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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

CITY OF CONCORD, N.H 



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NINETY - SECOND ANNUAL REPORT 



I 9 4 4 






MS1iXMV^?««:^<^ 



THE NIN ETY-SECOND 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

for the 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1944 




Capital of the State of New Humps/uie 

County Seat of Mern'maef^ County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 2j,iyi (1940) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision of the City 
Planning Board by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



We Dedicate This Report 



To tlie 3,400 Concord citizens 
who have left our midst to carry 
the fight to our enemies on 
battlefields in all parts of the 
world. We are ever mindful of 
their great contribution to our 
safety and welfare. 




To the thousands of our w^ar 
workers at home and afield w^ho 
have rolled up their sleeves to 
forge the sinews of war Avith 
which the bonds of tyranny will 
be lifted to rekindle the light of 
freedom in a darkened ^vorld. 
We salute them. 



Meji Juing out their signs 
indicative of their respective 
trades; shoemakers hang out a 
giga)itic slioe; jewelers, a mon- 
ster umtch; and the dentist hangs 
ont a gold tooth; hut up in the 
mountains of New Hampshire, 
God AlmigJity lias hiing out a 
sign to short' tJiat tJiere He makes 
men. 



—Daniel Webster. 



To oiu' home front citizens who 
by countless deeds and sacrifices 
have contributed imgrudgingly 
to the common good. Theirs 
has been the glorious task of 
keeping faith with their fellow 
men. 



And in so doing, let us re- 
dedicate ourselves with all our 
strength to bring this struggle 
for freedom to a victorious end 
. . . soon! 




Atinual Report i i i ^ 



oncord on the Meynmac\ 



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MOLL OF eONOM 

1^ 1^ 1^ 

Regular Employees of the City of Concord 

World War II 



-is 

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<^ 
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it 

it 
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Daniel C. Abbott 
Donald G. Barton 
Chester S. Blake 
Walter H. Carlson 
Winthrop L. Clark 
Paul R. Colgan 
Liberto Colletti 
Melvin G. Davis 
Eugene G. Densmore 
Robert P. Drouin 
Parker L. Hancock 
Bryan E. Libby 



Gordon S. Lord 
William J. McFarland, Jr. 
J. Francis McGuire 
Dean C. Moran 
Richard J. Morey 
Arnold B. Murphy 
James J. Ouilette 
Cleon F. Perry 
George E. Ruddy 
John R. Selig 
Vilho a. Skarp 
Paul E. Welcome 
Raymond A. York 



^ i -f f City of Concord 




A Message from Mayor McKee 

Passing of another war year finds 3,400 Concord citizens in the armed forces 
of the United States — 500 more than a year ago. Our unbounded pride in 
their achievements is matched only by our pride in the cause for which they so 
courageously fight. Yet, as we look proudly upon their accomplishments, we 
are starkly aware that the struggle for freedom is not without heavy cost of 
life. As we count the growing number of those who will not return, let us 
reverently bow our heads in full knowledge of the everlasting debt we owe them. 
It is for us to make any sacrifice within our means to fulfill the great purpose 
for which they gave all. 

Your mayor would be remiss in his duties if he were not to acknowledge with 
heartfelt thanks your patience and indulgence in matters of municipal concern 
during the trying times of the past year. The provision of municipal services 
has not been without the difficulties that stem from shortages in manpower 
and materiel. We, at City Hall, have tried to serve you to the best of our 
ability. Whatever measure of success we have enjoyed could not have been 
attained without your full cooperation. How well we have succeeded is for 
you to judge. 

The war continues. Although our faith in Concord is unshaken, we know 
not what the future holds in store. However, we hasten to assure you that 
we shall spare no effort in meeting every municipal problem squarely and 
honestly. We invite your continued interest and assistance. 



L Mayor 



Mayc 
Annual Report i i i ^ 



Legislative Review 
1944 



Board of Aldermen 



^ Established an Official Map cover- 
ing the City Proper section of Concord. 

^ Established a classification and 
compensation plan governing mu- 
nicipal employees. 

^ Established the position of Real 
Estate Agent and adopted administra- 
tive procedure for the disposal of tax- 
sale property. 

^ Authorized the appointment of an 
aldermanic committee to study juvenile 
delinquency. 

^ Enacted an ordinance establish- 
airport approach zoning. 

^ Authorized the Planning Board to 
undertake a study of the need for re- 
vision of the building code and the 
plumbing rules. 

^ Took steps to purchase the Cogs- 
well School property for a South-End 
station site. 

^ Authorized the Mayor to appoint 
a committee to contact federal officials 
in an effort to have the proposed vet- 
erans' hospital located in Concord. 

^ Authorized the compilation of a 
list of post-war public works projects. 

^ Acquired property for street pur- 
poses at the junction of Airport Road 
and Manchester Street. 

^ Filled the vacancy in the Board of 
Assessors arising out of the death of 
Joseph E. Shepard. 

(i i i i City of Concord 



^ Employed special counsel to seek 
payment of sewer rent charges from 
the State of New Hampshire. 

^ Passed an ordinance regulating 
places of outdoor amusement operated 
under canvas. 

^ Established set-back lines for future 
street widening purposes on North 
State and South State Streets. 

^ Authorized the Fire Department 
to purchase a new aerial ladder truck 
to replace Ladder No. 2. 

^ Voted a war-time cost of living 
pay increase for municipal employees. 

^ Turned down a proposed increase 
in pay of ward election officials. 

^ Authorized a study of the need for 
recreation building facilities in Con- 
cord. 

^ Undertook a study of the need for 
a clarification of the ordinance govern- 
ing attendance and leave of municipal 
employees. 

^ Authorized an investigation into 
the operation of convalescent and nurs- 
ing homes in Concord. 

^ Continued the "pay-as-you-go" 
policy and authorized no new bond 
issues. 

^ Sent copies of the 1943 City Report 
to all Concord citizens serving in the 
armed forces. 

^ Authorized emergency repairs in 
connection with Police Department 
property. 



Administrative Review 
1944 



Municipal Departments 



^ The City Clerk was the first in the 
state to set up a special election system 
to- facilitate voting by war workers un- 
able to get to polls during regular 
hours. 

^ The Board of Assessors reported a 

$168,241.00 decrease in the city's total 

assessed valuation. 

^ The Tax Collector experienced the 

best year of collections in recent times. 

^ The City Treasurer reported an 

unappropriated surplus of $166,774.54 

at the close of the year. 

^ The City Solicitor participated in 

the successful presentation before the 

Supreme Court of the City's case in 

the matter of payment of sewer rents 

by the State. 

^ The Planning Board adopted the 

first section of its major street plan. 

^ The Health Department immun- 
ized 241 children at clinics and 
reported improved conditions of public 
health in the city. 

^ The Playground Committee con- 
ducted a well-rounded program of play 
activities for the children of the city. 
^ The Recreation Committee noted 
an increase in the use of its facilities 
due to the lifting of the pleasure driv- 
ing ban. 

^ The Public Library circulated 
162,443 books through the main li- 
brary, branches, schools and hospitals. 



^ The Relief Department reported a 
further reduction in relief recipients, 
but old age assistance continued to in- 
crease. 

^ The Police Department recorded 
an increase of 296 arrests, most of 
which were parking and driving vio- 
lations. 

^ The Probation Department noted 
a definite decrease in the number of 
cases to come before the Juvenile Court. 

^ The Fire Department experienced 
its worst year of fire loss in recent 
time; damage amounted to $117,767.33. 

^ The City Sealer carried out an in- 
tensified program of checking due to 
increased small-lot sales. 

^ The Zoning, Building and Plumb- 
ing Departments continued to feel the 
pinch of war restrictions on construc- 
tion. 

^ The Public Works Department 
completed its first year of operating 
sanitary sewers under the rental charge 
system. 

^ The Airport Commission reported 
the resumption of regular air transport 
service out of Concord to Boston and 
Montreal. 

^ The Water Department initiated 
extensive changes in the pumping 
equipment located at the Penacook 
Street Station. 

^ The School Department started 
work on post-war plans to modernize 
the school plant. 

Annual Report i i i '] 



GOVERNMENT 

iiiiiiiiiliiii 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Mayor 

John C. Tilton 
Siibslitttte Mayor 

■fiiiiiiiiiiiii 

ALDERMEN-AT-LAKGE AND 

MEMBERS BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

RuBERr W. Potter 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Nelson E. Strong 
John Swenson 
John C. Tilton 
William A. Stevens 



WARD ALDERMEN 

Charles P. Coakli.v 
John E. Davis 
William J. Flynn 
Winfield J. Phillips 
Harry D. Challis 
Lawrence J. Mo^nihan 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Clarence E. Huggins 
Thomas B. Jennings 



Ward I 

Ward 2 

Ward J 

Ward 4 

Ward 5 

Ward 6 

Ward 7 

Ward 8 

Ward 9 



STANDING COMMITTEES 

OF THE BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

Arbitration: 

Aldermen Moynihan, Bartlett, Flynn and 

Tilton. 
}5ills, Seixjnd Reading: 

Aldermen Strong, Coakley, LaPointe and 

Tilton. 
Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Tilton, Davis, Jennings and 

LaPointe. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Jennings, Coakley, Strong and 

Tilton. 
Financ:e: 

Mayor McKce, Aldermen Challis, Phillips, 

Stevens and Swenson. 
Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Flynn, Moynihan and 

Potter. 

Lands and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett, Davis, Huggins and 
Jennings. 

Playgrou.nds and Bath: 

Aldermen LaPointe, Coakley, Flynn, Hug- 
gins and Jennings. 

Police and License: 

Aldermen Huggins, Davis, Strong and 
Tilton. 

Public Instruction: 

Akiermen Fhnn, Huggins, Jennings and 
Moynihan. 

Reliei : 

Aldermen Davis, Bartlett and Coakley. 




The piihlic is cordially 
invited to he present at 
meetings of the Board 
of A I d e r m e n. This 
scene shows the City 
Ciorernnient attending to 
mtinicipid affairs at one 
of its regular meetings 
held at the Council 
Chamber in City Hall 
on the second Monday 
of each month. 



OFFICIALS 



Board of Airport Commissioners: 

Charles J. McKce, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, John N. Engel, Charles W. 
Howard, Donald J. McFarland, Robert W. 
Potter, John Swenson. 



Building Inspector 
City Clerii 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer 
Commissioner , Board 

Public Works 
Fire Chic] 
Judge, Municipal 

Court 
Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milli Inspector 
Oi'erseer of Poor 
Overseer of Poor, 

Penacook 
Planning Director 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

I 'ital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Measures 
Siipt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 
Siipt. of Streets 
Siipt. of Water Work. 
Superi'isor of 

Playgrounds 
Tax Collector 
Tree Warden 



of 



Edward E. Beane 

Arthur E. Roby 

Edward E. Beane 

Henry W. Smith 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 

Ervin E. Webber 
Clarence H. Green 

William L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

Marion F. Holt 

Austin B. Presby 

Parker L. Hancock 

Charles P. Coakley 

GusTAF H. Lehtinen 

Arthur W. McIsaac 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Donald G. Barton 

J. Shkpard Norris 

Leslie C. Clark 
Ervin E. Webber 
Pkrc:v R. Sanders 

Paul G. Crowell 
Amos B. Morrison 
Ervin 1-^. Webber 



BOARDS, COMMISSIONS AND TRUSTEES 

Board oe Adjustment: 

Donald G. Matson, Chairman: John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Harold E. 
Langley, Laurence M. Meyer. 



Board of Assessors: 

Clarence L. Clark, Chairman: Arthur F. 
Henry, Clarence O. Philbrick. 

City Planning Board: 

James M. Langley, Chairman; Edward E. 
Beane, Douglas N. Everett, Warren H. 
Greene, A. Clifford Hudson, John B. 
Jameson, Charles J. McKee, Dudley W. 
Orr, Robert W. Potter. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 

William J. Bishop, Chairman; Edward E. 
Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 

Board of Health: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Dr. Pierre 
A. Boucher, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. 
Clinton R. Mullins. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman; Clarence H. 
Green, Percy R. Sanders. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Oliver Jenkins, President; Harold W. 
Bridge, Joseph J. Comi, Lela Y. Johnson, 
John F. MacEachran, William B. Mclnnis, 
George W. Randall, Alexander Rcnnie, 
Jr., Martha G. Upton. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman: George A. Hill, 
Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman; Gardner G. 
Emmons, Leigh S. Hall, Charles J. 
McKee, Carleton R. Metcalf. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, I. Reed 
Gourlev. 



Board of Water Commissioners: 

James W. Jameson, President; Robert W. 
Brown, Harry H. Dudley, Allen M. Free- 
man, Charles P. Johnson, Donald Knowl- 
ton, Charles J. McKee, Benjamin H. Orr, 
Gardner Tilton. 



Annual Report i -f -f g 



CITY CLERK 



Arthur E. Roby City Cleil{ 

Margaret A. Spencer Deputy City Clerk. 

1944 Expenditure $8,814.72 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



The Board of Aldermen held 13 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WOEKS 

During the year, the Board of 
Public Works met on 16 occasions. 
Twelve of these were regular and four 
were special meetings. The board's 
1944 activity was highlighted by the 
first year of operation of sanitary 
sewers on a rental system. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

The certification of vital statistics 
records continues to be an important 
public service activity of the City 
Clerk's department. There has been 
regular, one adjourned and three spe- a steady demand for birth certificates 
cial meetings during 1944. One hear- in connection with war plant employ- 
ing was also scheduled during the year. ment. At the same time, more and 
A summary of the board's activity more people have availed themselves of 
for 1944 showed the passage of 35 certified copies of their birth record for 
resolutions and 1 1 ordiances. Perhaps purposes other than those directly re- 
the outstanding piece of legislation lated to the war effort, 
passed during the year was an The department has continued its 

ordinance establishing a classification practice of providing service men and 
and compensation plan for municipal their families and minors with vital 
employees. statistics records without charge. Re- 

Special voting facilities were prorided at the City Clerl(s Office during 
the ig44 national election to accommodate citizens who due to wor/^ing 
hours and out-of-town employment would otherwise hare been unable 
to cast their ballots on election day. Concord was the first city in the 
state to provide this special service to its citizens. The City Clerk is 
ihdtvu handing a ballot to a war worker. 




10 1 i i City of Concord 



ceipts from records furnished non- 
exempt citizens amounted to $226.75 
during 1944. 

During the year, the City Clerk's 
Office recorded 587 births, 220 mar- 
riages and 631 deaths. This repre- 
sented an increase of 12 births and a 
decrease of 13 marriages and 19 deaths 
from the totals for 1943. It is inter- 
esting to note that contrary to what 
might be expected in war times, births 
increased and marriages fell off only 
slightly. 

MORTGAGES AND 
CONDITIONAL SALES 

Due to war restrictions on the manu- 
facture and sale of automobiles and 
many household commodities, the 
recording of mortgages and conditional 
sales showed little activity. Receipts 
from this source amounted to $267.46, 
a slight increase over the all-time low 
of $228.25 reported in 1943. 

LICENSES, TEES, ETC. 

Receipts from auto permits showed a 
further drop in 1944. A total of 
$15,182.45 was collected as against 
$19,215.04 for 1943. This situation 
arises out of the shutdown in auto- 
mobile manufacture and the further 
fact that most cars now in operation 
have reached the low taxation rate of 
three mills. 

The total amount of revenue col- 
lected by the City Clerk during 1944 
from other sources including rents, li- 
cense fees for taxis, theatres, pool 
rooms, bowling alleys, etc., amounted 
to $15,291.23, an increase of $2,963.23 
over the total for the previous year. 

ELECTIONS 

The national and state election was 
held on November 7, 1944. Conduct 
of the election provided many unusual 



features not the least of which was the 
absentee balloting. Three types of ab- 
sentee ballots were used including the 
federal war ballot, the state war ballot 
and the state absentee ballot. 

The federal and state war ballots 
were received from the Secretary of 
State at various intervals and had to be 
checked by the ward supervisors and 
kept intact until election day. This 
entailed a considerable amount of extra 
work both by the City Clerk's Office 
and the ward supervisors. Every pos- 
sible effort was made to facilitate the 
voting procedure for Concord citizens 
serving in the armed forces. 

Many war workers, who could not 
get home to vote on election day, 
availed themselves of the opportunity 
to use the state absentee ballot. To 
facilitate voting by war workers who 
could not get to the polls during 
regular voting hours, the City Clerk 
set up a special election system where- 
by the City Clerk's Office was kept 
open on October 31, 1944 between the 
hours of 7:00 P. M. and 9:00 P. M. 
With the office staff and the super- 
visors of the various wards in attend- 
ance, the City Clerk assisted these 
voters in making application and cast- 
ing their vote by the state absentee 
ballot procedure. A total of 36 voters 
took advantage of this novel system to 
cast their ballots. It is noteworthy that 
this procedure was approved by the 
Secretary of State and set a precedent 
for other New Hampshire cities to 
follow. 

A total of 1,447 absentee ballots were 
cast in the city. Of this number, 32 
were federal war ballots, 823 were 
state absentee ballots and 192 were 
state absentee ballots based on physical 
disability. 



Annual Report i i i 11 



ASSESSMENT 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Clarence L. Clark, Chainnan 
Clarence O. Philbrick, Clerk^ 
Arthur F. Henry 

1944 Expernliture $12,423.07 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Hlospplt iEcistmau ^hrparii 
IBfifi - 1944 

It is with the deepest re^uret that 
the Hoard of Assessors announces the 
death on May 20, 1944 of its senior 
member and clerk, Mr. Joseph E. 
Shepard, who served the City of Con- 
cord faithfully and well as a member 
of the Board of Assessors from 1897 
to 1944, a period of forty-seven years, 
to set an all time record for tenure of 
office for an assessor in the state of 
New Hampshire. 

His efficiency and ability was well 
known throughout the state. The 
Cit\ has lost one of its most capable 
officials and the people a good friend, 
one who was always interested in 
seeing that both the City and the tax- 
payer got a sc]uare deal. 



REAL PROPERTY 

The total number of deeds recorded 
in the city during 1944 was 663. This 
number was 62 more than the total 
for the previous year and 196 more 
than the number for 1942. There are 
definite indications of an up-swing in 
the real estate market in the increase 
of property transfers. The existence of 
this trend can be attributed in large 
part to the investment of war-accumu- 
lated savings in real property due to 
the unavailability of commodities such 



as automobiles, household appliances 
and building materials. 

No appreciable change was noted 
during the year in the number of 
parcels of taxable real estate of which 
there are approximately 12,000 in the 
city. 

The total number of building per- 
mits issued during the year was 51 as 
against 36 in 1943. Of the permits 
issued, 18 were for new buildings and 
garages, and 'i^}, were for remodeling of 
old structures. 

The year 1944 brought no relief in 
Concord's vacancy problem. The total 
number of vacant dwelling units on 
April I, as noted by the poll census 
takers, was 506, an increase of 41 over 
the total for the previous year. 

ASSESSED VALUATIONS, POLLS, ETC. 

The city's total assessed valuation for 
the year 1944 was $33,083,027.00. This 
sum was $168,241.00 less than the 1943 
total and reflects the continuing restric- 
tions on construction as well as 
depreciation of existing properties. 

There were 12,416 taxable polls in 
the city on April i, 1944. This repre- 
sented an increase of 211 over the 
previous year during which period 600 
citizens left the city to enter the armed 
services. 

The total number of shares of rail- 
road stock held by Concord citizens in 
1944 was 3,440, an increase of 681 
over the total for the previous year. 

TAX WARRANT 

The city's 1944 tax warrant was 
$1,088,928.60. This represented an in- 
crease of only $1,781.56 over the war- 
rant of 1943. The average tax rate 
for 1944 was $30.93, the lowest rate 
experienced by the city since 1929. 



12 i i i City of Co/word 



TAX 
COLLECTION 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Amos B. Morrisox Tax Collector 

1 944 Expenditure $8,825.43 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 
1944 COLLECTIONS 

Increased earnings due to war em- 
ployment continue to be reflected in 
better property tax collections. Of the 
$1,088,928.00 tax warrant for 1944, 
only $107,113.00 remained uncollected 
at the close of the year. This sum was 



smaller than any outstanding total in 
the city's recent tax history. Similar 
improvement was note in the collection 
of taxes outstanding against previous 
years. A total of $15,218.39 of such 
taxes remained unpaid as against 
$18,385.62 in 1943. 

Through the services of a part-time 
collector, the intensified program of 
collection of outstanding poll and per- 
sonal property taxes was continued 
with effective results. 

The following tabulation indicates 
the amount of uncollected taxes carried 
by the Tax Collector on December 31 
of the past three years: 



As oj 

Year Dec. ji, 1942 

1939 $5,61 8.1 1 

1940 6,944.88 

1 94 1 8,371.10 

1942 203,057.14 

1943 

1944 

Total $223,991.23 



As of 


As of 


Dec. 31,1943 


Dec. 31, 1944 


$3>i09-55 


$1,601.91 


3,851.79 


2,195.63 


4,126.86 


2,413-93 


6,297.42 


4,444.25 


117,656.47 


4,562.67 




107,113.00 




$135,042.09 


$122,331.39 



TAXES BOUGHT BY CITY 

Striking evidence of the improve- 
ment in the tax-collection picture is 
indicated by the fact that the amount 
of back taxes acquired by the City 
at the 1944 Tax Collector's Sale was 
$10,899.72 as against $32,329.23 in 
1943 and $51,098.47 in the pre-war 
year of 1941. Total unredeemed de- 
linquent taxes at the close of the year 
amounted to $11,718.24 as against 
$41,227.98 in 1943. 

The status of delinquent taxes as of 
December 31, 1944 is summarized in 
the following table: 

Amount Bought Amount 
Year by City Redeemed 

1940 $51,089.47 $46,404.77 

1941 40,504.50 38,187.19 

1942 32,329.23 26,845.17 

1943 10,899.79 3,167.72 



OTHER ACTIVITY 

Under an ordinance relating to tax- 
sale property, passed by the Board of 
Aldermen in 1944, the Tax Collector 
assumed the duties of Real Estate 
Agent for the City of Concord. This 
job which entails the sale of property 
deeded to the City in non-payment of 
taxes was formerly handled by the 
aldermanic committee on lands and 
buildings. 

During the year, the Tax Collector's 
receipts from the rent and sale of 
property deed to the City amounted 
to $1,726.21. 



Abated by 


Deeded 


Amount 


Assessors 


to City 


Unredeemed 


$3,029.52 


$1,655-18 




1,408.52 


884.17 


$24.62 


662.58 


448.87 


4,372.61 


317.07 


93-99 


7,321.01 



Antmal Report i i i i^ 



FINANCES 



Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1944 Expenditure $4,339.77 

iiiiiiliiiliii 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Harry H. Dudley 

Carl H. Foster 

I. Reed Gourley 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1 944 Expenditure $360.00 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 



fers SO that total funds available 
amounted to $1,588,449.34. Total ex- 
penditures during 1944 were $1,- 
378,350.40 which deducted from the 
total amount available left an unex- 
pended balance of $210,098.94. From 
this amount, $177,562.02 was carried 
forward to 1945 leaving a net un- 
expended balance from 1944 operations 
of $32,536.92. 

The City concluded its 1944 activi- 
ties with an unappropriated surplus of 
$166,774.54. This sum was $20,436.75 
less than the amotmt on hand at the 
beginning of the year. 



The year 1944 witnessed a continuation 
of the trend of improvement in the 
financial status of the City of Con- 
cord. This betterment in the City's 
financial condition can be attributed in 
most part to the war in that major 
public works are at a standstill and 
relief costs are down. The City's net 
debt at the end of the year was 
$544,225.46, a $98,563.25 reduction 
from the total outstanding on January 
I, 1944. 



GENERAL FUND 

Total receipts for the year amounted 
to $1,284,044.19 from which $72,245.31 
was deducted by transfer leaving net 
receipts of $1,211,798.88. This sum 
was $3,986.86 in excess of estimated 
revenues set at $1,207,812.02 at the be- 
ginning of the year. 

Appropriations for 1944 totaled 
$1,319,968.23. This sum was augment- 
ed by $165,858.38 brought forward 
from the previous year, $30,514.08 in 
cash receipts and $72,108.51 in trans- 



BOND FUNDS 

Bonds and notes amounting to 
$119,000.00 were retired during the 
year. No new bonds were issued. The 
total amount outstanding at the end 
of the year, including school and water 
debt, was $711,000.00. A breakdown 
of this sum showed $274,000.00 in 
municipal, $346,000.00 in school and 
$91,000.00 in waterworks bonds. 

Total debt service charges until ma- 
turity on the outstanding debt amounts 
to $179,661.25, of which $27,930.00 is 
interest on municipal bonds, $140,- 
280.00 on school debt and $11,451.25 
on waterworks obligations. 

TRUST FUNDS 

Trustees of Trust Funds reported 
assets of $461,090.92 in various trusts 
at the close of 1944- Cemetery trusts 
accounted for $361,431.50 of this sum. 
During the year, $13,888.05 was added 
to permanent trust funds. Trust fund 
income amounted to $18,849.90 as 
against expenditures of $15,942.92. 



I/}, i i i City of Concord 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Gordon S. Lord City Solicitor 

Henry P. Callahan Acting City Solicitor 

(In the absence of Mr. Lord) 

1944 Expenditure $1,646.35 



In the capacity of Acting City Solicitor, 
Mr. Henry P. Callahan has continued 
to conduct in an able manner the 
various legsl aspects of municipal 
business. City Solicitor Gordon S. 
Lord is in the service of the United 
States Army. 

GENERAL ACTIVITY 

In spite of the war, the number of 
legal matters requiring the attention 
of the City's law department has in- 
creased steadily. On numerous occa- 
sions, the City Solicitor has been called 
upon by city officials for legal inter- 
pretations of provisions of the city 
charter, and the various state and 
federal laws that bear on municipal 
afTairs. The department has continued 
its practice of assisting the city govern- 
ment in drafting ordinances and 
resolutions. 

One of the outstanding accomplish- 
ments of the department during 1944 
was the successful presentation before 
the Supreme Court of the City's case 
in the matter of the payment of sewer 
charges by State agencies under the 
newly-established sewer rental ordi- 
nance. 

LITIGATIONS — PENDING 

City of Concord Petition to Dis- 
continue Sheep Road. This matter 

16 i i i City of Concord 



has been referred to the Merrimack 
County Commissioners for a hearing, 
and arises out of the closing of said 
road for the development of the Con- 
cord Municipal Airport. The matter 
should be heard at the April 1945 
Term of Merrimack County Superior 
Court. 

City of Concord Petition to Dis- 
continue dough's Mill Road. This 
matter has been referred to the Merri- 
mack County Commissioners for a 
hearing, and arises out of the closing 
of said road for the development of 
the Concord Municipal Airport. This 
matter should be heard at the April 
1945 Term of Merrimack County 
Superior Court. 

Maude L. Croivley vs. City of Con- 
cord. This is an action which arises 
out of the City's alleged taking of land 
from Maude L. Crowley for airport 
purposes. 

Samuel C. Mar den vs. City of 
Concord. This claim arises out of an 
alleged lease between the City and 
Marden, furnishing a dwelling to a 
relief recipient. There will be some 
delay in litigating this matter as the 
Overseer of the Poor is in the United 
States Army. 

Richard .i. Morton vs. City of Con- 
cord. This matter has been continued, 
with the petitioner preparing to bring 
a new petition to the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment. 

Max Cohen vs. City of Concord. 
This matter is to be heard before the 
Supreme Court as to whether the 
Cohens had a legal use of their 
property as a junk yard before the 
zoning ordinance was originally 
adopted. 



PLANNING 



CITY PLANNING BOARD 

James M. Langley, Chairnuui 

Dudley W. Orr, Secretary 

Edward E. Beane 

Douglas N. Everett 

Warren H. Greene 

A. Clifford Hudson 

John B. Jameson 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 

Robert W. Potter 

GusTAF H. Lehtinen Director 

1944 Expenditure $5,058.20 



MAJOR STREET PLAN 

Based upon two years of surveying 
done by the City Engineer, the City 
Planning Board, in January 1944, 
adopted the first section of its major 
street plan. This mapped area, which 
covers the city proper section of Con- 
cord, was subsequently established as 
the official map by the Board of Alder- 
men. During the latter part of the 
year, surveying and mapping activities 
were continued to the end that a 
sizable area covering the west part of 
the Plains district was added to the 
major street plan and the official map 
early in 1945. As time permits, this 
work will be continued until the entire 
area of the city is tied into a com- 
prehensive street plan. 

First notification of possible future 
street changes on the official map was 
accomplished in adoption by the Board 
of Aldermen of the Planning Board's 
recommendations for set-back lines of 
North State and South State Streets 
between Penacook Street and South 
Main Street. 



The Planning Board also presented 
the State Highway Department its 
recommendations on the development 
of by-pass and through traffic highways 
in Concord. As a result, the Board of 
Public Works entered into a contract 
with the state to do the survey work 
on some of the proposed routes as part 
of the development of a post-war high- 
way program. 

STREETS 

Due to war restrictions on private 
development, petitions for street ac- 
ceptance disappeared entirely. No 
activity in this field is anticipated until 
some time after the end of the war. 

On the recommendation of the 
Planning Board, the Board of Alder- 
men purchased a parcel of land for 
street purposes at the junction of Air- 
port Road and Manchester Street. This 
corrected a situation where public 
travel had encroached on private prop- 
erty. 

The Planning Board also gave pre- 
liminary consideration to the laying 
out of an alley between Low Avenue 
and Depot Street. 

BUILDING CODE 

Anticipating the need for more ef- 
fective controls of building construc- 
tion in the post-war era, the Board of 
Aldermen requested the Planning 
Board to undertake a revision of the 
building code and plumbing rules 
ordinances. An advisory committee of 
consultants was appointed by the 
Planning Board to assist in this work. 

After careful review of existing 
building laws, the board, upon the 
advice of the consulting group, recom- 
mended that the city government 



Annual Report i i i ij 



should take steps to secure enabling 
legislation to permit the adoption of 
national standards by reference in 
building codes. A bill to accomplish 
this end was introduced in the 1945 
General Court and passed. The work 
of revision is going forward under the 
greatly simplified procedure permitted 
by the new law. 

FIEE STATION SITE 

During the year, school authorities 
voted to dispose of the Cogswell 
School property at Broadway and West 
Street. The Planning Board recom- 



mended that this property should be 
acc]uired by the City for a fire station 
site in the South-End. Acting on this 
recommendation, the Board of Alder- 
men took the necessary steps to acquire 
title to the property. 

WARD LINES 

One of the outstanding projects of 
the year was the preparation of a re- 
port relative to the need for a revision 
of the city's ward lines. This study 
was authorized by the Board of Alder- 
men at the request of the Concord 
Delegation of the 1943 Legislature. A 



Plan of proposed downtaiir, niiinuipal pcirliiiig lut. 



^_i 




18 -f i -f City of Concord 



detailed report based on factual not 
political considerations was compiled 
and transmitted to the Board of Alder- 
men and the 1945 Concord legislative 
delegation. 

