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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

ANNUAL REPORT -1950 



University of New Hampshire 
Library 




THE ATHENIAN OATH 

W^e ivlll Never Bring Disgrace to this Our City, by 
any Act of Dishonesty or Cowardice nor ever Desert 
our Suffering Comrades in the Ranks; We ivill Fight 
for the Ideals and Sacred Things of the City, both 
Alone and With Many; We will Revere and Obey 
the City's Laws and Do our Best to Incite a like Respect 
in Those Above Us who are Prone to Annul or Set 
Them at Naught; We will Strive Unceasingly to 
Quicken the Public's Sense of Civic Duty. Thus in 
all these tvays We Will Transmit this City not only 
Not Less, but Greater and More Beautiful than it was 
Transmitted to Us. 



The Athenian Oath is 2,500 years old. Yet the high ideals 
of American democracy continue to reflect its inspiration and 
masjnificent challenge. 




Cover delineated by Archy F. McDonnell 



c^*^ 



The Ninety -eighth 
ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

CITY OF CONCORD 

New Hampshire 

for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1950 




Capital of the State of New Hampshire 

County Seat of Alerrimack County 

Area: 64 Square Miles. Population: 27 ,9H4 



Published under the supervision 

of the City Planning Board 

by the City Manager 

in accordance with the requirements of law 



PRESENTING YOUR CITY FAMILY 



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CTH 
I9S6 



HovvK Andkrson 
Harry D. Chai.i.is 
Lkic;h S. Hail 



December 31, 1950 
THE CITY COUNCIL 

SHKim O. W^Al.KKR, M<ty<>Y 

]. Richard Jackman, Mayor I'vo-Toii 

Councilmen-at-Large 

Thomas B. JenjNIN(;.s 
William A. Stevens 
Shelby O. Walker 



James Ferrin 
Kenneih C. Gridlea 

MeRION C. BlClKMlNSil r 

J. Rkiharo Jaokman 



Ward Coiincilmen 
Ward 1 Floyd F. ()i io 
Ward 2 James Ross 
Ward .1 MiLroN f. Barnes 
Waid I Edwin R. Lan(;evin 
EMMErr A. Nawn. AN'ard !) 



Ward 5 

W^ard (} 

Ward 7 

AVard S 



THE CITY ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the City Manager Woodbury' Brackeii, City MaiKiocj- 

Airport Deparimene WooDBliR^■ Brackeip, City Manager 

Assessing Deparemene C. Fred Molh.ton, Assessor 

Sidney Dach, Assessor 
John J. Hallinan, Assessor 

CuY Hall Deparimene Arihur E. Roby, City Clerk 

En(;ineerin(; Deparemeni Edward E. Beane, City Engineer 

EELswoRrn B. Phiebrick, Engineering Inspector 
J. Shepard Norris, Sealer of JVeiglits and Measures 

Financ:e DEPAREMENr \rchie N. GoLRi e-s , City Auditor 

Amos B. Morrison, City Colhu tor 
Wallace W. Jones, City Treasurer 

Fire Deparimeni Ci.arenc:e H. Green, Eire Chief 

Henry E. Drew% Deputy Eire Chief 

Duncan M. Murdoch, 2}id Deputy Eire Chief 

Joseph F. Greenough, Jr., 2nd Deputy Eire Chief 

HEAi.rH Department Pierre A. Boucher, m.d.. City Physiria)i 

AusriN B. PRESB'i', Sanitary Inspector 

Legal Department Gordon S. Lord, City Solid tor 

LIBRAR^' DEPARiMENr IvEiiii DoMs. I.ihraria)! 

SiRi M. Andrews, Assistant Lihxiri/ni 

Personnel Deparimeni W^oodbury Brackei r. City Manager 

Planning Department Gusiaf H. Lehtinen, Pla)ining Director 

Police Depariment Arihur W. McIsaac:, Police Chief 

J. Edward Silva, Deputy Police Chief 

4 " " City of Concord 



I'l BLu; Works 1)i p arimkni WcjoDiuiRv Brackeii, City M(ina<rer 

Ei)\v \Ri) L. HovvLANi), Farh (uul Cemetery Superintendent 

Wii.i.iAM H. MuRPHV, Sciver Superintendoit 

Edward E. Hf.ani,, Tree ]Varde)i 

Purchasing Dki'ARimi ,\ r VVoodburv Brackkit, City Manager 

Records Dkpari mkn r Arihur E. Roby, City Clerk 

Recreation Deparimeni Paul G. Crowell, Playground Supervisor 

Water Departmeni G. Arthur Faneuf, Water Superintendent 

Welfare Deparimeni Gerirude E. W^atkins, Acting Welfare Director 

Charles P. C(jaki.e^ , Ox'erseer of Poor, W^ard 1 

THE MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judiciary Donald G. Mai son, Judge 

Peter J. Rin(;, Special Judge 

C Murray' ,Sa\v\er, Clerk of Court 

C. Murray Sa\v\ er, Probatioii Officer 



MUNICIPAL BOARDS 

December .SI, 1950 



Board of Building Appeals 
Eugene V. Magenau, Chaiiinan 
George Bouley 
Carroll Garland 
A. Clittord Hudson 
Arnold Peneion 



Board of Health 
Ihoinas M. Dudley, m.d. 
Pierre A. Boucher, \ld. 
Clinton R. Midlins. \ld. 



Cliaii 



Library Board 

Willis D. Ihonipson, Jr., Chairman 
Ralph Avery 
Harold W. Bridge 
Josej>h J. Conii 
John F. iMacEachran 
Sara B. Magenau 
Mayland H. Morse, Jr. 
Martha G. Upton 

Personnel Advisory Board 
Douglas B. Whiting, Chairman 
WilHam H. Macmcla 
I. Mitchell Ahern 



City Planning Board 
Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 
Edward E. Beane 
Woodbury Brackett 
Charles C. Davie 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Douglas N. Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
A. (^liHord Hudson 
]ohu B. Jameson 

Board of Plumbing Examiners 

Arthur W^ Sargent, Chairman 
George E. Young 
Edwaid E. Beane 

Trustees of Trust Funds 
Rol)ert M. Beyer 
Wallace W. Jones 
Leon S. Merrill 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 
Ehvin L. Page, CJiairiiKui 
A. CI i fiord Hudson 
Raymond V. LaPointe 
Donald G. Matson 
Lawrence J. Moynihan 



Annual Report 




City of Concord, New Hampshire 
Office of the City Manager 

To the Honorable Mayor, City Council, (tnd Citize)is of Cojicord: 

1 he first year of operation under the Council-Manager form of gov- 
ernment lias been an eventful one. 

Concord has one of the best and clearest-cut City Charters of any 
city in the country. Under its provisions the possibility of political in- 
terference with administrative functions is cut to a minimum. As re- 
quired by the Charter, a Merit Plan for city employees was adopted 
and a Personnel Appeal Board apjjointed. Also, an Administrative 
Code setting forth the functions and relations of each department was 
completed. 

Accomplishments dining this first year were many. Departmental 
reorganization and the introduction of more efficient business methods 
brought aboiu savings that would have residted in more than $4.00 off 
the tax rate. This saving was reduced to a $1.15 tax-rate reduction by 
increased school costs, city debt requirements, and of comse, the rapid 
rise in the cost of materials and wages, due to conditions well known 
to all. 

Many of the City's services were extended and improved. A com- 
plete reappraisal of all property for tax pinposes is well under way, 
and plans are imder consideration for the solution of our serious 
sewer and drainage problem. 

There are some serious problems facing your City Government. Not 
the least of these is the growing demand for more and better services 
at a time when costs are mounting rapidly, and the amoiuit of tax the 
property owner can pay appears near the breaking point. Concord's 
problem is made more serious by the fact that forty percent of the 
valuation is tax exempt. This makes our challenge greater and the 
need for the utmost vigilance and most efficient management a ne- 
cessity. 

In a report such as this the citizens, officials and employees who have 
worked hard to make Concord a better city cannot be listed by name, 
but without their untiring efforts little could have been accomplished. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VVOODIUIRV Brackett, 

City Manager 



'"pTTTT? The council meets regularly at 7:00 

J- -LXXZ/ P.M. on the second Monday of each 

^-^-_.,__-^_ - •^/'^T T1VT/^^TX nionth. In addition, special meetings 

y^\^ J_ j[ C-jCJ U iN V 7 1 i y ^^^^ be called by the city manager or 

by a majority of the council for the 
.^.^^^.^^^^^^^^^.f^^^^^^^^^^^^f^f^^^^f^f^^^^r^f^^^^ consideration of urgent business. All 

meetings of the city council are open 
Membership: to the public. 

Councilmen-at-Large 6 During 1950, the council held 12 

Ward Councilmen 9 regular meetings, five special meetings 

ExpENDiTURFS- and ten public hearings. Twenty-seven 

Operating . $.8,000.00 ordinances and 41 resolutions were 

enacted during the year. 

Major Council Action 

The City Council is the governing At its organization meeting held 

body of the city. Its fifteen members, January 9, the city council elected 

six of whom are elected at large and Shelby O. Walker to the office of 

one each from the city's nine wards, mayor, and J. Richard Jackman to 

adopt city ordinances, establish city the office of mayor, pro-tem. By 

policy and see that the city manager, unanimous vote, Woodbury Brackett 

who is their appointee, conducts the was elected city manager to take office 

affairs of the city in the best interests on February 15, 1950. 

of the citizens. In March the council approved 

City Manager Woodbury Brackett and Mayor Shelby Walker 




Annual Report 



4 :.^.^jM^i^^ 



^^.^^k'L^ 



*y^j*^ 



%a^jm 



First meeting of the new City Council 



:i proi:)()secl system oi federal-urban 
streets loi' submission to the state 
iiighway commissioner and the federal 
l)iireaii of roads. 

Also in March, the city manager 
was authorized to re-organi/e the fi- 
nancial administration of the city to 
effect centralized control of all minii- 
cipal financial activities. 

The city coinicil tackled the park- 
ing problem in the downtown area on 
April 10 by authorizing the city man- 
ager to investigate and report on vari- 
ous off-street p a r k i n g proposals. 
Council consideration of the vari- 
ous aspects of this diffictdt problem 
continued Avithout letuj) through the 
year. 

A complete appraisal and revalu- 
ation of jiroperty in Concord was au- 
thorized on April 10. The firm of 
Cole - Layer - Trumble Comj^any of 
Dayton, Ohio was emjjloved to dcj 
this work at a cost of .^36,000.00. 

At a special meeting held June 7, 
the council adopted personnel rules 
and regulations governing city em- 
ployees. These rides and regidations, 
which were adopted in accordance 
with charter requirements, were estab- 
lished to provide a system of person- 
nel administration based on merit 
principles and designed to secine effi- 
cient service. 



On September II, tiie c (j u n c i 1 
amended the official map of the city 
by adding thereto a south-east section 
whicli includes a large portion of the 
street pattern of the Concord Plains 
area. By law, the map is deemed to 
be final and conclusive with respect 
to the location and width of streets 
and the location of }jarks. 

A major improvement of the city's 
rmal highway system was voted at a 
jiublic hearing held October 28. This 
involved the relocation and recon- 
struction of more than a mile of Lake- 
view Drive bet^veen Hutchins Street 
and Little Road. Work on the i:)rojec t, 
\\hicli is being done as part of the 
town-road-aid program, was well ini- 
der way at the end of the year. 

fn accordance with provisions of 
the charter, classification and compen- 
sation plans were enacted by the coun- 
cil at its regular October meeting. The 
various positions in the city service 
and their salaries are fixed by these 
plans. 

Probably the most important single 
action of the council in 19.30 was the 
adoption of an administrative code on 
December 1 1. 1 he code establishes the 
departments and boards of the city 
government and defines the duties 
and responsibilities of each dej^art- 
ment head. 



8 



City of Concord 



CITY CLERK 



Employees: 
Full-time 



Expenditures: 
Oj^eratiiig . 



