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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

7 



A CEPCET 

T€ THE 

CITIZENS qr CCNCCCD 




87th 
ANNUAL 
REPORT 



OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1939 

AREA - 64 SQUARE MILES 
CAPITAL OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
POPULATION (1930) - 25.228 




AUTHORIZED AND PUBLISHED BY 
THE MAYOR AND BOARD OF AL- 
DERMEN UNDER THE SUPERVISION 
OF THE CITY PLANNING BOARD 



FOREWORD 

IN THE past, it has been customary for people 
to take their local government lor granted. 
Moie recently, the iiend toward greater taxation 
in all fields has accomplished an awakening ol 
public interest in governmental expenditures. 
More and more citizens are making an effort to 
ascertain the relationship between their tax dol- 
lar and the services they receive in return. Un- 
fortunately, public reporting has not made this 
clear in all cases. 

Your elected officials at the City Hall believe 
that the citizens of Concord desire to be better 
informed about their city government. This 
publication, departing as it does from the tradi- 
tional mould, is for the purpose of presenting a 
more visible and understandable accounting of 
the conduct of city affairs. Necessarily, only the 
barest summary is possible in a review of this 
size. Complete information is available at City 
Hall for those who may desire additional details. 

It is the earnest desire of your city officials 
that this report may stimulate greater citizen 
participation in civic affairs to the end that I he 
Caty oi Cloncord may continue to prosper. 



CITY GOVERNMENT 

Mayor 

Hon. John W. Storrs 



Assistant Mayor 

William L. Stevens 



Aldermen-at-Large and Members Board of Public Works 



William Artliiir Stevens 
George H. Corbett 
W'illiam L. Stevens 



Harold D. Merrill 
Charles J. MtKee 
Arthur F. Stiirte\ant 



C;harles I*. Coakley 
Ralph L. Stearns 
Harry C. Anderson 
Harry L. Alexander 



Earl \V. 



Ward Aldermen 



Ward I 

Ward 2 

Ward .'? 

Ward 4 
Gaige 



Stewart Nelson 
John C. Tillon 
Harold M. Farrar 
Leigh M. Wentworth 
Ward 9 



Ward 5 
Ward G 
Ward 7 
\Vard 8 



Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen 



Accounts and Claims: 
Aldermen Corbett, Nelson, I'ilton, Far- 



Lands and Buildings: 

Aldermen Gaige, McKee, Stearns, Nel- 
son. 



Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen William A. Stevens, Sturte- 
vant, Farrar, Stearns. 



Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Alexander, Tilton, Went- 
worth, Stearns. 

Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Sturtevant, Corbett, Gaige, 
Nelson. 

Finance: 

Aldermen William L. Stevens, McKee, 
Ale.xander, Anderson. 

Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Anderson, Merrill, 



Gaige. 



Playgrounds and Bath: 

yVldermen Merrill, Anderson, Coakley, 
Gaige, Wentworth, Farrar; Mrs. Maud 
N. Blackwood, Mrs. Victoria Mahoney, 
Miss Margaret Challis, Mrs. Ethel M. 
Storrs, Mrs. Kathleen Mullen, Mrs. Nora 
E. Donovan, Mrs. James M. Langley. 

Police and License: 

Aldermen Sturtevant, William A. Stev- 
ens, Coakley, Lilton. 

Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Sturtevant, Corbett, Nelson, 
Wentworth. 

Project Committee: 

Aldermen McKee, William A. Stevens, 
Stearns. 

Relief: 

Aldermen Anderson, Stearns, Sturtevant. 



CITY OFFICIALS 



Uiiil(liii<; Inspector 
Clilv Clerk 
C.ilv F.ngiiieer 
City Messenger 
City Physician 
Citv Physician, 

Assistant 
Citv SoHcitor 
Citv 'rreasiirer 
Fire Chicl 
Judge, Municipal 

Coint 
[iKlgc. Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milk Ins|)ector 
()\erseer ol Poor 
0\eiseer ol Poor, 

Penacook 



l.dwartl K. Heanc 

Arthur E. Rohy 

Edward E. Beane 

Henry W. Smith 

Thomas J. Halligan 

Elmer U. Sargent 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 

W'illiam T. Happny 

William L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

Marion ¥. Holt 

Austin B. Presby 

Frank C. Gilbert 



Planning nirpr toi__ 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Measures 
Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 

Supt. of Streets 

Supt. of Water Worl 

Supervisor of 
Playgrounds 

J rcc Warden 



Charles P. Coaklcv Tax Clollcctor 



Gu.staf H. Lehtineu 

Victor L Moore 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Donald G. Barton 

Cieorge A. Dearborn 

Carl L. Sargent 

Ervin E. Webber 

s I'ercy R. Sanders 

Paul G. Crowcll 

Carl L. Sargent 

Amos B. Morrison 



Boards, Commissions and Trustees 



Board of Adjustmeni: James M. Lang- 
ley, Chairman; John S. Corbett, Eugene 
F. ISLigenau, Donald G. Matson, J. Dun- 
bar Shields. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: Charles 
J. McKee, Chairman; Harry L. Alex- 
ander, Samuel B. Dunsford, Charles W^ 
Howard, John \W. Storrs, Leigh M. 
Wentwortii. 

Board of Assessors: Clarence O. Phil- 
brick, Chairman; Edward F. Donovan, 
Joseph E. Shepard. 

City Planning Board: James ^L Lang 
ley, Chairman; Edward E. Beane, Fred- 
erick P. Clark, Raymond D. F.dwards. 
John B. Jameson, Harold D. Merrill. 
I)udlev W. Orr, Austin E. Page, John 
^V. Storrs. 

Bo.\RD of Examiners of Plumbers: Wil 
liam J. Bishop, Chair>iuni: Edward E. 
Beane. Charles H. Berry. 

Board of Health: John W. Storrs, 
Chairman; Dr. Robert O. Blood, Dr. 
Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. Carl A. Dahi- 
gren, Dr. Thomas J. Halligan. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: Ed- 
ward E. Beane, William T. Happny, 
Percv R. Sanders. 



Board of Library Trustees: 01i\cr Jen 
kins. President; Henry B. Cannon, Jr., 
Joseph J. Comi, Edward A. Dame, 
Fred M. Dodge, Mrs. Armine M. Ing- 
ham, Parley B. Phillips, Alexander Ren- 
nie, Jr., Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 



Park and Cemetery Commission: John 
W. Storrs, Chairman; Herbert G. Abbot, 
Pierre A. Boucher, Gardner G. Emmons, 
Robert J. Gra\es, Alpheus M. Johnson, 
Mrs. Thomas N. Troxell. 



Police Commission: Charles L. Jackman, 
Chairman; Daniel Shea, Guy .\. Swen- 
son. 



Recreation Commission: J. Mitchell 
Ahern, Chairman; Gardner G. Emmons, 
Leigh S. Hall, Carleton R. Metcalf, 
John W. Storrs. 

TRUsrEES OF Trust Funds: Harry H. 
Dudley, Carl H. Foster, Edgar C. Hirst. 



Board of Water Commissioners: Harry 
H. Dudley, President; Allen M. Free- 
man, James W. Jameson, Charles P. 
Johnson, Donald Knowlton, Benjamin 
H. Orr, Richard Rolfe, John W. Storrs, 
Gardner Tiltoii. 



SUMMARY 

or 

MUNICIPAL ACTIVITIES 

AND 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 
1939 



Alihougli ihe hurricane iRccssitaiccl a tlowiiwaid adjust niciit 
ol .|175,000, the net increase in assessed vahialioiis in 10.1*) 
amounted to .fl 63,647. 

Tax collections impro\ed. Delinquent taxes sold lo ilic (ity 
dropped from 4.66% in l')3S to 3.36% in 1939. 

I he net bonded debt was reduced by .^filS.OOO. Ol tins amount 
.■jli 17,000 were water works bonds. 

Damage suits totaling ,518,600 were disposed of at a cost of 

.R893. 

An energetic restaurant insjxxtion ])rogram resulted in a lating 
of satisfactory or better for all eating establishments in Concord. 

1 he new baseball field at ^\4nte Paik was completed. 

7 he pond at Blossom Hill Cemetery was restored. 

Most of the restoration \voik necessitated by the hurricane of 
1938 has been completed. 

Operations at the city's plant and tree niusery were expanded. 

Attendance figures showed an increase of .5,800 over the ])revi()us 
year at the supervised playgrounds. 

A new wading pool \vas ojjcned at the relocated playgrotuid on 
the Plains. 

The Municipal Golf Course continued to serve a large nimibcr 
of people at a very small cost to the city. 



Action Avas starkd toward ilic disc oiiliiiuaiuf ol inoic ilian six 
miles ol unused liigliways. 

The consiriKlion ol the new City Library was (ompleted. 

Book cireuhation at the Cat\ Library reached an all-iinic high ol 
195,598 volumes. 

The \\'V\ progiam was continued throughout the )'ear. The 
a\erage number ol persons employed was 300. 

A t^\'o-wa\ police radio conmuniication sNstem was jilaced in 
operation. 

Through the installation of a new fding system, the police de- 
partment established a modern method of dime recording. 

A new aerial ladder truck was added to the fire department's 
equipment. 

Peiniits for jjri\ate new consiiuclion increased from .'>I77,()05 in 
1938 to $399,982 in 1939. 

The city's housing facilities were increased by 93 dwelling units 
during the year. 

The city laid out 0.52 miles of new street, most new building 
taking place on existing streets. 

The Board of Aldermen voted to require persons offering new 
streets for acceptance and future maintenance by the city to pay 
the total costs of initial imjirovements. 

South State Street was widened from Wall Stieet to Pleasant 
Street. 

The Department of Public Works laid 17,741 sfjuare yards of 
semi-j)ermanent road pavement and 1,317 square yards ol hard- 
surfaced sidewalk. 

The city constructed 15.010 feet of storm and sanitary sewer. 
Of this amount, 9,090 feet were laid with the aid of WPA lal)or. 

The Water Department salvaged 1,300,000 board feei of huiri- 
cane lumber at the Penacook Lake watershed. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

Foreword 3 

City Go\crnnienl 4 

City Officials 5 

Sumniarv of \runicipal Activities and AccomplishniciUs 6 

Table ol Contents 8 

Mayor's Message 9 

Office of the City Clerk 10 

Vital Statistics 10 

Elections . . 11 

Assessment of Properly 12 

Tax Collection 14 

Finances 15 

General Fmid 15 

liond Funds 15 

Trust Fimtis 15 

Legal Service 18 

Planning 20 

Pidjlic Health and Saniialion 22 

Milk Inspection 24 

Medical Ser\'ice 26 

Parks, Cemeteries and Trees 27 

Recreation 29 

Playgroiuid and Bath 29 

Special Recreational Facilities 31 

Public Library 33 

Relief 36 

WPA 39 

Police Protection 40 

Probation 44 

Municipal Court 46 

Fire Protection 47 

Hydrants 49 

Weights and Measures 50 

Building Activity 51 

Plumbing 52 

Examination of Plumbers 52 

Plumbing Inspection 52 

Zoning Appeals 53 

Public Works Services 55 

Streets and Sidewalks 55 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 56 

Refuse Collection 56 

Garbage Disposal 56 

Engineering 57 

Sewers 57 

Street Lighting 58 

Other Activities 53 

Municipal Airport 59 

Water Supply 61 

Public Schools 63 

Facts About Concord 66 

Financial Statements and Statistics Appendix 



MAYOR'S 
MESSAGE 



^^ 




HON. JOHN W. STORRS 
MAYOR 



npHE year 19^^9 brings to a close another decade oi progress by our 
-^ community. I think it is j)ertinent that we point out the fact that 
the city's growth, aUhough devoid of the spectacular, has been marked by 
an unfahering persistency. 

Dining the past few years, social and economic conditions liave 
presented more than the usual proI)lems of city government. Wliile 
the road of progress has been "rocky" at times, I believe tliat we can look 
back with considerable satisfaction at the thoroughness with which 
each new pioblem has been considered. 

A\'hat the future may hold in store for Concord in these changing 
times cannot be predicted with any degree of certainty. However, as 
far as we can foresee, I feel sure tliat the city will continue to meet every 
new situation wath prudence. 

I wish to take this opportunity to express my sincere appreciation 
to the citizeirs and the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord for 
their interest and whole-hearted support in dealing with the manifold 
problems of our city government. I am indebted to the department 
heads, boards, trustees and commissions and to the employees for their 
efficient and courteous cooperation in the maintenance of a high standard 
of service for the public. 




OFFICE OF THE CITY CLERK 



THE city clerk is ihc secretarial official of the city governinent. He 
is cleik of the Board of Aldermen and the Board of l*nbli( Works. 
He scivcs as custodian of the records of both of these boards. 

Board of Aldermen 

During iJie year 1939, 75 resolutions and 13 ordinances were passed 
by the Board of Aldermen. Ihc board held 12 regular meetings, live 
adjourned meetings, one special meeting and four public hearings. 

Board of Public Works 

Twelve regular meetings were held by the Board of Public AV'^orks 
during the year. In addition to these, tlie board held four special meet- 
ings and seven public hearings. Petitions for sidewalks, driveways and 
utility poles were considered at these meetings as a part of the routine 
business of running the city's public works. 

Vital Statistics 

The city clerk serves as the registrar of vital statistics. During the 
past year, the total numbers of births, deaths and marriages leccived, 
recorded and reported to the State Board of PTealth were as follows: 

Births 537 

Marriages 243 

Deaths 679 

City at large 177 

Institutions 404 

Brought here for burial 98 

(Note: Although the detailed records of births, marriages and deaths formerly 
included in city reports have been omitted, the vital statistics records at the city clerk's 
office are open to inspection by the public.) 

There has been an increase in the demand for certified copies of 
vital statistics records during the year. Requests were received from 
people from all parts of the United States for birth certificates. This 
increased demand was due largely to requirements imposed by the Old 
Age Assistance Law. Two hundred seventy-six certificates were issued 
for this purpose alone. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 

The recording of chnttel moitgages and (on- 
ditional sales is also a duty of the city clerk. 
The fees received during 1939 lor this scr\icc 
amounted to .11,374.88. 



CITY CLERK: 

AurmK I'.. Koi 



DEPUTY CITY CLERK: 

M\K(;\I<K1 A. Sl'lNCKK 



1939 EXPENDITURE: 

.S7,975.(.7 



Licenses, Fees, etc. 

All business licenses requircil by (he city 



10 




The City Clerk's Office serves as a clearing house for municipal business 



arc issued by the city clerk's office. Taxi, theatre, junk, circus, bowling- 
alley and pool table licenses are included in this group. 

The department issued 1,382 dog licenses during the year. A 
revenue of $2,808.78 was returned to the city from this source. 

A total of 8,360 auto permits was issued in 1939. The income from 
these permits w^as $33,590.38. Over and above this amount, the total 
receipts of the department during 1939 were $12,959.17. All moneys 
received were deposited wath the city treasurer. 

Records 

The city clerk's office serves as a depository for most of the im- 
portant city records. A complete card index system is kept by the 
department so that information is readily available for public use at all 
times. The department acts as a clearing house for thousands of requests 
each year for information pertaining to the activities of the City of 
Concord. 

ELECTIONS 

The conduct of city elections in the City of Concord is uudcr the 
control of the city clerk and the ward officials as prescribed 1)\ ilu- City 
Charter and the Public Laws of the State of New Hampshire. 

There are approximately 14,000 registered voters on the checklists 
in tlic city's nine wards. 

The city elections were held during 1939. Filings for candidates 
foi mayor, assessor, three aldermcn-at-large and nine ward aldermen 
opened August 9, 1939. There were six filings for mayor, one with- 
drew; one for assessor, nine for alderman-at-large and 22 for ward alder- 
man. 

^"Iic Primary Election was held on October 10, 1939 with 4,491 
\()(es cast for the candidates for mayor. The Election was held Novem- 
l)er 7, 1939 at which time there were 8,738 votes cast for mayor. 

The total cost of these elections was $3,940.41. Most of this amount 
was paid out for the salaries of the election officers. 

11 



ASSESSMENT OF PROPERTY 



THE Board ot Assessors provides the foundation lor the financial 
structure ol the City of Concord. Their assessment work is vital 
to dependal)]e goNcrnniental finance. 

Duties 

It is the cUity of the Board of Assessors to appraise all taxable 
property in the city at its full and true value. The board is charged 
with the responsibility of assessing all county taxes for which it has 
warrants; all taxes duly voted by the City of Concord; and all school 
district taxes duly voted in Concord and certified to the board; and all 
sums recjuired to be assessed in meeting city and school district bond 
obligations. 

Real Property 

There are approximately twelve th(^usand ))arcels of taxable real 
estate in the city. There were 519 deeds recorded in the city during 
1939. The total ntnnber of building j^ermits issued during the year was 
18(). Of this amount, 115 were for new buildings and garages and 71 
were for remodeling of old structures. 

Assessed Valuations, Polls and Stocks 

With a total assessed valuation of $32,365,017 for the year 1939, 
an increase of $163,647 was recorded over the previous year. There were 
13,887 taxable polls enumerated in 1939, an increase of 387 over 1938. 
The number of shares of railroad stock held in Concord which the state 
taxes and credits to the city dropped from 3,491 in 1938 to 2,798 in 1939, 
or a decrease of about 20 per cent. This decrease has been a con- 
tinuous one since 1934. 

Tax Warrant 

The total amount of the tax warrant submitted to the tax collector 
during 1939 was $1,176,029.78 as compared with the 1938 figures of 
$1,282,689.02. The average 1939 tax rate of $35.30 was $3.52 less than 
that of the previous year. 