AIRPORT 

At the request of the Airport Com- 
mission, the Planning Board under- 
took the preparation of a development 
plan of the grounds and facilities 
immediately adjacent to the airport 
buildings. The proposed plan was 
adopted by the airport commissioners 
and made a part of the post-war im- 
provement program at the airport. 

The board's staff also assisted the 
Airport Commission in compiling a 
factual report which was presented to 
the Civil Aeronautics Board at a hear- 
ing held in Washington on a petition 
to operate a direct airline between 
Concord and New York City, and 
Concord and Portland, Maine. In this 
connection, the Planning Board went 
on record as favoring the establishment 
of the proposed route in line with the 
planned program of development of 
the Concord Municipal Airport. 

POST-WAR PROJECTS 

Post-war public works projects of 
the various city departments were sur- 
veyed and listed for the Board of 
Aldermen. This survey which was 
preliminary in nature showed an accu- 
mulation of needed projects estimated 
to cost $500,000.00. 

The board recommended that funds 
should be provided to get projects out 
of the preliminary thinking stage on to 
paper ready for execution. The 194^ 
budget appropriation includes a 
$5,000.00 item for this purpose. 



TAX-SALE PROPERTY 

Under the operation of the new tax- 
sale property ordinance, the Planning 
Board surveyed all properties deeded 
to the Tax Collector in non-payment 
of taxes to ascertain whether or not 
the City had reasonably foreseeable use 
for any of these parcels. Thirty-six 
tracts were withheld from sale for air- 
port, highway, cemetery and lake de- 
velopment purposes. Maps showing 
parcels to be sold were prepared for 
the City Real Estate Agent. 

CONVALESCENT AND NURSING HOMES 

The Board of Aldermen asked the 
Planning Board to study the convales- 
cent and nursing home problem in the 
city. A regulatory ordinance covering 
these intsitutions will be submitted to 
the city government for consideration. 
The board proposes to conduct a com- 
prehensive study of the broader aspects 
of the problem to the end that it can 
recommend a long range policy in re- 
gard to the care of semi-hospitalized 
patients. 

ZONING 

Early in 1945, the Planning Board, 
acting in its capacity of Zoning Com- 
mission, turned down a request 
originating with the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment for re-zoning of a part 
of the downtown general residence 
district into an apartment house dis- 
trict. The board's recommendation in 
this matter was upheld by the Board 
of Aldermen. 

PUBLICITY 

The City of Concord and the City 
Planning Board received nation-wide 
recognition in a booklet "Local Plan- 



Annual Report i -f i ig 




Ill ilni^.<l}tiiU(l <nl>iii-/>Liii l-j't I'ciiinid, //;/. nitiiKuiid i/ih{ honors 
Ehciiczcr Eastman, Concord's first settler, and stands as a fitting reminder 
of the city's historical past. The clock also marks the Concord terminus 
of the First New Hampshire Turnpike hiiilt from Durham to Concord. 
The turnpike was incorporated in lygi). 



ning is Practical" published and dis- 
tributed by the Community Develop- 
ment Committee of the New England 
Council. The publication tells the 
story of city planning in Concord. 

This City Report is the sixth in a 
series published under the supervision 
of the Planning Board by the Mayor 
aiid Board of Aldermen. Requests 
received from outside of the city in- 
dicate that Concord's annual story 
reaches the far corners of the United 
States. 

OTHER ACTIVITY 

The board extended its cooperation 
to the Mayor's Veterans' Hospital 
Committee in the preparation of maps 
and related data in connection with 
efforts to bring the proposed New 



Hampshire veterans* hospital to Con- 
cord. 

Local school authorities were also 
assisted in studying post-war school 
building needs in the South-End sec- 
tion of the city, particularly with 
regard to the Rumford and Conant 
Schools. 

The board has been in close touch 
with the growing movement to do 
something about pollution in the 
Merrimack River. The board's direc- 
tor participated in the Merrimack 
River Pollution Conference held at the 
State House for the purpose of bring- 
ing to the meeting the Planning Board's 
views on the manifold problems that 
would confront the average municipal- 
ity in event a pollution elimination 
program is undertaken. 



20 i i i City of Concord 



RECREATION 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Raymond V. LaPointe, Chainnan 

Charles P. Coakley 

William J. Flynn 

Clarence E. Huggins 

Thomas B. Jennings 

Paul G. Crowell Supervisor 

1944 Expenditure $9,932.27 

Iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

. . . Playgrounds and Bath 

Notwithstanding maintenance diffi- 
culties resulting from war-time labor 
and material shortages, the municipal 
playground system experienced a very 
successful year during 1944. Although 
children in the older age group were 
noticeably absent, as was the case dur- 
ing 1943, there was no slackening of 
interest in outdoor play among the 
younger children. The Playground 
Committee placed the weight of its 
organized program on activities in- 



tended to meet the recreational needs 
of the younger age group. Looking 
back over the year, it is clear that what 
the program lacked in scope was more 
than offset by the all-round enthusiasm 
displayed by the participants. No 
small part of the success attained in 
carrying out the 1944 play schedule 
can be attributed to the understanding 
and co-operation of parents. 

SUMMER ACTIVITIES 

In line with the over-all policy of 
featuring activities for the 14-year-and- 
under age group, the summer play- 
ground athletic program included 
midget and junior baseball, softball, 
volleyball, newcomb, cricket, horseshoe 
pitching and goal-high. At a number 
of the playgrounds, instructors taught 
simple handicraft. 

Out of necessity due to transporta- 
tion restrictions, the regular inter-play- 
ground competitive games were not 
held. Nevertheless, the desire for this 
type of sport continued strong, and 
teams from the various play areas de- 



Cotiipetition and plenty of it! Getting set for a fast foot race at the 
annual Fourth of July celebration held at White Parly. 




.1/1/1 Kill Kcpuit i i i 21 



vised their own means of transporta- 
tion in making the rounds of the 
"playground circuit" This same re- 
sourcefulness of the city's youth was 
reflected by a noticeable increase in the 
use of playgrounds after-hours and 
during week-ends for unorganized 
play. 

The annual Fourth of July celebra- 
tion provided the feature playground 
attraction of the year. Under the 
supervision of members of the Play- 
ground Committee and a group of 
public-spirited citizens, the city's youth 
were treated to an all-day program 
which included a baseball game, a 
treasure hunt, a decorated doll-carriage 
and bicycle parade, competitive sports 
and a pie-eating contest. Numerous 
prizes in war stamps were offered in 
addition to free ice cream and tonic. 

The municipal wading pools con- 
tinued to attract a large number of 
users. During the severe August heat, 
which lasted about two weeks, the 
wading pools were literally "mobbed" 
from dawn to dusk. 

WINTER ACTIVITY 

The heavy snow fall of the past win- 
ter and the scarcity of maintenance 
help combined to limit the number of 
skating days to 59 as compared to 71 
during 1943. The department main- 
tained seven skating areas, the pond 
at White Park and six lesser areas in 
various sections of the city. A new 
skating rink was developed and main- 
tained at the junction of Broadway 
and South Street in order to better 
serve the children living in the imme- 
diate South-End section. 

In cooperation with school officials, 
the Playground Department undertook 



the maintenance of the high school 
hockey rink. Under this arrangement, 
the rink was available for limited use 
by hockey enthusiasts. This tem- 
porary arrangement permitted a partial 
resumption of hockey activities dis- 
continued at the start of the war. 

Following the practice of previous 
years, protected street sliding areas 
were maintained during the winter in 
all sections of the city. 

ATTENDANCE 

During the summer season, attend- 
ance at playgrounds and pools totaled 
84,000. This represented an increase 
of about 4,000 over the total for the 
previous year. The Playground Super- 
visor attributed the increase to an un- 
usual heavy use of wading pool 
facilities during the August hot spell. 
The total attendance of children at 
playgrounds continues to run approxi- 
mately 40,000 short of the pre-war 
annual total. 

MAINTENANCE PROBLEMS 

The lack of available manpower, 
particularly part-time workers, created 
numerous maintenance problems dur- 
ing 1944. Not the least of these was 
the delay in readying facilities for use. 
In spite of the help situation, the de- 
partment's physical plant was main- 
tained in good working order even 
though many needed repairs had to be 
put oft for the duration. The fact 
that fewer complaints were received 
during the year than in 1943 would 
seem to indicate that the public realizes 
that the department is doing every- 
thing it can under existing conditions 
to provide for the playground needs of 
the city's children. 



22 i 1 1 City of Concord 










A pie-eating contest with blueberry pie from 
ear to ear. One of the highlights of the 
annual playground outing at White Parl^. 



Annual Report i i i 2^ 



. . . special Facilities 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman 

Gardner G. Emmons 

Leigh S. Hall 

Hon. Charles }. McKee 

Carleton R. Metcalf 

1944 Expenditure $5)598-57 

1944 Receipts $2,957.87 

Net Cost to City $2,640.70 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BEAVER MEADOW GOLF COURSE 

Due in large part to the lifting of 
the ban on pleasure driving which was 
in effect during the 1943 golfing season, 
activities at the Beaver Meadow Golf 
Course increased markedly during the 
past year. Definite proof of this up- 
ward trend is indicated by the fact 
that 104 regular memberships were 
sold during 1944 as compared to 62 
for the previous year. Similarly, the 
sale of one-day-play tickets increased 
from 1,335 to 1,716. Although mem- 
bership was about 25 per cent below 
the pre-war average, use of the course 
has increased largely as the result of 
continued gasoline rationing which has 
limited travel to more distant golf 
courses. 

Many servicemen home on leaves 
and furloughs have had occasion to 
use the facilities at Beaver Meadow to 
brush-up on their pre-war "weapons". 
The Recreation Commission has con- 
tinued the practice of allowing mem- 
bers of the armed forces free use of 
the municipal golfing establishment. 

Notwithstanding prevailing main- 
tenance difficulties, every eflfort has 
been made to keep the fairways and 



greens in top condition in anticipation 
of an increase in the number of users 
after the war. 

MEMORIAL FIELD 

During 1944, Memorial Field served 
the athletic needs of Concord schools. 
From early spring to late fall, the field 
provided excellent facilities for a 
"parade" of sport events including 
track and field meets, baseball, field 
hockey and football games. 

Night football games had to be dis- 
continued in 1944 due to the unavail- 
ability of portable lighting equipment. 
Considerable interest has been indicated 
by the sport-following public in the 
possibility of erecting permanent light- 
ing facilities at Memorial Field. This 
matter will be given careful considera- 
tion during the coming year. 

The recreation plant was used ex- 
tensively during the year for unorgan- 
ized sports. In this respect, the tennis 
courts were particularly popular. 

Post-war major repairs to facilities 
proposed by the Recreation Commis- 
sion include resurfacing of tennis 
courts, painting of bleachers, resetting 
of fences and addition of drains. 

RUSSELL POND AREA 

As the result of an unusually heavy 
snow cover, conditions at the Russell 
Pond Winter Sports Area were ideal 
for skiing during the past season. In 
line with the policy adopted in 1943, 
the area was put in first class condition 
in the fall, but no caretaker was em- 
ployed during the winter. The lack 
of this service in no way diminished 
the popularity of the area. Even travel 
restrictions were not a bar to skiing 
enthusiasts who frequented the winter 
sports center in large numbers, par- 
ticularly on week ends. 



2^ i i i City of Concord 



PUBLIC 

HEALTH and 

SANITATION 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 

Pierre A. Boucher, M.D. 

Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 

Clinton R. Mullins, M.D. 

Donald G. Barton, M.D. ..Sanitary Officer 

Walter C. Rowe, M.D. 

Acting Sanitary Officer 
(In the absence of Dr. Barton) 

Austin B. Presby M//^ Inspector 

1944 Expenditure $7,209.0 1 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

In the continued absence of Dr. 
Donald (j. Barton, now serving in the 
Medical Corps of the United States 
Army, municipal public health activi- 
ties have been directed by Dr. Walter 
C. Rowe in the capacity of Acting 
Sanitary Officer. 

HEALTH CONDITIONS 

Generally speaking, health conditions 
in Concord were much better during 
the past year than in 1943. This was 
particularly true with regard to the 
prevalence of pneumonia and common 
colds. 

In spite of many trying conditions, 
restaurant operations were maintained 
at a high standard of cleanliness. Due 
to a more or less constant turnover of 
employees in the city's food dispensing 
establishments, the Health Depart- 
ment's restaurant inspection program 
was intensified. 

Alleyways and public toilet facilities 
were checked periodically to insure 



against any let-up in the maintenance 
of adequate safeguards to health. 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

Thirty-four scarlet fever cases were 
reported during the year. Of this num- 
ber, fifteen cases occurred in the 
months of November and December. 
This year-end increase was due to the 
fact that some cases were so mild that 
other children were exposed before 
medical advice was secured. 

Three cases of poliomyelitis were re- 
ported during 1944. There were also 
two cases of meningitis, one of which 
involved the death of a non-resident. 
Reports of whooping cough, mumps, 
measles and chicken pox indicated a 
normal incidence in these children's 
diseases during 1944. 

CLINICS 

In cooperation with the Concord 
District Nursing Association, two 
clinics were conducted during the year 
for immunization against diphtheria 
and small pox. One hundred ninety- 
four children registered for treatment 
at these clinics. Preventive treatment 
for diphtheria, small pox and whoop- 
ing cough was administered to 49 
children by the city health officer in 
connection with the work of the Well 
Child Clinic. 

Gratifying results have been ob- 
tained since toxoid clinics were estab- 
lished in 1930. During the 1930-1935 
period, 27 cases of diphtheria were re- 
ported. Since that time, only one case 
has come to the department's attention, 
and that concerned a child who had 
not been immunized. 

Venereal disease clinics have been 
continued under state supervision. 
Quarters for these clinics were pro- 
vided by the city. 



Annual Report i i i 2^ 



VITAL STATISTICS 



rious institutions located in the city, 

^ . ^1111 Of ^^^ 276 resident deaths, 249 were 

Uunntj 1944, 61 s local deaths were ■ 

° ^^^ ^ in the over-45 age category. 

reported to the Health Department. Of a <;„<, „^^.. ^^ ■ „ r • j ^ 

^ ^ A nve-year comparison or resident 

this number, 339 deaths involved non- deaths from seven common causes is 

resident patients and inmates of va- presented in the following table: 



1940 

Diseases of the circulatory system 97 

Cancer 42 

Nephritis 14 

Accidental deaths 1 

Pneumonia 15 

Diabetes 7 

Tuberculosis 2 



1941 



il 


1942 


'943 


'944 


2 


117 


113 


109 


7 


36 


32 


42 


I 


19 


14 


21 


7 


12 


15 


12 


8 


7 


II 


4 


7 


12 


8 


II 


9 


5 


I 


2 



FEDERAL ASSISTANCE 

Once again, the Health Department 
wishes to express its appreciation to 
the United States Public Health Service 
for financial assistance in sufficient 
amount to permit the employment of 
a public health engineer. The services 
of this employee have been invaluable 
in the handling of wartime public 
health problems. 

The training of cadet ntiises, such as the 
two pictured here, is an important part of 
the war-time program of Concord's hospitals. 




, . . Milk Control 

From the public health standpoint, 
no food is more important than milk. 
It is a necessary and indispensable 
part of a child's diet and a wholesome 
food for adults. Since milk is ever 
subject to contamination, and may be- 
come a source in the spread of certain 
communicable diseases, it is the 
responsibility of the Milk Inspector to 
see that there is available an ample 
supply of clean milk. This end can- 
not be accomplished without pains- 
taking effort involving continuous in- 
spection, laboratory analysis and a 
program of education that reaches both 
the dairyman and the milk consumer. 

SUPPLY 

Except for a limited period during 
the early part of the summer, no appre- 
ciable surplus of milk was available in 
this area during 1944. The supply 
received from Concord and adjacent 
5 areas was sufficient to meet the city's 
needs until the fall season, when 
it became necessary to permit local 
distributors to go outside of the Con- 
cord milk shed to bring in an emer- 
gency supply to supplement the output 
of regular sources. 



The approximate amount of milk 
supplied from beyond the Concord 
area was 440 quarts per day. All of 
this emergency milk was pasteurized 
by local plants before distribution to 
the public. 

PRODUCTION 

A slight increase in the number of 
producers selling milk in the local 
market was noted during the year. 
The number of dairy farms increased 
from 162 to 173. Six producers went 
out of the milk business, while five 
new producers were granted licenses 
to sell in the Concord area. Five pro- 
ducer-dealers gave up retail business to 
sell direct to pasteurizing plants in the 
city. 

During 1944, nine milk pasteurizing 
plants operated in Concord. Three 
plants discontinued business and one 
new plant was established. Of the 
total volume of milk sold in the city, 
74 per cent is pasteurized. This repre- 
sents a one per cent gain over the 
previous year. 

CONSUMPTION 

Consumption of milk in the city in- 
creased during the year. The Milk 
Inspector attributes this increase to an 
improvement in the quality of milk 
and to the restriction on the sale of 
heavy cream. The substitution of 
milk for other staple foods due to war- 
time shortages is a further contributing 
factor in this increase. 

An average total of 13,602 quarts of 
milk was consumed daily. Of this 
amount, 10,065 quarts were pasteur- 
ized and 3,537 quarts were raw milk. 
The average daily consumption of 
Grade "A" milk amounted to 346 



quarts. Average daily sales of other 
products included 499 quarts of light 
cream, 340 quarts of chocolate milk 
and 90 quarts of orangeade. The daily 
output of cream was approximately 55 
per cent of normal. 

It is gratifying to note that con- 
sumer complaints, received in consider- 
able numbers in the past, have prac- 
tically ceased. 

MANPOWER SHORTAGE 

During the year, manpower short- 
ages added to the many war-time diffi- 
culties of the milk business. Untrained 
milk plant workers create an unsatis- 
factory situation, and when such 
workers show indifference and un- 
reliableness with respect to their duties, 
the matter becomes one of real con- 
cern. Needless to say, increased 
supervision is an absolute necessity in 
the employment of such help. The 
whole problem is one that has been 
forced on milk plant managers by an 
inadequate labor supply. 

The Milk Inspector has spared no 
eflort in maintaining a continuous 
check on dairy workers. In every in- 
stance, plant managers have extended 
the inspector full cooperation in 
making certain that the purity of milk 
was not impaired by conditions grow- 
ing out of labor shortages. 

VITAMIN MILK 

Of the 13,602 quarts of milk sold 
daily in Concord, 54 quarts of Grade 
"A" milk were sold as a vitamin milk. 
The Milk Inspector has discouraged 
the distribution of vitamin-added milk 
because of the wide difference of 
opinion among competent authorities 
in regard to the value of the whole 
procedure. 



Ai7i7ual Report -r -r -r 2y 



At the present time, the department 
has httle or no information on the 
vitamin potency of the milk sold in 
Concord. This is because the inspector 
has no means at his command for 
making a bioassay of the vitamin con- 
tent of such milk, and because the 
cost of making such an analysis ranges 
from twenty to thirty dollars per 
sample. 

SCHOOL MILK 

Approximately 588 quarts of milk 
and 113 quarts of chocolate milk were 
consumed daily in Concord schools 
during 1944. Nearly all of this milk 
was distributed to the pupils in half- 
pint bottles, either at the mid-morning 
recess or at the noon luncheon period. 

TESTS AND INSPECTION 

All milk sold in Concord during the 
past year came from tuberculin and 



Bang's disease tested herds. Under 
state and federal supervision, these 
tests are made at least once each year. 

The department's dairy inspection 
program during 1944 placed particular 
emphasis on the need for dairyhead 
cleanliness. In all cases of laxness, 
immediate steps were taken to effect 
needed improvement in the care of 
herds. 

An increase was noted during the 
year in the number of milking 
machines and cooling tanks used by 
dairies. This increase resulted from 
the availability of equipment and the 
desire to keep labor costs at a mini- 
mum. 

During the year, the Milk Inspector 
made 416 visits to milk plants, 458 to 
dairies and 41 to eating places. The 
department issued 178 milk licenses. 

In carrying out its 1944 program, 
the department collected 2,459 samples 
for laboratory analysis. 



Regular inspection of dairy plants is part of the City's program to safe- 
guard the health of its citizens. The Mil/{ Inspector is shown examining 
bottled mil!^ m the steam-filled bottling room of u l<ual diiiry. 




28 i i i City of Co/! cord 



PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 

iiiiiiiiiiiii-f 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Oliver Jenkins, President 
Harold W. Bridge 
Joseph J. Comi 
Lela Y. Johnson 
John F. MacEachran 
William B. McInnis 
George W. Randall 
Alexander Rennie, Jr. 
Martha G. Upton 

Marion F. Holt Librarian 

1944 Expenditure $28,988.87 



The Concord Public Library carried 
out a full program of service to the 
reading public during 1944- This 
service was rendered efficiently and 
without limitation as to scope in spite 
of the many shortages and problems 
growing out of war-created conditions. 
Since the outset of the war emergency, 
the Board of Library Trustees has 
recognized its special responsibility of 
adjusting library policies so as to effect 
a maximum of service for a citizenry 
dedicated to the task of winning the 
war. In carrying out this purpose, 
every attention has been given to pro- 
viding books and related services 
urgently in public demand. 

FINANCES 

The 1944 cost of operating the Con- 
cord library system amounted to 
$28,988.87, an increase of $1,318.40 
over the total for the previous year. 
Income derived from various library 



trust funds during 1943 totaled 
$10,362.44. This sum was applied 
against 1944 operating costs. 

During the year, the sum of 
$21,334.57 ^"^-^^ turned over to the 
library from the estate of Charles R. 
Corey in accordance with a bequest 
establishing a fund for library use to 
be known as the Alice Chandler Corey 
Trust. In addition to this amount, 
the sum of $15,000.00 was received 
from the trustees under the will of 
Charles R. Corning, a former mayor 
of Concord, for the purpose of estab- 
lishing the Charles R. Corning Public 
Library Building Trust. 

COLLECTION AND CIRCULATION 

In keeping with the public demand 
for reading material, 2,566 new books 
were added to the library's collection 
which totaled 50,875 volumes at the 
close of the year. 

During 1944, the library circulated 
162,443 books to equal the total of the 
previous year. The circulation of pic- 
tures doubled during the year — an 
indication that the public is becoming 
acquainted with the library's sizeable 
picture collection. 

True to the established trend, fiction 
led all other types of books in public 
demand. Nevertheless, a satisfactory 
percentage of non-fiction was circu- 
lated. This was particularly true of 
books dealing with war subjects. 

BRANCH LIBRARIES 

During the year, 300 new books 
were purchased for the branch libraries 
maintained in the city's four suburbs. 
Excepting the month of July, book de- 
posits at the four branches were 
changed each month. An inventory of 



Annual Report i -f -f ig 





Fyondiiig hospital patients with hooki is one of the many scriiccs ren- 
dered by the Public Library. Assisted by a Gruy Lady, the Librarian is 
shoivn "bringing the library" to a patient at the New Hampshire 
Memorial Hospital. 



books was made at the Penacook and 
East Concord branches as part of a 
city-wide survey of collections. 

In order to facilitate the use of the 
Penacook branch by war workers in 
that community, library hours were 
increased. Notwithstanding efforts to 
accommodate library users, the over- 
all branch book circulation decreased 
by about i,ooo from the 1943 total. 

CHILDREN'S WORK 

In addition to the school libraries 
maintained at Conant and Garrison 
Schools, a new library was opened at 
Rumford School during 1944. Class- 
room book collections were sent to 
various other elementary schools as 
part of the program of providing li- 
brary service to children. 

There has been no slackening in the 
popularity of the regular Saturday 



morning story hours conducted for the 
benefit of the smaller children. A 
varied and interesting program, in- 
cluding movies and dramatizations, 
has been presented by the staff assist- 
ed, from time to time, by guest nar- 
rators. The general acceptance of this 
phase of library work is indicated by 
the fact that these Saturday morning 
meetings have enjoyed an average at- 
tendance of about 80 children. 

The circulation of books by the 
children's department showed an in- 
crease of more than 2,000 over the 
total number charged during 1943. 

REFERENCE WORK 

During the past year, more and more 
adults have taken advantage of the 
services provided by the library's refer- 
ence department. Telephone requests 
for information have increased no- 



^o i i i City of Concord 



ticeably. Requests for assistance in 
compilintj bibliographies have been 
particularly numerous. A recapitula- 
tion ot 1944 activities indicates that 
5,082 reference questions were pro- 
cessed by the department. 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

In conformity with the practice of 
previous years, seventh grade school 
children were instructed in the proper 
use of the library. This course of 
study covered three lessons and all 
divisions of the seventh grade were 
brought to the library to complete the 
program of instructions. During the 
year, two high school groups from 
Penacook visited the library and were 
instructed in library procedure by the 
young people's department. 

Working in cooperation with school 
authorities, the library loaned about 
500 books to the Concord and Pena- 
cook High Schools. 

HOSPITAL SERVICE 

Assisted by the Gray Ladies, the li- 
brary has continued to provide a book 



service for patients at the New Hamp- 
shire Memorial Hospital. At the same 
time, every facility of the library has 
been made available to the student 
nurses in training at Concord hospitals. 
Including in this service has been the 
maintenance of book collections at hos- 
pital dormitories. 

POST WAR BOOK TRANSPORTATION 

The need for depositing books at 
branch libraries, schools and hospitals 
located at considerable distances from 
the main library has created a serious 
transportation problem. Existing book 
carrying practices leave much to be 
desired from the standpoint of pro- 
tection of books, regularity in delivery 
and constant turnover in collections. 
There is also a very definite need for 
service to areas not served by existing 
outlets. 

To the end that the library may 
better serve the citizens of Concord, 
the Board of Library Trustees is giving 
serious consideration to the acquisition 
of a bookmobile when this type of 
equipment becomes available after the 
war. 



The library Reference Room with its modern jacilities and uell-rotinded collection 
of source materials proi'idcs ideal conditions for study and research for adults and 
children ali/(e. The Reference Room is used extensiiely by school children during 

after-school hour;. 




RELIEF 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

CITY RELIEF BOARD 

John E. Davis, Chiiirnian 
Charles A. Hartlett 
Charles P. Coakley 

Parker L. Hancock Overseer oj Poor 

John W. Stanley .... Acting Overseer oj Poor 
( III the absence oj Mr. Hancock, ) 

Charles P. Coakley Overseer oj Poor 

Ward I 
1944 Expenditures: 

City $3 1,953.49 

Penacook $ 4,05 1 .70 



In the continued absence of Overseer 
Parker L. Hancock, now serving in 
the United States Army, the super- 
vision of reHet in eight of the city's 
nine wards has been in charge of Act- 
ing Overseer John W. Stanley. Alder- 
man Charles P. Coakley continues to 
administer relief in Penacook, Con- 
cord's Ward One. 

GENEEAL TREND 

In line with the expected trend for 
the duration of the war, the number of 
relief recipients dropped to a new low 
during 1944. In many instances, in- 
creased employment opportunities have 
developed into acute labor shortages, 
making it possible for the Relief De- 
partment to secure work for all able- 
bodied members of families receiving 
public aid. The department has had 
the cooperation of several local business 
establishments in finding jobs for em- 
ployable relief clients. 

Family allotments from members of 
relief families in the armed forces have 
contributed noticeably to the reduction 



of relief rolls. In some cases, entire 
families have become self-supporting 
as the result of service allotments. 

RELIEF LOAD 

The department started the year 
with 125 active relief cases. Of this 
number, 75 were county and 50 were 
city cases. During the year, 39 cases 
were dropped from the relief rolls. 
This left 49 county and 37 city cases 
active at the end of the year. The 
number of persons receiving aid in 
December, 1944 was 185, of which 119 
were on county and 66 on city relief. 
In most part, those who remain on 
relief are unable to work due to age 
or health conditions. A few cases re- 
ceive supplementary allowances to 
round out income from other sources 
in sufficient amount to meet family 
budget needs. 

RELIEF COSTS 

The total cost of city relief in Con- 
cord during 1944 was $36,005.19, of 
which $4,051.70 was expended in 
Penacook and $31,953.49 in other sec- 
tions of the city. A further breakdown 
of relief costs by type shows the ex- 
penditure of $16,920.90 for direct re- 
lief, $222.80 for dependent soldiers, 
$16,124.92 for old age assistance and 
$2,736.57 for hospitalization. 

County relief costs for 1944 totaled 
$26,953.74. O^ '^^'^ amount, $23,958.42 
was expended for direct relief and 
$2,995.32 for dependent soldiers. 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 

In the face of a downward trend 
of relief costs, it should be noted that 
the cost of old age assistance is increas- 
ing each year. The 1944 cost of as- 



^2 i i i City of Concord 




The Picirc family hiiihil lot in the Old North Cemetery. This tiiiprc- 
tentious monument marks the grare of Franklin Pierce, fourteenth presi- 
dent oi the United States. 



sistance to the aged amounted to 
$16,124.92 as against $15,037.22 for 
the previovis year. The current cost 
of old age assistance ahniost douhles 
the 1938 cost of $8,878.06. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The two overseers of poor are as- 
sisted in administering rehef by a 
trained case worker. Other members 
of the rehef office staflf include two 
employees charged with the keeping of 
city and county relief records, and a 
stenographic clerk. One investigator 
left the department in August, 1944 
to take a position with the Red Cross. 



The department continues to handle 
county relief cases in Concord; the cost 
of these cases as well as about one-half 
of the administrative cost of operating 
the relief office is borne by the county. 

In serving the needy public, the Re- 
lief Department has been accorded 
splendid cooperation by the Red Cross, 
the Concord Family Welfare Society 
and the State Board of Welfare. 

The department makes every effort 
to keep fully cognizant of the needs 
of the indigent families entrusted to 
its care. It stands ready and willing 
at all times to aid, counsel and assist 
these needy in their problems. 

Annual Report -f -f -f ^^ 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 



i i i i 



POLICE 



iiiiiiiii 



COMMISSION 



Daniel J. Shea, Chairman 

George A. Hill 

Guy a. Swenson 

Arthur W. McIsaac Chief of Police 

J. Edward Silva Deputy Chief of Police 

1944 Operating Expenditure $77,912.42 

1944 Equipment Expenditure $ 1,481.82 



PERSONNEL 

The operating efficiency of the PoHce 
Department was maintained at a high 
level during the past year in spite of 
numerous changes affecting personnel. 
One patrolman left the department to 
enter the armed service, while three 



others, two regulars and one special, 
resigned from the police force. 

Two new officers were appointed 
during 1944, one of whom had seen 
previous service as a special policeman. 

During the year, working schedules 
had to be re-arranged due to vacancies 
and changes in personnel. Vacancies, 
resulting from loss of manpower to 
the armed services, have been filled by 
"duration" officers. Due to resigna- 
tions and dismissals, there has been a 
more or less constant turnover in this 
temporary help. 

COST TO THE CITY 

The cost of operating the Police De- 
partment during 1944 was 177,912.42. 
This amount was $5,395.69 in excess 
of the total for the previous year. Out 
of a capital budget item of $1,800.00, 
the department spent $1,481.82 in re- 
locating the radio mast, transmitter 
and receiver. Police Department earn- 
ings during 1944 amounted to $998.91. 



This display shows the rariotis types of modern firearms used by the 
Concord Police Department. 