$11,768.:^ 



Reo rganizatio n 

Under the new administrative code, 
the city clerk's office became tlie rec- 
ords department. Most ol the finan- 
cial duties ot the office were trans- 
ferred to the new finance department. 
The department's office was moved 
across the hall to quarters formerly 
occupied by the tax collector. 

rhe functions of the department 
include those which relate to the con- 
duct of city council affairs, the re- 
cording of vitaf statistics, mortgages 
and conditional sales, the conduct of 
elections, the collection of certain li- 
censes and fees, and the keeping im- 
portant documents. The city clerk 
also operates the city hall department, 
which is charged with the mainte- 
nance of the city hall and auditorium. 

Vital Statistics 

The downward trend of births, 
noted in last year's report, continued 
in 1950. The city clerk recorded a to- 
tal of 828 births as against 866 in 1949 
and 1,077 in the post-war peak year 
of 1947. There was a corresponding 
decrease in deaths, with 624 recorded 
as compared with 662 for the jjrevious 
year. As a result, the Concord birth 
rate continued to run ahead of the 
death rate for the fifth consecutive 
year. 

There was no appreciable change 
in the nimiber of marriages in the 
city. The 1950 total of 331 was only 
one greater than the total recorded 
in 1949. 



Licenses, Fees, Etc. 

Auto permit fees were collected by 
the city clerk until mid-year when 
this function was assumed by the col- 
lection division of the finance depart- 
ment. Receipts from certain other 
fees, the collection of which con- 
tinue with the city clerk, amounted 
to $10,304.78. 

More than 2,200 dogs were licensed 
dining the year, an all-time record 
high for the city. Receipts from this 
source amoimted to $4,759.25. The 
large number of licenses issued was 
attributed by the city clerk to the 
house to house canvass made by the 
police department in April listing in- 
formation which included the names 
of all dog owners. 

Mortgages and Conditional Sales 

Despite federal restrictions placed 
on time payments, the number of 
chattel mortgages and conditional 
sales recorded by the city clerk in- 
creased in 1950. Receipts for this serv- 
ice totaled $1,841.30. 

Elections 

The state j^rimary and state elec- 
tion were held in 1950. The city clerk, 
as an agent of the secretary of state, 
directed election formalities in the 
city. 

The clerk handled 202 applications 
for absentee ballots. Of the ballots 
mailed out, 176 were returned in time 
to be counted on the day of election. 

The city's 1950 election expendi- 
tures amounted to $5,485.44. 

Other Activity 

In addition to the duties of clerk 
of the city council and keeper of 
municipal records, the city clerk was 
elected to hold the position of city 
manager from January 9 to February 
15, 1950 pending the arrival of Mr. 
Woodbury Brackett to assume the of- 
fice. 



Annual Report 



A Q ^ Th ^ Q A/T Th 1\J HP intlustrial machinery in Concord. Vhe 

IX. v3 v3 d v3 >3 -LVX 12/ J.\| X Cole-Layer-Tnmible Company, pro- 

lessional appraisers, ot Dayton, Ohio 

were employed to carry out this work 

Employees: at a cost of $36,000.00. An appraisal 

Full-time 3 ot all tax-exempt property in the city 

Part-time 2 will also be made at no additional 

Expenditures: *"^?t-', ■ • , ■ , 

„ . , . o K .o w> ^^^^ pro]ect involves measurnie and 

Operating S 3,543. ,• ,• n V -i r i i i .• 

i & ^ ■'•"•■' listing all buildings, and calculating 

'*'*^'*'*'*^'**'*^*^'*'*^'^'*^*^*'«^'^'^'^*^^*^'^^ the separate value of each building 

and parcel of land. Each property will 

^ ^^^^ be reviewed in the field for accuracy 

County, city and school tax war- and equalization of comparative val- 

rants submitted to the collector in nes. These values will be used by the 

1950 totaled SI, 962,780. 19. The 1950 city assessors in setting tax assessments 

tax rate, based on .$1,000.00 of as- for the year 1951. 

sessed valuations, was $49.20 in the Assessors 

city and S60.03 in Penacook as com- .^,, . , . , 

pared with 1949 tax rates of $51.35 , I he new city charter requires that 

and $59.00 respectively. '^]^\^ '^''^^^ '^.^ '^"'^^ assess()rs appoint- 

The 1950 assessed valuation of prop- ^^^ '^y ^^^^ city manager. This repre- 

erty in Concord totaled S38,782,444.()0 f "^^ '' ''''''^f departme Irom the 

an increase of $16,464.00 over the ^"^"/^'" Pi^^edure ol electing assessors 

previous year. Polls and property val- '^^ }}^ polls. 

nations exempt from taxation totaled ^^ ^ssrs. C. I<red Moulton, Sydney 

SI 044 33'^ 00 Dach and John ). Hallinan were ap- 

' r pointed assessors by the citv manager. 

Revaluation j^jj, \jo^,ito,i ^^as transferred to 'his 

In June 1950, wr^rk wms started on new duties from the engineering de- 

the revaluation and equalization of partment A\here he served as assistant 

tax assessments on all real estate and city engineer. 

Tax assessment field survey crew measures a house 

I ■ 

* ^^v 




LEGAL 
E R V I C E 



Employees: 

Part-time 1 

Expenditures: 

Operating $2,715.75 



New Charter 

The City of Concord acquired a 
new basic law for the government of 
its municipal affairs in 1950. 1 he new 
charter, which took effect on January 
9, 1950, is a brief document in which 
legal terminology has been reduced to 
a mininunu so that it can easily be 
luiderstood by the layman. 

Although the charter attained clar- 
ity, it dicl not dispense with the need 
for legal interpretation in applying 
its requirements to the conduct of city 
government. The considerable body 
of ordinance law, enacted over the 
years, had to be reviewed to determine 
what parts were so re})ugnant to the 
terms and declared purjjoses of the 
charter as to be aiUomaiically re- 
voked. 

A large number of ordinances re- 
quired revision to bring them into 
line with the council-manager form 
of government. In several instances, 
where these ordinances related to the 
every-day conduct of city affairs, temp- 
orary measures were devised to permit 
uninterrupted service to the j>ublic 
until new ordinances could be pre- 
pared and presented to the city coun- 
cil for enactment. 

Administrative Code 

The city solicitor assisted the 
city manager in preparing an adminis- 
trative code for submission to the city 
council. The code establishes the de- 



partments and boards of the city gov- 
ernment and defines the scope of their 
activities. It also describes the duties 
and responsibilities of each depart- 
ment head. 

Merit Plan 

The solicitor aided in the drafting 
of a merit plan. The plan fixes the 
rules governing the selection, advance- 
ment and separation of city employ- 
ees. It also includes a comprehensive 
compensation schedule for all posi- 
tions in the municipal service. An- 
other important feature of the plan is 
the detailed job specification wherein 
the qualifications and types of duties 
required in each position are pre- 
scribed. 

Litigation 

Criterion Services Inc. vs City of 
Concord This was an appeal from 
an order of the zoning board of ad- 
justment which declined to authorize 
the petitioner to erect advertising 
signs in a general residence district. 
The petitioner removed its signs and 
withdrew its appeal. 

Colonial Realty Company vs. City 
of Concord This was an appeal from 
the denial of an application for a per- 
mit to construct a driveway across the 
sidewalk at a location north of the 
Pahsi Block and south of the Elks' 
Club on North Main Street. Follow- 
ing a re-hearing before a committee 
of the city council, the permit was 
granted subject to restrictions and 
limitations acceptable to both the city 
government and the petitioner. 

Bickford, el al. vs. City of Concord 
In January, 1950, tlie boarci of alder- 
men pursuant to an agreement with 
the State of New Hampshire, discon- 
tinued a part of Eastman Street to ve- 
hicular traffic. The petitioners ap- 
jjealed from the discontinuance and 
fiom the award of damages. The case 
has been referred to the Merrimack 
County Commissioners for hearing. 



Annual Report " " 11 




City Treasurer Jones. City Auditor 
Gourley and Tax Collector Morrison 

FINANCES 



Employees: 

Full-time '. 8 

Part-time I 

Expenditures: 

Operating $21,200.16 

Capital " % 7,694.76 



Centralized Accounting 

Early in 1950, the city manager took 
steps to centralize the accounting and 
other financial activities of the city. 
The firm ol Roliert Douglas & Com- 
jjany, certified public accountants, of 
Boston, Massachusetts was engaged to 
make a survey and to submit recom- 
mendations to accomplish this pur- 
pose. The result was the establishment 
of a finance department to perform 
the functions of auditing and accoinit- 
ing, collection, custody and disbin.se- 
ment of funds. 

The finance department is luider 
the direction of the city auditor and 
consists of three divisions; auditing, 
collection and treasury. Mr. Archie N. 
Gourley, formerly assistant city treas- 
urer, was appointed to the post of city 
auditor. 



Auditing 

The auditing di\isi(jii is luider the 
innnediate supervision of the city au- 
ditor. The division pre-audits claims, 
post-audits collections and disburse- 
ments, handles the acctnuuing lor all 
financial transactions and assists the 
city manager in the preparation and 
adnn'nistration of the annual budget. 

Collection 

riie collection division, under the 
su]jervisi(jn of the city collector, is 
charged with the collection of all 
taxes, aiuo permit fees, water and 
se\ver rentals, departmental licenses 
and permits, and miscellaneous re- 
ceivables. Mr. Amos B. Aforrison, lor 
many years city tax collector, was 
placed in charge of the new collection 
division. 

Because of provisions of state law, 
the (ollection of dog taxes and certain 
other fees was continued with the city 
clerk. Also, as a matter of convenience 
to the public, certain othei revenues 
are collec ted at the cemetery office, the 
golf coinse and the jjolice station. 

Treasury 

rhe treasurer is responsible for the 
custody and disbursement of all city 
funds, including general, water, sani- 
tary sewer, parking meter, bond and 
trust fluids. 

Mr. Carl H. Foster, city treasurer 
since 1920, resigned during the year. 
Mr. W'allace W. |ones was appointed 
to fill the vacancy. 

Accounting Mechanized 

As part of the financial re-organiza- 
tion, accounting machines have been 
installed to enable the staff to perform 
their work more accurately and effi- 
ciently. Aj:)propriation accounting has 
been mechanized, and all money re- 
ceived by the collector is mechanically 
recorded and classified as received 
c^ver the couiuer. 



12 



City of C Oil cord 



PLANNING 

Employees: 

Full-time 2 

Expenditures: 

Operating $8,369.96 

Highways 

Working in cooperation with the 
state highway department, the plan- 
ning board mapped for approval of 
the city council and submission to 
the federal bureau of roads a pro- 
posed system of federal-urban streets. 
Bureau of road approval of the sys- 
tem will make federal funds available 
on a participating basis for imjjrove- 
ment of certain major streets pre- 
sently the sole resjjonsibility of the 
city. 

Dining the year, plans were pre- 
pared for the relocation of Canal and 
Walnut Streets in Penacook. These 
plans, which call for a new bridge 
over the Contoocook River to replace 
the so-called Twin Bridges, were pro- 
jected in the process of locating a tan- 
nery addition so as not to interfere 
with the orderly development of the 
Penacook street system. 

Other 1950 highway study j^roblenrs 
resulted in reconmiendations relating 



to the extension of the throughpass, 
the laying out and re-location of a 
part of Lakeview Drive, the widening 
of a section of South Spring Street and 
the intersection of Washington Street 
and Borough Road in Penacook, and 
the discontinuance of a portion of 
Eastman Street. 

Major Street Plan 

One of the planning board's pri- 
mary projects, the preparation of a 
comprehensive street plan, moved a 
step closer to completion during the 
year with the adoption of a major 
street plan for the south-east section 
of the city. This plan, which covers a 
large section of the Concord Plains 
area, was established as part of the 
official map by the city council on 
September 1 1, 1950. 

Off -Street Parking 

Past proposals for ofE-street park- 
ing were reviewed Ijy the planning 
board. In this connection the board 
recommended to city council the con- 
struction of a parking lot in the 
area between North State and Green 
Streets soiuh of the Christian Science 
Church. The board also recommend- 
ed that parking lot possibilities in the 
Low Avenue area be studied. 

