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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

The Ninety-sixth. 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

CITY OF CONCORD 

New Hampshire 

for the 
YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1948 




Capital of the State of New Hampsliire 

County Seat of Merrimack County 

Area: 67 Square Miles. Populalion: 2^ ,1"] i (i()4o) 



Authorized and Published under the supervision 

of the Board of Library Trustees by the 

Mayor and Board of Aldermen 




/•//// siiilf jarnui/g in the shadow uj the ittatc lluiise Dome 




A Word from the Mayor 

Each year a concise yet comprehensive accounting of the City's 
business and activities is published for you — the stockholders in 
the City of Concord. This report is for your use. Give it the same 
careful consideration and study you would give to your own business. 

Concord, your city, is a good city and one in which all its 
citizens may well take pride. It is not perfect and probably never 
will be. However, we can constantly attempt to grow in the right 
direction, and if each of us takes the time to learn how the city is 
governed, what it has to offer, and how each one of us can help 
solve its problems as they develop, there is no cause to worry about 
the future. 

I urge the youth of Concord in particular to read this book 
and to study city government, for on the shoulders of today's yotuh 
rests the well-beino- of the Concord of tomorrow. 




Mayor. 







Legislative Review 
1948 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN . . . 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

i i Voted abandonment of West 
Garden which was leased to the Con- 
cord Chapter of the American Red 
Cross. 

y i Authorized a survey of the insur- 
ance of the City of Concord. 
/ / Voted a ten per cent high cost of 
living increase to city employees. 
i i Executed an agreement with the 
state of New Hampshire providing for 
the discontinuance of grade crossings 
at Ferry Street and Eastman Street. 
/ i Issued serial bonds in the amount 
of $430,000.00 for the purchase of the 
capital budget items. 
i i Approved execution of a Grant 
Agreement with the Civil Aeronautics 
Commission, providing for Federal Aid 
to the Concord Municipal Airport. 

^ i i i City of Concord 



i i Authorized a study and subse- 
quent report on water holes. 
i i Voted to abandon a portion of 
Deer Park for sub-division purposes. 
/ i Authorized the making of an 
aerial survey of the City of Concord. 
/ i Voted to abolish the Aldermanic 
Playground Committee and turn its 
functions over to the Recreation Com- 
mission. 

i i Accepted a portion of the Conant 
Park street plan. 

/ i Authorized the Planning Board 
to cooperate with the Chamber of Com- 
merce in a further study of the possi 
bilities of the Concord Lake Develop- 
ment. 

< i Rezoned the northerly side of 
Clinton Street from a single residence 
to a general residence district. 



i i Authorized the purchase of a com- 
bination street flusher and tank truck 
for the joint use of the Board of PubHc 
Works and the Fire Department. 
i i Rejected proposed construction of 
a pubHc swimming area at Garrison 
Park. 



i i Authorized the closing of the 
offices in City Hall on Saturdays. 
i i Discontinued old highway from 
Hutchins Street to Penacook Lake. 
i i Authorized the preparation of a 
sub-division ordinance by the Planning 
Board. 



Administrative Review 
1948 



MUNICIPAL DEPARTMENTS . . . 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

i i The City Clerk's new policy of 
supplying billfold size birth certificates 
met with widespread approval. 
/ y The Board of Assessors reported a 
total assessed valuation of $37,230,- 
320.00, an all-time high. 
/ i The Tax Collector collected 
$13,910.33 in back taxes, nearly 
$6,000.00 more than the 1947 total. 
i i The City Treasurer reported a net 
debt of $729,467.07 at the close of the 
year. 

i i The City Solicitor continued his 
work of complete revision of the city 
ordinances. 

i i The Planning Board processed and 
approved plans of three subdivisions 
involving approximately 300 house lots. 
/ i The Health Department reported 
two cases of scarlet fever as against 
14 cases during 1947. 
■f r The Milk Department noted that 
the price of milk advanced three times 
to an all-time high. 

/ i The Playground Committee re- 
ported a total attendance of 56,853 
people at city playgrounds. 
i i The Recreation Commission re- 
ported the installation of a privately- 
owned ski tow at the Russell Pond 
Area. 

i i The Public Library expanded its 
service to Concord Hospital and the 
elementary schools of the city. 



/ i The Relief Department reported 
a steadily increasing case load during 
the final months of the past year. 
i i The Police Departmnt purchased 
a Dictaphone Electronic Belt Record- 
ing and Reproducing Machine which 
records all radio, telephone and call-box 
communications. 

i i The Probation Department re- 
ported an increase in the amount of 
juvenile deliquency. A total of 33 
juvenile cases were brought before the 
Concord Juvenile Court. 
i i The Municipal Court handled a 
record-breaking number of 4,735 crimi- 
nal cases. Increased minor lawlessness 
was apparent to court officials. 
i i The Airport Commission reported 
the installation of a new Omni Direc- 
tional Range which was commissioned 
on a shake-down basis and put into 
operation. 

/ i The Fire Department reduced the 
number of call men from a comple- 
ment of 129 to a stream-lined organ- 
ization of 79 call men. 
i i The Pviblic Works Department 
used 171,264 gallons of tar in maintain- 
ing the city's many tar-surfaced streets 
and roads. 

i i The City Sealer noted a marked 
improvement in scales and pumps used 
by merchants throughout the city. 

Annual Report i -f i ^ 




The Democratic Approach. 



GOVERNMENT 



Hon. Charles J. McKee 
Mayor 

William A. Stevens 
Substitute Mavor 



Aldermen-at-Large and Members 
Board of Public Works 

William A. Stevens 
Nelson E. Strong 
Robert W. Potter 
Charles A. Bartlett 
Thomas B. Jennings 
Harry D. Challis 

Ward Aldermen 

John M. Allen Ward i 

John E. Davis Ward 2 

William J. Flynn Ward 3 

WiNFiELD J. Phillips Ward 4 

John W. Stanley Ward 5 

Edward L. Love joy Ward 6 

Lester W. Holt Ward 7 

Clarence A. Drown Ward 8 

Emmett a. Nawn Ward 9 



Standing Committees of 
The Board of Aldermen 

Accounts and Claims: 

Aldermen Drown, Bartlett, Holt and Love- 
joy. 
Bills, Second Reading: 

Aldermen Strong, Davis, Drown and Nawn. 
Elections and Returns: 

Aldermen Nawn, Davis, Holt and Potter. 
Engrossed Ordinances: 

Aldermen Allen, Holt, Lovejoy and Strong. 
Finance: 

Mayor McKee, Aldermen Stevens, Challis, 

Phillips and Stanley. 
Fire Department: 

Aldermen Potter, Allen, Fhnn and Loveioy. 
Land and Buildings: 

Aldermen Bartlett. Fhnn, Holt and Nawn. 
Playgrounds: 

Aldermen Jennings, Allen, Davis, Drown 

and Flynn. 
Police and License: 

Aldermen Davis, Jennings, Nawn and 

Strong. 
Public Instruction: 

Aldermen Flynn, Allen, Drown and 

Jennings. 
Relief: 

Aldermen Davis, Allen and Bartlett. 



6 Y -f f City of Coticoid 



OFFICIALS 



Airport Manager 
Building Inspector 
City Clerk 
City Engineer 
City Messenger 
City Solicitor 
City Treasurer 
Commissioner, Board 

Public Worlds 
Fire Chief 

Judge, 'Municipal Cour 
Judge, Special, 

Municipal Court 
Librarian 
Milli Inspector 
Overseer of Poor 
Overseer of Poor, 

Penacoo\ 
Planning Director 
Probation Officer 
Registrar of 

Vital Statistics 
Sanitary Officer 
Sealer of Weights 

and Measures 
Stipt. of Par\s 

and Cemeteries 
Supt. of Streets 
Supt. of Water Worlds 
Supervisor of 

Playgrounds 
Tax Collector 
Tree Warden 



William F. Flynn 
Edward E. Bean 
Arthur E. Roby 
Edward E. Bean 
Henry W. Smith 
Gordon S. Lord 
Carl H. Foster 



of 



Ervin E. Webber 

Clarence H. Green 

t William L. Stevens 

Peter J. King 

R. Keith Doms 

Austin B. Presby 

Parker L. Hancock 

Charles P. Coakley 

GusTAF H. Lehtinen 

Robert L. Colby 

Arthur E. Roby 
Walter C. Rowe 

J. Shepard Norris 

Edward L. Howland 

Ervin E. Webber 

G. Arthur Faneuf 

Paul G. Crowell 
Amos B. Morrison 
Ervin E. Webber 



Board of Examiners of Plumbers: 

William J. Bishop, Chairman; Arthur W. 
Saryent, George E. Young. 

Board of Health: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Dr. Pierre 
A. Boucher, Dr. Thomas M. Dudley, Dr. 
Chnton R. Mullins. 

Board of Hydrant Commissioners: 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman; Chirence H. 
Green, G. Arthur Faneuf. 

Board of Library Trustees: 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr., Chairman; Francis 
E. Beer; Harold W. Bridge, Joseph J. Comi, 
John F. MacEachran, Sara B. Magenau, 
Alvah W. Sulloway, Martiia G. Upton. 

Police Commission: 

Daniel Shea, Chairman; M. Harrison 
Duffy, Guy A. Swenson. 

Recreation Commission: 

Leigh S. Hall, Chairman; Rucl N. Colby, 
William D. Haller, Chester G. Larson, 
Charles J. McKee. 

Trustees of Trust Funds: 

Harry H. Dudley, Carl H. Foster, L Reed 
Gourley. 

Board of Water Commissioners: 

James W. Jameson, President; Robert W. 
Brown, Harry H. Dudley, Allen M. Free- 
man, Charles P. Johnson, Donald Knowl- 
ton, Charles J. McKee, (Jardner Tilton, 
Leonard W. Trager. 



Boards, Commissions and Trustees 

Hoard of Adjustment: 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman; John S. Cor- 



Air mail direct to New York i^f^ official 
send-off from Mayor and Postmaster. 



bett, A. Clifford Hudson, Elwin L 
Shelbv O. Walker. 



Pas 



Board of Airport Commissioners: 

Charles J. McKee, Chairman; Charles A. 
Bartlett, John N. Engel, Charles C. Hoag- 
land, Edward L. Lovejoy, Donald J. Mc- 
Farland, Robert W. Potter. 

Board of Appeals — Building Code: 

Eugene F. Magenau, Chairman; George 
Bouley, Carroll Garland, A. Clifford Hud- 
son, Arnold Perreton. 

CiiY Planning Board: 

Dudley W. Orr, Chairman; Edward E. 
Beane, Charles C. Davie, Douglas N. 
Everett, Warren H. Greene, A. Clifford 
Hudson, John B. Jameson, Charles J. 
McKee, Robert W. Potter. 





Concord citizens registered to rote in three elections during the past year. 



CITY CLERK 

iiiiiliiiiiii 

Arthur E. Roby City Clerly 

Margaret A. Spencer Deputy City Clerk^ 

1948 Expenditure $11,967.38 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Legislation curbing installment buy- 
ing did not, to all appearances, cut 
down on the number of auto permits 
issued by the Office of the City Clerk. 
Receipts from this source rocketed to 
an all-time high of $56,163.68. In fact, 
the City Clerk predicts that revenue 
from this source will be topped again 
in 1949, as more new cars become in- 
creasingly available. 

In addition, the City Clerk is respon- 
sible for the collection of general fees, 
rents and other miscellaneous items. 
The total revenue collected from these 
sources amounted to $20,648.98. 

Vital Statistics 

The City Clerk reported fewer births 
and marriages, as compared with an 



increase in the numbers of deaths re- 
corded. 



Births 

Marriages 

Deaths 



1947 
1077 

451 
668 



1948 
877 

385 
709 



The birth rate exceeded the death 
rate for the third consecutive time in 
the history of the City of Concord. On 
the other hand, there has been a steady 
downward trend in the number of mar- 
riage licenses issued during the past 
two years. 

For the first time, birth certificates 
were issued designed to fit into a purse 
or bill fold. Revenue from this source 
of income totaled $315.81. 

There was little let-up in the demand 
for certified copies of other vital sta- 
tistic records during 1948. The depart- 
ment continued its practice of provid- 
ing servicemen and their families such 
records without charge. 

Board of Mayor and Aldermen 

The Board of Mayor and Aldermen 
held 13 regular, four adjourned and 



8 i i i City of Concord 



three special meetings during 1948. 
Eight pubhc hearings were also sched- 
uled and held during the year. 

Twenty ordinances and 41 resolu- 
tions were enacted as compared to the 
enactment of ten ordinances and 35 
resolutions in the preceeding year. 

Board of Public Works 

The Board ot Public Works, during 
the year 1948, held 12 regular and 
eight special meetings. There were in 
addition, three hearings and one ad- 
journed meeting. The major part of 
the Board's activity for the year was 
related to sidewalk construction, sewers, 
and installation of additional electric 
lights throughout the city. 

State Bonus Papers 

Although the City Clerk continued 
certification of state bonus papers, the 
number of applicants has dwindled 
appreciably. This service is demanded 
by statutory requirement relating to 
the payment of state bonuses to veter- 
ans of World War II. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 

Household commodities and appli- 
ances continued to become more plenti- 
ful during 1948. This trend is re- 
flected, in part, by a pronounced in- 



crease in fees taken for recording 
mortgages and conditional sales. 

Revenue gained from recording 
mortgages totaled $825.95, and $562.45 
for recording sales. Comparable fig- 
ures for 1947 show receipts of $762.80 
and $420.45 respectively from these 
two sources. 

Elections 

Three elections were held during 
1948. On March 9, delegates to the 
Constitutional Convention and candi- 
dates to the National Conventions were 
elected. The State Primary preceded 
the national and state election held on 
November 2, 1948. 

Conduct of the national election in- 
volved the processing of many applica- 
tions for absentee ballots. Approxi- 
mately 300 ballots were mailed to 
absentee voters in nearly every part of 
the world. The Office of the City 
Clerk continued its practice of assist- 
ing residents of the Home for the 
Aged, The New Hampshire Odd Fel- 
lows Home, and the Christian Science 
Pleasant View Home in the procure- 
ment of absentee ballots. 

Election expenditures totaled 
$7,250.43. This amount includes the 
printing of check lists, election officials' 
salaries, rentals, labor performed, and 
lunches for officials. 



N'amc 


1 .'■ '-,"/ 


BIRTH CERTIFICATION 


'\-)e 




Hiiih n 


nte June 1, 1900 


Sex Fenple 


lli.tl.pl; 


te Cr.n^^'-'ra 


STATF. OF MEW HAMPSHIRE 


Father's 


\;tmc 


' .'6 




Mother' 


s M-iicicn Nan. 


c Aii.ce Doe 




n.ui- Re 


eord Fih<l J 


'ine 3.1900 i, 


,eFsue.i Jvr.e 1, 1948 


By Mn 




,mn.-(il hcrton. said rawd 


.'/ /,«/,■ ranrdcd on Birth Record 
/•cm^ filed aciording to ititv. 

Concord, N.H. 




^^ 


\lcrk of 



Annual Report i i i g 



ASSESSMENT 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Clarence L. Clark Chairman 

Arthur F. Henry 

Clarence O. Philbrick 

1948 Expenditure $16,398.57 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Real Property 

Although there was considerable 
activity in the local real estate market 
during 1948 as compared with the 
amount of pre-war property exchange, 
a downward trend, first apparent in 
1947, continued. Property transfers 
during the past year numbered 812, a 
decrease of 143 over the previous year. 
This figure represents an approximate 
seven per cent turnover of Concords 
12,000 parcels of real estate. 

Two factors contributed largely to 
the decline in turnover in real prop- 
erty. A small relief in the local hous- 
ing situation was one of these in- 
fluences. The other contributing fac- 
tor was caused by increased buyer re- 
sistance, which, in itself, may be re- 
flective of a reversed trend. 

The total number of building per- 
mits issued during the year was 230 
as against 223 in 1947. Of the permits 



Moving day is a big job for ihis Concord 
property owner. 




issued, 133 were for new buildings and 
garages and 97 were for remodeling 
of old structures. Labor and building 
materials continued to become increas- 
mgly available and 1948 construction 
continued well above pre-war levels. 

Assessed Valuations, Polls, Etc. 

The total assessed valuation of prop- 
erty in Concord for the year 1948 was 
$37,230,320.00. This figure was 
$772,781.00 greater than the total for 
the previous year. The 1948 assessed 
valuation of property in Concord was 
the highest in the city's history. 

The total number of taxable polls 
enumerated in 1948 was 11,859, ^^ com- 
pared with 11,606 for the preceeding 
year. During 1948 the number of tax- 
exempt veterans increased from 2,817 
to 3,050. It is interesting to note that 
the increase in the number of taxable 
polls and tax-exempt veterans was 
nearly the same. 

Polls and property valuations exempt 
from taxation totaled $845,972.00, an 
increase of $156,222.00 over the pre- 
vious year. The latter amount is en- 
tirely an increase in veterans polls and 
property valuations. 

EXEMPTIONS 

Veterans 

Property valuation $836,850.00 

Polls 6,100.00 

Hliml 

Property valuation 3,000.00 

Polls 22.00 



Total exemptions $845,972.00 

The total number of shares of rail- 
road stock held in Concord, which the 
state taxes and credits to the city was 
4,069, which was 496 less than the 
total for 1947. 

Tax Warrant 

Tiie 1948 tax warrant totaled 
$1,749,517.43. This represented an in- 
crease of $192,280.20 over the total for 
the previous year. The 1948 tax rate 
per $1,000.00 of assessed valuation was 
$45. g2 in the city and $48.90 in Pena- 
cook. 



TAX 

COLLECTION 



Amos B Morrison Tax Collector 

1948 Expenditure $9,826.58 



1948 Collections 

The Tax Collector was handed a 
total warrant o£ $1,749,517.43 to col- 
lect during 1948. This amount, the 
largest tax warrant ever submitted in 
the history of the City of Concord, ex- 



ceeded the amount for 1947 by 
$192,280.20. Approximately 92 per 
cent of the total 1948 tax warrant was 
collected during 1948. Of the total tax 
warrant submitted for collection, 
$152,530.53 remained outstanding at 
the close of the year. The total amount 
of uncollected taxes against previous 
years was $28,185.93, or $2,540.32 more 
than the total remaining at the end of 
1947. This increase is a reversed trend, 
and, in part, indicated a leveling off 
in the local economy. 

The following tabulation shows the 
amount of uncollected taxes carried on 
the Tax Collector's books on Decem- 
ber 31 of the past three years: 



As of 

Year Dec. ji, 1946 

1939 $1,268.47 

1 940 I >736.65 

1 94 1 ■■■■ 1,874.13 

194^ 2,257.28 

1943 1,832.93 

1944 9,216.84 

1945 12,875.65 

1 946 92,902.45 

1947 

1948 

Total $123,964.40 



As of 


As of 


Dec. 31, i<)47 


Dec. 31, IS, 


$1,044.91 


$995-45 


1,398.96 


1,342.96 


1,532.95 


i>433-9i 


1,616.33 


1,509.88 


1,395.21 


1,259.90 


6,226.19 


5,881.99 


8,523.59 


7,879-01 


3,867.47 


3,397-97 


123,869.82 


4,484-96 




152,530-53 




$149,515-43 


$180,716.56 



Back Taxes $5,786.37 more than the total for the 

previous year. The status of the 
The amount of back taxes acquired delinquent taxes as of December 31, 
by the City of Concord at the 1948 Tax 1948 is summarized in the following 
Collector's sale was $13,910.33, or table: 



AtJiotint Bought Amount 



Year 
1944 

1945 
1946 

1947 



by City 

$6,570.79 

4,877.84 

8,i23.g6 

13,910.33 



Redeemed 

$6,130.1 1 

4,606.01 

5,515.48 

5,348.22 



Other Activity 

The Tax Collector acting as City 
Real Estate Agent sold a limited num- 
ber of pieces of tax-deed real estate 
during the year. Total receipts from 



Abated by Deeded 

Assessors to City 

$277.77 $162.91 

102.80 80.14 

231-31 



Amount 
Unredeemed 



2,377-17 
^,279.84 



the sale and rent of property deeded 
to the city amounted to $1,546.71, con- 
trasted with a total of $931.57 realized 
from the sale and rent of tax-deed real 
estate during the previous year. 



Annual Report i i i 11 




FINANCES 



Carl H. Foster City Treasurer 

1948 Expenditure $6,205.50 



TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Harrv H. Dudley 

Carl H. Foster 

I. Reed Gourley 

Carl H. Foster Custodian 

1948 F.xpentliture $567.30 



Bond Funds 

The City's bonded indebtedness 
totaled $810,000.00 on December 31, 
1948. This, in effect, represented a 
departure from the "Pay as you go" 
method of financing. Among the 
factors contributing towards abandon- 
ment of the latter policy were the cur- 
rent necessity of purchasing new equip- 
ment and the need for construction of 
public works of a permanent nature. 

A total of $430,000.00 in new bonds 
was issued during the past year. Of 
this sum, $230,000.00 were for the new 
fire and police signal system and 
$200,000.00 were issued for equipment 
and improvements. Of the outstanding 
bond obligations, $238,000.00 were 
school bonds, $545,000.00 were muni- 
cipal bonds and $27,000.00 were water 
works bonds. 



Total interest charges until maturity 
on the bonded debt amounted to 
$123,226.25. Of this sum, $91,035.00 
represents interest on school bonds, 
$30,470.00 interest on municipal bonds 
and $1,721.25 interest on water works 
bonds. Bonds and notes were retired 
aggregating $63,300.00. 

General Fund 

Total revenue for the year amounted 
to $1,982,340.91 as against an esti- 
mated total of $1,927,144.83. After 
deductions by transfer amounting to 
$23,521.46, net revenue totaled 
$1,958,819.45. Actual revenue exceeded 
estimated revenue by $31,674.62. 

Appropriations for 1948 totaled 
$1,981,369.25, which together with 
$238,849.90 carried forward from the 
previous year, $51,696.10 in cash re- 
ceipts and $23,521.46 in transfers, 
brought the total amount of funds 
available up to $2,295,436.71. Expendi- 
tures for the year amounted to 
$1,968,572.71, leaving an unexpended 
balance of $326,864.00, of which 
$292,583.96 were carried forward to 
1949 and $34,280.04 were credited to 
surplus. 

