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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

THE HOME FRONT 



TWO YEARS OF WAR 



^ 



*** 

ik * ~k 

• * * 




A REPORT TO THE 
CITIZENS OF CONCORD 



i 



THE NINETY-FIRST 

ANNUAL REPOR T 

OF THE 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FOR THE 
TEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1943 




Capital of the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Merrimack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27,171 (1940) 



Authorized and Published under t/ie supervision of the City 
Planning Board by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



^52. , O 7 
C74- 

I QA-2 



FOREWORD 



TO OUR CITIZENS AT HOME: 

To you whose lot it is to "keep the home fires 
burning," your City Government once again 
presents for your consideration and investigation 
this annual accounting of municipal activities. You 
will note, as you did a year ago, that services and 
activities have been curtailed to fit the pattern of 
a war economy. However, your City Government 
has spared no effort to provide you with every 
service essential to your health and welfare. With 
full knowledge that many of these municipal re- 
sponsibilities have been cut to a bare minimum of 
sufficiency, your City asks your continued tolerance 
and cooperation during the trying days which lie 
ahead. 

TO OUR CITIZENS ALL OVER THE WORLD: 

To each of the 2,900 of you who fight for the 
cause of freedom and justice, wherever you may 
be, the City of Concord sends its greetings and 
wishes for the best that the fortunes of war have to 
offer. In sending you this copy of the Annual City 
Report, the Board of Aldermen hopes that it will 
add to your information of happenings at home 
and that it will serve to refresh your memory of 
familiar scenes and faces. Your City Government 
wants you to know that it is doing everything in its 
power to keep the "home town' 1 as you would have 
it on your return. May that day be soon. 



Annual Report * * 1 3 






u 



ROLL OF HONOR 
& # '-& 

Regular Employees 

of the 

City of Concord 

SERVING IN THE ARMED FORCES 

OF THE 

UNITED STATES 






Wts 









Daniel C. Abbott 
Donald G. Barton 
Chester S. Blake 
Walter H. Carlson 
Winthrop L. Clark 
Paul R. Colgan 

LlBERO COLLETTI 

Melvin G. Davis 
Robert P. Drouin 
Parker L. Hancock 
Bryan E. Libby 
Gordon S. Lord 



William J. McFarland, Jr. 
J. Francis McGuire 
Dean C. Moran 
Richard J. Morey 
Arnold B. Murphy 
James J. Ouilette 
Cleon F. Perry 
George E. Ruddy 
John R. Selig 
Vilho A. Skarp 
Paul E. Welcome 
Raymond A. York 



4 1 1 f City of Concord 




MAYOR McKEE'S MESSAGE 



Along with the annual report to the citizens of Concord, it has been a 
custom for the Mayor to transmit a few timely words about municipal 
affairs of the past year and to prophesy achievements to come. 

Whatever the City of Concord has done during the past year on the 
home front, it has been with a keen appreciation of the greater contribu- 
tion made by its 2,900 men and women who have donned the uniform of 
the country's armed services. 

The reports of the various city departments which are contained in the 
following text need no perfunctory introduction from the Mayor. It 
suffices to say that every municipal function has been carried out in a 
manner that has been in complete accord with the spirit of a united war 
effort and with the interest and welfare of the citizens of Concord. 

As for the pattern of future events, the way may be obscured at' times 
but the end to be gained is as clear as the cause of free men for which our 
absent citizens fight. Your city government proposes to practice and 
adhere to the wisdom of that homely Yankee adage "to hew to a straight 
line and let the chips fall where they may" in striving for a better com- 
munity in which to live. 




Mayor 
Annual Report / / / 5 



A SYNOPSIS 

OF 

YOUR CITY AT WAR 

1943 



C A system of rents was established 
to defray the cost of operating the 
City's sanitary sewers. 

CI Sunday afternoon movies were 
legalized by a referendum vote. 

C A uniform practice in relation to 
attendance and leave of municipal 
employees was adopted by the 
Board of Aldermen. 

CL Vital statistics records showed 
575 births, 233 marriages and 650 
deaths during the year. 

d Receipts from auto permits 
dropped to $19,215.04 as compared 
with $27,969.48 in 1942 and $37,- 
779.12 in 1941. 

d A census by the Board of Asses- 
sors showed 465 vacant dwelling 
units in the City. 

d The City's total assessed valua- 
tion of $33,251,268.00 was only 
$31,600.00 less than the total for 
1942. 

d A 979 loss in the number of 
taxable polls was experienced dur- 
ing the year. 

6 * f 1 City of Concord 



d The average tax rate dropped 
from $38.40 to $31.80 per $1,000.00 
of assessed valuation. 

d The amount of back taxes bought 
by the City was $32,329.23, the 
smallest sum since 1934. 

CI A financial improvement of $84,- 
542.68 was effected in the City's 
net debt status. 

d The City closed its operations for 
the year with an unappropriated 
surplus of $187,211.29. 

CI Bonds and notes totaling $169,- 
000.00 were retired during the year 
leaving the city with a total bonded 
indebtedness of $830,000.00. 

d The net increase in trust fund 
balances during the year was $26,- 
664.98. 

CI A major street plan was adopted 
by the Planning Board and the 
Board of Aldermen established an 
official map of covering the city 
proper section of Concord. 

C. As a part of the gasoline and rub- 
ber conservation program, a 28.6 
per cent reduction was effected in 



the annual mileage of municipal 
vehicles. 

d The activities of the Health De- 
partment were expanded to include 
a smallpox clinic for children. 

C Hue to war-related causes, a 
noticeable decrease in playground 
attendance occurred during the 
summer recreation season. 

d Several thousand books were 
collected and shipped to the armed 
forces by the Public Library. 

C Nearly 1,000 new names were 
added to the city honor roll during 
the year. 

d The library reference depart- 
ment handled more than 4,500 
reference questions during the year. 

CI The Public Library circulated 
162,063 books which represents a 
20 per cent drop from the pre-war 
total. 

CI A sharp reduction occurred in 
the number of families on relief; all 
able-bodied persons were gainfully 
employed. 

d The total cost of relief was 

$71,374.15 as against $106,972.76 
in 1942. 

d Police Department arrests de- 
creased from 859 in 1942 to 571; 
stolen property valued at $3,026.95 
was recovered. 

d The Police Department con- 
ducted an average of three investi- 
gations daily for government agen- 
cies and war industries; about 4,000 
sets of fingerprints were processed. 

C. The Probation Department re- 



ported a definite decrease in juve- 
nile delinquency. 

CI The total fire loss for the year 
was $84,450.92; insurance pay- 
ments brought the net loss down to 

$7,602.02. 

d Two-way radio communication 
facilities were added to the city's 
fire fighting equipment; the depart- 
ment also acquired three trailer and 
two skid pumps from the O.C.D. 
for auxiliary use. 

d Building, plumbing and zoning 
activities hit an all-time low due to 
war restrictions. 

d The Public Works Department 
used 131,739 gallons of tar for 
road maintenance. 

d The Engineering Department 
surveyed 30.45 miles of existing 
streets. 

d New burial sections covering 
about one acre of land were devel- 
oped in three cemeteries. 

d Construction of a blacksmith 
shop and a three-car addition to 
the garage at the City Sheds was 
started during the year. 

d A new hangar was added to the 
facilities of the Municipal Airport. 

d The W.T.S. program operating 
at the airport ran up a total of 
47,150 hours of student flying time. 

d Zoning regulations was adopted 
to protect the aerial approaches to 
runways at the Municipal Airport. 

d Due to curtailed construction, 
water bills for one quarter of 1943 
were abated by the Water Depart- 
ment. 



Annual Report * * i 7 



GOVERNMENT 



Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Mayor 

John C. Tilton 

Substitute Mayor 



ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE AND 
MEMBERS BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

William A- Stevens 
John W. Stanley 
John C. Tilton 
Robert W. Potter 
John Swenson 
Charles A. Bartlett 



WARD ALDERMEN 
Charles P. Coakley 
Ralph L. Stearns 
William J. Flynn 
Winfield J. Phillips 
Harry D. Challis 
Clarence L. Clark 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Clarence E. Huggins 
Thomas B. Jennings 



Ward 7 
Ward 2 
Ward 3 
Ward 4 
Ward5 
Ward 6 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward 9 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Arbitration: 

Aldermen Clark, Bartlett, Flynn, 

Tilton. 
Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen Stevens, Coakley, LaPointe, 

Stearns. 
Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Tilton, Challis, Jennings, 

LaPointe. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Tilton, Jennings, Phillips, 

Stanley. 
Finance: 

Mayor Charles J. McKee, Aldermen 

Challis, Phillips, Stanley, Swenson. 
Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Clark, Flynn, Potter. 
Lands and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett, Huggins, Jennings, 

Stearns. 
Playgrounds and Bath: 

Aldermen LaPointe, Coakley, Flynn, 

Huggins, Jennings. 
Police and License: 

Aldermen Stevens, Huggins, Potter, 

Tilton. 
Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Flynn, Clark, Huggins, Jen- 
nings. 
Relief: 

Aldermen Stearns, Phillips, Stanley. 




CONCORD CITY 

GOVERNMENT 

1944-1945 

Seated, left to right, 
City Clerk Roby, 
Mayor McKee, Sub- 
stitute Mayor and Al- 
derman Tilton; 
standing, second row, 
Aldermen Coakley, 
Challis, LaPointe, 
Potter, Bartlett, Phil- 
lips; third row, Al- 
dermen Jennings, 
Swenson, Strong, 
Moynihan; back row, 
Aldermen Davis, 
Flynn, Stevens and 
Huggins 



OFFICIALS 



Edward E. Beane 
Arthur E. Roby 

Edward E. Beane 

Henry W. Smith 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 



Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
■ City Treasurer 
Commissioner, Board of 

Public Works Ervin E. Webber 

Fire Chief Clarence H. Green 

Judge, Municipal 

Court William L. Stevens 

Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court Peter J. King 

Librarian Marion F. Holt 

Milk Inspector Austin B. Presby 

Overseer of Poor Parker L. Hancock 

Overseer of Poor, 

Penacook Charles P. Coakley 

Planning Director Gustaf H. Lehtinen 
Police Chief Arthur W. McIsaac 

Probation Officer Robert L. Colby 

Registrar of 

Vital Statistics Arthur E. Roby 

Sanitary Officer Donald G. Barton 

Scaler of Weights 

and Measures George W. Wilde 

Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries Leslie C. Clark 

Supt. of Streets Ervin E. Webber 

Supt. of Water Works Percy R. Sanders 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds Paul G. Crowell 

Tax Collector Amos B. Morrison 

Tree Warden Ervin E. Webber 

BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND TRUSTEES 

Board of Adjustment: 

Donald G. Matson, Chairman; John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Harold 
E. Langley, Laurence M. Meyer. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Charles 
A. Bartlett, Samuel B. Dunsford, John 



N. Engel, Charles W. Howard, Robert 
W. Potter, John Swenson. 

Board of Assessors: 

Clarence O. Philbrick, Chairman; 
Thomas A. Foley, Joseph E. Shepard. 

City Planning Board: 
James M. Langley, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Douglas N. Everett, Warren 
H. Greene, John B. Jameson, Charles 
J. McKee, Dudley W. Orr, Austin E. 
Page, Robert W. Potter. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 
William J. Bishop, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 

Board of Health: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Dr. Pierre 
A. Boucher, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, 
Dr. Clinton R. Mullins. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 
Edward E. Beane, Chairman; Clarence 
H. Green, Percy R. Sanders. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Oliver Jenkins, President; Harold W. 
Bridge, Joseph J. Comi, Lela Y. John- 
son, John F. MacEachran, William B. 
Mclnnis, George W. Randall, Alex- 
ander Rennie, Jr., Martha G. Upton. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman; George A. Hill, 
Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 
J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman; Gardner 
G. Emmons, Leigh S. Hall, Charles J. 
McKee, Carleton R. Metcalf. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, 
I. Reed Gourley. 

Board of Water Commissioners: 
James W. Jameson, President; Robert 
W. Brown, Harry H. Dudley, Allen M. 
Freeman, Charles P. Johnson, Donald 
Knowlton, Charles J. McKee, Ben- 
jamin H. Orr, Gardner Tilton. 



Annual Report 1 -t -t 9 



CITY CLERK 



Arthur E. Roby City Clerk 

Margaret A. Spencer. . .Deputy City Clerk. 
1943 Expenditure $8,180.46 

<///////////// 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

During 1 943 the Board of Alder- 
men passed 15 ordinances and 42 
resolutions. The board met on 15 
separate occasions holding 12 regu- 
lar, one special and two adjourned 
meetings. 

The 1943 legislative activity of 
the Board of Aldermen was high- 
lighted by the enactment of ordi- 
nances which established a system 
of sewer rents, Sunday afternoon 
movies, and a uniform practice in 
relation to attendance and leave of 
municipal employees. 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The Board of Public Works held 
20 meetings during the year. Of this 
number, 12 were regular and eight 
were special meetings. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

During 1943 the City Clerk's of- 
fice recorded 575 births, 233 mar- 
riages and 650 deaths. The total 
number of births represented a 
slight decrease from the 1942 all- 
time high of 597. This was the first 
break in the upward trend of births 
in Concord in recent years, and 
probably marks the beginning of a 
downward trend which will con- 
tinue until sometime after the war. 
The 34 per cent increase in mar- 
riages which occurred in 1942 was 
more than offset by a 37 per cent 

10 1 i i City of Concord 



decrease during the past year; mar- 
riages dropped from 37 1 to 233. 
This reversal of trend was not un- 
expected in light of the fact that 
1942 was definitely a "war mar- 
riage" year. The 1943 death total 
indicated an increase of 24 over the 
preceding year. Concord's abnor- 
mally large annual death total 
arises out of the fact that the State 
Hospital and three institutions for 
the aged are located in the city. 

Because most war industries re- 
quire new employees to furnish 
proof of citizenship and age, the de- 
mand for certified copies of vital 
statistics continued unabated dur- 
ing 1943. The total number of such 
records issued by the City Clerk, 
for which a 50-cent charge is made, 
was 569. The practice of making no 
charge for vital statistics records re- 
quested by service men and minors 
was continued. 

MORTGAGES AND CONDITIONAL SALES 

Receipts from the recording of 
mortgages and conditional sales 
dropped to a new low of $228.25. 
War-time restrictions on time pur- 
chases and the stoppage of new car 
sales are directly responsible for the 
drying up of this source of munici- 
pal income. 

LICENSES, FEES, ETC. 

Revenue from auto permits to- 
taled SI 9,21 5.04 as against $27,- 
969.48 in 1942. In 1941 income 
from this source amounted to 
$37,779.12. The reduced receipts 
from car registrations offers posi- 
tive proof that war economy on the 
home front is making itself felt in 
the matter of private transporta- 
tion. A further reduction in revenue 



from auto permits is a certainty in 
1 944 in light of the fact that no new- 
cars are being manufactured for 
private use while the permit rate on 
old cars continues to decrease each 
year. 

The total amount of revenue col- 
lected by the City Clerk from vari- 
ous other sources such as taxi, 
theatre, bowling alley, pool table 
and circus licenses amounted to 
$12,328.00, or $2,174.79 more than 
the total for 1942. 

. . . Elections 

CITY PRIMARY 

The biennial municipal primary 
was held October 5, 1943. Mayor 
Charles J. McKee was an unop- 
posed candidate to succeed himself. 
There were eight candidates for 
alderman-at-large, fifteen for ward 
alderman and five for assessor. 
With nearly 17,000 names on the 
checklists, only 1,689 ballots were 
cast in what proved to be the light- 
est primary vote in the recent his- 
tory of the city. 

CITY ELECTION 

The municipal election was held 
November 2, 1943. The total vote 
cast was 4,943. Mayor McKee, 
running unopposed, was elected 
mayor and Aldermen Swenson, 
Tilton and Stevens won re-election 
for four year terms as aldermen-at- 
large. Nelson Strong was elected 
alderman-at-large for a two-year 
term to fill the vacancy created in 
the Board of Public Works by the 
appointment of Mayor McKee to 
succeed the late Mayor Storrs. The 
aldermen elected for the nine wards 
respectively were: Charles Coak- 
ley, John Davis, William Flynn, 



Winfield Phillips, Harry Challis, 
Lawrence Moynihan, Raymond 
LaPointe, Clarence Huggins and 
Thomas Jennings. Clarence Phil- 
brick was elected assessor and Clar- 
ence Clark also won election to the 
office of assessor to fill out the un- 
expired term of the late Edward 
Donovan. 