Zoning 

rhe board processed fom- proposed 
amendments of the zoning cjrdinance. 



The public gives its attention to the parking problem at a hearing in the 

council chamber 




I'hese iiuiucled proj^osals lo le/onc 
the Daniel Webster sul^divisioii on 
Penacook Plains Ironi an agricultural 
to a general residence district, to re- 
vise the local business district at the 
junction of Loudon, Pittsfield and 
Sheep Davis Roads on Concord Plains, 
to permit trailer camps in certain dis- 
tricts, and to increase the minimum 
requirements relating to setbacks ol 
buildings on corner lots. 

Subdivision Control 

A major planning accomplishment 
was the adoption ot sidodivision con- 
trols. Under authority of an ordinance 
enacted late in 1949, the jjlanning 
board developed regulations govern- 
ing the new subdivision of land. 
Tliese regidations, which were de- 
signed to promote the orderly de- 
velopment of the comnuuiity, were 
adopted by the board on February 7, 
1950. 

Special Assessment 

At the request of the city manager, 
the planning board studied special 
assessment fmancing of pidjlic im- 



j>r()vements. Ihe jnnjjose of this in- 
\estigation Avas the preparation of an 
ordinance which would permit the 
city to exercise the jiowers of special 
assessment contained in sections 42 
and 1 -^ of the new charter. A proposed 
ordinance was submitted to the city 
council for its consideration. 

Tax-Exempt Property 

A listing ot all tax-exempt projjerty 
in the city was prepared for sidjmis- 
sion to the joint interim committee of 
the legislature studying tax-exemj:)- 
ticjn laws. The study shcjwed that of 
a tfjtal valuation of .Sfi(),()33,79().()0, 
non-taxable property accoimted for 
.1^27,251,350.00 or 41.:^ percent. 

Other Activities 

Other 1950 activities of the plan- 
ning board included the preparation 
of an ordinance governing trailers 
and trailer camps, the drafting of 
street imprcjvement regidations, the 
listing of all forest lands owned by 
the city, and the checking of varic;)us 
city-owned tracts of land projicjsed for 
sale. 



A scale model of the proposed Low Avenue off-street parking structure 




14 " " City of Concord 



PUBLIC 

HEALTH and 

SANITATION 



Employ F.Ks: 

Full-time 2 

Part-time I 

EXIMNDI ri'RKS: 

Oljerating $15,701.00 



Health Conditions 

Jt is becoming increasingly difficult 
to jjresent a true picture of public 
health as it relates to conmuuiicable 
diseases. This is due to the fact that 
many of the so-called children's dis- 
eases are not rej^orted because the 
period of illness or convalescence has 
been cut markedly by the use of new 
drugs administered on early diagnosis. 

Four cases of scarlet fever and sev- 
eral of whooping cough and measles 
were reported in 1950. I hree children 
were also reported as ha\'ing polio- 
myelitis. 

Immunization Clinics 

Twelve clinics were held during the 
year at which 385 treatments were 
given for protection against diptheria, 
whooping cough and tetanus. Seventy- 
six children were vaccinated. 

It has l)een many years since dipthe- 
ria was reported and it is hc:)ped that 
whooping cough will be much less 
severe each year until that, too, has 
disappeared. 

Sanitation Program 

Ihe health department received 
127 sanitation complaints during 
1950. 1 hese were investigated and fol- 
lowed up to insure abatement of nui- 
sances. Routine inspections of alley- 
ways were conducted, and 1,321 in- 



spections (jf lestaurants, markets, 
stores, bakeries and other locations 
were made during the year. 

Nine visits were made to nursing 
homes and 14 to homes for boarding 
or day care of children for the pur- 
]K>se of determining conditions of 
sanitation. One court case involving 
a health nuisance was prosecuted. 

On December 1st, Mr. Ellsworth B. 
Philbrick, sanitary officer since 1937, 
was transferred to the engineering de- 
partment. Mr. Austin B. Presby, the 
dejxirtment's milk inspector, assumed 
the added duties of the sanitary in- 
spector. 

Vital Statistics 

Ihe health department recorded 
610 deaths in Concord during 1950. 
This represents a decrease of 40 from 
the total of the previous year. Of the 
1950 deaths, 260 were residents and 
350 were non-residents. 

The accompanying tabulation 
shows the number of resident deaths 
from the seven most conuuon causes 
during the past five years. 

Milk Control 

The 1950 average daily consump- 
tion of milk in Concord was 14,800 
cpiarts. Of this amount, 83 jjer cent 
was pasteurized. In addition, heavy 
cream consumption averaged 400 
quarts daily. The milk industry which 
served the local market during 1950 
included 126 producers, 13 producer- 
dealers and nine pasteurization plants, 
laming the year. 1 1 producers went 
out of lousiness as against four new 
sources of supply. 

The quality and cleanliness of milk 
sold in the city was maintained at a 
high level by a continuing program of 
collection and analysis of samples. A 
total of 2,251 milk and cream samples 
^vere processed during the year. 1 his 
testing residted in the condenuiing of 
4()0 quarts of milk as sub-standard. 

Routine inspection of milk produc- 
tion facilities and equij^ment is an 



Annual Report 



13 



importaiiL ,... t ot the milk control were very good, 4 per cent were pass- 
program. During the year, 544 in- able and 23.9 per cent were unsatis- 
spections were made at dairies and iactory. Inniiediate steps were taken 
270 at milk plants. Thirty-nine milk lo correct unclean conditions, 
truck inspections were also conducted. There has been a noticeable im- 

Restaurant Inspection proxement in the methods used by 

.,, f ^, ,. . . ,. , Concord restaurants to nisure proper 

All ot Concords eatnig establish- it t ■ ^ -ru- u 

, P ,. ,, , cleanhness ot equipment. This has 

ments w^ere insi^ected periodically tor , i- i i i .i 

, ,. T^ • I ^ • been accomplished by the cooperative 

cleanliness. Particular attention was rr r i . 

placed on the sterility of glassware, ^^^"^ ^^ '^^ ov^nevs, managers and 

dishes, silverware and other articles employees of the city s eating estab- 

used in the preparation and serving lishments. Further gains are antici- 

of food. A total of 685 swab rinse P'^ted as food handlers become better 

samples were collected and analyzed. acquainted with essential sanitary 

Of the samples collected, 72.1 per cent jjrocedures. 

19-16 1947 194S 1949 19=>0 

Diseases of the circulatory system .... Ill 127 139 108 114 

Cancer and other malignant tumors . . 37 45 40 31 54 

Nephritis ' 7 13 13 10 2 

Accidental deaths 24 18 14 12 12 

Pneumonia 13 12 11 16 6 

Diabetes mellitus 14 9 8 13 10 

Puberculosis 5 3 4 2 2 



RECREATION 



Employees: 

Full-time 3 

Part-time 1 

ExPENDirilRES: 

Operating 124,461. (Hi 

Capital ^ S 308.70 



Playgrounds and Pools 

Ihe recreation department oper- 
ated nine playgrounds and eight wad- 
ing pools during the summer of 1950. 
Attendance at the summer play areas 
was 59,094, an increase of approxi- 
mately 4,000 over the 1949 total. 

The playground recreation ]>rogram 
highlighted league baseball games in 
three age-group divisions. A "jjint- 
sized" diamond was developed at 
White Park for Little League baseball 
games. 



The routine summer playground 
program was expanded to include 
handicraft taught by a full-time in- 
structor. 1 he program also included 
horseshoe pitching with an end-of-the- 
season tournament at Rollins Park. 

Red Cross instructors taught swim- 
ming at the wading pools throughout 
the summer season. Ihis activity 
served the dual purjjose of making it 
])ossible lor scores of children to en- 
joy more fully a fine ty]je of recreation 
and to gain basic knowledge in water 
safety. 

Skating and Coasting Areas 

Seven skating areas of which six 
were in the outlying sections of the 
(ity were oj^erated during the winter 
season. 1 he center of skating activities 
was the jjond at \\4iite Park where as 
many as 350 skaters were counted on 
a Sunday afternoon. .Another popular 
attraction at White Park was the regu- 
lation hockey rink which was used ex- 
tensively by the older boys. 



IG 



City of Concord 




The Welding pool at W bite Park 



Fourteen street coasting areas were 
set aside in various sections ot the 
city lor use and enjoyment of neigh- 
borliood children. 

Beaver Meadow Golf Club 

I'he municipal golt course con- 
tinued to attract a large lunnber of 
users. A total of 147 adult season tick- 
ets were sold as compared to 137 in 
1949. Total revenue from operations 
during the seven-month season was 
,^4,694.00. 

During the year, eight tomnaments 
were held at the club. I hese were rini 
under the able direction ot Mrs. Ruth 
LeBlanc, club manager. 

Maintenance work included the re- 
loaming of all greens and fairways. 
I'hese areas were fertilized twice din- 
ing the year. As a residt, the greens 
were in excellent playing condition. 
Other major maintenance Avork in- 
volved the rebuilding of the firei^lace 
in the club house loimge. 

Memorial Field 

Memorial Athletic Field played an 
imjiortant part in the city's 1950 sj:)ort 



activities. It was used as the home 
field for the football games of the 
public and parochial high schools. 
Concord High School also held four 
track meets at the field. 

The baseball facilities at the field 
were used for after-supper games by 
the City Softball League. I he Chmc h 
Baseball League also used the play 
areas on Satmday mornings. An effort 
was made to promote night softball 
using the field lights, but play was 
discontinued due to lack of j^ublic 
interest. 

Fhe six clay courts at the field were 
used for quarter-final and semi-final 
l^lay during the 1950 state tennis 
tournament. 

Russell Pond Area 

Because oi a poor snow cover, the 
Russell Pond winter sports area was 
not used as much as in former years. 
\\\e annual winter ski carnival was 
held under adverse weather condi- 
tions and the ski tow operated inter- 
mittently as weather permitted. 

As in former years, all ski trails in 
the area were cleared of brush. 



Annual Report 



17 



LIBRARY 



Employees: 

Full-time 11 

Part-time 1- 

EXPENDIIURES: 

Operating $54,007.00 

Capital ^. .1 499.97 

Income: 

Trusts, etc Sl(i,2r)0.0() 



Facilities and Staff 

The Concord Public Library pro- 
vided reading material and related 
services to residents ot the city 
through its main library, a branch li- 
brary in Penacook, a station in West 
Concord, a book trailer and two hos- 
pital units. During the first half of the 
year, book collections were also main- 
tained in 12 elementary schools. 

Ihe library operated with a staff of 
five professional librarians, four 
clerical assistants, a stenograjjher and 
some part-time assistants. 

Book Collection and Registration 

The library book collection, at the 
end of the year, nmnberetl 59,919 vol- 
umes. During the year, '^,778 books 
were added to the collection and 1,8!}() 
were discarded, resulting in a net gain 
of 1,948 volumes. The collection pro- 
vides about two books per person for 
the j)0|)ulation of Concord. 

The library closed its 1950 oj:)ei- 
ations with 13,117 active registered 
card holders. This indicates that ap- 
proximately one-half of the city's pop- 
idation are library tisers. 

Book Circulation 

More books were borrowed in 1950 
than ever before in this histoiv of the 



library. The book circulation was 
231,170 volumes, an increase of 
11,598 over the previous year. An av- 
erage of 17 books were read by each 
of the registered borrowers. 

Approximately one out of every five 
books circulated was borrowed from 
the branches and the book trailer, a 
division ot the library which showed 
a l)ig circidation increase in 1950. 
1 his trend is interpreted as indicating 
a need for more lil)rary outlets in dis- 
tricts Icjcated at some distance from 
the main lil)rary. 

Of the total circulation, al)out one- 
cjuarter were children's books. This is 
jiarticularly gratifying in that it in- 
dicates the imj)ortant jjart the library 
is playing in helj>ing the youth of 
Concord tco become intelligent adidt 
c iti/ens. 