^4 -f i i City of Concord 



CRIME DATA 



felonies known to the police, 66 were 

^. , , , , r cleared by arrest. 

Eijrht hundred torty-seven arrests „, r u ■ u i • u 

*' ^ The rollowing tabulation snows a 

were made by the Police Department breakdown by type and number of the 

during the year. This was an increase criminal cases handled by the Concord 

of 296 over the total for 1943. Of 222 Police Department during 1944: 



CRIMINAL CASES DURING i944 

. Actual Cleared 

Classification Unfounded Offenses hy Arrest 
Offenses Known: 
Criminal Homicide 

Manslaughter by Negligence i i 

Rape 1 7 7 

Breaking and Entering 7 73 11 

Larceny 4 128 43 

Auto Theft 13 5 

Total : 12 222 66 



Classification Charged Arrested 
Persons Charged — Felonies: 
Criminal Homicide 

Manslaughter by Negligence i 

Rape 7 7 

Breaking and Entering •' 13 ^3 

Larceny 5° 50 

Auto Theft :... 9 9 

Total 80 79 

Persons Charged- — -Misdemeanors: 

Assaults 18 16 

Forgery i i 

Fraud 3 2 

Sex Offenses 4 4 

Non-Support 10 10 

Drunkenness 241 241 

Disorderly Conduct 29 29 

Vagrancy i i 

Gambling i i 

Drunken Driving 21 21 

Road and Driving Laws 69 69 

Parking Violations 305 305 

Motor Vehicle Laws 51 5i 

Other Offenses 13 13 

Total 767 764 

Grand Total 847 843 



Summoned 
or Cited 



Annual Report -f -f -f SS 



TRAFFIC 

A slight increase in the amount of 
traffic in the city was noted during the 
summer and latter part of 1944. The 
department took the necessary steps 
to keep the traveling puhlic consciovis 
of the need for compliance with war- 
time regulations governing travel 
speed. It is gratifying to note that 



comparatively few motorists were ar- 
raigned in court for speeding. 

The department investigated 223 
traffic accidents during 1944. This 
represented an increase of 31 accidents 
over the total for the previous year. 
Two pedestrians were fatally injured 
as the result of Concord's 1944 acci- 
dent experience. 




-^i^Mf^' 



V, 



The value of off-street partying in eliminating highnuiy traffic hazards is 

clearly indicated by these pictures taken bcjorc and ajter the establishment 

of a parking lot by a local industry. 



SAFETY 



During the year, a number of se- 
rious traffic and parking problems af- 
fecting public safety arose out of con- 



of a Safe Driving Club. In connec- 
tion with this effort for greater safety, 
the department accepted the responsi- 
bility of keeping up to date a display 



gested conditions in the vacinity of t>o^irtl located on the State House 



war plants. With the cooperation of 
the industries concerned, the depart- 
ment set up rules and regulations 
which were effective in establishing 
an adequate margin of safety. At 
police suggestion, one industry ac- 



Plaza showing Concords record of 
consecutive days without a motor ve- 
hicle fatality. 

AUXILIARY POLICE UNIT 

With the discontinuance of blackouts 

quired an off-street parking lot for and air-raid alarms during 1944, most 

the use of its employees, and ruled of the civilian defense organizations 

out all-day street parking by its work- were disbanded. Although no longer 

ers in the vicinity of its factory. needed for this war-emergency activity, 

Every cooperation was extended by the auxiliary police unit was continued 

the police force to the newly-organized in force on the basis of its proven 

City Safety Council in its sponsorship worth in other types of emergencies. 



^6 1 i i City of Concord 



Thoroughly trained in the rudiments 
ot police procedure, the unit is in a 
position to render valuable service to 
the community by augmenting the 
regular force in the event of emer- 
gency. With this thought in mind, the 
auxiliary force was re-organized and 
can be alerted on a moment's notice 
by the Chief of Police. 

TRAINING PROGEAM 

For the second consecutive year, all 
regular officers of the department re- 
ceived firearm instructions covering 
every type of weapon used by the 
police force. This practice not only 
perfects accuracy but serves to better 
acquaint each patrolman with these 
firearms in order to insure their proper 
and effective use when the need arises. 

The old adage of "all brawn and no 
brains" commonly applied to the old- 
fashioned police officer was further 
dispelled as the result of completion by 
the regular force of a five-week course 
of study covering the following sub- 
jects: report writing, elements of va- 
rious crimes, city ordinances, accident 
investigations, rules of evidence, lab 
oratory aides and techniques, inter 
views and interrogations, crime scene 
search, court procedure and testifyin;^ 
in court. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Work on renovating police head- 
quarters, started in 1943, was completed 
during the past year. The entire in- 
terior was re-painted in a light color 
scheme and Venetian blinds were in- 
stalled in the various offices. Parti- 
tions, switchboards, radio equipment 
and counters were re-arranged to pru 
vide greater facility in operation. 

The police radio antenna mast witl 
its supporting electronic ecjuipmeii! 



was moved from its Little Pond loca- 
tion to headquarters. The mast was 
erected on top of the police building 
and the radio apparatus was placed in 
second floor quarters only a short dis- 
tance removed from the control point. 
This change eliminates the need for 
rented communication lines and pro- 
vides easy access to these units for 
service checks and replacements. 

In October, the heating plant at 
police headquarters broke down and 
replacement became an urgent neces- 
sity. New installations were consid- 
ered, but due to the difficulty in 
securing equipment, it was decided to 
utilize the heating service of the Con- 
cord Steam Corporation. The neces- 
sary connections were made and, in 
the short space of time that the build- 



Lifc •■living is till important part of police 

nor I,;. This mod cm restiscitator was added 

to the department's equipment during the 

vcir. 




Do your part in boosting this number. 




ing has been heated by this method, 
there is evidence that the new arrange- 
ment will prove satisfactory from the 
standpoint of efficiency and economy. 

During the year, the department ac- 
quired a modern resuscitator for use 
in reviving victims of asphyxiation. 
This machine eliminates the use of 
artificial respiration and is mechan- 
ically designed to automatically adjust 
itself to the varying respiratory 
capacities of patients, thereby reducing 
the chance of injury to the patient 
due to improper control of the machine. 

The police ambulance was equipped 
with a two-way radio. Installation of 
this radio apparatus permits the opera- 
tor of the ambulance to keep in touch 



with headquarters at all times. On 
accident runs, mformation, which may 
save valuable time in situations where 
a matter of a few minutes means life 
or death, can be radioed ahead to the 
hospital via police headquarters. 

RECOMMENDATION 

Each year, the need for additional 
space increases in urgency. Existing 
space for police records is entirely in- 
adequate. Space is also needed for a 
juvenile detention room as well as for 
technical laboratories. It is recom- 
mended that steps should be taken at 
an early date to correct this situation 
so that police efficiency may not be 
impaired. 



^8 -f i i City of Concord 



PROBATION 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judge William L. Stevens 

Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 

1 944 Expenditure $i ,600.08 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

The Probation Department, by legis- 
lative enactment, functions as a part of 
the municipal judicial system. Because 
it deals with family problems of a 
delicate and intimate nature, particu- 
larly as these relate to the welfare of 
children, the department's activities 
are conducted with a minimum of 
public notice. At all times, the de- 
partment stands ready to be of assist- 
ance to parents in solving their child 
guidance problems. Such parents are 
urged to avail themselves of the Pro- 
bation Officer's advisory service rather 
than to permit the control of their 
children to become the responsibility 
of some civic or social agency due to 
delinquency. 

1944 TREND 

The year 1944 showed a definite 
decrease in the number of official cases 
to come before the Juvenile Court. 
This does not necessarily mean that the 
city had fewer juvenile law violators. 
Rather, it is likely that many juvenile 
delinquents were not fortunate enough 
to be apprehended — fortunate, be- 
cause had they been brought to ac- 
count, these juveniles would now be 
well on their way to reinstatement in 
our social community instead of root- 
ing deeper into unlawful actions. 



The tendency during tne past year 
has been toward the committing of 
sex offenses rather than breaking, en- 
tering and larceny which for the past 
six years has been the chief offense of 
juveniles. In many respects, this indi- 
cates a deterioration in the moral stand- 
ard of good, clean living. To a large 
degree, this lack of moral responsi- 
bility in the boy or girl who appears 
before the Juvenile Court can be 
traced to a breakdown of religious 
training in the home and the failure to 
keep certain fundamental religious 
principles before the minds of the chil- 
dren in schools. Testimony offered by 
those who have appeared before the 
court, both parents and children, pro- 
vides ample proof of the existence of 
this condition. 



SUMMARY OF ACTIVITY 

A total of 19 juveniles appeared be- 
fore the court during 1944. Of this 
number, seven were placed on proba- 
tion, five were dismissed because the 
offense did not warrant further court 
action, five were committed to the 
State Industrial School and one was 
placed in custody of the State Welfare 
Department. Only one juvenile vio- 
lated probation. 

The probation periods of ten juve- 
niles expired during the year. Five 
probation cases were carried over into 
1945. 

It is an interesting fact that of the 
29 cases which the court has dismissed 
during the past six years because the 
seriousness of the offense did not war- 
rant further action, not one appeared 
again before the court for any violation 
of the law. 



Annual Report i i i ^g 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

iiiiiiiiliiiii 

William L. Stevens ]"dge 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

John W. Stanley Cler/{ 

1944 Expenditure $2,960.00 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

CASES TRIED 

From the standpoint of lawlessness, 
the city's 1944 experience was relative- 
ly good. Once again, this situation 
can be attributed to various aspects ol 
a community at war, particularly a 
community affected by war restrictions 
and an out-migration of population. 
In many ways, that which Concord 
may have lost in being by-passed as 
a center of war production, has been 
offset by a corresponding decrease in 
unlawful actions. 

Although the total number of 
criminal cases to come before the court 
increased from the 1943 low of 701 to 
880, it is satisfying to note that this 
increase, in its entirety, resulted from 
a 204 jump in parking violations, 
relatively a minor infraction of the law. 

The 'Mtniiniu k ('< 



Forty-three civil actions were tried 
before the Municipal Court. This 
represented a decrease of 37 or about 
one-half of the total for the previous 
year. The court also heard one small- 
claim case as against 10 such cases 
tried in 1943. The decrease in civil 
cases continues to reflect the war-time 
improvement in the financial status of 
the average citizen. 

At various times during the year, 
the court held private sessions in con- 
nection with the offenses of 19 
juveniles. 

REVENUE AND COSTS 

The financial records of the Clerk of 
the Municipal Court indicate the re- 
ceipt of $4,089.98 from fines, costs and 
sundry fees. Of this amount, the court 
turned over $2,129.80, representing 
revenue received from violators of mo- 
tor vehicle laws, to the New Hamp- 
shire Motor Vehicle Department as 
prescribed by statute. Miscellaneous 
court expenses amounted to $59.80. 
The balance of $1,960.18 was deposited 
with the City Treasurer. Court oper- 
ating costs, which are a part of the 
annual municipal budget appropriation, 
amounted to $2,960.00. 

minv Cnlllt llnllSt. 




42 i i i City of Concord 



FIRE 
PROTECTION 

iiiiiliiiiiiii 

FIRE BOARD 

Charles P. Coakley, Chauman 

William J. Flynn 

Lawrence J. Moynihan 

Robert W. Potter 

Clarence H. Green Fire Chief 

Michael }. Martin "] 

.. D T5 r Deputy Clue s 

Milan R. Piper J 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief 

1944 Operating Expenditure $95,497.96 

1944 Kquipnient Expenditure $ 600.00 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Vxreman 

Killed in Action World V^ar 11 

October 14, 1944 



FIRE AND FIRE LOSS 

The Concord Fire Department 
responded to 587 fire alarms during 
1944. Of this number, 524 were still 
alarms and 63 were box calls. The 
total number of alarms was 28 more 
than the total for the previous 12 
months. 

From the standpoint of fire loss, the 
city experienced one of its worst years 
in recent time. The total loss for 1944 
was estimated at $117,767.33. This 
figure was $33,316.41 greater than the 



fire loss for 1943, a year that exceeded 
the annual loss of any years since 1935. 
The over-all picture is not as dark as 
it may seem in light of the fact that 
the value of the property involved was 
set at $952,072.00, and the further fact 
that much valuable property adjacent 
to bad fires was saved from damage. 
Of the total property destroyed during 
the year, only $10,355.00 worth was 
not covered by insurance payments. 

Among the serious fires during 1944 
were the Davis dairy farm in East 
Concord, the Bartemus grain elevator, 
the wood-frame factory formerly occu- 
pied by the Concord Silversmiths, and 
the New England Cable Company fac- 
tory. The Bartemus and Cable Com- 
pany fires were brought under control 
with a minimum of loss which permit- 
ted quick repairs and saved the jobs of 
many Concord citizens employed in 
essential war work. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

During the year, many fire hazards 
were eliminated as the result of the 
department's continuing program of 
inspection of public and private build- 
ings. 

Enforcement of the so-called "Cocoa- 
nut Grove" law, passed by the 1943 
Legislature, which provides for safety 
to life in places of assembly, has gone 
forward as rapidly as the time avail- 
able for this work has permitted. Con- 
sidering the amount of additional work 
required in the enforcement of this 
law, it is entirely probable that addi- 
tional personnel will be needed in the 



Value 

Buildings $423,771.00 

Contents 528,301.00 

Total $952,072.00 



Loss Insurance Insurance Paid 

^51,638. 56 $359,355-50 $45,203.56 
66,128.77 414,926.00 62,228.77 



Net Loss 
$6,435.00 
3,900.00 



5117,767.33 $774,281.50 $107,432.33 $10,335.00 
Annual Report i i i ^^ 



near future to carry out the provisions 
of this act. 

The department has continued its 
poHcy of cooperating with school offi- 
cials in the conduct of tire drills and 
fire prevention meetings in the various 
city schools. 

Regulations relating to the installa- 
tion of oil hurner etjuipmcnt have 
been enforced to the letter. 

PERSONNEL 

The department's personnel consists 
of 30 permanent men and 129 call 
men. In addition, about 100 auxiliary 
firemen, organized into three com- 
panies under the civilian defense pro- 
gram, have continued to take an 
active part in fire-fighting activities and 
have proven a valuable asset to the de- 
partment. 



It is with regret that the department 
reports the death of one of its most 
able members, Arnold B. Murphy. 
Fireman Murphy was killed in action 
while serving in the armed forces of 
the United States. Another permanent 
fireman, Chester S. Blake, resumed his 
duties with the department after re- 
ceiving an honorable discharge from 
the United States Navy. 

By aldermanic action, upon recom- 
mendation of the Fire Board, the per- 
sonnel of call companies in the out- 
lying wards was cut from 30 to 15. 
Under this plan, the salaries of call 
men were increased and more stringent 
rules relating to attendance at fires 
were put into eflect. Experience over 
the past year indicates greatly im- 
proved attendance at tires and a cor- 
responding improvement in service 
rendered to the public. 



Getting at flics in tall stnutiircs is always a 
major prohlcni. The value of aerial lad iter 
equipment is graphically depicted in this 
picture taken at a recent grain elevator fire. 




APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

During the summer. Ladder No. 2 
de\eloped serious mechanical defects. 
Because of the considerable costs in- 
volved in putting this antiquated piece 
of apparatus in working order, it was 
abandoned and steps were taken to 
acquire a new 65-foot Seagrave aerial 
ladder truck to be delivered at an early 
date. Meanwhile, Engine 5 was moved 
to headquarters and pressed into tem- 
porary use as a converted ladder truck. 

Two new radio units were purchased 
in 1944. These were installed in En- 
gine 3 at Penacook and Engine 4 at 
the Central Station. The addition of 
this equipment will eliminate loss of 
\aluable time in calling headquarters 
for more men and equipment when 
needed. 

The department's supply of hose 
consists of 19,550 feet of two and 



one-hall inch hose and 2,250 feet of 
three-quarter inch booster hose. 

The fire alarm system has been 
maintained in good working order. 
Many changes and replacements have 
been made and further alterations are 
contemplated as fast as available man- 
power and materials will permit. 

In spite of the age of many of the 
department's trucks, all rolling equip- 
ment has been maintained in oper- 
ating order. Necessary repairs and re- 
placements have been effected under 
the direction of an experienced depart- 
ment mechanic at the Central Station 
workshop. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

Due to war conditions, replacement 
of apparatus has marked time for three 
years. Plans are now being made to 
purchase a new pumper to replace 
Engine 4, purchased in 1932. This 
truck has carried the heaviest load of 
hre-runs over a twelve-year period and 
should be retired from first-line duty. 

Serious consideration should be given 
to the immediate establishment of a 
capital budget program to replace ob- 
solete apparatus. In line with this 
suggestion, it is recommended that a 
new deputy chief's car should be ac- 
quired in the near future. 

With the acquisition of a site for a 
new fire station in the South End, the 
Fire Board proposes to develop plans 
for the new structure cluring the 
coming year as part of its post-war 
program. 



Ttvo-u'dy radios installed on fire engines are 

the latest addition to Concord's fire-fighting 

equipment. 



. . . Fire Hydrants 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF 
HYDRANT COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
Clarence H. Green 
Percy R. Sanders 
1 1;44 Expenditure 'None 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

No changes were made in the 
municipal fire hydrant system during 
1944. The system is made up of 798 
hydrants of which 687 are public and 
1 1 1 are private services. Under the 
supervision of the Board of Hydrant 
Commissioners, periodic checks of ail 
hydrants were made during the year 
in order to insure maximum operating 
efficiency in the event of an emergency. 

The Board of Hydrant Commission- 
ers anticipates no changes of con- 
sequence in the hydrant system until 
such time as current restrictions on 
huildinu: construction are removed. 




WEIGHTS and 
MEASURES 



J. Shepard Norris City Scaler 

1944 Expenditure $1,319.97 



It is a safe assumption that the average 
citizen is unaware of the doUars-and- 
cents value to the pubhc of the in- 
spection services of the Weights and 
Measures Department. Studies made 
of cities where this service is main- 
tained and those where it is not, show 
that in the unprotected community. 
the customer pays heavily for goods 
not received. The average extra cost 
per person is approximately $11.00 per 
year. In a family of five, this amounts 
to $54.00, or better than a dollar a 
week. In comparison, the protection 
secured through the inspection activi- 
ties of the City Sealer costs the Con- 
cord family of five only about 25 cents 
a year. 

NEW CITY SEALER 

During the year, Mr. George W. 
Wilde resigned as City Sealer to take a 
full-time job with the State Depart- 



ment of Weights and Measures. Mr. 
J. Shepard Norris succeeded Mr. Wilde 
as City Sealer. 

1944 ACTIVITY 

The intensified inspection program 
inaugurated in 1943 was continued dur- 
ing the past year. Everything the 
public buys by weight and measure 
has come under the careful scrutiny 
of the City Sealer. All possible pre- 
cautions have been taken to protect the 
public from errors in weight and meas- 
ure arising out of increased small-lot 
commodity sales and frequent turn- 
over in sales personnel. 

COOPERATION 

In order to better serve the pur- 
chasing public, the City Sealer has 
worked in close cooperation with the 
officials of the State Department of 
Weights and Measvires. It is also note- 
worthy that under merchandising 
conditions which have been trying, the 
sealer has had the full and ready co- 
operation of local merchants in carrying 
out the department's war-time program. 

The City Sealer earnestly solicits the 
full cooperation of the purchasing 
public. All irregularities in weight 
and measure should be reported with- 
out delay. 



Correcf 

Scales 552 

Weights 832 

Liquid Measures 209 

Gas Pumps 94 98 

Kerosene Pumps 63 7 

Grease Dispensers 84 

Oil Bottles 649 

Tank Trucks 

Tank and Truck Meters 16 7 

Package Re-weigh 250 1,069* 

Coal Re-weigh 3 i 

Cart Bodies 16 

Yardsticks 20 

* Underweight — 578; overweight — 491. 

46 i -f i City o f Concord 



Adjusted Coudcnuifd Incorrect 
255 2 21 



Cautioned Idle 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

A slight improvement in zoning, 
building and plumbing activities was 
noted during 1944. Due to continued 
war-time restrictions on building con- 
struction, the weight of 1944 activity 
was on construction sufficiently essen- 
tial to the war efifort to command a 
priority on building materials. A no- 
ticeable increase in permissible minor 
construction and repairs presages an 
active building program in the post- 
war period. 

. . . Xoning 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Donald G. Matson, Chairman 

John S. Corbett 

A. Clifford Hudson 

Harold E. Langley 

Laurence M. Meyer 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk, 

1944 Expenditure $120.27 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Six appeals were taken to the Zoning 
Board of Adjustment during 1944. 
This represented an increase of four 
over the previous year. Four of these 
appeals were granted conditionally and 
two were denied. By type, five of the 
appeals were for a variance from the 
terms of the ordinance, and one was 
for an exception. One of the cases 
was an appeal taken on the action of 
the Administrative Officer in granting 



a permit for a poultry farm in a local 
business district. The Board decided 
in favor of the appellants and revoked 
all permits issued the defendant except 
one for a small brooder house. 

. . . Building 

Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 

1 944 Expediture None 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

An increase in building activity in 
1944 was indicated by the granting of 
51 permits as against 36 for the pre- 
vious year. Of the permits issued, 18 
were for new construction and 33 for 
repairs and alterations. The total 
estimated valuation for the permits 
issued was $90,585.00, an increase of 
$64,745.00 over 1943. Eleven permits 
were issued for new dwelling units. 

. . . Plumbing 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS OF 
PLUMBERS 

William J. Bishop, Clnurnian 

Edward E. Beane 

Arthur W. Sargent 

Edward E. Beane Plumbing Inspector 

1 944 Expenditure $ .50 

1 944 Receipts $25.00 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Thirty-three plumbing permits were 
issued in 1944, an increase of 13 over 
the previous year. A total of 75 
plumbing inspections were made dui- 
ing the year. 

The Board of Examiners received 
only one application for a master 
plumber's license. The applicant failed 
to pass the required examination. 



Annual Report i i i ^y 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 



partment used 66 temporary employees 
to assist the regular staff in snow plow- 
ing, street sand removal and catch 
basin cleanin*! activities. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. Charles J. McKhe, Channiau 

Robert W. Potier 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Nelson E. Strong 

John Swenson 

John C Tilton 

WiLLE\M A. Stevens 

Ervin E. Webber Coiiimisfioncr 

Ervin E. Webber, Stipt. of Streets 
Er\in E. Webber, Tree W'aidcii 
Edward E. Beane, City Engineer 
Leslie C. Clark, Siipt. of Ptir/xS 
and Cemeteries 

11)44 Expenditure $266,524.41 



In spite of many war-time handicaps, 
especially in the field of equipment 
maintenance, the routine activities oi 
the Department of Public Works have 
been accomplished with a minimum of 
inconvenience to the taxpayer. The 
department has spared no effort in 
maintaining a high level of service in 
connection with the upkeep of streets, 
sidewalks, sewers, parks trees and 
cemeteries. It has also provided the 
public with an efficient refuse collec- 
tion service. 

PERSONNEL 

The department operated with a 
permanent personnel of 102 employees. 
This represented a decrease of nine 
from the total of the previous year. 
Four seasonal workers were employed 
to do maintenance work in parks and 
cemeteries. During the year, the dt- 



IMPROVEMENTS 

Improvement of Warner Road in 
the Mast Yard district highlighted the 
departments highway construction 
program during 1944. This project, 
which covers a distance of 9,500 feet 
from the junction of Blackwater and 
Horse Hill Roads to the Hopkinton 
town line, was accomplished under the 
Town Road Aid program in which 
state funds participate to the extent 
of four-fifths of the costs involved. In 
addition to the road construction work, 
which necessitated extensive changes 
in grade, the project entailed the 
building of nine culverts, 18 head 
walls, and the laying of 376 feet of 
reinforced concrete pipe. 

Other improvements involved the 
surface treating with tar of AUard 
Street, formerly a gravel road, and the 
rebuilding and tarring of a 1,234-foot 
section of Bow Street. A new culvert 
was built on Hutchins Street west of 
Lake Street to relieve a poor drainage 
situation. Five new catch basins were 
installed at various points in the city. 

HIGHWAY MAINTENANCE 

CJovernment-imposed restrictions on 
the use of asphalt were lifted during 
the year. As a result, the Highway 
Division resumed its program of side- 
walk replacement with the reconstruc- 
tion of 1,447 square yards of asphalt 
walk. During the year, the coal-tar 
sidewalk abutting the waterworks 
property at North State and Penacook 
Streets was replaced with a cement 



48 -f f f City of Concord 



walk. This project involved ^77 
square yards of sidewalk. 

A total of 165,011 gallons of tar was 
applied to city streets in 1944. This 
represented an increase of 33,272 gal- 
lons over the amount applied in 1943- 
One thousand seventy tons of cold 
patch material was used by the High- 
way Division during the year. 

Eight old stone culverts were re- 
placed. The largest of the new cul- 
verts, which are of cement construc- 
tion, is located on Broad Cove Drive 
west of Riverhill. 

SNOW AND ICE 

The city experienced a heavy snow- 
fall during 1944. A total of 81.3 inches 
was recorded as against 58 inches dur- 
ing the previous year. Due to man- 
power and equipment shortages, only 
three hired trucks were available to 
augment the 14 trucks, two graders, 
two tractors and rotary plow used by 
the department for snow removal 
work. Because the heavy snowfall and 
continued drifting threatened to block 
country roads, the rotary plow was 
used extensively in clearing these out- 
lying highways. The rotary was also 
used for downtown snow removal and 
airport runway clearing and was often 
kept in 24-hour operation for days. 

The Highway Division spread 7,761 
cubic yards of sand on streets and 
sidewalks during the winter season. 

The eflfect of the heavy snowfall ci 
municipal costs is indicated by the 
fact that the 1944 cost of removal 
amounted to $18,313.44 as compared to 
$12,671.08 for the previous yeai. 
Sanding cost the City $10,057.12 dur- 
ing 1944. 





Keeping highu'dyi passahle is an endless 
task- {Top) Workmen jccding a sand 
spreader during tarring operations. (Bot- 
tom I The rotary ploiu clears a snow-filled 
country road. 

REFUSE AND GARBAGE SERVICE 

At a cost of 80 cents per cubic yard, 
the department collected 45,173 cubic 
yards of household refuse during 1944. 
War-time wage increases and the oper- 
ation of the ordinance on attendance 
and leave were largely instrumental in 
a 16 cents per cubic yard increase in 
the cost of this service. 

Collection of table garbage, which 
is by contract, cost the City of Concord 
$5,800.00 in 1944. 

ENGINEERING 

Anticipating a demand for street 
line location in the future, the En- 
gineering Division re-established 23.97 



,. iAi 



Annual Report i i i ^g 



miles of highway during the year. All 
intersection angles were established 
and marked with stone bounds. Al- 
together, 185 stone bounds were set 
during 1944. The entire area from 
the Bow line to West Concord, and 
from the Loudon line to Grandview 
Avenue has been resurveyed during the 
past three years. The layouts of these 
streets have been plotted and are on 
file in the engineering office. 

Due to curtailed highway construc- 
tion, engineering for this type of work 
has decreased noticeably. Nevertheless, 
lines and grades as well as grades for 
culverts were established in connection 
with the rebuilding of eight-tenths of 
a mile of road. 

Engineering service was provided for 
the Cemetery Division in connection 
with the grading of 3.5 acres of land 
and the laying out of 1,940 feet on 
new roads. The Engineering Division 
also staked out 91 new cemetery lots. 

During the year, grades and lines 



were set for 404 feet of sanitary sewer, 
and grades were furnished for several 
house connections. Plans and profiles 
of city sewers and locations of man- 
holes and catch basins were brought 
up to date. 

The engineering staff recorded 633 
transfers of real estate and made all 
necessary corrections on the assessors' 
plans. In addition to this work, all 
buildings in the area between Center 
Street and Blossom Hill Cemetery 
were checked as to size and location 
on lot. 

A survey was conducted and plans 
and estimates were prepared for a 
post-war storm sewer in the downtown 
section of the city. 

Six hundred yards of black and 
white prints were developed during 
the year. 

SANITARY SEWERS 

The operation of the city's sanitary 
sewers under a system of sewer rents 



This iry-coirrcd jiineral chapel reflects the hindscaped beauty and quiet 
stirroundings of Blossom Hill Cemetery. 




^o i i i City of Concord 




This city-owned building on Concord Plains formerly housed the activ- 
ities of the National Youth Administration. Last fall it was used as living 
quarters by a group of Jamaicans helping out tvith the harvest on farms 
in the Concord area. 



became effective January i, 1944. Un- 
der this plan, the cost of sanitary sewer 
maintenance is borne by those who vise 
the sewers in proportion to the amount 
of such use. Previously, these sewer 
costs were raised out of the property 
tax without consideration as to what 
benefit, if any, the individual property 
owner derived from such sewers. One 
of the advantages of the new system is 
that it enables the City to build up a 
depreciation reserve from which re- 
placements and extensions can be 
financed when the need arises. 

Operating revenues for the year 1944 
amounted to $24,798.84. Operating 
expenses totaled $8,461.60. A depre- 
ciation reserve of $13,023.52 was set 
up, leaving an earned surplus of 
$3,313.72. The city sanitary sewers 
were capitalized at $1,039,907.43 from 
which depreciation of $487,399.57 was 
deducted to arrive at a net fixed 
capital of $552,507.86. This amovmt 



together with cash, accounts receivable, 
materials and supplies brought the to- 
tal assets of the Sanitary Sewer Divi- 
sion to $568,341.24. In setting up the 
necessary accounts to operate the new 
system, the department received the 
cooperation of the New Hampshire 
Public Service Commission. 

Only one sanitary sewer costruction 
project was authorized during 1944. 
This pertained to a 404-foot extension 
in Westbourne Road to supply service 
to three houses. In addition, 12 new 
manholes were built and 13 new cus- 
tomer connections were installed. 
Twelve connections were relaid. This 
work was accomplished at a cost of 
$2,806.12. 

Routine cleaning of main-line sewers 
was carried on during the year and 
all lines were cleared of obstructions. 
Ninety-eight lateral sewer plugs were 
removed. 



Annual Report -f -f i ^i 




.1 new of the bridge over the ditck^ pond in 
the quiet stinotindings of Rollins Pari;. 

On December 31, 1944, the City op- 
erated 71.97 miles o£ sewers. The 1944 
per mile cost of maintaining the system 
was $117.58. 

STOKM SEWERS 

The city's storm sewer system was 
maintained in good working order. A 
short extension was laid in North State 
Street at a cost o£ $70.88. The cost 
of operating storm sewers is not a part 
of the sewer rental system. 

STREET LIGHTING 

During 1944, the City maintained 
in operation 1,603 street lights at a 
cost of $40,539.04. These totals were 
identically the same as those of the 
previous year. The average cost per 
light amounted to $25.29. 

TREES 

The Tree Division set out 24 shade 
trees during 1944. These were largely 
replacenients. The division has spared 
no effort in keeping all street shade 
trees in a healthy growing condition. 

There has been no let-up in the pro- 
gram to control gypsy and brown tail 
moths. The eradication of poison ivy 
was also a part of the division's 1944 
program. 



