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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"



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% CONCORD 

(jnnual Rapo/itr 

1946 



IIHllttUliiii MM 



<2&*. 



The Ninety-fourth 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

CITY OF CONCORD 

New Hampshire 

for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1946 




Capital oj the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Merrimack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27,171 (1940) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision 

of the City Planning Board by the 

Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



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i'idJ* 



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Fellow Citizens: 

In accordance with the usual custom, the Annual 
Report of the City of Concord is herewith trans- 
mitted to you for your consideration. 

This, the 94th Annual Report, has been prepared 
by the City Planning Board, and I am sure that 
you will agree, as you turn these pages, that the 
Planning Board has clone a commendable job. 

In looking back over the year 1946, it is obvious, 
with the war over, that picking up the slack and 
getting back to normal has not been as rapid as some 
would desire. 

However, realizing that the citizens of Concord 
have been more than patient, I assure you that every- 
thing in our power has and will be done to hasten a 
return to "business as usual", as Mayor John Storrs 
used to say. 

In behalf of the officials of your City Government, 
I ask your continued support and cooperation in our 
efforts to accomplish this purpose. 



JUL^&< a & 



CZ*S-r-X- 



Mayor 



: rccdom of Worship — Sunday Morning at St. Paul's School 



Legislative Review 
1946 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN . 



{[Laid out a system of access 
highways connecting Eastman 
Street with the proposed Con- 
cord Throughpass. 
{[Authorized the Mayor to ap- 
point a representative for the City 
of Concord in the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Association. 
{[Voted to sell the abandoned 
NYA Building on East Side 
Drive. 

{[Amended the Zoning Map of 
the City of Concord by establish- 
ing new local business, commer- 
cial and industrial districts in the 
Fisherville Road section of West 
Concord. 

{[Purchased land at the junction 
of Bridge Street and Airport 
Road for street widening pur- 
poses. 

{[Voted conditional acceptance 
of a portion of the street plan 
of the Daniel Webster Develop- 
ment on Fisherville Road. 
{[Enlarged the civic district in 
the downtown area by amending 
the Zoning Map of the City of 
Concord. 

{[Authorized the preparation of 
plans for a community recreation 
building with the assistance of 
federal funds. 

{[Voted to extend retirement 
benefits to city officers and em- 
ployees by participating in the 
Employees' Retirement System 
of New Hampshire. 



{[Revised the ordinance govern- 
ing the operation of the Concord 
Public Library. 

{[Appointed a citizens commit- 
tee to study the need for parking 
meters in the downtown business 
district. 

{[Directed the Planning Board to 
prepare a plan establishing the 
mapped lines of a future street 
from North Main Street at 
Centre Street to the Concord 
Throughpass near Stickney Ave- 
nue. 

{[Extended the junkyard area off 
Hall Street to include Sandquist 
Street by amending the Zoning 
Map of the City of Concord. 
{[Accepted a gift of land from 
the Rolfe Family for park, play- 
ground and athletic field purposes 
at Rolfe Park in Penacook. 
{[Acquired a triangular plot of 
land at the corner of South Main 
and West Streets for street wid- 
ening purposes. 

{[Amended the Official Map of 
the City of Concord by voting 
extensions to Westbourne Road 
and Sunset Avenue. 
{[Authorized the City Solicitor 
to undertake a revision of the 
Ordinances of the City of Con- 
cord. 

{[Purchased land in the Hall 
Street area for a neighborhood 
playground. 

{[Voted authorization and funds 
for a study of municipal recrea- 
tion in Concord by the National 
Recreational Association. 



4 City of Concord 



Administrative Review 
1946 



MUNICIPAL 

DEPARTMENTS . . . 

1 1 i / / / 

{J^The City Clerk certified ap- 
proximately 1,000 applications by 
local veterans for state bonus 
payments. 

^Tbe Board of Assessors re- 
ported a total assessed valuation 
of $33,622,496.00, the highest in 
the city's history. 
^The Tax Collector acting as 
City Real Estate Agent sold 31 
parcels of tax-deed property. 
^The City Treasurer reported a 
surplus of $65,353.68 at the close 
of the year. 

^TThe City Solicitor disposed of 
nine litigations in which the City 
of Concord was involved. 
^The Planning Board completed 
its activities in connection with 
the preparation of engineering 
plans of the proposed Concord 
Lake development. 
^The Health Department re- 
corded 11 cases of poliomylitis, of 
which two resulted in death. 
^The Milk Inspector noted a 
sharp drop in milk production 
due to an unfavorable farm labor 
situation and the high cost and 
poor quality of grain. 
^The Playground Committee 
sponsored the establishment of 
a new playground in the Hall 
Street neighborhood. 
^The Recreation Commission 
reported a marked increase in 
use of its facilities, particularly 
the municipal golf course. 



^The Public Library developed 
plans for a new branch library at 
Penacook to be located in the 
Police Station building. 
^TThe Relief Department re- 
ported a sharp increase in old age 
assistance costs due to the rising 
cost of living and a steadily 
growing case load. 
^The Police Department inten- 
sified its safety program in the 
face of a growing traffic accident 
rate. 

^The Probation Department 
noted a low rate of juvenile delin- 
quency which it attributed to the 
excellent work of churches, civic 
and social organizations. 
{TThe Municipal Court reported 
an all-time high in the number of 
cases handled due to an increase 
in minor lawlessness. 
^TThe Fire Department adopted 
a two-platoon system under 
which all permanent fireman al- 
ternate on and off duty on a 
24-hour basis. 

CThe Public Works Depart- 
ment expanded its activities in 
all divisions to meet the demands 
of the war-created backlog of 
work. 

^The City Sealer noted the in- 
stallation of much new weighing 
and measuring equipment which 
was carefully checked for ac- 
curacy. 

^The Airport Commission hired 
a full-time manager to supervise 
operations at the municipal air- 
port. 



Annual Report 



-,*> 




Youth takes over the reins of city government 



GOVERNMENT 



Hon. Charles C. Davie 
Mayor 

John C. Tilton 
Substitute Mayor 



Aldermen-at-Large and Members 
Board of Public Works 

John Swenson 
John C. Tilton 
William A. Stevens 
Nelson E. Strong 
Robert W. Potter 
Charles A. Bartlett 

Ward Aldermen 

Charles P. Coakley Ward 1 

John E. Davis Ward 2 

William J. Flynn Ward 3 

Winfield J. Phillips Ward 4 

Harry D. Chai.i.is Ward 5 

Lawrence J. Moyniiian Ward 6 

Basil D. French Ward 7 

Clarence A. Drown Ward 8 

Thomas B. Jennings Ward 9 



Standing Committees of 
The Board of Aldermen 

Arbitration : 

Aldermen Moynihan, Bartlett, French 
and Jennings. 

Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen Strong, Tilton, French and 

Drown. 
Elections and Returns : 

Aldermen Tilton, Jennings, Davis and 

French. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Drown, Strong, Coakley and 

Tilton. 
Finance: 

Mayor Davie, Aldermen Challis, 

Phillips, Stevens and Swenson. 
Fire Department : 

Aldermen Coakley, Potter, Flynn and 

Moynihan. 
Land and Buildings : 

Aldermen Bartlett, Jennings, Davis 

and Flynn. 
Playgrounds : 

Aldermen Jennings, Flynn, Coakley, 

Drown and Davis. 
Police and License : 

Aldermen French, Davis, Moynihan 

and Strong. 
Public Instruction : 

Aldermen Flynn, Jennings, Moynihan 

and Drown. 
Relief : 

Aldermen Davis, Bartlett and Coaklev. 



6 — City of Concord 



OFFICIALS 



Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer 



Edward E. Beane 

Arthur E. Roby 

Edward E. Beane 

Henry W. Smith 

Gordon S. Lord 

Carl H. Foster 



Commissioner, Board of 



Ervin E. Webber 
Clarence H. Green 

William L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

Marion F. Holt 

Austin B. Presby 

Parker L. Hancock 

Charles P. Coakley 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

Arthur W. McIsaac 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Donald G. Barton 

J. Shepard Norris 

Leslie C. Clark 
Ervin E. Webber 
Supt of Water Works Percy R. Sanders 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds Paul G. Crowell 

Tax Collector Amos B. Morrison 

Tree Warden Ervin E. Webber 

Boards, Commissions and Trustees 

Board of Adjustment: 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman; John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Laurence 
M. Meyer, Shelby O. Walker. 

Board of Airport Commissioners : 
Charles C. Davie, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, John N. Engel, Charles W. 
Howard, Donald J. McFarland, Robert 
W. Potter, John Swenson. 

Board of Assessors : 

Clarence L. Clark, Chairman; Arthur 
F. Henrv, Clarence O. Philbrick. 



Public Works 
Fire Chief 
.Indue, Municipal 

Court 
Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milk Inspector 
Overseer of Poor 
Overseer of Poor, 

Penacook 
Planning Director 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of W eights 

and Measures 
Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 
Supt. of Streets 



City Planning Board: 

James M. Langley, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Charles C. Davie, Douglas 
N. Everett, Warren H. Greene, A. 
Clifford Hudson, John B. Jameson. 
Dudley W. Orr, Robert W. Potter. 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers : 
William J. Bishop, Chairman; Edward 
E. Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 

Board of Health : 

Charles C. Davie, Chairman; Dr. 

Pierre A. Boucher, Dr. Thomas M. 

Dudley, Dr. Clinton R. Mullins. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners : 
Edward E. Beane, Chairman; Clarence 
H. Green, Percy R. Sanders. 

Board of Library Trustees : 
Willis D. Thompson, Chairman: Francis 
E. Beer, Harold W. Bridge, Joseph J. 
Comi, Lela Y. Johnson, John F. Mac- 
Eachran, Sara B. Magenau, Alvah W. 
Sulloway, Martha G. Upton. 

Police Commission : 
Daniel Shea, Chairman; Roy W. 
Peaslee, Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 
J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman; Ruel N. 
Colby, Charles C. Davie, Leigh S. Hall, 
Carlton R. Metcalf. 

Trustees of Trust Funds : 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, I. 
Reed Gourley. 

Board of Water Commissioners : 
James W. Jameson, President; Robert 
W. Brown, Charles C. Davie, Harry 
H. Dudley, Allen M. Freeman, Charles 
P. Johnson, Donald Knowlton, Benja- 
min H. Orr. Gardner Tilton. 

. / cardial greeting to visitors at the 
southern approach to the city 




CITY CLERK 

•f i i i i i 

Arthur E. Roby City Clerk 

Margaret A. Spencer, Deputy City Clerk 
1946 Expenditure $9,791.56 



Board of Mayor and Aldermen 

The Board of Mayor and Al- 
dermen held 29 meetings during 
1946. Of these, 12 were regularly- 
scheduled, eight were on call of 
the mayor and nine were public 
hearings. During the year, the 
board enacted 11 ordinances and 
39 resolutions. 

The year 1946 marked the first 
complete year of city government 
operation since the end of the 
war. In this connection it is note- 
worthy that no small part of the 
efforts of the board was directed 
to the task of re-adjusting muni- 
cipal affairs to a peace-time basis. 

Board of Public Works 

The Board of Public Works 
averaged two meetings a month 
during 1946. The board held 12 
regular, one adjourned and seven 
special meetings. The board also 
conducted four public hearings. 
Particular emphasis was placed 
on revitalizing the war-inter- 
rupted highway and sidewalk con- 
struction program. 

Vital Statistics 

During the year, the City 
Clerk's office recorded 851 births, 
545 marriages and 711 deaths. 
The decline in births noted in 
1945 reversed itself markedly; the 



increase over the previous year 
amounted to 287 or 51 percent. 
At the same time, marriages con- 
tinued to increase; the 1946 fig- 
ure exceeded that of the preceding 
year by 110. Deaths also increased 
by 96 or about 15 percent. It is 
interesting to note that for the 
first time in the city's recent his- 
tory, the birth rate exceeded the 
death rate. 

There was little if any let-up 
during 1946 in the demand for 
certified copies of vital statistics 
records. This continuing demand 
has made it necessary for the de- 
partment to keep one member of 
its staff working almost all the 
time on vital statistics records. 

The practice of making no 
charge to servicemen and their 
families for copies of vital statis- 
tics records for governmental 
purposes was continued. Revenue 
received from this source, other 
than servicemen, amounted to 
$338.00 as compared to $275.00 in 
1945. 

State Bonus Papers 

Under statutory requirement 
relating to the payment of a state 
bonus to veterans of World War 
II, the City Clerk certified ap- 
proximately 1,000 applications 
during 1946. This service was 
performed free of charge. Vet- 
erans Avere also assisted in the 
proper completion of their bonus 
papers. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 
As the result of appearance on 
the market of many scarce house- 
hold commodities and appliances, 
as well as a limited number of new 



8 — City of Concord 



automobiles, there was 
a decided increase in 
mortgages and condi- 
tional sales. Receipts 
from the recording of 
these business trans- 
actions amounted to 
$608.20 for mortgages 
and $213.60 for condi- 
tional sales. Compar- 
able figures for the 
year 1945 show re- 
ceipts of $202.50 and 
$144.40 from these two 
sources. Because of 
the increasing supply 
of these goods, it is 
reasonable to assume 
that receipts from 
this type of recording activity will 
increase during the coming year. 

Licenses, Fees, Etc. 

Receipts from auto permits 
which dropped to the low figure 
of about $15,000.00 during 1944 
and 1945 due to war restrictions 
affecting automobiles, started 
their return to normalcy in 
1946. Total receipts jumped to 
$27,259.04. The trend in revenue 
from car permits will continue 
upward for the next few years 
as more and more new cars ap- 
pear on the market. 

Other receipts collected by the 
City Clerk's office from various 
licenses, fees, rentals, sales, etc. 
during the year amounted to 
$49,119.00. This figure was con- 
siderably in excess of the 1945 
total of $20,703.29. It should be 
noted, however, that included in 
this year's receipts were such 
non-recurring items as $17,500.00 




Two candidates for elective offices arc 

shown filing the necessary forms zvith 

the City Clerk 

from the Rumford Press for relo- 
cation of Ferry Street, $5,000.00 
from the sale of the Goodwill 
Fire Station, $5,100.00 from the 
sale of the NYA Building and a 
federal grant of $6,100.00 for sur- 
vey work on the Lake Develop- 
ment Project. 

Elections 

Concord held two elections dur- 
ing 1946, the State Primary on 
August 6th and the State Elec- 
tion on November 5th. Filing 
fees received from candidates for 
representatives and other lesser 
elective offices totaled $99.00. 

The city's election expendi- 
tures for the year amounted to 
$4,550.44. This sum was spent for 
printing of check lists, salaries of 
election officials, rent of voting 
places, setting up and taking 
down voting booths, and lunches 
for voting officials on primary and 
election day. 



Annual Report — 9 



BUMFGSD 



B^kJil 




Addition to Riimford Press 

ASSESSMENT 

i i i i i i 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Clarence L. Clark Chairman 

Clarence O. Pliilbrick Clerk 

Arthur F. Henry Member 

1946 Expenditure $14,359.61 

i 1 i i i i 

Real Property 

The local real estate market 
continued extremely active dur- 
ing- 1946. Property transfers 
climbed to the all-time high total 
of l ,193. This figure is approxi- 
mately double the pre-war aver- 
age exchange and represents a 
ten percent turnover of Concord's 
12,000 parcels of real estate. 

Two factors contributed 
largely to the abnormal turnover 
of real property. One of these 
influences was the demand mar- 
ket for residential property grow- 
ing out of the more or less acute 
shortage of housing. The other 
contributing factor was the pro- 
fit motive in inflationary prices 
which brought many properties 
into the market for sale. 

The total number of building 
permits issued during the year 

10 City of Concord 



was 212 as against 110 in 1945. 
Of the permits issued, 115 were 
for new buildings and garages, 
and 97 were for remodeling of 
old structures. Although build- 
ing materials and labor continued 
scarce, some improvement was 
noted in the amount cf construc- 
tion work that got under way 
during the year. 

Assessed Valuations, Polls, Etc. 

The total assessed valuation of 
property in Concord for the year 
1946 was $33,622,496.00. This 
figure was $658,650.00 greater 
than the total for the previous 
year. Not only was the 1946 as- 
sessed valuation the highest in 
the city's history but it repre- 
sented an about-face in the down- 
ward trend of assessed valuations 
which has prevailed since the 
start of the war. 

The total number cf taxable 
polls listed during 1946 was 
12,129 as compared with 11,734 
for the preceding year. This 
slight increase is particularly 
noteworthy in light of the fact 
that the number of tax-exempt 
veterans jumped from 701 to 2,570 
over the same period. 

The total number of shares of 
railroad stock held in Concord 
was 4,782 or 588 less than the 
total for 1945. 