Other Activities 

in addition to circidating l^ocjks, 
])eriodicals, pictures and pamj^hlets, 
and answering an inniuiieral^le variety 
of reference cjuestions, the library jjro- 
vided many other services for the 
people of Concord. Ihese included 
two "Great Books" discussion groups 
lor achdts, twc;) reading clubs for 
young people, a film j^rogram for the 
yoiuiger children, weekly story hours 
for small children, and instruction in 
the use ot bcjoks and the card catalog 
for all seventh grade students in the 
city. 

14ie library ccjnducted a weekly 
radio program over WKXL which 
featured reviews and discussion of 
books, library activities, and personal 
ajjpearances ot a nimiber of New 
Hampshire authors. 

Other noteworthy acti\'ities were a 
Aveekly book review in the Concord 
Daily Monitor, some 25 appearances 
by staff members before local groups 
to talk on books, and the running ot 
a variety ot changing exhibits at the 
main library. 



18 



City of Concord 



RELIEF 



Employees: 

Full-time 3 

Part-time 1 

Expenditures: 

Operating $111,578.22 

General Trend 

There was a sharp decrease in the 
number ot families receiving aid from 
the city in 1950. Ihis was due to ex- 
pandecl employment opportunities 
which made it possible tor anyone 
capable ot working to secure a lull 
or part-time job. 

Expenditures lor reliel remained 
high in spite of the reduction in the 
number of cases carried by the city. 
This was due to a marked increase in 
the cost of living. 

The majority of the relief case load 
consists of people who are incapaci- 
tated due to illness or physical handi- 
cap. 

Administration 

In January 1950, Overseer Parker L. 
Hancock resigned his office to accept 
appointment as warden of the state 
prison. iMr. Hancock served as city 
overseer of jioor for six years. Miss 
Gertrude E. Watkins of the city relief 
department staff was elevated to the 
position of acting overseer of jjoor. 
Mr. Charles P. Coakley continued to 
serve as overseer of poor in Penacook. 

Four members of the staff left the 
department during the year. Due to 
the decreasing relief load and admin- 
istrative changes, none of the vacated 
positions were Idled. The dejiartment 
staff at the end of the year consisted 
of three persons. 

For many years, the department ad- 
ministered all county relief cases re- 



siding in Concord. Under this ar- 
rangement the county shared in all 
administrative costs. City administra- 
tion of county relief was terminated 
by the county commissioners effective 
as of December 31, 1950. 

Relief Load 

At the beginning of the year, there 
-were 89 active city relief cases repre- 
senting 241 persons. By December, 
this load had been cut to 59 cases and 
120 persons. A total of 120 cases were 
processed by the city relief depart- 
ment dining the year. 

The active county relief case load 
was reduced from 52 to 35 during the 
year. 

Old Age Assistance 

Old age assistance continued to in- 
crease in 1950. The number of cases 
rose from 250 to 274. The city under- 
writes 25 percent of the cost of these 
cases. The remainder is borne jointly 
bv the state and federal governments. 

Relief Costs 

1 he total amount expended for city 
relief during 1950 was .'$108,500.00, of 
which .'$12,500.00 were disbmsed in 
Penacook. At the same time, approxi- 
mately S43,000.00 were spent on 
comity relief cases. 

Reimbursements in the sum total of 
$8,569.97 were received by the de- 
partment during the year. 

Other Activities 

A city work [project was established 
in 1950. All able-bodied men on the 
relief rolls were required to work in 
payment for assistance rendered by 
the city. 

For the first time in many years, 
the relief dej^artment disbmsecl sur- 
plus food conmiodities to relief recip- 
ients. This food was made available 
to relief families in all categories and 
to border-line cases. 



Annual Report 



19 



P/^ T T /^ T7 of stolen property was recovered by 

V>/ -L X V-> J-/ the department. 

PROTECTION r,./^^ 

^r^-f^^^^^^^^^^^^t-ff^^j^^.t'r^^f^^^^-r^r^^^^ i Iic volume of traffic in Concord 

continued to increase during 1950. 

Employees: However, the partial diversion ot 

Full-time Sb through traffic to the new bypass, 

Part-time 2.^ (jpened in November, 1949, brought 

Expenditures: 'i measure of relief to the congested 

Operating 3127.006.19 '^^'^i" "^^^eet area. 

Capital ' $ 10,768.79 '^ '^e department nivestigated 544 

aut(jmobile accidents during 1950. 

'^^'^^^^^f^^^^^^^^^-^^^'^'^'^^^^^'^^^^^'^^^^'^'^*^^ Two j^ersons were killed and 149 

others were injured. 1 he first of these 

Offenses fatalities, which occurred on Septem- 

The police department reported ber 15, 1950, brought an end to the 

3,165 offenses during 1950, 38 more city's all-time record of 654 consecu- 

than the total for the previous year, tive days without a fatal traffic acci- 

Of these offenses, all but 126 were mis- dent, 
demeanors. Automobile cases, alone, 
accounted for 2,614 of the offenses 
brought to the attention of the police. 
The department also handled 8,276 
minor complaints. 

Property valued at $25,567.76 was 
reported stolen to the police during 
1950. An estimated |16,141.35 worth 



Safety 

I'he department continued to phue 
a great deal of emphasis on safety, 
working in close cooperation with the 
Concord Safety Council. In carrying 
out its safety program, the dej^art- 
ment availed itself of every oppor- 



Police tabulate results of annual census of polls 




20 



City of Concord 




Chief Mclsciac inspects neiv city anibidainc 



tuniiy to impress upon the children 
ol Concord the vakie of accident pre- 
vention. Lectures on safety were given 
in all schools, and interest in traffic 
patrols at granniiar schools was main- 
tained at a high le\el. 

Ambulance Service 

Every passing year brings an in- 
creased demand for aml)u lance serv- 
ice. The department answered 985 
calls during the year as compared to 
899 in 1949. 

After ten years of continuous serv- 
ice, the old police ambulance was re- 
placed with a new 1950 Cadillac lim- 
ousine ambulance. 

Traffic Lights 

New traffic lights were installed at 
the junction of I'leasant, South and 
Green Streets. Ihis installation in- 
cluded push button controls for pe- 
destrians as an added factor of safety. 

Parking Meters 

A total of 519 automatic parking 
meters were policed ancf maintained 
by the department in the downtown 



business district during 1950. The 
1950 revenue from these meters was 
,'$42,059.45 as against operating ex- 
penses of $12,273.53 and a depreci- 
ation allowance of |i4,268.32. 
Personnel 

The police department experienced 
several personnel changes during 
1950. Two patrolmen were granted 
leaves of absence, one to serve in the 
armed forces and the other to a posi- 
tion with the FBI for the duration of 
the national emergency. Two patrol- 
men were added to the force and an- 
other was promoted to sergeant. 

Three special officers resigned dur- 
ing the year, llie department re- 
activated and Idled the manpower 
needs of its auxiliary police force for 
service in time of emergency. 

Training Program 

Effective police work depends in 
large measure on continuous train- 
ing. During 1950, an intensive three- 
day firearm training course was 
conducted for all members of the de- 
j^artment. 

Annual Report " " 21 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 



Employees: 

Part-time "1 

Expenditures: 

Operating $5,949.77 

Personnel 

On April 5, 1930, judge William 
L. Stevens retired as justice ot the 
Concord Municipal Court because 
ot constitutional age limitation. At- 
torney Donald G. Matson was ap- 
pointed justice by Governor Sherman 
Adams to succeed fudge Stevens. 

Attorney \Vinslo\v H. Osborne re- 
signed as Clerk ot Court in the tall 
of 1950 due to the pressure ot jMivate 
business. The court appointed At- 
torney C. Murray Sawyer to fill the 
vacancy. 

Sessions 

Regular sessions ot the court are 
held each week day at 9:00 A.xM. tor 
disposition ot criminal matters. Civil 
sessions are held following the hear- 
ing of criminal cases. 1 he court also 
holds many afternoon sessions. 

All regular sessions are open to the 
public and the press. It is the firm 
belief of the presiding justice that 
alert and accurate reporting of all 
court proceedings is a necessary fac- 
tor in protecting the personal and 
)jroperty rights of all citizens who a})- 
pcar in coiat. 

Cases 

During 1950, the court considered 
28 felonies, 3,044 misdemeanors, 158 
small claims cases and 28 landlord 
and tenant actions. The court also 
heard 111 civil actions during the 
year. 

22 " " City of Concord 



Revenue 

Ihe total income ot the court dur- 
ing 1950 was ,1? 16,049.88, ot which 
$2^1 10.95 was spent for supplies, wit- 
ness tees and stenographic services. 
The sum of 87,482.50 representing 
motor vehicle fines, was jxiid to the 
state as recjuired by law. 

A total of .S6, 156.43 was turned 
into the city treasury by the coiut 
in 1950. Ihis was an increase of 
S 1,000.00 over the total tor the previ- 
ous year. 

Courtroom Renovations 

Because a dingy courtroom tends 
to make a bad impression on both 
involuntary and voluntary visitors, 
sj^ecial emphasis was placed on clean 
court facilities in 1950. Toward this 
end, the floor was polished, the walls 
were washed and painted, the ceiling 
was whitened and the lighting was 
improved. 

A room oft the main cotntroom, 
formerly used for the storage of rec- 
ords, was redecorated and pressed 
into service for juvenile sessions of 
the court, interviews betw^een delin- 
quents and the city probation offi- 
cer, and (onterences for attorneys and 
clients. 

Probation 

Fifty-one cases were reviewed by 
the municipal court in juvenile ses- 
sion during 1950 as the result of pe- 
titions for neglected children Ided by 
the state public welfare department, 
and charges of juvenile delinquency 
filed by state and local police. 

Ihe state mental hygiene and child 
guidance clinic, located at the 
W'inant house on Pleasant Street, 
rendered valuable service to the court 
in studying cases of juvenile delin- 
quency. Local school officials were 
also most helpful in assisting the 
court in hantlling many juvenile 
cases. 



FT T^ T-v Regulations (onirolling oil burner 

X Jv Xl installations were rigidly eniorced. 

■ipv -pj >^ np j-> >^ r-p -|- ^^ -]^j In this connection, approximately 
i XV vJ J- III/ V^ 1 1 vy i>l 2,000 inspections of power oil burn- 
ing equiiHuent were made by depart- 
ment inspectors in all sections ot the 
Emim,()\ Kis: city. 

Fidl-time 45 The department availed itselt ot 

Part-time 78 every opportiuiity to promote its con- 
tinuing fne prevention program. 
ExpENDniRKs: Newspaper stories, radio talks and 

Operating ,1>159,7(Ki.5S group discussion were used to focus 

public attention on the need for fire 
hazard elimination. 



Fire and Fire Loss 

The fire department responded to 
762 calls during 1950. Of these, 81 
were bell and 681 were still alarms. 
This represented an increase of 184 
alarms over the total for the previous 
year. 1 he department also answered 
nimierous emergency calls not direct- 
ly connected with firefighting. 

Fire losses for 1950 totaled 
1110,163.03 of which |83,637.24 rep- 
resented structtues and ,|i26,525.79 
contents. The two most serious fires 
in 1950 were the American Fegion 
fire of January 8 with a loss of 
$27,932.20 and the Lyster Block fire 
of December 30 with a loss of 
•IS 12,659.83. 

Fire Prevention 

Depaitment personnel conducted 
2,200 hre inspections dining the year. 
All commercial property in the busi- 
ness district was checkecl regularly for 
possible fire hazards. Routine inspec- 
tion were also carried out at all hos- 
pitals, convalescent homes, schools 
and places of public assembly. 



Training Program 

Effective firefighting requires 
a well-trained fire force. Every mem- 
ber of the department is required to 
participate in the training program 
conducted under the supervision of 
the fire chief. The program is design- 
ed to keep the department's per- 
sonnel abreast of improvements in 
equipment and firefighting methods. 

For the second consecutive year, 
the New Hamj^shire State Fire Col- 
lege was held in Concord imder the 
direction of Fire Chief Clarence H. 
Green. More than 300 firemen from 
all sections of the state attended this 
two-day training session which was 
held at Saint Paid's School. The col- 
lege is sponsored by the New Hamp- 
shire Fire Chief's Club. 

