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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

M 



74 



City of 

CONCORD 

Annual Report 




1937 



1937 
CITY OF CONCORD 

EIGHTY - FIFTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

RECEIPTS and EXPENDITURES 

for the year ending 

DECEMBER 31, 1937 

TOGETHER WITH OTHER ANNUAL REPORTS 

AND PAPERS RELATING TO THE 

AFFAIRS OF THE CITY 




BRIDGE & BYRON 
CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



y 



MUNICIPAL REGULATIONS 

For Payment of Bills Against the City 



All persons furnishing materials or service for the city, 
or aid to the city poor, should be particular to take the 
name of the person ordering such service, material, or aid, 
and should know that the person is duly authorized to 
contract such liability. 

The city will not be holden for merchandise sold or de- 
livered on city poor account, except on the written order 
of the overseer of the poor, and for no longer time tlian 
until his successor shall have been appointed and qualified. 

All bills against the city must be approved by the per- 
son authorizing the charge ; and unless this is done, no 
action can be had upon the bill by the Committee on 
Accounts and Claims, and no order will be given for its 
payment. 

Bills so certified should be left with the city clerk on or 
before the second day of the month. 

If approved by the Committee on Accounts and Claims, 
they will be ready for payment on Thursday following the 
regular monthly meeting of the city government. The 
regular monthly meetings of the city government occur on 
the second Mondav of eacli montli. 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



\ 



ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS 
Passed During the Year Ending January 10, 1938. 



An Ordinance amending chapter forty-three of the revised 
ordinances in relation to the police department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 43, Section 1, clause (g) by strik- 
ing out the words "two thousand" and inserting the words 
"twenty-two hundred" so that said clause shall read as follows : 
(g) Captain of the night watch, twenty-two hundred 
dollars per annum. 
Amend clause (i) of said section 1 by sti'iking out the whole 
of said clause and inserting the following: 

(i) First year patrolman, seventeen hundred dollars; 
second year patrolman, eighteen hundred dollars; third 
year patrolman, nineteen hundred sixteen dollars per 
annum. Provided, that in the rating above prescribed, 
two years of service as a special officer shall be regarded 
as the equivalent of the first year of service as a regular 
patrolman. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect as of January 1, 
1937. 

Passed February 9, 1937. 



An Ordinance relating to the rights of the airport com- 
mission. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. The immediate management and direction of the 
airport in the city shall be vested in the board of airport com- 
missioners, consisting of three members of the Board of Alder- 
men, two legal voters of Concord who are familiar with aviation 
and airports, and the mayor, who shall be, ex-officio, a member 
of the board of commissioners. 

Sect. 2. The Mayor, subject to the approval of the Board of 
Aldermen, shall appoint the members of said commission as fol- 
lows: 



4 CITY OF CONCORD 

One member outside of the Board of Aldermen for a term 
of three years and the other member outside of the Board of 
Aldermen for a term of four years. 

Those members appointed from the Board of Aldermen shall 
be appointed as follows: 

One member for one year, one member for two years and one 
member for three years. 

Sect. 3. The Mayor, subject to the approval of the Board 
of Aldermen, annually, in the month of January, shall appoint 
a commissioner and/or commissioners for a term of two years 
each, in the places of those whose terms of office expire at that 
time. Whenever a vacancy in the airpoi't commission shall 
occur from any cause, it shall be filled by an appointment by 
the Mayor, subject to the approval of the Board of Aldermen; 
and the person so appointed shall hold office for the balance of 
the term he is appointed to fill. 

Said commissioners shall, in addition to their regular term, 
hold their office until others are duly appointed in their places; 
but any commissioner may be removed from office at any time 
by a vote of the Board of Aldermen for that purpose. 

The board may choose one of their number as president, and 
appoint a clerk, and may make such rules and regulations for 
their own government, and in relation to all officers and agents 
appointed by them, as they may think proper. 

Sect. 4. The airport commissioners shall have and exercise, 
for and on behalf of the city, and subject to such ordinances 
and regulations as may from time to time be made and pre- 
scribed by the Board of Aldermen in relation thereto, the 
management, control and operation of the airport of the City 
of Concord. Said commissioners shall serve without pay. 

Passed February 9, 1937. 



An Ordinance regulating the use of radios and other sound 

PRODUCING apparatus. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldo'men of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. No person, co-partnership, association or corpora- 
tion shall use or operate or cause to be used or operated any 
mechanical device, machine, apparatus or instrument for the 
reproduction, intensification or amplification of the human voice, 



ORDINANCES O 

music or any other sound or noise from any private place in 
such manner that the peace and good order of the neighborhood 
is disturbed or that persons owning, using or occupying property 
in the neighborhood are disturbed or annoyed. 

Sect. 2. Any person, co-partnership, association or corpora- 
tion violating the provisions of the foregoing section shall, upon 
conviction be punished by a fine of not more than $10. Each 
day during which such violation continues shall constitute a 
separate offense. 

Passed February 9, 1937. 



An Ordinance amending chapter forty-three of the re- 
vised ORDINANCES RELATING TO SALARIES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That Chapter 43 of the Revised Ordinances be amended by 
adding thereto the following section: 

Section 2. All salaries in excess of fifteen hundred dollars 
shall remain reduced by five per cent for one year beginning 
April 15, 1937. 

Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take effect as of April 15, 1937. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



An Ordinance amending section one of chapter thirteen 
OF revised ordinances of 1926. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1 of Chapter 13 of Revised Ordinances of 1926 of the 
City of Concord, is hereby amended by striking out the whole 
thereof and substituting the following: 

Section 1. All matters relating to the public health of the 
City shall be under the control of a Board of Health, consisting 
of the Mayor, who shall be chairman, the City Physician who 
shall serve ex-officio and as secretary to said Board, and three 
other members who shall be members of the medical profession. 
At the commencement of the succeeding year and whenever a 



6 CITY OF CONCORD 

vacancy shall exist, members of such Board shall be appointed 
by the Mayor with the approval of the Board of Aldermen, who 
shall hold office for two years, and until his, her or their suc- 
cessor and/or successors are appointed. Such Board shall con- 
sider all matters relative to the public health which in their 
judgment call for action on the part of the Board of Aldermen 
or which may be referred to them by the Board of Aldermen, 
the Sanitary Officer or the City Physician, and make recom- 
mendation with reference thereto, and shall perform such other 
duties as may be imposed upon them by this ordinance or by 
the laws of the state. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



An Ordinance amending chapter nine of the revised ordi- 
nances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Alderv^en of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. That Section 2 of Chapter IX of the Revised 
Ordinances be amended by striking out the words "bowling 
alley" and by adding after said section the following new section 
2a. Every bowling alley shall be cleared of company and closed 
on week days, excepting Saturdays, at 12 o'clock in the evening, 
and on Saturdays at 11:45 o'clock in the evening; and not re- 
opened until thirty minutes before 8 o'clock the following morn- 
ing, except on Sundays when they shall be kept closed. 

Passed May 10, 1937. 



An Ordinance amendinCx plumbers, plumbing construction 
and inspection rules of the city of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Amend "Plumbers, Plumbing Construction and Inspection" 
rules of the City of Concord, as same appears in City Ordinances, 
1925 and amend all amendments thereto, particularly referring 
to said City Ordinances, 1925, Page 76 to Page 83 at the end 
of Section 32 thereof, by striking out the whole and substituting 
therefore the following: 



ORDINANCES I 

PLUMBING RULES 

of the City of Concord, N. H. 
Plumbers, Plumbing Construction and Inspection 

Section. 

1. Public laws adopted. 

2. Board of examiners of plumbers. 

3. Duties of Board. 

4. Sanitary officer to enforce laws, etc., regulating plumbing. 

5. Plumbers to register. 

6. Description of work to be filed. 

7. Plumbing to be connected with public sewer unless. 

8. Main drains. 

9. Drains and ventilating pipes to be exposed. 

10. Location of drains; clean outs. 

11. Rain-water leaders. 

12. Material to be used in pipes. 

13. Water-closets; number, construction, location. 

14. Waste pipes from sinks, basins, etc. 

15. Traps; vent pipes. 

16. Vent connections. 

17. Pipes used; sizes, weights. 

18. Lead pipes for waste or vent lines. 

19. Water-closet connections; lead traps; sleeves. 

20. Joints; connections. 

21. Waste pipes from safes, refrigerators, etc. 

22. Steam exhausts; blow-offs. 

23. Saddle hubs not to be used. 

24. Notice to city engineer. 

25. Drainage systems exposed until approved. 

26. Plumbing to be tested. 

27. Board to issue certificate of appi'oval when. 

28. Suspension of licenses, for what cause. 

29. Permits not to issue when. 

30. Verbal permission insufficient. 

31. Chapter applies to new work, modifications, etc. 

32. Penalty. 

Section 1. The provisions of chapter 153 of the Public Laws 
relating to licensing plumbers are hereby adopted to be in force 
in the city. 

Sec. 2. There is hereby created a board of examiners of 
plumbers for the City of Concord, consisting of a member of the 
board of health, the city engineer and a plumber of not less 



(^ 



8 CITY OF CONCORD 

than five years active and continuous practical experience. At 
the regular meeting of the Board of Aldermen in April of each 
year, the Mayor shall appoint two members of this board to 
serve for one year and until their successors are appointed and 
qualified. The Mayor may make an appointment to member- 
ship in this board at any time to fill a vacancy occurring from 
any cause. The members of this board shall serve vi^ithout com- 
pensation. The present members of said board shall serve until 
their successors are appointed. 

Sec. 3. Said board of examiners shall, immediately after 
their appointment, meet and organize by the selection of a chair- 
man, and shall designate the time and place for the examination 
of all applicants desiring to engage in or v^^ork at the business 
of plumbing within the City of Concord. Said board shall ex- 
amine said applicants as to their practical knowledge of plumb- 
ing, house drainage and plumbing ventilation. Said examina- 
tions shall be both written and oral, together with such prac- 
tical work as said board may deem necessai-y. If, upon such 
examination, said board is satisfied that the applicant is com- 
petent to engage in and work at the business of plumbing, it 
shall thereupon issue a license to said applicant authorizing 
him to engage in and work at the business of plumbing in said 
city, either as a master or as a journeyman plumber. The fees 
to be charged for examinations and licenses shall be in accord- 
ance with chapter 153, of the Public Laws. 

Sec. 4. The city engineer shall be charged with the enforce- 
ment of the rules and regulations hereinafter contained, and with 
the enforcement of all other rules and regulations that may be 
adopted by the Board of Aldermen relating to plumbing, and 
shall perform all other duties of like kind that may be from 
time to time prescribed by the laws of the state and by the ordi- 
nances of the city. Said city engineer shall be well versed in 
matters pertaining to sanitary regulations in testing drainage 
systems and in making examinations of plumbing work ; he shall 
be of temperate habits and capable of keeping all books and 
records that shall be required of him, and shall make an annual 
report to the Board of Aldermen, including in said report a 
record of plumbing work inspected, number of permits granted, 
and any other data that in his judgment would be of interest 
to the public. 

Sec. 5. Every person, firm, company or corporation who shall 
carry on the business of plumbing in the City of Concord, shall 
register his name and place of business in the oflice of the Board 



ORDINANCES 9 

of Examiners of Plumbers, and notice of any change in the place 
of business of a registered plumber shall be immediately given 
to the Board. This section shall not apply to employees while 
working for a registered plumber. 

No person, firm, company and/or corporation shall start and/ 
or do work on plumbing and/or drainage within any building 
or part thereof, unless said person, firm, company and /or cor- 
poration has obtained a certificate of license to do said work and 
the plans for said work are signed by a master plumber. 

Sec. 6. Every plumber before doing any work in a building, 
except the repairing of leaks and the replacing of broken fix- 
tures, such as sinks, marble or slate slabs, earthern or crockery 
ware, and the opening of obstructed and frozen pipes, and the 
replacing of leaking traps, shall file at the ofiice of the City 
Engineer, upon blanks for that purpose, a description and sketch 
of the work to be performed, and no such work shall be com- 
menced without the approval of said Board or the City Engineer. 

Sec. 7. The plumbing of every building shall be separately 
and independently connected with the public sewer, where such 
sewer is within one hundred feet of said premises, unless per- 
mission is given by the City Engineer to connect in some other 
way. When there is no public sewer the plumbing shall be con- 
nected with a private sewer or with a cesspool, of a construc- 
tion and capacity approved by said City Engineer. 

Sec. 8. The main drain of any building from a point four 
feet outside the interior face of the foundation wall to a point 
inside the cellar, shall be of extra heavy tarcoated cast-iron of 
a sufficient size, not less than four inches in diameter, of a 
weight not less than hereinafter specified. Said main drain shall 
be of extra heavy tar-coated cast-iron pipe its entire length and 
shall be carried open up through the roof to a sufficient height, 
not less than two feet above said roof, and not less than five 
feet above the top of any window within ten feet. Soil pipe and 
fittings may be either plain or tar-coated with the following ex- 
ceptions: all soil pipe and fittings to be placed underground shall 
be tar-coated on the outside. Should a water closet be con- 
nected with said main drain, the latter shall not be less than 
four inches throughout its entire length. If no water-closet is 
to be connected the main drain may be reduced inside the cellar 
wall to not less than two inches in diameter; provided, however, 
that said main drain is again increased to four inches in di- 
ameter before passing through the roof. 



10 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 9. Whenever any drain or ventilating pipe shall be run 
outside of a building, before going through the roof, all such 
exposed pipe shall be extra heavy and shall not be less than four 
inches in diameter. If a second line of pipe is connected with 
the main drain, said main drain must be increased at the point 
of such connection to not less than four inches in diameter, and 
continued to the sewer or cesspool undiminished. All pipes 
which pass through the roof of any building shall be connected 
to the roof -flange with a tight joint. Change in direction shall 
be made with curved pipes, ofF-sets or bends, and all connections 
to inclined runs with Y branches, or tee Y's. The main drain 
and all other pipes shall, so far as is practicable, be laid above 
the floor of the basement or cellar, and be exposed to sight. 
They shall be properly secured by irons to walls or floor timbers, 
and shall not be exposed to external pressure where they pass 
through or under any wall. 

Sec. 10. That part of the drain which is outside of the build- 
ing and more than four feet from the foundation wall, shall be 
of extra heavy tar-coated cast-iron pipe, with lead joints or 
vitrafied salt-glazed earthern pipe with cement joints. It shall be 
laid, where practicable, in a straight line, with a uniform fall 
not less than one-fourth inch per foot. No house drain or 
private sewer shall pass under another house or within four feet 
of the wall thereof, except by written permission of the City 
Engineer. Every drain shall have a clean-out at base of stack 
and at a point where main drain leaves building and clean-outs 
of all kinds shall be provided with brass screw-caps. 

Sec. 11. Rain-water leaders shall never be used as soil, waste, 
or vent pipes, but shall be carried to a point five or more feet 
outside of the foundation wall before being connected with the 
main drain, and the main drain shall be enlarged at the point 
where the rain-water leader enters it. When rain-water leaders 
are within the building they must be of extra heavy, cast-iron 
pipe with leaded joints connected with the roof drain by an 
approved expansion joint. Rain-water leaders when outside of 
the house and connected with house drain, it must, if of sheet 
metal with slip joints, be trapped beneath the ground or just 
inside of the wall, the trap being arranged so as to prevent 
freezing. All rain-water leaders must be trapped. That portion 
of a rain-water leader that is undei'ground shall be of extra 
heavy tar-coated cast-iron. 

Sec. 12. Soil-pipes shall be of extra heavy tar-coated cast- 
iron and not less than four inches in diameter. Other waste 



ORDINANCES 11 

lines shall be of lead, cast-iron, or brass, and of not less than 
the following sizes, viz. : for wash-basins, bathtubs, laundry- 
tubs, urinals and sinks, not less than one and one-fourth inches; 
for slop-hoppers, not less than three inches. All fittings used 
in connection with cast-iron pipe shall correspond with it in 
weight and qaulity. 

Sec. 13. Every building used as a dwelling in which plumb- 
ing arrangements are to be placed shall be supplied with a water- 
closet for every fifteen persons. Each room or stall in which a 
closet is set shall be well lighted and ventilated, preferably 
with a window communicating directly with the outer air. No 
water-closet shall be set in a cellar or basement without per- 
mission of the City Engineer. Every water-closet or line of 
water-closets on the same floor shall be constantly supplied with 
water from a tank or cistern, and each closet shall have a flush- 
ing pipe of not less than one and one-fourth inches in diameter. 
No pan-closet shall be set. No direct supply closet shall be set 
unless located outside of the building proper in places where 
tanks cannot be made secure from frosts, and no such location 
of closets shall be allowed unless the board has become satisfied 
that it is impracticable to put closets in the building proper. 
When direct supply closets are allowed they shall receive their 
water supply directly from the main, service pipes, and shall 
be equipped with vacuum breakers approved by the City 
Engineer. In cases where the regulations in regard to water- 
closets have been fully complied with the construction and main- 
tenance of urinals is optional with the owner of the property 
excepting that in any special case, when it shall appear neces- 
sary either in old or new buildings, the Board of Health may 
require such a urinal to be constructed and maintained. When 
a urinal or urinals are provided all regulations that shall be in 
force in regard to water-closets shall apply to such urinal or 
urinals, except as to limit of the number of persons using said 
fixtures, and also that said fixtures may be supplied with a 
flushing pipe connected directly with the water main through 
fixtures, service pipes, and connections approved by the City 
Engineer. No water-closet shall be encased in woodwork. Toilet 
rooms shall be separate and apart from the room or rooms in 
which food is being handled. Such toilet rooms shall be pro- 
vided with independent ventilation and shall be kept closed at 
all times. All drinking fountains shall be of a type approved 
by the City Engineer and connected with the plumbing system 
according to any other fixture. 



12 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 14. The waste pipe of each and every sink, basin, water- 
closet, and of each set of trays or other fixtures except bath-tubs, 
shall be furnished with a separate trap which shall be placed 
above the floor of the room in which the fixture stands, unless 
otherwise dii'ected by the City Engineer. The waste pipe of each 
and all bath-tubs shall be furnished with a pot or other trap 
acceptable to the City Engineer, which shall be placed not more 
than eighteen inches from the fixture it serves. 

Sec. 15. Traps must be protected from syphonage and ven- 
tilated by special lines of cast-iron vent pipe or galvanized iron 
water pipe when the delivery pipe from a trap to a line of pipe 
running through the roof is six feet or more in length, measure 
to be taken from the center of the trap to the hub of the fitting 
on the pipe, running through the roof. The short lines from 
these branches to each trap, if exposed to view, may be of lead 
or brass. They shall be two inches in diameter for water-closet 
traps, and of the same size as the waste pipe for other traps. 
Vent pipes for water closet traps when more than thirty feet 
in length, shall be three inches in diameter. All vent pipes must 
extend at least two feet above the roof, or they must connect 
with the soil-pipe above the highest fixture, and in no case shall 
they terminate in a chimney-flue. They shall be run as direct 
as possible. If less than four inches in diameter they shall be 
enlarged to that size before passing through the roof. Bow 
venting will not be allowed. Fixtures changed from their pres- 
ent location shall be vented. 

Sec. 16. Local vents of water-closets or urinals must not be 
connected with any vent pipe, but must be carried into a flue 
provided for the purpose. 

Sec. 17. All pipe shall be of uniform thickness, free from all 
defects, and shall have an average weight per linear foot not less 
than below specified, viz. : 

Ordinary Extra 
pipe heavy 

Internal diameter, 2 inches 3V^ lbs. 5V2 lbs. 

Internal diameter, 3 inches 4V2 lbs. dVz lbs. 

Internal diameter, 4 inches 6V2 lbs. 12 lbs. 

Internal diameter, 5 inches 8 lbs. 17 lbs. 

Internal diameter, 6 inches 10 lbs. 20 lbs. 

Internal diameter, 8 inches 33y2 lbs. 

Internal diameter, 10 inches 45 lbs. 



ORDINANCES 13 

All cast-iron pipe used shall bear a mark showing it is extra 
heavy and shall be branded on the hub or within 6 inches of 
the hub. 

Sec. 18. All lead pipe used for waste or vent lines shall be 
of uniform thickness, free from defects, and shall have an aver- 
age weight per linear foot not less than below specified, viz. : 

Internal diameter 1% inch pipe 3 pounds 

Internal diameter IV2 inch pipe 3 lbs. 8 oz. 

Internal diameter 1% inch pipe 5 pounds 

Internal diameter 2 inch pipe 6 pounds 

Sec. 19. Four inch lead pipe or bends used in connecting 
water-closets shall weigh not less than eight pounds to the foot. 
Extra heavy cast-iron bends for water-closet connections are 
allowable. Weight of lead traps shall be as below specified, viz. : 

4 inch round traps, not lighter than 8 lbs 4 inch pipe 

5 inch round traps, not lighter than 8 lbs 5 inch pipe 

All sleeves used in connecting lead waste and vent pipe to 

cast-iron pipe shall be of the kind known to the trade as "extra- 
heavy" brass. 

Sec. 20. Joints in cast-iron pipes shall be packed with oakum 
run with molten lead, thoroughly calked and made tight. No 
joint shall be covered with paint until after the inspection and 
approval required by these regulations. Joints in lead pipes 
shall be of wiped solder. Connections of lead to cast-iron pipes 
shall be made with brass ferrules calked to the iron and con- 
nected to the lead by wiped solder. All connections of lead to 
brass ferrules shall be of wiped solder. Joints in earthern pipes 
shall be made water-tight by means of the best hydraulic 
cement with which the joint shall be thoroughly filled, and care 
must be taken that all mortar which comes through into the in- 
side of the pipe is wiped out. 

Sec. 31. Waste pipes from safes, refrigerators, and over- 
flows of tanks or cisterns shall empty over sinks, trapped gulley- 
holes, or otherwise as may be approved, but shall not connect 
with the drainage system, or be allowed to drip on cellar 
bottoms. 

Sec. 22. No steam exhaust, blow-off from a boiler or heating 
apparatus, shall connect with a sewer, house drain, or any part 
of the drainage system of the building. Such pipes shall dis- 
charge into a suitable tank or condenser, from which a trapped 
outlet to the house drain shall be provided. 



14 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 23. No saddle hub will be allowed on any plumbing. 

Sec. 24. The contractor or plumber having charge of the con- 
struction, reconstruction or any portion of the drainage system 
of any building shall, when the work is completed or sufficiently 
advanced for inspection, notify, in writing, the City engineer, 
who shall proceed to pass upon the work at once, or not later 
than twenty-four hours of secular time after such notification. 

Sec. 25. No part of any drainage system shall be covered 
up or hidden from view until approved by the City Engineer. 

Sec. 26. All plumbing shall be tested by water pressure test 
by the plumber in the presence of the City Engineei*. 

Sec. 27. The City Engineer shall promptly condemn and 
order removal of any work not done in accordance with these 
regulations, and when he finds any piece of work pi-operly done 
and in full compliance with these regulations, he shall issue a 
certificate to that effect. 

Sec. 28. Bad faith in the performance of work under a per- 
mit shall be deemed a sufficient reason for subjecting the plumber 
so offending to a suspension of his license, and every plumber 
shall be held responsible for the violation of these regulations 
by mechanics, laborers, and helpers employed by him. 

Sec. 29. No permit shall be issued to any licensed plumber 
during the time that he shall fail to agree to remedy any de- 
fective work after the sending of a written notice that he has 
been held responsible therefor under these regulations. 

Sec. 30. Under no circumstances whatever shall verbal per- 
mission given by anyone whether connected with the govern- 
ment of the city or not, be considered a justification for any 
deviation from, or violation of, these regulations. 

Sec. 31. This ordinance applies only to new work and all 
modifications, replacements, and extensions of existing work; 
but shall not debar the sanitary officer from making inspections 
of any plumbing, and enforcing Sec. 3, Ch. 13 of the city 
ordinances relating to public health. 

Sec. 32. Any person, or any persons or corporation by his 
or its agents, violating any of the terms of this chapter shall be 
fined not exceeding twenty dollars, and the license of such per- 
son or corporation shall be revoked in the discretion of the 
Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



ordinances 15 

An Ordinance amending chapter xl of the city ordinances, 
1925 AND amendments thereto. 

Be it ordaiyied by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter XL of City Ordinances, 1925 and 
amend any amendments thereto, by striking out the whole and 
substituting therefore, the following: 

CHAPTED XL. 

Building Code. 
Section. 

1. Title of chapter. 

2. Inspector of Buildings; assistant inspector; duties. 

3. Fire limits defined; restricted area. 

4. Permit required in certain cases for building, altering and 
moving. 

5. Fireproof construction of certain parts required in restricted 
area. 

6. Frames and wooden structures limited in restricted area. 

7. Repairing frame buildings in restricted area. 

8. Limits of height and area. 

9. Walls in restricted area. 

10. Concrete construction in fire limits. 

11. Protection of ends of wooden beams in fire limits. 

12. (a) Protection of wall openings in fire limits. 

(b) Certain doors and windows in restricted area to be 
equipped for fire protection. 

13. Stairway and elevator shafts in fire limits. 

14. Skylights over same. 

15. Floor lights. 

16. Light, vent and dumbwaiter shafts in fire limits. 

17. Roof covering in fire limits. 

18. Roof openings in fire limits. 

19. Exits required in fire limits. 

20. Fire stops. 

21. Areaways in restricted area. 

22. Frame buildings in fire limits. 

23. Electrical installations in fire limits. 

24. Chimneys for high temperature appliances in fire limits. 

25. Chimneys for low temperature appliances in fire limits. 

26. Hot air pipes. 

27. Steam and hot water pipes. 

28. Dry rooms in fire limits. 



16 CITY OF CONCORD 

29. Stoves and ranges in fire limits. 

30. Heating appliances in fire limits. 

31. Open flame heating devices in fire limits. 

32. Gas connections in fire limits. 

33. Vent flues in fire limits. 

34. Safety of design in fire limits. 

35. No buildings to be built or used for certain purposes unless 
license given by Mayor and Aldermen. 

36. Prerequisites to license. 

37. Storage of gunpowder or dynamite. 

38. Building inspector empowered to stop work in certain cases. 

39. Temporary structures. 

40. Duties of building inspector. 

41. Penalty. 

42. Definition of a garage. 

43. Classification of garages. 

44. Definition of Classifications. 

45. Garage beneath a dwelling. 

46. Permit for construction of Class C and D garages. 

47. Class A and B garage regulations. 

48. Class C and D garage regulations for construction. 

49. Pits. 

50. Storage of gasoline. 

51. Drains when required. 

52. Fire extinguishers when required. 

53. Board of Adjustment. 

CHAPTER XL. 

Building Code. 

Section 1. The name and title of this chapter is The Build- 
ing Code and it shall be known and cited as such. 

Sec. 2. The City Engineer shall act as Inspector of Buildings 
and shall have the duty of enforcing the provisions of this chap- 
ter. The Chief Engineer of the Fire Department and such other 
designated person of the Engineering Department shall be 
Building Inspectors for the purposes of consultation. And in 
case of the absence or disability of the Inspector of Buildings 
such designated person of the Engineering Department shall 
act in that capacity. 

Sec. 3. Beginning on the Concord and Claremont track of the 
Boston and Maine Railroad on the center line of Curtice Avenue 
thence westerly on the center line of Curtice Avenue to the 



ORDINANCES 17 

center line of Rumford Street; thence southerly on the center 
line of Rumford Street to the center line of Penacook Street; 
thence westerly on the center line of Penacook Street 200 feet; 
thence southerly on a line parallel to and 200 feet westerly of 
the center line of Rumford Street to a point 200 feet northerly 
of the center line of Franklin Street; thence westerly to a line 
parallel to and 200 feet north of the center line of Franklin 
Street to a point 200 feet westerly of the center line of Ridge 
Road; thence southerly 200 feet westerly of and parallel to 
the center line of Ridge Road to a point 200 feet northerly 
of the center line of Park Ridge; thence westerly on a line 
parallel to and 200 feet northerly of the center line of 
Park Ridge to a point 200 feet westerly of the center line 
of Westbourne Road; thence southerly 200 feet westerly of 
and parallel to the center line of Westbourne Road to 
Warren Street; thence continuing on the same course to 
the center line of Pleasant Street; thence easterly on the 
center line of Pleasant Street to a point opposite the center 
line of Merrimack Street; thence southerly on the line 
of the center of Merrimack Street extended to a point 200 
feet south of the southerly line of Pleasant Street; thence 
easterly on a line 200 feet south of and parallel with the 
southerly line of Pleasant Street to a point 200 feet west of the 
westerly line of South Spring Street; thence southerly on a 
line 200 feet west of and parallel with the westerly line of South 
Spring Street to the southerly line of Clinton Street; thence 
westerly on the southerly line of Clinton Street to a point 200 
feet westerly of the westerly line of Yale Street; thence south- 
erly on a line parallel to and 200 feet westerly of the westerly 
line of Yale Street to a point 200 feet southerly of the south- 
erly line of Noyes Street; thence easterly on a line parallel to 
and 200 feet southerly of the southerly line of Noyes Street to 
a point 200 feet westerly of the westerly line of South Street; 
thence southerly on a line 200 feet west of and parallel with 
the westerly line of South Street to a point 200 feet south of the 
southerly line of Rockingham Street; thence easterly on a line 
200 feet south of and parallel with the southerly line of Rock- 
ingham Street to a point 200 feet westerly of the westerly line 
of Donovan Street; thence southerly on a line 200 feet west of 
and parallel with the westerly line of Donovan Street to a point 
200 feet south of the southerly line of Wiggin Street; thence 
easterly on a line 200 feet south of and parallel with the south- 
erly line of Wiggin Street extended to the track of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad ; thence northerly by the track of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad to the point of beginning. 



18 CITY OF CONCORD 

Also all territory lying easterly of the Merrimack River that 
is bounded as follows: Beginning at the intersection of the 
center line of Bridge Street with the center line of the Merri- 
mack River, thence easterly on the center line of Bridge Street, 
1,000 feet, thence southerly at right angles to the center line 
of Bridge Street 1,000 feet, thence westerly parallel with the 
center line of Bridge Street 1,000 feet to the center of the Merri- 
mack River, thence northerly by the center line of said river 
to the point of beginning. 

Also within the boundaries of the above described fire limits 
there is defined an additional restricted area within which the 
provisions of Sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 12B and 21 shall apply. The 
boundaries of this restricted area within the fire limits are as 
follows : 

Beginning on the track of the Boston and Maine Railroad, 
Claremont Branch, at a point opposite Montgomery Street ex- 
tended, thence westerly in the center line of North State Street, 
thence southerly to the center line of Pleasant Stret, thence 
southerly in the center line of South State Street to the center 
line of Fayette Street, thence easterly to the Boston and Maine 
Railroad tracks, thence northerly along the tracks of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad to the point of beginning. And all schools, 
hospitals, theatres, public and private institutions and other 
places of public assemblage hereafter constructed shall be con- 
sidered as within the restricted area. 

That the restricted area covered by this code be extended to 
include the business area in Penacook, Ward One, namely: Main 
Street from Contoocook River Bridge to Hoyt's Garage, area 
to include 200 feet east from the east line of said street to 200 
feet west from west line of said street. 

All other sections of this building code not specified in the 
above restricted area are understood to apply to all classes of 
buildings which may be hereafter erected or altered within the 
fire limits. 

Sec. 4. No wall, building or part thereof costing more than 
one thousand dollars shall be built; and no enlargement or 
alteration shall be made to an existing wall, structure or build- 
ing, costing more than five hundred dollars, until duplicate 
plans showing the details of the proposed work accompanied by 
duplicate specifications covering material or materials to be used, 
have been submitted to and approved by the building inspector, 
and a permit issued for the proposed construction or alteration. 
One set of the approved plans and specifications shall be re- 
tained by the building inspector and the other set shall be kept 



ORDINANCES 19 

at the building during its construction. Pencil sketches and 
general specifications may be accepted by the building inspec- 
tors. No changes from the approved plans shall be made until 
revised plans and specifications have been submitted to and 
approved by the building inspector. 

No building shall be moved from without to within the fire 
limits and no building of any type shall be moved until a permit 
has been obtained from the building inspector; and no permit 
shall be issued for moving a building to a new location unless 
the application for the permit is accompanied by formal ap- 
proval and permission of the Board of Public Works. 

Sec. 5. Every building hereafter erected or enlarged within 
the restricted area shall be enclosed on all sides with walls con- 
structed wholly of stone, brick, hollow building tile, concrete, 
or other equivalent incombustible material; and shall have the 
roof, top, and sides of all roof structures, including dormer 
windows, covered with incombustible material. All cornices 
except those on dwelling houses, shall be of or covered with 
incombustible material. 

Sec. 6. No frame or wooden structure shall hereafter be 
built within the restricted area as given herein except dwelling 
houses of not larger than 2 family design, except the following; 
and all roofs placed upon such buildings or structures shall have 
an incombustible covering: 

(a) Temporary one-story frame buildings for the use of 
builder. 

(b) One-story sheds not over 15 feet high, open on the long 
side with sides covered with incombustible material, and 
with an area not exceeding 500 square feet. A wooden 
fence shall not be used to form the back or side of such 
sheds. 

(c) Wooden fences not over 10 feet high. 

(d) Piazzas or balconies not exceeding 10 feet in width, nor 
extending more than 3 feet above the second story floor 
beams. No such structui-e shall extend beyond the lot 
line, or be joined to any similar structure or another 
building. 

(e) Bay windows when covered with incombustible material. 

(f) Small outhouses not exceeding 150 square feet in area 
and 8 feet in height. 

Wooden sheds or outhouses shall not be located within 5 feet 
of any lot line, nor less than 30 feet from any other building 
over one story high. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 7. In case of any existing frame building which may 
hereafter be damaged by fire, decay or otherwise, to an amount 
greater than one-half of its sound value, exclusive of the founda- 
tion, the same shall not be repaired or rebuilt until the plans 
and specifications are satisfactory to the building inspector. In 
no case shall the area be increased if repaired. In case of a 
disagreement between the owner (and or other parties inter- 
ested) and the building inspector as to the value of the property 
involved, each of them shall choose a representative and the two 
thus chosen shall select a third person. These three shall serve 
as a board of arbitration in the disputed matter and their de- 
cision shall be final on the owner of the property. 

Sec. 8. Except as specified in Section 22, no building here- 
after erected within the fire limits, having walls of hollow build- 
ing tile or concrete blocks, shall exceed three stories, or 40 feet 
in height; and no building hereafter erected or altered shall ex- 
ceed four stories or 55 feet in height, unless it be of fireproof 
construction. 

The floor area between fire walls of non-fireproof buildings 
shall not exceed the following: When fronting on one street, 
5,000 square feet; when fronting on two streets, 6,000 square 
feet; and when fronting on three streets, 7,500 square feet. 
These area limits may be increased under the following condi- 
tions as indicated : 

For non-fireproof buildings, fully equipped with approved 
automatic sprinklers, 66 2-3 per cent. 

For fireproof buildings, not exceeding 125 feet in height, 50 
per cent. 

For fireproof buildings, not exceeding 125 feet in height fully 
equipped with approved automatic sprinklers, 100 per cent. 

The term floor area as used in this section shall mean the 
entire floor space between exterior walls and fire walls. 

Sec. 9. All exterior, or division walls of buildings hereafter 
erected within the restricted area shall be of masonry or con- 
crete and of sufficient thickness to support safely the load to 
be carried. 

Walls, excepting pai'ty and fire walls, for all buildings of other 
than the dwelling house class, not exceeding five stories or 65 
feet in height, shall have the upper story not less than 8 inches 
thick, increasing 4 inches in thickness for each two stories or 
fraction thereof below. For such buildings in excess of five 
stories, but not exceeding ten stories or 125 feet in height, the 
top story shall be not less than 8 inches thick, increasing 4 



ORDINANCES 21 

inches in thickness, for each two stories or fraction thereof be- 
low. No two-story increment shall exceed 30 feet in height. 

Solid masonry exterior walls of dwellings not exceeding 30 
feet in height, exclusive of gable, and occupied by not more than 
two families, shall be not less than 8 inches thick, and shall in- 
clude cellar and basement walls if built the same thickness. The 
unsupported length of such walls shall not exceed 25 feet. 

Solid concrete walls shall be not less than 6 inches thick, and 
hollow monolithic concrete walls shall have an aggregate thick- 
ness not less than 6 inches. If masonry walls are built hollow, 
or are constructed of hollow clay or concrete units, the allow- 
able height of the 8-inch portion shall be limited to 20 feet and 
the remaining lower portion shall be at least 10 inches thick. 

For dwellings over 30 feet high, but not exceeding 40 feet in 
height, the exterior walls shall be not less than 8 inches thick 
for the uppermost 20 feet and shall be at least 12 inches thick 
for the remaining lower portion. 

Solid party and division walls of dwellings shall be not less 
than 8 inches thick for the uppermost 20 feet and shall be at 
least 12 inches for the remaining lower portion. Such party 
and division walls, if hollow, or if built of hollow clay or con- 
crete units, shall be not less than 12 inches thick. 

All walls of buildings of the dwelling house class of ordinary 
construction exceeding 40 feet in height shall be solid. The 
upper story shall not be less than 8 inches thick, increasing 4 
inches in thickness for each three-story or fraction thereof be- 
low. No three-story increment shall exceed 45 feet in height. 

Brick or concrete walls of buildings outside the restricted 
area, which under this ordinance could be of wood, may have a 
minimum thickness of 8 inches. Such walls shall not exceed two 
stories or 30 feet in height, exclusive of gable, nor shall they 
exceed 35 feet in length unless properly braced by cross walls, 
piers, or buttresses. 

Walls in skeleton construction shall be supported by girders 
at each story, and shall be not less than 8 inches thick, except 
the solid concrete may be 8 inches thick, if properly reinforced. 

In all new buildings, except dwellings, frame buildings, and 
skeleton construction, party walls and fire walls which serve as 
bearing walls on both sides, shall be not less than 16 inches 
thick at the top. No two-story increment shall exceed 30 feet 
in height. 

Rubble stone walls shall be 4 inches thicker than required for 
brick walls. 

The foundation walls of all buildings over two stories in 
height, except as above provided, shall be 4 inches thicker from 
footing to grade than required for the remainder of the wall. 



22 CITY OF CONCORD 

All division or party walls over one story high, shall extend 
the full thickness of top story to at least 2 feet above the roof 
surfacing of a building as parapet and be properly coped, ex- 
cepting walls which face on a street and are finished with 
cornices covered with incombustible materials, gutters or crown 
mouldings; excepting also the walls of detached dwellings with 
peaked or hipped roofs. 

Clay brick used for exterior walls, chimneys or piers, shall 
have an average compressive strength of 2,000 pounds per square 
inch, and an absorption not exceeding 20 per cent. Concrete, 
or other varieties of brick, used for the same purposes shall have 
an average crushing strength of 1,500 pounds per square inch, 
and an absorption not exceeding 15 per cent. 

Portland cement only shall be used in the manufacture of con- 
crete blocks to be used for walls within the restricted ai'ea, and 
the coarse aggregate shall be of suitable material graded in 
size, but in no case shall the maximum dimension exceed one- 
fourth the minimum width of any section of the finished block. 

Concrete blocks shall not be used in construction until they 
have attained the age of 28 days, or developed a strength re- 
quired in this section. 

The compressive strength of building blocks shall in all cases 
be calculated upon the gross area of the bedding faces, no 
account being taken of the cellular spaces. 

Hollow building tile used for exterior or party walls or piers, 
and designed to be laid normally with the cells vertical, shall 
have an average compressive strength of not less than 1,200 
pounds per square inch when tested with the cells vertical, and 
not less than 300 pounds per square inch when tested with the 
cells horizontal. 

The average compi'essive strength of hollow building tile de- 
signed to be laid normally with the cells horizontal and tested 
with the cells in that position, shall be not less than 700 pounds 
per square inch. 

Hollow concrete block or tile used for exterior or party walls 
or piers shall have an average compressive strength of not less 
than 700 pounds per square inch. 

Concrete blocks shall be not more than 36 days old when 
tested. The average strength of the blocks as here given shall 
be obtained by testing five blocks of average quality. 

The allowable working stress on all masonry construction 
shall not exceed one-tenth of the required average test strength. 

All walls and partitions in schools, hospitals, and places of 
public assemblage, over one story high, and all walls and parti- 



ORDINANCES 23 

tions in theatres, shall hei'eafter be built of brick, stone, hollow 
or solid blocks, or metal lath and Portland cement plaster on 
metal studding, or other equivalent incombustible construction. 

The mortar used for all 8-inch walls, fire walls, foundation 
walls, walls for skeleton construction, and all walls built of 
hollow building tile or concrete blocks, shall be either Portland 
cement mortar, or cement-lime mortar, the latter in proportion 
not leaner than 1 part Portland cement, 1 part lime, and 6 parts 
sand by volume. 

Sec. 10. Concrete for reinforced concrete construction shall 
consist of a medium wet mixture of one pai-t of Portland 
cement to not more than six parts of aggregate, fine and coarse, 
in such proportions as to produce the greatest density. 

The quality of the materials, the design, and the construc- 
tion, shall be in accordance with the best engineering practice. 

Note: — Quartz gravel or other highly silicious gravel 
should not be used as an aggregate in concrete fireproofing 
or in reinforced concrete construction in portions of a build- 
ing liable to be subjected to fire. It has been fully proven 
that such concrete cannot be depended upon when subjected 
to high temperatures. 

Sec. 11. The ends of all floors, ceiling, or roof beams, enter- 
ing a party or fire wall from opposite sides, shall be separated 
by at least 6 inches of solid masonry. Such separation may 
be obtained by corbeling the wall, or staggering the beams, or 
the beams may be supported by steel wall hangers, but no wall 
shall be corbeled more than 2 inches for this purpose. The ends 
of all wooden beams which enter walls shall be cut to a bevel 
to make them self -releasing. 

Sec. 12. (a) No opening in any interior masonry wall shall 
exceed 8 feet by 10 feet unless the load above shall be supported 
by steel girders of sufficient strength, said girders shall be pro- 
tected with at least two inches of approved insulating material. 
If the opening be in a party or fire wall it shall have a standard 
automatic fire door on each side of the wall. If an opening in 
a fire wall is made to serve as an emergency exit it shall not 
exceed 48 square feet in ai^ea and a self-closing swinging fire 
door shall be substituted for one of the automatic fire doors. 
The total openings in a fire wall shall not exceed 25 per cent 
in linear length of the wall. 

(b) Every building hereafter erected within the restricted 
area, except churches, dwellings, tenement houses, dormitories, 
and lodging houses, shall have standard fire doors, shutters, or 



24 CITY OF CONCORD 

wired glass in incombustible frames and sash on every exterior 
opening above the first story, except when fronting on a street 
not less than 50 feet wide or where no other building is within 
35 feet of such opening. The wall of a building in the same 
plane as that in which the opening is situated, shall not be con- 
sidered as coming within the intent of this rule. All openings 
in the side and rear walls of the first story, except show win- 
dows, shall be protected as prescribed in this section when within 
50 feet of another building. 

All exterior windows more than 75 feet above the curb shall 
have incombustible frames and sash glazed with wired glass. 

Sec. 13. In all buildings hereafter erected, which are used 
above the first floor for business purposes or for public assem- 
blage, or for any purpose whatever if over three stories high, 
the stair shafts shall be separately and continuously enclosed 
by incombustible partitions. Elevator shafts in all buildings 
hereafter erected shall be enclosed in the same manner. The 
partitions shall be constructed of brick or other fire-resistive 
material approved by the Building Inspector or other designated 
official. No such partition shall be less than 4 inches thick. 

All door openings in stair and elevator enclosures shall be 
protected by fire doors mounted with wrought iron or steel hard- 
ware, and shall be securely attached to the wall or partition, or 
to substantial incombustible frames anchored thereto. If glass 
panels be used in such doors, they shall be of wire glass not 
exceeding 720 square inches in area. Interior shaft windows 
shall not be permitted. 

Doors opening into stairway shafts shall swing in the direc- 
tion of exit travel, shall be self-closing, and shall be at least 
30 inches wide. 

The enclosure walls for all elevator shafts shall extend at 
least 3 feet above the roof, and at least three-fourths of the 
area shall be covered with a skylight constructed as specified 
in Section 14. If in the opinion of the Building Inspector, or 
other designated official, it is necessary to preserve an open 
elevator or hoistway in existing buildings, the floor openings 
through which they pass shall be equipped with automatically 
closing trap doors not less than 1^/2 inches thick, made of two 
thicknesses of matched boards, covered on the under side with 
tin; the trap doors when closed, shall extend beyond the open- 
ings on all sides. 

Sec. 14. Where a stairway, elevator, or dumbwaiter shaft 
extends through the roof and is covered by a skylight, the sky- 



ORDINANCES 25 

light shall be constructed with incombustible frame and sash, 
glazed with ordinary thin glass, and shall be protected by a 
galvanized steel wire screen with a mesh not exceeding one 
inch, and the wire not smaller than No. 12 gauge. The screen 
shall have metal supports and be placed not less than 6 inches 
above the skylight. Instead of a skylight, a window may be 
placed above the roof in the side of the shaft which is farthest 
removed from a property line. The window shall have incom- 
bustible frame and sash, and be glazed with thin glass. 

Sec. 15. Except in dwellings, all openings hereafter made in 
floors for the transmission of light to floors below shall be 
covered with glass set in metal frames and bars. The glass shall 
be not less than % inch in thickness, and if any glass measures 
more than 16 square inches there shall be a rigid wire mesh 
either in the glass or under it. 

Sec. 16. In every building hereafter erected or altered 
except frame buildings, all walls or partitions forming interior 
light or vent shafts shall be built in accordance with the re- 
quirements for stair and elevator shafts in new buildings as 
specified in Section 13. The walls of dumbwaiter shafts, except 
those in dwellings which extend only one story above the base- 
ment or cellar, shall be of fire-resistive construction, and shall 
be not less than 3 incTies thick if constructed of brick, hollow 
or solid partition blocks, or of steel or wood studding and metal 
lath with % inch of Portland cement plaster on each side; or a 
2 inch solid metal lath and Portland cement plaster wall may be 
permitted, if securely anchored at each floor. The material and 
method of construction to be as specified for stair and elevator 
shafts in existing buildings in Section 13. 

Where a dumb-waiter shaft does not extend through the roof, 
the top of the shaft shall be of fire-resistive construction of the 
same thickness as the walls of the shaft. 

All openings in dumb-waiter shafts shall be protected by fire 
doors mounted in incombustible frames securely anchored to 
the walls. 

The walls of all light and vent shafts hereafter erected shall 
extend not less than 3 feet above the roof level, except that 
when a shaft is covered by an incombustible ventilating sky- 
light, the walls need not extend more than 2 feet above the 
roof. Masonry walls shall be properly coped. 

When metal louvres are used for ventilating purposes, the 
louvres or slats shall be riveted to the metal frame. 



20 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 17. Every building hereafter erected and every roof 
hereafter renewed within the corporate limits shall have a fire- 
resistive roof covering, and no existing wooden shingle roof, if 
damaged by fire or other casualty more than 25 per cent, shall 
be renewed or repaired with other than a fire-resistive roof 
covering. No existing wood shingled roof shall be covered with 
fire-resistive material. Said wood shingles shall be removed 
before applying the fire-resistive material. 

Sec. 18. All openings in roofs for the admission of light or 
air, other than those provided for in Section 14 and 16, shall 
have incombustible frames and sash glazed with wii-ed glass; 
or ordinary glass may be used, if protected above and below 
by galvanized steel wire screens with a mesh not exceeding one 
inch, and the wire not smaller than No. 12 guage. The top 
screen shall be installed as specified in Section 14. 

Sec. 19. All dwellings hereafter erected or altered when 
occupied above the first floor as tenement or apartments shall 
have two stairways, and in every building hereafter erected, 
not exceeding two stories in height and buildings erected solely 
for storage purposes each floor area as defined in Section 8, 
above the first shall be provided with at least two means of 
egress remote from each other, one of which shall be an en- 
closed stairway as provided in Section 13, or a doorway in a 
fire wall leading to another floor area separately provided with 
adequate stairs or other independent means of exit. Such door- 
way serving as an emergency exit in a fire wall shall be pro- 
tected by an automatic and a self-closing fire door as specified 
in Section 12.* No portion of any floor shall be more than 100 
feet from a place of egress. Elevators shall not be considered 
as a required means of egress as specified in this section.** 

•i=Note: — As a means of rapid and safe egress from a burning building, 
tlie use of horizontal exits through a fire wall or a fire erxit partition are 
strongly recommended. Such a partition shall be built of a fire-resistive 
material not less than 3 inches thick, and be securely attached to the walls, 
floor, and ceiling of the room which it sub-divides. It shall be provided 
with one or more self-closing fire doors, that is, doors which are kept 
closed by some automatic device. Such a partition would afford an area of 
quick refuge upon either side. Each area must be sufficient to accommodate 
all the ijeople employed upon the' floor, and must be provided with at least 
one independent exit to the street. As above indicated, a fire wall may be 
made to serve the' same purpose. As a means of egress, a doorway in such 
a i)artition or fire wall may be considered the equivalent of three times 
the same width of stairway. 