Flood and Hurricane Adjustments 

In April, 1938, the Merrimack and the Contoocook Rivers over- 
flowed their banks. Although the dam- 
age was considerable, it was in no sense 
as serious as that caused by the flood of 
March, 1936, when an adjustment of tax 
\aluation in excess of $160,000 was nec- 
essary during the year that followed. 
The damage wrought by the April, 1938 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS: 

Clarence O. Philbrick, Chairman 
Joseph E. Shepard, Clerk 
Edward F. Donovan 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$10,829.17 



12 



«0,35O,OOO WOI^TH Or DOWNTOWN 
TAX CXCIVIPT M^OPCI^TY 




1 POST OFFICE 

2 STATE HOUSE 

3 STATE OFFICE BLOC 

4 STATE LIBRARY 

5 STATE ARMORr 
6. COUNTY COORT 
7 CITY HALL 
S.CITY LIBRARY 
BFIRE STATION 

10 FIRE CHIEFS HOME 
I I POLICE STATION 
I Z-FLETCHER-MURPHY 

PARK 
I 3.00YEN PARK 
14. LIBRARY PARK 

15 PARKER SCHOOL 

16 NH. HISTORICAL 

8UIL0INC 

note: 



t 1,000,000 

l,?SO,000 

1,000,000 

800,00 

75,00 

100,000 

175,000 

250,000 

87,400 

4,000 

48,000 

3,000 
10,00 
20,000 
50,000 



17 YM C A 

18 FRIENDLY CLUB 
If SALVATION ARMY 

20. N H CONG 

CONFERENCE 
2 I- ST JOHNS HALL 

22 ADVENT CHURCH 

23 PLEASANT ST 

BAPTIST CHURCH 
24,50 CO NO. CHURCH 
25 SO CONG. CHURCH 

PROPERTY 
2«. CATHOLIC CHURCH 

t, SCHOOL 
27. CATHOLIC CHURCH 

CONVENT 
28 CATHQLIC CHURCH 

RECTORY 



i 35,000 

30,000 

6.000 

18,000 
40,000 
2 7,00 



7,500 

125.000 

18,000 

15,000 



29 BAKER MEM CHURCH 

30 BAKER MEM CHURCH 

PARSONAGE 
3 I. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
32. WHITE MEM CHURCH 
33 FIRST CHURCH 

CHRIST, SCIENTIST 
3^. CHRIST, SCIENTIST 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 
35 UNITARIAN CHURCH 
3S. EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

37 EPISCOPAL CHURCH 

PARISH HOUSE 

38 N H EPISCOPAL 

BISHOPS HOUSE 

39 CREEK CHURCH 

40 FIRST METHODIST 

EPISCOPAL CHURCH 



THEY ARE NOT NECESSARILY 



6, SOO 
18,000 
2 5,000 



10,000 
3 5,000 
60,000 



flood was adjusted in 1939 when a final reduction in tax values was made 
on individual inspection of each piece of property. Lack of protests 
indicated that these adjustments were evidently to the satisfaction of 
the owners. 

In September, 1938, a hurricane of vast proportion visited the city, 
blowing off roofs and tearing down many buildings. Many of these were 
destroyed beyond repair. An unprecedented amount of damage was 
done to shade trees. Wood and timber lots were devastated. It was 
estimated that twenty million feet of timber were destroyed. The broken 
and twisted condition of this timber made it practically worthless. 

Nearly all repairs to improved property were completed before 
the date of the new assessment in 1939. Each piece of damaged property 
was inspected and reassessed by the board. Up to December 31, no 
appeal has been taken by any party from the board's findings. The 
loss in tax values due to the flood and hurricane was about .1)175,000. 

Recommendations 

The board recommends more attention to detail on the depart- 
ment's excellent maps. A small additional expenditure each year would 
soon result in a modern system of plans with complete detailed inform- 
ation available for individual plots. 

13 



TAX COLLECTION 



Duties 

TIIK ia\ (i)ll(<l()i is \'cstc(l willi llic (liil\ of (ollcction of laxcs siih- 
inilic'd lo liiin l)\ AV.nranI liom llu- board ol assessors. li is his 
liiillici (lul\, alki duv pKxcss ol law, lo pKxccd lo sill all |)io|)trly in 
non-]>a\nKiii ol taxes. 

1939 Trend 

lax collet lions showed a decided ini[)roveiiient during' ihe year. 
The amount ol delinciiieni laxes sold to the city on Se|)tenil)er 27th was 
.|i41,9]9.:50. or :5.:'.(i per (ent ol the ( harge ,,1 SI ,249.-l(iS.7r) as against 
158,590.11, or l.(i() per (cnt ol the thargi' ol .^^i ,25(i,8ll.(i5 ol the j:»revious 
year. 

lln(()lle( led laxes as ol December .Hi, 19,S9 were as toUows: 

I <);5i.' S'i.HOi .so 

i9-{:5 .'i.iioo.i'.: 

1934 !,(il9.s7 

1935^ (i,037.7l 

1936 $6,894.30 

1937 9,332.92 

1938 10,588.58 

1939 273,867.72 

Taxes Sold to tne Uity 



A sunmiar\ ol the slaliis ol taxes sold lo the Clity ol Coi 
are (allied on the books ol the (ollectoi lor redenipl ion, 
in the loliowinir table. 



1< Ol (I 

is pi 



, whi( h 
t'senled 



Yrar 
1 9.". I 
1 93.'') 
1936 
1937 
1 938 



's9f,: 



Am' I Sol, I 
lo City 

... .1i;27,0fil.26 
46,589.46 
47,570.0,5 
5S„590. 1 1 
II.9I9..3(1 

5 I ol I liis sum \\;is 



. / iiiiiinil 
Ixcdccincd 
,$26,149.04 
31,136.36 
41,234.15 
39,236.S() 
10,102.21 



Ahaird by 

. tsse.ssots 

$472.78 

10,819.12* 

566.00 

1,184.79 

293.99 



Drnlrd 
lo Cily 

,11; H 2. II 

1,627.41 

S9().2I 

710.89 






IIKIIIIll 

tch'ciiicd 



,873.66 



17,127.87 
31.223.10 
);ilc(l on i;i\es jsscsst-d auainsi ijic ihoik-iIv ol hrklasii 



I cinple Real I'.slalc .Vssot iai ion liy oulcr ol Siipcrioi Coiiil. 

Other Activity 

During I9.'i9, the lax (olledoi ading as ageiil loi ilie aldeimenic 
lands and buildings (onmiiMee received Ironi rent and sale ol proj)erly 
deeded to the cily the sum of ,|> -5, 108.9.1. This amount was turned ovei 
lo the city treasurer. 

Recommendation 

.\l the end ol the year, a tonsideiable amount 
ol non-ie\enue [producing tax deed property re- 
mained on tlie tax collectoi's books. E\ery effort 
should be made to return this property lo I lie ac- 
li\c lax list at the earliest |)ossible dale. 



TAX COLLECTOR: 


Amos 15. .MoKKisoN 


1939 EXPENDITURE: 


$7,19h.ii4 



14 



FINANCES 



\ ()Rl)I\AN(iE, the (iiv lieasurer is required lo keep an acdiiaU: 
'and 11 IK' a((()uiit ol all nnfipis and j)aynieni,s on btliall ol the city. 
All |)a\nKiits ol tily lunds made l)\ the licasurei must ha\e ihe wiillen 
aj)j)i<)\al ol the Mayor. 

General Fund 

7'he total amount ol unciuumbered ie\enue received by ilie Clity oL 
Concord during 1939 was .^1 ,y(i(),82l.7r). This sum was |140,164.42 less 
ihan the total revenue rccei\'cd in 19-iS. Most ol this reduction was due 
to a decrease in the H).')!) tax levy. In addition lo the rexenue received 
by the citv, .SI 1 .81) I .()(S Avorth ol back taxes were i:>ought by the City ol 
Concord duiing H)'i9: these taxes weie added to the assets ol the citN. 
On the other hand, the total 19-^9 a[)pro[jriation expenditure, which 
included an oxeichalt ol ,|;21,192.72, was .^1 ,4(M,*l(i9.()r). Calculations in- 
dicate that the city was operated at a deluit ol' $1,756.22 duiino 193'.). 

Bond Funds 

The bonded indebtedness ol the city, as ol December 31, 1939, was 
."I!) 1,234, 000. Ihis amount was distril)uted as lollows: municipal bonds 
-. '§601,000, school bonds -84.57,000, and watei- works bonds -, 1176.000. 
Although .'>1IS,()00 in bonds were retiied during 1939, the net bonded 
debt was reduced cmK .S3S,000 due to the issuance of $80,000 worth ol 
new bonds. 

By dedticling the net operating delicit Irom the net reduction in 
bonded debt, the residt indicates that the net debt ol the city was re- 
duced by .'|i36,243.78 during the past year. 

Trust Funds 



CITY TREASURER: 

C\Kl. n. FOSTKK 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$2,852.74 



TRUSTEES OF 
TRUST FUNDS: 

H\Kk\ H. Dl DLKV 

Oarl H. Fostkr 
Edoar CI. Hirst 

CUSTODIAN: 

Cl\kl II. I'dSlIk 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

,$(.00.00 



liy an act ol the state legislatme, all trust 
lunds ol the C^ity ol Concord are |jlaced in the 
cusloch ol three trustees, one of whom must l)e 
the cit) treasiuer. The act also stipulates how the 
iiustees shall invest the funds placed in their care. 

1 he total amount of trust funds and miex- 
pended income, as of December 31, 1939, was 
.|i392,803.50 as compared with ,'$388,373.12 in De- 
cember of 1938. During 1939, income from 
interest and dividends amoiuited lo .'$12,8()4.37. 
while total disbtnsements were $13,25.5.75. A 
total ol .S7.622.9() was accepted in new trust funds 
during the year. Simdry cemetery trusts ac- 
counted foi .'$5,075 or 66.6 percent of the new 
funds placed in the cusicjdy of the trustees. 



15 




^¥HCI^E THE 1939 REVENUE 
DOLEAI^ CA^E rnOlVI 



i MISCELLANEOUS RECEIPTS- FEES- ETC. 0.1 <t 

d COURT FINES AND FORFEITS 0.2<t 

d SALE AND RENT, TAX PROPERTY 0.21 

(3 TAX DEEDS REDEEMED 0.3<t 

(3 LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 0.3C 

(3 INSURANCE TAX 0.4 (t 

(9 MISCELLANEOUS CITY CLERK'S RECEIPTS 0.5 C 

(3 PARK AND TREE DEPARTMENT REVENUES 0.7 C 

® RAILROAD TAX 1.0 i 

@(1 DELINQUENT TAXES 1.2 C 

(3)(! CEMETERY DEPARTMENT REVENUES 1.3(1: 

(S)(il DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS EARNINGS \.9<t 

@®^ AUTO RECEIPTS 2.5<t 

@@(3 SAVINGS BANK TAX 2 .7<t 

®®® INTEREST AND DIVIDENDS TAX 3.0C 

@(i$)@(g)(l|)@@@(g)@(g)(g CURRENT TAX LEVY 83.7C 

@ (g) (g) @ @ @ @ @ (g) (g) (g) @ @ (g) @ (g) @ (g) (g) @ 

(g) (g) (g) @ @ @ (g) (g) (g) @ (g) (g) @ (g) (g) (g) (g) @ (g) (g) (g) @ @ (g) 

(3) (3) @ (g) (g) ® (i) (g) (g) (g) (g) (g) (g) @ @ (g) (g) (g) (g) @ (g) @ (g) @ 



CITY or CONCOI^D, NEVr HAr%ir$HII^E 



16 




®®®®®®®®®®®®o 



novr THE I93Q KCTCNUC 
OOl-l-An >YAS STENT 



SCHOOL DISTRICTS 25.8 C 



®®®®®®®®®®® 
®®®®®®®®®(3 



®®®®®®®(1S 
®®®®®®0 

®®®®®@ 

®®®®®(] 

®®®®(3 
®@® 



DEPT OF PUBLIC WORKS 20. SC 



COUNTY TAXES 14. Set 



®®Q1 

®^ 

®i 

® 


(3 



RELIEF 5.9(t 

CITY & PRECINCT BOND REDEMPTION 5.2<t 

FIRE PROTECTION 4.9 C 

POLICE PROTECTION 4.3(t 

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION & FINANCE 4.2 (t 

TAXES BOUGHT BY CITY 2.9 C 

I PARKS & TREES 2.6 C 

CEMETERIES 2.4 <t 

LIBRARY 1.3 <t 

RECREATION l.l<t 

INTEREST ON CITY & PRECINCT BONDS 1.0 C 

DISCOUNTS & ABATEMENTS- UNCOLLECTED TAXES 0.9 C 

MISCELLANEOUS EXPENDITURES 0.8 C 

PRIVATE CHARITIES 0.6 C 

HEALTH 0.5 (t 

INCIDENTALS & LAND DAMAGES 0.3<t 



cixr or coNCOi^E, new ha^pshii^e 



17 



LEGAL SERVICE 



Duties 

THE city solicitor is attorney lor the city government. Ii is incum- 
bent upon him to draft all instruments of a legal character rec|uirecl 
by the city in the exercise of its corporate functions. He must interpret 
the law for city officials and advise with and assist them whenever legal 
problems are encountered in the course of official duty. The solicitor 
collects from the city's delinquent debtors, commences and prosecutes 
lawsuits on behalf of the city and defends all actions in which the city 
is named defendant. 

Administrative Assistance 

During 1939, the solicitor drafted 50 resolutions and ordinances, 
53 deeds and leases and rendered 32 written opinions. In addition, a 
large number of oral opinions were rendered at the request of city 
officials. 

Cases Settled 

Ihe following cases in which the claimants sought to recover 
$18,600.00 in damages were disposed of at a cost to the city of $3,892.58: 
Ethel Bhinkenburg vs. City of Concord; Bernard Mahon by Patrick 
Mahon vs. City of Concord; W. Fred Lane vs. City of Concord; Thomas 
Kelley et al. vs. City of Concord. 

Clara B. Morrill vs. City of Concord and The Tide Water Associ 
ated Oil Co. vs. City of Concord were appeals from assessments imposed 
by the Board of Assessors. The first case was dismissed by court order, 
the assessment remaining unaltered; the second was compromised. 

Frank Ramsay vs. Jajnes M. Langley et al.,, Roy L. Knox vs. James 
M. Langley et al., The Kimball System, Inc. vs. James M. Langley et al. 
were appeals from rulings of the Board of Adjustment. In each case, a 
settlement favoraf3le to the city was effected. 

Two collection matters were enforced by suits. Certain trust provi- 
sions in the will of one Seth Jones Tvere interpreted by the court for the 
benefit of the Trustees of Trust Funds. In Stale vs. Urzel Faille, the 
defendant was charged with the violation of an oidinance regulating 
barbering. The case came to an end when the Supreme Court ruled 
the ordinance unconstitutional. 

The Public Service Commission ordered the city to contribute 
toward the maintenance of warning signals at certain railroad crossings. 
The city appealed in a case entitled State of New Hampshire vs. Boston 
& Maine Railrcad. At the direction of the Board 
of Aldermen, the aj^j^eal was withdrawn. 

Pending Cases 

Nine cases were pending in court at the end of 
the year. They are as fcjflows: 



CITY SOLICITOR: 

(iORDON S. Lokl) 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,431.90 



18 



(1) Four appeals by the Bektash Real Estate Association from the 
values assessed upon its real estate for the years 193(3, 1937, 1938, 1939. 
Preliminary questions have been submitted to the court for decision, 
but the main issues are yet to be decided. 

(2) Anna M. Man?i vs. City of Concord. This is a claim for dam- 
ages alleged to have been caused while an adjoining highway was being 
constructed. 

(3) Maude L. Crowley vs. City of Concord is an appeal from the 
alleged taking by eminent domain of certain land of the petitioner. 

(4) Shirley Brunei vs. City of Concord. This is a claim for dam- 
ages alleged to have been caused by selvage flowing from a break in a 
sewer line. A settlement is in the process of negotiation. 

(5) State vs. Kenneth Moore is a prosecution for violation of a 
trucking ordinance. The case is before the Supreme Court pending a 
riding on the validity of the ordinance. 

(6) Kenneth Moore vs. Johri W. Storrs et al. is an application for 
a court order to compel the city to grant a trucking license to the 
petitioner. A referee has recommended that the court order the issuance 
of a license. The case has been appealed to the Supreme Court. 

(7) The Petition of the Trustees of Trust Funds is an application 
for the construction of certain pro\isions of the wills of Nathaniel 
Bouton and David Osgood. 

(8) Slate Oil Comfjany vs. City of Concord is an appeal from a 
ruling of the Board of Adjustment. 

(9) Shelby O. Walker vs. City of Concord is an appeal from a 
ruling of the Board of Adjustment. 

With one or two exceptions, it is reasonable to believe that final 
disposition of these pending cases will be reached dining the coming 
year. Special effort will be made to bring to a close the four tax suits 
of the liektash Temple Real Estate Association which have been pending 
for a number of years. 

Other Activity 

At the close of the year, the legal department had under prepara- 
tion for insertion in the Revised Ordinances a summary of new ordi- 
nances, and annotations of ordinances amended or appealed. This new 
draft will be ready for presentation to the city government in a few 
months. 

