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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

Unwersiti) of 

Hew Hampshire 
library 



The Ninety -fifth 
ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

CITY OF CONCORD 

New Hampshire 

for tfoe 
Year Ending December 31, 1947 




Capital of the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Merrimack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27,171 (1940) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision 

of the Board of Library Trustees by the 

Mayor and Board of Aldermen 



o o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

I I Am the City of Concord | 

o -^ o 

o o 

</ o 

^ I record every birth, marriage and death. ^ 

o o 

<^ I conduct your elections. o 

o I collect your taxes which pay for the public services you ^ 

^ receive. ^ 

o ^ . "> 

^ I plan for the orderly development of your community. ^ 

o I inspect foods and restaurants in the interest of your o 

% health. % 

o . . . <' 

^ I keep your parks and playgrounds in good condition ^^ 

o for your year around enjoyment. </ 

% I provide books, magazines and pamphlets for your entire ^ 

^ family's use. ^ 

♦ o 

o I take care of the sick, the aged and the needy. o 

o I protect your family, your property, and I answer all ^ 

^ emergency calls. ^ 

o o 

^ I guide children in need of constructive influence. ^ 

o o 

o I enforce your laws. o 

% I respond to every fire that occurs within my boundaries. <^ 

o o 

^ I insist on soundly constructed homes and buildings for ^ 

o your health and safety. o 

^ I maintain your streets and sidewalks. <> 

♦ o 
% I check all weights and measures to protect your purchases. | 

o I provide pure water for drinking purposes. o 

o I operate an airport for your travel convenience. o 

♦ o 

^ I maintain public schools, manned by competent per- ^ 

^ sonnel, to develop future citizens in whom you and I ^ 

o can take pride. o 

o o 

o o 

o o 

o These things I do and many others. I could do more o 

o with your active support. Only as this support is forth- ^ 

^ coming can I better serve you. ^ 

o o 

♦ o 
o o 
o o 
o o 
o o 



Lesislative Revie^v 
1947 



Board of Aldermen . . . 

» » Authorized tlie study of City Char- 
ter revision. 

» » Voted to re-zone a section of Man- 
chester Street from an agricultural to 
a local business district. 

» » Adopted a modern building code 
for the City of Concord using nation- 
ally accepted standards by reference. 

» » Acquired land from Y. M. C. A. 
on North State Street for street widen- 
ing pvnposes. 

» » Established William Reed Play- 
groimd on Hall Street. 

» » Appointed a conmiittee to study 
the report of the National Recreational 
Association on municipal recreational 
organization. 

» » Voted greater financial support to 
District Nursing Association on recom- 
mendation of Conuntmity Chest Sur- 
vey. 



» » Directed the Planning Board to 
prepare a plan establishing the map- 
ped lines of future streets connecting 
the Concord throughpass at Ferry Street 
with Eastman Street in East Concord. 

» » Voted to replace the Fire and Po- 
lice Signal System. 

» » Raised the maximum area limita- 
tion of signs in local business districts 
under the Zoning ordinance from 20 
to 40 stjuare feet. 

» » Appointed a special committee to 
in\estigate the operation of taxicabs 
within the City of Concmxl. 

» » Voted conditional acceptance of 
portions of Ormond, Christian, and 
Allard Streets on Concord Heights. 

» » .Accepted the negative report of a 
special conmiittee appointed to in\esti- 
gate the use of Forge Pond as a public 
swimming area, and authorized further 
study of possible swimming sites for 
public use. 

» » Raised miuiicipal salaries in keep- 
ing with the increased cost of living. 



» » Authorized the installation of park- » » Placed the question of Sunday 
ing meters in the down-town business Sports before the electorate for refer- 
district. endum. 



» » Appropriated Sfj.OOO towards the 
cost of a meeting phu e lor the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars. 

» » Acquired the abandoned Canal in 
the Periacook business district for street 
widening and parking lot pinposes. 



» » V(jted to participate ^vith the Fed- 
eral Government in the expansion of 
apron and taxiway facilities at the 
Miuiicipal Airport. 

» » Increased the salaries of ward-elec- 
tion officials. 



4 « « C/fy of Concord 



Administrative Review 
1947 



Municipal 
Departments . . . 

» » The City Clerk recorded 1,077 
births, the greatest number in the his- 
tory of the City of C>)ncord. 

» » The Board of Assessors reported 
a total assessed valuation of $'-56,457,- 
539.00,, an all-time high. 

» » The Tax Collector collected $8,- 
123.9(i in back taxes, nearly double the 
194(3 total. 

» » The City Treasmer reported a sin- 
plus of .$67,201.65 at the close of the 
year. 

» » The City Solicitor, by directi(jn of 
the Board of Aldermen, has com- 
menced work on a complete revision 
of the city ordinances. 

» » The Planning Board, after three 
years of intensive study, reconnnended 
and carried through to adoption a new 
building code for the city. 

» » The Health Department reported 
only one resident case of poliomyelitis. 
Recovery was complete in this instance. 

» » The Milk Department noted a de- 
cline in the production of milk in the 
Concord area for the third consecutive 
year. 

» » The Playground Committee re- 
ported the completion of the new Wil- 
liam Reed Playground in the Hall 
Street neighborhood. 

» » The Recreation Commission erec- 
ted permanent floodlights at Memorial 
Field to be used for night football by 
both high schools. 



» » The Public Library's newly re- 
modeled Penacook Branch, located in 
the Police Station building, was opened 
for public use in November. 

» » The Relief Department noted that 
with prevailing conditions of prosper- 
ity, the number of persons in need of 
public aid and direct relief remained 
comparatively low. 

» » The Police Department added the 
duty of parking meter maintenance to 
its constantly growing list of services. 

» » The Probation Department re- 
ported a continued low rate of juvenile 
delincjuency which may be attributed 
to the general prosperity, together with 
constructive church, civic and social 
work. 

» » The Municipal Court handled a 
record number of 4,542 criminal cases 
which is largely the result of the high 
increase in nnnf)r lawlessness. 

» » The Airport Commission noted a 
marked increase in the number of 
\ eterans who availed themselves of the 
opportunity for various phases of 
flight training under the G. L Bill of 
Rights. 

» » The Fire Department intensified 
its fire prevention program and re- 
ported a marked increase in fire pre- 
vention education. 

» » The Public Works Department em- 
ployed a total of 215 permanent and 
part-time workers, indicating resump- 
tion of full-scale operations. 

» » The City Sealer was particularly 
active inspecting replacements for war- 
^vorn weighing and measuring equip- 
ment. 



Annual Report » » 3 




Inauguration Day — Student City Government 



GOVERNMENT 



Hon. Charles C. Davie 
A[ayor 

John C. Tilton 

Snhsliliitc Mayor 



Aldermen-at-Large and Members 

Board of Public Works 
John Swenson 
John C. Tilton 
William A. Stevens 
Nelson E. Strong 
Robert W. Potter 
Charles A. Bartlett 

Ward Aldermen 



Charles P. Coakley 


Ward 


1 


John E. Davis 


Ward 


2 


William J. Flynn 


Ward 


3 


WiNFiELD J, Phillips 


Ward 


4 


Harry D. Challis 


Ward 


S 


Lawrence J. Moynihan 


Ward 


6 


Basil D. French 


Ward 


7 


Clarence A. Drown 


Ward 


8 


Thomas B. Jennings 


Ward 


9 



Standing Committees of 
The Board of Aldermen 

Arbitration: 

Aldermen Moynihan, Bartlett, French and 

Jennings. 
Bills. Second Reading: 

Aldermen Strong, Tilton, French and Drown. 
Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Tilton, Jennings, Davis and 

French. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Drown, Strong, Coakley and Til- 
ton. 
Finance: 

Mayor Davie, Aldermen Challis, Phillips, 

Stevens and Swenson. 
Fire Department: 

Aldermen Coakley, Potter, Flynn and Moyni- 
han. 
Land and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett, Jennings, Davis and 

Flynn. 
Playgrounds: 

Aldermen Jennings, Flynn, Coakley, Drown 

and Davis. 
Police and License: 

Aldermen French, Davis, Moynihan and 

Strong. 
Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Flynn, Jennings, Moynihan and 

Drown. 
Relief: 

Aldermen D-«»"e Bartlett and Coakley. 



6 « « City of Concord 



OFFICIALS 



Airport Manager 
Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer 
Commissioner. Board of 

Public Works 
Fire Chief 
Judge, Municipal 

Court 
Judge. Special. 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milk Inspector 
Overseer of Poor 
Overseer of Poor. 

Penacook 
Planning Director 
Police Chief 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Pleasures 
Stipt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 
St«pt. of Streets 
Supt. of Water Works 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds 
Tax Collector 
Tree Warden 



William F. Flynn 
Edward E. Beane 
Arthur E. Roby 
Edward E. Beane 
Henry W. Smith 
Gordon S. Lord 
Carl H. Foster 

Ervin E. Webber 
Clarence H. Green 

WILLIAM L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

R. Keith Doms 

Austin B. Presby 

Parker L. Hancock 

Charles P. Coakley 

GUSTAF H. Lehtinen 

Arthur W. McIsaac 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Rosy 
Donald G. Barton 

J. Shepard Norris 

Leslie C. Clark 

Ervin E. Webber 

G. Arthur Faneuf 

Paul G. Crowell 

Amos B. Morrison 

Ervin E. Webber 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 

William J. Bishop, Chairman; Edward E. 
Beane, Arthur W. Sargent. 

Board of Health-. 

Charles C. Davie, Chairman; Dr. Pierre 

A. Boucher, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. 
Clinton R. Mullins. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman; Clarence H. 
Green, G. Arthur Faneuf. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr., Chairman; Francis 
E. Beer, Harold W. Bridge, Joseph J. Comi, 
Lela Y. Johnson, John F. MacEachran, Sara 

B. Magenau, Alvah W. Sulloway, Martha 
G. Upton. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman; M. Harrison Duffy, 
Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 

Ruel N. Colby, Chairman; Charles C. Davie, 
Leigh S. Hall, Chester G. Larson, Carlton 
R. Metcalf. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, L Reed 
Gourley. 

Board of Water Commissioners: 

James W. Jameson, President; Robert W. 
Brown, Charles C. Davie, Harry H. Dudley, 
Allen M. Freeman, Charles P. Johnson, 
Donald Knowlton, Gardner Tilton, Leonard 
W. Trager. 



Boards, Commissions and Trustees 

Board of Adjustment: 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman; John S. 
Corbett, A. Clifford Hudson, Laurence M. 
Meyer, Shelby O. Walker. 

Board of Airport Commissioners: 

Charles C. Davie, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, John N. Engel, Charles W. How- 
ard, Donald J. McFarland, Robert W. Pot- 
ter, John Swenson. 

Board of Assessors: 

Clarence L. Clark, Chairman; Arthur F. 
Henry, Clarence O. Philbrick. 

City Planning Board: 

Dudley W. Orr, Chairman; Edward E. 
Beane, Charles C. Davie, Douglas N. Ever- 
ett, Warren H. Greene, A. Clifford Hudson, 
John B. Jameson, Charles J. McKee, Robert 
W. Potter. 



Mayor Davie administers 
office to Mayor-Elect M 



oath of 

:Kce 





^mf 



Concord City Government 194<S-1949 



CITY CLERK 

Arthur E. Roby Ciiy Clerk 

Margaret A. Spencer Deputy City Clerk 

1947 Expenditure $10,830.37 



Board of Mayor and Aldermen 

The Board of Mayor and Aldermen 
held 12 regnlar, four adjourned and 
one special meetings during 1947. 
Seven public hearings were also sched- 
uled during the year. 

Ten ordinances and thirty-five reso- 
lutions were enacted in 1947. One of 
the most noteworthy pieces of legisla- 
tion passed during the year Avas an 
ordinance establishing a building code. 

Board of Public Works 

During 1947, the Board of Public 
Works held 12 regular, and an equal 
number of special meetings and two 

8 « « City of Concord 



public hearings. Highlights of the 
Board's 1947 acti\ity continued to be 
sidewalk construction and considera- 
tion of the installation of additional 
electric lights throughout the city. 

Vital Statistics 

Dining the year, the City Clerk's 
Office recorded 1077 births, 451 mar- 
riages and 668 deaths. For the second 
time in the history of the city, the 
birth rate, with an increase of 226, or 
37 percent, exceeded the death rate. 
Deaths decreased by 43. or about 16 
percent. At the same time, marriages 
declined showing a decrease of 94 in 
comparison ^vith the preceding year. 

The heavy demand for certified 
copies of vital statistics records con- 
tinued dining 1947. The department 
has continued its practice of providing 
servicemen and their families with vital 
statistics records without charge. Rev- 
enue received from this source, other 
than servicemen, totaled $313.25 as 
compared to $338.00 in 1946. 



State Bonus Papers 

Under statutory requirement re- 
lating to the payment ot state I)()nuses 
to veterans of World War 11. the 
City Clerk continued to tertily these 
applications. There was a pronounced 
decrease in this free service since most 
veterans made their bonus applications 
in 1946. Veterans also received assis- 
tance in the proper completion of their 
bonus papers. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 

Reflecting the general increase in 
production in 1947, a slight increase 
in mortgages and conditional sales 
occurred. Receipts from recording 
these business transactions amounted 
to .'ji762.80 for mortgages and .S42().45 
for conditional sales. Comparable fig- 
ures for the year 1946 show receipts of 
$608.20 and |213.60 respectively from 
these two sources. 

Licenses, Fees, Etc. 

Many new cars Iia\e appeared on 
the market in 1947 and as a result 
receipts taken in from auto permits 
hit an ail-lime high of $43,527. 19. Ihe 



trend in revenue from car permits 
points to an CAen greater amount to 
be received from this source in 1948. 
The total amount of revenue col- 
lected by the City Clerk during 1947 
from other sources including various 
licenses, fees, rentals, sales, etc. totaled 
$15,283.36. 

Elections 

The municipal election was held 
November 4, 1947 with 7,833 voters 
casting their ballots lor candidates for 
mayor. Of this number, Charles J. 
McKee received 4,708 and Charles A. 
Bartlett received 3,114, with the re- 
mainder scattered among write-in can- 
didates. 

William A. Stevens, 1 homas B. Jen- 
nings, and Harry D. Clhallis were 
elected as aldermen-at-large for four- 
year terms. Aldermen elected for the 
nine wards for two-year terms were 
John M. Allen, John E. Davis, Wil- 
liam J. FlyiHi, Winfield J. I'hillips, 
[ohn W. Stanley. Edward L. Lovejoy, 
Lester W. Holt, Clarence A. Drown, 
and Emmett A. Nawn. 

Clarence L. Clark was re-elected to 
the Board of Assessois. 




Responsibility julfllled 



Annual Report » » 9 



ASSESSMENT 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Clarence L. Clark Chairman 

Arthur F. Henry 

Clarence O. Philbrick 

1947 Expenditure $15,5 37.28 

Real Property 

A decline in activity was noted in 
the local real estate market during 
1947. Property transfers numbered 
955. Although this figure represents 
a decrease of 238 over the previous 
year, it remains substantially more 
than the amount of pre-war property 
exchange. In fact, the property trans- 
fers which occurred in 1947, represents 
an approximate eight per cent turn- 
over of Concord's 12,000 parcels of 
land. This can be attributed largely 
to the continuation of the housing 
shortage. Another contributing factor 
was the profit moti\e in inflationary 
prices which brought many properties 
into the market for sale. 

The total number of building per- 
mits issued during the year was 223 as 
against 212 in 1946. Of the 1947 per- 
mits issued, 137 were for new buildings 
and garages, and 86 were for remodel- 
ing of old structures. During the 
year building materials and labor be- 
came slightly more plentiful making 
a greater amount of construction work 
possible. It is interesting to note that 
1947 construction is well above the 
pre-war level. 

Easing the housing shortage 



Assessed Valuations, Polls, Etc. 

Ihe City's total assessed valuation 
for the year 1947 amounted to $36,457,- 
539.00. This figure was $2,835,043.00 
greater than the total for the previous 
year and represented the highest as- 
sessed valuation of property in the 
history of the City of Concord. The 
1947 increase in assessed valuation of 
city property is due, in part, to a 
city-wide adjustment in valuation and 
to new construction. 

The total nimiber of taxable polls 
compiled in 1947 was 11,606 as com- 
pared with 12.129 for the preceding 
year. This reduction clearly indicates 
that an increasing number of veterans 
are availing themselves of the poll-tax 
exemptions to ex-servicemen. During 
1947 the number of tax-exempt veter- 
ans jumped 2,570 to 2,817. 

Polls and property valuations ex- 
empt from taxation totaled $689,750.00. 
Of this amount, $682,100.00 was veter- 
ans' property valuation, $5,634.00 was 
veterans' polls and $2,016.00 was prop- 
erty and poll tax exemption for the 
blind. 

The total number of shares of rail- 
road stock held in Concord was 4,565 
or 217 less than the total for 1946. 

Tax Warrant 

The total amount of the city's 1947 
tax warrant submitted by the Board of 
Assessors to the Tax Collector was 
$1,557,237.23. This represented an in- 
crease of $224,320.23 over the warrant 
of the previous year. The 1947 tax 
rate per $1,000.00 of assessed valuation 
was $41.47 in the City and $48.67 in 
Penacook. 




lill I i 



TAX 
COLLECTION 



<« <> C> C> s'> C> 



<^ C> 



Amos B. Morrison Tax Collector 

1947 Expenditure $9,138.39 

1947 Collections 

A total tax warrant of $1. 557.237. 2.'5 
was submitted for collection in 1947. 
This was the largest tax warrant ever 
submitted in the history of the City of 
Conccjrd, exceeding the amount for 



1946 by $224,356.2.8. Of the total 1947 
tax warrant which was submitted for 
collection, $123,869.82 remained out- 
standing at the close of the year. The 
total amount of uncollected taxes 
against the previous years was $25,- 
645.61, or 55,416.34 less than the total 
rem.iining at the end of 1946. Much 
of this drop is the result of the poll tax 
levy being $1,066 less in 1947 than for 
the preceding year. This indicates 
that approximately 500 additional vet- 
erans are now availing themselves of 
poll tax exemption. 

The following tabulation shows the 
amount of uncollected taxes carried 
on the Tax Collector's books on De 
cember 31 of the past three years: 



As of As of As of 

Year Dec.n,JO-fy Dcc.1IJ^>4b Dec. "il, 1947 

1939 .51,351.00 .11,268.47 .51.044.91 

1940 1,812.65 1,736.65 1,398.96 

1941 1.992.13 1,874.13 1,532.95 

1942 2,435.28 2,257.28 1,616.33 

1943 2.042.80 1,832.93 1,395.21 

1944 10.127.19 9.216.84 6,226.19 

1945 100,910.70 12,875.65 8.523.59 

1946 92,902.45 3,867.47 

1947 123,869.82 

Total $120,671.75 $123,964.40 $149,515.43 



The amount of back taxes acquired 
by the City of Concord at the 1947 
Tax Collector's Sale was $8,123.96 or 
$3,446.12 more than the total for the 
]ire\ ious year. This sum, almost 
douijle last year's amount of delin- 



quent taxes, is contrary to the general 
prosperity which prexailed throughout 
the period coxered by the sale. The 
status of delincjuent taxes as of Decem- 
ber 31, 1947 is smnmari/ed in the fol- 
lowina table: 





Amount Boui^ht 


Aiiioiuit 


Alxtted by 


Deeded 


A mount 


Year 


by City 


Redeemed 


Assessors 


To City 


Unredeemed 

• 


1941 ... 


.540,504.50 


,538,204.63 


$1,408.,',2 


.5891.35 




1942 . . . 


32.329.23 


31,037.34 


732.6.-. 


559.33 




1943 ... 


10,899.79 


9,912.70 


759.63 


277.46 




1944 ... 


6.570.79 


6,077.75 


277.77 


162.91 


.552.36 


1945 . . . 


4,877.84 


2,460.16 


61.19 


80.14 


2,276.35 


1946 ... 


8,123.96 


2,692.14 


176.13 




5,255.69 



Other Activity 

The Tax Collector acting as City 
Real Estate Agent sold only a few 
pieces of tax-deed real estate during 
the year. Total receipts from the sale 



and rent of property deeded to the 
City amounted to $931.57, contrasted 
with a total of $6,097.94 realized from 
the sale and rent of tax-deed real 
estate during the previf)us year. 



Annual Report '* » 11 




FINANCES 

<> <» c c> c> c> c- <• c> c> c> c> c^ 

Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1947 Expenditure $5,560.14 

o o <» o c- c> <><>«> o ♦<> <> 
TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Harry H. Dudley 

Carl H. Foster 

I. Reed Gourley 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1947 Expenditure S43I.OO 

City finances were laced with the 
same problems and exigencies created 
by inflationary pressures that private 
finances were forced to contend with 
during the past year. In spite of the 
aljnormal economic trend. Concord's 
financial condition showed an improve- 
ment at the close of the year 1947. At 
the end of the fiscal year, the City's net 
debt totaled $376,098..S5, or ,$61. .547.97 
less than the amoimt outstanding at 
the beginning of the year. It is in- 
teresting to note that a sizeable rechic- 
tion in net debt was accomplished in 
spite of the application of .S.'30,() 14.00. 
representing cash surplus, t(j current 
operations, thereby lowering the 1947 
tax rate by approximately $1.40 per 
$1,000.00 of assessed valuation. 



General fund 

Total Revenue for the year a- 
iiiounted to .SI, 77,^, 9^^0.36 as against 
au estimated total of $1,722,684.44. 
.\ftcr deductions by transfer amount- 
ing to $46,850.67. net revenue totaled 
$1,727,079.69. Actual revenue exceeded 
estimated revenue by $4,395.25. 

Appropriations for 1947 totaled $1,- 
804, .390. 74, which together with .S203,- 
719.96 carried forward from the previ- 
ous year, .S29,772.74 in cash receipts, 
and $26,818.43 in tiansfers, brought 
the total amount ol funds available uo 
to $2,064,701.87. Exjx'uditures for the 
year amounted to $1,762,540.98 leaving 
an unexpended balance of $302,160.89 
of which $238,849.90 were carried for- 
ward to 1948 and 863,310.99 were 
credited to surplus. 

