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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

CONCORD 




k;-' 



2> 



1855 




1953 



CONCORD 







Facts About Concord 



Date of City Incorporation 1853 

Form ot Government Council-Manager (1950) 

Area 64 sq. mi. 

Population (1950) 27,988 

Churches .SI (Representing 21 denominations) 

Schools 16 public 

4 parochial 
1 preparatory 

Ojlleges Concord Commercial College 

Pierce Secretarial School 
Concord School lor Nurses 

Hospital Margaret Pillsbury imit and 

Xe^v Hampshire Memorial unit 
ol Concord Hospital 

Libraries Concord Public Library 

(60,403 volumes) 
State Library 

(298,156 volumes) 

Recreation Areas 33 areas with acreage of 150 

Rail Ser\ ice Boston and Maine Railroad 

Airline Northeast Airlines 

Miles ol Streets 180.61 miles 

Paved 139.22 " 

Graded 41.39 " 

Miles of Sewers 83.59 

Miles of Water Mains 104 

Niunber of Fire H^drants 819 

Financial Institutions 7 banks 

1 trust company 

1 cooperative bank 

2 building and loan associations 
12 insurance companies 

Total Tax Rate .S47.50 per thousand 

(Penacook .S52.53 per thousaiul) 

Cover delineated by Archy F. McDonnell 



CONCORD 3.Pa^o-, 

(L7f 

"THE CAPITAL CITY" '^""'^ 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Rc|iort5 to \\s Peopli' 
oil \Xs lOOtli Anniversary 

Table of Contents 

vxc.v. 

Facts About Coik oi d 2 

Your City Family — 1 952 4 

Manager's Letter H 

City Coun( il 7 

City Clerk 8 

Legal Department 9 

Assessment Department 10 

Finance Department 11 

Planning Department 12 

Munic ipal Airpoi t 13 

Publi( Works Dej)ai tmeni 14 

Health and Sanitation Department Ifi 

Recreation and I'ai ks Dejxirtment 17 

Library 18 

Welfare Department 19 

Fire Dej^artment 20 

Police Department 21 

Muni{ ij^al Com 1 22 

Water Depai tmenl 23 

Zoning, Building, Plumbing 24 

Commemorating Concord's Past 100 Years 25 

The Farly History ol the City From 1 85. S to 1900 25 

Concord During the T\ventieih Century 31 

Index — Financial Sec tion 37 

How Your City Functions 51 

Sei vices as Close as Your Telephone 52 



YOUR CITY FAMILY— 1952 



CITY COUNCIL 

Shelbv O. Walker, Mayor 
Howe Anderson, Mayor Pro-teiu 



Councilmen-at-Large 

Howe Anderson Herbert Rainie 

Wayne Gardner William A. Stevens 

Leigh S. Hall Shelby O. Walker 



Ward Coiincihnen 

James P. Ferrin Ward 1 Conrad Robinson Ward 5 

Harlan F. Johnson Ward 2 Clarenct: L. Clark Ward (i 

Charles C. Hoagland Ward 3 Milton J. Barnes Ward 7 

LoLis G. K. Clarner Ward 4 Edwin R. Langevin Ward 8 
1 HOMAs B. [ennings. Ward 9 



CITY ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the Ciiy Mana(;er Woodbir'* Brackett, City Manager 

Airport DEPARrMENi Woodbir^ Brackett, City Manager 

Assessing Deparimeni C. Fred Mollton, Assessor 

SiDNKN Dach, Assess<jr 
John J. Hallinan, Assessor 

Criv Hall DEPARr.MKNi Arihur E. Robv, City Clerh 

Engineerin(; DEPARiMKNr Wesley E. Haynes, City Engineer 

ELLs\voRrH B. Phii.brigk, Engineering Inspector 
J. Sheperd NoRRis, Sealer of ]]'elglits and Measures 

Finance DEPARiMENr Archie N. CioiRLEv, City Auditor 

Amos B. Morrison, City (]oUe<tor 
Wallact: W. Jones, City Treasurer 

Fire Deparimeni Clarence H. Green, Eire Chief 

Henr\ E. Drew, Deputy Eire Chief 

Duncan M. Mlrdock, 2nd Deputy Eire Chief 

Joseph F. Greenough, Jr., 2nd Deputy Eire Chief 

Health Department Pierre .\. Botcher, m.d.. City Physician 

AusriN B. Presb^ , Sanitary Enspector 

Legal Deparimeni Ei'(;ene Struckhoff, City Solicitor 

Library Department Siri M. Andrews, Librarian 

Personnel Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Planning Department Gustaf H. Lehtinen, Planning Director 

Police Department Arthur W. McFsaac, Police Chief 

J. Edward Silva, Deputy Police CJiief 

4 « « City of Concord 



Public Works Defartmf.nt VV. E. Havnks, Siipt. of Public Works 

Edward L. Howland, Park and Cemetery Superintendent 
Wii.LiAi\r H. Mi'RPHV, Sewer Superintendent 

Pi'RCHASiNC; Defartmf.nt Woodbur-S' Brackiit, City Manager 

Records Departmenf \rthiir E. Robv, City Clerk 

Recreation Departmeni Donald F. Sinn, Recreation Director 

Water Departmeni (.. Arihur Fanelif, Water Superintendent 

Welfare Departmeni Gertrude E. Watkins, Welfare Director 

Charles P. Coaklen, Overseer of Poor, Ward 1 



MUNICIPAL COURT 



Donald G. Matson, Judge 

Peier f. King, Special Judge 

C. Murray Sawyer, Clerk of Court 

C. Murray Sawyer, Probation Officer 



MUNICIPAL BOARDS 



Board of Building Appeal 

Eugene F. Magenau, Chairrnan 
Carrol Garland 
William Johns 
Arnold Perreton 
Laurence J. Riis 



Board of Health 

Pierre A. Boucher, m.d. 
Thomas M. Dudley, m.d. 
C^linton R. Mullins, m.d. 



Library Board 

Mayland H. Morse, Jr., Chairman 

Ralph H. Avery 

Joseph J. Comi 

Otis Kingsbury 

Mrs. Eugene Magenau 

Mrs. Paul Shaw 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederic EJpton 

Timodiy Woodman 

Personnel Advisory Board 

Douglas B. Whiting, CJiairman 
William H. Macurda 
J. Mitchell Ahern 



City Planning Board 

Dudley W. Orr, CJiairman 
W^oodbury Brackett 
Charles C. Davie 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Douglas Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
Wesley E. Haynes 
A. Clifford Hudson 
John B. Jameson 



Board of Plumbing Examiners 

Arthur \V. Sargent 
W^illiam J. Bishop 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 



Trustees of Trust Funds 

Robert M. Beyer 
Wallace W. Jones 
Leon Merrill 



Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Elwin L. Page, Chairman 
A. Clifford Hudson 
Raymond V. Lapointe 
Donald G. Matson 
Lawrence J. Moynihan 

Annual Report 




CITY OF CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 

Office of the City Manager 

To the Honorahle Mayor, City Council, iiud Citizens of Concord: 

A city report is worth while only to the extent that the majority oi 
citizens read and miderstand it. 

This report highlights the diversified tasks undertaken by your city 
government during 1952 in a way that it is hoped will reach the average 
citizen and taxpayer of Concord. Those interested in more detail are 
referred to the monthlv reports to the City Coinicil or to records at the 
City Hall. 

Your city iunctions toi the health and well being ol its citizens. Each 
year the job ol jjroviding the required services becomes more complex, 
requiring the services ol hundreds ot well trained people. 

One hundred years ago the City ot Concord was incorporated. The 
expenditures tor ALL services in the new city's first year were only 
one-half of the cost of lighting the streets for the current year. 

Concord's founding fathers never envisioned ten thousand auto- 
mobiles on the streets of the city and thousands more traveling through 
each day with attendant hazards, or many ot the other problems that 
go with the age in which we now live. 

The spirit of progress is in the air on Concord's Centennial and the 
citizens have a right to be proud of the conmiunity they live in. The 
imited efforts of the citizens, the City Council, and city employees 
promise a great deal loi- the futme of oiu' community. 

Respectfully submitted, 

VVOODBIIRV BrACKETT, 

City Manager 



CITY OF CONCORD 



ORIGINAL SEAL 




CENTENNIAL 



ADOPTED 1853 



CITY COUNCIL 



Membership: 

Six Councilmen-at-Large 
Nine Ward Councilmen 
Expended: $3,000.00 



The City Council, your elected rep- 
resentatives, is the policy making body 
of your city government and as such 
has authority to do all that is neces- 
sary and expedient for promoting and 
maintaining the comfort, peace, health, 
safety, and welfare of you, the inhabi- 
tants of Concord. 

