(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

TC THE 

CITIZEN* €P CCNCCEE) 




88th 

ANNUAL 

REPORT 



OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE YEAR ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1940 



CAPITAL OF THE STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
COUNTY SEAT OF MERRIMACK COUNTY 
AREA— 64 SQUARE MILES 
POPULATION— 27,1 71 



AUTHORIZED AND PUBLISHED UN- 
DER THE SUPERVISION OF THE 
CITY PLANNING BOARD BY THE 
MAYOR AND BOARD OF ALDERMEN 









. 




5 



mm -* 





\ 



FOREWORD 



THE CITY'S business is your business. This fact 
cannot be over-emphasized. You are a stockholder 
of the City of Concord and in that capacity you 
share in the activity of a corporation which does an 
annual volume of business well in excess of a million 
dollars. This report is addressed to you. Every effort 
has been made to present a concise yet comprehensive 
accounting of the City's 1940 activities. You should 
scrutinize this report carefully. Give it the same con- 
sideration that you give to your everyday business affairs. 

As a taxpayer, you finance the City government. 
Does your interest in it start when you receive your tax 
bill and end when you pay it? Does your concern amount 
to more than a fond hope that your next year's taxes will 
be less? You owe it to yourself and your fellow citizens 
to find out what you need to know about your City's busi- 
ness, and having done so, you should take more than a 
passive interest in the way it is operated. Only then will 
you have the assurance that your City government is what 
most of you want it to be now and in the future. 

Those who run your City's business believe that they 
have served you well. They invite your investigation and 
cooperation. There is no better place to start than with 
this brief review of last year's activities. 



The main entrance of the 
Concord Public Library 



h 
Z 
u 

Z 
UJ 



© 
O 



Q 
UJ 

tz 
o 

QO 

u 

z 

© 

© 

I 



lOco 1 
lZQ.1 

l O<| 



cr uii 

Oz, 



-o 

Oo 
Q--1 



mb- 
O^ 

ceo 



5 -i z 



o> 

IQ 



SO 

ui- 
5!? 



. ul^ 

z> 

OQ 





















































cr 








o 
z 
< 




Z(J 

<z 

<OQ 




o< 




UJZ 

UJ 




°£ 




o 
> 




UJ 


Ul 




z 




U_l 




a.^- 




O-l 




on 




Id 






UJ 




li_ 




*=> 




Zrr 




°-o 




?< 




~) 






H 








,UJ 




UIO 










If) 


























a. 










5 


























































u . 
































O 
















z 








o 












10 














^ 












H 










z 
< 

h- 




PS 

z< 

D J 
on 




Q 
,uj 




Z(/l 

oz 




z 

-Jcj 




u 

UJ 

-) 

o 
cr 




o 

< 

Z 

n 




u. 

UJ 




M 




m n 














rr 




UJ 






z 
o 






U1 




< 




o 
n 




cr 








u 

UJ 
10 








z 




5 




o 





















rr 




cr 


















o 




O 




DC 




7 




h-Z 




o 




X" 




cr 




< 




z< 

?o 




u_ 




^n 




3 




O 






n 




o 








V) 




">,o 




cr 




era 

UJq; 




Ul 

cr 




> 
I 




<o> 

10 I 




UJ 






1- 








<CL 




cr 

UJ 




cri 

Ul 

> 






















c 


J 




O 












(1 


r 






















u 

_i 
o 




O 

1- 
o 

UJ 

_l 
_l 
o 




cr 

o 

H 
U 




cr 

u 
O 

z 
uj 




£cr 
HO 
7*>- 








o 




J 








<^ 




o 




X 

< 




o 

10 




u 
5 




IflU 



5^ 



(0 




cr 


1- 






l-z 




(£C0 


Z5 

zfc 

OT 


<5 

5 


N 2 


() 




O 





CTuj 

crio - ^ < 



£UJ 
CT5 



#cr 



OS 
>1 




MAYOR'S MESSAGE 

In these trying times when our citizens are harassed on all sides 
by increasing federal assessments, I am aware of the demands of those 
who believe that the solution to the problem of rising taxation is to be 
found in a summary reduction of local taxes. Yet to do so means the 
curtailment of essential municipal services which are already operated 
at a minimum of cost in accord with the needs of the community. In 
line with this thought, I think that it is proper to direct attention to a 
number of unusual circumstances which affect municipal government 
in Concord. 

As far as I have been able to determine, Concord, with an area of 
64 square miles, has the lowest population density of any city in the 
United States inhabited by more than 2 5,000 people. Likewise, few 
cities carry as large a burden of tax exempt property in proportion to 
total valuation as does Concord. Approximately 41 per cent of all 
the property in the city is untaxable. 

I believe that our citizens are proud of the position Concord holds 
as the center of our state and county governments and as the focal 
point of business activity in central New Hampshire. I know that 
our citizens are equally proud of the fact that in our 200 farms, the 
community enjoys a healthy agricultural economy. Yet this diversified 
economic development requires of the City a multitude of services 
which are a necessary part of everyday living, services which must be 
spread over a much larger area than most cities with comparable 
resources. 

During 1940, your City Government has performed every neces- 
sary function with foresight and at the lowest possible cost in line with 
efficiency. We look toward the future with assurance that this policy 
will be continued. 




CITY GOVERNMENT 

Mayor 

Hox. John \V. Storks 

Substitute Mayor 

Charles J. McKee 



Aldermen-at-Large and Members Board of Public Works 



Harold D. Merrill 
Charles J. McKee 
Arthur F. Sturtevant 



William A. Stevens 
John W. Stanley 
John C. Tilton 



Ward Aldermen 



Charles P. Coakley 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William J. Flynn 
Robert W. Potter 



Ward 1 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Thomas B. Jennings 



Stewart Nelson Ward 5 

Clarence L. Clark Ward 6 

Raymond V. LaPointe Ward 7 

Charles A. Bartlett Ward 8 
Ward 9 



Standing Committees of the Board of Aldermen 



Accounts and Claims: 

Aldermen Clark, Tilton, Sturtevant, 
Bartlett. 

Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen Stevens, Stearns, Coakley, 
LaPointe. 



Elections and Retlirns : 
Aldermen Nelson, Tilton, LaPointe, 
Jennings. 

Engrossed Ordinances : 

Aldermen Tilton, Flynn, Jennings, 
Stanley. 

Finance : 

Mayor John W. Storrs, Aldermen 
McKee, Merrill, Stanley, Nelson. 



Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Merrill, Clark, 
Potter. 



Lands and Buildings : 

Aldermen Bartlett, Flynn, LaPointe, 
Nelson. 

Playgrounds and Bath : 

Aldermen Merrill, Coakley, Flynn, 
LaPointe, Jennings ; Mrs. Maud N. 
Blackwood, Mrs. Victoria Mahoney, 
Miss Margaret Challis, Mrs. Ethel 
M. Storrs, Mrs. Kathleen Mullen, 
Mrs. Nora E. Donovan, Mrs. James 
M. Langley. 

Police and License: 
Aldermen Stevens, Tilton, Sturte- 
vant, Potter. 

Public Instructions : 

Aldermen Flynn, Potter, Clark, 
Jennings. 

Project Com m ittee : 

Aldermen McKee, Stevens, Stearns. 

Relief : 

Aldermen Stearns, Stanley, Sturte- 
vant. 



CITY OFFICIALS 



Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Physician 
City Physician, 

Assistant 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer 
Fire Chief 
Judge, Municipal 

Court 
Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milk Inspector 
Overseer of Poor 
Overseer of Poor, 

Penacook 



Edward E. Beane 

Arthur E. Roby 

Edward E. Beane 

Henry W. Smith 

Thomas J. Halligan 

Elmer U. Sargent 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 

William T. Happny 

William L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

Marion F. Holt 

Austin B. Presby 

Frank C. Gilbert 

Charles P. Coakley 



Planning Director 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Measures 
Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 
Supt. of Streets 
Supt. of Water W'ork 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds 
Tree Warden 
Tax Collector 
W.P.A. Coordinator 



Gustaf H. Lehtinen 
Victor I. Moore 
Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Donald G. Barton 

George A. Dearborn 

Carl L. Sargent 
Ervin E. Webber 
Percy R. Sanders 

Paul G. Crowell 

Carl L. Sargent 

Amos B. Morrison 

kvman W. Biarelow 



Boards, Commissions and Trustees 



Board ok Adjustment: Henry P. Call- 
ahan, Chairman; John S. Corbett, 
Eugene F. Magenau, Donald G. Mat- 
son, J. Dunbar Shields. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: John 
W. Storrs, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, Samuel B. Dunsford, John N. 
Engel, Charles W. Howard, Charles J. 
McKee, Robert W. Potter. 

Board of Assessors : Clarence O. Phil- 
brick, Chairman ; Fdward F. Donovan, 
Joseph E. Shepard. 

City Planning Board : James M. Lang- 
ley. Chairman; Edward E. Beane, Fred- 
erick P. Clark, Warren H. Greene, John 
B. Jameson, Harold D. Merrill, Dudley 
W. Orr, Austin E. Page, John W. 
Storrs. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 
William J. Bishop, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Charles H. Berry. 

Board of Health: John W. Storrs, 
Chairman; Dr. Robert O. Blood, Dr. 
Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. Carl A. Dahl- 
gren, Dr. Thomas J. Halligan. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: Ed- 
ward E. Beane, Chairman; William T. 
Happny, Percy R. Sanders. 



Board of Library Trustees: Oliver 

Jenkins, President; Henry B. Cannon, 
Jr., Joseph J. Comi, Edward A. Dame, 
Fred M. Dodge, Airs. Armine M. Ing- 
ham, Perley B. Phillips, Alexander 
Rennie, Jr., Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 

Park and Cemetery Commission : John 
\Y. Storrs, Chairman; Herbert G. .Ab- 
bot, Pierre A. Boucher, Gardner G. 
Emmons, Robert J. Graves, Alpheus 
Al. Johnson, Mrs. Thomas N. Troxell. 

Police Commission : Charles L. Jack- 
man, Chairman; Daniel Shea, Guy A. 
Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: J. Mitchell 
Ahern, Chairman ; Gardner G. Emmons, 
Leigh S. Hall, Carletoit R. Metcalf, 
John W. Storrs. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: Harry H. 
Dudley, Carl H. Foster, Edgar C. Hirst. 

Board of Water Commissioners: Harry 
H. Dudley, President; Allen M Free- 
man, James W. Jameson, Charles P. 
Johnson, Donald Knowlton, Benjamin 
H. Orr, John W. Storrs, John Swen- 
son, Gardner Tilton. 



1940 IN RETROSPECT 

The assessed valuation of the city increased $426,773, an in- 
crease which was almost three times that of 1939. 

Taxable polls increased by 447. 

Property valued at $175,000, formerly considered tax exempt, 
was added to the tax list as a result of the Exeter Academy 
decision. 

The net bonded debt of the City was reduced by $116,000. Cur- 
rent operations were concluded with a surplus of $28,813.36. 
The total net gain in the City's financial condition was 

$144,813.36. 

No new bond issues were floated. 

On the recommendation of the Planning Board the Board of 
Aldermen refused to accept 3,855 feet of unnecessary street. 

A complete revision of the zoning ordinance has been accom- 
plished. 

The extensive restoration work at hurricane-damaged Rollins 
Park was completed. 

The swampy center piece at White Park was reclaimed. 

A total of 565 new shade trees were set out along city streets. 

A new wading pool was built and put into use at Rolfe Park in 
Penacook. 

The entire area of the West Street Playground was recon- 
structed and landscaped. 

The total attendance of 12,524 at the Broken Bridge bathing 
area exceeded all previous attendance records. 

For the first time in Concord's history, night football was 
played at Memorial Field. 

At the Public Library, a new high was reached in circulation; 
217,396 books were distributed to borrowers. 



The average number of persons on City relief was 391 as com- 
pared with 443 during 1939. 

The Board of Aldermen adopted a "pay-as-you-go" policy in 
relation to W. P. A. expenditures. 

The average number of W. P. A. workers dropped to 200, or 
100 less than the average for 1939. 

The W. P. A. river erosion project north of Horseshoe Pond 
was 95 per cent complete at the end of the year. 

A new ambulance was purchased for the Police Department. 

The registration of bicycles was adopted. 

Greater traffic control was effected by the inauguration of day- 
cruiser patrol. 

Only 15 new juvenile delinquency cases were recorded as com- 
pared with 39 in 1939. 

A total fire loss of $22,296.62 was the smallest which the city 
has suffered in a quarter of a century. 

A new air whistle alarm was installed at the fire station in 
Penacook. 

The City spent $165,299 on road construction and maintenance. 

The City laid out 1.421 miles of new street, most of which rep- 
resents acceptance of roads already used by the public for 
highway purposes. 

New storm and sanitary sewer construction amounted to 15,067 
feet. 

A definite increase in the use of the Municipal Airport took 
place. 

With the assistance of the W. P. A., the Water Department re- 
laid two miles of water main between West Concord and Pena- 
cook. 

Plans for a new school in the Concord Plains area were being 
considered bv the Board of Education. 



Office of the City Clerk 

THE OFFICE of the City Clerk serves as the "nerve center" 
through which a large share of Concord's municipal business is 
transacted. Beside the many services which the department 
renders to the Board of Aldermen, the Board of Public Works and 
various city departments, it is the duty of this office to register vital 
statistics, record conditional sales and chattel mortgages, issue licenses 
and permits, collect fees and preserve numerous public records. 

Board of Aldermen 

During 1940, the Board of Aldermen held 16 meetings and five 
hearings. In addition to the regular routine matters to come before 
the board, 68 resolutions and ten ordinances were passed during the 
year. 

Board of Public Works 

The Board of Public Works held 12 regular monthly meetings 
during the past year. Two special meetings and two hearings were 
called in 1940. 

Vital Statistics 

The number of copies of birth certificates which were issued dur- 
ing the year showed a marked increase over previous years. Even a 
greater number could have been issued if the necessary information had 
been available. Unfortunately, Concord's early vital statistics records 
are very incomplete because many doctors neglected to send in the 
required returns. 

During 1940, 550 births, 251 marriages and 660 deaths were regis- 
tered in Concord. Of the 660 deaths, 399 occurred in institutions, 167 
were from the city at large, and 94 were cases where death had oc- 
curred elsewhere and the deceased was brought to Concord for burial. 
The New Hampshire State Hospital and a number of private institu- 
tions for the aged are responsible for the large number of institutional 
deaths which occur in Concord each year. 

Licenses, Fees, Etc. 

During the past year, the City Clerk's office collected $48,456.41 
in fees for various licenses and permits issued by the department. In- 
cluded in this sum are receipts from rents 
and other miscellaneous collections. Of the 
total amount collected, the tax on automo- 
biles accounted for $35,026.52. This 
amount is about $1,400.00 more than that 
which was received in 1939. The number 
of auto permits issued increased slightly. 



CITY CLERK: 

Arthur E. Roby 

DEPUTY CITY CLERK: 

Margaret A. Spencer 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$7,852.39 



10 



A total of 1 ,449 dogs were licensed during the year. The revenue 
received from this source amounted to $2,933.11. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 

The photostatic process is employed by the department to record 
all chattel mortgages and conditional sales. In order to facilitate their 
use by the public, these records are filed under a system of cross in- 
dexes. During 1940, receipts from this activity amounted to $1,214.95. 

ELECTIONS 

Concord had three election days during 1940, the presidential 
primary in March, the state primary in September, and the general 
election in November. In connection with these elections, it is the 
duty of the City Clerk to forward to the Secretary of State a certified 
copy of the record of the votes cast. 

Absentee Voting 

As the City's election officer, the conduct of absentee voting for 
presidential electors is a responsibility of the City Clerk. This work 
involves the handling of applications for ballots, the verification of 
the right to vote, the mailing of the ballots and the delivery of the re- 
turned ballots on election day to the moderators of the wards in which 
the absentee voters are registered. 

Registered Voters 

The number of registered voters on the City's checklists showed 
no marked change during the past year. Approximately 14,000 per- 
sons are listed. This number represents about 52 per cent of the total 
population of the city. Although the number of voters that turned out 
for the presidential and state primaries was comparatively small, a con- 
siderable interest was manifested in the general election. x\bout 90 
per cent of the registered voters cast their ballots in November. 

Election Costs 

Election expenses incurred during 1940 amounted to $5,133.98. 
Because there were three voting days instead of two, election expenses 
for 1940 were somewhat larger than those of 1939. Most of the money 
spent for elections went into salaries for ward officers. 



Important municipal records are kept in 
fire proof vaults in the City Clerk's 
Office. Shown here is a part of the ex- 
tensive filing system. 



f 


■ * ' m 


m 


k\ 


' .« j •::* 


E!5 


li 
m 


^Hl 


S5 


m 




H 


i 


55 WJ 


m 


■ 


~ ' i 


■:i 


«» 


■ n 


?! 


i 




«« 



' ® * ■ 



[r r r t 



*n77f' 



Assessment of Property 

IT IS THE responsibility of the Board of Assessors to apportion and 
assess equitably all taxable real and personal property in the city. 
Upon a fair and unbiased execution of this trust depends, to a large 
degree, the progress and development of the community. 

Real Property 

During 1940, 615 deeds were recorded in the city. This was 96 
more than the number recorded during the previous year. Although 
more deeds changed hands, the 167 building permits issued during 
1940 fell slightly below the total for 1939. Of the total number of 
permits issued, new construction accounted for 98 while the remainder 
were for remodeling existing structures. 

Assessed Valuation, Polls and Stocks, Tax Warrant 

An increase of $426,773 brought the total assessed valuation of the 
City of Concord for the year 1940 up to $32,791,790. The 1940 in- 
crease was almost three times that of the previous year. The num- 
ber of taxable polls continued to increase during 1940 with 447 more 
persons enumerated than in 1939. Altogether, 14,332 taxable polls 

were reported to the Tax Collector. The 
number of shares of railroad stock ac- 
credited to Concord taxpayers was 2,947 
or 149 more than the number held in 
1939. Small as this increase is, it is 
noteworthy that this is the first time 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS: 

Clarence O. Philbrkk, Charm: 
Joseph E. Shepard, Clerk 
Edward F. Donovan 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$11,301.90 



Equitable assessment is vital to good government. An important part of the work of the 
Board of Assessors is the actual inspection of the premises during the process of appraisal. 






PttOPE^TY 


VALUES INCREASED 
IN 1040 






co 1931 1932 1933 
CC 


1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 




< 

_l 

O 33 
Q 

LL 

O 

£ 32 

O 

_l 
_l 

i 3i 














































































-~,rf^ 


„,, , \\H 




mi 
nn 


A 


rv 




f™ V] R-^l TTl^ 


aczicr) no 1 


i^rist- 











since 1934 that an increase has occurred in the number of shares 
of railroad stock held in Concord. The 1940 tax warrant totaled 
$1,280,926.90 or S104.894.12 more than the 1939 warrant. The av- 
erage tax rate for 1940 was $38.00. 