Personnel 

Ihe personnel of the fire depart- 
ment consisted of 45 permanent fire- 
men and 78 call men. This force was 
augmented by an active auxiliary imit 
ready for service in any emergency. 



Fire Losses 



Buildings 
Contents 

Totals 



Value 

,$1,046,000.00 
297,295.00 



Loss 

.S 83,637.24 
26,525.79 



Insurance 

$521,685.69 
179,595.00 



Insiuance 
Paid 

79,386.25 
21,309.29 



Net Loss 

$4,250.99 
5,216.50 



$1,343,295.00 $110,163.03 $701,280.69 $100,695.54 $9,467.49 



Annual Report " " 23 



ZONING 
BUILDING 
PLUMBING 



Employees: 
Part-time 



Expenditures: 

Operating Si 54.82 



Administration 

Uhe administration ol the zoning 
ordinance and the building and 
plinnbing codes was made the re- 
sponsibility of a full-time engineering 
inspector in 1950. Previously, this 
work was performed by the city engi- 
neer. Mr. Ellsworth B. Philbrick of 
the health department staH was trans- 
ferred to the engineering office to fill 
the newly-createcl position. 

Zoning 

The zoning board of adjustment 
considered 23 appeals taken from de- 
cisions of the /oning administrator. 
The board disposed of these cases by 
granting 17, conditionally granting 
two and denying four. 

Building 

The engineering department issued 
212 building permits in 1950. Of 
these permits, 118 were for new con- 
struction and 94 were for alterations 
and repairs. 



The estimated total value of work 
represented by 1950 permits was 
.$2,216,140.00, of which SI, 649,200.00 
was for new construction and |566,- 
940.00 for idterations and repairs. 
Eighty-eight new dwelling units were 
built during the year. 

Noteworthy construction projects 
authorized in 1950 and their esti- 
mated (osts were as follows: audi- 
torium at St. Paul's School 
.$390,000.00; alterations and addi- 
tions at the N.H. State Hospital, 
S2(')0,375.00; science building at St. 
Paul's School, S260,000.00; monastery 
of Carmelite Order of Discalced 
Nuns, .$225,000.00; addition at Brez- 
ner Tannery, ,1ji 175,000.00; remodel- 
ing at Merrimack County Savings 
Bank, .'u; 150,000.00; and plant of Con- 
cord Dairy Company, .5125,000.00. It 
is interesting to note that the first 
four projects listed, with a total value 
of .1)1,1,35,375.00, were non-taxable 
property. 

Plumbing 

Requests for plinnbing permits 
dropped to a ne^v post-war low in 
1950. Ninety-nine permits were is- 
sued as compared with 114 for the 
previous year and 151 for the peak 
year of 1947. 

Ihirty-nine master plumbers and 
22 journeymen were licensed by the 
department dining the year. The 
board of plumi)ing examiners li- 
censed one iie^v master phnnber in 
1950. 



The new addition at the Brezner tannery in Peuacook 

r 7 







PUBLIC 
WORKS 



Employees: 

Full-time 97 

Part-time 1 

ExPENnniJREs: 
Operating 

Highways $209,954.37 

Refuse $ 54,391.03 

Street Cleaning $ 42,275.92 

Sanitary Sewers ....$ 28,187.60 

Engineering .1^ 15,101.04 

Cemeteries .|i 44,818.53 

Parks $ 14,601.13 

Capital I 7,149.30 

Income: 

Sanitary Sewers ^ .'11,707.10 

C:emeteries .fl 15,250.00 



Roads and Bridges 

By a ruling of the state highway 
commissioner, eleven miles of 
heavily-traveled main highway were 
shifted from state to city mainte- 
nance in 1950. As a result, the ^vork 
load of the public works dejjartment 
was measmably increased. The de- 
partment maintained all but 22.23 
miles of the city's 203.24-mile high- 
way system. Ihe remainder was 
maintained by the state and repre- 
sented Class 1 and Class II highways 
located in the rural sections of the 
city. 

Maintenance activities during 1950 
included the application of 234,280 
gallons of tar and asphalt for resur- 
facing and patching streets. In this 
connection, all streets south of Pleas- 
ant Street were tarred and many of 
these were scarified and resurfaced. 
Other routine maintenance included 
the regrading of all gravel roads, the 
construction of three new culverts 



and the relaying ol two existing road 
drains. 

As part of the town-road-aid pro- 
gram, 6,200 feet of Little Pond Road 
was rebuilt and smfaced with mixed- 
in-place asphalt. Dining the year, 
state forces installed a new steel deck 
in the Se^\■al^s Falls Bridge. 'Fhe cost 
of this improvement was borne by 
the city out of bond funds. 

During the winter season, 39,318 
cubic feet of snow was removed from 
city streets, and about 10,000 cubic 
yards of sand was spread on streets, 
sidewalks and railroad crossings. In 
order to better control icy street 
conditions, more salt was used during 
the past winter than in previous 
years. The depai tment spread 78 tons 
of salt in 1950. 

Refuse and Garbage Service 

The sanitation di\'ision of the j^ub- 
lic works department collected 55,262 
cubic yards of refuse in 1950. Horse- 
dra^vn collection wagons were dis- 
continued in favor of a completely 
motorized service. Four miles were 
added to refuse collection routes dur- 
ing the year. 

Continuing the practice of j^revi- 
ous years, table garbage Avas collected 
by private contractors. 

Street Cleaning 

Ihe spring and fall street-cleaning 
program resulted in the removal of 
12,894 cubic yards of sand, leaves and 
other materials from streets. As a part 
of this activity, 669 catch basins were 
cleaned. The work was facilitated by 
use of an eductcjr rented from the 
state highway department. 

Street Lighting 

At a cost of $45,771.22, the city 
maintained 1,680 street lights in 
1950. Although only 11 new lights 
Avere added to the system during the 
year, the service cost the city .14,088.71 
more than was sj^ent in 1949. Ihis 
was due, in large part, tcj increased 



Annual Report " " 23 




liicl charges o\er \vhi(h the city had 
no control. Several char.ges were 
made in the location and intensity oi 
lights to increase the efficiency of the 
system. 

Sanitary Sewers 

Dining the year, the sanitary sewer 
system was extended 1,312 feet in 
Bow Street and 468 feet in Kisherville 
Road. 1 his ^vork was done by a pri- 
vate contractor. Sewer extensions 
Avere also laid in Abbott, Penacook 
and C^rescent Streets. 

The sewer division made 57 new 
house connections and relaid 21 old 
services in 1950. In addition to rou- 
tine maintenance, 203 frozen catch 
i:);!sins were cleared and 33 cellars 
\vere ])umpecl cnit during the year. 

Engineering 

1 he engineering division ran 
15,725 leet of line and grade for 
highway construction projects in- 
volving Lakeview Drive, Brookside 
Drive, Mocjreland Avenue and Put- 
ney Avenue. Grades were also estab- 
lished for 450 feet of sidewalk. 

Other road work included a Inial 
survey of the 5, 120-foot- long Little 
Road Project during which 15 
bounds were set in place, and tlie 
re-establishing of 18,333 feet of street 
layout for the official map. 

Sewer batters were set for 2,548 
feet of construction work. Prelim- 
inary surveys, involving 7,275 feet of 
main, were made for a sewer exten- 
sion to the new Concord Hospital 
site and a storm ^vater chain to the 
C^oncord Drive-In 1 heatre. 



(Top) A grader tackles the job of re- 
building a residential street (Center) 
Workmen remove planking from 
Sewall's Falls Bridge preparatory to 
installation of new steel decking 
(Left) The Snogo does double duty 
in clearing leaves from city streets 



Engineering surxeys were (ondiui- 
ed in connection with tlie pro])().secl 
parking area on Low Avenue, a skat- 
ing rink in Penacook, a parcel ol 
watershed land on Jerry Hill and 
an airport administration building 
grotmds project. A number ol lots 
were also staked out at the Blossom 
Hill Cemetery. 

Dining the year, the d i v i s i o n 
processed 778 deeds, Icjcated all new 
buildings and lot changes and noted 
these de\elopments on the assessor's 
maps. All changes in the street light- 
ing system were also recorded. 

A duplicating service was added to 
the division's functions in 1950. An 
automatic duplicating machine was 
acquired and 51,145 sheets oi printed 
matter were rini lor various city de- 
partments. In addition, 825 square 
yards ot black and white j^rints were 
develojjed by the divisions dralting 
section. 

The division was also vested with 
the responsibility ol jnuchasing office 
supplies lor all city dejiartments. 
Stock room facilities were installed 
and ojjerated in conjiniction with the 
dujilicating 1 miction. 

Parks 

The nuniicipal park system was 
maintained in top-notch Condition 
during H)5() in spite ol an unusually 
chy sunnner. I'articidar emphasis was 
placed on sinnmer maintenance. 1 his 
represented no mean task in light ol 
the tact that the park system includ- 
ed some 84 acres of developed area. 

White and Rollins Parks were used 
extensively by the public for recre- 
ational activities. As a result of this 
use, grounds and facilities in these 



(Top) Quantity production of road- 
patch material at the city sand pit 
(Center) A grader and tar truck team- 
up to re-surface a country road (Right) 
A mechanical spreading unit sanding 
neivly applied tar 




major parks required more than the 
usual amount ol attention. 

During the winter season, the jjark 
division was in charge of the various 
skating areas operated in conjvmc- 
tion with tire retreation department's 
winter sports program. 

Cemeteries 

In August 1950, the (emetery divi- 
sion recorded its 8,()()()th burial since 
the start of a continuing record in 
October 1924. Two hinidred eleven 
interments were made in eight city 
cemeteries during the year. At the 
same time, there were 69 burials in 
the two Catholic cemeteries. 1 he city 
is reimbursed lor the cost of all work 
performed by the cemetery division 
in the church cemeteries. 

Dining the year, 60 lots were sold 
by the cemetery division. Most of 
these lots were of the two-grave type 
and were located in Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. I'rusts were established 
for the care of all new lots sold. In 
addition, seven trusts were establish- 
ed for special maintenance of old 
lots. 

Cemetery maintenance work in- 
cluded the setting out of 200 tulip 
and crocus bulbs at Blossom Hill 
Cemetery, 100 pine trees at Wood- 
lawn and Calvary Cemeteries and a 
number of maple trees at the Maple 



Cirove Cemetery. Heavy storm dam- 
age to trees, requiring extensive re- 
moval and rejjair, was experienced in 
November. 

Other cemetery division activities 
included the surface-treating of three 
miles of roadway in Blossom Hill 
Ometery, the painting of the iron 
fence at Old North Cemetery and the 
(illing-in and loaming of a new sec- 
tion of C^alvary Cemetery. 

Considerable improvement in con- 
ditions affecting routine sinnmer 
maintenance, particularly mowing, 
was noted dining the year. This re- 
sulted from the use of cement liners 
and vaidts \vhich eliminates siniken 
graves, the ))lacing of markers flush 
with the groinid, and the remoxal of 
some cinbing around old lots. 

Trees i 

All city shade trees were sprayed in 
19.50 for insect and blight control. 
Routine pruning and trimming oper- 
ations were carried out, and all de- 
fective trees were remc:)ved. New 
street trees were set out wherever a 
need was indicated. 

High winds accompanying a severe 
south-east storm in November raised 
havoc with many of the larger shade 
trees. Emergency crews Avere j^ressed 
into service to repair the damage 
caused by fallen and broken trees. 



Newly acquired highway maintenance equipment 

and a snow plow 



a grader, a street sweeper 





When poor weather conditions close nearby metropolitan air terminals, this is 
not an uncommon sight at Concord's "fog-free" municipal airport 

MJT IVT T /^ T T) A T Uuring the year, 7,()4() pounds of 

U IMlV^ll l\ 1^ mail, 10,950 pounds of express and 

ATT? T) C~\ T? T"^ 3,258 pounds of freight were handled 

l\ J- -tv X vy XV JL by the airline at its station in the 

,^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^,^^^^.^^^^,^^^^.^,^,^,^^^ airport administration building. 