The City of Concord closed the year 
with an unappropriated current surplus 
of $80,532.92. 

Parking Meter Fund 

Receipts from parking meters during 
1948 totaled $45,862.20. Daily intake 
was approximately $150.00. Operating 
costs totaled $14,054.91 and a sum of 
$22,987.31 was expended for the pur- 
chase of meters. 

Trust Funds 

Trust fund assets totaled $527,635.70 
at the end of 1948. Of this sum, 
$399,830.55 were cemetery funds, 
$122,643.42 were library funds and 
$5,161.73 represented miscellaneous 
trusts. Trust fund receipts totaled 
$24,724.04 as against disbursements of 
$21,022.08. 



11 i i i City of Concord 



LEGAL 
SERVICE 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Gordon S. Lord City Solicitor 

1948 Expenditure $2,671.75 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Old Litigation 

State of New Hampshire us. ^81.86 
Acres of Land, James M. Satvyer et al. 
This was a proceeding to take by 
eminent domain certain land located in 
the Plains District in Concord for 
municipal airport uses. Action was in- 
stituted in April 1942 and a decree of 
the Superior Court, making final dis- 
position of the case, issued in March 
1948. Explanation of this protraction 
is to be found in the fact that some of 
the former owners of the land refused 
to accept the damages awarded to them 
by the commissioners, appointed by the 
Court to determine the value of the 
land taken, or to prosecute an appeal 
from the awards. In other instances 
the owners were found only after exten- 
sive search and in a few cases it has 
been impossible to locate the title hold- 
ers of portions of this property. 

Roland St. Onge vs. City of Concord. 
In this case the plaintiff applied to the 
Zoning Board of Adjustment for leave 
to convert a four family building lo- 
cated in a general residence district into 
a six family unit. The Zoning Ordi- 
nance expressly prohibits the use of any 
building in a general residence district 
for more than four families. The board 
refused to grant the permit and the 
plaintiff appealed to the Superior Court. 
This Court ruled that the Zoning Board 
was in error and that the permit should 
have been granted. Confronted with 
an order that a use specifically prohi- 
bited by the ordinance was in fact 
permissable, the City appealed. The 
decision of the lower court was affirmed 
by the Supreme Court. Following its 



decision, the Supreme Court concluded 
to review the case anew. Upon recon- 
sideration the former result was 
affirmed. 

Page Belting Company vs. City of 
Concord was an appeal from the allow- 
ance of compensation for the taking of 
real estate for the use as a highway by 
eminent domain proceedings. The lo- 
cation of the proposed highway was 
changed so that no property of the 
petitioner is to be taken. The case will 
be dismissed by agreement of the 
parties. 

Concord Electric Company vs. City 
of Concord was a petition for an award 
of compensation for the alleged taking 
by eminent domain proceedings of an 
easement owned by the petitioner. The 
proceeding was dismissed by agreement 
of the parties. 

New Litigation 

Criterion Service Inc. vs. City of 
Concord. This was an appeal from an 
order of the Zoning Board of Adjust- 
ment denying to the petitioner a permit 
to maintain poster panels on premises 
located in general residence and local 
business districts. Hearing on this case 
was postponed pending final disposi- 
tion of the St. Onge case. (See above.) 

Colonial Realty Company vs. City of 
Concord. The Colonial Realty Com- 
pany applied to the Board of Public 
Works for a permit to establish a drive- 
way connecting its property with North 
Main Street at a specified location situ- 
ated northerly from Bridge Street. The 
Board of Public Works declined to 
grant the permit at the requested loca- 
tion and the petitioner appealed. 

Concord Electric Company vs. City 
of Concord. This was a petition for 
an award of damages resulting from 
the taking by the City of Concord, 
through eminent domain proceedings, 
of certain land for highway purposes in 
which the petitioner claims to own cer- 
tain rights. 



Annual Report 



13 



Wni/^|_I"rC ;anH ^^^ packages. The consumer benefits 

L I O n I O d 1 1 U jr^.^!^ double protection. In addition 

Mr A ^ I I p p C to the department's careful inspection 

C r\ :> U l\ t ;? of packaged food stuffs, state law re- 

^y^y^y^Y^YY-ff quires packaged foods to be plainly 

marked with the net weight of the con- 

jAMEs S. NoRRis City Sealer Gained commodity. 

1948 Expenditure $1,717-90 j.^^ ^-^^ gealer reported discovery of 

iii^iiiiiiiii only a few discrepancies during 1948 

and reported that few complaints were 

When you drive your car to a service received from customers regarding 

station and say "fill 'er up," you reflect quality or quantity of food stuffs in 

the confidence with which the general containers, 

public makes its every day purchases. Inspections 

A large part of this confidence may be -pj^^ ^ity Sealer made more than 

traced back to the City Sealer's incon- j^oo inspections during 1948. It is 

spicuous program of checks made of interesting to note that in addition to 

weighing and measuring devices. This regular routine inspections, there were 

is a continuous program which includes ^ number of special requests from 

inspection of everything ranging from physicians and hospitals to test scales 

pre-packaged pork chops to the grease ^^^ weights. Requests of a special 

dispensers used at your garage. nature are always complied with by the 

Improvement Noted department. 

During his many tours of inspection Cart bodies used in the sale of vvood 
in 1948,'the City Sealer noted a marked were measured and inspected In a 
improvement in scales and pumps number of cases, the City Sealer con- 
being used by merchandisers throughout ^^'1^^^ with owners and advised where 
the City. This improved condition is 'i^d how to correct length or height in 
in large part due ta the ability to get ^'^^\^^ "^^^^V f [^q^"''^"^^"\'- 
any replacement of small parts which Before applying tor licenses to buy 
during the war years were very often f^d sell, junk dealers are required by 
almost impossible to get. 1^^' ]« ^ave their scales tested and 

sealed before applying for their licenses. 

Packages Acting in the interests of the general 

In view of the constantly increasing public, the necessary inspections were 

popularity of pre-packaged commodi- made. 

ties with both the general public and The following table summarizes the 

store managers, the City Sealer car- department's inspection activities for 

ries on an active program of re-weigh- the year ending December 31, 1948. 

INSPECTIONS DURING 1948 

Correct Adjusted Condemned Idle 

Scales 302 76 9 

Weights II o o 

Liquid Measures 72 o o 

Gas Pumps 187 7 i n 

Kerosene Pumps 16 i o 

Grease Dispensers 68 o 

Oil Bottles 262 o o 

Tank Trucks 17 o O 

Truck Meters 2 i o o 

Package Re-weighs 215 o 

Cart Bodies 12 o 

ij\. i i i City of Concord 



PLANNING 



CITY PLANNING BOARD 

Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 

Edward E. Beane 

Charles C. Davie 

Douglas N. Everett 

Warren H. Greene 

A. Clifford Hudson 

John B. Jameson 

Hon. Charles J. McKee 

Robert W. Potter 

GusTAF H. Lehtinen Director 

1948 Expenditure $8,379.07 

iiiii-fiiiiiil 

Zoning 

Four requests for changes in the 
Zoning Map of the City of Concord 
were considered by the City Planning 
Board during 1948. Of these, only one, 
a proposed change of district from 
single residence to general residence of 
a section of the state hospital lot on 
Clinton Street, was approved by the 
board. The three changes which failed 
approval were the rezoning from gen- 
eral residence to local business of a sec- 
tion of Fosterville, the rezoning from 
general residence and agricultural to 
commercial of a tract of land on South 
Main Street in Penacook, and the re- 
zoning of the Penacook Lake water- 
shed from agricultural to a special 
watershed district. 

Subdivisions 

Considerable new subdivision activity 
was noted during the year. The Plan- 
ning Board processed and approved 
plans of three subdivisions involving 
approximately 300 house lots. The 
areas platted were Conant Park on 
South Street, the Winant property on 
Pleasant Street and the state hospital lot 
on Clinton Street. The board also ap- 
proved sale by the city of a four-lot 
subdivision in Deer Park. 

Various studies made by the Plan- 
ning Board in recent years have clearly 
indicated the adverse effects on city 
finances of premature subdivision. Con- 



tinuing subdivision activity of this 
type has pointed up a need for the 
establishment of controls in the interest 
of orderly community growth. Toward 
this end, the Board of Aldermen re- 
quested the Planning Board to prepare 
rules and regulations for the subdivi- 
sion of land. Work on this project has 
been started and a recommended pro- 
cedure will be forthcoming early in 
1949. 

Land Use and Housing 

A recent survey by the board indi- 
cates that in the 16-month period from 
January 1946 to May 1948, 8,686 feet 
of frontage along streets with full city 
facilities was utilized for construction 
of 98 new units, all dwellings but two. 
This use of existing vacant frontage 
represents about ten per cent of the total 
available, a gain in land use that can 
be attributed in large part to the policy 
of accepting no new streets unless the 
petitioners pay installation costs. 

There were few if any signs of a 
letup in the housing shortage during 
1948. The April census showed a total 
of 104 vacant dwelling units, the lowest 
figure since 1938. Of this number, ap- 
proximately one-third were vm tenant- 
able dwellings; the remainder repre- 
sented a normal turnover in occupancy. 

Streets and Highways 

New street layouts were approved by 
the Planning Board in connection with 
the three subdivisions previously men- 
tioned. In each instance, it was recom- 
mended that the subdivider pay the 
cost of initial improvements. The board 
also gave its approval to a revised lay- 
out of access highways from Eastman 
Street and Ferry Street to the Concord 
throughpass. 

In the matter of rural highway 
betterment, plans prepared by the City 
Engineer for the relocation of sections 
of Little Pond Road and Lake View 
Drive near Penacook Lake were ap- 
proved in principle. The relocation 



Annua] Report -f i -f i'^ 



of Elm Street via Riverhill Avenue, pre- 
viously considered in 1947, was ap- 
proved for inclusion in the town road 
aid program at a conveniently feasible 
future date. 

A number of problems relating to 
unused roads were studied. The board 
recommended the discontinuance of a 
highway leading from Penacook Lake 
at the site of the old Holden dam to 
Hutchins Street. Also recommended 
for abandonment were Guild Street and 
Holly Avenue located in the south-end 
section of the city proper. The board 
advised against re-establishing the Old 
River Road which formerly ran along 
the westerly bank of the Merrimack 
River southerly of Hammond Street. 

At the request of the State Highway 
Department, a survey of municipal 
highway needs was conducted in coop- 
eration with the City Engineer. It was 
determined that 10.6 miles of urban 
primary and secondary highways in 
Concord were in need of reconstruction. 
The cost of this work was estimated 
at $859,000.00. 



Parks 

Two problems involving park aban- 
donment were referred to the Planning 
Board during the year. The first per- 
tained to the discontinuance of West 
Garden on North Main Street in favor 
of its use by the Red Cross as a site for 
a new chapter house; the second related 
to the sale of four house lots in the Bow 
Street section of Deer Park. In both 
instances, the board found in favor of 
abandonment and recommended that 
the official map be amended accord- 
ingly. 

Airport 

At the request of the Board of Air- 
port Commissioners, the Planning 
Board studied the feasibility of enlarg- 
ing the airport administration building 
for office space purposes. The require- 
ments of existing and potential occu- 
pants were surveyed. As the result of 



this investigation, the board concluded 
that expanded facilities were justified 
and preliminary plans were drawn for 
an addition of sufficient size to meet the 
indicated demand. These were trans- 
mitted to the Airport Commission with 
the recommendation that the building 
addition project should be added to the 
master plan of airport development. 

Capital Budget 

The Planning Board's assistance was 
sought by the Finance Committee in 
the preparation of a six-year financial 
plan for the City of Concord. The 
total estimated cost of capital work 
for the six-year period as submitted by 
the various municipal departments was 
$1,325,987.00. Of this amount, 
$490,380.00 represented outlays during 
1948. The board recommended that 
the full participation of the Board of 
Education in the capital budget pro- 
gram should be secured in order that 
the procedure could be used effectively 
in stabilizing the tax rate. 

Aerial Survey 

For several years, the Planning 
Board has recognized a need for an 
aerial survey of the city for general 
planning purposes. During the year, 
funds were made available by the 
Board of Aldermen and Fairchild 
Aerial Surveys of New York were em- 
ployed for the survey. The work 
was completed late in the year at a 
cost of $2,656.00. Contact prints at a 
scale of one inch equals 1,000 feet of 
the entire area of the city, and at a scale 
of one inch equals 600 feet of the city 
proper, are now available for third- 
dimension studies. Also on file are en- 
largements of the entire city area at 
one inch equals 200 feet and of the 
city proper at one inch equals 100 feet. 
These photographs will be of inestim- 
able value in facilitating the work of 
the board as well as that of other city 
departments, particularly the Engineer- 
ing Department and the Board of 
Assessors. 



iS i i i City of Concord 




Parked baby carriages bear mute testimonv to popularity of Well-Baby Clinic. 



PUBLIC HEALTH 
and SANITATION 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 

Pierre A. Boucher, M.D. 

Thomas M. Dudley, M.D. 

Clinton R. Mullins, M.D. 

Walter C. Rowe, M.D Health Officer 

Austin B. Presby Milk^ Inspector 

1948 Expenditure $9,308.52 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

. . . PUBLIC HEALTH 
AND SANITATION 

Health Conditions 

The year 1948 was an eventful one 
for the Health Department. Health 
conditions showed a general improve- 
ment and there was a reduction in the 
incidence of communicable diseases. 

Only two cases of scarlet fever were 
reported to the Health Department dur- 



ing the past year as against 14 during 
1947 and 36 during 1946. Measles con- 
tinued to be most predominant, if not 
popular, type of communicable disease. 
A small number of scattered cases of 
whooping cough and chicken pox were 
reported during the past year. Two 
resident cases of poliomyelitis were re- 
ported during 1948, but in both in- 
stances the cases were very mild. 

The department reports that new 
drugs have been of considerable bene- 
tit in treating certain communicable dis- 
eases. In several cases the use of the 
drugs made it possible to shorten the 
quarantine period. 

Immunization Clinics 

The Health Department assisted the 
Concord District Nursing Association 
at the monthly clinics held on the sec- 
ond Tuesday of each month. A total 
of 474 children received the immuniz- 
ing treatment for whooping cough, 



Annual Report i i i ig 




ducted by the Health Department. If 
inspections indicate below-standard con- 
ditions of cleanliness, inspections are 
repeated until improvement is apparent. 



Federal Aid 

The Concord Health Department 
wishes to express its appreciation to the 
United States Public Health Service for 
continuing to make available to the 
city a full-time health engineer. 



"Weighing in" is an important part of this 
voting man's program for good lirtng. 



diphtheria and tetanus during 1948. 
An additional 78 children were vaccin- 
ated against smallpox by the Health 
Officer. 

Although concrete evidence cannot 
be offered to substantiate the theory 
that the reduction in the amount of 
communicable diseases noted during 
the past year was, in part, the result 
of the immunization program, it may 
be assumed that it might have been a 
contributing factor towards the un- 
usually good health conditions which 
prevailed in Concord during 1948. 

Sanitation Program 

The routine inspection of restaurants 
and other establishments where food is 
served has resulted in constantly im- 
proving conditions and higher stand- 
ards of cleanliness in Concord eating 
establishments. Basic to the sanitation 
program are the periodic swab rinse 
tests of glasses, cups and utensils, con- 



r)iseases of the circulatory system 

Cancer and other mahgnant tumors 

Nephritis 

Accidental deaths 

Pneumonia 

Diabetes mellitus 

Tuberculosis 



Objectives 

The aim of the Health Department 
is to make our city a clean and healthy 
place in which to live. The department 
promotes sanitation and cleanliness 
through advice, demonstrations and 
follow-up work; and helps to control 
communicable diseases by teaching 
techniques for prevention of the spread 
of these diseases. 



Vital Statistics 

A total of 709 deaths in Concord dur- 
ing 1948 was recorded by the depart- 
ment. This figure represented an in- 
crease of 48 over the total for 1947. 
The entire increase can be wholly at- 
tributed to the non-resident category 
representing institutional deaths. Of 
the deaths recorded in 1948, 297 were 
residents, and 412 non-residents, as 
compared to 297 and 364 respectively 
for the year 1947. 

Presented herewith in summary form 
is a tabulation showing the number of 
resident deaths from the seven most 
common causes during the past five 
year period. 



944 


'94 5 


7946 


1947 


1948 


I 0(J 


108 


1 1 1 


1^7 


139 


42 


37 


37 


45 


40 


21 


16 


7 


I ^ 


13 


12 


10 


24 


18 


14 


4 


10 


13 


12 


1 1 


11 


8 


14 


9 


8 


2 


9 


5 


.3 


4 



20 i i ■< City of Concord 



Appointment 

Dr. Walter C. Rowe was appointed 
Health Officer in January, to fill the 
unexpired term of Dr. Donald G. 
Barton. Dr. Rowe served in the same 
capacity during the war years. 

. . . MILK CONTROL 

Consumption 

The price of milk advanced three 
times during 1948 to an all-time high. 
At the same time, the sale of milk in- 
creased over last year by approximately 
756 quarts daily. The average daily 
consumption of fluid milk in Concord 
was i5'735 quarts. Of this amount. 
13,040 quarts were pasteurized and 
2,695 quarts were raw milk. 

The trend during the past year was 
to use more milk and less cream, 
brought about principally by price in- 
creases. Sales of grade "A" milk, 
vitamin "D" milk and homogenized 
milk continued to increase. 

Production 

Local milk producers reported a 14 
per cent rise in production costs dur- 
ing the first 8 months of 1948. Many 
producers were compelled to sell milch 
cows for slaughter in view of the fact 
that feed prices had increased, farm 
wages had risen, and machinery and 
fertilizers continued to rise in cost 
throughout the year. As a result of 
these factors, the cow population within 
the natural milk shed of Concord is 
the lowest since 1930. 

In fact, nine local producers went 
out of business during 1948, whereas 
only four new producers were per- 
mitted to wholesale their products. A 
total of 154 producers located within an 
18-mile radius of Concord supplied 
milk to the city. Approximately 972 
quarts daily were received from plants 
outside of this area. The sources of 
this milk are inspected by other health 
authorities. 



Cleanliness Double-Checked 

Every precaution is taken by the 
Milk Inspector to protect the consumer. 
As a part of this program all cows pro- 
ducing milk sold in the local market 
receive both tuberculin and Bangs dis- 
ease tests, through the cooperation of 
the New Hampshire Department of 
Agriculture. All animals that react to 
these tests are sold for slaughter to 
federally inspected abattoirs. These 
testing services are performed free of 
charge. 

Cleanliness of stables and milk rooms 
is stressed by the Milk Inspector. 
Periodic whitewashing of cow stables is 
required by the department. Through 
use of DDT spray, local producers have 
been able to keep stables and milk 
rooms relatively free from flies. 

The use of a chemical powder by all 
producers for washing dairy utensils 
is another sanitation safeguard. The 
thermostatically controlled electric 
coolers used by all wholesale producers 
must be kept clean at all times. 



Milk, samples are taken at dairy for analysis 
by milk inspector. 




Tests and Inspections 

It is the Milk Inspector's responsi- 
bility to insure production of quality 
milk for local consumption. This in- 
cludes detailed inspection at the dairy, 
as well as at the plant where the milk 
is received, processed, and distributed. 

To determine the quality and clean- 
liness of milk delivered by the dairy- 
men to the plant, a sample of the milk 
was collected directly from the cans 
of each producer and subjected to bac- 
teriological and chemical tests at the 
department laboratory. After analysis 
the results are filed with the Board of 
Health. During 1948. there were i'5i4 
samples of milk analyzed. 

Another major activity of the depart- 
ment is the conducting of periodic 
swab-rinse tests of glassware, silverware 
and other articles used in local eating 
establishments. A total of 115 inspec- 
tions of eating establishments were 
made during 1948. In general good 
results were obtained in the majority 
of public eating places inspected. 
However, nearly four per cent of Con- 
cord's eating places showed undesirable 
conditions. It is anticipated that con- 
tinued close, intelligent cooperation 
will correct this situation in the near 
future. 

Other inspections made by the de- 



partment during 1948 included 580 
dairy and 205 milk plant inspections. 
In addition 34 milk trucks were in- 
spected. 

Cream 

During 1948 the local sale of heavy 
(40^-) cream averaged 425 quarts 
daily, which was 40 quarts less per day 
than last year. Of this total 378 quarts 
were pasteurized and 47 quarts were 
raw cream. The average daily con- 
sumption of both pasteurized and raw 
cream decreased due to price increases. 

For the most part, the quality of 
cream sold in Concord during the year 
was better than last year. The greater 
portion of cream sold in Concord ar- 
rived from the Middle West and will 
continue to arrive from the West as 
long as there is no surplus milk in this 
area. 

Chocolate Milk 

There was approximately 360 quarts 
of chocolate milk sold per day in Con- 
cord as compared to 265 quarts daily 
average last year, an increase of 68.57 
per cent over the previous year. The 
chocolate milk drink as manufactured 
and distributed by the various milk 
plants met with all the requirements as 
to bacterial standards and chemical con- 
stitutents. 




22 i -f i City of ConcoiJ 








.li!iun-ii-pU'nty at White F.n/{. 



RECREATION 



PLAYGROUND COMMITTEE 

Thomas B. Jennings, C/iainnaii 

John M. Allen 

John E. Davis 

Clarence A. Drown 

William J. Flynn 

Paul G. Crowell Supervisor 

1948 Expenditures $19,174.02 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

. . . PLAYGROUNDS 
AND BATH 

For many years the aldermanic Play- 
ground Committee performed the vital 
and necessary job of administering the 
city's play areas. On August 11, 1948, 
the Board of Alderman adopted a 
resolution transfering all duties and 
activites of the Playground Committee 
to the City Recreation Commission, 
effective January i, 1949. 

This action was, impart, the result 
of a study made by the National Recre- 
ation Association of New York City at 
the request of the Playground Commit- 



tee of the Board of Aldermen to deter- 
mine the ways and means of securing 
maximum use of Concord's recreational 
resources. 

With the abolition of the Playground 
Committee, all policy-making respon- 
sibility for public recreation will be 
vested in a single administrative 
agency. 

Improvements 

During 1948, a considerable amount 
of improvement to several play-areas 
was accomplished. The ball diamond 
at the Robert W. Reed Playground 
was graded as was the ball diamond at 
the Rolfe Field, Penacook. 

