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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

The Nitiety- third 
ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

CITY OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 

for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1945 




Capital of the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Merrimack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27,171 (1940) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision of the City 
Planning Board by the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



o 



o o 

\ FOREWORD I 

o o 

;' Yesterday ... ^ 

^ From the standpoint of municipal government, the war 



^^ years constituted a period of "marking time" — a period of <* 

expediency and improvision in keeping city affairs func- ^ 

tioning in spite of shortages in manpower, equipment and ^ 

almost all types of materials used in municipal operations. ^ 

Of necessity there were some curtailments of services. In 
most instances, however, these were relatively of minor con- 
sequence. A limited number of services directly related to ^ 
the war effort were inaugurated and subsequently discon- 



o 



o 



</ 



% tinued when their need was no longer urgent. On the ^ 

% whole, the City of Concord emerged from the war period o 

X with Its service structure intact. o 

Today ... ^ 

o The "shooting" war is over. As far as the City is con- o 

o . . ^ 

o cerned, the war's most serious aftermath arises from an <> 

<* almost complete discontinuance of public works construe- ^ 

*> tion during the period of hostilities. As a result, we have ^ 

<' the task before us of giving effect to a backlog of public ^ 

^ works construction which will provide both the facilities ^ 

^^ which had to be set aside during the war and normal im- ^ 

^ provements and replacements. ^ 

% Tomorrow ... % 

% The coming period must, of necessity, be a busy one. o 

<, Many needed improvements will have to be provided. Dififi- o 

'y cult problems affecting municipal operations will arise and <> 

</ will require solution based on sound judgment. Not the o 

o least of these problems is the need for a carefully planned o 

o financial program which will be in keeping with the ability o 

</ of the tax structure to pay for needed public works. o 

o The unexpected slowness of reconversion to a peace-time o 

o economy resulting from serious shortages of manpower and ^^ 

o materials can be expected to retard initial progress of the o 

<* City's post-war program. However, every effort will be o 

<* made to proceed with the work at the earliest possible date. ^^ 

o o 



'eace 



Legislative Review 
1945 



Board of Aldermen . . . 

» » Established an addition to the Offi- 
cial Map of the City ot Concord, 
South-Central Section. 

» » Adopted an ordinance regulating 
the use of property for convalescent 
and nursing home purposes. 

» » Amended the Zoning Map of the 
City of Concord by extending the 
commercial district in the North Main 
Street section of the City Proper. 

» » Authorized the City P 1 a n n i n g 
Board to make a study of all insurance 
carried on City of Concord property. 

» » Purchased the Cogswell School lot 
from the Concord Union School Dis- 
trict to provide a site for a fire station 
in the South-End section of the city. 

» » Appropriated the sum of §9,000.0(1 
for the purchase and installation of 
permanent floodlights at Memorial Ath- 
letic Field. 

» » Studied the advisability of pnnid- 
ing a retirement system for municipal 
employees as aiuhori/ed under House 
Bill No. 201. 

» » Authorized engineering studies of 
an artificial lake in the south-western 
section of the city. 

» » Purchased land for cemetery pur 
pose in the Sawyer Street section adja- 
cent to the Blossom Hill Cemetery. 

» » Rescinded action taken in I9.H.H to 
lay out a narrow alley between Park 
and Centre Streets. 

» » Requested the Planning Hoard to 
study the feasibility cjf establishing a 

4 ** ** City of Concord 



public parking lot in the area between 
LoAv Avenue and the railroad yard. 

» » Adjusted the salaries of municipal 
employees to oftset the rising cost of 
living. 

» » Leased projierty in ixick of the 
police station for parking purposes in 
connection with a new lousiness estab- 
lished in the building located at the 
corner of Odd Fellows Avenue and 
Market Lane. 

» » Authorized the Lands and Build- 
ings Committee to sell the NYA prop- 
erty on Eastside Drive. 

» » Continued the "pay-as-you-go" pol- 
icy and aiuhorized no new bond issues. 

» » Placed itself on record as favoring 
legislation which would permit the use 
of national standards by reference in 
the building code. 

» » Voted to relocate a portion of 
Ferry Street in the vicinity of the Rum- 
ford Press. 

» » Extended the downtown alley plan 
l)y voting to lay out an extension of 
Low Avenue from Phenix Avenue to 
Depot Street. 

» » Aiuhorized the appointment of a 
special citizens committee to determine 
the need for provision of cpiarters for 
veterans' organizations. 

» » Made fluids availal)le to the Board 
of Public Works for the purchase of a 
new road grading madiine. 

» » Appropriated .1i;64.000.0O in the 
1945 municipal budget for capital ex- 
penditures. 

» » Purchased land at the junction of 
Airport Road and Manchester Street 
for street widening purposes. 



Administrative Review 
1945 



Municipal 
Departments . . . 



<> c> c« o c» c> c> 



<> o o c» o 



» » The City Clerk assisted approxi- 
mately 1,200 Concord veterans in the 
proper completion of their state bonus 
applications. 

» » The Board of Assessors reported a 
§119,181.00 decrease in the city's total 
assessed valuation. 

» » The Tax Collector experienced a 
high percentage of collettion of cm- 
rent taxes. 

» » The City Treasiner leported a 
SI 14,000.00 reduction in the city's 
bonded indebtedness. 

» » The City Solicitor dcNoied con- 
siderable time to the mailer oi city 
participation in the state employees' 
retirement system. 

» » The Planning Board cooperated 
with the State Highway Department in 
the preparation of plans of the Con- 
cord through pass. 

» » The Pla)groinid Committee enjoy- 
ed a large measine of success in pro- 
viding a program geared to a war-time 
schedule of activities. 

» » The Recreation Ck)mmittec re- 
ported increased use of its facilities, 
particularly by returning servicemen. 

» » The Health Department noted a 
favorable puijlic health situation \\ith 
iro epidemics. 

» » The Milk Inspector reported the 
greatest increase in fluid milk con- 
sumption ever recorded by the milk 
inspection agency. 



» » The Public Library circulated 197,- 
289 books, an increase of .S4,835 over 
the 1944 total. 

» » The Relief Department experi- 
enced a continuation of the downward 
trend iir the number of relief recipi- 
ents, but expenditures for old age 
assistance increased noticeably. 

» » The Police Department made 1,372 
arrests, an increase of 525 over the 
total for the previous year. 

» » The Probation Department noted 
an increase in juvenile delinqtiency, 
especially in the younger age group. 

» » The Fire Department reported a 
considerable improvement in fire loss; 
fire loss dropped to .'f74,45fi.fi8 from 
.'5117,767.33. 

» » The City Sealer reported a con- 
tinuation of a stejjped-up inspection 
program clue to small lot sales growing 
out of commodity scarcities. 

» » The Zoning. Building and Plumb- 
ing Departments noted an innnediate 
increase in requests for permits due to 
the end of the war. 

» » The Public Works Department 
made considerable progress on its 
farm-to-market road reconstruction pro- 
gram. 

» » The Airport Commission made 
plans for an expanded program of 
post-war activities at the Concord Mu- 
nicipal Airport. 

» » The Water Department made ex- 
tensive changes in its stand-by pump- 
ing equipment at the Penacook Street 
Station. 



Annual Report » » 5 



GOVERNMENT 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Af ay or 

John C. Tii.ton 
Siihstittite Mayor 

Aldermen-at-Large and Alemhers 

Board of Public Works 

Robert w. Potter 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Nelson E. Strong 
John Swenson 
John C. Tilton 
WiMiAM A. Stevens 



W^ard Aldermen 






Charles P. Coakley 


Ward 


1 


John E. Davis 


Ward 


2 


William J. Flynn 


Ward 


3 


WiNFiELD J. Phillips 


Ward 


•i 


Harry D. Challis 


Ward 


S 


Lawrence J. Moynihan 


Ward 


6 


Raymond V. LaPointe 


Ward 


7 


Clarence E. Huggins 


Ward 


S 


Thomas B. Jennings 


Ward 


y 



Standing Committees of 
The Board of Aldermen 

Arbitration: 

Aldermen Moynihan. Bartlett, Flynn and 

Tilton. 
Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen Strong, Coakley, LaPointe and 

Tilton. 
Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Tilton, Davis, Jennings and La- 
Pointe. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Jennings, Coakley, Strong and 

Tilton. 

FINANCE: 

Mayor McKee, Aldermen Challis, Phillips, 
Stevens and Swenson. 

Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Flynn, Moynihan and 
Potter 

Lands and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett, Davis, Huggins and Jen- 
nings. 

Playgrounds and Bath: 

Aldermen LaPointe, Coakley, Flynn, Hug- 
gins and Jennings. 

Police and License: 

Aldermen Huggins, Davis, Strong and Tilton. 

Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Flynn, Huggins, Jennings and 
Moynihan. 

Relief: 

Aldermen Davis, Bartlett and Coakley. 




Concord 

City 

Government 

1946-1947 

Left to right, front row, 
Alderman Strong, Cit] 
Clerk Roby, Mayor Da 
vie. Aldermen Tilton 
Swenson; second roiv 
Aldermen Potter, Phil 
lips, Bartlett, Coakley 
Stevens; back rou\ Al 
dermen Flynn, French 
Moynihan, Challis, Da 
vis, Jennings and Drowr 



OFFICIALS 



Building hispeclor 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer 
Commissioner, Board 

Public Works 
Fire Chief 
Judge, Municipal 

Court 
Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milk Inspector 
Overseer of Poor 
Overseer of Poor, 

Penacook 
Planning Director 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Measures 
Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 
Supt. of Streets 
Supt. of Water Wor 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds 
Tax Collector 
Tree Warden 



of 



F.DWARD E. BEANE 

Arthur E. RoB^ 

Edward E. Beane 

Henry W. Smith 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 

Ervin E. Webber 
Clarence H. Green 

William L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

Marion F. Holt 

Austin B. Presbv 

Parker L. Hancock 

Charles P. Coaklev 

CinsTAF H. Lehtinen 

Arthur W. McIsaac 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Donald G. Barton 

J. SlIEPARI) NOKNIS 



Leslie E. Clark 

Ervin E. Webber 

ks Percy R. Sanders 

Paul G. Crowell 

Amos B. Morrison 

Ervin E. Webber 



Boards, Commissions and Trustees 

Board of Adjustment: 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman: John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Laurence M. 
Meyer, Shelby O. Walker. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, John N. Engel, Charles W. How- 
ard, Donald J. McFarland, Robert W. Pot- 
ter, John Swenson. 

Board of Assessors: 

Clarence L. Clark, Chairman: Arthur F. 
Henry, Clarence O. Philbrick, 

City Planning Board: 

James M. Langley, Chairman: Edward E. 
Beane, Douglas N. Everett, Warren H. 
Greene, A. Clifford Hudson, John B. Jame- 
son, Charles J. McKee, Dudley W. Orr, 
Robert W. Potter. 




City Hall 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 

William J. Bishop, Chairman: Edward E. 
Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 



Board of Health: 

(Charles J. McKee, Chairman 



A. Boucher, Dr. Thomas 
Clinton R. Mullins. 



Dr. Pierre 
M. Dudley, Dr. 



Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman: Clarence H. 
Green, Percy R. Sanders. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Oliver Jenkins, President: Harold W. Bridge, 
Joseph J. Comi, Lela Y. Johnson, John F. 
MacEachran, William B. Mclnnis, George W. 
Randall, Alexander Rennie, Jr., Martha G. 
Upton. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman: Roy W. Peaslee, 
Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman; Gardner G. 
Emmons, Leigh S. Hall, Charles J. McKee, 
Carleton R. Metcalf. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, L Reed 
Gourley. 

Board of Water Co.mmiss:oners: 

James W. Jameson, President: Robert W. 
Brown, Harry H. Dudley, Allen M. Free- 
man, Charles P. Johnson, Donald Knowlton, 
Charles J. McKee, Benjamin H. Orr, Gardner 
Tilton. 



Annual Report » » 7 



CITY CLERK 

Arthur E. Roby City Clerk 

Margaret A. Spencer Deputy City Clerk 

19-45 Expenditure $8,822.90 

Board of Mayor and Aldermen 

The Board of Mayor and Aldeniien 
met to transact mimicipal business on 
25 occasions during 1945. Of these 
meetings, 12 were reguhaiy-scheduled. 
five were special and four were ad- 
jomned sessions. Foin- public hear- 
ings were also held during the year. 

The board's deliberations resulted 
in the passage of eight ordinances and 
■^6 resokuions. Legislative accomplish- 
ments of particular note included 
establishment of rides governing con- 
valescent homes, preliminary apprtjval 
of a pension system for mimicipal em- 
ployees, and street and zoning changes 
advantageous to the plant expansion 
program of one of the city's largest 
industries. 

Board of Public Works 

During 1945, the ii(jard of Public 
Works held 12 regular and four special 
meetings and one public hearing. The 
board's activities were highlighted by 
the resumption of the highway and 
sidewalk construction program inter- 
mitted by the war. 

Vital Statistics 

The City Clerk's office recorded 563 
births, ;535 marriages and 615 deaths 
in C^oncord during 1945. Compared 
with totals for the previous year, births 
and deaths were down 24 and 16, re- 
spectively. On the other hand, mar- 
riages showed an increase of 115 or 
52 per cent. In most part, this in 
crease can be attribtUed to the ter 
mination of the war and the return 
of servicemen to Ct)ncord. 

During the past vear, theic has been 

8 « « City of Concord 



no slackening in the demand for certi- 
fied copies of vital statistics records. In 
fact, the efforts of one member of the 
department's staff has been devoted 
almost entirely to sujjplying the pub- 
lic with attested copies of these records 
which are required in connection with 
employment, insurance, compensation 
and many other matters. 

Revenue received during 1945 from 
certification of records amounted io 
.'$275.00. The department continued 
its war-time practice of making no 
charge to servicemen and their families 
foi (0|)ies of \ital statistics iccoids. 

State Bonus Papers 

Under statutory rei]uirement relat- 
ing to the payment of a state bonus 
to \eterans of World War II, all city 
and town clerks are called upon to 
certify the residence of veterans ap- 
jjlying for such bonus. During the 
last four months of 1945, the City 
Clerk's office certified the residence of 
approxiiriately 1,200 Concord veterans. 
It has been the policy of the depart- 
ment to render every assistance to dis- 
charged servicemen in the proper com- 
pletion of their bonus application. 
There is no charge for this certification 
service. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 

Receipts from the recording of mort- 
gages and conditional sales showed a 
slight increase during 1945. This was 
due to the lifting of certain war-time 
restrictions and the appearance on the 
market of some household commodities 
and appliance not manufactured dur- 
ing the war. Income from this source 
can be expected to increase during the 
coming year as civilian goods produc- 
tion expands. However, war-accumu- 
lated savings will tend to limit the 
number and amount of conditional 
sales contiacts for some time to come. 

Licenses, Fees, Etc. 

The City Clerk's office ser\es as the 
clearing house for receipts from muni- 
cipal licenses and fees such as auto per- 



mits, tax licenses, dog licenses, theatre 
licenses, city-owned property rentals, 
etc. Even though receipts Irom auto 
permits which amounted to ,1j> 15,424. 10 
for 1945 increased less than $350.00 
over the 1944 total, it is interesting to 
Hole iliat there was a decided jump in 
iliis source ol revenue after V-J Day 
uiili ilu- termination of gasoline ration- 
ing and the return of many unregis- 
tered cars to the highways. Although 
no new cars appeared in the market 
during 1945, a consideraijle lunnber 
should he available in 194(i and auto 
permit receipts should start to climb 
to their former important plate as a 
source of miniicipal income. 

Total 1945 receipts from licenses, 
fees, etc. other than atuo permits, a- 
mounted to $20,70.8.29 as lompared 
with $15,291.2'^ Un the picvious year. 

ELECTIONS 

City Primary 

The biennial miuiitipai ])iiiiiai\ held 
October 9, 1945 brought out an ex- 
tremely light vote. Out of approxi- 
mately 17,000 registered voters, less 
than ten per cent cast their ballots. 

Mayor CJiarles }. McKee ran unop- 
posed to succeed himself in ollice. 
Canvass of the primary vote showed 
that C:harles C!. Davie ^\as second with 



28 write-in votes for mayor. Mr. Davie 
accepted the nomination of candidate 
for mayor. 

Primary candidates for other muni- 
cipal offices included lour for alderman- 
at-large, two for assessoi', and 15 for 
ward alderman. 

City Election 

The municipal election was held 
November fi, 1945 with 5,851 voters 
casting their ballots for candidates for 
mayor. Of this numl)er. Clharles C. 
Davie received 2,95!) and Charles J. 
McKee received 2,887, -.vith the re- 
mainder scattered among write-in can- 
didates. After a re-count ol the votes 
for maycjr, Hon. C^harles C. Davie was 
declared duly elected as mayor to be- 
come the youngest chief executive in 
the city's history. 

Alderman Nelson E. Strong, Roliert 
W. Potter and Charles A. Bartlett 
were re-elected as aldermen-at-large for 
loin-year terms. Aldermen elected lor 
the nine wards for two-year terms were 
C^harles P. Coakley, John E. Davis, 
William J. Flynn, Winfield J. Phillips. 
Harry D. C;hallis, Eawrence J. Mo)ni- 
han, \\as'\\ 1). Ficiuh. Clarence A. 
Drown and 1 homas 1>. Jennings. 

Arthur F. Henry was elected to the 
office of assessor for a six-vear term. 



Democracy at work — W^ard Six Wardroom 




A ^ ^ Th Q ^ A/T 1h 1\T T '" ^'^*^ l:)uilding trades, nuich of the 
-^^ *^ ^ J— ' ^ v3 JL VX X_/ X ^ X work applied for was not started diir- 

X K X V "1^^ 1945. 

c> >> c> c> c> c> c> c^ c> <^ <» <> c> '7 . , , , 

A considerable nnpro\enient was 

noted in (loncord Aacan(\ simalion. 
BOA RD OF ASSESSORS riu' loial number of vacaiu dwelling 

CLARENCE L. CLARK Chairman ''"''' ''^ '''*' ' ''^ '"^ M^'il >• l^^ Was 

CLARENCE O. PH.LBR.CK Clerk •^^•' ='' •'•"'""'' '''^' 'll'-t""^' ll'S'l '>' ■'<>'> 

ARTHUR F. HENRY '" '•'■*''• ^^ Hh' close ol ll.e Year. 

there was ample e\ idencc ilial llie nuni- 

19-.'; Expenditure $13,120.68 |hi ,,f xacancies was nnu ii less ilian (he 

Aniil total. In hul. llie existinu \a- 

(ancies aic ol <|iiesiionai)ie residential 

\aiue and for the (nsl lime in many 

Real Property ^,^.^„,^ C.Muor.i .s laced wnl, a .lefniite 

llie u|)swinj4 in (lie loral real estate honsiii"' slioiia<'e 
maikel wliidi bej^an making itself fell 

in l'J44 (ontinned to gather niomentmn Assessed Valuations, Polls. Etc. 

during the past year. This can be The cily's loial assessed \alualion 

altribiited. in large |)art, to the adiie for the year 1945 amounted to ."iji.HjI.UIi.S,- 

housing slioilage which together with 84(1. or .SI 19.181.(10 Icvss than ihe total 

reslric lions on new c oiistnu lion has joi ihe prexioiis \c-ai. I his shrinkage 

created an abnormal liirno\ei in e\- was ihc icsnil ol ihc- normal factors 

isting resideiilial pmperi\. Allogelher. uncling lo dc-|)rec iaic- existing proper- 

!).S8 |)ropc-ily liaiisleis wcmc- ic-corded lies and ihe lack ol new tonsiriic I ion. 

during 1945 as compared wiih (ili.'l in alleialioiis and repairs growing oni oi 

1944, r»(ll in l!M.''i and 4()7 in 1942. w.ir resi i ic I ions on building a(li\ii\. 

The 1945 exchange of deeds re])re,senls I lu' lol.il nuinl)er of taxable polls 

a 7.H per ceiil ininoNcr ol the cil\'s enuiiiei aled in l!)45\vas II.7.HI as eom- 

12,000 pare (4s ol real eslale. pared wiili I'J.lHi for llie preceding 

The niimbei ol building permils \cai. I his dec rease ol (172 |)olls can be 

issued during ihe \ear more than alliii>uled wholb lo men eiileiing llie 

doiiljletl the tolal ol llie previous \c'ai. aiiiicd seixices. il is inlei csl iiig lo 

One hundred leu permils were i.ssued note ih.il ihe number ol lax-exempi 

as against 51 in l!)4 1. Ol the 1945 xeleians increased Irom 079 in I!) 11 

permils. 4(1 were lor new buildings lo 701 in 1945. I his is the beginning 

and garages, and (il were lor reinoclc4- ol an upward tiend in \c'teraiis' |)oll 

iiig ol exisiing siiuc lures. Due lo lax exemplions which can lie expec led 

coulinued scarcities in building ma- lo reac h llie :!. 000 lo 1.000 (iguic in the 

terials and ihe shoiiage ol skilled labor nexl iwo \c'ars. 

One of the first post-war residences built in Concord 

'^W* - ' ' - '" iiF^"^f iiiiiiM[iii r 1 r h 




The total number of shares of rail- Tax Warrant 



load stock held in Concord during 
1945 was 5,370. This number indi- 
cated an increase of 1,930 shares over 
thi- tola! of the previous year. Rail- 
road stock is taxed by the state and 
(icdited to the city in proportion to 
the niiinbcr of shares ()\vne(i b\ Con- 
(okI sto( kiiolders. 



The total amount of the city's 1945 
tax warrant submitted by the Board 
of Assessors to the Tax Collector was 
.11,181,708.97. This represented an in- 
crease of .192,780.37 over the warrant 
of the previous year. The 1945 tax 
rate amounted to .1>33.r)8 per SI. 000.00 
of assessed valuation. 



T~^ A '^Z 708.97 warrant sul^mitted lor toliection. 

-L i\JSl. 8100,910.70 remained outstanding at 

^-^y-^-|- -p T^ /^^ T^ T /^ TVT I Ih- end of the year. The total amount 

^ ,V^ I ^1 y P/V J JL JlV>/1^ <»' uncollected taxes against previous 

years was .SI 9, 76 1.05. This sum was ap- 
cv <v c, c> c c> c» s> c> •C' <► ♦ o proximately ,1i;4, 500.00 more than the 

AMOS B. MORRISON Tax Collector l'>t''l outstanding at the (lose of the 

nrecedinsi vear and (an l)i- attributed in 

19i5 Expenditure $9,05r,.i2 ' '^- ,, . , ,i ,i , 

most |)aii to the eitect ol the three 
C>C>0<>C>>><'OOOC>v^<» dollai |)oll lax iiuicase on a more or 

less normal d( lincpieiu \ . 
79-^5 Collections The amoiuit of uncollected taxes car- 

The collection of ciiiiciu taxes ried by the Tax Collector at the close 
(ontiniicd ai a Ingli percentage level dI ilie past three yeais is indicated in 
dining tiie past yeai. Of the .^1,181,- ilu' lollowing table: 

Y('(ir liiioinil Boiii^hl .IiikhiiiI Almled by Deeded Aiiioinil 

h\' City Redeemed Assessors lo C.ily Viiredeenied 

1941 ,1i;40,.f)04.50 $'W,I87.I9 .|l,408..')2 $881.17 .fllM.til,' 

1942 .'}2..H29.2.'5 .'{l,l)()9.IS 7?i2.6ry 532.21 r),'').l(i 

1943 10,899.79 7.7l(i..1() 7.'')9.().3 \46Iyi 2,277.2(i 

lOM ().r)7n.79 ;i,l(K».7.'i 227.r)0 SS.I.') 3,151.11 

Taxes Bought By City Other Activity 

The amoinit oi hack taxes accpiiicci During 1945, fiNe piojierties were 

by the City at the 1945 lax Collec (ci s deeded to the Calv in non-payment of 

Sale was 80,570.79. 'I'his sum was taxes. Ol this luimbei, two were with- 

S4,328.!),1 less than the total lot the held Irom sale by the City Planning 

l^revious vear and represeiued the IJoard because of reasonably foresee- 

Icjwest delincpienc y in the Cil\'s icc cut able numicipal use. Twelve tax-title 

tax history. properties were sold during the year 

The following tabulation shows ilu' U\ the Tax Collector in his capacity of 

status of delincjuent taxes as of Decern- City Real Estate .\gent. Total receipts 

ber 31, 1945: Irom this source amounted to .$2,314.90. 

As of As of As of 

Year Dec. 31, 10-13 Dec. .31, 19^4 Dec. 31, 1945 

1939 .'$3,109.55 $1,601.91 $1,351.00 

1940 3,851.79 2,195.63 1.812.65 

1911 1.126.S6 2,413.93 1,992.13 

1 !) 42 (>.297.42 4.444.25 2. I3,5.2X 

1943 117.(ir)(").17 4..f)62.67 2.(M2.SO 

1914 107.113.00 10.127.19 

1915 100,910.70 

Total $135,042.09 .$122,331.39 $120,671.75 

Annual Report » » II 



FINANCES 

Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1945 Expenditure $4,939.56 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Harry h. Dudley 

Carl H. Foster 

I. Reed Gourley 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1945 Expendirure $410.00 



<> C> <► 



<v o \N <;> o ♦ 



Durino (he year 1945, the City of 
Concord coiitiiuied to chart a sound 
financial coui.se. At the close of the 
year, the City's net debt stood at 
$538,.S7().22. or .^5,855.24 le.ss than the 
total outstanding at the beginning of 
the year. The reduction in net debt 
would have been substantially greater 
had it not Ijeen for the fact that 
$108,144.71) of accumidated surplus was 
applied to 1945 operations. In sub- 
stance, this represented a saving to the 
taxpayer of approximately $3.00 per 
.$1,000.00 of assessed valuation. 



Concord celebrates Memorial Day 




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General Fund 

Gross receipts for the year amounted 
to $1,357,633.39. Net receipts totaled 
$1,331,281.46 after deductions by trans- 
fer amounting to $26,351.93. Net re- 
ceipts were in excess of estimated 
revenues by $175,063.56. Most of this 
excess was due to a better-than-average 
retinn (ju the 1945 tax levy, receipts 
from which exceeded estimates by 
$166,182.82. 

Appropriations for 1945 totaled $1,- 
507,570.91 which sum together with 
$177,562.02 carried forward from the 
previous year. $27,270.27 in cash re- 
ceipts, and $34,439.42 from transfers 
bnnight the total amount available up 
to $1,746,842.62. Deductions and ex- 
penditures totaled $1,540,785.49 ^vhich 
together with $178,353.90 carried to 
1946 left a net imexpended balance 
of ,$27,703.23. 

The City closed its books with an 
unappropriated surplus of $58,629.78, 
or $108,144.76 less than the amoiuii 
on hand at the beginning of the year. 

Bond Funds 

Dtning 1945, the City reduced its 
bonded indebtedness by $114,000.00. 
At the end of the year, oiUstanding 
bonds totaled $597,000.00 of which 
$222,000.00 represented m u n i c i p a 1 
bonds, $301,000.00 school bonds and 
$74,000.00 waterworks bonds. For the 
third conseciuive year, the City i.ssued 
no new bonds. 

Total interest charges uruil maturity 
on the City's oiUstanding debt amount 
to $156,146.25. Of this sum, $21,716.25 
is interest on miuiicipal bonds, $126,- 
405.00 on school bonds and $8,025.00 
on waterwoiks bonds. 

Trust Funds 

The Trustees of Trust Fluids le- 
ported total assets of .S5 15.489.70 at 
I he (lose of 1945. Of this simi. .S374.- 
463.67 represented cemetery trust fund 
assets. During the year, $51,494.43 was 
added to permanent trust funds. Trust 
fund receipts amounted to 519,840.72 
as against disbursements of $16,936.37. 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 

Gordon S. Lord City Solicitor 

Donald G. Matson Acting City Solicitor 

( In the absence of Mr. Lord ) 

1945 Expenditure $1,990.70 

Due to the continued absence of City 
Solicitor Gordon S. Lord, serving in 
the armed forces, and the resignation 
of Henry P. Callahan, who substituted 
for Mr. Lord, the City's legal work was 
carried on by Donald G. Matson as 
Acting City Solicitor. 

Old Litigations — Continued 

riie loUcMving actions have been 
continued without prejudice to the 
interests of the City: 

City of Concord Pclitioti to Discon- 
tinue Sheep Road. This matter has 
been referred to the Merrimack Onmty 
Commissioners lor a hearing, and 
arises out of the closing of said road 
for the development of the Concord 
Municipal Airport. The matter should 
be heard at the April 1946 Term of 
the Superior Court. 

City of Coticord Petition to Discon- 
tinue Clough's Mill Road. This matter 
has been referred to the Merrimack 
Coimty Commissioneis lor a hearing, 
and arises out of the closing of said 
road for the development of the Cion- 
cord Municipal Airport. This matter 
should be heard at the April H)46 
Term of the Superior Court. 