**Smokeproof Tower — The use of a smokeproof tower or stairway is also 
recommended as one of the best known means of safe escape from a burn- 
ing building. At the same time it furnishes a protected position from which 
fireroen can attack a fire on any floor. Such a tower is built entirely of 
incornbustible materials, and has no direct openings to the interior of the 
building it serves. It is reached by a fireproof open-air balcony or interior 
open-air vestibule, thus effectively excluding smoke and fire from the tower. 
The entrance at each floor level is protected by a self-closing fire door. 



ORDINANCES 1 1 

Except in dwellings, no required stairway shall be less than 
44 inches wide, and in all public buildings the total width of 
exit door-ways leading therefrom shall at least be equal to the 
total width of the stairways which they serve. 

The total width of stairway, interior and exterior, provided 
for the occupancy of each floor and those above, shall be not 
less than 44 inches for the first 50 persons, and 12 inches for 
each additional 50 persons to be accommodated thereby. The 
stair treads shall be not less than 9^/^ inches wide, and the risers 
not more than 7% inches high. Winders in such required stair- 
ways are prohibited. 

Every school, hospital and theatre, over one story high, shall 
have at least two stairways constructed entirely of incombustible 
material, located remote from each other and continuous from 
grade line to the topmost story. 

All exit doors in schools, hospitals, theatres, and other places 
of public assemblage, shall open outward, and shall be equipped 
with anti-panic latches or bolts. 

Sec. 20. At each floor level in all buildings hereafter erected 
within the fire limits, all stud walls, partitions, furrings and 
spaces between joists where they rest on division walls or parti- 
tions, shall be fire-stopped with incombustible material in a man- 
ner to completely cut off communication by fire through con- 
cealed spaces. Such fire-stopping shall extend the full width of 
the studding and at least 4 inches above each fioor level. Stair 
carriages shall be fire-stopped at least once in the middle portion 
of each run. Buildings of over one story in height if framed 
with girts the full size of the wall studding and floor timbers, 
no other fire-stop would be required. If balloon framing is used 
fire-stops will be required at each fioor as specified for interior 
partitions as above. 

Sec. 21. All areaways shall be guarded with suitable railings, 
or be protected by incombustible covers or gratings. If gratings 
be used, they shall have a wire screen of not more than i^-inch 
mesh securely attached to the under side. Open areaways shall 
not project beyond the lot line. 

Sec. 22. No frame buildings hereafter erected or altered 
shall exceed two stories or 30 feet in height, except that houses 
designed for private dwelling occupancy exclusively, may be 
three stories or 40 feet in height. 

No frame building hereafter erected for any occupancy other 
than grain elevators, coal elevators and coal pockets, ice houses 
and exhibition buildings, shall cover a ground area exceeding 



28 CITY OP CONCORD 

the following: One-story building 7,500 square feet; two-story 
building, 5,000 square feet. 

In rows of frame houses the dividing walls or partitions be- 
tween houses shall be built of brick, hollow tile, concrete or other 
incombustible material; or they may be built with 4-inch studs, 
filled solidly with brickwork laid in mortar, or other incom- 
bustible material and covered with metal lath and plaster. Such 
dividing partitions shall rest on masonry walls and shall extend 
to under side of roof boards. A flush mortar joint shall be made 
between the roof boards and the wall or partition. In rows of 
more than three houses every alternate division wall or parti- 
tion shall be constructed of solid brickwork not less than 8 
inches in thickness. 

Buildings with wooden framework clad with sheet metal or 
stucco or veneered with brick, shall be classed as frame buildings. 

Sec. 23. All electrical installations shall be in accordance 
with the National Electrical Code, and no installation of elec- 
trical equipment shall be made, except in conformity thereto. 

Sec. 24. The smoke flue of every high pressure steam boiler, 
hereafter erected, and every appliance producing a correspond- 
ing temperature in a flue, if built of brick, stone, reinforced 
concrete or other approved masonry, shall have walls not less 
than 12 inches thick, and the inside 4 inches of such wall shall 
be fire brick, laid in fire mortar, for a distance of at least 25 
feet from the point where the smoke connection of the boiler 
enters the flue. 

Metal smokestacks may be permitted for boilers, furnaces and 
similar apparatus, where large hot fires are used, provided they 
have a clearance from all combustible material of not less than 
one-half the diameter of the stack, but not less than 15 inches 
unless the combustible material be properly guarded by loose- 
fitting metal shields, in which case the distance shall be not less 
than 12 inches. Where such stack passes through a combus- 
tible roof it shall be guarded by a galvanized iron ventilating 
thimble extending from at least 9 inches below the under side 
of the ceiling or roof beams, to at least 9 inches above the roof, 
and the diameter of the ventilating thimble shall be not less than 
36 inches greater than that of the smokestack. Metal smoke- 
stacks shall not be permitted to pass through floors. 

Sec. 25. All chimneys, hereafter erected within the corpo- 
rate limits shall be built of brick, or other fireproof, incombus- 
tible material, and in no case shall rest upon any flooring with- 
out footing of masonry or iron-supported by iron beams, having 



ORDINANCES 29 

a secure bearing of masonry or iron at either end. All chimneys 
shall be constructed with either 8-inch brick walls or with 4-inch 
brickwoi'k and a terra-cotta flue lining set in cement. Brick 
chimneys shall be smoothly plastered with mortar on the out- 
side below the roofing. In no case shall a nail be driven into 
the masonry of any flue. All flues shall be guarded by either 
a double collar of metal or a recess, leaving two inches of space 
around the flue. No drain pipe or earthenware of any descrip- 
tion shall be used for horizontal flues but all flues of this kind 
shall be made of iron pipe laid in brick and mortar, or a double 
galvanized iron pipe, the air space between the pipes to be not 
less than two inches. All flues shall be topped out at least four 
feet above a flat roof and two feet above the ridge of a pitched 
roof building and all chimneys shall be covered with a cap of 
metal, concrete, or stone properly secured. No soft brick shall 
be used on the exterior above the roof or on the interior within 
four feet of the roofing in the construction of chimneys. No 
smokepipe or flue shall project through an external wall or 
through any window, door, or other opening in said wall, and 
no stove funnel shall project through any partition or floor un- 
less the same is safely and securely surrounded by brick or stone- 
work. Hearths or flreplaces or grates shall not be less than 
eight inches thick and shall be laid upon brick or other trimmed 
arches, or upon bars of iron supporting a bed of brickwork. 

All funnel receivers shall be built into the chimneys at the 
time of their construction. All chimneys shall have at their 
base an ash door, or some opening sufficient to enable them to be 
readily cleaned. If any existing or hereafter erected chimney, 
flue, or other heating apparatus shall be dangerous or unsafe, 
the Inspector shall at once notify, in writing, the owner-agent, 
or other party having an interest in said premises, and shall 
require him to make the same safe immediately. All woodwork 
shall be kept away at least two inches from any chimney. 

No building shall be hereafter erected in which chimneys, 
boilers, or heating apparatus of any kind are used, or are to be 
erected and maintained, nor shall any alteration be made in 
chimneys or flues already erected, without notice to the Inspec- 
tor before such changes or alterations are commenced, and this 
provision shall apply to all buildings raised, moved, or built upon. 

Sec. 26. No woodwork shall be placed at a less distance than 
one inch from any tin or other metal flue, or flues, pipe or 
pipes, used or intended to be used to convey heated air in any 
building unless protected by a metal or earthern casing so con- 



30 CITY OF CONCORD 

structed as to permit the free circulation of air around said 
flues or pipes. 

Cold-air ducts for hot-air furnaces shall be made of incom- 
bustible material. 

Sec. 27. No unprotected steam or hot water pipe shall be 
within one inch of any woodwork. Every steam or hot water 
pipe passing through combustible floors, or ceilings, or wooden 
lath and plaster partitions, shall be protected by a metal tube, 
and be provided with a metal cap. All wooden boxes, or casings, 
enclosing steam or hot water heating pipes, or wooden covers 
to recesses in walls in which steam or hot water heating pipes 
are placed, shall be lined with metal. 

Sec. 28. No combustible material shall be permitted in the 
construction of any dry room hereafter erected, in which a 
temperature of 125 degrees Fahrenheit or over may exist. If 
a temperature under 125 degrees Fahrenheit is to be used, the 
dry room may be constructed of wood, but it shall be lined 
throughout with 1-8 inch asbestos, covered with sheet metal. 

If windows are placed in walls or ceilings of dry rooms they 
shall be wired glass set in fixed incombustible sash and frames. 

Sec. 29. Hotel and restaurant ranges shall be provided with 
a metal hood, placed at least 9 inches below any wooden lath 
and plaster or wooden ceiling, and have an individual pipe out- 
let connected with a good brick flue. The pipe shall be pro- 
tected by at least one inch of asbestos covering, or its equivalent. 

Combustible floors under coal ranges and similar appliances 
without legs, such as mentioned in Section 30 in which hot fires 
are maintained, shall rest upon 6-inch foundations built of in- 
combustible materials supported within the thickness of the floor 
framing. Such hearths shall extend at least 24 inches in front 
and 12 inches on the sides and back of the range or similar 
heating appliance. 

Sec. 30. Any woodwork, wooden lath and plaster partition 
or ceiling within 4 feet of the sides or back, or 6 feet from the 
front of any heating boiler, furnace, bakery oven, coffee roaster, 
fii-e-heated candy kettle, laundry stove or other similar appli- 
ance shall be covered with metal to a height of at least 4 feet 
above the floor. This covering shall extend the full length of 
the boiler, furnace, or heating appliance, and to at least 5 feet 
in front of it. Metal shield shall be loosely attached, thus 
preserving an air space behind them. In no case shall such 



ORDINANCES 31 

combustible construction be permitted within 2 feet of the sides 
or back of the heating appliance, or 5 feet in front of same. 

No furnace, boiler, range, or other heating appliance, shall 
be placed against a wall furred with wood. 

Heating boilers shall be encased on sides and top by an in- 
combustible protective covering not less than IV2 inches thick. 

Sec. 31. All gas, gasoline, oil, or charcoal burning stoves or 
heating devices shall be placed on iron stands at least 6 inches 
above combustible supports, unless the burners are at least 5 
inches above the base with metal guard plates 4 inches below 
the burners. 

No open flame heating or lighting devices shall be used in any 
room where gasoline or other volatile inflammable fluids are 
stored or handled. 

Sec. 32. Gas connections to stoves and similar heating de- 
vices shall be made by rigid metal pipes. For small portable 
gas heating devices, flexible metal or rubber tubing may be used 
when there is no valve or other shut-off on the device. 

Sec. 33. Vent flues or ducts, for the removal of foul or 
vitiated air, in which the temperature of the air cannot exceed 
that of the rooms, shall be constructed of metal or other incom- 
bustible material, and shall not be placed nearer than one inch 
to any woodwork, and no such flue shall be used for any other 
purpose. 

Sec. 34. All parts of every building shall be designed to 
safely carry the loads to be imposed thereon, and shall in all 
other respects conform to good engineering practice. 

Sec. 35. No permit shall be granted by the Building Inspec- 
tor for the erection or remodeling of any building to be used as 
a blacksmith shop, coal yard, filling station, junk yard, lumber 
yard, public storage or repair garage, commercialized amuse- 
ment, dry cleaning plant, steam mill, furnace or foundry or 
house for storing powder unless the owner has obtained a per- 
mit from the Zoning Board of Adjustment, subject to the ap- 
proval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen. No building 
already erected shall be used or occupied for any of the above 
named purposes unless a permit to so use or occupy has been 
granted by the Zoning Board of Adjustment, subject to the 
approval of the Mayor and Board of Aldermen; and the Build- 
ing Inspector shall have power to order such changes in existing 
buildings used for the above named purposes as he may deem 
necessary. 



32 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 36. No person shall hereafter erect or build, or cause 
to be erected or built, any buildings for the aforesaid purposes, 
until he has presented to the Board of Mayor and Aldermen a 
petition therefor ; setting out the proposed situation of such pub- 
lic garage, steam mill, furnace, foundry, blacksmith shop, vul- 
canizing or dry cleansing establishment, the materials of which 
the same are to be built, the dimensions, height, and number of 
stories of the proposed building, the situation of all boilers 
therein, the manner in which the same are to be secured or set, 
the height of the chimney, and the various branches of business 
to be carried on or proposed to be carried on in said building, 
and having first obtained a license therefor. 

Sec. 37. No person shall erect, or cause to be erected or 
built within the city, any building for the storage of dynamite 
or gunpowder, in quantities of over twenty-five pounds weight, 
nor use or permit to be used or occupied any building for such 
purpose, unless in a building situated more than sixty rods from 
any dwelling house, public road, or place, and under a license 
from the Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Sec. 38. The Building Inspector shall have the authority to 
stop the construction of any building, or the making of any 
alterations or repairs of any building, within the city, when 
the same is being done in a reckless or careless manner, or in 
violation of any ordinance of this city, and to order, in writing 
or parole, any and all persons in any way or manner whatever 
engaged in so constructing, altering, or repairing any such 
building, to stop and desist therefrom ; and to have the authority, 
if they find any building or part thereof in an unsafe condition 
and so that said unsafe condition may be averted by the im- 
mediate application of precautionary measures, to cause such 
precautionary measures to be taken, all work necessary to render 
said building or any part hereof safe to be done after having 
served written notice upon the owner, lessee, occupant, or agent 
of said building personally. Following any order of the build- 
ing inspector made under the provisions of this section, any 
party interested may petition the Board of Adjustment to have 
the questions raised by such order heard and determined by 
such board. Upon receipt of such petition the Board of Adjust- 
ment shall notify all parties interested to appear and be heard 
at a meeting of the board which shall be called for that purpose. 

Sec. 39. Temporary observation stands, booths, and plat- 
forms may be erected within the fire limits upon permits issued 
by the Building Inspector. 



ORDINANCES 33 

Sec. 40. The Building Inspector is hereby authorized and 
empowered : 

First: To enforce all ordinances relating to the construc- 
tion, equipment, and condition of all property with- 
in the corporate limits. 

Second : To supervise the construction or re-construction of all 
buildings. 

Third : When called upon to report to the Mayor and Board 
of Aldermen regarding the condition of the city on 
all matters pertaining thereto. 

Sec. 41. Any and all persons who shall violate any of the 
provisions of this chapter or fail to comply therewith, or who 
shall violate or fail to comply with any order or regulation made 
thereunder, or who shall build in violation of any detailed state- 
ment or specifications or plans submitted and approved there- 
under, or any certificate or permit issued thereunder, shall 
severally for each and every such violation and non-compliance 
respectively, forfeit and pay a penalty in the sum of twenty 
dollars. The imposition of one penalty for any violation of this 
chapter shall not excuse the violation, or permit it to continue; 
and all such persons shall be required to correct or remedy such 
violations or defects within a reasonable time; and when not 
otherwise specified, each ten days that prohibited conditions are 
maintained shall constitute a separate offense. 

The application of the above penalty shall not be held to 
prevent the enforced removal of prohibited conditions, as pro- 
vided in section 2 of this chapter. 

GARAGES WITHIN THE FIRE LIMITS. 

Note : — To insure a standard quality of construction, it is 
suggested that all fire doors, windows, shutters, and similar de- 
vices required by the provisions of this chapter, shall be of a 
manufacture which has been tested and approved by the Under- 
writers' Laboratories. 

Sec. 42. The word "garage" wherever occurring in this Code 
shall mean a building or any part thereof, in which there shall 
be housed or kept one or more self-propelled vehicles, or auto- 
mobiles, containing inflammable liquid for fuel or power. The 
plans for every garage shall be filed in duplicate with the 
Building Inspector and shall be approved by him before any 
use of the garage as such. 



34 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sec. 43. For the purposes of this chapter garages are classed 
as follows: 

Class A — Private Garages. 

Class B — Private Storage Garages. 

Class C — Public Storage and/or Sales Garages. 

Class D — Public Repair Garages. 

Sec. 44. Class A. A private garage is one in which there 
shall be housed or kept, or which shall have a capacity for not 
more than four self-pi'opelled vehicles or automobiles and in 
which no business or industry connected directly or indirectly 
with motor vehicles is carried on. 

Class B. A private storage garage is one in which there are 
kept more than four self-propelled vehicles or automobiles and 
in which no business or industry connected directly or indirectly 
with motor vehicles is carried on. 

Class C. A public garage and/or sales garage is one in which 
regular or transient automobiles are stored or displayed, but 
in which no repairing is done, but which may have in connection 
therewith a public filling or greasing station. 

Class D. A public repair garage is one in which self-propelled 
vehicles or automobiles may be stored or repaired and which 
may have in connection therewith a public filling or greasing 
station. 

Sec. 45. A Class A garage may be located beneath a dwell- 
ing, provided the following regulations as to its construction 
are rigidly complied with: 

(A) The floor and ceiling construction above the garage when 
it is located beneath the building, or the roof when the garage 
is attached to the building, shall be unpierced and shall have a 
fire-resistance of one hour based upon the Standard Specifica- 
tions for Fire Tests of Materials and Construction. 

(B) Walls and partitions shall be of such construction as will 
meet requirements of the one-hour test as above specified. 

Note — A minimum type of floor and ceiling construction 
which it is believed will meet the requirements of the speci- 
fied test would be constructed as follows: Two-inch floor 
joists spaced on not less than 16 inch centers and properly 
bridged. Overhead flooring double, of %-inch rough and 
finished floor boards with a layer of asbestos floor felt be- 
tween. Ceiling of heavy metal lath and Portland cement 
or gypsum plaster not less than %-inch thick. The metal 
lath to be attached to the joists by 6 penny nails driven 
nearly home and heads turned over against the lath, also 



ORDINANCES 35 

by strands of No. 8 annealed wire looped over each third 
joist engaging the lath at bottom of joist and twisted to 
place. These loops to be spaced at intervals of 2 feet along 
the joists. The lath to be bent down 6 inches along the 
walls on all sides and securely attached to same. 

For walls and partitions and construction meeting the 
test qualifications should be approved. In absence of test 
records proving that less thickness of material may be em- 
ployed the following may be accepted: Brick, hollow tile, 
concrete block or gypsum block, 4 inches thick, or reinforced 
concrete 3 inches thick. The foregoing incombustible con- 
structions are recommended. 

The minimum construction meeting the requirement for 
walls would be a backplastered Portland cement stucco on 
heavy metal lath attached to wooden studs spaced on 16 
inch centers with metal lath and %-inch Portland cement or 
gypsum plaster on the inside surface. 

For partitions, %-inch Portland cement or gypsum 
plaster on metal lath on each side of stud construction as 
above specified may be accepted as fulfilling the requirement. 

(C) All doors and windows with their sash and frames shall 
be standard fire-proof construction and glazed with wired glass. 

(D) Openings from dwellings into garage shall be restricted 
to a single doorway and such openings shall be protected by a 
standard swinging self-closing fire door with approved fire- 
resistive frame and hai-dware. No glass shall be permitted in 
such door. 

(E) When the doorway connects directly with a cellar or 
basement on the same or lower level in which there is any heat- 
ing device or gas fixture, it shall have a sill raised at least one 
foot above the garage floor level; or the doorway shall lead 
into a vestibule from which a second door connects with the 
cellar or basement. 

(F) The garage floor shall be of concrete or equal fire- 
resistive and impervious material and shall have a slope suffi- 
cient to permit natural drainage of gasses, oil and water to the 
outside, except as provided for in Section 51. 

(G) There shall be no stove or forge in any private garage 
except in a heating room thereof, which heating room shall be 
separated from every other part of the garage by partitions 
having one hour fire resistance fitted tightly to floor and ceiling. 

(H) There shall be no pit in any floor. 

Sec. 46. Class C and D. No class C and D garage shall be 
constructed, or maintained or used as such, until a permit there- 



36 CITY OF CONCORD 

for has been granted by the Building Inspector. The following 
regulations shall govern the construction of and maintenance of 
all Class C and D garages. 

(A) No Class C and D garage shall be located or maintained 
within 50 feet of any school, place of assemblage or place of 
detention. 

(B) Hereafter no permit shall be granted for the maintenance 
of a Class C and D garage, in the restricted area, in any frame 
building or in any building used in pai't as a dwelling. 

Sec. 47. A Class A and B garage shall have the following 
regulations : 

(A) Gasoline in excess of 5 gallons, exclusive of that in the 
tanks, or vehicles in storage, shall not be kept within any private 
garage. That quantity or less shall be kept only in a 5-gallon 
can approved by the Building Inspector, and any quantity in 
excess of 5 gallons shall be kept only in a tank or tanks placed 
not less than 3 feet beneath the surface of the ground and ap- 
proved by the Building Inspector. 

(B) No private garage shall hereafter be erected or used 
as such nearer than 15 feet to any church, school, or other public 
building unless the garage be constructed of brick, concrete or 
other non-combustible material, when the same may be erected 
or used if not nearer than 10 feet to any church, school, or other 
public building. 

(C) Barns, stables, sheds or other buildings already standing 
may be utilized for private use only without the necessity of 
securing a permit; except that in case of any alterations being 
required to so use the building or buildings, permit shall be 
secured as provided for in the following section. 

(D) When erected within 5 feet of a lot line the space between 
the studs on such side be filled solidly with not less than 2i/^ 
inches of brickwork or other equivalent incombustible material, 
or unless the outer walls are covered on both sides with metal 
lath and stucco. 

Sec. 48. All Class C and D garages hereafter erected within 
the fire limits shall have enclosing walls of masonry, concrete 
or reinforced concrete. Every window exposing any building 
within 50 feet shall have a standard metal frame and sash 
glazed with wired glass. All elevators, stairways and ramps 
shall be enclosed with fire-resistive material and every opening 
in such elevators, or stairway enclosure protected by automatic 
fire door. 

Exposed steel work shall be permitted in roof supports only. 
All floors shall be of fire-resistive construction, with an imper- 



ORDINANCES 37 

vious surface and designed to carry safely the loads imposed. 
Wooden roof or floor supports shall be of mill type, or of built- 
up truss construction with no wooden members less than 2x8 
inches (nominal size) in minimum dimension. 

A Class C and D garage exceeding 50 cars storage capacity 
on any one floor and with unprotected steel or wooden roof 
supports or wooden floor supports shall be protected by an auto- 
matic sprinkler system. 

Sec. 49. No pits shall be permitted. No I'oom used for stor- 
age shall be permitted below a grade which will prevent natural 
ventilation at the floor level. 

Sec. 50. (A) All storage of gasoline shall be in underground 
tanks; provided, however, that there may be in each garage one 
or more approved portable wheeled tanks, each of a capacity 
not exceeding sixty gallons, to be used for transferring such 
liquid from the storage tank. The number of these wheeled 
tanks shall be fixed for each garage by the Chief Engineer of 
the Fire Department and the Building Inspector. The reservoirs 
of motor vehicles shall be filled directly through hose from 
pumps attached to such portable tanks, or by hose coupled to 
permanent filling stations connected with the main storage 
tanks. No transfer of gasoline in any garage shall be made 
in any open container. Hose for use in connection with the 
filling station or with the portable tank shall be such design 
and material as to prevent leakage. 

(B) Storage tanks for gasoline shall be buried at such points 
as shall be directed by the Chief Engineer of the Fire Depart- 
ment and by the Building Inspector. The top of each tank shall 
be at least three feet below the surface of the ground and below 
the level of the lowest pipe in the building to be supplied. Tanks 
may be permitted underneath a building, if buried at least three 
feet below the lowest floor. Tanks shall be set on firm founda- 
tions and shall be surrounded by soft earth or sand well tamped 
into place, or encased in concrete. A tank may have a test well, 
provided it extends to near the bottom of the tank, and its top 
shall be hermetically sealed and locked, except when necessarily 
open. When a tank is located underneath a building its test 
well shall extend above the source of supply. The limit of tank 
storage capacity permitted shall depend upon the location of 
tanks with respect to the building to be supplied and adjacent 
buildings, as follows: 

(1) Unlimited capacity if lower than any floor, base- 
ment, cellar or pit in any building within a radius of fifty 
feet. 



38 CITY OF CONCORD 

(2) 20,000 gallons total capacity if lower than any floor 
basement, cellar or pit in any building within a radius of 
thirty feet. 

(3) 5,000 gallons total capacity if lower than any floor, 
basement, cellar or pit in any building within a radius of 
twenty feet. 

(4) 1,500 gallons total capacity if lower than any floor, 
basement, cellar or pit in any building within a radius of 
ten feet. 

(5) 500 gallons if not lower than every floor, basement, 
cellar or pit in any building within a radius of ten feet, 
in which case it shall be entirely encased in six inches of 
concrete. 

(C) Except existing tanks in good condition, all tanks below 
ground as permitted by this chapter shall be made of basic open 
hearth steel or wrought iron of a minimum gauge, depending 
upon the capacity or size as given in the following table: 

MiniTnum 

Capacity Thickness 

1 to 560 gallons No. 14 BWG 

560 to 1,100 gallons No. 12 BWG 

1,100 to 4,000 gallons No. 7 BWG 

4,000 to 10,500 gallons Vi inch 

10,500 to 20,000 gallons 5-16 inch 

20,000 to 30,000 gallons % inch 

Tanks shall be riveted, welded or brazed and shall be soldered, 
caulked or otherwise made tight in a mechanical and workman- 
like manner, and if to be used with a pressure discharge system 
shall safely sustain a hydrostatic test at least double the pres- 
sure to which each tank may be subjected. The top of each tank 
shall be securely fastened to top ring with joints of equal tight- 
ness to those between rings. Every tank shall be covered with 
asphaltum or other rust-preventing paint or coating. All pipe 
connections shall be made through flanges or reinforced metal, 
securely riveted, welded or bolted to tank and made thoroughly 
tight. 

(D) All underground storage systems, in which the tank shall 
contain inflammable gases, shall have at least a 1-inch vent 
pipe running from the top of the tank to a joint outside of the 
building and acceptable to the Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment and to the Building Inspector, and which shall end at 
least 12 feet above the level of the source of supply and in a 
location remote from fire escapes and never nearer than three 
feet, measured horizontally and vertically, to any window or 



ORDINANCES 39 

other opening; the tank vent pipe shall terminate in a goose- 
neck, protected at its outer end by a 30x30 mesh, or equivalent, 
brass wire screen, or by a combined vent and filling pipe, so 
equipped and located as to vent the tank at all times even dur- 
ing filling operations. The vent pipes from two or more tanks 
may be connected to one upright, provided they be so connected 
at a point at least one foot above the level of the source of 
supply. 

(E) All drawing-off pipes terminating inside of any building 
shall have valves at the discharge ends. 

(F) The end of the filling pipe for every underground stor- 
age tank shall be carried to an approved location outside of any 
building but not within 5 feet of any entrance door, or cellar 
opening, and shall be set in an approved metal box with cover, 
which shall be kept locked except during filling operations; and 
this filling pipe shall be closed by a screw cap. A 30x30 mesh, 
or equivalent, brass screen strainer shall be placed in the supply 
end of the filling pipe. 

(G) Liquids shall be drawn from tanks by pumps so con- 
structed as to prevent leakage or waste splashing, or by some 
other system approved by the Chief Engineer of the Fire De- 
partment and by the Building Inspector with controlling ap- 
paratus and piping so arranged as to allow control of the 
amount of discharge and prevent leakage or discharge inside the 
building by any derangement of the system. When inside of a 
building, the pump or other drawing-off device shall be located 
on the grade floor, prefex'ably near an entrance or other well- 
ventilated place. 

Sec. 51. In no instance shall gasoline or other volatile or in- 
flammable liquid be allowed to run upon the floor or to fall or 
pass into the drainage system of the premises unless provided 
with a trap acceptable to the Inspector. Self-closing metal cans 
shall be used for all oily waste or wasted oils. 

Sec. 52. In every public garage two or more approved 
chemical fire extinguishers and four or more pails of sand shall 
be kept convenient for quick use in case of fire. 

Sec. 53. The Mayor, the Building Inspector and the assist- 
ant Building Inspector shall constitute a Board of Adjustment 
who shall have authority in appropriate cases arising under 
this chapter and subject to appropriate provisions and safe- 
guards, to make special exception to the terms of this chapter 
as in their discretion may be in harmony with the general pur- 



40 CITY OF CONCORD 

pose and intent of this chapter and in accordance with the 
general or specific rules herein contained. The Board of Ad- 
justment may adopt rules in accordance with which such ex- 
ceptions may be made. The Mayor shall be chairman ex-oflficio 
of the boai'd, and meetings may be had at the call of the chair- 
man and at such other times as the board may determine. The 
chairman, or in his absence, the acting chairman, may administer 
oaths or compel the attendance of witnesses. All meetings of 
the board shall be open to the public. Any person aggrieved by 
any decision of the Building Inspector or the Assistant Build- 
ing Inspector under this chapter may take an appeal to the 
Board of Adjustment within such reasonable time, as shall be 
provided by the rules of said board, and the procedure shall be 
such as the rules of said board shall prescribe. Such an appeal 
shall stay all proceedings in furtherance of the action appealed 
from unless the Inspector from whom the appeal is taken certi- 
fies to the Board of Adjustment that by reason of facts stated 
in the certificate a stay would in his opinion cause imminent 
peril to life or property. In such case proceedings shall not be 
stayed otherwise than by restraining order which may be granted 
by the Board of Adjustment or by a court of record on appli- 
cation arid on notice to the officer from whom the appeal is 
taken and on due cause shown. 

The Board of Adjustment shall fix a reasonable time for the 
hearing of the appeal, giving public notice thereof as well as 
notice to the parties in interest, and shall decide the appeal 
within a reasonable time. Due notice of any hearing shall be 
deemed to be not less than seven days. Public notice shall be 
given by posting at the City Hall. 

The said board upon such appeal and also upon its own 
motion may make such order as they deem best at variance from 
the terms of this chapter and as will not be contrary to the 
public interests, where, owing to special conditions a literal en- 
forcement of the provisions of this chapter will result in un- 
necessai-y hardship, so that the spirit of this chapter shall be 
observed and substantial justice done; and such order may be 
made subject to such reasonable conditions and terms as the 
Board of Adjustment may determine. All decisions of the 
Board of Adjustment shall be final. 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



ordixaxces 41 

An Ordinance to protect the public, the public health, 

WELL being and MORALS BY GOVERNING AND REGULATING 
CONDITIONS OF BARBER SHOPS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as folloivs: 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person, persons, firm 
or corporation maintaining an establishment and hereinafter 
referred to as a Barber Shop, wherein Shaving, Cutting, Sham- 
pooing or dressing of the hair is done for pay, to operate such 
an establishment unless said establishment is operated in accord- 
ance with the provisions of this Ordinance, provided, however, 
that this Ordinance shall not apply to establishments operating 
as Beauty Shoppes or hair dressing establishments serving 
female customers exclusively. 

Sec. 2. It shall be unlawful for any Barber Shop, or other 
Public Place, wherein barbering is done, to operate in the City 
of Concord other than in a manner provided by the Public 
Health Laws of the State of New Hampshire. The New Hamp- 
shire Barber Law, The Rules and Regulations of the local Board 
of Health governing such establishments, and in accordance with 
the regulations contained in Section 3 of this Ordinance, relat- 
ing to the hours such establishments shall operate. 

Sect. 3. It shall be unlawful for any person, persons, firm or 
corporation operating an establishment wherein Barbering is 
carried on in the City of Concoi'd to operate such an establish- 
ment before 8 a. m., on week days or to operate after the hours 
herein specified, when located in the area covered by the follow- 
ing Zones I'egulating closing hours. 

Zone 1. Shall include all Barber Shops located in Ward 1 of 
the City of Concord whose closing hours shall be as follows: 
Monday 6 p. m., Tuesday 6 p. m., Wednesday 12 noon, except 
when holidays occur in any week, then closing hour shall be 
6 p. m., Thursday 6 p. m., Friday 8 p.m., Saturday, 9 p. m. 

Zone 2. Shall include all Barber Shops located in the City of 
Concord except those located in Zone 1. The hours for closing 
in Zone 2 shall be as follows: Monday, 6 p. m., Tuesday, 6 p. m., 
Wednesday, 12 noon, except when holidays occur in any week, 
then closing hour shall be 6 p. m., Thursday, 8 p. m., Friday 
6 p. m., Saturday, 9 p. m. 

Sect. 4. It shall be unlawful for any person, persons, firm 
or coi-poration to operate an establishment wherein barbering 



42 CITY OF CONCORD 

is done in the City of Concord on the following Legal Holidays: 
New Year's Day; Washington's Birthday; Fast Day; Memorial 
Day; Independence Day; Labor Day; Columbus Day; Armistice 
Day; Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day, provided, how- 
ever, that said establishment may extend its closing hour to 
9 p. m., on the day preceding each holiday. 

Sect. 5. Any person, persons, firm or corporation who shall 
violate the terms of this Ordinance shall be fined not less than 
$10.00 nor more than $20.00 and each day that a violation of 
the provisions of this Ordinance is permitted to continue or 
exist shall constitute a separate offense and shall be punishable 
as such. 

Sect. 6. This Ordinance shall take effect upon its passage 
and all Ordinances or parts of Ordinances inconsistent therewith 
are hereby repealed. 

Passed November 8, 1937. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 42 of the revised ordi- 
nances RELATING TO SHOWS, EXHIBITIONS AND DANCES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

That Chapter XLII of the Revised Ordinances be amended 
as follows: 

Section 1. Add after Section 15 thereof, the following new 
section : 

Section 15a. The rules, regulations and provisions of 
the foregoing six sections shall apply to the operation of 
roller skating areas. 

Sect. 2. Amend Section 16 thereof by substituting the word 
seven in place of the word six, so that said section shall read: 

Section 16. The violation of any of the provisions of the 
seven sections last preceding shall be punished by a fine 
not exceeding ten dollars for each offense. 

Sect. 3. Amend Section 17 thereof by adding the words or 
roller skating after the word dances, and after the word dance 
therein, so that said section shall read as follows: 



ORDINANCES 43 

Section 17. Theatre proprietors and proprietors of halls 
used for public assemblage are prohibited from selling or 
permitting to be sold, tickets for public entertainments, or 
public dances, or roller skating, to be held within such 
theatres or halls, in excess of the established seating ca- 
pacity of such theatres or halls, said capacity being fixed 
by the proprietor or lessees and the Building Inspector, and 
said capacity posted in the several theatres or halls, and 
recorded in the office of the City Clerk. The manager of 
any such entertainment or dance or roller skating or ticket 
seller thereat, are likewise prohibited from selling such 
excess tickets. 

Sect. 4. This ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 

Passed November 8, 1937. 



An Ordinance relating to parks, commons and cemeteries. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldertnen of the City of Concord, 
as follows: 

Section 1. The several parks (including White, Rollins and 
all other city parks), commons, public squares, and the several 
cemeteries of the City of Concord shall be under the manage- 
ment, superintendence and control of a park and cemetery com- 
mission, consisting of the Mayor as chairman, and six legal 
voters of Concord, to be appointed by the Mayor, subject to the 
approval of the Board of Aldermen. On the creation of said 
commission, two members shall be appointed for a term of one 
year, two members for a term of two years and two members 
for a term of three years, all members to serve until their suc- 
cessors are chosen. The Mayor, subject to the approval of the 
Board of Aldermen, shall, in the month of January of each year 
after January, 1938, appoint two commissioners for a term of 
two years, in place of those whose terms of office expire in 
January, 1939, and at each yearly time thereafter in January; 
any vacancy may be filled by appointment by the Mayor, sub- 
ject to the approval of the Board of Aldermen. Nothing herein 
shall prevent the re-appointment of former members of said 
commission. At least three of said commissioners shall be lot 
owners in some of said cemeteries. 

Sect. 2. Said commission shall establish from time to time 
such rules and regulations for the government of parks, com- 



44 CITY OF CONCORD 

mons, public squares and cemeteries in the city as they shall 
deem for the best interest of all parties interested, subject how- 
ever to the approval of the Board of Aldermen. The care, im- 
provement, and management of all parks, commons, public 
squares and cemeteries shall be intrusted to said commission, 
subject to the direction and control of the Boai'd of Aldermen. 
The expenditure of all sums of money available in the care, 
improvement, and management thereof shall be under the direc- 
tion of said commission, but no charge or expense to the city 
shall at any time be created or incurred by said commission, 
except to the amount of any money in their hands set aside to 
be expended by them, without the authority or approval of the 
Board of Aldermen. 

Sect. 3. All money derived from sale and care of lots in the 
cemeteries of the city shall be paid to the City Treasurer once 
in three months, and the pay-rolls for such cemeteries shall be 
made up and forwarded to the City Treasurer once each week, 
and shall be paid by said Treasurer in the same manner as pay- 
rolls for other departments are now paid. The several accounts 
of the cemeteries of the city shall be kept by the City Treasurer. 

Sect. 4. There shall be used for the upkeep of the cemeteries 
of the city the income derived from the care of lots and for grad- 
ing, one-third of all money accruing from the sale of lots, and 
the income from securities purchased with one-third of the 
money accruing from sale of lots. Any money or income thus 
derived shall be expended for the care of the particular cemetery 
from which it originated. 

Sect. 5. Lots for which the city holds trust funds shall be 
cared for out of the money authorized to be expended for the 
care of cemeteries, and so much of the income from these trust 
funds as may be thus expended shall be deposited in the city 
treasury at the close of the year, and the remainder, in each 
instance, credited to the individual funds. 

Sect. 6. Said commissioners, with the concurrence of the 
Board of Aldermen shall sevei-ally have full power to make all 
such by-laws and regulations, and affix penalties thereto, in 
regard to the several cemeteries under their control as they may 
deem expedient, and shall have full power to execute or enforce 
all the ordinances of the city, and by-laws and regulations per- 
taining to such cemeteries, unless otherwise specified. The con- 
struction of avenues, paths, and all the grades and improvements 
of avenues, pathways, or grounds, and the laying out into suit- 



ORDINANCES 45 

able lots of the unoccupied portions of said cemeteries, shall be 
under the direction and supervision of the commissioners. 

Sect. 7. In each of said cemeteries a certain portion of the 
same, if practicable, shall be set apart and designated by metes 
and bounds as a common burial ground, in which strangers and 
persons of the city other than owners of lots may be buried, but 
no lots in the same shall be sold or inclosed by any person; and 
no person shall take or hold any lot for free burial purposes, 
except in such designated portion and in such place as shall be 
determined by the commissioners. 

Sect. 8. Every lot shall be appraised by the commissioners 
before the same shall be offered for sale, and no lot shall be sold 
for less than its appraised value. All lots surveyed and graded 
shall from time to time be appraised. All money arising from 
the sale of lots in each cemetery shall be divided into three equal 
parts and kept as three distinct funds for each cemetery. One 
part shall be appropriated to adding to, improving and ornament- 
ing the cemetery grounds; one part shall be used for current 
maintenance; a third part shall constitute a permanent fund 
to be invested by the trustees of the trust funds in securities of 
the city, if practicable, otherwise in other good securities, the 
income of which shall annually be paid over and expended in 
the care, protection and ornamentation of the several cemeteries 
whence the fund originated. 

Sect. 9. All applications for the purchase of cemetery lots 
shall be made to the superintendent who shall give to the person 
applying an order on the City Clerk for a deed, stating the 
number of the lot and its price. The City Clerk, upon the re- 
ception of such order, and satisfactory evidence that the price 
has been paid, shall deliver a deed of such lot, signed by the. 
Mayor and countersigned by the City Clerk, to the person so 
applying. 

Sect. 10. The owner of any lot shall have the right to use 
the same for the burial of the dead, for the erection of suitable 
stones, monuments, or tombs, for cultivation of trees, shrubs, 
plants, and flowers, and to inclose the same, subject to the super- 
vision of the commissioners. 

Sect. 11. If any lot or avenue shall be injured or materially 
incommoded by means of any shrubbery, or other object in or 
upon an adjacent lot the owner thereof shall be required to re- 
move the obstruction; and in case of failure seasonably to do so. 



46 CITY OF CONCORD 

it shall be the duty of the commissioners to cause it to be re- 
moved at the owner's expense. 

Sect. 12. If any monument, effigy, or structure of any kind 
(or the device or inscription thereon), which may be placed in 
or upon any lot, shall be decided by the commissioners to be 
detrimental or offensive, it shall be the right and duty of said 
commissioners to cause such improper object to be forthwith 
removed; and no fence shall be placed or erected on or around 
any lot, the materials or design of which shall be disapproved 
by the commissioners. 

Sect. 13. All graves shall be dug to the depth of not less 
than four feet to the top of the coffin for all persons over twelve 
years of age, and not less than three and a half feet for all 
under twelve; and no person except the superintendent or his 
authorized assistants, shall be allowed to dig any grave or open 
any tomb for the interment of any dead body. 

Sect. 14. The commissioners shall receive, from time to time, 
such compensation for their services as the Board of Aldermen 
may determine. 

Sect. 15. That portion of the old City Farm land lying 
westerly of the old cart path leading southerly from Lake Street, 
opposite the passway across the dam at the outlet of Forge Pond 
and southerly of high water mark of Forge Pond, heretofore 
set apart as Penacook Park, shall be in the custody and control 
of the Board of Water Commissioners, and shall by said board 
be kept and maintained as a park at the expense of the Water 
Department. The Board of Water Commissioners is hereby 
vested with all powers and duties in regard tx) said parcel of 
land as by virtue of Section 2 are vested in the Board of Park 
Commissioners for the custody, management, improvement and 
control of other parks in the City of Concord. 

Sect. 16. The lot of land owned by the city, on the easterly 
side of Merrimack River, lying just north of the Free Bridge 
road, is set aside for a playground for public use, and shall 
be under the control of the Standing Committee on Lands and 
Buildings. 

Sect. 17. No person while on the city lot, so called on War- 
ren Street, shall use loud, profane or indecent language, but 
shall conduct himself in a quiet and orderly manner. No 
nuisance of any sort shall be committed on said premises and no 



RESOLUTIONS 47 

person shall stand or be upon the sidewalks surrounding said 
city lot except as he travels along the same. 

Sect. 18. Any person who shall violate the provisions of this 
rule shall be fined not exceeding ten dollars. The violation of 
the provisions of this rule by any person who is a job teamster, 
licensed by the city, shall, in addition to subjecting him to the 
payment of the above fine, be cause for the revocation of such 
license, and said job teamster shall not thereafter enter upon 
the city lot, until he has obtained another license. 

Sect. 19. The care and management of West Garden shall 
be under control of said commission. 

Sect. 20. Repeal takes eff'ect, all ordinances and parts of 
ordinances inconsistent herewith are hereby repealed upon this 
ordinance becoming effective on January 10, 1938. 

Passed December 13, 1937. 



RESOLUTIONS 

Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

DEED TO home OWNERS' LOAN CORPORATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be authorized to execute to Home Owners' 
Loan Corporation of Washington, D. C, a quit-claim deed to 
land and buildings thereon, located at 21 Borough Road, Con- 
cord, for a consideration of Two Hundred and Sixty Dollars 
($260.00). 

Passed February 9, 1937. 



Resolution in relation to trust funds for public library. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of $801.64 representing the balance 
of the unexpended income from Trust Funds for the year 1935, 
Public Library be added to their appropriation for the year 1936. 



48 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sect. 2. That each year said unexpended income from said 
Trust Funds be added to the appropriation for Public Library. 

Passed February 9, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the setting aside of a portion of 
the $25,000.00 bond issue for public improvements for 

the CONSTRUCTION OF THE WASHINGTON STREET STORM 
SEWER. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of Ten Thousand twenty-nine dollars ($10,- 
029.00) be, and hereby is, set aside from the $25,000.00 Bond 
Issue for Public Improvements, passed October 15, 1936, to an 
account to be known as the Washington Street Storm Sewer. 

The estimated cost of said severer is Eighteen Thousand Tvi^o 
Hundred Thirty-three Dollars ($18,233.00), the said Ten Thous- 
and Twenty-nine Dollars ($10,029.00) represents 55';; of the 
construction and the balance to be covered by a grant from the 
Federal Government up to 45% of the cost of construction. 

Passed February 9, 1937. 



Resolution relating to the establishing of a playground 
ON the chandler school property. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That it be the sense of this Board that the 
Chandler School Lot be deeded to the City by the Board of 
Education for playground purposes. 

Sect. 2. That a copy of this resolution be sent to the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Education. 

Passed March 8, 1937. 



resolutions 49 

Resolution relative to the purchase of property from percy 
h. sanborn. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 

Section 1. That the offer of Percy H. Sanborn, dated Febru- 
ary 25, 1937, to sell to the City of Concord a certain tract of 
land located on the Sewalls Falls Road, which is to become a 
part of the new proposed highway be accepted. 

Sect, 2. That the sum stipulated in said offer, namely $150.00 
be taken from the appropriation. Incidentals and Land damages. 

Passed March 8, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to appoint a committee 

TO REVISE the PLUMBING CODE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
folloivs : 

Section 1. That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to 
appoint a committee to revise the Plumbing Code of the City 
of Concord. 

Passed March 8, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to appoint a committee 
TO revise the building code. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to 
appoint a committee to revise the Building Code of the City 
of Concord. 

Passed March 8, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the purchase of rowboats. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00) 
be appropriated for the purchase of rowboats and equipment 



50 CITY OF CONCORD 

therefor. Said sum to be added to the appropriation for Police 
Department. 

Sect. 2. Said boats are to be used in emergencies under the 
direction of the Police Department. 

Passed March 8, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute to Walter s. 
tucker a quit-claim deed. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized in behalf of the 
City of Concord to execute to Walter S. Tucker a quitclaim deed 
to 10 acres on the Penacook to Loudon Road for a consideration 
of $25.00. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute to harold b. 

AREY a quitclaim DEED. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute in 
behalf of the City of Concord a quitclaim deed to Harold B. 
Arey for lots Nos. 324 and 325 of Jones Park Development for 
a consideration of $50.00. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute to grace c. 
kelly a quitclaim deed. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute in 
behalf of the City of Concord a quitclaim deed to Grace C. 



RESOLUTIONS 51 

Kelly to land on South Main Street for a consideration of 
$25.00. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



Resolution in relation to leasing the radio range station 
TO the united states government. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 

follows : 

That Charles J. McKee, President of the Concord Airport 
Commission, be and hereby is authorized to sign in behalf of 
the City of Concord a lease to the United States Government for 
the Radio Range Station located in said Concord. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



Resolution appropriating tw^o hundred dollars for purchase 

OF LAND for HIGHWAY PURPOSES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of Two Hundred Dollars ($200.00) be, and the 
same hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury 
not otherwise appropriated, for the purchase of land on Sewells 
Falls and Mountain Roads, now owned by Henry H. Smith, for 
highway purposes. 

Passed April 12, 1937. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money to 

BE raised on the TAXABLE PROPERTY AND INHABITANTS 
WITHIN THE LIMITS OF THE SEWERAGE PRECINCT FOR THE 
ENSUING FINANCIAL YEAR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised, and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the sewer- 



52 CITY OF CONCORD 

age precinct of said city, the sum of twenty-six hundred fifty 
dollars ($2,650) to defray the necessary expenses and charges 
of said precinct for the ensuing financial year which shall be 
appropriated as follows: 

For the payment of bonds $2,500.00 

For the payment of interest that may become 

due on precinct bonds 150.00 

Sect. 2. This resolution shall take eff"ect upon its passage. 

Passed April 30, 1937. 