In an effort to maintain satisfactory 
hockey rink conditions, the rinks at 
both White Park and Penacook were 
regraded. 

Summer Activities 

School vacation-time is boom-time at 
Concord's playgrounds. Swimming 



and baseball continued to lead 
popularity parade. 



the 



.-Annual Report i i i 2^ 




Members oj Recrea.'ioii Commission study findings oj the National Recreation Commission. 



The American Red Cross supplied 
instructors for two periods a week at 
all of the city's swimming pools. An 
additional swimming facility was again 
made available by authorities at St. 
Paul's School. Supervised swimming 
activities were conducted at their pond 
during the entire summer season. 

Another top-favorite of the summer 
season was the annual Fourth of July 
celebration. Festivities on the Fourth 
included a children's party at White 
Park in the afternoon and evening 
fireworks at the Camp (jrounds on the 
Plains. 

Attendance 

Attendance at eleven play-areas 
totaled 56,853 during 1948. Average 
weekly attendance was 5,168. These 
statistics apply to the summer season 
only. 

Until provisions are made for super- 
vision of the winter sports areas, it 
will be impossible to estimate total 
winter attendance. Spot-checks have 
indicated that substantial numbers of 
people avail themselves of the city's 
winter sport facilities. 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

Leigh S. Hall, Chairman 
RuEL N. Colby 
William D. Haller 
Chester G. Larson 
Hon. Charles J. McKee 

1948 Expenditures $10,789.45 

1948 Receipts 7,231.90 

Net Cost to City 3)557-55 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 



r inances 

Total receipts from 1948 operations 
at Beaver Meadow and the Memorial 
Athletic Field amounted to $7,231.90. 
Of this amount, $5,271.89 represented 
golf fees, $1,960.01 rental charges and 
concessions at Memorial Field. The 
Commission received a 1948 appropria- 
tion of $10,535.00 from the City Gov- 
ernment. 

Routine expenditures for the year 
amounted to $10,789.45 of which 
$7,533.65 was spent at Beaver Meadow, 
$3-020.55 at Memorial Field, and 
$235.25 at Russell Pond Winter Sports 
Area. In addition to these expendi- 
tures approximately $493.08 was ex- 



27 / *■ / City of Concord 



pcnded from the capital budget for the 
Russell Pond Area. 

Beaver Meadow Golf Course 

The club facilities and the nine hole 
golf course at Beaver Meadow con- 
tinued to be used to full capacity dur- 
ing the entire golfing season. There 
were 128 senior and 12 junior season 
ticket holders. There was a noticeable 
increase in the number of juniors using 
the course for both day fees and season 
memberships. Daily golf fees amounted 
to $2,360.20 for the season. 

A total of approximately $2,000 was 
spent for a special grass seed mixture 
and Milorganite fertilizer which was 
applied to the fairways under expert 
supervision in an attempt to improve 
the fairways. This treatment is to be 
continued throughout the 1949 season. 
The greens have been maintained in 
excellent condition. It is planned to 
install a new modern hot water system 
to overcome the shortage of hot water 
which has existed in previous years. 

The club manager and groundskeeper 
continued to operate the club house 
and course in a gratifying and efficient 
manner. 

Memorial Field 

The football field at Memorial Field 
was used by both high schools and 
New England College. The popularity 
of night games increased the receipts 
over previous years. New loam and 
fertilizer was applied to the football 
field and grassed areas under a general 
improvement program. 



During the summer the field was 
used extensively for organized after- 
supper Softball. Constant use was also 
made of the six tennis courts available 
at the field. 

Russell Pond Area 

A bulldozer was used to regrade the 
new open slope at Russell Pond Area. 
The ski jump was repaired and painted 
where necessary. A substantial saving 
to the city was possible through the 
active cooperation of the Concord Ski 
Club which, by regular organized 
work parties, assisted in the grading 
of the slope and repairing of the jump. 
A privately owned and operated ski 
tow was installed which services the 
new open slope and existing trails. 
These improvements have resulted in a 
greatly increased use of this area. 

Reorganization of Commission 

A study was made by the National 
Recreation Association, at the request 
of the Board of Aldermen, of the exist- 
ing public recreational facilities and 
organizations in the City of Concord. 
These proposed recommendations were 
considered by a Citizens Committee 
appointed by the Mayor. This com- 
mittee recommended to the Board of 
Aldermen the consolidation of the 
Aldermanic Playground Committee and 
the Recreation Commission into one 
Commission which would have jurisdic- 
tion over all public recreation in the 
City of Concord. The Aldermen voted 
to amend the revised ordinances to 
establish a new Recreation Commission. 



The City Atiditoyiiini i.< a niajor recreational jacility. 



f 






i \ 




Library patrons reaci !<nd relax iii comjortahle periodical room. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr., Chairman 

Francis E. Beer 

Harold W. Bridge 

Joseph J. Comi 

John F. McEachran 

Mrs. Eugene F. Magenau 

Alvah W. Sulloway 

Mrs. Robert W. Upton 

R. Kehh Doms Librarian 

1948 Expenditure $54,868.21 



Circulation 

Library patrons carried home a 
mountain of books during 1948. If 
the 185,247 books borrowed were 
stacked in one pile, it would tower 
nearly 4.4 miles into the sky. The 
1948 circulation represented an increase 
of 15,587 over the total number of 
books circulated in the preceding year. 



In general, this was a healthy in- 
crease with gains in adult non-fiction, 
adult fiction and books for children. 
It reflects an ever-increasing awareness 
of the library's value to all age-levels 
of the community. 

Children's Work 

The library, as an agency of informal 
education, must contend with the prob- 
lem created by the large post-war baby 
crop of increased number of children 
in outlying areas. For that reason, an 
intensified school library service pro- 
gram was adopted early in 1948 in an 
effort to bring more books to those 
children who are not within walking 
distance of the library. The Children's 
Department circulation increased nearly 
6.000 over the previous year, including 
books borrowed by children at ten 
elementary schools. 

A movie projector was purchased 
from library trust funds to supplement 



26 iii City of Concord 



the well-attended Saturday morning 
story hour. Fihns are shown once a 
month to two different age-groups. 

During the summer months, a highly 
successful "Fishing for Books" sum- 
reading club was conducted for chil- 
dren. It is interesting to note that this 
group read considerably more non- 
fiction than fiction. 

Other activities included many visits 
to the children's room by classes from 
various schools, as well as a gala obser- 
vation of Book Week. 

Young People's Work 

One of the library's main objectives 
in its work with young people is to en- 
courage reading for pleasure, together 
with developing an interest in the many 
fields of literature. Towards that end, 
two reading clubs were organized 
when school opened in the fall. Both 



the Junior and Senior Reading Clubs 
have been active and the members have 
profited from their association with 
books and new friends. 

During the past year, 225 junior 
high school students made a total of 
32 class visits to the Young People's 
Room for instruction in the use of the 
card catalog and reference books. This 
instruction is of considerable assistance 
to them in preparing regular school 
assignments. 

The Young People's Librarian 
actively promoted the reading of good 
books on the library's weekly radio 
program, "Do You Know Books." Of 
a total of 18 broadcasts, the reading 
clubs participated in seven of them and 
on two occasions children's books were 
reviewed by the Children's Librarian. 
Also several New Hampshire authors 
and artists were interviewed. 




"// was the night before Christmas." 

. innual Report i ■( i 2y 




Concord Hospital patients look fonvard to wcclih risits of Boo/{ Cart. 



Branches 

Durini; the past year, due to in- 
creased enrollment, it was necessary to 
move the Concord Heights Branch 
Library from the Dame School to the 
basement of Immanuel Chapel on 
Grove Street. 

Adult library service was suspended 
in East Concord until such time when 
a more central location is available. A 
mobile library unit could effectively 
bring high quality library service to 
this particular community. 

Library service to the two units of 
Concord Hospital was greatly expanded 
during 1948. Circulation totaled 2,570 
for the year as compared with the 1947 
total of 603. 

A committee of Penacook women 
provided the man-power for story 
hours at the Penacook Branch Library 
until a member of the library staff be- 
came available to provide this service. 
The cooperation of this local committee 
is appreciated. Also it was possible for 
the Penacook Librarian to attend the 



New Hampshire-Vermont Library In- 
stitute. 

Reference Work 

Various physical changes made in the 
Reference Department in 1948 were 
designed to increase the department's 
efficiency in its all-important task of 
supplying patrons with reqviested in- 
formation on every conceivable subject. 

In line with its goal of fostering pub- 
lic relations, the department through 
the media of exhibits, lectures, radio 
and the press contributed much towa^-ds 
favorable library publicity. 

A critical, but elastic, policy is ob- 
served at all times in making accessible 
books and materials that will make for 
more comprehensive and more practical 
public service. 

Registration and Collection 

Eleven thousand, nine hundred and 
thirty-nine children and adults are reg- 
istered borrowers at the main library 
and at the Penacook Branch Library. 



28 i i i City of Concord 



Nearly 79 per cent ot this total live 
within a one-mile radius of the main 
library. During 1948. a total of 2,046 
registrations and re-registrations was 
recorded. 

The library added 4,077 books dur- 
ing 1948. Of this number 1,112 were 
children's books. The library's total 
book collection numbered 53,697 
volumes at the end of the year. 

Survey 

A survey of the geographical distri- 
bution of library users was made which 
pointed out the real need for a 
mobile book unit in Concord. A unit 
of this type is the most economical and 
effective way of serving Concord's 64 
square mile area. Children unable to 
come to the main library would par- 
ticularly benefit from this type of serv- 
ice. 

General Activities 

The library's nieeting room facilities 
continued to be heavily utilized with 
more than 130 meetings scheduled for 
1948. 

As an added service to the City of 
Concord, the Board of Library Trustees 



assumed responsibility for the publica- 
tion of the City Report. Although it 
may appear unique, several metropoli- 
tan libraries perform this function. 

The library is indebted to the local 
press and radio for their cooperation in 
furthering increased usage of the li- 
brary's services and facilities. 

The many books and periodicals 
donated by friends of the library have 
strengthened the book collection and 
were appreciated. The continued co- 
operation of the many city departments 
during 1948, as always, often made pos- 
sible the saving of both money and 
time. 



Finances 

The library system was operated at 
a total cost of 154,868.21 during 1948. 
Of this sum, $30,195.90 represented 
salaries paid to employees and 
$8,684.27, expenditures for books and 
periodicals. 

Library income from sources other 
than taxation amounted to $15,868.04 
during 1948. This figure included 
$13,616.65 in trust fund earnings and 
$2,251.39 in fines. 



RELIEF 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

CITY RELIEF BOARD 

John K. Davis, Chairman 
Charles A. Bartlett 
John M. Allen 

Parker L. Hancock Overseer of the Poor 

Charles P. Coakley Overseer of the Poor 

(Ward i) 
194!^ Expenditures: 

City $59,566.89 

Penacook 7,868.54 

iiiii-fiilii-fi 

General Trend 

Again in 1948, as has been true for 
the past five years, a large percentage 
of relief cases and expenditures were 
the result of old age, sickness, accidents, 



and marital difficulties. Other contri- 
buting factors are indicated in the 
drawing, which accompanies this re- 
port. During the last two months of 
the year, several individuals and fam- 
ilies needed relief because of unemploy- 
ment — a significant problem again 
for the first time since early 1942. In 
the final months of 1948, a steadily in- 
creasing case load was experienced. 
Many men had been laid ofT their jobs, 
and were unable to find other work. 
Unemployment benefits were in many 
cases inadequate, or in some cases so 
slow in coming through that many 
families had to apply for public assist- 
ance. 

The Department had an unusually 
large number of requests for the place- 



Annual Report 



2g 



ment of children. In nearly every case 
the child needed placement because of 
a breakdown in the family life. With 
these child welfare problems, the de- 
partment received valuable assistance 
and cooperation from the State Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare and the Fam- 
ily Service Society. Constant attempts 
are being made to rehabilitate these 
families and wherever possible, to re- 
unite these families and return the 
children to their own home. 

Administration 

The City Relief Department is the 
agency which has been created by the 
City government to carry out the tax 
supported public assistance and social 
work program for the City of Concord. 
Merrimack County also uses this same 
agency for those individuals and fam- 
ilies living in Concord who are relief 
responsibilities of the County. This 
arrangement eliminates duplications. 
Merrimack County and the City of 
Concord share equally all administra- 
tive costs. The County repays the City 
on a monthly basis for money expended 
on County cases. 

Old Age Assistance 

For the first time since 1936, when 
the present Old Age Assistance plan 
was started, there appeared to be a 
leveling off in the number of persons 
receiving this type of aid. In January, 
there were 253 persons receiving Old 
Age Assistance, and in December, the 
Old Age Assistance case load was 250. 
The monthly average was 248. If 
present plans materialize for more 
adequate social security benefits with 
broader coverage, a steadily decreasing 
number of persons who will need this 
type of public assistance may be antici- 
pated. 

Although this program is adminis- 
trated by the State Public Welfare De- 
partment, each case chargeable to the 
City of Concord is discussed with the 
State case worker prior to its acceptance 



by the Overseer. The list of persons 
receiving this type of aid is reviewed 
monthly. 

Old Age Assistance is granted by 
means of a cash (check) grant, issued 
twice a month. In order to enable 
those individuals who are dependent 
upon this type of aid to meet the rising 
cost of living, it was necessary to in- 
crease the amount of the grant for each 
Old Age Assistance recipient chargeable 
to the City of Concord. The city's 
share in this program for the year 1948, 
amounted to $34,895, as compared to 
$29,075 in 1947. 

The following table shows the trend 
in Old Age Assistance both as to num- 
ber of cases and costs. 

Ave. Number Cost to 

Year of Cases City 

1941 156 $10,378.24 

1942 176 12,450.02 

1943 177 15,070.96 

1944 ^7^ i6,i2^.gi 

1945 189 19,118.00 

1946 214 25,221.00 

1947 232 29,075.00 

1948 248 34,895.67 

Relief Costs 

The total cost of City relief during 
1948 was $67,435.43, of which $7,868.54 
were expended in Penacook and 
$59,566.89 were expended in the re- 
mainder of the city. Direct relief ex- 
penditures for groceries, milk, fuel, 
rent, board and care of adults, board 
and care of children, medicine, cloth- 
ing, funerals and cash allowances 
amounted to $15,237.11. Expenditures 
for similar items for dependent soldiers 
totaled $3,632.39. A total of $34,895.67 
was spent for old age assistance, and an 
additional $5,962.16 was expended for 
hospitalization of poor and indigent 
persons. 

County relief costs during 1948 
totaled $33,768.64. Of this amount, 
$22,174.33 represented direct county 
relief and $5,542.61 aid to dependent 
soldiers. 



JO f y f City of Concord 



ALCOHOLICS 





MARITAL FRICTION 



INSUFFICIENT 
INCOME 

O 




A QUIET WAITING ROOM 
HOLDS THESE PROBLEMS 




OLD AGE 





DEATH OF THE 
BREADWINNER 

n n 

PARENT- CHILD 
DIFFICULTIES 



UNMARRIED 
TRANSIENTS MOTHER 



TYPES OF PROBLEMS MET IN THE 
CITY RELIEF OFFICE 



Annual Report -f -f -f ^i 



Relief Load 

There were 52 city relief cases repre- 
senting 93 persons on the department's 
rolls at the end of the year. This rep- 
resented an increase of 17 cases and 39 
persons from the total at the beginning 
of the year. 

County relief cases at the close of 
1948 numbered 54 with 143 persons 
represented. This was 3 cases and 19 
persons more than the number on file 
in January. 

Throughout the year public assist- 
ance was granted to 123 different city 
cases representing 284 persons, and 102 
county cases representing 321 persons. 
This makes a combined total of 225 
cases representing 605 persons. 

In addition, aid and assistance and 
transportation was given to 13 tran- 
sients. Counseling, and other services 
were given to 12 cases who were in 
need of social case work service, but 
were not in need of any financial help. 
These 25 cases are not included in the 
above. 



Medical Care and Hospitalization 

Poor health is often the cause of de- 
pendency. In some cases, it has been 
found that persons were unemployed 
and on relief because they could not 
afford medical attention to correct some 
obvious or hidden condition affecting 
health. It has been the policy of the 
department as a part of its program of 
rehabilitation to provide medical care 
and hospitalization for clients and 
wherever possible to correct any condi- 
tion of health which may be the cause 
of non-employment. 

An increased number of requests 
were received for hospitalization at 
public expense. A total of 830 days 
care was provided for poor and indi- 
gent persons at the Concord Hospital. 
The city's share of this undertaking 
was 396 days and the county's share, 
434 days. Additional hospital care at 
public expense was provided to individ- 
uals at the Merrimack County Hospital, 
the Mary Hitchcock Hospital in Han- 
over, and the Massachusetts General 
Hospital in Boston. 



Main Street pi ores ideal for Boy Scouts' semaphore practice. 




^2 i i i City of Concord 




New dpparatiti iccurds all incoming radio, 
telephone and call box communications. 



POLICE 
PROTECTION 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

POLICE COMMISSION 

Danill J. Shea, Chairman 

M. Harrison DuFtv 

Guy a. Swenson 

Akthur W. McIsaac Chief of Police 

I. Edward Silva Deputy Chief of Police 

1948 Operating Expenditures $124,791.01 

1948 Equipment and Improvement 

Expenditures , 4,824.89 



Crime Data 

Arrests during 1948 totaled 4,512, an 
increase of 74 over 1947. Minor com- 
plaints for the year totaled 7,332. This 
represented an increase of 1,888 over 

1947- 

Presented in the following table is 
a classification by type and number of 
the criminal cases handled by the 



Police Department during 1948. The 
number of minor daily complaints is 
included. 

CRIMINAL CASES DURING 1948 

Classification 

P[;r,sons Charged — Felonies 

Rape I 

Robbery i 

Aggravated Assault 3 

Burglary — breaking and/or enter- 

19 

57 



Larceny — theft 

Auto Theft 

Forgery 

Embezzlement and Fraud 

Total 



Persons Charged — Misdemeanors 

Assaults 7 

Weapons: Carrying, possessing, etc. ^ 

Sex Offenses 4 

Offenses against family and chil- 
dren I 

Drunkenness 293 

Disorderly Conduct 32 

Vagrancy 3 

Gambling i 

Driving while intoxicated 28 

Road and Driving Laws 436 

Parking Violations 3,326 

Motor Vehicle Laws 236 

Other Offenses 43 

Suspicion or held for investigation ... i 



Total 4;4 1 4 

Grand Total 4,512 

.\ctive Cases for Year 200 



Total 

Minor Complaints 



(jrand Total of Offenses and Com- 
plaints 



4.712 
7,332 



12,044 



During the year, property reported 
stolen totaled $30,482.93. The depart- 
ment recovered $18,652.31 worth of 
stolen property. 

Finances 

The City appropriated $129,997.27 
for Police Department purposes for the 
year 1948. Of this sum, $124,791.01 
represented operating costs and 
$4,824.89 capital expenditures. A break- 
down of capital costs shows $3,825.00 
expended for a new combination am- 



Annnal Report 'f -f -f S3 




Electn 



hoist does work, of six men 
4$ seconds. 



bulance and patrol wagon, and $999.89 
for changing the heating system. 

The department's unexpended bal- 
ance at the end of the year totaled 
$381.37. This sum together with earn- 
ings of $1,947.93 was returned to the 
City Treasurer. 

Personnel 

There were several changes made in 
the Police Department personnel dur- 
ing the past year. One Inspector and 
one Sergeant were added for better 
supervision of the men on the streets. 
Two regular and seven special police- 
men were appointed during 1948. Two 
regular and five special patrolmen re- 
signed during the year. A Senior Clerk 
and Clerk-Typist were appointed to 
work in the Bureau of Records. 

Traffic 

The amount of traffic continued to 
show a marked increase during 1948. 
Traffic violations increased proportion- 
ately. Part of this increase is a direct 
result of increased through traffic. 

The department investigated 499 
automobile accidents during 1948, 
which represented a seven per cent in- 
crease over the total for 1947. Four 
fatalities occurred and 141 persons were 
injured during 1948. These figures 
show that the year 1948 was a most un- 
satisfactory one from the standpoint of 
highway traffic safety. 



Safety 

Due to the increase in the accident 
rate, combined with the increasing flow 
ol traffic, the department has intensified 
its safety program. 

A great deal of time was spent on 
safety lectures throughout the schools 
and traffic patrols, established in 1946 
at all the City's grammar schools, were 
continued. 

Full cooperation has been extended to 
the Concord Safety Council in its effort 
to cope with this serious problem and 
will continue the battle to lessen traffic 
accidents in the future. 

Parking Meters 

At the close of the year, there were 
526 Dual Automatic Parking Meters 
in operation in congested business areas 
of the City. Although the parking 
meters are not the final solution to the 
parking problem, they have greatly re- 
lieved the acuteness of this situation. 
A positive solution seems to be the 
establishment of off-street parking lots. 
The gross income from the meters from 
October 15, 1947 to December 31, 1948 
was $55,575.11. 

Training Program 

As in the past several years, all regu- 
lar and special police officers were re- 
quired to attend the Police Training 
School conducted by the Chief of the 
Department. 

One member of the department was 
sent to the Federal Bureau of Investi- 
gation Police Academy in Washington 
for an intensive course in criminology. 
Another member of the department 
was sent to Canton, Ohio, where he re- 
ceived a complete course of instruction 
in the repair and maintenance of park- 
ing meters. 

New Equipment 

During the past year- the department 
acquired a new truck to be used as a 
combination patrol wagon and emer- 
gency ambulance. This piece of equip- 
ment has been in use since August, 



^^ i i i City of Concord 



194^ i^'''<J was used as an ambulance on 
three separate occasions when the am- 
bulance was responding to other calls. 
It also is sent to all bell-alarm fires. 

Other equipment additions included 
a lathe to work on generators. It is 
used in turning down armatures and 
rebuilding generators and starters on 
the cruisers, ambulance and trucks. 
This lathe has proved to be a big sav- 
ing, both in time and money. 

There also was added a critically 
needed electric hoist for the police boat 
which is housed in the garage and was 
previously hung dangerously by ropes 
from the roof. This hoist will raise 
or lower the boat in 45 seconds. Prior 
to acquisition of the hoist it required 
5 or 6 men to perform this operation. 

A Dictaphone Electronic Belt Record- 
ing-Reproducing Machine was in- 
stalled. This apparatus records all 
radio, telephone and call box communi- 
cations received by the department. 