Tax Warrant 

The 1946 tax warrant totaled 
SI, 332.917.00. This represented 
an increase of $151,208.03 over 
the total for the previous year. 
The 1946 tax rate per $1 000.00 of 
assessed valuation was ?38.26 in 
the City and $45.81 in Penacook. 



rp a y ted for collection, only $92,902.45 

*■ -**■-**■ remained outstanding- at the 

C^-x j t T7 f> np T r\ "NT close of the year. The total 
\J \^\^d£jVj 1 1 W IN amount of uncollected taxes 

against the previous years was 

$31,061.95 or $11,500.90 mere 

Amos B. Morrison Tax Collector than the total remaining at the 

ttxA , _, .. MC „„ end of 1945. Once again this can 

1946 Expenditure $8,552.53 . , 

be attributed in most part to the 

1 1 * * * * $5.00 poll tax of 1944 and 1945, 

1946 Collections which more than doubled the 

The steady improvement in average annual delinquency. 

property tax collections which The following tabulation shows 

has prevailed over the past sev- the amount of uncollected taxes 

eral years continued in 1946. carried on the Tax Collector's 

Of the total tax warrant of books on December 31 of the past 

$1,332,917.00 which was submit- three years: 

As of As of As of 

Year Dec. 31, 1944 Dec. 31, 1945 Dec. 31, 1946 

1939 $1,601.91 $1,351.00 $1,268.47 

1940 . 2,195.63 1,812.65 1,736.65 

1941 .. 2,413.93 1,992.13 1,874.13 

1942 4,444.25 2,435.28 2,257.28 

1943 4,562.67 2,042.80 1,832.93 

1944 107,113.00 10,127.19 9,216.84 

1945 100,910.70 12,875.65 

1940 92,902.45 

Total $122,331.39 $120,671.75 $123,964.40 

The amount of back taxes ac- and reflects the general pros- 
quired by the City at the 1946 perity which prevailed through- 
Tax Collector's Sale was $4,877.84 out the period covered by the sale, 
or $1,692.95 less than the total The status of delinquent taxes as 
for the previous year. This sum of December 31, 1946 is summa- 
is a new low in delinquent taxes rized in the following table: 

Amount Bought Amount Abatedby Deeded Amount 

Year by City Redeemed Assessors to City Unredeemed 

1941 $40,504.50 $38,204.63 $1,408.52 $884.17 $7.18 

1942 32,329.23 31,037.34 732.65 532.24 27.00 

1943 10,899.79 9,912.70 759.63 227.46 

1944 b,570.79 4,705.31 268.79 162.91 1,433.78 

1945 4,877.84 443.16 43.62 80.14 4,310.92 

Other Activity Collector acting as City Real 

Ten parcels of property were Estate Agent sold 31 pieces of 

deeded to the City in 1946 for tax-deed real estate during the 

nonpayment of taxes. Two of year. Total receipts from the sale 

these parcels were withheld from and rent of property deeded to 

sale for municipal use. The Tax the City amounted to $6,097.94. 



Annual Report — 11 



FINANCES 

Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1946 Expenditure $5,115.82 

////// 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST 

FUNDS 

Harry H. Dudley 

Carl H. Foster 

I. Reed Gourley 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1946 Expenditure $502.50 

i i i i i i 

Concord's financial condition in 
1946 continued its steady im- 
provement of the past several 
years. At the end of the fiscal 
vear, the City's net deht totaled 
$437,646.32, or $100,723.90 less 
than the amount outstanding at 
the beginning of the year. Of par- 
ticular interest is the fact that 
this sizable reduction in net debt 
was accomplished in spite of the 
application of $57,959.68, repre- 
senting cash surplus, to current 
operations, thereby lowering the 
1946 tax rate by a little less than 
$2.00 per $1,000.00 of assessed 
valuation. 

General Fund 

Total receipts for the year 
amounted to $1,599,075.63 as 
against an estimated total of 
$1,523,586.42. After deductions by 
transfer amounting to $61,003.79, 
net receipts totaled $1,538,071.84. 
Receipts exceeded estimated in- 
come by $14,485.42. 

Appropriations for 1946 totaled 
$1,581,546.10, which together with 
$178,353.90 carried forward from 
the previous year, $72,475.68 in 



cash receipts and $20,661.85 in 
transfers, brought the total 
amount of funds available up to 
$1,853,037.53. Expenditures for 
the year amounted to $1,576,609.47 
leaving an unexpended balance of 
$276,428.06 of which $203,719.96 
were carried forward to 1947 and 
$72,708.10 were credited to sur- 
plus. 

The City of Concord closed the 
year with a surplus of $65,353.68- 

Bond Funds 

On December 31, 1946, the 
City's bonded indebtedness to- 
taled $503,000.00 as the result of 
a $94,000.00 reduction effected 
during the year. Of the out- 
standing bond obligations. 
$276,000.00 were school bonds, 
$170,000.00 were municipal bonds 
and $57,000.00 were waterworks 
bonds. No new bonds were is- 
sued during the year. 

Total interest charges until 
maturity on the bonded debt 
amounted to $135,776.25. Of this 
sum, $113,687.50 represents in- 
terest on school bonds, $16,827.50 
interest on municipal bonds and 
$5,261.25 interest on waterworks 
bonds. 

Trust Funds 

At the end of 1946, trust fund 
assets totaled $532,414.01, of 
which $391,321.05 were cemetery 
funds, $135,095.41 were library 
funds and $5,997.55 represented 
miscellaneous trusts. During the 
year, $12,993.93 were added to 
permanent cemetery trust funds. 
Trust fund receipts totaled 
$23,354.41 as against disburse- 
ments of $19,424.03. 



12 — City of Concord 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 

i i 1 i 1 i 

Gordon S. Lord City Solicitor 

1946 Expenditure $2,379.70 

i i i i i i 

Old Litigation 

Richard A. Morton vs. City of 
Concord. This case was disposed 
of by an agreement between the 
parties concerned. The agreement 
received the sanction of the court. 

State of New Hampshire vs. 
381.86 Acres of Land. This pro- 
ceeding to condemn land in the 
vicinity of the municipal airport 
is still pending. The great bulk 
of the property sought in this 
proceeding has already been ac- 
quired through negotiations with 
the individual owners. Inability 
to locate the owners of some 
tracts has delayed final disposi- 
tion of this case. 

City of Concord Petition to Dis- 
co ntinue C lough's Mill Road. 
This was a petition to discon- 
tinue an unused road located in 
the Concord Municipal Airport 
area. The petition was granted 
and the road discontinued. 

City of Concord Petition to Dis- 
continue Sheep Road. It was orig- 
inally planned to discontinue that 
portion of Sheep Road located in 
the vicinity of Loudon Road. 
More recently this road was se- 
lected for development as a state 
highway and the petition was ac- 
cordingly withdrawn. 

Maude L. Crowley vs. City of 
Concord. This was an action 



arising out of the City's alleged 
taking of land from Maude L. 
Crowley for airport purposes. 
The case was settled for $175.00. 

Samuel C. Mar den vs. City of 
Concord. This was a claim for 
rent of premises furnished to a 
relief recipient at the request of 
the City. The case was settled 
for $134.00. 

Max Cohen vs. City of Con- 
cord. This was a case to deter- 
mine whether the petitioner had 
a right to conduct a junk yard 
business on his premises. The 
petitioner voluntary withdrew 
his petition. 

John W. Stanley vs. City of 
Concord. This was a bill in equity 
to restrain the City from transfer- 
ring certain real estate. The case 
was discontinued. 

Gilman vs. City of Concord. This 
was a bill to cure defects in the 
title to real estate. The case was 
terminated by a court order en- 
tered by the consent of the parties. 

New Litigation 

Concord Electric Company vs. 
City of Concord. This is an ap- 
peal from the disallowance of a 
claim for damages for the alleged 
taking of an easement by eminent 
domain proceedings. 

Page Belting Company vs. City 
of Concord. This is an appeal 
from the allowance of damages 
for the taking of real estate by 
eminent domain proceedings. 

John E. Rich vs. City of Con- 
cord. This is a bill in equity to 
clear an alleged defect in the 
title to land formerly owned by 
the City. 



Annual Report — 13 



PLANNING 

i 1 i 1 1 1 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 

James M. Langley, Chairman 
Dudley W. Orr, Secretary 
Edward E. Beane 
Hon. Charles C. Davie 
Douglas N. Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
A. Clifford Hudson 
John B. Jameson 
Robert W. Potter 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen Director 

1946 Expenditure $6,067.22 

Major Street Plan 

Considerable progress was 
made during- 1946 in working out 
details of the proposed Concord 
throughpass. Plans were pre- 
pared for a system of access 
highways connecting Eastman 
Street in the vicinity of the Page 
Belting Company with the pro- 
posed trunkline highway. The 
new Eastside approach accomp- 
lishes the elimination of two rail- 
road crossings on Eastman Street 
near North Main Street. 

A plan of a future street con- 
necting North Main Street at 
Centre Street with the through- 
pass in the vicinity of Stickney 
Avenue was also prepared and 
certified to the Board of Alder- 
men. When the new location is 
developed, Bridge Street with its 
many traffic hazards will be dis- 
continued as a through-traffic 
highway by the removal of the 
existing railroad overpass. 

Street Extensions 

After a period of war-time in- 
activity, requests for street lay- 



outs returned to the Planning 
Board's agenda. The board con- 
sidered seven petitions for new 
streets, five of which received 
favorable action. These included 
street layouts at Douglas and 
Winsor Avenues in the Daniel 
Webster Development on Pena- 
cook Plains, Sunset Avenue at 
the Greenacre Subdivision off 
South Street, Westbourne Road 
in the West End Development, 
and the entire street plan of the 
State Hospital Subdivision. Un- 
favorable action was taken on 
proposed extensions of First 
Street in West Concord and Tut- 
tle Street in the French Village 
section. 
Street Widening 

During the year, the Planning 
Board recommended street wid- 
enings at two important highway 
intersections. The first of these 
was at the corner of Bridge 
Street and Airport Road and in- 
volved property recently ac- 
quired by the Carmelite Mon- 
astery. The other was a triangu- 
lar plot at the intersection of 
South Main and W T est Streets 
which will greatly improve the 
street alignment and the flow of 
traffic at this location. 

In an exchange of land on the 
recommendation of the Planning 
Board, the City acquired a 10- 
foot-wide strip of Y.M.C.A. prop- 
erty on the westerly side of North 
State Street for street widening 
purposes. This action was in ac- 
cordance with the purposes of the 
established setback line for the 
future widening of North State 
Street. 



14 City of Concord 




PROPOSED 

SHEEP DAVIS ROAD 

BYPASS PROJECT 



RELOCATION & EXTENSION-N H.I06 
□ □□□ RELOCATION -US 4 & 202 



Parking 

The board's cooperation was 
extended the Rum ford Printing- 
Company in preparation of plans 
for an off-street parking lot in 
connection with the firm's plant 
expansion program. Construction 
of the lot resulted in the elimina- 
tion of mass on-street parking on 
upper North Main Street by em- 
ployees of the company. 



Preliminary plans were pre- 
pared for a parking lot at 
Memorial Athletic Field to ac- 
commodate 500 to 1.000 cars. The 
tentative location is in the area 
between the athletic field and 
Redington Street. Approximately 
one-half the land needed for this 
development is tax-deed property. 

The board's staff and facilities 
were made available to a special 



Annual Report IS 




Traffic congestion on upper Main Street was greatly relieved by this new off-street 
parking lot at the Ritmford Press 



committee studying- parking lot 
locations at the request of the 
Board of Aldermen. 
Zoning 

Three major changes were 
recommended in the zoning ordi- 
nance during the year. These in- 
cluded an extension of the indus- 
trial district in the junkyard 
area off Hall Street to Sandquist 
Street, and an extension of the 
civic district from School to 
Pleasant Street on both sides of 
Green Street. The minimum vol- 
ume requirement for dwelling 
units in the nonconforming uses 
section of the ordinance permit- 
ting the conversion of large resi- 
dences in two-family districts 
was changed from 8,000 cubic 
feet to 800 feet of floor space. 



This abolished the inequity grow- 
ing out of varying room heights. 

State Hospital Subdivision 

In cooperation with state hos- 
pital authorities, the Planning 
Board developed a subdivision 
plan for a 300-foot strip of the 
hospital's home ground tract 
along Clinton Street. The state 
proposes to sell this property 
in order that it may be used 
for private residential purposes. 
This action is worthy of com- 
mendation in that a relatively 
large area of centrally-located 
land, now tax free, will be re- 
turned to the tax list. 

Airport Development 

At the request of the Board 
of Airport Commissioners, the 



16 City of Concord 



Planning- Board prepared a plan 
for the future development of 
hangar space at the municipal 
airport. In connection with the 
fixing of building lines for this 
purpose, the hoard's survey was 
expanded to include a master 
plan of airport runway and taxi- 
way development. 

Further assistance was pro- 
vided in the preparation of pre- 
liminary plans and estimates for 
the extension of apron and taxi- 
way facilities in connection with 
the Airport Commission's appli- 
cation for financial assistance 
under the federal airport develop- 
ment program. 

Lake Development 

Engineering plans for the pro- 
posed Concord Lake project were 
completed last spring by the en- 
gineering firm of Metcalf and 
Eddy of Boston, Massachusetts. 
These plans were subsequently 
approved by the New Hampshire 
Water Control Commission and 
the Federal Works Agency. An 
advisory committee of legal ex- 
perts was appointed to prepare 
enablimr legislation for submis- 



sion to the 1947 State Legisla- 
ture. 
Other Activities 

In accordance with the ordi- 
nance governing tax-sale prop- 
erty, all such parcels acquired by 
the city were screened for fore- 
seeable future municipal use. 
Two parcels on the Plains were 
withheld from sale for highway 
and airport use. Several proper- 
ties in the vicinity of Memorial 
Field were withdrawn for future 
parking lot purposes. Two resi- 
dences formerly occupied by re- 
lief clients were released for sale. 

Information relative to vacant 
land and unoccupied dwelling 
units was compiled and turned 
over to the Housing Committee 
of the Chamber of Commerce. 
The board's staff also assisted 
chamber officials in the prepara- 
tion of promotional housing lit- 
erature. 

Satisfactory progress was made 
in drafting a new building code 
for the city. An advisory com- 
mittee is assisting the board in 
this work and it is hoped that a 
final draft will be ready for sub- 
mission to the Board of Alder- 
men early in 1947. 



.-/ view of the Clinton Street section of the state hospital lot which the state proposes 

to subdivide into house lots 



«&kJi.: '/ 







PUBLIC 

HEALTH and 

SANITATION 

i 1 i i i i 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles C. Davie, Chairman 

Pierre A. Boucher, M.D. 

Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 

Clinton R. Mullins, M.D. 

Donald G. Barton, M.D Health Officer 

Austin B. Prksby Milk Inspector 

1946 Expenditure $7,662.72 

i i i i 1 i 

Health Conditions 

Good public health conditions 
prevailed in Concord during 1946. 
The city was free of epidemics 
and there was a decided decrease 
in the number of communicable 
disease cases. 

Thirty-six cases of scarlet fever 
were reported to the Health De- 
partment during the year as 
against 122 during 1945. As us- 
ual, a scattering number of cases 
of measles, whooping cough, 
mumps and chicken pox were re- 
ported. 

During the late summer and 
fall, Concord experienced an un- 
usual number of poliomylitis 
cases. Of the ll cases reported, 
two resulted in death. All hospi- 
talized patients were discharged 
with very little paralysis noted. 
Concord's 1946 experience with 
this dreaded disease followed the 
abnormal pattern which prevail- 
ed throughout the state and much 
of the nation. 



Immunization Clinics 

Due to the prevalence of 
poliomylitis, the Health Officer 
ordered the discontinuance of 
immunization clinics during the 
months of September, October 
and November. Notwithstanding 
this interruption, the Health De- 
partment conducted ten clinics at 
which 357 children were immu- 
nized. Many of the children who 
attended these clinics received 
both toxoid and whooping cough 
preventative treatment. A total 
of 163 whooping cough and 241 
toxoid inoculations were per- 
formed during the year. In ad- 
dition 45 children were vacci- 
nated. 

Valuable assistance at clinics 
was received from the Concord 
District Nursing Association and 
the Junior League. The nursing 
association made available the 
services of a nurse while the 
league furnished the clerical help 
needed to register the children. 

Sanitation Program 

A sanitation program for res- 
taurants, soda fountains and 
other food dispensing establish- 
ments was instituted during the 
late summer. The purpose of this 
program was to insure better 
washing and handling of eating 
utensils. 

Periodic swab rinse tests were 
conducted on a city-wide basis. 
Splendid cooperation was re- 
ceived from restaurant owners 
and managers and a marked im- 
provement was noted in sanitary 
conditions. This program will 
be continued during the coming 



18 — City of Concord 



year and the department will increase of 84 over the total for 

spare no effort in maintaining- a the previous year. Most of this 

high standard of cleanliness at all increase can be attributed to the 

Concord eating establishments. non-resident category represent- 

Federal Aid ing institutional deaths. The re- 

Once again, the Concord cords of the Health Department 
Health Department wishes to ex- show 270 resident and 420 non- 
press its appreciation to the resident deaths during the past 
United States Public Health year as compared to 258 and 3-18 
Service for making available to in 1945. 

the City the full time services of Presented herewith in sum- 
a public health engineer. mary form is a tabulation show- 
Vital Statistics ing the number of resident deaths 

The total number of deaths in from seven most common causes 

Concord during 1946 was 690, an during the past five-year period. 

1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 

Diseases of the circulatory system 117 113 109 108 111 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 36 32 42 37 37 

Nephritis 19 14 21 16 7 

Accidental deaths 12 IS 12 10 24 

Pneumonia 7 11 4 10 13 

Diabetes mellitus 12 8 11 8 14 

Tuberculosis 5 12 9 5 

i i i i i i grant made to producers by the 

. . . MILK CONTROL government during the war years 

/ / / / / /in order to maintain an adequate 

The average daily consumption supply of this vital food. 

of milk in Concord during 1946 p roduction 

was 14,979 quarts, or 419 quarts 

, , ,. , ., r Milk production m Concord 

less than the daily average for „ , l . , 

. . r^ x • , suffered a sharp drop during 

the previous year, lhis decrease \ ° 

, \ , .„ , 1946. 1 he gap between supplv 

m the amount of milk consumed , , , ' , . , l -. 

, , .. . . ^ and demand was the widest of 

can be attributed in part to the . T , 

... ... , .,, , • , any previous year. In order to 

all-time high cost of milk which J - . , . 

, , or .°- T make up the mud milk denciencv, 

reached 20.5 cents per quart. In ' 

some instances due to the higher The mik Inspector takes a sampIe of 

COSt, canned milk was used as a milk for laboratory testing from our of 

partial substitute for the fresh ' / "' " ,a »y cows zuhich ™PPb the Concord 

, , area 

product. 

On July 1, 1946, the retail price 
of milk, delivered at the consum- 
er's door, advanced three cents 
per quart. This increase coin- 
cided with the termination of the 
federal milk subsidy and was 
equivalent in amount to the 




'kuouon HOSPITAL 



Pleasant Street site of the pr< 
approximately 1,800 quarts daily 
were bought outside of the Con- 
cord area, chiefly in Littleton, 
Laconia and Derry. 