* 

The City Council met in 12 regular 
sessions and three special meetings dur- 
ing 1952. All meetings were open to 
the public. A review of the minutes 
for these 15 meetings reveals that 17 
ordinances were enatted, 42 resohi- 
tions were adopted, and 17 public 
hearings were held. 



Regular Council meetings are held 
at 7:00 p.m. on the second Monday 
of each month. Special meetings are 
held upon notice delivered to each 
Councilman by the City Clerk at the 
written request of the Manager or at 
least eight Councilmen. In addition 
to participating in these meetings, 
members of the Council attend meet- 
ings of committees to which they have 
been appointed. They are also called 
upon to attend public functions of 
various kinds. 

* 
At the Council meetings city prob- 
lems having to do with many essen- 
tials are discussed, such as paving of 
streets, installation of sewers, safe- 
guarding the water supply, improve- 
ment of parking areas, protection of 
lives and property, and a myriad of 
other similar activities. 

• 

The City Clerk acts as secretary to 

(lie council. He keeps the minutes of 

all council meetings and maintains a 

permanent record of all actions taken. 



Mayor Walker and neiv Conncihueu look ncer the 19^2 budget 




Annual lie [for t » » 7 



CITY CLERK 



Personnel: 

Two Permanent 
One Part-time 

Expended: $9,822.85 



The City Clerk, who is appointed 
by the City Manager, records and 
keeps the minutes of all Council meet- 
ings and is the official custodian of all 
public documents. He maintains vital 
statistics antl records, supervises all 
elections and voter registration, and 
issues many kinds of city licenses and 
permits. 

* 

During the year, the City Clerk's 
Office issued nine different types of 

Au all-time x'othig record xvas set in the 
I^ovember election — 13,737 ballots ivere 



VOTING 



cast 

N CONCORD 




licenses and ])ermits to protect the 
public and the licensee. Among these 
^vere licenses for dogs, taxi-cab drivers, 
and niarriages. 

* 
f^irths increased in 1952; 866 were 
recorded as compared to 827 in 1951 
and 828 in 1950. 

* 
Deaths declined to tlie lowest point 
in Ine years, which may indicate that 
a hardier species of citizenry is de- 
veloj)ing in Concord. 
* 
Marriages totaled only 327 during 
1952, the smallest number since 1944 
Avlien 220 (ouples marched to the 
a liar. 

* 
The demand for certified copies of 
records was again great dining the 
jjast year largely because of the fact 
that certified documents are required 
by the federal government for social 
security, old age retirement, and in- 
duction into the various branches of 
llic armed forces. 

* 
i'lic number of chattel moilgages 
and conditional sales recorded by the 
City Clerk showed a decided increase 
over the previous year. This was due 
in part to the lifting of federal restric- 
tions on time jjurchases of many arti- 
c Ics. ReceijJts for this recording service 
totaled .'$2,170.15 in 1952. compared to 
.V2. 2.1.1.60 in 1951. 

* 
Ihe total receipts of the Depart- 
ment for the year totaled .112,0,S9.,15, 
which is slightly less than the receipts 
for the previous year. 
* 
A presidential primary, state pri- 
mary, and national election made this 
a busy year for the City Clerk. Appli- 
cations for absentee ballots processed 
for the fall election nimibered 907, of 
which 204 were received from service- 
men and women in all parts of the 
world. Of these absentee ballots, 827 
were returned in time to be coimted 
in the November election. 






Citizens voice their opinions at a heorins^ on the proposed opening of Long Pond 



LEGAL 
DEPARTMENT 



Person NF. I.: 

One Part-tiiiie 
Expended: $2,288.51 



The work of Concord's Legal De- 
partment is not as well understood by 
our citizens as the work of city depart- 
ments which render a more direct 
service to the public. A chief function 
of the City Solicitor is to attend all 
City Council meetings in order to ad- 
vise on legal matters and to act as 
parliamentarian. Jt is also his duty to 
engage in legal research and to render 
opinions to Council, city department 
heads, and the City Manager concern- 
ing the legal implications of proposed 
or completed actions. This Depart- 
ment also is responsible for represent- 
ing the municijiality in all actions at 
law commenced by or against the Clity 
and for drafting the necessary legal 
resolutions to implement Council pol- 
icies. 



During 1952 the City Solicitor: 
* 

Engaged in much research and ren- 
dered many opinions to Council con- 
cerning the construction of three pub- 
lic parking lots voted by Council. 
Condemnation proceedings were insti- 
tuted, where necessary, to obtain the 
needed land. 

* 

Assisted the Tax Collector and the 
Einance Department in the collection 
of delinquent taxes. 
* 

Assisted the City Welfare Depart- 
ment by obtaining reimbursement 
from paupers and parents of neglected 
and delinquent children. 
* 

Drafted an ordinance governing the 
regulation of recreational facilities. 
* 

C-oUaborated with special counsel 
employed by the City to defend the 
action of the Board of Health in re- 
fusing to grant a license to retail milk 
produ( ts of the H. P. Hood Company. 
* 

Instituted actions for the Airport 
Department to collect about .i> 1,500 
owed the City; recovery was obtained. 

Annual Report » » 9 




The Tax Collector's staff prepares 8,000 tax bills for mailing 



ASSESSMENT 
DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

Ihiee PeimanciU 

'\\\o Pal t-tinie 
Exi'kndkd: .S12,9(i.'i.->S 

I () the average taxjjayei , the assess- 
ing ot property is a very iin])ortant 
municijial lunction. It is important 
to know that the Assessment I)ej)art- 
nient uses the best avaihible methods 
to de\clop j)roj)erty assessments which 
are fair and eqnital:)Ie. The co-opera- 
tive spirit with whicli the citizens in 
Concord have aided this work is 
greatly appreciated. 
* 

The P)()ard ol Assessors heard 1H2 
taxjjayers during 12 regular and 57 
special meetings. 

_ ^ * 

A new visual card system lor record- 
ing real and personal property was put 
into oj)eration. 



A master file ol poll taxjiayers was 
developed and olien lefened to. 
* 

A report received Irom (ioIe-Layer- 
Trumhle Company reveals that $15,- 
,'i 12,890 of i^roperty or aj)|)roximately 
•i2% of all projjerty within the City 
AVIS lax exempt in I*)52. 
* 

I'he annual \m\\ tax census was 
completed bv six membeis of the Po- 
lice f)epartmcnt. 



Total Assessed Vnlnntinyn 
CI rV OF CONCORD 

(1913-1952) 



Ye<ir 


VaJuafion 


194.H 


.1i;33,25 1,268 


1941 


33,083,027 


1915 


32,963,846 


I9f(i 


33,622,49(i 


1947 


36,457,539 


1948 


37,330,320 


1949 


38,765,980 


1950 


38,782,440 


1951 


47,013,784 


1952 


47,490,362 



10 



« City of Concord 



FINANCE 
DEPARTMENT 



I'frsonnf.l: 

Nine Peiinanent 
ExFFNDKi): S-H,-4.H:5.89 



The liiiKtions and responsibilities 
ot the Finance Department may be 
broadly described as follows: ac- 
counting, budget control, pre-audit, 
fuuin( ia! reporting, debt arrangement, 
collections and disbinsements, and 
maintenance ol a cential office supply 
and duj)licating service ior all depart- 
ments. 



Clash discounts totaling S 1,1 1 1 were 
taken on bills paid dining 1952. 

* 
A drive to collect delincjuent poll 
taxes reduced the amount outstanding 
from :$25,090 to $19,092 during the 
twelve month period. 

* 

The City Treasiner issued 4,478 
general revenue and 12,677 payroll 
checks during the year. 

• 

Parking meter revenue totaling 
$48,14 l.-i5 was sorted and counted. 

* 

The miuiicipal debt was reduced 
by $104,000. 



SOURCir OF 



1952 
NCOME DOLLAR 




1952 

DISTRIBUTfON OF ^^^Q^^ DOLLAR 



■ GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



DEBT 5ERVICE 



CAPITAL OUTLAY 




RECREATION 3 bj^ 

HEALTH ^ y^ \ \ 

/ \ ^LIBRARy 



ISCELLANEOUS 



Annual Report » » // 



PLANNING 
DEPARTMENT 

Personnel: 

Two Permanent 
Expended: $9,348.07 



The Planning Department is a staff 
agency which studies every phase ot 
city development to determine those 
projects which are in the best interests 
ot the citizens. These preliminary 
studies are essential for the orderly 
development of city resources and the 
future expansion of municipal facili- 
ties. 

* 

A future Downtown By-pass east of 
Main Street was proposed to ease the 
through-traffic burden. 



The Planning Board approved pe- 
titions to provide one new street and 
to extend four existing streets which 
will provide 2,395 feet of additional 
residential highway and open up 45 
new house lots. 