Sunday afternoon movies re- 
ceived the approval of the electo- 
rate by a vote of 2,444 to 1,016. 

77?^ State House 




ASSESSMENT 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 
Clarence O. Philbrick, Chairman 
Joseph E. Shepard, Clerk 
Thomas A. Foley 

1943 Expenditure $11,642.16 

f-ff-fYi-fi-fi-fiii 

REAL PROPERTY 

During 1943 real estate transac- 
tions, insofar as they concern prop- 
erty transfers, showed a reversal of 
trend and returned to a more nor- 
mal status. The total number of 
deeds recorded in the city was 601 
as against 467 for the previous year. 
This transfer represented a 5 per 
cent turnover of the city's 12,000 
parcels of real estate. There are 
definite indications that the real 
estate market, set back by the ini- 
tial impact of war, will continue to 
improve due to increased earnings 
and the relative stability of invest- 
ments made in real property. 

Only 36 building permits were 
issued in 1943 as compared with 76 
in 1942. Of the total number issued 
during the past year, 25 were for 
new buildings and garages, and 11 
were for remodeling of existing 
structures. Federal restrictions on 
non-essential building have been 
instrumental in reducing construc- 
tion activity in Concord to a neg- 
ligible item. 

The number of vacant dwelling 
units in the city hit an all-time high 
during 1943. The results of a sur- 
vey conducted in connection with 
the April poll census showed that 
Concord had a total of 465 vacan- 
cies, 97 more than the 1942 total 



and 277 more than the 1939 total. 
Due to increased industrial em- 
ployment in Concord since April, 
1 943, every probability exists that 
1944 will show a slackening trend 
of increase in vacant dwellings. 

ASSESSED VALUATIONS, POLLS, ETC. 

Concord's total assessed valua- 
tion for the year 1943 was $33,251,- 
268.00. The fact that this total was 
only $31,600.00 less than the total 
for 1942 indicated that real prop- 
erty values in the city were holding 
their own without the benefit of 
new construction and major repairs. 

The total number of taxable polls 
listed during 1943 was 12,205 as 
against 13,184 for 1942. Most of 
this 979 loss can be attributed to 
the war effort by way of military 
service and out-of-town war work. 
An interesting aside is the fact that 
women now outnumber men in 
Concord by 2,587. 

The number of shares of railroad 
stock held by Concord citizens in 
1943 was 2,759. This stock is taxed 
by the State and credited to the 
City. 

TAX WARRANT 

The 1943 tax warrant submitted 
to the Tax Collector by the Board 
of Assessors was $1,087,147.04. 
This amount was, $225, 691. 18 less 
than the 1942 warrant and, to a 
certain degree, reflects war econ- 
omies effected by the municipal, 
school and county governments. 
Reduced expenditures plus the ap- 
plication of a substantial municipal 
surplus against operating costs cut 
the average tax rate for the city 
from $38.40 to $31.80. 



12 f / / City of Concord 



TAX 
COLLECTION 



Amos B. Morrison Tax Collector 

1943 Operating Expenditure. . . .$8, 152.65 
1943 Equipment Expenditure $179.55 

1943 COLLECTIONS 

Tax collections continued to im- 
prove in 1943. At the close of the 
year, only $117,656.47 of the 1943 
tax warrant of $1,087,147.04 re- 
mained uncollected. This sum was 
approximately $85,000.00 less than 
the outstanding total at the end of 



1942. In addition to the uncollected 
total for 1943, $18,385.62 remained 
unpaid on the warrants of 1939 to 
1942 inclusive. 

During the year, a part-time col- 
lector was employed to assist the 
Tax Collector in seeking payment 
of outstanding poll and personal 
property taxes. An intensified tax 
collection program was carried out 
and the results obtained indicated 
that the effort expended was defi- 
nitely worthwhile. 

The amount of uncollected taxes 
carried on the Tax Collector's 
books as of December 31 for the 
past three years is indicated in the 
following tabulation: 



Year 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 

Total . 



As of 


As of 


As of 


Dec. 31, 1941 


Dec. 31, 1942 


Dec. 31, 1943 


$ 4,883.53 






5,924.65 






6,405.61 






6,311.56 


$ 5,618.11 


$ 3,109.55 


8,081.76 


6,944.88 


3,851.79 


206,860.62 


8,371.10 


4,126.86 




203,057.14 


6,297.42 
117,656.47 


$238,467.73 


$223,991.23 


$135,042.09 



TAXES BOUGHT BY CITY 

The general improvement in tax 
collections is further indicated by 
the fact that the amount of back 
taxes bought by the City at the 
Tax Collector's Sale in September 
was $32,329.23, or $8,175.27 less 
than the total of the previous year. 
The amount of back taxes was the 
smallest acquired by the City since 
1934. 



The status of delinquent taxes 
on December 31, 1943 is shown 
in summary form in the following 
table. 

OTHER ACTIVITY 

During 1943, the Tax Collector 
turned over to the City Treasurer 
$5,199.06 received from rent and 
sale of property deeded to the City 
in non-payment of taxes. 



Amount Bought Amount 
Year by City Redeemed 

1939 $41,755.52 $37,120.48 

1940 51,089.47 46,423.91 

1941 40,504.50 22,824.71 

1942 32,329.23 8,244.84 



Abated by 
Assessors 

$3,074.69 

2,958.79 

926.35 



Deeded 
to City 
^1,560.35 
1,267.62 
363.57 



Amount 
Unredeemed 

$ V ; io9!i5 

16,389.87 



355.43 23,728.96 



Annual Report 



13 



FINANCES 

Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1943 Expenditure $4,677.06 

11111111111111 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Harry H. Dudley 
Carl H. Foster 
I. Reed Gourley 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1943 Expenditure SI 92.50 

11111111111111 

The financial status of the City 
of Concord continued to improve 
during 1943. The City's net debt 
at the close of the year stood at 
$645,788.71. This amount was 
$84,542.68 less than the total out- 
standing at the end of 1942 and 
represented an 11.5 per cent im- 
provement in the City's financial 
condition. The reduction in net 
debt resulted from the retirement 
of bonds and notes. 

GENERAL FUND 

Total receipts for 1943 were 
$1,421,248.94. After deductions by 
transfer totaling $70,533.06, the 
net balance for the year amounted 
to $1,350,715.88. Actual net re- 
ceipts during 1943 exceeded esti- 
mated revenues by $29,567.62. 

Appropriations for 1 943 amounted 
to $1,321,148.26 which together 
with $159,976.39 carried forward 
from 1942, $38,515.25 in cash re- 
ceipts, and $76,504.11 in transfers 
brought the total amount available 
to $1,596,144.01. Deductions and 
expenditures for the year totaled 
$1,421,953.76. Transfers and other 



debits of $5,971.05 raised total 
charges for 1943 to $1,427,924.81. 
Of an unexpended balance of 
$168,219.20, $165,858.38 were car- 
ried to 1944, leaving a net unex- 
pended balance after 1943 opera- 
tions of $2,360.82. 

At the beginning of the year, 
the City's unappropriated surplus 
amounted to $271,668.61. Of this 
sum, $105,209.00 was applied to 
the 1943 municipal budget. At the 
close of operations on December 
31, 1943, the unappropriated sur- 
plus totaled $187,211.29. 

BOND FUNDS 

No new bonds were floated dur- 
ing 1943. Bonds and notes retired 
during the year amounted to $169,- 
000.00. At the close of the year, the 
City's bonded indebtedness, in- 
cluding school and water bonds, 
was $830,000.00. Of this total, 
$331,000.00 represented municipal 
bonds, $391,000.00 school district 
bonds and notes, and $108,000.00 
water precinct bonds. 

At the end of the year, interest to 
be paid on outstanding bonds and 
notes until maturity amounted to 
$206,201.25, of which three-fourths 
or $155,092.50 represented interest 
charges which will accrue against 
the school debt. 

TRUST FUNDS 

The Trustees of Trust Funds re- 
ported total assets in various trusts 
as of December 31, 1943 of $444,- 
295.89. Of this total, $347,926.22 
represented cemetery trust funds. 

During the year, cemetery trusts 
showed a net increase of $8,330.41. 
Over the same period, $21,334.57 



14 111 City of Concord 



were added to other trust funds and 
a $3,000.00 fund was written off 
as of no value. The net 1943 in- 
crease in fund balances covering 
all trusts held by the Trustees of 
Trust Funds was $26,664.98. 



Of the $444,295.89 of trust fund 
assets, $5,428.35 represented cash 
held in local banks, $349,836.91 
savings bank deposits, $86,810.63 
U. S. Treasury Bonds, and $2,- 
220.00 sundry securities. 



BONDED DEBT 



LONG TERM BONDING 

VS 

PAY-AS-YOU-GO POLICY 

AND 

WAR-TIME DEBT RETIREMENT 




LEGAL 
SERVICE 

11111111111111 

Gordon S. Lord City Solicitor 

Henry P. Callahan . . . Acting City Solicitor 
{In the absence of Mr. Lord) 

1943 Expenditure SI, 676.07 

11111111111111 

In the continued absence of City 
Solicitor Gordon S. Lord, now serv- 



ing in the United States Army, the 
City's legal business has been con- 
ducted by Henry P. Callahan, Esq., 
in the capacity of Acting City So- 
licitor. 

GENERAL ACTIVITY 

There has been no appreciable 
slackening in the amount and vari- 
ety of legal duties which the City 
Solicitor is required to perform. If 
anything, the impact of the war has 
created many unusual municipal 
problems to which the solicitor has 



Annual Report 1 1 1 15 



had to devote an increasing amount 
of time and effort. 

In addition to work in connec- 
tion with litigations to which the 
City of Concord is a party, the ef- 
forts of the City Solicitor during 
the past year have fallen into three 
main categories. These include the 
making of many adjustments in re- 
lation to the taking of property for 
airport expansion purposes, the 
drafting of several ordinances for 
the Board of Aldermen, and the 
rendering of numerous opinions 
and legal advice to the Board of 
Aldermen, boards and commissions 
and department heads. 

LITIGATIONS — SETTLED AND ADJUDICATED 

Estate of Charles R. Corey. This 
matter involved the legal question 
of whether a will made in Vermont, 
after a will had been made in Con- 
cord, should govern the said estate. 
After many hearings before the 
court, the case was finally settled 
with the City of Concord receiving 
$25,000.00. 

Alpheus M. Johnson vs. City of 
Concord. This case for action on a 
contract by Alpheus M. Johnson 
was settled for the sum of $110.00. 

LITIGATIONS — PENDING 

City of Concord Petition to Discon- 
tinue Sheep Road. This matter has 
been referred to the Merrimack 
County Commissioners for a hear- 



ing, and arises out of the closing of 
said road for the development of the 
Concord Municipal Airport. 

City of Concord Petition to Discon- 
tinue dough's Mill Road. This mat- 
ter has been referred to the Merri- 
mack County Commissioners for a 
hearing, and arises out of the 
closing of said road for the develop- 
ment of the Concord Municipal 
Airport. 

Maude L. Crowley vs. City of Con- 
cord. This is an action which arises 
out of the City's alleged taking of 
land from Maude L. Crowley for 
airport purposes. 

Samuel C. Marden vs. City of Con- 
cord. This claim arises out of an 
alleged lease between the City and 
Marden, furnishing a dwelling to a 
relief recipient. There will be some 
delay in litigating this matter as the 
Overseer of the Poor is in the 
United States Army. 

Richard A. Morton vs. City of Con- 
cord. This matter has been contin- 
ued, with the petitioner preparing 
to bring a new petition to the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment. 

Max Cohen vs. City of Concord. 
This matter is to be heard before 
the Supreme Court as to whether 
the Cohens had a legal use of their 
property as a junk yard before the 
zoning ordinance was originally 
adopted. 



These training planes present a graphic picture of Con- 
cord's participation in the nation' 's flight training program 







PLANNING 



CITY PLANNING BOARD 

James M. Langley, Chairman 
Dudley W. Orr, Secretary 
Edward E. Beane 
Douglas N. Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
John B. Jameson 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Austin E. Page 
Robert W. Potter 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen Director 

1943 Expenditure $4,808.93 



STREETS 

Petitions for street acceptances 
hit a new low during 1943 due to 
war restrictions on private develop- 
ment. Only two requests for the ac- 
ceptance of streets were considered 
by the City Planning Board. Both 
of these involved existing private 
ways and in both instances the 
Planning Board recommended against 
the acceptance of the proposed 
streets. 

The board recorded its disap- 
proval of the relocation of Old 
Turnpike or Dump Road by the 
Department of Public Works. In a 
communication to the Board of 
Aldermen, the Planning Board 
took the position that highway re- 
locations were contrary to public 
interest unless first approved by 
the Board of Aldermen. 

In developing its major street 
plan, the board recommended that 
Rockingham Street be widened at 
its westerly end to bring the street 
to an even width of 50 feet. The 
Board of Aldermen adopted this 
recommendation and the necessary 



land was purchased to effect the 
widening. 

The abandonment of Aldrich 
Street, a proposed street in the 
South End, was considered at the 
request of the Board of Aldermen. 
The Planning Board established 
the fact that the City had no inter- 
est in the proposed street. 

Work was started on a study in- 
volving the construction of a traf- 
fic rotary at the junction of Broad- 
way, South, West and Clinton 
Streets in order to solve the traffic 
problem at this much-traveled in- 
tersection. A preliminary plan of 
the proposed traffic circle accom- 
panies this report. 

After two years of street survey 
work by the Engineering Depart- 
ment, the Planning Board, on 
January 4, 1944, adopted a major 
street plan covering the city proper 
section of Concord. This map was 
certified to the Board of Aldermen 
and on January 20, 1944 the Board 
of Aldermen established an official 
map of the City based on the Plan- 
ning Board's major street plan. 
Work on the major street plan will 
continue until it encompasses the 
entire area of Concord. 

The establishment of the official 
map, a copy of which is on file with 
the Merrimack Registry of Deeds, 
gives the City a positive control 
over subdivision development within 
the area covered by the map. 

SEWERS 

At the request of the Board of 
Public Works, consideration was 
given to a proposed storm sewer in 
the downtown business district. It 
was recommended that this proj- 
ect should be made a part of the 



Annual Report 



77 




PROPOSED POST-WAR HIGHWAY DEVELOPMENT 

TRAFMC ROTARY 

BROADWAY- SOUTH-WEST-CLINTON STREETS 



CITY PLANNING BOARD.CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



postwar public works program. 

The study of a system of rents for 
sanitary sewer service was con- 
cluded and transmitted to the 
Board of Aldermen. Operation of 
the system was made a duty of the 
Board of Public Works; billing and 
collecting was delegated to the 
Water Department as agent for the 
Board of Public Works. 

On request of the Mayor, the 
board interested itself in a proposed 
Merrimack River valley trunk line 
sewer. This project is being spon- 
sored by several Massachusetts 
cities and calls for a trunk line 
sewer paralleling the Merrimack 
River to the ocean. Massachusetts is 
studying the proposal as part of its 
postwar program and the possibil- 
ity exists that the project could be 



made to serve the New Hampshire 
cities of Nashua, Manchester and 
Concord. 

ZONING 

During the year, at the request of 
the Airport Commission, the Plan- 
ning Board prepared an amend- 
ment to the zoning ordinance to 
protect the aerial approaches to 
the runways of the municipal air- 
port. The amendment was passed 
by the Board of Aldermen early in 
1944. 

RECREATION 

A study involving the provision 
of adult swimming facilities was re- 
quested by the Board of Aldermen. 
In this connection, the Planning 
Board undertook to survey the 
recreational and development pos- 
sibilities of Penacook Lake. Work is 
continuing on this survey. 