A new radio-telephone switchboard 
was installed as part of the new com- 
bined fire-police communications sys- 
tem. The new board replaced a switch- 
board that had been in continuous serv- 
ice since 1927. At the present time, 
there are 19 police patrol boxes, 14 
combination police bell and light re- 
call units, and one emergency gong 
connected to this new system. 

Most of the steam pipes throughout 
the police station were replaced during 
the past year. This was a much needed 
improvement since many of the old 
pipes were corroded and some were 
completely filled with rust. 



Ambulance 

The police ambulance responded to 
a total of 789 calls during 1948. This 
is an increase of 42 calls over the year 
1947. In the Ninety-Fifth Annual Re- 
port, ambulance calls should have read 
747 instead of 847 as stated. Both the 
ambulance and patrol wagon are 
equipped with an inhalator. The in- 
halator that is in the police ambulance 
was donated to the department in 




Hoop-Stars of Addison Boys' Club model new 
uniforms. 

April, 1948 by the operators at the New 
England Telephone and Telegraph 
Company, Concord Exchange. 

Recommendations 

It is recommended that an extension 
to the police garage should be con- 
structed to house all police equipment. 
Present quarters are not adequate in 
view of the fact that the department has 
eight vehicles and two motorcycles and 
only a five-car garage. As a result, 
it is necessary to keep much of the 
police equipment out of doors. 

It is further recommended that a new 
ambulance be purchased to serve the 
public. The one now in use is nine 
years old and will require a great deal 
of work done on it very soon. Every 
year there are more calls for the am- 
bulance to respond to and it is of the 
utmost importance that it is ready for 
use at all times. 

Newly acquired truck, doubles as patrol wagon 
and emergency ambulance. 





Judge Stei'eiis rounds out 2j years of service. 

MUNICIPAL 
COURT 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

William L. Stevens Judge 

Peter J. King Special Judge 

WiNSLOw H. Osborne Clerl{ 

1948 Expenditure $4,100.00 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Cases Tried 

More cases came before the Concord 
Municipal Court during 1948 than at 
any other time in its history. A total 
of 4. 735 criminal cases were handled 
by the court during 1948 as compared 
to 4,542 in 1947' ^'37^ '^ ^945 ^""^ 
880 in 1944. 

It is interesting to note that in spite 
of a lenient policy on the part of the 
Police Department during 1947 while 
motorists were becoming accustomed 
to parking meters, there were 3,326 



parking violations during 1948. This 
figure represented an increase of 212 
over the total for the previous year and 
reHects an increasing amount of neg- 
ligence on the part of drivers. 

For the most part, the large number 
of criminal cases that were brought 
before the court in 1948 may be attrib- 
uted to minor lawlessness. Increased 
vigilance by the Police Department, 
particularly in the enforcement of 
motor vehicle laws- was another con- 
tributing factor. 

In spite of the considerable amount 
of minor lawlessness reported during 
1948, a downward trend in criminal 
cases of a more serious nature was 
noted. During the year 1948, cases 
involving felonies numbered 29. This 
figure represented a decrease of 16 over 
the previous year and was the second 
consecutive year in which there was a 
decline in the number of felonies. 

Other cases brought before the Muni- 
cipal Court included 162 civil cases and 
50 small claims cases. The former 
represented an increase of 44 compared 
with the year 1947. Forty-four more 
small claims cases were brought before 
the court in 1948 than in the previous 
year. 

According to the report of the Pro- 
bation Officer, 33 juvenile cases were 
handled by the court during the past 
year. 

Revenue and Costs 

The statement of receipts and ex- 
penditures for the year 1948, as sub- 
mitted by the clerk of the court, showed 
income from fines, costs and sundry 
fees in the amount of $13,442.42. 
Revenue from the same sources during 
1947 totaled $17,962.03. 

Of the payments made by the court 
during the past year, $5,540.85 were 
turned over to various state depart- 
ments as prescribed by law. The sum 
of $6,976.95 representing net receipts 
after expenditures and deductions by 
transfer, was paid to the City Treasurer. 



36 i i i City of Concord 



PROBATION 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

JiDGE William L. SriiVENs 

RoKiRT L. Colby rrohatiou Officer 

194S Expenditure $1,720.00 



Large Increase 

The year 1948 ended with a marked 
increase in the number of juvenile 
cases appearing before the Concord 
Juvenile Court. A total of 7,^ cases 
were brought before the court during 
1948 as compared with seven during 
the previous year. Of these 33 boys 
and girls, 18 were placed in the legal 
custody of the State Department of 
Public Welfare. The average age of 
this group was six years. Fifteen of 
these had been neglected by their 
parents and in three cases, the children 
had been abandoned by their parents. 
There were nine cases in which the 
juvenile was adjudged delinquent and 
placed on probation for one year. The 
average age of this group was 13 years 
and nine months. 

There were three commitments to 
the State Industrial School at Man- 
chester during 1948. In these cases, the 
juveniles were considered to be incor- 
rigible and non-responsive to probation 
treatment. On two occasions juveniles 
were referred to the Child Guidance 
Center for psychiatric examination in 
an effort to determine mental ability. 
In another case a child was returned 
to the custody of his parents subsequent 
to running away from home. 

On the bright side of the ledger, five 
juveniles were discharged by the Court 
upon completion of successful periods 
of probation. 



Why? 

The Probation Officer believes that 
the pronounced increase in delinquent 
and neglected children experienced 
during 1948 was caused, largely, by a 
decline in the general prosperity. In- 
creased unemployment and a down- 
ward trend in wage income contribute 
to delinquency, particularly in border- 
line cases. There are indications that 
the delinquency rate will continue to 
increase. 

In a large measure, the low rate of 
juvenile delinquency noted from 1943- 
1947 may be attributed to a high in- 
come and to the special efforts made by 
public and semi-public agencies and 
organizations to combat delinquency 
and neglect. 



Is There an A 



nswer ; 



In the opinion of the Probation 
Officer there is. He believes that it is 
necessary for every citizen and agency 
to put forth a greater effort than be- 
fore. As a part of this effort there 
should be a program to educate par- 
ents. This educational program should 
be an integral part of our public school 
system in order that legal as well as 
moral obligations may be taught to 
boys and girls who will someday be a 
parent, so that they may be better able 
to properly execute the responsibilities 
cast upon them by contemporary living. 



Cooperation 

The Probation Department contin- 
ued to experience the cooperation of the 
police department, churches, civic or- 
ganizations and social agencies. These 
organizations, through the promotion 
of character development, good sports- 
manship and tolerance have contributed 
substantially to a positive program for 
curbing juvenile delinquency. 



Annual Report i i i 37 




C. F. D.'s new tank tnicli is added protection for Concord property owners. 



FIRE 
PROTECTION 



FIRE BOA 

Robert W. Potter, C/iair 
John M. Allen 
William J. Flynn 
Edward L. Lovejoy 

Clarence H. Green 

Henry E. Drew 

Duncan M. Murdoch 

Joseph F. Greenough, Jr 

1948 Operating Expenditure 

1948 Capital Expenditure 

iiiiiiii 



i i i 

R D 

man 



Fire Chief 

Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 

. $156,068.47 
2,000.00 



LEO F. BLODGETT 

Deputy 

DIED 

December 24, 1948 

JOHN S. CHANDLER 

DIED 

June 18, 1948 

Fires and Fire Loss 

Concord's Fire Department re- 
sponded to a total of 643 alarms rang- 



Buildins 
Contents 



ing from the rescue of a child trapped 
in a second floor bathroom to a 
multiple-alarm freight house fire. Of 
the 643 alarms recorded during 1948, 
576 were still alarms and 67 were box 
alarms. This represented an increase 
of 90 over the total for the previous 
year. 

Although the Fire Department con- 
siders every fire a serious fire, there 
were several instances where fire loss 
was particularly destructive. The major 
fire of 1948 occurred at the Boston and 
Maine Freight House with a total loss 
of $166-702.00. In addition, there were 
two serious grocery store fires. They 
were at Jimmy's Store located on Wash- 
ington Street and The Superior Mar- 
ket on South State Street. 

On two separate occasions the City 
suffered the loss of three lives by fire. 

Fire losses for 1948 totaled 
1218,975.12, as compared with 
$126,922.82 for the previous year. 
This represented an increase of 
$92,052.30. Presented herewith is a 



Totals 

^8 i i i City of Concord 





FIRE 


LOSSES 






Value 


Loss 


hisiirance 


Insurance Paid 


Net Loss 


$319,550.00 


$1 10,841.59 


$i73'95"-oo 


$25,479.59 


$85,362.00 


154,107.00 


$218,975.12 


61,770.00 


30,213.53 


77,920.00 


$47.^,657.00 


$235,720.00 


$55,693-12 


$163,282.00 



summarization of losses by fire during 
the past year. 

Personnel 

During 1948 the number of call men 
was reduced to a complement of 79. 
The call force totaled 129 men during 
the previous year. There was no 
change in the number of permanent 
personnel. The latter group consists of 
43 men. The auxiliary fire force, or- 
ganized during World War II, ren- 
dered valuable service at several fires. 

New Fire Alarm System 

Construction of the New Gamewell 
Fire and Police Signal System was 
begun in August and is scheduled for 
completion in 1949. Each mile of 
cable, both aerial and underground, 
was renewed. This was a large un- 
dertaking for Concord has a total of 
26 miles of cable. Also, this system re- 
places the old signal system in the Fire 



Alarm Office and stations with new and 
modern equipment. In addition, a 
total of 28 new boxes were added. Of 
the new boxes, 21 were installed with 
new locations in the City proper and 
seven with new locations were installed 
in Penacook. At the close of the year, 
the City had a total of 172 boxes which 
adds up to a lot of protection for you. 

Fire Prevention 

Fire Department officials know 
through experience that carelessness is 
a major cause of countless fires every 
year. As a result of this knowledge 
the Concord Fire Department contin- 
ued with its intensified fire prevention 
program during 1948. In addition to 
routine inspection activities, fire drills 
were conducted in all the city schools 
and students were instructed in fire pre- 
vention. The department received, as 
in the past, the full cooperation of the 
Concord Safety Council and the various 




Boston and Maine freig/it house — A major fire of ig48. 

Annual Report < < ^ J9 




^^.'ii/>"r-Mi-.«s 



CONCORD'S SVlilMMING POOLS 

■ Riglit: 

White Park 
Concord Heights 
Fosterville 
Rollins Parl| 
Penacook ([mall Pool) 
West Concdrd 
East Concii'd 
Penacook (iarge Pool) 



■M'm 






service clubs, as well as the local radio 
station and newspaper, in promoting 
public instruction in fire prevention. 

As a part of a continuous program, 
all the convalescent homes, the hospitals 
and the schools in the City were sub- 
jected to periodic inspections. The de- 
partment was very active during 1948 
inspecting new power oil burner instal- 
lations and heating units converted 
from coal to oil. 

Apparatus and Equipment 

In the event of a fire emergency, any 
of 14 fire trucks might race to the scene 
of the fire. In addition to its normal 
quota of 14 fire trucks of various types, 
there are three official cars and one 
service truck. This apparatus was 
housed in four stations, one of which 
is located in the city proper and three 
in the outlying districts. 

In July, a contract was signed for 
the purchase of a 750-gallon Mack 
pumper. The new pumper was sched- 
uled to be used as a replacement for 
one of the older trucks which has been 
in service for a long period of time. 

At the close of the year, the depart- 
ment had more than six miles of vari- 
ous types of hose in service, or nearly 
enough to stretch from the Central Fire 
Station to the Ward One Station. There 
were 20,850 feet of two and one-half 
inch hose, 2,650 feet of three-quarter 
inch booster hose and 1,600 feet of 
one and one-half inch hose in service. 

Recommendations 

Considerable progress has been made 
in improving the effectiveness of the 
department under the capital budget 
system of equipment replacement. It 
is recommended that the programming 
of needed improvements be continued. 

Plans have been formulated for the 
construction of a new fire station in the 
south-end section of the city proper. 
Owing to the fact that this section is 
an area of much new construction, it 
is recommended that construction of 
this new facility be undertaken. 



. . . FIRE HYDRANTS 

BOARD OF HYDRANT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Edward E. Beane, Chairman 
G. Arthur Faneuf 
Clarence H. Greene 

1 048 Expenditure None 



Some fires are fought with various 
chemical preparations, but old-fash- 
ioned water continues to be the top 
fire squelcher. For that reason every 
effort is made to maintain the city fire 
hydrant system in good working order. 
As part of a cooperative maintenance 
plan, periodic inspections of all hy- 
drants are made during the months 
of December through March. Particu- 
lar care was taken during the winter 
months to check for leaks which might 
cause ice to form in hydrants and make 
them inoperative. 




An annual affair at the Central Fire Station. 



^2 i i i City of Concord 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Zoning, building and plumbing 
activities are some of the ingredients 
which contribute to good buildings. It 
is an old saw that good construction 
is a mark of prosperity and of com- 
munity well-being. By the same token, 
poor construction indicates a lack of 
progressive development. 

It is sound public policy to guard 
against poor development for the good 
of the entire community. Adequate 
regulation of building construction is 
the best way by which a community 
can maintain high building standards. 
The Zoning Board of Adjustment, the 
Building Inspector and Board of Ex- 
aminers of Plumbers all function to- 
ward that end. 

. . . ZONING 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Harold E. Langley, Chairman 

John S. Corbett 

A. Cl IK ford Hudson 

Elwin L. Page 

Shelby O. Walker 

Mrs. Frances A. Richardson Clerks 

1948 Expenditure $133.29 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

There were twenty appeals heard by 
the Zoning Board of Adjustment dur- 
ing the year. This represented a de- 
crease of 13 over the previous year. 
Seventeen were for a variance from 
the terms of the ordinance and three 
were exceptions to the terms of the 
ordinance. Three of the appeals for a 
variance were denied, seven were 
granted, five were granted condition- 
ally, and one was withdrawn. 

On the remaining appeal no action 
was taken pending the outcome of the 
appeal to the Supreme Court on the 



St. Onge case. Two appeals for ex- 
ceptions were granted, and one was 
denied. 

. . . BUILDING 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Edward E. Beane Inspector oj Buildings 

Expenditures None 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Building permit issued during the 
year 1948 totaled 230 as compared to 
223 for the previous year. Of the 1948 
permits, 133 were for new construction 
and 97 were for alterations and repairs. 

The total estimated valuation for per- 
mits issued was $1,286,745.00, an in- 
crease of $446,483.00. This increase 
can be attributed in part to the Boston 
& Maine Railroad Boiler Room and 
Freight House, $102,350; 18 School 
Street, $100,000; New Hampshire Sav- 
ings Bank, $85,000; Newbury Store, 
$50,000. Of the total 1948 valuation, 
$572,055.00 represented new work, and 
$717-690.00 repairs and alterations. One 
hundred and twenty-one dwelling units 
were added during the year. Of these 
75 were new construction and 46 from 
conversion of existing buildings. 

. . . PLUMBING 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS 
OF PLUMBING 

Arthur W. Sargent, Chainnan 

George E. Young 

Edward E. Beane 

Edward E. Beane Pltimhing Inspector 

Expenditures None 

Receipts $38.00 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

One hundred and fifty-nine plumb- 
ing permits were issued in 1948, an in- 
crease of eight over the previous year. 
Two applicants for a journeyman's 
license and one for a master's license 
were examined during the year. Two 
applicants successfully passed the re- 
quired examinations, and one is still 
pending. 

Annual Report i i i 4^ 




Main Street ajter application of salt by Piihlic Works Department. 



PUBLIC 
WORKS 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Harry D. Challis 

Thomas R. Jennings 

Robert W. Potter 

William A. Stevens 

Nelson E. Strong 
Ervin E. Webber Commissioner 

Ervin E. Webber, Stipt. of Streets 

Ervin E. Webber, Tree Warden 

Edward E. Beane. City Engineer 

Edward L. Howland, Stipt. of Parks 
and Cemeteries 

1048 Operating Expenditure $463,117.00 

1948 Capital Expenditure :53,745.iq 

iiiiiiiiiiii-f 

Public works is a tlifficult term to 
define. In fact, the editors of the 
Webster dictionary don't even attempt 
to interpret "public works." Actually, 
public works means a lot of things. To 

4^1 i -f i City of Concord 



one person it may be snow removal, 
to another road repair is associated with 
the functions of this department and 
to still another public works means 
replacing the bulbs of street lights. 
Public works does mean all of these 
things and many more, too. Other 
functions of the department include re- 
placing the street sign on your corner, 
repairing fences, survey work, main- 
tenance of parks, and cemeteries, refuse 
and garbage collection, sewer mainten- 
ance and care of trees. 

Construction 

During the year, the department 
completed the filling of the canal in 
Penacook. This project was under- 
taken in an effort to eliminate an un- 
sanitary condition which prevailed in 
the Penacook business district. Addi- 
tional work in Penacook included the 
removal of clay holes on several differ- 
ent streets. 

The department was particularly 
active in its program of resurfacing and 



laying new sidewalks. A total of 
10,320 square yards of asphalt side- 
walks were laid and 3,360 feet of curb- 
ing was laid and reset during the year 
of 1948. 

Other items of construction included 
the rebuilding and repairing of nine 
culverts, the repair of seven bridges, 
fence repair and construction of many 
street signs. New catch basins were 
built as were many repaired. 

The department's stone-crusher was 
operated throughout the entire season. 
The materials processed by the stone- 
crusher were used on grading and re- 
surfacing streets and sidewalks. 

Streets rebuilt and surface-treated 
with tar during the year included Palm 
Street in its entirety and 1700 feet of 
new pavement on South Main Street, 
Penacook. The latter work was con- 
structed with Federal Aid under the 
supervision of the State Highway De- 
partment. Bridge Street was resurfaced 
from the Boston and Maine railroad 
bridge to its junction with North Main 
Street. In addition, one and one-tenth 
mile of Little Pond Road was rebuilt, 
being financed partially through the 
Town Road Aid program. The city's 
contribution toward this work was 
$2,979.51. 

Highway Maintenance 

rhe maintenance of paved streets 
and roads is one of the largest and 



most costly of the department's many 
activities. During the season, 171,264 
gallons of tar were used in maintaining 
tar-surfaced streets and roads. In the 
process of this work, the highway 
division used 1590 tons of cold patch 
material for road patching work. This 
represented an increase of 610,000 lbs. 
of cold patch as compared with the 
total used during the previous year. 

The department carries out a semi- 
annual street cleaning program. Dur- 
ing the fall, use of the sno-go for leaf 
removal continued to be very effective. 
The total cost of keeping Concord's 
streets clean amounted to $39,142.63. 

Street sweeping, culvert replacements, 
and gravel road maintenance constitute 
typical routine maintenance work un- 
dertaken when necessary. 

New Equipment 

During the year, a new street flusher 
was delivered to the department. Its 
capacity is 1,700 gallons. Other equip- 
ment added by the department in- 
cluded three new trucks, two load 
packers for refuse collection, a power 
shovel, a bulldozer and a cyclone rotary. 

Refuse and Garbage Service 

Department records show that refuse 
and garbage service was used to a 
greater degree than ever with a total of 
61,766 cubic yards of refuse collected 
during the year. This amount exceeded 




Street jlusher »ni/{es debitt. 



Annual Report i i i ^^ 




Public Workj Sno-Go helped remove 128,000 cubic yards of snoiv from City roads 

durnig 11)48. 



the total for 1947 by 6,727 cubic yards. 
Refuse was collected in the city proper, 
Penacook, West Concord, East Con- 
cord and Concord Heights. 

Table garbage was collected in the 
same areas by a private contractor at 
a total cost of $6,050.00 to the city. 
The garbage is used for feeding pur- 
poses at a commercial piggery operated 
outside of the city limits. 

Snow and Ice 

According to the United States 
Weather Bureau, the city experenced a 
65.2-inch snow fall during 1948. Frus- 
trated ski enthusiasts probably won't 
believe that this was 6.3 inches more 
than the total for the previous year. 
The department used trucks, graders, 
a rotary plow and a snow fighter with 
roto wings, together with sidewalk 
tractors to clear the city streets of snow. 

Over 128,000 cubic yards of snow 
were hauled away during 1948. In 
contrast, approximately 65,000 cubic 
yards of snow were trucked from the 
city streets in 1947. This large increase 
may be attributed in part to expansion 
of snow removal activities to cover a 
greater street area as well as to the in- 



creased snow fall experienced during 
the year 1948. 

Total cost to the City of Concord for 
plowing, sanding and snow removal 
operations amounted to $48,879.70 for 
1948. The total amount expended for 
the same operations during the previous 
year came to $45,519.19. 

Engineering 

The Engineering Department com- 
pleted the plans for reconstruction of 
Main Street, Penacook, and in conjunc- 
tion with the State Highway Depart- 
ment established the lines and grade 
for the construction of the project 
which was completed and accepted in 
September. As a part of this project, 
a large gravel bank in Boscawen was 
cross-sectioned in order to determine 
the necessary gravel fill together with 
sections and lines of the canal west of 
Main Street for parking. 

The highway division rebuilt a por- 
tion of the road around Long Pond. 
This involved new location and regrad- 
ing requiring more than 5000 feet of 
grade stakes and alignment. 

The Airport Commission extended 
the apron in front of the hangars and 



^6 -f i i City of Concord 



luiilt a new taxiway at the airport. 
The plans, totaling 9200 square yards 
of asphalt surface, were completed in 
the office of the City Engineer. All 
the necessary engineering, including su- 
pervision of the construction, was per- 
formed by the engineering department. 

In addition to this construction, the 
department set 7,660 feet of grade stakes 
for miscellaneous road work, 7,680 feet 
of curb and walk grades for sidewalk 
rebuilding. 

The entire length of Bouton Street 
was surveyed, sections run and plans 
made for submission to the Federal 
Government for the rebuilding of this 
street in conjunction with the through- 
pass. 

Other surveys involving all of the 
area between the Administration Build- 
ing and Airport Road at the Airport 
and the section of South Street from 
Clinton Street to the Bow line were 
made preparatory to rebuilding. 

A section of Blossom Hill Cemetery 
was laid out for the Temple Beth 
Jacob in addition to several lots in the 
cemetery proper. A number of lots 
were also laid out in Woodlown 
Cemetery. Cemetery plans were 
brought up to date during the year. 