Maude L. Croivley vs. City of Con- 
cord. I'his is an action which arises 
out ol the C^ity's alleged taking of land 
from Maude L. Crowley for airport 
purposes. 

Samuel C. Marden vs. City of Con- 
cord. This claim arises out of an 
alleged lease between the City and 
Marden, furnishing a dwelling to a 
relief recipient. 



Max Cohen vs. City of Concord. 
This matter is to be heard before the 
Superior Court as to whether the Co- 
hens had a legal use of their property 
as a junk yard before the establishment 
of the zoning ordinance. 

New Litigations 

Richard A. Morton vs. City of Con- 
cord. This is an appeal to the Su- 
perior Ciourt from a decision of the 
Zoning Board of Adjustment. It 
should be terminated at the April 1946 
Term. 

El bridge H. Edson x's. City of Con- 
cord. This is a petition relati\e tf) 
title of real estate. The action has 
been terminated without expense to 
the City so far as the rights of the City 
are concerned. 

Adrian T. Peahody vs. City of Con- 
cord. This is a petition relative to 
title of real estate. The action has 
been terminated without expense to 
the City so far as the rights of the City 
are concerned. 

Murcliie vs. City of Concord. This 
is a Zoning Board of Adjustment mat- 
ter and has been terminated so far as 
the interests of the City arc concerned. 

John W. Stanley vs. City of Concord. 
This is a bill in equity to restrain the 
City from transferring the NYA build- 
ing. The temporary restraining order 
expired, the bill was answered and 
the prf)perty in (piestion was conveyed. 
The bill will probably be dismissed at 
the next term of the Superior Court 
without (f)st to the City. 

Cilman et al vs. City of Concord. 
This is a petition relative to title to 
real estate. An answer has been filed 
on behalf of the City and the matter 
will proliably be determined at the 
next term of court. 

Retirement System 

The Acting City Solicitor has de- 
voted considerable time to the matter 
of City participation in the State Em- 
ployees' Retirement System. Member- 
ship in this system appears to be 
definitely in the interest of the City 
as well as its employees. 

Annual Report » » 13 



PLANNING 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 

James M. LANGLEY, Chairman 

Dudley W. Orr. Secretary 

Edward E. Beane 

Douglas N. Everett 

Warren H. Greene 

A. Clifford Hudson 

John B. Jameson 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 

Robert W. Potter 

GUSTAF H. Lehtinen Director 

1945 Expenditure $5,2 39.05 

Concord Throughpass 

One oi the outstanding projects un- 
dertaken Ijy the (;ity Planning Board 
(hiring WHb was the preparation ol 
plans lor a north-south throughpass 
skirting the city's main ijusiness district. 
These plans were prepared in coopera- 
tion with the .State Highway Depart- 
ment. 1 he project, which was approved 
|jy the Ciovernor and C^ouncil alter 
hearings held early in 1946, involves 
a 9,fi0()-toot relocation of the Daniel 
Webster Highway. The relocation will 
effect a material imprf)vement in travel 
conditions in the main shopping dis- 
trict hy tliverting therelrom much ol 
the through traltic which now congests 
the area. 

This map shows the location of 
Indications point to 



The jiroposed new highway begins 
immediately west of the south-end river 
bridge where it bears easterly and runs 
northerly between the railroad yard 
and the river to Bridge .Street. Con- 
tinuing northward, the new highway 
crosses the Hat intervale to the vicinity 
of Ferry Street, from which point it 
swings north-westerly and, by means 
of an overpass across the railroad yard, 
returns to North Main Street opposite 
Bouton Street. 

The relocation is the first step in a 
carefully studied over-all plan for the 
improvement of main through routes 
in (x)iuord. It is in fact the central 
settion of the citys master plan of 
major streets. It has been designed 
.so as to facilitate future highway de- 
velopment, particularly a southerly 
connection with the westside highway 
in Bow and a northerly extension from 
Ferry Street \ia East Concord to Bos- 
cawen. 

The estimated cost of the project is 
.'S;425,()0().()0. The city will participate 
in this ccjst to the extent of .'$2.o,()()().()(). 
The remainder will be paid out of 
federal and state higlnvay funds. 
Present indications are thai coiistruc- 
lioii will be started in 1947. 

Major Street Plan 

l^arly in the year, after extensive 
surveying by the Engineering Depart- 

the proposed Concord throughpass. 
construction in 1947 




14 " *' City of Concord 




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Concord's business district any Saturday morning. The proposed through- 
pass will do much to relieve this traffic congestion 



ment, tlie iiKijor siicci plan ami ilic 
official (ily nui]) wcvc aiiu'iulcd l)\ 
the addition ol ihc |)rc\ iously nnma|)- 
pcd |M)ition ol the sonlli-ccntial scclion 
ol (lie (ily. riiis addition (()\crs the 
Plains area between the Men iina( k 
River and East Side Drive. 

Other changes in the official map 
processed l)y the i'lanning Board in- 
clnded an extension of Low A\inne 
from Phenix A\cnue to Depot Street, 
the dis((»ntinnance and relocation ol 
a secticiii of Ferry Street in connection 
with plant expansion activities at the 
Rmnlord Press, and tlie laying out of 
a system of access roads connecting 
Eastman Street with the C^oncord 
thioiighpass. A parcel of land at the 
jnndion of Bridge Street and Airport 
Road was also accpiired lor street 
widening pmposes. 

On the reconnnendation of the 



Plainiing Board, the city go\ernment 
icscinded pre\ ions action taken in 
(onne(tion with the la\ing out ol an 
alle\ between Paik and Centic Stieets. 

Parking 

At the recpiest of the Board of Al- 
dermen, the Planning Board devised a 
parking ])lan for the citv-owned area 
located in the rear of the Warren 
Street Police Station. A limited space 
ha\ing a capacity of four cars was 
reser\ed for private business rise in 
connection with a ch) cleaning bus- 
iness established in the C:hase Realty 
Clompany building on Odd Fellows 
.\venue. 

Zoning 

Four recpiests for changes in the 
zcjning ordinance and map were con- 
siderc-d by the Planning Board. Two 

Annual Report » » 13 




PROPOSED LAKEDEVELOPMENT 



crry plamning BOABD 

CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1945 




(>1 llicsc rccjufsis came liom ilic Zon- 
ing lioard ot Adiustiucnt. llu' liisi ol 
these concerned a proposed enlarge- 
ment of the apartment house /one in 
the downtown district: the second, a 
suggested change in the text ol the 
ordinance relative to convalescent home 
use. In both instances, the Planning 
Fxiaid h)uii(l the changes unwarranted 
and so recommended to the Board ol 
Aldermen. 

During the year, the board reccjm- 
mended two amendments affecting the 
zoning map. These suggested revi- 
sions were interrelated and involved a 
northward extension of the commer- 



cial chstrict on the easterly side ot 
North Main Street from Ferry Street 
to Franklin Street. The recommended 
changes were adopted by the Board of 
Aldermen. 
Recreation 

In the field of recreation, the Plan- 
ning Board investigated the need for 
floodlighting facilities at Memorial 
Athletic Field. Ihis was in connection 
with the growing popularity of high 
school night football games played 
under makeshift lighting ecjuipment. 
After careful consideration and deter- 
mination of cost, the Planning Board 
reccjnmiended the installation cjf per- 



16 ^^ « City of Concord 



mancnt type floodlights estimated to 
cost $9,000.00. .\ capital expenditure 
item for these lights in the amount 
estimated was included in the 1946 
mimicipal budget. 

Concord Lake 

Extensive surveys were undertaken 
during the year in connection with 
the development of a large artificial 
lake in the south-western section of 
the city. The lake would be created 
by the construction of a dam across 
Turkey River immediately west of 
Saint Paul's School, inundating the 
sub-marginal lands in the vicinity of 
Little Turkey and Great Turkey Ponds 
in Concord and Turee Pond in Bow. 
The reservoir would form a lake abotit 
4.7 miles long by 1.8 miles wide having 
a water surface of 3.8 square miles and 
a shore line of 28.2 miles. 

The principal purposes of the new 
lake would be to provide a much 
needed recreational area and a reserve 
water supply for the city. In addition 
to the public recreation features which 
would be an inherent part of the de- 
velopment, the lake would greatly 
enhance property values and increase 
tax revenues in this riual area which 
now contributes very little to the gen- 
eral welfare of the community. 

Under a financial agreement between 
the City of Concord and the Federal 
Works Agency, the sum of §26,500.00 
was made available for the preparation 
of plans and specifications of the pro- 
ject. The engineering firm of Metcalf 
&: Eddy of Boston. Massachusetts was 
employed to conduct the necessary 
engineering studies. 

The completed plans indicate that 
the project is entirely feasible. The 
Planning Board is investigating the 
various legal and financial considera- 
tions involved in giving eftect to the 
lake development. Careful attention 
is being paid to the make-^vork aspects 
of the project and to the possil)ility 
that the development can be financed 
as a self-liquidating enterprise through 



city lease of much of the extensive 
shore frontage for house and camp lots. 

Fire Station Abandonment 

At the request of the Fire Board, 
the Planning Board considered possible 
public uses for the abandoned Goodwill 
Fire Station. After a thorough canvass 
of possibilities, the board recommended 
that the city dispose of the building 
and make arrangements for rented 
voting facilities for Ward Six elsewhere. 
Accordingly, the property was sold 
and returned to the tax list. 

Capital Budget Procedure 

Due to the war, permanent munici- 
pal improvements and equipment pur- 
chases were almost entirely curtailed. 
As a result, the city is faced with a 
considerable backlog of needed public 
works. In order that these capital 
expenditures might be financed dining 
the post-war period in an orderly man- 
ner so as to make the tax Ijurden as 
easy as possible, the Planning Board 
recommended the reinstatement of the 
capital budget procediue which was 
abandoned at the outset of the war. 
Accepting this suggestion, the P'inance 
Committee requested the Planning 
Board to prepare a six-year capital 
budget program for consideration in 
connection with the 1947 municipal 
budget. 

Other Activity 

In line with the tax-sale property 
procedure adopted hy the Board of 
Aldermen in 1944. the Planning Board 
screened all properties acquired by 
the city in non-payment of taxes for 
possible future municipal use. In con- 
nection with this work, the board as- 
sisted the City Real Estate Agent in 
compiling an accurate list of all tax- 
deed property cleared for sale. 

The 1945 City Report published 
under the supervision of the Planning 
Board was awarded first prize in a 
state-wide municipal reporting contest 
conducted by the LJniversity of New 
Hampshire. Subsequently, the report 
won second place in the New England 
Council municipal report contest. 



Annual Report » » 17 



PUBLIC 

HEALTH and 

SANITATION 



C> C> <> C- s^ c> <» c> <» c> <> c> o 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles J. McKee. Chairman 
Pierre A. Boucher. M.D. 
Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 
Clinton R. Mullins. M.D. 

Donald G. Barton, M.D Health Oijicer 

Walter C. Rowe. M.D. 

Acting, Health Officer 
(In the absence of Dr. Barton) 

Austin B. Presby Milk Inspector 

1945 Expenditure $7,274.72 

On November 15, 194,5. Dr. Donald 
G. Barton returned to the Health De- 
partment and resumed his duties as 
Health Officer after an absence ol five 
years in the .\rmy Medical Corps. 
During Dr. Karton's leave, the activi- 
ties of the Health Department were 
directed by Dr. Walter C;. Rowe. The 
department wishes to take this oppor- 
tunity to express its appreciation to 
Dr. Rowe for his helpfulness in guiding 
the city's health program through the 
war emergency. 

Health Conditions 

The city experienced no epidemics 
dining 1945 and general health con- 
ditions were maintained at a high level. 
As the result of this favorable health 
situation, local industries were able to 
contribute their full measure of ])ro- 
duction to the war effort. 

Due to the shortage of foods and the 
inability to get ccjmpetent help, a con- 
siderable number of eating establish- 
ments closed for the duration. Many 
of these places have now reopened and 

18 « « City of Concord 



there arc indications that several new 
ones will be established during the 
coming year. A revitalized restaurant 
inspection program will be put into 
operation in 1946 and an intensive 
ilrive will be made to enforce better 
methods in handling food and eating 
utensils. 

Communicable Diseases 

Scarlet fever continued prevalent 
during 1945. .\ total of 122 cases of 
this disease was recorded by the Health 
Department. In additicjn, the depart- 
ment received the usual number of 
reports of whooping cough, measles, 
mimips and chicken pox. 

Three cases of poliomyelitis were 
hospitalized in Concord during 1945. 
No cases of meningitis were reported 
during the year. 

Clinics 

Two hundred forty-one children 
^vere immunized against diphtheria, 
whooping cough and small pox dining 
the past year at free clinics condiu ted 
by the department in cooperation with 
the Concord District Nursing Associa- 
tifjn. 

Vital Statistics 

During the year 1945, the Health 
Department recorded a total of 606 
deaths in Concord. Of this number, 
258 were resident and 348 were non- 
resident deaths. There were 225 over 
45 years of age in the resident group 
and 321 in the non-resident. The 
large numiier of non-residents repre- 
sents deaths occurring at the New 
Hamp,shire .State Hospital, the New 
Hampshire Odd Fellows Home, the 
Christian .Science Pleasant View Home, 
the New Hampshire Centennial Home 
for the Aged, Concord's two general 
hospitals and numerous private con- 
valescent homes. 

Presented herewith is a comparative 
tabulation of the seven most common 
causes of resident deaths during the 
past five-year period. 



1Q41 



70-/: 



10 f: 



19-i4 



19-15 



Diseases of llic circulatory system 

Cancer and other malignant tumors . . . . 

Nephritis 

AcciileiUal deaths 

I'ncumonia 

l)ial)etes mellilus 

Tuberculosis 

Federal Aid 

The services ol a tull-tinie public 
health engineer were again made avail- 
able to the city through the courtesy 
of the United States Public Health 
Service. The department is most ap- 
preciative of this important contribu- 
tion to its program by the federal 
health service. 

Prospects for 1946 

With the end of hostilities, man- 
power and material shortages affecting 
public health are gradually decreasing. 
At the same time, there is a noticeable 
reduction in the physical and mental 
strains that are an inescapable conse- 
quence of war. Undesirable conditions 
that came into being through neglect 
or indifference and which were tolera- 
ted in the name of the war effort are 
beginning to disappear. All of this 
points to a general improvement in 
public health during 1946. The de- 



:02 


117 


113 


109 


108 


27 


36 


32 


42 


37 


21 


19 


14 


21 


16 


7 


12 


15 


12 


10 


8 


7 


11 


4 


10 


7 


12 


8 


11 


8 


9 


5 


1 


2 


9 



partment will spare no effort during 
the coming year in providing the 
citizens of Concord with the benefits 
of a soinid program in all branches of 
public health work. 

. . . Milk Control 

Concord's milk production showed 
a marked decline in 1945, particularly 
during the closing months of the year. 
The supply was inadecjuate to meet 
the demand and milk concerns found 
it necessary to go outside of the Con- 
cord milk shed to supply consumers. 
The primary cause for the drop in 
production was a reduction in the 
nimiber of milk cows. The milk short- 
age was ftuther aggravated by the in- 
creased demand resulting from the 
retiun of ser\icemen and \var workers 



One of the many herds from which Concord gets its milk 








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to the city, and from the inflated bny- 
ing power of consumers generally. 

The amount of fluid milk bought 
outside of the Concord milk shed 
averaged approximately 1,000 quarts 
per day. Much of this milk came 
from the Littleton, Franklin and Gil- 
manton areas. 

Quality of Milk 

The elements of time, temperature, 
cleanliness, cooling, storing, loading 
and delivering all aff^ect the quality of 
milk. Furthermore, the reliability, in- 
terest and personal habits of the milk 
handler has a definite bearing on the 
quality of the final product. 

The Milk Inspector has endeavored 
by every practical means to make sure 
that the milk supply entering the Con- 
cord market is of the highest quality. 
Milk samples have been collected at 
frequent intervals and subjected to 
laboratory tests. The vast majority 
of samples have been found satisfactory 
and in full compliance with laws and 
regulations go\erning the sale of milk. 

Consumption 

\n average daily total of 15,398 
quarts of milk was consumed in Con- 
cord during 1945. Of this amount, 
11,375 quarts or 73.9 per cent were 
pasteurized milk and the remaining 
4,023 quarts represented raw milk. 

The year 1945 showed the greatest 
increase in fluid milk consumption 
ever recorded by the Milk Department. 
This increase can be attributed in 
most part to restrictions on the sale of 
heavy cream and to the continuing 
high level of consumer purchasing 
power. 

Producers and Dealers 

There were 170 milk producers lo- 
cated within a 15-mile radius of Con- 
cord who siq^plied milk to the Concord 
market during 1945. The number of 
producers supplying milk from outside 
of the 15-mile radius is not known, 
but most of their product is channeled 
through a milk receiving plant super- 
vised by the Massachusetts Department 
of Health. 



During the year, 12 new producers 
were licensed to wholesale milk to 
dairy plants. At the same time, ten 
producers went out of the milk busi- 
ness. There were seven pasteurizing 
plants serving the city during 1945. 

A recapitulation of producer-dealers 
showed 14 delivering from trucks and 
38 who delivered at the farm, averag- 
ing one to three quarts of milk daily. 
Two producer-dealers gave up retailing 
to wholesale milk to dairy plants, and 
one discontinued business. 

With the exception of nine pio- 
ducers who still use ice to cool milk, 
all producers in the Concord milk 
shed use electric cooling equipment 
in processing milk. All producers are 
required to whitewash cow stables at 
least once during the year. 

The number of milch cows on farms 
declined during 1945 due to the lack 
of good replacement stock. At the 
same time, milk production per cow 
also decreased. Although uniformly 
good dairy pasture conditions prevailed 
during 1945, the quality of grain pur- 
chased by producers was the poorest in 
years. Milk subsidies were continued 
but due to high labor costs many pro- 
ducers reduced the size of their herds. 
All of these factors contributed to re- 
duce total milk production. 

Herd Tests 

All cows producing milk sold in the 
local market are both tuberculin and 
Bang's Disease tested at least once 
a year and oftener as occasion may 
demand. All animals that react to 
these tests are tagged, branded and 
sold for slaughter to federal-inspected 
abattoirs. The testing service is per- 
formed free of charge through the 
cooperation of the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture and the 
Division of Animal Industry of the 
State Department of Agriculture. 

Cost of Milk 

Over the past several years, there 
has been a gradual increase in the cost 
of milk to consumers due to higher 



20 « « City of Concord 



production costs. Higher milk prices 
have become effective only alter the 
New Hampshire Milk Control Board 
riUed these increases justified. How- 
ever, these prices would have been 
even higher had it not been for the 
fact tliat the federal government, in 
order to stimulate milk production 
without added cost to the consumer, 
set up a program of subsidy payments 
to producers. This subsidy arrange- 
ment ciu two cents per quart oft the 
consumer milk bill. 

The alternate day delivery of milk 
on retail routes, which was adopted 
at the start of the war, has been con- 
tinued. This procedure has contribu- 
ted to keeping down the cost of milk 
due to savings resulting from lower 
mileage, reduced gasoline consumption, 
less wear ancf tear on vehicles, and 
fewer delivery man-hours. 

Sale of Cream 

During 1945, the average daily sale 
of 40 per cent cream amounted to 476 
quarts as compared to average sales of 
249 for the previous year. This in- 
crease was due, in most part, to the 
lifting of tlie government restriction 
which permitted sale of only light 
cream. .Another factor that contribu- 
ted to the increased sale of cream was 



the butter shortage. Many consumers 
bought cream for the piupose of mak- 
ing butter at home. 

Ninety-nine per cent of all cream 
sold in Concord was pasteurized. Prac- 
tically all of this pasteurized cream 
came from the middle western states. 

Laboratory Tests 

The department collected and made 
laboratory tests of 13,646 samples in 
1945. Of this number, f 3,435 were 
milk and cream samples, 48 were ice 
cream and chocolate milk samples, 15 
were orangeade samples, and 148 were 
swab rinses collected during routine 
inspections of local eating establish- 
ments. 

Inspections 

During the year, the department 
conducted 680 dairy and 290 milk 
plant inspections. Sixty milk trucks 
were also inspected as were 40 eating 
places where milk was sold. Alto- 
gether, 380 quarts of milk were con- 
demned and 159 notices were sent out 
ordering improvements at dairies and 
milk plants. 

A total of 174 milk licenses were 
issued during 1945. Of these, 29 were 
free licenses. Fees received from milk 
licenses amounted to $288.00. 



A scale model of the new Concord Hospital 




RECREATION 

PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Raymond V. Lapointe. Chairman 

Charles P. Coakley 

William J. Flynn 

Clarence E. Huggins 

Thomas B. Jennings 

Paul G. CROWELL Supervisor 

1945 Expenditure $10,397.99 

. . . Playgrounds and Bath 

In 1945, for the third consecutive year, 
the city's playground program was 
geared to a war-time schedule of acti- 
vities. Many of the usual features 
continued curtailed, if not entirely 
eliminated, due to trying maintenance 
and supervisory problems. In most 
instances, those activities that were 
continued had to be adapted to the 
needs of a younger-than-usual age 
group. In spite of the many difficulties 
and adjustments witli which the Play- 



ground Committee had to contend, the 
city's 1945 recreation program achieved 
a large measure of success. 

The Playground Committee wishes 
to take this opportunity to express 
its ap]jreciation to the parents of Con- 
cord for their understanding and co- 
operation in meeting the shortcomings 
of a war-curtailed recreation program. 
With the war ended, the Ccjmmittee 
pledges itself to do all that it can to 
restore a well-balanced program of 
activities during the coming year. 

Siiwmer Activities 

With attendance at the city play- 
grounds running almost entirely to 
the younger children, softball. volley- 
ball, cricket, newcomb and horseshoes 
were the sports attracting most interest 
and greatest participation. In a lim- 
ited way, baseball continued popular. 
Teams were organized at many of the 
play centers and short series were ar- 
ranged and played with other areas 
within the playground system. It is 
hoped that the regular inter-play- 
grotmd baseball program can be re- 
sumed during the 1946 season. 



A girVs swimming class at the White Park pool 






22 « « City of Coutonl 



«:^ '^ 






A regular summer evening attraction 

Due to the absence ot older children 
and the scarcity fjt materials, the play- 
ground handicraft program was again 
dropped. Nevertheless, several play 
centers carried on their own handicraft 
activities supervised by home-ground 
instructors. 

In keeping with past practice, a 
"safe and sane" Fourth of [uly cele- 
bration was held at White Park. The 
Playgroiuid Committee was hf)st to 
children from all sections of the city 
for a day-long program of acli\ities 
Avhich included a ijaseball game, a band 
concert, free refreshments, and nu- 
merous contests and sports events with 
attiactive prizes for the winners. No 
accidents marred the occasion which 
attracted the largest attendance of the 
sunnncr playground season. 

Swim,m,mg Activities 

Supervised wading pools were main- 
tained at seven play centers in the 
city. As usual, these bathing facilities 
provided the feature attraction of the 
playgroimd system and were well at- 
tended throughout the vacation season. 
In spite of the large numbers using 
the pools, only two minor accidents 
were recorded during the 1945 season. 

Swimmin" facilities were also main- 



— outdoor concert by Nevers Band 

tained at the Broken Bridge area on 
the Soucook River. A lifeguard was 
stationed at this deep-^vater pool which 
was used extensi\ely Ijy the older ciiil- 
dren and adults. 

Band Concerts 

An expanded series of outdoor band 
concerts was instituted during the 1945 
summer season. Under the able direc- 
tion of Conductor Heri)ert W. Rainie, 
the Nevers Band played at least two 
concerts in eight different locations in 
the city. Uniform large attendances 
attested to the fine quality of the music 
and the popularity of this type of en- 
tertainment with the citizens of Con- 
cord. 

Winter Activities 

Nine skating areas were maintained 
in the city during the winter season. 
Tliese included facilities located in 
each of the four subinbs, at White and 
Rollins Parks, at the Kimball Play- 
ground, at the High School hockey 
rink and a new area on the city lot at 
the intersection of Broadway, South 
and West Streets. Although main- 
tenance difficulties were present due to 
the shortage f)f lal)or, most of the 
areas were kept in satisfactory condi- 
tion. A total of 69 skating days was 

Annual Report » » 25 






'W i^. 



.f*.5^ 'f 



> 



J^- 



Folk dancing at the Penacook 

recorded at the White Park Pond as 
compared to 59 days during the 1944 
season. 

Attendance 

A total attendance ol 97,313 was 
recorded during the 1945 season at the 
playgrounds and pools. This repre- 
sented an increase of appnjximately 
13,000 over the total for the previous 
year. No attendance figures were com- 
piled for the skating areas. 

. . . Special Facilities 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

J. Mitchell Ahern. Chairman 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Leigh S. Hall 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Carleton R. Metcalf 

1945 Expenditures S6,799.67 

1945 Receipts $3,854.49 

Net Cost to City $2,945.18 

<• o o c> <> c> c> o o <> c> c» *> 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course 

Golf play at Beaver Meadow last 
year continued the up-swing first noted 
in 1944, when lifting of the wartime 

24 " " City of Concord 



lake pavilion in W est Concord 

ban on pleasure driving greatly in- 
creased patronage at the municipal 
links. 

Both the regular season memberships 
and one-day-play tickets showed a gain 
over the 1944 figures. Club member- 
ship went up from 104 to 115. after 
having dropped to an all-time low of 
62 in 1943: while day fees totaled 
1,919 as compared kj 1,716 for the 
previous year. 

Membership was still below pre-war 
average but toward the end of the 
season indications pointed to a tre- 
mendous increase for 1946 as dis- 
charged servicemen in growing num- 
l)ers joined the ranks of the piil)Hc 
Hnksmen. 

throughout the 1945 playing season 
soldiers and sailors home on leave 
were accorded free use of the munici- 
pal golfing establishment, in pursuance 
of the practice which the Recreation 
Commission instituted in 1942. 

The customary club championship 
and handicap tournaments were re- 
sumed, with frecjuent week-end events 
scheduled to stimulate interest in com- 
petitive golf among the members. The 
course received the biggest play yet 
from the ser\ icemen \\ho are destined 



to liikt' a leading role in aflairs ol llie 
club (luring the seasons immediately 
ahead. Maintenance difficulties in- 
creased because ol wartime shortages, 
but the course was kept in as good 
conditions as possible under the cir- 
cumstances, looking forward to the 
anticijjated post-war boom in golt. 

Alemorial Field 

During the 1945 season Memorial 
Field became the setting for a football 
renaissance without a parallel in the 
city's history. More night games, more 
public interest marked the upward 
trend in the use of the South Fruit 
Street athletic grounds. 

Record throngs were lured to the 
football gridiron where six night games 
were staged during September and 
October. Arclighted football combat 
had been discontinued the previous 
year because of war-imposed problems, 
but portable lighting equipment was 
secured last fall and so successful were 
the Concord and St. John High games 
on Friday and Monday nights that 
action was taken toward a permanent 
installation. 

Field and track meets were staged 



at the city field in llie spring, and 
Softball, field hockey teams used the 
grounds during the summer. Tennis 
courts also were kept open although 
play fell off somewhat because of the 
wartime conditions. 

Greatest need at the municipal arena 
is for re-surfacing of the tennis strip, 
re-setting of the backstops, and installa- 
tion of a new drainage system. The 
bleachers formerly used for baseball 
were setup on the north side of the 
gridiron to accommodate more fans 
for the increasingly popular football 
spectacles. 

Russell Pond Area 

With the war continuing to suspend 
normal use of the skiing facilities at 
the Russell Pond Winter Sports Area, 
the region still drew skiers for week- 
end recreation. No caretaker was em- 
ployed for the winter although, in line 
with the policy adopted in 1943, the 
slopes were put in first-class condition 
during the fall. With the return of 
normal conditions, the city"s "Snow 
Bowl" is expected to be the center of 
greatly increased skiing activity during 
1946-47. 



Ninth green and club house at the municipal golf course 




PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Oliver Jenkins, President 

Harold W. Bridge 

Joseph J. Comi 

Lela Y. Johnson 

John F. MacEachran 

William B. McInnis 

George W. Randall 

Alexander Rennie, Jr. 

Martha G. Upton 

Marion F. Holt Librarian 

1945 Expenditure $29,42 5.40 

Circulation 

During 1945. the Concord Public 
Library circulated 197,289 books, an 
increase of :^4,835 over the total lor 
the previous year. Most ot this in- 
crease can be attributed to circulation 
of children's books. The children's 
room at the main library more than 
doubled its book service: a total of 
62,214 books were loaned as compared 
with 29,590 in 1944. 

The total circulation ol the four 
branches, which was 22,223, showed 
no significant change from the total 
of the previous year. However, among 
the branches, circulation \aried ccjn- 
siderably with Penacook showing a 20 
per cent increase, while that at East 
Concord and Concord Heights de- 
creased 42 and 28 per cent, respectively. 
West Concord circulation remained 
unchanged. 