TAX TITLE PROPERTY 

For the purpose of developing a 
more orderly procedure in relation 
to the processing of property ac- 
quired by the City by tax deed, the 
board conducted an extensive sur- 
vey of tax delinquent property. 
The study culminated in the sub- 
mission of a proposed ordinance to 
the Board of Aldermen covering 
the handling of tax sale property. 

MUNICIPAL SALARIES 

Acting as a fact-finding agency, 
the Planning Board, at the request 
of the Finance Committee, con- 
ducted a survey of prevailing wages 
paid to municipal employees in 
New England cities of Concord's 
population size. Subsequently, the 



78 



City of Concord 



Planning Board's staff assisted the 
Finance Committee in drafting a 
classification and compensation plan 
for adoption by the Board of Alder- 
men. 

FLOOD CONTROL 

During the year, a New Hamp- 
shire electric utility petitioned the 
Federal Power Commission for per- 
mission to convert the Franklin 
Falls Flood Control Project into a 
power development. The Planning 
Board recommended to the Board 
of Aldermen that it take recogni- 
tion of this move so that no precipi- 
tate action of a detrimental nature 
to the city of Concord would result 
therefrom. A committee was ap- 
pointed to keep the Board of Alder- 
men informed in respect to future 
actions on this petition. 

OTHER ACTIVITY 

This city report is the fifth con- 
secutive annual publication pre- 
pared by the Planning Board at the 
request of the Board of Aldermen. 
Although the editing of the City 
Report has required considerable 
time and effort, the Planning 
Board considers the work involved 



well worthwhile because the publi- 
cation has served as a medium to 
bring nationwide recognition to 
Concord. 

The board has continued its work 
of keeping up to date the Munici- 
pal Honor Roll on which are listed 
the names of Concord citizens serv- 
ing in the armed forces of the United 
States. 

The board's director has doubled 
in the capacity of Local Mileage 
Administrator for the City of Con- 
cord in the government gasoline 
and rubber conservation program. 
A municipal mileage reduction of 
142,313 miles was effected during 
1943. 

Among studies requested of the 
Planning Board during the past 
year were two that originated out- 
side the city government. The first 
of these involved a consideration of 
a revision of ward lines requested 
by the Concord delegation of the 
1943 Legislature; the other con- 
cerned a determination of school 
building needs in the south-end 
section of the city and was re- 
quested by the Board of Education. 
These studies will be undertaken 
during 1944. 



The trading center of central New Hampshire — Concord's busy Alain Street 




PUBLIC 

HEALTH and 

SANITATION 

■ff-f-fiiii-t-f-f-f-fi 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 
Pierre A. Boucher, M.D. 
Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 
Clinton R. Mullins, M.D. 
Donald G. Barton, M.D.. . .Sanitary Officer 

Walter C. Rowe, M.D. 

(In the absence of Dr. Barton) 

Austin B. Presby Milk Inspector 

1943 Expenditure $6,736.36 



i i i i i -f 1 



GENERAL CONDITIONS 



f i i ■( -f i 



Generally, health conditions in 
Concord were normal during most 
of 1 943. Toward the end of the 
year, the city suffered from the epi- 
demic of severe colds and grippe 
which prevailed throughout the 
country. In spite of the increased 
illness due to pneumonia and influ- 
enza, deaths were few. No small 
amount of credit is due to the 
city's reduced number of doctors for 
their excellent care of the sick. 

The department's sanitary in- 
spection program was continued 
without letup during the year. Res- 
taurants, soda fountains, bakeries 
and markets were advised relative 
to the best methods of sterilizing 
dishes and eating utensils. Estab- 
lishments preparing and handling 
food were also instructed how to 
maintain proper cleanliness. 

Routine inspections of public toi- 
lets and alleyways were conducted 



by the inspector and, on the whole, 
conditions were found to be satis- 
factory. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

During the past year, there were 
fewer cases of scarlet fever than in 
1942; the same was true of measles, 
mumps, chicken pox and whoop- 
ing cough. 

Two cases of poliomyelitis, with 
no paralysis, were reported; one 
report of typhoid fever was also re- 
ceived. A sailor and a Navy yard 
worker were slightly ill and were 
advised to return to their homes 
here where their family physicians 
diagnosed their sickness as menin- 
gitis. One recovered very soon and 
returned to work and the other 
went to a government hospital for 
further treatment. 

CLINICS 

Four toxoid clinics were held in 
the Health Department offices at 
City Hall. About forty young chil- 
dren were immunized against diph- 
theria. 

For the first time in the depart- 
ment's history, a smallpox clinic 
was conducted. During the month 
of August, 48 children were vacci- 
nated to protect them from this 
disease. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

The total number of deaths in 
Concord reported to the Health 
Department in 1943 was 638. Of 
this number, 363 were non-resi- 
dent and 275 were resident deaths. 
It is an interesting fact that al- 
though non-resident deaths in- 
creased from a l 942 total of 308 to 



20 i * * City of Concord 



363, resident deaths decreased from 
298 to 275 over the same period. 

A comparative table of resident 
deaths from seven common causes 
covering the five-year period 1939 
to 1943 is presented herewith: 



. . . Milk Inspection 

Milk is one of the most valuable 
of all foods. There is no real substi- 
tute for good milk in a well bal- 
anced diet. To a large degree, the 



1940 


1941 


1942 


1943 


97 


102 


117 


113 


42 


27 


36 


32 


14 


21 


19 


14 


10 


7 


12 


15 


15 


8 


7 


11 


7 


7 


12 


8 


2 ' 


9 


5 


1 



1939 

Diseases of the circulatory system 106 

Cancer 32 

Nephritis 20 

Accidental deaths 18 

Pneumonia 11 

Diabetes 10 

Tuberculosis 6 

federal assistance general health of a city is affected by 
Grants from the United States the quality and amount of its milk 
Public Health Service have enabled supply. Most of Concord's milk 
the department to employ a public producers are doing everything 
health nurse and a public health they can to market a safe and whole- 
engineer. The Health Department some supply of milk. No effort is 
joins with the public in an expres- being spared by the Milk Inspec- 
sion of appreciation for the health tion Division of the Board of Health 
services rendered by these Federal to assure the citizens of Concord of 
Government sponsored employees, the best in milk at all times. 



Margaret Pillsbury General Hospital 




:/- 



feL, 








itWi. 



Annual Report i < / 2 7 



WAR RESTRICTIONS 

Federal regulation of the milk 
business as a part of the war effort 
came into being during the past 
year with a bewildering sudden- 
ness. In most part, these regulatory 
orders were restrictive and effected 
the disposition of milk, cream, ice 
cream mix, skim milk, buttermilk 
and flavored drinks. In spite of the 
many inconveniences and changes 
resulting from the milk control pro- 
gram, local producers and dealers 
complied wholeheartedly. 

A big saving was effected by the 
adoption of every-other-day milk 
deliveries. This method worked out 
well and no sour milk complaints 
were received by the Milk Inspec- 
tor. 

PRODUCTION 

The production of milk within 
the natural boundaries of Con- 
cord's milk shed showed a 7 per 
cent decrease in 1943. Increased 
labor costs and manpower short- 
ages coupled with inferior quality 
of feed at advanced prices were re- 
sponsible for an over-all reduction 
in the number of milch cows in 
herds. To some degree, this de- 
crease can be attributed to govern- 
ment restrictions and to the ceiling 
price of milk. 

During the year, 162 dairy farms 
produced milk and cream for the 
Concord market. Three producers 
discontinued business and three 
new producers were permitted to 
sell milk in the city. Sixteen pro- 
ducers sold six quarts of milk or 
less per day, 29 were retail dis- 
tributors of milk and six sold cream 
only. The herds of all producers 
were tuberculin and Bang's disease 



tested, and for the most part ac- 
credited against these diseases. The 
supply of three producers was ex- 
cluded from the Concord market 
during 1943 due to the lack of ade- 
quate operating facilities and poor 
quality of equipment. The City's 
milk supply came from 18 towns, 
all within a radius of 17 miles of 
Concord. 

CONSUMPTION 

The consumption of milk in- 
creased considerably over that of 

1942. Although the fluid milk sup- 
ply decreased during the year, dis- 
tributors were able to supply the 
increased demand from surplus 
milk formerly available for use as 
cream, cheese and other dairy 
products. Except for coffee cream, 
by-products of milk appear to be 
out for the duration in the Concord 
milk shed. 

Approximately 13,000 quarts of 
milk, representing a per capita use 
of .478 quarts, were consumed daily 
in Concord during 1943. The 
amount of milk consumed com- 
pared favorably with total use in 
other cities of comparable size. 
During the past year, 73 per cent of 
all milk sold in Concord was pas- 
teurized. 

The daily output of cream was 
30 per cent of normal. This de- 
crease in demand resulted from 
government restrictions on the sale 
of heavy cream. The butterfat con- 
tent of cream was cut to 1 9 per cent 
and the sale of heavy cream was 
permitted only on order of a physi- 
cian. During the latter part of 

1943, the quality of cream bought 
and sold by Concord milk plants 
fell off noticeably. Due to the lim- 



22 1 1 i City of Concord 



ited local supply, much of the 
cream used in the city came from 
the mid-western states. 

SCHOOL MILK 

During 1943, approximately 712 
quarts of milk were consumed daily 
in the City's 19 public and paro- 
chial schools. Seventy-three per cent 
of the school milk program was 
government subsidized; the cost to 
pupils was one cent for a half-pint 
bottle. Free milk was provided for 
those who were unable to pay this 
small charge. All school milk was 
pasteurized and periodic tests of 
samples taken from schools indi- 
cated that the quality of milk was 
highly satisfactory in every respect. 

INSPECTION AND TESTS 

The fundamental requirement 
for the production of quality milk is 
cleanliness. The Milk Inspector 
placed a great deal of emphasis 
during the past year on sanitary 
dairy practices. Methods used in 



the handling and care of milk as 
well as the condition and efficiency 
of dairy equipment were checked 
carefully. 

Dairy farm samples of raw milk 
were collected about once a month 
for standard laboratory tests. The 
results of these analyses are on rec- 
ord in the office of the Board of 
Health and are open to public in- 
spection. 

During the year, the Milk In- 
spector collected and analyzed 
2,370 samples of milk and milk 
products. The inspector made 590 
visits to dairy farms and 327 to milk 
plants. Due to the lack of proper 
production and cooling practices, 
520 quarts of milk were rejected. 

The Milk Inspector took an ac- 
tive part in the Health Depart- 
ment's restaurant inspection pro- 
gram. By the collection and plating 
of swab samples from restaurant 
glasses, dishes, and utensils, satis- 
factory sanitary standards were 
maintained in public eating places. 



JV. H. Memorial Hospital 




Annual Report * ? * 23 



u$. 



RECREATION 



PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Raymond V. LaPointe, Chairman 

Charles P. Coakley 

William J. Flynn 

Clarence E. Huggins 

Thomas B. Jennings 

Paul G. Crowell Supervisor 

1943 Expenditure $8,789.46 



. . . Playgrounds and Bath 

EFFECT OF WAR 

During the past year, the munici- 
pal playground program was af- 
fected by many changing condi- 
tions growing out of the continuing 
war economy. In most part, these 
war-wrought changes served to 
restrict the scope of recreational ac- 
tivities. In spite of numerous diffi- 
culties, the Playground Commit- 
tee's 1943 program achieved a 



large measure of success in provid- 
ing Concord children with ample 
opportunity for wholesome play. 

There was a noticeable decrease 
in the number of children over 14 
years of age in attendance at play 
areas. This situation can be at- 
tributed to the fact that vacation 
jobs were plentiful and a large sec- 
tion of the City's youth availed 
themselves of the opportunity to 
earn good wages while making a 
definite contribution to the war 
effort. 

War jobs and military service 
combined to make it increasingly 
difficult to secure experienced play- 
ground instructors and pool guards. 
Fewer instructors were employed 
and these, on the whole, were of a 
younger-than-usual age group. De- 
spite their youth and lack of experi- 
ence, these "green'' instructors did 
a fine job in carrying out the sum- 
mer recreation program. 



The old swimming hole at Broken Bridge 



18H* 










A number of regular playground 
activities were dropped during 1943 
due to war restrictions and labor 
and material shortages. 

PLAYGROUND AND POOL ATTENDANCE 

From an all-time high of 112,535 
in 1942, attendance at playgrounds 
and pools dropped to 80,036 dur- 
ing the past summer. Factors con- 
tributing to this sharp reduction in 
attendance include an abnormal 
number of cold and rainy days, a 
curtailment in playground activi- 
ties, fewer older children with 
leisure time, and unsettled condi- 
tions in many homes due to war- 
related causes. 

SUMMER ACTIVITIES 

As soon as ground conditions per- 
mitted, tennis courts and baseball 
fields in the various parks and play- 
grounds were placed in order. 
These facilities were used exten- 
sively throughout the spring, sum- 
mer and fall seasons. 

The organized playground pro- 
gram got under way soon after the 
schools closed for the summer. Due 
to the absence of older children, 
the program was geared to meet the 
recreation needs of the younger age 
groups. Emphasis was placed on 
midget and junior baseball, soft- 
ball, volleyball, basketball, new- 
comb and cricket. These activities 
were very popular with the chil- 
dren. Horseshoe pitching also at- 
tracted a large following. 

Inter-playground competitive 
games, which for all practical pur- 
poses ceased to exist in 1 942 due to 
travel restrictions, came back strong 
during the 1943 summer season as 
the city's youth refused to be denied 



competition in sport and displayed 
their Yankee tenacity by taking to 
bicycles as the means of transporta- 
tion to the various playgrounds. 

Although detailed plans were 
made for a gala Fourth of July cele- 
bration at White Park, the event 
had to be called off due to bad 
weather. 

The wading pools continued to 
attract a large number of users. 
Attendance at the pools, which were 
in operation from June 19 to Sep- 
tember 4, was affected considerably 
by the fact that there were 1 5 rainy 
and 11 cold days during the 1943 
swimming season. 

WINTER ACTIVITY 

The Playground Committee 
maintained six skating areas in dif- 
ferent sections of the city during 



With restrictions on travel to more distant 
winter sports areas, the pond at White Park 
offers ideal conditions for "in-town" skating 





Ready for use, Beaver Meadow Golf Course 

and Memorial Athletic Field await the return 

of Concord's sport-minded servicemen 



the winter season. At the pond in 
White Park, the skating area was 
available for use a total of 71 days. 
Ice conditions were satisfactory 
although the manpower shortage 
made it impossible to plane ice 
surfaces as often as usual. 

The provision of hockey facilities 
was ruled out for the duration of 
the war due to a lack of partici- 
pants among older boys. 

Protected street sliding areas 
were maintained during the winter 
in all sections of the city. Plenty of 
snow, coupled with a uniformly 
cold winter, provided ideal sliding 
conditions which attracted many 
coasting enthusiasts. 



. . . Special Facilities 

fi-fi-fii-f-f-fiii-f 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman 

Gardner G. Emmons 

Leigh S. Hall 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 

Carleton R. Metcalf 

1943 Expenditure $5,089.92 

1943 Receipts $2,230.27 

Net Cost to City $2,859.65 



BEAVER MEADOW GOLF COURSE 

The 1943 season at Beaver 
Meadow Golf Course was satisfac- 
tory in consideration of wartime 
conditions. This recreational activ- 
ity, patronized principally by adults, 
has been affected adversely because 
so many devotees of golf and tennis 
are now serving in the armed 
forces. Curtailed transportation also 
affected public use of the course. 
The no-pleasure-driving ban to 
conserve gasoline and tires for the 
war effort was in effect during the 
major part of the playing season 
covering the period from May 20 to 
September 1 . Public bus service 
was also reduced during part of the 
golf season. 

Notwithstanding travel restric- 
tions, 62 regular members used the 
course during the 1943 season. In 
addition. 1,355 tickets were sold on 
a pay-as-you-play basis. Many for- 
mer players home on furlough 
availed themselves of the privilege 
to use the facilities of the course 
free of charge. 

The policy of maintaining the 
course in good condition was con- 
tinued during the year. The com- 



26 f * * City of Concord 



mission proposes to adhere to this 
policy in order that the boys and 
girls now away on war activities 
will find the course in tip-top shape 
and ready for use when they return 
to Concord. 

