeded, 


21.96 


(last report) 




Paid reg. deeds, 


.50 


Expense, 


3.10 


Unredeemed, 


49.39 


(last report) 








Fees (last report), 


1.00 







$859.73 



$859.73 



1923 



Resident list, 


$1,831.47 


Paid treasurer, $1,173.81 


Non-resident list, 


25.42 


(last report) 


Interest, 


62.36 


Paid treasurer 1926, 779.02 


(last report) 




Deeded, 25.42 


Interest 1926, 


146.85 


Paid reg. deeds, 1.25 


Expense, 


3.87 


(last report) 


(last report) 




Paid reg. deeds 1926, .25 


Expense 1926, 


1.17 


In reserve for reg. 


Fees (last report) 


2.50 


deeds, .25 


Fees 1926, 


1.00 


Unredeemed, 94.64 



$2,074.64 



1924 



Resident list, 


$3,663.55 


Non-resident list, 


7.32 


Interest, 


70.07 


(last report) 




Interest 1926, 


178.92 


Expense, 


12.18 


(last report) 




Expense 1926, 


2.32 


Fees (last report) 


, 11.50 


Fees 1926, 


4.00 



$2,074.64 



$1,669.83 



Paid treasurer, 

(last report) 
Paid treas. 1926, 1,736.28 
Paid reg. deeds, 5.75 

(last report) 
Paid reg. deeds 1926, 1.50 
In reserve for reg. 

deeds, .50 

Unredeemed, 536.00 



$3,949.86 



$3,949.86 



276 



CITY OF CONCORD. 
1925 



Resident list, $1,638.91 

Non-resident list, 15.69 
Interest, 17.01 

Expense, 10.80 

Fees, 10.50 



$1,692.91 



Paid treasurer, $1,063.34 
Paid reg. deeds, 5.25 

Unredeemed, 624.32 



$1,692.91 



1921 taxes paid by 

city, $1.71 

Interest, .47 



Reimbursements 

Paid treasurer, 



$16.09 

1924 taxes paid by 

city, $36.74 

Interest, 6.01 



Paid treasurer, 



$2.18 





$2.18 




$2.18 


1922 taxes paid by 




Paid treasurer, 


$18.74 


city, 


$16.51 






Interest, 


2.23 








$18.74 


$18.74 


1923 taxes paid by 




Paid treasurer, 


$16.09 


city, 


$12.86 






Interest, 


3.23 







$16.09 

$42.75 



$42.7i 



$42.75 



TAX COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 277 



1925 taxes paid by Paid treasurer, $151.94 

city, $144.80 

Interest, 7.14 



$151.94 $151.94 



Respectfully submitted, 



AMOS B. MORRISON, 

Collector. 
January 22, 1927. 



REPORT OF THE CEMETERY 
COMMISSIONERS 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1926. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : Your commissioners herewith submit their 
report for year ending December 31, 1926. 

There were seven meetings of the commissioners held 
during the year. 

By vote of the city government, all the public ceme- 
teries, being ten in all, were placed under the control of 
the cemetery commissioners. 

It was found that the records of lots in cemeteries, other 
than Blossom Hill and Old North were kept under the old 
style of record keeping, and the commissioners found it 
advisable to have new records made to conform with those 
of Blossom Hill. Superintendent Hammond has made 
good progress along these lines and when the work is com- 
pleted, we feel that the work will be complete and satis- 
factory. 

All outlying cemeteries have been surveyed and plans 
filed. 

Two blocks were partially graded in Blossom Hill ceme- 
tery, and several lots in other cemeteries were brought up 
to grade. 

The office has been enlarged and the Superintendent now 
has added new office equipment that was needed. 

The work of caring for the cemeteries is an expensive 
proposition at best; in spite of this fact, we are pleased 
to report that the cost of maintenance of all the cemeteries 
combined has been kept within the appropriation owing 
to the untiring efforts of Superintendent Fred N. Ham- 
mond and his co-workers. 



REPORT OP THE CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 279 

A detail statement of the accounts will appear in the 
Superintendent's report, and are available at all times at 
his office. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS, 

by Fred "W. Lang, 
Clerk of Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF 
TRUST FUNDS 



NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
CARL H. FOSTER, 



Receipts 
1926 
Jan. 1. To balance from 1925, $5,540.43 

Dec. 31. Income J. B. & 0. B. Abbott trust, 5.00 

Harper Allen trust, 2.13 

William E. Chandler trust, 12.75 

William M. Chase trust, 12.75 

H. H. Corson trust, 2.13 

Eliza A. Cole trust, 2.83 

Calvin P. Couch trust, 2.13 

Jacob C. Dunklee trust, 8.50 

Samuel C. Eastman trust, 47.24 

Samuel C. Eastman trust, 3.50 

Seth Eastman trust, 5.00 

Sarah E. Farrand trust, 8.50 

George G. Fogg trust, 14.00 

Leverett N. Freeman trust, 4.25 

Jacob H. Gallinger trust, 8.50 

Heber B. Hardy trust, 4.25 

Mary D. Hart trust, 12.00 

Loren W. James trust, 1.42 

Sarah H. James trust, 1.42 

William H. Johns trust, 2.84 

Mary J. Jones trust, 2.83 

Eliza Lane trust, 4.25 

George S. Little trust, 4.25 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 



281 



Income, J. "W. & E. J. Little trust, $6.00 

Lydia F, Lund trust, 12.75 

Myra F. Morey trust, 4.25 

Charles W. Morse trust, 4.25 

George Gay trust, .04 

Lucy M. Roach trust, 2.13 

Elizabeth P. Schutz trust, 8.47 

Charles E. Scorer trust, 4.25 

Antonio J. Souza trust, 2.13 

Hiram B. Tibbetts trust, 13.20 

Robert Upton trust, 2.13 
Interest, note City of Concord, 

$40,581.67 @ 4%, 1,623.26 
Interest, note City of Concord, 

$5,797.38 @ 4%, 212.55 
Interest, trust funds, Merrimack 

County Savings Bank, 713.29 
Interest, trust funds, Union Trust 

Company, 635.40 
Interest, trust funds, N. H. Savings 

Bank, 705.24 
Interest, trust funds, Loan & Trust 

Savings Bank, 141.47 
Interest, trust funds, Loan & Trust 

Savings Bank, 152.57 

Income Seth K. Jones trust, 12.00 

J. Eastman Pecker trust, 12.00 

Charlotte Merrill trust, 26.00 

Levi C. Heath trust, 5.75 

Henry Burleigh trust, 7.65 

Abial Walker trust, 45.00 

Countess of Rumford trust, 85.00 

David Osgood trust, 25.00 

P. B. Cogswell trust, 89.18 

G. Parker Lyon trust, 40.00 

Franklin Pierce trust, 42.50 

Thomas G. Valpey trust, 20.00 

Joseph Hazeltine trust, 150.55 



282 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Income, 



Interest, 



Seth Jones trust, 


$25.53 


K. P. & D. Rollins trust, 


70.51 


Samuel C. Eastman trust, 


103.82 


Samuel C. Eastman trust, 


1,628.96 


William M. Chase trust, 


42.50 


Benjamin A. Kimball trust, 


2,300.00 


H. A. Kimball trust, 


100.00 


unexpended balance, ceme- 




tery trust funds, 


234.65 




$15,022.88 



1926 
Dee. 31. 



Expenditures 

Mary E. Bourne, account labor, trust 

lot, Calvary Cemetery, $3.50 

Rev. A. A. Sylvestre, account David 

Osgood trust, 25.00 

Caroline Stewart, treasurer, income 

Countess of Rumford trust, 85.00 

Rev. Dennis C. Ling, account labor, 

trust lots, Calvary Cemetery, 182.50 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Blossom Hill Cemetery, 2,621.25 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Old North Cemetery, 400.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Maple Grove Cemetery, 135.50 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Pine Grove Cemetery, 174.50 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS. 283 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Old Fort Cemetery, $18.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Millville Cemetery, 139.50 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Soucook Cemetery, 10.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in "Woodlawn Cemetery, 451.00 

