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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"




Hgritulturc, 






GIFT OF 

The State of Mew Hampsnire 




HON. OLIN HOSEA CHASE 

IiKiitpin-dft'd Mayor, Januari/ J4, I'.l^S 
Born Atu/Hst 24, 1875 
Died Bccemher S, 1928 



1 928 
SEVENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

— FOR THE — 

YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1928 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




Bridge & Byron 

Concord, N. H. 

1929 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment op Bills Against the City 



-0- 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to 
contract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or de- 
livered on citj' poor account, except on the written order 
of the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time than 
until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

Duplicate copies will be required of all bills payable by 
the city, furnished on countj^ poor account. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the })erson 
authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no action 
can be had upon the bill by the Committee on Accounts and 
Claims, and no order will be given for its pajnnent. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. 

The regular monthly meetings of the city government 
occur on the second Monday of each month. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



(V 



^5Z. 



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INAUGURAL ADDRESS OP OLIN H. CHASE 
Mayor of Concord, N. H., January 24, 1928 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

While an unhappy decree of fate has broiig'ht me to the 
executive chair of the city of Concord without running the 
gauntlet of a popular election, I am mindful of the fact 
that my obligation to the citizens of Concord is in no 
measure lessened by the sad circumstances which made the 
intervention of the charter necessary. 

I am also cognizant of my obligation to the members of 
the Board of Aldermen, a majority of whom have been my 
associates in the city government for the past four years, 
for making it possible for me to fill the vacancy caused by 
the regretted death of my predecessor. 

Had Mayor Fred N. Marden been spared to preside over 
the deliberations of this hour, he would undoubtedly have 
referred to the achievements of the past two yeai's. Since 
he was not permitted to give an accounting of his own 
stewardship, I may be pardoned for briefly alluding to the 
subject. 

The general affairs of the city were conducted in an 
orderly, dignified and capable manner under ]\Iayor Mar- 
den's direction, and uniform courtesy and consideration 
characterized his dealings with the public. 

The outstanding accomplishments of the jNIarden ad- 
ministration included the following: 

The city government co-operated with the Chamber of 
Commerce and citizens in carrying out a fitting celebration 
of the two hundredth anniversary of the settlement of 
Concord. 



4 CITY OF CONCORD 

The White property on Capitol Street was purchased to 
safeguard the opportunity for future expansion of the 
public library facilities. 

A modern system of street lighting was installed on 
Main Street which adds much to the appearance of the 
city as well as to the safety of travelers botli on foot and 
awheel. 

The long agitation for a comfort station Avas brought 
to an end by installing such a utility in the police station, 
which, judging from the lack of adverse comment, is 
giving good satisfaction. 

A code of traffic regulations Avas ado]ited. While these 
regulations do not perform the impossible feat of satisfying 
all the varying opinions on the subject, they appear to 
have, in a measure, clarified the hectic situation into which 
vehicle control had fallen. 

Believing that the members of the Board of Aldermen 
and citizens of Concord have the right to know the mental 
attitude of the individual whom you have selected as your 
titular head, permit me to state frankly that I am not in- 
herently a reformer. 

I am a believer in conservative and healthy progress and 
welcome change when change promises improvement, but 
change merely for the purpose of upsetting the established 
order of things results in no betterment and generally 
leads to cost and confusion. 

Economy, national, state and munici})al, enjoys a high 
degree of popularity as a topic for discussion, but its ap- 
plication to departments of government finds but little 
favor with those whose pet projects are thereby effected. 
Abraham Lincoln is reputed to have said: "The place to 
have a boil is on the other fellow's nose." So it is with 
most of us in our views of public expenditures. It is those 
public enterprises to which other citizens are i)artial that 
the much advocated economies should apply. 



MAYOR S ADDRESS 5 

The lessening' of taxes is a simple matter of cause and 
effect. When the people are willing to deny themselves 
those things for which public money is expended, taxes 
will automatically reduce. Personally I do not expect to 
live to see that day. There is, however, on the part of 
every department the responsibility of making every dollar 
which taxpayers contribute to the city budget, in many 
cases at no small hardship, perform as much service as is 
possible in the conduct of public business. 

The method of disposing of rubbish and garbage is one 
of the most annoying and expensive problems witli which 
municipalities have to deal. Concord's city government 
has for some time been giving consideration to the question 
through a committee. I recommend that the present com- 
mittee be continued with the mayor added to till the va- 
cancy caused by the death of Mayor ]\Iarden, and that the 
subject be further investigated with a view to purchasing 
and installing an incinerator as soon as may be consistent 
with good business policy. I am not under the delusion that 
this will end all the irritating situations that arise, either 
on the part of the householders or the Board of Public 
Works, but it will afford a more modern and sanitary dis- 
posal of refuse aud will lead to the ultimate abolishment 
of the unsightly and malodorous dump, now maintained 
from necessity, on the east bank of the Merrimack River. 

Hall Street and considerable area adjacent thereto, in- 
cluding Home Avenue and Rumford Avenue are without 
anything worthy the name of sewerage. The locality has 
been surveyed by City Engineer Fred W. Lang, who finds 
that the construction of a sewer, which would care for 
twenty-eight houses already built and make provision for 
the probable increase, is mechanically feasible. The cost 
of the same has been estimated by two competent persons, 
independent of each other, and in their judgment will not 
exceed $20,000. I recommend that this sewer be built the 



6 CITY OP CONCORD 

present year, and as it would be without question a per- 
manent improvement, that the payment therefor be spread 
over a reasonable term of years. 

The Plains district is also in urgent need of sewers, but 
it would be like placing the cart before the horse to install 
sewers before the section is adequately supplied with water. 
The latter project is under the jurisdiction of the Board 
of Water Commissioners, who are giving much study to 
the subject in the hope that a definite plan for a water 
supply on the Plains may be solved in the near future. 
Therefore, I recommend that the petitions for sewers on 
the Plains, now on the table in the Board of Public Works, 
be allowed to remain there until the water problem is 
worked out. 

It is my earnest desire that this board shall continue to 
be in the future, as it has been in the past, a clearing house 
for the ideas of its members ; that all matters claiming the 
board's attention may have fair and full discussion and 
that the conclusions thus arrived at may be attended by 
concord and harmonv. 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 

Passed During the Year Ending January 14, 1929. 

o 

An Ordinance: in amendment of section 10, chapter 5, of the 
revised ordinances, relative to time off for the members of 
the police department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Amend Section 10, Chapter ."i, of the Revised Ordinances by strik- 
ing out the word " fifteen ' ' wherever it appears and substituting the 
word ' ' seven. ' ' 

Passed March 12, 1928. 



An Ordinance: in amendment of section 2, of chapter xlhi of 
the revised ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloics: 

Section 1. Section 2 of Chapter XLIII of the Revised Ordinances 
is hereby amended by inserting therein after the first word the fol- 
lowing : maximum ; so that the first clause of said section as amended 
shall read as follows : Section 2. The maximum salaries of clerks 
in the employ of the city shall be as follows, in each case to be in 
full for services rendered for the period stated. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 9, 1928. 



An Ordinance: providing for a tree warden. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. Subject to the confirmation of the Board of Aldermen 
the Mayor shall annually appoint a tree warden. 



O CITY OF CONCORp 

Sect. 2. The tree warden shall have the care and control of all 
trees on city property except parks and water works property. He 
shall also have and exercise all such powers as town tree wardens may 
have and exercise under the Public Laws and amendments thereto 
made or to be made in the future. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 9, 1928. 



An Ordinance: in amendment of section 17 of chaptee 13 of the 

REVISED ordinances RELATING TO THE GATHERING OF SWILL. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. Section 17 of Cliapter 13 of the Eevised Ordinances is 
hereby amended by adding at the end thereof the following: Ap- 
plications for such licenses shall have the written approval of the 
Superintendent of Streets before they shall be issued by the Board 
of Health. Licenses shall be conditioned upon the observance of 
such reasonable rules and regulations by the licensee as may, from 
time to time, be prescribed by the Board of Health after consulta- 
tion with the Superintendent of Streets. Such rules and regulations 
as may be in existence at the time of the issuance of each license, 
shall be endorsed on the back of the license or attached thereto. 
Every license shall always be conditioned upon the observance of 
any new rules and regulations which may be prescribed by the 
authority above mentioned during the period while said license is 
in force, provided that the licensee is given ten days written notice 
of such additional regulations. For breach of any rule or regula- 
tion prescribed as above mentioned, the Board of Health may, after 
a hearing, of which the licensee shall have seven days notice, revoke 
the license; so that said section as amended shall read as follows: 
Sect. 17. No person shall remove, or carry in, or through, any of 
the streets, squares, courts, lanes, avenues or alleys within the city 
of Concord any swill or house offal, animal or vegetable, grease or 
bones, or any refuse substance from any dwelling houses, or other 
places in the city, unless such person so removing, or carrying the 
same, shall have been expressly licensed by the Board of Health, 
annually. Applications for such licenses shall have the written 



ORDINANCES 9 

approval of the Superintendent of Streets before they shall be issued 
by the Board of Health. Licenses shall be conditioned upon the 
observance of such reasonable rules and regulations by the licensee 
as may, from time to time, be prescribed b}' the Board of Health 
after consultation with the Superintendent of Streets. Such rules 
and regulations as may be in existence at the time of the issuance 
of each license, shall be endorsed on the back of the license or 
attached thereto. Every license shall always be conditioned upon 
the observance of any new rules and regulations which may be pre- 
scribed by the authority above mentioned during the period while 
said license is in force, provided that the licensee is given ten days 
written notice of such additional regulations. For breach of any 
rules or regulations prescribed as above mentioned, the Board of 
Health may, after a hearing, of which the licensee shall have seven 
days notice, revoke the license. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 9, 1928. 



An Ordinance: in amendment of chapter xliii of the revised 
ordinances relative to salaries. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of tJie City of Concord, as 
follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 1, clause f. Chapter XLIII of the 
Eevised Ordinances by striking out the words ' 'twenty-two ' ' and 
substituting the words ' ' twenty-four ' ' so said clause as amended 
shall read as follows: (f) Deputy chief of police, twenty-four 
hundred dollars jier annum. 

Sect. 2. Further amend said Section 1, clause w, by striking out 
the word "fifteen" and substitute the word "eighteen" so said 
clause as amended shall read as follows: (w) Superintendent of 
parks, eighteen hundred dollars per annum. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect as of January 1, 1928. 

Passed April 27, 1928. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD 

An Ordinance: in amendment of section 25 of chapter xr, of 

THE REVISED ORDINANCES RELATING TO ASH DOORS IN CHIMNEYS. 

Be it ordah\ed by the Board of Aldermen of the Citi/ of Coneord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. Section 25 of Cliapter XL of the Revised Ordinances 
is hereby amended by adding at the end of the second paragraph 
thereof the following: Any existing or hereafter erected chimney 
or flue shall be deemed to be dangerous or unsafe if not furnished 
with an iron clean-out door at or near the base of the chimney, or 
some opening sufficient to enable them to be readily cleaned ; so that 
said second paragraph of said Section shall read as follows: All 
funnel receivers shall be built into the chimneys at the time of their 
construction. All chimneys shall have at their base an ash door, or 
some opening sufficient to enable them to be readily cleaned. If any 
existing or hereafter erected chimney, flue, or other heating apparatus 
shall be dangerous or unsafe, the Inspector shall at once notify, in 
writing, the owner, agent, or other party having an interest in said 
premises, and shall require him to make the same safe immediately. 
All woodwork shall be kept away at least two inches from any chim- 
ney. Any existing or hereafter erected chimney or flue shall be 
deemed to be dangerous or unsafe if not furnished with an iron 
clean-out door at or near the base of the chimney, or some opening 
sufficient to enable them to be readily cleaned. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect three months after its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1928. 



An Ordinance: relating to the placing of gasoline pumps in 
highways. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Coneord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. Amend Section 12 of Cliapter VI of the Revised 
Ordinances by striking out tlie words ' ' The foregoing provisions 
shall not apply to gasoline pumps erected under a permit from the 
Board of Public Works, but no permit shall be allowed for a gasoline 
pump upon that portion of Main Street between Freight Street and 



ORDINANCES 11 

Center Street, ' ' and substituting therefor the following : No gasoline 
pump shall be installed in any part of any highway, street, sidewalk 
or other public way within the corporate limits of the city. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 13, 1928. 



An Ordinance: in amendment of chapter xli of the revised 
ordinances relative to street traffic rules. 

Be it ordained bi/ the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. Chapter XL! of the Revised Ordinances is hereby 
amended by striking out the whole thereof and substituting therefor 
the following: 

ARTICLE I. 
Definitions. 

Section 1. The word "vehicle" herein shall include horses 
hitched to vehicles, horses ridden or led, motor vehicles of all kinds, 
bicycles, everything on wheels or runners, excepting light carriages 
for the conveyance of children. 

Sect. 2. The word "horse" herein shall include all domestic 
animals. 

Sect. 3. The word "driver" herein shall include the rider, driver 
or leader of a horse, the rider of wheels and the operator of a motor 
vehicle. 

Sect. 4. The word "curb" herein shall mean the lateral boun- 
daries of that portion of a street designated for use of vehicles 
whether marked by curbstone or not so marked. 

Sect. 5. The words "intersecting way" herein shall mean any 
way which joins another at an angle wliether or not it crosses the 
other. 

Sect. 6. The word "crossing" herein shall mean a way for 
pedestrians to go from one side of a street 4:o the other which is 
marked by a pavement or otherwise; also points bordering the 



12 CITY OF CONCORD 

intersection of streets not marked but which are commonly used to 
go from one side of a street to the other. 

Sect. 7. The words ' ' Safety Zone ' ' herein shall include any part 
of the highway established and marked by the police department as 
such, from travel of which vehicles may be restricted or excluded. 

AETICLE II. 
Vehicles in Motion. 

Section 1. A vehicle, except when passing a vehicle ahead, shall 
keep to the right and as near the right curb as possible. 

Sect. 2. Vehicles meeting sliall pass each other to the right. 

Sect. P>. A vehicle overtaking another vehicle shall, in passing, 
keep to the left, but it shall not leave the line on the right unless 
there is a clear way to advance on the left. 

Sect. 4. A vehicle turning to the riglit into another street shall 
turn tlie corner as near the curb as possiljlc. 

Sect. 5. A vehicle turning to the left into another street shall 
pass to the right of and beyond the center of the intersection of the 
street before turning. 

Sect. 6. A vehicle crossing from one side of the street to the 
other shall do so by turning to the left so as to liead in the same 
direction as the traffic on that side of the street. 

Sect. 7. Slow moving vehicles shall keep as close as possible to 
the curb on the right so as to allow faster moving vehicles free 
passage on the left. 

Sect. 8. No driver of a vehicle sliall allow the sanu^ to come 
within ten feet of any vehicle in front of hina wlien ajijtroaching 
and passing over a crossing. 

Sect. 9. The driver of any vehicle, before turning the corner of 
any street or turning out or starting from or stopping at the curb 
line of any street, shall first see that there is sufficient space free 
from other vehicles so that such turn, stop or start may be made 
safely, and shall then give a plainly visible or audible signal. 

Sect. 10. (Extract from Motor Vehicle Law, sections 17 and 18, 
chapter 103, Public Laws) : 



ORDINANCES 13 

' ' Xo person shall operate a motor vehicle on any way at a rate 
of speed greater than is reasonable and i^roper, liaving regard to 
traffic. ' ' 

"In prosecutions for the violation of the provisions of the fore- 
going section, it shall be conclusive evidence of a rate of speed 
greater than is reasonable and proper as aforesaid if a motor 
vehicle is operated .... on any way inside (the thickly 
settled or business part of a city or town) at a rate of speed 
exceeding fifteen miles per hour for a distance of one-eighth 
of a mile, or on any way upon approaching an intersecting way, 
or in traversing a crossing or intersection of ways, or in going 
round a corner or curve in a street or way where the operator's 
view of the road traffic is obstructed at a rate exceeding ten 
miles per hour. . . . The provisions of this section shall not 
apply to motor vehicles of a fire department, motor police 
patrols, or motor ambulances, when in the emergency service of 
their respective departments. ' ' 

Sect. 11. Every bicycle operated during the period from one-half 
hour after sunset to one-half hour before sunrise shall display one 
lighted lamp on the front. 



ARTICLE III. 
Signals, Noises, Smoke and Traffic Signs. 

Section 1. Every driver of a vehicle shall, in slowing up, 
stopping, or backing, give a plainly visible or audible signal to 
show his intention. 

Sect. 2. In turning while in motion or in starting to turn from a 
standstill, a signal shall be given by the driver ipf the vehicle about 
to be turned by raising a whip or hand indicating the direction in 
which the turn is to be made. 

Sect. 3. (Extract from Motor Vehicle Law, sections 10 and 14, 
chapter 103, Public Laws) : 

' ' Upon approaching any intersecting way or a curve or corner 
in a way, every person operating a motor vehicle shall slow down 
and give timely signals with his bell, horn or other device for sig- 
nalling ; provided, that in the thickly settled parts of a city 
or town no signal shall be sounded so as to make an unreasonable 
noise. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD 

"No operator of any motor vcliiclc shall, or any way permit 
any unreasonable amount of smoke to escape from said vehicle, 
nor permit said vehicle to make any unnecessary noise, by 
cutting out the muffler or otherwise. ' ' 

Sect. 4. The police department shall control all traffic in the 
streets or highways. Police officers may divert vehicular or pe- 
destrian traffic when necessary to avoid congestion or to promote 
safety and convenience; and no person having charge of a vehicle 
shall refuse or neglect to stop or start or place the same as directed 
by a police officer. 

Sect. 5. No person shall break, deface or move any official sign, 
post or signalling device placed in a highway for direction of 
traffic. 

AETICLE IV. 
Stopping, Standing and Turning. 

Section 1. No vehicle shall stop so as to interfere witli or prevent 
the passage of pedestrians at crossings. 

Sect. 2. The drivers of cars parting on Main Street, between 
Center and Freight Streets, and on the west side of Main Street 
between Perley and Freight Streets and between Center and Pitman 
Streets, shall drive such vehicle until it shall stand with its riglit 
front wheel as nearly as possible to the curb and shall stand at an 
angle of forty-five degrees (45) to the curb. 

In Ward One (Penacook) on the west side of Main Street from 
the north side of Washington Street to the south end of the bridge, 
he shall back such vehicle until it shall stand with the right rear 
wheel as nearly as j)ossible to the curb and shall stand at an angle 
of forty-five degrees (45) to the curb. On the east side of Main 
Street from the north side of Merrimack Street to tlie south side of 
Electric Court, he sliall head such vehicle to the curb until it shall 
stand with the right forward wheel as nearly as possible to the curb 
and shall stand at an angle of forty-five degrees (45) to the curb. 

No vehicle shall be brought to a stop within any street except in 
the parking position prescribed for that place, except (1) at street 
intersections where stopping is required, and then only for such time 
as traffic conditions necessitate, (2) as traffic stoppage may neces- 
sitate, (^) commercial vehicles may stop for a reasonable time while 
actually taking on or delivering merchandise when such vehicles 



ORDINANCES 15 

can lind no nearby parking position, and (4) any veliiele, while 
actually taking on or leaving passengers, when such vehicle can find 
no nearby parking position. Except as otherwise specially provided, 
"parking positions" shall be deemed to be that space at the side 
of the street within which a vehicle can stand parallel to and as near 
as may be to the margin of the street. 

Sect. 3. (a) Parking on Main Street from Fiske Street to Freiglit 
Street shall be restricted to two hours except between six-thirty 
(6.30) p.m. and midnight; but in front of the Main Street entrance 
to the Endicott Hotel it shall be restricted to fifteen minutes at all 
times, and parking in front of the entrance to the Eagle Hotel is 
prohibited. 

(b) Parking on the south side of Capitol Street between Main 
and State Streets shall be heading in to the right at an angle of 
forty-five degrees. 

(c) Parking on the nortli side of Park Street between Main and 
State Streets is prohibited. 

(d) Parking on the north side of Freight Street shall be heading 
in to the left at an angle of forty-five degrees and parking on the 
south side of Freight Street is prohibited. 

(e) Parking on the north side of Depot Street is prohibited. 

(f) Parking on the south side of Prince Street is prohibited. 

(g) Parking on Kennedy Lane and Durgin Street, or either of 
them, is prohibited. 

(h) Parking on the south side of Fayette, Thompson, Concord 
and Thorndike Streets, or any of them, is prolul)ited between the 
hours of 12 'clock noon and 12 o 'clock midnight. 

(i) Parking on Odd Fellows' Avenue is prohibited except on 
the west side, and then only from Warren Street to a point distant 
one hundred and sixty-five feet southerly therefrom. 

(k) Parking on the south side of School Street between Main 
and State Streets is prohibited. 

Sect. 4. No vehicle shall stand on the south side of Warren Street 
between Green and Main Streets, except for the purjjose of taking 
on or setting down passengers. No vehicle shall stand on the north 
side of Warren Street between Green and Main Streets for more than 
fifteen minutes and in no case shall a horse be hitched or tied or a 
horse or vehicle backed up to the curb to load or unload merchandise. 



16 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sect. o. No vehicle shall stand within the intersection of any 
street, nor Avithin five feet of a fire hydrant, nor within ten feet of 
a curb street or alley corner, nor witliin twelve feet of a city stand- 
pipe. 

Sect. 6. No vehicle shall stop or stand within fifty feet either 
side of the center point of the front wall of a fire station, theater 
or moving picture house, except to let off or take on passengers or to 
receive or deliver goods or merchandise. 

Sect. 7. Except as provided in Section 9, unless in an emergency, 
or to allow another vehicle to cross its i^ath, no vehicle shall stop in 
any public street except close to the curb line. 

Sect. 8. When a horsedrawn vehicle is backed up to the curb, the 
iiorse or horses shall be turned so as to stand as near parallel with 
the sidewalk as possible and headed in the general direction of 
traffic for the side of the street on which the vehicle is standing. 

Sect. 9. In approaching or passing a street railway car which 
has been stopj^ed to take on or let off passengers the driver of every 
vehicle shall bring said vehicle to a full stop. 

Sect. 10. No vehicle incapable of being turned without backing 
shall be turned about in any of the following streets: Pleasant, 
Warren, School, Capitol, Park, between Main and State Streets, nor 
on Depot Street. 

Sect. 11. No horse or vehicle shall be driven backward, or allowed 
to stand on any sidewalk. 

Sect. 12. No vehicle licensed to carry passengers under Chapter 
XXXIV, of the Revised Ordinances shall park on Main Street, or 
Pleasant, Warren, School, and Capitol Streets from Main to State 
Streets, between the hours of 7 a.m. and 11 p.m., longer than to dis- 
charge or take on passengers unless in actual service, provided, how- 
ever, that the Chief of Police may, upon notice to him by one or 
more owners or operators of said vehicles, that the designated parking 
space on Pleasant Street Extension is unsafe, by reason of ice, snow, 
or other conditions, permit said vehicle to park on Main Street until 
in his judgment such unsafe condition is terminated. 

Pleasant Street, beginning 10 feet east from the east line of Main 
Street is hereby designated as a parking place for said vehicles, and 
reserved for such purpose. 

Sect. 13. In approaching the intersection of streets where stop 
signs are established, the driver of every vehicle shall bring his 
vehicle to a full stop immediately before entering such intersection. 



ORDINANCES 17 

Stop signs installed in the future shall bring the intersections where 
they shall be installed under the provisions of this section upon 
publication and posting of this section as to the said intersections. 

Sect. 14. No vehicle shall stop in such a way as to obstruct any 
street for the purpose of loading or unloading merchandise, except 
in accordance with a permit from the Chief of Police. 

Skct. 1.5. No person, firm or corporation owning, possessing or 
having the care of any street car, vehicle or vehicles of any description 
shall store or permit the same to remain unemployed and out of use 
in any public street or part of a highway, except temporarily in case 
of emergency. 

Sect. 16. Parking of vehicles throughout the night in any street 
or highway is prohibited. 

Sect. 17. Parking of vehicles in front of any public or private 
driveway is prohibited. 

AETICLE V. 

Eight of Way. 

Section 1. Police, fire department. United States mail vehicles, 
ambulances, funeral processions and emergency repair vehicles of 
public service corporations shall have the right of way in any street 
and through any procession. 

Sect. 2. A person driving or controlling a vehicle waiting ;it the 
curb shall promptly give place to a vehicle about to take on or let 
off passengers. 

Sect. 3. Subject to Section 1 of tliis article, street cars shall have 
the right of way between cross streets over all otiier vehicles ; and 
the driver of any vehicle proceeding on the track in front of a street 
car shall immediately turn out on a signal by the motorman or con- 
ductor of the car. 

Sect. 4. The driver of a vehicle, on approach of fire apparatus 
sliall immediately draw up said vehicle as near as practicable to the 
right hand curb and parallel thereto, and bring it to a standstill. 

Sect. 5. The driver of a street car shall stop between intersecting 
streets and keep it stationary upon the approach of fire apparatus. 

AETICLE VI. 
Care in Driving ; Condition and Treatment of Horses 
Section 1. No person shall drive or conduct any vehicle in such 
condition or so loaded as to be likely to cause delay in traffic, or 
accident or injury to man, beast or property. 



18 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sect. 2. No person sliall carry or cause to be carried a load in 
any public street the weiglit of which exceeds six tons, unless such 
load consist of an article which cannot be divided, and then only in 
accordance with a permit from the police department. 

Sect. 3. No person shall drive a horse not in every respect fit for 
use and capable for the work on whicli it is employed and free from 
lameness and sores and vices or disease likely to cause delay in traffic 
or accident or injury to persons or property. 

Sect. 4. No person shall illtreat, overload, overdrive or cruelly 
or unnecessarily beat any horse. 

Sect. 5. Any police officer, in his discretion, may remove or cause 
to be removed any horse or vehicle left upon any street not in apparent 
charge of a driver or other person, or which is in violation of any 
of these regulations, to another place on said street, or from said 
street to another street, or to the city yard, or to a garage or stable, 
and tliere leave the same. Such removal shall be at the cost of the 
person leaving the same. 

AETICLE VII. 

Street Cars. 

Section 1. No street car shall stand in the intersection of streets. 

Sect. 2. Drivers of street cars shall not pass the intersection of 
State and Pleasant, Warren and Liberty, Warren and Merrimack, 
School and Merrimack, State and Center, and State and Franklin 
Streets without audible warning, nor at a speed which would prevent 
such driver from bringing his car to a full stop in emergency, before 
reacliing the center line of intersection of said street. 

AETICLE VIIL 
Stealing Eides. 

Section 1. No person shall steal a ride upon any vehicle or street 
car, and no person shall ride upon tlie rear of any vehicle without 
the consent of the person in charge tliereof. 

AETICLE IX. 
Eestricted Zones. 

Section 1. Subject to tlie approval of the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen, the police department may establish ' ' Eestricted Zones, ' ' 



ORDINANCES 19 

"Safety Zones," "zones for the exclusive use of horse-drawn vehi- 
cles," or other purposes and all vehicles shall be restricted or ex- 
cluded from any part of a street established and marked by the Police 
Department as such. 

ARTICLE X. 

Section 1. Drivers of vehicles must exercise all due care and use 
every means to eliminate injury to persons crossing streets or walk- 
ing upon the streets and highways. Likewise it is the duty of 
pedestrians in stepping from sidewalks to the roadbed to look up 
and down the highway or street to see if vehicles are approaching ; 
further, they shall cross the street only at designated cross walks 
unless other locations are designated or marked. 

Sect. 2. Drivers should use extraordinary care in approaching and 
passing school buildings and should also use every reasonable precau- 
tion to prevent the frightening of horses when approaching or pass- 
ing vehicles drawn by same. 

ARTICLE XL 
One Way Street 

Blake Street, from State Street to Green Street. 

ARTICLE XII. 

Penalties for Violation. 

Section 1. Except as otherwise provided in the motor vehicle law 
of the state, any person violating any of the provisions herein con- 
tained shall be liable to penalty not to exceed five dollars for the 
first offence, or not to exceed twenty dollars for any subsequent 
offence. 

Sect. 2. Complaints against any person violating any of the pro- 
visions herein contained may be made at police headquarters or to 
any police officer. 

Sect. 3. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent here- 
with are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take effect February 
1, 1929. 

Passed December 31, 192S. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD 

An Ordinance: providing for an engine company in ward 8. 
Be it ordained bij the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 
Section 1. Amend Section 1 of Chapter XVIII of the Eevised 
Ordinances by inserting at the end of the first sentence thereof the 
following: engine company No. 5, not less than twenty nor more 
than tliirty men, so that said section as amended shall read as fol- 
lows: 

Section 1. Tlie fire department shall consist of a chief engi- 
neer, two assistants within the i:irecinct, one engineer each from 
Ward 1, Ward 2 and Ward 3 ; two steamer and hose companies, 
one company to consist of thirteen men, including driver, and 
one company to consist of fourteen men, including driver; one 
relief steamer (company) to consist of two men ; two hose com- 
panies to consist of eleven men, including driver; a combination 
engine company to consist of four men; a hook and ladder 
company to consist of twenty-one men, including driver; a house 
man, two spare men, a general utility man, and a fire inspector 
at Central Fire Station; steamer Pioneer, not less than twenty 
nor more than forty men, including driver ; hand engine company 
No. 2, not less than twenty nor more than thirty men ; 
engine company No. 5, not less than twenty nor more than thirty 
men. Each company shall be allowed three substitutes, except 
Hook and Ladder company No. 1, which shall have five, to be 
approved by the chief engineer. The engineers shall exercise 
the powers of fire wards, and those within the precinct shall 
constitute the board of engineers. 
Sect. 2. Amend Section 17 of said chapter l)y substituting for 

"and 3" the following: 3 and 8; so that said section as amended 

shall read as follows : 

Sect. 17. The department shall ai)pear for public parade, drill 
and inspection at such times as the chief engineer and com- 
mittee on fire department shall order, for which purpose three 
hundred dollars may be expended annually. The companies in 
Wards 1, 2, 3 and 8 will attend by invitation and voluntarily. 
Each company in the department under the direction of the 
chief engineer or assistants shall take out their respective engines 
and apparatus for exercise and drill as often as he shall direct, 
such exercise and drill to take place in public, not oftener than 
once a month, and at least once in two months, between the first 
of April and November. 



ORDINANCES 21 

Sect. 3. Amend Section 28 of said chapfer by inserting after the 
words ' ' Old Fort Company ' ' the following : and engine company 
No. o, each ; and further amend said section by striking out the word 
' ' each ' ' in line 22 and inserting after the word ' ' annum ' ' in said 
line the following: engine company No. 5, five hundred and ten 
dollars per annum ; so that said section as amended shall read as 
follows : 

Sect. 28. The annual pay of the members of the fire depart- 
ment shall be as follows, and in full for services in said de- 
partment : 

Chief, twenty-six hundred dollars per annum, which shall 
include compensation for services rendered as assistant building 
inspector; permanent force at Central fire station, at Good Will 
and Alert hose houses. Pioneer fire station and Cataract engine 
house, eighteen hundred dollars each ; and captain and lieutenant 
of Combination No. 1, eighteen hundred and fifty dollars each 
per annum, payable semi-monthly; chauffeur and caretaker. Old 
Fort company and engine company No. 5, each three hundred 
dollars per annum ; assistant engineers within the precinct, one 
hundred and forty-five dollars each ; engineers of steamers within 
the precinct, one hundred and thirty-five dollars each; captains 
of companies within the precinct, each one hundred and ten 
dollars per annum; lieutenants of companies within the precinct, 
one hundred and five dollars per annum; members of steamer 
and hook and ladder companies within the precinct and house 
man at Central fire station, one hundred dollars per annum; 
outside the precinct, Engine companies Nos. 2 and 3, five hun- 
dred and ten dollars each, and Pioneer steamer company No. 3, 
sixteen hundred and fifty dollars per annum, engine company 
No. 5, five hundred and ten dollars per annum, said sum to be 
divided among the members as each com^jany shall direct; 
engineer Of steamer at Penacook, one Imndred dollars per annum ; 
assistant engineer at Penacook, twenty-five dollars; assistant 
engineer at East Concord, twenty dollars ; and assistant engineer 
at West Concord, twenty dollars. 
Sect. 4. Amend Section 30 of said chapter by inserting after tlie 
first line the following : and a member of engine company No. 5 ; 
and further amend by substituting for the word "said" in line 4 of 
said section the following: his; so that said section as amended shall 
read as follows: 

Sect. 80. A member of the Old Fort engine company No. 2 
and a member of engine company No. 5 shall annually be 



22 CITY OF CONCORD 

designated by the cliief engineer, subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Aldermen, to act as chauffeur and caretalcer of the 
proj^erty in the service of his company, a single salary to cover 
all services he may perform except such as he may perform as 
janitor, if elected such. A permanent man shall be stationed 
at the Pioneer engine house in Ward 1 and another at the 
Cataract engine house in Ward 3, each of wliora shall perform 
such fire duties as shall be assigned by the fire engineer and 
shall also, without extra eomi)ensation therefor, care for the 
property in tlie service of his company and for the engine house 
building. 

Sect. 5. All ordinances and parts of ordinances inconsistent with 
this ordinance are hereby repealed, and this ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1929. 



An Ordinance: in amentment of chapter xliii op the revised 

ordinances relative to salaries. 
Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of ihe City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That Chapter XLIII, Section 1, clause (1), of the Eevised 
Ordinances be amended by striking out the word "thirteen" and 
substituting the word ' 'fifteen, ' ' so said clause as amended shall 
read as follows: 

(1) City Messenger, fifteen hundred dollars per annum. 

Passed January 14, 1929. 



RESOLUTIONS 

EESOLUTION: IN RELATION TO PAYING SALARIES, PAY-ROLLS AND 

RENTS. 

Eesolved by ihc Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Mayor be, and liereby is, authorized to draw his warrant 
on the city treasurer for the payment of all salaries, pay-rolls and 
rents as the same shall become due during the present municipal 
term, and all bills so paid shall be laid before the Committee on 
Accounts and Claims at tlie next meeting. 

Passed January 24, 1928. 



RESOLUTIONS 23 

BESOLUTION : PROVIDING FOR PRINTING OF THE ROSTER OF THE CITY 
GOVERNMENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Tliat tlie city clerk be instructed to prepare a roster of the present 
city government and cause copies to be printed, and that the expense 
of printing tlie same shall be charged to the account of printing and 
stationery. 

Passed January 24, 1928. 



KESOLUTION: ASKING FOR SEALED PROPOSALS FOR PRINTING AND BIND- 
ING THE ANNUAL CITY REPORTS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the citj' clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1927 
and submit the same to the Finance Committee who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 

Passed January 24, 1928. 



EESOLUTION : in relation to a temporary loan NOT EXCEEDING 
SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS ($600,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Committee on Finance is hereliy authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city the sum not to exceed six hundred thousand 
drJlars ($600,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the 
municipal year 1928 and to issue notes of the city therefor upon such 
terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine. The 
said loan is to be payable from the taxes for tlie said municipal year, 
and the said Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to refund 
all or any of the said notes at their maturity; provided, however, 
that the refunding notes shall be payable within one year after the 
date of the incurrence of the debt represented by the note or notes 
refunded. 

Passed January 24, 1928. 



24 CITY OP CONCORD 

Eesolution: appropriating the sum of $11.84 for the tax col- 
lector. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of eleven dollars and eighty-four cents ($11.84) be 
and the same is hereby appropriated for the purpose of reimbursing 
the Tax Collector for money paid into the treasury by him errone- 
ously as taxes assessed against B. E. Mosher, and that the Tax Col- 
lector be authorized to treat the said taxes as never having been 
received from the said Mosher and to collect the same from him. 

Passed February 13, 1928. 



Eesolution: delegating certain powers to the finance com- 
mittee relative to purchasing supplies. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 
That the Comittee on Finance be given power to arrange with the 
heads of all city departments to have them report to the City Clerk 
from time to time the requirements of their several departments for 
supplies, fuel and other purchases which in the judgment of the 
Finance Committee may be purchased at better advantage collectively 
rather than separately, and that the Finance Committee have power 
to devise such collective methods of purchase as may in their judg- 
ment tend to economy in buying, having in mind the provisions of 
state and rrnnicipal law applicable to buying. 
Passed March 12, 1928. 



Eesolution: authorizing the trustees of trust pyNDs to sell 

and transfer certain rights. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That Harry H. Dudley, Carl 11. Foster, and Burns P. Hodgman, 
Trustees of the Trust Funds of the city of Concord be and they 
hereby are authorized and directed to sell, transfer, and assign 
fractional Warrant No. F4881 for two twenty-fifths (2/25) of one 
share in Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Eailway Company, dated 
February 15th, 1928. 

Passed March 12, 1928. 



RESOLUTIONS 25 

Resolution: authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

DEED TO property FORMERLY OWNED BY ROBERT H. JESSEMAN. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim deed 
of property formerly owned by Eobert H. Jessemaii, Ward 8, being 
two Lots No. 4470, Map D, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to 
include all taxes and costs assessed against said property which 
amounts to seventeen and 55/100 dollars ($17.55). 

The deed to this property to be made out in the name of Harry A. 
Ford. 

Passed March 12, 1928. 



Resolution: authorizing the issue of $130,000 of public im- 
provement AND REFUNDING BONDS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That pursuant to tlie Municipal Bonds Statute, Chapter 59, Public 
Laws, the city treasurer is hereby authorized and directed to issue 
one hundred and thirty thousand dollars ($130,000) of serial bonds 
of the city of Concord for the purpose of making public improvements 
of a permanent nature, consisting of the construction of new and 
permanently improved highways, the construction of highway bridges, 
the construction of sewers, and the construction of a plant for the 
disposal of waste and garbage, and for the refunding of certain 
sewer bonds of the city of Concord maturing in 1928 to the amount 
the sinking funds provided therefor shall be inadequate to pay the 
said bonds at maturity. The bonds hereby authorized shall be 
coupon bonds and shall be paid in ten equal annual payments, the 
tirst payment to be due one year from the date of the bonds. The 
city treasurer with the approval of the finance committee is author- 
ized to sell the bonds and to fix the rate of interest and the place of 
payment of the bonds. 

Passed April 9, 1928. 



26 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Resolution: regarding the disposition of the proceeds of the 
public improvement and refunding bonds. 

Ec.solvcd hi/ the Board of Aldermen of the Cifi/ of Concord, as 
follows : 

That tlie proceeds of the public improvement and refunding bonds 
autliorized liv resolution passed April 9, 1928, be appropriated and 
used for the following purposes: 

(1) For the payment of $25,000 of sewer bonds maturing in 
1928. 

(2) The balance of the proceeds for the following purposes and 
in proportion to the amounts stated: $35,000 for the construction of 
a reinforced concrete highway on the Hopkinton Road, provided that 
the city shall not become obligated to pay more than one-third of tlie 
cost of said construction; $20,000 for the construction of new 
oridges; $30,000 for the construction of new sewers; $20,000 for the 
construction of a plant for the disposal of waste and garbage. 

That the city treasurer be directed to set aside the proceeds of 
the sale of said bonds in separate funds for each of the aforesaid 
purposes in the amounts above provided, and that the mayor and city 
clerk be directed to draw against the same only upon satisfactory 
proof that the drafts made are for the purposes provided herein and 
for no other purpose, and that except for the payment of $25,000 of 
sewer bonds maturing in 1928 all payments are for public improve- 
ments of a permanent nature. 

That in case bonds for any of the above purposes shall not be 
issued and sold, the proportion above provided shall be altered in 
accordance with the item or items that may be eliminated. 

Passed April 9, 1928. 



Resolution: fixing and determining the amount op money to be 

RAISED for the ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR FOR THE USE OF THE 
CITY. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Coneord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within said city, the sum of 
three hundred forty-five thousand fifty dollars ($345,050) to defray 



RESOLUTIONS 



27 



the necessary expenses and charges of the city for the ensuing finan- 
cial year, which, together with the sums wliicli may be raised by taxes 
on railroads and from other sources, shall be appropriated as fol- 
lows: 



City Poor 



Aid 

Salaries, Overseers 



Aid 



Aid 



Aid 



Dependent Soldiers, City 

Dependent Soldiers, County 

County Poor 



Bonds and Notes 



Bridge 

City Hall 

Highway 

Public Improvement 

Departmental Equipment 

Cemetery Trust Note 

Pleasant Street Sewer 



Care 
Improvement 



Salary, Messenger 

Salary, Janitor 

Fuel 

Lights 

Incidentals 



Cemeteries 



City Hall 



$7,110.00 
390.00 

$7,500.00 

$300.00 

$1,000.00 

$15,000.00 

$ 4,000.00 

10,000.00 

10,000.00 

14,000.00 

4,000.00 

5,797.38 

2,500.00 

$50,297.38 

$15,880.00 
1,500.00 

$17,380.00 

$1,300.00 

1,248.00 

2,700.00. 

900.00 

2.000.00 



$8,148.00 



z» 


CITY OF CONCORD 






Mayor 




Salary 




$2,166.66 


Incidentals 




350.00 



$2,516.66 



City Cleric 
Salary 

Salary, Clerk Board of Public Works 
Salary, Clerks 
Incidentals 
Photostat 



$1,950.00 

200.00 

4,000.00 

900.00 

850.00 



$7,900.00 



Salary 
Incidentals 



City Solicitor 



$1,000.00 
150.00 



$1,150.00 



City Treasurer 



Salary 
Incidentals 




$1,300.00 
300.00 




$1,600.00 


Salary 
Incidentals 


City Physicians 


$700.00 
75.00 




$775.00 




Care of Clocks 




Care 




$110.00 


Salary, Sealer 
Incidentals 


Weights and Measures 


$720.00 
200.00 



$920.00 



RESOLUTIONS 29 

Police Court 

Salary, Judge $1,800.00 

Salary, Clerk 600.00 



Elections 



$2,400.00 



Assessors 

Salaries, Assessors $4,400.00 

Salary, Clerk 1,092.00 

Incidentals 2,300.00 



$7,792.00 



Tax Collector 

Salary, Collector $3,000.00 

Salary, Clerks 2,192.00 

Incidentals 1,150.00 



$6,342.00 



Salaries, Election Officers 




$2,808.00 


Incidentals 




800.00 




$3,608.00 


Engineering 


Department 




Salary, Engineer 




$3,500.00 


Salary, Assistant Engineer 




1,900.00 


Salary, Eodman 




1,200.00 


Salary, Clerk 




1,044.00 


Salary, Clerk, Vacation 




30.00 


Auto upkeep 




400.00 


Incidentals 




575.00 


Zoning 




600.00 



$9,249.00 



Fire Department 

Salary, Chief $2,600.00 

Salary, Houseman 100.00 

Salary, Permanent Men 28,900.00 

Salary, Vacations 1,112.00 



30 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Salary, Semi-annual 10 270.00 

Rent, Veterans' Association 300.00 

^^^^ 2,300.00 

I^ig^'ts 1,050.00 

Horse Hire 150.00 

Auto Upkeep • 1 825.00 

Laundry 9O.00 

Fire Inspection ' 685.00 

Fire Alarm 1,600.00 

Fire Alarm, Ward One 200.00 

Hose . 1,100.00 

Incidentals 2 400.00 

Telephones 39O.00 

Repairs 1,700.00 

Repairs, Veterans' Room 1,000.00 

Brusli Fires 200.00 



Milk Inspection 



$57,972.00 



Fire Department 

New Equipment $15,900.00 

Health Department 

Salary, Sanitary Officer $2,000.00 

Salary, Clerk $1,144.00 

Auto Upkeep 400.00 

Fumigation Supplies 100.00 

Contagious Diseases 500.00 

Incidentals 356.00 



$4,500.00 



Salary, Inspector 




$1,800.00 


Auto Upkeep 




400.00 


Incidentals 




500.00 




$2,700.00 




Department of Public Works 




Roads and Bridges 




$200,000.00 


Table Garbage 




4,000.00 



RESOLUTIONS 



31 



Garbage 

Sewers 

Trees 

Lighting Streets 



Appropriation 



Inciclevtals and Land Damages 



Inierest Notes and Bonds 
Cemetery Trust Funds 
Bonds 

Temporary Loans 
Departmental Equipment 
Pleasant Street Sewer 
White Property 



Parks 



Salary, Superintendent 

Salaries 

Shrubbery 

White Park, Pence 

Rollins Park, Fence 

Incidentals 



Appropriation 

Appropriation 

Ai^propriation 

Salaries 
Incidentals 



Playgrounds and Bath 



White Pine Blister Rust 



Municipal Clirisimas Tree 



Comfort Station 



30,.100.00 

15,000.00 

6,000.00 

43,550.00 

$299,050.00 



$3,500.00 

$1,372.03 
8,793.75 

11,725.94 

3,145.00 

118.76 

1,775.36 

$26,930.84 

$1,800.00 

3,700.00 

250.00 

500.00 

500.00 

1,250.00 

$8,000.00 

$6,118.00 

$1,000.00 

$100.00 



$1,200.00- 
200.00 



$1,400.00 



32 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Appropriation 
Wiiite Property 



Salary, Chief 

Salary, Deputy 

Salary, Captain 

Salary, Sargeant 

Salaries, Officers 

Salaries, Specials 

Repairs 

Fuel 

Lights 

Auto Supplies 

Incidentals 

Janitor 

New Ambulance 

Police Boxes 



Appropriation 
Api^ropriation 
Appropriation 



Public Library 



Police Department 



Printing and Stationery 

Repairs Buildings 

Salary, Board of Aldermen 



Miscellaneous 
Concord Family Welfare Society 
Concord District Nursing Association 
Penacook District Nursing Association 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 
N. H. Memorial Hospital 
Memorial Day 
Open Air Concerts 
E. E. Sturtevant Post G. A. R. 



$7,000.00 
1,000.00 

$8,000.00 

$2,600.00 
2,400.00 
2,000.00 
1,950.00 

28,062.00 
5,200.00 
1,000.00 
1,300.00 
1,200.00 
2,150.00 
3,100.00 
600.00 
2,850.00 
210.80 

$54,622.80 

$5,000.00 

$1,000.00 

$1,905.00 

$350.00 

350.00 

50.00 

5,000.00 

2,000.00 

460.00 

800.00 

450.00 



$9,460.00 



RESOLUTIONS 33 

Sect. 2. Tliere shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to be 
raised, a tax of three and 50/100 dollars ($3.50) on each thousand 
dollars of the value of the ratable estates taxable within said city 
for the support of the public schools, which, together with the income 
of the Abial Walker fund shall be appropriated and divided among 
the school districts according to the valuation thereof. 

There shall also be raised a sum equal to two dollars ($2.00) for 
each child residing in the city who was enrolled in the public schools 
in the last jireceding school year. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the cemeteries of the city one-third of the income from the sale of 
lots and the income derived for the care of lots and grading, which 
sum shall be dejiosited by the superintendent, or others receiving 
them, in the city treasury. The care of lots for which the city holds 
trust funds shall be paid from the money appropriated for the care 
of cemeteries, and so mucli of the income of these trust funds as may 
be thus expended shall be deposited in the city treasury at tlie close 
of the year, and the remainder in each instance credited to the in- 
dividual fund. 

Sect. 4. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated for 
the use of the Public Library the income derived from the Public 
Library Trust Funds. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 27, 1928. 



Resolution: fixing and determining the amount of money to 
be raised on the taxable property and inhabitants within 
the limits of the sewerage precinct for the ensuing finan- 
cial year. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
foUoxcs: 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered to 
be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the sewerage precinct 
of said city, the sum of twenty-five hundred thirty-seven and 50/100 
dollars ($2,537.50), to defray the necessary expenses and charges of 
said precinct for the ensuing financial year, which shall be appro- 
priated as follows : 



34 CITY OF CONCORD 

For tlic payment of interest that may become due on precinct 
bonds, $2,537.50. 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed April 27, 1928. 



Eesoi.ution: providing for the refunding of certain notes due 
JULY 29, 1928. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That for the purpose of refunding the notes amounting to thirty- 
seven thousand three hundred and seventy-six dollars and thirty 
cents ($37,376.30) maturing July 29, 1928, the city treasurer be and 
he hereby is authorized and directed to issue under such date as he 
may determine to be most convenient the following promissory notes 
of the city of Concord: one note for seven thousand three hundred 
and seventy-six dollars and thirty cents ($7,376.30) payable December 
31, 1928, and four notes for seven thousand five hundred dollars 
($7,500) each, payable respectively December 31, 1929, December 
31, 1930, December 31, 1931, and December 31, 1932, said notes to 
bear such rate of interest as the city treasurer may fix with the 
approval of the finance committee and the library trustees and to be 
payable at such place and to be sold as the city treasurer determines 
best for the purpose. 

Passed May 14, 1928. 



Eesolution: setting aside land in ward eight for use of concord 
airport. 

licsolvrd by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Tliat all land now belonging, or which hereafter may be owned 
by this city, as shown on Map C, City Engineer's Plan within the 
boundaries as follows: Beginning at a point on the Canterbury 
Eoad at the intersection with the Branch Turnpike, thence southerly 
to the land of Ellen H. Locke, thence easterly by said Ellen H. 
Locke's land and the Soucook Eiver to land of James M. Sawyer, 
thence northerly by lands now or formerly of James M. Sawyer, 



RESOLUTIONS 35 

Stephen Brown, Caleb Little, Leon B. Simpson, Fred Cherette, Charles 
H. Wheeler, Mary A. Morton, and John H. Clarke to North Pembroke 
Road, thence westerly by North Pembroke Road and Branch Turn- 
pike to point begun at, and including whatever rights the city has in 
and to the streets shown on said plan within the above described 
area, which includes the tract referred to above, be and hereby is set 
aside for use in connection with the Concord Airport. The Concord 
Airport Corporation is hereby authorized to take the custody of said 
land and to improve it for said use without expense to tlic city, 
under the following conditions; that if this land and the present air- 
port is abandoned as an active airport this land shall revert to the 
city for such use as it cares to make of it. 

(Supplementing Resolution No. 748 passed by this Board Septem- 
ber 12, 1927). 

Passed June 11, 1928. 



Resolution: relating to the public libraky. 

Bcsolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the proposed form of agreement relative to the interpretation 
of the deed of gift from William P. Fowler and Clara M. Fowler, 
dated October 18, 1888, be and the same is hereby approved, and 
Olin H. Chase, Mayor of the city of Concord, is hereby authorized 
to execute, seal and deliver the same in behalf of the city of Con- 
cord. 

Passed June 11, 1928. 



Resolution: relating to uncollected taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the recommendation of the Finance Committee regarding the 
abatement of certain taxes be approved and tliat the abatement be 
recommended by this Board; and further 

That this Board support the Collector in the collection of all un- 
paid poll taxes in accordance with the provisions of Sections 1 and 2 
of Chapter 66 of the Public Laws. 

Passed June 11, 1928. 



36 CITY OF CONCORD 

Resolution: regarding a playground in ward 8. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Tliat the property formerly owned by Stephen C. Badger Estate, 
in Ward 8, being Lot No. 4704, Map D, on the easterly side of the 
Canterbury Road, sold to tlie city for taxes, be set aside for use as a 
playground. 

Passed June 11, 1928. 



-o- 



Resolution : authorizing the mayor to execute a contract con- 
cerning THE care of the CLOCK, BELL, AND CUPOLA ON THE BOARD 
OP TRADE BUILDING. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized and instructed to 
sign, seal and deliver in behalf of the city a contract with the owners 
of the Board of Trade Building, in which the city shall assume the 
care and repairs of the clock, the bell and the cupola in which the 
same are located. 

Passed June 11, 1928. 



Resolution: authorizing the issue of bonds of the city of con- 
cord FOR the south street schoolhouse. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for the erection, 
original equipment and furnishing of a school building on the school- 
house lot on South Street, the city borrow the sum of one hundred 
thousand dollars ($100,000) in accordance with tlie request and upon 
the terms contained in the vote of the District passed at its annual 
meeting held April 5, 1928, and upon condition that the said District, 
at its special meeting to be held July 12, 1928, shall further vote to 
authorize its Board of Education to contract with the city for 
maturities in accordance with the terms of tliis resolution. Said bonds 
to be one hundred (100) in number and of the denomination of one 
thousand dollars ($1,000) each, to be dated September 1, 1928, and 
to be made payable to bearer with interest coupons attached bearing 



RESOLUTIONS 37 

interest at a rate not to exceed four and one-half (4i/^) per centum 
per annum payable semi-annually on the first day of March and the 
first day of September in eacli year. Said bonds to become due and 
payable serially, five thousand dollars ($5,000) to be payable the 
first day of September, 1929, and five thousand dollars ($5,000) on 
the first day of September of each succeeding year until and including 
the first day of September, 1948. The principal of said bonds and 
the interest coupons attached to be made payable at the National 
Shawmut Bank of Boston, Massachusetts, or at the office of the City 
Treasurer in Concord, New Hampshire, at the option of the holder. 

Sect. 2. The City Treasurer is hereby authorized to procure pro- 
posals for the sale of the bonds hereby authorized, and whichever 
bid seems for the best interest of the city shall be accepted by him, 
provided the same is approved by the finance committee. The right 
is reserved, however, to reject any or all bids. 

Sect. 3. The Mayor and City Treasurer are authorized to execute 
in the name and behalf of the city sucli agreements in writing be- 
tween it and said District as they may deem necessary and advisable 
to protect the rights of the respective parties growing out of this 
transaction. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon the passage by the 
District special meeting of the vote contemplated by Section 1. 

Passed July 9, 1928. 



Eesolution: appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1927 
on resident real estate sold to the city of concord for 
unpaid taxes. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of thirteen hundred thirty-nine and 
56/100 dollars ($1,339.56) be, and the same is hereby appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay 
taxes assessed in 1927 on resident real estate sold to the city for 
unpaid taxes as follows: 



38 CITY OF CONCORD 

1922 Taxes $ 22.75 

1923 Taxes 120.88 

1924 Taxes 185.41 

1925 Taxes 251.10 

1926 Taxes 759.42 



$1,339.56 
Sect. 2. That tlie city treasurer is liereby authorized to pay to 

the collector of taxes said amount of thirteen hundred thirty-nine 

and 56/100 dollars ($1,339.56). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 9, 1928. 



Eesolution: appropriating money to pay taxes assessed in 1927 
on non-resident real estate sold to the city of concord for 
unpaid taxes. 
Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 
Section 1. That the sura of eleven and 41/100 dollars ($11.41) be, 
and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to pay taxes assessed in 1927 on 
non-resident real estate sold to the city for unpaid taxes as follows: 
1919 Taxes $ .30 

1924 Taxes 2.22 

1925 Taxes 8.89 



$11.41 



Sect. 2. That the city treasurer is hereby authorized to i^ay to 
the collector of taxes said amount of eleven and 41/100 dollars 
($11.41). 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed July 9, 1928. 