MEMORIAL FIELD 

In line with past practices. Me- 
morial Field was used during the 
1943 spring and fall seasons by the 
city schools for track meets, base- 
ball, football, field hockey and 
other sports. Due to difficulties in 
obtaining portable lighting equip- 
ment, only one night football game 
was played during the football sea- 
son. This game was successful and 
largely attended. 

The six tennis courts at the field 
were used a great deal during the 
tennis season. 



RUSSELL POND AREA 

During the 1943 fall season the 
Russell Pond winter-sports area was_ 
cleared of brush. Due to plenty of 
snow, excellent conditions prevailed 
throughout the winter at the trails 
and the ski jump. However, it was 
not considered advisable to main- 
tain a caretaker at the area because 
so many young people were away 
at war and because restrictions on 
travel made it difficult for those 
who remained to reach the area. 
Nevertheless, a far greater number 
than was anticipated traveled to 
the "snow bowr' and made good 
use of the facilities. There is very 
little doubt that as soon as times 
return to normal, the Russell Pond 
area will regain its former popular- 
ity as the center of Concord's all- 
around winter recreation program. 



This group of children at Fletcher-Murphy Park is typical of 
eight other neighborhood groups which participate in the Play- 
ground Committee's supervised summer recreation program 




Annual Report * 1 i 27 



PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 

i-fiiii-fi-f-f-f-f-f-f 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Oliver Jenkins, President 
Harold W. Bridge 
Joseph J. Comi 
Lela Y. Johnson 
John F. MacEachran 
William B. McInnis 
George W. Randall 
Alexander Rennie, Jr. 
Martha G. Upton 

Marion F. Holt Librarian 

1943 Expenditure $27,670.47 



ADMINISTRATION CHANGES 

A definite improvement was ef- 
fected during 1943 in the financial 
administration of the Library. For 
the first time, the Library was op- 
erated on an exact budget. Income 
received in 1943 from trust funds 
was allowed to accumulate instead 
of being applied against current 
operating costs. At the close of the 
year, $10,360.00 was turned over 
to the City for 1944 library appro- 
priation use. Under this procedure, 
the need for an annual estimate of 
library income is eliminated. 

War conditions were largely re- 
sponsible for several resignations 
from the staff during 1943. Quali- 
fied replacements were secured to 
fill all vacancies. 



WAR SERVICE 

The Victory Book Campaign 
started in 1942 was continued in 
1943. Several thousand books were 
received, sorted, packed and shipped 
to the armed forces. In addition to 
these, several cartons of books con- 
tributed by the Daughters of the 
American Revolution were sent to 
the men in the Merchant Marine. 

The Library has continued its 
work of listing the names of Con- 
cord citizens who have joined the 
armed forces. Nearly a thousand 
new names were added to the City 
Honor Roll during the past year. 

Many letters have been received 
from Concord citizens in the armed 
services telling of their experiences 
in far off lands. There has been a 
marked trend toward the use of the 
library as a meeting place by serv- 
icemen on leave and by those sta- 
tioned in the city. 



CHILDREN'S WORK 

The children's department com- 
pleted a very active year. The 
weekly "story hours" for small chil- 
dren were well attended through- 
out the year. Special attractions 
included narrations by members 
of the Junior Service League and 
the Monday Review Club, Girl 
Scout shadowgraphs and illustrated 
talks by Jesse Blackstone. 

Children's library service was 
continued at Gonant and Garrison 
Schools, where 9,621 books were 
circulated during 1943. Collections 
of books were also sent to most of 
Concord's schools. In a number of 
instances, the Children's Librarian 
has participated actively in class- 
room instruction of children in 
reading. 

The Children's Room celebrated 
the Spring Book Festival with spe- 
cial exhibits and many new books. 



28 i * t City of Concord 




Seventh-grade pupils are shown preparing examination papers on library 
practices in the Young People's Room of the Concord Public Library 



Book Week in 1943 was centered 
around the theme "build the future 
with books" and appropriate post- 
ers and books were used to carry 
out the idea. 

During 1943, the children's de- 
partment purchased 495 new books 
and 165 replacements. The de- 
partment circulated 27,790 books 
of which 21,743 were fiction and 
6,047 were non-fiction. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

In addition to its routine book 
service to the older youth of the 
city, the young people's department 
conducted a library school for all 
seventh grade public school pupils. 
Over a three-week period, seventh 



grade students, accompanied by their 
teachers, came to the Library dur- 
ing regular class periods to receive 
instructions in the use of the Li- 
brary. After touring the building, 
during which tour they were told 
of the work of the various depart- 
ments, the students were taught 
how books are arranged in a li- 
brary, how to find material for 
themselves and how to use the ref- 
erence room and the catalog. Seven 
divisions averaging 25 pupils each 
participated in this program. 

REFERENCE WORK 

In many ways, the work of the 
reference department reflects the 
thinking of the community. The 



Annual Report * * * 29 



year 1943 has indicated a definite 
change from the pursuits of leisure 
to serious participation in the ac- 
tivities of a country at war. In- 
quiries have primarily touched the 
sciences and practical arts, with 
requests for material on victory 
gardening, navigation, mathemat- 
ics, tool-making, etc. On the other 
hand, there have been many indi- 
cations that the public is striving 
to keep abreast of current affairs. 
Questions on geography, diplomacy 
and similar subjects have been 
numerous. 

In the purchase of new material, 
the reference department has en- 
deavored to supply the public with 
the latest information on current 
events by adding new yearbooks, 
biographical services, dictionaries 
of war words and place names and 
an atlas to its collection. 




A marked increase in reference 
service to adults and students was 
noted in 1943. With gasoline re- 
strictions curtailing travel, tele- 
phone reference service increased 
noticeably. Summary statistics show 
that 4,691 questions were handled 
during the past year. 

EXHIBITS 

During the year several interest- 
ing exhibits were arranged by the 
library staff. Displays included ar- 
ticles from Africa, Australia, Alaska 
and the Latin American countries. 
Of particular note was a historical 
exhibit shown in the Concord Room 
during the month of March. 

CIRCULATION 

The total number of books cir- 
culated by the Library during 1943 
was 162,063. This figure is about 
20 per cent less than the pre-war 
total and reflects the extent that 
library use has been affected by 
war conditions, chiefly population 
loss and reduced leisure time. 

Governor Robert 0. Blood speaks at the 

dedication of Concord's Roll of Honor on the 

State House Plaza 




1941 MP* 19+ 
3F CONCORD ROM f\tr i,a», 

- OF HONOR newhamps! 



RELIEF 



CITY RELIEF BOARD 

Ralph L. Stearns, Chairman 
Winfield J. Phillips 
John W. Stanley 

Parker L. Hancock Overseer of Poor 

Charles P. Coakley Overseer of Poor 

Ward 1 
1943 Expenditures: 

City $34,456.79 

Penacook $4,815.89 



The year 1943 brought a sharp de- 
cline in the number of families re- 
ceiving aid from the City; relief 
costs were reduced commensu- 
rately. Due to expanded employ- 
ment opportunities, especially in 
war industries, anyone capable of 
working was able to secure a full- or 
part-time job. It is a safe assump- 
tion that at the present time, all 
employable members of families on 
relief are working. 

A policy of encouraging students 
to secure jobs after school hours 
was adopted by school authorities 
during 1943. As the result of the 
operation of this program, many 
dependent children were able to 
provide for their own clothing and 
incidentals. 

The allotment plan for members 
of the armed services has been a 
definite help in connection with a 
number of relief cases. The Relief 
Department, cooperating with the 
Red Cross, has arranged for allot- 
ments which have made it possible 
for several relief families to become 
self-supporting. 



ADMINISTRATION 

In addition to the overseers, the 
personnel of the department con- 
sists of two investigators, two book- 
keepers and a stenographer. In 
December, 1943 Overseer Parker L. 
Hancock entered the U. S. Army; 
John W. Stanley was appointed 
Acting Overseer on a part-time 
basis to administer the depart- 
ment in the absence of Mr. Han- 
cock. During the year, two mem- 
bers of the staff left the employ 
of the department and were not 
replaced. The department contin- 
ued its handling of county relief 
cases; administrative costs were di- 
vided between the city and county 
on about an equal basis. 

RELIEF LOAD 

In January, 1943 there were 154 
active relief cases divided between 
the county and city — 91 and 63 
respectively. By the end of the year 
the number of families on relief 
dropped to 118, of which 72 were 
county and 46 were city cases. A 
study of the present case load re- 
veals that of the approximate 1 1 8 
families receiving relief, only about 
22 include children of school age. 
The remainder of the cases involve 
adults who are unable to work due 
to age or health difficulties. Of the 
relief families with children, some 
receive only a small supplementa- 
tion to their own income or to aid 
granted by the State. 

RELIEF COSTS 

The total cost of relief in Concord 
during 1943 was $71,374.15. Of 
this sum, $34,456.79 represented 
the cost of city relief and $36,917.36 



Annual Report 



31 



the cost of county relief. A $35,- 
598.61 reduction in total relief costs 
was effected during 1943. 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

The City of Concord is respon- 
sible for 25 per cent of the cost of 
old age assistance granted to people 
who have a Concord settlement. 
In recent years there has been a 
steady increase in the cost of relief 
to the aged. During 1943 Con- 
cord's contribution for this purpose 
amounted to about $1,253.50 
monthly. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

Less time was spent by the Over- 
seer and the investigators in locat- 
ing jobs for persons on relief and 



greater attention was given to assist- 
ing relief families in planning their 
budgets and living conditions in 
order to enable them to be self- 
supporting. A few cases of non- 
support were tried in court so that 
families would be assured of weekly 
or monthly contributions from the 
family wage earner. 

Through constant contacts and 
planning by the department's in- 
vestigators, several families were 
kept together and means were de- 
vised to make them self-supporting. 
In carrying out its social work pro- 
gram, the department investigated 
boarding homes for children. In a 
few instances where unsatisfactory 
environments were found, children 
were removed to more suitable 
foster homes. 



Getting in the scrap to throw at Hitler and Tojo 




Z2 * * * Ciiy of Concord 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 



POLIGE COMMISSION 
Daniel Shea, Chairman 
George A. Hill 
Guy A. Swenson 

Arthur W. McIsaac Chief of Police 

J. Edward Silva Deputy Chief of Police 

1943 Operating Expenditure. . .$72,516.73 
1943 Equipment Expenditure $2,700.00 



PERSONNEL 

During 1943, three regular po- 
licemen left the department to join 
the armed forces. The vacancies 
thereby created were filled for the 
duration from the ranks of special 
officers. Only one permanent ap- 
pointment was made during the 
year. Nine special officers also 
joined the armed forces. Due to this 
reduction in personnel, some tem- 



porary readjustment in working 
hours and schedules was necessary 
to maintain regular police protec- 
tion standards. 

COST TO THE CITY 

The total cost of operating the 
Police Department for the year 
1943 was $75,216.73, which in- 
cluded a $2,700.00 capital budget 
item for cruiser purchases. At the 
close of the year, $1,532.22 re- 
mained unexpended which, to- 
gether with department earnings of 
$956.61, were turned back to the 
City. Operating costs for 1943 were 
$2,729.03 less than 1942 costs. 

CRIME DATA 

A marked decrease in arrests 
occurred in 1943; 571 arrests were 
made as against 859 in 1942. Most 
of this reduction resulted from fewer 
parking and driving violations. Fel- 
onies increased 26 per cent; 125 
were reported during the year. Of 
this number, 80 were cleared by 
arrest. 



The reward of an all-night vigil — bicycle license plate No. 7 




Annual Report * y * 33 



The following tabulation shows cidents. A summary of reports filed 
the number and type of felonies on these accidents showed that 289 

and misdemeanors handled by the autos, 27 pedestrians, 11 bicycles, 

Police Department during the past five motorcycles, three horse drawn 
year. vehicles, two trains and one mis- 

Classification of Offenses Reported Cleared 

Felonies 

Manslaughter by Negligence 2 2 

Rape 

Robbery 1 1 

Burglary — Breaking and Entering 39 21 

Larceny 60 36 

Auto Theft 3 2 

Other Assaults 16 16 

Forgery and Counterfeiting 

Embezzlement and Fraud 4 2 

Total 125 80 

Misdemeanors 

Offenses against the Family and Children 8 8 

Drunkenness 231 231 

Liquor Laws 2 2 

Disorderly Conduct 11 11 

Driving while Intoxicated 15 15 

Violation of Road and Driving Laws 53 53 

Parking Violations 101 101 

Traffic and Motor Vehicle Laws 38 38 

All Other Offenses 31 31 

Suspicion 1 1 

Total 491 491 

Grand Total 616 571 



Property valued at $4,809.47 was 
reported stolen during 1943. The 
department effected the recovery 
of $3,026.95 worth of this property. 

Juvenile delinquency increased 
only slightly over that of the pre- 
vious year — 4.2 per cent to be 
exact. 

INVESTIGATIONS 

During 1943 the department con- 
ducted an average of three investi- 
gations daily for government agen- 
cies and for industries hiring per- 
sonnel for war work. 

Police investigations were made 
in connection with 188 traffic ac- 



cellaneous vehicle were involved. 
During the year, auto accidents 
were responsible for three deaths 
and the injury of 63 persons. 

AMBULANCE SERVICE 

The city ambulance operated by 
the Police Department averaged 
four runs a day during 1943. Runs 
were made to all sections of the city 
in response to emergency calls and 
calls of doctors to move patients. 

WAR-RELATED ACTIVITIES 

During 1943 the entire personnel 
of the department, including regu- 



34 f -f 1 City of Concord 



lar, special and auxiliary police, 
was mobilized on nine occasions 
for test blackouts. Each officer was 
given an assignment for which he 
was prepared as the result of an 
intensive training program con- 
ducted by the department. 

In cooperation with federal de- 
fense authorities, a special radio 
is kept tuned on a 24-hour-a-day 
basis to a war emergency station. 
Alert signals are received daily at 
varying intervals. These signals are 
recorded and the remitting station 
is notified immediately of the re- 
ceipt of the message. 

During the year, approximately 
4,000 sets of fingerprints were taken 
of persons entering the armed serv- 
ices and war employment. 

FIREARMS INSTRUCTION 

A three-week course in the use of 
all types of firearms was conducted 
during the fall season under the 
supervision of an instructor from 
the Federal Bureau of Investiga 
tion. All officers were given in- 
dividual three-day examinations on 
completion of the course of study. 

For the first time since the de- 
partment acquired the Thompson 
Sub-Machine Gun, all members of 
the police force were instructed in 
its use. Scores were kept on all 
firing and were made a part of 
the final record of the training 
program. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

At Penacook, the police station 
was completely renovated during 
1943. Floors were sanded and re- 
finished, several ceilings were re- 
placed and the station interior was 
given a thorough washing and paint- 



ing. At police headquarters, new 
fluorescent light fixtures were in- 
stalled and extensive repainting 
operations were started to brighten 
the interior of the building. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

It is recommended that, as soon 
as conditions will permit, a new 
heating system should be installed 
at the Concord station. The present 
heating equipment is old and in- 
efficient and consumption of fuel 
is out of line with ordinary needs 
for the space to be heated. 

The department reiterates its ap- 
peal for more space. At present, 
a major inconvenience is effected 
by the lack of a juvenile detention 
room. Also hindering the efficient 
operation of the department is the 
fact that for the lack of proper 
space, police records must be kept 
in several sections of the building. 
The clinic quarters, if made avail- 
able to the Police Department, 
would go a long way toward al- 
leviating the urgent need for added 
space. 

A reminder of Concord's proud past 




Annual Report 1 1 1 35 



PROBATION 

MUNICIPAL COURT 
Judge William L. Stevens 

Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 

1943 Expenditure $1,599.99 

11111111111111 

As far as the Probation Depart- 
ment was concerned, there was a 
definite decrease in juvenile de- 
linquency in Concord during the 
year 1943. This conclusion is based 
on the actual number of cases which 
came before the Juvenile Court and 
not on cases handled unofficially or 
otherwise. 