* 

The Board recommended to the 
Coinicil that 15 roads or sections of 
roads, involving 13.4 miles of highway, 
be discontinued. 

* 

Three off-street parking plans were 
proposed to the City Council to pro- 
vide parking spaces for approximately 
325 cars. 

• 

The advisibility of abandoning the 
open dump method of refuse disposal 
was studied and recommendation 
made that a sanitary landfill be sub- 
stituted. 



The reionstruction of Main Street was one of the major projects proposed by tlie 

Planning Department 








DOWNTOWN BYPASS 

PROPOSED HIGHWAY — PARKING DEVELOPMENT 

PLEASANT ST. EXT TO HALLS COURT SECTION 



The Doivtitmvn Ryluiss unts rf commended hy the Pltnnihtg Deljmtmetit 



MUNICIPAL 
AIRPORT 



Pkrsonnkl: 

One Pait-time 
Expended: ,1;;i(),I()7.(m 



Concord Municijjal Airport, lorateil 
in East Concord and covering .800 
acres, boasts ol three iiard surlace riui- 
ways, two hangars, and a modern 
administration building. Northeast 
Airlines, the Civil .Veronautics Ad- 
ministration, the State Aeronautics 
Connnission, and the I'. S. Weather 
Bureau have offices in the adniinstra- 
tion building. Serviced by Northeast 
Airlines, flights are regularly schedided 
to Boston and other ( ities. 
* 

The total number ol jiassengers in- 
boinul and outbound \\'as 2,941, a de- 
crease of 385 since 1951. This decrease 
was due, in pai t. to lessened service. 
* 

Nfail handled by the Airline at its 
station in the administration building 
was 3,035 pounds, express 3,067 
pounds, and freight 6,902 poimds din- 
ing 1952. Totals for these three cate- 
gories were 6,290, 11,985, and 6,153 



respectively in 1951, showing a de- 
crease in a(ti\ity at the Airport last 
year. 

* 
During 1952 Concord was coimected 
by N(jrtheast's service to Boston and 
NcAv York. For certain periods of the 
year, tlie Airport was connected to 
Montreal, Manchester, and Worcester. 

* 
I'ixed-base connnerdal flight opera- 
lions were condiuted from the two 
(ily owned hangars by the W^illiam E. 
Martin I-lying Service and Fein's Fly- 
inu Service. 



Concord Airfmrt is noted for being free of 
ground fog 





4iitiuul Reljort 



13 





PUBLIC WORKS 
DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

Ninety-seven Permanent 

Two Part-time 
Expended: §421.814.99 

The Public Works Department is 
the largest single department in the 
City. Municipal operations such as 
road and cemetery maintenance, sewer 
extension, retuse collection and dis- 
posal, building inspection, street 
(leaning, and plumbing and electrical 
installation are carried out by this De- 
])artment. Moreovei, all construction 
jjeriaining to the foregoing miuiicipal 
lunc ti(jns. that is not done by contract, 
is undei taken by public works forces. 

All jjr(jposed city projects are sur- 
\eyetl and designed by city engineers. 
Ihese engineering studies reveal the 
ini|)oi tance and practicality of under- 
lakiiig each jjroject. They finther in- 
sure that all money spent on public 
\v(jrks is used in the ^v'isest manner 
]K)ssible. 

• 

Duiiiig the winter 71 inches of snow 
made necessary the plowing of 1665 
miles of roads and 135 miles of side- 




(Tof)) Stio-Go loads trucks ii'ith leaves 
during aututnti cleanup (Center) Public 
Works creiv patches holes caused by frost 
action (Left) Lessening the curve in West 
Concord 



walks. (:il\' loKes scalteied l!)() ions 
ot l)iilk salt and 5575 cubic yards ol 
sand in combating hazardous tra\eling 
conditions. 

* 
1512 tons ol cold patch materia! 
was laid to repair roads. 
• 
7<>, <)()<) cid)i( yards ol reliise was col- 
lected by the sanitation vehicles, which 
traveled 34,175 miles. 
* 
8,735 cid>ic yards ot waste material 
was removed Irom the streets ol Con- 
cord. 

* 
Ovei (i.OOO (iibic yards ot gravel 
was spread to improve unpaved roads 
within the City. 

* 
40 major and 736 minor repairs 
were made on public works equipment 
by city mechanics in keej^ing city ma- 
chinery in the best possible condition. 
* 
695 street signs were replaced din- 
ing 1952. 

* 
The Cemetery and Parks Division 
spent many hours in helping to im- 
prove the physical beauty ot Con- 
cord. 

* 
Engineers drew plans for the con- 
struction ot 1500 feet of the Daniel 
Webster Highway in West Concord. 




<^ 




(Top) Public Works maintenance shop 
(Center) City officials insfyect a full-size 
model of ticostep curbing considered for 
Main Street (Right) Street cleaning crerv 
siceefys up aided by a fjoiver-siveeper and 
a dump-bucket 




HEALTH AND 

SANITATION 

DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

Four Permanent 
One Part-time 

Expended: |34,457.49 



Good health is one oi the most 
basic motivations in yoiu- daily lite. 
The function of protecting you against 
disease and sickness is the responsi- 
bility of the Health and Sanitation 
Department, which conducts health 
clinics, inspects eating establishments, 
and carries out other sanitary precau- 
tions to safeguard voiu" health. 
* 

•585 children attended immimiza- 
tion clinics to receive protective treat- 



mciu against diphtheria, tetanus, and 
whooping (ough. 

* 
(il!i deaths were reported, 360 of 
Avliich were non-residents of Cloncord. 
* 
521,181 Avas granted to Concord 
Hosjjital to help meet its 1952 deficit. 
* 
1,1. 'i5 beverage samples Avere col- 
lected and analyzed by the Sanitary 
Ins])Cclor. 

• 
1,1)21 insjiections of all types of eat- 
ing establishments and food process- 
itig plants were made during the 
twelve month ])eriod. 
* 
One case of poliomyelitis was re- 
ported. 

* 
Food foiuul unfit for human con- 
simijition was ordered removed from 
sale bv the Dcpaitment. 
* 
New drugs continued to assist in 
(arrying out the public health pro- 
gram. 



(Left) The City Health Officer imcinntes one of Coxcord's youtiger citizens 
(Right) Enjoying the national fmstitne at Rollins Park 




■'; ■S-ar:0!s^ ^ .^ .- 'j^^ 



RECREATION 

AND PARKS 

DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

Three Permanent 
Twenty-six Part-time 

Expended: $46,220.24 



The year 1952 marked the begin- 
ning of constructive planning for 
recreation. A full-time Recreation Di- 
rector was appointed to develop a 
Avell-roimded program and a long 
range plan for maintaining park and 
playground facilities. A diversified 
year-round program is being adminis- 
tered as a result of the efforts of this 
Department. Concord can indeed be 
proud of its newly organized Recrea- 
tion Department. 



Limited skiing was enjoyed at Rus- 
sel Pond Ski Area during the early 
part of the year. 

* 
Skating and coasting were excellent 
during the winter months of 1952. 
* 
The nine playgroimds attracted ap- 
proximately 65,000 participants dur- 
ing the nine week summer program. 
* 
Memorial Field was the scene of 
high school track meets, as well as 
baseball and football games. 
* 
New events added during the year 
included an adults' arts and crafts 
class, a Saturday morning athletic pro- 
gram for teen-agers, and an expanded 
Halloween program. 
* 
Many citizens used Beaver Meadow 
Golf Course during the summer 
months. 

* 

Sunnner band concerts were well 
attended. 



(Left) The starter checks the competitors before the obstacle cross cotintry race begins 
(Right) Min-inu good!!!! But ichy don't they make these thirst quenchers shorter? 



¥'^\ t 












A model of East Concord — one of the many displays exhibited in the Library 



LIBRARY 



Pkrsonnkl: 

Fitteen Permanent 
Expfnoed: .'$fi.H.54(>..HI 

The Concord Public Library con- 
sists ot the catalog, reterence, chil- 
dren's, youth, people's, and branch 
divisions. It makes a concentrated ef- 
fort to reach the citizens of the mu- 
nicipality to improve reading habits. 
* 
3,028 patrons were issued library 
cards last year; there Avere 17,732 ac- 
tive cards on file on December 3L 
1952. 

• 
5,602 volimies were added to the 
Library. 

• 
60,403 volimies composed the total 
book stock of the Library at the end 
ot the fiscal year. 

• 
110 periodicals were regularly re- 
ceived by the Library. 

18 « « City of Concord 



39,768 volumes were circulated via 
the book trailer. 

• 
181 meetings of various types at- 
tracted 4,045 participants from all age 
groups. 

* 
Lhe catalog division completed an 
author, title, and subject file during 
the year. 