Resolution fixing and determining the amount of money 
TO be raised for the ensuing financial year for the 
USE of the city. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. There shall be raised and there is hereby ordered 
to be raised on the polls and ratable estates within the city the 
sum of five hundred thirty-seven thousand one hundred dollars 
($537,100) to defray the necessary expenses and charges of the 
city for the ensuing financial year, which together with the sums 
which may be raised on railroads and from other sources which 
are approximately one hundred forty-nine thousand two hundred 
eighty-three dollars ($149,283), and shall be appropriated as 
follows: 

City Poor $50,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 18,000.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City 10,000.00 

Bonds and Notes 

City Hall and Auditorium $5,000.00 

Public Improvement 19,000.00 

Highways 5,000.00 

Departmental Equipment 4,000.00 

Central Fire Station 1,000.00 

Public Improvement and Refund 10,500.00 

Highway Notes 7,000.00 



RESOLUTIONS 53 

Sprinkler System Notes 1,000.00 

Sewers 9,000.00 



$61,500.00 



Cemeteries $14,595.00 

Regrading Blocks "O" and "M" 4,396.00 



$18,991.00 



City Hall and Auditorium 



Salary, Messenger $1,500.00 

Salary, Janitor 1,248.00 

Fuel 1,500.00 

Lights 1,100.00 

Insurance 600.00 

Incidentals 900.00 



$6,848.00 



Mayor 



Salary $2,000.00 

Clerk 1,000.00 

Incidentals 200.00 

$3,200.00 

City Clerk 

Salai-y, City Clerk $2,137.50 

Salary, Clerk, Board of Public Works 200.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,400.00 

Auto Upkeep 400.00 

Incidentals 825.00 

$7,962.50 

City Solicitor 

Salary $1,000.00 

Incidentals 261.00 

$1,261.00 



54 CITY OF CONCORD 

City Treasurer 

Salary $1,300.00 

Clerk Hire 400.00 

Incidentals 550.00 

$2,250.00 

City Physicians $1,200.00 

Care, City Clocks 110.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Salary, Weigher $920.00 

Incidentals 100.00 

Auto Upkeep 200.00 

$1,220.00 
Police Court 

Salary, Judge $1,800.00 

Salary, Associate Judge 500.00 

Salary, Clerk 600.00 

$2,900.00 
Assessors 

Salary, Assessors $6,400.00 

Salary, Clerks 2,627.75 

Auto Hire 400.00 

Listing Polls 600.00 

Incidentals 700.00 

$10,727.75 
Tax Collector 

Salary, Collector $2,850.00 

Salary, Clerks 2,165.45 

Postage and Printing 750.00 

Incidentals 500.00 

$6,265.45 
Election 

Salary, Election Officers $3,500.00 

Incidentals 1,000.00 

$4,500.00 



RESOLUTIONS 55 
Fire Department 

Salary, Chief $2,470.00 

Salaries 37,712.00 

Salaries, Semi-Annual 10,480.00 

Fuel 2,000.00 

Lights 1,000.00 

Upkeep Equipment 2,200.00 

Laundry 85.00 

Fire Inspection 1,000.00 

Hose 1.000.00 

Telephone and Insurance 1,445.00 

Fire Alarm 2,500.00 

Repairs 1,000.00 

New Equipment 1,000.00 

Incidentals 1,000.00 



$64,892.00 



Health Department 

Salary, Sanitary Officer $1,900.00 

Salary, Clerk 1,144.00 

Auto Upkeep 200.00 

Departmental Expenses 1,450.00 

Milk Inspection: 

Salary, Milk Inspector 1,710.00 

Incidentals 300.00 

Auto Upkeep 400.00 



$7,104.00 



Department of Public Works 

Roads and Bridges $168,676.00 

Office 3,360.00 

Refuse Collection 35,000.00 

Table Garbage 4,610.00 

Sewers 12,532.00 

Engineering 6,800.00 

Lighting Streets 37,000.00 

$267,978.00 
Incidentals and Land Damages $1,900.00 



56 CITY OP CONCORD 

Interest Notes and Bonds 

Notes and Bonds $13,066.25 

Temporary Loans 2,500.00 

$15,566.25 

Parks 

Salary, Superintendent and Tree Warden $2,200.00 

Salary, Employees 5,952.00 

Shrubbery and Trees 500.00 

Trucking 510.00 

Incidentals 2,291.00 

$11,453.00 

Care of Trees 13,344.00 

$24,797.00 

Playgrounds and Bath $7,340.00 

Chandler School lot, reconstruction and equipment 1,500.00 

Public Comfort Station 

Salaries $1,000.00 

Incidentals 325.00 

Repairs 200.00 

Lights 175.00 

$1,700.00 
Public Library 

Public Library $7,500.00 

Police and Watch 

Salary, Chief $2,470.00 

Salary, Deputy 2,280.00 

Salary, Officers 36,512.00 

Salary, Specials 3,700.00 

Salary, Stenographer 1,200.00 

Salary, Part Time Officer, Penacook 1,082.60 

Repairs 300.00 

Fuel 1,300.00 

Lights 800.00 

Auto and Auto Supplies 2,300.00 

Marking Streets 400.00 



RESOLUTIONS 57 

Telephone and Gamewell 600.00 

Insurance 375.00 

Keeping Prisoners 200.00 

Incidentals 1,100.00 

Printing 150.00 

Diving Suits 185.00 

$54,954.60 

Printing and Stationery $2,500.00 

Repairs, Buildings 1,000.00 

Salai-y, Board of Aldermen 1,915.00 

Miscellaneoiis 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital $4,500.00 

N. H. Memorial Hospital 3,000.00 

Memorial Day 400.00 

Family Welfare Society 350.00 

Concord District Nursing Association 350.00 

Penacook District Nursing Association 200.00 

Zoning '. .'. 150.00 

Recreation Commission 2,150.00 

Band Concerts 800.00 

Work Relief Projects 3,000.00 

Armistice Day 100.00 

Fourth of July, Concord 200.00 

Airport 1,000.00 

Ordinance Revision 1,500.00 

Goodhue Bird Collection 1,000.00 

Fourth of July, Penacook 100.00 

Sect. 2. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 
for the cemeteries of the city one-third of the income from the 
sale of lots and the income derived for the care of lots and 
grading, which sums shall be deposited by the Superintendent, 
or others receiving them, in the city treasury. The care of lots 
for which the city holds trust funds shall be paid from the money 
appropriated for the care of cemeteries, and so much of the 
income of these trust funds as may be thus expended shall be 
deposited in the city treasury at the close of the year, and the 
remainder in each instance credited to the individual fund. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing there is appropriated 
for the use of the Public Library the income derived from Public 
Library Trust Funds. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed April 30, 1937. 



58 city of concord 

Resolution authorizing the issuance of serial bonds in the 
amount of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) 
for the purpose of making public improvements of a 
permanent nature. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for public im- 
provements of a permanent nature, there is appropriated the 
sum of twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) ; and to meet 
the said appropriation the city shall borrow the sum of twenty- 
five thousand dollars ($25,000.00) and give its bonds therefor. 

These bonds shall be twenty-five in number and of the denomi- 
nation of one thousand dollars each; shall be dated May 1, 1937, 
and shall be made payable to bearer with interest coupons 
attached bearing interest at a rate not to exceed two and one- 
half (21/2) per centum per annum, payable semi-annually on the 
first day of May and the first day of November in each year. 
Five thousand dollars of said bonds shall become due and pay- 
able on the first day of May, 1938, and five thousand dollars 
annually on the first day of May in each succeeding year until 
and including the first day of May, 1942. The principal of said 
bonds and the interest coupons attached shall be made payable 
at the National Shawmut Bank of Boston, Massachusetts, or at 
the office of the City Treasurer at Concord, New Hampshire, 
at the option of the holder. 

Sect. 2. The City Treasurer is hereby authorized to secure 
pi'oposals for the series of bonds hereby authorized and shall 
accept whichever proposal seems to be for the best interests of 
the city, subject, however, to the approval of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen. The right shall be reserved 
to reject any or all bids. 

Sect. 3. The appropriation pi-ovided for in Section One of 
this resolution shall be expended under the direction of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed May 10, 1937. 



resolutions 59 

Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 
deed to mrs. florida perron. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be authorized to execute to Mrs. Florida 
Perron a quitclaim deed to Lots Nos. 195-196-197 on Broadway 
Plat for a consideration of Twenty and 62/100 Dollars ($20.62). 

Passed May 10, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 
deed to charles rancor. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be authorized to execute to Charles Rancor 
a quitclaim deed to Lot No. 4437A on Canterbury Road for a 
consideration of Fifty Dollars ($50.00). 

Passed May 10, 1937. 



Resolution in relation to the purchase of land owned by 
harold h. blake. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermeyi of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of $1,000 be and hereby is appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated for the 
purchase of a piece of land on Ferry Street owned by Harold 
H. Blake containing approximately eight acres. 

Passed May 26, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to appoint a committee 
to make a study and report relative to the purchase of 
land for a city gravel bank. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to appoint a com- 
mittee to make a study and a comprehensive report as to the 



60 CITY OF CONCORD 

advisability of the purchase of land for a city gravel bank. 
For the use of said committee there is hereby appropriated out 
of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated the 
sum of five hundred dollars for the purpose of making borings 
or other investigations so as to enable the committee to deter- 
mine and arrive at a definite and satisfactory conclusion. 

Passed May 26, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to quitclaim a tract of 

LAND ON the LOUDON ROAD, SO-CALLED, IN SAID CONCORD TO 
FRANCES A. BROWNE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute a 
quitclaim deed from the City of Concord to Frances A. Browne 
a tract of land, located on the Loudon Road, so-called, in said 
Concord, more particularly described as No. 4258 E of Assessors 
Maps 114D, City of Concord Assessors Records, for a considera- 
tion of Three Hundred Dollars ($300.00). 

Passed June 14, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to quitclaim tracts of 
land located on hope avenue in said city to boutwell 
lumber company, inc. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute a 
quitclaim deed from the City of Concord to Boutwell Lumber 
Company, Inc., covering tracts of land located on Hope Avenue, 
in said Concord, more particularly described as beings Lots 169, 
170 and 171 of No. 3449A-18, Sheet 8, Assessors Maps, City 
of Concord, for a consideration of $18.28. 

Passed June 14, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing mayor to quitclaim tract of land 
in riverhill, so-called, to cora m. chase. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 



RESOLUTIONS 61 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute a quit- 
claim deed from the City of Concord to Cora M. Chase covering 
a tract of land at Riverhill, so-called, known as "pasture and 
brush" Riverhill, in order to correct an error in a former deed 
from said City to said Cora M. Chase. 

Passed June 14, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

DEED to archie MOODY. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be authorized to execute to Archie Moody 
a quitclaim deed to a parcel of land located on Sugar Ball Road 
in said Concord, carried on the Assessors Books as, "Land, 
Sugar Ball Road, Archie Moody" for a consideration of Ten 
Dollars ($10.00). 

Passed June 14, 1937. 



Resolution in relation to grading in garrison park. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of two hundred dollars ($200.00) be and hereby 
is appropriated out of the account of Public Improvement Bond 
Account for the purpose of filling in and grading the brook at 
Garrison Park. 

Passed June 14, 1937. 



Resolution in relation to the purchase of the chandler 
school lot. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Committee on Playgrounds be and hereby is author- 
ized in behalf of the City of Concord to purchase the Chandler 



62 CITY OF CONCORD 

School lot for a consideration of one dollar ($1.00) for play- 
ground purposes in accordance with a plan herewith submitted. 
Said sum of one dollar ($1.00) to be taken from the appropria- 
tion for Playgrounds. 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



Resolution relative to the purchase of gravel banks. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be, and hereby is authoi'ized to purchase, as 
recommended by the Board of Public Works, the gravel bank 
now owned by William Jenovese in the rear of Rumford Street 
near Walker Street for the sum of fifteen hundred eighty dol- 
lars ($1,580.00) ; also the gravel bank now owned by the Con- 
cord Lumber Company on Wyman Street for the sum of five 
hundred dollars ($500.00). 

That said sums be taken from the Public Improvement Bond 
Account No. Three. 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



Resolution relative to the bequest of the late charles 

GOODHUE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of $1,000 be and hereby is appropriated out of 
any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the 
care and upkeep of the "Charles F. Goodhue Collection" so- 
called, same to be expended under the supervision of the Board 
of Trustees of the Public Library. 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to issue a quitclaim deed 
to simeon sharaf. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follotvs : 

That the Mayor be authorized in the name and behalf of the 
City to execute and deliver a quitclaim deed to Simeon Sharaf 



RESOLUTIONS 63 

of Lot Number 65 Holly Street, deeded to the City March 26, 
1937, for a consideration of Eighty-Nine Dollars and Seventy- 
four Cents ($89.74). 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to issue a quitclaim 

DEED TO BOUTWELL LUMBER COMPANY, INC. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be authorized in the name and behalf of the 
city to execute and deliver a quitclaim deed to Boutwell Lumber 
Company, Inc., of "Cottage and Lot south side of River Road, 
Land, River Road, Land River Road," "Martin House, White 
Gate, leased land.", the first mentioned River Road tracts deeded 
to the City, September 26, 1934 and the second tract "Martin 
House" deeded to the City, March 26, 1937, the total considera- 
tion being Two Hundred and Sixty-Three Dollars and Sixty- 
Eight Cents ($263.68). 

Passed July 12, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the finance committee to contract 
for an audit of the books of the city of concord for the 

YEAR 1936. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the Finance Committee be and hereby is authorized to 
secure the services of a firm of certified public accountants of 
the State of New Hampshire to audit the books of all depart- 
ments of the city for the year 1936 and make an inventory and 
valuation of the assets of the city and install new accounting 
system in such departments as needed at a cost not to exceed 
fifteen hundred dollars ($1,500.00). 

Passed August 9, 1937. 



64 city of concord 

Resolution authorizing the issuance of serial bonds in the 
amount of thirty-five thousand dollars ($35,000.00) 
for the purpose of making public improvements of a 
permanent nature. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for public im- 
provements of a permanent nature, there is appropriated the 
sum of thirty-five thousand dollars ($35,000.00) ; and to meet 
the said appropriation the city shall borrow the sum of thirty- 
five thousand dollars ($35,000.00) and give its bond therefor. 

These bonds shall be thirty-five in number and of the denomi- 
nation of one thousand dollars each; shall be dated September 
1, 1937, and shall be made payable to the bearer with interest 
coupons attached bearing interest at a rate not to exceed two 
and one-half (2i/^) per centum per annum, payable semi- 
annually on the first day of March and the first day of September 
in each year. Five thousand dollars of said bonds shall be- 
come due and payable on the first day of September, 1938, and 
five thousand dollars annually on the first day of September in 
each succeeding year until and including the first day of Septem- 
ber, 1944. The principal of said bonds and the interest coupons 
attached shall be made payable at the National Shawmut Bank 
of Boston, Massachusetts, or at the office of the City Treasurer 
at Concord, New Hampshire, at the option of the holder. 

Sect. 2. The City Treasurer is hereby authorized to secure 
proposals for the series of bonds hereby authorized, and shall 
accept whichever proposal seems to be for the best interests 
of the city, subject, however, to the approvel of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen. The right shall be reserved 
to reject any or all bids. 

Sect. 3. The appropriation provided for in Section One of 
this resolution shall be expended under the direction of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 9, 1937. 



resolutions 65 

Resolution appropriating additional money for the police 
department. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That a sum not to exceed five hundred dollars ($500.00) be, 
and hereby is appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated to be added to the account of Salaries 
Officers, Police Department. 

Passed September 13, 1937. 



Resolution establishing corriveau square. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the plot of land located at South, Carter and Bow Streets 
be named Corriveau Square in memoi'y of Lieutenant Paul 
Edward Corriveau who was killed in action at Meuse-Argonne, 
October 6, 1918. 

Passed September 13, 1937. 



Resolution appropriating forty-seven thousand five hun- 
dred five and 49/100 dollars to pay for real estate 
sold to the city of concord for unpaid taxes for the 

YEAR 1936. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows: 

That the sum of forty-seven thousand five hundred five 
and 49/100 dollars ($47,505.49) be, and hereby is appropriated 
out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to 
pay the amount due the City of Concord for real estate pur- 
chased at the Tax Collector's sale, September 27, 1937, of real 
estate, for unpaid taxes for the year 1936. 

Passed October 11, 1937. 



66 city of concord 

Resolution establishing fletcher-murphy park. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the lot of land at the corner of Fayette and South 
Streets, formerly known as the Chandler School Lot, and 
recently established as a park be named Fletcher-Murphy Park 
in memory of Lucy N. Fletcher and Teresa M. Murphy, nurses 
who served in the World War. 

Passed October 11, 1937. 



Resolution appropriating money for the dedication of cor- 

RIVEAU square AND FLETCHER-MURPHY PARK. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the sum of three hundred dollars ($300.00) be, and 
hereby is, appropriated out of any money in the treasury not 
otherwise appropriated for the dedication of Corriveau Square 
and Fletcher-Murphy Park on November 11, 1937, said sum to 
be expended by a Special Committee appointed by the Mayor. 

Passed October 11, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the appointment of a special com- 
mittee TO investigate the advisability of pensions for 
city officials and city employees. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to appoint a 
Special Committee of three to investigate the advisiability of 
pensions for city officials and city employees. 

Passed October 11, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to execute a quitclaim 

deed to guy H. HUBBARD ADMINISTRATOR OF THE ESTATE OF 
SAMUEL J. SHEPARD. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 



RESOLUTIONS 67 

That the Mayor be and hereby is authorized to execute a 
quitclaim deed to Guy H. Hubbard, Administrator of the Estate 
of Samuel J. Shepard, for the house and lot, Linden Street, 
Penacook, land at 10 St. Catherine Street (lot No. 42 Fifield 
Plat) Penacook, standing in the name of Samuel J. Shepard 
and deeded to the City of Concord March 26, 1937. 

The consideration for said transfer to be one hundred forty- 
eight and 77/100 dollars ($148.77). 

Passed October 11, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the issuance of serial bonds in the 
amount of one hundred thirty-five thousand dollars 
($135,000.00) for the purpose of construction of storm 

SEWERS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for the construc- 
tion of storm sewers there is appropriated the sum of one hun- 
dred thirty-five thousand dollars ($135,000.00) and to meet the 
said appropriation the city shall borrow the sum of one hundred 
thirty-five thousand dollars ($135,000.00) and give its bond 
therefor. 

These bonds shall be one hundred thirty-five in number and of 
the denomination of one thousand dollars each; shall be dated 
November 1, 1937 and shall be made payable to the bearer with 
interest coupons attached bearing interest at a rate not to ex- 
ceed three per cent (3%) per annum, payable semi-annually 
on the first day of May and the first day of November in each 
year. Eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00) of said bonds shall 
become due and payable on the first day of November of 1938 
and eight thousand dollars ($8,000.00) on the first day of Novem- 
ber of 1939 and seven thousand dollars ($7,000.00) annually on 
the first day of November in each succeeding year until and in- 
cluding the first day of November, 1956. The principal of said 
bonds and the interest coupons attached shall be made payable 
at the National Shawmut Bank of Boston, Massachusetts or at 
the office of the City Treasurer of Concord, New Hampshire, at 
the option of the holder. 

Sect. 2. The City Treasurer is hereby authorized to secure 
proposals for the series of bonds hereby authorized, and shall 



68 CITY OF CONCORD 

accept whichever proposal seems to be for the best interest of 
the city, subject, however, to the approval of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen. The right shall be reserved 
to reject any or all bids. 

Sect. 3. The appropriation provided for in Section One of 
this resolution shall be expended under the direction of the 
Board of Public Works. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 8, 1937. 



Resolution relative to the care of fletcher-murphy park. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the care and upkeep of the Fletcher-Murphy Park be 
and hereby is placed under the supervision of the Park Depart- 
ment. 

Passed November 8, 1937, 



Resolution authorizing the issuance of serial bonds in the 

AMOUNT OF seventy THOUSAND DOLLARS ($70,000.00) FOR 
THE PURPOSE OF MAKING PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS OF A PER- 
MANENT NATURE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That for the purpose of paying for public im- 
provements of a permanent nature there is appropriated the 
sum of seventy thousand dollars ($70,000.00) ; and to meet the 
said appropriation the city shall borrow the sum of seventy 
thousand dollars ($70,000.00) and give its bonds therefor. 

These bonds shall be seventy in number and of the denomina- 
tion of one thousand dollars each; shall be dated January 1, 
1938 and shall be made payable to bearer with interest coupons 
attached bearing interest at a rate not to exceed three (3) per 
centum per annum, payable semi-annually on the first day of 
January and the first day of July in each year. Ten thousand 
dollars of said bonds shall become due and payable on the first 



RESOLUTIONS 69 

day of January, 1940, and ten thousand dollars annually on the 
first day of January in each succeeding year until and including 
the first day of January, 1946. The principal of said bonds and 
the interest coupons attached shall be made payable at the 
National Shawmut Bank of Boston, Massachusetts, or at the 
office of the City Treasurer, at Concord, New Hampshire, at the 
option of the holder. 

Sect. 2. The City Treasurer is hereby authorized to secure 
proposals for the series of bonds hereby authorized, and shall 
accept whichever proposal seems to be for the best interests of 
the city, subject, however, to the approval of the Finance Com- 
mittee of the Board of Aldermen. The right shall be reserved 
to reject any or all bids. 

Sect. 3. The appropriation provided for in Section One of 
this resolution shall be expended under the direction and super- 
vision of the special committee on Work Relief Projects. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed November 23, 1937. 



Resolution authorizing the city clerk to ask for proposals 

FOR printing and BINDING THE REVISED ORDINANCES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the City Clerk be and hereby is authorized to ask for 
proposals for printing and binding the Revised Ordinances in 
quantities of 500 and 1,000. 

Said proposals to be submitted to the Committee on Finance 
for consideration on or before December 30, 1937. 

Passed Dcember 13, 1937. 



Resolution relating to nursery schools. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That it be the sense of this Board that the Nursery Schools 
in Concord be continued for a period of six months beginning 
January 1, 1938, and that a sum of six hundred dollars ($600.00) 



70 CITY OP CONCORD 

be included in the 1938 budget to pay for 50% of the cost of 
lunches during said period. 

Passed December 30, 1937. 



Resolution relative to Washington street storm sewer 

FUNDS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

That the balance of Two Thousand Forty-seven Dollars and 
Sixty Cents ($2,047.60), now in the Washington Storm Sewer 
Account, be returned and transferred to Bond Account No. 2. 

Passed January 10, 1938. 



Resolution donating the sum of twenty-five dollars out of 

income from the DAVID OSGOOD TRUST. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) be 
hereby donated out of the income from the David Osgood Trust 
to the poor children of the French Parochial School who are in- 
habitants of the City of Concord, for the purpose of buying 
school books for said children. 

Sect. 2. That said sum of twenty-five dollars ($25.00) be 
paid to and expended under the direction of the principal of said 
school. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 10, 1938. 



Resolution appropriating money for deficits in the several 
departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, as 
follows : 

Section 1. That the sum of nineteen thousand one hundred 
thirty-four and 20 100 dollars ($19,134.20) be, and hereby is 



RESOLUTIONS 71 

appropriated out of any money in the treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, to pay outstanding claims as follows: 

Assessors $41.09 

City Hall and Auditorium 437.27 

City Relief 16,199.76 

City Treasurer 84.87 

Department of Public Works Office 129.27 

Incidentals and Land Damages 890.47 

Interest, Temporary Loans 852.51 

Printing and Stationery 411.62 

Work Relief Projects 49.68 

Zoning 37.66 



$19,134.20 

Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the .appropriation for 
Recreation Commission for the year 1937, the sum of thirty-one 
hundred sixty-nine and 85/100 dollars ($3,169.85), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Public Library for the year 1937, the sum of eight hundred seven 
and 24/100 dollars ($807.24) representing fines; and eight 
hundred forty dollars ($840.00) representing rent of the battery 
station. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Tax Collector for the year 1937, the sum of six hundred forty- 
three and 20/100 dollars ($643.20), the same being the earn- 
ings of this department. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Roads and Bridges for the year 1937, the sum of thirty-three 
thousand two hundred thirty-three and 47/100 dollars ($33,- 
233.47), the same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 6. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Sewers for the year 1937, the sum of nineteen hundred sixty- 
seven and 71/100 dollars ($1,967.71), the same being the earn- 
ings of this department. 

Sect. 7. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Parks for the year 1937, the sum of thirteen hundred fifty-one 
and 99/100 dollars ($1,351.99), the same being the earnings 
of this department. 



72 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sect. 8. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
Airport for the year 1937, the sum of three hundred forty-nine 
and 10/100 dollars ($349.10), the same being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 9. That there be transferred to the appropriation for 
City Relief for the year 1937, the sum of three thousand sixty- 
six and 40/100 dollars ($3,066.40), this amount representing 
refunds from other towns, cities and counties; and the sum of 
twenty thousand two hundred thirty-nine and 97/100 dollars 
($20,239.97) this amount representing reimbursements from 
the State of New Hampshire. 

Sect. 10. This resolution shall take effect upon its passage. 

Passed January 10, 1938. 



CITY GOVERNMENT. 1937 



Mayor and Chairman, Board of Pnblic Works 
HON. JOHN W. STORES 

Office, City Hall 
Salary, .$2,000 per annum 

O 

Aldermen-at-Laro-e and Members Board of Public Works 

Salary, .$200 per annum, plus .$10 per annum to each member 
of Committee on Accounts and Claims 

Term Expires, January, 1938 

CHARLES J. McKEE, 7 Badger St. 

ARTHUR F. STURTEVANT, 60 So. State St. 

EDWARD B. HASKELL, 10 Jackson St. 

Term Expires, January, 1940 

WILLIAM ARTHUR STEVENS, East Concord 

GEORGE H. CORBETT, 12 Thompson St. 

WILLIAM L. STEVENS, 78 School St. 

WARD ALDERMEN 

Salary, .$7;) per annum, plus .$10 per annum to each member 
of Committee on Accounts and Claims 

Ward 1— CHARLES P. COAKLEY, Penacook 

Ward 2— HAROLD D. MERRILL, East Concord 

Ward 3— HARRY C. ANDERSON, Roger Ave. 

Ward 4— HARRY L. ALEXANDER, 12 Auburn St. 

Ward 5— NUTE B. FLANDERS, 3 Tahanto St. 

Ward 6— CLARENCE L. CLARK, 71 South St. 

Ward 7— WALDO S. ROUNDY, 125 South St. 

Ward 8— SIMEON SHARAF, 98 No. Main St. 

Ward 9— EARL W. GAIGE, 5 Charles St. 



74 city of concord 

Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen 

On Accounts and Claims — 

Aldermen Clark, Corbett, Roiindy, Flanders 

On Bills, Second Reading — 

Aldermen Corbett, Stiirtevant, William A. Stevens, 
Flanders 

On Elections and Returns — 

Aldermen Roundy, Haskell, Sharaf, Alexander 

On Engrossed Ordinances — 
Aldermen Sturtevant, William A. Stevens, Sharaf, Gaige 

On Finance — 

Aldermen William L. Stevens, McKee, Alexander, 
Anderson 

On Fire Department — 

Aldermen Coakley, Anderson, Clark, Merrill 

On Lands and Buildings — 

Aldermen Haskell, Roundy, McKee, Gaige 

On Police and License — 

Aldermen Sturtevant, William A. Stevens, Coakley, 
Flanders 

On Playgrounds and Bath — 

Aldermen Merrill, Anderson, Coakley, Sharaf, Gaige, 
Roundy, Mrs. Bertha Chase, Mrs. Maul N. Black- 
wood, Mrs. Victoria Mahoney, Miss Margaret Challis, 
Mrs. Ethel M. Storrs, Mrs. Kathleen Mullen, Mrs. H. 
C. Kittredge, Mrs. Nora E. Donovan. 

On Public Instruction — 

Aldermen Sturtevant, Haskell, Sharaf, Corbett 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



75 



CITY OFFICIALS 



Salary 
Per Annum 



Joseph E. Sheparil 
Clarence O. Philbrick 
Edward F. Donovan 
Fred N. Hammond 
Art2iur E. Roby 
Arthur E. Roby 
Arthur E. Roby 
Arthur B. Roby 
Margaret A. Spencer 
Charles P. Coakley 
Harold D. Merrill 
Henry P. Callalian 
John J. Crawford 
Wilfred Lesperance 
Fred H. Perley 
Ervin E. Webber 
Edward E. Beane 
Edward E. Beane 
Ralph W. Flanders 
Edward E. Beane 
Ellsworth P. Runnells 
William T. Happny 
Edward E. Beane 
William T. Happny 
Percy R. Sanders 
Marion F. Holt 
Board of Adjustment 



Henry W. Smith 
Austin B. Presby 
Carl L. Sargent 
Clarence I. Tebbetts 
Dr. Thomas J. Ilalligan 
Dr. Elmer U. Sargent 
V. I. Moore 
J. Edward Silva 
Arthur W. Mclsaac 
Dr. Donald G. Barton 
W. B. Mclnnis 

George A. Dearborn 
Amos B. Morrison 
Carl H. Foster 
Carl H. Foster 
Percy R. Sanders 
William L. Stevens 
Peter J. King 



Assessor, Clerk 

Assessor 

Assessor, Chairman 

Superintendent of Cemeteries 

City Clerk 

Registrar of Vital Statistics 

Clerk of Board of Public Works 

Overseer of the Poor, Wards 3, 4, ">. 6, 7, 9 

Deputy City Clerk 

Overseer of the Poor, Ward 1 

Overseer of the Poor, Ward 2 

City Solicitor 

Superintendent of City Clocks 

Superintendent of City Clocks, Penacook 

Culler of Staves 

Superintendent of Streets 

City Engineer 

Building Inspector, e.r-officio 

Fence Viewer "j 

Fence A'^iewer K. $2 per da.v 

Fence Viewer J interested 

Chief, Fire Department 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners 

Librarian 

Mayor, ex-officio. Chairman, Knildinj; 

ex-offlcio, and Assistant Building I 

eX'Officio 
City Messenger 
Milk Inspector 
Superintendent of Parks 
Inspector of Petroleum 
City Physician 
Assistant City Physician 
Chief, Police Department 
Assistant Chief, Police Department 
Captain, Police Department 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Leather, reasonable price 

person employing 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 
Tax Collector 
City Treasurer 
Cemetery Treasurer 
Superintendent of Water Works 
Judge, Municipal Court 
Associate Judge. Municipal Court 



.$2,400 

2,000 

2,000 

2,600 

2,250 

None 

200 

.500 

1,750 

.S50 

25 

1,000 

85 

25 

Fees 

3,000 

3,000 

None 

paid by parties 

2,600 
None 
None 
None 
1,200 

: Inspector 

nspector. 

None 
1,500 
1,800 
1,800 
Fees 
1,000 
200 
2.600 
2,400 
2,000 
2,000 

. by 

930 

3.000 
1.200 

100 
4.000 
1.800 

500 



76 



CITY OF CONCORD 



John W. Stanley 
Charles L. Jackman 
Guy A. Swenson 
Daniel Shea 



Clerk, Municipal Court 
Police Commission, Chairman 
Police Commission 
Police Commission, Clerk 



Salary 

Per Annum 

600 

None 

None 

None 



All salaries in excess of $1,500 subject to 5% cut from April 15, 1937 
to April 15, 1938. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 77 

AIRPORT COMMISSION 

Appointed in January l).v Mayor sHl)ject to confirmation l)y Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Ordinance Book, Vol. 10, Page 30. 

John W. Storks, Mayor, ex-officio, Chairman. 

William A. Stevens 1939 

Charles J. McKee 1940 

Harry L. Alexander 1940 

Samuel B. Dunsford 1940 

Charles W. How^ard 1942 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Two members appointed in March for three-year term by Mayor subject 
to contirniation by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

John W. Storrs, ex-officio, Chairman 
Harold H. Blake Term expires 1938 

Allen Hollis " " 1938 

Herbert G. Abbot " " 1939 

Harry G. Emmons " " 1939 

Fred W. Lang, Clerk, " " 1940 

Claude H. Swain " " 1940 



UNDERTAKERS 

Appointed biennially in .lanuary by Mayor subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

Hiram G. Kilkenny Term expires 1939 

Nyron S. Calkin " " 1939 

William H. Hoyt " " 1939 

Harley Boutwell " " 1939 



78 



CITY OF CONCORD 



LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Appiiinted hieimially in January by ^Mayor subject to confirmation 
by Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 



Ward 1 — Fred M. Dodge 

" 2 — Mrs. Armine Ingham 

" 3— Levin J. Chase 

" 4 — Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 

" 5 — Edward A. Dame 

' ' 6 — Oliver Jenkins 

" 7 — -PIenry B. Cannon 

" 8 — Perley B. Phillips 

" 9 — Joseph J. Comi 



Term expires 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1939 



BOARD OP^ EXAMINERS OF PLUMBERS 

Appointed annually in April l)y Mayor. Salary, none. 



Thomas J. Halligan, M.D. 
Edward E. Beane, ex-officio, Clerk 
Wilfred Brennan 



Term ex]iires 1938 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

.Apl)ointed biennially in January by Mayor subject to confirmation by 
Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

John W. Storrs, Mayor, ex-officio 
Dr. Thomas J. Halligan Term expires 1939 

Dr. Thomas M. Dudley " " 1939 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



79 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Two iiiipointed anmially in March for four-year tt-nn by Board 
of Aldermen. Salary, none. 

John W. Stores, Mayor, ex-officio 



Dr. James W. Jameson 
H. H. Dudley, President 
B. H. Orr 
Gardner Tilton 
Allen M. Freeman 
Richard S. Rolfe 
Charles P. Johnson 
Burns P. Hodgman, Clerk 



Term expires 1938 

" 1938 

" 1939 

" 1939 

" 1940 

" 1940 

" 1941 

" 1941 



TRUSTEES OP TRUST FUNDS 

One appointed by Mayor annually in January for three-year term subject 
to confirmation of Board of Aldermen. Salary, none. 



Carl H. Foster 
Harry H. Dudley 
Burns P. Hodgman 



Term expires 1938 
" 1939 
" 1940 



PARK COMMISSIONERS 

Two appointed in January for three-year term subject to confirmation 
of Board of Aldermen. 

John W. Stores, Mayor, ex-officio 

Gardner G. Emmons Term expires 1938 

Mrs. Thomas N. Trqxel " " 1938 

Edgar C. Hirst " " 1939 

Alpheus M. Johnson " " 1939 

Will J. Drew " " 1940 

Dr. Robert J. Graves " " 1940 



80 



CITY OF CONCORD 



RECREATION COMMISSIONERS 

Ai)p()iiited in April for a term of tliree years by Mayor subject to con- 
flrniatiou by Board of Aldermeu. Salary, none. 

JouN W. Stores, Mayor, ex-officio 

Gardner G. Emmons, Clerk Term expires 1938 

J. M. Ahern, Chairman " " 1938 

Dr. C. R. Metcalf " " 1939 

Leigh S. Hall " " 1939 



WARD OFFICERS 

Ward 1— ANDREW FOLEY, ]\Ioderator 

A. YORK 1 

GEORGE McGIRR L 

E. LAFLAMME j 

GRENVILLE T. DODGE, Clerk 



Supervisors 



Ward 2— RALPH W. JONES, Moderator 

II. F. PIPER 
STUART POTTER 
H. W. INGHAM 

E. M. SABEN, Clerk 



Supervisors 



Ward 3— ARTHUR F. HENRY, Moderator 



JOHN N. ENGEL 
EVA FARNUM 
OMAR E. F. EKSTROI\[ 



1 



J 



Supervisors 



HOWARD P. BLANCHARD, Clerk 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



81 



Ward 4— J. S. OTIS, Moderator 

RUSSELL M. FRASIER 
HARRY II. KENNEDY 
MARGARET CHALLIS 
W. C. BRUNEL, Clerk 



Supervisors 



Ward 5 — W. L. Stevens, Moderator 
E. W. WALKER 
HAROLD W. GREATOREX 
C. E. NASON J 

ARTHUR W. PROUD, Clerk 

Ward 6— ARTHUR E. BEAN, Moderator 
NELSON STRONG 1 

E. W. SALTMARSH [ 

W. A. STEVENS j 

GUY JEWETT, Clerk 



Supervisors 



Supervisors 



Ward 7— ALLEN N. FREEMAN, Moderator 
H. M. FARRAR, 1 

ALVIN P. HUSSEY [ Supervisors 

L. D. CILLEY J 

RAYMOND S. SIBLEY, Clerk 

Ward 8— ROBERT E. PHILBRICK, Moderator 
A. J. AYOTTE 1 



PAUL E. MUDGETT 
CHARLES A. BARTLETT 
HENRY BOISVERT, Clerk 



[ Supervisors 

1 

J 



Ward 9— ANDREW SALTMARSH, Moderator 
MINNIE A. DREW 1 

GEORGE KENNEY !- Supervisors 

MARTIN H. SPAIN j 

MARGARET M. GAVAGHAN, Clerk 



82 CITY OF CONCORD 

BALLOT INSPECTORS 

Ward 1— W. H. ROLFE 
G. F. GRIFFIN 
WILLIAM HOWE 
ROGER CORBETT 

Ward 2— HERBERT STUART 

HERBERT KNOWLES 
C. E. PERRY 
HERBERT GARDNER 

Ward 3— M. H. PEABODY 
AGNES JOHNSON 
MYLA CHAMBERLIN 
HARRY ANDERSON 

Ward 4— WINFIELD J. PHILLIPS 
J. ROY GORDON 
THOMAS CONWAY 
EDWIN DeANGELIS 

Ward 5— ATWOOD LEVENSALER 
EARL F. NEWTON 
J. W. STANLEY 
GEORGE A. CONLON 

Ward 6— WALTER WILLIAMSON 
JAMES II. DOLAN 
GEORGE W. LOVEJOY 
DONALD SALTMARSH 

Ward 7— AZRO G. MAXHAM 
CHESTER JEWELL 
JOSEPH NAUGHTON 
A. 0. PRESTON 



CITY GOVERNMENT 83 

Ward 8— HAROLD B. AREY 

ADOLPHE BOISVERT 
LEIGH M. WBNTWORTH 
A. W. THOMPSON 

Ward 9— WILLIAM JOHNS 
FRED COATES 
GEORGE HODGE 
DAVID WHALEN 

Salary 

Per Annum 

Moderators and Ward Clerks $40.00 

Supervisors— Wards 1, 2, 3, 8, 9 40.00 

Supervisors— Wards 4, 5, 6, 7 50.00 

Per Diem 
Ballot Inspectors $8.00 



84 CITY OF CONCORD 

MAYORS OF THE CITY OP CONCORD 

The original cliarter of the city was adopted by the inhabitants March 
10, 1858, and until ISSO the Mayor has been elected tor two years, at eacli 
biennial election in November. Under the CVty Charter, adopted May 11, 
1!»()!), tlie Mayor was elected, in December, 1910, for one year, and bien- 
nially thereafter in November beginning in the year 1911. 

Hon. JOSEPH LOW 1853- '54 

" RUFUS CLEMENTS,* '55 

" JOHN ABBOTT 1856-'57-'58 

" MOSES T. WILLARD 1859- '60 

" MOSES HUMPHREY 1861- '62 

" BENJAMIN F. GALE 1863- '64 

" MOSES HUMPHREY '65 

" JOHN ABBOTT 1866- '67 

" LYMAN D. STEVENS 1868- '69 

" ABRAHAM G. JONES 1870- '71 

" JOHN KIMBALL 1872- '73- '74- '75 

" GEORGE A. PILLSBURY 1876- '77 

" HORACE A. BROWN,! 1878- '79- '80 

" GEORGE A. CUMMINGS,t 1880- '81- '82 

" EDGAR H. WOODMAN 1883- '84- '85- '86 

" JOHN E. ROBERTSON 1887- '88 

" STILLMAN HUMPPIREY 1889- '90 

" HENRY W. CLAPP 1891- '92 

" PARSONS B. COGSWELL 1893- '94 

" HENRY ROBINSON 1895- '96 

" ALBERT B. WOODWORTH 1897- '98 

" NATHANIEL MARTIN 1899-1900 

" HARRY G. SARGENT 1901- '02 

" CHARLES R. CORNING 1903- '08 

" CHARLES J. FRENCH 1909- '15 

" NATHANIEL AV. HOBBS 1916- '17 



*Died in office, January 1.3, 1850. 
t'lVrni closed in November, 1880. 
JTerin conuneiiced in November, 1880. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 85 

Hon. CHARLES J. FRENCH 1918- '19 

HENRY E. CHAMBERLIN 1920- '23 

WILLIS H. FLINT 1924- '25 

FRED N. HARDEN* 1926- '27 

OLIN H. CHASEt 1928- 

ROBERT W. BROWN** 1928- '33 

JOHN W. STORRS 1934- ' 



*Died in office, November 23, 1927. 
tDied in office, December 8, 1928. 
♦♦Elected to fill vacancy, December 12, 1928. 



WATER DEPARTMENT, 1937 
— — 

Board of Water Commissioners 

JOHN W. STORRS, Mayor, ex-officio 

BURNS P. HODGMAN to March 31, 1941 

CHARLES P. JOHNSON to March 31, 1941 

ALLEN M. FREEMAN to March 31, 1940 

RICHARD S. ROLPE • to March 31, 1940 

BENJAMIN H. ORR to March 31, 1939 

GARDNER TILTON to March 31, 1939 

HARRY H. DUDLEY to March 31, 1938 

DR. JAMES W. JAMESON to March 31, 1938 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, President 
BURNS P. HODGMAN, Clerk 

SUPERINTENDENT 

P. R. SANDERS 

CLERK 

ALICE G. COCHRAN 

FOREMAN 

JAMES T. DAVIS 

ENGINEER 

P. JEROME HOYT 



WATER DEPARTMENT 87 

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 



To the Honorahh Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

The Board of Water Commissioners, in presenting their 
sixty-sixth annual report, call your attention to the de- 
tailed report of the Superintendent, Percy R. Sanders. 
Said report fully describes the year's work, including ex- 
tensions and all other work in caring for the city Water 
Works proi)erty. The financial statement shows you the 
amount of revenue collected from the water takers during 
the year and how the money was expended, and we end 
the year with a substantial balance. 

The surph^s income of the year enabled the superin- 
tendent to do quite a little extension work of laying mains, 
particularly on the Loudon Road, by laying 7,346 feet of 
eight inch pipe and laying 1,766 feet of six inch pipe on 
the Pembroke Road in East Concord, besides other numer- 
ous extensions in the city proper, for the purpose of ex- 
tending the water service to additional takers, as well as 
affording better fire protection. 

The assets of the City Water Works, representing the 
cost of the plant, according to the Public Service Com- 
mission forms, and including the current assets, show a 
total as of January 1, 1938, of $1,839,837.15. The depre- 
ciated value of the property as of January 1, 1938, as 
returned to the Public Service Commission is $1,221,924.17. 

It is gratifying to report that the yearly receipts from 
the water takers is sufficient to pay all bills for keeping 
the plant in excellent condition, to render good service, 
including a certain amount of extensions, relaying old pipe 
with new, and to pay interest and principal on the bonded 
indebtedness as they become due each year. 

Out of said yearly revenue $26,000 of the bonded in- 
debtedness was paid this year, leaving a balance of bonds 



»b CITY OF CONCORD 

outstanding of $210,000 which will all be paid off by the 
year 1951 or possibly earlier. 

At times we read in our daily papers letters from citi- 
zens suggesting that the city sell out its water supply 
system at Penacook Lake for a recreational center. The 
Board of Water Commissioners hope that such a proposi- 
tion will never be seriously considered by the city as it 
would mean that the city of Concord would be giving up 
one of the best water supplies of any New England city. 

Respectfully submitted, 

For the Board of Water Commissioners, 
duly authorized, 

HARRY H. DUDLEY, 

President. 



WATER DEPARTMENT Si) 

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
— — 

To the Board of Wafer Commissioners: 

I herewith present to you the sixty-sixth annual report 
of the operations of this Department : 

Receipts 

For water at fixed rates, Com- 
mercial $5,559.68 

For water at meter rates, Com 
mercial 

For water at meter rates. Industrial 

For water, 1935 and 1936 accounts 

From delinquents 

For water for building' purposes 

For water for miscellaneous uses 

For pipe and stock sold and labor 

For old metals 

For rent of land 

Miscellaneous receipts 

Sale of building- 

For shutting' off and turning on water, 
non-payment of water bills 

Deduct abatements 



From Construction Account Water 
Works P.W.A. Project No. N. H. 
1042-R 

Materials furnished $1,565.98 

Refund of interest on bonds is- 
sued for project, from date of 
issue to completion of work 1,380.00 



85,807.67 




15,068.33 




371.45 




350.42 




157.10 




112.25 




1,783.98 




79.79 




150.00 




80.65 




100.00 




;er, 

4.00 




sbino cof; oo 


fpXxJ 


i/,VJ^fJ.»J^ 




40.83 


$109,584.49 



90 CITY OF CONCORD 

Return of insurance on labor ad- 
vanced by General Water 
Works fund 648.36 

3,594.34 



Expenditures 
operation and maintenance 



$113,178.83 



Superintendence 




$4,383.16 


Distribution wages 




9,516.98 


Distribution supplies and expenses 




517.52 


Mains 




592.37 


Services 




411.59 


Hydrants 




839.94 


Meters 




3,708.61 


Purification plant 




356.41 


I'enaeook Lake exjjenses 




2,154.90 


Office account 




3,611.23 


Reading meters and house inspection 




1,436.81 


Automobile account 




2,392.87 


Shop expenses 




294.67 


Repairs to water supply' structures 




978.58 


Repairs and insurance, cottage at Lai 


ke 


419.20 


Repairs to pavilion at Lake 




122.08 


Incidentals 




568.50 


North State Street Pumi)ing Station : 






Salaries 


$2,196.30 




Power 


2,573.46 




Supplies and expenses 


345.03 




Fuel 


212.00 




Repairs to equipment 


45.21 


■^ -xio nn 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



91 



Sanders Pumping Station 



Salaries 


3,866.57 




Power 


1,815.80 




Fuel 


138.00 




Supplies and expenses 


190.66 




Repairs to structure 


59.09 


6,070.12 






Extra High Service Station : 






Salary 


272.09 




Power 


539.43 




Fuel 


40.00 




Supplies and expenses 


40.00 




Repairs to structure 


10.35 


901.87 







$44,649.41 



PLANT ACCOUNT 

Mains, new and replaced 22,875.61 

Hydrant*s, new and replaced 3,716.17 

Services, new and relaid 4,312.58 

Meters 1,491.55 

Equipment 556.10 

Auto equipment 707.00 

Purification equipment 250.00 

North State Street pumping station 90.25 

East Concord elevated tank 38.18 

Grading at Penacook elevated tank 320.58 

Grading at Extra High Service standpipe 332.81 

Grading at Columbus Avenue pumping station 381.15 

Stock account 1,049.21 

$36,121.19 

Total expenditures for 1937 $80,770.60 

Transferred to Construction Bond Account to 
complete payment of P.W.A. Project No. 

N. H. 1042-R $1,382.11 



92 CITY OF CONCORD 

EXTENSIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS 

Distribution pipe laid: 
8-inch : 

Loudon Koad, 7,346 feet, extended east I'l'om Canterbury 
Road ; 281 feet of 2-incli discontinued. 

South Spring Street, 887 feet, south from Concord 
Street, replacing 4-inch. 
6-inch : 

Pembroke Road, East Concord, 1,765 feet, extended 
south. 

Gates Street, 859 feet, south from Loudon Road. 

Ellsworth Street, 788 feet, south from Loudon Road. 

Drew Street, 684 feet, south from Loudon Road. 
4-incli : 

Prospect Street, right of way running west, 75 feet ; 8 
feet of 6 -inch on connection. 

Perkins Court, 144 feet, north from right of way. 
3-inch : 

Roy Street, 198 feet, north from North Pembroke Road. 
2-inch : 

Allard Street, 484 feet, soutJi from Loudon Road. 

Heights Road, 238 feet, extended west. 

B Street, 221 feet, east from Gates Street. 

South Pembroke Road, 195 feet, extended south from 
Warren Locke's. 

Roy Street, 129 feet, south from end of 8-inch. 
1-inch : 

River Street, 100 feet, extended north from Clarke 
Street. 

On hydrant branches: 259 feet of 6-inch; 26 feet dis- 
continued. 

Distribution pipe discontinued : 

4-inch, 674 feet; 2-inch, 1,251 feet. 

Thirty-three new gates were set, four 8-inch and twenty- 
nine 6-inch ; four 4-inch gates were discontinued. 

Twenty-one additional hydrants were set : 

Pembroke Road, East Concord, south side, at Flovd's. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 93 

Pembroke Road, East Concord, south side, at Chase's. 

Pembroke Road, East Concord, south side, at Leach's. 