PARKS 

Due to the war, no new construction 
projects were undertaken in the city 
park system. Maintenance work has 
been carried on as usual. Twenty-five 
trees were set out in White and Rollins 
Parks. Filling-in activities at the 
swamp in White Park have been car- 
ried on whenever time and materials 
were available. Fertilizer was applied 
to shrubs and flower beds, and to some 
extent, to various lawn areas. 

CEMETERIES 

At Blossom Hill Cemetery, a one- 
acre burial section was developed. In 
addition, two acres of land were cleared 
for future development. About one 
and one-half acres in the old burial 
section of Woodlawn Cemetery were 
re-graded in order to eliminate raised 
lots and walkways. This work, which 
was started in 1943, adds much to the 
general appearance of the cemetery and 
greatly facilitates maintenance opera- 
tions. 

The tree planting program has been 
continued with the setting out of 50 
trees in Blossom Hill, Maple Grove, 
Pine Grove and Woodlawn Cemeteries. 
Fertilizer was applied to 15 acres of 
land as a part of the over-all cemetery 
soil improvement project. 

Thirty-one hundred feet of roads in 
Blossom Hill Cemetery were graded, 
surfaced and treated with two coats 
of tar. At Maple Grove, about 1,000 
feet of cemetery streets were graded 
and tarred. 

A total of 244 interments were made 
in city-owned cemeteries during 1944. 
Sixty-five lots were sold and 71 in- 
dividual cemetery trust funds were es- 
tablished. « 



^2 -f -f -f City oj Concord 



During 1944, the Cemetery Division 
was in charge of maintenance and care 
of the Concord Calvary Cemetery. In 
addition to ordinary maintenance, 
graves were prepared for 71 burials. 

VSTAR RELATED ACTIVITIES 

In cooperation with salvage authori- 
ties, the program of regular collection 
and transportation of tin cans from 
stores to the salvage depot was con- 
tinued during 1944. 

Several bond rallies were held during 
the year. The department-owned band- 
stand was transported to each of these 
rallies for use as a speaking platform. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

Other activities undertaken by the 
department included plowing, sanding 
and mowing of the municipal airport; 
widening the taxiway and installing 



new catch basins and drains in front 
of the airport buildings; building a 
catch basin and repairing a drain for 
the Concord Union School District; 
grading the civic center for the Town 
of Canterbury; building a display board 
for the Concord Safety Council; con- 
structing a catch basin off Railroad 
Street for the Boston and Maine Rail- 
road; and assisting various city de- 
partments and agencies in performing 
numerous minor chores. 

APPRECIATION 

The Department of Public Works 
takes this opportunity to express its 
thanks to the citizens of Concord for 
their whole-hearted cooperation during 
the past year. It is gratifying to know 
that the public is mindful of the many 
war-time difficulties that confront the 
department in its efforts to provide 
efficient municipal service. 



Large crowds fumed out to cii/oy the fun and frolic at the annual hos- 
pital heyday held at White Parl^. "Fishing" in tht iiading pool 11 a^ 
one of the featured attractions of the occasion 




Annual Report -f -f i 53 




i 





MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 



BOARD OF 
AIRPORT COMMISSIONERS 

Hon. C'harles ]. McKee, Chairman 

Robert W. Potter, Clerl^ 

Charles A. Bartlett 

John N. Engel 

Charles W. Howard 

Donald J. McFarland 

John Swenson 

1944 Expenditure $10,637.55 

1944 Earning $ 8,038.40 



Activities at the Concord Municipal 
Airport underwent drastic changes 
during 1944. With the improvement 
in the war situation, the army-spon- 
sored war training service program 
was discontinued. The student 
trainees left the city immediately; they, 
in turn, were followed by the pilot- 
instructors and the operators of the 
training school. Most of the planes 
and equipment used by the school were 
removed soon after the termination of 
the program. 

The year 1944 saw the return of 
regular air transport service which was 
discontinued at the start of the war. 
A limited resumption of commercial 
flying from the airport also occurred 
during the year. 




(Top) A section oj the large crowd that 
turned out to inspect nary planes tailing part 
m a war bond tour. {Upper Center) Pas- 
sengers leaving a transport plane just in 
from Boston. (Lower Center) Weather 
Bureau officials preparing weather charts for 
flyers at the hitreaii's airport office, (Left) 
Auto parl(iiig tit the airport by spectators 
attending an air show. 



From the standpoint of the City and 
the Board of Airport Commissioners, 
the year 1944 was important in that 
it marked a change of emphasis from 
war-related activities to phmning for 
the fullest use of facilities to meet the 
communities post-war aviation needs. 

OPERATING POLICY 

Due to the many problems that have 
presented themselves during the past 
year, and in anticipation of even great- 
er problems to come in connection with 
airport operations in the fast-moving 
field of aviation, the Board of Airport 
Commissioners designated three of its 
members as a policy committee for the 
purpose of giving careful study to de- 
tails of a variety of matters that have 
a direct bearing on the operation of 
the airport and its facilities. The work 
of the committee will be invaluable in 
guiding the full board in administering 
the airport on a sound basis of service 
to the public. 



AIRLINE SERVICE 

Regularly scheduled air transport 
service was resumed at the Concord 
Municipal Airport late in 1944. Four 
stops are made daily by transport 
planes in the course of two round trips 
between Boston, Massachusetts, and 
Montreal, Canada. This service which 
is operated by the Northeast Airlines, 
provides Concord with much needed 
air passenger, mail and express accom- 
modations north and south of the city. 
It is interesting to note that Concord 
is the only city in New Hampshire 
where a stop is scheduled by the air- 
line. 

AIRLINE EXPANSION 

The Airport Commissoin cooperated 
vvith the Concord Chamber of Com- 
merce, the New Hampshire State 
Aeronautics Commission and the New 
Hampshire State Planning and De- 
velopment Commission in preparing 
and presenting a brief covering the 



Government agencies located at the airport are equipped with every modern com- 
munication facility. (Left) .1 ('.. .1. .1. employee is shown operating a teletype 
niachine at the agency's comnuinications office. (Right) A Weather Bureau 
employee is shown broadcasting weather information at the hureau's radio 

microphone. 




need for direct air transport connect- 
ing Concord with Portland, Maine and 
New York City. This material, which 
was presented in connection with an 
airline petition for permission to op- 
erate over this route, was placed before 
an examiner of the Civil Aeronautics 
Board at a hearing held in Washing- 
ton, D. C. The matter is now in the 
hands of the federal licensing board 
and favorable action is hoped for in 
the near future. 

With the evidence presented in sup- 
port of the petition was a survey show- 
ing that the demand warranted the 
service, as well as a study showing that 
no community in New Hampshire was 
more favorably located from the stand- 
point of interconnecting railroad, high- 
way and bus routes to serve the needs 
of the people of the state. Along with 
the existing airline between Boston and 
Montreal, the proposed new route 
would establish Concord as the stra- 
tegic junction point of air transporta- 
tion in northern New England in that 
much traffic now routed via the Boston 
"bottleneck" would clear through Con- 
cord. 

CIVIL AERONAUTICS AGENCIES 

The administration building at the 
airport continues to serve as the 
"nerve-center" of Civil Aeronautics 
Administration activities in New 
England. The agency's regional 
administrative and inspection offices 
are located at the airport headquarters, 
as are the C. A. A.-operated regular 
two-way radio communication, tele- 
type interphone and radio beam 
services. The Airport Commission is 
looking forward to an expansion of 
C. A. A.'s local facilities during the 
coming year. 



U. S. WEATHER BUREAU 

The United States Weather Bureau 
continued its vital weather forecast 
service from quarters located in the 
airport administration building. Dur- 
ing the year, security restrictions on 
weather information were removed 
and the agency resumed regular fore- 
casts. As a further service to the pub- 
lic, the agency broadcasts weather 
information daily through the facilities 
of a Manchester radio station. 

AIRPORT IMPROVEMENTS 

The widening of the taxiway lead- 
ing from the runways to the admin- 
istration building highlighted the 
airport improvement program during 
1944. This wider approach strip 
greatly improved conditions in the 
vicinity of the airport structures, par- 
ticularly in relation to loading opera- 
tions of transport planes. 

As an added safety measure, obstruc- 
tion lights were installed near the 
north end of the north-south runway 
and at the easterly approach to the 
east-west runway. 

Other improvements included re- 
decoration of the lobby of the 
administration building and relocation 
of the radio antenna operated in con- 
nection with the airline service. 

In cooperation with the City Plan- 
ning Board, plans were prepared for 
extensive improvement of the grounds 
adjacent to the airport buildings. This 
work which calls for the relocation 
of the Beauclerk Memorial and the 
construction of driveways, a parking 
area, a drainage system and other 
necessary facilities, will be undertaken 
as a post-war project. Plans were also 
made to widen the existing apron in 
front of the airport hangars. 



^6 i i -f City of Concord 



WAT E R 
SUPPLY 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF 
WATER COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson, President 

Robert W. Brown 

Harry H. Dudley 

Allen M. Freeman 

Charles P. Johnson 

Donald Knowlton 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 

Benjamin H. Orr 

CJardner Tilton 

Percy R. Sanders Sitpeiiiitendent 

1944 Expenditures f 76,053.09 

1944 Receipts $101,759.03 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

Due to continued war-time shortages 
of labor and materials, the Water De- 
partment attempted no new water 



main construction during the past 
year. The department's efforts have 
been concentrated on maintenance 
activities to the end that the existing 
water system will continue to provide 
a maximum of efficient service to the 
community until such time as condi- 
tions will permit a resumption of work 
on improvements interrupted by the 
war. 

PUMPING SYSTEM 

Extensive changes are being made 
at the main pumping station at North 
State and Penacook Streets. The 
pumping apparatus has consisted of 
two steam pumps operated by hori- 
zontal boilers and two electrically- 
operated centrifugal pumps. The 
steam pumps were installed in 1893 
and 1904; the electric pumps were 
added in 1919 and 1925. Since 1919, 
the steam pumps have been used for 
emergency service only. 



A view of the dam, gatehouses and caretaker's residence located at the 
West Concord end of Penacook, Lake, the City's main source ol water 

Supply. 




Annual Report i i i 57 




Cuiuurd'i ll'ii/cr I'icss/iu System. 

(Upper Lejt) Extra high service stand pipe, LittU 

Pond Road. (Ahove) Elevated tank, Penacouk. 

(Left) Elevated tank, East Concord. (Below) 

Open reservoir, Pcnacool{ Street. 



Due to the age of the steam boilers, 
allowable steam pressure has been re- 
duced from 90 to 70 pounds, and 
operation of this equipment has been 
limited to relatively short periods. 

After thorough investigation, the 
Board of Water Commissioners voted 
to remove the steam pumps and boilers 
and replace this equipment with a 
3,800,000 gallons per 24 hours centri- 
fugal pump driven by a Sterling 
125-horsepower gasoline engine. This 
new unit is to be constructed in ac- 
cordance with the recommendations of 
the National Board of Fire Under- 
writers. 

In connection with the change and 
relocation of pumps, a new enclosed 
switchboard will be installed to re- 
place the present open board' in service 
since 1918. 

CONSUMPTION 

The total consumption of water for 
the year 1944 was 1,063,287,000 gal- 
lons. This amount included 12,310,000 
gallons furnished to the Penacook- 
Boscawen Water Precinct. Water con- 
sumption for 1944 exceeded that of 
the previous year by 42,300,000 gallons. 
On a per capita basis, consumption 
reached 106.6 gallons per day. 

In meeting the city's water needs, 
the department supplied 532,215,000 
gallons by pumping and a comparable 
532,072,000 gallons by direct gravity 
feed from Penacook Lake. During 
the year, 3,300 pounds of chlorine were 
consumed at the rate of 3.18 pounds 
per million gallons of water. 

The mean height of water in Pena- 
cook Lake during 1944 was 182.36 
feet. This level was only one-half foot 
below the mean of the previous year. 



FINANCES 

Total receipts of the Water Depart- 
ment for the year 1944 amounted to 
$101,759.03, of which all but $884.06 
represented payments made by water 
users. 

Expenditures for 1944 totaled $76,- 
053.09, of which $54,964.34 were used 
for operations, $17,000.00 for bond 
payments, and $4,088.75 for bond in- 
terest. 

In anticipation of post-war develop- 
ment, $15,000.00 were transferred to 
the Income-Investment Account. To- 
tal funds in this account at the close 
of the year amounted to $86,352.25. 
This sum, together with a cash balance 
of $19,853.83, brought the depart- 
ment's cash assets to $106,210.22 as 
of December 31, 1944. 

At the end of the year, the water 
precinct's bonded indebtedness stood 
at $91,000.00. The last of this out- 
standing debt matures on February i, 
1951. 

The waterworks plant represents 
total fixed assets valued at $1,960,- 
907.81. Depreciation to date, totaling 
$715,721.03, leaves an adjusted plant 
valuation of $1,245,186.78. 

OTHER ACTIVITY 

Operation of the City's sanitary 
sewers under a system of rents became 
effective on January i, 1944. Because 
metered water consumption was adopt- 
ed as the basis for sewer charges, the 
Board of Public Works sought and 
received the cooperation of the Water 
Department in handling its sewer bill- 
ing and collection activities. The 
experience of the past year indicates 
that joint collection of water and sewer 
charges works well. 



Annual Report i i i ^g 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

iiiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Holi.is, President 

Charles F. Cook 

Lela Y. Johnson 

Albert G. Lindenthal 

Violet L. McIvor 

Edwina L. Roundy 

Donald W. Saltmarsh 

Osmond R. Strong 

Dixon H. Turcott 

Natt B. Burbank StiperiiUendent 

H. Raymond Danforth Snperintendenl 

{In the absence of Mr. Btirbankt 

Cost of Oj^eration: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June jo, J 944: 
$J47J9'^-59 



. . . Concord School District 

The past year has seen a continuation 
of the problems of running a school 
system in time of war. Outside of 
operating schools as smoothly as con- 
ditions permitted, the major concern 
of tha Board of Education has been to 
plan for the future. Much ground 
work has been done and the coming 
year should see the crystallization of 
plans for future rehabilitation of the 
school plant and for gradual revision 
of the curriculum to meet present and 
future needs. 

OPERATING COSTS 

During the 1943- 1944 school year, 
the district spent $347,796.59. This 
sum was applied to direct operating 
charges and does not include payments 



on the district's bonded debt or 
cafeteria expenses. At the close of 
the year, the district's bonded debt 
stood at $346,000.00, a reduction of 
$45,000.00 from the amount outstand- 
ing a year ago. Of the debt remaining 
unpaid, $294,000.00 represented high 
school bonds issued in 1925. 

The per-student cost of operation 
was $112.85 as against $107.94 for the 
previous year. The two factors 
responsible for this increase were the 
reduced enrollment at the Concord 
High School and the rising cost of 
instruction. 

ENROLLMENT 

Statistics on enrollment show that 
3,082 pupils attended Concord public 
schools during the 1943-1944 school 
year, or 75 less than the total for the 
preceding year. The daily average 
membership was 2,939 ^^^ ^^^ daily 
average attendance was 2,706. A 
comparison of the attendance reports 
for the month of February in 1944 and 
1945 shows an up-swing of 44 pupils 
and foreshadows a return to normalcy 
in school attendance in the near future. 

SCHOOL HOURS 

In line with the policy adopted a 
year ago, the Junior and Senior High 
Schools were again operated on the 
shortened day, 8:30 A. M. to 1:30 
P. M. The early closing hour per- 
mitted older students to take part- 
time jobs after school. The elementary 
schools operated on an 8:30 A. M. to 
2:45 P. M. schedule. 

POSTWAR PLANNING 

During the past year, much emphasis 
was placed on postwar planning. An 



60 i i i City of Concord 



elementary council, consisting of the 
Elementary Supervisor and one teacher 
from each of the nine grade schools, 
served as a committee to conduct a 
postwar planning survey of the elemen- 
tary schools. A similar job was done 
by the faculty of the Junior High 
School, and various departments of 
the Senior High School completed 
postwar planning reports covering 
their respective programs. The under- 
lying purpose of these surveys is to 
provide material that can be used by 
the school board in formulating long 
range plans for Concord schools. 

In its annual report to the citizens 
of the district, the Board of Education 
has the following to say about postwar 
plans. "We hope in the next year to 
complete a definite plan for the future 
rehabilitation of our school plant and 
gradual revision of our curriculum to 
meet present and future needs. We 



fully appreciate the fact that this pro- 
gram involves substantial expenditures 
both for facilities and operating ex- 
penses. We will, however, develop the 
program and lay it before you. You 
can adopt as much of it as you feel 
you are able to afford. Our only 
interest is to provide as good public 
schools as Concord wants to pay for." 



TEACHERS 

Concord lost a number of good 
teachers last June. When schools 
opened again in September, i8 new- 
teachers were introduced to the as- 
sembly of teachers held on the first 
day of the fall term. Four full-time 
and two part-time teachers have been 
employed since September. This un- 
usually large turnover in personnel 
can be attributed to the abnormal con- 
ditions that prevail in war times. 



A school report cover contest jor art students is conducted each year by 
the senior high school art department. Shown here are the prize-win- 
ning covers used on the past jour school reports. 






Annual Report i i i 6i 



CAFETERIA PROGRAM 

With two exceptions, the Kimball 
and Dewey Schools, all of Concord's 
public schools are served by cafeterias. 
The pupils of the Kimball School go 
to nearby Rundlett Junior High School 
for their lunches. During the cold 
winter months, the Dewey School 
children are served soup and crackers 
from the Senior High School cafeteria. 

The districts cafeteria program 
represents an outstanding achievement 
by school officials in that it carries 
great beneiit to the children of Con- 
cord. 

HEALTH PROGRAM 

The school medical department 
spared no effort in doing everything 
in its power to maintain a high stand- 
ard of health among school pupils. 
Countless examinations of children 
were made by the Medical^ Inspector 
and the School Nurse. 



. . . Penacook School District 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Frank Beede, Chairman 

Francis E. Beer 

Claire V. Breckell 

Katherine C. Butt 

James J. Hayes 

Alfred J. York 

CJeorge W. Sumner Siipcnntcndcnt 

Cost of Operation: 

¥oy the Fiscal Year Ending June jo, 1944: 
$42,184.20 



FINANCES 

The cost of operating the Penacook 
Union School District for the year 
ending June 30, 1944 was $42,184.20. 
Sales and reimbursements of $1,422.71 
brought the net operating cost to 
$40,761.49, only $314.16 in excess of 



There is ample eridence in experience that school and library facilities go 

hand in hand. Pictured here is the neivly-estahlishcd library at the 

Rum ford School. 




62 f f f City of Concord 




A ivell-yoiindcd educational program tyiakes fidl use of dramatizations. 

Garrison School ptipils are shown going over last minute details of a 

historical play. 

the net total of the previous year. An decrease of 35, which was otTset in part 

increase of about |i, 000.00 in district by an increase of nine in the grade 

salaries was oflfset by a corresponding schools. The drop-oft in membership 

decrease in expenditures for textbooks, was a continuation of the war-time 

fuel and minor repairs. trend of older students leaving school 

A $2,000.00 payment was made on to accept jobs at attractive wages. It 

the district's bonded debt of which is gratifying to note that this trend 

$28,000.00 remained outstanding at appears to have run its course and 

the end of the fiscal year. Interest that high school enrollment for the 

payments and service charges on dis- current year is somewhat larger than 

trict bonds amounted to $901.00. that of last year. 

The sum of $33,691.21 was raised 

by property taxes to help defray the teaching statf 

cost of operating the district's school. The district operated with a teaching 

Income from other sources, chiefly staff of 17, consisting of nine high 

from high school tuitions, amounted school instructors, seven grade school 

to $8,044.18. The school tax rate was teachers and a music supervisor. In 

$16.72 per $1,000.00 of assessed valua- spite of a continuing turnover in the 

tion as against $15.84 for the previous teaching stafl", particularly at the high 

year. school, the district has spared no ef- 
fort in securing qualified replacements. 

MEMBERSHIP 

The average daily membership of postwar building program 
the student body of the Penacook For the past several years, the 
school system was 320, a decrease of people of Penacook have recognized 
26 from the 1943 total. This loss in the urgent need of an auditorium- 
membership consisted of a high school gymnasium in connection with the 



Annual Report 



6j 




ft^f»*tt^J%* «f^ 



Members of elementary school patrols pose for ti ^}'"np picture after wit- 
nessing a demonstration of a Fire Department aerial ladder trncl(. 



school and community activities. Such 
a huilding is a particular need in 
rounding out the educational program 
at Penacook High School. The Board 
of Education is of the opinion that 
the time is at hand for planning the 
erection of this needed facility. There 
are indications that federal funds will 
be made available in the immediate 
post-war era in connection with school 



building programs. The district needs 
to take the necessary steps now to be 
prepared for such an eventuality. 

Much has been said about the build- 
ing of "living memorials" to honor 
those who are fighting and dying for 
the cause of freedom. Penacook could 
erect no more fitting and useful mem- 
orial to its fighting men and women 
than an auditorium-gymnasium. 



Natural history lessons are made easy as well as interesting by the use of 
scale models such as the one pictured here. 




6i^ i i i City of Concord 



APPENDIX 

^ ^ i^ 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATISTICS 

PAGE 

General Fund — Balance Sheet 66 

General Fund — Reconciliation of Unappropriated Surplus 67 

General Fund — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 67 

General Fund — Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 68 

General Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 70 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 71 

Bond Funds — Comparative Balance Sheets 72 

Bond Funds — Balance Sheet of Non-Revenue Accounts 72 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 73 

Trust Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 74 

Trust Funds — Reconciliation of Fund Balances 74 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Balance Sheet 75 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Statement of Operations 75 

Concord Water Works — Balance Sheet 76 

Concord Water Works — Income-Investment Account 76 

Concord Water Works — Statement of Operations 77 

Concord Water Works — Cash Receipts and Expenditures 77 

Assessors' Statement for 1944 7H 

City Relief Department — ■ General Classification of Relief Expenditures 79 

Board of Public Works — Financial Statement 80 

Municipal Court — Statement of Receipts and Expenditures 80 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valu- 
ations, Tax Levies and Average Rates in Concord, 1 935-1 944 80 

Comparative Table of Budget Appropriations, 1 939-1 944 81 

Reconciliation of Tax Levies, 1939-1944 82 



GENERAL FUND 

Balance Sheet — December :5I, 1944 

ASSETS 

Cash : 

Cash in Bank — Regular $224,264.23 

Cash in Bank — Bond and Coupon Account 2,833.75 

Cash in Office — Tax Collector 550.98 

Cash in Office — -City Clerk 363.50 



Total Cash $228,012.46 

Reimbursements Receivable: 

Merrimack County $2,957.53 

Other Municipalities 84.20 $3,041.73 



Less Reser\e for Doubtful Accounts 1,123.70 



Total Reimbursements Receivable $1,918.03 

Taxes Receirable: 

1939 Levy $1 ,60 1 .9 1 

1 940 Levy 2,1 95.63 

1 94 1 Levy 2,413.93 

1942 Levy 4,444.25 

1943 Levy 4,562.67 

1944 Levy 107,113.00 $122,331.39 



Less Reserve for Doubtful Accounts 23,706.77 

Total Taxes Receivable $98,624.62 

Unredeemed Taxes Bought by City 11,718.24 

Property Acquired by Tax Collector's Deeds 6,896.96 



Total Assets $347,170.31 



LIABILITIES 

Matured Bonds Payable $2,000.00 

Bond Coupons Payable ^33 -75 



Total $2,833.75 

Unexpended Balances of Appropriations: 

Airport Commission $5,689.69 

Public Library 11,207.40 

School District — Bond Interest 6,999.38 

Union School District 138,691.99 

Penacook School District 14,973.56 



Total Appropriation Liabilities $177,562.02 



Total Liabilities $180,395.77 

Current Surplus 166.774.54 



Total Liabilities and Surplus $347,170.31 

66 i -f i City of Concord 



GENERAL FUND 

Reconciliation ok Unappropriated Surplus 

Unappropriated Surplus — January i, 1944 $187,211.29 

Add: 

Estimated Revenue $1,207,812.02 

Excess of Actual Revenues over Estimated 3,986.86 $1,211,798.88 

Overlay 30,706.62 

Property Acquired by Tax Deed in Prior Years 1,267.72 

Decrease in Reserves for Uncollectible Taxes 11,335.32 

Decrease in Reserve for Uncollectible Accounts Receivable 97-78 
Increase in Property Acquired by Tax Deeds — Current 

Year 848.81 

Refund of Taxes Collected 39-78 

Unredeemed Taxes Purchased by City 10,899.79 1,266,994.70 



M ,454,205.99 



Deduct: 

Appropriations $1,319,968.37 

Less Net Unexpended Balances 32,536.92 1,287,431.45 



Unappropriated Surplus — December 31, 1944 $166,774.54 



GENERAL FUND 

Analysis oh Change in Net Debt 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1944 

Net Debt, December 31, 1943 (Adjusted) $642,788.71 

Deductions: 

Bonds and Notes Retired During 1944: 

Municipal Bonds $57,000.00 

School Bonds 25,000.00 

School Notes 20,000.00 

$102,000.00 
Water Bonds 17,000.00 

Deduction for Bonds and Notes Retired 119,000.00 

$523,788.71 
Deduction for Amount Carried to Surplus representing the results of opera- 
tions for the year 1944 and transactions affecting prior years 20,436.75 



Net Debt, December 31, 1944 $544,225.46 



SUMMARY 

Net Debt, December 31, 1943 $642,788.71 

Net Debt, December 31, 1944 544,225.46 

I mprovement in Financial Condition $98,563 .25 



Annual Report ■/ -t -f 6y 






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Oif-I 



BOND FUNDS 

Comparative Balance Sheet 
December 31, 1943 — December 31, 1944 



ASSETS 

Net Bonded Debt: 

Balancing Account 

Notes Payable: 

Balancing Account 

Total 



1943 



40,000.00 



'944 



20,000.00 



Decrease 
$99,000.00 

20,000.00 



'11,000.00 $119,000.00 



LIABILITIES 



Serial Bonds: 

Central Fire Station 

City Hall and Auditorium 

Departmental Equipment 

Highways 

Public Improvement 

Sewers 

Union School District 
Water Department ... 
Municipal Airport ... 

Serial Notes: 

Union School District 



Total 



5t)i 1,000.00 

20,000.00 

12,000.00 

15,000.00 

79,000.00 

158,000.00 

351,000.00 

108,000.00 

36,000.00 



$10,000.00 

15,000.00 

8,000.00 

10,000.00 

56,000.00 

143,000.00 

326,000.00 

91,000.00 

32,000.00 



40,000.00 20,000.00 



$1,000.00 

5,000.00 

4,000.00 

5,000.00 

23,000.00 

15,000.00 

25,000.00 

17,000.00 

4,000.00 



20,000.00 



50,000.00 |>7i 1,000.00 $119,000.00 



BOND FUNDS 

Balance Sheet of Non-Revenue Accounts 
December 31, 1944 



Cash with Depositary: 

First National Bank, Concord 



Concord Airport: 
Land Account 



ASSETS 



LIABILITIES 



$26.63 



$26.63 



y2 i i i City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1944 

ASSETS 

Total Cemetery Other 

All Funds Trust Funds Trust Funds 
Cash: 

Unexpended Balances of Income deposited at 
interest in: 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank $645.93 $496.34 $149.59 

Merrimaciv County Savings Bank 5,634.40 5,509.86 124.54 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 639.95 639.95 

Union Trust Company 1,415.05 977-73 437-32 



Total Income Cash $8,335-33 $7,623.88 $711.45 



Permanent Funds: 

Savings Bank, Deposits: 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank $86,751.73 $79,962.04 $6,789.69 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 76,722.15 64,891.33 11,830.82 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 80,540.00 70,378.54 10,161.46 

Union Trust Company 90,061.08 71, 375-71 18,685.37 

Securities: 

United States Treasury Bonds 116,460.63 66,500.00 49,960.63 

Great Northern Railroad Pfd. (i share) 100.00 100.00 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad (3) 300.00 300.00 

Northern Railroad of New Hampshire (i) 100.00 100.00 

Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad (i) 100.00 100.00 

Boston & Maine Railroad ist Pfd. C (6) 600.00 100.00 500.00 

Concord Gas Company Com. (12) 1,020.00 1,020.00 

Jackson Construction Track Company Bonds 

$3,000.00 (no value) (no value) 



Total Permanent Funds $452,755.59 $353,807.62 $98,947.97 



Total Assets $461,090.92 $361,431.50 $99,659.42 



Unexpended Income Balances: 

Cemeteries 


LIABILITIES 

$7,623.88 


$7,623.88 


$ 


Schools 


4 ^7."? 2 


437-32 
274-13 


Parks and Playgrounds 


274.13 








Total Unexpended Income ... 


$8,^^=5.^^ 


$7,623.88 


$711.45 






Permanent Funds: 
Cemetery Trusts 


$353,807.62 

1,200.00 

1,961.73 
93.786.24 

2,000.00 


$353,807.62 


$ 


School Trusts .. 


