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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

M. DUW 



: 



********* 



A HEI'IIIIT Til THE 

CITIZENS (IF r IB M C II II II 






1942 



THE NINETIETH 

ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE 
TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1942 




Capital of the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Merrimack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27,771 (J 940) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision of the City 
Planning Board by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 




A MESSAGE from the MAYOR 

In his message to you a year ago, the late Mayor John W. 
Storrs pointed out that "'business as usual' 1 would be subordi- 
nated to the all-out war effort, and bespoke your patience where 
municipal facilities and services were not what you were accus- 
tomed to enjoy. 

Looking back over the past year, your city government and 
department heads can attest wholeheartedly to the fact that 
you, as a community, have been most patient, understanding 
and cooperative when imperative municipal curtailments were 
necessary. 

Even in war time there is no particular magic in the operation 
of a well organized city. It requires clear thinking, sound planning 
and concerted action by many people working together. Individ- 
ually, each of you must contribute your share, be it large or small, 
for the common good. It gives me no small measure of satisfaction 
to note that it is Concord's good fortune that so many of its citi- 
zens are generously endowed with these virtues. 

May it be added that the members of the Board of Aldermen 
are ever mindful of their trust as your chosen representatives. You 
may be certain that they will bend every effort to smooth your 
way in the trying days that are ahead. 




Mayor 
In everlasting debt they stop to gaze 



YOUR CITY Takes Inventory 
After a Tear of War 



11-t-tiff-fi-f-f-t-f-fiii 

C Records of the Registrar of Vital 
Statistics indicated a mild "war 
boom" in marriages; the 1941 total 
was exceeded by 34 per cent. 
C. The City Clerk's office noted a 
large increase in demand for certi- 
fied copies of vital statistics growing 
out of the checking of citizenship by 
war production industries. 
C[ Due to travel restrictions, popu- 
lation loss and no new car registra- 
tions, receipts from auto permits 
dropped from the 1941 total of $37,- 
779.12 to $27,969.48. 
C Restrictions on time purchases 
and new car sales cut receipts from 
mortgages and conditional sales by 
more than one-half. 
CI The Board of Assessors' annual 
census indicated a population loss 
of 690 polls since the taking of the 
1941 count. 

d The Board of Aldermen passed 
an air raid and blackout ordinance 
in the interest of the community 
defense program. 

C. Added picnicking facilities were 
provided in city parks as a part of 
the "stay-at-home" recreation pro- 
gram. 

C. The City erected a Roll of Honor 
listing the names of Concord citi- 
zens serving in the armed forces. 
C. At the request of the Board of 
Aldermen, the Planning Board stud- 
ied the feasibility of several public 
works projects to provide employ- 

4 ' - ' City of Concord 



fffffffff 



ment during the post-war read- 
adjustment period. 
(I. Due to travel restrictions, at- 
tendance at the city playgrounds 
during the summer reached an all- 
time high of 1 12,535, an increase of 
30,000 over the 1941 total. 
C The regular membership of the 
municipal golf course decreased 
about 20 per cent due to members 
going into the armed services. 
C Insufficient funds and travel re- 
strictions caused the closing of the 
Russell Pond Winter Sports Area. 
C. For its part in the Victory Book 
Campaign, the Public Library 
sorted, packed and sent more than 
12,000 books to military posts. 
C. Because of transportation diffi- 
culties, there was a noticeable in- 
crease in circulation at the four 
suburban branch libraries. 
C[ Due to defense labor demands, 
the number of Concord persons on 
relief decreased about 50 per cent, 
effecting a $55,791.68 reduction in 
relief costs. 

C All W. P. A. projects were dis- 
continued by government order; 
almost all of the city's 234 project 
workers found employment in pri- 
vate industry. 

C The Police Department com- 
pleted 1,096 investigations at the 
request of the federal government 
and industries engaged in defense 
production. 



C. The activities of the auxiliary 
police force were continued and 
members were instructed in ap- 
proved practices of coping with in- 
cidents that might occur during the 
war emergency. 

CL Police cruiser routes were rear- 
ranged and mileage was cut sharply 
to save gasoline and tires for the 
war effort. 

C In order to conserve oil, the 
heating unit at the Penacook Police 
Station was converted to the use of 
coal. 

CL A sharp decrease occurred in the 
number of criminal and civil cases 
to come before the Municipal 
Court; the court attributed this 
trend to less idleness due to the 
rapid expansion of defense employ- 
ment, to a loss of population, espe- 
cially young men, to the armed 
forces, and to fewer traffic viola- 
tions due to travel restrictions. 
C The auxiliary fire force, 100 
strong, underwent an intensive 
training program covering a wide 
range of air raid "incidents." 
C The fire signal system was placed 
at the disposal of local civilian de- 
fense authorities for air raid alarm 
purposes. 

C Due to war restrictions on non- 
essential construction activity, the 
valuation of building permits dropped 
to $124,295 from the 1941 total of 
$394,105; only 11 new dwelling 
units were completed as against 71 
in 1941. 

C. Vacant dwelling units continued 
to increase due, in most part, to a 
shifting of population to defense 
employment areas. 
CL Due to a policy of reduced 



construction for the duration, the 
Board of Public Works undertook no 
large scale high way or sewer projects. 
C Public Roads Administration 
limitations on highway mainte- 
nance cut the City's tar allowance 
from 282,700 gallons to 138,783 
gallons. 

C. On several occasions the De- 
partment of Public Works placed 
men and equipment at the disposal 
of civilian groups participating in 
war salvage drives. 

C. The airport expansion project, a 
part of the national program of air- 
port development, was completed. 
CL The administration building and 
Hangar No. 1 were extensively 
altered to provide additional space 
for increased operations at the air- 
port. 

CL The construction of a new han- 
gar was authorized by the Board of 
Aldermen to facilitate the conduct 
of the C. A. A. pilot training pro- 
gram. 

CL The flying school at the airport 
graduated 525 students participat- 
ing in the war training service 
program. 

CL Due to the freezing of materials, 
the Water Department halted its 
construction activities and abated 
water bills amounting to $29,075.91. 

CL More than 200 tons of metal 
scrap and thousands of pounds of 
tin cans were collected by the city's 
public and private school children 
for use in the war effort. 

CL Public school teachers functioned 
willingly and efficiently during va- 
rious registrations conducted by 
selective service and rationing au- 
thorities. 



Annual Report 



GOVERNMENT 



Hon. Charles J. McKee 

Mayor 

John C. Tilton 

Substitute Mayor 



ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE AND 

MEMBERS BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

William A. Stevens 
John W. Stanley 
John C. Tilton 
Robert W. Potter 
John Swenson 
Charles A. Bartlett 



WARD ALDERMEN 

Charles P. Coakley 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William J. Flynn 
Winfield J. Phillips 
Harry D. Challis 
Clarence L. Clark 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Clarence E. Huggins 
Thomas B. Jennings 



Ward 1 
Ward 2 

Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward 5 
Ward 6 
Ward? 
WardS 
Ward 9 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Arbitration: 

Aldermen Clark, Bartlett, Flynn, 

Tilton. 
Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen Stevens, Coakley, LaPointe, 

Stearns. 
Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Tilton, Challis, Jennings, 

LaPointe. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Tilton, Jennings, Phillips, 

Stanley. 
Finance: 

Mayor Charles J. McKee, Aldermen 

Challis, Phillips, Stanley, Swenson. 
Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Clark, Flynn, Potter. 
Lands and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett, Huggins, Jennings, 

Stearns. 
Playgrounds and Bath: 

Aldermen LaPointe, Coakley, Flynn, 

Huggins, Jennings. 
Police and License: 

Aldermen Stevens, Huggins, Potter, 

Tilton. 
Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Flynn, Clark, Huggins, Jen- 
nings. 
Relief: 

Aldermen Stearns, Phillips, Stanley. 



HON. JOHN WILLIAM STORRS, Mayor 
Died: September 19, 1942 

Whereas, the Infinite but Loving God, the source of all life, has called home to 
Himself the soul of our late Mayor, John William Storrs, be it therefore 

Resolved, that we, the members of the Board of Aldermen of the City of Concord, 
New Hampshire, do hereby give expression to our own deep sense of personal loss in 
the passing of Mayor Storrs, and that we do also emphasize the even greater loss to 
our city and to its people, and be it further 

Resolved, that we do recognize in our late Mayor Storrs an unusual character; 
one who overcame difficulties and physical handicap to become an outstanding 
bridge builder; one who was elected Mayor of the City of Concord several years after 
he had lived man's allotted time of three score years and ten, and who, at the time of 
his death, had nearly completed half of his fifth term as Mayor, thus breaking all 
precedents; and one, too, whose kindly spirit endeared him to the hearts of the peo- 
ple, and whose policies and practices in office were sound, fair and efficient, and be it 
further 

Resolved, that these resolutions be spread upon the Records of the Board of 
Aldermen and that a copy of the same be sent to the bereaved family. 

Adopted by the Board of Aldermen 
October 13, 1942 



City of Concord 



OFFICIALS 



Edward E. Beane 
Arthur E. Roby 

Edward E. Beane 
Henry W. Smith 

Paul R. Donovan 



Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Physician 
City Physician, 

Assistant Elmer U. Sargent 

City Solicitor Gordon S. Lord 

City Treasurer Carl H. Foster 

Commissioner, Board of 

Public Works Ervin E. Webber 

Fire Chief William T. Happny 

Judge, Municipal 

Court William L. Stevens 

Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court Peter J. King 

Librarian Marion F. Holt 

Milk Inspector Austin B. Presby 

Overseer of Poor Parker L. Hancock 

Overseer of Poor, 

Penacook Charles P. Coakley 

Planning Director Gustaf H. Lehtinen 
Police Chief Arthur W. McIsaac 

Probation Officer Robert L. Colby 

Registrar of 

Vital Statistics Arthur E. Roby 

Sanitary Officer Donald G. Barton 

Sealer of Weights 

and Measures George W. Wilde 

Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries Leslie C. Clark 

Supt. of Streets Ervin E. Webber 

Supt. of Water Works Percy R. Sanders 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds Paul G. Crowell 

Tax Collector Amos B. Morrison 

Tree Warden Ervin E. Webber 

BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND TRUSTEES 

Board of Adjustment: 

Donald G. Matson, Chairman; John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Harold 
E. Langley, Laurence M. Mever. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Charles 



A. Bartlett, Samuel B. Dunsford, John 
N. Engel, Charles W. Howard, Robert 
W. Potter, John Swenson. 

Board of Assessors: 

Clarence O. Philbrick, Chairman; Ed- 
ward F. Donovan, Joseph E. Shepard. 

City Planning Board: 

James M. Langley, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Douglas N. Everett, Warren 
H. Greene, John B. Jameson, Charles 
J. McKee, Dudley W. Orr, Austin E. 
Page, Robert W. Potter. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 
William J. Bishop, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 

Board of Health: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Dr. Paul 
R. Donovan, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, 
Dr. Clinton R. Mullins, Dr. Ellsworth 
M. Tracy. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 
Edward E. Beane, Chairman; William 
T. Happny, Percy R. Sanders. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Oliver Jenkins, President; Henry B. 
Cannon, Jr., Joseph J. Comi, Edward 

A. Dame, Wilbur H. Ferry, William 

B. Mclnnis, Perley B. Phillips, George 
W. Randall, Alexander Rennie, Jr. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman; George A. Hill, 
Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman; Gardner 
G. Emmons, Leigh S. Hall, Charles J. 
McKee, Carleton R. Metcalf. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, Ed- 
gar C. Hirst. 

Board of Water Commissioners: 

James W. Jameson, President; Robert 
W. Brown, Harry H. Dudley, Allen M. 
Freeman, Charles P. Johnson, Donald 
Knowlton, Charles J. McKee, Ben- 
jamin H. Orr, Gardner Tilton. 



Annual Report 



NINETEEN FORTY-TWO 

Facts and Figures 



C The City's financial condition 
showed an improvement of $156,- 
771.98 of which $47,771.98 was 
surplus from operations and $109,- 
000.00 was a reduction in outstand- 
ing bonds and notes. 

C Municipal accounting practices 
were revised by the adoption of a 
purchase order system which pro- 
vides for the taking of discounts by 
prompt payment of bills. 

C. A $214,389 assessed valuation 
increase placed the city's total tax- 
able valuation at $33,282,876 — an 
all-time high. 

C The rent and sale of tax-deeded 
property netted the City $2,709.87 
as compared with $818.03 in 1941. 

C The average tax rate for 1941 
was $38.40, an increase of $1.20 
over that of the previous year. 

C, Delinquent property taxes ac- 
quired by the City at the Tax Col- 
lectors Sale amounted to $40,504.50 
— lowest since 1934. 

C The Planning Board handled 18 
studies covering various municipal 
problems; most of these studies were 
requested by the Board of Alder- 
men and the Board of Public Works. 

C. Toxoid clinics were conducted 
by the Health Department for the 
prevention of diphtheria; 180 chil- 
dren under eight years of age were 
immunized. 



regard to the hospitalization of in- 
digents; hospitals were paid for 
service on a per diem basis for each 
patient instead of receiving a flat 
annual donation. 

C, Weekly library service for hos- 
pital patients and nurses was in- 
augurated. 

C Registration records showed that 
the Public Library served 1,155 
new borrowers. 

d. The number of old age assist- 
ance cases handled by the Relief 
Department increased; payments 
to oldsters averaged nearly $7,000.00 
monthly, the City's share of which 
amounted to about $1,200.00. 

C. Of stolen property valued at 
$3,579.79, the Police Department 
recovered $2,702.76 worth. 

C. The Police Department ex- 
tended its downtown patrol area to 
North State Street; the alarm sys- 
tem was thoroughly overhauled and 
several changes were made in box 
locations to permit greater effi- 
ciency in street patrol. 

C. Placing greater emphasis on the 
investigation of complaints, the 
Police Commission created the posi- 
tion of Police Inspector. 

d The Police Department contin- 
ued its highly successful sponsorship 
of a Junior Police Corps. 



CI The City changed its policy in C. Contrary to general belief, juve- 



City of Concord 



nile delinquency did not increase 
noticeably. 

d The total loss due to fire was 
$25,728.32 as against $39,286.22 in 
1941. 

d The Fire Department purchased 
a new pumping engine to replace 
one of its older trucks. 

d The Park and Cemetery Com- 
mission was abolished and its func- 
tions were transferred to the Board 
of Public Works. 

d The Board of Public Works re- 
established the position of Commis- 
sioner of Public Works. 

d The Highway Department tarred 
more than three miles of gravel 
road; 597 square yards of cement 
walks were constructed in the down- 
town area. 

d Due to abnormal ice conditions, 
10,099 cubic yards of sand were 
spread on streets and sidewalks 
during the winter season. 

d As part of a program of re-estab- 
lishing existing streets, the Engi- 
neering Division surveyed 28.79 
miles of street and set 565 stone 
bounds. 

d The per mile cost of maintaining 
the city's 80 miles of sewer mains 
was $143.92. 

d Completion of the street light 
candlepower readjustment program 
effected a 38 per cent increase in 
street illumination. 



d A two-acre section of Pine Crove 
Cemetery in East Concord was de- 
veloped by the Cemetery Division 
of the Department of Public Works. 

d Snow removal and sanding dur- 
ing the winter season cost the City 

$20,773.72. 

d The Tree Division set out 196 
shade trees along city streets; sev- 
eral newly developed streets were 
lined with shade trees. 

d Considerable progress was made 
on the Rollins Park redevelopment 
project started after complete de- 
struction of the park by the 1938 
hurricane. 

d The town pound in West Con- 
cord, one of the city's historic land- 
marks, was restored by the Depart- 
ment of Public Works working in 
cooperation with a local civic group. 

d The city's annual water con- 
sumption amounted to 1,037,839,- 
900 gallons of which 342,590,900 
gallons were drawn from the driven 
well field in Pembroke. 

d The per pupil cost of operating 
the city's schools was $106.93 or 
$14.79 per capita on the basis of 
total population. 

d The outstanding bonded indebt- 
edness of the Concord School Dis- 
trict amounted to $436,000.00; that 
of the Penacook School District was 

$32,000.00. 



Annual Report 



CITY CLERK 



Arthur E. Robv City Clerk 

Margaret A. Spencer . . . Deputy City Clerk 
1942 Expenditure $7,908.97 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

During 1942 the Board of Alder- 
men held 1 3 regular, one special 
and two adjourned meetings. The 
board also participated in three 
hearings. The board passed 59 
resolutions and 15 ordinances dur- 
ing the year. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The Board of Public Works met 
24 times during 1942. Twelve of 
these were regular meetings, eight 
were special meetings, and four 
were public hearings. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

During the year, 597 births, 371 
marriages and 626 deaths were 
recorded by the City Clerk. The 
number of births increased slightly 
over the 1941 total of 588. Mar- 
riages showed a 34 per cent increase 
over 1941. This abnormal increase 
in the number of recorded mar- 
riages can be attributed in various 
ways to the war situation. Deaths 
decreased from 682 in 1941 to 626. 
The large number of institutional 
deaths which occur in Concord 
each year makes the city's death 
rate a weighted one and one that is 



subject to considerable annual fluc- 
tuation. 

Due to the general policy of 
careful checking by war plants of 
persons seeking employment, the 
demand for certified copies of vital 
statistics continued to increase dur- 
ing 1942. The City Clerk's office 
issued 759 copies of such records at 
a charge of 50 cents each. Many 
additional certificates were fur- 
nished free of charge to persons 
under 21 years of age and persons 
entering the military services. 

MORTGAGES AND CONDITIONAL SALES 

Receipts from the recording of 
mortgages and conditional sales 
dropped from SI, 098. 39 in 1941 to 
$422.30 in 1942. This decrease was 
due to government restrictions 
placed on the time purchase plan 
and to the cessation of new auto- 
mobile purchases. 

LICENCES, FEES, ETC. 

A sizeable reduction in revenue 
received from auto permits oc- 
curred during the year. The sum of 
$27,969.48 was collected as com- 
pared to $37,779.12 for the pre- 
vious year. Restriction of travel and 
lack of new car registrations were 
largely responsible for the shrinking 
of this source of revenue. The large 
number of citizens who have left 
the city for the armed services, 
many of whom were car owners, is 
also a factor in this decrease. The 
year 1943 is certain to bring a fur- 
ther reduction in revenue from 
auto permits. 