Eesolution: appropriating ten thousand seven hundred forty- 
nine AND 56/100 dollars to pay for real estate sold to the 

CITY OF CONCORD FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1927. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 
That the sum of ten thousand seven Imndred forty-nine and 56/100 
dollars ($10,749.56) be, and the same hereby is appropriated out of 



RESOLUTIONS 39 

any money in tlie treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay the 
amount due to the City of Concord for real estate purchased at the 
tax collector 's sale of real estate for the unpaid taxes for the year 
1927. 

Passed July 9, 1928. 



Eesolution: authorizing the mayor to revoke a supposed accept- 
ance OP the workmen 's compensation act. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Mayor be authorized and instructed to file with the State 
Commissioner of Labor a formal revocation of the supposed accept- 
ance of the Workmen 's Compensation Act under date of September 
19, 1923, the same not having been authorized by this Board, it 
being the object of this resolution not to recognize said acceptance, 
but to remove the same from the records. 

Passed August 13, 1928. 



Eesolution: making additional appropriation to the account of 
repairs buildings. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of six hundred seventy-five dollars ($675.00) be, and 
the same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated for repairs buildings. Said sum to be 
used for repairs made to the Board of Trade tower. 

Passed August 13, 1928. 



Eesolution: appropriating money to pay judgments in matters 

in which the city was sued as trustee for RAYMOND MOSHEB. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of eleven and eighty-four one hundredths dollars 
($11.84) be appropriated for the payment to Albert W. Levensaler, 
Attorney for John Gaudreau and Bernard J. Perrin, of the liability 



40 CITY OF CONCORD 

of tlie city as trustee in the suits of said Gaudreau and Fcrrin against 
Raymond Moslier, the same to be charged to incidentals and land 
damages. 

Passed August 13, 1928. 



Eesolution: appropriating money for the purchase of the 
charles wirrell house. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of eighteen hundred dollars ($1,800) be, and the 
same hereby is appropriated for the purchase of the real estate of 
Charles Wirrell at the junction of Center and Washington Streets, 
the same to be used with twelve hundred dollars ($1,200) contributed 
for that purpose by various citizens with the understanding that the 
buildings thereon shall be removed within a reasonable time. 

That the Mayor be and he hereby is authorized to make contract 
for the sale and demolition or removal of the said buildings within 
a reasonable time, and that upon removal of the said buildings the 
tract of land to be acquired by the city shall forever be subject to 
the condition that no building or erection or planting shall be placed 
thereon which shall obstruct the view of those using the highway 
adjacent to said property. 

That said appropriation shall be charged to the account of inci- 
dentals and land damages. 

Passed August 13, 1928. 

Resolution: authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
TO property formerly owned by the central light and power 

COMPANY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Tliat the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim deed of 
property formerly owned by the Central Light and Power Company, 
Ward One, Lot No. 7280, Fisherville Road, sold to the city for taxes, 
at a price to include all taxes and costs assessed against said property 
which amounts to fifteen hundred fifty-three and 50/100 dollars 
($1,553.50). 



RESOLUTIONS 41 

The deed to this property to be made out in the name of Arthur 
E. Eastman. 

Passed September 10, 1928. 



Eesolution: authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by eugene t. bull. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

The Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim deed of 
property formerly owned by Eugene T. Bull, Ward 8, being five lots 
No. 4636, sold to the city for taxes, at a price to be fixed by a commit- 
tee of three, one of whom shall be appointed by the Mayor, one by the 
prospective purchaser, and one by the two persons thus chosen. The 
expense of determining the price to be paid shall be l)orne by the 
purchaser. 

The deed to tliis property to be made out in the name of Steplien 
E. Hall. 

Passed September 10, 1928. 



Eesolution: authorizing the mayor to investigate the subject 
OF stream erosion. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Mayor be authorized, in behalf of the city, to engage in 
conferences with otlier interested parties looking to ways and means of 
controlling damage done by erosion from stream flow within the 
limits of the City of Concord. 

Passed September 10, 1928. 



Resolution: appropriating money for improvements at the north 
entrance of blossom hill cemetery. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) be and the same 
hereby is appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otlier- 



42 CITY OF CONCORD 

wise appropriated for paving tlie road at the north entrance of the 
Blossom Hill Cemetery and for constructing at the same place a 
storm sewer with manholes, catch-basins and other necessary appur- 
tenances. The said appropriation is to be expended under the direc- 
•tion of a special committee composed of the Mayor, the City Engineer, 
the Superintendent of Streets and the Superintendent of Cemeteries. 
Passed October 8, 1928. 



Resolution : authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by the central light and power 

COMPANY. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Tliat the Mayor is hereby authorized in tlie execution of the quit- 
claim deed of property formerly owned by the Central Light and 
Power Company, Ward One, to include Lot No. 7272 in addition to 
Lot No. 7280, as passed by a resolution dated September 10, 1928. 

Passed October 8, 1928. 



RESOLUTION: AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO EXECUTE AND DELIVER A 
DEED OF WATER WORKS LAND IN WEBSTER. 

Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Mayor be and he hereby is authorized in the name and 
behalf of the city to execute and deliver to Isabel Anderson and 
Henry H. Austin a deed of the land owned by the city for Water 
Works uses at or near the outlet of Long Pond in Webster, New 
Hampshire, in accordance with the recommendation of the Board of 
Water Commissioners, one-half the taxes for 1928 to be paid by the 
purchaser. 

Passed October 8, 1928. 



Resolution: appropriating money for city poor. 
Besolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of two thousand dollars ($2,000) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for city poor. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



RESOLUTIONS 43 

Resolution : appropriating money for incidentals and land 

DAMAGES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of four hundred dollars ($400) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for incidentals and land damages. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: appropriating money for printing and stationery. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of tliree hundred dollars ($300) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for printing and stationery. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: appropriating money for comfort station. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of five hundred dollars ($500) be, and the same 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not other- 
wise appropriated for comfort station. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: authorizing the mayor to give a right of way 
across land owned by the city. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and he hereby is authorized to execute in the 
name of the city all such papers as may be necessary to give to the 
New Hampshire Public Service Company a right of way for poles 
and wires over lot number 4492B as shown on the assessor's map, 



44 CITY OF CONCORD 

said riglit of way to be one lumdred and twenty-five feet (125 ft.) in 
Avidth its entire lengtli. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: appropriating money for repairs buildings. 

Eesolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of three hundred fifty dollars ($3.j0) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise approi)riated for repairs buildings. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: authorizing the committee on fire department to 

MAKE A lease FOR FIRE STATION. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Fire Department be authorized to sign, in 
behalf of the City of Concord, a lease from George W. Howe of Con- 
cord, to a tract of land with the buildings thereon situated on tlie 
Loudon road, to be used for a fire station, at a rental of ten dollars 
per month, said lease to carry a clause giving the city an option to 
buy the property any time within one year. 

Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: authorizing the mayor to execute and deliver to 
c. L. piper a deed of certain land. 

Eesolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Tliat the Mayor be and he hereby is authorized to execute and 
deliver to C. L. Piper in the name and behalf of the city a quitclaim 
deed upon payment of the purchase price of two hundred and fifty 
dollars covering the following tract of land in Ward 3 : 

Beginning at a stone bound in the westerly line of the right of way 
of the Boston and Maine Railroad ; thence north 62 degrees 7 minutes, 
west 1.51.7 feet to an iron pin in a ledge; thence north 4 degrees 



RESOLUTIONS . 45 

east 176.9 feet to a stone bound; tlience north 87 degrees 28 minutes 
east 88.7 feet to a stone bound in the westerly line of the right of 
way of the Boston & Maine Railroad; tlience southerly by the said 
right of way 253.33 feet to the bound begun at. 
Passed November 12, 1928. 



Resolution: authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim deed 
to property formerly owned by f. raymond potter. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim deed 
of property of the Concord Land and Water Power Co., Lot No. 28, 
Gladstone Avenue, being No. 6283, Assessor's Map, Sheet No. 73, 
formerly owned by F. Raymond Potter and sold to the city June 30, 
1924, for non-payment of 1923 taxes. The price for the above lot to 
include all taxes and costs assessed against said property which 
amounts to twenty-five and 31/100 dollars ($2;'). 31). 

The deed to this property to be made out in the name of the Con- 
cord Electric Co. 

Passed December 31, 1928. 



Resolution: relative to the discontinuance of a portion op the 
iiopkinton road near st. paul's school. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a certain portion of the Hopkinton Road, so-called, near St. 
Paul's School, in said Concord, beginning on the westerly side of the 
Dunbarton Road, so-called, at the intersection of the Dunbarton Road 
with Pleasant Street, so-called, and extending westerly a distance of 
thirty-three hundred eighty-six (3386) feet, more or less, from the 
point marked A to the point marked B on the plan annexed to the 
petition for the discontinuance of said highway, be, and the same is 
hereby discontinued, upon condition that St. Paul 's School, the 
petitioner for said discontinuance, shall at its own cost and expense, 
and before said discontinuance shall finally become effective, construct 
a new highway, subject to the approval of and acceptance by the 
Board of Public Works of said Concord, to the extent of preparing 
the same for the laying of the cement, including the building of all 



46 CITY OF CONCORD 

necessary culverts from tlie point marked C to the point marked D 
on said plan, — and upon further condition that an agreement be 
executed by St. Paul's Scliool providing that the City of Concord, by 
its agents and servants, shall at all times have the right to enter the 
highway so discontinued for the purpose of laying, relaying or re- 
pairing city water or sewer pipes therein, and upon the further condi- 
tion that such discontinuance shall not become effective until said 
new highway shall be opened for travel. 
Passed December 31, 1928. 



Eesolution: relative to the laying out of a new highway over 
land of st. paul's school in said concord. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
foUotvs : 

That a public highway be, and the same is, hereby laid out and 
established in Millville, near St. Paul 's School, in said Concord, said 
highway being described as follows : 

Beginning at a point on the center line of Pleasant Street as 
heretofore laid out, 720.1 feet easterly of a stone bound opposite 
Fiske Eoad; thence south 81° 25' west a distance of 209.7 feet; 
thence curving to the right with a radius of 1G37.1 feet a 
distance of 638.1 feet (said curve having an intersection angle 
of 22° 20') ; thence on a tangent north 76° 15' west a distance 
of 1477.9 feet ; thence curving to the right with a radius of 
1910.0 feet a distance of 438.3 feet (said curve having an inter- 
section angle of 13° 09') ; thence on a tangent bearing north 
63° 06' west a distance of 770.9 feet; thence on a curve to the 
left with a radius of 1910.0 feet a distance of 292.2 feet (said 
curve having an intersection angle of 8° 46'). The above de- 
scribed line to be the center line of said highway, and said high- 
way to be 55 feet wide for the first 62 feet, 25 feet being on the 
north side of the above described line; thence 60 feet wide, 30 
feet each side of the above line, for 2856 feet; then 80 feet wide, 
50 feet being on the north of the above described line for the 
remaining distance, — as shown on plan annexed to the petition 
for the laying out of said highway, between points D and E on 
said plan. 

Tliat said liigliway shall be constructed by said St. Paul 's School 
between the point marked C and tlie point marked D on said plan to 



RESOLUTIONS 47 

tlie extent of preparing said liigliway for the laying of cement and 
the construction of all necessary culverts without cost or expense to 
the said City of Concord, and said highway shall be built in all 
respects subject to the approval of, and acceptance by, the Board 
of Public Works of said City of Concord. 
Passed December 31, 1928. 



Eesolution : in relation to a temporary loan not exceeding 
six hundred thousand dollars ($600,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to borrow on 
the credit of the city the sum not to exceed six hundred thousand 
dollars ($600,000) for expenses in anticipation of taxes for the 
municipal year 1929 and to issue notes of the city therefor upon such 
terms and for such amounts as the committee shall determine. The 
said loan is to be payable from the taxes for the said municipal year, 
and the said Committee on Finance is hereby authorized to refund 
all or any of the said notes at their maturity; provided, however, that 
the refunding notes shall be payable within one year after the date 
of the incurrence of the debt represented by the note or notes re- 
funded. 

Passed Jan. 14, 1929. 



Eesolution : appropriating money for deficits in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty thousand two hundred ninety- 
two and 85/100 dollars ($20,292.85) be, and hereby is, appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay 
outstanding claims as follows: 

Assessors - $ 167.37 

Care, City Clocks 12.50 

Cemeteries * 1,008.09 

City Poor 680.93 

County Poor 6,409.68 



48 CITY OF CONCORD 



Dependent Soldiers, City 


5.00 


Garbage 


1,418.91 


Elections 


465.64 


Improvements, North Entrance Blossom Hill Cemetery 


480.20 


Interest on Bonds 


1,397.50 


Interest on Temporary Loans 


1,779.13 


Interest on White Property 


3.96 


Parks 


162.65 


Eoads and Bridges 


6,301.29 



$20,292.85 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Assessors for the year 1928, the sum of seventeen and 75/100 dollars 
($17.75), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Garbage for the year 1928, the sum of two hundred nineteen and 
68/100 dollars ($219.68), the same being the earnings of this de- 
partment. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Parks 
for the year 1928, the sum of one hundred seven and 90/100 dollars 
($107.90), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Police 
and Watch for the year 1928, the sum of three hundred eighty-six 
and 96/100 dollars ($386.96), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 

Sect. 6. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Public 
Library for the year 1928, the sum of four hundred forty-seven 
dollars ($447), the same being the earnings of this department. Also 
that there be transferred to the Public Library the sum of three 
hundred fifty dollars ($350), this sum representing the rent of the 
battery station on the White Property from the first of August. 

Sect. 7. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Roads 
and Bridges for the year 1928, the sum of eighteen thousand six 
hundred seventy-four and 99/00 dollars ($18,674.99), tlie same being 
the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 8. That there be transferred to the appropriation for Trees 
for the year 1928, the sum of fifty-eight and 61/100 dollars ($58.61), 
the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 9. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Sewers for the year 1928, the sum of eighteen hundred sixty-eiglit 
and 05/100 dollars ($1,868.05), the same being the earnings of this 
department. 



RESOLUTIONS 49 

Sect. 10. Tliis resolution sliall take effect upon its iiassage. 
Passed January 14, 1929. 

Eesolution: asking for sealed proposals for printing and bind- 
ing THE annual city REPORTS. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 
That the City Clerk be, and hereby is, instructed to ask for sealed 
proposals for printing and binding the city reports for the year 1928 
and submit the same to the Finance Committee who shall have full 
power to act in the matter. 
Passed January 14, 1929. 



Eesolution: authorizing the mayor to withdraw from the 
merrimack county savings bank the sum of two hundred 

eighty-six and 22/100 dollars on account OF WEST GARDEN. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be, and hereby is, authorized to withdraw from the 
Merrimack County Savings Bank the sum of two hundred eighty-six 
and 22/100 dollars ($286.22) to reimburse the city for money ex- 
pended in the care of the West Garden. 

The said sum of two hundred eighty-six and 22/100 dollars 
($286.22) being a portion of the money deposited in said Savings 
Bank by the heirs of the late Frank W. Rollins for changes and im- 
provements to be made in the said West Garden. 

Passed January 14, 1929. 



Resolution: donating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of 

THE income from THE DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be hereby 
donated out of the income from the David Osgood trust, to the poor 
children of the French Parochial School, who are inhabitants of the 
City of Concord, for the purpose of buying school books for said 
children. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25) be paid to and 
expended under the direction of the principal of said school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 14, 1929. 



CITY QOVERNMENT, 1928 



Inaugurated fourth Tuesday in January, 1928 

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT 



MAYOR 

Salary, $2,000 per annum 

* HON. OLIN H. CHASE 
** ROBERT W. BROWN 

Office: City Hall, Room 4 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Aldermen-at-large, salary, $200 per annum. Ward Alderman, salary, $75 per 
annum, with additional $10 to each member of the Committee on Accounts 
and Claims. 

Alder men-at-Large 

Term Expires January, 1930 

CHARLES H. ROWE, 38 South State Street 

ROBERT W. BROWN, 3 Cambridge Street 

***EVERETT L. DAVIS, Penacook 

WILLIAM W. KENNEDY, 67 Rumford Street 

Term Expires January, 1932 

CHARLES J. McKEE, 7 Badger Street 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 84 School Street 

CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS, East Concord 

(Term expires January, 1930) 

♦Died December 8, 1928. 
**Elected Mayor, December 12, 1928, by the Board of Aldermen. 
•♦♦Elected to fill vacancy. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



51 



Ward 1- 
Ward 2- 
Ward 3- 
Ward 4- 
Ward 5- 
Ward 6- 
Ward 7- 
Ward 8- 
Ward 9- 



Ward Aldermen 

-WILLIAM H. McGIRR, 
-FREEMAN F. POTTER, 
-CLINTON 0. PARTRIDGE, 
-GUY H. CUTTER, 



Penacook 

East Concord 

West Concord 

18 Ridffe Road 



-CLARENCE J. WASHBURN, 57 Center Street 
-LEVI L. HEATH, 16 South State Street 

-WALDO S. ROUND Y, 125 South Street 

-EVERETT S. MAHONEY, R. F. D. 6 

-JAMES McGUIRE, Jr., 212 North State Street 



CITY CLERK 



Elected biennially in Januarj' by the Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,950 per 

annum 



ARTHUR E. ROBY 

Office: City Hall, Room 3 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor, ex-officio 
ROBERT W. BROWN, Mayor, ex-officio 



CHARLES H. ROWE, 
ROBERT W. BROWN, 
EVERETT L. DAVIS, 
WILLIAM W. KENNEDY, 
CHARLES J. McKEE, 
WILLIAM I^. STEVENS, 
CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS, 



Term Expires January, 1930 

1930 
1930 
1930 
1932 
1932 
1930 



52 CITY OF CONCORD 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Roundy, Heath, Kennedy 

On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Cutter, Stevens, Malioney 

On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen ]\Ialioney, Partridge, Potter 

On Engrossed Ordinances — 

Aldermen BroAvn, Potter, Roundy 

On Finance — 

Mayor, Aldermen Brown, Stevens, Cutter, ]\IcKee 

On Fire Department — 

Aldermen Tebbetts, jNIcGirr, IMcGuire 

On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Heath, McGuire, Partridge 

On Police and License — 

Aldermen Rowe, JMcGirr, Washburn 

Committee on Playgrounds and Bath ■ — 

Aldermen Kennedy, Washburn, McGirr, Tebbetts, Roundy, 
McGuire; Mrs. Cora Sullivan, Mrs. I\Iaude N. Black- 
wood, Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins. 



CITY TREASURER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond to the acceptance 
of the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. Salary, $1,200 per annum, and $100 
as Treasurer of Cemeteries. 

CARL H. FOSTER 

Office: First National Bank 



CITY GOVERNMENT 53 

CITY ENGINEER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salarj% $3,500 per annum 

FRED W. LANG 

Offie: City Hall. 
O 



CITY MESSENGER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,300 per annum 

* EDWARD M. PROCTOR 
** FRED G. CROWELL 



-0- 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Elected annually in January by Board of Aldermen. Bond within six days to 
satisfaction of the board. Salary, $3,000 per annum 

AMOS B. MORRISON 

Office: City Hall 



ASSESSORS 

Salary, $1,200 per annum. Clerk, $2,000 per annum 
Office: Room 5, City Hall 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Chairman, 

Term expires January, 1934 
JAMES H. MORRIS, Clerk, " " " 1932 

***MICHAEL H. DONOVAN, " " " 1930 

****MICHAEL J. LEE 



SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS 

Appointed by Board of Public Works. Term, unlimited. Bond, $1,000. 
Salarj', $3,500. 

ORRIN W. HEAD 

Office: City Hall 

♦Resigned April 27, 1928. 
**Elected to fill vacancy. 
***Died May 16, 1928. 
****Elected to fill vacancy. 



54 CITY OF CONCORD 

SANITARY OFFICER 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $2,000 per annum 

CHARLES E. PALMER 

Office: City Hall 



-0- 



MILK INSPECTOR 

Appointed by the Board of Health. Term, unlimited. Salary, $1,800 per amium 

AUSTIN B. PRESBY 



CITY PHYSICIAN 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $600 per annum 

DR. WALTER C. ROWE 

Office: 26 Green Street 



ASSISTANT CITY PHYSICIAN 

Elected biermially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum 

DR. E. U. SARGENT 

Office : Penacook 



CITY SOLICITOR 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $1,000 per annum 

ELWIN L. PAGE 



CITY GOVERNMENT 55 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR 

Elected biennially in January by Board of Aldermen 

Ward i— WILLIAM H. McGIRR, Penacook 

Salary, $30 per annum 

Ward 5— FREEMAN F. POTTER, East Concord 

Salary, $10 per annum 

Wards 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, P— ARTHUR E. ROBY, City Hall 

Salarj', $350 per annum 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT 

Appointed by Governor and Council. Salarj', $1,800 per annum 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS 

Office: Police Station 



-0- 



CLERK MUNICIPAL COURT 

Appointed by Justice. Salary, $600 per annum 

JOHN W. STANLEY 



CHIEF 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Bond of $1,000 required 
Salary, $2,600 per annum 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL 

Office : Police Station 



DEPUTY CHIEF 

Appointed by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,400 per annum 

VICTOR I. MOORE 



56 



CITY OF CONCORD 



REGULAR POLICE AND NIGHT WATCH 

Appointed by Chief, subject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Term, un- 
limited. Salary, $1,650 per annum to $1,916 according to term of service. 
Police Station service, $1,000 to $1,300. 

J. Edward Silva, Captain of Night Watch 

Salary, $2,000 per annum 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant 

Salary, $1,950 per annum 

HOUSE OFFICERS 

Samuel L. Bachelder George H. Silsby 

Irving B. Robinson 



Samuel Rodd, 
William E. White, 
Cleveland H. Curtis, 
Arthur W. Mclsaac, 
Paul H. Moore, 
Merle F. Densmore, 
Joseph G. Andrews, 



PATROLMEN 

F. Scott Rogers, 
Eugene G. Densmore, 
James J. Halligan, 
George M. Dooley, 
Abraham D. Gushing, 
Thomas M. Harrison. 



Joseph King, 
Edward L. Rowland, 
D. Otis Swain, 
Mark D. Casey, 
John P. Walsh, 
Nelson E. Strong, 
James M. Kent, 
Thomas Andrews, 
Walter H. Bean, 
Fred S. Pendleton, 
William Welcome, 



RESERVE OFFICERS 

George H. Abbott, Captain 
Frank Silva, 



Herbert E. Clark, 
Addison N. Martin, 
Perley H. Morse, 
II ay ward C. Logan, 
Harry D. Long, 
Michael Mulligan, 

o'lier B. Clough, 

olm Kenney, 
G. E. Percy, 
n^orge A. Griffin. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 57 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



TRUSTEES 

Appointed biennially in Januarj' by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ward i— CHARLES H. SANDERS. 
Ward 5— OSCAR H. WOODWARD. 
Ward 5— LEVIN J. CHASE. 
Ward 4— JOHN A. BLACKWOOD. 
Word .7— WILLIS D. THOMPSON. 
Ward 6—1. EUGENE KEELER. 
Ward 7— WILLIAM W. FLINT. 
Ward 8— PERLEY B. PHILLIPS. 
Ward 5— PATRICK J. BOLGER. 



LIBRARIAN 

Elected annually by trustees of library. 

GRACE BLANCHARD 



ASSISTANTS 

JOSEPHINE M. BROWN 
MARY W. DENNETT 
HELEN C. CLARKE 
RUTH P. MELVIN 



58 



CITY OF CONCORD 



CITY WATER WORKS 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Two appointed annually in March, for four years, by Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. Salary, none. 
Office: Room 1, City Hall. 

OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor, cx-officio 
ROBERT W. BROWN, Mayor, ex-officio 



Te 



PATRICK H. CAIIILL, 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, 

JAMES W. JAMESON, M.D 

H. H. DUDLEY, 

BENJAMIN H. ORR, 

CARLOS H. FOSTER, 

PRANK P. QUIMBY, 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, 

President — H. H. Dudley 
Clerk — Burns P. Hodgman 



rm expires March 21, 1929 
1929 



1930 
1930 
1931 
1931 
1932 
1932 



SUPERINTENDENT OF WATER WORKS 

Appointed by Board of Water Commissioners. Salary, $4,000 per annum 
Term, unlimited 

PERCY R. SANDERS 

OfRce: City Hall 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 



CARL H. FOSTER, 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, 



Term ex{)ires January, 1929 
1930 
1931 



CITY GOVERNMENT 59 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 



CHIEF ENGINEER 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. Salary, $2,600 per annum 

WILLIAM C. GREEN 



-0- 



ASSISTANT ENGINEERS 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Term, unlimited. 

FOR PRECINCT 

Salary, $145 each per annum 

W. A. KING 
J. EDWARD MORRISON 

FOR PENACOOK 
Salary, $100 per anniun 

FRED M. DODGE 

FOR EAST CONCORD 
Salary, $20 per annum 

W. E. VIRGIN 

FOR WEST CONCORD 
Salary, $20 per annum 

GEORGE W. KEMP 



STEWARD FIRE STATION, EAST CONCORD 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $30 per annum 

M. J. LACROIX 



60 CITY OF CONCORD 

SUPERINTENDENT FIRE ALARM, PENACOOK 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, $100 per annum 

FRED M. DODGE 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 

FRED W. LANG, ex-ojficio 

Assistant Building Inspector 

WILLIAM C. GREEN, ex-officio 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CITY CLOCKS 

Elected by Board of Aldermen. Salary, 585 per annum 

MERVIN E. BANKS 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Appointed biennially in January, by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor, ex-officio 
ROBERT W. BROWN, Mayor, ex-officio 
DR. WALTER C. ROWE, ex-offcio 
DR. DONALD G. McIVOR 



REGISTRAR OF VITAL STATISTICS 

ARTHUR E. ROBY 

Office: City Hall 



CITY GOVERNMENT 61 

BOARD OF HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS 



No Salary. 



FRED W. LAXG, 
WILLIAM C. GREEN, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 



City Engineer 

Chief of the Fire Department 

Siipt. of the Water Works 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

The Mayor, Building Inspector and Assistant Buikling 
Inspector 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

Two appointed annually in January, for three years, by Mayor, subject to 
confirmation by Board of Aldermeru No salary. 

OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor, ex-officio 

ROBERT W. BROWN, Mayor, ex-officio 

GARDNER G. EMMONS, Term expires January, 1929 

1929 
1930 
1930 
1931 
1931 



CHARLES L. JACKMAN, 

B. C. WHITE, 

ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON, 

WILL J. DREW, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, Jr., 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PARKS 
FRANK ATKINSON 

Salary, $1,500 per annum 



62 CITY OF CONCORD 

COMMISSIONERS OF CEMETERIES 

Two members appointed annually in March, for three years, by M&yor, sub- 
ject to confirmation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor, ex-officio 
ROBERT W. BROWN, Mayor, ex-officio 

CHARLES G, REMICK, Term expires March, 1929 

ALLEN HOLLIS, " " " 1929 

HERBERT G. ABBOTT, " " " 1930 

HARRY G. EMMONS, " " " 1930 

FRED W. LANG, " " " 1931 

CHARLES L. JACKMAN, " " " 1931 



SUPERINTENDENT OF CEMETERIES 

FRED N. HAMMOND 

Salary, $2,400 per annum. 



UNDERTAKERS 

Appointed biennially in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

HAMILTON A. KENDALL 
CARLOS H. FOSTER 
HIRAI\[ G. KILKENNY 
FRANK J. KELLEY 
WILLIAM H. HOYT 
JOHN F. WATERS 
EMILE J. TURGEON 



CITY GOVERNMENT 63 



INSPECTOR OF PETROLEUM 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, one-fourth cent per gallon for inspection, paid by owner 
of oil. 

CLARENCE I. TEBBETTS 



FENCE VIEWERS 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, |2 per day, paid by parties interested. 

FRED W. LANG 
EVERETT H. RUNNELLS 
ELLSWORTH P. RUNNELLS 



POUND KEEPER 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, two cents each for impounding sheep, and five cents each 
for all other creatures, paid by owners. 

OMAR L. SHEPARD, JR. 



SEALERS OF LEATHER 

Appointed annuallj- in Januarj' by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by person employing. 

JOHN C. THORNE 



-0- 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
Aldermen. Salary, $720. 

GEORGE A. DEARBORN 

Office: 27 Beacon Street 



-0- 



CULLER OF STAVES 

Appointed annually in Januarj' by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 

of Aldermen. Fees, bbl. staves, 28 cents ; hhd. staves, 34 cents ; pipe staves, 

40 cents; butt sta.ves, 45 cents; hoop, 50 cents; heading, 33 cents per M. — 
paid by party for whom culling is done. 

FRED H. PERLEY 



64 



CITY OF CONCORD 



WEIGHERS OF HAY, COAL, ETC. 



Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price per load, paid by party requiring service. 



Arthur G. Stevens 
Everett L. Davis 
Hallett E. Patten 
Arthur N. Day 
James F. Fitzgerald 
Fred H. Perley 
Fred I. Rolfe 
William J. Mullen 
Henry A. Brown 
Charles E. Hardy 
PYank Jutras 
Frank L. Smith 
Charles J. Sawyer 
E. E. Young 
H. C. Morgan 
R. J. Rowland 
Asher E. Ormsbee 
E. W. Saltmarsh 
R. W. Gordon 
Fred E. Wattles 
Chester D. Parkhursi 
J. A. Provost 
John White 
Nelson Forrest 
George B. Whittredge 
Howard Perley 
W. A. Flanders 
J. S. Callahan 
C. H. Staniels 
Frank J. Clancy 
G. W. Love joy 



Alphonse King 
John S. Chandler 
William Gooden 
Guy Rowell 
Clarence S. Anderson 
C. H. Hanson 

C. J. Roers 
Roger W. Fowler 
Charles E. Cook 
V. J. Bennett 
Waldo A. Holmes 
Joseph W. Brawn 
Earl Woodbury 
S. A. Clark 

G. F. Rogers 
Herbert A. Stuart 
J. W. Currier 
G. W. Hunter 

D. C. Taylor 
A. M. Follett 
Phillip Desmarais 
Omar C. Allard 

T. F. O'Neil 
J. T. Turcotte 
Harold C. Lee 
Frank Edmunds 
William Arthur Stevens 
Algernon B. Tewksbury 
Ellsworth A. White 
Thomas Murphy 
W. J. Callahan 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



65 



Robert E. Gordon 
E. W. Neff 
Duane E. Gordon 
M. J. Moses 
Frank R. Garland 
Robert A. Ranson 
Ben P. Ahern 
Harry W. Drew 
Stillman H. Clough 
Everett Gagnon 
James S. Chalmers 
Arthur M. Virgin 
James Maloney 
Henry F. Robinson 
C. E. Moulton 
George T. Kenney 



Robert J. B\Tne 
Herbert J. Kennedy 
George H. Abbott 
Alfred T. Vezina 
J. E. Kiley 
George Peaslee 
Harold W. Howe 
Ira S. B. Flanders 
Rowland C. Kenney 
Richard J. O'Brien 
John J. Morrison 
William M. Haynes 
Howard B. Moore 
William H. Moar 
Harley Osgood 
Richard J. Britton 



CITY WEIGHER 

ROMULUS P. TURCOTTE 

Office : Rear of Police Station. 



SURVEYORS OF PAINTING 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



George Abbott, Jr. 
Charles F. Mudgett 



George Griffin 



SURVEYORS OF MASONRY 

Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees, reasonable price, paid by party employing. 



Fred L. Plummer 
Stephen H. Swain 



William Rowell 



66 



CITY OF CONCORD 



SURVEYORS OF WOOD, LUMBER AND BARK 



Appointed annually in January by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. Fees for surveying shingles and clapboards, 4 cents per M. ; 
boards and timber, 16 cents per M. ; measuring cord wood, 4 cents per cord 
or load, or 40 cents per hour for over twenty cords — paid by person employing. 



Arthur G. Stevens 
John A. Blackwood 
Albert 0. Preston 
Edgar D. Eastman 
George Darrah 
Arthur N. Day 
Prank E. Dimond 
Henry Rolfe 
William E. Virgin 
John Rolfe 
Fred G. Chandler 
Clinton 0. Partridge 
Harvey H. Hay ward 
Alfred D. Mayo 
Louis P. Merrill 
Joseph Messier 
Herbert W. Rolfe 
Herman C. Colby 
Edward L. Poster 
C. H. Osgood 
Richard J. Hennessey 
Stacy E. Oliver 
Harry Walsh 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Harry L. Billings 
Guy P. Avery 
J. 0. Clark 
Charles A. Wilkins 
Earle P. Boutwell 
Prank J. Geddis 



Oliver Reno 
Silas Wiggin 
P. E. Prost 
Irving T. Chesley 
Arthur C. Stewart 
Fred W. Lang 
Everett L. Davis 
Ezra B. Runnells 
David L. Carson 
Oliver J. Pifield 
Hallett E. Patten 
W. J. Mullen 
Henry M. Richardson 
' Arthur R. Stewart 
Edward R. Poster 
Irving Burbank 
John E. Colton 
Everett Runnells 
Clifford G. Culver 
Horace B. Annis 
S. 0. Daigneau 
Henry J. McCrossan 
Robert E. Philbrick 
William T. Tippet 
Algernon B. Tewksbury 
Solon Colby 
Roy C. Titus 
Gerald M. Estell 
George Thurber 
Robert J. Mullin 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



67 



LICENSED DRAIN LAYERS 

Appointed annually in Januarj- by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. No salary. 



William Rowell 
J. Henry Sanborn 
Everett S. Mahoney 
P. Henry D. Leary 
William J. Bishop 
William A. Lee 
Richard J. Lee 
Zeb P. Swain 
Albert S. Trask 
Charles W. Bateman 
Elmer E. Babb 
Clarence J. Spead 
W. J. Sleeper 
John W. McGowan 
Henry H. Kennedy 
John Sweeney 
John R. Hall 
Michael J. Lee 
Arthur W. Brown 
Edward E. Beane 
Robert F. Keane, Jr. 
Victor T. Lauze 
William H. Murphy 
Malcolm Butler 
W. Arthur Bean 
Henrv Morrill 



Willis H. Robbins 
Ilenr}' Rolfe 
G. Arthur Nichols 
Fred L. Plummer 
John H. Clark 
Xed J. Morrill 
Seth R. Hood 
William Stanley 
George E. Robinson 
Joseph J. Booth 
Arthur W. Buntin 
Harris S. Parmenter 
Manley W. Morgan 
Henry Riley 
Fred W. Lang 
Charles H. Berry 
Niram M. Kays 
Wilfred H. Brennan 
James H. Brannigan 
E. H. Smart 
John C. Smith 
L J. Huneau 
Philip W. Clark 
Richard Morrill 
Georji'e E. Youngr 



-0- 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS 

Appointed annually in March by Mayor, subject to confirmation by Board 
of Aldermen. No salary. 

WALTER C. ROWE, M.D., ex-officio 
FRED W. LANG, ex-officio 
ARTHUR W. BROWN 



68 CITY OF CONCORD 

WARD OFFICERS 
SUPERVISORS OF CHECK-LISTS 

Ward i— ALFRED J. YORK 
ELI LAFLAMME 
GEORGE F. McGIRR 

Ward 5— HAROLD A. GATE 
LEON S. POTTER 
EDWARD M. SABEN 

Ward 5— EDWARD P. ROBINSON 
JOHN N. ENGEL 
EVA J. FARNUM 

Ward 4— HARRY D. CHALLIS 

CARLTON M. STRONG 
RUSSELL M. FRASIER 

Ward 5—E. W. WALKER 
CARL H. NASON 
EDWARD A. DAME 

Ward ^—CHARLES DUNCAN 

ARTHUR W. STEVENS 
ERNEST W. SALTMARSH 

Ward 7— HAROLD M. FARRAR 
RAYMOND S. SIBLEY 
JAMES P. HAYWARD 

Ward 8— FRED SMITH 

WILLAM S. CHENETTE 
ALBERT J. AYOTTE 

Ward 5— PATRICK J. CAVAGHAN 
WILLIAM A. DREW 
GEORGE KENNEY 



CITY GOVERNMENT 69 

WARD CLERKS 

Ward :Z— ORION H. HARDY 
Ward 5— WILLIS R. LYNA 
Ward 5— EARL N. WOODBURY 
Ward i— WILLIAM C. BRUNEL 
Ward 5— HAROLD W. GREATOREX 
Ward 5— GUY JEWETT 
Ward 7— GEORGE B. WHITTREDGE 
Ward 8— LOUIS P. BOISVERT 
Ward 5— EARLE W. GAIGE 



MODERATORS 

Ward i— JOHN H. ROLFE 

Ward 5— GEORGE A. HILL 

Ward 5— J. HAROLD JOHNSON 

Ward 4— JOSEPH S. OTIS 

Ward 5— WILLIAM L. STEVENS 

Ward 5— ARTHUR E. DOLE 

Ward 7— CLARENCE 0. PHILBRICK 

Ward S— ROBERT E. PHILBRICK 

Ward 5— PAUL E. CASEY 



70 CITY OF CONCORD 

MAYORS OF CITY OF CONCORD 

The original charter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 10, 
1853, and mitil 1880 the Mayor was elected annually. Since 1880 the Mayor 

has been elected for two j-ears at each biennial election in November. Under 
the City Charter, adopted May 11, 1909, the Mayor was elected, in December, 

1910, for one year, and biennially there after in November beginning in the 
year. 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW, 1853- '54 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1856- '57- '58 

" MOSES T. WILLARD, 1859- '60 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, 1861- '62 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE, 1863- '64 

" MOSES HUMPHREY, '65 

" JOHN ABBOTT, 1866- '67 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS, 1868- '69 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES, 1870- '71 

" JOHN KIMBALL, 1872- '73- '74- '75 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY, 1876- '77 

" HORACE A. BROWN,t 1878- '79- '80 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880- '81- '82 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN, 1883- '84- '85- '86 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON, 1887- '88 

" STILLMAN HUMPHREY, 1889- '90 

" HENRY W. CLAPP, 1891- '92 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL, 1893- '94 

" HENRY ROBINSON, 1895- '96 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH, 1897- '98 

" NATHANIEL E. MARTIN, 1899-1900 

" HARRY G. SARGENT, 1901- '02 

" CHARLES R. CORNING, 1903- '08 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1909- '15 

" NATHANIEL W. HOBBS, 1916- '17 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH, 1918-'19 

" HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN, 1920- '23 

" WILLIS H. FLINT, 1924- '25 

" FRED N. MARDEN,** 1926- '27 

" OLIN H. CHASE,*** 1928 

" ROBERT W. BROWN, **** 1928 

•Died in office, January 13, 1856. 
fTerm closed in November, 1880. 
J Term commenced in November, 1880. 
•♦Died in office, November 23, 1927. 
•♦*Died in office, December 8, 1928. 
••♦♦Elected to fill vacancy, December 12, 1928. 



IN MEMORIAM 

"Whereas, God in his infinite wisdom, has taken from us 
into eternal life, Hon. Olin H. Chase, Mayor of the City of 
Concord, be it therefore 

Resolved, that we, the members of the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, hereby express our sincere feeling 
of grief and sense of personal loss, in the termination of our 
earthly relationships with JMayor Chase, who has served our 
city as Chief Executive, faithfully, impartially, and with 
signal ability. 

Resolved, that Mayor Chase's generous nature, absolute 
fairness, keen sense of humor and spirit of comradeship and 
service have endeared him to all of us, and the pleasant 
memories of our joint service with him on this Board, will 
endure throughout our lives. Be it further 

Resolved, that these resolutions be spread upon the offi- 
cial records of the Board of Aldermen, and a copy sent to 
Mrs. Chase. 

In Board of Aldermen January 14, 1929. Adopted. 



DEPARTMENT REPORTS 



SCHOOL REPORT 

Board of Education, 1928-1929 



MEMBERS 



-o- 



TERM EXPIRES 
1929 



^Ie. Bennett Batchelder, 
Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins, 
Mr. Joseph S. Otis, 



1930 



Benjamin W. Couch, Esq., 
Mrs. Grace A. Moulton, 
Mr. George A. Hill, 



1931 



Mr. Leigh S. Hall, 

Mrs. Dorothy B. Jackson, 

Dr. Charles H. Dolloff, 



103 Center Street 

24 Union Street 

26 Church Street 



7 Merrimack Street 
27 So. Spring Street 
East Concord, N. H. 



16 South Street 

111 Center Street 

105 Pleasant Street 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

finance 
Mr. Couch Mr. Otis 

high school 
Mr. Otis Mrs. Elkins 



Dr. Dolloff 



Mr. Hill 



76 



CITY OF CONCORD 



junior high school 
Mrs. Moulton Mr. Hall Mrs. Jackson 



Mr. Jackson 



elementary schools 
Mr. Hill 



Dr. Dolloff 



Mrs. Moulton 



kindergarten 
Mrs. Jackson 



Mrs. Elkins 



Mr. Hill 



rural schools 
Mr. Hall 



Mrs. Moulton 



buildings and repairs 
Mr. Batchelder Mr. Couch 



Mr. Otis 



Mr. Couch 



discipline 
Mrs. Jackson 



Dr. Dolloff 



Mr. Hall 



manual training 

Wood and Iron 
Mr. Hill 



Mrs. Jackson 



Mrs. Jackson 



Sewing and Cooking 
Mrs. Elkins 



Mrs. Moulton 



Mrs. Elkins 



MUSIC 

Mr. Hall 



Mrs. Moulton 



Mrs. Jackson 



drawing 
Dr. Dolloff 



Mrs. Elkins 



Mr. Couch 



text books 
Mrs. Elkins 



Mrs. Moulton 



SCHOOL REPORT 



77 



Mr. Otis 



Dr. Dolloff 



training school 
Mrs. Jackson 

NIGHT school 

Mr. Otis 



Mr. Hill 



Mr. Batchelder 



Mrs. Elkins 



pensions 
Mr. Couch 



Mr. Hall 



-0- 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Louis John Rundlett 

15 Summit Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 4 to 5 p. m., school days. Office open, 8.30 to 5 

p.m. Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 603-R. 



ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

Charles Waterman Walker 

47 Auburn Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a.m., 4 to 5 p. m., school days. 

Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 1582-W. 



-0- 



TREASURER 

Harry Lucius Alexander 
Mechanicks Bank. 12 Auburn Street. Telephone 63. 



78 CITY OF CONCORD 

ATTENDANCE OFFICER 

Arthur James Taylor 

6 Avon Street. Office : Parker School. 

Hours: 8.45 to 9 a. m., 1.45 to 2 p. m., on school days; 

summer vacation, 2 to 4 p. m. 

Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 2667-W. 



SECRETARIES 

Bookkeeper 

Gyrene Sargent Farrar 

4 Rockingham Street. Telephone, 702. 

Stenographers 

Celia Shuff 

7 Oak Street. Telephone, 1783-J. 

Madeleine Lumina Tetreault 

Suncook, N. H. 





MEDICAL INSPECTION 
DIRECTOR 

Arthur Kehew Day, M.D. 

11 South Street. Office: Parker School. 

Hours: 8.30 to 9 a. m., and 4 to 4.30 p. m., on school days. 

Telephones: Office, 2360; house, 887-W. 



SCHOOL REPORT 79 

NURSE 

Georgena Campbell Mansur, R. N, 

9 Perry Avenue. Office : Parker School. 

Hours : 8.30 to 9 a.m., on school days. 
Telephones : Office, 2360 ; house, 405-R. 



DENTISTS 

William A. Young, D.D.S. 
3 Essex Street. Telephone, 919-M. 

Charles R. Morton, D.D.S. 
Kent Street. Telephone, 1108-R. 

Clarence J. Washburn, D.D.S. 
57 Center Street. Telephone, 1709. 

Operating Room, Parker School Building. 



CLERK 

Esther Augusta Magnuson 
50 West Street. Telephone, 203-J. 



-o- 



OFFICERS OF THE DISTRICT 

Arthur P. Morrill, \ Moderator 

Ray E. Burkett, Clerk 

William C. Brunell and Clyde M. Davis, Auditors 



80 CITY OF CONCORD 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



To the Residents of Union School District: 

Following the traditions of the past, the Board of Edu- 
cation has tried this year to center its interest on the 
points of greatest need. For some time the necessity of a 
new school building in the South End of the city has been 
realized by the School Board and by the citizens of the Dis- 
trict. It is our pleasure to report that during the past year 
this need has been met. The new South End Platoon School 
stands completed today, as this winter has been unusually 
favorable for building activities. It will probably not be 
occupied, however, until the opening of the September 
term. 

The building is practical to the last degree and is archi- 
tecturally one of which Concord citizens may justly be 
proud. This, like many new school buildings today, is a 
one-story building. Ideally located on a lot containing 
eight acres of land it affords plenty of good air and sun- 
shine. The building contains eight class rooms, a physical 
culture room 60x24, a highly modern kindergarten room, 
principal 's office, teachers ' room, library, dental clinic office, 
and an auditorium that seats 300 people. 

The general contractor w^as the H. P. Cummings Con- 
struction Co., which used quite a good percentage of local 
labor in its work. Their bid was $73,583.25. Three local 
companies were successful bidders : 

Orr & Rolfe Co., Heating and ventilating $12,684.00 
Lee Bros., Plumbing Contract 3,498.00 

Reliable Wiring Co., Electrical Work 2,398.46 

Architect's Fees — practically 6,000.00 

Final payments have not yet been made but there have 
been verj'- few extras and of the appropriation of $100,000, 
a balance of around $1,000 will probably be left. We do, 



SCHOOL REPORT 81 

however, find it necessary to ask for $7,000 for grading the 
lot and equipping this school. 

Now that this building has been completed it is con- 
sidered advisable by the School Board to sell the Penacook 
School, the Dunklee Street Kindergarten and the Iron 
Works School. Authority for so doing is asked in the war- 
rant. 

A second accomplishment during the past year has been 
the inauguration of the Platoon System in the Walker 
School. This has proved to be a real success and the Board 
is co-operating with Mr. Rundlett in his effort to make it 
more nearly universal. When the South End School is 
opened this system will be in force there. 

A feature which has been worked out successfully in the 
Walker, Kimball and Rumford Schools is the "traffic sys- 
tem." A traffic squad, so-called, is appointed from each 
of the buildings. The members of this squad march out 
ahead of the other pupils and take their posts on certain 
crossings to direct the student traffic. Through the co- 
operation of the American Automobile Association, 
these boys have been furnished with belts and caps which 
lend some dignity to their positions. Our local police have 
also given these boys some instruction. In these congested 
districts this plan is unquestionably a wise precaution and 
a safeguard for the children. 

Probabl}^ the Morrill School commands the real support 
and interest of all citizens to a greater extent than does any 
other school in our entire district. This is practical educa- 
tion and, as such, invaluable. The popularity of this school 
has manifested itself in the fact that during the past few 
years the enrollment has practically doubled with a three- 
fold increase in the number of pupil periods. This situa- 
tion has brought to us the problem of providing larger 
quarters, and after careful study the logical solution seems 
to be to carry out the original idea of the architect, namely, 
to add two additional floors to the machine shop extension 



82 CITY OF CONCORD 

built in 1923. This plan will also adapt itself admirably to 
the addition of other vocational courses which have pre- 
viously been recommended by the Superintendent in former 
annual reports. We are asking for an appropriation of 
$35,000 which we feel will amply cover this expense. We 
are confident we will have the hearty support of all in this 
request. 

A very careful study of the Teachers' Pension System 
has been made by Mr. Leigh S. Hall of the Board of Edu- 
cation, and a few minor changes suggested by him were 
adopted. We are pleased to say that at the present time 
the Pension System is working to the satisfaction of every- 
one concerned. 

Some few weeks ago contracts were made with the Inter- 
national Thrift Institute, Inc., of New York, for a school 
savings system conducted in connection with the New 
Hampshire Savings Bank. This institute operates in more 
than seven hundred cities and towns, and has already been 
the means of accumulating over $40,000,000 of school sav- 
ings. At the present time about 70% of our scholars are 
enrolled as weekly savers, which indicates that this effort 
is worth while. We believe it is one of our primary duties 
to teach thrift in our public schools. 

During the year the grading of the High School grounds 
has been nearly finished and only a small portion of the 
work remains to be done in the Spring. The sidewalks, 
etc., are not yet completed. This work was done by A. H. 
Starkweather Co., of Needham, Mass., in connection with 
Mr. D. Osmond McLeod of our city. This has wrought a 
wonderful change in the appearance of both the building 
and the grounds and we have heard nothing but favorable 
comment. 

Generally speaking, things have run along in a normal 
way this past year. We feel justified in otfering our 
opinion that we are still maintaining high grade schools 



SCHOOL REPORT 83 

and an up-to-date system of education throughout the 
Union School District. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Mr. Bennett Batchelder 
Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins 
Mr. Joseph S. Otis 
Benjamin W. Couch, Esq. 
Mr. George A. Hill 
Mr. Leigh S. Hall 
Mrs. Dorothy B. Jackson 
Mrs. Grace A. Moulton 
Dr. Charles H. Dolloff 



84 



CITY OF CONCORD 



REPORT OF TREASURER 

Union School District 
Concord, N. H. 

March 9, 1928, to March 13, 1929 

H. L. Alexander, Treasurer 

appropriations 

Amount voted by District for general 

purposes 
Received from Dog Licenses 
Received from Abial Wall^er Fund 



$307,287.03 

2,457.53 

41.45 

$309,786.01 



receipts 

Balance on hand March 9, 1928 $ 11,774.13 

Drawn from City Treasurer 309,786.01 

Received from Tuition 7,871.06 

Received from cash sales for School Lunches 4,295.35 

Received from cash sales for Miscellaneous 406.79 

Received from cash sales for Text Books 101.97 
Received from cash sales for Scholars 

Supplies* (Manual Training) 4,143.12 

Received from cash sales for Repairs 11.39 

Received from cash sales for Medical Inspection 233.26 
Received from cash sales for Rent Hall Street 

House 321.85 

$338,944.93 



*Eeceived from State of New Hampshire 
Received from Supplies 



$3,718.54 
424.58 



$4,143.12 



SCHOOL REPORT 85 
EXPENDED 

1 Expenses of School Board and Other 

District Officers $ 657.60 

2 Expenses of Superintendent 4,700.00 

3 Truant Officer and Census 189.66 
Salary of Truant Officer 800.00 

4 Other Expenses of Administration — 

Maintenance 541.90 

Salaries 3,071.95 

5 Salaries of Principals and Regular 

Teachers 175,939.52 

6 Salaries of Supervisors of Special 

Subjects 46,205.31 

7 Text-Books 7,392.63 

8 Reference Books, Maps, Apparatus, etc. 507.22 

9 Scholars' Supplies 7,872.60 

10 Graduation Exercises, Exhibits, etc. 234.40 

11 Other Expenses of Instruction 1,704.45 

12 Janitors' Salaries 18,427.43 
Janitor and Building Supplies 2,312.38 

13 Fuel 13,827.11 

14 Water 657.25 

15 Light and Power 3,736.27 

16 Repairs— Salaries 1,803.22 

Maintenance 7,361.37 

17 Other Expenses of Operation and 

Maintenance 2,409.85 

18 Libraries 288.97 

19 Medical Inspection — Maintenance 1,995.80 

Salaries 5,100.00 

20 Transportation 16,095.25 

21 Other Special Activities — I\Iaintenance 3,534.38 

Night School 379.00 

22 Insurance 3,059.99 

23 Rebate of Tuition 232.30 



86 CITY OF CONCORD 

24 Per Capita Tax 6,922.00 

25 New Equipment 912.60 



$338,872.41 
Balance on hand March 13, 1929 72.52 



$338,944.93 



H. L. ALEXANDER, 

Treasurer. 



SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS 

Rumford School Heating Plant 

Appropriation April 5, 1928 $7,000.00 

Expenditures : 

Lee Brothers Company $6,560.45 

George W. Griffin 400.00 

H. K. Larsen 39.55 

7,000.00 

Grading New High School 

Appropriation April 5, 1928 $25,000.00 

Expenditures : 

Donald 0. McLeod $ 598.80 

0. H. Starkweather 13,278.70 

13,877.50 



Balance in hands of Treasurer March 13, 1929 $11,122.50 



Teachers Pension Fund 

Appropriation April 5, 1928 $2,000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 2,000.00 



SCHOOL REPORT 87 

New South End School Building 

Bonds authorized April 5, 1928, for school 

building and equipment $100,000.00 

Premium on bonds sold 520.00 



$100,520.00 
Amount withdrawn from City Treasurer 82,500.00 



Amount in hands of City Treasurer ' $18,020.00 

Receipts : 

Amount received from City 

Treasurer $82,500.00 

Amount received from Concord 
Lumber Co. for 1,092 ft. 8-inch 
Akron pipe trucked from South 
End School 174.72 

$82,674.72 



spenditures : 

City of Concord — Concord Water 




Works 


$ 18.70 


H. P. Cummings Construction Co. 


62,862.12 


Lee Brothers Co. 


2,973.30 


Lhoyd & Mann 


137.32 


Monitor-Patriot Company 


22.40 


Orr & Rolfe 


10,072.50 


Elwin L. Page 


50.00 


Reliable Wiring Company 


2,108.01 


Wells & Hudson 


4,199.28 



82,443.63 
Balance in hands of Treasurer March 13, 1929 $231.09 



88 CITY OF CONCORD 

New High School Building 

Balance on hand March 14, 1928 $5,858.75 

Expenditures : 



George Abbott, Jr. 


$542.49 


Wm. H. Avery 


300.00 


Concord Lumber Company 


59.40 


Concord Wiring & Supply Co. 


88.67 


D. M. Dillon Steam Boiler Works 


7.10 


Harry G. Emmons 


1,049.50 


George W. Griffin 


220.00 


Hutchinson Building Company 


1.00 


Kenney Brothers & Wolkins 


45.38 


S. S. Kimball 


2.50 


George L. Lincoln Furniture Co. 


214.00 


Manchester & Concord Express Co. 