City treasurer, account income sun- 
dry trust funds to reimburse city 
for money advanced for care of 
lots in Horse Hill Cemetery, 30.50 

City treasurer, income Thomas G. 
Valpey trust, 20.00 

City treasurer, income G. Parker 
Lyon trust, 40.00 

City treasurer, income Seth K. Jones 
trust, 25.53 

City treasurer, income K. P. & D. 
Rollins trust, 70.51 

City treasurer, income Samuel C. 
Eastman trust, 1,732.78 

City treasurer, income P. B. Cogs- 
well trust, 89.18 

City treasurer, income Franklin 
Pierce trust, 42.50 

City treasurer, income Abial "Walker 
trust, 45.00 

City treasurer, income Joseph Hazel- 
tine trust, 150.55 



284 CITY OF CONCORD. 

City treasurer, income William M. 

Chase trust, $42.50 

City treasurer, income Benjamin A. 

Kimball trust, 2,300.00 

City treasurer, income Henry A. 

Kimball trust, 100.00 

H. H. Dudley, treasurer, account 

Minot Enclosure, 120.00 

By balance, • 5,968.08 

$15,022.88 



TRUST FUNDS 



ABIAL WALKER TRUST. 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 45.00 

Paid into the city treasury. 45.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



COUNTESS OP RUMFORD TRUST. 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to b« 

applied to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its 
direction. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 85.00 

Paid Caroline Stewart, treasurer of the society. 85.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital, $200.00 

Balance, income last year. $386.87 

Income received, 1926, 24.44 

411.31 



Paid to Rev. A. A. Sylvestre, treas., $25.00 
Income on hand, Januarv 1, 1927, 386.31 



411.31 



Capital, $200, deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank ; income deposited in Union Trust Company. 



286 CITY OP CONCORD. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the pur- 
chase of books of a biographical, historical and scientific character, and the 
books relating to science shall be those that give the latest developments and 
discoveries by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital, $2,145.00 

Income received, 1926, 89.18 

Paid into city treasury, 89.18 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $1,500.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 145.00 



G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 40.00 

Paid into city treasury, 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 



FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 42.50 

Paid into the city treasury, 42.50 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, $500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 500.00 



THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Capital, $500.00 

Income received, 1926, 20.00 

Paid into the city treasury, 20.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4 per cent. bond. 



TRUST FUNDS. 287 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital, $3,312.60 

Income received, 1926, 150.55 

Paid into the city treasury, 150.55 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, $1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 1,000.00 

SETH K. JONES TRUST. 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city 
bond, the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keep- 
ing lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition; six dollars 
each year to be deposited in some savings institution to create a monument 
fund; and the balance of the income to be expended each year in purchasing 
books for the Concord public library. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 43.53 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones monu- 
ment fund, $6.00 

Paid to city treasurer for puolic 
library, 25.53 

Paid for care of lot. 12.00 



$43.53 



Invested in City of Hartford, Conn., 4 per cent. 

bond due June 1, 1934, $922.60 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 77.40 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND. 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1926, $764.13 
From Seth K. Jones trust, 6.00 

Income received, 1926, 34.31 



$804.44 



Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank. 



288 CITY OF CONCORD. 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST. 
Donated to the city by Abbie P. Minot, the income to be expended annually 
by the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellish- 
ment of the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of 
the duly appointed officials. 

Capital, $3,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 120.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer, 120.00 

Deposited (at 4 per cent.) with city of Concord, in 
general account. 

JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER TRUST. 

Income to be used as follows: So much of income as is necessary to be used 
for the care of burial lots numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, East Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be 
added to principal till same amounts to $10,000; then the balance of income 
accruing each year after paying for care of said lot and monument, to be ex- 
pended under the direction of the mayor for the general care and improvement 
of Pine Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Capital, January 1, 1926, $6,924.55 

Received from income of fund, 1926, 314.96 

$7,239.51 



Paid for care of lot, $12.00 

Capital, January 1, 1927, 7,227.51 

$7,239.51 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bankj $3,028.47 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 1,916.59 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank, 2,282.45 

CHARLOTTE MERRILL CEMETERY TRUST. 

Income to be used in perpetuity in keeping burial lot and monument in 
Blossom Hill Cemetery in good condition, namely: In keeping the soil properly 
enriched, the grass closely cut and watered, the monument and all other stone 
work thereon clean, and replacing said monument by a new one when neces- 
sary by reason of decay or defacement. The balance of the income, if any, 
is to be appropriated for the purpose of beautifying said cemetery. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Balance, income, $33.75 

Income received, 1926, 46.48 



Paid for care of lot, $26.00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1927, 54.23 



$80.23 



.23 



Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank. 



TRUST FUNDS. 289 

KATHARINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST. 
Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital, $1,511.25 

Income received, 1926, 70.51 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 70.51 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN TRUST. 

Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign languages for the 
Public Library. 

Capital, $1,332.46 

Income received, 1926, 103.82 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 103.82 

Invested in thirty-two shares United Gas & 

Improvement Company common stock, 1,321.50 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 10.96 

WILLIAM M. CHASE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the pur- 
chase of books on historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational 
subjects. 

Capital, $1,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 42.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 42.50 

Invested in Fourth U. S. Liberty Loan 4^4 per cent. bond. 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 
Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library. 

Capital, January 1, 1926, $38,848.97 

Premium received from sale of bonds, 743.75 

Five shares Boston & Maine first 
preferred, Class D, set up on book 
at par heretofore carried at no 
value, 500.00 

$40,092.72 

Transferred to income account as 
per resolution, dated February 
23, 1926, $8,886.27 

Capital, January 1, 1927, 31,206.45 



$40,092.72 



290 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Invested in $5,700 First Liberty Loan bonds, $4,914.20 
Invested in $13,500 U. S. Fourth Liberty Loan 

414 per cent, bonds, 12,376.00 

Invested in $3,000 Treasury 4*4 per cent. 

bonds, 1952, 2,960.63 

Twelve shares Concord Gas Co., common, 1,020.00 

Five shares Boston & Maine, First preferred, 

Class D, 500.00 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, 218.42 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 2,164.70 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank, 7,052.50 
Transferred from principal account 

as per resolution, February 23, 1926, $8,886.27 
Income received, 1926, 1,628.96 

$10,515.23 



Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, $10,515.23 



BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Income received, 1926, $5,100.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, $2,300.00 
Transferred to Building Fund as per 

resolution dated January 10. 1927. 2,800.00 

■ $5,100.00 



HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Income received, 1926, $550.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, $100.00 
Transferred to Building Fund as per 

resolution dated January 10, 1927, 450.00 

$550.00 



BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND. 