Tax Exempt Property 

Concord has an unusual large amount of tax exempt property. Re- 
vised figures indicate that there is $22,867,000 worth of non-taxable 
property in the city. This amount represents 41 per cent of the total 
valuation of the city. 

As a result of the decision handed down by the Supreme Court in 
the Exeter Academy Case cities and towns were declared to have the 
right to tax certain school property which had previously been con- 
sidered to be tax free. The effect of this ruling in Concord was to in- 
crease the assessed valuation of property owned by St. Paul's School 
by $175,000. 

Other 1940 changes in tax exempt property included a return to 
the tax list of the Christian Science Farm on Clinton Street through 
the sale of the property. Property taken off the tax list included the 
Cilley Farm on Iron Works Road valued at $15,000 which was ac- 
quired by the State Hospital, and land at West Concord valued at 
$2,000 which was purchased by the State Prison. 

New Building, 1940 

During the past year, the only large new unit of taxable property 
completed in the city was the new super-market on South Main Street. 
Under construction was the new office building of the United Life and 
Accident Insurance Company on the lot formerly occupied by the va- 
cant Gorham Company plant on Washington Street. 

Residential construction in 1940 has been almost entirely of the 
owner-occupied single-family type. 



13 



Tax Collection 



1940 Collections 

THE ANNUAL tax warrant submitted to the Tax Collector by the 
Board of Assessors on July 26, 1940 amounted to $1,280,926.90. 
Of this sum, only $251,325.61 remained uncollected at the end 
of the year. In addition, $38,748.56 worth of back taxes covering the 
years 1932 to 1939 remained to be collected. 

The following tabulation indicates the progress which was made 
during the past year in the reduction of outstanding taxes. 

Year 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 



Total 



As of 




As of 


Pec. 31, 1930 


Di 


c. 31, 1940 


$ 2.891.80 


3 


2.142.64 


3,200.42 




2,345.46 


4,619.87 




3,569.11 


6,037.74 




4,662.05 


6,894.39 




5,059.99 


9,332.92 




6,342.98 


10.588.58 




7,156.18 


273,K<>7.72 




7,470.15 




2 

$2 


51,325.61 






$317,433.44 


)0,074.17 



Taxes Bought By City 

There is no better criterion of the prosperity of a community than 
the amount of delinquent taxes which the tax collector has on his books. 
The amount of taxes bought by the City on September 27, 1940 at the 
Tax Collector's Sale totaled $41,755.52. This was slightly less than 
the amount purchased in 1939. Not since 1934, has a smaller purchase 
been recorded. 

A five-year summary of the taxes bought by the City of Concord 
and held in the Tax Collector's Office for redemption is as follows: 

Am' t Bought Amount Abated by Deeded Amount 

) ear by City Redeemed Assessors to City Unredeemed 

1935 $46,589.46 $34,136.36 $10,819.12* $1,633.98 

1936 47,570.05 42,999.21 701.28 1,203.88 $ 2,665.68 

1937 58,590.41 48,436.16 1,506.28 990.02 7,657.95 

1938 41,919.30 2o.784.13 759.87 165.98 14.209.32 

1939 41,755.52 9,005.09 475.63 32,274.80 

'Includes $9,677.54 abated on Bektash Temple property by order of court. 



TAX COLLECTOR: 

Amos R. Morrison 



1940 EXPENDITURE: 
$7,380.54 



Other Activity 

In addition to the regular revenue collec- 
tions, the Tax Collector received $1,192.37 
from persons who rented or purchased prop- 
erty which the City has acquired through 
non-payment of taxes. 



14 



Finances 



FINANCIALLY, the year 1940 was a very successful one for the 
City of Concord. Current operations were concluded with a 
surplus of $28,813.36. Bond payments amounting to $116,000.00 
were made during the year. The City of Concord improved its finan- 
cial condition in 1940 by $144,813.36. The effect of this improvement 
is reflected in the reduction of the City's net debt from $1,040,437.22 
on January 1, 1940 to $895,623.86 on December 31, 1940. It is in- 
teresting to note that the City has accomplished a reduction in its net 
debt of more than a quarter of a million dollars during the past three 
years — $253,528.84 to be exact. Unless this trend is interrupted, it 
is reasonable to assume that a material reduction in the City's tax rate 
can be effected in the near future. 

General Fund 

During 1940, the revenue collected by the City amounted to 
$1,550,790.90. After deducting current transfers, the net revenue 
available for expenditure was $1,519,899.66. This amount was 
$33,572.45 more than the total estimated revenue for 1940, and 
$159,077.91 more than the amount collected during the previous year. 

Appropriations for the year totaled $1,523,327.21. An overdraft 
of appropriations of $10,472.40 is indicated by total charges of 
$1,533,799.61. Calculations indicate that the City had a net surplus 
from current operations of $28,813.36. (See Financial Statements in 
Appendix ) . 

Bond Funds 

The summary of bond fund receipts and disbursements indicates 
that $28,689.43 were available for expenditure during 1940. Of this 
amount, $15,000.00 represents the proceeds from the sale of the Public 
Improvement Note of May 1, 1940. All moneys were expended during 
the year thereby closing out all bond fund balances. 

Debt services requirements indicate that 
the City, as of December 31, 1940, had a 
bonded debt of $1,098,000. Of this amount, 
$159,000 represent Water Department bonds. 
These bonds are retired out of the earnings 
of the department. Bonds and notes re- 
tired during the year amounted to $151,000. 
Against this reduction, $35,000 in notes were 
issued. The net reduction in bonded debt 
was $116,000. 



CITY TREASURER: 

Carl H. I-'u>ter 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$3,205.21 



TRUSTEES OF 
TRUST FUNDS: 

Harry H. Dudley 
Carl H. Foster 
Edgar C. Hirst 

CUSTODIAN: 

Carl H. Foster 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$150.00 



Trust Funds 

As of December 31. 1940, total trust fund 



15 




"""STRATION H* 5 M ° 



HOW YOUR TAX MONEY IS USED 

investments and unexpended income amounted to $398,547.43 as com- 
pared with $392,803.50 at the close of 1939. Except for $7,630.63 
invested in securities, the City's trust funds are invested at interest 
in Concord's four savings banks. Income received from interest and 
dividends during the year amounted to $18,035.33. Total disburse- 
ments were $18,126.73. During 1940, $5,519.65 in new trust funds 
were received. Of this amount, $4,994.24 represented sundry cemetery 
trusts. In addition to the new trusts, $680.00 in trust deposits were 
received from the sale of cemetery lots. 

The City's trust funds can be invested only by deposit in savings 
banks or savings departments of national banks or trust companies 
in the state, or in United States government bonds and obligations, or 
in state, county, town, city and school district bonds and the notes of 
towns and cities in New Hampshire. 



Legal Service 



Scope of Service 

TO THE CITY and its officers, the most important legal services 
are interpretation of statutes and ordinances, definition of the 
powers and duties of local government and its officials and the 
drafting of the many and varied legal instruments required in the 
conduct of municipal business. The adjustment of claims against the 
municipal corporation constitutes but a minor Dart of the legal service 
required of the city's attorney. Experience has proven that most 
claims against the City can be settled through negotiation. Only oc- 
casionally does it become necessary to resort to court action in order 
to secure the rights of the City. 

Administrative Assistance 

During the past year, assistance has been rendered to the Board of 
Aldermen in an attempt to rewrite a number of local ordinances to 
conform with and enable modern municipal practices. Ordinances now 
in force have been collected and annotated in revised form. 

Litigations — Settled or Adjudicated 

Anna M. Mann vs. City of Concord and Shirley Brunei vs. City of 
Concord were claims for damages occasioned by the overflow of waters 
from the sewerage system following exceedingly heavy rainfall. The 
first case was settled by payment of the sum of $50.00 and the sec- 
ond upon payment of $1,604.09. 

State vs. Kenneth Moore challenged the validity of an ordinance 
regulating the grant of licenses to persons and corperations engaged 
in the business of transporting goods for hire entirely within city limits. 
The Supreme Court ruled that this sort of regulation is not permissible. 
The case of Kenneth Moore vs. John W. Storrs et al. was an appli- 
cation for a court order to compel the Mayor and Aldermen to issue 
a local trucking license to the petitioner. With the licensing ordinance 
declared void, the necessity for application no longer existed. 

State Oil Company vs. City of Concord was an appeal from a rul- 
ing of the Board of Adjustment denying an application for a permit to 
conduct a filling station on North Main Street. The case was settled 
by withdrawal, on the part of the City, of objection to the petitioner's 
request. 

Mahon vs. City of Concord was a claim for damages resulting 
from an injury sustained by a minor while bathing in a public pool 

at the Kimball Playground. The claim was 
settled for $100.00." 

George W. Perry vs. City of Concord 
was an appeal from an order of the Board 
of Adjustment. The appeal was withdrawn. 



CITY SOLICITOR: 
Gordon S. Lord 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,532.00 



17 



Litigation — Pending 

Bcktash Real Estate Association vs. City of Concord are five ap- 
peals from assessments imposed upon the real estate of the petitioner 
for the years 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939 and 1940. Interminable negotia- 
tions have failed to produce an acceptable basis of settlement. No 
trial has been had of the principal issues in controversy. 

Maude L. Crowley vs. City of Concord is an appeal from the al- 
leged taking by eminent domain of certain land of the petitioner. 

The Petition of the Trustees of Trust Funds is a request for inter- 
pretation of certain portions of the wills of Nathaniel Bouton and 
David Osgood. 

Shelby O. Walker vs. City of Concord is an appeal from a ruling of 
the Board of Adjustment. 

Aune Saari, Administratrix, Estate of Mikko Saari vs. City of Con- 
cord. The plaintiff's intestate fell from a bridge in Penacook, landed 
on a ledge at the base of an abutment and was killed. His adminis- 
tratrix takes the position that the bridge was defectively constructed or 
improperly maintained and that the accident was caused by the condi- 
tion of the bridge. 

Charles Filides and William Filides vs. City of Concord is an ap- 
peal from the Assessors' valuation of the petitioners' real estate. 

Franklin Hollis, Administrator of the Estate of Edward Adams vs. 
City of Concord. This is an action to recover the value of certain land 
over which, it is alleged, the City has exercised dominion and control. 

City of Concord vs. Marie A. Bourdeau is an action by the City to 
enforce a lien for water service on the real estate of the defendant. 

City of Concord vs. Town of Bow is a suit to recover for relief 
granted by Concord to a person who has a settlement in Bow. 

Other Activity 

The number of parcels of land sold annually for non-payment of 
taxes has increased markedly in the last decade. Failures to redeem 
real estate sold in this manner, within the period prescribed by law, 
have increased correspondingly. To sell the land at a price sufficient 
to remiburse the City for lost taxes and return the property to the tax 
roles has accordingly become an important duty of the City Govern- 
ment, and one to which the City Solicitor has had to devote more and 
more time. As broker for the City, the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings has made a sustained and successful effort to dispose of the 
City's unwanted real estate. 

Some assistance has been rendered to the Tax Collector in his 
persistent drive to collect delinquent personal property and poll taxes. 

18 



Planning 



Extent of Activity 

DURING THE past year, 13 requests for studies were received 
from the Board of Aldermen by the Planning Board. Of this 
number, eight were requests for consideration of new street ac- 
ceptances and five pertained to studies relating to various municipal 
problems. In addition to these, five studies were referred to the Plan- 
ning Board by committees of the Board of Aldermen. During the 
year, several studies requested in 1939 were completed. Altogether, 
reports were issued on 18 separate projects during 1940. 

Street Acceptance 

Eight petitions for the acceptance of streets received the attention 
of the Planning Board. After careful analysis of the merits of each 
proposed street in relation to need, character of layout, and con- 
formity to the future development of the city as a whole, the board 
recommended that four streets be accepted and that four be rejected. 
These recommendations were accepted by the Board of Aldermen. Of 
the four accepted, two streets, representing 6,662 feet of highway, 
were already used by the public. Actual new street acceptance in- 
volved the addition of only 550 feet of roadway to the street plan of 
the city. By adopting the recommendations of the Planning Board, 
the Board of Aldermen refused acceptance of 3,855 feet of unnecessary 
street. 

Zoning Revision 

Outstanding among the studies undertaken during the year was 
the matter of revising the zoning ordinance. The ordinance which was 
established in 1930, required considerable revision in order that it 
might better fit the development needs of the community. Extensive 
changes were recommended in the text of the ordinance and the zoning 
map. Especially noteworthy was the establishment of two new types 
of districts — civic and agricultural, and the extension of single resi- 
dence zoning to a large section of the fast 
developing South End. Provision was also 
made to permit the conversion of large 
residences into apartment houses accom- 
modating three or four families. It is 
interesting to note that the professional 
services retained by the City to establish 
zoning in Concord cost $2,500. The pres- 
ent revision which required as much if 
not more study, was accomplished entirely 
within the regular Planning Board appro- 
priation at no added cost to the City. 



CITY PLANNING 
BOARD: 

James M. Langley, Chairman 

Edward E. Beane 

Frederick P. Clark 

Warren H. Greene 

John B. Tameson 

Harold D. Merrill 

Dudley W. Orr 

Austin E. Page 

Hon. John W. Storrs 

DIRECTOR: 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen 
EXPENDITURE: 

$3,584.96 



19 




~* ■--? vr> aaaaeaa -■■ 



NORTH STATE STREET 





PROPOSED PARKING LOT 

CAPACITY 01 CARS 



■®i 



CONCORD CITY PLANNING BOARD 



Parking 

The efforts of the Planning Board to alleviate the parking prob- 
lem in the downtown area were continued during the year. Out of 
the several sites surveyed as possible off-street parking lots, the board 
recommended the initiation of joint action with the State of New 
Hampshire to the end that the park located at the rear of the State 
Library be converted into an auto parking area. A committee of the 
Board of Aldermen met with State authorities on this matter and 
State action is being taken to create an off-street parking lot sufficient 
to accommodate 60 cars at the proposed location. This lot will by no 
means solve the parking problem. However, it is a definite step in the 
right direction and may well result in the establishment of several such 
areas in Concord. 



20 



City Report 

The supervision of the publishing of the annual city report was 
turned over to the Planning Board by the Board of Aldermen in 1940. 
Believing that the old statistical type of city report had little value as 
a report of municipal activity, the Planning Board undertook to mod- 
ernize the report by condensing the statistics and by including therein 
a text, photographs, graphic illustrations, maps, etc. The 1939 "stream- 
lined" report was the first of its kind to be issued in New Hampshire. 

By changing the style of the report, the number of pages was 
cut from 260 to 80. The number of copies issued was increased from 
1,500 to 2,500 while a saving of approximately $500 was effected in the 
total cost of publishing the report. 

Research Studies 

During the past year, the Board of Aldermen and committees of 
the board have continued the practice of referring problems which re- 
quire research to the Planning Board. Exhaustive studies were made 
in relation to the need for a new fire station in the South End, the ex- 
pansion of the Municipal Airport, and the desirability of an indoor 
recreation center. The South End Fire Station Study is especially 
noteworthy because it brought out the fact that a $30,000 expenditure 
for the new fire station plus an annual maintenance cost of $5,300 
would affect a reduction in insurance rates in that area of only $350. 

At the request of the Board of Education, the Planning Board 
undertook a study involving the determination of the location and size 
of a proposed new school building in the Plains area. The cost of 
making the study was borne by the school district. 

Proposed Legislation 

On two occasions during the past year, the Planning Board has 
indicated to the Board of Aldermen the need for enabling legislation 
in matters pertaining to the city government. The first of these was 
in relation to the charging of rentals for the use of the sewerage sys- 
tem; the second involved the right to spend public funds for parking 
areas. Action has been taken by the City in each of these matters and 
enabling legislation is now being sought in the General Court. 

1941 

The Planning Board is looking forward to a busy year. Six re- 
search studies requested by the Board of Aldermen are now pending 
action by the board. To be considered are a capital budget program, 
a financial analysis of the City, an industrial survey, a refuse dis- 
posal study, a proposed relocation of the clinics and the comfort 
station, and a proposed new fire station on the Plains. 

Surveys being conducted by the Engineering Department should 
enable the Planning Board to recommend to the Board of Aldermen 
the adoption of an official city map during the coming year. 

21 



Public Health-Sanitation 

IT IS HARD to evaluate the activities of the Health Department 
without taking into consideration the department's objectives. Even 
when these objectives have been accomplished and good public 
health prevails, the situation is accepted with a general feeling of in- 
difference. Only when communicable diseases reach near-epidemic 
proportions is the public unduly aroused. Nevertheless, the depart- 
ment is continually active in its efforts to prevent the spread of disease. 

Communicable Disease 

During the past year, the general health of the community has re- 
mained at a high level. With the exception of a few mild cases of 
scarlet fever reported in the fall, there was no concentration of com- 
municable disease cases in Concord during 1940. 

Vital Statistics 

There were 281 resident and 276 non-resident deaths in the city 
during 1940. Ten still births were recorded by the department. Of 
the total number of resident deaths, there were ten in the under one 
year age group; four in the 1-9 group; three in the 10-19; 19 in the 
20-44; and 245 in the 45 and over age classification. Concord's death 
rate showed no perceptible change over that of the previous year; 11.1 
deaths were recorded per 1,000 population. 

A five-year comparative analysis of the number of deaths in Con- 
cord from seven common causes is presented herewith. 



Diseases of the circulatory system 

Cancer 

Nephritis (Bright's Disease) 

Accidental deaths 

Pneumonia 

Diabetes 

Tuberculosis 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 

Hon. Tolm W. Storrs, Chairman 
Robert O. Blood. M.D. 
Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 
Carl A. Dahlgren, M.D. 
Thomas J. Halligan, M.D. 

SANITARY OFFICER: 

Donald G. Barton, M.D. 
Walter C. Rowe, M.D. 

(In the absence of Dr. Barton) 

MILK INSPECTOR: 

Austin B. Presby 
1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$6,633.77 



936 


1937 


1938 


1939 


1940 


135 


111 


114 


106 


97 


43 


39 


32 


32 


42 


18 


7 


28 


20 


14 


14 


14 


17 


18 


10 


20 


24 


9 


11 


IS 


7 


9 


10 


10 


7 


6 


5 


6 


6 


2 



Inspection Program 

The restaurant inspection program 
inaugurated in 1939 has been continued 
with satisfactory results. The program 
was expanded during the past year to 
cover restaurant kitchen ventilation. In 
several cases, fumes were discharged 
with the aid of electric fans directly into 
adjacent alleys. Needless to say, the re- 
sulting odor and grease caused no little 
annoyance to nearby business establish- 



22 



This view taken several years ago 
shows the poor sanitary condition 
which prevailed in many of the 
downtown alleys before the 
Health Department undertook the 
elimination of this type of a 
health menace. 