Vinances 

The Concord library system was 
operated at a total cost of $29,425.40 
during 1945. Of this sum, ,? 18,528.44 
represented salaries paid to employees, 
and .'$5,803.52 expenditures for books, 
periodicals and other reading matter. 

Library income from sources other 
than taxation amounted to .'> 12,747.20 
during 1945. This figure included 

26 « « City of Concord 



$11,007.20 in trust fund earnings and 
$1,740.00 in fines. 

The Concord Public Liiirary ^vas 
named a beneficiary under the will 
of the late Grace Blanchard. Miss 
Blanchard, who served as City Li- 
ijrarian for 40 years, left the library 
the residue of her estate in the amount 
of $41,484.17. 

Collection and Registration 

During the past year, 2,580 new 
volumes were added to the library book 
collection. An inventory conducted at 
the end of the year showed a total 
collection of 52,888 books. 

The library registered 2,273 new 
borrowers during 1945 to bring its 
total registration up to 15,437. 

Branches 

Following the practice of previous 
years, library service to residents living 
in the outlying areas was provided 
through the facilities of four branch 
libraries cjperated in Penacook, East 
Concord, West Concord and Concord 
Heights. This work has been under 
the immediate supervision of a branch 
librarian. By frequent changes of 
books, the quality of reading matter 
at the branches has been maintained 
(Ml the same high level that prevails 
at the main library. 

Children's Work 

The library carried out a very active 
program of children's work. Books 
were sent regularly to all of elemen- 
tary schools, both public and private. 
Libraries were maintained as usual 
at the Garrison and Rum ford Schools. 
At the Conant School, the library had 
to be discontinued because the space 
was needed for regular school activities. 
However, books were moved to the 
various classrooms to forestall any in- 
terruption of library service at the 
school. 

At the children's room in the main 
library, Saturday morning story hours 
have lost none of their jjopularity 
with the younger children. This popu- 
lar attraction is sponsored by members 
of the Junior Service League who con- 



OCWOOBS BXV HlXPSEIBl PUBLIC LIBaABT 

^t/ven, u/nde-K '>n/u Aamet anet iea/ on, July 5 f-9 45 

SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY 



STATE CHAIRW 



Certificate awarded the Public Library in connection with the 
7th War Bond drive 



tribute their services twice a niontli 
to tell stories to the children. 

Reference Work 

During 1945, the library reference 
department was asked to find answers 
for 5,.S98 cjucstions covering a wide 
range of subjects. The number of re- 
quests by adults for research assistance 
increased noticeably with particular 
emphasis on search for vocational ma- 
terial. Alfjng these lines, books were 
held on reserve in connection Avith ex- 
tension courses sponsored by the llni\- 
ersity of New Hampshire. Several 
books were sent for use at the Com- 
munity Leadership Training School. 

More and more high school students 
are finding the department a ready 
source of reference material. This 
has been especially true in relation to 
high school debating activities. 

The department completed a file of 



New Hampshire authors during the 
year. On numerous occasions, assis- 
tance was rendered to pef)ple prepar- 
ing bil)liographies on a variety of 
subjects. 

Young People's Work 

The young people's department ar- 
ranged several interesting exhibits dur- 
ing the past year. Under the direction 
of the young people's librarian, all 
seventh grade pupils in the puljlic 
schools were instructed in the use of 
the liljrary. The course of instruction 
was planned to provide "on the scene" 
experience in all phases of library 
activity. 

Ff)r disciplinaiy reasons, older stu- 
dents using the library during evening 
hours were restricted to the young 
people's and reference rooms. This 
procedure permitted undisturbed use 
of the reading room by adults. 



Annual Report » » 27 



Other Activities 

The filtli ;iiini\c'rs:iry of the new 
library building was marked by an 
Open House held January "iOih. More 
than 200 peo])le availed themselves 
of this opportunity to inspect the li- 
brary as guests ol the Board of Library 
Trustees. 

In June, the Seventh War Bond 
Drive Committee sponsored a book and 
author rally in Concord. During the 
afternoon, a tea for 250 people was 
held at the library. Those who at- 
tended had an opportunity to meet 
Colonel Henricjues, Lou.s Bromfield, 
Fannie Hurst and Ogden Nash. As 
a result ol the rally, the library re- 
ceived the original manuscript of 
"Pleasant Valley" h\ Louis Bromfield, 
a lithograph from the l)ook "Make 
Way for Ducklings" by Robert Mc- 
Closkey, and water ccjlors from the 
book "Dorcus Porkus" by Tasha Tu- 
dor. 



A great many ex-servicemen have 
used the library to check on vocaticmal 
information, college recjuirements and 
job possibilities. It has been a dis- 
tinct pleasure to see so many veterans 
using the library. 

Several exhibits were displayed in 
the lilirary during the year. The 
monthly exhibits of the Concord 
Camera Club were particularly inter- 
esting and attracted much fa\()ral)le 
comment. 

On numerous occasions during the 
past year, the librarian and members 
of the staff were called upon to review 
new books and to explain the work 
of the varicjus departments. 

The library building has established 
somewhat of a reputation as a model 
small city library. During the year, 
a large number of librarians, trustees 
and architects visited the library to 
obtain ideas and help in formulating 
plans for post-war libraries. 



Authors who participated in the 1th War Bond hook and authors rally 

sponsored by the Public Library. Left to right, Louis Bromfield, Fannie 

Hurst, Colonel Robert Henriques and Ogden Nash 




RELIEF 

CITY RELIEF BOARD 

John E. Davis. Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Charles P. Coakley 

Parker L. Hancock Overseer of Poor 

John W. Stanley . . Acting Overseer of Poor 
(In the absence of Mr. Hancock) 

Charles P. Coakley Overseer of Poor 

(Ward 1) 

1945 Expenditures: 

City $30,938.46 

Penacook $3,761.70 

Administration 

Relief Department activities during 
1945 were directed by Acting Overseer 
John W. Stanley in the absence of 
b\ erseer Parker L. Hancock serving in 
the United States Army. Alderman 
Charles P. Coakley administered the 
relief needs of the suburb of Penacook. 

As in previous years, the City of 
Concord Relief Department supervised 
both city and comity relief cases. Ad- 
ministrative costs were shared equally 
by the city and county. 

General Trend 

The downward trend in the num- 
ber of cases and persons on relief con- 
tinued thnnighout 1945. Due to the 
acute labor shortage, some relief cases 
which had been previously classified 
as unemployable were able to find 
work and become self-supporting. .\lso, 
because of the demand labor market, 
very few new applications for assistance 
were received during the year. 

During 1945, a number of cases 
which had been supported entirely by 
the city for some time, became eligible 
for and were transferred to old age 
assistance. Likewise, several city cases 
of five year duration were automatical- 
ly transferred to the county for sup- 
port. 



Relief Load 

The Relief Department started the 
year with 35 city and 54 county cases, 
involving 70 and 154 persons, respec- 
tively. During the year, 70 relief 
recipients ^vere dropped from the de- 
partment's rolls. The year closed with 
'H city and 48 comity cases remaining 
active. A total of 154 persons depen- 
dent on public support was carried 
over to 1946. Of this number, 42 
represented city and 112 represented 
county poor. 

Of the cases on relief at the close 
of the year, a considerable number 
were single persons unable to work 
because of sickness or old age. Several 
cases were persons over 65 years of 
age but not eligible to receive old 
age assistance because they had not 
attained full citizenship rights. Some 
cases were the residt of marital-domes- 
tic problems and a few were of the 
large-family type with insufficient in- 
come requiring supplementary aid to 
insure adequate subsistence. 

Relief Costs 

The total cost of city relief in Con- 
cord during 1945 was ,'$34,700.16, of 
Avhich ,13,761.70 were expended in Pen- 
acook and 3-^0,938.46 in the remainder 
of the city. A more detailed break- 
down of relief costs shows that ?|>8,727.07 
were spent for direct relief, $530.79 for 
dependent soldiers — city, $19,119.31 for 
old age assistance, and $1,242.86 for 
hospitalization. 

Comity relief costs for the year to- 
taled $22,214.96. Of this amount, 
$15,171.44 were expended for direct 
relief and $2,907.63 for dependent 
soldiers — county. 

Old Age Assistance 

The City of Concord is responsible 
for 25 per cent of the old age assistance 
granted to people who have a Con- 
cord settlement. Although the total 
cost of relief showed a reduction from 
the previous year, the amount spent 
for old age assistance increased con- 
siderably. In this item, a constantly 
increasing monthly expenditure was 



Annual Report » » 29 



noted over the 12-month period. In 
January, the monthly cost ol old age 
assistance amounted to $1,190.55. By 
July this amount had risen to $1,542.75 
and in December the monthly cost of 
the City's share of relief to the aged 
amounted to $1,781.90. 

The total number of old age assis- 
tance cases increased from 155 in Jan- 
uary t<i 184 in December. .Although 
no small ])art of the increase in old 
age costs ^\as due to the growing num- 
ber of recipients, it should also be 
noted that increases had to be made 
in all individual grants to offset the 
higher cost of food and other neces- 
sary living expenses. A further cause 
contributing to the growing cost of 
old age assistance can be found in the 
fact that a nimiber fjf elderly persons 

The intervale at Horseshoe Pond. 
A pastoral scene only five minutes 
removed from Concord's busy main 

street 




hitherto county charges have gained 
Concord settlements after five years 
of residence in the city. Under law, 
the City of Concord had to assinnc 
the 25 per cent portion of their sup- 
p(jrt which was formerly paid by the 
county. This appears to be the pen- 
alty the city will have to pay because 
of the location in Concord of several 
institutions for the aged and numerous 
convalescent homes catering to old 
people. 

Some consolation may be present in 
the fact that more and more people 
who apply for old age assistance are 
entitled to social security benefits. It 
is (juite possible that the monthly cost 
of old age assistance will soon reach 
its peak and that in the future the 
cost of this type of relief will tend to 
decrease gradually. 
Other Activities 

Because of the reduced relief load, 
it was possible for investigators to de- 
\(jte more time to individual relief 
cases. In a number of instances, the 
department was able to assist relief 
recipients in deriving benefits from 
Veterans' Status for which they had 
not applied. The department's staff 
also assisted a number of relief per- 
sons in gaining citizenship thereby ac- 
complishing eligibility for old age as- 
sistance and removal from direct re- 
lief rolls. In other cases, sohuions 
were foimd for family problems which 
enabled relief recipients to become 
self-supporting. 

Consitlerable work was done in co- 
operation with the Red Cross in secur- 
ing family allotments for dependents 
of servicemen. These government al- 
lotments were instrumental in remov- 
ing several families from the relief 
rolls. 

The Relief Department has con- 
tinued to provide medical service and 
hospitalization for the poor. In a num- 
ber of cases, proper medical care re- 
sulted in restoration of health and 
(■nal)led relief recipients to return to 
gainful employment. 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Daniel J. Shea, Chairman 

Roy W. Peaslee 

Guy a. Swenson 

Arthur W. McIsaac Chiei of Police 

J. Edward Silva Deputy Chief of Police 

1945 Operating Expenditure $86,605.77 

1945 Equipment Expenditure $ 3,461.93 

Personnel 

During the past year, there were 
many changes in Police Department 
personnel. Three regular and three 
special policemen resigned from the 
force. Six new patrolmen were ap- 
pointed. One of these men had seen 
previous service as a special policeman. 
One regular officer returned to the 
department from the armed forces and 
another continues in service replaced 
by a duration officer. 

Finances 

A total of $90,935.19 was appropria- 
ted in 1945 for Police Department 
purposes. The cost of operating the 
department, exclusive of capital ex- 
penditures, was $86,605.77. I'his a- 
moimt was in excess of the total 
expended in 1944 by $8,69.3.35. 

The department spent $3,937.58 lor 
equipment during the year. This ex- 
penditure included $1,764.62 for new- 
type traffic lights, $600.00 for ne^v 
radio equipment, and $1,097.31 for re- 
modeling the cell block. 

At the end of the year, the depart- 
ment had an unexpended appropria- 
tion balance of $4,329.42 which was 
returned to tlie city treasury. Police 
Department earnings during 1945 a- 
mounted to $1,092.48. 
Crime Data 

A total of 1,372 arrests were made 
during 1945. This number repre- 
sented an increase of 525 over the 
total for the previous year. Most of 



this increase residted from misdemea- 
nors involving violations of parking, 
driving and motor vehicle laws. 

The type and niunber of criminal 
cases handled by the Police Depart- 
ment during 1945 are classified in the 
tabulation on the next page. 



r T f -^ 




Two desperate criminals and public ene- 
mies apprehended by Concord police. 

Resolution passed by the New Hamp- 
shire Senate 



TEE ^TiTZ Of HEl myp^anng 



BESOLDTIOII 



BE IT RE3(T,?ni, T>wn tu i:«, B<»#KjiiA< StntU «u«na to 



M IT »CSTEEB .■iESPI.TEl, That o v^ of thv» 



xituli. 



C3L- 



7^ 



.q^^L.^ 



Sanou 



iJ^'=^^V-<^^ss^ 



Pic^kCteni »{ 4Jk£ 



Annual Report » » 31 



CRIMINAL CASES DURING 1945 

Actual Cleared 

Classification Unfounded Offenses by Arrest 

Offenses Known: 

Criminal Homicide 

Manslaughter by Negligence 2 2 2 

Rape . . . ." 1 1 

Breaking and Entering 2 58 17 

Larceny 21 147 47 

Auto Theft 3 16 13 

Total 28 224 80 



Classification Charged 

Persons Charged — Felonies: 

Criminal Homicide 

Manslaughter by Negligence 2 

Rape I 

Breaking and Entering 25 

Larceny 61 

Auto Theft 18 

Total 107 

Persons Charged — Misdemeanors: 

Assaults 18 

Forgery , I 

Prostitution and Commercial Vice 

Carrying W^eapons 

Sex Offenses 

Fraud 

Non-Support 

Drunkenness 

Disorderly Conduct 

\'agrancy 

Drunken Driving 

Road and Driving Laws 

Parking Violations 

Motor N'ehicle Laws 

Other Offenses 

Total 1,265 

Grand Total 1,372 



Arrested 



2 
I 

25 
61 

18 

107 



Summoned 
or Cited 



1 


1 




10 


10 




7 


7 




6 


6 




292 


292 




32 


32 




24 


24 




145 


145 




561 


561 




149 


149 




17 


17 




1,265 


1,264 


I 


1,372 


1,371 


I 



During the year stolen property 
valued at $14,.H63.99 was reported to 
the department. Of this amount, 
property valued at $13,934.91 was re- 
covered. 

Traffic 

There was a noticeable increase in 
automobile accidents during the lat- 
ter part of 1945. This increase can 
be attributed directly to the return of 



heavy traffic as the result of the ter- 
mination of gasoline rationing. Tlie 
department investigated 273 accidents, 
an increase of 50 over the total for the 
preceding year. Five fatal accidents 
marred Concords 1945 highway safety 
program. 

Safety 

In line with a nation-wide campaign, 
the department conducted a drive on 



32 « « City of Concord 



faulty l:)rakt\s during 1945. It is in- 
lorcsting to note that a very low per- 
centage of defective equipment was 
discovered in spite of the fact that the 
average age of cars has increased con- 
siderably and that replacement parts 
and accessories have become scarce 
items. 

Auxiliary Police 

The auxiliary police force, organized 
at the outset of the war emergency, 
has continued to serve as an effective 
instrument of police work. During 
the vacation season, auxiliary police 
substituted for regular patrolmen on 
leave. Widiout this reserve, the regu- 
lar vacation list could not have been 
carried out on schedule. 

Training Program 

Fen- the iliircl consecutive year, all 
regular police personnel received in- 
structions in the use of firearms in 
order to improve accuracy and effi- 
ciency. In cooperation with the Red 
Cross, all regular patrolmen were 
given a refresher course in first aid. 

The department sent one of its 
men to the Northwestern Traiiic In- 
stitute for an intensive course in trallic 
and accident control. Upon comple- 
tion of the ccjiuse, this officer will be 
c|ualifie(l to instruct other members of 



the department in effective traffic and 
accident work. 

Improvements 

A new air compressor unit was in- 
stalled at police headquarters during 
1945. The department is now fully 
equipped to do its own traffic sign 
painting and cell block maintenance 
at a considerable saving to the city. 

The cell block at the Warren Street 
station was completely renovated dur- 
ing 1945. New wiring and lights were 
installed, the antiquated toilet system 
was replaced with modern push-button 
type flush toilet facilities, and the 
entire jail section was repainted. Fur- 
ther improvements at police headquar- 
ters included the addition of a new 
photographic dark room, and the in- 
stallation of added locker and gun 
cabinet facilities. 

New traffic lights capable of ettecting 
a n:iore orderly flow of traffic were in- 
stalled at the intersection of Main and 
Pleasant Streets and at the intersection 
of North Main and Bridge Streets. 

Recommendation 

It is reconnnended that a traffic 
bureau manned by a trained worker 
be set up to facilitate efforts to solve 
the problems created by rapidly in- 
creasing Concord traffic. 



Members of the Concord police force who are World War II veterans 




PROBATION 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judge William L. Stevens 

Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 

1945 Expenditure $1,585.28 

An increase in juvenile delinquency 
was noted during 1945. I'wenty-five 
cases came before the Concord Juvenile 
Court. Of this number, one was for 
reckless driving resulting in death, two 
were for neglected children, seven for 
sex offenses and 15 for larceny. Six 
juveniles were committed tO' industrial 
school, two were placed in custody of 
state welfare authorities and 17 were 
placed on probation. The probation 
period of six juveniles expired during 
the year and I 1 ^vere carried over to 
1946. 
Current Influences 

There has been a definite shifting of 
responsibility for child guidance by 
parents onto public agencies engaged 
in rehabilitating juvenile delinquents. 
This disquieting state of affairs is in- 
dicated by the fact that the average 
age of delinquents has dropped to 13 — 
the lowest in local probation history. 

The serious housing shortage which 
prevails throughout the city has also 
contributed to delinquency. Cramped 
living accommodations in the city's 
low-rent areas do not lend themselves 
to delinquency prevention. A migra- 



tion of border-line delinquent families 
back to Concord from the large centers 
of war industry is beginning to make 
itself felt. As these families return 
in larger numbers, they can be ex- 
pected to add to the city's delinquency 
problem. 

There were no prol)ati()n Niolatious 
during the past year. Ibis condition 
can lie attributed to a careful screen- 
ing of juveniles placed on proi)ation. 
At the same time, the department has 
adopted a policy of placing new re- 
sponsibilities on delinquents in order 
to correct the shortcomings of previous 
parental guidance. 

Institutional Deficiencies 

Present da\ ])rol)ati()n work is be- 
ing seriously handicapped l)y the fact 
that the state has only two institutions 
for commitment ol diildren — the 
industrial school and the school for 
feeble minded. In cases where ju- 
veniles are not hi subjects for pioba- 
ti(jn, the court has no choice but to 
commit these offenders to one or the 
other of these institutions. Oftentimes, 
the effect of ccjmmitment to these in- 
stitutions is definitely detrimental lo 
the rehabilitation ol (crtain types of 
delint]uents. llie state needs a public 
institution conq)aral)lc lo llie C.oidcii 
Rule Parm. 

Re com m endatio n 

liight Ncais lia\e jjassed since the 
Concord Proljation Department was 
established. The experience gained 
during that period cjffers positive proof 
that whatevei- progre.ss the departmeni 
has made in llic jirex t'liiion ol (ichii- 



This accident cost two lives. Drive carefully 




quency and the rehabilitation of offen- 
ders could have ijeen more efficiently 
and successfully accomplished on a 
full rather than a part-time schedule. 
Every indication points to an increase 
in juvenile delinquency during the 
inmiediate post-war period. In tlie 
light of the relatively small cost in- 
volved in putting the department on a 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

William L. Stevens Judge 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

John W. Stanley Clerk 

1945 Expenditure §2,960.00 

Cases Tried 

llie total number of cases to come 
before the Concord Municipal Court 
during 1945 showed a 56 percent in- 
crease over the total for the previous 
year. This considerable growth in law- 
lessness otters ample evidence that the 
"honeymoon period" of low crime in- 
cidence which the city has enjoyed for 
the past two years due to war restric- 
tions and an out-migratlon of popula- 
tion is at an end. 

A total of 1,372 criminal cases were 
handled by the court as against 880 
in 1944 and 701 in 1943. Although 
the weight of this increase represented 
misdemeanors in connection with auto- 
mobile operations, such as infractions 
of parking, road and dri\ing, and 
general motor vehicle laws, there was 
a definite upswing in cases of a more 
serious nature. Along these lines, 
felony cases jumped from 80 to 107. 
It is disquieting to note that cases of 
breaking and entering went from 13 
to 25, larceny from 50 to 61, and auto 
theft from 9 to 18. 

Very little satisfaction is to be had 
from the fact that most of the increase 
in court cases can be attributed to the 



full-time basis, the city can ill afford to 
be oblivious of the consequences of 
increased delinquency. 

The department sincerely hopes that 
it will be granted sufficient funds in 
1947 to give substance to a probation 
program which will fulfill Concord's 
needs in this important field of human 
relations. 



post-war increase in auto use. While 
parking violations and "dollar club 
membership" can be brushed off light- 
ly, it is sobering to note that 1945 
police records show 273 automobile 
accidents, five of which involved fatal- 
ities. 

The Municipal Court tried 62 civil 
cases during 1945. This number rep- 
resents an increase of 19 actions over 
the total for the previous year, and 
reflects a movement toward the pre- 
war level of civil suits. No small 
claims cases were heard by the court. 
This situation results from the fact 
that laws governing small claims are 
not effective in accomplishing their 
intended purpose. 

The court held 40 sessions involving 
offenses of juveniles. There was a 
noticeable increase in the number of 
delinquent youths brought before the 
court. 

Revenue and Costs 

The statement of receipts and ex- 
penditures for the year 1945, as sub- 
mitted by the clerk of the court, 
showed income from fines, costs and 
sundry fees in the amount of $5,727.96. 
Out of this sum, $2,686.80 were dis- 
bursed. Of the payments made by 
the court, $2,406.50 represented fines 
collected for motor vehicle violations 
which were turned over to the Com- 
missioner of Motor Vehicles as pre- 
scribed by law. The sum of $3,041.16 
representing net receipts after expen- 
ditures and deductions by transfer, was 
paid to the City Treasurer. The city 
appropriated $2,960.00 to defray the 
salaries of court officers. 



Annual Report » » 33 



#>^^ 




"Three recent additions to the Fire Departinent's mobile equipiuent — a 
chiefs car, a I'yO-gallon Alack pumper, and a 65-foot Seagrave aerial ladder 



"PTT? "P ^" •1f74,45r).r)8. Net loss alter insurame 

-'- J-XvJ_-/ payments anioiintecl to .'112,967.46. 

T)"0 /^'T~^"C /^^TpT/^TVT The city experienced two serious 

J- JVv>/ X XjV^ JL J-V^i>| fires during 1945. These occurred at 

the New Knoland Houses storehouse 

«> <> C ♦ «> V> S> C C> '^ C> C> «> , 7 , T^ , TT 1 1 

at the rear ol the Eag4c Hotel and at 

FIRE BOARD "^'^^ abandoned Barnett Cabinet Shop 

CHARtES P. COAKLEY, Chain„a„ '" ^^^^ ^^"^^''^1 busiuess sectiou of Pcna- 

WiLLiAM J. Flynn cook. lu the first instance damage 

Lawrence J. Moynihan was confined in most part to stored 

Robert w. Potter building materials; in the second, there 

Clarence H.Green Fire Chief ^vas considerable damage to the old 

Milan R. Piper ) „ ^, . , , r ^ . a* i »t i 

MICHAEL J. MARTIN ^'^'"^ ^'"'*' ^v'ood-fiame structure. At both places, 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief ^'i^ department was able to prevent 

,„,, „ ■ r J- ^,.^.,^c.^^ the fire from spreading to valuable ad- 

1945 Operating Expenditure $96,708.72 . . • '^ 

1945 Capital Expenditure $25,891.00 jacent business property. 

o«>oo<>o<>o<j><><>o<> Fire Prevention 

The routine fire inspection program 

Fires and Fire Loss conducted over the past several years 

During 1945, the Fire Department was continued during 1945. Many fire 

responded to 498 alarms of which 444 hazards resulting from negligence were 

were still alarms and 54 were box calls. discovered and ordered eliminated. As 

The total number of alarms showed a fast as available time, materials and 

decrease of 89 from the total of the manpower permit, the department is 

previous year. giving force to the provisions for 

From the standpoint of fire loss, a safety of life in places of assembly con- 
considerable improvement was noted tained in Chapter 153 of the Laws of 
during the year. Total loss due to 1943, more commonly known as the 
fire dropped from $117,767.33 in 1944 Cocoanut Grove Law. 

Value Loss Insurance Insurance Paid Net Loss 

Buildings .... $627,250.00 $46,883.62 $540,425.00 $41,236.16 $5,647.46 

Contents 105,707.12 27.573.06 82,165.00 20,253.06 7,320.00 

Total .. $732,957.12 $74,456.68 $622,590.00 $61,489.22 $12,967.46 
36 « « City of Concord 



During the summer of 1945, the 
I'.(i:ii(l ot Mayor and Aldermen passed 
;ni ordinaiKe governing the use of 
|)r(>])rii\ lor convalescent and nursing 
home piuposes. This ordinance con- 
tained provisions relative to fire pro- 
tection which the department is called 
upon to enforce. Cicjnsideraljle effort 
lias l)een expended along these lines 
dining the past year. 

Due to the shortage of hard fuels, 
an unusual amount of conversion from 
coal lo oil occurred dining 1945. This 
resulted in no mean increase in the 
amoiuu oi lime the department's in- 
spection staff has had to devote to en- 
forcement of rcgidations controlling 
llic insiallalion ol powei oil biu'ning 
(■(jui|)menl. 

As usual, lire drills were conducted 
ill all til\ schools and stucU'nts were 
iiisii u( led ill lire pi(\ ciition. 

Personnel 

No changes wcyv made during 1945 
in the oxer-all liic Iokc personnel. 
1 he ilepartment contiiuied to operate 
with a staff of .SO permanent and 129 
call firemen. The auxiliary fire force, 
organized cail\ in the war, has re- 
mained on call and has aclivc4y ]>arti- 
(ipated in extinguishing fires. 

Except for one man killed in the 
nar, all permanent firemen uhcj served 
ill the armed forces lia\c' iciuinecl lo 
tile department. 

Apparatus and Equipment 

I he iioiiiial c|uota ol fire Depart- 
ir;:il niohile appai::lus includes 14 
(ire trucks ol \ai.ous t\pes. txvo offi- 
cial cars and a scr\ici- truck. This 
apparatus was housed in lour stations, 
one ol \vhicli is located in the c\t\ 
))ro|)cr and thiec' in the outlying dis- 
tricts. 

In Jaiuiary, Engine Six Static^n lo 
cated at South State and Cioncorcl 
Streets was closed and tli-.' ap|)aratus 
and ]iersonnel \\ere renio\ed to head- 
cjuarters. I'll is action resulted from 
the fact that the stal On which is loca- 
ted onh a short distance from heacl- 
(|uartc-is has outk\;-d its useluliicss. 



Ihe abandoned building will be sold 
at an early date. 

Engine Fi\ e, formerly housed at Con- 
cord Heights, wds brought to head- 
cpiarters clue to the lack of a driver 
and station caretaker at this call com- 
pany location. At the close of the year, 
this engine remained hoirsed in the 
city proper. 

The department acquired a new 
()5-foot Seagrave aerial ladder in June 
to replace Ladder No. 2 which had to 
be abandoned due to serious mechani- 
cal defects. Since- the new ladder was 
commissioned, it has responded to 
numerous calls and has proven satis- 
factory in every respect. 

The department prcjposes to re- 

histruction in the use of ladders is 

part of Fire Department training 

program for new firemen 





The Chief and the Deputy Chief 
inspect a scale model of the pro- 
posed south-end fire station. Model 
of Central Fire Station in back- 
ground 

place Engine Four with a new 750-gal- 
lon Mack pumper. Delivery oi this 
new truck has been promised early in 
1946. Engine Four will be overhauled 
and moved to the fire station at West 
Concord. 

At the close oi the year, the de- 
partment had on hand in usable con- 
dition 19,650 teet ot two and one-hall 
inch liose and 2,575 leet ol tlnee-quar- 
ler inch booster hose. 

Maintenance 

In spite ot the lact that many of the 
city's fire trucks are old models, all 
apparatus has been maintained in good 
running order. All necessary repairs 
and replacements were made by de- 
partment personnel at no extra cost 
to the city. 