11.95 


Narragansett Machine Company 


972.13 


National Treatre Supply Company 


1,308.70 


Orr & Rolfe 


20.38 


Pickett & Stuart 


14.25 


Reliable Wiring Company 


228.00 


R. P. Robinson Company 


7.02 


G. E. Stimpson Company 


710.00 


Thompson & Hoague Company 


25.39 




5 8^7 8fi 




OjO^ t *0\J 


alance in hand of Treasurer March 13, 1929 $30.89 


PENSION FUNDS 




Receipts 




ccrued Liability Fund — Balance 




March 14, 1928 


$2,063.73 


Appropriation April 5, 1928 


2,000.00 


Interest 


133.60 




$4,197.33 



SCHOOL REPORT 




89 


Teachers Benefit Fund : 






Received from Membership Fund 


406.83 




Interest 


8.38 


415.21 







$4,612.54 



Expenditures 
Pensions Paid : 

Accrued Liability Fund $1,454.41 

Teachers Benefit Fund 36.03 



1,490.44 

Balance on hand March 13, 1929, Accrued 
Liability Fund (Merrimack County Savings 
Bank) 2,742.92 

Balance on hand March 13, 1929, Teachers 

Benefit Fund (New Hampshire Savings Bank) 379.18 



$4,612.54 

PERMANENT FUNDS 

Charles E. Walker Pension Fund — 

Balance March 14, 1928 $1,124.77 

Interest 50.58 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank $1,175.35 

Concord Teachers Association Pension Fund — 
Balance March 14, 1928 $1,735.07 

Interest 78.07 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 1,813.14 

Fred Sargent Memorial Fund — 

Received September 12, 1928 $1,467.50 

Interest 16.50 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 1,484.00 



90 CITY OF CONCORD 

Wm. W. Thayer Fund — 

Balance March 14, 1928 $520.00 

Withdrawn for prize awarded 20.00 



$500.00 
Interest 20.32 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 520.32 

Wm. W. Thayer Fund — 

Balance March 14, 1928 $520.00 

Withdrawn for prize awarded 20.00 



$500.00 
Interest 20.32 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 520.32 



),513.13 



H. L. ALEXANDER, 

Treasurer. 



Concord, N. H., March 13, 1929. 

We hereby certify that we have examined the foregoing 
accounts of the Treasurer of Union School District and find 
the expenditures correctly cast and a proper voucher for 
each item. 

CLYDE M. DAVIS 
WILLIAM C. BRUNEL 

Auditors. 



SCHOOL REPORT 91 



STATISTICS 



Valuation of Concord (1928) $32,012,175.00 

Valuation of Union School District (1928) 29,488,042.00 

Rate of taxation per $1000 28.96 

Average rate of assessed valuation per C. 2.87 + 

Bonded indebtedness of City entire 1,299,986.91 
Bonded indebtedness of Union School District 707,000.00 

Number of public day schools : 

Senior High 1 

Rundlett Junior High 1 

Elementary 48 

Rural (mixed) 3 

Kindergartens 6 

Special 1 

Mechanic Arts 1 

Home Economics 1 

Number of Evening Schools 2 

Number of Summer Schools 3 

Number of School Buildings 23 

Number of Teachers : 

High School 22 

Junior High Schools 20 

Elementary Schools 58 

Rural Schools 4 

Kindergartens 12 

Special Class 1 

Evening Schools 2 

Summer Schools 3 

Mechanic Arts 13 

Home Economics 4 

Music 2 

Drawiner 2 



92 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Physical Culture 
Training Teacher 
Dean of Girls (High School) 
Librarian (High School) 
Special Teacher 



Number of Janitors 
Special Repair Man 
Attendance Officer 



17 
1 
1 



Medical Inspection 
Inspector 
Nurse 



Clerks : 



Superintendents 
High School 
Rundlett Junior High 
Parker School 
Medical Inspection 



Average Salaries of Superintendents (paid by 

city) $2,350.00 

Average Salary of Headmaster (High School) 3,800.00 

Average Salary of Sub-master (High School) 2,600.00 

Average Salaries of Teachers (Men) 2,156.82 

Average Salaries of Teachers (Women) 1,429.31 

Average Salaries of High School (Men) 2,350.00 

Average Salaries of High School (Women) 1,690.63 

Average Salaries of High School (both) 1,891.30 

Average Salaries Junior High School 1,689.50 

Average Salaries Elementary Schools 1,307.79 

Average Salaries Kindergartens 1,250.00 

Average Salaries Clerks 878.57 

Average Salary Librarian 1,000.00 



SCHOOL REPORT 93 

Average Salary Dean of Girls & Physical 

Instructor 2,500.00 

Average Salaries Janitors 1,067.41 

Average Salaries Mechanic Arts Teachers 2,046.15 

Average Salaries Home Economics Teachers 1,350.00 

Average Salary Physical Director 2,000.00 

Average Salary Special Repair Man 1,920.00 

Average Salary Medical Inspector 2,800.00 

Average Salary Nurse 1,500.00 

Average Salary Attendance Officer 800.00 



94 CITY OF CONCORD 

COST PER CAPITA 

Entire expense based on average membership $ 103.96 

Entire expense based on entire enrollment 95.29 

Senior high school based on average membership 151.22 

Senior high school based on entire enrollment 146.71 

Junior high school based on average membership 120.56 

Junior high school based on entire enrollment 116.01 

Elementary schools based on average membership 83.34 

Elementary schools based on entire enrollment 76.26 

Rural schools based on average membership 102.30 

Rural schools based on entire enrollment 94.55 

Kindergartens based on average membership 89.72 

Kindergartens based on entire enrollment 66.32 

Music based on average membership 1.39 

Music based on entire enrollment 1.30 

Drawing based on average membership .95 

Drawing based on entire enrollment .89 

Manual training based on average membership 50.64 

Manual training based on entire enrollment 44.85 

Home Economics based on average membership 12.97 

Home Economics based on entire enrollment 11.80 

Text-books based on average membership 2.45 

Text-books based on entire enrollment 2.29 

Scholars' supplies based on average membership 2.41 

Scholars' supplies based on entire enrollment 2.21 





SCHOOL 


REPORT 




90 




TUITION 


RECEIPTS 




High School 






$7,636.73 




Parker School 






29.75 




Garrison School 






12.63 




Kimball School 






19.58 




Penacook School 






47.37 




Cogswell School 






25.00 




Concord Training School 




100.00 












$7,871.06 






Less Rebates 








232.30 



$7,638.76 

FOR EVERY DOLLAR EXPENDED 
1928 - 1929 

1.6555 Teachers' Salaries 

.0612 Janitors' Salaries and Supplies 

.0474 Transportation of Pupils 

.0408 Fuel 

.0270 Repairs 

.0232 Scholars' Supplies 

.0218 Text-Books 

.0209 Medical Inspection 

.0204 State Per Capita Tax 

.0138 Superintendents' Salaries 

.0115 Other Special Activities 

.0113 Other Expenses of Administration 

.0110 Light and Power 

.0090 Insurance 

.0071 Other Expenses of Operation and Maintenance 

.0050 Other Expenses of Instruction 

.0029 Attendance Officer 

.0024 New Equipment 

.0019 Water 

.0014 Reference Books 

.0045 All other minor items 



96 CITY OF CONCORD 

SCHOOL BOARD REPORT OF ESTIMATED BUDGET 

FOR 1929-1930 

Amount of money required by law ($3.50 on each $1,000 of 
the inventory). 

Elementary High 
Schools Schools 

I — Budget (school money) : 

(a) For support of schools $196,744.23 $128,901.40 

(b) For purchase of text-books 

and scholars' supplies 5,437.50 3,562.50 

(c) For purchase of flags and 

appurtenances 15.10 9.90 

(d) For payment of tuitions in 

high schools 

(e) Total amount required for 

the above items 202,196.83 132,473.80 

(f ) Estimate of $5 tax on 1928 

inventory 147,440.21 

II — Requirements to meet the 
Budget : 

(a) For support of elementary 

schools 202,196.83 

(b) For support of high 

schools 132,473.80 

Total support of all schools 334,670.63 

III — School Board report of 
assessment required : 
(1) For the support of schools 
and the purchase of re- 
quired books, supplies 
and flags, and the pay- 
ment of high school tui- 
tions 334,670.63 



SCHOOL REPORT 97 

Estimate of $3.50 tax on 1928 

assessed valuation 103,208.15 

Estimate of additional sums 

needed 231,462.48 

(2) For the payment of per 

capita tax 6,974.00 

(3) For the payment of debt 

(statutory) 32,000.00 

(4) For the payment of in- 

terest (statutory) 29,685.00 

(5) For the payment of other 

statutory requirements 

(6) For the general adminis- 

tration of the schools 10,300.00 

Total budget for 1929-1930 413,629.63 



IN MEMORIAM 

MARY MARGARET DOHERTY 

Born May 24, 1894. Died May 10, 1928. 

Graduate Concord High School, 1911. 

Graduate Concord Training School, 1913. 

Elected teacher of Grade II in Kimball School in 1914, 
and Rumford School in 1915. Faithful, kind and true. 
One of the most efficient teachers ever connected with 
Concord's Schools. 



SCHOOL REPORT 99 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Honorable Board of Education of Union School 
District: 

It is my privilege, for the forty-third time, to submit for 
your consideration an annual report of the accomplishments 
of the schools of this district. It is the seventy-first of its 
series. 

I invite j^our careful reading of the reports made by 
Assistant Superintendent Walker and the various heads of 
departments. 

Educaiional Progress 

In order to maintain the right perspective and to evalu- 
ate properly the progress of local educational conditions 
it is well for us to consider briefly the activities of the 
national forces that have a controlling influence in general 
educational advancement. 

Some of these are : 

1 — Curriculum Revision. 

2 — Shortening the time heretofore given to public school 
work. 

3 — An earlier start for the child by closer study of in- 
dividual differences and through scientific training of 
children of pre-school age. 

4 — The larger provision for adult education. 

5 — The wider use of objective tests to stimulate and 
direct the learning processes. 

The National Educational Association this year recom- 
mends that the curriculum of public education be so ad- 
justed that six 3^ears of elementary education and four 
years of high school education be adopted hy the schools of 
the country and that two succeeding years be devoted to 



100 CITY OF CONCORD 

high school extension courses. Progress toward this scheme 
has already been made in some states. 

A review of school conditions in the state of Texas by 
the University of Texas recommends that the eleven-year 
plan be retained because it is educationally as strong as 
the longer plan and financially much more economical. 

Salt Lake City, a city of 120,000, has just completed the 
installation of the eleven-year plan, and Cleveland with its 
950,000 population is changing the twelve-year system to 
the ten-year scheme advised by the National Educational 
Association. 

This movement for a closer adjustment of school time 
will gradually establish itself as a national policy and 
extension courses for high schools will be installed for the 
further continuance in school of those who cannot afford 
the expense of higher institutions. Such an arrangement 
for Concord can be put in operation with little if any in- 
crease of expense and with much greater educational 
advantage. 

Pupil Enrollment 

In the last three decades pupil enrollment in the schools 
has shown an increase of forty-one per cent. This increase, 
while moderate as compared with the more thickly settled 
sections of the country, shows that the population of the 
city is growing rather more steadily and surely than it did 
thirty years ago. 

The Junior and the Senior High Schools gain consist- 
ently. 

With the completion of the South End Platoon School the 
enrollment in that section will be well accommodated for 
a number of years to come. 

The Walker and the Dewey Schools should care for the 
northwest part of the city for a long time. 

The rural school enrollment varies but little and any 
considerable gain here need not be expected. The question 



SCHOOL REPORT 101 

of transporting these pupils to schools where better con- 
veniences are to be found is still worthy of consideration 
for the Mountain and Riverhill districts. This scheme is 
one that presents definite educational and financial 
economies. 

School Buildings 

Concord now has school buildings of which it should be 
proud. They are, for the most part, equipped according 
to modern ideas. 

It must be borne in mind that buildings, like everything 
else, deteriorate unless given careful repair at frequent 
intervals and an appropriation should be made each year 
to take care of this. 

The closet arrangement of the Parker School must be 
replaced by one that is more modern and effective. 

The entire inside of the Junior High School should be 
refinished and the piping renewed. 

Some other buildings need repairs at once. Beginning 
next fall term we shall have a number of buildings in 
disuse. 

I see no reason why they should not be sold. Deteriora- 
tion grows rapidly in unused buildings and a serious 
economic loss always follows. 

The Senior High School 

The general tone of the school has shown improvement 
during the past year. The spirit of co-operation between 
this institution and the lower schools has been manifest in 
the efforts of all the administrative officers of the faculty 
and the departments of Physical Culture and Home 
Economics. 

The detailed work may be found in the reports of Head- 
master Cook and Assistant Superintendent Walker. 



102 CITY OF CONCORD 

The Rundlett Junior High School 

Junior High Schools have now become an established 
educational jiolicy throughout the country. 

The accomplishments of this school testify to its strength. 
The teachers and pupils seem to be an interested corps of 
mutual helpers, a fact that has not only continued the 
success of last year but added to it in sufficient measure. 
The library is growing and well patronized by serious 
students. Standard objective tests reveal growing power 
in all the more important branches. 

The laboratories for general science are of good working 
capacity. The pupil attendance is very large but, although 
exceeding the original capacity of the building, it is being 
quite well accommodated. The lack of sufficient yard room 
seriously handicaps the work of the school. The building 
ought to be refinished throughout and the piping needs 
readjusting to get the required heat in all the different 
parts. The united efforts of the Principal and the entire 
corps of assistants is worthy of the highest commendation. 

Elementcwy 

Results shown b.y objective tests reveal that these schools 
are u\) to the standards set by educational authorities. 

As far as possible the homogeneous grouping of pupils 
has been followed with much success. The methods of 
previous years that recognized the mass only as the unit 
are gradually giving way to the idea that the individual 
is the unit — a change that is revolutionizing the problem 
of curriculum-making in the interests of all pupils. 

The most concrete illustration of this work is to found 
in the Parker School where the results of a one semester 
trial shows a very high rate of promotion (97.3%) which 
proves strength in individual work. 

The Concord Training School 

At the end of last June Miss Addie P. Straw, who had 
been identified with the Concord Training School since its 



SCHOOL REPORT 103 

inception in 1888, was retired under the rules of the 
Teachers' Pension System. 

It was thought best to continue teacher-training in the 
interests of the schools. Mrs. Alice J. Reed was chosen to 
take the place of Miss Straw. The wisdom of the choice 
is vouched for in the interest and achievements of the 
teachers in training. The work of Mrs. Reed is character- 
ized by the results of broad professional training, unyield- 
ing energy and an ever-growing interest in her work. 

The school was changed from the Dewey building to the 
Walker so that the pupil teachers might be able to observe 
constantly the working of five grades. Before, they had 
been confined to observation in but three grades. 

The value of this school was clearly demonstrated in the 
winter just passed when from six hundred to one thousand 
pupils per day were absent during two weeks, also from 
eight to fifteen teachers. Had it not been for the services 
of these girls in training many rooms would have been 
closed. 

The school is a decided asset for the educational welfare 
of the city. 

Addle Frances Straw 

Addie Frances Straw was born in Concord on November 
21, 1857. 

She received her education in the public schools of 
Concord, graduating from the high school in June, 1876. 

In September, 1888, when it was decided to establish a 
training class for girls who were to adopt teaching as a 
profession, she was the one thought admirably fitted to 
conduct such a class. Subsequent success proved the wis- 
dom of the selection. 

Miss Straw's work in this school has alwa3's been one of 
the main factors of educational progress in our city. 

Always shunning everything that would seem to call to 
public attention the value of her efforts, and never sparing 



104 CITY OF CONCORD 

her mental and physical strength in the performance of her 
obligations, she continued with unqualified success up to 
the time of her retirement. There are all too few person- 
alities like Miss Straw in any community, and her work 
as an educator has left its indelible mark upon the school 
history of Concord. 

The Fine Arts 

The results shown in both music and drawing are dis- 
tinctly superior to those of recent years. The work of all 
the instructors has been painstaking and efficient. 

The reports of the heads of these departments deal fully 
with the details of the work. 

The Manual Arts 

The standards of previous years have been fully main- 
tained. We have been fortunate in securing and retaining 
competent teachers. 

The number of pupils taking this work shows a steady 
increase. 

In the Morrill School a department of Automobile study 
and repair should be inaugurated. This was recommended 
in my last annual report. 

The administration of the Home Economics department 
has increased in efficiency. The school lunches are nutri- 
tious and rather more economically managed than I find 
to be the case elsewhere. 

My inquiries into this work as conducted in other places 
reveals the fact that in almost every instance the entire 
expense of these departments is sustained by the sale of food 
in the lunches. Such expense includes all salaries and 
equipment as well as the cost of food. 

The work required to conduct school lunches and that of 
the Home Economics differ very materially. Each is of 
such magnitude that the work requires much closer super- 
vision than can be expected reasonably from one supervisor. 



SCHOOL REPORT 105 

The only remedy that I can recommend is that each de- 
partment be conducted under its own supervisor. 

The Special School 

This is located in the Walker building and is sustained 
for the accommodation of those pupils who, unfortunately, 
can never meet the requirements of the regular course of 
study. 

These pupils come from various localities, some being 
transported at the expense of the district. 

They have accomplished things that cannot help but gain 
the commendation of all. Many articles are made and sold 
by these children for the benefit of the school and at least 
once a year a public exhibition of the work is held. A half- 
tone reproduction of some of the work is to be found in 
this volume. 

The Platoon Schools 

The Platoon System of conducting schools was installed 
in the Walker School last September. 

Miss Elizabeth J. Talpe}-, the first principal in the state 
to attempt the plan, studied its possibilities and saw at 
once the advantages it offered. Her enthusiasm, energy 
and well thought out way of installing it are worthy of the 
highest praise and its success is to be attributed largely to 
her skill. 

This is the first of its kind to be adopted in the state. 
Like all other innovations that have been made in the 
schools, this scheme is of proven worth and may be con- 
sidered a valuable contribution to the educational progress 
of the city. The advantageous features of the plan are 
definite and numerous. 

The work of the regular home-room teacher is relieved 
of caring for so many subjects, thus assuring more con- 
crete attention upon the preparation of a few things rather 



106 CITY OF CONCORD 

than upon many. Each of the following groups is handled 
by one teacher : 

1 — Home room studies — Reading, writing, arithmetic, 
language, spelling, history. 

2 — Physical Culture — Games, and Auditorium Ac- 
tivities. 

3 — Music and Drawing. 

4 — Geography, Nature Study. 

From official investigation and the testimony of the 
teachers, I find that the scheme produces a better school 
morale, greater interest, and more effective work in the 
regular studies. This plan, which will be inaugurated in 
the new South End school, lends itself readily to the fuller 
enrichment of the curriculum and to the broader educa- 
tion of the child. 

Pupil Safety 

During the year safety patrols have been inaugurated 
in the Walker, Kimball, and Rumford Schools. These 
patrols, which have been in operation in other cities, were 
begun here at the suggestion of Mr. Porter of the Concord 
Chamber of Commerce, to whom the credit rightfully be- 
longs. The movement was sanctioned by a vote of the 
Board of Education and has jDroved itself to be very effec- 
tive in keeping pupils out of danger from the automobile 
traffic. The local representative of the American Automo- 
bile Association, on invitation, kindly equipped the officers 
of these patrols with belts and caps and the Concord Police 
Department lent timely aid. 

Recommendations 

1 — That more yard room be provided for the Junior 
High School. 

2 — That the Morrill School be enlarged to meet its grow- 
ing enrollment. 



SCHOOL REPORT 107 

3 — That once in every successive three-year period each 
teacher be required to attend a standard summer school, and 
that a definite salary increment be allowed for professional 
study. 

4 — That steps be taken to revise the curriculum of 
studies so that graduates of the high school after ten years 
of elementary and secondary instruction, may have the 
advantage of two years of post secondary study in the 
various departments. 

5 — That visual instruction be stressed in all grades of 
school and that apparatus be provided to carry it into 
effect. 

6 — That school lunches be divorced from the department 
of Home Economics, be made to become self-sustaining, and 
that a supervisor be appointed for this work alone. 

7 — That a supervisor of Home Economics be appointed. 

8 — That the policy of appropriating a sufficient sum each 
year to insure proper upkeep of the buildings be adopted. 

Teachers 

The teachers of this district are unusually strong, hard- 
working and conscientious public servants. 

They deserve all that the public can give them. 

Each succeeding year many vacancies occur that are 
filled to the best advantage as allowed by the remuneration 
paid. Compared with other cities in the state their salaries 
are above the average and they are, in general, profession- 
ally alert. 

A teacher's position now calls for more than the teach- 
ing required in the school year. In the country as a whole 
there appear well-defined movements to standardize the 
teaching of the various grades of school work. 

This suggests that some scheme be adopted toward 
recognizing the worth of advanced professional study, 
through remunerative increments. 



]08 CITY OF CONCORD 

The injustice of paying all teachers alike regardless of 
their attitude toward professional improvement is very 
apparent. 

One teacher anxious for advancement in professional 
growth devotes a part of his summer recess to such work. 
Another of the same grade devotes a part of his recess to 
work that bears little relation to school progress, yet each 
is receiving the same salary. Without doubt the profes- 
sionally inclined teacher is worth more to the schools than 
the other and his worth should be recognized financially. 

With this in mind I recommend a scheme of salary in- 
crements be formulated and adopted by your Honorable 
Body through which study for professional improvement 
can be provided with financial help. 

I also recommend that all teachers in the employ of the 
district be required, once in successive three-year periods, 
to devote at least six weeks of the summer recess to pro- 
fessional study in standard summer schools approved by 
the superintendents. 

Such schemes are in successful operation in many cities 
at the present time. 

. High professional equipment will generally be reflected 
in better teaching for the children. 

The requirements for assuming a position in the Junior 
High School hereafter will be much more exacting than 
before, approximating quite closely those of the Senior 
High School. 

With keen appreciation of the assistance of your Hon- 
orable Body and all others with whom I have been pro- 
fessionally associated during the past year, I respectfully 
submit this report. 

L. J. RUNDLETT, Supt. 



SCHOOL REPORT 109 

REPORT OF THE ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT 
OF SCHOOLS, CONCORD, N. H. 

Superintendent L. J. Bundlett, Concord, N. H. 
Dear sir: 

The annual report of 1927 treated in detail the qualifica- 
tions possessed by the Concord teaching staff. The report 
for 1928 was centered about the topic "Success of the 
Concord High School Graduates in Colleges and Other 
Post-secondary Schools." This report will be a continua- 
tion of the policy of treating comprehensively each year 
one phase of school administration. This report will confine 
itself to a discussion of the work being done in the Com- 
mercial Department of the Concord Schools. 

1. Aim of Commercial Education 

To many individuals the mere mention of the words 
"Commercial Department" brings to mind the vision of 
pupils actively engaged in learning to typewrite, in study- 
ing shorthand, and in acquiring a knowledge of book- 
keeping. To others, the work of the Commercial Depart- 
ment in a public high school is justified only on vocational 
grounds. This view is decidedly limited and does not 
adequately express the present underlying principle of 
commercial education. 

As early as 1899 the National Herbart Society recognized 
the danger of over-emphasizing the mechanical aspects of 
the course at the expense of the cultural. In its fifth year- 
book the following warning was given : 

"Education for commerce will disappoint if it be planned 
on narrow technical lines. If schools of commerce, as a 
branch of public education, are to win and hold the favor 
of educational experts on the one hand and the business 
community on the other, they must be more than "clerk 
factories." Training for business to be of real value should 
be accompanied by breadth of view." 



110 CITY OF CONCORD 

The modern business world demands in the young ap- 
prentice not only tokens that he has acquired and mastered 
the technical skills such as typewriting, stenography, book- 
keeping, and computation, but also that he has acquired 
the understanding of the basic principles of business organ- 
ization and administration. In addition to this intellectual 
equipment, the prospective employer seeks to inform him- 
self concerning certain character traits of the candidate 
such as punctuality, reliability, industry, initiative, manner 
of address, honesty, and many others. No other institution 
is so well adapted to provide opportunities to acquire 
fundamental technical skills along with ample cultural 
background as the cosmopolitan junior and senior high 
school with try-out possibilities in the lower secondary 
classes and the gradual emphasis on specialization in the 
junior and senior year. 

2. Commercial Department Graduates 

The records show that from 1919 to June, 1928, inclu- 
sive, 312 Concord young people have received diplomas 
from this department. This is an average of about 31 a 
j^ear. In 1919, the number of commercial graduates was 
27, and in 1928 the number was 34. In 1919 the total num- 
ber of high school graduates was 102 and in 1928 the total 
number was 150. In other words, one out of every four 
pupils who received diplomas in 1919 and in 1928 was a 
commercial student. These figures indicate that the de- 
partment has had a healthy gro^vtll with no great fluctua- 
tions in numbers from year to year. 

3. The Curricuhim of the Commercial Department 

The subjects offered in the Commercial Department will 
be discussed under the following heads : Technical subjects, 
semi-vocational subjects, and cultural subjects. 

A — Technical Subjects 

The instruction in the technical subjects has for its 



SCHOOL REPORT 111 

primary purpose the development of skills on the part 
of the learner. The subjects of typewriting, stenography, 
bookkeeping, and commercial arithmetic are included 
within this classification. 

a — Typewriting 

Typewriting is required of each pupil at the be- 
ginning of the sophomore year, and the instruction is 
continued through the first semester of the senior 
year. 

The beginning of typewriting at the beginning of 
the first semester in the sophomore class rather than 
in the second semester was thought advisable because 
of the advantage it would give the pupil in transcrib- 
ing his shorthand notes during the second half of the 
school year. 

h — Stenography 

This subject is begun at the beginning of the second 
semester of the sophomore year. The work for this 
period is in the nature of a try-out course where the 
work of each pupil is carefully scrutinized, and his 
capacities for this subject studied by the instructor. 
At the end of the period, recommendations are made 
either for further study or for its discontinuance. Two 
typical reports on the work of students follow. 

Pupil No. 1 
Reasons for Continuing Reasons for Dropping 

Shorthand Shorthand 

1. Fairly quick mental 1. Left-handed, 

processes. 2. Slightly deaf. 

3. Interested mostly in 
bookkeeping. 

Recommendation : That she drop shorthand and take 
General Business Course. 



112 city of concord 

Pupil No. 2 
Reasons for Continuing Reasons for Dropping 



Shorthand 


Shorthand 


1. Interested in short- 


None. 


hand. 




2. Studious. 




3. Ambition is to be a 




stenographer. 




Recommendation : That 


she continue the Secretarial 


Course. 





c — Bookkeeping 

This subject is begun at the beginning of the sopho- 
more year and may be pursued either one or two years. 
Two years work is required of all pupils who elect the 
General Business Course in the junior year. 
d — Commercial Arithmetic 

This subject is run as a unit course in the first half 
of the sophomore year and is required of all pupils 
enrolled in this department. 
B — Semi-vocational Subjects 

The subjects from which pupils can acquire a knowl- 
edge of underlying business principles may be called 
semi-vocational. Under this heading are included : 
Junior Business Training, Economics, Sociology, and 
Secretarial Practice. 

a — Junior Business Training 

This course is offered for an entire year in the fresh- 
man class (0 and P) in the Rundlett Junior High 
School. Its aim is to give the pupil a broad acquaint- 
ance with the work done in the business and industrial 
world. It is distinctly a Junior High School subject. 

& — Sociology and Economics 

These two subjects are offered as electives in the 
Secretarial Course and as required subjects in the 



SCHOOL REPORT 113 

General Business Course in the senior year. The pur- 
pose of the instruction in these two subjects is to give 
the pupil a knowledge of the more simple laws of 
economics and sociology which underlie most of the 
problems arising in the business world. 

c — Secretarial Practice 

This course has been given a place in the last 
semester of the senior year. Its purpose is to provide 
actual office practice for the commercial people not 
only in office technique, but to give an opportunity for 
each pupil to apply his knowledge in actual office 
practice, and to gradually get away from the atmos- 
phere of the class room to the actual environment of 
the busy office in mercantile, and industrial establish- 
ments. The success of this part of the course depends 
a great deal upon the degree of co-operation which is 
secured from our local business concerns. 

C — Cultural Subjects 

The term "cultural" is very elastic. A subject may 
be thought of as cultural even though the main motive 
for taking the subject may be entirely vocational. For 
instance, a pupil may take English for the direct purpose 
of preparing to pass a college entrance requirement and 
the course may be taught entirely from this point of 
view. From the point of view of the commerce teachers, 
perhaps, those subjects which are not directly or indi- 
rectly aligned to the work of business may be regarded 
as "cultural." Such subjects are: General mathematics, 
algebra, geometry, history, modern languages, music, art, 
and science. 

In the commercial department of the Concord Second- 
ary Schools an opportunity is provided during the four 
years for every pupil to acquire some information in the 
cultural fields listed above. 



114 CITY OF CONCORD 

D — Courses in Home Economics and Mechanic Arts 

The program of the Commercial Department permits 
a girl to acquire information and skills in sewing and 
cooking, general home making, nursing, home organiza- 
tion, and home management. 

To the boy, courses at the Morrill School are open as 
far as the facilities permit. 
4 — Placement of Graduaies 

An effort is made to place each graduate of this de- 
partment in local positions. Local merchants and busi- 
ness men have co-operated and unsolicited letters of com- 
mendation received from employers show the degree of 
success of the department along this line. A form letter 
that is used in this placement work is shown below : 
* ' Gentlemen : 

On January 25 another class graduated from Concord 
High School. Among the members are a number of 
pupils who have taken the Commercial Courses and who 
hope to find employment at an early date. We hope you 
wall consider them when you have an opening for full 
time or part time employment. 

We would suggest that, before employing one of our 
graduates, you call up Mr. Cook at the High School (No. 
1373) or Miss Hood at her home (No. 2588-R), as we 
keep records of each commercial graduate and can 
furnish you with data as to ability to do the kind of 
work required and the personality and general habits of 
the applicant. We keep such records for the purpose of 
helping the business man to find the type of worker best 
fitted to do the work and best suited to the environment 
of the office where he or she is needed. 
Appreciating your co-operation, we are 

Respectfully yours. 

Commercial Department. 
by " 



SCHOOL REPORT 115 

5 — Extension of Work 

(a) Additional Commercial Training unnecessary after 
graduation 
The boy or girl who takes either the secretarial or the 
general business course is full}- qualified at graduation 
to enter the industrial world. For this type of pupil 
further commercial work of a high school character is 
entirely unnecessary. 

(&) Elective Commercial Courses 

Instruction is offered in certain commercial subjects 
to pupils whose main concern is with the work in other 
curricula. The ability to typewrite may almost be 
considered one of the signs of an "educated person." 
The facilities of the department permit such instruc- 
tion to be given to pupils who are not specializing in 
commerce. 
(c) Post Graduate Work Availahle 

The department has successfully given instruction to 
graduates of both the classical or academic courses who 
have found themselves unable to attend colleges or 
normal schools. This instruction is given to thes§ 
pupils without additional expense to parents. 
6 — Summary 

(a) — The aim of the commercial department is to 
provide a liberal education as well as to secure pro- 
ficienc}' in the technical subjects. 

(h) — The school records show that the commercial 
department has had a healthy growth over a period of 
ten years. 

(c) — Graduates of this department enter successfully 
the local business otBces and mercantile establishments. 

(d) — An adequate system of placement has been 
installed, and the department in the past has succeeded 
in placing its graduates through the co-operation of 
local business men. 



116 CITY OF CONCORD 

(e) — The department has the necessary facilities for 
training the boy or girl who graduates from other 
curriculum and finds it necessary to obtain office em- 
ployment. To such boy or girl an opportunity is pro- 
vided to secure commercial training without further 
expense to parent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES W. WALKER, 

Assistant Superintendent. 

February 15, 1929. 



SCHOOL REPORT 117 
NIGHT SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 

Toial Number Enrolled Elementary Advance Total 

Men 12 13 25 

Women 10 12 22 



Canadian 20 

Albanian 

Swedish 

Norwegian 

Italian 

American 



Total 22 25 47 



Nationalities Represented 



10 


Greek 


1 


6 


Armenian 


2 


9 


Irish 


1 


1 


English 


2 


2 


P^innish 


1 




2 





118 CITY OF CONCORD 

REPORT OF THE MEDICAL INSPECTOR 

Mr. L. J. Rundlett, Superintendent of ScJiools: 
Dear sir: 

Following is a general resume of the work of medical 
inspection in Union School District for the year ending 
January 31, 1929. 

With the capable assistance of the school nurse and the 
dental assistant, 2980 routine physical examinations of 
pupils were conducted in the district. A detailed report of 
the results of these examinations and the follow-up work of 
the school nurse is given herewith. In addition to this 
number, 569 pupils in the parochial schools were ex- 
amined. 

Milk Lunches 

The pasteurization of milk has been under discussion 
during the past year, some citizens feeling that an in- 
creased number of lunches would result from the distribu- 
tion of raw milk to those pupils who preferred it. Con- 
sidering the remarkable freedom from infectious disease 
that now exists in the district, the medical inspector feels 
that this change would be a distinct step backward and 
contrary to the best recognized practice of leading medical 
authorities. A survey of the reports of the city health 
department shows but two deaths of children of school age, 
during the year 1928 — one from acute Bright 's disease 
and one from meningitis — an enviable record for a popu- 
lation of 3,500 children. 

General health conditions have been excellent. With the 
exception of numerous cases of grippe in January, 1929, 
contagious diseases were very few throughout the year. 

In November, with the approval of the school dentists, 
the dental clinic was transferred from the Walker School 
to the office of the Medical Inspector in Parker School — 



SCHOOL REPORT 119 

a much more convenient location. The clinic continues to 
perform its valuable service to the district. 

Recommendations 

At the present time the most urgent need from a sanitary- 
standpoint is a thorough renovation of toilets in the Parker 
and Harriet P. Dame Schools. With the recent installation 
of city water on the plains there need be no excuse for the 
lack of modern plumbing in the latter building; and con- 
ditions at the Parker School are not creditable to the dis- 
trict. Proper toilet facilities are a part of the health edu- 
cation of the child. 

In conclusion the medical inspector expresses his appre- 
ciation of the various organizations of the city, the Kiwanis 
Club, the hospitals, and specialists, who have made possible 
many corrections of physical defects in the "under- 
privileged. ' ' 

With sincere thanks to you, Mr. Rundlett, and my asso- 
ciates in the district, for hearty co-operation in my work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR K. DAY, M.D., 

Medical Inspector. . 



120 CITY OF CONCORD 

SUMMARY OF PHYSICAL EXAMINATION 

From February 1, 1928, to February 1, 1929 

Number of pupils examined 2980 

Number of pupils more than 10% below weight 584 

Summary of Health Defects 

Treatment 

No. of Cases Secured 

Defective Teeth 768 595 

Defective Vision 110 84 

Strabismus 2 1 

Defective Hearing 1 

Unvaccinated 88 37 

Pediculosis 110 81 

Hypertrophied Tonsils 51 17 

Adenoids 1 

Defective Breathing 1 1 

Orthopedic 1 

Impetigo 8 8 

Scabies 6 6 

Total 1147 830 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR K. DAY, M.D., 

Medical Inspector. 



SCHOOL REPORT 121 

DETAILED REPORT OF SCHOOL NURSE 

February 1, 1928, to February 1, 1929 

Number of schools visited 19 

Number of visits to schools 646 

Miscellaneous visits to schools 82 

Number of visits to homes at request of teachers for 
absences and follow-up work relative to the cor- 
rection of defects 473 

Assisted Medical Inspector at routine physical exam- 
inations 2980 

Number of pupils examined for personal cleanliness 1691 

Number of Parochial School children examined 569 

Number of interviews with officials and physicians to 

make arrangements for treatment 304 

With the assistance of the Concord Family Welfare 
Association and numerous interested citizens, children 
absent from school were provided with clothing and their 
attendance secured. 

I wish to thank the physicians and hospitals of the city. 
Dexter Optical Co., and the Kiwanis Club for their valuable 
assistance. 

Respectfully submitted, 



GEORGENA C. MANSUR, R.N., 

School Nurse. 



122 city of concord 

Dental Clinic 

February 1, 1928, to February 1, 1929 

Number of clinics held 52 

Number of patients _ 440 

Number of examinations , 438 

Number of cleanings 389 

Number of extractions 765 

Number of fillings 692 

Amalgam 466 

Cement 226 

Number of treatments 9 



Total number of operations 2293 

Dentists: Dr. Young, Dr. Morton, Dr. Washburn. 
Respectfully submitted, 

ESTHER A. MAGNUSON, 

Assistant. 



SCHOOL REPORT 123 

REPORT OF THE HEADMASTER OF THE 
HIGH SCHOOL 

February 19, 1929. 
Superintendent L. J. Bundlett, 
Concot^d, N. H. 
Dear Sir: 

I am sending you the annual report of the Senior High 
School. 

Student Body 

The following tables show the enrollment and graduation 
for the past j-ear. 

Boys Girls Total 

First Semester 1928-29 .l 325 335 660 

Present Semester 337 335 672 

Class of January, 1928 15 24 39 

Class of June, 1928 47 58 105 

Total for 1928 62 82 144 

Class of January, 1929 21 23 44 

The enrollment has been the largest in the history of the 
school. The Class of June, 1928, was the largest single 
class to graduate and the combined January and June 
classes make the largest number ever graduated from the 
school in any one year. 

We have received satisfactory reports from our college 
students as a whole with some individual reports showing 
a high grade of work. We are also receiving good reports 
from those who have gone out from the commercial de- 
partment. The returns from this department are not so 
definite nor so regular as from the colleges but those which 
do come give evidence of good preparation for office work. 



124 CITY OF CONCORD 

Changes in Teachers 

At the close of the academic year in June, 1928, we lost 
by resignation, seven teachers, and since the opening of 
the present year one other teacher resigned. This makes a 
change in approximately one-third of our faculty from last 
year. It is a greater change than we have had for several 
years and is one which it is to be hoped will not be re- 
peated very often. One of the strongest forces in main- 
taining the standards of school work is found in the retain- 
ing of capable teachers for a period of years. This makes 
it possible to carry out a consistent policy which makes for 
effective work and satisfactory results. 

Courses of Study 

Two changes in our courses of study have been made with 
the beginning of the present school year. The first affects 
the Commercial Course and consists in dividing the course 
after the sophomore year into two parts. Secretarial and 
Business. In the Secretarial Course the requirement of 
bookkeeping has been reduced to one year. Stenography 
and typewriting are continued through the first semester 
of the senior year, being replaced in the second semester 
by Office Practice. In the Business Course, stenography is 
not required. Typewriting and Bookkeeping are required 
for two years. Economics, Sociology, and Office Practice 
are also required for a semester each. This change makes 
it possible to give a form of business training to students 
who cannot meet the speed requirements of stenography or 
who do not wish to take that subject. It also gives excellent 
training for office work where stenography is not needed. 

The second change is in connection with the fifth course. 
This has heretofore been the Domestic Arts Course. As 
such, strictly, it was small in numbers and those electing 
it as a separate course were growing fewer. The classes 
in Domestic Arts were maintained by offering these sub- 
jects as electives in other courses. The change made was 



SCHOOL REPORT 125 

to make this course a General Course, including in it all 
students, both boys and girls, who do not take ancient or 
modern languages. This change makes a course more 
nearly comparable in size to the other courses and is of 
assistance in arranging class divisions. As our courses 
now stand we have five in all. The first or Classical Course 
requires Latin through the entire course. The second or 
Academic, requires French through the three years of the 
Senior High School. The third is the Commercial, divided 
in the junior year into two sections, Secretarial and Busi- 
ness. The fourth course is the Mechanic Arts Course which 
is so arranged that the students in the junior and senior 
years are working under the Smith-Hughes plan. The fifth 
is the new General Course in which is offered combinations 
of English, Science, Mathematics, History and Domestic 
Arts. These five courses offer rather a wide field of choice 
for the student, yet each course is designed to lead to some 
definite end. 

Grounds and Building 

The laying out of the grounds around the building has 
been nearly completed. There remains only some grading 
to be done, the sidewalk to be built, and the road to be 
surfaced. When these have been done and when the lawns 
have been developed and some plantings made, the building 
will have a suitable and attractive setting which will add 
much to its appearance. 

A moving picture machine has been installed and a screen 
purchased for the stage. The machine can be used for 
either slides or for moving pictures. This gives the school 
equipment which enables it to take advantage of the latest 
development in visual education. 

The lighting of the stage has been improved by putting 
in a dimmer and overhead lights. It has proved a decided 
asset in staging the school plays. 

There also has been bought for the gymnasium several 



]26 CITY OF CONCORD 

pieces of apparatns which are necessary for the work of 
the classes. There is at the present time all that is really 
needed for phj^sical education work except a curtain which 
should be installed to divide the gymnasium into two parts. 
This installation will render the work of physical education 
more easily administered and more efficient than it is at 
the present time. We have now to give the gymnasium 
three days a week to the boys and two days a week to the 
girls for one week, alternating the next week. This is not 
as satisfactory as it would be to be able to divide the classes 
so they could come every week the same number of times* 

Music and Drawing 

The glee clubs, band, and orchestra have never been 
better than they have been the past year. The operetta, 
which was given by the combined dramatic club, music 
clubs, and art club last year, provided a very attractive 
feature. A similar one is to be given this year. The new 
building has given us a greater opportunity to develop this 
line of work than ever before and the increased facilities 
have increased the character of work of these departments. 
During the present semester, we are having the art in- 
structor for seven periods a week and have a class in draw- 
ing. I feel confident that if we could have the time of the 
instructor in art, we could develop drawing to a greater 
extent than has been possible in the past. I think, also, 
the same would be true in regard to music if it were possi- 
ble to secure more of the teacher's time. Both of these 
departments now have rooms and I feel that there is a great 
deal in these courses that would appeal to and be a benefit 
to the students of the school. 

Aims 

The work of the High School has changed greatly in the 
last few years. The introduction of the practical courses 
and the broadening of the academic curricula have trans- 



SCHOOL REPORT 127 

formed the school. The aim of the High School formerly 
seemed to be chiefly to stand as an inspiration and an aid 
for those who wished to go beyond high school for their 
education. At the present time the aim has changed to a 
larger degree. If we are to sum it up in one word we 
would take for the aim ''citizenship." At least the High 
School is now endeavoring to train its students so they 
can go out into the world better equipped for life and 
citizenship in this country. It is, I think, the correct view 
to take of High School work and yet at the same time while 
developing these courses to the fullest extent and making 
them of as much practical value as possible, we should en- 
deavor to retain as much as possible of the cultural and 
educational benefits that did actually exist under the older 
system. 

Respectfully submitted, 

C. F. COOK, 

Headmaster. 



128 CITY OF CONCORD 

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE RUNDLETT 
JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Mr. Louis J. Rimdlett, Superintendent of ScJiooIs: 
Dear Sir: 

I herewith submit my second annual report of the Rund- 
lett Junior High School. 

To fill the places made vacant by the resignation of two 
of the teachers last spring, Miss Shaw and Miss Gelpke 
were added to the teaching staff. However, the latter, due 
to illness, was obliged to resign at the end of six weeks, and 
we were most fortunate to be able to again secure the ser- 
vices of Mrs. Bertha Osterheld, who had been with us two 
3^ears and whom we were very sorry to lose from the staff. 

When school opened in the fall, six hundred and forty 
pupils were enrolled, making necessary the employment of 
another teacher, and Mrs. Minnie Thompson was engaged. 
We realize our good fortune in obtaining Miss Shaw and 
Mrs. Thompson as members of the teaching force. With 
such a large enrollment it is necessary to conduct one class 
in a corner of the Assembly Hall, a condition that is not 
ideal. If the enrollment increases, steps will have to be 
taken in a short time to meet the crowded conditions. It 
seems unfortunate that there is no suitable playground in 
connection with a school building housing such a large 
group of students. 

The name of the school has been cut in the granite over 
the main entrance. The placing of new treads on the stairs 
has added to the appearance of the building and to the 
safety of the pupils. 

I wish to call especial attention to the heating apparatus 
of the building. It is most inadequate and unsatisfactory 
and should have a thorough overhauling before another 
winter. 



SCHOOL REPORT 129 

In closing, I wish to acknowledge the great assistance and 
co-operation I have received from the superintendents, 
special teachers, and the members of the teaching staff. 

Respectfidly submitted, 

HARRIET S. EMMONS. 



130 CITY OF CONCORD 

REPORT OF THE PRINCIPAL OF THE MORRILL 
SCHOOL OF MECHANIC ARTS 

Mr. L. J. Bundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: 

I respectfully and briefly .submit my tenth annual report 
of the work of the Morrill School. 

Teachers 

Again, I am \evy thankful for the privilege of conducting 
the activities of this school with a full staff of trained and 
experienced teachers. It has made it possible to maintain 
large classes without impairing the quality of our instruc- 
tion and without the annoyance of disciplinary troubles. 
The spirit of professional improvement among the members 
of the staff has been most exemplary. All conventions and 
school surveys, as recommended by the State Department 
of Education, have been faithfully attended, and twelve of 
our teachers were members of the professional improvement 
class conducted this winter by Headmaster Charles F. 
Cook. 

Organization 

The school schedule has continued to be arranged so that 
Senior High School pupils pass between the High and 
Morrill Schools during the noon recess. This method of 
organization has proven so satisfactory that no greater 
conduct troubles have been encountered than were ex- 
pected, from the passing problem, when the schools were 
adjacent. 

Projects 

The outstanding projects, completed during the past 
year, have been the printing of the school magazines for 
the Rundlett Junior High and the Parker Schools, the con- 
struction of three great chests for use in the Senior High 



SCHOOL REPORT 131 

School, and the designing and development of plans for the 
proposed enlargement of the Morrill School. 

The school magazines, the "Rundlett Junior High School 
Life" and the "Parker School Crystal," are publications 
in which Concord parents should be greatly interested. We 
are proud of our part in producing these papers, for we 
know that we have shown the proper spirit for school team- 
work, and we believe that very few school print shops, 
training Junior and Senior High School pupils, surpass 
the excellent craftsmanship exhibited in these projects. 

The three large chests were made by Junior High pupils 
for the High School Athletic Association. The material 
used was hard wood and the workmanship and finish were 
exceptionally high grade. Due to the crowded condition 
of our shops, it was exceedingly difficult to handle these 
great chests during their construction. 

Designing and developing the plans for the proposed 
addition to this school has been the most educational and 
interesting project ever attempted by our drafting depart- 
ment. Our older pupils thoroughly appreciate the necessity 
for more room in the school, and many also desire instruc- 
tion in auto repairing. Therefore, the interest was very 
keen from the start, and the study of building construction 
and Concord's new building code has guaranteed the edu- 
cational value of the work. 

Other departments in the school have done commendable 
work during the past year, but the instruction and ]:)rojects 
have been, for the most part, in keeping with well estab- 
lished and thoroughly tested educational procedure. 

Enrollment 

A total enrollment of six hundred and seven pupils for 
the first semester of the year and a total of six hundred 
and twelve pupils for the second semester was a decided 
gain over any previous year. The increase has been largely 
in the Junior and Senior High School classes, wliich has 



132 CITY OP CONCORD 

grreatly added to the pupil period load. We trust that the 
consistent increase in the mechanic arts enrollment indi- 
cates the approval of the Morrill School by Concord 
parents. Because of this consistently increased enrollment 
over a period of years and the addition of many pupil 
activities, we feel justified in asking for more room and 
better working conditions. It is earnestly hoped that this 
request may be granted soon, so that it will not be necessary 
to limit the number of pupils allowed to participate in the 
mechanic arts work. In planning for more room, we have 
suggested the installation of an auto repair department, 
rather than a duplication of shops now in operation. In 
recommending the installation of an auto repair depart- 
ment, we are acting in accord with the expressed wishes of 
the superintendent of schools and in line with the best 
educational practice, for schools of this type, throughout 
the country. 
Inspections 

On two occasions, during the past year, the school has 
been thrown open, in the evening, for public inspection. 
Pupils returned to the shops in order that the school might 
be operated under actual working conditions and exhibits 
of projects were arranged. The Spring exhibit of Junior 
High School cabinet-making received much favorable com- 
ment from our own people, and from many visiting edu- 
cators from other school systems. We are glad to report 
that on all such occasions the attendance has been very 
great. 
In Appreciation 

The splendid spirit and co-operation, which I have re- 
ceived from our superintendent of schools, other school 
officials, parents and my immediate associates, has been 
most gratifying. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROLAND G. HARTWELL, 

Principal. 



SCHOOL REPORT 133 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF HOME 
ECONOMICS 

Mr. L. J. Rundleft, Superintendent of Schools: 

Dear Sir: 

During the past year there have been a few changes in 
the Home Economics work. 

Miss Esther Eastman and Miss Dorothy Barnard re- 
signed their positions during the summer vacation, which 
were respectively filled by Miss Elizabeth Hanson of East 
Concord and Miss Helen Watson of Rochester. Both 
teachers have done commendable work. Unfortunately, 
near the close of the first semester, Miss Watson met with 
an accident which necessitated the hiring of a substitute. 
This position is being well filled by Mrs. Harold Hood of 
this city. 

The Plome Economics Course, or fifth course, has been 
replaced by a General Course, making the various home 
economics courses elective. Our classes have never had as 
large enrollments. 

A new course, entitled General Homemaking, was intro- 
duced this September for classes 0, P. This is a true ex- 
ploratory course of Home Economics work. 

Camp Cookery Clubs for boys have been organized in 
the Rundlett Junior High School. These have proved very 
popular. 

The nursing classes at the High School visited the Pem- 
broke Sanitorium during the Christmas vacation for edu- 
cational purposes. A program was put on for the children 
followed by a Christmas tree, distribution of presents and 
refreshments. 

A banquet was given to the Kiwanians in the early fall, 
and the proceeds were used to more completely equip the 
cooking laboratory at the Rundlett Junior High School. 



134 CITY OF CONCORD 

The lunch rooms are functioning well, increased receipts 
over last year showing increased patronage. 
I reconnnend the following changes : 

High School 

That more of the Home Economics work be required than 
elective. 

A linoleum floor laid in the student dining room. 

Rundlett Junior High School 

Transparent windows to replace the opaque windows in 
the dining room, kitchen and cooking laboratory. 

In general 

That two small electric dishwashing machines be pur- 
chased for the lunch rooms at the Rundlett Junior High 
School and Senior High School. 

The Concord Woman's Club has shown a profound in- 
terest in our department, for which I wish to publicly 
express my appreciation. 

In closing, it seems most fitting to add my sincere thanks 
to all with whom it has been my pleasure to work, each one 
giving their loyal support and co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RUTH M. CUTTER, 

Supervisor of Home Economics 
and Lunch Rooms. 



SCHOOL REPORT 135 

REPORT OF KINDERGARTEN SUPERVISOR 

Mr. Louis J. Bundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 
Dear Sir: 

I am submitting my annual report of the kindergarten 
department for the past year. 

To an outsider there has not been much change from that 
of previous years. The aims of the kindergarten and the 
objectives reached each June must of necessity be prac- 
tically the same. It is the many ways by which these 
objectives are reached that keep the spirit of the kinder- 
garten alive and growing. 

The number of children enrolled in the kindergarten has 
been about the same as of former years. The average 
attendance except during epidemics has been good. The 
number of marks for tardiness and absence is always large 
with little children, but every year shows some improve- 
ment in that direction. 

With the exception of the Christmas Tree Parties which 
were well attended as usual, there have been no public 
special days. In every kindergarten the so-called party 
days are numerous. At present it is quite popular for a 
child to celebrate his birthday at the luncheon period. This 
friendly co-operation with the mother helps to bring the 
home and the kindergarten together. 

Mothers are our most frequent visitors and are welcome 
at all times. We wish that others, whether parents or not, 
could find time to visit and see the children at their work 
under normal conditions. 

In accordance with regulations of the Board of Educa- 
tion a child may be admitted to first grade before six years 
of age if his parents desire, provided he has had at least one 
half year in kindergarten and the teacher deems such pro- 
motion beneficial to the child. I would recommend that 
the half year be raised to a whole year, as I consider the 



136 CITY OF CONCORD 

first half of the year is needed for the child's adjustment 
to his new environment ; the second, in preparing him to 
meet the requirements of the first grade. 

There have been tAvo changes in the teaching staff owing 
to the resignations in June of Miss Katherine Remick and 
Miss Sally Clement. Miss Pauline Davenport has been 
given the principalship at the Rumford School with Miss 
Doris Robinson of Concord as her assistant. Miss Lucy 
Howard has returned as assistant at the Garrison School. 

Teacher's meetings are held every third Tuesday, this 
year in the different kindergarten rooms. 

We have this fall revised the kindergarten report card 
and used it at the February promotion. We think this 
card an improvement over the first one as it explains more 
clearly what we consider important in the child's develop- 
ment. We hope to revise also the Habit Records which we 
are using. 

At present we are trying to put into tangible form the 
work carried on in the Concord kindergartens, what we 
are doing today and have done in the past year. This work 
is being done by committees, each group taking one activity 
of the morning, and compiling lists of stories told, songs 
sung, games played, projects that have been carried on, 
equipment of the rooms, and various other things. 

It is due to interest and co-operation of all that such 
things are possible, and I appreciate the work that each one 
is willing to give to accomplish this. 

I am also grateful to you and Mr. Walker for the friendly 
attitude shown and helpful advice given to me at all times. 

Respectfully submitted, 

lYLA CHAMBERLIN, 

Supervisor of Kindergartens. 



SCHOOL REPORT 137 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING 

31 r. Louis J. Bundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 
Dear Sir: 

I liereAvitli submit my report as Art Director in the 
schools of Concord. 

A new course of study has been adopted and practiced 
with ver}^ satisfactory results in both the grades and the 
High School. Miss Coombs teaches drawing and painting 
in classes A through K, with a brief talk on Art Apprecia- 
tion each month. 

At the Parker School, even though necessary to combine 
some of the classes, which is unforunate, there is unusual 
interest. Twelve pupils calling themselves the "Parker 
Palettes" designed and painted a mural for the wall space 
above the entrance to the Assembly Rppm. 

Art has been made a compulsory subject in the M and N 
classes in the Rundlett Junior High School. They meet 
once a week and their work comprises figure study, nature 
and design, poster, lettering and color. An Art Club of 
thirty members was organized to meet each week for the 
purpose of studying craft work, such as making and 
decorating cement tiles, soap carving, basket weaving and 
decorating wooden household articles, 

A seven period a week credit course in Elective Drawing 
is being started this semester in the High School. The out- 
line of this course is as follows : Post drawing and figure 
construction, nature, design, poster construction, lettering, 
decorative panels, and color. Each week there is a meet- 
ing of the Art Club. The pupils have been decorating 
wooden salad sets, covered tin boxes with triangular pieces 
of letter linings and shellacked, designed and cut copper 
book ends. We are about to take up leathercraft. This 
club plans to design and paint the scenery for the Operetta 
to be presented in the spring. 



138 CITY OF COXCORD 

The Art Appreciation course in conjunction with Music 
Appreciation meets eacli day at the High School. The 
history of Art, from the period of Primitive Art to the 
present day, was briefly studied. Note books are kept for 
Picture Study, in which each pupil has miniature famous 
pictures with accompanying description and life of the 
artist. 

The Concord Training Class meets an hour and a half 
each week for the purpose of acquiring the fundamentals 
and general knowledge of Art. They assisted the Senior 
class in planning the decorations in the gymnasium for the 
Senior Levee. 