The decrease in juvenile delin- 
quency can be attributed to a num- 
ber of reasons. Outstanding fac- 
tors contributing to this improved 
condition are a more comprehen- 
sive and systematic program of 
check-ups by local police, an ex- 
panded program of activities for 
younger boys, a growing citizen 
interest in the welfare of boys and 
girls who are not in the armed 
forces, and a removal of problem 
families from the city to areas of 
war industry. 

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITY 

On January l, 1 943, 26 active 
probation cases were brought for- 
ward from the previous year. Of 
this number, 20 completed their 
terms of probation during 1943. 
Six of these old cases continued 
active as the year closed. 

During the past year, the Juve- 
nile Court considered the cases of 
20 juvenile delinquent boys and 

36 1 1 1 City of Concord 



two girls, three dependent and neg- 
lected boys and two <j,irls. In the 
cases of the dependent and neg- 
lected juveniles, each was placed in 
a foster home under the custody of 
the State Department of Welfare. 

Of the 20 juvenile delinquent 
boys who came before the court, ten 
were placed on probation, four 
were committed to the State In- 
dustrial School at Manchester and 
six were dismissed by the court 
because the offense was of such a 
minor nature that it did not war- 
rant further action. It is gratifying 
to note that none of the six juveniles 
dismissed by the court reappeared 
for further law violations. 

POSTWAR PROBLEM 

The Probation Department an- 
ticipates a sharp increase in juvenile 
delinquency in Concord in the post- 
war period. With the return of 
migrant families from areas of war 
industry, there can be little doubt 
that many family units will undergo 
environmental changes which will 
affect the emotional stability of 
children in these units and in- 
directly the stability of a large 
number of juveniles who come in 
contact with these returning fam- 
ilies. 

It seems most important to rec- 
ommend that the city take steps 
now to meet the very real probabil- 
ity of a postwar increase in juvenile 
delinquency. This can best be ac- 
complished by the combined efforts 
of social agencies at all government 
levels working in close cooperation 
with such private agencies as the 
Scout organizations, the churches, 
the Y.M.C.A. and Y.W.C.A., the 
fraternal organizations, etc. 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

fi-f-f-fiii-fiii-fi 

William L. Stevens Judge 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

John W. Stanley Clerk 

1943 Expenditure $2,960.00 

ii-fi-fiiii-fif-f-f 

CASES TRIED 

Lawlessness continued to de- 
crease during the past year. This 
favorable situation is the outgrowth 
of a number of contributing factors 
including a population loss in the 
younger adult age groups due to the 
demands of the armed forces and 
migration to out-of-town war in- 
dustries, increased local employ- 
ment at good wages, and war re- 
strictions on the use of automobiles, 
especially with regard to speed. 
Improved police protection meth- 
ods also have contributed noticea- 
bly in discouraging crime. 

The total number of criminal 
cases to come before the court dur- 
ing 1943 was 701 as compared with 
910 in 1942 and 1,601 in 1941. In 
most part, the reduction in criminal 



cases resulted from fewer violations 
of motor vehicle laws and parking 
regulations. 

The number of civil actions tried 
by the court dropped from 131 in 
1942 to 80. The court also ruled on 
10 small claims cases. This number 
was 55 less than the 1942 total and 
reflects a general improvement in 
the financial status of the average 
Concord wage earner. 

According to the report of the 
Probation Officer, 27 juvenile cases 
were handled by the court during 
the past year. 

REVENUE AND COSTS 

With the reduction in crime, 
there was a marked decrease in 
court receipts. Total 1943 court 
revenue from fines, costs and sundry 
fees amounted to $2,913.27 as 
against $5,437.54 for the previous 
year. Funds received from fines 
totaling $1,596.10 were turned over 
to various state departments as pre- 
scribed by law. Miscellaneous ex- 
penditures amounted to $110.88. 
After deducting transfers and ex- 
penditures, the sum of $1,206.29 
was turned over to the City Treas- 
urer. The cost of operating the 
court was borne by a budget ap- 
propriation of $2,960.00. 



Concord' 's railroad station — "home port" of our 3,000 servicemen 






1 1 1 




FIRE 
PROTECTION 

iif-fiiii-fiif-f-f 

FIRE BOARD 

Charles P. Coakley, Chairman 

Clarence L. Clark 

William J. Flynn 

Robert W. Potter 

William T. Happny Fire Chief 

Michael T. Martin 1 _, _,, . , 

J > Deputy Chiefs 

Milan R. Piper I 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief 

1943 Expenditure $79,086.70 



WILLIAM T. HAPPNY 

Fire Chief 
1901-1943 



FIRES AND FIRE LOSS 

During 1943 the Fire Depart- 
ment answered 559 alarms of which 
497 were still alarms and 62 were 
box calls. The total number of 
alarms was 39 less than the total for 
the previous year. Box or bell 
alarms increased by five over the 
same period. 

Although the number of fires was 
less than the total for 1942, fire loss 
was the largest suffered by the city 
since 1935, the year of the North 
Church fire. The 1943 fire loss 
amounted to $84,450.98 as against 



$25,728.32 for 1942. The sharp in- 
crease in loss was due, in most part, 
to four fires involving Proctor's 
Men's Shop on North Main Street, 
the Lee Block on South Main 
Street, the Bartemus grain elevator 
and the Wilson meat storage plant. 
Insurance payments amounting 
to $76,848.90 were made on the 
1943 fire loss leaving a net loss by 
fire of $7,602.02. Of the net loss, 
$3,334.15 represented buildings and 
$4,267.87 contents. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

During 1943, the Fire Depart- 
ment continued without let-up its 
fire prevention program. Public and 
private buildings were inspected 
regularly and many fire hazards 
were cleaned up. 

Under the supervision of depart- 
ment personnel, periodic fire drills 
were conducted in city schools. Spe- 
cial instructions in fire prevention 
were also a part of all school pro- 
grams. 

APPARATUS, EQUIPMENT AND 
PERSONNEL 

No major changes were made 
during 1943 in the regular depart- 
ment apparatus, which includes 14 
fire trucks, two official cars and a 
service truck. Engine One, which 
was replaced by a new pumper pur- 
chased in 1942, was renumbered 
Engine Nine. This pumper, al- 
though outmoded, will be held in 
reserve for the duration. 

Seven hundred fiftv feet of two 



Value Loss Insurance Insurance Paid Net Loss 

Buildings $ 707,017.05 $45,085.34 $ 577,075.00 $41,751.19 $3,334.15 

Contents 1,779,356.09 39,365 58 1,431,915.96 35,097.71 4,267.87 

Total $2,486,373.14 $84,450.92 $2,008,990.96 $76,848.90 $7,602.02 

40 ' * 1 City of Concord 



and one-half inch hose was added 
to the department's supply during 
the year making a total of 19,200 
feet. The department's trucks are 
equipped with a total of 2,350 feet 
of three-quarter inch booster hose. 
The Fire Department's perma- 
nent personnel was increased from 
26 to 30. The regular staff was 
supplemented by 174 call men. At 
the close of the year, eight perma- 
nent and 29 call men were serving 
with the armed forces. 

RADIO EQUIPMENT 

During 1943, two-way radio was 
made a part of the city's fire fighting 
equipment. Short wave radios were 
installed in the department's two 
official cars. Constant communica- 
tion can be maintained between 
these radio cars and fire headquar- 
ters, as well as with the State For- 
estry Department and fire compa- 
nies in several near-by communities. 

In the short time that the depart- 
ment has used two-way radio, the 
equipment has more than proved 
its value. When additional fire 



equipment is needed, it can be 
called on a moment's notice saving 
much valuable time formerly re- 
quired to hunt up a telephone or a 
fire alarm box. This is especially 
true of farm and forest fires where 
the nearest telephone may be at 
some distance from the scene of the 
fire. 

WORKING HOURS 

During the year, the Board of 
Aldermen, on the recommendation 
of the Fire Board, changed the work- 
ing hours of regular firemen from 
72 hours on duty and 24 hours off 
duty to 48 on and 24 off. The Con- 
cord Fire Department operates on a 
single platoon system. 

CIVILIAN DEFENSE ACTIVITY 

The Fire Department's person- 
nel was augmented by three auxil- 
iary fire companies with a total 
membership of about 100. Organ- 
ized under the civilian defense pro- 
gram, these citizen firemen were 
given a thorough training in the 
various aspects of fighting fires. 



Concord's auxiliary fire force demonstrates its O.C.D. fire-fightmg 
equipment at public inspection exercises at the pond in White Park 




Today, with enemy air raids more 
and more an improbability, the 
anxiliar.y fire foree stands ready to 
perform a further service to the 
community by throwing the weight 
of its trained manpower into any 
emergency that may tax the war- 
depleted ranks of regular and call 
firemen. 

Early in the year, the Office of 
Civilian Defense equipped the Fire 
Department and its auxiliaries with 
three trailer and two skid pumps. 
In addition, the O.C.D. allocated 
2,000 feet of two and one-half inch 
hose and 1,000 feet of one and one- 
quarter inch hose to the city to be 
used in connection with the opera- 
tion of these motor-driven pumps. 

The Concord Fire Department 
wishes to take this opportunity to ex- 
press its appreciation to the O.C.D. 
for its cooperation in granting the 
city the use of this valuable fire 
fighting equipment. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

To further increase the value of 
the department's radio communica- 
tion system, it is recommended that 
immediate steps should be taken to 
install radio units on Engine Three 
and Engine Four. 

The No. 10 Fire Alarm Circuit in 
Penacook is overloaded. As soon 
as materials and labor are available, 
this situation should be remedied. 

The fire truck replacement pro- 
gram, which was held up by the 
war, should be resumed at the ear- 
liest possible date in order that the 
efficiency of the department may 
not be impaired. Unless this pro- 
cedure is adopted, the city will be 
faced with mass replacement in the 
near future. 



NEW CHIEF 

Tn the sudden death of Fire Chief 
William T. Happny on November 
21, 1943, the City of Concord lost a 
capable and faithful servant. Mr. 
Happny was appointed a member 
of the Concord Fire Department in 
1901 and served as chief of the 
department from November 14, 
1932 until the time of his death. 

On December 8, 1943, the Fire 
Board appointed Clarence H. Green 
to the position of Fire Chief. This 
appointment was unanimously con- 
firmed by the Board of Aldermen 
on December 13, 1943. 



. . . Fire Hydrants 



BOARD OF 
HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
William T. Happny 
Percy R. Sanders 

1943 Expenditure None 

■fififfi-ffi-f-fi-f 

The municipal hydrant situation 
remained unchanged during the 
past year. This static condition was 
due to the fact that the physical 
growth of the city, particularly as 
it relates to building development 
and new street layouts, was brought 
to an abrupt stop by federal restric- 
tions on construction. All existing 
hydrant services were maintained 
in perfect working order by the 
Board of Hydrant Commissioners. 

The number of hydrants in use 
during 1943 was 798. Of this num- 
ber, 687 were public and 111 were 
private outlets. 



42 y 1 1 City of Concord 



WEIGHTS and 
MEASURES 

t 11111 '111111 -if 

George W. Wilde City Sealer 

1943 Expenditure $1,218.88 

1111111111111-f 

The year 1943 was marked by 
a growing scarcity in many food 
products and fuels. As the result of 
this war-created trend, it became 
necessary for merchants to divide 
commodities in smaller quantities 
to effect a more even distribution 
of available stocks among customers. 
The increase in small-lot sales ne- 
cessitated a step-up in the inspection 
activities of the City Sealer. Al- 
though the possibilities for misun- 
derstanding were many, good re- 
sults were obtained due to a high 
degree of cooperation between bus- 
iness establishments and the sealer. 

SPECIAL ACTIVITY 

Many of the war restrictions 
placed on the sale of merchandise 
presented problems of weight and 
measure. The sealer was called on 
numerous occasions to assist in the 



solution of perplexing questions and 
situations. 

In many instances, the man- 
power shortage created difficulties 
in relation to the proper packaging 
of goods. This was particularly true 
in connection with the employment 
of inexperienced clerks. In order 
to overcome this troublesome situa- 
tion, inspections were increased in 
establishments where a turnover in 
help was noted. 

During the year, the department 
was instrumental in effecting a num- 
ber of needed changes in the method 
of delivery of fuel. In most part, these 
changes affected the sale of wood. 

COOPERATION WITH STATE 

The City Sealer has worked in 
close cooperation with the New 
Hampshire State Department of 
Weights and Measures. In this con- 
nection, the city has had the bene- 
fit of the State's experience in the 
solution of a wide variety of prob- 
lems relating to proper weight and 
measure. The use of state-owned 
equipment, such as the fuel delivery 
testing truck, has been of great 
assistance to the City Sealer in 
carrying out the work of the de- 
partment. 



Correct 

Scales 378 

Weights 620 

Liquid Measures 86 

Gas Pumps 114 

Kerosene Pumps 34 

Grease Dispensers 67 

Oil Bottles 464 

3 
5 
74 
2 
19 
4 



Tank Trucks 

Tank & Truck Meters . 
Package Re-weigh 

Coal Re-weigh 

Cart Bodies 

Yardsticks 



Adjusted Condemned Incorrect Cautioned 
179 2 23 



21 

1 
1 



2 
1,494 ' 
1 



21 
1 



12 
1 

2 



48 
3 



Idle 

5 
3 

12 



Underweight — 1,206; overweight — 288. 



Annual Report 



43 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 



Zoning, building and plumbing ac- 
tivities hit an all-time low during 
the past year as the result of con- 
tinued government-imposed restric- 
tions on building construction and 
repairs. There is very little prospect 
that the ban on the use of materials 
on non-essential building : activity 
will be removed until after the war. 

. . . Zoning 

iii-f-fii-fii-fiYf 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Donald G. Matson, Chairman 

John S. Corbett 

A. Clifford Hudson 

Harold E. Langlev 

Laurence M. Meyer 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk 

1943 Expenditure $106.83 

iiii-fififi-fy-ff 

During 1943 only two appeals 
were heard by the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment. Both of these appeals 
were granted conditionally. One 
was a request by New England 
Houses, Inc., a corporation per- 
forming war work, for permission 
to erect a woodworking plant and 
to store lumber on property leased 
from the State of New Hampshire 
located opposite the State Prison 
and immediately north of the com- 
pany's existing plant. The other 
appeal was for a tire vulcanizing 
plant in a public garage. 



. . . Building 

ifiiff-ff-fi-f-fii 

Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 

1943 Expenditure None 

iiii-ff-fi-fi-fiii 

With the issuance of only 36 
permits for all types of construction, 
building activity reached an un- 
precedented low during 1943. The 
low ebb of building construction is 
further indicated by the fact that 
the number of permits issued during 
the past year was only ten per cent 
of the total issued in 1941. Of the 
36 permits issued, 28 were for new 
construction and eight were for re- 
pairs and alterations. The total 
valuation of all permits was $25,- 
840.00 as compared with $124,- 
295.00 in 1942 and $394,105.00 in 
1941. 

Three permits were issued for 
new dwelling units during 1943. 

. . . Plumbing 

y-ti-f-f-f-fY-ff-f-f-f-f 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS 

William J. Bishop, Chairman 

Edward E. Beane 

Arthur W. Sargent 

Edward E. Beane Plumbing Inspector 

1943 Expenditure None 

1943 Receipts $23.00 



As in the case of building per- 
mits, 1943 plumbing permits hit 
a record low. Only 20 permits were 
issued. Forty plumbing inspections 
were made during the year. 

No applications were received 
by the Board of Examiners of 
Plumbers for plumber's licenses. 



44 i 1 i City of Concord 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Hon. Charles J. MgKee, Chairman 
William A. Stevens 
John W. Stanley 
John C. Tilton 
Robert W. Potter 
Charles A. Bartlett 
John Swenson 

Ervin E. Webber Commissioner 

Ervin E. Webber, Supt. of Streets 
Ervin E. Webber, Tree Warden 
Edward E. Beane, City Engineer 
Leslie C. Clark, Supt. of Parks 
and Cemeteries 

1943 Expenditure $313,687.19 



The year 1 943 marked the first full 
year of operation of the reorganized 
Department of Public Works. The 
construction and maintenance of 



highways and sewers, the main- 
tenance of parks, cemeteries and 
trees, and the collection of refuse 
were under the direction of a single 
administrative head, the Commis- 
sioner of Public Works. 