During the j^ast year, considerable 
progress was made in improving the 
efficiency of the fire alarm system. Fur- 
ther changes are needed to keep the 
system functioning properly. This 
work will be inidertaken as last as 



availalile labor and materials will per- 
mit. 

Recommendations 

Preliminary plans have lieen readied 
lor a new fire station in the south-end 
section of the city proper. In order 
that this thickly settled area may be 
pro\ ided with better fire protection 
than is possible luider the present ar- 
rangement, it is recf)mmended that 
construction of the south-end station 
i)e given precedence in the city's post- 
war j^rogram of public works. 

Replacement of obsolete fire appara- 
tirs should be continued as a part of a 
re\ itali/ed post-war capital budget pro- 
gram. 

. . . Fire Hydrants 

BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
Clarence H. Green 
Percy R. Sanders 

1945 Expenditure None 

Only one new fire hydrant was in- 
stalled during 1945. This Avas placed 
on Carpenter Street in East Concord 
neai- the Eastman Noz/lc Company 
plant. Duiing tlie year, a niunbei' of 
hydrants were replaced or mo\ed to 
more efiective locations. The mtmici- 
pal hydrant system now consists of 
799 ser\ices of which 688 are public 
and 1 1 1 private. 

All existing services were maintained 
in excellent working order. This was 
accomplished by a program of periodic 
inspections conducted under the super- 
vision of the Board of Hydrant Com- 
missioners. 

A ninnber of new services will prob- 
ably be installed dining the coming 
year to provide fire protection foi areas 
of new residential d(\ elopment. 



3H « « City of Concord 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 



Tlie end ol hostiliiit-s Ijiouglu an 
immediate increase in request for per- 
mits to build. This can be attributed 
to a war-created backlog of restricted 
construction and to the pressure of a 
moimting demand for housing result- 
ing from the return to Concord of a 
large ninnl^cr of servicemen and war 
workers. Although a significant a- 
mount of building activity got under 
way, the ntmiber and value of permits 
sought do not reflect the true picture 
of the local situation. Materials con- 
tinue exceedingly scarce and new 
government restrictions place severe 
limitations on the type of work that 
can be undertaken. 

. . . Zoning 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman 
John S. Corbett 
A. Clifford Hudson 
Laurence M. Meyer 
Shelby O. Walker 
Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk 

1945 Expenditure S216.69 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment 
was asked to rule on 28 appeals dur- 
ing 1945. Of these appeals, eight 
were granted, 12 were granted con- 
ditionally, seven were denied and one 
appellant made no appearance. 

Two of the appellants denied per- 
mits appealed the Zoning Board's de- 
cision to the Superior Ciourt. One 
of the appellants petitioned for an 11- 
car garage on Harrod Street on the 
Ijasis of a continuing non-conforming 



use. The other appealed the decision 
of the board granting a property owner 
the right to construct a garage in the 
cellar of a house on Liberty Street. 
This action was later disinissed by the 
court at the appellant's request. 

. . . Building 

Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 

1945 Expenditure None 

A total of 110 permits were issued 
during 1945. Of this nvnnber, 46 were 
for new work and 64 were for altera- 
tions and repairs. The number of 
permits isstied more than doubled the 
51 total of the previous year. 

The total estimated value of the 
work for which permits were granted 
amounted to |676,630.00, an increase 
of $586,045.00 over the 1944 total. In 
most part, this increase was due to ex- 
tensive alterations to the Eagle Hotel 
and to building additions at the State 
Hospital. Forty-two dwelling units 
were added during the year. All but 
six resulted from conversion of exist- 
ing dwellings. 

. . . Plumbing 

Edward E. Beane Plumbing Inspector 

1945 Expenditures None 

1945 Receipts $27.50 

During 1945, the Plumbing Inspector 
issued 36 plumbing permits. This 
number was only three in excess of the 
total for the previous year and reflects 
the continued scarcity of plumbing 
fixtures. 

Five applicants for plumber's licenses 
were examined dining the year. Two 
of these sought master's licenses and 
three journeyman's licenses. 

Annual Report » » 39 




.*£:3»'**"Bm»»1' ' 



Recently ac quired, this Walters wing-rotor plow is used to clear snow 
from the airport runways 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 

<. <v <v c* «> c c^ o o <« <^ -> c> 
BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. Charles J. McKee. Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Robert W. Potter 

John C. Tilton 

William A. Stevens 

Nelson E. Strong 

John Swenson 

Ervin E. Webber Commissioner 

Ervin E. Webber, Supt. of Streets 
Ervin E. Webber. Tree Warden 
Edward E. Beane, City Engineer 
Leslie C. Clark. Supt of Parks 

and Cemeteries 

1945 Operating Expenditure $334,428.01 

1945 Capital Expenditure S 25,709.75 

With the exception oi a number of 
significant road improvements, the 1945 
activities of the Department of Pulilic 
Works were restricted to the |>ei for- 
mance of routine fiuutions. I his 
procecUire was in V\\\v witii the pohc \ 
adopted at the oiUsel ol the war wlucli 

42 « « City of Concord 



was (U'si^iied to pro\ ide adecpiate ser- 
vile to the public without detractino 
in any way fr(jm the material and man- 
power needs of the wai citorl. 

Personnel 

The department carried out its func- 
tioirs with a full-time personnel of 
108 employees. In addition to these, 
70 men were hired to do seasonal \\ork. 
in connection with highway and ceme- 
tery maintenance. During the latter 
part of the year, several department 
employees who served in the armed 
forces leturned to their fonner jobs. 
The coming year should see the de- 
partments regular personnel revert to 
its pre-war level. 

Construction 

During the year, several sections of 
highway were excavated and rebuilt in 
order to eliminate troublesome clay 
pockets. This work was performed 
on Pillsljury Street in the city proper 
and on Sanders Street and Merrimack 
Street in Penacook. It is planned to 
continue this activity until all such 
troiU:)le spots are corrected. 

As ])ait of a general ])rogram of 
fai into niai kel road (onstruction, the 
(l( pal tnicnt (onipk-ted woik on Hul- 
( hills Siiccl, West Palish Ro. id. District 



No. 4 Road, Little Road and Oak Hill 
Road. This program will be con- 
tinued during the coming year with 
the reconstruction of Fiske Road. 

Gra\el roads treated with tar in- 
cluded Fan Road, Sand Hill Road in 
Penacook, and a section ol Roger 
A\enue. In addition, the department 
constructed one new culvert and re- 
laid six others in various sections of 
I he city. 

Other activities residted in the con- 
struction of 1,002 square yards of new 
and 2. .871 square yards of resurfaced 
asphalt sidewalk, four new and 10 re- 
l)uilt catch basins, and 16 calch basin 
connection replacements. 

Department personnel built an ad- 
dition to the department garage at 
the city yards off Warren Street to be 
used as a blacksmith shop. 

Highivay Maintenance 

Dining the year, 100,927 gallons of 
tar were applied to seal-coat surface- 
treated gravel roads. In the process 
of this work, 7,035 cubic yards of sand 
and 9.86 cubic yards of gravel were 
spread to ijind the newly-applietl tar. 
The department also used 1,260 tons 
of cold-patch material in repairing 



broken road surfaces. The routine 
work of cleaning streets, catch basins 
and culverts was carried on as in pre- 
vious years. 

Two bridges were rcplanked in 
Penacook during 1945. These were 
the bridge over the Outlet to the 
Island in the Contoocook River and 
the Walnut Street bridge over the 
Contoocook to Boscawen. The bridge 
over the Soucook River, abandoned 
with the closing of Clough's Mill Road, 
was removed during the year. The 
Town of Pembroke, part owner of the 
structure, participated in the cost of 
removal. 

Snow and Ice 

1 he city experienced a 7.H. 5-inch 
snow fall during 1945. This was 7.8 
inches less than the total for the pre- 
vious year. The department used 15 
trucks, two graders, a rotary plow and 
three sidewalk tractors to clear the 
city streets of snow. Because of the 
continued scarcity of privately-owned 
equipment, oidy three trucks were 
hired to assist in snow removal opera- 
tions. \)\w i() an uuiisuai amount of 
drifting, the rotary plow was used 
extensi\ely in dearing .snow from 



Highway Department equipment at work rebuilding one of the city's 

farm-to-market roads 




country roads. Iliis resulted in (on- 
siderable dela\ in icniox iui; snow Iroiii 
the downtown area and the airport. 

Late in the winter, the departnieiu 
purchased a new Wakers Snow Fighter. 
This wing-rotor plow, which cost |21,- 
000.00, will be used to clear snow 
Ironi the airjjori riuiwa\s. 

A recapitidaiiou oi l!)-l,5 winter 
activities shows that a total oi 32,928 
cubic yards of snow was removed by 
truck from ilie downtown area. At 
the same lime, ilic department spread 
.5,066 cubic \.irds oi sand on icy streets. 

Plowing and snow remoxal cost the 
city .f29.:^,f)2.7r) in 194,5 as against 
.'i!>]H,.SI .^. '{.H lor I he previous winter. 
Sanding (osis (lro|)ped lo .'flS.SS'i. 1 3 
Iroiii llic I'll! cxpcnchuuc oi .'ii;iO,057.- 
12. 

Refuse and Garbage Service 

The department (ollecled l(),782 
cubic yards ol refuse ihuing 1945. 
This ^\()rk A\as accomplished at a per- 
cul)ic-\ard cosi ol 77 cents which con- 
tinues extremely low as compaic-d with 
average refuse collection costs in other 
cities. 

The collection ol table gaibage is 
performed bv pii\ate opc-ralors under 
contract with the (it\. This service 



cost the city .16,050.00. The 1945 ex- 
penditure was ;i!i250.00 in excess of the 
total ccjst for the previous year due to 
the addition of the village of East 
Concord to the garbage service area. 

Engineering 

During 1945, the Engineering Divi- 
sion established 6,458 feet of line and 
grade for new and old road and side- 
walk work. In addition, the engineer- 
ing force ran the location lines and 
the center line levels as well as the 
cross sections for the proposed (ioncord 
throughpass which the state proposes 
to build between the railroad yards 
and the Merrimack River from Water 
Street to North Main Street opposite 
Church Street, a distance of approx- 
imately 9.600 feet. This work was 
undertaken in cooperation with ihc 
State Highway DepartmeiH. 

Other load engineeiing activity in- 
cluded an extension ol Low Axenue 
and a relocation ol a poition ol Ferry 
Street. I hesc- new layouts added 1.052 
feet to the city higliAvay system. 
About 55-i feet of Feiiy Sticet was 
abandoned in c4lecling the rc4oca(ion. 
The net result was the addition of 
0.094 miles of sticet. 



Main entrance to the Blossom Hill Cemetery. The building in the back- 
ground houses the Cemetery Department offices 




At the municipal airport, the division 
ptilornifcl the necessary engineering 
ser\ic('s in connection ^villi enlarging 
and re|iairing the apron in front of 
the hangars. This project involved 
the la\ing of 7,267 square yard.s of 
paxcnuni and 172 feet of storm sewer 
drain. 

Lines and grades were set for ].")<• 
feet of new sanitary sewer as well as 
lor 180 feet of sanitary sewer replace- 
ment. As of December ,^1, the city 
operated 72 miles of sanitary sewers. 

During the year, the division con- 
ducted surveys and ])repared plans for 
a burial plot at Blossom Hill Cemetery 
to be used by the Beth Jacob Parish. 

Other activities of a routine nature 
included the recording of 938 property 
transfers, the making of all necessary 
revisions of the assessors maps, and the 
developing of 1,200 yards of black 
and white prints. In addition, all 
sewer and catch basin plans and pro- 
files were checked and brought up to 
date. 

Sewers 

The second yeai of o|)erating sani- 
tary sewers imder a system of rents 
showed a total revenue of .127, 059. .54. 
of which .|22.0fi0.78 represented gen- 
eral rents, .14,9,51.08 industrial rents 
and ,|47.68 customers' penalties. 

Total operating expenses for the 
year 1945 amounted to .f8,707.85. The 
sum of .'5iM,025..'i2 ^vas applied to de- 
preciation l('a\ing a iicl income ol 
.^4,.32(i..S7. 

At the (lose ol (lie \( ar. ihc Sanilarv 
Sewer Dixisioii iiad current assets ol 
.1i)'-}0,750,5(). i his Sinn was made up 
of $22,792. .^8 in cash, .1:7,683.50 in ac- 
counts receivable and $274.68 in ma- 
terials and supplies. Total fixed as.sets 
after depreciation were carried on the 
books at $567,690.33. 

Only one new sanitary sewer con- 
struction project was authorized during 
1945. This in\c)lved the building of 
150 feet of 8-inch main in Forest Street 
to supply service to two residences. 
Replacements included 138 feet of 8- 




Tarring streets is a routine main- 
tenance operation of the Highway 
Department 

inch pipe in Sanders Street and 44 
feet of 8-inch ])ipe in Merrimack Street. 
This work was accomplished in con- 
jiniction ^\•ith road improvemenl pro- 
jects luiderlaken on these two j'eiiacook 
streets. 

During the year, 15 new customer 
connections were installed, antl nine 
old sewer connections were relaid. In 
addition, six new manholes were built 
and loin- others ^vere reconsti ucted. 
All main iiiie sewcis wcic kept free 
ol obstructions and in good working 
condition. Plugs in 40 lateial se\ver 
lines ^vere corrected. 
Street Lighting 

Fifteen new street lights were added 
to the municipal street lighting system 
during the year. This brought the 
total number fjf lights in operation 
up to l.()18. The street lighting .ser- 
vice was maintained by the Concord 
Electric Company at a cost of $40,- 
560.40 to the City of Concord. 

Annual Report » » 4'y 



*ai««i»' 




The new hlacksniith shop at the city sheds off W'cirren Street 



Trees 

The regular program of maintaining 
all city shade trees in good condition 
has been carrietl on without letup. 
All luihealthy trees were remo\ed and 
replaced with new trees. Altogether, 
the Tree l)i\ision set out 75 pin oaks 
and .")() rock maples during 1945. 

Clonsideraijie cHort was expended in 
pest control. .\ll trees were carefully 
sprayed and pruned in the process of 
this work. The eradication of poison 
ivy was also a part of division's 1945 
program. 

Parks 

.U Ri>llins Park, the Park Division 
set oiu 40 white ])ine trees and fer- 
tilized four acres of park lawn. In 
addition, all roads in the park were 
surface treated with tar. 

Maintenance activities at White Park 
included the jilanting of 75 oak and 
60 white pine trees in the wooded area 
along the westerly side of the park. 
Six acres of the park lawn were fertil- 
ized and 400 feet ol iron boiuidary 
fence was cleaned anil painted. 

During the past wintei, the Higli 
Street slope in White Park was used 

46 « « City of Concord 



as a ski area l)\ the Cloncord Ski C4ul). 
In order to facilitate this use, a sec- 
lion of the slope was cleared and lights 
were installed loi nighi skiing. 

Cemeteries 

In addition lo rouliiu- mainlenaiue, 
the Cemetery Dixision regraded a l\\()- 
acre area in the (iommon (iround 
section of ihe Hhjssom Hill (Cemetery. 
Also a pari of the 1945 construction 
jirogram was the development of a 
sizable area in the extreme westerly 
portion of Blossom Hill lor use as a 
Jewish cemetery. 

At the Pine Giove Clemetery in East 
Concord, the division laid 850 feet of 
iron pipe in order to provide water 
service to lots in the newly-develo])ed 
portion of the cemetery. 
War-Related Activities 

The collection of tin cans for sal- 
vage purposes was discontinued scjon 
after the first of the year. However, 
the department donated personnel and 
equipment to assist the War Depart- 
ment in staging two public demonstra- 
tions, one of which was the "This Is 
\our Infantry" shcnx . Department 
personnel and eL|Liipment were also 



made available in connection wilh 
\arious clothing drives conducted to 
alleviate the suffering people in war- 
ravaged countries. 

Interdepartmental Cooperation 

At \arious times dining the year, 
the department assisted other city de- 
partments in the performance of a 



wide variety of municipal activities. 
Among the city agencies aided were 
the Airport Commission, the Water 
Department, the Planning Board, the 
Police Department, the Playground 
Committee, the Recreation Commission 
and the Lands and Buildings Com- 
mittee. 



WEIGHTS and 
MEASURES 

J. Shepard Norris City Sealer 

1945 Expenditure $1,445.24 

There has been no slackening in the 
inspection activities of the city weights 
and measines department. Although 
hostilities ended dining the year, the 
anticipated increase in commodity sup- 
ply, with but few exceptions, did not 
materialize. In fact, in most instances, 
available stocks and (|iiantities of con- 
sumer goods droppi'd below llie war- 
time level of su|)plv. .\s a result, small- 
lot sales continued to ]>re\ail as the 
accepted rule ol lair distributicm, and 
the stepped-up program of checking 
retail weights and measures, instituted 
at the outset of the war, was prosecuted 
without letup. 

Packages 

J he time-woin system of sales from 
bulk is last ijecoming a thing ol the 
past. More anil more, everyday con- 



sumer goods are being channeled Irom 
producer to the wholesaler and on to 
the retail merchant in packaged form. 
Due to the rapid growth of this mer- 
chandising practice, the department 
carries on a continuous program of 
package checks. All off-weight packages 
are removed from counters and shehes 
to be corrected or returned to the 
wholesaler for adjustment. 

State laws require that all packages 
placed on sale must be plainly marked 
with the net weight of the contained 
commodity. For its own proteition. 
the public should check these weights 
and report any shortages to the City 
.Sealer, Any packages not properly 
marked shoidd also be reported im- 
mediately. 

Petroleum Products 

Willi the lilting of the drixing ban. 
petroleimi products were among the 
lew connnodities that leturned to the 
market in ample supply. The im- 
mediate residt was that many filling 
stations, closed during the war, were 
reopened and much old and new dis- 
pensing apparatus was put into opera- 
tion. All of this ecjuipment was care- 
fully testeil and sealeil. 



INSPECTIONS DURING 1945 

Con- 
Correct Adjusted demned 



Scales 

Weights 

Liquid Measines 

Gas Piuni^s 

Kerosene Pumps 

Cirease Dispensers 

Oil Bottles 

Tank and Truck Meters. 

Package Re-weigh 

Cart Bodies 

Oil Pumps 



325 
522 
115 
153 

30 

63 
276 

14 
105 

14 



19 



12 

9 
1 

4 



Cau- 
Incorrect tioned 
23 



Idle 



22 



Annual Report » » 47 



WATER 
SUPPLY 

O C C* <* <> O C» C> <> C» C> s^ c^ 

BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson. Prisideni 
Robert W. Brown 
Harry H. Dudley 
Allen M. Freeman 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Gardner Tilton 

Percy R. Sanders SiAperintendent 

1945 Expenditures $ 89,002.31 

1945 Receipts sS108, 730.44 



Planned Program 

No lunv ^\';Ucr ni;iin construction 
wa.s undertaken dining the pa,st year. 
However, the Water Department plans 
to initiate a construction program ol 
considerable scope as soon as materials 
and labor arc available. 

The first project which the depart- 
ment proposes to enter upon invcjlves 
the replacement of the 18-inch 188;? 
main from Penacook Lake to Foster- 
ville. Work on this 1 1.400-foot replac- 
nient project was started in 1941 and 
had to be discontinued alter 4,000 
feet of pipp were in place due to th( 
war'. Work will be itsuiiied on the 
remaining 7.l<»n leei of this -!4 inch 
pipe ])roi((l at llie earliest pt)ssible 
date. 

Plans have been made to construct a 
10-inch main on Rockingham Street 
between Broadway and South Street. 
This project, which calls for the laying 
of 2,530 feet of pipe, will connect the 
10-inch main in Broadway Avith a 
similar main at South Street, and will 
replace short sections of (i-inch main 
which now lun westerly from Broad- 
way and c.isicih liom South Street. 



The department also proposes to 
construct .HOO feet of S-incli line on 
Noyes Street westerly horn Soiiili 
Street. 

Pumping System 

(ihanges at the North State Street 
Piunping Station were partially com- 
])leted during 194.5. The two steam 
]ium))ing engines and the steam boiler 
system were lemoved. In place ol 
this antit|uatecl auxiliary ])umping 
(■(|uipin(nl, the cle|)aitment installed 
a single-stage double-suction Morris 
centrifugal pump driven by a Ster- 
ling Petrel six-cylinder lM2-h()rsepower 
gasoline engine. The installation was 
supervised by Metcalf &: Eddy, En- 
gineers, of Boston, Massachu.setts. 

riie new unit has a guaranteed per- 
formance of 2.590 gallons per minute 
with an operating efficiency of 15,400 
gallons of water per gallon of gasoline 
pum])ing against a 128.5-foot head. 
After a satisfactory service performance 
test conducted October 25, H)45, the 
unit was accepted and |)hicecl in ser- 
vice. 

Consumption 

I he total consumption of water for 
the year 1945 was 1,072,028,300 gallons. 
Of this amount, 522,260,000 gallons 
were supplied by gra\ ity from the lake 
and 549.768,300 gallons were pumped 
to supply the high service district. 
Ill addition, 23.711,086 gallons were 
|)uiii|)e(l from the high sen'ice reser- 
\oii to supply the extra high service 
district. Fhe average daily (onsump- 
tion was 2.937,063 gallons. 

During the year, the Water Depart- 
ment pumped 15,753,500 gallons of 
Avater to the Penacook-Boscawen water 
precinct. 

Finances 

In line with its war-time policy, the 
Board of Water Commissioners abated 
50 per cent of meter bills for the third 
cjuarter of 1945, and a 25 per cent 
abatement was made on schedule bills 
for the six-month period running from 



4S « « City of Concord 




The crystal clear waters of Penacook 

Lake, Concord's tnain water st^pply, 

reflect the evening light 



Annual Report » » 49 




This new auxiliary gasoline-driven pun/p was installed during J 'J I? at 
the main pumping statioii in place of two antiquated steam pumps 



Octobrr I, I!)!.") to \|)iil I, l!'l<). I iic 
total sa\ing to (oiisuiiicis ainoiiiucd to 
$15,411.70. 

Total (Icpailiiiciu i((cipts in KM.") 
amotmtfd to S I OH, 7,10. M, ol wliidi 
.1(104,6 10. ,5.5 rrprcsmtcd payments re- 
ceived Iroin water sales. The depart- 
ment received .|l, 86,1. 78 Ironi the 
Sanitary ,Se\ver Department (o\erin,g 
the cost i)\ i)illing and collecting sewer 
charges for the years 1944 and 194,5. 

Expenditures tor 1945 totaled %'S\),- 
002.31. Ol thi,s amount, .'§;68,576.06 
were spent lor general operations, 
$17,000.00 loi l)ond retirement, and 
$3,426.25 for l)oiid interest. 

During the year, $10,000.00 were 
used to purchase United .States Trea- 
sury Bonds and a like sum was trans- 
ferred from current funds to savings 



hank accoinits to l)e held as a reserve 
against Inline < oiisti la tion. 

.\t the end ol the year, the Water 
Departnieni hKome-TnvestTiienl Ac 
coinit showed a balance o\ SI 08, ,155. 85 
which togethei with $19,570.40 on hand 
in iIh- (it\ ticasury gave the deparl- 
mcnt .1 <ash balance of $127.92(i.25. 

Mic $17,000.00 ]xiyment niiidc on 
the Water DepailinciU bonded debt 
iHoiigiil the total amount outstanding 
at the end of the year clown to .S71,- 
000.00 Unless new bond issues aic 
aullujrized, the department will l)e en- 
tirely debt free in 1951. 

The nuinicipal w^ater facility repre- 
sents a total investment of $1,977,970.- 
10. Alter allowing for depreciation, 
the plant valuation as of Decemljer 31, 
1945 was $1,239,132.81. 



30 « « City of Concord 



MT T 1\T T /^^ T T) A T cant increase in all phases of aviation 
LJ J- >l JL V^ X JL l\. 1—/ activity. Only the lack of civilian 
. -_- -_^ -_-^ ^^^ -_^ ,-^ planes restricted the reconversion im- 

J^ I j\ \^ II \\^ I petus and greatly expanded operations 

at the municipal air field. 

operating Policy 

BOARD OF AIRPORT During the year the Airport Com- 

COMMISSIONERS mission adopted a policy intended to 

TT^, «".. ^. T in^ T.- ^/ provide erreater flexibility in commer- 

HON. Charles J. McKee. Chanwati ' & ; 

Robert w. Potter. Clerk cial operations at the auport. The 

Charles A. Bartlett exclusive privileges granted under lease 

John n. Engel ^q jj^g single commercial operator at 

Charles W. Howard ^i , •»! j ■ c c 

^ , ,, T^ the port were withdrawn in favor of 

Donald J. McFarland ' . _,, 

John Swenson '* pohcy of multiple operations. The 

immediate effect of this change was the 

1945 Operating Expenditure $10,068.52 j^^^^ ^j ^j^^ ^^^^^11^^. ^j ^j^^ ^^^,^ hangars 

1945 Capital Expenditure $6,248.24 ^^ ^j^^ f^^j^ ^^ ^ ^^^ 3^;,^^ ^^^^,-^^ 

1945 Earning $ 6,831.30 organized by two former naval aviators. 

<><^o<><^<^<^o♦oo<^o Recognizing the need for supervision 

and coordination of the various ele- 
With the war over, activities at the ments of airport operations, and anti- 
Concord Municipal Airport started cipating a rapid expansion in the use 
their return to normal conditions. All of available facilities, the Airport Corn- 
indications pointed toward a signifi- mission intends to employ a full-time 

Aerial view of the Concord Municipal Airport 








Admin/strtitiou building and hcini^ar jacilities at the airport 



aiipoil inaiKi^ci (liiiiii^ llic (oiniiit^ 
yciiv. Oil llic s( (lie Mi|)t r\ isioii will 
develop ^itaU-r cIlKit-iuy in aiipoil 
aclmiiiistial ion and hcticr sc'ixicc lo 
liic pul)li(. 

Airline Service 

Since the ic-cslahlishnient of rrgii- 
larly sc lit'dnlcil aiiliiu- s('i\i(c al llic 
immicipal airpoi i laic in i!)41, loni 
stops daily are made in Concord by 
Norlheasi Airlines planes operated on 
the Imernational Ronte bet^veen Bos- 
ton and Monlital. i his line pioxiilcs 
Concord with a bare iiiinimnni ol 
noiih sontii air passenger, express and 
mail ser\ ite. There is ain])le evidence 
that the city needs increased accommo- 
dations on this route. Present demand 
for service greatly exceeds availal:)le 
space and the trend is definitely to- 
ward a greater demand in the imme- 
diate future. The situaticm is further 
aggravated by the fact that more and 
more peo|)le from all sections ol the 
state are seeking (learance ilirongli 
the local airpoil. 

Added s<i\i(e is also needed on a 



pidjected route between I'oilland and 
New \()ik (!il\ \ ia (ioiuord. Such 
a route would eliminate the (oiisidei- 
able dela\ which now results Irom 
(hangini; |)laiies at the lioston ter- 
minal. Dining the \c'ar, ihe Airport 
( '.ommissioii acting in behalf ol the 
City of (ioncord joined with the State 
of New Hampshiie in petitioning the 
Ci\il Aeronautics board loi this much 
ncccled additional sciN.ie. To date, 
no decision in this m.ittei has been 
made b\ llie ledeial agency. 

Civil Aeronautics Agencies 

Ihe (a\il Aeronautics Commission's 
regional inspection sei\icc\ which was 
uio\ed to the airport at the beginning 
of the war, continued to operate from 
otiices in the administration building. 
The agency's examination activities in- 
creased noticeably with the end of the 
Avar as mil.tar\ pilots sought cixilian 
])ilot status. 

Ihe (!. A. A. also maintained and 
operated ic'mdar two-way radio com- 
mnnication. lelcixpe interphone and 
ladio be. mi sei\ ices al the .liipoit. 



52 « « City of Concord 



Weather Bureau 

The United States Weatliei Bureau 
operated its comprehensive weather 
forecast service from headc]uarters lo- 
cated in the airport admin stration 
huildino,. In addition to pro\ iding iip- 
lo ihc ininulc wcalher inloi niation lor 
llit;ht |)urposes, the bureau l)roadcasts 
dailv weather reports over a direct-^vire 
radio hookup from its oliucs al the air- 
poi t. 

Airport Improvements 

In hue willi a (ontinuiui; progiani 
ol airpoil impiox cnicnl. the apron in 
Iront ol llic hangais was widened dur- 
ing 1**45. Ihis \vork. inxohcd the 
laying of approximately 7,.H0() s(|uai(' 
yards of pavement and the iirstallation 
of 472 feet of storm se\ver diain. llic 
eidarged apron area gicallx Lu.lilaics 
(onnnercial operations, |)arl i( ularh in 
hunishing nioic paiking space lor 
planes and in keeping llic lialli( lane 
in lioiu ol llic hangais open lor ia\i- 
ing. 