1,200.00 


Parks and Playgrounds Trusts 




1,961.73 
93.786.24 


Library Trusts 




Other 










Total Permanent Funds 


$452,755-59 


$353,807.62 


$98,947-97 



Total Liabilities $461,090.92 $361,431.50 $99,659.42 

Annual Report -f -f i JS 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1944 

Total Cemetery Other 

All Funds Trust Funds Trust Funds 
Cash Balances of Unexpended Income ■ — • January 

I, 1944 $5>428.35 $4,773.19 $655.16 



Receipts: 

Income from Interest and Dividends: 

School Trusts $32.47 $ $32.47 

Park and Playground Trusts 43.82 43-82 

Library Trusts 10,115.28 10,115.28 

Other 40.00 40.00 

Cemeteries 7.398.33 7.398-33 

One-third Receipts from Sale of Lots 1,220.00 1,220.00 



Total Receipts $18,849.90 $8,618.33 $10,231.57 



t24,27S.25 $13,391. 52 5t'io,»8b.73 



Disbursements: 

School Trusts $20.00 $ $20.00 

Park and Playground Trusts 

Library Trusts 10,115.28 10,115.28 

Other 40.00 40.00 

Cemeteries 5,767.64 5,767.64 



Total Disbursements $15,942.92 $5,767.64 $10,175.28 



Cash Balances of Unexpended Income — December 

31, 1944 $8,335.33 $7,623.88 $711-45 



TRUST FUNDS 

Reconciliation of Fund Balances 

Total Cemetery Other 

All Funds Trust Funds Trust Funds 

Fund Balances — -January i, 1944 $438,867.54 $343,153-03 $95,714.51 

Add: 

New Trusts ■ — Sundry Cemetery $9,097.50 $9,097.50 $ 

New Trusts — Special 3.333-46 100.00 3,233.46 

Sale of Lots ^ — -one-third to Permanent Fund 1,220.00 1,220.00 

Sale of Graves 220.00 220.00 

Seth K. Jones 17-09 17-09 



Total Additions $13,888.05 $10,654.59 $3,233.46 



Fund Balances — December 31, 1944 $452,755.59 $353,807.62 $98,947.9^ 

y4 i i -f City of Concord 



DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS - SANITARY SEWERS 

Balance Sheet- — December 31, 1944 
ASSETS 
Current Assets: 

Cash . $8,478.25 

Accounts Receivable 6,754.93 

Materials and Supplies 600.20 

Total Current Assets $15,833.38 

Fixed Assets: 

Mains $840,219.29 

Manholes 89,750.86 

Customers' Connections 109.937.28 

$1,039,907.43 

Less Depreciation Reserve 487,399.57 

Total Fixed Assets 552,507.86 

Total Assets $568,341.24 

LIABILITIES 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable $903.10 

Capital: 

Contributions in aid of construction $109,863.59 

Contributions from City 454,260.83 

$564,124.42 

Earned Surplus 3,3 13.72 

Total Capital .r. 567,438.14 

Total Liabilities $568,341.24 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1944 

Operating Revenues: 

General Rents $20,380.36 

Industrial Rents 4,385.94 

Customers' Penalties 32.54 

Total Operating Revenues $24,798.84 

Operating Expenses: 

Superintendence $2,119.18 

Main and Manhole Operating Labor and Expense 1,747.20 

Customers' Connections Operating Labor and Expense 433-55 

Maintenance of Mains 833.76 

Maintenance of Manholes 1 85.42 

Maintenance of Customers' Connections 42.21 

Customers' Meter Reading and Collecting 225.78 

Customers' Billing and Accounting 677.32 

Salaries of General Office Employees 11 1.59 

General Office Supplies and Expense 155-45 

Insurance — Workmen's Compensation i3i-53 

Insurance — Miscellaneous 23.82 

Injuries 108.00 

Annual Leave, Sick Leave, Holiday Pay 1,391.77 

Miscellaneous General Expense 271.58 

Inventory Adjustments 3.44 

Total Operating Labor and Expenses $8,461.60 

Depreciation 13,023.52 

Total Operating Cost 21,485.12 

Earned Surplus $3,313.72 



Annual Report ■* i 1 JS 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1944 

ASSETS 
Current Assets: 

Cash $19,857.97 

Accounts Receivable 129.40 

Material and Supplies 16,971.00 

Total Current Assets $36,958-37 

Fixed Assets: 

Water and Flowage Rights $167,688.11 

Engineering and Superintendence Construction Cost 63,877.22 

Land 129,386.35 

Structures (less depreciation reserve) 198,393.14 

Equipment (less depreciation reserve) 13,229.89 

Distribution System (less depreciation reserve) 668,087.03 

Other Equipment (less depreciation reserve) 4,525.04 

Total Fixed Assets 1,245,186.78 

Other Assets: 

Income — Investment Fund 86,352.25 

Total Assets $1,368,497.40 

LIABILITIES 

Current Liabilities: 

Interest Coupons Payable $146.00 

Funded Debt: 

Bonds Payable •-- 91,000.00 

Total Liabilities $91,146.00 

Capital: 

Municipal Investment $9631 1 94-74 

Federal Grants in Aid of Construction 61,915.08 1,025,109.82 

Surplus: 

Balance — January 1, 1944 $227,644.72 

Net Profit for the Year 24,596.86 

— ■ — — ■ — 252,241.58 

Total Liabilities $1,368,497.40 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 



Income — Investment Account 

CAPITAL AND INCOME 

Balance • — January i, 1944 

Transferred from Cash Balance 

Income Received during year 

Balance — December 31, 1944 

INVESTMENTS 

U. S. Treasury Bonds zVi 64/69 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2 52/54 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2 '/2 66/71 

Deposited in: 

Loan & Trust Savings Bank 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 

Union Trust Company 

Balance — December 31, 1944 



^69,714.39 

15,000.00 

1,637.86 

586,352.25 



1130,000.00 

10,000.00 

5,000.00 

9,945.18 
11,310.12 
10,058.37 
10,038.58 
586,352.25 



j6 i i -f City oj Concord 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations for the Year Ending December 31, 1944 

RECEIPTS 

Water Sales: 

Commercial — Flat Rate $3,082.64 

Commercial — Metered 78,51 1.29 

Industrial • — • Metered 1 9,333. 1 

Miscellaneous Water Revenue 35-oo 

Total Operating Revenue 

EXPENDITURES 

Operating Expenses: 

Water Supply Expense $2 1 ,866.64 

Distribution Expense 1 9,784. 1 8 

General and Miscellaneous Undistributed Expense 9,429.00 

Depreciation 23,166.72 

Total Operating Expenses 

Net Operating Income 

Other Income 

Other Expense — Interest Paid 

Net Profit for Year ;. 



$100,962.03 



74 
$26 



246.54 

715-49 
,970.12 



$28,1 
$24,596.86 



,685.61 
,088.75 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Cash Receipts and Expenditures 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1944 

RECEIPTS 

Balance, January i, 1944 

Receipts: 

For Water at Fixed Rates, General $3,036.01 

For Water at Meter Rates, General 78,250.59 

For Water at Meter Rates, Industrial 19,329.62 

For Water for Miscellaneous Uses 35-Oo 

From Delinquents 223.75 

For Pipe and Stock Sold and Labor 527.49 

For Hay, Old Iron and Brass 278.97 

Refund on Insurance and Freight 77.60 

Total Receipts 

EXPENDITURES 
Orders Paid: 

Operation and Maintenance $51,618.31 

Plant Account 3,346.03 

Bonds and Interest Paid: 

Bonds $17,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 4,088.75 

Total Expenditures 

Transferred to Investment Account and for Purchase of U. S. 

Treasury Bonds „ 

Accrued Interest on Purchase of U. S. Treasury Bonds 

Balance in City Treasury, December 31, 1944 



,152.03 



101,759.03 
110,911.06 



}.964-34 



2i,o»».75 

$76,053.09 

15,000.00 

4.14 

I9.853-83 

$110,911.06 



Annual Report 



77 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1944 



Money raised for the: 

County 

City Budget 

Schools: 

* City Union 

** Penacook Union 



Assessed 

Vahiatioti of 

City and Precinct 

$33,083,027.00 
33,083,027.00 

31,026,782.00 
2,068,695.00 



Total 

Allowed for Errors and Corrections 

Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 

City Rate 

Penacook Rate 

Average Rate for City 

* Includes property located in Loudon. 
** Includes property located in Canterbury. 



Amount of 
Appropriation 

172,863.94 
477,293.00 

433,290.09 
40,107.20 

fi.023, 554-23 



Poll Taxes 



Men 

Women 



No. 
5.117 
7.299 



Total 



12,416 



Exemptions 



Veterans 

Property Valuation 
Polls (77) 

Blind 

Property Valuation 
Polls (8) 



Total Exemptions 
Bank Stock 



Bank Stock 



Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 



Type 
Improved and Unimproved Land and Buildings 

Electric Plants 

Growing Wood and Timber 

Horses 

Asses and Mules 

Oxen 

Cows 

Neat Stock 

Sheep (includmg Goats) 

Hogs 

Fowls 

Fur-bearing Animals 

Vehicles 

Portable Mills 
Boats and Launches 
Wood and Lumber 
Gas Tanks and Pumps 
Stock in Trade 
Machinery 

Total 

jS i i i City of Concord 



No. 



180 



1,083 

183 

72 

36 

23,405 

75 



Tax Rate 
per $1,000 

$2.20 
14.42 

13-97 
19.39 



30,706.62 

1,088,928.60 

3,571.61 

30-59 
36.01 

30.93 



Amount 
$24,245.00 
36,477.00 

$60,722.00 



5)200,347.00 
231.00 

1,000.00 
40.00 

$281,618.00 
$6,217.41 

Valuation 

528,927,060.00 

1,700,580.00 

6,355.00 

21,755.00 

0.00 

300.00 

148,105.00 

16,315.00 

744.00 

540.00 

23,405.00 

405.00 

0.00 

0.00 

1,500.00 

20,408.00 

24,570.00 

1,748,655.00 

442,330.00 

533,083,027.00 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1944 



Direct Expenditures for Relief: 
Cash Allowance 
Groceries 
Milk 
Fuel 
Rent 

Board and Care — Adults 
Board and Care — Children 
Medical 
Clothini; 
Miscellaneous 



City 


County 


Total 


i3.070.50 


$6,409.50 


$9,480.00 


1,302.91 
174.87 
644.30 


3.009-95 
1,782.80 
1,412.25 


4,312.86 
1,957.67 
2,056.55 


913.00 


1,562.00 


2,475.00 


2.277.27 


1,305.10 


3.582.37 


1,128.00 




1,128.00 


646.93 

82.92 

366.32 


2,706.60 
333-98 
602.63 


3.353-53 
416.90 
968.95 



Miscellaneous 5.15 5.15 



12.50 

298.00 

538.67 


5-15 


$2 


.995-32 



Miscellaneous 302.29 47-56 349-85 



Total Administration $5,845.35 $4,833.61 $10,678.96 

Old Age Assistance 16,124.92 16,124.92 



Grand Totals $36,004.30 $26,953.74 $62,958.04 



162.03 

104.49 

60.00 


221.10 


47.56 


$4,833-61 




$26,953.74 



Total City and County Poor $10,607.02 $19,124.81 $29,731.83 

Other Towns 467.64 467.64 

Hospitalization 2,736.57 2,736.57 



513,811.23 $19,124.81 $32,936.04 



Dependent Soldiers: 

Cash Allowances $192.00 $1,964.50 $2,156.50 

Groceries 25.80 176.50 202.30 

Milk 

Fuel 1 2.50 1 2.50 

Rent 298.00 298.00 

Medical 5.00 538.67 543-67 

Clothing 



5,210.12 



Administration : 

Salaries — Overseers $1,197.65 $962.90 $2,160.55 

Salaries — Office and Case Workers 3.158.73 3,184.98 6,343.71 

Mileage 130.91 90.55 221.46 

Auto Use and Auto Hire 

Office Supplies 168.20 162.03 330-23 

Telephone 104.47 104.49 208.96 

Lights 1 01. 01 1 01. 01 

Heat 60.00 60.00 1 20.00 

Janitor Service 156.00 156.00 

Withholding and Victory Taxes (Wages) 266.09 221.10 487.19 

Auto Maintenance 200.00 200.00 



Annual Report -r -r -f jg 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Financial Statement eor the Year Ending December 31, 1944 



Appropriation 

Roads and Bridges $148,410.04 

Office 4,654.00 

Refuse Collection 35-657.00 

Table Garbage 5,800.00 

Sewers 2,392.00 

Engineering 8,700.00 

Lighting Streets 40,531.56 

Clerk of Board 200.00 

Trees 7,363.00 

Parks 13,545.00 

Cemeteries 30,525.40 

Total $297,778.00 



Total 

Receipts Available 

^22,601.69 $171,011.73 

4,654.00 

114.67 35.771-67 

5,800.00 

8.64 2,400.64 

24.71 8,724.71 

13.40 40,544.96 

200.00 

58.68 7.421.68 

36.82 13,581.82 

15,255.81 45,781.21 



Expended 

162,372.57 

4,438.98 

36,300.84 

5,800.00 

832.36 

8,703.33 

40,539.04 

200.00 


Unexpended 

Balance or 

Overdraft* 

$8,639.16 

215.02 

529.17* 


1,568.28 

21.38 

5-92 


6,609.43 

13.504-73 
42,254.00 


812.25 

77.09 

3.527-21 



,114.42 $335,892.42 $321,555.28 $14,337.14 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement of Receipts and E.xpenditures 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1944 

Receipts: 

Received for fines, costs and sundry fees 

Expenditures: 

Special Justices $3.00 

Clerk's Bond 5.00 

Postage and Supplies 45-05 

Paid Louis Borosfsky for restitution made by Guy Roger Young 

in State vs. Young 6.75 

State of New Hampshire Motor Vehicle Department 2,070.00 

Balance — Paid City Treasurer 



$4,089.98 



2,129.00 



$1,960.18 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 



Of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 



Tax Levies and Rates 1935 — 1944 



Polls 

1935 13338 

1936 13166 

1937 1 361 2 

1938 13490 

1939 13877 

1940 14334 

1 94 1 13874 

1942 1 31 84 

1943 12205 

1944 1 24 1 6 



Veterans 


Valuations 


Tax 


Rate 


1116 


$31,910,830.00 


$1,193,828.43 


$36.48 


1030 


32,039,851.00 


1,245,352.87 


37-86 


919 


32,195,052.00 


1,290,330.81 


39-04 


936 


32,201,370.00 


1,282,689.02 


38.82 


958 


32,365,017.00 


1,176,029.78 


35-30 


925 


32,791,790.00 


1,280,926.90 


38.00 


896 


33,068,487.00 


1,264,315.56 


37-20 


897 


33,282,876.00 


1,312,838.22 


38.40 


796 


33,251,268.00 


1,087,147.04 


31.80 


679 


33,083,027.00 


1,088,928.60 


30.59 



80 i i i City of Concord 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 



Oh Budget Appropriations, 1939 — 1944 



Operating Budget : 

City Poor 

City Poor, Ward One 

Bonds and Notes 

Interest, Bonds and Notes 

City Hall and Auditorium 

Mayor ...._ ._ 

City Clerk 

City Solicitor 

City Treasurer 

Cit\- Physician ._ 

Weights and Measures 

Police Court 

Probation Officer 

Assessors 

Tax Collector 

Real Estate Agent 

Elections 

Fire Department 

Health Department _ 

Department of Public Works ... 

Cemeteries 

Parks 

Trees 

PI aygrounds 

Planning Board , 

Public Library 

Police Department 

Comfort Station 

Recreation Commission 

Zoning Board 

w. p: a 

Mi.srelloneous : 

Clock, care of 

Incidentals and Land Damages 

Printing and Stationery 

Repairs Buildings 

Board of Aldermen, Salary 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital . 

Memorial Hospital 

Family Welfare Society 

Concord District Nursing 

Ass'n _ 

Penacook Nursing Ass'n ...._ 

Memorial Day 

Armistice Day 

Armistice Day. Penacook 

Spanish War Veterans 

Band Concerts _ 

Work Relief Projects _... 

Nursing Schools 

Auditing . 

Survey, Bal. Acct. 1938 

Civilian Defense 

Finance Committee : 
Contingent Fund 



1939 
$88,000.00 



Gross Operating Budget _ 

Capital Budget Items : 

City Clerk 

Fire Department . 
Department Public Works 

Playgrounds _ 

Police Department 

W. P. A. Department _ 

Tax Collector 



Total Capital Bvidget 

Total Municipal Budget 
Estimated Income 



74,000,00 
16,. 586. 2,5 
6.548.00 
3.300.0(1 
7, 912.00 
1,460.00 
3,367.00 
1,800.00 
1,200.00 
2,900.00 
1,410.00 
10,878.00 
6,522.85 

"4,100,00 

68.972.00 

6,644.00 

263,492.26 

16,728.00 

13,879.00 

13,206.00 

10,232.00 

3,485.00 

12.388.34 

60.739.90 

875.00 

2,150.00 

175.00 



85.00 
2.500.00 
2,500.00 

934.00 
1,915.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 

350.00 

350.00 
200.00 
400.00 
100.00 

400,00 

500.00 

2,500.00 



750,00 
642.50 



mo 

$56,000.00 



107,000.00 
15,288.75 
6.800.00 
3„568.,50 
7,920.00 
1.560.00 
3,370.85 
1 ,800.00 
1.220.00 
2,900.00 
1,500.00 
11,404.00 
6,588.65 

4450^00 
69,435.00 

6,700.00 
283.479.86 
15.728.00 
13,803.00 
12.345.00 

9,870.00 

3.685.00 

20..500.00 

62,245.00 

900.00 

2,550.00 

175.00 

30,000.00 

2,500.00 

85.00 
2,500.00 
2.800.00 
1,000.00 
1,915.00 
5,000.00 
3,500.00 
3.50,00 

3.50,00 
200.00 
400.00 
100.00 

400.00 

500.00 

1,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,200.00 



1941 

$.53,415.00 
6.575.00 
93,000.00 
13.269.31 
7.0.50.00 
3,500.00 
8.292.00 
1,560.00 
3.675..50 
1.800.00 
1.220.00 
2,900.00 
1,500.00 
11.558.00 
6,738.65 

3,900.00 
75,713.00> 

6,900.00 
274.703.41 
15,315.00 
12.913.00 
10,849.00 
10,728.00 

3.885.00 
17,843.20 
67,289.00 

2,597.00 

2.550.00 

200.00 

35,000.00 



.50.00 
2, ,500. 00 
2,800.00 
1.000.00 
1.915.00 
5,000.00 
3,500.00 
350.00 

350.00 
200.00 
400.00 
100,00 

400^^00 

500.00 

1,. 500.00 

2,500.00 

1,200.00 



1942 

$54 ,.500.00 
5.925.00 
98,000.00 
12.345.00 
8,230.00 
3, .500. 00 
7.825.00 
1,560.00 
3,060.00 
1,800.0(1 
1.220.00 
2,900.00 
1 ,450.00 
11, .558.00 
6,738.65 



3,488.00 
77.435. .52 

6,925.00 

266.6.50.00 

20,388.00 

15,690.69 

8,400.00 
11.148.00 

4.685.00 
18.012.11 
71.088.62 

2,080.00 

2. .550. 00 

200.00 

20.800.00 



.50.00 
2..50O.0O 
2,200.00 
1,000.00 
1,915.00 



350.00 

350.00 
200.00 
400.00 
100.00 

400^00 

500.00 

1.500.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 



1943 

$41,500.00 
5.135.00 

107,000.00 
11,058.75 
8.697.50 
1,830.00 
8,454.50 
1.680.00 
4,789.25 



1,312.00 
2,960.00 
1,600,00 
12,018.00 
8,052.85 

4,100.00 

78.914.25 

7,2.55.00 

291,467.40 



10,083.00 
5.000.00 
23.000.00 
74,048.95 
2,248.00 
3..5OO.OO 
200.00 

6,524^50 

.50.00 
2,500.00 
2.7,50.00 
1,200.00 
1,915.00 



350.00 

350.00 
200.00 
400.00 
100.00 
30.00 
400.00 
1,000.00 



1,000.00 
3.000.00 



1944 

$39,9.50.00 
5.320.00 
57,000.00 
9.451.25 
8,984.50 
3,9.50.00 
9,000.00 
1,680.00 
4,876.00 

1,400.00 

2,960.00 

1,600.00 

12.9.58.00 

8.623.65 

475.00 

4,150.00 

95,803.79 

7,630.00 

297,778.00 



11,805.00 
5,247.25 
29,000.00 
79.018.91 
2,365.00 
3,500.00 
150.00 

9,288T00 

50.00 
2.500.00 
3.450.00 
1.200.00 
1,875.00 



3.50.00 

3,50.00 
200.00 
400.00 
100.00 
30.00 
400.00 
1,000.00 



1,000.00 

500.00 
6,000.00 



$725,4.98.00 $788,286.61 $780,704,07 $767,617.59 $737,613.45 $734,771.00 



250.00 - 

9,000.00 
4.052.40 

195.00 

2,282.00 

4,200.00 
265.00 



625.00 



700.00 
1,800.00 



$19,979.40 



$265.00 $3,125.00 



$725,498.00 $788,287.00 $780,704.07 $787,596.99 $737,878.45 $737,896.00 
$162,500.00 140,000.00 148,000.00 135,000.00 ♦225,285.00 *260.603.00 



Total Raised by Taxation ^ $562,998.00 $648,287.00 $632,705,00 $652,597.00 $512,593.00' $477,293.00 

* Includes cash on hand at beginning of year. 

Annual Report i i i 81 



RECONCILIATION OF TAX LEVIES, 1939-1944 

As OF December 31, 1944 



Tut Levy— 1944 1943 1942 1941 1940 1939 

Resident List $1,021,631.89 $1.0.56,1.52.33 $1,279,935.91 $1,229,917.73 $1,24.5.507.74 $1,141,546.57 

Poll Tax List _ 58.685.00 24.410.00 26,368.00 27,748.00 28,664.00 27,754.00 

Veterans Tax List 2.037.00 _ 

Non-Resident List 357.30 371.55 480.15 481.67 571.00 546.05 

Bank Stock 6,217.41 6,213.16 6,054.16 6,168.16 6,184.16 6,183.16 

Total Tax Levy $1,088,928.60 $1,087,147.04 $1,312,838.22 $1,264,315.56 $1,280,926.90 $1,176,029.78 



Additions — 

Additions and Corrections . $3,.571.61 $2,130.94 $1,283.46 $1,516.36 $1,707.84 $2,020.15 

Interest _ .54.26 3.742.37 8,845.49 10,300.42 12,612.17 12,848.52 

Costs — _ 179.20 1,260.01 1,707.75 2,103.31 2,341.61 2,439.25 

Total Additions _ $3,805.07 $7,133.32 $11,836.70 $13,920.09 $16,661.62 $17,307.92 

Total - _ $1,092,733.67 $1,094,280.36 $1,324,674.92 $1,278,235.65 $1,297,588.52 $1,193,337.70 



Deductions — 
Abatements $7,670.72 $10,078.25 $9,724.80 $10,193.76 $10,627.58 $9,698.09 



Total _ $1,085,062.95 $1,084,202.11 $1,314,950.12 $1,268,041.89 $1,286,960.94 $1,183,639.61 



Collections — 
Paid to Treasurer : 

Prior Years $ _ $964,100.93 $1,309,215.28 $1,264,707.23 $1,284,043.51 $1,181,375.15 

Current Year _.. 977,400.97 115..536.51 1,290.59 920.73 721.80 662.55 

Cash on Hand ..., _ 548.98 2.00 ,... _ _ ..._ 

Total Collected _ $977,949.95 $1,079,639.44 $1,310,505.87 $1,265,627.96 $1,284,765.31 $1,182,037.70 

Balance Uncollected $107,113.00 $4,562.67 $4,444.25 $2,413.93 $2,195.63 $1,601.91 



SuMM.'^RY OE Uncollected T.\xes — December 31, 1944 



Non-Resident . - _ 


$ 13.75 

1.132.61 

84.989.84 

20,976.80 


$ 

367.02 

271.85 

3,923.80 


$...,_ „ 


$ 

569.13 

1,844.80 


1 - 

565.43 


$.... 


Personal Tax List 

Property Taxes _ 


636.65 


150.16 


Poll Taxes _ _ 


3,807.60 


1,630.20 


1,451.75 


Total Uncollected 


$107,113.00 


$4,562.67 


$4,444.25 


$2,413.93 


$2,195.63 


11,601.91 



82 i 1 1 City of Concord 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiii-f-ffii-tiiii 



INDEX 



ify-iiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiii-f 



PAGE 

Activities in 1944 6 

Assessment 1 2 

Appendix : 65 

Bond Funds 14 

Building Activity 47 

Cemeteries 5^ 

City Clerk 10 

City Government 8 

City Officials 9 

Elections r 1 1 

Engineering 4 9 

Examination of Plumbers .17 



Finances 1 4 

Financial Statements and Statistics 66 

Fire Protection .■ 45 

Garbage Disposal 49 

General Fund 14 

Health and Sanitation 25 

Hydrants 45 

Legal Service 16 

Library 29 

Mayor's Message 5 

Milk Control 26 

' -t -f i i i i i i i i i i i 



Municipal Airport 54 

Municipal Court 42 

Parks 52 

Planning 17 

Playgrounds and Bath 21 

Plumbing Inspection 47 

Police Protection 34 

Probation : 39 

Public Works 48 

Recreation 21 

Refuse Collection 49 

Relief 32 

Schools 60 

Sewers 50 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 49 

Special Recreational Facilities 24 

Street Lighting 52 

Tax Collection 13 

Trees 52 

Trust Funds 14 

Vital Statistics 10 

Water Supply 57 

Weights and Measures 46 

Zoning Appeals 47 

iii-fiiii-f-fiiii 

Annual Report i i i 8^ 



BRIDGE & BYRON. Printers 
Concord, N. H. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 




FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1944 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY OF CONCORD 
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1944 



FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Chief 

Salaries 

Call Salaries 

Fire Alarm 

Fire Inspection 

Incidentals 

Repairs Buildings 

Fuel 

Lights 

Upkeep Equipment 

Telephones 

Insurance 

New Equipment 

Hose 

Supplies and Laundry 

Snow Removal 

Retirement Fund 



Capital Budget 
POLICE DEPARTMENT: 



Salary, Chief 

Salary, Deputy 

Salary, Captain 

Salary, Officers 

Salary, Patrolman and Bureau of Records 

Salary, Janitor 

Special Officers 

Car Expense 

Repairs 

Fuel 

Lights 

Auto and Auto Supplies 

Marking Streets 

Telephone, Gamewell and Radio 

Insurance 

Keeping Prisoners 

Printing 

Traffic Lights and Supplies 

Office Supplies and Equipment 

Retirement Fund 

Incidentals 



Capital Budget 

PUBLIC LIBRARY: 

Salaries 

Books, etc. 

Rent of Branches 

Heat, Light, etc. 

Supplies 

Incidentals, etc. 



Appropriation 


Expended Balance 


$3,300.00 


$3,300.06 


64,576.29 


64,798.32 


12,617.50 


11,971.63 


1,860.00 


1.925.38 


1,000.00 


970.25 


500.00 


705.03 


800.00 


825.86 


2.400.00 


2,508.91 


800.00 


778.80 


2.000.00 


1 ,989.66 


700.00 


716.64 


2,000.00 


1 ,929.65 


600.00 


589.01 


1 ,000.00 


980.00 


600.00 


427.35 


250.00 


211.02 


800.00 


870.39 


195,803.79 


$95,497.96 $305.83 


625.00 


600.00 25.00 


$3,300.00 


$3,300.00 


2,870.00 


2,869.96 


2,562.50 


2.576.58 


49,247.10 


48,426.17 


1,995.00 


2,005.93 


1,650.00 


1,179.10 


5.126.82 


4,288.76 


200.00 


200.00 


500.00 


994.60 


1 ,600.00 


1,766.69 


950.00 


840.71 


3,200.00 


3,718.78 


200.00 


184.95 


1 ,400.00 


1.315.84 


575.00 


658.87 


90.00 


70.00 


200.00 


159.20 


100.00 


81.97 


300.00 


217.78 


1,242.49 


1,131.13 


1,710.00 


1,925.40 


$79,018.91 


$77,912.42 $1,106.49 


1 ,800.00 


1,481.82 318.18 


$17,935.00 


$18,073.09 


5,985.00 


6,100.99 


180.00 


190.00 


3.490.00 


3,003.38 


800.00 


669.56 


610.00 


951.85 


$28,000.00 





Appropriation 
Balance, 1943 
Income, Trust Fluids, etc., 1943 



Appropriation 

$18,640.00 

4.32 

10,358.12 



Expended 



Balance 





$29,002.44 


$28,988.87 


$13.57 


BOARD OF HEALTH: 








Salary, Sanitary Officer 


$2,100.00 


$2,100.00 




Salary, Clerk 


1,650.00 


1,650.00 




Auto Allowance 


200.00 


200.00 




Departmental Expenses 


700.00 


280.00 


$419.99 


Milk Inspection: 








Salary, Inspector 


2,111.50) 
143.50 1 


9 255 00 




Contingent Fund 






Auto Allowance 


400.00 


400.00 




Incidentals 


325.00 


324.00 


i.bb 




$7,630.00 


$7,209.01 


$420.99 


MAYOR: 








Salary, Mayor 


$2,000.00 


$200.00 


$1,800.00 


Salary, Secretary 


1.650.00 


1,604.81 


45.19 


Incidentals 


300.00 


280.83 


19.17 




$3,950.00 


.$2,085.64 


$1,864.36 


CITY CLERK: 








Salary, City Clerk 


$2,870.00 


.$2,870.00 




Salary, Clerks 


4.965.00 


5.005.00 




Salary, Extra Clerk 


240.00 


137.34 




Auto Allowance 


200.00 


200.00 




Telephone 


75.00 


63.25 




Photostat 


200.00 


98.50 




Supplies 


450.00 


140.63 






$9,000.00 


$8,814.72 


$185.28 


CITY TREASURER: 








Salary, Treasurer 


$1,320.00 


$1,320.00 




Salary, Treas. Trust Funds 


1 10.00 


110.00 




Salary, Clerk 


1,701.00 


1.701.00 




Clerical Asst. Trust Funds 


250.00 


250.00 




Clerical Asst. Payrolls and Salary De- 








ductions 


1,320.00 


1,012.05 




Bond Deputy Treasurer 


25.00 


24.66 




Supplies and Incidentals 


150.00 


282.06 






$4,876.00 


$4,699.77 


$176.23 


CITY SOLICITOR: 








Salary, Solicitor 


$1,320.00 


$1,320.00 




Auto Allowance 


50.00 


32.60 


17.40 


Clerk Hire 


230.00 


230.00 




Supplies 


80.00 


63.75 


16.25 




$1,680.00 


$1,646.35 


$33.65 


SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: 








Salary, Sealer 


$1,100.00 


$1,099.92 


$.08 


Auto Allowance 


200.00 


200.00 




Supplies 


100.00 


20.05 


79.95 



1,400.00 $1,319.97 



POLICE COURT: 

Salary, Judge 

Salary, Associate Judge 

Salary, Clerk 



PROBATION OFFICER: 
Salary, Officer 
Clerk and Supplies 
Mileage 
Contingent Fund 



ASSESSORS: 

Salary, Assessors 

Salary, Clerks 

Auto Allowance 

Listing Polls 

Telephone 

Postage and Printing 

Supplies and Furniture 



TAX COLLECTOR: 

Salary, Collector 

Salary, Clerks 

Salary, Extra Clerk 

Clerk Hire 

Incidentals 

Collector and Clerks' Bonds 

Mileage 

Printing, Postage and Stationery 

Real Estate Sale 



REAL ESTATE AGENT: 

Salary, Agent 
Advertising, etc. 

ELECTIONS: 

Salary, Election Officers 
Rent, Voting Places 
Supplies 
Contingent Fund 



Printing and Stationery 

Incidentals and Land Damages 

Repairs Buildings 

Zoning 

Dog Licenses 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS: 

Roads and Bridges 
Earnings to balance account 



Appropriation 


Expended 


Balance 


$1,800.00 


$1,800.00 




500.00 


500.00 




660.00 


660.00 




$2,960.00 


$2,960.00 




$1,100.00 


$1,100.00 




300.00 


342.50 




200.00 


157.58 




5.00 






$1,605.00 


$1,600.08 


$4.92 


$6,400.00 


$6,233.34 


$166.66 


4,300.00 


4,285.65 


14.35 


400.00 


400.00 




1,000.00 


900.00 


100.00 


58.00 


52.31 


5.69 


400.00 


. 346.75 


53.25 


400.00 


205.02 


194.98 


$12,958.00 


$12,423.07 


$534.93 


$3,075.00 


$3,075.00 




2,860.00 


2,930.00 




200.00 


60.50 




1,000.00 


945.00 




88.65 


67.11 




150.00 


150.00 




100.00 


100.00 




1,150.00 


877.18 
354.64 




$8,623.65 


,$8,559.43 


,$64.22 


$247.50 


$247.50 




200.00 


18.50 


$181.50 


$447.50 


$266.00 


$181.50 


$3,100.00 


$3,182.00 




250.00 


285.00 




800.00 


1,623.26 




940.26 






.$5,090.26 


$5,090.26 




$3,450.00 


$3,120.05 


$329.95 


$2,500.00 


$1,352.07 


$1,147.93 


$1,200.00 


$346.91 


$853.09 


$150.00 


$120.27 
$169.48 


$29.73 


$148,410.04 


$162,372.57 




13.962.53 






$162,372.57 





Refuse Collection 

Earnings 
Contingent Fund 



Tal)le Garbage 
Lighting Streets 
Earnings to balance account 



Storm Sewers 

Trees 

Parks 

Salary, Clerk of Board 

Office 

Engineering 

Earnings to balance account 



Cemeteries 

Income Trust Funds, etc. 