The City of Ccmcord closed the year 
with a surplus of $67,201.65. 

Bond funds 

On December 31, 1947. the City's 
bonded indebtedness totaled $443,300.- 
00 as the result of a $59,700.00 net re- 
duction effected during the year. Of 
the oiustanding bond obligations $257,- 
000.00 were school bonds, $146,300.00 
were municipal bonds and ,$40,000.00 
were waterworks bonds. No new bonds 
were issued during the year. 

Total interest charges initil maturity 
on the bonded debt amounted to 
$117,993.65. Of this sum. $101,957.50 
represents interest on school bonds, 
$12,876.15 interest on nuuiicipal bonds 
and $3,160.00 interest on waterworks 
bonds. 

Trust Funds 

Trust fund assets totaled S519.7()7.79 
at the end of 1947. Of this sum, 
$390,579.94 were cemetery funds, $124,- 
026.12 were library funds and $5,161.73 
represented miscellaneous trusts. Trust 
fund receipts totaled $23,941.74 as 
against disbursements of $20,570.83. 



72 « « City of Concord 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 

Gordon S. Lord Cify Solicitor 

1947 Expenditure $2,370.50 

Old Litigation 

State of N'ew Hatnfhslnre xis. 3S1.S6 
Acres of Land, James M. Sawyer, et. al. 
was a proceeding to coiideiiin land 
for use as a part of the Concord Muni- 
cipal Airport. A settlement was made 
with all except the former o^vners of 
eight of the tracts taken in this pro- 
ceeding. Diligent search failed to re- 
veal the whereabouts of some of these 
owners while others of this group re- 
fused to accept the amoimts awarded 
as compensation. Application was 
made for a court order terminating the 
case upon payment into court of the 
amounts due these former owners. 

Concord Electric Company vs. City 
of Concord was a petition for an award 
of compensation for the alleged taking 
by eminent domain proceedings of an 
easement owned by the petitioner. 
The petitioner claimed that these 
rights are appurtenant to land taken 
by the city for use as a street. 

Page Belting Coiujiaiiy vs. City of 
Concord. This ^vas an appeal from 
the allowance of compensation for the 
taking of real estate for use as a high- 
way by eminent domain proceedings. 

John E. Rich vs. City of Concord 
was a bill in equity to cure an alleged 
defect in the title to land conveyed by 
the City to Mr. Rich. The parties 
agreed upon a deciee which disposed 
of the case. 

New Litigation 

Roland SI. Ongr vs. Cily of Concord. 
The plaintiff applied to the Zoning 



Board of Adjustment for a permit to 
convert a four family dwelling into a 
six family dwelling. The Zoning 
lioard declined and the plaintiff ap- 
pealed to the Superior Court which 
granted the permit. Appeal has been 
taken and is now pending in the State 
Supreme Court. 

Other Activities 

Pursuant to direction of the Board 
of Aldermen, work on a complete re- 
vision of the city ordinances was begun. 
The purpose of the revision is to 
modernize as well as to compile and 
index. Each ordinance was carefully 
scrutinized by the Committee On Bills 
On Second Reading for applicability 
to the existing situation. Obsolete 
ordinances were eliminated and others 
^vere modified to meet changed condi- 
tions. It also was necessary to examine 
recent acts of the legislature pertain- 
ing to miniicipalities in order to elim- 
inate ordinances conflicting with the 
state law. 

At the suggestion of the city govern- 
ment a bill was introduced ancl adop- 
ted by the 1947 General C^ourt author- 
izing municipalities to install parking 
meters. The primary purpose of this 
legislation was to solve a parking profj- 
lem rather than to tap a new source 
of rexenue. The pro\ ision in the 
statiUe specifying the purposes for 
which the revenue may be expended 
insures that rexenue in excess of main- 
tenance costs shall be expended to pro- 
vide additional parking space. 

Counting parking meter revenue 





Aerial vieiv of proposed Concord throughpass 



PLANNING 



CITY PLANNING BOARD 

Dudley W. OrR. Chairman 
Edward E. Beane 
Hon. Charles C. Davie 
Douglas N. Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
A. Clifford Hudson 
John B. Jameson 
Charles J. McKee 
Robert W. Potter 

GUSTAF H. LEHTINEN Director 

1947 Expenditure $7,069.42 

Major Street Plan 

In keeping with its program for the 
orderly development of the city's plan 
of major streets, the City Planning 
Board approved two important high- 
way projects during 1947. These were 
the Sheep Davis Road bypass and a 
future street connecting East Concord 
with the Concord through- pass. 



In cooperation with the State High- 
way Department, preliminary plans 
were prepared to develop Sheep Davis 
Road as part of the secondary state 
highway system. This project will re- 
duce the travel distance between the 
Daniel Webster Highway in Pembroke 
and N. H. Route No. 106 at OK 
Garage In one and one-half miles. 
The project will also ser\e to reduce 
the daily \'olume of through traffic in 
the Concord Plains settlement by 
aijout I, ()()() (ars. 

A plan ol .1 I mure street running 
ironi the Contortl throughpass in the 
\ icinity of Ferry Street to East Concord 
on the easterly side of the White Moun- 
tain Division railroad right of way was 
certified to the Board of Mayor and 
Aldermen. This project is part of the 
o\er-all throughpass plan and will 
serve to eliminate a bad railroad cross- 
ing on the easterly approach to the 
East Concord ri\er bridge. The pro- 
posed new street will also provide the 
means for opening up an industrial 
estate on the easterly side of the rail- 
road to East Concord. 



i-^ « « City of Concord 



Street Extensions 

During the year, the Phinniiig Board 
processed eight petitions requesting 
new street layouts. These included 
layouts at Christian, Ormond and Al- 
lard Streets on Concord Plains; Allen- 
dale Road, Haig, Neville and Dono- 
van Streets in the South End; and 
Riverhill Avenue at Ri\erhill. Favor- 
able action, conditioned on payment 
by the petitioners of the cost of the 
installation of city facilities, was taken 
with regard to the first four streets 
mentioned. In the case of Allendale 
Road, the petition was subsequently 
withdrawn. The Planning Board re- 
commended against the acceptance of 
Riverhill Avenue and Haig, Neville 
and Donovan Streets. 

Street Improvements 

As an alternate to the acceptance cjf 
Riverhill Avenue, particularly in light 
of its present use by residents of camjjs 
along the Contoocook River, the board 
recommended minor improvements to 
the existing road. In this connection, 
a plan was devised for the future ac- 
ceptance of Riverhill Avenue as part of 
a project calling for the relocation of 
Elm Street. 



Other street improvement projects 
studied by the board included a pro- 
posed relocation of a section of Gar- 
vin's Falls Road to eliminate an "S" 
curve, and proposed changes in the 
traveled ways of Palm and Fairbanks 
Streets. 

Penacook Canal Project 

One of the outstancHng planning 
projects undertaken during the year 
involved the alxmdoned canal on the 
southerly side of the Contoocook River 
in the Penacook business district. The 
\arious aspects of the problem involved 
the filling of the canal to eliminate a 
health nuisance, acquisition of the 
canal property by the city, widening 
of East Canal Street and the creation 
of needed parking space both on- and 
off-street. 

In connection with this project, it 
was recommended that the city cooper- 
ate with the state in rebuilding a 
l,40()-foot section of South Main Street 
and that the excavation therefrom be 
used to fill the canal. 

Building Code 

After intensive study over a period 
of three years, during which legisla- 




PROPOSED STREET WIDENING AND PARKING LOT 
PENACOOK BUSINESS DISTRICT 



Annual Report » » 15 




tion was sought to permit the adoption 
of national standards by reference, the 
Planning Board recommended and 
carried through to adoption a new 
building code for the city. Adoption 
of the new code was particularly timely 
in that it assures the city of the advan- 
tages of modern construction practices 
in a period of imprecedented building 
activity. 

Zoning 

During the year, the Planning Board 
recommended one change in the zon- 
ing map of the city. This involved 
the area on Manchester Street immedi- 
ately below the South End river bridge. 
The location was re-zoned from an 
agricultural to a local business district. 

At the request of the Board of Ad- 
justment, the Planning Board reviewed 
the provisions cjf the zoning ordinance 
relating to signs. As the result of this 
examination, it ^vas recommended that 
the area linu'tation on signs in local 
business districts lie increased irom 
twenty to forty scjuare feet. 



Airport Development 

In connection with the proposed 
expansion of apron and taxiway facil- 
ities at the miniicipal airport under 
the federal airport development pro- 
gram, the board's staff assisted the City 
Engineering Department in the pre- 
paration of detailed plans for submis- 
sion to the Civil Aeronautics Admin- 
istration. The proposed expansion 
conforms to the master plan for the 
development of the airport, previously 
prepared by the board. 

Lake Development 

Legislation permitting the construc- 
tion of Concord Lake was secured at 
the 1947 session of the legislature. The 
question was submitted to the elector- 
ate at the municipal election held in 
November and failed to pass by a t^vo 
to one vote margin. 

As time permits, the Planning Board 
will (oniiiuic its study of this project 
to the end that the citizens of Con- 
cord may be provided with more facts 
relative to the merits of the proposed 
lake development. 



If) " « City of Concord 



Committee Activity 

During the past year, members of 
the Phinning Board and the board's 
staff ha\e been called with increasing 
frequency to serve on special com- 
mittees of the Board of Aldermen. 
With particular reference to the staff, 
no mean amount of its effort has been 
expended toward this end. Committee 
assignments ha\e included service on 
the Parking Lot Locations Committee, 
the Parking Meter Committee, the 
Forge Pond Swimming Area Conmiit- 
tee, the National Recreation Associa- 
ti(jn Report Study Committee and the 
SAvimming Facilities Study (^onmiittee. 

Other Activities 

Early in the year, the board con- 
ducted a New England-wide survey of 



municipal salaries at the request of 
the Finance Committee. This material 
proved useful to the committee in es- 
tablishing salary ranges for city em- 
ployees. 

For the eighth consecutive year, the 
annual city report was published under 
the supervision of the l«>ard. The 
Concord report continued to hold a 
high place in state and regional minii- 
cipal report competition. 

In accordance with the tax-sale prop- 
erty ordinance, all tax-sale property 
was studied for foreseeable future 
municipal use. 1 he board also brought 
to an end its war-time duties of keep- 
ing the city honor roll. The final post- 
ing showed 3,775 names of which 82 
were gold-starred. 



Historic Fiske building, landmark of the old North End, ivill soon be 
razed to make way for the new throughpass. 




PUBLIC 

HEALTH Mid 

SANITATION 

c> c> c» o \^ s^ c> \^ <> c> ^^ c> N> 
BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles C. Davie. Chairman 
Pierre A. Boucher. M.D. 
Thomas M. Dudley. M.D. 
Clinton R. Mullins. M.D. 

Donald G. Barton. M.D Health Officer 

Austin B. Presby Milk Inspector 

1947 Expenditure S8,215.31 

O C> <> C> C' <> C- C- s^ C- C" \^ s^ 

. . . Public Health 
AND Sanitation 

Health Conditions 

The absence oi epidemics and a 
marked decrease in the number of 
communicable disease cases contribu- 
ted largely to the good pulilic health 
conditions ^vhich prevailed in Concord 
during 1947. 

Fourteen cases of scarlet fever were 
reported to the Health Department 
during the past year as against 36 dur- 
ing 1946. Although cases of whoop- 
ing cough, mumps, measles and chicken 
pox were reported in different sections 
of the city, it was in niunbers consider- 
ably less than in previous years. 

Only one resident case of poliomye- 
litis was reported during 1947. For- 
tunately, recovery was complete in this 
instance. 

Immunization Clinics 

During the past year, the Health 
Department conducted 1 1 clinics at 
which 386 children were immunized 
as against 357 in 1946. A total of iTY) 
inoculations were given for diphtheria. 
There were 278 inoculations lor whoop- 



ing cough, and 83 children were vac- 
cinated against small pox. At the 
December clinic live children were 
given tetanus toxoid for protection 
from lock jaw. In many instances, 
chiklren received both toxoid and 
wliooping cough ])reventati\e treat- 
ment. 

No small measure of credit for the 
continued success of the immuniza- 
ti(jn clinics is due to the valuable as- 
sistance received from the Concord 
District Ninsing Association and the 
Junior League. The nursing associa- 
tion made available the services of a 
nurse while the League furnished the 
clerical help needed to register the 
children. 

Sanitation Program 

The routine inspection of restau- 
rants and other establishments where 
food is served has resulted in maintain- 
ing a high standard of cleanliness at 
all Concord eating establishments. The 
periodic swab rinse tests of glasses, 
cups, and utensils conducted by the 
department is essential to a successful 
sanitation program. 

Another phase of the Health De- 
partment's sanitation program is the 
inspection of alley ways in the business 
district of the city. During the past 
year all unsanitary alley ways were 
inspected and a marked improvement 
was noted. 

Federal Aid 

The Concord Health Department 
wishes to express its appreciation to 
the United States Public Health Ser- 
vice for making available to the City a 
lull time public health engineer. 

Vital Statistics 

The total number of deaths in Con- 
cord during 1947 was 661. This figure 
represented a decrease of 29 over the 
total for 1946. Most of this decrease 
can be attributed to the non-resi- 
dent category representing institutional 
deaths. Of the deaths recorded in 



is « « City of Concord 



1947, 297 were residents, and 364 non- 
residents, as compared to 270 and 420 
for the year 1946. 

Presented herewith in summary form 

Diseases of the circulatory system .... 
Cancer and other malignant tumors . . 

Nephritis 

Accidental deaths 

Pneumonia 

Dial)etes uieUiius 

Tul)ercidosis 

Resignation 

The resignation of Dr. Donald G. 
Barton, Health Officer, became effec- 
tive on December 31. Dr. Barton was 
appointed Health Officer in January 
1937, and with the exception of dut\ 
with the Army Medical Corps during; 
World War II, has served the City in 
that capacity for the past ten years. 

. . . Milk Control 

For the third ccjnsecuti\e year there 
was a decline in the production of milk 
in the Concord area, and it was not 
possible for local producers to ade- 
quately supply Concord with dairy 
products. As a result, it was necessarv 
for concerns to go beyond the natural 
milk shed of Concord in order to bu\ 
enough milk to meet consumer de- 
mands. 

Among the factors which have dis- 
couraged milk production are the 
shortage of manpower, the high cost 
of labor on farnrs, the high cost of 
farm machinery and stock feed, and 
the poor quality of grain. As a re- 
sult, the ratio of producers going out 
of business as against new producers 
was about 2.5 to 1, or bv actual count 
25 to 10. 

A total of 159 producers located 
within an 18-mile radius of Concord 
supplied milk to the city. The num- 
ber of producers who supplied milk 
from outside of the 18-mile radius is 
not known, but most of their product 
is channeled through a milk receiving- 



is a tabulation showing the number of 
resident deaths from the seven most 
ccmimon causes during the past fi\e- 
year pericjd. 



9-/ 5 


l'H4 


/<>-/> 


/<A/6 


79-/ 7 


113 


109 


] 08 


111 


127 


32 


42 


37 


37 


45 


14 


21 


16 


7 


13 


15 


12 


10 


24 


18 


11 


4 


10 


13 


12 


s 


11 


8 


14 


9 


1 


2 


9 


5 


3 



plant supervised by the Massachusetts 
Departmein of Health. 

Consumption 

During the year the a\erage daily 
consumption of fluid milk in Concord 
was 15.021 quarts, which was a slight 
increase over the preceding year. Of 
this amount, 12,356 quarts were sold 
as pasteurized milk, and 2,566 quarts 
were raw milk. 

Owing to the continuing high level 
of consumer purchasing power and 



Periodic dental checks pay off in 
sound teeth. 






-.' \ 



■•<%<f,J^ 



■:'«»»- 







Penacook Lake — Beautiful from any angle 



the shortage of heavy cream, the 
amount ol fluid milk consumed daih 
remained high. 

Cleanliness Required 

The consumers of dairy products 
demand that milk should be produced 
under sanitary conditions, consequent- 
ly the Milk Department in its inspec- 
tion program emphasizes cleanliness 
of cows, stables, and milk rooms. 
Periodic whitewashing of cow stables 
is required by tlie department. The 
use of a chemical powder by all pro- 
ducers for washing dairy utensils is 
another sanitation safeguard. The 
thermostatically - controlled electric 
coolers used by all wholesale producers 
must be kept clean at all times. 

The use of DDT spray is an im- 
portant factor in keeping stables and 



milk njoms dean. Many producers 
carried out programs of periodic spray- 
ing with a high degree of success. As 
a result, fewer flies in stables and milk 
rooms were observed by the Milk In- 
spector than at any other time in the 
histoiy of the Milk Department. 

Pasteurizatio n 

rogether with local authorities, the 
city's seven j^asteurizing plants con- 
tinued to function effectively as a vital 
safeguard to |niblic health. In addi- 
tion to regular inspections of all pas- 
teurizing plants, all pasteurizing equip- 
ment was checked for sanitation. 
Weekly inspections of the temperature 
charts used on each pasteurizer were 
conducted by the department. To 
determine the quality of milk, samples 
were collected from each producer's 



20 « « City of Concord 



supply for laboratory tests and analysis. 
As a result of this activity. .S20 quarts 
of milk were rejected for reasons of be- 
ing off flavor or sour. 

Vitamin Milk 

Daily sales of vitamin "D" milk 
averaged 180 quarts, all of which were 
pasteurized. The sale of vitamin milk 
continued to show an increase. An 
increase in the sale of homogenized 
milk was noted during 1947. The aver- 
age daily sales of homogenized milk 
was 510 quarts. 

Cream 

During 1947, the average daily sale 
of heavy cream amounted to 465 
quarts. Of this total, 413 quarts were 
pasteurized and 52 quarts were raw 
cream. Average daily sales increased 
29 quarts as compared with the daily 
consumption of cream in 1946. A 
large amount of heavy cream came 
from the Middle West and will con- 
tinue to arrive from distant points as 



long as fluid milk consumption re- 
mains high. The general quality of 
cream received was satisfactory. 

Inspections and Tests 

The department made 795 dairy and 
364 milk plant inspections during 
1947. In addition, 57 milk trucks 
were inspected, as were 72 eating es- 
tablishments where milk is sold. One 
hundred sixty eight written notices 
were sent to milk plants and dairies 
ordering improvements in unsatisfac- 
tory conditions. 

During the year, the department 
collected 1,694 samples of milk, cream, 
chocolate milk, ice cream and orange- 
ade which were subjected to a variety 
of laboratory tests. In addition, 194 
restaurant swab rinse samples were col- 
lected and analyzed. 

A new state regulation, which re- 
quires all distributors of milk and 
cream to label bottle caps or bottles 
with the name and place of business, 
became effectixc during 1947. 



Canning projects are an important part of the school health program. 
This one is conducted by the Walker School Mothers Club. 




Annual Report » » 21 




Mayor Davie pitches the first ball at the opening game of the Twilight 

League at Rollins Park. 



RECREATION 



c>c>c»<>c>c>c>>>c>c> 



s> S.N s> 



PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Paul G. CrOWELL Supervisor 

1947 Expenditure $17,798.90 

o o <» c> c> c >> «> c- c> c» C^ C^ 

. . , Playgrounds and Bath 

For many years there has been an 
ever increasing recognition on the part 
of all social minded people that recre- 
ation in some h)rm is a i)asic need in 
the life of every individnal. Directly 
related to this concept of more and 
improved recreational facilities was the 
initiation of an intensified program 
of activity l)y the Playground Com- 
mittee during the past year. 

Improvements 

During n)47, the recently accpiired 
William Reed Playground on Hall 
Street had its face lifted. New equip- 
ment installed at this neiphhorhood 



play area included a swing outfit, a 16 
foot chute and a double teeter bedway. 
In addition, the construction of a new 
shelter-house was completed which will 
]:)ro\ ide ade(|uate tf)ilet facilities. The 
\Villiam Reed Playgroiuid occupies an 
8-acre tiait of land located off Hall 
Street in the block between Home Ave- 
nue and Sandcpiist Street. 

The rc-grading of the hockey rink 
area at White Park by the Public 
Works Department contril^uted to the 
very successfid hockey season reported 
b\ the Playground Committee. In an 
ell<jrt to maintain satisfactory hockey 
rink conditions at Wliite Park, the rink 
will be graded next year prior to the 
hockey season. 

Snmwer Activities 

Sunnner playground activities in- 
cluded such ])erennial favorites as base- 
ball, softiiall, volley ball, cricket, new- 
comb and horseshoes. Inter - play- 
ground l)aseljall continued to be tops 
in the field of summer playground 
activity, with the championship being 
vvon by the White Park Boys' Team. 



22 « « City of Concord 



Owing to the continued absence of 
adult swimming facilities, Saint Paul's 
School authorities again ofTered tiie 
use of their pond to the city for a piil)- 
lic swimming area. The offer was ac- 
cepted and siiper\ised swimming ac- 
tivities were conducted at the pond 
during the entire summer season. 

Swimming instructors, "who were 
made a\'ailable by the American Red 
Cross, taught swimming at all of the 
city's pools. Lessons were given on a 
two-periods-a-week basis. The course 
in advanced life-saving was continued 
at the Saint Paul's School area. 

One of the outstanding attractions 
of the 1947 summer season was the 
annual Fourth of Jidy celebration. 
The various events, all well-received by 
the many spectators present, included 
a children's party at White Park in 
the afternoon, evening fireworks at the 
Camp Groiuids on the Plains and sev- 
eral band concerts. 

Summer attendance at Concord's su- 
pervised playgrounds showed a sul)- 
stantial increase of approximately 10,- 

New press and radio box at Memorial Field erected by the Concord 

Booster s Club. 



000 as compared with the total atten- 
dance for the previous year. A major 
factor in this increase was the absence 
of any poliomyelitis outbreaks. 

It is interesting to note that only 
one minor accident, a glass-cut, occur- 
red during the 1947 summer season. 