Among- the factors which have 
discouraged milk production are 
the shortage of manpower, the 
high cost of labor on farms, the 
high cost of farm machinery and 
stock feed, and the poor cpiality 
of grain. As a result, the ratio of 
producers going out of business 
as against new producers was 
about two to one, or by actual 
count 43 to 23. 
Equipment 

Milk equipment and repair 
parts were in fair delivery dur- 
ing 1946 but substantially in no 
better supply than before the end 
of the war. A number of local 
milk plants were able to acquire 
some new machinery. In every 
instance, these new installations 
resulted in better milk processing 
methods. 



•fused nezv Concord Hospital 

Ninety-nine percent of all pro- 
ducers delivering milk in Concord 
are equipped with electric refrig- 
eration, single service disk pads 
and strainers. Due to the farm 
labor shortage, many producers 
have installed milking machines. 
Cleanliness Required 

The Milk Department's inspec- 
tion program emphasizes clean- 
liness of cows, stables and milk 
rooms. The department requires 
periodic whitewashing of cow 
stables and also insists that all 
producers use a chemical powder 
for washing dairy utensils. This 
process must be followed by a 
hypochlorite rinse and draining 
without wiping. Cooling tanks, 
where milk is held pending de- 
livery to processing plants, must 
be kept clean at all times. During 
the past year, the department has 
sought to improve the ventilation 
of stables. Attention has also 
been given to requiring proper 



20--- City of Concord 



cleanliness in the bedding- of 
cows. 

Another important factor in 
keeping stables and milk rooms 
clean is the use of a DDT spray. 
Many producers carried out pro- 
grams of periodic spraying with 
this new chemical. As a result, 
the Milk Inspector observed 
fewer flies in stables and milk 
rooms than at any time during 
the past 20 years. 

Pasteurization 

No major changes were noted 
during 1946 in the methods and 
practices of the city's six pasteur- 
izing plants. All pasteurizing 
equipment was checked for sani- 
tation. In addition, the depart- 
ment conducted weekly inspec- 
tions of temperature charts at all 
plants to insure the maintenance 
of proper processing tempera- 
tures. Furthermore, samples of 
milk from the jugs of each pro- 
ducer delivering at these plants 
were collected and tested once a 
month. As a result of this ac- 
tivity, 560 quarts of milk were 
condemned for reasons of being 
off flavor, sour or watered. 

Vitamin Milk 

During 1946, daily sales of vi- 
tamin "D" milk averaged 150 
quarts, all of which was pasteur- 
ized. The sale of vitamin milk 
showed an increase while the 
market for grade "A" milk fell 
off noticeably. One plant discon- 
tinued the sale of grade "A" milk 
in favor of the vitamin "D" 
product. 

For the first time in its his- 
tory, the department bioassayed 



a sample of vitamin "D" milk to 
determine whether or not the 
milk contained 400 USP units of 
vitamin "D" per quart. Such an 
analysis costs $33.00 per sample 
and the cost involved in the bio- 
assay referred to was borne by 
the producer and not the depart- 
ment. 
Cream 

Local sales of heavy cream 
averaged 434 quarts daily during 
1946. Of this total, 355 quarts 
were pasteurized and 79 quarts 
were raw cream. Average daily 
sales dropped off 42 quarts as 
compared with the daily con- 
sumption of cream in 1945. This 
decrease was due to a poor qual- 
ity product and a substantial price 
increase. The unsatisfactory qual- 
ity of much of the cream sold in 
Concord resulted from the fact 
that it was shipped into the city 
from the West and was too old 
on arrival. 
Inspections and Tests 

The department made 486 
dairy and 376 milk plant inspec- 
tions during 1946. In addition, 
28 milk trucks were checked for 
cleanliness as were 36 eating 
establishments where milk is sold. 
One hundred five written no- 
tices were sent to milk plants and 
dairies ordering improvements in 
unsatisfactory conditions. 

During the year, 1,424 samples 
of milk, cream, chocolate milk, 
ice cream and orangeade were 
collected and subjected to vari- 
ous types of laboratory tests. In 
addition, 169 restaurant swab 
rinse samples were collected and 
analyzed. 



Annual Report — 21 




RECREATION 



PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Thomas B. Jennings, Chairman 

Charles P. Coakley 

John E. Davis 

Clarence A. Drown 

William J. Flynn 

Paul G. Crowell Supervisor 

1946 Expenditures $13,693.30 



. . . PLAYGROUNDS AND 
BATH 

The municipal playground pro- 
gram underwent considerable re- 
adjustment during 1946. Activi- 
ties curtailed by the war were 
expanded to meet the needs of 
peace-time conditions. In addi- 
tion to initiating a stepped-up 
program of activity, the Play- 
ground Committee tackled the 
job of repairing and replacing 
worn-out equipment. A definite 
start was made in this direction 
but it will take several years be- 
fore plant facilities can be fully 
re-conditioned. 

New Playground 

In response to a petition sub- 
mitted by residents of the Hall 
Street area, an eight-acre tract of 
land, located off Hall Street in 
the block between Home Avenue 
and Sandquist Street, was ac- 
quired by the City for playground 
purposes. This area, which the 
Playground Committee hopes 

(Tap) Outdoor community concert at 
Rollins Park. (Center) Sliding the chute 
at Fletcher-Murphy Playground. (Bot- 
tom) Swimming instructions at one of the 
city's eight wading pools 



will fill a long-standing need of 
the neighborhood, was leveled 
off and a skating" rink was pre- 
pared for winter use. Plans have 
been completed for the installa- 
tion of regular playground equip- 
ment early next year and a super- 
vised program of activities will 
be put into operation at the play 
area this coming summer. 

Other Improvements 

During the year, the hockey 
rink area at White Park was 
graded by the Public Works De- 
partment. Although a marked 
improvement was effected in the 
condition of the rink, additional 
grading will be needed to prepare 
the surface of the area for satis- 
factory flooding. 

At Rolfe Park in Penacook, the 
infield of the baseball diamond 
was re-conditioned. However, clue 
to the lack of adequate mainte- 
nance, the condition of the field 
deteriorated noticeably during 
the summer playing season. 

Two new chlorofeeders were 
purchased for use at wading 
pools. This equipment was ac- 
quired as part of an annual re- 
placement program to insure sani- 
tary conditions at the city's eight 
popular wading areas. 

Swimming Area 

In the fall of 1945, the State 
Board of Health ordered the 
Broken Bridge Swimming Area 
closed due to pollution in the 
Soucook River. As a temporary 

(Top) Concord goes -up for a basket at 
the high school gym. (Center) The 
Community Players put on a dress re- 
hearsal at the City Auditorium. (Bot- 
tom) Ruth LeBlanc. popular manager of 
the municipal golf course 




measure pending' provision of 
adult swimming" facilities else- 
where. Saint Paul School author- 
ities offered the use of their pond 
to the City for a public swimming- 
area. The offer was accepted and 
supervised swimming activities 
were conducted at the pond dur- 
ing- six weeks of the summer 
season. As a precautionary meas- 
ure due to the prevalence of 
poliomylitis, the swimming area 
and the wading pools were or- 
dered closed on August 21. This 
forced-closing at the height of the 
season combined with relatively 
cool weather in July resulted in 
a reduced program of swimming- 
activities during the 1946 season. 
During the limited season, 
swimming was taught at all of 
the pools by instructors whose 
services were furnished by the 
American Red Cross. Lessons 
were given on a two-periods-a- 
week basis and the results ob- 
tained were highly satisfactory. 
In addition, advanced life-saving- 
was taught at the Saint Paul's 
School area. 

Summer Activities 

The usual summer playground 
activities such as baseball, soft- 
ball, volleyball, cricket, newcomb 
and horseshoes were conducted 
at all playgrounds. Once again, 
inter-playground baseball proved 
most popular with all playgrounds 
participating in a full schedule of 
games. However, there was a 
noticeable lack of bovs in the 15 
and 16-year age group due to va- 
cation employment. 

Attendance at playgrounds was 



somewhat less than in previous 
years. This was attributed to the 
poliomylitis scare which prompt- 
ed many parents to keep their 
children at home in order to avoid 
contact with other children. 

Special Events 

The outstanding attraction of 
the 1946 summer season was the 
Fourth of July celebration. Spe- 
cial events of the celebration 
included a children's party at 
White Park on the afternoon of 
the Fourth, an informal street 
dance on the State House Plaza, 
several band concerts, a night- 
before-the-Fourth bonfire and a 
huge display of fireworks at the 
Camp Grounds on the Plains. 
The various events were well re- 
ceived by the uniformly-large 
crowds that turned out to cele- 
brate a safe-and-sane Fourth of 
July. 

Winter Activities 

During the winter of 1946, the 
Playground Committee operated 
nine skating areas. Favorable ice 
conditions permitted 62 clays of 
skating. The usual maintenance 
problems were present but satis- 
factory ice surfaces w T ere pro- 
vided throughout the city. All 
of the skating areas were used 
extensively by old and young 
alike. Street coasting areas were 
also provided in various parts of 
the city. However, some diffi- 
culty was experienced with the 
legal aspects of the maintenance 
of these on-street areas and steps 
were taken to insure a more posi- 
tive control of streets set aside 
for sliding purposes. 



24 — City of Concord 



Outlook for 1947 

Although the Playground Com- 
mittee continues to be plagued 
with material and manpower 
shortages, the outlook for the 
coming year is brighter than at 
any time in recent years. With 
the war over, a return to normal 
conditions is inevitable. The 
Playground Committee proposes 
to do everything in its power to 
provide a well-rounded program 
of supervised play for the chil- 
dren of Concord. 

. . . SPECIAL FACILITIES 
i i i -f i i 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

J. Mitchell Ahern, Chairman 

Ruel N. Colby 

Hon. Charles C. Davie 

Leigh S. Hall 

Carlton R. Metcalf 

1946 Expenditures $10,763.32 

1946 Receipts $8,449.65 

Net Cost to City $2,313.67 

1 i i i i i 

Finances 

Total receipts from 1946 opera- 
tions at the Beaver Meadow 
Municipal • Golf Course and the 
Memorial Athletic Field amount- 
ed to $5,566.89. Of this amount, 
$4,758.86 represented golf fees 
and $808.03 rental charges for 
use of the athletic field. The sum 
of $2,882.76 was received as an 
insurance settlement in connec- 
tion with a fire which destroyed 
a portion of the Beaver Meadow 
Club House in May. The com- 
mission received a 1946 appro- 
priation of $3,200.00 from the city 
government. 

Routine expenditures for the 
year amounted to $7,877.36, of 



which $5,376.96 were spent at 
Beaver Meadow, $2,426.26 at 
Memorial Field and $74.14 at 
the Russell Pond Winter Sports 
Area. Repairs to the fire-damaged 
club house at Beaver Meadow 
cost $2,885.96. Of the $3,200.00 
allotted to the commission in the 
annual budget, $886.33 were un- 
used. Thus the net cost to the 
taxpayer for operating the muni- 
cipal golf course, athletic field 
and winter sports area was only 
$2,313.67. It is also interesting 
to note that the rebuilding cost 
after the fire at Beaver Meadow 
was within $3.20 of the settle- 
ment received from insurance. 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course 

A marked increase in use of the 
municipal golf course was noted 
during the year. The number of 
season ticket holders went up to 
175 from the 1945 figure of 115. 
At the same time, slightly more 
than 3.000 day fee tickets were 
sold as compared with 1.919 for 
the previous year. The club's ten- 
nis facilities also experienced in- 
creased activity. 

Although the expanded use of 
the municipal golf plant was 
most gratifying to the commis- 
sion from the standpoint of pub- 
lic acceptance of this major fea- 
ture of the city's recreational 
facilities, it is nevertheless a fact 
that the amount of use more or 
less strained the capacity of the 
nine-hole course. That no com- 
plaints were received speaks we'l 
for the club manager and the 
grounds staff'. 



Annual Report — 25 



Memorial Field 

At Memorial Field, scarcities 
in materials and equipment post- 
poned the installation of perma- 
nent floodlights for night foot- 
ball. However, the two local 
high schools played a full sched- 
ule of night games using a 
temporary lighting installation 
rented for the fall season. Splen- 
did attendance at football games 
was enjoyed by both schools. 
Because the rented lighting 
equipment was installed by the 
schools, the usual rental charge 
for the field — ten percent of the 
gross receipts after federal taxes 
— was reduced to five percent. 

During the summer, the field 
was used extensively for organ- 
ized after-supper Softball. Con- 
stant use was also made of the 
six tennis courts available at the 
field. 

Russell Pond Area 

Greatly increased skiing activ- 
ity was noted at the Russell Pond 
Winter Sports Area. Every in- 
dication pointed to a return to 
normalcy in the use of this popu- 
lar area after several years of 
suspended activity due to travel 



restrictions and the demands of 
war service on Concord's youth. 
An even greater use of the "snow 
bowl" area is anticipated dur- 
ing the coming season due to 
the ever-increasing popularity of 
skiing as a winter sport. 

All trails at the ski area were 
cleared of brush during the fall 
to make them ready for winter 
use. Valuable assistance was re- 
ceived from the Concord Ski Club 
whose members worked on the 
various trails making them wider 
and safer. 

New Equipment 

During the year, the commis- 
sion was able to break through 
the equipment bottleneck created 
bv the war. Xew power mowing 
equipment was purchased for use 
at the municipal golf course and 
similar type equipment will be 
acquired during the coming year 
for use at Memorial Field. 

Plans are now completed for 
the installation of permanent 
field lights for night football at 
the athletic field. The commis- 
sion hopes to have these lights 
in operation for the 1947 fall 
season. 



The White Park pond offers ideal facilities for skating 




PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 

•f i i i -f -f 

BOARD OF LIBRARY 

TRUSTEES 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr., Chairman 

Francis E. Beer 

Harold W. Bridge 

Joseph J. Comi 

Mrs. Charles P. Johnson 

John F. MacEachran 

Mrs. Eugene F. Magenau 

Alvah W. Sulloway 

Mrs. Robert W. Upton 

Marion F. Holt Librarian 

1946 Expenditure $33,656.47 

i i -f i i i 

The year 1946 was a very busy 
one for the Concord Public Li- 
brary. In addition to handling 
routine matters, the library was 
called on repeatedly to assist re- 
turning- servicemen in securing 
information on the G. I. Bill of 
Rights, colleges and vocations. 
In its efforts to meet the de- 
mands of the public, the library 
was handicapped by the lack of 
trained personnel. 

Library Board Reorganized 

During the year, the Board of 
Aldermen adopted an ordinance 
which effected a number of im- 
portant changes in the method of 
appointment of library trustees. 
Two major changes were par- 
ticularly noteworthy. The first 
eliminated the requirement that 
members must be chosen on a 
one-from-each-ward basis ; the 
other abolished the system under 
which the entire membership was 
appointed simultaneously for a 
two-year period in favor of a ro- 



tating pattern whereby three 
members of the nine-member 
board are appointed annually for 
three-year terms. 

Finances 

Library expenditures for the 
year 1946 totaled $33,656.47. Of 
this sum, $19,200.24 was spent for 
salaries, $6,332.45 for books and 
$757.52 for periodicals. Income 
from trust funds amounted to 
$13,553.91 while receipts from 
fines totaled $1,795.00. 

Circulation 

A total of 183,653 books were 
circulated during 1946. This rep- 
resents a decrease of 13,636 from 
the total distribution of the pre- 
ceding year. However, it is in- 
teresting to note that this loss in 
circulation can be attributed en- 
tirely to children's books which 
dropped to 44.232 from a 1945 
total of 62,214. On the brighter 
side, adult circulation jumped 
from 135,075 to 139,421 and 
branch library circulation from 
22,223 to 24.043. 

Collection and Registration 

During the year. 11,504 books— 
2,799 fiction 'and 8.705 non-fic- 
tion — were discarded for reason 
of being obsolete. All standard 
books were kept or replaced. At 
the close of the year, the library's 
book collection numbered 41.384 
volumes. 

The library catalogued 3,786 
books during 1946. Of this num- 
ber, 3,270 were in the adult col- 
lection and 516 were children's 
books. The library reading room 
collection consisted of 144 period- 
icals and eight newspapers. 



Annual Report — 27 



W**m 




This building at Penacook, formerly occupied as a police station, will be converted 
into a modern branch library 



Library registrations for 1946 
totaled 19,330. During the year, 
library cards were issued to 2,555 
new users. 

Branches 

The city's four branch libra- 
ries, located in the suburbs of 
Penacook, West Concord, East 
Concord and Concord Heights, 
experienced a busy year. Books 
at the branch libraries were 
changed regularly each month. 
The branches at East Concord 
and the Heights were moved 
from rented quarters to the East- 
man and Dame Schools. After 
the change, circulation at these 
branches increased noticeably. 

During the coming year, work 
will be started on remodeling the 
Penacook police station to pro- 
vide new quarters for the 
Penacook branch. The increased 



facilities which will be available 
at the new location will fill a 
long standing need for better li- 
brary service in Penacook. 

Children's Work 

Children's work continued to 
hold an important place in the 
library program. Books were cir- 
culated from centers main- 
tained at all schools in the city. 
The children's librarian person- 
ally conducted the library at Gar- 
rison School in West Concord. 

As has been the custom in past 
years, weekly story hours were 
held at the children's room in the 
main library. No small measur x 
of credit for the continued suc- 
cess of this special feature is due 
to the Junior Service League 
which provides guest story-tellers 
to augment the work of the regu- 
lar staff. 



28 — City of Concord 



Reference Work 

During 1946, the library was 
called upon to provide the an- 
swers to 4,677 reference ques- 
tions. More and more people 
are beginning to realize that the 
library is a ready source of in- 
formation on about every con- 
ceivable subject matter. The 
reference department maintains 
an unusually complete file of 
factual data and is continually 
adding source material to its col- 
lection. 

Young People's Work 

Once again, classes in use of 
the library were conducted for 
seventh grade pupils. This is a 
regularly-scheduled part of the 
public school curriculum and is 
conducted under the supervision 
of the young people's librarian. 

There was no let-up in the 
large number of high school stu- 
dents who regularly used the 
young people's room at the main 
library. In fact, after-school and 
evening use of the library by stu- 
dents taxed the capacity of young 
people's department. A policy of 
strict discipline was adopted to 
insure satisfactory study condi- 
tions. 

Other Activities 

The library featured many good 
exhibits during the year. Partic- 
ularly noteworthy were the dis- 
plays presented in connection 
with the Concord Hospital drive, 
the observance of book week and 
the housing publicity program. 