Because of the expansion of this department, and after 
conferences with Mr. Walker, it was found necessary to 
curtail the Art work in the Millville, Ironworks, Riverhill, 
Mountain and Hall Street Schools, thus making it necessary 
to hold monthly meetings with these teachers. 

As usual the exhibition will be held during the month of 
June. 

In conclusion, I wish to express my sincere appreciation 
to the Superintendent, the Assistant Superintendent and 
the teachers for the interest and co-operation extended to 
both Miss Coombs and myself. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DOROTHY A. GRIBBIN, 

Art Director. 



SCHOOL REPORT 139 

REPORT OF THE SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

Mr. Louis J. Eundlett, Superintendent of Schools: 
Dear Sir: 

One of the most pleasing and interesting developments 
this year in the Union School District has been the adoption 
of the platoon system by one of the larger schools. 

Under the sympathetic work of one teacher, interested 
in music and the teaching of the same, more time has been 
allotted to the Art. 

Moreover, the groups of children taught under this sys- 
tem are smaller, which must increase individual efficiency. 

The art of intelligent listening, or Music Appreciation, 
as it is called, has also at this school been given its correct 
place in the curriculum. 

In all the lower grades, more time has been given to 
individual note reading. The ability to read music easily 
is a fundamental for good intelligent singing. Much in- 
dividual work with large classes could not be given during 
the short music periods. However, with more schools under 
the platoon system, it is hoped that results then attained 
will more than offset the lack of time under the old system. 

All the classes from A up to, and including J, in the city 
and rural schools have been watched over most faithfully 
and carefully by my assistant. Miss Rachael Johnson. 

The Parker School chorus under the direction of the 
Principal, has maintained a high standard of work. The 
singing of this large and enthusiastic group has been 
supervised by me twice a month. 

An orchestra has also been organized in the building. 

In the Rundlett Junior High School the unusually large 
chorus of over 600 children has sung under my direction 
for two 45 minute periods a week. Their singing is in- 
spiring. 

The Junior Orchestra in this building, consisting of over 
30 members, has done excellent w^ork. Meeting for an 



140 CITY OF CONCORD 

hour's concentrated practice each week, good progress has 
been made on the new music by the great Masters, and 
whieli was introduced this year. The instrumentation of 
these pieces relegates the wind section of the orchestra to 
its proper place in the ensemble. 

In the Senior High School the Boy's Glee Club of 35 
members, and the Girl 's Glee Club of 52 members have done 
good work. 

The Band and the Orchestra in the same building have 
met regularly also once a week. These four important or- 
ganizations were called on to provide entertainment at the 
State Teacher's Conference last October, and their efforts 
were highly spoken of. 

Mr. Nevers kindly directed the Band for me in the 
Gymnasium, whilst, at the same hour I sponsored the two 
Glee Clubs in the Assembly Hall. 

At the sectional Music Supervisor's business meeting 
held on the first morning of the Conference, it was decided 
to organize an All-State Orchestra for the State Convention 
to be held in October of this year. 

Perhaps the outstanding feature of this year for the 
Music Department was the presentation, for the first time 
in the history of the Union School District, of an Operetta. 

''Peggy and the Pirate" was chosen as the work. The 
music is written by Geoffrey O'Hara, the well-known com- 
poser of songs, and libretto by Geoffrey Morgan. 

It was presented on two successive evenings, and the 
performance- was on a high level. The Assembly Hall was 
filled to capacity on both occasions. Such a work was only 
possible by the harmonious and sincere co-operation of the 
Dramatic Department under the Sub-master, Mr. Tucker, 
the Art Department, and the Home Arts Department, un- 
der the supervision of Miss Magoon and Miss Cutter, re- 
spectively. 

I am happy that the year's work has been marked by a 
desire, on the part of all with whom my work has brought 



SCHOOL REPORT 141 

me into contact, to do their very best, and to faculty and 
pupils alike, I desire to put on record my deep apprecia- 
tion of the same. 

Respectfully yours, 

H. MAITLAND BARNES. 



142 CITY OF CONCORD 

REPORT OF THE PHYSICAL DIRECTOR 

Mr. L. J. Rundleff, 
Superintendent of Schools. 
Dear Sir: 

I hereby submit my report as Physical Director and 
Coach of Athletic Teams. This report deals briefly with 
instructions given, schools benefited and recommendations 
for improvement. 

Physical exercises are presented at a certain period each 
day in the Elementary Schools, the Junior High School 
and the Senior High School. 

Two important improvements have been made at the 
Senior High School during the past year. 

(1) The gymnasium has been equipped with apparatus, 
which makes our physical program more interesting 
for the boys during their drill periods. 

(2) Towels have been furnished to the students free of 
charge, which makes it possible for each boy to have 
a bath after his drill period. (This is greatly appre- 
ciated by the students.) 

The Rundlett Junior High School exercises are presented 
in the school rooms under the supervision of the teacher 
with pupil leaders directing and instructing the classes. 
These leaders are changed at different periods for the 
development of student leadership. 

The Parker School physical exercises are held outdoors, 
when the weather permits, and in the assembly liall at all 
other times. Calisthenics and dumbell exercises are pre- 
sented here with music which adds rhythm and interest to 
the different exercises and drills. 

The Elementary Schools' physical work is divided into 
two classes. 
(1) The classes from A to D have mimetic exercises 



SCHOOL REPORT 143 

and games in which considerable interest is shown 
by the youngsters. 
(2) Classes from E to J have calisthenics and games 

which are presented usualh" with pupil leaders under 
the supervision of the teacher. By rotating the pupil 
leaders, leadership is developed in the Avhole class. 
With the completion of the new athletic field on Fruit 
Street our program for the development of athletic teams 
will be benefited considerably. It will add time to the 
periods of instruction, also making it possible for the boys 
to hurry to the locker room and have a shower before cool- 
ing off after a hard practice. 

At this time I wish to thank the public-spirited citizens 
who so generously gave their time and money to develop 
this field which was a vital necessity for the proper de- 
velopment of the youth in our city. 

There are two recommendations for improvement which 
I believe will help this work at the Senior High School. 

(1) By installing a curtain in the gymnasium it would 
be possible for us to have gymnasium assignments for 
the boys each day. 

(2) As the balcony is so located at present that there is 
an obstruction wdiich interferes with a view of the 
program being carried on, I believe that the front 
could be changed at a nominal cost, and a much 
better view obtained. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EUGENE M. CALLAHAN, 

Physical Director. 



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SCHOOL REPORT 145 

CENSUS, 1928 
SUMMARY OF WARDS 

Boys 

Number of children enumerated 1803 

Increase since 1927 

Number attending school since 1927 47 

Number attending public schools 1436 

Number attending parochial schools 281 

Number attending private schools 22 

Number of children enumerated be- 
tween the ages of 5 and 16 1803 1673 3476 

Number between the ages of 5 and 8 
not registered in the district or else- 
where 10 6 16 

Number between the ages of 8 and 14 
not registered in the district or else- 
where 2 2 

Number between the ages of 14 and 16 
not registered in the district or else- 
where 4 4 8 

Number between 5 and 16 not attend- 
ing school regularly _ 

Number between 5 and 8 not attending 

school regularly 

Number between 8 and 14 not attend- 
ing school regularly 10 1 

Number between 14 and 16 not attend- 
ing school regularly 

Number between 10 and 16 not able to 
read and write the English language 
correctly 

How many of these were born in New 

Hampshire 

Elsewhere in the United States 

In foreign countries 

Moved to the district since 1927 49 





















34 


83 



146 CITY OF CONCORD 

NATIVITY OF PARENT 

American born _ 1482 

Foreign born 385 

Russia - - 13 

West Indies 

Italy „ „ _ - 46 

New B runswiek „ 6 

England 25 

Poland - 

Sweden 46 

Roumania 

Ireland _ 30 

Canada 129 

Denmark 5 

Germany 2 

Nova Scotia 10 

Prince Edward Island 9 

Finland 28 

Scotland 12 

Albania _ _ 

Austria 3 

Switzerland _ 

Greece „ „ 9 

Newfoundland 1 

Armenia _ _ - 

France 2 

South America 

Australia _ ~ 1 

Hungaria - - 1 

Portugal - 1 

Cape Breton „ _ 1 

China _ 1 

Turkey — « 1 

Norway _ _ _ 1 



SCHOOL REPORT 147 

NATIVITY OF CHILD 

Boys Girls Total 

American born 1779 1642 3421 

Foreign born 24 31 55 

Russia 2 2 

Italy _ 2 2 

England 12 3 

Sweden 

Ireland 5 5 

Armenia _ „ 10 1 

Canada „ 14 15 29 

Scotland _ „ „ 112 

Finland 2 2 

Newfoundland _ 

Nova Scotia „ 2 2 

Albania „ „... 

New Brunswick „ 2 13 

Prince Edward Island Oil 

Greece „ Oil 

Cape Breton _ 112 



148 



CITY OF CONCORD 

SCHOOL TABLE 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



Group I — High 
School 



Charles F. Cook 
Ruel E. Tucker 



Seth G. Twitchell 

Henry W. Pope 

John T. Waldron ___ 

John E. Reed ._ 

William G. Couser __ 
Grace L. Ross - 



Elisabeth Averill 

Carrie E. Baker 

Carrie A. Hood 

Helen J. Knox 

Grace E. Weston 

Stella M. Osgood _._. 

Agnes I. Moberg 

Mildred E. Rowe ...._ 
Helen H. Richardson 

Constance J. Timlia 

Helen L. Brown — 

Belle L. Twombly 

Irene E. McCarthy . 

Alice M. Perkins 

Alma A. Sargent __ 

Mary E. Melifant . 

Agnes L. Smith 

Thomas G. Walters . 
Charlotte M. Sawyer 



Position and room 



Headmaster __ _. 

Submaster, room 312 



Assistant, rooms 314, 
317 



Assistant, room 304 
Assistant, room 310 



Grades and subjects 
taught 



Assistant, rooms 206, 
208 — 



Assistant, rooms 101 
106 

Dean of Girls, Dean'i 
Office 

Assistant, room 202 .... 
Assistant, room 203 ... 

Assistant, room 301 ... 

Assistant, room 201 ... 

Assistant, room 204 ... 
Assistant, room 205 ... 

Assistant, room 303 .... 

Assistant, room 104 .... 
Assistant, room 102 ... 

Assistant, room 311 ... 

Assistant, room 210 .... 

Assistant, room 209 ... 

Assistant, room 105 _. 

Assistant, room 307 ... 

Assistant, room 103 . 

Librarian 

Secretary, Office ._ 

On Leave of Absence. 
Resigned at end of 
spring term. 



Councillor of Boys, 
Civics, Economics 
and Business Practice 



Physics, Chemistry, 
Faculty Manager of 
Athletics 



Sociology, Economics, 
Bookkeeping 

Bookkeeping, Type- 
writing _ — 



English and European 
History, Economics 
and Business prac- 



English 



Physical 
(Giris) 



Education 



French, German 

French — 

Stenography and 

Typewriting ....._. — 
English 

French 

Latin, English, 
History 



Stenography, 

Typewriting 
Mathematics 
English 



American History, 

Civics 

English 



English 

Mathematics 

Biology, English — 
Mathematics, Latin 



Residence ( )^out 
of town 



33 Pleasant St. 



45 Thompson St. 
(Saylesville, R. I.) 



28 Thompson St. 
(Fitchburg, Mass.) 

4 No. Spring St. 

33 Warren St. 
(Peabody, Mass.) 



1181/2 Pleasant St. 

22 Fremont St. 
(Dover, N. H.) 



14 Merrimack St. 
(New York, N. Y.) 
11/2 Merrimack St. 
Wi Merrimack St. 
(Lancaster, N. H.) 

140 Rumford St. 
(722 Pine St., 
Manchester, N. H.) 
11/2 Merrimack St. 

124 Warren St. 
(Medford, Mass.) 

169 Pleasant St. 
85 South St. 
169 Pleasant St. 
(Sabattus, Me.) 

11 So. Spring St. 
(27 Elm St., 
Penacook, N. H.) 
76 Warren St. 
(Milford, N. H.) 
86V2 Pleasant St. 
(Manchester, N. H.) 
16 Thompson St. 
(Dover, N. H.) 
18 Rumford St. 
(Milford. N. H.) 
36 So. State St. 
22 South St. 



SCHOOL REPORT 

SCHOOL TABLE — Continued 



149 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



Dorothy P. Kendall 
M. Virginia Musk 

Alice J. Reed 

Audrey A. Davis -.. 
Emily R. Jewell __ 



Group II — Rundlett 
Jr. High School 



Harriet S. Emmons 
Helen O. Stephenson. 



Mary W. Cross 

Bernice M. Cummings 
Cora T. Fletcher 

Elizabeth J. Donovan 

Mary Flavin . _ 

Florence A. Chandler _ 

Julia M. Degnan 

Anna M. Keenan 

Viola J. Brock 

Mabel F. Lane 

Irene W. Hart .- 

Harriett L. Megrath — 

Mary A. McGuire _ 

Edith C. Ericson _ 

Agnes R. Kelley 

Evelyn C. Shaw 

Bertha F. Osterheld ...- 
Minnie M. Thompson- 
Charlotte M. Bagley .. 
Christine C. Petersea^ 

Louise E. Gelpke 



Position and room 



Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Transferred to Concord 

Training School. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during fall 

term. 



Supervising Principal .- 
Sub-Prmcipal . 



Assistant, room 23 



Assistant, room 21 

Assistant, room 31 

.\ssistant, room 28 

Assistant, room 27 

.\ssistant, room 22 



Assistant, room 25 
Assistant, room 38 

Assistant, room 11 

Assistant, room 12 

-Assistant, room 13 

Assistant, room 15 

Assistant, room 17 

Assistant, room 18 

Assistant, room 37 
Assistant, room 24 

Assistant, room 26 



Assistant. Assembly 
room 

Clerk ..._...- ..._ .. 

Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned during fall 

term. 



Grades and subjects 
taught 



Clas,ses O. P, Math- 
ematics, Latin, Eng- 
lish 

Clas.ses O. P, 
Mathematics 



Classes O, P, English., 

Classes O, P, Science, 

Business Methods 

Classes O, P, English. 

Classes O, P, English 

Cla-sses O, P, Civics, 

Business Methods 



Classes O, P, Math- 
ematics, French _ 

Classes M, N, O, P, 
Latin, Science _ 

Classes M, N, History-, 
Mathematics 

Cla.s.ses M, N, English, 
Science . - _ 

Classes M, N, 
Mathematics 

Classes M, N, History 

Cla.sses M, N, 

Mathematics 

Classes M, N, Science, 

Historv 

Classes iVI, N, English 
Classes O, P, Ancient 

History, Civics _ 

Clas.ses O, P, 
Mathematics 

Class M, English, 
Science 



Residence ( )=out 
of town 



6 So. State St. 



7 So. State St. 
(Lowell, Vt.) 

(10 Webster St., 
Franklin, N. H.) 
20 Pine St. 

5 So. State St. 
28 Thorndike St. 
2 No. Spring St. 

(20 Winter St.. 
Penacook, N. H.) 

20 Bradley St. 

(93 High St., 
Penacook, N. H.) 

99 No. State St. 

105 No. State St. 

63 High St. 
71 Warren St. 
(Hooksett, N. H.) 

77 So. State St. 

Box 14. 

12 Beacon St. 

30 Rumford St. 
(Hampton, N. H.) 

105 Pleasant St. 



25 Pine St. 

14 No. State St. 



150 



CITY OF CONCORD 

SCHOOL TABLE — Continued 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



Parker School 
6th grade 

M. Kathleen Hickey 

Anne I. Hart 

Margaret A. Fanning 

Rutli M. McCaig .._ 

Hannah E. Bourne 

Anne M. Branon 

Rose C. McCormick ... 
Katherine C. Butt 



Julia M. Melifant 

Walker School 

Julia E. Talpey ,.... 

Rose E. Donovan 

Eva H. Tandy „. 

Mary J. Degnan _. 

Margaret G. Mannion 

Mabel Clark 

Sara E. McClure 

Doris E. Abbott .._ 

Alice M. M. Phaneuf. 

M. Gertrude Doherty 
Ruth L. J. Holmgren.. 

Agnes V. SuITivan 

Dorothea Lamson 

Grace C. Kelley ^ 



Position and room 



Concord Training 
School— Walker School 



Alice Jesseman Reed 



Senior Training Class 
(Graduates June, 1929) 

Kathleen A. Degnan 

Helen C. Ericson 

Helen M. Lowe 

Marjorie F. Lowe 

Doris A. Tappan 



Junior Training Class 
(Graduates June, 1930) 

Gladys E. Foote 

Caroline H. Eraser 



Supervising Principal 

Assistant, room 1 

Assistant, room 4 . 

As.sistant. room 8 

Assistant, room 5 

Assistant, room 3 

Assistant, room 7 

Assistant, room 2 

Clerk, Study Hall . 



Supervising Principal. 

Assistant, room 7 

Assistant, room 8 

Assistant, room 5 

Assistant, room 4 

Assistant, room 3 

Assistant, room 2 

Assistant, room 1 

Assistant, room 10 



Grades and subjects 
taught 



Assistant, room 11 
Assistant, Auditorium.. 

Assistant 

Assistant - 



Assistant, room 6 



Mathematics 

History, Geography, 
Music .... . 

Grammar, Literature, 
Music . 

Grammar, Literature, 
Music, Hygiene 

History, Grammar, 
Hygiene, Penman- 
ship, Art 

Geography, Hygiene, 
Penmanship 

Literature, Grammar, 
Geography, Arith- 
metic, Hygiene, 
Music 



Classes I, J 

Classes G, H _ 

Classes E, F 

Class D 

Class C 

Class B 

Class A 

Geography, Nature 

Study 

Music, Drawing 

Physical Culture 

Kindergarten, Library 
Kindergarten, Plays 

and Games 

LTngraded . 



Trainer for Student 
Teachers 



Residence ( )=out 
of town 



70 Rumford St. 
63 High St. 

90 Rumford St. 

13 Rockingham St. 

661/2 No. State St. 

8 Wall St. 
24 Broadway. 



10 Lyndon St. 
36 So. State St. 



41 Warren St. 
105 So. Main St. 
66 High St. 
20 Bradley St. 
13 Maple St. 
126 Warren St. 
11 Cummings Ave. 
63 School St. 

90 Rumford St. 
145 No. State St. 
13 Wall St. 
49 Lyndon St. 

56 Beacon St. 

(New London, N. H.) 

59 Broadway. 



1181/2 Pleasant St. 



20 Bradlev St. 
10 Davis St. 
120 Rumford St. 
12t) Rumford St. 
36 Laurel St. 



Concord, N. H. 
R. F. D. No. 3. 
12 Hanover St. 



SCHOOL EEPORT 

SCHOOL TABLE — Continued 



151 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



Jeanne McKenzie 

Mary E. D. Reardon....- 

Lenore C. Roberts 

Sadie A. Stone _ 

Marjorie L. Wetherbee 

Garrison School 

Nora A. Cotter 

Frances M. Twomey.-.. 

Ina L. Tebbetts __ 

Clara M. Ingalls 

Myrta B. Lowe 

Lucy B. Howard 

Katherine E. Crabbe . 

Sally Clement 

Eastman School 

Elizabeth N. Merrill 

Dorothy W. Twomey .._ 

Sibyl RawclifFe 

Catherine F. Bean 

Ruth L. J. Holmgren.- 

RuMFORD School 

Jessie N. Stimson . 

Annette Prescott 

Annie E. Saltmarsh 

Ellen C. Doherty _ 

Abbie T. McDonald 

Esther M. Mannion „._ 
Clara J. Henry 

Cecilia P. Jones 

Pauline G. Davenport 
Doris L. Robinson 

Frances M. Twomey 

Mary M. Doherty 

Katherine L. Remick 

Kimball School 

Susan M. Little 

Marguerite M. J. 
Tetreault 



Position and room 



Clara E. Flanders 

Charlotte A. Norris 

Mary A. Coughlin 

Hannah E. O'Brien 

Edna M. Kennedy 

Maude B. Binet 

Jessie Gould 

Harriet C. Kimball 



Principal, room 8 _.. 

Assistant, room 6 _._ 

Assistant, room 2 _ 

Assistant, room 4 ..... 

Assistant, room 1 __ 

Assistant, room 1 _... 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



Principal , room 4 
A.ssistant , room 3 
Assistant, room 2 
Assistant, room 1 
Transferred to 
Walker School. 



Supervising Principal. 

Assistant, room 8 

Assistant, room 7 

Assi.=tant, room 6 

Assistant, room 5 

Assistant, room 3 _._ 

Assistant, room 2 

Assistant, room 1 

Assistant, room 4 

Assistant, room 4 

Transferred to 
Garrison School. 

Died during spring 
term. 

Retired on pension. 



Supervising Principal 

Assistant, room 5 

Assistant, room 7 

Assistant, room 8 



Assi-stant, room 4 

Assistant, room 1 

Assistant, room 3 

Assistant, room 2 

Assistant, room 2 

Assistant 



Grades and subjects 
taught 








Classes I, J 




Classes F, G, 
Classes A, B 
Classes C, D 
Kindergarten, 
Primary _ 


H 

and 



Kindergarten 



Grades V, VI 
Grades IH, IV 
Grade II 



Grade I 



Office _ 

Class J, English 

Class I, Arithmetic 

Classes F, H _. __ 

Classes E, F 

Classes D, E 

Classes B, C 

Classes A, B 

Kindergarten, Primary 
Kindergarten, Primary 



Class J _ _ 

Classes H, I _ 
Classes G, H 



Classes E, F 

Classes C, D _ 

Classes A, B 

Kindergarten, Primary 
Kindergarten, Primary 
Special Teacher 



Residence ( )^out 
of town 

57 So. State St. 
34 Fiske Road. 
26 Thorndike St. 
R. F. D. No. 10 

30 Fiske Road. 



5 Engel St., 

West Concord, N. H. 

23 Forest St. 

East Concord, N. H. 

40 Center St. 

60 No. Spring St. 
31 Auburn St. 



East Concord, N. H. 
23 Forest St. 
7 Holt St. 
28 Jackson St. 



11 Holt St. 

25 Green St. 

60 Beacon St. 

11 Thorndike St. 

78 Washington St. 

16 No. Spring St. 

513 No. State St. 

West Concord, N. H. 

75 South St. 

6 Court St. 

4 View St.. 

West Concord, N. H. 



90 School St. 

38 Concord St. 
118 Pleasant St. 
(20 Slimmer St., 
Penacook. N. H.) 
22 Albin St. 
60 Franklin St. 
10 Blanchard St. 
7 Washington St. 
(Contoocook, N. H.) 
Hopkinton Road. 



152 



CITY OF CONCORD 

SCHOOL TABLE — Continued 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



Penacook School 

\bbie A. Donovan 

Regis E. Scully - 

P. Alice Haskell 

Marion F. Callahan— 

Dewey School 

A. Delia Shaw 

lyla Chamberlin _ 

Alice M. Sargent 

Belle E. Shepard _ 

Olive M. Scott 

Helen F. Stevens __ 

Addie F. Straw _ 

Harriet P. Dame 

School 

Nettie M. Bowen 

Winifred J. Welch _ 
Teresa C. Johnston __ 

Catherine F. Hurley 

Margaret G. Mannion 

Esther M. Mannion 

Cogswell School 

Fannie B. Lothrop 

Anna E. Murphy 

Hall Street School 

Gladys Morrill 

Dunklee Street 
School 

Marion Silsby 

Mildred Dole 

Millville School 

Frances E. Currier 

Nora E. Murphy 

Iron Works School 

Delia I. Lewis . 

Ida M. Cilley 

Mountain School 

Doris E. Currier 

Clara J. Henry .;_ _ 



Position and room 



Principal, room 4 ... 

Assistant, room 3 _ 

Assistant, room 2 _. 

Assistant, room 1 . 

Principal, room 5 .. 
Assistant, room 1 _ 

Assistant, room 4 .. 
Assistant, room 2 .. 
Assistant, room 3 - 
Assistant, room 1 . 
Retired on pension 



Principal 



Assistant - 

Assistant 

Assistant .— — 

Transferred to Walker 

School. 
Transferred to Rum- 

ford School. 



Principal, room 2 
Assistant, room 1 

Principal 



Principal 

Assistant 

Principal, room 2 

Assistant, room 1 

Principal . 

Assistant 

Principal 

Transferred to Rum 
ford School. 



Grades and subjects 
taught 



Class H 

Class G _- — _ _- 

Classes E, F 

Classes A, C 

Classes E, F 

Supervisor of 
Kindergartens 

Classes C, D 

Classes A, B 

Class B - 

Kindergarten, Primary 

Grades V, VI 

Grades III, IV 

Grade II _ 

Grade I 



Class D 
Class B 



Classes A, B, C, D 



Kindergarten, Primarj' 
Kindergarten, Primary 



Grades IV, V, VI 

Grades I, II, III _ 



Grades IV, V, VI 
Grades I, II, III 



Mixed grades 



Residence ( )=out 
of town 



84 Center St . 
6 Walker St. 
167 Rum ford St. 
11 Concord St. 



72 School St. 

2 View St. 

West Concord, N. H. 

23 Lyndon St. 

11/2 Merrimack St. 

43 Lyndon St. 

55 South St. 



(29 Center St., 
Penacook, N. H.) 
22 Church St. 
10 Abbott St. 
45 Penacook St. 



67 South St. 
(Bristol, N. H.) 
18 So. Fruit St. 



123 No. State St. 



51 Pleasant St. 
6 Merrimack St. 



Hopkinton Road. 
Fiske Road. 



Clinton St., 
R. F. D. No. 2. 
Iron Works Road, 
R. F. D. No. 3. 



East Concord, N. H. 
(Pittsfield, N. H.) 



SCHOOL REPORT 

SCHOOL TABLE — Continued 



153 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



RiVERHiLL School 

Fanny I. Sanel 

Sibyl Rawcliffe 

Morrill School 
Roland G. Hartwell 

Raymond P. Oilman . 
Herbert C. Wilcox 

Philip H. Pike 

Harold C. Chamberlin 

Willard H. Nute _. 

Arthur G. Paige 

Charles F. Dodge ...- 

Lawrence H. Woods..- 
George A. Bartlett 



Earl S. Temple .._.... 
Paul A. Brazier 

Eugene C. Maxam 



Maxwell E. Coulter 



Home Economics 
Department 



Ruth M. Cutter _ 

Elizabeth F. Hanson., 



Ila G. Batchelder 
Helen M. Watson 



Position and room 



Principal — 

Transferred to East- 
man School. 



Principal 



Assistant, room 1 
Assistant , room 5 



Assistant, room 4 .. 

Assistant, room 6 .. 

Assistant, room 3 _ 

Assistant, room 7 _ 

Assistant, room 2 _ 

Assistant, room 8 .. 

Assistant, room 3 A 

Assistant, room 4 _ 

Assistant, room 1 .. 

Assistant 



Residned at end of 
spring term. 



Supervisor of Home 
Economics 



Assistant 



Assistant 
Assistant 



Grades and subjects 
taught 



Mixed grades 



Supervision, Teacher 
Training Seniors 

Machine Shop Practice 
Pattern -Making, 

Wood-turning. 

Teacher Training 

Juniors _ _ 

Electricity, Applied 

Physics 



Cabinet - Making , 
Repairs, Manual 
Tra ining 

Forging, Manual 
Training, at Walker 
School 

Mechanical Drawing... 

Applied Mathematics, 
Applied Physics, 
Applied Chemistry 

Printing _ 

Bookbinding; room 1, 
Mechanical Draw- 
ing; room 5, Manual 
Training 

Electricity; room 6A, 
English „ 

Machine Shop Practice, 

Manual Training 
(drawing) ...._ 

Opportunity Class, 
Manual Training at 
Rumford School, 
Classes K, L 



Foods, Nursing, 
Household Organiza- 
tion, Household 
Management, Gen- 
eral Home Making, 
Classes O, P, Q, 
S, T, U, V 

Sewing, Cooking, 
Classes K, L, M, N 

Sewing, Cooking, 
Classes K, L, M, N 



Residence ( )=out 
of town 



24 Clinton St. 



4 No. State St. 

Suite 5. 
10 Maple St. 



229 No. Main St. 
58 No. Spring St. 

East Concord, N. H. 



315 So. Main St. 
9 Humphrey St. 



28 Beacon St. 
25 Clinton St. 



4 Jackson St. 
73 School St. 

55 So. State St. 
14 Glen St. 



6 So. State St. 
(Antrim, N. H.) 



East Concord, N. H. 



59 Warren St. 
(Manchester, N. H.) 



59 Warren St. 
(Rochester, N. H.) 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD 

SCHOOL TABLE — Continued 



Names of buildings 
and teachers 



Edna F. Watson _... 

M. Emma Parsons .„. 

Alice M. Powell 

Minnie B. Sanborn 

Nellie M. Dow ._.... 

Esther B. Eastman 

Dorothy Barnard 

Annie C. Cobb 

Daisy R. Sadler 

Music 
H. Maitland Barnes _ 
Rachael H. Johnson... 

Drawing 

Dorothy A. Gribbia... 

Margaret M. Coombs 
Ida M. Magoon 



Physical Drill 

Eugene M. Callahan 

Janitors 

Charles M. Thomas _ 
Henry C. Smith ..._. 
Dwight A. Frisbee ... 
Louis P. Whittier ... 

Charles W. Scherig ... 

Charles Ada _.. 



John McKenzie 

Frank J. Boyd 

Willis C. Prescott 

Park French 

Harvey B. Fowler -. 



John P. Heath „.. 

William R. Butler ...- 

George F. Bcmis 

Benjamin F. Robinson 



Arthur J. Taylor ... 

William C. Leavitt 

Special Repairs 
Reuben L. Cate 



Position and room 



Lunch room at Sr. 

High School 

Lunch room at Sr. 

High School 



Lunch room at Jr. 

Hiffh School 

Lunch room at Jr. 

High School 

Lunch room at 

Parker School ..._ .. 
Re.signed at end of 

spring term. 
Rpsdsncd during the 

summer. 
Resigned at end of 

spring term. 
Resicrned at end of 

spring term. 

Director _ 

Assistant 



Director 

Assistant 



Resigned at end of 

spring term. 



Director 



Sr. High School ..^ 

Sr. High School 

Sr. High School 

Jr. High and 
Morrill Schools 

Jr. High and 

Morrill Schools 

Custodian of school 
books and general 
siipplies. Home 
Economics Cottage 

Parker School 

Walker School 

Garrison School - 

Eastman School 

Rumford School ...._ 

Kimball School 

Penacook School _.._ 

Dewey School . 

Harriet P. Dame 
Sch ool ._ 

Cogswell and Dunklee 

St. Schools 

Millville School 



Grades and subjects 
taught 



Residence ( )=out 
of town 



51 So. Spring St. 

88 No. State St. 

39 No. Fruit St. 

11 Kimball St. 

16 Elm St. 



116 School St. 
Route 1 
(Hopkinton, N. H.) 

66 Warren St. 
(Portland, Me.) 
59 Warren St. (East 
Vassalboro, Me.) 



73 Rumford St. 



161,4 Glad.'^tone St. 
8 Prince St. 
4 Avon St. 

I Greenwood Ave. 

II Pierce St. 



5 Chapel St. 

57 So. State St. 

140 Rumford St. 

482 No. State St. 

We.st Concord, N. H. 

East Concord, N. H. 

Coit House. 

St. Paul's School. 

10 Wall St. 

139 No. State St. 

39 So. Spring St. 

No. Pembroke Road, 
The Plains. 

6 Avon St. 

6 So. Main St. 



East Concord, N. H. 



SCHOOL REPORT 



155 



HIGH SCHOOL TABLE 

Showing the Number of Students Taking Each Study 

First Semester, 1928-1929 



Classes 



SUBJECTS 



English . — . 

Latin 

French 

German 

Ancient History .., .. 

United States History 

Civics . ._ 

English History 

Modern Euro'^ean History 

Mathematics __._ , 

Chemistry 

Physics 

Biology 

Economics . . 

Bookkeeping ___ 

Stenography 

Typewriting 

Commercial Arithmetic 

Commercial Geography 

Machine Shop Practice 

Applied Mathematics 

Printing 

Pattern -Making 

Forging 

Electricity 

Applied Physics 

Mechanical Drawing . 

Economics and Business 

Practice 

Wood -Turning __ 

Cabinet Making ____. 

Manual Training 

Household Chemistry _ 

Household Organization 

Household Management .... 

Home Nursing 

Freehand Drawing 

General Home Making ., 

Music and Art Appreciation.™ 

Music, Chorus . 

Music, Orchestra 

Elementary Science 

Girls' Glee Club . 

History of Art 

Cooking 



M 



202 



Shop Practice Tryout Courses-_ 

Band 

Boys' Glee Club _._ 

H. S. Arithmetic 

Sociology ._ 

Applied Chemistry 

Auto Ignition , 

Ind. Geography 

Business Methods 



202 



202 



111 



90 



88 24 



127 



156 



CITY OF CONCORD 



MANUAL TRAINING — TABLE OF ATTENDANCE 



SCHOOLS 



Mechanic Arts 






I ^ 



° M 

X' 3 






Sewing 



X 3 

3 
C M 



Cooking 






1 <D 


C J= 
















m C 


!C M 






-a -2 


w 


&„ 


3 


3 


o.:g 


■<-T3 












— 


v 


O tiO 


0^ ^ 

lis 


O 




03 


3 


u. 


C SB 




O 


. c 








— 3 ■? 


i: 


■o'^S 


i^uo 


►-1 


!$-^ >. 



Higli -.._ - - 


.15 


37 


178 


35 


7 


28 


17 


2 


15 


Rundlett Jr. High * 


251 


26 


225 


31 


11 


21 


209 


17 


192 


ParVpf 


146 


11 


135 


134 


4 


130 


_. 






Walker 
























Eastman _ 


10 


1 


9 


9 


1 


8 






— 


Rumford _ _ 


_.. 




— 






-.- 


— 


..- 


- 


Kimball 




.... 




.... 




— 


— 




- 


Penacook 


— 


— 




.._ 


- 


.... 


- 


- 


- 


Dewey Training _. 


14 





14 


13 





13 


- 


- 


- 


Harriet P. Dame 


6 


1 


5 


6 





6 


- 




- 


Millville __ — 


8 





8 


8 


1 


7 


- 




- 


Mountain .. 




_.. 




_.. 




... 


— 


- 


- 


Iron Works — 


6 


1 


5 


4 





4 


... 


- 


- 


Riverhill ... .._ 


.... 


.... 


— 




_.. 


.... 


- 


- 


- 


Special — — 


18 





18 






- 


-■ 


- 


- 


Totals -.- 


674 


77 


597 


240 


24 


217 


226 


19 


207 


* (16 opportunity) 



























































TABLE OF ATTENDANCE FOR 


THE YEAR ENDING JUNE, 1928 






































. 




Of the pupilH registered how many 




















■^1=1' 










j 












1 V 






R 




1 




liud, prior to registration in this 
school, been registered during this 
fleliool year 






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reported 


in 3 above how many c 


n September 1 (last) were 




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fill 








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1 


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1 




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1 
>. 


1 


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1 


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1 


1 


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s 

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1 
1 


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3 


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1 












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s 
















. 
















































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— 


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inffi 


fe 


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^ 


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b 


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1 


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1 


1 
O 


1 


1 


3 


1 


1 


3 


1 


g. 


i 


H 


1 


5 


H 


1 


1 

a 


1 


1 


3 


^ 


1 


15 
IS 


1 


i 


i 


1 


2 


1 


1 

< 


E 
1 


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S 

s 


£ 


1 


g 
2 


E 


1 J 


z 


g 

z 


1 

Z 


i-s 




z 


HlOH School. 




























1 






















































































Sr. Hiiih Scliool 


m 


3eg 


742 


48 


49 


07 


3 


9 


3 


1 





1 


321 


320 


641 


- 


~ 


— 


- 


- 


- 


2 


6 


8 


121 


126 


247 


197 


187 


384 


1 


1 


2 


380 


13 


4 


2 


4 


22 


358 


215.033 


8,999 


600.65 


25.13 


625.78 


.9598 


792 


76 


51 


47 


99 


25 


35 


1 


64 


60 


- 


Total -- 


a;a 


3IIII 


743 


48 


40 


97 


3 


,1 


3 


1 


n 


1 


321 


320 


641 














2 


6 


a 


l?l 


176 


747 


197 


187 


384 


1 


1 


3 


380 


1? 






, 


27 


358 


315.933 


8,999 


699.65 


25.13 


625.78 


9508 


792 


75 


51 


47 


90 


35 


35 


1 


64 


60 




Rundlott Jr. Higli 




















































































































School — . 


397 


■m 


me 


66 


46 


102 


6 


9 


15 


1 


2 


3 


274 


302 


676 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


137 


172 


309 


119 


123 


342 


18 


7 


25 






- 


380 


12 


4 


2 


* 


33 


358 


187.307 


8.383 


523.29 


23.41 


546.61 


.9571 


204 


183 


41 


28 


99 


20 


32 


15 


76 


64 


2 


Totol _ 


337 


259 


608 


56 


16 


102 


6 


9 


15 


1 


2 


3 


274 


302 


576 




- 


_ 


_ 


- 


_ 


137 


172 


309 


119 


123 


242 


18 


7 


25 




_ 


^ 


380 


12 


4 


2 




22 


358 


187.307 


8,383 


,523.30 


33.41 


549,61 


.9571 


204 


183 


41 


23 


99 


20 


22 


15 


76 


64 


2 






















































































































Pnrkor School 


■m 


m 


3311 


61 


31 


112 


5 


1 


n 








137 


103 


240 














119 


95 


214 


17 


8 


25 


1 




1 








380 


12 


4 


2 


4 


22 


358 


75.828 


3,673 


311,3,52 


10.3.59 


221.511 


,953 


12 


26 


3 


25 




411 


,50 


12 


400 


14 




Walkor SolionI 


2IIII 


m 


3H(I 


Ml 


.Ml 


118 


2 


4 


6 








139 


193 


242 








47 


49 


96 


86 


.54 


14(1 


6 




6 














380 




•a 




28 


1,54 


368 


77.226 


5.438 


212.581 


14,902 


227.483 


,9343 


73 


1 


1 


31 


7 


34 


70 




2(13 


.5 


4,55 


Gnrrinon School 


K» 


hh 


144 


28 


17 


45 


1 




1 








60 


38 


08 








l.i 


2(1 


35 


43 


18 


61 


2 




2 














332.5 


44 


14 


6 


16 


.8(1 


312,5 


29;S08 


1.824 


98.07 


5.771 


101.841 


9414 


47 






27 




28 


36 




Kill 


8 


381 


EaHtnuin School 


eu 


.111 


iin 


2 




2 














67 


.5(1 


117 








22 


23 


45 


44 


26 


7(1 


1 


1 


2 














380 


36 






12 


66 


358 


37.530 


2.446 


104.81 


6.82 


111.63 


9419 


44 


(I 




24 


2 


9 


21 


6 


113 


14 


222 


Rtimford School 


2.14 


1113 


447 


Hi 


.Ml 


141 




5 


9 








168 


129 


297 








61 


54 


115 


1(13 


75 


178 




































5,963 


258,03 


16.62 


274.65 


9383 


111 


19 




24 




34 


65 


1 


1.57 


16 


331 


Kbnbull School 


mil 


2(11 


411(1 


118 


75 


14H 


3 


7 






1 


1 


128 


118 


246 








,39 


29 


68 


88 


89 


177 


1 




1 














380 








24 


13' 


358 


82,155 


5.113 


230.479 


14.268 


244.747 


,94211 


02 


1 




» 




27 


88 


8 


419 


18 


328 


PvtiBcoolt School 


129 


146 


2;2 


45 


.54 


(10 


2 


2 


4 




1 


1 


71 


80 


168 








2.5 


18 


43 


53 


71 




1 




I 














380 


48 


16 


8 


IB 


88 


358 


50.723 


3,562 


141,67 


9.78 


151.45 


9345 


64 


8 


1 






16 


36 




9/ 


5 


176 


IJcwoy School . . 


n 


K(l 


1.V2 


14 


15 


29 








1 




1 


il 


6.5 


122 








35 


39 




22 


26 


48 




















380 


36 


17 






86 


358 


37,211 


2.570 


103.93 


7.16 


111.08 


93/2 


87 






11 


3 


17 


23 


5 


291 


17 


187 


H. P. Uiunc School 


74 


73 


147 


6 


8 


14 


3 


4 


7 




1 


1 


66 


69 


125 




1 


1 


19 


32 


51 


45 


27 


72 


1 






























358 


39.112 


2,456 


110.03 


6.85 


116.93 


9381 


36 


24 








32 


56 




41 


11 


449 


Cognivoll School - 


«2 




UK 


22 


18 


49 


2 


1 


3 








38 


37 


75 








29 


32 


61 


9 




14 




















380 




8 




8 




358 


25,142 


2,568 


71.06 


7.17 


78.23 


.9070 


57 


2 


1 






13 


30 




1.52 


2 


.53 


Holl 81. School 


lb 


IS 


3(1 




1 


1 














15 


14 


20 








12 


12 


24 


3 


2 


5 


































5,916 


880 


16.47 


2.43 


18.99 


8714 


8 










7 


7 




20 




99 








67 


1 


' 


2 


5 


4 


9 








33 


23 


66 


- 


- 


- 


9 


8 


17 


24 


13 


37 


- 


3 


2 




- 


— 


— 


- 


- 


380 




8 


4 


8 




358 


17,557 


1.655 


49.03 


4.61 


53.64 


.9135 


5 


10 






- 


8 


10 


- 


23 


3 


143 


Totnl 


K02 


1108 


2600 


388 


338 


720 


27 


28 


55 


I 


3 


4 


986 


829 


1815 


_ 


1 


1 


313 


316 


629 


639 


501 


1140 


33 


11 


44 


1 


_ 


1 


_ 


_ 


-„ 


376. 


524 


174 


86 


178 


962 


334. 


570.099 


38,147 


1605,452 


199,64 


1612.992 


.9344 


616 


91 


10 


256 


12 


284 


482 


32 


1941 


112 


2818 


ROIULS 




















































































































Icon Worka School 


20 


23 


43 


2 


4 


6 




1 


1 


., 






18 


18 


36 








6 


6 


13 


9 


12 


21 


3 




3 














380 










22 


358 


11.599 


659 


32.40 


1.84 


34.24 


9463 


21 


13 








6 


15 




81 




107 




























12 


19 


22 








5 


8 


13 


7 


2 


9 




















380 


13 








22 


358 


6.874 


480 


19.20 


1.34 


20.54 


,9348 


64 


6 








5 




















- 


' 


' 




2 


2 


- 


- 


- 


5 


8 


13 




- 


- 


1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


9 




1 


1 




- 


-^ 




- 




380 


12 


4 


_ 


4 


20 


360 


4.684 


562 


13.91 


1.63 


14.54 


.8947 


13 


3 








8 


9 


1 


15 


3 




Total 


87 


» 


82 


2 


5 


7 




4 


4 


_ 


_ 


_ 


35 


36 


-1 








12 


16 


28 


20 


19 


39 


3 


1 


4 














380 


36 


12 


4 


12 


64 


359 


23,157 


1,701 


64.61 


4.71 


69.32 


.9252 


98 


33 








19 


31 


3 


119 


4 


335 


KlNOnOAnTBNft 




















































































































WiJkor School 


37 


43 


80 


1 


1 


2 






_ 








36 


42 


78 


20 


13 


33 


16 


79 


45 






























^ 








358 


16,718 


3,204 


46.70 


9.22 


55.92 


8399 


4 










6 


8 


2 


81 


1 


_ 




























17 


16 


33 


10 




19 


7 


7 




















































8766 






1 






3 


























— 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


39 


29 


.iO 


17 


16 


33 


13 


13 


26 


























380 










23 


358 


13.786 


1.666 


38.51 


4.96 


42.57 


9.135 


13 










4 


4 


1 


108 


1 






























2.5 


IV 


42 


15 


7 


22 


19 


in 


29 
















































32.87 


8335 


26 
















































32 


27 


.59 


15 


14 


29 


17 


13 


30 


























380 


1? 




? 




22 


3£a 


13.124 


3.098 


37.49 


8.85 


46.14 


,8124 


71 










8 


12 


3 


219 




























- 


- 


26 


42 


68 


12 


21 


33 


14 


31 


35 




- 


- 




- 


- 


~ 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


_ 


380 


12 


4 


2 




33 


338 


13,966 


3.158 


38.98 


8.81 


47.79 


.81 


21 










9 


10 


2 


132 




' 


ToUl 


172 


1S2 


3S4 


' 


9 


15 








- 


- 


- 


166 


173 


339 


89 


80 


169 


77 


93 


170 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


380 


73 


34 


12 


24 


132 


368 


75.119 


14.302 


211.26 


39.33 


250.60 


.8598 


134 




' 


21 




33 


44 


12 


800 


* 


31 


W.lk«r School -_ 
Morrill Sdionl 


8 


8 


16 


3 




3 














5 


8 


13 














3 


7 


19 


2 


1 


3 


















^ 




1 




358 


4.830 


400 


13.49 


1.11 


14.69 


9255 


7 


8 








6 


15 


1 


10 




104 








18 








- 






- 


- 


- 


- 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 














- 


- 




- 


~ 




146 




2 




1 


5 


141 


2.084 


321 


14.83 


2.27 


16.90 


.8666 


30 


3 










2 




- 




School 




24 


24 




8 


8 






- 


- 


- 






16 


16 




- 


- 


^ 


- 


- 




2 


2 


- 


12 


12 




2 


3 


_ 


- 




389 


12 


4 


2 


1 


23 


358 


4.937 


697 


20.57 


3.99 


23.47 


.8704 


5 






28 


09 


20 


22 


15 


76 1 


22 


Total ^_ 


39 


32 


9S 


21 8 


29 






_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


5 


24 


29 


_ 












3 


9 


12 


2 


13 


15 




3 


2 








302 


36 


10 


4 


9 


49 


286 


11.831 


1,418 


48.69 


8.28 


54,97 


.8991 


12 


13 




37 


90 


26 


30 


10 


92 3 


134 


Qntnd TotaU 


2347 


21U 


4332 


521 455 


0-6 


36 


41 


77 


3 11 


8 


1787 


1684 


3471 


89 


81 


170 


402 


425 


827 


801 


707 


1508 


278 


274 


553 


216 


196 


413 


1 


1 


1 


372.68 


682 


328 


110 


231 


1251 


351.12 


1 ,083.767 


72,930 


3033.862 


205.50 


3259.362 


.92381 1886 ' 


381 


m 


110 


300 


387 1 


653 


!i. 


3083 247 


3320 



SCHOOL REPORT 157 

FORTY-FIRST ANNUAL ELOCUTIONARY 
CONTEST 

BY THE PUPILS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS 

OF UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT 

CONCORD, N. H. 

RUNDLETT JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL HALL 

THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 7, 1929 

AT EIGHT o'clock 

PROGRAM 

March: "Under the Double Eagle" Wagner 

High School Band 

ORIGNAL DECLAMATION— Senior High School 

1. "True Friends" 

Dana Crawford Bogart 
Class T 

2. "My Isle of Dreams" 

Marguerite Louise Chenette 
Class V 

3. "The Disappearance of the Fireside" 

Mildred Linfield Doyle 
Class R 

Schottische: "Idle Hours" Fulton 

High School Band 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION — Rundlett Junior 
High School 

1. "Lincoln" Anon. 

Betty McLean 
Class 

2. "Ballad of Lucky Lindbergh" Turner 

Jean Elkins 
Class N 



158 CITY OF CONCORD 

3. "Men To Make a State" Doane 

William Herbert Gifford 

Class P 

March: "Philo March" Fulton 

High School Band 

FORENSIC DECLAMATION— Elementary Schools 

1. ''Ambition" Jerome 

Paul Ferdinand Rylander, Parker School 

2. ' ' Obeying the Law ' ' 'Brien 

Edward Krekor Sampadian, Walker School 

3. "Life Lessons" Bain 

Karl Eklund Swenson, Kimball School 

March : ' ' Uncle Reuben ' ' Fulton 

High School Band 

MISCELLANEOUS DECLAMATION— Elementary 

Schools 

1. "Dr. Johnson's Picture Cow" Guest 

Kenneth Francis Folsom, Millville School 

2. "Where Ignorance Is Bliss" Fielding 

Stanley Edgar Johnson, Garrison School 

3. "Pointers Dyspeptic Goat" Boyle 

Pearl Gray, Harriet P. Dame School 

4. "Mary Elizabeth" Anon. 

Ruth Mildred Radford, Eastman School 

5. "Weighing the Baby" Anon. 

Margaret Hall Peaslee, Rumford School 

March: "State Line March" Fulton 

High School Band 



SCHOOL REPORT 159 

AWARD OF PRIZES 

Original Declamation — Senior High School 
First Prize, $15, awarded to Marguerite Louise Chenette. 
Second Prize, $10, awarded to Dana Crawford Bogart. 

Forensic Declamation — Rundlett Junior High School 
First Prize, $6, awarded to William Herbert Gifford. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Jean Elkins. 

Forensic Declamation — Elementary Schools 
First Prize, $6, awarded to Karl Eklund Swenson. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Paul Ferdinand Rylander. 

Miscellaneous Declamation — Elementary Schools 
First Prize, $6, awarded to Stanley Edgar Johnson. 
Second Prize, $4, awarded to Kenneth Francis Folsom. 
Third Prize, $2, awarded to Ruth Mildred Radford. 

BOARD OF JUDGES 
H. Stewart Bosson, Meredith, N. H. 

Hon. Fred T. Wadleigh, Milford, N. H. 

Hon. William W. Allen, Penacook, N. H. 

PRIZE SPEAKING ACCOUNT 

Received 

Balance from last year's account $3,862.11 

Interest accruing on same during the year 167.34 

Sale of 414 tickets at 35 cents 144.90 



$4,174.35 
Expended 
Una W. Linscott, professional services $70.00 

Prizes, including books 58.76 

English Prize Composition expense 130.50 

Miscellaneous expense, including selling and taking 

tickets, judges, ushers, music, etc. 22.75 

Cash on hand as a guarantee fund for future 

contests 3,892.34 

$4,174.35 



160 



CITY OF CONCORD 



ANNUAL CONTEST IN ENGLISH COMPOSITION FOR 
HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS 

Held at the Parker School, May 5, 1928. 



O 
O 

No. puj 
enrolled 
school. 

No. puf 

taking 

part. 




< 2 a 


aga 

03 o 3 

•< ft o 


Senior High 644 25 


3.88+ 


18.16 


78.46 + 


Rundlett Jr. High 541 36 


6.65+ 


39.91 + 


65.80+ 


PRIZES 








(Essays) 








General Prizes 






Prizes Awarded to 


Class 


Subject 


First, $6 Robert Whittier Parker 

Second, $4 Elizabeth Anna Sullivan 
Third, $3 Nyleen Eleanor Newton 

Fourth, $2 Dixon Hodgdon Turcotte 


u 

R 

T 

T 


A Day in Paris 
During the Revolu- 
tion. 

Molly Wood. 
Four Modern 
Poets. 

Webster's Ideas of 
Patriotism. 



First, 



Class Prizes 
Senior High School 
Classes TJ , V 
Robert Whittier Parker U 



Second, $3 M. Evelyn Hebert V 

Classes S, T 

First, $4 Nyleen Eleanor Newton T 

Second, $3 Dixon Hodgdon Turcotte T 

Third, $2 Janet Katherine Webster T 

Fourth, $1 Hilda Constance Salter T 



A Day in Paris 
During the Revolu- 
tion. 

A Day in Paris 
During the Revolu- 
tion. 



Four Modern 

Poets. 

Webster's Ideas of 

Patriotism. 

A Day in Doone 

Valley. 

A Day in Doone 

Valley. 



SCHOOL REPORT 



161 



PRIZES — Continued 



Prize 



Classes Q, B 

Awarded to Class 



Subject 



First, $4 Elizabeth Anna Sullivan R Molly Wood. 

Second, $3 Olavi Arvi Waananen Q Molly Wood. 

Third, $2 Dorothy Ernestine Holmes R Molly Wood. 

Fourth, $1 Helen Jackson Durgin R Molly Wood. 

RuNDLETT Junior High School 
Classes 0, P 
First, $4 Mildred Linfield Doyle 

Second, $3 Elizabeth Mable Heron 

Third, $2 Mary Louise Doherty 
Fourth, $1 Jeanette Grace Huneau 



First, 



Classes M, N 
$4 Nona Gertrude Long 



Second, $3 Linda Morrison 
Third, $2 Sarah Spear Coville 
Fourth, $1 Verna Gladys Batchelder 



(Poems) 
General Prize 
Nyleen Eleanor Newton T Rain. 



p 


A Day Behind the 




Counter. 


p 


Is Shylock a 




Villain? 


p 


Enoch's Return. 





Long John Silver. 


M 


Evangeline's Wan- 




derings. 


N 


The Combat. 


N 


The Combat. 


N 


The Combat. 



First, 



Senior High School 
Classes Q, R, S, T, V, V 



First, $4 Nyleen Eleanor Newton T 

Second, $3 Viola Johanna Goodyear T 

Third, $2 Flora May Dimond Q 

Fourth, $1 Virginia Lee Morrison R 



Rain. 

Daffodils. 

The Village Street. 

Candle Light. 



RuNDLETT Junior High School 
Classes M, N, 0, P 

First, $4 Mildred Linfield Doyle P Candle Light. 

Second, $3 Hazel Gertrude Burnham P The Brook. 

Third, $2 Una Cleveland Rogers Rain. 

Fourth, $1 Margaret Dorothy Grant P The Brook. 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD 



TWELFTH ANNUAL ALBIN PRIZE MEDAL CONTEST 

High School Hall, June 8, 1928 



PROGRAM 

Overture : Lustspiel Keler-Bela 

High School Banjo Club 

Order of Speakers: 

Janet Grace Kennedy 
Edward March Cummings 
Florence Mildred Baker 
Carl Rodney Strom 
Dorris Marion Tilton 
John Francis Grady 
Dorothy Marie Hadley 

Waltz: Artists Life Strauss 

March : March of the Mandolins Williams 



Selected : 



Russell Leavitt 



High School Banjo Club 
Directed by Mr. Fowler 

JUDGES 

Melhem Nasser 



Mayland Morse 



MEDAL WINNERS 

Carl Rodney Strom — ''Chivalry" 
Dorothy Marie Hadley — ''Thrift" 



SCHOOL REPORT 



163 



GRADUATION EXERCISES, CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL 

Auditorium, Friday, June 22, 1928, 2.30 p.m. 