Winter Activities 

VVinter-sports-minded citizens used 
extensively the many skating and 
street-coasting areas operated by the 
Playground Committee. Until provi- 
sions are made for supervision of the 
winter-sports areas, it will be impossi- 
Ijle to estimate total winter attendance. 
Spot-checks have indicated that old 
and young alike derive equal amoimts 
of pleasure from the city's winter-sport 
facilities. 

Maintenance 

Two new chlorofeeders were pur- 
chased for use at wading pools. This 
equipment was acquired as a part of 
an annual replacement program to in- 
siue sanitary conditions at the city's 
wadins areas. 




Annual lie /> art » » 23 




Thousands of Concord people viewed the exhibits in the freedom Train 
during Rededication Week. 



Badly-worn chain-link swings were 
replaced for the first time since 1942. 
Now that equipment is more readily 
available, extensive equipment replace- 
ment is anticipated. 

The tennis courts were re-surfaced 
at Rollins Park and at East Concord. 
Plans have been made to re-sinface the 
groinids at Penacook in the near fu- 
ture. 

Recreation Study 

At the rcc|uest of the Playgroimd 
Committee of the Board of .Aldermen, 
the National Recreation Association of 
New York City made a study to de- 
termine the ways and means of secur- 
ing maximimi use of the recreation 
resources in the City of Concord. 

In its report, the National Recrea- 
tion Commission recommended that 
the Playground Conmiittee be abol- 
ished and its functions assumed by the 
Recreation Commission as a means of 
vesting policy-making responsibility in 
a single administrative agency. 

Findings by the survey group indi- 
cate a greater need for indoor recrea- 



tional facilities. At the same time, 
the National Recreation Commission 
pointed out that it shoidd he possible 
to furnish a larger share of the popula- 
tion of Concord with all-year recrea- 
tional opportiuiities b) using facilities 
that now exist. 

<• C» C O C' o c> c> c> c» <* o c> 
RECREATION COMMISSION 

RUEL N. Colby, Chairman 
Hon. Charles C. Davie 
Leigh S. Hall 
Chester G. Larson 
Carleton R. Metcalf 

1947 Expenditures $8,930.23 

1947 Receipts 55,768.24 

Net Cost to City $3,161.99 

O O C> <^ C> O C» >> C> C» <> C> s'' 

Finances 

Total receipts from 1!)17 operations 
at the Beaver Meadow Municipal Golf 
Course and the Memorial Athletic 
Field amounted to ,1?5,768.24. Of this 
amount, .^4,678. 8'^ represented golf 



24 " " City of Concord 



fees. $885.99 rental charges for use of 
the athletic field and .'>20-^.92 from con- 
cessions at iMemorial Field. The C^oni- 
mission received a 1947 appropriation 
of ,'52.80().()() from the city government. 
Routine expenditures for the year 
amounted to $8,930.2.S. of ^vhich .$6,- 
584. .S8 were spent at Beaver Meadow, 
$2,047.80 at Nfemorial Field and $298.- 
05 at the Russell Pond Winter Sports 
Area. In addition to these expendi- 
tines. approximately $1,000.00 were 
expended from the capital budget for 
the Russell Pond Area. 

Beater Meadow Golf Course 

The chd) facilities and the nine-hole 
golf course at Beaver Meadow were 
used to full capacity during the entire 
season. There were 150 season ticket 
holders and 3,000 day fee tickets were 
sold. The tennis court was used and 
enjoyed by many. Several tees were 
made larger during the year. 

The club manager and grounds- 
keeper continued to operate the club 
house and course in a gratifying and 
efficient manner. 

Memorial Field 

Permanent floodlights for night foot- 
ball were installed at Memorial Field 
in time for the opening of the football 
season. These were a decided impro\'e- 
ment over the temporary lighting facil- 
ities used in 1946. The use of flood- 
lights has increased materially the 
attendance at the football games played 
by both high schools. 

A much needed press and radio I)ox 
was erected on the permanent grand 
stand through the generosity of the 
Concord Booster's Club. This box en- 
ables more efficient reporting of the 
games and is very much appreciated 
by the press and radio. 

Considerable work was done on the 
drainage system to improve conditions 
on baseball diamond and other areas 
affected by excess of groiuid water in 
the spring. 

During the stunmer, the field was 
used extensively for organized after- 



supper Softball. Constant use was also 
macle of the six tennis coiuts available 
at the field. 

Russell Pond Area 

Circatly increased skiing activity was 
noted at the Russell Pond Winter 
Sports Area. 

A. new open slope was created at a 
cost of approximately $1,000.00 by 
widening the expert trail, thereby de- 
veloping the area for more diversified 
skiing and increasing the capacity of 
the snow bowl. A sulistantial saving 
to the city was made possii)le through 
the active cooperation of the Concord 
Ski Club which, by regular organized 
work parties, saved a great deal of 
labor expense. 

A privately owned ski tow has been 
in operation on the easterly slope 
which has attracted many skiers to the 
area. 

Future plans for Russell Pond Area 
include bull-dozing and smoothing up 
the new slope with some additional 
clearing, repairing and painting of the 
ski jump, clearing out an area for 
better parking facilities, improving the 
road leading to the ski area and im- 
proving the intermediate trail. Ihe 
Commission hopes to have a privately 
owned and operated ski tf)w to service 
the new slope and trails for the next 
skiing season. These improvements 
will develop this into an outstanding 
ski area and increase its use tremen- 
dously. 

New Equipment 

New power mowing ecpiipment was 
])iuchased for both the municipal golf 
course and Memorial Field. Perma- 
nent floodlights for night football were 
installed at Memorial Field. 





Children's nook at Penacook Branch Library. 



U B L I C 
LIBRARY 

<s >> <^ <v <v <> <^ c> c^ c> c> c> c^ 
BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Willis D. Thompson. Jr.. Chairtnan 

Francis E. Beer 

Harold W. Bridge 

Joseph J. Comi 

Mrs. Charles P. Johnson 

John F. MacEachran 

Mrs. Eugene F. Magenau 

Alvah W. Sulloway 

Mrs. Robert W. Upton 

R. Keith DOMS Libraridu 

1947 Expenditure §33,618.45 



o s> s> o <^ 



o o o o 



One ol the lil)rary',s main objectives 
in 1947, as always, has been to provide 
better branch lil)rary service. A nnni- 



Ixr ot plnsical improvements were 
made in 1947, notably at Penacook. 

After more than 80 years in tempo- 
rary cjiiartcrs, the Penacook l^ranch 
library opened the doors of its perma- 
nent home on November 8, 1947. 

The Penacook branch was made pos- 
sible as a result of the City Government 
turning the Penacook police station 
over to the library for its use. Re- 
modeling expenditures totaled .'>12,- 
917.HM. Vhc entire amount ^vas with- 
fhawn liom hl)rary trust funds avail- 
able for that ]iurpose. 

Generally recognized as one of the 
finest brancli libraries in New Hamp- 
shire, this completely modern library 
li.is a capacity of 4,000 volumes. 

In l)ranch library service it has been 
found that, like many comnuKUties, 
(he ])i()du(t must be brouglit nearer 
to llic |)ot(iuial consumer. To supply 
llie iiospilal, as well as the branches, 



26 « « City of Concord 



Avith more current materials which 
make lor "live" collections, a form 
of more flexilile transportation is sug- 
gested. 

Children's Work 

Twelve of Concords elementary 
schools received library service, and 
according to all indications there will 
be a heavier demand for school library 
services in 1948. 

The Saturday morning story hours 
were unusually popular, with the chil- 
dren's room often packed to full capa- 
city. The generous loan of a record 
player made it possible to experiment 
with recorded stories. These weekly 
story hours were supplemented by 
Junior Service League guest enter- 
tainers. 

Young People's Work 

Under the guidance of 
the Young People's libra- 
rian, 7th grade pupils were 
instructed in library usage, 
as a regtilarly scheduled 
part of the public school 
curriculum. 

Large nimibers of high 
school students continued 
to avail themselves of the 
Yotmg People's Room al 
the main library. To in- 
sure desirable study condi- 
tions, as Avell as to provide 
a suitable situation for 
atlult patrons, a iiionilnr 
system was inaugmated. At 
the same time, young peo- 
ple were given the new 
privilege of using the peri- 
odical room and stacks, as 
well as the continued use 
of the "S'oung People's and 
Reference Rooms. 

Reference Work 

I'he 1-lelerence Depart- 
ment, answering on an 
average of 25-30 questions 



daily, is a dynamic force in Concord's 
library service. Questions vary from 
conmionplace queries to assistance in 
identifying "Miss Hush. " 

It is interesting to note that 20 per- 
cent of the reference service transacted 
is done through the mediimis of tele- 
phone and mail. 

General Activities 

A "fine-less" book week, believed to 
be the first of its kind in New Hamp- 
shire, was sponsored by the Public 
Library during the week of Christmas. 
Much interest was shown both in 
Concord and throughout New Eng- 
land, many long overdue books having 
been returned. 

The library's meeting-room facilities 
were heavily luilized with 119 meetings 
scheduled durin*' 1!)47. 




Branch librarian at circulation desk of the 
new Penacook Branch. 



Annual Report » » 27 



Many displays of local interest were 
featined. The Concord Camera Club's 
showings were unusually well received. 

The many books donated by friends 
of the library in 1947 have helped 
strengthen the lx>ok. collection, and 
Avere appreciated. Noteworthy gifts 
of books were received from the libra- 
ries (}f Rev. Charles VV. Ivelley and the 
Wonolancet Club. 

Circulation 

A total of 169,660 books were bor- 
rowed by library patrons during 1947. 
This represented a decrease of 13,993 
from the total number of books circu- 
lated in the preceding year. However, 
this is not in reality a drop in circu- 
lation, but is due instead to a new 
system, begun in 1947, of counting 
children's books circulated to the 
schools. 



In spite of the Penacook branch 
being closed for three months, there 
was an increase in branch and adult 
circulation. 

Registration and Collection 

One of the first things sought by 
newcomers to Concord is a library card. 
2,203 new users were registered in 1947. 

The library added 4,144 books dur- 
ing 1947. Of this number 735 were 
children's books. The library's total 
book collection numbered 50,598 vol- 
umes at the end of the year. 

Finances 

Library expenditures for the year 
1947 totaled $33,618.45. Major operat- 
ing expenses were .1? 19,850.95 for salar- 
ies, $6,443.20 for books and .'ii;665.99 for 
periodicals. Receipts from fines to- 
taled $2,383.53 while income from trust 
funds amounted to $14,384.78. 



Air. Rabbit was the center of attraction at the pojiular Easter story hour 

at the Main Library. 




28 « « City of Concord 



R E L I E F 

<> <v <>v <v s> C <> C> C> O C> <• S'' 

CITY RELIEF BOARD 

John E. Davis. Chairman 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Charles P. Coakley 

Parker L. Hancock Overseer of Poor 

Charles P. Coakley Overseer of Poor 

(Ward I) 

1947 Expenditures: 

City $41,308.33 

Penacook 5,982.30 

Administration 

The City Relief Department is the 
agency which has been created Ijy tlie 
city government to carry out the tax- 
supported social work program lor the 
Clity of Cloncord. Merrimack Clcnmty 
also uses this same agency h)r those 
individuals and iamilies living in Con- 
cord who are relief responsibilities of 
the County. This arrangement elim- 
inates duplications. Merrimack Coun- 
ty and the City of Concord share 
equally all administrative costs. The 
Cormty repays the City on a monthly 
basis for money expended on Comity 
cases. Since both City and Clounty 
direct relief loads remained relati\ely 
light, it was possible to carry on the 
work of the department with a person- 
nel of only five, including Concord and 
Penacook Overseers. This was an all- 
time low in the number of employees. 

General Trend 

With continuing prosperity and 
plenty of employment opportunities, 
the number of persons in need of pub- 
lic aid and direct relief, remained com- 
paratively lo^v. 

The increased costs for the neces- 
sities of life had a direct effect on the 
overall relief program and relief ex- 



penditures. The department found 
it necessary to pay higher rates to con- 
valescent and boarding homes which 
provided board, room, and musing 
care for indigent persons in need of 
this type of aid. In those cases where 
food, fuel or other necessities of life 
were directly provided to the poor, it 
was necessary to pay higher prices. The 
board rates for children were also in- 
creased. The department also felt 
the effects of high prices because sev- 
eral large families with moderate to 
low incomes were forced to ajjply for 
sujjplemental assistance. 

Unfortunately "prosperity" does not 
(ome to those who are aged, ill or dis- 
al)led. Approximately 75 per cent of 
our relief cases during 1947 were the 
result of old age and sickness. Another 
major cause of relief was broken homes 
and marital difficulties wherein one 
parent deserted, Avas alcoholic, mis- 
spent his earnings, or was in jail. In- 
sufficient income, unemployment, un- 
deremployment and transients were 
other causes lor relief needs. 

Old Age Assistance 

More than two hundred peojile to 
whom public assistance was granted in 
1947 by the City of Concord were the 
aged. We may expect this number to 
continue to increase in view of the 
declining death rate. It is hoped that 
ultimately social secmity benefits, in- 
surance benefits, and other pension 
plans will cover all the aged people so 
that they will not need public financial 
assistance. VV^ith the broadening of 
the Social Security program and the 
instigation of other pension systems, 
there should be, within a few years, a 
decrease in the number of Old Age 
Assistance recipients. 

Again in 1947, there was an increase 
in the number of jiersons receiving Old 
Age Assistance. In January, there 
were 225 individuals receiving this 
type of aid, but by December, the num- 
ber had increased to 247. This type 
of assistance is given by means of a 



Annual Report » » 29 



cash grant issued twice a month. In 
order to enable those individuals who 
aie dependent upon this type of aid 
to meet the rising costs ol living, it was 
necessary to increase the amount of the 
monthly grants. Tlie City contributes 
twenty-five pencnt towards the month- 
ly grant lor eadi Old Age Assistance 
recipient (iiaigeal)le to the City of 
Concord. The (lity's shaic in this jjhj- 
gram for 1947 amounted to .S2!),()7r).00, 
as compared to SL'").!'.! 1 .00 in lOKi. 

Relief Costs 

I'ht' total cost of Caty Reliel during 
1947 was $47,29().6.-i. of which .^5,982.30 
was expended in Penacook and §41,- 
308.3/^ in the remainder of the City. 
Direct leliel e\])enclitines for groceries, 
milk, iuel, rent, board and care of 
adidts. Ijoard and care of children, 
medical, clothing, cash allowances, 
finierals and miscellaneous items a- 
mounted to .f9,630.20. This was an 
increase of ,§1,761.22 as compared to 
the previous year. Expenditures for 
similar items for dependent soldiers 
and sailors totaled $699.25. The sum 



One of the last vehicles to carry the 

name made famous by the Concord 

Coach. 




of .S2.1.S0..S9 was expended for hos- 
pitalization of pocjr and indigent per- 
sons. 

Fotal County Relief costs amounted 
to §25,417.86. This constituted an in- 
crease of $1.. 383. 69 over the previous 
)ear. Ihe sum of $17,604.07 was ex- 
pended for direct County aid and §3,- 
032.05 for aid to dependent soldiers 
and sailors. 

Relief Load 

In January there were 26 City cases 
representing 39 persons and 48 Coun- 
ty cases representing 118 persons, for 
a total of 74 cases representing 157 
persons. By December the case load 
had increased to 41 City cases repre- 
senting 68 persons, and 55 County 
cases representing 140 persons, for a 
total of 96 cases representing 208 per- 
sons. 

Throughout the year public aid and 
relief was granted to 71 different City 
cases representing 142 persons, and 
101 Coimty cases representing 259 per- 
sons, making a combined total of 172 
cases representing 401 persons. This 
case load count does not include service 
cases of which there were many, nor 
does it include those cases wherein 
the ap])licant was foimd ineligible for 
public aid. 

Objectives 

The fundamental and basic objec- 
ti^e of the department is the preven- 
tion and treatment o{ dependency. 
The ]jroblenrs and difficulties of 
individuals and families are given 
indi\idual ccjusideration witli the ob- 
jective of enabling them to be self- 
supporting if at all possible. Social 
case work services by trained and ex- 
perienced workers are given to those 
who are in need of public assistance 
from the City and Covmty and also to 
some borderline cases, with the inten- 
tion of helping them resume a satisfy- 
ing and prcjductive place in our com- 
munitv. 




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N'JKt- 



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Addison Boys Club hasebidl squad — jV hustlhig ball hawks. 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Daniel J. Shea, Chairman 

M. Harrison Duffy 

Guy a. Swenson 

Arthur W. McIsaac Chief of Police 

J. Edward SilVA Deputy Chief of Police 

1947 Operating Expenditures $106,645.79 

1947 Equipment Expenditures $2,657.33 

Personnel 

There were several changes in Police 
Department personnel during the past 
year. Five regular and three special 
policemen ^vere appointed during 1947. 
Three regular and two special patrol- 
men resiened. 



Finances 

The City appropriated $109,517.79 
for Police Department purposes for 
the year 1947. Of this sum, $106,645.79 
represented operating costs and $2,- 
700.00 capital expenditures. A break- 
down of capital costs shows $2,158.17 
expended for new cruisers, and $499.16 
for photographic equipment. 

The department's unexpended bal- 
ance at the end of the year totaled 
$216.67. This sum together with earn- 
ings of $2,462.29 was returned to the 
City Treasury. 

Crime Data 

Arrests during 1947 totaled 4,438, 
an inciease of 1,,^78 over 1946. The 
increase was due largely to misdemean- 
ors involving violations of parking, 
driving and motor vehicle laws. It is 
also important to note that minor 
daily complaints totaled 5,444. 

Presented in the following table is 
a classification by type and number of 
the criminal cases handled by the Po- 
lice Department during 1947. Type 
and number of minor daily complaints 
are included. 



Annual Report » » 31 




Latest addition to police facilities at 

tion r 

CRIMINAL CASES DllRTNG 1947 
Classification 
Persons char(;ki) — Felonies 

Rai>e 3 

Aggia\ated Assault 1 

Breaking and Knlering 10 

Larceny 29 

Aulo 7'liefl 2 

Tolal 45 

i'ERSONS (;HAR(.E1) MISDEMEANORS 

Assaults IH 

Forgery 1 

Enibezzleinenl and Fraud .... 2 

Stolen jjioperlN 1 

Carrying vveajjons 3 

Sex otfeirses 2 

Licjuor Laws 3 

Driuikeiniess 35.') 

Disorderly Conduct 42 

(ianibling 

Drunken Driving 29 

Road and Driving Laws 532 

Parking Violations 3,114 

Motor ' X'chidc Laws 26S 

Other Ollenses 17 

Tolal 4,393 

Grand Total 4,43S 

Active Cases lor \env 62 

Total 4,500 

Minor Complaints 5,44 1 

Grand Total of Ollenses and Com- 
plaints 9,94 1 

32 « « City of Concord 



headifi/arters — a locker and recrea- 
ooni. 

During the year property reported 
stolen totaled ,'S8,159..3.H. The depart- 
ment recoveied $4,998.18 of this prop- 
erty. 

Traffic 

riie amount of tialhc ctjiuiiuied to 
show a marked increase during 1947. 
There was a ])ro|)ortionale increase in 
tralfic \iolations. I'aii ol tiiis increase 
is a direct result ol incieased through 
traffic. 

The department imestigated 465 
aiitomoljile accideius dining 1947, 
which It-presented II percent less than 
the lotal lor 194(). Fi\e fatalities oc- 
cnrred and 95 j^eisons were injured 
(hiring 1947. Although this is an im- 
])rovement o\er the preceding year, 
from a standpoint of highway traffic 
safety this ligure is still most unsatis- 
factory. 

Safety 

Due to an increasing accident rate, 
combined with .in unusually heavy 
flow of trallic, the department has in- 
tensified its safety program. A great 
deal of time has been spent on safe- 
ty lectures throughout the schools. 
Through the close cooperation of the 



school. i\]c home and the police de- 
pariiiHiit, many accidents can be pre- 
vented. 

The Concord Safety Coinicil and the 
department have jointly promoted traf- 
fic safety dining the past year and will 
continue their common battle against 
traffic accidents in the future. 

Parking Meters 

Meters were installed, effective Octo- 
ber 15, 1947, on Main Street and side 
streets throughout the congested busi- 
ness area. Parking meters, althf>ugh 
not the final solution to the parking 
problem, have effectively reduced park- 
ing congestion. A positive solution 
seems to be the estalilishment of ott- 
street parking lots. 

Training Program 

In keeping with the practice of 
the past several years, all regular police 
officers were required to participate in 
the Police Training School conducted 
by the Chief of the department. 

One member of the department was 
sent to the Federal Biueau of Investiga- 
tion Police Academy in Washington 
for further instruction. Three mem- 
bers were sent to Canton, Ohio, where 



they received a complete course of in- 
struction in the repair and mainte- 
nance of parking meters. 

Ambulance 

All pre\ ious records Avere shattered 
when the police ambidance responded 
to a total of 847 calls during 1947. 
This represents an increase of 297 calls 
over the year of 1946. 

Recofnmendations 

It is recommended that the steam 
pipes throughfjut the police station be 
replaced. At the time the old boiler 
rusted out and the system was linked 
with the Concord Steam Plant none 
of the pipes were replaced. y\s a re- 
sult, many pipes have corroded and 
some of them are completely filled with 
rust, thus reducing heating efficiency 
tremendously. Heating costs woidd be 
substantially reduced if these changes 
were effected as soon as possible. 

It is further recommended that an 
extension should be built to the police 
garage soon. At present the depart- 
ment houses seven vehicles and two 
motorcycles in a five-car garage. As 
a result, much police equipment must, 
of necessity, be kept out of doors. 



Emergency obstetrics explained to police. 




Annual Report » » 33 




Estate of late Ambassador ]ohn G. Winant acquired by state for 

study center. 



child 



PROBATION 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judge William L. Stevens 

Robert L. Colby Probation Officer 

1947 Expenditure 51,583.90 

The purpose ol this agency of city 
government is the prevention and cor- 
rection of juvenile cleHnqueucy. This 
department has been primarily con- 
cerned with neglected and delinquent 
children, but has also included any 
adult case-work necessary to effecting 
social rehabilitation. 