Airline service included direct 

Employees: flights to and from Boston and New 

Full-time 2 York, and flights to Montreal with 

Expenditures: ^^"P*^. '^"^ Lebanon, Montpelier and 

^ . d-i/^^rvooo limiington. During the sunmier sea- 

^Pef'-^V"^ J ?'innt ^«'i' tl^'e airhne operated a ilight to 

<^^^Pital -> 5.490.44 ^,^^ j^^^^^ ^.^^.^^^/ ^^^ Laconia and 

Income: inaugurated service to the northern 

Rents, etc % 7,546.3-5 P'Ht of New Hampshire by operating 

a flight to Berlin. 

Aeronautics Commission 



Airline Service 

The growing acceptance of air 
travel was reflected by increased use 
of the scheduled airline service at the 
Cloncord Miuiicij^al Airport in 1950. 
Northeast Airlines reported that the 
number of revenue passengers board- 
ing transports at the airport exceedetl 
the 1949 total by 850. A comjxuable 
increase in the number of passengers 
arriving in Concord ^vas also noted. 



The New Hampshire Aeronautics 
Commission, the state regulatory 
agency, completed its first full year 
of operation at the airport. The com- 
mission occujjies office space in the 
airport administration building. 14iis 
arrangement has permitted the com- 
mission's staff to operate with greater 
efficiency, and has at the same time 
brought about an increased use of 
ladlities at the airport. 



Annual Report " " 29 



Other Activities 

The Civil Aeronautics Administra- 
tion's aviation safety and conniumi- 
cation offices continued to operate 
from the airport, as did the Weather 
Btneau. Ihese federal agencies oc- 
cupy the entire second floor of the 
administration. 

Fixed-base commercial flight oj)- 
erations were conducted Irom the 
two city-owned hangars by the Wil- 
liam E. Martin Flying Service and 
the Ferns Flying Service. 

Improvements 

Work was completed in 1950 on 
the grounds improvements in front 



of the administration building. 
These included the construction of 
an automobile parking area, a drive- 
way system, the relocation of the air- 
port memorial, and the rebuilding 
of all grassed areas. At the same time, 
a segmented circle showing runway 
directions and a wind direction 
marker were erected on the flying 
field. Federal and state fluids were 
used to underwrite 75 per cent of the 
cost of these improvements. 

During the coming year, it is pro- 
posed to investigate the need for an 
improved runway lighting system to 
effect greater safety in night flying 
operations. 



WATER 
U P P L 



Y 



Eaii'I.ovkes: 

Full-time f)\ 

ExPENnrrnRKs: 

Operating .|f 4(),6S9.()() 

Income: 

Water Sales, etc .f; 1 67,645.46 

Departmental Reorganization 

With the adoption of the new city 
charter, the board of water commis- 
sioners was abolished and the oper- 
ation of the water department was 
placed luider the jurisdiction of the 
city manager. 

Water dejjartment collections \vere 
transferred from the water office to 
the newly-created finance depart- 
ment. Ihe finance department also 
assumed the responsibility and di- 
rection of all water department ac- 
coimting. 



Water revenue is now deposited in 
the general fund of the city but is 
earmarked for the exclusive use of 
the Avater dejjartment. 

Supply and Consumption 

In 1950, for the third consecutive 
year, rainfall was below normal. Due 
to this lack of precipitation, pimip- 
ing was continued from the auxiliary 
supply at the well field in Pembroke. 
A total of 311,458,700 gallons was 
supplied from this source, and the 
Avell field, once again, proved a \alu- 
able asset to the water system. 

Ihe total water consmnjition for 
1950 was 1,142.895,400 gallons, which 
represents an increase of 12,743,300 
gallons over the total for the previ- 
ous year. Of the total water used, 
646,873,400 gallons ^vere pinnped and 
496,022,000 gallons were supplied by 
gravity. 

Construction and Replacetuent 

Construction ccjntinued on the 24- 
inch supply main being laid along 
North State Street. Nineteen hun- 
dred fifty-three feet of pij^e was 
jilaced dining the year. Construction 



30 



City of Concord 



on this section was particularly dit- 
ficult in that ledge was encountered 
and blasting was not advisable be- 
cause the new line was laid within 
12 inches of an existing 20-inch sup- 
ply main. 

Replacement ot well points at the 
Pembroke ^vell field was continued. 
Fitty-t\\() ^vell casings were with- 
drawn, new well points were installed 
and the wells were redriven. 

Watershed 

Six tracts ot land, containing 112 
acres and located on the Penacook 
Lake watershed, were purchased by 
the water department in 19,50. 'Fhis 
projjerty was acquired in line with 
the dej^artment's policy oi control- 
ling land aroiuid the lake lor greater 
protection ot the city's water supply. 

As part ot the department's water- 
shed forest conservation program, 
5,000 pine seedlings were set out dur- 
ing the year. Prime timber in the 
amount of 10,000 board feet of limi- 
ber was cut in the watershed for 
waterworks use. All of this work was 
done by department personnel. 

Maintenance 

1 he waterworks labor force paint- 
ed the North State Street shop and 
garage, installed a new ceiling in the 
Cohmibus Avenue booster station 
and j^ainted the interior of the struc- 
ture including all equipment. De- 
partment personnel also installed a 
new steam heating boiler and all new 
piping in the heating system of the 
central pumping station. In addition, 
all automotive and service equipment 
was checked and repaired. 

Other maintenance work included 
the cleaning of ^^,567 feet of six-inch 
main, the lowering of 59 valve boxes 
in streets to facilitate the use of snow 
plowing equipment, and the testing 
and repairing of 555 water meters. 

All city fire hydrants were flushed 
in the spring and fall to clean mains 
and check proper hydrant operation. 
Through the ^vinter months, hydrants 
were tested weekly to prevent freeze- 
ups and to check jjossible damage. 



New Equipment 

During the year, the water dejjart- 
ment acquired several needed items 
of ne^v equipment. These included a 
one-half ton G.M.C. pickuj) truck, a 
trailer-mounted four-inch diajjhragm 
ditch pump, a flexible service cleaner 
for reaming out house connections, 
and a Locke .HO-inch jiower lawn 
mower. 

Finances 

1 he municipal water utility show- 
ed a net profit on operations of 
.126,956.46 for 1950. Of this sum, 
,'li24,975.45 represented operating in- 
come and $1,981.01 represented mis- 
cellaneous receipts. 

At the close of the year, the de- 
partment's assets carried a value of 
.f; 1,68 1,488.55, of which fixed assets 
accounted for .|1,440,90!100, cash in 
water bond construction account 
,'li;96,638.77, and current assets $143,- 
946.78. Of the latter sum, $50,720.92 
represented the department's inven- 
tory of materials and supplies. At the 
close of the year, the waterworks 
bonded debt was $199,000.00. 



A tvaterworks employee operates the 

department's newly acquired flexible 

service cleaner to ream out a clogged 

house connection 




FINANCIAL REPORTS 



GENERAL 

Consolidated Balance Sheet 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 

Cnli: 

First National Bank of C'oiicoicl 

Petty cash 

Cash for payment of bonds and interest 

Taxes Receivable: 

Levy of 1930 

Less: Reserve for abatements 



$199,314.45 
17,220.14 



$359,022.67 

965.00 

1,257.50 



$182,094.31 



$361,245. n 



Taxes of prior years 

Less: Reserve for non-collection 



Unredeemed taxes bought by city at tax sale 
Less: Reserve for non-collection 



Miscellaneous Accounts Rcoiiable: 

Water and sewer rentals 

Less: Reserve for non-collection 



Departmental accounts receivable . 
Less: Reserve for non-realization 

Due from Water Bond Fund 



Miscellaneous Assets: 
Public works inventory 
Postage and stationery 



Less: Reser\e for non-realization 



Tax deeded properties 

Less: Reserve for non-realization 



$29,143.23 
29,143.23 

$22,723.00 
14,810.14 



$49,085.24 
4,428.34 

$9,399.33 
1,008.71 



$16,148.73 
385.03 



$16,533.76 
8,074.37 

$3,386.62 
3,386.62 



7,912.« 



$44,656.90 



8,390.62 
8,669.13 



$8,459.39 



190.(107. 



61,716.65 



8,459.39 



Total General Fund Assets 



521,428.38 



On deposit in savings banks 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 



First National Bank — trust fund acciuint 
Loan and Trust Savings Bank 
Merrimack County Savings Bank 
New Hampshire Savings Bank 

L'nion Trust Company 

.Storks and lionris 



$5,516.57 
96,021.69 
101,433.30 
96,114.92 
104.552.93 
177,543.30 



581.182.71 



PARKING METER FUND ASSETS 



Due from Geneial Fund 
Investments in savings bank accounts 
I'ixed assets (net) 



.$20,817.45 
36,090.00 
38,768.84 



95,676.29 



Cash in bank accounts 



BOND FUND ASSETS (Municipal only) 



4.274.96 



CAPITAL FUND ASSETS (Municipal only) 
Bond and note lequirenients. future years, for city and schools 



841,000.00 
$2,143,562.34 



32 



City of Concord 



FUND 



December 31, 19 W 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 



Accounts Payable: 

Ciinent vouchers payable 

Unpresented bonds and interest coupons 

State of New Hampshire — special poll taxes collected 



$72,005.92 

1.257.50 

360.00 



$73,623,42 



Unexpcndi d Apt>>'>P>'>ations: 

Douglas Avenue construction 

School bond and note recjuircmeiits to .June 30. 1951 

Union School District 

Penacook School District 



$668. (H 

4.837. .50 

357,593.60 

34.834.87 



397,934.01 



Due to Other Funds: 

Water Fund 
Sanitary Sewer Fund 
Parking Meter Fund 

Reserve for encumbrances 

Total Liabilities 



$62,254.38 
15.784.24 
20,817.45 



98,856,07 
2.709.00 



$573,122.50 



Current Surplus: 

Available during ne.xt twcK c months 

Total General Fund Liabilities and Sinplus 



48.305.. 



521. 428. S"! 



TRUST FUNDS 



Principal 
Accumulated income 



$555 ,9 7 7.. 58 
25,205.13 



,581.182.71 



PARKING METER FUND 



Fund balance (reserved) 



95.676.29 



BOND FUNDS (Municipal only) 



Current vouchers payable 
Capital sinplus 



$726.35 
3,548.61 



4.274.96 



CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES (Municipal only) 



Bonded Debt and Long-term Notes: 

City activities 

Schools 



$581,000.00 
260,000.00 



841.000.00 
$2,143,.562.3t 



Annual Report 



33 



GENERAL FUND 

Statement of Current Surplus 

For the Year Ending Dkcemdfr 31, 1951) 



lialancr. January I. 1950 

Deduct : 
Portion of opening balance carried forward in 1950 budget and used 
to reduce tax rate 

Remaining balance, as of January 1. 1950 

AH did in 1950: 

llnexpended balances of appropriations 



Excess of actual revenues over budget estimates 

Transfer of excess reserves for non-collection of taxes — net 
Transfer of reserve for Old Age Assistance as of January 1. 1950 



Deduct: 
Transfer to reserve for non-realiration of public works inventory 

Balance, December 31. 1950 



$20,506.57 
11. 844. 56 
15,793.13 
4,516.77 



Statement of Revenues 

For the Year Ending Dexember 31. 1950 



Tax 



Propei ty taxes — current 

Poll taxes — current 

National bank stock tax .... 

Interest, penalties, and costs . . . 
.Auto permits 

Rent and profit — tax deed prop. 
1 axes added — prior years 



State Tax Cdnlrihiitions: 
Railroad tax 
Savings bank tax 
Interest and dividend tax 
Other state collected taxes 



Liifnses and Permits: 

Bicycle registrations 

Taxi licenses 

Health licenses 

Amusement licenses* 

Police and protective licenses 

Profe.ssional and occupational licences 



Registration Fees and Permits: 
Marriage licenses 
Recording fees — legal documents 

riling fees . . 