Capital, $2,800.00 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 2,800.00 



TRUST FUNDS. 291 

HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND. 

Capital, $450.00 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 450.00 

CHARLES R. CORNING PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building 
purposes. 

Capital, $21,747.13 

Income received, 1926, 728.92 

$22,476.05 

Capital, January 1, 1927, $22,476.05 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank, $5,721.24 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank, 5,721.25 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank, 5,303.80 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, 5,729.76 

$22,476.05 

HORACE B. BARTLETT PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST. 

Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building 
purposes. 

Capital, $10,891.89 

Income received, 1926, 448.55 

$11,340.44 

Capital, January 1, 1927, 11,340.44 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings 

Bank, $6,995.98 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank, 2,877.46 

Invested in $1,500 Fourth Liberty Loan 

bonds, 1,467.00 

Invested in $3,000 Jackson Cons. 

Tract. Co., 0.00 

$11,340.44 

19 



292 CITY OF CONCORD. 

ARTHUR P. MORRILL AND GEORGE A. FOSTER PUBLIC 
LIBRARY TRUST. 

Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building 
purposes. 

Capital, $2,000.00 

Income received, 1926, 33.22 

$2,033.22 

Capital, January 1, 1927, $2,033.22 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $2,033.22 

EASTMAN ASSOCIATION TRUST. 

Income to be used for the care and maintenance of monument and lot 
known as Eastman Park, East Concord, N. H. 

Capital, $450.48 

Balance, income, January 1, 1926, $133.44 

Income received, 1926, 26.23 

- — ■ $159.67 

Income on hand, January 1, 1927, $159.67 

Capital and income deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 
Bank. 



I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the 
hands of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find 
such trust funds invested, and the income for the year 
1926 accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees 
kept for that purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



CEMETERY TRUSTS 



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Dep. in Loan and Trust Savings Bank, Concord, N. TI. 


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Dop. in Tioan and Trust Savings Bank, Concord, N. TI. 
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TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



SPECIAL FUNDS. 



City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian op Special 
Funds. 

blossom hill cemetery fund. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is nsed for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1926, $48,013.07 
Received from sale of one-third of 

lots, 1926, 1,611.73 

Received from income of fund, 1926, 2,082.97 

$51,707.77 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $2,082.97 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1927, 49,624.80 

$51,707.77 

Invested in City of Concord 4% 
bonds, $1,000.00 

Invested in U. S. Third Liberty Loan, 

bonds, 999.22 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, 15,937.01 

Deposited in Union Trust Com- 
pany, 16,076.84 

Deposited in Loan and Trust Sav- 
ings Bank, 10.000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 
Savings Bank, 5,611.73 

$49,624.80 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 351 

OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
Teceived from the sale of lots. The income to be used for the care, pro- 
tection and ornamentation of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1926. $815.00 
Income received, 1926, 36.67 

Received from one-third sale of lots, 18.00 



(]: 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $36.67 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1927, 833.00 



$869.6^ 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year .by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection 
*nd ornamentation of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1926. $932.78 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1926, 10.00 

Received from income of fund, 41.94 



.72 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $41.94 

Amount of capital, January 1. 1927, 942.78 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

PINE GROVE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1926. $402.50 
Received from income of fund, 1926. 18.03 

Received from one-third sale of lots. 16.66 

$437.19 



352 CITY OP CONCORD. 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $18.03 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1927, 419.16 

$437.19 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank. 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of 

interested parties and by the addition of one-third the amount received from 
the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of 
Millville Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1926, $2,227.15 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 16.66 

Received from income of fund, 1926, 101.18 

$2,344.99 

Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $101.18 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1927, 2,243.81 

$2,344.99 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank, 872.59 

Deposited in Merrimack Co. Savings Bank, 1,371.22 



SODCOOK CEMETERY FUND. 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Soucook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1926, $31.38 
Received from income of fund, 1926, 1.42 

Received from one-third sale of lots, 23.00 



Credited city of Concord, general 

account, $1.42 

Amount of capital, January 1. 1027. 54.38 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank. 



$55.80 



$55.80 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 353 



WOODLAWN CEMETERY FUND. 



This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income to be used for the care, pro- 
tection and ornamentation of Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Received from one-third sale of lots, $39.16 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1927, $39.16 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



CEMETERY FEND FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING AND 
ORNAMENTING CEMETERY GROUNDS. 

Created under resolution of Board of Aldermen, March 9, 1925. 

Capital, January 1, 1926, $1,056.00 

Received from one-third sale of lots, 1,735.21 
Income received, 1926, 43.56 

$2,834.77 

Paid to C. H. Foster, treasurer, $1,385.93 

Capital, January 1, 1927, 1,448.84 

$2,834.77 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



354 



City Hall Building, 



Public Park, 



Bridge, 



Street, 



Public Improvement. 



CITY OF CONCORD. 




)EBTE 


DNESS 


OF THE CE 


Municipal. 








Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


July 


1, 1927 


3y 2 


$10,000 


July 


1, 1928, 


3y 2 , 


10,000 


July 


1, 1929, 


3y 2 , 


5,000 


Dec. 


1, 1931, 


4, 


10,000 


Dec. 


1, 1933, 


4, 


5,000 


June 


1, 1927, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1928, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1929, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1930, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1931, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1932, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1933, 


4, 


4,000 


June 


1, 1934, 


4. 


4.000 


June 


1, 1935, 


4, 


10,000 


Nov. 


1, 1927, 


4y 2 , 


10,000 


Nov. 


1, 1928, 


4y 2 , 


10,000 


May 


15, 1927, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1928, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1929, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1930, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1931, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1932, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1933, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1934, 


4y 2 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1927, 


4y 4 , 


7,000 


May 15, 1928, 


4y 4 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1929, 


41/4, 


7,000 


May 


15, 1930, 


4y 4 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1931, 


41/4, 


7,000 


May 


15, 1932, 


41/4, 


7,000 


May 


15, 1933, 


4y 4 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1934, 


4y 4 , 


7,000 


May 


15, 1935, 


414, 


7,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



355 



Departmental Equip.. May 1, 1927, 4*4, 

May 1, 1928, 4%, 

May 1, 1929, 4%, 

May 1, 1930, 4y 4 , 

May 1, 1931, 4V 4 , 

May 1, 1932, 414, 

May 1, 1933, 414, 

May 1, 1934, 4y 4 , 

May 1, 1935, 4%, 

May 1, 1936, 4%, 

May 1, 1937, 4y 4 , 

May 1, 1938, 4%, 

May 1, 1939, 4y 4 , 

May 1, 1940, 414, 

May 1, 1941, 4*4, 

May 1, 1942, 414, 

May 1, 1943, 414, 

May 1, 1944, 4%, 

May 1, 1945, 4%, 

Mav 1, 1946, 4y, 



Sewer, 



$4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4.000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 



Precinct. 






Due. 


Rate. 


Amount. 