Fifteen years prior to the establish- 
ment of the l^roiiation department ex- 
isting social organizations shunned the 
juvenile delinquent. This situation 
no longer exists in Concord. With the 
aid of many coojierating agencies, con- 
structive and expeditious action is now 
a fact. 



Decrease 

It is encouraging to note that Con- 
cortl had another decrease in juvenile 
delincpiency during 1947. This is ex- 
plained in part by the fact that the 
wage income of those families who had 
|5rospective delincjuents remained at 
an all-time high level, thus affording 
more money to be expended for rec- 
reaticMial purposes. At the same time, 
higher incomes made it possible for 
potentially delintjuent families to es- 
taijlish themselves in more desirable 
environments. Inadequate housing is 
in itself a major factor contriiniting to 
juvenile delinquency. 

Current Trends 

Of particular interest is the fact that 
no cfjumiitments to the State Indus- 
trial School were made during 1947. 
Noteworthy, too, is the failure of any 
adult cases to come before this depart- 
ment, nor were there any violations 
ol prol)alion. 

A total of seven cases were brought 
before the court during 1947. Of 
these, two were concerned with the 



34 " " City of Concord 



neglect of children. One of the chil- 
dren invohed was placed in the cus- 
tody of the state welfare department. 
The other child was returned to the 
custody of its parents. Tliere were 
fi\e cases in ^vhich the juvenile was 
adjudged delinquent and placed on 
probation for one year. 

Cotnmimity Cooperation 

The police department, churches, 
civic organizations and social agencies 
have made major contributions to re- 
ducing juvenile delinquency in Con- 
cord. These organizations ha\e the 
objectives of character development, 
good sportsmanship and tolerance. 

Lack of sufficient parental supervi- 
sion and the gradual shifting of respon- 
sibility for child guidance to public 
agencies and social institutions remain 
as the principal factors contributing to 
juvenile delinquency. 

FeAv New England cities of com- 
paralile size can match Concord's con- 
structive approach in the control of 
dclincjuency. The continued coopera- 
tion of civic and social agencies is 
essential if Concord is to maintain its 
high standards in this field. 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

o c> c> c> <»«><* c> c> «>«> -> c^ 

William L. Stevens Judge 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

WiNSLOw H. Osborne Clerk 

1947 Expenditure S3,460.00 

Cases Tried 

The number of cases to come before 
the Cioncord Municipal Court exceeded 
h)' a tremendous margin the all-time 
high of 1946. The court handled 
4,542 criminal cases during 1947 as 



compared to 3,060 in 1946, 1,372 in 
194.5 and 880 in 1944. 

For the most part, this unusually 
high increase can be attributed to 
minor lawlessness. The increased vigi- 
lance by the Police Department in the 
enforcement of motor vehicle laws 
has resulted in more \iolators being 
brought before the court. It is in- 
teresting to note that the major factor 
in increasing court activity was vio- 
lation of parking laws. There were 
3,114 parking violations during 1947 
contrasted with 1,954 parking offenses 
in the preceding year. This jump is 
closely related to the installation of 
parking meters in 1947, and indicates 
great negligence on the part of motor- 
ists in spite of a lenient policy on the 
part of the Police Department while 
drivers were becoming accustomed to 
parking meters. 

The year of 1947 marked another 
decline in criminal cases of a more 
serious nature. Cases involving felon- 
ies numbered 45 as against 54 for the 
year 1946. 

Other cases brought before the Mu- 
nicipal Court included 118 civil cases 
and six small claims cases. The for- 
mer represented a decrease of nine 
compared with the year 1946. No small 
claims cases were brought before the 
court in 1947. 

Revenue and Costs 

The 1947 financial statement of the 
Municipal Court clearly reflected the 
record number of cases acted upon. 
Revenue collected from fines, costs, 
and fees totaled .^ 17,962.03, as com- 
pared to the 1946 total of $12,948.91. 

Fines totaling .'>8,094.87 collected by 
the court were turned over to various 
state departments as prescribed by law. 
The sum of $9,114.20 representing net 
receipts after expenditures and deduc- 
tions by transfer was paid to the City 
Treasury. Ihe city government ap- 
propriated .§3,460.00 to the Municipal 
Court to defray salaries court. 



Annual Report » » 5"^ 




Water shortage may cause this. 



FIRE 
PROTECTION 

FIRE BOARD 

Charles P. Coakley. Chairman 
William J. Flynn 
Lawrence J. Moynihan 
Robert W. Potter 

Clarence H. Green Fire Chief 

Henry E. Drew Deputy Chief 

Duncan M. Murdoch Deputy Chief 

Leo F. Blodgett Deputy Chief 

Fred M. Dodge District Chief 

1947 Operating Expenditure $135,94L62 

1947 Capital Expenditure 2,983.80 

Fires and Fire Loss 

During 1947. the P^irc Department 
responded to 55;i alarms of which 487 



were still alarms and 66 were Ijox 
alarms. This represented a decrease 
ol 114 o\er the total for the previous 
year. 

The City of Concord experienced 
three serious fires during 1947. They 
were the West Congregational Cliurch 
located at the corner of North State 
and Hutchins Streets, West Cioncord; 
Becde Electric, Penacook; and the 
Davis Transformer Company, 291-299 
North State Street. Also a series of 
rural fires occiured in areas where ade- 
(juate water supply was not available. 

It is interesting to note that in 
spite of the fact that there were con- 



WILLIAM 


A 


KING 


Deputy, 


Retired | 


Di 


ED 




October 


2 


1947 



36 « « City of Concord 



FIRE LOSSES 



Building 
Contents 



Value 

$657,900.00 

407,465.93 



Loss 
,172,042.82 
54,880.00 



Insurance 

$585,370.00 

284.272.62 



Totals $1,065,365.93 $126,922.82 $869,642.62 



Insurance Paid 

$46,747.82 
50,149.19 

$96,897.01 



Net Loss 

.$25,295.00 

4,730.81 

$30,025.81 



.siclerably fewer fires during 1947 than 
during the previous year, the total 
amount of fire loss increased by nearly 
78 percent. Fire losses for 1947 totaled 
.$126,922.82 as compared with .$70,771.- 
17 for the preceding year. 

Fire Prevention 

The department continued witli its 
intensified fire prevention program 
during 1947. In addition to routine 
inspection activities, there was a 
marked increase in fire prevention edu- 
cation. Fire drills were conducted in 
all the City schools and students were 
instructed in fire prevention. As in 
the past, the department continued to 
receive the full cooperation of the 
Concord Safety Council and the various 
service clubs, as well as the local radio 
station and newspaper, in promoting 
public iiisli U( tion in fire prevention. 



All the convalescent homes, the hos- 
pitals and the schools in the City were 
subjected to periodic inspections. In 
every case where new power oil burn- 
ing equipment has been installed, or 
where there was a conversion from coal 
to oil, it was inspected by the depart- 
ment. 

Personnel 

No changes were made during 1947 
in the over-all fire force personnel. 
The permanent personnel now num- 
bers 43 men, and the department's call 
force includes 129 men. The auxiliary 
fire force, organized early during 
World War II, rendered valuable ser- 
vice at several major fires. 

Apparatus and Equipment 

The normal quota of Fire Depart- 
ment mobile apparatus includes 14 fire 



Concord Firewen busy tvith spring house cleaning at Central Fire Station. 




Annual Report » » 37 



trucks ot various types, three official 
cars and a service truck. This appara- 
tus was housed in fcjur stations, one 
of which is located in the city proper 
and three in the outlying districts. 
In October, a 750-gall()n Mack pumper 
was acquired and commissioned in 
place of Engine No. 3 located in 
Penacook. Engine No. 3, a 1928- 
model Concord truck, was completely 
oxerhauled and put in commission 
in place of Hose No. 2 and is now 
Engine No. 10. Hose No. 2, also a 
1928-moclel Concord truck, had com- 
pletely worn out and was scrapped. 

At the close of the year, the depart- 
ment had in service 20,150 feet of two 
and one-half inch hose, 2,650 feet of 
three-quarter inch booster hose and 
600 feet of one and one-half inch hose. 

Maintenance 

In spite of the fact that several of 
the city's fire trucks are old models, 
all apparatus has been maintained in 
good running order. All necessary 
repairs and replacements were made 
by department personnel at no extra 
cost to the city. 

The Fire Alarm System, due to gen- 
eral deterioration because of age, de- 
veloped serious trouble in both the 
aerial and underground cables, as well 
as at the central office, during the past 
year. The system was sur\'eyed by 
authorized representatives of the Game- 
well Company, and as a resiUt of the 
survey it was recommended that a 
replacement of the Fire Alarm System 
be effected as soon as possible to elim- 
inate the prevailing serious condition. 

Re com m end at ions 

Under the capital budget system of 
equipment replacement, considerable 
progress had been made in improving 
the effectiveness of the department. It 
is recommended that the programming 
of needed inqirovements be continued. 

Plans have been formulated for a 
new fire station in the south-end sec- 



tion of the city proper. Owing to the 
fact that this is an area of much new 
construction, it is recommended that 
construction of this facility be under- 
taken at the earliest possible date. 



. . . Fire Hydrants 

BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMIS SIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
G. Arthur Faneuf 
Clarence H. Green 

1947 Expenditure None 

During the past year, six new hy- 
drants Avere installed. This is in 
keeping with the policy of the City 
of Concord to extend adequate fire 
protection to its citizens. The city's 
fire hydrant system consists of 807 ser- 
vices of which 694 are public and 113 
are private hydrants. 

In addition to periodical inspections 
of all hydrants, existing services were 
maintained in good working order. 
Particvdar care was taken during the 
^vinter months to check for leaks which 
might cause ice to form in hydrants 
and make them inoperative. Also, 
during the past year, all hydrants were 
scraped and painted for the first time 
since the war. 

A satisfactory solution to the prob- 
lem of snow removal from hydrants, 
created by changes in street plowing 
practices, was arrived at by the Board 
of Hydrant Commissioners during 1947. 
The problem was eliminated through 
the establishment of a policy of inter- 
departmental cooperation between the 
Fire Department, the Water Depart- 
ment and the Public Works Depart- 
ment. 



38 " « City of Concord 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 



The need lor all types ol building 
construction continued to exist during 
1947. In spite of the fact that nearly 
50 percent of the building pemiits 
issued during 1947 were for residential 
construction, Concord's housing situ- 
ation was still of a critical natme. 
Contrary to expectations, inflationary 
prices served only as a mild deterrent 
in the construction field. An indica- 
tion of this is the fact that there was 
an increase in the ninnber of building 
permits issued during 1947, as com- 
pared with tlie preceding vear. 



. . . Zoning 



c- <> o o o o 



c> c» c> o >> 



BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Harold E. Langi.ev. Chairman 

John S. Cokbett 

A. Clifford Hudson 

Laurence M. Meyer 

Shelby O. Walker 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerk 

1947 Expenditure $537.87 



C» 



Thirty three appeals were taken to 
the Zoning Board of Adjustment dur- 
ing 1947. This represents a decrease 
of two over the previous year. Of the 
appeals heard, 17 were granted out- 
right, eight were granted conditionally 
and eight were denied. By type. 22 of 
the appeals were for a \ariance from 



the terms of the ordinance, 10 were 
for exceptions and one was for re- 

hearina. 



. . . Building 

c> c> c» c> c* c c« c» c> c> c> c> c> 

Edward E. Beane Building Inspector 

1947 Expenditure None 

Building permits issued during 1947 
totaled 223 as compared to 212 for the 
previous year. Of the 1947 permits, 
137 were for new construction and 86 
were for alterations and repairs. 

The total estimated valuation for 
the permits issued was $840,262.00, a 
decrease of ,$437,118.00. This decrease 
may be attributed to the completion of 
work on the Rumford Press plant ad- 
dition. Of the total 1947 valuation, 
S640,000.00 represented new work, and 
$200,262.00 repairs and alterations. 
Eighty seven dwelling units were added 
during the year. Of these, 69 resulted 
from new construction and 18 from 
conversion of existing buildings. 

. . . Plumbing 

v> v> C" ^ C^ <^ v^ -^ >> O C> C> sS 

Edward E. Beane Plumbing Inspector 

1947 Expenditure None 

1947 Receipts S34.00 



c> c> c> 



o <> 



One hundred fifty-one plumbing per- 
mits were issued in 1947, an increase 
of 50 over the previous year. Six ap- 
plicants for a journeyman's license and 
two for a master's license were exam- 
ined during the year. Seven applicants 
successfiUly passed the required exam- 
inations, and one failed to meet the 
necessary recjuirements. 



Annual Report » » 39 




PUBLIC 
WORKS 



o <> 



c> c» o <• 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. Charles C. Davie. Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Robert W. Potter 

William A. Stevens 

Nelson E. Strong 

John Swenson 

John C. Tilton 

Ervin E. Webber Commissioner 

Ervin E. Webber. Supt. of Streets 
Ervin E. Webber. Tree Warden 
Edward E. Beane. City Engineer 
Leslie C. Clark, Supt. of Parks 

and Cemeteries 

1947 Operating Expenditure 3412,412.03 

1947 Capital Expenditure 25,230.45 



C> C> 



o o o <> 



All City shade trees are sprayed an- 
nually. 



tor the first time since World ^Var 
II, the Pubhc Works Department has 
resumed full-scale operations. Indica- 
tive of the department's return to nor- 
mal activity is the fact that the depart- 
ment employed 215 people during 
1947. Of this number, 113 were per- 
manent employees, and 102 were part- 
time workers. 

Through the impro\ement of facili- 
ties, work was speeded up appreciably. 
The acquisition of a pick-up street 
sweeper resulted in considerably in- 
creased efficiency in street cleaning. 

Construction 

During the year, the department 
filled the canal in Penacook to a depth 
of approximately four feet with sand, 
as an initial effort to eliminate an un- 
sanitary condition which prevailed in 
the Penacook business district. This 
project, Avhich was authorized by the 
Board of Public Works, will be con- 
tinued until the canal has been com- 
pletely filled. 

Following completion of the Rum- 
ford Printing Press plant addition, 
Ferrv Street was rebuilt and tarred. 



In addition, some new curljing was 
installed on Ferry Street. 

A hazardous cinve Avas eliminated 
at the northerly approach to the rail- 
road crossing on Eastman Street in 
East Concord. To accomplish this, the 
department rebuilt and straightened 
Eastman Street. 

The department's stone-crusher re- 
sumed operations tor the first time 
since the war. The materials processed 
by the stone-crusher were utilized in 
new highway and sidewalk construc- 
tion. 

Streets rebuilt and surface-treated 
with tar during the year included Au- 
burn Street at its northerly end, Cy- 
press Street, Elm Street in Penacook, 
for a distance of approximately two 
miles, and the northerly end of East 
Side Drive. 

In response to petitions for new side- 
walks, 740 scjuare yards of new side- 
walks were laid. In addition, .860 feet 
of curbing was installed on Westbournc 
Road to control ^vaterfiow. 



Highway Maintenance 

During the season, 107,538 gallons 
of tar were used in maintaining tar- 
siufaced roads. In the process of tliis 
work, the highway division spread 
5.408 cubic yards of sand and gi-avel. 
Road patching activities required 1,285 
tons of coal patch material. 

In carrying out its regular semi-an- 
nual street cleaning program, the 
department made very effective use of 
the sno-go for leaf removal. The 
spring and fall cleaning was accom- 
plished at a cost of $32,559.12. This 
represented an increase of $13,517.82 
over the previous year which may be 
attributed, for the most part, to in- 
creased labor costs. 

One bridge was re-planked during 
1947. This was the bridge over the 
Contoocook River at Riverhill. Minor 
repairs were made to two smaller 
bridges. 

The custtmiary routine maintenance 
Avork, such as street sweeping, culvert 




Blossom Hill Cemetery chapel reflects a quiet dignity and restful beauty. 

Annual Report » » 43 



replacements, and gravel road main- 
tenance, was undertaken when needed. 

Refuse and Garbage Service 

Reliise and garbage service was used 
by householders tcj a greater degree 
than e\er. ^vith a total oi ,55,039 cubic 
yards ot reiuse collected during the 
year. This amount exceeded the total 
for 1946 by 4,9.84 cubic yards. Reiuse 
was collected in the city jjroper, Pena- 
cook, West Conccjrd, East (loncord and 
Concord Heights. 

Table garbage was collected at fixed 
intervals by a private contractor at a 
total cost of ,'>6,050.00 to the city. The 
garl:)age was used for feeding purposes 
at a connnercial piggery operated out- 
side of the city limits. 

Snow and Ice 

The city experienced a 58.9-inch 
sn(n\- fall during 1947. This was 10.9 
inches less than the total for the previ- 
ous year. The department used 15 
trucks, two graders, a rotary sncnv 
plow and a snow fighter with roto 
wang, together with four sidewalk trac- 
tors to clear the city streets of snow. 
A number of privately owned trucks 
were hired to augment the city's snow 
fighting equipment. 

A total of ()4,905 cubic yards of snow 
were trucked from the city streets, as 
compared to 39,928 cubic yards ia 
194(). It is interesting to note thai 
this large increase occurred despite a 
decrease in snow fall. 

Major factors tontriliuting to this 
unustial situation were the rapid suc- 
cession of a number of snow storms, 
together with the expansion of snow 
removal activities to cover a greater 
street area than in previous years. 
During the winter season, icy streets 
were coated \vith 10,292 cubic yards 
of sand. 

Snow plowing and snow removal cost 
the city $.32,642.67 during the past win- 
ter as against .Si32.279.08 in 1946. Sand- 
ing costs showed an increase to .SI2,- 
876.52 from the ])re\ious year's total 
of .^l{),(i79.47. 



Engineering 

The Engineering Division re-estab- 
lished 28,070 feet of streets and high- 
ways for the Official Map of the City 
of Concord by connecting Eastman 
Street with North State Street by way 
of the Sewalls Falls Road. The policy 
of re-establishing city streets and high- 
Avays for the Official Map was initiated 
in 1942. In addition, 2,119 feet of 
new streets Avere laid out. Stone 
bounds were placed at the beginning 
and end of each new street. 

The division ran sections and pro- 
files and established grades for all road 
work undertaken during 1947. A sur- 
vey involving 1,269 feet of sidewalk 
work was com])leted for the Highway 
Division. Other ^vork by the survey 
party included the establishment oi 
485 feet of sidewalk grades. 

In connection Avith the Penaccjok 
Canal project, the division completed 
a siuvey in\()l\ing 1,008 feet of East 
Canal Street, Penacook. This survey 
was essential to the elimination of the 
Penacook Canal. In conjunction with 
the Canal survey, 2.750 feet of Main 
Street, Penacook, was surveyed, sec- 
tions run and plans made preparatory 
to submitting the Main Street project 
to the State Highway department for 
construction. Additional stuveys in- 
cluded Palm Street and Riverhill A\e- 
nue from Mast ^'ard Road to Elm 
Street. 

Otliei siu\eys were made at Garri- 
s(jn Park and at the Mimicipal Airport. 
The division also laid out several 
blocks of lots at the Blossom Hill and 
VVoodlawn cemeteries. Ceinetery plans 
were brought up to date dining the 
year. 

A total of !)51 tiansfers of j^roperty 
were recoided and all proj^erty line 
changes were noted on the assessors' 
maps. All sewer and catch basin plans 
and piofiles were checked and brought 
up to dale. In addition, 1,500 square 
yards u[ prints were developed during 



44 <* « City of Concord 




New refuse removal units of the Board of Public Works combine effi- 
ciency, speed and economy of operation. 



the year. These prints are available 
to the public tor reference purposes. 

Storm Sewers 

Concord's storm sewers are of rela- 
tively recent construction and as a 
result, expenditures were, for the most 
part, limited to maintenance costs. 
One short extension to the storm sewer 
draining the Airport was completed 
during the past year. 

Street Lighting 

Five new street lights were installed 
during 1947. This brought the total 
number of lights in operation \\\) to 
1,625. In a number of instances, lights 
were relocated to provide more effec- 
tive street illumination. The munici- 
pal street lighting system was operated 
at a cost of ,i40,940.88. 

Sanitary Seivers 

Ihe total revenue derived from 
sewer rentals in 1947 was $33,944.17. 
Of this amount, general sewer rents 



accounted for ,'$24,817.78, industrial 
rents .$4,622.67, penalties $.56.10, house 
connections and jobbing $4,255.62 
and from insurance and miscellaneous 
$192.00. 

Total operating costs for the year 
amounted to $17,566.25. A total of 
$13,708.90 was applied to depreciation, 
leaving a net income of $2,669.02. 

On December 31. 1947, the sanitary 
sewer account showed current assets 
amounting to $50,876.63. This sum 
included $39,363.74 in cash, .$7,861.77 
in accounts receivable and $3,651.12 
in materials and supplies. Total fixed 
assets after depreciation were carried 
on the books at $564,195.40. 

During the year, the division con- 
structed 4,157 feet of main in Eastside 
Drive, 202 feet in the Airport Road 
and 128 feet in Thomas Street. The 
cost of this work ran from $1.55 to 
$4.07 per foot. In addition, 22 man- 
holes were built and 90 new house 
connections were completed. 



Annual Report » » 43 



Parks and Trees 

In addition to the general main- 
tenance of parks. 50 white pine trees 
were set out in RolHns Park, as were 
an additional 50 in Garrison Park. 
The department is gradually ncaring 
its goal of reforesting the various park 
areas which were devastated by the 
hurricane. 

Miuiicipal out-door recreational fa- 
cilities were augmented by the con- 
struction of new bleachers for the 
ball field at Rollins Park. 

The Tree Di\'ision carried oiu its 
annual program of maintaining the 
city's shade trees. In addition to rou- 
tine priming, trimming and spraying 
activities, the moth control and poison 
ivy eradication programs were contin- 
ued with satisfactory results. 

Cemeteries 

In keeping with its pnjgram of ceme- 
tery beautification, the cemetery Divi- 
sion set out 30 trees in various ceme- 



teries. Additional ^vork included the 
preparation of four-tenths of a mile 
of road for tarring and continuation 
of the grave raising project. During 
1947, 200 graves which had settled 
were raised. 