PROGRAM 

Selection: Ballet Suite from Rosamiuide 

a. Andante un poco assai 

b. Andantino 

High School Orchestra 



Schubert 



Prayer : 



Essay : Silence 



Essay : Days 



Rev. Ralph L. Minker 



Dorris Marion Tilton 



Janet Grace Kennedy 



First Honor 



Second Honor 



Selection: Ballet Sylvia 

a. Valse Lente 

b. Pizzicato Polka 

High School Orchestra 



Delihes 



Address 



Bishop John T. Dallas, Concord, N. H. 



Presentation of Class Gift: 

Carl Rodney Strom 



Acceptance : 



Robert Whittier Parker 



Award of Prizes : 

Albin Medals 
Harvard Club Prize 
Woman's College Club Prize 



164 CITY OF CONCORD 

Chandler Commercial Club Prize 
D. A. R. History Prize 
Thayer History Prize 
Alumni Prizes 
Thayer Athletic Prize 
Class of January 1922 Cup 
Class of June 1925 Cup 
Hi Y Cup 

Presentation of Diplomas : 

Headmaster, Charles F. Cook 

March Militaire : Schubert 

Hiffh School Orchestra 



SCHOOL REPORT 165 

GRADUATING CLASS OF JUNE 22, 1928 

Katherine Elizabeth Allen Commercial 

Gladys Lillian Angwin Academic 

Forest Augustus Bartlett Mechanic Arts 

Harry Lewis Bartlett Academic 

Nan G. Bean Academic 

Alva Marie Bergstrom Commercial 

Hazel Louise Brown Commercial 

Charles W. Burton Mechanic Arts 

Stephen Ernest Butterfield Classical 

Raymond Henry Champigney Mechanic Arts 

Ida Rae Chapman Commercial 

Estelle Marie Charpentier Commercial 

Richard Caswell Clapp Academic 

Arthur Estes Clarke, Jr Academic 

Mary Louise Cloutman Academic 

Ona Collins Classical 

Mary Verna Courchene Commercial 

Robert Whalen Crawford Academic 

Doris Mildred Creighton Commercial 

Gilman Kimball Crowell Academic 

Bernard Francis Crowley Academic 

Edward March Cummings Academic 

Harriette Van Mater Dakin Classical 

John Alexander Dane Mechanic Arts 

Kathleen Isabella Dane Commercial 

John Joseph Dawson Commercial 

Howard Thomas Demerse Mechanic Arts 

Geneva Lois Doe Commercial 

James William Dougal, Jr Mechanic Arts 

Robert Kirker Dougal Academic 

Gerald Craig Edmunds Mechanic Arts 

Russell J. Ellsworth Mechanic Arts 

Mary Frances Farrar Classical 

Mildred Augusta Fellows Classical 

William Houghton Foster Academic 

Astrid Evelyn Franzen Domestic Arts 

Caroline Helen Frazer Academic 

Lester Howard Gale Mechanic Arts 

John Francis Grady Mechanic Arts 

Morris S. Wylie Gring Academic 

Marie Evelyn Hebert Commercial 

Alice Louise Hoadley Commercial 

Donald Little Homans Academic 

Helen Beatrice Huston Academic 

Norman R. Jeannotte Mechanic Arts 

Francis Xavier Keane Classical 

Janet Grace Kennedy Classical 

lone Bell Knight Academic 

George Crane Knox Mechanic Arts 



166 CITY OP CONCORD 

Jennie Lachance Commercial 

Gerald J. Lackey Mechanic Arts 

Edwina Marie Laflamme Commercial 

Pierre Joseph Laflamme Commercial 

Phyllis Lake Classical 

Thomas Harrison Leary Academic 

Angus Harold MacNeil Academic 

Phyllis W. Malm Domestic Arts 

Anna Demetrius Mamos Academic 

Paul Amos Mansur Academic 

Edith Florence Masters Domestic Arts 

Ralph Paul McDonald Mechanic Arts 

Katherine Mclnnis Academic 

Jeanne McKenzie Domestic Arts 

Ruth Frances Melvin Academic 

Margaret Frances Mori'ison Classical 

Thomas Harold Murphy Academic 

Elizabeth Gary O'Connell Academic 

Lloyd Thomas Olmstead Mechanic Arts 

Sarah Louise Otis Academic 

Pansy Papazian Commercial 

Pauline Helen Marie Patoine Commercial 

Harold William Nelson Peabody Mechanic Arts 

Edward Perriello Mechanic Arts 

Eugene Holden Philbrick Mechanic Arts 

Raymond Clark Proctor Mechanic Arts 

Miriam Pauline Putney Academic 

Mary E. Delphine Reardon Domestic Arts 

Frances Emma Reid Domestic Arts 

Theodore Kenneth Rice Mechanic Arts 

Lenore Katheryne Roberts Academic 

Hope Marie Rosell Academic 

Irene Evangeline Roy Commercial 

Josephine L. Roy Academic 

Samuel Scappettuolo Mechanic Arts 

Toivo Ferdinand Skarp Commercial 

Carl M. Smith Mechanic Arts 

Erdine Smith Commercial 

Marguerite Catherine Stanley Domestic Arts 

Mary Louise Stoddard Academic 

Sarah A. Stone Academic 

Pauline Estelle Story Academic 

Carl Rodney Strom Classical 

Dorothy Swain Commercial 

Hazel Grace Taylor Domestic Arts 

Dorris Marion Tilton Classical 

Lynda Jennie Waldron Commercial 

Dorothy Mabel Walker Commercial 

Everett Heath Webber Mechanic Arts 

Dorothea Frances Welch Academic 

Marjorie Louise Wetherbee Domestic Arts 

Lorraine Wheeler Commercial 



SCHOOL REPORT 167 



Gilbert Warren White Mechanic Arts 

Dean Plummer Williamson Academic 

Frances Evelyn Witham Domestic Arts 

Douglas Russell Woodward Mechanic Arts 



CLASS OFFICERS 

Carl Rodney Strom President 

Sarah Louise Otis Vice-President 

Russell J. Ellsworth Secretary 

Estelle Marie Charpentier Treasurer 



168 



CITY OF CONCORD 



GRADUATION EXERCISES, CONCORD HIGH SCHOOL 

High School Hall, Friday, January 25, 1929 
PROGRAM 

Selection: Allegro Molto Schubert 

High School Orchestra 
Prayer : 

Rev. Laurence F. Piper 
Essay: The Value of Culture First Honor 

Robert Whittier Parker 
Essay : Reverie Second Honor 

Doris Bradford Wilson 
Trumpet Solo : My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice Saint Saens 

Anne Florence Shaw 
Address : 

President Edward M. Lewis 

University of New Hampshire 

Selection : Minuet Mozart 

High School Orchestra 
Presentation of Class Gift : 

Mary Rushworth Crossley 

Acceptance : 

Clarence Daley 

Award of Prizes: 

Woman's College Club Prize 
Alumni Prize 
Class of January 1922 Cup 
Class of January 1925 Cup 
Hi Y Cup 

Presentation of Diplomas : 

Mr. Leigh S. Hall 

March : Coronation Meyerbeer 

High School Orchestra 



SCHOOL REPORT 169 

GRADUATING CLASS, JANUARY 25, 1929 

Raymond Houghton Adams General 

Agnes Marie Elizabeth Anderson General 

Beatrice Evelyn Baker Business 

Richard Wood Berry Mechanic Arts 

Lilian Edythe Blakey General 

Elizabeth Hortense Brower Secretarial 

Donald James Brunei Academic 

Richard Allen Brunei General 

Robert Edward Bunker Mechanic Arts 

Vivian K. V. Champigney Secretarial 

Lendall Taft Cleveland Mechanic Arts 

Rose Harriet Copson Secretarial 

Robert John Crawford Mechanic Arts 

Mary Rushworth Crossley Secretarial 

John Joseph Crowley Mechanic Arts 

Hazel Gertrude Curtis Secretarial 

Perley Lee Everett Academic 

Raymond Charles Fitts Mechanic Arts 

Mildred Kathryn Fitzgerald Secretarial 

Juliette O. Gagne Secretarial 

Alyce Mary Gorham Secretarial 

Richmond Hammond Hoyt Mechanic Arts 

Atwood Levensaler Academic 

Rachel Edith Merrill General 

Harold Rudolph Norquist Academic 

Robert Whittier Parker Classical 

Robert Wright Parmenter Mechanic Arts 

Eleanor Edith Pinkham General 

John Edward Pitts Classical 

Mary Ellen Pomphret General 

George Gerald Ross General 

Edna Mae Sanborn Academic 

Bernice Lena Scherig General 

Ruth Elizabeth Scherig Secretarial 

Anne Florence Shaw Business 

Paul Prince Silver General 

Albert Walter Smith General 

Thelma Irene Snow General 

Lena Hazel Tabor Secretarial 

Eleanor Haley Taylor General 

Kenneth Oscar Taylor Mechanic Arts 

Ernest Robert Turnquist Mechanic Arts 

Mildred Wilhelmson General 

Doris Bradford Wilson Classical 

CLASS OFFICERS 

Robert Parker President 

Mary Crossley Vice-President 

Thelma Snow Secretary 

Doris Wilson Treasurer 



170 CITY OF CONCORD 

ANNUAL SCHOOL MEETING WARRANT 

STATE OP NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the Inhahitants of Union School District in Concord, 
N. H., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Auditorium on 
Prince Street in said district on the fifth day of April, 
1928, at three o'clock in the afternoon to act upon articles 
1, 2 and 4 of this warrant. Voting for election of moder- 
ator, clerk and members of the Board of Education will be 
by official ballot and checklists. The polls will be open for 
this purpose at three o'clock p.m. and will remain open 
until eight o'clock p.m. and for such further time, if any, 
as the moderator may determine at the meeting ; and at 
eight o'clock p.m. to act upon the remaining articles of the 
w^arrant. 

1. To choose a moderator for the ensuing year. 

2. To choose a clerk for the ensuing year. 

3. To hear and act upon the report of the Board of 
Education for the past year. 

4. To choose three members of the Board of Education 
to hold office for three years, to fill the vacancies arising 
from the expiration of the term of office of Harry F. Lake, 
Dorothy B. Jackson, and Merton C. Knapp. 

5. To choose one or more auditors for the ensuing year. 

6. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the support of schools for the ensuing year. 

7. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the payment of the debts of the district. 

8. To see if the district will vote to erect and equip a 
grade school on its lot on South Street, raise and appro- 
priate money for the same, and authorize the Board of 
Education to do all things necessary to carry this into 
effect. 



SCHOOL REPORT 171 

9. To see what sum of money the district will raise and 
appropriate for the teachers' pension fund. 

10. To see if the district will vote to authorize the 
Board of Education to install steam-heat in the Rumford 
School in place of the present warm air system, raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 

11. To see if the district will vote to authorize the 
Board of Education to grade the high school lot, raise and 
appropriate money for the same. 

12. To see if the district will vote to give the Board of 
Education authority to sell the Chandler School building 
and lot on the corner of South and Fayette Streets. 

13. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 19th day of March, 1928. 

HARRY F. LAKE, 
ELISABETH R. ELKINS, 
DOROTHY B. JACKSON, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
GRACE G. MOULTON, 
GEORGE A. HILL, 
BENJAMIN W. COUCH, 
MERTON C. KNAPP, 

Board of Education of rnion School District. 

I certify that on the 20th day of March, 1928, I posted a 
copy of the written warrant, attested by the Board of Edu- 
cation of said District at the place of meeting within 
named, and a like attested copy at the Police Station in the 
City of Concord, N. H., being a public place in said Dis- 
trict. 

. LOUIS J. RUNDLETT. 



172 CITY OF CONCORD 

Concord, N. H., March 20, 1928. 

Then personally appeared before me, on this date, the 
said Louis J. Rundlett, and made oath that the above 
certificate by him signed is true. 

I. REED GOURLEY, 

Justice of the Peace. 



SCHOOL REPORT 173 

RECORD OF ANNNUAL MEETING 
1928 

The annual meeting of the legal voters of Union School 
District was held at the City Auditorium in Concord, 
April 5, 1928, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon. 

Articles I, II and IV. 

The moderator called the meeting to order and read the 
warrant and declared the polls open for the election of 
moderator, clerk and three members of the Board of Edu- 
cation, to remain open until 8 p.m. and for such further 
time as the moderator might determine. 

Article III. On motion of Bennett Batchelder, duly- 
seconded, it was 

Voted: That the report of the Board of Education hav- 
ing been printed and distributed, the reading of the same 
be dispensed with and the report as printed be accepted 
and placed on file. 

Article V. On motion of Alpheus M. Johnson, duly 
seconded, it was 

Voted: That the clerk be instructed to cast one ballot 
for William C. Brunei and Clyde M. Davis as auditors for 
the ensuing year, and they were declared duly elected to 
said office. 

Article VI. On motion of George A. Hill, duly seconded, 
it was 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District for the support of schools for the ensuing year such 
a sum as in addition to the sum required by law will amount 
to the sum of Three Hundred Seven Thousand Two 
Hundred Eighty-seven and 03/100 dollars ($307,287.03.) 

Article VII. On motion of Harry F. Lake, duly 
seconded, it was 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 



174 CITY OF CONCORD 

District the sum of Fifty-three Thousand Four Hundred 
Twelve and 50/100 dollars ($53,412.50) of which sum 
Twenty-Seven Thousand dollars ($27,000) shall be appro- 
priated for the payment of bonds maturing during the 
year and Twenty-six Thousand Four Hundred Twelve and 
50/100 dollars ($26,412.50) for the payment of the interest 
on its bonded indebtedness accruing during the year. 

Article VIII. On motion of Merton C. Knapp, duly 
seconded, it was 

Voted: That Union School District erect, originally 
equip, and furnish a school building to accommodate at 
least two hundred fifty (250) school children, on its school 
house lot on South Street and that the sum of One Hundred 
Thousand dollars ($100,000) is hereby raised and appro- 
priated for the same, and to provide for the same appro- 
priation the Board of Education of said district is hereby 
authorized and directed, pursuant to authority of law, to 
enter into an agreement with the city of Concord that said 
city of Concord borrow on the credit of said city of Con- 
cord for the purpose of erecting, originally equipping and 
furnishing of said building in said Union School District, 
the sum of One Hundred Thousand dollars ($100,000) and 
to issue bonds of said city of Concord for the payment of 
the same and bearing a rate of interest not exceeding four 
and one-half per cent (4V^%) per annum and there is 
appointed the Board of Education of said Union School 
District as a committee who shall power to erect, originally 
equip, and furnish said school building. 

Article IX. On motion of Elwin L. Page, duly sec- 
onded, it was 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District the sum of Two Thousand dollars ($2,000) and 
the same be appropriated for the Teachers' Pension Fund. 

Article X. On motion of Bennett Batchelder, duly sec- 
onded, it was 



SCHOOL REPORT 175 

Voted: That there be raised and is hereby ordered to be 
raised on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District the sum of Seven Thousand dollars ($7,000) for 
installing steam heat in the Rumford School. 

Article XL On motion of Joseph S. Otis, duly seconded, 
it was 

Voted: That there be raised, and is hereby ordered to be 
raised, on the polls and ratable estates within Union School 
District the sum of Twenty-five Thousand dollars ($25,000), 
for the general purpose of grading the present High School 
lot, and that the same be expended at the discretion of the 
School Board. 

Article XII. On motion of Benjamin W. Couch, duly 
seconded, it was 

Voted: That the Board of Education be authorized to 
sell by public auction or to the highest bidder in private 
sale, the Chandler School building and lot, situated at the 
northeast corner of Fayette and South Streets, and be 
directed to enter the sum received by the sale to the credit 
of Union School District. 

The moderator declared the polls closed at 9.05 p.m. and 
announced the result of the ballot as follows : 

Total number of ballots cast " 1516 

For moderator : 

Arthur P. Morrill had 1212 votes 

and he was declared duly elected moderator for the ensuing 
year and took the oath of office as prescribed by law before 
Ray E. Burkett, Justice of the Peace. 
For Clerk: 

Ray E. Burkett had 1195 votes 

and he was declared duly elected clerk of the District for 
the ensuing year and took the oath of office prescribed by 
law before the moderator. 



176 CITY OF CONCORD 



For members of the Board of Education : 




Dennis Sullivan had 


1 vot 


James M. Langley had 


1 " 


Wallace Purrin^on had 


1 " 


George W. Parker had 


304 " 


Elmer J. Foster had 


531 " 


Merton C. Knapp had 


641 " 


Charles H. Dolloff had 


787 " 


Dorothy B. Jackson had 


912 " 


Leigh S. Hall had 


946 " 



and Charles H. Dolloff and Dorothy B. Jackson and Leigh 
S. Hall were declared duly elected members of the Board 
of Education for a term of three years. 

On motion of Harry F. Lake, at 9.20 p.m. the meeting 
adjourned. 



A true record. Attest: 



RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



SCHOOL REPORT 177 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 

To the Inhabitants of Union School District in Concord, 
N. H., qualified to vote in district affairs: 

You are hereby notified to meet at the Parker School on 
School Street, in said district on the twelfth day of July at 
seven thirty o'clock in the evening to act upon the follow- 
ing articles of this warrant: 

1. To see upon what terms of maturity the Board of 
Education shall contract with the City of Concord regard- 
ing the bonds authorized by the district on April 5, 1928, 
to pay for the erection, original equipment and furnishing 
of the school building on the South Street lot. 

2. To transact any other business that may legally 
come before said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 28th day of June, 1928. 

BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
LEIGH S. HALL, 
GRACE G. MOULTON, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
CHARLES H. DOLLOFF, 
GEORGE A. HILL, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 

A true copy of the original warrant attest: 

BENNETT BATCHELDER, 
LEIGH S. HALL, 
GRACE G. MOULTON, 
JOSEPH S. OTIS, 
CHARLES H. DOLLOFF, 
GEORGE A. HILL, 
Board of Education of Union School District. 



178 CITY OF CONCORD 

RECORD OF SPECIAL MEETING 

Concord, N. H., July 12, 1928. 

A special meeting of the inhabitants of the Union School 
District was held at the Parker School, July 12, 1928, at 
7.30 o'clock. 

The meeting was called to order by the Moderator who 
read the warrant and order of the Court authorizing the 
calling of the meeting. 

On motion of Bennett Batchelder, duly seconded, it was : 

''Voted: That the Board of Education be and they 
hereby are authorized to contract with the City of Concord 
for the issue of one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) 
in bonds contemplated by vote of the District on April 5, 
1928, to pay for the erection, original equipment and 
furnishing of a school building on the school house lot on 
South Street, upon the following terms as to maturity, to 
wit: Five thousand dollars ($5,000) one year from the date 
of said bonds and five thousand dollars ($5,000) annually 
thereafter until all of said bonds shall mature, the last 
maturity being twenty (20) years from the date of said 
bonds, which shall be September 1, 1928. 

No further business coming before the meeting, on mo- 
tion of Mr. Joseph S. Otis, it was voted to adjourn. 

A true record : 

Attest : 

RAY E. BURKETT, 

Clerk. 



school report 179 

Bonded Indebtedness op Union School District 

Yearly Total 

Date of Building amount indebted- 
payment due ness 

1929 

July 1 H. G 10,000 $707,000 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 15,000 

1930 

Julyl H. G. 10,000 $675,000 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 15,000 

1931 

Julyl H. G. 9,000 $643,000 

Sept. 1 S.E.P. 5,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1932 

May 1 W. 10,000 $613,000 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1933 

May 1 W. 10,000 $582,000 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1934 

May 1 W. 10,000 $551,000 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 



180 CITY OF CONCORD 

Bonded Indebtedness — Continued 

Yearly Total 
Date of Building amount indebted- 
payment due ness 

1935 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 $520,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1936 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 $499,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1937 

Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $478,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1938 

Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $457,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1939 

Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $436,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1940 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 $415,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1941 

Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $394,000 

Oct. 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1942 

Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 $373,000 

Oct, 1 M. 2,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 



SCHOOL REPORT 181 

Bonded Indebtedness — Continued 

Yearly Total 

Date of Building amount indebted - 

payment due ness 

1943 
Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $352,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1944 
Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $333,000 

Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1945 

Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $314,000 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1946 
Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 $295,000 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1947 
Sept. 1 S. E. P. 5,000 $276,000 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1948 

Sept. 1 S. E.P. 5,000 $257,000 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 

1949 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 $238,000 

1950 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 $224,000 

1951 
Dee. 1 N. H. 14,000 $210,000 

1952 
Dec. ] N. H. 14,000 $196,000 

1953 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 $182,000 

1954 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 $168,000 

1955 
Dec. 1 N. H. 14,000 $154,000 



182 CITY OF CONCORD 

Bonded Indebtedness — Continued 



Date of 
payment 


Building 


Yearly 
amount 
due 


Total 
indebted- 
ness 


1956 








Dec. 1 
1957 


N. H. 


14,000 


$140,000 


Dec. 1 

1958 


N. H. 


14,000 


$126,000 


Dec. 1 
1959 


N. H. 


14,000 


$112,000 


Dec. 1 

1960 


N. H. 


14,000 


$98,000 


Dec. 1 
1961 


N. H. 


14,000 


$84,000 


Dec. 1 
1962 


N. H. 


14,000 


$70,000 


Dec. 1 
1963 


N. H. 


14,000 


$56,000 


Dec. 1 
1964 


N. H. 


14,000 


$42,000 


Dec. 1 
1965 


N. H. 


14,000 


$28,000 


Dec. 1 


N. H. 


14,000 


$14,000 



Legend. H=High; G=Garrison; N. H.=New High; 
W=Walker; M=Morrill; S. E. P.=South End Platoon. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 183 

WATER DEPARTMENT 
1928 



Board of Water Commissioners 

OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor, ex-officio 
Died December 8, 1928 

ROBERT W. BROWN, Mayor, ex-officio 

FRANK P. QUIMBY, to March 31, 1932 

GEORGE T. KENNEY, to March 31, 1932 

CARLOS H. FOSTER, to March 31, 1931 

BENJAMIN H. ORR, to March 31, 1931 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, to March 31, 1930 

DR. JAMES W. JAMESON, to March 31, 1930 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, to March 31, 1929 

PATRICK H. CAHILL, to March 31, 1929 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, President 

BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk 

superintendent 
p. R. SANDERS 

clerk 
ALICE G. COCHRAN 

foreman 
JAMES T. DAVIS 

engineer 
F. JEROME HOYT 



184 CITY OF CONCORD 

CONSTRUCTION 



Cost of land and water and flowage rights : 

Penacook Lake, $256,514.56 

Lake Winnepocket, 5,000.00 

Cost of property and rights of 

Torrent Aqueduct Association, 20,000.00 
Cost of property and rights of 

Plains Water Co., 3,000.00 

Cost of dam, gate-houses and ap- 
purtenances, 72,540.61 
Cost of mains (low service main 
and pump main from the dam 
to Penacook Street,) force main 
from the pump to the reservoir, 
fire main through North and 
South Main Street and high ser- 
vice main from Penacook Street 
to Stark Street, Penacook, 182,241.70 
Cost of distribution pipe, 516,345.30 
Cost of service pipe, 110,952.93 
Cost of reservoir, including land, 45,044.09 
Cost of pumping station, shop, 
stable and storehouse, including 
land, 29,743.35 
Cost of pumping machinery, 23,881.06 
Cost of engineering and superin- 
tendence, 16,751.53 
Cost of incidentals, 8,237.98 



Cost of works, January 1, 1929, $1,290,253.11 

Less amount received for lumber, land and 

buildings sold, 10,419.11 



$1,279,834.00 



WATER DEPARTMENT 185 

REPORT OF THE 
BOARD OF WATER COMMISSIONERS 



To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The period covered by this report was one of most un- 
usual activity in plant extension, requiring for proper and 
intelligent decision a vast amount of time and study. 

For the past few years, the Board has been much con- 
cerned over the question of water supply. The growth of 
the city and the greatly increased consumption of water, 
combined with an abnormally low rainfall, had resulted in 
keeping Penacook Lake at a dangerously low level. Even 
with the spring run-off, the Lake had not at any time 
reached its normal high point. For the purpose of making 
an exhaustive survey of water supply sources, we engaged 
an engineering firm of national repute, and the summer 
and fall of 1927 were devoted to their studies, every possi- 
ble source of supply within a reasonable distance being 
carefully studied and surveyed. Many projects were con- 
sidered, but after giving due weight to every argument, 
we eventually decided to accept what is known as the Sou- 
cook River proposition, and then, looking to the time when 
this additional supply would be required, and in further- 
ance of that plan, in the summer of 1928 we extended the 
mains into the Plains area directly on the course to the 
Soucook, so that at the present time we have only one mile 
further to lay pipes in order to tap the supply which we 
have in mind. At the same time the Plains section is given 
a domestic supply and excellent fire protection. With a 
normal rainfall, Penacook Lake will provide a sufficient 
supply for present uses, but if occasion develops, it is a 
comparatively small undertaking to install the necessary 
storage dam, filtration beds and pumping station at the 
point selected by us on the Soucook River. 



186 CITY OF CONCORD 

It was at first thought that the additional "water supply, 
the extension into the Plains area, the lajdng of water mains 
to East Concord, and the additional high-pressure service 
'needed in the western parts of the city might be forced 
upon us in a single year, and if so, this would have required 
a large expenditure, which with the bonds already issued 
and coming due yearly, with their interest, would have 
involved a very marked increase in water rates. We de- 
cided to postpone every project, except the extension to 
the Plains, believing that if we could take one step at a 
time, an increase in water rates might be prevented. For- 
tunately we had a normal supply of rain during the past 
season, so that the additional supply has not yet become 
necessary, and we have been able to pay the expense of the 
Plains extension from current income and the investment 
account. 

During the season of 1929 we shall extend the system to 
East Concord, commence a three-year program of relaying 
cement-lined pipe in Penacook, at a total estimated cost of 
$54,000, lay a main in Snow Street, Concord Manor, relay 
a line on South Main Street, and extend a line from Giles 
Street west on School Street to Grand View Avenue. The 
East Concord project requires an expenditure of approx- 
imately $75,000. This will call for a bond issue. It is ex- 
pected that the other projects can be paid from current 
income. We hope, within the next five years, to develop 
the new supply on the Soucook and the additional high- 
pressure system, resorting of course to bond issues, so far 
as necessary, but without increasing water rates to any 
material extent, and perhaps not at all. 

During 1928, in addition to the Plains development and 
the normal extensions which come every year, we assisted 
the IMemorial Athletic Field by laying its water supply 
without expense to the citizens of Concord. 

It should be stated that neither the Plains District nor 
the East Concord section can demonstrate any reasonable 



WATER DEPARTMENT 187 

return on the investment, yet these communities are thriv- 
ing, prosperous suburbs, and it has been our judgment that 
the convenience of having city water and fire protection 
was in line with modern civic progress, and that the ex- 
penditure was justified. 

The details of the various projects w^hich were completed 
last year, including the chlorination plant at Penacook 
Lake, are fully covered in the Superintendent's report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harry H. Dudley, President 
Frank P. Quimby 
George T. Kenney 
Carlos H. Foster 
Benjamin H. Orr 
James W. Jameson 
Burns P. Hodgman 
Patrick H. Cahill 
Robert W. Brown, ex-ojficio 

Board of Water Commissioners. 
March 7, 1929. 



188 CITY OF CONCORD 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 

To the Board of Water Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the fifty-seventh annual report 
of the operations of this department, showing the receipts, 
expenditures, and abatements, together with a statement of 
the extensions and improvements made during the year 
ending December 31, 1928. 

Ueceipis 
For water from consumers at fixed 

rates, $ 8,049.33 

For water from consumers at meter 

rates, 88,005.98 

From delinquents, 196.89 

For water for building purposes, 651.68 

From Penacook and Boscawen Water 

Precinct, for water, 470.00 

From wood and farm lands, 210.00 

For labor and materials furnished on 

private fire lines, 1,493.41 

For pipe and stock sold and labor, 986.71 

For repairing hydrants broken by 

automobiles, 97.55 

For old brass and iron, 124.45 

For guaranty on extension, 13.39 

From City for share of repairs to 

Ward 9 Ward House, 198.20 

From City Sewer Bond Account for 

sewer. Linden Street, Penacook, 693.07 

For land and rights at Lake Winne- 

pocket, Webster, 2,551.00 



$103,741.66 
Deduct abatements, 90.17 

$103,651.49 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



189 



Expenditures 
Maintenance Account 



General care and maintenance: 



Salaries and labor, 


$13,574.22 




Automobile account, 


1,513.48 




Supplies and repairs, 


2,611.35 




Incidental expenses, 


1,638.05 








$19,337.10 


Office expenses, 




4,259.82 


Care and repair of hydrants. 




863.22 


Care and repair of meters, 




1,631.94 


Relaying service pipes. 




3,269.82 


Leak account, 




789.24 


Penacook Park account, 




310.97 


Taxes, town of Webster, 




102.00 


Repairing storehouse and Ward 9 Ward house, 


485.50 


Pumping Station: 






Salaries, 


$2,610.31 




General expenses, 


348.73 




Electric Pumps : 






Power, $2,411.61 






Supplies and repairs, 77.74 






Heating, 352.02 


2,841.37 










- 


5,800.41 


Total maintenance account, 


$36,860.02 



Construction Account 



Distribution pipes. 
Service pipes. 



$ 4,011.91 
1,146.83 



190 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Hydrants, 
Meters, 



1,226.31 
2,696.10 



Total construction account, $ 9,081.15 
Installation of water system at City Memorial 

Athletic Field, 1,156.72 

Survey account, 678.41 

Chlorinator, 3,453.93 

Plains Extension account, itemized below, 51,927.01 



Total expenditures, 1928, 



$103,157.24 



Itemized Plains Account 



'istribution pipe : 




7627 feet of 12 inch pipe. 


$11,821.85 


5869 feet of 8 inch pipe. 


5,075.00 


5787 feet of 6 inch pipe, 


3,568.65 


980 feet of 2 inch pipe. 


396.90 


Branches, 


278.43 


21 gates and curbs. 


827.64 


Inspection of pipe, 


167.48 


Unloading pipe. 


342.00 


Joint compound and yarn, 


960.50 


Labor, 


9,378.24 


Supplies, 


248.57 


Sundries, 


33.93 



$33,099.19 



Bridge crossing : 

504 feet of 12 inch Universal pipe 

and couplings, 1,135.37 

Expansion joints and special 

castings, 372.34 

Brackets for pipe line in place, 1,863.09 

Labor, laying pipe, 364.17 



WATER DEPARTMENT 191 

Boxing and insulation, including 



labor, 


1,207.35 




Supplies, 


247.76 




Engineering and incidentals, 


214.38 








$5,404.46 


Hydrants : 






28 hydrants. 


1,835.68 




Branches, gates and curbs, 


1,443.37 




Labor, 


920.00 








4,199.05 


Service Pipe : 






Pipe, 


494.14 




Corporations, curbs and valves, 


949.42 




Labor, 


862.33 








2,305.89 


Meters : 






98 meters and fittings. 


1,043.77 




Labor and boxes, 


166.34 








1,210.11 


Back-filler and truck account, 




525.00 


Repairing streets, 




589.65 


Police protection, 




164.70 


Lisurance, 




136.39 


Plans and supervision, 




1,160.00 


Office account. 




150.00 


Incidentals, 




35.38 


Plains Water Co. : 






$3,000., less $102.81 credit for water 






furnished in 1927, 




2,897.19 


Rights of way. 




50.00 


Cash payments made, 


$51,927.01 


Plains Water Co., to balance of $3,000, 




102.81 


Total cost. 


$52,029.82 



192 CITY OF CONCORD 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS 

Distribution pipes laid in 1928 : 
6-inch : 

Hope Avenue, west from Broadway, 1036 feet. 

Kensington Road, extended north, 399 feet. 

Granite Street, extended east, 259 feet. 

Dunklee Street, north from McKinley Street, 197 feet. 

Old Hopkinton Road, opposite Millville Cemetery, 190 
feet, replacing 4-inch. 

Palm Street, extended west, 12 feet. 

Linden Street, Penacook, extended south, 317 feet. 
2-inch : 33 feet ; 1-inch, 190 feet ; 33 feet discontinued. 

On hydrant branches: 111 feet of 6-inch. 

Thirteen gates were set during the year. 

Eight new hydrants were set as follows : 

South Main Street, west side at Margaret Pillsbury Gen- 
eral Hospital. 

South Street, west side at Jackson Avenue. 

South Street, west side at South End School House. 

South Street, west side near R. W. Upton's. 

Hope Avenue, north side, 500 feet west from Broadway. 

Hope Avenue, south side at end of street. 

Granite Street, north side near No. 12. 

Linden Street, Penacook, east side, 460 feet south from 
Washington Street. 

Eighty-one new services have been laid consisting of 1496 
feet of 3/4-inch ; 328 feet of 1-inch, and 8 feet of 1-1/4-inch 
pipe. One 6-inch connection for fire supply pipe was made 
for Concord Gas Co. 

Twenty-one services were discontinued of which 8 were 
replaced by new ones and 13 discontinued permanently. 

Twenty-nine supplies were added to our total number of 
services when the city accepted several private ways in 
Concord Manor. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 193 

One hundred and ten services were relaid and curb valves 
placed on 26 old services. 

One hundred and thirty-nine new meters have been set 
and 10 have been discontinued. 

PLAINS SYSTEM 

Distribution pipes : 
12-inch : 

Bridge Street, from opposite Taylor Coal Co. to junction 
of North Pembroke and Loudon Roads, 4681 feet. 

North Pembroke Road, from junction with Loudon Road 
to east of Canterbury Road, 3450 feet. 
8-inch : 

Canterbury Road, from North Pembroke Road to Loudon 
Road, 1257 feet. 

Grover Street, from Loudon Road to North Pembroke 
Road, 640 feet. 

Loudon Road, from junction with North Pembroke Road 
to east of Grover Street, 2305 feet. 

South Pembroke Road, south from North Pembroke 
Road, 1667 feet. 
6-inch : 

Grant Street, south from North Pembroke Road, 1086 
feet. 

Greeley Street, south from North Pembroke Road, 1080 
feet. 

Lawrence Street, west from South Pembroke Road, 1425 
feet. 

Ormond Street, north from Loudon Road, 560 feet. 

Prescott Street, west from Ormond Street, 580 feet. 

Robinson Street, south from North Pembroke Road, 540 
feet. 

Weston Street, west from South Pembroke Road, 504 
feet. 



194 CITY OF CONCORD 

2-inch : 

Lawrence Street, west from end of 6-inch, 418 feet. 

Loudon Road, east from end of 8-inch, 231 feet. 

North Pembroke Road, east from end of 12-inch, 337 
feet. 

On hydrant branches : 358 feet of 6-inch. 

On blow off: 12 feet of 6-inch. 

Forty-five gates were set as follows : 12-inch, 5 ; 8-inch, 
5 ; 6-inch, 35 ; also three 2-inch. 

Twenty-eight hydrants were set as follows : 

Bridge Street, north side at Lane's. 

Bridge Street, north side, at foot of Gully Hill. 

Bridge Street, north side opposite South Pembroke Road. 

Canterbury Road, west side, halfway between North 
Pembroke Road and Loudon Road. 

Grant Street, west side, 500 feet south from North Pem- 
broke Road. 

Grant Street, east side, at end of street. 

Greeley Street, west side, 500 feet south from North 
Pembroke Road. 

Gi'eeley Street, west side, at end of street. 

Lawrence Street, north side, 700 feet from South Pem- 
broke Road. 

Lawrence Street, north side, at end of 6-inch pipe. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Curtis house. No. 11. 

Loudon Road, north side, opposite Howe's store. 

Loudon Road, north side, at Canterbury Road. 

Loudon Road, north side, opposite Grover Street. 

Loudon Road, north side, at end of 8-inch pipe. 

North Pembroke Road, north side, opposite N. H. State 
Camp Grounds. 

North Pembroke Road, north side, at Harriet P. Dame 
School. 

North Pembroke Road, northwest corner of Grover Street. 

North Pembroke Road, north side, opposite Grant Street. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 195 

North Pembroke Road, south side, east of Robinson 
Street. 

North Pembroke Road, south side, at Canterbury Road. 

Ormond Street, east side, at end of pipe. 

Prescott Street, east side, at end of pipe. 

Robinson Street, west side, at end of street. 

South Pembroke Road, west side, near Weston Street. 

South Pembroke Road, west side, near Ash house, No. 32. 

South Pembroke Road, west side, at Kimball house. No. 
52. 

Weston Street, north side, at end of pipe. 

One hundred and seven service pipes were laid of which 
one hundred and one were connected and are in use ; three 
were connected but are not yet in use ; three have not been 
connected to house. 

Length of 107 services : 2451 feet of 3/4-inch ; 59 feet of 
1-inch and 36 feet of 3-inch pipe. 

Ninety-eight meters were set. 



STATISTICS 

Total length of main and distribution pipes now in use 
in system, 427,224 feet or 80.91 miles. 

Total number of gates, 1179. 

Total number of hj^drants, 530; private 102. 

Total number of services 4514; length of service pipes, 
106,408 feet or 20.15 miles; also supply three houses on 
private ways. 

Total number of meters now in use, 3489 of which ten 
are only for estimating use. 

The most important work of the year was the extension 
of the High Service to the Plains. The cost of this exten- 
sion was considerably lowered by the use of centrifugal 
cast iron pipe lined with cement instead of sand cast pipe, 
a power shovel owned and operated by W. E. Lynch of 



196 CITY OF CONCORD 

West Concord to dig the ditches, and a tractor backfiller 
owned by the Water Works to fill the ditches. Leadite and 
lead hydrotite were used for joint material instead of lead. 

A 500-foot crossing of the Merrimack River was part of 
the job, and whether to go on the bed of the river or on the 
bridge was for a while considerable of a problem. At first 
it seemed best to lay the pipe in a trench in the bed of the 
river and numerous soundings from the ice were made to 
ascertain the nature of the bottom. It was found to be 
sand and quicksand as far as could be tested by rods and 
the surface of the bottom constantly changing. It was 
finally decided to lay the pipe on the bridge w^here it could 
always be inspected. 

Permission was requested and received from the Board 
of Public Works and 12-inch Universal pipe was purchased 
and laid with two expansion joints on a steel structure 
built onto the' north side of the bridge. 

In order to protect the pipe from freezing a two foot box 
was constructed around it and the pipe packed with coarse 
granulated cork. The average pressure on the Plains is 
58 pounds. 

Twenty-eight hydrants were installed, approximately 380 
persons are supplied and practically all services metered. 
The average daily consumption is 5000 gallons ; this low 
consumption is accounted for by the fact that the Plains 
have no sewerage system. 

The service pipes in North Main Street from Centre to 
Church Street w^ere relaid with galvanized cement lined 
wrought iron pipe on account of resurfacing the street. In 
Pleasant Street west from Fruit Street to Fiske Road, the 
services were also relaid in preparation for the proposed 
concrete highway. One inch red brass pipe was used on this 
relaying job. 

All the buildings at the dam consisting of the pavilion at 
the Park, the gate houses and the cottage have been painted 



WATER DEPARTMENT 197 

and repaired. The store house at the shop has also been 
painted and shingled. 

The system of accounts and billing of water rates has 
been changed from book ledgers to cards. Formerly the 
bills were kept at the office and the consumer sent a postal 
card with the amount of his bill written on it ; now all 
bills are sent out which it is hoped will result in conven- 
ience to both the consumer and the office. 

I would recommend that a start be made in 1929 in re- 
placing the cement lined mains in Penacook with cast iron. 
These mains were laid in 1887 and their condition as shown 
by several breaks and other inspections indicate that they 
should be relaid. 

There is now in Penacook north from Stark Street 17,091 
feet of cement lined pipe varying in size from 4-inch to 
12-inch. The amount of cast iron pipe in Penacook is 
19,427 feet varying from 4-inch to 10-inch in size. It 
would probably take about three years, to relay the cement 
lined pipe. 

The water supply in Penacook Lake reached the overflow 
mark June 1, 1928, making 3.5 feet rise since January 1 or 
6.5 feet rise since the low point of 178.5 on November 6, 
1927, and continued to waste until about the middle of July 
when it began to drop gradually and December 31, stood 
at 182.30, which is 2.7 feet below the overflow or .8 foot 
higher than December 31, 1927. With an average spring 
rainfall the lake should reach the overflow in the spring of 
1929. 

In accordance with the recommendations of Metcalf & 
Eddy and the State Board of Health an automatic chlorin- 
ating plant controlled by a 20x9 Venturi meter has been 
placed in operation at the brick gate house at the lake. 
The amount used is at the rate of 2.3 pounds per million 
gallons or .27 parts per million; at a cost of $.09 per 
pound of chlorine the cost of chlorinating 1,000,000 gallons 
of water amounts to $.21 or approximately $.546 per day. 



198 CITY OF CONCORD 

With the amount used by Concord it is impossible to detect 
the slightest trace of chlorine at any tap in the city. 

Chlorine is made from salt by passing electricity through 
salt-water. It is just as harmless as salt and just as neces- 
sary. The proper application of liquid chlorine will not 
create taste or odor, — will not change the potable quality 
or the chemical or physical characteristics of the water in 
the least, but it will kill the microbes of disease and make 
the water absolutely safe to drink. 

The average daih^ consumption by Venturi meter is 
2,500,000 gallons. 

In this the fifty-sixth annual report of the Superinten- 
dent of the Board of Water Commissioners and my twenty- 
second report, I wish to express to the Board my thanks 
for the continuance of their support and confidence. 

Respectfully submitted, 

PERCY R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 
RECORD OF ELECTRIC PUMPS FOR 1928 



199 



Months 



■^ s 



a 


&£ 


feW 




> • 


C3> 




>. 











January 

February 

March 

April — 

May 

June - 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 

Daily average 



31 


6:38 


29 


6:43 


31 


6:35 


30 


6:25 


31 


7:28 


30 


6:59 


31 


6:55 


31 


6:51 


30 


6:48 


31 


6:57 


30 


8:36 


31 


6:33 


366 






6:57 



16,335 
15,680 
16,620 
16,370 
18,830 
16,790 
17,140 
16,840 
16.300 
17,330 
20,840 
16,230 



205,305 



526 
540 
536 
545 
607 
559 
552 
543 
543 
558 
694 
523 



560 



31,769,000 
30.688,000 
32,408,000 
31,285,000 
36,854.000 
33.147,000 
33,844,000 
33,435,000 
32,295,000 
33,849,000 
40,613,000 
31, .581, 000 



401,768,000 



1,024,806 
1,058,206 
1,045,419 
1,042,833 
1,188,838 
1,104,900 
1,091,741 
1,078,547 
1,076,500 
1,091,903 
1.353,766 
1.018.741 



1.098,016 



200 CITY OF CONCORD 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, Treasurer 

In account with Concord Water Works 

Beceipts 

Balance on hand January 1, 1928, $ 35,012.48 

Receipts, P. R. Sanders, Supt., 101,100.49 

Transferred from Investment Ac- 
count, 2,000.00 

Proceeds sale of U. S. First Liberty 

Loan, converted, 414% Bond 5,072.12 

Proceeds sale of U. S. Third Liberty 

Loan 414% Bond, 10,118.24 

Sale of land and water rights, Lake 

Winnepocket, plus I/2 taxes, 2,551.00 



$155,854.33 

Expenditures 

Orders paid, $103,143.24 

Bonds paid, 18,000.00 

Interest on bonds, 7,695.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1929, 27,016.09* 



$155,854.33 
*Outstanding order unpaid January 1, 1929, $15.00. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



201 



CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME 



Investment Account 

Amount of capital, Janiiary 1, 1929, 
Invested in Fourth Liberty Bond, 4^/4 ^«' 



$10,000.00 



Income Account 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1928, $4,583.71 
Income received, 1928, 942.62 



Transferred to General Account, 2,000.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929, 3,526.33 



Deposited in Union Trust Company, 



$5,526.33 



$5,526.33 
$5,526.33 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS 



Due 


Rate 


Amount 


January 1, 1929, 


41/2, 


$18,000.00 


January 1, 1930, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1931, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1932, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1933, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1934, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1935, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1936, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 


January 1, 1937, 


41/2, 


18,000.00 




$162,000.00 



202 CITY OF CONCORD 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 1928 
CONCORD WATER WORKS 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



GENERAL STATISTICS 

Population by census of 1920 — 22,167. 
Date of construction — 1872. 
By whom owned — City of Concord. 
Source of supply — Penacook Lake. 

Mode of supply — Gravity, also pumping to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection. 

PUMPING 

Builders of pumping machinery ■ — Worthington Pump and 
Machinery Corporation and DeLaval Steam Turbine Co. 

Electric Pumps 

1. Description of power: 

a. Alternating, 3 phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,800 

R. P. M. 

b. Price per K. W. H., $0.01 1/3, 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. ; 

maximum, $1,800 per year, 300,000,000 gallons ; 
$6.00 per 1,000,000 gallons over 300,000,000. 

2. K. W. H. used for year, 205,305. 

3. Total pumpage, by Venturi meter, 401,768,000 gal- 
lons. 

4. Average static head against which pump works, 90 
feet. 

5. Average dynamic head against which pump works, 
115.2 feet. 

6. Gallons pumped per K. W. H., 1956.9. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 203 

7. K. W. H. used per 1,000,000 gallons pumped, 511. 

8. Cost of total pumping figured on pumping station 
expenses — $5800.41. 

9. Per million gallons pumped — $14,437. 

10. Per million gallons raised one foot (dynamic) — 
$0.1253. 

DISTRIBUTION 

Mains 

1. Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 

2. Sizes — four-inch to twenty-four-inch. 

3. Extended — 22,476 feet during year. 

4. Relaid — 190 feet during year. 

5. Discontinued — .0 feet during year. 

6. Total now in use — 80.91 miles. 

7. Number of leaks per mile for year — 

8. Length of pipes two inches and less diameter — 5.445 
miles. 

9. Number of hydrants added during year — public, 36. 

10. Number of hydrants now in use — public, 530, 
private, 102. 

11. Number of stop gates added during year — 58. 

12. Number of stop gates now in use — 1179. 

13. Number of stop gates smaller than four-inch — 

14. Number of blow-off gates — 80. 

15. Range of pressure on mains at center of city — 88 
pounds high service and 48 pounds low service. 

Services 

16. Kind of pipe — cement-lined. 

17. Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

18. Extended — 4378 feet. 

19. Discontinued — 410 feet. 

20. Total now in use — 106,408 feet. 

21. Number of service taps added during year — 197. 



204 CITY OF CONCORD 

22. Number now in use — 4514. 

23. Average length of service — 23.57 feet. 

24. Average cost of service for the year — . 

25. Number of meters added during year — 227. 

26. Number now in use — 3489. 

27. Percentage of services metered — 77.29. 

28. Percentage of receipts from metered water — 90.62. 

29. Number of elevators added — none. 

30. Number now in use — 9. 

31. Number of stand pipes for street watering — . 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



205 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES 





"3 






Length anc 


Size 


3f Iron 


Pipe 


in Feet. 








CQ'O 




















STREETS 




















Oj ^s 


30- 


24- 


20- 


18- 


16- 


14- 


12- 


lo- 


8- 


6- 


4- 






in. 
2220 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


^" 


Conduit 






_ 


Reserve main 




282 
















..... 


.... 





Low service main 






331 


1905 


75 















7 


Pump main ...._ 






13598 


58 


75 


147 




... 









6 


Gate-houses and layout 








_ 








_ 









29 


Force main 




240 


2962 




42 


20 




_- 




.... 




5 


Pumping station and 


























layout _ 











__ 


















8 


Abbott 





- 


- 


.-. 




- 


- 







49 

458 


323 


2 


Academy 


1 


Albin - .. ._ _ 












_. 




785 








2 


Alleyways 








_ 




__ 


__ 


776 




450 


505 


2 


Allison - - 




















2492 




4 


Auburn 












2182 






.... 


508 


.... 


2 


Avon 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 




- 


..._ 


724 
423 


595 


2 




2 


Ren con 




















2145 




3 


Blake .... 
















..._ 




265 


250 


2 


Blanchard . 





















475 




1 


Blossom Hill 



























1781 




1 


Bow _ 













_ 









590 




1 


Bradley _ 








__ 


_ 


„ 




1577 




260 





4 


Bridge _ - 














4681 


327 


195 


1123 




6 


Broad Ave. - 












__ 








1074 


.._ 


1 


Broadway _- 




_ 




_ 





_ 


2278 


2052 








3 


Cambridge 















__ 






6 


154 


1 


Canterbury Road 


















12.57 






2 


Capitol 
















508 




763 




5 


Carter 




- 


- 


- 


.... 


- 


- 


3529 


2690 


1077 




2 


Centre 


14 


Chandler 





















306 




1 


Chapel _ 








_ 













585 


56 


2 


Charles ... _.. 






















516 


1 


Chestnut - 


















375" 


330 




2 


Church _ _ 


















21 


1600 


547 


7 


Clarke ... .._ ... . 




















350 







Clinton _ _ . _. 


- 


..... 


- 


- 


- 


2100 


... 


1942 


180 


1663 


.... 


3 


Columbus Avenue . 


1 


Concord ._ _.. 




















1593 


286 


5 


Court 




















670 




2 


Curtice Avenue 




















422 




2 


Dakin _ 




















19 


836 


2 


Dartmouth _ _ _ 




















590 




2 


Depot 




















387 


242 


?, 


Donovan _ 




















456 




1 


Downing , 




_ 




_ 


_ 


_ 


.._ 


_. 


.... 


1977 


92 


4 


Dunklpp 

























2260 




- 5 


Dunbarton Road 


._ 








_ 













1226 




..- 





Durgin _ ___ 











_ 















265 




1 


Eastman ... _ _ 




















400 


400 


1 


Electric „_ . .. 


_ 




_ 














550 




1 


Elm __ - - 




















270 


607 


4 


Engel _ 




















700 




1 


Essex 




















587 




2 


Essex, North _ 


- 


._. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


..._ 






262 


- 


1 



206 



CITY OF CONCORD 



SCHEDULE OP IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES — Confinued 





.^ 




















■^s 






Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 








au 
















•^ ? 


STREETS 


















s" 




30- 


24- 


20- 


18- 


16- 


14- 


12- 


lo- 


8- 


6- 


4- 


■^a 




in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


in. 


m. 


z^ 


Fairbanks .- _ 




















165 


_ 


_. 


Fayette -. _ . ._ 












_ 









1187 


„ 


3 


Ferry 












_ 








1000 




1066 


4 


Fisher 

















_ 





343 







Fiske _ 






1045 



















1 


Fiske Road 




















750 


. 


1 


Ford Place . _ 























225 


1 


Forest. 




















628 




2 


Foster _ . 




















180 





1 


Franklin _ 














2166 


1546 




1659 





13 


Freight 
















438 





285 





3 


Fremont 























590 


2 


Fruit, North 




















1078 





1 


Fruit, South . _ 




















2874 





3 


Fuller 


_ 
















_._ 




88 





Oardpn 




















194 





1 


Gas 
















550 









1 


Giles ....- -. 


















300 


858 


_ 


4 


Gladstone _ _ 





_ 





_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 







709 




1 


Glen .... . 











_ 















840 




2 


Grand View Ave. _ 




_ 














53 


1108 





1 


Granite Avenue _ 






















210 





Granite .... 




















586 




1 


Grant. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 






- 




1086 
1080 


-- 


1 




1 


Green . _ _ . 
















431 




1755 




7 


Greenwood Avenue 






















245 





Grove _ 




















1093 





4 




















640 






1 


Hall 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




~ 


1621 
905 


1068 


2375 


-- 


3 


Hall's Court . _ _... 


1 


Hammond 




_ 
















498 


287 


1 


Hanover _ 






















600 


2 


Harrison 


_ 











_ 








240 


230 


1 


Harrod 




















4 


329 


1 




- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


27 


1091 


15 

982 


760 


2 


High __ 


4 






















146 


746 


2 


Hill's Avenue _ - 


















69 


312 




2 


Holly _ _ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




_ 






_. 




740 


__ 


1 


Holt .._ _ 





_ 








_ 













646 


__ 


1 


Home Avenue _ 


_ 











_ 


__ 


.-- 






362 





1 


Hope Avenue 









_ 
















1036 





1 


Hopkinton Road 










_ 





^ 




-.,- 




759 




1 


Humphrey 











..._ 














498 





2 


Huntington 
















.... 









213 





1 


Hutchins, W. Concord- 






381 









120 






589 





1 


Iron Works Road 


_. 








__ 












... 


1332 




1 




- 


-- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 




1576 


266 
311 


4 


Jefferson _ _ . 


1 


K 




_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 


_ 




..._ 




283 


_. 


1 


Kensington Road 







_ 














207 


905 





2 


Kent _ — _ 


























165 


_. 





Kimball _ 
























803 


334 


1 


Knight, W. Concord 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 




.... 




350 


- 


1 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



207 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES — Continued 



STREETS 


'n 3 






Length z 


iid Size of I 


on Pi 


ie in Feet. 








30- 
in. 


24- 
in. 


20- 
in. 

4209 
300 


18- 
in. 


16- 
in. 

2596 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 

1311 
1373 

3450 
10791 


lo- 
in. 

360 

5125 
5179 



62 

2457 

4159 


8- 
in. 

1216 

2305 

508 



■■■- 
750 

1016 

m 

681 

292 


6- 

in. 


4- 
in. 


1" 


Lake, W. Concord 

Langdon 

Laurel ' 


380 
1026 

300 


465 
358 
1550 
1425 

726 
38 
1260 
482 
430 

400 
738 

1729 

124 

26 

860 

1289 
700 
516 

190 
620 
560 
608 
601 
380 
584 

2448 
616 

2215 

2493 
985 

185 
580 

661 

800 
584 

1713 
182 
540 

1320 
218 

176 


357 

367 

300 

3650 

382 
330 

1378 
1294 

324" 

305 
229 
624 

460 
546 

'480 

531 

320 


1 

4 

? 


Lawrence _ -. 

Liberty 

Lincoln _ . 


1 
3 


Loudon Road _ 

Lyndon _ ..... 

Main, North 

Main, South 

Maitland _ 

Maple 


1 
5 
11 
15 
1 
? 


Marshall __ _ 

Martin 


1 


McKinley 

Merrimack ._ 

Mill Road, S. P. School.. 

Mills _ 

Minot - _ _ 


2 
6 
3 

4 
2 

f. 


Montgomery 

Morton _ . 

Myrtle _ 


2 

1 
1 


North Pembroke Road_ 

Noyes _ _ 

Oak _ . _ 


2 


Odd Fellows Ave 

Old Hopkinton Road 

Orchard _ _ , _ 

OrmonH 


1 

1 
1 
1 


Palm __ .... 

Park . 

Peahndy 

Pearl 

Penacook _ 


1 

3 

1 
2 
9 


Perley .. ._ 

Perry Avenue _ 

Pierce _. 