10 f * ' City of Concord 



During the year the City Clerk's 
office collected $10,153.21 in fees 
from various sources including taxi, 
theatre, bowling alley, pool table 
and circus licenses. 

NEW ACCOUNTING SYSTEM 

October 1, 1942, marked the be- 
ginning of a revised system of mu- 
nicipal accounting for the City of 
Concord. Under an amendment of 
Chapter Three of the Revised 
Ordinances, the City Clerk was 
made city accounting officer. A new 
order system was established for all 
city purchases with the exception of 
those made by the Board of Public 
Works. The system provides for 
semi-monthly payment of all city 
bills and permits the taking of dis- 
counts when these are available. 
One of the important advantages of 
the new procedure is that depart- 



mental balances can be established 
at a glance. Formerly, this informa- 
tion was not available until some 
time after the close of each month's 
operations. 

. . . Elections 

Concord had two elections dur- 
ing the year, the State Primary on 
September 15. 1942 and the State 
Election on November 3, 1942. Fil- 
ing fees received from candidates 
for representatives and ward offi- 
cers amounted to SI 02.00. 

The city's election expenditures 
during 1942 totaled $3,884.04. 
This money was spent for printing 
of checklists, salaries of election of- 
ficers, rent of voting places, lunches 
for officials in charge of the polls, 
and miscellaneous supplies. 



BIRTHS AND MARRIAGES IN CONCORD 
HAVE INCREASED ANNUALLY SINCE 1938 



BIRTHS 

4 600 

ife: 
































^<? 


MARRIAGES 300 

11: 








INCREASED RATE 

DUE TO 
WAR MARRIAGES 





















I939 



I940 



1 942 



Annual Report '''11 



ASSESSMENT 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Clarence O. Phii. brick. Chairman 
Joseph E. Shepard, Clnk 
Edward F. Donovan 

1942 Expenditure $11,107.24 



REAL PROPERTY 

During the year there were very 
few divisions of existing lots. The 
number of parcels of real estate in 
the city remained at approximately 
12,000. The total number of deeds 
recorded in Concord was 467 or 
163 less than the total for 1941. 
Seventy-six building permits were 
issued during the year, of which 27 
were for new buildings and garages 
and 49 were for remodeling of old 
structures. 

ASSESSED VALUATIONS AND POLLS 

The city's total assessed valua- 



tion for 1942 was $33,282,876.00. 
This amount, which exceeded by 
$214,389.00 the 1941 figure, was 
the highest valuation in the history 
of Concord. 

The number of polls listed during 
the year was 13,184. This repre- 
sented a decrease of 690 from the 
total of the previous year. Of this 
decrease, 476 were men and 214 
were women. There were approxi- 
mately 2,000 more women poll 
taxpayers in the city than there 
were men. 

TAX WARRANT 

City, school and county appro- 
priations amounted to $1,280,049.- 
28. To this sum, the assessors 
added $32,788.94 for errors and 
corrections to bring the total 1942 
tax warrant up to $1,312,838.22. 
On the basis of $1,000.00 of tax 
valuation, the City rate was $38.30 
and the Penacook rate was $41.30. 
The average rate for 1942 was 
pegged at $38.40. 



EDWARD F. DONOVAN 

1935-1942 





VACANT HOUSES ARE INCREASING 






1939 


^L ^L ^L ^k |qq EACH HOUSE REPRESENTS 

fmUi IP EO WM 50 VACANT DWELLING UNITS 




1940 


ffij fly ffli fflft B 


1941 


tP ttt fla ^m IP 1 263 


1942 


iiBL ^tm> ^AL mHL± ^flk ^Hsk ^flL A F) ft 









12 



City of Concord 



TAX 
COLLECTION 



Amos B. Morrison Tax Collector 

1942 Expenditure $7,302.16 

1942 COLLECTIONS 

All but $203,057.14 of the 1942 
tax warrant of $1,312,838.22 was 
collected before the closing of 
books on December 31, 1942. It 
was an interesting fact that al- 
though the 1942 warrant was larger 
than that of the preceding year by 
about $48,000.00, the amount out- 
standing and uncollected at the 
end of the year was $3,803.48 less. 

During the year, by collection 



and abatement, the outstanding 
taxes for the years 1936, 1937 and 
1938 were cleared from the Tax 
Collector's accounts. This was in 
line with the newly adopted policy 
of the Finance Committee to place 
the City on a sound current finan- 
cial basis, and to concentrate col- 
lection efforts on taxes in arrears of 
not-too-long standing. To this end, 
there was included in the Tax 
Collector's budget request for 1943 
a $1,000 item for the services of a 
part-time collector whose duty it 
will be to seek payment of outstand- 
ing poll and personal taxes. 

The accompanying table shows 
comparatively the amount of un- 
paid taxes on the City's books on 
December 31 for the past three 
years. 



} ear 

1932. 

1933. 

1934. 

1935. 

1936. 

1937. 

1938. 

1939. 

1940. 

1941 . 

1942. 



As of 

Dec. 31, I'lto 

$ 2,142.64 

2,345.46 

3,569 1 1 

4,662.05 

5,059.99 

6,342.98 

7,156.18 

7,470.15 

251,325.61 



De 



As of 
. 31, 1941 



As of 
Dec. 31, 1942 



\ 4,883.53 
5,924.65 
6,405.61 
6, 3 11. 56 
8,081 .76 

206,860.62 



i 5,618.11 
6,944.88 
8,371.10 

203,057.14 



Total $290,074.17 $238,467.73 $223,991.23 



TAXES BOUGHT BY CITY 

A considerable improvement in 
tax collections is indicated by the 
fact that the amount of back taxes 
which the City bought at the Tax 
Collector's Sale on September 27, 
1942, was $10,584.97 less than the 



amount acquired in 1941. Last 
year's delinquent taxes totaled 
$40,504.50. 

The table which follows indicates 
the condition of delinquent taxes 
on December 31, 1942. 



Am't Bought Amount Abated by 



Deeded 



Tear 

1938. 
1939. 
1940. 
1941 . 



Amount 

I T nredeemed 



by City Redeemed Assessors to City 

53,467.21 $1,850.40 

3,036.08 1,212.61 $1,535.81 

51,089.47 30,757.43 2,777.72 869.39 16,684.93 

40,504.50 '1.098.24 513.16 30,893.10 



{41,919.30 $36,601.69 
41,755.52 35,971.02 



Annual Report 



13 



FINANCES 



Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1942 Expenditure $3,181.66 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 
Harry H. Dudley 
Carl H. Foster 
Edgar C. Hirst 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1942 Expenditure $100.00 



From a financial standpoint. Con- 
cord experienced one of its best 
years in 1942. During the course of 
the year, a 17 per cent improve- 
ment was effected in the City's 
financial condition. Although no 
small part of this betterment re- 
sulted from abnormal closing ap- 
propriation balances in certain de- 
partments due to war curtailed 
activities, most of the accomplished 
gain can be attributed to the fact 
that the Board of Aldermen con- 
tinued to adhere to a debt reduc- 
tion policy. 

GENERAL FUND 

Total receipts during 1942 
amounted to $1,538,033.63. Deduc- 
tions by transfer totaled $30,974.60 
leaving a net balance available for 
expenditure of $1,507,059.03. This 
sum exceeded by $14,697.95 the 
estimate of revenue made at the 
beginning of the year. 

Appropriations made during 
1942 totaled $1,492,361.08. This 
sum together with $150,260.08 
carried over from 1941, $6,587.46 
in departmental receipts and $99,- 
862.32 in transfers brought the 
amount available for expenditure 
up to $1,749,070.94. Expenditures, 



deductions, transfers and balances 
carried to 1943 amounted to $1,- 
746,740.52 leaving an unexpended 
balance of $2,330.42. 

The City closed its books on 
December 31, 1942 with an unap- 
propriated surplus of $271,668.61. 
Of this total, $47,771.98 represent- 
ed the amount carried to surplus 
as the result of 1942 operations. 

BOND FUNDS 

Bonds and notes retired during 
the year totaled $179,000.00; new 
issues for airport purposes amount- 
ed to $70,000.00. The $109,000.00 
reduction thereby effected reduced 
the City's general indebtedness 
from $1,111,000.00 to $1,002,000.- 
00. This reduction does not reflect 
$3,000.00 of bonds due in 1942 
which were presented and paid in 
January, 1943. 

Of the City's $1,002,000.00 out- 
standing debt, $438,000.00 repre- 
sented municipal obligations, $439,- 
000.00 school bonds and notes and 
$125,000.00 water precinct bonds. 

TRUST FUNDS 

On December 31, 1942, the 
Trustees of Trust Funds reported 
total assets of $417,625.58 of which 
$107,025.42 were permanent ceme- 
tery funds, $236,137.19 were sun- 
dry cemetery funds and $74,462.97 
were library funds. New trustscreated 
during the year totaled $8,026.61. 

Income from interest and divi- 
dends amounted to $13,523.64. 
An additional $900.17 was re- 
ceived from the sale of cemetery 
lots. Disbursements and transfers 
totaled $12,835.60. A cash balance 
of $5,423.02 in the unexpended in- 
come account was carried on the 
books at the close of the year. 



14 



City of Concord 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 

1111111111111 

Gordon S. Lord City Solicitor 

Henry P. Callahan 

(In the absence of Mr. Lord) 

1942 Expenditure SI ,617 . 51 

1111111111111 

During the summer of 1942 
City Solicitor Gordon S. Lord 
entered the armed services of the 
United States. Mr. Lord was 
granted a leave of absence by the 
Board of Aldermen and Henry P. 
Callahan was elected to succeed 
Mr. Lord in the capacity of Acting 
City Solicitor. 

LITIGATIONS 

Petition of Trustees of Trust Funds, a re- 
quest for interpretation of certain portions 
of the wills of Nathaniel Bouton and David 
Osgood, was acted upon by the Superior 
Court of Merrimack County and a decree 
was made by the court. The ruling of the 
court has been filed with the proper au- 
thorities. 

Maude L. Crowley vs. City of Concord, an ap- 
peal from the alleged taking by eminent 
domain of certain lands of the petitioner, 
will be adjusted by the taking of land at the 
airport by the State of New Hampshire. 

City of Concord vs. Marie A. Bourdeau, an 
action of the City to enforce a lien for 
water service on the real estate of the de- 
fendant, is pending action before the 
Superior Court. 

Max Cohen and Bertha Cohen vs. City of 
Concord, an appeal from the ruling of the 
Zoning Board of Adjustment, was heard 
before the Superior Court. The ruling of the 
Zoning Board of Adjustment in this matter 
was upheld by the court. The attorney for 
the petitioners is arranging to have a re- 
served case in the Supreme Court relative to 
the interpretation of whether or not the 



Cohens had a "legal use" of the premises at 
the time of the passage of the original zon- 
ing ordinance. 

Richard Morton vs. City of Concord, an ap- 
peal from the ruling of the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment, was entered in the Superior 
Court on September 22, 1942. Answer of 
the City to the petition of said Morton was 
filed on September 30, 1942. In all prob- 
ability the court will act upon this matter 
during its April, 1943, term. 

ROAD DISCONTINUANCE 

The City of Concord has peti- 
tioned the Superior Court for the 
discontinuance of Sheep Road and 
Clough's Mill Road. This matter 
was entered November 16, 1942, 
and has been referred by the 
court to the county commissioners 
for a hearing. 

AIRPORT CONDEMNATION 

During the past year the City 
Solicitor has been in consultation 
with the Airport Commission, the 
Attorney General's office and the 
owners of land in the airport area 
on frequent occasions. The City 
has been able to settle with many 
of these land owners. A number of 
owners who have not settled, have 
agreed to accept the valuation 
which will be placed upon the 
land by the commission appointed 
by the Superior Court to hear dam- 
age claims in the condemnation 
proceeding. 

OTHER ACTIVITY 

On numerous occasions, the City 
Solicitor has cooperated with dif- 
ferent city departments in the 
interpretation of the city charter 
and ordinances. The solicitor has 
also been a member of several com- 
mittees on special matters having to 
do with the activities of various 
boards and commissions. 



Annual Report 



15 



PLANNING 



CITY PLANNING BOARD 
James M. Langlev, Chairman 
Dudley W. Orr, Secretary 
Edward E. Beane 
Douglas N. Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
John B. Jameson 
Hon. Charles J. MgKee 
Austin E. Page 
Robert W. Potter 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen Director 

1942 Expenditure $4,642 . 70 



SUMMARY OF ACTIVITIES 

Eighteen requests for studies were 
handled by the Planning Board 
during the past year. Of this num- 
ber, 12 originated with the Board of 
Aldermen, four with the Board of 
Public Works, and one each with 
the Mayor and Airport Commis- 
sion. Seven of the studies requested 
involved the layout, relocation and 
narrowing of streets. The remainder 
concerned a variety of municipal 
matters with particular considera- 
tion being given to problems relat- 
ing to the sewer system, the munic- 
ipal airport and recreational fa- 
cilities. 

Due to war restrictions on private 
development, a marked change of 
emphasis in the activities of the 
Planning Board occurred during 
1 942. Considerations of requests for 



new streets and subdivision layouts 
were replaced by studies of current 
war-affected municipal problems 
and surveys of projects to be de- 
veloped during the post-war period. 

STREETS 

The lack of definite layouts for 
many of Concord's streets was 
brought to the attention of the board 
by the Board of Aldermen. To the 
end that an official street map may 
be prepared for adoption by the 
Board of Aldermen, the Planning 
Board recommended that the En- 
gineering Division of the Board of 
Public Works make every effort to 
expedite the survey of the streets 
involved. 

The layouts of two existing 
streets in the East Concord section 
of the city, involving approxi- 
mately 6,000 feet of street, were ap- 
proved. In the case of one of these 
streets, extensive alterations con- 
templated by the W.P.A. were dis- 
couraged due to the limited use 
received by the street. 

Relocations of sections of Oak 
Hill Road and Carter Hill Road to 
eliminate dangerous curves were 
recommended. Both of these roads 
are a part of the city's secondary 
road system and receive consider- 
able use. 

The board recommended that a 
petition to narrow a section of 
Pembroke Road, one of the main 
thoroughfares in the Plains area, be 
denied. 

The matter of constructing addi- 
tional sidewalks in the Plains area 



16 



City of Concord 



was referred to the Planning Board 
by the Board of Public Works. 
After studying the sidewalk prob- 
lem in relation to the new Dame 
School, new walks were recom- 
mended on the school property and 
a plan for supervising the move- 
ment of children to and from school 
was suggested to school authorities. 

RECREATION 

As a result of restrictions placed 
on travel, two studies involving the 
provision of added recreational fa- 
cilities were referred to the board 
by the City Government. One of 
these related to the provision of 
suitable picnicking facilities in the 
city parks; the other concerned the 
proposed purchase and develop- 
ment of the Broken Bridge Swim- 
ming Area on the Soucook River. 
A definite program providing for 
picnicking facilities in the munic- 
ipal park system was formulated 
and transmitted to the Board of 
Public Works. Extensive analyses 
of water and conditions along the 
Soucook River in cooperation with 
the State Board of Health indicated 
the existence of considerable pollu- 
tion. In light of this fact, the board 
recommended that the purchase 
and development of the area be 
held in abeyance until such time as 
the purity of the river water meets 
with the approval of the State 
Board of Health. 

AIRPORT 

The year 1942 witnessed the relo- 



cation and expansion of the runway 
plan at the municipal airport. In 
cooperation with the Airport Com- 
mission, the Planning Board par- 
ticipated in the preparation of pre- 
liminary layout plans which were 
approved in principle by the C.A.A. 
and the army engineers. The board's 
efforts were in no small degree 
responsible for the adoption of a 
runway plan which resulted in a 
minimum of land damage and 
which lends itself to future ex- 
pansion. 

The proposed construction of a 
new hangar to facilitate expanded 
operations at the airport was 
brought to the attention of the 
board by the Airport Commission. 
The board favored the construction 
of the hangar as an orderly part of 
the planned development of the 
municipal airport. 

CITY REPORT 

In 1942, for the third consecutive 
year, the City of Concord was 
awarded first prize for its annual re- 
port in a statewide town report con- 
test sponsored by the University of 
New Hampshire. Supervision of the 
publication of the report has been 
an annual chore of the Planning 
Board since the 1939 issue. 

HONOR ROLL 

At the request of the Board of 
Aldermen, the Planning Board de- 
signed and prepared a roll of honor 
listing the names of Concord citi- 
zens serving in the armed forces. 



Annual Report 



17 



The plaque, on which more than 
2,000 names are posted at this 
writing, was erected on the plaza in 
front of the State House. At dedica- 
tion exercises held early in 1943, 
the city presented the memorial to 
the American Legion. 

RESEARCH STUDIES 

One of the most important studies 
undertaken by the board during the 
past year related to the proposed 
establishment of a system of sewer 
rents in Concord. In cooperation 
with the City Solicitor and the City 
Engineer, practices in other cities 
were investigated and the various 
aspects of the Concord situation 
were thoroughly canvassed. A draft 
of a proposed ordinance has been 
prepared for submission to the 
Board of Aldermen at an early 
date. 

At the request of the Board of 
Public Works, the board studied 
and approved the construction of a 
proposed storm sewer in the down- 
town section of the city. The board 
recommended that the project be 
deferred to provide employment 
during the post-war readjustment 
period. 

In cooperation with the alder- 
manic fire board a factual study 
was made of a proposed new fire 
station in the Plains area. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

On behalf of the City Govern- 
ment a list of projects was prepared 
for submission to the Public Works 
Reserve as a part of the federal gov- 



ernment's program to accumulate a 
reserve of useful work to be under- 
taken at the termination of the war. 

In an effort to solve the problem 
resulting from the lack of adequate 
air raid alarm in many sections of 
the city, local defense officials and 
the fire board were assisted in the 
preparation of an audibility map 
based on information collected dur- 
ing previous tests. 

At the request of the Mayor an 
estimate of 1943 income was pre- 
pared for budget purposes. 