At Blossom Hill Cemetery, work was 
continued on the development of a 
ncAv section for use as a Jewisli ceme- 
tery. 

Other Activities 

Again the Department furnished the 
men and equipment necessary for con- 
struction and field maintenance at the 
municipal airport. 

At various times during the year, the 
department assisted other city depart- 
ments in the performance of a Avide 
variety of municipal activities. Among 
the city agencies aided were the Water 
Department, the Planning Board, the 
Police Department, the Playground 
Committee, the Recreation Committee 
and the Public Lii^rary. 



"Hot top" pavement material is mixed at the gravel hank off Walker Street. 




46 « « City of Concord 



WEIGHTS and 
MEASURES 

J. Shepard Norris City Sealer 

1947 Expenditure SI. 389. 54 

The Department of Weights and 
Measures, empowered by state and 
local hiw to enforce fair trade practices 
for the city at large, is constantly at 
work, checking, weighing and measiu- 
ing to make sure all standards, meas- 
ures, containers and other devices 
used by wholesale and retail merchants 
are correct. 

During 1947 the City Sealer was 
particularly active due to the replace- 
ment of a great amoimt of war-worn 
equipment by new weighing and meas- 
uring devices. All new and rebin'lt 
equipment was carefully checked for 
accuracy. 

Packages 

There was a noticeable increase in 
both the number and variety of pre- 
packaged commodities for sale during 
the past year. This trend cf)n tinned 
to be most apparent in stores selling 
groceries and meat. The consimicr 



is protected l)y state laws which re- 
quire packaged foods to be plainly 
marked with the net weight of the 
contained commodity. As a result of 
the careful inspection by the sealer of 
packaged food stufls. particularly of 
new commodities appearing in pack- 
aged form, few complains were received 
from customers regarding quality or 
quantity of food stuffs in containers. 

Inspections 

The combined appearance on the 
retail market of many new packaged 
food stuffs, together with an apprecia- 
ble increase in the number of retail 
merchandising outlets, made necessary 
continuation of the department's step- 
ped-up inspection program. The re- 
ceipt in advance of recjuests for in- 
spections clearly indicates the high 
degree of merchant cooperation ex- 
perienced during 1947. 

The department made a special 
effort during the past year to check 
and test equipment used in door-to- 
door sales and purchases. Cart bodies 
used in the sale of wood were measured 
and inspected as were the scales of 
jiuik dealers. Junk dealers are re- 
([uired hy law to have their scales 
tested and sealed before applying for 
their licenses. 

The following table summarizes the 
department's inspection activities for 
the vear ending Decemijer .11, 1947: 



INSPECTIONS DllRING 1947 



Correct 

Scales 311 

Weights 10 

Liquid Measures 9(S 

Gas Pimiijs 216 

Kerosene Pumps 26 

Oil Pumps 4 

Grease Dispensers 72 

Oil Bottles 268 

Tanks and Truck Meters . 1 

Package Re-weighs 208 

Cart Bodies 14 



Adjusted 


Coiiilcmncd 


Idle 


79 


6 























29 


8 


11 




















2 

















1 



























Annual Report » » 47 




Stock-pile of 24-incb pipe at the State Street pumpifig station. 



WATER 
SUPPLY 



BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson. President 
Robert W. Brown 
Hon. Charles C. Davie 
Harrv M. Dudley 
Allan M. Freeman 
Charles P. Johnson 
Donald Knowlton 
Leonard W. Tracer 
Gardner Tilton 

G. Arthur Faneuf Superintendent 

1947 Expenditure $176,594.06 

1947 Receipts s$141,615.46 

c> <> <> o c- C» <> c» c» c> ♦ <> c> 

Consumption 

riic total (()nsum|)l ion ol walci lui 
the year 1947 was l,l,'5!),692,(i7« gallons. 



This amount represented an increase 
of 3,S,1()4,9,H:^ gallons over the total for 
the jireceding year. Of the 1947 total, 
()()(), 003, ,500 gallons were pumped to 
sujjply the high service district, while 
473,689,178 gallons were supplied by 
gravity flow from Penacook Lake. In 
addition, 24,114,444 gallons were 
])unipe(l Iroin the high service system 
to the extra-high service standpipe on 
Little Pond Road. During the year, 
11,02.5,000 gallf)ns were sujjplied by 
piunping to the Penacook-Iioscawen 
water precinct. 

The average daily use of water was 
3,122,446 gallons, an increase of 90,692 
gallons o\(i' (he I9l(i fignic. On the 



PERCY R. SANDERS 

Superintendent , Ke tired 
Died 

May 2, 1947 



48 « « City of Concord 



basis of an estimated population of 
30,000, the average daily consumption 
per person was 104 gallons. 

Pumping System 

During the past year, the engineer- 
ing firm of Metcalf and Eddy, Boston, 
Massachusetts, completed plans and 
specifications for a new automatic high 
service pumping station to supply West 
Concord and Penacook. The new 
station will fill a long-standing need 
for better water pressure in these sub- 
urbs. Construction was started in fall 
and completion of the station is anti- 
cipated in 1948. Ihis station is loca- 
ted at Penacook Lake. 

Following the change-over in power 
rating from 2,300 to 4.000 volts, mo- 
dernization of ecjuipment at the North 
State Street pumping station, which 
was begun in 1945, was completed din- 
ing the past year. New equipment 



included an auxiliary pumping unit, 
two 100 horsepower electric motors, a 
gasoline stand-by pump and a metal- 
clad switchboard. In addition, the 
boiler room at the North State Street 
pimiping station was remodeled and 
converted into a garage for storage. 

New Equipment 

With equipment becoming more 
readily available, the Water Depart- 
ment acquired several critically needed 
pieces of equipment during the past 
year; notably, a self-propelled unit 
shovel. The shovel, equipped with 
a crane for lifting and a trench hoe 
for digging ditches, has contributed 
to more efficient and economical opera- 
tion of the department. Other newly 
acquired items of equipment included 
an air compressor, a tapping machine 
for making connections in large mains 
and a 1/9 ton pick-up truck. 



Ditch digging operations are speeded by this new motorized equipment 
of the Water Department. 




Annual Report » » 49 



Finances 

Total receipts for 1947 amounted 
to $141,615.46. This sum represented 
an increase of $12,435.01 over the pre- 
ceding year. Of the total 1947 receipts, 
$130,148.40 represented payments re- 
ceived from water sales. The depart- 
ment received $1,412.40 for services as 
Ijilling and collecting agent for the 
Sanitary Sewer Department. 

Expenditures for the year totaled 
$176,594.0(i. Of this sum, $80,187.82 
were spent for general operations, 
$17,000. 00 loi bond retirement and 
82,101.25 hjr bond interest. The de- 
partment started the year with a cash 
balance of $44,371.77 and closed its 
bocjks in Deceniln-r with a treasury 
balance of $9,393.17. 

As of December 31, 1947, the Water 
Department Income - Investment Ac- 
count amounted to $113,332.25 of 
which $55,000.00 were invested in 
United States Treasury Bonds bearing 
interest at the rate of two and one-half 



percent, and $58,332.25 were on deposit 
in local savings banks. The account 
sliowed an income of $2,530.19 for the 
year 1947. 

The total fixed assets of the depart- 
ment represent an investment of $2,- 
075,762.65. After deducting deprecia- 
tion, the value of the water works as 
of December 31, 1947 was carried on 
the liooksat SI ,292,457.49. 

Other Activities 

For the first time since World War 
II. the department was able to carry 
out needed maintenance work, which 
of necessity had been neglected dtning 
the war years. All of the city hydrants 
were scraped and painted and con- 
siderable work was done to improve 
appearances at the reservoir. 

In addition, the department laid 
90 new serxices and re-laid 96 services. 
Also, during 1947, 70 water meters 
were added. A total of 4,588 water 
meters are noAv in use throughcjut the 
City of Concord, 



Work fiears completion on auxiliary pumping station at Penacook Lake. 




50 « « City of Concord 




MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 

C> O C' c- c> c> c> c> c> <> c* c> >> 

BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Hon. Charles C. Davie. Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

John N. Engel 

Charles W. Howard 

Donald J. McFarland 

Robert W. Potter 

John Swenson 

William F. Flynn Airport Manager 

1947 Operating Expenditure $12,612.28 

1947 Capital Expenditure $1,914.54 

1947 Earning $6,424.16 



During 1947 the Concord Municipal 
Airport continued to experience great- 
ly increased flight activities. A marked 
increase was noted in the number ol 
veterans who availed themselves ot 
the opportunity for various phases of 
flight training under the provisions of 
the G. I. Bill of Rights. Demobiliza- 
tion has resulted in making more peo- 



ple eligible and was the prime factor 
contributing to this increase. The 
visitors' register at the airport indi- 
cated increased usage of port facilities 
In transit pilots. 

Operating Policy 

The William E. Martin Flying Ser- 
vice continued to use the larger of the 
two city-owned hangars and the Ferns 
Flying Service again used the smaller 
hangar for flight operations. During 
the year many students learned to fly 
at these schools. In addition to stu- 
dent-training, there was a considerable 
number of charter flights and sight- 
seeing trips. 

Plans and specifications were pre- 
pared by the (lity Fngineer and City 
Planning Board for an extension of the 
ramp to produce a larger plane park- 
ing area and to include a taxi-way con- 
necting with the north-south runway. 
Federal and State funds are to be used 
in the construction of this project. 
The Planning Board also slightly re- 
vised the master plan of the airport to 
meet Civil Aeronautics Administration 
requirements. 

Airline Services 

Northeast Airlines made four stops 
daily at Concord during the summer 



Annual Report » » 31 



months on its international route be- 
tween New York and Montreal. Din- 
ing the year, 1,900 outgoing passengers 
were cleared from the Concord ter- 
minal and approximately 1,800 in- 
coming passengers. These figvnes rep- 
resented a decrease in passenger clear- 
ance and may be attributed to the 
curtailment of the direct Concord to 
New York flight. The airline also 
handled 5,000 pounds of out-going air 
express and 1,200 pounds of incoming 
express. Several hundred pounds of 
air mail were also handled. 

As air travel increases, Northeast 
Airlines expects to add direct flight 
service from Concord to New York. 
It is expected that, in the near future, 
intrastate service will be added by other 
airlines connecting Concord with other 
cities in New Hampshire that are not 
beinsr served now. 



Northeast Airlines transport makes 
regular stop at the Municipal Air- 
port. 





Civil Aeronautics Agencies 

The Civil Aeronautics Administra- 
tion's District Inspection Office con- 
tinued to operate from the Concord 
Municipal Airport. The Safety Regu- 
lation District Office for Maine, Ver- 
mont, and New Hampshire has its 
headquarters at the Concord airport. 
Personnel was increased in this office 
to adequately handle nearly all phases 
of safety regulations. .Ml pilot certifi- 
cates for these states were handled 
through the Concord Office. The 
C. A. A. also operated and maintained 
two-way radio, teletype interphone and 
radio range services. A VHF — very 
liigh frequency — radio continued 
to operate at the Communications Sta- 
tion. The station enlarged their quar- 
ters to provide room for new equip- 
ment installed in a new VHF program. 
A neAV Omni Directional Range is 
being installed three miles north of 
the port and will be controlled from 
the Communications Office. This latest 
type range will provide better ser\'ice 
to pilots using the Concord Airport. 

Weather Bureau 

From headcjuarters located in the 
administration building, the U. S. 
Weather Bureau operated round-the- 
clock weather forecast service. In 
addition to providing up-to-the-minute 
weather information for flight pur- 
poses, the bureau broadcasts weather 
reports twice daily over a direct-wire 
radio hookup from its offices. Tele- 
type service provided instant (onmnuii- 
cation with other important ^veather 
stations in New Hampshire. 

Airport Iniprovetuents 

The Airport Commission seal-coated 
the east-west runway to protect its .sur- 
face. The north-south runway was 
seal-coated during the previous year. 
The Commission also purchased a 
number of parcels of land located in 
the approach zone area on the north- 
easterly side of the airport. 




Concord High School Band resplendent in new uniforms. 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

«^ o c> c> c> c> c> \"> <» c> <^ o c> 
BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Mollis, President 
Charles F. Cook 
J. Richard Jackman 
A. Harold MacNeil 
Edwina L. Roundy 
Donald W. Saltmarsh 
Osmond R. Strong 
Joan M. Whittaker 
Dean P. Williamson 

Harlan E. Atherton Superintendent 

Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1947: 

5476,077.70 



. . . Concord 
School District 

The post-wai" inflation period con- 
tinues to raise difficult prol:)lenis in 
school administration. Concord school 



costs have reflected tlie rising cost of 
living. Througli its action at the 
annual meeting last April the School 
District approved an up-to-date salary 
schedule for Concord teachers. This 
resulted in increased expenditures. A 
revived program of huilthiig repairs 
and improvement, impossible during 
the war years, was undertaken with 
vigor and attendant expense. Other 
services allied with the operation of 
schools also called for increased ex- 
penditures. 

The expenditure of additional 
money, hcjwever painful and difficult 
it may be, is offset by several benefits 
and improvements. With higher sal- 
aries better teachers can be secured. 
School efficiency and improved school 
services in general help to provide 
good education to which ail children 
are entitled. 

Finances 

During the 1946-1947 school year, 
the cost of operating Concord schools 
was $476,077.70. lliis sum does not 
include payments on the district's 
Ijonded debt, or achances to the bonus 



Annual Report » » 33 




Student Council makes plans to aid Crippled Children' s Hospital. 



accoiiiu iiiul pension Innd. Bonds 
totaling .IjHI.OOO.OO wcif retired during 
the year. "Fliis included j^aynients on 
the Senior High and the Conant 
Schools. The total outstanding indei)t- 
edness amounted to $257, ()()<). 00 oi 
which .5252,000.00 was chargeable to 
the High School and the remaining 
,15,000.00 to Conant School. 

The Staff 

The District operated with a teach- 
ing staff of 150. This number includes 
teachers of art. music, lip reading, phy- 
sical education, and physically handi- 
cajjped children, as well as regular 
classroom and laboratory instructors. 
Of this number, 12 arc new to the 
Concord school system this year. Most 
of the new staff members are experi- 
enced teachers. 

Other employees of the District 
School Department total 52. This 
group includes the Medical, Cafeteria, 
and Building Maintenance Depart- 



ments and office personnel. Even 
though other school employees do not 
always come in close contact with 
school pupils, they exert an important 
influence on the welfare of children 
and play an important part in school 
operation. 

Building Maintenance 

The maintenance |irograni during 
(he past yeai has included many re- 
pairs. After a war period in \vhich 
only the most essential work could be 
clone a great amoimt of repair work 
is necessary to return school buildings 
to good condition. First priority has 
been given to remedying structural 
defects and repairs to \aluable equip- 
ment, such as boilers. Following that, 
emphasis has been placed upon regidar 
maintenance of floors and repainting 
walls. 

Building improvements have been 
imdertaken, particidarly in the field 
of school lighting. Much expcrinien- 



34 " " City of Concord 



tal work has been done in an effort to 
determine the best type of lighiinj; 
fixtures, tile best colors for school room 
walls and the most practical kind of 
school room iilackboards for good light 
difrusion without glare. These experi- 
ments will result in a practical program 
of improved school lighting in all the 
rooms of the district's older buildings. 
The importance of this project cannot 
be overemphasized because of its effect 
upon the vision of school children. 
Modern school lighting helps in a 
large measure to prevent development 
of defective vision. 

Pupil Transportation 

Ihe School District anticipates tak- 
ing its third step in ownership and 
operation of school buses. Several 
years ago two carryall suburbans were 
pinxhased. These were operated by 
the School District on outlying school 
routes. In 1947, a large school bus 
was purchased and put into operation 
when one private contract had expired. 
Present plans call for replacement of 
the two smaller vehicles with two buses 
and taking over one additional route 
formerly operated by private contract. 

Records of financial operation al- 
ready show an economy of expenses 
in public ownership and operation of 
school transportation. The School 
District can operate at cost, without 
necessity for making a profit. It is 
exempt from the Federal tax on the 
purchase of equipment, as well as state 
taxes on gasoline and motor vehicle 
registration. Other advantages of pub- 
lic ownership include flexibility of 
operation and close supenision by 
school personnel. 
Conant School Addition 

The immediate emergency caused by 
the growth of population in the South 
End has resulted in the placing of an 
addition to the Conant School at the 
top of the priority list of building 
projects. The school is seriously over- 




crowded and reliet is needed. With 
the assistance of an outright grant 
from the federal government to defray 
the costs of phuining, an addition has 
been designed. Considerable thought 
and discussion on the part of the 
Board of Education, the teachers and 
the parents went into the development 
of the plans. When it is constructed, 
the Conant School will be equipped 
to serve the needs of the children ol 
that area for many years. 

Population Trends 

Already the rising birthrate is being 
felt in our schools. In the fall of 1947 
the Kimball School was unable to hold 
all the boys and girls residing in its 
district. This same overcrowding is 
true at the Rumford btiilding. 

During the next five years, this com- 
mtmity will be forced to meet a real 
crisis in the field of building capacity. 
Unless conditions in the building trade 
improve so that constructit^n of new 
buildings can be undertaken, drastic 
steps in the direction of transporta- 
tion of children from the crowded city 
schools to the otitlying buildings will 
have to be undertaken. Even that 
action will pnjiiably not be sufiicient to 
meet this crisis. 

. . . Penacook 
School District 

board of education 

Frank Beede, Chairman 

Claire V. Breckell 

James J. Hayes 

Beatrice E. Pettes 

Alfred J. York 

Edward York 

Fred W. Snell Superintendent 

Cost of operation: 

For the fiscal year ending June 30, 1947: 
S59,103.91 

Policy 

Educational research has indicated 
that six years is the best age at whicli 



a child should enter the first grade. 
As a residt of these findings, the policy 
was adopted of setting January 1 as the 
deadline for entering school. In the 
future, children who will be five by 
the following January 1, after entering 
school in September, will be allowed 
to enter the kindergarten unit. This 
establishes the starting age of six for 
the first grade by the next January. 

Finances 

The cost of operations for the year 
ending June 30, 1947 totaled $59,103.- 
91, an increase of $8,976.82 over the 
total for the previous fiscal year. On 
the whole, operating costs showed an 
increase in nearly all categories of ex- 
penditures, with a $4,445.27 increase in 
teachers' salaries leading the list. A 
$2,000.00 payment on the district's 
bonded debt reduced the amotnit out- 
standing to ,$22,000.00. 

Total receipts amounted to $59,- 
946.69, of which $45,324.16 represented 
income from taxation. Receipts from 
other somces, chiefly from high school 
tuitions, totaled $14,622.53. The school 
district tax was $23.17 per $1,000.00 
of assessed valuation as compared to 
$17.35 for the preceding year. 

Building Needs 

The real need for an auditorium- 
gymnasium continues. A facility of 
this nature is essential to the extra- 
currictdar activities associated with a 
well-rounded school program. The 
present rented facilities are definite- 
ly inadecjuate. Plans for the proposed 
auditoriinn-gymnasium ha\'e been com- 
pleted and will probably be submitted 
to the scho(jl district early in 1948. 

Improvements 

During the past year a consideraljle 
number of improvements to Penacook 
schools were accomplished. With the 
inclusion of a new kindergarten unit 
at the Charles Street School, it became 
necessary tf) repair and remodel one 
room at the Sunnner Street School to 



56 « « City of Concord 




l^/rst Concord High School team to win State Class A basketball champion- 
ship lines up for presentation of awards at the State Armory, Manchester. 



insure adequate class-room space. Ex- 
tensive repairs and painting were done 
at the high school and the plant is now 
in good order. Futine lighting and 
plumbing improvements are contem- 
plated. 

Teaching Staff 

The Pcnacook School District oper- 
ated with a staff of 19 teachers during 
the past school year. Of these, nine 
were employed at the high school, five 
at the Summer Street School, four at 
the Charles Street School and one su- 
pervised music in all schools. The new 
kindergarten unit made necessary the 
employment of one additional teacher. 



In the face of increasing li\ ing costs, 
teachers' salaries were adjusted in an 
effort to hold and attract an effective 
teaching personnel. 

Membership 

The average daily membership of 
the student body of the district was 
348. This number represented an in- 
crease of 19 students in the average 
daily membership, as compared with 
329 for the previous year, in spite of 
the fact that the total number of pupils 
registered was slightly less. During the 
past school year, a total of 376 pupils 
were registered at Penacook schools. 
Of this number, 171 were boys and 205 
were girls. 