19 



PLANNING 



Functions 

THE function of the City Planning Board is to act in an advisory 
capacity to the Mayor and the Board of Aldermen on matters relat- 
ing to all nature of public imjjrovements, civic improvements, city plan- 
ning, accepting, widening and changing of streets, controlling subdivision 
development, routing of traffic, developing the zoning plan, and such 
other matters pertaining to civic improvements as the Mayor and 
Aldermen may deem beneficial and to the interest of the City of Concord. 

Extent of Activity 

During 1939, the planning board undertook the first phase of its 
program, the collection and analysis of basic data necessary to the devel- 
opment of a city plan. Particidar attention was given to information 
relating to population, streets, parking, subdivision development, build- 
ing permits, zoning cases and various types of tax data. In addition to 
this activity, the board considered se\eral recpiests for fact-finding studies 
on current municipal problems. Five of these were requests from the 
Mayor; eight from the Board of Aldermen; one from the Board of 
Public Works and two from aldermanic committees. 

Subdivision Control 

During the year, three plats for land subdivision were investigated 
and approved. In two cases, improved street and lot arrangements were 
obtained. Realizing the value of controlled subdivision exjjansion, the 
Board of Aldermen on recommendation of the planning board passed 
an ordinance requiring greater participation by subdividers in the instal- 
lation costs of public facilities such as streets, sidewalks and sewers. 

Street Acceptance 

Petitions for the acceptance of six streets and alle\s were leferred 
to the board by the Board of Aldermen. 
After careful consideration, the planning 
hoard lecommended the acceptance of two 
streets in entirety, two in part; and sug- 
gested that two be denied. Through the 
adoption of these reconnnendations, the 
Board of Aldermen saAcd the city the cost 
of developing and maintaining 1,154 feet of 
unnecessary street. 

Research Studies 

sixteen reports were prepared and issued 
during the year. Space does not permit a 



CITY PLANNING BOARD: 

James M. Langi.ey, Chairman 
Edward E. Beane 
Frederick P. C^lark 
Raymond D. Edwards 
John B. Jameson 
Harold D. Merrill 
Dudley W. Orr 
Austin E. Page 
Hon. John W. Storrs 

DIRECTOR: 

(ksTAF H. I.EHTINEN 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$3,347.70 



20 








## 


















•v-Ji^ 



A growing parking problem in and near the Civic Square will require a police 

solution in the near future 

discussion of each report. However, it seems pertineiu to mention the 
findings in a few of the subjects studied. A study of a pioposed health 
center was made at the request of the Mayor. Tlie board found that 
sucli a center, tire estimated cost of which was $50,000, was unwarranted 
and reconmiended against any further immediate action on the matter. 
The board studied the advisabihty of reconstructing tlie city auditorium 
into an office building at the request of the Lands and Buildings Com- 
mittee. The findings of this study pointed conclusively toward the inad- 
\isability of undertaking a .$90,000 expenditure for this purpose. An- 
other study pertained to the discontinuance of certain highways. The 
problem involved the proposed abandomnent of 12 loads. After study- 
ing the various roads under consideration, the planning board submitted 
a report to the Board of Aldermen on the matter and recommended 
that steps should be taken to abandon such of these roads as coidd 
judiciously be closed. As a result, the city government undertook the 
necessary procedure to discontinue approximately six miles of highway. 
One of the most difficult tasks passed along to the planning board 
by the city government dining 1939 was the matter of eliminating 
existing street name diq^lications in Concord. There were more than 
100 of these duplicate street names and, in some cases, as man) as five 
streets were known by the same name. The board received the able 
assistance of a citizens advisory committee representing each of the city's 
nine wards in solving the problem. Recommendations based on the 
committee's report and a public hearing held by the board have been 
forwarded to the Board of Aldermen suggesting name changes affecting 
47 streets. Ultimate adoption of these changes by the Board of Alder- 
men will give the citizens, who reside on the streets affected, a greater 
measure of fire and police protection through the elimination of con- 
fusion due to street name similarity 

21 



PUBLIC HEALTH - SANITATION 



Aim 

HE aim of the health department is to pre\ent disease, and all 
activity is directed toward this objectiAC. The results obtained in 
1939 indicate that the department's efforts have not been in vain al- 
though a substantial share of the credit belongs to other organizations, 
to the physicians and to the general public. 

The department employs one half-time and two full-time em- 
ployees. The U. S. Public Health Service supplies funds for two addi- 
tional workers. With this staff, the health of the city is watched and 
protected. 

Communicable Disease 

Much effort has been expended during the year on the curtailment 
of communicable disease. The best record in the history of the city 
was established during 1939 for this type of disease. There were no 
cases of infantile paralysis, diphtheria, ophthalmia neonatorum or small 
pox and only one case of typhoid, the source of which was traced out- 
side the city. Six cases of scarlet fever were recorded as compared wath 
an annual average of 46 cases for the past ten years. There has been no 
epidemic of measles, mumps, whooping cough or chicken pox. 

Vital Statistics 

Although the city clerk is the registrar of vital statistics, the health 
department keeps complete statistical records of the \arious factors 
which indicate the general condition of health in the city. 

While the city's death rate remained more or less fixed at 11.2 
deaths per 1,000 population, the 1939 birth rate dropped to an all time 
low of 13.5 births per 1,000 population. Compared with the average 
birth rate of 18.1 for the five year period from 1916 to 1920, the 1939 
birth rate showed a decrease of 4.6 births per 1,000 population. 

Infant mortality, which is the ac- 
cepted index to health conditions, shows 
a marked decrease in Concord. Infant 
deaths have dropped from an average of 
72.3 per 1,000 living births for the period 
1916-1920 to an average of 37.5 lor 1936- 
1939. The accompanying chart shows 
the decrease in the maternal death rate 
()\er the same period. 

There were 679 deaths in Concord 
(Uning 1939. The following table indi- 
cates the number of deaths from seven 
important causes from 1935 to 1939. 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 

Hon. John W. Storrs, Chai 
Robert O. Blood, M.D. 
Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 
CIarl a. Dahlgren, M.D. 
Thoma.s J. Halligan, M.D. 

SANITARY OFFICER: 

Donald G. Barton, M.D. 

MILK INSPECTOR: 

ArsTiN B. Pkkshv 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$6,642.87 



22 



rE^Vtn MOTHERS 
AI^E DYING IN CHILCEir^TH 



1916-1920^^ S 
1921-1925 ^SS 
1926-1930^^ S 
1931-1935 ^S S 
1936-1939 ^S€ 



s 



EACH FIGURE 

DENOTES ONE DEATH 

PER 1000 BIRTHS 



HI35 l'J3(i 1937 1938 1939 

Diseases of circulatory system 135 135 111 114 106 

Cancer .' . . ' 39 13 39 32 32 

Nephritis (Brights' disease) 31 18 7 2« 20 

Accidental deaths 24 14 14 17 18 

Pneiunonia 20 20 24 9 11 

Diabetes 11 7 9 10 10 

Tuberculosis 6 6 5 6 6 

Sanitation 

Ilie sanitation of the city has been improved by the simple method 
of insisting on cleanHness. At the beginning of the year, an energetic 
campaign to improve dishwashing in restaurants was instituted. Bac- 
terial tests were rini on utensils and the results obtained were publishv?d 
as a matter of public interest. At the end of the year, the records 
showed that all establishments were in the very satisfactory classes 
with 80 per cent in the excellent or high groups. 

Plumbing Inspection 

llirough the depai tnient's plumbing inspection activity, nrany dan- 
gerous cross connections were corrected dining the year. The owners 
of man) low-rent tenement houses, where unsatisfactory plumbing facili- 
ties were discovered, have cooperated with the department by installing 
modern sanitary fixtures. During the past \ear, the department saw 
the successful completion of its efforts to clear up Mill Brook in East 
Concord. All sewers discharging into the brook have been discontinued 
and the lircok is no longer a menace to health. 

Environmental Sanitation 

A drive against insanitary tenements was staged during the summer 
months. Altogether, 228 places were inspected. Eightv-eight tenements 
were fumigated for bed begs and cockroaches. 

23 



Poison Ivy 

I'lic jnoblcni oi poison ivy was attacked with \ariou,s methotls of 
extermination. Burning, chemicals, pulHng and crank case oil were 
used with varying degrees ol success on 17 patches. The fight against 
this weed will need to be continued during the coming summer. Hay 
fever sufferers have requested work on ragweed. 

Routine Inspections 

The usual inspections of stores, barber shops, industries, public 
buildings, alleys and dumps were made and conditions were found to 
be satisfactory. The Manor dump was closed by order of the State Board 
of Health and the inhabitants of that vicinity have expressed their 
gratitude for the abatement of its byproducts. 

Educational Program 

The department's educational program has been expanded during 
the vear. However, there is much more work which should be done 
in this field of public health. A regular course of ten lectures in Public 
Health was given at the St. John High School under the direction of 
the public health nurse. A course of ten lectures on Public Health 
was given to the nurses at one of the hospitals and two courses of ten 
lectures each in First Aid were given by the medical officer in cooperation 
with the Red Cross. Forty-seven talks on Public Health were given to 
various clubs, conventions, church meetings and gatherings. Sixty-five 
news items were printed in the local paper concerning health conditions 
in the city. 

MILK INSPECTION 

Bang's Disease 

Concord's milk supply comes from 181 dairies located in 16 towns, 
all of which are within a 15 mile radius of the city. The cows produc- 
ing milk to be sold in Concord are 100 per cent tuberculin tested and 
74 per cent are under federal-state supervision for Bang's Disease. The 
number of cows blood tested has gradually increased from 239 in 1936 to 
1,332 in 1939. Due to this testing, 74 per cent of all the cows in the Con- 
cord area are known to be Bangs Disease free. This disease materially 
lowers milk production and reduces the sales value of all animals affected. 
In recent years, undulant fever has been recognized as one of the diseases 
of cattle commimicable to man through milk. This disease can be 
controlled without difficulty through the proper testing of all animals 
or through the pasteurization of milk. 

Pasteurization 

There are seven modern pastemizing jjlants in Concord which 
handle about 68 per cent of all milk sold. At present, there are 35 
milk distributors in Concord. Five raw milk distributors discontinued 
retail selling during 1939. All plants where milk was pasteurized or 

24 



In cooperation with the 
Health Department, res- 
taurants are maintaining 
a high standard of clean- 
liness. The Sanitary Offi- 
cer is shown gathering 
bacterial samples from 
eating utensils for exam- 
ination at the laboratory 




Every scientific precaution 
is taken to insure a whole- 
some milk supply for the 
people of Concord. The 
Milk Inspector is shown 
testing milk samples at 
the laboratory in City Hall 



otherwise processed were rr((|iKntl\ inspected; theii ecpiipnicni jtiid 
methods were checked b) regular laboiatory tests of samples (ollcc ted by 
the inspector. 

Tests 

ill order to determine the (]nalit\ of milk and cream delivered to 
(ioiKord people. 1.022 routine samjjles were taken from milk trucks to 
the laboiator) for analysis. Bacteriological and chemical examinations 
indicated that 96. .5 per cent of the milk samples tested were within the 
legal requirements. 

Inspections 

Ihe milk inspector made 1.001 inspections during 19.H9. In addi- 
tion to the tegular checking of the production and handling ol milk, the 
inspector assisted the farmers and the milk plant operatots in solving 
their daiiy problems. About 50 per cent of the producers have installed 
electric (ooling tanks for milk. 

1940 

There is reason to believe that all milch cows will be Bang's Drsease 
tested in 1940. Bacterial (oiuits shoidd decrease due to the increased 
use of the electric cooling ecpiipment. There will be some dcciease 
in the number of producer dealeis if the past year can be taken as an 
indication of trend. A greater improvement in dairies and milk rooms 
is anticipated in order that a satisfactory and more uniform mdk will 
be produced for public consumption in Concord. 

25 



MEDICAL SERVICE 



MEDICIAL services are provided by the City of Concord through the 
mecHiim of two city pliysicians, one of whom is (hissified as an 
assistant. Due to the extensive area of the city, the assistant physician 
is in complete charge of the city's medical work in Ward One. 

Duties 

It is the duty of these offiteis of the (ity government to attend u[j()n 
sick who are too poor to pay for piivate medical advice. Ihe tremen- 
dous increase in the number of persons on relief during recent years has 
been equalled by a similar increase in the number of persons who apply 
for free medical care. Most of the cases handled by the city doctors 
are referred to them by the overseers of the poor. However, there are 
many border-line cases of people not on relief who apply for and are 
given free medical attention. In addition to these, the city physician 
is called by the polite de]iartment to attend si( k transients. 

Scope of Service 

Both of the city physicians are regular practitioners and handle 
their city cases as part-time woik in conjunction with their private prac- 
tices. Whenever city patients are unable to call at the doctors' offices, 
house calls are made to the homes of these sick. Cases where hospitaliza- 
tion is needed are tinned over to the two private hospitals in the city 
and placed in the care of the legidar doctors on duty at these hospitals. 

Medical Aid during 1939 

During 1939, the city physician handled, on an average, eight city 
cases each day. The appioximate total number of calls and \isits during 
the year was 3,000. Theie was a slight decrease in the number of cases 
treated during 1939 as compared with the previous year. This was not 
due to an improved condition oi health as much as it was to a reduction 
in the niunbei of persons receiving relief. 

Medicine 

For tlie past two years, a small amount of money has been appro- 
priated by the city for the purchase of medicine for the city poor. This 
procedure has made it possible for the city physician to accpiire a modest 
supply of the more connnon medicines. In many 
cases where prescriptions were formerly neces- 
sary, the city doctor is now able to furnish his 
cnvn medicines. This has residted in a direct 
saving to the lelief department in reducing ex- 
jienditmes for piescribed medicine, riie adop- 
tion of this policy has made it possible for the city 
physician to piactice with more efficiency and 
with greater benefit to the city poor. 



CITY PHYSICIAN: 

Thomas J. II.m.i.kian 

ASSISTANT 
CITY PHYSICIAN: 

Im.mkk L'. Sakcjkni 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,751.97 



26 



PARKS - CEMETERIES - TREES 



ALL tily parks, coninioiis, public .st|iiaic's and (eineLeiics arc iiiuler 
tlic manageiiR-nt and control of a Park and Cemetery Commission. 
I he membership ol this connnission includes the Mayor and six legal 
voters ol the city. 1 he connnission appoints a superintendeiu who is 
in (hargc ol tlepai tmental operations. 

1 he care ol all trees on city property, except parks and water works, 
is the responsibilii) ol the city tree warden. He exercises all the powers 
granted to town tree wardens under the Public Laws of New Hampshire. 
The tree warden is appointed by the Board of Aldermen. 

Although these two city activities are by ordinance distinct entities, 
lor all piactical piii pose they operate as a single department. The super- 
intendent of pai ks and cemeteiies is also the tree warden. This arrange- 
ment has worked well and has resulted in gieatcr operating efficiency at 
a miniminn of cost to the city. 

Parks 

1 he storm damage of September, 19,18 left nuich work to be done 
in the city paiks. In Rollins Paik, the down timlx'r was sawed, sttunps 
were removed, ami the entile pai k was regiaded aiul loamed to a depth 
of seven inches. Foui luuidred red pine, eight to ten feet tall, were 
planted in the park during the spring. .\n avenue of large Norway 
Maples was set out. The entire cost of this work was fmanced by the 
sale of lumber which was sawed in the park. 

At W^hite Park, the new baseball field was completed with the aid 
of the WTA. Stmnps and damaged trees were removed during the 
early smnmer, and 23 new trees were planted. 

In Garrison Park, the fallen timber was cut and drawn to the mill. 
The remaining brush was burned, bm lack of funds did not permit the 

iem()\;d of the stumps. These stumps will 
be cleared duiing the coming year. 

The department stai ted many young 
jjlants at the nursery; many of them are 
perennials. 1 hese plants will be set out 
in the city jjaiks during 1940. llie nur- 
sery, started in 1936 as an experiment, has 
grown from a plantation of a ([uarter of 
an acre to one of one and one-half acres. 
There are now available hundreds of 
plants and tiees for use in parks, fortu- 
nately, the nursery has cost the city very 
little due to the welcome labor assistance 
rendeied by the N. \. A. 

Cemeteries 

The year 1939 was one of the most 



PARK <S CEMETERY 
COMMISSION: 

Hon. John W. Storks, Cliai 
Herkert G. Abbot 
Pierre A. Boucher 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Robert J. Graves 
Alpheus M. Johnson 
Mrs. Thomas N. Troxell 

SUPERINTENDENT: 

(i\ki, I-. .S\ki,i.Nr 

TREE WARDEN: 

(JARL I-. Sargent 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

I'aiks - $24,1G5.L".) 
Geiiieifiies - $35,:553.80 
Trees - $13,163.90 



27 



trying in the history of the cemetery department. In addition to the 
routine business of operating the city's many cemeteries, the department 
undertook the task of undoing the damage wrought by the 1938 gale. 
Many of the valuable ornamental trees injured by the storm had to be 
removed. Wherever possible, tree surgery was used to restore badly 
damaged trees. Many new trees and shrubs were j)lanted to cover scars 
left by the storm. Scores of monuments had to be straightened and reset. 
The summer house at Blossom Hill Cemetery was damaged lo suih an 
extent tliai it had lo be removed. 

All of this emergency work did not materially deter the dcj)artment 
from the execution of its cemetery imjjrovement jMogram. At Blossom 
Hill, five-eighths of a mile of new hard surface road was constructed, 
making a comijlete hard surface load from the north to the south gate. 
A new open-air pa\ilion was buih to take the j)la(e of the destroyed 
sunnner house. One and three-tenths acres of land were regraded and 
made suitable lot i)urial purj)oses. With the assistance of the WPA, the 
pond at Blossom Hill was restored after many )eais ol disuse. To fur- 
ther beautify this area, azaleas and i hododendrons were |)lanted in the 
pine gro^e to the Avest of the pond. 