During the past year the Plan- 
ning Board has devoted consider- 
able time and effort to expanding 
and keeping up to date its files of 
data and maps pertaining to mat- 
ters of municipal concern. It has 
been the policy of the board to 
place this material at the service of 
other city departments and the 
public in general. More and more 
people are turning to the Planning 
Board for answers to questions 
about Concord which they cannot 
find elsewhere. The board is ready 
to cooperate with the public and 
welcomes the opportunity to be of 
service at all times. 

1943 

During the coming year the Plan- 
ning Board will present to the 
Board of Aldermen for adoption an 
Official Map covering the streets 
in the City Proper based on surveys 
by the City Engineer. 

A preliminary study of the rec- 
reational possibilities of Penacook 
Lake is also contemplated. 



18 



City of Concord 



PUBLIC 

HEALTH and 

SANITATION 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 

Paul R. Donovan, M.D. 

Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 

Clinton R. Mullins, M.D. 

Ellsworth M. Tracy, M.D. 

Donald G. Barton, M.D. . .Sanitary Officer 

Walter C. Rowe, M.D. 

(In the absence of Dr. Barton) 

Austin B. Presby Milk Inspector 

1942 Expenditure 56,644.74 



GENERAL CONDITIONS 

The general condition of health 
was very good in Concord during 
1942. The Health Department was 
not confronted with any unusual 
public health problems. Regular 
visits were made at restaurants and 
other eating places during which 
special attention was given to the 
cleanliness of kitchens and toilets. 
In the downtown district, periodic 
inspections of alleyways were con- 
ducted during the summer season. 
All known health hazards, poten- 



tial or otherwise, were closely 
watched and every necessary step 
was taken to protect public health. 
The department received splendid 
cooperation from the public in 
remedying unsanitary conditions. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

As in previous years, scarlet fever 
headed the list of communicable 
diseases; all cases in the city were of 
a very mild nature. A fewer than 
usual number of cases of measles 
were reported during the year. 
There was no marked change in the 
number of cases of other common 
diseases such as chicken pox, mumps 
and whooping cough. 

Three cases of poliomyelitis were 
reported during the year as against 
two in 1941. Only one of these 
cases indicated a slight paralysis. 
No cases of diphtheria or typhoid 
fever were reported. 

TOXOID CLINICS 

The Health Department con- 
ducted six toxoid clinics during 
1942 for the prevention of diph- 
theria. Five of these were in the city 
proper and one in Penacook. Alto- 
gether, 180 children between the 
ages of six months and eight years 
were immunized. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

A slight increase in the number 
of deaths occurred during 1942. 
1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 



Diseases of the circulatory system 114 

Cancer 32 

Nephritis 28 

Accidental deaths 17 

Pneumonia 9 

Diabetes 10 

Tuberculosis 6 



106 97 102 
32 42 27 
20 14 21 
18 10 7 
11 15 8 
10 7 7 
6 2 9 


117 
36 
19 
12 

7 

12 

5 


Annual Report ' * 


* V 




At a toxoid clinic for the prevention of diphtheria, the City Health Officer, 
assisted by the Public Health .Nurse, is shown immunizing a youthful citizen 



The total number of deaths re- 
corded by the Health Department 
was 606, of which 308 were non- 
resident and 298 were resident 
deaths. Of the resident deaths 15 
were under the age of one year; 4 
were in the one to nine group; 5 
were in the 10 to 19 group; 22 were 
in the 20 to 44 group; and 252 were 
in the 45 and over category. 

The number of resident deaths 
due to seven common causes during 
the past five years is presented in 
the table on page 19. 

In addition to the foregoing, 34 
deaths due to cerebral hemorrhage 
and 12 deaths due to diseases 
of early infancy occurred during 
1942. 



FEDERAL ASSISTANCE 

During the year the department 
received grants from the United 
States Public Health Service which 
enabled it to employ the services of 
a public health nurse and a public 
health engineer. Through this added 
personnel, much work was accom- 
plished which otherwise could not 
have been undertaken. 

COMFORT STATION 

Many favorable comments have 
been received from the public in 
regard to the care and sanitation of 
the Comfort Station located in the 
police building on Warren Street. 
This facility was placed under the 
management and supervision of the 



20 



City of Concord 



Health Department in 1941. Two 
attendants were on daily duty at 
the rest rooms during the past year. 

. . . Milk Inspection 

EFFECT OF WAR 

War conditions brought many 
new problems during 1 942 which 
affected the production, handling 
and distribution of milk in the Con- 
cord area. Government regulations 
designed to conserve material and 
manpower resulted in the discon- 
tinuance of special and call-back 
deliveries, the adoption of every- 
other-day delivery, the elimination 
of heavy cream sales and the insti- 
tution of price ceilings. 

In the matter of every-other-day 
milk delivery, adopted to save 
equipment, tires and gasoline, labo- 
ratory analyses have shown that 
there has been no deterioration in 
the quality of milk distributed in 
Concord. The prevalent belief that 
milk is one day old at the time of 
delivery is an erroneous one. In- 
stead, plants are operated at full 
capacity every day and the entire 
output is delivered to one-half of 
(he customers. This practice as- 
sures the individual user that the 
milk delivered is just as fresh as it 
was under the daily delivery system. 
It is important to note that the con- 
sumer is responsible for the extra 
day's supply of milk held in refrig- 
eration and not the distributor. 

PRODUCTION 

During 1942, Concord's milk 
supply was obtained from 1 97 herds 
representing approximately 2,300 
cows, all of which are tuberculosis 
and Bang's disease tested. 



Of the total number of herds pro- 
ducing milk for the city, 48 were of 
three cows or less. Most of these 
small producers sold milk directly 
to the consumer. The milk supply 
of 149 herds was marketed through 
wholesale and retail channels. 

During the year 25 producers 
representing 21 3 milch cows, discon- 
tinued business. The total number 
of new producers issued permits 
to sell milk in Concord was eight 
and represented the addition of ap- 
proximately 50 cows in the local 
area. 

Although the production of milk 
in the Concord area in 1 942 was 
slightly less than during the pre- 
vious year, there was sufficient 
fluid milk to meet the demand. The 
reason why the city did not experi- 
ence a "pinch" was probably due 
to the fact that there was a sig- 
nificant decrease in population dur- 
ing 1942. The production of milk in 
the vicinity of Concord was not 
lowered by undue slaughter of dairy 
cows. In contrast to the drought of 
1 941, an abundance of rain fell dur- 
ing the year which filled dairy 
wells and enabled farmers to pro- 
duce the largest crop of hay and 
ensilage in years. 

DAIRY IMPROVEMENTS 

The number of milk machines 
and electric cooling tanks on milk 
farms increased during the year. 
This was due in part to the shortage 
of farm labor. About 85 per cent of 
the producers operated with elec- 
tric coolers. Many dairies were 
whitewashed during the year as the 
result of a clean-up program spon- 
sored by the Milk Inspector. 



Annual Report 



21 



DISTRIBUTION 

Due to a federal order requiring 
dealers to reduce the butterfat of 
cream from 40 to 19 per cent or 
less, the sale of cream in Concord 
declined more than 50 per cent dur- 
ing 1 942. As the result of this ruling, 
consumers adopted the practice of 
buying extra milk rather than light 
cream. 

Of the total daily supply of milk 
distributed in the city, about 2.5 per 
cent was marketed as Grade "A" 
Milk. The remaining 97.5 per cent 
was sold as ordinary milk. Insofar 
as health quality is concerned, lab- 
oratory analyses during the past 
year have shown no bacteriological 
or chemical differences in the con- 
stituents of these two types of milk. 

INSPECTIONS AND TESTS 

For the purpose of determing the 
quality of milk being delivered to 
the consumer, the Milk Inspector 
collected and examined 1,214 sam- 



ples of milk, 39 of cream and 49 of 
chocolate milk during the year. 
This examination was conducted on 
a monthly basis throughout the year 
and affected all dealers. Milk de- 
livered at dairy plants was also 
tested and 440 quarts were con- 
demned as unsatisfactory and re- 
turned to producers. 

Weekly inspections were con- 
ducted at pasteurization plants to 
check equipment and pasteuriza- 
tion methods. For the purpose of 
determining whether milk had been 
properly pasteurized, a new test 
known as the "Phosphatase Test" 
was incorporated in the work of the 
department's laboratory. 

During the year, 186 swab rinse 
samples were taken in eating places 
to determine by bacterial analysis 
whether food establishments were 
adhering to proper cleansing and 
sterilizing practices. A large major- 
ity of the samples collected were 
found to be satisfactory. 



In order to insure a high standard of quality, all dairy products sold in Con- 
cord undergo periodic analysis at the Milk Inspection Laboratory in City Hall 




22 



City of Concord 



MEDICAL 
S E RV I C E 



Paul R. Donovan City Physician 

Elmer U. Sargent. .Assistant City Physician 
1942 Expenditure $1,642 . 97 



PAST POLICY 

For many years past it has been 
the policy of the City of Concord to 
retain the part-time services of two 
physicians on an annual salary 
basis in the capacity of City Physi- 
cian and Assistant City Physician. 
The services of these doctors have 
been available free of charge to all 
relief families carried by the Relief 
Department and to certain near- 
relief cases. In addition to caring 
for the city's indigents, the City 
Physician has been subject to call 
by the Police Department when- 
ever detained persons required 
medical examination or treatment. 

RELIEF HEALTH IN 1942 

On the whole, the general con- 
dition of health of relief clients in 
Concord during 1942 continued 
good. Infectious cases among chil- 
dren of relief families were present 
in normal amount but there were 
no serious outbreaks of disease. 

The most notable health trend 
of the year was the drop in the num- 
ber of relief cases that needed 
medical attention. However, this 
trend was not due to an improved 
condition of health so much as it 



was to the considerable decrease in 
the total relief load growing out of 
greater opportunities for gainful 
employment. 

CITY PHYSICIAN ABOLISHED 

Due to the greatly reduced num- 
ber of City relief cases, the Board of 
Aldermen, after careful investiga- 
tion, voted to dispense with medical 
service for relief recipients on a re- 
tainer basis and abolished the of- 
fices of City Physician and Assistant 
City Physician. This action was 
taken in January, 1943, as an econ- 
omy measure. A new procedure 
was adopted under which the relief 
recipient is permitted his own 
choice of doctor when medical at- 
tention is needed. The Relief 
Department pays the physician for 
services rendered on a per call basis. 

HOSPITALIZATION 

At the beginning of the year the 
City revised its policy in regard to 
the hospitalization of relief persons. 
In place of the usual flat annual 
donation made to the city's two 
private hospitals for indigent care, 
these institutions are paid for ser- 
vice to the poor on a per diem 
basis out of Relief Department 
funds. A considerable saving has 
been effected under this new pro- 
cedure. 

All hospitalized relief persons 
are attended by the "on service" 
doctor free of charge. To date, this 
practice has been highly advanta- 
geous to the City. However, further 
trial is necessary before it can be 
definitely established that free "on 
service" care is the best solution for 
all parties concerned. 



Annual Report * < * 23 



RECREATION 



PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Raymond V. LaPointe, Chairman 

Charles P. Coakley 

William J. Flynn 

Clarence E. Huggins 

Thomas B. Jennings 

Paul G. Crowell Supervisor 

1942 Expenditures: 

Operation $10,733.16 

Chlorinator $195.00 



. . . Playgrounds and Bath 

THE WAR AND RECREATION 

In time of war, there are many 
who believe that the use of public 
funds for recreation is money ill 
spent. In all sincerity, these people 
contend that every penny should 
be applied to some activity directly 
related to the war effort. In prac- 
tice, such a procedure would be 



fine if it were not for the fact that 
successful prosecution of the war 
depends in no small measure on an 
uninterrupted flow of supplies from 
the "home front." In order that 
production of war materials may be 
maintained at a level sufficient to 
meet the needs of the armed forces, 
it is imperative that every effort 
is made to secure a high standard of 
physical fitness and mental alert- 
ness at home. The scope of the war 
is so all-inclusive that it affects 
every man, woman and child re- 
gardless of whether that person is 
employed in war work or not. To 
be negligent in providing recreation 
for adults is to invite fatigue, poor 
health and reduced production 
efficiency; to be lax in furnishing 
children opportunities for healthful 
play is to let down the bars to juve- 
nile delinquency. Nothing can be 
more important on "Victory Day" 
than the knowledge that children — 
men and women of tomorrow 
have survived the struggle with 
strong bodies and clean minds. 



An enthusiastic crowd — young and old — witnessed the swimming races at 
the White Park pool during the city's "safe and sane" Fourth of July celebration 




24 ' ' ' City of Concord 



PLAYGROUND ATTENDANCE BROKE 
ALL RECORDS IN 1042 


1938 


^jfj^JfjfJfjfjfjfJ^ 


1939 


^J^Jf^J^J^^ 


1940 
1941 


^J^fjfJfjfjfjfJ^j 


*j&y&u&y£y&ytsy$u& 


1942 


a& afc ofc afc ofc a& wk b& aft afr afc 


EACH FIGURE DENOTES 10,000 CHILDREN 



ACTIVITIES 

A full program of activities was 
conducted at the playgrounds and 
pools during the 1942 summer sea- 
son. Because of the restrictions on 
travel, home playground activities 
were intensified. The lack of trans- 
portation necessitated the curtail- 
ment of inter-playground contests 
and all-day outings to nearby lakes. 
Similarly, the annual playground 
field day, usually held at the close 
of the season at Rolfe Park in Pena- 
cook, was omitted in 1942. 

Summer sports activities in- 
cluded baseball, basketball, volley- 
ball, tennis and horseshoe pitching. 
Midget and junior baseball games 
were very popular during the year. 
In the girl's athletic department, 
newcomb highlighted the field of 
sports. A very successful handicraft 



program was conducted under the 
supervision of a special instructor. 
An exhibition of the work accom- 
plished by the handicraft pupils at 
the various playgrounds was mount- 
ed in a downtown store and drew 
many favorable comments from 
the passing public. 

As usual, the wading pools were 
very well attended during the 
summer. Swimming lessons were 
given at regular intervals at the 
pools and 85 children were taught 
to swim. The swimming season 
closed late in August with the 
annual aquatic meet at the Broken 
Bridge bathing area. 

During the winter season skating 
and sliding areas were operated in 
various sections of the city. The 
main skating area at the pond in 
White Park was open to skaters on 



Annual Report 



25 



68 days of the winter. The usual 
facilities for hockey were eliminated 
due to a sharp decrease in the num- 
ber of older boys using the play- 
grounds. 

FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION 

In line with a city- wide "safe 
and sane' 1 celebration of the Fourth 
of July, the Playground Committee 
sponsored a holiday field day for 
children at White Park. A program 
of competitive sports was arranged 
and prizes in the form of defense 
stamps were awarded to the win- 
ners. Refreshments, including ice 
cream, hot dogs and tonic, were 
provided free of charge. More than 
1,000 children participated in the 
celebration to make the occasion 
one of the most successful affairs 
in the city's playground history. 

PLAYGROUND ATTENDANCE 

The total attendance of 112,535 
at the city playgrounds during the 
past summer exceeded all former 
figures. The 1942 total represented 
an increase of 30,000 over that of 
the previous year. The increase re- 



sulted almost entirely from the fact 
that gasoline rationing curtailed 
pleasure driving during the summer 
vacation season. With family jun- 
kets to the mountains, lakes and 
seashore out for the duration, more 
and more children turned to the 
playgrounds for their recreational 
needs. The jump in attendance was 
even more remarkable in light of a 
sharp decline in playground use by 
older boys and girls due to employ- 
ment and call to service. 

. . . Special Facilities 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Leigh S. Hall 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Carleton R. Metcalf 

1 942 Expenditure S6,080 . 36 



BEAVER MEADOW GOLF COURSE 

The 1942 season at the Beaver 
Meadow Golf Course was a busy 
one despite the war times. The 



The pond at White Park is the "hub" of the city's skating activity. 
This is a typical Sunday afternoon scene during the winter sports season 




26 ' ' ' City of Concord 




Concord' 's extensive park and playground system offers ample opportunity for 
wholesome outdoor play. Swings and slides are always a popular attraction 



proximity of the course to a bus 
line made it possible for numbers 
of people to play golf or tennis, and 
enjoy the club house facilities. 
Table tennis has grown in popular- 
ity, particularly with junior mem- 
bers. For the first time in years, 
bicycles came into use as a means 
of transportation to the club. 

During the 1942 season, the club 
had a regular membership of 1 10, 
about 25 less than the total for the 
preceding year. This decrease was 
almost entirely due to former mem- 
bers having gone into the armed 
services. However, some of these 
servicemen used the course while 
home on furlough. One-day fees 
were paid by 1,475 golfers and 158 
tennis players. 

MEMORIAL FIELD 

The Memorial Field was used 
during the spring and fall for 
Concord's scholastic events. Once 
again, the facilities at the field were 



used for the Mid-State League 
Track Meet. During the fall season, 
a number of high school night 
football games were played at the 
field. These evening games continue 
to hold their popularity with Con- 
cord's sporting public. 

With travel restrictions curtail- 
ing recreational opportunities on 
all sides, more and more Concord 
people have turned to tennis for 
outdoor sport. The six tennis courts 
at the athletic field were in almost 
constant use. 

RUSSELL POND AREA 

Aside from some care by way of 
upkeep, it was impossible to keep 
the Russell Pond Area open for 
winter sports because of insufficient 
funds. It is doubtful, however, if 
the area could have been used 
during the past season to any great 
extent because restrictions on trans- 
portation made the winter sports 
center more or less inaccessible. 



Annual Report 



27 



PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 



BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Oliver Jenkins, President 

Henry B. Cannon, Jr. 

Joseph J. Comi 

Edward A. Dame 

Wilbur H. Ferry 

William B. McInnis 

Perley B. Phillips 

George W. Randall 

Alexander Rennie, Jr. 

Marion F. Holt Librarian 

1942 Expenditure $26,721 . 65 



WAR SERVICE 

During 1 942, the Victory Book 
Campaign played a prominent part 
in the work of the Concord Public 
Library. The drive for books for the 
armed forces brought a generous 
and instant response from the peo- 
ple of Concord. The library staff 
sorted, packed and sent more than 
12,000 books to military posts. 