Annual Report » » 57 



APPENDIX 



<> <> o 

PAGE 

General Fiiiul — Balance Sheet 59 

General Fund — State of Appiopriations and F\|)enditurc.s 60 

Genera! Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Re\enues (i2 

Bonded Indebtedness ol the Ciity 63 

General Fund — Statement of Unappropriated Sui plus 64 

Bond Finuls — .\nalysis ol Cihange in Net Debt 64 

Bond F"unds — Gomparative Balance Sheets 65 

Bond Funds — Snnnnary ol Debt Ser\ ice Gharges I'lnil Maturity 65 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 66 

Trust Funds — Statement ol Receipts an dDisbursements 67 

Trust Fimds — Schetlule ol I'ermanent Fund Securities 67 

Dept. of Pul)lic \\V)rks — Sanitary Se^veis — Balance Sheet 68 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Statement of Opeiations 69 

VV^ater Department — Balance Sheet 70 

Water Department — Income -In\estment .Xcioimt 70 

Water Department — Statemeiu of Operations 71 

Water Department — Clash Receipts and Disbursements 71 

Assessors' Statement for 1917 72 

Gily Relief Dept. — General Glassification of Relief F'xpenditnres 73 

Department of Public Works — Sunnnary of F^xpenditures 74 

Department of Public Works — Statement of Appropri.itions. Transfers, Ex- 
penditures and Unexpended Balances 75 

Munici))al Gourt — Statement of Re(ei])ts and Disbursements 75 

Gomparati\e Fable of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valua- 
tions, Tax Levies and Rates 75 

Gomparative Table of Budget Appropriations 76 

Reconciliation of Tax Levies, 1939-1947 77 



GENERAL FUND 

CoMPARAiivi; Balance Sheets 
As AT December 31, 1947 and 1946 

ASSETS 

Increase 
or 

Cash nil HiiihI ami In I!tiiil;\ 1947 l'>4(i Decrease* 

C.iiv rrcasurn .f 180,134.31 .f 162.988.27 .fn. 146.04 

r:,\ Collcdoi 4,848.69 3,52.90 4,49,5.79 

Citv C4c.k 717.35 488.81 228.54 

,P85,700.35 .|;163,829.98 .121,870.37 

Reiinbiirsenienls Receit'ahJe 

Merrimack County Relief .f 3,481. 85 .1?2.9.50.53 ,1i;531.32 

Otlier Mimicipalilies — Rcliel 14.20 222.20 208.00* 

$3,196.05 .US. 172.73 .1>323.32 

Less: Reserve tor Uncollectible Accoiuits 1,123.70 1,123.70 

$2,372.35 .$2,049.03 .$323.32 

Taxes Receivable 

Prior Years $25,645.61 .$31 .061 .95 $5, 116.34* 

Current Year 123,869.82 92,902.45 30,967.37 

Total $149,515.43 $1 23.964.40 .$25.551 .03 

Less Reserve for Uncollectible Accounts 37,241.93 31,061.95 6,179.98 

Net $112,273.50 .$92,902.45 $19,371.05 

Overlay Dejicil $1,564.80 $1,564.80* 

Unredeemed Taxes HoiK^hl h\ Cily Per Tax Sale $6,563.53 5,778.97 784.56 
Pro[H'rly Aetiiilred hy (iilx fnim Tax ('.olleelar's 

Deeds — Equity 1.320.98 5,218.28 897.30* 

Total Assets .$31 1.230.71 $271,343.51 .$.39,887.20 

LI Ai'.ii rnrs 

Vnexjiemled . \ jijndjiiial nnis 

Union School District $197,231.45 $I6I,218.,56 .$36,012.89 

Union School District Bond Interest 5.522.85 5.926.85 404.00* 

Penacook School Disi rid 15,950.90 16,542.31 591.41* 

Total Schools .$218,705.20 $183,687.72 .$35,017.48 

Public Lii)rary 19.476.66 20,032.24 5.55.58* 

Douglas .\venue F,\tcnsion 668.04 668.04 

Total Unexpended .\|)|)r()|)riations $238,849.90 $203,719.96 .$35,129.94 

Due Stale of New Hamjishire 

Old Age Assistance for December .$2,971.16 $2,269.87 $701.29 

Poll faxes Collected in 1947 ($3.00) 2,208.00 2.208.00 

Vual>lir„lniated Surl>lus 67,201.65 65.353.68 1.847.97 

Total Liabilities ,$311,230.71 .$271,313.51 ,$39,887.20 

Note: Included on the 1944 and ly^'j Levies are $3.00 poll taxes due the State of New Hampshire 
when collected. 

Annual Report » » 59 





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GENERAL FUND 

STATF.MKNr OF UnAI'I'RC )I'RI A I I D SlRri.US 
As AT DECKM151R 31. 1947 

Balance, January 1, 1947 .$65,353.68 

Deduct: 

Surplus used in 1947 lor rethulit)n ol tax rate $50,014.00 

Appropriations transferred to .Surplus in 1916 aiul reap- 
propriated in 1947 

Proceeds from Sale of Goodwill Fire Station 5,000.00 

Relocation of Ferrv Sttect 6,661 .3 I 61 .675.34 



Adjusted Balance January 1, 1917 .$3,678.34 

Additions: 

Unexpended Balance of 1947 Appropriation $63,310.99 

Excess of Actual Rexenue over Estimated 4,395.25 

Excess overlay in prior vears 1 ,326.10 

Miscellaneous' 1 .54 69,033.88 



Total $72,712.22 

Deductin7js: 

Increase in 1946 Reserve lor liuoliected laxes .$4,809.28 

Due State of \. H. Old A^e Assistance 

Due December 31, 1947 .$2,971.16 

Due December 31, 1946 2,269.87 701.29 5,510.57 



Balance December 31, 1947 .$67,201.65 



BOND FUNDS 

A^'AI.^SIS or Chance in CoNSOi.itJAtEn NEr Debt 
For the ^■E\R ENr-Et) Decemiser 31, 1947 



Net Debt — December 31, 1946 




.$437,646.32 


Additions: 

New Notes issuetl 




7,300.00 


Surplus used in reduction of tax rate for 1947 




50,014.00 


Old .'\ge Assistance — State of Ne\\' Ham|)sliire 

Due December 31 1947 


,12,071.16 
2,269.87 




Due December 31, 1946 


701.29 






A]jpropriati()ns iransfeiied to Sur|jlus in I9li) and reap 
jjioiMiated in 1947: 

Proceeds from Sale of Goodxvill Fire Station 

Relficalion of Ferrv .Street 


$5,000.00 
6,661.34 


11,661.34 






Increase in Reserve for 1946 Uncollected Faxes 


$31,000.00 
19,000.00 


4,809.28 


Dt'diuiinns: 

Honds Retired in 1947 — Mimiciiial 


$512,132.23 


Bonds Retired in 1947 — School 








Total 


.$50,000.00 
17,000.00 




Bonds Retired in 1947 — Water Depaiiniciu 








lotal Bonds Retired 


$67,000.00 ^ 

63,310.99 

4,395.25 

1,326.10 

1.54 




Appropriation Unexpended 

Excess of rcceiiDts o\cr Estimated Rexenue 




0\erlav Credits 




Miscellaneous Adiustmenis 


136,033.88 


Net Debt — Decend)er 31 1947 




$376,098.35 










64 *' " C/ty of Concord 



BOND FUNDS 

CoMPARAiivE Balance Sheet 
As AT December 31, 1947 and 1946 

ASSETS 

Increase 
December 31 or 

1947 1946 Decrease* 

Cash — Bond and Coupon Account $203.75 $3,31 1.25 

Bonded Del:)t 443,300.00 503,000.00 59,700.00* 



Total Assets $443,503.75 $506,311 .25 



LIABILITIES 

Serial Bonds 

Central Fire Station $7,000.00 ,$8,000.00 $1,000.00* 

City Hall and Audiloriuni 5,000.00 5,000.00* 

Pul)lic Iniproveuicnt 12.000.00 20,000.00 8,000.00* 

Sewers 99,000.00 1 13,000.00 14.000.00* 

Union School District 257.000.00 276,000.00 19,000.00* 

Water Department 40.000.00 57,000.00 17,000.00* 

Municipal Airport 21,000.00 24,000.00 3,000.00* 

Notes — N. H. Savings Bank (Note 1) 3,300.00 3.300.00 

Penacook Electric Light Co. (Note 2) 4,000.00 4,000.00 



Total Bonded Debt ,$443,300.00 ,$503,000.00 .$59,700.00* 



Bonds and Coupons Not Presented for Payment 

at Deceml>er U, P>-I7 and 1946 '. $203.75 .$3,311.25 

Total Liabilities ,$443,503.75 .$506,31 1.25 



Note 1 I.ssued for repairs to City Hall Roof 

2 Issued for purchase of Land fornierl\ a Canal in I'cnacook 



BOND FUNDS 

Summary of Debt Sii:r\tce Charces lIwriL Maturity 
As AT December 31, 1947 

Fiscal Period Princip/d Interest Total 

Municipal 1948-.56 $146,300.00 $12,876.15 $159,176.15 

School 1948-65 257,000.00 101 ,957.50 358,957.50 

Water 1948-51 57,000.00 3,160.00 43,160.00 

Total $443,300.00 $117,993.65 .$561,293.65 



Annual Report » » 63 



TRUST FUNDS 



Cash (Unexpended Income) 
Loan and Trust Sa\in^s Ba 
Merrimack Comity S\gs. Ba 

N. H. Savings Hank ." 

I'nion Trust ('.oin]3any . . . 


As 

nk . . 
ink .. 

Bank . 
Bank 


Balance Shee 
AT Dkcembi R 31, 

ASSETS 

Ceincterx 

$1,729.07 

14,917.06 

689.43 

777.41 


1 

, 1947 

Library 


Other 
$186.31 
241.69 


Total 

$1,915.38 

15,158.75 

689.43 

777.41 


I'otal Cash 


$18,112.97 




$428.00 


$18,540.97 


Fcnnaiu'nl Fluids 

Savings Bank Deposits: 
Loan and Trust Savings 1 
Merrimack County Svgs. 
N. H. Savings Bank . . . . 
Union Trust Company . 


$81,699.92 
68.156.57 
87,439.70 
73,983.75 


$4,631.46 
7,611.82 
7.251.20 
9.4 1 1 .64 


$450.48 
2,511.25 
1 ,200.00 
1 ,000.00 


$86,781.86 
78,279.64 
95,890.90 
84,395.39 


Total 


. $311,279.94 


$28,906.12 


.$5,161.73 


.$345,347.79 










$79,300.00 


.$95,120.00 




$174,420.00 










. $390,579.94 


$124,026.12 


$5,161.73 


.$519,767.79 









Utit\lirinl((i Inromt 



LIABILITIES 

$18,112.97 



Periiunienl Fund Principal 

Balance, January 1. 1947 .$376,986.81 $135,095.41 



Additions: 

New Trucks 

Sale ot Lots 

Sale of Graves 

Gain on Sale of Securities 
Seth K. Jones 



Deductions: 

Maiiuenance Fimd . . 
Grace Blancliard Finn 

Total Deductions 
Balance, December 1947 . . 



12,125.00 

1 ,250.00 

200.00 



18.13 



1,848.34 



,579.94 $136,943.75 



,$9,000.00 
3.917.63 

g 12.9 17.63 



$390,579.94 $124,026.12 



f28.00 $18,540.97 



$5,161.73 $517,243.95 



12,125.00 

1 ,250.00 

200.00 

1.848.34 

18.13 

,$5,161.73 .$.532,685.42 

$9,000.00 

3,917.63 

$12,917.63 

.$5,161.73 .$519,767.79 



66 « « City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statement of Rkceuts and Disbursemenis 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1947 

Cemetery Library 

CasJi Balance of Unexpended In- 
come 
January 1, 1947 $14,334.24 



Receipts 

Interest and Dividends: 

Cemetery 

Library 

Parks and Playground Trust . . 

Other 

One-third Receipts from Sale of 
Lots 



Total 

Total Receipts and Balance 



Disbursements 

Cemeteries 

Library Trusts 

School 

Other 

Transferred to Principal 
Direct Payment 



Total 

Casli I'xibiinc of Unexpended fii- 
eoine 
December 31, 1947 



Other 



Total 



$14,334.24 


$463.05 


.$372.77 


$15,170.06 


$8,699.78 
1,250.00 


$13,87V.73 


$55.23 
65.00 

$120.23 


$8,699.78 

13.871.73 

55.23 

65.00 

1,250.00 


.$9,949.78 


$13,871.73 


.$23,941.74 


$24,284.02 


$14,334.78 


■1493.00 


.1539,111.80 


$5,651.61 

18.13 
501.31 


$14,334.78 


.$25.00 
40.00 


.$5,651.61 

14,334.78 

25.00 

40.00 

18.13 

.501.31 


$6,171.05 


$14,334.78 


.$65.00 


.$20,570.83 


$18,112.97 




$428.00 


$18,540.97 



TRUST FUNDS 

Schedule of Permanent Fund Securities 
December 31, 1947 



V. S. Treasury Bonds 

1 sh. Great Northern R. R. Pref. . 

1 sh. Atchison Topeka and Santa 

Fe R. R. Pref 

2 sh. .'\tchison Topeka and Santa 

Fe R. R. Common 

1 sh. Northern Railroad of N. H. 
1 sh. Chicago. Burlington and 

Quincy R. R 

6 sh. Boston and Maine R. R. 1st 

Pref 

12 sh. Concord Gas Co. Common . . 
50 sh. Manufacturers Trust Co. . . . 

50 sh. Phoenix Insurance Co 

50 sh. N. H. Fire Insurance Co. . . 

50 sh. Central Hanover Bank and 

Trust Co 



Total 



'Cemeterx 


Library 


$78,600.00 
100.00 


$80,000.00 


100.00 




200.00 
100.00 




100.00 




100.00 


500.00 
1,020.00 
2,537.50 
4,025.00 
2.187.50 




4,850.00 


,$79,300.00 


$95,120.00 



Other 



Total 
$158,600.00 
100.00 

100.00 

200.00 
100.00 

100.00 

600.00 
1 ,020.00 
2,537.50 
4.025.00 
2. 187. .50 

4.850.00 

$174,420.00 



Annual Report '■* » 67 



PUBLIC WORKS — SANITARY SEWERS DIVISION 



Co.MrARAiivE Baianck, Shket 
As AT December 31, 1947 and 19-16 

ASSETS 



Current Assets IO-17 

Cash in Bank $39,363.7 1 

Accounts Receivable $9,491.67 

Less: Reserve for Uncollected 

Accoiuits 2,500.00 



Accoiuits Recei\ahle (Net) 
Accoinits Miscellaneous . . . . 
Materials and Snp|jlies . . . . 



6,991.67 

870.10 

3,651.12 



10-16 
■1535,040.55 



8.724.35 
3,352.55 



Total Current Assets 



Fixed Assets 

Mains .$884,038.43 

Manholes 94,145.55 

Customers' Connections 1 16.663.67 

Main Sewer Lands and Rights of Way 99.97 

General Eqinpnicnt 1,040.08 



Total $1.095,987.70 , 

Less: Depreciation Reserve 531,792.30 



,$875,524.52 

91,767.39 

. 112,569.70 

99.97 

934.82 

;i, 080 ,896.40 
518.508.40 



ihilinislied Const riu lion 

West Concord, HolI\\\()od Section 



?34.44 



Total Assets ,$615,072.03 ,$610,239.89 



Increase 

or 
Decrease* 
,$4,323.19 



1,732.68* 
870.10 
298.57 



.$50,876.63 .$47,117.45 ,$3,759.18 



,$8,513.91 
2,378.16 
4,093.97 



105.26 



$15,091.30 
13,283.90 



Net De])reciated \alue .$564,195.40 ,$562,388.00 $1,807.40 



$734.44* 



,832.14 



LIABILITIES, CAPITAL AND SURPLUS 

Current IJiiIiilities 

Accounts Payalile $55.50 ,$504.54 $449.04* 

Capital 

Contribulions in Aid of Construction $120,116.23 $115,057.24 .$5,058.99 

Conlrihuiion from City 480.323.45 480,323.45 

.$600,439.68 ,$595,380.69 ,$5,058.99 
Sur])lus 

Balance. January 1. 1947 and 1946 $14,354.66 $7,640.09 $6,714.57 

Deduct: Reserve for Uncollected Accounts . . 1,937.95 1.937.95 

$12,416.71 ,$7,640.09 .$4,776.62 

Net Profit 2,160.14 6.714.57 4.554.43* 

$14,576.85 $14,354.66 $222.19 

Total Liabilities, Capital and Surplus . . . ,$615,072.03 ,$610,239.89 $4,832.14 



68 « « C/fy of Concord 



PUBLIC WORKS — SANITARY SEWERS DIVISION 

COiMrARMIVF. StATEMENI of Ol'ERATINC; REVENUE 

For the Years Ended December 31, 1947 and 1946 



Opcntling Revenue 

Sewer Rentals, General $24,817.78 

Sewer Rentals, Industrial 

Penalties and Discounts Forieiled 

Sewer Connections and Jobbing 

Sewers — Runiford Printing Co 

Insurance and Miscellaneous 







Increase 






or 


/9-/7 


1Q46 


Decrease* 


:4,8I7.78 


.$23,290.47 


.11,527.31 


4.622.67 


1,885.77 


263.10* 


.56.10 


.52.16 


3.94 


4,255.62 


3.723.05 


532.57 




2,712.37 


2,712.37* 


192.00 




192.00 



Total .$33,944.17 .$34,663.82 



.$719.65* 



Opcraling Expenses 

Server — Rimiford Printing Co. — Costs. . . 

Superintendence 

Sewer Connections and Jobbing Costs 

Maintenance Labor and Expense: 

Main and Manhole Labor and Expense. . 
House Connections Labor and Expense. 
Maintenance of Sewer Mains — Repairs. 
Maintenance of Manholes — Repairs. . . 
Maintenance of House Connections . . . . 
Maintenance of General Equipment... 



Customers Expense (]Vatcr Deptniinenl) 

Meter Reading and Collecting 

Billing and Accounting 



General Administrative 

Office Salaries and Outside Help. . . . 

Legal and Accounting 

Office Supplies 

Insinance — Compensation and Fire 

Miscellaneous 

Insurance Adjustment in Costs 



Employees Accounts 
Annual Leave Payroll 

Sick Leave Payroll 

Holiday Payroll 

Retirement Fimd Costs 



Other Expenses 

Uncollectible Accounts 
Inventory Adjustment . 



Total Expenses 





.$2,712.37 


$2,712.37* 


4,284.15 


3.321.02 


963.13 


4,255.62 


3,683.19 


572.43 


1 ,459.06 


560.32 


898.74 


335.51 


349.76 


14.25* 


171.00 


392.52 


221 .52* 


398.71 


303.72 


94.99 


166.18 


201.93 


35.75* 


433.18 




433.18 



1,. 503. 41 $11,524.83 



.$21.42* 



.$354.19 


.$339.67 


$14. .52 


1,081.20 


1,018.97 


62.23 


$1,435.39 


$1,358.64 


.$76.75 


$669.65 


$107.26 


.$562.39 


846.00 




846.00 




6.50 


6.50* 


158.68 


99.70 


58.98 




193.55 


193.55* 




3.28* 


3.28 



,674.33 



.73 $1,270.60 



S592.56 


.$393.21 


$199.32 


859.55 


168.69 


690.86 


587.47 


457.69 


129.78 


913.54 




913.54 



.$2,953.12 



.$562.05 
53.17* 

$508.88 



M ,019.62 $1,933.50 



.$562.05 

88.54* 



35.37 



$35.37 



M8.075.13 $14,342.19 



.$473.51 
3,732.94 



Net Income Before Depreciation $15,869.04 .$20,321.63 .$4,452.59* 

Depreciation 13,708.90 13.607.06 101.84 

Net Income 



>,160.14 



,714.57 .$4,554.43* 



Annual Report » » 69 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Comparative Balance Sheet — Dpxember 31 

.'\S.SErS 

Fixed Assets 

Water and Flowage Riglits 

Engineering and .Suijerintentlence 

Construction Cost 

Land 

Structures 

K(|ui|)incnt 

Disiribution S\stein 

Oilier lx]ui|3nieiu 

Ijiitinished Construction 

Total Fixed Assets 

Current Assets 

Cash on Hand and In Bank 

Accounts Rccei\ahlc 

Material and Supplies 

Total Current Assets 

Other Assets 

Savings Deposits 

Governnient Bonds 

Total Other .Assets 

Total .\ssets 

LIABILITIES 

Cafy'ital Llnl'ilities 

Municipal Investment 

Funded Dchl 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Total Capital Liabilities 

Cii rreiit Liabilities 
Interest Coupons Payable 

Siirj)liis 

Balance Januar\ 1 , 1 947 

Net Profit 

Total Liabilities 



. 1947 AND 1946 

W47 
$167,663.11 

65,91 1.51 
132,436.35 
200,f)39.70 

28,489.50 
645,832.27 

27,037.66 

25,044.39 


1946 
$167,663.11 

65,914.51 
132.436.35 
195,433.87 

27.265.75 

643,624.40 

5,706.94 


SI. 292.457.49 

.$9,793.17 

307.22 

18,252.89 


$1,238,044.93 

.$44,771.77 

273.32 

17,818.88 


.$28,353.28 

.$58,332.25 
55,000.00 


.$62,863.97 

.$,55,802.06 
55,000.00 


$113,332.25 
$1,434,143.02 


$110,802.06 
$1,411,710,96 


$963,194.74 
40,000.00 

62,777.58 


$963,194.74 
57,000.00 
61,915.08 


$1,065,972.32 


$1,082,109.82 



$146.00 

$329,714.20 
38,310.50 



$146.00 

.$284,834.60 
44,620.54 



,024.70 $329,455.14 



1,434,143.02 $1,411,710,96 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Statement ov IwrsrMENTs A.\n Incomi, eor rHE Vear 
Ended December 31, 1947 

liten)tu' 

Balance Dejmsited in Balance 

1/1/47 Income Savings Bli. 12.''! 1/47 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $12,871.96 .$257.42 .$257.42 $13,129.38 

Merrimack County Savings Bank.. 16,933.07 377.85 1.752.85 18,685.92 

New Hampshire Savings Bank.. ., 13,014.71 260.28 260.28 13,274,99 

Union Trust Company'. 12,982.32 259.64 259.64 13,241.96 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2i/^ 67-72. .. . 10,000.00 2,50.00 10,000.00 

U. S, Treasury Bonds 2i/ 64-69. . . . 30.000.00 750.00 30,000,00 

U. S. Treasurv Bonds 2" 52-54 .... 10.000.00 250.00 10,000.00 

U. S. Treasury Bonds 2i/o 66-71 .... 5,000.00 125.00 5,000.00 

Totals $110,802.06 $2,530.19 .$2,530.19 $113,332.25 



70 « « City of Concord 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

CoMPARAiiVK Statement of Operaiions eor the Years Ended 
December 31, 1947 and 1946 

Increase or 

1947 J'N6 Decrease* 
]\'aler Sales 

Commercial — Flat Rate $3,445.08 $3,628.38 $183.30* 

Commercial — Metered 104,607.06 98,453.81 6,153.25 

Indiisuial — Metered 21,819.49 23.744.59 1 ,925.10* 

Miscellaneous Water Revenue 853.82 843.84 9.98 

Total Operating Revenues "$130,725.45 $126,670.62 ~ $4,054.83 

Upe rating Expenses 

Water Supply Expense .$26,550.79 .$21 ,847.74 .$4,703.05 

Distribution 29,923.99 25,815.13 4,108.86 

Other Operating Expenses 15,192.94 11,322.93 3,870.01 

Total Operating Expenses $71,667.72 $58,985.80 $12,681.92 

.$59,057.73 .$67,684.82 .$8,627.09* 
Fixed Capital Charges 

Depreciation .$23,572.18 .$23,245.49 .$326.69 

Taxes 19.10 17.75 1.35 

$23,591.28 .$23,263.24 $328.04 

$35,466.45 " .$44,421.58 $8,955.13* 
Funded Dehl Charges 

Interest Paid 2,101.25 2,763.75 662.50* 

$33,365.20' .$4T,657.83 $8,292.63* 
Other huanie 

Interest $2,530.19 .$2,446.21 $83.98 

Non Operating Revenue 1.119.51 516.50 603.01 

Gain on Sale of Fixed Assets 1 ,295.60 1 ,295.60 

$4,945.3"0" ~$2,962.71 ~ $1,982.59 

Net Profit $38,310.50 $44,620.54 .$6,310.04* 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Statfmeni of Cash Receums and Disbursements 
For ihe Year Ended December 31, 1947 

Balance Jaiuiarv I, 1947 .$44,371.77 

Receipts 

Water $130,450.80 

Sale of Materials 7,198.95 

Sanitary Server Depaitment 1,412.40 

Miscellaneous Receipts 2,553.31 

Total Receipts 141,615.46 

Total ReceijJts and Balance $185,987.23 

Disbursements 

Operation of Plant $80,187.82 

Capital Expenditure 77,304.99 

Bond 1 7,000.00 

Bonds — Interest 2,101.25 

Total Disbursements 176,594.06 



Balance, December 31, 1917 ,$9,393.17 



Annual Report » » 71 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1947 

Assessed 

Valuation of Anioinil 

City and of il'pro- Tax Rate 

Money Raised For Precinct priation per $1000 

Countv $36,457,539.00 |1 37,444.00 .$3.77 

City Budget 36,457.539.00 758,316.00 20.80 

Schools: 

*City Union 34,315,005.00 579,923.00 16.90 

**l'enacook Union Sciioois 2,151,131.00 51,849.0 24.10 

Totals .$1,527,532.00 



()\eila> Allowance for Abatements. Enois and Corrections 29,518.00 

Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector 1 ,557,237.23 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 2,090.00 

City Rate 41.47 

I'enacook Rate 48.67 

Average Rate for City Per $1,000.00 41.90 

*lncludes Property located in Loudon 
** Includes Property located in Canterbury 

PoLr Taxes jVo. Amount 

Men 4,013 $8,206.00 

Women 7,593 15,186.00 



Total 11,606 $23,212.00 



Veterans Exemimions 

Property Valuation $682,100.00 

Polls (2817) 5,634.00 687,734.00 



liliud 

Property Valualion 2,000.00 

Polls (8) 16.00 2,016.00 



Total Exemptions $689,750.00 



Rank Stock 
Bank Slock ,$6,259.00 



.^ss'^ssEn Valuations of \'arioi s r\iMs oi 
Types 

Laud and liuildings 

Growing Wood and Timber 

Electric Plants 

Horses 

Co^vs 

Other Neat Stock 

Sheep and Goats 

Hogs 

Fowls 

Fur Bearing .Xninials 

Portable Mills 

Boats and Laiuiches 

\Vood, Lumber, Etc 

Gasoline Pumps and Tanks 

Stock in Trade 

Mills and Machinery 

Asses and Mules 



ROI'I RT'S 




No. 