This is the same alley as it ap- 
pears today. The improvement 
has been accomplished as a result 
of regular inspections by the 
Health Department and an im- 
proved pick-up service condvicted 
by the Department of Public 
Works. 



ments and apartments. In most cases this condition was remedied after 
the Health Department insisted that the restaurateurs install metal 
stacks to carry the fumes to the top of the building. 

Routine sanitary inspections were made of public buildings, stores, 
shops, etc. In a few instances inspections were conducted in homes 
where unhealthy living conditions were reported by various social 
agencies. During 1940, the department received fewer complaints 
concerning insanitary conditions about residences. 

Two years ago, the department undertook the execution of a sani- 
tary survey with the assistance of the inspector made available by the 
U. S. Public Health Service. This work has been progressing steadily 
and much has been accomplished in the correction of faulty plumbing. 

MILK INSPECTION 

One of the responsibilities of public health administration is that 
of protecting and safe-guarding the milk supply of a community. To 
do this effectively involves an inspection of the dairy where the milk is 
produced, the plant where the milk is processed and its entire course 
from cow to consumer. This includes the taking of samples from 
delivery trucks during distribution to the homes. Laboratory tests, 
together with frequent inspection of the dairy where the milk is pro- 
duced or pasteurized, are a part of the activity of maintaining the 
quality of milk sold in the Concord market. The Health Department 
is in a position to give detailed information about the quality and 
purity of the city's milk supply to all who are interested. 



23 



Tests 

During 1940, there were tested 1,519 milk samples; 74 cream sam- 
ples; 28 ice cream and ice cream mixes; 48 chocolate milk samples; 
48 orangeade and 100 miscellaneous samples. Of the total number 
of samples tested, 97.4 per cent, an increase of 0.9 per cent over the 
previous year, were above legal requirements. In addition, 520 dairy 
and 281 milk plant inspections were made during the year. 

The number of producers supplying milk for Concord has increased 
8.5 per cent or from 181 to 198 herds. This herd expansion is due 
largely to an increased number of owners of one or two cows. There 
are 61 producer-dealers who sell their own milk supply direct from 
dairy to consumer and these represent 89.6 per cent of all dealers 
selling milk in Concord. There are seven dealers selling milk who 
are not producers. 

An average of 12,079 quarts of milk a day was handled during the 
year. Of this amount, 8,632 quarts were pasteurized. About 3,447 
quarts of raw milk are sold daily. There has been an increase in the 
amount of pasteurized milk sold over the previous year. The amount 
of raw milk represents 28.6 per cent of the total milk distribution. 

A total of 150 herds, or 75.7 per cent of all herds that supply the 
local market, have been tested for Bang's Disease. Concord ranks 
high among the cities of the nation in relation to the percentage of 
its milk supply which is produced by cows that are Bang's Disease free. 

Regular inspection is made of all plants to see that pasteurization 
is properly carried out and that proper sanitation of the premises and 
equipment is maintained. At each of the seven plants, daily tempera- 
ture recording charts are used on each pasteurizer which indicate the 
degree to which the milk is heated and the length of time that such 
temperature was maintained. At all plants these recording charts are 
checked each week and oftener if occasion demands it. 

During the year, 520 samples of swab wash and rinse waters were 
collected at eating places, barbershops and hair-dressing establish- 
ments by the department and plated for total bacterial count. 




In order that the citizens of Concord 
may have the best in milk, every step 
of the process from cow to the consumer 
is carefully inspected. The Milk In- 
spector is shown gathering samples of 
milk from a local herd for laboratory 
testing. 



Medical Service 

Purpose 

THE PROVISION of medical assistance for needy persons is one 
of the less conspicuous services rendered by the City of Con- 
cord. For this purpose, the City employs on a part-time basis 
two practicing physicians, one in the city proper and one at Penacook. 
The service is available only to those persons who are on relief or who 
are known to be unable to retain their own doctor. 

The soundness of the practice of providing free medical aid to 
needy people has long since been established. On the whole, people 
who are forced to live at a reduced standard are more susceptible to 
sickness than those who are better fortified with worldly goods. For 
the City to neglect its needy in sickness would be gross misadministra- 
tion and might well be the manner of affecting a general epidemic. 

At times, people seek charity because they are sick and unable 
to work. Through its medical service, the City is often able to return 
these persons to good health and, later, to gainful employment. 

Medical Aid During 1940 

During the past year, the decreasing trend in the number of 
cases treated which began in 1939 has continued. Approximately 2,500 
visits and calls were made during 1940. This number, which repre- 
sents a decrease of about 500 since the last report, appears to be the 
result of more people finding work and, in turn, seeking treatment 
when sick from their family doctors. 

During the year, the general condition of health among relief re- 
cipients has been exceptionally good. There has been no concentration 
of sickness other than that occasioned by seasonal changes in weather. 

Recommendation 

Most of the cases which the City Physician has to treat each year 
are of no considerable consequence. Many of these can be remedied 
by some of the more common medicines. It has been the practice of 
the City Physician to have a supply of these medicines on hand. This 
procedure has accomplished a definite saving in the amount .of money 
expended for prescribed medicines. The cost of drugs and medicines 
has risen considerably during the past year. It is altogether probable, 

unless there is a sharp decrease in the number 
of cases treated, that an increased appropria- 
tion for medicine will be necessary in the 
near future. If this is so, the City Physician 
recommends that such an added appropria- 
tion should be made in order to facilitate prac- 
tice and in order to effect a saving in medicine 
costs. 



CITY PHYSICIAN: 
Thomas J. Halligan 

ASSISTANT 

CITY PHYSICIAN: 

Elmer U. Sargent 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,833.82 



25 



Parks-Cemeteries-Trees 



A CITY SHOULD count among its best assets its public parks, 
trees and open spaces. Few things can convey to a visitor the 
impression of community well-being and prosperity with greater 
effect than well-kept parks and beautiful shade trees. To the resident, 
parks offer places for rest, relaxation, recreation and safety for chil- 
dren. Furthermore, the aesthetic beauty which parks and shade trees 
lend to a community is in no small way responsible for the maintenance 
of residential property values. 

Parks 

During 1940, the Park Department continued its program of beau- 
tification and planting of grounds in nearly all of the city's parks. 

Most of the 1940 development program has been conducted at Rol- 
lins Park where the department has been energetically striving to com- 
plete the reconstruction of its hurricane- 
damaged property. 

Perhaps the most important single 
project undertaken during the year in- 
volved the draining and filling of the 
centerpiece at White Park, commonly re- 
ferred to as the "swamp". This area 
which is about three-quarters of an acre 
in size, is located in the center of the park 
between the pond and the baseball 
diamond. Work has progressed to the 
stage where the replacement of the top 
soil will complete the project. 



PARK & CEMETERY 
COMMISSION: 

Hon. John W. Storr 
Herbert G. Abbot 
Pierre A. Boucher 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Robert J. Graves 
Alpheus M. Johnson 
Mrs. Thomas N. Troxell 

SUPERINTENDENT : 

Carl L. Sargent 

TREE WARDEN: 

Carl L. Sargent 

1940 EXPENDITURES 

Parks— $16,320.40 

Cemeteries— $33,403.34 
Trees— $12,321.75 



Chairman 



Located conveniently near the business district on North Main Street, West 
Garden offers the public an ideal place to stop for a moment's rest and relaxation. 




Cemeteries 

In addition to the usual cemetery activities, the department graded 
a small section at the Blossom Hill Cemetery and built a new section 
at Penacook, sufficient to accommodate 600 graves. During the year, 
the department caught up with some of the regular maintenance work 
which had to be pushed ahead in 1939 as a result of the 1938 hurri- 
cane. Over 2,700 graves were raised and 914 monuments anbl markers 
were straightened. New fences were built at the cemeteries in River- 
hill and Millville. At the East Concord cemetery, a new roadway was 
constructed and a large section of the yard was regraded. A new 
waterpipe system has been installed at the Woodlawn Cemetery in 
Penacook. 

Trees 

The program of setting out new street trees was continued during 
the year. A total of 565 trees were planted along the city streets. 
Many of these were replacements of trees destroyed by the near- 
hurricane. Work was completed on cabling and bolting of trees which 
were weakened by that gale. 

The gypsy-moth infestation in 1940 was one of the worst that the 
city has had to cope with in recent years. As a result, there is every 
reason to believe that an abnormal number of caterpillars will infest 
the city next spring. A definite decrease in the destruction wrought 
by Japanese Beetles was noted during the year. Except for small 
areas in the vicinity of the State Hospital and Allison Street where 
these pests are still present, the department's eradication work has been 
very successful. The fight will be carried on next summer and 
the department hopes that its efforts will soon result in complete 
control. 



Located in a setting of stately pines, the recently restored pond at Blossom Hill 
has greatly improved the attractiveness of the largest of Concord's cemeteries. 




Recreation 



PLAYGROUNDS AND BATH 

IT IS THE AIM of the Committee on Playgrounds and Bath to afford 
an opportunity to every boy and girl in the city to use his or her 
leisure hours constructively. To fulfill this purpose, a diversified 
program of activities is conducted in the widely separated sections of 
the city. 

Administration 

The question of the legal status of the Committee on Playgrounds 
and Bath came up during the year. By an amendment of Chapter 42 
of the Revised Ordinances, the Committee on Playgrounds and Bath 
was made one of the standing committees of the Board of Aldermen. 
The committee which has a membership of 12 made up of five aldermen 
and seven citizens is in charge of all playgrounds and pools. 

New Facilities 

During 1940, a new wading pool was constructed with the assist- 
ance of the Works Projects Administration at Rolfe Park in Penacook. 
This pool, which has a depth ranging from three and one-half to four 
feet, meets a long felt need in the Ward One section of the city. 

At the West Street Playground, an area used primarily by small 
children, better facilities were provided and a wire fence was erected 
around the play area. The general appearance of the entire lot was 
improved by landscaping that part which is not used for active play. 

Activities 

The playgrounds and pools were in continuous operation over a ten- 
week period during the summer. In addition to the regular playing 
and swimming activities, over 90 inter-playground contests were con- 
ducted with special emphasis on senior, junior and midget baseball, 
vollyball, newcomb ball and horseshoes. Several supervised all-day 

outings were held at lakeside recreation 
areas near Concord. At the close of 
the summer season, the annual field day 
was held at Rolfe Park in Penacook. 
Children from all parts of the city took 
part in the competitive program of sports. 
A water carnival was held at the 
Broken Bridge bathing area. A large 
crowd was on hand to witness the swim- 
ming races and the diving competition for 
the "city championships". Those who 
qualified at the carnival were sent to Man- 
chester to take part in the State Aquatic 



COMMITTEE ON 
PLAYGROUNDS & BATH: 

Harold I). .Merrill. Chairman 
Charles P. Coakley 
William J. Flynn 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Thomas B. Jennings 
Mrs. Maud N. Blackwood 
Mrs. Kathleen Mullen 
Mrs. Victoria Mahoney 
Miss Margaret Challis 
Mrs. Ethel M. Storrs 
Mrs. Nora E. Donovan 
Mrs. James M. Langley 

SUPERVISOR: 
Paul <;. Crowell 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 
$9,906.34 



28 



Meet held at the Rock Rimmon Pool. A team representing Concord 
won the state relay swimming championship. 

During the winter months, all of the city's skating and sliding 
areas were operated as usual. Due to the early snowfall, the sliding 
season began during the last week in November or about a month 
earlier than in 1939. The skating area maintained at White Park was 
available for public use during 76 days of the winter season. 

Attendance 

The total attendance at the playgrounds and pools during the ten- 
week summer season was 94,425. This figure was slightly less than 
that of the previous year. The decrease in attendance was undoubtedly 
due to the fact that there were 12 full days of rain during the season. 
Even with this unusual amount of rainy weather, the total attendance 
of 12,524 at Broken Bridge exceeded all previous attendance records 
for this swimming area. 



Competitive sports provide the center 

of attraction at the annual field day 

held at the end of the playground 

season. 



The new pool at Rolfe Park provides 

ample opportunity for safe swimming 

for tha children of Fenacook. 





J£* J& 







SPECIAL RECREATIONAL FACILITIES 

To the City Recreation Commission — a five-man board includ- 
ing the Mayor ex-officio and four members appointed by the Mayor 
from outside the Board of Aldermen — is entrusted the supervision 
of civil recreational affairs represented by the Beaver Meadow Golf 
Links, Memorial Athletic Field and the more recently developed 
Russell Pond Winter Sports Area. 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course 

One of the most active municipal golf clubs in the state, Beaver 
Meadow is situated on the northern outskirts of the city, close by the 
Daniel Webster highway. 

The recreation commission operates the golf course through a man- 
ager and two outside employees who work seven months a year. 

The annual club dues and day fees are scaled so that the course 
has in past years just about made expenses. Although no provision is 
specifically made for large-size improvements, certain innovations have 
been instituted each year and following the end of the 1940 season 
three of the greens were re-seeded. 

During the 1940 season the club had a regular membership of 165, 
as compared to 131 for the previous year, indicating the growth of 
Beaver Meadow in popular favor. Seven of the 1940 memberships 
were held by juniors. One-day fees, paid by non-member players, 
totaled 1,769, attesting to the extensive use of the club's facilities. 

Memorial Field 

For three seasons of the year Con- 
cord's schoolboy sports activities are cen- 
tered at Memorial Field, an attractive 
amphitheatre located off South Fruit Street 
in the city's West End. 

Focal point of all sorts of interscho- 



RECREATION 
COMMISSION: 

.1. Mitchell Ahem, Chairman 
Gardner (I. Emmons 
Leigh S. Hall 
Carleton K. Metcalf 
Hon. John W. Storrs 
1940 EXPENDITURE: 
$(..633.71 




Artificial lighting was used 
last fall for the first time 
in the history of Concord 
football. The stamp of ap- 
proval which the public 
gave to this innovation is 
indicated by the large 
crowd that turned out to 
watch the high school team 
at Memorial Field. 



The ski lodge is one of the 
many attractions which the 
City provides for winter 
sports enthusiasts at the 
Russell Pond Winter Sports 
Area. 




lastic sports combat — on gridiron, track, and baseball diamond — 
Memorial Field is in daily use throughout the spring and autumn. 
In the summer months its six tennis courts accommodate an increasing 
number of enthusiasts and provide the setting, each year, for the 
N. H. State Closed Championships, an important tournament sanc- 
tioned by the U.S.L.T.A. 

The excellent cinder path, a five-laps-to-the-mile track, with its 
accompanying pits for pole-vaulting and high and broad jumping, is the 
scene each June of the annual State Kiwanis meet, one of the high- 
lights of the track and field campaign in New Hampshire. 

Also the site of several state amateur championships in softball 
and hard ball, Memorial Field is "home" for the flourishing city soft- 
ball circuit, for Concord High's field hockey players, touch football 
teams and various other types of more or less extempore sports 
shows. 

Russell Pond "Snow Bowl" 

Popularly referred to as the "Snow Bowl", the picturesque Russell 
Pond area has brought winter sports directly into Concord's "back 
yard". This development in a hill-girt retreat two miles west of the 
city, near Penacook Lake, has given skiing enthusiasts excellent facili- 
ties for downhill racing, open slope skiing or ski-jumping. 

The Concord Ski and Outing Club instituted a successful winter 
carnival at "the Pond" in 1940, plans to make the fete an annual 
event, sanctioned by the E. A. S. A. (Eastern Amateur Ski Associa- 
tion). 

The area boasts three trails for beginners, intermediates and ex- 
perts, two open slopes, a 300-metre jumping hill, a ski-tow and a heated 
cabin where skiers may rest and relax. 



31 



Public Library 



THE YEAR 1940 was outstanding in the history of the public li- 
brary in Concord. With the opening of the new quarter-million 
dollar building in January, patronage and circulation took a 
pronounced upward surge. Many former library users who had be- 
come discouraged because of the inadequate facilities offered in the old 
building on School Street and the Pleasant Street temporary quarters, 
revealed renewed interest. In the present building, designed by Alfred 
Morton Githens and Frances Keally of New York City, Concord en- 
joys one of the finest small libraries in the nation. Spaciousness is 
emphasized without sacrificing functional needs. Comfortable reading- 
rooms, reference quarters and a separate children's library are features 
of the new building, and for the first time citizens may have ready 
access to some 10,000 books shelved in free-standing, open stacks. 
Somewhat unique in libraries of this size are the room for high school 
students and the three study rooms. The latter, located on the second 
floor, provide well-ventilated and sound-proof rooms for the scholar, 
the writer, the clergyman, the research student, facilities rarely en- 
countered in other than university libraries. 

Library System 

The Concord Public Library system, besides the main library on 
Green Street, embraces four branch libraries serving the residents of 
outlying sections. Books are changed frequently in each instance, 
although the branch library collections must of necessity be restricted. 

Book Collection 

The library book collection numbers 45,452. During 1940, 4,941 
books were added and 1,355 books were discarded. Approximately 
twice as many books were added in 1940 as in 1939. A good many 
books were replacements of worn-out books and standard titles, paid 
for out of a private trust fund. The juvenile book collection totals 
4,343. At present there are 1.67 volumes per capita in the library 

book collection. 



BOARD OF 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

Oliver Jenkins, President 

Henry B. Cannon, Jr. 

Joseph J. Comi 

Edward A. Dame 

Fred M. Dodge 

Mrs. Armine M. Ingham 

Perley B. Phillips 

Alexander Rennie, Jr. 

Willis D. Thompson. Jr. 
LIBRARIAN: 

Marion F. Holt 
1940 EXPENDITURES: 

Operation— $31,358.81 

Construction Acc't. $44,586.23 



Extent of Use 

Fifty-four per cent of the population of 
Concord are registered holders of library 
cards, a marked increase over 1939 when 46 
per cent held cards. During the year, 2,360 
new borrowers were recorded. The growth 
in patronage can be attributed in general to 
the new building and the greater facilities. 
Interest in current affairs, especially war and 
economics, is probably a contributing factor. 



32 




Through its branches like this one 
at Penacook, the Concord Public 
Library extends its services to 
the citizens who live in the city's 
suburban areas. 



Every modern convenience has 
been incorporated in the library's 
main circulation desk for the ac- 
commodation of the book-borrow- 
ing public. 



For the first time in Concord library history the total circulation 
exceeded the 200,000 mark. The 1940 circulation of 217,396 indicates 
an increase of 21,798. 

The total circulation of children's books amounted to 15 per cent 
of the total library circulation, a decline of nine per cent over 1939. 
This, however, is because of the inclusion of readers of high school age 
among adults. During use of temporary quarters in 1939, school chil- 
dren of all grades were grouped together. 



33 



Continued extensive use of the reference room was reported with 
a total of 6,800 reference questions answered. 