There were 1,590 feet of grades set 
for the Sanitary Sewer Division. 

A total of 812 property transfers 
were recorded during the year and all 
necessary changes in lot lines were 
made, thus keeping the assessors plans 
up to date. All catch basins and house 
connections were recorded on the 
sewer plans, a total of 97 house con- 
nections being added. In addition, 
1,200 square yards of prints were de- 
veloped during the year. Maps of the 
city are available to the public at all 
times. 

Storm Sewers 

In view of the fact that Concord's 
storm sewers are of relatively recent 
construction, expenditures during 1948 
were, for the most part, limited to 



maintenance costs. As of December 
31, 1948, the city operated more than 
eight miles of storm sewers. 

Street Lighting 

At the close of the year, the city 
was operating a total of 1,631 street 
lights. Six new street lights were in- 
stalled during 1948. In a number of 
instances, lights were relocated to pro- 
vide more effective street illumination. 
The municipal street lighting system 
was operated at a cost of $41,060.41 for 
the year 1948. 

Sanitary Sewers 

The income derived from sewer 
rentals during 1948 was $37,214.17. Of 
this amount, general sewer rents ac- 
counted for $24,478.61, industrial rents 
$4,627.31, penalties $75.64, house con- 
nections, insurance and miscellaneous 
work $8,032.61. 

Operating costs for the year 
amounted to a total of $13,098.61. A 
total of $13,905.74 was applied to de- 
preciation leaving a net income for 
1948 of $4,067.94. 

The sanitary sewer account on 
December 31, 1948, showed current 
assets amounting to $59,406.14. This 
sum included $47,720.97 in cash, 
$7,944.98 in accounts receivable and 
$3,740.19 in materials and supplies. 
Total fixed assets after depreciation 
were carried on the books at 
$567,484.09. 

During the year, 2,490 feet of sewers 
were constructed by the division. The 
cost of this work ranged from $1.93 to 
$7.03 per foot. The longest single in- 
stallation performed by the division 
was at Conant Park where a total of 
680 feet of main was laid. In addition, 
15 manholes were built and 20 house 
connections were relaid. 

Parks and Trees 

Mr. Edward L. Howland was ap- 
pointed Superintendent of Parks and 
Cemeteries during the year 1948. The 



Annual Report i i i ^j 



new superintendent was an employee 
of the city at the time of his appoint- 
ment. 

The bleachers constructed during the 
previous year at Rollins Park were 
painted as were the bleachers for the 
ball field at White Park. 

In addition to general niaintenance 
of all city parks, both White and Rol- 
lins Parks were treated with fertilizer 
in an effort to further improve the 
grass. 

The Tree Division carried out its 
annual program of maintaining the 
city's shade trees. This activity in- 
cludes pruning, trimming and spraying, 
moth control and poison ivy eradi- 
cation. Several trees were removed 
because of a decayed condition. In 
addition to this work, 41 new trees 
were set out in various locations 
throughout the city. 



Cemeteries 

The Cemetery Divison operates an 
active and continuing program of ceme- 
tery beautification. As a part of this 



program, many paths and lots were 
regraded. Many of the paths were 
tarred. The chapel at Blossom Hill 
was repainted and an addition was 
built to the garage. Additional work 
included setting out 200 pine trees at 
Woodlawn Cemetery, fences were 
painted at Horse Hill and Millville as 
was the summer house at the latter 
cemetery. 

At Blossom Hill Cemetery, work 
was continued on the development of a 
new section for the use of Temple Beth 
Jacob. 



Other Activities 

The department continued to assist 
other departments in the performance 
of a wide variety of municipal activi- 
ties. Among the city agencies aided 
were the Public Library, the Water De- 
partment, the Planning Board, the 
Police Department and the Recreation 
Commission. The municipal airport 
received considerable assistance from 
the department in field maintenance 
work. 







T/ie Department of I'nhlic Works requires eijiitpment equal to all tasks 
/j.8 -f i i City of Comni d 



WATER SUPPLY 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF WATER 
COMMISSIONERS 

James W. Jameson, President 

Robert W. Brown 

Harry H. Dudley 

Allen M. Freeman 

Charles P. Johnson 

Donald Knowlton 

Gardner Tilton 

Hon. Chaj^les J. McKee 

Leonard W. Traeger 

G. Arthur Faneuf Superintendent 

1948 Expenditure $246,328.58 

1948 Receipts $254,871.70 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 



Water Rates Increased 

In common with many other munic- 
ipalities, the Board of Water Com- 
missioners was forced by the increased 
costs of labor and materials to con- 
sider an increase in water rates which 
had been in effect since 1904. An 
accounting firm was engaged to make 
a study of income in relation to de- 
partmental expenses. On the strength 
of this study and in anticipation of 
future needs of the department, the 
Board of Water Commissioners voted 
an approximate increase of 25 per cent 
in water rates, effective April i, 1949. 

Consumption 

The average daily amount of water 
consumed by the City of Concord was 
3,022,925 gallons, a decrease of 99,521 
gallons in comparison with the 1947 
figure. Average daily consumption per 
person was approximately 100 gallons. 

Total consumption of water for the 
year 1948 was 1,106,390,600 gallons 
which represented a decrease of 
33,302,078 gallons. Of the 1948 total. 
673,689,600 were pumped to supply the 
high service district, while 432,701,0011 
were supplied by gravity flow from 
Penacook Lake. In addition, 23,869,8 ^S 
gallons were pumped from the high 
service system to the extra-high service 






Interior of licit aiitumatu high serine pinupiiig smtioii iit I'eiuimok Luke. 



standpipe on Little Pond Road. Dur- 
ing the year, 12,591,000 gallons were 
supplied by pumping to the Penacook- 
Boscawen water precinct. 

Improvements and Equipment 

During the past year, the elevated 
water tank in East Concord was 
cleaned and painted. The tank was 
painted on both inside and outside. 
Water resistant paint was used for the 
interior and the exterior was painted 
with aluminum paint. In addition, the 
woven wire fences around the tank 
were painted. 

Four trucks, ranging from eight to 
fifteen years of age, were replaced by 
three Yz ton and a one ton pickup 
truck. The department also acquired 
a small five-ton bull-dozer. This piece 
of equipment is used principally for 
filling ditches and plowing snow. 



Owing to the compactness of the bull- 
dozer it can be readily transported by 
department trucks. 

Pumping System 

Delay in the delivery of certain ma- 
terials held up completion of construc- 
tion of the new automatic high service 
pumping station at Penacook Lake. 
Completion of the station is anticipated 
in 1949. West Concord and Penacook 
will be supplied by the new station. 

Because the new pumping station 
will increase pressure in the old type 
cement pipe line, it was necessary to 
replace this pipe. Nearly 1200 feet of 
16-inch cast iron pipe was laid from 
the station to North State Street. 

Finances 

Total receipts for 1948 amounted to 
$254,871.10. This sum represented an 



^o -f -f •/ City of Concord 



increase of $113,156.24 over the pre- 
vious year. A large part of this in- 
crease, $104,765.00, was transferred 
from the Investment Account to make 
possible long-needed construction. Of 
the total 1948 receipts, $132,684.76 
represented payments received from 
water sales. The department received 
$1,457.71 for services as billing and 
collecting agent for the Sanitary Sewer 
Department. 

Expenditures for the year totaled 
$246,328.58. Of this sum, $104,666.74 
were spent for general operations, 
$127,223.09 for capital expenditures, 
$13,000.00 for bond retirement and 
$1,438.75 for bond interest. The de- 
partment closed its books in December 
with a cash balance of $8,543.12. 

As of December 31, 1948, the Water 
Department Income-Investment Ac- 
count amounted to $10,593.08 on de- 
posit in local savings banks. Income 



from the account amounted to $2,025.83 
for 1948. 

The total fixed assets of the depart- 
ment represent an investment of 
$2,056,977.59. After deducting depre- 
ciation, the value of the water works 
was carried on the books at 
$1,330,016.21. 

Other Activities 

The continued high trend of new 
construction was partially reflected in 
the activities of the Water Department. 
During 1948, 87 new house connections 
were laid and loi new water meters 
were set. In addition, no services 
were relaid as a part of the yearly main- 
tenance program. 

The department continued and ex- 
panded its meter testing program. 
Plans call for the testing and repair of 
every one of the city's 4,686 meters at 
least once every five years. 




The Water Department's new ^-ton bull-dozer is used both for filling ditches 
and snotv removal. 



Annual Report i i i ^i 




Airline)- malics ready for direct flight to New Yorl^ City. 



MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 

iliiiiiiiiiii 

BOARD OF AIRPORT 
COMMISSIONERS 

Hon. Charles J. McKee, Chairman 

Robert W. Potter 

Charles A. Bartlett 

Donald J. McFarland 

John N. Engel 

Edward L. Lovejoy 

Charles C. Hoagland 

William F. Flynn Airport Manager 

1948 Operating Expenditure $12,318.38 

1948 Capital Expenditure 12,797.83 

1948 Earning 6,224.87 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

Flight activities during 1948 at Con- 
cord's municipally-owned airport in- 
dicated that the Concord port is de- 
veloping as the commercial and private 
flying hub of New Hampshire. 

^2 i i i City of Concord 



Although there was a leveling off in 
the number of veterans participating 
in flight training during 1948. many 
veterans continued to avail themselves 
of the opportunities extended to them 
under the provisions of the Ct. I. Bill of 
Rights. 

The Concord Municipal Airport con- 
tinued to rank high in popularity with 
transient pilots. This may be attributed 
largely to a combination of excellent 
port facilities and central location. 

Operating Policy 

Of the two city-owned hangars, the 
William E. Martin Flying Service con- 
tinued to use the larger one and Ferns 
Flying Service used the smaller hangar 
for flight operations. A large number 
of students were flying students at both 
of these schools during the past year. 
In addition to student-training, several 
sight-seeing and charter flights were 
flown. 



In cooperation with the City Engi- 
neer and the City Planning Board, 
plans and specifications were completed 
for an extension of the plane parking 
area and a taxi-way connecting the 
North-South runway with the South- 
erly section of the ramp. 

Airline Services 

Northeast Airlines added two direct 
flights between Concord and New York 
during the year 1948. These direct 
flights, via Worcester, are made in the 
morning and evening and were of con- 
siderable value to both businessmen and 
private passengers. 

In addition to this new service, 
Northeast Airlines continued to make 
four stops daily at Concord during the 
summer months on its international 
route between New York and Mont- 
real. During the year, 2,000 outgoing 
passengers were cleared from the Con- 
cord terminal and approximately 2,200 
incoming passengers. These figures 
represent an increase in passenger 
clearance and may be attributed to the 
direct Concord-New York flights. 



Substantial increases in express, mail 
and freight were noted during 1948. 
The airline handled 4,000 pounds of 
outgoing express and 5,000 pounds of 
incoming express. The latter figure 
represented an increase of 3,800 pounds 
as compared with the previous year. 
In addition, 3,600 pounds of airmail 
were dispatched and 5,000 pounds were 
received. Several hundred pounds of 
air freight were also handled. 

Civil Aeronautics Agencies 

The Aviation Safety District Office 
continued to operate from the Concord 
Municipal Airport. The Concord 
office serves both Vermont and New 
Hampshire. In order to give the avia- 
tion public better service and to pro- 
mote aviation safety, another district 
office was opened in Portland, Maine, 
during November covering the Maine 
territory. Pilot certificates for New 
Hampshire and Vermont are still 
handled through the Concord office. 
The C.A.A. also operated and main- 
tained two-way radio, teletype, inter- 
phone and radio range services. Addi- 




Omni directional laiigc finder building. 

Annual Report ^ < f 55 



tional VHF (very high frequency) 
channels for air-ground operation were 
installed and commissioned during 
1948. The new Omni Directional 
Range was commissioned on a shake- 
down basis this past year and is now 
in full time operation. Official com- 
missioning of this equipment will be 
made in the near future. Because 
of the increasing amounts of new 
and varied radio equipment installed 
for the airport's use, the person- 
nel maintenance staff of the Radio 
Navigational Aids has been increased. 
The lighting panel was removed from 
the tower and re-installed in the Com- 
munications Station for 24-hour oper- 
ation. In connection with the lighting 
panel, wind velocity and direction in- 
dicators were also installed to provide 
better service to pilots using the Con- 
cord Airport. 



During the year the New Hampshire 
State Aeronautics Commission moved 
from their quarters in the State House 
Annex and will carry on its work in 
a lirst floor office of the administration 
building at the Concord port. 



Weather Bureau 

From headquarters located in the ad- 
ministration building, the U. S. Weath- 
er Bureau continued round-the-clock 
weather forecast service. In addition 
to providing up-to-the-minute weather 
information for flight purposes, the 
bureau broadcasts weather reports three 
times daily over a direct-wire radio 
hookup from its offices. Teletype serv- 
ice provides instant communication 
with other important weather stations 
in New England. 




Closc-iip oj iicif unuii directional radio equipment. 
5/^ i i i City of Concord 



i ' ' ! 




L/rinjAUfiAX^ 




Public school students welcome holidav season. 



PUBLIC 
SCHOOLS 

iiiiiiiiiiiii 

ROAJ^D OF EDUCATION 

Franklin Hollis, President 

Chari.fs F. Cook 

Della I. Lewis 

A. Harold MacNeil 

Mildred K. Perkins 

Donald W. Saltmarsh 

C. Murray Sawyer 

Osmond R. Strong 

Joan M. Whittaker 

Harlan E. Atherton Superintendent 

Dexter O. Arnold Assistant Superintendent 
Cost of Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1948: 
$564,600.21. 



. . . CONCORD 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Buildings and Equipment 

The "Three R's" are much easier to 
master if classrooms are properly 
illuminated and painted in colors which 
reduce eye-strain. This is one of the 



reasons why the Concord Union School 
District is actively engaged in equip- 
ping classrooms with fluorescent light- 
ing. Several rooms were relighted 
during the past summer. In addition, 
a number of classrooms were repainted 
in colors designed to create a pleasant 
atmosphere, as well as to be "easier on 
the eyes." This is a continuing pro- 
gram being effected in schools through- 
out the city as funds permit. 

The school plant consists of 13 build- 
ings. Of this number, there is a senior 
high school, a junior high school and 
annex, an industrial arts school and 
nine elementary schools. During the 
past year the only major construction 
took place at the Conant School where 
increased enrollments required a new 
kindergarten room. This change was 
accomplished by rebuilding the audi- 
torium and using the old kindergarten 
for a classroom. 

Ceiling repairs and replacement of 
plumbing facilities in several buildings 
was accomplished during the past sum- 
mer. A number of pupils' desks, old 



. In /in ill Report -f -f -f ^^ 




A bright moment at the Teachers' Wor\shop. 



and worn, were replaced with the more 
modern, moveable type. 

Transportation 

Two new buses were purchased as 
part of the program toward complete 
School District ownership of transporta- 
tion et]uipment. Experience has shown 
considerable saving in school transpor- 
tation costs through this procedure. 
Additional factors upon which the 
school authorities look with favor are 
the ability to utilize buses when and 
where needed and the improved control 
over pupils being transported. 

Pupils 

Enrollments in public schools showed 
an increase of eighty-two over those for 
the corresponding period last year. As 
of December 1948 there were 748 en- 
rolled at the Senior High School, 675 
at the Junior High and Annex, 1392 
in the elementary schools, 279 in kin- 
dergartens, and 86 in special classes. 
The total was 3180. 

Registrations will probably continue 
to rise and reach a peak following the 
school year 1951-52 when the impact 



of the heavy birthrate of 1947 will be 
felt. Further studies of school areas are 
being made to determine possibilities of 
meeting this wave of pupils with a 
minimum of expense to taxpayers. 

Changes in school boundaries for 
sixth grade pupils absorbed an over- 
load on the Kimball School. This pro- 
cess makes makes possible a maximum 
utilization of school plants. 



Other Activities 

The driver-training course has proved 
popular and effective and has been con- 
tinued. 

Through the cooperation of the Pub- 
lic Library, branches of the children's 
department have been installed in the 
elementary schools. Tliis adds consid- 
erably to the choice of supplementary 
materials. 

Over 1500 parents visited Concord 
schools during American Education 
Week. The goal of bringing the 
people was attained in a most succes- 
ful manner. 

The cafeteria department has contin- 
ued to provide hot lunches at low cost 



56 y < y City of Concord 



to all pupils in all schools. Menus 
are now published weekly as an aid to 
parents. 

It is planned to add a distributive 
education course to the high school 
curriculum as soon as satisfactory ar- 
rangements can be made. 

The school health program has been 
augmented by the addition of another 
nurse. Vision and hearing tests are 
being used extensively to locate defects, 
reports of which are made to the par- 
ents. Physical examinations are now 
given to all new pupils either through 
a pre-school clinic or upon entrance, 
and to all fourth, sixth, eighth, and 
eleventh grade pupils. The VoUmer 
Patch Test for Tuberculosis is given in 
the twelfth grade. 

Staff 

A total of 151 teachers and super- 
visors carried out the instructional pro- 
gram in Concord schools during 1948. 
These include a teacher of lip-reading 
and a teacher of physically handicapped 
children, both of whom are part-time 
teachers. 

The position of elementary school 
supervisor was abolished and the posi- 
tion of assistant superintendent was 



created to aid in the general adminis- 
tration and supervision of the school 
system. 

The school staff cooperated in con- 
ducting two elementary and secondary 
workshops. The secondary school 
teachers and administration explored 
the possibilities of secondary school 
reorganization while their elementary 
school counterparts studied health and 
physical education for their teaching 
level. State education officials and 
members of the University of New 
Hampshire faculty assisted in the work- 
shops. Enlightening reports which will 
eventually result in a richer educational 
program were outcomes of the experi- 
ment. 

Finances 

Total disbursements for the school 
year 1947-48 were $564,600.21. This 
included the Conant School improve- 
ments and new equipment, but not 
bonded indebtedness and interest. 

The Conant School bonds were re- 
tired in September and the only remain- 
ing indebtedness is for the Senior High 
School building. The latter bonds are 
being retired at the rate of $14,000 per 
year plus interest. The total outstand- 
ing indebtedness remaining is $238,000. 




Musicians of tomorrow rehearse for special program. 

Annual Report -f -f -f ^"J 



., ... f" ft arm tmt ^v ^ 



n 




Concord school children enjoy good food in school cafeterias. 



. . . PENACOOK 
SCHOOL DISTRICT 



BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Edward York, Chairman 

Claire V. Breckell 

John G. Dolkas 

Russell Eckloef 

Donald Perettie 

Beatrice E. Pettes 

Frhd W. Snell Superintendent 

Cost ot Operation: 

For the Fiscal Year Kndinji June 30, 1948: 
$73,327.09. 

iliiiiiiiiiii 
Finances 

The cost of operations for the year 
ending June 30, 1948 totaled $73,327.09. 
an increase of $14,223.18 over the 
total for the previous fiscal year. A 
$2,000.00 payment on the district's 
bonded debt reduced the amount out- 
standing to $20!000.00. 

Total receipts amounted to 
$73,414.99. of which $45,791.31 repre- 
sented income from taxation. Receipts 
from other sources totaled $27,623.68. 
Of this sum, the two principal sources 
of income were high school tuitions 



and state aid. The amount of state 
aid received totaled $10,936.23. Income 
from high school tuitions amounted 
to $8,944.32. The school district tax 
was $24.10 per $1,000.00 of assessed 
valuation as compared to $23.17 for 
the preceding year. 

Tax Rates 

A comparison of the costs of educa- 
tion in the Concord Union School Dis- 
trict and the Penacook Union School 
Dictrict revealed that the equalized 
valuation per pupil of average daily 
membership amounts to $14,528.00 in 
the city, while the valuation behind 
each pupil in the Penacook Union 
School District is $9,742.00. 

In fact, the per pupil costs for the 
two districts compared very favorably 
indicating that Penacook is actually 
spending less money than is Concord 
when the extra wealth behind each 
pupil in Concord is taken into consid- 
eration. 

Improvements 

A considerable number of improve- 
ments to Penacook schools were accom- 



5(V i i i City of Concord 



plished during the past year. At the 
Charles Street School a new power oil 
burner was installed as was a lavatory 
with hot and cold water service. The 
Summer Street School was brightened 
up appreciably by painting the outside 
trim and by reconditioning some of 
the classrooms. Repairs at the High 
School included painting, adding new 
screens and recementing of the front 
steps. 

In the interests of economy all school 
buildings were insulated. As an added 
measure, the windows and doors at the 
Summer Street School and at the High 
School were caulked. This work should 
result in lower fuel costs within a few 
years. 

Teaching Staff 

The Penacook School District oper- 
ated with a staff of 20 teachers during 
the past school year. This represented 
an increase of one teacher as compared 
with the total for the previous school 
year. Of the teaching staff, nine were 
employed at the High School, five at 
the Summer Street School, five at tht 
Charles Street School and one super 
vised music in all schools. 

Most people recognize the fact thai 
"the teacher is the school." If tlu 
pupils of the district are to benefit in 
the way of added educational op 
portunities. it is imperative that at- 
tractive working conditions should Ix 
encouraged and established. 

Membership 

Enrollment at Penacook schools dui 
ing the past year was equally divided 
between boys and girls. Of a total 
registration of 442 pupils, 221 were 
boys and 221 were girls. In fact- the 
total number of pupils registered re- 
presented an increase of 66 over the 
previous year. 

The average daily membership of 
the student body of the district was 401. 



Extra-ctiyyictdar actirities play a vital role in 
the det'elopment of students. 



This number represented an increase 
of 53 students in the average daily 
membership, as compared with 348 for 
the previous year. 

Operation Vittles 

It takes a lot of planning and quanti- 
ties of food to serve more than 16,000 
lunches to Penacook school children 
during a period of six months, but 
thanks to a considerable amount of co- 
operation this major fete was accom- 
plished under the school lunch pro- 
gram. 

Some of the factors contributing to 
this highly successful undertaking in- 
cluded many hours freely given by the 
P.T.A. to aid in the canning project 
as well as financial assistance, the loan 
of a garden plot which was operated by 
volunteer labor, teacher cooperation and 
competent kitchen assistants. 