.Sundry fees — City Clerk 

Dog licenses 



Departmental Serviee Charges: 

Rent of buildings 

Comfort Station 

Golf Club fees 

Memorial Field — royalties 

Memorial Field — concessions 

Airport — rent 

Airport — concessions 

Fines and forfeits — num. court 



Miscellaneuiis: 



Sale of Properties 
All other 



$83,723.36 



80.004. 1-1 
$3,719.22 



52.661.03 

$56,380.25 

8.074.37 

$48,305.88 



Totals 



Budget 


Revenues 






Estimate 


Realized 


Exeess 


Deficiency 


$1,914,474.29 


$1,914,850.82 


.$376.53 




20.570.00 


20.986.00 


416.00 




6.2411.61) 


6.316.60 


76.00 




7.80O.OU 


7.692.19 




$107.81 


72.000.00 


83.291.13 


11.291.13 




1.000,00 


147.26 




852.74 


500.00 


483.00 




17.00 


$2,022,584.89 


$2,033,767.00 


$11,182.11 




$12.0110.00 


$12,037.78 


$37.78 




14.0110.01) 


10.279.58 




.$3,720.42 


81.000.00 


82.629..38 


1,629.38 




30.00 


29.88 




.12 


107. 030. 00 


104.976.62 




$2,053.38 


$600.00 


$533.00 




$67.00 


.500.00 


435.00 




65.00 


350.01) 


349.00 




1.00 


1,200.01) 


1.763.50 


$563.50 




15(».00 


232.50 


82.50 




30.00 


52.50 


22.00 




$2,830.00 


.$3,365.00 


.$535.00 




^600. 00 


$682.00 


$82.00 




1.700.00 


1.983.30 


283.30 




200.00 


89.00 




$111.00 


500.00 


449.70 




50.30 


3,800.00 


4.565.05 


765.05 




$6,800.00 


$7,769.05 


$969.05 




$1,200.0') 


$1,063.03 




$137.00 


250.00 


231.51 




18.49 


4.600.00 


4.710.50 


$110.50 




1.400. 01) 


639.18 




760.82 


250.00 


174.80 




75.20 


7.345.00 


7.433.25 


88.25 




1.50.00 


113.08 




.36.92 


6.000.00 


6.224.41 


224.41 




$21,195.00 


$20,589.73 




$605.27 


,$600.00 


$2,351.00 


$1,751.00 




50.00 


116.05 


66.05 




$650.00 


$2,467.05 


$1,817.05 




.$2,161,089.89 


$2,172,934.45 


$11,844.56 





54 " " City of Concord 






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Annual Report " " 37 



PARKING METER FUND 

Balance Sheet 

December 31. 1950 

Assets: 

Due from General Fund $20,817.45 

Inv-estments in savings bank accounts _ 36. ((90. Oil 

Meters and coin-handling equipment $43,037.16 

Less: Reserve for depreciation 4,268.32 

33,768.84 



$£■5,676.29 



Fund Balance: 

Balance, January 1. 1950 $70.1.53.69 

.Add; Operating income for the year, as below 25,517.60 



Fund balance (surplus) December 31, 195lt $£5,676.29 



Statement of Operations 

For the Year Ending December 31. 1950 

Income: 

Cash receipts from parking meters .$42.(159.45 



Operating Expenses: 

Maintenance salaries $2,899.92 

Parts and supplies 266.92 

Enforcement salaries 5,121.11 

Enforcement supplies 11.75 

Collection salaries 1,219.20 

Collection supplies 48.25 

Accounting salaries 850.79 

Accounting supplies 175. 0() 

Marking streets — salaries 911 .36 

Incidentals 769.23 



12.273.53 
Depreciation: 4,268.32 

Total Operating Expenses 16,541 .85 



Operating income $25,517.60 



38 " " City of Concord 



WATER FUND 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1950 

ASSETS 

Fixed Assets, net of accrued depreciation: 

Water and flowage rights $167,663. 1 1 

Land 147,460.35 

Structures 280,698.84 

Pumping and purifying equipment 50,082.08 

Distribution mains, services and meters 714,112.81 

Other equipment l?'li7'on 

Unfinished construction 41,447.^0 

Cash in water bond construction accounts $105,307.90 

i^ess: Amount to be transferred to city general fund 8,669.13 



$1,440,903.00 



96,638.77 



Total Fixed Assets and Construction Cash $1,537,541.77 

Current Assets: 

Due from Genera! Fund $62,254.38 

Cash in savings banks 30,971.48 

Inventory of materials and supplies 50,720.92 

143.946.78 

Total Current Assets $1 .631 ,488.55 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Capital Liabilities: 

Bonded debt ($19,000.00 of principal due within one year) $199,000.00 

Fund Balance and Surplus: 

Municipal investment $963,194.74 

Contributions in aid of construction 68,851.33 

Surplus— balance January 1, 1950 $.381,893.36 

Add — Adjustment of revenue accounts for prior years as 

result of change in accounting method 41,592.66 

Profit for the year 1950 26.956.46 

450.442.48 



1,482,488.55 
Total Fund Balance $1,681,488.55 



Annual Report " " 39 



WATER FUND 

Statement of Operations 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1950 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Metered sales to general customers 

Flat rate sales to general customers 

Metered sales — industrial 

Sales to other utilities 

Miscellaneous operating revenues 



$131,527.50 

3,828.88 

27,783.93 

2,269.36 

254.78 

$165,664.45 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Water Supply: 

Superintendence 

Source of supply labor 

Pumping station labor 

Pumping station supplies and expenses 

Gravity system supplies and expenses 

Purification labor 

Purification supplies and expenses 

Power and fuel 

Repairs to equipment 

Dhlribution: 

Superintendence 

Labor 

Supplies and expenses 

Repairs to mains, services, hydrants and meters 

Administration: 

Salaries — office and meter readers 

Commercial supplies and expenses 

Stores and shop expenses 

Garage expense 

Office supplies, postage, etc 

Insurance and bonds 

Retirement fund payments 

Miscellaneous general expenses 

Fixed Charges: 

Depreciation 

Taxes 

Interest on funded debt 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating income 

Non-Operating Income: 

Interest 

Equipment rentals 

Gain on sale of capital assets 

Miscellaneous 

Net profit on operations 



$2,.500.00 

3,056.26 

15,362.63 

2,539.04 

169.21 

306.98 

485.36 

12,397.73 

849.00 



$2,500.00 

29,807.96 

1,505.97 

9,375.57 



$8,877.01 

111.01 

611.58 

1.022.03 

470.22 

5,321.88 

5,406.21 

533.44 



$33,470.16 

23.50 

3,986.25 



$456.99 
332.50 
707.82 
483.70 



$37,666.21 



43. 189. .511 



22, .353. 38 



37,479.91 



$140,689.00 
$24,975.45 



1,981.01 



$26,956.46 



40 



City of Concord 



/■iu/l Assil^: 

Land and Rights of Way 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Customer Connections 
Sundry Equipment 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1950 
ASSETS 



Less: Accrued Depreciation 

Ciiiiinl As.uls: 

Due from General Fund .. . 
Cash in Savings Banks 



Total Current Assets 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Current Liabilities: 

Advance Deposits on Customer Connections 

rund Balanee and Surplus: 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Earned Surplus: 

Balance, January 1. 1950 

Add: Profit on Operation for the V'ear 



$21,979.27 
2,79LI6 



Total Fund Balance 



Statement of Operations 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1950 
OPERATING REVENUES 



Sewer Rentals 
Sewer Rentals 
Penalties 
Miscellaneous 



General 
Industrial 



Total Operating Reveiuu-s 



$199.97 
921.901.97 
101,647.12 
128,940.62 

1.536.35 

,154,226.03 
571.907.03 



$15,784.24 
44,621.95 



$481,337.71 
136,512.05 



70.43 



,$582,319.00 



60.406.19 
$642,725.19 



$105.00 



642.620.19 
$642,725.19 



$24,635.32 

5.266.93 

37.57 

646.38 

$30,586.40 



(ieneral Operation: 

Superintendence and Engineering 
Main and Manhole Labor and Expense 
House Connections Labor and Expense 
Maintenance of Sewer Mains 
Maintenance of Manholes 
Maintenance of House Connections 

Customers' Expense (Water Department): 
Meter Readings and Collection 
Billing and Accounting 



OPER.VTING EXPENSES 



Administration: 
Insurance 

Miscellaneous General Expenses 

.Annual Leave. Sick Leave and Holiday Payroll 
Retirement Fund Payments 



Depreciation 

Total Operating Expenses 

Opeiating Income 
Non-operating hu ome: 

Interest on Savings Bank Accounts 



Non-operating Expetists: 

Provision for Loss on Accounts Receivable 

Net Profit on Operations for the Year 



$3,400.00 

1 ,698.95 

355.56 

1,936.111 

616.93 

586.65 



$185.93 
1.621.52 



$206.04 
647.43 

1,656.99 
852.04 



$8,594.19 



1,807.45 



3.362.50 
14.423.46 



1.120.70 

$3,519.50 

728.34 

$2,791.16 



Annual Report " " 41 



ASSESSORS' STATEMENT FOR 1950 



Assessed 
Valuation 
Money raised for the 

State 

County $38,782,444.00 

City Budget 38,782,444.00 

Schools 

*City Union 36,591,262.00 

**Penacook Union 2,200,882.011 

Totals 

Reserve for Abatements 



Amount of 
Appropriations 


Ta. 
Per 


I Rate 
$1,000 








$179,418.74 
882,958.93 


$4.63 
22.53 


806,573.75 
72,333.47 




22.04 
32.87 


$1,941,284.89 
21,416.43 




$1,962,701.32 







Total Requirements 

Warrants Submitted to Collector: 

Real Estate and Personal Property $1,931,490.96 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,240.60 

Timber Yield 878.63 

Polls— Men 4,058; Women 8,027; Total 12,085 24,170.00 

■ $1,962,780.19 

Raised by Supplementary Taxes 789.66 

City Rate . 49.20 

Penacook Rate 60.03 

Average Tax Rate per $1,000.00 of Assessed Valuation for City 49.80 



*Includes property located in Loudon 
**Includes property located in Canterbury 



EXEMPTIONS 

Veterans: 

Property Valuation $1,030,050.00 

Polls (3129) 6,258.00 

Blind: 

Property Valuation 4,000.00 

Polls (12) 24.00 

Other 4,000.00 



Total Exemptions $1,044,332.00 



Assessed Valuations of Various Types of Property 

Type No. Valuation 

Improved and Unimproved Land and Buildings $32,129,444.00 

Mature Wood and Timber 1.0(111.00 

Electric Plants 1,706,15(1.011 

Horses 101 11.7(111.00 

Oxen 2 2l»(l.l)(l 

Cows 1.(148 147.2(»(i.00 

Other Neat Stock 164 14.080.00 

Sheep and Goats 75 780,00 

Hogs 5 125.0(1 

Fowls 25,396 29,712.o:i 

Fur-Bearing Animals 18 18.0(1 

Boats and Launches 1 ,501). 00 

Portable Mills 5(M).0(» 

Wood, Lumber, etc 24.825.00 

Gasoline Pumps and Tanks 24,560.00 

Stock in Trade 3,918,5(K).00 

Machinery 772,150.00 



Total $38,782,444.00 



42 " " City of Concord 



TAX ACCOUNTS 

Statement of Accounts 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1950 



1950 Prior 

Levy Years 



Balance, January 1, 1950 $234,189.31 

1950 Levy Committed to Collector: 

Real Estate and Personal Property $1 ,931 ,490.96 

12,085 Polls 24,170.00 

Bank Stock Tax 6,240.60 

Timber Yield Tax 878.63 

Added Taxes 789.66 483.00 



*Taken as Current Revenue, including National Bank 

Stock Tax $1 ,942, 153.42 

Overlay Reserve 21,416.43 



Age Analysis of Unpaid Taxes Prior to 1930 



I 



Total Charges to Collector *$1, 963, 569.85 $234,672.31 



Accounted for as follows: 