Lou(U)n Road, north side, near Drew Street. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Gates Street. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Ford's. 

Loudon Road, north side, opposite John Ahern's. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Moses house. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Sperroif house. 

Loudon Road, north side, at Hillsgrove house. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Boulay's. 

Loudon Road, north side, at Andrews house. 

Loudon Road, north side, at Sunoco Filling Station. 

Loudon Road, north side, at Johnson's. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Knoll Crest Garden. 

Loudon Road, north side, near Portsmouth Road. 

Loudon Road, north side, at Tilton's. 

North Pembroke Road, northeast corner of Roy Street. 

Ellsworth Street, west side. 

Gates Street, west side. 

South Spring Street, w-est side, between Concord and 
Thorndike Streets. 

Eleven hydrants have been replaced by new ones. 

Ninety-four new services have been laid, consisting of 
30 feet of iy2-inch; 53 feet of 1-inch and 2,122 feet of 
%-inch pipe ; of these, 3 were relocations of old services ; 
10 were for consumers formerly supplied from pipe with 
another consumer; a 6-inch sprinkler service for State 
House was installed replacing 4-inch. 

Twenty-one services were discontinued in addition to 3 
relocations; net increase of services 70. 

Thirty-two services on Auburn Street were changed over 
to the new 12-inch extra high service main, adding 304 
feet additional service pipe and discontinuing 332 feet. 

Total length of service pipe added, 2,521 feet ; total 
length discontinued, 981 feet. 

Of the 94 services laid, 8 have not yet been connected to 
house pipes; 6 were for use by city and hence achl no in- 



94 CITY OF CONCORD 

come; i;5 were for consumers previously served by other 
pipes ; 2 consumers were added to pipes already serving 
others; increase of consumers 69, less 21 discontinued, net 
increase 48. 

Seventy-seven services were relaid and curb valves were 
placed on 16 old services. 

Eighty-four new meters were set ; 7 have been discon- 
tinued. 

Final i)ayments for work under P.W.A. Project No. 
N. H. 1042-R were made and following is financial state- 
ment for 1937 : 



RECEIPTS 

Federal Grants $8,110.45 

Transferred from Water Works Gen- 
eral fund to complete payment of 
Project 1,382.11 

Surplus of materials sold to Water 

Works 373.53 

Insurance refund 34.15 



$9,900.24 



EXPENDITURES 

Chicago Bridge & Iron Works, con- 
tract for standpipe and elevated 
tank, final payment $2,390.00 

L. H. Shattuck, Inc., contract for 
Columbus Ave. pumping station 
and foundations for standpipe 
and elevated tank, final payment 1,006.32 

F. A. Mazzur, Inc., contract for 

pumping equipment, final payment 293.73 

Metcalf & Eddy, contract for engi- 
neering services, final payment 9.86 

Incidentals 10.60 



WATER DEPARTMENT 9") 



Concord Water Works General Fund 
for materials furnished $940.81 
for maintenance of equip- 
ment 625.17 
for interest refund 1,380.00 
for insurance refund 648.36 



3,594.34 
$7,304.8") 



TOTAL P.W.A. CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 

RECEIPTS 

Bonds issued $48,158.40 

Transferred from Water Works 
General Fund to complete city's 
share of the estimated cost, 55% 2,166.60 

Federal grant, 45% of allowed grant 

basis expenditures 40,135.45 

Transferred from Water Works 
General Fund to complete pay- 
ment of cost 1,382.11 

Surplus materials sold 373.53 

Insurance refund 34.15 



Total receipts in P.W.A. Con- 
struction Account, 1935-1937 $92,250.24 

Total expenditures from this Ac- 
count $92,250.24 



In addition to expenditures from this Fund, there has 
been paid for this Project, from Water Works General 
Fund, $2,692.36 ; total expenditures with credit for surplus 
materials sold and insurance refund were $94,534.92, di- 
vided as follows: 



96 CITY OF CONCORD 

Extra High Service Station: 

Land $450.00 

Structure 6,662.01 

Grading 381.15 

Equipment 1,594.00 



$9,087.16 



Extra High Service Standpipe : 



Land $700.00 




Structure 9,182.89 




Grading 332.81 






10,215.70 


Penaeook Elevated Tank: 


Land $850.00 




Structure 18,289.26 




Grading 320.58 






19,459.84 
45,904.88 


Distribution mains 


Services 


635.04 


Hydrants 


1,863.95 


Engineering and inspection 


5,459.90 


Administration 


341.55 


Bond expense 


186.90 


Interest on bonds during construction 


1,380.00 




$94,534.92 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



97 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF JANUARY 1, 1938 
According to Public Service Commission Forms 

ASSETS 

Intangible Property $167,688.11 

Land: 

Water Supply Land $114,184.93 

Pumping Station Land 5,550.00 

Water Storage Land 4,634.00 

Other Land 5,014.98 

Total Land 129,383.91 
Structures : 

Water Supply Structures $115,513.18 

Pumping Station Structures 70,055.13 

Water Storage Structures 91,774.09 

Stores Department Structures 478.28 

Garage Structures 2,377.69 

Total Structures 280,198.37 
Equipment : 

Water Supply Equipment $1,389.88 

Pumping Station Equipment 44,184.83 

Purification Equipment 3,703.93 

Distribution Mains 865,907.29 

Services 100,673.82 

Hydrants 69,199.27 

Meters 44,842.18 

Stable and Garage Equipment 7,639.75 

Other Equipment 6,065.18 



Total Equipment 
Other Fixed Capital: 

Miscellaneovis Expenditures during 
Construction 



$1,143,606.13 



$63,383.63 



Total other Fixed Capital 
Total Fixed Assets 



63,383.63 



$1,784,260.15 



98 CITY OP CONCORD 

Current Assets: 

Cash— City Treasurer $42,673.94 

Materials and Supplies 12,569.84 

Current Receivables 333.22 



Total Current Assets 55,577.00 



$1,839,837.15 



LIABILITIES 



Capital Liabilities : 

Municipal Investment $958,022.64 

Funded Debt 210,000.00 



Total Capital Liabilities $1,168,022.64 

Federal Grant in aid of Construction 40,135.45 

Current Liabilities: 

Matured Interest Unpaid 146.00 
Reserve : 

Depreciation Reserve 562,335.98 

Profit from income account 69,197.08 



$1,839,837.15 
Total Fixed Assets $1,784,260.15 

Depreciation Reserve 562,335.98 



Depreciated Valuation of plant 

January 1, 1938 $1,221,924.17 



Respectfully submitted. 



P. R. SANDERS, 

Superintendent. 



water department 99 

Pumping Record at No. State St. Station for 1937 



Months 



Total 

Days 

Puinpinj 



Ave. Daily 

Hours K. W. H. 
Pumping Monthly 



Daily 

Ave. 

K. W. H. 



Total Gallons 

Pumped 
Venturi Metei 



Daily Ave. 
Gallons 



January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 



31 
2S 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 
31 
30 
31 
30 
31 



7-1(5 
7-20 
7-10 
C-55 
7-10 
8-OG 
8-02 
8-29 
7-59 
7-15 
7-26 
7-03 



17,970 
16,580 
17,650 
16,5.30 
17,430 
19,410 
19,740 
21,025 
19,300 
18,010 
17,740 
17,400 



579 
392 
569 
551 
562 
647 
636 
678 
643 
580 
591 
501 



256,000 
549,000 
942,000 
502,000 
499,000 
134,000 
504,000 
304,000 
239,000 
601,000 
132,000 
511,000 



1,169,548 
1,198,178 
1,159,419 
1,116,733 
1,145,129 
1,304,400 
1.274,322 
1.364,645 
1,307,966 
1,180,677 
1,204,400 
1.145,516 



Total 
Daily Ave. 



365 



7-31 I 



218,785 



599 



443,173,000 



1,214,172 



Pumped by steam 
Total Pumped 



2,336,000 
445,509,000 



Pumping Record at Sanders Station for 1937 



Mouths 



Gallons 
Pumped by 
Gas Engine 



Gallons 
Pumped by 
Electric Motor 



Total 
Gallons 
Pumped 



January 

February 

March 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

Total 

No. State St. Station 

Total pumped at both stations. 



68,200 

105,400 

102,300 

102,100 

36,000 

33,800 

68,400 

33,300 

70,100 

115,200 

120,900 



148, 

145, 

268, 

100, 

7,989, 

18,105, 

13,574, 

2,381. 

202, 

202, 

149, 



100 
700 
500 
100 
300 
100 
400 
100 
000 
300 
700 



216,300 

251,100 

370,800 

202,200 

8,025,300 

18,138,900 

13,642,800 

2,414,400 

272,100 

317,500 

270,600 



855,700 



43,266,300 | 



44,122,000 
445,509,000 
489,631,000 



Extra High Service Station 

The pumping; records at this station for the past year are incomplete owing to 
ad.iustments of pumps and registering meter to meet the guarantee, and are 
therefore not presented. 



100 



CITY OF CONCORD 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT 



Due 


Bate 


Feb. 


1, 1938 


41/4 


July 




1938 


41/2 


Oct. 




1938 


21/2 


Feb. 




1939 


41/4 


July 




, 1939 


41/2 


Oct. 




1939 


21/2 


Feb. 




1940 


41/4 


July 




1940 


41/2 


Oct. 




1940 


21/2 


Feb. 




1941 


41/4 


July 




1941 


41/2 


Oct. 




1941 


21/2 


Feb. 




1942 


41/4 


July 




1942 


41/2 


Oct. 




1942 


21/2 


Feb. 




1943 


41/4 


July 




1943 


41/2 


Oct. 




1943 


21/2 


Feb. 




1944 


41/4 


July 




1944 


41/2 


Oct. 




1944 


21/2 


Feb. 




1945 


41/4 


July 




1945 


41/2 


Oct. 




1945 


21/2 


Feb. 




1946 


41/4 


July 




1946 


41/2 


Oct. 




1946 


21/2 


Feb. 




1947 


41/4 


July 




1947 


41/2 


Oct. 


J- 


1947 


21/2 


Feb. 


j^ 


1948 


41/4 


Oct. 


1 


1948 


21/2 


Feb. 


1 


1949 


41/4 



Amount 
$9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
4,000 
9,000 
4,000 
9,000 



WATER DEPARTMENT 101 

Feb. 1, 1950 4i/4 9,000 

Feb. 1, 1951 41/4 9,000 



$210,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT 

Dr. 

To coupons overdue January 1, 1936 

and not presented $ 167.25 

To coupons due 1987 8,940.00 

$9,107.25 

Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1937 $8,961.25 

By coupons due and not presented 146.00 

$9,107.25 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
OF WATER WORKS ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1937 $43,092.06 
Receipts, P. R. Sanders, 

Superintendent 118,178.83 

$161,270.89 

EXPENDITURES 

Orders paid $83,635.70 

Bonds paid ' 26,000.00 

Interest on bonds 8,961.25 

Balance on hand January 1, 1938 42,673.94 

$161,270.89 



102 CITY OF CONCORD 

WATER WORKS CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 

RECEIPTS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1937 $1,412.61 

Federal Grants 8,110.45 

Loan from Water Works General 

Fund 1,000.00 

Transferred from Water Works 
General Fund to complete payment 

of Project 1,382.11 

Sundry receipts 407.68 

$12,312.85 

EXPENDITURES 

Orders paid $7,312.85 

Loans repaid Water Works General 

Fund 5,000.00 

$12,312.85 



WATER DEPARTMENT ]()') 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1937 
CONCORD WATER WORKS 

CITY OF CONCORD, COUNTY OF MERRIMACK, STATE OF 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



GENERAL STATISTICS 

Population by census of 1930, 25,228. 

Date of construction, 1872 and 1931. 

By whom owned. City of Concord. 

Sources of supply, Penacook Lake and driven wells in 
Pembroke. 

Mode of supply, gravity; also pumping- to reservoir for 
high service and fire protection and pumping to stand- 
pipe for extra high service for higher section of cit3^ 



PUMPING 

North State St. Pumping Station 

ELECTRIC pumps 

One Worthington 8", single stage centrifugal pump, capa- 
city 3,800,000 gallons per 24 hours. Motor, G. E., 100 
H. P., A. C. 

One DeLaval 8", single stage centrifugal pump, capacity 
3,600,000 gallons per 24 hours. Motor, G. E., 100 H. P., 
A. C. 

Power: alternating, 3-phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,740 
R. P. M. 

K. W. H. used for year, 218,785. 

Total pumpage by Venturi meter, 445,509,000 gallons. 

Average static head against Avhich pump works, 90 feet. 



104 CITY OF CONCORD 

Average dynamic head against which pump works, 115.2 
feet. 

Sanders Pumping Station, Well Supply 

Two 2-stage Morris electrically operated centrifugal 
pumps, direct connected 125 H. P. Westinghouse motors ; 
capacity each 1,600,000' gallons per 24 hours. 

One 3-stage Morris gasoline driven centrifugal pump op- 
erated b.y 175 H. P. Dolphin, C, 6-cylinder internal com- 
bustion engine, 1.200 R. P. M. ; capacity 1,600,000 gal- 
lons per 24 hours. 

Power: alternating 3-phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 1,740 
R. P. M. 

Total pumpage by Venturi meter, 44,122,000 gallons. 

Average dynamic head against which pump works, 288 
feet. 

Average suction lift, 15.5 feet. 

Total head against which pump works, 303.5 feet. 

Average static head against which pump works, 207.4 feet. 

Extra High Service Station 

Two single stage Allis Chalmers electrically operated cen- 
trifugal pumps, direct connected 10 H. P. Allis Chalmers 
motors ; capacity each 300 gallons per minute. 

Power : alternating 3-phase, 60 cycles, 2,200 volts, 3,500 
R. P. M. 

Operated automatically. 

Average dynamic head against which pum]) works, 85 feet. 

Average head on suction side, 51 feet. 

DISTRIBUTING SYSTEM 

Kind of pipe — cast iron and cement-lined. 
Sizes — four-inch to twenty-four inch. 
Extended — 11,791 feet during year. 
Relaid — 674 feet during year. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 105 

Discontinued — 26 feet during year. 
Total now in use, 481,913 feet, or 91.27 miles. 
Sizes — three-inch and less. 

Extended — • 1,561 feet during year. 
Relaid — feet during year. 
Discontinued — 1,241 feet during year. 
Total now in use — 33,323 feet, or 6.31 miles. 
Number of hydrants added during year — public, 21 
Number of hydrants now in use - — public, 648 ; private, 

112. 
Number of stop gates added during year — ■ 29. 
Number of stop gates now in use — 1,385. 
Number of blow-off gates — 76. 

Range of pressure on mains at center of city - — 88 pounds 
high service and 48 pounds low service. 

Services 

Kind of pipe — cement-lined, brass and copper tubing. 
Sizes — three-fourths-inch to ten-inch. 

Laid — 2,521 feet. 

Discontinued — 981 feet. 

Total now in use — 118,378 feet. 
Number of service taps added during year — 94. 
Number of service taps discontinued — 24. 
Number now in use — 4,963. 
Average length of service — 23.85 feet. 
Number of meters added during year — 77. 
Number now in use — 4,175. 
Additional services under meter rate — 23. 
Percentage of services metered — 84.54. 
Percentage of receipts from metered water — 94.71. 



106 CITY OF CONCORD 

STATISTICS OF CONSUMPTION OF WATER 

1. Estimated total population at date, 25,228. 

2. Estimated population on lines of pipe, 24,000. 
;3. Estimated population supplied, 24,000. 

4. Total consumption for year, 979,982,000 gallons. 

5. Amount supplied by gravity, 490,351,000 gallons. 

6. Amount supplied by pumping, 489,631,000 gallons. 

7. Average daily consumption, 2,682,100 gallons. 

8. Average daily use per service, 540 gallons. 

9. Gallons per day each consumer, 111.7 gallons. 

10. Amount of chlorine used, 2,300 pounds. 

11. Amount of chlorine per 1,000,000 gallons, 2.45 pounds. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



To the Board of Mayor and Aldermen: 

In accordance Avith the requirements of the city ordi- 
nance, I herewith submit for your consideration the re- 
port of the Fire Department for the year 1937. 

The Department responded to 507 alarms. 

Bells Stills Alarms 

54 453 507 

The number of alarms were less than the previous year 
by fifty-six, also there was a gratifying decrease in proper- 
ty loss. 

The task of rebuilding the old types of apparatus was 
completed this year. Engine 5 was rebuilt, and a modern 
booster pump and tank was installed. Engine 7 was over- 
hauled and repainted, and repairs on all other apparatus 
were made when required. 

New transmission gears were installed in Ladder 1. This 
necessitated placing this apparatus out of commission, 
leaving the city without ladder service until repairs were 
completed. 

Again I urgently recommend the purchase of an aerial 
ladder truck, as our ladder equipment is inadequate. 

The Fire Alarm system is in satisfactory condition. 
Four additional boxes were installed, and all other neces- 
sary repairs were made. The rebuilding of the Fire 
Alarm system in Penacook has been completed. 

A yearly test was made on all hose, and a large amount 
was rejected. Fifteen hundred feet of hose should be 
purchased for the coming year. 



108 CITY OF CONCORD 

Fire prevention work was carried on b}^ the regular 
force, and there were three thousand three hundred and 
twenty-eight inspections made. Results of this 'work have 
proven highly satisfactory. 

I wish to thank the citizens for co-operating with the 
fire inspectors. 

For the support and co-operation of your board, and the 
heads of departments, I wish to express my appreciation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

W. T. HAPPNY, 

Chief of Department. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



SUMMARY, 1937 



109 







BUILDINGS 






Value 


Loss 


Insurance 


Insurance Paid 


Net Loss 


$260,7'J9.00 


|25,275.5G 


$188,445.00 
CONTENTS 


$20,021.50 


$5,254.00 


Value 


Loss 


Insurance 


Insurance Paid 


Net Loss 


$79,088.00 


$8,507.14 


$58,550.00 


$6,017.14 


$2,550.00 




TOTAL BUILDINGS AND 


CONTENTS 




Value 


Loss 


Insurance 


Insurance Paid 


Net Loss 


$339,887.00 


$33,842.70 


$246,995.00 


$26,038.70 


$7,804.00 



W. T. Happny 



City of Concord 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Apparatus and Force 

— — 
Chief of Department 

Office, Central Fire Station 



M. J. Martin 



Deputy Chiefs 



C. G. Howser 



District Chief 
F. M. Dodge 



Apparatus 

Chief's Car — Central Station 
Deputy Chief's Car — Central Station 
Engine Co. No. 1 — Central Station 



110 CITY OF CONCORD 

Engine Co. No. 2 — Central Station 

Engine Co. No. 3 — Penacook 

Ladder Co. No. 3 — Penacook 

Hose Tender No. 3 — Penacook 

Engine Co. No. 4 — Central Station 

Engine Co. No. 5 — Plains 

Engine Co. No. 6 — South State and Concord 

Engine Co. No. 7 — East Concord 

Engine Co. No. 8 — West Concord 

Hose Co. No. 2 — Central Station 

Ladder Co. No. 1 — Central Station 

Service Truck — Central Station 

Veteran's Auxiliary Co. (15 men) 

Hose 

The department has in service seventeen thousand five 
hundred feet of cotton jacketed rubber lined hose, and 
twenty-one hundred feet of three-quarter inch booster hose. 

There are twenty-one permanent men, and one hundred 
and seventy call men connected with the department. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 111 



IN MEMORIAM 



DANIEL F. MURPHY 

Hose-man Engine Co. No. 2 

Died December 31, 1937 



REPORT OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Concord, N. II., January 1, 1938. 

To the Members of the Board of Mayor and Aldermeyi, and, 
the Members of the Police Commission: 

Gentlemen : I respectfully submit my third report of 
the Police Department, for the year ending- December 31, 
1937. 



ROSTER 



Victor I. Moore 
J. Edward Silva 
Artluir W. Mclsaac 
Samuel Rodd 
James J. Halligan 



Chief of Police 

Deputy Chief 

Captain 

Sergeant 

Sergeant 



Clerk 
Burton L. Bailey 

Pensioned 
Samuel Batchelder 



House-Officer 
Clarence E. Morse 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



113 



PATROLMEN 



Eugene G. Densmore 
Paul H. Moore 
George H. Dooley 
Thomas Harrison 
Merle F. Densmore 
Joseph G. Andrews 
William White 
Percy S. Davis 
Nelson Arseneault 



Joseph Keenan 
Delniar G. Thompson 
Roger E. Sargent 
Mark D. Casey 
Joseph D. Jones 
J. Bernard Halligan 
Francis Sullivan 
Walter Carlson 



RESERVE OFFICERS 



Capt. George H. Abbott 
Sgt. Joseph E. King 
Burton L. Bailey 
Richard Campbell 
James Ceriello 
Roland Fifield 
Einer Grell 
Amie C. Guimond 
William Goldthwaite, Jr. 
Richard Herold 
Edward L. Rowland 
Walter B. Huckins 
John Kenney 



Edward R. Loveley 
Stanley Lugg 
Addison Martin 
Clarence E. Moree 
Michael Mulligan 
John W. Naylor 
Timothy J. O'Brien 
Denzil M. Rowe 
Edward Sullivan 
Leonard B. Sullivan 
Emile J. Simard 
Norris Welch 
Irving E. Welch 



114 CITY OF CONCORD 

RETURN OP OFFENSES KNOWN TO POLICE 

Classification of I S I « ^' 2 

Offenses ^t a> *S -o- g 

PART I S fl.Si ■" a £ S 






] . Criminal Homicide : 
(a) Murder, non- 
negligent man- 
slaughter 



OS H 



2. Rape 111 

3. Robbery 2 1 1 

4. Aggravated assault 111 

5. Burglary : 

Breaking and Entering 30 23 5 18 

(i. Larceny Theft : 
(Except Auto) 

(a) $50 in value and over 

(b) Under $50 in value 

7. Auto Theft 

Total 93 78 24 54 



6 


6 


2 


4 


33 


30 


7 


23 


20 


16 


8 


8 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 115 

RETURN OP PERSONS CHARGED 



2. Rape 

3. Robbery 

4. Aggravated assault 

5. Burglary : 
Breaking and Entering 

6. Larceny Theft : 
(Except Auto) 

7. Auto Theft 

Total, Part I 



m 



Classification of 
Ofifenses 


•a 

i| 


a 

o 

CO 

Pi to 


4) 


o * 
3 © 


Part I Classes 










1. Criminal Homicide: 










(a) Murder, non- 










negligent man- 










slaughter 










(b) Manslaughter by 










negligence 











1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


9 


9 


6 


6 


20 


20 



116 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Classification of 
Offenses 



a at 



Part II Classes 

8. Other assaults 4 

9. Forgery and 

Counterfeiting 

10. Embezzlement and Fraud 

11. Stolen property, buying, 

stealing and possessing 

12. Weapons, carrying, 

possessing, etc. 

13. Prostitution, com- 

mercial vice 

14. Sex offenses, 

except 2 and 13 

If). Offenses against family 
and children 

16. Narcotic drugs 

17. Liquor laws 

18. Drunkenness 99 

19. Disorderly conduct 

20. Vagrancy 

21. Gambling 

22. Driving while 

intoxicated 2 

23. Violation of the road 

and driving laws 3 



28 


28 


1 


1 


3 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


6 


6 


257 


257 


24 


25 


3 


3 


15 


15 


39 


39 


39 


39 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 117 



24. 


Parking- violations 1484 


302 


302 


25. 


Traffic and Motor Vehicle 








laws except 22 and 24 3 


53 


53 


26. 


All other offenses 


13 


13 


27. 


Suspicion 2 








Total, Part II classes 1597 


787 


787 




Grand Total 1597 


807 


807 




B. L. BAILEY, 










Clerk 


of Police. 



VICTOR I. MOORE, 

Chief of Police. 



MISCELLANEOUS 

1. Auto accidents investigated 191 

2. Total Ambulance calls 165 

3. Ambulance in emergency 55 

4. Articles reported found 35 

5. Articles reported stolen 47 

6. Automobiles reported stolen from Concord 19 

7. Automobiles reported stolen from out of town 101 

8. Bicycles reported stolen 22 

9. Attempted breaks 10 

10. Breaks 38 

11. Complaints investigated 399 

12. Dangerous limbs and trees reported 8 

13. Disturbances quelled 91 

14. Dogs reported lost and found 104 

15. Dogs reported killed or injured 43 

16. Doors tried each night 1309 

17. Doors and windows found open or unlocked 868 



118 CITY OF CONCORD 

18. Escaped from State Institutions 74 

19. Fires 42 

20. Officer attending fires 125 

21. Holes in the street and sidewalks reported 21 

22. Traffic and Gamewell lights out 44 

23. Signal boxes and Traffic signals out of order 27 

24. Street lights reported out 713 

25. Articles reported lost 69 

26. Children reported lost 39 

27. Lights left burning in stores and buildings 73 

28. Merchants notified of trouble in stores 111 

29. Missing persons reported to this office 35 

30. Persons reported drowning 1 

31. Persons located 2 

32. Persons found dead 3 

33. Persons found ill on the street 4 

34. Persons investigated 10 

35. Police cars used for sick people and accidents 10 

36. Runaways reported to this office 14 

37. Stray animals reported 4 

38. Vacant buildings watched 36 

39. Wires reported down 8 

40. Suicides 2 



For the Expenditures of this Department, see the Finan- 
cial Statement. 



VICTOR I. MOORE, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1937. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The following is the yearly report of the 
various subdivisions of this department. 

Roads and Bridges 

Appropriation $168,676.00 

Receipts 33,248.33 

$201,924.33 

Expended 201,909.47 



Balance $14.86 

Bridges 

Finished filling approaches to Washington Street Bridge, 
Penacook. The State of New Hampshire relaid the west 
abutment, and built a trestle at the Sewalls Falls Bridge, 
Avhich will be maintained by this department 

Culverts 

New culverts were constructed at the following loca- 
tions : 

Sugar Ball 

Graham Road 

Webster Road 

Dump Road 

Hopkinton New Road 

Shaker Road 

Hutchins Street (two built) 

Wier Road 

West Parish Road 

Pleasant Street, Penacook 



120 CITY OF CONCORD 

Elm Street, Penacook 
Chas. Sanborn Road 
Hopkinton New Road 

Culverts were repaired at the following locations : 

West Parish Road 

Stickney Hill Road 

Second Street, West Concord 

Iron Works Road 

Clarke Street, West Concord 

Sugar Ball 

Rogers Avenue 

Catch Basins 

All catch basins were given a thorough spring and fall 
cleaning. 

Equipment 

New carts were built and old ones repaired. The 
asphalt plant, graders, compressor and shovels were kept 
in repair. 

New equipment purchased is as follows : 

Birch Road Hone 
Adams Diesel Grader 
Miscellaneous tools 

(See ''New Equipment— 1937") 

Fences 

Fences were built at the following locations : 

River Road, opposite Gifford cottage 
Mountain Road, East Concord 
Sugar Ball Road 
Sand Hill, Penacook 



DEPARTMENT OP PUBLIC WORKS 121 

New fence rails were built at the following locations : 

Main Street Bridge, Penacook 
Washington Street Bridge, Penacook 

Other fences were painted as time would permit. 
Snow fences were erected and taken down. 



Flushing 

The motor-driven flusher was used on the following 
streets during the warmer months : 

North and South State Streets 

North and South Main Streets 

Park 

Capitol 

Green 

School 

Warren 

Pleasant 

Center 

Prince 

South Street 



Garage 

General work was done on the garage building, also on 
trucks, tools and equipment. 

New trucks were purchased as follows : 

2 FWD 

5 Macks 

1 Rogers Semi-Trailer 

One band stand trailer was built. (See "New Equip- 
ment - 1937") 



122 CITY OF CONCORD 

Miscellaneous 

Completed painting new machine shop. 

A bad corner on the Borough Road near Provo's house 
was straightened. 

A hockey rink was graded and surfaced for the Union 
School District at the Senior High School. 

Miscellaneous work was done for the various depart- 
ments at their request. 

Gravel Road Maintenance 

39.1 miles of gravel road were graded, honed and new 
gravel applied. 

K. P. Patching 

A great deal of patching was done to tar-surfaced roads 
to keep them in shape. 

Plowing Streets, Walks, and Removing Snow 

The United States Weather Bureau recorded 57.80 
inches of snow fall in 1937. As is customary, the streets, 
T'oads and sidewalks were plowed, and the snow removed 
from the business section of the city. 

Sanding 

8,015 cu. yards of sand were spread on streets and side- 
walks in 1937. 

Sidewalks 

151.48 sq. yards of new sidewalk were built at the fol- 
lowing locations: 

71 South Spring Street 

(il Dunklee Street 

12 Badger Street 

20 Highland Street 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 123 

2,360 sq. yards of sidewalk were relaid at the following 
locations : 

Center St. — from No. 88 westerly to Washington St. 

Washington St. — North Main Street westerly 

No. Main St. — Washington Street northerly 

North State Street, West Concord 

Franklin Street — -Rumford Street easterly 

Bradley Street — corner of Church Street 

West Street — corner of State Street 

State Street — corner of West Street 

North Main Street — corner of Bridge Street 

Fayette Street 

Wall Street 

Hanover Street in front of No. 9 and 11 

Ridge Road in front of No. 11 

Gravel sidewalks were repaired at the following loca- 
tions : 

Broadway 

2 Curtice Avenue 

Granite Street 

Streets in Fosterville 

Dartmouth Street 

Highland Street 

Perkins Street 

Dakin Street 

Franklin Street 

North State Street, West Concord 

Hall Street 

Penacook Street 

Rolfe Street, Penacook 

Mills Street 

Badger Street 

South Fruit Street 

School Street 

Washington Street, Penacook 



124 CITY OF CONCORD 

Summer Street, Penacook 
High Street, Penacook 
Home Avenue 
Charles Street, Penacook 
South Main Street, Penacook 
Pillsbury Street 

Curbing Installed hy W.P.A. 

Pleasant Street 850 feet 

South Spring Street 1,703 feet 

Curtice Avenue 386 feet 

Prospect Street 88 feet 

North State Street 1,098 feet 



4,125 feet 



State Aid Construction 

The State of New Hampshire Highway Department re- 
built South Main Street from Maitland Street to the Bow 
line. One-half of the money necessary to complete this 
project was furnished by the city of Concord. 

Tarring 

50.5 miles of roads were tar surfaced during 1937. 

Equipment purchased in 1937 

Blacksmith Shop 

Forge and Grinder 

Tire bender and upsetter 

Miscellaneous Equipment 
Birch Road Hone 
New Carts 

Garage 

Battery charger 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 125 

20 ton jack 

Precision Tester 

F. W. D. Truck No. 27 

P. W. D. Truck No. 28 

Mack EJ 

Mack Jr. (two) 

Mack EQ 

Mack Jr. Pickup 

25-30 Ton Rogers Trailer 

Machine Shop 

Lathe with shaft, etc. 

Shaper 

Miscellaneous Equipment 

Patching 

Two wheelbarrows 

Plows 

1 — No. 50 SB Frink with attachments 

1 — No. 40 SB Frink One-Way complete with level- 
ing wing and hydraulic control 
l_No. 25 SB 103-9H Frink One-Way complete with 
hinged deflectors — lifting device 

Stable 

1 pair grey horses 
Electric water cooler 

Garbage 

Appropriation $35,000.00 

Expended 34,522.70 



Balance $477.30 

The entire city is covered for the collection of rubbish 
and ashes every two weeks. One week at the north end, 
and one week at the south end. The paper in the business 
section is collected every day. 



126 city of concord 

Table Garbage 
Appropriation $4,610.00 

Expended for contract. City Proper $4,000.00 
Expended for contract, W. Concord 250.00 

Expended for contract, Penacook 360.00 

4,610.00 



The contract for collecting table garbage in the City 
Proper has been held by Burt Holt, and the entire city is 
covered once each week. 

Mr. Fred Loranger has had the contract for collecting 
garbage in West Concord and Penacook. 

Work Done Under Bond Issues 
South Main Street Construction — East Side 
Roadway $6,157.41 

Sidewalk 1,120.02 

Curbing 948.21 

Manholes and Catch Basins 404.97 

$8,630.61 

Rebuilt sidewalk So. Main St.— West side 2,324.76 

Rebuilt sidewalk Pleasant St. — North side 950.61 

Rebuilt sidewalk No. Main St. — Thompson & 

Iloague's Alley to Emmon's Alley 1,396.95 
Warren Street Construction 

Roadway 4,566.05 

Sidewalk 885.84 

Curbing 6,352.55 

Manholes and Catch Basins 2,243.85 

14,048.29 



Resurfacing Fire Station Yards — Penacook 

and East Concord 541.65 

State Aid Construction 8,980.98 

Refund on Equipment 5,224.00 

Charges for Floating Bonds No. 4 and 5 276.10 



$42,373.95 



Respectfully submitted, 

ERVIN E. WEBBER, 

Superi7itende'nt of Streets. 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 127 

ENGINEERING 

Appropriation $6,800.00 

Receipts 39.80 

$6,839.80 

Expended 6,741.01 



Balance $98.79 

One hundred and three plans and 3,088 bine prints were 
made during the year. 8,588 feet of sidewalk grade stakes 
and 3,148 feet of road grade stakes were set. 12,975 feet 
of curb grades were set. 568 transfers of property were 
recorded. 

There were .8252 miles of streets laid out as follows: 

Roy Street 671.30 feet 

Joffre Street 707.20 feet 

Hutchinson Avenue 437.90 feet 

A Street 227.00 feet 

B Street 218.70 feet 

Gates Street 827.40 feet 

Drew Street 589.90 feet 

Ellsworth Street 677.90 feet 



4,357.30 feet or .8252 miles. 

Tliis brings the total mileage of roads and streets in the 
corporate limits of the city to 184.277. 

The deed book of Blossom Hill Cemetery showing trans- 
fers of lots was brought up to January 1, 1938. 

Sewers 
Appropriation $12,532.00 

Receipts 1,992.89 

$14,524.89 

Expended 14,499.71 

Balance $25.18 



128 CITY OF CONCORD 

174 feet of 8" Akron sewer pipe was laid in the following 
streets : 

Shawmut Street, East Concord 68 feet 

Merrimack Street, Penacook 106 feet 

4,345 feet of sewers were built at the following locations 
by W. P. A. forces : 

Farnum's Field 2,156'— 24" Cement 

Rumford Street 182'— 8" Akron 

Penacook Street 810'— 8" Akron 

So. Pembroke Road 1,197'— 12" Akron 

2,878 feet of storm sewer was built at the following 
locations by P.W.A. 

Washington Street 2,451' 

Pine Street 427' 

This brings the total miles of main line sewers to the 
following : 

City Proper 46.912 

West Concord 4.380 

East Concord 2.468 

Penacook 6.602 

Plains 3.680 

St. Paul's School 1.197 

Concord Manor 3.020 



68.259 miles. 

Fourteen new catch basins were built, 15 rebuilt and 
three had new connections to sewer. 

There were 91 private pipe plugs and 35 main line plugs 
wliich were removed as quickly as possible. 

There were 49 new house connections laid, and 20 house 
connections relaid. 

There were 13 new manholes constructed, and two re- 
built. 



i 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 129 



Bond Issues 



Washington Street Storm Sewer, which included 427 
feet on Pine Street was built at a total cost of $14,511.64. 
55% of this amount or $7,981.40 was borne by the city and 
the remaining $6,530.24 was contributed by P.W.A. funds. 
The sewer was built by the Ames-Sheehan Co., Inc., of 
Somersworth, N. H., under contract, and was built under 
the direction of the Public Works Administration of the 
Federal Government. 

On November 8, 1937, the Board of Mayor and Alder- 
men voted the issuance of serial bonds in the amount of 
$135,000.00 for the construction of storm sewers. In ac- 
cordance therewith, in December work was started on the 
construction of a storm sewer at the South End to relieve 
the congestion in the present system. This work will 
probably be completed within a year. 

Plumbing Inspections 

There were 150 plumbing permits issued and 300 in- 
spections were made. 

Through the efforts of Dr. Donald P. Barton, we have 
had the benefit of the services of Ellsworth F. Philbrick 
at no cost to the city. Mr. Philbrick started work on 
October 18, 1937, and he has done all inspecting of plumb- 
ing. He is paid by the Public Health Service of the Fed- 
eral Government. 

Street Lights 

During the year nine 60 c.p. lights were installed, and 
one 250 c.p. light was replaced with a 60 c.p. 

The following list shows the number and classification 
of street lights in operation December 31, 1937 : 

143 — 400 candle power lights 
215 — 250 candle power lights 



130 CITY OF CONCORD 

1 — 100 candle power lights 
1,171 — 60 candle power lights 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD E. BEANE, 

City Engineer. 



Office 
Appropriation $3,360.00 

Expended 3,489.27 



Debit balance $129.27 

In the middle of the year the Accountant's salary was 
raised. This had not been provided for when the budget 
was raised — therefore the overdraft. 

New Equipment Added: 
Piling Cabinet 
1 Hummer Punch 
1 Kleeradesk 
1 Postindex 

The many and varied duties of the Department of Public 
Works is carried on with an office force of two people under 
the direction of the Superintendent of Streets and City 
Engineer. The work involves keeping accurate records of 
all receipts and expenditures, the writing of Building, 
Plumbing and Zoning permits. Granting permits for the 
erection of signs, opening of streets and occupying side- 
walks. In addition to specific duties, doing all work re- 
quested by the Board of Public Works or individual mem- 
bers thereof. Requests from citizens were complied with 
when it was possible to do so. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCES A. RICHARDSON, 

Chief Clerk. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1937. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The thirty-eighth annual report of this 
board is herewith submitted. 

The membership of the board during the past year was 
comprised of the following : John J. Maloney, an examined 
master plumber; Thomas J. Halligan, M. D., and Edward 
E. Beane, City Engineer. Mr. Maloney was chairman of 
the Board, and Mr. Beane, Clerk. On July 24, 1937, Mr. 
Maloney resigned from the Board, and on August 9, 1937, 
the Board of Aldermen appointed Wilfred W. Brennan to 
take his place. 

Nine men were examined for Journeyman Plumbers. 
Four received a license and three failed to pass. Two 
liave not yet completed their examination. 

Five men were examined for Master Plumbers. Four 
received a license and one failed to pass. 

There are four classes of plumbers on the register, who 
have paid for their 1937 licenses. They are listed as fol- 
lows : 



Registered Masters 


4 


Registered Journeymen 


2 


Examined Masters 


37 


Examined Journeymen 


21 


Financial Statement 




Receipts 




Received for examinations 


$14.00 


Received for licenses 


23.50 



$37.50 



132 city of concord 

Disbursements 
Supplies 15.10 



Deposited with City Treasurer $22.40 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILFRED W. BRENNAN, 
THOMAS J. HALLIGAN, M. D., 
EDWARD E. BEANE, 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers. 



REPORT OF BUILDING INSPECTOR 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1937. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The fourteenth annual report of the Buikl- 
ing' Inspector is herewith submitted : 

Number of buikling permits issued 73 

Number of zoning permits issued 82 

Number of buildings completed 78 

Number of signs erected 25 

This department works in conjunction with the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment and 51 cases were referred to them 
for decisions. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD E. BEANE, 

Building Inspector. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HYDRANT 

COMMISSIONERS 

Concord, N. H., December 31, 1987. 

To the Board of Public Works: 

Gentlemen : The thirty-second annual report of this 
board for the year 1937 is herewith submitted : 

During the year the following hydrants were installed : 

Pembroke Road, E. Concord at Floyd's. 

Pembroke Road, E. Concord at Chase's and Leach's. 

South Spring Street between Concord and Thorndike 

street. 
Loudon Road near Drew Street. 
Loudon Road near Gates Street. 
Loudon Road near Ford 's. 
Loudon Road opposite Ahearn 's. 
Loudon Road near Moses'. 
Loudon Road near Spereoff's. 
Loudon Road near Hillsgrove 's. 
Loudon Road near Boulay's. 
Loudon Road near Sunoco Filling Station. 
Loudon Road at Johnson's. 
Loudon Road at Andrews'. 
Loudon Road at Knoll Crest Garden. 
Loudon Road near Portsmouth Road. 
Loudon Road near Tilton's. 
Ellsworth Street, west side. 
Gates Street, west side. 
No. Pembroke Road at Roy Street. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD E. BEANE, 
W. T. HAPPNEY, 
PERCY R. SANDERS, 
Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE CITY LIBRARY FOR 1937 



To the Board of Trustees of the Concord Public Library : 
The report for the year 1937 is as follows : 



Expenditures 






Salaries 






$6,760.00 


Books 






3,073.77 


Periodicals 






349.07 


Binding 






631.85 


Repairs and improvements 






411.67 


Furniture and fixtures 






173.06 


Heat 






627.28 


Light 






468.31 


Insurance 






157.25 


Printing 






98.97 


Supplies 






142.82 


Rent of branches : 








East Concord 




50.00 




Penacook 


- 


170.00 








220.00 


Extra help 






360.00 


Incidentals 






219.14 


Goodhue Collection excess ( 


3ver apprc 


)priation 


485.91 


Total 


$14,179.10 


Receipts 






City appropriation 






$7,500.00 


Interest on trust funds 






4,666.62 


Dues 






807.24 


Rental of Battery Station 






840.00 


Balance unexpended trust 


funds 




171.99 



Deficit (carried to 1938 expenditures) 



$13,985.85 
$193.25 



136 CITY OF CONCORD 

Our total circulation for the year was 169,245 books, an 
increase of 13,000 over the previous year. 

Desk circulation Fiction 99,954 

Non-fiction 30,176 







130,130 


Boys and Girls House 




25,657 


Penacook Branch 


Fiction 


7,260 




Non-fiction 


1,077 




8,335 


East Concord 




1,006 


West Concord 




772 


Concord Heights 




196 


Camps 




147 


Union School District 




2,977 


Public Library Commission 




25 



Total 169,245 

We have 1,317 new borrowers at the main library of 
whom 583 are of school age and with a new registration at 
Penacook of 335 the total registration is 9,285. Although 
the reference librarian has had fewer reference questions 
from school children due to the co-operation we have had 
from the Union School District, 7,137 have used the refer- 
ence room this year. 

We have purchased 2,077 books and have been given 147 
making a total of 2,224 books added. We have discarded 
4,064 books and the total number noAv in the library is 
40,000. 

To give you some idea of the work done — the building 
has been cleaned, repaired and the interior painted under 
the able direction of Mr. Phillips. A complete set of Merit 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 137 

Badge pamphlets for the Boy Scouts has been purchased 
and a rack for them was given by the National Council of 
Boy Scouts. Several colleges throughout the country have 
sent their catalogs on request and these are used a great 
deal by high school students. 

An inventory of books was started in May and it was 
found that 226 books have been lost over a period of three 
years. 

Work on the Goodhue Collection of birds has taken most 
of the year and upstairs rooms in the White building have 
been used to store them. The opening of the collection was 
held on Armistice Day. 

This library joined with the New Hampshire State 
Library and the Public Library Commission in exhibiting 
at the Hobby Show held at the City Y. M. C. A. 

During the summer months all the non-fiction on the 
second floor was arranged in order and we attempted to 
make more room for these books. 

The Boys and Girls House has been very active this year. 
This building has been freshly painted and papered. A 
collection of dolls from foreign countries has been started 
in a show case there and several local people have given 
dolls brought from their travels. Through the courtesy of 
Mr. Frank Strong of the Rumford Press and Tileston and 
Hollingsworth of Boston we were fortunate to have an ex- 
hibit on paper and the making of books. During the sum- 
mer the children enjoyed weekly story-hours by Miss Mary 
Woodworth who was willing to give her services and who 
also told stories at Christmas. The older children formed 
a travel club, reading books on various countries and a 
party was held for them at the Concord Country Club. 
All this was made possible by the kindness of local citizens 
interested in the children's library. During Book Week 
in November a marionette show, a peep show and an after- 
noon of Chinese music were enjoyed by the children and 
many new books were on display for them. Several edu- 
cational displays have been shown and an exhibit typical 



138 CITY OF CONCORD 

of each month in the year has been arranged by the child- 
ren's librarian. 

The Penacook Branch is now managed entirely by the 
staff of this library but the Penacook Woman's Club is 
ready to help us at any time. 

The Shakesi^eare Room has been used twice for meetings 
for the New Hampshire Bible Society, once by the State 
Board of Education and almost every day by classes in 
Adult Education. 

Several libraries have been visited by members of the 
staff during the year. Five of us attended the district 
meeting at Canterbury, all of the staff attended various 
sessions of the summer library school held in Manchester, 
all went to the state meeting of the New Hampshire Li- 
brary Association in New London, two went to the Massa- 
chusetts Library Association mid-winter meeting in Boston 
and one to the fall meeting in Springfield, Massachusetts. 
I include this to show you that our staff is interested in 
getting new ideas and in learning from other libraries. 

Of the many books given the libraiy this year we have 
had several from Miss Grace Hubbard, a ten-volume set of 
''World's Best Orations" and a ten-volume set of "Modern 
Eloquence" from Mrs. John Pearson. 

We have had fine co-operation from the junior and 
senior high schools and classes from the junior high under 
the direction of their school librarian have visited the li- 
brary and have been shown how to use it. 

I w^ould like to add that without the whole-hearted sup- 
port of both trustees and staff much of our work could not 
have been done and I appreciate their help more than I 
can say. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION F. HOLT, 

Lihrarian. 



KEPORT OF THE CITY CLERK 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned herewith presents an account of the 
amount received from fees, licenses and other sources for 
the year ending December 31, 1937 : 

Mortgages $311.50 

Conditional Sales, 1,049.63 

Discharges, 76.75 

Writs 19.00 

Assignment of Wages, 5.50 

Marriage Licenses, 546.00 

Certificates of Record, 149.80 

Resident Certificates, 74.00 



$2,232.18 



Theatre Licenses, $915.00 

Taxi and Job Team Licenses, 464.50 

Rent, Auditorium, 960.00 

Rent, Battery Station, 840.00 

Rent, Airport, 877.70 

Rent, F. Cass, 64.00 

Rent, L. Audette, 65.00 

Rent, Rifle Club, 25.00 

Rent, Council Chamber, 2.00 

Junk Licenses, 45.00 

Dog Licenses, 3,160.78 

Circus Licenses, 50.00 

Employment License, 5.00 

Pool Table and Bowling Alley Licenses, 363.00 

Filings, City Primary, 109.00 

W. P. A. Bond Account, 30.80 

Sale of Wood, Airport, 3.00 



140 CITY OF CONCORD 



Sale Logs, Airport 


38.20 


Airport, 


.88 


Sale Histories, 


40.00 


Photostat Income, 


121.20 


Welcome Cliildren, 


10.00 


Charles Farnum, refund. 


229.50 


George Provo, refund, 


120.00 


Old Age refund, 


24.00 


M. McDonald, refund. 


19.00 


Frank Lapolette, refund. 


140.00 


Airport, refund. 


17.72 


City of Laconia, refund, 


193.25 


Town of Allenstown, refund. 


84.13 


Town of Alton, refund. 


171.50 


Town of Boscawen, refund. 


268.11 


Town of Bow, refund. 


14.50 


Town of Fitzwilliam, refund. 


235.45 


Town of Moultonboro, refund 


110.20 


Town of New Hampton, refund. 


47.90 


Town of Pittsfield, refund. 


112.50 


County of Belknap, refund, 


515.40 


County of Grafton, refund. 


475.46 


County of Hillsboro, refund, 


153.00 


County of Merrimack, refund. 


135,049.29 


County of Sullivan, refund. 


16.50 


State of New Hampshire, relief refund. 


16,253.58 




$164,673.23 



Deposited, City Treasurer, $164,673.23 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1936, $804.49 

Deposited, City Treasurer, $804.49 



CITY CLERK 141 

Auto Permits: 

Cash on hand, January 16, 1937, $141.44 

Motor Vehicle permits, 1937 $29,664.46 

Less ca^h on hand, Dec. 31, 1937, 169.82 



29,494.64 
Cash on hand, January 1, 1938, a/c 1937 permits, 169.82 
Motor Vehicle permits, 1938, 692.20 



$30,498.10 
Less cash on hand, January 15, 1938, 123.70 



$30,374.40 
Deposited, City Treasurer, $30,374.40 

Respectfully submitted, 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



REPORT OF SEALER OF WEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES 

To His Honor the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

The usual careful inspection of all weighing and measur- 
ing devices was made by your sealer during the year 1937. 
Although the work is more Or less of a routine nature, 
nevertheless new angles often present themselves and the 
past year was no exception. Special services were per- 
formed for various citizens of Concord, at their request, 
such as measuring piles of loose wood and coal for the 
purpose of ascertaining the approximate amounts, testing 
family scales, etc. 