Trends of Use 

An expanded use of the library for educational exhibits was noted 
during the past year. Another noteworthy trend was the increased use 
of the reference service by students. Enlarged library facilities have 
permitted the staff to offer a better type of service to study groups, 
schools, churches and other organized groups. Along these lines and 
especially in relation to school children, library clubs have been formed 
through the efforts of the staff. In order to encourage a greater use 
of the library by children, a course of instruction has been given under 
the seventh grade guidance program in the public schools. 

Concord Room 

A new feature of the library is a room which has been set aside 
for the collection of material pertaining to Concord. It contains maps, 
early pictures, histories, and all books of Concord imprint or by local 
authors. During 1941, a member of the library staff will be placed 
in charge of this literature, much of which is still uncatalogued. Event- 
ually this room will be open to the general public. The Concord 
Historical Society has been instrumental in gathering local material to 
insure a permanent collection for the city. 

Cost of Operation 

The total cost of operation of the public library during 1940 was 
$31,358.81. Of this sum the city government appropriated $20,500; 
the remainder represents income from various library trust funds. 





HOW THE LIBP_AP_Y$ PUNDS 
ARE SPENT 



WHAT TYPE OP BOOKS 
CONCORD READS 



34 



W.P.A. 



A "PAY-AS-YOU-GO" policy in relation to W.P.A. expenditures 
was adopted for the first time by the Board of Aldermen in 
1940. In the past, funds for the work relief program were 
raised through the issuance of public improvement bonds. 

Number Employed 

The number of persons employed on W.P.A. projects during 1940 
averaged about 200. This number represents a reduction of 100 per- 
sons from the previous year. A large share of this decrease can be 
attributed to the up-turn in private employment during the past year. 
A number of project workers have found employment in government 
defense work, chiefly at navy yards. 

Accomplishments 

During the past 12 months, 12,305 feet of new storm and sanitary 
sewer were added to the City's sewerage system. At Rollins Park, 
about 400 feet of ashlar wall was constructed and a new baseball dia- 
mond was developed. Bleachers for the accommodation of spectators 
were relocated at White Park and Rollins Park and those at the play- 
ground on the Plains were moved and set up at Memorial Field 

As a part of the program to improve city streets, 5,762 feet of 
curbing were set during the year. Better drainage was provided on 
Clough Mill Road, Borough Road and Lake View Drive where inade- 
quate culverts were rebuilt. 

At Rolfe Park, a new wading pool was 
completed. The West Street Playground was 
regraded and fences were erected around the 
play area and on two sides of the park. In 
addition, a much needed rest room was added 
to the facilities at the playground. The 
river erosion project was nearly completed. 



PROJECT COMMITTEE: 

(harks J. McKee, Chairman 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William A. Stevens 
COORDINATOR: 

Lyman W. Bigelow 
1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$54,657.73 



W. P. A. workers have placed thousands of tons of granite along the west bank 
of the Merrimack River in order to arrest further shifting of the river bed. 





Relief 



General Trends 

DURING 1940, especially in the fall and winter, there was a 
marked improvement in the national employment situation. This 
was largely due to the step-up in production resulting from the 
national defense program. That this trend will continue as the country 
gears itself to a defense economy is almost a certainty. In Concord, 
however, there was no noticeable trend toward increased employment 
which affected the relief load. At this time, there is no indication that 
increased defense production will materially reduce the relief burden 
in the city. This is due to the fact that Concord has relatively few 
industries and that a number of these manufacture non-defense prod- 
ucts. To be sure, some reduction can be expected through increased 
employment, but the extent of that reduction should not be over- 
estimated. 

Administration 

The administration of relief is substantially the same as last year. 
There are two overseers of poor assisted by a staff of nine. The Relief 
Board has not seen fit to fill a vacancy created by the resignation of 
one of the staff members. 

The City Relief Department has continued in its capacity of agent 
in charge of administering Concord's county relief cases. 

The Relief Load 

During 1940, the average number of city relief cases dropped to 141 
or 20 less than the average for 1939. The average number of persons on 
city relief was 391 as compared with 443 during the previous year. 
Unfortunately, most of this reduction was accomplished by transfer of 
cases to county relief. This was in accordance with the law which 
makes a five-year city relief case the responsibility of the county. The 
reduction in city relief cases was offset by an increase in county cases 
credited to the city. The average number of county cases in Concord 
during 1940 was 289, an increase of 13 over the previous year. The 
average number of Concord people on county relief during 1940 was 

1,239 or 101 more than the average for 
1939. 

Toward the end of the year, there was 
a reduction in the amount of supplementary 
relief rendered by the department. This 
reduction was possible because a number of 
W. P. A. workers who had been receiving 
relief assistance were able to find employ- 
ment outside of the city, mostly in govern- 
ment defense work. 



CITY RELIEF BOARD: 

Ralph L. Stearns, Chairman 
John W. Stanley 
Arthur F. Sturtevant 

OVERSEER OF POOR: 

Frank C Gilbert 
OVERSEER OF POOR, 
WARD 1: 

Charles 1'. Coakley 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$70,708.68 



36 



The administration of 
city and comity relief in 
Concord is carried on 
from this office located 
in the Police Building 
on Warren Street. 




Relief Costs 

A total of $196,259.80 was expended by the Relief Department 
during 1940. Of this amount, $70,708.68 were spent for city relief 
while the remaining $125,551.12 represent county relief expenditures. 
Compared with a $76,066.03 expenditure during 1939, the city relief 
disbursement for 1940 indicates a reduction of $5,357.35. On the 
other hand, county relief costs increased $3,764.75 during the year. 

A breakdown of City relief costs indicates that direct expenditures 
for relief totaled $40,192.97. The City's share of Old Age Assistance 
was $7,652.34 while aid to dependent soldiers amounted to $3,170.34. 
Wood expenses for 1940 totaled $7,637.72. The administration of 
City relief cost $12,055.31. 

Other Activity 

The Relief Department has worked in close cooperation with the 
New Hampshire State Employment Service. Whenever openings have 
appeared in jobs which relief recipients could fill, the department has 
made every effort to place its charges in gainful employment. 

Poor health is often the cause of dependency. In some cases, it 
has been found that persons were unemployed and on relief because 
they could not afford medical attention to correct some obvious or 
hidden condition affecting health. It has been the policy of the de- 
partment as a part of its program of rehabilitation to do all it can to 
provide medical attention for its clients and wherever possible to cor- 
rect any condition of health which may be the cause of non-employ- 
ment. 

There are a number of state agencies — old age assistance, child 
welfare, etc. which are set up to handle special types of public relief 
cases. Working in cooperation with these social agencies, the depart- 
ment has been able to turn over to the state the responsibility for the 
care of many city cases. 



37 



Police Protection 

IT IS THE FUNCTION of the Police Department, through adequate 
systematic patrol, to furnish protection to persons and property, to 
prevent crime and other disorders and to apprehend criminals and 
law violators. Efficient and effective regulation of street traffic in order 
to insure the maximum of safety and convenience is also an important 
police function. 

Personnel 

The personnel of the Police Department during 1940 consisted of 
51 officers and policemen. Of this number, 27 were regularly em- 
ployed. Twenty-four special policemen were available on call to 
augment the regular force. 

Expenditures 

The cost of operating the department for the year, 1940, was 
$64,077.79. Figured on a per capita basis, police protection cost the 
Concord citizen about $2.36 for the entire year or less than five cents 
per week. Department earnings amounted to $915.42. 

Criminal Data 

A total of 204 felonies were reported to the department during 
1940. Nine of these were unfounded. Thirty-one per cent of these 
crimes, as compared with 23 per cent in 1939, were cleared by arrest. 
A summary of the return on felonies is presented herewith. 

Classification Not 

of Offenses Offenses Cleared Cleared 

Criminal homicide 

Rape 

Robbery 2 2 

Aggravated assault 

Breaking & entering 54 11 43 

Larceny (Over $50) 3 1 

(Under $50) 117 34 83 

Auto theft 19 12 7 



Total 



195 



60 



135 



POLICE COMMISSION: 

Charles L. Jackman, Chairman 
Daniel Shea 
Guy A. Swenson 

CHIEF OF POLICE: 

Victor I. Moore 
DEPUTY 
CHIEF OF POLICE: 

J. Edward Silva 
POLICE CLERK: 

Burton L. Bailey 
1940 EXPENDITURES: 

Operation— $64,077.79 
Ambulance— $3,000.00 



Stolen Property 

The value of property stolen during 
the year amounted to $11,039.00. Of 
this amount, the department effected the 
recovery of 89 per cent or an increase 
of 26 per cent over the percentage re- 
covered during 1939. Nineteen auto- 
mobiles were stolen during 1940. All but 
one of these were recovered. 

During the previous year, 237 fel- 
onies were recorded and property valued 



38 




Effective police protection depends largely on mobility. The Police Department's 
motorized equipment has been modernized to meet every contingency. 



at $18,112.72 was stolen. It is gratifying to note not only the de- 
crease during 1940 in the number of crimes and the amount of stolen 
property, but the greater effectiveness of the department's efforts as 
well. This improvement can be attributed largely to an increased 
departmental efficiency resulting from the acquisition of better police 
equipment. 



Improvements 

During 1940, another cruiser car was added to the department's 
mobile equipment. This car, which was equipped with two-way radio 
communication facilities, permitted a redistricting of the cruising areas 
in the city proper. By dividing the areas which were formerly cov- 
ered by two cars into three districts, the effectiveness of the cruiser 
patrol was increased greatly. For the first time, a day cruiser was 
put into service. This experiment proved so successful that with the 
addition of more officers, the day cruiser was placed into operation on 
a continuous patrol from 4:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

During the first month of day-cruiser operation, the number of 
auto accidents reported to the police decreased about 40 per cent. 
Through the efforts of this patrol, strict enforcement of traffic reg- 
ulations was accomplished, not without a sizeable increase in the num- 
ber of arrests for speeding and other road and driving law violations. 
Although the department does not believe in over-zealous policing of 
traffic, it adheres strictly to the principle that law enforcement is the 
best safety program. 

39 



Undoubtedly, the outstanding improvement during the year was 
the acquisition of a new ambulance. At a cost of $3,000.00, this piece 
of equipment is the last word in modern design, comfort and adapt- 
ability to its type of service. From specifications set up by the de- 
partment, it is equipped to carry four injured persons, should such 
an emergency arise. The department hopes that before the end of 
1941, the ambulance may also be equipped with two-way radio com- 
munications. 

Bicycle Registration 

An ordinance controlling the registration and use of bicycles in 
the city was introduced to the City Government through the efforts 
of the Police Department. On the passage of this ordinance, the reg- 
istration of all bicycles was required and regulations were adopted by 
the Police Commission to control bicycle operation. The adoption of 
this procedure has done much to insure the safety of children who 
ride bicycles. It is also noteworthy that larceny of bicycles has been 
reduced more than 50 per cent. 

One of the most gratifying results of the bicycle registration pro- 
gram is the growing feeling among the city's youth that they have a 
friend and not an enemy in the police officer. 

Traffic Safety 

A comparative summary of the motor vehicle accident records of 
1939 and 1940 indicates the following return. 

1939 1940 

Total accidents reported or investigated 329 390 

Injuries received in accidents 142 147 

Deaths resulting from accidents 2 2 

Although a greater number of accidents occurred in 1940 than 
in 1939, it should be noted that in proportion to the number reported, 
fewer injuries were received. This would indicate that the accidents 
were of less serious nature involving less speed. There is very little 
doubt that the noticeable reduction in the rate of speed of motor ve- 
hicles in the city has been the direct result of the inauguration of the 
day cruiser patrol. 

Recommendations of the Chief 

For a number of years, the department has been faced with the 
problem of detention of juvenile delinquents. Since the State estab- 
lished the probation system, there has grown a demand for adequate 
facilities for juvenile detention apart from the regular adult quarters. 
In fact, there is a state law which definitely requires that juveniles 
shall be separated from cells or cell blocks that are used for adult 
criminals. It is urgently recommended that a detention room for 
juveniles should be constructed at police headquarters and that this 
room should be equipped with suitable furnishings. 

40 



Since the purchase of a cruising car for use in Ward One, it has 
been necessary to rent garage space for its storage. The construction 
of a one-stall garage adjacent to the Penacook Police Station appears 
to be a desirable recommendation. The saving in rental charges would 
in due time offset the construction cost of the garage. 

A considerable amount of criticism has been directed at the de- 
partment by citizens who feel that the new ambulance should be placed 
at the disposal of all the citizens of Concord and that its use should 
not be restricted to relief recipients and accident emergency cases. 
The Chief of Police believes that this stand is well taken. However, 
the department is powerless to do otherwise until certain ordinances 
are revised and additional operators are provided to render this ser- 
vice. The Chief respectfully recommends that the Mayor and Board 
of Aldermen take the necessary steps to permit the department to man 
and place the ambulance at the service of all the citizens of the City 
of Concord. 



Acquired during the past year, the 
department's new ambulance is 
equipped with every modern de- 
vice for the comfort of the sick 
and the injured. 




Probation 



THE PROBATION Department concluded a most successful year 
of operation in 1940. Without a doubt, the outstanding achieve- 
ment of the year was the reduction effected in the number of 
new juvenile offenders. The new cases totaled 15 as compared with 
39 during 1939. To a large degree, this decrease is the result of the 
greater emphasis which has been placed on prevention of delinquency 
by closer check-ups in homes, schools, churches and places of employ- 
ment. No mean share of the credit for this improvement belongs to 
the Police Department as a direct result of the expanded cruiser patrol. 

Cooperation 

Too much cannot be said about the benefits derived from the pro- 
gram of cooperation which was initiated soon after the probation of- 
fice was created in 1938. The assistance which the Probation Officer 
has received from various social agencies, both public and private, 
has been of inestimable value not only in the prevention of delinquency 
but in the rehabilitation of those children who have been placed on 
probation. 

Commitments to Institutions 

In only a few cases has the department found it necessary to re- 
sort to placing delinquents in institutions. In three cases during the 
year, this procedure was adopted only after it was found that satis- 
factory conditions were not present in the home. 

Summary of Activities 

A summary of the activities of the Probation Officer is as follows: 

Cases carried over from 1939 51 

New cases 15 

Violators 2 

Committed to industrial school 4 

Honorably discharged 14 

Dismissals - 

Placed in institutions due to home conditions 3 

Placed in working positions 4 

Joined C. C. C. camps 3 

Joined U. S. Army 2 

Visits made by probationers to probation office 1040 

Check-ups by probation officer 211 

Contacts with city and state agencies 100 

Non-court cases under supervision 23 

Neglected children cases 1 

Transferrals to State Probation Department 3 

Housing Problem 

Attention is directed to the fact that 
poor housing conditions exist in those parts 
of the city where most of the probationers 
live. In fact, these poor housing conditions 

42 



MUNICIPAL COURT: 


Judge William L. Stevens 


PROBATION OFFICER: 


Robert L. Colby 


1940 EXPENDITURE: 


$1,499.99 



COOPER. AT I O N 

THE WATCHWORD OF PROBATION 



AGENCIES ON W 


HICH THE PRO B ATIO N 


OFFI CER DEPENDS 


FOR AID IN PREVENTING 


AND SUPERVISING 


JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 




CITY 


SCHOOLS 


LIBRARY 


RELI EF 




PLAYGROUNDS HEALTH 


POLICE 


STATE 


PROBATION 


LABOR 


LIBRARY 




UNIVERSITY 


HOSPITAL 


POLICE 




INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL 


SCHOOL FOR PUBLIC 
FEEBLE MINDED WELFARE 


PRIVATE 


CHURCHES 


SCHOOLS 


Y M.C. A. 




FAMILY 
WELFARE 


4H 
CLUB 


FRIENDLY 
CLUB 




COMMUNITY 
CHEST 


SERVICE 
CLUBS 


FRATERNAL 
SOCIETIES 



probably contribute through the lack of proper facilities to the delin- 
quency problem in the city. Insofar as the City is contributing to the 
delinquency situation by concentrating relief families in one or two 
poor housing areas, it would appear desirable to give some thought to 
a system whereby these families could be distributed more evenly over 
the entire city. 

Program of Prevention 

A review of case histories brings out the fact that most of Concord's 
juvenile offenders are members of large families. Invariably, these 
families have little to offer in the form of diversion. As a result, a 
certain bravado is attached to the actions of the delinquent by the 
other children in the family unit. Unfortunately, unless there is out- 
side supervision, these children are too often inclined to follow the poor 
example set by their delinquent brother or sister. Such cases compli- 
cate the work of the Probation Officer because he must of necessity 
extend his surveillance to all of the children in the family. Although 
no record is kept of this type of preventive pre-delinquency activity, 
a considerable amount of time is devoted to this work. The progress 
which has been made to date, indicates that these efforts have been 
worthwhile. 

During the coming year, every effort will be made to further 
expand the department's preventive program. Only through preven- 
tion can the desired reduction in the number of juvenile delinquents be 
effected. 



43 



Municipal Court 

Organization 

THE MUNICIPAL COURT, with its quarters in the Police 
Building on Warren Street, is the judicial branch of the City 
of Concord. In order that justice may be served to the best of 
advantage, state laws provide that the Judge and Special Judge shall 
be appointed by the Governor with the consent of the Council. The 
salaries of the justices are set by law and their payment by the City 
is mandatory. These provisions have the effect of divorcing the court 
from the legislative branch of the city government. 

Jurisdiction 

The Municipal Court is essentially a court of first resort. The 
court has original jurisdiction, subject to appeal, of all crimes and 
offenses committed within the city which carry a fine not in excess of 
$500 or imprisonment not exceeding one year. Civil cases where the 
damages demanded do not exceed $500 and which do not involve the 
title to real estate, are also within the jurisdiction of the court. This 
jurisdiction is exercised in concurrence with the Superior Court. Juve- 
nile cases are also within the sphere of authority of the Municipal 
Court. In these cases, it is the policy of the court to pass judgment 
only after a complete investigation has been conducted by the Proba- 
tion Officer. 

Cases Tried 

The court tried about 1,400 criminal and civil cases during 1940. 
This was an average of four cases for each session held by the court. 
As usual, most of the cases were prosecuted by the Police Department. 
Although there was no noticeable change in the number of civil cases 
to come before the court, the number of criminal cases increased by 
140. This situation should not be viewed with alarm because the in- 
crease is the direct result of the Police Department's expanded program 
of enforcement of motor vehicle laws and parking regulations. That 
this is so is indicated by the fact that the number of motor vehicle law 
violators summoned before the court increased from 102 in 1939 to 
158 in 1940. Likewise, a total of 461 parking violation cases were 
tried during the year as compared with 385 tried during 1939. 

Revenue 

During the year, the Clerk collected 
$6,422.73 in fines, costs, and sundry fees im- 
posed by the court. Of this sum, fines col- 
lected for and paid over to state agencies 
amounted to $3,084.15. After deducting cur- 
rent expenses, the sum of $3,103.60 was paid 
to the City Treasurer. 