Pillsbury _ _ . . 

Pine -.-. - 


4 
2 
3 

1 
4 
6 


Pleasant _ _ 


18 


Prince _ _ „ 

Princeton 

Prospect _ _ 


1 
2 

1 


Ridge Road 

River _ 

Robinson _ 

Rockingham 

Roger Ave _ _ 

Rollins 

Rowell _ 


1 
..... 

2 

1 
1 
1 















208 



CITY OF CONCORD 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES — Co7itinued 



STREETS 



Length and Size of Iron Pipe in Feet. 



30- 



Rumf ord „ 

Rumford Avenue ... 

Saw Mill Road, S.P.S.. 

School _ .._ _. 

Sewall's Falls Road _ 

Sexton Avenue _ 

Second, W. Concord 

Short _... 

South _ 

South Pembroke Road 

Spring, North 

Spring, South 

State, North _ 

State, South 

Stickney Avenue _ 

Stone _ 

Summer .._ 

Summit 

Tahanto 

Thompson 

Thorndike _ 

Tremont _ 

Union _ __ 

Valley 

View _ __ 

Walker _ _ 

Wall _- 

Warren 

Washington 

Water _ 

Waverly 

West 

Weston _ 

Westbourne Road _ 

White 

Wiggin 

Winter 

Wood Avenue 

Woodman 

Wyman _ 

Hydrant branches 

Blow-offs 

Penacook 

Penacook, high service 

main 

Penacook Road under 
cement, not connected : 
Borough Road, E— 

Abbott Road 

Hobart 

Borough Road . 

Canal, East 

Canal, West 



5969 



16- 



3049 



11340 



4036 



839 



1836 



lo- 
in. 



3302 

5202 



2422 

390 

31 

21 

250 



38 

1898 



705 

454 
1404 
310 

661 



225 



3826 



495 
708 



1667 

26 

2391 



326 
250 
823 

90S 



4258 
1118 



257 
10 



875 



575 
210 

1655 

210 

9 

4585 



2629 



1080 
19 

1015 
1380 

748 
1005 

279 
710 
754 
514 
1484 
320 

266 
504 
592 
237 
725 
23 

1041 
366 
220 

6207 
95 



25 

25 

25 

641 



2951 



214 



370 
172 



272 



202 
254 



87 
145 



413 
69 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



209 



SCHEDULE OP IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 

AND GATES — Continued 



STREETS 


'C 5 






Length 


and Size of I 


ron Pipe in Feet. 




m 


30- 
in. 

2220 


24- 
in. 

522 


20- 
in. 


1&- 
in. 

1963 


16- 
in. 

278« 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 


8- 
in. 


6- 

in. 


4- 
in. 


JO d 

1^ 


Centre -. - - 

Charles . 

Church 


- 





- 


247 
635 

70 
54 


37 
150 


467 

58 
461 
653 
476 

1300 
252 
784 
150 

3049 
356 
139 

1923 
364 
242 

1846 
53 

464 
258 

884 
2205 
450 
645 
14 


261 

10 
29476 


4 
3 

1 


Crescent - 


3 
3 


Electric Avenue 

Fllintt 




Fnwler 

High _ , 

Linden 


1 
2 

4 


Main, West - - 

Maple 

Merrimack _ 


3 

1 
5 
2 


Pine ... - 


- 


Rolfe _.... 




Spring .. , _ 

Stark .- _ _ 








Sylvester _ _ 




Walnut and Bye _ 




Winter _ 

Hydrant branches 

Plnvv-nffs 


76 
13 






Totals 


28795 


20544 


28048 


52984 


34599 


145108 


1179 



210 



CITY OF CONCORD 



SCHEDULE OF IRON AND CEMENT-LINED PIPES 
AND GATES — Concluded 







Length 


and Size of 
Pipe 


Cement -Lined 
in Feet. 


STREETS 


18- 
in. 


14- 
in. 


12- 
in. 


lo- 
in. 

529 
529 


8- 
in. 

628 
422 
479 

734 

1181 
652 

1149 
1193 


6- 

in. 


4- 
in. 




11391 


2230 
2354 


1764 
1221 

2573 
57 


120 

ii 

237 

245 
1777 
482 

2100 

1884 

675 
7531 














34 


State, North 


- 




88 




40 


Penacook 
Penacook, high service main 


_ 


Canal, West — - 

Centre 

Charles -... - _ 


— 










High -. -..- - 


- 


Merrimack _ ..... - .- 


- 


Stark .. 

Summer 


276 






Bl"W-nff<; 


55 






Tntnis 


11391 


14584 


5615 


6438 


493 







FIRE DEPARTMENT 211 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 



REPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER 

o 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

In accordance with the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the report 
of the Fire Department for the year 1928. 

The department responded to 58 bell alarms and 438 
still alarms. 

In addition one fire, entailing loss, occurred for which 
no alarm was given. 

Alarms 

Bell Still No Alarm Total 

Precinct 37 316 1 354 

Penacook 13 83 96 

East Concord 2 16 18 

West Concord 3 22 25 

*Plains 3 1 4 

Totals 58 438 1 497 

* Combination hose and chemical car installed on the Plains 
December 6, 1928. 

Engine Co. No. 5 also organized. Organization accepted 
and confirmed by the City Government, January 14, 1929. 

Compensation also determined same date. 

This report will be found to contain statements in detail 
embracing the amount of expenditures, and a complete roll 
of the department with residence and occupation of each 
member. 

The number of alarms responded to exceeded all previous 
records, accompanied by increase in loss over that of the 
preceding year. 



212 CITY OF CONCORD 

Thirty thousand dollars of the loss is accounted for, how- 
ever, by fire occurring in the suburbs far from adequate 
protection from fire. 

The apparatus is in good condition. 

Two new pumping engines were added to the equipment 
which was a move in the right direction. 

Fire protection was accorded the Plains District in the 
form of a new company equipped with a combination 
chemical and hose car and hydrant service. 

The fire alarm systems of the precinct and Penacook are 
working satisfactorily. 

Owing to existing conditions in the city, I earnestly 
recommend the addition of foamite equipment to the ap- 
paratus. 

The addition of a new company reduced the complement 
of hose in the precinct to the extent of one thousand feet. 

I therefore recommend the purchase of two thousand 
feet of hose. 

During the month of October I was privileged to attend 
the convention of the International Association of Fire 
Chiefs held at Philadelphia, a report of which I rendered 
at that time. 

I am deeply appreciative of the opportunity afforded me 
to attend. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. C. GREEN, 

Chief Engineer. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 213 



IN MEMORIAM 

CARL A. ECKSTROM 

Cataract Engine Company No. 3 

Died February 14th, 1928 

ALFRED L. DOWNING 

House Man 

Central Station 

Died March 27th, 1928 

OSCAR A. JOHNSON 

Cataract Engine Company No. 3 

Died September 1st, 1928 

MARTIN S. WAKEFIELD 

Captain Combination Company No. 1 

Died September 16th, 1928 

ABIAL C. ABBOTT 

Cataract Engine Company No. 3 

Died December 21st, 1928 



214 CITY OF CONCORD 

APPROPRIATIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Appropriation 


$73,872.0C 


Chief's Salary 


$2,600.00 


Permanent Men 


28,900.00 


Vacations 


1,042.29 


Call Men 


10,270.00 


House Man 


25.00 


Rent Veterans' Association 


300.00 


Telephones 


398.30 


Fuel 


2,239.93 


Repairs Buildings 


1,574.37 


Lights 


1,094.54 


Incidentals 


2,326.96 


Brush Fires 


125.48 


Horse Hire 


354.25 


New Equipment 


14,700.00 


Fire Alarm 


1,628.35 


Penacook Fire Alarm 


116.53 


Upkeep, Auto. Combinations 


1,673.34 


Laundry 


82.88 


Hose 


1,100.00 


Fire Inspections 


687.66 


Repairs Veterans' Rooms 


1,188.05 




$72,427.93 



Unexpended $1,444.07 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 215 



Buildings: 
Precinct 


Value 

$206,800.00 

_ 14.600.00 

_ 24.000.00 

_ 7,000.00 

$252,400.00 

$34,5.310.00 


SUMMARY 
1928 

Loss 

$31,331.89 

5,865.00 

14,224.00 

350.00 

$51,770.89 

$16,011.16 
6.659.40 
8,300.00 

$30,970"56 
51.770.89 
$82,741.45 


Insurance 

$171,950.00 

11,350.00 

12,100.00 

6.700.00 

$102,100.00 

$301,325.00 
7,300.00 
6,400.00 

$315,025.00 

102,100.00 

$417,125.00 


Ins. Paid 

$25,943.01 

4,340.00 

6.824.00 

150.00 

$37,257.01 

$7,948.81 
5,122.63 
6,200.00 

$19,271.44 
37,257.01 
$56,528.45 


Net Loss 

$5,388.88 

1,525.00 


East Concord 
West Concord 

Contents : 


7,400.00 
200.00 

$14,513.88 

$8,062.35 


Penacook 


.- 9,100.00 
8,300.00 


1,. 536. 77 
2.100.00 


West Concord _.. 


"$362 .9 10^00 
252,400.00 


$11,699'22 
14.513.88 


Buildings & Contents 


$615,310.00 


$26,213.00 



Apparatus and Force 

The apparatus and force of the department is as follows : 
Precinct, located at the Central Fire Station, one first- 
class Amoskeag engine, "Eagle," and one 750-gallon 
Ahrens-Fox motor-driven combination pumping engine and 
hose car, attached to Eagle Steam Fire Engine Company 
(15 men) ; one second-class Amoskeag engine, "Kearsarge," 
and auto-combination car, attached to the Kearsarge Steam 
Fire Engine Company (13 men) ; one second-class Amos- 
keag engine, "Governor Hill," relief engine, in charge of 
an engineer and fireman, one motor-driven combination 
pumping engine and hose car in charge of Combination 
Company No. 1; one motor-driven ladder truck, "City of 
Concord," attached to Hook and Ladder Company (21 
men) ; one Reo fire alarm repair truck; one house man at 
Central Fire Station. There are twelve permanent men at 
the Central Fire Station, one permanent man at each other 
fire station within the precinct, one permanent man at 
Pioneer Station, Penacook, and one permanent man at 
Cataract Station, West Concord. There are also two per- 
manent spare men to cover days off. 

The Alert Hose Company (11 men), located on Wash- 
ington Street, has an auto-combination car, with permanent 
man. 



216 



CITY OF CONCORD 



The Good Will Hose Company (11 men), located on the 
corner of Concord and South State Streets, has an auto- 
combination car, with a permanent man. 

Veterans' Auxiliary Company (30 men). 

Two wagons and one ladder truck in reserve. 

The "Pioneer" Engine Company, No. 3 (28 men), at 
Penacook, has a third-class Metropolitan engine, one hose 
wagon and one motor-driven combination pumping engine 
and hose car with permanent man. 

The Cataract Company (30 men), at West Concord, has 
a modern hose wagon and auto-combination car with per- 
manent man. 

Old Fort (30 men). East Concord, has a 4-1/2-inch 
cylinder Hunneman hand engine and hand ladder truck, 
and one hand-drawn chemical engine, 50-gallon, single 
tank, and one auto-combination car. 

Engine Company No. 5 (30 men), located on the Loudon 
Road, has a motor-driven combination car. 



Hose 



Precinct, 
Penacook, 
West Concord, 
East Concord, 



9,700 feet cotton, rubber lined 
3,400 " 
1,400 " 
500 " 



15,000 



Reservoirs 



No. Main Street, rear Court House, 
No. State Street, corner of Washington Street, 
Orchard Street, corner of Pine Street, 
School Street, corner of Summit Street, 



Capacity 
Cubic Feet 

2,000 
2,000 
4,000 
3,500 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



217 



ROLL OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT, 1928 



Permanent Chief Engineer 

William C. Green, Office, Central Fire Station 

Assistant Engineers 

PRECINCT 
W. A; King, 1st Asst., Machinist, 38 Franklin Street 

J. Edward Morrison, Snd Asst., Machinist, 8 Thorndike Street 

WARD 1 
Fred M. Dodge, Electrician, 61 Merrimack Street 

WARD 2 

W. E. Virgin, Contractor, East Penacook Street, East Concord 

WARD 3 
George W. Kemp, Overseer, 16 Fisher Street, West Concord 



KEARSARGE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 
COMPANY, NO. 2 

OFFICERS 

Charles Powell, Captain. George L. Livingston, Lieutenant 

and Clerk. Herbert M. Sanders, Engineer and Treasurer 

MEMBERS 



Residences 
75 Centre Street 

57 Franklin Street 
35 Warren Street 
32 Pleasant Street 

3 Broadway 
31 South Street 
90 Warren Street 

4 Perrv Avenue 
16 So. Spring Street 

58 Warren Street 
38 Franklin Street 
64 Rumford Street 

Central Fire Station 



Badge 




Nos. Names 


Occupations 


1 Charles Powell 


Machinist 


2 George L. Livingston 


Machinist 


3 Herbert M. Sanders 


Cashier 


4 George B. Davis 


Carriage painter 


5 Harry L. Messer . 


Machinist 


6 W. C. B. Saltmarsh 


Book binder 


7 Frank E. Hudson 


Machinist 


8 Roger F. Strong 


Pressman 


9 Nelson E. Strong 


Machinist 


10 William P. Baxter 


Pressman 


11 Luther E. Rowe 


Painter 


12 John H. Cushnie 


Silversmith 


13 Daniel F. Murphy 


Chauffeur 



218 



CITY OF CONCORD 



EAGLE STEAM FIRE ENGINE AND HOSE 

COMPANY, NO. 1 

OFFICEES 
J. C. McGiLVRAT, Captain. D. J. Adams, Lieutenant and Cleric 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

18 John C. McGilvray 

19 David J. Adams 

20 John M. Inman 

25 Willis J. Sawyer 

29 Philip J. 'Connell 

21 Charles W. Downing 

26 Raymond M. Galfetti 
24 Raymond W. Colby 
28 William C. Willard 
23 Clarence H. Green 

22 Arthur J. Landry 

27 D. Harrington 
14 Henry E. Drew 

30 George H. Eastman 



MEMBERS 

Occupations 
Chauffeur 
Theatre Manager 
Custodian 
Machinist 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Gas fitter 
Teamster 
Teamster 
Silverworker 
Garage man 
Inspector 
Chauffeur 
Chauffeur 



Besidences 
35 Washington Street 

9 Thompson Street 
16 Wall Street 
73 So. State Street 
27A Thompson Street 
72 Warren Street 
130 Rumford Street 
12 Myrtle Street 
61 School Street 
22 So. State Street 
91/2 Perkins Street 
29 Warren Street 
Central Fire Station 
Central Fire Station 



GOVERNOR HILL STEAMER, NO. 4 

RELIEF ENGINE 

Badge 

Nos. Names Occupations Besidences 

34 Elmer H. Farrar, E'Ti^'.Machinist 78 So. State Street 

35 Henry O. Powell, Fire. Blacksmith 81 So. State Street 



ALERT HOSE COMPANY, NO. 

OFFICERS 



John M. 


Davis, Capt 


ain. MiLO G. Davis, Lieutenant and Clerl 
A. C. Hardy, Treasurer 






MEMBERS 




Badge 








Nos. 


Names 


Occupations 


Besidences 


36 J. M. 


Davis 


Clerk 


5 Cambridge Street 


37 M. G. 


Davis 


Contractor 


2 Beacon Street 


39 H. F. 


Walker 


Chauffeur 


34 .Jackson Stret 


40 J. E. 


Murphy 


Printer 


171 No. Main Street 


38 A. C. 


Hardy 


Clerk 


12 Charles Street 


42 M. J. 


Gorham 


Carpenter 


861/2 No. Spring Street 


45 G. H. 


McGilvray 


Auto mechanic 


33 Washington Street 


43 W. J. 


Angwin 


Mason 


14 Charles Street 


44 A. W 


. McDonald 


Addressographer 


38 Hall Street 


41 M. G. 


Davis 


Carpenter 


2 Beacon Street 


* E. H. 


Abbott 


Printer 


32 Jackson Street 


46 A. B. 


Smart 


Chauffeur 


Alert Station 


*Acting 


for M. J. Gorham. 





FIRE DEPARTMENT 



219 



GOOD WILL HOSE COMPANY, NO. 3 

OFFICEES 

Harry L. Peacock, Captain. H. F. Ferrin, Lieutenant and Cleric 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

50 Harry L. Peacock 

51 Herbert F. Ferrin 

54 John W. McGowan 
53 Percy H. Flanders 

57 Harry C. Lougee 

52 Arthur B. Murdoek 
56 George B. Houston 

58 John W. Wright 

59 Walter Burtt 

55 *Chester E. Blake 

60 William T. Happny 
*Acting for Henry H. 



MEMBEKS 

Occupations 
Painter 
Electrician 
Plumber 
Carpenter 
Painter 
Chauffeur 
Blacksmith 
Painter 
Painter 
Plumber 
Chauffeur 
Ash. 



Residences 
36 Warren Street 
104 So. State Street 
3 No. State Street 
32 West Street 
57 So. State Street 
14 Eumford Street 
22 Perlcy Street 
48 Concord Street 
31 South Street 
21 Concord Street 
Good Will Station 



CITY OF CONCORD HOOK AND LADDER 
COMPANY, NO. 1 

OFFICERS 

Sam B. Morgan, Captain. Ned E. Herrin, Lieutenant and Cleric 

Ned Herrin, Treasurer 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

65 Sam B. Morgan 

77 Ned E. Herrin 

69 L. D. Caldon 

68 Henry V. Tittemore 

71 Daniel Crowley 

79 Louis Cote 

80 C. L. Clark 

81 B. J. Heath 

83 Harry Leary 

78 E. W. Gaige 

66 J. F. Byrne 

82 P. S. Badger 

67 S. C. Clark 

73 H. W. French 
77 R. H. McDonald 

75 R. S. Badger 

70 H. E. Lord 

76 T. W. Byrne 

74 C. E. Holt 

72 Duncan Murdoek 

84 A. J. Ladd 



MEMBERS 

Occupations 

Wood-worker 

Carpenter 

Wood-worker 

Teamster 

.Janitor 

Roofer 

Clerk 

Janitor 

Gas fitter 

Carpenter 

Gas fitter 

Auto repairer 

Auto repairer 

Chauffeur 

Electrician 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Janitor 

Clerk 

Electrician 

Chauffeur 



Residences 
10 Avon Street 
18 School Street 
13 West Street 
57 Dunklee Street 
130 Warren Street 

2 No. State Street 
71 South Street 
100 So. Fruit Street 
22 Fremont Street 

5 Charles Street 

5 Sexton Avenue 
189 No. Main Street 
35 Thorndike Street 

9 So. Spring Street 
73 Downing Street 
189 No. Main Street 
40 So. Spring Street 
State Armory 

9 Blake Street 
141 Rumford Street 
Central Fire Station 



220 



CITY OF CONCORD 



COMBINATION COMPANY, NO. 1 



M. J. Martin, Captain. 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

91 M. J. Martin 

92 M. E. Piper 

93 J. H. Brunei 

94 J. L. Alarie 

95 E. J. Brunei 

96 L. F. Blodgett 

275 C. G. Howser 
21 C. W. Downing 



OFFICEES 



MEMBEES 



M. E. Piper, Lieutenant 



Occupations 
Capt a in 
Lieutenant 
Chauffeur 
Chauffeur 

Spare Men 
Cliauffeur 
Cliauffeur 
General Utility Man 

Fire Inspector 



Residences 
Central Station 
Central Station 
Central Station 
Central Station 

Central Station 
Central Station 

Central Station 

72 Warren Street 



PIONEER STEAIVI FIRE ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3 

Penacook 

OFFICEES 

Cornelius W. O'Brien, Captain. William H. Holbrook, Lieutenant 

Eichard McBride, Clerk and Treasurer 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

100 Cornelius W. O 'Brien 

119 William H. Holbrook 

112 Eichard McBride 

102 Alfred Beddow 
108 Alfred J. York 

113 Peter A. Keenan 
123 William Corbett 

121 Albert Casseveaugh 

117 Guy B. Chase 

122 George L. Miner 
125 George D. Dowd 

114 William H. McGirr 
116 Harry Matott 

110 Grenville Dodge 

111 Eugene Gebo 

115 Eaymond J. Cassavough 
128 James A. Miller 

119 Perley A. Ketchum 

118 Jerry Lamore 
105 Arthur Watterson 

103 Frank D. O'Brien 



MEMBEES 

Occupations 
Mill operative 
Miller 

Mill operative 
Stationery en- 
Spinner [gineer 
Mill operative 
Second hand 
Teamster 
Miller 
Electrician 
Drug clerk 
Foreman 
Teamster 
Electrician 
Mill operative 
Mill operative 
Electrician 
Miller 
Electrician 
Cook 
Chauffeur 



Residences 
43 So. Main Street 
10 Church Street 
10 Union Street 
50 Elm Street 

7 Church Street 
42 High Street 
47 Centre Street 

9 Union Street 
Elm Street 
Stark Street 
Cliarles Street 
Summer Street 
Washington Street 
61 Merrimack Street 
Pioneer Station 
9 Union Street 
High Street 
Merrimack Street 
Summer Street 
Washington Street 
Pioneer Station 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



221 



OLD FORT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 2 

East Concord 

OFFICEES 

Clarence I. Tebbetts, Captain. Claude H. Savain, Treasicrer 

Herbert F. Piper, Lieutenant and Clerk 

M. J. Lacroix, Chauffeur and Janitor 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

120 Clarence I. Tebbetts 

128 Shadraeh M. Cate 

129 Ross W. Cate 

130 Herbert L. Knowles 

131 Park French 

132 Wesley Field 

133 John W. Sanborn 

135 John T. Cate 

136 Arthur P. Swain 

123 Michael Lacroix 

138 Reuben L. Cate 

139 William F. Paige 

140 Curtis A. Chamberlin 

143 Herbert A. Stuart 

146 Thomas D. Morrison 

147 J. Fred Gardner 
149 Fred J. Carter 
122 Claude H. Swain 

121 Herbert F. Piper 

141 William F. Cate 

134 Ernest W. Cate 
145 Harold D. Merrill 

125 Dana S. Morrison 

126 Harold A. Cate 

137 Charles A. Maxner 

124 Herbert W. Gardner 

144 George C. Stuart 

142 Ralph L. Stearns 

127 Cleon E. Perry 

148 John H. Bath 



MEMBERS 

Occupations 
Foreman 
Farmer 
Blacksmith 
Farmer 
Clerk 
Clerk 
Farmer 
Contractor 
Crossing tender 
Blacksmith 
Carpenter 
Watcliman 
Farmer 
Switch tender 
Clerk 

Wood worker 
Stone-cutter 
Clerk 

Belt-maker 
Farmer 
Clerk 
Painter 
Plumber 
Carpenter 
Laborer 
Carpenter 
Carpenter 
Clerk 

Electrician 
Machinist 



Residences 
E. Penacook Street 
Pembroke Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Potter Street 
E. Penacook Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Mountain Road 
Shawmut Street 
E. Penacook Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Cemetery Street 
Shawmut Street 
Shawmut Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Kearsarge Street 
Pembroke Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Shawmut Street 
Pembroke Street 
Pembroke Street 
Kearsarge Street 
Portsmouth Street 
Kearsarge Street 
Shawmut Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Pembroke Street 
E. Penacook Street 
E. Penacook Street 
Winthrop Street 
E. Penacook Street 



222 



CITY OF CONCORD 



CATARACT ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 3 
West Concord 



Harold E. Wakefield, 
and Cleric. 



OFFICERS 

Captain. Ernest W. Noonan, Lieutenant 
Andrew J. Abbott, Treasurer 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

150 Harold E. Wakefield 

lol Ernest W. Noonan 

152 Jeremiah Cotter 

153 Andrew J. Abbott 

154 Edward G. Lovering 

155 Robert Henry 

156 Matthew H. Peabody 

157 Carl A. Anderson 

158 Henry M. Richardson 

159 Oscar W. Anderson 

160 Clinton O. Patridge 

161 Clyde B. Loiselle 

162 Arthur F. Henry 

163 William J. Lynch 

164 Oscar T. Forsberg 

165 Carl A. Anderson 

166 Charles W. Scott 

167 Edward J. Courcy 

168 William J. Flynn 

169 Howard P. Blanchard 



MEMBERS 

Occupations 

Chauffeur 

Expressman 

Blacksmith 

Farmer 

Stone-cutter 

Silversmith 

Stationery engin 

Stationery engin 

Foreman 

Linesman 

Chauffeur 

Electrician 

Die sinker 

Chauffeur 

Trackman 

Trackman 

Truckman 

Foreman 

Merchant 

Stationery engin 



Besidences 
Cataract Station 

4 Peabody Street 

5 Engel Street 

382 No. State Street 

1 Clark Street 

513 No. State Street 

'r 4 View Street 

'r 359 No. State Street 

6 Lake Avenue 

499 y2 No. State Street 
426 No. State Street 
9 Hutchins Street 
513 No. State Street 
4441/0 No. State Street 
38 Lake Street 
414 No. State Street 
440 No. State Street 
480 No. State Street 
4 K Street 
'r 2 Fisher Street 



ENGINE COMPANY, NO. 5 
Plains 

OFFICERS 

Everett S. Mahoney, Captain. S. E. Hall, Lieutenant and Clerk 
Henry Curtis, Treasurer 



Badge 

Nos. Names 

170 Everett S. Mahoney 

171 S. E. Hall 

172 Ralph Benjamin 

173 Roger Baiiey 

174 Eugene Burleigh 

175 Walter Brooks 

176 Charles E. Chase 

177 Edward Chase 

178 Ray Colletti 



MEMBERS 

Occupations 
Salesman 
Machinist 
Clerk 
Roofer 
Chauffeur 
Molder 
Operator 
Truckman 
Machinist 



Besidences 
Loudon Road 
44 No. Pembroke Road 
Loudon Road 
Loudon Road 
Loudon Road 
33 Loudon Road 
Chase Street 
No. Pembroke Road 
15 Ormond Street 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



223 



179 Fred Columbe 

180 Marshal Columbe 

181 Henry Curtis 

182 Warren Foote 

183 Fred Giddis 

184 Arthur Giddis 

185 William Greeley 

186 George Howe 

187 Fred Kenniston 

188 William Mitchell 

189 William Mahoney 

190 Oscar Peranteau 

191 John Prescott 

192 Joseph Provencal 

193 Benjamin Robinson 

194 George Swain 

195 Lloyd Venne 

196 William Welcome 

197 Earl Woodward 

198 George Grant 

199 M. J. Moses 



Millman 

Millman 

Merchant 

lee man 

Mason 

Machinist 

Clerk 

Merchant 

aerk 

Auto mechanic 

Auto mechanic 

Salesman 

Well driver 

Painter 

Janitor 

Druggist 

Salesman 

Auto mechanic 

Clerk 

lee man 

Chauffeur 



No. Pembroke Road 
Greeley Street 
Loudon Road 
Weston Street 
Grover Street 
No. Pembroke 
Loudon Road 
28 Loudon Road 
Prescott Street 
Greeley Street 
So. Pembroke Road 
231/2 Union Street 
Ormond Street 
24 Grant Street 
No. Pembroke Road 
6 Grover Street 
Grant Street 
Loudon Road 
Loudon Road 
175 So. Pembroke Road 
35 Loudon Road 



VETERANS' AUXILIARY COMPANY 



OFFICERS 

S. S. Upham, Captain. H. T. Dickerman, First Lieutenant 

A. L. DiCKERMAN, Second Lieutenant 



MEMBERS 



T. J. Morrison 
Elba F. Home 
Arthur H. Britton 
W. D. Hutchinson 
F. W. Sanborn 
C. A. Milton 
H. C. Houston 
George F. Smith 
J. G. McQuilkin 
A. B. Morrison 



D. P. Wheeler 
W. K. Wingate 
L. S. Richardson 
John Knowlton 
H. C. Taylor 
Fred O. Libby 
M. F. Tliompson 

E. J. Brown 
H. P. Blake 
Charles C. Moore 



224 CITY OF CONCORD 

RELOCATION OF CONCORD FIRE ALARM 
SYSTEM 





Box Numbers 


The new list of numbers and boxes is as follows 


21 


No. Main and Warren 


23 


No. Main and School 


24 


No. Main and Park 


25 


Bridge at Concord Electric Co. 


26 


No. Main and Center 


27 


No. Main opp. Pitman 


28 


No. Main and Chapel 


*29 


Rumford Press 


212 


Ferry and Ferry Ave. 


213 


No. Main and Pearl 


214 


Fiske and Church 


*216 


Page Belting Co. 


31 


Pleasant and Main 


*32 


B. & M. Passenger Depot 


33 


So. Main opp. Fayette 


35 


So, Main opp. Thorndike 


*36 


Abbot-Downing Co. 


37 


So. Main and West 


38 


So. Main and Gas 


39 


Hall and Water 


312 


Hall opp. Hammond 


*313' 


B. & M. Engine Plouse 


314 


Hall and Rumford Ave. 


*41 


State and Capitol 


42 


No. State and Winter 


43 


Washington at Hose 2 


45 


Washington opp. Academy 


46 


Beacon and Lyndon 


47 


W. R. Durgin Co. 


48 


Beacon and White 


411 


Franklin and No. State 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 225 

412 Franklin and Jackson 

413 Franklin and Rumford 

414 Rumford and Highland 

415 Franklin and Charles 

416 Bradley and Walker 

421 No. State and Curtice Ave. 

422 No. State opp. Cemetery Rd. 
*423 New England Box Co. 

*424 New Hampshire State Prison 

425 No. State opp. Palm 

5 Fire Department Headquarters 

52 Elm and Fayette 

53 So. State and Concord 

54 Thorndike and Grove 

55 So. State and Laurel 
57 So. State and West 

512 West and Mills 

513 So. Main and Allison 

514 Dakin and Allison 
*516 B. & M. Repair Shops 

517 So. Main and Holly 

6 Green opp. City Hall 

61 No. Spring and School 

62 No. Spring and Cambridge 

64 Orchard and Merrimack 

65 Center and Essex 

66 Merrimack and School 
68 Warren and Pine 

*69 Board of Public Works, City Stable 

612 School and Giles 

613 Center and High 
615 Auburn and Granite 

*616 Pleasant and So. Fruit 

*621 Odd Fellows' Home 

622 Pleasant opp. Grand View Ave. 



226 CITY OF CONCORD 

624 St. Paul's School 

7 New Hampshire State Hospital 

72 Pleasant and So. Spring 

73 South and Thompson 

75 South and Thorndike 

76 Memorial Hospital 

711 Pierce and Perley 

712 South opp. Clinton 

713 Clinton and So. Fruit 
715 Noyes and Harvard 

721 South and Eastman 

722 Broadway and Pillsbury 

723 Broadway and Stone 

724 Broadway and Broad Ave. 
732 Rockingham and Broadway 

West Concord District 

431 No. State opp. Swenson Granite Co. 

432 No. State and K 

433 West Concord Fire Station 

434 No. State and Knight 

435 Lake and Gay 

436 No. State and Sewall's Falls Road 

Special Signals 
1-1-1 Recall 
2-2-2 Closing Schools 
4-4-4 Brush Fire 
11-11 Out of Town 
11-11-2 East Concord 
3-3-3 Military Call 
* Private boxes 

Penacook System 

There are nineteen boxes at Penacook the alarm from 
which are registered by tapper at the Central Fire Station 
but not thrown out over the precinct system. 

Fred M. Dodge, Supt. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



TWENTIETH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE 
CHIEF OF POLICE 



Concord, N. H., January 1, 1929. 

To His Honor the Mayor, and the Honorable Board of 
Aldermen of the City of Concord, N. H. 

Gentlemen : I respectfully submit my twentieth report 
of the Police Department for the year ending December 31, 
1928. 

ROSTER 

George A. S. Kimball, Chief of Police 

Victor I. Moore, Deputy Chief 

J. Edward Silva, Captain 

Christopher T. Wallace, Sergeant 

House Officers 

Samuel L. Bachelder George H. Silsby 

Irving B. Robinson 

Patrolmen 

Samuel Rodd F. Scott Rogers 

James J. Halligan E. G. Densmore 

C. H. Curtis G. M. Dooley 

A. W. Mclsaac M. F. Densmore 

Paul H. Moore J. G. Andrews 

Thomas M. Harrison W. E. White 
Abraham D. Cushing 



228 CITY OF CONCORD 

R. P. Tiircotte, Janitor 

Reserve Officers 
Captain G. H, Abbott 

Joseph King Frank Silva 

Edward L. Howland Herbert E. Clark 

D. Otis SAvain Addison N. Martin 

Marlv D. Case}^ Hayward C. Logan 

John P. Walsh Harry D. Long 

Perley H. Morse James M. Kent 

Michael Mulligan Homer B. Clough 

Nelson E. Strong John Kenney 

Walter H. Bean Thomas Andrews 

G. C. Percy Fred S. Pendleton 

William Welcome George A. Griffin 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Appropriation $54,622.80 

Special Resolution 386.96 

Department Earnings 1,479.67 

(Paid City Treasurer) 





Expenditures 


Salaries — Regulars 


$37,144.00 


Salaries — Specials 


4,874.56 


Fuel 


1,092.38 


Lights 


1,666.29 


Automobiles 


3,171.61 


Incidentals 


2,590.23 


Ambulance 


2,850.00 


Janitor 


600.00 


Police Boxes 


210.08 


Repairs 


810.61 



$56,489.43 



$55,009.76 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 229 

ARRESTS 
Year No. Year No. 

1909 281 1918 492 

1910 586 1919 350 

1911 1076 1920 471 

1912 1366 1921 553 

1913 1556 1922 663 

1914 1850 1923 708 

1915 1599 1924 813 

1916 1106 1925 699 

1917 1003 1926 964 

1927 894 

Arrests and Causes, 1928 

Total number of arrests 788 

Brought before the Court 540 

Discharged by the Court 11 

Released 233 

Assault 8 

Aggravated assault 6 

Breaking and entering 5 

Bastardy 8 

Drunkenness 147 

Fugitive from Justice 1 

Bigamy 1 

Deserters 2 

Arrests for out of town officers 28 

Fraud 1 

Phony Checks 1 

Gambling 3 

Insane 24 

Larceny 40 

Lacivious behavior 3 

Rude and disorderly conduct 42 

Debt 1 



230 CITY OF CONCORD 

Rude and indecent conduct 1 

Desertion 2 

Bound over to Superior Court 8 

Embezzlement 1 

Committed to House of Correction 83 

Committed to State Hospital 25 

Committed to Jail 8 

Committed to Industrial School 1 

Number fines paid 300 

Mittimusses not to issue till called for 164 

Appeals ' 6 

Nol-prossed 29 

Sentence suspended 195 

Mittimus called for 1 

Keeping gambling place 3 

Fighting 3 

Runaways 10 

Begging 2 

Non-support 10 

Carrying concealed weapons 1 

Attempted rape 1 

Fornication 4 
Operating auto while under influence of intoxicating 

liquor 29 

Overspeeding auto 31 

Violation motor boat law 1 

Traffic violations 11 

Reckless driving of auto 31 

Inadequate brakes 9 

Miscellaneous violations auto laws 54 

Failing to stop at command of officer 1 

Failing to stop after doing injury 4 

Excessive load on trucks 6 

Cruelty to animals 7 

Unlicensed dog 1 

Firing revolver 1 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 231 

Highway robbery 1 

Idle persons 2 

Vagrants 2 

Keeping liquor for sale 9 

Illegal possession of liquor 40 

Illegal transportation of liquor 13 

Manufacturing of liquor 3 

Selling liquor 5 

Common seller of liquor 6 

Violation Fish and Game Laws 7 

Cutting trees on State Reservation 2 

Selling mortgaged property 1 

Violation of milk law 1 

Aiding to commit an abortion 1 

Beating board bill 3 

Committing unnatural act 1 

False alarm fire 2 

Open gross lewdness 1 

Miscellaneous 

Auto collisions reported 266 

Auto accidents reported 104 

Autos in collisions with teams 6 

Autos — persons injured 140 

Autos — persons killed 1 

Autos stolen 38 

Autos recovered 31 

Autos abandoned on streets and recovered 31 

Ambulance calls 293 

Emergency ambulance calls 47 

Police car used carrying sick persons 11 

Accidental shooting 1 

Attempted breaks 8 

Bicycles stolen and recovered 31 

Bicvcle riders ordered in on account no lights 19 



232 CITY OF CONCORD 

Complaints investigated 430 

Persons drowned 3 

Doors and windows found unlocked and open 604 

Doors tried each night 946 

Disturbances quelled 57 

Dogs reported lost 69 

Dogs reported found 44 

Dogs run over by autos and killed 28 

Dogs injured by autos 20 

Dogs killed by police 9 

Escaped from N. H. State Institutions 58 

Articles found on streets 31 

Persons found dead — natural causes 5 

Officers attending fires 140 

Fires discovered by officers 9 

Still alarms telephoned to police station 6 

Lost articles reported 63 

Lost children found 40 

Leaks in water pipes reported 9 

Leaks in gas pipes reported 1 

Lights left burning 6 

Lights reported by officers (out in stores) 10 

Lodgers 1417 

Lights out in streets reported 1728 

Missing persons found 9 

Persons notified of trouble in stores 2 

Injured and sick persons treated at station 3 

Persons found sick on street 1 

Persons found dead 3 

Persons bitten by dogs 7 

Runaways 23 

Stray animals found 5 

Suicides 4 

Attempted suicides 1 

Holes in streets reported 15 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 233 

Dangerous trees reported 6 

Broken niggerheads reported 4 

Wires reported down 12 

Conclusion 

I wish to thank Judge William Stevens, John W. Stanley, 
Clerk of the Court, the Honorable Members of the Police 
Committee, and all the officers of the department, for their 
hearty co-operation during the year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. S. KIMBALL, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF THE ENGINEERING 
DEPARTMENT 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1928. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted the thirty-sixth 
annual report of the Engineering Department. 



Financial Statement 



Appropriation : 






Engineer, 


$3,500.00 




Assistant Engineer 


1,900.00 




Clerk, 


1,044.00 




Rodman 


1,200.00 




Extra clerk for vacation 


30.00 




Incidentals 


575.00 




Upkeep of automobile 


400.00 


$8,649.00 






Earnings 




20.00 


Funds available 


$8,669.00 


Dishursements 






Salaries and supplies 




$8,645.57 


Balance 


$23.43 


Appropriation for zoning 




$600.00 


Expended 




0.00 



Balance 



$600.00 



The work of construction and maintenance of the sewers 
is handled by this department for the Board of Public 
Works, 



REPORT OF ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



235 



This department has done whatever -work was assigned 
it by the several departments, committees and city gov- 
ernment. 

Your engineer has attended building hearings and ac- 
companied the city government on their hearings, as Avell 
as attended all meetings of the city government and Board 
of Public Works. 

All sewer connections were inspected and recorded. 

Grade stakes were set for 11,902 feet of sidewalks. 

Plans, estimates and blue prints were made when re- 
quested. The assessors' maps were kept up to date. There 
were 632 transfers of property during the year. 



Streets Laid Out 

School Street Extension 

Ormond Street 

Weston Street 

Grover Street 

Prescott Street 

Greeley Street Extension 

Grant Street 

Lawrence Street 

High Street Extension, Franklin St., N. 

Kennedy Lane 

Chapman Street, Ward One 

Bean Street, " 

Randlett Street, 

Mitchell Street, 

Welch Street, 

Hobart Street, 

Snow Street, " 

Kensington Road Extension 

Joffre Street 

Donovan Street Extension 

Vernon Street 



1,170.52 feet 

653.61 

516.82 

589.22 

807.21 

597.21 

624.36 
1,844.80 

325 

154.80 

290.69 

298.29 

300 

369.49 

735.40 
1,901.33 
2,302.93 

250.98 

667.77 

255.23 

322.39 



236 CITY OF CONCORD 

Total length of streets laid out in 1928 1.548 miles 

Total mileage of streets and roads 177.665 " 

Total mileage in compact part of city 49.672 " 

Total mileage in outlying part of city 127.993 " 

The records of this department are kept on a card system 
which gives in detail the expenditures and entire work of 
this department, which we will be pleased to show anyone 
who may be interested. 

We have handled practically every phase of municipal 
engineering for citizens and out-of-town people, as well as 
the city's work, all of which has been cheerfully attended 
to by the employees of this department, all of whom have 
rendered valuable service to the city. 

The roster of the engineering department outside of your 
engineer, is as follows: Mr. Edward E. Beane, assistant 
engineer; C. Fred Moulton, rodman, and Mrs. Frances 
Richardson, clerk. 

For the support and co-operation of our late Mayor, 
Olin H. Chase, your board, heads of departments and citi- 
zens of the city, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1928. 
To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen: The twenty-third annual report of this 
board for the year 1928 is herewith submitted. 

There were six meetings held during the year, and the 
installation of the following hydrants recommended: 

South Street, 500 feet south of Rockingham, two north of 
Rockingham and one opposite the new school house. 

Hope Avenue, 500 feet west of Broadway and 1,000 feet 
west of Broadway. 

South Main Street, between Maitland and Pillsbury 
Streets. 

Granite Street, just east of house No. 12. 

Linden Street, Penacook, opposite Spencer house. 



Loudon Road 
Ormond Street 
Prescott Street 
Canterbury Road 
North Pembroke Road 
Robinson Street, 
Grant Street 
Greeley Street 
Weston Street 
So. Pembroke Road 
Lawrence Street 



8 hydrants 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
2 



Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG 
W. C. GREEN 
P. R. SANDERS 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1928. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The twenty-ninth annual report of this 
board is herewith submitted. 

The membership of the present board is as follows : 
Arthur W. Brown, an examined master plumber; Walter 
C. RoAve, M.D. ; and Fred W. Lang, city engineer. Mr. 
Brown is chairman of the board, and Fred W. Lang, clerk. 

Five applications for journeyman's license, and two for 
master's license were received. 

Seven meetings of the board were held, all of the appli- 
cants were examined and five passed the required examina- 
tions ; two failed to pass. 

There are four classes of plumbers on the register: 
Registered master, examined master, registered journeyman 
and examined journeyman. 

The following paid for their 1928 license and are classified 
as follows: 



Registered Masters 



Arthur W. Bean 
Mary E. Clifford 
Seth R. Hood 
Michael J. Lee 
William A. Lee 
Richard J. Lee 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Willis H. Robbins 
Albert S. Trask 



License number 



1 

14 
2 

10 
4 
6 
5 
3 

11 



examiners of plumbers 
Examined Masters 



239 



Elmer E. Babb 
Charles W. Bateiuan 
William J. Bishop 
Arthur W. Brown 
Louis J. Cherrier 
Philip W. Clark 
Frederick F. Converse 
Edward F. Donovan 
Edward F. Edgeworth 
John L. Fahey 
William Johns 
Thomas J. Johnson 
John C. Keenan 
Robert J. Keane, Jr. 
John W. McGowan 
Manley W. Morgan 
G. Arthur Nichols 
Richard O'Brien 
Harris S. Parmenter 
Albert E. Roberts 
Geo. E. Robinson 
George L. Small 
John C. Smith 
Joseph B. Spear 
John W. Reardon 
Malcolm S. Butler 
William Trottier 
Wilfred W. Brennan 



License number 



13 
3 
27 
40 
23 
34 
35 
18 
30 
28 
37 
26 
15 
38 
44 
16 
2 
29 
24 
11 
33 
31 
11 
41 
42 
43 
7 
39 



Registered Journeymen 



P. Harrison D. Leary 
Harry H. Kennedy 



License number 



12 
11 



240 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Examined Journeymen 



Charles H. Berry 
Archie D. Brannen 
Stanley A. Buchanan 
Arthur W. Bunten 
Warren S. Collings 
Nelson Dane 
C. Nelson Griffin 
Chas. D. Hall 
Victor T. Lauze 
Adelard J. Lemire 
Everett S. Mahoney 
John J. Maloney 
William H. Stanley 
Clarence J. Speed 
George E. Towne 
Franklin H. Nutter 
Joseph C. Roy 
Fred L. Cook 
Thomas F. Day 
Charles C. Shurtleff 
Joseph A. Hartley 
Douglas Greenwood 
Melvin R. Radford 
Parker G. Morgan 



License number 



91 
86 
20 
92 
79 
62 
93 
78 
64 
72 
90 
59 
60 
87 
88 
94 
99 
96 
97 
98 
102 
103 
101 



Total number Registered Masters 9 

Total number Registered Journeymen 2 

Total number Examined Masters 28 

Total number Examined Journeymen 24 



examiners of plumbers 241 

Cash Receipts 

For licenses $30.00 

For examinations 7.00 



Total receipts $37.00 

Paid out for stamps and supplies 20.45 



Balance $16.55 

The clerk of the board holds receipts from the city treas- 
urer for $16.55. 



Respectfully submitted, 



ARTHUR W. BROWN 
WALTER C. ROWE, M.D. 
FRED W. LANG 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



REPORT OF THE PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1928. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The fourth annual report of the plumbing 
inspections in the city of Concord, is herewith submitted : 

There have been 194 permits issued for new work, against 
235 for 1927, 210 for 1926, and 156 for 1925. 

There were 390 inspections made. 

It is pleasing to the inspector to report that there have 
been very few complaints of evasion of the plumbing rules, 
and these being of a minor nature. 

A record is kept in the office of the city engineer of the 
various plumbing jobs, showing the layout of the work, 
date of completion, and the names of the parties doing the 
work. 

The plumbers of Concord, taken as a whole, are expert 
workmen, and it has been a great pleasure to your inspector 
to work with them. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

Plumbing Inspector. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF 
PUBLIC WORKS 

To the Board of Public Works: 

I have the honor to submit herewith my annual report 
for the year ending December 31, 1928. 

The work of the department embraces the construction 
and maintenance of streets , the collection of garbage , the 
construction of sidewalks and bridges and the care of trees. 

In the superintendent's office a complete record of all 
purchases, expenditures and detailed costs are maintained 
for reference. 

I make no recommendations, believing it to be more ap- 
propriate to make them to the board at the regular meet- 
ings. 

Finance 

Funds for the work of the department have been received 
from the annual budget and Bond issue for construction of 
bridges and concrete road. 

Appropriations 





App's 


Earnings 


Expended 


Balance 


General Maintenance 


$206,301.29 


$18,674.99 


$224,976.28 




Garbage 


35,918.91 


219.68 


36,138.59 




Trees 


6,000.00 


58.61 


6,058.61 




B. H. Cemetery 


1,492.22 




1,492.22 




Hopkinton Eoad Bond 


35,000.00 


3,751.55 


31,124.84 


$7,626.71 


Bridge Bond 


20,000.00 




4,486.00 


15,514.00- 


• 


Constr 


uction 







Bridges No. 12 and No. 43 over Mill Brook in East Con- 
cord and Bridge No. 19 on the Penacook-Loudon Road 
were built of reinforced concrete. 



244 CITY OF CONCORD 

The Hanover Street wall was relaid and concrete wall on 
High Street was built, the latter being a part of the agree- 
ment on securing the right of waj^ to lay out street to our 
asphalt and gravel plants. 

The north entrance to Blossom Hill Cemetery was im- 
proved jointly with the Sewer and Cemetery departments. 

Hopkinton trunk line, from St. Paul 's School to Hopkin- 
ton-Concord town line, was built in conjunction with the 
state department. On account of changes near St. Paul's 
School, the school paying the extra expense, the work will 
not be completed until another year. 

No. IMain Street from Center to Fiske — Fiske and No. 
State to Blossom Hill Cemetery — Pleasant Street from Main 
to Green, and Park, ]\Iain to State, were paved with asphalt. 

Sidewalks, concrete and tar, were laid in various parts of 
the city. Corrugated iron pipe replaced broken tile culverts 
on our outside roads. 

3Iaintenance 

Trunklines 

Trunklines were maintained, the state department paying 
one-half the cost. 

Bridges 

Bridges were repaired and painted ; Crescent Street 
Bridge was rebuilt — Twin Bridge was replanked, and 
Bridge Street Bridge, over the Merrimack, was replanked 
and traffic treads of steel laid. 

Grading 

Streets have been regraded to conform to legal grade and 
new streets built, the abutting owners paying for these im- 
provements. 

The dirt roads being so easily rutted, after each period of 
wet weather, has made it necessary to run road machines 
almost continually during the season. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 245 

Wages 

The rates paid for labor, teams and trucks were the same 
this year as last. 

Bituminous Surface 

The policy of improving several miles of streets with tar 
and gravel treatment, and liquid asphalt applied to the tar 
and gravel previously built, was continued. 

Streets were maintained with cold patching. 

Garage and StaMes 

One Mead-Morrison tractor, one street sweeper, two horse 
drawn road machines, one Chevrolet Coupe, and one Chev- 
rolet truck were added to our equipment. 

We have hired local trucks during the past year, not 
only for plowing snow, but for our summer work, and have 
found this very satisfactory. 

Two pairs of horses were purchased, replacing four old 
ones. We have at the present time, seven double and two 
single teams. 

A time clock was installed at the stables, each man having 
to register, thus keeping an accurate account of all time. 

Truck equipment is as follows : 

1 Chevrolet Coupe 

1 Chevrolet Truck 

1 Buick Coupe 

1 Ford Roadster 

1 Dodge Truck 

2 Concord Trucks 

4 International Trucks 

2 Nash Trucks 

5 Ford Trucks 

3 Mead-Morrison Tractors 

6 Fordsons 



246 CITY OF CONCORD 

Snow Removal 

Snow plowing was done with city owned and rented 
trucks, with the help of the tractors on the outside roads. 

Loading of snow was done by hand labor. 

Signs and Markings 

Stop and Slow signs were installed at intersections as 
designated by the board. 

Cross walk and parking areas were lined, and street di- 
rection and parking signs were made and erected. 

Cleaning Streets 

Streets were swept by hand and flushed each day, through 
the summer months, with the motor driven flusher in the 
business district. 

Catch Basins 

By vote of the board, the building and repairing of 
catch basins, after June 1, was transferred to the Sewer 
Department. 

Garbage 

The collection of garbage, ashes and rubbish has been 
continued as in former years; ashes and rubbish being col- 
lected by our department forces, and table garbage collected 
by contract with Burt Holt. 

Land was purchased, on the east side of the Merrimack 
River, for the disposal of refuse, and we hope to be able to 
discontinue the use of the Bridge Street site, in the near 
future. 

Trees 

One hundred Norway Maples were set out along city 
streets. Fourteen elms and nine maples, which were dead 
or unsafe, were removed, and seventy poplars were taken 
down. 

The Municipal Forest at West Concord was cleared and 
three thousand seedlings planted. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 247 

Pruning was confined to removing dangerous and un- 
sightly dead wood and low limbs. 

Gypsy moths were painted and trees sprayed in all parts 
of the city. 

General 

Work for the several committees was performed as re- 
quested. 

Conclusion 

I wish to acknowledge my appreciation of the interest 
shown by Mayor Chase and Mayor Brown, members of the 
board and employees of the department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ORRIN W. HEAD, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



REPORT OF THE SEWER DEPARTMENT 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1928. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The eighteenth annual report to your 
board, showing work done under the supervision of the 
Engineering Department, for your board, for the fiscal year 
ending December 31, 1928, is herewith submitted. 

In this report I shall make no recommendations, believing 
it to be more appropriate to make them to your board at 
your regular sessions, when the opportunity is always open. 

Financial Statement 



Appropriation for construction and repairs 


$15,000.00 


Earnings of Department 




2,198.61 


Funds available 


$17,198.61 


Disbursements 






Paid for liability insurance 


$209.23 




sewer pipe 


446.01 




akron elbows 


3.06 




manhole castings 


97.25 




catch basin castings 


176.46 




lamp hole castings 


62.50 




brick 


90.32 




recording deed 


0.77 




cement 


135.20 




wiring at city sheds 


44.47 




toilet at city sheds 


45.44 





BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



249 



cement floor at city sheds 18.85 

chimnej^ at city sheds 51.40 

sink at city sheds 6.48 

furnace at city sheds 145.00 

windows at city sheds 40.00 

fence at city sheds 132.56 

erecting fence at city sheds 45.00 

new metal shed 575.00 

repairing old shed 135.00 

gasoline 545.86 

oil 47.42 

grease 3.90 

tool account 919.35 

coal 87.60 

concrete walk repairs 9.80 

convention expenses 110,20 

express 8.33 

freight 7.49 

kerosene oil 10.95 

lumber 70.74 

rain coats and hats 42.00 

telephone 25.94 

wood 10.00 

index cards 42.25 

Reo truck account 431.01 

Chevrolet truck account 104.53 
Chevrolet dump truck account 844.46 

telephone duct, labor 10.64 

house connections, labor 1,298.76 

general repairs, labor 3,843.08 

construction, labor 435.44 

flushing labor 56.64 

outlet repairs, labor 23.14 

cleaning brick, labor 44.25 
cleaning catch basins, labor 2,966.76 



250 CITY OF CONCORD 

catch basins raised, labor 9.18 

new catch basins built, labor 382.86 

catch basin pipe relaid, labor 53.86 

catch basins repaired, labor 92.74 

catch basins plugged, labor 80.42 

catch basins rebuilt, labor 42.34 

unloading pipe, labor 30.42 

cement work, sheds, labor 55.80 

manholes raised, labor 240.18 

manholes built, labor 124.52 

main line plugs, labor 487.04 

private pipe plugs, labor 633.72 

main line repairs, labor 68.86 

lantern holes built, labor 17.22 

overflows built, labor 47.92 

cleaning outlets, labor 39.24 

testing sewer conn., labor 1.16 

$16,868.05 

Balance $330.56 

There was laid 12,692 feet of sewer in 1928. 
One hundred and seven plugs in house sewers were re- 
moved. 

Six new manholes were built other than those on con- 
struction jobs. 