* 
A total of 238,937 books were issued 
in 1952, as compared to 162,443 books 
checked out in 1944. 
• 
Adults read: 

14,833 Non-fiction 
14,226 Periodical 
113,997 Fiction 



173,056 Total 
* 
fu\cuiles read: 

1(),I94 Non-fiction 

l(i7 Periodical 
49,220 Fiction 



65,881 Total 



WELFARE 
DEPARTMENT 



Pk.rsonnkl: 

Two Permanent 
One Part-time 

Expkndf.d: .'$99,747.44 



During 1952 general emjiloynient 
()])j)ortunities were about the same as 
the jjrevious year, btit high j^rices 
caused welfare expentlitines to in- 
crease. Analysis ot the cinrent case 
load indicates that the most common 
reliel cases are those involving sick- 
ness, physical disability, and public 
care ol children irom broken or ne- 
glected la mi lies. 

* 

There were no changes in XV^elfare 
Department personnel dining 1952. 
The staff consisted of three members, 
two in Concord and one in Penacook. 



1952, including Penacook, was 61, 
representing 123 persons, compared 
with a case load of 58 during 1951, 
representing ll.H persons. 
* 

The cost of the Old Age Assistance 
program continued to increase during 
1952, although the average case load 
of 276 was three less than that for 
1951. The increased cost of this pro- 
gram can be mainly attributed to 
increased general and medical costs. 
* 

The following shows the trend in 
Old Age Assistance both as to number 
of cases and costs: 





Axiernge nvmber 




Year 


of cases 


Cost to City 


1943 


177 


■115,070 


1944 


178 


16,124 


1945 


189 


19,118 


1946 


214 


25,221 


1947 


232 


29.075 


1948 


248 


34,895 


1919 


248 


35,506 


1950 


274 


46,755 


1951 


279 


46,167 


1952 


276 


47,156 



The average nmnber of cases during 

Entlui.siasin for a l)iil)f}et shozv presented in the Library 




Annual Report » » 19 




Modern fire fighting eqiiilJinent protects your tije ami Ifrofjerty 



FIRE 
DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

Forty-five Permanent 
Seventy-eight Call 

Expended: SI 84.399.08 



The record oi the Fire Department 
for the past year indicates that fire 
fighting and fire prevention are big 
business. In 1952 the Fire Department 
answered r)()9 alarms of which 571 
were fires, 8 1 were rescue or emergency 
calls, and 17 were false alarms. The 
fire loss during 1952 totaled approxi- 
mately S5 1,525 as compared to the 

Fire losses in 1952 ivere the second loivest 
of the last ten years 



FIRE LOSSES 

CITY OF CONCORD 
1943-1952 






1943 

1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
I9SI 
1952 
















^^ 




',,77 


7 33 












^^1 




^ 


-^-^i-'f" 
















-H^'"--i 


















■ ' 


























^_ 


^^ 


'-nr 








^^ 




^^ 


^^ 








■ S3.«. 






















g> 




»3 
















^^ 




0.163 


^^B *;i 77 7 8 1 






















^^^^^^_ i 


.,,5^4 






■ 












< 




u *. 










J 


i c 


5 < 




> 


I i 


5 O 



record low of |2 1,777 in 1951. No lives 
were lost as the result of fire. 
• 
A total of 2,013 inspections were 
made of buildings throughout the City 
in the Department's fire prevention 
program. 

* 
Classes in fire prevention education 
were conducted in schools and hos- 
pitals by Department personnel. 
* 
All Department building mainte- 
nance and repairs were performed by 
Department personnel. 
• 
A year round training program was 
conducted to keep all permanent per- 
sonnel informed about the latest fire- 
fighting methods. 

* 
Summer training drills were held 
at regular intervals for the members 
of the call force. 

• 
Approximately 500 miniature fire 
tiucks were built and distributed to 
luiderprivileged children for Christ- 
mas. 



Fires by 


Classification 




Class 


1951 


1952 


Building 


244 


273 


Brush &: Grass 


92 


161 


Auto Fires 


71 


89 


Smoke Scares 


76 


48 



THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS 



Total 



483 



571 



20 « « City of Concord 



POLICE 

DEPARTMENT 



Pkrsonnel: 

Thirty-nine Permanent 
Twenty-three Special Police 

Expended: $154,652.46 









2 1 
20 

19 

le 

17 
16 
15 
14 
u> 13 

i>2 

^ M 
O 10 

>- 9 
8 

7 
6 

S 
4 
3 
2 
1 




2 


_ PARKING & TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS. 

IN r.ONCORr) 1943- IflS? 1 








1 


















































.u-s^mn \H 


MERIXM 


fj^ 


" 








\<^''^' 




^^" 










~::>'iSi^ 
















.^ 




















































































































































,,.^5.^:3^4?*, 






** 








t**r^<. 




**•' 






-''„.., 


M~.'£ 


T' 








— «6r.-H--- 


t'S., 


..- 


^•a 






943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 195 
YEAR 



The Police Department's lunction 
is to protect yon, the citizens ol Con- 
cord, and y(jur property. It's a twenty- 
loin- honr a day task and not an easy 
one. 

• 

7,285 reqnests for police assistance Perking violations have increased steadily 
were answered by the Department last during the last tivo years 

year. 

^ was continued with lectures in all city 

H(") major offenses were reported. schools. 

• * 

484 vehicular accidents occurred in Regular training sessions within the 

the City during the twelve month Dejjartment were held during the 



period. 

• 
124 persons were injured in auto- 
mobile accidents. 

* 
'^,851 ]xnking tickets were issued by 
the Depai tmcnt during 1952. 
• 
97(') ambulance calls were answered. 



year. 

• 
Twelve officers attended various law 
eniorcement schools in New England. 
• 
Penacook Police Station was com- 
|)letely renovated. 

* 
A year round program of activities 
ic was supervised at the Concord Police 

Ihe Depaitment's salety program Benevolent Association Boys' Club. 

(Left) A trial run zi'ith the polite resuscitalor (Right) Deputy Polite Chief Sih'a 
studies one of the missing persons circulars receix'ed by the Police Department 




MUNICIPAL 
COURT 



Personnel: 

Three Part-time 
Expended: $4,066.59 

"Hear Ye: Hear Ye: Hear Ye: All per- 
sons having any business betore the 
Municipal Court held here this day, 
within and tor the City of Concord, 
may at this time draw near and give 
their attendance and they shall be 
heard." 

Regular sessions ot the Court are 
held each week day at 9:00 a.m. tor 
disposition ot criminal cases. Civil ses- 
sions are held lollowing the hearing 
ot criminal cases. Afternoon sessions, 
caused by a larger volinne of comt 
cases, became a frequent occurrence 
during the year. 

All regular sessions are open to the 
public and all records of the Comt 
are public records, except those per- 
taining to juvenile cases which are 
held contidential l)v law. 



During 1952 the Court considered 
over 5,000 cases ot the following types: 
Felonies 30 

Misdemeanors 1,102 

Small Claims 215 

Civil Cases 105 

Traffic 

(Parking violations) 3,661 



Total 5,113 
• 
The total income ot the Court dur- 
ing 1952 was $17,575.26, of which 
$4,621.99 was spent for supplies, wit- 
ness fees, and stenographic services. A 
stun of $6,342.80, representing motor 
vehicle hues, was paid to the State as 
required by law. 

• 
A total of $6,572.47 was turned into 
the city treasury by the Court in 1952. 
This w'as an increase of $850.00 over 
the total for the previous vear. 
* 
Dining the year an inlaid tile floor 
Avas ])laced over the existing one. 
• 
The city seal was placed behind the 
judge's bench, where it adds a note of 
dionitv to the com troom. 



Judge Matson presides at the Municipal Comt assisted by the Court Clerk and 

Chief of Police 




22 



City of Concord 




Members of the City Council watch Manager Brackett pour the first flotiride into the 

Concord Water System 



WATER 
DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

Twenty-nine Permanent 
Expended: .fi 165,1 15.17 

The main source ot Concord's water 
supply is Penacook Lake. In addition, 
there is an auxiliary somce consistiuL; 
ot a series ot driven wells in the Town 
ot Pembroke. The Waiter Department 
is responsil)le tor supplying you with 
pure water troni these two soinces. To 
insure protection against harmtid bac- 
teria, it chlorinates all \vater that it 
pipes to your home. On May 12tli, 
1952, Concord became the first city in 
New Hampshire to add fluoride to 
drinking water. This program was in- 
itiated to help prevent dental decay, 
especially in the teeth ot diildren. 

* 
1,222,212,400 gallons ot water was 
consinned in 1952, or an average ot 
3,348,527 gallons daily. 

* 
104 miles ot mains served the 5,315 
Coiuord water customers. 