Soon aflei the stoim damage had been i"ej)aire(I. ihe dej)artment 
was confronted with one of the most severe droughts experienced in 
(]oncord in man) yens. Many lots suffered to the extent that it will 
be necessaiN lo regrass on a major scale duiing the connng spiing. 

Trees 

The trees along tlie city streets were left in a deplorable state by th" 
19.S8 near-hurricane. The tree department has labored incessantly in 
repairing the damage. It has been necessary to prune and lepait nearly 
every stieet shade tiee. Many tiees have been cabled. It will take 
several )ears loi these trees to recover firlly from the efTects of the storm. 
There has been \eiy little damage during the past yeai from 
defoliation caused b) G)psy Moth, Elm Leaf Beetle, or Japanese Beetle. 
The number of Japanese Beetles trapped in 1939 shows a decrease of 

nearl) 71 pei cent o\er any pre\ ions 
\ear. No new inlesicd areas lia\e been 
found and in mam ol ihc^ old areas the 
destrucliou ol the beetle has bc^cn com- 
plete. 

New seed beds were made ai the 
ninseiy for the |)lanting of Norway 
Maj:)les. Ijy starting its own seed, the 
city Avill be able to sa\e the cost of pur- 
c basing two year old tiansplaiUs. a cus- 
tomaiy |)taclicc' in the past. 



The aesthetic beauty of the 
city depends largely on tree 
preservation. City employees 
are shown working on a tree 
at Blossom Hill Cemetery 




RECREATION 



Playground and Bath 

ONE ol liu- iiiosi \alualjk' st-rv icf s rendered by ilie city is its recrea- 
tional program lor diiUlreii. Full well, does the city realize 
tliat it can ill alloitl to neglect to supervise the leisure time ot its 
children, lo l;i- guiliN ol such neglect would be the worst type ot folly. 
T'le econoni) ol lurnishing clean wholesome j^lav acti\itv in the 
safety of super\ised play ureas is an established lad. There is no better 
preventati\e of )u\enile delincjuency than a well-rounded recreational 
program. 

The responsibility of supervising the playgroiuul and bath acti\ity 
in the city is \ested in the Connnittee on iMaygrounds and Bath. 

Facilities 

rhe physical plant uhith is necessary to the conduct of the children's 
recreational program in Concord is unicjue. The large area of the city 
combined with the scattered suburban natiue of its growth has neces- 
sitated the establishment of nine playgrounds in a city with less than 
6,000 children between the ages of .^) and H). In addition to these nine 
playgrounds, all ol which are sujKi\ised. the cii\ maintains six. super- 
vised wading pools, a guarded swinnning area on the Suucocjk River, 
nine tennis ccjurts, seven skating areas, two hockey rinks, and ten pro- 
tected street sliding areas. 

Supervision 

Jhe city employs a supervisor of playgrounds on a full-time basis. 
He serves in the dual capacity of dircctoi of recreational activities and 
agent in charge of maintenance work. Duiing ilie siniiiiier months 

when the plaxgrounds and pools are in 
operation, -1 playgroiuul instructors and 
pool guaicls are employed. Throughout 
the winter when sliding is possible, pcjlice 
officers are stationed al two of llie larger 
sliding areas. Police officers are fuiuished 
h)r both of the city's after-supper baseball 
leagues throughout the siunmer. 

Activities 

The su pel vised summer jilayground 
j>rogram includes baseball, volleyball, bas- 
ketball, soft ball, tennis, track, horseshoes 
and many games of skill. Special instruc- 
tion for gioups interested in handicraft is 
available. Organized inter-playground com- 
petition in sports is conducted during the 

29 



COMMITTEE ON 
PLAYGROUNDS 6. BATH: 

U Akoi ij U. MhKKiii,, Chaiiman 

UaKKY C;. A.VLlEkSON 

CIharlks F. Coakley 
Earl W. Gaige 

1 EIGH M. WeNTVVOKTH 

Harolu M. Farrak 

Mrs. Maud N. Blackwood 

Mrs. Kathleen Mullen 

Mr.>). Victoria Mahoney 

Mis.s Margaret C.h/llls 

Mrs. Ethel M. Stokr-s 

Mrs. Nora E. Donovan 

Mrs. James M. I.angley 

SUPERVISOR: 

Paul CJ. C'.rowh i 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 



season. Supervised picnic trips to nearby lakes are a part of the varied 
acti\ity (onducted lor the enjo)nient of the children. Two city-wide 
licld days are held each year to climax the season's play activity. 

At the wading pools, continuous protection is furnished throughout 
the day. Special instruction in swimming is available at all pools. 
During the 1939 season, 140 children were taught to swim. Swimming 
meets between the Aarious playgrounds were sponsored, and a city-wide 
meet was held at the conclusion of the swimming season. A team rep- 
resenting Concord was entered in the New Hampshire Amateur Swim- 
ming Championships held at Manchester in August, 1939. The members 
of this team made a very creditable showing by placing five of their 
number among place winners. 

Duiing the winter months, skating, hockey and sliding facilities 
aie provided at various points throughout the city. A hockey league 
has been organized for the older boys and a schedule of games is main- 
tained during the skating season. In addition to the regular winter 
program, a successful winter carnival was held at White Park during 
January, 1939. With the cooperation of merchants and public spirited 
citizens, competitive winter sports events were luld and \aluable prizes 
were awarded to the winners. 

Attendance 

The combined attendance at the city's playgroimds and pools over 
the ten week j^eriod of operation during 1939 was 97,842. Compared 
with an attendance of 92,032 for the year 1938, the 1939 attendance 
figure showed an increase of about 5,800. Only the fact that the Sou- 
cook River Swimming Area was closed for more than three weeks by 
the State Board of Health at the very height of the swimming season 
kept the 1939 attendance from reaching a point well in excess of 100,000. 
The part which the city wading pools }:)lay in the scheme of sunrmer 
recreation is worthy of mention. The opening of a new wading pool 
on the Plains last summer caused the a\crage weekly attendance in that 
area to jump from 200 to 1,700. 

Althf)ugh a definite count of daily attendance at the skating areas 
has not been kept, spot checks ha^•e indicated as many as 800 persons 
using these areas on a single day. 

Year-around sports and recreational facilities are provided by the city. Here, the Mayor joins 
the children on a red-letter day — the annual opening of playground swimming activities 



/a 





Tournament play is only one of the many attractions of the Beaver Meadow Golf Course 



Special Recreational Facilities 

I lie City Recreation Commission, a five-man board including the 
Mayor E\-Officio and four members appointed from outside the Board 
of Aldermen by the Mayor, supervises that portion of civic recreational 
activities in Concord represented by Beaver Meadow Golf Course, 
Memorial Athletic Field, and the newly-improved Russell Pond Winter 
Sports Area. 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course, located conveniently near Daniel Web- 
ster Highway on the northern edge of the city, attracts both local and 
transient golfers by a combination of moderate fees and nine holes of 
medium difficidty. The recreation commission operates the golf course 
through a manager and two outside employees who arc on a seven- 
months-a-year basis. 

Fees are scaled so that the golf course has in jiast years been just 
about able to make expenses. No provision is made as a rule for large- 
size improvements on the course. Added attractions are a commodious 
clubhouse and locker-room, a tennis court, services of a golf professional 
at call, and a driving net. 

During the 1939 season, the club had a regular membership of 131. 
Ten of these were junior members. Outside of its membership, the 
facilities of the golf course were used cpiite extensively. This is indi- 
cated by the collection of 2,7(i7 one-day fees during the playing season. 

Memorial Athletic Field 

Mcnioiial Athletic Feld might j)roperly be called the Hub of Con- 
cord sports. Its football field houses all im- 
portant gridiron {(intests to come to the 
city. Its tennis courts accommodate a 
large proj)()ition of all tennis tournaments 
held here. Its wide green fields are equally 
in\()kc(l lot Softball and hardball leagues, 
touch football and other extempore sports 
during the so-called "off-seasons" of the 
year. 

31 



RECREATION 
COMMISSION: 

J. Mitchell Ahfrn, Cliaiiwan 
Gardner G. Emmons 
I.EioH S. Hall 
Garleton R. Metcalf 
Hon. John W. .Storrs 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

!i;,'i,936..'ia 




From ski jumping to skat- 
ing, facilities for the com- 
plete cycle of winter sports 
are available at the Russell 
Pond Winter Sports Area 











In addition to its use for 
sport activities, the Mem- 
orial Athletic Field provides 
ideal accommodations for 
outdoor gatherings like this 
state high school music 
festival 




Russell Pond Winter Sports Area 

All aspect ol the til\'s i ei i t-atioiial |jicliuv doiniaiu iiiilil this year, 
tlie Russell Pond Winter Sports Area, became a challenging lac tor with 
the installation of a ski-tow. ijiesenialion ol a cjiialilied ski-school, and 
a general betterment ol lacilities. 1 he area includes two spacious hill- 
sides, one now devoted to teaching and the other to more advanced 
skiing, a toboggan slide, skating lacilities, and accommodations lor 
tired enthusiasts. 

The area has been expanded at little expenditure to the city be- 
cause oi private establishment of the ski-tow and schcjol. .\n enlarged 
program ol snow activities, to include carnivals and legulai (omjjetilion, 
is envisioned by the recreation commission. 

32 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Policy 



Dl'RlNX; tlie yeai 19:59, 
( ixascil use ol the libr; 



(here was a noticeable trend towaul in- 
ary facilities by serious readers and study 
groups. This is in line with the etiorts ot the library to provide the 
public with eihuaiional as well as recreational opportunities, to provide 
a balanced approach lo suljjecls ol interest to citi/ens ol C^cjncord and 
lo make axailable to local people niateiial of a specialized nature which 
cannot be provided for in Concord's own book stacks, but which can be 
secuied through tlie inter-library loan service. 

Library System 

The Concord l*ublic Library system consists of a main libiaiy in 
the city proper and h)ui branch libraries located conveniently in the 
outlying sections of the city. During 1939, due to the necessity of vacat- 
ing the old library building before the new library was completed, the 
main libraiy acti\ity was caiiied on from temporary cjuaiters. 



BOARD OF 
LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

C)l.l\LK jENKliNS, Fliiidillt 

Henry B. Cannon, Jr. 
Joseph J. C'oMi 
Edward A. Dame 
Fred M. Dodge 
Mrs. Armine M. Inoh^.m 
Perley B. Phillips 
Alexander Rennie, Jr. 
Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 

LIBRARIAN: 

Ar^RioN r. HoiT 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

Operation - $18,544.f)(l 
Clonstruttioii An'l - $120,930.39 



Book Collection 

The libiaiy l)ook collection numbers 
41,86(). During 1939, 2, Hi3 books were 
added and (iOO were discarded. The fiction 
collection consists of 14,794 bcjoks. Ilie 
non-liction collection ol -!7,072 books re- 
presents (i,5 pei cent of I he total numbei 
of books at tlie library. 1 he juvenile book 
collection contains 4,l()7 books. Ihere are 
1.88 volumes per capita in the pul)lic 
library. 

Extent of Use 

Forty-six [)ei- cent of the population 



The new Concord Public Library, built at a cost ol approximately one-quarter of a million 
dollars, provides the city with the most modern library facilities in New Hampshire 




CONCORD PEOPLE APE 
LEAPING ^OPE EOOKS 



195^598 




1921 1924 1927 1930 1933 1936 1939 



of Concord arc ici»istcrc(l lioldeis ol library cards. During the year, 
1,008 new borrowers were lecorded. Even though tr)ing conditions were 
placed on borrowers and staff alike by the necessity of oj)erating in 
crowded, make-shift cjuarters, the total circidation of 195,598 represents 
an increase of nearly 5,000 over the previous year. The per capita cir- 
culation lor the year was 7.82 books. I he chilchen's circidation amoun- 
ted to 24 per cent of the total numljcr of xohuiies loaned by the library. 

Tlie reference loom was used extensively dining the )car. Ihe 
library staff answered 5,787 reference questions. As an added service, 
a weekly story houi lor diildrcn was conducted. Through these story 
hours greater panic ipat ion by juveniles in the use of the library has 
been stimulated. 

Cost of Operation 

I'hc total cost of operating I he librar) during 19-V.) was .|i 1 8,544.50. 
Of this sum, .1iil2.'^88.34 was aj)pio])riated by the cit\ government; the 
remainder re|)resents income from miscellaneous librar) trust lunds. In 
relation with the total nuiriber of volumes circulated, the operating 
cost, represents a jxr volume e\j)cndiiure of nine cents. 



34 



The New Library 

A (omljination ol ( Ik unisiaiiccs were insirimiciital in bringing 
about the conslruttion ot Concord's new j)ublic library. Although an 
urgcni need lor expanded libiary laeiliiies had been felt for some time, 
the matter did not come to a head until the State of New Hampshire 
started condemnation proceedings to acc|uire the library property to 
make way for the Slate House Annex. Fortunately, sufficient funds 
were made available from the condemnation award, various library 
construction trusts and a federal PWA grant to finance at no direct 
cost to the city the accjuisition of a new site, the construction of the 
library and the pinchase of necessary library equipment. 

In keeping with the development of the Civic Square, the city 
government approved the selection of a site for the new library adjacent 
to the City Hall on Green Street. Late in 1938, ground was iDroken for 
the new structure and construction has progressed to the stage where 
January 29, 1940 has been set as the date for the opening of library 
service in the new building. 

Although fnial figuies are not available at this time, reliable estimates 
have placed the combined cost of the site and the building at $266,705. 

Necessarily, nuich time and attention has been directed by the 
trustees and the stall to planning and supervising the many details ol 
construction of the new building. These efforts have been made in the 
hope that the year 1910 will inaugurate a new era of expanded library 
service for the citizens of Concord. 




Children enjoy the spe- 
cial facilities provided 
for their use in the chil- 
dren's room of the new 
library 



A view of the library 
reading room where the 
public can read good 
books under ideal condi- 
tions 



RELIEF 



RELIEF (ontiiuies to be one ol ilic iiuijoi proljlenis ol the City of 
Cioiuoid. Appioximateh six per cent of the entire population of 
tlie titv were lecipients of some foini of |)ul)li( reliel dining 19.H9. 

General Conditions 

Alllioiit^li there lias al\va)s been an expenditure foi ihi' relief of the 
poor and in all probability alwa)s will be, inosl of the present lelief 
problem nuisi be ecjusidered as a temjjorary eonditi(jn brought on l)y 
the lack of employment. Ehe size of the relief load depends largely on 
the amount of available private employment. Foi tunaiely, business 
conditions in (ioncord did not sutler dining 1939 to the extent that an 
added relief bmden was created. In most cases, slua-downs were tem- 
porary, and the lack of intome was absorbed through unempl(j\nient in- 
smance. A limitetl number of relief clients were retianed to private 
emplcnnieni dining the year. 

Administration 

I'hit administration of (Concord's relief is vested in c)ne or more 
overseeis of poor by an act of the New Hampshire legislature. There 
are two overseers ol [joor in Cioncoid, one lor Penacook antl one loi the 
remaining area of the lit). This arrangement has operated efficient 1\ 
and there has been no duplication of eflort. In addition to the overseers, 
the administrative stall consists ol ten permanent employees. Such 
administrative assistance as the Penacook Overseer needs is drawn from 
the regular stall of the city relief office. 



County Relief 

Under existing laws, cei 
bility ol the county. Most ol 



CITY RELIEF BOARD: 

Hakkv I'. Anderson, dhuii mati 
Ralph L. Stearns 

AriIHR K. SlllKlE\ANI 

OVERSEER OF POOR: 

Frank l). CiiLBERi 

OVERSEER OF POOR, 
WARD 1: 

CIHAR1.ES 1'. C'.OAKEEV 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

Relief - $76,066. 0:-i 

Wood Expense - $14,276.64 

1939 REIMBURSEMENTS 
AND EARNINGS: 

$5,05:r:io 



tain t)pes of relief cases are the responsi- 
these are lormei- city cases \vhiih have been 
turned i)\cr lo the county after receiving 
cit\ aid for a period of live years. Because 
the countv does not maintain a reliel office, 
the city reliel dei>artment selves as an agent 
of the (ounly in supervising Cloncord's 
c()uni\ relief cases. The cost of this relief 
and iis adiniiiistiaiion is charged directly 
against the count). However, no appreci- 
able saving accrues to the city by this case- 
trading pi act ice. I he county chaiges 52% 
of its Concoid relief cost directly to the 
city. The other 48",', is taken Irom the 
general county tax which is levied on a 
jjiopeity valuation basis on the various 
cities and towns in the county. The City 
of (oiuord, as the largest community in 



36 



Meiriinack County, .issunics indircdly the other '18% of the rity's 
tounty iclici costs through the heavy share ol the county tax that it pays. 

Other Activities 

In addition to straight rclici, aid is given to dependent sokHers 
through the city relief office. Tlie city also contributes 25 j)er cent of 
the total outlay for old age assistance and the entire cost of maintaining 
its dependent diildren. The supervision of both of these relief activ- 
ities is a fun( tion of the state. 

Over and above the giving of nionetaiy aid, the general health of 
relief clients is a concern of the dej^artnient. Medical services aie pro- 
vided in the form of physicians for the sick, dental and optical attention, 
hospitalization and medicine. In cases of death in relief families, funeral 
expenses are jiaid by the relief office. 