Assisted- by the women mem- 
bers of the Board of Library 



Trustees, the staff held a tea for 
senior girls in December. The oc- 
casion was w r ell attended and 
featured an interesting program 
of short talks on vocations. 

Throughout the year, the staff 
prepared and caused to be 
published in a local newspaper 
monthly lists of new books added 
to the library collection. A col- 
umn under the title "What Con- 
cord is Reading" was also pub- 
lished to keep the public in- 
formed on reader interest. 

Librarians from all sections of 
the state participated in a two- 
week institute for instructions 
which was held at the library in 
June. 

Policy 

On July 1, 1946, the library 
staff joined the city employees 
retirement plan. As a result, two 
members became eligible for and 
availed themselves of the benefits 
of the plan by retiring from li- 
brary service in January 1947. 

The municipal ordinance on 
attendance and leave was adopted 
by the library in September. Un- 
der the terms of this ordinance, 
staff members are eligible for 15 
days of annual leave and 15 days 
of sick leave each year without 
loss of pay. 

Senior (/iris attend a tea at the library 
as (/nests of the trustees and the 




RELIEF 

i i i i i i 

CITY RELIEF BOARD 

John E. Davis, Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Charles P. Coakley 
Parker L. Hancock.... Overseer of Poor 
Charles P. Coakley.. ..Overseer of Poor 

Ward 1 

1946 Expenditures : 

City $40,930.92 

Penacook $4,551.09 

i i i i i i 

Administration 

On January 2, 1946, Mr. Han- 
cock resumed his duties as Over- 
seer of the Poor, assisted by 
Alderman Charles P. Coakley as 
relief administrator of the suburb 
of Penacook. During the year, 
the work details within the relief 
office were revised and consoli- 
dated and the staff was reduced 
from four members to a new low 
of three. The extent to which 
personnel has been cut is indi- 
cated by the fact that staff mem- 
bership numbered ten in 1941. 

The City Relief Department 
continues to administer relief for 
both city relief cases and Merr- 
mack County cases living in Con- 
cord, thus avoiding duplica- 
cation. All administrative costs 
are shared equally between the 
city and county. 
General Trend 

As 1946 was the first full post- 
war year, the department was 
somewhat apprehensive in the 
early months of the year as to 
the possible extent of relief needs, 
especially in view of the epidemic 
of strikes, termination of war 



contracts, and the thousands of 
veterans available for employ- 
ment. However, the demand for 
labor continued and the amount 
of relief granted because of un- 
employment was exceedingly low. 
In fact, the total sum spent for di- 
rect relief in 1946 was less than 
the total for the preceding year. 

Of direct relief expenditures, 
approximately 75 percent were 
due to sickness cases which re- 
sulted in temporary or permanent 
unemployment. The other 25 
percent involved cases of un- 
married mothers, board and care 
of children, marital difficulties 
where the father was away from 
home, and short periods of un- 
employment where benefit pay- 
ments were not sufficient or the 
unemployed was not eligible for 
such payments. 

As in past years, some direct 
relief cases of five-year duration 
were transferred to the county. 
Other cases, involving persons 
who reached the age of 65. were 
taken off direct relief and carried 
as old age assistance cases. 

Old Age Assistance 

The year 1946 brought a sharp 
increase in old age assistance 
costs. A total of $25,221.69 was 
expended for this purpose as 
against $19,119.31 in 1945. As 
this sum represents only 25 per- 
cent of the total cost, the other 
75 percent being paid by the 
state and the federal govern- 
ments, it is obvious that more 
than $100,000.00 was paid over 
to Concord's old age assistance 
recipients during 1946. 



30 — City of Concord 



Two factors contributed to the 
increased cost of old age assist- 
ance. These were an increase in 
the number of old age cases and 
an increase in the size of monthly 
grants to all recipients due to the 
rising cost of living. 

The department feels that a 
leveling-off point in old age as- 
sistance costs has been reached 
and that in the coming years 
there should be a steady decline. 
This assumption is based on the 
fact that more and more people 
are becoming eligible fcr social 
security benefits and other retire- 
ment payments. Also, as the size 
of pensions increase, the neces- 
sity of supplementing small pen- 
sions with old age assistance will 
be largely eliminated. 
Relief Costs 

The total cost of city relief dur- 
ing 1946 was $40,930.92, of which 
$4,551.09 were expended in Pena- 
cook and $36,379.83 in the re- 
mainder of the city. Direct re- 
lief expenditures for groceries, 
milk, fuel, rent, board and care of 
adults, board and care of chil- 
dren, medicine, clothing, funerals 
and cash allowances amounted to 
$7,868.98. Expenditures for simi- 
lar items for dependent soldiers 
totaled $469.96. A total of 
$25,221.69 was spent for old age 
assistance, and an additional 
SI. 440. 19 was expended for hos- 
pitalization of poor and indigent 
persons. 

County relief costs during 
1946 totaled $24,034.17. Of this 
amount, $16,599.16 represented 
direct county relief and $2,250.65 
aid to dependent soldiers. 



Relief Load 

There were 25 city relief cases 
representing 33 persons on the 
department's rolls at the end of 
the year. This represented a de- 
crease of five cases and ten per- 
sons from the total at the begin- 
ning of the year. 

County relief cases at the close 
of 1946 numbered 36 with 87 per- 
sons represented. This was three 
cases and three persons less than 
the number on file in January. 

Old age assistance cases to- 
taled 225 in December, or 19 
more than the number carried at 
the end of 1945. 
Functional Activities 

Family and individual case 
work service is an important part 
of the relief department's activi- 
ties. Problems involving poverty, 
unemployment, illness, broken 
homes, physical and mental handi- 
caps, old age. poor housing, and 
behavior are continually coming 
to the attention of the depart- 
ment. Not only relief clients but 
many persons listed as border 
line cases are given attention. 
The underlying philosophy of the 
department's social work can best 
be expressed as "helping people 
to help themselves". The mo- 
tive behind this effort is to re- 
move the obstacles which bring 
people to the relief rolls and to 
assist them to become self-sup- 
porting citizens. 

It is the policy of the depart- 
ment to provide medical care and 
attention for clients and, when- 
ever possible, to correct any con- 
dition of health which may be the 
cause of non-employment. 



Annual Report 31 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 

/ i Y i i i 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Daniel J. Shea, Chairman 
Guy A. Swenson 
Roy W. Peaslee 

Arthur W. McIsaac Chief of Police 

J. Edward Sum a. ...Deputy Chief of Police 
1946 Operating Expenditures....$93,812.35 
1946 Equipment Expenditures. ...$3,530.23 
1 i i i i i 

Personnel 

There were several changes 
in Police Department personnel 
(hiring the past year. Two regu- 
lar officers returned to duty from 
service in the armed forces. Three 
regular and seven special police- 
men were appointed during the 
year. Six special and one regular 
patrolmen resigned and one reg- 
ular officer retired on pension due 
to physical disability. 

Finances 

The City appropriated $97,826.60 



for Police Department purposes 
for the year 1946. Of this sum, 
$93,812.35 represented operating 
costs and $3,530.23 capital ex- 
penditures. A breakdown of 
capital costs shows $2,800.00 ex- 
pended for new cruisers, $452.50 
for a street marking machine, and 
§277.7Z for three high-power spot 
lights. 

The department's unexpended 
balance at the end of the year 
totaled $484.02. This sum to- 
gether with earnings of $1,136.69 
was returned to the city treasury. 

Crime Data 

Arrests during 1946 totaled 
3,060, an increase of 1,688 over 
the total for the preceding year. 
It is important to note that this 
considerable increase was due in 
most part to misdemeanors in- 
volving violations of parking, 
driving and motor vehicle laws. 

Presented in the following" 
table is a classification by type 
and number of the criminal cases 
handled by the Police Depart- 
ment during" 1946. 



Clearly marked crosswalks and traffic channels are an important part of the Police 

Department's safety program. This view shows the pavement markings nt the 

intersection of Auburn, High, Centre and Liberty Streets 



fc^&. 






CRIMINAL CASES DURING 1946 



Classification 



Actual Cleared 
Unfounded Offenses by Arrest 



Offenses Known : 



Rape 

Aggravated Assault 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny 

Auto Theft 





1 


1 




1 


1 


4 


30 


17 


2 


98 


29 




8 


6 



Total 



Classification 
Persons Charged — Felonies : 

Rape 

Aggravated Assault 

Breaking and Entering 

Larceny 

Auto Theft 



Total 



Persons Charged — Misdemeanors : 



1 

1 

17 

29 

6 

54 



Assaults 15 

Forgery 3 

Embezzlement and Fraud 2 

Carrying Weapons 2 

Liquor Laws 1 

Drunkenness 361 

Disorderly Conduct 12 

Vagrancy 1 

Gambling 1 

Drunken Driving 34 

Road and Driving Laws 331 

Parking Violations 1,954 

Motor Vehicle Laws 263 

Other Offenses 26 



138 



54 



Summoned 
Charged Arrested or Cited 



1 

1 

17 

29 

6 

54 



15 

3 

2 

2 

1 

361 

12 

1 

1 

34 

331 

1,954 

263 

26 



Total 3,006 3,006 

Grand Total 3,060 3,060 



During the year stolen prop- 
erty in the amount of $12,485.88 
was reported to the department. 
Recovery of $8,163.57 worth of 
this property was effected. 

Traffic 

The amount of automobile 
traffic in Concord, particularly 
through traffic, continued to show 
a marked increase during 1946. 



increased pro- 



Traffic violations 
portionately. 

During the year, the depart- 
ment investigated 501 auto acci- 
dents, a 67 percent increase over 
the total for 1945. Four fatalities 
and 152 injured persons com- 
bined to make the year 1946 a 
most unsatisfactory one from the 
standpoint of highway traffic 
safety. 



Annual Report — 33 




The latest addition to police headquarters is this records room, made possible by the 
removal of clinics formerly housed in the building 

Safety licemen were required to partici- 

In the face of a growing acci- pate in a course of instructions on 

dent rate and a heavy flow of the use of firearms. The training 

traffic, the department intensified program covered the use of all 

its safety program. Full coopera- types of weapons in the police 

tion was extended to the Con- arsenal. 

cord Safety Council in its efforts One member of the department 

to cope with the problem. Spe- completed a course in traffic and 

cial attention was given to estab- accident control at the North- 

lishing adequate traffic patrols at western Traffic Institute. Another 

all of the city's grammar schools, was sent to the Federal Bureau 

In order to facilitate the flow of Investigation Police Academy 

of traffic in the downtown area, in Washington for an intensive 

a one-way traffic pattern was es- course in criminology, 
tablished between State and Main 

Streets on Warren, School, Capi- Im Provements 

tol and Park Streets. New bus Dunn S the > rean the de P art " 



stops at sidewalk curb were also 
established. These changes were 
instrumental in effecting a de- 
finite improvement in accident 
hazards in the congested business 
district. 

Training Program 



ment acquired four new cruisers, 
first replacements since 1942. 
Other equipment additions in- 
cluded a street line marker and 
three spot lights for use at Main 
Street intersections. The motor- 
driven street marker fills a long- 
standing- need for an economical 



Continuing the practice of the means of painting cross-walk^, 
past several years, all regular po- traffic lanes, parking spaces, etc. 



34 — City of Concord 



All of this work was previously 
done by hand. The spot light 
equipment provides greater pro- 
tection for officers directing night 
traffic on Main Street. 

At police headquarters, the 
bureau of records was moved to 
second-floor quarters previously 
used as a locker room. The locker 
facilities in turn, were installed in 
adjacent quarters made available 
by the removal of the health 
clinics which were formerly 



housed in the building. The first- 
floor room vacated by the bureau 
of records was renovated and 
pressed into use as a much- 
needed interrogation room. 

Recommendation 

It is recommended that the 
quarters now occupied by the Re- 
lief Department be vacated and 
returned to police use as a juve- 
nile court room and a classroom 
for police training purposes. 



Photographic laboratory at police headquarters 




Annual Report — 35 



PROBATION 

■f i i i i i 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judge William L. Stevens 

Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 

1946 Expenditure $1,477.50 

i i i i i i 

It is axiomatic that human mis- 
ery carries no price tag. Neither 
can a dollars-and-cents value be 
placed on probation work. With 
proper guidance, delinquent juve- 
niles can and do become useful 
law-abiding citizens. Society can 
ill-afford the burden of crime 
and punishment when it can be 
measurably lessened by tested re- 
habilitation practices. This is 
particularly true in the field of 
juvenile crime where the oppor- 
tunities for prevention and cor- 
rection are the greatest. 

Active Cases 

During 1946, a total of 23 cases 
were brought before the juvenile 
court. Of these, 13 were con- 
cerned with the neglect of chil- 
dren. In each instance, the child 
involved was placed in the cus- 
tody of the state welfare depart- 
ment. Seven of the cases brought 
before the court were for reason 
of larceny. 

Only one case of violation of 
probation was recorded during 
the year. This case involved a 
girl who became an adult under 
the law before her probationary 
period expired. 

Past Trends 

The causes of juvenile delin- 
quency in Concord have changed 



very little if any. during the past 
decade. Chief contributing fac- 
tors have been the lack of proper 
parental supervision and the un- 
willingness of juveniles to accept 
responsibilities. 

During the past few years, the 
city has experienced a low rate 
of juvenile delinquency. This 
situation can be attributed to the 
fact that churches, civic and so- 
cial organizations have taken an 
active interest in the welfare of 
Concord's youth. At the same 
time, no small measure of credit 
is due to the police department 
and the municipal court for their 
excellent handling of problem 
children. 

Past experience indicates that 
where probation is necessary, a 
a one-year period rather than a 
longer term produces the best 
results. Although this limitation 
may not apply to other cities, 
careful consideration of related 
influences such as age, type of 
home, financial capacity of the 
home and its family and social 
background appears to establish 
the soundness of a one-year pro- 
bationary period in Concord. In 
this connection, it is interesting 
to note that there have been very 
few violations of probation dur- 
ing the department's nine-year 
history. In fact. Concord's ex- 
perience with violations has been 
better than that of any other 
New England city of comparable 
size. 
The Future 

The outlook for the next 
few years points to an increase 
in juvenile delinquency. Larger 



36 — City of Concord 



cities are already experencing' an local situation is well in hand and 

increase and smaller cities us- the proper agencies are ready to 

ually follow the lead of the big- cope with any increase which 

ger communities. However, the may occur in Concord. 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

• / / / / / 

William L. Stevens Judge 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

John W. Stanley Clerk 

1946 Expenditure $2,960.00 

i i i i i i 

Cases Tried 

The number of cases to come 
before the Concord Municipal 
Court rose to an all-time high in 
1946. The court handled 3,060 
criminal cases as compared to 
1,372 in 1945, 880 in 1944 and 
701 in 1943. 

The tremendous acceleration in 
court activity can be attributed 
in most part to minor lawless- 
ness, particularly in the opera- 
tion of motor vehicles. Compared 
with figures for the preceding 
year, cases involving violations 
of road and driving laws jumped 
from 145 to 331, motor vehicle 
laws from 149 to 263, and park- 
ing regulations from 561 to 
1,954. Although the Police De- 
partment's stepped-up program 
of enforcement resulted in more 
violators being brought before 
the court, all indications pointed 
to a growing lack of attention by 
motorists to traffic rules. 

On the other hand, consider- 
able improvement was noted in 
criminal offenses of a more 
serious nature. Cases involving - 



felonies numbered 54 as against 
107 for the year 1945. The num- 
ber of cases of breaking and en- 
tering dropped from 25 to 17, 
larceny from 61 to 29, and auto 
theft from 18 to 6. 

The Municipal Court tried 127 
civil cases during 1946. This 
number represented an increase 
of 65 civil actions over the total 
for the previous year. Once again, 
no small claims cases were 
brought into court due to the 
fact that laws governing such 
legal actions are ineffective in 
accomplishing the purpose for 
which the statutes were enacted. 

Revenue and Costs 

The court's financial statement 
for the year reflected the record 
number of cases acted upon. Re- 
ceipts from fines, costs and sun- 
dry fees totaled $12,948.91, or 
more than double the 1945 figure 
of $5,727.96. 

Total expenditures amounted 
to $6,128.86. Of this sum, 
$5,727.90 represented fines col- 
lected by the court and turned 
over to various state departments 
as prescribed by law. 

The sum of $6,820.05 represent- 
ing net receipts after expendi- 
tures and deductions by transfer, 
was paid to the City Treasurer. 
The sum of $2,960.00 was appro- 
priated to the court by the city 
government to defray the salaries 
of court officers. 



Annual Report — 37 



My t -x t T p T D A T noticeable increase in the number 

U IN IVjlirVL f home-based aircraft at the air- 

AIRPORT 

Operating Policy 

/ / / / / / .... 

For the first time in the history 

BOARD OF AIRPORT of the field, supervision of opera- 

COMMISSIONERS tions was vested in a full-time 

^, . airport manager. This change in 

Hon. Charles C. Davie, Chairman . . . . , 

Robert W. Potter, Clerk administrative policy resulted 

Charles A. Bartlett from a need for a more active 

John N. Engel t Q f SU p erv ision to protect the 

Charles W. Howard -;. r r . . r 

Donald J. McFarland City s considerable investment in 

John Swenson the facility and to provide better 

William F. Flynn Airport Manager service to the air-traveling public. 

1946 Operating Expenditure $11,765.68 The commission employed Mr. 

1946 Capital Expenditure $4,512.79 William F. Flynn, a former navy 

1946 Earning $6,066.80 pilot, as airport manager. 

•f i i i i i During the year, a second 

The Concord Municipal Airport fixed-base operator established a 

experienced greatly increased flying service at the field. The 

flight activities during 1946. Ap- smaller of the two city-owned 

proximately 200 veterans availed hangars was leased to the Ferns 

themselves of the opportunity for Flying Service as an operations 

training under the G. I. Bill of center. The William E. Martin 

Rights and learned to fly. In ad- Flying Service continues to use 

dition, many former military fly- the larger city-owned hangar for 

ers completed refresher courses commercial flying activities, 

in order to retain their civilian In cooperation with the City 

pilot standings. In line with this Planning Board, the Airport 

stepped-up activity, there was a Commission prepared a master 

An unusual night scene at the municipal airport showing air freight unloaded front 

a large cargo transport 



V«t 






.***' w""" l *«Sfc 



£^S 



* «» 



■» «_.»> 



plan of the airport. The plan will 
lie invaluable as a guide to the 
future orderly development of air- 
port facilities. 