There were 34 main line sewer plugs. 
Sixteen catch basins were built. 
There were 11 catch basin plugs. 
Miles of main line sewers : 

City Proper 42.063 + 

East Concord 0.533+ 

Penacook 5.441 + 

West Concord 3.916 + 

St. Paul's School 1.197+ 

Total 53.150+ 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



251 



Sewers built by sewer department in 1928 : 

Hammond Street 84 feet of 8-inch 

Laurel Street 12 " 12-ineh 

Perkins Street 62 " 8-ineh 

Auburn Street, N. of Franklin St. 96 ' ' 8-ineh 



Sewer Bond Account 

Bids were asked for sewer construction for 1928, and 
were received from Ames Construction Co., of Somers- 
worth, Robie Construction Co. of Manchester and Connolly 
Brothers of Beverly Farms, Mass. Ames Construction Co. 
were low bidders, and contract was awarded them. The 



amounts paid them are as follows : 



Street 

So. Main St. N. of 

Rockingham Street 
Rockingham Street 
Broadway, Rockingham 

to Hope Avenue 
Hope Avenue 
Donovan Street 
Broadway-Rockingham 

to Wiggin Street 
Wiggin 
Home Avenue 
Hall 

Kensington Road 
Grand View Avenue 
Portsmouth Street 
Roger Ave. Outlet 
Roger Ave. E. of Outlet 
Roger Ave. W. of Outlet 
So. Main St. S. of 

Rockingham Street 



Man Lamp Catch 
Feet Holes Holes Basins Amount 



803 


3 




.. $1,325.11 


1,402 


5 




L 2,320.74 


250 






317.50 


1,170 


4 




1,317.90 


450 


2 




541.50 


451 


2 




587.47 


478 


2 




565.86 


749 


3 




.. 1,326.03 


606 


3 


1 


1,119.82 


497 


3 




1,001.79 


137 


2 




331.59 


1,052 


5 




1,410.44 


772 


4 


2 


979.64 


372 


1 


1 


402.64 


200 


1 




249.00 



1,850 8 



4,575.00 



252 CITY OF CONCORD 

High St.. Penacook 603 3 828.00 

St. Paur.s School 1 - - 80.00 



Total $19,280.03 

Linden Street Construction 

"^ork done jointly -^-ith Concord Water AVorks & Sewer 
Dept. laying 306 feet of 8-inch Akron pipe 
Ames Construction. Co.. 2 manholes $160.00 

Concord "^ater Works 693.07 

Sewer Department 84.82 

$937.89 



Clinton Street 

Connolly Brothers, relaying 290 feet 

of 12-inch Akron pipe $580.00 $580.00 

A. II. Britton Co., pipe 4,150.17 

Sewer Department, unloading pipe 755.07 

Inspector 724.00 

Catch basin opposite No. 85 Hall St. 18.36 

Catch basin opposite No. 82 Hall St. 12.32 

Catch basin Hammond Street 10.90 

Catch basin Portsmouth Street 10.80 

Catch basin Roger Avenue 20.00 

Catch ba.sin High St., Penacook 11.20 
Catch basin opposite No. 104 High 

Street, Penacook 13.44 

Manhole opposite Xo. 85 Hall St. 17.64 

Monitor-Patriot, advertising bids 4.20 
So. ]^Iain St. at Rockingham, changing 

water pipe 7.00 

5,785.10 

Total $26,583.02 



BOABD OF PUBLIC WORKS 253 

Appropriation $30,000.00 

Expended 26,583.02 



Balance S3.416.95 

CaTeh basins along the new sewers above outlined, will 
be built in 1929. 

A detailed aceoimt of the above expenditures are on file 
in the office of the Citv Engineer. 

Every sewer that was granted has been completed. 

On June 1, 1928, the construction and maintenance of 
the catch basins was placed under the sewer department. 
Every catch basin in the entire city has been thoroughly 
cleaned twice between June 1 and December 31. 

There is considerable work to be done in the matter of 
reconstruction of catch basins, as a great many are in a 
very bad condition. It is our intention to rebuild the de- 
fective ones next year. 

In this report you will find the cost of cleaning, repair- 
ing, etc. 

A Chevrolet dump truck was purchased May 2-i for use 
on catch basiu work, at a c-ost of $745J.O. 

A steel shed 20x30 feet has been erected on our portion 
of the city shed lot. A furnace, telephone, water and toilet 
have been installed in this shed, and we are now equipped 
in a first class manner. A five-foot chain link fence has 
been placed on the Pleasant Street side of our lot, A 
thirty-foot steel flag pole was erected. 

The open steel shed has been remodeled so that it is now 
closed in by the insertion of three 8-foot doors. We now 
have housing space for aU of our equipment, except the 
large size of pipe. 

Sewer pipe was purchased of A. H. Britton Co. 

Cement was purchased of Boutwell Lumber Co. 

Brick Wcis purchased of Concord Briek Co. 

Supplies were purchased locally when possible. 



254 CITY OF CONCORD 

Coal was purchased of Tenney Coal Co., Concord Lum- 
ber Co., and Taylor Coal Co. 

The construction work, other than that done by the con- 
tractor, and maintenance of the sewer system was done 
with a small force. Our regular employees of the depart- 
ment are : William H. Murphy, foreman ; Joseph Morgan, 
James J. Berryman and Richard Morrill as assistant fore- 
men. These men are skilled workmen, and as long as they 
are employed you may feel assured that the sewers will be 
well taken care of. 

A detailed account of every job, bill, etc., is kept in this 
office which we will be pleased to show and explain to any- 
one interested. 

Your engineer has attended the meetings and hearings 
of the Board of Public AVorks, reported on petitions, made 
plans and estimates, and given information as requested. 

I wish to thank every citizen for the courtesy extended 
me and employees of this department. 

I attended the meetings of the American Society for 
Municipal Improvements held at Detroit in October, and 
assure you the meetings were worth while, and I thank you 
for allowing me to attend. 

For the many courtesies extended me by your board, I 
wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

City Engineer. 



REPORT OF THE BUILDING INSPECTOR 



Concord, N. H., December 31, 1928. 

To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : The fifth annual report of your building 
inspector is herewith submitted. 



Permits Issued 



1 boiler room 
1 bakery oven 
1 cobbler shop 
1 carpenter shop 
1 chapel enlarged 
15 dwellings 

7 one car garages 
20 one car garages 
27 two car garages 

1 two car garage 

2 two car garages 

1 three car garage 

2 three car garages 
7 four car garages 
1 four car garage 

1 five car garage 

2 public garages 
2 henhouses 

lunch carts 
lunch cart addition 
paint shop addition 
office enlarged 
barn roof raised 



room over piazza 
road side stand 



brick 
brick 
wood 
wood 
brick 
wood 
metal 
wood 
wood 
cement concrete 
metal 
metal 
wood 
wood 
metal 
wood 
brick 
wood 
metal 
metal 
wood 
wood 
w^ood 
wood 
wood 



256 CITY OF CONCORD 



2 roofs raised 


wood 


1 school house 


brick 


1 show room 


glass 


3 sun porches 


wood 


2 stores made from dwellings 


wood 


2 stores altered 


brick 


1 store enlarged 


wood 


1 storage shed 


wood 


6 two tenement houses 


wood 


1 two tenement house 


brick 


1 work shop 


wood 


1 upholstering shop 


wood 


1 old house made into three apartments 


wood 


1 old house made into two apartments 


wood 


4 dwellings altered 


wood 


1 garage made into dwelling 


wood 



Buildings Completed in 1928 

1 two apartment house wood 

4 dwellings altered wood 

1 three apartment house wood 

1 bakery oven brick 

1 chapel enlarged brick 

15 dwellings wood 

1 garage made into dwelling wood 

15 one car garages wood 

6 one car garages metal 

20 two car garages wood 

3 two car garages metal 
1 two car garage cement concrete 
1 three car garage wood 
1 three car garage metal 

4 four car garages wood 
1 four car garage metal 
1 lunch cart metal 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 257 

1 addition to lunch cart metal 

1 office addition wood 

1 paint shop addition wood 

1 public garage brick 

1 repair shop wood 

1 road side stand wood 

2 roofs raised wood 

3 sun porches wood 
2 stores made from dwellings wood 
1 store interior alteration brick 
1 store enlarged brick 
1 store enlarged wood 
6 two tenement houses wood 
1 two tenement house brick 
1 upholstering shop wood 

Signs 

There have been 24 signs erected during the year, all of 
which have been erected in a substantial manner. 

The inspections have taken a great amount of time, and 
I feel that the code has been lived up to cheerfully by the 
contractors, with these exceptions: 

Three roofs were covered with wooden shingles; in one 
case they were removed, and the other two were covered 
with fire-resistive shingles over the wooden ones. 

For the courtesy extended me by your board, the con- 
tractors and citizens, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRED W. LANG, 

Building Inspector. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES 

To the Mayor- and Board of Aldermen of the City of Con- 
cord, New Hampshire: 

In May, 1928, the Board of Aldermen set apart the 
Armenia White property, owned by the city, for library 
purposes, with the understanding that the purchase price, 
$37,376.30, should be paid from income of library trust 
funds and from other sources lawfully applicable to such 
purposes. During the year this indebtedness has been re- 
duced $7,376.30. 

The White residence is occupied by the American Legion. 
Extensive repairs and betterments have been made on the 
interior at the expense of the Legion. 

In the death of Professor Worthen, the library has lost a 
devoted friend and an indefatigable worker for its welfare. 
Through his persistent effort and diplomacy, the agreement 
with the Fowler heirs for the future changes in the library 
building was consummated. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIS D. THOMPSON, 

President of the Board of Trustees. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARIAN FOR 1928 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Puhlic Library: 

Gentlemen : The annual report of the librarian is here- 
with submitted. It consists as usual of brief statistics and 
a few comments. 

To begin with the expenditures : 

Salaries and labor $5,776.90 

Books and periodicals 1,994.31 

Binding 614.90 

Printing 122.08 

Fuel and light 839.35 

Incidentals 971.14 



$10,318.68 
It will be seen from the above table that the expenses 
were those of an average year ; there was no unusual outlay 
required except for cleaning the inside of the building ; to 
have all the ceilings, walls and furniture washed was a 
much-needed purification. In 1907 electricity was installed 
except in the Shakespeare Room, but the old gas-fixtures 
were kept as a precautionary measure ; these were removed 
last summer, however, and electric lights were carried into 
the Shakespeare Room, which, by the way, is used now by 
only one club, once a week. 

The next figures to be presented are as follows : 
During 1928 we have 

Added by purchase 1,068 volumes 

gift 58 

" binding magazines 24 

1,150 

We have discarded 434 

Net gain 716 

Now in Library 38,143 



260 CITY OF CONCORD 

Last year our net gain was only 588 volumes. 

The year's circulation is always a matter of interest. 

In 1927 there were 81,900 desk borrowers; in 1928, 
90,207 — a gratifying gain of 8,307. There were also 
3,153 seekers after knowledge in the reference room, where 
Miss Dennett and Miss Clarke look to it that they get the 
information they come for. 

Every year our business is best in the two months when 
New England weather is likely to keep people indoors; in 
March our general customers numbered 9,480 ; reference 
ones, 402 ; in November general customers 7,627, and 
reference ones 417 ; whereas in July we had at the desk only 
5,291 and in the reference room only 57. 

New borrowers in 1928 again totalled about 700, those of 
school age being 30 more than the adults. 

Fully 3,000 postals have been sent out by Miss Dennett 
who on Monday mornings very carefully looks up the over- 
due books and writes reminder cards to the delinquent 
borrowers. 

Apparently people are following the current literary 
reviews as never before, fiction and non-fiction being fre- 
quently requested because the applicant saw the book 
praised by some well-known critic. 

That it is not all our imagination which makes us com- 
plain occasionally of misbehavior on the part of our youth- 
ful clientele is proved by the observation of the Monitor's 
Up and Down the Street man, who wrote : ' ' We have 
heard the peace and serenity of the public library shattered 
effectively by groups of little chaps. One gang of small 
boys did a good job last night. They piled, scrimmage 
fashion, in one corner of the outer room, grabbed books 
from each other, whispered fiendishly. They pushed each 
other out of chairs, piled the books helter-skelter and did 
everything but mark up the walls. The librarian finally 
quelled the riot gently. What she should have done was to 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 261 

wallop each of the rascals with a barrel stave and then call 
for the police patrol." 

The resignation of Miss Bertha Carr from the staff, 
July 1, necessitated finding a new assistant and ^liss Ruth 
Melvin, just graduated from our Senior High School, was 
asked to try out the vacant position. She seems satisfactory 
in ability and disposition. This change in the staff upset, 
however, our plan for a vacation reading club and other 
activities designed to convince the rising generation that 
even in this recreation-mad age, books still are a source of 
pure delight. 

During 1928 your Honorable Board took a decidedly 
worth-Vv'hile step in securing from the Fowler heirs conces- 
sions which will ultimately simplify matters when the time 
arrives to decide about a new building for the library. That 
almost mythical structure must be noble in proportions, 
convenient and commodious within ; but above all things, 
may it have an atmosphere like that of which ]\Iay Lamber- 
ton Becker, the Reader's Guide, writes when she says: 

"I have been in many cities of my country but I never 
feel at home in a new city until I have looked in at the 
public library. It is alwaj'S like home : as I look down the 
lines of shelves there are the friendly faces of well-known 
books, and at the desks the friendly faces of librarians who 
never saw me before, but will take as good care of me as if 
I were visiting royalty." 

On October 18 occurred the fortieth anniversary of the 
Library 's moving into this Fowler Building, then rightfully 
considered a valuable gift to the city. Our staff marked 
the occasion b}^ harking back to 1888 ; that is, we displayed 
the best sellers of that year and we wore gowns and hats of 
that period. These costumes interested those in whom they 
evoked memories and those to whom they were startling 
novelties. Many dropped in to see how the Library was 
celebrating. Mayor Chase was one of our first callers. As 
a souvenir we gave out a bookmark which epitomized both 



262 CITY OF CONCORD 

the letter and the spirit for this institution, for one side of 
the bookmark summarized information about this Library, 
and on the other side was printed what any library aims to 
be to its community. 

When President Coolidge spoke at a library dedication 
in the West, he declared : 

"A liberal education may begin in the classroom but it 
will scarcely rise above mediocrity unless it is extended 
into the library and by that means broadened into the 
practical experience of life." 

A conflicting opinion was that heard on Bailej^ Island in 
Casco Bay, from an old native ; asked how much he would 
give towards a local library, he replied, "Nawthin'. Readin' 
rots the mind." 

Perhaps a safe and sane estimate of the value of a public 
library was given expression to by John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 
in his gift of $2,000,000 to replace the city library of Tokio 
destroyed in the great earthquake of 1923. 

It is not only a pleasant but a beneficial thing to go to 
Library Conferences, and the last of June your librarian 
attended a New England Meeting held in Portland, Maine. 

Thanking the Trustees for their support and the staff for 
their continued co-operation although no new incentives 
have arisen to stimulate their efforts. 

Respectfuly submitted, 

GRACE BLANCHARD, 

Librarian. 



POOR DEPARTMENT 



-0- 



SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE OVERSEER 
OF THE POOR 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1928. 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith submits the sixty-first annual 
report of the expenditures for the poor, including Wards 
One and Two, for the year ending December 31, 1928. 

Citxj Poor 



Appropriation 


$7,500.00 


Resolution No. 787 


2,000.00 


Resolution No. 799 


680.73 


Paid groceries 


$597.27 


fuel 


436.90 


rents 


279.97 


board and care 


6,768.00 


care, children 


1,569.62 


transportation 


10.00 


shoes and clothing 


45.87 


burials 


65.00 


medical services 


15.00 


miscellaneous 


3.10 


salary, overseers 


390.00 


County Poor 




Appropriation 


$15,000.00 


Resolution No. 799 


6,409.68 



$10,180.73 



$10,180.73 



$21,409.68 



264 CITY OF CONCORD 



id groceries 


$5,359.04 


milk 


390.74 


fuel 


2,315.55 


rents 


4,080.54 


care, children 


4,617.00 


board and care 


3,847.50 


shoes and clothing 


356.20 


burials 


92.28 


transient account 


47.63 


services, doctors 


27.15 


hospital care 


184.57 


medicine 


28.03 


miscellaneous 


63.45 




21,409.68 


tal amount paid for aid to poor 


$31,590.41 



Dependeni Soldiers, City 
Appropriation $300.00 

Resolution No. 799 5.00 



$305.00 



Paid care $161.00 

care, children 40.00 

rent 104.00 



$305.00 

Dependent Soldiers, County 
Appropriation $1,000.00 

Paid groceries $131.00 

fuel 77.25 

rents 104.00 

board and care 257.14 

shoes and clothing 16.45 

$890.84 



Total amount paid for aid to soldiers $1,195.84 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

Overseer of the Poor. 



REPORT OF THE CITY CLERK 



To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses, and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1928. 



Marriage Licenses 


$ 215.00 


Recording Conditional Sales 


1,241.50 


Recording Personal Mortgages 


199.50 


Recording Mortgage Discharges 


62.75 


Recording Mortgage Assignments 


1.25 


Recording Writs 


4.20 


Recording Assignment of Wages 


2.25 


Certificates of Record 


12.20 


Resident Certificates 


86.50 


Pool Table and Bowling Alley Fees 


2.50 


Total amount, city clerk fees 


$1,827.65 


House Rent, Fire Chief 


$ 250.00 


Rent, Concord Battery Station 


840.00 


Theatre Licenses 


771.00 


Dog Licenses 


2,910.54 


Pool Table Licenses 


300.00 


Job Team and Passenger Carriage Licenses 


80.50 


Circus Licenses 


100.00 


Junk Licenses 


90.00 


Earnings, Comfort Station 


104.68 


Aid, County Poor 


21,409.68 


Aid, County Soldiers 


585.88 


Druggist Permits 


7.00 


Sale City Histories and Maps 


6.50 



266 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sale Historical Addresses 33.50 

Employment Bureau License 5.00 

Photostat Income 8.20 

Sale Brick, etc., West Garden 107.90 

Sale Land, Harry Ford 17.55 

Sale Wirrell House 25.00 

Sale Grass 50.00 

Gasoline Reimbursement 93.68 

State Primary Filing Fees 147.00 

Sale Land, Stephen Hall 125.00 

Playground Department 10.00 

Right of Way, Public Service Co. 100.00 

Rent, Auditorium 1,350.00 

Earnings, Assessors 17.75 

Bounty on Hedgehogs 3.40 



$31,377.41 
Motor Vehicle Permits, 1928 $24,358.05 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1929 21,690.82 



$77,426.28 



The foregoing amounts have been paid into the city 
treasury. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



For the City of Concord 
Covering Period January 1, 1928, to January 1, 1929 



To His Honor Bolert W. Brown, Mayor, and the Board of 
Aldermen: 

During the past year there were five hundred and sixty- 
five (565) scales tested which were found correct and were 
sealed, two hundred and sixty-six (266) were adjusted be- 
fore being sealed, nine (9) confiscated and fifteen (15) 
condemned for repairs which were later reinspected and 
sealed. 

There were one thousand three hundred and sixty-eight 
(1368) weights tested which were found correct and were 
sealed, four (4) were adjusted before being sealed and two 
(2) confiscated. 

One thousand seventy-two (1072) liquid measures were 
tested, found correct and sealed, three (3) adjusted before 
being sealed, forty -three (43) confiscated and two (2) con- 
demned for repairs which were later reinspected and sealed. 

Five hundred and twelve (512) tests of gasoline pumps 
were made, three hundred and thirty-six (336) of which 
were found correct and were sealed, one hundred and 
seventy-two (172) were adjusted before being sealed, one 
(1) condemned for use and three (3) condemned for re- 
pairs which were later reinspected and sealed. 

There were two thousand two hundred and eighty-seven 
(2287) packages of commodities put up in advance of sale 
reweighed, two thousand two hundred and one (2201) of 
which were found correct, nine (9) over and seventy-seven 
(77) underweight. 



268 CITY OF CONCORD 

Six loads of coal in the process of delivery were re- 
weighed, four (4) of which were found correct and two (2) 
under weight. 

Twenty-eight (28) cart bodies used in the delivery of 
wood were measured, twenty -three (23) of which were 
in accordance with the law and five (5) incorrect. There 
were also two (2) piles of wood measured for private 
individuals. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE A. DEARBORN, 

City Sealer. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The work of the City Solicitor during the year of 1928 
consisted of the usual volume of opinions to committees and 
city officials ; of the drafting of deeds and other papers ; 
and the drawing of ordinances and resolutions. 

Litigation pending a year ago is still pending. This 
consists of the suit of Frank H. Silver for salary after he 
was dismissed from the Fire Department ; of the litigation 
concerning the discontinuance of the old Soucook River 
Highway ; and of the suit of Leo Tremblay against the City 
resulting from a collision with one of the fire trucks. Dur- 
ing the year one new suit w^as entered — of Royal Ford 
against the City. This is a Water Works case and it will 
be handled by the insurance company. 

During the year some attempts were made to bring the 
first three matters to a head, but so far without success, al- 
though some progress has been made. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELWN L. PAGE, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The appropriation made by the City Government of Con- 
cord for playground work is used to assist recreational 
activities the entire year. However, the greater portion of 
this allotment is spent for ten weeks of intensive, organized 
playground work during the summer months. Through 
the winter the committee spends such funds as are necessary 
to promote winter sports. 

Last June, when the playgrounds opened, the equipment 
on hand was very poor and entirely inadequate. New 
equipment has been purchased and a careful inventory of 
same made, so that, at the opening of the playgrounds in 
1929, such material will be ready for further use. 

Several of the playgrounds have received special physical 
attention. At the Rollins, East Concord, and Kimball 
playgrounds the tennis courts have been renovated. At 
the Penacook playground the baseball ground has been put 
in shape. A tract of land in the Plains district was taken 
over by the city for playground purposes. This past 
season the Harriet P. Dame School grounds were used, but 
eventually this new land will be made acceptable for a 
playground. 

As heretofore, there have been two directors at each 
playground. The successful innovation of a special di- 
rector of handcraft was instituted this season. For many 
reasons this handcraft work is advantageous. It gives the 
child instruction that increases his ability to use his hands. 
It gives him the satisfaction of accomplishing something, 
and also makes a happy break in the long hot days of play. 

While in some localities playgrounds are more popular 
than in others, the attendance was unusually large during 



PLAYGROUNDS 271 

1928. For the first time directors were required to secure 
the number attending morning and afternoon sessions. The 
total municipal attendance was 35,982, or an average daily- 
attendance of 750. White playground had an average at- 
tendance of 203 per day. 

Exhibitions of all work were held at each playground. 
Inter-playground baseball games were played. Volley ball 
was played by the girls. Two attractive lantern parades 
were held ; one in the city proper, and one in Penacook. 
More than 1,000 children attended the two all-playground 
outings at Contoocook River Park. 

The Playground Committee has had the co-operation of 
the Board of Education of Union School District. Such 
co-operation has made possible the use of school b»uildings 
and grounds. This Committee gratefully acknowledges the 
helpfulness of Mr. Louis J. Rundlett, Superintendent of 
Schools. Mr. Roland G. Hartwell, Principal of Morrill 
School, and his staff of teachers have very kindly assisted 
dn word construction and by printing circulars. Mayor 
Chase was, through his continued interest, a source of en- 
couragement to the Committee. Mr. Head, Superintendent 
of Streets, Mr. Lang, City Engineer, Chief Green, of the 
Fire Department, and Chief Kimball, of the Police Depart- 
ment, have always been ready to assist in every way possi- 
ble. 

The members of this Committee, in reviewing the year's 
work, are confident of the value of playgrounds. Aside 
from the child's enjoyment, his safety is paramount. In 
these days of congested traffic a child in an organized, di- 
rected playground is a safe child. 

With the opening of our new Athletic Feld, Concord 
will be outstanding in its facilities for child and adult 
recreation. 

For the future, this Committee sees one great need. Un- 
deniably, there should be a municipal swimming pool. Our 
rivers have been condemned as bathing places by the health 



272 CITY OF CONCORD 

authorities, therefore this Committee goes on record as 
favoring the building of a swimming pool, to be supervised 
and controlled by the city for the use of all its citizens. 

William W. Kennedy 
Clarence I. Tebbetts 
• Dr. C. J. Washburn 
Wm. H. McGirr 
James McGuire 
Waldo S. Roundy 
Mrs. Elisabeth R. Elkins 
Mrs. Cora Sullivan 
Mrs. Maude N. Blackwood 
• ' Committee on Playgrounds. 

William E. Coughlin 

Supervisor of Playgrounds. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Health submits the following reports of 
the Sanitary Officer and I\Iilk Inspector for the year ending 
December 31, 1928. 

Many meetings have been held during the year on mat- 
ters pertaining to the health of the City. One of the 
important subjects being the attempt to clean up the hog- 
gery at the State Hospital and thereby abate a nuisance of 
long standing. 

It is of interest to note that the city has been remarkably 
free from the usual number of contagious diseases and that 
many of them have been reported from the public institu- 
tions. 

The continued good work of the Milk Inspector is shown 
by the improvement of the milk production. 

Again we are called upon to record the death of our 
Chairman, Mayor Olin S. Chase. His interest and hearty 
co-operation were appreciated. 

ROBERT W. BROWN 
WALTER C. ROWE 
DONALD G. McIVOR 

Board of Health. 



REPORT OF THE SANITARY OFFICER 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen : Herewith is submitted my 36th annual 
report as Sanitary Officer of the City of Concord for the 
year ending December 31, 1928. 

The city maintained its usual sanitary condition during 
the year, and we were remarkably free from contagious 
diseases: the number of cases being considerably less than 
the preceding year. Many of the cases as well as deaths 
reported were of non-residents from the public institutions 
in the city. Of the 533 deaths reported 255 were non-resi- 
dents and not counted in the death rate. 

ComiDlaints have been investigated and action taken to 
abate nuisances. Through the co-operation of the produce 
merchants, the alleyways in the rear of the business blocks 
show' a decided improvement. 

Inspection of the barber shops and beaut}' parlors have 
been made and conditions were very good. In some in- 
stances suggestions were made, that the shops might better 
comply with the State Law. 

The shores of Penacook Lake and the reservoir have been 
noted from time to time and samples of drinking water 
taken from different parts of the city and analyzed at the 
State Laboratory with satisfactory results. All of the 
school buildings within the city limits have been visited and 
found to be in very good condition. Houses outside the 
sewer precinct as well as boarding houses for children have 
been investigated. Restaurants, bakeries and markets have 
been inspected and favorable reports given. 

The Venereal Clinic is held weekly under the auspices of 
the State and local Boards of Health and the Concord 
Chapter of the American Red Cross. At this clinic during 
the past year, the physician in charge. Dr. John M. Murray, 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 275 

has administered 342 treatments to individuals from this 
city and surrounding towns. This cares for people able to 
come to the clinic for treatment but we need some place 
where cases needing institutional care can receive the care 
necessary. 

The following tables show in detail the financial report, 
report of contagious diseases, causes of death, in wards and 
in public institutions, by sex, age, condition and nativity, 
also a summarv is given. 



276 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Financial Report of Sanitary Officer 



Appropriations 



Salary, Sanitary Officer 
Salary, Clerk 
Upkeep of automobile 
Fumigation supplies 
Contagious diseases 
Incidental expenses 



$2,000.00 
1,144.00 
400.00 
100.00 
500.00 
356.00 



$4,500.00 



Expenditures 






Salary, Sanitary Officer 




$2,000.00 




Salary, Clerk 




1,144.00 




Upkeep of automobile 




400.00 




Fumigation supplies 




18.17 




Contagious diseases 




198.78 




Incidental expenses 




260.52 








$4,021.47 


Balance 






478.53 



$4,500.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



277 



CONTAGIOUS DISEASES 

The following table shows the number of contagious 
diseases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 



Months 





















■2 g 




'jfj 




















rt 


Oj 


■s s 


^ 


3 
E-i 


rs 


Is 




< 


— 03 

■9 o 

5 = 


ID ^ 


h'--S 


C; CIS 
>- 



o a 



m 




J5 




J3 




m 




































ca 




c3 


<D 


O 


o 




O 


-^ 


o 


y 

















c3 






o 


^ 



January 




— 


_.. 




4 




..._ 




1 


— 


- 


1 




..- 


4 


- 




- 


February 




— 


1 


1 


^.. 


_.. 


.._ 




1 


— 


- 






- 


- 




- 


- 


March 


-_ 


— 






2 


1 


^.. 






-_ 


_ 


5 


_ 


— 


— 


- 


..... 


— 


April 




— 


— 


— 


4 


_.. 




— 






- 


6 


— 




— 


— 





- 


May 








1 


n 








9 






? 














June 




1 




1 


56 





_ 





2 








3 











_ 


_ 


Jnly 








1 


9 












•> 


? 






:i 








August 





_ 







2 


._ 


„ 






_ 









_ 




_ 








September 




— 








- 







~ 


— 


— 


3 


— 


- 


3 


— 


- 


-- 


October 


— 


— 




— 


__. 


— 


_.. 






— 


— 


2 


— 


— 


1 


2 


- 


,.._ 


November _ 




— 






— 






— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


— 


— 


1 


2 


— 


„ 


December 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 




- 


- 


3 






2 




- 


2 


1 


-- 


- 


Total — _ _ 


8 


1 


~ 


5 


90 


1 




- 


9 




2 


27 


-■ 


- 


14 


5 


- 


- 



278 



CITY OF CONCORD 



COIMPARATIVE TABLE 

The following table contains the number of cases of con- 
tagious diseases and the deaths resulting therefrom for the 
years since and including 1918 : 





















































1 






•x,S 


'3 


^ 



X 





















ci 


q 


U 



P o 



73 




m 




w 


















2 














« 


U 


Q 


U 


Q 



1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 



„ 


206 


_ 


128 


— 


879 




107 


— 


174 




512 


— 


611 


— 


130 


_, 


315 


.._ 


708 




108 



health department 279 

Causes of Death 

No. of 

1 — Epidemic, Endemic and Infectious Diseases. Deaths 

7 Measles 1 

10 Diphtheria 1 

11 Influenza 5 

21 Erj^sipelas 1 

22 Acute poliomyelitis 1 
31 Tuberculosis of the respiratory system 31 
34 Tuberculosis of the vertebral column 1 
38 Syphilis - 1 
41 Purulent infection, septicemia 2 

2 — General Diseases not Included in Above. 

43 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

buccal cavity 1 

44 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

stomach and liver 9 

45 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

peritoneum, intestines and rectum 11 

46 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

female genital organs 6 

47 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

breast 4 

48 Cancer and other malignant tumors of the 

skin 1 

49 Cancer and other malignant tumors of other 

or unspecified organs 9 

52 Chronic rheumatism, osteoarthritis, gout 1 

54 Pellagra 1 

57 Diabetes Mellitus 5 

58 Anemia, Chlorosis 

(a) Pernicious anemia 4 

65 Leukemia and Hodgkins disease 1 

69 Other general diseases 1 
3 — Diseases of the Nervous System and of the 

Organs of Special Sense. 



280 CITY OF CONCORD 

71 Meningitis (does not include meningitis 

specified as meningococci, tiibercolosis, 
rheumatism, etc. ) 

(a) Simple meningitis 2 

72 Tabes dorsalis (locomotor ataxia) 1 

73 Other diseases of the spinal cord 2 

74 Cerebral hemorrhage, Apoplexy. 

(a) Cerebral hemorrhage 58 

(b) Apoplexy 4 

75 Paralysis without specified cause. 

(a) Hemiplegia 1 

(b) Others under this title 1 

76 General paralysis of the Insane 20 

77 Other forms of mental alienation 3 

78 Epilepsy 1 
80 Infantile convulsions (under 5 years) 1 
84 Other diseases of the nervous system 3 

86 Diseases of the Ear and of the mastoid process. 

(a) diseases of the ear 2 

(b) diseases of the mastoid process 1 
4 — Diseases of the Circulatory System. 

87 Pericarditis 1 

88 Endocarditis and myocarditis (acute) 5 

89 Angina pectoris 11 

90 Other diseases of the heart 125 

91 Other diseases of the arteries 

(b) Arteriosclerosis 19 

92 Embolism and thrombosis (not cerebral) 3 
5 — Diseases of the Respiratory Sj^stem. 

99 Bronchitis 5 

100 Bronchopneumonia (including capillary 

bronchitis) 

(a) Bronchopneumonia 27 

101 Pneumonia 

(a) Lobar 16 

(b) Not otherwise defined 3 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 281 

102 Pleurisy 2 

103 Congestion and hemorrhagic infarct of the 

lung 3 

107 Other diseases of the respiratory sj'stem 
(T. B. excepted) 

(a) Chronic interstitial pneumonia in- 
cluding occupational diseases of 
the lungs 1 

6 — Diseases of the Digestive System. 

109 Diseases of the pharynx and tonsils (including 
adenoid vegetation) 

(b) Others under this title 1 

111 Ulcer of the stomach and duodenum 

(a) ulcer of the stomach 1 

112 Other diseases of the stomach (cancer 

excepted) 2 

113 Diarrhea and enteritis (under 2 years of age) 1 

114 Diarrhea and enteritis (2 years and over) 2 

117 Appendicitis and typhlitis 2 

118 Hernia, intestinal obstruction 

(b) intestinal obstruction 3 

119 Other diseases of the intestines 1 

122 Cirrhosis of the liver 

(b) not specified as alcoholic 1 

123 Biliary calculi 1 

124 Other diseases of the liver 4 

125 Diseases of the pancreas 1 

126 Peretonitis without specified cause 1 

7 — Non-venereal Diseases of the Genitourinary System 
and Annexa. 

128 Acute nephritis (including unspecified 

under 10 years) 1 

129 Chronic nephritis (including unspecified 

10 years and over) 23 



282 CITY OF CONCORD 

131 Other diseases of the Kidneys and annexa 
(diseases of the kidneys in jiregnancy 
excepted ) 2 

135 Diseases of the Prostate 3 

138 Salpingitis and pelvic abscess 1 

139 Benign tumors of the uterus 1 
8— The Puerperal State. 

143 Accidents of pregnancy 4 

144 Puerperal hemorrhage 1 

145 Other accidents of labor 

(c) others under this title 1 

146 Puerperal septicemia 2 
9 — Diseases of the Skin and of the Cellular Tissue. 

151 Gangrene 1 

154 Other diseases of the skin and annexa 1 
10 — Diseases of the Bones and of the Organs of 

Locomotion. 

155 Diseases of the bones 1 
11 — Malformations. 

159 Congenital malformations (stillbirths not 

included) 

(a) Hydrocephalus 2 

(b) Others under this title 5 
12 — Early Infancy. 

160 Congenital debility, icterus and sclerema 4 

161 Premature birth, injury at birth 

(a) premature birth 13 

(b) injury at birth 2 

162 Other diseases peculiar to early infancy 3 
13— Old Age, 

164 Senility 2 
14 — External Causes. 

167 Suicide by poisonous gas 2 

168 Suicide by hanging or strangulation 3 
182 Accidental drowning 3 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 283 

183 Accidental traumatism by firearms 

(wounds of war excepted) 2 

185 Accidental traumatism by fall 2 
168 Accidental traumatism by other crushing 
(vehicles, landslides, railways, etc.) 

(c) Automobile accidents 2 

202 Other external violence (cause specified) 3 
15 — Ill-Defined Diseases. 

205 Cause of death not specified or ill-defined 3 

Deaths Reported by Wards and Public Institutions 

Ward 1 27 

Ward 2 . 4 

Ward 3 19 

Ward 4 46 

Ward 5 24 

Ward 6 32 

Ward 7 31 

Ward 8 22 

Ward 9 16 

New Hampshire State Hospital 181 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 77 

New Hampshire ]\Iemorial Hospital 36 

New Hampshire Odd Fellows' Home 3 

New Hampshire Centennial Home for the Aged 9 

Christian Science Home 4 

New Hampshire State Prison 1 

Unknown 1 

Deaths Eeported by Age 

Under 1 year 41 

From 1 year to 5 years 6 

From 5 to 10 years 2 



284 CITY OF CONCORD 

From 10 to 15 years 4 

From 15 to 20 years 6 

From 20 to 30 years ' 14 

From 30 to 40 years 29 

From 40 to 50 years 47 

From 50 to 60 years 84 

From 60 to 70 years 87 

From 70 to 80 years 121 

From 80 to 90 years 71 

From 90 to 100 years 16 
Not stated 



Total number of deaths 533 

Total number of stillbirths not included in deaths 20 

Deaths During 1928 by Sex, Condition and Nativity 

Sex: 

Males 288 

Females 245 
Condition : 

Married 203 

Single 155 

Widowed 154 

Divorced 10 

Not stated 11 
Nativity : 

Concord 106 

New Hampshire 178 

Other states 117 

Foreign 114 

Not stated . 18 

Total number of deaths for the year 1928, 533, compared 
with 474 in 1927. 

Average death-rate for the year 1928, 12. per cent, com- 
pared with 12.6 in 1927. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 285 



Summary 

Visits made to contagious diseases 173 

Burial permits issued 664 
Burial permits issued for interment of bodies 

brought here 111 

Transit permits issued 250 

Number of reports sent to State Board of Health 52 
Number of reports sent to the Surgeon-General, 

Public Health and Marine Hospital Service 52 
Number of samples of water collected for analysis 5 
Number of nuisances, complaints investigated 115 
Number of rooms, cellars, school rooms fumigated 56 
Number of bundles of clothing fumigated 2 
Number of Hospital Wards fumigated 4 
Number of barber shops, beauty parlors inspected 25 
Number of restaurants and bakeries inspected 15 
Number of school buildings inspected 19 
Number of boarding houses for children inspected 5 
In closing I wish to express my appreciation for the help 
and co-operation given me by Mayor Brown and the mem- 
bers of the Board of Health. I also wish to thank the 
City Officials for the many courtesies extended to me. 



Respectfully submitted, 



CHARLES E. PALMER, 

Sanitary Officer. 



REPORT OF MILK INSPECTOR 



To the Board of Health: 

Gentlemen: Herewith is submitted for your approval 
>& summary of the report of the work done by the IMilk 
Inspection Division of the Board of Health in the Field and 
Laboratory during the year ended December 31, 1928. 

The work of the milk inspection division has been car- 
ried on in much the same manner as for the past two years, 
by diligently expounding to the producer and dealer in 
milk the proper manner and method for producing and 
handling a cleaner and better milk supply. Visits were 
made, letters written, samples taken, analyses made, and in 
fact every effort has been made to keep the milk supply of 
Concord wholesome and clean. Sanitary conditions on the 
farms, in the stores and eating places continue to improve 
steadily in consequence of inspection. Altogether, progress 
in the work has been very definite and quite satisfactory. 

The bottled milk law effective since June 1, 1928, requir- 
ing that all milk served to patrons for beverage use shall 
be in the original bottle as delivered to the dispenser by the 
dairy or bottling plant was readily accepted by owners of 
eating places. A number of such places tripled their out- 
put of drinking milk because of the original capped idea, 
thus showing it is appreciated by the milk consuming pub- 
lic. Of the samples of milk collected from restaurants and 
drug stores the year previous, thirty per cent were below 
the required standard in butterfat, and ninety per cent of 
them were found in excess of the bacteria standard. This 
year not any of the milk samples collected from eating 
places were found below in butterfat and only one per cent 
had an excess of bacteria. 

Owing to the confusion and loss of milk bottles among 
milk distributors, it was decided to establish a local bottle 
exchange. It was also petitioned by the Milk Dealer's 



MILK INSPECTOR 287 

Association to have the milk inspector to take charge of the 
enforcement of the milk bottle regulation which became 
effective in May, 1928. During the past eight months 
12,475 bottles were collected, sorted and distributed to 
their proper owners. If the house-wife would carefully 
see that each milk bottle received is returned to the dis- 
tributor from whom she received the milk, there would be 
very little need of a bottle exchange in this city. 

Sixty-four different samples of milk were taken from an 
equal number of cows. Of these 64 samples, not one 
showed hemolytic streptococci of the beta type. Strepto- 
coccus epidemicus as sometimes found in milk and which 
is of human origin, is always to be feared, for it at times 
produces terrifying epidemics of septic sore throat. It is 
invariably associated with raw milk when found present 
at all in milk. The process of pasteurization destroys these 
organisms. 

There are at the present time 371 producers selling milk 
to the Concord market, from a total of 2,203 cows. The 
total number of quarts of fluid milk received in Concord 
last year w^as 17,640 daily. Of the total amount of milk 
received about 3 per cent comes from cows not tuberculin 
tested. Such milk is pasteurized. 

There are 107 producers in the City of Concord who have 
from 1 to 2 cows. A large percentage of these producers 
no doubt sell to nearby neighbors. For the most part it is 
the one, two or three cow producer who feels he cannot 
afford to whitewash his cow-stable and fix up as required 
by ordinance. 

Total number of producers who are house-to-house dis- 
tributors, 46. Total number of distributors not producers, 
9. Number of distributors who went out of business dur- 
ing the year, 5. 

The amount of raw milk entering Concord from outside 
of New Hampshire and consumed in the raw state amounted 
to 23,000 quarts. The amount of fluid milk shipped out- 



288 CITY OF CONCORD 

side of the city during the past year amounted approxi- 
mately to 67,840 quarts. The quantity of milk pasteurized 
in Concord based on the total out-put was 24.54 per cent, 
which shows an increase in the use of pasteurized milk over 
last year bj' 6.54 per cent. 

There are nine local producers who sell raw cream only. 
The total amount of 40 per cent raw cream sold per day 
amounts to 40 quarts. The total amount of 40 per cent 
cream pasteurized sold daih^ is 376 quarts or 90.39 per 
cent. 

Total number of milk, cream and ice cream samples col- 
lected and analj^zed during the past year was 1,004. 

The writer wishes to express his appreciation for the 
help and co-operation extended to him by members of the 
health department. 

Appended hereto are tabulations showing the work done 
by this division during the fiscal year. 

Total number of inspections made 942 

Number Dairy Farms and Milk Plants inspected 188 

Number Dairy Farms and Milk Plants reinspected 387 

Number Grocery Stores and Market Places inspected 75 

Number Grocery Stores and Market Places reinspected 100 

Number Soda Fountains and Eating places inspected 48 
Number Soda Fountains and Eating Places reinspected 154 

Number Ice Cream Factories inspected 4 

Number inspections made of milk trucks 187 

Number complaints investigated 4 

Number prosecutions 2 

Number milk cans inspected 247 

Number milk cans condemned 32 
Number milk cans and bottles cleared through milk 

bottle exchange 12,475 

Number written notices and letters sent out 673 

Number milk samples collected (regular and special) 975 

Number cream samples collected 14 



MILK INSPECTOR 289 

Number ice cream samples collected 40 

Number milk samples plated for total bacteria above 

standard 532 

Number milk samples plated for total bacteria below 

standard 61 

Number milk samples plated for B. Coli, above 

standard 431 

Number milk samples plated for B. Coli below 

standard 119 

Number milk samples above butterfat standard 437 

Number milk samples below butterfat standard 3 

Number milk samples run for total solids 408 

Number milk samples below standard for total solids 26 
Number milk samples run for temperature 130 

Number sediment tests run for dirty milk 424 

Number cream samples plated for total bacteria 

above standard 10 

Number cream samples plated for total bacteria 

below standard none 

Number cream samples plated for B. Coli. above 

standard 4 

Number cream samples plated for B. Coli. below 

standard 1 

Number cream samples run for butterfat above 

standard 7 

Number cream samples run for butterfat below 

standard none 

Number ice cream samples plated for total bacteria 

above standard 33 

Number ice cream samples plated for total bacteria 

below standard 7 

Number ice cream samples plated for B. Coli. 

above standard 22 

Number ice cream samples plated for B. Coli. 

below standard -18 



290 CITY OF CONCORD 

Number bacteriological determinations made on 

clean milk bottles 83 

Number bacteriological determinations made on 

clean milk cans 48 



Financial Report of Milk Inspector 
App7'opriations 



Salary, Milk Inspector 
Up-keep of automobile 
Laboratory and supplies 


$1,800.00 
400.00 
500.00 


$2,700.00 


Expenditures 

Salary, Milk Inspector 
Up-keep of automobile 
Laboratory and supplies 


$1,800.00 
400.00 
385.09 


Balance 


$2,585.09 
114.91 


$2,700.00 
$343.00 


Received from milk license fees 





Respectfully submitted. 



AUSTIN B. PRESBY, 

Inspecior of Milk. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF THE MUNICIPAL COURT 



Receipts 

Eeceived for fines, costs and snndry fees $11,239.44 

Expenditures 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses and com- 
plaints and warrants $2,089.06 
State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of 

Motor Vehicles 4,202.90 

Probation Officer, services and expenses 120.00 

Treasurer of Merrimack County 675.00 

Counsel in juvenile cases 110.00 

Postage, printing and other supplies 19.00 

Automobile hire, paid from costs 265.00 

Special Justices 384.00 
State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of 

Fish and Game 213.80 

Clerk's bond 3.00 

Concord Society— S.P.C.A. fines 20.00 

Balance paid City Treasurer 3,137.68 



Respectfully submitted. 



$11,239.44 



JOHN W. STANLEY, 

Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE PARK COMMISSIONERS 

To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The parks of the city have been kept up to the usual 
routine work. At Rollins Park the Lombardy poplars on 
the north side have been removed. They were in bad con- 
dition, ragged and beyond all hope of being reconstructed. 
One section of the new chain-link fence was built on the 
northern boundary and the park line was thus established 
against encroaches by abuttors. This fence is to be con- 
tinued until the boundary is carried along the entire width 
of the park. The lagoon has been connected with the sewer 
on Broadway. This will allow the stagnant water to be 
run off at intervals, to be replaced by water from the city 
mains. Several Carolina hemlocks have been planted on 
the green. The work of clearing out the undergrowth has 
been continued. 

The West Garden has been enclosed with a five-foot 
chain-link fence and the shelter in the rear has been re- 
painted and repaired. The fountain has been supplied 
with the figure of an alligator and boy — the gift of the 
Garden Club of Concord. 

At White Park many new white pine trees have been set 
out, to fill vacancies along the terrace. The Canadian wdld 
geese have increased in numbers, and these with the swans 
and ducks have proved to be a great attraction to visitors. 
A section of iron fence was carried along on White Street. 

The intersection of Center and Washington Streets was 
cleared of an obstructing residence and the land was turned 
over to the Park property. This should be properly en- 
closed and planted, thus beautifying the approach to the 
Center Street entrance of White Park. 

OLIN H. CHASE, Mayor 
WILLIS D. THOMPSON, Jr. 
CHARLES L. JACKMAN 
BENJAMIN C. WHITE 
ALPHEUS M. JOHNSON 
WILL J. DREW 
GARDNER G. EMMONS 

Park Commissioners. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 



To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration the 
following facts and figures showing the valuation of the 
City and its school districts and special precinct, with the 
amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the tax 
collector for collection. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised b}^ 
direct taxation for the years from 1918 to the present time, 
which shows the increased amount spent by the city. 



Tabulations of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 
Valuation of City and Precincts, with Rate for 
Each in 1928. 



Warrant 


Amounts of 
Warrants 


Tax rate 
per $1,000 


Assessed 
va'uation of 
city and 
precincts 


State - .._ - 


$95,163.40 1 
53,970.75 J 
345.050.00 

394,699.53 

34,675.73 

2,537.50 


$4.66 
10.80 

13.40 

10.40 
.10 




County 

City Budget 

Schools: — 


$32,012,175.00 
32.012,175.00 

29 488 042 00 


Ward 1 -.. __. 


2.524,133.00 
967,070.08 


Penacook and Boscawen 
Union School 

City Sewer - 


3,491,203.08 
24,495,342.00 



294 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Number of Shares of Railroad Stock Held Here on 
Which the Tax was Assessed and Collected by 
State of New Hampshire and Credited to the City. 



Railroad 


1925 


1926 


1927 


1928 


Boston & Maine ._ — 


191 


108 


123 


103 


Concord & Montreal ..,_ 


5,324 


4,025 


3.810 


3,539 


Concord & Portsmouth 


64 


34 


23 


23 


Fitchburg _.. 


62 


42 


37 


37 


Manchester & Lawrence _ 


115 


88 


105 


105 


New Boston — _ 


64 


64 


58 


30 




1,382 


1 377 


1,245 
1 


1,237 
1 


Nashua & Lowell 





6 


Peterborough 


8 


8 








Pemigewasset Valley _ 


160 


175 


175 


175 


Suncook Valley _.. 


46 


46 


44 


44 


Wilton 


13 


13 


13 


15 


Connecticut River — - 





5 








Nashua Street Railway _ 


567 


588 


467 


98 


Boston & Lowell _ 





141 


157 


157 


Prior Pref. B. & M 






315 


439 








13 


13 


Portland & Ogdensburg 








10 




7,996 


6,718 


6,586 


6,026 



assessors' report 



295 





No. 


Valuations 


Improved and unimproved land and 






buildings 




$28,372,087.00 


Camps on leased land 




3,830.00 


Horses 


488 


52,445.00 


Asses and IMules 


4 


350.00 


Oxen 


2 


225.00 


Cows 


1,144 


81,569.00 


Neat 


148 


6,655.00 


Sheep 


53 


530.00 


Hogs 


83 


1,940.00 


Fowls 




11,190.00 


Fur-bearing animals 


12 


2,400.00 


Vehicles 




8,450.00 


Portable Mills 




2,225.00 


Boats and Launches 




3.500.00 


"Wood and Lumber 




6,630.00 


Gas Tanks and Pumps 




31,950.00 


Stock in Trade 




3,015,663.00 


Machinery 




410,536.00 



Total $32,012,175.00 

Polls, 12,630 $25,260.00 

Amount of taxes committed to tax collector $950,336.03 
Average rate of taxation for all purposes 2.87 + 



296 city of concord 

Assessors' Report 

Polls, Valuation, and Taxes Assessed 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and on 
the real and personal estate of Concord since 1918 : 

Year Polls Valuation Tax 

1918 5,485 $20,440,315 $447,484.47 

1919 5,662 20,370,605 578,633.66 

1920 6,071 20,501,778 647,009.63 

1921 12,540 21,341,061 664,864.83 

1922 13,011 23,710,108 645,035.10 

1923 12,862 24,553,173 715,511.93 

1924 12,004 27,173,636 871,458.09 

1925 12,213 28,465,631 781,289.87 

1926 12,043 30,242,550 875,330.07 

1927 12,477 31,191,494 945,886.49 

1928 12,630 32,012,175 950,336.03 



List of Polls,. Valuations, and Tax Assessed in 
1927 AND 1928 



Polls 


Valuation 


Total tax assessed 


1927 1928 


1927 1928 


1927 1928 


12,477 12,630 


$31,191,494 $32,012,175 


$945,886.49 $950,336.03 



Total warrants submitted to tax collector : 

In 1927— Resident tax list $914,629.98 

Non-resident tax list 1,025.64 

Polls 24,954.00 

Bank stock 5,276.87 

Total $945,886.49 



assessor's report 297 

In 1928— Resident tax list $919,006.28 

Non-resident tax list 783.88 

Polls 25,260.00 

Bank stock 5,285.87 



Total $950,336.03 

Respectfully submitted, 

JOSEPH E. SHEPARD 
JAMES H. MORRIS 
MICHAEL J. LEE 



REPORT OF TAX COLLECTOR 

To the Board of Aid er men: 

The undersigned hereby submits the report of the Col- 
lector of Taxes to the close of business, December 31,1928. 

Tax Levy for 1921 

Resident list $602,280.14 

Poll Tax lists 61,520.00 

Non-Resident list 1,064.69 



$664,864.83 
Additions and Corrections 9,520.78 

Interest 2,620.14 

Costs 4.20 



-$677,009.95 



Cash paid Treasurer $653,929.93 

Discount 6,888.85 

Abatements 15,794.24 

Uncollected 396.93 



-$677,009.95 



Tax Levy for 1922 

Resident list $580,540.26 

Poll Tax lists 63,759.00 

Non-Resident list 735.84 



$645,035.10 
Additions and Corrections 3,096.93 

Interest 2,656.44 

Costs 27.40 



-$650,815.87 



Cash paid treasurer $623,942.11 

Discount 6,856.85 

Abatements 18,385.23 

Uncollected 1,631.68 



-$650,815.87 



TAX collector's REPORT 299 

Tax Levy for 1923 

Kesident list $651,696.46 

Poll Tax lists 62,987.00 

Non-Resideiit list 828.47 

Bank Stock 3,709.07 



$719,221.00 
Additions and Corrections 3,254.54 

Interest 2,357.33 

Costs 46.60 



-$724,879.47 



Cash paid Treasurer $687,971.78 

Discount 6,877.47 

Abatements 27,767.02 

Uncollected 2,263.20 



-$724,879.47 



Tax Levy for 1924 

Resident list $810,651.04 

Poll Tax lists 59,888.00 

Non-Resident list 919.05 

Bank Stock 3,304.29 



$874,762.38 
Additions and Corrections 1,929.35 

Interest 3,342.20 

Costs 368.99 



-$880,402.92 



Cash paid Treasurer $850,304.82 

Discount 10,225.55 

Abatements 16,310.16 

Uncollected 3,562.39 



-$880,402.92 



300 city of concord 

Tax Levy for 1925 

Resident list $740,548.77 

Poll Tax lists 36,639.00 

Non-Resident list 886.29 

Bank Stock 3,215.81 



$781,289.87 
Additions and Corrections 3,587.12 

Interest 2,865.76 

Costs 891.09 



-$788,633.84 



Cash paid Treasurer $769,313.27 

Discount 8,664.16 

Abatements 7,789.87 

Uncollected 2,866.54 



-$788,633.84 



Tax Levy for 1926 

Resident list $845,055.15 

Poll Tax lists 24,086.00 

Non-Resident list 901.05 

Bank Stock 5,287.87 



$875,330.07 
Additions and Corrections 3,086.64 

Interest 3,168.88 

Costs 845.25 



-$882,430.84 



Cash paid Treasurer $871,255.44 

Abatements 7,801.00 

Uncollected 3,374.40 



-$882,430.84 



TAX collector's REPORT 301 



Tax Levy for 1927 



Resident list $914,629.98 

Poll Tax lists 24,954.00 

Non-Resident list 1,025.64 

Bank Stock 5,276.87 



$945,886.49 
Additions and Corrections 1,721.55 

Interest 3,805.07 

Costs 925.90 



-$952,339.01 



Cash paid Treasurer $940,725.35 

Abatements 6,339.65 

Uncollected 5,274.01 



-$952,339.01 



Tax Levy for 1928 

Resident list $919,006.28 

Poll Tax lists 25,260.00 

Non-Resident list 783.88 

Bank Stock 5,285.87 



$950,336.03 
Additions and Corrections 1,849.66 

Interest 160.47 

Costs 455.00 



-$952,801.16 



Cash paid Treasurer $832,340.30 

Abatements 4,609.47 

Cash on hand 319.00 

Uncollected 115,532.39 



-$952,801.16 



302 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Taxes sold to the City of Concord et als in the office of 
the Collector for redemption. 