The relief dejiartment, in addition to the adminisiiation of assis- 
tance to thc^se in distress, does a considerable amount of social welfare 
work. Advice, j^ertaining to the j)uichase and preparation of foods, 
living conditions, marital diflerences, habits affecting family welfare 
and many other like matters, is a patt of the routine service rendered by 
the staff. 

The ReUef Load 

During the year 19.S9 the aveiage number of Concord persons receiv- 
ing relief were as follows: city relief 436, comity relief 1,134; city 
dependent soldiers 32, county dependent soldiers 13, old age assistance 
118, dependent children 13. The total cost of city relief was .f;76,066.03; 
the county's share of relief cc^sts amounted to $121,786.37 for a grand 
total relief cost in the City of Concord of $197,852.40. (A detailed 
breakdown of relief costs is presented in the appendix.) 

Although changing conditions minimize the value of comparisons 
with previous yeais, a general reduction in the number of clients and 
the total relief expenditure has been effected in Concord. Compared 
Avith 1938, the average number of persons receiving city lelief during 
1939 decreased 37 ])er cent and county relief persons decreased 7 per 
cent. The total cost of city relief expenditures was 26 per cent less in 
1939 than during the previous year. The total cost of county relief in 
Concord dropped 16 j)er cent during the same period. No one factor 
was respoirsiblc for these reductions. The answer can be found <mly in 
a combination of circumstances such as increased employment in private 
industry, em|)l()vmcni on make-work |)rojects, greater care in investi- 
gation, closer inidgei suj^ervision and similar factors. 

Food Costs 

In order to drterminc an ace in ate l)asis for the calculation of food 
costs for budgetary purjioses, the department sent out cpiartcrly price 
questionnaires to local food merchants in 1939. The response from 
these questionnaires indicated that a giadual decrease in food prices had 
taken place and thai the average food dollar purchased 14 per cent more 
in 1939 than in 1937, the date of the last survey used as a basis for setting 
up food budgets. 

37 



Fuel 

During 1939, in addition to actual relief expenditures, 1 1(5, 072. (J3 
was expended lor wood loi' iuel to be issued on order to relief clients. 
Most of this wood came from city-owned lots. On the basis of cost as 
jMepared by outside auditors, wood deliveries for the )ear resulted in 
savings of .fi 1,887. 00. On December -51, there was a balance of 2,25.5 
cords of mixed wood (ju hand at the \vood yard. I'he in\entory \alue 
of tliis wood al (osl is .SIO.595.7.1. i'he department estimates that this 
wood should ellec I an approximale luriher sa\ing of 39,000.00 in relief 

(OStS. 



S ^/ it? ! t 


i2 IJ 


!~> Uy 17 f 8 


fQ 20 


22 2 1 2 1 2p 


"a 


' --'^^-i,. 


m 




Efficient administration ol 
relief depends on thorough 
investigation by trained 
case workers. Depicted here, 
is a typical relief interview 
at the Relief Office on 
Warren Street 



Most of the fuel used by 
the city's relief recipients 
comes from the Relief De- 
partment's woodpile loca- 
ted on the Concord Plains 





Ashlar walls like this one 
at the Pine Grove Cemetery 
in East Concord are a part 
of the public improvement 
program sponsored by the 
city in cooperation with the 
W. P. A. 



W. p. A. 



Number of Persons Affected 

DURING 1939, the average number of persons employed on \V. P. A. 
projects was !^0(). Together with their dependents, these project 
workers represent o\ir I, ()()() Concord citizens who would ol necessity 
be recipients oi direct reliel il W. P. A. work was not available. 

Expenditures 

All the lunds expended by the city on prcjject work are used to 
puichase materials, ecjuipment, truck service, transportation and similar 
necessities. The lederal government's share is represented by the pay- 
ment ol all wages. The sponsorship ol the work relief jjrogram cost the 
City of Concord .$. 57,476. 75 during 19-59. Of this sum ^3. 1^9.20 was 
paid by direct appropriation lor "white-collar" projects, while $54,347.55 
was paid through the issuance of bonds for laboring piojec ts. 

Administration 

A project connnittee of the city government represents the city in 
its dealings with the fedeial government. It is a further duty of this 
committee to pass on all projects before they aie luidertaken. Tlie city 
engineer acts as the administrative ofhcei- foi the connnittee in the direct 
operation of projects. 



Accomplishments 

In return lot its share of the cost of the W. P. A. program, the 
city received 468,000 man-hoins of labor duiing the past year. This 
labor was applied to a huge variety of usefid pei manent work. Tlie larg- 
est single item was the construction of 9,090 feet of sanitary and storm 
sewers. Other accomplishments include the replacement of ten culverts, 

three miles of road alignment, roadside 
beautification, 5,441 feet of street curb, 
.3,000 feet of reconstructed sidewalk and 
1.600 feet of ashlar wall. In addition to 
these improvements, li\e water holes were 
built; 12 acres of land were graded at 
White and Rollins Paiks; and enlarged 
facilities were provided at the Russell 
Pond Winter Sports Area. Work was 
started during 1939 on the Merrimack 
River erosion project north of Horseshoe 
l^ond. Appioximaiely one-half mile of 
the west bank of the river is being re- 
enforced with stone in an effoit to arrest 
f lather shifting of the river channel. 

39 



PROJECT COMMITTEE: 

January-September 

Chaulk.s J. McKee, Chaiiinati 
William A. Stevens 
Gordon S. Lokd 
Arthur E. Robv 
September-December 

C^HARLES J. McKee, Chuiiinan 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William A. Stevens 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

OFFICER: 

Edward E. Beane, City Eiigiiif,! 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

Bond Issues - $54,347.55 

Diieil Appropiiation - $3,129.20 



POLICE PROTECTION 



Duties 

THE police (k']);irliiicnt is (li;ugc<l with tlic j)i otcc lion ol prisons aiui 
|)roj)cr() in the City of Concord. lis activiiics can be (livided into 
two general classifications: first, the prexention ol crime and law \iola- 
tions, and second, the apprehension of persons avIio ha\e violated the law. 
The regnlation of street traffic is a further duty of the dcpariniem. 

Personnel 

During 1939. the personnel of the j)olice de|)artnient consisted of 
a chief, four officers. Hi regular patrolmen, a chauffem -mechanic, a clerk 
and a regulaily employed special officer. Iwenty-six sjiecial officers 
wcrv a\ailal)l{' for duty when called. 

Appropriation 

The apj)ropriation for the maintenance ol the departmciu lor I'J.'V.) 
was $60,739.90, expenditures were in excess of this amount by .|i 18,3.65. 
Department income amounted to $346.92 and was credited to I he depart - 
mcni to offset the over-draft. 

Police Training 

For the fust time in the history of the Concord Police i:)cpai tnirni, 
an officers' training school was conducted. Operated during an eight 
week period on a one-afternoon-a-week basis, the school was devoted 
to training in the following subjects: mechanics of arrest, securing and 
preserving evidence, criminal law, arrests with and without wairanis, 
court behavior, accident prevention and zoning laws. 

The instructors were persons qualified to speak on the suf:)iects dis- 
cussed dining the course of study. One of these instructors was the 

department's own jjolice captain who at- 
tended I he V. B. I. School in Washington. 
During the course of study, gioiips ol 
officers were gi\en theoretical crimes to 
sohe. Evidence was arranged so that the 
guilt\ |iarty could be established and the 
|)roblem was turned o\er to the officers foi 
solution. 

Effecti\e ap|)lication b\ the officers ol 
the knowledge gained through the course 
of study has indicated thai the school was 
an uncjualificd success. 

In the last two years, 12 officers h:\\c 
attended the Police Training School con 
ducted by the New Hampshire State Police 
at the University of New Hampshire. 



POLICE COMMISSION: 

C;harles L. Jap.kman, Chairman 
Daniel .Shea 
Guy a. Swenson 



CHIEF OF POLICE: 

Victor 1. Moore 

DEPUTY 

CHIEF OF POLICE: 

J. KllWARn SlIAA 

POLICE CLERK: 

BuRTflN 1.. RaII EV 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

.$60,923.55 



40 



14 


3 


II 


136 


36 


100 


21 


13 


8 


237 


62 


175 



Criminal Data 

Ol the 258 crimes in Class I reported to the police, 21 were un- 
founded. Twenty-three per cent of the actual offenses were cleared by 
arrest. A return of Class I offenses is as follows: 

Classification Ofjciiscs Actual Not Cleared 

of Offenses Reported Ojjrnses Cleared December 31 

Criminal Homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated Assault 

Biirglarv— 

Breaking &: Entering . . 70 66 10 56 

Larcen\— theft 

(Over .S50) 15 

(Under 550) 151 

Auto Theft 22 

Total 258 

Stolen Property 

I^roperty valued at $18,112.72 was stolen during the year. Sixty- 
three per cent of this property was recovered. Twenty-one autos were 
stolen in the city; 20 of these were recovered, 16 locally and four by other 
jurisdictions. 

Statistics indicate that 19^^9 Class I offenses increased about 60 per 
cent ()\er the previous year. A more acciuate method of crime recording 
probably accounts for this rise. An increase of about 45 per cent in 
the amoinit of property stolen in 19,H9 over 1938, was due to larceny 
by juveniles of ten more cars. These cases were classed as joy-riding. 

Improvements 

During 1939, the department installed a complete new filing system. 
This system, which provides the city with a modern method of crime 
recording, has done much to increase the efficiency of the department. 
Through the use of comprehensive files, the police force has readily 
available valuable information to assist in the apprehension of criminals. 
The system provides a frequency index useful to the allocation of 
police patrols and to the determination of hazardous traffic areas. 

A police car was purchased for use at the Penacook Sub-Station. 
The mobility, which this car provides the officers stationed in the area, 
has increased the scope of the protection which the department furnishes 
the citizens of Penacook. The department has found that the main- 
tenance of a car at Penacook costs less than sending a car and driver 
from headc[uarters to Penacook at frecjuent intervals. 

Police Radio 

Although the acquisition of a police radio must be considered as a 
finther improvement in the police department, it deserves special men- 

41 



tion here. Through the generosity of an anonymous donor, the City 
of Concord now has a modern two-way poHce radio communication 
system. Through the medium of this ladio, the police department has 
been able to take a long step forward in adjusting its staff of 21 officers 
and men to the 64 sc[uare mile area of the city. The area of the city 
now under continuous patrol is much larger than in the past. The 
radio has reduced the time element, so important in the case of an 
emergency, to a minimum. Since the completion of the installation of 
this equipment in October, there has been ample proof that the police 
radio is an indispensable part of a program of efficient police protection 
in Concord. 

Finger-Printing 

Some 700 finger-print records, taken since the first of May, 1939, 
show a decided increase in the capacity of the identification bureau. 
The department in cooperation with local youth organizations has 
established about 350 personal identification records by finger prints 
with the Federal Bureau of Identification. 

Traffic Safety 

A summary of the motor vehicle accident record for 1939 shows the 
following figures: 

Total accidents reported or investigated 329 

Injuries received in accidents 142 

Deaths resulting from accidents 2 

The department is handicapped in its efl:ort to reduce motor vehicle 
accidents because it does not have enough policemen to maintain a 
day patrol for this piupose. 

During the year, greater effort was made to prosecute negligent 
operators involved in accidents. The department believes that the most 
efficient and efl^ective safety campaign is one of rigid law enforcement. 

A deviation from the regular schedule and arrangement of beats 
through the svmimer months, made it possible to have four instead of 
three policemen on Main Street patrol. This procedure facilitated the 
control of heavy traffic during the daylight hours and added to the 
safety of pedestrians at street crossings. 

A few changes in parking regulations were made in order to relieve 
congestion in certain unrestricted areas. The use of parking meters 
was brought to the attention of Concord citizens, but a canvass con- 
ducted by local merchants in cooperation with the Chamber of Com- 
merce indicated that a majority of those contacted did not approve 
of the meter. It is the opinion of the department that the installation of 
parking meters would be a great aid in the control of unrestricted 
parking and would be a source of considerable income at no expense to 
the city. 

42 




















Modern equipment, facilities and train- 
ing have brought a superior type of 
police protection to the citizens of 
Concord. The new police radio com- 
munication system increases the mobil- 
ity and the usefulness of the Police 
Department 



PROBATION 



Duties 

IT IS the responsiijility oi the Pioljaiion Officer to in\estigate anv case, 
matter or question at the request of tlie court and to malce such recom- 
mendations as may seem pertinent and necessary to bring about an 
adjustment. It is a furtlier duty of tfie probation officer to supervise 
tlie activity of persons placed ozi probation by tlie court. 

The office was created on June 20, 1938 and the probation officer 
lias been employed on a part time basis since that date. An increased 
case load has made it necessary for the officer to devote practically his 
entire time to this work in order to effect efficient results. 

Activities 

During the year 1939, 42 cases were referred to the j^robation officer 
by the court. Of this number, 39 were juvenile delinquents and three 
concerned the failure of husband or parent to properly support his 
family. There have been no violations by these probationers and no 
commitments were necessary. Nine juvenile cases were investigated in 
which no court action was taken because the offenses committed did 
not warrant such procedure. A sum of S260 was collected from the three 
adults under supervision for non-support. This money was turned 
over to their dependents. 

The total number of \isits by probationers to the probation officer 
was approximately 1,500. The officer made 300 field visits to homes, 
schools and places of employment of probationers. About 150 contacts 
were made with other agencies and community resources in behalf of 
probationers. 

At the present time, there are approximately 50 active probation 
cases. In addition to these, there are 30 cases which have never been 
brought before the court but which demand considerable attention and 
guidance in the prevention of delincjuency. 

Juvenile Delinquency 

Increased emphasis has been placed on efforts toward prevention 
of delinquency. The fvdl importance of this work cannot be under- 
stated and in no case is the familiar adage "an ounce of prevention is 

worth a poinid of cure" more fitting tlian in 
pre-delinquency efforts with the "border-line" 
youths of our city. 

The average age of the juvenile proba- 
tioner is 14 years. The principal cause of 
juvenile delinquency appears to be a lack of 
parental supervision. A definite correlation 
between this type of case and poor housing 
conditions has been noted. The period of 



MUNICIPAL COURT: 

Judge William L. Stevens 

PROBATION OFFICER: 

Robert L. Colby 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,404.47 



44 




BASED ON 1935 REAL 
PROPERTY INVENTORY 



CONCOD.D 

NEW M AM n 5 1-1 I lit 

PLANNING DOAPID 




CItV PROPCR- 







JUVENILE 
DELINQUENCY 

JLNt 1938- JANUARY 1940 

• ACTIVE PROBATION CASE 
A SUPERVISED BORDER- 
LINE CASE 



coNcono 

NEW MAMPSMIR-t 

PLANNING DOAR.D 



The accompanying maps indicate the close correlation between the distribution 
of population and juvenile delinquency in Concord 



probation in these cases varies from one to five years, depending upon 
the circiunstances surrounding each individual case. 

It has been the experience ot the probation office that regular re- 
porting by probationers and systematic visits in the homes, schools and 
places of employment of probationers contribute more in reaching 
favorable results in the rehaliilitation of character than anything else 
with two exceptions, the church and youth organizations. 

Cooperation 

The probation officer has continued to receive the whole-hearted 
cooperation of various city and state departments. Their assistance, 
freely rendered, has been gratifying and has aided immeasurably the 
attack on the problems of prevention and correction of juvenile delin- 
quency. 



45 



MUNICIPAL COURT 



Organization 

THE municipal court, or police court as it is commonly called, is set 
up according to the provisions of the Public Laws ot New Hamp- 
shire. There is a judge and a special judge who are appointed by the 
governor with the ad\ice and consent of the council. AH records are 
kept by a clerk of the court who is appointed by the judge. 

Jurisdiction 

1 he nuuiicipai court ser\es the City of Concord and a nmiiber of 
nearby Merrimack County towns where there are no courts. The court 
has original jurisdiction in criminal cases which are punishable by a 
fine not exceeding S500 or imprisonment not exceeding one year or 
both. Criminal cases of a more serious nature are bound over to the 
superior court, and in cases where bail is permitted, the judge of the 
municipal court sets the amount required as surety for appearance before 
the higher court. 

The municijjal coint has concurrent judisdiction with the superior 
court in civil cases where the damages demanded do not exceed $500 
and where the title to real estate is not involved. The court's juris- 
diction extends to cases of juvenile offenders and dependent or delin- 
quent children. 

Sessions 

Criminal sessions are held daily at 10:00 A. M., except on Sundays. 
Civil sessions are held on the last Saturday of each month or at such 
times as the court may order. Special secret sessions are held for 
juvenile cases. These secret sessions are not conducted in the regular 
court room. 

Cases Tried 

During the past year, the court tried approximately 1,300 criminal 
and civil cases. Of this number, about 85 per cent were prosecuted by 
the police department. Most of these cases pertained to violations of 
traffic regidations and motor vehicle laws. 



JUDGE: 


William L. Stevens 


SPECIAL JUDGE: 


Peter J. King 


CLERK: 


John \V. Stanley 


1939 EXPENDITURE: 


$2,900.00 



Revenue 

The municipal court is not operated for re\e- 
nue purposes. This fact is important. Any reve- 
nues which the court may receive in the form of 
fines, forfeits or fees are only incidental to the 
operation of the court. Through the imposition 
of fines, the coiut endeavors to discourage law 
breaking. During 1939, the court collected |6,- 
482.41 in fines, costs and sundry fees. 