During the year, t\vo ])ai(( Is ol land 
ol considerable size were puK based 
and added to the airport area. This 
newly-adjuiicd land is located on the 
.south-east side of the air|)oil in the 
vicinity of the abandoned (ilough's 
Mill Road. Purchase of (his land is 
pait ol a piogiaiii of accpiisil ion which 
includes all of the pi i\ali4v-o^vnc(l 
property lying west of the .Sheep Road. 

Airport y.on'nig 

By adopting airport zoning in l!)l I, 
the City of Cctiuord became one of the 
(irst cities in the (ounlry lo recogni/e 
the need for and give force to elleclixc 
protection of the approaches to the 
nniAvays f)f its airport. Since the 
height zoning regulaticjns ^vere a- 
dopted. the Civil Aeronautics Admin- 
istration has made extensive use ol 
the Concord ordinance as a model for 
other cities. The ,\irport Commission 
has rccei\ed numerous rec|ucsts from 
all sections of the country for informa- 
tion relative tcj its airport zoning \a\x. 




Top, the Concord radio range sta- 
tion located south of the airport in 
Pembroke: bottom, Northeast Air- 
lines office in the airport adminis- 
tration building 




PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Mollis, President 
Charles F. Cook 
J. Richard Jackman 
Lela Y. Johnson 
Violet L. McIvor 
Edwina L. Roundy 
Donald W. Saltmarsh 
Osmond R. Strong 
Dean P. Williamson 

Natt B. Burbank Superintendent 

H. Raymond Danforth Superintendent 

(In the absence of Mr. Burbank) 

Cost of Operation : 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1945: 
5365,056.01 

Three thousand boys and girls are 
enrolled in Concord's schools, almost 
halt of them in the junior and senior 
high school grades. The system is 
organized on the K-6-3-3 plan, with 
the kindergarten and the first six grades 
comprising the elementary division,, 
grades seven, eight, and nine the 
Junior High School, and the last three 
the Senior High School. 

In addition to the usual basic sub- 
jects, such as the three R's, extensive 
training is offered in industrial arts, 
music, art, physical education, and 
special-class work. The excellent col- 
lege preparation given by the Senior 
High School is demonstrated by the 
consistently high degree of success of 
its graduates in college. More and 
more attention is being paid to the 
large majority who do not go on to 
higher institutions, in an effort to give 
them a general education to fit them 
for adult life in a democracy. 

Finances 

The cost of operating Concord 
schools for the year 1944-45 was $36.5,- 



056.01. This sum does not include 
payments on the district's bonded debt 
or cafeteria expenses. During the year 
$45,000.00 in bonds and notes were 
retired, including a final payment of 
.$20, 000.00 on the new Dame School. 
Total indebtedness remaining to be 
])aid amounted to .S301 ,000.00. 

Teaching Staff 

The staff numbers 150, including 
principals and supervisors of special 
fields such as music and physical edu- 
cation. Several have earned master's 
degrees, and many are pursuing post- 
graduate work. 

The problem of finding teachers to 
fill vacancies has not abated with the 
cessation of the war. It is more diffi- 
cult now than it was a year ago. 
I raining institutions are not prepar- 
ing enough new teachers to meet state- 
wide demands. Higher salaries paid in 
other professions and occupations are 
drawing teachers away from the school- 
room. A leal crisis is approaching, 
even in Concord. 

Salaries in this schocjl system have 
not increased materially since the be- 
ginning of the war. It has become 
amply evident that this city must take 
immediate steps to raise the level of 
jiayments for teaching services. If this 
is not done it will be difficult, if not 
impossible, to attract successful teachers 
to fill vacancies. C^oncord is substan- 
tially below most New Hampshire 
cities, and even below many communi- 
ties of much smaller size, in le\el of 
teacher salaries. 

Pupil Transportation 

The unusually large size of this 
school district, 64 square miles, throws 
upon the schools a large burden f)f 
pupil transportation. Several hundred 
children must be carried to school. 

Most of this service is pro\ided i)y 
private carrier under contract. It has 
been clearly proven elsewhere that con- 
siderable economy can be effected by 
changing over to school district owner- 
ship of vehicles. This question will be 



54 *' " City of Concord 




Wholesome noon-day lunches are an important part of the Concord public 

school program 



carefully studied before the expiration 
of the current contract in 1948. 

Buildings 

Cloncord faces a graxe fiuant ial prob- 
lem in the field of school buildings. 
The Junior High School is housed in 
two plants, one of which, tiie Kund 
lett Building, is utterly inadecjuaie, 
and in scjnie respects unsafe. llic en- 
rollment has grcjwn to a point wluic 
it is almost impossible lo fnid space 
in which to care for the children. 
There are no facilities for a physical 
education program, no playground area 
worthy of the name, and no possibility 
of obtaining either. 

Another immediate problem is that 
of the overcrowding of the Conant ele- 
mentary school in the South End. 
This has Ijcen brought about by the 
shift of popidation into that section. 
A substantial addition nuist be built 
as soon as construction ccjnditions will 
permit. Tentative plans ha\ e been 



made tcj proceed \\'\i\\ this project in 
the summer of 1947. 

Other important l)ul not mgenl 
building problems are found in the 
Kimball and Rumford Schools. Nei- 
ihei of these plants is adequate for a 
modern elementary school program. 
1 hex siiouid be replaced soon. 

Pensions 

On faiuiar) 1, 1940, the local 
teachers' letiiement system, in effect 
lor many years, was abolished and 
Cloncord's teachers transferred to the 
State Teachers' Retirement System. 
This step has provided the teachers 
with protection which is more sound 
and no less generous than that of the 
kjcal system. 

Non-teaching employees of the school 
district have also been given an op- 
portunity to go over to the State 
Employees' Retirement Association, as 
authorized by the last session of the 
let>islaturc. 



Annual Report » » 55 



GRADtATCS ENTERING COLLEGE 


YEAR 


COMCORD HIGH SCHOOL SENIOR CLASS 


PERCENT 


1940 


^ 


12.7 


1941 


ihHi 


15.3 


1942 


^^m 


21.5 


1943 


I^H 


14.2 


1944 


^m 


14 1 


194 5 


^ 


14.3 



The Vutiire 

\\\v prohUiiis liuinK Cloncord's 
sdiool sNsttin iiiusi l)c .iliac kt*d witii 
louniSJC' and willioul dfiay. .Ml diili- 
cullics did not \aiiisli with \'-[ Oay. 
as soiiu- (.-xpt'c tfd. I lifsc |)()sl-\\ai 
vear.s arc cU"\ clopin.t^ an entirely dil- 
ierent i)ni not less oiuial \aiictv ol 
problcnis in tiic sdiools. Iluii .solu- 
tion will (omc out ol mndi sericnis 
ihon^iil on tile pait ol not only .school 
|jfople hilt paicnis and ollici cili/cns 
and taxpayers. 

Penacook 
. . . School District 



<> c> c> c> 



c» c> <> o 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Frank Beede, Chahmau 

Francis E. Beer 

Claire V. Breckei i. 

Katherine C. Butt 

James J. Hayes 

Alfred J. York 

George W. Sumner Superintendeut 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1945: 
$4.^,214. .^2 



Superintendent Retires 

Mr. Cicorof \\'. .Sumner, Superinten- 
dent ol .Schools lor "M years, retired 



January I, \\)M') i)ecause ol ill health. 
Diiriui; hi.s tenure ol ollice. Superin- 
tendent Sumner ])la\ed a majoi role 
in shapint' the destinies ol the Pena- 
cook Union. .V ijratehd citi/enry join.s 
in an e\|)iession ol thanks to Mr. 
Siminei loi his laithlul service to the 
Nouth ol Penacook. 

riic district was iortunate to secure 
Ml. V. Pester Trafton to succeed Mr. 
Simmer. Mr. Tratton comes to the 
distiict with wide experience in edu- 
cational work, and is well cpialilied 
to assume the res|)onsil)ililies ot his 
new position. 

Bnihliui^ Program 

Through the efforts of a School Plan- 
ning Ciommittee, the district sought 
and itcei\ed .luthority irom the 1945 
Pegislatuic to hollow money in excess 
ol its debt limit lor the purpose- ol 
erecting and ecpiip|)ing a gMunas um- 
auditorium. 

Suhsecpiently. the lioard of luluca- 
lion entered into an agreement with 
Mr. Granger of Hancner for his ser- 
vices as architect in designing the pro- 
posed ne\v building which is to be a 
memorial honoring Penacook citi/ens 
wluj sei\ecl their counli\ in World 
W'.ir II. 

rile Planning Committee, after care- 
ful siuih and consideration, recom- 
mended that funds should be solicited 



.56 « « City of Concord 



I)\' ])ul)lic subscription to (Itli;i\ pari 
of the expense of erecting this ninth- 
needed educational facility. 

School hunch Program 

During the school yeai , (he hot 
lunch |irogr;nn was expanded lo in- 
clude the first lour grades oi the |)ul)iic 
and parochial schools. riie program 
has heen \ ci \ beneficial to children 
who li\e at a distance, and who ha\ e 
been forced in I lie ])ast to carry cold 
lunches to school. Fiulherniore, llie 
new hnuli sNslcin has been iirsinniien- 
lal in eifecting a general inipio\ cnieni 
in sindent health which, in luin, lias 
lesulU'd in ixMler classroom work. 

Teaching Staff 

Ihe disliici (onlinucd lo opeiatc 
wilh a slafi oi 17 leachcrs. OI these, 
inne wcic high school instiuctors. si\ 
wcic grade school teachers, and one 
was a music supc i\ isor. four leacheis 
resigned during the year. Qualified 
replacements were employed lo (dl ihe 
vacancies. leachcrs' salaries were ad- 
justed (o meel the axeiage |)aid b\ 
other disiricis oi (ompaial)ic si/e. 
I' /nances 

()p(iating (osis loi liic \(ai ending 



June .10. 191.") amounted to $43,214.32 
as compared with ,'s42, 184.20 lor the- 
previous fiscal year. The largest single 
increase in cost involved a $1,530.34 
jump in teachers' salaries. A |2,000.00 
payment was made on the bonded debt 
of which .S2r).()00.0() remains to be ])aicl. 
1 otal receipts from all .soiuces a- 
mounted to .143,800.63. Income from 
local taxation totaled .'$.3(5,819.80 while 
that liont other sources, chieflv high 
school tuitions, amounted to ;it>6,980.83. 
The school district tax was $19.39 per 
.SI, 000. 00 ol assessed \aluation as 
against Sl().72 lor the picccding way. 

Membership 

Ihe axciage daily meml)ershi]i of 
ihe studenl body ol the Penacook Dis- 
trict \\as ,")2f). This re|)iesented an 
inc lease ol nine o\ fi ihe 1911 a\erage. 
I he- lad thai llic .ixeiage daih high 
school meinbeiship iiK teased b\ II 
would seem lo indicate' ihe beginning 
ol a trend which should e\c-ntuall\ 
retinn high school emollmeiil lo its 
pre-war lc\cl. lIowe\ cr, as long as 
jobs remain ic.idily a\ailable to older 
children, an aiicsied iicnd ol increase 
c .ui be e\|)cc led. 



High school plays are not only entertaining hut they provide a fine 
n/eclinni of expression for students with dran/atic ability 



^eOld^ Coontrio fSaira 




pf^ 





APPENDIX 



o ♦ ♦ 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATISTICS 

PAGE 

General Fund — Balance Sheet 59 

General Fund — State of Appropriations and Expenditmes 60 

General Fund — Statement oi Estimated and Actual Re\ enues 62 

Bonded Indebtedness ot the C^ity 63 

General Fund — Reconciliation of Unappropriated Surplus 64 

Bond Funds — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 64 

Bond Funds — Comparative Balance Sheets 65 

Bond Funds — Summary of Debt Service Charges Until Maturity 65 

Trust Fimds — Balance Sheet 66 

Trust Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 67 

Trust Ftnids — Reconciliation of Fund Balances 67 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Balance Sheet 68 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Statement (jf Operations 68 

Concord Water Works — Balance Sheet 69 

Concord Water Works — Income-Investment Account 69 

Concord Water Wcjrks — Statement (jf Operations 70 

Concord Water Works — Cash Receipts and Expenditures 70 

Assessors' Statement for 1 945 71 

City Relief Department — General Classification of Relief Expenditures ... 72 

Board of Puijlic Works — Financial Statement 73 

Municipal C^ourt — Statement of Receipts and Expendittires 7.3 

Comparative Table of the Nimiber of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valu- 
ations, Tax Levies and .Average Rates in Ccjncord, 1936-1945 73 

Comparative Fable of Budget .Appropriations, 1940-1945 74 

Reconciliation of Tax Levies, 1939-1945 75 



GENERAL FUND 

Balance Siikki — Di.ciMuiiR 31, 1915 

ASSETS 

Cash 

C'.asli in Hank ~ Rc,mil.ii ; .1125,572.80 

Clasii ill Hank — Moiul ,^- tioiipon Acxoiint 3()1.25 

Clash ill Oliicc — I a\ CloiiccLor I,03S.7;'> 

Cash in Odicc- — Cily Clcik }5().75 

lota! Clash .'i;i27,429.()2 

ll( hiihuyscmciils /tcn'ivdhic 

Meiriinack Counly .'tii3,0()8.17 

Other Municipalities ' 85.50 .f;.'?.! 5.'{.<)7 

Less Resei\e lor Doiihilnl Adoiiiils 1,123.70 

Total Reiiiihuiscincnls Rc(ci\al)lc- .'i>2,030.27 

Taxes Receix'dblc 

193!) Levy .Ijl ,351.00 

1940 Levy 1,K12.65 

1941 Levy 1,992.13 

1912 Levy 2,435.28 

1943 Levy 2,042.80 

1914 Levy 10.127.19 

1915 Levy 100,910.70 .'i> 1 20,07 1. 75 

Less Rc-sei\c loi DoiihUiil Vkoumis 24,553.00 

lolal I axes Receivable .f96,l 18.09 

Viircdcciiicd 'I'axrs lloiiglil by Cily 5_51 | jr; 

I'rupcrly Acq nil cd by 'I'nx Ctilla l<iy\ l)riil\ 0,255.20 

Total Assets .1f237,34'1.93 



LIAi'.ilJIIKS 

/.'()//(/ Cniijxins P(i\(ibJ,- .|361 .25 

Unrxpcudrd I'xibnii cs i>\ \ jilni>jni(iliiiii\ 

Public Library .114,022.00 

School District — • lioiul liiuiesi 0,120.00 

Union School District 1 15,431 .55 

I'enacook School District U ,879.75 

Total Appropi iaiion Lial)ililies .f:178,353.90 

Total Liabilities .1178,715.15 

Current Surplus 58,629.78 

Total Liabilities and Surplus $237M-i-9S 



Annual Report » » 39 



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1^ 



GENERAL FUND 

Reconciliation of Unappropriaikd Surplus 

Unappropriated Surplus — - January 1, 1946 $166,774.54 

Add: 

Unexpended Balance — Airport Appropriation $5,689.69 

Estimated Revenue .«; 1, 156 ,2 17.90 

Excess of Actual Revenue over Estimate 175,063.5() 1,?5,'?1 ,2SI .46 



Overlay 29,708.81 

Unredeemed Taxes Purchased by City 6,570.79 1,. '57.^,250.75 

$1,540,025.29 

Deduct: 

Decrease in Properly Accpiired by Tax Deed ,$641.76 

Decrease in Reserve for Uncollected I axes 846.29 

1944 Tax Levy Refund Adjustments .'59.78 

Appropriations $1 -507,570.91 

Less- Net Unexpended Balances 27.70.S.2.'5 1,179,867.68 1,481.395.51 



Unappropriated Suiplus — December 31, 1945 ,'S;58,629.78 



BOND FUNDS 

Anai.>sis of Cmanck in Nf.i J)ibt 
For ihf. Yfak Endi i> Dk imiuk 31, 1945 

Net Debt — December 31 , 1944 .$544,225.46 

Deductions: 

Bonds and Notes Reliicd l)uiin,n 1945 

Municipal Bonds .$52,000.00 

School Bonds 25,000.00 

School Notes 20,000.00 



Total $97,000.00 

Water Bonds 17,000.00 



Reduction for Bonds ;ni<l Notes Retiied 114,000.00 



$430,225.46 



Addition for Amount Carried to Surplus Representing the Results of 

Operations for the year 1945 and transactions affecting prior years 108,144.76 

Net Debt. December 31, 1945 ,'C;538,370.22 



SUMMARY 

Net Debt — December 31 , 1944 .$544,225.46 

Net Debt — December 31 . 1945 538,370.22 



Improveineiu in Einaiuial Cf)udition $5,855.24 

64 ** " City of Concord 



BOiND FUNDS 

CioMi'ARAiivi Halance SHp:Er 
DtcEMHiR 31, 1915 — December 31, 1<(11 

ASSETS 

l)c( cnihrr >/ 
Assets l'>n l'>1t DccrrMsc 

Bonded Debt $597,()()().()() .?(391 ,(K)0.0() $94,000.00 

Notes Payable 20,000.00 20,000.00 

lolal $597,000.00 |711,000.00 $114,000.00 



LIABILITIES 

Serial Bonds: 

Central Fire Station $9,000.00 $10,000.00 $1 ,000.00 

City Hall and Auditorium 10.000.00 15,000.00 5.000.00 

Departmental Equipment 4,000.00 H.OOO.OO 4,000.00 

Highways 5,000.00 1 0,000.00 5,000.00 

I'ublic Improvement 38,000.00 56,000.00 18,000.00 

Sewers 128,000.00 1 43,000.00 1 5,000.00 

Union School District 301,000.00 326,000.00 25,000.00 

Water Department 74,000.00 91,000.00 17,000.00 

Municipal Airport 28,000.00 32,000.00 4,000.00 

Serial Notes: 

Union School District 20,000.00 20,000.00 

1 otal $597,000.00 ,$71 1,000.00 $114,000.00 



BOND FUNDS 

StlMM'\R^ or Diur Service Char(;es Until Maturity 
As oE December 31, 1945 

l'is<(il I'rriod I'riiK ipal Interest Total 

Municipal 1946,56 ,$222,000.00 ,1:21,716.25 .$243,716.25 

School 1 946-65 301 ,000.00 1 26,405.00 427,405.00 

Water 1946-51 74,000.00 8,025.00 82,025.00 



lolai .$597,000.00 $156,146.25 .$753,146.25 



Annual Report » » 63 



TRUST FUNDS 

Bala.nce Sheet — December 31, 1945 

ASSETS 



Cash: Unexpended Balances of Income De- 
posited at Interest in: 



Loan and Trust Savings Bank . . . 
Merrimack County Savings Bank 
New Hampshire Savings Bank . . 
Union Trust Company 



Total Income Cash 

Permanent Funds: 

Savings Bank Deposits: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank . 
Merrimack County Savings Bank 
New Hampshire Savings Bank . . 
Union Trust Company 



Securities: 

United States Treasury Bonds 

Great Northern R. R. Pfd. (1 Sh.) 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe R. R. Pfd. (1 Sli.) 
Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe R. R. Com. (2 Sh.) 
Northern R. R. of New Hampshire (1 Sh.) . . . 
Chicago, Burlington & Ouincy R. R. (1 Sh.).. 
Boston & Maine R. R. fst Pfd. C. (6 Sh.) .... 

Concord Gas Co. Com 

Jackson Construction Traction Co. Bonds, 
$3,000.00 



Total 
III Funds 


Cemetery 
Trust Funds 


Other 
Trust 
Funds 


.$659.96 

8,866.96 

676.59 

1,000.17 


$534.37 

8,709.72 

676.59 

.550.11 


$161.59 
157.24 

450.06 



$92,294.78 
80,548.85 
86,385.79 
93,939.97 



100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
600.00 
1,020.00 

No Value 



$11,239.68 $10,470.79 



$82,680.09 
65,893.03 
73,399.33 
72,420.43 



100.00 
100.00 
200.00 
100.00 
100.00 
100.00 



.$768.89 



,$9,614.69 
14,655.82 
12,986.46 
21,519.54 



148,860.63 68,900.00 79,960.63 



500.00 
1 ,020.00 

No Value 



Total Permanent Funds $504,250.02 $363,992.88 $140,257.14 



Total Assets .$515,489.70 $374,463.67 $141,026.03 



LIABILiriKS 



Unexpended Income Balances: 

Cemeteries 

Schools 

Parks and Playgrounds 



.$10,470.79 
450.06 

318.83 



M0,I70.7!» 



Total Unexpended Income $11,239.68 $10,470.70 



.$450.06 
318.83 

,$768.89 



Permanent Funds: 

Cemetery Trusts $363,992.88 $363,992.88 

School Trusts 1 ,200.00 

Parks and Playgrounds Trusts 1,961.73 

Library Trusts 1 35,095.41 

Other 2,000.00 



$1,200.00 

1,961.73 

135,095.41 

2,000.00 



Total Permanent Funds ,$504,250.02 ,$363,992.88 $140,257.14 

Total Liabilities ,$515,489.70 $374,463.67 $141,026.03 



66 « << City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements for the Year 
Ending December 31, 1945 



Total 

All 

Funds 



Cemetery 
Trust 
Funds 



(lash Balaiues of Ijiexpended Income — January 
1, 1945 



Receipts: 

Income from Inlerest and Dividends School 

Trusts 

Park and Playground Trusts 

Library Trusts 

Other 

Cemeteries 

One third Receipts from Sale of Lots 



$8,335.33 $7,623.88 



lota I Receipts 



.$28,176.05 $16,343.51 



Disbursements: 

School Trusts 

Library Trusts 

Other 

Cemeteries 

Transferred to Principal 



Total Disbursements 

Cash Balances of Unexpended Income — Decem- 
ber 31, 1945 



Other 
Trust 
Funds 



,$711.45 



$32.74 

44.70 

11,003.65 

40.00 

7,614.30 

1,105.33 


$7,614.30 
1,105.33 


$32.74 

44.70 

11,003.65 

40.00 


$19,840.72 


$8,719.63 


$11,121.09 



1,832.54 



$20.00 

11,003.65 

40.00 

5.670.58 

202.14 


$5,670.58 
202.14 


$20.00 

11,003.65 

40.00 


$16,936.37 


$5,872.72 


$11,063.65 


$11,239.68 


$10,470.79 


$768.89 



TRUST FUNDS 

RiCONCILIATION OF FUND BALANCES 



Total Cemetery Other 

All Funds Trust Funds Trust Funds 



Fund Balances — January 1, 1945 $452,755.59 

Add: 

New Trusts — Sundry Cemetery 

New Trusts — Special 

Sale of Lots — One-third to Permanent Fund 

Sale of Craves 

Seth K. Jones 



153,807.62 $98,947.97 



8,567.50 


8.567.50 


41,484.17 


175.00 


1,105.33 


1.105.33 


320.00 


320.00 


17.43 


17.43 



41, .309. 17 



Total Additions .$51,494.43 $10,185.26 .$41,309.17 

Fund Balances — December 31, 1945 .$504,250.02 $363,992.88 $140,257.14 



Annual Report » » 67 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS— SANITARY SEWER DIVISION 

Balance Sheet — December 31, 1945 
ASSETS 

Current Assets 

Cash $^2,792.38 

Accounts Receivable 7,683.50 

Materials and Supplies 274.68 

Total Cui rent Assets .1?30,750.50 

Fixed Assets 

Mains .1871,192.62 

Manholes 90,227.29 

Customers' Connections 110,512.87 

Main Sewer Land and Rit;hts of Way 98.79 

Miscellaneous General Kcpiipnienl 934.82 

.1> 1,072,966.39 
Less Depreciation Reserve 505,276.06 

7'otal Fixed Assets 567,690.33 

Total Assets ,1598,440.89 

LIABILIIIKS 

Capital 

Contributions in Aid of Construction $1 10,477.35 

Contribution from City 480,323.45 

.?590,800.80 
Earned Surplus: 

Balance — January 1, 1945 .53,313.72 

Net Income — 1915 4,326.37 7,640.09 

Total Capital $598,440.W» 

Total Liabilities and Capital .1i;598,440.89 

STATEMENT OF (JI'ERATIO.XS FOR YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1945 

Operatins, Reiwnurs 

General Rents .fi22,060.78 

Industrial Rents 4,951.08 

Cvistomers' Penalties 47.68 

Total Operating Revcinie .1t;27,059.54 

O peratijig Expenses 

Superintendence .f2,327.02 

Main and Manhole Labor and Expense 819.72 

Customers' Connections Labor and Exj)cnse 349.90 

Maintenance of Mains 344.54 

Maintenance of Manholes 1 72.62 

Maintenance of Customers' Connections 142.91 

Customers' Meter Readins; and Collectin» 326.18 

Customers' Billing and Accounting 978.53 

Customers' Miscellaneous Accoutuing and Collet ling Ia 

pense (Legal) 943.50 

Salaries of General Office Employees 89.28 

General Office Supplies and Expense 40.10 

Insurance — ■ Workmen's Compensation 83.21 

Insurance — Fire 23.82 

Annual Leave, Sick Leave, Holiday Pay 1 ,657.96 

Miscellaneous General Expense 409.68 

Inventory Adjustments 1.12* 

Total Operating Labor and Expense $8,707.85 

Depreciation 14,025.32 

Total Operating Cost 22,733.17 

Net Income $4,326.37 



*Credit. 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

liALANOK Sm 1 I DiCFMBER 31, l'JI5 

ASSETS 

(Unroll Assets 

Ciish $19,570.40 

Accounts Receivable 1 19.03 

Material and Supplies 16,812.33 

Total Cmrent Assets .1i;36,501.76 

I'ixcd ylsscls 

Water and Flowase Ri.!;lils .|167,663.ll 

Kns'ineering and Stipcrinlcndence (ionsiniction Ciosl 64,428.02 

Land ...,.' l.H2,436.3.5 

StriKtiires (less de|)recialion resei\e) 196,252.55 

l.(|iiipnient (less deprctiaiion reserve) 20,637.1 1 

Dislrihiiiion System (less dcjireciation reserve) 652,868.81 

Other Kquipmeiit (less de|neciation reserve) 4,946.86 

Total Fixed Assets 1 ,239,232.81 

Other Assets 

Income — Invest niciit I mid 108,355.85 

Total Assets .f 1,384,090.42 

LIAHII.MIKS 

C 1 1 r re nt Lidhiliti es 

Interest Conpons I'ayahic .'};146.00 

I'lindcd Debt 

Bonds Payable 74,000.00 

Total Current Liabilities and I-inidcd Debt .$74,146.00 

Ciipit/il 

Mnnici|)al Investment .'s')63,l9l.7 1 

Federal Grants-in-Aid ol Constriiclion 61,915.08 1,025,109.82 

Surplus 

Balance — January 1 , 1945 .12.52,24 1 .58 

Net I'rolit lor the Year 32,593.02 2X4,834.60 

lotal Liabiliiics .Ij; 1, 384 ,090.42 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Income — iNvisiMKNr AccouNr 

CAPITAL AND INCOME 

Balance — January I, 1915 $86,352.25 

Transferied from Cash Balance 20,000.00 

Income Received dining yeai 2,003.60 

Balance, December ,">l , l!)15 $108,3.55.85 

I N V KS I M I'. MS 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 21/, 67/72 .$10,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2i/C 64/69 30,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2 52/54 10,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2"/4 66/71 5,000.00 

Deposited in 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank 12,644.08 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 15,224.46 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 12,759.53 

Union Trust Company 12,727.78 

Balance — December 31, 1945 $108,355.85 



Annual Report » » 69 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Statement of Operations for the \f\r F.NniNr. Dfcembfr 31, 1945 

RECEIPTS 

Water Sales 

Commercial — Flat Rate $3,033.04 

Commercial — Metered 79,752.95 

Industrial — Metered 21,517.40 

Miscellaneous Water Revciuic 497.48 

Total Operating Revenue .?104,800.87 

EXPEND]! IRIS 

Opera ling E\pcti\rs 

Water ^Supply Expeirse $21,045.25 

Distribution Expense 19,597.99 

General and MiseellaueDus I ndisiril)uted E\|)cnse 7,517.28 

Depreciation 23,016.46 

Total Operating Expenses 71,176.98 

Net Operating Income .$33,623.89 

Other Incoyne 2,395.38 

$36,019.27 
Other Expenses — IiileresI raid 3,426.25 

Net Profil for Year .$32,593.02 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Cash Ri;(:eii'is ami Exi'indim ris i or iiii: Year Ending December 31, 1945 

R EC EI PIS 

Balance, January 1 , 1945 $19,853.83 

Receipts: 

Water at Fixed Rates, Ceneral $2,991.14 

Water at Meter Rates, General 79,538.49 

Water at Meter Rates, Industrial 21,517.40 

Water, 1914 Account 66.04 

Water, Miscellaneous Uses 10.00 

Water Sold to Other Water irtilities 487.48 

Penalties, Delinquent Customers 200.69 

Pipe and Stock Sold and Labor 1 ,569.71 

Old Iron and Brass 203.63 

Refund, Insurance and Freight 114.00 

Sanitary Sewer Division, Billing and Collecting 1,863.78 

Miscellaneous Receipts 168.08 

Total Receipts 108,730.4 ! 