May 1, 1928, 


3y 2 , 


$25,000 


Dec. 1, 1930, 


4, 


5,000 


Dec. 1, 1932, 


4, 


10,000 


Dec. 1, 1934, 


4, 


10,000 



$301,000 



$50,000 



Union School Distr 



ct, July 1, 1927, 31/2, $35,000 

May 1, 1928, 4, 6,000 

July 1, 1928, 31/0, 4,000 

July 1, 1929, 31/2, 10,000 

July 1, 1930, 31/2, 10,000 

July 1, 1931, 3%, 9,000 



356 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Bonds 


Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


UnionSchoolDistrict, May 


1, 1932, 4, 


$10,000 


i < 


" May 


1, 1933, 4, 


10,000 


1 1 < 


' ' ' May 


1, 1934, 4, 


10,000 


i i < 


" Oct. 


1, 1927, 4, 


2,000 


" 


Oct. 


1, 1928, 4, 


2,000 


i < < 


" Oct. 


1, 1929, 4, 


2,000 


" ' 


Oct. 


1, 1930, 4, 


2,000 


'.' t 


" Oct. 


1, 1931, 4, 


2,000 


" 


Oct. 


1, 1932, 4, 


2,000 


t i i 


" Oct. 


1, 1933, 4, 


2,000 


i i t 


Oct. 


1, 1934, 4, 


2,000 


" ' 


" Oct. 


1, 1935, 4, 


2,000 


" 


Oct. 


1, 1936, 4, 


2,000 


1 1 i 


" Oct. 


1, 1937, 4, 


2,000 


" ' 


Oct. 


1, 1938, 4, 


2,000 


a t 


" Oct. 


1, 1939, 4, 


2,000 


a i 


" Oct. 


1, 1940, 4, 


2,000 


i i . 


" Oct. 


1, 1941, 4, 


2,000 


a i 


" Oct. 


1, 1942, 4, 


2,000 


" 


" Dec. 


1, 1927, 4i/ 4 , 


12,000 


a i 


' ; Dec. 


1, 1928, 4%, 


12,000 


it ■ i 


Dec. 


1, 1929, 414, 


12,000 


C i ( 


" Dec. 


1, 1930, 41/4, 


12,000 


" ' 


" Dec. 


1, 1931, 4%, 


11,000 


it i 


" Dec. 


1, 1932, 4i/ 4 , 


11,000 


" ' 


Dec. 


1, 1933, 414, 


11,000 


it 


" Dec. 


1, 1934, 414, 


11,000 


it t 


Dec. 


1, 1935, 414, 


11,000 


a t 


Dec. 


1, 1936, 414, 


11,000 




" Dec. 


1, 1937, 414, 


11,000 




Dec. 


1, 1938, 414, 


11,000 


a t 


Dec. 


1, 1939, 414, 


11,000 


a t 


" Dec. 


1, 1940, 414, 


11,000 


1 1 i 


" Dec. 


1, 1941, 414, 


11,000 


a t 


Dec. 


1, 1942, 41/4, 


11,000 


" 


Dec. 


1, 1943, 4%, 


11,000 


" 


" Dec. 


1, 1944, 414, 


11,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 357 





Bonds. 




Due. Rate. 


Amount. 


UnionSchoolDistrict 


, Dec, 


1, 1945, 4i/ 4 , 


$11,000 




it 1 1 1 1 


Dec. 


1, 1946, 41/4, 


11,000 




it a a 


Dec. 


1, 1947, 414, 


11,000 




a it a 


Dec. 


1, 1948, 4iA, 


11,000 




a a it 


Dec. 


1, 1949, 41,4, 


11,000 




ii tt a 


Dec. 


1, 1950, 414, 


11,000 




a a a 


Dec. 


1, 1951, 4i/ 4 , 


11,000 




i a a 


Dec. 


1, 1952, 4*4 


11,000 




t a it 


Dec. 


1, 1953, 414, 


11,000 




i it a 


Dec. 


1, 1954, 414, 


11,000 




t a a 


Dec. 


1, 1955, 414, 


11,000 




i a tt 


Dec. 


1, 1956, 414, 


11,000 




i a a 


Dec. 


1, 1957, 41/4, 


11,000 




i a it 


Dec. 


1, 1958, 414, 


11,000 




i a it 


Dec. 


1, 1959, 414, 


11,000 




t tt a 


Dec. 


1, 1960, 4^, 


11,000 




i a a 


Dec. 


1, 1961, 414, 


11,000 




i a n 


Dec. 


1, 1962, 4%, 


11,000 




i 1 1 it 


Dec. 


1, 1963, 414, 


11,000 




i a tt 


Dec. 


1, 1964, 414, 


11,000 


it a it 


Dec. 


1, 1965, 414, 


11,000 










$569,000 



Note — Soucook River Improvement due August 

23, 1927, $3,000.00 

Serial Refunding notes payable to Trustees of 
Trust funds, due December 1, 1927-33, in- 
clusive, 40,581.67 

Note — Armenia S. "White property, due July 

29, 1927, 37,396.30 

Note — Overflow Sewer, Pleasant Street Exten- 
sion, due September 3, 1927-28, 5.000.00 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, exclu- 

sive of water department, $1,005,977.97 



358 CITY OP CONCORD. 

STATEMENT OF THE COUPON ACCOUNT 
Dr. 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1926, 

municipal, . $90.00 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1926, 

precinct, 112.50 

Due and unpaid January 1, 1926, 
Union School District, 

Due in 1926 municipal, 

Due in 1926 precinct, 

Due in 1926 Union School District, 



Cr. 

Municipal, paid, 
Precinct sewer, paid, 
Union School District, paid, 
Municipal due and not presented, 
Precinct due and not presented, 
Union School District due and not 
presented, 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE WATER 
PRECINCT 

When due. Rate. Amount. When due. Rate. Amount. 

Jan. 1, 1927, 4y 2 , $18,000 Jan. 1, 1933, 4y 2 , $18,000 

Jan. 1, 1928, 4y 2 , 18,000 Jan. 1, 1934, 4y 2 , 18,000 

Jan. 1, 1929, 4y 2 , 18,000 Jan. 1, 1935, 4y 2 , 18,000 

Jan. 1, 1930, 4%, 18,000 Jan. 1, 1936, 4y 2 , 18,000 

Jan. 1, 1931, 4y 2 , 18,000 Jan. 1, 1937, 4y 2 , 18,000 



190.00 




12,138.75 




1,875.00 




, 16,313.75 






$30,720.00 




$12,016.25 




1,875.00 




16,338.75 




212.50 




112.50 




t 

165.00 






$30,720.00 



Jan. 1, 1932, 4y>, 18,000 



$198,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 359 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT ' 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1926, 

and not presented, $146.00 

To coupons due 1926, 9,315.00 

$9,461.00 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1926, $9,315.00 

By coupons due and not presented, 146.00 



1,461.00 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME 
INVESTMENT ACCOUNT 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1927. $25,000.00 

Invested in U. S. First Liberty Loan 

converted 4%% bonds, $5,000.00 

Invested in Third Liberty Loan 

41,4% bonds, 10,000.00 

Invested in Fourth Liberty Loan 

&A% bonds, 10,000.00 

$25,000.00 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME 
ACCOUNT 

Balance of income. January 1, 1926, $2,200.94 
Income received. 1926, 1,167.84 

$3,368.78 

Deposited in Union Trust Company, $3,368.78 



360 CITY OF CONCORD. 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
DEPARTMENTAL EQUIPMENT BOND ACCOUNT 

C. H. Foster, City Treasurer 

Receipts 

Departmental Equipment Bonds, $80,000.00 
Premium, 432.00 

$80,432.00 

Expenditures 

Orders paid, $70,706.84 

Balance on hand. 9,725.16 

$80,432.00 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT BOND ACCOUNT 

C. H. Foster, City Treasurer 

Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1926, $8,569.40 
Union School District bonds, 355,000.00 