Airline Service 

During the summer of 1946, 
the Northeast Airlines scheduled 
four stops daily at Concord on 
its International Route between 
Boston and Montreal. For a li- 
mited period, the airline also 
operated a direct Concord to New 
York flight with all transport 
seats available at the local flight 
terminal. During the year, the 
airline's Concord stop cleared 
2,500 out-going and 2,200 in-com- 
ing passengers. The airline also 
handled 2,400 pounds of Concord 
air express. As air travel in- 
creases, Northeast expects to add 
more flights through Concord. 

In the near future, it is expected 
that the Conway Valley Airlines 
will inaugurate an intrastate serv- 
ice which will connect Concord 
with other New Hampshire cities. 

Civil Aeronautics Agencies 

The Civil Aeronautics Admin- 
istration's regional inspection 
service continued to operate from 
the Concord Municipal Airport. 
Examination activities showed a 
tremendous increase as many ex- 
military pilots sought civilian 
pilot status. The C. A. A. also 
operated and maintained two-way 
radio, teletype interphone and 
radio range services at the air- 
port with offices in the adminis- 
tration building. In order to 
provide better service to pilots, 
the agency added a new VHF 




An observer checks the instrument kiosk 
at the airport weather station 

(very high frequency) radio to 
its communication station. 

Weather Bureau 

From headquarters located in 
the administration building, the 
U. S. Weather Bureau operated 
a round-the-clock weather fore- 
cast service. The bureau broad- 
casts daily weather reports over 
a direct-wire radio hookup from 
its offices. During the year, a 
new teletype was installed to pro- 
vide instant communication with 
other important weather stations 
in New Hampshire. 

Airport Improvements 

Rounding out its property ac- 
quisition program, the Airport 
Commission purchased a number 
of parcels of land located in the 
approach zone area on the east- 
erly side of the airport. The 
commission also seal-coated the 
north-south runway and the apron 
in front of the administration 
building and the hangars. 



Annual Report — 39 



FIRE 
PROTECTION 

i i i i i -f 

FIRE BOARD 

Charles P. Coakley, Chairman 
William J. Flynn 
Lawrence J. Moynihan 
Robert W. Potter 

Clarence H. Green Fire Chief 

Henry E. Drew | 

Duncan M. Murdoch .... Deputy Chiefs 

Leo F. Blodgett ' 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief 

1946 Operating Expenditure....$l 11,499.99 
1946 Capital Expenditure $12,175.50 



MILAN R. PIPER 

Deputy Chief 

Died 

August 15, 1946 



Fires and Fire Loss 

During 1946, the Fire Depart- 
ment responded to 667 alarms of 
which 601 were still and 66 were 
box alarms. This represented an 
increase of 169 over the total for 
the previous year. 

There were two serious fires 
during 1946, both of which occur- 
red in the downtown business 
district where exposures were 
great. One of these involved the 
Stickney Block on North Main 
Street near Bridge Street, while 
the other was in the structure lo- 
cated on the south-east corner of 
Warren and North State Streets. 



Value 
Buildings .... $567,550.00 
Contents 156,493.54 



Loss 

$49,774.74 
20,996.43 



Both fires were confined to the 
buildings in which they origi- 
nated. 

Although the number of fires 
showed a marked increase, there 
was not a corresponding increase 
in fire loss. In fact, the 1946 fire 
loss, which totaled $70,771.17, 
was $3,685.51 less than that of 
the preceding year. 

Fire Prevention 

The department's fire preven- 
tion program was intensified dur- 
ing 1946. In addition to routine 
inspection activities, considerable 
emphasis was placed on fire pre- 
vention education. The depart- 
ment received the full coop- 
eration of The Concord Safety 
Council, the service clubs, and 
the schools, as well as the local 
radio station and newspaper, in 
promoting public instruction in 
fire prevention. 

Periodic inspections were made 
at all convalescent homes and fire 
drills were conducted at all pub- 
lic schools. All installations of 
power oil burning equipment 
were inspected. The department 
also continued its long-range pro- 
gram of applying the require- 
ments of the Cocoanut Grove 
Law relative to safety of life in 
places of public assembly. 

Personnel 

A two-platoon system was es- 
tablished on July 1, 1946. Under 
this system, all permanent fire- 

Insurance Insurance Paid Net Loss 

$387,800.00 $43,174.47 $ 6,600.27 

124,511.53 17,378.43 3,618.00 



Total 



$724,043.54 $70,771.17 $512,311.53 $60,552.90 $10,218.27 



42 — City of Concord 




The West Congregational Church fire. 
important part in saving the 

men alternate on and off duty on 
a 24-hour basis. As the result of 
this major change in the depart- 
ment's working schedule, 13 men 
were added to the force. The 
permanent personnel now num- 
bers 43 men. 

Due to the adoption of the 
two-platoon system, the death of 
Deputy Milan R. Piper and the 
retirement of Deputy Michael J. 
Martin, the following officers 
were promoted to the rank of 
deputy chief : Captain Henry E. 
Drew to first deputy chief. Cap- 
tain Duncan M. Murdoch to sec- 
ond deputy chief, and Captain 
Leo F. Blodsfett to second de- 



Modern aerial ladder equipment played an 
church from total destruction 

puty chief. Other promotions 
included those of Lieutenant 
Melvin G. Davis to rank of cap- 
tain. Fireman Joseph F. Gree- 
nough to captain, and Fireman 
Dana S. Morrison to lieutenant. 

The department's call force 
numbered 129 men. In addition, 
the auxiliary fire force rendered 
valuable service at several major 
fires. 
Apparatus and Equipment 

The department's normal quota 
of apparatus includes 14 fire 
trucks, three official cars and a 
service truck. In April, a 750- 
gallon Mack pumper was ac- 
quired and commissioned in place 



Annual Report — 43 



of Engine No. 4. Engine No. 4, 
a 500-gallon Aherns Fox pumper 
was moved to West Concord to 
replace a 1922 Concord truck 
which was scrapped. At the same 
time, the fire chief was furnished 
a new official car and the car 
formerly used by the chief was 
turned over to the deputy chiefs. 

The department also placed an 
order during the year for a 750- 
gallon Mack pumper for its Pena- 
cook station. This new pumper 
will replace Engine No. 3, a 1928- 
model Concord truck. 

At the close of the year, the 
department had in service 19.750 
feet of two and one-half inch hose 
and 2,350 feet of three-quarter 
inch booster hose. 

Maintenance 

In spite of the age of many of 
the fire trucks, all apparatus was 
maintained in good working or- 
der. Necessary repairs and re- 
placements were made by the 
department's mechanic. 

All fire alarm boxes in the city 
have been cleaned, oiled, timed 
and tested. Twelve new alarm 
boxes were installed as replace- 
ments. Every effort was made 
to keep the fire alarm system in 
good working order. Because the 
system has been in service for 
many years, frequent changes and 
replacements are needed to keep 
the equipment operating properly. 

Recommendations 

In order to provide greater fire 
protection in the south-end sec- 
tion of the city proper, plans have 
been prepared for a new fire sta- 
tion at the corner of West Street 



and Broadway. It is recom- 
mended that construction of this 
facility be undertaken at the earl- 
iest possible date. 

Under the capital budget sys- 
tem of equipment replacement, 
considerable progress has been 
made in improving the effective- 
ness of the department. It is rec- 
ommended that the programming 
of needed improvements be con- 
tinued. 

. . . FIRE HYDRANTS 
////// 
BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
Clarence H. Green 
Percy R. Sanders 

1946 Expenditure None 

////// 

The city's fire hydrant system 
consists of 801 services of which 
688 are public and 113 are private 
hydrants. Two new private hy- 
drants were added during the 
past year. No changes were made 
in the public hydrant system. 

Existing services were main- 
tained in good working order. All 
hydrants were inspected period- 
ically, and particular care was 
taken during the winter months 
to check for leaks which might 
cause ice to form in hydrants and 
make them inoperative. 

The removal of snow from hy- 
drants is becoming more and 
more of a problem due to changes 
in street plowing practices. The 
Board of Hydrant Commissioners 
will endeavor to seek a solution 
to this problem during the com- 
ing year. 



44 — City of Concord 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 



All types of building construc- 
tion were in urgent demand dur- 
ing 1946. This was definitely 
the case in the residential con- 
struction field where the housing 
shortage continued acute with no 
immediate relief in sight. Dur- 
ing the year, inflationary prices 
began to put in an appearance 
and served somewhat to deter 
construction. Nevertheless, the 
amount of building construction 
undertaken almost doubled the 
total for the preceding year. 

. . . ZONING 

/ / 1 ' i i i 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman 
John S. Corbett 
A. Clifford Hudson 
Laurence M. Meyer 
Shelby O. Walker 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk 

1946 Expenditure $382.42 



The up-swing in cases to come 
before the Zoning Board of Ad- 
justment which was noted in 1945 
continued during the past year. 
The board ruled on 35 appeals or 
seven more than the 1945 total. 
Of the appeals heard, 16 were 
granted outright, 12 were granted 
conditionally and seven were 
denied. 



. . . BUILDING 

1 i i i 1 i 

Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 

1946 Expenditure None 

i i i i i i 

Building permits issued during 
1946 totaled 212 as compared to 
HO for the previous year. Of the 
1946 permits, 1 15 were for new 
construction and 97 were for al- 
terations and repairs. 

The estimated valuation of the 
work authorized by the permits 
issued was $1,277,380.00, an in- 
crease of $600,750.00 over the 

1945 total. This increase can be 
attributed to the Rumford Press 
plant addition which carried an 
estimated valuation of $664,660.00. 
Of the total 1946 valuation, 
$366,650.00 represented new work 
and $910,730.00 repairs and alter- 
ations. One hundred ten dwel- 
ling units were added during the 
year. Of these, 62 resulted from 
new construction and 48 from 
conversion of existing buildings. 

. . . PLUMBING 
////// 

Edward E. Beane. ...Plumbing Inspector 

1946 Expenditure None 

1946 Receipts $33.50 

////// 
The Plumbing Inspector issued 
101 plumbing permits during 
1946. This number represented 
a three-fold increase over the 
1945 total. Six applicants for 
a journeyman's license and one 
for a master's license were ex- 
amined during the year. All ap- 
plicants successfully passed the 
recmired examination. 



Annual Report — 45 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 

i -f i i i i 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. Charles C. Davie, Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Robert W. Potter 

William A. Stevens 

Nelson E. Strong 

John Swenson 

John C. Tilton 

Ervin E. Webber Commissioner 

Ervin E. Webber Supt. of Streets 

Ervin E. Webber Tree Warden 

Edward E. Beane City Engineer 

Leslie C. Clark Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 

1946 Operating Expenditure....$314,048.32 
1946 Capital Expenditure $23,173.10 

i i 1 1 i i 

With the war at an end, the 
Public Works Department's ac- 
tivities were expanded to meet 
the demands of a backlog of work. 
However, the department experi- 
enced considerable difficulty in 
undertaking major construction 
work due to the fact that labor, 
equipment and materials were not 
in sufficient supply. 

Personnel 

The department s personnel 
consisted of 106 permanent and 
86 part-time workers. Nine reg- 
ular employees resigned during 
ing the year. Some difficulty was 
experienced with the operation of 
the attendance and leave ordi- 
nance under which each employee 
receives 15 days of annual and 15 
days of sick leave on the basis of 
a full year's service. An unusual 

46 — City of Concord 



amount of absenteeism was noted 
as most of the department's 
workers took full advantage of 
free time with pay under the 
terms of the ordinance. 

Construction 

One of the major projects com- 
pleted during the year was the 
relocation of Ferry Street to make 
way for the new addition to 
the Rumford Printing Company 
plant. With the aid of state 
funds, the department also rebuilt 
Fiske Road in its entirety as well 
as a portion of Little Pond Road. 

In order to receive further state 
funds for the improvement of 
farm-to-market roads, the city 
was required to participate finan- 
cially in the state's secondary 
highway construction program. 
The particular project involved 
was the re-building of New 
Hampshire Route No. 3-B from 
East Concord village to the Can- 
terbury town line. The city ap- 
propriated $6,000.00 as its share 
of the cost of this work. In 
return, the state assumed the 
maintenance of the new highway. 

During the year, Richardson 
Mills Road on Concord Plains, 
Appleton Street in East Concord 
and Runnells Road at Riverhill 
were graded and surface-treated 
with tar. This work was in line 
with the city's policy of elimi- 
nating gravel roads and required 
the application of 11.788 gallons 
of tar. 

Other activities included the 
laying of 2,361 square yards of 
asphalt sidewalk and 1,078 feet 
of granite curbing. Seven catch 
basins, three catch basin connec- 



tions and a culvert were installed 
and one catch basin and a culvert 
were replaced. The department 
also built a concrete retaining- 
wall on the easterly side of South 
Main Street immediately south 
of the Sanel property. 

The blacksmith shop addition 
to the department's garage off 
Warren Street was completed 
during the year. The addition, 
which is of brick construction, 
was built by employees of the 
department. 

Highway Maintenance 

During the summer, 137,121 
gallons of tar were applied in 
maintaining surface-treated 
gravel roads. In the process of 
this w r ork, the highway division 
spread 4,130 cubic yards of sand 

A view of the Highway Department's ne 

bank off \\ 



and 1,112 cubic yards of gravel. 
Road patching activities required 
1,363 tons of cold patch material. 
With the assistance of temp- 
orary workers, the department 
carried out its regular semi- 
annual street cleaning program. 
This work was accomplished at 
a cost of $19,041.30. As in prev- 
ious years, routine maintenance 
work, such as street sweeping, 
catch basin cleaning and culvert 
repairs, was undertaken when 
needed. 

Snow and Ice 

During the year, the city 
experienced a 69.8 inch snowfall 
which was 3.7 inches less than 
the total for the previous winter. 
Fifteen trucks, two graders, a ro- 
tary plow, a snow fighter with 

:v "cold patch" plant located at the gravel 
alker Street 




Annual Report — 47 




Municipal signs of all types, numbering in the hundreds, are painted and lettered in 
this shop located at the city sheds off Warren Street 



roto wing and three sidewalk 
tractors, all department-owned, 
were used for plowing- and snow 
removal. In addition, three pri- 
vately-owned trucks and a side- 
walk plow were hired to augment 
the city's snow-fighting equip- 
ment. 

Snow removal activities were 
expanded to cover a greater street 
area than in previous years. As 
a result, a total of 39,928 cubic 
yards of snow were trucked from 
the city streets as compared t > 
32,928 cubic yards in 1945. Dur- 
ing the winter season, icy streets 
were coated with 6,106 cubic 
yards of sand. 

Snow plowing and snow re- 
moval cost the city $32,279.08 
during the past winter as against 



$29,352.75 in 1945. Sanding costs 
likewise increased to $10,697.47 
from the previous year's total of 
$8,333.13. 

Refuse and Garbage Service 

During 1946, 50,105 cubic yards 
of refuse were collected by de- 
partment trucks. This amount 
exceeded the total for the prev- 
ious year by 3,323 cubic yards. 

Table garbage was collected 
regularly by a private contrac- 
tor. This service cost the city 
$6,050.00 for the year 1946. The 
garbage was used for feeding 
purposes at a commercial piggery 
located outside of the city limits. 

Engineering 

In connection with its major 
street plan activities, the Engi- 



48 — City of Concord 



neering Division re-established 
11,632 feet of street in West Con- 
cord and 9,670 feet in East Con- 
cord. Stone bounds were set at 
all street intersections. Eighty 
bounds were placed in position 
during the year. 

The division ran sections and 
profiles and established grades 
for all road work undertaken dur- 
ing 1946. In addition, 1,984 feet 
of sidewalk grades were estab- 
lished. A survey involving the 
re-alignment of 2,056 feet of Lit- 
tle Pond Road was completed for 
the Highway Division. 

The Engineering Division ran 
9,995 feet of sewer profile which 
included a new line from Roger 
Avenue in West Concord to the 
Thirty Pines on Fisherville Road. 
Engineering service was pro- 
vided in connection with the con- 
struction of 680 feet of this proj- 
ect, as well as 1,046 feet of a 
relocated sewer built during the 
change in the location of Ferry 
Street. A 174-foot sanitary sewer 
in Dunklee Street was also laid 
out. 

Surveys were made of the 
Good Will Fire Station, the Hall 
Street Playground, and street 
line changes at the intersection 
of Bridge Street and Airport 
Road. The division also laid out 
several blocks of lots at the Blos- 
som Hill and Maple Grove Ceme- 
teries. Additional surveys were 
conducted as part of a general re- 
vision of cemetery plans. 

During the year, 1,203 deeds 
were recorded and all property 
line changes were noted on the 
assessors maps. All sewer and 



catch basin plans and profiles 
were checked and brought up to 
date. In addition, 1,300 square 
yards of prints were developed. 

Sanitary Sewers 

The third year of operation of 
the city's 72.16 miles of sani- 
tary sewers under a system of 
rents resulted in revenue total- 
ing $34,663.82. Of this amount, 
general sewer rents accounted 
for $23,290.47, industrial rents 
$4,885.77, sewer connections and 
jobbing $3,723.05, penalties and 
discounts forfeited $52.16 and 
charges for relocation of Ferry 
Street sewers $2,712.37. 

Total operating costs for the 
year amounted to $14,342.19. The 
sum of $13,607.06 was applied to 
depreciation leaving a net income 
of $6,714.57. 

As of December 31, 1946, the 
sanitary sewer account showed 
current assets in the amount 
of $47,117.45. This included 
$35,040.55 in cash, $8,724.35 in 
accounts receivable and $3,352.55 
in materials and supplies. Total 
fixed assets after depreciation 
were carried on the books at 
$562,388.00. 