PERSONNEL 

The department's permanent per- 
sonnel consisted of 111 full-time 
workers and 1 1 seasonal workers 
employed by the Parks and Cem- 
eteries Division. Sixty-eight tempo- 
rary employees were hired to clean 
streets and catch basins during the 
spring and fall seasons. 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS 

Due in the main to continuing 
war restrictions on highway ma- 
terials, the Highway Division's con- 
struction program was cut to ap- 
proximately one-third of normal 
capacity. The chief project of the 
year was the rebuilding and tarring 
of Bow Street southerly from Stone 
Street a distance of 870 feet. The 
relocation of Old Turnpike Road 



Concord's elm-shaded North Main Street 



m 



j«i 



y 



« 




-*a 






''.'.« 









•■^1 



3~ 



Beauty in nature is where one looks for it — close at home, try White Park 



was completed with the surface 
treating of the traveled way. 

Two and three-tenths miles of 
gravel road were tarred during 
1943. Roads so tarred included 
Portsmouth Street, Sugar Ball Road 
and Penacook Street in Penacook. 

In order to prevent the washing 
away of a section of sidewalk, the 
Highway Division set 75 feet of new 
curbing on Prospect Street in Fos- 
terville. No new sidewalk work was 
undertaken during the year. 

HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE 

Highway maintenance continued 
to feel the pinch of restricted use 
of materials. Only 131,739 gallons 



of tar were applied to roads in 
1943. This amount, which was cer- 
tified for use by the Public Roads 
Administration, was slightly less 
than the quantity used in 1942 and 
less than one-half of the total used 
in 1941. 

The Highway Division used 1,064 
tons of cold patch for street patch- 
ing purposes. This represented a 
226-ton reduction from the 1942 
total. 

SNOW AND ICE 

The United States Weather Bu- 
reau recorded a total snowfall of 
58 inches during 1943. The heaviest 
snowstorms occurred in January 



46 1 * * City of Concord 



and November. Fourteen depart- 
ment trucks, five private trucks, two 
graders and two tractors were used 
to clear the streets of snow. A 
rotary plow was used to remove 
20,370 cubic yards of snow from 
downtown streets. 

Because the 1943 winter season 
was abnormally cold with the tem- 
perature falling as low as 37 de- 
grees below zero, icy street condi- 
tions due to thaw were not preva- 
lent. Only 7,174 cubic yards of 
sand were used for street sanding 
purposes as compared with 10,099 
cubic yards in 1942. 

Snow removal and plowing cost 
the City $12,671.08 during 1943 
while street and sidewalk sanding 
cost $9,536.85. Sanding costs were 
$3,000.00 less than in 1942. This 
fact is noteworthy in that it serves 
to illustrate to what extent weather 
can affect public service costs. 

REFUSE AND GARBAGE SERVICE 

During the year, 49,189 cubic 
yards of trash were collected and 
transported to dumps. The cubic 
yard cost of refuse collection was 
64 cents or nine cents more than 
that of the previous year. 

The municipal garbage service, 
which is operated on a contract 
basis, cost the City $5,531.88 dur- 
ing 1943. The extension of garbage 
collection service to the Plains 
area was partly responsible for a 
$1,631.88 increase in the cost of 
this service during the past year. 

ENGINEERING 

Continuing its program of re- 
establishing exisiting street lines, 
the Engineering Division surveyed 
30.45 miles of street and set 280 



street bounds. This work, added to 
that of 1942, served as the basis for 
the adoption of a major street plan 
by the City Planning Board and the 
establishment of an official city 
map by the Board of Aldermen. 

No new streets were laid out and 
no grade stakes were set for the 
Highway Division. The engineering 
staff staked out 445 new lots for 
the Cemetery Division. 

The division made 1,065 prints 
and maps and recorded 601 trans- 
fers of real property. 

During the year, the Sewer Divi- 
sion was furnished grades for 3,988 
feet of sewer lines. All sewer plans 
and profiles were brought up to 
date. 

In cooperation with the Board of 
Assessors, buildings between Pleas- 
ant Street and the Bow line were 
checked for location on lots. All 
changes were noted and the asses- 
sors' maps were corrected accord- 
ingly. 

SEWERS 

Only two sanitary sewer con- 
struction projects were authorized 
during 1943. These sewer extensions 
were located in the Fernlawn sec- 
tion of Concord Plains and at 
Princeton Street Extension in the 
South End. The main line sewer 
in Walnut Street, Penacook, was 
replaced with 24-inch concrete pipe. 

In addition to the foregoing, the 
Sewer Division built four catch 
basins and 11 manholes. Twenty- 
three catch basins and three man- 
holes were repaired. Nineteen new 
house connections were installed 
and 1 1 old connections were relaid. 

Sewer Division maintenance crews 
cleaned main line sewers on about 



Annual Report r f r 47 




With manpower at a premium, the Highway 

Division'' s rotary snowplow provides an effective 

means of clearing downtown streets 

50 streets and removed 112 lateral 
pipe plugs. 

As of December 31, 1943, the 
City operated 80.552 miles of sew- 
ers. The per mile cost of 1943 
sewer maintenance amounted to 
$158.62. 

STREET LIGHTING 

No new street lights were in- 
stalled during 1943; the total num- 
ber of street lights remained at 
1,603. This was in line with a policy 
of the Board of Public Works to 
grant no petition for additional 
street lighting for the duration of 
the war. The 1943 cost of lighting 
city streets was $40,539.60. 

TREES 

During the year, 46 rock maples 
were set out along streets in all sec- 
tions of the city. In most instances 
these new trees replaced old ones 
removed by the Tree Division. 

Due to an extremely cold winter, 
gypsy and brown tail moths were 
not as prevalent as usual. However, 
the division carried out its routine 
measures in the control of these 
pests. 



PARKS 

Except for the hard-surfacing of 
the road running through White 
Park from High Street to White 
Street, no major improvements 
were made in the city parks during 
1943. 

In addition to ordinary park 
maintenance, Park Division em- 
ployees were kept busy applying 
fertilizer to lawns, shrubs and flower 
beds. This program covered the 
entire areas of Eastman Park, Park 
Ridge Park and the West Street 
Playground as well as large sections 
of Rollins and White Parks. 

CEMETERIES 

During the year, new burial sec- 
tions were developed in Blossom 
Hill, Pine Grove and Woodlawn 
Cemeteries. The land area devel- 
oped totaled about one acre. At the 
Maple Grove Cemetery, approxi- 
mately one-fourth of an acre was 
cleared for development. 

In Penacook at the Woodlawn 
Cemetery, three acres of the older 
section of the burial ground was 
regraded. This work necessitated 
the cutting down of some lots and 
the filling of others in order to 
bring all lots to an even grade. 
Routine maintenance, especially 
mowing, will be greatly facilitated 
as the result of this leveling opera- 
tion. 

A tree planting program, in- 
volving about 50 trees, was carried 
out in Blossom Hill, Woodlawn and 
Maple Grove Cemeteries. At the 
Blossom Hill Cemetery, 75 shrubs 
were planted to add to the beauty 
of this area. 

As a part of the soil improvement 
program in cemeteries, top-dressing 



48 



City of Concord 



was applied to about 32 acres of 
Blossom Hill, Pine Grove and Maple 
Grove Cemeteries. 

At Blossom Hill Cemetery, 3,400 
feet of gravel roads were surface 
treated with tar. In addition, 5,320 
feet of cemetery drives were re- 
coated with tar during 1943. 

There were 208 burials in the city 
cemeteries during the year. Rev- 
enue received from the sale of 36 
cemetery lots amounted to $1,517.00. 

WAR RELATED ACTIVITY 

During the year, the department 
continued its participation in the 
tin salvage program by making 
regular weekly collections at gro- 
cery store deposit centers. The sal- 
vage material was transported to a 
railroad loading point. 

The department took an active 
part in all air raid drills held during 
1943. The department's personnel 
and equipment were held in readi- 
ness to answer all emergency calls 
from civilian defense headquarters. 



OTHER ACTIVITY 

The Public Works Department 
was of service to several city depart- 
ments during the year. Tasks per- 
formed by the department included 
the plowing, sanding, mowing and 
grading at the airport; the erection 
of the municipal honor roll; the 
razing of unsafe houses acquired by 
the City on Sawyer Street; rolling 
Memorial Athletic Field; clearing 
ski trails at the Russell Pond Winter 
Sports Area; and transporting the 
municipal band stand to the locale 
of open-air concerts, bond rallies 
and other civic gatherings. 

Construction of an addition to 
the garage at the city yards was 
started during the year. This work 
will be completed in 1944 and will 
provide much needed space for 
three trucks and the department 
blacksmith shop. 

On North Spring Street, the 
stairways leading from the street to 
the terraced sidewalk were re- 
paired and made safe for use. 



The industrial community of Penacook on the Contoocook River is 
playing an important part in Concord's production for war 




MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 



BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Hon. Charles J. MgKee, Chairman 

Robert W. Potter, Clerk 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Samuel B. Dunsford 

John N. Engel 

Charles W. Howard 

John Swenson 

1943 Expenditure $8,226.72 

1943 Earnings $5,520.19 



During 1943, the Concord Munici- 
pal Airport continued to play an 
important role in the Nation's war 
effort. This was particularly true 
in connection with the pilot train- 
ing program of the War Training 
Service. The year 1943 also marked 
the first full year of airport opera- 
tions following the extensive expan- 
sion program initiated in 1941 and 
brought to a successful conclusion 
in 1942. 



Due to the progressiveness and 
foresight of the Airport Commission 
and the Board of Aldermen, Con- 
cord can lay claim to a civilian air- 
port second to none in New Hamp- 
shire and one which ranks among 
the best in the New England states. 
There can be little doubt that Con- 
cord's municipal airport facilities, 
developed to meet a war emergency, 
will bring many advantages to the 
city in the postwar period of air 
transport development. 

NEW HANGAR 

The construction of a modern 
hangar highlighted the airport 
plant development program for 
1 943. Constructed at a cost of about 
$40,000.00, the new hangar re- 
placed the 15-year-old Hangar No. 
2 which had outlived its usefulness. 
In addition to the main storage 
space, facilities in the new hangar 
include an office, a classroom, a 
locker room, a stock room, a ma- 
chine shop, a "dope" room, a lava- 
tory and a heating plant. 

Upon its completion, the hangar 
was put into immediate use to house 
many of the activities of the pri- 



Coricord's latest addition to the facilities of its expanded airport — a new hangar 





The training of flying cadets of the War Training Service program at the 
Municipal Airport was carried out by this group of experienced pilot-instructors 



vately-operated pilot training pro- 
gram. Cost of constructing the han- 
gar will be offset by rentals re- 
ceived over a period of years under 
a contract with private operators. 

CIVIL AERONAUTICS AGENCIES 

Due to army limitations on sea- 
board civilian flying, the adminis- 
trative offices of the New England 
branch of the Civil Aeronautics Ad- 
ministration, which were moved to 
Concord in 1942, continued to op- 
erate out of the airport adminis- 
tration building. In particular, 
Concord served as the regional 
headquarters for the C.A.A. in- 
spection and war training services. 
The agency also continued the op- 
eration of its regular two-way radio 
communication, teletype interphone 
and radio beam services. 

U. S. WEATHER BUREAU 

The greatly enlarged technical 
facilities and personnel of the U. S. 
Weather Bureau continued to op- 
erate on a 24-hour-a-day basis at 



the airport. The agency occupies 
quarters on the second floor of the 
administration building. 

PILOT TRAINING PROGRAM 

An intensive program of ele- 
mentary, secondary and cross coun- 
try flying in connection with the 
Army's pilot training activities was 
conducted at the airport under 
contract arrangement by the E. W. 
Wiggin Flying Service, the Denni- 
son Airport Operating Company 
and the Bayside Flying Service. 

Students came from various New 
England colleges and were mem- 
bers of the Army Enlisted Reserve 
Corps. The training program was 
sponsored by St. Paul's School un- 
der the supervision of the C.A.A. 
War Training Service. 

Trainees were under strict mili- 
tary discipline administered by regu- 
lar army personnel and were quar- 
tered in the city-owned N.Y.A. 
building on East Side Drive. 

Due to changes in army training 
policies, the W.T.S. program came 



Annual Report 



51 




The Administration Building with its new traffic control 
tower is the center of operations at the Concord Airport 



to an abrupt end early in 1944. A 
recapitulation of accomplishments 
showed that 270 students partici- 
pated in three elementary courses 
for a total of 9,450 flying hours, 250 
students took part in five secondary 
courses with 12,500 hours of flying 
time, and 630 trainees assigned to 
seven cross country training courses 
ran up a total of 25,200 flying 
hours. 

AIRPORT ZONING 

In order to protect the aerial ap- 
proaches to the runways of the ex- 



panded airport, the Airport Com- 
mission requested the Planning 
Board to prepare an amendment to 
the zoning ordinance which would 
establish necessary safety regula- 
tions in relation to the height of 
buildings and trees in the vicinity 
of the airport. An approach zone 
plan approved by the N. H. Aero- 
nautics Commission and the Civil 
Aeronautics Administration was 
made a part of the airport height 
zoning amendment which was 
adopted by the Board of Aldermen 
early in 1944. 



52 i t * City of Concord 



WAT E R 
SUPPLY 



BOARD OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson, President 
Robert W. Brown 
Harry H. Dudley 
Allen M. Freeman 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Gardner Tilton 

Percy R. Sanders Superintendent 

1943 Expenditures $72,855.75 

1943 Receipts $84,988.13 



The Water Department's 1943 ac- 
tivities were confined wholly to 
maintenance. While it was possible 
to obtain cast iron pipe and some 
other critical materials, the short- 
age of manpower made it inadvisa- 
ble to attempt any major construc- 
tion. This situation will in all prob- 
ability prevail in Concord until the 
close of the war. Restrictions on the 



use of copper tubing held in stock 
were removed and this material can 
be used for services as needed. 

INSPECTION PROGRAM 

During the year, all hydrants 
were given a thorough inspection. 
This work was done in the spring 
and fall and was in addition to rou- 
tine weekly tests made during the 
winter. 

The five year program on the in- 
spection, removal and repair of 
meters was continued during 1943. 
Whenever possible, defective meters 
were reconditioned and returned to 
use. 

CONSUMPTION 

Water consumption continued 
relatively normal. During the year, 
the department supplied 1,020,- 
988,400 gallons of water or approxi- 
mately 2,800,000 gallons daily. 
Total consumption for 1943 fell 
16,850,000 gallons short of the 
total for the previous year. 

Because the supply at Penacook 
Lake was ample to meet the city's 
needs, the driven well system was 
not used in 1943. The mean height 



Rowing on Penacook Lake is a part of St. Paul's School's war-time student physical fitness program 




«~t ^^r^S' 







Apple blossom time on the Penacook Lake water shed 



of water at the lake was 183.36 feet 
or 1.62 feet higher than the 1942 
level. The overflow level of the lake 
is 185 feet; this point was reached 
May 18. On December 31, 1943, 
the water level stood at 182.10 feet. 
As a safeguard against contami- 
nation and in order to provide a 
disinfecting action throughout the 
distribution system, chlorine was 
applied at the rate of .52 pounds 
per 1,000,000 pounds of water or 
4.3 pounds per 1,000,000 gallons. 

FINANCES 

Due to curtailed construction, 
the Board of Water Commission- 
ers, for the second year in succes- 
sion, abated meter bills for the 
three-month period ending October 
1, 1943, and one-half of the six 
months schedule bills from October 
1, 1943 to April 1, 1944. Water 
charges for hose use during the 1 943 
summer season were also written 
off as paid. The total abatement for 
the year amounted to $29,090.20. 

The 1943 receipts of the Water 
Department totaled $84,988.13. Ex- 



penditures included $51,100.42 for 
operations, $17,000 for bond retire- 
ment and $4,755.33 for bond inter- 
est. During the year, $20,000.00 
were transferred to the Investment 
Account to be used to purchase 
U. S. Treasury Bonds. 