PLAYGROUNDS: 

Salaries 

Equipment 

Auto Allowance 

Insurance 

Telephone and Electricity 

Trucking 

Fourth of July Celebration 



Capital Budget 

Recreation Commission 
Earnings to balance account 



CITY HALL AND AUDITORIUM 

Salary, City Messenger 

Salary, Janitors 

Fuel 

Lights and Gas 

Insurance 

Supplies 



SCHOOLS: 

Union School District: 
Balance Jan. 1, 1944 
Amount raised by district 
Teachers' Pensions 
Increase Cost of Living 
Survey School System 
Dog Licenses 
Abial Walker Fund 



Appropriation 

$35,657.00 
114.67 
529.17 


Expended 

$36,300.84 

.$5,800.00 
$40,539.04 

$832.36 

$6,609.43 

$13,504.73 

$200.00 
$4,438:98 
$8,703.33 

$42,254.00 

$7,775.01 
978.38 
400.00 
117.80 
90.13 
241.84 
329.11 


Balance 


$36,300.84 

$5,800.00 

$40,531.56 

7.48 




$40,539.04 

$2,392.00 

$7,363.00 

$13,545.00 

$200.00 

$4,654.00 

$8,700.00 

3.33 


$1,559.61 

$753.57 
$40.27 

$215.02 


$8,703.33 

$30,525.40 
$11,728.60 




$42,254.00 

$8,530.00 
1,675.00 
400.00 
150.00 
150.00 
500.00 
400.00 


$754.99 
696.62 

' 32.20 
59.87 

258.16 
70.89 


$11,805.00 
$700.00 

$3,500.00 
2,098.57 


$9,932.27 

$5,598.57 

$5,598.57 

$1,732.50 

3,102.00 

1,696.88 

898.93 

770.65 

441.91 


$1,872.73 
$700.00 


$5,598.57 

$1,732.50 

3,102.00 

1,750.00 

1,150.00 

750.00 

500.00 





?,984.50 



?,642.87 



$341.63 



$134,705.85 


$372,577.85 


338,239.28 




9,622.00 




25,500.00 




500.00 




2,683.96 




18.75 




$511,269.84 


$372,577.85 $138,691.99 



Interest on Bonds: 
Balance Jan. 1, 1944 
Amount raised by District 



Bonds and Notes: 
Amount raised i)y District 

Penacook District: 
Balance Jan. 1, 1944 
Amount raised by District 
1943 Bonus to employees 
Dog Licenses 
Abial Walker Fund 



COMFORT STATION: 

Salaries 
Incidentals 
Repairs 
Lighting 



Salary Board of Adlermen 
Auditing 

AIRPORT: 

Salary 

Miscellaneous 

Fuel 

Lights 

Repairs 

Sanding, Plowing and Mowing 

Insurance 

Capital Item 



y\ppropriation 
Balance, Jan. 1, 1944 
Receipts, 1944 



PLANNING BOARD: 

Salaries: 
Research 
Drafting 

Publishing Reports: 

Typing 

Printing 
Maps and Blueprints 
Supplies: 

Drafting 

Office 
Telephone 
Postage 
Auto Allowance 



Appropriation Expended 



Balance 



$7,553.09 
14,428.81 


$14,982.52 




$21,981.90 


$14,982.52 


$6,999.38 


$45,000.00 


$45,000.00 




$8,186.16 

37,567.20 

2,540.00 

178.95 

1.25 


•133,500.00 




$48,473.56 


$33,500.00 


$14,973.56 


$1,980.00 

170.00 

120.00 

95.00 


$1,831.50 

132.00 

114.50 

66.25 


$148.50 

38.00 

5.50 

28.75 


$2,365.00 
$1,875.00 
$1,000.00 


$2,144.25 

$1,875.00 

.$950.00 


$220.75 
$50.00 


$1,638.00 
500.00 
450.00 
450.00 
2,000.00 
3,500.00 
750.00 


$1,702.14 
441.00 
400.96 
359.28 
661.88 
723.34 
621.72 
5,727.23 




$9,288.00 


$10,637.55 




.$3,238.00 
5,050.84 
8,038.40 


•••■»■ 




$16,327.24 


$10,637.55 


$5,689.69 


$2,695.75 
1,764.00 


$2,695.75 
1,764.00 




100.00 

200.00 

67.50 


47.00 

132.89 

46.83 


$53.00 
67.11 
20.67 


65.00 
85.00 
45.00 
25.00 
200.00 


44.59 
62.00 
44.14 
21.00 
200.00 


20.41 

23.00 

.86 

4.00 



$5,247.25 $5,058.20 



$189.05 



CHARITIES. 

Family Welfare Society 

Concord District Nursing Association 

Penacook District Nursing Association 



Appropriation Expended 



Balance 



$350.00 
350.00 
200.00 

$900.00 



$350.00 
350.00 
200.00 

$900.00 



PATRIOTIC APPROPRIATIONS: 

Armistice Day 
Armistice Day, Penacook 
Band Concerts 
Civilian Defense 
Spanish War Veterans 



Care City Clock 

BONDS AND NOTES: 

City Hall and Auditorium 

Pul)lic ImiDrovement 

Highway 

Departmental Equipment 

Central Fire Station 

Sewers 

Airport 



INTEREST ACCOUNT: 
Bonds and Notes 
Temporary Loans 

1943 Real Estate Sold for Unpaid Taxes: 
Resolution No. 1563 

1944 Special Poll Tax Collected: 
Resolution No. 1569 

County Tax 

TEMPORARY LOAN NOTES: 

Borrowed in Anticipation of Taxes 
Paid December, 1944 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Contingent Fund 

Allocated to various Departments 



$100.00 
30.00 

1.000.00 
500.00 
400.00 



$100.00 



.$7,701.25 
1 ,750.00 



1 ,000.00 
343.87 
400.00 



.$57,000.00 .$57,000.00 



$7,638.75 
1,341.32 



$10,899.79 $10,899.79 

$23,940.00 ,$23,940.00 
$72,863.94 

.$600,000.00 

.$600,000.00 

$6,000.00 

$1,617.93 



$30.00 
156.13 



$2,030.00 


$1,843.87 


$186.13 


$50.00 


$6.00 


$44.00 


$5,000.00 


$5,000.00 




23,000.00 


23,000.00 




5,000.00 


5,000.00 




4,000.00 


4,000.00 




1,000.00 


1 ,000.00 




15,000.00 


15,000.00 




4,000.00 


4,000.00 





$62.50 
408.68 



$4,382.07 



RESUME OF DISBURSEMENTS 



City Departments 

City Poor and Soldiers 

County Poor and Soldiers 

Old Age Assistance 

Hospitalization 

City Notes 

City Bonds 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 

Schools 

Schools Bonds 

Schools, Interest on Bonds 

County Tax 

Private Charities 

Patriotic Appropriations 

1943 Real Estate Sold for Unpaid Taxes 

1944 Special Poll Tax 
Airport 



Poor Balances transferred to Treasury 
Balance on Hand January 1, 1945 



$622,026.59 

17,143.70 

26,953.74 

16,124.92 

2,736.57 

600,000.00 

57,000.00 

8,980.07 

406,077.85 

45,000.00 

14,982.52 

72,863.94 

900.00 

2,243.87 

10,899.79 

23,940.00 

10,637.55 

$1,938,511.11 

2,525.99 

224,264.23 

$2,165,301.33 



WATER WORKS 

Receipts Expenditures 

Balance on Hand January 1, 1944 .$9,152.03 

Water rents 101,759.03 

Expenditures, maintenance $69,968.48 

Bonds 17,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 4,088.75 

Balance on Hand January 1, 1945 19,853.83 

$110,911.06 $110,911.06 



SANITARY SEWERS: 

Receipts to Jan. 1, 1945 

Appropriation reverted to General Funtl 

Available balance as of January 1, 1945 

MUNICIPAL AIRPORT: 
Bond Account No. 1 
Balance on Hand January 1, 1944 
Transferred from Bond Account No. 2 



Appropriation Expended 



$18,954.00 
18.802.31 



$10,324.06 



$1,624.85 
22.78 



$1,621.00 



Balance 



i,478.25 



$26.63 



MUNICIPAL AIRPORT: 
Bond Account No. 2: 
Balance on Hand January 1, 1944 
Transferred to Bond Account No. 1 



$930.28 



.$907.50 
22.78 



PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT: 
Auditorium Bond Account: 
Balance on Hand January 1, 1944 
Transferred to General Account 



>,351.34 



$5,351.34 



RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

Appropriation Expended Balance 
CITY POOR: 
Checks drawn in favor of J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $18,350.00 

Relief City Proper $14,553.41 

Relief, Penacook 2,367.49 



$18,350.00 $16,920.90 
Transferred to City Treasury $1,429.10 

DEPENDENT SOLDIERS CITY: 

Checks drawn in favor of J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $285.00 

Relief, City Proper $222.80 

Transferred to City Treasury $62.20 

COUNTY POOR: 
Checks drawn in favor of J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $24,600.00 

Relief, City and Penacook $23,958.42 

Transferred to City Treasury $641.58 

DEPENDENT SOLDIERS COUNTY: 
Checks drawn in favor of J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $3,225.00 

Relief, City and Penacook $2,995.32 

Transferred to City Treasury .$229.68 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Checks drawn in favor of J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $16,124.92 

Relief, City Proper $1 4,440.71 

Relief, Penacook 1 ,684.21 



$16,124.92 $16,124.92 

HOSPITALIZATION: 

Checks drawn in favor of J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $2,900.00 

Hospital care ,$2,736.57 

Transferred to City Treasury $163.43 



RECEIPTS OF CITY FOR TWELVE MONTHS 
ENDING DECEMBER 31. 1944: 

Balance on Hand January 1, 1944 $202,563.23 

City Clerk's Department 2,663.45 

Dog Licenses 3,032.39 

Filing fees, State Primary 92.00 

Rent Airport 8,038.40 

Rent, Charles Julian 144.00 

Sale of Wood 141.44 

Comfort Station 185.37 

Fire Department 808.36 

Fire Department, credit a/c 1943 262.50 

Rent Chief Green 275.00 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1943 247.49 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1944 14,933.95 

Municipal Court Fees 1,960.18 

Relief Department: 

Reimbursement Manchester 216.46 

Reimbursement Greenville 83.20 

Reimbursement Estate G. W. Drake 85.00 

Reimbursement Merrimack County 28,248.64 

Reimbursement Merrimack County, clothing 5.03 

Reimbursement Merrimack County, Garceau 24.47 

City Poor, Board and care Joyce Price 360.00 

City Poor, Board and care H. Young 86.00 

Reimbursement Chichester 120.00 

Reimbursement Strafford County 38.58 

Sale Nursery School Equipment 62.10 

Refund Jackman &: Lang Admrs. 23.79 

Refund 1914 to General Account 2.00 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Drake 50.98 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Whiting 58.10 

Reimbursement City Poor, Smith 100.00 

Reimbursement City Poor, Lang 22.96 

Relief Department toll calls .70 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Favreault 25.00 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Goodrich 40.50 

Tax on B. & M. R. R. Ticket 1.00 

Reimbursement Warner 22.93 

1944 balance transferred. City Poor 1,429.10 

1944 balance transferred, County Poor 641.58 

1944 balance transferred. Dependent Soldiers, City 62.20 

1944 balance transferred. Dependent Soldiers, County 229.68 

1944 balance transferred Hospitalization 163.43 

Police Department 395.91 

Bicycle Permits 603.00 

Public Library 1,075.00 

Engineering Department 24.71 

Lighting Streets 13.40 

Roads and Bridges 22,601.69 

Trees 58.68 

Storm Sewers 8.64 

Refuse 114.67 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers 24.50 

Reimbursement Loss Taxes Public Forests 60.18 

Assessors 1.08 

Auditorium Bond Account 5,351.45 

Rent Auditorium 805.00 

Municipal Golf Course 2,664.55 



Memorial Field $293.32 

Milk Licenses 288.00 

Rent of Land and Circus License 50.00 

Bounty on Hedgehogs 16.90 

Park Department 36.82 

Refund Playgrounds 2.13 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 2.00 

1940 Redemptions 837.16 

1941 Redemptions 17,831.40 

1942 Redemptions 19,253.68 

1943 Redemptions ' 3,214.47 

1939 Taxes 662.55 

1940 Taxes 721.80 

1941 Taxes 920.73 

1942 Taxes 1,539.99 

1943 Taxes 115,536.51 

1944 Taxes 977,440.75 
Rents and Sale Property deeded to City 1,726.21 

State of New Hampshire: 

Building & Loan Association 35.59 

Interest and Dividends 59,643.28 

Railroad Tax 12,928.89 

Savings Bank Tax 25,570.97 

Income various funds account Cemeteries 15,255.81 

Income Public Library Trusts 10,118.83 

Income Walker Trust, schools 20.00 



$1,565,301.33 
Tax Anticipation Notes 600,000.00 



$2,165,301.33 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



ORDINANCES 

and 

RES OL UTI N S 

passed 

during the Tear Ending 

December 31^ 1944 



^ ^ 



ORDINANCES 

passed during the \ ear 
ending December 31, 1944 



An Ordinaxce amending chapter 3 
of the revised ordinances of the city 
of concord. 

Be if ordiiiiu'd by the Board of Aldcniicii 
of the City of Concord, as follozcs: 

Section 1. Amend Section S of said 
ordinance striking ont the words "liefore 
February 1" in the tliirteentii line and 
insert the following : "not later than the 
second Monday in February", so that said 
ordinance, when amended, sliall read as 
follows : 

"Sect. 8. The Committee on Finance, 
with the assistance of the City Treasurer 
and City Clerk, shall, not later than 
Nt)vember 15 of each year, ])repare and 
lay before the Board of Aldermen an 
estimate of the amount of money neces- 
sary to be raised for the ensuing year 
under appropriate titles to conform to the 
classification of accounts in force, and a 
statement of the ways and means for 
raising the same. Final action on all 
items of the budget of whatsoever nature 
shall be taken not later than the second 
Monday in February of each year, so 
that said Inidget shall be passed before 
said last mentioned date." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed Januarv 10, 1944. 



An Ordinance relating to the estab- 
lishing OF AN OFFICIAL M.M' OF THE 
CITY OF CONCORD. 

Be it ordai)ied by the Board of . Ilderiiieii 
of the City of Concord, as follo-ies: 

WHEREAS the City Planning Board 
has progressed in its master planning to 
the stage of the making and adoption of a 
major street plan based on surveys made 
by the City Engineer and recorded on 
street layouts numbered 1-153 and in 
survey notebooks 176 and 188 in the office 
of the City Engineer, and has certified a 
copy of such major street plan to this 
Board, 

NOW, THEREFORE, the plan identi- 
fied as Major Street Plan, South-Central 
Section dated Januarv 4. 1<M4, over the 



signatures of the City 1-Jigineer and the 
Chairman and Secretary of the City Plan- 
ning Board is established as an official 
map of that part of the City described 
thereon, showing the location of the ex- 
terior lines of streets heretofore existing, 
laid out and established by law as public 
streets, and also showing the location of 
the exterior lines of parks. 

The City Clerk shall execute a certifi- 
cate giving notice that the City has 
established the official map described 
above, stating the date of such establish- 
ment, and he shall file such certificate 
with the Register of Deeds of Merrimack 
County, New Hampshire. The City 
Clerk shall cause a certified copy of the 
above described map to be delivered to the 
Register of Deeds together with the cer- 
tificate of the City Clerk. 

Passed January 20, 1944. 



Certificate 

January 24, 1944 
Register of Deeds 
Merrimack County 
Concord, New Hampshire 

This is to certify that at an adjourned 
meeting of the Board of Aldermen held 
January 20, 1944, the (jfficial map of the 
City of Concord identified as Major 
Street Plan, South-Central Section 
dated January 4, 1944, herewith attached, 
was established as an official map of the 
City of Concord by an ordinance passed 
on this same date, in accordance with the 
l)rovisions of the Public Laws of the State 
of New Ham])sliire of 1935, Chapter 55, 
Sections If.- 18. 

Attest : 

Arthur E. Robv 
Citv Clerk ■ 



An Ordinance amending chapter 111, 

section 8 OF THE REVISED ORDINANCES. 

Be it ordained l>y the Board of .Uderinen 
of the City of Concord, as folloies : 

Amend Chapter 111, Section 8 of the 
Revised ordinances by striking out the 
last five lines of Section 8 so it will read, 
"The Committee on Finance, with the 
assistance of the City Treasurer and City 
Clerk, shall, not later than November 15 
of each year, prepare and lay before the 
Board of Aldermen an estimate of the 
amount of monev necessary to be raised 



O 3 



for the ensuing year under apjjrupriate 
titles to conform to tlie classification of 
accounts in force, and a statement of the 
ways and means for raising tlie same". 
Passed February 14. 1944. 



An Ordinance amending chapter lii 

OF THE revised ORDINANCES OF THE 
CITY OF CONCORD TO ESTABLISH A CLASSI- 
FICATION AND COMPENSATION PLAN FOB 
EMPLOYEES OF THE CITY OF CONCORD. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Ahienneti 
of the City of Co)ieord. as follozes: 

PART ONK— AMENDMENT 
AND REPEAL 
Section 1. Chapter 52 of the Revised 
Ordinances of the City of Concord is here- 
by amended by striking out the whole 
thereof, and by substituting in its i)lace 
the following new Chpater 52. 

PART TWO 
CLASSIFICATION PLAN 

.Section 1. The classification of posi- 
tions in the City service set fortli in the 
C lassification Plan dated Feliniary 24, 
1944 as submitted to the Board of Alder- 
men by the Finance Committee is hereby 
incorporated and made a part hereof by 
reference, and adopted as Part Two, Sec- 
tion 1 of this Ordinance, to become effec- 
tive in accordance with the terms set 
forth in this Ordinance. Tlie Classifica- 
tion Plan shall be applied with the words 
Equivalent and Minimum Qualifications 
therein, defined as follows: "Eqiiii'aleiit" 
The word et|uivalent wherever used in 
said Classification Plan shall be inter- 
preted as meaning 'of equal value'. 
Miniiiiiiiii Oiialifications." In considering 
the value of "experience and training" 
ec|uivalent to high school or college gra- 
duation, scholastic attainments shall not 
be the sole test. Department heads, boards, 
committees or commissions which have 
the i)ower of employment, appointment or 
promotion of officers or employees may, 
in absence of scholastic attainments, find 
that applicants for positions or employees 
who are subject for promotions, have 
ai)titudes, experience gained out of em- 
ployment in positions of responsibility, 
practical experience and practical train- 
ing that may be equal to and substitute for 
scholastic attainments, which will qualify 
said applicants or said em])loyces to meet 
the Minimum Qualification tests set forth 
in this Classification Plan. 

.Sect. 2. Said classificatinn jtlan witli 



any amendments thereto shall at all times 
remain on record in the office of the City 
Clerk and shall be open to public inspec- 
tion during office hours. 

Sect. 3. On and after the date of the 
passage of this ordinance, all persons em- 
ployed by the City of Concord shall be 
assigned to positions as hereinafter pro- 
vided : and no salary, wage, or other com- 
pensation shall be paid to anyone not em- 
ployed in accordance with the provisions 
herein prescribed, except this Section shall 
not be construed to limit the powers of 
the Mayor to act in emergencies in ac- 
cordance with the terms of City Ordi- 
nances, nor shall it apply until adopted 
by certain boards, departments and com- 
missions as set out in Part Six hereof. 

Sect. 4. All j^ositions in the City serv- 
ice other than those specifically exempted 
in Part Six shall be deemed to be in the 
classified service. Each position in the 
classified service shall be assigned to 
the class provided in the classification 
plan established herein by Part Two Sec- 
tion 1 which most accurately embraces 
the duties and responsibilities required by 
the position. Any employee of the City 
who deems his classification improper, 
or his salary inadequate, may file a writ- 
ten request (with the head of his depart- 
ment ) for a review of his classification 
and/or salary. Said department head 
immediately upon the filing of said re- 
quest shall notify the chairman of the 
board, committee or commission having 
jurisdiction of said department, of the 
filing of said request. Said chairman 
shall grant said employee a hearing be- 
fore said board, committee or commission 
within twenty days of the date said re- 
quest has been filed with said department 
head. The decision of said board, 
committee or commission shall be 
filed with the City Clerk within 
three days after said hearing. If said 
original hearing is not held within the 
twenty day period or if no decision has 
been rendered within three days after 
the hearing, said employee will be entitled 
to have the Board of IMayor and Alder- 
men pass upon said request at its next 
regular meeting. In the event said de- 
partment head is not serving in a posi- 
tion wherein a board, committee or com- 
mission has jurisdiction, said request 
shall be referred to the Finance Commit- 
tee and action on the same shall be in 
accordance with the procedure set forth 
in this section. All decisions mav be re- 



O 4 



viewed, niocHfied or anicndcd 1)\- the Hoard 
of Mayor and Aldermen. 

Skction 5. On and after the date of 
the passage of this ordinance, no i)ersoii 
may be appointed to a position in the 
classified service unless he possessed the 
minimum qualifications prescribed for 
the ]xisition in the classification ])lan as 
established in Part Two, Section 1 here- 
of. The head of the department, Iioard, 
committee or commission making the 
appointment shall complete and file with 
the City Clerk at least seven days before 
the appointment of any person to a posi- 
tion in the classified service, on prescribed 
forms, a written statement of the an- 
l)ointee's ([ualifications for the particular 
]Kisition in said classified service to which 
the person seeks appointment and said 
written statement shall be deemed a pub- 
lic record and open to public inspection. 

Sect. 6. The titles assigned to jiosi- 
tions by their assignment to the classes 
established by the classification ]ilan shall 
be used in all personnel, accounting, bud- 
get, appropriation and financial records 
of the City. 

Sect. 7. The division, creation, abol- 
ishment or amendments of classes of ])osi- 
tion shall remain solely in the Board of 
.Aldermen. 

Part Three — Compens.\tion Pe.an 

Section 1. The following com])ensa- 
tion i)lan is hereby adoiited as the official 
comjiensation plan for the classified serv- 
ice and shall be applied to positions in 
that service as hereinafter provided. 

Sdhiry 
P(K^ifi()ii l/;//.-.l/((.r. 

Deputv Citv Clerk l.dOO-l.yOd 

Milk Inspector l,y(l()-2.2()() 

-Assistant Librarian 1,2(1(1-1,500 

Relief Investigator 1,140-1,440 

Deputy Chief of Police 2.800 

Police Captain 2,500 

Police Inspector 2.400 

Police Sergeant 2,300 

Police Patrosman 1,900-2,100 

Police Clerk 1,900-2,100 

First Deputy Fire Chief 2.800 

Second Deputy Fire Chief .... 2,500 

Fire Captain" 2,400 

Fire Lieutenant Z.MM 

Fireman 1.900-2.100 

Switchboard Operator 1,500 

Court Clerk 000 

Junior Accountant 1.620-1.920 

Senior Clerk 1,140-1,020 



.Senior Clerk-Stenographer , 

.Senior Clerk-Typist 

Clerk-Stenographer 

Clerk-Typist 

.Account Clerk 

Clerk 

Probation Officer 

Superintendent, Parks and 

Cemeteries 

Assistant Fngineer 

Draftsman 

Highway Foreman 80- 

Assistant Highway 

Foreman 70- 

Sew'er Foreman 80- 

Assistant Sewer 

Foreman 70- 

Tree Foreman 80- 

Cemetery Foreman 80- 

Assistant Cemetery 

Foreman 70- 

Park Foreman 80- 

Motor Fquipment 

Operat(jr 70- 

Maintenance Machinist .o5- 
Maintenance 

Blacksmith 05- 

Maintenance Alason ()5- 

Alaintenance Mechanic .05- 
Alaintenance Carpenter.. .65 

Maintenance Painter 65- 

Time Keeper 65- 

Truck Driver 60 

Teamster 60- 

Stableman 54- 

Laborer 54- 

Tree Climber 70- 

Tree Alan 54- 

Plavground Supervisor 

Pool Guard 24.00-27 

Playground 

Instructor 15.00-18 

Alanager — Golf Course .. 1( 

Gnjundsman 54- 

Janitor 

Cleaner 



. 1,200-1.620 
. 1.140-1,620 

840-1,200 
. 780-1,140 
. 1,020-1, 500 

780-1,140 
. 700-1,000 

. 2,400-2.760 
. 2.100-2.400 
. 1,560-1,860 
85 ])er hour 

75 i)er hour 
85 per hour 

,75 per hour 
85 per hour 
85 per hour 

75 per hour 
,85 per hour 

80 per hour 
.7S per hour 



,75 ])er 

,75 per 

75 per 

•75 per 

.75 per 

.75 per 

.70 per 

.70 per 

-.60 per 

-.60 per 

-.80 per 

-.60 per 
.. 1,800- 

.00 i)er 



hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
hour 
2,100 
week 



00 per week 
per month 
.()() per hour 
.. 1,200-1.560 
.. 780- 960 



Sect. 2. .Any person holding a posi- 
tion in the classified service and receiv- 
ing, on the date of the passage of this 
ordinance, a salary or wage in excess of 
the salary or wage provided in the com- 
pensation plan established in Part 3, Sec- 
tion 1 for the class to which such em- 
ployee's position is assigned, shall be 
neither reduced nor increased in com- 
pensation so long as he remains in the 
service of the City, or until his cmplo}'- 
ment status is changed under the provi- 
sions of this ordinance. 

Sect. 3. Any person holding a posi- 



O 5 



til HI in tlic classified service and receiv- 
ing, on the date of the passage of tlii> 
ordinance, a salary or wage less than the 
salary or wage provided in the comjjen- 
sation plan estahlished in I'ar >■>, Section 
1 for the class to which such employee's 
])osition is assigned, shall, as of January 
1, 1944, be paid at the rate of pay estab- 
lished for the class in Part .S, .Section 1. 

Sect. 4. All persons entering a classi- 
fied position in the Cit}' Service on or 
after the date of the ])assage of this 
ordinance shall be paid the rates herein 
])rovided. 

Si-X'T. 5. The niininuini rate of i)a_\ 
for an\' class oi position shall be payalde 
to any pei'son on his first appointment to 
the position assigned to the class, provided 
that, if a jjcrson alread}' in the ser\ice 
is transferred, he may with the recom- 
mendation of the Finance Committee and 
the approval of the Board of Aldermen 
enter the position at the same rate of 
])ay as he had i)reviousl\' received. 

SiiCT. (). Any emplo\'ee emplo\'ed in 
a position assigned to a class carrying a 
maximum and minimum pay range luay 
be granted a pay increase from one step 
to the next higher step within the es- 
t;ibHshed range subject to the following: 

(1) Sixty (00) dollars a year shall con- 
stitute a step, except in the Depart- 
ments of Fire and Police. One Hun- 
dred (100) dollars a year shall con- 
stitute a step. 

(2) Recommendations for i)ay increases 
shall be made by (lei)artment heads 
or boards or commissions at the 
time of submission of annual budget 
estimates and at no other time. Such 
recommendations shall be made on 
the basis of the (|uality of work and 
seniority of individual emi>loyees. 

(.3) The Finance Committee shall re- 
view such proposed pay increase for 
availability of funds and conformity 
to the provisions of this ordinance 
and shall recommend approval or 
disapproval of the increase to the 
Board of Aldermen. 

(4) Xo employee may be eligible for a 
pay raise until he has served hte City 
one year. 

(5) No employee may be raised more 
than one step in any fiscal year. 

(d) Increased compensation received by 
an individttal as the result of promo- 
tion from a lower to a higher class 
-.hall not be deemed a pay increase 
in tile sense of the term as userl in 



this section and in the event of a 
proiuotion, the employee shall auto- 
matically receive the minimum salary 
for the class to which he has been 
promoted except that if the minimum 
salary is the same or less than the 
salary he received prior to his promo- 
tion, he may receive a salary which 
shall be that of the next higher stc]) 
in tile new range. 
Sect. 7. .\ given rate of pay as ex- 
pressed in the compensation plan may be 
commuted to monthly, bi-monthly, weekly, 
daily or hourly rate and established by a 
department head or a board or commis- 
mission with the approval of the Finance 
Committee, as the rate of pay for em- 
ployees of a particular class: ])rovided 
that all enii)loyees of a given class in a 
given unit of a department are paid on 
the same basis. 

.Sect. 8. Xo ofticer or employee of 
the Cit\- shall issue a check for i)ayment 
f)f, nor ])ay any salary or compensation 
to any person holding, or claiming to 
h(jld a position in the classified service, 
unless the City Clerk shall have first 
certified that the persons named on the 
])ayroll or account of such compensation 
have been appointed and are employed 
in accordance with this ordinance. 

Sect. 9. .\ny person regularly em- 
ployed by the City of Concord at the time 
of his entrance into the armed forces of 
the United .States or at the time of his 
entrance into non-military service by or- 
der of the War Manpower CommissicMi, 
whether such entrance occurs prior or 
subsequent to the passage of this or- 
dinance, shall continue to be entitled to 
all the rights and privileges secured to 
him by ordinances passed by the Board 
of .Xkiermen on September 13, 1943, and 
nothing in this ordinance shall be con- 
strued as in any way altering, amending 
or rejiealing any of the provisions of 
said ordinancse. 

.Sect. 10. The salaries assigned to all 
])ersons in the classified service under the 
com])ensation plan herein established shall 
be efl:'ective as of January 1, 1944. 

P.\RT l-'oTR UxCI..\S.SIEIEU POSITION' 

S.\E.\RIES 

.Skctiox 1. The following salaries 
paid to officers and employees of the City 
not in the classifietl service are hereby 
established and approved as the salaries 
and rates of compensation to be paid to 



O 6 



said officers aiul L-nipltiycfs, and iKicafter 
no liigiicr salary or compensation sliall 
be paid to any officer or employee, except 
as may specifically be anthorized by or- 
dinance or resolution. 

Sdhiry 
J'osifion Milt. -Mux. 

Mayor 2,0(1(1 

Alderman 7? 