JUDGE: 

William !.. Stevens 

SPECIAL JUDGE: 

Peter J. King 

CLERK: 

John W. Stanley 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$2,900.00 



44 



Fire Protection 



THERE ARE FEW if any cities in the United States in Concord's 
population class that are called upon to furnish fire protection 
for an area covering approximately 64 square miles. To meet 
the problem of protecting such a large area, the city maintains six 
fire stations, two in the city proper and one at each of Concord's four 
suburbs. This decentralization, necessary as it is, in no way impairs 
the service which the Fire Department at all times stands ready to 
render the citizens of the City of Concord. 

Apparatus, Equipment and Personnel 

The department's "rolling stock" consists of 13 fire trucks of va- 
rious types, two official and a service truck. During the past year, 
600 feet of two and one-half inch hose were added to the department's 
supply to bring the total amount to 18,400 feet. No change was made 
in the personnel during 1940. There are 24 regular firemen in the 
department. In addition to this force, 174 call firemen are ready to 
augment the permanent men should their services be needed. The 
department operates on a single platoon system. 

Maintenance 

All apparatus and equipment is in good working order. Wherever 
it has been found necessary, repairs and replacements have been made 
in the department workshop at a considerable saving to the City. The 
adeptness of the regular staff in executing out-of-the-ordinary main- 
tenance work resulted in the construction of six modern truss ladders 
during the year. These ladders were sorely needed and were im- 
mediately placed in commission on Ladder No. 3. 

Two new boxes were added to the fire alarm system in 1940. How- 
ever, of greater importance to the effectiveness of the fire alarm system 
was the installation of a compressed air whistle at the Penacook sta- 
tion. The tower striker system on which the fire company formerly 
depended to summon its call men, had on several occasions proved in- 
effective in spreading the necessary alarm. 

Fire Prevention 

True to the old proverb that "an 
ounce of prevention is worth a pound of 
cure", the department's fire inspection pro- 
gram was stepped-up during the year with 
3,030 inspections as compared with less 
than 2,400 in 1939. A special quarterly 
inspection was conducted in all convales- 
cent homes and private institutions. The 
policy of requiring that all power oil 
burner installations must be approved by 



FIRE BOARD: 

Charles P. Coakley, Chairman 
Clarence L. Clark 
Harold D. Merrill 
Robert W. Potter 

FIRE CHIEF: 

William T. Happny 
DEPUTY CHIEFS: 

Michael J. Martin 
Clarence G. Howser 

DISTRICT CHIEF: 

Fred M. Dodge 
1940 EXPENDITURES: 

Operation— $71,094.17 

Air Whistle- $1,750.00 



45 




Built to scale, this model of the Central Fire Station 
and the department's 13 fire trucks indicates the 
amount of motorized equipment which the City main- 
tains for fire fighting purposes. 



A.s a part of its fire prevention activity, the department 

supervises the installation of all power oil burners. By 

strict enforcement of regulations, many potentially 

hazardous conditions are eliminated. 



the department was rigidly enforced. A series 
of fire drills and special instructions in fire pre- 
vention were conducted in the city schools. 



Fires In 1940 

The fire department responded to 601 
alarms during 1940. Of this number, 546 were still alarms and 55 were 
box alarms. There were 38 less alarms in 1940 than in 1939. 

Fire Losses 

Fire loss amounting to $22,296.62 was sustained during the year, 
of which all but $6,165.00 was covered by insurance. The fire loss 
was only about one-quarter of that which the city suffered in 1939. 
This achievement is even more noteworthy in light of the fact that not 
since 1916, nearly a quarter of a century ago, has the total loss been 
less than that of the past year. The following tabulation indicates the 
breakdown of the 1940 fire loss. 




Buildings 
Contents 

Total 



Value 
$201,990.00 
135,500.00 



Loss 

$12,783.04 
9.513.58 



Insurance 

$180,850.00 

79,600.00 



Ins. Paid 

$ 9,483.04 

6.648.58 



$337,490.00 $22,296.62 $260,450.00 $16,131.62 



Net Loss 

$3,300.00 
2,865.00 

$6,165.00 



46 



Recommendations 

In view of the effectiveness of the air whistle in Penacook, the 
department is of the opinion that public safety would be better served 
in the city proper by the installation of an air whistle to replace the 
fifty year old tower strikers now in use. 

Serious consideration should be given to a program of replacement 
of apparatus. Some of the present equipment has been in operation 
for more than 20 years. This would indicate that if the efficiency of 
the department is to be maintained, a program of replacement cannot 
long be delayed. 

Once again, the department wishes to call attention to the need 
for a new fire station in the Plains area. 

FIRE HYDRANTS 

A good fire hydrant system is a fundamental of effective fire- 
fighting activity. The measure of fire protection which a city provides 
for its citizens depends largely on the water facilities which can be 
placed at the disposal of its fire department. The best fire equipment 
that money can buy is of little value unless an adequate water supply 
is readily accessible for instant use at all times. 

As a result of housing expansion and 
new water main construction, 14 new fire 
hydrants were placed into service during 
the past year. This brings the total num- 
ber of public hydrants up to 684. In 
addition to these public services, there 
are 113 private outlets in the city. 



BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS: 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
William T. Happny 
Percy R. Sanders 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

NONE 




This is a part of the intricate 
electrical equipment at the Cen- 
tral Fire Station which controls 
the operation of the City's fire 
alarm system. 



A demonstration fire alarm box 
which operates its own gong and 
ticker has been installed at the 
Central Fire Station for those 
who wish to acquaint themselves 
with the operation of the alarm 
system. 



Weights and Measures 

THE CONFIDENCE with which the general public makes its 
everyday purchases indicates the progress that has been made 
in the regulation and supervision of weighing and measuring de- 
vices. Because the customer takes it for granted that he or she is 
receiving honest weight and measure, very little thought is given to 
the efforts which go into the maintenance of high standards. In Con- 
cord the success which this confidence reflects is the result of a persist- 
ent yet inconspicuous program of checks and rechecks conducted by 
the Sealer of Weights and Measures. 

Summary of Activities 

The usual inspection of all weighing and measuring devices was 
made during the past year. The sale of commodities was closely super- 
vised at all times. Tabulated herewith are the results of the 1940 
program of inspections. 













Condemned 


Confis 




Tests 


Correct 


Adjusi 


cd 


for 


Repairs 


cated 


Scales 


840 


029 


176 






19 


16 


Weights 


958 


950 









2 


6 


Liquid Measures 


32,844 


32,829 


-> 









13 


Dry Measures 


4 


4 









(1 





Automatic Pumps 


380 


312 


63 






5 





Oil Measuring Devices 


4,921 


4,916 









(i 


5 


Cloth Measures 


IS 


10 












5 


Yardsticks 


25 


2S 















Loads of Coal 


4 


4 















Commodities in Packages 


3,984 


3,753 


231 


und 


?r\ve 


gilt 





In a number of cases, it was necessary to warn careless merchants 
about filling berry baskets and the necessity of complying with the law 
which requires that the net weight must be marked on packages. Dur- 
ing the year, special attention was given 
to the enforcement of the law applying to 
wood sales. Thirty-seven truck bodies used 
for delivery were measured and in several 
cases adjustments were ordered. 



SEALER OF 

WEIGHTS & MEASURES: 

George A. Dearborn 
1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$1,126.48 




Weighing and measuring devices 
which are inaccurate and which 
cannot he adjusted are confis- 
cated for destruction by the 
Sealer of Weights and Measures. 
Some of those seized last year 
are shown here. 



Building Activity 

ONE OF THE best assets any community can have is good 
buildings. Good construction is a mark of prosperity and of 
community well-being. Conversely, poor construction indicates 
a lack of progressive development. Many of the accepted standards 
by which a city is judged are not immediately apparent — not so with 
buildings. One has but to look around in order to form an opinion of 
the type of development a community has imposed on itself. To a 
large degree, that development indicates the kind of people that live 
in the area. 

To build soundly is to build for stability. Poor construction de- 
teriorates and depreciates rapidly. This condition affects not only the 
property in question but other property in the neighborhood as well. 
Therefore, it is sound public policy to guard against poor development 
for the good of the entire community. Adequate regulation of building 
construction is the best way by which a community can maintain high 
building standards. 

Permits and Valuations 

During 1940, 167 permits for new buildings and alterations to 
existing buildings were issued. These permits represent a total esti- 
mated valuation of $443,265.00. Ninety-eight of these permits were 
for new buildings and 69 were for alterations and repairs. The total 
number of permits issued was 19 less than in 1939. 

The valuation of permits for new construction dropped from 
$399,982.00 in 1939 to $379,550.00 in 1940 or a decrease of five per 
cent. Permits for alterations increased from $56,390.00 in 1939 to 
$63,715.00 in 1940. 



BUILDING INSPECTOR: 

Edward E. Beane. City Engineer 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

None 



Dwelling Units 

Sixty-two permits were issued for 
new dwelling units in 1940. Of these, 
46 were for single family dwellings. 



This aerial view shows the rapid- 
ly growing residential develop- 
ment in the South End area below 
the Conant School. 




Zoning Appeals 

Purpose 

THE CITY OF CONCORD enacted a zoning ordinance on Decem- 
ber 13, 1930 to safeguard the rights of individuals by regulating 
the use of land and buildings within districts designated for cer- 
tain uses. Ten years of experience has shown that zoning is not a 
panacea. It is, however, a firm step in the right direction and over a 
period of years will have a far-reaching and ever-broadening beneficial 
effect on the orderly development and use of land in Concord. 

Administration and Appeals 

Under the ordinance, the Building Inspector is charged with ad- 
ministering the zoning law. Any person aggrieved by his decision 
may take an appeal to the Zoning Board of Adjustment, a five-man 
quasi-judicial body, which sits as a court of first resort. Before handing 
down a decision, the board holds a public hearing on each appeal to 
enable all parties in interest to be heard. Appeals from the rulings of 
the Board of Adjustment may be taken to the superior court. 

1 940 Activity 

The Building Inspector granted 44 applications for zoning permits 
and in 31 cases appeals from his decisions denying permits were taken 
to the Zoning Board of Adjustment. The board considered 17 requests 
for variance, 12 for exceptions and two for re-hearing. Seven cases 
were denied, 17 granted, and three granted conditionally. Two cases 
are still before the board. Two appeals were withdrawn. 

Proposed Amendment of the Zoning Ordinance 

Since its adoption in 1930, very few changes have been made 
either in the maps or the text of the zoning ordinance. Believing that 
the ordinance might be amended to better serve the needs of community 
development, the Board of Aldermen requested the City Planning 
Board to study the existing ordinance with a view toward making it 
a more workable law. This study is now in process and members of 
the Zoning Board of Adjustment have had occasion to be of assistance 

to the Planning Board and to the Commit- 
tee on Bills on Second Reading in this 
important work. It now appears that a 
proposed amendment will be presented to 
the City government for its consideration 
sometime during the early spring. 

When the revision is completed. Con- 
cord will have one of the most comprehen- 
sive zoning laws in the state. 



BOARD OF 

ADJUSTMENT: 

Henry P. Callahan, Chairman 
John S. Corhett 
Eugene F. Magenau 
Donald G. Matson 
J. Dunbar Shields 

CLERK: 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson 
1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$160.66 



50 



Plumbing 



ONE OF THE less conspicuous services which the City provides 
for its citizens is the regulation of plumbing. Poor plumbing 
can be a serious menace to public health. Typhoid fever which 
was a more or less prevalent disease in the past, was in many cases the 
direct result of pollution of water through poor plumbing. In order 
to protect the health of its citizens, the City exercises strict regulation 
over the practice of plumbing in Concord. Every prospective plumber 
is required to pass certain examinations before he is permitted to prac- 
tice his trade in Concord. An inspection service is conducted on all 
new plumbing installations to ascertain whether the work has been 
done properly. A systematic check-up program is being conducted on 
old plumbing facilities in order to eliminate all conditions which are 
dangerous to health. 

Examinations and Licenses 

Thirty-three master and 18 journeyman plumbers were registered 
during 1940. The Board of Examiners conducted tests for two appli- 
cants for master plumber's licenses. In both cases, the applicants were 
found to have the proper qualifications and the licenses were granted. 

Plumbing Inspection 

Plumbing in the City of Concord is controlled by a plumbing code 
which is administered by the City Engineer as Plumbing Inspector. 

Since 1937, the United States Public 
Health Service has made available to 
the City the services of an inspector 
who divides his time between the in- 
spection of new plumbing installations 
and a survey of old plumbing facilities. 

In order that the citizens of Con- 
cord may be assured of the benefits 
which are to be derived from the main- 
tenance of high plumbing standards, all 
new installations are carefully in- 
spected. 

During 1940, 112 permits for 
plumbing installations were issued by 
the Plumbing Inspector. Two hundred 
and twenty-four routine plumbing in- 
spections were made during the year. 



Poor plumbing can be a sei-ious menace to the health 
of your family. As a safeguard, have the Plumb- 
ing Inspector check your sanitary system. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS 

OF PLUMBERS: 

William T. Bishop, Chairman 
Edward E. Beane 
Chark-s H. Berry 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR: 
Edward E. Beane, City Engineer 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 
None 

1940 RECEIPTS: 




Public Works Services 



THE BOARD OF Public Works, under the provisions of the city 
charter, regulates and controls all work done on the highways, 
sewer construction, collection and disposal of refuse and garbage, 
and street lighting. All of this work is handled through its Depart- 
ment of Public Works. 

The Board is comprised of six aldermen chosen by the entire 
electorate and is headed by the Mayor as chairman ex-officio. The 
Board decides the general policy governing the Department of Public 
Works, and approves the plan of work outlined by the department 
heads. Petitions for new work such as the building of catch basins, 
new sidewalk installations, etc., come before the Board for considera- 
tion and disposal. 

Organization and Administration 

The Public Works Department is divided into three divisions with 
a central office where all accounts and records are kept. The Highway 
Division is administered by the Superintendent of Streets who super- 
vises the construction and maintenance of roads and bridges, collection 
and disposal of refuse and garbage, and plant equipment and main- 
tenance. The Engineering and Sewer Divisions are administered by the 
City Engineer who supervises the preparation of all maps, plans and 
surveys as well as the construction and maintenance of the sewer system. 
The Superintendent of Streets and the City Engineer have a joint re- 
sponsibility in supervising street lighting. 

Employees 

During the year, the department had 95 persons on its permanent 
staff. In addition, 185 part-time workers were employed doing such 
seasonal work as spring and fall cleaning of streets and catch basins, 
snow removal and road construction. 



BOARD OF 
PUBLIC WORKS: 

Hon. John W. Storrs, Chairman 

Harold D. Merrill 

Charles J. McKee 

Arthur F. Sturtevant 

William A. Stevens 

John W. Stanley 

John C Tilton 

SUPERINTENDENT 
OF STREETS: 

Krvin E. Webber 

CITY ENGINEER: 
Edward E. Beane 

1940 EXPENDITURES: 
Operation— $302,570.09 
Public Improvement Bonds: 

$12,963.57 



Streets and Sidewalks 

During the past year, the Highway 
Division completed four street resurfac- 
ing projects. A so-called "hot top" (as- 
phaltic concrete ) type of pavement was 
laid on Brown Avenue, Low Avenue, 
Prince Street-Ford Avenue-Green Street, 
and Capitol Street. School Street, from 
Main to State, was rebuilt, except for 
laying the top which will be done in 1941. 
In all, 11,182 square yards of material 
were laid on these projects. 

On the surface-treated gravel roads, 



52 



it is necessary to do more or less continuous patching due to the 
heavy amount of traffic. Over 2,117 tons of patching material were 
used for this work during the past year. Experience has proven that 
an excellent way to preserve this type of road is to seal the surface with 
a coat of tar. During the year, 282,967 gallons of tar, which included 
the first application to seven miles of gravel road, were applied. 

A great deal of maintenance work must be done each year on 
asphalt sidewalks throughout the city. Every year there are many re- 
quests for new walks. During the year, 6,02 7.29 square yards of 
asphalt were laid, of which 1,287.29 square yards were for new work 
and 4,740 square yards were for replacements. New cement walks 
were laid in front of the new City Library on Prince and on Green 
Streets, and in front of the City Hall on Prince and on Green Streets. 

The city expended $165,299 on road construction and maintenance 
during 1940, or 54% of the total operating cost of the department. 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 

The winter of 1940 was about average for snow fall, a total of 
72.9 inches having fallen. Although there was usually plenty of time 
in between storms to do a good cleaning job, once or twice during the 
past winter, one storm followed another so closely that it made it dif- 
ficult to keep the main traffic arteries clear of snow for safe and con- 
venient parking. However, the division was well equipped, with 25 
trucks to keep the streets and roads plowed. Shovel crews were set 




The Highway Division operates 
its own stone crusher and 
screening plant at the gravel 
bank off Walker Street Exten- 
sion. 



The Sewer in School Street in 
the downtown area was relairt 
during 1940. Sewer Division 
employees are shown lowering 
a section of 24-inch concrete 
pipe. 



The "hot top" type of pave- 
ment vised by the highway 
division is manufactured at the 
division's mixing plant located 
at the Walker Street gravel 
hank. 




Purchased during 1940, the de- 
partment's new power shovel is 
shown excavating Capitol 
Street in preparation for the 
resurfacing of the street. 



to work after each storm to remove the snow in downtown areas. A 
special effort was made to clear curb space to all churches, hotels, thea- 
tres, and other public meeting places. Snow was also removed in front 
of private residences where funerals were to be held. A wheeled tractor 
and 15 horses are used to plow sidewalks and narrow alleys. The trac- 
tor has proven to be very effective in plowing the allevs and in cleaning 
cross walks. 

The work of keeping the city streets open during the winter is 
really a continuous activity. Not only is it necesary to plow the streets 
after each snow storm, but a regular follow-up program of plowing 
back snow banks must be carried out. In many sections of the city, 
the snow must be removed to make ready for the next storm, and drifts 
in the country have to be plowed again and again. During the year, 
13,760 cubic yards of sand were applied to the streets, sidewalks and 
railroad crossings. The division expended $20,146.74 for plowing and 
sanding city streets during the past year. 

Refuse Collection 

The entire built-up area of the city is covered once every two 
weeks for the collection of refuse. The city is divided into routes with 
certain districts being collected one week and the remaining districts 
the other week. The collection routes cover a distance of 110 miles. 
During the year, 51,298 cubic yards of refuse were collected at a per 

54 



cubic yard cost of fifty-nine cents. All but a small part of this refuse 
which can be used as fill, is disposed of by burning at the city dump. 

Garbage Disposal 

The area covered by the contractors includes most of the settled 
portions of Penacook, West Concord and the City Proper. They dis- 
pose of the garbage collected by hog feeding. This service costs the 
City $3,900 per year. 

Engineering 

All engineering services needed by the city are performed by this 
division. During the year just ended, the division set 22,016 feet of 
street, sidewalk and curb grade stakes. All plans and maps have been 
kept up to date. A total of 3,165 blue prints were made and 622 trans- 
fers of property were recorded. New streets laid out during the year 
totaled 1.421 miles. Most of this amount represents City acceptance 
of streets already used by the public. The total mileage of streets and 
roads in the city as of December 31, 1940 is 189.29 miles. 

Sewers 

Subject to the control of the Board of Public Works, the City 
Engineer has general charge of the construction of sewers. All records 
and plans of sewers, drains and connections are kept by the engineering 
division. 




The semi-annual street clean- 
ing program is one of the 
routine tasks of the Highway 
Division. Winter street sand- 
ing makes this work especially 
heavy during the spring clean- 
ing season. 



The Highway Division's "side- 
walk gang" is shown applying 
a new asphalt surface to a 
downtown sidewalk. Where 
changes in grade are necessary, 
particular care is taken to im- 
prove approaches to private 
property — witness the new 
stairs in this instance. 




In the past year, the division constructed 2,146 feet of sanitary 
sewers at an expenditure of $19,474.01. The funds for this work were 
provided from the balance of money in the Sewer Bond Account. The 
division also constructed 716 feet of sanitary sewer with money from 
the sewer appropriation. A total of 10,569 feet of storm sewer and 
1,636 feet of sanitary sewer were constructed by the City as a part of 
the Works Projects Administration program. The work was super- 
vised by the W. P. A. Co-Ordinator for the City. Under the Federal 
plan for the operation of Work Relief Projects, the city contributes as 
its share, all of the necessary materials used on the projects. These 
were paid for from the regular W. P. A. appropriation. 

The division maintains a total of 77.015 miles of sewer mains. 
This work is done at an expenditure of $153.00 per mile. 

Thirteen new catch basins and seven new manholes were built, 
and 63 new house connections were laid during the year. 

Street Lights 

The Concord Electric Company is under contract with the City 
to supply street lighting service. During the year 16 additional lights 
were installed. The total number of lights in operation December 31, 
1940 was 1,571. This service cost the City $37,141.50. 

Other Activities 

Acting under the provisions of Chapter 67, Laws of 1937, the City 
voted to accept aid from the State for use on Class V highways, and the 
following roads were graded and tarred in 1940: Melvin Hill Road, 
its entire length; Mountain Road from Mountain Lane to the Melvin 
Hill Road; and the Hoyt Road was graded and tarred from Rum Hill 
(so-called) to the Graham Road and the remainder of the road was 
graded. 

Regular spring and fall cleaning of streets was done at an ex- 
penditure to the City of $9,076.84. The number of square yards of 
material collected was 11,010. The hand broom sweeping method is 
used by the department in cleaning streets. 

The public, on the whole, is not cognizant of many of the services 
rendered by the Department of Public Works. Services such as filling 
a resident's sand box in the winter, or making a special collection of 
rubbish on moving day are among the extra conveniences which the 
department has provided for the accommodation of Concord's citizens. 

A mosquito elimination project at the corner of Auburn and Pena- 
cook Streets was begun during 1940. The project involves the filling 
of a large swamp with sand. A bad water condition was also eliminated 
at this point by the installation of a culvert. 

On numerous occasions during the past year, the Department of 
Public Works has had the opportunity to be of assistance to other City 
departments. At all times, these agencies have received the full co- 
operation of this department. 

56 



Municipal Airport 

IN ITS Municipal Airport, the City of Concord has kept abreast of 
the development of air transportation in New Hampshire. Few if 
any cities in the state can boast of the commercial and private avia- 
tion facilities which are available at the Concord Municipal Airport. 

Facilities 

The facilities at the airport include three landing strips, two hard 
surface runways, two hangars, an administration building with com- 
plete facilities, a repair shop and fueling equipment. In addition to 
the foregoing, the airport is equipped with a standard airport beacon, 
boundary and approach lights, obstruction lights, a ceiling projector, 
wind direction indicators and the usual identification markings. 

Management 

Although the Board of Airport Commissioners is charged with the 
operation of the airport, it has delegated actual management to Mr. 
William E. Martin who operates a flying service at the field. 



Northeast Airlines, Inc. 

The Northeast Airlines, 



BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS: 

Hon. John W. Storrs, Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Samuel B. Dunsford 

Tohn N. Engel 

Charles W. Howard 

Charles J. McKee 

Rohert W. Potter 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$4,636.52 
1940 RECEIPTS: 

$1,933.56 



Inc. uses the airport as a regular stop on 
its Boston to Montreal airline. The com- 
pany leases quarters in the administra- 
tion building where it maintains a radio 
communication office and facilities for 
the accommodation of airline passengers. 
During the past year, the airline trans- 
ports made 1,560 stops at the airport. 

Civil Aeronautics Board 

The Civil Aeronautics Board leases 
quarters in the administration building. 



These are some of the planes that stopped at the airport last summer in connection 
with the annual three-day New England Air Tour. 



By remote control from these quarters, the board operates a 150-watt 
radio range beacon located about two miles south of the airport. The 
radio range station is operated on a 24-hour standby service. The 
C. A. B. operates a teletype weather reporting service at the airport. 

1940 Activity 

In addition to the regular airline flights, 1,820 airplanes used the 
field during 1940. 

The local flying club did approximately 300 hours of flying from 
the airport during the year. The club has a membership of ten flyers. 

Pilot Training 

During the year, the William E. Martin Flying Service conducted 
a pilot training school at the airport. Mr. Martin also served as an 
instructor for the Civil Aeronautics Board's Concord flying school. 

During the year, 188 ground school students received training. 
Actual flying instructions were given to 50 local private pilot students 
and 25 government students. 

National Defense 

The Concord Municipal Airport was considered in relation to 
national defense no less than three times during 1940. A board of 
survey of the War Department inspected the airport for the purpose of 
determining the suitability of the area for an air corps tactical unit. 
The unit was later assigned to the City of Manchester. 

Brigadier General Bowen appeared before the commission in June 
in relation to his request for a National Guard Air Squadron to be 
assigned to New Hampshire. General Bowen indicated that should 
the Army authorize the squadron, serious consideration would be given 
to its location in Concord. Up to the present time, no such squadron 
has been allocated to New Hampshire. 

Due to the Army's priority rating of the airport, W. P. A. officials 
approached the City with a proposal to expand the existing landing 
facilities with the aid of federal funds. After due consideration, the 
City dropped the matter when it became apparent that the project 
was being advanced purely as a defense measure at a considerable cost 
to the City of Concord as its sponsor. 

1941 

There is every reason to believe that 1941 will be a banner year 
in the operation of the Municipal Airport. Expanding military avia- 
tion is largely responsible for the optimistic prediction. The current 
emphasis on military flying can be expected to effect an increased in- 
terest in private flying. Even more important is the fact that with 
the conversion of the Manchester Airport into a military air base, it 
is almost a certainty that Concord will become more than ever the 
"hub" of private and commercial flying in central New Hampshire. 

58 



Water Supply 



THE MAIN SOURCE of Concord's water supply is Penacook 
Lake in West Concord. Two feeder lines run from the lake to 
the central pumping station on North State Street near Penacook 
Street. Water is pumped from this station to the 2,000,000 gallon 
open reservoir on the hill off Penacook Street. This reservoir provides 
the necessary pressure to supply an adequate flow of water to the city 
proper and the outlying suburban areas. A 100,000 gallon tank at 
East Concord and a 250,000 gallon tank in Penacook, elevated to the 
level of the reservoir, maintain an adequate reserve of water to meet 
the fire protection needs of each of these suburbs. 

In addition to the main system, an extra high service system 
serves a limited area of the West End in the vicinity of Ridge Road 
and Lightning Hill. A small pumping station located on Columbus 
Avenue feeds a 250,000 gallon standpipe on Little Pond Road which 
supplies the pressure for the extra high service system. 

Held in reserve to augment both of these systems in case of a 
shortage of water is the auxiliary system which originates in the Town 
of Pembroke east of the Concord Plains area. This system is fed by 
a pumping station on the east side of the Soucook River which draws 
its water from a field of several hundred driven wells. In addition to 
the added amount of water which this source stands ready to supply, 
it guarantees an adequate flow of water at all times for fire protection 
purposes on the Plains. 

Construction 

The outstanding construction project of the year involved the re- 
placement of the main which serves Penacook between that suburb 
and West Concord. The original main was laid in 1887 and had out- 
lived its usefulness. Altogether, about two miles of pipe were relaid. 

The work, which was done as a W. P. A. 
Project, was executed in a very satisfactory 
manner. Other major construction work 
included the replacement of a six-inch pipe 
in South Street from Lincoln Avenue to 
Rockingham Street with a ten-inch main, 
and the installation of a new six-inch main 
in Low Avenue on the east side of North 
Main Street to take the place of an in- 
adequate four-inch pipe. In addition to this 
work, 3,832 feet of six and eight-inch pipe 
were laid in various sections of the city. 



BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS: 

Harry H. Dudley. President 
Allen M. Freeman 
James W. Jameson 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Hon. John W. Storrs 
John Svvenson 
Gardner Tilton 

SUPERINTENDENT : 

Percy R. Sanders 
1940 RECEIPTS: 
Operating Revenue $110,925.16 
( It her Income $3,182.84 

1940 EXPENDITURE: 

$72,790.12 
1940 NET PROFIT: 

$41,317.88 



Services and Consumption 

During the year, 42 new services were 



59 




A diver is shown descending into the well of the gate house at Penacook Lake to 
assist in removing stones which obstructed the flow of water. 

added to the distribution system. As of December 31, 1940, the de- 
partment was furnishing water to the people of Concord through 5.076 
active services. 

Water consumption in 1940 showed a 26,000,000 gallon increase 
over the previous year. The total 1940 consumption was one billion 
gallons or approximately 106 gallons of water per consumer per day. 
The large amount of water which is used in the operation of the pub- 
lic swimming pools is a factor contributing to the increase in con- 
sumption. 

Special Activity 

In the latter part of January, it was discovered that the move- 
ment of ice at Penacook Lake had badly damaged the upper stone 
gate house. Many of the heavy granite blocks had shifted seriously 
and a number of these had fallen into the well so as to obstruct the 
flow of water. The services of a diver were secured and the stones 
were removed. The walls of the gate house were then taken down 
to a point below the water level and new covering stones were placed 
over the opening to the chamber. 



60 



Public Schools 



CONCORD SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Buildings 

IN THE Concord School District there are thirteen buildings now 
being used for purposes of public instruction. Included in this 
number is a senior high school, housing grades ten, eleven, and 
twelve; two junior high schools, one taking care of grades eight and 
nine and the other grade seven; one mechanic arts building and nine 
elementary buildings. One other plant, the Cogswell School, is no 
longer used for public school purposes. 

Teachers and Employees 

The School District employs a total of 175 full — or part-time 
employees. There are 135 teachers, 3 administrative and supervisory 
officers, and 37 other employees including the health staff, office force, 
attendance officer and janitors. The teaching staff is classified as 
follows: 114 classroom teachers, 10 supervisors, 10 teaching prin- 
cipals and one home teacher of physically handicapped children. 

Enrollment 

The total number of pupils enrolled during the last complete 
school year was 3,462. The average daily membership was 3,312.32 
and the average daily attendance 3,126. 

Cost of Operation 

For the school year ending June 30, 1940, the cost of operating 
the schools, exclusive of bond payments and cafeteria expenses was 
$352,548.61. This represents a cost of $101.83 per pupil enrolled, or 
$12.95 per capita of total population according to the 1940 census. 
The tax raised for school purposes in 1940 was 32 per cent of the total 
tax bill of the city. 

The School District bears a bonded 
indebtedness of $430,000, most of which 
represents the remaining payments for the 
Senior High School. All other bonds now 
outstanding will be retired before or during 
1948. Bonded indebtedness is being retired 
at the rate of $2 7,000 per year. 



BOARD OF 
EDUCATION: 

Earl F. Newton, President 

Gerard L. Gaudrault 

Franklin Hollis 

Mrs. Lela Y. Johnson 

Mrs. Violet L. Mclvor 

Mrs. Edwina L. Round v 

Donald W. Saltmarsh 

Dixon H. Turcott 

Mrs. Bertha H. Woodward 

SUPERINTENDENT : 

Xatt P.. Burbank 
COST OF OPERATION: 

For the fiscal year ending 
Tune 30. 1940: 
S352.548.61 



Problems 

The major problem facing the Board of 
Education is that of housing of the school 
population on Concord Heights. By direc- 



61 




This is the architects' drawing of the proposed new school which is to replace the 
Harriet P. Dame School in the Concord Plains section of the city. 



tion of the 1940 school meeting a special building committee is study- 
ing the problem, with the expert assistance of the City Planning 
Board. This committee is likely to recommend to the 1941 meeting 
that a new building be built to replace the limited as well as unsafe 
plant now serving this area. 

Facilities are still overtaxed at the Conant and Rumford Schools 
but the former will be slightly relieved by the anticipated construction 
of the Heights building. If the southward expansion of the residential 
area continues, the need for an addition to the Conant School will 
soon become acute. 

Maintenance of the regular health services in the schools has 
been a difficult problem during the past year. The school physician 
is now in military service and it has not been possible to secure a 
dentist to continue the work of the past. In the former case, the 
splendid cooperation of local physicians has made it possible to carry 
on with a minimum of disruption. It is hoped that the dental pro- 
gram can soon be resumed. 

Policy 

It is the policy of the Board of Education to provide public in- 
struction of a moderately conservative nature, paying careful atten- 
tion to the fundamentals necessary to sound elementary and secondary 
education. The extremes of Progressive Education to which some 
American schools have gone in recent years are being avoided. Con- 
cord's schools furnish adequate instruction for every type of child. 

National Defense 

Since July 19, 1940, the School District has been operating a 
National Defense Training School, under the direction of the State 
Board for Vocational Education and the United States Office of Edu- 
cation. Courses have been offered in machine shop work, wood- 
working, and auto mechanics, and 133 men, previously unskilled, have 
been trained, or are being trained, to help meet the national emer- 
gency. All costs of this training are borne by the Federal Government. 



62 






Instruction for Physically Handicapped Children 

In accordance with a law enacted by the 1939 General Court, a 
special teacher has been employed to furnish elementary instruction 
to children who are so physically handicapped that they cannot take 
advantage of the regular public facilities. She goes to the homes of 
these boys and girls, spending about five hours per week with each. 

PENACOOK SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Jurisdiction 

The jurisdiction of the Penacook School District includes all of 
Ward One with the exception of a small area at Riverhill; a section 
of Ward Two across the Merrimack River opposite the Penacook 
settlement; Goodwin's Point in Ward Three and a limited area in the 
adjacent Town of Canterbury. 

Schools and Staff 

The district operates a high school and two elementary schools. 
Sixteen teachers are employed, nine at the high school and seven in the 
lower grades. A supervisor of music and two janitors are also em- 
ployed by the district. 

Membership 

During the school year 1939-1940, the average membership was 
396, only one less than during the previous year. Of this number, 21 1 
were high school students. In addition to the Penacook students, a 
large number of children from nearby towns matriculate at Penacook 
High School. 

Finances 

During the year, $29,427.00 were raised by taxation toward the 
operation of the school district. An added sum of $6,689.51 was re- 
ceived from other sources, chiefly from high school tuitions. It is 
interesting to note that in the less-than-five-years history of the high 
school, income from tuitions has increased more than 40 per cent. 

Gross expenditures for the year amounted to $35,760:74. The 
district has a bonded debt of $37,000.00. 

Teachers' salaries were raised $875.00 during the year. On the 
whole, these salaries are still below the average for the state. 

Legislation 

By a recent act of the State Legislature, a major change was 
made in the manner of electing the officers of the district. The act 
permits the Penacook School District to choose its officers by a plurality 
instead of a majority of all the votes cast. 

63 



CONCORD 

A HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 

The City of Concord, or Pennycook as it was then called, early 
attracted attention as a desirable place for civilized settlement. Be- 
tween 1652 and 1725 various petitions were submitted to the General 
Court of Massachusetts for grants of land in this area. The petition 
of June, 1725 was successful and on January 17, 1726 the General 
Court sanctioned a township of seven square miles to be known as the 
Plantation of Pennycook. One hundred citizens were admitted as 
settlers. Considerable time was lost in the allotment of land and it 
was not until the fall of 172 7 that Ebenezer Eastman moved from 
Haverhill to Pennycook to establish the first permanent settlement in 
the new grant. Others followed soon thereafter and on February 27, 
1733, the plantation was incorporated into a town and the name was 
changed to Rumford. No authentic history of the source of the name 
is available although it is understood to have been taken from a parish 
in England, the former home of some of the settlers. On June 7, 1765 
the name was changed to Concord. After the task of settling the com- 
munity had been established under the leadership of Reverend Timothy 
Walker and others, the town became a city in 1853. 

The first religious service ever held in the central part of New 
Hampshire was conducted on Sunday, May 15, 1726 upon the table 
land directly overlooking the Sugar Ball Plain by Mr. Enoch Coffin, 
chaplain of a party of men who came from Massachusetts to lay out 
the new township. That the early settlers were God-fearing people is 
indicated by the fact that a building to serve as a church and meeting 
house was the first structure reared on the new land. With the ordina- 
tion of Rev. Mr. Walker on November 18, 1730, the settlement acquired 
its first permanent minister. 

During the Indian troubles, Rumford was continually menaced by 
roving bands of redmen. The most serious local incident occurred on 
August 11, 1746 when Lieutenant Jonathan Bradley and seven com- 
panions were ambushed by savages. Hopelessly outnumbered, Lieuten- 
ant Bradley and four of his men were massacred in this engagement. 
The onslaughts of savages continued and it is recorded that as late as 
1754 Rumford was in perilous circumstances due to Indian attacks. 
In that year, a company of nine men under the command of Captain 
John Chandler was assigned to protect the people of the township. 

The first legal meeting of the freeholders and inhabitants of the 
Parish of Concord was held on January 21, 1766 and town officers were 

64 



chosen. The first law office opened in Concord was in 1767 when 
Peter Green became the first lawyer to settle in Concord. During the 
same year, the first census of the province was taken and the return 
from Concord showed 752 inhabitants. The first regular post office 
was established in Concord in 1792. The growing advantages of Con- 
cord as a business and financial center received recognition in 1806 
when the legislature made it the location of an incorporated bank. 

For a quarter of a century after 1782, the General Court held its 
sessions in numerous communities. Fortunately, most of the sessions 
were held at Concord due perhaps to its central location. This rec- 
ognition foretold that Concord would, sometime, be the permanent 
capital of the state. This has been so since 1808. In June 1816, the 
legislature passed a resolution to build a state house in Concord upon 
the conditions that Concord convey to the state a suitable building lot 
and give all the necessary stone for the building and deliver the same 
at the site. 

Concord's men took part in the war for independence and since 
that time her men have been prompt to respond to the nation's call in 
every emergency. During the war of 1812, the town became a prom- 
inent recruiting station and a convenient meeting place for enlisting 
soldiers and for troops on their way from Boston to the Canadian 
frontier. 

In the autumn of 1814, the Merrimack Boating Company's first 
cargo boat arrived at Concord to inaugurate river transportation of 
merchandise. Meanwhile, the Concord coach made by the Abbot- 
Downing Company which came into general use after 1828 and which 
brought Concord world fame, served to keep the community abreast 
of the best highway transportation available. River and coach trans- 
portation were soon to give way to the railroads for in 1842 the first 
tracks were laid to Concord and on September 6 of that year the first 
passenger train arrived in town to mark the beginning of service bv 
the Concord Railroad. Between 1840 and 1850 the population nearly 
doubled because Concord was an attractive center on a railroad bearing 
its name. 

In 1836, Isaac Hill resigned his seat in the United States Senate 
to assume the governorship of New Hampshire — the first Concord 
citizen to hold this position. 

On April 5, 1853, General Joseph Low became the first mayor of 
Concord. The city council, in its first three meetings held within the 
space of seven days during April, set the machinery of municipal leg- 
islation in orderly and effective motion. During the first year of ex- 
periment, the change from town to city government was so wisely 
handled as to bear fairly and not heavily upon the citizens of Concord. 

65 



APPENDIX 

Financial Statements and Statistics 

Page 

General Fund — Consolidated Balance Sheet 67 

General Fund — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 67 

Bond Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 68 

Debt Service Charges on Present Bonded Debt 68 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 69 

Trust Funds — Receipts and Disbursements 69 

Concord Water Works — Balance Sheet 70 

Concord Water Works — Statement of Operations 70 

General Fund— Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 72 

General Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 71 

Board of Public Works — Financial Statement 74 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 

Tax Levies and Rates in Concord, 1930-1940 74 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 75 

Status of Tax Collections, 1932-1940 76 

Assessors Statement for 1940 T^ 

City Relief Department — Relief Expenditures 78 

Municipal Court — Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 79 

Summary of the City's Investment in Property and Equipment 79 



66 



GENERAL FUND 

Consolidated Balance Sheet 
December 31, 1940 

Assets and Net Debt 

Cash $ 115,237.50 

Reimbursements Receivable 11,935.81 

Taxes Receivable 290,074.17 

Unredeemed Taxes Bought by City 56,779.53 

Property Acquired by Tax Collectors' Deeds 4,610.87 

Total Assets $ 478,637.88 

Net Debt 

Balance. January 1. 1940 $1,040,437.22 

Deduct Net Gain for Year 144,813.36 

Balance, December 31, 1940 895,623.86 

Total Assets and Net Debt $1,374,261 74 

Liabilities 

Unexpended Balances $ 156,155.49 

Temporary Loans 100,000.00 

Bond Coupons Due and Unpresented 106.25 

Bonds and Notes 1,118,000.00 

Total Liabilities $1,374,261.74 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Changes in Net Debt 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1940 

Net Debt, January 1, 1940 $1,040,437.22 

Deduct Surplus from 1940 Operations : 

Excess of Actual over Estimated Revenues $ 33,572.45 

Tax Liens purchased by City 41,755.52 

(Added to Assets of City) 

Property Acquired by Tax Collectors' Deeds 4,610.87 

(Added to Assets of City) 

Unclaimed Payroll Account Balances transferred to 

General Fund 310.60 

Balance of Overseer of Poor (Prior Year) trans- 
ferred to General Fund 16.75 

Adjustment of Citv Poor Reimbursements to Cash 
Basis 492.31 

$ 80,758.50 

Tax Sales Redeemed $ 39,084.32 

(Deducted from Assets of City) 
Adjustment of Public Works Accounts 

Receivable to Cash Basis 2,364.47 

Lost Checks Presented and Paid 23.95 

Overdrafts of Appropriations 10,472.40 51,945.14 

Net Surplus from Current Operations 28,813.36 

$1,011,623.86 

Deduct Reduction in Bonded Debt : 

Bonds and Notes Retired during year $ 151,000.00 

Notes Issued during year 35,000.00 

Net Reduction in Bonded Debt 1 16,000.00 

Net Debt, December 31, 1040 $ 895,623.86 

67 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Changes in Net Debt (Continued) 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1940 

Summary of Results for the Year 

Net Debt, January 1, 1940 $1,040,437.22 

Net Debt, December 31, 1940 895.623.86 

Improvement in Financial Condition $ 144,813.36 

Accounted For By 

Net Surplus from Current Operations of $ 28,813.36 

Net Reduction in Bonded Debt of 116,000.00 



Total Gain for the Year $ 144,813.36 



BOND FUNDS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 
for the Year Ending December 31, 1940 

Unexpended Cash Balances, January 1, 1940 $ 13,689.07 

Add Receipts : 

Proceeds from Sale of $15,000.00 Public Improvement Note of 

May 1, 1940 15.000.00 

Inter-Fund Transfers by Resolution .36 

Total Available for Expenditure $ 28,689.43 

Deduct Expenditures : 

Cash Expenditures $ 28.272.82 

Inter-Fund Transfers by Resolution 416.61 

Total Expenditures $ 28.689.43 

Unexpended Cash Balances, December 31, 1940 — — 



DEBT SERVICE CHARGES ON PRESENT BONDED DEBT 

Annual Annual Total Annual 

Bond Interest Maturities 

Maturities on Bonds and Interest 

1941 $ 117,000.00 $35,814.00 $ 152,814 00 

1942 112,000.00 32,494.00 144,494.00 

1943 105.000.00 29,274.00 134,274.00 

1944 105,000.00 26,067.00 131,067.00 

1945 90,000.00 22,941.00 1 12.941.00 

1946 90,000.00 19,990.00 109,990.00 

1947 64,000.00 17,311.75 81,311.75 

1948 53.000.00 15,199.25 68,199.25 

1949 42,000.00 13,456.75 55,456.75 

1950 - 36,000.00 12,056.75 48,056.75 

1951 36,000.00 10,731.75 46,731.75 

1952 27,000.00 9,597.50 36,597.50 

1953 27,000.00 8,655.00 35,655.00 

1954 ,. 26,000.00 7.727.50 33,727.50 

1955 21 ,000.00 6,860.00 27,860.00 

1956 21,000.00 6,107.50 27,107.50 

1957 14,000.00 5,355.00 19,355.00 

1958 14,000.00 4,760.00 18,760.00 

1959 14.000.00 4,165.00 18,165.00 

1960 14,000.00 3,570.00 17,370.00 

1961 14,000.00 2,975.00 16.975.00 

1962 „ 14.000.00 2,380.00 16,380,00 

1963 14,000.00 1,785.00 1S,7S5.00 

1964 _ 14,000.00 1,190.00 15.190.00 

1965 14,000.00 595.00 14,595.00 

Total $1,098,000.00 $301,058.75 $1,399,058.75 

68 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1940 

Sundry All Other 

Total Cemetery Trust 

ASSETS All Funds Trust Funds Funds 
Cash 

Unexpended Balances of Income Re- 
ceived and deposited at interest in : 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 532.38 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 535.93 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 574.29 

Union Trust Company 1,796.92 

Total Cash $ 3,439.52 

Investments 

Funds at interest in : 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 89,408.97 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 94,879.83 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 98,283.83 

Union Trust Company 104,904.65 

Securities 7,630.63 

Total Investments $395,107.91 

Total Assets $398,547.43 

LIABILITIES 

Trust Fund Balances $395,107.91 

Unexpended Income Balances 3,439.52 

Total Liabilities $398,547.43 



$ 427.42 
409.97 
563.44 
381.56 


$ 104.90 

125.96 

10.85 

1,415.36 


$ 1,782.39 


$ 1,657.13 


$ 60,872.47 

48,290.46 

51,362.28 

60,647.88 

2,150.00 


$ 28,536.50 

46,589.37 

46,921.55 

44,256.77 

5,480.63 


$223,323.09 
$225,105.48 


$171,784.82 
$173,441.95 


%223,323.09 
1,782.39 


$171,784.82 
1,657.13 


$225,105.48 


$173,441.95 



TRUST FUNDS 

Receipts and Disbursements — Changes in Fund Balances 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1940 

Receipts and Disbursements 

Sundry All Other 

Total Cemetery Trust 

All Funds Trust Funds Fluids 
Cash Balances of Unexpended Income, — 

January 1, 1940 $ 3,530.92 $ 1,884.49 $ 1,646.43 

Receipts : 

Income from Interest and Dividends .... 18,035.33 5,627.19 12,408.14 

Total Available $ 21,566.25 $ 7,511.68 $ 14,054.57 

Disbursements 18,126.73 5,729.29 12,397.44 

Cash Balances of Unexpended Income — 

December 31, 1940 $ 3,439.52 $ 1,782.39 $ 1,057.13 



Changes in Fund Balances 

Fund Balances, January 1, 1940 $389,272.58 $218,693.17 $170,579.41 

Add: 

New Trust Funds 5,519.65 4,994.24 525.41 

One-third receipts from sale of lots and 

Blossom Hill Cemetery Annex 1 680.00 680.00 

Totals $395,472.23 $223,687.41 $171,784.82 

Deduct : 

Reduction in principal : 

Loss on Sale of Securities 364.32 364.32 .^ li:i:::::: ^ ::::i 

Fund Balances, December 31, 1940 $395,107.91 $223,323.09 $171,784.82 

69 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1940 

(Not including Water Bonds) 

Assets 

Water and Flowage Rights $107,688.11 

Engineering Construction Costs 63,383.63 

Land • 129,386.35 

Structures (less depreciation reserves) 207,194.74 

Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 17,699.03 

Distribution System (less depreciation reserves) 677,767.91 

Other Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 7,244.73 

Total Fixed Assets $1,270,364.50 

Current Assets 

Cash $ 56,546.29 

Accounts Receivable 577.04 

Material and Supplies 15,916.86 

Total Current Assets 73.040.19 

Total Assets $1,343,404.69 

Liabilities 

Capital Liabilities 

Municipal Investment $1,343,404.69 

Current Liabilities None 



Total Liabilities and Municipal Investment $1,343,404.69 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1940 

Receipts 

Water Sales 

Commercial— Flat Rate $ 4,330.65 

Commercial — Metered 91,955.81 

Industrial— Metered 14,379.68 

Miscellaneous Water Sales 259.02 

Total Operating Revenue $110,925.16 

Expenditures 

Operating Expenses 

Water Supply Expenses $15,424.51 

Distribution Expenses 16,780.48 

General and Miscellaneous Undistributed Expenses .... 32,167.99 

Total Operating Expenses 64,372.98 

Net Operating Income $ 46,552.18 

Add Other Income 3,182.84 

$ 49,735.02 
Deduct Other Expenses 8,417.14 

Net Profit for Year $ 41,317.88 

70 



Q> 



Q 3 



§1 

_J <g 
< g 

Z « 

LU - 

2 



w 



y -■ c 



*rt 


•J3 > 


u 




< 




T) 




C 





in t^. oc -^r o -*r 

trj i-i od — i O CM 

-f ON IT) 1^ r^ ON 

On 00 00 tJ- j^ in 



o co o 

SO CM -h' 





i^ -r w 


m 


CM ON 


= 


x. 


tJ; in 1^ 


co 


oq o 


q 


y 


CO in .-I 


cm 


i—J t-H 


CO 




~ 1" On 


CO 


NO 'O 


a 


& "3 


1^. ON 0C_ 


m 


O CM 














cm* u~* ■— r 




in in 


co 


pq 


0C — T 


o 


CO 





CNHiflONO 
^h "<S" On O CO m 
CO fOCNN CM 



co CC 

csi oo 



cn) o —> o 
■^ •-; t^ co 
in 6 d ^' 
hOhN 
On io co l^ 

ON 



— co in Tt- 

T 00 CM ON 



l>* -cf 1^ 
rt- in i^ 


in 

co 


CN) co 

CO CM 


NO 


cm l< «-< 

CM ~1" s 
t^ On CC 


CM* 

co 
m 


i-h' Tf 

VC CO 
O CM 


co 


cm io ~~ 

cc — -r 


g 


in cc* 

co 


cn 



nOOlOOKONOKO 

n- ^h in fOTj-rr q on t^ j^. 
m O ■-" — .' vo co ■-< O -h' rxj tt 
— O u-, CM — i CO T r '. .— > o "T 
On in CM t>. co co ~ U~; i— < 

CN1 —I « 



cn) m 

On ~h 



OT3 S 

4/ C 



C •" 41 k. _ 

w >* f _£ .£ 
!~ ^ ~ 53 



o - 



« £ K c Q g 



^ O *-• *J 



rt - 



K 'S'53 o- - 






H § 



Oh 



O 



X !* C "3 "S '-" W 






a! J 



— n: - t? "J 



■Sffi 



— > r- — - i~ v 



3 ^ 2Q o 



n !_ '^ it* 






o 5 rt r-r ^ii-i: 



JS - 

•71 Oh 



4) 



rt C — 



C g 



_ rg i- -ii O a; - 
P 



o "2 = 

4) 3 rt 

= rt — 

CS 4> 

^ — .L 
. ii S. S 



NO 


in 


C 


rj- 


t< 


cm" 




t^ 


in 


in 


t>T 


CO* 


NO 


CO 


W- 


<r> 



vO 


•*T 




CN1 


NO 


^_J 




~ 


•— ' 


CO 




o 




CO 




'/. 



« 



H o 



?s <u C 



o >— — 



e/9- 



^ S N W O O "1 ■"< 
^•■9 On l< CO in ro CM 

<* B CJ NO CM ^ On © 



^ 



<*o 


00 


<M 


-r 


NO 


3 


vO 


CM 




CM 



~G 'fO»Ort«JOOO'*OOfO 

. % fN] oo O (^) -^ On O io O O TT 

~~ U On CM Cm' in no ■— ' <~0 © lo © On 

Q g M ui fO io (N] 3 ro CO -h C ir, 

qC tJ\ CO irj_ co ^h_ ro i— i rn Ox ON_ 00 

^•2 <r>" iC-h* r'}"^"'- , "m~rC^H"cM" no" 



t^ TT NO On 

l^ On ■— i ON 

© O <0 Tf 



rO rO K C t^ 

"5 fO uv N t 
CO NO ©■ lO © 



— © On 
■00 © On 
© -* 00 



© Tf- U~; © — I 

f fO N O N 

© -O ~ © ro 
CM © rv] © ro 
ro ON fO ^ O 
NO On" C\f O 



o 

z 



< a 

a: 9 







2 ^ fe9_ 

•2 t-j ■^•ON©^HGO©CO^|-©© r O 

■£ J- CM | <0 © ^ I -r On On in © © T_ 

S S On CM CM LO no >-H <"0° ©' lo ©' On 

-5 ~ ^ l ""> <~o 'o rv) © co co -h © m 

£ ;~ loOOionrt(«5rtroOC>M 

C) ~ CiVCr- "ro" r-r^irTi^^rNf o" 



r\] no 

l^ On 


ON 1^ 


© CO 

© LO 


1^ On 

© © 


LO CO 





00 1^. ( ^ — . CO 



«J © © © in © © CO "S" O © <"n 

-^ ."5 "^ © © 00 © © O; lo © © TT 

Q Q CO ©©'©'©' ^f' ro ©) lo © On 

t* ."2 n0(njv0N(MOC000<hOio 

© q in CNin CO CN^Tf rt ro a ON 00 

E~i £> forC-Tro «- "•-* lo"i^T»-"cn4 no 



^ i ©cm © *"0 
CO On CO m O 



© ■© 
© © 


On l^. 


~T © 
l^. © 


^1 O 'O i^ Tf 
OC © l^ LO CO 


rv) © © 

rO © © 


© T © © 00 

"* <o o © ■**■_ 


© LO 

"O CO 
CM_ 0_ 


l^ On 


NO © 

^ © 

<0 lo 


r o ©' i< © od 

ro © LO On NO 

oq i^. © t>. i^ 


© © © 

© © © 

ini'* On 


© NO LO' © ^ 

CM O tJ- © CM 

rO On rO m K 


LO CO 


NO t^ 


1-1 


i-T no" i-T rsf ,-T 

© -o 


r-TO\ 

ON 


NO* On" CvT o" 



W - Sn"Q 



8 =5 2 ~ 



< 



1 g"S 
I),*- -~ 

I t-i «j {/)■ 

: ^ 

I OOomOOCOTt-OO 

lo_ © ■©> 00 © © On lo © © 

i <-) cd © o © © ■**■' <^i © lo o 

O S OlN| O t>. CN) © ro CO >— i © 
i^ _© m_ ON m fO fNl * -i ro On On ! 

■^•'■^ <o t>r^-Trrr r-Tr-T u-rt-c^cM" ■ 

■ex. e t-i 



r-1 On 

ro CO 
CO CO 



©r-irj- 
CM Iv. CO 

<0 ©' CO 

OOrt'O 
ro © 
On"'-"" 



CM © lo no © 
CO © io CO © 
•O © rf' On © 
•O © t^ 1^ © 
00 t-^ON Tf t>^ 
"- 1 no" ro"©" 
CO <0 

CN) 



IO © © 

© © © 

© © © 

ro © ; © 
CO * On 

-rr"ON 



On © in © © 
On l^ Tf © io 

lo co to lo >n 
in" On* CM* CM* 



• - 3 > 



_ o 






PL, 



u T3 q "O 

<u _ — w 

C O ° C<^ rt 

S3 s -2 u ^ ;g w i3 



g"PU^ 



<0 _,PQ ° ii c 



_ o 



o . n 



G^h 



2 „ 



c -o o Ph 
" Ct/l 



O 



P0Lh 



.hrt^u. — .t; <u o rt 

UhQ Oh S U K U & 

I! Q 



J 



a : ^ 






^ u s u 



3 J5 



3h 



o c 

l-t (1; 
&H "S 

aj 

03 
M 

(A Ui 



rt e ^ O 

tn u aj 

O nS o _ 

c a c ? 

3 <U O O 

O Q U "■* 3 

i- re 

bo _^ <u 

Sj 4) - <J 

Oh H^^ 



72 



— i cm 
co o 
o cm 
m" cm" 









1^ 

o 
so" 

Os 

ON 


o 
o 
cm" 




O) 
co 

IT; 






CM 
<M 

SO 



co O CO m-^lfOOMO 
CO r O m ir, M Q 3 00 09 O 
•<1- O i^ NO '-linn m 



O VO 0\ o o 
o o o o o 


CO o 


o co 

co O 


O SO rf CO in 

— co co in cm 


CO m 

CO 
CO 


■st in 

SO ON 

00 o 


m".— r 




rt'oC 



t}-_ so i>^ 

CO T~ r-T 



so r o CO 

CO !>. o 

co Os CO 

o t^ m 
"* °^ ^ 

("O m ^H 

CO 



in — i cs] (*-> O 00 O 
in CO O O CO CO o 
N O (S| in ro un 

.-i - in cs f .— T 



3 o t o m <o in 
CO CO O m CM CO 

into co 



— i O O m 



u 



.5S 



- 



£ c 



C J0 < 



•- i 

< -i 



SP re 



s~ ' ■- re re 

i- > o. 