There were 1,112 scales tested, 731 of which were found 
correct and were sealed, 349 were adjusted before being 
sealed, 16 condemned for repairs and later reinspected and 
sealed, and 16 confiscated, being insusceptible of repair. 
Of the 1,570 weights tested, 1,319 were found correct and 
were sealed, 5 were adjusted before being sealed, 18 con- 
fiscated, and 28 condemned for repairs. 

There were 18,934 liquid measures tested, 18,917 being 
found correct, 7 adjusted before being sealed, and 10 con- 
fiscated. Twenty-eight (28) dry measures were tested, 
found correct and sealed. 

Gasoline pumps are frequently undergoing changes due 
to replacements, new locations, repairs, &c, and, conse- 
quently, a closer supervision must be kept of them to in- 
sure accurate measure being given. There were 440 tests 
made of these devices, 324 of which indicated that they 
were working accurately and were sealed. It was necessary 
to make adjustments on 103 before sealing them, while 19 
were condemned for repairs and later reinspected and 
sealed. 

The reweighing of commodities in package form is one 
of the im])ortant duties of the sealer of weights and 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 143 

measures, and during the past year 6,244 such reweighings 
were made with the following results: 6,115 were found to 
contain the correct amounts, 53 were found over and 76 
under weight. 

Fourteen (14) loads of coal in the process of delivery 
were reweighed, 7 of which were found to contain the 
amounts indicated on the slips and 2 over and 5 under 
weight. Thirty-two (32) yardsticks were found to be 
correct and 6 cloth measuring machines were tested, one 
of which was found inaccurate. 

There were measured 58 cart bodies used in the de- 
livery of wood, 52 of which were found to be correct, and 
6 did not comply with the law. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEO. A. DEARBORN, 

Sealer of Weights and Measures. 



REPORT OF THE CLERK OF THE MUNICIPAL 
COURT FOR 1937 

— — 

Receipts 
Received for fines, costs and sundry fees $8,365.09 

Expenditures 
Paid for fees of officers, witnesses, 



and complaints and warrants 


$ 277.00 


State of New Hampshire, Commis- 




sion of Motor Vehicles 


4,525.22 


State of New Hampshire, Fish & 




Game Department 


127.30 


Clerk's bond 


5.00 


Postage, printing and supplies 


98.45 


Special Justices 


114.00 


Counsel fees in juvenile eases 


70.00 


Probation officer, services and ex- 




penses 


180.00 


Balance paid City Treasurer 


2,968.12 



$8,365.09 



Respectfully submitted, 



JOHN W. STANLEY, 

Clerk. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

To his Honor Mayor Storrs, the Board of Health and the 
Board of Aldermen: 

I have the honor to submit the following report of the 
Health Department for the year ending December 31, 
1937. 

On January 11, 1937, Dr. Donald G. Barton, graduate 
of McGill '35, was elected Sanitary Officer, replacing Dr. 
Travis P. Burroughs, who went to the State Department 
of Health as Secretary. During this year the member- 
ship of the Board of Health was increased by two, the 
members being Mayor Storrs, Chairman, Dr. Thomas J. 
Halligan, Secretary, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. Robert 
0. Blood and Dr. Carl A. Dahlgren. Generally speaking, 
the year 1937 was an exceptionall}^ good health year. 
There were 291 resident deaths reported as against 302 
for 1936 and 250 non-resident deaths as compared to 231 
the previous year. Several measles cases were reported 
in September with an increasing number toward the end 
of the year. Only 16 cases of scarlet fever were reported 
this year which is the lowest number since 1928. Diph- 
theria clinics were again held in various parts of the city 
and 412 children were given the protective treatment 
against this disease. There were but two cases in the city, 
both being adults confined in an institution. The 
prevalence of whooping cough was noted in the fall and 
early winter. 

Due to the fact that the department has a full time 
medical health officer, the Board of Health was able to 
again obtain a grant from the United States Public 
Health Service, enabling us to employ a Sanitary In- 
spector and Public Health Nurse. Miss Emily Foss, who 
left to take up duties with the New Hampshire Cancer 
Commission, was replaced by Mrs. Sarah Siroy, R.N. In 
the absence of Mr. Elmer P. Wheeler, Sanitary Inspector, 



146 CITY OF CONCORD 

who was sent at government expense to the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology for special training, Mr. Ronald 
F. Buchan, a graduate of University of New Hampshire 
with the degree of A.B., was appointed to carry on the 
work. Also added to the staff, under the grant of the 
United States Public Health Service, is a Housing and 
Plumbing Inspector, Mr. Ellsworth B. Philbrick, a grad- 
uate of University of New Hampshire, 1923, B.S. archi- 
tectural engineering. Much valuable data has been ob- 
tained regarding faulty plumbing and many corrections 
have already been made. 

Much time has been spent by the Sanitary Inspector in 
restaurants and other eating places in encouraging better 
methods for cleaning and sterilizing dishes, glasses and 
other tableware. It was most gratifying to find willing 
cooperation in the majority of places visited. 

Acknowledging the growing need for a more modern 
and efficient method of garbage and rubbish disposal, the 
Health Officer recommended in a communication to the 
Board of Aldermen, the installation of a municipal incin- 
erator. The recommendation was referred to a special 
committee for investigation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DONALD G. BARTON, M.D., 

Sanitary Officer. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

COMPARATIVE TABLE 



147 



The following table contains the number of cases of 
communicable diseases and the deaths resulting there- 
from for the years since and including 1927 : 



cj 


3 


M 








C3 


















s s 
















X 








Ol 








o 


O a 


a, 

o jq 

^ s 


a 
a 

a 


O. 

•rH 

Q 




o 

^1 




ft 

a 




7) 




7J 




rn 




■n 




r/;^ 














x 


^ 


02 


-a 




X 


CO 


^ 




^ 




^ 


X 




02 




































EQ 




'/! 


rt 






03 


rt 












ci 




c; 


crt 




a 




rt 




71 


3J 


CS 


0^ 


r-t 


i' 




Oj 


^ 


Oj 


U 


^ 


U 


« 


U 


Ci 


U 


Q 


^ 


Q 


O 


Q 


u 


" 




a 



1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 



35 
9 

57 
28 
26 
156 
38 
32 
60 
38 
16 



660 
90 

269 
27 

226 

38 

3 

323 



708 


3 


108 


3 


347 


7 


72 


3 


251 





197 


3 


46 


1 


878 


2 


88 


3 


46 


1 


143 


1 


291 


250 


9 


82 


52 


52 


94 


18 


5 


6 




93 



SUMMARY 
Resident deaths 
Non-resident deaths 
Stillbirths 

Burial permits issued for bodies brought here 
Number reports sent to State Board of Health 
Number of reports sent to Surgeon General, 

Public Health and Marine Service 
Number of nuisance complaints investigated 
Number of school buildings inspected 
Number of boarding houses for children in- 
spected 
Number of parks and swimming pools in- 
spected 
Number of barber shops and beauty parlors 
inspected 



148 



CITY OF CONCORD 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



The following table shows the number of communicable 
diseases reported during each month of the year, and the 
deaths resulting therefrom : 

























cj 






.S 3 




05 

© 






M 
























0; 


N 




a o 




3 




CS M 








a 






+^ 


U 


o 

a 

>-, 




ft 




5 


e 




S 2 
O a 


it 




fever 

Vener 
diseas 


O A 
O tH 

^ 8 


























oc 




•r. 


X 




t; 




T' 




T 


^ 


X 






^ 




A 


32 






^ 7" 


J^ 


y 


.C 
























Oj 










aj 








CS 




rt 


M 


n 




a 




c( 




a 


7. 


c; V. 












Q> 




0) 


a 


<v 




o 




OJ 




u 








C3 






U 


Q 


u 


Q 


U 


'^ 


o 


a 


u 


p 


u 


a 


U 


Q 6 


-^ 




(-1 


January 








4 










1 


1 








.... 5 








February 








9 










3 






i 




.... 21 








March 








3 










2 






2 




.... 5 




.... 




April 










i 








1 






2 




2 








May 










2 














2 




.... 4 








June 

July 










4 








o 










.... 3 
















1 








o 






1 




.... 5 








August 










1 














2 




.... 6 








September 










1 














2 




.... 10 








October 








i' 


13 








i 






1 




3 




ii 




November 








1 


25 








2 






2 








2 




December 










63 


















.... 3 




9 




Total 


2 








18 


111 








16 


1 





15 





69 


1 


14 














HEALTH DEPARTMENT 149 

MILK INSPECTION DIVISION 



To the Honorable Mayor and Board of Aldermen: 

Gentlemen : 

Herewith is submitted for your approval a summary of 
a report of the work done by the Milk Inspection Division 
of the Board of Health in the Laboratory and Field during 
the year ending December 31, 1937. 

Laboratory: 

Total number of milk samples collected and ana- 
lyzed, 863 

Total number of cream samples collected and ana- 
lyzed, 62 

Total number of ice cream samples collected and 
analyzed, 24 

Miscellaneous samples analyzed including Mastitis 
and Agglutination tests for Bang's Disea.se, 311 

Number of milk and cream samples brought to the 
laboratory, 12 

Milk Itemized: 

Number of milk samples plated for total bacteria 
within legal requirements, 863 

Number of milk samples plated for total bacteria not 
within legal requirements, 11 

Number of milk samples plated for B. Coli within 
legal requirements, 811 

Number of milk samples plated for B. Coli not with- 
in legal requirements, 52 

Number of milk samples within legal butterfat re- 
quirements, 621 

Number of milk samples not within legal butterfat 
requirements, 10 



150 CITY OF CONCORD 

Number of milk samples run for total solids, 461 

Number of milk samples run for temperatures, 76 

Number of milk samples run for specific gravity, 469 

Number of sediment tests run for dirty milk, 959 

Number of cream samples plated for total bacteria 
within legal requirements, 48 

Number of cream samples plated for total bacteria 
not within legal requirements, 16 

Number of cream samples plated for B. Coli within 
legal requirements, 56 

Number of cream samples plated for B. Coli not 
within legal requirements, 6 

Number of cream samples within legal butterfat re- 
quirements, 56 

Number of cream samples not within legal butter- 
fat requirements, 2 

Number of ice cream samples plated for total bac- 
teria within legal requirements, 24 

Number of ice cream samples plated for total bac- 
teria not within legal requirements, 

Number of ice cream samples plated for B. Coli 
within legal requirements, 23 

Number of ice cream samples plated for B. Coli not 
within legal requirements, 1 

Number of ice cream samples within legal butterfat 
requirements, 33 

Number of ice cream samples not within legal butter- 
fat requirements, 

Number of chocolate milk samples plated for total 
bacteria within legal requirements, 19 

Number of chocolate milk samples plated for total 
bacteria not within legal requirements, 3 

Number of chocolate milk samples plated for B. Coli 
within legal requirements, 19 

Number of chocolate milk samples plated for B. Coli 
not within legal requirements, 3 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 151 

Number of chocolate milk samples within legal 
butterfat requirements, 32 

Number of chocolate milk samples not within legal 
butterfat requirements, 1 

Number of orange-ade samples analyzed, 22 



Field: 



Total number of inspections made, 1489 

Number of inspections made of dairies, 848 

Number of inspections made of milk plants, 394 

Number of inspections made of cans in restaurants, 36 

Number of inspections made of milk trucks, 211 

Number of complaints investigated, 18 

Notices given to improve conditions, written, 98 
Followup notices given to improve conditions, 

written, 10 

Number of cans inspected, 487 
Number of bottles inspected, 1400 

Number of cans and bottles condemned, 8 
Number of bottles and cans cleared through the milk 

bottle exchange, 5862 

Number of milk licenses issued, 243 

Number of milk licenses refused, 3 

Court convictions, 1 

Total number of milk distributors not producers, 6 

Total number of producers with paid licenses, 31 

Total number of producers with free license, 65 
Of the total amount of milk sold in Concord 64% 

is pasteurized. 
Of the total number of cows producing milk for the 
Concord Market 14% have been tested for Bang's 
Disease under supervision of the State Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. 



152 CITY OF CONCORD 



Remarks: 



Financial statement of the Milk Inspection Division : 
Total appropriation, $2,410.00 

Yearly expenses, 2,390.86 

Appropriation balance, 19.14 

Received from milk licenses, 347.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

AUSTIN B. PRESBY, 

Milk Inspector. 



ASSESSORS' REPORT 

To the Taxpayers of the City of Concord: 

The Board of Assessors submit to your consideration 
the following facts and figures showing the valuation of 
the city and its school districts and special precinct, with 
the amount of taxes raised in each and returned to the 
tax collector for collection. 

In the following report is a table of the amount raised 
by direct taxation for the years from 1927 to the present 
time, which shows the amount raised by direct taxation. 

Tabulations of Warrants Submitted for Assessment, 
Valuation of City and Precincts, with Rate for 
Each in 1937. 



Warrant 



Amounts of 
Warrants 



Tax rate 
per .$1000 



Assessed 
Valuation of City 
and Precincts 



State 

County 

City Budget 

Schools 

*City Union 

**Penacook U. School 
City Sewer Bonds 



$108,064.00 
190.710.7.3 
542,471.00 

3S3,0.37.14 

20.773.71 

2,050.00 



Total for city $1,250,706.58 

Average tax rate for city ....' | 



$3.36 I $32,195,052.00 

5.93 I 32,195,052.00 

16.84 I 32,195,052.00 

12.68 I 30.222,860.00 

15.03 I 1,982,367.00 

.11 24,174,239.00 



3.90 + 



♦Includes property located in Loudon. 
**Includes property located in Canterbury. 
Exemptions for Veterans 
On property 

On polls 919 

Rate of taxation per $1000 
Fun Rate 
No Sewer Bond 
Penacool£ 



$280,260.00 
1,838.00 



$38.92 
38.81 
41.16 



154 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Number op Shares of Railroad Stock Held Here on 
Which the Tax was Assessed and Collected by 
State of New Hampshire and Credited to the City. 



Railroad 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


Boston & Maine 


794 

45 

2188 

102 

36 

3 

1170 

177 

10 

58 

17 

7 

100 


792 

35 

2060 

70 

36 

3 

1232 

138 

10 

46 

17 

7 

50 


614 

45 

1598 

37 

23 

3 

1216 

135 

10 

48 

17 

27 




627 


A — Fitchbiirgr 


45 


C — Concord & Montreal .... 
D — Manchester & Lawrence 
Concord & Portsmouth .... 
Nashua & Lowell 


1538 

37 

23 

3 


Northern 


1139 




120 







Suncook Valley 


48 


Wilton 


9 


Maine Central 


27 


Portland & Ogdensburjr .... 







4707 


4496 


3773 


3616 





No. 


Valuation 


Improved and unimproved land 


and 




buildings 


$28,014,157.00 


Electric plants 




1,714,480.00 


Horses 


234 


17,445.00 


Asses and mules 


2 


140.00 


Oxen 


2 


200.00 


Cows 


1,223 


84,922.00 


Neat 


169 


7,187.00 


Sheep 


77 


516.00 


Hogs 


32 


370.00 


Fowls 


17,050 


17,050.00 


Fur-bearing animals 


32 


1,600.00 


Vehicles 




0.00 


Portable mills 




500.00 


Boats and launches 




1,500.00 


Wood and lumber 




13,500.00 


Gas tanks and pumps 




22,560.00 


Stock in trade 




1,842,945.00 


Machinery 




455,980.00 



Total 



$32,195,052.00 



assessor's report 155 

Polls, Valuation and Taxes Assessed 

The number of polls, and the tax assessed on polls and 
on the real and personal estate of Concord since 1927 
Avith rates. 



Year 


Polls 


Veterans 


Valuation 


Tax 


Rates 


1927 


12,477 




$31,191,494 


$945,886.49 


$29.72 


192S 


12,630 




32,012,175 


950.336.03 


28.96 


1929 


12,655 




32,684,774 


987,383.48 


29.60 


1930 


12,863 




33,199,950 


1,077,953.51 


31.95 


1931 


12.926 


1,233 


33,155,968 


1.068,152.51 


31.57 


1932 


12,812 


1,278 


32,585,968 


983,638.74 


29.54 


1983 


13,092 


1,325 


31,676,008 


957,889.64 


29.37 


1934 


13,523 


1,319 


31,969,987 


981,805.50 


29.98 


1935 


13,338 


1,116 


31,910,830 


1,193.828.43 


36.48 


1936 


13,166 


1,030 


32,039,851 


1,245,352.87 


37.86 


1937 


13,612 


919 


32,195,052 


1,290,330.81 


av. 39.04 



List of Polls, Valuations and Tax Assessed in 
1936 AND 1937 

Total warrants submitted to Tax Collector : 

In 1936— Resident tax list $1,212,413.83 

Non-resident tax list 612.35 

Polls 26,332.00 

Bank stock 5,994.69 



Total $1,245,352.87 

In 1937— Resident tax list $1,256,223.52 

Non-resident tax list 621.13 

Polls 27,224.00 

Bank stock 6,262.16 



Total $1,290,330.81 

Number of deeds recorded, 

January 1 to December 31, 1937 568 

Number of building permits issued for past year 152 



156 CITY OF CONCORD 

For new buildings 43 

garages 25 

remodelings 84 

There are the 1936 and 1937 taxes of the Bektash Tem- 
ple Real Estate Association, pending adjustment. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CLARENCE 0. PHILBRICK, Chairman. 
JOSEPH E. SHEPARD, Clerk. 
EDWARD F. DONOVAN. 



REPORT OP TAX COLLECTOR 

To the Board of Aldermen: 

The undersigned hereby submits the report of the Col- 
lector of Taxes to the close of business, December 31, 1937. 

Tax Levy for 1930 

Resident list $1,045,565.20 

Poll tax lists 25,726.00 

Non-resident list 825.94 

Bank stock 5,836.37 



$1,077,953.51 
Additions and corrections 2,731.16 

Interest 5,167.28 

Costs 1,029.45 



$1,086,881.40 



Cash paid Treasurer $1,069,359.26 

Abatements 15,269.56 

Uncollected 2,252.58 



$1,086,881.40 



Tax Levy for 1931 

Resident list $1,035,791.06 

Poll tax lists 25,852.00 

Non-resident list 728.08 

Bank stock 5,781.37 



$1,068,152.51 
Additions and corrections 1,014.56 

Interest 6,637.44 

Costs 1,511.46 



$1,077,315.97 



Cash paid Treasurer $1,055,604.00 

Abatements 18,796.98 

Uncollected 2,914.99 



$1,077,315.97 



158 



city of concord 
Tax Levy for 1932 



Resident list 


$951,465.98 




Poll tax lists 


25,624.00 




Non-resident list 


665.39 




Bank stock 


5,883.37 






$983,638.74 




Additions and corrections 


956.10 




Interest 


7,070.38 




Costs 


1,824.35 


$993,489.57 






Cash i^aid Treasurer 
Discount 
Abatements 
Uncollected 


$971,987.46 

2,617.09 

15,308.08 

3,576.94 


$993,489.57 



Tax Levy for 1933 



Resident list 
Poll tax lists 
Non-resident list 
Bank stock 
Moth charge 



Additions and corrections 

Interest 

Costs 

Cash paid Treasurer 
Discount 
Abatements 
Uncollected 



$925,143.19 

26,184.00 

568.08 

5,994.37 

887.81 

$958,777.45 
1,886.78 
9,389.04 
1,626.51 

$951,773.96 

5,190.49 

10,699.55 

4,015.78 



$971,679.78 



$971,679.78 



TAX collector's REPORT 



159 



Tax Levy for 1934 



Resident list 
Poll tax lists 
Non-resident list 
Bank stock 



Additions and corrections 

Interest 

Costs 

Cash paid Treasurer 

Abatements 

Uncollected 



$948,058.69 

27,046.00 

539.44 

6,161.37 

$981,805.50 
2,424.65 
9,978.41 
1,959.87 

$980,807.93 
9,620.43 
5,740.07 



$996,168.43 



$996,168.43 



Tax Levy for 1935 



Resident list 
Poll tax lists 
Non-resident list 
Bank stock 



Additions and corrections 

Interest 

Costs 

Cash paid Treasurer 

Abatements 

Uncollected 



$1,160,437.04 

26,676.00 

659.45 

6,055.94 

$1,193,828.43 

1,804.74 

13,087.29 

2,114.77 

$1,191,009.98 
12,001.44 

7,823.81 



$1,210,835.23 



$1,210,835.23 



160 



city of concord 
Tax Levy for 1936 



Resident list 
Poll tax lists 
Non-resident list 
Bank stock 



Additions and corrections 

Interest 

Costs 

Cash paid Treasurer 

Abatements 

Uncollected 



$1,212,413.83 

26,332.00 

612.35 

5,994.69 

$1,245,352.87 

4,934.17 

13,429.14 

2,088.45 

$1,246,035.34 

10,708.81 

9,060.48 



$1,265,804.63 



$1,265,804.63 



Tax Levy for 1937 



Resident list 
Poll tax lists 
Non-resident list 
Bank stock 



Additions and corrections 

Interest 

Costs 

Cash paid Treasurer 
Abatements 
Cash on hand 
Uncollected 



$1,256,223.52 

27,224.00 

621.13 

6,262.16 

$1,290,330.81 
789.35 
204.88 
239.40 

$1,008,917.04 

4,013.09 

309.17 

278,325.14 



$1,291,564.44 



$1,291,564.44 



TAX collector's REPORT 



161 



Taxes sold the City of Concord et als in the office of the 
Collector for redemption. 

1926 

Resident list $4,368.17 



Interest 
Expense 
Fees 



Resident list 
Interest 
Expense 
Fees 



Resident list 
Interest, L. R. 
Interest, 1937 
Expense, L. R. 
Expense, 1937 
Fees, L. R. 
Fees, 1937 



Resident list 
Interest, L. R. 
Interest, 1937 
Expense, L. R. 
Expense, 1937 
Fees, L. R. 
Fees, 1937 



Paid Treasurer 
252.27 Paid Reg. of Deeds 
9.10 Deeded 

27.00 Cancelled by C. G. 
Unredeemed 



1O30.10 

13.25 

324.98 

251.16 

37-05 



$4,656.54 

129,769.41 

2,790.95 

131-37 

143-75 

132,835.48 

^22,956.84 

1,293.81 

88.13 

69.66 

2.83 

92.50 

4.00 



1932 



Paid Treasurer 

Paid Reg. of Deeds 

Abated 

Deeded 

Unredeemed 



^4,656.54 

51-719-43 

72.00 

124.17 

887.84 

32.04 

52,835.48 



1933 



Paid Treasurer, L. R. $22,234.38 

Paid Treasurer, 1937 357-07 

Paid King 125.45 

Paid Reg. of Deeds, L. R. 46.25 

Paid Reg. of Deeds, 1937 2.00 

Abated, L. R. 421.24 

Abated, 1937 49-67 

Deeded 1,258.78 

Unredeemed 12.93 



1.24,507.77 



1.24,507.77 



1934 
$27,064.26 Paid Treasurer, L. R. $20,695.24 



959-39 


Paid Treasurer, 1937 


6,413.84 


905.63 


Paid Reg. of Deeds, L. R. 


53-00 


80.22 


Paid Reg. of Deeds, 1937 


12.25 


21.92 


Abated, L. R. 


347-76 


53-25 


Abated, 1937 


85.03 


12.25 


Deeded 


265.38 




Unredeemed 


1,224.42 



$29,096.92 



$29,096.92 



162 



CITY OF CONCORD 



1935 



Resident list 


$46,589.46 


Paid Treasurer, L. R. $9,892.03 


Interest, L. R. 


97.27 


Paid Treasurer, 1937 17,881.13 


Interest, 1937 


2,007.68 


Paid Shepard 41-85 


Expense, L. R. 


21.12 


Paid Reg. of Deeds, L. R. 16.00 


Expense, 1937 


48.66 


Paid Reg. of Deeds, 1937 28.50 


Fees, L. R. 


16.00 


Abated, L. R. 101.12 


Fees, 1937 


28.50 


Abated, 1937 10,256.21 
Deeded 529.71 
Unredeemed 10,062.14 



$48,808.69 



$48,808.69 



1936 



Resident list 


$47,570.05 


Paid Treasurer 


$17,711-85 


Interest 


182.73 


Paid Reg. of Deeds 


19.50 


Expense 


23.29 


Abated 


123.88 


Fees 


19.50 


Unredeemed 


29,940.34 



,795-57 



,795-57 



1934 
Reimbursements 



1934 Taxes, paid by City $893.98 Paid Treasurer 
Interest 246.55 Paid Reg. of Deeds 

Fees 1.50 



$1,142.03 
Received from rent and 
sale of property deeded 
to the City $1,422.39 Paid Treasurer 



)I,I4I.20 

-75 



[11,142.03 



|>i,422.39 



Respectfully submitted, 



AMOS B. MORRISON, 

Collector. 



REPORT OF THE PARK COMMISSIONERS 

To the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen: 

Much has been accomplished by the Park Department 
during 1937 both as far as maintenance and new construc- 
tion are concerned. 

In June the new administration building at White Park 
was completed by W. P. A. and gradually by gift and 
purchase furnished and equipped so at the end of the year 
the City of Concord has the foundation for one of the best 
service bureaus in tree surgery, insect control, tree and 
flower preservation and propagation in this section of the 
country. The new building was further improved by prac- 
tical yet attractive stone embankments, grading, new road- 
ways and seeding. 

Four new bath houses were erected in Kimball, West 
Concord, Rollins and Penacook Playgrounds making it 
possible for the playground system to have an attendance 
of 80,000 bathers during the summer months without any 
accidents. Toilets were installed in three parks. 

Armistice Day two new parks were dedicated — Corri- 
veau at South and Bow Streets and Fletcher-Murphy at 
Fayette and South Streets. Corriveau is a small but 
attractive piece of landscaping while Fletcher-Murphy is 
much larger and contains a park and a playground for 
small children. 

The Parks have been more than fortunate in regards to 
lack of destruction of city property. Not only are the 
recreational facilities of the Parks responsible for this but 
the classes being held at White Park are a major factor in 
the respect the young people have for public property. 

The approaches to the City of Concord from the west 
and east have many new trees, walls and grading projects 
to add to the lasting beauty of the city. 



164 CITY OF CONCORD 

The Tree Department has a creditable nursery holding 
stock for public set outs in the spring as well as shrubbery 
for the Parks. 

Satisfactory progress in Japanese Beetle control was made 
insomuch as over 3,500 beetles were trapped during the 
summer and approximately one-fourth of the infested area 
controlled. 



REPORT OF THE CITY SOLICITOR 

To His Honor Mayor Storrs and the Board of Aldermen: 

Your Solicitor reports the following legal actions pend- 
ing against the City of Concord and/or its duly appointed 
ol^cials in carrying out their municipal duties. All en- 
tries of actions and Bills in Equity are at the Merrimack 
County Superior Court. 

Ethel Blankenherg vs. City of Concord Water Depart- 
ment 

Entered April Term, 1932, for personal injuries allegedly 
arising out of a fall on a sidewalk on North Main Street. 

Bektash Temple Real Estate Association vs. City of 
Concord 

An appeal from tax assessment for the years 1936 and 
1937. 

Frank Truchon vs. City of Concord 

This action was entered at the October Term, 1934, for 
alleged damage to property, which is claimed to have arisen 
out of the use of the City Dump at the southeasterly part 
of the city. Your Solicitor has taken the deposition of the 
claimant and the matter has been referred to Judge Joseph 
S. Matthews for a hearing. 

Clement Schettino vs. City of Concord 

This action was entered at the October Term, 1934, for 
injurie.s alleged to have been sustained while Schettino was 
working as a City employee. Demond, Woodworth, Sullo- 
way, Piper and Jones, Esquires, have joined with the 
City Solicitor as associate counsel. 



166 CITY OF CONCORD 

Nicholas Faretra vs. James M. Langley et als 

This is a Bill in Equity entered at the March Term, 
1935, praying for a reversal of a ruling of the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment, relative to a parcel of land and 
buildings owned by the petitioner on Liberty Street. Your 
Solicitor has endeavored to get this matter heard and has 
filed motions in Court relating to an early hearing of the 
appeal. 

Frank Ramsay vs. James M. Langley et als 

This is a Bill in Equity entered at the April Term, 1936, 
praying for a reversal of a ruling of the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment, relative to the use of the petitioner's property 
located near Penacook on the Daniel Webster Highway. 

Mary J. Perry vs. City of Concord 

This action was entered at the October Term, 1936, for 
damages to her property located at 296 North State Street, 
which she alleges arose out of unreasonable and negligent 
use by the City of said North State Street, near her 
premises. 

Sarah J. Oilman vs. City of Concord 

Action entered at the October Term, 1936, for loss of 
liens and equipment, and depreciation of property and 
business arising from operation of poultry plant, allegedly 
arising out of (1) negligence of the City, its agents and 
servants, and (2) unreasonable use of its possessory rights 
in a public highway, whereby a certain allegedly poisonous 
spray, caused the loss complained of by the plaintiff. 

This action went to the Supreme Court on rulings of 
law, and is now in the Superior Court aforesaid for a 
hearing on its merits. 



CITY SOLICITOR 167 

Larson and Carlson, Inc. vs. City of Concord 

Action entered at the April Term, 1937. Claim for 
damages arising out of inadequate sewers, drains, culverts, 
and improper and unreasonable use of highway (North 
State Street) near property of the claimant, at 294 North 
State Street. 

Edward J. Blanchard vs. Tax Assessors of City of Con- 
cord 

Petition for abatement of assessment of taxes for year 
1936 referred by Judge Johnston to George M. Fletcher, 
as a Master. Entered at April Term, 1937. 

The Kimball System, Inc. vs. James M. Langley et als 

Bill in Equity entered at October Term, 1937, praying 
for reversal of a ruling of the Zoning Board of Adjust- 
ment, relative to placing of a large sign near a public 
highway. 

Roy L. Knox vs. James M. Langley et als 

Bill in Equity entered at October Term, 1937, praying 
for a reversal of a ruling of the Zoning Board of Adjust- 
ment, relative to the use of petitioner's property on 
Pleasant Street. 

Thomas Kelley et al vs. City of Concord 

Petition for damages resulting from changing of grades, 
and, use of highway, at intersection of Water and South 
Main Streets. Entered at October Term, 1937. 

All city officials and employees have rendered aid and 
assistance to me in the carrying out of my duties as City 
Solicitor, for which I am sincerely grateful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY P. CALLAHAN, 

City Solicitor. 



REPORT OF TRUSTEES OP TRUST FUNDS 
HARRY H. DUDLEY, 1 





BURNS P. HODGMAN, [ 


Trustees. 




CARL H. FOSTER, j 






Receipts 




1937 






Jan. 1 


To balance from 1936 


$4,427.58 


Dec. 31 


Income, J. B. & 0. B. Abbott, trust 


2.00 




Harper Allen, trust 


1.50 




Henry Burleigh, trust 


5.10 




William E. Chandler, trust 


12.75 




William M. Chase, trust 


9.25 




Calvin P. Couch, trust 


2.70 




Jacob C. Dunklee, trust 


8.50 




Samuel C. Eastman, trust 


35.00 




Seth Eastman, trust 


5.00 




Sarah E. Farrand, trust 


6.00 




George Fogg, trust 


4.00 




Leverett M. Freeman, trust 


3.00 




Jacob H. Gallinger, trust 


8.50 




Heber B. Hardy, trust 


3.25 




Mary D. Hart, trust 


12.00 




Liva C. Heath, trust 


3.79 




Eliza Lane, trust 


4.25 




J. W. and E. J. Little, trust, 


6.00 




Lydia F. Lund, trust 


12.75 




Mary Ann Lyons, trust 


3.12 




Myra F. Morey, trust 


3.00 




Charles W. Morse, trust 


4.25 




Lucy M. Roach, trust 


1.50 




Charles E. Scorer, trust 


3.00 




Antonio J. Sousa, trust 


1.50 




Hiram B. Tebbetts, trust 


4.40 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 169 

Frank Watson, trust 3.00 

Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund 1,759.44 

Horse Hill Cemetery Fund .39 

Maple Grove Cemetery Fund 41.13 

Millville Cemetery Fund 72.43 

Pine Grove Cemetery Fund 16.97 

Old North Cemetery Fund 24.99 

Soucook Cemetery Fund 3.13 

Woodlawn Cemetery Fund 15.07 

John H. Albin Cemetery Trust 12.43 

Charlotte Merrill, trust 30.00 

Minot Enclosure, trust 90.00 
K. P. and Douglas Rollins, trust 45.33 

Countess of Rumford, trust 60.00 

Abial Walker, trust 30.00 

Charlotte Day, trust 6.00 

Ida B. Fosgate, trust 3.34 

Isaac L. Heath, trust 3.47 

Matilda B. Higgins, trust 1.18 

Margaret A. Howe, trust 8.00 

Louis B. Landon, trust 6.00 

Cornelia S. Parmenter, trust 1.69 
Lilian Carpenter Streeter, trust 3.75 

Martha J. Theobald, trust 6.00 

William M. Chase, trust 32.50 

P. B. Cogswell, trust 64.41 

Samuel Eastman, trust 96.57 

Samuel Eastman, trust 1,046.34 

Joseph Hazeltine, trust 99.96 

Benjamin A. Kimball, trust 2,775.00 

Henry A. Kimball, trust 462.50 

Seth K. Jones, trust 12.00 

Seth K. Jones, trust 14.34 

G. Parker Lyon, trust 30.00 

Franklin Pierce, trust 30.00 

Thomas G. Valpey, trust 15.00 

David Osgood, trust 25.00 



170 CITY OF CONCORD 

Fred E. Emerton (C. R. 

Corning, trust) 451.71 

Annie Boisvert, trust .04 

Georgianna Tetreault 3.00 

Interest, trust funds. Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 1,787.56 

Interest, trust funds, Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 1,440.54 

Interest, trust funds, NeAV Hampshire Savings 

Bank 1,260.75 

Interest, trust funds, Union Trust Company 1,502.21 

Interest, unexpended balance, cemetery trust 

funds 137.80 

Prom cemetery fund for the purpose of improv- 
ing and ornamenting cemetei*y grounds 899.87 
From unexpended income, sundry trust funds 893.08 



$19,917.61 



Expenditures 

1937 
Dec. 31 By paid — 

Mary E. Bourne, account labor, 

trust lot. Calvary Cemetery $ 1.50 

Rt. Rev. Msgr. J. S. Buckley, ac- 
count labor, trust lots. Calvary 
Cemetery 387.50 

H. H. Dudley, treasurer, account 

Minot Enclosure 90.00 

Fred E. Emerton, income C. R. 

Corning trust 451.71 

Rev. T. C. Laughlin, account labor, 
trust lots. Calvary Cemetery, 
Penacook 6.00 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 171 

Martha J. Nelson, treasurer, in- 
come Countess of Rumford trust 60.00 
Rev. A. A. Sylvestre, account 

David Osgood trust 25.00 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Blossom Hill Cemetery 4,922.96 
City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Horse Hill Cemetery 12.75 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Maple Grove Cemetery 260.12 
City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Millville Cemetery 113.24 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Old Fort Cemetery 8.50 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Old North Cemetery 417.78 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Pine Grove Cemetery 319.60 

City Treasurer, account of income 
sundry trust funds, to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care 
of lots in Soucook Cemetery 22.48 



172 CITY OF CONCORD 



City Treasurer, account of income 

sundry trust funds, to reimburse 

city for money advanced for care 

of lots in Woodlawn Cemetery 815.52 

City Treasurer, income, William 

M. Chase, trust 32.50 

City Treasurer, income, P. B. Cogs- 
well, trust 64.41 
City Treasurer, income, Samuel C. 

Eastman, trust 96.57 

City Treasurer, income, Samuel C. 

Eastman, trust 1,046.34 

City Treasurer, income, Joseph 

Hazeltine, trust 99.96 

City Treasurer, income, Benjamin 

A. Kimball, trust 2,775.00 

City Treasurer, income, Henry A. 

Kimball, trust 462.50 

City Treasurer, income, Seth K. 

Jones, trust 14.34 

City Treasurer, income, G. Parker 

Lyon, trust 30.00 

City Treasurer, income, Franklin 

Pierce, trust 30.00 

City Treasurer, income, K. P. and 

Douglas Rollins, trust 45.33 

City Treasurer, income, Thomas 

G. Valpey, trust 15.00 

City Treasurer, income, Abial 

Walker, trust 30.00 

City Treasurer, income. Blossom 

Hill Cemetery 1,759.44 

City Treasurer, income, Horse Hill 

Cemetery .39 

City Treasurer, income, Maple 

Grove Cemetery 41.13 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 173 

City Treasurer, income, Millville 

Cemetery 72.43 

City Treasurer, income, Pine Grove 

Cemetery 16.97 

City Treasurer, income, Old North 

Cemetery 24.99 

City Treasurer, income, Soucook 

Cemetery 3.13 

City Treasurer, income, Woodlawn 

Cemetery 15.07 

City Treasurer, from Cemetery 
Fund for the purpose of improv- 
ing and ornamenting cemetery 
grounds 899.87 

City Treasurer, unexpended in- 
come, sundry trust funds 893.08 
By balance 3,534.50 

$19,917.61 



TRUST FUNDS 


BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income of the fund is used for the care, 
protection and ornamentation of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $58,506.61 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1937, 766.27 

Received from income of fund, 1937 1,759.44 

: $61,032.32 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 1,759.44 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 59,272.88 

61,032.32 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 10,250.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank 15,508.37 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank 17,187.67 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 16,326.84 

59,272.88 



HORSE HILL CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income to be used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of Horse Hill Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $ 13.34 
Received from income of fund .39 

13.73 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account .39 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 13.34 



13.73 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 13.34 



TRUST FUNDS 175 

MAPLE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. The income to be used for the care, protection 
and ornamentation of Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $1,371.79 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1937 82.87 

Received from income of fund, 1937 41.13 

1,495.79 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 41.13 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 1,454.66 

1,495.79 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank 1,454.66 

MILLVILLE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund originated, and is provided for, by voluntary contributions of intsrested 
parties and by the addition of one-third the amount received from the sale of 
lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and ornamentation of Millville 
Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $2,402.16 
Received from income of fund, 1937 72.43 

2,474.59 



Credited city of Concord, general ac- 
count 72.43 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 2,402.16 



2,474.59 



Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 872.59 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank 1,529.57 



2,402.16 



OLD NORTH CEMETERY FUND 



This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Old North Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $833.00 
Income received, 1937 24.99 

857.99 



176 CITY OF CONCORD 

Credited city of Concord, general ac- 
count 24.99 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 833.00 

857.99 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 

ino-s Bank 833.00 



PINE GROVE CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Pine Grove Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $567.85 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1937 16.67 

Received from income of fund, 1937 16.97 

601.49 



Credited city of Concord, general ac- 
count 16.97 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 584.52 

601.49 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank 584.52 



SOUCOOK CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the amount 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Soucook Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $106.66 
Received from income of fund, 1937 3.13 

109.79 



Credited city of Concord, general ac- 
count 3.13 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 106.66 

109.79 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 106.66 



TRUST FUNDS 177 



WOODI.AWN CEMETERY FUND 

This fund is increased each year by the addition of one-third the ainoiuit 
received from the sale of lots. Income devoted to the care, protection and 
ornamentation of Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $507.40 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1937 23.34 

Received from income of fund, 1937 15.07 

545.81 



Credited city of Concord, general ac- 
count 15.07 
Amount of capital, January 1, 1938 530.74 



545.81 



Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank 530.74 



CEMETERY FUND FOR THE PURPOSE OF IMPROVING AND 
ORNAMENTING CEMETERY GROUNDS 
Created under resolution of Board of Aldermen, March 9, 1925. 

Amount of capital, January 1, 1937 $2,091.17 
Received from one-third sale of lots, 

1937, 889.14 

Income received, 1937 62.46 

3,042.77 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 899.87 

Capital, January 1, 1938 2,142.90 

3,042.77 

Deposited in Merrimack County Sav- 
ings Bank 2,142.90 

BLOSSOM HILL CEMETERY, SECTION 1, ANNEX 
Income to be used for care of inexpensive single graves and common ground. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 $448.00 

Received during 1937 196.00 

644.00 



178 CITY OF CONCORD 

Capital, January 1, 1938 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 16.99 

Income received, 1937 16.53 



Income on hand, January 1, 1938 33.52 

Capital and Income deposited in 

Union Trust Company 677.52 



JOHN H. ALBIN CEMETERY TRUST 

Income to be devoted to the preservation and care of lot in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, and also for the furnishing of suitable floral decorations during the 
appropriate seasons of the year. 

Capital 300.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $ 3.34 

Income received, 1937 9.09 

12.43 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 12.43 



12.43 



Deposited in Union Trust Company 300.00 



CHARLOTTE MERRILL CEMETERY TRUST 

Income to be used in perpetuity in keeping burial lot and monument in 
Blossom Hill Cemetery in good condition, namely: In keeping the soil properly 
enriched, the grass closely cut and watered, the monument and all other stone 
work thereon clean, and replacing said monument by a new one when necessary 
by reason of decay or defacement. The balance of the income, if any, is to be 
appropriated for the purpose of beautifying said cemetery. 

Capital 1,000.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $29.43 

Income received, 1937 30.87 

60.30 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 30.00 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1938 30.30 



60.30 

Capital and income deposited in New 

Hampshire Savings Bank 1,030.30 



TRUST FUNDS 179 

MINOT ENCLOSURE CEMETERY TRUST 

Donated to the city by Abbie P. Minot, the income to be expended annually by 
the superintendent of cemeteries for the preservation, care and embellishment of 
the burial lots known as the Minot enclosure, under the direction of the duly 
appointed officials. 

Capital 3,000.00 

Income received, 1937 $90.00 

Paid H. H. Dudley, treasurer 90.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings 
Bank 3,000.00 



JONATHAN EASTMAN PECKER CEMETERY TRUST 

Income to be used as follows : So much of income as is necessary to bo used 
for the care of burial lots numbered 22 and 24 and monument in Pine Grove 
Cemetery, East Concord, the balance of income not used as aforesaid to be 
added to principal till same amount to $10,000, then the balance of income 
accruing each year after paying for care of said lots and monument, to be expended 
under the direction of the mayor for the general care and improvement of Pine 
Grove Cemetery, East Concord. 

Capital 10,000.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $270.29 

Income received, 1937 313.17 

583.46 

583.46 



Income on hand, January 1, 1938 583.46 



Capital and income deposited in 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank 2,247.98 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 4,528.24 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 3,807.24 



10,583.46 



MARY F. CLIFFORD CEMETERY AND FLOWER TRUST 

Income to be expended for care of lot No. 72, in Old North Cemetery, and for 
flowers on Memorial Day. 

Capital 150.00 

Income received, 1937 $3.75 

Capital and income deposited in 

Union Trust Company 153.75 



180 CITY OP CONCORD 

CHARLOTTE B. DAY FLOWER TRUST 
Income to be expended for flowers on Lot 152, Block S, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital 200.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $2.00 

Income received, 1937 6.06 

8.06 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 6.00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1938 2.06 

8.06 

Capital and income deposited in 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank 202.06 



IDA B. FOSGATE FLOWER TRUST 
Income to be expended for flowers on Lot. No. 39 Block S, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital 100.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $ .34 

Income received, 1937 3.00 

3.34 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 3.34 

3.34 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 100.00 



ISAAC L. HEATH FLOWER TRUST 
Income to be expended for flowers on Lot No. 67, Block V, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital 100.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $ .47 

Income received, 1937 3.00 

3.47 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 3.47 

3.47 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 100.00 



TRUST FUNDS 181 



MATILDA B. HIGGINS FLOWER TRUST 

Income to be expended for flowers on Anna Johnson Lot, Block N, Blossom 
Hill Cemetery. 



Capital 




25.00 


Balance, income, January 1, 1937 


$ .43 




Income received, 1937 


.75 


1.18 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 1.18 

1.18 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 25.00 

MARGARET A. HOWE FLOWER TRUST 

Income to be expended for flowers on Lot No. 75, Block CC, Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. 

Capital 200.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $3.52 

Income received, 1937 6.09 

9.61 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 8.00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1938 1.61 

9.61 

Capital and income deposited in 

Union Trust Company 201.61 

LOUIS B. LANDON FLOWER TRUST 
Income to be expended for flowers on Lot 13, The Lawn, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital 500.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $1.25 

Income received, 1937 15.03 

16.28 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 6.00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1938 10.28 



16.28 



Capital and income deposited in 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 510.28 



182 CITY OF CONCORD 

CORNELIA S. PARMENTER FLOWER TRUST 
Income to be expended for flowers on Lot No. 291, Old Part Woodlawn Cemetery. 

Capital ^"iO.OO 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $ .19 

Income received, 1937 1.50 

1.69 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 1.69 

1.69 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 50.00 



LILIAN CARPENTER STREETER FLOWER TRUST 

Income to be expended for flowers and shrubs on Lots Nos. 3 and 4, Block U, 
Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital 100.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $ .75 

Income received, 1937 3.00 

3.75 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 3.75 



3.75 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 100.00 



MARTHA J. THEOBALD FLOWER TRUST 
Income to be expended for flowers on Lot 1, Block AA, Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Capital 200.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $2.50 

Income received, 1937 6.03 

8.53 



Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 6.00 

Income on hand, January 1, 1938 2.53 



8.53 

Capital and income deposited in 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank 202.53 



TRUST FUNDS 183 



SETH K. JONES MONUMENT FUND 

Increased six dollars each year from the income of the Seth K. Jones trust. 
The entire accumulation to be expended every fifty years in erecting a new 
monument on his lot in Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

Accumulations to January 1, 1937 $1,253.75 
From Seth K. Jones trust 6.00 

Income received, 1937 37.48 

1,297.23 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings 

Bank 1,297.23 



DAVID OSGOOD TRUST 
Income to be used for the purchase of school-books for poor children. 

Capital 200.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $389.59 

Income received, 1937 17.67 

407.26 



Paid Rev. A. A. Sylvestre, treasurer 25.00 

Income on hand January 1, 1938 382.26 



407.26 

Capital deposited in New Hampshire 

Savings Bank 200.00 

Income deposited in Union Trust 

Company 382.26 



KATHERINE P. AND DOUGLAS ROLLINS TRUST 
Income to be used for the care of the West Garden. 

Capital 1,511.25 

Income received, 1937 $45.33 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 45.33 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 1,511.25 



184 CITY OF CONCORD 

COUNTESS OF RUMFORD TRUST 

For the benefit of the Concord Female Charitable Society. Income to be applied 
to the charitable uses and purposes of said society, and under its direction. 

Capital 2,000.00 

Income received, 1937 $60.00 

Paid to Martha J. Nelson, treasurer 60.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank 1,000.00 
Deposited in Union Trust Company 1,000.00 

ABIAL WALKER TRUST 
For the benefit of the school fund. 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1937 $30.00 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 30.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County 

Savings Bank 1,000.00 

WILLIAM M. CHASE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library in the purchase 
of books on historical, political, sociological, scientific and educational subjects. 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1937 $32.50 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 32.50 

Invested in Treasury 41/4-31/4 1943-45 bonds. 

COGSWELL COLLECTION OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY 

Request of P. B. Cogswell, the income to be spent annually for the purchase 
of books of a biographical, historical and scientific character, and the books 
relating to science shall be those that give thei latest developments and discoveries 
by scientific persons from year to year. 

Capital 2,145.00 

Income received, 1937 $64.41 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 64.41 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 145.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 1,500.00 



TRUST FUNDS 185 

SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Income to be used for the purchase of books in foreign languages for the 
Public Library. 

Capital 3,219.71 

Income received, 1937 $96.57 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 96.57 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 3,017.07 
Deposited in Union Trust Company 202.64 



SAMUEL C. EASTMAN PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 
Annual income to be used for the benefit of the Public Library. 

Capital 35,040.90 

Income received, 1937 $1,046.34 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 1,046.34 

Invested in $3,000 Treasury 414 7o 

bonds, due 1952 2,960.63 

Invested in 12 shares Concord Gas 

Company, common 1,020.00 

Invested in 5 shares Boston & Maine, 

first pfd.. Class "D" 500.00 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 4,631.61 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 7,052.50 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 11,711.46 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 7,164.70 

JOSEPH HAZELTINE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 
Annual income to be expended in the purchase of high class literature. 