$128,584.27 
Orders Paid: EXPENDriURES == 

Operation and MaiiUenante $51,.526.35 

Plant y\ccoinit 17,049.71 $68,576.06 

Hands and Interest I'aid: 

Bonds $17,000.00 

Interest 3,426.25 20,126.25 

$89,002.31 

U. S. Treasury Bonds Purchased 10,000.00 

Accrued Interest on Bonds Purchased 11 •5() 

Transfer, Cmrent Ftmds to Savings Banks 10,000.00 

Balance — Deceinber 31, 1915 19,570.40 

$128,584.27 
70 " " City of Concord 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1945 

Assessed 

Valuation of 

City and 

Precincts 

Money Raised for 

County .$32,963,846.00 

City Budget 32,963,846.00 

Schools 

*City Union 30,916,766.00 

**Penacook Union 2,0.59,530.00 



Amount of 
Appropriation 


Tax Rate 
per $1000 


1100,410.23 
503,661.00 


$3.05 
15.28 


474,552.82 
35,723.06 


15.35 
17.35 



'lotais $1,114,347.11 



Allowed for P^rrors and Corrections 29,708.00 

Warrants Subinitted to Tax Collector 1 ,181,708.97 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 2,192.01 

City Rate 33.68 

Penacook Rate 35.68 

Average Rate for City — per $100 3.38 

* Includes property located in Loudon 
** Includes property located in Canterbury 

Poll Taxes No. Ariwunl 

Men 4,388 $21,940.00 

Women 7,346 36,730.00 



Total 11.734 .1:58,670.00 



Veterans: Exemimions 

Property Valuation $288,045.00 

Polls (701) 2,103.00 

Blind: 

Property Valuation 2,000.00 

Polls (14) 70.00 



Total Exemptions .$292,218.00 



Bank Stock 
Bank Stock $6,240.81 



Assessed Vauiaikjn of Various Tvim.s oe PRorERiv 
Type 

Improved and Unimproved Land and Buildings 

Electric Plants 

Horses 

Mules 

Oxen 

Cows 

Neat Stock 

Sheep (including Goats) 

Hogs 

Fowl 

Fur Bearing Animals 

Boats and Launches 

Wood and Lumber 

Gas Tanks and Pimips 

Stock in Trade 

Mills and Machinery 

Growing Wood and Timber 

Portable Mills 



No. 


Valuation 




$28,832,610.00 




1,700,580.00 


m 


20,990.00 


1 


100.00 


9 


300.00 


1,082 


149,553.00 


197 


17,934.00 


81 


804.00 


28 


560.00 


26,195 


26,207.00 


100 


380.00 




1,500.00 




14,400.00 




21,040.00 




1,845,350.00 




312,000.00 




18,038.00 




1 .500.00 



Total $32,963,846.00 



Annual Report » » 71 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

GiNIRAr, CilASSIlKAIION OI' R I LIEF EXl'KNDIl URES FOR 1945 

City Comity Tolnl 



Direcl Expenditures for JxelicI 

Cash Allowances 

Groceries 

Milk 

Fuel 

Rem 

Board and (.;iif — Adiills . . 
Board and Gaic — (iliildren 

Medical 

CMolliins; 

Miscellaneous 



1 olal Ciily ;nid Coinily I'oor 



Oilier I owns . 
H()S|)ilMli/;ili()n 



Depoidiiil Soldiers 

Casii Allowances 

Groceries 

Milk 

Fuel 

Rent 

Board and Gare — Children 

Medical 

Clothing 

Miscellaneous 



Adinniistnilinn 

Salaries — Overseers 

Salaries — Office anil Case Workers 

Mileage 

Office Sn|)|)Iies 

leleplione 

Lights 

Heat 

[anitor Service 

Withholding I ;i\es (Wages) 

Auto Maintenance 

Miscellaneous 



lotal Aduiinisliation 

Old Age Assistance 

Grand loiais . . . 



•12,810.11 


.15,233.10 


$8,013.51 


91 ■?.*»() 


2,463.47 


3,377.13 


90.5 1 


624.72 


715.23 


.'{70.15 


1 ,026.79 


1,396.91 


IS9.5(I 


1,007.32 


1 ,496.82 


2.-:i9.!>.s 


1.160.20 


3,110.18 


017.07 




(n7.67 


101.00 


;i,i;is.K9 


3,5 12.8!) 


15.00 


110.63 


1.56.23 


125.01 


106.32 


531.36 


.¥8,11 6. H2 


.*.15.l7l.ll 


.$23,288.26 


010.25 




610.25 


1,212.80 




1,242.86 


.1ii9,969.93 


$15,171.41 


$25,141.37 



.$222.0(t 


$1,586.25 


$1,808.25 


5.00 


481.75 


486.75 




62.64 


62.61 


60.66 


86.00 


1 16.6(i 




286.00 


286.00 


230.00 




230.00 


10.15 


372.56 


382.71 




32.43 


32.43 


2.98 




2.98 


.$530.79 


.$2,907.63 


$3,438.12 



.$63 1 .00 


$895.20 


$1,526.20 


3,121.08 


2.576.78 


5,700.86 


8S.65 


89.00 


177.65 


117.17 


113.77 


230.9 1 


108. I<» 


108.22 


216.41 


89. 1 1 




89.41 


(iO.OO 


(iO.OO 


1 20.00 


201.00 




201.00 


257.5s 


276. 12 


531.00 


200.00 




200.00 


201.02 


16.50 


271.52 


.$5,081.13 


$1,135.89 


.$9,217.02 


19.118.31 




19.118.31 


.$34,700.16 


.$22,214.96 


.$.56,915.12 



72 « « City of Concord 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Financial Statement for the Year Ending December 31, 1945 

Finance Total Unexpended 

Appropriation Com. Available Expended Balance 

Roads and Bridges .. . $182,436.79 3182,436.79 $182,194.18 .1>242.61 

Office 4.551 .00 4,551.00 4,325.83 225.17 

Refuse Collection . . . 36.700.00 36,700.00 36,220.33 479.67 

Table Garbage 5,800.0(1 $187..50 5,987.50 5,987.50 

Sewers 1 .236.00 1 ,236.00 168.23 1 ,067.77 

l-.ngineering 8,700.00 8,700.00 8,497.65 202.35 

Liohtiiip Streets 10.539.04 21.36 40„560.40 40,560.40 

C;ierk oV Hoard 200.00 200.00 200.00 

Trees 7,730.00 7,730.00 6,011.67 1.718.33 

Parks 12,776.00 12,776.00 10,881.41 1.894.59 

Cemeteries 42,278.90 42,278.90 39,380.81 2.898.09 



Total .$342,947.73 $208.86 $343,156.59 .$334,428.01 $8,728.58 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

SlATEMENI OF RECEif'lS AN1> KxiMNDl tUKl S 1 OR I HE Ve\R K\D1N(. DkIMHIR 31, 1945 

Receipts 

Rec:ei\t'(l lor fuies, cosis. and snndiy lees $5,727.96 

I'.xpendilini's 

Special |nstices $18.00 

Clerk's Bond 5.00 

Postage and Supplies 13.55 

Slale ol New Hanipsliirc Motor Vehicle Department 2.406.50 

State of New Hampshire P'ish K: (iame Dept 70.10 

( )fficers Fees 1 3.70 

Printing 109.00 

I'.mile .Simard — restiliilion 1.25 

Counsel fees in jusenile cases 5.00 

Deposit — Stale IS Howard Mason 14.70 2.686.80 

Balance — Paid Cits Ireasiuer $3,041.16 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number oe Poles anii Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 
T.\x Levies and Rates 1936T945 

Polls Veterans Valuations Tax Rate 

1936 13,166 1,030 .$32,039,851.00 $1,245,352.87 .$37.86 

1937 13,612 919 32.195.052.00 1,290,330.81 39.04 

1938 13,490 936 ,32,201.370.00 1.282.689.02 38.82 

1939 13,877 958 32.365.017.00 1,176,029.78 35.30 

1940 14,334 925 32.791,790.00 1.280.926.90 38.00 

1941 13,874 896 33.068.487.00 1.264.315..56 37.20 

1942 13,184 897 33,282.876.00 1,312.838.22 38.40 

1943 12,205 796 33.251,268.00 1.087.147.04 31.80 

1944 12.416 679 .33.083,027.00 1,088.928.60 .m59 

1945 1 1 .73 1 701 .32,963,846.00 1,181,708.97 33.68 

Annual Report » » 73 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 



Of Budget Appropriations, 1940 — 1945 



Opi rating Budget: 

City Poor 

City Poor, Ward One 

Bonds and Notes 

Interest, Bonds and Notes . . . . 
City Hall and Auditorium . . . . 

Mayor 

City Clerk 

City Solicitor 

City Treasurer 

City Physician 

Weights and Measures 

Police Court 

Probation Officer 

Assessors 

Tax Collector 

Real Estate Agent 

Elections 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Department of Public Works . 

Cemeteries 

Parks 

Trees 

Playgrounds 

Planning Board 

Public Library 

Police Department 

Comfort Station 

Recreation Commission 

Zoning Board 

W. P. A 

Airport 

Miscellaneous: 

Clock, care of 

Incidentals and Land Damages. 

Printing and Stationery 

Repairs Buildings 

Board of Aldermen, Salary . . 
Margaret Pillsbury Hospital . . 

Memorial Hospital ._ 

Family Welfare Society ...... 

Concord District Nursing Ass'n 

Penacook Nursing Ass'n 

Memorial Day 

Armistice Day 

Armistice Day, Penacook 

Spanish War Veterans 

Band Concerts 

Work Relief Projects 

Nursing Schools 

Auditing 

Civilian Defense 

Finance Committee: 

Contingent Fund 

Fost-War Planning 

(iross Operating Budget 

Capital Budget Items: 

City Clerk 

Fire Department 

Department Public Works . . . . 

Playgrounds 

Police Department 

W. P. A. Department 

Tax Collector 

Airport 

Total Capital Budget 

Total Municipal Budget 

Estimated Income 

Total Raised by Taxation 



1940 



1941 



1942 



1943 



1944 



1945 



$56,000.00 


$53,415.00 


$54,500.00 


$41,500.00 


$39,950.00 


$37,700.00 




6,575.00 


5,925.00 


5,135.00 


5,320.00 


5,135.00 


107,000.00 


93,000.00 


98,000.00 


107,000.00 


57,000.00 


52,000.00 


15,288.75 


13,269.31 


12,345.011 


11,058.75 


9,451.25 


7,963.75 


6,800.00 


7,050.00 


8,230.01) 


8,697.50 


8,984.50 


9,582.31 


3,568.50 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


1,830.00 


3,950.00 


3,938.00 


7,920.00 


8,292.00 


7,825.00 


8,454.50 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


1,560.01) 


1,560.00 


1,560.00 


1,630.00 


1,680.00 


2,460.00 


3,370.85 


3,675.50 


3,060.01) 


4,789.25 


4,876.00 


5,830.25 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 








1,220.00 


1,220.00 


1,220.00 


1,312.00 


1,400.66 


l,406.6o 


2,900.00 


2,900.00 


2,900.00 


2,960.00 


2,960.00 


2,960.00 


1,500.01) 


1,500.00 


1,450.00 


1,600.00 


1,600.01) 


1,600.00 


11,404.00 


11,558.00 


11,558.0(1 


12,018.00 


12.958.00 


12,934.01) 


6,588.65 


6,738.65 


6,7.38.65 


8,052.85 


8,623.65 
475.00 


9,027.65 
530.01) 


4,150.00 


3,900.00 


3,488.00 


4,100.00 


4,150.01) 


4,100.01) 


69.435.00 


75,713.00 


77,435.52 


78,914.25 


95,803.79 


98,631.63 


6,700.00 


6,900.00 


6,925.00 


7,255.01) 


/, 6.30. 00 


7,618.00 


283,479.86 


274,703.41 


266,650.00 


291,467.40 


297,778.00 


347,657.48 


15,728.00 


15,315.00 


20,388.00 








13,803.00 


12,913.01) 


15,690.69 








12,345.00 


10,849.00 


8,400.00 








9,870.011 


10,728.00 


11,148.00 


10,083.00 


11,805.00 


11,802.00 


3,685.00 


3,885.00 


4,685.01) 


5,000.00 


5,247.25 


5,371.75 


20,500.00 


17,843.20 


18,012.11 


23,000.00 


29,000.00 


31.100.00 


62,245.00 


67,289.00 


71,088.62 


74,048.95 


79,018.91 


84,497.61 


900.00 


2,597.00 


2,080.00 


2,248.00 


2,365.00 


2,264.00 


2,550.00 


2,550.00 


2,550.01) 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


6,450.00 


175.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


150.00 


200.00 


30,000.00 


.35,000.00 


20,800.00 








2,500.00 






6,524.50 


9,288.00 


9,938.66 


85.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.01) 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


2,51)0.(.)(1 


2,500.00 


2,800.00 


2,800.01) 


2,200.00 


2,7.50.00 


3,450.00 


3,450.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.1)0 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


1,450.00 


1,9)5.00 


1,915.00 


1,915.01) 


1,915.00 


1,875.00 


1,875.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 










3,500.00 


3,500.00 










350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.01) 


350.01) 


350.00 


.350.00 


350.00 


200.00 


2011.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.01) 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


100.00 


100.01) 


100.01) 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 








30.00 


30.00 


60.0(1 


400.00 


400.0(1 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


500.00 


500.00 


500.00 


1 ,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,500.00 


1,500.00 








2,000.00 


2,500.00 


2,000.00 








1,200.00 


1,200.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 






3,000.00 


3,000.00 


500.00 





6,000.00 



6,000.00 
5,000.00 



$788,286.61 $780,704.07 $767,617.59 $737,613.45 $734,771.00 $795,876.43 



250.00 
9,000.00 
4,052.40 

195.00 
2,282.00 
4,200.00 



$19,979.40 



265.00 



625.00 



700.00 
1,800.00 



25,000.00 

21,000.00 

700.00 

6,437.58 



11,000.00 



$265.00 $3,125.00 $64,137.58 



$788,287.00 $780,704.07 $787,596.99 $737,878.45 $737,896.00 $860,014.01 
140,000.00 148,000.00 135,000.00 *225,285.00 *260,603.00 *351,353.00 



$648,287.00 $632,705.00 $652,597.00 $512,593.00 $477,293.00 $508,661.00 



*Includes cash on hand at beginning of year. 



74 ** ** City of Concuni 



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INDEX 



C> C> <^ C> C> C> C> C' >> C> C> ^^«^ C^ C C- C> <> C> v^ C- O C» O «> <* C^ C^ «> C^ <> C> C> >> C> <^ C> C> «> C> C> C> C> C> <> s> s^ c> <> c> c^ c> c> c> 

PAGE PAGE 

.\( li\ ilirs in 1!) I") I Mimic i|):il Coin i 35 

Assessnicnt Kl I'aiks 44 

Appendix r)S I'htnnint^ 14 

Bond Fnnds IL' lMa\,<;i()nnd.s ;nul U.illi 22 

lUiildin,!^ .\(ti\ilv .">!' IMnmhino Inspcdion 39 

(icnu'leries II I'olic c I'l oicc tion 31 

C'.itv C;ierk « Probation 34 

City Covnnnieni i> ''"'''" ^^'"'^^ '^^ 

Caiy Ottitials 7 Kfcie-alion 22 

Flections !» '<^'"-- ^-ll'-'t.on 42 

Kn-ineni.iK 42 l^^"^'' -' 

Kxanunaiion ol I'hnnl.eis 3!) Schools 54 

Finances 12 ^^^^ers 43 

Financial Statements and Statistics 5') Siicm IM.min- and Sanclin- 41 

Fire Protection :'.('. Spec iai Recrc-ational Fac ilnies . . . 24 

C.arhaoe Disposal 42 Sf^*-' ''^'"i'lK '^^ 

Cenc-ia! Fund 12 Tax Collection 11 

Healtii and Sanitation IH Trees 44 

Hydrants 38 Trust Funds 12 

Legal Service 13 Vital Statistics H 

Library 26 Water Supply 46 

Milk Control 19 Weights and Measures 45 

Municipal Airport 4!) Zoning Appeals 39 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 




FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 
DECEMBER 3L 1945 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY OF CONCORD 

FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 3L 1945 

FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Chief 

Salaries 

Call Salaries 

Fire Alarm 

Fire Inspection 

Incidentals 

Repairs Roof Engine No. 3 

Repairs Buildings 

Fuel 

Lights 

Upkeep Equipment 

Telephones 

Insurance 

New . Equipment 

Hose 

Supplies and Laundry 

Snow Removal 

Retirement Fund 



Ai>iiniiiiiali(in 


KxpL-ndcil 


$3,300.00 


$3,300.00 


07.8f)R.90 


67,9()8.27 


12,180.00 


11,022.64 


960.00 


1,146.57 


100.00 


7.35 


375.00 


434.67 


1,700.00 


1,7()0.(K) 


800.00 


897.05 


2,400.00 


2,027.13 


800.00 


633.87 


2.000.00 


1,911.30 


725.00 


648.17 


2,1()0.0() 


1. (.75.98 


600.00 


571.16 


1,000.00 


980.00 


600.00 


387.94 


250.00 


290.45 


872.73 


1,166.17 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 
Ladder Truck 
Pumping Engine 
Contingent Fund 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 
Salary, Chief 
Salary, Deputy 
Salary, Captain 
Salary, Officers 
Special Officers 
Bureau of Records 
Janitor 
Car Expense 
Repairs 
Fuel 
Lights 

Auto and Auto Supplies 
Marking Streets 

Telephone, Ganiewcll and Radio 
Insurance 
Keeping Prisoners 
Printing 
Traffic Lights and Supplies 

Contingent Fund 
Office Supplies and Fx|uipment 
Training Program 

Cleaning Toilets, Supplies and Equipment 
Bicycle Plates and Forms 
Police Equipment 
Incidentals 
Retirement Fund 



$16,()()0.()0 


15,94^1.00 


9,000.00) 
945.00) 


9,945.00 


.$3,300.00 


$3,300.00 


2,870.00 


2.869.92 


2,562.50 


2,562.48 


52,615.58 


51,876.56 


5,000.00 


4.367.82 


2,152.50 


2.152.56 


1,320.00 


1,317.38 


300.00 


300.00 


500.00 


507.58 


1.600.00 


1,637.18 


950.00 


912.96 


3,800.00 


4,.^28.61 


200.00 


202.41 


1.200.00 


1,264.36 


1,725.28 


1,374.25 


90.00 


80.00 


200.00 


201.90 


100.00) 
440.00) 


608.36 


300.00 


289.77 


500.00 


367.64 


300.00 


302.85 


500.00 


438.30 


500.00 


520.47 


600.00 


622.37 


1,311.75 


1,313.11 



Kalance 



^,631.63 $96,708.72 $1,922.91 



54.00 



$84,937.61 $83,718.84 $1,218.77 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 
Cell Block Project 
New Inhalator 
Traffic Lights 
Trading Car.s 
Mobile Radio Units 

PUBLIC LIBRARY: 
Salaries 
Books, etc 
Heat, Lights, etc 
Rent of Branches 
S^^ipplies 
Incidentals 

Balance Jannary 1, 1945 
Fines Collected, 1945 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 

Salary, Sanitary Officer 

Salary, Clerk 

Auto Allowance 

Departmental Expenses 

Milk Inspection : 
Salary, Inspector 
.Auto Allowance 
Incidentals 



MAYOR : 

Salary, Mayor 
Salary, Clerk 
Incidentals 



CITY CLERK: 
Salary, City Clerk 
Salary, Clerks 
Salary, Extra Clerk 
Auto Allowance 
Telephone 
Photostat 
Supplies 



CITY TREASURER: 
Salary, Treasurer 
Salary, Treasurer Trust Funds 
Salary, Clerk 

Clerical Assistance, Trust Funds 
Clerical Assistance, Payrolls, etc 
Surety Bond, Deputy Treasurer 
Supplies and Incidentals 
Surety Bond, Treasurer, Two Years 
Surety Bond, Treasurer Trust Funds, 
Two Years 



Appropriation K.xpetulcd Balance 

$1,1 ()().()() $1,097.31 $2.69 

425.00 425.00 

1,812.58 1,764.62 47.96 

2,500.00 2,500.00 

600.00 600.00 

$18,605.00 $18,528.44 

6,575.00 5,803.52 

3,490.00 2,764.46 

360.00 366.00 

800.00 545.38 

1,270.00 1,417.60 

13.57 

1,740.00 

$32,853.57 $29,425.40 $3,428.17 

$2,100.00 $2,100.00 

1,638.00 1,638.00 

200.00 20O.(X) 

700.00 444.89 $255.11 

2.255.00 2,255.00 

400.00 400.00 

325.00 236.83 88.17 



$7,618.00 


$7,274.72 


$2,000.00 


$200.00 


1,638.0(1 


1,638.00 


30().(K) 


288.79 


$3,938.00 


$2,126.79 


$2,870.00 


$2,870.00 


5,019.00 


5.019.00 


200.00 


162.92 


200.00 


2(X).0O 


75.00 


63.37 


190.00 


117.63 


446.00 


389.98 


$9,000.00 


$8,822.90 


$1,320.00 


$1,320.00 


110.00 


110.00 


1,764.00 


1,764.00 


300.00 


300.00 


1,300.00 


1,011.15 


25.00 


14.39 


225.00 


136.27 


693.75 


693.75 


92.50 









$343.28 



$1,800.00 



11.21 



$1,811.21 



37.08 

TlAl 
72.37 
56.02 



$177.10 



288.85 
10.61 
88.73 



92.50 



$5,830.25 $5,349.56 



$480.69 



CITY SOLICITOR: 
Salary, Solicitor 
Auto Allowance 
Clerk Hire 
Supplies 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
Salary, Sealer 
Auto Allowance 
Supplies 

Contingent Fund 



POLICE COURT : 

Salary, Judge 
Salary, Associate Juc 
Salary, Clerk 



PROBATION OFFICER; 
Salary, Officer 
Clerk and Supplies 
Mileage 



ASSESSORS: 
Salary, Assessors 
Salary, Clerks 
Auto Allowance 
Listing Polls 
Telephone 

Postage and Printing 
Supplies and Furniture 
Contingent Fund 



TAX COLLECTOR: 

Salary, Collector 

Salary, Clerks 

Salary, Extra Clerk 

Collection Delinqiient Taxes 

Contingent Fund 

Printing, Postage and Stationery 

Incidentals 

Collector and Clerks' Bonds 

Mileage 

Real Estate Sale 



REAL ESTATE AGENT 
Salary, Agent 
Advertising 



Appropriation 
$2,100.00 

50.00 

230.00 

80.00 


Expended 

$1,750.00 

17.75 

171.50 

59.45 


Balance 

$350.00 
32.25 
58.50 
20.55 


$2,460.00 

ES: 

$1,100.00 


$1,998.70 

$1,100.00 
200.00 

145.24 


$401.30 


200.00 




100.00) 
75.00) 


$29.76 


$1,475.00 

$1,81)0.00 
500 00 


$1,445.24 

$1,800.00 
500.00 
660.00 


$29.76 




660.00 








$2,960.00 

$1,100.00 
300 00 


$2,960.00 

$1,100.00 
300.00 
185.28 






2O0.(X) 


$14.72 


$1,600.00 

$6,400.00 
4 276 00 


$1,585.28 

$6,774.69 
4,380.18 
400.00 
900.00 
51.96 
403.84 
210.01 


$14.72 




400 00 




1 000 00 




S8 00 




400.00 




400.00 




186.68 










$13,120.68 

$3,075.00 
2 914 00 


$13,120.68 

$3,075.00 

2,914.00 

107.60 

1,015.00 

1.044.78 

87.66 

150.00 

100.00 

197.24 






200 00 




1,000.00) 




15.00) 
1,500.00 
88 65 






ISO 00 




100 00 












$9,042.65 

$330.00 
200.00 


$8,691.28 

$330.00 
35.14 


$351.37 


$164.86 



$530.00 $365.14 $164.86 



ELECTIONS: 
Salary, Elections Ofificers 
Rent Voting Places 
Supplies 
Printing Ballots 


RY 
DAMAGES 

WORKS: 
;et 

ridges 


Appropriation 

$2,900.00 
200.00 
600.00 
400.00 


Expended 

$2,814.00 
100.00 
554.41 
355.00 


Balance 
$86.00 
100.00 

45.59 
45.00 


PRINTING AND STATIONE 

INCIDENTALS AND LAND 
Contingent Fund 

REPAIRS BUILDINGS 

ZONING 

Contingent Fund 

DOG LICENSES 


$4,100.00 

$3,450.00 

; $2,500.00) 
300.00) 

$1,450.00 

$200.00) 
16.69) 


$3,823.41 

$2,555.35 

$2,756.38 

$1,288.77 

$216.69 

$100.65 

$182,194.18) 
4,709.75) 
4,325.83 
36,220.33 

5,987.50 

168.23 
8,497.65 

40,560.40 

200.00 

6,011.67 

10,881.41 

39,380.81 

25,709.75 

$7,951.20 
1,009.31 
393.48 
119.00 
78.17 
483.88 
362.95 


$276.59 
$894.65 

$43.62 

$161.23 




DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
Roads and Bridges 
Transferred to Capital Budg 


$187,146.54 


$242.61 


Office 

Refuse 

Table Garbage 

Contingent Fund 
Storm Sewers 
Engineering 
Lighting Streets 


4,551.00 
36,700.00 
5,800.00) 
187.50) 
1,236.00 
8,700.00 
40,539.04) 
21.36) 
200.00 
7,730.00 
12,776.00 
42,278.90 

21,000.00) 
4,709.75) 

$8,527.00 
1,675.00 
400.00 
150.00 
150.00 
500.00 
400.00 


225.17 
479.67 


1,067.77 
202.35 


Contingent Fund 
Clerk of Board 




Trees 
Parks 
Cemeteries 

CAPITAL BUDGET: 

New Equipment 

Transferred from Roads and B 

PLAYGROUNDS : 

Salaries 

Equipment 

Auto Allowance 

Insurance 

Telephone and Electricity 

Trucking 

Fourth of July Celebration 


1,718.33 
1,894.59 
2,898.09 


$575.80 
665.69 
6.52 
31.00 
71.83 
16.12 
37.05 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 
Purchase Truck 

RECREATION COMMISSION 
Contingent Fund 

CITY HALL AND AUDITORIUM 
Salary, City Messenger 
Salary, Janitors and Overtime 
Fuel 
Lights and Gas 



$11,802.00 $10,397.99 $1,404.01 

$700.00 $700.00 

^450 00) $6,799.67 $100.33 



$1,732.50 


$1,732.50 

2,927.88 

1,744.15 

957:37 




3,534.00 
1,750.00 
1,150.00 


$606.12 

5.85 

192.63 



Insurance 
Supplies 


Appropriation 

915.81 
500.00 


Expended 

895.18 
463.21 


Balance 

20.63 
36.79 


SCHOOLS: 
Union District : 

Balance January 1, 1945 


$9,582.31 

$138,691.99 

364,882.37 

10,774.17 

35,600.00 

5,000.00 

2,730.43 

18.75 


$8,720.29 
$412,266.16 


$862.02 


Amount Raised by District 
Teachers' Pensions 








Cost Living Increase 






Survey School System 
Dog Licenses 
Abial Walker Trust 





















BONDS : 

Amount Raised by District 

INTEREST ON BONDS: 
Balance January 1, 1945 
Amount Raised by District 



PENACOOK DISTRICT: 
Balance January 1, 1945 
Amount raised by District 
Dog Licenses 
Abial Walker Trust 



COMFORT STATION 
Salaries 
Incidentals 
Repairs 
Lights 



SALARY BOARD OF ALDERMEN 
AUDITING 

AIRPORT: 

Salary 

Fuel 

Lights 

Maintenance, Operation and Repairs 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous 

Airport Development 

Contingent Fund 



$557,697.71 $412,266.16 $145,431.55 
$45,000.00 $45,000.00 



$6,999.38 $13,875.06 $6,420.60 
13,296.28 



$20,295.66 


$13,875.06 


$14,973.56 
35,723.06 


$39,000.00 


181.88 




1.25 








$50,879.75 


$39,000.00 


$1,914.00 

165.00 

115.00 

70.00 


$1,974.00 
48.09 
44.67 
84.40 


$2,264.00 
$1,875.00 


$2,151.16 
$1,875.00 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$1,638.00 
450.00 
600.00 
5,500.00 
750.00 
500.00 
500.00 
130.52 