46 



FIRE PROTECTION 



THE most spectacular service rendered by the city is its fire fighting 
activity. There is hardly an adult or child who does not thrill to the 
roar of fire engines rushing down the street. Behind this exciting phase 
of fire work are the less spectacular factors of organization, administra- 
tion, maintenance, fire prevention, training and actual fire fighting, all 
of which operate to give the city a sound basis for fire protection. 

Appurtenances 

The physical plant of the fire department consists of six fire stations; 
two in the city proper and four in the outlying areas of the city. The 
apparatus includes 13 fire trucks, a service truck and two official cars. 
1 he department has in service 17,800 feet of regular fire hose and 2,100 
feet of three-quarter inch booster hose. 

Fire Force 

There are 24 permanent men and 174 call men in the department. 
The permanent force operates on a single platoon system with a 
schedule of 96 consecutive hours of duty against 24 hoins of time off 
subject to call. 

Fire Prevention 

Fire prevention is one of the most important activities of the depart- 
ment. Although this work lacks the color of actual fire fighting, never- 
theless, it plays an important part in keeping fire losses at a minimum. 
During 1939, the regular force conducted 2,330 inspections of business 
blocks and public buildings. Many inspections of private dwellings 
were made at the request of residents. The department cooperated with 
school officials in a program of instructions on fire prevention for the 

benefit of school children. The fire depart- 
ment has found the public very cooperative 
in fire prevention work. 



FIRE BOARD: 

Charles P. Coakley, Chairman 
Harry C. Anderson 
Earl W. Gaige 
Harold D. Merrill 

FIRE CHIEF: 

William T. Haphny 

DEPUTY CHIEFS: 

Michael J. Martin 
Clarence G. Howser 

DISTRICT CHIEF: 

Fred M. Dodge 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

Operation - $68,776.84 

Aerial Ladder Truck - $15,675.0C 



Fires During 1939 

Dining the year, the department re- 
sponded to 649 alarms of which 76 were 
box alarms and 573 were still alarms. This 
number represents an increase of 136 fires 
over the previous year. 

Fire Losses 

Due to several fires in factories and 
business blocks, the amount of fire loss 
increased during the year. The extent of 
this loss is summarized hercAvith. 

47 



ril^E LOSSES INCI2EASEC) IN 1939 



140- 


■ 


■1 






H 


■■ 


H 


■1 


H 




(0 


^^^^H 


^^^^H 






^^^^H 


^ft f ^H 


^^^^H 


^^^^H 


^^^^H 




^120 


^H 


^H 






^^M 


F 1 


^H 


^H 


^^M 




_l 


^^^^H 


^^^n 






^^^^H 


^fe ^M 


^^^^H 


^^^^H 


^^^^H 




d 100- 


H 


pj 






^1 


k-l^ 


^H 


^H 


^1 




^ 80- 


^^H 


r^j 


Km 




^^H 


rr 1 


^^H 


^^H 


^^H 




o 


^^H 


M ^ 






^^H 


^ /J 


f^H 


^^H 


^^H 


TcA 


(0 60- 


^^^1 


■ "^^j 






^^^H 


■ I M 


^^^H 


^^^H 


^^^H 




Q 


^^^^^^1 


^L ^1 






^^^^^^H 


A 1 1 H 


^^i^^^i 


^^^^^^H 


^^^^^^H 




Z 


B^V^I 








^^^^H 


M 


W^ V 1 


^^^^H 


^^^^H 




/^ 


< 40- 


^, J 








^^^^H 


w A 


^^^^H 


^pl^l 




m 


O 20 




ll'l 






E3 


wm 


^^^3 


Krr 11 




1 


X 

1- 




■ -1 -lB 


H 7 iVi 7ff 


^iTnTinff 


'|-^IMI?li 


r^ 




Will ii?i P 


1 ** ^ "''I 


l^ 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


1934 


1935 


1936 


1937 


1938 


1939 



Buildings 
Contents 

Total 



J '(line 
$631,715.00 
410,441.54 

.1? 1,042, 156.54 



Loss 

$29,632.29 
53,727.94 



Insurance 

$560,841.06 

361,473.94 



.f;83,360.23 $922,315.00 



Ins. Paid 

$25,472.73 

38,902.14 

$64,374.87 



Met Loss 
.$4,159.56 
14,825.80 

$18,985.36 



Maintenance 

1 hroiigh the use ot the lacilities a\ailable at the department work- 
shop, the fire force has continued the practice oi making its own repairs 
and replacements. All a}:)paratus and eciuiiJment is in good working 
order. 

The damage to the fire alarm system, caused by the hurricane ot 
1938, has been repaired and the system is now in Al condition. Seven 
new fire alarm boxes were added to the system during the year. 

New Equipment 

A modern aerial ladder truck was added to the city's fire fighting 
equipment dining the year. This ladder which has a maximum exten- 
sion ot eighty-five teet fills a long standing need ot the department. 
Through its use, the fire department is in a position to provide the 
citizens ot Concord with greater protection of lite and property than 
has been possible in the past. 

18^5 





The public is given a demonstration performance of the fire-fighting equipment 
incorporated in the new aerial ladder truck 

Recommendation 

Consideration should be given to the construction of a modern fire 
station to replace the structmc which houses Engine 5 in the Plains 
District. 



Hydrants 



One of the less noticeable municipal functions is performed by the 
board of hydrant commissioners. It is the duty of this three man 
board which consists of the fire chief, the city engineer and the super- 
intendent of water works to provide proper protection against fire by an 

effectual placement of fire hydrants. 

I'he city's fire hydrant system includes 
a total of 783 outlets. Of this number, 670 
are public hydrants and 113 are private 
services. Dining 1939, eleven new public 
hydrants were installed by the city on 
recommendation of the board of hydrant 
(ommissioners. 

1939 



BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS: 

Edward E. Beank 
William T. Happnv 
Percy R. Sanders 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

None 




WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



Duties 

IT IS the duty of the sealer of weights and measures to protect the 
people of Concord against unlavvfvd merchandising practices as they 
pertain to the quantity and amount of purchases. The surveillance of 
the sealer has a direct effect on the citizen's pocketbook through savings 
in daily purchases. Through the elimination of incorrect weights and 
measures, the work of the sealer gives assurance to the merchant against 
inifair competition. 

Extent of Activity 

During 1939, the sealer, in the conduct of routine inspection, tested 
38,196 weighing and measuring devices. The results of these tests aie 
summari/etl in the accompanying table. 











Condemned 


Confis 




Tests 


Correct 


Adjusted 


fo> 


Repairs 


cated 


Scales 


1,320 


885 


372 




18 


25 


Weights 


1,191 


1,182 







9 





Dry Measures 


16 


16 













Liquid Measures 


23,827 


23,806 


9 







12 


Automatic Pumps 


501 


414 


81 




6 





Oil Measuring De\ices 


829 


827 


1 




1 





Cloth Measures 


6 


5 










1 


Yardsticks 


4,022 


4,022 













Wood Cart Bodies 


56 


51 







5 





Loads of Coal 


9 


9* 













Commodities in Packages 


6,419 


6,041** 


378 u 


ndeiwe 


ght 




* 3 o\erweight 






- 








** 125 underweight 















In addition to this routine activity, a number of unusual requests 
received the attention of the sealer during the year. A number of loose 
piles of wood were measured. At the request of an oil concern, a 1,000 
gallon tank was tested. In addition to regular inspections, the scaler 
was requested to measure 17 loads of coal. The sale of oranges was 
closely supervised when it was learned that in some instances they were 
being offered for sale by measure rather than by weight or count as the 
law specifically provides. 

The sealer has found that inaccuracies 
and violations in weights and measures are 
due more to carelessness than deliberate in- 
tent. In the few cases where it has been neces- 
sary, warnings have been sufficient to bring 
about the desired correction. In no case, dur- 
ing 1939, has it been necessary to resort to 
legal action or prosecution. 



SEALER OF 

WEIGHTS <& MEASURES: 

Geouge a. Dearborn 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,156.47 



50 



BUILDING ACTIVITY 



UILDING activity is controlled by a municipal building code. 

'Proper enforcement of this code has raised construction standards 
in the city and reduced the danger to life and property from fire. The 
purpose of the building code is to insure greater safety for the individual 
and for the public. 

Permits 

Building permits with a valuation of $456,372 were issued during 
the year. Of a total of 186 permits issued, 115 were for new buildings 
and 71 were for alterations and repairs. The number of permits issued 
in 1939 remained about the same as the return for 1938 when 177 
permits were recorded. 

Valuations 

The valuation of permits for new constructions dropped from 
$1,027,065 in 1938 to $399,982 in 1939. This tremendous drop is not 
as alarming as it would indicate because $850,000 of the 1938 figure 
represents the valuation of the state house annex and the city library; 
both are structures exempt from taxation. Actually, permits for private 
new construction increased from $177,605 to $399,982. Permits for 
alterations decreased from $99,121 in 1938 to $56,390 during the past 
year. 

Dwelling Units 

Construction activity during 1939 re- 
sulted in the addition of 93 dwelling units 
in the city. Of this number, 66 were new 
single-family dwellings. Remodeling of ex- 
isting structures accounted for the other 27. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR: 

Edward E. Bi-.ank, Cily Engineer 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

None 



>^Ltl4TION OF PRIVATE BUILDING 
PEI^IMITS INCREASED IN 1039 



(933 




1937 



PLUMBING 



Examination of Plumbers 

ALL persons desiring to engage in or work at the business ot plumb- 
ing in Concord are required by ordinance to pass an examination to 
determine their practical knowledge ol plumbing. Examinations are 
conducted b) a board ol examiners ol plumbers. All applicants who 
pass the examination to the satisfaction ot the board are issued licenses 
authorizing them to engage in plumbing work. 

The purpose of the board is to insure the public against poor 
plumbing, and the potential health hazard created through defective 
plumbing, by establishing the competence of those who would practice 
the tiade. 

There were 38 master and 20 )ourne\man plumbers registered in 
the city during 1939. Two applicants requested journeyman pknnber's 

licenses dining the year. After examina- 
tion, the l:oard granted one license and 
denied the other. One apjjlication for a 
master phunber's license was received. No 
action has been taken on this rec[uest 
])ending examination. 

During 1939, the Board collected 
$32.00 from plumbing licenses and exam- 
ination fees. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBERS: 

William J. Bishop, Chairman 
Edward E. Beane 
Charles H. Berry 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

\oiie 

1939 RECEIPTS: 

$:vi.(i() 



Plumbing Inspection 

Of ecjual importance with examination of plumbers in the mainte- 
nance of high plumbing standards is the city's plumbing inspection 
activity. Control is exercised througli a plumbing code administered 
by the city engineer as plumbing inspector. Since 1937, the United 
States Public Health Service has made available to the city the services 
of an inspector who divides most of his efforts between inspections of 
new plumbing installations and check-ups of old plumbing facilities. 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR: 

Edward E. Beank, Cily Engineer 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

None 



During 1939, 154 permits for plumb- 
ing installations were issued by the plumb- 
ing inspector. There were 308 routine 
pliuiibing inspections made during the 
\ear. 



52 



ZONING APPEALS 



Purpose 

ON DECEMBER 13, 1930, the City of Concord enacted a zoning 
ordinance to regulate and restrict the use and construction of build- 
ings and premises in the city. By the adoption of zoning, the city govern- 
ment ga\e to the citizens of Concord a protecti\e measure whereby 
they and their property weie safeguarded against unbridled and inap- 
propriate development of land. The watchword of zoning is order- 
liness. Zoning does no more than apply the rules of reason to community 
development. Through the restriction of injurious uses, it protects 
property \ aluations from prematine depreciation. The zoning ordinance 
does not endeavor to be wholly a preventive, it admits all uses— good, 
bad and indifferent. However, it does allocate these uses to areas 
where they w'ill be of benefit, not detriment, to the common w^elfare 
of all the people of Concord. 

Administration and Appeal 

Under the ordinance, the administrative officer charged with the 
enforcement of the zoning law^ is the building inspector. The ordi- 
nance also provides for a zoning board of adjustment of five members 
to rule on appeals taken from the decision of the administrative officer. 
It is a further duty of the board to act on special exceptions to the 
terms of the ordinance upon which the board is reqiured by ordinance 
to pass. Before the board renders a decision on an appeal, a public 
hearing is conducted to permit all parties in interest an opportunity to 
be heard. 



1939 Activity 

Dining 1939, 59 applicatic^ns for zoning permits were granted by the 

administration officer. In 39 cases, appeals 
from the actions of the administrative 
officer in denying permits were taken to 
the board of adjustment. Of this number. 
23 were requests for variance, 1 1 for excep- 
tion, one for installation and four for re- 
hearing. Of tlie 39 cases to come before 
it, the board of adjustment denied 15, 
granted 20 and granted four on condi- 
tions. 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

James M. Langlf.v, Cliainiian 
John S. Corbett 
Eugene F. Magenav 
Donald G. Matson 
J. Dunbar Shields 



CLERK: 

Mrs. Frances A 



Richardson 



1939 EXPENDITURE 

$ia;!.47 



53 



This fleet of Highway Divi- 
sion trucks is a part of the 
equipment which is re- 
quired to maintain Con- 
cord's 185 miles of highways 





These Highway Division 
horses still serve a useful 
purpose in the city's street 
patching, sidewalk plowing 
and refuse collection 
activities 



This heavy trailer makes it 
possible for the Highway 
Division to move its equip- 
ment from one job to an- 
other with the minimum loss 
of time 





The city's sand-bank on 
the Concord Plains is the 
source of the sand used on 
Concord streets. A power 
shovel is used to load trucks 



PUBLIC WORKS SERVICES 



THE Board of Public Works is the largest department of the city 
government. It has full charge of the construction and main- 
tenance of streets, sidewalks and sewers, and the collection and disposal 
of refuse and garbage. Supervision of street lighting operations is a 
further responsibility of the board. 

The Mayor and six aldermen chosen at large constitute the Board 
of Public Works. The board participates actively in much of the 
department's woik. In addition to the determination of general policy 
and procedure, the board gives individual consideration to the num- 
erous petitions received by the department for extension of pidjlic 
works services. 

Organization and Administration 

Intradepartmental organization provides for three divisions— high- 
way, sewer and engineering. The administration of the highway division 
is in charge of a superintendent of streets. In addition to the construc- 
tion and maintenance of streets, this division supervises the collection 
and disposal of refuse and garbage. The sewer and engineering divisions 
are administered by a city engineer. The supervision of street lights is a 
joint activit) of the superintendent of streets and the city engineer. 

Employees 

During 1939, the Board of Public Works employed 94 persons on 
its permanent staff. At various times during the year, 178 part-time 
workers were employed to assist the regidar crews in rush work, such 
as street cleaning, snow removal and street surfacing. In addition, ap- 
proximately 20 men were employed continuously on sewer construction 
during the year. Funds for this sewer work were provided by the issu- 
ance of bonds. 

Streets and Sidewalks 

Dining the past year, ths highway 
division undertook and completed three 
major street improvement projects. A 
more permanent type of road surface was 
laid on South Main Street from West 
Street to Maitland Street, and on W^ash- 
ington Street in Penacook. South State 
Street was widened from W'all Street to 
Pleasant Street to facilitate the flow of 
traffic in this congested section of the 
downtown district. Altogether, 17,741 
square yards of semi-permanent pavement 
were laid by the department. 

In addition to these projects, the 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS: 

Hon. John W. Storrs, Chairman 

William A. Stevens 

George H. Corbett 

William L. Stevens 

Harold D. Merrill 

Charles J. McKee 

Arthur F. Sturtevant 

SUPERINTENDENT 
OF STREETS: 

Ervin E. Webber 

CITY ENGINEER: 

Edward E. Beane 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

Operation - .'$290,402.10 
Public Improvement Bonds; 

Roads - $23,213.37 

Sewers - $42,158.30 



55 



division rcpaiied more than 161 miles of the city's 185 miles of surface- 
treated and giavel roads. Over 2,000 tons of patching material were 
used to rejKiir broken roads. The maintenance of the city's improved 
roads recpiired the application of 2-^1. 000 gallons of tar. 

During the year, the division hiitl 10,094 square yards of hard-sur- 
faced sidewalk. Of this amount, new construction accounted for 1.347 
square )ards, and replacements totaled 8,747 scjuare yards. The largest 
single side^valk project undertaken during the )ear was the construction 
of a cement walk on the west side of Main Street from the New Hamp- 
shire Sa\ings Bank Building to Warren Street. 

Road construction and maintenance during 1939 cost the city 
$161,813.62, or 56 per cent of the total operating cost of the whole 
department. 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 

C^oncord experienced an average winter in 1939 with a snow-fall of 
61.8 inches. Fhe highway division used 27 trucks to keej) the city 
streets open to traffic. In the downtown area, shovel crews removed 
snow after each stomi to j)ro\ide better cinb parking h)r cars. More or 
less continuous sanding was necessary during the winter season with as 
many as 22 trucks sanding streets at one time. In addition to street 
plowing, the di\isi()n kept the sidewalks free of snow for pedestrian 
traffic. I'wenty-two horse drawn plows were used in this work. A 
tractor plow was purchased late in the year and the division is testing 
its practicability in lelation to Concord's sidewalks. 

Few people are aware of the amount of effort expended in keeping 
the city streets open during the winter. In the process of clearing 
streets and sidewalks after an average storm, the combined distance 
covered by plows is 1,880 miles, or a mileage sufficient to operate one 
piece of ecjuipment more than one-half the distance across the United 
States. During the year, 11,218 cubic yards of sand were applied to 
streets, sidewalks and railroad crossings. This amount of sand would 
cover a mile of average road to a depth of about two feet. 