Cooperating in the drive to enlist 
war nurses, the library granted the 
Red Cross use of the main lobby for 
recruiting purposes for a two-week 
period. A booth was set up in the 
lobby to facilitate the recruiting 
activities of the nurses in charge of 
the drive. 

In connection with civilian de- 
fense, an air raid protection pro- 
gram was worked out for the benefit 
of the public using the library 
building. The staff qualified as air 
raid wardens after an intensive 
training course in first aid and air 
raid procedure. A raid shelter was 
set up in the basement which has 



been blacked out for the duration. 
Several air raid drills were con- 
ducted during the year with very 
successful results. 

The reference department main- 
tained its war information service 
with material sent from Washing- 
ton. Many people availed them- 
selves of this service during the year. 

In cooperation with the City 
Planning Board, a list of the names 
of Concord citizens in the armed 
forces was posted in the lobby dur- 
ing the fall and winter to permit 
checking by the public. The names 
were later transferred to the honor 
roll on the state house plaza. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

Notwithstanding a cut in the 
budget, the trustees continued the 
operation of the four branch libra- 
ries. The branch at East Concord 
was moved to a room in the East- 
man School to effect a saving in 
rent. Circulation in the branches 
increased during 1942 due in a 
large measure to transportation 
difficulties. 

Although every effort has been 
made to provide an adequate flow 
of books to the branches, the matter 
of transportation from the main 
library still remains as a problem to 
the library staff. Should the means 
of public travel be further re- 
stricted, an increased demand for 
books at branches by people who 
cannot reach the main library is a 
certainty- Such a situation would 
greatly aggravate the problem of 
providing for a turnover of branch 
books. 

CONCORD ROOM 

The Concord Room was used 
during the year by the Concord 



28 



City of Concord 



Historical Association for meetings 
and two exhibits. Considerable 
public interest was manifested in 
these exhibits, one of which related 
to original documents and the 
other to old school pictures. 

MEETINGS 

During the year, 78 meetings 
were held at the library in the 
Shakespeare and Concord Rooms. 
The facilities of the library were 
made available to the members of 
the New Hampshire Library Asso- 
ciation during the organization's 
53rd annual convention which was 
held in Concord in June. 

HOSPITAL SERVICE 

At the request of the New Hamp- 
shire Memorial Hospital, library 
service for patients was started in 
1942. The service is a cooperative 
undertaking in which the library 



furnishes books and transportation, 
the hospital provides space for 
books and a book truck to wheel 
to each patient's bedside, and the 
Gray Ladies of the Red Cross assist 
in giving out the books. The service 
is on a weekly basis and is definitely 
worthwhile because it helps pa- 
tients to pass otherwise long hours 
by reading good books, and it pro- 
vides books for nurses whose on- 
service hours prevent them from 
using the library. 

The service is not given at the 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital but 
books are taken from the library to 
the nurses' home where the collec- 
tion is changed each month. 

Student nurses in Concord are 
usually brought to the library to 
become acquainted with the facili- 
ties which are available to them. On 
various occasions, members of the 



During the summer season, weather permitting, the children's story hour at the 
Public Library offers the added attraction of an occasional "open-air" meeting 




Annual Report > * > 29 




To those who are interested in the city' 's past, the Concord Room located on the 
second floor of the Public Library offers a wealth of historical material 



library staff have given talks to the 
nurses at the Margaret Pillsbury 
Hospital. 

REGISTRATION AND BOOK COLLECTION 

In 1942, the library served 1,155 
new borrowers. A total of 2,670 
children in the first six school 
grades used the library in connec- 
tion with school work. 

The library acquired 2,614 new 
books during the year to bring its 
total book collection up to 49,667. 

SCHOOL COOPERATION 

The library continued its policy 
of cooperating with school authori- 
ties during 1942. Programs of library 
service at the Garrison and Conant 
Schools were carried out and that 



at the latter school was enlarged 
to include story telling, individual 
class projects and instructions in the 
use of the library. This work was ac- 
complished by the children's libra- 
rian with the assistance of the 
teaching staffs of these schools. 

At the Parker School, library 
service was provided for children 
traveling to and from school by 
bus. This activity was under the 
supervision of the young people's 
librarian. Seventh grade pupils 
were instructed in the use of the 
library during the fall term. During 
the year, student demand for mate- 
rial related to school work in- 
creased considerably. Requests of 
this type were handled by the 
reference department. 



30 



City of Concord 



RELIEF 



CITY RELIEF BOARD 
Ralph L. Stearns, Chairman 
Winfield J. Phillips 
John W. Stanley 

Parker L. Hancock Overseer of Poor 

Charles P. Coakley Overseer of Poor 

Ward 1 

1942 Expenditures: 

City $40,411.35 

Penacook $4,567.83 



GENERAL TREND 

The city experienced a sharp re- 
duction during 1942 in the number 
of persons who were wholly or par- 
tially on public assistance. This 
reduction resulted in a large de- 
crease in money expended for 
relief. 

The constantly increasing de- 
mand for manpower growing out of 
the war opened up good paying 
positions for many unemployed 
persons. Many part-time workers 
found permanent employment, and 
a number of relief clients formerly 
classified as ''practically unemploy- 
able" located jobs which they could 
handle. A general upward surge of 
wages made many families, pre- 
viously on supplementary relief, 
self-supporting. 

Several relief recipients went to 
work in out-of-town defense indus- 
tries and moved their families out of 
the city. Others left the relief rolls 



when additional members of the 
family group found work and in- 
creased the family income to a 
point where no aid was needed. 

Many men and women enrolled 
in the W.P.A. Vocational Training 
School to learn useful trades. Ap- 
proximately 100 persons were rec- 
ommended to this school by the 
relief office. In almost every in- 
stance, trainees found good paying 
jobs waiting for them upon com- 
pletion of the course. 

ADMINISTRATION 

Many changes occurred during 
1942 in the personnel of the City 
Relief Department. A new overseer 
was elected by the Board of Alder- 
men. During the year, five members 
of the relief staff left the employ of 
the department. Replacements were 
made in three instances. 

The City Relief Office continued 
to administer all city and county re- 
lief cases in Concord. Administra- 
tive costs were divided between the 
city and county on about a 50-50 
basis. At the close of the year, the 
department operated with seven 
employees, or four less than the 
number employed about a year 
ago. 

RELIEF LOAD 

The number of Concord persons 
on relief was cut about 50 per cent 
during 1942. At the beginning of 
the year, the Relief Department 
carried 281 active cases — 102 city 
and 179 county. These cases repre- 



Annual Report 



31 



sented a total of 1,012 persons. By 
December 31, 1942, the number of 
city relief cases dropped to 72 and 
county cases to 92. The total num- 
ber of Concord people on relief at 
the close of the year was 522. 

A study of the 1 64 cases carried 
at the end of the year showed that 
there was very little likelihood that 
the relief load would continue to 
decrease. Only a few cases re- 
mained which had any prospect of 
being dropped from public assist- 
ance. Practically all of the cases on 
relief represented those chronically 
ill, aged persons or dependent chil- 
dren. A number of cases were of the 
extra large family type where sup- 
plementary aid was necessary to 
augment meager family earnings. 



RELIEF COSTS 

An over-all reduction in city and 
county relief costs of $55,791.68 
was effected in 1942. Of this reduc- 
tion, $11,065.02 accrued from city 
cases and $44,726.66 from county 
cases. The total cost of relief in 
Concord during 1942 was $106,- 
972.76. Of this sum, $44,979.18 
represented the cost of city relief and 
$61,993.58 the cost of county relief. 

W.P.A. PROJECTS 

In January, 1942, there were 
234 Concord persons employed on 
W.P.A. projects. These persons 
earned an average wage of $60.50 
per month which was sufficient, in 
most cases, to keep them off relief. 
During the year, the number of 



WAR JOBS CUT THE RELIEF LOAD 
MORE THAN ONE THIRD IN 1942 




NUMBER OF CASES 
REMAINING ON RELIEF 



JAN 

I 



SEPT 



32 



City of Concord 



W.P.A. workers decreased rapidly 
as the federal government started 
to close out its work-relief agency. 
In December, when orders came 
that all projects were to close, only 
31 Concord people were employed 
on W.P.A. work. 

At times during the year as one 
project after another was discon- 
tinued, it was feared that many 
project workers would fall back on 
direct relief. Fortunately, almost all 
of these workers were absorbed by 
private industry and no significant 
increase occurred in city and county 
relief costs. In fact, the closing of 
some local projects effected a defi- 
nite saving in that the appropria- 
tion of funds for sponsorship of 
made- work was no longer necessary. 

The Relief Department spon- 
sored sewing project employing 
about 25 women was discontinued 
by W.P.A. on the first of June. The 
project which provided clothes for 
children of poor families was con- 
tinued with city and county funds 
until the opening of school in the 
fall. Women employed on the 
project were assisted in seeking 
other work and all but seven found 
new employment before the closing 
date. 



OTHER ACTIVITIES 

During the year, a great deal of 
time was spent by the Overseer and 
members of the staff in locating 
jobs for persons who were on relief. 
In many cases, persons applying for 
relief were placed almost immedi- 



ately on jobs so that no public 
assistance was necessary. 

A large number of homes of relief 
clients were inspected and where 
living conditions were found to be 
unsatisfactory usually due to the 
lack of adequate sanitary facilities, 
relief families were encouraged to 
move to better quarters. Much 
needless sickness was avoided by 
adherence to this practice of safe- 
guarding the health of relief re- 
cipients. 

Through the efforts of the de- 
partment's case workers, many 
serious domestic relations problems 
of relief clients were solved. In 
numerous instances, the break-up 
of homes was averted by the timely 
intervention of the social worker. 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

Although direct relief as a whole 
decreased noticeably during 1942, 
old age assistance cases showed 
a decided upward trend. The 
city's contribution for this purpose 
amounted to about $1,200 monthly. 
The county contributed approxi- 
mately $500 per month for county 
old age cases living in Concord. 

Under the old age assistance 
plan, the city or county pays 25 per 
cent of the cost (dependent upon 
person's settlement). Of the remain- 
ing 75 per cent, the state pays 25 
per cent and the federal govern- 
ment 50 per cent. Payments to 
needy old persons in Concord aver- 
aged nearly $7,000 per month 
during 1942. 



Annual Report 



33 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 



POLICE COMMISSION 

Daniel Shea, Chairman 

George A. Hill 

Guy A. Swenson 

Arthur W. McIsaac Chief of Police 

J. Edward Silva Deputy Chief of Police 

1942 Expenditures: 

Operation $75,245 . 76 

Traffic Lights $2,208 . 48 



DELMER G. THOMPSON 

Patrolman 
1931-1942 



PERSONNEL 

During the past year, the city 
was provided police protection by 
a staff of 28 permanent and 26 
special officers. The number of ser- 
geants on the permanent force was 
increased to two in April. Several 
changes in personnel were effected 
during the year due to death, re- 
tirement and resignation. In most 
part, vacancies were filled by pro- 
motion and appointment from the 
ranks of special officers. 

COST TO CITY 

The 1942 cost of operating the 
department amounted to $75,245.76 
or approximately $6,000 more than 
that of the previous year. Most of 
this additional cost is the direct 



result of salary increases voted by 
the Board of Aldermen to city em- 
ployees. The department's earnings 
for the year amounted to $1,302.79. 
Of this amount, $1,203.14 was used 
to offset an appropriation overdraft. 

CRIME DATA 

A slight increase occurred in the 
number of felonies committed dur- 
ing the year. Sixty-five of the 99 
felonies reported to the department 
were cleared by arrest. 

Presented herewith is a break- 
down by type of the felonious of- 
fenses committed in Concord dur- 
ing 1942. 

Classification of Offenses Reported Cleared Active 

Criminal Homicide 

Manslaughter by Negli- 
gence 1 1 

Rape 2 2 

Breaking and Entering. . 20 10 10 

Larceny 54 34 20 

Other Assaults 7 7 

Forgery and Counter- 
feiting 6 4 2 

Embezzlement and Fraud 9 7 

Total 99 OS M 

STOLEN PROPERTY 

Property valued at $3,579.79 was 
stolen during the year. The depart- 
ment succeeded in recovering 
$2,702.76 worth or 75.5 per cent 
of this property. Three autos re- 
ported stolen were recovered and 
each case was closed by the arrest 
of the guilty party. 

MISDEMEANORS 

Arrests in connection with less 
serious offenses were as follows: 232 
for drunkenness, 31 for operating 



34 



City of Concord 



a motor vehicle while under the 
influence of intoxicating liquors, 
five for sex offenses, nine for offenses 
against the family and children, 41 
for disorderly conduct, 142 for vio- 
lation of road and driving laws, and 
72 for violation of traffic and motor 
vehicle laws. 

INVESTIGATIONS 

A total of 1,096 investigations 
were conducted for the federal gov- 
ernment and industries engaged in 
defense production. Reports were 
filed on 216 accident investigations. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

The fuel oil situation necessitated 
the conversion of the heating facil- 
ities at the Penacook Station to the 
use of coal. A stoker was installed 
and a considerable saving in the 
cost of fuel consumed was effected 
without loss of heating efficiency. 

At police headquarters, several 
minor improvements were made 
and the building was given a thor- 
ough cleaning. Additions to the 
fixtures included the installation of 
new desks and filing equipment. By 
using its regular personnel, no extra 
labor costs were incurred by the 
department in accomplishing these 
improvements. 

In cooperation with the fire de- 
partment, the police alarm system 
was thoroughly overhauled. Many 

Positive identification is an essential part of 
modern police work. These views depict the 
different stages of the identification procedure 
at Police Headquarters. {Top) Fingerprinting 
(Center) Photographing (Right) Weighing 
and rneasui inn 





Proficiency in the use of firearms is required of all Concord policemen. This view shows a 
of officers at pistol practice on the department's outdoor range 



group 



changes were made in the location 
of boxes in order to improve the 
efficiency of street patrol. A number 
of new boxes were installed on 
North State Street and this section 
of the downtown district was added 
to the area covered at regular inter- 
vals by patrolmen. 

ORGANIZATION CHANGES 

Department officials have been 
placed in charge of the desk at 
headquarters on a 24-hour-a-day 
basis. This procedure has greatly 
expedited the investigation of com- 
plaints and has the further advan- 
tage that all matters of police con- 
cern receive the immediate atten- 
tion of an official who is vested with 
the authority to institute prompt 
action. 



On May 1, 1942, the position of 
inspector was created in the de- 
partment and filled from the ranks 
by competitive examination. It is 
the duty of the inspector to take 
care of all founded complaints and 
make a complete and thorough in- 
vestigation in each instance. Since 
the office was established, a definite 
increase in the number of appre- 
hensions has been noted. 

CURTAILED ACTIVITY 

Due to the current shortage of 
gasoline and tires, the department 
has cooperated in the war effort by 
sharply curtailing police cruiser ac- 
tivities. Mileage has been reduced 
wherever it has been possible to do 
so. Cruiser schedules have been re- 
arranged in a manner to permit a 



36 



City of Concord 



minimum of travel in the provision 
of adequate police protection. 

AUXILIARY POLICE 

The activities of the auxiliary po- 
lice force, which was organized in 
1941, have been continued under the 
supervision and able leadership of 
the captain of police. Regular meet- 
ings of the force were held twice a 
month. Members have been in- 
structed in approved practices of 
coping with incidents that might 
occur during the present emergency. 

JUNIOR POLICE CORPS 

During the past year, the depart- 
ment continued its highly successful 
sponsorship of a junior police corps. 
The purpose of this activity is to 
foster a better understanding be- 
tween the police department and 
the city's youth, to develop and 
inspire patriotism, to encourage 
faithfulness to home, church and 
school, to give boys an idea how 
law enforcement and courts work, 
and to keep juvenile crime at a 
minimum. 

Membership in the junior police 
is limited to 35 boys between the 
ages of 10 and 14. An interesting 
program has been worked out which 
includes instruction in first aid, 
military drill, calisthenics, sports, 
educational movies and talks by 
guest speakers. 

Junior police activities are con- 
ducted at no expense to the tax- 
payer. Members of the department 
donate their time in supervising the 
program. Such financial assistance 



as has been necessary has been 
subscribed to by public-spirited 
citizens. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Once again, it is recommended 
that the part of the main police build- 
ing now used by the clinics should 
be turned over to the department 
for its own use. The gradual expan- 
sion of records and the need for a 
room for examination of persons 
being detained makes this request 
an urgent one. 

In anticipation of post-war traffic 
again assuming its place as one of 
the department's major problems, 
it is recommended that an officer 
from the regular force be selected 
for an intensive course of traffic 
study at Northwestern University. 
The department believes that a 
trained officer would be able to 
effect improvements in traffic con- 
ditions in Concord which would 
reduce fatalities, injuries and prop- 
erty damage and make travelling 
more convenient. 

APPRECIATION 

The department wishes to express 
its appreciation for the cooperation 
it has received from the police com- 
mission, the city government and 
various city departments. No small 
measure of credit for the effective- 
ness of police work in Concord is 
due to the general public. The de- 
partment appreciates the assistance 
it has received from the public and 
hopes to continue to merit its trust. 



Annual Report < ' * 37 



PROBATION 



MUNICIPAL C O U R T 
Judge William L. Stevens 

Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 

1942 Expenditure $1,524.97 

fffffYffff-ff-f 

PROBATION OFFICER'S DUTIES 

Thedutiesof the Probation Officer 
include supervising a probationer's 
activities and checking his improve- 
ment record in school, home, church 
and social surroundings. The officer 
also supervises probationers who 
report periodically to the probation 
office. At the end of each month, 
the Probation Officer makes a re- 
port to the State Probation Depart- 
ment covering all cases referred to 
him by the Judge of the Juvenile 
Court. In addition to this activity, a 
considerable amount of time and 
effort is spent in preventing juvenile 
delinquency. The success of this 
work depends not so much on what 
the Probation Officer does indi- 
vidually as it does on the coopera- 
tive efforts of all organizations con- 
cerned with attaining beneficial re- 
sults for the juvenile. 