$1,638.00 
371.62 
1,010.48 
5,791.86 
700.70 
442.02 
113.84 







$6,420.60 



$11,879.75 



$112.84 



$10,068.52 $10,068.52 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

New Apron $4,000.00) 

Contingent Fund 1,988.24) 

Land Acquisition 7,000.00) 

Transferred Airport from Bond Account No. 1 26.63) 



$5,988.24 



260.00 $6,766.63 



PLANNING BQARD: 
Salaries : 





Association 
Association 

TIONS: 
944 and 1945 


$2,757.25 
1,827.00 

100.00 

200.00 

67.50 

65.00 
85.00 
45.00 
25.00 
200.00 


$2,757.25 
1,827.00 

93.30 

174.31 

20.92 

29.82 
71.76 
49.19 
15.50 
200.00 




Drafting 
Publishing Reports : 

Typing 

Printing 
Maps and Blueprints 
Supplies : 

Drafting 

Office 














Telephone 

Postage 

Auto '\llo\vance 












CHARITIES: 

Family Welfare Society 
Concord District Nursing 
Penacook District Nursing 

PATRIOTIC APPROPRIA 
Armistice Day 


$5,371.75 

$350.00 
350.00 
200.00 

$100.00 
60.00 

1,000.00) 
130.00) 
400.00 
400.00 


$5,239.05 

$350.00 
350.00 
200.00 

$100.00 
60.00 

1,130.00 

400.00 
400.00 


$132.70 










Band Concerts 




Contingent Fund 
Memorial Day 
Spanish War Veterans 







CARE CITY CLOCK 

BONDS AND NOTES: 
City Hall and Auditorium 
Public Improvement 
Highway 

Departmental Equipment 
Central Fire Station 
Sewers 
Airport 



INTEREST ACCOUNT: 
Bonds and Notes 
Temporary Loans 

TEMPORARY LOAN NOTES: 
Borrowed in Anticipation of Taxes 
Paid in December, 1945 

COUNTY TAX 

1944 REAL ESTATE SOLD FOR 
UNPAID TAXES: 
Resolution No. 1589 

SPECIAL POLL TAX COLLECTED 
1944 and 1945 



$50.00 



$17.23 



$5,000.00 


$5,()00.(M) 


18,000.00 


18.000.00 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


15,000.00 


15,000.00 


4,000.00 


4,000.00 


$52,000.00 


$52,000.00 


$6,213.75 


$6,213.75 


1,750.00 


1,376.67 


$600,000.00 






$600,000.00 




$100,410.23 


$6,570.79 


$6,570.79 




$30,300.00 



$32.77 



P73.33 



CAPITAL BUDGET ITEM FROM 
CONTINGENT FUND: 
Purchase of Land $700.00 $700.00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE POST 

WAR PLANNING $5,000 

Allocated to Fire Board ($1,000.00) $4,000.00 

Federal Grant 6,500.00 6,435.01 74.99 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Contingent Fund $6,000.00 

Allocated to Various Departments $5,944.62 $55.38 



RESUME OF DISBURSEMENTS 

City Departments $644,962.90 

City Poor and Soldiers 14,338.99 

County Poor and Soldiers 22,214.96 

Old Age Assistance 19,118.31 

Hospitalization 1,242.86 

City Notes 600,000.00 

City Bonds 52,000.00 

Interest on Notes and Bonds 7,590.42 

Schools 451,266.10 

School Bonds 45,000.00 

Schools, Interest on Bonds 13,875.00 

County Tax 100,410.23 

Private Charities 900.00 

Patriotic Appropriations 2,090.00 

1944 Real Estate Sold for Taxes 6,570.79 

1944 and 1945 Special Poll Tax 30,300.00 

Airport 10,068.52 

Capital Budget Items 62,435.92 

Post War Planning 6,425.01 

$2,090,810.13 

Relief Department Balances transferred to Treasury 3,353.19 

Balance on hand January 1, 1946 125,572.89 

$2,219,736.21 



WATER WORKS 

Cash on hand January 1, 1945 $19,853.83 

Receipts, 1945 108,730.44 

Expenditures, Maintenance, 1945 $88,587.62 

Interest on Bonds 3,426.25 

Bonds paid 17,000.00 

Cash on hand January 1, 1946 19,570.40 

$128,584.27 $128,584.27 

SANITARY SEWERS: 

Cash on hand January 1, 1945 $8,478.25 

Receipts, 1945 26,644.94 

Maintenance, 1945 $12,330.81 

Cash on hand January 1, 1946 22,792.38 

$35,123.19 $35,123.19 



MUNICIPAL AIRPORT BOND 
ACCOUNT NO. 1: 

Balance January 1, 1945 $20.63 

Transferred to Airport Land 

Acquisition Account ' $26.63 



relip:f department 
city poor: 

Checks drawn in t'avur J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $15,500.00 

Relief City Proper $11,906.18 

Relief, Penacook 1,902.02 



$15,500.00 $13,808.20 
Transferred to City Treasury $1,691.50 

dependent soldiers CITY: 
Checks drawn in favor J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $750.00 

Relief City Proper $530.79 

Transferred to City Treasury $219.21 

COUNTY POOR : 

Checks drawn in favor J. W. .Stanley, 

Acting Overseer ' ' $20,00().()0 

Relief City and Penacook $19,307.33 

Transferred to City Treasury $692.67 

DEPENDENT SOLDIERS COUNTY: 
Checks drawn in favor J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer ' $3,L5().0() 

Relief City and Penacook $2,907.63 

Transferred to City Treasury $242.37 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Checks drawn in favor J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer $19,118.31 

Relief, City Proper $17,258.63 

Relief, Penacook 1,859.68 



$19,118.31 $19,118.31 

HOSPITALIZATION: 

Checks drawn in favor J. W. Stanley, 

Acting Overseer ' $1,7.50.00 

Hospital Care $L242.86 

Transferred to City Treasury $507.14 

RECEIPTS OF CITY FOR TWELVE MONTHS 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1945: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1945 $224,264.23 

City Clerk's Department 3,118.40 

Dog Licenses 3,012.96 

Rent Airport 6,831.30 

Post War Planning, Federal Grant 6,500.00 

Rent, Mrs. Charles Julian 6.00 

Rent, Mrs George Frawley 90.00 

Fire Department 772.7i 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1944 183.18 



Motor Vehicle Permits, 1945 15,247.67 

Municipal Court Fees 3,041.16 
Relief Department: 

Reimbursement Chichester 260.00 

City Old Age Assistance, Gstettner 54.13 

Old Age Assistance, Taylor 43.23 

City Poor Board, J. Price 240.00 

Reimbursement Greenville 42.00 

Reimbursement Merrimack County 21,813.81 

Reimbursement Administration, telephone calls 8.30 

Reimbursement Dunbarton 238.70 

Reimbursement Boscawen 58.25 

Old Age Assistance, Alice and Wm. Hoyt 32.06 

Old Age .Assistance, .Anna Johnson 122.55 

Old Age .Assistance, John Johnson 117.()6 

Reimbursement Hospital Bill, .Ayer 25.00 

City Relief, Wiggin child ' 200.00 

City Poor, reimbursement household articles sold in auction 13.08 

City Relief, Fanny 45.02 

City Relief, Hinds 56.88 

City Relief, Moody 77.69 

Part payment Wood aid 300.00 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Bugbee 14.04 

City Poor, unexpended balance 1,691.80 

County Poor, unexpended balance 692.67 

Dependent Soldiers City, unexpended balance 219.21 

Dependent Soldiers County, unexpended balance 242.37 

Hospitalization, unexpended balance 507.14 

Public Library 1.740.(M) 

Engineering Department 441.65 

Refuse 64.75 

Roads and Bridges 16,831.86 

Trees 13.50 

Lighting Streets 8.04 

Parks 21.66 

Police Department 508.48 

Bicycle Permits 584.00 

Comfort Station 204.06 

Rent Chief Green 300.00 

Rent Auditorium 755.00 

Penacook Street Lighting Precinct 5.36 

Bounty on Hedgehogs 22.50 

Municipal Golf Course 3,142.45 

Municipal Golf Course, gas tax refund 18.40 

Memorial Field 693.64 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers 27.50 

Milk Licenses 288.00 

Playground Department 55.38 

Filing Fees, Citv Primary 14.00 

City Planning Board 201.15 

Land Acquisition Airport Appropriation, 

transfer Airport Bond Account 26.63 

Licenses Convalescent Homes 19.50 

Forest Land Tax from State N. H. . 32.45 

Sale of Wood 15.32 

1942 Redemptions 4.912.27 

1943 Redemptions 4.829.64 

1944 Redemptions 3,081.32 

1939 Taxes 161.10 

1940 Taxes 260.04 

1941 Taxes 297.03 



1942 Taxes 

1943 Taxes 

1944 Taxes 

1945 Taxes 

Real Estate Agent, rents, etc 

State of New Hampshire, interest on dividends 

State of New Hampsliire, Railroad Tax 

State of New Hampsliire, Savings Bank Tax 

Income various funds account Cemeteries 

Income Public Library Trusts and Maintenance Fund 

Income Walker Trust, Schools 



Tax Anticipation Notes 



1,830.46 

1,36579 

105,526.58 

1,066,410.22 

2,314.90 

47,173.27 

12,792.57 

26,055.38 

15,479.94 

11,007.20 

20.00 

$1,619,736.21 
600,000.00 

$2,219,736.21 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk. 



l / '^ 



ORDINANCES 

and 

RES OL UTIONS 

passed 

during the Tear Ending 

December 31^ 1945 



"^ » 



ORDINANCES 

passed during the i ear 
ending December 31, 1945 



An Ordinance amending chapter 52 

OF THE revised ORDINANCES OF THE CITY 
OF CONCORD, KNOWN AS THE CLASSIFI- 
CATION AND COMPENSATION PLAN FOR 
EMPLOYEES OF THE CITY OF CONCORD, 
SALARY, CITY SOLICITOR. 

Be if ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as foUon's: 

Section 1. Amend Part Four — Un- 
classified position salaries, by striking out 
the whole of line eleven under heading 
"Position" which reads "City Solicitor 
$1,200." and insert in i)lace thereof the 
following, "City Solicitor $1,200 - $2,000." 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take effect 
January 1, 1945. 

Passed February 12, 1945. 



An Ordinance relating to the estab- 
lishing OF an addition to the offi- 
cial MAP of the city of CONCORD. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as folloti's: 

WHEREAS the plan identified as 
Major Street Plan, South-Central Sec- 
tion dated January 4, 1944, over the signa- 
tures of the City Engineer and the Chair- 
man and Secretary of the City Planning 
Board was established as an official map 
of that part of the City described thereon 
by the Board of .Aldermen, January 20, 
1944. 

AND WHEREAS the City Planning 
Board has progressed in its master plan- 
ning to the stage of making and adoption 
of an addition to said major street plan 
based on surveys made by the City En- 
gineer and recorded on street layouts 
1-155 and in survey notebooks 188 and 
189 in the office of the City Engineer, and 
has certified a copy of such addition to 
said major street plan to this Board, 

NOW, THEREFORE, the plan iden- 
tified as Major Street Plan, South Cen- 
tral Section dated March 6, 1945, over 
the signatures of the City Engineer and 
the Chairman and Acting Secretary of 
the City Planning Board is established as 



an addition to said official map as estab- 
blished January 20, 1944, meaning to in- 
clude all the area described thereon lying- 
east of the Merrimack River, showing the 
location of the exterior lines of streets 
heretofore existing, laid out and estab- 
lished by law as public streets, and also 
showing the location of the e.xterior lines 
of parks. 

The City Clerk shall execute a certifi- 
cate giving notice that the City has estab- 
lished the addition to the official map 
described above, stating the date of such 
establishment, and he shall file such cer- 
tificate with the Register of Deeds of 
Merrimack County, New Hampshire. The 
City Clerk shall cause a certified copy of 
the above described map to be delivered 
to the Register of Deeds together with 
the certificate of the City Clerk. 

Passed April 9. 1945. 



.■Xn Ordinance relative to the use 

of PROPERTY as A CONVALESCENT OR 
NURSING HOME. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as folloics: 

1. For the purpose of this ordinance 
the term "convalescent or nursing home" 
shall mean real personal or mi.xed prop- 
erty operated for a profit, wherein five or 
more persons are receiving nursing care 
or medical attention for gradual recovery 
of health and strength after disease, 
and/or are receiving in said property 
special attention due to infancy, senility 
or other physical or mental handicaps. 

2. No person, firm, corporation or as- 
sociation shall use real personal or mixed 
property in the City of Concord for con- 
valescent or nursing home purposes, ex- 
cept subject to the conditions set forth 
in the following paragraphs. . 

3. When a license to operate said real 
personal or mixed property for said uses 
has been issued by the Board of Health, 
subject to the approval of the Chief of 
the Fire Department and the Inspector 
of Buildings or their deputies, said li- 
cense shall contain the following condi- 
tions : — 

a. No habitually bedridden person or 
blind person shall occupy a room 
above the grade floor. 

b. There shall be two adequate means 
of exit from all floors above the 
grade floor. 



O 3 



c. All exits shall be lighted from a 
separate electrical circuit. 

d. Corridors shall be kept clear of fur- 
niture, beds, cots or other objects 
which may impede progress through 
said corridors in case of an emer- 
gency. 

e. The use of each room shall be in 
accordance with air space capacity 
as fixed by the law^s of the State of 
New Hampshire. 

f. All persons employed as attendants 
in said property, shall be at least 
twenty-one years of age. 

g. All of said homes shall be open for 
periodic inspection at reasonable 
times by health, fire and building 
officials of the City, who may enter 
said homes for the purpose of carry- 
ing out their municipal duties. 

h. There shall be at least one fire ex- 
tinguisher on each floor. 

i. Licenses shall be renewed annually 

on the first day of April. 
j. The license fee shall be one dollar 

per patient bed. 

4. The license so issued shall be sub- 
ject to revocation upon violation of any 
of the above set forth conditions, or for 
violation of any other ordinance and/or 
State law relative to the use of said 
property. 

5. Any person, firm, corporation or 
association who violates the provisions of 
this ordinance may be punished by a fine 
not exceeding twenty dollars for each day 
of violation. 

6. This ordinance shall not interfere 
with, annul or amend any other ordinance, 
rule, regulation or permit now in efi^ect, 
provided that unless specifically excepted, 
where this ordinance is more stringent, 
it shall control. 

7. It is the intent of the Mayor and 
Board of Aldermen that each separate 
provision hereof shall be deemed inde- 
pendent of all other provisions herein and 
if any provision herein shall be declared 
invalid, all other provisions not affected 
by said invalid portion, shall remain valid 
and enforceable. 

8. This ordinance shall take effect 
upon its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1945. 



An Ordinance amending chapter 48 
OF the revised ordinances of the 

CITY OF CONCORD. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coiieord, as f(dlows: 

Section 1. Amend the Zoning Map 
of the City of Concord by transferring 
or converting the following described area 
into a commercial district : 

Beginning at a point in the northerly 
line of the commercial district at a point 
approximately 160 feet easterly of the 
intersection of said northerly line of the 
commercial district with the easterly line 
of North Main Street, which point of in- 
tersection, as appears from said Zoning 
Map, is approximately 40 feet northerly 
of the northerly line of Ferry Street : 
thence running northerly parallel with 
and 160 feet easterly of the easterly line 
of North Main Street approximately 175 
feet to the southerly line of land now or 
formerly of Olivia B. Abbott ; thence in 
an easterly direction along the southerly 
line of said Abbott land to the point 
where said southerly line intersects the 
boundary line between the business and 
industrial districts, as shown on said 
Zoning Map ; thence southerly along said 
boundary line approximately 160 feet to 
the northerly line of said commercial dis- 
trict ; thence westerly along the northerly 
line of said commercial district to the 
point begun at. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 
Passed June 19, 1945. 



An Ordinance in amendment of sec- 
tion IV, CHAPTER XLIII OF THE RE- 
VISED ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF CON- 
CORD. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follo-ws: 

Section 1. Amend Section 4 of Chap- 
ter XLIII of the Revised Ordinances of 
the City of Concord, by striking out the 
whole of said Section and inserting the 
following : 

Sect. 4. The Offices of all City De- 
partment in City Hall and the Relief 
Office shall be open continuously from 
nine o'clock in the morning until five 
o'clock in the afternoon of each day ex- 
cepting Sundays, Holidays and Saturdays. 
On Saturday such offices shall be kept 
open from nine o'clock in the morning 



O 4 



until twelve at ikmhi, except during the 
months of July and August when such 
offices shall be open with a skeleton staff ; 
except that the tax collector's office shall 
be kept open on Saturdays including 
afternoon and evening preceding the last 
day on which taxes can be paid with the 
discount. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 
Passed July 13, 1945. 



An ORDINANtK AMKNMIINC; fHAt'TKR 4S OK 
THE REVISED ORDINANfES OK THE CITY 
OF CONCORD. 

Be if ordained by the Hoard of Aldcriiicii 
of the City of Concord, as follon's: 

Section 1. Amend the Zoning Map of 
the City of Concord by transferring or 
converting the following described area 
into a commercial district : 

Beginning at a point in the center of 
North Main Street forty feet northerly 
of the northerly line of Ferry Street, said 
point being the north-west corner of the 
commercial district as shown on the 
Zoning Map: thence northerly by the 
center line of North Main Street to a 
point where said line intersects the center 
line of Franklin Street extended easterly ; 
thence easterly at a right angle to North 
A'lain Street to a point where said line 
intersects the industrial district, saicT 
point being in the center of the roadbed 
of the Northern Division of the Boston 
and Maine Railroad : thence southerly by 
the boundary of said industrial district to 
a point where said line intersects the 
northerly line of the commercial district : 
thence westerly, southerly and westerly 
bv the boundary of said commercial dis- 
trict to the i)oint of beginning. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 
Passed Aug. 13, 1945. 



Amend Section 2 of Chapter 00 of the 
Ordinance on Attendance and Leave by 
adding a new sentence at the end of said 
section, the same to read as follows : 

"In the application of this section, em- 
ployees of the police and fire departments 
who, vmder ordinary working conditions, 
gain days off by working a certain num- 
ber of days, shall not be entitled to cre- 
dits for days off during the period of time 
they are taking their annual leave." 

Passed Aug. 13, 1945. 



An Ordinance amendinc; section 2 ok 
chapter 60 OK the ordinance on at- 
tendance AND LEAVE. 

Be if ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of fhe City of Concord, as folhncs: 



An Ordinance amending section 3, 
chapter 50 of the revised ordinances 
of the city of condord relativf, to 

TAXICABS. 

Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follou's: 

Section 1. Amend Section 3, Chapter 
50 of the Revised Ordinances of the City 
of Concord, by adding after the words 
"$15.00" the following: "for a full calen- 
dar year, except all licenses granted 
between July first and October first shall 
be at half rate," so that said section as 
amended shall read as follows : 

Sect. 3. Applications for taxicab li- 
censes under this ordinance shall be made 
upon forms provided by the City Clerk, 
who shall keep a record of all applications 
and licenses granted. All information re- 
(juired by the Police Board shall be com- 
pletely furnished by the Applicant, and 
all licenses shall be numbered in order as 
granted. The fee for each taxicab licensed 
hereunder shall be $15.00 for a full calen- 
dar year, except all licenses granted 
between July first and October first shall 
be at half rate, and shall be paid to the 
City Clerk at the time such license is 
issued. No license shall be sold, assigned, 
or transferred, without the consent in 
writing of said Police Board. Fvery li- 
cense granted hereunder shall apply only 
to the particular taxicab designated there- 
in by its numl)er or otherwise made cer- 
tain. 

Sect. 2. This ordinance shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed August 30, 1945. 



O 5 



RESOLUTIONS 

passed during the Year 
ending December 31^ 1945 

Resoi-I'tion authorizing the finance 
committee to arrange for an audit 
of accounts and books of city de- 
partments for the year 1944. 

Rcsoh'cd by flic Board of Aldcnncn 
of the City of Concord, as folUm's: 

That the Finance Committee be and 
hereby is authorized to employ Certified 
Public Accounts to audit the accounts and 
books of the City Departments and Com- 
missions for the year 1944. 

That said audit be at the discretion of 
and under the control of said Finance 
Committee. 

Passed January 8, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to a temporary 

LOAN not exceeding SEVEN HITNDRED 
THOUSAND DOLLARS ($700,000). 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as folUra's: 

That the Committee on Finance is here- 
by authorized to borrow on the credit of 
the city the sum not to exceed seven hun- 
dred thousand dollars ($700.000. ) for ex- 
penses in anticipation of taxes for the 
municipal year of 1945 and to issue notes 
of the City therefor upon such terms and 
for such amounts as the committee shall 
determine. The said loan is to be payable 
from the taxes for the said municipal 
year, and the said Committee on Finance 
is hereby authorized to refund all or any 
of the said notes at their maturity ; pro- 
vided, however, that the refunding notes 
shall be payable within one year after the 
date of the incurrence of the debt repre- 
ented by the note or notes refunded. 

Passed January 8, 1945 



Resolution appropriating earnings to 

SEVERAL departments. 

Kesoh'cd by the Board of Aldcnucn 
of the City of Concord, as f(dloii's: 

That the following amounts be liereby 
appropriated to the enumerated Depart- 
ments, the same being from the Depart- 
ment earnings for the year 1944 : 



Engineering 
Lighting Streets 
Recreation 
Refuse Collectit)n 
Roads and Bridges 
Passed January 8, 1945. 



; 3.33 

7.48 

2,098.57 

\\4.()7 

13.962.53 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 

EXECUTE A quitclaim DEED TO FRANCIS 
J. MULLIN. 

Resoh'cd by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follozvs: 

That tlie Mayor be and hereby is 
authorized to execute and deliver a quit- 
claim deed in the name and on behalf of 
the City, to Francis J. Mullin, a certain 
tract of land bounded on the west by 
South Street ; on the east by land of 
Francis J. Mullin and on the south by 
Carter Street. 

TVie consideration for this conveyance 
being in the sum of one dollar. ($1.()0). 

Passed January 8, 1945. 



Resolution appropriating money for 
maude crowley. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follozvs: 

That the sum of one hundred and 
seventy-five ($175) dollars be and here- 
by is appropriated out of the Incidental 
and Land Damage Budget for the pay- 
ment of said amount to Maude Crowley 
for settlement of a legal action against 
the City of Concord, pending in the 
Superior Court of Merrimack County. 

Passed February 12, 1945. 



Resolution relative to the purchase 

OF LAND from MRS. J. E. NORMANDEAU, 
AGENT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follozvs: 

That the ofifer of Mrs. J. E. Norman- 
deau. Agent, to sell to the City of Con- 
cord a strip of land at the junction of 
Airport Road and Daniel Webster High- 
way for the sum of four hundred dollars 
($400) be accepted, and same be charged 
to the appropriation "Incidentals and 
Land Damages". 

Passed February 12, 1945. 



R 6 



Resolution in rklation to thk bal- 
ance IN the airport appropriation 

AS SHOWN IN the FINANCIAL STATE- 
MENT FOR THE YEAR 1944. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldeniicn 
of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the sum of $5,689.69 as shown 
in the financial statement of the City of 
Concord for the year 1944 in the Airport 
Appropriation he not credited to the 1945 
Airport Account and in the future the 
practice of crediting the Airport Account 
with any balance at the end of the muni- 
cipal year, he dispensed with. 

Passed February 12, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to insurance 
carried by the city of concord. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the City Planning Board be and 
hereby is authorized to make a study of 
all insurance carried on City of Concord 
Property and make their report to the 
Board of Aldermen, together with such 
recommendations as may be desired, re- 
lative to the passage by the New Hamp- 
shire Legislature of an enabling act, per- 
mitting the City of Concord to establish 
a sinking fund, covering their own in- 
surance. 

Passed February 12, 1945. 



Resolution fixing and determining the 

AMOUNT of MONEY TO BE RAISED FOR 
THE FINANCIAL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 

31, 1945. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follon's: 

Section 1. That there shall be raised, 
and there is hereby ordered to be raised 
on the polls and ratable estates within 
the city the sum of five hundred eight 
thousand six hundred sixty-one dollars 
($508,661), which together with the 
balance on hand January 1, 1945, which 
is approximately one liundred fifty-eight 
thousand four hundred twenty-six dollars 
($158,426), and the sums which may be 
raised on railroads and from other 
sources, approximately one hundred 
ninety-two thousand nine hundred twenty- 
seven dollars ($192,927), is hereby ap- 
propriated to defray the necessary ex- 
penses and charges of the City for the 



ensuing financial year ; an estimate of 

said expenses and charges is as follows : 

City Poor 

Administration $ 5,()()0.()() 

Relief 11,000.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City .... 700.00 

Hospitalization 4,000.00 

Old Age Assistance 17,000.00 

$ 37,700.00 

City Poor. Ward 1 

Administration $ 835.00 

Relief 2,100.00 

Dependent Soldiers, City .... 200.00 

Old Age Assistance 2,000.00 

$ 5,135.00 

Bonds and Notes 

(Does not include School District or 

Water Works) 

City Hall and Auditorium .... $ 5,000.00 

Public Improvement 18,000.00 

Highway 5,000.00 

Departmental Equipment .... 4,000.00 

Central Fire Station 1,000.00 

Sewers 15,000.00 

Airport 4,000.00 

$ 52,000.00 

Interest Account 

Bonds and Notes $ 6,213.75 

Temporary Loaris 1,750.00 

$ 7,963.75 

City Hall and Auditorium 

Salary, City Messenger $ 1,650.00 

Salary, Janitors & overtime 3,240.00 

Fuel ' 1,750.00 

Lights and Gas 1,150.00 

Insurance 915.81 

Supplies 500.00 

Wartime Bonus 376.50 

$ 9,582.31 

Mayor 

Salary, Mayor $ 2,(K)0.00 

Salary, Secretary 1,560.00 

Incidentals 300.00 

Wartime Bonus 78.00 

$ 3.938.00 

Citx Clerk 

Salary, City Clerk $ 2,800.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,720.00 



R 7 



Salan-, Extra Clerk 2()l).()0 

Auto Allowance 2()().()() 

Telephone 75.00 

Photostat 190.00 

Supplies 446.00 

Wartime Bonus 369.00 

$ 9,000.00 

City Solicitor 

Salary, City Solicitor $ 2,000.00 

Auto Allowance 50.00 

Clerk Hire 230.00 

Supplies 80.00 

Wartime Bonus 100.00 

$ 2,400.00 

City I'rcasitrcr 

Salary, City Treasurer $ 1,200.00 

Salary, Treasurer of Trust 

Funds 100.00 

Salary, Clerk 1,680.00 

Clerical Assistance Trust 

Funds 300.00 

Clerical Assistance Payrolls, 

etc ". 1.300.00 

Surety Bond, Deputy Trea- 
surer .^ ; 25.00 

Supplies and Incidentals .... 225.00 

Wartime Bonus 214.00 

Surety Bond, Treasurer 2 

years 693.75 

Surety Fond, Treasurer 

Trust Funds 2 years 92.50 

$ 5,830.25 

Sealer of IVeic/hfs and Measures 

Salary, Sealer $ 1,000.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

Supplies 100.00 

Wartime Bonus lOO.OO 

$ 1,400.00 

Police Court 

Salary, JudRe $ 1,800.00 

Salary, Associate Judge .... 500.00 

Salary, Clerk .' 600.00 

Wartime Bonus, Clerk 60.00 

$ 2,960.00 

Probation Officer 

Salary, Officer $ 1,000.00 

Clerk and Supplies 300.00 

Mileage 200.00 

Wartime Bonus 100.00 

$ 1,600.00 

R 8 



Assessors 

Salary, Assessors $ 6,400.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,120.00 

.\uto Allowance 400.00 

Listing Polls 1,000.00 

Telephone 58.00 

Postage and Printing 400.00 

Supplies and Furniture 400.00 

Wartime Bonus, Clerks 156.00 

$ 12,934.00 
fax Collector 

Salary, Collector $ 3,000.00 

Salary, Clerks 2,720.00 

Salary, Extra Clerk 200.00 

Collections, Delinquent Taxes 1,000.00 
Printing, Postage and Sta- 
tionery 1,500.00 