The combined cost of plowing and sanding city streets during 1939 
was .S28,924.80. 

Refuse Collection 

The highway diAision operates the city's waste collection activity. 
The collection district includes the entire built-up area of the city and 
covers a road distance of 110 miles. During the year, 13,841 tons of 
refuse were collected by the city at a per ton cost of $1.79. Most of this 
refuse was hauled to the city dump where all inflammable materials were 
]:)urned. A limited amount of ashes and similar refuse has been used 
in various parts of the city for fill. 

Garbage Disposal 

Garbage collection is supervised by the highway division, although 
actual collection and disposal are let to private contractors. The area 

56 



covered by the collectors includes most of the settled portions of Pena- 
cook. West Concord and the city proper. The contractors operate com- 
mercial piggeries and dispose of the garbage b) iiog feeding. This ser- 
vice cost the city $4,166.35 during 1939. 

Engineering 

The engineering division set 24.563 feet of street, sidewalk and curb 
grade stakes during the year. In addition to the continuous work of 
keeping the division's plans up to date, 3,564 blue prints were made. 
The staff recorded 509 transfers of property during 1939. 

For accommodation of the public, the division prepared a new 
base map of the city at a scale of one inch ecjuals 1,600 feet. Copies of 
this map which shows streets, rivers, ponds, hills and other pertinent in- 
formation are available to the public at a small charge. The division 
laid out .52 miles of new street in 1939. This increases the total mileage 
of streets and roads in the City of Concord to 185.39 miles. 

In addition to its regular departmental activity, the division has 
cooperated with other agencies and departments of the city government 
bv rendering engineering assistance whenever such service was needed. 

Sewers 

The sewer division of the Board of Public Works constructs and 
maintains the city sewer system. The city engineer is in charge of the 
operation of this public works service and the engineering division fur- 
nishes all grades required in construction work. All records and plans 
of sewers, drains and connections are kept by the engineering division. 

W^ith funds made available through the issuance of sewer bonds, 
the division constructed 5,920 feet of storxii and sanitary sewer during 
1939. This work cost the city $42,158.30. In addition, the city, in co- 
operation with the Works Progress Administration, undertook several 
sewer construction projects. These projects, Avhich were executed under 
the supervision of the sewer division, resulted in the construction of 




A daily refuse paper col- 
lection service is provided 
by the city in the business 
district 



A hydraulic jack is being 
operated by a Sewer Divi- 
sion employee to push a 
section of 3G-inch re-en- 
forced concrete pipe through 
a tunnel excavated under 
a building 




Each spring, frozen catch basins are thawed out by the Highway Division with this 

portable steam equipment 

9.030 feet ol sewer. As its share of the cost of this work, the city pur- 
chased all the necessary materials. Funds for this pin p<^se came from 
the regidar \VPA bond appropriation. 

The division maintains 72.9 miles of sewer mains. The per mile 
cost of maintenance in 1939 was S2 10.00. Fifty-four new house connec- 
tions were laid during the year. 

Street Lights 

The City of Concord contracts with the Concord Electric Company 
for its street lighting service. There are 1,551 street lights in operation 
throughout the city, eight of which were installed during 1939. The 
total 1939 cost of street lighting was $36,960.36. 

Other Activities 

Dining 1939, the department performed numerous minor tasks 
which recur each year. Among these annual activities were the spring 
and fall street cleaning operations, the cleaning of catch basins in the 
spring and fall, and the flushing of the downtown streets during the 
summer months. Another recurring task is the thawing of frozen catch 
basins in the late winter. In conjunction with its street plowing activity, 
the highway division cleared the runways at the municipal ;iirport after 
each snow storm. 

In addition to its regular work, the department completed the hurri- 
cane restoration work started in 1938. Stumps of fallen street trees 
were uprooted and removed with department ecjuipment to the city 
dump and the scars left in sidewalks and streets were repaired. 

As a special project, the highway division undertook to improve the 
road on Fort Hill in East Concord. The clay road bed which had made 
this highway a difficult and expensive one to maintain was removed over 
the entire length of the hill and a new hard-surfaced road was con- 
structed. 

58 



MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 



CONCORD'S Municipal Airport ranks among the best in northern 
New England. The airport is the focal point of aeronautics in the 
central section of New Hampshire. 

The airport covers an area of about 240 acres. Located as it is, 
at a considerable distance above the Soucook and Merrimack Rivers, 
the landing field is seldom fog-bound. The sandy loam sin face of the 
port lends itself to easy natural drainage. This eliminates the surface 
water problem and greatly enhances its use by air commerce. 

Investment 

The airport represents an investment of |256,044.21. Of this sum, 

$74,740.76 was expended by the city; the 
remainder represents wages paid by various 
relief agencies of the federal government 
for labor used in the development of the 
airport. 



BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS: 



C:harle.s J. McKee, Chairman 
Harrv L. Alexander 
Samuel B. Dunsford 
Charles H. Howard 
Hon. John W. Storrs 
Leigh M. Wentworth 

1939 EXPENDITURE: 

$574 J 3 

1939 RECEIPTS: 

$1,559.20 



Facilities 

The facilities include two hard surface 
runways, 2,000 feet long and 100 feet wide. 
There are two large hangars and a newly 
constructed administiation Ijuilding on the 
airport. 



Concord is the center of air transportation in New Hampshire. This aerial view shows the 
Municipal Airport on Concord Plains 






Management 

The management and direction of the airport on behalf of the city 
is vested in the Board of Airport Commissioners. Actual operation of 
the port is in the hands of the Boston and Maine Airways, Inc. under 
a lease from the city. The right to free use of landing field for private 
flying is reserved in the lease. 

Air Commerce 

The Concord Airport is a regular stop for commercial transport 
ships on the Boston-Montreal airline service operated Ijy the Boston and 
Maine Airways, Inc. This service brings to the people of Concord the 
fastest type of transportation available, and by connections in Boston 
provides through service to all the larger cities in the country. 

The airport is well equipped to serve air commerce. As a part of 
its operation of the anport, the Boston & Maine Airways maintains a 
field manager at the administration building. For the accommodation 
of the air-traveling public, the building contains a ticket office, a waiting 
room and rest rooms. Additional cjiiarters are occupied by the Airways 
radio office and a weather bureau office supervised jointly by the Airways 
and the Civil Aeronautics Authority. As an adjunct to the operation 
of the airline, a radio range station is located south of the airport in the 
Town of Pembroke. The building and equipment is owned by the 
federal government and the site is owned by the City of Concord. Two 
offices in the administration building are leased to the Civil Aeronautics 
Authority for the purpose of operating the radio range station by remote 
control. The city enters into direct operation of the airport by con- 
tracting with the Airways to plow the runways throughout the winter 
season. 

Extent of Use 

During 1939, the airline carried approximately 700 passengers to 
and from the Concord Airport. A considerable amount of air-mail also 
cleared the airport. Aside from the commercial airline activity, about 
500 planes, mostlv pri\ate, used the air field as a port of call during 1939. 
A limited amount of pri\ate fi>ing was carried on directly from the 
airport. 

The Army Air Base Consideration 

During the spring of 1939, the U. S. Army renewed its interest in 
the possibility of locating the New England Army Air Base in Concord. 
Serious consideration was given to an area which included the munici- 
pal airport on the Plains as a possible site for the air base. 

At the request of army officials, the matter was brought to the 
attention of the Board of Aldermen. It was the sense of the board that 
the city would be willing to sell the municipal airport to the federal 
government for an air base at a consideration of one dollar. The matter 
came to a head in August with the selection of a site in Massachusetts 
for the air base. Thereafter, the city government rescinded its vote on 
the matter. 

60 



WATER SUPPLY 



Sources of Supply 

PENACOOK Lake at the foot of Rattlesnake Hill in the western sec- 
tion of the city is the main somce of Concord's crystal-clear water. 
The lake, which covers a water area of 359 acres, is fed by springs and 
numerous small brooks that (low down the slopes of the surroiniding 
hills. In order to protect the purity of its water supply, the city, over a 
number of years, has acquired nearly all of the lake frontage and a large 
part of the watershed area. In addition to the lake supply, an auxiliary 
source has been developed east of the Concord Plains district in the 
Town of Pembroke. This supply constitutes a field of driven wells near 
the Soucook River and taps an almost limitless supplv of fine water. 
During recent years, the supply at Penacook Lake has been sufficient to 
take care of the city's needs and there has been no necessity for use of 
the reserve which is available at the well field. 

Department Operations 

The nuniicipal water utility is owned by the City of Concord. It 
is operated as a corporation apart from the other governmental depart- 
ments of the city. The water department is entirely self-supporting- 
through rates charged to water consumers. Its management is vested in 
a board of water commissioners. Actual operations are in charge of a 
superintendent of water works. 

Cost of Service 

Even though no effort has been spared to provide the city with a 

water of first quality, the city's water rates 
are among the lowest in the country. The 
average home owner pays less than three 
and one-half cents a ton for water, and in 
the case of large users the per ton cost 
is even less. 



BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS: 

Harry H. Dudley, Pnsidenl 
Allen M. Freeman 
James W. Jameson 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Richard Rolfe 
Hon. John W. Storrs 
Gardner Tilton 

SUPERINTENDENT: 

Percy R. Sanders 

1939 RECEIPTS: 

Operating Revenue - $109,997.08 
Other Income - $16,966.19 

1939 EXPENDITURES: 

Operating Expense - $63,003.20 
Other Expense - $27,732.01 

1939 NET PROFIT: 

$36,228.06 



Free Service 

In addition to the supply which the 
department sells, water is furnished 
charoe-free to the Citv of Concord and the 
School District. The amount of water 
used in schools, city buildings, cemeteries, 
parks, swimming pools, etc. is no mean 
item. Not the least of these uses is the 
water supplied for fire protection through- 
out the city. 

Number of Services 

During 1939, the city water works 

61 



sii]i]>lied water through 5,034 active services to an estimated population 
of 24,000. Seventy-four new service taps were added during the year and 
14 were discontinued. 

Consumption 

1 he city consumed over 970 million gallons of water last year, or 
approximately 1 1 1 gallons per consumer per day. Of the total amount 
of water used, 49.7 per cent was supjilied by gravity and 50.3 per cent 
by pumping. The newly installed extra high service system supplied 
more than 24 million gallons of water dining the year. 

Distribution System 

The distribution system embraces over 99 miles of water main rang- 
ing in size up to a diameter of 24 inches. This mileage is sufficient to 
convey water from Concord to a point be)ond Portland, Maine. The 
department added 3,686 feet of water main in 1939. 

Bonded Debt 

No new bonds were issued during the past year. The water works 
redeemed $17,000 of bonds which matured during 1939. A ,$122,000 
reduction in bonded debt has been accomplished since 1932. 

Valuation of Water Works 

llie water department's plant and property represent a total capital 
investment of $f,826,277.51. 1 he depreciated value as of December 31, 
1939 was $1,219,122.77. Against this valuation there was an outstanding 
bonded indebtedness of .$176,000. 

Special Activity 

In addition to its regular acti\ity, the department undertook the 
work of clearing the damage which the 1938 hurricane visited on the 
Penacook Lake watershed. A mill was set up on the property and all 
blown down timber that could be salvaged was sawed into lumber. 
The department was able to salvage approximately 1,300,000 feet of 
lumber from the tangled mass of hurricane broken trees. Hard wood 
and pine too small to be converted into lumber was given to the city 
relief department to be worked into cordwood. Wath the assistance of 
W. P. A. labor, the regular crew cleared the brush left by the salvage 
operations. 

The Sanders Pumping Station in Pembroke. This is the nerve center of the well field which 
is the source of Concord's auxiliary water supply 




,,,«»««Kt«ift>»~""«««***^ 



PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



THE area of the City of Concord is divided between two union 
school districts. The jurisdiction of the Concord School District 
extends over the entire area of the city with the exception of VV^ird One. 
This ward and a limited adjacent area in the Town of Canterbury make 
up the Penacook School District which in turn is a part of a supervisory 
union which embraces several nearby towns. 

The school districts are operated as separate governmental units. 
The officers and the members of the school boards are chosen directly 
by the voters of the districts. Each district conducts an annual school 
meeting at which all business, necessary to the operation of the schools 
for the ensuing year, is transacted. The only connection which the City 
of Concord has with the operation of its public schools is through the 
tax levy. The city is required by law to raise a sum of money each 
year for public school purposes equal to the amount determined by the 
district. 



Concord School District 

Buildings 

The physical plant of the district includes 14 school buildings, 13 
of which are being used for school purposes. There are nine elementary 
schools, two junior high schools, one high school and one mechanic arts 
school. One building, the Cogswell School, which was formerly an 
elementary school, is being used bv the city to house a \V. I*. A. sewing 
project. 

Teachers and Employees 

The personnel empl())ed by the school board includes a superin- 
tendent of schools, a teaching staff of 133, 
and 32 other employees. The teaching 
staff consists of 23 high scln)ol teachers, 
21 junior high teachers, 55 elementarv 
grade teachers and 34 instructors in spe- 
cial subjects. A total of $211,043.26 was 
expended dining the past school year for 
the salaries of teachers. 



BOARD OF 
EDUCATION: 



Earl F. Newton, President 
Gerard Gaudrault 
Franklin Hollis 
Mrs. Lela Y. Johnson 
Mrs. Violet McIvor 
Mrs. Edwina Roundv 
Donald W. Saltmarsh 
Dixon J. Turcott 
Mrs. Bertha H. Woodward 



SUPERINTENDENT: 

Chester A. Moody 

COST OF OPERATION: 
For the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1939: 

$334,988.13 



Enrollment 

At one time or another during the 
year, 3,414 pupils were enrolled in the 
schools of the district. The average mem- 
bership was 3,337. The pid^lic school 
enrollment represented approximately 77 
per cent of the entire school population 

63 



of the district. Of the remainder, 22 per cent attended parochial schools 
and one per cent was enrolled in private schools. 

Cost of Operation 

For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1939, there was expended the 
sum of $334,988.13 for the operation of the public schools of the district. 
Salaries, alcMie, accounted for 74.3 per cent of this amount and involved 
an expenditure of $249,258.77. One of the important lesser expendi- 
tures was an outlay of $16,188 for the transportation of pupils to and 
from schools. The extensive area of the city and its suburban type of 
development are factors which contribute to a sizable transportation 
expense for the district. 

On a school popidation basis, the net cost per pupil during the past 
year was $96.69. Although no recent figures on the population of the 
district are available, it has been estimated that the per capita cost of 
school operations for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1939 was $13.40. 

Of the district's $35.10 tax rate per $1,000 of assessed valuation for 
1939, the sum of $11.60 was raised to defray the cost of operating the 
pidilic schools. 

Bonded Indebtedness 

It has been brought out elsewhere in this report that the total 
bonded debt of the city as of December 31, 1939 was $1,234,000. 
This amoimt includes an outstanding school district bonded debt of 
$457,000. During the year, $27,000 in school district bonds matured and 

The Concord High School. Spacious lawns, ample play areas and modern equipment 

and facilities have been combined to provide Concord children with one of the most 

up-to-date educational structures in New Hampshire 




were redeemed. Tlie 1939 interest payment on outstanding school bonds 
amounted to $20,013.75. 

1939 Activity 

Dining the past year, the senior and junior high schools have been 
operated efficiently and the usual high standard of administration has 
been maintained. Improved results have been obtained in the elemen- 
tar) schools through the employment ot a supervisor, who is responsible 
lor the conduct of elementary school education. The school health 
department has continued to provide a fine health service in the schools. 

1 hroughout the district, all of the school buildings were maintained 
in good repair. Improved heating systems were installed during the 
vear in the Dewey and Garrison Schools. These new heating plants 
liave resulted in a greater efficiency and economy in the operation of 
these two schools. 

Problems 

Ihe school board believes that there exists a very definite problem 
in relation to the need foi a new building to replace the Dame School 
on the Heights. There are indications that somewhat crowded condi- 
tions have developed at the Rumh)rd and Conant Schools. The Board 
of Education is actively studying l)oth of these problems and a solution 
will be forthcoming in due time. 

Penacook School District 

Ihe facilities of the Penacook School District includes one high 
and two elementary schools. Constructed in 1936, the Penacook High 
School is one of the most modern school buildings in the city. 

The district employs 16 teachers, a music instructor, a school ninse 
and two janitors to operate its schools. Superintendence is furnished 
by the superintendent of the supervisory imion of which the district is 
a part. 

The total school enrollment for the year 1938-1939 was 434. The 
average membership was 397. Dining the year, 231 pupils were regis- 
tered at the high school, this number included 80 out-of-town tuition 
students. The large number of tuition pupils is due to the fact the 
Penacook School District is a part of a supervisory union which includes 
several towns where there are no high schools. These towns are sending 
a large number of their advanced pupils to the Penacook High School. 

The cost of operating the schools of the district for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1939 was $35,128.70. The net operating cost to the 
taxpayer was somewhat reduced due to the receipt of $6,633.39 from 
various non-property tax sources, chief among which was a $5,885.81 
income from high school tuitions. 

Bond redemptions amounted to $3,000 during the year. This reduc- 
tion brought the school district's bonded debt down to $40,000. The 
1939 interest charge on the funded debt was $1,245. 