Premium, 3,369.00 

$366,938.40 



Expenditures 

Orders paid, $215,633.74 

Balance on hand, 151,304.66 

$366,938.40 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 361 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT 

C. H. Foster, City Treasurer 



Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1926, $34,212.93 
Receipts, P. R. Sanders, Supt., 89,731.22 



-$123,944.15 



Expenditures 

Orders paid, $67,638.74 

Bonds paid, , 18,000.00 

Interest on bonds, 9,315.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1927, 28,990.41 



-$123,944.15 



I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
accounts of Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, for the year 
1926, and find all items of receipts and expenditures 
therein properly recorded and authenticated by appro- 
priate vouchers, and the several items correctly cast, and 
the cash balance to be thirty-seven thousand fourteen 
dollars and five cents ($37,014.05) ; the balance to the 
credit of the Departmental Equipment Bond Account to 
be nine thousand seven hundred twenty-five dollars six- 
teen cents ($9,725.16) ; the Union School District Bond 
Account balance to be one hundred fifty-one thousand 
three hundred four dollars sixty-six cents ($151,304.66) ; 
and City Water Department balance to be twenty-eight 
thousand nine hundred ninety dollars forty-one cents 
($28,990.41). 



362 CITY OF CONCORD. 

I have also verified the account of the special funds 
of the city in the hands of the city treasurer, and find 
such special funds invested, and the income thereof for 
the year 1926 accounted for as shown by the books of 
the city treasurer for that purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT. 



363 



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CITY OF CONCORD. 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
OF THE CITY OF CONCORD 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1926. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, City, $200.00 $140.34 $59.66 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, County 1,000.00 933.88 66.12 

Aid, City Poor, 5,000.00 ( 

Resolution No. 724, 1,500.00 \ M&^ 147.18 

Aid, County Poor, 15,000.00 [ 

Resolution No. 732, 1,808.06} 16 ' 808 - 06 

Auditorium Exits, 1,500.001 

Resolution No. 717, 400.00 \ 1,914.39 

Resolution No. 732, 14.39J 

Bonds, City Hall, 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Bridge Bonds, 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Bonds, Highway, 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Bonds, Public Improvements,. 14,000.00 14,000.00 

Cemeteries: 18,000.00 33,038.50 

Income Transferred, 

Accounts, 8,040.75 

Income Trust Funds, 3,980.25 

Income Permanent Funds, 2,282.21 

Improvements, etc., 1,385.93 





$33,689.14 


$33,038.50 


$650.64 


City Hall: 








Salaries, 


$6,900.00) 


$7,280.67 




Resolution No. 732, 


380.67} 




Fuel, 


3,000.00 


2,737.05 


$262.95 


Lights, 


1,000.00 


869.20 


130.80 


Comfort Station: 


6,500.00 


6,482.82 


6.41 


Transferred to Repairs 








Buildings, 




10.77 




Concord Charity Organization 








Society: 


350.00 


350.00 






374 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Concord District Nursing Asso- 
ciation: $350.00 $350.00 

Penacook District Nursing Asso- 
ciation: 50.00 50.00 

Dog Licenses, 69.00 

Dog License Fees, 34.00 

Engineering Department: 

Salary Engineer, 3,300.00 3,300.00 

Salary Assistant Engineer, 1,800.00 1,800.00 

Salary Clerk, 1,044.00 1,014.00 

Incidentals, 981.54 1,095.44 

Up-keep of Auto, 400.00 400.00 

Salary, Rodman, 900.00 816.00 

Extra Clerk, Vacation, 30.00 30.00 

$8,455.54 $8,455.44 $0.10 
E. E. Sturtevant Post, G. A. R., 

Aid, $450.00 $450.00 

Fire Department: 

Salary, Chief, $2,600.00 $2,600.00 

Salary, House Man, 100.00 100.00 

Salaries, Permanent Men, 27,100.00 28,825.00 

Salaries, Vacations, 1,043.00 1,042.29 

Salaries, Semi-Annual, 10,270.00 10,270.00 

Rent Veterans' Association, 300.00 300.00 

Fuel, 2,500.00 2,222.92 

Lights, 850.00 830.41 

Horse Hire, 500.00 343.55 

New Equipment, 200.00 

Supplies, Auto Combination, 1,900.00 1,895.69 

Laundry, 100.00 76.03 

Fire Inspection, 630.00 625.70 

Fire Alarm, 1,500.00 1,879.98 

Penacook Fire Alarm, 300.00 235.03 

Incidentals, 2,657.00 1,760.00 

Hose, 2,000.00 2,396.65 

Telephones, 450.00 391.18 

Repairs, 1,200.00 1,699.00 

Brush Fires, 500.00 4.00 

Resolution No. 732, 797.43 

$57,497.43 $57,497.43 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 



375 



Health, Board of: 

Salary Sanitary Officer, 
Up-keep of Automobile, 
Fumigation Supplies, 
Incidentals, 
Contagious Diseases, 
Salary, Milk Inspector, 
Laboratory and Incidentals, 
Up-keep of Automobile 
Resolution No. 732, 



Appropriation. 


Expended. 


$2,000.00 


$2,000.00 


400.00 


400.00 


100.00 


66.69 


1,500.00 


1,431.96 


1,000.00 


1,725.92 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 


600.00 


599.60 


400.00 


400.00 


624.17 





$8,124.17 $8,124.17 



Department of Public Works: 
Garbage, 
Resolution No. 732, acct. 



earnings, 
Resolution No. 



732, 



Table Garbage, 
Resolution No. 732, 
Sprinkling Streets, 
Trees, 
Resolution No. 726, 



$26,000.00 

259.21 
2,331.92J 

5,100.00 



100.00 
7,000.00 
6,000.00^ 
1,200.00^ 



$28,591.13 

5,200.00 
6,902.41 
6,998.15 



$97.59 
201.85 



Roads and Bridges: 



!00,000.00) 



Resolution No. 732, acct. )■ 204,281.63 

earnings, 4,281.63J 

Lighting Streets: 32,000.00 

Sewers, 19,000.00] 

Resolution No. 707, 1,100.00 | 

Serial Notes, 5,000.00 J> 
Resolution No. 732, acct. 

earnings, 1,013.79J 

Incidentals and Land Damages, 13,000.00] 

Resolution No. 715, 1,000.00 \ 

Resolution No. 723, 2,500.00J 

Interest, Cemetery Trust Funds, 1,835.81 

Interest, Bonds, 10,825.00 \ 

Resolution No. 732, 1,191.25^ 

Interest, Temporary Loan, 8,000.00 ) 

Resolution No. 732, 3,286.57 \ 



31,909.50 



26,113.79 



16,386.83 



90.50 



113.17 



1,835.81 
12,016.25 

11,286.57 



376 CITY OF CONCORD. 





Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Land Sold for Taxes: 








Resolution No. 706, 


$1,654.60 


$1,654.60 




Taxes on Land Sold City: 