Incidentals 88.65 

Collector and Clerks' Bonds 150.00 

Mileage 100.00 

Wartime Bonus 269.00 

$ 9,027.65 

Real Estate Af/eiit 

Salary, Agent $ 300.00 

Wartime Bonus 30.00 

.Adyertising, etc 200.00 

$ 530.00 

FJeetions 

Salaries, Election Officers .... $ 2,900.00 

Rent Voting Places 200.00 

Supplies 600.00 

Printing Ballots 400.00 

$ 4,100.00 

Fire Department 

Salary, Chief $ 3,300.00 

Salaries 66,096.86 

Call Salaries 12,180.00 

Fire Alarm 960.00 

Fire Inspection 100.00 

Incidentals 375.00 

Repairs, Roof Engine 3 1,700.00 

Repairs. Buildings 800.00 

Fuel 2,400.00 

Lights 800.00 

Upkeep, Ecpiipment 2,000.00 

Telephones 725.00 

Insurance 2.100.00 

New Equipment 600.00 

Hose 1,000.00 

Supplies and Laundry 600.00 

Snow Removal 250.00 



Retirenicnt Vund (S"2.73 

Wartinif Bonus 1,772.04 

$ 98,03 l.(i3 

Board of Health 

Salary, Sanitary Ofticcr .... $ i.OOO.Od 

Salary, Clerk 1,560.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

Departmental E.xpen.se 700.00 

Wartime Bonus 178.00 

.1////.' I lis [section 

Salary, Inspector $ 2,200.00 

Auto Allowance 400.00 

Incidentals 325.00 

Wartime Bonus 55.00 

$ 7.018.00 

Dcpartmoit of Public Works 

Roads and Bridges $187,140.54 

Office 4,551.00 

Refuse 36,700.00 

Table Garbage 5,800.00 

Storm Sewers _ 1,230.(!0 

Engineering 8,700.00 

Ligbting Streets 40,539.04 

Clerk of Board 200.00 

Trees 7,730.00 

$292,602.58 

Parks 12.776.00 

Cemeteries 42.278.90 

$347,057.48 

Playj/roimds 

Salaries $ 8,474.5(1 

Equipment 1,075.0() 

Auto Allowance 400.01) 

Insurance 150.00 

Telepbone and P'lectricity .... 150.00 

Trucking .' 500.00 

4tb July or Patriotic Cele- 
brations 400.00 

Wartime Bonus 52.50 

$ 11,802.01) 

C iVv Plaiiiiiiii/ Board 
Salaries : 

Researcb $ 2,o9').0() 

Drafting 1,740.00 

Publishing Reports : 

Typing 100.00 

Printing 200.00 

Maps and Blueprints 67.50 



Supplies : 

Drafting 05.00 

Office 85.00 

Telepbone 45.00 

Po.stage 25.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 

^\'artime Bonus 154.25 

$ 5,371.75 

Public Library 

Salaries $ 18,605.00 

Books, etc 6,575.00 

Heat, Light, etc 3,490.00 

Rent of Branches 300.00 

Supplies 800.00 

Incidentals, etc 1,270.00 

$ 31,100.00 
Police P)cfyartiiiciif 

Salaries : 

Chief $ 3,300.00 

Deputy Chief 2,800.00 

Captain 2.500.00 

Officers : 

Inspector ( 1 ) 2,400.00 

Sergeant ( 1 ) 2„300.O() 

Tliird Year Patrolmen 

(12) 25.200.00 

Second Year Patrolmen 

(3) f).128.33 

First Year Patrolmen (4) 7,020.00 

Duration Patrolmen (4) 7,592.00 

Special Officers 5,000.00 

Bureau of Records 2,100.00 

lanitor 1,200.00 

\\'artime Bonus 1,680.25 

Car expense $300.00 

Repairs 500.00 

Fuel 1,600.00 

Eights 950.00 

Auto and Auto Supplies .... 3,800.00 

Marking Streets 2()().()() 

Telephone, Gamewell and 

Radio 1.200.00 

Insurance 1,725.28 

Keeping Prisoners 90.00 

Printing 200.00 

Traffic Eights and Suoplies lOO.OO 
Office Supplies and Ecpiip- 

ment 300.00 

Training Program 500.00 

Cleaning. Toilet Supplies 

and Equipment 300.00 

Bicycle Plates and Forms .... 500.00 

Police Equipment 500.00 

Incidentals 600.0(j 

Retirement Fund 1,311.75 

$ 84.497.61 
R 9 



Comfort Station 

Salaries 

Incidentals 

Repairs 

Lighting 

Wartime Bonus 

Recreation Commission 

Zoning Board of Adujstment 

.lirport 

Salary 

Fuel 

Lights 

Maintenance, Operation and 

Repairs 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous 

Airport Development 

Wartime Bonus 



$ 1,74().()() 

1()5.0() 

115.00 

70.00 

174.00 

$ 2,2r)4.0() 

$ ().450.0O 
200.00 



$ 1,500.00 
450.00 
()()0.()() 

5,500.00 

750.00 

500.00 

500.00 

78.00 

$ 9,938.00 



Misirlliiurous 

Repairs, Buildings $ 1,450.00 

Clock, Care of 50.00 

Incidentals and Land 

Damages 2,500.00 

Printing and Stationery .... 3,450.00 

Salary, Board of Aldermen 1,.S75.00 

Family Welfare Society .... 350.00 
Concord District Nursing 

Association 350.00 

Penacook District Nursing 

Association 200.00 

Memorial Dav 400.00 

Armistice Day 100.00 

Armistice D^v. Penacook, 

1944 and 1945 60.00 

Spanish War Veterans 400.00 

Band Concerts 1.(100.00 

Auditing I.OOd.OO 

Finance Committee Contin- 
gent Fund 6,000.00 

Finance Committee, Post 

War Planning 5,000.00 

Capital BrixiKT Items 

Fire Department 

Ladder Truck $ Ui.OOO.OO 

Pumping Engine 9,000.00 

$ 25,000.00 
Department of I'lthlie Works 

Equipment $ 21,000.00 



Playgrounds 
Truck, Purchase $ 700.00 

I'oliee I'epartment 

Cell Block Project $ 1,100.00 

New Inhalator 425.00 

Traffic Lights 1,812.58 

Trading Cars 2,500.00 

Alobile Radio Units 600.00 

$ 6,437.58 

Airport 

New Apron 4,000.00 

Land .\cquisition 7,000.00 

$ 11,000.00 

ShXT. 2. In addition to the foregoing 
there is appropriated for the cemeteries 
vi the City one-third of the income from 
the sale of lots and the income derived 
for the care of lots and grading, which 
sums shall be deposited by the Superin- 
tendent or others receiving them in the 
City Treasury. The care of lots for 
which the City holds trust funds shall be 
paid from the money appropriated for the 
care of cemeteries, and so much of the 
income of these trust funds as may be 
thus expended shall be deposited in the 
city treasury at the close of the year, and 
the remainder in each instance credited 
to the individual fund. 

Sect. 3. This resolution shall take 
effect upon its passage. 

Passed Februarv 20. 1945. 



Resolution appropriating money to 

J'AV the state of new HAMPSHIRE FOR 
I'OLL TA.XES COLLECTED DURING THE 
YEAR 1944 IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAP- 
TER 201, LAWS OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 
1943. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Coneord. as f(dlows: 

That the sum of Five hundred Forty- 
Six Dollars ($546.00) be, and hereby 'is 
appropriated out of money in the Trea- 
sury received during the year 1944, being 
the three dollar ($3.00) Special per capita 
poll tax levy, in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 201, Laws of New- 
Hampshire, 1943, same to be paid to the 
Treasurer of the State of New Hamp- 
shire in payment of one hundred eighty- 



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two (182) additional poll taxes received 
during the fiscal vear ending December 
31. 1944. 

Passed March 12. 1945. 



Resolution in relation to the pur- 
chase OF the COGSWELL SCHOOL LOT 
FROM THE UNION SCHOOL DISTRICT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldcnncn 
of the City of Concord, as follozvs: 

That the City of Concord purchase 
from the Concord Union School District, 
the Cogswell School lot for the sum of 
$1.00 in accordance with their offer dated 
March 6, 1945, in which they state, they 
have no further use for same and under- 
stand the City of Concord desires to own 
it for the purpose of erecting a fire station 
and offer said lot for the sum of $1.00 
upon the condition that if the City ever 
sold the property into private ownership 
the Concord Union School District would 
receive the sale price of same. 

Said sum of $1.00 the purchase price to 
be taken from the appropriation "Inci- 
dentals and Land Damages. 

Passed March 12, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to lichting 

MEMORIAL field. 

Resoh'cd by the Board of Alderiiieii 
of the City of Concord, as follo-a's: 

That the City Planning Pioard be and 
hereby is authorized to make a study of 
the cost of the installation of liglits at 
Memorial Field, for night football and 
entertainments. 

Passed April 9, 1945. 



Resolution appropriating money to 

PAY THE state OF NEW HAMPSHIRE FOR 
POLL TAXES COLLECTED DURING THE 
YEAR 1944 IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAP- 
TER 201, LAWS OF NEW HAMPSHIRE 
1943. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follozvs: 

That tlic sum of Thirty-nine hundred 
sixty-three dollars ($3,963.) be, and here- 
by is appropriated out of money in the 
Treasury received account the year 1944, 
being the three dollars ($3.00) Special 
per capita poll tax levy, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter 201, Laws 



of New Hampshire, 1943, same to be paid 
to the Treasurer of the State of New 
Hampshire in payment of thirteen hun- 
dred twenty-one (1321) additional poll 
taxes received account the fiscal year 
ending December 31, 1944. 

Passed .'Kpril 9, 1945. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor to 

E.XECUTE IN the NAME AND ON BEHALF 
OF THE CITY, A LEASE OF CERTAIN PRE- 
MISES FOR BATHING AND RECREATIONAL 
PURPOSES AT BROKEN BRIDGE SO-CALLED, 

Resolved by the Board of Aldernioi 
of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

1. Tlie Mayor is hereby auhtorized to 
execute in the name and on behalf of the 
City of Concord a lease of certain pre- 
mises from Ralph W. and Evelyn Scott, 
on the northerly bank of the Soucook 
River, bounded and described as fol- 
lows — : 

Beginning on tlie westerly line of 
Broken Bridge at the Soucook River ; 
thence northerly by the westerly line of 
Broken Bridge Road a distance of 350 
feet more or less ; thence westerly at right 
angles with said road through land of 
Evelyn and Ralph W. Scott a distance 
of 530 feet more or less to the easterly 
line of land of Jacob E. Chickering ; 
thence southerly by the easterly line of 
land of Jacob E. Chickering a distance of 
425 feet more or less to the Soucook 
River ; thence easterly up the Soucook 
River a distance of 675 feet more or less 
to point of beginning. Containing 4.7 
acres more or less. 

2. The said premises to be placed un- 
der the control of the Committee on Play- 
grounds and to be used for bathing pur- 
poses at said River. 

3. The said lease to be for a period 
beginning June 18, 1945 to and includ- 
ing September 3, 1945. The total rent 
for said period to be in the sum of 
Seventy-five Dollars ($75.00). 

4. The said city to have tlie right to 
complete occupancy of said premises only 
for such period of time as there is a duly 
authorized employee of the city at said 
bathing area, nresent and engaged in 
carrying out his/her duties within the 
scope of his/her employment. 

5. This resolution to take effect uikju 
its passage. 

Passed June 11, 1945. 



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Resolution providinc; for a rktirement 

SYSTEM for city EMI'I.OYEES KNOWN AS 
HOUSE BILL NO. 201. 

Rrsnl'i'cd hy flic Ihnird of .Udcniioi 
of the City of Concord, as folloi^'s: 

That the Mayor W herohy authorized 
t(i appoint a committee consisting of one 
member of the Board of Aldermen, the 
City SoHcitor, the head of one Depart- 
ment, one member of the City Employees" 
Council, and .Attorney Donald G. Matson, 
to make a study and report as to the 
advisability of the city paticipating in the 
retirement benefits of House Bill No. 201. 

Passed June 11, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to a petition 
for the laying out of a street 
northerly from park street. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldeniieu 
of the City of Concord, as follon's: 

That the petition of Fred W. Lang for 
laying out of a street beginning at a gas 
pipe in the north line of Park Street just 
westerly of the Lincoln House, (so- 
called) which was considered at a hearing 
of the Board of Aldermen, December 18, 
1933, be referred to the City Planning 
Board for a study and report back to the 
Board of .\ldermen. 

Passed August 13, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to a proposkii 
lake development project. 

Resolved hy the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follo-n's: 

WHEREAS the City Planning Board, 
as part of its master plan for the rlevelop- 
ment of the City of Concord, has recom- 
mended to the Board of Aldermen that the 
water areas of Little Turkey and Great 
Turkey Ponds be enlarged by the con- 
struction of a dam across the Turkey 
River west of Saint Paul's School, there- 
by creating one continuous lake in the 
south-western section of Concord, and 

WHERE.AS the construction of such 
a lake would benefit the welfare of the 
citizens of the City of Concord by pro- 
viding an auxiliary water supply, flood 
control, recereational facilities and other 
municipal uses, now therefore, be it 

RESOLVED that the City Planning 
Board be and hereby is authorized and 



empowered on behalf of the City of Con- 
cord to employ competent engineers for 
the purpose of making engineering 
studies, plans and specifications of the 
proposed lake development project, and 
be it 

RESOLVED that the City Planning 
Board be and hereby is authorized and 
empowered on behalf of the City of Con- 
cord to file an ai)plication with the Bureau 
of Community Facilities of the Federal 
Works Agency for the purpose of secur- 
ing financial assistance from said agency 
under the War Mobilization and Recon- 
version Act of 1944 in the i)lan i)repara- 
tion of said project, and he it 

RESOLVED that the engineering 
costs incurred in excess of such funds as 
may be made available to the City of 
Concord by the Federal Works Agency 
in the preparation of plans for said pro- 
ject shall be paid out of such funds and 
in such manner as the Finance Committee 
shall recommend, and in the event that 
any such engineering charges remain out- 
standing at the end of the year, they shall 
be included as a capital budget item in the 
1946 municipal budget, and be it. further 

RESOLVED that such funds as may 
be paid to the City of Concord by the 
Federal Works Agency shall be credited 
to the Finance Committee, Post War 
Planning appropriation, any 1945 balance 
of which shall be transferred to said 
account for 1946. 

Passed August 30, 1<M5. 



Resolution appropriating seven hun- 
dred fifty dollars f'or the purchasf, 
of cf'.rtain tracts 0*^ land with tlie 
buildings thereon on the west side 
of sawyer street. 

Resolved hy the Board of . Udernicu 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the sum of Seven hundred fifty 
dollars ($75().()()) be and hereby is ap- 
l)rr)priated out of the account of Inci- 
dentals and Land Damages for the pur- 
chase of certain tracts of land, with the 
buildings thereon on the West side of 
Sawyer Street, from Cornelius, Mar- 
suerite A. and Agnes C. Schoolcraft of 
Pearl River, Ccninty of Rockland, State 
of New York, bounded and described as 
follows : 

A certain tract of land, and being the 
property deeded by David F. Dudley, 



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Administrator of the Estate of Mildred 
E. Royce of Concord, and located on the 
West side of Sawyer Street in said Con- 
cord, bounded as follows : 

Beginning at the Northeast corner of 
the tract at an iron pin driven in the 
ground at Southeast corner of land of 
Hiram Brown: thence West by Brown's 
land 132 feet to land now or formerly of 
the National State Capital Bank ; thence 
Southerly by said E^ank's land 132 feet ; 
thence Easterly by land now or formerly 
of William E. Sleeper, through line to 
Sawyer Street at a ix)int indicated by a 
mark on a stone ; thence North by said 
Sawyer Street 132 feet to point begun at ; 
being the premises described in Deed of 
James C. Smith to Mildred E. Sanville, 
dated May 1, 1924 and recorded in Merri- 
mack Ccjuntv Registry, Book 468, Page 
475. 

Also another tract of land adjoining 
the above tract of land, bounded as fol- 
lows : Beginning at an iron pin on the 
West line of said Sawyer Street, 68 feet 
South of the Southeasterly corner of land 
of said James C. Smith; thence Westerly 
by Smith's Southerly bound 100 feet to 
land of said Royce ; thence South parallel 
with West line of Sawyer Street to the 
gravelled road on the South side of said 
tract at a point near the North boundary 
line of Blossom Hill Cemetery ; thence 
Northerly by Sawyer Street to point be- 
gun at ; meaning to describe the same 
premises described in Deed of Ernest S. 
Royce to David F. Dudley, dated August 
10, 1927, and recorded in Merrimack 
County Registry, Book 478, Page 473. 
.Also recorded in Vol. 560, Page 303 of 
Merrimack Countv Records. Also re- 
corded in Book 600, Page 19. 

Passed September 10, 1945. 



Resolution transferring balance in 
municipal airport bond account no. 

1 TO CAPITAL BUDGET ITEM "lAND AC- 
QUISITION" IN AIRPORT APPROPRIATION. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follon's: 

That the sum of twenty-six and 63/100 
dollars ($26.63) the balance in the muni- 
cipal airport bond account, No. 1, be 
hereby transferred to the capital budget 
item, land acquisition, in the airport ap- 
propriation, 1945. 

Passed September 10, 1945. 



Resolution appropriating money to 

PAY FOR real estate SOLD TO THE CITY 
OF CONCORD FOR L'NPAin TAXES FOR THE 
YEAR 1944. 

Resoli'cd by the Board of .llderinen 
of the City of Concord, as folloi^'s: 

That the sum of sixty-five hundred 
seventy dollars and seventy-nine cents 
($6,570.79) be appropriated to pay the 
amount due to the City of Concord for 
Real Estate purchased at the Tax Col- 
lector's sale, September 28, 1945, of Real 
Estate, for unpaid taxes for the year 1944. 

Passed October 8, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to the 1945 
CITY report. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the City Planning Board be 
authorized to prepare and have printed 
in due time the 1945 City Reixjrt and that 
they be authorized to procure photographs 
for the said City Report and said pho- 
tographs to be paid from the 1945 ap- 
propriation of printing and stationery. 

Passed October 8, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to the proposed 

LAKE development PROJECT. 

Resolved by the Hoard of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Chairman of the City Plan- 
ning Board be and hereby is authorized 
and empowered on behalf of the City of 
Concord to enter into an agreement with 
the United States of America for an ad- 
vance of $13,000.(J0 for the plan prepara- 
tion of tlie proposed lake development 
project. 

Passed October 8, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to the proposed 

LAKE development PROJECT. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the City Planning Board in con- 
nection with the proposed lake develop- 
ment project be and hereby is authorized 
and empowered to employ such special 
legal counsel as in the judgment of said 



RI3 



board may be required to progress tbe 
orderly development of said project and 
that the expense involved shall be charge- 
able to the Finance Committee, Post War 
Planning appropriation. 
Passed October 8, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to a vote of 
the board of aldermen. taken de- 
CEMBER 18, 1933. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldennen 
(-'f the City of Concord, as folloin's: 

WHEREAS on March 4, 1933 Fred 
W. Lang, Commissioner of Public Works 
for the City of Concord, petitioned the 
Alayor and Board of Aldermen of the 
City of Concord for the layout of a street 
in said City, beginning at : — 
"a gas pipe in the north line of Park 
Street just westerly of the Lincoln House, 
so-called, approximately 174.4 feet wester- 
ly of the westerly line of Main Street at 
a stone bound; thence north 4°23' west 
169.7 feet to a stone bound ; thence north 
4°03' west 54.25 feet to a stone bound at 
the southwest corner of the property of 
Nellie A. Kelley ; thence north 4°U3' west 
1U4.U0 feet, more or less, along the wester- 
ly line of the property of Nellie A. Kelley 
to a stone bound in the southerly line of 
Center Street. The above described line 
to be the easterly line of the proposed 
Street, and the Street to be 12 feet in 
width its entire length." and that sub- 
sequent to the filing of the Petition 
waivers of certain interests were secured 
from abutting property owners, and on 
the 18th day of December 1933 the Mayor 
and Board of Aldermen voted to accept 
the proposed layout when in a condition 
satisfactory to the Commissioner of 
Public Works : 

AND WHEREAS no legal procedure 
has been completed for the purpose of lay- 
ing out of said street in the location given 
above, and it further appearing that the 
conditions required by the vote of the 
Board of Aldermen taken on Dec. 18, 
1933 have never been fulfilled ; and as 
there appears to be no present need or 
requirement for a public street in this 
location ; 

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RE- 
SOLVED : That the vote of the Board 
of Aldermen taken on Dec. 18, 1933 in 
relation to the laying out of said proposed 

street be and hereby is recinded. 

Passed October 8, 1945. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor 
TO execute a quitclaim deed to 

MARIA KONTOS. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldennen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Mayor be and hereby is auth- 
orized to execute a quitclaim deed to 
Maria Kontos of a certain tract of land, 
situated on the South Pembroke Road 
for one dollar and other valuable con- 
sideration, described as follows : begin- 
ning on the east corner of the lot at a 
telephone pole ; thence running north 
eight (8) rods on the South Pembroke 
Road; thence west twenty (20) rods; 
thence south eight (8) rods; thence east 
twenty (20) rods to the place of begin- 
ning, containing one ( 1 ) acre more or 
less. Meaning and intending to describe 
the second tract in deed of Mary L. 
Blackwood to Maria Kontos, dated Sep- 
tember 30, 1944, recorded in Merrimack 
County Registry, Book 610, Page 478. 

Passed Oct. 8, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to a public 

PARKING lot. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
"/ the City of Concord, as follozvs: 

That the City Planning Board be re- 
quested to make a study and report to the 
Board of Aldermen their findings, as to 
the feasibility of establishing a public 
parking lot in the rear of the store of 
Harry G. Emmons and extending to the 
tracks of the Boston and Maine Railroad. 

Passed November 13, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to the salaries 
of municipal employees. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

WHEREAS municipal employees are 
receiving a wartime bonus in addition to 
their base pay, and 

WHEREAS it appears desirable to 
discontinue the wartime bonus in favor 
of a permanent adjustment of municipal 
salaries to offset the rising cost of living, 
now therefore be it 

RESOLVED that the Finance Com- 
mittee in the preparation of the 1946 mu- 
nicipal budget consider amending Chap- 
ter 52 of the Revised Ordinances so as 



RI4 



to effect an annual salary increase of 
ten (10) per cent plus seventy-five ($75) 
dollars with a minimum of two hundred 
($200) dollars and a maximum of three 
hundred fifty ($350) dollars for all full- 
time classified and unclassified employees 
of the City of Concord, and be it further 

RES0LVF:U that the Finance Com- 
mittee recommend such other salary ad- 
justments as may be in keeping with the 
intent of this resolution. 

Passed November 13. 1945. 



Resolution in relation to transfer- 
ring MONEY FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF 

public works budget to the depart- 
ment of public works "capital 
budget". 

Resoh'cd by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the sum of $4,709.75 be and here- 
by is transferred from the Board of 
Public Works budget for the year 1945 to 
the Department of Public Works capital 
budget item for the year 1945. 

The transfer of this sum is to cover the 
expense of the jmrchase of an Adams 
412-H Grader as per vote of the Board 
of Public Works November 7, 1945. 

Passed November 13, 1945. 



Resolution authorizing the mayor 
TO execute a quitclaim deed to 

CHARLES A. VENNE. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Mayor be and hereby is auth- 
orized to execute a quitclaim deed to 
Charles A. \'enne of the flowage rights 
and other interests in White's Reservoir 
adjacent to Litt'c Pop.d Road, purchased 
by the City of Concord from the Torrent 
Aqueduct Association. Nathaniel Wiiite 
and John A. White on October 1. 1«73. 
The consideration for said deed to be 
twenty-five dollars. ($25.00). 

Passed November 13, 1945. 



Resolution relative to services of an 
actuary to assist the retirement 
committee. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

That the Retirement Committee be 



authorized to procure the services of a 
competent actuary to render such assist- 
ance as may be required by the committee 
in securing accurate information as to 
the cost to the City of Membership Par- 
ticipation in the Employees' Retirement 
System of the State of New Hampshire 
for City Employees. 

Passed December 10, 1945. 



Resolution authorizing the finance 
committee to arrange for an audit 
of accounts and books of city de- 
partments for the year 1945. 

Resolved by the Board of Aldermen 
of the City of Concord, as follows: 

Section 1. That the Finance Commit- 
tee be and hereby is authorized to employ 
Certified Public Accountants to audit the 
accounts and b<3oks of the City Depart- 
ments and commissions for the year 
1945. 

Sect. 2. That said audit be at the dis- 
cretion of and under the control of said 
Finance Committee. 

Passed December 10, 1945. 



Resolution relative to leasing cer- 
tain city owned property to WILLIAM 

charcalis. 

Resolved by the Board of Alder)nen 
of the City of Concord, as folloivs: 

That the Mayor be and hereby is auth- 
orized to lease to William Charcalis cer- 
tain City owned real estate situated 
northerly of Market Lane, easterly of 
Odd Fellows .Avenue and westerly of 
property of Chase Realty Company and 
being more particularly described in Plot 
Plan of proposed parking area submitted 
by the City Planning Board under date 
of November 6, 1945. 

The lease is to contain a provision that 
it may be terminated at the pleasure of 
the City. It shall also contain a pro- 
vision that the lessee and successors, 
heirs or assigns shall give bond or insur- 
ance policy to the City of Concord to save 
the City harmless from all actions for 
damages to persons or property on the 
leased premises. 

The rental consideration shall be $1.00 
per year payable in advance. 

Passed December 10, 1945. 



RIB 



Resolution in relation to the pub- 
chase OF property from WILLIAM E. 
SLEEPER AND EDWARD F. 'JRUE. 

Resolved by the Board of Ahiennen 
of the City of Coitcord. as foUoi^'s: 
Tliat the sum of $700. be taken from 
ttie Finance Committee, Cuntingent 
Fund for the year 1945 and set up as a 
"Cai)ital Budget Item" for the purcliase 
from William E. Sleeper and Edward F. 
True, "a certain tract of land located 
on Sawyer Street with the buildings 
thereon and being the same property for- 
merly owned by the Merrimack County 
Savings Bank." And be it further RE- 
SOLVED : Tliat after purcliase, said 
property Itecome a part of Blossom Hil! 
Cemetery. 

Passed December 28, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to the pur- 
chase OF FLOOD I.HillTS AT MEMORIAL 
FIELD. 

Kesok'ed by the Board of .lldeniieii 
of the City of Coneord. as f()lli}ioss 
That tlie sum of $9,000.00 be appropri- 
ated in the 194o luidget, as a Capital Item, 
for the purchase and installation of per- 
manent flood lights at Memorial Field. 
The purchase, supervision and main- 
tenance of said lights to be placed under 
the control of the Recreation Commis- 
sion. 

Passed December 28, 1945. 



Resolution relative to disposition of 
land and buildings formerly occu- 
pied by the national youth admin- 
istration. 

Resolved l>y the Board of .Udeniieii 
"f the City of Coneord, as fol lazes: 
That the Committee on lands and 
buildings be and hereby is authorized t.j 
advertise for sale to the general public 
the following described real estate with 
the buildings thereon situated in the City 
uf Concord bounded as follows to wit : — 
Beginning at a stone bound on the 
easterly line of Eastside Drive at the 
northwest corner of land of Mattie E. 
Drew ; thence S. 86 degrees E. by land 
of Mattie E. Drew and Lawrence R. 
Drew a distance of 1105 feet more or less 
to an iron pipe at land of Hilda E. Car 
ter; thence N. 5 degrees E. by bnd of 
Hilda E. Carter a distance of 1060 feet 
more or less to a stake and stones at land 
of Holt Brothers Manufacturing Com- 



pany ; thence northwesterly by land of 
Holt Brothers Manufacturing Company 
a distance of 1080 feet more or less to a 
stake and stones on the easterly side of 
Eastside Drive ; thence southerly by the 
easterly line of Eastside Drive a distance 
of 1100 feet more or less to the point of 
beginning. 

The above described property is zoned 
as Agricultural and any use not permit- 
ted in such Agricultural area must be 
ruled upon by the Zoning Board of Ad- 
justment. 

The committee shall advertise publicly 
the above described property for sale at 
least once a week for three successive 
weeks in a daily newspaper located in 
said Concord and elsewhere that the com- 
mittee shall deem advantageous, in the 
public press. They shall in such adver- 
tising, specifically reserve the right to 
reject any and all bids, and must require 
that all bids be sealed when submitted 
to the said committee. 

When in the judgment of said com- 
mittee the proffer for sealed bids should 
terminate the committee may insert such 
date in the ads. The committee may re- 
quire all bidders to accompany their bid 
with a certified check of a certain per- 
centage of the bid as evidence of good 
faith. 

The Committee shdll submit to the 
Board of Aldermen evidence of the bids 
received with tlieir recommendations 
thereon for such further action therein 
as the Board of Aldermen may deem ad- 
visable for the best interests of the City 
of Concord. 

Passed December 28, 1945. 



Resolution in relation to salaries 

and wages of city employees. 

Resoh'ed by the Board of Aldeniieii 
of tlie City of Coneord, as folloivs: 

That the salaries and wages of City 
Employees be increased for the year 1946 
as follows : 

Persons receiving up and including 
$1,500. \Q%. 

Persons receiving from $1,500. up to 
and including $2,000. 5%. 

Persons receiving from $2,000. up to 
and including $3,000. 2^%- 

Said sums required to meet this addi- 
tional expense shall be added to the Sal- 
ary and Wage item in each Department 
Budget. 

Passed December 28, 1945. 



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