COLLECTION OF SEWER RENTS 

During 1943 the Board of Alder- 
men adopted a system of rental 
charges for the use of City sewers. 
The Board of Public Works was 
vested with the responsibility of op- 
erating the sanitary sewers under the 
sewer rent ordinance. The board, 
in turn, requested and received the 
cooperation of the Water Depart- 
ment in the matter of billing and 
collecting rents for sewer use. Coop- 
erative effort in this respect is par- 
ticularly desirable in light of the 
fact that sewer charges are based on 
metered water consumption and 
schedule water rates. The sewer 
rental system became effective 
January 1, 1944, and bills for the 
first quarter of 1944 were sent out 
April 1. 



54 i i * City of Concord 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Hollis, President 

Charles F. Cook 

Gerard L. Gaudrault 

Lela Y. Johnson 

Violet L. McIvor 

Edwina L. Roundy 

Donald W. Saltmarsh 

Osmond R. Strong 

Dixon H. Turcott 

Natt B. Burbank Superintendent 

H. Raymond Danforth 

{Supt. in the absence of Mr. Burbank) 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Tear Ending June 30, 7943: 
$340,884.02 



. . . Concord School District 

The total number of pupils en- 
rolled in Concord public schools 
during the year ending June 30, 
1943 was 3,157. This represented a 
loss of 157 from the total of the 



previous year. The daily average 
membership was 3,024 and the 
daily average attendance was 
2,807. The monthly attendance re- 
port of February, 1 944 showed a 1 .4 
per cent decrease when compared 
with the same report for 1943. 

COST OF OPERATION 

The total operating cost for the 
school year 1942-1943, exclusive 
of payments on bonded debt and 
cafeteria charges, was $340,884.02. 
The per-pupil cost of operating the 
Concord schools was $107.94 as 
compared with $106.93 for the pre- 
ceding school year. Payments on 
school bonds and notes amounted to 
$45,000.00 during 1943. This re- 
duced the district's bonded indebt- 
edness to $391,000.00. 

SCHOOL HOURS 

One of the principal changes of 
the past school year was the short- 
ening of the school day introduced 
in the High School and the Junior 
High School in September for the 
purpose of enabling students to 
work during after-school hours, and 
in the elementary schools in Decem- 



With fathers, brothers, relatives and friends in the armed forces in all parts 
of the world, school children are showing an eager interest in geography 




Annual Report 1 * i 55 




The Concord High School Honor Society poses for its group picture 



ber for the purpose of adjusting bus 
schedules. On the whole, the revi- 
sion of hours worked well. The ex- 
perience gained will be useful to the 
School Board in laying plans for the 
postwar period. 

CAFETERIA PROGRAM 

During the past year, the cafe- 
teria program was expanded con- 
siderably. The district operated 
nine cafeterias and offered hot 
lunches in every school building. 
The size of the cafeteria program 
and its popular acceptance is in- 
dicated by the fact that more than 
1 5,000 noonday meals and more 



than 8,500 mid-morning crackers 
and milk were served each month. 
The increase in the demands on 
school food program brought into 
sharp focus the inadequacy of exist- 
ing cafeteria facilities. 

POSTWAR PLANNING 

Realizing that peace will bring 
not only problems of reconversion 
but also many new problems, the 
school board and the superintend- 
ent initiated a survey of the entire 
school system for the purpose of for- 
mulating long range plans for the 
future. This is to be a cooperative 
venture of the entire school staff, the 



56 i * * City of Concord 



school board and the citizens of 
Concord. It is proposed to analyze 
the courses and the curriculum to 
see what needs to be done to make 
Concord schools serve the city's 
youth to the best possible advan- 
tage now and in the future. Long 
range plans will be laid for modern- 
izing the school plant and adding 
necessary equipment. The problem 
as stated by President Hollis is as 
follows: "We need to review our 
policies and practices. We will make 
it possible and easy in various ways 
for Concord to criticize the present 
and make suggestions for the future. 
Since it is obvious that readjust- 
ments will have to be made when 
the war is over, now is the time to 
plan for them. We ask everybody's 
cooperation that we may plan 
soundly." 

TEACHERS 

Concord lost very few teachers 
during the past year. The district 
was particularly fortunate in secur- 
ing duration teachers of a high 
caliber as replacement. 



Penacook School District 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Frank Beede, Chairman 
Francis E. Beer 
Claire V. Breckell 
Katherine C. Butt 
James J. Hayes 
Alfred J. York 

George W. Summer Superintendent 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Tear Ending June 30, 1943: 

$47,050.66 



Although the Board of Education 
of the Penacook Union School Dis- 
trict practiced every economy dur- 
ing the past year, the cost of operat- 
ing the Penacook schools was 
$41,050.66 or $2,624.98 more than 
the total for 1942. The board attrib- 
uted the increase in over-all operat- 
ing charges to advanced costs of 
materials and labor. This statement 
is substantiated by the fact that 
teacher salaries showed an increase 
of $3,036.88 over the previous year. 



Hot noon lunches served in school cafeterias are an 
important part of the wartime school health program 




Annual Report r r * 57 



Due to higher living costs, the dis- 
trict voted $2, 540.00 as a bonus to 
school employees for the 1942-1943 
school year. 

The district's bonded debt was 
reduced to $30,000.00 as the result 
of a $2,000.00 payment on the prin- 
cipal. Interest payments and service 
charges on the outstanding debt 
amounted to $961.00. 

The district raised $31,669.00 
toward school costs by direct taxa- 
tion. The school tax rate was 
$16.72 per $1,000.00 of assessed 
valuation. Income from sources 
other than taxation amounted to 
$6,121.99. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The average membership of the 
student body of the Penacook pub- 
lic schools was 346, or 24 less than 
the average for the preceding school 
year. Most of this loss occurred in 
the high school where students left 
to accept employment at high 
wages and to enter the armed 
forces. Many of the remaining 
older students are working during 
out-of-school hours assisting farm- 
ers, storekeepers, householders and 



others who are affected by the cur- 
rent shortage of manpower. 

TEACHER PROBLEM 

The district has not been without 
its teacher problem. During the 
past school year, it was necessary to 
make replacements on short notice 
of a number of teachers who re- 
signed to take other work or left for 
military service. The district was 
fortunate in obtaining capable 
teachers to fill its vacancies. 

CHANGES IN POLICY 

Due to increased costs, the 
Board of Education voted to raise 
the high school tuition from $75.00 
to $96.55. The board also voted 
to sponsor a school milk program 
which it feels will provide added 
health insurance for school children 
in these abnormal times. 

The School Board also decided 
to allow a diploma to be presented 
to any student leaving high school 
who earned the required credits for 
graduation through a correspond- 
ence course approved by the Army 
Institute. This plan has the approval 
of the State Board of Education. 



Conant School is located in quiet and spacious surroundings in the South End 




1 







'i***MM 



58 1 1 1 City of Concord 



APPENDIX 



-ft- ft & 
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATISTICS 

PAGE 

General Fund — Balance Sheet 60 

General Fund — Reconciliation of Unappropriated Surplus 61 

General Fund — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 61 

General Fund — Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 62 

General Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 64 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 65 

Bond Funds — Comparative Balance Sheets 66 

Bond Funds — Balance Sheet of Non-Revenue Accounts 66 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 67 

Trust Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 68 

Trust Funds — Reconciliation of Fund Balances 68 

Concord Water Works — Balance Sheet 69 

Concord Water Works — Income-Investment Account 69 

Concord Water Works - — Statement of Operations 70 

Concord Water Works — Cash Receipts and Expenditures 70 

Assessors' Statement for 1943 71 

Reconciliation of Tax Levies, 1939-1943 72 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 

Tax Levies and Average Rates in Concord, 1934-1943 72 

City Relief Department — General Classification of Relief Expenditures 73 

Municipal Court — Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 74 

Board of Public Works — Financial Statement 74 



GENERAL FUND 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1943 

ASSETS 
Cash: 

Cash in Bank— Regular $202,563 . 23 

Cash in Bank — Bond and Coupon Account 1,148.75 

Cash in Office— Tax Collector 948 . 55 

Cash in Office— City Clerk 362 . 49 

Total Cash $205,023 . 02 

Reimbursements Receivable: 

Merrimack County $ 4,281 .18 

Other Municipalities 146.33 $ 4,427.51 

Less Reserve for Doubtful Accounts 1,221 .48 3,206.03 

Taxes Receivable: 

1939 Levy $ 3,109.55 

1940 Levy 3,851 .79 

1941 Levy 4,126.86 

1942 Levy 6,297.42 

1943 Levy 117,656.47 $135,042.09 

Less Reserve for Doubtful Accounts 35,042.09 100,000.00 

Unredeemed Taxes Bought by City 41 ,227 . 98 

Property Acquired by Tax Collector'' s Deeds 4,761 . 39 



Total Assets $354,218 . 42 



LIABILITIES 

Matured Bonds Payable $ 1 ,000 . 00 

Bond Coupons Payable 148 . 75 

Unexpended Balances of Appropriations: 

Airport Commission $ 5,050 84 

Public Library 10,362 . 44 

School District — Bond Interest 7,553.09 

Union School District 134,705.85 

Penacook School District 8,186.16 165,858.38 

Total Liabilities $167,007.13 

Current Surplus 187,211 .29 



Total Liabilities and Surplus $354,21 8 . 42 



60 1 1 t City of Concord 



GENERAL FUND 

Reconciliation of Unappropriated Surplus 

Unappropriated Surplus, January 1, 1943 $ 271,668.61 

Add: 

Estimated Revenues $1,321,148.26 

Excess of Actual Revenues over Estimated 29,567.62 1,350,715.88 



Deduct: 

Appropriations $1,321,148.26 

Less Net Unexpended Balances 2,360 .82 $1 ,31 8,787 . 44 



$1,622,384.49 



Net Decreases in Receivables and Tax Deeds 81,343.67 

Increase in Reserve for Uncollectible Taxes 35,042.09 1,435,173.20 



Unappropriated Surplus— December 31, 1943 $ 187,211 .29 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis of Change in Net Debt for the Year 
Ending December 31, 1943 

Net Debt, December 31, 1942 $727,331 .39 

Deductions: 

Bonds and Notes Retired During 1943: 

Municipal Bonds $ 77,000 . 00 

Municipal Notes — Airport 30,000.00 

School Bonds 25,000.00 

School Notes 20,000 . 00 



$152,000.00 
Water Bonds 17,000.00 



Reduction for Bonds and Notes Retired 169,000.00 



$558,331.39 
Deduction for Amount Carried to Surplus, representing the results of 

operations for the year 1 943 and transactions affecting prior years .... 84,457 . 32 



Net Debt, December 31, 1943 $642,788.71 



SUMMARY 

Net Debt, December 31, 1942 $727,331 .39 

Net Debt, December 31, 1943 642,788.71 



Improvement in Financial Condition $ 84,542.68 



Annual Report * * * 61 



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BOND FUNDS 

Comparative Balance Sheets 
December 31, 1942— December 31, 1943 

1942 1943 Decrease 

ASSETS 
Net Bonded Debt: 

Balancing Account $909,000.00 $790,000.00 $119,000.00 

Notes Payable: 

Balancing Account 90,000.00 40,000.00 50,000.00 



Total $999,000.00 $830,000.00 $169,000.00 

LIABILITIES 

Serial Bonds: 

Central Fire Station $12,000.00 $11,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

City Hall and Auditorium 25,000.00 20,000.00 5,000.00 

Departmental Equipment 16,000.00 12,000.00 4,000.00 

Highways 20,000.00 15,000.00 5,000.00 

Public Improvements 1 22,000 . 00 79,000 . 00 43,000 . 00 

Sewers 173,000.00 158,000.00 15,000.00 

Union School District 376,000.00 351,000.00 25,000.00 

Water Department 125,000.00 108,000.00 17,000.00 

Municipal Airport 40,000.00 36,000.00 4,000.00 

Serial Notes: 

Union School District 60,000.00 40,000.00 20,000.00 

Municipal Airport 30,000 .00 30,000 . 00 

Total $999,000.00 $830,000.00 $169,000.00 



BOND FUNDS 

Balance Sheet of Non-Revenue Accounts 
December 31, 1943 

ASSETS 
Cash with Depositary: 

First National Bank, Concord $7,906 . 47 

LIABILITIES 
Concord Airport: 

Land Account $1,624.85 

Concord Airport: 

New Hangar Account 930 . 28 

Concord Auditorium: 

Construction and Repairs 5,351 . 34 

Total $7,906 . 47 

66 * * 1 City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1943 
ASSETS 



Cash: 

Unexpended Balances of Income deposited 
at interest in: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 

Union Trust Company 

Total Income Cash 

Permanent Funds: 

Savings Bank Deposits: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 

Union Trust Company 

Securities: 

United States Treasury Bonds 

Great Northern R. R. Pfd. (1 sh.) 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R. (3) . . 

Northern R. R. of N. H. (1 sh.) 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R. R. (1) . . 
Boston & Maine R. R. 1st Pfd. C (6 sh.) . . 

Concord Gas Co. Com. (12 sh.) 

Jackson Construction Tract Co. Bonds 
$3,000 

Total Permanent Funds 

Total Assets 



Total 
All Funds 


Cemetery 
Trust Funds 


Other 
Trust Funds 


$ 616.51 

2,724.24 

617.63 

1,469.97 


$ 478 . 68 

2,631.76 

617.63 

1,045.12 


$ 137.83 
92.48 

424.85 


$ 5,428.35 


$ 4,773.19 


$ 655.16 


$ 87,048.84 
84,212.37 
85,867.43 
92,708.27 


$ 77,759.15 
67,881.55 
71,205.97 
72,756.36 


$ 9,289.69 
16,330.82 
14,661.46 
19,951.91 


86,810.63 
100.00 
300.00 
100.00 
100.00 
600.00 
1,020.00 


52,850.00 
100. 00 
300.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 


33,960.63 

500.00 
1,020.00 


(no value) 




(no value) 


$438,867.54 


$343,153.03 


$95,714.51 


$444,295.89 


$347,926.22 


$96,369.67 



LIABILITIES 

Unexpended Income Balances: 

Cemeteries $ 4,773 .19 $ 4,773 . 19 

Schools 424.85 

Parks and Playgrounds 230 .31 



Permanent Funds: 

Cemetery Trusts $343,153.03 $343,153.03 

School Trusts 1,200.00 

Parks and Playgrounds Trusts 1,961 .73 

Library Trusts 90,552 .78 

Other 2,000.00 



424.85 
230.31 



Total Unexpended Income $ 5,428.35 $ 4,773.19 $ 655.16 



1,200.00 

1,961.73 

90,552.78 

2,000.00 



Total Permanent Funds . 



,867.54 $343,153.03 $95,714.51 



Total Liabilities '. . . $444,295.89 $347,926.22 $96,369.67 



Annual Report f i * 67 



TRUST FUNDS 



Statement of Receipts 
for the Year Ending 



Cash Balances of Unexpended Income, 
January 1 , 1 943 



Receipts: 

Income from Interest and Dividends: 

School Trust 

Park and Playground Trusts 

Library Trusts 

Other 

Cemeteries 

One-third Receipts from Sale of Lots . 



and Disburse: 


ments 




December 31, 


1943 








Cemetery 


Other 


Total 




Trust 


Trust 


All Funds 




Funds 


Funds 


$ 5,421.77 


$ 


3,654.44 


$ 1,767.33 


$ 32.23 


$ 




$ 32.23 


42.96 






42.96 


13,036.90 






13,036.90 


40.00 






40.00 


7,018.87 




7,018.87 




660.67 




660.67 





Total Receipts $20,831.63 $ 7,679.54 $13,152.09 



$ 26,253.40 $ 11,333.98 $14,919.42 



Disbursements: 

School Trusts * 

Park and Playground Trusts . 

Library Trusts 

Other .' 

Cemeteries 

Transfer — Seth K.Jones. . . . 



20 . 00 $ $ 20 . 00 



14,204.26 

40 . 00 

6,544.04 6,544.04 

16.75 16.75 



14,204.26 
40.00 



Total Disbursements $20,825.05 $ 6,560.79 $14,264.26 



Cash Balances of Unexpended Income, 
December 31, 1943 



5,428.35 $ 4,773.19 $ 655.16 



TRUST FUNDS 

Reconciliation of Fund Balances 



Fund Balances January 1, 1943 

Less: Horace B. Bartlett Fund — No value. 