Resolution No. 696, 


$0.26 


$0.26 




Resolution No. 697, 


166.32 


166.32 




Resolution No. 698, 


37.70 


37.70 




Resolution No. 699, 


74.54 


74.54 




Resolution No. 700, 


1.95 


1.95 




Resolution No. 702, 


755.90 


755.90 




Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 




Memorial Day, 


460.00 


460.00 




Municipal Christmas Tree, 


125.00 


92.00 


$33.00 


Note, Cemetery Trust Fund, 


5,797.38 


5,797.38 





Revising Ordinances, $1,500.00 $1,166.00 $334.00 
Wading Pool, White Park: 

Resolution No. 710, 1,000.00 986.88 13.12 

Winter Sports, 250.00 202.27 47.73 
Soucook River Project: 

Notes, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Interest on Notes, 300.00 300.00 

Toboggan Chutes, 150.00 36.50 113.50 

Eradication White Pine Blister, 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Clearing Skating Areas, 500.00 451.91 48.09 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, 1,500.00 1,500.00 

Open Air Concerts, 650.00 650.00 

Band Concerts, July 4: 

Resolution No. 703, 150.00 150.00 

Parks : 

Salary, Superintendent, 1,500.00 1,500.00 .-. 

Salaries, 4,500.00 3,673.45 

Completing Toilets, 200.00 180.32 

New Shrubbery, 250.00 203.73 

Portion Fence, White Park, 500.00 489.53 

Incidentals, 700.00 1,199.42 

Doyen Park Walks, 150.00 149.99 

Eastman Park, 200.00 313.42 



5,000.00 $7,709.86 $290.14 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 





Appropriation. 


Expended. 


Balance. 


Playgrounds : 








Salaries, 


$2,800.00] 


$2,570.00] 




Incidentals, 


1,200.00}- 


1,422.63 [- 


$7.37 


Upkeep of Auto, 


150.00J 


150.00J 




Rollins Park Ball Ground: 


50.00 


4.80 


45.20 


White Park Ball Ground, 


150.00 


146.61 


3.39 


Police and Watch: 








Salary, Chief, 


2,600.00 


2,600.00 




Salary, Deputy, 


2,200.00 


2,200.00 




Salary, Captain, 


2,000.00 


2,000.00 




Salary, Sergeant, 


1,950.00 


1,950.00 




Salaries, Officers, 


27,950.00 


27,915.11 




Repairs, 


700.00 


494.99 




Salaries, Specials, 


5,500.00 


5,381.43 




Fuel, 


1,400.00 


1,228.98 




Lights, 


350.00 


419.05 




Auto Supplies, 


1,900.00 


2,045.79 




Incidentals, 


3,500.00 


4,454.77 




Resolution No. 732, acct. 








earnings, 


640.12 








$50,690.12 


$50,690.12 




Precinct, Sewer, City: 








Interest, Bonds, 


$1,875.00 


$1,875.00 




Printing and Stationery, 


5,000.00/ 






Resolution No. 725, 


1,000.00 \ 


5,955.72 


$44.28 


Public Library, 


11,400.00/ 






Eastman Fund, 


8,886.27 \ 


20,243.44 


42.83 


Purchase Armenia S. White 








Property : 









Serial Notes, 

Two Hundredth Anniversary 
Settlement of Concord: 

Resolution No. 683, 

Repairs of Buildings, 
Resolution No. 714, 
Transfer from Comfort 
Station, 



37,376.30 37,376.30 



2,500.00 

850.00] 
400.00 l 

10.77J 



358.33 2,141.67 



1,260.77 



378 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance 

Salaries: 

Mayor, $2,000.00 $2,000.00 

City Clerk, 1,950.00 1,950.00 

Clerk, Board of Public Works, 200.00 200.00 

Overseers of Poor, 390.00 390.00 

Solicitor, 800.00 800.00 

Treasurer, 1,225.00 1,225.00 

Messenger, 1,300.00 1,300.00 

City Physicians, 700.00 700.00 

Care City Clocks, 110.00 110.00 

Assessors, 4,400.00 4,400.00 

Moderators, Ward Clerks, 720.00 720.00 

Supervisors and Inspectors 

of Election, 1,900.00 1,718.00 182.00 

Judge, Police Court, 1,200.00 1,200.00 

Clerk, Police Court, 600.00 600.00 

Sealer of Weights and Meas- 
ures, 720.00 720.00 

Collector of Taxes, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Incidental Salaries, Tax 

Office, 1,000.00 918.00 82.00 



$22,215.00 $21,951.00 $264.00 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, $1,905.00 $1,905.00 

Schools: 

Union School District: 

General Fund, Balance, 

1925, $59,694.65 $304,694.65 

Amount Voted by District, 296,097.69 

Dog Licenses, 2,438.51 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 40.97 

Hall Street School, 4,000.00 

Option Site, South End, 500.00 

Teachers' Pension System, 1,000.00 ' 

Bonds, 12,000.00 12,000.00 

Interest on Bonds, 15,758.13 ( 

Balance, 1925, 440.00 \ 16 > 338 -' 5 



$391,969.95 $333,033.40 $58,936.55 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 379 

Appropriation. Expended. Balance. 

Penacook District: 

General Fund, Balance, 

1925, $13,270.78 $28,600.00 

Dog Licenses, 240.40 

Amount Voted by District, 24,810.44 

Abial Walker Trust Fund, 4.03 

Reimbursement, ■ 729.22 



$39,054.87 $28,600.00 $10,454.87 
New High School: 

Bonds and Premium, $366,938.40 

Expended per Orders, $215,633.74 

Balance on hand, $151,304.66 

County Tax, 50,535.57 

State Tax, 85,380.00 

Departmental Equipment 
Bond Account: 

Bonds, 80,000.00 [ 

Premium, 432.00 \ 70,706.84 9,725.16 



RECEIPTS 

Receipts of the City for the year ending December 31, 1926 : 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1926, $26,558.54 

Taxes, 1921, 28.00 

Taxes, 1922, 223.10 

Taxes, 1923, 388.88 

Taxes, 1924, 1,308.56 

Taxes, 1925, 86,953.62 

Taxes, 1926, 782,631.72 

Real Estate Redeemed, 1920, 26.76 

Real Estate Redeemed, 1921, 173.24 

Real Estate Redeemed, 1923, 779.02 

Real Estate Redeemed, 1924, 2,086.11 

Real Estate Redeemed, 1925, 1,063.34 



380 



CITY OF CONCORD. 



Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 1921, $2.18 

Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 1922, 18.74 

Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 1923, 126.76 

Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 1924, 288.06 

Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 1925, 151.94 

Municipal Court Fees, 7,126.76 

Library Fines, 414.00 

Dependent Soldiers, County, . 933.88 

County Poor, 16,808.06 

Temporary Loans, 800,000.00 

Fees, City Clerk, 1,578.36 

Garbage, 259.21 

Sprinkling, 422.66 

Highway Department, 5,779.50 

Trees, 260.33 

Dog Licenses, 2,747.91 

Dog License Fees, 237.60 

Amusement Licenses, . 1,144.00 

Rent Auditorium, 1,800.00 

Rent basement, City Hall, 100.00 

Rent Battery Station, 350.00 

Circus License, 50.00 

Rent Chief's House, 250.00 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1926, 27,073.28 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1927, 17,240.18 

Passenger Carriage and Job Team Licenses, 102.50 

Pool Table Licenses, 280.00 

Junk Dealers' Licenses, 110.00 

Sewer Department, 1,011.87 

Sale of Pipe, 16.40 

Druggists' Permits, 6.00 

Land Sold, 62.60 

Employment Bureau License, 5.00 

Milk Licenses and Fees, 326.50 

Fumigation Supplies, 9.45 

Declarations Candidacy, State Primary, 125.00 

Histories and Maps, City of Concord, 20.25 

Interest on Daily Balances, 2,630.14 

Fines and Dance Licenses, Chief, 908.97 

Aid, M. J. Preston, 30.00 

Lease of Land, 25.00 

Sale of Grass, 55.00 

W. C. Green, Sale of Sundries, 28.05 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers, 7.13 

Insurance Tax, 6,141.68 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 381 

Railroad Tax, $67,460.91 

Savings Bank Tax, 65,685.56 

Building & Loan Association Tax, 97.50 

Intangible Tax, I 48,813.89 

Transferred Blossom Hill Cemetery Account, 6,380.61 

Transferred Old North Cemetery Account, L25.50 

Transferred Maple Grove Cemetery Account, 161.75 

Transferred Pine Grove Cemetery Account, 221.18 

Transferred Millville Cemetery Account, 136.18 

Transferred Soucook Cemetery Account, 66.50 

Transferred Horse Hill Cemetery Account, 15.00 

Transferred Woodlawn Cemetery Account, 934.03 

Income Trust Funds, Blossom Hill Cemetery, 2,621.25 

Income Trust Funds, Old North Cemetery, 400.00 

Income Trust Funds, Maple Grove Cemetery, 135.50 

Income Trust Funds, Old Fort Cemetery, 18.00 

Income Trust Funds, Pine Grove Cemetery, 174.50 

Income Trust Funds, Millville Cemetery, 139.50 

Income Trust Funds, Soucook Cemetery, 10.00 

Income Trust Funds, Woodlawn Cemetery, 451.00 

Income Trust Funds, Horse Hill Cemetery, 30.50 

Income Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools, 45.00 

Income P. B. Cogswell Trust Fund, Public Library, 89.18 
Income G. Parker Lyon Trust Fund, Public Library, 40.00 
Income Franklin Pierce Trust Fund, Public Library, 42.50 
Income Thos. Valpey Trust Fund, Public Library, 20.00 
Income Jos. Hazeltine Trust Fund, Public Library, 150.55 
Income Seth K. Jones Trust Fund, Public Library, 25.53 
Income Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library, 103.82 
Income Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library, 1,628.96 
Income Wm. Chase Trust Fund, Public Library, 42.50 

Income Henry Kimball Trust Fund, Public Library, 100.00 
Income Benj. Kimball Trust Fund, Public Library, 2,300.00 
Income K. P. and D. Rollins Trust Fund, West Garden 70.51 
Income Permanent Fund, 
Income Permanent Fund, 
Income Permanent Fund, 
Income Permanent Fund, 
Income Permanent Fund, 
Income Permanent Fund, 
Reimbursement Penacook 
Parks, 

Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds. 
Notes Purchase Armenia W 
Notes Pleasant Street Sewei 



Blossom Hill, 


2,082.97 


Old North, 


36.67 


Millville, 


101.18 


Pine Grove, 


18.03 


Maple Grove, 


41.94 


Soucook, 


1.42 


School District, 


729.22 




50.75 


Bonds, 


3,776.02 


White Property, 


37,376.30 


» r er, 


5,000.00 



382 CITY OF CONCORD. 

Transferred from Income Samuel Eastman Trust 

Fund, $8,886.27 

Transferred to City Account Reimbursement for 

Expenditures for Improving Cemeta^s, 1,385.93 

Miscellaneous, 90.66 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Disbursements : 



$2,057,600.61 



City Departments, 


$620,217.52 


City Poor and Soldiers, 


6,493.16 


County Poor and Soldiers, 


17,741.94 


City Notes, 


808,797.38 


City Bonds, 


38,000.00 


Interest on Notes and Bonds, 


23,602.82 


Interest Cemetery Trust Funds, 


1,835.81 


Schools, 


333,294.65 


Schools, Interest on Bonds, 


16,338.75 


Schools, Bonds, 


12,000.00 


Precinct Sewer, Interest on Bonds, 


1,875.00 


County Tax, 


50,535.57 


State Tax, 


85,380.00 


Paid Outstanding Orders, 


4,727.55 


Treasury Balance, January 1, 1927, 


37,014.05 




$2,057,854.20 


Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid January 1, 


1927, 253.59 




$2,057,600.61 



Receipts. Expenditures. 

Temporary Loan, $800,000.00 $800,000.00- 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 



Cash Balance, January 1, 1926, 

Receipts Deposited with Treasurer, 

Expended Per Orders, 

Bonds, 

Interest on Bonds, 

Treasury Balance, January 1, 1927, 


Receipts. Expenditures. 

$34,212.93 
89,731.22 

$67,646.74 

18,000.00 

9,315.00 

28,990.41 


$123,944.15 $123,952.15 

Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid January 1, 

1927, 8.00 




8123,944.15 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL DEBT 



Funded Debt 



City Hall bonds, $25,000.00 
State Library bonds, 15,000.00 
Bridge bonds, 42,000.00 
Street bonds, 20,000.00 
Public Improvement bonds, 119,000.00 
Cemetery Trust Fund note, 40,581.67 
Soucook River Improvement note, 3,000.00 
Departmental Equipment bonds, 80,000.00 
Armenia S. White Property note, 37,396.30 
Overflow Sewer, Pleasant Street Ex- 
tension note, 5,000.00 



-$386,977.97 



Debt Not Funded 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1927, $253.59 

Interest accrued, not yet due, munic- 
ipal bonds, 2,210.00 

Coupons overdue, not presented, mu- 
nicipal bonds, 212.50 

Coupons overdue, not presented, 
Union School District bonds, 165.00 

Due School Districts, 69,391.42 



Total debt not funded, $72,232.51 

Total city indebtedness, $459,210.48- 



financial statement. 385 

Available Assets 

Treasurer's cash balance January 

1, 1927, $37,014.05 

Taxes, 1919, uncollected, 1,730.40 

Taxes, 1921, uncollected, 926.40 

Taxes, 1922, uncollected, 2,977.80 

Taxes, 1923, uncollected, 4,287.77 

Taxes, 1924, uncollected, 6,666.75 

Taxes, 1925, uncollected, 5,021.13 

Taxes, 1926, uncollected, 91,832.75 

Cash in hand of tax collector, January, 

1, 1927, 240.79 

Cash in hand of city clerk, account 

motor vehicle permits, January 1, 

1927, 183.13 

Taxes bid in by city, 1,335.41 

Due highway department, 100.00 

$152,316.38 

Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 

1927, $306,894.10 

Indebtedness above assets, January 1, 

1926, 257,964.43 



Increase for the year, $48,929.67 



PRECINCT DEBT 



Funded Debt 

Water Works bonds, $198,000.00 

Sewer bonds, 50,000.00 

$248,000.00 

Debt Not Funded 



Interest accrued, not yet due, 




sewer bonds, 


$229.17 


Interest accrued, not yet due, 




water bonds, 


4,455.00 


Coupons overdue, not presented. 




sewer bonds, 


112.50 


Coupons overdue, not presented, 




water bonds, 


146.00 




1 91° 67 








$252,942.67 



Available Assets 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1927, $28,990.41 

Liberty bonds, Water Works, in- 
vestment account, 25,000.00 

$53,990.41 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1927, $198,952.26 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1926, 212,134.74 



Decrease for the year, $13,182.48 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 387 

Other Precinct Liabilities 



Union School District bonds, $569,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due, 3,283.54 



-$572,283.54 



RECAPITULATION 



Net regular debt, $306,894.10 

precinct debt, 198,952.26 

school district, 572,283.54 

$1,078,129.90 

Increase for the yeaf, $369,863.65 



CITY PROPERTY 



Having Value But Not 


Considered Available Assets 


Water Department, 


$1,235,822.82 


Fire Department, 




221,275.00 


Highway Department, 




125,000.00 


Engineering Department, 




1,359.75 


Sewer Department, 




1,703.00 


Health Department, 




910.00 


Milk Inspection Department, 


1,800.00 


Police Department. 