* 
819 tne hydrants stood ready to 
protect millions ot dollars ot jMoperty 
in (.oncord. 



65% of all the water delivered to 
Concord was pumped to the customer. 
Only 35% could be delivered by the 
inexpensive gravitv feed method. 
* 

Yotu" water supply was fluoridated 
lor less than 11^ per capita during 
1952. 

Ledge encountered by the Water Depart- 
ment xuhile installing a neiu loater main 
in West Concord 




Annual Report » » 23 



ZONING, 
BUILDING, 
PLUMBING 



Personnel: 

One Part-time 
Expended: SL57.39 



The adininistiation ol the zoning 
()i(linan(e and the bnilchng and 
phiinbing codes is the responsibility ot 
a tnll-tinie engineering inspector. 

* 
Zoning 

The Zoning Board ot Adjustment 
conducted 13 hearings and considered 
45 appeals from the decision ot the 
zoning administrator. In 1951 only 26 
appeals were considered. 

* 
It granted -^(O ajjpeals outright, con- 
ditionally granted seven, and denied 
lour. 

* 
Building 

The Building Department issued 
243 building permits in 1952. Ot these, 
131 were tor new construction and 1 12 
were tor alterations and repairs. 



The estimated total value ot work 
represented by the permits to build 
\vas .? 1,272,365, ot which 5976,990 was 
tor new construction and $295,375 tor 
alterations and repairs. 
ic 
A total ol 61 new dwelling units 
were built. 

• 
Noteworthy construction projects 
authorized in 1952 and their estimated 
costs were as tollows: 

Boston and Maine Bus 

Storage | 55,000 

Telephone Dial Conver- 
sion Building $300,000 

if 
Noteworthy alterations and repairs: 
Remodeling ot the First 

National Bank .$ 50,000 

* 
Plumbing 

The total number ot plumbing per- 
mits issued Avas 95, ccjmparetl to 75 
given in 1951. 

• 
A total ot ■').") master jjlumi^ers antl 
20 journeymen were licensed by the 
Department during the year, com- 
pared to 35 masters and 23 joinney- 
men in 1951. 

* 
Five applicants tor ])luinbing li- 
censes were examined. 



Building Permits Issued in Concord (1943-1952) 



Year 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 



Total )i 11 III ho 


'>\ 


A'iniihci issued 


IjiiiUliiig perm 


lis 


fof line 


issued 




eonslriielioii 


36 




28 


51 




18 


110 




46 


212 




115 


223 




137 


230 




133 


203 




113 


212 




118 


214 




123 


243 




131 



24 



City of Concord 



COMMEMORATING 

CONCORD'S PAST 

100 YEARS 

The Early History of the City 
From 18^3 to 1900 

In the beginning tlieie was the Plan- 
tation ot Penacook; then there was 
the Town ot Rumtord; later came the 
Town of Concord: finally came the 
City ot Concord. 

On March 10, 1853 the citizens of 
Concord, deciding the unwieldy Town 
organization was no longer adequate 
for their growing mimicipal needs, 
approved the city charter granted i^y 
the 1849 session of the State Legis- 
lature. The first Mayor, Joseph Low, 
a seven member City Coimcil, and a 
14 member Common Council were 
elected later that month. Officials were 
immediately appointed to estaljlish 
the necessary services in keeping pace 
with the needs of the rapidly growing 
city. 

At its birth as a city C^oncord had 
8,576 people, 200 miles of highways, 
20 bridges, a Fire Dejjartment ;vith 




A replica of the first public building — a 

float in the parade of 1915 celebrating the 

Town of Concord's 150th anniversary 

six engines and 2,150 feet of hose, a 
Board of Health, water supplied to 
homes by the Torrent Aqueduct As- 
sociation and Nathaniel White, and 
gas street lights in the center section 
of the City. Proposals for a Police De- 
partment and a Police Court were im- 
mediately enacted. Gradually these 
services were expanded and others 
(such as parks and library) added. 



Police Station and Dojvning Carriage Factory in 1860 



W^' 























sidle block, loriwr of Main (Did Sdiool Streets, iu early years 



At first the city governineiit IkkI 
offices in the old Town fUiiklintj, but 
on January 31, 1857, it Ijegan opeiat- 
ing in the new City-Connty IJuikling. 
in which were also located the Coiuii) 
Court and Public Library. It was not 
until January, 1904, that the city ol- 
ficials occupied their own i)uilding, 
the present City Hall at Cireen and 
Prince Streets. The first two acts ol 
bonded dei)t were in contribiuion 
towards the City-County Building. 

Personal gifts of money and prop- 
erty were in many instances the key- 
stone towards the expansion of Con- 
cord's services. The Pid:)lic Library, 
while reconnnended by the Coimcils, 
actually received its first fimds from 
private citizens; after 30 years of 
"lioarding room" residence it opened 
its own home upon property given to 
the City in 1888. From its origin the 
Library received annual and ever in- 
creasing appropriations from the city 
government, but the contributions of 

The old City Hall atid Court House 




pri\atc (iti/cns Avere responsiljlc for 
iiuich of its giowih. The Department 
of I^arks ancl (Cemeteries also received 
l)e(juests and donations of land which, 
\vhile not as great as those given to 
the Library, nevertheless handsomely 
augmented the City's efforts. This is 
jxirticidarly true of White Park, the 
|)ond of Avhich in earlier years had 
l)ecn the soince of much of the City's 
fresh ^vater supply. 

Concord's earliest system of street 
lighting was gas light. In order that 
all citizens woidd not have to pay for 
a service rendered to only the central 
area of the City, a gas precinct was 
established in 1857. This di\ision was 
instrinnental in developing other serv- 
ices; the gas precinct boundaries were 
used in laying the first sewerage lines 
in 18()9 and in establishing a water 
jjrecinct foiu- years later. Electric 
street lights were initiated to supple- 
ment gas illimiination in 1881. To 
insure proper installation the City 
Coimcils appointed an Inspector of 
Electric VV^ires. who served from f895 
to f897. By 1900 the City was spending 
$10,750 annually for street lighting. 

The city government has always 
been concerned with the health of its 
citizens. From its beginning it has en- 
comaged good health practices by con- 
structing and maintaining sanitary 
sewers. In' guarding its Avater supply, 
and l)y creating a Board of Health to 
oversee those as})ects of sanitation 
which fall more Avithin the private 



26 « « City of Concord 



cloniain. In \HH7 the Board ol Health 
a|)|)()inte(l its (irst Sanitary Officer to 
( Ih'( k on home tise of avaihible sewer- 
at;e lines, it attenijjted to save Pena- 
(ook Lake Ironi polhition, and chuing 
tlie I89()'s tried luisiiccesslidly to es- 
tal)lish a liosjjital lor contagiotis dis- 
eases. In H)()() the Board assisted in 
lorniing the Board ot Pliuiibing Ex- 
aminers to insure an adequate and 
correct instaUation ol plinnbing fa- 
cilities in homes and jjublic buildings. 
During the same year the Sanitary 
Officer also took on the duties ol 
Phmtbing Inspector. 

Increasing interest in accurate en- 
gineering of sewerage and water lines 
led to the creation of the Office of City 
Engineer in 1893, imder whose direc- 
tion sewer lines were extended to West 
Concord, East Concord, and Penacook. 
There was such a rapid gro^vth in 
server lines that, even though the first 
se^vers were not laid tuitil 1869, by 
1900 there were 32 miles of sewers. 

The objective of acctnacy which led 
to the estal:)lishment of the Office ol 
City Engineer also was responsible lor 
the creation ol the Office of C^ity Au- 
ditor. In 189(), after an outside auditor 
examined the City's books and lound 
great discrepancies, it was decided to 
hire a permanent central accountant 
to record city revenue and expenses. 

The Concord Railroad antl Hose 
Company ^1 ^vas formed in 1859, re- 
lic\ ing the City in part Irom sujjplying 
Avater for fire fighting. Consideration 
of using Long Pond as a water somxe 
began in the same year, but it was not 
luuil 1870 that it was finally decided 



C O H C O B D,Qt<i"" '^/t ^ J 8 a< 

Vol u« htrabjr aotiCad to pro»id« f er joorT*""^ "/ JT-^^^c 
«c«ii»i«d b/ yt.**^ -ai^ jfrZf food and Bab 

LoBUer Bacx«U, thir^o lochoi higb, aod MTen iochci in diunator 
top and six tncbva mi bouom ; fod to provide moA bftve lb*r«oa « g 
core ladder or Udder* rtwhirif frem tbe grooiid to the ridge pole v( •« 



^^ fitt 






/Ai V^u^^^Tit , 






y 



B/ order of (be^itHMrM of Ocnc4n<. 