APPENDIX 



PAGE 

General Fund — Balance Sheet 6i 

General Fund — State of Appropriations and Expenditures 62 

General Fund — Statement of Estimated and Actual Revenues 65 

Bonded Indebtedness of the City 66 

General Fund — Statement of Unappropriated Surplus 67 

Bond Funds — Analysis of Change in Net Debt 67 

Bond Funds — Comparative Balance Sheets 68 

Bond Funds - — Summary of Debt Service Charges Until Maturity 68 

Bond Funds — New Bond Issues 69 

Trust Funds — Balance Sheet 70 

Trust Funds — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 71 

Trust Funds — Schedule of Permanent Fund Securities 71 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Balance Sheet 72 

Dept. of Public Works — Sanitary Sewers — Statement of Operations 73 

Water Department — Balance Sheet 74 

Water Department — Income -Investment Account 74 

Water Department - — Statement of Operations 75 

Water Department — Cash Receipts and Disbursements 75 

Assessors' Statement for 1948 7^ 

City Relief Dept. — General Classification of Relief Expenditures 77 

Parking Meter Fund 7^ 

Department of Public Works — Summary of Expenditures 79 

Department of Public Works — Statement of Appropriations, Transfers, Ex- 
penditures and Unexpended Balances 80 

Municipal Court — Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 80 

Comparative Table of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valu- 
ations, Tax Levies and Rates 80 

Comparative Table of Budget Appropriations 81 

Reconciliation of Tax Levies, 1939-1948 82 



GENERAL FUND 

CoMPARATivi-; Balancf Sheet — Ge.nkral Fund 

As AT DecEMBEK 31, 1948 AND 1 94 7 

ASSETS 



Cash on Hand and In Banl^s 

City Treasurer 

Tax Collector 

City Clerk 



Reimbursements Receivable 
State of New Hampshire 
Merrimack County Relief 
Public Works Department 
Other Municipalities 



Total 

Less: Reserve for Uncollectible Accounts 



Net 







Increase 


1948 


1947 


or 
Decrease* 


$227,833.92 
678.16 
507.62 


118(1,134.31 

4,848.69 

717-35 


$47,699.61 

4,170.53' 

209-73' 


$220,019.70 


$185,700.35 


$43,319-35 


$1,090.86 
5,017.39 

2,537-29 
14.20 


$3,481-85 


$1,090.86 
1,535-54 
2,537-29 


14.20 



$8,659.74 

1,123.70 

$7,536.04 



$3,496.05 

1,123.70 

^2,372-35 



5,163.69 



$5,163.69 



Taxes Receivable 

Prior Years 

Current Year . 



Total 

Less: Reserve for Uncollectible Accounts 



Net 



Unredeemed Taxes Botig/it by City Per Tax 
Sale 

Property Acquired by City from Tax Collec- 
tor's Deeds — Equity 

Total Assets 



$28,186.01 
152,530.55 

16180,716.56 
47,433-61 

$133,282.95 



$2,659.44 



5,975-48 
,473-61 



$25,645-61 
123,869.82 

5149,515-43 
37,241-93 

5112,273.50 



,563-53 



,320.C 



;ii,230.7i 



$2,540.40 
28,660.73 



$31 

10, 


,201.13 
,191.68 


$21 


,009.45 


$3 


,904-09' 


$345-50' 


$65. 


,242.90 





LIABILITIES 



Unexpended Appropriations 

Union School District 

Union School District Bond Interest 
Penacook School District 

Total Schools 

Public Library 

Douglas Avenue Extension 



Total Unexpended Appropriations 

Due State of New Hampshire 

Old Age Assistance for December 

Poll Taxes Collected in 1947 and 1948 

(3-00) 

Unappropriated Surplus 

Total Liabilities 



$256,700.82 

5,057.50 

18,659.35 

$280,417.67 

11,498.25 

668.04 



$3,230.72 

126.00 

$80,532.93 

'376,473-61 



H97>23i-45 
5,522.85 

15,950-90 

{218,705.20 

19,476.66 

668.04 



.$292,583.96 $238,849.90 



$2,971.16 

2,208.00 
567,201.65 

!i 1,230.71 



$59,469.37 

465.35* 
2,708.45 

$61,712.47 
7,978.41* 



5,734.06 



$259-56 

2,082.00* 
{13,331.28 

565,242.90 



Annual Report i i i 61 










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GENERAL FUND 

Statemf.nt of Unappropriated Surplus 
As AT December 31, 1948 

Balance, January i, 1948 

Deduct: 

Surplus used in 1948 for Reduction of tax rate 

Adjusted Balance January i, 1948 

Additions: 

Unexpended Balance of 1948 Appropriation $34,280.04 

Excess of Actual Revenue over Estimated 31,674.62 

Excess Reserve for Uncollected Taxes — Prior Years 1,200.70 

Reduction in Reserves 890.37 

Miscellaneous .58 

DedttctiotJs: 

Increase in Reserves $230.47 

Due State of New Hampshire Old Age Assistance: 

Due December 31, 1948 $3,230.72 

Due December 31, 1947 2,971.16 259.56 

Balance December 31, 1948 '. 



$67,201.65 

54,225.00 

$12,976.65 



58,046.31 
$1,022.96 



490.03 



30,532-93 



BOND FUNDS 

Analysis of Change in Consolidated Net Debt 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1948 

Net Debt — December 31, 1947 

Additions: 

New Bonds issued; 

Signal System $230,000.00 

Equipment and Improvement 200,000.00 

Surplus used in reduction of tax rate for 1948 

Increase in Reserves 

Old Age Assistance: 

Due December 51, 1948 $3,230.72 

Due December 31, 1947 2,971.16 



Total 



,098.35 



430,000.00 

54,225.00 

230.47 



259.56 
50,813.38 



Deductions: 

Bonds Retired in 1Q48 — Municipal 
Bonds Retired in 1948 — School 



131,300.00 
19,000.00 



Total 

Bonds Retired 



■ Water Department 



1150,300.00 
13,000.00 



Total Bonds Retired 
Appropriations Unexpended 
Excess of Receipts o\ei Estimated Revenue 
Excess Reserve for Uncollected Tax Prior Year 
Reduction in Reserve 
Miscellaneous 



Total Deductions 

Net Debt — December 31, 1948 



$63,300.00 

34,280.04 

31,674.62 

1,200.70 

890.37 

.58 

$131,346.31 

$729,467.07 



Annual Report -f -f i 6y 



BOND FUNDS 

Comparative Balance Sheet 
As AT December 31, 1948 and 1947 



ASSETS 



Cash — Bond and Coupon Accotinl $3,127.50 

Bonded Debt 810,000.00 

Total Assets $81 3,1 27.50 



1947 

$203.75 
443,300.00 



.50375 



Increase or 
Decrease* 

$2,923.75 
366,700.00 



.623.75 



LIABILITIES 
Serial Bonds: 

Central Fire Station $6,000.00 

Public Improvement 6,000.00 
Sewers 85,000.00 


$7,000.00 
12,000.00 
99,000.00 
257,000.00 
40,000.00 
21,000.00 


$1,000.00" 

6,000.00" 

14,000.00" 


Union School District 238,000.00 
Water Department 27,000.00 
Municipal Airport .. 18,000.00 

Signal System 230,000.00 

Equipment and Im]iro\ement 200,000.00 


19,000.00" 

13,000.00" 

3,000.00" 

230,000.00 

200,000.00 




3,300.00 
4,000.00 


3,300.00" 
4,000.00" 








Total Bonded Debt $810,000.00 


$443,300.00 


$366,700.00 


Bond Coupons not Presented for Payment at Decem- 
ber 31, 1948 and 1947 $3,127.50 


$203.75 


$2,923.75 


Total Liabilities $813,127.50 


$443,503.75 


$369,623.75 



BOND FUNDS 

Summai'.y 01 Debt Service Charges Until Maturity 
As AT December 31, 1948 

Fiscal Period Principal Interest Total 

Municipal 1949-58 $545,000.00 $30,470.00 $575,470.00 

School 1949-65 238,000.00 91,035.00 329,035.00 

Water 1949-51 27,000.00 1,721.25 28,721.25 

Total $810,000.00 $123,226.25 $933,226.25 



68 -f i i City of Concord 



BOND FUNDS 

Nhw Bond Issues 

Eqitipnicnt and Impiot enient Bonds 

Bond Issued $200,000.00 

Premium 92.00 

Total $200,092.00 

Expenditures: 

Main Street, Penacook $24,217.25 

Airport — Tarring 2,586.08 

New Equipment: 

Power Sliovel $i 1,350.00 

Bulldozer 8,850.00 

Sno-Go 7>995-oo 

Flusher and Fire Fighter Combination 4,776.00 

1 GMC Dump Truck 5,025.00 

2 Load Packers 16,528.00 

Combination Ambulance and Patrol Wagon 3,825.00 

Fire Department Equipment 478.00 

1 GMC Chassis 4,960.00 

2 Mack Chassis 10,000.00 73,787.00 

Expense of Bond Issue 868.73 

Transfer to Federal .'Mrport Project 8,250.00 

Loaned to Federal Airport Project i5!874-52* 

Total $125,583.68 

Cash Balance December 31, 1948 $74,508.32 

* This amount was repaid February 15, i949) $16,083.01. 

Federal Airport Project 
Receipts 

Transfer from Equipment and Improvement Account $8,250.00 

Borrowed from Bond Account 15,874.52 

State of New Hampshire 8,04 1 .5 1 

Total $32,166.03 

Expenditures 

Taxiway and Apron $32,1 66.03 



The Federal Government reimbursed the bond account for Vi of the cost of the project. 

Signal System Bonds 

Proceeds of Issue $230,000.00 

Premium 105.80 



Total $230,105.80 

Expenditures 

Payments on Contract $1 80,000.00 

Expense of Bond Issue 172.24 



fi8o,i72.24 



Cash Balance December 31, 1948 $49,933.56 



Annual Report -f i -f 6^ 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet 
As AT December 31, 1948 

ASSETS 

Cemetery Library Other Total 
Cash (Unexpended Income) 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $1,573.66 $ $207.14 $1,780.80 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 18,176.13 285.49 18,461.62 

N. H. Savings Bank 1,106.23 1,106.23 

Union Trust Company 894.28 894.28 



Total Cash $21,750.3:0 % $492.63 $22,242.93 



Permanent Funds 

Savings Bank Deposits: 

Loan and Trust Savings Bank $83,092.04 $4,631.46 $450.48 $88,173.98 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 68,818.82 7,247.10 2,511.25 78,577.17 

N. H. Savings Bank 87,023.44 6,886.49 1,200.00 95,109.93 

Union Trust Company 78,496.25 8,758.37 1,000.00 88,254.62 



Total $317,430.55 $27,523.42 $5,161.73 $350,115.70 

Investments 82,400.00 95,120.00 177,520.00 



Total Permanent Funds $399,830.55 $122,643.42 $5,161.73 $527,635.70 



LIABILITIES AND PRINCIPAL 



Unexpended Income $21,750.30 $ $492.63 $22,242.93 



Permanent Fundi Principe 
Balance, January i, 19^ 
Additions: 
New Trusts 


|H 


■■ 1390-579-94 

.. . 8,062.50 


$124,026.12 


$5, 


161.73 


$519,767.79 

8,062.50 
961.66 
200.00 


Sale of Lots 






961.66 










Fu 

IS 

19. 


nd 


200.00 

26.45 

$399,830.55 








Seth K. Jones 








26.45 










$124,026.12 


$5, 


161.73 


$529,018.40 


Deductions: 


1 


$1,149.24 
233-46 


$ 




$1,149.24 
233.46 




















$ 


$1,382.70 


$ 




$1,382.70 




)8 








Balance December 31, 


$399,830.55 


$122,643.42 


$5, 


161.73 


$527,635.70 



JO i i i City of Concord 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 
For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 194 



Cash Balance of Unexpended Incoi 
January i, 1948 


mc 


Cemetery 

$18,112.97 


Library 

$ 




Other 

$428.00 


Total 

$18,540.97 






Receipts 

Interest and Dividends: 

Cemetery 


$10,006.09 


$ 


$. 




$10,006.09 






$13,616.65 




13,616.65 


Parks and Playground Trust 

Other 


of 




64.63 
75.00 


64.63 






75.00 


One third Receipts from Sale 
Lots 


961.67 




961.67 










Total 


$10,967.76 


$13,616.65 




$139.63 


$24,724.04 


Total Receipts and Balance 


$29,080.73 


$13,616.65 




$567.63 


$43,265.01 


Disbursements 

Cemeteries 


$6,846.62 


$ 


$. 




$6,846.62 

13,616.65 

75-00 

26.45 

457-36 


Library Trusts 




13,616.65 




Other 




75.00 


Transferred to Principal 

Direct Payment : 




26.45 
457-36 

$7>330-43 










me 






Total 


$13,616.65 




$75.00 


$21, .022. 08 


Cash Balance of Unexpended Incoi 
December 31, 1948 


$21,750.30 


$ 




$492.63 


$22,242.93 





TRUST FUNDS 

Schedule ok Permanent Find Securities 

As AT December 31, 1948 

Cemetery Library Other Total 

U. S. Treasury Bonds $82,400.00 $80,000.00 $ $162,400.00 

I sh. Great Northern R. R. Pref 100.00 100.00 

1 sh. Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 

R. R. Pref 100.00 100.00 

2 sh. Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe 

R. R. Common 200.00 ^. 200.00 

I sh. Northern Railroad of N. H 100.00 100.00 

I sh. Chicago, Burlington and Quincy 

R. R 100.00 100.00 

6 sh. Boston and Maine R. R. ist 

Pref 100.00 500.00 600.00 

12 sh. Concord Gas Co. Common 1,020.00 1,020.00 

50 sh. Manufacturers Trust Co 2,537.50 2,537.50 

50 sh. Phoenix Mutual Insurance Co. 4,025.00 4,025.00 

50 sh. N. H. Fire Insurance Co 2,187.50 2,187.50 

50 sh. Central Hanover Bank and 

Trust Co 4,850.00 4,850.00 



Total $83,100.00 $95,120.00 $ $178,220.00 



Annual Report i i i "ji 



PUBLIC WORKS — SANITARY SEWERS DIVISION 

Co.MPARAiivH Balance Shekt 
As AT December 31, 1948 and 1947 



ASSETS 



Current Assets 

Cash in Bank 

Accounts Receivable $9,951.5^ 

Less: Reserve for Uncollected 

Accounts 3,000.00 

Accounts Receivable (Net) 

Accounts Miscellaneous 

Materials and Supplies 







Increase or 


194^ 


1947 


Decrease* 


.720.97 


$39,363-74 


$8,357-23 



Total Current Assets 



Fixed Assets 

Mains 

Manholes 

Customers' Connections 

Main Sewer Land and Rights of Way 
General Equipment 



Total 

Less: Depreciation Reserve .. 

Net Depreciated Value 

Total Assets 



6,951-53 

993-45 
3.740-19 


6,991.67 
870.10 

3,651.12 


40.14* 

123-35 
89.07 


$59,406.14 


$50,876.63 


$8,529.51 


$892,368.73 

97.344-31 
121,226.63 

199-97 
1,248.95 


$884,038.43 
94.145-55 

116,663.67 

99-97 

1,040.08 


$8,330.30 

3,198-76 

4,562.96 

100.00 

208.87 


51,112,388.59 s 
544.904-50 


ji, 095, 987. 70 
531,792-30 


$16,400.89 
13,112.20 


$567,484.09 


$564,195.40 


$3,288.69 


$626,890.23 


$615,072.03 


$11,818.20 



LL^BILITIES, CAPITAL AND SURPLUS 

Current Liabilities 

Accounts Payable $ $55-50 

Capital 

Contributions in Aid of Construction $128,494.39 $120,116.23 

Contribution from City 480,323.45 480,323.45 

$608,817.84 $600,439.68 

Stirplus 

Balance, January i, 1948 and 1947 $14,576.85 $14,354.66 

Deduct: Reserve for Uncollected Accounts 572-40 i,937-95 

$14,004.45 $12,416.71 

Net Profit 4,067.94 2,160.14 

$18,072.39 $14,576.85 

Total Liabilities. Capital and Surplus $626,890.23 $615,072.03 



$55-50* 



,378.16 



^,378.16 



$222.19 
1.365-55* 

$1,587-74 
1,907.80 

$3,495-54 
III, 818.20 



12 i i i City of Concoid 



PUBLIC WORKS — SANITARY SEWERS DIVISION 

Comparative Statement of Operations 
For the Years Ended December 31, 1948 and 1947 

Increase or 

I Q48 1 947 Decrease* 
Operating Rereniic 

Sewer Rentals, CJeneral $24,831.07 $24,817.78 $13-29 

Sewer Rentals, Industrial 4,798.10 4,622.67 175-43 

Penalties and Discounts Forfeited 75-64 56.10 19-54 

Insurance and Miscellaneous 1,367.48 192.00 1,175.48 



51,072.29 $29,688.55 $1,383.74 



Operating Expenses 

Superintendence and Kngineerin.u 

Main and Manhole Labor and Expense . 
House Connections Labor and Expense .... 
Maintenance of Sewer Mains — Repairs 

Maintenance of Manholes — Repairs 

Maintenance of House Connections 

Maintenance of General Equipment 



$3,723-34 


$4,284 15 


$560.81* 


1,813.39 


1,459.06 


354-33 


507.94 


335-51 


172.43 


710.78 


171.00 


539-78 


429.24 


398.71 


30.53 


35.61 


166.18 


130.57* 




433-i8 


433-18* 



,220.30 $7,247.79 $27-49* 



Customers Expense {Water Department) 

Meter Reading and Collecting $330-34 $354-i9 $23-85* 

Billing and Accounting 1,130.29 1,081.20 49.09 



$1,460.63 $1,435-39 $25.24 



General Adm inistrative 

Office Salaries and Outside Help $501.68 $669.65 $167.97* 

Legal and Accounting 570.00 846.00 276.00* 

Office Supplies 29.00 29.00 

Insurance Compensation and Fire 282.11 158.68 123.43 

Miscellaneous 1 28.74 1 28.74 



^1,511.53 $1,674.33 $162.80* 



Employees Accounts 

Annual Leave Payroll ... 

Sick Leave Payroll 

Holiday Payroll 

Retirement Fund Costs 



$556.49 
39-32 

1,221.63 


$592.56 
859-55 
587-47 


$36.07^ 
820.23 

634.16 


754.22 


913-54 


159.32 



$2,571.66 $2,953.12 $381.46* 



Other Expenses 

Damages Repaired $334-59 $ $334-49 

Uncollectible Accounts 562.05 562.05* 

Inventory Adjustment 53-17* 53-17 



$334.49 $508.88 $174-39* 



Total Expenses $13,098.61 $13,819.51 $720.90* 



Net Income Before Depreciation $17,973.68 $15,869.04 $2,104.64 

Depreciation 13-905-74 13-708.90 196.84 

Net Income $4,067.94 $2,160.14 $1,907.80 



Annual Report -f -f -f JS 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Comparative Balance Sheet 

As AT December 51, 1948 and 1947 

ASSETS 



fixed Assets 

Water and Flowage Rights 

Engineering and Superintendence Construction Cost 

Land 

Structures 

Equipment 

Distribution System 

Other Equipment 

Unfinishcti Construction 



Total Fixed Assets 

Current Assets 

Cash on Hand and in Bank 

Accounts Receivable 

Material and Supplies 



Total Current Assets 



Other Assets 

Savings Deposits 
Government Bonds 



Total Other Assets 
Total Assets 



$167,663.11 

8,780.73 

132,436.35 

2i7'957-34 
28,066.57 

679,016.36 
38,845-84 
57>249-9i 



*8,543-i2 

272.37 

59,069.32 

$67,884.81 



$10,593.08 



1)1,400,494.10 



'947 

$167,663.11 

65,914.51 

132,436.35 

200,039.70 

28,489.50 

645,832.27 

27,037.66 

25,044.39 



61,330,016.21 $1,292,457.49 



$9,793-17 

307.22 

18,252.89 



ti28,353-2f 



t'58,332.25 
55,000.00 



$10,593.08 $113,332.25 



1)1,434,143.02 



LIABILITIES 



Capital Liahilities 

Municipal Investment 

Funded Debt 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Total Capital Liabilities 



Current Liahilities 

Interest Coupons Payable 

Surplus 



194.74 
27,000.00 
65,040.08 



$963,194.74 
40,000.00 
62,777.58 



61,055,234.82 $1,065,972.32 



Total Liabilities $1 ,408,494. i o 



6146.00 



$353,259-28 $368,024.70 



(11,434,143.02 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Statement of In\estmems and Income 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1948 



Loan and Trust Savings Bank 

Merrimack County Savings Bank 

New Hampshire Savings Bank 

Union Trust Company 

U. S. Treasurv Bonds 







Transfers to 




Balance 




Operating 


Balance 


111/48 


Income 


Account 


12/31/48 


.13,129.38 


$286.20 


$11,000.00 


$2,415.58 


18,685.92 


196.33 


15,846.91 


3,035-34 


13,274-99 


179-77 


11,000.00 


2,454.76 


13,241.96 


210.44 


10,765.00 


2,687.40 


55.000.00 


1,153.09 


56,153.09 





Totals $113,332.25 $2,025.83 $104,765.00 $10,593.08 



y^ i i -f City of Concoid 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Comparative Statement of Operations 
For the Fiscal Years Ended December 31, 1948 and 1947 

Increase or 

1948 1947 Decrease* 
Water Sales 

Commercial — Flat Rate $^,340.07 $3,445.08 $105.01* 

Commercial — Metered 107,925.74 104,607.06 3,318.68 

Industrial — Metered 21,258.95 21,819.49 560.54* 

Miscellaneous Water Revenue 160.00 853.82 693.82* 

Total Ojierating Revenue $132,684.76 $130,725.45 $1,959.31 

Operating Expenses 

Water Supply Expense $32,697.08 $26,550.79 $6,146.29 

Distribution 45,350.46 29,923.99 1 5,426.47 

Other Operating Expenses 21,377.24 15,192.94 6,184.30 

Total Operating Expenses $99,424.78 $71,667.72 

$33-259-98 $59.057-73 
Fixed Capital Charges 

Depreciation $27,222.24 $23,572.18 

Taxes 24.36 19.10 

Total Fixed Capital Charges $27,246.60 $23,591.28 

$6,013.38 $35,466.45 
Funded Debt Charges 

Interest Paid 1,438.75 2,101.25 

$4,574.63 $33.365.20 
Other Income 

Interest $2,025.83 $2,530.19 504.36* 

Non Operating Revenue 554-86 1,119.51 564.65* 

Gain on Sale of Fixed Assets 1,698.02 1,295.60 402.42 

$4.278.71 $4,945.30 $666.59* 

Net Profit $8,853.34 $38,310.50 $29,457.16* 



$27,757.06 


$25,797.75* 


$3,650.06 

5.26 


$3,655-32 


$29,453.07* 

662.50* 


$28,790.57* 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Statement of Cash Receipts and Disbursements 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1948 

Balance January i, 1948 $9>793-i7 

Receipts 

Water $132,589.61 

Transferred from Investment Account 104,765.00 

Sanitary Sewer Department 1,457.71 

Contributions in Aid of Construction — Conant Park Dev 2,230.00 

Sale of Material 1,681.50 

Miscellaneous 2,354.71 



Total Receipts 245,078.53 



Total Receipts and Balance $254,871.70 

Dishtirsements 

Operation of Plant $104,666.74 

Capital Expenditures 127,223.09 

Bond 13,000.00 

Bond Interest 1,438.75 



Total Disbursements 246,328.58 



Balance December 31, 1948 $8,543.12 

Annual Report -f i •( J^ 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1948 

Assessed 
Valuation of Amount 

City and of Appro- 

Precinct priation 

Money Raised For 

County $37,330,320.00 $130,266.00 

City Budget 37,330,320.00 893,049.00 

Schools: 

*City Union 35,068,114.00 

**Penacook Union 2,172,916.00 



Tax Rate 
Per $1 ,000 



*3-5o 
23.09 



677,728.00 
48,474.00 



Totals 



1)1,749,517.00 



Overlay Allowance for Abateiiunts, Errors and Corrections 

Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector 

Raised by Supplementar\- Taxes 

City Rate 

Penacook Rate 

Average Rate for City per $1,000.00 



19-33 
22.31 



32,675.09 

1,749,517.43 

3,236.00 

45.92 

48.90 

46.10 



*Includes Property located in Loudon. 
**Includes Property located in Canterbury 



Pol/ Taxes 



Men 

Women 



Total 



I eterans 

Property Valuation 

Polls (3050) 

Polls (157) Nurses, War Widows, etc. 