During the year, the division 
constructed 174 feet of main in 
Dunklee Street, 435 feet in Roger 
Avenue and 454 feet in Ferry 
Street. The cost of this work ran 
from $2.11 to $5.80 per foot. The 
division also built 18 new man- 
holes and completed 45 new cus- 
tomer connections. Plugs were re- 
moved from 33 lateral sewer lines 
and all main line sewers were 
maintained in g-ood working: order. 



Annual Report — 49 




The carpenter shop at the city slieds plays an important part in maintaining municipal 
equipment in good working order 



Storm Sewers 

A new storm sewer system was 
built at the Ferry Street-Rum- 
ford Press location during the 
year. This included the construc- 
tion of a 278-foot line in Ferry 
Street, part of which laid under 
the Rumford Press addition, and 
the construction of private feeder 
lines for the printing company. 
Three new catch basins and five 
manholes were installed in the 
course of this work. 

Minor storm sewer extensions 
were made at the Airport and on 
North State Street in West Con- 
cord. A new drain was installed 
at Summer Street in Penacook as 
the result of the discovery of an 
old underground reservoir in the 
street. In addition to routine 
maintenance, repairs were made 
at the Hammond Field sewer off 
South Street and obstructions 
were cleared from the main at 
Broken Bridge Road. 



As of December 31, 1946, the 
city operated 8.56 miles of storm 
sewers. 

Street Lighting 

Two new street lights were in- 
stalled during 1946. This brought 
the total number of lights in oper- 
ation up to 1,620. In a number 
of instances, lights were relocated 
to provide more effective street il- 
lumination. The municipal street 
lighting system was operated at 
a cost of $40,853.50. 

Parks 

The municipal park system 
was maintained in good condition 
during the past year. Through- 
out the summer, the numerous 
flower beds and shrubs in the 
various parks were carefully 
tended. The resulting floral dis- 
plays greatly enhanced the na- 
tural beauty of these open areas. 

During the year, the Park Di- 
vision resurfaced 3,744 feet of 



50 — City of Concord 



roadway in White Park and 
2,622 feet in Rollins Park. The 
division also continued its refor- 
estation program at Garrison Park 
in West Concord. 

Cemeteries 

At Blossom Hill Cemetery, 
work was continued on the de- 
velopment of a new section for 
use as a Jewish cemetery. In 
addition to this work, 12,846 feet 
of cemetery streets were resur- 
faced. 

The Cemetery Division com- 
pleted its regrading activities at 
the Woodlawn Cemetery in Pen- 
acook. Approximately one and 
one-quarter acres of the old por- 
tion of the cemetery were rebuilt 
during the year. 

Extensive improvements were 
made at the President Franklin 
Pierce Lot in the Old North 
Cemetery. The lot was com- 
pletely regraded and a new mon- 
ument was erected over the 
grave. This work was accom- 
plished under the direction of a 
special committee authorized by 
the 1945 State Legislature which 
appropriated $5,500.00 to cover 
the cost of erecting the new mon- 
ument. 



Two hundred forty-two burials 
were conducted in city-owned 
cemeteries during 1946. 

Trees 

The Tree Division, consisting 
of a three-man crew, carried out 
its annual program of maintain- 
ing the city's shade trees in good 
condition. Pruning, trimming and 
spraying activities were pursued 
in routine fashion, and all un- 
healthy trees were removed. The 
division continued its moth con- 
trol and poison ivy eradication 
programs with good results. 

Other Activities 

Once again, the department 
furnished the manpower and 
equipment for construction and 
field maintenance at the muni- 
cipal airport. The bleachers at 
Rollins Park were moved to Me- 
morial Field to increase the seat- 
ing capacity at night football 
games. The department continued 
its policy of allowing various city 
departments the use of its men 
and equipment to perforin a wide 
variety of tasks lor which out- 
side help would otherwise be re- 
quired at a considerable added 
cost to the city. 



Transmitting facilities of radio station WKXL 




II1III hlllll' 




WEIGHTS and 

MEASURES 

////// 

J. Shepard Norris City Sealer 

1946 Expenditure $1,330.24 

1 i 1 i i 1 

New Equipment 

Much new weighing and meas- 
uring equipment was installed 
during the year. This was par- 
ticularly true of gasoline filling 
stations where old pumping 
equipment was rebuilt or re- 
placed by the wholesale distribu- 
tors. 

New scales and measures be- 
gan to appear in limited numbers 
as manufacturers turned to peace- 
time production. Wherever this 
new equipment put in its appear- 
ance, it was carefully checked for 
accuracy. 

Packages 

The past year witnessed a de- 
finite increase in the number and 
variety of commodities pre-pack- 
aged for sale. This trend was 
most noticeable in stores sell- 
ing groceries and meat. State 
laws require packaged goods to 
be plainly marked with the net 
weight of the contained com- 



modity. Although all pre-pack- 
aged goods were carefully in- 
spected by the sealer, particular 
attention was given to new 
commodities appearing in pack- 
aged form. Wherever discrepan- 
cies were found these were 
ordered corrected and merchants 
were warned against recurrences. 

Inspections 

The department's inspection 
program was stepped-up all along 
the line to meet the needs of the 
post-war expansion in retail mer- 
chandising. Merchant coopera- 
tion was excellent as indicated by 
numerous requests for inspec- 
tions received in advance of rou- 
tine checks. It is also gratifying 
to note that the department re- 
ceived very few customer com- 
plaints during the year. 

Special emphasis was placed 
on checking equipment used in 
door-to-door sales and purchases. 
Cart bodies used in the sale of 
wood were inspected as were the 
scales of junk dealers engaged 
in buying waste materials from 
householders. 

The following table summa- 
rizes the department's inspection 
activities for the year ending 
December 31, 1946: 





INSPECTIONS DURING 1946 












Con- 


Cau- 






Correct 


Adjusted 


demned Incorrect 


tioned 


Idle 


Scales 


325 


95 


12 23 






Weights 


520 
88 










Liquid Measures 




Gas Pumps 


169 


36 


2 


2 


12 


Kerosene Pumps 


23 










Grease Dispensers 


69 




1 






Oil Bottles 


280 










Tank and Truck Meters 


15 


7 








Package Re-weighs .... 


172 










Cart Bodies 


17 











52 — City of Concord 



WATER 
SUPPLY 

•f i i i i 1 

BOARD OF WATER 

COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson, President 
Robert W. Brown 
Hon. Charles C. Davie 
Harry H. Dudley 
Allen M. Freeman 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Benjamin H. Orr 
Gardner Tilton 

Percy R. Sanders Superintendent 

1946 Expenditures $104,379.08 

1946 Receipts $129,180.45 

////// 

Consumption 

Concord used 1,106,587,746 gal- 
lons of water during- 1946. This 
amount represented an increase 
of 34,559,446 gallons over the to- 
tal for the preceding year. Of 
the 1946 total, 591,936,746 gallons 
were pumped to the high service 
district, while 514,651,000 gallons 
were supplied by gravity flow. 
In addition, 24,262.140 gallons 
were pumped from the high 
service system to the extra-high 
service standpipe on Little Pond 
Road. During the year, 14,594,600 
gallons were supplied by pump- 
ing to the Penacook-Boscawen 
water precinct. 

The average daily use of water 
was 3,031,754 gallons, an increase 
of 94,691 gallons over the 1945 
figure. On the basis of an esti- 
mated population of 30.000, the 
average daily consumption per 
person was 101 gallons. 



Pumping System 

Modernization of equipment at 
the North State Street pumping 
station, which got under way in 
1945 with the installation of a 
new auxiliary pumping unit, was 
continued during the past year. 
Of particular importance was the 
installation of new electrical ap- 
paratus which will increase the 
power rating of the plant from 
2,300 to 4,000 volts. Although the 
change-over was not completed 
at the end of the year, the metal- 
clad switchboard was in place and 
two 100 horsepower electric mo- 
tors for the new voltage were 
ready for installation. The work 
is under the supervision of the 
engineering firm of Metcalf and 
Eddy of Boston, Massachusetts. 

Another project for which plans 
are being prepared is a new 
pumping station at Penacook 



A vieiv of Penacook Lake looking north- 
cast from Lakeview Drive 





The newly-installed switchboard at the 

main pumping station 

Lake. This proposed automatic 
high service station will fill a 
a long-standing- need for better 
water pressure in the suburbs of 
West Concord and Penacook. 

Distribution System 

No major changes were made 
in the distribution system during 
1946. Although the Water De- 
partment held several projects in 
readiness for construction, the 
continued shortage of materials 
and labor made it inadvisable to 
undertake any of this work. 

As soon as conditions permit, 
work will be resumed on the 
24-inch cast iron main project 
between Penacook Lake and Fos- 
terville. Approximately 4,000 
feet of this main was laid be- 

Annual ice cutting operations at the tipper 
end df Penacook Lake 




fore the war. Some 7,400 feet 
remain to be constructed before 
the main can be cut-in as a re- 
placement for the existing 18- 
inch pipe which was laid in 1883. 
Finances 

With the war ended, the policy 
of abating one-quarter of the 
annual water bill was discon- 
tinued. Total receipts for 1946 
amounted to $129,180.45. Of this 
sum, $126,064.96 represented pay- 
ments received from water sales. 
The department received $1,347.03 
for services as billing and collect- 
ing agent for the Sanitary Sewer 
Department. 

Expenditures for the year to- 
taled $104,379.08. Of this sum, 
$84,615.33 were spent for general 
operations, $17,000.00 for bond 
retirement and $2,763.75 for bond 
interest. The department started 
the year with a cash balance of 
$19,570.40 and closed its books in 
December with a treasury bal- 
ance of $44,371.77. 

As of December 31, 1947, the 
Water Department Income-In- 
vestment Account amounted to 
$110,802.06, of which $55,000.00 
were invested in United States 
Treasury Bonds bearing interest 
at the rate of two and one-half 
percent, and $55,802.06 were on 
deposit in local savings banks. 
The account showed an income 
of $2,446.21 for the year 1946. 

The total fixed assets of the 
department represent an invest- 
ment of $2,000,027.91. After de- 
ducting depreciation, the value of 
the water works as of December 
31, 1946 was carried on the books 
at $1,239,122.49. 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

•f 1 i 1 1 1 

BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Hollis, President 
Charles F. Cook 
J. Richard Jackman 
Lela Y. Johnson 
Violet L. McIvor 
Edwina L. Roundy 
Donald W. Saltmarsh 
Osmond R. Strong 
Dean P. Williamson 

Natt B. Burbank Superintendent 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 
1946: $384,790.39 

i i i i i i 

. . . CONCORD SCHOOL 
DISTRICT 

The administration of a public 
school system in these post-war 
days is a task which would chal- 
lenge the wisdom of Solomon 
himself. While management is 
is only an adjunct of the more 
important work of instruction in 
the classroom, and exists solely 
to further that work, it is true 
that administrative decisions cast 
a broad shadow of assistance or 
handicap over the day-by-day 
task of educating children. 

In spite of the gravity of the 
present situation in public educa- 
tion, it is a challenging time in 
which to have a hand. The pos- 
sibilities are great, both for suc- 
cess and for disaster. A high 
quality of leadership is a prime 
need. 

This leadership must come not 
only from professional educa- 



tors but from intelligent, public 
spirited citizens who will take a 
strong interest in the schools. 
Only when such laymen come 
forward and lend a hand in the 
development of school policy will 
education move forward steadily. 

Finances 

During the year 1945-1946, the 
cost of operating Concord schools 
was $384,790.39. This sum does 
not include payments on the dis- 
trict's bonded debt, cafeteria ex- 
penses or advances to the bonus 
account and pension fund. Bonds 
totaling $25,000.00 were retired 
during the year. This included 
final payments on the Eastman 
School and the Morrill School 
Addition. The total outstand- 
ing indebtedness amounted to 
$276,000.00 of which $266,000.00 
were chargeable to the High 
School and the remaining 
$10,000.00 to Conant School. 

Teaching Staff 

The district operated with a 
teaching staff of 149, including 
all categories of instructors. The 
problem of finding teachers to 
fill vacancies shows no signs of 
abatement. At the start of the 
1946-1947 school year, 27 teachers 
were new to the community and 
13 had no teaching experience. 

The teacher situation has boiled 
down to the point where it is 
simply a matter of taking anyone 
who is available, without regard 
to the usual qualifications re- 
quired for admission to the teach- 
ing staff of a city school system. 

In pre-war days Concord could 



Annual Report — 55 



4 


.1 


CI 

'J 

m 


Of 

i 

, i 
: & 1 


01 

• * 


* . JHMK1 




. , r , w ... ,... : , ; . .,„ 


*. 





Learning the second 

draw good teachers from the 
smaller communities of the state 
where $1,000.00 was a relatively 
high salary. By last summer, 
many of the towns in New 
Hampshire were paying salaries 
high enough to hold their teach- 
ers. Repeatedly candidates for 
positions here withdrew upon be- 
ing offered more by some town 
of three or four thousand popu- 
lation. 

Now that the supply of quali- 
fied teachers has all but dried up, 
there is nothing left to do but to 
step boldly forward and set up a 
salary standard which will re- 
establish Concord's ability to pull 
competent teachers from other 
places. 

Pupil Transportation 

The school district is about to 
take the first step toward event- 
ual ownership and operation of 
school busses. The private con- 



R — penmanship class 

tract expiring at the end of the 
coming school year will not be 
rewritten. The Board of Educa- 
tion will insert in the forthcoming 
budget an item to defray the cost 
of purchasing a bus to operate on 
this route. 

Two major benefits will derive 
immediately from this action. 
First, the conditions under which 
pupils ride will be improved by 
the closer supervision which will 
be possible through public own- 
ership. In addition, a substantial 
saving in the cost of transporta- 
tion will be realized. 

The board intends to follow 
through by taking over the con- 
duct of the remaining routes un- 
der private contract at the expir- 
ation of the current agreement in 
1948. 

Tuition 

In keeping with the increase in 
per-pupil costs during the last 12 



56 — City of Concord 



months the tuition rates have 
been increased. For the high 
school grades, nine through 12, 
the figure will be $150.00 for 1947- 
1948, as compared to $125.00 in 
effect this year. Elementary grade 
tuition will be raised from $115.00 
to $135.00. 

It was deemed only fair that 
Concord should not continue to 
subsidize neighboring towns by 
granting them attendance privi- 
leges at a cost far below the ac- 
tual expense involved. 

School Plant Use 

The school buildings and 
grounds of this city have cost the 
taxpayers millions of dollars. It 
is no more than common sense 
to get as much use as possible 
from them. 

Current policy of the Concord 
Board of Education provides that 
any nonprofit organization may 



use school facilities whenever 
such activities will not interfere 
with the work of the schools. 

Numerous groups are taking 
advantage of this policy. Classes 
for carpenter and plumber ap- 
prentices, policemen, and bankers 
have been held in school build- 
ings this year. St. John High 
School has played its home 
games in the Senior High School 
gymnasium. Nearly every school 
building is a meeting place for 
Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, 4-H 
Clubs, and other youth groups. 
Minimum charges are made to 
cover costs. 

This expansion of utilization of 
buildings has brought new ad- 
ministrative problems but careful 
planning will meet and solve 
them. More and more the schools 
should be thought of as commu- 
nity centers serving the people 
who are paying for them. 



First of the publicly-owned and operated school busses acquired under the district's; 

new transportation policy 




PENACOOK 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Frank Beede, Chairman 

Claire V. Breckell 

James J. Hayes 

Beatrice E. Pettes 

Alfred J. York 

Edward York 

Fred W. Snell Superintendent 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 
1946: $50,127.09 



New Superintendent 

During the year, Mr. F. Lester 
Trafton, who took over the su- 
perintendency of the Penacook 
district upon the retirement of 
Mr. George W. Sumner, resigned 
from the position. Mr. Trafton 
was succeeded by Mr. Fred W. 
Snell who came to the district 
with an educational background 
that augurs well for a continua- 
tion of the high caliber of leader- 
ship which the district enjoyed 
during Mr. Sumner's long tenure 
of office. 



Building Needs 

With increasing enrollment, 
the district finds itself faced with 
the problem of providing ade- 
quate facilities to house the 
school population. This is par- 
ticularly true with respect to con- 
ditions at the Summer Street 
School where the music and lunch 
room was pressed into use as a 
temporary classroom. During the 
coming year it appears that this 
room will have to be used wholly 
as a classroom. 

The Superintendent is of the 
opinion that serious consider- 
ation should be given to the 
consolidation of the district's ele- 
mentary schools into a modern 
and adequate plant to serve the 
needs of the youth of the com- 
munity. 

The need for an auditorium- 
gymnasium continues. Present 
rented facilities are definitely in- 
adequate and serve to restrict the 
extracurricular activities asso- 
ciated with a well-rounded school 



.1 science experiment at the senior high sclwol 




58 — City of Concord 




Practical application of street-crossing safety by the traffic patrol unit of the 

Rum ford School 



program. Steps already taken 
have advanced the plan prepara- 
tion of the proposed building and 
it is hoped that the much-needed 
facility will be added to the 
school plant in the near future. 

Teaching Staff 

The district operated with a 
staff of 18 teachers during the 
past school year. Of these, nine 
were employed at the high school, 
four each at the two elementary 
schools, and one supervised music 
at all schools. During the year, 
an additional instructor was em- 
ployed at the Summer Street 
School to assist in teaching the 
seventh and eighth grades. 

With increasing living costs, 
the district continues to be faced 
with the problem of paying its 
teachers an adequate wage. This 
is a problem which must be met 
squarely if the district is to at- 
tract and hold an efficient and 
effective teaching personnel. 

Membership 

The average daily membership 
of the student body of the dis- 
trict was 329. This was substan- 
tially the same as the average 



membership for the previous year 
although the elementary schools 
showed a slight gain as against a 
comparable loss at the high 
school. The total number of 
pupils registered at Penacook 
schools during the year was 382. 
Of this number, 185 were boys 
and 197 were girls. 
Finances 

The cost of operations for the 
year ending June 30, 1946 totaled 
$50,127.09, an increase of $6,912.77 
over the total for the previous 
fiscal year. On the whole, oper- 
ating costs were up in all cate- 
gories of expenditures, with a 
$2,328.24 increase in teach- 
ers' salaries leading the list 
A $2,000.00 payment on the 
district's bonded debt reduced the 
amount outstanding to $24,000.00. 