Capital 3,312.60 

Income received, 1937 $99.96 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 99-96 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 1,312.60 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 1,000.00 
Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 1,000.00 



186 CITY OP CONCORD 

BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Income received, 1937 2,775.00 

Credited to city of Concord, general account 2,775.00 

HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Income received, 1937 462.50 

Credited to city of Concord, general account 462.50 

SETH K. JONES TRUST 

Bequest to the city of Concord to be invested in some New England city bond, 
the income to be applied as follows : Twelve dollars each year to keeping lot in 
Blossom Hill Cemetery in neat and orderly condition ; six dollars each year to be 
deposited in some savings institution to create a monument fund ; and the balance 
of the income to be expended each year in purchasing books for the Concord 
Public Library. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 1,077.40 

Income received, 1937 32.34 

Transferred to Seth K. Jones Monu- 
ment Fund $6.00 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 14.34 

Paid for care of lot 12.00 

32.34 



Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 77.40 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 1,000.00 

G. PARKER LYON PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1937 $30.00 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 30.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 1,000.00 

FRANKLIN PIERCE PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Capital 1,000.00 

Income received, 1937 $30.00 

Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 30.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 500.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 500.00 



TRUST FUNDS 187 
THOMAS G. VALPEY PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUST 

Capital 500.00 
Income received, 1937 $15.00 
Credited to city of Concord, general 

account 15.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 500.00 

HORACE B. BARTLETT PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 17,108.30 

Income received, 1937, to be added to principal 562.68 

Capital, January 1, 1938 17,670.98 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 5,148.63 

Invested in Treasury 43/4-31^, 1943-45 bonds 978.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 11,544.35 
Invested in $3,000 Jackson Cons. Tract. Co. bonds 

CHARLES R. CORNING PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Income to be paid to Fred E. Emerton during his lifetime. 

Capital 15,000.00 
Income received, 1937 $451.71 
Paid Fred E. Emerton 451.71 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 3,750.00 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 3,750.00 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 3,750.00 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 3,750.00 

CHARLES R. CORNING PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Principal and income to be used for Concord Public Library purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 32,934.71 

Income received, 1937, to be added to principal 987.96 

Capital, January 1, 1938 33,922.67 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 8,045.98 

Deposited in Merrimack County Savings Bank 8,554.66 

Deposited in New Hampshire Savings Bank 8,809.51 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 8,512.52 



188 CITY OF CONCORD 

BENJAMIN A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Princ'pal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 12,539.44 

Income received, 1937, to be added to principal 376.17 

Capital, January 1, 1938 12,915.61 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 12,915.61 



HENRY A. KIMBALL PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING FUND 
Prncipal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 1,652.37 

Income received, 1937, to be added to principal 49.56 

Capital, January 1, 1938 1,701.93 

Deposited in Loan & Trust Savings Bank 1,701.93 



ARTHUR P. MORRILL AND GEORGE A. FOSTER PUBLIC LIBRARY 

BUILDING FUND 
Prncipal and income to be used for Concord Public Library Building purposes. 

Capital, January 1, 1937 2,937.68 

Income received, 1937, to be added to principal 88.11 

Capital, January 1, 1938 3,025.79 

Deposited in Union Trust Company 3,025.79 



CONCORD PUBLIC LIBRARY MAINTENANCE FUND 

Capital, January 1, 1937 6,000.00 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $1,058.15 

Income received, 1937 211.74 



Income on hand January 1, 1938 1,269.89 

Capital and income deposited in Union 

Trust Company 7,269.89 



TRUST FUNDS 189 

EASTMAN ASSOCIATION TRUST 

Income to be used for the care and maintenance of monument and lot known as 
Eastman Park, East Concord, N. H. 

Capital 450.48 

Balance, income, January 1, 1937 $147.12 

Income received, 1937 17.91 



Income on hand January 1, 1938 165.03 

Capital and income deposited in Loan & 

Trust Savinars Bank 615.51 



SUNDRY CEMETERY TRUSTS 


Capital, January 1, 1937 (1784 in- 
dividual trusts) $200,781.06 

Total trusts received during 1937, 

(58) 6,937.11 



Capital, January 1, 1938 (1842 indi- 
vidual trusts) $207,718.17 
Unexpended income of previous years 4,427.58 
Interest on unexpended income, 1937 137.80 
Income received, 1937 6,163.21 

10,728.59 



Credited to city of Concord general 

account 6,799.09 

Paid Rt. Rev. Msgr. J. S. Buckley, 

account of Calvary Cemetery 387.50 

Paid Rev. T. C. Laughlin, account 

Calvary Cemetery, Penacook 6.00 

Paid Mary E. Bourne, account of 

Collins Trust 1.50 

Unexpended income on hand, Jan- 
uary 1, 1938 3,534.50 

10,728.59 

Capital and income deposited in Concord Savings 
Banks, in sundry stocks and United States bonds. 

The above includes the following trusts received during 
the year 1937. 

Blossom Hill Cemetery 

Bean, L. S. & D. R. $100.00 

Benjamin, Ralph A. 100.00 

Brannigan, James H. & Jessie E. 25.00 

Brunei, Joseph H. Estate 150.00 



CEMETERY TRUSTS 191 

Burt, Randall 100.00 

Carpenter, Dumont H. & Eva M. 50.00 

Gate, Maurice A. 25.00 

Chalmers, James & Elizabeth 100.00 

Chase, James H. 300.00 

Cornell, John E. & Julia E. 50.00 

Cushnie, John H. & Annie F. 150.00 

Day, Howard C. & Margaret C. 100.00 

Dearborn, Sarah F. (additional) 62.11 

Dolloff, Charles H. (additional) 100.00 
Dunstane, Wm. S., Geo. H. & Henry 

G. Wendelin 125.00 

Durrell, Mrs. Mary J. 150.00 

Erian, John 50.00 

Featherstone, Walter & Winifred E. 25.00 

Follansbee, Frank W. & Flora M. 50.00 

George, S. Augusta 100.00 

Gillette, Lewis F. & Ella M. 125.00 

Goodwin, Hobart A. 100.00 

Haggett, Mildred M. 100.00 

Hardy, Edward H. & Lizzie C. 125.00 

Hinds, Eugene M. 100.00 

Hoague, Edward C. & Mary T. 125.00 

Howard, Charles D. & Ada I. 125.00 

Hulsart, Wm. W. & Eloise A. 100.00 

Hutehins, George E. 200.00 

Jeaneret, Albert A. & Mary E. 125.00 

Ladd, Mary T. 100.00 

Lindberg, Victor S. & Hilma P. 125.00 
Marden, Guy C. & 

Elliott, Ella M. 150.00 

Morrill, Frank S. 100.00 

Oliver, Raymond H. 25.00 

Page, Charles T. 250.00 

Paige, Frederick W. & Edith M. 125.00 

Pettingill, Phil S. & Mattie A. 50.00 

Quimby, Frank P. 500.00 



192 CITY OF CONCORD 

Quint, Ida F. 50.00 

Ross, Kenneth A. 100.00 

St. Pierre, Caroline 50.00 

Smith, Ernest C. & Gertrude M. 50.00 

Steele, William & Christina 100.00 

Stone, William A. & Gertrude L. 125.00 

Taylor, Stephen A. (additional) 300.00 

Teulon, J. Bernard & Edith F. 125.00 



Calvary Cemetery 

Callahan, Jeremiah M. (additional) $100.00 
Prince, Mary J. 100.00 



Maple Grove Cemetery 



Briggs, Samuel W. & Amanda 


$100.00 


Clark, Lewis E. 


50.00 


Engel, Fiesco P. & Eva M. 


125.00 


Samjjson, Matthew 


50.00 



Old North Cemetery 
Mason, James L. & Mary Abbie $50.00 



Pine Grove Cemetery 



Fairfield, Frank E. 


$100.00 


Lyle, Edward J. 


100.00 


Maynard, Roy W. 


100.00 


Potter, Emma & Samuel 


200.00 



$5,462.11 



200.00 



325.00 



50.00 



500.00 



CEMETERY TRUSTS 193 

WooDLAWN Cemetery 

Dennis, Marshall J. & Exevine $100.00 

Holt, Cora E. 100.00 

Kimball, Sadie L. 150.00 

LaFleur, Walter L. & Sadie M. 50.00 

400.00 



Total Trusts received, 1937 $6,937.11 

Total amount of Trust Funds in custody of the Trustees 
of Trust Funds : 

Blossom Hill Cemetery Fund $59,272.88 

Horse Hill Cemetery Fund 13.34 

Maple Grove Cemetery Fund 1,454.66 

Millville Cemetery Fund 2,402.16 

Pine Grove Cemetery Fund 584.52 

Old North Cemetery Fund 833.00 

Soucook Cemetery Fund 106.66 

Woodlawn Cemetery Fund 530.74 
Cemetery Fund for the purpose of improving 

and ornamenting cemetery grounds 2,142.90 

Blossom Hill Cemetery, Section 1, annex 644.00 

John H. Albin Cemetery Trust 300.00 

Charlotte Merrill Cemetery Trust 1,000.00 

Minot Enclosure Cemetery Trust 3,000.00 

Jonathan Eastman Pecker Cemetery Trust 10,000.00 

Charlotte B. Day, Flower Trust 200.00 

Mary F. Clifford, Cemetery & Flower Trust 150.00 

Ida B. Fosgate, Flower Trust 100.00 

Isaac L. Heath, Flower Trust 100.00 

Matilda B. Higgins, FloAver Trust 25.00 

Margaret A. Howe, Flower Trust 200.00 

Louis B. Landon, Flower Trust 500.00 

Cornelia S. Parmenter, Flower Trust 50.00 

Lilian Carpenter Streeter, Flower Trust 100.00 

Martha J. Theobald, Flower Trust 200.00 



194 CITY OF CONCORD 

Seth K. Jones Monument Fund 1,297.23 

David Osgood Trust 200.00 

Katharine P. & Douglas Rollins Trust 1,511.25 

Countess of Rumford Trust 2,000.00 

Abial Walker Trust 1,000.00 

William M. Chase Public Library Trust 1,000.00 

Cogswell Collection of the Public Library 2,145.00 

Samuel C. Eastman Public Library Trust 3,219.71 

Samuel C. Eastman Public Library Trust 35,040.90 

Joseph Hazeltine Public Library Trust 3,312.60 

Seth K. Jones Trust 1,077.40 

G. Parker Lyon Public Library Trust 1,000.00 

Franklin Pierce Public Library Trust 1,000.00 

Thomas G. Valpey Public Library Trust 500.00 

Horace B. Bartlett Public Library Bldg. Fund 17,670.98 

Charles R. Corning Public Library Bldg. Fund 15,000.00 

Charles R. Corning Public Library Bldg. Fund 33,922.67 
Benjamin A. Kimball Public Library Bldg. Fund 12,915.61 

Henry A. Kimball Public Library Bldg. Fund 1,701.93 
Arthur P. Morrill & George A. Foster Public 

Library Bldg. Fund 3,025.79 

Concord Public Library Maintenance Fund 6,000.00 

Eastman Association Trust 450.48 

Sundry Cemetery Trusts 207,718.17 



$436,619.58 



I have verified the trust accounts of the city in the 
hands of the Board of Trustees of Trust Funds, and find 
such trust funds invested, and the income for the year 
1937 accounted for as shown by the books of the trustees 
kept for that purpose. 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY 



o 

Municipal 








BONDS 




Due 




Rate 


Amount 


Central Fire Station, 


Apr. 


-'■5 


1938 


31/2 


$1,000 




Apr. 


-'-J 


1939 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 


■'- 


1940 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 


-'■ 


1941 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1942 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 


-'- 


1943 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1944 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1945 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 


-^ 


1946 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1947 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1948 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1949 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1950 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1951 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1952 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1953 


31/2 


1,000 




Apr. 




1954 


31/2 


1,000 


City Hall and Auditorium 


Oct. 




1938 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1939 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




1940 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




1941 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1942 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1943 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1944 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1945 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1946 


41/2 


5,000 




Oct. 




, 1947 


41/2 


5,000 


Departmental Equipment, 


May 




, 1938 


41/4 


4,000 




May 




, 1939 


41/4 


4,000 




May 




, 1940 


41/4 


4,000 




May 




, 1941 


41/4 


4,000 



196 



Highway, 



CITY OF CONCORD 






BONDS 


Due 


Rate 


Amount 


May 


1, 1942 


41/4 


4,000 


May 




1943 


41/4 


4,000 


May 




1944 


41/4 


4,000 


May 




1945 


41/4 


4,000 


May 




1946 


41/4 


4,000 


May 




1938 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1939 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1940 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1941 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1942 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1943 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1944 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1945 


31/4 


5,000 


May 




1946 


31/4 


5,000 


rovement, Jan. 




1938 


11/4 


10,000 


Jan. 




1939 


11/4 


10,000 


Jan. 




1940 


iy4 


10,000 


Jan. 




1941 


11/4 


10,000 


Jan. 




1942 


11/4 


10,000 


Jan. 




1943 


11/4 


10,000 


Jan. 




1944 


11/4 


10,000 


rovement May 




1938 


1V2 


5,000 


May 




1939 


11/2 


5,000 


May 




1940 


11/0 


5,000 


May 




1941 


iMi 


5,000 


May 




1942 


W2 


5,000 


Sept. 




1938 


2 


5,000 


Sept. 




1939 


2 


5,000 


Sept. 


-*- 


1940 


2 


5,000 


Sept. 




1941 


2 


5,000 


Sept. 




1942 


2 


5,000 


Sept. 


-*■ 


1943 


2 


5,000 


Sept. 


-*■ 


1944 


2 


5,000 


Oct. 


■^ 


1938 


41/4 


4,000 


Oct. 


-*■ 


1939 


41/4 


4,000 


Oct. 


^ 


1940 


41/4 


4,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 197 

BONDS Due Rate Amount 

Dec. 1, 1938 11/2 10,000 

Dec. 1, 1939 IVs 10,000 

Dee. 1, 1940 IVs 10,000 

Dec. 1, 1938 1 5,000 

Dec. 1, 1939 1 5,000 

Dec. 1, 1940 1 5,000 

Dec. 1, 1941 1 5,000 

Public Improvement and 

Refunding May 1, 1938 4 10,500 

Sewer, Apr. 1, 1938 31/2 2,000 

Apr. 1, 1939 31/2 2,000 

Apr. 1, 1940 31/2 2,000 

Apr. 1, 1941 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1942 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1943 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1944 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1945 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1946 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1947 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1948 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1949 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1950 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1951 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1952 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1953 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 1, 1954 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1938 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1939 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1940 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1941 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1942 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1943 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1944 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1945 31/2 1,000 

Apr. 15, 1946 31/2 1,000 

May 1, 1938 3 6,000 



198 



BONDS 



Storm Sewer, 



CITY OF CONCORD 








Due 




Rate 


Amount 


May 




1939 


3 


6,000 


May 


■'• 


1940 


3 


6,000 


May 


-'- 


1941 


3 


6,000 


May 




1942 


3 


6,000 


May 




1943 


3 


6,000 


May 




1944 


3 


6,000 


May 




1945 


3 


6,000 


May 




1946 


3 


6,000 


May 




1947 


3 


6,000 


May 




1948 


3 


6,000 


May 




1949 


3 


4,000 


May 




1950 


3 


4,000 


May 




1951 


3 


4,000 


May 




1952 


3 


4,000 


May 




1953 


3 


4,000 


May 




, 1954 


3 


3,000 


Nov. 




1938 


21/4 


8,000 


Nov. 




1939 


21/4 


8,000 


Nov. 




1940 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1941 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 


■^ 


1942 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1943 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1944 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1945 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1946 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1947 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1948 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1949 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1950 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1951 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 


-^ 


1952 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1953 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1954 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 




1955 


21/4 


7,000 


Nov. 


-•- 


1956 


21/4 


7,000 



$603,500 



treasury department 
Precinct 



BONDS 



Sewer 



Due Rate 

May 1, 1938 4 



199 



Amount 

$2,500 



$2,500 



School 



BONDS 




Due 




Rate 


Amount 


ion School District, 


Oct. 


-*- 


1938 


4 


$2,000 




Oct. 


■'- 


1939 


4 


2,000 




Oct. 




1940 


4 


2,000 




Oct. 




1941 


4 


2,000 




Oct. 




1942 


4 


2,000 




Dec. 


-*- 


1938 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1939 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 


■'- 


1940 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1941 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1942 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1943 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1944 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1945 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1946 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1947 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1948 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1949 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1950 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1951 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1952 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1953 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1954 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1955 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1956 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1957 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1958 


41/4 


14,000 




Dee. 




1959 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1960 


41/4 


14,000 




Dec. 




1961 


41/4 


14,000 



200 



CITY OF CONCORD 










Due 




Rate 


Amount 


Dec. 




1962 


41/4 


14,000 


Dec. 




1963 


41/4 


14,000 


Dec. 




1964 


41/4 


14,000 


Dec. 




1965 


41/4 


14,000 


Sept. 




1938 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1939 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1940 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1941 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1942 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1943 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1944 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1945 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1946 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1947 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1948 


41/4 


5,000 


Sept. 




1938 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1939 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1940 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1941 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1942 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1943 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1944 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1945 


41/2 


2,000 


Sept. 




1946 


41/2 


2,000 


Nov. 




1938 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1939 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1940 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1941 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1942 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1943 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1944 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1945 


21/4 


4,000 


Nov. 




1946 


21/4 


4,000 



$511,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 


201 


Due Rate 


Amount 


Notes — Highway Dept. 




Equipment Apr. 21, 1938 3 


$3,000 


Apr. 21, 1939 3 


3,000 



Total bonded indebtedness of the city 

exclusive of Water Department $1,123,000 



STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT 



Dr. 




Due and unpaid, January 1, 1937, 




municipal 


$ 70.00 


Due and unpaid, January 1, 1937, 




precinct 


92.50 


Due and unpaid, January 1, 1937, 




Union School District 


170.00 


Due in 1937, municipal 


12,858.75 


Due in 1937, precinct 


150.00 


Due in 1937, Union School District 


22,085.00 




4?35 /10« 95 




«pfJ«-/-~iJVJ.i-jC 


Cr. 




Municipal, paid 


12,842.50 


Precinct sewer paid 


150.00 


Union School District paid 


22,106.25 


Municipal due and not presented 


86.25 


Precinct due and not presented 


92.50 


Union School District due and not 




presented 


148.75 

.*S.f^ 4.96 9,5 



202 



CITY OF CONCORD 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE WATER 
PRECINCT 





Du( 




Rate 


Amount 


July 


■*-; 


1938 


41/2 


$4,000 


July 


•^j 


1939 


41/2 


4,000 


July 


-*-) 


1940 


41/2 


4,000 


July 


-•■) 


1941 


41/2 


4,000 


July 


■^} 


1942 


41/2 


4,000 


July 




1943 


41/2 


4,000 


July 


-'-) 


1944 


41/2 


4,000 


July 




1945 


41/2 


4,000 


July 


-*■ 


1946 


41/2 


4,000 


July 




1947 


41/2 


4,000 


Feb. 




1938 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1939 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 


■^ 


1940 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1941 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1942 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1943 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1944 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1945 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1946 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1947 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1948 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1949 


41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1950 


.41/4 


9,000 


Feb. 




1951 


41/4 


9,000 


Oct. 




1938 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




, 1939 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




1940 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




, 1941 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




1942 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




, 1943 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




, 1944 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




, 1945 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 




, 1946 


21/2 


4,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 203 



Due 


Rate 


Amount 


Oct. 1, 1947 


21/2 


4,000 


Oct. 1, 1948 


21/2 


4,000 



$210,000 



204 CITY OF CONCORD 

STATEMENT OF COUPON ACCOUNT OF THE 
WATER PRECINCT 
Dr. 
To coupons overdue January 1, 1936, 

and not presented $ 167.25 

To coupons due 1937 8,940.00 



),107.25 



Cr. 

By coupons paid, 1937 $8,961.25 

By coupons due and not presented 146.00 



$9,107.25 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
WATER WORKS ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer 



Receipts 

Balance on hand January 1, 1937 $43,092.06 
Receipts, P. R. Sanders, Superin- 
tendent 118,178.83 

$161,270.89 



Expenditures 

Orders paid $83,635.70 

Bonds paid 26,000.00 

Interest on bonds 8,961.25 

Balance on hand January 1, 1938 42,673.94 

$161,270.89 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 205 

CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT OF 
GENERAL ACCOUNT 

Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer 

In Account with City of Concord 
Dr. 

To balance on hand, January 1, 1937 $69,944.79 

Board of Health, milk licenses 370.00 

William T. Happny, chief, rents 333.00 

William T. Happny, chief, assistance, fires 125.00 

William T. Happny, chief, merchandise sold 14.51 

Marion Holt, librarian, library fines 807.24 

V. I. Moore, chief, dance licenses 64.00 

V. I. Moore, chief, department earnings 38.72 

V. I. Moore, chief, comfort station 180.53 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, amounts which 
have been received from rents and sale of 
property which has been deeded to city 1,422.39 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1930 taxes 106.40 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1931 taxes 138.51 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1932 taxes 150.00 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1933 redemptions 357.07 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1933 taxes 153.36 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, reimbursement 

for 1934 taxes paid by city 1,141.28 

Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1934 redemp- 
tions 6,413.89 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1934 taxes 487.09 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1935 redemp- 
tions 17,881.13 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1935 taxes 1,457.47 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1936 redemp- 
tions 17,711.85 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1936 taxes 277,542.68 
Amos B. Morrison, collector, 1937 taxes 1,008,917.04 
Notes, City of Concord 700,000.00 



206 CITY OF CONCORD 

Department of Public Works, roads and 

bridges 33,248.33 

Department of Public Works, sewers 1,992.89 
Department of Public Works, Engineering 

Department 39.80 
Department of Public Works, Board of 

Examiners of Plumbers 22.40 
Recreation Committee, Memorial Athletic 

Field 30.00 
Recreation Committee, Municipal Golf 

Course 3,190.64 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, fees 2,232.18 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, theatre licenses 915.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, taxi and job team 

licenses 464.50 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent. Auditorium 960.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent, battery station 840.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent, airport .877.70 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent, F. Cass 64.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent, L. Audette 65.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent. Rifle Club 25.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, rent. Council Chamber 2.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, junk licenses 45.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, dog licenses 3,160.78 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, circus licenses 50.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, employment license 5.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, pool table and bowl- 
ing alley licenses 363.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, filings, city primary 109.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, W.P.A. Bond Account 30.80 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, sale wood, airport 3.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, sale logs, airport 38.20 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, airport .88 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, sale histories 40.00 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, photostat income 121.20 
A. E. Roby, city clerk. Welcome children 10.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 207 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, Charles Farnum, re- 
fund 229.50 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, George Provo, refund 120.00 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Old Age refund 24.00 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, M. McDonald, refund 19.00 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, Frank Lapolette, re- 
fund 140.00 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, Airport, refund 17.72 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, City of Laconia, re- 
fund 193.25 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, Town of AUenstown, 

refund 84.13 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Town of Boscawen, 

refund 268.11 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, Town of Alton, refund 171.50 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Town of Bow, refund 14.50 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Town of Fitzwilliam, 

refund 235.45 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Town of Moultonboro, 

refund 110.20 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Town of New Hamp- 
ton, refund 47.90 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. Town of Pittsfield, 

refund 112.50 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. County of Belknap, 

refund 515.40 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. County of Grafton, 

refund 475.46 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, County of Hillsboro, 

refund 153.00 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. County of Merrimack, 

refund 135,049.29 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, County of Sullivan, 

refund 16.50 

A. E. Roby, city clerk. State of New Hamp- 
shire, relief refund 16,253.58 



208 CITY OF CONCORD 

A. E. Roby, city clerk, Motor Vehicle Per- 
mits, 1936 804.49 
A. E. Roby, city clerk. Motor Vehicle Per- 
mits, 1937 29,494.64 
A. E. Roby, city clerk, Motor Vehicle Per- 

mite, 1938 738.32 

Carl S. Sargent, Superintendent Park De- 
partment 1,388.00 
Carl S. Sargent, Superintendent Tree De- 
partment 15.15 
J. W. Stanley, Clerk Municipal Court, fees 2,968.12 
State of New Hampshire, insurance tax 5,137.98 
State of New Hampshire, railroad tax 25,110.15 
State of New Hampshire, savings bank tax 44,404.00 
State of New Hampshire, Building and Loan 

Association tax 54.98 

State of New Hampshire, tax on interest and 

dividends 46,015.88 

Transferred from Blossom Hill Cemetery 

Fund 4,016.48 

Transferred from Horse Hill Cemetery Fund 19.00 

Transferred from Maple Grove Cemetery 

Fund 444.11 

Transferred from Millville Cemetery Fund 24.75 

Transferred from Old North Cemetery Fund 283.50 
Transferred from Pine Grove Cemetery Fund 249.91 
Transferred from Soucook Cemetery Fund 39.50 

Transferred from Woodlawn Cemetery Fund 916.08 
Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Blossom Hill Cemetery 4,922.96 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Horse Hill Cemetery 12.75 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Maple Grove Cemetery 260.12 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 209 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Millville Cemetery 113.24 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Old Fort Cemetery 8.50 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Old North Cemetery 417.78 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Pine Grove Cemetery 319.60 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Soucook Cemetery 22.48 

Income sundry trust funds to reimburse 
city for money advanced for care of lots 
in Woodlawn Cemetery 815.52 

Income permanent fund, Blossom Hill Ceme- 
tery 1,759.44 
Income permanent fund, Horse Hill Ceme- 
tery .39 
Income permanent fund. Maple Grove Ceme- 
tery 41.13 
Income permanent fund, Millville Cemetery 72.43 
Income permanent fund, Old North Cemetery 24.99 
Income permanent fund, Pine Grove Cemetery 16.97 
Income permanent fund, Soucook Cemetery 3.13 
Income permanent fund, Woodlawn Cemetery 15.07 
Income William M. Chase, Public Library 

trust 32.50 

Income P. B. Cogswell, Public Library trust 64.41 

Income Samuel C. Eastman, Public Library 

trust 96.57 

Income Samuel C. Eastman, Public Library 

trust 1,046.34 



210 CITY OF CONCORD 

Income Joseph Hazeltine, Public Library 

trust 99.96 

Income Seth K. Jones, Public Library trust 14.34 

Income Benjamin A. Kimball, Public Library 

trust 2,775.00 

Income Henry A. Kimball, Public Library 

trust 462.50 

Income G. Parker Lyon, Public Library 

trust 30.00 

Income Franklin Pierce, Public Library 

trust 30.00 

Income K. P. and Douglas Rollins trust 45.33 

Income Thomas G. Valpey, Public Library 

trust 15.00 

Income Abial Walker, trust fund for schools 30.00 

Accrued interest on bonds sold 382.75 

Transferred to general account from Cem- 
etery Trust Fund, established for the pur- 
pose of improving and ornamenting ceme- 
tery grounds 899.87 
Sale of Hall Street School property 1,497.00 
Zoning .80 



$2,487,429.10 



Cr. 

By aid to dependent soldiers, city $14,792.96 

Aid to dependent soldiers, county 7,628.68 

Airport 1,349.10 

Armistice Day 100.00 

Assessors 10,778.42 

Auditing accounts 1,000.00 

Band concerts 800.00 

Blake land purchase 1,000.00 

Board of Health 6,259.30 

Bonds, Central Fire Station 1,000.00 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 211 



Bonds, City Hall and Auditorium 


5,000.00 


Bonds, Departmental Equipment 


4,000.00 


Bonds, Highway 


5,000.00 


Bonds, Public Improvement 


19,000.00 


Bonds, Public Improvement and Refunding 


10,500.00 


Bonds, Sewer 


9,000.00 


Care of clocks 


85.00 


Cemeteries 


33,761.22 


Chandler School Lot 


1,477.80 


City Clerk 


7,817.94 


City Hall and Auditorium 


7,301.89 


City Physician 


1,200.00 


City Poor 


85,155.03 


City Solicitor 


1,263.25 


City Treasurer 


2,334.87 


Comfort Station 


1,047.63 


Concord District Nursing Association 


350.00 


Concord Family Welfare Association 


350.00 


Corriveau Square and Fletcher, Murphy 




Park 


250.00 


County Poor 


129,948.18 


Dog Licenses 


380.91 


Elections 


4,052.00 


Fire Department 


65,189.38 


Fourth of July 


300.00 


Charles F. Goodhue, Collector 


2,015.11 


Incidentals and Land Damage 


2,757.47 


Interest on coupons 


12,842.50 


Interest on temporary loans 


3,352.51 


Interest on Engineering Department notes 


135.00 


Interest on Highway Department equip- 




ment notes 


225.00 


Interest on Sprinkler System at City Hall 




notes 


35.00 


Margaret Pillsbury Hospital 


4,500.00 


Mayor 


3,176.72 


Memorial Day 


400.00 



212 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Merrimack County tax 190,710.73 

New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 3,000.00 

Notes, City of Concord 600,000.00 

Notes, Engineering Department 4,000.00 

Note, Highway Department, equipment 3,000.00 

Note, Sprinkler System at City Hall 1,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 14,821.73 

Parks 12,859.89 

Penacook District Nursing Association 200.00 

Playgrounds and baths 7,284.97 

Police Court 2,900.00 

Police and Watch 55,466.90 

Precinct, interest on sewer bonds 150.00 

Precinct, sewer bonds 2,500.00 

Printing and Stationery 2,911.62 

Public Library 14,202.67 

Public Works Department 306,429.78 

Recreation Commission 5,339.68 

Repairs, Buildings 927.22 

Revision of City Ordinances 204.00 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen 1,915.00 

Henry H. Smith, land. Highway purposes 200.00 

State Tax 108,064.00 

Tax Collector 6,912.98 

Tree Department 13,232.96 

1936 Real estate sold for unpaid taxes 47,505.49 

Union School District 387,325.91 

Union School District bonds 27,000.00 

Union School District interest 22,106.25 

Weights and Measures 1,187.57 

Work Relief projects 3,111.36 

Zoning Survey 187.66 
Balance on hand December 31, 1937 (out- 
standing and unpaid notes issued in an- 
ticipation of taxes for $200,000 due, 
$100,000 January 26, 1938 and $100,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 213 

due February 16, 1938, 1937 uncollected 
taxes as of December 31, 1937, $278,- 
325.14) 171,857.86 



$2,487,429.10 



CITY TREASURER'S CONDENSED STATEMENT 
BOND ACCOUNT 

Carl II. Foster, City Treasurer 

Highway Bond Account 

Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1937 $169.29 

$169.29 



Expenditures 
Orders paid $169.29 

$169.29 

Memorial Athletic Field Bond Account 
Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1937 $27.15 

$27.15 

Expenditures 

Orders paid 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1938 $27.15 

$27.15 

Public Improvement Bond Account No 1 
Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1937 $9,336.60 

$9,336.60 



214 city of concord 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $9,333.21 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1938 3.39 

$9,336.60 

Public Improvement Bond Account No. 2 
Receipts 
Balance on hand, January 1, 1937 $17,170.02 
Transferred from Department of 

Public Works 16.00 

$17,186.02 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $17,170.02 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1938 16.00 

$17,186.02 

Public Improvement Bond Account No. 3 
Receipts 
$70,000 11/4% Bonds dated January 

1, 1937 $70,000.00 

Premium 326.90 

Transferred from Public Improve- 
ment Bond Account No. 6 92.58 

$70,419.48 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $70,419.23 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1938 .25 

$70,419.48 

Public Improvement Bond Account No. 4 

Receipts 

$25,000 11/2% Bonds dated May 1, 

1937 $25,000.00 

Premium 68.75 

$25,068.75 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 215 

ExPEJfDITURES 

Orders paid $25,068.75 

$25,068.75 

Public Improvement Bond Account No. 5 

Receipts 

$35,000 2% Bonds dated September 

1, 1937 $35,000.00 

Premium 93.10 

$35,093.10 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $10,119.89 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1938 24,973.21 

$35,093.10 

Sewer Bond Account 

Receipts 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1937 $138.19 

$138.19 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $138.19 

$138.19 

Storm Sewer Bond Account 
Receipts 

$135,000 21^% Bonds dated Novem- 
ber 1, 1937 $135,000.00 
Premium 1,200.15 

$136,200.15 

Expenditures 
Orders paid $18,943.13 

Balance on hand January 1, 1938 117,257.02 

$136,200.15 



216 city of concord 

Washington Street Storm Sewer Bond Account 

Receipts 

Transferred from Public Improve- 
ment Bond Account, No. 2 $10,029.00 

Received from U. S. Treasury De- 
partment 4,557.75 

Received from Department of Public 

Works 1,972.49 

$16,559.24 

Expenditures 

Orders paid $14,511.64 

Balance on hand January 1, 1938 2,047.60 

$16,559.24 

Water Works Construction Account 
Receipts 



Balance on hand January 1, 1937 


$1,412.61 


Federal Grants 


8,110.45 


Loan from Water Works General 




Fund 


1,000.00 


Transferred from Water Works Gen- 




eral Fund to complete payment of 




project 


1,382.11 


Sundry receipts 


407.68 




<t10 Q10 Qf; 




«p X ^ , O ± ii/ . O tJ 


Expenditures 




Orders paid 


$7,312.85 


Loans repaid Water Works General 




Fund 


5,000.00 

<t10 Q10 Qf; 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 217 

I hereby certify that I have examined the foregoing 
accounts of Carl H. Foster, City Treasurer, for the year 
1937, and find all items of receipts and expenditures 
therein properly recorded and authenticated by appro- 
priate vouchers, and the several items correctly cast, and 
the cash balance to be $171,857.86 (one hundred seventy- 
one thousand eight hundred fifty-seven dollars and 
eighty-six cents), with notes outstanding and unpaid for 
$200,000 (two hundred thousand dollars) due $100,000 
(one hundred thousand dollars) January 26, 1938, and 
$100,000 (one hundred thousand dollars) February 16, 
1938; Memorial Athletic Field Bond Account, $27.15, 
(twenty-seven dollars and fifteen cents) ; Public Improve- 
ment Bond Account No. 1, $3.39 (three dollars and 
thirty-nine cents) ; Public Improvement Bond Account 
No. 2, $16.00 (sixteen dollars) ; Public Improvement Bond 
Account No. 3, $.25 (twenty-five cents) ; Public Improve- 
ment Bond Account No. 5, $24,973.21 (twenty-four 
thousand nine hundred seventy-three dollars and twenty- 
one cents) ; Storm Sewer Bond Account, $117,257.02 
(one hundred seventeen thousand two hundred fifty-seven 
dollars and two cents) ; Washington Street Storm Sewer 
Bond Account, $2,047.60 (two thousand forty-seven 
dollars and sixty cents) ; and City Water Department, 
$42,673.94 (forty-two thousand six hundred seventy-three 
dollars and ninety-four cents). 

ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



218 



CITY OF CONCORD 



MATURITIES OF SECURITIES OF THE 
CITY OF CONCORD 



Jan, 


^ 


1938 $10,000 


Public Improvement 


IV4 


Feb. 




9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


31/2 


Apr. 




2,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


Apr. 


15 


1,000 


Walker St. Sewer 


31/2 


Apr. 


21 


3,000 


Highway Dept. Equipment 


3 


May 


^ 


4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


41/4 


May 




10,500 


Public Improvement and 
refunding 


4 


May 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


IV2 


May 




2,500 


Sewer 


4 


May 


^ 


5,000 


Highway 


31/4 


May 




6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 




4,000 


Water 


41/2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Sept. 




2,000 


Union School 


4V2 


Oct. 




5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


41/2 


Oct. 




4,000 


Public Improvement 


41/4 


Oct. 




2,000 


Union School 


4 


Oct. 




4,000 


Water 


2y2 


Nov. 


^) 


4,000 


Eastman School 


21/4 


Nov. 




8,000 


Storm Sewer 


2 1/4 


Dec. 




14,000 


Union School 


41^ 


Dec. 




10,000 


Public Improvement 


11/2 


Dec. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


1 


Jan. 




1939 $10,000 


Public Improvement 


11/4 


Feb. 




9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


31/2 


Apr. 




2,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


Apr. 


15 


1,000 


Walker St. Sewer 


31/2 


Apr. 


21 


3,000 


Highway Dept. Equipment 


3 


May 




4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


41/4 


May 




5,000 


Highway 


31/4 


May 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


iy2 


May 




6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 




4,000 


Water 


41/2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


2 



$131,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 219 



Sept. 




5,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Sept. 




2,000 


Union School 


4V2 


Oct. 




5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


41/2 


Oct. 




4,000 


Public Improvement 


41/4 


Oct. 




2,000 


Union School 


4 


Oct. 




4,000 


Water 


2V2 


Nov. 




4,000 


Eastman School 


21/4 


Nov. 




8,000 


Storm Sewer 


21/4 


Dec. 




14,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Dec. 




10,000 


Public Improvement 


11/2 


Dec. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


1 

$118,000 



Jan. 1, 1940 $10,000 Public Improvement 1 1^ 



Feb. 




9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


3y2 


Apr. 




2,000 


Sewer 


3y2 


Apr. 


15, 


1,000 


Walker Street Sewer 


31/2 


May 




4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


41/4 


May 




5,000 


Highway 


31/4 


May 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


iy2 


May 




6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 




4,000 


Water 


4V2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Sept. 




2,000 


Union School 


41/2 


Oct. 




5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


4 ¥2 


Oct. 




4,000 


Public Improvement 


41/4 


Oct. 




2,000 


Union School District 


4 


Oct. 




4,000 


Water 


21/2 


Nov. 




4,000 


Eastman School 


21/4 


Nov. 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


2 1/4 


Dec. 




14,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Dec. 




10,000 


Public Improvement 


1V2 


Dec. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


1 

$114,000 


Jan. 


1, 


1941 $10,000 


Public Improvement 


IV4 


Feb. 


1, 


9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 


1, 


1,000 


Central Fire Station 


31/2 


Apr. 


1, 


1,000 


Sewer 


3y2 


Apr. 


15, 


1,000 


Walker Street Sewer 


3 ¥2 



220 CITY OF CONCORD 



May 


1, 


4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


4V4 


May 


1, 


5,000 


Highway 


31/4 


May 


1, 


5,000 


Public Improvement 


iy2 


May 


1, 


6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 


1, 


4,000 


Water 


4V2 


Sept. 


1, 


5,000 


Public Improvement 


2 


Sept. 


1, 


5,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Sept. 


1, 


2,000 


Union School 


41/2 


Oct. 


1, 


5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


41/2 


Oct. 


1, 


4,000 


Water 


2y2 


Oct. 


1, 


2,000 


Union School 


4 


Nov. 


1, 


4,000 


Eastman School 


21^ 


Nov. 


1, 


7,000 


Storm Sewer 


21/4 


Dec. 


1, 


14,000 


Union School 


414 


Dec. 


1, 

1, 


5,000 


Public Improvement 
Public Improvement 


1 


Jan. 


1942 $10,000 


11/4 


Feb. 


1, 


9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 


1, 


1,000 


Central Fire Station 


31/2 


Apr. 


1, 


1,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


Apr. 


15, 


1,000 


Walker Street Sewer 


31/2 


May 


1, 


4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


41/4 


May 


1, 


5,000 


Highway 


31/4 


May 


1, 


5,000 


Public Improvement 


iy2 


May 


1, 


6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 


1, 


4,000 


Water 


4V2 


Sept. 


1, 


5,000 


Public Improvement 


2 


Sept. 


1, 


5,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Sept. 


1, 


2,000 


Union School 


4y2 


Oct. 


1, 


5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


4y2 


Oct. 


1, 


2,000 


Union School 


4 


Oct. 


1, 


4,000 


Water 


2y2 


Nov. 


1, 


4,000 


Eastman School 


2% 


Nov. 


1, 


7,000 


Storm Sewer 


2y4 


Dec. 


1, 


14,000 


Union School 


4y4 


Jan. 


1, 


1943 $10,000 


Public Improvement 


iy4 


Feb. 


1, 


9,000 


Water 


41^ 


Apr. 


1, 


1,000 


Central Fire Station 


3y2 


Apr. 


1, 


1,000 


Sewer 


3y2 


Apr. 


15, 


1,000 


Walker Street Sewer 


3y2 



$99,000 



$94,000 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 221 

May 1, 4,000 Departmental Equipment 4^/4 

May 1, 5,000 Highway SV^ 

May 1, 6,000 Sewer 3 

July 1, 4,000 Water 4V2 

Sept. 1, 5,000 Public Improvement 2 

Sept. 1, 5,000 Union School 4% 

Sept. 1, 2,000 Union School 41/2 

Oct. 1, 5,000 City Hall & Auditorium 4^/2 

Oct. 1, 4,000 Water 2y2 

Nov. 1, 4,000 Eastman School 2i/4 

Nov. 1, 7,000 Storm Sewer 2% 

Dec. 1, 14,000 Union School 4^/4 

$87,000 



Jan. 




1944 $10,000 


Public Improvement 


ly* 


Feb. 




9,000 


Water 


4y4 


Apr. 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


3y2 


Apr. 




1,000 


Sewer 


3y2 


Apr. 


15, 


1,000 


Walker Street Sewer 


3y2 


May 




4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


4y4 


May 




5,000 


Highway 


sy* 


May 




6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 




4,000 


Water 


4y2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Public Improvement 


2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Union School 


4y4 


Sept. 




2,000 


Union School 


4y2 


Oct. 




5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


4y2 


Oct. 




4,000 


Water 


2y2 


Nov. 




4,000 


Eastman School 


2% 


Nov. 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


2y4 


Dec. 




14,000 


Union School 


4y4 



$87,000 



Feb. 1, 1945 $9,000 Water 4^/4 

Apr. 1, 1,000 Central Fire Station 3y2 

Apr. 1, 1,000 Sewer 3 y2 

Apr. 15, 1,000 Walker Street Sewer 3y2 

May 1, 4,000 Departmental Equipment 4% 

May 1, 5,000 Highway 3% 

May 1, 6,000 Sewer 3 

July 1, 4,000 Water 4y2 

Sept. 1, 5,000 Union School 4% 



222 CITY OF CONCORD 

Sept. 1, 2,000 Union School 4% 

Oct. 1, 5,000 City Hall & Auditorium 4V2 

Oct. 1, 4,000 Water 21/2 

Nov. 1, 4,000 Eastman School 2% 

Nov. 1, 7,000 Storm Sewer 2Vi 

Dec. 1, 14,000 Union School 4% 



Feb. 


1, 1946 


$9,000 


Water 


414 


Apr. 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


SVa 


Apr. 




1,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


Apr. 


15, 


1,000 


Walker Street Sewer 


31/2 


May 




4,000 


Departmental Equipment 


41/4 


May 




5,000 


Highway 


3% 


May 




6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 




4,000 


Water 


4y2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Union School 


4y4 


Sept. 




2,000 


Union School 


4% 


Oct. 




5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


41/2 


Oct. 




4,000 


Water 


2y2 


Nov. 




4,000 


Eastman School 


2% 


Nov. 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


2^ 


Dec. 




14,000 


Union School 


4% 


Feb. 


1, 1947 


$9,000 


Water 


4% 


Apr. 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


3V2 


Apr. 




1,000 


Sewer 


3y2 


May 




6,000 


Sewer 


3 


July 




4,000 


Water 


4y2 


Sept. 




5,000 


Union School 


41/4 


Oct. 




5,000 


City Hall & Auditorium 


4y2 


Oct. 




4,000 


Water 


2y2 


Nov. 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


2y4 


Dec. 




14,000 


Union School 


4y4 



$72,000 



$72,000 



$56,000 



Feb. 1, 1948 $9,000 Water 4% 

Apr. 1, 1,000 Central Fire Station 3y2 

Apr. 1, 1,000 Sewer 3% 

May 1, 6,000 Sewer 3 

Sept. 1, 5,000 Union School 4% 



TREASURY DEPARTMENT 223 

Oct. 1, 4,000 Water 2^/2 

Nov. 1, 7,000 Storm Sewer 2% 

Dec. 1, 14,000 Union School 4^/4 



Feb. 


1, 


1949 


$9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


SVa 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Sewer 


3V2 


May 


1, 




4,000 


Sewer 


3 


Nov. 


1, 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


214 


Dec. 


1, 




14,000 


Union School 


41/4 

$36,000 








Feb. 


1, 


1950 


$9,000 


Water 


4% 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


SV2 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


May 


1, 




4,000 


Sewer 


3 


Nov. 


1, 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


21/4 


Dec. 


1, 




14,000 


Union School 


41/4 

$36,000 








Feb. 


1, 


1951 


$9,000 


Water 


41/4 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Central Fire Station 


31/2 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


May 


1, 




4,000 


Sewer 


3 


Nov. 


1, 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


21/4 


Dec. 


1, 




14,000 


Union School 


41/4 

$36,000 








Apr. 


1, 


1952 


$1,000 


Central Fire Station 


3y2 


Apr. 


1, 




1,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


May 


1, 




4,000 


Sewer 


3 


Nov. 


1, 




7,000 


Storm Sewer 


21/4 


Dec. 


1, 




14,000 


Union School 


41/4 

$27,000 

31/2 


Apr. 




1953 


$1,000 


Central Fire Station 


Apr. 






1,000 


Sewer 


31/2 


May 






4,000 


Sewer 


3 


Nov. 






7,000 


Storm Sewer 


2Vi 


Dec. 