Blind 

Property Valuation 
Polls (11) 



Exemptions 



Total Exemptions 
Bank Stock 



Banli Stock, 



No. 
4,047 
7,812 


Amount 

$8,094.00 
15,624.00 


11,859 


$23,718.00 


$836,850.00 

6,100.00 

314.00 


$843,264.00 


$3,000.00 
22.00 


3,022.00 




$846,286.00 








$6,444.60 



Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 

Types Number Valuation 

Land anil Buddings $31,465,640.00 

Grovvini,' Wood and Tnnber 12,098.00 

Electric Plants 1,694,450.00 

Horses 123 15,000.00 

Cows 987 131,225.00 

Other Neat Stock 145 11,530.00 

Sheep and Croats 104 2,366.00 

Hogs 15 375-00 

Fowls 26,111 29,856.00 

Fur Bearing Animals 92 420.00 

Portable Mills . 500.00 

Boats and Launches . 1,500.00 

Wood, Lumber, Etc. 41,100.00 

Gasoline Pumps and Tanks 25,160.00 

Stock in Trade 3,486,250.00 

Mills and Machinery 412,450.00 

Oxen 3 400.00 

Total $37,330,320.00 

y6 y -f -f City of Concord 



CITY RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

For ihk Yi-ar Ended December 31, 1948 

City County Total 



Direct Expenditures for Relief 

Cash Allowances $1,449.75 

Groceries 2,683.28 

Milk 107.10 

Fuel 647.94 

Rent 42.25 

Board and Care — Adults 5,434.56 

Board and Care — Children 3,256.81 

Medical i ,059. 1 5 

Clothing 317.66 

Transportation, Meals and Miscellaneous 238.61 

Total City and County Poor $15,237.11 

Other Towns 673.48 

Hospitalization 5,962. 1 6 

Total $21,872.75 

Dependent Soldiers 

Cash Allowances $98.60 

Groceries 1,416.14 

Milk 19.12 

Fuel 28 1 .98 

Rent 1 99- 1 4 

Board and Care — Children 1,068.27 

Medical 1 92.06 

Work — Relief 80.02 

Clothing 1 06.67 

Miscellaneous 170.39 

Total $3,632.39 

Administration 

Salaries — Overseers (Concord and Penacook) $2,640.00 

Salaries — Office and Case Workers 3,248.78 

Mileage and Travel Allowance 392.39 

Office Supplier 214.63 

Telephone 237.23 

Lights 21.43 

Heat 60.00 

Janitor Service 12.25 

Miscellaneous 122.79 



Total $6,949.50 



Old Age Assistance $34,895.67 



Total City and County Expenditures $67,350.31 



$4,154.50 


$5,604.25 


5>035-44 


7,718.72 


337-09 


444.19 


1,472.36 


2,120.30 


689.75 


732.00 


3,838.68 


9,273.24 




3,256.81 
7.053-77 


5,994.62 


199.26 


516.92 


452.63 


691.24 


$22,174.33 


$37,411.44 




673-48 
5,962.16 






$22,174.33 


$44,047.08 


$1,494.00 


$1,592.60 


1,979.09 


3.395-23 


735-54 


754.66 


356.20 


638.18 


117.00 


316.14 


43.00 


1,111.27 


468.97 


661.03 




80.02 


153-32 


259.99 


195.49 


365.88 


$5,542.61 


$9,175.00 


$2,046.00 


$4,686.00 


3,420.32 


6,669.10 


170.34 


562.73 


171. 81 


386.44 


237.18 


474.41 


21.42 


42.85 


60.00 


120.00 




12.25 
132-54 


9-75 


$6,136.82 


$13,086.32 




$34,895.67 




$33,853-76 


$101,204.07 



Annual Report -r i i yj 



PARKING METER FUND 

Statement oe Receipts and Disbursements 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1948 

Cash Balance January i, 1948 $3,984.82 

Receipts 45,862.20 

Total 

Disbursements — Operating Expenses 

Meter Maintenance and Salaries 

Meter Parts and Supplies 

Meter Maintaining Training 

Enforcement Salaries 

Enforcement Supplies 

Collecting Salaries .'... 

Collecting Supplies 

Accounting Salaries 

Accounting Supplies 

Accounting Miscel laneous 

Marking Streets — Supplies 

Incidentals 



Total Operating Disbursements 



Total 

Capital Expenditures 

Purchase of Meters 

Coin Sorting Machine 



lialance December 31, 1948 





$49,847.02 


$3,281.81 




1,190.55 




446.77 




4,994.31 




1,121.71 




1,298.92 




15.00 




653.01 




437-50 




33.38 




262.50 




319-45 






$14,054.91 




$35,792.11 


$22,987.31 




767.00 


23>754-3i 




$12,037.80 



y8 f i i City of Concord 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Summary oi- Departmental Expenditi res 
For the Year Ended ]3ecember 51, 1948 

Expense Operating 

and Cost of 

Material Equipment 

Labor Bills Used Total 
Roads and Bridges 
Operating Budget 

General Maintenance $86,959.24 136,199.16 $42,852.55 $166,010.95 

Outside Functions 1,721.63 2,371.95 26,146.00 30,239.58 

General Overhead 34,210.57 4,089.14 1,609.75 39,909.46 

Equipment Maintenance 30,169.52 45,935.62 186.70 76,291.84 



Total $153,060.96 $88,595.87 $70,795.00 $312,451.83 



Capital Budget 

Construction $9,124.34 $855.45 $5,496.84 $15,476.63 

New Elquipment 350.00 350.00 



Total $9,124.34 $1,205.45 $5,496.84 $15,826.63 



$162,185.30 $89,801.32 $76,291.84 $328,278.46 
Less: 

Equipment Maintenance Trans- 
ferred to various functi(jns 





and Insurance 
nee 






' 






Total 


. $162,185.30 


$89,801.32 






$251,986.62 






Storms Sewers 


$575-11 


$109.66 




$158.00 


$842.77 


Office 

Operating Budget 
Salaries, Supplies 


$4-522.78 


$2,813.35 


$7,336.13 






Engineering 


$14,261.50 


$916.90 






$15,178.40 






Street Lighting 




$41,060.41 






$41,060.41 






Clerk of Board 


$220.00 








$220.00 










Trees 

Operating Budget 
General Maintena 


$6,109.07 

84-15 
1,003.29 


$301.84 


$: 


:. 537-40 
32.40 


$7,948-31 

116.55 

1,343.84 


Outside Work — : 


Xmas 


General Overhead 


340.55 










$7,196.51 


$642.39 


$1 


[,569.80 


$9,408.70 


Total 


. $188,961.20 


$135,344.03 


$] 


[,727.80 


$326,033.03 



Annual Report i -r -r yg 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Statement oe Appropkiations, Transeers, Expenditures 

AND Unexpended Balances 

For the Year Ivvded December 31, 1948 



Roads and Bridges 

Storm Sewers 

Office 

Engineering 

Street Lighting 

Clerk of Board 

Trees 

Total 



Appro- 
priations 
$2 ',6,1 ^6.52 


Transfers 
$15,850.10 


Total 

$251,986.62 

4,289.75 

7,997.00 

15,210.00 

41,060.41 

220.00 

10,476.68 


Expendi- 
tures 

$251,986.62 
842.77 

7,336.13 

15,178.40 

41,060.41 

220.00 

9,408.70 


Unexpended 
Balance 


4,289.75 

7,997.00 

15,210.00 

41,000.00 

220.00 


$3,446.98 

660.87 

31.60 




60.41 




10,476.68 




1,067.98 


$315,329.95 


$15,910.51 


$331,240.46 


$326,033.03 


$5,207.43 



STATEMENT OF MUNICIPAL COURT 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1948 

Balance January 1, 1948 $915.32 

Receipts 

Fines, Costs and Fees $14,279.40 

Bail 2,300.00 1 6,579.40 

Total Receipts and Balance $17,494.72 

Disbursements 

City Treasurer $6,976.95 

State of N. H. Motor Vehicle Department 5.585-75 

State of N. H. Fish and Game Department 43-40 

Bail 2,100.00 

Secretarial Services 515.80 

Printing, Postage and Office Supplies 122.75 

Miscellaneous Fees and Expenses 202.58 

Restitution ■ — Dodge Freedman 90.00 15,637.23 

Balance December 31, 1948 $1,857.49 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 

Of the Number of Polls and Veterans, Assessed Valuations, 
Tax Levies and Rates 1938-1948 



Year 

1938 
1939 
1940 
1941 
1942 

1943 
1944 

1945 
1946 

1947 
1948 





Exemptions 




Committed 


Polls 


Veterans 


Valuations 


Tax* 


13,490 


936 


$32,201,370.00 


$1,282,689.02 


13,877 


958 


32,365,017.00 


1,176,029.78 


14-334 


925 


32,791,790.00 


1,280,926.90 


13-874 


896 


33,068,487.00 


1,264,315.56 


13,184 


897 


33,282,876.00 


1,312,838.22 


12,205 


796 


33,251,268.00 


1,087,147.04 


12,416 


679 


33,083,027.00 


1,088,928.60 


11,734 


701 


32,963,846.00 


1,181,708.97 


12,159 


2,570 


33,622,496.00 


1,333,172.60 


1 1,606 


2,817 


36,457,539-00 


1,557,237-23 


11,859 


3,207 


37,330,320.00 


1,749,517.43 



Rate 
$38.82 
35-30 
38.00 
37-20 
38.40 
31.80 
30.59 
33.68 
38.26 
41.47 
45-92 



* Does not reflect Abatements and Deductions allowed by Assessors. 



80 



City of Concord 



COMPARATIVE TABLE 



Of Budge p A 


PPRdPhl.VTUIN: 


■■,. 1943-1948 










1943 


1914 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


Operating Budget : 














City Poor 


$41,50<».l>0 


.?39,950.00 


S37,700.00 


$38,380.00 


$40,600.00 


$.54,389.00 


City Poor, Ward One 


5,135.(K' 


5,320.00 


5,135.00 


4. 815.00 


5,889.00 


7,766.00 


Bonds and Notes 


107,000.00 


57.000.00 


52,000.00 


52,000.00 


31,00O.(HI 


31,300.00 


Interest, Bonds and Notes 


11,058.75 


9,451.25 


7,963.75 


6.638.75 


6,135.<M> 


11,088.65 


City Hall and Auditorium ....- 


8,697..5<1 


8,9.S4..5o 


9,5S2.31 


9,373.56 


9,949.00 


12,681.00 


Mayor _ — _ 


1,830.01) 


3. 950. Oil 


3,938.00 


4.1.57.00 


4,0.53.00 


4,236.00 


City Clerk _ 


8,454.50 


9,OW>.O0 


9,000.00 


9,724.00 


11,(I74.<I0 


12,028.50 


City Solicitor 


1,680.00 


1.680.00 


2,460.00 


2,380.00 


2,380.00 


2,700.00 


City Treasurer 


4,789.25 


4,876.00 


5.830.25 


5,086.50 


6.478.00 


6,773.00 


Weights and Meas>uu ^ 


1,312.00 


1 ,400.00 


1.400.00 


1,4.50.00 


1,4.50.00 


1,720.(MI 


Police Court 


2.960.011 


2.960.00 


2.96(».0O 


2,96:1.00 


2,960.00 


4,100.00 


Probation Offii er 


1,600.00 


1,600.00 


1.600. 00 


1 ,450.00 


1,600.00 


1,720.00 


Assessors - 


12,018.00 


12.958.00 


12.934.00 


14.122.00 


15..539.<Kl 


16,426.00 


Tax Collector _ _ _ 


8,052.85 


8.623.65 


9,027.65 


8,165.65 


8.955.65 


9,464.65 


Real Estate Agent 




475.00 


530.00 


500.00 


500.011 


530.00 


Elections _ 


4,100.00 


4,1.50.00 


4.10O.0O 


4.1O0.00 


4,200.00 


6. .502.00 


Fire Department 


78,914.25 


95.803.79 


98,631.63 


113.327.48 


139.070.12 


159,438.08 


Health Department 


7.255.00 


7,630.00 


7,618.00 


7,902.00 


8,136.00 


9,520.00 


Department of Public ^^OIks 


291,467.4(1 


297,778.00 


347.657.48 


356,836.68 


396,428.69 


4.53,887.23 


Playgrounds . 


10,083.00 


11,8<15.00 


11.802.00 


13 341.05 


17,944.00 


19.880.05 


Planning Board 


5.000.00 


5 247.25 


5,371.75 


6.100.00 


6,922.66 


8,422.50 


Public Library 


23,00<).(Wi 


29.(M>0.00 


31,000.00 


36,465.00 


36.240.00 


48,464.00 


Police Department 


74,048.95 


79,018.91 


84,497.61 


93,8.51.60 


104,422.62 


125,172.27 


Comfort Station 


5-;, 24 8. 00 


2,365.00 


2.264.00 


2.625.00 


3.879. OO 


4.038.00 


Recreation Commission 


3.50(t.OO 


3.500.00 


6.450.(Ml 


6,635.00 


8, ,80(1. (Ml 


10.535.00 


Zoning Board 


2<lO.OO 


1.5I>.00 


2011.(10 


200.00 


500.00 


550.00 


Airport _ 

Clork. ruvr nf 


6, 524. .50 


9.288.00 


9,93S.()> 


11,.S08.00 


13,1,S4.(H) 


13,980.00 


50.00 


50.00 


50.00 


2.5.(k:) 


.50.00 


50.00 


IncidriitaN -iiid Linil Dinnge 


2,500.0(1 


2, .500.00 


2.500.00 


2,500.00 


6.500.00 


2,500.00 


Printing and Slationciv 


2.7.50.00 


3.450.00 


3.450.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


Repairs, Buildings 


1,200.00 


1.200.00 


1,450.<KI 


2,2.50.00 


4,2(MI.OII 


4,200.00 


Board of Aldeinieii hddij 


1,915.011 


1,875.00 


1.875.00 


1,875.00 


1. 875.00 


3,150.00 


Family Welfare ^(xntx 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


3.50. OO 


350.00 


350.00 


Concord Distrut Nui'-ng As^ n 


350.00 


350.00 


350.00 


3.5(t.on 


350.00 


2,350.00 


Penacook Nursing Ass n 


200.00 


200.00 


20(t.0ll 


200. (Ml 


200.00 


200.00 


Memorial Day 


400. (Ml 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


600.0(1 


600.00 


Armistice Day _. 


100.00 


100.00 


lOO.OII 


100. IMI 


1(10.(M) 


100.0(1 


Armistice Day, Penacook 


30.00 


30.00 


60.00 


3<I.<I0 


30.00 


3(1.00 


Spanish War Veterans 


400.00 


li/O.OO 


400.00 


400.mi 


400.00 


400.00 


Band Concerts 


l.COO.OO 


l.OOO.CO 


1,000.00 


1,<M10.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.0(1 


Spanish War Vet. Anniversarv 


1 .01K).'00 


1 ,000.00 


1,000.00 


i,0O0.00 




500 00 


Auditing „ 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Civilian Defense _ _ 


3,000.00 


500.00 










Finance Committee : 


















6,000.00 


6,0<W.OO 


9,000.00 


9,000.0(1 


9,000.00 






5,000.00 






Employees Retirement Fund 








8,000.00 


16,000.00 


15.000.00 


Merrimack Valley Regional Asso- 














ciation _ 












500.00 
1,500.00 


500.00 


Revision of Ordinances 




1,000.00 


Blister Rust Control _ 










l.OOO.OO 


1 .000.00 



Gross Operating Budget _ $737,613.43 $734,771.00 $795,876.43 $844,874.27 $935,944.74 $1,083,241.93 

Capital Budget Items : 

Zoning . __ _. 

Fire Department 
Department Public Works 

Playgrounds _ . 

Police Department - - 

Tax Collector _ _ 

Airport . _ _. 

Recreation Commission 

Lake Survey .. . _ . 

By-Pass Project . . 

City Planning Board 



$265 00 



$625 00 



700 00 
800 00 



$25,000.00 $11,700.00 

21,000.00 32,000.00 

700.00 485.00 

6,437.58 3,975.00 



ll.OOO.OO 10.0(W.OO 

9,600.00 

9.(M10.00 

_ 25,000.00 



$3,400.00 

25,500.00 

4,250.00 

2,700.00 

19.000.0(1 
10,800.00 



$1,000.00 
2,000.00 

49,928.38 
1.650.00 
1,000.00 



2,000.00 
800.00 



25,000.00 



2,756.00 



Total Capital Budget $265.00 $3,: 

Total Municipal Budget _ $737,878.45 $737, i 

Estimated Income 



,125.00 
,896.00 
*$225,285.00 *$260,603.00 
Total Raised by Taxation $512,593.00 $477,293.00 



$64,137.58 $101,760.00 $90,650.00 $61,134.38 



$860,014.01 $946,634.27 $1,026,594.74 $1,124,900.00 



$351,353.00 *$258,254.33 *$265,245.03 *$265,294.00 



$508,661.00 $688,379.94 $761,351.00 $859,606.00 



Includes cash on hand at beginning of year. 



Annual Report i i i 81 



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«* 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Activities in 1948 4 

Appendix 60 

Assessment 10 

Bond Funds 12 

Building Activity 43 

Cemeteries 48 

City Clerk 8 

City Government 6 

City Officials 7 

Elections 9 

Engineering 46 

Examination o£ Plumbers 43 

Finances 12 

Financial Statements and Statistics 61 

Fire Protection 38 

Garbage Disposal 45 

General Fund 12 

Health and Sanitation 19 

Hydrants 42 

Legal Service 13 

Library 26 

Milk Control 21 

Municipal Airport 52 



PAGE 

Municipal Court 36 

Parks 47 

Planning 15 

Playgrounds and Bath 23 

Plumbing Inspection 43 

Police Protection 33 

Probation 37 

Public Works 44 

Recreation 24 

Refuse Collection 45 

Relief 29 

Schools 55 

Sewers 47 

Snow Plowing and Sanding 46 

Special Recreational Facilities 25 

Street Lighting 47 

Tax Collection 11 

Trees 47 

Trust Funds 12 

Vital Statistics 8 

Water Supply 49 

Weights and Measures 14 

Zoning Appeals 43 



Government is a trust, and the officers of the 
government are trustees; and both the trust 
and the trustees are created for the benefit 
of the people. 