I'd I nation 




$30,955,310.00 




28,873.00 




1,692,430.00 


139 


17.375.00 


1,050 


143,0.50.00 


178 


16,610.00 


40 


778.00 


11 


125.00 


18,676 


23,816.00 


47 


207.00 




500.00 




1,500.00 




7,500.00 




23,960.00 




3,149,175.00 




396,250.00 


1 


50.00 



Total $36,457,539.00 

72 « « C/fy of Concord 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

General Classieicaiion of Relief Expenditures for 1946 



Direct. Expenditures for Relief 

Cash Allowances 

Groceries 

Milk 

Fuel 

Rent 

Board and Care — Adults 

Board and Care — Chiklren 

Medical 

Clothing 

Funerals, Transportation and Misc. 



Total City and Comity Poor 

Other Towns 

Hospitalization 



Total 

Dependent Soldiers 

Cash Allowances 

Groceries 

Milk 

Fuel 

Rent 

Board and Care — Children 

Medical 

Clothing 

Public Utilities and Miscellaneous 

Total 



Administration 

Salaries — ■ Overseers (Concord and Penacook) 

Salaries — Ofhce and Case Workers 

Mileage and 'rra\el Allo\vance 

Odite Su]3plies 

Telephone 

Lights 

Heat 

Janitor Services 

Miscellaneous 



Total 

Old Age Assistance 

Total City and County E\[ienditurcs 



City 


County 


Total 


$1,442.50 


.$3,634.35 


$5,076.85 


1 ,060.40 


2,776.79 


3,837.19 


77.52 


834.20 


911.72 


501.25 


676.19 


1,177.44 


386.00 


753.13 


1,139.13 


3,671.82 


3,706.12 


7,378.24 


1,020.00 




1,020.00 


723.62 


4,203.76 


4,927.38 


137.14 


290.83 


427.97 


265.95 


728.40 


994.35 


$9,286.20 


117,604.07 


$26,890.27 


344.00 




344.00 


2,130.39 




2,130.39 


,$11,760.59 


$17,604.07 


.$29,364.66 


$160.00 


$1,039.00 


$1,199.00 


254.95 


805.30 


1,060.25 


64.11 


389.80 


453.91 


67.09 


117.55 


184.64 


71.41 


195.00 


266.41 


30.00 


41.97 


71.97 


19.75 


366.34 


386.09 


26.69 


59.75 


86.44 


5.25 


17.34 


22.59 


$699.25 


$3,032.05 


.$3,731.30 


$2,319.28 


$1,812.40 


$1,131.68 


2,496.86 


2,500.35 


4,997.21 


307.60 


96.80 


404.40 


19().9() 


146.90 


343.80 


1 17.99 


145.46 


293.45 


19.83 


19.83 


39.66 


60.00 


60.00 


120.00 


42.50 




12.50 


164.53 




164.53 


$5.755. 19 


$1,781.74 


$10,537.23 


29,075.30 




29,075.30 


$47,290.63 


,$25,417.86 


$72,708.49 



Annual Report » » 73 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Summary of Departmental Expenditures for the Year 
Ended December 31, 1947 

Oprrafiiig 
Expense cnicl Cost nf 
Materia} Equipment 
Roads and Bridges Labor Bills Used Total 

Operating Budget: 

General Maintenance .1i;75.395.32 .1!;2S,492.49 .«;32.1 11.40 ?135,999.2] 

Outside Functions 2,119.82 22.00 21,489.40 23,631.22 

General Overhead 27.160.31 3,315.74 950.63 31,426.68 

Equipment Maintenance 23.225.72 37.1 19.61 60,345.33 

Total $127,901.17 $68,949.84 .D;54,551.43 $251,402.44 



Capital Budget: 

Construction $10,732.67 $1 1 ,040.79 .$5,679.50 .$27,452.96 

New Equipment 913.16 450.06 114.40 1,477.62 



Total $11 ,645.83 $1 1 ,490.85 $5,793.90 .$28,930.58 



$139,547.00 .$80,440.69 $60,345.33 .$280,333.02 
Less: Ecjuipment Maintenance 

transferred to various functions 60,345.33 60,315.33 



Total $139,547.00 .$80,440.69 .$219,987.69 



Storm Sewers .$240.22 .$28.00 $68.40 .$336.62 



Office 

Operating Budget: 

Salaries, Supplies and 
Insurance 



Capital Budget: 
.\ddinsr Machine 



Total . . . 

Refuse 

Table Garbage 
Engineering 
Street Lighting 
Clerk of Board 



Trees 

Operating Budget: 

General Maintenance . . . 
Outside Work — Xnias 
General Overhead 



Capital Budget: 
New Trees . . 



$5,710.39 


$1,808.81 
219.90 




$7,519.20 
219.90 


$5,710.39 


.$2,028.71 




$7,739.10 


35,424.54 


855.55 


11,134.60 


47,114.69 




6,050.00 




6,050.00 


10,937.00 


752.90 




11,689.90 




40,940.88 




40,940.88 


200.00 






200.00 


$4,717.62 

71.10 

1.004.98 


.$507.65 

20.00 

213.84 


$1 ,262.50 
33.90 


,$6,487.77 

125.00 

1,218.82 


.$5,793.70 
79.65 


.$741.49 


$1,296.40 
19.80 


.$7,831.59 
99.45 


.$5,873.35 


,$741.49 


$1,316.20 


.$7,931.04 


$197,932.50 


$131,838.22 


$12,519.20 


.$342,289.92 



74 " " City of Concord 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Statement of Appropriations, Transfers, Expenditures 
AND Unexpended Balances — 1947 



Roads and Bridges 

Storm Servers 

Office 

Refuse 

Table Gariiage . . . . 

P.ngineering 

Street Lighting . . . 
Clerk of Board . . . 
Trees 



A jjpro- 

prialions 

$212,050.33 

2,723.46 

6.662.92 

41,692.84 

6,0.50.00 

1 1 .796.99 

41,255.90 

200.00 

8,921.22 



Transjers 
.1:7,937.36 



1,076.18 
5,721.85 



Tola I 
.f2 19,987.69 

2,723.46 

7.739.10 
47,414.69 

6,050.00 

11,796.99 

41,255.90 

200.00 

8,921.22 



Expetidi- 

tiires 

.f21 9,987.69 

336.62 

7,739.10 

47,414.69 

6,050.00 

1 1 ,689.90 

40,940.88 

200.00 

7,931.04 



Unexpended 
Balances 



.1)2,386.84 



107.09 
315.02 



).18 



Total $331,353.66 $14,735.39 ,$346,089.05 .$342,289.92 .$3,799.13 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Statement for 1947 

Balance, January 1, 1947 

Receipts 

Fines, Costs and Fees 

Bail 

Total Recei|Jts and Balance 

Disbursements 

City Treasurer- 

State of N. H. — Motor \'ehicle Department 

State of N. H. — Aeronautical Commission 

State of N. H. — Fish and Ciame Department 

Bail 

Printing and Office Supplies 

Secretarial Services 

Miscellaneous Fees and Expenses 

Cash Balance, December 31 . 1947 



$98.75 



$17,950.67 




3,250.00 


21,200.67 




.$21,299.42 


$9,114.20 




7.753.70 




260.00 




36.70 




2,500.00 




359.84 




258.08 




139.08 


20,421.60 




$877.82 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number cjf Polls and Veterans, Assessed \'aluations. 
Tax Levies and Rates 1937 1947 



Polls 

1937 13,612 

1938 13,490 

1939 13,877 

1940 14,334 

1941 13,874 

1942 13.184 

1943 12,205 

1944 12,416 

1945 11.734 

1946 12,139 

1947 11,606 



Exemptions 
Veterans 

919 

936 

958 

925 

896 

897 

796 

679 

701 
2,570 
2,817 



J'aliialions 



132,195 
32,201 
32,365 
32,791 
33,068 
33.282 
33,251 
33,083 
32,963 
33,622 
36,457 



,052.00 
,370.00 
.017.00 
,790.00 
,487.00 
876.00 
.268.00 
,027.00 
,846.00 
496.00 
539.00 



Committed 




Tax* 


Rate 


F 1,290,330.81 


$39.04 


1 ,282,689.02 


38.82 


1,176,029.78 


35.30 


1 ,280,926.90 


38.00 


1,264,315.56 


37.20 


1,312,838.22 


38.40 


1,087,147.04 


31.80 


1.088,928.60 


30.59 


1,181,708.97 


33.68 


1,333,172.60 


38.26 


1,557,237.23 


41.47 



*Does not reflect Abatements and Deductions allowed by Assessors. 



Annual Report » » 75 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 



operating Budget : 

City Poor 

City Poor, Ward One 

Bonds and Notes 

Interest, Bonds and Notes 

City Hall and Auditorium . . 

Mayor 

City Clerk 

City Solicitor 

City Treasurer 

City Physician 

Weights and Measures 

Police Court 

Probation Officer 

.Assessors 

Ta-x Collector 

Real Estate Agent 

Elections 

Fire Department 

Health Department 

Department ol Pulilic Works 

Cemeteries 

Parks 

Trees 

Playgrounds 

Planning Board 

Public Library 

Police Department 

Comlort Station 

Recreation Commission 

Zoning Board 

W. P, A 

Airport 

Miscellaneous: 

Clock, care of 

Incidentals and Land Damages 

Printing and Stationery . 

Repairs Buildings . 

Board of Aldermen, Salary 

Family Welfare .Society 

Concord District Nursing Ass'n 

Penacook Nursing Ass'n 

Memorial Day 

Armistice Day 

.Armistice Day. Penacook 

Spanish War Veterans 

Band Concerts 

Work Relief Projects 

Nursing Schools 

Auditing 

Civilian Defense 

Finance Committee: 

Contingent Fund 

Post-War Planning 

Employees Retirement Fund 

Merrimack Valley Regional As- 
sociation 

Revision of Ordinances 

Blister Rust Control 

Gross Operating Budget 

Capital Budget Items: 

City Clerk 

Fire Department ... 

Department Public Works . 

Playgrounds 

Police Department 

W. P. A. Department 

Tax Collector 

Airport 

Recreation Commission 

Lake Survey 

By-Pass Project 

Total Capital Budget 

Total Municipal Budget 

Estimated Income 

Total Raised by Taxation 



Of Budget Appropriations, 1942-1947 






1942 


1943 


1944 


1945 


194f. 


1947 


$54-.500.00 


,$41,500.00 


,$39,950.00 


$37,700.00 


$:>8,3aii.(iii 


.$40,600.00 


5,925.00 


5,135.00 


5,320.00 


5,135.00 


4,815.(1(1 


5.889.00 


98,000.00 


107,000.00 


57,000.00 


52,0(10.00 


52,000.00 


31,000.00 


12,345.00 


11,058.75 


9,451.25 


7,963.75 


6,638.75 


6,135.00 


8.230.00 


8,697.-50 


8,984.50 


9,582.31 


9,373.56 


9.949.00 


3,500.00 


1,830.00 


3,9-50.00 


3,938.00 


4,157.00 


4,053.00 


7,825.00 


8,4,54.50 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


9.724.(10 


11,074.00 


1,560.00 


1,680.00 


1,680.00 


2.460.00 


2,38(1.0(1 


2,380.00 


3,060.00 


4,789.25 


4,876.00 


5.830.25 


5,086.50 


6,478.00 


1,800.00 












1,220.00 


1,312.00 


1,400.00 


1,400.00 


1.450.00 


1,450.00 


2,900.00 


2,960.00 


2,960.0(1 


2,960.00 


2.960.00 


2,960.00 


1,450.00 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


1.6(111.(1(1 


1,450.00 


1,600.00 


11,558.00 


12.018.00 


12,958.00 


12,934.00 


14,122.00 


15,539,00 


6,738.65 


8.052.85 


8,623.65 


9,027.65 


8,165.65 


8,955,65 






475.00 


530.00 


5011.00 


500,00 


3,488.00 


4,100.00 


4,150.00 


4,1(10.0(1 


4,100.00 


4,200,00 


77,435.52 


78,914.25 


95,803.79 


98,631.63 


113,327.48 


139,070.12 


6.925.00 


7, 255. (JO 


7,630.00 


7,618.00 


7,902.00 


8,136.00 


266,650.00 


291,467.40 


297,778.00 


347,657.48 


356,836.68 


396,428.69 


20,388.00 












15,690.69 

8,400.00 

11,148.00 












10,083.00 


11,805.00 


11,802.00 


13,341.05 


17,944.00 


4,685.00 


5,000.00 


5,247.25 


5,371.75 


6,100.00 


6,922.66 


18,012.11 


23,000.00 


29,000.00 


31,100.00 


36,465.00 


36.240.00 


71,088.62 


74,048.95 


79,018.91 


84.497.61 


93,851.60 


104,422.62 


2,080.00 


2,248.00 


2,. 365. 00 


2.264.00 


2,625.00 


3,879.00 


2,-550.00 


3,500.00 


3.500.00 


6 45(1.00 


6,635.00 


8,800.00 


200.00 
20,800.00 


200.00 


150.00 


200.00 


200.00 


500.00 


6,524.50 


9,288.00 


9,938.00 


11,808.00 


13,184.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


25.00 


50.00 


2,500.00 


2,500.00 


2 500. (JO 


2,500.(10 


2,500.00 


6,500.00 


2,200.00 


2,750.00 


3,450.0(1 


3,450.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,200.00 


1 200.0(1 


1,450.00 


2,250.00 


4.200.00 


1,915.00 


1,915.00 


1,875.(10 


1,875.00 


. 1,875.00 


1,875.00 


350.00 


350.00 


35(1.0(1 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


350.(10 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


200.00 


200.00 


200.(111 


200.00 


200.00 


200.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


600.00 


100.00 


100.00 


1011.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 




30.00 


30.00 


60.00 


30.00 


30.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


500.011 


1,000.00 


1,0(10.00 


1.000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,. 500. 00 












2,000.00 












1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1.000.00 


1.000.00 


1.00(1.00 


3,000.00 


3,(.)00.00 


50(1.00 












6,000.00 


6,000.00 
5,000.00 


9,00(1.00 
8,000.00 


9.000.00 

16.000.00 

500.00 
1,500.00 












1,000,00 


,S767, 61 7.-59 


$737,613.43 


$734,771.00 


$795,876.43 


$844,874.27 


$935,944.74 


25(1. 0(1 












').()()(». (II) 




625.00 


25.000.00 


11,700.00 


3,400.00 


4,052.40 






21,000.00 


32,000.00 


25,500.00 


195.00 




700.00 


700.00 


485.00 


4,250.00 


2,282.00 




1,800.00 


6,437.58 


3.975.00 


2,700.00 


4.200.00 


265.00 
















11,000.00 


10,000.00 

9,600.00 

9,000.00 

25,000.00 

$101,760.00 


19,000,00 
10,800.00 

25,000.00 


$19,979.40 


$265.00 


S'vl'.''i.(i(l 


$64,137.58 


$90,650.00 


$787,596,99 


$737,878.45 


.'t;7;7..".'i(i,nii 


$860,014,01 


$94€,634.27 


$1,026,594.74 


135,000.00 


*225,285.00 


*2t)0.b03.00 


*35 1,353. 00 


*2.58,254.33 


* 265, 245. 03 


$652,597.00 


$512,-593.00 


$477,293.00 


$508,661.00 


$688,379.94 


$761,351.00 



^■Includes cash on hand at beginning of year. 



76 « « City of Concord 



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INDEX 

PAGE PAGE 

Activities in 1947 4 Municipal Coint 35 

Assessment 10 Parks 46 

Appendix 58 Planning 14 

Bond Funds 12 Phn grounds and Bath 22 

Building Activity 39 Plumbing Inspection 39 

Cemeteries 46 Police Protection 31 

Citv Clerk 8 Probation 34 

City Go\ernment 6 Public Works 42 

City Officials 7 Recreation 22 

Elections 9 Reiirse Collection 44 

Engineering 44 Reliel -J 

Examination of Plumbers 39 Schools 53 

Finances 12 Sewers 45 

Financial Statements and Statistics 59 Snow Plowing and Sanding 44 

Fire Protection 36 Special Recreational Facilities ... 24 

Garbage Disposal 44 Street Lighting 45 

General Fund 12 Tax Collection 11 

Health and Sanitation 18 Trees 46 

Hydrants 38 Trust Funds 12 

Legal Service 13 \'ita! Statistics 8 

Library 26 Water Supply 48 

Milk Control 19 AVeighis and Measures 47 

Municipal Airport 51 Zoning Appeals 39 



Evans Printing Company, Concord, N. H, 



gSsSSSssSSsSSSssSSsSSSs5SSsSSSsSSSs5SSsSSSsSSSsssS5SSSsSS&! 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 



FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1947 



KssssSs5SSsssSs5SSsssSsS5Sssss?ssssssSsssssssSsSSSsss^^ 




FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY OF CONCORD 
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1947 



FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Chief, 
Salaries, 
Call Salaries, 
Fire Alarm 
Fire Inspection 
Incidentals 

Contingent Fund 
Repairs Buildings 
Fuel 
Lights 
Upkeep Equipment 

Resolution, No. 1660 
Telephone 
Insurance 
New Equipment 
Hose 

Supplies and Laundry 
Snow Removal 
Retirement Fund 
Repairs Roof 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 
Fire Alarm Boxes 
Service Truck Radio, 
Communication to Penacook 
Line to Penacook, 



POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Chief 

Salary, Deputy 

Salary, Captain 

Salary, Officers, 

Specials 

Salary, Bureau of Records, 

Salary, Houseman 

Repairs 

Fuel 

Lights 

Auto and Auto Supplies 

Marking Streets 

Telephone, Gamewell and Radio 

Insurance 

Keeping Prisoners 

Printing 

Traffic Lights and Supplies 

Office Supplies and Equipment 

Training Program 

Cleaning, Toilet Supplies and Equipment 

Bicycle Plates and Forms 

Police Equipment 

Incidentals 

Resolution, No. 1665 
Retirement Fund 
F.B.I. School 
Purchase Auto, Resolution No. 1678 



Aii])r(ii)riatiui 

$3,967.00 

103,800.00 

12,180.00 


1 K-\i,eiulf(l Balance 

$3,967.00 


101,945.94 


11,408.88 


1,000 00 


913.12 


100.00 


34.44 


734.00) 


1,255.73 


85.00) 