Alderman-at-laroe 2110 

Citv Clerk 2,200-2,800 

Clerk Hoard of Public Works 200 

Assessor 2,000 

Clerk, Board of Assessors .... 2,400 

Ta.x Collector 2,700-3,000 

City Treasurer 1,200 

Treasurer of Trust Funds .... 100 

City Solicitor 1,20(1 

Planning Director 2.450-2,750 

Health Officer 2,000 

Librarian 1,800-2,400 

Citv Messenger 1,050 

Overseer of Poor— Concord.. 2,100-2,400 
Overseer of Poor — Penacook 500- dOO 

Chief of Police 3,300 

Fire Chief \30() 

Judge, Municipal Court 1,800 

Associate Judge, 

Municipal Court 500 

City Sealer 1,000 

Commissioner of 

Public Works 3,500-4,000 

City Engineer 2,800-3,200 

Clerk, Zoning Board of 

.Adjustment 100-150 per year 

Special Police Officer (>S per hour 

Call Fireman — District 

Chief, Penacook 200 ])er year 

Call Fireman — Captain 130 jjcr year 

Call Fireman — Lieutenant — 

Penacook 110 i>er year 

Call Fireman — Lieutenant — 

Concord 120 per year 

Call Fireman — Driver 

and Caretaker — East 

Concord and Concord 

Plains 325 yer year 

Call Fireman — Concord 110 ]mjv year 

Call Fireman — Penacook .. 10(1 i)er year 
Call Fireman — West Con- 
cord, East Concord and 

Plains 50 per year 

(Limit, LS men in each Company) 
Call Fireman — Central Sta- 
tion House Alan 100 yer year 

Aloderator 40 per year 

Ward Clerk 40 per year 

Supervisor of the Check 

List 50 ])er year 

Ballot Lispector 8.00 ])er day 



Sect. 2. The salaries assigned to all 
unclassified positions shall be effective 
as of January 1, 1944. 

Sect. 3. All temporary and duration- 
of-\var employees of the City are express- 
ly excluded from the classification and 
compensation plan herein set forth. The 
rate of pay of such employees shall be 
set by the particular department, board, 
commission or committee. 

P.VKT I^'lVK \'.\I.II)1TV 

Section 1. The invalidity of any part, 
section or jjrovision of this ordinance 
shall not invalidate anj^ other part, sec- 
tion or provision thereof, not effected 
thereby. 

P.\RT Six — \\ HEX Effective 

Section L The classification of offi- 
cers and employees of the following de- 
partments, to wit. Board of Public Works, 
Board of Water Commissioners, Police 
Department, Relief Department, Public 
Library and Planning Board, shall not 
become eft'ective until said boards, de- 
])artments or commissions have adopted 
the Classification Plan set forth herein. 
Compensation for said officers and em- 
jjloyees in said boards, departments and 
commissions shall be fixed or determined 
by said boards, departments or commis- 
sions in accordance with the law or or- 
dinance in effect previous to the passage 
of this Ordinance. Officials elected by 
the people, officials ajjpointed by the 
Mayor or elected by the Board of Alder- 
men, e.xecutive officers of boards and 
commissions. Judge and .Associate Judge 
of the Municipal Court, and election offi- 
cials shall continue to be classified in 
accordance with the law or ordinance 
now in effect creating said positions. 

Sect. 2. All ordinances or parts of 
ordinances, in so far as they may be in- 
consistent with this new Chapter, except 
as saved herein, are hereby repealed. 

.Sect. 3. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect and become ojurative upon its pass- 
age. 

Passed March 13, 1944. 



An Ordinance in .vmendment of 
an ordin.^nce on attendance and 

LEAVE. 

Br if ordained hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord. as foUoz^'s: 

Section 1. .Amend Section 6 of an 



O 7 



Ordinance on Attendanci.- and Leave by 
striking out the whole thereof, and .sub- 
stituting in place thereof, the following: — 

"Sect. 6. The above regulations shall 
not apply to department heads nor to 
their deputies, nor to members of boards 
or commissions, nor to employees of any 
department who are employed in seasonal 
positions." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take ef- 
fect upon its passage.. 

Passed March 13, 1944. 



.\x Oriiixaxce rki.atixc to tax-sai.k 

PROPEKTN'. 

Be it ordained hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord. as folloies: 

Sectiox 1. In addition to and sepa- 
rate froiu liis duties as Tax Collector, 
as set out by the statutes and special 
acts of the State of New Hampshire, the 
Tax Collector shall, under the title of 
"Real Estate Agent", act for the City in 
the sale of tax-sale property. He is to 
receive, in addition to his compensation 
as Tax Collector, a separate compensa- 
tion as Real Estate Agent, for serv- 
ices set forth herein, the sum of three 
hundred ($300) dollars a year, payable 
monthly. 

Sect. 2 The Real Estate Agent shall 
prepare forthwith a list of all property 
sold to the City for taxes more than two 
years before the date of the enactment i it 
this ordinance and at that date unre- 
deemed. After the preparation of such a 
list, the Real Estate .Agent shall add to 
it from time to time as two-year periods 
shall elapse all other land sold to the City 
for two years and not redeemed. riie 
list hereby required to be kei)t shall be 
prepared on cards or in such other read- 
ily accessible and convenient form as 
will show with respect to each piece of 
property the following : assessors' sheet 
and number; location by street and num- 
ber: locaticjn by street and numlier or 
other appropriate description: the name 
of the former owner ; an accurate de- 
scription of the property itself ; the book 
and page where the deed to the City is 
recorded; the date of delivery of the tax 
deed to the City ; the total consideration 
paid for the deed, including taxes, interest, 
fees, and costs ; the assessed valuation of 
the property : and. in event the property 
shall I)e sold by the City, the date of sucli 
sale, the name of the buyer, ]>rice paid. 



the flate the purchaser's deed was re- 
corded, the book and page of record, and 
the date of notification to the Cit\' En- 
gineer and Hoard of Assessors of the 
transfer. 

Sect. 3. .Ml such property not now 
conveyed to the City by a proper deed 
shall be so transferred at once. There- 
after, title to property sold to the City 
for ta.xes and not redeemed within two 
years shall be conveyed to the City by 
a proper deed within sixty days after the 
period of reflemi)tion shall ha\e expired. 

-Sect. 4. No such property shall be 
sold if the City Planning Board shall cer- 
tify in writing to the Real Estate .\gent 
that the City, has present or reasonably 
foreseeable use for the property. Not less 
than ninety days before the Real Estate 
.Agent shall arrange for the sale of any 
such property, he shall submit to the City 
Planning Board a list thereof with the 
information required by Section 2. and if, 
within si.xty days thereafter, the City 
Planning Board delivers no such certi- 
ficate as is herein described, then the 
Real Estate .Agent may arrange for the 
sale of any property on the list so sub- 
mitted. 

Sect. 5. On the first day of Alay. 
1944, and annually thereafter on May 
1st, the Real Estate .Agent shall ofYer all 
tax-acquired property at public sale in 
the following manner : he shall prepare 
or cause to be prepared a map clearly 
showing the location of all property of- 
fered for sale, and he shall cause the map 
to be e.xposed to public inspection at rea- 
sonably convenient times and places. The 
said Real Estate .Agent shall by published 
notices in the form of a display advertise- 
ment in a newspaper of general circula- 
tion in the city, acquaint the public of 
the time and place of public sales of said 
property, and the fact that maps, lists of 
said property and other data are avail- 
able to the ])ublic at his office in the City 
Hall. The last publication of said notice 
shall be at least ten days before sales. 
-Such publication shall also notify the 
public of the times and places where the 
Real Estate Agent's map may be in- 
spected and of the fact that all bids must 
be submitted in writing, sealed, and ac- 
companied by cash or a certified check in 
an amount equal to at least ten per cent 
of the bid price. Sealed bids shall be 
opened publicly. Property st) advertised 
for sale shall be conveyed to the highest 
iiidder, subject to conditions hereinfater 



O 8 



set t'dftli aiul witli the hilldwing excep- 
tions : 

(a) No property shall he sold for less 
than the amount of taxes, costs, interest, 
and fees charged against said property 
hefore its conveyance to the City except 
with the written consent of the Lands and 
Buildings Committee. 

(h) The Lands and Buildings Com- 
mittee in writing delivered to the Real 
Estate Agent before or at the time of 
opening the bids may authorize the Real 
Estate Agent to convey to the previous 
owner thereof any prpoperty for an 
amount equal to or in excess of the total 
amount of taxes, costs, interest, and fees 
chargeable against it before its convey- 
ance to the City notwithstanding the fact 
that such owner may not have submitted 
the highest bid at the time of the pub- 
lic sale herein provided for. 

(c) If no bid equal to or exceeding 
the amount of taxes, costs, interest, and 
fees charged against said property shall 
be received at the public sale, the Real 
Estate Agent may sell said property pri- 
vately in his discretion to the first per- 
son who thereafter ofYers an amount for 
the property equal to the total of such 
taxes, costs, interest and fees. 

(d) The deed conveying any of said 
real estate from the City of Concord to 
purchasers shall contain a condition that 
said deed will not be effective to transfer 
title to tracts conveyed and there shall be 
no use or occupancy of said premises by 
the purchaser until said deed has been 
legally recorded in the Registry of Deeds 
of Merrimack County. The Real Estate 
Agent shall arrange for such a deed to 
be recorded and shall pay the expense of 
the recording which shall he a charge 
against the purchase price of the property. 

Sect. 6. The Real Estate Agent, upon 
the recordation of said deed, shall by writ- 
ten notification inform the City Engineer 
and the Board of Assessors of the name 
of the grantee, the date of the conveyance, 
the tract of land conveyed and the volume 
and page of recordation. 

Sect. 7. The Mayor is hereby au- 
thorized and empowered in the name and 
on behalf of the City of Concord to exe- 
cute and deliver Quitclaim Deeds, sub- 
ject to the condition set forth in Section 
5 (d) hereof, to purchasers of real estate 
sold under this Ordinance. 

Sect. 8. The invalidity of any part, 
section or provision of tliis ordinance 



shall nt)t invalidate anj' other part, sec- 
tion or provision not affected thereby. 

Sect. 9. This ordinance shall take 
effect on its passage, and all ordinances 
or parts of ordinances inconsistent here- 
with are hereby repealed. 

Passed April 10, 1944. 



An Ordinance amending cii.apter 48 
OF the revised ordinances of the 

CITY OF CONCORD. 

Be it ordained l>y the Ihnird of Aldertnen 
of the City of Coiieord, as folloi^'s: 

Section 1. Amend Chapter 48 of the 
Revised Ordinances of the City of Con- 
cord by adding the following new sec- 
tion. 

Section lA 
Airport Approach Zones 

(a) Eor the purpose of regulating 
and restricting the height of structures 
and trees for the protection of life and 
property in relation to the use of the 
aerial approaches to the runways of the 
Concord Municipal Airport, the approach 
zones shown on a map prepared by the 
New Hampshire Aeronautics Commis- 
sion identified as Municipal Airport Con- 
cord, N. H. Approach Zones and dated 
March 1, 1944, are hereby adopted and 
established as the approach zones of the 
Concord Municipal Airport. 

(b) The approach zones shall have 
dimensions of 500 feet in width at the 
ends of runways and 2,500 feet in width 
at a distance of two miles. 

(c) A copy of said approach zone 
map shall become a part of the Zoning 
Map of Concord, New Hampshire and 
shall be filed with the City Clerk. 

Sect. 2. Amend Section 11 of said 
Chapter 48 by adding the following new 
sub-sections. 

Airport Approach Zone Heights 
( k ) Within the areas of approach 
zones described in Section lA hereof and 
shown on the approach zone map, no 
structure or tree shall be erected, altered, 
or allowed to grow above a glide path 
elevation of thirty feet to one foot 
measured from the end of the runway 
served by said approach zone, except that 
the Board of Adjustment shall have the 
power to grant a variance of this regula- 
tion where a literal application or enforce- 
ment of the same w^ould result in prac- 
tical difficulty or unnecessary hardship 



O 9 



and tlic rt'lief tii'^mtc-d would iKjt be con- 
trary to tin.- public interest but do sub- 
stantial justice and be in accordance with 
the spirit of this regulation. 

Effect on Other Height Regulations 
( 1 ) The height regulations existing 
at the time of the adoption of this sub- 
section shall not limit the effectiveness 
or scope of the airport approach zone 
height regulations adopted under sub- 
section (k) hereof. 
Passed April 10. 1944. 



Ax Orhinance amendinc; part hi of 

CIIAl'TER 52 OK THE REVISED ORDINANCES 
01- THE CITV OE CON'CORD. 

Be it (irditiiicd by the Heard of Aldcnncn 
iif the City of Coiucrd. as follozes: 

Section 1. Amend Part III of Chapter 
52 of the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Concord by adding a new section to 
be numbered .Section 11, as follows: — 
Sect. 11. This ordinance shall not pre- 
vent the Police Department from pay- 
ing to permanent policemen, overtime 
pay at the usual rates, when said police- 
men work on the days and/or during 
hours which they are, by ordinance 
and/or rule, not ol)liged to work. This 
section shall not apply to extreme con- 
ditions which may arise due to riots, 
bombings, conflagrations, floods, hurri- 
canes or instances of other public ca- 
tastrophies. This section shall be 
cft'ective only during the War Period 
as set out in an ordinance relating to 
military and other war services, passed 
Septenilier 13, 1943. 
Sect. 2. This ordinance shall be effec- 
tive upon its passage. 
Passed Mav 8. 1944. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 60 of 

the revised ordinances RELATING TO 

attendance and leave. 

Be it ordained by tlie Board of .Udeniien 
of the City of Coiieord, as follo-u's: 

Strike out all after "Section 2. Annual 
Leave" and insert the following : 

Sect. 2. ANNUAL LEAVE: Each 
l)ermanent employee shall be entitled to 
annual leave w'ith full pay computed on 
the basis of one and one quarter (1^4) 
days for each completed month of ser- 
vice. Annual leave or accumulative an- 
nual leave shall be granted by the depart- 



ment head, upon proper application in 
writing, at sucli time or times as will least 
interfere with the efficient operation of 
the department. No such leave shall be 
granted b\- the department head for 
periods longer than fifteen days plus ac- 
cruals of not more than 15 days in any 
one year ; provided, however, that no 
leave for a period longer than thirty days 
shall be granted in any one year. Em- 
])loyees shall be entitled to their current 
annual leave, as it becomes earned, sub- 
ject to the terms hereof. Annual leave 
shall not be taken in advance. Saturdays 
shall be considered as half days in com- 
puting annual leave for those employees 
who only are expected to w'ork a half 
day on Saturday, but shall be considered 
a full day for employees who normally 
W(-)rk the full day. 

Accumulative annual leave for the pur- 
pose of this section shall mean cases in 
which an employee has failed to take his 
annual leave for a previous year or years. 
so that he shall be entitled at some future 
date or dates to the accrued leave, so that 
same shall be granted to said employee 
in future year or years, in accordance 
with the terms of the section. Such ac- 
cumulative annual leave shall in no event 
exceed a total of thirty days. 

The resignation or dismissal of a per- 
manent employee from the city's service 
shall entitle him to a sum equal to the 
jjay he would have received for the num- 
l)er of days annual leave remaining to his 
credit at the time of said resignation or 
dismissal. If a permanent employee, 
while in the city's service, dies and there 
is remaining to his credit days of annual 
leave, the said sum mentioned in the pre- 
vious sentence shall be payable to the fol- 
lowing classes in the following order of 
priority : 

1. A named beneticiar)' whose name 
has been filed by said employee with 
the head of the department in which 
he is employed. 

2. When ni)t having so filed a name 
of b(.'ncficiar_\-. to his widow. 

3. Or not having named a beneficiary 
or not being survived by a widow, to 
the estate of the deceased. 

This sum is determined by computing 
the numlier of days of annual leave to 
which the employee is entitled times his 
day rate of i^ay at the time his services 
are terminated. 

4. Seniority riglits will prevail in the 
granting of annual leave. 



O ID 



Amend "Section 3. Sick Leave" by 
striking out the word "working" so that 
said Section shall read as follows : 

Sfxt. 3. SICK LEAX'E: Each perma- 
nent employee shall be entitled to sick 
leave with lull pay computed on the basis 
of one and one quarter (P/4) days for 
each completed month of service. Such 
sick leave shall be cumulative for not 
more than ninety (9U) days and shall not 
lapse. 

All employees who have been in the 
City service six (0) years or more at 
tlie time tnese regulations are adopted 
snail be considered to have the maximum 
sick leave to their creait without con- 
sideration of sick leave they have had in 
tile meantime. Employees who have been 
in the City service less than six (0) years 
shall be allowed fifteen (15) days for 
each completed year of service without 
regard to such leave they have had in the 
meantime. 

Employees shall be required to furnish 
a certificate each pay period from an at- 
tending physician for ail consecutive days 
of such leave beyond three (3) days. Said 
certificate must be filed at least once a 
week during said period of incapacity. 
Employees shall be entitled to their cur- 
rent sick leave as it becomes earned 
whether they have the maximum sick 
leave to their credit or not. Sick leave 
shall not be taken in advance. Department 
head or heads reserve the right to have 
an independent physician examine any 
employee, at City expense, claiming sick 
who, in his/their opinion may not be 
entitled to the same, and/or is not so in- 
capacitated as to perform some official 
duties. The opinion of the independent 
physician shall be final. 

If a permanent employee, while in the 
city's service, dies, and there is remain- 
ing to his credit, days of sick leave, the 
said sum shall be payable to the follow- 
ing classes in the following order of 
priority : 

1. A named beneficiary whose name 
has been filed by said employee with 
the head of the department in which 
he is employed. 

2. When not having so filed a name 
of beneficiary, to his widow. 

3. Or not having named a benefi- 
ciary or not being survived by a widow, 
to the estate of the deceasecl. 

The sum payable shall be determined 
by computing the total number of days 
of sick leave remaining to his credit at 



the time of his decease times the day rate 
of pay at the time his service was termi- 
nated. This shall apply only to sick leave 
provided by this section up to ninety (9U; 
days. 

Employees entitled to sick leave bene- 
fits, injured while engaged within the 
scope of their employment, shall be al- 
lowed medical care tor a period not to 
exceed sixty (60) days, in addition to 
their sick leave plus one-half of their 
salary for all additional sick leave neces- 
sary over and above that which may be 
to their credit, at the time of the injury, 
for a period not to exceed three hundred 
(3UU) weeks. 

In the event an employee is injured or 
becomes ill in the course of his employ- 
ment, so as to entitle him to Workmen's 
Compensation insurance benefits, in the 
form of compensation for loss of wages, 
under policies carried by City Depart- 
ments, the amount received under said 
insurance benefits shall be deducted from 
the amount received directly from the 
city as sick leave benefits, so that the 
total of the insurance benefits and city 
sick leave benefit shall total the amount 
he would have received if there were no 
insurance benefits. 

In the event an employee entitled to 
sick leave benefits, herein, or benefits 
under Workmen's Compensation Act 
policies, elects to waive his rights under 
the Compensation Act, and institutes 
legal action against the City of Concord 
at Common Law, the sick leave benefits 
set forth herein shall not become payable 
until final disposition of said legal action, 
and_ if said employee obtains judgment 
against the City of Concord in the pro- 
secution of said legal action, the total 
amount payable as sick leave benefit shall 
be deducted from said judgment; pro- 
vided, however, if said judgment is less 
than the sick leave benefit, so much more 
than the judgment shall be paid to the 
employee to make his total amount includ- 
ing his judgment and sick leave payment, 
the total of the sick leave benefit he 
would have received had he not instituted 
said legal action. 

Passed July 10, 1944. 



An Ordinance regarding places of out- 
door AMUSEMENT UNDER CANVAS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of flic City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That every place of out- 
door amusement with a seating capacity 



ON 



of fifty or more operating under canvas 
shall have a proper exit for each section 
of its seating capacity and shall prior to 
opening submit to the Licensing Board a 
certificate, signed by the Chief of the 
Fire Department and the Chief of the 
Police Department, of approval. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance to take effect 
upon its passage, and remain in effect 
until December 31, 1944. 

Passed July 10, 1944. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 
xlix of the revised ordinances of 
the city of concord. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldeniieii 
of the City of Concord, as follon'S : 

That section 1, line 12 of Chapter 
XLIX of the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Concord I)e amended liy striking 
out the word, Mayor and inserting in 



place thereof, Chief of the Fire Depart- 
ment, so that said section shall read, 

"Section 1 : No showman, tumbler, 
rope dancer, ventriloquist or other person 
shall for pay, exhibit any feats or agility 
or horsemanship or sleight of hand, rope 
dancing, or feats of cards, or any animal, 
wax figures, pupets or other show, or 
shall perform or exhibit any theatrical 
representation in this city, nor give any 
musical performance or exhibition of sing- 
ing or dancing or other exhibition or 
amusement of any kind with or without 
pay, nor hold or engage in any parade or 
procession upon any public street or way, 
not hold or take part in any open-air 
public meeting upon any ground abutting 
thereon, unless a license or permit there- 
for in writing, specifying the time and 
object for which said license is granted, 
shall first be obtained from the Chief of 
the Fire Department, city clerk, and 
Chief of Police, who are hereby consti- 
tuted a licensing board. 

Passed September 11, 1944. 



OI2 



RESOLUTIONS 

passed during tJie rear 
ending December 31, 1944 



Resolution appropriating earnings to 
the several departments. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldcrnicit 
of the City of Concord as follows: 

That the following amounts be hereby 
appropriated to the enumerated Depart- 
ments, the same being from the depart- 
mental earnings of the year 1943 : 
Recreation Commission, $1,589.92 

Roads and Bridges, 11,083.77 

Sewers, 850.55 

Tax Collector, 99.80 

Passed January 10, 1944. 



of the incurrence of the debt represented 
by the note or notes refunded. 
Passed January 25, 1944. 



Resolution providing for printing of 

THE roster of the CITY GOVERNMENT. 

Resolved by tlie Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That the City Clerk be instructed to 
prepare a roster of the present City 
Government and cause copies to be printed 
and that the expense of printing the same 
shall be charged to the account of Print- 
ing and Stationery. 

Passed January 25, 1944. 



Resolution in relation to a tempo- 
rary LOAN not exceeding SEVEN HUN- 
DRED thousand dollars ($700,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That the Committee on Finance is here- 
by authorized to borrow on the credit of 
the City the sum not to exceed seven 
hundred thousand dollars ($700,000) for 
expenses in anticipation of taxes for the 
municipal year 1944 and to issue notes 
of the City therefor upon such terms and 
for such amounts as the Committee shall 
determine. The said loan is to he payable 
from the taxes for the said municipal year, 
and the said Committee on Finance is 
hereby authorized to refund all or any of 
the said notes at their maturity ; provided, 
however, that the refunding notes shall 
be payable within one year after the date 



Resolution in relation to chapter 
xlvii of the revised ordin.\nces of 
the city of concord relating to the 
building code. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That the City Planning Board of the 
City of Concord be and hereby is re- 
quested to make a study of Chapter 
XLVII of the Revised Ordinances of the 
City of Concord relating to the Building 
Code and report back to the Board of 
Aldermen any changes that may be 
desired. 

Passed March 13, 1944 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 

EXECUTE A quitclaim DEED TO THE 
CONCORD BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIA- 
TION. 

Resoh'cd by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord as follows: 

WHEREAS under date of March 8, 
1943 the Board of Aldermen by resolution 
authorized the Mayor to execute a ciuit- 
claim deed to the Concord Building and 
Loan Association of Lot 6507 of Asses- 
sors' Numbers, it being the intention to 
convey Lots 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 and 26 on 
Plan of Broadway Plat made by C. A. 
Thayer, C. E. recorded in Merrimack 
County Registry of Deeds Records as 
Plan 276, and further described in Vol. 
523, Pages 279 and 280 of said Record . 
and 

WHEREAS said Lot 6507 of Asses- 
sors' Numbers is not the correct lot num- 
ber for the description of the premises 
supposedly conveyed, as Lot 3449-A-54 is 
the correct lot number. 

WHEREAS the Mayor executed a 
quitclaim deed on March 19, 1943 to the 
said Association of Lot 6507 of Assessors' 
Numbers, and 

WHEREAS said Association recorded 
said deed in Merrimack Countv Registry 
of Deeds Records in Vol. 586, 'Page 410, 

Be It Resolved by the Board of Alder- 
men of the City of Concord, as follows : 

That for the purpose of correcting 
errors in said conveyance of IMarch 19, 
1943 made under said resolution of March 



RI3 



8, 1943, the Mayur he and hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the City, to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed to the Concord Building and 
Loan Association of the following prop- 
erty : A certain tract of land with the 
buildings thereon located at 40 Broad 
Avenue in said Concord, same being Lot 
No. 3449-A-54 of Assessors' Numbers, 
bemg premises conveyed to the City of 
Concord by the Tax Collector, on March 
2b, 1943 as recorded in said County 
Records \'ol. 582, Page 413. Said pre- 
mises were formerly taxed in 1938 to 
Harold L. Eastman, having been sold to 
the City of Concord at tax sale on Sep- 
tember 27, 1939. The same are Lots zl, 
22, 23, 24, 25 and 26 on Plan of Broadway 
Plat made by C. A. Thayer, C. E. re- 
corded in Merrimack County Registry of 
Deeds Records as Plan 270, and further 
described in Vol. 523, Pages 279 and 280 
of said Records. Said conveyance being 
for the purpose of making a proper con- 
veyance of Lot No. 3449-A-54 and so that 
the recordation of the deed from the City 
of Concord to said Association in said 
County Records Vol. 586, Page 410 may 
be corrected. 

There is no consideration for the con- 
veyance contemplated under this Resolu- 
tion as said Association under date of 
March 19, 1943 has paid the City of Con- 
cord full consideration in the sum of Four 
Hundred Seventy Dollars and Four Cents 
($470.04) presumably for Lot 3449- A-54. 
It is understood that said Association will 
convey to the City of Concord any in- 
terest said Association may have in Lot 
No. 6507 aforesaid. 

Passed March 13, 1944. 



Librarian and the cost of printing and 
mailing the same shall be charged to the 
appropriation of Printing and Stationery. 
Passed March 13, 1944. 



Resolution relative to the sending 
city reports to concord citizens 
serving in the armed forces of the 
united states. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldennen 
of the City of Concord as folloivs: 

That for the purpose of sending a copy 
of the 1943 annual city report to each 
Concord citizen serving in the armed 
forces of the United States, the City 
Planning Board is hereby authorized and 
directed to have printed, in addition to 
such number as may be needed for local 
circulation, 3,000 copies of said report. 
The distribution of said report to Con- 
cord citizens serving in the armed forces 
shall be under the direction of the City 



Resolution fixing and determining 
the amount of money to be raised 
for the financial year ending 
december 31, 1944. 

Resolz'cd by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord, as folloivs: 

Section 1. That there shall be raised, 
and there is hereby ordered to be raised 
on the polls and ratable estates within 
tlie City the sum of four hundred seventy- 
seven thousand two hundred ninety-three 
dollars ($477,293.), which together with 
tlie Ijalance on hand January 1, 1944, 
which is approximately one hundred 
eleven thousand one hundred eighty-five 
dollars ($111,185), and the sums which 
may be raised on railroads and from 
other sources, approximately one hundred 
forty-nine thousand four hundred eighteen 
dollars ($149,418), is hereby appropriated 
to defray the necessary expenses and 
charges of the City for the ensuing finan- 
cial year ; and estimate of said expenses 
and charges is as follows : 

City Poor 

Administration $ 5,250.00 

Relief 14,000.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City .... 700.00 

Hospitalization 3,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 17,000.00 

$ 39,950.00 
Income 1,000.00 

$ 38,950.00 

City Poor, Ward 1 

Administration $ 820.00 

Relief 2,300.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City .... 200.00 

Old Age Assistance 2,000.00 

$ 5,320.00 

Bonds and Notes 

(Does not include School District or 
Water Works) 

Citv Hall and Auditorium.... $ 5,000.00 

Public Improvement 23,000.00 

Highway 5,000.00 

Departmental Equipment .... 4,000.00 

Central Fire Station 1,000.00 



RI4 



Sewers IS.UOU.UU 

Airport 4,UU0.0U 

$ 57,()()().()() 

Interest Acciniiit 

Bonds and Notes $ 7,701.25 

Temporary Loans 1,75().()() 

$ 9,431.25 

C // V //(/// (Did .liiditor'uiin 

Salary. City Messenger $ 1,()5().()() 

Salary, Janitors 2,82().()l) 

Fuel 1,750.00 

Lights and Gas 1,150.00 

Insurance 750.00 

Su]iplies 500.0;) 

Salary Increases 304.50 

$ 8,984.50 

Mayor 

Salary, Mayor $ 2,000.00 

Salary, Secretary 1,500.00 

Incidentals 300.00 

Salary increase, Secretary .... 150.00 

$ 3,950.00 

City Clerk 

Salary, Citv Clerk $ 2,800.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,000.00 

Salary. Extra Clerk 240.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

Telephone 75.00 

Plioto.stat 200.00 

Supplies 450.00 

Salary Increases 435.00 

$ 9.000.00 

City Solicitor 

Salary, City Solicitor $ 1,200.00 

Auto Allowance 50.00 

Clerk Hire 230.00 

Supplies 80.00 

Salary Increase 120.00 

$ 1,08().()0 

City Treasurer 

Salary, City Treasurer $ 1,200.00 

Salary, Treasurer of Trust 

Funds 100.00 

Salary, Clerk I,(i20.0() 

Clerical Assistance, Trust 

Funds 250.00 

Clerical Assistance, pay-rolls 

and salary deductions 1,200.00 

Surety Bond, Deputy Trea- 
surer 25.00 



Supplies antl Incidentals .... 150.00 

Salary Increases 331.00 

$ 4,876.00 

Scaler of U'ci(/hts and }fcasurcs 

Salary, Sealer $ 1,000.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

Supplies 100.01) 

Salary Increase 100.00 

$ 1,400.00 

Police Court 

Salary, Judge $ 1,800.00 

Salary. Associate Judge 500. 00 

Salary, Clerk ." ()0().00 

Salary Increase Clerk OO.OO 

$ 2,9()().00 

Probation Officer 

Salary, Officer $ 1.000.00 

Clerk and Supplies 300. 00 

Mileage 200.00 

Salary Increase 100.00 

$ 1,000.00 

Assessors 

Salary, Assessors $ (),400.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,000.00 

Auto Allowance 400.00 

Listing Polls 1,000.00 

Telephone 58.00 

Postage and Printing 400.00 

Supplies and Furniture 400.00 

Salary Increases, Clerks .... 300.00 

$ 12,958.00 

Tax Collector 

Salary, Collector $ 3,000.00 

Salary, Clerks 2,000.00 

Salary, Extra Clerk 200.00 

Clerk Hire 1,000.00 

Printing, Postage and Sta- 
tionery 1,150.00 

Incidentals 88.05 

Collector and Clerk's Bonds 150.00 

Mileage 100.00 

Salary increases 335.00 

$ 8,623.65 

Real Estate Afient 
Amos B. Morrison, Agent, 

Salary .'. $ 225.00 

Wartime Increase 22.50 

Advertising, etc 200.00 



$475.50 



RIB 



Ii.!cctions 

Salary. Flection Officers .... $ ,11(10.0(1 

Rent Votino Places 250.(J0 

Supplies 8;)0.U0 

$ 4,150.00 
fire Pchirtmriit 

-Salary, Chief $ .\300.00 

■Salaries o4,57(>.29 

Call Salaries 12,017.50 

Fire Alarm 1,8()0.00 

Fire Inspection 1,000.00 

Incidentals 500.00 

Repairs Buildinos 800.00 

Fuel 2,400.00 

Lights 800.(J0 

Upkeep Fquipment 2,000.00 

Telephones 700.00 

Insurance 2,000.00 

New Fquipment 000.00 

Hose 1,000.00 

Supplies and Laundry r)00.00 

Snow Removal 250.00 

Retirement Fund 800.00 

$ 95,803.79 

Board of Health 

^Salary, Sanitary Officer .... $ 2,100.00 

*Salary, Clerk 1,650.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

Departmental Expenses 700.00 

Milk Iiispcclion 

*Salary, Inspector $ 2,111.5(1 

Auto Allowance 400.00 

Incidentals 325.00 

$ 7,486.50 

*Increases included in the amounts as 
reported 

Dcpartiiirnt of riihlic ll'orks 

Highway Division: 