The balance of the Probation 
Officer's activity covers cases of 
neglected children and non-support. 
In the matter of neglected children, 
the Probation Officer investigates 
each case and submits a report in 
writing to the court describing what 
the conditions are under which the 
neglected child is living and recom- 
mending what action, if any, should 
be taken to provide better care and 
environment for the child. In a non- 



support case, an investigation is 
conducted and a report is made to 
the court covering the welfare of 
the family whose income is being 
mismanaged to the extent that 
members are not being properly 
fed and clothed. The outcome of 
such a case often finds the father 
placed on probation and required 
by court order to furnish a definite 
sum of money from his earnings each 
week for the support of his family. 
In this connection, it is the duty of 
the Probation Officer to see that 
the father abides by the order of the 
court. 

CAUSE OF DELINQUENCY 

The primary cause of juvenile de- 
linquency during the past five years 
has been improper supervision by 
parents of their children. Juveniles 
have been accorded privileges be- 
yond the scope of parental super- 
vision. This has been particularly 
true since the onset of the war. The 
underlying cause for this condition 
can be attributed to the fact that 
one or both parents are employed, 
leaving no one in their absence with 
responsibility for the care of their 
children. 

1942 TREND 

While the country has experi- 
enced an increase in juvenile de- 
linquency since the start of the war, 
delinquency in Concord has not 
increased. The city has been rela- 
tively free from the impact of the 
war as it affects juveniles. However, 
a definite increase in delinquency is 
a very real probability when mi- 
grant families return to Concord 
from defense factory areas. 



38 



City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

tiiiitiiiiiii 

William L. Stevens 3 U( lg e 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

John W. Stanley Clerk 

1942 Expenditure $2,945.00 



ORGANIZATION AND JURISDICTION 

Although the Municipal Court 
constitutes the judicial branch of 
the City of Concord, it is in fact 
an instrument of the State of New 
Hampshire. Its judges are appointed 
by the governor with the advice 
and consent of the council. In ad- 
dition to Concord, the court serves 
surrounding towns where court fa- 
cilities are lacking. Most of the 
cases which are tried by the court 
involve infractions of state laws and 
regulations. 

The Municipal Court has origi- 
nal jurisdiction in all criminal cases 
which are punishable by a fine of 
less than $500 or imprisonment of 
less than one year. Criminal cases 
where the penalty exceeds these 
limits are bound over to the Supe- 
rior Court, and, if bail is allowed, 
the amount of surety is set by the 
Judge of Municipal Court. The 
court also hears cases involving 
juvenile offenders and dependent 
and delinquent children. 

In civil cases, the court's juris- 
diction extends to those actions 
where claims for damages are less 
than $500 and where the title of 
real estate is not a factor. This juris- 
diction is exercised in concurrence 
with the Superior Court. 



CASES TRIED 

There was a general decrease in 
the number of cases — criminal and 
civil — which came before the court 
in 1942. To some degree, this de- 
crease can be attributed to a popu- 
lation loss due to the large number 
of young men who left the city dur- 
ing the year for service in the armed 
forces. Another contributing factor 
to a lessening of crime was the rapid 
expansion of employment which re- 
moved idleness as an important 
cause for lawlessness. Still another 
reason for fewer court cases was the 
reduction in travel growing out of 
war restrictions on the use of auto- 
mobiles. Motor vehicle violations 
decreased noticeably. 

The court tried 910 criminal 
cases during 1942 as compared 
with 1,601 during the preceding 
year. The number of civil cases ex- 
clusive of small claims was 131 as 
against 165 for 1941. Small claims 
dropped from 111 to 65 during the 
same period. The court acted on 29 
juvenile cases or four more than the 
total for the previous year. 

REVENUE AND COSTS 

During the year, $5,437.54 was 
collected in fines, costs and sundry 
fees, an amount that fell consider- 
ably short of the $9,151.25 total of 
1941. At the end of the year, after 
making all necessary transfers and 
payments, the sum of $2,290.39 was 
paid to the City Treasurer. It is an 
interesting fact that for the first time 
in several years, net receipts were 
less than the $2,900 which the City 
raises annually for the operation of 
the court. However, it is important 
to note that the court is not run for 
revenue purposes. 



Annual Report * ' ' 39 



FIRE 
PROTECTION 

f-t-f-f-tifiif-ff-f 

FIRE BOARD 

Charles P. Coakley, Chairman 
Clarence L. Clark 
William J. Flynn 
Robert W. Potter 

William T. Happny Fire Chief 

Michael J. Martin 1 

> Deputy Chiefs 

Milan R. Piper J 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief 

1942 Expenditures: 

Operation $77,820.26 

Fire Truck 9,000.00 



CORNELIUS O'BRIEN 

Deputy Chief 
1906-1942 

W. CARL RILEY 

Call Man 
1931-1942 



FIRES AND FIRE LOSS 

The City of Concord experienced 
no real serious fires during 1942. 
The Fire Department responded to 
598 alarms, of which 57 were box 
alarms. The total number of calls 



answered was exactly the same as 
the total for the preceding year. 

There was an appreciable de- 
crease in loss due to fire during the 
year. The total loss for 1942 was 
$25,728.32 as against $39,286.22 
for 1 941 . In view of the fact that the 
number of alarms did not decrease, 
the considerable reduction in fire 
loss can be attributed largely to the 
efficiency of the fire force in coping 
with every emergency. Another fac- 
tor contributing to the decrease was 
the arrest of persons responsible for 
the wave of incendiary fires which 
plagued the city during 1941. 

Insurance payments covered the 
1942 fire loss to the extent of 
$23,634.79. The net loss for the 
year was $2,093.53. This amount 
was less than one-third of the net 
loss suffered during the previous 
year. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

During the year, the department 
exerted every effort to eliminate 
fire hazards. Regular routine in- 
spections were made in public and 
private buildings especially those 
located in the downtown business 
district. Power oil burning equip- 
ment was carefully checked and the 
regulations governing the instal- 
lation of these units was rigidly 
enforced. 

As in previous years, a series of 
fire drills and special instructions in 
fire prevention was conducted in 
the city schools by members of the 
department. 



Value 

Buildings $360,021.60 

Contents 87,902 . 53 



Loss 

SI 4,827. 48 
10,900.84 



Insurance 

,475.23 
69,673.76 



Total . 



40 



7,924.13 $25,728.32 $359,148.99 
City of Concord 



Ins. Paid Net Loss 

14,258.09 $ 569.39 

9,376.70 1,524.14 



*,634.79 $2,093.53 



APPARATUS, EQUIPMENT AND 
PERSONNEL 

Out of six fire stations, two in the 
city proper and one each in the 
city's four suburbs, the department 
operates 14 fire trucks, a service 
truck and two official cars. During 
the year, a new pumping engine 
was purchased to replace one of the 
older trucks which had outlived its 
usefulness. 

The department is equipped with 
18,450 feet of two and one-half inch 
hose and 2,200 feet of three-quarter 
inch booster hose. 

The city's fire-fighting personnel 
consists of 26 permanent and 174 
call men. During the year, six regu- 
lar and 20 call men entered the 
armed services of the United States. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE ACTIVITY 

Concord's three companies of 
auxiliary firemen, approximately 
100 strong, underwent an intensive 
training program during 1942. Dur- 
ing various air raid drills conducted 
by civilian defense authorities, the 
auxiliary fire force gave a good ac- 
count of itself in handling prepared 
"incidents". The Fire Department 
is proud of the fact that it can mus- 





( Top) This new pumping engine is the first 
acquired under a planned program of fire truck 
replacement . {Center) Two-way radio com- 
munication is the latest addition to Concordes 
fire-fighting equipment. (Below) The depart- 
ment does its own repair work at the Central 
Station machine shop 



WSSffiBSBSBM& 




Vtkjm ^""Jlr 




An artist's con- 
ception of local 
auxiliary firemen 
in action at a 
Penacook factory 
fire 



ter 300 trained men in event of an 
emergency. 

Early in 1942, the department 
placed its fire signal system at the 
disposal of local civilian defense 
authorities for air raid alarm pur- 
poses. On the whole, the depart- 
ment's warning devices in all sec- 
tions of the city have functioned 
satisfactorily during practice black- 
outs. 

RECOMMENDATION 

The replacement of old fire 
trucks, which was started this year 
under the capital budget system, 
should be continued on an annual 
basis as soon as the present emer- 
gency is ended to insure continued 
department efficiency. 



. . . Fire Hydrants 

rrf-fffffff-fff 

BOARD OF 
HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 

William T. Happny 

Percy R. Sanders 
1942 Expenditure None 

Due to the fact that war restric- 
tions halted building activity and 
residential development during 
1942, no new fire hydrants were in- 
stalled by the Board of Hydrant Com- 
missioners. All existing services were 
maintained in good working order. 

Water for fire protection was 
available from 798 hydrants of 
which 687 were public and 1 1 1 
were private services. 



42 



City of Concord 



WEIGHTS and 
MEASURES 



1-r-f 



11111 



George W. Wilde 

Sealer of Weights and Measures 

1942 Expenditure $1,210.97 



Due to commodity scarcities and 
purchase restrictions brought on by 
the war, people everywhere have 
suddenly acquired an active inter- 
est in weight and measure. This is 
especially so in relation to food pur- 
chases. 

The Sealer of Weights and Meas- 
ures has redoubled his efforts to 
protect the buying public against 
short measure and to cooperate in 
every way with merchants to the 
end that weight and measure shall 
be accurate. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITY 

Special attention has been given 
to the reweighing of packaged goods 
and to the visibility of weighing 
devices. Underweight packages have 
been ordered adjusted to the stated 



weight, and all scales used for direct 
customer purchases have been or- 
dered placed so that the weight 
indicator is visible to the buyer. 

During the year, the State De- 
partment of Weights and Measures 
placed at the disposal of the sealer 
a fuel oil delivery testing truck. 
All local fuel truck meters have 
been tested and sealed. 

Careful attention has been given 
to wood deliveries. For its own 
protection, the public is reminded 
that wood dealers are required to 
provide customers with a sales slip 
showing the dealer's name and 
address, the date of delivery, the 
name of the purchaser, the grade 
and quantity of wood, the price per 
unit and the total amount due. 

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITY 



U 



157 



Scales 393 

Weights 652 

Liquid Measures. . .. 131 

Gasoline Pumps. . . 170 

Kerosene Pumps . 23 

Grease Dispensers . . . 00 

Oil Bottles 198 

Tank Trucks .'1 

Packages $84 1,002* 

Coal 1 

Cart Bodies 13 

Yard Sticks 16 



44 
1 



5 



*Underweight 



243; overweight — 759. 



The Sealer of Weights and Measures is shown testing the accuracy of the 
meter of a fuel oil delivery truck. The special testing equipment is available to 
the City through the courtesy of the State Department of Weights and Measures 




ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBI NG 



Zoning, building and plumbing are 
interrelated in that each in its own 
way has to do with the structural 
development of" the community. 
During 1942, in the interest of the 
war effort, the War Production 
Board restricted non-essential build- 
ing activity to a bare minimum. 
The sharp decrease in zoning ap- 
peals, building activity and plumb- 
ing permits reflects this stop-con- 
struction order. 

. . . Zoning 

1111111111111 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Donald G. Matson, Chairman 

John S. Corbett 

A. Clifford Hudson 

Harold E. Langlev 

Laurence M. Meyer 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk 

1942 Expenditure $143.56 

During the year, 1 1 appeals were 
taken to the Zoning Board of Ad- 
justment. Of this number, four were 
granted, six were granted condi- 
tionally and one was denied. 

One of the appeals granted con- 
ditionally pertained to a junk yard 
use which the Superior Court re- 
manded to the zoning board for 
further hearing. The board granted 
the appeal conditionally on the 
grounds that insufficient evidence 
had been presented to prove the use 
injurious, noxious, offensive or 
detrimental to the neighborhood. 



Building 



Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 

1942 Expenditure None 



During 1942, 75 permits were 
issued for all types of construction 
as compared to 1 69 in l 941 . Of this 
number, 33 were for new work and 
42 were for repairs and alterations. 
The valuation of permits issued fell 
off from $394,105.00 in 1941 to 
$124,295.00 in 1942. 

Eighteen permits were issued for 
new dwelling units during 1942, 1 1 
of which were for single family 
houses. During 1941, permits were 
issued for 58 dwelling units. 

. . . Plumbing 
t-ti-t-f-fttt-tfii 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS 

William J. Bishop, Chairman 

Edward E. Beane 

Arthur W. Sargent 

Edward E. Beane Plumbing Inspector 

1942 Expenditure None 

1942 Receipts $29.00 

1111111111111 

Plumbing activity was cut to the 
bone during 1942. This was due not 
only to the ban on building con- 
struction but also to government 
restrictions placed on the sale of 
plumbing fixtures and supplies. 
Plumbing permits were issued in 57 
instances. Plumbing inspections to- 
taled 134 for the year. 

Two applicants for master plumb- 
er's licenses and one for a journey- 
man's license were examined by the 
Board of Examiners of Plumbers 
during the year. One master plumb- 
er's license was issued. 



44 



City of Concord 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 

William A. Stevens 

John W. Stanley 

John C. Tilton 

Robert W. Potter 

Charles A. Bartlett 

John Swenson 

Ervin E. Webber Commissioner 

Ervin E. Webber, Supt. oj Streets 
Ervin E. Webber, Tree Warden 
Edward E. Beane, City Engineer 
Leslie C. Clark, Supt. of Parks 
and Cemeteries 

WAl Expenditures: 

General Operation $266,054.08 

Capital Budget 343.00 

W. P. A 9,403.78 

Parks 12,723.04 

Cemeteries 35,064.25 

Trees 6,329.98 



ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 

In April, 1942, the Board of 
Aldermen abolished the Park and 
Cemetery Commission and trans- 
ferred the care and maintenance of 
the city's parks and cemeteries to 
the Board of Public Works. This 
change of jurisdiction was effected 
in order to accomplish a saving in 
operating costs by pooling man- 
power and equipment. 

At the same time, the Board of 
Public Works created the office 
of Commissioner elevating Mr. Er- 
vin E. Webber, Superintendent of 
Streets, to this position. The Com- 
missioner was vested with full 
control over the construction and 



maintenance of sewers, formerly 
the responsibility of the City Engi- 
neer. Public work functions now 
under the jurisdiction of the Com- 
missioner include the construction 
and maintenance of highways and 
sewers, the development and main- 
tenance of parks, trees and ceme- 
teries, and the collection of refuse 
and table garbage. All of these ac- 
tivities require the same general 
type of supervision and substantial 
economies are possible as the result 
of a coordinated program of plan- 
ning and execution of work. 

The new Parks and Cemeteries 
Division operates under a superin- 
tendent who is directly responsible 
to the Commissioner of Public 
Works. 

The Engineering Division, ad- 
ministered by the City Engineer, 
furnishes engineering services to the 
department and to all other city 
agencies requiring such service. 

The Division of Accounts and 
Records is supervised by a Chief 
Clerk who is responsible to the 
Commissioner and the City Engi- 
neer. All records are kept by this 
division except those pertaining to 
parks and cemeteries which are 
handled in an office maintained at 
Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

PERSONNEL 

The reorganized department em- 
ployed 130 people on a permanent 
basis during 1942. In addition, 99 
temporary workers were employed 
for seasonal work. This represents a 
decrease of 72 seasonal employees 
since 1941. The reduction is due to 
a curtailment of the department's 
program of semi-permanent street 
construction. 



Annual Report 



45 



STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

In keeping with the policy of a 
reduced construction program dur- 
ing the war, the department did not 
undertake any large highway proj- 
ects during 1942. However, various 
small but important improvements 
were effected. Among these was the 
relocation of the Old Turnpike 
Road from the city dump to the 
south-end bridge. This project en- 
tailed the elimination of an exceed- 
ingly dangerous curve. 

In the west-end residential sec- 
tion, Hillside Road from Center 
Street southerly, and Minot Street 
from Woodman Street to School 
Street were graded and tarred. 

Haines Road in the Plains area 
was widened, straightened and sur- 
face treated with tar. This road re- 
ceives considerable use as a by-pass 
connection between two trunk line 
highways. A sharp curve on the 
Shaker Road was also straightened 
in order to eliminate a perilous 
traffic hazard. 

In order to correct a dangerous 
step in the Main Street sidewalk, 
the entrance to Market Lane from 
Main Street was regraded and sur- 
faced with tar. 

A new rail fence was erected on 
the Old Turnpike Road along a 
steep embankment. The depart- 
ment also built a boulder fence on 
Eastman Street around the curve of 
Horseshoe Pond. 

During the year, the department 
constructed three new culverts to 
facilitate drainage under highways. 
These were located on Lake View 
Drive, Virgin Hill and Airport 
Road. The Airport Road culvert is 
a part of the extensive new drainage 
system recently installed at the 



Concord Municipal Airport. 

More than three miles of gravel 
roads were surface treated with tar 
during 1942. These roads include 
Cemetery Street, Crescent Street, 
Appleton Street, Haines Road, 
parts of Locke Road and Ports- 
mouth Turnpike. 

New tar sidewalks were built in 
the Plains area for the accommoda- 
tion of children attending the new 
Dame School on Canterbury Road. 
In the downtown business district, 
597 square yards of hard -surfaced 
sidewalks were replaced with ce- 
ment walks. 

HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE 

War restrictions have made it in- 
creasingly difficult to obtain mate- 
rials for highway maintenance. In 
the item of tar, alone, roads on 
which it was to be applied had to be 
certified by the Public Roads Ad- 
ministration as necessary to the 
successful prosecution of the war. 
As the result of this ruling, only 
138,783 gallons of tar were used for 
road maintenance during 1942 as 
compared with 282,700 during the 
previous year. A substantial reduc- 
tion in the amount of cold patch 
material used was also effected. A 
total of 1,290 tons was applied as 
against 1,980 tons in 1941. This de- 
crease was due in most part to im- 
proved road conditions. 

SNOW AND ICE 

A total of 49.6 inches of snow fell 
during the winter season. After 
each storm, streets were promptly 
freed of snow by 14 department- 
owned trucks and two graders aug- 
mented by 11 hired trucks. Two 
sidewalk tractors and 17 horse- 
drawn plows were used to keep 



46 



City of Concord 



walks open for pedestrian travel. 