Collections to Treasurer $1,760,059.11 $21(1,017.39 

.'Authorized Abatements 4,196.29 4 511 69 

Uncollected, December 31, 1950 199,314.45 29,143.23 



$1,963,569.85 $234,672.31 





Personal 


Poll 




Property 


Taxes 


Levied for the year 1949 


$1 349 64 


$2 936 00 


1948 


1.083.63 


2,586.00 


1947 


502.10 


2,472.60 


1946 


503.27 


2,190.00 


1945 


233.99 


5,983.90 


1944 


134.29 


4.582.60 


1943 


69.10 


946.60 


1942 


56.70 


953.60 


1941 


79.46 


874.80 


1940 


39.31 


790.20 


1939 


12.29 


763.15 




$4,063.78 


$25,079.45 


Total of Personal Propeity Taxes and Polls 




$29 143 23 












Note: All taxes prior to 1950 are covered by equal reserves for non-collection 







Annual Report " " 43 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statement of Changes in Balances 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1950 



PRINCIPAL ACCOUNT 

Balance, January I, 1950 

New Trusts Received 

Portion of Proceeds of Cemetery Lots and 

Graves ._ 

Gains on Sales of Securities 

Balance of Principal, Decembei 31, 1950 

INCOME ACCOUNT 

Balance of Accumulated Incom?, January 
1, 1950 

Interest and Dividends on Investments 

Portion of Proceeds of Sale of Cemetery 
Lots . ._ 

Income from Trusts where Principal held 
by Other Trustees 

Total Available 

Disbur se ments : 

Transfer to Cemeteries 

Transfer to Library 

Transfer to Schools 

Inter-fund Transfers 

Direct Grants and Expenses Paid to 
v^uiside Parties 

Total Disbursements 

Balance of Accumulated Income, Decem- 
ber 31, 1950 



Cemetery 
Funds 


Library 
Funds 


Other 

Funds 


Total 


$408,136.45 


$128,920.82 


$4,961.73 


$542,019.00 


10.158.47 






10,158.47 


1,070.00 
2,043.10 


687'.0i 




1,070.00 
2,730.11 


$421,408.02 


$129,607.83 


$4,961.73 


$555,977.58 



$20,064.25 
10.727.15 

2,140.00 


$3,391.11 
12,260.80 


$554.05 
137.99 


$20,618.30 
14.256.25 

2,140.00 

12,260.80 


$32,931.40 


$15,651.91 


$692.04 


$49,275.35 


$8,688.57 

" — 'l8.0(i 
1,106.96 


$14,199.69 

'ik'.iio 


$25.00 

50.00 


$8,688.57 

14,199.69 

25.00 

1.156.96 


$9,777.53 


$14,217.69 


$75.00 
$617.04 


$24,070.22 


$23,153.87 


$1,434.22 


$25,205.13 



BOND FUNDS 



Analysis of Bonded Debt Maturities 



Due ill yeai 



1951 

1952 . . . 
1S53 ... 

1954 . 

1955 . . . 

1956 . . 

1957 . . 
1958 

1959 . . . 
1960 
Bevond 



Municipal 


School 


Water 


$104,000.00 


$39,000.00 


$19,000.00 


1114. (I(ll>. 0(1 


39,000.00 


10.000.00 


11 (4,01 10.00 


14,000.00 


10,000.00 


()3. 0011. 0(1 


14,000.00 


10,000.00 


5."). 0(10. 00 


14,00(».00 


10.000.00 


55.0(10.00 


14,000.00 


lO.OOO.OO 


48.000.00 


14,000.00 


1(1,000.00 


. 48.000.00 


14.000,00 


lO.OOO.OO 




14,(I00,0(» 


10,000.00 




14.(I00,0(» 


10,000.00 




70,000,00 


90.000.00 


$581,000.00 


$260,000,00 


$199,000.00 



44 " " City of Concord 



BOND FUNDS 



Statement of Bonded Debt 



MUNICIPAL 

Central Fire Station 

Sewers 

Sewers 

Storm Sewers 

Airport Bonds 

Signal System 

Equipment and Iniprovemfnts 

Equipment and Improvements 

Total Municipal 

SCHOOL 

High School 

Conant School — Serial Notes 

Total School 

WATER 

Water Bonds 

Water Bonds 

Total Water 

Total Bonded Debt . . . . 



Decem 

1934 

1934 
1934 
1937 
1942 
1948 
1948 
1949 


BER 31, 

Rale 

3/2 
3'/. 
3 

2'A 

l"/4 
l'/4 

l"/4 

VA 

4y4 
v/, 

4"/4 
13/4 


1950 

Balance 
Dec. 31, -50 

$4,000.00 

4,000.011 

15,000.0(1 

42,000.0(1 

12.000.0(1 

184,000.00 

120.000.00 

200.(100.(10 


Paid in 
Principal 

$1,000.00 

1,000.00 

4,000.00 

7.000.0(1 

3,000.00 

23,000.00 

40,000.00 

25.0(10.01) 


1950 

Intertit 

$157.50 

157.50 

510.00 

1,1 02.. 50 

187,50 

2.443,7,5 

1.750.00 

3.187.50 


1925 
1949 


$581,000.00 

$210,000.00 
50,000.00 


$104.00(1,00 

$14,000. (W 
25,000.00 


$9,496.25 

$9,520.00 
968.75 


1931 
1949 


$260,000.00 

$9,000.00 
190,000.00 


$39,000.00 

$9.()0(t.OO 
10,0(1(1.00 


$10,488.75 

$573.75 
3.412.50 




$199,000.00 


$19,000.00 


$3,986.25 




$1.040.()00.00 













BOND FUNDS 

Disposition of Proceeds of Bonds 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1950 
Balance available, January 1 , 1950 



Improvement and Equipment Bonds 
Federal Airport Project 
Water Department 



$8,744.83 

5.455.12 

184.863.57 

$199,063.52 



$199,063.52 



Receipts from State of New Hampshire and U. S. Department of Com- 
merce for their Shares in the Airport Project 

Total Available 



Expenditures of Equipment Bond Proceeds: 

Eastman Street through pass — Crossing Signals 
Sewalls Falls Bridge — New Floor 



Federal Airport Project — Contract Costs to Complete Project 

Expenditures of Water Bond Proceeds: 

Penacook High Service Station — Balance due Contractor on 1949 
Account 

Installation of 24-inch Mains — Cost of Labor, Pipe and Sundries . . 

Purchase of .Additional 24-inch Pipe to be laid in Future Years 

Purchase of Six Additional Parcels of Land 

Transfer of L^nexpended Equipment Bond Monies to Capital Surplus 
Account 

Total Expenditures and Transfers 

Balance Available, December 31, 1950 



Balance Available is Assigned to: 
Water Bond Construction . 



18,729.94 
$217,793.46 



$726.35 
4,434..55 


$5,160.90 






24,220.38 


$361.00 
32,471.61 
40,368.19 
15,024.00 


88.224.80 
3,548.61 





$121,154.69 

96.638.77 

$217,793.46 



$96,638.77 



Atmnitl Report " " 45 



ORGANIZATION OF CITY OF CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

1 



PEOPLE OF CONCORD I ^i 



GOVERNOR & 
COUNCIL 



CITY COUNCIL 



BOARD OF 
ADJUSTMENT 



1- 



BOARD OF 
BLDG. APPEALS 



MANAGER 



MUNICIPAL 
COURT 






BOARD OF 
PLUMBING EXAM. 



PERSONNEL 
ADVISORY BD. 



RECORDS 



ASSESSING 



PURCHASING 



PLANNING 



POLICE 






L EGAL 



FINANCE 



PERSONNEL 



ENGINEERING 



FIRE 



HEALT 



LI BRARY 



D-^ 



H 



RECREATION 



WELFARE 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Al RPORT 






WATER 



CITY HALL 



TRUST FUNDS 



i_^ 1 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Aii-jjort 29 

Assessment 10 

Athenian Oath 2 

Bond Fimds 44 

Building Activities 24 

Cemeteries 28 

City Clerk 9 

City Council 7 

City Government 4 

City Manager 6 

City Officials 4 

Directory 48 

Elections 9 

Engineering 26 

Examination ol iMmnbers 24 

Finances 12 

Financial Statements 32 

Fire Protection 23 

Garbage Disposal 25 

General Finid 32 

Health and Sanitation 15 

Legal Service 11 



PAGE 

Library 18 

Milk Inspection 15 

Municipal Court 22 

Parks 27 

Planning 13 

Plumbing Inspection 24 

Police Protection 20 

Probation 22 

Public Works 25 

Recreation 16 

Reluse Collection 25 

Relief 19 

Roads and Bridges 25 

Sanitary Sewers 26 

Street Cleaning 25 

Street Lighting 25 

Tax Collection 43 

Trees 28 

Trust Funds 44 

Vital Statistics 9 

Water Supply 30 

Zoning Appeals 24 



FINANCIAL TABLES 

PAGE 

General Fund — Consolidated Balance Sheet 32 

General Fund — Statement of CiuTent Surplus 34 

General Fund — Statement of Revenues 34 

General Fimd — Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 35 

Parking Meter Fund — Balance Sheet 38 

Parking Meter Fund — Statement of Operations 38 

Water Fimd — Balance Sheet 39 

Water Fund — Statement of Operations 40 

Sanitary Sewer Fund — Balance Sheet 41 

Sanitary Sewer Fund — Statement of Operation 41 

Assessors' Statement 42 

Tax Accounts — Statement of Accounts 43 

Tax Accounts — Age Analysis of Unpaid Taxes Prior Years 43 

Trust Funds — Statement of Changes in Balances 44 

Bond Funds — Analysis of Bonded Debt Maturities 44 

Bond Funds — Statement of Bonded Debt 45 

Bond Funds -— Disposition of Proceeds of Bonds 45 



THE CITY OF CONCORD AT YOUR SERVICE 

A Handy Check -List and Directory of Often -Used City Services 



FIRE 1960 



POLICE 783 



Service 

Administration, General 

Airport 

Ambulance 

Assessments 

Auditorium, Rental 

Auto Permits 

Bicycle Licenses 

Bills and Accounts 

Beano Licenses 

Birth Certificates 

Bookmobile 

Building Permits 

Cemetery 

City Council 

Dance Licenses 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Elections 

Engineering, City 

Fire 

Garbage Collection 

Golf Course 

Health, Public 

Laboratory 

Library 

Maps — City 

Marriage Certificates 

Milk Licenses & Inspection 

Mortgages & Conditional Sales 

Nursing, Public Health 

Oil Burner Inspection 

Old Age Assistance 

Ordinances & Resolutions, City 

Parks 

Payments by City 

Personnel, City 

Planning 

Playgrounds 

Plumbing Permits & Licenses 

Police 

Purchasing 

Refuse Collection 

Relief 

Sanitation, Public 

Sewers 

Snow Plowing & Sanding 

Soldiers' Relief 

Street Lights, Out 

Street Maintenance 

Subdivisions 

Tax Collection 

Trees, City 

Water 

Water Bills 

Weights & Measures 

Zoning Permits 

Zoning Changes 



Department Phone 

City Manager 3129 

Airport 3129 

Police 783 

Assessors 209 

Records 3128 

Finance 237 

Police 783 

Finance 4232 

Police 783 

Records 3128 

Library 3700 

Engineering 282 

Public Works 1763W 

City Manager 3129 

Police 783 

Records 3128 

Records 3128 

Records 3128 

Engineering 282 

Fire I960 

Public Works 256 

Recreation 427 

Health 39 

Health 39 

Library 3700 

Engineering 282 

Records 3128 

Health 39 

Records 3128 

District Nursing Office 703 

Fire 1960 

Welfare 3363 

Records 3128 

Public Works 1 763W 

Finance 4232 

Personnel 3129 

Planning 282 

Recreation 3129 

Engineering 282 

Police 783 

Purchasing M 29 

Public Works 256 

Welfare 3363 

Health 39 

Public Works 256 

Public Works 256 

Welfare 3363 

Electric Company 462 

Public Works 256 

Planning 282 

Finance 237 

Engineering 282 

Water 117 

Finance 4232 

Engineering 282 

Engineering 282 

Planning 282 



FOR INFORIVIATION ON OTHER SERVICES NOT LISTED - 3129