Total receipts amounted to 
$49,501.38, of which $41,316.87 
represented income from taxation. 
Receipts from other sources, 
chiefly from high school tuitions, 
totaled $8,184.51. The school dis- 
trict tax was $17.35 per $1,000.00 
of assessed valuation as com- 
pared to $19.39 for the preceding 
vear. 



Annual Report — 59 



APPENDIX 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND STATISTICS 

PAGE 

General Fund- — Balance Sheet 61 

General Fund — Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 62 

General Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 64 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 65 

General Fund — Statement of Surplus 66 

Bond Funds — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 67 

Bond Funds — Balance Sheet 68 

Bond Funds ■ — Summary of Debt Service Charges Until Maturity 68 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 69 

Trust Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 70 

Trust Funds — Schedule of Permanent Fund Securities 70 

Public Works — Sanitary Sewers Division — Balance Sheet 71 

Public Works — Sanitary Sewers Division — Statement of Operations 71 

Water Department — Balance Sheet 73 

Water Department — Statement of Investments and Income 73 

Water Department — Statement of Operations 74 

Water Department — Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 74 

Assessors' Statement for 1946 75 

City Relief Department — General Classification of Relief Expenditures 76 

Department of Public Works — Statement of Appropriations, Transfers, Ex- 
penditures and Unexpended Balances 77 

Municipal Court — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 77 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 

Tax Levies and Rates 77 

Comparative Table of Budget Appropriations 78 



GENERAL FUND 

Comparative Balance Sheets 
As at December 31, 1946 and 1945 

ASSETS 

Increase 

Cash on Hand and in Banks: 1946 1945 Decrease* 

City Treasurer $162,988.27 $125,572.89 $37,415.38 

Tax Collector 352.90 1,038.73 685.83* 

City Clerk 488.81 456.75 _ 32.06 

163,829.98 127,068J7 36,761.61 
Reimbursements Receivable 

Merrimack County Relief 2,950.53 3,068.47 117.94* 

Other Municipalities— Relief 222.2 85.50 136.70_ 

3,172.73 " 3,153.97 18.76 

Less: Doubtful Accounts 1,123.70 1,123.70 

2,049.03 2,030.27 18.76 
Taxes Receivable 
Prior Year Levies 

1939 Levy 1,268.47 1,351.00 82.53* 

1940 Levy 1,736.65 1,812.65 76.00* 

1941 Levy 1,874.13 1,992.13 118.00* 

1942 Levy 2,257.28 2,435.28 178.00* 

1943 Levy 1,832.93 2,042.80 209.87* 

1944 Levy 9,216.84 10,127.19 910.35* 

1945 Levy 12,875.65 _100,910.70 _88,035.05* 

Prior Year Balances 31,061.95 120,671.75 89,609.80* 

Less: Prior Year— Overlays _L7,98L65^ 24,553.06 6,571.41* 

13,080.30 96,118.69 83,038.39* 

Current Year Levy— 1946 92,902.4 5 ^^ 11::::::: ^ 1 92,902.45 

105,982.75 96,118.69 9,864.06 

Overlay Deficit— 1946 Levy (J) 1,564.80 1,564.80 

Unredeemed Taxes Bought by City — 

Per Tax Sales 5,778.97 5,511.15 267.82 

Property Acquired by City From 

Tax Collector's Deeds— Equity 5,218.28 6,255.20 1,036.92* 

Total Assets $284,423.81 $236,983.68 $47,440.13 

LIABILITIES 

Unexpended Appropriations 

School District Bond Interest $ 5,926.85 $ 6,420.60 $ 493.75* 

Union School District 161,218.56 145,431.55 15,787.01 

Penacook School District 16,542.31 11,879.75 4^662.56^ 

Total School 183,687.72 163,731.90 19,955.82 

Public Library 20,032.24 14,62 2.00 5,410.24 

Total Unexpended 203,719.96 178,353.90 25,366.06 

Liability to State of New Hampshire 

Old Age Assistance for ( Not ) 

December 1946 2,269.87 (Reported) 2,269.87 

Reserve for $3.00 Poll Taxes — Contra 
Included in 1944 and 1945 

Tax Warrants to be paid to ( Not ) 

State of N. H. as received 13,080.30 (Reported) 13,080.30 

Surplus— General Fund 65,353.68 58,629.78 6,723.90 

Total Liabilities and Surplus $284,423.81 $236,983.68 $47,440.13 

(1) Abatements in 1946 exceeded overlay. 



Annual Report — 61 



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GENERAL FUND 

Statement of Surplus 
As at December 31, 1946 

Surplus, December 31, 19-15, Per Report dated 

May 6, 1946 $58,629.78 

Prior Year Adjustments : Charges 

Poll Taxes for 1944 and 1945 ($3.00) Collected $ 7,677.00 

Poll Taxes— State of N. H.— Uncollected Dec. 31, 1946 13,080.30 

Abatements, Etc., Taxes Bought by City 106.66 

Payroll Check 1936 Unpaid 21.60 

$20,885.56 

Less: Overlay Adjustments— 1944-1945 $4,046.00 

County Receivable— 1945 290.6)1 

Excess Overlay in Prior Years 1939 
to 1943 Inclusive 383.87 4,720.48 16,165.08 

Adjusted Surplus— January 1, 1946 $42,464.70 

Current Activity in 1946 

Surplus used in 1946 for Reduction of Tax Rate 57,959.68 

Surplus, Prior Years (Deficit) $15,494.98* 

Appropriations and Revenues 

Unexpended Balances of Appropriations, 1946 $276,428.06 

Less: Appropriations carried to 1947 203,719.96 

$ 72,708.10 
Net Excess from Actual Revenues over Estimates, 1946 14,485.42 

Results from Appropriations and Revenues 87,193.52 

$71,698.54 

Current CJiarges Direct to Surplus 

Old Age Assistance Charge due State of N. H. for De- 
cember 1946 $ 2,269.87 

Capital Budget Lake Survey 4,074.99 

6,344.86 
Surplus, December 31, 1946 $65,353.68 



:!: Deduction 



66 — City of Concord 



BOND FUNDS 

Analysis of Change in Net Debt 
Consolidated — Year Ended December 31, 1946 

Net Debt — December 31, 1945 $538,370.22 

Additions — Prior Years 

State of New Hampshire Poll Taxes $3.00 $2:1,757.30 

Payroll 1936 •. 21.60 

$20,778.90 
Less: County Receivable Adjustment 290.61 20,488.29 

$558,858.51 

I 'eductions — Current Year 1946 

Bonds Retired During 1946 

Municipal Bonds $52,000:00 

School Bonds 25,000.00 

$77,000.00 
Water Department Bonds 17,000.00 

$94,000.00 

Appropriations Unexpended 72,708.10 

Excess of Receipts over Estimated Income 14,485.42 

Overlay Credits 4,429.87 185,623.39 



$373,235.12 



Additions — Current Year 1946 



Cash Surplus Used in Reduction of Tax Rate for 1946 $57,959.68 

Capital Budget — Lake Survey 4,074.99 

Old Age Assistance — State of New Hampshire 2,269.87 

Abatements — Taxes Bought by City 106.66 64.411.20 

Net Debt — December 1, 1946 $437,646.32 



SUMMARY 

Net Debt — December 31, 1945 $538,370.22 

Net Debt — December 31, 1946 437,646.32 

Improvement in Financial Condition $100. 723.90 



Annual Report — 67 



BOND FUNDS 

Comparative Balance Sheet 
As at December 31, 1946 and December 31, 1945 

ASSETS 

December 31 

1046 1045 Decrease 

Cash — Bond and Coupon Account $ 3,311.25 $ $ 

Bonded Debt 503,000.00 597,000.00 94,000.00 

Total Assets $506,311.25 $597,000.00 $94,000.00 



LIABILITIES 

Serial Bonds: 

Central Fire Station $ 8,000.00 $ 9,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

City Hall and Auditorium 5,000.0(1 10,000.00 5,000.00 

Departmental Equipment 4,01)0.0:) 4,000.00 

Highways 5,000.00 5,000.00 

Public Improvement 20,000.00 38,000.00 18,000.00 

Sewers 113,000.00 128,000.00 15,000.00 

Union School District 276,000.00 301,000.00 25,000.00 

Water Department 57,000.00 74,000.00 17.000.00 

Municipal Airport 24,000.00 28,000.00 4,000.00 

Bonded Debt $503,000.00 $597,000.00 $94,000.00 

Bonds and Coupons Not Presented for Payment 

at December 31, 1946 3,311.25 

Total Liabilities $506,311.25 $597,000.00 $94,000.00 



BOND FUNDS 

Summary of Debt Service Charges Until Maturity 
As at December 31, 1946 

Fiscal Period Principal Interest Total 

Municipal 1947-50 $170,000.00 $ 10,827.50 $186,827.50 

School 1947-65 276.000.00 113,687.50 389,687.50 

Water 1947-51 57,000.00 5,261.25 62,261.25 



Total $503,000.00 $135,776.25 $638,776.25 



68 — City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet — As at December 31, 1946 



ASSETS 
Cemetery Library Other Total 



Cash 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank .. $ 1,146.60 $. 
Merrimack County Svgs. Bank 11,368.87 
New Hampshire Savings Bank 1,128.76 

Union Trust Company 690.01 



Total $ 14,334.24 $. 



$ 173.83 
198.94 


$ 1,320.43 

11,567.81 

1,128.76 


463.05 


1,153.06 


$ 835.82 


$ 15,170.06 



Permanent Funds 

Savings Bank Deposits : 

Loan and Trust Savings $ 82,274.06 $ 9,164.21 $ 450.48 $ 91,888.75 

Merrimack County Savings .. 67,665.20 12,144.57 2,511.25 82,321.02 

New Hampshire Savings 80,307.13 11,786.46 1,200.00 93,293.59 

Union Trust Company 72,640.42 20,519.54 1,000.00 94,159.96 



Total $302,886.81 $ 53.614.78 $5,161.73 $361,663.32 



Investments $ 74,100.00 $ 81,480.63 $ $155,580.63 



Total Assets $391,321.05 $135,095.41 $5,997.55 $532,414.01 



LIABILITIES 
Unexpended Income $ 14.334.24 $ $ 835.82 $ 15,170.06 



Principal Permanent Funds 

Balance January 1, 1946 $363,992.88 $135,095.41 

Additions : 

New Trusts 11,337.50 

Sale of Lots — one third added 

to Permanent Funds 1,358.66 

Sale of Graves 280.00 

Seth K. Jones 17.77 



Balance December 31. 1940 $376,986.81 $135,095.41 



Total Liabilities $391,321.05 $135,095.41 



$5,161.73 


$504,250.02 
11.337.50 




1.358.66 




280.00 




17.77 






$5,161.73 


$517,243.95 


$5,997.55 


$532,414.01 



Annual Report — 69 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements for the 
Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1946 

Cemetery Library Other Total 
Cash Balance of Unexpended In- 
come January 1, 1946 $ 10,470.79 $ $ 768.89 $ 11,239.68 



Receipts 

Interest and Dividends 

. Cemetery $ 8.349.90 $ 

Lfbrary 13,553.91 

Parks and Playground Trust 

Other 

One-third Receipts from Sale 
of Lots 1,358.67 



Total $ 9,708.57 $ 13,553.91 



Total Receipts and Balance .... $ 20,179.36 $ 13,553.91 $ 860.82 



Disbursements 

Cemeteries $ 5.394.79 $ 

Library Trusts 13,553.91 

School 

Other 

Transferred to Principal 17.77 



Direct Payments 432.56 



Total $ 5,845.12 $ 13,553.91 $ 25.1)0 



Cash Balance of Unexpended In- 
come December 31, 1946 $ 14,334.24 $ 



$ 




$ 8.349.90 






13,553.91 




53.94 
37.99 


53.94 
37.99 

1,358.67 








$ 


91.93 


$ 23,354.41 


$ 


860.82 


$ 34,594.09 


$ 




$ 5,394.79 






13,553.91 




25.00 


25.00 






17.77 






432.56 








$ 


25.00 


$ 19,424.03 


$ 


835.82 


$ 15.170.06 



TRUST FUNDS 

Schedule of Permanent Fund Securities 
December 31, 1946 

Cemetery Library Other Total 

U. S. Treasury Bonds $ 73,400.00 $ 79,960.63 $ $153,360.63 

1 sh. Great Northern R.R. Pref. 100.00 100.00 

1 sh. Atchison Topeka & Santa 

Fe R.R. Pref 100.01) 100.00 

2 sh. Atchison Topeka & Santa 

Fe R.R. Common 200.00 200.00 

1 sh. Northern Railroad of N.H. 100.00 100.00 

1 sh. Chic. Burl. & Quincy R.R. 100.00 100.00 

6 sh. Bos. & Me. R.R. 1st Pref. 100.00 500.00 600.00 

12 sh. Concord Gas Co. Common 1,020.00 1,020.00 



Total $ 74,100.00 $ 81,480.6 3 $ $155.580.63 

70 — City of Concord 



PUBLIC WORKS— SANITARY SEWERS DIVISION 

Comparative Balance Sheets 
As at December 31, 1945 and December 31, 1940 



December December Increase 

31, 1946 31, 1945 Decrease* 
Current Assets 

Cash in Bank $ 35,040.55 $ 22,792.38 $12,248.17 

Accounts Receivable 8,724.35 7,683.50 1,040.85 

Materials and Supplies 3,352.55 274.68 3,077.87 

Total Current Assets $ 47,117.45 $ 30,750.56 $16,366.89 

Fixed Assets 

Mains $875,524.52 $871,192.62 $ 4,331.90 

Manholes 91,767.39 90,227.29 1,540.10 

Customers' Connections 112,569.70 110,512.87 2,056.83 

Main Sewer Lands and Rights of Way .... 99.97 9S.79 1.18 

General Equipment 934.82 934.82 

$1,080,896.40 $1,072,966.39 $ 7,930.01 

Less: Depreciation Reserve 518,508.40 505,276.06 13,232.34* 

$562,388.00 $567,690.33 $ 5,302.33 :!: 



I 'n finished Construction 
West Concord, Hollywood Section $ 734.44 $ $ 734.44 

Total Assets $610,239.89 $598,440.89 $11,799.00 



LIABILITIES 

Capital 

Contributions in Aid of Construction $115,057.24 $110,477.35 $ 4,579.89 

Contribution from City 480,323.45 480,323.45 

Total Capital $595,380.69 $590,800.80 $ 4,579.89 

Accounts Payable $ 504.54 $ $ 504.54 

Surplus 

Balance, Beginning of Year $ 7,640.09 $ 3,313.72 $ 4,326.37 

Net Income for 1946 6,714.57 4,326.37 2,388.20 

Surplus, End of Year $ 14,354.66 $ 7,640.09 $ 6,714.57 

Total Liabilities $610,239.89 $598,440.89 $11,799.00 



Annual Report — 71 



PUBLIC WORKS— SANITARY SEWERS DIVISION 

Comparative Statement of Operations 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1946 and 1945 



December December Increase 

31,1946 31,1945 Decrease* 

Revenues — Operating and Contributions 

Sewer Rentals, General $ 23,290.47 $ 22,060.78 $ 1,229.69 

Sewer Rentals, Industrial 4,885.77 4,951.08 65.31* 

Penalties and Discounts Forfeited 52.16 47.08 4.48 

Sewer Connections and Jobbing 3.723.05 3,723.05 

Sewers — Rumford Printing Company 2,7\2.37 2.712.37 

Total Revenue $ 34,663.82 $ 27,059.54 $ 7,604.28 

Operation and Contribution Costs 

Sewer — Rumford Printing Company Costs $ 2,712.37 $ ^ 2,7\2.37 

Superintendence 3,321.02 2,327 \)2 994.00 

Sewer Connections and Jobbing Costs 3,083.19 3,083.19 

Maintenance Labor and Expense : 

Main and Manhole Labor and Expense .... 560.32 819.72 259.40* 

House Connections Labor and Expense .. 349. 70 349.90 .14* 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains — Repair .. 392.52 344.54 47.98 

Maintenance of Manholes — Repair 303.72 172.62 131.10 

Maintenance of House Connections 201.93 142.91 59.02 

Customers Expense (lJ T ater Department) 

Meter Reading and Collecting 339.67 326.18 13.49 

Billing and Accounting 1,018.97 978.53 40.44 

Litigation Expense 943.50 943.50* 

General Administrative 

Office Salaries, Outside Help 107.26 89.28 17.98 

Office Supplies 6.50 40.10 33.60* 

Insurance — Compensation and Fire 99.70 107.03 7.33* 

Miscellaneous 193.55 409.68 216.13* 

Insurance Adjustment in Costs 3. 28* 3.28* 

Employees Accounts 

Annual Leave Payroll 393.24 339.85 53.39 

Sick Leave Payroll 168.69 902.11 733.42* 

Holiday Payroll 457.69 410.00 41.69 

Other Expenses 

Inventory Adjustments 35.37 1.12* 36.49 

Total $ 14,342.19 $ 8,707.85 $ 5,634.34 

Income Before Depreciation $ 20,321.63 $ 18,351.69 $ 1,969.94 

Depreciation, Mains, Manholes & Con'ect'ns 13,607.06 14,025.32 418.20* 

Net Income $ 6,714.57 $ 4,326.37 $ 2,388.20 

72 — City of Concord 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Comparative Balance Sheet — As at December 31, 1945 and 1946 

ASSETS 

1946 1945 
Fixed Assets 

Water and Flowage Rights $ 167,663.11 $ 167,663.1] 

Engineering and Superintendence Construction Cost 65,914.51 64,428.02 

Land 132,436.35 132,436.35 

Structures 195,433.87 196,252.55 

Equipment 27,265.75 20,637.11 

Distribution System 643,624.40 652,868.81 

Other Equipment 5,706.94 4,94 6.86 

Total Fixed Assets $1,238,044.93" $1,239,232.81 

u itwcytt A.ssct ? 