14,000 


Union School 


41/4 

$27,000 



224 CITY OF CONCORD 

Apr. 1, 1954 $1,000 Central Fire Station 3V2 

Apr. 1, 1,000 Sewer SVz 

May 1, 3,000 Sewer 3 

Nov. 1, 7,000 Storm Sewer 2Vi 

Dec. 1, 14,000 Union School 4^^ 



Nov. 1, 1955 $7,000 Storm Sewer 2Vi 

Dec. 1, 14,000 Union School 4^4 



$26,000 



$21,000 



Nov. 1, 1956 $7,000 Storm Sewer 2^/4 

Dec. 1, 14,000 Union School 4^/4 

$21,000 

Dec. 1, 1957 $14,000 Union School 4% 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1958 $14,000 Union School 4i/4 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1959 $14,000 Union School 4^/4 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1960 $14,000 Union School 4^/4 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1961 $14,000 Union School 4Vi 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1962 $14,000 Union School 4% 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1963 $14,000 Union School 4^/4 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1964 $14,000 Union School 414 

$14,000 

Dec. 1, 1965 $14,000 Union School 4^/4 

$14,000 

$1,333,000 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE 
CITY OF CONCORD 



GENERAL FUND 




Balance Sheet — December 31, 1937 




Assets 






Cash: 






In Depositories, 


$171,443.05 




Undeposited Cash, 


432.87 




Petty Cash, 


250.00 








$172,125.92 


Accounts Receivable, 




279.45 


Reimbursable Expenditures: 






State, 


$1,895.94 




County, 


14,004.47 




Miscellaneous Municipalities, 


876.16 








16,776.57 


Taxes Receivable: 






Taxes Receivable — Current, 


$278,325.14 




Taxes Receivable — Delinquent, 


35,384.65 








313,709.79 


Tax Liens, 




41,308.92 


Due from Public Library, 




193.25 


Total Assets, 


$544,393.90 


Liabilities and Surplus 




Notes Payable, 




$200,000.00 


Due Airport, 




595.68 


Accrued Interest Payable: 






Municipal Bonds, 


$3,394.74 




Sewer Bonds, 


16.66 




School Bonds, 


6,968.75 








$10,380.15 



226 CITY OP CONCORD 

Unpresented Coupons: 

Municipal Bonds, 86.25 

Sewer Bonds, 92.50 

School Bonds, 170.00 



348.75 



Total Liabilities, $211,324.58 

Surplus, 333,069.32 



Total Liabilities and Surplus, $544,393.90 



Statement of General Fund Cash Receipts for 1937 

Local Taxes: 

Collections — Current Year, $1,008,917.04 

Collections — Previous Year, 280,035.51 
Redemption of Taxes Bought by 

City, 42,363.89 
Reimbursements of Taxes Paid by 

City, 1,141.28 



$1,332,457.72 



Taxes Collected by State: 

Interest and Dividends Tax, $46,015.88 

Savings Banks Tax, 44,404.00 

Railroad Tax, 25,110.15 

Insurance Tax, 5,137.98 



120,668.01 



Reimbursements for Charities: 

Merrimack County, $135,049.29 
State of New Hampshire, 16,253.58 
Various Counties, Towns and Indi- 
viduals, 2,940.40 



154,243.27 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 227 

Receipts Collected by City Clerk: 

Auto Permits— 1936, 1937 and 1938, $31,037.45 

Dog Licenses, 3,160.78 

City Clerk Fees, 2,232.18 

Theatre Licenses, 915.00 

Taxi and Job Team Licenses, 464.50 

Pool and Bowling Alley Permits, 36.3.00 

Photostat Income, 121.20 

Rent of Auditorium, 960.00 

Rent of Battery Station, 840.00 

Rent of Airport, 877.70 

Miscellaneous Rents, 156.00 

Filing Fees, 109.00 

Circus Licenses, 50.00 

Other Receipts, 180.60 



41,467.41 
Fines and Forfeits, Municipal Court, 2,968.12 

Police Department: 

Comfort Station, $180.53 

Other Receipts, 102.72 



Fire Department: 

Rent, $333.00 

Other Income, 139.51 



Department of Public Works: 

Roads and Bridges, $33,248.33 

Sewers, 1-992.89 

Engineering, 39.80 

Plumbers Examinations, 22.40 



Park and Tree Department: 

Parks, $1-388.00 

Trees, 1^-1^ 



283.25 



472.51 



35,303.42 



1,403.15 



228 CITY OF CONCORD 

Recreation Committee: 

Golf, $3,190.64 

Memorial Athletic Field, 30.00 



Board of Health - 


— Milk Licenses, 


City Treasurer — 


Accrued 


Interest oi 


of Bonds, 






Library Fines, 






Trustees of Trust 


Funds: 




Income from Trust Funds 




Cemeteries, 




$6,892.95 


Libraries, 




4,666.62 


Schools, 




30.00 


West Garden, 




45.33 



$11,634.90 
Income, Permanent Fund — Cemeteries, 1,933.55 
Transfer Account — Cemeteries, 5,993.33 

Cemetery Fund for Improvements, etc., 899.87 



3,220.64 
370.00 

382.75 
807.24 



20,461.65 
Sale of Property Deeded to City, 1,422.39 

Sale of Hall Street School Building, 1,497.00 

Zoning Board Adjustment, .80 

Abatement of State Tax — 1936 and 1937, 54.98 

Proceeds of Temporary Loans, 700,000.00 



Total General Fund Receipts, $2,417,484.31 

Statement of General Fund Cash Disbursement for 1937 

General Government 

Mayor: 

Salary, Mayor, $2,000.00 

Salary, Clerk, 1,000.00 

Incidentals, 171.72 

$3,171.72 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 229 

City Clerk: 

Salary, City Clerk, $2,137.50 

Salary, Clerk, Board of Public Works, 200.00 

Salary, Clerks, 4,394.67 

Auto Upkeep, 400.00 

Incidentals, 815.20 

7,947.37 



1,261.00 



City Solicitor: 




Salary, City Solicitor, 


$999.96 


Incidentals, 


261.04 


City Treasurer: 




Salary, City Treasurer, 


$1,300.00 


Salary, Clerks, 


513.00 


Incidentals, 


521.87 


Sealer of Weights and Measures: 




Salary, 


$920.00 


Auto Upkeep, 


200.00 


Incidentals, 


17.57 


Assessors : 




Salary, Assessors, 


$6,400.00 


Salary, Clerks, 


2,634.75 


Auto Hire, 


400.00 


Listing Polls, 


600.00 


Incidentals, 


734.09 


Elections : 




Salary, Election Officers, 


$2,784.00 


Incidentals, 


1,280.10 


Tax Collector: 


• 


Salary, Tax Collector, 


$2,850.00 


Salary, Clerks, 


2,157.33 


Postage and Printing, 


1,241.53 


Incidentals, 


659.79 



2,334.87 



1,137.57 



10,768.84 



4,064.10 



6,908.65 



230 CITY OF CONCORD 

Board of Aldermen: 

Salaries, Board of Aldermen, 1,915.00 



Municipal Court: 




Salary, Judge, 


$1,800.00 


Salary, Associate Judge, 


500.00 


Salary, Clerk, 


600.00 


City Hall and Auditorium: 




Salary, Messenger, 


$1,500.00 


Salary, Janitor, 


1,248.00 


Fuel, 


1,580.75 


Lights, 


1,251.35 


Insurance, 


526.94 


Incidentals, 


1,178.23 



Miscellaneous General Government Expenses: 

Care of City Clocks, $85.00 

Printing and Stationery, 2,911.62 

Zoning Expense, 187.66 

Ordinance Revision, 204.00 

Repairs, City Buildings, 930.22 

Land, 1,000.00 

Audit, 1,000.00 



Police and Watch: 




Salary, Chief, 


$2,469.84 


Salary, Deputy, 


2,280.00 


Salary, Officers, 


37,571.90 


Salary, Specials, 


3,161.47 


Salary, Stenographer, 


1,207.67 


Salary, part time officer, Penacook, 


1,176.12 


Repairs, 


178.11 


Fuel, 


1,176.64 


Lights, 


777.77 



2,900.00 



7,285.27 



6,318.50 



Total General Government Expense, $56,012.89 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 231 

Auto Expense, 1,777.13 

Marking Streets, 378.19 

Telephone and Gamewell, 580.22 

Insurance, 231.97 

Keeping Prisoners, 125.60 

Printing, 188.95 

Incidentals, 2,106.98 



Fire Department: 

Salary, Chief, $2,470.00 

Salaries, 38,067.86 

Salaries, Semi-Annual, 10,283.47 

Fuel, 2,020.86 

Lights, 773.36 

Laundry, 81.60 

Fire Inspection, 928.68 

Telephone and Insurance, 1,060.60 

Upkeep, Equipment, 2,607.14 

Upkeep, Fire Alarm, 2,469.75 

Repairs, 1,063.81 

Hose, 1,046.00 

New Equipment, 1,054.46 

Incidentals, 964.41 



$55,388.56 



64,892.00 
Damage by Dogs, 380.91 



Total Protection of Persons and Property, $120,661.47 



Health 



Health Department: 




Salary, City Physician, 


$1,000.00 


Salary, Sanitary Officer, 


1,900.00 


Salary, Assistant Physician, 


200.00 


Salary, Clerk, 


1,144.00 


Auto Upkeep, 


200.00 


Incidentals, 


605.33 



$5,049.33 



232 CITY OF CONCORD 



Milk Inspection: 




Salary, Milk Inspector, 


$1,638.75 


Auto Upkeep, 


400.00 


Incidentals, 


352.11 



Public Comfort Station: 

Salaries, $766.00 

Lights, 84.37 

Repairs, 35.96 

Incidentals, 151.80 



2,390.86 



1,038.13 



?,478.32 



Department of Public Works: 




Highway and Bridges — 




New Equipment, 


$33,146.51 


Highway and Bridges — 




Maintenance, 


, 168,762.96 


Sewers — New Construction, 


727.93 


Sewers — Maintenance, 


13,771.78 


Land, 


200.00 


Office, 


3,489.27 


Refuse Collection, 


34,522.70 


Table Garbage, 


4,610.00 


Engineering, 


6,741.01 


Street Lighting, 


36,392.00 


Total Department of Public 


Works, $302,364.16 



Public Library, 14,179.10 

Charities : 

Old Age Assistance, $13,572.75 

City Poor, 85,155.03 

Dependent Soldiers — City, 14,792.96 

County Poor, 129,830.30 

Work Relief Projects, 3,049.68 

Dependent Soldiers — County, 7,577.43 



Total Charities, 253,978.15 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 233 

Patriotic Purposes: 



Memorial Day, 


$400.00 


Armistice Day, 


100.00 


Fourth of July — Concord, 


200.00 


Fourth of July — Penacook, 


100.00 


Total Patriotic Purposes, 




irks and Playgrounds: 




Salary, Superintendent and Tree 




Warden, 


$2,159.13 


Salary, Employees, 


7,277.11 


Shrubbery and Trees, 


471.05 


Trucking, 


561.36 


Care of Trees, 


13,332.96 


Incidentals, 


2,332.92 


Playgrounds and Bath, 


7,273.72 


Land, 


1,727.80 


Band Concerts, 


800.00 


Recreation Commission, 


5,319.85 



800.00 



Total Parks and Playgrounds, 41,255,90 

Public Service Enterprises: 

Cemeteries, General Expenses, $29,250.22 

Cemeteries, Permanent Improvements, 4,396.00 
Concord Airport — General, 1,129.89 

Concord Airport — Improvements, 219.21 



Total Public Service Enterprises, 34,995.32 

Unclassified: 

Damage and Legal Expense, $2,790.47 

Taxes Bought by City, 47,505.49 

Goodhue Bird Collection, 2,000.00 



Total Unclassified, 52,295.96 

Private Charities: 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital, $4,500.00 

N. H. Memorial Hospital, 3,000.00 

Family Welfare Society, 350.00 

Concord District Nursing Ass'n., 350.00 

Penacook District Nursing Ass'n., 200.00 



Total Private Charities, 8,400.00 



234 CITY OF CONCORD 

Interest : 

Interest on Temporary Loans, $3,352.51 

Interest on Notes, 395.00 

Interest on Bonded Debt, 35,098.75 



Payments to Other Government Divisions: 

Taxes Paid to State, $108,064.00 

Taxes Paid to County, 190,710.73 

Taxes Paid to Union School District, 356,025.91 
Taxes Paid to Penacook School Dis- 
trict, 31,300.00 



38,846.26 



Total Payments to Other Government 

Divisions, 686,100.64 

Payments of Bonds and Notes: 

City Hall and Auditorium Bonds, $5,000.00 

Public Improvement Bonds, 19,000.00 

Highway Bonds, 5,000.00 

Departmental Equipment Bonds, 4,000.00 

Central Fire Station Bonds, 1,000.00 
Public Improvement and Refunding 

Bonds, 10,500.00 

Sewer Bonds, 9,000.00 

Highway Notes, 7,000.00 

Sprinkler System Notes, 1,000.00 

Precinct Sewer Bonds, 2,500.00 

School Bonds, 27,000.00 

Temporary Loans, 600,000.00 



Total Payments of Bonds and Notes, 691,000.00 



Total Disbursements, $2,309,368.17 



financial statement 235 

Reconciliation of Receipts and Disbursements 
FOR Year with Cash Balance 

Balance — 1/1/37, $63,326.91 

Add: 

Revenue Receipts, $1,717,484.31 

Borrowings — Temporary Loans, 700,000.00 



2,417,484.31 
$2,480,811.22 



Deduct: 

Expenses, $1,618,368.17 

Payments on Bonded Debt, 91,000.00 

Payments on Temporary Loans, 600,000.00 



2,309,368.17 
Balance — 12/31/37, $171,443.05 



236 city of concord 

Budget Statement of Appropriation Accounts 

Appropriation 

Overdrafts* or Departmental 
Unexpended Income 

Appropriation Expended Balance Appropriated 

Mayor: 

Salary, Mayor, $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ $ 

Salary, Clerk, 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Incidentals, 200.00 171.72 28.28 

Totals, $ 3,200.00 $ 3,171.72 $ 28.28 $ 

City Clerk: 

Salary, City Clerk, $ 2,137.50 $ 2,137.50 $ $ 

Salary, Clerk, Board 

of Public Works, 200.00 200.00 

Salary, Clerks, 4,400.00 4,394.67 5.33 

Auto Upkeep, 400.00 400.00 

Incidentals, 825.00 815.20 9.80 

Totals, $ 7,962.50 $ 7,947.37 $ 15.13 $ 



City Solicitor: 

Salary, $ 1,000.00 $ 999.96 $ .04* $. 

Incidentals, 261.00 261.04 .04 

Totals, $ 1,261.00 $ 1,261.00 $ $. 

City Treasurer: 

Salary, City Treas- 
urer, $ 1,300.00 $ 1,300.00 $ $. 

Salary, Clerk, 400.00 513.00 113.00* . 

Incidentals, 550.00 521.87 28.13 . 

Totals, $ 2,250.00 $ 2,334.87 $ 84.87* $. 

Sealer of Weights and 
Measures : 

Salary, $ 920.00 $ 920.00 $ $. 

Auto Upkeep, 200.00 200.00 

Incidentals, 100.00 17.57 82.43 . 

Totals, $ 1,220.00 $ 1,137.57 $ 82.43 $. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



237 



Assessors : 


Appropriation 


ExiKMuled 


Salary, Assessors, 


$ 


6,400.00 


$ 


6,400.00 


Salary, Clerks, 




2,627.75 




2,634.75 


Auto Hire, 




400.00 




400.00 


Listing Polls, 




600.00 




600.00 


Incidentals, 




700.00 




734.09 


Totals, 


$ 


10,727.75 


$ 


10,768.84 


Elections: 










Salary, Oflficers, 


$ 


3,500.00 


$ 


2,784.00 


Incidentals, 




1,000.00 




1,280.10 


Totals, 


$ 


4,500.00 


$ 


4,064.10 


Tax Collector: 










Salary, Tax Collector, 


$ 


2,850.00 


$ 


2,850.00 


Salary, Clerks, 




2,165.45 




2,157.33 


Postage and Printing, 




750.00 




1,241.53 


Incidentals, 




500.00 




659.79 



Appropriation 

Overdrafts* or 

Unexpended 

Balance 



Departmental 

Income 
Appropriated 



Totals, 


$ 


6,265.45 


Police and Watch: 






Salary, Chief, 


$ 


2,470.00 


Salary, Deputy, 




2,280.00 


Salary, Officers, 




37,012.00 


Salary, Specials, 




3,700.00 


Salary, Stenographer, 




1,200.00 


Salary, part-time 






Officer, Penacook, 




1,082.60 


Repairs, 




300.00 


Fuel, 




1,300.00 


Lights, 




800.00 


Auto and Auto Supplies, 


2,300.00 


Marking Streets, 




400.00 


Telephone and Gamewell, 


600.00 


Insurance, 




375.00 


Keeping Prisoners, 




200.00 


Incidentals, 




1,100.00 


Printing, 




150.00 


Diving Suits, 




185.00 



Totals, 



$ 55,454.60 $ 



7.00* 

34.09* 

41.09* $ 

716.00 $ 

280.10* 

435.90 $ 

$ 

8.12 

491.53* 

159.79* 

6,908.65 $ 643.20* $ 643.20 

2,469.84 $ .16 $ 

2,280.00 

37,571.90 559.90* 

3,161.47 538.53 

1,207.67 7.67* 

1.176.12 93.52* 

178.11 121.89 

1,176.64 123.36 

777.77 22.23 

1.777.13 522.87 

378.19 21.81 

580.22 19.78 

231.97 143.03 

125.60 74.40 

2,106.98 1,006.98* 

188.95 38.95* 

185.00 

55,388.56 $ 66.04 $ 



238 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Health Department: 

Salary, City Physi- 
cian, 

Salary, Assistant 
Physician, 

Salary, Sanitary 
Officer, 

Salary, Clerk, 

Auto Upkeep, 

Incidentals, 

Totals, 

Milk Inspection: 
Salary, Inspector, 
Auto Upkeep, 
Incidentals, 

Totals, 

Public Comfort Station: 
Salaries, 
Lights, 
Repairs, 
Incidentals, 

Totals, 

Board of Aldermen: 
Salaries, Board of 
Aldermen, 

Totals, 

Municipal Court: 
Salary, Judge, 
Salary, Associate 

Judge, 
Salary, Clerk, 

Totals, 



Appropriation 



Expended 



Appropriation 

Overdrafts* or Departmental 
Unexpended Income 

Balance Appropriated 



$ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 $ 

200.00 200.00 

1,900.00 1,900.00 

1,144.00 1,144.00 

200.00 200.00 

1,450.00 605.33 844.67 

$ 5,894.00 $ 5,049.33 $ 844.67 

$ 1,710.00 $ 1,638.75 $ 71.25 

400.00 400.00 

300.00 352.11 52.11* 

$ 2,410.00 $ 2,390.86 $ 19.14 

$ 1,000.00 $ 766.00 $ 234.00 

325.00 84.37 240.63 

200.00 35.96 164.04 

175.00 151.80 23.20 

$ 1,700.00 $ 1,038.13 $ 661.87 

$ 1,915.00 $ 1,915.00 $ 

$ 1,915.00 $ 1,915.00 $ 

$ 1,800.0 $ 1,800.00 $ 

500.00 500.00 

600.00 600.00 

$ 2,900.00 $ 2,900.00 $ 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



239 



Appropriation 

City Hall and Auditorium : 

Salary, Messenger, $ 1,500.00 

Salary, Janitor, 1,248.00 

Fuel, 1,500.00 

Lights, 1,100.00 

Insurance, 600.00 

Incidentals, 900.00 



Totals, 



Miscellaneous City 
Government : 
Care City Clock, $ 

Care City Clock- 
Ward One, 
Printing and Stationery, 
Land and Buildings, 
Zoning Expense, 
Audit, 

Ordinance Revision, 
Repairs — City Buildings, 



Totals, 

Fire Department: 
Salary, Chief, 
Salaries, 

Salaries, Semi-Annual, 
Fuel, 
Lights, 

Upkeep Equipment, 
Upkeep Fire Alarm, 
Laundry, 
Fire Inspection, 
Hose, 

Telephone and Insur- 
ance, 
Repairs, 

New Equipment, 
Incidentals, 

Totals, 



25.00 
2,500.00 
1,000.00 
150.00 
1,500.00 
1,500.00 
1,000.00 



2,470.00 

37,712.00 

10,480.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,200.00 

2,500.00 

85.00 

1,000.00 

1,000.00 

1,445.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 



Expended 

1,500.00 
1,248.00 
1,580.75 
1,251.35 
526.94 
1,178.23 



Appropriation 

Overdrafts* or 

Unexpended 

Balance 



Departmental 

Income 
Appropriated 



2,911.62 

1,000.00 

187.66 

1,000.00 

204.00 

930.22 



2,470.00 

38,067.86 

10,283.47 

2,020.86 

773.36 

2,607.14 

2,469.75 

81.60 

928.68 

1,046.00 

1,060.60 

1,063.81 

1,054.46 

964.41 



$ 6,848.00 $ 7,285.27 $ 



85.00 $ 85.00 $. 



$ 7,760.00 $ 6,318.50 $ 



$64,892.00 $ 64,892.00 $. 



80.75* 
151.35* 

73.06 
278.23* 

437.27* 

25.00 
411.62* 

37.66* 
500.00 
1,296.00 
69.78 

1,441.50 

355.86* 
196.53 

20.86* 
226.64 
407.14* 

30.25 
3.40 

71.32 

46.00* 

384.40 
63.81* 
54.46* 
35.59 



240 CITY OF CONCORD 

Appropriation 

Overdrafts* or Departmental 

Unexpended Income 

Appropriation Expended Balance Appropriated 

Department of Public 
Works: 

Roads and Bridges, $168,676.00 $201,909.47 $ 33,233.47* $ 33,233.47 

Office, 3,360.00 3,489.27 129.27* 129.27 

Refuse Collection, 35,000.00 34,522.70 477.30 

Table Garbage, 4,610.00 4,610.00 

Sewers, 12,532.00 14,499.71 1,967.71* 1,967.71 

Engineering, 6,800.00 6,741.01 58.99 

Street Lighting, 37,000.00 36,392.00 608.00 

Land, 200.00 200.00 

Totals, $268,178.00 $302,364.16 $ 34,186.16* $ 35,330.45 

Incidentals and Land 

Damages, $ 1,900.00 $ 2,790.47 $ 890.47* .$ 

Public Library, (1) $ 13,985.85 $ 14,179.10 $ 193.25* $ 

Charities: 

Old Age Assistance, $ 18,000.00 $ 13,572.96 $ 4,427.04 $ 

City Poor, 50,000.00 85,155.03 35,155.03* 

Dependent Soldiers — 

City, 10,000.00 14,792.96 4,792.96* 

Totals, $ 78,000.00 $113,520.95 $35,520.95* (2) $19,319.98 

Patriotic Purposes: 

Memorial Day, $ 400.00 $ 400.00 $ $ 

Armistice Day, 100.00 100.00 

Fourth of July — 

Concord, 200.00 200.00 

Fourth of July — 

Penacook, 100.00 100.00 

Totals, $ 800.00 $ 800.00 $ $ 

Parks and Playgrounds: 
Salary, Superintendent 

and Tree Warden, $ 2,200.00 $ 2,159.13 $ 40.87 $ 

Salaries, Employees, 5,952.00 7,277.11 1,325.11* 1,348.57 

Shrubbery and Trees, 500.00 471.05 28.95 

Trucking, 510.00 561.36 51.36* 

Care of Trees, 13,344.00 13,332.96 11.04 

Incidentals, 2,291.00 2,332.92 41.92* 

Playgrounds and Bath, 7,340.00 7,273.72 66.28 

Land and Buildings, 1,800.00 1,727.80 72.20 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 241 

Appropriation 

Overdrafts* or Departmental 

Unexpended Income 

Appropriation Expended Balance Appropriated 

Band Concerts, 800.00 800.00 

Recreation Commission, 2,150.00 5,319.85 3,169.85* 3,169.85 

Totals, $ 36,887.00 $ 41,255.90 $ 4,368.90* $ 4,518.42 
Public Service Enterprises: 

Cemeteries, (1) $ 34,710.70 $ 33,646.22 $ 1,064.48 $ 

Concord Airport, 1,000,00 1,349.10 349.10* 349.10 

Totals, $ 35,710.70 $ 34,995.32 $ 713.58 $ 349.10 

Unclassified: 

Goodhue Bird Col- 
lection, $ 2,000.00 $ 2,000.00 $ $ 

Private Charities: 

Margaret Pillsbury 

Hospital, $ 4,500.00 $ 4,500.00 $ $ 

N. H. Memorial Hos- 
pital, 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Family Welfare Society, 350.00 350.00 

Concord District Nurs- 
ing Association, 350.00 350.00 

Penacook District Nurs- 
ing Association, 200.00 200.00 

Totals, $ 8,400.00 $ 8,400.00 $ $ 

Interest : 

Interest on Temporary 

Loans, $ 2,500.00 $ 3,352.51 $ 852.51* $ 

Interest on Bonds and 

Notes, 13,216.25 13,387.50 171.25* 

Totals, $ 15,716.25 $ 16,740.01 $ 1,023.76* $ 

(1) Includes Trust Fund Income and Departmental Earnings. 

(2) Refunds from State of New Hampshire and from other Cities and 

Towns. 



242 



CITY OP CONCORD 



CITY PROPERTY HAVING VALUE BUT NOT CONSIDERED 
AVAILABLE ASSETS. 



Fire Department, 

Fire and Police Alarm System, 

Police Department, 

Highway Department, 

City Hall and Auditorium, 

AATnrrl 7 nnrl Q W^arrl Houses 


Land and 
Buildings 

$102,265.21 

85,180.97 

54,417.50 

38,877.62 

257,773.60 

6,660.98 

37,376.30 

20,000.00 

No records 

1,500.00 

1,200.00 

70,999.65 

14,706.68 
17,455.63 

1,000.00 
98,524.02 

8,842.39 
108,578.91 


Equipment 

Sound Values 

$59,271.07 


Total 
Investment 

$161,536.28 
85,180.97 


3,930.99 

88,632.74 

6,273.95 


58,348.49 

127,510.36 

264,047.55 

6,660.98 


White Property, 

City Lot, rear State Library, 

Wood lot and quarries. Ward 3, 

Field, Bridge Street, 

Land, Ferry Street, 

Concord Airport, 

Beaver Meadow Golf Club, 

(Buildings and Equipment), 
Hollis Memorial Athletic Field, 




37,376.30 




20,000.00 








1,500.00 




1,200.00 




70,999.65 


240.33 


14,947.01 
17,455.63 


Blake land. Ferry Street, 

Parks, 

Playgrounds, 

Cemeteries, 

Tree Department, 

Public Library, books. 




1,000.00 


2,040.49 
4,379.90 
4,814.72 
2,209.40 
25,080.91 


100,564.51 

13,222.29 

113,393.63 

2,209.40 




25,080.91 







$925,359.46 $196,874.50 $1,122,233.96 
For property of Water Department see Water Works report. 



1937 

Population of city (1930), 

Valuation of city. 

Tax Assessed for the year. 

Rate of taxation. 

Rate of Union School District, 

Rate of sewer precinct. 

Total rate, 



25,228 

$32,195,052.00 

$1,290,330.81 

$26.13 per $1,000.00 

$12.68 

$.11 

$38.92 per $1,000.00 



VITAL STATISTICS 



VITAL STATISTICS 

Births Registered In the City of Concord for the Year Ending 
December 31, 1937. 

JANUARY 



Date 



Child's Name 



Father's Name 



Mother's 
Maiden Name 



Carol Ann P L 

Phyllis Jean F " 

I'riscilla Ann P " 

Beverly Bertha P " 

Joseph Pierre Claude M " 

Natalie Ellen P " 

Philip Joseph M " 

Joan Helen P " 

Sylvia Ann P " 

Olive Danice F " 

Robert Eugene M " 

Noreene Kay F " 

Clarence Edwin M " 

Joseph Francis M " 

Kobert Mahlon, Jr M " 

Shirley Ann F " 

Barbara Jean P " 

Jon Ilirani M " 

Constance Ann P " 

Joseph M " 

John M " 

William Sprague, Jr M " 

Robert Vincent M " 

Scott M" 

Donald Charles M " 

Beatrice F " 

Barbara Joan P " 

Shirley Jean F " 

Ruth Ann F " 

Marie Claire P " 

Patricia Yvonne P 

Lois Marie P " 

Paul Lawrence M " 

Joan Elise P " 

Richard Wilson, 2nd ....M " 

Patsy, Jr M " 

Joanna Alethea Mesier....F " 

Dorothy Charlotte P " 

Sandra Jean F 

Wilbur Scales M " 



Samuel S. Richmond Hazel Stewart 

George Edward Cooper.... Annabell Keaton 

Stanley Dexter Lena Cooper 

Erwin Albert Ames Mary Caroll 

Adrien Dorais Blanche Vigina 

Abraham D. Cushing .... Gladys Gale 

Maurice E. Welch ,_, Margaret R. Mclsaac 

Joseph Greenougih Helen McElroy 

William Pluff Alice Simard 

Oliver Danno Johnson.... Margaret Wells 

Albert Mayo Evelyn Stone 

George L. Stevens Flossie French 

Bernard C. Chase Doris A. Clark 

Joseph A. King Irene O'Donnell 

Rol)ert Mahlon Averill.... Mabel Elinor Stearns 

William P. Chenette Idia Marguerite Osier 

Arthur Whitehead Lillian Chadwicli 

Ross Lovejoy Annabelle Clark 

Guy Wells Gladys Cochran 

George P. Dickson Angle Cucciare 

George P. Dickson Angle Cucciare 

William Sprague Bailey.. Alice Lowe 

Richard Albert Gushing.. Ruth Fletcher 

Russell Ormsbee Berenice Wheeler 

Artliur ;\Iason Bullock .... Ruth Evelyn Lindciuist 

Asian Aslanian Antoinette Ankine 

Russell Keet'e Mary Frenette 

John E. V. Griffith Elizabeth Florence 

Eugene Whipperman Eleanor Gallant 

Ilormidas Provencher .... Imelda Carson 

Thomas M. Conley Adeline Audet 

(Jeorge P. Carroll Annabelle P. Perry 

Napoleon Francis Damour Margaret C. Norton 

Howe Anderson Myrtle Morteson 

Richard Wislon Cressy .. Pauline Butnian 

Patsy Alosa Jennie Sanzone 

Henry M.Spencer-Mounsey Agnes Ursula Joyce 

Gedeon Joseph Plamond.. Bessie Cass 

Calvin Irvin Clark Marie Hanson 

Will)ur S. Maxfleld Mary E. Chase 



BIRTHS 



245 



FEBRUARY 



Ihitr CTiild'sNamc 
L' Lawrence M L 

2 F " 

3 Helen F S 

4 Ray Nathalie F L 

5 James Duncan M " 

(•) John Russell M " 

(> David I.eo M '" 

7 Ruth Ann F " 

7 Patricia Lou F " 

8 Donald Mitchell M " 

!» Ernest Joseph M " 

11 William M " 

15 Richard Almy M" 

l(i Arthur Frederick, Jr M" 

17 David Ernest M" 

17 Ellen Jay F " 

17 Roland Steward M " 

17 William Thomas, Jr M" 

IS Marjorie Mae F " 

18 Norman Jason M " 

20 Sandra Elizabeth F " 

20 Jacqueline Ann F " 

22 Leila Kay F '" 

22 Joan Louise F " 

22 Rose Marie F " 

25 Evelyn (Jrace F " 

25 Yvonne Lucette F " 

26 Paul. Jr M " 

27 Judith Ann F " 

28 Richard Edward M " 



Mother's 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

Lloyd Amadou Robie .... Bernice Clarkson 

Amy F. Heath 

John Moore Rita Marie Moore 

Ansel R. Clay Frances A. McComb 

Edgar K. Towle Dorothy French 

G. Cleveland Percy Mary A. Hyland 

Leo Wilfred Guimond .... Beryle McLaughlin 

William J. liassonde Rosa A. Dion 

Edward E. Dustin Vera Gordon 

Herbert Carl Person .... Julia Mitchell 

Ira J. Auprey Myrtle F. Tilton 

Richard Woodward Iris Ford 

Lewis Donald Chafiin .... Elsie Randolph Mobley 

Arthur Frederick Sargent Gertrude Hurd 

John Gilbert Pike, Jr Louise Farrand 

Herbert Anderson Jennie Webster 

Glendon S. Carmichael .. Doris White 

William Thomas Ferns .. Mary Lecours 

Justin Sweatt Florence Goodrich 

Hyman Samuel Triesman Bessie Norton 

Frank H. LaRose Bertha Murray 

Leo Albert Lavoie Estelle Fontaine 

Francis Reagan Catherine Fields 

Leonal Nadeau Clara Flamond 

Ernest Chagnon Pauline Audette 

Clarence E. Glover Betty Tuttle 

Edgar Bourgault Albertine LaBreque 

Paul Murphy Dorothy Odette 

Maurice A. Rice Marjorie Dubois 

Harold Edw'd. Saltmarsh Dorothy Shepard 



MARCH 



1 Natalie F L 

1 F " 

1 Mary Carol F " 

1 Francis Vernon, 3rd M " 

1 Shirley Ann F " 

3 William Miles M " 

3 Anne Martina F " 

4 Joyce F " 

4 Marie Jacqueline F " 

4 Ethel May F " 

5 Philip Roy M " 

Marlene Frances F " 

7 Edward Paul M " 

7 Albert M " 

7 Judith Cook F " 



Patsy Santacruce Ceila Mary Pelillo 

Howard T. Ring Helen Belrose 

William L. Dailey Mary Burns 

Francis V. Lloyd, Jr Elisabeth Boardman 

William Joseph Flamand Evelyn Giguere 

Lynn Emery Potter Georgia Hudson 

Martin Carlen Edna Mae Sanborn 

Joseph Wm. Clement .... Doris Ethel Muzzey 

Emanuel Audet Doris Smith 

Joseph C. Boynton Dorothy E. Smith 

Edward C. Demers Pauline Roy 

Fred Whitman Gretchen lona Selvey 

Simon F. Stiles Nora Downey 

Max Martin Engle Eva Hinz 

William S. Stammers, Jr. P^laine Tincarre 



246 



CITY OF CONCORD 



MARCH— Concluded 



Date Child's Name 
y M " 

10 Gladys Mildred P " 

11 Douglas Emmons M" 

11 Sally Ann F " 

12 Dean Felton M" 

13 Guy, Jr M " 

1?> Robert Peter M" 

14 Ruth Jane F " 

ir> Sidney Clayton M " 

15 Ronald Joseph M" 

15 Michael Edmund M" 

17 Norma Elizabeth F " 

17 Theadore William M " 

17 George Louis M" 

IS Carole Jane F " 

1!) Robert Andrew M " 

20 Roberta Irene F " 

20 LeRoy Henry, Jr M " 

21 Shirley Kay F " 

2.S Elaine Ruth F " 

2:'. Patricia Pauline F " 

23 Robert Burton, Jr M " 

26 Nancy Gertrude F " 

26 Theresa Bernadette F " 

20 James Vincent M " 

27 Anne Hihbard F " 

28 Leon Edward M " 

20 Clara May F " 

20 Jonathan M " 

30 Diane F " 

30 F •' 

31 Richard Joseph M " 



Mother's 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

Delora Ilussey 

Glen Spooner Helen Marcy 

Walter Elmer Brown .... Marian Young 

Patrick Griffith Margaret Wriglit 

Chandler F. Ordway Hazel McLaughlin 

Guy Alosa Theresa Federico 

Milton Shapiro Blanche Sherman 

Robert Matott Anna Guyette 

Edward Clayton Ellis.... Jessie Rogers 
Octave Joseph Dulude .... Mildred Dudley 

Edmund Parenteau Winifred Higgins 

Norman Perkins Elizabeth Reddy 

Guy R. Strachan Maud T. Carson 

George A. Mercier Anne ^Nlarie Gallieu 

Malcom A. Spoor Madelyn Calkin 

Walter Andrew Felker.... Marian Davenport 

Ira O. Thorley Alberta Robitgille 

LeRoy Henry English .... Rachel Bartlett 

Errol S. Morse Dorothy Flanders 

Clarence Stoneham Gladys Rice 

Raymond Preve Hilda Rabideau 

Robert Burton Johnson.. Beatrice Reade 

Walter E. Kenneson Ruth Foley 

Burdette Pebbles Yvonne Audet 

John Intinarelle Hazel Turner 

Harry (William) Shafer.. Alyce Hibbard 

Edward F. True Daisy Miller 

Leon Webster Towle Florence Seavey 

Walter Earle Royer Jean Gove 

•Joseph Henry Dearborn.. Hilda Orr 

Hugh Malcolm Galbraith Marjorie Scaddin 

Peter J. Lessard Eva J. LaPlante 



APRIL 



2 Joyce Elizabeth F L 

4 Roger Arthur M " 

5 Diane F " 

5 Arthur Rockwell M " 

6 Ronald Peter M " 

6 Thomas Joseph, Jr M " 

6 John Edward M " 

Mary Amelia F " 

Evelyn Lillian F " 

Carolyn Louise F " 

Betty Jean P " 

10 Walter Crooker, Jr M " 

11 Antoine Joseph Desire. ...M " 



Floyd Raymond Helen • Small 

Roger Fred Durgin Alice Grace Valley 

Richard J. C. Datson .... Beatrice McDonald 

Arthur Louis More Dorothy Elma Rockwell 

Wendell J. Butt Katherine Crabb 

Thomas Joseph Halligan Alice Katherine Hanley 

John H. Wing Marion Cirves 

Wesley Franklin Rand.... Pearl Lena Swain 

Lloyd M. Saltniarsh Katherine Sullivan 

liloyd M. Saltmarsh Katherine Sullivan 

Wilbur E. Harris Doris M. York 

Walter Crooker Sterling.. Grace Aldrich Romanos 

Joseph Bolduc Genoria Mary Cote 



BIRTHS 



247 



APRII^Concluded 



Date Child's Name 

11 Kobert George M " 

12 Francis George M '" 

12 Joyce Trussell F " 

12 Perley Glen M " 

13 Judith F '• 

14 Robert Edwin M " 

15 Jean F " 

15 John Harold M " 

17 David William Kaiser. .. .M " 
19 Evelyn Beverly F " 

19 Sandra Grace F " 

20 Elaine Evelyn F " 

21 John M" 

22 Ann Gertrude F " 

24 Harold Lee M S 

25 Nancy Louise F L 

20 Henry Dominie M ' 

20 Marie Yvonne F ' 

20 George Ronald M ' 

27 William Conrad M ' 

28 Marcel Raymond M ' 

29 Shirley James M ' 

30 Raymond Joseph Leonel M ' 
30 Jane Elizabeth F ' 



Mother's 
Fntha-'s Name Maiden Name 

Georgetta R. Wallace 

Francis Eugene McKenna Carmen Alice Gilbert 

Joseph G. Annan June Stone 

John L. Creighton Sylvia S. Poor 

Frank E. Colby. Jr Hazel M. Myers 

Paul W. Bunnell Florence M. Johnson 

Eugene M. Callahan Pauline Oyston 

John Kirl< Esther Smith 

William Hobart Sumner.. Jeanette Swenson 

Max Levine Rose Soloman 

George F. Ordway Grace A. Elliott 

Edgar M. Reed Pauline R. Towle 

George H. Plummer Ruth Holt 

George Morrill Mabel Chapman 

Allyn Nelson Tucker .... Rubia May Huckins 

Charles Leonard Allen.... Beatrice Esma Little 

Henry Hamel Ida Auger 

Joseph L'Hereux Eva Drouin 

George Thomas Kee Dorothy MacMartin 

Raymond Earl English.... Helen Tasker 

John Victor Amrol Marie Michand 

Arlene Moulton 

Domina Reil Edna M. Gladu 

Guy Webster Mann Bertha Angwin 



MAY 



1 Russell ML 

3 Gunnar Ives M " 

3 Christine Mary F " 

3 Raymond M " 

4 Myriel F " 

4 Patricia Caroline F " 

5 Marylin Jane F " 

Richard M " 

Henry Pearson M " 

David Brower M " 

Clifford Alfred M" 

7 Robert Charles M " 

8 Kenneth Ray M " 

9 M S 

9 Louise Mae F L 

10 Dawn Corene F " 

12 Thomas Francis, Jr M " 

13 Nancy Craig F " 

13 Leon Murrice M " 

13 Maxine May F " 

13 Elinor Ann F " 



Arthur Bishop Harriett Duckworth 

Henry Ives Baldwin Birgit Sverdrup 

Arthur Lawrence Foy .... Lillian McAteer 

John Caswell Lillian Rousseau 

Francis John Crowley .... Gladys Angwin 

Rudolph Knoetzsch Felecia Pelczarski 

Robert Gould Hamlin .... Hope Tenney 

Mabel Taylor 

Paul Mock Winifred Kimball 

Howard H. Shedd Elizabeth H. Brower 

Perley Savoy Irene Hooper 

Charles Henry Flanders.. Lillie Demour 

James Madison Howe .... Marian Helen Williams 

Hartwell Atwood Blanche Stevens 

Russel Fife Edna Lizzie Child 

William Howard Cook.... Zelma Cilley 

Thomas F. Richardson.... Sarah Riley 

David Freeman Dudley .. Florence Elizabeth Bayliss 

Murrice Parker Ilene Murdougli 

Florence Barnes 

Bradley Callahan Alice Agrodonia 



248 



CITY OF CONCORD 



MAY— Concluded 



Date ( hild's Name 

14 Betty Jane P 

14 David Warren M ' 

14 Graham James M 

15 Frances Jean F 

15 William Henry, Jr M 

1(5 Kenneth Warren M 

18 Carole Louise F 

l!t James Robert M ' 

19 Alvin Freeland M 

20 Judith May F 

21 Allen Raymond M 

21 Judith Audrey F 

22 Shirley Barbara F 

24 Arlene Margaret F 

24 Betty Elaine F 

24 Joan Elaine F 

24 Carol Lois F 

25 Lawrence Edward, 2nd....M 

26 David Chaloner M 

27 Fay Elaine F 

28 Judith Estelle F 

30 — — M 

31 Ruth Esther F 



Mother's 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

George A. Drew Ethel Maud LaDuke 

Nathan Wicker Ilylan .... Mar.iorie Van Valkenburgh 

Wilfred Osborne Louise Doherty 

Carl A. Henrikson Dorothy R. Arnold 

William O'Clair Fern Woodbury 

Kenneth Stickney Ward.. Christine Parmenter 

Nelson LeClaire Norma LeCoy 

Stanley Mancini Evelyn Gagnan 

Alvin F. llurlbutt Beth Lovett 

Herbert Louis Wilder .... Eveline Struthers 

Quincy V. Sinclair Gertrude R. Foote 

Clifford Sawyer Dorothy Gove 

Edgar W. Locke Irenea Cantara 

Clayton Asli Margaret Bernard 

Frederick Greele.v Beverly Ramsey 

Richard L. Paige Doris Rand 

William Towne Caswell.. Olive Townsend 

Lawrence Edward Cotter Lois Marian Cliase 

MacLean John Gill Marie Florence Chaloner 

Harvey Clifford Chadwick Evangeline LeCasseur 

Charles Burton Richards Estelle Page 

John Mercier '. Elizabeth Lyonhood 

Frank Kenney Grace Ballard 



JUNE 



1 John Joseph M L 

1 M" 

1 F " 

2 M S 

2 William Allen M L 

3 Miriam F " 

5 Stewart Goodwin M " 

6 David Arthur M " 

7 William Everett M " 

7 Sylvia Mary F " 

8 David Frank M " 

8 June Eleanor F " 

10 Louis Edward M " 

10 F " 

11 Kathleen Myra F " 

12 Betty Ann F " 

12 Sarah June F " 

12 Joseph Robert M " 

14 Alice Nina F " 

15 Kathleen F " 

15 John Edward M " 

15 Ronald Dana, Jr M " 



Patrick H. Donahue Bertha Plankey 

Christ Maletes Helen Harkophlias 

Albert Jobin Aimee LaFlamme 

•Wilfred Lucier Alice Shagnon 

Rodger Tyler Elizabeth Allen 

Kenneth W. Hazen Catherine F. Savoy 

Stewart G. Potter Sylvia Osgood 

Arthur Kimball Kelley.... Mabel Isabel Howe 

Everett Lawrence Pauline Briggs 

Arvo Sou.ianen Mildred Delaney 

Frank Elliott Bernice Beede 

Frank E. Woodbury, Jr... Eleanor LaMora 

James Newton Aanna Jos 

Thomas ^Nlamos Katherine Zeras 

Perry P. Young Dorothea Goodwin 

Levi Paul Dow Frances Roach 

■ Bernice Heath 

Albert G. Gagne Cora Causler 

Earl H. Griffin Etta Yeaton 

Stanley Dame Mildred Estabrook 

Wm. M. Cook Mary F. Hallinan 

Ronald Dana Daniels .... Nellie Ward 



BIRTHS 



249 



JUNE— Concluded 



15 
15 
](> 
IS 
1!) 
21 
21 
21 



tc Child's Name 

Frank George M " 

Clifton Mark M " 

Barbara Elizabeth P " 

Robert Chesley M " 

M" 

Ruth Elizabeth P " 

Roy Osgood M '" 

.Tacqualine Rita P 

Diane Lovejoy F " 

Kenneth James M " 

William Prancis M " 

Paul Roland M " 

Marcia June P '' 

Joyce Ellen P " 

Shirley P S 



Mother's 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

Georjre B. Merrill Doris I'nderwood 

Clifton Ralph Bohanon.. F'lorenee Dunhal 

Harvey Labbe Mary Godbout 

Chesley W. Weatherbee.. Marion Bachelder 

John Jackman Gladys Houlberj; 

(reorfje Sunnicliffe Duke.. Evelyn ^l. Murray 

Ibrey Gilbert Olive Milligan 

William L. Downes Mary E. Savage 

Earle X. Cutter May Gwendolyn Chesley 

Prank II. Saltmarsh Leona Huntoon 

Joseph Edward Walsh.... Florence Venne 

Philip Brasley Blanche Gagnon 

Fred H. Brown. Jr ^Nlarjorie Wheeler 

Charles Robert Wheeler.. Josephine Craytf)n 

Olaf Wells Ada Davis 



JULY 



Robert Alfred M L 

Patricia Audrey F " 

Madaline Eva F " 

James Francis M " 

Betsy Morrison P " 

Henry M " 

Joann Anita F '" 

Cec^le Margaret F " 

Frederick Jackson M '' 

Donald Henry M " 

Richard Norman M " 

Edward Raymond M " 

Marylin Ruth P " 

Sylvia Ann P " 

F S 

Warren M " 

Lester Loren M L 

Bruce Porter M " 

Charles Noel M '' 

Elizabeth Ann P " 

Victor Joseph M '' 

Norman Esdras M " 

Susan F " 

Beverly Jean F " 

Sandra Mae F " 

Brownlo Christie M " 

Jane F " 

Gerard Robert M " 

Robert Donald M " 

Richard Stephen M " 



Charles Edwin Earle .... Lois Blerrill 

Arthur Taylor Edythe Ilorton 

Victor R. Girard Blanche Wilcotte 

Prancis Edwin Robinson.. Elizabeth Scudder 

John W. Thornton Nellie Mudge 

Phillip Cournoyer Dorilla Masse 

Charles West Lois Jones 

Arthur Joseph Daneault Fabiola Cantara 

Fred Garside Madeline Hackett 

Omer A. Guignard Blanche R. Chenette 

Norman Barton Evelyn Divest 

Albert J. Labrie Helen C. Foley 

J. Emery Hoadley Virginia Douglas 

Sylvio Vezina Arlene Massey 

Jonathan Piper Evangeline (Mven 

Loren Lester Putnam .... Ilia Stacey 

Harold Spencer Ramsey.. Marjorie Beagarie 

William B. Goldthwalte Dorothea Wetmore 

Noel Dore Doros Hanaford 

Robert Whittaker Elizabeth Newhall 

Victor A. Tremblay Clotilda A. Comi 

Aime Drapeau Emily Chateauneuf 

Paul Steven Otis Ethel Scott 

Carrol Butman Muriel Bryant 

Donald Bonnette ^Miriam Carmichael 

Edward P. Abbott Theda Gray 

George Noyes Elva Preble 

Omer Grandmaison Emma Lefebure 

Robert V. Clement Laura Drolet 

Alfred Bibeau Stephanie Hebert 



250 



CITY OF CONCORD 



JULY— Concluded 



Da 
lit 
20 
20 



te Child's Name 

James Robert M " 

Grace Estelle F " 

Beverly Ann F " 

June Ann F " 

Barbara F " 

Rochelle Evelyn F " 

Katherine Agnes F " 

Mary Ellen F " 

Robert Alan M " 

Susan Albright F " 

Winifred Ruth F " 

Phyllis Olive F " 

Suzanne F L 

Richard Ernest M " 

Patricia Ann F " 

Clarence Albert M " 

F " 

John Albin M " 

Cheryl Ann F " 

Stephen M " 

Beverly Ann F " 

Donald Morris M " 

Shirley Anne F " 

Raymond Josepli M " 

Jerold Lee M " 

Jane Rankin F " 

Myrsine Paul F " 

Robert Allen M " 

Joan Elizabeth F " 

Mary Elizabeth F " 

Mildred Gladys F " 

Mary Ellen F " 

Antonett ^Nlarie F " 

Barbara Jean Keyes F " 

Richard Franklin M " 

Mary Dolores F " 

Caroline Eunice F " 

Leo Paul M " 

Theodore Thomas M " 

Joseph M " 

Dorothy Estella F " 

Allan Norman M " 

Richard Putnam M " 

Frederick Gerald, Jr M " 

Lois Barbara F " 

Anita Delia F " 



Mother's 

Father's Name Maiden Name 

Wesley James Weir Anne Bisson 

Edmund Barle Cutting.... Grace Willuir 

Frederick Andrew Luella Morrison 

John B. Dennis Ethel E. Mason 

Irving Chase Mary Shugrue 

Albert Plioenix Frances Pearson 

Alvin Cook Julia Fisher 

Leonard S. Hill Alice Merrill 

Russell Wilcox ^luriel (iituere 

Ralph Taylor Esther Chandler 

Lindsay 'SI. Shaw (irace E. Melvin 

Ralph S. Maxwell Ellen E. Street 

AUGUST 

Russel Webster Olive Ayer 

Walter Ford Adelle Osborne 

William Jolin McCarthy Pauline Drouin 

Clarence Albert Lyon .... Stella Fesette 

Earl C. Geer Leona T. Auprey 

Albin Sanborn Bernice Richardson 

Warren D. Miller Hazel Burtt 

Burton Horn Annie Pierce 

Herbert Locke Mary Home 

Everett Nelson Kinsley .. Helen Morris 

Fred D. Baker Katie I'atten 

Sliirley Carl Knapp Ella Hammond 

John Low Babson Jean Carruthers 

Russell Blake McGirr .... Bernice Stammers 

Paul Christy Anna Kypritte 

Allen Ingills Lewis Alda Goodrum 

Alfred Mihachik Ruth Elizabeth Caverly 

(iordon Earle Moore .... Nan Gorda Bean 

Leonard Powell Doris Hoyt 

William Joseph Manning Helmi Skarp 

Antliony Ceriello Rose Barasso 

Gene Hamel Bessie Keyes 

Arthur S. Groves Lina Knox 

Oliver Charpentier Dolores Cornier 

Garold Brown Doris Blaisdell 

Leo Paul Emond Estelle Poisson 

Lewis Frederick Braley.. Betty Eagles 

Ernest Boisvert Aurore Boucher 

Harold Drew Dorothy Moody 

Norman .Teanotte Evelyn Messier 

Richard I'utnam Currier Eleiinor Tozier 

Fred'k. G. Whitman, Jr. Frances Lawrie 

Leo Joseph Gagne Ruth Nelson 

Edgar Baron Marie Ange Lacroix 



BIRTHS 



251 



AUGUST— Concluded 



Date Child's Name 

lis Sandra Jean P " 

li!) John Henry M " 