2,000.00 

2,661.36 

700.00 


924.82 


2,497.67 


539.07 


2,100.00) 
56.74) 
675.00 


2,528.62 


808.29 


2,631.08 
600.00 


2,124.00 


930.05 


1,000.00 
748 60 


1,290.40 


774.02 


500 00 


359.76 


1 973 08 


1,889.81 


1 700 00 


1 750 00 






$139,211.86 

$1,400.00 

391.00 

609.00 

1,000.00 

$4,316.64 
3 516 67 


$135,941.62 $3,270.24 
$1 400.00 


300.00 $91.00 
444.00 165.00 
839.80 160.20 

$4,316.64 


3,516.72 


3 075 01 


3,074.96 


68,688.32 
4,500-00 
2 364 12 


68,567.42 


4, .507.07 


2 307 87 


2,084.98 
500 00 


2,084.96 


535.22 


1,800.00 
950 00 


1,563.84 


1,031.16 


4,000.00 
600 00 


4,121.12 


606.97 


1,500.00 

1,600.00 

90.00 


1,433.88 


1,578.63 


42.25 


300 00 


308.88 


150 00 


116 98 


300 00 


297.68 


300 00 


297 05 


300 00 


347 46 


300 00 


257 18 


500 00 


595.89 


600.00) 
545.17) 
1,386.88 
700 00 


1 119 52 


1,464.59 


700 00 


1,852.00 


1 851 85 




$106,819.79 


$106,645.79 $174.00 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 



Trading Cars 
Photo Equipment 

PUBLIC LIBRARY: 


Aiiproiirintioii 

$2,200.00 
500.00 

$22,500.00 

6,000.00 

550.00 

1,200.00 


Kxiieiuleil BaUim-e 

$2,158.17 $41.83 
499.16 .84 

$19,850.95 


Books 


6,443.20 


Periodicals 


665.99 


Binding 

Rent Bi'anches 


912.82 


160.00 


Heat 


1,400.00 
400.00 
400.00 
400.00 
400.00 

1,500.00 
140.00 
150.00 
100.00 
100.00 

1,000.00 


1,564.60 




136.10 


Supplies, Janitor 
Supplies, Library 


203.01 


584.60 


512.17 


Lights and Power 

Telephone 

Transportation 

Printing 

Equipment 


1.347.54 


167.17 


79.42 


11.75 


106.95 


872.18 


Penacook Branch, Repairs Police Station 


12,917.63 








$36,240.00 

50.00 

9,582.78 

3,334.85 

2,470.33 

14,334.78 


$46,536.08 


Thornton Fund 

Maintenance and Blanchard Fund 

Blanchard Fund 

Library Fines 

Income Trust Funds 




HEALTH DEPARTMENT: 
Salary, Sanitary Officer 
Salary, Clerk 
Auto Allowance 


$66,012.74 

$2,100.00 

1,953.00 

200.00 

500.00 

2,633.00 

500.00 

250.00 

79.31 


$19,476.66 
$2,100.00 


1,952.33 


200.00 


Departmental -Expenses 

Milk Inspection: 
Salary, Inspector 
Auto Allowance 


494.97 


2,631.67 


600.00 


Incidentals 


236.34 


Contingent Fund 








$8,215.11 

$2,000.00 

1,753.00 

300.00 

65.26 


$8,215.31 


MAYOR: 

Salary, Mayor 
Salary, Secretary 
Incidentals 


$2,000.00 


1,795.24 


323.02 


Contingent Fund 








$4,118.26 

$3,384.67 
6,144.33 
300.00 
200.00 
75.00 
150.00 
400.00 
300.00 
120.00 


$4,118.26 


CITY CLERK: 

Salary, City Clerk 
Salary, Clerks 
Salary, Extra Clerk 
Auto Allowance 


$3,-384.67 


6.064.04 


272.00 


200.00 


Telephone 
Photostat 


81.70 


111.86 


Supplies 

New Typewriters 

New Steel Desk 


423.20 


292.90 










$11,074.00 


$10,830.37 $243.63 



CITY TREASURER: 

Salary, City Treasurer 

Salary, Treasurer, Trust Funds 

Salary, Deputy City Treasurer 

Clerical Assistance, Trust Funds 

Clerical Assistance, Pay-Rolls 

Bond, City Treasurer 

Surety Bond, Deputy Treasurer 

Supplies and Incidentals 

Equipment 



CITY SOLICITOR; 
Salary, Solicitor 
Auto Allowance 
Clerk Hire 
Supplies 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURERS: 
Salary, Sealer 
Auto Allowance 
Supplies 
Contingent Fund 



POLICE COURT: 
Salary, Judge 
Salary, Associate Judge 
Salary, Clerk 
Contingent Fund 



PROBATION OFFICER: 
Salary, Officer 
Cler-k and Supplies 
Mileage 



ASSESSORS: 

Salary, Assessors 

Salary, Clerks 

Auto Allowance 

Listing Polls 

Telephone 

Postage and Printing 

Supplies and Furniture 



TAX COLLECTOR: 
Salary, Collector 
Salary, Clerks 
Salary, Extra Clerk 
Printing, Postage and Stationery 
Incidentals 

Collector and Clerk's Bonds 
Mileage 

Office Equipment 
Real Estate Sale 
Contingent Fund 



Apiiropriation 


Expended 


$1,320.00 


$1,320.00 


110.00 


110.00 


2,335.00 


2,329.00 


300.00 


300.00 


1,300.00 


1,044.70 


693.75 


693.75 


45.00 


44.18 


159.25 


149.51 


215.00 








$6,478.00 


$5,991.14 


$2,100.00 


$2,100.00 


30.00 


30.00 


200.00 


200.00 


50.00 


40.50 


$2,380.00 


$2,370.50 


iKS: 

$1,100.00 


$1,100.00 


250.00 


250.00 


100.00 


39.54 


35.00 








$1,485.00 


$1,389.54 


$1,800.00 


$2,300.00 


500.00 


500.00 


660.00 


660.00 


500.00 









Ha hi IK 



$3,460.00 $3,460.00 

$1,200.00 $1,200.00 

200.00 230.00 

200.00 153.90 



$1,600.00 


$1,583.90 


$7,600.00 


$7,599.97 


5,681.00 


5,613.60 


400.00 


400.00 


1,000.00 


900.00 


58.00 


72.81 


400.00 


360.90 


400.00 


590.00 


$15,539.00 


$15,537.28 


$3,422.00 


$3,450.00 


3,545.00 


3,513.32 


100.00 


6.50 


1,100.00 


1,227.44 


88.65 


130.70 


450.00 


454.75 


100.00 


100.00 


150.00 


131.75 




123.93 


182.74 








$9,138.39 


$9,138.39 



$486.86 



$9.50 



$95.46 



$16.10 



$1.72 



REAL ESTATE AGENT: 

Salary, Agent 
Advertising, etc. 



ELECTIONS: 

Salaries, Officers 
Rent, Voting Places 
Maintenance and Repairs 
Printing Ballots 
Contingent Fund 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY: 

Contingent Fund 

INCIDENTALS AND LAND DAMAGES: 

REPAIRS, BUILDINGS: 
Contingent Fund 

ZONING: 

Contingent Fund 

DOG LICENSES: 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS: 
Roads and Bridges 

Resolution, No. 1683 
Office 

Resolution, No. 1683 
Refuse 

Resolution, No. 1683 
Table Garbage 
Storm Sewers 
Engineering 
Lighting Streets 
Clerk of Board 
Trees 
Parks 
Cemeteries 

CAPITAL BUDGET: 
Equipment 

RELOCATION FERRY STREET: 
Balance January 1, 1947 

DOUGLAS AVENUE CONSTRUCTION: 

1947 Revenue, Balance to be carried to 1948 $1,050.00 

PLAYGROUNDS: 

Salaries 

Equipment 

Auto Allowance 

Insurance 

Telephone and Electricity 

Trucking 

Maintenance 

Survey 

Fourth of July, Children 

Fourth of July, City 

Foui'th of July, Penacook 



Aji]iroiii-i;itioi 

$300.00 


1 Kxi)eii(l(Hl 

$300.00 
31.09 


Balance 


200.00 








$500.00 
$2,900.00 


$331.09 

$3,762.00 
225.00 
972.45 
440.75 


$168.91 


300.00 




600.00 




400.00 




1,200.20 










$5,400.20 


$5,400.20 
$3,693.92 

$5,868.16 
$4,217.05 

$537.87 

$488.51 

$219,987.60 

7,739.10 

47,414.69 

6,050.00 

336.62 

11,689.90 

40,940.88 

200.00 

7,931.04 

14,765.92 

48,312.89 

$25,230.45 

$6,661.34 

$381.96 

$11,380.49 
1,042.51 
458.26 
409.53 
290.16 
671.27 
1,187.82 
759.31 
389.05 
960.50 
250.00 




$3,000.00) 




693.92) 
$6,500.00 
$4,200.00) 


$631.84 


17.05) 

$500.00) 
37.87) 




$212,050.33) 
7,937.36) 
6,662.92) 
1,076.18) 
41,692.84) 
5,721.85) 
6,050.00 




2,723.46 

n,796.99 

41,225.90 

200.00 


$2,386.84 
107.09 
315.02 


8,921.22 
14,771.17 
50,303.86 

$25,500.00 

$6,661.34 


990.18 

5 25 

1,990'.97 

$269.55 


8 $1,050.00 
$11,614.00 


$668.04 


1,000.00 




500.00 




330.00 




400.00 




700.00 




1,000.00 




750.00 




400.00 




1,000.00 




250.00 









$17,944.00 $17,798.90 



$145.10 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 





Aiipropriatioi 

$400.00 
1,350.00 
1,000.00 
1,500.00 

$8,800.00) 
130.25) 

$9,000.00) 
14.07) 
800.00 
1,000.00 
125.00 

$1,964.00 

4,030.00 

1,800.00 

900.00 

755.00 

500.00 

37.33 


1 I'^x)>eiide(l 

$400.00 

1,302.48 

508.50 

1,326.02 

$8,930.25 

$9,014.07 

536.50 
1,125.00 

$1,963.28 

4,030.43 

1,749.46 

1,133.70 

797.24 

312.22 


Bahince 


Truck 

Tennis Courts 

Equipment, Hall Street Playground 

RECREATION COMMISSION: 
Contingent Fund 

CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Lights, Memorial Field 
Contingent Fund 
Mower, Memorial Field 
Improvement, Russell Pond 
Contingent Fund 

CITY HALL AND AUDITORIUM: 

Salary, City Messenger 
Salary, Janitors and Overtime, 
Fuel 


$47.52 
491.50 
173.98 

263.50 






Lights and Gas 






Supplies 
Contingent Fund 












$9,986.33 

$161,218.56 

479,686.00 

10,349.00 

16.283.00 

3,541.00 

36,800.00 

2,521.93 

23.52 


$9,986.33 
$513,191.56 




SCHOOLS: 

Union District: 

Balance January 1, 1947, 
Amount Voted by District, 










N H Teachers' Retirement Board 






N. H. Employees' Retirement 

Pav Increase as of November 7. 1946 










Dog Licenses 

Abial Walker Trust Fund 


















$710,423.01 


$513,191.56 


$197,231.45 



INTEREST ON BONDS: 
Balance January 1, 1947 
Amount Voted by District 



$5,926.85) $11,730.00 
11,326.00 



$5,522.85 



BONDS: 

Amount Voted by District 



$19,000.00 $19,000.00 



PENACOOK DISTRICT: 
Balance January 1. 1947 
Amount Voted by District 
Dog Licenses 
Abial Walker Trust Fund 



$16,542.31 

51,749.00 

158.11 

1.48 



$52,500.00 



$68,450.90 $52,500.00 $15,950.90 



COMFORT STATION: 

Salaries 
Incidentals 
Repairs 
Lighting 



$3,454.00 

230.00 

100.00 

95.00 



$3,320.00 

142.86 

32.07 

103.63 



$3,879.00 $3,598.56 



$280.44 



SALARY, BOARD OF ALDERMEN: 
AUDITING: 



AIRPORT: 

Salaries 

Fuel 

Lights 

Maintenance, Operation and Repairs 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous 

Airport Development 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 
Land Acquisition 
Seal Coat Runway 
Federal Project 



-Approiiriatioii Kxpeiuled Baliince 

$1,875.00 $1,875.00 

$1,000.00 $1,000.00 

$4,484.00 $4,437.60 

500.00 432.67 

1,000.00 876.67 

5,500.00 5,494.46 

700.00 705.23 

500.00 579.90 

500.00 85.75 



$2,000.00 

3,000.00 

14,000.00 



$13,184.00 $12,612.28 



$195.00 
1,719.54 



$571.72 



$1,805.00 

1,280.46 

14,000.00 



PLANNING BOARD: 

Salaries : 

Research 

Drafting 
Publishing Reports: 

Typing 

Pi'inting 
Maps and Blueprints 
Supplies: 

Drafting 

Office 
Telephone 
Postage 

Auto Allowance 
Special 
Contingent Fund 



CHARITIES: 

Family Welfare Society 

Concord District Nursing Association 

Penacook District Nursing Association 



PATRIOTIC ORGANIZATIONS: 
Memorial Day 
Memorial Day, Penacook 
Armistice Day 
Armistice Day, Penacook 
Spanish War Veterans 
Band Concerts 



$3,916.66 


$3,915.66 
2,307.00 

100.10 

172.31 

37.68 

52.38 
77.33 
64.11 
15.10 
200.00 
127.75 




2,286.00 




100.00 




175.00 




50.00 




50.00 




75.00 




45.00 




25.00 




200.00 








147.75 










$7,070.41 
$350.00 


$7,069.42 

$350.00 
350.00 
200.00 

$400.00 

200.00 

100.00 

30.00 

400.00 

1,000.00 


$ .99 


350.00 




200.00 




$400.00 




200.00 




100.00 




30.00 




400.00 




1,000.00 





VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS: 
Sale, Good Will Fire Station: 
Balance January 1, 1947 

CARE CITY CLOCK: 

BLISTER RUST CONTROL: 



$4,970.00 $4,970.00 

$50.00 $38.92 

$1,000.00 $1,000.00 



$11.08 



BONDS AND NOTES: 

City Hall and Auditorium 
Public Improvement 
Central Fire Station 
Sewers 
Airport 



INTEREST ACCOUNT: 
Bonds and Notes 
Temporary Loans 
Contingent Fund 

COUNTY TAX: 

TEMPORARY LOAN NOTES: 
Borrowed in Anticipation of Taxes 
Paid in December 

MERRIMACK VALLEY REGIONAL 
ASSOCIATION: 



Ajiju-diiriiitioii 

$5,000.00 
8,000.00 
1,000.00 

14,000.00 
3,000.00 



Kxpciul.Ml 

$5,000.00 
8,000.00 
1,000.00 

14,000.00 
3,000.00 



B.-ihincr 



$31,000.00 $31,000.00 



$3,835.00 
2,300.00) 
329.79) 



$3,835.00 
2,629.79 

137,400.66 



$700,000.00 



1946 REAL ESTATE SOLD FOR UNPAID 
TAXES: 
Resolution, No. 1672 

RETIREMENT FUND, EMPLOYEES: 

REVISION ORDINANCES 

BY PASS PROJECT: 
Capital Budget 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 
Contingent Fund 
Allocated to Various Appropriations 



$500.00 

$8,123.96 

$16,000.00 

$1,500.00 

$25,000.00 

$9,000.00 



$700,000.00 
$500.00 

$8,123.96 

$12,974.16 

$1,456.00 



$3,025.84 
$44.00 

$25,000.00 



$4,702.53 $4,297.47 



RESUME OF DISBURSEMENTS 

City Departments 

City Poor and Soldiers 

County Poor and Soldiers 

Old Age Assistance 

Hospitalization 

City Notes 

City Bonds 

Interest Notes and Bonds 

Schools 

School Bonds 

Schools, Interest on Bonds 

County Tax 

Private Charities 

Patriotic Appropriations 

1946 Real Estate Sold for Taxes 

Airport 

Capital Budget Items 

Employees Retirement Fund 

Relocation Ferry Street 

Douglas Avenue Construction 

Veterans of Foreign Wars 



Relief Department Balances transferred to Treasury 
Balance on hand January 1, 1948 



$830,917.09 

16,084.94 

25,417.82 

29,075.30 

2,130.39 

700,000.00 

31,000.00 

6,464.79 

565,691.56 

19,000.00 

11,730.00 

137,400.66 

900.00 

2,130.00 

8,123.96 

12,612.28 

46,998.69 

12,974.16 

6,661.34 

381.96 

4,970.00 

$2,470,664.94 

516.85 

180,134.31 

$2,651,316.10 



CITY HALL ROOF REPAIRS 

Aiiin-oiii'iation I'',.\|H'n(lc( 

Short Term Note, No. 567 $3,300.00 $3,300.00 



PARKING METER FUND 



Receipts to January 1, 1948 
Maintenance to January 1 
Balance on hand January 1, 1948 



,712.91 



$5,728.09 
3,984.82 



$9,712.91 $9,712.91 



SANITARY SEWERS 



Cash on hand January 1, 1947 
Receipts to January 1, 1948 
Maintenance to January 1, 
Balance on hand January 1, 1948 



$35,040.55 
32,905.79 



$28,649.20 
39,297.14 



$67,946.34 $67,946.34 



CONCORD WATER WORKS 



Cash on hand January 1, 1947 

Receipts to January 1, 1948 

Maintenance to January 1, 1948 

Bonds Paid 

Interest on Bonds 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 



$44,371.77 
141,615.46 



$157,492.81 

17,000.00 

2,101.25 

9,393.17 



$185,987.23 $185,987.23 



RELIEF DEPARTMENT 



CITY POOR: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

Parker L. Hancock, Overseer 
Relief, City Proper 
Relief, Penacook 



Transferred to City Treasury 



$15,450.00 



$12,351.37 
3,034.32 



$15,450.00 $15,385.69 



$64.31 



DEPENDENT SOLDIERS, CITY: 
Checks drawn in favor of 

Parker L. Hancock, Overseer 
City Proper 
Penacook 



Transferred to City Treasury 



$750.00 



$750.00 



$622.42 
76.83 

$699.25 



$50.75 



COUNTY POOR: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

Parker L. Hancock, Overseer 
Relief, City and Penacook 
Transferred to City Treasury 



$22,700.00 



$22,385.77 



$314.23 



DEPENDENT SOLDIERS, COUNTY: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

Parker L. Hancock, Overseer 
Transferred to City Treasury 



$3,050.00 $3,032.05 



$17.95 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Ajipruitriatidii Expended Uahincc 

Checks drawn in favor of 

Parker L. Hancock, Overseer $29,075.30 

City Proper $26,204.15 

Penacook 2,871.15 



$29,075.30 $29,075.30 



HOSPITALIZATION: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

Parker L. Hancock, Overseer $2,200.00 

Hospital care, $2,130.39 

Transferred to City Treasury $69.61 



RECEIPTS OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR TWELVE MONTHS 
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1947 

Balance on hand January 1, 1947 $162,988.27 

City Clerk's Department 4,237.85 

Dog Licenses 3,168.55 

Cancelled Premium 1.67 

Rent Airport 6,424.16 

Fire Department 461.14 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1946 1,249.52 

Motor Vehicle Permits, 1947 41,941.57 

Rent Auditorium 1,033.00 
Relief Department: 

Reimbursement Edgeworth ' 31.25 

Reimbursement Hopkinton 81.00 

Reimbursement Franklin 75.00 

Reimbursement Dunbarton 170.00 

Reimbursement City Poor, Flett 730.35 

Reimbursement City Poor, Bray 83.79 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Taylor 16.50 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Wellman 11.47 

Reimbursement Heath 6.70 

Reimbursement Truchon 164.00 

Reimbursement Gregoire 70.00 

Reimbursement Merrimack County 24,886.50 

Reimbursement Administration 10.53 

Aid Age Assistance Recovery 47.84 

Reimbursement LeMay 21.00 

Reimbursement Old Age Assistance, Thompson 250.24 

Reimbursement Northfield 35.00 

Reimbursement City Poor, Hall 28.00 

Reimbursement Manchester 10.50 

Reimbursement Boscawen 10.00 

Reimbursement Belanger 5.00 

Transfer to Close City Poor Account 64.31 

Transfer to Close County Poor Account 299.23 

Transfer to Close Dependent Soldiers, City Account 50.75 

Transfer to Close Dependent Soldiers, County Account 17.95 

Transfer to Close Hospitalization Account 69.61 

Adjustment Error 1947 County Poor 15.00 

Municipal Court Fees 9,114.20 

Police Department 1,818.04 

Bicycle Permits 644.25 

Public Library 2,470.33 

Public Library, Thornton Fund 50.00 

Penacook Library, Maintenance and Blanchard Funds 9,582.78 

Penacook Libi-ary, Blanchard Fund 3,334.85 

Parks 300.00 



Roads and Bridges $28,028.53 

Engineering 416.03 

Office, Public Works 669.65 

Comfort Station 286.23 

Milk Licenses 315.00 

Circus Licenses 50.00 

Board of Examiners of Plumbers 34.00 

State Athletic Association 114.68 

Recreation Commission, Golf Course 4,678.33 

Recreation Commission, Memorial Field 1,089.91 

Convalescent Homes 75.00 

Bounty on Hedgehogs 34.00 

Pay-Roll Account, Police, 1946 ' .26 

Filing Fees, City Primary 95.00 

Refund Playgrounds 17.05 

Refund Insurance, Boiler, City Hall 62.40 

Refund Forestry Appropriation 1.55 

Reimbursement Loss Taxes, Public Forest Lands 43.45 

1944 Redemptions 1,572.27 

1945 Redemptions 2,172.38 

1946 Redemptions 2,719.99 

1939 Taxes 113.65 

1940 Taxes 180.54 

1941 Taxes 202.16 

1942 Taxes 236.20 

1943 Taxes 211.40 

1944 Taxes 1,358.05 

1945 Taxes 2,534.63 

1946 Taxes 90,586.43 

1947 Taxes 1,416,841.39 
Rent deeded property and deeded property sold 931.57 
Cemetery Collections 10,182.17 
Income Cemetery Trust Funds 5,681.74 
Income Public Library Trust Funds 13,858.48 
Unexpended income David Osgood Trust credided to Public Library 476.30 
Income Walker Trust, a c Schools 25.00 
Received from State of New Hampshire: 

Building & Loan Tax 5.75 

Interest and Dividend Tax 58,742.16 

Railroad Tax 12,886.19 

Savings Bank Tax 17,704.88 



$1,951,316.10 
Tax Anticipation Notes 700,000.00 



$2,651,316.10 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk.