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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

YOUR CITY 



^S^SS 



WAS 




Ration 



CHART^ 



ADO? 



A REPORT TO THE 

CITIZENS OF CONCORD 

1941 



THE EIGHT Y - NI NTH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 7947 




Capita/ of the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Merri/nack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27,171 (1940) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision of the City 
Planning Board by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



PBOPKETY OF 
• PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT COMMIS 



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CONCORD 

Dedicates This Report 

-& & & 

Since the City of Concord issued its last 
accounting of municipal activities, hun- 
dreds of its citizens, both men and women, 
hare joined the country s armed forces. This 
report is dedicated to them. Concord is 
working long and hard to contribute to then- 
welfare in the national war effort. Their 
city is being administered as efficiently as 
possible. Concord wants to assure its sons 
and daughters in service that it is 
holding secure the democracy 
for which they fight 



ft 



\lert — twenty-four hours 
day, seven days a wed 



A CHALLENGE ACCEPTED 



1941 



FOR DEFENSE 

V The Board of Aldermen appro- 
priated funds to assist in setting up 
the local defense headquarters and 
made plans to include a $3,000 ap- 
propriation for defense in the 1 942 
budget. 

V The City Government made its 
buildings available for meetings re- 
lated to defense activities. 

V The Fire Department recruited 
and trained 100 men to form a 
three-company auxiliary fire force. 

V The Fire Department's alarm 
system was placed at the disposal 
of Concord Defense Council for air 
raid warning purposes. 

V The Police Department organ- 
ized a 75-man auxiliary police 
force. 

V The Highway Department deliv- 
ered dry sand to householders for 
use in extinguishing incendiary 
bombs. 

V The Engineering Department 
distributed detailed property maps 
to air raid wardens. 

V The Planning Board made its 
surveys and the services of its staff 
available to the local defense com- 
mittee. 

V The Public Library offered a 
greatly expanded information serv- 
ice on mat ters relating to national 
defense. 



V The Project Committee in coop- 
eration with the W.P.A. trans- 
ferred a large number of its work- 
ers to out-of-town defense projects. 
All remaining workers were put to 
work on secondary road improve- 
ment projects as a defense trans- 
portation measure. 

FOR VICTORY 

V The Public Library participat- 
ing in the Victory Book Campaign 
sent over 8,000 books to the armed 
forces. 

V The Flying Service at the Munic- 
ipal Airport operated a civilian 
pilot training course. 

V The Airport Commission made 
plans for a $400,000 expansion of 
the airport. 

V The Board of Education oper- 
ated a defense training school on a 
24-hour-a-day basis at the Morrill 
School. 

FOR PEACE 

V The Industrial Committee of 
the Board of Aldermen in coopera- 
tion with the Planning Board sur- 
veyed vacant plants and industrial 
sites for the purpose of inducing 
new industries to locate in Concord. 

V The Board of Aldermen author- 
ized the Planning Board to make 
plans for the future development of 
the City under a six-year program 
of public works to be prosecuted 
alter the war. 



The Mayor Says: 

For the second time in less than a 
quarter of a century, our country 
is participating in a world-wide 
war. Its ultimate effects on the 
City of Concord are yet to be 
determined. But its immediate ef- 
fects are already very much in 
evidence. 

Because the services of your 
city government affect your wel- 
fare more continuously and more 
closely than those of your county, 
state and federal governments, I 
know that you examine your city's 
activities critically. I need not 
impress upon you the fact that 
for the duration of the war the 
day of '•"business as usual" is a 
thing of the past at all levels of 
government. Our whole economy 
must be subordinated to the all- 
out war effort. 

In the days that lie ahead, I ask 
you to be patient when municipal 
facilities and services do not ap- 
pear to be what they should be 
or what they have been. I ask 
you to remember that your city 
government is doing everything 
in its power — doing it willingly 
— to the end that victory will be 
ours. 



i* 



T 




I want to assure you that all 
that can be done will be done to 
provide each and every one of you 
with the necessary city services. 
You may be assured that no effort 
will be spared to adapt existing 
facilities to meet the changed 
problems of wartime, and that 
every city service will be admin- 
istered efficiently, honestly and 
effectively. 

Whatever the future may hold 
in store, I am confident that the 
citizens of Concord, working and 
acting together, will meet the 
challenge of post-war readjust- 
ment with prudence. 



f^oVF d ivivrF ivt Bills ' Second rea ° ing: 

VSrKJ V ILrVlMVirjlN 1 Aldermen Stevens, Stearns, Coakley, 

LaPointe. 



HON. JOHN W. STORRS 
Mayor 

CHARLES J. McKEE 

Substitute Mayoi 



Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Nelson, Tilton, LaPointe, 
Jennings. 



Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Tilton, Flynn, Jennings, 
Stanley. 



ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE AND 

MEMBERS BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Harold D. Merrill 
Charles J. McKee 
Arthur F. Sturtevant 
William A. Stevens 
John W. Stanley 
John C. Tilton 



WARD ALDERMEN 

Charles P. Coakley 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William J. Flynn 
Robert W. Potter 
Stewart Nelson 
Clarence L. Clark 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Thomas B. Jennincs 



Vard I 
Vard2 

Vard 3 
Vard 4 
Vard 5 
I ard 6 
I r ard 7 
I 'ard S 
I 'aid 9 



Finance: 

Mayor John W. Storrs, Aldermen 
McKee, Merrill, Stanley, Nelson. 



Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Merrill, Clark, 
Potter. 



Lands and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett, Flynn, LaPointe, 
Nelson. 



Playgrounds and Bath: 

Aldermen Merrill, Coakley, Flynn, 
LaPointe, Jennings; Mrs. Maud N. 
Blaekwood, Mrs. Victoria Mahoney, 
Miss Margaret Challis, Mrs. Ethel M. 
Storrs, Mrs. Kathleen Mullen, Mrs. 
Nora E. Donovan, Mrs. James M. 
Langley. 

Police and License: 

Aldermen Stevens, Tilton, Sturtevant, 
Potter. 

Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Flynn, Potter, Clark, Jen- 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Accounts and Claims: 

Aldermen Clark, Tilton, Sturte^ 
Bartlett. 



Project Committee: 

Aldermen McKee, Stevens, Stearns 



Relief: 

Aldermen Stearns, Stanley. Sturtevant. 



City of Concord 



OFFICIALS 



Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Physician 
City Physician, 

Assist nut 
City Solicitor 
City Treasure) 
Fire Chief 
Judge, Municipal 

Court 
Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milk Inspector 
Overseer of Poor 
Ovei seer of Poor, 

Penacook 
Planning Director 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Measures 
Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 
Supt. of Streets 
Sufi, of Water Work 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds 
Tree Warden 
Tax Collet tor 
II .P. A. Coordinator 



Edward E. Beane 
Arthur E. Roby 

Edward E. Beam. 
Henry W. Smith 

Paue R. Donovan 

Elmer U. Sargent 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 

William T. Happny 

William L. Stevens 

Peter J. Kino 

Marion F. Holt 

Austin B. Presby 

Frank C. Gilbert 

Charles P. Coakley 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

Victor I. Moore 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Donald G. Barton 

George W. Wilde 

Leslie C. Clark 

Ervin E. Webber 

j Percy R. Sanders 

Paul G. Crowell 

Ervin E. Webber 

Amos B. Morrison 

Howard E. Stevens 



BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND TRUSTEES 

Board of Adjustment: 

Henry P. Callahan, Chairman; John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Eugene 
F. Mageneau, Donald G. Matson. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: 
John W. Storrs, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, Samuel B. Dunsford, John N. 
Engel, Charles W. Howard, Charles J. 
McK.ee, Robert W. Potter. 



Board of Assessors: 

Clarence O. Philbrick, Chairman; Ed- 
ward F. Donovan, Joseph E. Shepard. 

City Planning Board: 

James M. Langley, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Frederick P. Clark, Warren 
H. Greene, John B. Jameson, Harold 
D. Merrill, Dudley W. Orr, Austin E. 
Page, John W. Storrs. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 
William Bishop, Chairman; Edward E. 
Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 

Board of Health: 

John W. Storrs, Chairman; Dr. Paul R. 
Donovan, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. 
Clinton R. Mullins, Dr. Ellsworth M. 
Tracy. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 
Edward E. Beane, Chairman; William 
T. Happny, Percy R. Sanders. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Oliver Jenkins, President; Henry B. 
Cannon, Jr., Joseph J. Comi, Edward 
A. Dame, Mrs. Armine M. Ingham, 
William B. Mclnnis, Perley B. Phil- 
lips, George W. Randall, Alexander 
Rennie, Jr. 

Park and Cemetery Commission: 
John W. Storrs, Chairman; Herbert G. 
Abbot, Pierre A. Boucher, Gardner G. 
Emmons, Robert J. Graves, Alpheus 
M. Johnson, Mrs. Thomas N. Troxell. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman; George A. Hill, 
Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 
J. Mitchell Ahem, Chairman; Gardner 
G. Emmons, Leigh S. Hall, Carleton 
R. Metcalf, John W. Storrs. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harrv H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, 
Edgar C. Hirst. 

Board of Water Commissioners: 

Harry H. Dudley, President; Allen M. 
Freeman, James W. Jameson, Charles 
P. Johnson, Donald Knowlton, Benja- 
min H. Orr, John W. Storrs, John 
Swenson, Gardner Tilton. 



Annual Report 



NINETEEN FORTY-ONE 



in Retrospect 



€1 The City's financial condition 
was improved to the extent of 
$8,520.49 of which $7,000.00 rep- 
resented a decrease in outstanding 
bonds and notes. 



d No long-term financial obliga- 
tions were incurred; the "pay-as- 
you-go'" policy was continued. 



<[ The assessed valuation of the 
city increased $276,697. 



C. The average tax rate dropped 
from $38.00 in 1940 to $37.20. 



C. A total of 169 building permits 
were issued; 58 of these permits 
were for new dwelling units. 



C. Receipts from auto permits 
amounted to $37,779.12, or $2,- 
752.60 more than the total for the 
previous year. 



<L A modern steel counter was 
installed for the convenience of 
the public in the City Clerk's 
office. 



C. Fifteen litigations were cleared 
up by the City Solicitor; only 
four minor cases were pending at 
the end of the year. 



€[ On the recommendation of the 
Planning Board, the Board of 
Aldermen refused to accept 3,000 
feet of unnecessary street involv- 
ing the expenditure of about 
$36,000. 

1 i 1 

C. About 200 shade trees were set 
out along city streets. 

C. A new flood-lighting system for 
night hockey was put into opera- 
tion at White Park. 



C The Municipal Golf Course 
was admitted to membership in 
the New Hampshire Golf Asso- 
ciation. 

C. Over 8,000 reference questions 
were answered by the Public 
Library. 

C. The average number of W.P.A. 
workers dropped from 200 in 1940 
to 150. 



City of Concord 



C Outstanding accomplishments 
of W.P.A. were the construction 
of 12,436 feet of storm and sani- 
tary sewers, 1,400 feet of retaining 
wall and 7,258 feet of curb. 



C The average number of per- 
sons on relief was 1,174, or 456 
less than the average for 1940. 



<[ The wood business activities of 
the Relief Department were ter- 
minated. 



C The number of felony cases 
showed a marked decrease. 



C New sidewalk type traffic lights 
were installed at the junctions of 
North State Street and Centre 
Street, and North State Street and 
School Street. 



curbing; and the resurfacing of 
6,156 square yards of sidewalk. 



C The Highway Division used 
282,700 gallons of tar in surface- 
treating city streets. 



d The City's snow removal ac- 
tivities were speeded up by the 
acquisition of a rotary snow plow. 



C Under a new contract with the 
electric utility, street illumination 
was greatly increased; lights in the 
business section of Main Street 
were increased from 400 to 1,000 
candlepower. 

C At the airport, the north-south 
runway was extended from 2,000 
feet to 3,140 feet to permit con- 
tinuation of airline operation. 



<[ A Junior Police League for 
boys between the ages of 10 and 
16 was organized by the Police 
Department. 



C A new fire whistle was installed 
at the Central Fire Station. 



<[ Construction activities of the 
Board of Public Works included 
the laying of 3,947 square yards of 
permanent street surface, 1,912 
square yards of new sidewalk 
pavement, 1,504 lineal feet of 



€[ Plans were under way for a 
$400,000 expansion of the Munici- 
pal Airport. 

C With the assistance of W.P.A. 
the Water Department laid 4,000 
feet of 24-inch main in North 
State Street north of Rumford 
Street. 

€[ The new Dame School on the 
Plains was completed to give this 
section the finest school of its kind 
in New Hampshire. 



Annual Report 



CITY CLERK 



Arthur E. Robv City Clerk 

Margaret A. Spencer . . . Deputy City Clerk 
1941 Expenditure $8,362.86 



The City Clerk, an appointee of the 
Board of Aldermen for a two-year 
term of office, serves as secretarial 
official to the Board of Aldermen 
and the Board of Public Works. As 
such, it is his duty to maintain a 
record of the proceedings of these 
bodies. In general, the City Clerk is 
custodian of public records and is 
responsible for the filing, indexing 
and safekeeping of the same. 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

During 12 regular, two ad- 
journed and two special meetings, 
the Board of Aldermen passed 13 
ordinances and 53 resolutions. Two 
public hearings were also held dur- 
ing the year. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The Board of Public Works held 
12 regular meetings, 'six special 
meetings, and two hearings during 
1941. In addition to the routine 
business of running the City's pub- 
lic works, the board acted on nu- 
merous petitions for sewers, cul- 
verts, sidewalks, street lights and 
driveways. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

During the year, the demand for 
certified copies of vital statistics 



continued to increase. Require- 
ments which make it necessary for 
people who seek employment in de- 
fense work to show proof of citizen- 
ship are largely responsible for this 
increased demand. 

Vital statistics records for years 
prior to 1880 are very incomplete. 
Records for subsequent years are 
entirely satisfactory and are prov- 
ing invaluable to Concord citizens 
in establishing exact dates. 

The total number of births in the 
city showed a continuing upward 
trend; 588 were recorded as com- 
pared with 550 for 1940 and 537 for 
1939. The total number of mar- 
riages was 277 as against 251 in 

1940 and 243 in 1939. Altogether, 
682 deaths were recorded during 
1941. Of this number, 146 were 
from the city at large, 446 occurred 
in institutions and 90 were brought 
here for interment. 

MORTGAGES AND CONDITIONAL SALES 

All mortgages and conditional 
sales are recorded by photostatic 
reproduction. This method has 
proved satisfactory not only be- 
cause it saves time but because it 
assures absolute accuracy. Total 

1941 fees from this source amounted 
to $1,098.39. 

LICENSES, FEES, ETC. 

It is the duty of the City Clerk, 
when authorized to do so by the 
Board of Aldermen, to issue various 
types of business licenses required 
by ordinance. Included in this 
group are taxi, theatre, circus, 
bowling alley and pool table li- 
censes. The City Clerk also handles 



10 



Cify of Concord 



the issuance of automobile permits. 
The income from auto permits in 
1941 amounted to $37,779.12. This 
amount was S2.752.60 more than 
the total sum for the previous 
year. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

During the year, a modern steel 
counter was purchased to replace 
the outmoded wooden shelf over 
which the department formerly 
served the public. Increased office 
efficiency has already proved the 
wisdom of acquiring this new 
equipment. 

. . . Elections 

The biennial city elections were 
held in October and November of 
1941. The Public Laws of New 
Hampshire and the City Charter 
specify that these elections shall be 
under the control of the City Clerk 



and the officers of the different 
wards. It is the further duty of the 
City Clerk to receive filings for the 
various offices and to prepare the 
official ballot. 

A total of 33 candidates filed for 
eity offices. Of this number, three 
were for mayor, four for assessor, 
seven for the three alderman-at- 
large posts, and nineteen for the 
nine ward alderman offices. 

At the Primary Election, 3,553 
votes were cast for the mayoralty 
candidates. In the Election that 
followed, the two candidates for 
mayor received a combined vote ol 
7,826. The number of votes cast for 
the office of mayor in the Election 
was 912 less than the total for the 
1939 ballot. 

The municipal elections cost the 
taxpayers $4,034.98, most of which 
was paid out in salaries to the elec- 
tion officers. 



Installed in the City Clerk's office during 1941, this new steel counter offers the public greatei 
convenience and permits the department's staff to operate with increased efficiency 




yL ti 



ASSESSMENT 



percent for errors and corrections 
in assessment, by the aggregate 
assessed valuation. 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Clarence O. Phil. brick, Chairman 
Joseph E. Shepard, Clerk 
Edward F. Donovan 

1941 Expenditure $11,292.66 



It has been said that nothing is cer- 
tain but death and taxes. The 
owner of real property is reconciled 
to the need for taxes and he expects 
to be called upon to pay them to 
support the operation of his city, 
school and county governments. 
His willingness to participate in 
underwriting these governmental 
costs is usually accompanied by 
two reservations: first, that his 
money must be spent wisely, and 
second, that he will not be called 
upon to pay more than his just 
share. In this connection, it is the 
duty of the Board of Assessors to 
determine property values and to 
make assessments in such a manner 
that equitable treatment is accorded 
to all. 

TAX LEVY PROCEDURE 

The tax levy is based upon a sim- 
ple percentage computation in- 
volving the use of two known fac- 
tors from which a third, the tax 
rate, is calculated. The amount of 
money required to meet budget 
appropriations and the assessed 
valuation of property are the two 
established factors. The tax rate is 
determined by dividing the amount 
of money to be raised, which in- 
cludes a sum not in excess of live 



TWO TAX RATES 

Concord has two tax rates, one 
for the suburb of Penacook and the 
other for the remainder of the city. 
This situation is the result of two 
separate and distinct school dis- 
tricts. While the money to be raised 
to operate the city and county gov- 
ernments is prorated over the whole 
tax structure of the city, the funds 
needed to run the two school dis- 
tricts are raised by assessing the 
taxable property within the area of 
each district. 

The result of this arrangement is 
that the school tax in each district 
varies in direct proportion to the 
amount of money to be raised for 
school use and the amount of real 
property available to carry the 
load. Because the school levy in 
Penacook is disproportionately 
heavy in relation to the assessed 
valuation of the district, Ward One 
taxpayers were called upon to pay 
a school tax which exceeded that of 
their fellow citizens in the Concord 
School District by three dollars for 
each $1,000 of assessed valuation. 

REAL PROPERTY 

No appreciable change occurred 
during the year in the number of 
parcels of taxable real estate. Ap- 
proximately 12,000 pieces of prop- 
erty were carried on the assessors' 
books. During the year, 630 deeds 
were recorded in the city. A total of 
169 building permits was issued 
during 1941. Eighty of these permits 
were for new structures; the re- 
maining 89 were for alterations, 



12 



City of Concord ] 



additions and repairs to existing 
buildings. 

ASSESSED VALUATION AND POLLS 

The total assessed valuation of 
the City of Concord during 1941 
was $33,068,487. This amount was 
$276,697 more than the total valua- 
tion for the previous year. It is an 
interesting fact that only $215 of 
this increase occurred in the Pena- 
cook precinct. 

The number of polls listed dur- 
ing 1941 was 13,874, or 458 less 
than the total for 1940. This de- 
crease more than offset the 1939- 
1940 gain of 447. 

RAILROAD STOCK 

Railroad stocks are taxed by the 
state, and the revenue collected from 
this source is credited to the city or 
town where the stock is held. The 
number of shares held in Concord 
in 1941 was 2,672. This figure was 
275 less than the 1940 total. 



TAX WARRANT 

A 1941 tax warrant totaling $1,- 
264,315.56 was submitted to the 
Tax Collector. This amount was 
$16,611.34 less than the 1940 war- 
rant. On the valuation basis of 
$1,000, the City rate was $37.04, 
while the Penacook rate was $40.04. 
The average rate for 1941 was 
$37.20. 

EXEMPTIONS 

Veterans' exemption claims 
amounted to $284,245 against real 
property. Eight hundred ninety- 
six veterans filed claims for poll tax 
exemptions totaling $1,792. 

Seven blind persons were ex- 
empted from paying poll taxes. One 
blind exemption claim was filed on 
property valued at $1,000. 

Total exemption claims amounted 
to $287,051. This is an increase of 
$5,605 over the preceding year. 



REDUCED INCOME FROM OTHER 
SOURCES HAS INCREASED THE TAX 
RATE THREE DOLLARS SINCE 1931 



THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS 

— — — - — rv> 
x> o ro £• <T) oo o 
D o o o o o o 








1 












STATE COLLECTED TAXES 

TAX I93J 1941 
INTEREST &. DIVIDEND $58,528 $49,841 
SAVINGS BANK 58,194 34,447 
RAILROAD 60,740 14,276 




















INSURANCE 8,72] 
$ 186, 18 




$ 98,5 


64 




































\ 


























l< 


)3I 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 19 


41 



Annual Report 



13 



np A "\7" is, therefore, imperative that every 

■*- -t\.-/\- effort be made to collect these over- 

y^ s~\T T T? /^1 'T' T /^\T\T c ' ue taxes m orc l e r that the number 
V^i V_J JLi l^t £j K^A JL 1 V-J IN of foreclosures due to non-payment 
,,,,,,////////' can De kept at an absolute mini- 
mum. 
Amos B. Morrison 7a* Collectoi 

104, Expenditure 17,217.86 1941 COLLECTIONS 

„ / / 1 i ° f a tax warr ant of $1,264,- 

315.56, all but $206,860.62 was 
Expenditures for the operation of collected by December 31. College- 
government are incurred in antici- tions covering prior years totaled 
pation of the collection of tax levies. $206,368.96, redemptions of tax 

sales excluded. 

During the past two years, out- 
standing taxes have been reduced 
by $78,965.71 as shown in the 
accompanying table. 



For this reason, it is important that 
such levies are collected without 
delay. Unfortunately, experience 
has shown that a certain amount of 
delinquency cannot be avoided. It 



} 'ear 

1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939. 
1940. 
1941 . 



As of 
Dec. 37, 7939 



2,891.80 
3,200.42 
4,619.87 
6,037.74 
6,894.39 
9,332.92 
10,588.58 
273,867.72 



As of 
Dec. 31, 1940 

$ 2,142.64 
2,345.46 
3,569.11 
4,662.05 
5,059.99 
6,342.98 
7,156.18 
7,470 . 1 5 
251,325.61 



As of 
Dec. 37. 1941 



I 4,883.53 
5,924.65 
6,405.61 
6,311.56 
8,081.76 

206,860.62 



$317,433.44 1290,074.17 $238,467.73 



TAXES BOUGHT BY CITY 

At the Tax Collector's Sale held 
September 27, 1941, the City 
bought $51,089.47 worth of back 
taxes. This sum represents a 3.9 per 
cent delinquency. The 1941 per- 



centage of delinquency is six-tenths 
of one per cent above the average 
for the past ten years. 

The status of delinquent taxes as 
of December 31, 1941, is indicated 
in the following table: 





Am't Bought 


Amount 


Abated by 


Deeded 


Amount 


} ear 


by City 


Redeemed 


Assessors 


lo City 


I 'nredeemed 


1936. .. . 


. . . $47,570 05 


$43,771.89 


$2,594.28 


$1,203.88 




1937 


. .. 58,590.41 


53,043 . 36 


3,761 .33 


1,785.72 




1 938 .... 


. .. 41,919.30 


33,446 . 65 


2,903.22 


878.22 


S 4.691 .21 


1939. . . . 


. .. 41,755.52 


25,9')') is 


2.536.34 


515.42 


12,704.58 


1 940 


. . . 51,089 r 


16,845.53 


2,221 .13 




32,022.81 



OTHER ACTIVITY 

During the year, the sum of 
$818.03 was received by the Tax 
Collector from rent and sale of 



property deeded to the City. 
Receipts from itinerant vendor's 
licenses netted the City $120.00 in 
1941. 



14 



Cify of Concord 



FINANCES 



Carl H. Foster 
1941 Expendituri 



City Treasurei 
$3,485.96 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Harry H. Dudi ey 
Car i. H. Fosi er 
Edgar C. Hirst 

Cari H. Foster Custodian 

1941 Expenditure $142.50 



The financial condition of the City 
of Concord continued to improve 
during 1941. although at a mate- 
rially reduced rate. The reduction 
in the rate of improvement was cine 
to the necessity of issuing note's dur- 
ing the year to finance the con- 
struction of the new Dame School 
on Concord Plains. The total im- 
provement in the City's financial 
condition in 1941 amounted to 
$8,520.49 of which SI, 520. 49 repre- 
sented surplus from current opera- 
tion and $7,000.00 the decrease in 
the amount of outstanding bonds 
and notes. 

On the opening of the City's 
books on January 1, 1938, Con- 
cord's net debt totaled $1,149.- 
1 52.70; and on December 31.1 941 . 
the net debt amounted to $887, 
103.37, a reduction in the inter- 
vening four years of $262,049.33 or 
22 per cent. Of this amount, $222,- 
000.00 represented a decrease in 
bonds and notes payable. 



GENERAL FUND 

The revenue collected by the 
City during 1941 amounted to 
$1,562,313.33. After making al- 
lowances for deductions by transfer, 
the net receipts available for ex- 
penditure totaled SI. 507. 494. 41. 
Compared with the total revenue 
estimate of $1,451,737.16 made at 
the beginning of the year, actual 
receipts were in excess of estimated 
receipts by $55,757.25. 

Appropriations totaling $1,466,- 
251.10 were made during the year. 
Departmental receipts, reimburse- 
ments and earnings added $343.- 
219.95 to this sum to make the total 
funds available $1,809,471.05. Ex- 
penditures, transfers and balances 
carried forward amounted to $1,- 
819,534.83. Although a net over- 
draft of appropriations of $10,- 
063.78 was thereby effected, the net 
surplus from 1941 operations was 
$1,520.49. (See detailed analysis in 
Appendix. ) 

BOND FUNDS 

At the beginning of the year, the 
City's outstanding debt was $1,- 
1 18,000 of which $1,098,000 repre- 
sented bonds and $20,000, notes. 
During the year, the Concord 
School District issued $80,000 
worth of notes to finance the new 
Plains school; the City issued notes 
to the extent of $50,000 to cover the 
cost of repairs to the Auditorium 
and to continue the sponsorship of 
W.P.A. projects. 

Bonds retired during 1941 in- 



Annual Report 



15 



eluded $73,000 of municipal bonds. 
$17,000 of water bonds and $27,000 
of school bonds. In addition to 
these, $20,000 worth of W.P.A. 
notes were retired. Outstanding 
bonds and notes as of December 31, 
1941 amounted to $1,111,000 or 
$7,000 less than the total at the 
beginning of the year. Of this 
amount, the City's bonded in- 
debtedness accounted for $981,000; 
notes due in one to four years made 
up the remaining $130,000. 

TRUST FUNDS 

At the close of the year, the 
Trustees of Trust Funds reported 
total assets of $405,010.76 of which 
$401,175.95 represented invest- 
ments and $3,834.81, unexpended 
income. With the exception of 



$7,630.63 invested in securities, 
this money was deposited in four 
savings banks in Concord. Sundry 
cemetery trusts accounted for 
$229,482.75 of the total assets held 
in custody by the Trustees. 

During the year, $5,564.03 in 
new trust funds was received. In 
addition, $604.01 was added to 
the trust fund balance from one- 
third receipts from the sale of lots 
in Blossom Hill Cemetery Annex 
One. A deduction of $100.00 from 
cemetery trusts was made as the 
result of a transfer of funds. 

Income from interest and divi- 
dends amounted to $10,776.10 in 
1941. This sum was $7,259.23 less 
than the amount received during 
the previous year. Disbursements 
during 1941 totaled $10,380.81. 



PAY AS YOU GO BEGINS TO PAY Off 



£- CO O) O — 
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0)0 0)0)0) 



M U N I C I PA L 



BONDED DEBT 



-DAME SCHOOL NOTES 




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O C) O ^f ^ 
CT) 0") O) O) °> 



SCHOOL 



S 00 O) o ~ 

rn n m ^ <* 
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WATER 



16 



City of Concord 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 



Gordon S. Lord 
1941 Expenditure 



City Solicitoi 

..81,523.45 



Changing conditions due largely to 
the national emergency have ef- 
fected a marked decrease in the 
customary type of legal assistance 
required of the City Solicitor by the 
City Government. There have been 
fewer requests for interpretations of 
statutes and ordinances, fewer pro- 
posed changes of ordinances and, 
except in connection with matters 
related to national defense, fewer 
legal instruments to be drafted. 

The lessening demands on the 
Solicitor for services in the tradi- 
tional sphere of activity have been 
offset by expanded duties growing 
out of the City's increasing partici- 
pation in the national defense and 
war effort. 



ORDINANCE REVISION 

During the year, the Solicitor has 
rendered assistance to members of 
the Board of Aldermen in revising 
a number of important ordinances. 
In this connection, ordinances 
adopted during the past year or 
now in the process of passage have 
been aimed at departmental con- 
solidation, elimination of duplica- 
tion of effort and equipment, and 
at economy without decrease in the 
number and quality of the services 
rendered by the City to the in- 
habitants of the community. 



RELIEF INVESTIGATION 

Under the direction of a special 
committee of the Board of Alder- 
men, the Solicitor made a thorough 
and painstaking investigation of the 
City Relief Department's handling 
of wood for relief families. This in- 
vestigation extended over a period 
of several months. Upon the com- 
pletion of the inquiry, a report of 
the committee's findings was made 
to the City Government. The re- 
port indicated quite clearly the un- 
profitableness of municipal govern- 
ment operation of this type of 
activity. 

AIRPORT EXPANSION 

In connection with the Munici- 
pal Airport expansion program, the 
City of Concord acquired title to 
381 acres of land in the Plains Dis- 
trict. At the same time, the City's 
title to several parcels of land 
within the area of the airport was 
cleared. The work involved the 
examination of the title to approxi- 
mately 100 separate tracts of land 
and the institution of condemna- 
tion proceedings. In the acquisition 
of this land, the City Solicitor has 
worked in close cooperation with 
the Civil Aeronautics Administra- 
tion, through which agency the 
Federal Government proposes to 
expend a considerable sum of 
money in expanding and modern- 
izing the facilities of the local air- 
port. Completion of the project will 
give the City of Concord an airport 
which will meet in every way the 
expanding needs of air transporta- 
tion. 



Annual Report 



17 



LITIGATIONS-SETTLED AND ADJUDICATED 

Bektash Real Estate Association vs. 
City oj Concord were five cases con- 
stituting appeals from assessments 
imposed upon the real estate of the 
petitioner for the years 1 936 to 1 940 
inclusive. These cases were settled 
by compromise reached by the 
present owners of the real estate 
and the Board of Assessors repre- 
senting the City of Concord. 

May Whit taker vs. City oj Concord 
and Charles Filides and William 
Filides vs. City of Concord were also 
tax appeals. The petitioners and 
the Board of Assessors agreed to ad- 
justments that were mutually ac- 
ceptable. 

Franklin Hollis, Administrator of 
the Estate of Edward Adams, vs. City 
of Concord was an action to recover 
damage for the City's use of certain 
land owned by the heirs of Edward 
Adams and located within the area 
of the Municipal Airport. This case 
was settled by the payment of 
$27.15. 

Aune Saarf Administratrix of the 
Estate of Mikko Saari, vs. City of 
Concord. The plaintiff's intestate fell 
from a bridge over the Contoocook 
River in Penacook when the railing 
along the outside of the sidewalk on 
the bridge gave way under his 
weight. He fell to a ledge at the 
base of one of the bridge abutments 
and was killed. His administratrix 
took the position that the bridge 
was defectively railed and that the 
accident was caused by this defect. 
The case was settled upon payment 
by the City of the sum of $2,250 to 
the decedent's administratrix. 

Shelby 0. Waller vs. City of Con- 



cord was an appeal from a ruling of 
the Board of Adjustment. The peti- 
tioner withdrew his appeal. 

Ned Levin vs. City of Concord was 
an appeal from a ruling of the 
Board of Adjustment. The case was 
heard by the Superior Court and 
ultimately resulted in an amend- 
ment of the Zoning Ordinance per- 
mitting the petitioner to make the 
use of his premises requested in the 
petition. 

City of Concord vs. Town of Bow 
was a suit to recover for relief 
granted by Concord to an inhabit- 
ant of Concord who had a settle- 
ment in Bow. The case was settled 
upon the payment by the Town of 
Bow of the amount recommended 
by the Overseer of Poor for the 
City of Concord. 

LITIGATIONS-PENDING 

The Petition of the Trustees of Trust 
Funds is a request for interpretation 
of certain portions of the wills of 
Nathaniel Bouton and David Os- 
good . 

Maude L. Crowley vs. City of Con- 
cord is an appeal from the alleged 
taking by eminent domain of cer- 
tain lands of the petitioner. This 
case will be terminated by the 
actual taking by the City of Con- 
cord of the land in controversy. 

City of Concord vs. Marie A. Bour- 
deau is an action of the City to en- 
force a lien for water service on the 

real estate of the defendant. 

Max Cohen and Bertha Cohen vs. 
City of Concord is an appeal from a 
ruling of the Zoning Board of Ad- 
justment. 



18 



City of Concord 



PLANNING 



CITY PLANNI N G B O A R D 

James M. Langley, Chairman 
Dudley W. Orr, Secretai r 
Edward E. Beane 
Frederick P. Clark 
Warren H. Greene 
John B. Jameson 
Harold D. Merrill 
Austin E. Page 
Hon. John W. Storrs 

GUSTAF H. LEHTINEN Dunlin 

1941 Expenditure $3,905 99 



EXTENT OF ACTIVITY 

The City Planning Board experi- 
enced a most active year in 1941. 
The board received 24 requests for 
studies, an increase of 10 over the 
previous year. Of the total number 
of requests received, 17 came di- 
rectly from the Board of Aldermen, 
two from special committees of the 
board, two from the Board of Pub- 
lic Works, one from the Mayor and 
two from the Board of Education. 
Of the 22 which originated within 
the City Government, 1 1 pertained 
to the acceptance, layout and 
widening of streets and 1 1 con- 
cerned various current municipal 
problems. Studies asked for by the 
school authorities involved the loca- 
tion of a school building and a sur- 
vey of traffic in relation to the 
safety of children. 

During the year the Planning 
Board completed 19 studies and 
issued 15 mimeographed reports. 
Two matters involving administra- 
tive reorganization were returned 
to the Board of Aldermen without 
studv because the considerations in- 



volved were outside of the scope of 
the Planning Board's functions as 
defined by the ordinance establish- 
ing the duties of the board. At the 
close of the year, three studies were 
awaiting." action bv the board. 



STREETS 

Five petitions involving 3,527 
feet for new streets were considered 
by the board. After investigating 
the merits of the proposed streets, 
the board recommended to the 
Board of Aldermen that one be ac- 
cepted in its entirety, one in part 
and that three be denied. As the re- 
sult of these recommendations, the 
Board of Aldermen refused to ac- 
cept approximately 3,000 feet of 
unnecessary streets. Cost estimates 
prepared by the board showed that 
the initial cost of facilities involved 
in the complete development of the 
streets which were turned down 
would have amounted to $35,735. 

In two instances, the acceptance 
of layouts for existing streets were 
recommended. One of these layouts 
involved the relocation of several 
hundred feet of highway in order to 
straighten a dangerous curve. 

The board discouraged the wid- 
ening of Ferry Street east of the 
railroad pending action by the 
State on the relocation of the main 
highway from the Plains area to the 
city proper. 

SUBDIVISION 

Three subdivision layouts re- 
ceived the attention of the Planning 
Board during 1941. One of these 
was in relation to the contemplated 
sale of a parcel of tax title land by 



Annual Report '''19 



the Lands and Buildings Commit- 
tee. The board recommended the 
reservation of land for street pur- 
poses in accordance with a plan 
which would permit an orderly de- 
velopment of the street plan of the 
city. Several desirable changes 
were recommended in the two 
plats submitted by private sub- 
dividers. 



During the year, the Planning 
Board recommended two changes 
in the Zoning Map. The first of 
these was in relation to the rcdis- 
tricting of an area in Penacook 
from commercial to industrial use. 
The board called for this action in 
order to facilitate efforts to secure 
new industries for two vacant 
plants located in the area. In the 
second instance, the establishment 
of a new commercial district on the 
Concord Plains was suggested to 
meet changing conditions resulting 
from the relocation of the Dame 
School. 

PARKING 

The State Library Parking Area, 
the establishment of which the 
board recommended as early as 
1939, materialized during the year 
to give Concord its first public off- 
street parking lot. The lot accom- 
modates about 55 cars and its ca- 
pacity use during the fall and win- 
ter has demonstrated beyond doubt 
the value of this type of parking 
accommodation. 

At the request of the Board of 
Aldermen, a study was made of the 
feasibility of establishing a public 



parking lot south of the Christian 
Science Church. This project was 
found to have definite merits. How- 
ever, in light of present world con- 
ditions, the board felt that this 
project should be listed among 
other public works projects to be 
re-examined after the conclusion 
of the war. 

CITY REPORT 

The publication of the annual 
city report has become a regular 
task of the Planning Board to which 
the board has had to devote con- 
siderable time and effort. 

The modernized 1940 city report 
won first prize in a statewide town 
report contest conducted by the 
Bureau of Government Research at 
the University of New Hampshire. 

RESEARCH STUDIES 

The conduct of research studies 
for the City Government has be- 
come an increasingly important 
activity of the Planning Board. 
During 1941, eleven such studies 
were referred to the Planning 
Board. Outstanding among the re- 
ports that were issued during the 
year was an Economic Survey of 
Concord prepared at the request of 
an aldermanic committee ap- 
pointed to induce new industries to 
locate in Concord. This report has 
been given wide distribution and, 
in general, has been very well re- 
ceived. 

One of the most important stud- 
ies undertaken in 1941 related to 
the preparation of a long range 
capital budget procedure. The 
study which will be presented to 



20 ' ' ' City of Concord 



the Board of Aldermen for consid- 
eration before the 1942 budget is 
acted upon, will endeavor to lay 
down a method of advance pro- 
gramming and budgeting of needed 
municipal improvements. The first 
year of the six-year program will 
be the capital budget for the year 
1942. The remaining five years of 
the program represent a tentative 
schedule of needed improvements. 
not yet committed, but carefully 
thought out on the basis of the 
city's ability to pay. Once adopted, 
the program would be carried on 
from year to year. This procedure 
would permit the Board of Alder- 
men to weigh again and again 
every item of capital outlay before 
it is finally placed in the budget. 
The errors of hasty and ill-consid- 
ered action on capital improvements 
would thereby be guarded against so 
far as it is humanly possible to do so. 



The board has continued to add 
to its extensive file of maps covering 
a wide range of pertinent informa- 
tion. Although most of these maps 
have been prepared as a basis for 
a master plan of development of the 
city, they have found more and 
more use as valuable reference ma- 
terial for other city departments 
and for the public at large. 

COOPERATION 

The Planning Board believes in 
cooperation both within and with- 
out the city government structure. 
Only by cooperation can the best 
interests of the citizens of Concord 
be served. 



An outstanding example of the 
value of cooperation for public 
good is the Plains school building 
study prepared by the Planning 
Board for the Board of Education. 
As a result of this survey, the size 
and the best available location 
for the new school were deter- 
mined, and the school board pro- 
ceeded accordingly. 

During the year, the board found 
occasion to make the services of its 
staff available to the local defense 
authorities in preparing maps and 
providing data needed for the 
solution of various defense prob- 
lems. 

The past year has witnessed a 
greatly expanded use of the services 
and facilities of the Planning Board 
by the Board of Aldermen, city 
departments and the public at 
large. Problems ranging from refer- 
ence questions to projects requiring 
several clays of study have been 
referred to the board in increasing 
numbers. This activity has become 
an important part of the board's 
program of work. 

1942 

Although many of the usual ac- 
tivities such as street acceptance 
and subdivision development will 
of necessity have to be curtailed for 
the duration of the war, the Plan- 
ning Board believes that the time is 
now opportune to proceed with its 
primary function, the establish- 
ment of a Master Plan for the City 
of Concord. Surveys being con- 
ducted by the Engineering Depart- 
ment will enable the Planning 
Board to go ahead with its planning 
program in the near future. 



Annual Report 



21 



P T T DT T f~^ all necessary precautionary meas- 

-L vJ J-* -"-^ -*- ^ ures were taken to prevent the 

HEALTH am/ spread of disease ' 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

O l\ INI 1 _L l\ ± 1 V.J IN The usual number of cases of 

measles, mumps and whooping- 
cough occurred during the year. 

BOARD OF HEALTH Scarlet fever was first on the list of 

Hon. John W. Storrs, Chairman communicable diseases with 28 

Paul R. Donovan, M.D. , , ... r , 

Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. cases recorded. All of these cases 

Clinton R. Mullins, M.D. were of a mild nature, so much so, 

Ellsworth M. Tracy, M.D. that the scrvices of a doctor were 

Donald G. Barton, M.D. Sanitary Officer nQt reta j ncc } 
Walter C. Rowe, M.D. 

(In the absence of Dr Barton) V|TAL STAT|ST|CS 
Austin B. Presby Milk Inspector 

1941 Expenditure $6,826.46 The department's vital statistics 

records showed 261 resident and 
298 non-resident deaths in the city 

The first responsibility of municipal during the year. In comparison 

government is good public health. with the previous year, the resident 

Without good health, the efforts of deaths showed a decrease of 20. Of 

the other agencies of city govern- the total number of resident deaths, 

ment are of little consequence. Pub- ten were noted in the under-one- 

lic safety, public works, education year age group; five in the one to 

and all other services must first nine group; one in the 10 to 19; 12 

yield to health before these activi- in the 20 to 44; and 233 in the 45 

ties can be made to serve the pur- and over category. 

poses for which they are intended. The large number of non-resi- 

Therefore, the measure of success dent deaths results from the fact 

attained by the Health Department that the New Hampshire State 

is of serious concern to every citizen Hospital, two private hospitals 

of the city. which serve a large surrounding 

A high standard of health was area, and several institutions for the 

maintained in Concord during aged are located in the city. 

1 941 . The Health Department was A five-year comparison of the 

not faced with any acute problems. number of resident deaths resulting 

All potential health hazards were from seven common causes is pre- 

kept under close surveillance and sented herewith. 

1937 1938 1939 1910 1941 

Diseases of the circulatory system Ill 114 106 97 102 

Cancer 39 32 32 42 27 

Nephritis 7 28 20 14 21 

Accidental deaths 14 17 18 10 7 

Pneumonia 24 9 11 15 8 

Diabetes 9 1(1 10 7 7 

Tuberculosis 5 6 6 2 9 

22 ' ' ' City of Concord 



PUBLIC COOPERATION 

The department has received 
fine cooperation from the public in 
reporting and remedying unsani- 
tary conditions. Numerous com- 
plaints concerning unhealthy con- 
ditions have been received, and in 
each case, the department has con- 
ducted a thorough investigation. It 
is gratifying to note that the general 
public is sufficiently cognizant of 
the need for a high standard of 
health to report unsanitary condi- 
tions long before they reach real 
serious proportions. It is equally 
satisfying to record that citizens 
who have been requested to correct 
bad health situations have done so 
willingly, and in no case has the de- 
partment had to resort to court 
procedure in order to effect the 
necessary improvements. 

More and more, the department 
is being called on for advice in cor- 
recting conditions affecting general 
health. During the past year, this 
has been especially true of people 
whose homes have been infested by 
rats. To those who have sought 



counsel, the department has recom- 
mended ways and means by which 
solutions might be found for many 
trying health problems. 

FEDERAL ASSISTANCE 

The United States Public Health 
Service has continued to allot the 
City sufficient funds to employ a 
public health engineer and a public 
health nurse. This added personnel 
has permitted the department to 
carry on a greatly expanded pro- 
gram to the immeasurable benefit 
of the citizens of Concord. 

COMFORT STATION 

During 1941, control of the 
Municipal Comfort Station located 
in the Police Station at the corner 
of Warren Street and Odd Fellows 
Avenue was turned over to the 
Health Department by the Board 
of Aldermen. The Comfort Station 
was completely remodeled and 
painted, and the latest type of 
plumbing fixtures were installed. 

After the renovation was com- 
pleted, two attendants were em- 





LEADING CAUSES Of 


DEATH IN 1941 








RATE PER 








1,000 






1 HEART DISEASES 


nnnni 4.25 






2 CANCER, ALL FORMS 


Dl 1.12 






3 NEPHRITIS 


D 0.85 






4 CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE 


B 0.75 






5 TUBERCULOSIS, ALL FORMS 


0.37 






6 PNEUMONIA, ALL FORMS 


0.33 






7 DISEASES OF EARLY INFANO 


1 0.33 






8 ACCIDENTS, ALL FORMS 


0.2 9 






9 DIABETES MELLITUS 


] 0.29 













Annual Report * ' ' 23 



ployed. Several months of opera- 
tion have indicated that the new 
arrangement is working out satis- 
factorily for all concerned. 

. . . Milk Inspection 

During the year, regular inspec- 
tions were conducted in 190 dairies 
and eight milk plants serving the 
Concord area. These dairies were 
located in 16 towns within a 16- 
mile radius of Concord. During the 
year, 18 dairies discontinued busi- 
ness, while four new producers were 
issued permits to sell milk. Ap- 
proximately 80 per cent of all 
dairies supplying milk for the city 
were equipped with electrical re- 
frigeration. 

The department's routine labo- 
ratory activity included the testing 
of 1,648 samples of milk, 57 of 
cream, 42 of ice cream, 52 of choco- 
late milk, 42 of orangeade and 76 
miscellaneous samples. In addition, 
59 swab rinses were plated. 

DISEASE FREE CATTLE 

The entire milk supply of the 



city comes from tuberculin and 
Bang's Disease free accredited 
herds or herds under state and fed- 
eral supervision. All cattle brought 
into the Concord area must under- 
go examination to establish their 
freedom from these diseases. 

PASTEURIZATION 

Approximately 12,600 quarts of 
milk were consumed daily in Con- 
cord in 1941. Over 72 per cent of 
this amount was pasteurized. 

Many improvements in equip- 
ment and methods of pasteurizing 
and handlingofmilk were noted dur- 
ing dairy plant inspections in 1 94 1 . 

INSPECTION OF LABORATORY 

During the year, a survey of the 
department's laboratory was made 
by a representative of the United 
States Public Health Service. Ex- 
cept for a few minor deficiencies, 
which were corrected immediately, 
the equipment and technique used 
in the laboratory were found to be 
highly satisfactory and in accord- 
ance with the standard methods for 
the examination of dairy products. 



The Milk Inspector protects your health by 
examining all utensils used in handling milk 




WATER SUPPLY SHORTAGE 

As the result of a severe drought 
during the latter part of 1941, there 
was an acute water shortage at 
many of the dairies supplying milk 
for the city. To meet this emer- 
gency, the Water Department pro- 
vided tap facilities in water mains 
from which dairymen in the out- 
lying districts were permitted to 
draw water. In a few instances, 
farmers disposed of their cattle in 
preference to transporting water. 
This action resulted in a limited 
depletion of the milk supply. 



MEDICAL 
SERVICE 



Paul R. Donovan City Physician 

Elmer U. Sargent Assistant City Physician 

1941 Expenditure $1,857.10 



Because the City employs the 
part-time services of two practicing 
physicians, it is not to be assumed 
that the City of Concord is in the 
business of practicing medicine. 
The medical service provided by 
the City is for the exclusive use of 
people on relief and such other 
persons who are classified by the 
Relief Department as border-line 
cases. 

GENERAL CONDITION OF HEALTH 

The general condition of health 
of the relief recipients in the city 
was above normal during 1941. Al- 
though a great many infectious 
cases were noted among children, 
there were only a few ^^_ 
among adults. On the 
whole, there were no seri- 
ous outbreaks of infectious 
diseases among indigents. 

1941 ACTIVITY 

During the year the 
City Physician answered 
and took care of between 
three and four thousand 
office and house calls. Four- 



The health of needy people is a 

vital concern of the City. The City 

Physician is shown examining a 

patient 



teen patients were hospitalized for 
a total of 196 days at the New 
Hampshire Memorial Hospital and 
33 persons spent 385 hospital days 
at the Margaret Pillsbury General 
Hospital. 

COOPERATION 

Throughout the year the City 
Physician received splendid co- 
operation from the Relief Depart- 
ment, the Overseer of Poor and the 
Mayor. Many recommendations 
were made by the City Physician; 
most of these were accepted and 
carried out. 

RECOMMENDATION 

The usual allowance of $350 for 
office medicines was found inade- 
quate to meet 1941 requirements. 
Because of this lack of funds, many 
relatively simple prescriptions had 
to be filled at drug stores at a con- 
siderable added cost to the Relief 
Department. It is suggested that 
the appropriation for this purpose 
be raised to at least $500. 




PARKS AND 
CEMETERIES 



PARK AND CEMETARY 
COMMISSION 
Hon. John W. Storrs, Chairman 
Herbert G. Abbot 
Pierre A. Boucher 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Robert J. Graves 
Alpheus M. Johnson 
Mrs. Thomas N. Troxell 
Leslie C. Clark Superintendent 

1942 Expenditures: 

Parks $14,395.60 

Cemeteries $31,734.73 



Parks play an important part in the 
defense program because they tend 
to build physical and mental fitness 
by providing facilities for recrea- 
tion, rest and relaxation. Concord's 
parks are admirably designed and 
located to promote activities that 
will develop the physical fitness of 
its citizens. 

The park system was well pat- 
ronized during 1941 and all indi- 
cations point to an increased use in 
1942 as the result of limitations 
placed on travel by the rationing of 
autos, tires and gasoline. 

Due to an unusually severe 
drought during the summer, many 
newly established lawn areas suf- 
fered considerable damage. Some 
of these areas will have to be done 
over during the coming spring 
season. 

In addition to its regular main- 
tenance work, the department 
painted 1,500 feet of iron fence at 
White Park along Centre and 



Washington Streets. It is expected 
that an equivalent amount will be 
painted during the coming year. 

At Rollins Park, the area into 
which the wading pool drained is 
being filled. In addition to provid- 
ing more play area for children, 
this project will accomplish the 
elimination of a mosquito breeding 
nuisance. 

CEMETERIES 

The summer of 1941 was one of 
the most trying in the history of the 
Cemetery Department. Large areas 
of grass suffered severe burns due to 
the lack of sufficient rain. The gen- 
eral dryness of the soil also made it 
necessary to suspend the annual 
program of raising sunken graves. 
The June Beetle was very active 
and a considerable amount of sod 
was destroyed by this pest. 

Not the least of the department's 
difficulties resulted from defense 
measures which cut off the supply 
of water pipe. All water line con- 
struction and replacement had to 
be discontinued. There is very little 
likelihood that this necessary work 
can be resumed until after the con- 
clusion of the war. 

During 1941, 227 interments 
were made in the city's ten ceme- 
teries. The number of burials after 
cremation for the same period was 
nine, or about double the number 
for the previous year. 

The lot construction program 
was continued during the year. 
Areas sufficient in size to accommo- 
date approximately 200 graves 
were developed. 

In addition to its usual main- 
tenance activity, the department 
planted trees and shrubs at the 



26 ' ' ' City of Concord 



Blossom Hill Cemetery. At the 
Soucook Cemetery, the brush was 
cleared and the rough ground 
graded. The iron fence around the 
Minot Enclosure was painted. 
About 800 feet of curbing were re- 
moved in the Old North and Pine 
Grove Cemeteries. In the Latter 
cemetery, 400 feet of gravel road 
were constructed. 

. . . Trees 



Ervin E. Webber 
1 94 1 Expenditures 



Tree Warden 

$11,176.03 



All of the trees belonging to the 
City except those located in parks 
and on land owned by the Water 
Works arc under the care and con- 
trol of the Tree Warden who has all 
the powers granted town tree 
wardens under the Public Laws of 
New Hampshire. 

REORGANIZATION 

A reorganization of the Tree 
Department was effected during 
the year as the result of the resig- 
nation of Tree Warden Carl L. 
Sargent, Jr. Mr. Sargent, who was 
also Superintendent of Parks and 
Cemeteries, operated the Tree De- 
partment in conjunction with the 
Park and Cemetery Department. 
On July 14, 1941, the Board of 
Aldermen conlirmed the appoint- 
ment of Superintendent of Streets 
Ervin E. Webber to fill the vacancy 
in the position of Tree Warden. 

Upon assuming this added duty 
on August 1, Mr. Webber trans- 
ferred the Tree Department's per- 
sonnel and equipment from the Ad- 
ministration Building at White 
Park to the Highway Division's 



yard on Warren Street. The ac- 
tivities of the Tree Department 
were thereby brought into closer 
association with the highway func- 
tions of the Board of Public Works. 

ACTIVITIES 

Two hundred Norway Maple 
trees were planted during the fall 
season by the Tree Department. Of 
this number, 32 were set out on 
school property at the Senior High, 
Parker and Conant schools. The re- 
mainder of these trees were set out 
along city streets where new trees 
were needed and where old trees 
required replacement. 

During the year, a considerable 
number of shade trees that were 
found to be unsound were cut 
down. An unusual number of 
weak limbs that were beginning to 
show the tree-twisting effect of the 
1938 hurricane were removed. 

The annual program of gypsy 
and brown tail moth control was 
conducted during the winter 
months. Hundreds of nests were 
removed from trees in all sections 
of the city. As an added precaution 
against the infestation of these 
pests, all trees were given a thor- 
ough spraying in the early spring. 

The ducks, geese and swan are the centei oj 
at traction at the pond at White Park. 




RECREATION 



PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 
Harold D. Merrill, Chairman 
Charles P. Coakley 
William J. Flynn 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Thomas B. Jennings 
Mrs. Maud N. Blackwood 
Miss Margaret Challis 
Mrs. Nora E. Donovan 
Mrs. Florence M. Langley 
Mrs. Victoria Mahoney 
Mrs. Kathleen Mullen 
Mrs. Ethel M. Storrs 
Paul G. Crowell Supervisor 

1941 Expenditure $10,760.01 



. . . Playgrounds and Bath 

Now, as never before, when people 
are bending every effort to increase 
production for the war by working 
long and hard, is there a need for 
recreation and relaxation. The oft- 
heard statement that work not play 
is the order of the day should not be 
misconstrued; its intent is to dis- 
courage "lying down on the job 1 ' 
rather than to propose the curtail- 
ment of recreation. In these trying 
times, it is of prime importance that 
the entire population, whether it is 
employed in war work or not, meets 
every new situation, with clear 
thinking and steady nerves. There 
is no better way to make sure that 
these conditions prevail than to 
provide adequate opportunity for 
health-building recreation. 

REORGANIZATION 

At the close of the year, tin- 
Board of Aldermen effected a re- 
organization of the Committee on 
Playgrounds and Bath. The old 
committee which had a member- 



ship of 12 made up of five aldermen 
and seven citizens was abolished. 
The reorganization eliminated citi- 
zen membership and placed all 
playgrounds and pools under the 
direction of a committee of five 
aldermen appointed by the Mayor. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

During 1941, a new flood-light- 
ing system was installed at the 
White Park hockey rink. This 
equipment, which is made up of 
eight 1,500 watt reflector type 
lights, is equal to that used at any 
outdoor college rink in the East. 
The lighting equipment was in- 
stalled as an accident prevention 
measure and its use during the past 
year has definitely proved its worth. 

At the East Concord Playground, 
all of the heavy apparatus such as 
swings, teeters and slide were 
moved to a more desirable location 
on the playground. 

A large feeder pipe was installed 
in the wading pool at Rollins Park 
to replace a small unsatisfactory 
main. Water can now be returned 
to the pool after the weekly clean- 
ings with the minimum of delay. 
This improvement was a boon to 
the children of the neighborhood 
who patronize the pool regularly 
during the hot summer months. 

ACTIVITIES 

During the summer of 1941, the 
playgrounds and pools were kept in 
continual operation from the mid- 
dle of June until early in Septem- 
ber. Activities at all playgrounds 
were conducted in accordance with 
a supervised and systematized rec- 
reational program which included 
more than 70 inter-playground 



28 



City of Concord 



contests. As in former years, base- 
ball, basketball and volleyball com- 
petition proved popular with chil- 
dren in all age groups. Horseshoe 
pitching continued to hold the in- 
terest of both young and old; throw- 
ing pits at many of the playgrounds 
were in continuous use from dawn 
to dusk. Tennis was another sport 
which attracted many people to the 
playgrounds. 

The work done by the children 
who participated in the playground 
handicraft activities exceeded ex- 
pectations. Unfortunately the hand- 
icraft program had to be cut 
drastically due to the limited appro- 
priation allocated for this purpose. 

As usual, the all-day outings to 
nearby lakes proved very popular 
to the juvenile population. It is 
interesting to note that a large pro- 
portion of the children who partici- 
pated in these excursions came 
from families who were financially 
unable to provide this type of 
recreation for their children. 

Once again the annual play- 
ground field day was held at Rolfe 
Park in Penacook. This event which 
climaxes the summer play season 
was well attended and competition 
in the sports events was keen. The 
annual water carnival at the Broken 
Bridge swimming area was also 
held. 

During the winter season, skat- 
ing, sliding and hockey areas were 
maintained in various sections of 
the city. Due to the fact that each 
snow storm was followed by some 
rain, considerable difficulty was 
experienced in maintaining good 
ice conditions. The pond at White 
Park was used for skating a total of 
71 days during the past winter. 




Duffer's huh! The municipal golf course at 

Beaver Meadow offers a variety of interesting 

hazards to the golfing public 




*Hbi 



The ski jump at Russell Pond attracts 
the more courageous of the winter sports fans 

The track facilities at Memorial Field are 
among the best in New Hampshire 




ATTENDANCE 

During the summer season, the 
total checked attendance at play- 
grounds and pools was 82,540. This 
figure represented a 13 per cent 
decrease from the 94,425 total of 
the preceding year. The decline in 
attendance appears to have re- 
sulted from the fact that many of 
the older boys and girls who fre- 
quented the playgrounds in previ- 
ous years have found employment. 

. . . Special Facilities 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Leigh S. Hall 
Carleton R. Metcalf 
Hon. John W. Storrs 
1941 Expenditure $6,102.16 



During the past year, sporls con- 
tinued to hold their position as an 
important phase of community life 
in Concord. Special recreational 
facilities for young and old are pro- 
vided by the public golf links in 
West Concord, by spacious Memo- 
rial Athletic Field off South Fruit 
Street and by the Russell Pond 
Winter Sports Area two miles wesl 
of the city proper. Control of these 
projects is invested in the City 
Recreation Commission, a five-man 
group which is composed of the 
Mayor, ex-officio. and four mem- 
bers appointed by the Mayor from 
outside the Aldermanic Board. 

BEAVER MEADOW GOLF COURSE 

The year 1941 was a notable one 
in the history of the municipal golf 
club, one of the most progressive 



organizations of its kind in the 
state. Through the formation of a 
"Country Club" within the munic- 
ipal membership, Beaver Meadow 
won admittance to the New Hamp- 
shire Golf Association, thereby for 
the first time in history making its 
players eligible for participation in 
all tournaments sponsored by the 
N.H.G.A. 

Situated on the outskirts of the 
city, near the Daniel Webster 
Highway where it is easily access- 
ible to tourists, the public course 
is operated by the Commission 
through a manager and two outside 
employees who work seven months 
a year. Last year the club had 135 
regular season members. One-day 
fees paid by non-members totalled 
1,656, which compared favorably 
with the preceding year's record. 

A rebirth of interest in tennis at 
the club court was evidenced by the 
fact that one-day tennis fees to- 
talled 210. The golf membership 
was slightly under the 1940 figure, 
but still above the 1939 mark. 

MEMORIAL FIELD 

This 11 -acre sports area, located 
in the western section of the City, 
again was the focal point of Con- 
cord's scholastic athletic events. 
Here the Mid-State League Track 
Meet, successor to the Kiwanis 
State Games, was held in the Spring 
on the fivc-laps-to-the mile running 
track and adjacent strips for pole- 
vaulting, jumping and weight- 
throwing. 

After a successful debut in 1940, 
night football continued to enjoy 
great popularity. Uniformly large 
crowds turned out to watch the 
high school eleven in three contests 



30 



City of Concord 



•» 








pi 



:--ia^ 



t 



/.\ typical of any week night Sunset Leag 

under artificial lighting. The grid- 
iron, inside the cinder path, rates as 
one of the finest available for inter- 
scholastic combat in New Hamp- 
shire. 

In the summer months the six 
tennis courts provided adequate 
facilities for large numbers of en- 
thusiasts and, as usual, supplied an 
ideal site for the annual State 
Closed Championships under 
U.S.L.T.A. sponsorship. 

The grounds, where a caretaker 
is on duty daily throughout three 
seasons of the year, were also 
utilized by softball teams, Concord 
High's girls field hockey squad, and 
various semi-professional football 
clubs. 

RUSSELL POND "SNOW BOWL" 

For the third consecutive year, 
this winter sports center near Pena- 
cook Lake enabled ski devotees to 



dest sports attractions. This viev 
lame at the White Park diamond 



indulge their taste for downhill 
racing, open-slope running and ski- 
jumping without being forced to 
make long trips by train or auto. 

The Concord Ski and Outing 
Club conducted another very suc- 
cessful winter carnival late in the 
season, when a new hill record was 
established during the ski meet on 
the 30-meter jump. Sanctioned by 
the Eastern Amateur Ski Associa- 
tion, the event attracted some of the 
best collegiate and amateur club 
skiers in this section and proved one 
of the highlights of the city's year- 
round sports program. 

There are trails at Russell's for 
beginners, intermediates and ex- 
perts, two open slopes and a ski-tow 
in addition to the jumping tower. 
The City Recreation Commission 
also maintains a caretaker at the 
"Ski Bowl" during the winter 
months. 



Annual Repori 



31 



PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Oliver Jenkins, President 
Henry B. Cannon, Jr. 
Joseph J. Comi 
Edward A. Dame 
Mrs. Armine M. Ingham 
William B. McInnis 
Perley B. Phillips 
George W. Randall 
Alexander Rennie, Jr. 



Marion F. Holt 



Librarian 



1941 Expenditure $25,853.13 



CIRCULATION 

During the past year, the second 
of operation in its new building, the 
Concord Public Library circulated 
196,440 books. This number fell 
more than 20,000 short of 1940's 
all-time record. Although some of 
this decrease can be attributed to 
the natural lessening of public in- 
terest in the new library structure, 
most of the loss is the result of con- 
ditions growing out of the nation's 
defense and wartime activities. A 
noticeable reduction in the number 
of library users has taken place be- 
cause of the emigration of families, 
members of which have accepted 
employment in centers of war in- 
dustry. A further factor in this re- 
duction is the large number of Con- 
cord citizens who have joined the 
country's armed forces. Also of im- 
portance is the apparent decrease 
in the amount of time that the 
reading public is devoting to books. 
The demands which the expanding 
defense training and civilian de- 
fense programs are making on the 



public's leisure time, are largely 
responsible for this trend. 

BOOK COLLECTION AND BORROWERS 

The library added 4,185 books to 
its collection during the year and 
discarded 2,584 volumes. This 
leaves the total number of books at 
47,053. The library's registration 
showed 17,065 borrowers at the 
close of 1941. Of this number, 
2,483 were children below the sev- 
enth grade. A total of 1,688 new 
borrowers was recorded during the 
past year. 

CHILDREN'S ACTIVITY 

Increased activity for children 
highlighted the library's service to 
the public in 1941. In this connec- 
tion, the children's department 
opened branches in the Conant and 
Garrison Schools where a chil- 
dren's librarian and an assistant 
were in attendance one morning 
each week. This arrangement, 
whereby the library supplies the 
books and personnel and the school 
district supplies transportation and 
book space, may soon be extended 
to service all elementary schools in 
the outlying districts. 

A course in library instruction 
for the sixth grade students of the 
Walker School was conducted once 
a week in the children's room of the 
library. The purpose of this course 
was to develop greater efficiency in 
the use of the library by school 
children. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S PROGRAM 

As a part of the vocational guid- 
ance program of the public schools, 
200 students of the Parker School 
completed a course in the use of the 



3 2 



City of Concord 



library under the tutelage of the 
library staff. 

In line with the program of 
"bringing the library to the reader," 
a book room is maintained at the 
Parker School. Once a week this 
room is open to school children, 
who, because they travel by bus, 
are unable to use the facilities of the 
main library. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

Four branch libraries — in Pena- 
cook, West Concord, East Con- 
cord, and Concord Heights — were 
operated during the year. Keeping 
these branches supplied with books 
has given rise to a crying need for 
better transportation facilities be- 
tween these outposts and the main 
library. Present transportation 
practices are totally unsatisfactory 
in meeting the demand for turn- 
over of books. 

It seems highly desirable that the 
library's policy of providing "the 
right book for the right person at 



"II hen people are burning 
books in other parts of the world, 
we ought to be distributing them 
with greater vigor, for books are 
among our best allies in the fight 
to make democracy work." 

— JOHN STUDEBAK.ER 



the right time" should be expanded 
by the acquisition of a bookmobile 
to be used to cover various sections 
of the city now without library serv- 
ice. A bookmobile would also solve 
the problem of branch library 
transportation. 

CONCORD ROOM 

In April, a member of the staff 
was placed in charge of the Con- 
cord Room on a part time basis in 
order that Concord material would 
be more readily available to the 
public. 

The collection of local history is 
growing steadily and should prove 
a valuable asset to the community. 



This Christmas story hour in the children's room of Concordes modern library 
represents but one <>f the many attraction* which the city offers to its young citizens 








These are only a small part of 8,000 books 

which the library collected and sent to the 

armed forces during 1941 



The work of arranging and catalog- 
ing of the many books, pamphlets, 
maps and pictures is progressing 
rapidly. 

REFERENCE ACTIVITY 

Student use of the library's refer- 
ence facilities showed a marked in- 
crease in 1941. More than 8,000 
questions submitted by the public 
were answered. 

During the year, many long-felt 
needs of the reference department 
were remedied. A considerable 
amount of new reference material 
was acquired to help in answering 
the numerous questions directed to 
this service. 



WAR INFORMATION 

Through the medium of Library 
War Information, a monthly serv- 
ice conducted by the Executive Of- 
fice of the President, the Public 
Library is building a collection of 
government publications that cov- 
ers many phases of the national war 
effort. Non-technical in presenta- 
tion, this material is a source of 
much valuable information to the 
reading public. Posters covering 
new releases are given prominent 
display space in the entry of the 
library. 

VICTORY BOOKS 

The library participated actively 
in the victory book campaign col- 
lecting recreational reading for the 
men in the armed forces. More 
than 6,000 books, gifts from Con- 
cord citizens, were gathered, sorted, 
packed and sent to the men in serv- 
ice. Books are still being collected 
and it is expected that this work 
will be a part of the library's 
program for the duration of the 
war. 

From September, 1940, up to the 
time of the outbreak of the war, the 
library, of its own accord, made 
monthly shipments of books to 
Concord men stationed at Texas 
training camps. During this period, 
more than 2,000 books were shipped 
to the local regiment. 

OPERATING COSTS 

The total cost of operating the 
library system in 1941 was $25,- 
853.13. Of this amount, $7,700.33 
was derived from income from trust 
funds and $822.00 from receipts 
from book fines. 



34 



City of Concord 



W.P.A. 



PRO] E C T C: O M MITTEE 
Charles J. McKee, Chun man 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William A. Stevens 



Howard E. Stevens 
1941 Expend in ki 



Coordinator 

. S5S.778.26 



The number of persons employed 
on W.P.A. construction projects 
sponsored by the City of Concord 
showed a further decrease during 
1941. As the result of the upward 
trend of private employment, the 
average number employed on proj- 
ect work decreased from 200 in 
1940 to 150 during the past year. 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

During the year, 12,436 feet of 
storm and sanitary sewers were laid 
in various parts of the city. In con- 
nection with this work. 58 man- 
holes and 60 catchbasins were con- 
structed. At the w^ading pools in 
Penacook and Concord Plains, the 
old board walks were removed and 
five-foot concrete walks were built 
around the bathing areas. At Rol- 
lins Park, a 75-foot addition to the 
old pool was constructed. 

Wall projects completed during 
the year include 846 feet of ashlar 
wall at West Concord village and 
346 feet of seamed-face wall along 
South Main and Merrimack Streets 



in Penacook. A 200-foot seam-faced 
wall is now being constructed on 
the north side of Palm Street. A 
total of 7,258 feet of curbing was set 
at 25 different locations. 

Four road work projects were 
undertaken in 1941. A limited 
amount of roadside improvement 
was accomplished on the West 
Parish Road. Late in the year, the 
widening and straightening of Cem- 
etery Street in East Concord was 
started and work is progressing on 
this project at the present time. At 
the intersection of Bow, Carter and 
South Streets, the road surface of 
the discontinued part of Bow 
Street was removed. As a part ot 
this project, Corriveau Park was 
moved from the north side to the 
south side of Carter Street. The en- 
tire area was regraded. seeded and 
suitably landscaped. On South 
Street, the Bow Brook culvert was 
extended a distance of about 100 
feet with 60-inch reinforced con- 
crete pipe. In the process, a consid- 
erable amount of filling was done at 
the north end of the Deer Park 
ravine. A greatly improved entrance 
to South Street from Bow Street 
was accomplished by this project. 

COST TO CITY 

It cost the City of Concord $55,- 
778.26 to sponsor W.P.A. projects 
during 1941. Figured on the basis 
of the average employment of 150, 
the cost per W.P.A. worker was 
about $371. 



of the W.P.A. intersection mi/irorement project at Carter, Bow and South Streets 



RELIEF 



CITY RELIEF BOARD 

Ralph L. Stearns, Chairman 
John W. Stanley 
Arthur F. Sturtevant 

Frank C. Gilbert Overseer of Poor 

Charles P. Coaki.ey Overseer of Pour, 

U'artl 7 

1941 Expenditures: 

City $50,727.49 

Pcnacook $5,316.71 



During the past year, the impetus 
of defense activity speeded up em- 
ployment and effected a consider- 
able reduction in the number of 
relief recipients. However, the im- 
provement in employment by no 
means solved the manifold prob- 
lems of the Relief Department. 
Constantly changing conditions 
greatly increased the amount of ac- 
tive supervision required of the 
department's staff. To a large de- 
gree, this added effort offset the 
reduction in case work resulting 
from the drop in the total number 
of persons on relief. 

With opportunities for work 
opening up on all sides, the public 
as a whole is becoming more criti- 
cal of relief. Why people are still on 
relief at a time like this is a question 
that is asked repeatedly. Unfor- 
tunately, a large part of the local 
relief roll is made up of unemploy- 
ables. 1 1 is important to note that 
the war economy is not making old 
people young; neither is it making 
dependent children less dependent. 
The sick, the infirm and the dis- 
abled are not immediately finding a 
new source of health. People who 



are mentally disturbed are not in- 
stantly becoming sound of mind in 
a world which overnight became 
more completely confused. In short, 
the war is not a cure-all for social 
maladjustment. 



DUAL FUNCTION AND ORGANIZATION 

In addition to administering to 
the needs of City relief persons, the 
Relief Department, acting as the 
agent of Merrimack County, super- 
vises all County cases in Concord. 
This dual arrangement disposes of 
the necessity of maintaining two 
separate offices and eliminates the 
possibility of a duplication of ef- 
fort. The County reimburses the 
City for its share of administrative 
costs as well as for expenditures in- 
curred in providing for the needs of 
county indigents. 

The internal organization of the 
Relief Department makes provision 
for two Overseers of Poor, one for 
Penacook and one for the City 
Proper including all outlying sec- 
tions of the city exclusive of Ward 
One. Each Overseer has complete 
jurisdiction over all city and county 
cases within his district. 



RELIEF LOAD 

The direct relief case load showed 
a definite improvement in 1941. 
The average number of city relief 
cases was 99. This number repre- 
sented a 29.8 per cent decrease 
from the 1940 total. In direct con- 
trast to the 1939 1940 reduction, 
this improvement was not accom- 
plished by means of the law which 
makes a five-year relief case a 
county responsibility. During 1941, 



36 



Cify of Concord 



a 2K.4 per cent reduction was ef- 
fected in the average number of 
county cases in Concord; 217 such 
cases were recorded as against 289 
for the previous year. 

Altogether, the average number 
of Concord persons on relief in 1 94 1 
was 1,174 or 456 less than the aver- 
age for 1940. The average number 
of families receiving direct assist- 
ance was 237. 



RELIEF COSTS 

The total cost of relief in Concord 
was $163,876.94 in 1941. This sum 
was $32,382.86 less than the amount 
expended in 1940. City relief costs 
dropped from $70,708.68 in 1940 
to $56,044.20 in 1941. County ex- 
penditures in Concord decreased 
from $125,551.12 to $107,832.74 



during the same period. Of the 
total sum expended by the Relief 
Department, $21,350.86 or 13 per 
cent went toward administration. 
The average expenditure for each 
relief person amounted to about 
$140.00 during 1941. 



SEWING PROJECT 

The W.P.A. sewing project spon- 
sored jointly by the City and 
County through the Relief Depart- 
ment was continued during the 
year. This project which occupied 
quarters in the discontinued Cogs- 
well School, employed about 17 
women. A considerable part of the 
clothing which the department dis- 
tributed to relief and border-line 
families was made by the sewing 
project. 



ItnER CONCORD 
PEOPLE APE ON PELIEF 












^| 191 1 




1570 




^A 1630 




31 ° 










«! ° 


gi o 




1174 

ft 


1938 


1939 


1940 


1941 



Annual Report 



37 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 



POLICE COMMISSION 

Daniel Shea, Chairman 
George A. Hill 
Guv A. Swenson 
Victor I. Moore Chief of Police 

J. Edward Silva Deputy Chief of Police 

Burton L. Bailey Police Clerk 

1941 Expenditures 

Operation $67,112.20 

Traffic Lights $2,134.48 



FUNCTION 

It is the duty of the personnel of 
the Police Department to prevent 
the commission of offenses against 
the laws of the State and the ordi- 
nances and regulations of the City 
of Concord. It is the further duty of 
the department to observe and en- 
force these laws, ordinances and 
regulations and to detect and arrest 
all persons violating the same. The 
Police Department is also charged 
with the responsibility of preserving- 
good order in the city by protecting 
its citizens from violence and safe- 
guarding property from injury. 

PERSONNEL 

No significant changes were 
made in the personnel during 1941; 
the police force was made up of 51 
men of whom 27 were regularly 



employed and 24 were special offi- 
cers available when called. One 
new patrolmen was appointed in 
September. 

COST TO CITY 

The City Government appropri- 
ated $67,689 for the maintenance 
of the department during 1 941 . Ex- 
penditures were in excess of this 
amount by $1,557.68. Police De- 
partment earnings amounted to 
$1,004.84. This income was cred- 
ited to the department for use 
against its overdraft. 

CRIME DATA 

A noticeable decrease in the 
number of felonies committed oc- 
curred during 1941. Of 87 felonies 
reported to the department, 13 
were found to have no basis. 

The accompanying tabulation 
indicates that 41, or 55 per cent, of 
the total number of felonies com- 
mitted in Concord were cleared. 

STOLEN PROPERTY 

During 1941, property valued at 
$7,682.45 was stolen. The depart- 
ment succeeded in recovering 64 
per cent of this amount. Of the 12 
automobiles stolen during the year, 
ten were recovered. Five of these 
cases were cleared by arrest. 

MISDEMEANORS 

Of the more common lesser 
offenses, arrests were made as fol- 



Classifkation oj Offenses, 

( Iriminal I Lomicide 

Rape 

Robbery 

Aggravated Assault 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny 

Auto Theft 

Total 

38 ' < > City of Concord 



Offenses, Cleared Ac lire 












7 


6 


1 




1 



1 






99 


18 


4 


32 


11 


21 


12 


5 


7 



33 



lows: 214 for drunkenness. 22 for 
operating a motor vehicle while 
under the influence of intoxicants, 
six for simple assault, three for 
fraud and embezzlement, six for 
sex offenses, seven for offenses 
against the family and children, 
and 497 for violations of the road 
and driving laws. 

TRAFFIC SAFETY 

Due to a fatal auto accident in 
West Concord last summer, the 
citizens of that section circulated a 
petition which was later placed be- 
fore the City Government asking 
for the establishment of a daytime 
police patrol in West Concord. 
Additional funds were made avail- 
able for the purpose of providing 
better traffic control and a cruis- 
ing car was assigned to patrol not 
only the Ward Three section but 
other sections as well. As a part oi 
this program, large ''25 Miles An 
Hour" speed signs were erected un- 
der the direction of the State High- 
way Safety Department on all the 



trunk line routes entering the city. 
During the last four months of the 
year, 426 arrests were made for 
violation of speeding regulations. 
Although the department was sub- 
jected to much criticism and ridi- 
cule by people living in and outside 
of the City, the strict enforcement 
program was very effective in 
providing greater highway traffic 
safety. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

During the year, a two-way radio 
was installed in the night cruiser 
used for continuous patrol in Pena- 
cook. As a result, the citizens of 
Ward One now have the same 
up-to-date protection afforded resi- 
dents of the City Proper. 

Traffic lights of the latest type 
were installed at the intersections of 
North State Street and School 
Street, and North State Street and 
Centre Street. Since these lights 
have been in operation, a notice- 
able decrease has occurred in traffic 
congestion at these intersections. 



The newly organized auxiliary police force is In, 
police practices. Members of the force are shown rt 



trainer/ in standard 
ing fust aid training 




V 




For the first time since the new 
ambulance was purchased more 
than a year ago, it has been placed 
at the disposal of all the citizens of 
the City. Previously, its use was 
limited to emergency and indigent 
cases. The demands made upon the 
departmen t's ambulance service has 
increased tremendously as the re- 
sult of this new policy. 

The efficiency of the depart- 
ment's photographic branch was 
increased by the purchase of a new 
all-purpose camera. A dark room 
has been established at headquar- 
ters and the department is now 
handling its own developing and 
printing. The use of photographs 
as an aid in prosecuting criminal 
cases is becoming an important 
phase of police work. By doing its 
own photography, a saving will 
accrue which will more than offset 
the cost of the department's new 
equipment. 

JUNIOR POLICE 

A Junior Police League has been 
organized and placed under the 
direction of a police officer. The 
membership of this organization is 
limited to 40 boys between the ages 
of ten and 16. The purpose of this 
organization is to impart to these 
youths a better understanding of 
what constitute punishable offenses, 
to prevent by guidance the com- 
mission of the common juvenile 

( Top) The efficiency of the Police Department 
is increased greatly by this recently installed 
filing system. {Center) Life saving is an im- 
portant part of police work. In the event of a 
drowning accident, the department is equipped 
with modern inhalating apparatus. (Left) 
(.'//tiling cars failed in restricted zones is 
facilitated by the use of this mi it or dispatch car 



misdemeanors, and to enlist support 
of the members in discouraging 
other youths from participating in 
unlawful acts. These boys are given 
basic instructions in the funda- 
mentals of first-aid, physical culture 
and citizenship. The organization's 
program also includes military drill, 
sports and various types of instruc- 
tive training. 



AUXILIARY POLICE 

In cooperation with the various 
national defense agencies, the de- 
partment has organized an auxili- 
ary police force consisting of about 
75 men. This group will augment 
the regular and special policemen 
during blackouts and other emer- 
gencies. Members of the Auxiliary 
Force are being given intensive 
training in police procedure, de- 
fense measures and first aid. 



RECOMMENDATIONS 

The need for a juvenile detention 
room is still paramount. Under the 
present arrangement, the City is 
subject to violations of the stringent 
provisions of the State law relating 
to the detention of juveniles. There 
is no place at the Police Station 
other than the cells in the main cell 
block where a person can be con- 
fined for any length of time. This 
method of detention of juveniles is 
definitely prohibited by State stat- 
utes. Serious consideration has been 
given to the matter and a plan has 
been prepared to construct a deten- 
tion room at a minimum of expense 
to the City. Further action awaits 
authorization from the Board of 
Aldermen. 



With the modernization ol the 
department's motorized equipment 
and the adoption of two-way radio 
communication, the sub-station at 
Penacook has outlived its useful- 
ness. Equal, if not greater, protec- 
tion could be provided the citizens 
of Ward One if the so-called Pena- 
cook Department was handled di- 
rectly from headquarters. Such 
a consolidation would result in 
greater interdepartmental efficiency. 
A desk could be maintained at the 
Penacook Station, probably in the 
basement, and the remainder of the 
building might well be utilized for 
some other purpose. 

The increased use of photogra- 
phy, ballistics, laboratory analysis 
and detailed records in local police 
work has created an urgent need 
for more floor space at headquar- 
ters. Sufficient space to meet the 
department's expanded needs is 
available at the police station in 
rooms now occupied by the clinics. 
It is recommended that other pro- 
visions be made for the clinics and 
that these rooms be placed at the 
disposal of the Police Department. 



The Policr Department provides the services oj 

an officer for the safety of school children flow- 
ing Concord's most heavily traveled highway 




PROBATION 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judge William L. Stevens 
Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 
1941 Expenditure $1,510.36 



The work of the Probation Officer 
is conducted under the direction of 
the Judge of the Municipal Court. 
Although the Probation Depart- 
ment's activities are thereby closely 
connected with an agency of law, 
its program is geared to construc- 
tive, corrective and protective rather 
than punitive measures. 

In order to accomplish its pur- 
pose — the rebuilding of impres- 
sionable delinquents and the read- 
justment of human relationships in 
the family — the department has 
emphasized the social and educa- 
tional approach in dealing with its 
cases. 



The department had 42 juvenile 
cases under surveillance at the start 



of the year. Twenty-eight new cases 
were added during 1941. During 
the same period, 1 5 juveniles were 
honorably discharged and three 
were dismissed. Six children were 
committed to the State Industrial 
School, while five were placed in 
the custody of the State Welfare 
Department. Four youths violated 
probation requirements. 

During the year, the department 
investigated five cases involving 
neglected children. In two in- 
stances, children were placed in in- 
stitutions because of unfavorable 
home conditions. 

Two adult cases carried over 
from 1940 were dismissed during 
the year. Eight persons were placed 
in working positions and one was 
committed to the county farm. 

RECOMMENDATION 

Effective probation work depends 
to a large degree on check-ups and 
contacts. The Probation Officer is 
therefore obliged to travel exten- 
sively in the execution of his work. 
Serious consideration should be 
given to an increase in the depart- 
ment's transportation allowance. 




42 



City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 



Wilf.iam L. Stevens 
Peter J. King 
John W. Stanley 
1941 Expenditure. . 



Judgi 

Special Judge 

Clerk 

. . .$2,900.00 



The Municipal Court, which serves 
the City of Concord and nearby 
towns where there are no police 
courts, is a tribunal of first resort in 
all criminal cases. It has original 
jurisdiction in all such cases, sub- 
ject to further appeal, where the 
punishment does not exceed a fine 
of $500 or imprisonment of one 
year, or both. When the crime is of 
a more serious classification, the 
case is forwarded to the Superior 
Court. In such of these cases where 
bail is permissible, the amount of 
surety for appearance before the 
higher court is established by the 
Judge of the Municipal Court. 

In civil cases, the Municipal 
Court has concurrent jurisdiction 
with the Superior Court when the 
damages petitioned for are not in 
excess of $500 and when the owner- 
ship of real estate is not in question. 
Cases involving juvenile offenders 
and dependent and delinquent chil- 
dren are also within the sphere of 
the court's authority. 

SESSIONS 

Criminal sessions are held every 
weekday at 10:00 a.m. Civil actions 
may be entered on the last Satur- 
day of each month or at such special 
times as the court may order. In all 
cases relating to juveniles, special 



sessions arc held at a time and 
place designated by the Judge. 
These sessions, which arc conducted 
in strict privacy, are not held in the 
regular court room. 

CASES TRIED 

During the year 1941, the num- 
ber of criminal cases handled by 
the court was 1601. This represents 
an increase of 201 over the total for 
the previous year. Most of these 
criminal cases pertained to viola- 
tions of traffic regulations and 
motor vehicle laws, and were prose- 
cuted by the Police Department. 

Civil cases before the court, ex- 
clusive of cases under the small 
claims law, numbered 165. In 
addition to these, the court tried 
1 1 1 small claims cases and 25 
juvenile cases. 

REVENUE AND COSTS 

During the year, the court col- 
lected fines, costs and sundry fees 
totaling $9,151.25. This sum. which 
exceeded 1940 collections by more 
than $2,700, was the largest ever 
collected in the history of the court. 
The increase can be attributed al- 
most entirely to the increased num- 
ber of motor vehicle law and traffic 
regulation violations. Motor vehicle 
lines, which the court is required by 
law to turn over to the Commis- 
sioner of Motor Vehicles, amounted 
to $4,567.40, or $1,591.25 more 
than the total collected in 1940. 
After deducting current expendi- 
tures and transfers, the sum of $4,- 
353.78 was paid to the City Treas- 
urer. A statement of receipts and 
expenditures of the Municipal 
Court is presented in the appendix 
of this report. 



Annual Report 



43 



Tj 1 T "D T7 number, 540 were still alarms and 

-*- ■*■ A ^ *~^ 58 were box alarms. Although the 

-pv -pv >^ r-pi t--< y^ rp t /^ "\T number of box alarms was 20 more 

X ICvJ 1 £jK^ 1 lvJIM than the total for 1940. the aggre- 

////r/// gate number of alarms was three 

less than the total for the previous 
FIRE BOARD . 

Charles P. Coakley, Chairman 

Clarence L. Clark 

Harold D. Merrill FIRE LOSS 

Robert W. Potter 

The fire loss for 1941 was $39,- 

William T. Happnv Fire Chief on , „ , . , „.,..,-. _.„, ,„ 

286.22 as compared with S22.296.62 
Michael J. Martin „,. ,. 

, i7 _,_ />/w/r C/w/.v f or the preceding; year. Almost all 

Cornelius W. O Brien J r & / 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief of this increase was due to a num- 

1941 Expenditure $76,028.05 ber of incendiary fires. Insurance 

amounting to $31,612.92 was paid 
on the total loss. The net loss for the 

The City of Concord maintains a Y ear was $7,673.30. An analysis of 

Fire Department. This is a simple thc 1941 fire loss is presented in the 

statement of fact. Nothing to get accompanying; table, 
excited about; nothing that has not 

been taken for granted for years. FIRE PREVENTION 

Not so today. Modern warfare, es- The most sensible plan of attack 
pecially the use of the incendiary of fire losses is through prevention, 
bomb, has brought home to the In order to achieve the desired re- 
average citizen, as no one thing has suit, the department endeavors by 
ever done before, the need for ade- means of education and by rigorous 
quate fire fighting facilities. Utmost inspection of buildings to eliminate 
efficiency is demanded of the fire fire hazards and to make certain of 
force. On this point, there is no the adequacy of fire protection de- 
cause for alarm; the Fire Depart- vices. 

ment stands ready to meet every During the year many fire haz- 

emergency with the same effective- ards were corrected as the result of 

ncss it has demonstrated in the past. more than 2,900 inspections of 

public and private buildings. 

FIRES Continuing the practice of previ- 

During 1941, the Fire Depart- ous years, the department has co- 

ment answered 598 alarms. Of this operated with the school authorities 

Value Loss Insurance Ins. Paid Net Loss 

Buildings $430,400.00 $23,567.68 $317,850.00 $18,247.68 $5,320.00 

Contents 177,172.98 15,718.54 169,905.00 13,365.24 2,353.30 

Total $607,572.98 $39,286.22 $487,755.00 $31,612.92 $7,673.30 

44 ' ' ' City of Concord 



in the conduct of frequent fire drills 
in the public schools. In connection 
with the schools, special instructions 
have been given in fire prevention. 



ORGANIZATION 

No changes were effected during 
the year in the size and organiza- 
tion of the permanent Fire Depart- 
ment personnel. Twenty-four men 
make up the regular force. In 
addition to these, there are 174 
call men on the department's roster. 

The fire force is organized into 
two engine and ladder companies, 
six engine companies, a ladder 
company and a hose company. 



AUXILIARY FORCE 

Through the establishment of an 
auxiliary fire force, the department 
is actively participating in the 
civilian defense program. Approxi- 
mately 100 men have been recruited 
for this service. These auxiliary 
members are receiving the same fire 
training course which the depart- 
ment prescribes for its regular men. 
The volunteer force has been di- 
vided into three companies, one of 
which is located at the Penacook 
Fire Station. These men will be 
called on for duty only in case of 
unusual emergency. 



In connection with civilian defense, Concord citizens were treated to a demonstration 

of deluge-gun operations by the Fire Department. This picture shows the large 

crowd which turned out to witness the event 






APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

The department's apparatus in- 
cludes 13 fire trucks, two cars and 
a service truck. These are housed 
in six fire stations, four of which 
are located in the suburbs. A new 
service truck was purchased during 
the year. 

The department is equipped with 
1 8,200 feet of two and one-half inch 
fire hose and 2,200 of three-quarter 
inch booster hose. 



NEW EQUIPMENT 

During the year, a new fire 
whistle was purchased to replace 
the tower striker at the Central 
Fire Station. This whistle has been 
placed in operation. 

Two new alarm boxes were 
added to the fire alarm system dur- 
ing 1941. 



RECOMMENDATION 

In order that the department's 
high standard of efficiency may be 
maintained, serious consideration 
should be given to the replacement 
of aged fire trucks. A program of 
annual replacement is suggested to 
obviate the necessity of mass pur- 
chase in the near future. 



{Top) This switchboard located at the Central 

Stall mi is the nerve centei of the city's fire alarm 
system. {Center) This compressor furnishes air 
in operate the newly installed fire whistle at 
Central Station. {Left) The mechanisms of all 
/tie ahum boxes are inspected ami tested once 

a inniit/i 



Fire Hydrants 



BOARD OF 
HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
William T. Happnv 
Percy R. Sanders 

l'Ml Expenditure Vone 



The municipal fire hydrant serv- 
ice is under the control of a Board 
of Commissioners made up of the 
Superintendent of Water Works, 
the Fire Chief and the City En- 
gineer. It is the duty of this board 
to prescribe the character and 
location of all new fire hydrants 
installed in the city, and to effect 
such changes in existing facilities as 
they may deem necessary for the 
maintenance of adequate fire pro- 
tection. 

During 1941. the Board of Hy- 
drant Commissioners ordered the 
installation of three new public 
hydrants — one in Penacook and 
two in the City Proper. The total 
number of public hydrants was 
thereby increased to 687. 

Two private hydrants were dis- 
continued during the year. The 
number of these services in use as of 
December 31, 1941, was 111. 








Hundreds of broken toys, donated by Concord 

citizens, were reconditioned by firemen at the 
Central Station foi Christmas distribution to 

needy children 




Members of the Fire Department on way to 
Annual Memorial Servict I 





WEIGHTS and 
MEASURES 



George W. Wilde 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
1 941 Expenditures . ' $909 . 44 



All gas pumps in the city are tested regularly 
by the City Sealer 



GEORGE A. DEARBORN 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 
1927 — 1941 



neither the vendor or the vendee 
will gain or suffer in respect to the 
quantity involved in a transaction. 

Before making a purchase, the 
public should make it a point to 
sec that the merchant's scale dis- 
plays the department's seal. Fur- 
thermore, the customer has a right 
to demand that the measuring 
device is so placed that the weight 
indicator is clearly visible. It is the 
duty of the vendor to tell the pur- 
chaser the actual weight he is being 
charged for. The time-worn state- 
ment "a little more or less than a 
pound" is not legal and should not 
be accepted. 

The public is encouraged to 
check the weight of pre-packed 
commodities especially vegetables 
in order to make sure that the 
weight marked on the package is 
correctly stated. 



It is the duly of the Sealer of ACTIVITY 

Weights and Measures to examine The following tabulation pre- 

scales and measuring-devices to as- sents a summary of the depart- 

certain their accuracy so that ment's activities during 1941. 



Scales 

Weights 

Liquid Measures . , 

Pumps 

Grease Dispensers . 

Oil Bottles 

Dry Measures . . . . 

Packages 

Coal 

( !ai i Bodies 

Yardsticks 

* I Fnderweight 



Correct 

566 
862 
160 

262 
102 

497 
8 

666 
7 
13 

104 



Adjusted Condemned Condemned for Repairs Idle 
135 17 31 1 

6 
3 
25 .. 15 20 



48 



City of Concord 



BUILDING 
ACTIVITY 



Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 
1941 Expenditure Vone 



It is the duty of the Inspector of 
Buildings to pass on all plans and 
specifications relating' to proposed 
construction to determine whether 
such structures measure up to 
the requirements of the municipal 
building code. After a permit has 
been issued, it is the further duty of 
the inspector to make periodic 
checks during the various stages of 
construction to see that the work 
is carried out in accordance with 
the terms of the permit. 

PERMITS AND VALUATIONS 

Although pre-war restrictions 
on the procurement of materials 
slowed down building activity con- 
siderably, 169 permits were issued 
for various types of construction 
during 1941. This number was two 
more than the total issued during 
the previous year. However, the 
estimated value of the work cov- 
ered by these permits was $394,105 



or approximately $50,000 less than 
that of 1940. Of the total number 
of permits issued, 80 were for new 
buildings and 89 were for altera- 
tions, additions and repairs. 

Permits for new structures, hav- 
ing an estimated construction cost 
of $277,540, showed a valuation 
decrease of 27 per cent on the basis 
of the 1940 total figure of $379,550. 
The new Dame School, valued at 
$67,000, represented nearly one- 
fourth of the total value of new 
construction projects. 

The valuation of permits for al- 
terations and additions for 1941 was 
$116,565 or almost double the 
1940 figure of $63,715. 

NEW DWELLING UNITS 

During the year, 58 permits were 
issued for new dwelling units. 
Thirty-nine of these represented 
single family residences. The num- 
ber of new units was only four less 
than the total for 1940. 

THE FUTURE 

There is every indication that 
private building activity will be 
reduced to a bare minimum during 
the coming year as the result of the 
diversion of most of the necessary 
building materials and much of the 
city's skilled labor into war pro- 
duction channels. 



This 



'he 



a view of some of the new homes recently constructed 
rapidly-growing South End section of the city 



,# 



n u ii ii m 



1 I|P^_ 



i illl I 

m « mt 



T„" 



sJL Ki$ 




ZONING 
APPEALS 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Henry P. Callahan, Chairman 

John S. Corbett 

A. Clifford Hudson 

Eugene F. Magenau 

Donald G. Matson 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk 

1941 Expenditure $260.20 



Next to his family, few things are 
closer to a man's heart than the 
material things that he and his 
family have acquired by years of 
conscientious work. He has the 
right to demand of government 
that his property be safeguarded 
against injury whether that injury 
is by direct or indirect act of 
others. Toward this end, zoning 
assures him protection against un- 
reasonable development of build- 
ings and land in the vicinity of his 
property. 

The Zoning Ordinance is more 
than a measure to provide protec- 
tion for the individual; it is the tool 
which guides the development and 
growth of various sections of the 
city to the maximum 'benefit of all. 

All persons denied a permit ly the Building 

lnsh-ilnt It, ice a right /<) appeal Ins decision In 

the £oning Bonn/ nl Adjustment 




PROCEDURE 

The ordinance is administered 
by the City Engineer in his ca- 
pacity of Inspector of Buildings. 
The Zoning Board of Adjustment, a 
quasi-judicial body, stands ready 
to hear the appeals of those who 
are of the opinion that the Inspec- 
tor of Buildings has not interpreted 
the provisions of the ordinance 
correctly or who believe that his 
decisions have caused undue hard- 
ships. 

APPEALS 

Twenty-four citizens applied for 
permits to make changes to their 
property which involved excep- 
tions to or variances from the 
terms of the zoning Ordinance. 
These requests were either denied 
by the Inspector of Buildings or 
referred by him to the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment. The citizens 
whose requests were denied exer- 
cised their right of appeal. Of the 
24 appeals taken, 12 were for 
variance, ten for exceptions, and 
two were for relief from decisions 
of the administrative officer grant- 
ing permits to applicants. Of this 
number, ten were granted, six 
granted conditionally, seven denied 
and one withdrawn. Two of these 
appeals involved a junk yard use in 
a restricted area. The permits 
sought were denied by the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment and were 
subsequently appealed to the Su- 
perior Court. The court, after 
hearing one of these cases, re- 
manded it to the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment lor a further hearing; 
the other petition is pending before 
the court. 



PLUMBING 



BOARD OF E X A M I N I R S O I 

FLU MBE R S 

William Bishop, Chairman 

Edward E. Beane 

Arthur W. Sargent 

Edward E. Beane, Plumbing Inspectoi 

1941 Expenditure Hone 

1941 Receipts $38.70 



Not the least of the many factors 
which contribute to the mainte- 
nance of a high standard of health 
in the City is the control exercised 
over plumbing. This control is ef- 
fected by means of a set of plumb- 
ing rules and regulations, com- 
monly called the Plumbing Code. 
The City Engineer as Plumbing In- 
spector is charged with the enforce- 
ment of the municipal ordinance 
relating to plumbing practices. 

In order that the citizens of Con- 
cord can be assured that the arti- 
sans whom they employ are duly 
qualified to perform satisfactory 
work, all persons engaged in or 
employed at the business of plumb- 
ing must prove to the satisfaction of 
the Board of Examiners of Plumb- 
ers that they have mastered their 
vocation. Not until they have 
passed the board's examinations 
arc plumbers issued licenses to 
practice their trade in Concord. 
These licenses must be renewed 
each year. 

INSPECTION PROCEDURE 

Every plumber before starting 
work on a project is required to file 
at the office of the Plumbing In- 



spector a plan of the work to be 
performed. If the plan meets with 
the inspector's approval, a permit 
is issued lor the job. 

During the installation of a 
plumbing job, periodic checks are 
made by the Plumbing Inspector 
who is assisted in this activity by a 
Public Health Engineer whose 
services are made available to the 
City without cost by the United 
States Public Health Service. No 
new plumbing facilities can be 
placed in operation until the Plumb- 
ing Department has made a final 
examination and has given the 
work its approval. 

In addition to its inspection of 
new installations, the department 
has been continually active in in- 
specting old plumbing fixtures, 
facilities which were installed many 
years before the City adopted a 
standard code of plumbing prac- 
tices. This activity has resulted in 
the elimination of many potentially 
dangerous conditions. 



During the year, 244 tests and 
inspections of plumbing were con- 
ducted by the department. This 
total exceeded by 20 the number 
made in 1940. 

EXAMINATIONS AND LICENSES 

The Board of Examiners of 
Plumbers had an unusually active 
year. Nine applicants, six for jour- 
neymen and three for master 
plumber's licenses, were examined. 
Five of the would-be journeymen 
failed to pass the required examina- 
tion; the sixth has not yet completed 
his test. 



Annual Report 



51 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. John W. Storrs. Chairman 
Harold D. Merrii l 
Ghari.es J. McKee 
Arthur F. Sturtevant 
William A. Stevens 
John W. Stanley 
John C. Tilton 

Ervin E. Webber 



Edward E. Bi \\i 



Supt. of Streets 
City Engineer 



1941 Expenditure $301,917.40 



Under the provisions of the City 
Charter, the Board of Public Works 
is vested with full authority for the 
control and direction of the con- 
struction and maintenance of high- 
ways and sewers, collection and 
disposal of rubbish and garbage, 
removal of snow, construction of 
sidewalks and the lighting of 
streets. 

Although most of the board's ac- 
tivities are self-initiated, from time 
to time, property owners petition 
the board to undertake new public 
improvements or to provide addi- 
tional city services. Before taking 
action on these petitions, it is the 
established practice of the board to 
view the locations in question and 
if necessary to hold public hearings 
on the matters under consideration. 

ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

The Department of Public Works 
is divided into four divisions — 
highway, sewer, engineering, and 
accounts and records. The High- 
way Division is administered by a 



Superintendent of Streets who is in 
charge of the construction and 
mainctnance of roads, bridges and 
sidewalks; the maintenance of 
equipment; and the collection and 
disposal of refuse. The Sewer and 
Engineering Divisions are adminis- 
tered by a City Engineer who exer- 
cises general control over the vari- 
ous activities of these divisions and 
actively supervises all engineering 
work required by other City de- 
partments. The Division of Ac- 
counts and Records is supervised 
by a Chief Clerk under the direc- 
tion of the Superintendent of 
Streets and the City Engineer, in 
addition to keeping all the regular 
departmental accounts, this divi- 
sion executes the department's de- 
tailed annual budget, prepares cost 
accounts and related records, and 
issues permits to utilities to excavate 
and encumber streets and side- 
walks for construction and main- 
tenance purposes. 

The Street Lighting Committee 
of the Board of Public Works with 
the assistance of the Superintendent 
of Streets and the City Engineer 
supervises the City's highway il- 
lumination activity. 

PERSONNEL 

The department employed 98 
persons on a permanent basis dur- 
ing 1941. This number represents 
an increase of three over the pre- 
ceding year. At various times dur- 
ing the year, 171 persons were em- 
ployed on a part-time basis to do 
necessary seasonal work. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

During 1941, the Highway Divi- 
sion laid 3,947 square yards of 



52 



City of Concord 



asphaltic concrete pavement. Most 
of this work was done on Odd 
Fellows Avenue, Pickering Street, 
Dexter Lane, Evans Lane, Cen- 
tral Avenue and Eagle Pass way — 
streets which make up a large part 
of the city's downtown alley system. 

In order to provide for an easier 
flow of traffic on Depot Street, the 
sidewalk on the north side of the 
street was reduced in width over its 
entire length. The traveled way on 
Green Street at its junction with 
Pleasant Street was also widened as 
a step to alleviate traffic congestion 
at this much-used intersection. 

At the corner of White and 
Washington Streets where the old 
Durgin factory was replaced by the 
new United Life and Accident In- 
surance Company building, reloca- 
tion of entrances and driveways 
necessitated a considerable amount 
of sidewalk readjustment. In the 
process, 527 feet of new curbing 
was set. 



On the West Parish Road, a bad 
drainage condition was relieved by 
the installation of a new culvert. 
Horse Hill Road from Blackwater 
Road to the Mast Yard Station site 
was widened and visibility at a 
sharp curve in this road was im- 
proved by the removal of 2,110 
cubic yards of ledge. 

During the year, Currier Road 
was rebuilt and surface-treated 
with tar. This work was done with 
funds supplied jointly by the State 
and City in connection with the 
Town Road Aid program. 

Other improvements include the 
construction of 1,912 square yards 
of new asphalt sidewalk, and the in- 
stallation of 1,504 lineal feet of new 
curbing. 

HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE 

A total of 1,980 tons of cold patch 
material was used in repairing sur- 
face-treated roads and streets. Over 
282,700 arallons of tar were used on 



THE AMOUNT OP PERMANENT 
STREET SURFACE IS INCREASING 



1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
194 I 



4.23 



4.39 



4.56 



MILES OF 
HOT-TOP PAVEMENT 



5.10 




Annual Report 



53 



the city's highways during 1941. 
Although most of this amount was 
used in seal-coating existing hard- 
surfaced streets, tar was applied for 
the first time on 7.9 miles of gravel 
roads. During the year, 6,156 
square yards of asphalt sidewalk 
was resurfaced. 

SNOW PLOWING AND SANDING 

The efficiency of the Highway 
Division's snow removal procedure 
was increased greatly as the result 
of the acquisition of a rotary snow 
plow late in 1941. With the use of 
this new piece of equipment, it is 
now possible to clear the downtown 
streets of snow much faster than by 
the old method of hand shoveling. 
Furthermore, the new rotary can 
be operated at night when the 
streets are free of parked cars — a 
procedure that was impractical 



when a large ciew of hand shovelers 
was needed to accomplish the task. 
The new speedier method of remov- 
ing snow in the business district has 
reduced congestion and effected 
greater public safety and con- 
venience. 

During the year, the division ac- 
quired its second sidewalk tractor. 
These small mechanical plows have 
been found very effective in clear- 
ing snow from alleys and cross 
walks. 

In addition to the foregoing 
equipment, 19 department-owned 
and 12 hired trucks were used to 
clear snow from the city streets. 

The Weather Bureau recorded a 
total snowfall of 51.3 inches during 
the past winter. This amount was 
about 22 inches less than the 
amount which fell during 1940. 

The amount of sand spread on 



The Department of Public Works operates its own machine shop at the City Sheds 
off Warren Street. The shop is equipped for all kinds of heavy maintenance work 




i'.Ipl 




Painting is a necessary part of the City's bridge maintenance act i cities. Wearing 
protective masks workmen are shown sandblasting a bridge in preparation for painting 



streets and sidewalks was 5,780 
cubic yards or less than one-half of 
the quantity used during the pre- 
ceding year. This decrease can be 
attributed to the moderate sleet 
and ice conditions which prevailed 
during the winter. 

During the past year, the cost of 
plowing and sanding city streets 
was $17,409.46 as compared with 
$20,146.74 in 1940. 

REFUSE AND GARBAGE SERVICE 

Horse-drawn vehicles are used by 
the department for refuse collec- 
tion. Contrary to general belief, 
this method of pick-up is econom- 
ically sound. During 1941, 55.676 
cubic yards of refuse were collected 
at a cost to the City of $29,968.77 or 



53.8 cents per cubic yard. Except 
for such material as can be used for 
fill, refuse is transported to the city 
dump where it is burned. 

The city table garbage service 
covers the thickly settled portions of 
Penacook, West Concord and the 
City Proper. This service is oper- 
ated on a onc-day-a-wcek basis by 
two private contractors employed 
by the Board of Public Works. The 
collection of garbage cost the City 
$3,900 in 1941. 

ENGINEERING 

The Engineering Division set 
34,482 feet of street, sidewalk and 
curb grade stakes during the past 
year. No new streets were laid out 
during 1941. However, layouts 



Annual Report 



55 



were established for 0.22 miles of 
street already in public use. Rou- 
tine office activity included the 
making of 3,380 reproductions of 
maps and plans and the recording 
of 630 transfers of property. All 
plans and maps were brought up 
to date. 

SEWERS 

In addition to the sewer construc- 
tion activities noted under the 
W.P.A. section of this report, 1,462 
feet of sanitary and storm sewers 
were built by the Sewer Division in 
1941. This work was accomplished 
at a cost of $3,020.61. 

Other activities included the 
construction of 38 new catch basins 
and 35 new manholes. Ninety-six 
lateral pipe plugs were removed 
during the year. The catch basin 
drain at the corner of Auburn and 
Penacook Streets which was started 
in 1940 was completed. The main 
line sewer in Dexter Lane was 
relaid. The Evans Lane sewer was 
relaid at the request of the Concord 
Electric Company. The utility re- 
imbursed the City for the cost of 
this project. 

The per mile cost of maintaining 
the city's 78.865 miles of sewer 
mains during 1941 was $126.00. 

STREET LIGHTING 

Seven new street lights were 
installed during the year. This 
brought the total number of such 
lights operated in the City up to 
1.578. A general all-over program 
of readjustment of the candlepower 
of lights was started in 1941 under 
an agreement acceptable to the 
City and the electric light utility. A 
considerable increase in the amount 



of street illumination was effected 
under the new arrangement. 

The City of Concord paid $37,- 
794 to light its streets during the 
past year or about $650 more than 
the amount paid in 1940. 

DEFENSE ACTIVITY 

During the winter, local defense 
authorities encouraged household- 
ers to place pails of sand at strategic 
points in their homes as a precau- 
tion against incendiary bombs. 
Cooperating in this program, the 
department delivered more than 60 
cubic yards of dry sand to citizens 
in all sections of the city. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

The swamp filling project at the 
corner of Penacook and Auburn 
Streets undertaken in 1940 was 
completed. The mosquito nuisance 
at this location was effectively 
abated as the result of this work. 

The department raised the ce- 
ment walkway leading to the Public 
Library in order to eliminate a 
hazardous step located near the 
entrance. A permanent surface was 
also laid on the parking area at the 
rear of the library building. 

At the request of the State High- 
way Department, the Highway 
Division surfaced the new off-street 
parking lot for state employees at 
the corner of North State and Cen- 
ter Streets. This work was paid for 
by the State of New Hampshire. 

The department extended the 
northwest to southeast runway at 
the Municipal Airport approxi- 
mately 1,000 feet at the request of 
the Airport Commission. This proj- 
ect required a considerable amount 
of grading and tarring. 



56 



City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 



BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Hon. John W. Storrs, Chairman 
Chari.es A. Bartlett 
Samuel B. Dunsford 
John N. Engei. 
Charles W. Howard 
Charles J. McKee 
Robert W. Potter 



1941 Expenditure. 
1941 Earnings: . . . 



$6,527.38 
$2,790.87 



In these turbulent times, few people 
have the courage or the inclination 
to venture a forecast of coming 
events. Yet, ask any man what he 
thinks of the future of aviation and 
the inevitable answer is that flying 
will be "the thing" after the war. 
This unanimity of opinion can be 
attributed to the important part 
which the airplane is playing in the 
present world conflict and to the 
realization that thousands upon 
thousands of military flyers, now 
being trained by the government, 
will eventually return to civilian 
life to give private and commercial 
flying a i 'shot-in-the-arm 1 ' un- 
paralleled in aviation history. The 
Board of Airport Commissioners 
under whose management the Con- 
cord Municipal Airport is oper- 
ated, shares with the general pub- 
lic the conviction that aviation is 
on the threshold of maturity. 

The year 1941 was one of the 
most eventful in the history of the 
Municipal Airport. Not only were 
the extensive facilities of the air- 
port maintained and operated effi- 



ciently, but important improve- 
ments were effected and plans were 
made for even greater activity. 

NORTHEAST AIRLINES, INC. 

The Northeast Airlines contin- 
ued to use the airport as a regular 
stop on its Boston to Montreal air- 
line. There was a noticeable in- 
crease in the number of passengers 
and the amount of air mail and air 
express carried to and from Con- 
cord. Owing to the increased vol- 
ume of business all along the run, 
the company replaced its Lockheed 
transports with larger Douglas 
DC3s. A decided improvement in 
service was accomplished by this 
change of equipment. 

U. S. WEATHER BUREAU 

During the year, the office of the 
United States Weather Bureau was 
moved from its Main Street loca- 
tion to the airport administration 
building. With the weather service 
and the C.A.A. operated two-way 
radio communication, teletype in- 
terphone and radio beam services 
under one roof, the airport became 
one of the best technically equipped 
air centers in northern New Eng- 
land. 

CIVILIAN PILOT TRAINING 

In cooperation with the C.A.A. , 
the William E. Martin Flying Serv- 
ice conducted a civilian pilot train- 
ing school at the airport. During 
the year, 287 students were given 
ground school training and 195 
received flight training ranging 
from one to 100 hours of flying 
time. A total of 44 students success- 
fully completed the C.P.T. flight 
scholarship course. 



Annual Report 



< 57 



AIRPORT EXPANSION 



improvement to plant limR . operations at the airport 
Due to the increased interest in under a temporary permit pending 
aviation, more people visited the further expansion of facilities, 
airport to watch operations than 
ever before. At times, the throng 
was so large that it seriously im- In connection with the national 
peded operations in the vicinity of program of airport development, 
the administration buildings and Congress, in 1941, ear-marked 
hangars. In order to overcome this $379,000 for use in expanding the 
situation, a wire-mesh fence was Concord airport. This sum was 
erected to separate the flying field placed under the control of the 
from the administration building Civil Aeronautics Administration 
and the parking lot. The fence to be expended at such time as the 
effectively solved the problem of City of Concord indicated its will- 
providing protection for the pub- ingncss to participate in the ex- 
lic. pansion program. 

Because of regulations imposed Satisfied beyond doubt of the 
by the C.A.A., the city was faced inadequacy of existing landing 
with the possibility of losing its facilities and convinced of the par- 
air service unless greater runway amount essentiality of a first class 
length was made available at the airport to a progressive munici- 
airport. A temporary solution was pality, the Airport Commission 
effected by the construction of a after much preliminary investiga- 
1.1 40-foot extension to the north- tion and planning sought and re- 
south runway. This addition which ceived from the Board of Aldermen 
gave the airport a 3,140-foot run- permission to proceed with the ex- 
way, was still 360 feet short of the pansion of the airport. 
C. A. A. minimum requirement. As its share of the project, the 
However, the added length was City was asked to acquire title 
sufficient to allow the airline to con- to the additional adjacent land 

needed for expansion purposes. 

r , , t ■ ., , Preliminary surveys indicated that 

knowledge of airplane motors is a necessary ' J 

part of the C. P. T. course at the airport approximately 400 acres were in- 

volved. The Board of Aldermen ap- 
propriated $30,000 to cover the 
cost of this land and condemnation 
proceedings were instituted. 

Under the proposed plan of de- 
velopment, the existing runways 
will be relocated. Instead of two 
runways there will be three, each 
of which will have double the 
length and half again the width of 
the present runways. Greatly ex- 
panded field lighting facilities are 
also contemplated. 




WATER 
SUPPLY 



BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 

Harry H. Dudley, President 

Allen M. Freeman 

James W. Jameson 

Charles P. Johnson 

Donald Knowi.ton 

Benjamin H. Orr 

Hon. John W. Storrs 

John Swenson 

Gardner Tilton 
Percy R. Sanders Superintendent 

1941 Expenditures $115,785.46 

1941 Receipts $1 18,380.38 



Pure water is one of the most vital 
commodities of everyday life. It is 
the constant necessity of every man. 
woman and child. In order that 
water may be supplied to the citi- 
zens of Concord in abundance and 
at a reasonable price, the City op- 
erates its own supply system. 

The municipal water utility func- 
tions under the control of a board 
of commissioners. The board en- 
joys an unbroken record of efficient 
operation which extends back to 
the time of its organization some 70 
years ago. The fact that Concord 
people show very little concern in 
regard to the purity and cost of 
water attests to their confidence in 
the Board of Water Commissioners 
and the effectiveness of the board's 
operation of this public service. 

CONSTRUCTION 

During 1941, the Water Works 
began the work of replacing the 58- 
year-old 18-inch supply main from 
West Concord to the City Proper. 
With the assistance of WPA la- 



bor, work was started at the junc- 
tion of Rumford and North State 
Streets and carried forward towards 
the lake a distance of approxi- 
mately 4,000 feet. 

The project which consists of the 
laying of 11,400 feet of 24-inch 
centrifugal cast iron pipe will take 
three years to complete providing 
the necessary materials can be 
secured. 

Other new construction involved 
the laying of 791 feet of six-inch 
cast iron pipe in newly accepted 
streets in various sections of the city. 



Forty-seven new services were 
laid during the year. In addition 
to these, the Water Department 
laid a six-inch private fire line into 
the grounds of the Christian Sci- 
ence Pleasant View Home for the 
purpose of supplying two private 
hydrants. The total number of 
services in use in the city at the 
close of the year was 5,112, an in- 
crease of 36 over the previous year. 
Municipally-used services from 
which the Water Department col- 
lected no revenue totaled 109. 

During the year, 76 new meters 
were set of which 29 were on old 
services. Of the department's 5.003 
customers, 89.4 per cent received 
their water through metered serv- 
ice. In 1941, 96.3 per cent of the 
revenue derived from water sales 
came from the metered supply. 

CONSUMPTION 

The total water consumption for 
the year was approximately one 
and one-third billion gallons or an 
increase of about 33 per cent over 
the total for 1940. Of this amount. 



Annual Report 



59 



50.6 per cent was pumped to the 
high service system and the balance 
was supplied by gravity to the low 
service mains. 

EFFECT OF DROUGHT 

On account of the extended 
drought of the Summer and Fall of 
1941, the water level in the lake 
dropped five and one-half feet be- 
low the over-flow. In order to re- 
lieve the strain on the lake supply, 
pumping was started from the aux- 
iliary driven-well system on No- 
vember 10, 1941, at the rate of 
1,000,000 gallons per day. After 
pumping from this source for a 
short time, it was found that the 
level of the lake was falling at only 
about one-half its former rate. 

Late in the Fall, eight connec- 
tions were made at the ends of 



mains in the outskirts of the city to 
enable farmers and residents whose 
wells were dry to get a supply of 
water. No charge was made for 
this service. 

FINANCES 

The total receipts of the Water 
Department for 1941, were $118.- 
380.35. Expenditures for bonds, 
interest, maintenance and con- 
struction were $115,784.40. Re- 
ceipts exceeded expenditures by 
$2,595.92. The Water Depart- 
ment's bonded debt as of December 
31, 1941, was $142,000.00. 

On a cost basis, the City's water 
utility represents an investment of 
$1,949,616.93. The net value of 
the department's fixed assets after 
allowing for depreciation is $1,298,- 
256.59. 



This is a view of the Water Works' steam and electric pumping equipment 
used to provide pressure for the city's high service water system 




PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Holms, President 
Charles F. Cook 
Gerard L. Gaudrault 
Mrs. Lela Y. Johnson 
Mrs. Violet L. McIvor 
Mrs. Edwina L. Roundv 
Donald W. Saltmarsh 
Dixon H. Turcott 
Mrs. Bertha H. Woodward 



Natt B. Burbank 
Cost of Operation 



Superintendent 



For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1941: 
$354,727.92 



. . . Concord School District 

It is the policy of the Board of Ed- 
ucation to provide public instruc- 
tion of a moderately conservative 
nature, paying careful attention to 
the fundamentals necessary to sound 
elementary and secondary educa- 
tion. Concord's schools furnish ade- 
quate instruction for every type of 
child. 



In the Concord School District 
there are 13 buildings now being- 
used for purposes of public instruc- 
tion. Included in this number is a 
senior high school, housing grades 
10, 11 and 12; two junior high 
schools, one taking care of grades 
eight and nine and the other grade 
seven; one mechanic arts building, 
and nine elementary buildings. One 
other plant, the Cogswell School, is 
no longer used for public school 
purposes. 



Concord's last wooden school 
building was replaced by a modern 
plant during the past winter, when 
the new Dame school building on 
Canterbury Road was opened. 

The old Harriet P. Dame build- 
ing was unsafe and inadequate and 
was located on a site not adapted 
to school purposes. As a result of a 
thorough study by the City Plan- 
ning Board the new school is placed 
on a five-acre plot near the center 
of population and well removed 
from arterial traffic. 

Built of red brick with white 
trimming, floored with red and 
black asphalt tile, heated by hot 
water, and boasting the first photo- 
electric light control installation in 
the schools of New Hampshire, 
this schoolhouse will be an asset 
to the community and to the city. 

TEACHERS AND EMPLOYEES 

The School District employs a 
total of 177 full- or part-time 
employees. There are 135 teachers, 
four administrative and supervisory 
officers, and 38 other employees 
including the health staff, office 
force, attendance officer, cafeteria 
workers, and janitors. The teaching 
staff is classified as follows: 115 
classroom teachers, nine supervis- 
ors, ten teaching principals and 
one home teacher of physically 
handicapped children. 

ENROLLMENT 

The total number of pupils en- 
rolled during the last complete 
school year was 3,385. The aver- 
age daily membership was 3,241 .01 
and the average daily attendance 
3,034.13. 



Annual Report 



61 



COST OF OPERATION 

For the school year ending June 
30, 1941, the cost of operating the 
schools, exclusive of bond pay- 
ments and cafeteria expenses was 
$354,727.92. This represents a cost 
of $104.79 per pupil enrolled, or 
$13.04 per capita of total popula- 
tion according to the 1940 census. 
The tax raised for school purposes 
in 1941 was 32 per cent of the total 
tax bill of the city. 

The School District bears a bonded 
indebtedness of $483,000.00, most 
of which represents the remaining 
payments for the Senior High School. 
All other bonds now outstanding will 
be retired before or during 1948. 
Bonded indebtedness is being retired 
at the rate of $47,000.00 per year. 

The cost of the new Dame school 
building has been financed on a 
short-term basis at an exceptionally 
low rate. The total appropriation 
of $80,000.00 will be paid in four 
installments of $20,000.00 each, the 
first falling due on July 1. 1942, 
and the last on July 1, 1945. The 
total financing charge will be only 
$1,200.00, or three-eighths of one 
per cent of the cost of the building. 

Operated on a 24-hour-a-day basis, ike ma- 
chine shop at Morrill School is used to train 
men badly needed for defense industry 




The unsoundness of the District's 
teacher-pension fund is engaging 
the attention of the Board of Edu- 
cation. This plan was established 16 
years ago on the basis of mortality 
tables now outdated. The increas- 
ing length of life has rendered the 
1926 figures obsolete. 

Another phase of the difficulty is 
found in the decrease in interest 
rates during the last few years. The 
plan was built upon the assump- 
tion that its investments would 
bring in three and one-half per 
cent. Now that the figure is down 
to two per cent or less it becomes 
plain that there are two reasons 
why the system is financially weak. 

The Concord Teachers' Associa- 
tion has requested and received 
the board's permission to make a 
study of the situation and to for- 
mulate recommendations as to pro- 
cedure. It is expected that the 
results of the work of the association 
and the board will be reported to 
the voters at the 1943 district 
meeting. 

FOR VICTORY 

Since the fall of 1941, the Me- 
chanic Arts School plant has been 
operating on a twenty-four-hour-a- 
day basis training men for the na- 
tional production effort. In addi- 
tion to the regular classes, there are 
two three-hour shifts of machine 
shop training for employed men 
and one eight-hour trick for unem- 
ployed. All adult training runs 
seven days a week. Since the begin- 
ning of this program in July of 
1940, over 400 men have been 
trained to take part in the drive 
for victory. 



. Penocook School District 



BOARD OF E D U C A T I O N 

Frank Beede, Chairman 
Claire V. Breckell 
James J. Haves 
Leslie H. Jones 
Samuel A. Walker 
Alfred J. York 



George W. Si mm r 
( !ost OF Operation: 



Superintendent 



For the Fiscal rear Ending June 30, 1941: 

$37,502. in 



The Penacook School District 
serves that part of Concord which 
is not under the jurisdiction of the 
Concord Union School District and 
a limited area of the adjacent town 
of Canterbury. Employing a staff 
of 17 instructors, the district oper- 
ates a high school and two gram- 
mar schools. Through its high 
school, the district also serves the 
secondary school education needs 
of several neighboring towns. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The average student member- 
ship for the year ending June 30, 
1941 was 382 or 14 less than the 
average for the preceding school 
year. However, the average mem- 
bership of the high school increased 
from 211 in 1940 to 215 in 1941. 

FINANCES 

The district's gross operating ex- 
penses for the year amounted to 
$37,502.46. This sum exceeded the 
total for the previous year by $1.- 



741.72. Teachers' salaries accounted 
for $21,21 1.90 or 56.5 per cent of 
the total cost of operation. A reduc- 
tion of $3,000.00 was effected in 
the funded debt. This brought the 
outstanding total down to $34,- 
000.00. Carrying charges on the 
bonded debt amounted to $1,- 
096.00 during 1941. 

A total of $31,000.00 was re- 
ceived from the City of Concord 
toward the operation of the Pena- 
cook schools. Of this amount. $30,- 
838.65 was raised from the taxable 
property in the district. In addition 
to the sum received from the City, 
$5,143.54 was received from other 
sources, chiefly from high school 
tuitions. At the close of the school 
year, the District Treasurer's report 
indicated a cash balance of $350.63 
or $1,358.92 less than the amount 
on hand at the beginning of the 
year. 

There is every indication that the 
budget will have to be increased 
during the coming year due to less 
revenue from tuition pupils, in- 
creases in teachers' salaries and 
higher prices of materials and sup- 
plies. 

USE OF HIGH SCHOOL 

The past year has witnessed one 
of the most noteworthy advances 
made by the district in recent years 
— the policy of permitting the high 
school building to be used by 
groups organized for the good of 
the community. This practice has 
met with wide public approval. 
During the school year, such use 
has averaged three times a week. 



Annual Report 



63 



APPENDIX 



-fr ^r it 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATISTICS 

PAGE 

General Fund — Consolidated Balance Sheet 65 

General Fund — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 66 

Bond Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 67 

Debt Service Charges on Present Bonded Debt 67 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 68 

Trust Funds Receipts and Disbursements 68 

Concord Water Works — Balance Sheet 69 

Concord Water Works — Statement of Operations 69 

Concord Water Works — Treasurer's Statements of Clash Receipts and 

Expenditures 70 

Concord Water Works — Income-Investment Account 70 

General Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 71 

General Fund — Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 72 

Board of Public Works — Financial Statement 74 

W.P.A. Expenditures for 1941 74 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Val- 
uations, Tax Levies and Rates in Concord, 1 ( )32 1941 74 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 75 

Status of Tax Collections, 1932 1941 76 

Assessors Statement for 1941 77 

City Relief Department Relief Expenditures 78 

Municipal Court Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 79 

Summary of the City's Investment in Property and Equipment 79 



GENERAL FUND 

Consolidated Balance Sheet 
December 31, 1941 

ASSETS AND NET DEBT 
Cash 

Cash in Bank $170,440.79 

Cash in Office — Tax Collector 3,103 . 23 

Cash in Office — City Clerk 1 17 . 47 

Revolving Fund 250 . 00 

$ 173,911.49 
Reimbursements Receivable 

Merrimack County $ 7,197.57 

Other Municipalities 616.81 

$ 7,814.38 
Less Reserve for Doubtful Accounts 1,584. 93 

6,229.45 
Taxes Receivable 

1936 Levy $ 4,883.53 

1937 Levy 5,924.65 

1938 Levy 6,405.61 

1939 Levy 6,311.56 

1940 Levy 8,081.76 

1941 Levy 206,860.62 

238,467.73 

Unredeemed Taxes Bought by City 49,371 . 34 

Property Acquired by Tax Collectors'' Deeds 6,394 . 20 

Total Assets $ 474,374 . 21 

Net Debt 

Balance— January 1, 1941 $895,623.86 

Deduct Net Gain for the Year 8,520 . 49 

Balance, December 31, 1941 887,103.37 

Total Assets and Net Debt $1,361,477. 58 

LIABILITIES 
Unexpended Balances of Appropriations 

Concord Airport $ 872 . 62 

Union School District 130,699.71 

Penacook School District 9,737 . 85 

Public Library 512.40 

School District Bond Interest 8,437 . 50 

$ 150,260.08 

Temporary Loans 100,000 . 00 

Bond Coupons Due and Unpresented 217 . 50 

Bonds and Notes 1,111,000.00 

Total Liabilities $1,361,477.58 

Annual Report * * * 65 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Changes in Net Debt 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 

Net Debt, January 1, 1941 $ 895,623.86 

Deduct: 

Surplus from 1941 Operations $ 1,520 . 49 

Net Reduction in Bonded Debt 7,000 . 00 

Total Improvement in Financial Condition 8,520 . 49 



Net Debt, December 31, 1941 $ 887,103.37 

DETAILS OF SURPLUS FROM 1941 OPERATIONS 
Credits 

Estimated Revenues $1,451,737.16 

Excess of Actual Revenues over Estimated 55,757 . 25 

Unpresented Checks Charged Off 12 . 65 

Total Credits $1,507,507.06 

Charges 

Total Appropriations $1,466,251 . 10 

Overdrafts of Appropriations 10,063 . 78 

Increase in Liability for Unpresented Coupons 111.25 

Net Decreases in Receivables and Tax Deeds 29,560 . 44 

Total Charges 1,505,986.57 



Surplus from 1941 Operations $ 1,520.49 

DETAILS OF REDUCTION IN BONDED DEBT 

Total Bonds and Notes Payable, January 1, 1941 $1,118,000.00 

Add Bonds and Notes Issued during Year: 

Union School District Notes of 42-45 $ 80,000 . 00 

City Hall and Auditorium Notes due 1942 25,000.00 

W.P.A. Project Note due 1942 25,000.00 130,000.00 

$1,248,000.00 
Deduct Bonds and Notes Retired During Year: 

Municipal Bonds $ 73,000.00 

Water Bonds 17,000.00 

School Bonds 27,000 . 00 

W.P.A. Notes 20,000 . 00 1 37,000 . 00 

Total Bonds and Notes Payable. December 31, 1941 $1,111,000.00 

Net Reduction in Bonded Debt $ 7,000 . 00 



66 ' ' ' City of Concord 



BOND FUNDS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 
for the Year Ending December 31, 1941 

Proceeds from Sale of $80,000.00 Union School District Notes of 1 945 $ 80,000 . 00 

Proceeds from Sale of $25,000.00 W.P.A. Notes of 1942 25,000 . 00 

Proceeds from Sale of $25,000.00 Concord Improvement Auditorium 

Bonds 25,000 . 00 

Total Available for Expenditures $1 30,000 . 00 

Deduct Expenditures: 

Cash Expenditures 90,822 . 04 

Unexpended Cash Balances December 31, 1941 $ 39,177.96 



DEBT SERVICE CHARGES 

ON PRESENT BONDED DEBT 

Annual Annual Total Annual 

Bond Interest Maturities 

Maturities on Bonds and Interest 

1942 $ 182,000.00 $32,494.00 $ 214,494.00 

1943 125,000.00 29,274.00 154,274.00 

1944 125,000.00 26,067.00 151,067.00 

1945 110,000.00 22,941.00 132,941.00 

1946 90,000.00 19,990.00 109,990.00 

1947 64,000.00 17,311.75 81,311.75 

1948 53,000.00 15,199.25 68,199.25 

1949 42,000.00 13,456.75 55,456.75 

1950 36,000.00 12,056.75 48,056.75 

1951 36,000.00 10,731.75 46,731.75 

1952 27,000.00 9,597.50 36,597.50 

1953 27,000.00 8,655.00 35,655.00 

1954 26,000.00 7,727.50 33,727.50 

1955 21,000.00 6,860.00 27,860.00 

1956 21,000.00 6,107.50 27,107.50 

1957 14,000.00 5,355.00 19,355.00 

1958 14,000.00 4,760.00 18,760.00 

1959 14,000.00 4,165.00 18,165.00 

1960 14,000.00 3,570.00 17,570.00 

1961 14,000.00 2,975.00 16,975.00 

1962 14,000.00 2,380.00 16,380.00 

1963 14,000.00 1,785.00 15,785.00 

1964 14,000.00 1,190.00 15,190.00 

1965 14,000.00 595.00 14,595.00 

Total $1,111,000.00 $265,244.75 $1,376,244.75 



Annual Report 



67 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1941 

ASSETS 

Sundry All Other 

Total Cemetery Trust 

All Funds Trust Funds Funds 
Cash 

Unexpended Balances of Income Received 
and deposited at interest in: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 619.35 $ 436.34 $ 183.01 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 765.76 418.15 347.61 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 634 . 25 555.25 79 . 00 

Union Trust Company 1,815.45 _ 389.18 1,426.27 

Total Cash $ 3,834.81 $ 1,798.92 $ 2,035.89 

Investments 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 89,465.58 $ 60,772 .47 $ 28,693.11 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 95,588 . 78 48,290 . 46 47,298 . 32 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 102,049 . 33 55,320 . 84 46,728 . 49 

Union Trust Company 106,441.63 61,150.06 45,291.57 

Securities 7,630.63 2,150.00 5,480.63 

Total Investments $401,175.95 S227,683.83 $173,492.12 

Total Assets $405,010.76 $229,482.75 $175,528.01 

LIABILITIES 

Trust Fund Balances $401,175.95 $227,683.83 $173,492.12 

Unexpended Income Balances 3,834.81 1,798.92 2,035.89 

Total Liabilities $405,010.76 $229,482.75 $175,528.01 

TRUST FUNDS 

Receipts and Disbursements — Changes in Fund Balances 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Sundry All Other 
Total Cemetery Trust 
All Funds Trust Funds Funds 
Cash Balances of LInexpended Income — Jan- 
uary 1, 1941 $ 3,439.52 $ 1,782.39 $ 1,657.13 

Receipts 

Income from Interest and Dividends 10,776.10 4,572.59 6,203.51 

Total Available $14,215.62 $ 6,354.98 $ 7,860.64 

Disbursements 10,380.81 4,556.06 5,824.75 

Cash Balances of Unexpended Income — 

December 31, 1941 $ 3,834.81 $ 1,798.92 $ 2,035.89 

CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

Fund Balances, January 1, 1941 $395,107.91 $223,323.09 $171,784.82 

Add: 

New Trust Funds 5,564.03 4,460.74 1,103.29 

One-third receipts from sale of lots in Blossom 

Hill Cemetery Annex 1 _ 604.01 604.01 

Totals $401,275.95 $227,783.83 $173,492.12 

Deduct: 

Transfer — Henry E. and Florence E. Lau . . _ 100.00 _ 100.00 

Fund Balances, December 31, 1941 $401,175.95 $227,683.83 $173,492.12 

68 ' ' ' City of Concord 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1941 

(Not including Water Bonds) 

ASSETS 
Fixed Assets 

Water and Flowage Rights $167,688 . 1 1 

Engineering and Superintendence Construction Cost .... 63,383 . 63 

Land 129,386 . 35 

Structures (less depreciation reserves) 204,326. 31 

Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 16,391 . 92 

Distribution System (less depreciation reserves) 711 ,055 . 26 

Other Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 6,025.01 

Total Fixed Assets ' " $1,298,256.59 

Current Assets 

Cash $ 59,570 . 73 

Accounts Receivable 333 . 53 

Materials and Supplies 18,192.93 

Total Current Assets 78,097 . 19 



Total Assets $1,376,353.78 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Liabilities 

Municipal Investment $1,376,207.78 

Current Liabilities 

Coupons Payable 146 . 00 

Total Liabilities $1,376,353.78 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 

RECEIPTS 
Water Sales 

Commercial — Flat Rate $ 4,195 . 07 

Commercial — Metered 94,164.27 

Industrial — Metered 14,704.51 

Miscellaneous Water Sales 1,332. 49 



Total Operating Revenue $1 14,396 . 34 

EXPENDITURES 

Operating Expenses 

Water Supply Expenses $ 1 6,697 . 84 

Distribution Expenses 19,518.45 

General and Miscellaneous L T ndistributed Expenses 31,853.63 

Total Operating Expenses ~ 68,069 . 92 

Net Operating Income $ 46,326 . 42 

Other Income 1,341 . 83 

$ 47,668.25 

Other Expenses 6,205 . 10 

Net Profit for Year $ 41,463.15 



Annual Report > * * 69 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

City Treasurer's Statement 

Cash Receipts and Expenditures 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 

RECEIPTS 

Balance, January 1, 1941 $ 35,117.98 

Water — City 8113,581.45 

Water — Boscawen and Penacook Precinct 1 ,058 . 40 

Sale of Lumber 560 . 91 

Sundry Receipts 3,179.62 

Total Receipts 1 1 8,380 . 38 

$153,498.36 

EXPENDITURES 
Orders Paid: 

Operation and Plant $ 58,105.15 

24-inch Main 34,603 . 06 

Bonds Paid 17,000.00 

Bond Interest 6,076 . 25 

Total Expenditures $11 5,784 . 46 

Balance, December 31, 1941 37,713.90 

$153,498.36 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

City Treasurer's Statement 

Income-Investment Account 
December 31, 1941 

CAPITAL AND INCOME 

Capital • $ 20,000 . 00 

Income received to January 1, 1941 1,428.31 

Income received 1941 428 . 52 



$ 21,856.83 

INVESTMENT 
Deposited in: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 5,41 3 . 98 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 5,480 . 95 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 5,480 . 95 

Union Trust Company 5,480 . 95 



$ 21,856.83 
70 ' ' ' City of Concord 






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Annual Report 



73 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1941 



Roads and Bridges . 

Office 

Refuse 

Table Garbage . . . 

Sewers 

Engineering 

Lighting Streets . . . 
Clerk of Board 

Total 



Total 

Appropriation Receipts Available Expended 

$175,661.72 $23,084.07 $198,745.79 $198,362.32 

3,764 .69 3,764 . 69 3,926 . 29 

30,000.00 30,000.00 29,968.77 

3,900 .00 3,900 . 00 3,900 . 00 

14,879.00 4,034.21 18,913.21 18,871.84 

8,846.00 97.54 8,943.54 8,893.28 

37,452 .00 37,452 . 00 37,794 . 90 

200.00 200.00 200.00 

$274,703.41 $27,215.82 $301,919.23 $301,917.40 



Balance 
$383.47 
- 161.60 
31.23 



41.37 

50.26 

342.90 



$ 1.83 



W.P.A. EXPENDITURES 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 



Funds Supplied From 



W.P.A. 

Project Appropriations 

Parks and Playgrounds $ 1 ,469 . 65 

Sewers 22,442 . 46 

Soil Erosion 4,657 . 99 

Streets and Roads 17,996 . 68 

Payrolls 2,731 . 50 

Office Supplies 182.18 

Shop Supplies 33 . 48 

Totals $49,51 3 . 94 



W.P.A. 


Bond Fund 


% 36 


52 


508 


.72 


5,380 


72 


292 


50 


38 


96 


6 


90 


$6,264. 


32 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 
Tax Levies and Rates in Concord 1932-1941 

Polls Veterans Valuations Tax Rates 

1932 12,812 1,278 $32,585,968 $ 983,638.74 $29.54 

1933 13,092 1,325 31,676,008 957,889.64 29.37 

1934 13,523 1,319 31,969,987 981,805.50 29.98 

1935 13,338 1,116 31,910,830 1,193,828.43 36.48 

1936 13,166 1,030 32,039,851 1,245,352.87 37.86 

1937 13,612 919 32,195,052 1,290,330.81 39.04 av. 

1938 13,490 936 32,201,370 1,282,689.02 38.82 + av. 

1939 13,877 958 32,365,017 1,176,029.78 35.30 + av. 

1940 14,334 925 32,791,790 1,280,926.90 38.00 + av. 

1941 13,874 896 33,068,487 1,264,315.56 37.20 + av. 

74 < ' ' City of Concord 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY 

MUNICIPAL 

Interest Annual Term of Unmatured 

Name of Issue Rate Maturities Payment Dec. 31, 1941 

Central Fire Station 3K' P $ 1,000 1942-54 $ 13,000 

City Hall and Auditorium 4 l / 2 ' , 5,000 1942-47 30,000 

Departmental Equipment ^V\% 4,000 1942-46 20,000 

Highway 3X% 5,000 1942-46 25,000 

Public Improvement 1^4% 10,000 1942-44 30,000 

Public Improvement 1K% 5,000 1942 5,000 

Public Improvement 2% 5,000 1942-44 15,000 

Public Improvement 1 %% 10,000 1942-46 50,000 

Public Improvement 1%% 8,000 1 942-47 

(same issue) 1 yi% 6,000 1 948-49 60,000 

Sewer W7o 1,000 1942-54 13,000 

Sewer 3K% 1,000 1942-46 5,000 

Sewer 3 % 6,000 1 942-48 

(same issue) 3% 4,000 1949-53 

(same issue) 3% 3,000 1954 65,000 

Storm Sewer 2K% 7,000 1942-56 105,000 

SCHOOL 

Morrill School 4% 2,000 1942 2,000 

High School 4X% 14,000 1942-65 336,000 

Conant School A}i% 5,000 1942-48 35,000 

Morrill School ^ l A% 2,000 1942-46 10,000 

Eastman School 1%% 4,000 1942-46 20,000 

Dame School * 20,000 1 942-45 80,000 

WATER WORKS 

Water 4^% 4,000 1942-47 24,000 

Water A}i% 9,000 1942-51 90,000 

Water 2 l / 4 % 4,000 1 942-48 28,000 

SUMMARY 

Municipal 436,000 

School 483,000 

Water Works 142,000 



Total $1,061,000 

* Four notes carrying interest from .20% to .85% 



Annual Report ' ' * 75 



STATUS OF TAX COLLECTIONS 1932-1941 

As of December 31, 1941 

1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 

Resident List $ 951,465.98 $ 925,143.19 S 948,058.69 $1,160,437.04 $1,212,413.83 

Poll Tax Lists 25,624.00 26,184.00 27,046.00 26,676.00 26,332.00 
Non-Resident 

List 665.39 568.08 539.44 659.45 612.35 

Bank Stock.. 5,883.37 5,994.37 6,161.37 6,055.94 5,994.69 

Moth Charge 887 . 81 



$ 983,638.74 $ 958,777.45 $ 981,805.50 $1,193,828.43 $1,245,352.87 
Additions and 

Corrections $ 958.10 $ 1,886.78 $ 2,426.65 $ 1,806.74 $ 4,952.17 

Interest 7,092.80 9,426.70 10,035.28 13,196.26 13,577.54 

Costs 1,863.15 1,662.91 2,013.27 2,194.77 2,188.25 



$ 993,552.79 $ 971,753.84 $ 996,280.70 $1,211,026.20 $1,266,070.83 
Cash Paid 

Treasurer. $ 972,965.92 $ 952,659.08 $ 981,946.82 $1,192,849.52 $1,248,682.54 

Discount 2,617.09 5,190.49 

Abatements. 17,969.78 13,904.27 14,333.88 18,176.68 12,504.76 

Cash on Hand 

Uncollected. 4,883.53 



$ 993,552.79 $ 971,753.84 $ 996,280.70 $1,211,026.20 $1,266,070.83 



1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 

Resident List $1,256,223.52 $1,248,861.42 $1,141,546.57 $1,245,507.74 $1,229,917.73 

Poll Tax Lists 27,224.00 26,980.00 27,754.00 28,664.00 27,748.00 
Non-Resident 

List 621.13 607.44 546.05 571.00 481.67 

Bank Stock.. 6,262.16 6,240.16 6,183.16 6,184.16 6,168.16 

Moth Charge 

$1,290,330.81 $1,282,689.02 $1,176,029.78 $1,280,926.90 $1,264,315.56 
Additions and 

Corrections $ 1,806.71 $ 2,559.70 $ 2,016.15 $ 1,699.84 $ 876.36 

Interest 14,181.92 13,474.60 12,631.38 12,440.30 118.14 

Costs 2,483.10 2,353.20 2,278.65 2,147.61 172.40 

$1,308,802.54 $1,301,076.52 $1,192,955.96 $1,297,214.65 $1,265,482.46 
Cash Paid 

Treasurer. $1,290,132.78 $1,284,071.51 $1,179,420.74 $1,281,284.69 $1,051,208.49 

Discount .... 

Abatements. 12,745.11 10,599.40 7,223.66 7,848.20 4,310.12 

Cash on Hand 3,103.23 

Uncollected. 5,924.65 6,405.61 6,311.56 8,081.76 206,860.62 

$1,308,802.54 $1,301,076.52 $1,192,955.96 $1,297,214.65 $1,265,482.46 

76 < ' ' City of Concord 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1941 



Assessed Valua- 
tion of City 
and Precincts 



the: 



Money raised for 

County 

City Budget. . . . 
Schools 

*City Union 31,098,174.00 

* * Penacook U. School 1 ,980,923 . 00 



$33,068,487.00 
33,068,487.00 



Total. 



Amount of 
Appropriation 

$ 206,722.32 
632,705.00 

372,647.75 
29,684.98 

$1,241,760.05 



Tax Rate 
per $1,000 



6.24 
18.32 



11.98 
14.98 



Allowed for errors and corrections $ 22,555 51 

Warrants submitted to Tax Collector 1,264,315 . 56 

Raised by Supplementary taxes 876 . 36 

City rate 

Penacook rate 

Average tax rate for city 

* Includes property located in Loudon. 
** Includes property located in Canterbury. 



POLL TAXES 



Men. . . 

Women . 



No. 

6,075 

7,799 



Total . 



Veterans 

Property Valuation. 

Polls (896) 

Blind 

Property Valuation 

Polls (7) 



EXEMPTIONS 



Total Exemptions . 



BANK STOCK 



Bank Stock. 



ASSESSED VALUATIONS OF VARIOUS TYPES 
Type 

Improved and unimproved land and buildings 

Electric Plants 

Horses 

Asses and Mules 

Oxen 

Cows 

Neat Stock 

Sheep (inc. Goats) 

Hogs 

Fowls 

Fur-bearing Animals 

Vehicles 

Boats and Launches 

Wood and Lumber 

Gas Tanks and Pumps 

Stock in Trade 

Machinery 



37.04 
40.04 
37.20 + 



Amount 
$ 12,150.00 
15,598.00 



13,874 


$ 27,748.00 




$284,245.00 




1,792.00 




1,000.00 




14.00 




$287,051.00 




$ 6,168.16 


OF PROPERTY 


No. 


I 'ablation 




$29,009,184.00 




1,700,580.00 


168 


13,840.00 


2 


140.00 


2 


200.00 


1,185 


84,170.00 


178 


5,985.00 


38 


285.00 


71 


645.00 


20,440 


20,440.00 


51 


745.00 




300.00 




1,650.00 




5,083.00 




31,330.00 




1,752,530.00 




441,380.00 



Total. 



$33,068,487.00 



Annual Report 



77 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1941 



Direct Expenditures for Relief 
Work Relief-Janitor Project .... 

Work Relief-Project Wages 

Cash Allowances 

Provisions and Milk 

Fuel-Rent-Clothing 

Medical-Hospital, etc 

Board and Care — Adults 

Board and Care — Children 

Housework and Nursing 

Funerals and Burials 

W.P.A. Sewing Project Materials. 
House Furnishings and Repairs . . 

Relief Gardens 

Public Utilities 

Trucking and Moving Clients. . . . 
Sundry Expenditures 



City 


Count v 


Total 


$ 957.00 $ 


957.00 


533.80 


1,166.04 


1,699.84 


3,633.00 


6,392.10 


10,025.10 


9,672.23 


33,718.26 


43,380.49 


4,605.25 


21,337.67 


25,942.92 


2,776.28 


21,784.00 


24,560.28 


4,254.81 


2,610.61 


6,865.42 


2,861.56 




2,861.56 


16.25 


501.95 


518.20 


434.00 


616.58 


1,050.58 


1,230.73 




1,230.73 


13.25 


141.25 


154.29 




27.56 


27.56 


35.89 


106.50 


142.39 


142.00 


243.60 


385.60 


26.48 


79.75 


106.23 



Total City and County Poor $30,235.53 $89,682.66 $119,918.19 

Other Towns 1,588.46 1,588.46 



Dependent Soldiers 

Work Relief — Project Wages. 

Cash Allowances 

Provisions and Milk 

Fuel-Rent-Clothing 

Medical, etc 

Board and Care — Children . . 
All Other 



Total Dependent Soldiers 



Administration 

Salaries — Overseers 

Salaries — Office and Case Workers . 

Mileage — Case Workers 

Auto Use and Auto Hire , 

Office Supplies 

Tel.-Heat-Elec. -Janitor 

Wages — Project Supervisor 

Project Materials and Express 

Repairs to Office and Equipment . . . 

Office Equipment 

Misc. Office Expense 

Equipm't Ins. and Expense-Project. 
Clothing and Supplies Purchases . . . 



il,823.99 $ 


89,682.66 


$121,506.65 


74.20 




$ 74.20 


25.00 $ 


1,843.00 


1,868.00 


1,128.86 


3,009.61 


4,138.47 


501.07 


2,034.50 


2,535.57 


24.24 


1,288.41 


1,312.65 


326.00 




326.00 


8.85 


121.45 


130.30 


2,088.22 $ 


8,296.97 


$ 10,385.19 


1,600.00 $ 


1,100.00 


$ 2,700.00 


6,319.49 


5,635.01 


11,954.50 


420 . 68 


693.36 


1,114.04 


224.85 


24.85 


249.70 


579.38 


491.43 


1,070.81 


438.02 


187.63 


625.65 


467 . 60 


487 . 60 


955.20 


1.97 


1,230.73 


1,232.70 


178.21 




178.21 


549 . 46 




549.46 


169.12 




169.12 


75.65 




75.65 


473.32 


2.50 


475.82 



Total Administration $11,497.75 $ 9,853.11 $21,350.86 

Old Age Assistance 10,372.24 10,372.24 

Wood Expenditures 262.00 262.00 

Grand Total $56,044.20 $107,832.74 $163,876.94 

78 ' ' ' City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1941 

Receipts 

Received for fines, costs and sundry fees 

Expenditures 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses and complaints and warrants 

State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of Motor Vehicles . . 

State of New Hampshire, Fish and Game Department 

Clerk's Bond 

Postage, printing and supplies 

Special Justices 

Perley Banfill, restitution made in State v. Hinz 

Overseer of the Poor, fine, State v. Moody 

Balance 

Paid Citv Treasurer 





S9.151.25 


S 44.22 




4,567.40 




6.70 




5.00 




111.15 




12.00 




1.00 




50.00 


4,797.47 




$4,353.78 




$4,353.78 



SUMMARY OF THE CITY'S INVESTMENT 
IN PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT 



December 31, 1941 



Total 

Investments Equipment 

Land and Sound Grand 

Buildings Values Total 

Fire Department $ 188,522.73 $67,197.62 $ 255,720.35 

Police and Watch Department 54,669 . 00 8,438 . 29 63,107 . 29 

Public Works Department 47,607 . 62 66,8 1 3 . 69 11 4,421 . 31 

Miscellaneous Other Property 710,929.18 5,749.72 716,678.90 

Park Department 117,310.09 2,164.64 119,474.73 

Tree Department 2,439.15 2,439.15 

Playgrounds Department 15,643.31 3.614.06 19,257.37 

Cemeteries Department 107,834.87 6,080.56 113,915.43 

Totals $1,242,516.80 $162,497.73 $1,405,014.53 



Annual Report 



79 



ORDINANCES 

and 

RESOLUTIONS 

passed 

during the Tear Ending 

January 12, 1942 



ORDINANCES 

passed during the Tear end- 
ing January 12, 1942 



An Ordinance amending chapter i.ii of 
the revised ordinances in relation to 
salary of sergeant of police. 

/>V it ordained by the Board oj Aldermen oj tht 
City oj Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter LII, Section 
1, clause (h) by striking out the words 
"nineteen hundred and fifty dollars" and 
inserting the words "two thousand fifty 
dollars" so that said clause shall read as 
follows : 

(h) Sergeant of police, two thousand 
fifty dollars per annum. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect 
as of March 1, 1941. 

Passed February 10, 1941. 



An Ordinance in amendment of chapter 
XIII of the revised ordinances relat- 
ing TO COMFORT station. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter XIII of the 
Revised Ordinances by striking out the 
whole thereof and substituting the follow- 
ing: "That the Board of Health of the City 
of Concord be given control and super- 
vision of the Comfort Station, including 
appropriation, care and maintenance of 
said station." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed March 10, 1941. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 48 of 
the revised ordinances of the city of 
concord, revised april 1, 1940. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, asfolloivs: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 48 of the Re- 



vised Ordinances of the City of Concord, 
revised April 1, 1940, by striking out the 
whole thereof, and substituting in its place 
the following new Chapter. 

ESTABLISHMENT OF DISTRICTS 

Section 1 
Eight Classes of Districts 

(a) The City oj Concord is hereby divided as 
shown on the ^pning Map in two sheets dale,! 
September, 1940, and filed with the City Clerk, 
into eight classes of districts: 

Single residence districts, 
General residence districts. 
Agricultural districts, 
Apartment house districts, 
Civic distrii ts, 
Local hits mess districts, 
Cummer, ml districts, 
Indus trial districts. 

Boundaries of Districts 

(b) The boundaries between districts are, 
unless otherwise shown, either the center 
lines of streets, alleys or railroads, or lines 
parallel to and one hundred feet distant 
from the less restricted side of the block, pro- 
vided that within blocks less than two hun- 
dred feet wide such lines are median lines 
between the street lines. 

Cases of Lots in Two Districts 

(c) Where a district boundary line di- 
vides a lot in a single or joint ownership of 
record at the time such line is adopted, the 
regulations for the less restricted portion of 
such lot shall extend not more than thirty 
feet into the more restricted portion, pro- 
vided the lot has frontage on a street in the 
less restricted district. 

Definitions 
id) Lot shall be construed to mean that parcel 
of land on which a principal building and its ac- 
cessories are placed, together with the required 
open space. 

(e) A semi-detached one-family dwelling is a 
one family house having one party wall in com- 
mon with an adjacent house, the two houses to- 
gether, however, accommodating but two families, 
one family living on either side of the party wall. 

(f) A detached two-family dwelling is a house 
accommodating altogether but two families. Such 
dice/ ling has, moreover, no party wall or walls in 
common with an adjacent house or houses. 



83 



USE REGULATIONS 

Section 2 
Single Residence District Uses 
In a single residence district no building 
or premises shall be erected, altered or used 
for any purpose except 

1. Detached dwelling for one family or 
housekeeping unit; 

2. Club, except a club the chief activity 
of which is a service customarily carried on 
as a business or a club with more than five 
sleeping rooms; 

3. Church; 

4. Educational use, except dormitories: 

5. Farm or garden, excluding any use in- 
jurious, noxious or offensive to the neighbor- 
hood; 

6. Municipal recreational use; 

7. Accessory use customarily incident to 
any of the above uses. The term "accessory 
use" in this ordinance shall not include 

(a) Any use injurious, noxious or offen- 
sive to the neighborhood; 

(b) Any use not on the same lot with the 
building to which it is accessory; 

(c) The taking of more than four lodgers; 

(d) The sale of produce not raised on the 
premises; 

(e) Garage space for more than two 
automobiles, provided that one additional 
automobile may be provided for on a lot 
with an area exceeding nine thousand 
square feet and two on a lot with an area 
exceeding twelve thousand square feet; 

(f) Garage space for or storage of more 
than one truck or automobile used for public hire, 
except on a farm; 

(g) Any use, except signs, located upon 
that half of the lot nearest the street line or 
lines, or within ten feet of such part of an 
adjacent lot, unless it is either fifty feet from 
the nearest street or in the same building to 
which the use is accessory; or 

(h) Signs, except those pertaining to the 
lease, sale or use of a lot or building on 
which placed, and not exceeding a total 
area of eight square feet; on a lot occupied 
by a dwelling there shall not be more than 
one such sign pertaining to the use thereof 
or bearing the name or occupation of an 
occupant for each family housed and no 
such sign shall exceed one square foot in 
area. 

8. Any of the following uses, provided the 
Board of Adjustment shall rule that such 



use is not injurious, noxious, offensive or 
detrimental to the neighborhood; 

(a) Aviation field; 

(b) Cemetery; 

(c) Greenhouse or nursery; 

(d) Harvesting of natural ice and storage 
on the same premises; 

(e) Hospital, sanitarium, or charitable use; 

(f) Governmental use; 

(g) Garage, provided that repairs other 
than minor repairs of automobiles stored 
therein shall not be done, and, except on a 
farm, not more than one truck or automobile 
used for public hire shall be stored, and pro- 
vided further that there are on file with the 
Board the written consents of the owners of 
75 per cent of all the frontage of the follow- 
ing property, exclusive of the lot for which 
the permit is sought and exclusive of all lots 
used for such a garage and all lots in local 
business, commercial and industrial dis- 
tricts: (1) all lots within one hundred and 
twenty feet of such lot; (2) all additional 
lots abutting on any street or alley to which 
such garage is to have vehicular access, or 
on a street or alley in substantially direct 
continuation thereto, and within three hun- 
dred feet of the site of the proposed build- 
ing. Where a portion of a lot is within the 
above limits a length of frontage equal to the 
width of such portion only shall be included. 
On a corner lot with both sides within the 
above limits the longer side only shall be 
included. 

Section 3 
General Residence District Uses 
In a general residence district no build- 
ing or premises shall be erected, altered or 
used for any purpose except 

1 . Any use permitted in a single residence 
district; 

2. Detached two-family dwelling or pair 
of semi-detached one-family dwellings; 

3. Telephone exchange, not including a 
service station or outside storage of supplies; 

4. Customary home occupation, such as milli- 
nery, hair-dressing, manicuring, laundering, 
preserving and home cooking or the office oj a doc- 
tor, dentist, musician, teacher, architect, artist, or 
in cm her of some other recognized profession, pro- 
ruled that such occupation shall be carried on by a 
person only within a dwelling or apartment used 
by him or her as his or her private residence and 
provided that no more than one other person is em- 
ployed and provided that such occupation shall not 



84 



occupy more than one-third of the area of such resi- 
dence or apartment and provided that such occupa- 
tion shall not be carried on in an accessory building 
and provided that there is no display from the 
street nor advertising except a professional or an- 
nouncement sign not exceeding four square feet in 
area; 

5. Accessory use customarily incident to 
any of the above uses. 

Section 4 
Agricultural District Uses 
In an agricultural district no building or 
premises shall be erected, altered or used for any 
purpose except 

7. Any use permitted in a general residence 
district; 

2. General farming, including horticulture, 
dairying, livestock and poultry raising, and other 
agricultural enterprises or uses; 

3. Processing the natural resources of the agri- 
cultural district; 

4. Orchard warehouse; 

5. Creamery or cannery; 

6. Aircraft landing field, hangar and equip- 
ment; 

7. Forestry; 

8. Telephone, telegraph or power transmission 
lines; 

9. Organized recreational camp; 

10. Golf course — public or private, park or 
playground; 

11. One or more signs pertaining to the lease, 
sale or use of the premises on which placed and 
not exceeding a total area of thirty square feet; 

12. Accessory use customarily incident to any 
oj the above uses; 

13. Farm operated for the disposal of garbage, 
sewage, rubbish or offal or rendering plant pro- 
vided the Board of Adjustment shall rule that 
such use under such conditions and in such a build- 
ing as it may prescribe will not be detrimental or 
injurious to the neighborhood. 

Section 5 

Apartment House District Uses 

In an apartment house district no build- 
ing or premises shall be erected, altered or 
used for any purpose except 

1. Any use permitted in a general resi- 
dence district; 

2. Dwelling or dormitory; 

3. Club, except clubs the chief activity of 
which is a service customarily carried on as 
a business; 



4. Hotel, provided it conforms to all the 
requirements of this ordinance for a dwell- 
ing; 

5. Accessory use customarily incident to 
any of the above uses. 

Section 6 
Civic District Uses 

In a civic district no building or premises shall 

be erected, altered or used for any purpose except 

7. Any use permitted in an apartment house 
district; 

2. Building used exclusively by the federal, 
state, county or local municipal government for 
public purposes, but not including workshops and 
warehouses; 

3. Historical building or museum, not operated 
exclusively for profit; 

4. Building used exclusively for offices; 

5. Public parking area. 

Section 7 

Local Business District Uses 

In a local business district no building 
or premises shall be erected, altered or used 
for any purpose prohibited in a commercial 
district, nor, except under like restrictions, 
for any purpose restricted in a commercial 
district; for any purpose injurious, noxious 
or offensive to a neighborhood by reason of 
the emission of odor, fumes, dust, smoke, 
vibration or noise or any other cause; or for 
any purpose except 

1. Any use permitted in an apartment 
house district; 

2. Hotel; 

3. Fire station; 

4. Office or bank; 

5. Place of amusement or assembly; 

6. Any other retail business or service not 
involving manufacture on the premises ex- 
cept of products the major portion of which 
are to be sold at retail by the manufacturer 
to the consumer, and provided further that 
not more than five operatives shall be en- 
gaged in such manufacture; 

7. One or more signs pertaining to the lease, 
sale or use of the premises on which placed and not 
exceeding a total area of twenty square feet. 

Section 8 
Commercial District Uses 
(a) In a commercial district no building 



85 



or premises shall be erected, altered or used 
for any of the following specified trades or 
uses: 

1 . Ammonia, bleaching powder or chlor- 
ine manufacture or refining; 

2. Asphalt manufacturing or refining; 

3. Blast furnace; 

4. Cement, gypsum, lime or plaster of 
paris manufacture; 

5. Coke manufacture; 

6. Creosote manufacture; 

7. Dextrin, glucose or starch manufac- 
ture; 

8. Distillation of bones, coal or wood or 
manufacture or any of their by-products; 

9. Dye manufacture; 

10. Explosives or fireworks manufacture, 
or storage in excess of five hundred pounds; 

1 1 . Fat, grease, lard or tallow manufac- 
ture, refining or rendering; 

12. Fertilizer manufacture; 

13. Gas (fuel or illuminating) manufac- 
ture in excess of one thousand cubic feet per 
day or storage in excess of ten thousand 
cubic feet, except in a municipal or public 
service plant; 

14. Gelatin, glue or size manufacture 
from fish, animal refuse or offal; 

15. Hair manufacture; 

16. Hot rolling mill; 

17. Hydrochloric, nitric, picric, sul- 
phuric or sulphurous acid manufacture; 

18. Incineration, reduction or dumping 
of dead animals, garbage, offal or refuse ex- 
cept by the city or its agents or when ac- 
cumulated and consumed on the same 
premises without the emission of odor; 

19. Lamp black manufacture; 

20. Linoleum, or oilcloth manufacture; 

21. Match manufacture; 

22. Petroleum or other inflammable 
liquids: production or refining; 

23. Pyroxylin manufacture, manufacture 
of articles thereof, or storage in excess of five 
hundred pounds; 

24. Rubber manufacture, or treatment 
involving offensive odor; 

25. Slaughtering except as permitted by 
the Board of Health or stock yard except as 
appurtenant thereto; 

26. Tanning, curing or storage of raw 
hides or skins; 

27. Tar distillation or manufacture; 

28. Turpentine or varnish manufacture; 

29. JuiiL ya/d or place where junk is collet ted 
id stored. The nurd "junk" in this ordinance 



shall mean any old metals, old hot I Irs, col Ion or 
woo/en mill waste, unfinished cloth, unfinished 
cotton or woolen null yarns, old rags, old paper 
products, old rubber products, two or more un- 
registered motor vehicles which are unfit for re- 
conditioning for use on the highways, used parts 
and materials of motor vehicles the quantity of 
which shall be equal in bulk to two or more 
vehicles, and any other second hand articles the 
accumulation of which is detrimental or injurious 
to the neighborhood. 

30. Any other trade, industry or use that 
is injurious, noxious or offensive to a neigh- 
borhood by reason of the emission of odor, 
fumes, dust, smoke, vibration or noise or 
other cause, but not including places of 
amusement; provided, however, that a 
building or use otherwise excluded but dis- 
tinctly incidental and essential to a use oi a 
building or plant with a series of buildings 
permitted in a commercial district may be 
erected, altered and used if not more than 
10 per cent of the total floor area of the 
building or plant is to be so occupied, if not 
more than 10 per cent of all the employees 
are to be engaged therein, if it is not located 
within fifty feet of any street line or lot line, 
and if it is not detrimental or injurious to 
the neighborhood. 

Restricted Uses 

(b) No building or premises shall be erected, 
altered or used for any of the following specific 
uses unless the Board of Adjustment shall rule 
that sik/i use under such conditions ami in such a 
building as it may prescribe tall not be detri- 
mental or injurious to the neighborhood: 

1 . Blacksmith shop: 

2. Coal yard: 

3. Filling station: 

4. Lumber yard; 

5. Public garage or stable; 

6. Commercialized amusements. 

Section 9 

Industrial District Uses 

In an industrial district no building or 
premises shall be erected, altered or used for 
any use prohibited in a commercial district 
unless the Board of Adjustment shall rule 
that such use under such conditions and in 
such a building as it may prescribe will not 
be detrimental or injurious to the neighbor- 
hood. 



86 



NON-CONFORMING USES 

Section 10 

Continuation of Non-Conforming I r ses 

(a) Any lawful building or use of a build- 
ing or premises or part thereof in existence 
previous to Dec-mho 13, 1930 may be con- 
tinued although such building or use does 
not conform to the above provisions hereof. 

Conversion oj Existing Dwellings — Single 
Residence District 

(b) In a single residence district nothing 
herein shall prevent any dwelling, existing 
at the time this ordinance is adopted and 
having a volume above the first story floor, 
exclusive of porches, exceeding twenty-five 
thousand cubic feet, being altered to pro- 
vide for and being used for two families. 
provided it is not enlarged in volume. 

Conversion of Existing Dwellings — General 
Residence and Agricultural Districts 

(c) Nothing herein shall prevent any dwelling 
in a general residence oi agricultural district exist- 
ingprioi to Decembei 13, 1930 from being altered 
to provide for and being used for more than two, 
but not more than four families, provided it is not 
enlarged in volume and meets the requirements as 
to volume and unbuilt-Upon yard space listed in 
the following table: 

Minimum 

Volume above Minimum 

Conversion the first story Unbuilt- 

to floor exclusive upon Yard 

of porches space 

Three family 

Dwelling 35,000 cu. ft. 5,000 sq. ft. 

Four family 

Dwelling 45,000 cu. ft. 6,000 sq. ft. 

and provided no dwelling unit shall have a volume 
of less than 8,000 cu. ft. 

Change or Extension of Non-Conforming Uses 

(d) The Board of Adjustment may order the 
issuance of a permit for any non-conforming use 
to be changed to another non-conforming use not 
substantially different in its purpose and manner 
of application and no more harmful or objection- 
able to the neighborhood provided that the building 
involved shall neither be structurally altered nor 
enlarged to an extent in the aggregate greater than 
20 per cent in volume and 50 per cent of the assessed 
value of the land and building on December 13, 
1930. The extension must be of the same or better 



type oj main ml and construction as the original 
building. No non-conforming use, ij once changed 
to a use permitted in the district in which it is 
Unnted. dud I be changed back to a non-conforming 



Temporary Uses 

(e) The Board of Adjustment may order 
the issuance of a permit for a quarry or 
gravel or sand pit or for a non-conforming 
temporary building or use incidental to the 
development of a neighborhood, such per- 
mit to be issued for an initial period of not 
more than two years and only upon appli- 
cation accompanied by a bond payable to the 
City of Concord in uich amount and in such form 
as the Board of Adjustment may order. In become 
effective in case the building is not re- 
moved prior to the expiration of the permit. 
Such permits may be ordered renewed by 
the Board for successive periods of not 
more than one year each. 

Restoi ulam After Fire 

(f) Nothing herein shall prevent the sub- 
stantial restoration within one year and 
continued use of a building damaged by 
fire or other casualty, provided that, in case 
of damage to a building non-conforming in 
use, location or structure to an extent that 
the estimated cost of such restoration ex- 
ceeds three-quarters of its fair valuation 
immediately prior to such damage, authori- 
zation of the Board of Adjustment must be ob- 
tained for such restoration. 

HEIGHT REGULATION 

Section 11 

Single Residence District Height 

(a) In a single residence district no build- 
ing shall exceed two stories or thirty feet in 
height unless it sets back from each street 
and lot line five feet in addition to the re- 
quirements of Section 12 plus one foot for 
each foot of excess height. No building shall 
exceed four stories or fifty-five feet in height. 

General Residence District Height 

(b) In a general residence district no 
building shall exceed two stories or thirty 
feet in height unless it sets back from each 
street and lot line five feet in addition to 
the requirement of Section 12 plus one 
foot for each foot of excess height. No build- 
ing shall exceed four stories or fifty-five 
feet in height. No dwelling for more than 



87 



one family shall exceed two stories or thirty 
feet in height, provided that this shall not 
prevent any dwelling existing prior to De- 
cember 13, 1930 from being altered to ac- 
commodate not more than two families. 

Agricultural District Height 

(c) In an agricultural district height regula- 
tions shall be the same as those permitted in a 
general residence district. 

Apartment District Height 

(d) In an apartment house district no 
building shall exceed four stories or fifty- 
five feet in height unless it sets back from 
each street and lot line ten feet in addition 
to the requirements of Section 12 plus one 
foot for each foot of excess height. No build- 
ing shall exceed six stories or seventy-five 
feet in height. 

Civic District Height 

(e) In a civic district height regulations shall 
be the same as those permitted in an apartment 
house district. 

Local Business District Height 

(f) In a local business district no building 
shall exceed thirty feet in height unless every 
part exceeding such height sets back from 
each street and lot line one foot for each 
foot of excess height. No building shall ex- 
ceed fifty-five feet in height. In a local 
business district contiguous to an apart- 
ment house or commercial district these 
heights may be exceeded by twenty-five 
feet. In a local business district not contig- 
uous to an apartment house or commercial 
district no dwelling shall exceed two stories 
or thirty feet in height. 

Commercial District Height 

(g) In a commercial district no part 
of a building shall exceed seventy-five feet 
in height unless such part is set back from 
each street and lot line one foot for each 
one and one-half feet of excess height. No 
building shall exceed in volume its lot area 
multiplied by seventy-five feet. 

Industrial District Height 
(h) In an industrial district no building 
shall exceed the height prescribed in com- 
mercial districts. No dwelling shall exceed 
three stories or forty feet in height. 



Measurement oj Height 
(j) The height of a building abutting on 
a street shall be measured from the average 
curb grade, and if not on a street from the 
average ground level along its front, to the 
average height of that portion of the roof 
above the highest floor. 

Height Exceptions 
(j) Chimneys, elevators, tanks, poles, 
spires and towers not used for human occu- 
pancy may extend above the height limits 
herein fixed, and parapet walls and other 
unused projections and bulkheads may so 
extend not more than five feet. 

AREA REGULATIONS 

Section 12 

Rear lards 

(a) In a single residence district no 
building shall be built within a distance 
from the rear lot line equal to one-quarter 
of the depth of the lot or thirty feet which- 
ever is the less. In a general residence or 
agricultural district no building shall be built 
within a distance from the rear lot line 
equal to one-fifth of the depth of the lot or 
twenty-four feet, whichever is the less. In an 
apartment house district no building, and 
in a civic, local business, commercial or in- 
dustrial district no dwelling shall be built 
within a distance from the rear lot line 
equal to one-fifth of the depth of the lot or 
fifteen feet, whichever is the less, and such 
distance shall be increased five feet for each 
additional story of the building above three 
stories. 

Side Yards 

(b) In a single residence, general resi- 
dence or agricultural district no building 
shall be built within five feet of a side lot 
line, nor within ten feet of any other building 
on the same lot, provided that on no lot 
existing prior to December 13, 1930 shall the 
aggregate width of side yards required be 
such that less than twenty-four feet of the 
width of the lot may be built upon, and 
provided further that in a general residence 
or agricultural district nothing herein shall 
prevent the building together of two one- 
family dwellings separated by a fireproof 
division with no openings. In an apart- 
ment house or civic district no building shall 



88 



be built with a side wall within five feet of 
a side lot line, except where there is a party 
wall, and such distance shall be increased 
one foot for each additional story of the 
building above three stories and also one 
foot for each twenty feet or fraction thereof 
that the length of the side yard exceeds 
sixty feet. In a local business, commercial 
or industrial district, no dwelling shall be 
built with a side wall within the distance 
required in an apartment house district 
from a side lot line unless contiguous 
thereto. 

Outer Courts 

(c) The term "outer court" shall mean 
an unoccupied space other than a yard and 
extending through its full required width 
to a street, yard, or other outer court. No 
outer court on a lot line shall be less than 
six feet wide. For each story over three 
stories in the height of any such court its 
width shall be increased one foot. No such 
court shall be less than one-seventh as wide 
as it is long. No outer court not on a lot line 
shall be less than twelve feet wide. For each 
story over three stories in the height of any 
such court its width shall be increased two 
feet. No such court shall be less than two- 
sevenths as wide as it is long. In a single 
residence, general residence or agricultural 
district no window in a dwelling shall open 
upon an outer court with a horizontal depth 
exceeding its width. 

Inner Courts 

(d) The term "inner court" shall mean 
an unoccupied space other than a yard and 
not extending through its full required 
width to a street, yard or outer court. No 
inner court on a lot line shall be less than 
eight feet wide nor less than sixteen feet 
long. For each story over three stories in 
the height of any such court its width 
shall be increased one foot and its length 
shall be increased two feet. No inner 
court not on a lot line shall be less than 
sixteen feet wide or long. For each story 
over three stories in the height of any such 
court its width and length shall each be in- 
creased two feet. In a single residence, gen- 
eral residence or agricultural district no win- 
dow in a dwelling shall open upon an 
inner court with a vertical depth exceeding 
its width. 



Front Yards 

(e) In a single residence, general resi- 
dence or agricultural district no building 
shall be built and no roadside stand shall 
be placed within fifteen feet of the street 
line, provided that no building need be set 
back more than 20 per cent of the depth of 
the lot nor more than the average of the 
setbacks of the buildings on the lots next 
thereto on either side, a vacant lot or a lot 
occupied by a building set back more than 
fifteen feet being counted as though oc- 
cupied by a building set back fifteen feet, 
and provided further that no uncovered 
porch need set back more than ten feet. In 
an apartment house, civic or local business 
district no building shall be built within 
five feet of the street line. 

Rear Dwellings 

(f) There shall be in front of every 
building not fronting on a street a yard no 
less in depth than the depth required for 
the rear yard behind the same building. 

Vegetation On Corners 

(g) Within the area formed by the lines 
of intersecting streets and a line joining 
points on such lines fifteen feet distant from 
their point of intersection, or in the case 
of a rounded corner the point of intersec- 
tion of their tangents, no structure other 
than a building and no foliage may be 
maintained between a height three and 
one-half feet and a height of eight feet 
above the plane through their curb grades. 

Accessory Buildings 
(h) On a lot occupied by a dwelling 
other than an apartment or tenement house 
or hotel, a one-story building of accessory 
use thereto and not more than twelve feet 
high may be located in and occupy not 
more than 30 per cent of the rear yard of 
such dwelling. No yards are required for 
such building by this ordinance. The area 
occupied by a building of accessory use 
shall be included as occupied area in com- 
puting lot occupancy. 

Projections 
(i) Nothing herein shall prevent the pro- 
jection of cornices, window sills, belt courses 
and other ornamental features not more 
than three inches into any required yard or 



89 



court, nor the projection of cornices not 
more than fifteen inches into any required 
yard. 

Lot Size 
(j) In a single residence, general resi- 
dence or agricultural district no dwelling 
shall be erected on a lot containing less than 
five thousand square feet or less than fifty 
feet wide unless such a lot is of record prior 
to December 13, 1940, and no dwelling for 
more than one family shall be erected on 
any lot containing less than six thousand 
square feet. In any district no dwelling shall 
occupy more than seventy per cent of its lot. 

Required Windows 
(k) Every room in which one or more 
persons live, sleep, work continuously or 
congregate, except storage rooms, bath- 
rooms, toilet compartments, hallways, 
stairways, rooms where the nature of the 
occupancy will not permit, and rooms me- 
chanically ventilated so as to provide at least 
three positive air changes per hour, shall 
have windows or ventilating skylights, with 
an aggregate area not less than one-eighth 
of the floor area of the room opening di- 
rectly either upon a street, alley, public 
park, cemetery, or railroad right-of-way, 
or upon a yard or court located upon the 
same lot. 

Appurtenant Open Space 
(1) No lot shall be so reduced that the 
dimensions of any of the open spaces shall 
be smaller than herein prescribed. No yard 
or other open space required for such a 
building by this ordinance shall during the 
life of such building be occupied by or 
counted as open space for another building. 

ENFORCEMENT 

Section 13 
Administration and Enforcement 
(a) This ordinance shall be administered 
by the Inspector of Buildings in the same 
manner and with the same powers provided 
under the Building Code of the City of 
Concord. No building or structure or part 
thereof shall be erected, altered or moved 
without a permit from the Inspector of 
Buildings, issued upon application, stating 
that the plans and intended use indicate 
that the building is to conform in all respects 



to the provisions of this ordinance. Upon 
written complaint of the Inspector of Buildings, 
the Chief of Police shall enforce this ordinance. 

Certification of Occupancy Required 

(b) No premises or structure or part 
thereof hereafter erected or altered wholly 
or partly in use or structure, or moved, or 
the open spaces of which are in any way re- 
duced, shall be used until the Inspector of 
Buildings shall have certified on the build- 
ings permit, or in case none is issued shall 
have issued a certificate of occupancy, speci- 
fying the use to which the premises, or 
buildings upon being sufficiently completed 
to comply with the provisions and regula- 
tions relating thereto, may be put. 

Board of Adjustment 

(c) As terms expire or vacancies occur, 
the Mayor, subject to confirmation by the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen, shall make 
appointments to a Board of Adjustments 
conforming in membership and duties as 
provided by the statutes of the State of New 
Hampshire. The Board shall act on all mat- 
ters within its jurisdiction under this ordi- 
nance in the manner prescribed by statutes 
and subject always to the rule that due con- 
sideration shall be given to conserving the 
public health, safety, convenience, welfare 
and property values. 

Penalty 

(d) Whoever violates any of the provi- 
sions of this ordinance shall be punished by 
a fine not exceeding twenty dollars for each 
day of such violation. 

Section 14 

Other Laws, Etc., Not Interfered Jl'ith Unless 

Less Stringent 

(a) This ordinance shall not interfere 
with or annul any ordinance, rule, regula- 
tion or permit, provided that, unless specif- 
ically excepted, where this ordinance is 
more stringent it shall control. 

Validity 

(b) The invalidity of any section or pro- 
vision of this ordinance shall not invalidate 
any other section or provision hereof. 

When Effective 

(c) This ordinance shall take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed April 14, 1941. 



90 



An Ordinance amending chapter LII of 

THE REVISED ORDINANCES RELATING TO 
SALARIES. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That Chapter LII of the Revised Ordi- 
nances relating to salaries be amended by 
striking out the whole of Section 1, para- 
graph (vv), which reads, "Tree Warden, 
six hundred dollars per L annum." 

July 14, 1941. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 52 of 
the revised ordinances of the cltv of 
Concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 1, Chapter 52 
of the Revised Ordinances of the City of 
Concord, revised April 1, 1940, by adding 
the following new subsection to be desig- 
nated subsection "y": 

y. Director of the city planning board 
twenty-five hundred dollars per annum. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect 
January 1, 1942. 

Passed August 11, 1941. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 33 of 
revised ordinances. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. Amend Section 3, Chapter 33 
of the Revised Ordinances of the City of 
Concord, revised April 1, 1940, by striking 
out the whole thereof and inserting in its 
place the following new section: 

Sect. 3. No trustee shall receive compen- 
sation for his services but his actual expenses 
when in discharge of his duties shall be paid 
out of any sum specifically appropriated for 
that purpose provided that said board of 
trustees shall approve said expenses before 
the same are incurred. 

Passed August 11, 1941. 



An Ordinance amending chapter XLVII 
of the revised ordinances of the 
City of Concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1 . Amend Section 3, Chapter 
47 of the Revised Ordinances of the City of 
Concord revised April 1, 1940, by striking 
out the whole of said section and substitut- 
ing in its place the following new section: 

Sect. 3. Beginning on the Concord and 
Claremont track of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad on the center line of Curtis Ave- 
nue; thence westerly on the center line of 
Curtis Avenue to the center line of Rumford 
Street; thence southerly on the center line of 
Rumford Street to the center line of Pena- 
cook Street; thence westerly on the center 
line of Penacook Street to the center line of 
Auburn Street; thence southerly on the cen- 
ter line of Auburn Street a distance of 900 
feet; thence westerly at right angles to the 
center line of Auburn Street to the center 
line of Ridge Road extended northerly; 
thence southerly on the center line of Ridge 
Road extension to a point 200 feet north of 
the center line of Franklin Street; thence 
westerly on a line parallel to and 200 feet 
north of the center line of Franklin Street to 
a point 200 feet westerly of the center line of 
Ridge Road; thence southerly 200 feet 
westerly of and parallel to the center line of 
Ridge Road to a point 200 feet northerly of 
the center line of Park Ridge; thence west- 
erly in a line parallel to and 200 feet north- 
erly of the center line of Park Ridge to a 
point 200 feet westerly of the center line of 
Westbourne Road; thence southerly 200 
feet westerly of and parallel to the center 
line of Westbourne Road to Warren Street; 
thence continuing on the same course to the 
center line of Pleasant Street; thence 
easterly on the center line of Pleasant 
Street to a point opposite the center line of 
Merrimack Street; thence southerly on the 
line of the center of Merrimack Street ex- 
tended to a point 200 feet south of the 
southerly line of Pleasant Street; thence 
easterly on a line 200 feet south of and 
parallel with the southerly line of Pleasant 
Street to a point 200 feet west of the westerly 
line of South Spring Street; thence south- 
erly on a line 200 feet west of and parallel 
with the westerly line of South Spring Street 
to the southerly line of Clinton Street; 



91 



thence westerly on the southerly line of 
Clinton Street to a point 200 feet westerly 
of the westerly line of Yale Street; thence 
southerly on a line parallel to and 200 feet 
westerly of the westerly line of Yale Street 
to a point 200 feet southerly of the southerly 
line of Noyes Street; thence easterly on a 
line parallel to and 200 feet southerly of the 
southerly line of Noyes Street to a point 200 
feet westerly of the westerly line of South 
Street; thence southerly on a line 200 feet 
west of and parallel with the westerly line of 
South Street to a point 200 feet south of the 
southerly line of Rockingham Street; thence 
easterly on a line 200 feet south of and 
parallel with the southerly line of Rocking- 
ham Street to a point 200 feet westerly of 
the westerly line of Donovan Street; thence 
southerly on a line 200 feet west of and 
parallel with the westerly line of Donovan 
Street to a point 200 feet south of the 
southerly line of Wiggin Street; thence 
easterly on a line 200 feet south of and 
parallel with the southerly line of Wiggin 
Street extended to the track of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad; thence northerly by 
the track of the Boston and Maine Railroad 
to the point of beginning. 

Beginning on the south line of Bridge 
Street, 1,200 feet west of the west line of 
South Pembroke Road, thence southerly in 
a line parallel to and 1,200 feet from the 
westerly line of South Pembroke Road to a 
point 200 feet north of the north line of 
Lawrence Street; thence westerly and south- 
erly in a line parallel to and 200 feet from the 
westerly line of Lawrence Street to a point 
100 feet south of the south end of Lawrence 
Street; thence easterly on a line parallel to 
and 100 feet distant from the southerly end 
of Lawrence Street to the easterly line of 
South Pembroke Road; thence northerly 
by the easterly line of South Pembroke Road 
to the southerly line of North Pembroke 
Road; thence easterly by the southerly line 
of North Pembroke Road to the easterly 
line of Greeley Street; thence southerly by 
the easterly line of Greeley Street to a point 
100 feet south of the south line of a proposed 
street; thence easterly on a line parallel to 
and 100 feet southerly of the southerly line 
of Proposed Street to the northerly line of 
the Branch Turnpike; thence northeasterly 
by the northerly line of Branch Turnpike to 
to the southerly line of the North Pembroke- 
Road; thence easterly by the southerly line 



of the North Pembroke Road to a point 200 
feet easterly of the easterly line of Roy Street 
extended southerly; thence northerly and 
easterly parallel to and 200 feet from the 
easterly and southerly lines of Roy Street to 
the northerly line of the Branch Turnpike; 
thence easterly by the northerly line of the 
Branch Turnpike to the southerly line of 
the Loudon Road; thence at right angles 
across the Loudon Road to a point 200 feet 
north of the north line of the Loudon Road; 
thence westerly in a line parallel to and 200 
feet north of the Loudon Road to a point 

200 feet east of the east line of the Canter- 
bury Road; thence northerly on a line 
parallel to and 200 feet easterly of the east 
line of Canterbury Road to a point 200 feet 
north of the north line of Burns Avenue ex- 
tended easterly; thence westerly on a line 

201 feet north of and parallel to the north- 
erly line of Burns Avenue to the easterly 
line of Ormond Street; thence southerly on 
the easterly line of Ormond Street to a point 
200 feet north of the north line of Prescott 
Street; thence westerly on a line parallel to 
and 200 feet north of the north line of Pres- 
cott Street to the east line of land of the 
State of New Hampshire; thence southerly 
by the easterly line of land of the State of 
New Hampshire to the south line of Bridge 
Street; thence westerly by the southerly line 
of Bridge Street to the point of beginning. 

Also all territory lying easterly of the 
Merrimack River that is bounded as fol- 
lows: Beginning at the intersection of the 
center line of Bridge Street with the center 
line of the Merrimack River, thence easterly 
on the center line of Bridge Street, 1,000 
feet; thence southerly at right angles to the 
center line of Bridge Street 1 ,000 feet, thence 
westerly parallel with the center line of 
Bridge Street 1 ,000 feet to the center of the 
Merrimack River, thence northerly by the 
center line of said river to the point of 
beginning. 

Also within the boundaries of the above 
described fire limits there is defined an addi- 
tional restricted area within which the pro- 
visions of Sections 5, 6, 7, 9, 12B and 21 
shall apply. The boundaries of this restricted 
area within the fire limits are as follows: 

Beginning on the track of the Boston and 
Maine Railroad, Claremont Branch, at a 
point opposite Montgomery Street ex- 
tended, thence westerly in the center line 
of North State Street, thence southerly to 



92 



the center line of Pleasant Street, thence 
southerly in the center line of South State 
Street to the center line of Fayette Street 
thence easterly to the Boston and Maine 
Railroad tracks, thence northerly along the 
tracks of the Boston and Maine Railroad to 
the point of beginning. And all schools, hos- 
pitals, theatres, public and private institu- 
tions and other places of public assemblage 
hereafter constructed shall be considered as 
within the restricted area. That the re- 
stricted area covered by this code be ex- 
tended to include the business area in 
Penacook, Ward One, namely: Main Street 
from Contoocook River Bridge to Hoyt's 
Garage, area to include 200 feet east from 
the east side of said street to 200 feet west 
from the west line of said street. 

All other sections of this building code 
not specified in the above restricted area are 
understood to apply to all classes of build- 
ings which may be hereafter erected or 
altered within the fire limits. 

Passed November 10, 1941. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 24 of 
the revised ordinances of the clty of 
Concord relating to fire department. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 



Section 1 : Amend Section 1 of Chapter 
24 of the Revised Ordinances of the City of 
Concord, revised April 1, 1940, by striking 
out the whole of said section, and substitut- 
ing in its place the following new section. 

Section 1 : The Fire Department shall 
consist of a chief engineer, a first deputy, a 
second deputy, 23 permanent men and 
officers and 174 Call-men and call-officers. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect 
as of January 1, 1942. 

Passed, December 8, 1941. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 45 of 
the revised ordinances relating to 
the city ambulance. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1 . Amend Section 1 of Chapter 
45 of the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Concord, revised April 1, 1940, by strik- 
ing out said section, and substituting in the 
place thereof the following new section: 

Section 1. The use of the city ambulance 
shall be subject to such rules and regula- 
tions as may be prescribed by the Police 
Commission. 

January 12, 1942. 



93 



RESOLUTIONS 

passed during the Tear end- 
ing January 12, 1942 



Resolution fixing and determining the 
amount of money to be raised for the 
ensuing financial year. 
Section 1. That there shall be raised, 
and there is hereby ordered to be raised on 
the polls and ratable estates within the 
City the sum of six hundred thirty-two 
thousand seven hundred five dollars 
($632,705) which together with the sums 
which may be raised on railroads and from 
other sources, approximately one hundred 
forty-eight thousand dollars ($148,000), 
is hereby appropriated to defray the neces- 
sary expenses and charges of the City for 
the ensuing financial year; an estimate of 
said expenses and charges is as follows: 

City Poor 

Administration $ 10,285.00 

Relief 35,000.00 

Wood Expense 750.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City. . . 3,580.00 

Old Age Assistance 7,000 . 00 

$ 56,615.00 
Income 3,200.00 

$ 53,415.00 
City Poor, Ward 7 

Administration $ 975.00 

Relief 4,400.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City ... 200 . 00 

Old Age Assistance 1 ,000 . 00 

$ 6,575.00 



Total of All Relief Items. . . $ 59,990 . 00 
Bonds and Notes 

City Hall and Auditorium. . . $ 5,000 . 00 

Public Improvement 43,000.00 

Highway 5,000 . 00 

Departmental Equipment.. . 4,000.00 

Central Fire Station 1,000.00 

Sewers 15,000.00 

W.P.A. Note 20,000 . 00 



Cemeteries 

Salary, Superintendent $ 800 . 00 

Salary, Employees 21 ,490 . 00 

Office 350.00 

Auto Allowance 200 . 00 

Insurance 575 . 00 

Truck Maintenance 1,100.00 

Heat and Light 250 . 00 

Fertilizer and Seed 500 . 00 

Tools and Mower 600 . 00 

Shrubs and Trees 300.00 

Pipe, Paint and Cement .... 600 . 00 

New Roads 50.00 

Truck exchange 500 . 00 

$ 27,315.00 
Estimated Income (Trust 

Funds, etc.) 12,000.00 



$ 15,315.00 

City Hall and Auditorium 

Salary, City Messenger $ 1,650.00 

Salary, Janitor 1,350 . 00 

Fuel 1,700.00 

Lights and Gas 1,150.00 

Insurance 750 . 00 

Supplies 450 . 00 

$ 7,050.00 
Mayor 

Salary, Mayor $ 2,000 . 00 

Salary, Secretary 1,300.00 

Incidentals 200 . 00 

$ 3,500.00 
City Clerk 

Salary, City Clerk $ 2,400.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,100.00 

Salary, Extra Clerk 300 . 00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

Telephone 75.00 

Photostat 250.00 

Supplies 400 . 00 

Steel Counter 567.00 

$ 8,292.00 
City Solicitor 

Salary, City Solicitor $ 1,200.00 

Auto, Allowance 50 . 00 

Clerk Hire 230 . 00 

Supplies 80 . 00 



$ 93,000.00 



$ 1,560.00 
95 



1,200.00 

100.00 

1,300.00 

250.00 

693.00 





92 


50 




40 


00 


s 


3,675 


.50 


$ 


1,000 


00 




200. 


00 




350 


00 




200 


(id 




50 


00 



City Treasurer 

Salary, City Treasurer $ 

Salary, Treasurer of Trust 

Funds 

Salary, Clerk 

Clerical Assistance 

Surety Bond, Treasurer (2 

years) 

Surety Bond, Treasurer, 

Trust Funds (2 years) .... 
Supplies and Incidentals. . . . 

City Physicians 

Salary, City Physician 

Salary, Assistant Physician . . 

Supplies 

Auto Allowance, City 

Auto Allowance, Penacook . . 



$ 1,800.00 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Salary, Sealer % 920.00 

Auto Allowance 200 . 00 

Supplies 100.00 

$ 1,220.00 
Police Court 

Salary, Judge $ 1,800.00 

Salary, Associate Judge 500.00 

Salary, Clerk 600.00 

S 2,900.00 
Probation Officer 

Salary, Officer $ 1,000.00 

Clerk and Supplies 300 . 00 

Mileage 200.00 

$ 1,500.00 
Assessors 

Salary, Assessors $ 6,400 . 00 

Salary, Clerks 3,300 . 00 

Auto Allowance 400 . 00 

Listing Polls 600.00 

Telephone 58.00 

Postage and Printing 400 . 00 

Supplies and Furniture 400 . 00 

S 11,558.00 
Tax Collector 

Salary, Collector S 3,000 . 00 

Salary, Clerks 2,500 . 00 

96 



Printing, Postage and Sta- 
tionery $ 1 ,000 . 00 

Incidentals 88.65 

Collector and Clerks' Bonds. . 1 50 . 00 



$ 6,738.65 



Elections 

Salary, Election Officers $ 2,800.00 

Printing Ballots 500 . 00 

Rent, Voting Places 300 . 00 

Supplies 300 . 00 



$ 3,900.00 

Fire Department 

Salary, Chief $ 2,600.00 

Salaries 45,616.00 

Call Salaries 10,380 . 00 

Fire Alarm 1,900.00 

Fire Inspection 1 ,000 . 00 

Incidentals 443 . 00 

Repairs Buildings 800.00 

Fuel 2,000.00 

Lights 800 . 00 

Upkeep Equipment 2,000.00 

Telephone 675 . 00 

Insurance 1,650.00 

New Equipment 1,000.00 

Hose 1,000.00 

Supplies and Laundry 549 . 00 

Snow Removal 200 . 00 

Air Whistle, F.A 3,100 . 00 



$ 75,713.00 



Health Department 

Salary, Sanitary Officer $ 2,000 . 00 

Salary, Clerk 1,300.00 

Auto Allowance 200 . 00 

Departmental Expenses .... 700 . 00 

Milk Inspection 

Salary, Inspector $ 2,000 . 00 

Auto Allowance 400 . 00 

Incidentals 300.00 



S 6,900.00 



Department of Public Works 

Highway Division: 

Roads and Bridges 8175,661 . 72 

Refuse Collection 30,000 . 00 

Table Garbage 3,900.00 

Lighting Streets 37,452 . 00 



Office Division $ 3,764 . 69 

Engineering Division: 

Engineering 8,846 . 00 

Sewers 14,879.00 

Clerk of Board 200.00 



$274,703.41 



Parks 

Salary, Superintendent $ 1,800.00 

Salary, Employees 8,213 . 00 

Auto Allowance 200 . 00 

Shrubs and Trees 450.00 

Insurance 350.00 

Truck Maintenance 550.00 

Mechanical Equipment 800.00 

Supplies 550.00 



$ 12,913.00 



Trees 

Salary, Warden $ 600 .00 

Salary, Employees 7,374 . 00 

Auto Allowance 200 . 00 

Insurance and Auto Repairs . 600 . 00 

Nursery 200.00 

Spray and Tools 600.00 

Supplies 500.00 

Trade 1937 Truck 775.00 



$ 10,849.00 



Playgrounds and Pools 

Salary, Supervisor $ 1,800.00 

Auto Allowance 400 . 00 

Assistant Supervisor 250.00 

Caretaker, Penacook 250.00 

Handicraft Instructor 180.00 

Instructors 2,200.00 

Pool Guards 1,848.00 

Broken Bridge: 

Supervisor! 330.00 

Rental 75.00 

Upkeep 20.00 

Police 300 . 00 

Insurance 150.00 

Sporting Goods 400.00 

Equipment 1,000.00 

Pool Supplies 300 . 00 

Telephone and Electricity ... 1 50 . 00 

Handicraft Supplies 75.00 

Trucking 300.00 

Labor 700.00 



City Planning Board 

Salaries : 

Research $ 2,000.00 

Drafting 1,200.00 

Publishing Reports: 

Typing 150.00 

Printing 240.00 

Maps and Blueprints 75 .00 

Supplies: 

Drafting 65.00 

Office 85.00 

Telephone 45 . 00 

Postage 25.00 

$ 3,885.00 

Public Library 

Book Purchases $ 4,500 . 00 

Periodicals 400.00 

Rebinding 1,100.00 

Salary, Librarian 1,800.00 

Salary, Staff 10,328.00 

Salary, Janitors 2,200 . 00 

Salary, Branch Librarians . . . 545 . 20 

Rent of Branches 280.00 

Steam Heat 1,400.00 

Light and Power 1,600.00 

Insurance 300 . 00 

Supplies 700.00 

Printing 200.00 

Telephone 140.00 

Building Maintenance 200.00 

Miscellaneous 450 . 00 

Convention Attendance. . . . 200.00 



Estimated Income 
Funds, etc.) 



(Trust 



$ 26,343.20 



8,500.00 



$ 10,728.00 



$ 17,843.20 

Police Department 

Salaries : 

Chief S 2,800.00 

Deputy Chief 2,400.00 

Captain 2,200.00 

Officers 38,800.00 

Specials 4,707.00 

Police Clerk 1,600.00 

Janitor-Mechanic 1,500.00 

House Man 650.00 

Pension 900.00 

Repairs 300.00 

Fuel 1,500.00 

Lights 800.00 

Auto and Auto Supplies 3,500 . 00 



97 



Marking Streets $ 300 . 00 

Telephone, Gamewell and 

Radio 975.00 

Insurance 575 . 00 

Keeping Prisoners 150.00 

Printing 150.00 

Traffic Lights and Supplies . . 1 00 . 00 
Office Supplies and Equip- 
ment 200 . 00 

Incidentals 1,000.00 

$ 65,107.00 
Non-Recurring Traffic Lights 

(2) 2,182.00 

$ 67,289.00 
Comfort Station 

Salaries $ 1,700.00 

Incidentals 150.00 

Repairs 647 . 00 

Lights 100.00 



$ 2,597.00 
Recreation Commission 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course $ 900 . 00 

Memorial Field 1,350 . 00 

Russell Pond Ski Area 300 . 00 

$ 2,550.00 

W.P.A. Department 

W.P.A $ 35,000.00 

Nursery Schools 2,500 . 00 

Work Relief Projects 1 ,500 . 00 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 200.00 

Interest Account 

Bonds and Notes $ 11,913.75 

Temporary Loan 1 ,200 . 00 

W.P.A. Note ,.. 155.56 

S 13,269.31 
Miscellaneous 

Clock, Care of $ 50 . 00 

Incidentals and Land Dam- 
ages 2,500.00 

Printing and Stationery. . . . 2,800.00 

Repairs Buildings 1,000.00 

Board of Aldermen, Salary . . 1,915.00 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital . 5,000 . 00 

N. H. Memorial Hospital. . . . 3,500 . 00 

Family Welfare Society 350 . 00 

Concord District Nursing 

Association 350.00 

98 



Penacook District Nursing 

Association $ 200 . 00 

Memorial Day 400.00 

Armistice Day 100.00 

Spanish War Veterans 400 . 00 

Band Concerts 500 . 00 

Auditing 1,200.00 

Sect. 2. In addition to the foregoing 
there is appropriated for the cemeteries of 
the City one-third of the income from the 
sale of lots and the income derived for the 
care of lots and grading, which sums shall 
be deposited by the Superintendent or others 
receiving them in the City Treasury. The 
care of lots for which the City holds trust 
funds shall be paid from the money appro- 
priated for the care of cemeteries, and so 
much of the income of these trust funds as 
may be thus expended shall be deposited 
in the city treasury at the close of the year, 
and the remainder in each instance cred- 
ited to the individual fund. 

Sect. 3. In addition to the foregoing 
there is appropriated for the use of the 
Public Library the income derived from 
the Public Library Trust Funds, also the 
money collected for fines. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed February 10, 1941. 



Resolution in relation to chapter 3 of 

the revised ordinances. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 

of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the matter of revision of Chapter 3 
of the Revised Ordinances be submitted to 
the Planning Board for a report and recom- 
mendation of all Departments that may be 
legally included. 

Passed March 10, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the appoint- 
ment OF A SPECIAL COMMITTEE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
appoint a committee to be composed of 
three aldermen and two residents of Con- 
cord; it shall be the duty of said committee 
to encourage and induce industries and 
commercial enterprises to locate in Concord. 
Passed March 10, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain land to joseph m. lacasse 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 3445-B of the Assessors' Map 
of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Joseph M. Lacasse for the sum of $93.00; 
that the Mayor is hereby authorized to exe- 
cute a quitclaim deed of said premises to 
the said Joseph M. Lacasse. 

Passed March 10, 1041. 



Resolution relating to the rental of 
certain premises. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That certain land and buildings situated 
northerly from Loudon Road, and formerly 
occupied by the officers, employees and 
students of National Youth Administration, 
be leased to said National Youth Adminis- 
tration for such sum and subject to such 
conditions as the Committee on Lands and 
Buildings may prescribe. That the Mayor is 
hereby authorized to execute any lease that 
said Committee on Lands and Buildings 
shall approve. 

Passed March 10, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the sale of 
certain premises to john p. healey. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lots Nos. 3750, 3752, 3753, 3754, 
3755, 3766, 3767, 3768, 3769, 3774 of the 
Assessors' Map of the City of Concord be 
conveyed to John P. Healey for the sum of 
$175.00; that the Mayor is hereby author- 
ized to execute a quitclaim deed of said 
premises to the said John P. Healey. 

April 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 
convey land to freeman a. west. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 4506 of the Assessors' Map 
of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Freeman West for the sum of $6.74; that 
the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute 



a quitclaim deed of said premises to the 
said Freeman A. West. 
Passed April 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 
convey certain land to the state of 
new hampshire. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That a certain tract or parcel of land 
situated in Concord in the county of Mer- 
rimack and State of New Hampshire 
bounded and described as follows: Begin- 
ning at a stake at the intersection of North 
State and Center Streets; thence N. 76 de- 
grees 15' E. one hundred and eighty-three 
feet and seven inches (183' 7") to a stake, 
thence southerly one hundred thirty-six 
feet and ten inches (136' 10") to land of the 
State of New Hampshire; thence westerly 
by said land of the State of New Hampshire 
and the State Library to North State Street; 
thence northerly by said North State Street 
ninety-six feet and ten inches (96' 10") to 
the bound begun at, meaning and intend- 
ing to convey the same premises acquired 
by the City of Concord by purchase and 
condemnation pursuant to authority granted 
to said City by Chapter 267, Laws of 1891 ; 
that the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises 
to the State of New Hampshire. 



Passed Apr 



[941 



Resolution — appropriating $250.00 for 

an industrial slirvey. 
Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 

of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of $250.00 is hereby ap- 
propriated out of any funds in the treas- 
ury not otherwise appropriated to be 
expended for an industrial survey of Con- 
cord; said sum shall be expended under the 
direction and control of the Committee on 
New Industries. 

Passed April 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 
convey certain premises. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 
That a certain tract of land on Curtis 

Road in Concord taxed in 1937 to Carlton 



99 



L. Ruiter and described on the Assessors' 
Books as being lot No. 8024 or No. 47 11 on 
the Assessors' Map of the City of Concord 
be conveyed to Rollo Earl Dow for the 
sum of 871.66; that the Mayor is hereby 
authorized to execute a quitclaim deed of 
said premises to the said Rollo Earl Dow. 

Passed April 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the sale of 
certain premises to florence e. 
mcdonald. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That lot No. 3449A-29 of the Assessors' 
Map of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Florence E. McDonald for the sum of SI. 00; 
that the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises 
to the said Florence E. McDonald. 

April 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the payment of 
compensation to the acting superin- 
tendent of parks and cemeteries. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Park and Cemetery Commis- 
sion is hereby authorized to pay the acting 
superintendent of parks and cemeteries 
fair and reasonable compensation for his 
services; that said commission is authorized 
to pay said acting superintendent for serv- 
ices performed since the time of his appoint- 
ment as acting superintendent. 

Passed May 12, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain premises to lynold l. 

LAFLEUR. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the title acquired by the City to lot 
No. 4731-17 of the Assessors' Map of the 
City of Concord through the sale of said 
premises for non-payment of 1937 taxes be 
conveyed to Lynold L. LaFleur for the 
sum of $82.37; that the Mayor is hereby 
authorized to execute a quitclaim deed of 
said premises to the said Lynold H. LaFleur. 

Passed May 12, 1941. 



RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING THE CONVEYANCE 
OF CERTAIN PREMISES TO PETER BART. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 4222A-1 of the Assessors' 
Map of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Peter Bart for the sum of $25.00; that the 
Mayor is hereby authorized to execute a 
quitclaim deed of said premises to the said 
Peter Bart. 

May 12, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain premises to bertha m. pratt. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the following described premises be 
conveyed to Bertha M. Pratt for the sum of 
$50.00: Beginning at the intersection of two 
ditches, it being the northwest corner of 
land of Charles J. McKee and the northeast 
corner of land of Warren M. Davis and the 
southeast corner of the tract conveyed; 
thence N. 14 degrees 30' W. through land 
of City of Concord a distance of 167.5'; 
thence N. 61 degrees 28' W., a distance of 
115.8' to an iron pin at the corner of land 
of Bertha M. Pratt; thence S. 27 degrees 
05' W. by land of Pratt a distance of 1 1 5.97' 
to an iron pipe; thence S. 30 degrees 12' 
W., by land of Florence L. Cofiin a distance 
of 69.03' to an iron pipe at land of Margaret 
B. and Royal A. Ford; thence S. 26 degrees 
18' W. by land of Ford a distance of 77.4' 
to land of Warren M. Davis; thence south- 
easterly by land of Davis a distance of 266.5' 
to the point of beginning. Subject to a right 
of way on the westerly side of said tract. 
Also reserving a 25' right of way across the 
southerly end of tract. Being part of 508-255, 
508-286, 515-83; that the Mayor is hereby 
authorized to execute a quitclaim deed of 
said premises to the said Bertha M. Pratt. 

Passed May 12, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain premises to ellsworth p. 
runnells. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the premises described in the deed 
of Everett H. Runnells to the City of Con- 



100 



cord dated June 18, 1930 and recorded Mer- 
rimack County Registry Book 512, Page 
433 be conveyed to Ellsworth P. Runnells 
for the sum of $50.00; that the Mayor is 
hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim 
deed of said premises to the said Ellsworth 
P. Runnells. 

Passed May 12, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain premises to howard a. 

CORSON. 



Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City oj Concord, as follows: 

That lots Nos. 4609, 4610, 4611, 4614, 
4616, 4617, 4618, 4619, 4631 of the Asses- 
sors' Map of the City of Concord be con- 
veyed to Howard A. Corson for the sum of 
$29.21; that the Mayor is hereby author- 
ized to execute a quitclaim deed of said 
premises to the said Howard A. Corson. 

Passed May 12, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating money to 
settle claim of ellsworth p. runnells. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of seventy-five ($75.00) 
dollars be and hereby is appropriated out 
of the Incidentals and Land Damage to 
pay the claim of Ellsworth P. Runnells, for 
loam taken by the city from his land. 

Passed May 12, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of 
$10,000.00 and authorizing the issue 
of a note in said sum of $10,000.00. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the sum ten thousand 
dollars ($10,000.00) is hereby appropri- 
ated to be expended, under the direction 
and control of the Board of Airport Com- 
missioners, for the purchase of land to be 
used for airport purposes. 

Sect. 2. To meet the said appropriation 
the City shall borrow the sum of ten thou- 
sand dollars ($10,000.00) and give its 
negotiable, promissory note therefor. This 
note shall be dated June 1, 1941 and shall 
be made payable to the order of the lender 



March 1, 1942, with interest at a rate not to 
exceed 1 per cent per annum payable 
March 1, 1942. The principal of said note 
and the interest thereon shall be made pay- 
able at the office of the City Treasurer at 
Concord, N. H. 

Sect. 3. The City Treasurer is hereby 
authorized to secure proposals for said note 
and shall accept whichever proposal seems 
for the best interests of the City, subject, 
however, to the approval of the Finance 
Committee of the Board of Aldermen. The 
right shall be reserved to reject any and 
all bids. 

Sect. 4. This resolution shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed May 19, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the issuance of 
promissory notes in the amount of 
$80,000.00 for the purpose of acquir- 
ing land, erecting, furnishing and 
originally equipping thereon a 
school building in union school 
district. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1 . That the sum of eighty thou- 
sand dollars ($80,000.00) is hereby appro- 
priated for the use of Union School District 
to purchase a school house lot on the west 
side of Canterbury Road in Concord, be- 
tween North Pembroke Road and Loudon 
Road and to erect, furnish and originally 
equip thereon a school building and to grade 
the lot around said building. 

Sect. 2. To meet said appropriation the 
City shall borrow the sum of eighty thou- 
sand dollars ($80,000.00) and give its ne- 
gotiable, promissory notes therefor. These 
notes shall be dated July 1, 1941 and shall 
be as many in number and in such amounts, 
not exceeding in the aggregate the sum of 
eighty thousand dollars ($80,000.00), as 
the City Treasurer shall determine and 
direct; said notes shall be made payable to 
the order of the lenders or lender with in- 
terest at a rate not to exceed 1 l A per cent 
per annum payable semiannually on the 
first day of January and the first day of 
July in each year. Twenty thousand dollars 
($20,000.00) of said notes shall become due 
and payable on the first day of July, 1942, 
and twenty thousand dollars ($20,000.00) 



101 



annually on the first day of July in each 
succeeding year until and including the 
first day of July, 1945. The principal of said 
notes and the interest thereon shall be 
made payable at the office of the City 
Treasurer at Concord, N. H. 

Sect. 3. The City Treasurer is hereby 
authorized to secure proposals for said notes 
and shall accept whichever proposal seems 
for the best interests of the City and Union 
School District, subject, however, to the 
approval of the Finance Committee of the 
Board of Aldermen. The right shall be re- 
served to reject any and all bids. 

Sect. 4. The Mayor and City Treasurer 
are hereby authorized to execute on behalf 
of the City an agreement with Union School 
District a copy of which said agreement is 
hereto attached. 

Sect. 5. This resolution shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed May 19, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the convey- 
ance OF CERTAIN LAND TO FRED A. LEWIS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 3880-31 of the Assessors' 
Map of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Fred A. Lewis for the sum of $25.00; that 
the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quitclaim deed of said premises to said 
Fred A. Lewis. 

Passed June 9, 1941. 



Resolution rescinding a resolution 
passed june 9, 1941. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a resolution passed June 9, 1941 
authorizing the conveyance of lot No. 
3880-31 of the Assessors' Map of the City 
of Concord to Fred A. Lewis is hereby 
rescinded. 

Passed July 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain land to frank a. lewis. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 

of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 3880-31 of the Assessors' 



Map of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Frank A. Lewis for the sum of $25.00; that 
the Mayor is hereby authorized to execute 
a quitclaim deed of said premises to said 
Frank A. Lewis. 

Passed July 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the convey- 
ance of certain land. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lots No. 3810, 3811 and 3812 of the 
Assessors' Map of the City of Concord be 
conveyed to John Fagan for the sum of 
$50.00; that the Mayor is hereby authorized 
to execute a quitclaim deed of said premises 
to the said John Fagan. 

Passed July 14, 1941. 



Resolution discontinuing a certain area 
as a public park. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a certain tract of land bounded on 
the west by North State Street, on the north 
by Center Street, on the east and south by 
land of the State of New Hampshire be dis- 
continued as a public park. 

Passed July 14, 1941. 



Resolution rescinding a resolution au- 
thorizing THE SALE OF CERTAIN LAND. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a resolution heretofore adopted 
authorizing the conveyance of lot No. 8288 
of the Assessors' Map of the City of Concord 
to Walter S. Tucker for the sum of $25.00 
is hereby rescinded. 

Passed August 11, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the sale of 
certain land. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 8288 of the Assessors' Map 
of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Walter S. Tucker for the sum of $35.00; 



102 



that the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises 
to the said Walter S. Tucker. 



Passed August 



1041 



Resolution adopting a petition request- 
ing THE APPOINTMENT OF AN ADDITIONAL 
BAIL COMMISSIONER. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City oj Concord, as follows: 

That the attached petition requesting the 
appointment of an additional bail com- 
missioner is hereby adopted and the city 
solicitor is instructed to present said petition 
to a Justice of the Superior Court. 

Passed August 11, 1941. 



Resolution in relation to repairs to the 
auditorium. 

Resolved by the Board oj Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of $25,000 is hereby appro- 
priated for the purpose of performing neces- 
sary repairs in the Auditorium, and City 
Hall. 

Said sum to be expended under the di- 
rection and control of the Committee on 
Lands and Buildings. 

That the City Treasurer is authorized to 
borrow said sum of $25,000 and to issue 
note of the City of Concord therefor, said 
note to mature May 1 , 1 942, and the inter- 
est on said indebtedness shall not exceed 
2 per centum per annum. 

Passed August 18, 1941. 



Resolution in relation to the salary, 
city messenger. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That for the remainder of the year 1941, 
the balance of the amount appropriated for 
Salary, City Messenger, be paid to City 
Messenger, Henry W. Smith. 

Passed August 18, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain land to jennie l. hargen. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 3813 of the Assessors' Map 



of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Jennie L. Hargen for the sum of $20.00; 
that the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises to 
the said Jennie L. Hargen. 
Passed September 8, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of certain land to michael j. duffy. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
oj the City oj Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 2187 of the Assessors' Map 
of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Michael J. 'Duffy for the sum of $159.24; 
that the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises to 
the said Michael J. Duffy. 

Passed September 8, 1941. 



Resolution in relation to the 1941 
CITY report. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the City Planning Board be au- 
thorized to prepare and have printed in due 
time the 1941 City Report and that they be 
authorized to procure photographs for the 
said City Report and said photographs to 
be paid from the 1941 appropriation of 
Printing and Stationery. 

Passed September 8, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating money for ad- 
ditional POLICE PROTECTION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of four hundred ($400) 
dollars be and hereby is appropriated out 
of any money in the Treasury not otherwise 
appropriated, to cover the cost for the re- 
mainder of the fiscal year of additional 
Police Protection. 

Passed September 8, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating funds for 
vv.p.a. projects. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of twenty-five thousand 
($25,000) is hereby appropriated to be ex- 
pended for public improvements of a per- 



103 



manent nature; that said sum shall be ex- 
pended under the direction and control of 
the W.P.A. Project Committee; that the 
City Treasurer is authorized to borrow said 
sum of twenty-five thousand dollars 
($25,000) and to issue note or notes of the 
City therefor, said note or notes to mature 
April 5, 1942 and the interest on said in- 
debtedness shall not exceed 2 per centum 
per annum. 

Passed September 8, 1941. 



Resolution requesting a study of the 
feasibility of a municipal-owned park- 
ING LOT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Planning Board be requested to 
investigate and report upon the feasibility of 
establishing a municipal parking lot on the 
west side of North State Street in the general 
area which lies between the Central Fire 
Station and the Christian Science Church. 

Passed October 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the convey- 
ance of certain land to marceline 
tetrault. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 7352-A 17 of the Assessors' 
Map of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Marceline Tetrault for twelve dollars 
eighty-one cents ($12.81); the Mayor is 
hereby authorized to execute a quitclaim 
deed of said premises to the said Marceline 
Tetrault. 

Passed October 14, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the convey- 
ance OF CERTAIN LAND TO PERCY H. 

SANBORN. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 8226 of the Assessors' Map 
of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Percy H. Sanborn for the sum of one dollar 
($1.00); the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises 
to the said Percy H. Sanborn. 

Passed October 14, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating fifty-one 
thousand, seventy dollars and forty- 
three cents to pay for real estate 
sold to the city of concord for unpaid 
taxes for the year 1940. 

Resolved by the Board oj Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of fifty-one thousand, seventy 
dollars and forty-three cents, ($51,070.43) 
be and hereby is appropriated, to pay the 
amount due the City of Concord for Real 
Estate purchased at the Tax Collector's 
sale, September 25, 1941, of Real Estate, 
for unpaid taxes for the year of 1940. 

Passed November 10, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating the sum of 
twenty-two hundred fifty dollars. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of twenty-two hundred 
fifty dollars ($2,250.00) is hereby appro- 
priated out of any funds in the Treasury not 
otherwise appropriated, to pay and settle 
the claim of Aune Sari, Administratrix of 
the Estate of Mikko Saari against the City 
of Concord; said sum shall be expended 
under the direction and control of the Com- 
mittee on Finance. 

Passed November 10, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the conveyance 
of land to myrtie m. la valley. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That lot No. 39 12- A of the Assessors' 
Map of the City of Concord be conveyed to 
Myrtie M. La Valley for the sum of twelve 
dollars fifty cents ($12.50). 

That the Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute a quitclaim deed of said premises to 
the said Myrtie M. La Valley. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



Resolution appropriating $3,351.67 for 
the airport. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of $3,351.67 be appro- 
priated out of any money in the Treasury 



104 



not otherwise appropriated for the Munici- 
pal Airport to pay for work done by the 
Board of Public Works at the Airport. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the planning 
board to make report on the advis- 
ability of re-districting a certain 

AREA. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Planning Board is authorized 
to make a study and report on the advis- 
ability of converting the following described 
area into a commercial district. 

Beginning at the center line of Airport 
Road 100 feet southerly from the southerly 
line of Pembroke Road; thence easterly in a 
line parallel and 100 feet distant from the 
southerly side line of Pembroke Road to the 
easterly boundary line of the N. H. National 
Guard Camp Ground; thence northerly by 
said line to the center line of Pembroke 
Road; thence easterly by the center line of 
Pembroke Road to its intersection with the 
center line of Grover Street; thence north- 
erly by center line of Grover Street and 
Grover Street extended to the northerly 
side line of Loudon Road; thence continu- 
ing in the same direction to a point in a line 
parallel to the northerly side line of Loudon 
Road and 100 feet distant therefrom; thence 
southwesterly by said line parallel to Lou- 
don Road and Bridge Street to a point 
opposite a point in the center line of Bridge 
street and 100 feet westerly from the inter- 
section of the westerly side line of Airport 
Road and the center line of Bridge Street; 
thence southerly at right angles to the center 
line of Bridge Street to a point 100 feet dis- 
tant from the southerly line of Bridge 
Street; thence easterly to point of beginning. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



Resolution in relation to sewer rental 

CHARGES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That a committee consisting of the follow- 
ing: City Engineer, City Solicitor and Plan- 
ning Board be and hereby are, a committee 



to draw up an Ordinance, covering sewer 
rental charges, as per the enabling act, 
passed by the 1941 Legislature, and present 
same to the Board of Aldermen for consider- 
ation. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



Resolution relating to the earnings of 
city departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That such portion as may be needed of 
earnings (so called) be and hereby are ap- 
propriated to the various departments of 
the City of Concord, having same, for the 
year 1941 to balance their accounts. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the finance com- 
mittee to arrange for an audit of 
accounts and books of city depart- 
ments FOR the year 1941. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the Finance Committee 
be and hereby is authorized to employ Cer- 
tified Public Accountants to audit the ac- 
counts and books of the City Departments 
and Commissions for the year 1941. 

Sect. 2. That said audit be at the dis- 
cretion of and under the control of said 
Finance Committee. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



Resolution authorizing the planning 
board to make a study and report 
relative to the changing of the 
boundaries of existing zoning districts 
and the creation of new districts. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Planning Board is hereby au- 
thorized to make a study and report on the 
advisability of changing the boundaries of 
the existing zoning districts and establishing 
new districts in order to create additional 
sites for commercial and industrial enter- 
prises. 

Passed December 8, 1941. 



105 



Resolution authorizing the planning 
board to prepare a list of public 
works projects. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Planning Board be and hereby 
is authorized to prepare, in connection 
with its capital budget study, a list of 
needed and desirable public works projects 
for submission to the Board of Aldermen 
with a view toward participating in the 
program of the Federal Public Work Re- 
serve. 

Passed December 30, 1941. 



Probation Officer . . . 
Work Relief Projects 
Zoning 



10.36 
12.75 
60.20 



Resolution appropriating $30,000.00 for 
the municipal airport. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of thirty thousand dollars 
($30,000.00) is hereby appropriated to be 
expended in enlarging the municipal air- 
port; that said sum shall be expended under 
the direction and control of the Board of 
Airport Commissioners; That the City 
Treasurer is hereby authorized to borrow 
said sum of $30,000.00 in such manner and 
subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Committee on Finance shall prescribe. 

Passed January 9, 1942. 



Resolution appropriating money for 
deficits in the several departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as. follows: 

Section 1. That the sum of forty-six 
hundred three and 10/100 dollars ($4,603.10) 
be, and hereby is, appropriated out of any 
money in the treasury not otherwise appro- 
priated, to pay outstanding claims as 
follows : 

Cemeteries $3,800.00 

City Physicians 57 . 10 

Department of Public Works, 

Office 161.60 

Elections 134.98 

Interest, W. P. A. Note 1.04 

Lighting Streets 342.90 

Nursery Schools 22 . 17 

106 



$4,603.10 



Sect. 2. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for City Hall and Auditorium 
for the year 1941, the sum of seven hundred 
sixty-five and 23/100 dollars ($765.23), the 
same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 3. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for City Planning Board for 
the year 1941, the sum of twenty and 99/100 
dollars ($20.99), the same being the earn- 
ings of this department. 

Sect. 4. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for City Clerk for the year 
1941, the sum of seventy and 86/100 dol- 
lars ($70.86), the same being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 5. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for Engineering Department 
for the year 1941, the sum of forty-seven 
and 28/100 dollars ($47.28), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 6. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for Fire Department for the 
year 1941, the sum of three hundred fifteen 
and 05/100 dollars ($315.05), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 7. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for Parks for the year 1941, 
the sum of fourteen hundred eighty-two and 
60/100 dollars ($1,482.60), the same being 
the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 8. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for Playground Department 
for the year 1941, the sum of thirty-two 
and 01/100 dollars ($32.01), the same 
being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 9. That there be transferred to the 
appropriation for Recreation Commission 
for the year 1941, the sum of thirty-five 
hundred fifty-two and 16/100 dollars 
($3,552.16), the same being the earnings of 
this department. 

Sect. 10. That there be transferred to 
the appropriation for Roads and Bridges for 
the year 1941, the sum of twenty-two thou- 
sand seven hundred and 60/100 dollars 
($22,700.60), the same being the earnings 
of this department. 

Sect. 1 1 . That there be transferred to 
the appropriation for Sewers for the year 



1941, the sum of thirty-nine hundred 
ninety-two and 84/100 dollars ($3,992.84), 
the same being the earnings of this de- 
partment. 

Sect. 12. That there be transferred to 
the appropriation for Tax Collector for the 
year 1941, the sum of four hundred seventv- 
nine and 21 100 dollars ($479.21). the 
same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 13. That there be transferred to 
the appropriation for Trees for the year 
1941, the sum of three hundred twenty- 
seven and 03/100 dollars ($327.03), the 
same being the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 14. That there be transferred to 
the appropriation for Work Relief Projects 
for the year 1941, the sum of one hundred 
fifteen dollars ($115.00), the same being 
the earnings of this department. 

Sect. 1 5. This resolution shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed January 12, 1942. 



Resolution in relation to city employ- 
ees ENTERING THE UNITED STATES ARMY. 
NAVY OR MARINES. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 



That the employment of all city employ- 
ees who may enter or be called for service 
in the United States Army, Navy or Ma- 
rines be secured for them upon their return 
from said service. 

Passed January 12, 1942. 



Resolution in relation to the appro- 
priation of money for the police 
department. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of five hundred fifty-two 
and 84/100 dollars ($552.84) be and hereby 
is appropriated out of any money in the 
treasury not otherwise appropriated to par- 
tially balance the accounts of the Police 
Department for the year 1941 and that the 
sum often hundred four and 84/100 dollars 
($1,004.84) which represents the earnings 
of said department also be appropriated to 
said Department to balance the accounts 
for the year 1941. 

Passed January 12. 1942. 



107 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Activities in 1940 8 

Assessment 12 

Appendix 64 

Bond Funds 15 

Building Activity 49 

Cemeteries 26 

City Clerk 10 

City Government 6 

City Officials 7 

Elections 11 

Engineering 55 

Examination of Plumbers 51 

Finances 15 

Financial Statements and Sta- 
tistics 64 

Fire Protection 44 

For Victory 4 

Garbage Disposal 55 

General Fund . . . .• 15 

I lealth and Sanitation 22 

Hydrants 47 

Legal Service 17 

Library 32 

Mayor's Message 5 

Medical Service 25 

Milk Inspection 24 



PAGE 

Municipal Airport 57 

Municipal Court 43 

Parks 26 

Planning 19 

Playground and Bath 28 

Plumbing Inspection 51 

Police Protection 38 

Probation 42 

Public Works 52 

Recreation 28 

Refuse Collection 55 

Relief 36 

Schools 61 

Sewers 56 

Snow Plowing and Sanding. ... 54 

Special Recreational Facilities. . 30 

Street Lighting 56 

Tax Collection 14 

Trees 27 

Trust Funds 16 

Vital Statistics 10 

Water Supply 59 

Weights and Measures 48 

WPA 35 

Zoning Appeals 50 



108