The department's rotary plow, 
acquired late in 1941, was used 
very effectively last winter in clear- 
ing snow from downtown streets. 
Without this equipment, the city 
would have been faced with a seri- 
ous snow removal problem due to 
the lack of available manpower for 
street clearing purposes. 

A total of 10,099 cubic yards of 
sand was spread on streets and side- 
walks during the year. This amount 
was almost double the quantity 
used in 1941. Abnormal ice condi- 
tions contributed largely to this 
increase. 

During the year, $8,227.70 were 
expended for snow removal and 
plowing and $12,546.02 for sanding 
streets and sidewalks. 

REFUSE AND GARBAGE SERVICE 

The volume of trash collected 
varies but slightly from year to 
year. Collections during 1942 to- 
taled 56,780 cubic yards as com- 
pared with 55,676 cubic yards in 
1941. This work was accomplished 
at a cost of $31,769.11 or approxi- 
mately 55 cents per cubic yard. 

Table garbage was collected on 
the same basis and over the same 
territory as in 1941. This service 
cost the city $3,900.00 for the year. 

ENGINEERING 

As a part of its program of re- 
establishing existing streets, the En- 
gineering Division surveyed 28.79 
miles of street. In connection with 
this work, 565 street bounds were 
set during 1942. 

A total of 14,607 feet of road, 
sidewalk and curb was grade staked 
for the Highway Division. No new 




The Highway Division's rotary snow 
plow is shown clearing an airport runway 

streets were laid out during the 
year. 

The division reproduced 2,208 
maps and plans and recorded 467 
transfers of property. Sewer plans 
and assessors' maps were brought 
up to date. 

SEWERS 

Due to the war, the sewer con- 
struction program was curtailed 
sharply. The 1 942 work program 
was confined to minor main line ex- 
tensions and replacements. The 
sanitary sewer system was extended 
on Rumford Street, Crescent Street, 
Carpenter Street and Ridge Road. 
At Center Street in Penacook, a new 
sanitary sewer was constructed, and 
the Clinton Street sewer was relaid 
from South Fruit Street, westerly. 
A short storm sewer was con- 
structed at Borough Road. 

During the year, four catch ba- 
sins and four manholes were built, 
and 1 3 new house connections were 
laid. Fine progress was made by the 
maintenance crew on the program 
of cleaning main line sewers. In 
addition to this work, 104 plugs 
were removed from lateral lines. 



Annual Reporf 



47 



The 1 942 per mile cost of maintain- 
ing the city's 80 miles of sewer 
mains was SI 43. 92. 

STREET LIGHTING 

The street light candlepower re- 
adjustment program started in 1 941 
was completed during the year. 
Eight new sodium lights were in- 
stalled. On December 31, 1942, the 
municipal street illumination sys- 
tem consisted of 1,603 lightsranging 
in candlepower from 600 to 10,000. 
This service cost the city $40,238. 1 8 
which represents an increase of 
$2,443.28 over the previous year. 

TREES 

During 1942, the Tree Division 
set out 196 shade trees along city 
streets. In addition to these, eight 
trees were set out on school proper- 
ties, seven at the East Concord 
playground, and a like number at 
the town pound in West Concord. 

As a part of the division's tree 
planting program, several newly 
developed streets were lined with 
shade trees. These included Wild- 



mere Terrace, Hillside Road, Jor- 
dan, Wilson and Roosevelt Avenues. 
In the spring, the Tree Division 
carried out its annual gypsy and 
brown tail moth control program in 
all parts of the city. Results ob- 
tained were very effective and the 
city was remarkably free of these 
pests during the year. 

PARKS 

During the year, the Park Divi- 
sion expended no little effort in im- 
proving the physical plant and 
facilities of the city's park system. 
At White Park, a part of the swamp 
between the pond and the ball field 
was graded. Reclamation of this 
swampy section will greatly en- 
hance the aesthetic value of the 
park. Picnicking facilities at the 
park were used frequently during 
the summer due to war-time pleas- 
ure travel restrictions. To meet the 
demand for greater facilities, addi- 
tional fireplaces and picnic tables 
were provided in the wooded upper 
area of the park. 

Considerable progress was made 



Most of the city's refuse is collected by horse-drawn vehicles. These teams are 
playing an important part in conserving gasoline and tires for war use 




48 



City of Concord 



STREET LIGHTING READJUSTMENT PROGRAM 
INCREASED LIGHT-38% INCREASED COST-8% 




LUMENS 


600 


1,000 


2,500 


4,000 


10,000 


TOTAL 




TYPE 

OF 

FIXTURE 


/vm^A 






* 


TA 


ALL 
TYPES 


u. _ 
tDt- 


1940 


1,2 11 


2 


215 


143 





1,571 


1942 


1,041 


173 


239 


57 


93 


1,603 


id 

UJ Q. 

DH 

o 
F 


1940 


726,600 


2,000 


537,500 


572,000 





1,838,100 
($37,141.50) 


1942 


624,600 


1 73,000 


597,500 


228,000 


930,000 


2,553,100 
($40,238.18) 











during 1942 on the Rollins Park re- 
development program. This work 
has been going on ever since the 
1938 hurricane uprooted the old- 
growth pine that covered the 
greater part of the area of the park. 
Additional trees were planted and 
newly developed grass areas and 
flower beds were carefully main- 
tained. The picnicking facilities at 
the park were expanded to meet the 
increased demand for this type of 
outdoor recreation. During the 
winter months, eight bird-feeder 
stations were maintained at the 
park by the division's personnel. 
Needless to say, the area has be- 
come an important bird sanctuary. 
After many years of very little 
use, West Garden on North Main 
Street was "rediscovered" last sum- 
mer by many Concord citizens. 
Limited in area, yet one of the most 
beautiful spots in the city, the gar- 
den offers a pleasant retreat to the 
public. During the summer season, 



many employees of a large nearby 
industry availed themselves of the 
facilities and pleasant surroundings 
of the garden to enjoy outdoor noon 
lunches. One of the most successful 
open-air events of the summer, a 
strawberry festival, was held at the 
garden under the sponsorship of a 
local church group. 

CEMETERIES 

There were 216 interments in 
city cemeteries during 1942. This 
number was the lowest in any year 
since 1931. Fifty-one cemetery lots 
were sold during the year. The 
revenue received from the sale of 
lots amounted to $2,700.00. 

At Blossom Hill Cemetery, a new 
two-grave section containing 100 
lots was developed. The memorial 
chapel was redecorated and re- 
opened for burial service use. Ap- 
proximately 4,000 feet of gravel 
roads in the cemetery were tarred 
for the first time. A like amount of 
surface-treated road was also tarred. 



Annual Report 



49 




All city shade trees are sprayed by 
means of this automotive equipment 

About 1,000 feet of gravel walks 
were eliminated by loaming and 
seeding. 

During 1942, the Cemetery Divi- 
sion undertook the development of 
two acres of the area of Pine Grove 
Cemetery in East Concord. This 
work necessitated much grading, 
leveling and loaming. Improve- 
ments were carried out in accord- 
ance with plans prepared by the 
Engineering Division. The project 
involved the construction of 1,500 
feet of new roads. A considerable 
amount of work remains to be done; 
plans call for the completion of the 
project in 1943. 

DEFENSE ACTIVITY 

The department has continued to 
work in close cooperation with local 
civilian defense authorities. During 
the various salvage drives con- 
ducted in 1942, men and equip- 
ment were made available for col- 



lection and loading purposes. In 
connection with the tin salvage 
program, the department made 
regular weekly collections at grocery 
store deposit centers and trans- 
ported the salvage material to the 
railroad loading point. The depart- 
ment's personnel and equipment 
were placed at the service of defense 
officials during the various air raid 
drills held during the year. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

The department has extended its 
cooperation to the various city de- 
partments. Examples of this service 
include rolling the ball field at 
Memorial Field for the Recreation 
Commission, building a service 
board for the Planning Board, drill- 
ing holes in sidewalks for police 
traffic signs, and providing band- 
stand facilities at various parks for 
public concerts. 

In cooperation with the West 
Concord Garden Club, the depart- 
ment undertook the restoration of 
the historic town pound at West 
Concord. The granite walls of the 
pound were reset and an appropri- 
ate sign was erected calling atten- 
tion to the fact that the pound was 
established in 1830. The land 
around the pound was graded and 
seeded and several shade trees were 
set out on the lot by the Tree 
Division. 

At the request of the Northeast 
Timber Salvage Agency of the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture, a road was constructed 
from Clinton Street to Turkey 
Pond. Logs stored in the pond since 
the 1938 hurricane are being proc- 
essed into lumber to be used in the 
national war effort. 



50 



City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 



BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Hon. Charles J. MgKee, Chan man 
Robert W. Potter, Clerk 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Samuel B. Dunsford 
John N. Engel 
Charles W. Howard 
John Swenson 
1942 Expenditures: 

Airport Expansion $9,632 . 53 

Alterations to Administration 

Building 5,000.00 

Hangar Construction 986 . 90 

Operations 6,041 .71 

1942 Earnings 2,784.86 



No single agency of the city govern- 
ment has been more closely asso- 
ciated with activities bearing di- 
rectly on national defense and all- 
out prosecution of the war than has 
the Municipal Airport. During the 
past year, almost every phase of the 
airport and its operations was ex- 
panded tremendously to meet the 
demands of war-time aviation. 
Without reservation, it can be said 
that 1942 marks the year during 
which the Concord Municipal Air- 
port attained its full stature as a 
major public service enterprise. 

AIRPORT EXPANSION 

The airport expansion project 
authorized in 1941 by the Board of 
Aldermen in connection with the 
national program of airport devel- 
opment got under way early in 
1942 and, for all practical pur- 
poses, was completed by the time 



winter set in. The expenditure of 
federal funds for local airport pur- 
poses, first set at $379,000 by Con- 
gress, was increased at various 
times during progress of the work 
until the government's contribu- 
tion finally amounted to about 
$459,000. The City, for its share of 
the cost of the project, raised $30,- 
000 to be used to purchase addi- 
tional land. As the year ended, 
condemnation proceedings were 
still in process on the matter of 
award for damages for land taken. 
The newly expanded airport 
covers an area well over 600 acres 
or three times the area of the origi- 
nal layout. The landing field's two- 
runway design was changed to one 
of three runways. The new run- 
ways, roughly twice as long and 
one-half again as wide as those 
which they replaced, were relo- 
cated according to a plan which 
takes into account the possibility of 
a need for even greater runway 
length in the future. An extensive 
drainage system and modern field 
lighting facilities were also in- 
stalled as part of the expansion 
program. 

OTHER IMPROVEMENTS TO PLANT 

During the year, major improve- 
ments were made at the administra- 
tion building. At a cost of about 
$5,000, the structure was converted 
from a one and one-half to a two 
story building. This structural 
change resulted in the addition of 
four badly needed offices. At the 
same time, the basement was rear- 
ranged to provide classroom facili- 
ties for ground school instruction. 

As part of the alterations to the 
administration building, a glass- 



Annual Report 



51 




These are a jew of the large number of planes being used at the Municipal Air- 
port to tram flyers under the (.'. .1. .1. supervised war training service program 



enclosed control tower was con- 
structed on top of the main struc- 
ture. All sections of the landing field 
are clearly visible from the tower, 
from which air traffic in and out of 
the port can be routed so as to per- 
mit a maximum of operating safety. 

In order to provide more space 
for the storage of planes, especially 
during winter months, the roof of 
Hangar No. 1 was raised about four 
feet. This added height is sufficient 
to permit vertical dead storage of 
double the number of planes that 
can be housed in the hangar using 
the conventional storing arrange- 
ment. 

Because of the greatly increased 
activity at the airport, the Board of 
Aldermen, late in 1942, authorized 
the expenditure of $40,000 for the 
construction of a new hangar. The 
proposed new structure, plans of 
which call for many modern service 
facilities, will replace Hangar No. 2 
which has outlived its usefulness. 



CIVIL AERONAUTICS AGENCIES 

The activities of the Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration of the U. S. 
Department of Commerce at the 
airport increased in scope during 
the year. In addition to the two- 
way radio communication, teletype 
interphone and radio beam services 
which the C. A. A. has operated at 
the airport for several years, the 
agency moved its regional inspec- 
tion service from Portland, Maine 
and Boston, Massachusetts to Con- 
cord establishing here a centralized 
branch. The Portland branch of 
the C. A. A. war training service 
was also transferred to Concord. 
This action was taken as the result 
of the army ban on civilian flying in 
the eastern seaboard area. The 
Concord Municipal Airport was 
chosen because of its central loca- 
tion in the region. The administra- 
tive offices of the C. A. A. occupy 
the ground floor of the administra- 
tion building while the agency's 



52 



City of Concord 



technical equipment is operated 
from second-floor quarters. 

U. S. WEATHER BUREAU 

Transferred to the airport from 
downtown offices in 1941, the U. S. 
Weather Bureau completed its first 
full year of operation at the admin- 
istration building during 1942. Due 
to military demands, the weather 
reporting service's technical facili- 
ties were enlarged and its personnel 
increased from two to five. 

CIVILIAN PILOT TRAINING 

A complete reorganization of 
civilian pilot training at the airport 
occurred during 1942. The training 
program formerly conducted by the 
William E. Martin Flying Service 
under C. A. A. sponsorship was re- 
placed by the war training service 
also under C. A. A. supervision. 

By contract arrangement, the 
new training program is conducted 
by the William E. Martin Flying 
Service in cooperation with the E. 
W. Wiggin Flying Service, the Den- 
nison Airport Operating Company 



and the Bayside Flying Service. 
This combination of flying serv- 
ices created at the Concord airport 
one of the largest, if not the largest, 
privately-operated training groups 
in New England. 

Trainees under the war program 
are members of the Army Enlisted 
Reserve Corps. The local training 
groups are made up of undergradu- 
ates of Northeastern University, 
Tufts College and Rhode Island State 
College. 

During the past year, courses 
have been conducted in elementary 
and secondary flying. A training 
course for instructors has also been 
a part of the flying curriculum. 

In less than a full year's opera- 
tion, the expanded flying school has 
graduated 525 students represent- 
ing approximately 18,000 hours of 
flying time. Currently, the school is 
operating on a 24-hour basis with 
190 students, on a schedule which 
calls for 4,000 hours of flying per 
month. The number of planes used 
for training varies from 30 to 50. 



Air cadets who hare successfully completed then training at the Munici- 
pal Airport are shown participating in outdoor graduation exercises 




Annual Report ' * ' 53 



WATER 
SUPPLY 



BOARD OF WATER 

COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson, President 
Robert W. Brown 
Harry H. Dudley 
Allen M. Freeman 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Gardner Tilton 

Percy R. Sanders Superintendent 

1942 Expenditures $81,725.16 

1942 Receipts $87,030.91 



CONSUMPTION 

The war has had very little if any 
effect on the consumption of water 
in Concord. Water Department 
measuring devices indicated that 
1 ,037,839,900 gallons of water were 
drawn from the city's two sources 
of supply during the past year. This 
amount was considerable less than 
the total for 1941, a year during 
which Concord experienced a real 
severe summer drought and a heavy 
demand for water for lawn sprink- 
ling and garden purposes. The 1 942 
total represented a return to normal 
consumption. 

Of the total amount of water 
used, 695,249,000 gallons, or better 
than two-thirds, were drawn from 
Penacook Lake, the city's chief sup- 
ply source. The driven well field 
near the Soucook River in Pem- 
broke accounted for the remaining 
342,590,900 gallons. A total of 31,- 
960,950 gallons, or 60,167 gallons 



daily, was pumped from the high 
service system into the extra high 
service system by means of auto- 
matic pumps located at the Extra 
High Service Station on Columbus 
Avenue. 

Regular daily pumping was 
started at the driven well field on 
November 9, 1941 and continued 
until December 9, 1942. During 
this period the water level at Pena- 
cook Lake rose two feet to a point 
three and four-tenths feet below the 
overflow. In anticipation of a nor- 
mal spring run-off sufficient in 
amount to lift the level of the lake 
to the overflow mark, further pump- 
ing at the Pembroke station was 
discontinued. 

CONSTRUCTION 

Due to restrictions imposed by 
the War Production Board on ma- 
terial purchases, the Water Depart- 
ment's construction and replace- 
ment activities were at a near 
standstill during the year. Aside 
from two short extensions of small 
street pipe, ten new services and 34 
meter installations, no new work 
was undertaken during 1942. 

Chief project to suffer from cur- 
tailed construction was the 24-inch 
main replacement from the junc- 
tion of North State and Rumford 
Streets to Penacook Lake. With the 
assistance of the W. P. A., approxi- 
mately one-third of this job was 
completed in 1941. Work will be 
resumed on the project as soon as 
materials and labor are available 
after the end of the war. 

FINANCES 

The receipts of the Water De- 
partment for 1942 totaled $87,- 



54 



City of Concord 



030.91. Expenditures for bonds, in- 
terest, construction and mainte- 
nance amounted to $81,725.16. Re- 
ceipts exceeded expenses by $5,- 
305.75. During the year, $17,000 in 
water bonds were retired. 

The normal course of Water De- 
partment finances was altered some- 
what due to the proscription on 
new construction. It has been the 
water works annual policy to apply 
a certain portion of the revenue re- 
ceived from water sales for new 
construction and replacement. Un- 
able to undertake new work, the 
department was faced with a situa- 
tion whereby its rate structure was 
developing more revenue than was 
needed solely for operation and 
maintenance. In order to ad- 
just this condition, the Board of 
Water Commissioners authorized 
the abatement of all water bills due 



These views show the extra high 
service pumping station and stand pipe 



October 1, 1942 for water supplied 
during the previous three months. 
Bills for the use of hose for the sea- 
son of 1 942, and one-half of bills for 
the six months flat rate covering the 
period beginning October 1, 1942 
and ending April 1, 1943 were also 
abated. The amount of money in- 
volved was $29,075.91. This abate- 
ment was made possible only by 
unusual war conditions. In no sense 
should it be considered as setting a 
precedent for future abatements. 




Annual Report 



55 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Hollis, President 
Charles F. Cook 
Gerard L. Gaudrault 
Mrs. Lela Y. Johnson 
Mrs. Violet L. McIvor 
Mrs. Edwina L. Roundy 
Donald W. Saltmarsh 
Dixon H. Turcott 
Mrs. Bertha H. Woodward 

Natt B. Burbank Superintendent 

H. Raymond Danforth 

(In the absence of Mr. Burbank) 
Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1942: 

$354,383.20 

. . . Concord School District 

The total number of pupils enrolled 
in Concord public schools during 
the year ending June 30, 1942 was 
3,31 4. This represented a loss of 71 
against the previous year. The daily 
average membership was 3,240 and 
the average daily attendance was 
3,027. Despite war conditions, it 
would seem that Concord held its 
own to an unexpected degree in the 
matter of enrollment. 

WAR EFFORT 

A great deal of attention was 
given in all schools during the past 
year to the Schools at War Pro- 
gram. This program sought to use 
the natural interest and enthusiasm 
of school children to promote the 
war effort and, at the same time, to 
teach practical patriotism to the 
boys and girls. Along these lines. 



thousands of dollars worth of stamps 
and bonds were purchased by the 
students, over 200 tons of scrap 
were collected, and thousands of 
pounds of tin cans were salvaged for 
use in the war effort. It was possible 
to use this interest on the part of the 
pupils as a motivating force in his- 
tory, geography and current events 
lessons. 

One of the outstanding contribu- 
tions of the schools in the war ef- 
fort was in the field of rationing. 
The teachers functioned willingly 
and efficiently to make it possible 
for the people of Concord to get 
various ration books without delay. 

COST OF OPERATION 

A study of the financial picture of 
the Union School District for the 
school year ending June 30, 1942, 
shows that the cost of operating the 
schools exclusive of the bonded in- 
debtedness and cafeterias was $354,- 
383.20. This represents a per pupil 
cost of SI 06. 9 3 or $14.79 per capita 
of the total population of Concord 
exclusive of Ward One according to 
the 1 940 census. The taxes raised 
for school purposes in 1 942 repre- 
sented 39 per cent of the total tax 
bill of the City of Concord. There is 
at the present time a total of $436,- 
000.00 of bonded indebtedness. 

PENSIONS 

During the year, the School 
Board and the Pension Committee 
of the Concord Teachers' Associa- 
tion spent much time and effort in a 
revision of the Teachers' Retire- 
ment System for the Concord 
School District. The purpose of this 
revision is to put the pension system 
on a sound operating basis. The fol- 
lowing excerpt is from the report of 



56 



City of Concord 



the Board of Education: "As stated 
in the last report of the Board, the 
present system was set up on the 
theory that it would eventually be- 
come self-supporting from contribu- 
tions by teachers. It is the Board's 
unanimous opinion that we must 
readjust our approach to this prob- 
lem. It is an unsound principle that 
the teachers, in view of the size of 
their salaries, should be expected to 
bear the whole cost of a pension 
system. Actually, declining interest 
rates, declining mortality rates, and 
the increase in the cost of living 
make it impossible for the teachers 
to afford to contribute a sufficiently 
large percentage of their salaries to 
make such a system self-supporting. 
The principle that the employer 
should be responsible for at least 
part of the cost of a retirement sys- 
tem has become well established. 
The teachers are willing to increase 
their contributions and we are re- 
vising the old system upon the 
principle that the District will un- 
derwrite the difference between the 
amount of pensions the contribu- 
tions by the teachers will produce 
and pensions at half pay for life. 
Concord can and should afford 
what this will cost." 

TEACHERS 

The teacher situation in Concord 
offers a peculiar problem, namely, 
that though there are many teach- 
ers in the small towns who would 
like to get into Concord to teach, 
these teachers can only sign con- 
tracts during the brief period in 
which they are free from other con- 
tractual obligations. This means 
that from May to the first of July, 
Concord has a wide field for selec- 



tion of teachers. However, if after 
the first of July and during the 
school year, the district loses teach- 
ers, it is as hard pressed as the small 
towns to find replacements because 
most teachers are then under con- 
tract for the ensuing school year. So 
far, the district has been very for- 
tunate in securing good substitute 
material to fill the positions left 
open by men going into the armed 
forces. 

PROBLEMS 

One of the serious problems for 
the coming school year is that of 
providing for adequate medical in- 
spection for students due to the 
great scarcity of doctors. It is hoped 
that through the advice and cooper- 
ation of the Medical Association, 
the district will find a solution to 
this problem before the opening of 
school in September. 

Another problem concerns the 
athletic program in the Rundlett 
Junior High School. For several 
years the auditorium on the third 
floor has been used as a gymnasium 
to the very great detriment of the 
physical plant. Also, the noise from 
the gymnasium classes has been a 
handicap in carrying out classroom 
work on the lower floors. The prob- 
lem is not easy of solution for it 

Getting in the scrap — Concord's school chil- 
dren show the spirit that makes victory a 
certainty 




calls for a new gymnasium which 
could not be constructed under 
present conditions. However, it is 
proposed to work out a program 
which will utilize the playground 
to its fullest capacity during the fall 
and spring months and which will 
provide for the teaching of certain 
health units in the classrooms dur- 
ing the winter months. 

. . . Penacook School District 



BOARD O F EDUCATION 

Frank Beede, Chairman 

Claire V. Breckell 

Mrs. (Catherine Butts 

James J. Hayes 

Leslie H. Jones 

Alfred J. York 

George W. Sumner Superintendent 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Tear Ending ,7"'"' 30, 1942: 
$38,425.68 



During the year ending June 30, 
1942, the Penacook school district 
was operated at a cost of $ 3 8, 42 5. 6 8, 
an amount $922.22 in excess of the 
1941 figure. Although payments of 
principal on the bonded debt 
dropped from $3,000.00 to $2,000.00, 
increases occurred in most operat- 
ing items sufficient in amount to 
more than offset the decrease in 
bond payments. During the year, 
expenditures for teachers' salaries 
and fuel increased $1,027.38 and 
$1,1 17.39, respectively, to head the 
list of higher costs. At the end of the 
year, the district's bonded debt 
stood at $32,000.00. 

The City of Concord raised 
$29,684.98 for the support of Pena- 



cook schools from property within 
the district valued at $1,980,923.00. 
The district's tax rate for school 
purposes amounted to $14.98 per 
$1,000.00 of assessed valuation. A 
total of $9,608.18 was received from 
other revenue sources. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The average membership of stu- 
dents attending Penacook schools 
dropped from 382 to 370 during the 
year. High school membership de- 
creased from 215 to 187 during 
the same period. According to the 
headmaster of the high school, this 
decrease in attendance can be at- 
tributed to the fact that a larger 
than usual number of older children 
left school to go to work due to 
abnormal employment conditions. 

EFFECT OF WAR 

The policy of adapting the school 
as far as possible to the unusual 
needs of pupils in the present war 
emergency has been continued. In 
accomplishing this end, every effort 
has been made to keep up standards 
in regular courses to the end that 
each student may be well equipped 
to meet the normal problems of life. 

More and more, teachers have 
been called to take up new duties, 
both connected with and outside 
of their regular work. Registrations 
in connection with the rationing 
program were conducted by the 
teaching staff. 

Penacook is findingitincreasingly 
difficult to retain and find the kind 
of teachers it needs. Attractive op- 
portunities in the armed services, in 
war plants, and in other school sys- 
tems are creating a serious shortage 
of teachers. 



58 



City of Concord 



APPENDIX 



■fr & ir 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATISTICS 

PAGE 

General Fund — Comparative Balance Sheet 60 

General Fund — Analysis of Changes in Unappropriated Surplus. . . . 60 

General Fund — Analysis of Changes in Appropriated Surplus 61 

General Fund — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 61 

General Fund — Comparative Statement of Budgetary Appropria- 
tions and Expenditures 62-63 

General Fund — Statement of Actual and Estimated Revenues 64 

Bond Funds — Comparative Balance Sheet 65 

Bond Funds — Balance Sheet of Non-Revenue Accounts 65 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 66 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 67 

Trust Funds — Receipts and Disbursements, Changes in Fund Bal- 
ances 67 

Concord Water Works — Balance Sheet 68 

Concord Water Works — Statement of Operations 68 

Concord Water Works — Cash Receipts and Expenditures 69 

Concord Water Works — Income-Investment Account 69 

Assessors' Statement for 1942 70 

Status of Tax Collections, 1936-1942 71 

City Relief Department — Relief Expenditures 72 

Municipal Court — Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 73 

Board of Public Works — Financial Statement 74 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed 

Valuations, Tax Levies and Rates in Concord, 1933-1942 74 



GENERAL FUND 

Comparative Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1941-December 31, 1942 

December 31st Increase 

Assets 1941 1942 Decrease * 
Cash: 

In Depositories $170,440.79 $129,501.19 $40,939.60* 

Undeposited Cash — Tax Collector 3,103.23 689.44 2,413.79* 

Undeposited Cash — City Clerk 117.47 114.82 2.65* 

Revolving Fund — City Clerk 250 . 00 250 . 00 

Custody of City Officials 2,398 . 94 2,398 . 94 

Accounts Receivable — Trustees 18,449 .81 18,449 . 81 

Taxes Receivable: 
Uncollected — 

Levy of 1936 4,883.53 4,883.53* 

Levy of 1937 5,924.65 5,924.65* 

Levy of 1938 6,405.61 6,405.61* 

Levy of 1939 6,311.56 5,618.11 693.45* 

Levy of 1940 8,081.76 6,944.88 1,136.88* 

Levy of 1941 206,860.62 8,371.10 198,489.52* 

Levy of 1942 203,057.14 203,057.14 

Reimbursable Expenditures: 

Merrimack County 7,197.57 5,389.75 1,807.82* 

Other Municipalities 616.81 153.57 463.24* 

Less: Reserve for Doubtful Accounts. . . 1,584. 93 f 1,221. 48 f 363.45 

Tax Liens (Unredeemed Taxes) Bought bv 

City 49,371.34 49,094.80 276.54* 

Property Acquired by Tax Collector's Deed 6,394.20 6,107.93 286.27* 

Total Assets $474,374.21 $434,920.00 $ 39,454.21* 

Liabilities and Surplus 
Current Debt: 

Temporary Loans in Anticipation of 



Bonds and Coupons Due 

Reserves and Overlays — For Uncollect- 
ible Taxes, Etc 

Appropriations: 

Unexpended Balances Carried to 1943: 

Concord Airport 

Union School District 

Penacook School District 

Public Library 

School District Bond Interest 



$100,000.00 
217.50 


$ 

3,275.00 


$100,000.00* 
3,057.50 


872.62 

130,699.71 

9,737.85 

512.40 
8,437.50 


1,232.87 

140,019.53 

10,827.22 

7,896.77 


360.25 
9,319.82 
1,089.37 

512.40* 

540.73* 


223,896.63 


271,668.61 


47,771.98 


$474,374.21 


$434,920.00 


$ 39,454.21* 



I hiappropriated Surplus: 

1 942 and Prior Years 

Total Liabilities and Surplus $474,374.21 

f Denotes Deduction. 

GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Changes in Unappropriated Surplus 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 

Unappropriated Surplus Per Books December 31, 1941 $223,896.63 

Add: 

Amount carried to Surplus for Year Ended December 31, 1942 47,771 .98 

Unappropriated Surplus Per Books December 31, 1942 $271,668.61 

60 ' ' ' City of Concord 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Changes in Appropriated Surplus 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 

Credits 

Unexpended Balances $51,444.43 

Less: Overdrafts 19,870.64 

Net Unexpended Balances $ 31,573.79 

Accounts Receivable — Trustees 18,449 .81 

Excess of Revenues Over Estimates 14,697 . 95 

Total Credits $ 64,721 . 55 

Charges 
Decrease in Receivables: 

City Clerk $ 2 . 65 

* Taxes Receivable 14,476.50 

Reimbursable Items: 

County $1,807 . 82 

Municipalities 463.24 

$2,271.06 

Reserve Deducted 363.45 1,907.61 

Tax Liens 276 . 54 

Tax Deeded Property 286.27 

Net Decreases 16,949.57 

Amount Carried to Surplus — 1942 $ 47,771.98 

* Includes charges for abatements. 

GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Change in Net Debt 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 

Net Debt, December 31, 1941 $887,103.37 

Additions: 

Bonds and Notes Issued During 1942: 

Municipal Airport Bonds $ 40,000 . 00 

Municipal Airport Notes 30,000 . 00 70,000 . 00 

Total $957,103.37 

Deductions: 

Bonds and Notes Retired During 1942: 

Municipal Bonds $ 68,000 . 00 

School Bonds 24,000 . 00 

School Notes 20,000 . 00 

Municipal Notes — Auditorium 25,000 . 00 

Municipal — W.P.A 25,000.00 

$162,000.00 

Water Bonds 17,000.00 

Reduction for Bonds and Notes Retired 179,000.00 

$778,103.37 
Deduction for Amount Carried to Surplus, representing the results of 

operations for the year 1942 and transactions affecting prior years. . 47,771 .98 

Net Debt, December 31, 1942 $730,331.39 

SUMMARY 

Net Debt, December 31, 1941 $887,103.37 

Net Debt, December 31, 1942 730,331.39 

Improvement in Financial Condition $156,771 .98 

Annual Report * * * 61 














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GENERAL FUND 

Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 



Source 
Local Taxes: 

Taxes — 1942 Lew 


Eslimate< 
Revenues 

51,356,457 


i 

.41 


Actual 

Receipts 

$1,107,149.19 

209,463.69 
39,148.01 

53,033.54 
30,819.53 

14,32 2 24 

27,969.48 

3,009.50 
942.45 
102.00 

2,149.50 

30.75 
834.00 
120.24 

2,290.39 

1,302.79 

625.83 

19,478.09 

331.36 

46.57 

162.42 

314.00 

12,000.00 

6,429.81 

2,251.81 
605.47 


Deductions 
by Transfer 

$ 501.77 


Net 

Balances 

SI, 106, 647. 42 

209,463.69 

39,148.01 

53,033.54 
30,819.53 
14,322.24 

27,969.48 

858.48 
102 00 

2,149.50 

30.75 
608.97 
120.24 

2,290.39 

99.65 

241.09 

12,361.45 

331.36 

46.57 
162.42 
314.00 

2,251.81 
605.47 


Excess or 

Deficiency* 

$249,809.99* 
209,463 69 












39,148 01 




98,563 


.67 






388 36* 


































City Clerk's Receipt',: 


28,896 
4,184, 


59 
37 






927 11* 








314.43* 




3,009 

83 


.50 

.97 
































Sales of Histories, Maps, 
Etc 


















225 


.03 














3,924 


04 






1,633 65* 


Departmental Earnings and 
Income: 


1,203 

384 

7,116 


.14 
.74 
.64 


99 65 








241.09 








12 361 45 








331.36 












46.57 












162.42 


Board of Health . . 


335. 


00 






21 00* 




12,000 
6,429 


.00 
.81 












Relief Department — 






2,251 .81 


Old Age Assistance 










605.47 



Miscellaneous Revenues: 
Sales and Rentals — Tax 

( hvned Property 

Miscellaneous Revenue. 



2,709.87 
391.10 



2,709.87 
371.10 



2,709.87 
371.10 



Grand Totals $1,492,361.08 $1,538,033.63 $30,974.60 $1,507,059.03 $14,697.95 



64 



City of Concord 



BOND FUNDS 

Comparative Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1941-December 31, 1942 

December 31st Increase 

Title of Accounts 1941 1942 Decrease * 
Assets 
Net Bonded Debt: 

Balancing Account $ 981,000.00 $ 912,000.00 $69,000.00* 

Notes Payable: 

Balancing Account 1 30,000 . 00 90,000 . 00 40,000 . 00 * 

Total $1,111,000.00 $1,002,000.00 $109,000.00* 

Liabilities 

Serial Bonds: 

Central Fire Station $ 13,000.00 $ 12,000.00 $ 1,000.00* 

City Hall and Auditorium 30,000 . 00 25,000 . 00 5,000 . 00 * 

Departmental Equipment 20,000.00 16,000.00 4,000.00* 

Highways 25,000 . 00 20,000 . 00 5,000 . 00 * 

Public Improvements 1 60,000 . 00 1 22,000 . 00 38,000 . 00 * 

Sewers 188,000.00 173,000.00 15,000.00* 

Union School District 403,000 . 00 379,000 . 00 f 24,000 . 00 * 

Water Department 142,000.00 125,000.00 17,000.00* 

Municipal Airport 40,000 . 00 40,000 . 00 

Serial Notes: 

Union School District 80,000 . 00 60,000 . 00 20,000 . 00 * 

Municipal Airport 30,000 . 00 30,000 . 00 

City Hall and Auditorium 25,000 .00 25,000 . 00 * 

W. P. A. Project 25,000.00 25,000.00* 

Total $1,111,000.00 $1,002,000.00 $109,000.00* 



t Includes $3,000,00 of bonds due December 1, 1942; presented and paid by the City 
Treasurer on January 5 and 13, 1943. 