; cj u u 

S -O - 3 I 

g re v - / | oo C 

<" !— ^ _■ ir' — . S 

5--,^^ § Si 

qW SI 



[-H en 



J 



OO £ 



-o ro 



C *0 O co 



w g 



f u 



wpq 



s t- 1 



3h 



U< 



c 

s 

re 3 x 

■ — i re • — 

= H3 



• — ■ re •— 
re *-• eu 



rep? 
--.ere 

!-■ S ° 



S * SK 



re y re 



&H-? 



ey H ^h ■ "3 c 3 3 

— ' CO !C ! t: ^ • — i— - 



1) 

re -S hr <u 
sJ 5.5 W 

S ° ° 
| Stole 

~_ 2 

<-< en 5 >5 

re bD-s pJ 

c: cc 



- 



£ = 



SO CM 

CC CM 

en m 

Os'so" 

r n 









CO 
in 

CM 
CM 

O 
SO" 


Os 

in 
in 

so" 
in 

55- 



^ O J . O ~1 o 
co — • 1- — : ~ — ' 
£? S r 5 S o 



O O CO o 
^^-,0 


~ O O CO o o o 
c: CO CO CO O CO o 


in co 
t^ in 


O O 00 
so CO CO 


CO O CO 


o o o o 

OMOO 
m n . — i in 


o o ^i" o in* co in 
OOOiflNO 
m CO so Os 


co CM 
in c5 


CO CO CO 
co CO CO 
Os <o CM 


o co o 

CO' O CO 
CO_ O CO 


cm" 


O'-T 
in 


r-H ^1 


in cd co 
o en m 


t~>T rC i-C 
rvj — ^_ 



o o 

CO — . 


o o 
o o 


CO O 'Os — — 
O O CO CO o 


CO o 

q q 


m in 


O CO o 
sq o oq 


CO CO 

cr cc 

in eo 


CO CO 
CO CO 

r-i in 


co co ^ co in 

o co com < - 1 
in co o^ 


co in 
o 

Os 


CO cd 
CO ^l - 
CM CO 


CO ^h' t< 
co Cs tv. 
Os m "T 


cm" 




O'-H 

in 




in'oo' 


in"o-o 

O co cs) 



o 



sa 



- 



'Bti^r/a 



^Z re 






iO 



Oh.^ 



Q - 






in . O o 



>> O 



w<B§> 



I- .tc 



•y) b 



_, *-> o 7C c~ C u 

£ 5 rt . 2 53 . 2 y 






". c c c S." 1 O 



U 



o 



^ 



X 



^_ -— OJ 



u 
o i^ 



rt is 



o a 



Ph 


-/cS 


^j 


u"S b 


o 


5 M 5 










U 












5 


Jfl 


13 






u *i (u 


"o 






■• S bib jJ 






^ 


tj Si J3 ° 



UOsSn 



73 



in oo oo 

O W Cn 

© —•' cm 



cq 



LO 



o 



£+++ 



t, in in i- in cc co o Tf <m o o 

'J OvifiUjro On ^r CO O 00 CO O 

"S Hi- iCAOvON'ONoiodiricO 

rS fl ^ M N '•! 1*5 ^ fO ro « co 



LO r^ 

a: 

Si 



Q_ E 

u_ H 

O M 

< £ 

O g 

CQ s- 

H 



fe 



_ — CM cm O MNOO 

■>» oJrH'lsOrt't'-'O 
~ cnOCMOOO^J-O 
"2 ©„ *""", "* On. °0 On »-h CM 

•t- cm* Tj-' o" <o* u-T co* t~C 

hO CO .— i co 
^£1 



O 

O 

s 

• 1-1 

-4-3 

c3 

'- 

O) 

O 



* ^ -U 



--. — - 0\ CI C O IT; IT; 0\ O 

<3 ~ -f-QN'TOOO'^-O 

"5-2 OOlfla In On CM_ CM 

r ■ s cm" Tt" o co" o oo* t-C 



u 

OS 

a, 

Q 



oin 
-. ""! 

-cL in co : : -t 'On 
• ~ nc : : co .— i 

^> cxi : CO -— ' 



< 



■v. coOnOO^iOOnO 
C 00 0C*OKTf ycO 

-c_ m* -n* o* co* cm* oo* rC 

c, oo co <— i co 

•cl, v± 



pq 



o ■£ 
psSC 






u 



o 



fcnpq 



» « E 
•2-S =* °fTcS 

CJ CC q> £* . — — . 



.53 '■S^ H 



"C3 LO 

►§ CO 
s 'O 
"a On 

*~ CM* 

"5 Zl 



w c ~ A 



t-i *= CM* 



o 
pq 

M S ~ r O 



rQ 



O * ^ cm 

5 ~= -* on 
c3 



OCi ~ *— 5 



02 



s o 

a -a 

^ 5 

^ m 



PQ 






cq 



PL, 



S H 



H 



< 
> 



LO 
CO 

OJ 
CO 

co 

< 

co" 
Z 
< 



UIIO (s qin •* CO 00 O K CN 

CO CM' 00 On in CO CM o On On \d 
, in it, co OO O M in co 0O M N 

". On i-h -o COX oqcOco VOOO 

j* 3 in" co* co* rC <-* co* m* o" of \o~ o* 

c— 1 N'OcomxcN^cNooNoo 

O O On On On -— i CM CM CM -— ' CM 



o 
o 

o 

ro 
O 



O 

O 



> 



<o 
J," 



~ C CO 0O CO K O --"Nl o N O 

~ ir, o o o » fo m m in -h o\ 

. ~ C\ CN CN O CN. 00_CO_o co O N 

Tn On in un vo* On CD On in* ^-T m" ^-T 

i: CMncOKCifOCNOVOOv 

^ h h if) \c 0_ 0\ O .—i rv) co In 

C fy-T jnt;" fxf ^h* ^_ ^h r\) Of C\f CM* ^ r 

,__ CO CO CO CO <0 CO CO CO CO CO CO 



cocomONVOOONVOCOin 

CO In CM ■— ' -—i CO — i CO in CM 
CM<Mco r O'— iOOnOnOnOn 



Oco^ 

Q. LU 
CQZ 



2< 



^ fO'CN^IfOCCO^ION' 
-2 O CM >-i ON CM co \o — On in i 

g cooNOOOinco— lortco' 

co cC - 



CM CM CM co co co CO co co co tT 



£ LU 



LL.X 

o< 



CQ 

< 



< 

OH 

< 

Q_ 



o 
o 



O <— i CM co ■«*• in V C In CC ON ~ 

co CO CO CO CO co CO CO co co 'f 
OnOnOnOnONOnOnOnOnOnOn 



74 



~S <S> OOOOOOOQO 

"- *+■ ooooooooo 

~ On ooooooooo 

■E , * 1 , <fin" -t o* o o o u-T o 

c ^ (ft 



o o 

3 5 

o o 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 

o o o o — 



o o o 

o o o 
o. o o_^ 
oT o'cC 



?*• ■<)• K O O 1- M t VC t^ On Tf O 00 CO \0 

■^ 5 lfl Tf t Tf Tf Tf Tf t >t Tf If) f TJ- IfJ lO 

£,' On On On On On On On On On On On On On On On On On 



r\) m 00 vO 'O 

t O 't t I" 
I I I I I 



h 



&, 



o 

LU 
I 



2 t- ooooooooooooooooo 
s - ooooooooooooooooo 

= ~ © o o o o o^ o o o o o o o o o o o 

.~ ~ — " lo Tf' i/-J o* irT in in 3* GO O <-h i-T vo t" <*> t-C 

^3 ^ w- —I —I 



o o o o o 
o o o o o 
o o o o o 



o o o 
o o o 

o o o 



CO 
CO 



CO 

LU 

Q 

z 

Q 

LU 

Q 

z 

o 

CQ 



o3 






2 ^ ^^^^^^i#^^^^.i#.^^^^^. 

i N ~i NjvtvtvN \"i ro ro ^ Sjt 



» iV f/ t Tf f, - -H rt rt rH f, f^ 







■= is u 
= co -o 






U V V V V V 



>>>>>>„■; 

O O O O O O '{i 
U Ul i- u u u " 

>> JE JE lS JE JE. JE £ 

rt a! 



S •« « ^ 3 3 3 3 3 3 

U U 3 X CU Q-, Dh IX P-, Ph 



' U I* Ih 

!S iS S 

a; at a> 



'Si Ti C/j Cfl W3 

qqqpS 



55DD5 







rt 




t 

L 

u 

- 


"rt 





c o £ 




3 -3 zi 


> > > 


^ u > 



75 



O oc 



_l 


oo 


_J 


2 


o 


LU 


o 


o 




LU 


X 


Q 


< 


u_ 


i— 


o 


u_ 




o 


< 


oo 




3 




\— 




< 




1— 




oo 





,t 8 8 S 

t^ -^ ^h 3; 

O SO t^ 00 



w o "-• "O 
•" S p -. 

S SO -T ~D "a 



§T SO 



o 






cm 


5 
o 


2 


^ 






OS 


CM 


CsJ 


SO 


SO 


1 






SO 

in 


1^ 

CM 




SO 








55- 








O 


o 












CO 






CO 


Q 
p 


8 


Os 


Z 


"" 


SO 


•r 


C3 


3 


3 


O 


— r 


ON 


CM 


SO 
CM 




■"" 


— 


m 




h 











*r o in 
o 25 i; 


:>_ 




"T 


r*' 


t-^ no On 

"j n in 

~T^ NC ^O 

m5 o-i 


SO 




CO 

CO 
OS 




8 8? 


% 




o 


> 


CO so Os 
p p ""' 


sC 




o 

CO 




oo rC 

-T CM 

ON 


so 




CO 
Os 




On O 00 

— , o O 


1^ 


5 


3 


o> 


$925,143. 
26,184. 

568. 


Os 

OS 


« 

oc 


cc 

ON 




CO O Os 

Os S <■""- 


r^ 




: ^ 


o-' 


1951,465. 

25,624. 
665 


X 




: oo 

: on 



fH 


A 


o 


no 


GO 
00 


s 


<") 


w 


OJ 



CO <"^j 



sO 00 ^h 

O ""- 1^ 

CO — ; t)- 

H TT M 



no \o in 

O On CO 
rn" ro (N 



§ °T Ol 

8S? 



76 



a ■* 



M 



^ Pi 

3 o a o 
CL, £ B 3 



13 u In 

~ tJ 6 
< A U 



- ; 2 K 

•5 B 

£ ; C 5 






ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1940 

Assessed Valua- 
tion of city Amount of Tax rate 
a>id precincts Appropriation per $1 ,000 
Money raised for the : 

State None 

County $32,791,790.00 $ 205.93&.60 $ 6.30 

City Budget 32.791,790.00 648,287.00 19.42 

Schools 

*City Union 30,820,852.00 371,826.61 12.08 

**Penacook U. School 1,981,138.00 30,591.00 15.42 



Total $1,256,643.21 

Allowed for errors and corrections $ 24,283.69 

Warrants submitted to Tax Collector $1,280,926.90 

Raised by supplementary taxes $ 1,109.84 

City rate 37.80 

Penacook rate 41.14 

Average tax rate for city 38.00+ 

*Includes property located in Loudon. 
**Inchides property located in Canterbury. 

Poll Taxes 

No. Amount 

Men 6,372 $ 12,744.00 

Women 7,962 15,924.00 



Total 14,334 $ 28,668.00 

Exemptions 

Veterans 

Property Valuation $ 278,586.00 

Polls (925 ) 1,850.00 

Blind 

Property Valuation 1,000.00 

Polls (5) 10.00 

Total Exemptions $ 281,446.00 

Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 

Type No. J'ahtation 

Improved and unimproved land and b'ld'gs $ 28.670,934.00 

Electric Plants 1.726,980.00 

Horses 198 17,145.00 

Asses and Mules 2 140.00 

Oxen 

Cows 1,215 84,985.00 

Neat Stock 259 8,275.00 

Sheep (inc. Goats) 44 288.00 

Hogs 139 1,118.00 

Fowls 19,135 19,135.00 

Fur-bearing Animals 59 1,040.00 

Vehicles 2,300.00 

Portable Mills 525.00 

Boats and Launches 1,650.00 

Wood and Lumber 21.700.00 

Gas Tanks and Pumps 27,710.00 

Stock in Trade 1,780,975.00 

Machinery 426,980.00 

Total $32,791,790.00 

77 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 
General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1940 



Direct Expenditures for Relief 

Work Relief 

Cash Allowances 

Provisions and Milk 

Fuel-Rent-Clothing, etc 

Medical-Hospital, etc 

Board and Care — Adults 

Board and Care — Children 

Housework and Nursing 

Funerals and Burials 

WPA Sewing Project Materials 
House Furnishings and Repairs 

Relief Gardens 

Public Utilities 

Sundry Expenditures 



'ity 

130.44 
050.97 
426.37 
542.67 
573.46 
389.07 
467.68 
6.18 
330.00 
445.08 
179.67 
82.80 



254.98 



County 

1,4 13*34 

7,791.76 

45,306.90 

27,794.10 

15,865.95 

4,393.09 

305.87 

538.00 

""170*69 

7.00 
226.61 
300.04 



Total 

1,543.78 

13,842.73 

57,733.27 

34,336.77 

17,439.41 

10,782.16 

2,467.68 

312.05 

868.00 

1,445.08 

350.36 

89.80 

226.61 

555.02 



$37,879.37 $104,113.35 $141,992.72 



Other Towns 

Total City and County Pour 



2,313.60 



2,313.60 



$40,192.97 $104,113.35 $144,306.32 



Dependent Soldiers 

Cash Allowances 

Provisions and Milk 

Fuel-Rent-Clothing, etc 

Medical, etc 

Board and Care — Adults 

Board and Care — Children 

All Other 

Total Dependent Soldiers 



Administration 

Salary — Overseer Concord 

Salary — Overseer Penacook 

Salaries — Office and Case Workers .. 

Mileage — Case Workers 

Auto Use and Auto Hire 

Office Supplies 

Tel.-Elec.-Heat-Janitor 

Sewing Machines for Project 

Wages — Project Supervisor and Exp. 

WPA Sewing Project Materials 

Repairs to Office and Equipment 

Office Equipment 

Attorney's Fees 

Workmens' Comp. Insurance 

Other Misc. Expenses 



$ 150.00 
1,377.25 
775.18 
189.03 
267.61 
371.20 


$ 702.08 

5,388.72 

2,975.46 

1,418.07 

762.75 


$ 852.08 
6,765.97 
3,750.64 
1,607.10 
1,030.36 
371.20 


40.07 
$ 3,170.34 

$ 1,100.00 
500.0(1 


46.89 
$ 11,293.97 

$ 1,100.00 


86.96 
$ 14,464.31 

$ 2,200.00 
500.00 


6,881.65 
313.38 
424.63 
430.55 
450.98 
160.82 


6,158.10 

589.96 

24.62 

378.95 

160.44 


13,039.75 
903.34 
449.25 
809.50 
611.42 
160.82 


366.01 


286.65 
1,445.08 


652.66 
1,445.08 


247.15 


247.15 


807.28 




807.28 


104.50 




104.50 


101.61 




101.61 


166.75 




166.75 









Total Administration 



$12,055.31 $ 10,143.80 $ 22,199.11 



Old Age Assistance 



7,652.34 



7,652.34 



Wood Expenditures 
( irand Total .... 



7,637.72 



7,637.72 



$70,708.68 $125,551.12 $196,259.80 



78 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statements of Receipts and Expenditures 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1940 

Receipts • 

Received for fines, costs and sundry fees $6,422.73 

Expenditures : 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses, and complaints and 

warrants $ 53.54 

State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of Motor 

Vehicles 2,976.15 

State of New Hampshire, Fish & Game Department 83.00 

State of New Hampshire, Department of Agriculture 25.00 

Clerk's Bond 5.00 

Postage, printing and supplies 139.45 

Special Justices 12.00 

Counsel fees in juvenile cases 15.00 

John T. Dallas, restitution for fence 9.99 3,319.13 

Balance $3,103.60 



Paid City Treasurer 3,103.60 



SUMMARY OF THE CITY'S INVESTMENT IN PROPERTY AND 

EQUIPMENT 

December 31, 1940 

Total 

Investments Equipment 

Land and Sound Grand 

Buildings Values Total 

Fire Department $ 188,522.73 $ 68,942.56 $ 257,465.29 

Police and Watch Department 54,669.00 8,513.98 63,182.98 

Public Works Department 47,607.62 71,942.84 119,550.46 

Miscellaneous Other Property 723,474.42 5,405.61 728,880.03 

Park Department 116,032.29 2,667.66 118,699.95 

Tree Department 1,983.42 1,983.42 

Playgrounds Department 15,643.31 3,845.16 ■ 19,488.47 

Cemeteries Department 109,691.87 6,325.86 116,017.73 

Totals $1,255,641.24 $169,627.09 $1,425,268.33 



79 



INDEX 

Page 

Activities in 1940 8 

Assessment of Property 1- 

Appendix (l(l 

Bond Funds 68 

Building Activity 49 

Cemeteries 27 

City Clerk 10 

City Government 6 

City Officials 7 

Elections 11 

Engineering 55 

Examination of Plumbers 51 

Finances 15 

Financial Statements and Statistics 66 

Fire Protection 45 

Garbage Disposal 55 

General Fund 67 

Health and Sanitation 22 

Historical Background — Concord 64 

Hydrants '. 47 

Legal Service 17 

Library 32 

Mayor's Message 5 

Medical Service 25 

Milk Inspection 23 

Municipal Airport 57 

Municipal Court 44 

Organization Chart 4 

Parks 26 

Planning 19 

Playground and Bath 28 

Plumbing Inspection 51 

Police Protection 38 

Probation 42 

Public Works Services 52 

Recreation 28 

Refuse Collection 54 

Relief 36 

Schools 61 

Sewers 55 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 53 

Special Recreational Facilities 30 

Street Lighting v 56 

Streets and Sidewalks 52 

Tax Collection 14 

Trees 27 

Trust Funds 69 

Vital Statistics 10 

Water Supply 59 

Weights and Measures 48 

WPA 35 

Zoning Appeals 50 



80 



PRINTED BY 
THE CONCORD PRESS 



"