1920 



Resident list $2,416.54 

Non-Resident list 5.05 

Interest 357.23 

Fees 1.00 



$2,779.82 



Paid Treasurer $2,732.88 
Deeded 15.38 

Paid Reg. of Deeds .50 

Unredeemed 31.06 



$2,779.82 



Resident list 
Interest 



1921 



$1,986.26 
111.83 

$2,098.09 



Paid Treasurer 
Deeded 



$2,091.57 
6.52 

$2,098.09 



1922 



Resident list 


$819.45 


Non-Resident list 


7.96 


Interest 


28.22 


Expense 


3.10 


Fees 


1.00 



559.73 



Paid Treasurer $787.88 
Deeded 29.92 

Paid Reg. of Deeds .50 

Unredeemed 41.43 



$859.73 



Resident 


list 




$1,831.47 


Non-Resident 


list 


25.42 


Interest 






224.76 


Expense 






5.04 


Fees 






4.00 



1923 

Paid Treasurer $2,007.21 
Deeded (last report) 25.42 
Deeded 1928 5.57 

Paid Reg. of Deeds 2.00 
Unredeemed 50.49 



$2,090.69 



$2,090.69 



TAX collector's REPORT 



303 



1924 



Resident list 


$3,663.55 


Paid Treasurer 


$3,543.60 


Non-Resident list 


7.32 


(last report) 




Interest 


272.76 


Paid Treasurer : 


1928 5.96 


(last report) 




Paid Reg. of Deeds 8.25 


Interest 1928 


1.37 


(last report) 




Expense 


14.85 


Paid Reg. of Deeds .50 


Fees (last report) 


17.00 


1928 




Fees 1928 


.50 


Unredeemed 


419.04 




$3,977.35 


$3,977.35 




192£ 


i 




Resident list 


$1,638.91 


Paid Treasurer 


$1,389.62 


Non-Resident list 


15.69 


(last report) 




Interest 


49.63 


Paid Treasurer 


156.30 


(last report) 




1928 




Interest 1928 


28.83 


Paid Reg. of Deeds 7.50 


Expense 


14.15 


(last report) 




Fees (last report) 


15.00 


Paid Reg. of Deeds .25 


Fees 1928 


1.50 


1928 








Held in reserve 


.50 






Unredeemed 


209.54 




$1,763.71 


$] ,763.71 




1926 




Resident list 


$4,368.17 


Paid Treasurer 


$2,150.39 


Interest 


15.33 


(last report) 




(last report) 




Paid Treasurer 


1,297.99 


Interest 1928 


127.98 


1928 




Expense 


1.40 


Paid Reg. of Deeds 5.50 


(last report) 




(last report) 




Expense 1928 


7.00 


Paid Reg. of Deeds 4.75 


Fees (last report) 11.50 


1928 




Fees 1928 


9.50 


Unredeemed 


1,082.25 



$4,540.88 



$4,540.88 



304 



CITY OF CONCORD 



1927 



Resident list 

Interest 

Expense 

Fees 



$10,749.56 

27.60 

5.39 

24.00 

$10,806.55 



Paid Treasurer $3,400.20 
Paid Reg. of Deeds 12.00 
Unredeemed 7,394.35 



$10,806.55 





Reimhw 


'sements 




1923 Taxes paid 




Paid Treasurer 


$10.00 


by City 


$10.00 






1925 Taxes paid 




Paid Treasurer 


$19.69 


by City 


$15.95 






Interest 


3.74 








$19.69 


$19.69 


1926 Taxes paid 




Paid Treasurer 


$132.81 


by City 


$120.89 






Interest 


11.92 








$132.81 


$132.81 


1927 Taxes paid 




Paid Treasurer 


$126.12 


by City 


$116.62 






Interest 


9.50 







$126.12 



$126.12 



Respectfully submitted. 



AMOS B. MORRISON, 

Collector. 



January 19, 1929. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF 
TRUST FUNDS 



HARRY H. DUDLEY ] 
BURNS P. HODGMAN 
CARL H. FOSTER 



Trustees 



Receipts 

1928 

Jan. 1 To balance from 1927 

Dec. 31 Income J. B. & 0. B. Abbott trust 
Harper Allen trust 
Wm. E. Chandler trust 
Wm. ]\I. Chase trust 
H. H. Corson trust 
Calvin P. Couch trust 
Jacob C. Dunklee trust 
Samuel C. Eastman trust 
Samuel C. Eastman trust 
Seth Eastman trust 
Sarah E. Farrand trust 
George G. Fogg trust 
Leverett N. Freeman trust 
Jacob H, Gallinger trust 
Heber B. Hardy trust 
Mary D. Hart trust 
Eliza Lane trust 
George S. Little trust 
J. W. & E. J. Little trust 
Lydia F. Lund trust 
Myra F. Morey trust 
Charles W. Morse trust 
Lucy M. Roach trust 
Chas. E. Scorer trust 
Antonio J. Sousa trust 



5,677.83 
5.00 
2.13 

12.75 

12.75 
1.66 
2.78 
8.50 

35.00 
7.00 
5.00 
8.50 

26.64 
4.25 
8.50 
4.25 

12.00 
4.25 
4.25 
6.00 

12.75 
4.25 
4.25 
2.13 
4.25 
2.13 



306 CITY OF CONCORD 



Hiram B. Tibbetts trust 


13.20 


Frank Watson trust 


2.12 


Henry Burleigh trust 


7.65 


Liva C. Heath trust 


5.74 


Isaac Heath trust 


3.50 


Seth K. Jones trust 


12.00 


Charlotte Merrill trust 


30.00 


J. Eastman Pecker trust 


12.00 


Wm. M. Chase trust 


42.50 


P. B. Cogswell trust 


89.16 


Samuel Eastman trust 


128.40 


Samuel Eastman trust 


1,673.43 


Joseph Hazeltine trust 


150.41 


Benjamin A. Kimball trust 


6,500.00 


Henry A. Kimball trust 


750.00 


Seth K. Jones trust 


25.53 


G. Parker Lyon trust 


40.00 


Franklin Pierce trust 


42.50 


Thomas G. Valpey trust 


20.00 


David Osgood trust 


25.00 


Abial Walker trust 


45.00 


Countess of Rumford trust 


85.00 


K. P. & D. Rollins trust 


67.99 


Interest, note City of Concord 




$28,986.91 @ 4% 


1,159.44 


Interest, note City of Concord 




$5,797.38 @ 4% 


212.55 


Interest, Trust funds, Merrimack 




County Savings Bank 


713.29 


Interest, Trust funds, Merrimack 




County Savings Bank (note) 


260.86 


Interest, Trust funds, Union 




Trust Company 


635.40 


Interest, Trust funds, Union 




Trust Company 


244.33 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 



307 



Interest, Trust funds, New Hampshire 

Savings Bank 
Interest, Trust funds, New Hampshire 

Savings Bank (note) 
Interest, Trust funds. Loan & Trust 

Savings Bank 
Interest, Trust funds, Loan & Trust 

Savings Bank (note) 
Interest, Unexpended balance, 

cemetery trust funds 



707.30 
282.61 
1,038.13 
266 80 
286.23 
$22,456.87 



1928 
Dec. 31 



Expenditures 

Mary E. Bourne, account labor, trust 

lot. Calvary Cemetery $ 3.00 

Rev. A. A. Sylvestre, account David 

Osgood trust 25.00 

Caroline Stewart, Treasurer, income 

Countess of Rumford trust 85.00 

Msgr. J. S. Buckley, account of labor, 

trust lots. Calvary Cemetery 226.50 

H. H. Dudley, Treasurer, account 

Minot Enclosure 120.00 

City Treasurer, account of income 

sundry trust funds to reimburse 

city for money advanced for care 

of lots in Blossom Hill Cemetery 3,275.75 

City Treasurer, account of income 

sundry trust funds to reimburse 

city for monej^ advanced for care 

of lots in Old North Cemetery 424.00 



308 CITY OF CONCORD 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Maple Grove Cemetery 193.50 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Pine Grove Cemetery 218.00 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Old Fort Cemetery 13.00 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Millville Cemetery 106.00 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Soucook Cemetery 10.00 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Woodlawn Cemetery 561.50 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Horse Hill Cemetery 8.25 

City Treasurer, income 

Thomas G. Valpey trust 20.00 

City Treasurer, income 

Wm. M. Chase trust 42.50 

City Treasurer, income 

P. B. Cogswell trust 89.16 

City Treasurer, income 

Samuel C. Eastman trust 128.40 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 309 

City Treasurer, income 

Samuel C. Eastman trust 1,673.43 

City Treasurer, income 

Joseph Hazeltine trust 150.41 

City Treasurer, income 

Benjamin A. Kimball trust 6,500.00 

City Treasurer, income 

Henry A. Kimball trust 750.00 

City Treasurer, income 

Seth K. Jones trust 25.53 

City Treasurer, income 

G. Parker Lyon trust 40.00 

City Treasurer, income 

Franklin Pierce trust 42.50 

City Treasurer, income 

Abial Walker trust 45.00 

City Treasurer, income 

K. P. & D. Rollins trust 67.99 

By balance 7,612.45 

$22,456.87 



TRUST FUNDS 



ISAAC L. HEATH, FLOWER TRUST 

Income to be expended for flowers on Lot No. 67 Block V, Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. 



Capital, 

Income received, 1928 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 
Income on hand, January 1, 1929 



$4.33 



3.50 

.83 



$100.00 



4.33 



4.33 



Capital and income deposited in Union Trust Co. 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT TRUST 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. The 
entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new monument 
on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1928 846.46 

From Seth K. Jones trust 6.00 

Income received, 1928 37.91 



Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 



890.37 
890.37 



CHARLOTTE MERRILL CEMETERY TRUST 
Income to be used in perpetuity in keeping burial lot and monument in Blossom 
Hill Cemetery in good condition, namely: In keeping the soil properly enriched, 
the grass closely cut and watered, the monument and all other stone work thereon 
clean, and replacing said monument by a new one when necessary by reason of 
decay or defacement. The balance of the income, if any, is to be appropriated 
for the purpose of beautifying said cemetery. 



Capital 

Balance, income January 1, 1928 

Income received, 1928 

Paid Carl M. Foster, city treasurer 
Income on hand, January 1, 1929 



71.66 
48.19 



30.00 

89.85 



1,000.00 



119.85 



119.85 



Capital and income deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank. 



TRUST FUNDS 311 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST 
Donated to the city by Ahbie P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by 
the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of the 
burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of the duly appointed 
officials. 

Capital 3,000.00 

Income received, 1928 120.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer 120.00 

Deposited (at 4%) with City of Concord, in general ac- 
count. 



JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER CEMETERY TRUST 
Income to be used as follows : So much of income as is necessary to be used for 
the care of burial lots numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove Cemetery, 
East Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be added to principal 
till same amounts to $10,000, then the balance of income accruing each year after 
paying for care of said lot and monument, to be expended under the direction of 
the ma>-or for the general care and improvement of Pine Grove Cemetery, East 
Concord. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 7,540.95 

Income received, 1928 839.56 



Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 12.00 

Capital, January 1, 1929 7,868.51 



7,880.51 



7,880.51 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 3,307.11 

Deposited in Loan & Tru.st Savings Bank 2,068.94 

Deposited in New Hamp.sliire Savings Bank 2,492.46 



WILLIAM M. CHASE, PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 
Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the purchase 
of books on historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational subjects. 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1928 42.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 42.50 

Invested in Fourth U. S. Libertv Loan 4% % bond. 



312 CITT OF CONCORD 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Bequest of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase of 
books of a biographical, historical and scientific character, and the books relating 
to science shall be those that give the latest developments and discoveries by 
scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital 2,145.00 

Income received, 1928 89.16 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 89.16 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 145.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 1,500.00 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign languages for the Public 
Library. ^ 

Capital 1,332.46 

Income received, 1928 128.40 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 128.40 

Invested in thirty-two shares United Gas & 

Improvement Company common stock 1,321.50 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 10.96 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 
Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library. 

Capital 31,206.45 

Income received, 1928 1,673.43 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 1,673.43 

Invested in $5,700 First Liberty Loan Bonds 4,914.20 

Invested in $13,500 Fourth Liberty Loan Bonds 12,376.00 

Invested in $3,000 Treas. 4V4 % bonds, due 1952 2,960.63 

Invested in 12 shares Concord Gas Co. common 1,020.00 
Invested in 5 shares Boston & Maine, first 

pfd. ''D" 500.00 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 218.42 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 7,052.50 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 2,164.70 



TRUST FUNDS 313 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital 3,312.60 

Income received, 1928 150.41 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 150.41 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 1,000.00 



BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Income received, 1928 6,500.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 6,500.00 

HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Income received, 1928 750.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 750.00 



SETH K. JONES TRUST 
Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, 
the income to be applied as follows: Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in 
Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each year to be 
deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund ; and the balance 
of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord Public 
Library. 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1928 43.53 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones 

Monument Fund 6.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 

for public library 25.53 

Paid for care of lot 12.00 

• 43.53 



Invested in City of Hartford, Conn., 4% bond 

due June 1, 1934 922.60 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 77.40 



314 CITY OF CONCORD 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1928 40.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 40.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4% bond. 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1928 42.50 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 42.50 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 500.00 

THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Capital 500.00 

Income received, 1928 20.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 20.00 

Invested in City of Concord 4% bond. 

HORACE B. BARTLETT PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 11,887.65 

Income received, 1928 533.78 



Capital, January 1, 1929 12,421.43 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank 7,639.70 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 3,314.73 

Invested in $1,500 FouHh Liberty 

Loan bonds 1,467.00 

Invested in $3,000 Jackson Cons. 

Trac. Co., bonds ******* 

12,421.43 



TRUST FUNDS 315 

CHARLES R. CORNING PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 

Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 23,448.72 

Income received, 1928 1,025.33 



Capital, January 1, 1929 24,474.05 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 5,791.82 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 6,247.69 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank 6,247.70 

Deposited in Union Trust Comi^any 6,186.84 

24,474.05 



BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 9,052.50 

Income received, 1928 244.59 



Capital, January 1, 1929 9,297.09 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank. 

HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 1,190.90 

Income received, 1928 34.31 



Capital, January 1, 1929 1,225.21 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Banlf. 

ARTHUR P. MORRILL AND GEORGE A. FOSTER PUBLIC LIBRARY 

BUILDING FUND 
Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 2,114.64 

Income received, 1928 84.56 



Capital, January 1, 1929 2,199.20 

Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



316 CITY OF CONCORD 

DAVID OSGOOD TRUST 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 



Capital 




200.00 


Balance income, January 1, 1928 


385.75 




Income received, 1928 


24.40 


410.15 



Paid to Rev. A. A. Sylvestre, Treas. 25.00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1929 385.15 

410.15 

Capital deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank; 
income deposited in Union Trust Company. 

ABIAL WALKER TRUST 

For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1928 45.00 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 45.00 
Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST 
For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied 
to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital 2,000.00 

Income received, 1928 85.00 

Paid Caroline Stewart, treasurer of the Society 85.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 1,000.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 1,000.00 

EASTMAN ASSOCIATION TRUST 
Income to be vised for'the care and maintenance of monument and lot known as 
Eastman Park, East Concord, N. H. 

Capital 450.48 

Balance of income, January 1, 1928 187.12 

Income received, 1928 28.66 

215.78 

Income on hand, January 1, 1929 215.78 

Capital and income deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank, 



TRUST FUNDS 317 

KATHERINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST 
Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital 1,511.25 

Income received, 1928 67.99 

Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 67.99 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the hands 
of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find such 
trust funds invested, and the income for the year 1928 
accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees kept 
for that purpose. 

' ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



318 



CITY OF CONCORD 
CEMETERY TRUSTS 



NAMES 









^ 


OO 






















~ O r. 
















? S 5 


^■'C 


£ 








5-= - 


.5 ~ 


W" 



1206 Individual Trusts... | 136,350.77 | 5,603.53 1 5,630.39 | 4,982.00 ] 6,251.92 



INVESTED 

Deposited in Concord Savings Banks, with City of Concord, N. H., at 4% 
and in sundry stocks and United States and Municipal bonds. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



SPECIAL FUNDS 

City Treasurer's Accounts as Custodian of 
Special Funds 

blossom hill cemetery fund 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, protec- 
tion and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1928 $51,030.05 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1928 872.17 

Received from income of fund, 1928 2,225.00 
Gain from sale of U. S. Third 

Liberty Loan Bonds 1.44 

$54,128.66 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account 2,225.00 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 51,903.66 



54,128.66 



Invested in City of Concord 4% 

bonds 1,000.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire 

Savings Bank ' 16,937.67 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 16,076.84 
Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 10,000.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 7,889.15 



51,903.66 



320 CITY OF CONCORD 

MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from tlie sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of Capital, January 1, 1928 1,031.78 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1928 80.00 

Received from income of fund, 1928 46.20 

1,157.98 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account 46.20 

Amount of Capital, January 1, 1928 1,111.78 



1,157.98 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of inter- 
ested parties and by the addition of one-third the amount received from the sale 
of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Millville 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1928 2,260.48 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1928 16.67 

Received from income of fund, 1928 102.55 

2,379.70 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account 102.55 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 2,277.15 



2,379.70 



Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 872.59 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 1,404.56 



2,277.15 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 321 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and orna- 
mentation of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of Capital, January 1, 1928 452.83 

Received from income of fund, 1928 20.28 

473.11 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account 20.28 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 452.83 



473.11 



Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank. 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income to be used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital January 1, 1928 833.00 

Income received, 1928 37.48 

870.48 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account 37.48 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 833.00 



870.48 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income is used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Soucook Cemeterj'. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1928 54.38 

Received from income of fund, 1928 2.47 

Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1928 22.60 

79.45 



322 CITY OF CONCORD 

Credited City of Concord, general 

account 2.47 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 76.98 

79.45 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank. 

WOODLAWN CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount re- 
ceived from the sale of lots. The income to be used for the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1928 181.86 

Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1928 12.00 

Received from income of fund, 1928 7.60 

201.46 



Credited City of Concord, general 

account 7.60 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 193.86 



201.46 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 

CEMETERY FUND FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING AND 
ORNAMENTING CEMETERY GROUNDS 
Created under resolution of Board of Aldermen, March 9, 1925. 

Capital, January 1, 1928 2,114.35 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1928 1,003.42 

Income received, 1928 92.85 



3,210.62 



Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 1,003.42 
Paid Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, 

out of capital 337.58 

Capital, January 1, 1929 1,869.62 



3,210.62 



Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



323 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OP THE CITY 




Municipal 




Bonds. 


Due. 


Rate 


Amount 


City Hall Building 


July 




, 1929, 31/2 


$ 5,000 


Public Park 


Dec. 




, 1931, 4 


10,000 


y } ) ) 


Dec. 




, 1933, 4 


5,000 


Bridge 


June 




1929, 4 


4,000 


; > 


June 




, 1930, 4 


4,000 


)) 


June 




1931, 4 


4,000 


> > 


June 




1932, 4 


4,000 


j> 


June 




1933, 4 


4,000 


>> 


June 




1934, 4 


4,000 


>» 


June 




1935, 4 


10,000 


Public Improvement 


May 


15 


1929, 41/2 


7,000 


} } > 7 


May 


15 


1930, 41/2 


7,000 


>> H 


May 


15 


1931, 41/2 


7,000 


ff M 


May 


15 


1932, 41/2 


7,000 


>7 >> 


May 


15 


1933, 41/2 


7,000 


}> >} 


May 


15 


1934, 41/2 


7,000 


»> J > 


]\Iay 


15 


1929, 414 


7,000 


>> >> 


May 


15 


1930, 4^4 


7,000 


>> >> 


May 


15 


1931, 414 


7,000 


>> >J 


May 


15 


1932, 414 


7,000 


>> >> 


May 


15 


1933, 4>4 


7,000 


l> >> 


May 


15 


1934, 41/4 


7,000 


>> J J 


. May 


15, 


1935, 414 


7,000 


Public Improvement & Ref. May 


-'- 


1929, 4 


13,000 


J } T> ! 


' JMay 


-•■ 


1930, 4 


13,000 


)) )7 } 


i\Iay 


-^ 


1931, 4 


13,000 


J> J J 5 


May 


-'- 


1932, 4 


13,000 


>> J J ) 


May 


-'-1 


1933, 4 


13,000 


>> 5> } 


]\Iay 


-'■) 


1934, 4 


13,000 


>J J> 5 


' ]\Iay 


-^j 


1935, 4 


13,000 


5> J> » 


May 


•^> 


1936, 4 


13,000 


J> J5 7 


' May 




1937, 4 


13,000 


>> > > > 


May 


1, 


1938, 4 


13,000 



324 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Bonds. Due. 

Departmental Equipment May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1 

May 1, 

May 1, 



Rate 

1929, 41/4 

1930, 414 

1931, 41/4 

1932, 414 

1933, 41/4 

1934, 41/4 

1935, 414 

1936, 41/4 

1937, 41/4 

1938, 41/4 

1939, 41^ 

1940, 41/4 

1941, 41/4 

1942, 414 

1943, 41/4 

1944, 41/4 

1945, 41/4 

1946, 41/4 



Bonds. 



Sewer 



Amount 

4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 



Precinct 






Due. 


Rate 


Amount 


Dec. 1, 1930, 


4 


$5,000 


Dec. 1, 1932, 


4 


10,000 


Dec. 1, 1934, 


4 


10,000 



$347,000 



25,000 



School 



Bonds. 


Due. 




Rate Amount 


Union School District 


July 1, 


1929, 


31/2 $10,000 


M J» >' 


July 1, 


1930, 


31/2 10,000 


J» >> '> 


July 1, 


1931, 


31/2 9,000 


>> >> " 


May 1, 


1932, 


4 10,000 


>> )} »» 


May 1, 


1933, 


4 10,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 



325 



Bonds. 

Union School District 



May 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 



Due. 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1934 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 



Rate 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

4Vi 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 

41/4 



Amount 

10,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

2,000 

15,000 

15,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 

14,000 



326 



CITY OF CONCORD 





Bonds 


Due. 




Rate Amount 


Union Sch 


ool District Dec. 


1, 1949, 414 14,000 






Dec. 




1950 


41/4 14,000 






Dec. 




1951 


41/4 14,000 






Dec. 




1952 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1953 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1954 


414 1^,000 






Dec. 




1955 


41/4 14,000 






Dec. 




1956 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1957 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1958 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1959 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1960 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1961 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1962 


414 14,000 






Dec. 




1963 


414 14,000 






' " Dec. 




1964 


41/4 14,000 






Dec. 




1965 


414 14,000 






Sept. 


1 


1929 


414 5,000 






' " Sept. 




1930 


41/4 5,000 






Sept. 




1931 


414 5,000 






' " Sept. 




1932 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1933 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1934 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1935 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1936 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1937 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1938 


41/4 5,000 






Sept. 


1 


1939 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1940 


41/4 5,000 






' " Sept. 


1 


1941 


41/4 5,000 






Sept. 


1 


1942 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1943 


414 5,000 






Sept. 




1944 


41/4 5,000 






* " Sept. 




1945 


41/4 5,000 






Sept. 




1946 


414 5,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 327 

Bonds. Due. Rate Amount 

Union School District Sept. 1, 1947, 414 5,000 

Sept. 1, 1948, 414 5,000 



707,000.00 

Serial Refunding notes payable to Trustee of Trust 

Funds, due December 1, 1929-33 incl. 4% 28,986.91 

Notes — Armenia S. White property due December 31, 

1929 to 32 incl. ^%%, 30,000.00 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city, exclusive 

of water department $1,137,986.91 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT 

Dr. 
Due and unpaid January 1, 1928, 



municipal 


$367.50 


Due and unpaid January 1, 1928, 




precinct 


170.00 


Due and unpaid January 1, 1928, 




Union School District 


266.25 


Due in 1928, municipal 


13,038.75 


Due in 1928, precinct 


1,437.50 


Due in 1928, Union School District 


26,412.50 




<k ^^ fiO'^ ^n 




q> '±±,\Ja^.O\J 


Cr. 




Municipal paid 


$13,272.50 


Precinct sewer paid 


1,495.00 


Union School District paid 


26,578.75 


Municipal due and not presented 


133.75 


Precinct due and not presented 


112.50 


Union School District due and not 




presented 


100.00 




$ 41,692.50 



328 CITY OF CONCORD 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT 





Du( 




Rate 


Amount 




Due 


Rate 


Amount 


Jan. 




1929 


41/2 


$18,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1934 


4V2 


$18,000 


Jan. 




1930 


41/2 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1935 


4:V2 


18,000 


Jan. 




1931 


41/2 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1936 


4V2 


18,000 


Jan. 




1932 


4V2 


18,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1937 


41/2 


18,000 


Jan. 




1933 


41/2 


18,000 








- 





$162,000 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 

WATER PRECINCT 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1928 

and not presented $ 146.00 

To coupons due 1928 7,695.00 

$ 7,841.00 



Cr. 
By coupons paid, 1928 $7,695.00 

By coupons due and not presented 146.00 

$ 7,841.00 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS INCOME 
INVESTMENT ACCOUNT 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1929 $10,000.00 

Invested in Fourth Liberty Bond, 4^4%. 

CITY OF CONCORD WATER WORKS 
INCOME ACCOUNT 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1928 $4,583.71 
Income received, 1928 942.62 

$ 5,526.33 

$ 5,526.33 



Transferred to General Account $2,000.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 3,526.33 



Deposited in Union Trust Company. 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 329 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OP 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, Citij Treasurer 

Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1928 $ 35,012.48 
Receipts P. R. Sanders, Supt. 101,100.49 

Transferred from Investment 

Account 2,000.00 

Proceeds sale of U. S. First Liberty 

Loan converted 4^4% Bond 5,072.12 

Proceeds sale of U. S. Third Liberty 

Loan 414% Bond 10,118.24 

Sale of land and water rights. Lake 

Winnepocket plus ^ taxes 2,551.00 

$155,854.33 



Expenditures 

Orders paid $103,143.24 

Bonds paid 18,000.00 

Interest on bonds 7,695.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 27,016.09 



-$155,854.33 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 

PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT AND REFUNDING 

BOND ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer 
Bridge Bond Account 
Receipts 
Bridge Bonds $20,000.00 

Premium 66.60 

$ 20,066.60 



330 CITY OF CONCORD 

Expe7iditures 
Orders paid $4,486.03 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 15,580.57 

$ 20,066.60 

HoPKiNTON Road Bond Account 
Receipts 
Hopkinton Road Bonds $35,000.00 

Premium 116.55 

0. W. Head 3,751.55 

$ 38,868.10 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $31,124.84 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 7,743.26 

$ 38,868.10 

Incinerator Bond Account 

Receipts 
Incinerator Bonds $20,000.00 

Premium 66.60 

$ 20,066.60 

Expenditures 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 $20,066.60 

$ 20,066.60 

Sewer Bond Account 

Receipts 
Sewer Bonds $30,000.00 

Premium 99.90 

$ 30,099.90 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $26,583.02 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 3,516.88 

$ 30,099.90 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 331 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OP 
DEPARTMENTAL EQUIPMENT BOND ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer 

Receipts 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1928 $229.92 

$ 229.92 



Expenditures 
Orders paid $229.92 



$ 229.92 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT BOND ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer 

Receipts 
Union School District Bonds $100,000.00 

Premium 520.00 

$100,520.00 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $50,500.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1929 50,020.00 

$100,520.00 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
accounts of Carl H. Foster, city treasurer, for the year 
1928, and find all items of receipts and expenditures therein 
properly recorded and authenticated by appropriate 
vouehers, and the several items correctly cast, and the cash 
balance to be twenty-one thousand two hundred sixty-five 
dollars and sixtj^-five cents ($21,265.65) ; the balance to the 
credit of Bridge Bond Account to be fifteen thousand five 



332 CITY OF CONCORD 

hundred eighty dollars and fifty-seven cents ($15,580.57) ; 
Hopkinton Road Bond Account seven thousand seven 
hundred forty-three dollars and twenty-six cents 
($7,743.26) ; Incinerator Bond Account twenty thousand 
sixty-six dollars and sixty cents ($20,066.60) ; Sewer Bond 
Account three thousand five hundred sixteen dollars and 
eighty-eight cents ($3,516.88) ; Union School District Bond 
Account fifty thousand twenty dollars and no cents 
($50,020.00) ; and the City Water Department twenty- 
seven thousand sixteen dollars and nine cents ($27,016.09). 
I have also verified the account of the special funds of the 
City in the hands of the city treasurer, and find such special 
funds invested and the income thereof for the year 1928 
accounted for as shown by the books of the city treasurer 
for that purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



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340 



CITY OF CONCORD 



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FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

OF THE CITY OF CONCORD 
For the Twelve Months Ending December 31, 1928 

Appropriation Expended Balance 



Aid, City Poor ?7,500.00 $10,180.73 

Resolution No. 787 2,000.00 

Resolution No. 799 680.73 



$36,215.48 $36,215.48 

Blossom Hill Cemetery 

Improvement North Entrance: 

Resolution No. 784 $5,000.00 (, «c /.on 9n 

Resolution No. 799 480.20 ( ^»'*»^-" 

City Hall: 

Salary, Messenger $1,300.00 $1,300.00 

Salary, Janitor 1,248.00 1,248.00 

Fuel 2,700.00 2,154.16 

Lights 900.00 888.70 

Incidentals 2,000.00 1,815.92 



$10,180.73 $10,180.73 

Aid, Dependent Soldiers, 1 

City $300.00 V $305.00 

Resolution No. 799 5.00 ^ 
Aid, Dependent Soldiers, 

County $1,000.00 $585.84 $414.16 

Aid, County Poor $15,000.00 I ^^. a(\q a^ 

Resolution No. 799 6,409.68 J *^-^'4^-^-^» 

Bonds and Notes: 

Bridge $4,000.00 $4,000.00 

City Hall 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Highway 10,000.00 10,000.00 

Public Improvement 14,000.00 14,000.00 

Departmental Equipment 4,000.00 4,000.00 

Cemetery Trust Note 5,797.38 5,797.38 

Pleasant Street Sewer 

Note 2,500.00 2,500.00 

White Property Note 37,376.30 44,752.60 

Care ' $15,880.00 $34,843.95 

New Work 1,500.00 1,371.53 

Income Trust Funds 4,810.00 

Income Transferred 

Account 9,234.81 

Income Permanent 

Funds 2,441.58 

Improvements, etc. 1,341.00 

Resolution No. 799 1,008.09 



!,148.00 $7,406.78 $741.22 



342 CITY OF CONCORD 

Mavor * Appropriation Expended Balance 

Salary $2,166.66 $2,249.91 

Incidentals 350.00 113.95 



$2,516.66 $2,363.86 $152.80 
City Clerk: 

Salary $1,950.00 $1,950.00 

Clei-k Board of Public 

Works 200.00 200.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,000.00 3,853.00 

Incidentals 900.00 958.54 

Photostat 850.00 835.00 



$7,900.00 $7,796.54 $103.46 

$1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Incidentals 150.00 13.10 



City Solicitor: 

Salary $1,000.00 $1,000.00 



City Treasurer 

Salary $1,300.00 $1,300.00 



Police Court 

Salary, Judge $1,800.00 $1,800.00 



$2,400.00 $2,400.00 
Assessors: 

Salaries, Assessors $4,400.00 $4,316.67 

Salary, Clerk 1,092.00 1,092.00 

Incidentals 2,300.00 2,565.40 



Resolution No. 799, refund 17.75 
Resolution No. 799 164.32 



$7,974.07 $7,974.07 
Tax Collector: 

Salary, Collector $3,000.00 $3,000.00 

Salary, Clerks 2,192.00 1,909.29 

Incidentals 1,150.00 1,125.35 



$1,150.00 $1,013.10 $136.90 

$1,300.00 $1,300.00 

Incidentals 300.00 225.00 



$1,600.00 $1,525.00 $75.00 
City Physicians: 

Salajies ^^^S^X^ I $700.00 $75.00 

Incidentals 75.00 f 
Care of Clocks: 

Salaries $110.00 I <si^oo Ka 

Resolution No. 799 12.50 ( ?'-L — ou 

Weights and Measures: 

Salary $720.00 $720.00 

Incidentals 200.00 198.43 



$920.00 $918.43 $1.57 

.,800.00 $1,800.00 

Salary, Clerk 600.00 600.00 



$6,342.00 $6,034.64 $307.36 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



343 



Elections: 

Salaries, Election 


Apjiropriation 

$2,808.00 
800.00 
468.69 . 


Expended Balance 

$2,784.00 


Incidentals 
Resolution No. 799 


1,292.69 








$4,076.69 

$3,500.00 

1,900.00 
1,200.00 
1,044.00 

30.00 
400.00 
575.00 


$4 076 69 


Engineering Department: 
Salary, Engineer 
Salary, Assistant 

Engineer 
Salary, Rodman 
Salary, Clerk 
Salary, Clerk, 


$3,500.00 


1 900.00 


1 100 00 


1,044 00 


30.00 


Upkeep Auto 


400.00 


671 57 






Fire Department: 
Salary, Chief 
Salary, Houseman 
Salaries, Permanent 


$8,649.00 

$2,600.00 
100.00 

28,900.00 

1,112.00 

10,270.00 

300.00 
2,300.00 
1,050.00 

150.00 

1,825.00 

90.00 

685.00 
1,600.00 

200.00 
1,100.00 
2,400.00 

390.00 
1,700.00 

200.00 

n 1,000.00 

15,900.00 


$8,645^7 $3.43 
2 600.00 


25.00 


28,900.00 




1,042 29 




10,270.00 


Rent, Veterans' 


300.00 


Fiipl 


2 239.93 


Lights 


1,094.54 


354.25 


Upkeep Autos 

Laundry 

Fire Inspection 


1,673.34 


82.88 


687 66 


1,628.35 


Ppn>irnnlc P^irp Alarm 


116.53 




1 100 00 




2 326 96 


Telephones 
Repairs 


398.27 


1,574.37 


125.48 


Repairs Veterans' Roor 
New Equipment 


1 188 05 


14 700 00 




Health Department: 

Salary, Sanitary Officer 
Salary, Clerk 
Upkeep Auto 
Fumigation Supplies 
Contagious Diseases 
Incidentals 


$73,872.00 

■ $2,000.00 
1,144.00 
400.00 
100.00 
500.00 
356.00 


$72,427.90 $1,444.10 
$2 000 00 


1 144 00 


400 00 


18 17 


191 78 


263 52 






$4,500,00 


$4,017.47 $482.53 



344 CITY OF CONCORD 

Appropriation Expended Balance 

Milk Inspection: 

Salary, Inspector $1,800.00 $1,800.00 

Upkeep Auto 400.00 400.00 

Incidentals 500.00 389.09 



$224,976.28 $224,976.28 

Garbage $30,500.00 $32,138.59 
Resolution No. 799 

a/c earnings 219.68 

Resolution No. 799 1,418.91 



} 



10,191.25 



$2,700.00 $2,589.09 $110.91 
Department of Public Works: 

Roads and Bridges $200,000.00 $224,976.28 

Resolution No. 799 

a/c earnings 18,674.99 

Resolution No. 799 6,301.29 



$32,138.59 $32,138.59 

Table Garbage $4,000.00 $4,000.00 

Sewers $15,000.00 ] 

Resolution No. 799 ^$16,868.05 

a/c earnings 1,868.05 J 

Lighting Streets $43,550.00 $43,002.25 $547.75 

Incidentals and Land Damages: 

Appropriation ^^'5nX'nn f" $3,897.54 $2.46 

Resolution No. 788 400.00 j "^ ' ^ 

Interest Notes and Bonds: 

Cemetery Trust Fund $1,372.03 $1,371.99 $.04 

Bonds 8,793.75 

Resolution No. 799 1,397.50 



Temporary Loans 11.725.94 I -locAcn? 

Resolution No. 799 1,779.13 f ^'^'^^»-"' 

Departmental Equipment 3,145.00 3,081.25 $63.75 

Pleasant Street Sewer 118.76 118.76 

White Property 1,775.36 | . qoq on 

Resolution No. 799 3.96 f ^'^^^■^'^ 

Sewers 2,537.50 1,495.00 $1,042.50 

Salary, Superintendent $1,800.00 $1,800.00 

Salaries 3,700.00 3,573.20 

Shrubbery 250.00 164.21 

Fence, White Park 500.00 499.10 

Fence, Rollins Park 500.00 499.30 

Incidentals 1,250.00 2,020.96 

Resolution No. 799 

a c earnings 107.90 

Resolution No. 799 162.65 

Portion Income West 

Garden Fund 286.22 



5,556.77 $8,556.77 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 345 

Appropriation Expended Balance 

Playgrounds and Bath: 

Appropriation $6,118.00 $5,568.50 $549.50 
White Pine Blister Rust: 

Appropriation $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Municipal Christmas Tree: 

Appropriation $100.00 $55.30 $44.70 
Public Comfort Station: 

Salaries $1,200.00 $1,200.00 

Incidentals 200.00 562.68 

Resolution No. 790 500.00 

$1,900.00 1,762.68 $137.32 
Public Library: 

Appropriation $7,000.00 $10,318.68 

WhiteProperty 1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Income Trust Funds 2,521.68 

Resolution No. 799, 

Rent Battery Station 350.00 

Resolution No. 799, 

Library Fines 447.00 

$10,318.68 $10,318.68 $1,000.00 
Police and Watch: 

Salary, Chief $2,600.00 $2,600.00 

Salary, Deputy 2,400.00 2,400.00 

Salary, Captain 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Salarv, Sergeant 1,950.00 1,950.00 

Salaries, Officers 28,062.00 28,194.00 

Salaries, Specials 5,200.00 4,874.56 

Repairs 1,000.00 810.61 

Fuel 1,300.00 1,092.38 

Lights 1,200.00 1,666.29 

Supplies Autos 2,150.00 3,171.61 

Incidentals 3,100.00 2,590.23 

Janitor 600.00 600.00 

New Ambulance 2,850.00 2,850.00 

Police Boxes 210.80 210.08 

Resolution No. 799 

a/c earnings 386.96 



$55,009.76 $55,009.76 

Precinct Sewer Bonds: 
Sale of Bonds 

(Refund) $25,000.00 $25,000.00 

Printing and Stationery: 

Appropriation ^^iZna [ ?5,194.90 $105.10 

Resolution No. 789 300.00 ) ^ ' ^ 
Repairs Buildings: 

Appropriation $1,000.00 $2,000.06 

Resolution No. 778 675.00 

Resolution No. 792 350.00 

$2,025.00 $2,000.06 $24.94 



346 CITY OF CONCORD 



Appropriation Expended Balance 

Salary Board of Aldermen: 

Appropriation $1,905.00 $1,905.00 

Trees: 

Appropriation $6,000.00 > 

Resolution No. 799 I $6,058.61 

a/c earnings 58.61 J 

Miscellaneous: 

Concord Family Welfare 

Society 350.00 $350.00 

Concord District Nursing 

Association 350.00 350.00 

Penacook District Nursing 

Association 50.00 50.00 

Margaret Pillsbury 

Hospital 5,000.00 5,000.00 

N. H. Memorial Hospital 2,000.00 2,000.00 

Memorial Day 460.00 460.00 

Open Air Concerts 800.00 800.00 

E. E. Sturtevant Post, 

G. A. R. 450.00 450.00 

Schools: 

Union District: 

Balance, 1927 $59,438.48 $332,638.48 

Amount Voted by 

District 307,287.03 

Pensions 2,000.00 

Heating Apparatus 

Rumford School 7,000.00 

Grading High School 25,000.00 

Dog Licenses 2,457.53 

Abial Walker Trust 

Fund 41.45 



$403,224.49 $332,638.48 $70,586.01 

Interest on Bonds $26,412.50 $26,578.75 

Bonds $27,000.00 $27,000.00 

Penacook District: 

Balance, 1927 $11,216.90 $20,716.90 

Amount Voted by 

District 25,070.49 

Dog Licenses 210.36 

Abial Walker Trust 

Fund 3.55 



$36,501.30 $20,716.90 $15,784.40 
South End School 
Bond Account: 
Sale of Bonds and 

Premium $100,520.00 $50,500.00 $50,020.00 
Land Sold for Unpaid 
Taxes: 
Resolution No. 776 $10,749.56 $10,749.56 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 347 

Appropriation Expended Balance 

Taxes on Land Sold City: 

Resolution No. 774 $1,339.56 $1,339.56 

Resolution No. 775 11.41 11.41 

Dog Licenses $242.65 

Departmental Equipment 
Bond Account: 

Balance, 1927 $229.92 $229.92 

Bridge Bonds Account: 
Sale of Bonds and 

Premium $20,066.60 $4,486.03 $15,580.57 

Hopkinton Road Bond 
Account: 
Sale of Bonds and 

Premium $35,116.55 ^ 

O. W. Head, L $31,124.84 $7,743.26 

Superintendent 3,751.55 J 

Sewer Bond Account: 
Sale of Bonds and 

Premium $30,099.90 $26,583.02 $3,516.88 

Incinerator Bond Account: 
Sale of Bonds and 

Premium $20,066.60 $20,066.60 

State Tax $95,163.40 

County Tax $53,970.75 

Receipts Paid 

Temporary Loans $675,000.00 $675,000.00 

Water Works: 

Receipts Expended 

Cash Balance, January 1, 

1928 $35,012.48 

Receipts, Water Rents 101,100.49 

Sale Liberty Bonds 15,190.36 

Transferred from In- 
vestment Account 2,000.00 

Sale of Land and Water 
Rights, Lake Winne- 
pocket plus one-half 
taxes 2,551.00 

Expended per Orders $103,157.24 

Interest on Bonds 7,695.00 

Bonds 18,000.00 

Paid outstanding order 1.00 

Treasury Balance, January 

1, 1929 27,016.09 

$155,869.33 

Less outstanding orders 

unpaid 15.00 



$155,854.33 $155,854.33 



348 CITY OF CONCORD 

RECEIPTS FOR THE CITY FOR THE YEAR 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1928 



Balance on hand, January 1, 1928 




$39,443.90 


Taxes, 1921 




5.00 


Taxes, 1922 




21.40 


Taxes, 1923 




71.00 


Taxes, 1924 




132.70 


Taxes, 1925 




213.84 


Taxes, 1926 




918.28 


Taxes, 1927 




104,610.79 


Taxes, 1928 




832,340.30 


Real Estate Redeemed, 1924 




5.96 


Real Estate Redeemed, 1925 




156.30 


Real Estate Redeemed, 1926 




1,297.99 


Real Estate Redeemed, 1927 




3,400.20 


Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 


1923 


10.00 


Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 


1925 


19.69 


Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 


1926 


132.81 


Reimbursement Taxes paid by City, 


1927 


126.12 


Municipal Court Fees 




3,137.68 


Library Fines 




447.00 


Dependent Soldiers, County 




585.88 


County Poor 




21,409.68 


Temporary Loans 




675,000.00 


Fees, City Clerk 




1,827.65 


Garbage 




219.68 


Highway Department 




18,674.99 


Trees 




140.19 


Playgrounds 




73.48 


Dog Licenses 




2,910.54 


Earnings, Comfort Station 




104.68 


Amusement Licenses 




771.00 


Rent Auditorium 




1,800.00 


Rent Basement, City Hall 




25.00 


Rent Battery Station 




840.00 


Circus Licenses 


, 


100.00 


Rent Chief's House 




250.00 


Motor Vehicle Permits, 1928 




24,358.05 


Motor Vehicle Permits, 1929 




21,690.82 


Passenger Carriage and Job Team Licenses 


80.50 


Pool Table Licenses 




300.00 


Junk Dealers' Licenses 




90.00 


Sev/er Department 




2,198.61 


Druggists' Permits 




7.00 


Land Sold 




142.55 


Employment Bureau License 




5.00 


Income Photostat 




8.20 


Milk Licenses and Fees 




343.00 


Declarations Candidacy, State Primary 


147.00 


Histories and Maps, City of Concord 




6.50 


Sale Historical Addresses 




33.50 


Interest on Daily Balances 




2,099.95 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



349 



Fines and Dance Licenses, Chief of Police 1,479.67 

Reimbursement Forest Fires 61.66 

Sale of Grass 50.00 
Fire Department, sale of sundries, removing fire 

alarm box, liability insurance 166.51 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers 16.55 

Insurance Tax 7,052.44 

Railroad Tax 58,130.17 

Savings Bank Tax 67,321.69 

Building and Loan Association Tax 104.13 

Tax on Interest and Dividends 64,356.04 

Pedlars' Licenses 58.00 

Engineering Department 20.00 

Right of Way, Public Service Company 100.00 

Transferred Blossom Hill Cemetery Account 5,944.74 

Transferred Old North Cemetery Account 340.60 

Transferred Maple Grove Cemetery Account 629.50 

Transferred Pine Grove Cemetery Account 418.45 

Transferred Millville Cemetery Account 130.92 

Transferred Soucook Cemetery Account 131.60 

Transferred Horse Hill Cemetery Account 44.00 

Transferred Woodlawn Cemetery Account 1,595.00 

Income Trust Funds, Blossom Hill Cemetery 3,275.75 

Income Trust Funds, Old North Cemetery 424.00 

Income Trust Funds, Maple Grove Cemetery 193.50 

Income Trust Funds, Old Fort Cemetery 13.00 

Income Trust Funds, Pine Grove Cemetery 218.00 

Income Trust Funds, Millville Cemetery 106.00 

Income Trust Funds, Soucook Cemetery 10.00 

Income Trust Funds, Woodlawn Cemetery 561.50 

Income Trust Funds, Horse Hill Cemetery 8.25 

Income Abial Walker Trust Fund, Schools 45.00 

Income P. B. Cogswell Trust Fund, Public Library 89.16 

Income G. Parker Lyon Trust Fund, Public Library 40.00 

Income Franklin Pierce Trust Fund, Public Library 42.50 

Income Thos. Valpey Trust Fund, Public Library 20.00 

Income Jos. Hazeltine Trust Fund, Public Library 150.41 

Income Seth K. Jones Trust Fund, Public Library 25.53 

Income Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library 128.40 

Income Samuel Eastman Trust Fund, Public Library 1,673.43 

Income William Chase Trust Fund, Public Library 42.50 

Income Henry Kimball Trust Fund, Public Library 750.00 

Income Benjamin Kimball Trust Fund, Public Library 6,500.00 

Income K. P. & D. Rollins Trust Fund, West Garden 67.99 

Income Permanent Fund, Blossom Hill Cemetery 2,225.00 

Income Permanent Fund, Old North Cemetery 37.48 

Income Permanent Fund, Millville Cemetery 102.55 

Income Permanent Fund, Pine Grove Cemetery 20.28 

Income Permanent Fund, Maple Grove Cemetery 46.20 

Income Permanent Fund, Soucook Cemetery 2.47 

Income Permanent Fund, Woodlawn Cemetery 7.60 
Transferred to General Account Reimbursement for 

improving grounds, Blossom Hill Cemetery 872.16 



350 CITY OF CONCORD 



Transferred to General Account Reimbursement for 

improving grounds, Soucook Cemetery 22.60 
Transferred to General Account Reimbursement for 

improving grounds, Woodlawn Cemetery 12.00 
Transferred to General Account Reimbursement for 

improving grounds. Maple Grove Cemetery 80.00 
Transferred to General Account Reimbursement for 

improving grounds, Millville Cemetery 16.66 

Parks 394.12 

Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds 430.89 
Notes Purchase Armenia White Property 37,376.30 
Refunded Sewer Bonds 25,000.00 

Quantity discount on gasoline, 1927 93.68 
Transferred to General Account Reimbursement for 

Expenditures for Improving Cemeteries 337.58 

Miscellaneous 46.15 



$2,052,394.72 



DISBURSEMENTS 

City Disbursements ^615,826.97 

City Poor and Soldiers 10,485.73 

County Poor and Soldiers 21,995.52 

City Notes 728.049.98 

City Bonds 42,000.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 28,825.53 

Interest Cemetery Trust Funds 1,371.99 

Schools 353,355.38 

Schools, Interest on Bonds 26,578.75 

School Bonds 27.000.00 

Precinct Sewer Bonds 25,000.00 

Precinct Sewer, Interest on Bonds 1,495.00 

County Tax 53,970.75 

State Tax 95,163.40 

Paid Outstanding Orders 365.63 

Treasury Balance, January 1, 1929 21,265.65 



$2,052,750.28 
Less Outstanding Orders Unpaid January 1, 1929 355.56 



$2,052,394.72 



ARTHUR E. ROBY. 

City Clerk. 



MUNICIPAL DEBTS 



Funded Debt 

City Hall bonds $ 5,000.00 

State Library bonds 15,000.00 

Bridge bonds 34,000.00 
Public Improvement bonds and 

refund 221,000.00 

Departmental Equipment bonds 72,000.00 

Cemetery Trust note 28,986.91 

Armenia S. White property note 30,000.00 



-$405,986.91 



Debt Not Funded 

Orders outstanding January 1, 1929 $355.56 
Interest accrued, not yet due, 

municipal bonds 2,124.05 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

municipal bonds 133.75 
Coupons overdue, not presented, 

Union School District bonds 100.00 

Due School Districts 86,370.41 

Due South End School bonds 50,020.00 

Due Bridge bonds 15,580.57 

Due Hopkinton Road bonds 7,743.26 

Due Sewer bonds 3,516.88 

Due Incinerator bonds 20,066.60 



Total debt not funded $186,011.08 

Total city indebtedness $591,997.99 



352 city op concord 

Available Assets 



Treasurer's cash balance, January 1, 




1929 


$21,265.65 


Taxes, 1921, uncollected 


396.93 


Taxes, 1922, uncollected 


1,631.68 


Taxes, 1923, uncollected 


2,263.20 


Taxes, 1924, uncollected 


3,562.39 


Taxes, 1925, uncollected 


2,866.54 


Taxes, 1926, uncollected 


3,374.00 


Taxes, 1927, uncollected 


5,274.01 


Taxes, 1928, uncollected 


115,532.39 


Cash in hand of tax collector, 




January 1, 1929 


319.00 


Cash in hand of city clerk, account 




motor vehicle permits, January 




1, 1929 


87.48 


Taxes bid in by city 


9,228.16 


Due highway department 


187.65 




d?1CF; OQO fjQ 




*P±\JOjC/OiJ.\JO 


Indebtedness above assets, January 




1, 1929 


$426,008.91 


Indebtedness above assets, January 




1, 1928 


235,806.86 


Increase for the year 


$190,202.05 



PRECINCT DEBT 



Funded Debt 

Water Works bonds $162,000.00 

Sewer bonds 25,000.00 

$187,000.00 

Debt Not Funded 



Interest accrued, not yet due. 




water bonds 


$3,645.00 


Interest accrued, not yet due, 




sewer bonds 


83.34 


Coupons overdue, not presented. 




water bonds 


146.00 


Coupons overdue, not presented, 




sewer bonds 


112.50 




d. O (\Q(\ QA 




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$190,986.84 



Available Assets 

Cash on hand, water department, 

January 1, 1929 $27,016.09 

Liberty bonds. Water Works, 

investment account 10,000.00 

Income, investment account 3,526.33 



$ 40,542.42 

Net precinct debt, January 1, 1929 $150,444.42 

Net ]n-ecinct debt, January 1, 1928 169,998.98 



Decrease for the year $19,554.56 



354 city of concord 

Other Precinct Liabilities 

Union School District bonds $707,000.00 

Interest accrued, not yet due 4,245.83 



-$711,245.83 



Recapitulation 

Net regular debt $426,008.91 

precinct debt 150,444.42 

school district 711,245.83 

$ 1,287,699.16 

Increase for the year $244,881.23 



CITY PROPERTY 



Having Value But Not Considered Available 



Assets 



Water Department $1,279,834.00 


Fire Department 


240,543.00 


Highway Department 


120,000.00 


Engineering Department 


1,363.50 


Sewer Department 


4,683.10 


Health Department 


940.00 


Milk Inspection Department 


1,891.00 


Police Department 


64,650.00 


City Clerk's Office 


2,525.00 


Commissioner's Office 


140.17 


Mayor's Office 


250.00 


Assessor's Office 


1,000.00 


Tax Collector's Office 


300.00 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


325.00 


City Messenger's Department 


2,250.00 


Park Commissioner's Department 


225.00 


Public Library 


17,500.00 


City History Commission 


10.00 


Cemetery Commissioner's Dept. 


9,000.00 


Real Estate 


567,376.30 




$2,395,806.07 



1928 

Population of city (1920) 22,167 

Valuation of city $32,012,175.00 

Tax Assessed for the year $950,336.03 

Rate of taxation, $15.46 per $1,000. 
Eate of Union School District, $13.40. 
Rate for sewer precinct, $.10. 
Total rate, $28.96 per $1,000. 



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SUMMARY 



-0- 



Total number of births for the year 503 

Total number of marriages for the year 199 

Total number of deaths in the different wards 228 

Total number of deaths in public institutions 325 

Total number brought to the city for burial Ill 

I hereby certify that the foregoing is a transcript from the 
records of said city of Concord. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Assessors, board of, report of 293 

Board of Health. See Sanitary Department 

Bonded indebtedness 323 

Building Inspector, report of 255 

City Clerk, report of 265 

government, departments, personnel of, 1928.... 50 

board of adjustment 61 

building inspector 60 

commissioners of cemeteries 62 

culler of staves 63 

drain layers 67 

fence-viewers 63 

fire department, ofiicers of 59 

health officers 60 

hydrant commissioners 61 

inspector of petroleum 63 

park commissioners 61 

plumbers, board of examiners of 67 

pound-keeper 63 

police department officers and members of 

police force 55 

public library, trustees of 57 

librarian and assistants 57 

registrar of vital statistics 60 

sealers of leather 63 

sealer of weights and measures 63 

superintendent cemeteries 62 

superintendent of clocks 60 

superintendent of parks 61 

surveyors of painting 65 

masonry 65 

wood, lumber and bark ' 66 

trustees of trust funds 58 

undertakers 62 

ward officers 68 

water-works, city, commissioners 58 

superintendent 58 

weigher 65 

weighers of hay, coal, etc 64 



PAGE 

Coupon account, statement of 327 

Engineer, city, report of 234 

Financial statement 341 

Fire department, report of 211 

Hydrant commissioners, report of board of 237 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 70 

Mayor's inaugural address 3 

Milk inspector, report of 286 

Municipal debt 351 

regulations 2 

court, report of 291 

Ordinances and resolutions 7 

Park commissioners, report of 292 

Playgrounds, report of 270 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 238 

Plumbing inspector, report of 242 

Police department, report of 227 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1918 296 

Poor department, report of overseer 263 

Population 356 

Precincts, debts of 353 

Property, city, inventory of 355 

Public library, report of 258 

Public works, board of, report of 243 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 273 

School reports 75 

Sealer of weights and measures, report of 267 

Sewer department, report of 248 

Solicitor, report of 269 

Tax collector, report of 298 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 333 

Treasury department, report of 319 

Tree Warden, report of 243 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 305 

Trust funds 310 

Trusts, individual cemetery 318 

Union School District, bond account 324 

Vital statistics, tables of 359 

Water department, report of 183 

treasurer's condensed statement .... 329 



^N 35g^7 C? 4 192 8 

Concord, N,H, 

Annual report. 



C74- 

A fine of Two Cents will be charged for each day the 
book is kept overtime. 



DATE DUE 



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L i L I 

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