/Of 1/ -^ ~ 



Concord Fire Department had an early 
beginning 

to do so. The City Board o[ Water 
Connnissioners was formed in f872 
and the City proceeded to buy up pri- 
vate water interests and suppliers. 
Water started to flow from Long Pond 
in January of 1873. Within four years 
water mains had been constructed in 
AVest Concord, Penacook, and Mill- 
ville. High Service (gravity flow) was 
introduced in 1891 and the following 
year a pinnp house was completed and 
the reservoir was opened. During the 
next year the City acquired majority 
control of the water rights by buying 
out the last outstanding jjrivate inter- 
ests. By 1900 the ^vater works were 
financially self-sufficient and had cost 
a total of $860,000 to construct. 

Along with health, Concord's gov- 
ernment has also always been inter- 
ested in expanding its services for the 
safety of its citizens. From its origin 
until 1887 the Police Comt handled 
only criminal cases. In 1874 it became 
a court of record. The first three Caty 
Marshalls were also City Tax Col- 
lectors. Through the years the police 



Main Street about 1S90 




torcc steadily iiureased in ninnljei. In 
1893 the ]:)ower ot appointment to and 
removal trom the force was transterred 
Irom the (aty C>)uncils to a board of 
three commissioners apjjointed by the 
Ciovernor. Dining its first year ot ac- 
tivity this board issued the Police Rule 
Book. The 189()'s marked another im- 
portant period tor the Dej^artment, 
during which the Station House on 
Warren Street was constructed and the 
I*olicc Signal service was established. 
In 1900 the 12 signal boxes located be- 
tween the South IjuI and Penacook 
carried 29, ,100 duty calls plus numer- 
ous emergency summonses. 

The Fire Department experienced a 
steady growth, too, Avith physical ad- 
ditions that nuist have caused great 
civic interest and pride. Until the 
ojjening ot Long Pond in 187!i how- 
ever, there never was an adequate 
Avater supply tor fire lighting. At the 
time ot incorporation the City had 17 



l)ubli( leservoirs. The t8(5U's witnessed 
the debut ot tlie steam fire engine in 
(loncord. The "Gov. Hill" was intro- 
duced in 1862 and the "Kearsage" four 
years later. The hand companies did 
not leave service until 1867 when an 
ordinance tor reorganization of the 
De|)artment Avas jjassed. The Central 
Fire Station on VVarren Street was oc- 
(upied 12 years later. With division 
of the C^ity into tour fire districts, 21 
alarm boxes were installed by the 
C.amcwell Fire Alarm Company in 
1880. Three years later a new steam 
engine was bought tor Penacook and 
the Fireman's Relief Association was 
formed. In 1881 a new engine house, 
the bell tower on Jackson Street, and 
the t)ell tower on the Central Fire 
House were built: the two-circuit 
alarm was changed to four-circuit; and 
new alarm boxes and three gongs were 
added. A fourth steam engine was 
l)ought in 18!)0: in 1895 a Holloway 



Original Police station house on Warroi Street 





■^ f- 




Good Will Company (now Engine Company ^6), fortnerly located on the corner of 
Concord and South State Streets, 1902 



CheniictI Engine was jjuichasecl; the 
storage Ijattcry plant was bought in 
I89(). Thoiigli the years the firemen's 
parades and reviews were enthusiasti- 
cally received by the popidace and the 
Firemen's Ball was the social event of 
each winter. The Department was re- 
organi/ed in 1885 and again in 1891, 
Avhen the j)osition ot Fire Chiel be- 
came a lull time job with iree house 
rent in addition to an annual salary. 
The lollowing year the Veteran's 
Auxiliary Company was formed. 

As the City grew, public roads con- 
stantly demanded higher appropria- 
tions. (In early years the nuuiicipality 
was involved in many law suits lor in- 
jinies sustained l)y incli\ iduals because 
of poor road conditions.) The office of 
Superintendent of Repairs of High- 
ways and Bridges was created in 1855 
to oversee 31 highway districts and to 
collect taxes assessed for construction 



and lepairs. I'lom 1 850 until 1887 this 
|)osition was held by the Mayor. The 
i)iggest single pid)lic works achieve- 
ment dining early city growth was the 
construction of Auburn Street from 
Little Pond Road to Washington 
Street, its continuance to Long Pond 
being completed by John G. Hook 
who owned most of the land in the 
West End which was opened for home 
de\elopment as a residt of road ex- 
tension. Macadamizing of streets was 
first recommended in 1868, and in 
1881 a stationary stone-crusher was 
l)ought to facilitate a more economical 
jirocess of paving; a portable one was 
purchased in 1897, two years after the 
j:)inchase of the first city steannoller. 
Dining the '9()'s Pleasant Street was 
Avidened and extended from the rail- 
road to St. Paul's School, financed 
through a bond issue. Street-sprinkling 
Avas partly financed by j)ul)lic subscrip- 



Tlic I Idlhnrtix ( Iudi'k <il riiiiiiic. /,S'^i 





Summer branch of the Concord Public 
Library in East Concord. 1901 

tion until IcSDo Avhen a taxalile sprin- 
kling district ^vas established. Seven 
new bridges were biult in the 189()'s 
(Avronght iron being irsed) io replace 
old wooden and iron ones. Side\valks 
received a great deal oi attention and 
were constantly extended, repaired, 
and improved. Department appropria- 
tions in 1880 were 520,000; in 1890, 
$33,000 (.13,000 tor sidewalks). In 1900, 
with an appropriation of .535,000. the 
Highway Department had 300 miles 
of roads to maintain. 

In its concern for developing practi- 
cal city services, the government did 
not neglect to provide for the mental 
and physical relaxation of its citizens, 
nor for a final resting place of the de- 
ceased. As mentioned before, the Li- 
brary, parks, and cemeteries benefited 
from many public contributions. In 
the same year that the Library received 
its own building, 1888, it also became 
"free" and began a twice weekly li- 
brary day in Pen a cook. In 1900 the 
Library owned 22,000 i)ooks and 
boasted of an annual ciiculation of 
90,000 vohunes. 

Public jiarks had their real begin- 
ning when, on reconnnendation of the 
Water Connnissioners. AV^atcr \\^)rks 
Park was established in West Concord 



in 1871. (This later became Penacook 
Park.) In 1881, the City began appro- 
jjriating for parks and, aided by pri- 
vate subscriptions, made Penacook 
Park into cjuite a shcjwplace with a 
lake steamer and a pavilion. Other 
park areas and beautifying features 




Early recreation — "May Pole Dance" at 
White Park in 1912 



were donated over the years: White 
Park, Rollins Park, Bradley Park, 
Ridge Avenue Park, swans for White 
Pond from Mary Baker Eddy, etc. For 
a ^vhile Rollins Park, presented to the 
City by Edward H. Rollins, was not 
accessible to the mass of people. The 
street car, however, made it possible 
for the people of Penacook to obtain 
a ride for a dime from Contoocook 
River Park, developed under private 
auspices, to Rollins Park. 

With an increasing interest in beau- 
tifying the City's burial grounds, exist- 
ing cemeteries were expanded and new 
ones added. A Cemetery Committee 
guided these ojierations from 18()0 to 
1890 \vhen it was replaced by a Bc:)ard 
of Connnissioners of Cemeteries. Spe- 
cial activities of note were the plant- 
ing of elms on the South Avenue of 
Blossom Hill Cemetery in 1862 and 
the dedication of the commemorative 
tablet for C^oncord's thirteen Revolu- 
tionarv War j:)atriots at Old Fort 
Cemetery in 1891. In 1900. 20 years of 
accumulated cemetery monies residted 
in I 10 tiust lunds for cemetery care. 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Memorial 



30 « « CAty of Concord 



Arch, a l^eaiititying feature overlook- 
ing the State House Plaza, was built 
in' 1892 at a cost ot Sir),700. The site 
as well as tlic design lor this monu- 
ment was approved l)y Frederick L. 
Olmstead, a famous landscape archi- 
tect. Inscribed upon the arch is a 





City Hall was first occupied in JtnuKnx, 
1904 



SohUivs' tiiul Sailors' MeiitoridI Arch, 1S99 



simple tribute worthy of remembrance. 
"To the memory of her soldiers 
and sailors, the City of Concord 
builds this moiuiment." 



Concord Diirifig the Tiventieth 
Century 

The fust historic ally significant date 
involving the City of C^oncord dining 
the Twentieth Century was 1909. In 
that year a major change occiured in 
the structure of government that was 
to last for foin- decades. Until 1909. 
the governing body had consisted of a 
Mayor, a Bcjard of Aldermen, and a 
Common Council. A Non-Partisan 
City Charter, adopted in 1909 and 
taking effect the following year, elimi- 
nated the Common Coinicil. The new 
government consisted of a Board of 
Aldermen with six aldermen-at-large 
and one aldeinian from each of nine 
wards. The aldermen-at-large consti- 
tuted the Board of Public Works. 