30 Caroline I^ouise F " 

30 Roehelle Jean F " 

31 Ann Marie F " 

31 F •' 

1 F L 

1 Robert Ernest M " 

."! Sarah F " 

3 Nylene Nester F " 

3 Rosalie Elizabeth F " 

4 Diane Anita F " 

.J Barbara Florence F " 

5 Erdine Anona F " 

.") Robert Rudolph M " 

r> Robert William M " 

(■> Florence Virginia F " 

7 Judith Ann F " 

S (Jerald Stevens M " 

S Mary Elsie F " 

8 Irving James M " 

8 Rufus Ripley M" 

8 Joan Lois F " 

!t James Roy, Jr M " 

!» Katherine Belle F " 

10 Robert Leslie M" 

1(1 William Robert M" 

10 Sandra F " 

11 F " 

11 Alan Frank M" 

12 Harris Tyler M" 

12 Barbara Adine F " 

12 Carol Helen F " 

12 Henry Walter M " 

13 Carol Ann F " 

13 Ann London F " 

13 Warren Oliver M " 

1(5 Susan F " 

10 Robert Arthur M" 

IS John Stephen M " 

19 Constance Evelyn F " 

20 Leon Francis M " 

21 Mary Jane F " 

21 Patricia Belle F " 

21 F " 

21 Joan F " 



Mot her', 1 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

Russell Eric Hokinson.... Isabella Courage 

Raymond Henry Oliver.. Weltha Louise Belrose 

Oliver Wallace Isabelle Kidston 

Joseph I. Desmarais Helen B. Huston 

Albert L. Drew Ruby Johnson 

Raymond G. Sawtelle .... Belle Rivers 



SEPTEMBER 



William R. Foote Martha N. Shepard 

Ernest P. Dustin Evelyn M. Home 

George C. Sumner Helen S. Butson 

Merton E. Davis Mildred H. Ingraham 

Harry F. Reagan Elizabeth L. Dyer 

Melviii W. Worthen Marion L. Silverthorne 

Lewis Senise Ruth 

Robert Edward Tilton .. Anona Mount 

Rudolph O. Lefebvre .... Clara E. Desmarais 

Ralph William Spofford.. Florence Holland 

Edgar Eugene Tenney.... Violet Alexander 

Wm. J. McFarland, Jr... Ruth I. Beane 

Warren S. Higgins Arline E. Moulton 

Milton Francis Lovell .... Elsie Perkins 

James A. Spead Vivian F. Kimton 

Dr. Duncan Chalmers.... Marion H. Ripley 

Frank A. Abbott Virginia L. Allen 

James Roy Jordan Marguerite Brown 

Ray L. Tucker Altha L. Currier 

Leslie C. Knowlton Lena Gingras 

(iilbert (Jallian Rose Mahair 

Myron J. Hazen Barbara Cushman 

I'aul H. Provost Lena L. Gibeau 

Donald T. Blanchard .... Jane Paul 

Raymond J. Barnard .... Ruth Farnham 

pjrwin Allen Chase Adine Nelson 

George Edward Barbour Marjorie Weatherbee 

Walter Bourque Ora Gregoire 

Joseph Sandciuist Doris Cheney 

Lawrence E. Russell Geneva F. London 

LeRoy E. Whittemore.... Margaret Mobbs 

Richard A. Morton Mildred Dole 

Wilfred Thibeault Alice Leduc 

Robert Foley Marion McFadyen 

Charles W. Gaskell Louise Bartlette 

Melvin W. Chase Marguerite Harry 

Edwin Herbert Firth .... Mary Murphy 

William A. Mahoney .... Anna Alice INIoxley 

Louis Manais Xanthoula Bacogianes 

John Robert Selig Martha C. Wallace 



252 



CITY OF CONCORD 



SEPTEMBER— Concluded 



Date ( hild's Name 

22 Elizabeth Janet P " 

22 Susan Ann F "' 

2:J M '■ 

23 Sandra Louise F '" 

23 Ijdrraine .Tanis F " 

24 Alan Everett M "" 

24 Mary Sophia F " 

24 Carol Ellen F " 

25 Peter York M " 

25 Joseph Alfred, 2nd M " 

26 Bstelle Jeanne F " 

2fi John Francis. Jr M "' 

20 Richard Whitney M '" 

29 Joanne Helen F " 



Mother's 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

William (Jeorse Coderre.. Olive Wallace 

Oeorjre A. Batchelder .... Marion Morrill 

(ieorfre F. Abbott Ruth I. Jackson 

Harold J. Jones Norah Streeter 

Morison John Batchelder Mildred Wheeler 

William Roland SarjitMit Edna Zambs 

Kenneth Smith Minard .. Dorothy Patten 

Floyd L. Avery Alberta (Jilman 

Theodore Russell Lovejoy Esther Emery York 

Joseph Alfred Garceau.. Barbara Robinson 

Edward J. Morin Fabiola LeBrun 

John Francis Power Grace J. Coughlin 

I^eon J. Northup Mildred Whitney 

Joseph Crasin Helen Bills 



OCTOBER 



1 Christina F L 

3 Barbara Ann F "" 

3 Larry Keith M " 

3 David George M " 

3 Roberta May F " 

5 James David M " 

6 Elizabeth Ann F " 

7 Ronald M " 

7 Harold Frederick. Jr M " 

7 Muriel Marie F " 

7 Ronald Herbert M " 

8 Daniel M " 

8 Louise Ann F "' 

8 Carol Ann ...F " 

8 Adelmor George M " 

8 Robert Doddridge M " 

10 Walter Everett M ' 

11 Carolyn Beatrice F " 

11 Sylvia Ann F " 

12 Shirley Frances F " 

12 Joanne Louise F " 

12 Bertha Mary F " 

12 Richard Francis M " 

13 Eugene Nelson M " 

15 Anita Theresa F " 

15 Stanley Fred M" 

16 M " 

16 M S 

17 Hope F L 

IS F " 

18 Duane Currier M '' 



Charles Fanares Mary Couropoulous 

Vincent D. Heath Dorothy Gallien 

James Lawrence Eaton.. Lauretta Cote 

Philip O. Parenteau .... Jeanette Ayot 

Robert William King .... Marjorie Provencher 

James I'aveglio Phyllis Pinsonneault 

Carl Olaf Larson Agnes E. M. Anderson 

Maurice Damour Grace Duval 

Harold Frederick Logan Hazel Edmunds 

Frederick Bean Elsie Harriman 

Herbert G. Hardy Thelma Porter 

Daniel Anthony McDonald Florence Bouche 

Paul Francis Venne Mary Crawford 

Arthur Boyce Kathleen Speed 

Adelmor George Boisvert Ida Fleury 

Doddridge R. Wheeler.... Helen Buckley 

Walter Everett Darrah.. Sarah Moody 

Herbert B. Pettes Beatrice Leech 

Ronald P. Knee Yvonne M. Frenette 

(ieorge A. Wright Alice Rosina Baker 

Burton L. Bailey Melissa A. Pedeare 

Adam A. Mitchell Laura E. Green 

Fred A. White Mary F. Vacaro 

Francis N. Mitchel Doreen Venne 

Francis Sinotte Florence Poirier 

Fred L. Cook Cora Woodbiary 

Howard C. Potter Edith M. Balloo 

Percy LaTulipe Helen Brown 

Charles C. Latham Eva L- Swain 

Bertram Cecil Mason .... Clara Thompson 

Duane C. Gordon Marion Miner 



BIRTHS 



253 



OCTOBER— Concluded 



Da 

20 
23 
23 
23 
24 
24 
28 
2'J 
2'J 
31 
31 



tc Child's Name 

Uorrine Louise P " 

Peter Joseph M " 

Margaret Irene F " 

Sliirley Ann F " 

Edward Wayne M " 

Richard Frank M " 

Lawrence James M " 

Robert Lyle M " 

Shirley Ann F " 

Leroy Walter M " 

Sylvia Irene F " 

Robert Jordan M L 

Warren John M " 

Judith May F " 

Richard Roy M " 

Robert Maurice M " 

Beverly Ann F " 

Margery Ann F " 

David Herbert M " 

Carol Marion Fl " 

Arthur John Charles M S 

Nancy Ann F L 

Kenneth Leonard M " 

Rita Catherine F " 

William Lamson, 3rd ....M " 

Richard M " 

Jans McKenzie M " 

Ernest Andree M " 

Mary Pauline P " 

■ M" 

Barbara Ellen F " 

Robert Stanley M " 

Lois Ellen P " 

— F " 

Roger Le^wis M " 

Gertrude Mary P " 

Blianor May P " 

Xancy Davis P " 

Edward M S 

Darrell Cass M L 

Virginia Gail F " 

Robert Albert M " 

M" 

Michael Thomas M " 

M" 

Jeffrey Adams M " 



Mother's 

Father's Name Maiden Name 

Lloyd Joseph LaQuire.... Helen Whittier 

Joseph I). Blanchard .... Harriett B. Bryant 

Robert E. Coleman Prudence I. Merchant 

Cyrus Elmer Young Elizabeth J. Henderson 

Eugene Lambert Louise ITord 

Rocco Dicicco Alice Chaput 

Joseph John Keenan .... Muriel Strachan 

George J. Urlwin Esther Hasty 

Leo Begin Beatrice M. LaCroix 

Harrison S. Sargent .... Mona F. Porter 

Oliver R. Mayo Marie L. LaBonte 



NOVEMBER 



9 
10 
12 
13 

15 
15 
16 
18 
18 
IS 
18 
18 
1!) 
20 
20 



Robert William Howley.. Shirley Jordan 

John Henry Virgin Norah Roy 

Harold P. Lufkin Dawn Reed 

Michael Barry Berniee Wilkins , , 

.Melvin Hines Eva LeDue 

William J. Bailey Alice E. Russell 

Eugene F. Rohwedder .... Dorothy Keen 

Rev. Joy H. Hammond.... Helen J. Godwin 

Robert A. Vitagliano .... Beatrice Hewitt 

Ralph Arthur Pepin Rose Alise Gaudreau 

I'aul E. Clark Helen Sparrow 

Harry M. Corson Gladys E. Reil 

Leo D. Berard Josephine Pelillo 

William L. Stockman. Jr. Natalie Jones 

James Bernard Halligan Dorothy Hammond 

Jans Julius Carlen Kathryn McKenzie 

Honore J. Denoncourt .... Louise A. Crevier 

Earl E. Hoitt Lena M. A. Bourdon 

Leo A. Murray Agnes M. Breen 

Charles Louis Beck Ellen Olson 

Raymond O. Fife Adeline E. Shattuck 

Frank Buckley Arlene Colburn 

Harold Turgeon Theresa Audette 

Natalie E. Hill 

Octave A. Bellrose Alice V. Bellrose 

Raymond F. Phelps Eleanor M. Bassett 

Warren H. Greene Marion Davis 

Vernon Gerard Mary Briggs 

Allen M. Larrabee Doris F. Cass 

Leroy Charles Smith .... Eugenia Lessard 

Albert Guemond Jean Guemond 

Roland C. Fifleld Margaret E. Smith 

Thomas Jamanais Pagona Sakelarion 

Harley J. French Sarah M. Heath 

Alfred Randolpli Mills.... Elizabeth Adams 



254 



CITY OF CONCORD 



NOVEMBER— Concluded 



Date Child's Name 

2.S Frederick Cushman M ' 

L'8 :Miehael John M 

12'J Marcia Anne F 

lilt Carol Rose F ' 

2!) Joan Emily F ' 



Mother's 
Father's Name Maiden Name 

Lincoln H. Berry Ruth Foster 

llolton E. White Margaret Faucher 

Curtis W. Jones Elizabeth Provencal 

Harold B. Drescher Rose H. Copson 

John A. Linquist Ruth Tuttle 



DECEMBER 



1 Alice Elizabeth F L 

2 Robert Bruce M " 

2 F S 

2 Bruce Ackland M L 

3 Judith Ann F " 

4 Charles Calvin, 3rd M " 

5 Donald Aime M " 

5 Robert Emmet M " 

T) Sandra Jean F " 

5 June Dale F " 

David Foster M " 

7 Robert Christopher M " 

8 Nancy Ruth F " 

10 Virginia Ruth F " 

10 Beth Elaine F " 

11 Shirley Cecilia F " 

12 Harold Emery, Jr M " 

13 Frank Dexter M " 

14 Elizabeth Ann F " 

15 Carolyn F " 

15 David Gordon M" 

10 David Paul M" 

18 Cynthia Ann F " 

18 Robert Fitch M " 

21 Beverly F " 

21 John Arthur M " 

21 Nancy Ann F " 

22 Robert William M " 

20 M" 

20 Peter Arthur M " 

27 Helen Morris F " 

2!) Beverly Carolyn F " 

2!) Eleanor Louise F " 

30 Joseph Lewis M " 



Carroll E. Garland Julia Wilson 

— Ruth Elizabeth McNulty 

Harvey Hollins Irene Darrocli 

Charles W. Brown Barbara E. Eddy 

Edmund Chase Catherine Allen 

Charles C. Norris, 2nd.. Hazel Poquin 

Aime Neven Mabel Wells 

Robert Emmet Dwyer .... Ann McCombly 

Joseph T. Walker Winnifred L. Crouin 

I'hilip J. Jennato jHelen A. Greeley 

Merle Densmore Dorothy Sprague 

John Christopher Wallace Helen McDaniels 

Albert Tonkin Hazel Perrin 

Henry J. Welcome Beatrice J. Sweeney 

Carl T. Bruno Audrey J. Hart 

Henry James Long Elizabeth Finn 

Harold Emery Diamond.. Yvonne A. Minot 

Thomas Harvey Johnson Isabelle Downs 

Francis Crowley Anna Chapman 

Kenneth W. Hayward .... Bernice Anne Rapsis 

John Warren Quigley .... Gladys Geer 

Stearns H. Whitney Margaret Gaspir 

Melvin G. Whitehouse .. Marjorie Parsons 

Robert William Loomis.. Margarite Adelaide Fitch 

John B. Arnold Laura Chapman 

Arthur George Clark .... Kathryn Lair 

Jerry Raduazzo Hilda Tromblay 

William A. Gamache .... Odena Marie Gilbert 

Guy Edward Kenerson .. Clara Burroughs 

Arthur O. Lyford Gertrude C. Tilton 

William Prince Isabel Manson 

Eldon W. Hardy Arleine Dalton 

Howard Edgar Flanders.. Doris Davis 

Erman Lewis Gibeau .... Alice Wilcott 



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DEATHS 267 

Deaths Registered in the City of Concord for the Year 
ending December 31, 1937 



JANUARY 



FEBRUARY 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


fl 


13 


!) 


24 


3 


12 


5 


14 



Date Name Years 

1 Emerson Augustus Kimball 69 

2 Harry Morrison Cheney 76 

4 Marietta S. Brown 88 

5 Harriet M. Toof 90 

7 William H. Putnam 83 

7 Mary Gardner 65 

9 Ellis E. Nash 59 

9 Rodney Austin Gate 

9 Bridget Winifred Dufresne 65 

10 Fred G. Crowell 64 

14 Anna McKenna 79 

17 Jesse G. Hinds 63 

17 Paul Lassonde 13 

18 Fred C. Dow 71 

25 Mary Fanny Nutter 79 

27 Mary Ann Murphy 68 

28 Bridget Gill 80 

29 William H. Prindall, 3rd 13 

29 John Francis Twomey 76 

29 William H. Bradley 62 

29 Harry Louis Rollins 53 



o 


13 


6 


6 


6 


16 


11 


10 


1 


11 




30 


11 


9 


6 


17 


9 


30 


2 


24 


5 


28 


11 


7 




7 



Date Name Years 

2 Lydia Malcom Worrall 75 

2 Emma F. Rowe 76 

7 Mildred E. Royce 36 

7 Emma Frances Thompson 77 

8 Anna Louise Forsberg 72 

8 Jerome Sawyer Runnells 83 

10 John A. Whittaker 67 

11 Joseph C. Bourgault 33 

13 Cora E. Leighton 56 

14 Almyr J. Shepard 78 

16 Ruby Chase 49 

16 Milicent Avena Frost 47 

17 Ida Frances Quint 82 

15 Ray E. Chase 56 

18 James Albert Massie, 3rd 26 

21 Hazel B. Weeks 40 

21 Elizabeth Rachel Haggett 58 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


4 


1 


4 


22 


7 


29 


7 




9 


29 


2 


9 


4 




3 


2 


6 


12 


1 




5 


19 


11 


5 


4 


9 


5 


28 


5 


4 


1 


19 


1 


12 



268 



CITY OF CONCORD 



FEBRUARY— Concluded 



Date Name Years 

23 William Pennington 93 

24 Laura Ann Symonds 89 

25 Lawrence H. Desmond 65 

25 Edith F. (Beane) Teulon 49 

28 Alice Young 56 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


10 


6 


10 


15 


3 


21 


4 


27 


9 


13 



MARCH 



Date Name Yean 

1 Florence Daggett Braddock 36 

1 Ring 

2 Minnie O'Brien 77 

3 Caroline Emma Baker 81 

8 William Hulsart 72 

8 Patsy Freo 38 

9 Sarah Coveney 83 

9 Oscar William Plummer 42 

13 Frances Holden Hall 77 

14 Daniel B. Wetherbee 28 

17 Frederick A. Rushlow 50 

18 Sarah Augusta George 88 

23 Melissa A. Perry IS 

23 Marion H. Nighswander 38 

27 Jennie Lynn Colby 71 

29 Jennie M. Savage 67 

31 Winnifred E. Thompson 68 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


3 


29 


5 


10 




26 


11 


7 


6 


10 


8 


6 


3 


26 


7 


9 


5 


3 


7 


6 




2 


7 


12 


6 


8 


4 


6 


7 


8 



APRIL 



Date Nam,e Yean 

3 Gloria T. Neff 11 

5 Frank E. Towle 80 

5 Nellie Rose B. Braley 54 

6 Margaret C. Stanley 60 

7 Frank William Sargent 68 

11 Joseph Masse 77 

14 Jules J. LeBlanc 75 

16 Fred Kimball Blodgett 69 

24 Ludmile Spanarel Levansaleur 86 

25 Frederick C. Lyford 75 

26 Fred Sherman Heath 71 

26 John K. Kalagian 76 

30 Grace Ellen Foster 81 



AGE 




'onths 


Days 


3 


14 


6 


5 


7 


4 


9 


25 


6 


22 


1 


7 


2 


27 


4 


14 


7 


27 


6 


5 


2 


6 


1 


2 



DEATHS 



269 



MAY 



Date Name Years 

1 A. Lorena Lang 83 

1 Ellen Dwyer 87 

3 Isola Lapierre 77 

3 Alice C. McKee 67 

4 Julia Ann Wilkins 74 

8 William Florence 57 

10 Mary E. Girard 74 

12 Josephine H. Dimond 88 

14 Mary E. Cole 75 

14 Charles E. Palmer 81 

16 Minnie E. Dow 77 

22 Catherine Agnes Clark 73 

22 Joseph Edward McGuire 26 

24 Flora A. Maclntire 83 

25 Daniel Crowley 68 

20 Francis B. Wadleigh 76 

28 Alonzo W. Elliott 83 



AGE 




'onths 


Dayx 


9 


10 


9 




1 


29 


11 


10 


6 


10 


5 




10 


17 




13 


11 




1 


10 


5 


14 


5 


7 


10 


1 


10 


21 


9 


.... 


4 


4 



JUNE 



Date Name Years 

2 Mark E. Warriner 76 

2 Mary A. Dowd 80 

3 Catherine Branswell 58 

5 Lucia 

6 Louis P. Gillette 80 

8 Mary G. Moses 73 

17 Henry J. Fortier 32 

28 Henry Howard Ash 70 

30 Walter Delmont Nutting 68 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


5 


23 




25 


7 


24 


3 


23 


9 


12 


1 


12 


6 


1 


8 


24 



JULY 



Date Name Years 

1 Cleave Worthley Barnard 76 

2 Samuel Washington Briggs 77 

2 Harriet Belle Mitchell 65 

2 Margaret J. Wood 71 

2 Sarah E. Lougee 93 

7 Frank Belisle 52 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


1 


20 


1 


10 


2 


20 


10 


21 


10 


4 


'> 


19 



270 



CITY OF CONCORD 



JULY— Concluded 



Date Name Years 

!» Signe Person 50 

11 Ame Pelletier 78 

13 Ida L. Fitts 84 

liO Benjamin Franklin Adams 81 

27 J. A. Edmour Jeannotte 69 

27 Rose Anna (Mercier) Wilcott 52 

HI Sophie Louise Wester 69 



AGE 




Months 


Day 


9 


27 


10 


24 


5 


18 


2 


4 




8 


6 


15 


4 


21 



AUGUST 



Date Name Yean 

2 Patriclv J. Kelley 65 

3 Emma Supry 75 

4 Annie Meinliardt Cushuie 65 

7 Nellie B. Pendleton 68 

8 John Bunyon Hammond 82 

11 Christopher T. Wallace 75 

12 Louis Rewitzer 71 

13 Vera Evelyn Freeman 26 

13 Charles Edward Barker 62 

IG Ida E. Merrill 75 

16 Alfred A. Holt 74 

16 Mary Merrick Prentiss 39 

18 Wilbur A. Chase 77 

19 Artliur Eugene Provencal 52 

19 Henry F. Hayes 75 

19 Alexander James McLeod 68 

20 Williamina Burt Russell 45 

21 Clinton E. Whittier 63 

24 Melvin Harford Bragg 69 

27 Wilbur N. Hanson 67 

30 Etta Bridget McDonald 72 

30 William Harry Reed 71 



AGE 




Months 


Dayi 


4 


29 


1 


3 


10 


2 


11 


IS 


4 


16 


4 


11 


8 


22 


3 


23 


4 




7 


3 


6 


8 


11 


4 


3 


7 


6 


15 




7 


2 


7 


4 


16 


3 


15 


6 


27 


7 


18 


4 


1 



SEPTEMBER 



Date Name Yean 

5 Austin M. Winslow 69 

14 L. Augusta Howser 81 

20 Lois Wallace Kennedy 76 

20 Charles B. Tardif 73 

26 Steplien George Kimball 58 

26 George E. Kendall 79 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


9 


9 


1 


23 


1 




4 


17 


7 


13 


9 


14 



DEATHS 



271 



OCTOBER 



Date Name Years 

1 Lilla Belle Milton (IS 

2 Amanda Bi-ocliu Mercier 62 

4 Nellie M. Prentiss 54 

() Fred Willis Lang 59 

8 James F. Tabor 01 

•J Lydia Ellen Rolfe S6 

9 Alfred Belair 74 

IS Lemuel H. Pettingill S3 

19 Mrs. Ellen Burns 65 

22 Alice A. Moore 64 

20 Augusta Locke Southard 84 

24 Sanford Denison Palmer 42 

25 Edward B. Hanchay 80 

25 Frank Marsh Crossley 57 

30 Julia Dow Child S8 

31 Lizzie C. Hardy 75 



Months 


Dai/f 
27 


11 


29 


S 


17 


6 


7 


6 


1 


1 






10 


9 


10 


11 


5 


11 




7 


7 


7 


23 


6 


7 


9 


24 


5 


20 


7 


28 



NOVEMBER 



Date Name Yean 

1 Delina Hins Levesque 73 

3 Sidney Lyman Dewey 75 

7 William Steele SO 

7 Dorothy E. Sargent 41 

7 Marie Emily Sargent 7 

S ^larguerite Renaud 06 

IS Sarah Elizabeth Oilman 93 

21 Lionel B. Nadeau 30 

29 George Colvert Carter 77 

29 John T. Prowse GO 

30 Mabel Pallett 73 



AGE 




[onths 


nai/s 


4 


6 


S 


17 


7 


2 


4 


7 


3 


27 


7 


12 


3 


26 


11 


10 


8 


26 




24 



DECEMBER 



Date Name Years 

3 John W. Lowry 79 

4 Frederick I. Hibbard 65 

4 Herbert Wilson Rolfe 62 

4 Bertha M. Mitchell 

6 Flora Veazie Clark 65 

5 Nellie M. Lindsay 73 

S Eleanor F. Nolan 82 



AGE 




Months 


Dni/n 


4 


26 


11 


24 





17 




22 


8 


11 


9 


15 


1 


9 



272 CITY OF CONCORD 



DECEMBER — Concluded 



Date Name Years 

9 Nellie Daisy Stanley 61 

18 Margie B. Marshall 52 

IS George F. Stevens 69 

19 Paul Herbert Kenney 22 

20 Ida B. Merrill 82 

22 Ralph W. Keith 59 

24 H. Edla Dow Bean 89 

24 Selma Johnson 74 

25 David Smith Fifield 

25 Woodbury E. Hunt 80 

28 Marietta S. Gage 90 

29 Emma Henneberry 78 

30 Everett Hazen Runnells 86 

30 Ruth Minot Farrand 61 

31 Addie B. Potter 64 

31 Daniel F. Murphy 63 

? Clifford A. Savoy 30 



onths 


Days 


10 


18 


1 


3 


5 


23 




27 


4 


12 


5 


24 




14 


7 


17 


1 


1 


1 


25 


10 


6 


9 


9 


6 


23 




13 


1 


11 


7 





AGE 




':onths 


Days 


1 


11 


10 


30 




29 



DEATHS 273 

Deaths Registered at the New Hampshire State Hospital for the 
year ending December 31, 1937 



JANUARY 



Date Name Years 

1 Beri Tobine 72 

5 Ellen T. Carroll 52 

o Elleu M. Drew 72 

S Alice M. Hall 62 

9 Wooster B. Titus 90 8 29 

10 Louise Bedell 78 

12 Arthur Migneault 48 

13 Henry A. Gibson 88 

15 p]lizabeth Fox 74 

10 Roland Provencher 32 

18 Eliza Lowry 74 

23 Victoria Milligan 76 

24 Margaret Corbett 64 

26 Ludger Turgeon 62 

27 Catherine F. Callahan 54 

29 Charles Tukey 86 

29 Everett Wicom 79 

29 Lucille Morin 36 

30 Mathilda Noel 68 

30 Edith Morrill 72 

.".1 .Sylvester Milenski 43 



FEBRUARY 



Date Name Years 

1 Alfred K. Brown 82 

5 Ellen R. Byrne 43 

7 Harriet Elizabeth Hardy 83 

11 Frances R. Carruthers 63 

11 Ellen M. Mason 86 

12 Margaret Ayers 69 

13 Judson Ellsworth 75 

13 Roy B. Pulsifer 40 

14 Mary Horan 78 

14 Blanche Rivet 46 

17 Mary Jane Mitchell 82 

18 Clara J. Sanborn 75 

20 ]Mary Vroom 73 

23 Margaret Ready 76 

24 Clara B. Cilley 75 

26 Henry Purdy 61 



4 


24 


7 


3 


.1 


2 


9 


16 




25 


7 


18 


9 


14 


5 


25 


3 


26 


5 


10 




17 



AGE 




Months 


Day 


4 


6 




21 


1 


2 


4 


6 


1 


27 


9 


19 


5 


3 



7 


14 


7 


27 


4 


7 


11 


17 



274 



CITY OF CONCORD 



MARCH 



AGE 
Months 



Days 
24 



Date Name Years 

1 Alfred Franklin Ellis 84 

2 Lottie J. Heath 77 

3 Petronella Snarski 01 

11 Alphonse Beaulieu 74 

15 Elizabeth Pearson 74 

15 Melpomone Stavron 46 

17 Arthur H. Plaisted 62 

20 Joseph Agurex (Lamoreux) 70 

21 Georgia Gray 56 

21 Eliza Merrill 73 

23 Elizabeth Hanna 62 

25 Herve PLnard 35 

;U Anna Schmidt 71 



6 


19 


10 


5 


11 


22 


9 


4 


7 


16 



APRIL 



Da 



fe Name Years 

Celinda Soucy 35 

Marjorie Dickinson 28 

Josepliine CristofuUi 52 

Gedeon Tardif 69 

Robert Tincarre 70 

William H. Small 82 

Mt'Ivina Bickford 54 

Charles Theodore Hill 33 

Anna Schambier 67 

Matilda Leavitt 74 

Samuel Chapman 63 

Franklin H. Harrington 82 



AGE 




'onths 


Koj/i 


4 


11 


2 


24 


5 


21 




10 


11 


22 


5 


5 


11 


15 


11 


14 


11 


17 


3 


29 


8 


18 



MAY 



Date Name Years 

4 Augusta J. Webster 86 

5 Nellie Hanscom 69 

7 Norman F. Prince 14 

!» Emma J. Healey 74 

9 Jane Prince 82 

10 William E. Chase 81 

10 Blanche B. Whittier 56 

10 Sidney H. Smith 81 

13 Evilina Morin 50 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


10 


6 


5 


24 


6 


5 


9 


7 


6 


19 



DEATHS 



275 



MAY — Concluded 



Date 'Name Years 

16 .lonnie Hall 77 

20 George O. Hartley 07 

20 Henry Lambert 77 

21 Clara E. Jones 63 

22 William Alonzo Rhinesmitli 75 

20 Alice A. Morton 77 

29 Charlotte Walters 84 

31 Regina Cheuinard 31 



AGU 
Months 


Days 


2 


1 


2 


26 


10 


6 


2 


4 


1 


24 


8 


21 



JUNE 



Date Name Years 

2 William Brown 80 

3 Catherine Paul 73 

4 Averice Pepin 76 

7 John King 03 

8 Will D. Hutchinson 68 

10 I.oriman A. French 85 

11 Ruth O. Prouty 95 

13 Georgianna Barrett 74 

17 Lionel W. Blood 2 

20 Ruth Monahan 25 

23 H. Willis Little 74 

27 Milan Plummer 59 

28 Mary Riley 78 

30 Josephine Evans 70 

30 Theodore Legace 71 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


11 


20 


5 


8 


4 


9 


3 


14 


7 


16 




26 


9 


22 


1 


21 


8 


9 


1 


19 


11 


12 



JULY 



Date Name Years 

1 Frank A. Dodge 85 

3 Jennie Byers 78 

5 Andrew Clough 75 

Gedeon Dorval 55 

6 Elizabeth B. Lanphy 60 

11 Jennie Chadbourne 78 

14 Julia Edmonds 77 

16 Rose Carlino 84 

18 Ida A. Offhaus 46 

22 Mary Kelly 69 

23 George Sweeney 59 

25 Wallace M. Dodge 65 



AGE 

Months 

2 



11 



Days 
3 



276. 



CITY OF CONCORD 



JULY— Concluded 



Dale Name Yean 

25 John Gehigan 70 

20 Delvina Grenier 80 

28 George Ladd 81 

80 Fannie Pevear 51 



AOE 

Months 

2 

9 
1 



Days 
21 



18 
4 



AUGUST 



Date Name Years 

Agnes Poulin 74 

Clinton Atwood 75 

George H. Craig 82 

7 Tseli Phillips 52 

7 Ruth A. Marsh 77 

10 Grace Dennis 56 

10 George Desmond 84 

13 Gertrude Gove 61 

10 John Long 45 

17 Nathan Nason 29 

17 Jennie Spaulding 79 

]7 Ervvin Hubbard 71 

29 Perl J. Reed 65 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


3 


23 




27 


8 


28 


2 


8 


1 


13 


1 


23 


8 


20 


7 


21 


3 


6 


8 


29 


4 


16 


5 


26 



SEPTEMBER 



Date Name Years 

4 Alice E. Robinson 60 

7 Mildred Perkins 38 

7 John Novali 47 

8 Mattie Libbey 90 

9 Bernard Davenport 67 

20 Philip Pyette 55 

23 Irving Colby 42 

24 Mary Oshier 82 

26 George Bradley 64 

28 Frank Bailey 69 

30 Joseph Poulin 58 



AOE 

Months 



10 



7 


28 


2 


12 


11 


17 


1 


17 


3 


9 


11 


12 


3 


23 



DEATHS 



277 



OCTOBER 



Da 
6 

7 
8 
10 
10 
12 
12 
12 
14 
Ki 
17 
U> 
20 



te Name Veart 

James Keefe 63 

Edward Peterson 63 

Harry E. Staples 71 

George H. Patch 83 

William Yakopolos 55 

Anna Wentworth 81 

Sarah Evans 77 

Leonard Brown 66 

William Watterman 57 

Luella Whitham 76 

Edward Cummings 72 

Arthur Price 75 

Marcia Bassett 76 

Richard Emery 85 

Joseph E. Owens 64 

Thomas H. Aulis 80 

Alphonse Roy 43 

Everett L. Nichols 27 



AGE 

Monthf! 



Days 



19 
26 



3 


22 




22 


5 


10 


6 


7 


9 


2 


3 


16 



NOVEMBER 



Date Name Years 

2 Margaret Baker 66 

4 Oscar LeBlanc 27 

9 Joseph Pacyosa 27 

9 George W. Brown 64 

10 Joseph Gagne 70 

14 Melville Heath 79 

15 Alfred E. Buckley 70 

15 Mary Walton 83 

16 Donald Barnes 34 

17 Charles L. Waldron 67 

17 Charles L. Miles 58 

19 Michael Reagan 79 

23 Anna Larson 45 

24 Hurley F. Lord 32 

24 Fred Goodwin 73 

25 Mary Protrowska 49 

26 Susie Graham 78 

29 Lillian Nobert 28 



AGE 




"onths 


Days 


3 


29 


8 


3 


9 


25 


4 


7 


11 


2(') 


7 


16 


4 


5 


4 


3 


5 


4 


3 


20 


6 


18 


9 


9 


9 


25 


2 


12 


5 


1 



17 



278 CITY OF CONCORD 



DECEMBER 



Date Name Years 

7 Willie Dysart 69 

9 Clara Sanschagrin 41 

10 Rose Smart 61 

11 William Auclair 78 

i;; Bion W. Sanborn 74 

14 Justin C. McCarthy 81 

18 William Bakanowski 63 

18 Fred Cutting 68 

21 Josephine Pelkey 79 

22 Addie Blaisdell 68 

23 Rosanna Palardy 76 

23 Delia Clay 84 

24 Emma Jolbert 59 

28 John Aranosian 73 

28 Alfred Jutras 56 11 

29 William Odiorne 73 



AGE 




Months 


Dayi 


10 


5 


7 


28 


11 


5 


8 


14 


3 


11 


7 


6 


8 


22 


11 


27 


4 


29 


8 


25 



DEATHS 



279 



Deaths Registered at the Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital 
for the year ending December 31, 1937 



JANUARY 



Date Name Yean 

2 Emma Bell Lord Tuttle 64 

5 Gladys Sullivan 22 

7 Mabel C. White 71 

10 William Bergevin 10 

16 Richard Jacobs 63 

19 Leon H. Berry 5S 

19 Barbara Jean Whitehead 

23 Joseph E. Spring 03 

23 Lucy Mary Batchelder 57 

24 Malcolm McDonald 79 

24 Samuel Shepard 57 

28 Katherine T. Cass 77 



AGE 




Mont lis 


J) ays 




4 


5 


27 


9 


28 


3 


19 


7 




1 


27 




2 





18 


4 


14 



10 



FEBRUARY 



Date 
3 • 
3 
8 

17 

22 

27 



Name Years 

Moore 

Gordon A. Page 53 

Gladys M. Stevens 25 

Joseph E. Lemay 60 

Julius Wittenburg 55 

Abbie Palmer Locke 69 



AGE 
Months 



Days 



13 
27 



MARCH 



Date Nam,e Years 

8 Charles P. Russell 60 

11 Charles Jourley 75 

30 Galbraith 



AGE 




Months 


Day: 


11 


1 


4 


1 



APRIL 



Date Name Years 

1 Betty Ann Gibbs 

1 Joseph Richardson (Rechisky) 37 

3 John J. Doherty 66 

5 Frank E. Starkey 26 



AGE 




'onths 


Days 


7 


18 


1 


25 



22 



280 



CITY OF CONCORD 



APRIL — Concluded 



Dat€ Name Years 

5 Elizabeth Newsham 65 

S Charles Stephen Piper 85 

!) Franklin J. Morrill 48 

!t May A. Rand 

V> Nellie Knee 59 

17 Mary B. Baldwin 68 

23 Mattie Celine Cooley 81 

24 Allyn N. Tucker 



AGE 




'onthx 


Dtnm 


1 




4 


19 


2 


18 




6 hrs. 


7 


29 


9 


17 


1 


13 



MAY 



AGE 




'onths 


Dayx 


11 


19 


7 


17 




2 hrs. 



Date Name Years 

3 Marie Margaret Donovan 33 

4 Lucius Snellings 61 

4 Caswell 

5 Matthew Sampson 84 

!> Atwood 

9 Francis Waldo Grayshan 25 

11 Theodore R. Atkinson 35 

12 Dudley A. Charpentier 

13 Walter Ramage 72 

15 Mary B. Sanborn 77 

16 Charles S. Corliss 55 

16 David John Williams 

19 Mary B. Button 66 

26 Ruby D. Carpenter 21 



18 



8 


19 




19 


4 


24 


9 


19 


5 


5 


10 


13 


5 


7 



JUNE 



Date Name 

13 Nelson Irving Heath 

19 Larz Christian Johnson 





AGE 




Years 


Months 


Days 


6 


5 


27 


82 


1 


26 



JULY 



nate Name Years 

10 Walter Ellsworth Wilson 39 

11 Piper 

21 Edmund Lewis Cadarette 65 

24 Jennie B. Blodgett 78 

25 Ella J. White 72 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


10 


4 


2 


29 




07 



11 



13 



DEATHS 



281 



AUGUST 



Date Name Years 

4 Alice M. Gauthier 58 

5 Wilfred Drolet 17 

13 Peter Duperon 74 

18 Henry L. Huntress 88 

27 Fred E. Hooper 56 

30 Mary Teaton 62 



AGE 




Months 


Dfiyi 


7 


27 


5 


2!) 


8 


25 


8 


1 


« 


17 


6 


13 



SEPTEMBER 



Date Name Years 

3 Bula B. Norris 52 

4 Paul Louis DuBois 61 

6 John Edward Sullivan 59 

22 Grace E. Lancey 71 

26 Geneva London Russell 28 



AGE 




'onths 


Days 


2 


15 


2 


8 


2 


2 


10 


19 


1 


20 



OCTOBER 



Dale Name Years 

'.) Roland Herbert Hardy 

11 Dorothy A. Gordon 61 

18 Thelma Mae Mason 

22 Edwin Gillmore 84 

24 Natalie H. Gushing 

27 Winifred E. Featherstone 34 



AGE 




'onths 


Days 




2 


6 


7 




23 


10 


19 




4 



NOVEMBER 



Date Name Years 

13 Richard Halligan 

16 Marie Ida Gilbert 24 

19 Lizzie Mary Boutelle 8S 

22 John S. Shepard 76 

22 Edward Gerard 

22 Robert John Blodgett 34 

23 George A. Couturier 44 



Months 


Days 




1 hr. 


7 


4 


1 


9 


10 


22 




8 hrs. 


1 


13 




14 



282 CITY OF CONCORD 



DECEMBER 



Date Name Years 

2 Hollins 

4 Richard W. Perrott 80 

7 Elisha C. Vose 73 

10 William B. Boynton 59 

15 Hazel Tonkin 23 

19 Idella Howe 71 

30 Sarah B. OLeary 45 



AGE 




'onths 


Day 


1 


26 


9 


« 


4 


15 


11 


25 


4 


22 


9 


10 



DEATHS 



283 



Deaths Registered at the New Hampshire Memorial Hospital 
for the year ending December 31, 1937 



JANUARY 



Date Name Years 

1 Joseph Anprey 63 

11 Mary Besin 72 

20 Joseph Dickson 

20 John Dickson 

21 David Lawrence Brown 85 

27 Robert Wm. Keefe 

27 Elizabeth C. Lord 27 

29 Clara E. Nuttinjr 72 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


2 


18 


!) 


10 




1 hr. 




1 hr. 


2 


1 


1 


18 


7 


4 




29 



FEBRUARY 



Date Name Yeart 

2 Ellis 

16 Joseph Oliver Raymond 72 

24 Charles F. Adams 85 



AGE 
Months 



11 
9 



Days 



23 
4 



MARCH 



Date Name Years 

23 Frank James Kelley 53 

29 Frank Eugene Ripley 84 

29 Clara May Towle 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


10 


11 


1 


25 




6 hrs. 



APRIL 



Date Name Years 

1 Ellen Frances Richards 84 

6 George Judson French 60 

13 Harris 

14 Alice Wittenberg 54 

16 John W. Lindsey 52 

28 May Abbie Ellis 53 

26 Sadie I. Johnson 72 



AGE 




Months 


Day 


3 


9 


6 


10 




4 




20 


10 


20 



284 



CITY OF CONCORD 



MAY 



Date Name Years 

10 Fife 

1 1 James Henry Brannigan 4."j 

2.'> Esdras Drapeau 60 



AGE 




Months 


Days 




1 


7 


14 


11 


20 



JUNE 



Date Name Years 

1 Pesce 

2 Royal Bartlett Flanders 38 

19 Ray L. Hurd 61 

20 Jaekman 

30 Wells 



AGE 




Months 


Days 




23 


10 


19 


1 


2 




i/ahr. 



JULY 



Date Name Years 

10 I^aura Leonard Carr 81 

13 Liira B. Brooks 51 

1(! Grace L. Downing 66 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


5 


28 


i 


21 


3 


25 



AUGUST 



Date Name Yeart 

1 Clara G. Berryman 65 

4 Eliza Richardson 79 

14 Nellie A. McCarthy 57 



AGE 

Months 



10 



Days 
29 



SEPTEMBER 



Date Name Years 

11 Mary F. Buzzell 94 

20 William H. Coville 80 

25 Noyes Hinkley Williamson 82 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


1 


18 


9 


8 




16 



DEATHS 



285 



OCTOBER 



Date Name Years 

6 William Milton Shurtleff 74 

10 Minnie M. Cloiigh G7 

11 WUliam Burke 63 

15 Ethel E. Campbell 61 

16 LaTulipe 



AGE 

Months 



10 



Days 

15 

15 

1 

17 



NOVEMBER 



Date 

7 ■ 



28 
28 



Name Yeart 

Pepin 

Ellen M. Harrington 74 

Henry A. Rowell 86 

French 



AGE 

Months 



11 

10 



Days 

13 

28 



DECEMBER 



Date Name Years 

9 Herbert E. Clark 44 

10 Helen Mahoney 67 

1!) Orniand Drown 74 

28 Charles O'Hara 26 



Months 


Days 


9 


13 


11 


9 


6 


17 




29 



286 



CITY OF CONCORD 



Deaths Registered at Home for the Aged for the 
year ending December 31, 1937 



FEBRUARY 



Date Name 

12 Margaret Holmes 
18 Martha J. Webster 



Yeart 
73 
83 



AGE 

Months 
10 



Days 

10 

3 



MARCH 



Date Name 

15 Nicholas A. Briggs 





AaE 




Years 


Months 


Days 


95 


5 


22 



JUNE 



Date Name 

13 Annie L. Burnham 



Years 
79 



AGE 

Months 
11 



Days 
25 



JULY 



Date Name 

22 Gertrude B. Ordway 





AGE 




ears 


Months 


Days 


78 


1 


20 



DECEMBER 



Date 

26 Susan 



Name 
Adams 





AGE 




Years 


Months 


Days 


83 


6 


12 



DEATHS 



287 



Deaths Registered at Odd Fellows Home for the year 
ending December 31, 1937 



JANUARY 



Date Name 

I! William O. Stiles 





AGE 




Years 


Months 


Days 


74 


5 


12 



FEBRUARY 



Date Name 

26 Clement F. DeWitt 



Years 
74 



AGE 

Months 



Days 
24 



MARCH 



Date Name Yean 

1 William H. Sheafe 82 

(5 Charles S. Seavy 82 

11 George A. Dudley 69 



AGE 

Months 

7 

5 



Days 

10 

5 

13 



APRIL 



Date Name 

7 Edward A. Truesdale 





AGE 




Years 


Months 


Days 


85 


5 


27 



MAY 



Date Name 

9 Julia A. Freeman . 
28 George M. Goddard 





AGE 




Years 


Months 


Days 


93 


4 


11 


80 


3 


12 



JUNE 



Date Name 

4 Ella Peacocli 

10 Walter E. Woodward 



Years 



80 



AGE 




lonths 


Days 


2 


28 


5 


17 



288 



CITY OF CONCORD 



JULY 



Date Name Years 

11 Elizabeth I. Hewlett 83 

20 Mrs. Nellie A. Sargent 79 



AGE 




lonths 


Day. 




14 


11 


13 



AUGUST 



Date Name Years 

20 Charles Edward Parks 79 

23 Arden P. Jones 85 

31 Larkin D. Hobbs 73 



AGE 

Months 
4 
4 



Days 

10 

7 

16 



DECEMBER 



Date Name Years 

23 Prank Pierce Hobbs 82 



AGE 

Months 
3 



Days 
17 



DEATHS 



289 



Deaths Registered at Christian Science Pleasant View Home 
for the year ending December 31, 1937 



JANUARY 



Date Name Years 

18 Anna Babbit Hale 79 

18 Otis B. Bucklin 96 

20 Gertrude Gray Gardner 96 



AGE 

Months 




Days 
11> 



29 



FEBRUARY 



Date Name Years 

C Aphraeia Hope Moorman 78 

8 Lily L. Holden 87 



AGE 
Months 

8 



Days 



10 



APRIL 



Date Name 

25 Ruth Wells Brewster 





AGE 




ears 


Months 


Days 


90 


6 


29 



MAY 



Date Name Years 

17 Alice Barton Van Bmon 77 

22 Arris Wicklifife 86 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


6 


26 


9 


23 



JULY 



Date Name Years 

23 Edith B. Dudley 72 

26 Lucy Ann Campbell 78 



AGE 




Months 


Days 


1 


27 


6 


5 



290 CITY OF CONCORD 

AUGUST 

Dnte Name Years 

17 Elena R. Dayton 85 

IS Flora Croft 72 



AGE 




Months 


Days 




26 


3 


5 



SEPTEMBER 


Date Name 

10 Eva I. Calvert 


Years 
81 


AGE 

Months 


Days 
2 


OCTOBER 


Date Name 

31 Henrietta D. Sanger 


Years 
70 


AGE 

Months 

3 


Days 
19 



DEATHS 291 

Deaths Registered at State Prison 

DECEMBER 



AGE 
Date Name Years Months Days 

6 Joseph Homer Cartier 66 11 8 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Assessors, board of, report of 153 

Board of Health, See Sanitary Department. 

Bonded indebtedness 195 

Building Inspector, report of 133 

City Clerk, report of 139 

government, departments, personnel of, 1937 73 

officials 75 

airport commission 77 

commissions of cemeteries 77 

health officers 78 

park commissioners 79 

plumbers, board of examiners of 78 

public library, trustees of 78 

recreation commission 80 

trustees of trust funds 79 

undertakers 77 

ward officers 80 

water-works, city, commissioners 79 

Financial statement 225 

Fire department, report of 107 

Hydrant Commissioners, report of board of 134 

Mayors of the City of Concord, list of 84 

Milk inspector, report of 149 

Municipal: 

regulations 2 

court, report of 144 

Ordinances and resolutions 3 

Overseer of Poor, report of 232 

Parks, report of 163 

Plumbers, report of board of examiners 131 

Police department, report of 112 

Polls, valuation, etc., from 1927 155 

Population 242 

Property, city, inventory of 242 

Public library, report of 135 

Public works, department of, report 119 



PAGE 

Sanitary department, board of health, report of 145 

Sealer of weights and measures, report of 142 

Securities, maturity of 218 

Solicitor, city, report of 165 

Tax collector, report of 157 

Treasurer, balance sheet of 205 

Treasurer, condensed statement, bond account 213 

Trustees, trust funds, report of 168 

Trust funds 174 

Vital statistics, tables of 243 

Water department, report of 86 

treasurer's condensed statement 204