61,300.00 


City Clerk's Office. 




1,650.00 


Commissioner's Office, 




140.17 


Mayor's Office, 




250.00 


Assessors' Office, 




882.00 


Tax Collector's Office, 




300.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures, 


325.00 


City Messenger's Department, 


2,250.00 


Park Commissioners' Dep 


artment 


:, 225.00 


Public Library, 




17,500.00 


City History Commission 




10.00 


Cemetery Commissioners ' 


Dept. 


8,500.00 


Real Estate, 




530.000.00 

$2,209,432.74 



1926 

Population of city (census 1920), 22,167 

Valuation of city. $30,242,550.00 

Tax Assessed for the year, $875,330.07 

Rate of taxation, $16.19 per $1,000. 
Rate of Union School District. $11.96. 
Rate for sewer precinct. $.08. 
Total rate, $28.23 per $1,000. 



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Muses Quimby 

Samuel Davis 

Levj Jewell 

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Samuel Eisner 

Charles Tyler 

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Ezra Washburne 

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Henry 0. Washburne. 

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Elmer J. Hideout 

Ranson Nichols 

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Manning B. Taylor ... 

Warren (i. Ileald 

Timothy P. Sullivan .. 

Horace Tasker 

Kva I'.arnes 

luseph Fenderson 

Kmilie Hannaford — 
Gardner Kennerson. .. 
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Stephen P. Stoddard.. 
William 11. Angleton.. 

Delbert S. Ham 

Evangeline Rock 

Edward Doucet 

Nellie Dowlin 

Rachel Pike 

Hummer P. Moody... 

Xavier Pinard 

Charles M. Steven.s ... 

Eliza Ann Howe 

Eliza Davis 

Joel F. Brown 

John Ferris 

Luther A. Ford, Jr 

George Heath 

Blanche Webster 

lohn Henry Jenness .. 
Georgiana Nault 


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Ellen Koran 
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SUMMARY. 



Total number of births returned for the year 455 

Total number of marriages returned for the year 224 

Total number of deaths in different wards 234 

Total number of deaths in institutions 343 

Total number brought to the city for burial 102 

I hereby certify that the foregoing is a transcript from the 
records of said city of Concod. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk: 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Assessors, board of, report of 266 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 354 

Building Inspector, report of 234 

Cemetery Commissioners, report of 278 

City clerk, report of 243 

government, departments, personnel of, 1926 45 

assessors 48 

board of aldermen 45 

board of public works 46 

building inspector 55 

clerk 46 

collector of taxes 48 

commissioners of cemeteries 57 

committees of board of aldermen 47 

culler of staves 58 

drain layers 62 

engineer 47 

fence-viewers 58 

fire department, officers of 54 

health officers 55 

hydrant commissioners 56 

inspector of petroleum 58 

mayor 45 

messenger 48 

milk inspector 49 

overseers of poor 49 

park commissioners 56 

physician, city and assistant 49 

plumbers, board of examiners of 62 

pound-keeper 58 

police department officers and members of police 

force 50 

public library, trustees of 52 

librarian and assistants 52 

registrar of vital statistics 55 

sanitary officer 48 

sealers of leather 58 

sealer of weights and measures 58 



PAGE 

City solicitor 49 

street department, superintendent of streets 48 

superintendent Blossom Hill and Old North ceme- 
teries 57 

superintendent of clocks 55 

superintendent of parks 56 

surveyors of painting 60 

masonry 60 

wood, lumber and bark 61 

treasurer 47 

trustees of trust funds 53 

undertakers 57 

ward officers 63 

water-works, city, commissioners 53 

superintendent 53 

weigher 60 

weighers of hay, coal, etc ( 59 

Coupon account, statement of 358 

Debts, recapitulation 387 

Departmental equipment, bond account 360 

Engineer, city, report of 220 

Financial statement 373 

Fire department, chief engineer, report of 199 

roll of members 204 

relocation of boxes 210 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 223 

Inaugural address 3 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 65 

Municipal debt 384 

regulations 2 

court, report of 265 

Ordinances and resolutions . . . : 17 

Park commissioners, report of 248 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 224 

Plumbing inspector, report of 227 

Police department, report of chief 213 

Polls, valuation, etc, from 1915 269 

Poor department, report of overseer 241 

Population 389 

Precincts, debts of 386 

Property, city, inventory of 388 

Public library, report of trustees 237 

librarian 238 

Public works, board of, report of 228 



I'AGE 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 250 

contagious diseases 254 

milk inspection, report of 263 

sanitary officer, report of 251 

School reports 69 

Union School District, Albin Prize Medal contest 163 

annual school meeting warrant. . 169 

annual school meeting 171 

attendance officer 72 

attendance officer, report of 147 

board of education 69 

board of education, report of . . . 74 

bonded indebtedness 175 

census, 1926 148 

clerk 73 

elocutionary contest 159 

English prize essay contest . . . 161 

graduation exercises 164 

graduating classes 166 

headmaster, report of 127 

high school, table of 157 

kindergarten supervisor, report 

of 137 

manual training, table of attend- 
ance 158 

medical inspector 73 

medical inspector, report of .... 121 

officers of the district 73 

physical director, report of .... 145 
principal of Morrill school, re- 
port of 130 

school nurses 73 

school nurses, report of 125 

secretaries 72 

superintendents 71, 72 

superintendent, report of 91 

superintendent, assistant, report 

of 107 

supervisor of drawing, report of 139 
supervisor of home economics, 

report of 134 

supervisor of music, report of . . 143 

teachers, list of 150 

treasurer 72 

treasurer's report 80 



PAGE 

Sealer of weights and measures, report of 245 

Sewer department, report of 231 

Solicitor, report of ' 246 

Superintendent of streets, report of 228 

Tax collectors, report of 271 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 363 

Treasury department, report of 350 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 280 

Trust funds 285 

Trusts, individual, cemetery , • 293 

Union School District, bond account 360 

Vital statistics, tables of 391 

Water department, report of 179 

commissioners, report of 181 

coupon account 359 

engineer's report 187 

financial report 193 

investment account 189, 359 

precinct, bonded indebtedness of. . 189, 358 

schedule pipes and gates 194 

summary of statistics 190 

superintendent, report of 182 

treasurer's condensed statement . . . 188, 361 



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