The new plan of government was in- 
stituted for two main reasons. Its first 
goal was the elimination of jjartisan 



jjolitics from city government. To 
achieve this, party nominations and 
tlesignations were abolished and nui- 
nici]jal elections were to be held on 
alternate years from national and 
state elections. The second objective 
was to concentrate responsibility in 
leaver officials. Mucli power was given 
to a B(Knd of Public Works which 
administered the work of the High^vay 
Dejjartment. A Superintendent of 
Streets ^vas emj^loyed by the Board to 
act in a supervisory capacity. This 
form of government remained in effect 
until 1950 when it was replaced by 
the Coimcil-Manager Plan. 

Another 1909 charter change abol- 
ished the Police Commission (this 
Cionnnission was reestafjlished in 19-^5) 
and created, in its place, a Police De- 
partment subject to the orders of the 
Mayor, who became Chief of Police. 
Police equipment at that time con- 
sisted of an ambulance, patrol wagon, 
light driving wagon, motoicycle, and 
horse. (It is interesting to note that 
the horse was kept in a stable located 
on Durgin Lane in the building no^\■ 
known as Roger's Garage.) The use 
of horse-drawn vehicles came to an 
end in 1914 with the pmchase of a 

Annual Report » » 31 




The (.omhhuttioii Auto I'tittol Wdsion and Ainhiilance 



second-liaiul toui iiij^ cii. Iht (iisi t ii\ 
police ciiiisei car, ackk'cl in 1924, was 
a five-passenger Overland loming cai. 
These old antoniobiles are a lar cry 
from present day police ecjuipnieni. 
Foday, the Department owns hnn 
(ruiser cars, a linionsine anibidance, 
a coml)inati(jn jjatixjl and emergency 
wagon, a panel irnck, and a three- 
wiieel motorcycle. It also has in con- 
tinnal use a two-way ])oli(e connnuni- 
cation system (installed in H);!9). 

City traflic laws were j^assed in Hll.l. 
Officer Silva (now l)e}Jiity C^hiei), 
whose })ost was at the intersection ol 
Main and Pleasant Streets, was the 
(iity's (nst traitic officer. The first Con- 
(ord police signal system was installed 
in 1925 by the Ciamewell (^omjxiny. 
The piesent combined jiolice and fire 
alarm system began operating in 1919. 

Increased liaffic had its effect on 
public: works. In the spring ol 191 1 
insjjection revealed that several city 
bridges needed strengthening or re- 
placement. This led to a bridge con 
struction program of considerable 
scope. The increased use of automo- 
biles also pointed up the necessity for 
an adequate system of street lighting, 

32 « « City of Concord 



and brought about the installation of 
modem sticet lights on Main Street 
in 1928. 

1 he flcjods and hurricanes cjf 19.16 
and 19.'iS caused a substantial increase 
in apprcjjMiations for pid)lic works ac- 
tivities. 1 he Pidjlic Works Depart- 
ment spent a total of .f)20,284 to repair 
the damage caused l)y the I9.H() Hood 
and .S2(),8I 1 for the same purpose 
after the I9'i8 flood and hiuricane. 
1 he estimated damage to city prcjp- 
erty due to the I9'i8 ffood and hurri- 
cane amounted to .'Sll-J,792. 

The advent of aviation had its effect 
on Concord. Acti\e interest in fixing 
fiist materialized in Concord in 1919 
with the retinn tcj the City of serv- 
icemen experienced in military avia- 
tion, rhroiigh their efforts, flying 
operations were started at the Muster- 
grounds (now called the Camp- 
grounds). An "Aviation Syndicate" 
was organi/ed by 75 citizens in the 
early 2()'s. In 192() the Concord Air- 
p(M t C^cjrporation was formed, which 
ojjerated initil 19-^() when it sold cnit 
to the City of Concord for ^K'.OOO. 

Under numicipal ownership, con- 
trol of the airjiort was vested in a 



Board of Airport Coininissioners, 
which upon assuming office con- 
structed a modern achiiinistration 
building, a racHo range station, and 
three lancUng strips. By 1941, the need 
ior expanded rimways and additional 
space ior airplane storage and adminis- 
trative offices was apparent. The fol- 
lo^ving year, the City of Concord in 
c()-o]jeration \vith the Civil Aero- 
nautics Administration and Army En- 
gineers expantletl the airport riniway 
fa( iliiies at a cost of .1i;4()(),()00, largely 
underwritten by the Federal Govern- 
ment, in addition, one of the old 
hangars ^\•as replaced (for another 
340, ()()()) and the sj^ace in the other 
hangar was increased. The adminis- 
tration building was also remodeled. 
By 194;^ the (Concord Municipal Air- 
port had attained fidl stature as a 
major public service enterprise. 

Governmental activities were ex- 
panded in 19'^8 when the City Plan- 
ning Board was established to act in 
an advisory capacity to the Mayor and 



Board of Aldermen. It is the f miction 
of the Planning Board to formulate 
plans and policies affecting the present 
and future development of Concord. 
Not restricted to any one field, the 
Board has engaged in a great number 
(jf projects. It revised the zoning (the 
original zoning law was adopted in 
19,S0), building, and phmibing codes; 
it has done much highway and recrea- 
tional planning; and in 195!) it pre- 
j)ared sidjdivision regidations. 

In 1929, a Recreation Commission 
was established to manage Memorial 
Athletic Field which was being built 
at that time. Previously a Playground 
Committee had been created to super- 
vise nuuiicipal playgrounds. These 
two management bodies existed jointly 
in the field of recreation luitil 1948 
when the Playground Conmiittee was 
abolished and all responsibility for 
lecreation was vested in the Recrea- 
tion Commission. It was not until the 
Manager Plan went into effect that a 
l)e|jaitment of Recreation \vas estab- 



On July 23, 1927 , L'nidbeigli made an emergency landing at Concord Airport in the 

jamous "Spirit of St. Louis" 




^'^PQRT CORP, 




Annual Report 




\l l\ 




This photogral)h of the original "Deadicood Coach" ivas takoi iti the yard of the old 
Abbot-Dotvning Co. in 1895. "Buffalo Bill" Cody is shozun holding the reins 



lislied in the City of Concord. 

One year after the Recreation Com- 
mission was appointed, the City ac- 
quired Beaver Meadow Golf Coinse 
from the Concord Coimtry Chdj, 
wliich moved to East Concord and 
there established a new private golf 
course. Beaver Meadow, a nine-hole 
course located in West Concord, was 
the first golf course either pid^lic or 
private, to be established in Ne^v 
Hampshire. Used extensively, it fills a 
real need in the miuiicipal recreation 
program. 

The City of Concord maintains for 
the benefit of its citizens foiu" major 
parks, Memorial Athletic Field, six 
j)laygroiuids, a municij)al golf course. 



a ski area, and 20 roadside areas. Many 
of the recreational facilities in the City 
parks and playgrounds were built dur- 
ing the depression era in the 19-^0's. 
The Federal Works Progress Adminis- 
tration was responsible for the con- 
struction of such facilities as wading 
pools, bathhouses, tennis courts, locker 
rooms, bleachers, and a winter sports 
area. It spent approximately .'^,^1,300 
on these j^rojects dining the three 
year period from 1936 to 1939. 

The year 19.S9 was a memorable one 
in that it marked the comjjletion of 
the new $250, 000 City Library and the 
establishment of a separate depart- 
ment for the administration of relief, 
])reviously a function of the City 



The Beax'er Meadotv Golf Club House in 1H99 





The sixth putting green of the golf course during the late 1890' s 



(;ieik as Overseer ol the Poor. 1 he 
period during VV^orld W^ar II was one 
ot expecUency and iniprovision in 
keeping city affairs lunctioning in 
spite oi shortages in manpower, equip- 
ment, and almost all types of materials 
used in municipal operations. The 
war also resulted in an increased rate 
ol juvenile delin(|uency in C^oncord. 
The Cloncord Police Benc\olent Asso 
elation, organized in \\)\?t, established 
a Roys' (llui) which has i)een an effec- 
tive force in kcc])ing delincjuency to 
a minimum. 

With the cessation oi hostilities, 
wartime restrictions were remo\ed and 
the number ol automobiles increased 
greatly. Parking proi)lems became a 
matter ot serious concern. In 1947, the 
City installed parking meters on Main 
Street and side streets throughout the 
business district to bring a measure ot 



reliel to the problem. 

rhe intlationary spiral since the 
Second \V^)rld War increased the costs 
ot operating Ck)ncord Hospital, a j^ri- 
vate institution, and expenses could 
no longer l)e met out cjt the usual 
source ot tiuids. The City ot Concord 
and surroiniding commimities, ap- 
|)ealed to by hospital authorities tor 
financial aicl, have contriljuted to the 
cost of ojierating Concord Hospital 
since 1919 (with the exception ot 
l<)5()). 