Roads' and Bridges $148,410.04 

Refuse Collection 35,057.00 

Tahle Garhage 5,800.00 

Lighting Streets 40,531.50 

Storm Sewers 2,392.00 

Trees 7,303.0() 

Parks 13,545.00 

Clerk of Board 200.00 

Office Division 4,054.00 

Engineering Division : 8,700.00 

Cemeteries 30,525.40 

$297,778.00 

Sanitary Sewers 18,954.00 



Playgrounds 

Salaries $ 8,53().(J0 

Flquipment 1,675.00 

Auto Allowance 400.00 

Insurance 150.00 

Telephone and Electricity .... 150.00 

Trucking ' 150.00 

Fourth of July Celehration 400.00 



$ 11,805.00 

City Plamiiittj Board 

'■'Salaries : 

Research $ 2,095.75 

Drafting 1,704.00 

Publishing Reports : 

Typing 100.00 

Printing 200.00 

Maps and Blueprints 07.50 

Supplies : 

Drafting 05.00 

Office 85.(JO 

Telephone 45.00 

Postage 25.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 



$ 5,247.25 

■"Increases included in tlie amounts as 
reported 

Public Library 

Salaries $ 17,935.00 

Books, etc 5,985.00 

Rent of Branches 180.00 

Heat, Light, etc 3,490.00 

Supplies 800.00 

Incidentals, etc 010.00 

$ 29,000.00 

Income 10,300.00 

$ 18,040.00 

Police Dcpartuiciit 

Salaries : 

Chief $ 3,300.00 

Deputy Chief 2,870.00 

Captain 2,502.50 

Officers : 

2 Sergeants 4,715.00 

1 Inspector 2,400.00 

15 3rd Year Patrolmen .... 31,787.50 

4 2nd Year Patrolmen .... 8,289.00 

1 1st Year Patrolmen .... 1,995.00 
Patrolman Bureau of 

Records 1,995.00 

Tanitor 1,050.00 



RI6 



Si)(.'cial Officers : 

Police 5,12f).82 

Car Expense 21)0.00 

Repairs 500.00 

Fuel 1,()OII.OO 

Lights 930.00 

Auto and Auto Supplies 3,200.00 

-Marking Streets 200.00 

Telephone, Gamewell and 

Radio 1,400.00 

Insurance 575.00 

Keeping Prisoners 90.00 

Printing 200.00 

Traffic Lights and Supplies 100.00 
Office Supplies and Kcpiip- 

ment 300.00 

Retirement Fund 1,242.49 

Incidentals 1.710.00 

$ 79,018.91 

Comfort Sfafioii 

^Salaries $ 1,980.00 

Incidentals 170.00 

Repairs 120.00 

Lighting 95.00 

$ 2,3()5. 00 

Recreation Commission $ 3,500.00 

Zoning Board of Adjust- 
ments $ 150.00 

Airl^orf 

='^Salary $ l,o38.00 

Fuel 450.00 

Lights 450.00 

Repairs 2,000.00 

Sanding, Plowing and Mow- 
ing 3,500.00 

Insurance 750.00 

:\Iiscellaneous 500.00 



l^stiniated income, rents etc 



$ 9,288.00 
2,050.00 



$ 7,238.00 
Less, Portion of 1943 

Balance 4,000.00 

$ 3.238.00 
P'stimated income 

Hanger No. 2 $ 0,000.00 

Miscellaneous 

Repairs Buildings $ 1,200.00 

Clock, Care of 50.00 

Incidentals and Land 

Damages 2.500.00 

Printing and Stationery .... 3,450.00 

F5(iard of Aldermen, Salary 1,875.00 

Faniilv Welfare Society ".. 350.00 



Concord District Nursing 

Association 350.00 

Penacook District Nursing 

Association ". 200.01) 

Memorial Day 400.00 

.\rmistice Day lOO.Ol) 

Armistice Day, Penacook 30.00 

Spanish War X'eterans .... 41)0.00 

Band Concerts 1,01)0.00 

Auditing 1,000.00 

Civilian Defense 500.00 

Finance Committee, Con- 
tingent Fund O.OOO.OO 

C.M'IT.M. Bl-DCKT 1944 

Police Department : 

Aloving Radio Transmitter 
from Jordan Lot and Plac- 
ing Tower on Top Police 
Station and purchase of 
supplies $l,80l).(;o 

Playground Department : 

Purchase Truck $700.00 

Fire Department Radio 

Units: 625.00 

'■Increases included in the amounts as 
reported. 

Sect. 2. In addition to the foregoing 
there is appropriated for the cemeteries 
of the City one-third of the income from 
the sale of lots and the income derived for 
the care of lots and grading, which sums 
shall be deposited by the Superintendent 
or others receiving them in the City Trea- 
sury. The care of lots for which the City 
holds trust funds shall be paid from the 
Tuoney appropriated for the care of ceme- 
teries, and so much of the income of these 
trust funds as may be thus expended shall 
be deposited in the city treasury at the 
close of the year, and the remainder in 
each instance credited to the individual 
fund. 

Skct. 3. This resolution shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Estimated I^-coME 

Cash on hand 

January 1, 1944 $202,571.98 
Less outstand- 
ing Checks 2,000.00 

$200,571.98 

Uncollected Taxes : 

1940 $3,849.79 

1941 4,121.86 

1942 6,283.86 



RI7 



1943 



l^stiiiiated 
Ovtrasc .. 



117,515.32 



29,010.29 



$102,7(.0.54 
$303,332.52 



Due .Schouls: 
Union Scliool 

Di.strict $141,9(j1.44 

Penacook 
School Dis- 
trict S,18b.lo 

1943 Commit- 
ments 2,000.00 



l-'stimated amount I'rop- 
ertv for 1943 sold Citv at 
Safe 



152,147.()0 
$151,184.92 



40,000.00 
$111,184.02 



Income : 

Duilding and Loan Ta.x .... $ ()'i.l8 

Railroad Ta.x 13,517.83 

Savings Bank Tax 28.155.79 

Interest and Dividends 

Tax 49,233.38 

City Collections : 

Auto Permits 9,000.00 

Fees, Licenses, Rents, etc 4,100.00 

Municipal Court Fees 1,200.29 

Board of Health ( Alilk 

Licenses) 288.00 

Sanitary Sewer Rentals .... 18,000.00 

Sales and rentals Tax 

Owned Propertv 500.00 

Tax Sales Redeemed 20.000.00 

Balance, Transferred from 

Auditorium Bond .\ccount 5,351.34 



Passed April 1(1, 1944. 



$149,418.81 



Resolution authorizing the transfer 
of the balance in the auditorium 
bono account. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord, as folhra's: 

That the sum of $5,351.34 being the 
unexpended balance as of December 31, 
1943 in the Auditorium Bond Account be 
and hereby is transferred to the City of 
Concord general account, with the un- 



derstanding that $5,000. of .said amount 
shall be used to pay the City Hall and 
.\uditorium Bonds due October 1, 1944 
and the balance $351.34 shall be applied 
toward the payment of coupons due t)n 
said bonds, for the vear 1944. 
Passed April 10, "1944. 



Rksolltion transferkinc; .money from 



.\IRPGRT BOND ACCOUNT XO. 
BOND ACCOUNT XO. 1. 



TO AIRPCIRT 



h'esnived hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City (if Coneord. as i(dloiei 



That the sum ui $22.78 be transferred 
from .Airport F>ond Account No. 2 to 
.\irport Bond Account No. 1. 

Passed .\pril 10, 1944. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 

EXECUTE A quitclaim DEED TO CONRAD 
N. IIl'BERT AND ANNIE M. HUBERT AS 

JOINT TENANTS OR SURVIVOR. 

lu'Sid'c'ed hy the Board of .Udermen 
of the City ,./ Coneord. as fidhnes: 

'i'liat the Mayor he and hereby is 
authorized to execute and deliver in the 
name and on behalf of the City, a quit- 
claim deed to Conrad N. Hubert and 
.\nnie AI. Hubert as joint tenants or sur- 
vivor, of Lot No. 4121 formerly taxed to 
Lois A. Little and deeded to the City in 
1925, and Lot No. 4119-A formerly taxed 
to Harold H. Blake and deeded to the 
City in 1937. Both of said lots being 
more i)articularly shown on Assessors' 
Sheet 46.^.. Both of said tracts are 
located on Ferry Street in said Concord. 
The consideration for said conveyance to 
be in the sum of Five Hundred Dollars 
($500.00). 

Passed April 10, 1944. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 

EXECUTE A quitclaim DEED JO CHARLES 
FORREST PH-.M.MER. 

Resoh'ed hy the Board of .Udermen 
of the City of Coneord. as follows: 

That the Alayor be and hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the City to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed to Charles Forrest Plummer 
of house, shop and lot located on Burns 
Avenue in said City, same being Lot 
4258- M, and two tracts of land located on 
said Burns Avenue being Lots 4258-N 
and 4258-0, set forth on Assessors' Sheet 



Rl 



114-D. Saiil premises were idi'iiiLTly 
taxed to Charles Forrest Plummer and 
deeded to tlie City by the Tax Collector 
in ]\Iarch, 1944. The consideration for 
said conveyance to be in the sum of Forty- 
nine Dollars anrl I'iftv-four Cents 
($49.54). 
Passed April lO, 1944. 



Re.^0LI'TI0.\ AiriHlRlZIXd Till-: M.WOR TO 
EXECX'TK A Ol'lTCI.AI.M MKKII TO HEl.EX 
r. LABRIE. 

Rcsoh'cd hy flic Board nf Aldcniioi 
of the Cily oj L'oiu-ord. as jolloz.'s: 

'J'iiat tine Alayor he and hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the Cit\' to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed to Jlelen C. Labrie of Lot 
Xos. j834 and 3(S35 located on Sandquist 
Street in said City, being more par- 
ticularly shown on Assessors' Sheet 6. 
Said lots were deeded to the City of Con- 
cord b}- Edward L. Mercier on March 
11, 1944 see Merrimack Countv Registrv 
of Deeds Records Vol. 604. Page 49. The 
consideration for said conveyance to be 
in the sum of Forty Dollars' ($4().()()). 

Passed April 10, 1944. 



Re.-^olutiox authorizixg the mayor to 
execute a qultceai.\r iieeii to ceorce 
11. mcalpixe. 

RcsohcTd hy the Hoard of .lldcrnicn 
of the City of Coiuord. as follir-a's: 

That the Mayor be and hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the City to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed to George H. McAlpine of Lot 
Nos. 8324, 8325, 8336, 8327, 8329, 8331, 
8341 and 8325-A, at the Beaver Pond 
Location so-called in said City. Said 
Lot 8324 being formerly taxed to John H. 
Clark and deeded to the City by the Tax 
Collector on March 26, 1942 see Merri- 
mack Countv Registrv of Deeds Records 
A'ol. 582, Page 411; Lot 8325 being 
formerly taxed to Edmond A. Trombly 
and deeded to the City on Afarch 16, 1938, 
see said Records \'ol. 559, Page 354; Lot 
8326 being formerly taxed to Elmer 
Trombly Estate and deeded to the City 
on ]\ larch 26, 1941, sec said Records \^o!. 
582, Page 342; Lot 8327 being formerly 
taxed to Ida L. Morrill and deeded to t'^e 
Citv on Alarch 26, 1942, see said Records 
Vol. 582, Page 414; Lot 8329 being for- 
merly taxed to Napoleon A. Trombly and 



deeded to the City on March 23, 1930, 
see said Records \'ol. 534, Page 532 ; Lot 
8331 and Lot 8341 being formerly taxed 
to Elmer Trombly Estate and deeded to 
the Citv on March 26. 1941, see said 
Records \"ol. 582. Page 343 ; Lot 8325-A 
being formerly taxed to Elmer Trombly 
Estate and deeded to the Citv on March 
2(>. 1941, see said Records Vol. 582, Page 
343. Being more particularly shown on 
Assessors' Sheet 123. The consideration 
for said conveyance to be in the sum of 
Three Hundred and I-'iftv Dollars 
($350.0(1). 
Passed April 10. 1944. 



ReS0EUTK)X ArT!10RIZ[X(; THE MAYOR TO 
EXECUTE A gfITC.LAi:.r DEED TO ERNEST 
W. JI.VXSOX AXD EOTTIE E, H.\X.SOX A.S 
JOINT TENANTS OR SURVI\dR. 

h'esohi'i'd hy the Board of .Udeiineii 
of the City of Ci'iieord. as foll(nes: 

That the Mayor be and herel)\' is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the City to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed to Ernest W. Hanson and 
Lottie L. Hanson as joint tenants or sur- 
vivor, of Lot No. 3445-B located at the 
corner of Wood Avenue and Bow Street, 
formerly ta.xed to the Elizabeth N. 
LaCasse Estate and deeded to the City 
by the Tax Collector on March 28, 1940 
see Merrimack County Registrj^ of Deeds 
Records \'ol. 560, Page 116, also being 
more particularly shown on Assessor's 
Sheet 8. The consideration for said con- 
vevance to be in the sum of Two Hundred 
and One Dollars ($201.00). 

Passed April 10, 1944. 



ReSOEUTION AUTHORIZING THE MAYOR TO 
EXECUTE A QUITCEIAM DEED TO STANEEY 
LEWIS AND EVELY'N II. LEWIS AS JOINT 
TENANTS OR SURVIVOR. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as folloics: 

That the Mayor be and hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the City to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed to Stanley Lewis and Evelyn 
H. Lewis as joint tenants or survivor, of 
Lot No. 43-41-40 located on Catherine 
Street on Fifield Plain, so-called, in 
Penacook, being formerh' taxed to Anne 
Marie Davis and Arthur Cartier and 
deeded to the City by the Tax Collector 
in 1941. Said lot being a part of Lot 



R!9 



No. 7352-A and i)cini4 more particularly 
shown on Assessors" Sheet ZAP. The 
consideration for said conveyance t(j be 
in the sum nt Seventv-tive Dollars 
($75.(JU). 
Passed April 10, l'M4. 



RliSOl.UTlOX AUTIIORIZIXC. THE MAVOK TO 
EX1-:CUTE A yriTCLAI.M DKKU TO n<A I. 
AUPREY AND MYRTLE AVrKKV AS JOINT 
TENANTS OR Sl'RVlVOk. 

Rcsoh'cd hy the Board tij Aldcniicii 
of tlic City of Concord, as iollo-n\s: 

That the Mayor he and hereby is 
authorized in the name and im behalf of 
the City to execute and deliver a ipiitclaim 
deed to Ira J. Auprey and Myrtle Auprey 
as joint tenants or survivor, of Lot No. 
7()70 located on the River Road in said 
Concord, iormerl>- taxed to Conrad 
Vincent and deeded to the City by the 
Tax Collector in March, 1936. Said lot 
is more particularly shown on Assessors' 
Sheet 107. The consideration for said 
convevance to be in the sum of Twcntv- 
five Dollars ($25.00). 

Passed April 10, 1944. 



Resolution aitthorizing refuni) of 194,i 

TAXES paid on PROPERTY OF EDWARD P.. 
AND ELSIE D. TEWKSBURV. 

Rcsol^rd />y the Board of .Udcniicn 
of the City of Concord, as folloics: 

That the sum of $31.54 be and hereby 
is paid from the appropriation of Inci- 
dentals and Lands Damages, to the Loan 
and Trust Savings Banks as a refund of 
the amount abated by the Board of As- 
sessors, after payment of $142.37 as 1943 
taxes on the property owned by Edward 
B. and Elsie D. Tewksbury at 2-4 
Marshall St., paid by said Loan and 
Trust Savings Bank as mortgagee. 

The reason for said abatement is that 
the said Edward B. Tewksbury is a 
Spanish War W-teran and entitled to an 
exemption of $1,000. valuation. 

Passed May 8, 1944. 



Resolution regarding deed of the city 

OF CONCORD to EDITH B. ROGERS. 

Resolved by the Board of .lldennen 
of the City of Concord, as follon's: 

WHEREAS The Board of Mavor and 



Aklermen on October 11, 1943 passed a 
Resolution for the conveyance to Edith 
B. Rogers of certain property located on 
Jackson Court in said Concord, and 

WHEREAS it appears that in said 
deed there was a reservation to David W. 
Clement, his heirs and assigns, and 

^\^HEREAS a search of the records at 
the Merrimack County Registry of Deeds 
reveals that the said David W. Clement, 
his heirs and assigns, have no right to a 
])assway across said land to Jackson 
Court, and 

WHEREAS reference in said deed is 
that premises were conveyed bv David W. 
Clement to the City on August 28. 1888, 
as shown by Merrimack Countv Records 
\^)1. 280, Page 250, and 

WHEREAS The City also received 
part of its title to said premises by deed 
of Sarah J. Clement to said City on 
August 28, 1888, recorded in said Countv 
Records \'ol. 283. Page 250, and 

Be it hereby resolved that the Resolu- 
tion passed by the Board of Aldermen on 
October 11, 1943 in respect to said prop- 
erty, be hereby corrected, and that the 
Alayor be and hereby is authorized to 
execute and deliver in the name and on 
behalf of the City, a quitclaim deed to 
Edith B. Rogers of the following 
described ])remises : — 

A certain tract of land with the build- 
ings thereon, situated in said Concord, 
bounded and described as follows : 

Commencing at a stone bound at the 
northwesterly corner of land of O. VV. 
Thompson; thence running northwesterly 
45 feet to Jackson Court; thence south- 
westerly 00 feet on Jackson's Court to 
land formerly owned by S. S. Kimball ; 
thence southwesterly 45 feet to land oc- 
cupied by said Sarah J. Clement; thence 
running northerly 00 feet to the bound 
begun at, and containing 3,000 feet of 
land, more or less. 

Meaning and intending to hereby des- 
cribe and convey the same premises con- 
veyed to the City of Concord by deeds 
of David W. Clement and Sarah J. 
Clement on August 28, 1888 as shown by 
]\Ierrimack Countv Registrv of Deeds 
Records Vol. 280, Page 250 and Vol. 283, 
Page 50. 

Consideration not over $200. 

Passed Alay 8, 1944. 



R20 



Resolution' rei.akdixo deed oe the city 
of concoru to stanley lenyis axu 
evaline ii. lewis. 

h'csohc'cd hy the Hoard of Aldermen 
oj the ( // V ('/ Lo)!eord. as folUncs: 

WHEREAS Tlie Board of Alayor and 
Aldermen on April 10, 1944 passed a 
Resolution for the coiiYeyance to Stanley 
].e\vis and Evelyn H. Lewis of Lot No. 
43-41-40 situated on Catherine Street on 
Fifield Plain, so-called, in Penacook, 
Assessors' Sheet 24P. and 

WHEREAS said purchasers' names 
are Stanley Lewis and Evalino H. Lewis, 
and 

WHEREAS the purciiasers are de- 
sirous of having a deed with the proper 
spelling of the name Evaline, 

Be it herehy resolved that the Resolu- 
tion passed by the Board of Aldermen on 
April 10, 1944 in respect to said property, 
corrected, and that the Mayor be and 
hereby is authorized to execute and de- 
liver in the name and on liehalf of the 
City, a quitclaim deed to Stanley Lewis 
and Evaline H. Lewis as joint tenants or 
survivor, of Lot No. 43-41-40 located on 
Catherine Street on Fifield Plain, so- 
called, in Penacook, being formerly taxed 
to Anne Marie Davis and Arthur Cartier 
and deeded to the City by the Tax Col- 
lector in 1941. Said lot being a part of 
Lot No. 7352-A and being more par- 
ticularly shown on Assessors' Sheet 24P. 
The consideration for said conveyance to 
be in the sum of Seventv-five Dollars 
f $75.00). 

Passed Mav 8, 1944. 



Resolution in relation to chapter 
XIX OF the revised ordinances of the 

CITY OF CONCORD RELATING TO PLUMBING 
RULES. 

Rcsolz'ed hy I he ISoard of Aldermen 
oj the City of Coneord. as follozcs: 

That in connection with a study of the 
building code, previously requested by the 
Board of Aldermen, the City Planning 
Board of the City of Concord be and 
hereby is requested to make a study of 
Chapter XIX of the Revised Ordinances 
I if the City of Concord relating to plumb- 
ing rules and report back to the Board 
of Alderman any changes that may be 
desired. 

Passed May 8, 1944. 



Resolution relating to the cogswell 

SCHOOL property. 

h'esohi'ed hy the Board of .Udermen 
of the City of Coneord, as folhnes: 

Tiiat the Fire Board be and hereby is 
auth(jrized and directed to negotiate with 
the fjoard of Education of the Concord 
Union School District to acquire the 
Cogswell School property for future fire 
station purposes. 

Passed May 8, 1944. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 
execute a quitclaim deed to wyman 
d. stearns. 

J\'esoli'ed hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord. as folloz^'s: 

That the Mayor l)e and hereby is 
authorized in the name and on behalf of 
the City to execute and deliver a quit- 
claiiu deed to Wyman D. Stearns of land 
located on East Penacook Street and 
Pembroke Street, being on Map #8273B 
and also the Clark Store Building so- 
called, located on 255 and 257 Eastman 
Street, on May #8418. The considera- 
tion for said conveyance to be in the sum 
of Eight Hundred Six Dollars and Eight 
Cents ($800.08). 

Passed June 12. 1944. 



Resolution for the employment of 
special counsel for claims against 
the state of new hampshire. 

A'esolird hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord. as follows: 

1. That Robert W. Upton be employed 
as special counsel for the City in "the 
matter of claims against the State of New 
Ham])shire for rental charges for sewer 
uses by the State. 

2. The amount to be a])propriated for 
said services to be passed upon at a future 
date. 

Passed June 12, 1944. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 

EXECUTE in the NAME AND ON BEHALF 
OF THE city a LEASE OF CERTAIN PRE- 
MISES FOR BATHING AND RECREATIONAL 
PURPOSES AT BROKEN BRIDGE SO-CALLED. 

Resolzrd by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follo-ws: 

1. The Mayor is hereby authorized to 
execute in the name and on behalf of the 



R2I 



City of Concord a lease ot certain i)re- 
mises from Ralph \V. and Kvelyn Sc(jtt, 
on tlie northerly liank of tlie Soucook 
River, bounded and descrilied as fol- 
lows:— 

Beginning on the westerly line of 
Broken Bridge at tlie Soucook River; 
thence northerly by the westerl\' line 
of Broken Bridge Road a distance of 
350 feet more or less ; then westerly 
at right angles with said road through 
land of Evelyn and Ralph W. Scott a 
distance of 530 feet more or less to the 
easterly line of land of Jacob E. 
Chickering : thence southerly b\' the 
easterly line of land of Jacob R. 
Chickering a distance of 425 feet more 
or less to the Soucook River ; thence 
easterly up the Soucook River a dis- 
tance of 675 feet more or less to point 
of beginning. Containing 4.7 acres 
more or less. 

2. The said ])remises to be placed under 
the control of the Committee on Play- 
grounds and to be used for loathing pur- 
poses at said River. 

3. The said lease to be for a period 
beginning June 21, 1944, and expiring on 
September 22, 1944. The total rent for 
said period to be in the sum of Sevent\'- 
five Dollars ($75.00). 

4. The said city to have the right to 
complete occupancy of said premises only 
for such period of time as there is a duly 
authorized employee of the city at said 
bathing area, present and engaged in 
carrying out his/her duties within the 
scope of his/her employment. 

5. This resolution to take effect upon 
its passage. 

Passed Tune 12, 1944. 



Resolution rklative to the cost of 
administration of the attexdaxce 
and leave ordinance. 

Rcsoli'cd hy thr Board of .Udcniioi 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That each department of the City of 
Concord is hereby requested to submit to 
the Finance Committee the cost of the 
operation of the Ordinance: "On .At- 
tendance and Leave" to their respective 
department, from the date it became effec- 
tive, namely, July 1, 1943 to July 1, 1944. 
Same to be submitted to the Finance Com- 
mittee on or before August 1. 1944. 

Passed July 10, 1944. 



ReSOLI'TIOX in RELATION TO THE 1944 
CITV REI'ORT. 

Rrsohcvd hy tlic Board of .lldcniioi 
of thr City of Concord, as follows: 
That the City Planning Board be 
autht)rized to prepare and have printed in 
due time the 1944 City Report and that 
they be authorized to procure photograi)hs 
for the said City Repcjrt and said pho- 
tograplLs to be paid from the 1944 appro- 
priation of ])rinting and stationerv. 
Passed .August 14, 1944. 



ReSOLITIO.V I.V RELATION Tt) MAPPED 

LINES FOR THE FUTURE WIDENING OF 

NORTH STATE STREET AND SOl'TH STATE 
STREET. 

I\'cs(d7rd hy the Board of .lldcrnicn 
of the City of Concord, as folhrws: 

That the City Planning Board be and 
hereby is authorized to survey Xorth 
State Street and South State Street for 
street widening purposes, and to make and 
certify to the Board of Aldermen a plan 
of said survey on which are indicated the 
locations of the line recommended by the 
Planning Board as the planned or mapped 
lines of future widenings of said streets. 

Passed August 14, 1944. 



ReSOLI'TIOX ArTHORIZIXi; THE PURCHASE 
OF A NEW ],ADDER TRUCK FOR THE FIRE 
DEPARTMENT. 

h'csohi'cd hy tlic Board of .lldcrnicn 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Fire Board be and hereby is 
authorized to purchase a new Ladder 
Truck for the Fire Department, at a cost 
not to exceed $16,000. 

Said sum to be appropriated to the 
1945 Fire Department Capital Budget for 
this purpose. 

Passed .August 28, 1944. 



Resolution appropriating ten thou- 
sand EIGHT lUXDREI) NINETY-NINE 
AND 79/100 DOLLARS TO PAY FOR REAL 
ESTATE SOLD TO THE CITY OF CONCORD 
FOR UNPAID TAXES FOR THE YEAR 1943. 

Rcsohc'cd hy the Jhnird of .lldcrnicn 
of the City of Concord, as folloz<'s: 

That the sum of ten thousand eight 
eight hundred ninetv-nine and 79/100 
dollars ($10,899.79) be and hereby is 
appropriated to pa\- the amount due 
the City of Concord for Real Estate pur- 



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dialed at the Tax Collector's sale. Sep- 
tember 28. 1944. of Real Estate, for un- 
paid taxes for the year 1943. 
Passed October 9. 1944. 



RkSOLUTIOX IX RF.LATIOX TO SALARIES 
AXI) WAGKS OF CITY F.MPI.OVEKS. 

Kcsohi'cd by flic Board of .Udcnncii 
of flic City of Concord, as folloi\.'s: 

That the salaries and wages of City 
J'.niiiluyees be increased for the year 1945 
as follows : 

Persons recei\'ini' up and including; 
$1,500. 107c. 

Persons receiving" from $1,500. ni) to 
and including $2,000. 5%. 

Persons receiving from $2,000. uj) to 
and including $3,000. 2'/:.7r. 

.Said sums required to meet tiiis addi- 
tional expense shall be- added to the 
Salary and Wage item in each Depart- 
ment Budget. 

Passed November 13. 1944. 



ReSOLUTIOX REL.'XTIVE to VETKKAXS HOS- 
PITAL COMMITTEE REPORT. 

Rcsoh'cd by fhc Board of .{Idcniicii 
of flic Cify of Concord, as fidloa's: 

That the report of the \'eterans Hos- 
pital Committee, authorized by the Board 
of Aldermen and appointed by the Mayor, 
be accepted and that they be re(|uested 
to continue such negotiations as in their 
judgment may seem proper and that they 
be authorized to expend such sums as 
may be necessary, subiect to the approval 
of the Committee on Finance. 

Passed November 27. 1944. 



ReSOHTIOX relative to THE PURCHASE 
OF LAXIi FROM IVIRS. J. E. NORMANDEAU. 
AGENT. 

Rcsoh'cd by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follozi.'s: 

That the offer of }.Irs. J. E. Norman- 
deau. Agent, to sell to the City of Con- 
cord a strip of land at the junction of 
Airport Road and Daniel Webster High- 
way for the sum of four hundred dollars 
($400.00) be accepted, and same be 
charged to the appropriation "Incidentals 
and Land Daniages". 

Passed December 11, 1944. 



ReSOLUTIOX to INVESTIGATE AND MAKE 
A REPORT AS TO CONVALESCENT ANI) 
NURSING HOMES IN THE CITY OF CON- 
CORD. 

Rcsoh'cd by the Board of Aldermen 
of fhc City of Concord, as f(dlows: 

That the Sanitary Officer. City En- 
gineer. Chief of the Fire Department and 
City Solicitor be and hereby are named 
as a committee to investigate and make 
a report relative to the use of property 
for convalescent and nursing home pur- 
poses in the City of Concord. 

Passed Deceiuber 11, 1944. 



ReSOLT'TIOX IX RELATION TO A COMMU- 
NITY RECREATION BIMLDIXG. 

Resolved by flic Board of Aldermen 
of fhc Cify of Concord, as fcdUncs: 

That in tlie development of a post-war 
program of public works for the City of 
Concord, the City Planning Board be and 
hereby is requested to investigate and re- 
port to the Board of Aldermen on the 
merits of providing community recreation 
building facilities, and in its investigation 
the Planning Board be further ret|uested 
to give particular consideration to any 
existing public buildings that may become 
available and could be convertecl to such 
use. 

Passed December 11. 1944. 



Resolution' .appropriatixi; moxey to pay 

THE state of new H.VMPSHIRE FOR POLL 
taxes collected DURING THE YEAR 1944 
IX ACCORDAXCE WITH CHAPTER 201, 
L.VWS OF XEW HAMPSHIRE. 1943. 

Resolved by the Board of .lldermcn 
of flic Cify of Concord, as folloies: 

That the sum of Twenty-Three Thou- 
sand Nine Hundred b'orty Dollars 
(23.940.00) be and hereby is appropriated 
out of money in tlie Treasury received 
during the year 1944. being the three 
dollar ($3.00) Special per capita poll tax 
levy, in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 201. Laws of New Hampshire 
1943. same to be paid to the Treasurer 
of the State of New Hampshire in pay- 
ment of seven thousand nine hundred 
eighty (7.980) poll taxes received during 
the year 1944 un to December 11. 1944. 

Passed December 11. 1944. 



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