Henry Clay, 
Speech at Lexington, 
Kentucky, 1829. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



OF THE 



CITY OF CONCORD 




FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING 
DECEMBER 31, 1948 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE CITY OF CONCORD 
FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1948 



FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Chief 

Salaries 

Call Salaries 

Fire Alarm 

Fire Inspection 

Incidentals 

Rei)airs Buildings 

Fuel 

Lights 

Ujikeep Fcjuipmcnt 

Telephones 

Insurance 

New Equipment 

Hose 

Supplies and Laundry 

SiK)w Removal 

Retirement Fund 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Inspector's Car 

POLICE DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Chief 
Salary, Deputy 
Salary, Captain 
Salary, Officers 
Senior Clerk and Typist 
Specials 
Houseman 
Repairs 
Fuel 
Lights 

Auto and Auto Supplies 
Alarking Streets 

Telephone, Gamewell and Radio 
Insurance 
Keeping Prisoners 
Printing- 
Traffic Lights and Supplies 
Office Supplies and E(|uipment 
Training Program 
Incidentals 

Cleaning, Toilet Supplies and Equipment 
Police Equipment 
Retirement Fund 
Bicycle Plates and Forms 
Photo Supplies and Equipment 
Traffic and F.BT. School 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Heating System 



Appropriation 

$4,620.00 

118,575.32 

13,r.lO.OU 

1,0U(I.(K) 

100.00 

678.39 

4,800.00 

3,097.50 

700.00 

2,200.00 

1,104.60 

2,633.36 

600.00 

1,000.00 

790.25 

500.00 

3,428.66 



Expended Balance 

$4,6^0.00 

116,694.04 

11,888.50 

900.60 

66.76 

720.61 

4,471.23 

2,82().42 

585.98 

3,072.5() 

1,159.10 

2.259.50 

7f)3.lO 

1,210.40 

955.83 

507.83 

3,366.01 



$159,438.08 $156,008.47 $3,369.61 



$2,000.00 



$4,950.00 

4,070.00 

3,740.00 

78,615.27 

2,992.00 

5,500.00 

2,310.00 

500.00 

2,300.00 

1,050.00 

6,970.00 

600.00 

2,500.00 

2,085.00 

90.00 

400.00 

200.00 

500.00 

500.00 

600.00 

500.00 

1,500.00 

1,450.00 

300.00 

250.00 

700.00 



$2,000.00 

$4,950.00 

4,070.16 

3,739.98 

78,559.41 

2,612.05 

5.419.75 

2,310.29 

500.00 

2,289.23 

1,000.79 

7,768.89 

597.99 

2,503.70 

1,698.72 

63.56 

338.64 

97.93 

403.15 

492.25 

625.86 

511.59 

1.497.72 

1.482.84 

275.05 

221.46 

700.00 



$125,172.27 $124,791.01 



$1,000.00 



$999.89 



$381.26 
$.11 



PUBLIC LIBRARY: 



Salaries 


Appropriation 

$29,964.00 

1,400.00 

8.000.00 

050.00 

100.00 

1,800.00 

1,650.00 

300.00 

2,300.00 

450.00 

750.00 

600.00 

200.00 

100.00 

200.00 


Expentled Balance 

$30,195.90 


Binding 


059.92 


Books 


8.002.35 


Periodicals 


681.92 


Printing- 


50.50 


Heat 


2.140.78 


Lights and Power 


1,670.62 


Telephone 


368.41 


Maintenance 


6,512.51 


Supplies Janitor 


239.86 


Supplies Library 


808.25 


Incidentals 


660.71 


Insurance 


225.55 


Equipment 


209.32 


Transportation 


15.77 


Penacook Branch, Special Fund 


1,824 12 


Projector 




601.72 


Appropriation 

Balance Trust Funds January 1, 1948, 


28.987.34) 
19,476.66) 




Blanchard Fund 
Thornton Fund 
Trust Funds 
Principal Tliayer Fund 
Fines 


$48,464.00 

1,382.70 

50.00 

13,616.65 

601.72 

2,251.39 


$54,868.21 


HEALTH DEPARTMENT: 

Salary, Sanitary Officer 


$66,366.46 

$2,420.00 

2,200.00 

200.00 

500.00 

3,300.00 
600.00 
300.00 


$11,498.25 
$2,420.00 


Salary, Clerk 


2,200.00 


Auto Allowance 


200.00 


Departmental h^xpenses 


281.29 


MILK INSPECTION: 

Salary, Inspector 


3,300.00 


Auto Allowance 


600.00 


Incidentals 


307.23 






MAYOR: 

Salary, Mayor 


$9,520.00 

$2,000.00 

1,936.00 

300.00 


$9,308.52 $211.48 
$2,000.00 


Salary, Secretary 


1,936.00 


Incidentals 


280.96 






CITY CLERK: 

Salary, City Clerk 


$4,236.00 

$3,850.00 
6,798.00 
330.00 
200.00 
108.00 
200.00 
400.00 
142.50 


$4,216.96 $19.04 
$3,850.00 


Salary, Clerks 


6,825.50 


Salary. Extra Clerk 


203.99 


Auto Allowance 


200.00 


Telephone 


130.65 


Photostat 


156.21 


Supplies 


458.53 


Desk 


142.50 



$12,028.50 $11,967.38 



')1.12 



CITY TREASURER: 

AppiTipriation Expended Balance 

Salary, Citv Treasurer $1,452.00 $1,452.00 

Salary, Treasurer, Trust Funds 121.00 121.00 

Salary, Deputy Treasurer 2,750.00 2,750.00 

Clerical Assistance, Trust Fimds 350.00 350.00 

Clerical Assistance, Pay-Rolls 1,430.00 1,338.00 

Equipment 297.90 377.90 

Surety Bond, Deputy Treasurer 137.50 117.16 

Supplies 144.60 172.94 

In.cidentals 90.00 93.80 

$6,773.00 $6,772.80 $.20 

CITY SOLICITOR: 

Salary, Solicitor $2,420.00 $2,420.00 

Clerk Hire 200.0O 200.00 

Auto Allowance 30.00 30.00 

Supplies 50.00 21.75 

$2,700.00 $2,671.75 $28.25 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: 

Salary, Sealer ' $1,320.00 $1,320.00 

Auto Allowance 300.00 300.00 

Supplies 100.00 97.90 

$1,72(1.00 $1,717.90 $2.10 

MUNICIPAL COURT: 

Salary, Jud^e $2,800.00 $2,800.00 

Salary, Associate Judge 500.00 500.00 

Salary, Clerk 800.00 800.00 

$4,100.00 $4,100.00 

PROBATION OFFICER: 

Salary, Officer $1,320.00 $1,320.00 

Clerk 200.00 200.00 

Auto Allowance 200.00 200.00 

$1,72(1.00 $1,720.00 

ASSESSORS: 

Salary, Assessors $7,600.00 $7,6(J0.(J0 

Salary, Clerks 6,380.00 6,380.00 

Auto Allowance 400.00 400.00 

Listing Polls 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Telephone 96.00 112.21 

Postage and Printing 500.00 309.46 

Supplies and Furniture 450.00 596.90 

$16,420.00 $16,398.57 $27.43 

TAX COLLECTOR: 

Salary, Collector $3,850.00 $3,850.00 

Salary, Clerks 4,026.00 4,026.00 

Salary, Extra Clerk 100.00 50.63 

Printing, Postage and Stationery 1,275.00 1,265.01 

Incidentals 88.65 132.99 

Clerk's Bond 25.00 25.00 

:\Iileage 100.00 100.00 

Real Estate Sale 376.95 

Contingent Fund 361.93 

$9,826.58 $9,826.58 



REAL ESTATE AGENT 

Salary. Agent 
Advertising 



ELECTIONS: 

Salary, Election Officers 

Rent \'oting Places 

Maintenance Repairs and Supplies 

Contingent Fund 



PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Contingent Fund 

INCIDENTALS AND LAND 
DAMAGES: 

Contingent Fund 

REPAIRS BUILDINGS: 
ZONING: 



Appropriation Expended Ralance 

$330.00 $330.00 

200.00 8.46 

$530.00 $338.46 $191.54 

$4,302.00 $4,290.00 

400.00 150.00 

1,800.00 2,810.43 

748.43 

$7,250.43 $7,250.43 

$3,000.00) $3,393.16 

393.16) 

$2,500.00) $2,604.27 

104.27) 



$4,200.00 $3,072.80 



$550.00 



$133.29 



$1,127.20 
$41(,.71 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Recording iMacliine $1,000.00 

DOG LICENSES: 

DEPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS: 

Roads and Bridges $236,136.52) 

Earnings 15,850.10) 

Office • 7,997.00 

Refuse 57,365.03 

Table Garbage 6,050.00 

Engineering 15,210.00 

Lighting Streets 41,000.00) 

Earnings 8.04) 

Contingent Fund 52.37) 

Clerk of Board 220.00 

Trees 10,476.68 

Storm Sewers 4,289.75 

Cemeteries 56,608.90 

Parks 18,533.35 

CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Monroe Calculator 600.00 

Power Lawn Mower 900.00 

2 Trucks 3,200.00 

3 Coupes 4,500.00 
Roads and Bridges 40,173.73 
Trees 554.65 

DOUGLAS AVENUE CONSTRUCTION: 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 668.04 



$770.65 
$258.30 



$251,986.62 

7,336.13 
56,321.38 

6,050.00 
15,178.40 
41,060.41 



220.00 
9,408.70 

842.77 
56.505.54 
18,207.14 



400.00 

715.00 

2,612.71 

4,015.10 

25,559.35 

443.03 



$229.35 



660.87 
1,043.65 

31.60 



1,067.98 

3,446.98 

103.36 

326.21 



200.00 
185.00 
587.29 
484.90 
14,614.38 
111.62 



668.04 



PLAYGROUND DEPARTMENT: 

Salaries 

Equipment 

Insurance 

Telephone and Electricity 

Trucking 

jMaintenance 

Truck Maintenance 

Fourth of July, Children 

Fourth of July, Penacook 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Chlorinaturs 

Tennis Courts 

Hall Street Playground 

RECREATION COMMISSION; 

Salaries : 
Golf Course 
^Memorial Field 
Insurance 
Lights and Heat 
Repairs 
Aliscellaneous 
Contingent Fund 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

New Mower Equipment 
Development Russell Pond 

CITY HALL AND AUDITORIUM: 

Salary, City Messenger 

Salary, lanitors and Overtime 

Fuel ' 

Liglns and Gas 

Insurance 

Supplies 

Contingent Fund 



SCHOOLS: 

Union District : 

Balance January 1, 1948 

Amount Voted by District _ 

Improvement and New Equipment 

Teachers' Pensions 

N. H. Teachers' Retirement Board 

Employees' Retirement System, N. H. 

Purchase Land Conant School 

Dog Licenses 

Abial Walker Trust Fund 



INTEREST ON BONDS: 

Balance January 1, 1948 
Amount Voted by District 



Appropriation 

$13,880.05 


Expended 

13,233.74 
1,196.80 
435.40 
300.63 
833.94 
1.933.19 
448.22 
542.10 
250.00 


Balance 


1,200.00 




450.00 




500.00 




1,000.00 




1,500.00 




500.00 




600.00 




250.00 








$19,880.05 
450.00 


$19,174.02 

450.00 
698.13 
406.66 

$3,652.49 

1,661.60 

511.67 

334.18 

756.22 

3.873.29 


$706.03 


700.00 
500.00 

$3,630.00 


1.87 
93.34 


1,980.00 




500.00 




325.00 




600.00 




3,500.00 




254.45 










$10,789.45 


$10,789.45 

289.00 
493.08 




$300.00 
500.00 


$11.00 
6.92 



$2,200.00 $2,200.00 

4,565.00 4,485.25 

3,500.00 4,346.87 

1,000.00 1,196.94 

916.00 827.54 

500.00 437.02 

812.62 

$13,493.62 $13,493.62 

$197,231.45) $557,231.45 $206,493.00 

566,493.00) 

45,000.00 45,000.00 

10,834.00 10.834.00 

18,950.00 18,950.00 

4,778.00 4,778.00 

2,216.55 2,216.55 

2,967.73 2,967.73 

23.54 23.54 

$848,494.27 $591,793.45 $256,700.82 



$5,522.85) $10,922.50 $5,057.50 
10,457.15) 



Q^^Kjr^C. Appropriation Expeiuled Balance 

.Amount \'oted !;y District $19,000.00 $19,000.00 

PENACOOK DISTRICT: 

Balance lanuarv 1. 1948 $15,950.90 $45,950.90 

Amount Voted bv District 48,474.00 

Doe Licenses 183.89 

.Abial Walker Trust Fund 1.46 

$04,610.25 $45,950.90 $18,659.35 

COMFORT STATION: 

Salaries $3,608.00 $3,677.75 

Incidentals 230.00 265.67 

Repairs 100.00 41.72 

Lighting 100.00 105.28 

Contingent Fund 52.42 

$4,090.42 $4,090.42 

SALARY, BOARD OF ALDERMEN: $3,i5ooo $3.15000 

AUDITING: $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

AIRPORT: 

Salaries $5,280.00 $5,205.35 

Fuel 500.00 429.16 

Lights 1,000.00 1,022.66 

Alaintenance, Operation and Repairs 5,500.0(1 4,288.99 

Insurance 700.00 709.80 

Miscellaneous 500.00 558.42 

Airport Development 500.00 104.00 

$13,980.00 $12,318.38 $1,661.62 

CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Land Acquisition $2,000.00 $1,901.75 $38.25 

PLANNING BOARD: 

Salaries : 
Research 
Drafting 

Publishing Reports, typing 
Printing 

Maps and Blueprints 

Supplies : 
Drafting- 
Office 

Telephone 

Postage 

Auto Allowance 



CAPITAL BUDGET: 

Aerial Alaps 

CHARITIES: 

Family Service 

Concord District Nursing Association 

Penacook District Nursing Association 



$4,950.00 


$4,950.00 

2,640.00 

86.65 

204.25 

60.86 

42.72 
77.09 

107.50 
10.00 

200.00 




2,640.00 




100.00 




200.00 




67.50 




65.00 




85.00 




90.00 




25.00 




.200.00 








$8,422.50 
$2,756.00 

$350.00 


$8,379.07 
$2,698.00 

$350.00 

2,350.00 

200.00 


$43.43 
$58.00 


2,350.00 




200.00 





PATRIOTIC ORGANIZATIONS: 

Appropriation Expeiulcil Balance 

Memorial Day $400.00 $400.00 

Memorial Dav, Penacook 200.00 200.00 

Armistice Day 100.00 100.00 

Armistice Day, Penacook 30.00 30.0<J 

Band Concerts 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Spanish War Veterans 40O.OO 400.00 

.Spanish War Veterans Anniversary 500.00 5U0.00 

CARE CITY CLOCK $5000 $35.29 $14.71 

BLISTER RUST CONTROL $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

MERRIMACK VALLEY 

REGIONAL ASSOCIATION $50o.oo $500oo 

RESERVE SPECIAL $3.00 

POLL TAX $2,409.00 

RETIREMENT FUND, EMPLOYEES 

$15,000.00) $18,896.12 

Contingent P^und 3,896.12) 

LAND DAMAGE ACCOUNT BY-PASS: 

Received, State of N. H. $5,000.00 $5,0(X).00 

REVISION ORDINANCES $1,000.00 $400.oo $600.00 

1947 REAL ESTATE SOLD FOR 
UNPAID TAXES: 

Resolution No. 1708 $13,910.33 $13,910.33 

BONDS AND NOTES: 

Central Fire Station $1,000.00 $1,000.00 

Sewers 14,000.00 14,000.00 

Airport • 3,000.00 3,000.00 

Public Improvement 6,000.00 6,000.00 

Penacook Canal 4,000.00 4,000.00 

City Hall Roof Repairs 3,300.00 3,300.00 

$31,300.00 $31,300.00 

INTEREST ON BONDS 

AND NOTES: $11,088.65 $10,270.22 $818.43 

COUNTY TAX $130,266.90 $130,266.90 

TEMPORARY LOAN NOTES: 

Borrowed in Anticipation of Taxes $1,000,000.00 

Paid in December $1,TOO,000.00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Contingent Fund $9,000.00 

Allocated to Various Appropriations $7,702.80 $1,297.20 



RESUME OF DISBURSEMENTS 

Citv Departments $946,607.82 

City Poor and Soldiers 26,577.6U 

Countv Poor and Soldiers 33,768.64 

Old Age Assistance 34,895.67 

Hospitalization 5,962.16 

Tax Anticipation Notes 1,000,000.00 

City Notes and Bonds 31,300.00 

Interest Notes and Bonds 10,270.22 

Schools 637,744.35 

School Bonds 19,000.00 

Schools. Interest on Bonds 10,922.50 

County Tax 130,266.90 

Private Charities 2,900.00 

Patriotic Appropriations 2,630.00 

1947 Real Estate Sold for Taxes 13,910.33 

Airport 12,318.38 

Capital Budget Items 44,512.35 

Employees Retirement Fund 18,896.12 

Land Damage By- Pass 5,000.00 

Reserve Special $3.00 Poll Tax 2,409.00 



$2,989,892.04 
Relief Department Balances transferred to Treasury 941.60 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 227,833.92 



$3,218,667.56 



PARKING METER FUND 

Appropriation Expended Balance 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 $3,984.82 

Receipts 1948 45,708.97 

Maintenance 1948 $37,861.42 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 11,832.37 



$49,693.79 $49,693.79 

SANITARY SEWERS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 $39,297.14 

Receipts 1948 ?>7,ZM.72 

Maintenance 1948 $28,814.89 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 47,720.97 



$76,535.86 $76,535.86 

EQUIPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT BOND ACCOUNT 

Authorized April 6, 1948 $200,000.00 

Premium 92.00 

Expended Permanent Improvements $101,459.16 

Loan Federal Airport Project 15,874.52 

Federal Airport Project, 

authorized August 13. 1948 8,250.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 74,508.32 



$200,092.00 $200,092.00 

SIGNAL SYSTEM BOND ACCOUNT 

Authorized April 6, 1948 $230,000.00 

Premium 105.80 

Expended Gamewell System $180,172.24 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 49,933.56 



$230,105.80 $230,105.80 



FEDERAL AIRPORT PROJECT 

Appropriation Expended Balance 

Loan, Equipment and Improvement 

Bond Account $15,874.52 $32,166.03 

Transfer, Equipment and Improvement 

Bond Account 8,250.00 

State of New Hampshire 8,041.51 

$32,166.03 $32,166.03 

CONCORD WATER WORKS 

Balance on hand January 1, 1948 $9,393.17 

Receipts 1948 245,078.53 

Maintenance 1948 $231,889.83 

Interest on Bonds 1,438.75 

Bonds Paid 13,000.00 

Balance on hand January 1, 1949 8,143.12 

$254,471.70 $254,471.70 

RELIEF DEPARTMENT 

CITY POOR: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

P. L. Hancock, Overseer $23,000.00 

Relief, City Proper $19,156.10 

Relief, Penacook 3,789.11 

$23,000.00 $22,945.21 ......^.. 

Deposited City Treasury $.-'4./9 

DEPENDENT SOLDIERS, CITY: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

P. L. Hancock, Overseer $3,650.00 

Relief, City Proper $3,257.62 

Relief, Penacook 374.// 

$3,650.00 $3,632.39 

Deposited City Treasury $17.61 

COUNTY POOR: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

P. L. Hancock, Overseer $28,800.00 

Relief City and Penacook $28,226.03 •••-.•;:■""" 

Deposited City Treasury $0/3.97 

DEPENDENT SOLDIERS, COUNTY: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

P. L. Hancock, Overseer $5,600.00 "■;••;"-— 

Relief City and Penacook $5,542.61 ..... ....^.^. 

Deposited City Treasury $5/.3y 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE: 

Checks drawn in favor of 

P. L. Hancock, Overseer $34,895.67 . ...^...^.. 

City Proper ^^vin/^i 

Penacook 3,/04.66 



HOSPITALIZATION: 

Cliecks drawn in favor of 

P. L. Hancock, Overseer 
Hospital care 
Deposited City Treasury 



Appropriation Expended 

$6,200.00 

$5,962.16 



Balance 



$237.84 



RECEIPTS OF THE CITY OF CONCORD FOR TWELVE 

MONTHS ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1948 

Balance o.n hand January 1, 1948 $180,134.31 

City Clerk's Department 4,357.96 

Refund Tax Collector • 18.45 

Rent Airport 6,134.87 

Rent Auditorium 1,225.00 

Dog Licenses 3,409.92 

Comfort Station 353.61 

Refund Playgrounds 24.80 

Playgrounds, Sale Trailer 10.25 

Motor \'ehicle Permits, 1947 1.195.13 

Motor \>hicle Permits, 1948 54,710.93 
Relief Department : 

City Poor, Piroso 50.00 

City Poor, Truchon children 565.50 

City Poor, Lula Hall 211.00 

City Soldiers, Jones children 252.00 

City Poor, J. IBelanger 29.18 

City Poor, Nellie Barbour 12.50 

City Poor, balance Darrah 29.32 

Reimbursement, Merrimack County 32,233.10 

Reimbursement, Lincoln 103.44 

City Poor, Bailey & Bullard 189.30 

Old Age Assistance, Hayford and Taylor 67.06 

Reimbursement Manchester 62.49 

City Poor, Riley 280.00 

City Poor, Turgeon 336.00 

Old Age Assistance, Colby 50.31 

Old Age Assistance, Gorham 81.77 

Old .\ge Assistance, Mercier 4.13 

Citv Poor, Pedeare 100.00 

City Poor, Roy 150.00 

Citv Poor, Administration 10.85 

City Poor, Clark 40.00 

Reimbursement Nottingham 28.38 

Reimbursement Keene 27.25 

Reimbursement Northfield 65.00 

City Poor, Corson 195.00 

Reimbursement Andover 124.26 

Hospitalization, Dobbins 24.71 

Old Age Assistance 309.98 

Old Age Assistance, Griffin 853.97 

City Poor — close 1948 account 54.79 

County Poor — close 1948 account 573.97 

Dependent Soldiers City — close 1948 account 17.61 

Dependent Soldiers County — close 1948 account 57.39 

Hospitalization — close 1948 account 237.84 

Public Library, fines 2,251.39 

Public Library, principal Thayer Fund 601.72 

Public Library, Thornton Fund 50.00 

Penacook Branch. Library, Blanchard Fund 1,382.70 

Parks 300.00 



Roads and Bridges 42,285.29 

Ensrineering 1,591.81 

Lights 8.04 

Office 5U1.68 

Municipal Court Fees 6.976.95 

Police Department 1,256.68 

Bicycle Permits 691.25 

Board of P2xaminers of Plumbers 38.00 

Municipal Golf Course 5,271.89 

Memorial Field 1.960.01 

Airport Concessions 90.00 

Fire Department 1.439.77 

Convalescent Homes 42.00 

Milk Licenses 306.00 

State Atliletic Association 23.07 

Bounty on Hedgehogs 50.50 

Sale of Land 276.50 

Land taken for Walker Estate, State of New Hampshire 5,000.00 

Loss of Taxes — Rand 27.66 

Rent deeded property and deeded property sold 1,546.71- 

1944 Redemptions 55.64 

1945 Redemptions ■ 2,417.03 

1946 Redemptions 2.817.35 

1947 Redemptions " 4.058.76 

1939 Taxes 19.49 

1940 Taxes 22.00 

1941 Taxes 15.20 

1942 Taxes 28.40 

1943 Taxes 43.60 

1944 Taxes 218.72 

1945 Taxes 418.51 

1946 Taxes 489.20 

1947 Taxes 129.079.07 

1948 Taxes 1,589,917.08 

State of New Hampshire : 

Interest on Dividends 66.593.43 

Railroad Tax 12.891.28 

Savings Bank Tax 13,878.24 

Licome Public Library Trust Funds 13.616.65 

Income Walker Trust Fund, Schools 25.00 
Cemeteries : 

Income Trust Funds 6,261.61 

Income Special Trust Funds 585.01 

Income 1/3 Sale of Lots 961.67 

Income Collections 11.281.67 



$2,218,667.56 
Tax Anticipation Notes 1.000.000.00 



$3,218,667.56 



ARTHUR E. ROBY, 

City Clerk.