BOND FUNDS 

Balance Sheet of Non-Revenue Accounts 

December 31, 1942 

Assets 
Cash in Depositories: 

First National Bank, Concord, New Hampshire $64,731 .91 

Liabilities 
Concord Airport: 

Land Account $20,367 . 47 

Concord Airport: 

New Hangar Account 39,013. 10 

Concord Auditorium: 

Construction and Repairs 5,351 . 34 

Total $64,731 .91 



Annual Report 



65 



BONDED INDEBTEDNESS OF THE CITY 



MUNICIPAL 

Interest 

Name of Issue Rate 

Central Fire Station 3 ! 2 ' , 

City Hall and Auditorium 4/4% 

Departmental Equipment 4' 4 ' , 

Highway 3 ' 4 ' { 

Public Improvement 1 ! 4 ' < 

Public Improvement 2% 

Public Improvement 1 -' 4 ' ,' 

Public Improvement 1 ' 4 ' < 

(same issue) 1 ' 4 ' < 

Public Improvement — Airport 1 '4 ' , 

(same issue) 1 ! 4 ' < 

Sewer 3 ' 2 ' < 

Sewer 3 ' 2 ' , 

Sewer 3 % 

(same issue) 3' <- 

(same issue) 3' , 

Storm Sewer 2 ! 4 ' , 

Airport * 

SCHOOL 

High School 4 J 4 ' , 

Conant School 4X% 

Morrill School 4 ! . ' , 

Eastman School 2 ! 4 ' , 

Dame School f 



Annual 

Maturities 

$ 1,000 

5,000 

4,000 

5,000 

10,000 
5,000 

10,000 
8,000 
6,000 
4,000 
3,000 
1,000 
1,000 
6,000 
4,000 
3,000 
7,000 

10,000 



14,000 
5,000 
2,000 
4,000 

20,000 



Term of 

Payment 

1943-54 

1943-47 

1943-46 

1943-46 

1943-44 

1943-44 

1943-46 

1943-47 

1948-49 

1943-46 

1947-54 

1943-54 

1943-46 

1943-48 

1949-53 

1954 

1943-56 

1943-45 



1943-65 
1943-48 
1943-46 
1943-46 
1943-45 



Unmatured 
Dec. 31, 1942 

$ 12,000 
25,000 
16,000 
20,000 
20,000 
10,000 
40,000 

52.000 



40,000 

12,000 

4,000 



59,000 
98,000 
30,000 



322,000 

30,000 

8,000 

16,000 

60,000 



WATER WORKS 

Water 4^' f 4,000 1943-47 20,000 

Water 4' 4 \ 9,000 1943-51 81,000 

Water 2^% 4,000 1943-48 24,000 



SUMMARY 



Municipal . . . 

School 

Water Works . 
Total . 



* Three notes carrying interest from .75' c to 1.50' ( . 
t Three notes carrying interest from .30' ( to .85%. 
% Does not include $3,000 of school bonds due in December 
in January, 1943. 



438,000 

436,000J 

125,000 

$999,000 % 



1942; presented and paid 



66 



City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1942 

ASSETS 

Sundry 

Total Cemetery All Other 

All Funds Trust Funds Trust Funds 
Cash in Savings Banks and Trust Companies: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 90,407.93 8 61,317.53 $ 29,090.40 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 98,608 . 1 3 48,805 . 44 49,802 . 69 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 105,612.00 58,867.19 46,744.81 

Union Trust Company 108,665.64 61,597.03 47,068 . 61 

Total Cash 8403,293.70 8230,587.19 

Securities: 

United States Bonds $ 9,111.88 $ 4,850.00 

Other Bonds 3,000 .00 

Stocks 2,220.00 700.00 

Total Securities 8 14,331.88 8 5,550.00 

Total Assets 8417,625.58 8236,137.19 

LIABILITIES 

Trust Fund Balances 8417,625.58 8236,137.19 8181,488.39 

Total Liabilities 8417,625.58 8236,137.19 $181,488.39 



$172,706 


.51 


$ 4,261 
3,000 
1,520 


,88 
.00 

.00 


8 8,781 


.88 


$181,488. 


39 



TRUST FUNDS 



Receipts and Disbursements — Changes in Fund Balances 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 



Cash Balances of LInexpended Income, De- 
cember 31, 1941 

Receipts: 

Income from Interest and Dividends .... 

One-third from Sale of Lots 

Total Available 

Disbursements 

Transfer (Contra) 

Cash Balance of Unexpended Income, De- 
cember 31, 1942 



Total 

3,834.81 

13,523.64 
900.17 



$ 


18,258 

12,829 

6, 


62 

60 
00 


$ 


5,423 


(12 



Sundry 

Cemetei r 

Trust Funds 

$ 1,798.92 

4,697.82 



6,496.74 
4,573.38 



$ 1,923.36 



All Other 
Trust Funds 

$ 2,035.89 





8,825 
900 


.82 

17 


$ 


11,761 

8,256 

6 


88 
22 
.00 


$ 


3,499 


(.(. 



Fund Balances, December 31, 1941 

Additions: 

New Trusts Created 

One-third Receipts from Sale of Lots . . 

Sale of Graves 

Seth K. Jones, Income 

Seth K. Jones, Transfer (Contra) 



CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

,175.95 8227,683.83 



176,492.12 



6,830.00 

1,120.18 

60.00 

10.43 

6.00 


6,530.00 


300.00 

1,120.18 

60.00 

10.43 

6.00 


8412,202.56 


8234,213.83 


8177,988.73 


Annual Report 


-'67 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance Sheet December 31, 1942 
ASSETS 
Fixed Assets: 

Water and Flowage Rights $ 167,688 . 1 1 

Engineering and Superintendence Construction Cost. 63,383.63 

Land 129,386 . 35 

Fixed Assets (Subject to Depreciation): $1,595,372.62 

Less: Depreciation Reserve 674,389 . 23 

Net Depreciable Fixed Assets 920,983 . 39 

Current Assets: 

Cash in Depositories $ 17,019.65 

Accounts Receivable 27,005 . 40 

Materials and Supplies 17,123.39 

Total Current Assets 61 , 1 48 . 44 

Other Assets: 

Cash in Savings Banks: 

Income — Investment Fund 48,488.89 

Total Assets $1,391,078.81 

LIABILITIES 

Current Liabilities: 

Bond Coupons Unpaid $ 146 . 00 

Funded Debt: 

Bonds 125,000.00 

Capital Liabilities: 

Municipal Investment $ 958,022 . 64 

Federal Grants in Aid of Construction 61,915.08 1,019,937.72 

Surplus: 

Profit and Loss — Earned 245,995.09 

Total Liabilities and Capital $1,391,078.81 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations for the Year Ending December 31, 1942 
Revenues: 

Hater Sales: 

Commercial, Industrial and Miscellaneous $ 114,036.37 

Less: Abatements allowed and voted by Water Board 29,075 . 91 

Net Water Sales $ 84,960 . 46 

Operating Expenses: 

Water Supply Expenses $ 23,900 . 28 

Distribution Expenses 19,754.97 

Other Expenses 9,537.47 

Total Operating Expenses $ 53,192.72 

Fixed Capital Charges: 

Depreciation $23,028 . 89 

Taxes 17.35 23,046.24 

Total Operating Charges 76,238.96 

Water Operating Income $ 8,721 . 50 

Funded Debt Charges: 

Interest Paid 5,413.75 

$ 3,307.75 

Other Income 1,091.20 

Income Balance to Profit and Loss $ 4,398 . 95 

68 ' ' ' City of Concord 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Cash Receipts and Expenditures 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 

RECEIPTS 

Balance, January 1, 1942 $ 37,713.90 

Receipts: 

For Water at Fixed Rates, General $ 2,744 . 48 

For Water at Meter Rates, General 68,998 . 61 

For Water at Meter Rates, Industrial 12,406 . 16 

For Water, Accounts Prior to 1 942 286 . 04 

For Water, Miscellaneous Uses 140 . 50 

For Water, Boscawen and Penacook Water Precincts. . . 1,303. 12 

Miscellaneous Receipts 1,152.00 



Total Receipts 87,030 .91 



124,744.81 



EXPENDITURES 

Orders Paid $59,31 1 .41 

Bonds Paid 17,000 . 00 

Bond Interest 5,4 1 3 . 75 



Total Expenditures $ 81,725. 16 

Transferred to Income-Investment Account 26,000.00 

Balance in City Treasury, December 31, 1942 17,019.65* 



$124,744.81 



* Order issued not paid December 31, 1942, $30.00. 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Income-Investment Account 

December 31, 1942 

CAPITAL AND INCOME 

Capital $ 20,000 . 00 

Transferred from Cash Balance 26,000 . 00 



Total Capital, December 31, 1942 $ 46,000.00 

Income Received to January 1, 1942 $ 1,856.83 

Income Received 1 942 632 . 06 



Total Income, December 31, 1942 2,488.89 



$ 48,488.89 



INVESTMENT 

Deposited in: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 12,022.24 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 12,155 . 55 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 12,155 . 55 

Union Trust Company 12,155 . 55 



$ 48,488.89 
Annual Report > < < 69 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1942 



Assessed 

Valuation of 
City and Preciru ts 
Money raised for the: 

County $33,282,876 . 00 

City Budget . 33,282,876 . 00 

Schools: 

* City Union 31,293,694.00 

t Penacook U. School 2,000,902.00 

Total 

Allowed for Errors and Corrections 

Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 

City Rate 

Penacook Rate 

Average Rate for City 

* Includes property located in Loudon. 

f Includes property located in Canterbury. 



Amount of 
Appropriation 

I 194,247.83 
652,597.00 

401,535.45 

31,669.00 

$1,280,049.28 

I 32,788.94 

1,312,838.22 

731.16 



Tax Rate 
per $1,000 

5.86 
19.60 

12.84 
15.84 



38.30 
41 . 30 
38 . 40 + 



POLL TAXES 



Men 

Women . . . 
Total. 



EXEMPTIONS 



Veterans 

Property Valuation. 

Polls (897) 

Blind. . 

Property Valuation . 

Polls (10) 

Total Exemptions . 



BANK STOCK 



Bank Stock. 



Type 

Improved and Unimproved Land and Buildings 

Electric Plants 

Horses 

Asses and Mules 

Oxen 

Cows 

Neat Stock 

Sheep (including Goats) 

Hogs 

Fowls 

Fur-bearing Animals 

Vehicles 

Portable Mills 

Boats and Launches 

Wood and Lumber 

Gas Tanks and Pumps 

Stock in Trade 

Machinery 

Total 



No. 


Amount 


5,599 


$ 11,198.00 


7,585 


15,170.00 


13,184 


$ 26,368.00 




$274,600.00 




1,794.00 




2,000.00 




20.00 




$278,414.00 








$ 6,054.16 


5 OF PROPERTY 


No. 


I a/ nation 




$29,147,735.00 




1,700,580.00 


147 


13,570.00 


4 


300.00 




0.00 


1,085 


98,185.00 


144 


6,195.00 


73 


628.00 


34 


575.00 


23,375 


23,375.00 


79 


515.00 




0.00 




0.00 




1,500.00 




1,483.00 




24,090.00 




1,826,715.00 




437,430.00 



$33,282,876.00 



70 



City of Concord 



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Annual Report 



71 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1942 

Direct Expenditures for Relief: City County 

Work Relief — Janitor — Project $ $ 680.40 

Work Relief— Project Wages 378.10 1,083.10 

Cash Allowances 2,831 . 89 4,999 . 92 

Groceries 4,235.89 12,961.08 

Milk 1 ,005 . 45 4,887 . 09 

Fuel 1,585.38 4,193.25 

Rent 1,031.50 7,099.00 

Board and Care — Adults 3,818.14 2,372.18 

Board and Care — Children 1,740. 15 

Medical 1 ,849 . 78 9,446 . 44 

Clothing 158.49 606 . 09 

Funerals 85 . 00 587 . 50 

House Furnishings and Repairs 21 .65 98.20 

Housework and Nursing 3 . 20 1 47 . 50 

Trucking and Moving Clients 37 . 00 147 . 49 

Public Utilities 33.01 63 . 37 

WPA Sewing Project Material 922 . 1 9 922 . 1 9 

Sewing Project Material (Not WPA) 79 . 37 79.38 

Sundry Expenditures 56 . 38 274 . 66 

Total City and County Poor $19,872.57 $50,648.84 

Other Towns 819.46 

Hospitalization 2,688 .07 



Total 




$ 680 


.40 


1,461 


.20 


7,831 


.81 


17,196 


.97 


5,892 


.54 


5,778 


.63 


8,130 


.50 


6,190 


32 


1,740 


,15 


11,296 


,22 


764 


.58 


672 


50 


119 


85 


150 


70 


184. 


49 


96. 


38 


1,844. 


38 


158. 


75 


331. 


04 


$ 70,521. 


41 


819. 


46 


2,688. 


07 


$ 74,028. 


94 



523,380.10 $50,648.84 



Dependent Soldiers: 

Work Relief — Project Wages 

Cash Allowances 

Groceries 

Milk 

Fuel 

Rent 

Board and Care — Adults 

Board and Care — Children 

Medical 

Clothing 

Public Utilities 

Sundry Expenditures 

Total Dependent Soldiers $ 954 . 05 $ 5,021 . 08 $ 5,975 . 1 3 

72 ' ' ' City of Concord 



$ 12 


.00 

.50 


$ 


, . . J 


5 12 
2,216 


00 


100 


2,116 


.00 


.50 


430 


.51 


773 


.98 


1,204 


.49 


130 


19 


358 


34 


488 


.53 


77 


.75 


329 


.37 


407 


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72 


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3 


55 


37. 


89 


41 


.44 






2, 
40. 


83 
95 


2 
40. 


83 






95 









Administration: 

Salaries — Overseers $1,796.52 S 1,109.20 $ 2,905.72 

Salaries — Office and Case Workers 4,753 . 9 1 3,999 . 60 8,753 . 51 

Mileage 176.83 448.97 625.80 

Auto Use and Auto Hire 148.38 23.37 171.75 

Office Supplies . . 205.70 165.55 371.25 

Telephone 

Lights 



124.65 124.64 249.29 

77.21 77.21 



Heat 60 . 00 60 . 00 120 . 00 

Janitor Service 156.00 156.00 

Wages — Supervisor — W PA Sewing Project 245.70 245.70 491.40 

Express — Project Materials 14 . 67 14 . 67 

Miscellaneous Expenses — Sewing Project ... 23 . 70 23 . 70 

Insurance 52.09 52.09 

Repairs to Office and Equipment 40 . 79 40 . 79 

Miscellaneous Office Expense 1 97 . 60 38.13 235.73 

Wages — Supervisor — Sewing Project (Not 

WPA) 120.00 120.00 240.00 



Total Administration $8,193.75 $6,335.16 $14,528.91 

Old Age Assistance 12,451.28 12,451.28 



Grand Total $44,979.18 $62,005.08 $106,984.26 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1942 

Receipts 

Received for fines, costs and sundry fees $5,437 . 54 

Expenditures 

Paid for fees of officers, witnesses and complaints and warrants $ 20 40 
State of New Hampshire, Commissioner of Motor Vehicles . . 2,980 . 80 

State of New Hampshire, Fish and Game Department 16.70 

Clerk's Bond 5 . 00 

Postage, printing and supplies 78 . 55 

Special Justices 6 . 00 

State of New Hampshire, Department of Agriculture 20.00 

Counsel fees in juvenile cases 5 . 00 

Check of Benjamin Caplan for fine and costs, uncollected and 

worthless 14.70 3,147.15 



Balance $2,290.39 



Paid City Treasurer $2,290 . 39 

Annual Report ' ' ' 73 



BOARD OF PUBLIC: WORKS 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1942 



Roads and Bridges . 

Office 

Refuse Collection . . 
Table Garbage . . . . 

Sewers 

Engineering 

Lighting Streets. . . . 
Clerk of Board 



Appropriation 

$160,000.00 

4,500.00 

32,000 . 00 

3,900 . 00 

16,336.00 

9,050.00 

40,664 . 00 

200 . 00 



Receipts 
11,746.96 



7,558.59 

32.75 



Total 

Available 

5171,746.96 

4,500.00 
32,000.00 

3,900.00 
23,894.59 

9,082.75 

40,664.00 

200.00 



Expended Balance 

$153,760.46 $17,986.50 



4,365.74 
31,769.11 

3,900 . 00 
23,452.64 

8,367.95 

40,238.18 

200 . 00 



134.26 
230.89 

441.95 
714.80 
425.82 



Sub-Total $266,650.00 $19,338.30 $285,988.30 $266,054.08 $19,934.22 

Capital Budget — 

R. & B 4,052 . 40 4,052 . 40 343 . 00 3,709 . 40 

W. P. A. Appropriation 17,014.78* 110.79 17,125.57 9,403.78 7,721.79 



Grand Total. 



,717.18 $19,449.09 $307,166.27 $275,800.86 $31,365.41 



Amount transferred to Board of Public Works on November 1, 1942. 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 
Tax Levies and Rates in Concord 1933-1942 

Polls Veterans Valuations Tax Rates 

1933 13,092 1,325 31,676,008 957,889.64 29.37 

1934 13,523 1,319 31,969,987 981,805.50 29.98 

1935 13,338 1,116 31,910,830 1,193,828.43 36.48 

1936 13,166 1,030 32,039,851 1,245,352.87 37.86 

1937 13,612 919 32,195,052 1,290,330.81 39.04 av. 

1938 13,490 936 32,201,370 1,282,689.02 38.82 + av. 

1939 13,877 958 32,365,017 1,176,029.78 35.30 + av. 

1940 14,334 925 32,791,790 1,280,926.90 38.00 + av. 

1941 13,874 896 33,068,487 1,264,315.56 37.20 + av. 

1942 13,184 897 33,282,876 1,312,838.22 38.40 + av. 



74 



City of Concord 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Activities in 1942 8 

Assessment 12 

Appendix 59 

Bond Funds 14 

Building Activity 44 

Cemeteries 49 

City Clerk 10 

City Government 6 

City Officials 7 

Effect of War 4 

Elections 11 

Engineering 47 

Examination of Plumbers .... 44 

Finances 14 

Financial Statements and Sta- 
tistics 59 

Fire Protection 40 

Garbage Disposal 47 

General Fund 14 

Health and Sanitation 19 

Hydrants 42 

Legal Service 15 

Library 28 

Mayor's Message 3 

Medical Service 23 



PAGE 

Milk Inspection 21 

Municipal Airport 51 

Municipal Court 39 

Parks 48 

Planning 16 

Playgrounds and Bath 24 

Plumbing Inspection 44 

Police Protection 34 

Probation 33 

Public Works 45 

Recreation 24 

Refuse Collection 47 

Relief 31 

Schools 56 

Sewers 47 

Snow Plowing and Sanding. . 46 

Special Recreational Facilities . 26 

Street Lighting 48 

Tax Collection 13 

Trees 48 

Trust Funds 14 

Vital Statistics 10 

Water Supply 54 

Weights and Measures 43 

Zoning Appeals 44 



Annual Report 



75 



RUMFORD PRESS 
CONCORD. N. H.