Cash on Hand and in Bank $ 44,771.77 $ 19,570.40 

Accounts Receivable 273.32 119.03 

Material and Supplies 17,818.88 16,812.33 

Total Current Assets $ 62.863.97 $ 36,501.76 

Other Assets 

Savings Deposits $ 55,802.06 $ 53.355.85 

Government Bonds 55,000.00 55,00 0.00 

Total Other Assets $ 110,802.06 $ 108.355.85 

Total Assets $1,411,710.96 $1,384,090.42 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Liabilities 

Municipal Investment $ 963,194.74 $ 963,194.74 

Funded Debt 57.000.00 74,000.00 

Federal Grants in Aid of Construction 61,915.08 61,915.08 

Total Capital Liabilities $1.082,109.82 " $1,099,109.82 

Current Liabilities 

Interest Coupons Payable $ 146.00 $ 146.00 

Surplus 

Balance January 1, 1946 $ 284,834.60 $ 252,241.58 

Net Profit 44,620 54 32.593 02 

Total $ 329,45571? $ 284,834.60 

Total Liabilities $1,411,710.96 $1,384,090.42 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Statement of Investments and Income 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1946 

Income 

Balance Deposited Balance 
1/1/46 Income inSvas.Bk. 12/31/46 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $ 12,644.08 $ 227.88 $ 227.88 $ 12.871.9') 

Merrimack County Savings Bank .... 15,224.46 38161 1,708.61 16,933.07 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 12,759.53 255.18 255.18 13,014.71 

Union Trust Company 12.727.78 254.54 254.54 12,982.32 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2 l / 2 67-72 .'. 10,000.00 250.00 10.000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2% 64-69 30,000.00 750.00 30,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2 52-54 10,000.00 200.00 10,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2]/ 2 66-71 5,000.00 125.00 5,000.00 



Totals $108,355.85 $2,446.21 $2,446.21 $110,802.06 

Annual Report — 73 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Comparative Statement of Operations 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1946 and 1945 

Water Sales 1946 1945 

Commercial — Flat Rate $ 3,628.38 $ 3,033.04 

Commercial — Metered 98,453.81 79,752.95 

Industrial — Metered 23,744.59 21,517.40 

Miscellaneous Water Revenue 843.84 497.48 

Total Operating Revenue $ 126,670.62 $ 104,800.87 

Operating Expenses 

Water Supply Expense $ 21,847.74 $ 21,045.25 

Distribution 25,815.13 19,597.99 

Other Operating Expenses 11,322.93 7,517.28 

Total Operating Expenses $ 58,985.80 $ 48,160.5 2 

$ 67,684.82 $ 56,640.35 
Fixed Capital Charges 

Depreciation $ 23,245.49 $ 23,016.46 

Taxes 17.75 

$ 23,263.24 $ 23,016.46 

$ 44,421.58 $ 33,623.89 
Funded Debt Charges 

Interest Paid $ 2,763.75 $ 3,426.25 

$ 41,657.83 $ 30,197.64 
Other Income 

Interest $ 2,446.21 $ 2,003.60 

Non Operating Revenue 516.50 391.78 

Total ~$ 2,962.71 $ 2,395.38 

Net Profit "$ 44,620.54 $ 32.593.02 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 
For the Year Ending December 31, 1946 

Balance January 1, 1946 $ 19,570.40 

Receipts 

Water $ 126,321.33 

Sale of Materials 1,085.66 

Sanitary Sewer Department 1,347.03 

Miscellaneous Receipts 426.43 

Total Receipts $ 129,180.45 

Total Receipts and Balance $ 148,750.85 

Disbursements 

Operation of Plant $ 62,712.06 

Capital Expenditures 21,903.27 

Bond Interest 2,763.75 

Bonds 17,000.00 

Total Disbursements $ 104.379.08 

Balance December 31, 1946 $ 44,371.77 



74 — City of Concord 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1946 

Assessed 
Valuation of 

City and Amount of Tax Rote 

Money Raised For Precincts Appropriation per $1,000.00 

County $33,622,496.00 $ 93,464.74 $2.78 

City Budget 33,622,490.0(1 688,380.00 19.86 

Schools 

*City Union 31,520,675.00 492,460.37 15.62 

**Penacook Union Schools 2,114,271.00 48,986.72 23.17 



Totals $ 1,323,291.83 

Overlay Allowance for Abatements, Errors and Corrections 9,880.77 

Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector 1,332,917.00 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 1,855.46 

City Rate 38.26 

Penacook Rate 45.81 

Average Rate for City per $100.00 3.87 

* Includes Property located in Loudon 
**Includes Property located in Canterbury 

Poll Taxes 

No. Amount 

Men 4,318 $ 8,636.00 

Women 7,821 15,642.00 



Total 12,139 $ 24,278.00 

Exemptions 
Veterans: 

Property Valuation $ 418,161.00 

Polls (2,570) 5,140.00 

Blind: 

Propertv Valuation " 3,000.00 

Polls (12) 24.00 



Bank Stock 
Bank Stock 



Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 
Type 

Land and Buildings 

Growing Wood and Timber 

Electric Plants 

Horses 

Cows 

Other Neat Stock 

Sheep and Goats 

Hogs 

Fowls 

Fur-Bearing Animals 

Portable Mills 

Boats and Launches 

Wood, Lumber, Etc 

Gasoline Pumps and Tanks 

Stock in Trade 

Mills and Machinery 

Total $33,622,496.00 

Annual Report — 75 





$ 426.325.00 




$ 6,240.40 


3 ERTY 

umber 


Valuation 




$29,140,150.00 




15.373.00 




1.004,880.00 


165 


21,875.00 


1,078 


151,660.00 


182 


15,029.00 


124 


1,026.00 


25 


500.00 


!9,632 


37.218.00 


55 


425.00 




1,500.00 




1.500.00 




6,600.00 




24,560.00 




2,076.450.00 




433,750.00 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classification of Relief Expenditures for 1946 

City Comity Total 



Direct Expenditures for Relief 


$ 


2,032.50 

474.26 

24.36 

305.35 

440.23 

2,852.39 

300.00 

372.37 

67.68 

313.02 


$ 4,480.80 

2,456.20 

608.33 

496.12 

1,024.00 

2,500.53 


$ 6.513.3d 






2.930.46 


Milk 




632.69 


Rent 




801.47 
1,464.23 
5.352.92 






300.00 


Medical 




4.263.09 
226.12 
543.97 


4.635.46 


Clothing 




293.80 


Funerals, Transportation and Misc 




856.99 








Total City and County Poor 


$ 


7,182.16 

686 82 

1,440.19 


$16,599.16 


$23,781.32 
686.82 








1.440.19 






$16,599.16 

$ 1,350.00 

293.93 

21.50 

27.25 

195.00 




Dependent Soldiers 

Cash Allowances 


$ 
$ 


9.309.17 

1(14.00 
203.()(i 


$25,908.33 
$ 1,454.00 


Groceries 




496.99 


Milk 




21.50 


Fuel 




61.85 

20.00 

39.33 
25.88 
15.84 


89.10 


Rent 




215.00 








Medical 


254.75 
39.50 

68.72 


294.08 


Clothing 




65.38 


Public Utilities and Miscellaneous 




84.56 




$ 


469.96 


$ 2.250.65 


$ 2.720.61 



Administration 

Salaries— Overseers (Concord and Penacook ) $ 1.920.15 $ 1.592.30 $ 3.512.45 

Salaries— Office and Case Workers 2.<^.()2 2.690.17 5,313.19 

Mileage 235.98 188.45 424.43 

Office Supplies 200.52 154.91 355.43 

Telephone 104.27 102.25 206.52 

Lights 24.92 20.48 45.40 

Heat '.o.oo 60.00 120.00 

Tanitor Service 91.65 91.65 

Withholding Taxes (Wages) 324.15 357.02 681.17 

Retirement Board — New Hampshire 151.20 151.20 

Blue Cross and Miscellaneous 194.24 18.78 213.02 



Total Administration $ 5,930.10 $ 5.184.36 $11,114.46 

Old Age Assistance 25,221.69 25.221.69 



$40,930.92 $24,034.17 $64,965.09 



76 — City of Concord 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Statement of Appropriations, Transfers, Expenditures and Unexpended 

Balances — -1946 
Appro- Uncx- 

Transfers Total Expenditures pended 



Roads and Bridges.... 


priations 

$188,905.30 












1,830.00 






Road Building ■ — 




Office 


5,177.00 




38,600.00 








6,05(1.(10 


Engineering 


10,289.38 


Street Lighting 

Clerk of Board 

Trees 


41,035.00 
200.00 

8,400.00 



$. 



11,220.30 

4,979.97 

1,730.68 206,836.25 201,663.88 5,172.37 



1,015.63 



1,415.64 4,261.27 2,623.03 1,638.24 
5,177.00 5,175.94 1.06 



708.60 



39,308.60 


39,308.60 


6,050.00 


6,050.00 


10,289.38 


10,204.20 


41,035.00 


40.853.50 


200.0(1 


200.00 


8,400.00 


7,969.17 



85.18 
181.50 

436!83 



Total $300,486.68 $21,070.82 $ 321,557.50 $314,048.32 $ 7,509.18 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement for 1946 
Receipts 

Fines and Costs and Fees $12,948.9 1 

Disbursements 

Paid to City Treasurer $ 6,820.05 

Paid to Motor Vehicle Department 5,501.10 

Paid to N.H. Aeronautical Commission 101.70 

Printing and Office Supplies 236.65 

Witness and Officers' Fees 131.90 

Paid to Fish and Game Department 125.10 

Refunds 15.41 

Clerk's Bond 10.00 

Special Justice 3.00 

Refund to John Stanley 4.00 



Total $12,948.91 

COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 
Tax Levies and Rates 1937-1946 

Year Polls 

1937 13,612 

1938 13,490 

1939 13,877 

1940 14,334 

1941 13,874 

1942 13,184 

1943 12,205 

1944 12,41d 

1945 11,734 

1946 12,139 

*Does not reflect Abatements and Deductions allowed by Assessors. 



Exemptions 




Committed 




Veterans 


Valuations 


Tax* 


Rate 


919 


$32,195,052.00 


$1,290,330.81 


$39.04 


936 


32,201,370.00 


1,282,689.02 


38.82 


958 


32,365,017.00 


1.176.029.78 


35.30 


925 


32,791,790.00 


1,280.926.90 


38.00 


896 


33,068,487.00 


1,264,315.56 


37.20 


897 


33,282,876.00 


1,312,838.22 


38.40 


796 


33,251.268.00 


1,087,147.04 


31.80 


679 


33,083,027.00 


1,088,928.60 


30.59 


701 


32,963,846.00 


1,181,708.97 


33.68 


2,570 


33,622,496.00 


1,333,172.60 


38.26 



Annual Report — 77 



Operating Budget: 

City Poor 

City Poor, Ward One 

Bonds and Notes 

Interest, Bonds and Notes 

City Hall and Auditorium 

Mayor 

City Clerk 

City Solicitor 

City Treasurer 

City Physician 

Weights and Measures 

Police Court 

Probation Officer 

Assessors 

Tax Collector 

Real Estate Agent 

Elections 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Department of Public Works .... 

Cemeteries 

Parks 

Trees 

Playgrounds 

Planning Board 

Public Library 

Police Department 

Comfort Station 

Recreation Commission 

Zoning Board 

W. P. A 

Airport 

Miscellaneous: 

Clock, care of 

Incidentals and Land Damages 

Printing and Stationery 

Repairs Buildings 

Board of Aldermen, Salary 

Margaret Pillsbury Hospital .... 

Memorial Hospital 

Family Welfare Society 

Concord District Nursing Ass'n. 

Penacook Nursing Ass'n 

Memorial Dav 

Armistice Day 

Armistice Day Penacook 

Spanish War Veterans 

Band Concerts 

Work Rel-'ef Projects 

Nursing Schools 

A uditing 

Civilian Defense 

Finance Committee: 

Contingent Fund 

Post-War Planning 

Employees Retirement Fund .... 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of Budget Appropriations, 1941—1946 
1941 1942 1943 1 



1945 



6.000.00 



6.000.00 
5.000.00 



1946 



$53,415.00 


$54,500.00 


$41,500.00 


$39,950.00 


$37,700.00 


$38,380.00 


6,575.00 


5,925.00 


5,135.00 


5,320.00 


5,135.00 


4,815.00 


95,000.00 


98,000.00 


107,000.00 


57,000.00 


52,000.00 


52,000.00 


15,269.31 


12,345.00 


11,058.75 


9,451.25 


7,963.75 


6,638.75 


7,050.00 


8,230.00 


8,697.50 


8,984.50 


9,582.31 


9,373.56 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


1,830.00 


3.950.00 


3,938.00 


4,157.00 


8,292.00 


7,825.00 


8,454.50 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


9.724.00 


1,560.00 


1,560.00 


1.680.00 


1,680.00 


2,460.00 


2,380.00 


3,675.50 


3,060.00 


4,789.25 


4,876.00 


5,830.25 


5,086.50 


1,800.00 


1,800.00 










1.220.00 


1,220.00 


1,312.00 


1.4CO.0O 


1.400.00 


1.450.00 


2,900.00 


2,900.00 


2,960.00 


2,960.00 


2.960.00 


2.960.00 


1,500.00 


1,450.00 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


1,450.00 


11.558.00 


11.558.00 


12,018.00 


12,958.00 


12.934.00 


14.122.00 


6,738.65 


6,738.65 


8.052.85 


8,623.65 


9,027.65 


8,165.65 








475.00 
4.150.00 


530.00 
4.100.00 


500.00 


3,900.00 


3,488.00 


4.100.00 


4.100.00 


75.713.00 


77.435.52 


78,914.25 


95,803.79 


98,631.63 


113.327.48 


6.900.00 


6.925.00 


7,255.00 


7,630.00 


7.618.0O 


7.902.00 


274,703.41 


266.650.00 


291,467.40 


297.778.00 


347,657.48 


356,836.68 


15.315.00 


20.388.00 










12,913.00 


15.690.69 

8,400.00 

11.148.00 










10.849.00 










10.728.00 


10.083.00 


11,805.00 


11.802.00 


13.341.05 


3.885.00 


4.685.00 


5,000.00 


5,247.25 


5.371.75 


6.100.00 


17.843.20 


18.012.11 


23.000.00 


29.000.00 


31.100.00 


36.465.00 


67.289.00 


71.088.62 


74.048.95 


79.018.91 


84.497.61 


93.851.60 


2.597.00 


2.080.00 


2.24S.O0 


2.565.00 


2.264.00 


2.625.00 


2.550.00 


2.550.00 


3.500.00 


3.500.00 


6.450.00 


6.635.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


150.00 


200.00 


200.00 


35.000.00 


20.800.00 












6 524.50 
50.00 


9.288.00 
50.00 


9.938.00 
50.00 


11.808.00 


50.00 


50.00 


25.00 


2.500.00 


2.500.00 


2.500.00 


2,500.00 


2.500.00 


2.500.00 


2 800.00 


2.200.00 


2.750.00 


3.450.00 


3.450.00 


3 000.00 


1 000.00 


1.000.00 


1. 200.00 


1,200.00 


1.450.00 


2.250.00 


1 cis. oo 


1.915.00 


1.915.00 


1.875.00 


1.875.00 


1.875.00 


5.000 oo 












3 500 00 












350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


550.00 


350.00 


350.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


400.00 


400 00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100 00 


100.00 


100.00 






30.0C 
400 00 


30.00 
400 00 


60.00 
400 00 


30.00 


400 00 


400 00 


400.00 


^00 00 


500 00 


1 .000.00 


1 000.00 


1 .000.00 


1.000.00 


1 W>00 


1 snooo 
2.000.00 
1 000.00 










? 500 00 






1.000.00 




1.200.00 


1 .000.00 


1 .000.00 


1.000.00 




3.000.00 


3.000.00 


500 00 







Cross Operating Budget $780,704.07 $767,617.59 $737,613.43 $734,771.00 $795,876.43 

Capital Budget Items: 

City Clerk 250.00 

Fire Department 9.000.00 

Department Public Works 4^052.40 

Playgrounds 195.00 

Police Department 2,282.00 

W. P. A. Department 4,200.00 

Tax Collector 

Airport 

Recreation Commission 

Lake Survey 

By-Pass Project 



9,000.00 

"s.bob.oo 

$844,874.27 



265.00 



(.25.00 



700.00 
1,800.00 



25,000.00 

21.000.00 

700.00 

6,437.58 



11.000.00 



11.700.00 

32.000.00 

485.00 

3,975.00 



10,000.00 
9,600.00 
9.000.00 

25.000.00 



$265.00 $3,125.00 $64,137.58 $101,760.00 



Total Capital Budget $19,979.40 

Total Municipal Budget $780,704.07 $7S7,596.99 $737,878.45 $737,896.00 $860,014.01 $946,634.27 

Estimated Income 148,000.00 135,000.00 *225,285.O0 "260.605.00 *351. 353.00 *258,254.33 

Total Raised by Taxation $632,705.00 $652,597.00 $512,593.00 $477,293.00 $508,661.00 $688,379.94 



^Includes cash on hand at beginning of year. 



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INDEX 



PAGE PAGE 

Activities in 1940 4 Municipal Court 37 

Assessment 10 Parks 50 

Appendix 60 Planning 14 

Bond Funds 12 Playgrounds and Bath 22 

Building Activity 45 Plumbing Inspection 45 

Cemeteries 51 Police Protection 32 

City Clerk 8 Probation 36 

City Government 6 Public Works 46 

City Officials 7 Recreation 22 

Elections 8 Refuse Collection 48 

Engineering 48 Relief 30 

Examination of Plumbers 45 Schools 55 

Finances 12 Sewers 49 

Financial Statements and Statistics 61 Snow Plowing and Sanding 47 

Fire Protection 42 Special Recreation Facilities 25 

Garbage Disposal 48 Street Lighting 50 

General Fund 12 Tax Collection 11 

Health and Sanitation 18 Trees 51 

Hydrants 44 Trust Funds 12 

Legal Service 13 Vital Statistics 8 

Library 27 Water Supply 53 

Milk Control 19 Weights and Measures 52 

Municipal Airport 38 Zoning Appeals 4? 



THE CONCORD PRESS 
CONCORD. N. H.