Add: 

New Trusts — Sundry Cemetery 

New Trusts — Special 

Sale of Lots — One-third to Permanent 

Fund 

Sale of Graves 

Seth K. Jones 



$412,202.56 $334,822.62 
3,000.00 



$77,379.94 
3,000 . 00 



$409,202.56 $334,822.62 $74,379.94 



$ 7,083.00 $ 7,083.00 
21,834.57 500.00 



21,334.57 



660.66 660.66 

120.00 120.00 

16.75 16.75 



Total Additions $29,714.98 $ 8,380.41 $21,334.57 



Deduct: 

Arthur R. Griffin Trust withdrawn . 



Fund Balances December 31, 1943. 
68 * 1 -f City of Concord 



$438,917.54 $343,203.03 
50.00 50.00 



$95,714.51 



$438,867.54 $343,153.03 $95,714.51 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1943 

ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash % 9,152.03 

Accounts Receivable 42 . 34 

Material and Supplies 1 7,002 . 64 

Total Current Assets $ 26,197.01 

Fixed Assets: 

Water and Flowage Rights $167,688 . 1 1 

Engineering and Superintendence Construction Cost. . . 63,383.63 

Land 129,386.35 

Structures (less depreciation reserves) 200,686 . 85 

Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 14,579.20 

Distribution System (less depreciation reserves) 684,397 . 56 

Other Equipment (less depreciation reserves) 4,867.44 

Total Fixed Assets 1,264,989. 14 

Other Assets: 

Income — Investment Fund 69,714.39 

Total Assets $1,360,900.54 

LIABILITIES 

Current Liabilities: 

Interest Coupons Payable $ 146.00 

Funded Debt: 

Bonds Payable 108,000.00 

Total Liabilities $ 108,146.00 

Capital: 

Municipal Investment $963,194.74 

Federal Grants in Aid of Construction 61,915.08 1,025,109.82 

Surplus: 

Balance January 1, 1943 $219,104.26 

Net Profit for the Year 8,540.46 227,644. 72 

Total Liabilities $1,360,900.54 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Income — Investment Account 

CAPITAL AND INCOME 

Balance, January 1, 1943 $48,488.89 

Transferred from Cash Balance 20,000 . 00 

Income Received during year 1,225 . 50 

$69,714.39 

INVESTMENTS 

U. S. Treasury Bonds, 2^-64/69 $30,000.00 

Deposited in: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank 9,750. 18 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 10,257.24 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 9,861 . 1 5 

Union Trust Company 9,845.82 

Balance, December 31 , 1 943 $69,714.39 



Annual Report 1 1 / 69 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations for the Year Ending December 31, 1943 

RECEIPTS 
Water Sales: 

Commercial— Flat Rate $ 2,669 . 32 

Commercial — Metered 65,875 . 27 

Industrial— Metered 1 5,306 . 88 

Miscellaneous Water Revenue 271 . 68 

Total Operating Revenue $84,123.15 

EXPENDITURES 

Operating Expenses: 

Water Supply Expense $21,146.52 

Distribution Expense 1 8,283 . 23 

General and Miscellaneous Undistributed Expense 9,654.57 

Depreciation 23,337 . 18 

Total Operating Expenses 72,421 . 50 

Net Operating Income $11,701.65 

Other Income 1,590.06 

$13,291.71 

Other Expenses — Interest Paid 4,751 .25 

Net Profit for Year ' $ 8,540.46 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Cash Receipts and Expenditures 
for the Year Ending December 31, 1943 

RECEIPTS 

Balance, January 1, 1943 $ 17,019.65 

Receipts: 

For Water at Fixed Rates, General $ 2,650. 54 

For Water at Meter Rates, General 65,664.38 

For Water at Meter Rates, Industrial 15,306. 88 

For Water from Accounts Prior to 1 943 72.23 

For Water for Building Purposes 17.40 

For Water for Miscellaneous Uses 100. 13 

For Water for Boscawen and Penacook Water Precinct .... 1 56 . 1 5 

Miscellaneous Receipts 1,020. 42 

Total Receipts 84,988.13 

$102,007.78 



EXPENDITURES 
Orders Paid: 

Operation and Maintenance $49,380.16 

Plant Account 1,720.26 $ 51,100.42 

Bonds and Interest Paid: 

Bonds. .- $17,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 4,751 . 25 

Accrued Interest on Bonds 4.08 21,755.33 

Total Expenditures $ 72,855.75 

Transferred to Investment Account and for Purchase of U. S 

Treasury Bonds 20,000.00 

Balance in City Treasury, December 31, 1943 9,152.03 

$102,007.78 

70 r 1 f City of Concord 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1943 



Assessed 
Valuation of 
City and Precincts 
Money raised for the: 

County $33,251,268.00 

City Budget 33,251,268.00 

Schools: 

* City Union . .'. 31 ,248,439 . 00 

f Penacook Union 2,015,529.00 

Total 

Allowed for Errors and Corrections 

Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 

City Rate 

Penacook Rate 

Average Rate for City 

* Includes property located in Loudon. 

f Includes property located in Canterbury. 



Amount of 
Appropriation 

I 98,098.66 
512,653.00 

411,590.21 

33,691.21 

51,056,033.08 

31,113.96 

;i,087,147.04 

1,289.69 



Men . . . 
Women . 



Poll Taxes 

No. 

4,809 

7,396 

Total 12,205 

Exemptions 
Veterans 

Property Valuation 

Polls (797) 

Blind 

Property Valuation 

Polls (7) 

Total Exemptions 



Bank Stock 



Bank Stock 



Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 
Type No. 

Improved and Unimproved Land and Buildings 

Electric Plants 

Horses 168 

Asses and Mules 2 

Oxen 

Cows 1 ,083 

Neat Stock 225 

Sheep (including Goats) 83 

Hogs 22 

Fowls 28,675 

Fur-bearing Animals 110 

Vehicles 

Portable Mills 

Boats and Launches 

Wood and Lumber 

Gas Tanks and Pumps 

Stock in Trade 

Machinery 

Total 



Tax Rate 
per SI, 000 

2.95 
15.42 

13.17 
16.72 



31.54 
35.09 
31 80 



Amount 
$ 9,618.00 

14,792.00 
$ 24,410.00 



$271,450.00 
1,594.00 

2,000.00 

14.00 

$275,058.00 



$ 6,213.16 



Valuation 

$29,080,080.00 

1,700,580.00 

17,850.00 

150.00 

0.00 

154,800.00 

18,635.00 

762.00 

625 . 00 

36,096.00 

222.00 

0.00 

0.00 

1,500.00 

33,183.00 

19,910.00 

1,748,635.00 

438,240.00 

$33,251,268.00 



Annual Report 



71 



RECONCILIATION OF TAX LEVIES, 1939-1943 

As of December 31, 1943 

1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 

Tax Levy: 

Resident List $1,056,152.33 $1,279,935.91 $1,229,917.73 $1,245,507.74 $1,141,546.57 

Poll Tax List 24,410.00 26,368.00 27,748.00 28,664.00 27,754.00 

Non-Resident List 371.55 480.15 481.67 571.00 546.05 

Bank Stock 6,213.16 6,054.16 6,168.16 1,684.16 6,183.16 

Total Tax Levy $1,087,147.04 $1,312,838.22 $1,264,315.56 $1,280,926.90 $1,176,029.78 

Additions: 

Additions and Corrections. . $ 1,289.69$ 1,269.46$ 1,512.36$ 1,705.84$ 2,018.15 

Interest 40.01 8,837.71 10,289.25 12,612.17 12,836.27 

Costs 160.40 1,602.15 2,029.71 2,279.61 2.384.25 

Total Additions $ 1,490.10$ 11,709.32$ 13,831.32$ 16,597.62$ 17,238.67 

Total $1,088,637.14 $1,324,547.54 $1,278,146.88 $1,297,524.52 $1,193,268.45 

Deductions: 

Discounts $ $ $ $ $ 

Abatements 5,931.19 9,034.84 9,312.79 9,629.22 8,783.75 

Total Deductions $ 5,931.19$ 9,034.84$ 9,312.79$ 9,629.22$ 8,783.75 

Totals $1,082,705.95 $1,315,512.70 $1,268,834.09 $1,287,895.30 $1,184,484.70 

Collections: 

Paid to Treasurer $ 964,100.93 $1,309,215.28 $1,264,707 .23 $1,284,043.51 $1,181,375.15 

Cash on Hand 948 . 55 

Total Collected $ 965,049.48 $1,309,215.28 $1,264,707.25 $1,284,043.51 $1,181,375.15 

Balance Uncollected $ 117,656.47$ 6,297.42$ 4,126.86$ 3,851.79$ 3,109.55 



Summary of Uncollected Taxes December 31, 1943 

Non-Resident $ 14.99$ $ $ $ 

Property TaxeV^ } 108,949.48 796.02 727.06 836.89 504.25 

Poll Taxes 8,692.00 5,501.40 3,399.80 3,014.90 2,605.30 

Total Uncollected. . $ 117,656.47 $ 6,297.42$ 4,126.86$ 3,851.79$ 3,109.55 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 
Tax Levies and Average Rates in Concord 1934-1943 

Polls Veterans I 'a/ nations Tax Levies Av. Rates 

1934 13,523 1,319 31,969,987 981,805.50 29.98 

1935 13,338 1,116 31,910,830 1,193,828.43 36 48 

1936 13,166 1,030 32,039,851 1,245,352.87 37.86 

1937 13,612 919 32,195,052 1,290,330.81 39.04 

1938 13,490 936 32,201,370 1,282,689.02 38.82 

1939 13,877 958 32,365,017 1,176,029.78 35.30 

1940 14,334 925 32,791,790 1,280,926.90 38.00 

1941 13,874 896 33,068,487 1,264,315.56 37.20 

1942 13,184 897 33,282,876 1,312,838.22 38.40 

1943 12,205 797 33,251,268 1,087,147.04 31.80 



72 f * * City of Concord 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1943 

Direct Expenditures for Relief: City County Total 

Cash Allowances $ 3,060 . 98 $ 5,931 . 40 $ 8,992 . 38 

Groceries 2,214 . 36 5,431 . 06 7,645 . 42 

Milk 428.71 2,427.14 2,855.85 

Fuel 1,079.54 2,422.29 3,501.83 

Rent 1,068 . 50 3,075 . 25 4,143 . 75 

Board and Care— Adults 3,220.61 1,522.79 4,743.40 

Board and Care— Children 1,661 .06 1,661 .06 

Medical 1,001.12 4,501.14 5,502.26 

Clothing 195.40 877.87 1,073.27 

Miscellaneous 688.02 1,331.35 2,019.37 



Total City and County Poor $14,618.30 $27,520.29 $42,138.59 

Other Towns 611.21 611.21 

Hospitalization 1,726.41 1,726.41 



$16,955.92 $27,520.29 $44,476.21 

Dependent Soldiers: 

Cash Allowances $ 192.00 $1,870.50 $2,062.50 

Groceries 88 . 00 289 . 48 377 . 48 

Milk 40 . 80 40 . 80 

Fuel 70.80 244.90 315.70 

Rent 294.00 294.00 

Medical 4.50 689.04 693.54 

Clothing 49 . 39 49 . 39 



$ 355.30 $ 3,478.11 $ 3,833.41 

Administration: 

Salaries— Overseers $ 1,614.24 $ 1,263.18 $ 2,877.42 

Salaries— Office and Case Workers 3,786 . 06 3,783 . 95 7,570 . 01 

Mileage 173.03 276.09 449.12 

Auto Use and Auto Hire 7.70 9.40 17.10 

Office Supplies 84.41 98.11 182.52 

Telephone 123.75 123.77 247.52 

Lights 80 . 61 80 . 61 

Heat 60.00 60.00 120.00 

Janitor Service 159.00 159.00 

Withholding and Victory Taxes (Wages) 250.44 231 . 32 481 .76 

Auto Maintenance 200 . 00 200 . 00 

Miscellaneous 385.00 73.14 458.14 



Total Administration $6,924.24 $5,918.96 $12,843.20 

Old Age Assistance 15,037.22 15,037.22 

Grand Totals $39,272.68 $36,917.36 $76,190.04 



Annual Report * 1 * 73 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 
for the Year Ending December 31, 1943 

Receipts: 

Received from fines, costs and sundry fees 

Expenditures: 

Paid for officers' fees $ 3 . 40 

Special justices 6 . 00 

Clerk's bond 5 . 00 

Bank charges for new check book 1 . 83 

State Treasurer — fine, State vs. Burgess 5.00 

Counsel fees in juvenile case 20 . 00 

Paid for cleaning court room flag , 1.25 

W. A. Colby, County Solicitor — costs / State vs. Hannaford 2 . 00 

Postage and supplies 6.65 

Printing warrants and dockets 64 . 75 

Department of Agriculture — fine, State vs. Poultry Mart 25 . 00 

State of New Hampshire Motor Vehicle Dept 1,566. 10 

Balance 

Paid City Treasurer 



>,913.27 



1,706.98 
$1,206.29 
$1,206.29 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1943 













Unexpended 








Total 




Balance or 




Appropriation 


Receipts 


Available 


Expended 


Overdraft * 


Roads and Bridges. . 


. $134,942.00 


$17,133.33 


$152,075.33 


$146,025.77 


$6,049.56 


Office 


4,550.00 




4,550.00 


4,464.87 


85.13 


Refuse Collection. . . 


32,400 . 00 


60.00 


32,460.00 


31,544.35 


915.65 


Table Garbage 


5,400.00 




5,400.00 


5,531.88 


131.88* 


Sewers 


19,280.00 


856.55 


20,136.55 


20,949.74 


813.19* 


Engineering 


8,180.00 


4.55 


8,184.55 


8,182.14 


2.41 


Lighting Streets. . . . 


40,650.00 


4.26 


40,654.26 


40,539.60 


114.66 


Clerk of Board 


200.00 




200.00 


200.00 




Sub-Total . . . 


. $245,602.00 


$18,058.69 


$263,660.69 


$257,438.35 


$6,222.34 


Trees 


6,100.00 


215.09 


6,315.09 


5,753.45 


561.64 


Parks 


12,445.00 


30.50 


12,475.50 


12,138.49 


337.01 


Cemeteries 


27.320.40 


12,000.00 
$30,304.28 


39,320.40 


38,356.90 
$313,687.19 


963.50 


Grand Total . 


. $291,467.40 


$321,771.68 


$8,084.49 



74 



City of Concord 



t1-f1i-f1111-t1f1-t-f1-t1-t1111-*-t11 



INDEX 



fii-tiii-ff-ti-fi-t-t-tiiiiiii-'-f*i 



PAGE 

Activiies in 1943 6 

Assessment 12 

Appendix 59 

Bond Funds 14 

Building Activity 44 

Cemeteries 48 

City Clerk 10 

City Government 8 

City Officials 9 

Elections 11 

Engineering 47 

Examination of Plumbers 44 

Finances 14 

Financial Statements and Statistics. 60 

Fire Protection 40 

Garbage Disposal 47 

General Fund 14 

Health and Sanitation 20 

Hydrants 42 

Legal Service 15 

Library 28 

Mayor's Message 5 

Milk Inspection 21 



Municipal Airport 50 

Municipal Court 37 

Parks 48 

Planning 17 

Playgrounds and Bath 24 

Plumbing Inspection 44 

Police Protection 33 

Probation 36 

Public Works 45 

Recreation 24 

Refuse Collection 47 

Relief 31 

Schools 55 

Sewers 47 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 46 

Special Recreational Facilities 26 

Street Lighting 48 

Tax Collection 13 

Trees 48 

Trust Funds 14 

Vital Statistics 10 

Water Supply 53 

Weights and Measures 43 

Zoning Appeals 44 



■f-f-fii-fiiiii-fi-fi-ffii-f-f-f^-f'' ii ' f 



Annual Report * i * 75 



RUMFORD PRESS 
CONCORD. N. H.