65 



FACTS ABOUT CONCORD 



General 

Area ol city 
Maximum aliitiule 
Average rainlall 
Average temperature 

Historical 

First settlement— Plantation of Pennycook 
Incorporated— Town of Rumford 
Re-incorporated— Town of Concord 
Became capital of New Hampshire 
Granted city charter 

Population 

Census- 1930 
Estimated- 1939 
Rate of growth- 1920- 1930 
Numbei of homes 

Transportation 

Head([uartcrs of the Southern Division of the Boston & 

Maine Railroad— trackage 
Freight tonnage recei\cd and shipped— 1939 
U. S. and State Highways in city 

Mercantile 

1 lading popidation 

Jobbing popidation (wholesale) 

Retail establishments 

Wholesalers 

Professional offices 

Annual retail business 

Annual wholesale trade 

Industrial 

Manufacturing plants 

Annual production of finished goods 

Annual wages paid 

Financial 

National banks 

Savings banks 

Building and loan associations 

Bank deposits 

Bank resources 

Annual bank clearings 

Post office receipts 



64 scj. mi. 

283 ft. 

37.07 in. 

45.5° 



1725 
1734 
1784 
1816 
1853 



25,228 

27,000+ 

13.7% 

5,600 



40 mi. 

308,404 tons 

8 



75,000 

150,000 

300 

22 

350 

.112.000,000 

$8,000,000 

80 

.$20,800,000 

$4,500,000 

3 

4 

2 

.$46,423,557 

$52,788,468 

11121,766,109 

$536,839 



66 



APPENDIX 

Financial Statements and Statistics 

Page 

General Fund— Consolidated Balance Sheet 68 

General Fund— Analysis of Change in Net Debt 68 

Rond Funds— Balance Sheet 69 

Bond Funds— Statement of Receipts and Disbuisenients 69 

Debt Ser\ice Charges on Present Bonded Debt 69 

Trust Funds— Balance Sheet 70 

Trust Fluids- Receipts and Disbursements 70 

Concord Water Works— Balance Sheet 71 

Concord Water W^orks— Statement of Operations 71 

General Fund— Statement of Ap|M()priations and Expenditures 72 

General Fund— Statement of F.stimated and Actual Revenues 74 

Board of Public Works— Financial Statement 75 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 

Tax Levies and Rates in Concord, 1929-1939 75 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 76 

Status of Tax Collections, 1930-1939 77 

Assessors Statement for 1939 /8 

City Relief Department— Relief Expenditures 79 

Municipal Court-Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 80 

Summary of the City's Investment in Property and Equipment 80 



67 



GENERAL FUND 

Consolidated Balance Sheei 
December 31, 1939 

Assets and Net Debt 

Current Assets 

Cash $150,592.96 

Accounts Receivable 2,712.73 

Relief Reimbursements Due 12,624.63 

Taxes Receivable 317,433.44 

Unredeemed I axes Bought by City 53,502.95 

Total Current Assets .'tt;536,866.71 

Net Debt 

Balance, Jan. I, 1939 .1; 1,076,68 1.00 

Add Net Gain for Year 36,243.78 

Balance, Dec. 31, 1939 $\ ,040,437.22 

Total Assets and Net Del)t $1,577,303.93 

Liabilities 

CurrenI Liabilities 

Unexpended Balances $142,866.43 

Temporary Loans 200,000.00 

Bond Coupons Due and Unpresented 437.50 

Total Current Liabilities .$343,303.93 

Bonded Debt 1,234,000.00 

Total Liabilities $1,577,303.93 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Changes ln N'Et Debt 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1939 

Net Debt, January 1, 1939 $1,076,681.00 

Add Deficit from Current Operations: 

Total Appropriations 'til,383,276.33 

Overdrafts of Appropriations 21,192.72 

Total Changes for Year $1,404,469.05 

Estimated Revenues $1,341,385.25 

Excess of Actual Over Estimated 

Revenues 19,436.50 

Taxes Bought by City 11,891.08 

(Added to Assets of City) 

Total Credits for Year $1,402,712.83 

Net Deficit from Current Operations $1,756.22 

$1,078,437.22 
Deduct Reduction in Bonded Debt: 

Bonds Retired during Year $118,000.00 

New Bonds Issued 80,000.00 

Net Reduction in Bonded Debt $38,000.00 

Net Debt, December 31, 1939 $1,040,437.22 

68 



BOND FUNDS 

Balance Shkei 
December 31, 1939 

Assets 
Unexpended Balances 

Public Inipiovemcnl Bontl Fund No. 7 .1513,661.56 

Memorial Athletic Field lloiul Funtl 27.15 

Storm Sewer Bond Fund .36 



Total Assets $13,689.07 



Liabilities 

Unencumbered Bond Fund Balances $13,689.07 



BOND FUNDS 

SrAtEMEM OF Receipts and Disbursemenis 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1939 

Unexpended Cash Balance, January 1, 1939 $68,738.56 

.Add Receipts: 

Proceeds from Sale ol $80,000.00 Pub. Imp. 2% Bonds 80,575.20 

Inter-Fund Transfers 28.12 

Totals Available for Expenditure 

Deduct Exjjenditures: 

Cash Expenditures 

Inter-fund Transfers 

Unexpended Cash Balance, Dec. 31, 1939 



Aitnual 

Interest 

Maturities 

1940 $136,000.00 

1941 117,000.00 

1942 112,000.00 

194.S 105,000.00 

1944 105.000.00 

1945 90;000.00 

1946 90,000.00 

1947 64,000.00 

1948 53,000.00 

1949 42,000.00 

1950 36,000.00 

1951 36,000.00 

1952 27,000.00 

1953 27,000.00 

1954 26,000.00 

1955 21,000.00 

1956 21,000.00 

1957 14,000.00 

1958 14,000.00 

1959 14,000.00 

1960 14,000.00 

1961 14,000.00 

1962 14,000.00 

1963 14,000.00 

1964 14,000.00 

1965 14,000.00 

Total $1,234,000.00 





$149,341.88 


$135,624.69 




28.12 


$135,652.81 




$13,689.07 






r BONDED DEBT 


Ainiuul 


Total Annua! 


Iiilirisl 


Payments 


on Bonds 


and Interest 


$48,998.75 


$184,998.75 


43,731.25 


160,731.25 


38,801.25 


150,801.25 


33,958.75 


138,958.75 


29,233.75 


134,233.75 


24,508.75 


114,508.75 


20,008.75 


110,008.75 


17,442.50 


81,442.50 


15,330.00 


68,330.00 


13,575.00 


55,575.00 


12,212.50 


48,212.50 


10,887.50 


46,887.50 


9,562.50 


36,562.50 


8,620.00 


35,620.00 


7,692.50 


33,692.50 


6,860.00 


27,860.00 


6,107.50 


27,107.50 


5,355.00 


19,355.00 


4,760.00 


18,760.00 


4,165.00 


18,165.00 


3,570.00 


17,570.00 


2,975.00 


16,975.00 


2,380.00 


16,380.00 


1,785.00 


15,785.00 


1,190.00 


15,190.00 


595.00 


14,595.00 


$374,306.25 


$1,608,306.25 



69 



TRUST FUNDS 

Bal.\nci: Sheki— Dkcembkr 31, 193<( 

A.ss,:li 

Cash: Sundry All Oilur 

Total Cemetery TnnI 

All Funds Funds I'liiid^ 
Unexpended Balance of Income Received and 
deposited at Interest in: 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank $556.93 $452.31 $104.62 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 462.29 436.73 25.56 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 677.89 586.45 91.44 

Union Trust Company 1,833.81 409.00 1,424.81 

Total Cash $3,530.92 $1,884.49 $1,646.43 

Investments: 

Funds at Interest in: 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 

Union Trust Company 

Securities 

Total Investments 

Total Assets 

Liabilities 

Trust Fund Balances 

L'nexpended Income Balances 

Total Liabilities 



TRUST FUNDS 

Receipts and Disbursements— Ch.\nges in Fund Balances 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1939 

Receipts and Disbursements 

Sundry 
Total Cemetery All Other 

All Fundi Trust Funds Trust Funds 

Cash Balances of Unexpended Income— - 

January 1, 1939 $3,922.30 $2,290.92 $1,631.38 

Receipts: 

Income from Interest and Dividends 12,864.37 5,497.90 7,366.47 

Total Available $16,786.67 $7,788.82 $8,997.85 

Disbursements 13,255.75 5,904.33 7,351 .42 



.$88,877.65 
94,546.64 
93,354.26 

104,163.40 
8,330.63 

$389,272.58 
$392,803.50 


$60,502.55 

48,290.46 

46,402.28 

60,647.88 

2,850.00 

$218,693.17 
$220,577.66 


$28,375.10 

46,256.18 

46,951.98 

43,515.52 

5,480.63 

$170,579.41 
$172,225.84 


$389,272.58 
3,530.92 


$218,693.17 
1,884.49 


$170,579.41 
1,646.43 


$392,803.50 


$220,577.66 


$172,225.84 



Cash Balances of L^nexpended Income- — 
December 31, 1939 $3,530.92 $1,884.49 $1,646.43 



Changes in Fund Balances 

Fund Balances, Januaiy 1, 1939 $384,450.82 

Add: 

New Trust Funds 7,622.96 

One-third receipts from sale of lots 548.68 

$392,622.46 
Deduct: 

Expenditure for Seth K. Jones Monument 891.10 

Expenditures for ornamenting and improving 

cemetery grounds 2,458.78 

Total Withdrawals $3,349.88 

Fund Balances, December 31, 1939 $389,272.58 



$213,618.17 


$170,832.65 


5,075.00 


2,547.96 
548.68 


$218,693.17 


$173,929.29 




891.10 




2,458.78 


$3,349.88 


$218,693.17 


$170,579.41 



70 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance Siiki:i 
Dix:emblr 31, 11)39 

Fixed Assets Assets 

Water and Flouai^c Rights §167,688.1 1 

Engineering Cionstriiction Costs 63,383.63 

Land . . . .' 129,386.35 

Structures (less dejireciation reserves) ... 210,047.14 

Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 18,948.78 

Distribution System (less depreciation reserves) 621,938.42 

Other Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 7,730.34 

Total Fixed Assets $1,219,122.77 

Current Assets 

Cash .1i;68,525.83 

Accounts Receivable 663.83 

Material and Supplies 17,523.19 

Total Current Assets .1^86,712.85 



Total Assets .f 1,305,835.62 

Capital Liabilities Liabilities 

Municipal Investment ,$1,305,647.12 

Current Liabilities 

Matured Bond Coupons Unclaimed $146.00 

Accrued Interest (Current Bond Coupons) 42.50 

Total Current Liabilities $188.50 

Total Liabilities and Municipal Investment $1,305,835.62 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1939 

Water Sales Receipts 

Commercial-Flat Rate $4,716.82 

Commercial-Metered 90,842.51 

Industrial-Metered 14,091.56 

Miscellaneous Water Sales 346.19 

Total Operating Rcveiuie $109,997.08 

operating Expenses Expenditures 

Water Supply Expenses $14,380.42 

Distribution Expenses 18,170.04 

General and Miscellaneous LJndisliibuted Expenses . 30,452.74 

Total Operating Expenses $63,003.20 

Net Operating Income $46,993.88 

Add Other Income 16,966.19 

.$63,960.07 

Deduct Other Expenses .$27,732.01 

Net Profit for Year $36,228.06 

71 



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77 



ASSESSORS STATEMENT FOR 1939 

Valuations, Warrants and Rates 



Warrant 



State 



County 

City Budget 

Schools 

*City Union 

**Penacook U. School 

Total lor city 



Assessed Valua- 
tion of city 
and precincts 


Amount of 
H'arrants 

None 


Tax rate 
per $1,000 


.'f;32,365,017 
32,365,017 


$208,820.99 
562,998.00 


$6.46 
17.04 


30,396,844 

1 ,979,578 


352,390.31 
29,427.00 


11.60 
14.86 




.^1,153,636.30 





City Rate 

Penacook Rate 

Average tax rate ior city 



35.10 

38.36 

35.30 + 



^Includes property located in Loudon. 
'■^Includes pioperty lorated in Canterbury. 



Exemptions 

Veterans 

Property Valuation 

Polls (958) 

Blind 

Property Valuation 

Polls (5) 

Total Exemptions 



$284,015.00 
1,916.00 



2,000.00 
10.00 

$287,941.00 



Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 



Type 

Improved and luiimproved land and bldgs. 

Electric Plants 

Horses 

Asses and Mules 

Oxen 

Cows 

Neat Stock 

Sheep (inc. Goats) 

Hogs 

Fow Is 

Fin-bearing Animals 

\'ehicles 

Portable Mills . . 

Boats and Launches 

Wood and Lumber 

Gas Tanks and Pumps 

Stock in Trade 

Machinery 



No. 



216 

2 



1,266 

163 

50 

80 

17,615 

1.52 



Valuation 



$2H 
1 



,220,246.00 

,726,980.00 

1 8,090.00 

1 10.00 

O.OO 

86,925.00 

5,680.00 

341.00 

815.00 

17,615.00 

820.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

1 ,500.00 

18,300.00 

28,110.00 

,785,925.00 

450,530.00 



Total 



$32,365,017.00 



78 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1939 

City County Total 

DirccI Relief 

Cash Allowances 

I'rovisions and Milk 

Fiiel-Rent-Clothing. etc 

Medical 

Board and Care— Adults 

Board and Care— Children 

Funerals and Burials 

WPA Projects and Bus Tickets 

Reliel Cardens 

Sundry Expenditures 

Other Towns 

Total City and County I'ooi 



Dependenl Soldiers 

Cash Allowances 

Pro\isions and Milk . . 
Fuel-Rent-Clothing, etc. 

Medical 

Board and Care 

Ail other 



.56,572.10 


87,628.42 


814,205.52 


15,191.72 


45,249.11 


60,440.83 


11,167.99 


30,904.21 


42.072.20 


2,942.62 


11,081.68 


14,024.30 


7,822.58 


3,846.00 


1 1 ,668.58 


2,803.64 




2.803.64 


300.00 


518.00 


818.00 


857.24 


1,724.30 


2,581.54 


287.55 




287.55 


484.18 


675.69 


1,114.87 


.1^48,434.62 


.'§101,609.41 


$150,044.03 


1,614.28 




1,614.28 


.s;50,048.90 


8101,609.41 


8151,658.31 



•8182.50 


8789.20 


.$971.70 


2,875.08 


5,395.71 


8,270.79 


1,134.19 


3,846.48 


4,980.67 


143.21 


775.34 


918.55 


318.00 


235.00 


553.00 


230.59 


87.87 


318.46 


.54,883.57 


811,129.60 


$16,013.17 



I'otal Dependent Soldiers 



Old Age Assistance $8,631.88 .$8,631.88 



Administration 

Salary— Overseer Concord 

Salary— Overseer Penacook 

Mileage— In\estigators 

Mileage and Auto Use 

Overseer— Concord 

0\erseer— Penacook 

Salaries— OHice and Investigators 

Office Supplies 

Tel. -Flee. -Heat-Office Expense . . 

Sinidry Expenditures 

\\.\ and WPA Sewing Projects 

Audit of Accoiuits 

Office Equipment— Alterations . . 
14 Sewing Machines— Project . . . 



Grand Total 



$1,050.00 


$1,049.99 


$2,099.99 


500.00 




500.00 


411.46 


782.62 


1,194.08 


400.00 




400.00 


43.25 


10.70 


53.95 


6,470.14 


6,422.00 


12,892.14 


649.09 


568.60 


1,217.69 


639.47 


160.95 


800.42 


86.54 




86.54 


100.06 


52.50 


152..56 


239.25 




239.25 


1,275.46 




1,275.46 


636.96 




636.96 


$12,501.68 


$9,047.36 


$21,549.04 


$76,066.03 


1121,786.37 


$197,852.40 



79 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement of Receipis and Expenditures 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1939 

Receipts: 

Received lor fines, costs ;ind sundry fees $6,482.41 

Expendiiures: 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses and complaints 

and warrants $131.16 

SiaU- of New Hampsjiire. Motor Vehicle Department 3,432.70 

State of New Hampsfiire, Fisli & Game Department 11.70 

Pid)lic Service Commission, fine. State v. Parker . . . 10.00 
State Treasurer of New Hampshire, fine. State \. 

Rosenblatt 50.00 

Secretary of State of New Hampshire, Public Laws 

for Judge's Bench 20.00 

Clerk's Bond 5.00 

Fred Hill, refimd of fine. State v. Hill 5.00 

Police Department, restitution. State v. Spellmaii . . . 5.00 

Farnham's Dry Cleaning Co., cleaning flag 1.00 

Postage, ])rinting and supplies 1 18.25 3,789.81 

Balance: $2.692.(i() 

Paid Cily Treasurer .S2,fJ92.fiO 



SUMMARY OF THE CITY'S INVESTMENT IN PROPERTY AND 

EQUIPMENT 

Decemrkr 31, 1939 

Total 

Invi'Stntetits Equipment 

Land and Sound Grand 

Buildings Values Total 

Fire Department .$188,522.73 .'571.881.69 8260,401.12 

Pohce Department 54,669.00 4.840.10 ,59.509.10 

Public Works Department . 42.607.62 71.676.08 111.2K3.70 

Park Department 1 12.145.71 2,620.94 1 14,766.65 

Tree Department 2,417.99 2.417.99 

Playground Department 14,754.31 3,585.38 18,339.69 

Cemeteries Department 111,191.87 7,306.64 118.498.51 

Miscellaneous Other Property 612,741.42 5.877.90 618.619.32 

Totals .IJl, 1.36,632.66 $170,206.72 $1,306,839.38 



80 



EVANS PRINTING CO.. CONCORD. N. ».