Ol its hundred years as a city, 1949 
was an important and truittul one tor 
Concord. On October 11, 1949, the 
\oters ot Concord repealed the charter 
Avhich had been in existence since 1910 
and approved a Council-Manager 
lorm ot government. Under the new 
c barter, the governing body is the City 
Council consisting of 15 members. 



Concord's "Finest" in 1915 




Annual Report » » 55 




Sigtis of mn)V(if)al fnogress. (Left) Constriuthiir the Freis^ht Street fmrkiufr lot. 
(Right) The recently coinJ7leted North State Street fxnkiug lot 



nine representing wards and six serv- 
ing as coiincilnien-at-large. The Coun- 
cil elects a city manager who is the 
chief administrative officer ot the City. 
In 1950, the first year ot operation 
under the Council-Manager Plan, 
W^oodbury Brackett was chosen to 
serve as City Manager, departments 
were reorganized, more efficient busi- 
ness methods were introduced, and a 
merit ])lan lor (itv employees was 
atlopted. 1 he second year ol operation 
under the new government was high- 
lighted by the completion of a re- 



assessment of all city property and the 
installation of liuoridation ecjuipment 
by the City Water Department. 

Concord is at present in the midst of 
more physical clevelopment than has 
occurred in many years. The construc- 
tion of parking lots and the major 
reconstruction of Main Street offer 
concrete evidence that the city govern- 
ment is contiiuiing to do its share to 
make Concord a l:)etter place in which 
to li\e. Cloncord. the "Cajjital C^ity," 
is keeping pace \vith its proud heri- 
tage of nuniic ipal |jrc:)gress. 



Itnproving Main Street 




INDEX - FINANCIAL SECTION 

PAGE 

Combined Balance Sheet — City Activities 38 

Ceneial Fund 

Statement cji Ciuiieni Surplus 40 

Statement of Revenues 40 

Statement ot Tax Accounts 41 

Statement of Assessments 42 

Statement of A|)|)r()pi iations R: Expenditures 43 

Trust Funds — Statement of Changes in Balances 46 

Water Fund 

Balance Sheet 46 

Statement of Operations 47 

Parking Meter Fund 

Balance Sheet 48 

Statement ol Opciations 48 

Statement of Surplus 48 

Sanilaiy Sewer I'und 

Balance Sheet 49 

Statement ol Opciations 49 

Bond Funds — Disposition ol Proceeds 50 

Statement of Fong Ferm Debt 50 

Schedule of hncstmcnts, All 1-uiids 50 

Annual Relyort » » 37 



CITY 



Combined Balance Sheet 



GFNKRAI, MM) ASStlS 
Cash: 

First National Bank — General Atcount $1^79,442.37 

Imprest Funds 1,077.20 

Certificates of Deposit — Other Banks 100,000.00 

Cash for Payment of Bonds and Coupons 292.50 

.$380,812.07 

Taxes Receixmble: 

CUirrcnt Year Levy — Property |269,0.'')(i.7() 

Current Year Levy — Polls 4,843.00 

Total Current Year |273,899.7fi 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 23,817.30 

,«;250,082.46 

Prior Year Levies — Property $4,149.27 

Prior Year Levies— Polls 14,249.12 

Fotal Prior Years $18,398.39 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 18,398.39 

Faxes Bought by C:ity — LInredeemed 18, 491. .52 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 18,491.52 

250,082. 4(i 

Misrellniicnii\ Arroinils Raeii'ahle: 

Water and Sewer Rentals $45,273.23 

Departmental Receivables 1 7,601 .34 

Cemetery Receivables 2,246.39 

$65,120.96 

Less: Reserves lor Non-Collections 6,624.61 

58,496.35 

Stores Aecoinils: 

Public Works Inventory .$27,134.54 

.Stationerv and Supplies Inventory 2,079.48 

Postage Meter Inventory 207.65 

Recreation Inventory 14.47 

$29,436.14 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 25,000.00 

4,436.14 

Lax-Deeded Properties $2,097. 1 7 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 2.097.17 

Slate Head Taxes Receivable: 

Levy of 1952 $17,699.00 

Levy of 1951 3,800.31 

$21,499.31 

Less: Reserve for Non-Collection 2,872.89 

18,626.42 

Total General Fund Assets $712,453.44 

TRUST FUND ASSETS 

First National Bank - Irust Fund Account .510,889.96 

Investments (.See Schedule Page 50) 586,791.81 ,597,681.77 

PARKING METER FUND ASSE I S 

Due fiom (ieneral Fund $64,659.27 

lineslinents (See Schedule I'age 50) 36,908.13 

1101,567.40 

CAPIFAL FUND ASSE IS (Municipal Only) 
Bond Reiiuheriieuls — Future Years: 

Municipal $373,000.00 

School 182,000.00 

555,000.00 

$1,966.702.61 

38 « « City of Concord 



ACTIVITIES 



December 31, 1952 



GENERAL FUNn LIABILITIES AND SURPLUS 

rliroinils Payable: 

Unpiesented Coupons — Municipal I10L25 

Unpiesented Coupons — School IrJi'r? 

Current Vouchers Payable .i.Vl J».jO 

lax Refunds Payable t'**"" 

Unexpended Appropriations: 

Union School District |438,8.'!8.01) 

Penacook School District '^ri ir 

Interest — School Bonds .5,867.r)l) 

Due Id Other Funds: 

Water Fund §19,767.17 

Sanitary Seuer Fund 35,521.09 

Parking Meter Fund 64,659.27 

Advance Deposits: 

1 imber Yield Taxes $1()0.{)0 

Other Taxes i^O.OO 

Miscellaneous 1,668.04 

Reserves: 

For Fncunibrances $1,200.00 

For liilure I imber Yield Tax Loss 3,316.92 

Head Taxes Due to State: 

Leyv of 1952 .f47, 124.97 

Levy of 1951 4,156.81 

Total General Fund Liabilities 

Current Surplus 

Total General Fund Liabilies and Surplus 

TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal $574,867.04 

Aduinulated Iniome 22,814.73 

PARKING METER FUND LIABILITIES 

Unexpended .Appropriations $84,885.00 

Linappropriatetl Surplus 16,682.40 

CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES (Municipal Only) 

Bonded Debt $555,000.00 

Long lerm Notes 



$33,497.00 



484,836.90 



119,947.53 



1,788.04 



4,516.92 



51,281.78 
$695,868.17 

16,585.27 
$712,453.44 



101,567.40 



555,000.00 
$1,966,702.61 



Annual Report » » 39 



GENERAL FUND 

Statement of Current SiirfAus 

I OR iHK Vkar ENI)IN(; Deci'mbir 31, I9:")2 



Halaute, January 1, 1932 

IJediKt portion of opening balance ust-d to ieilu(e tax rate. 

Remaining balance as of January I, 1952 

Add 1932 Budget Surplus: 

Unemcumbered balances of appropriations 

Excess of actual over estimated revenues 



Add Prior Year Reserves Liquidated: 

Excess reserves for encumbrances 

Excess reserves for non-collection of taxes. 



Deduct Portion Used to Increase Resemes: 
For non-realization of unredeemed taxes. 
For non-realization of Tax Deeded Property. 

F"or non-reali/ation of .Stores 

lor future loss of timber yield taxes 



Balance Dtiember 3 1 , 1952 a\ailable for reduction of 195;! lax rale... 

Statement of Revenues 

liiK III! \v\R Fm>i.\(. Dkimrir .'i 1 , 1952 



Local Taxes: 

Property Taxes (Current Yr. Levy). 

Poll Taxes (Current Yr. Levy) 

National Bank .Stock (Cur. Yr. Levy). 
.Welded I axes. Prior Yrs. — Properi\ . 

-Added Taxes, Prior Yrs. — Polls 

Interest. Penalties and Costs 

Auto Permits 

Rent and Protil 1 ax Deeded Prop.. 
Timber Seveiance lax 





.■$40,963. OG 
40,930.00 


.•S; 10,994.0,". 
0,U92.;i4 


33.0(i 

23,080.37 
3,215.72 


$:i30.oo 

2,885.72 




.f4,r)3:i.88 

121.08 
I,(i78.()0 
3,310.92 


$26,335.75 
9,750.48 






$10,585.27 



State I'ax C.onli itiiilion.s: 

Railroad Tax 

Savings Bank I ax 

Interest and Dividend lax 

Loss of Taxes — .Stale forest Lands 



Luenses and I'tmiils: 

Bic>cle Registrations 

I axi Licenses 

Health Licenses 

Amusement Licenses 

Police and Protective Licenses 

Piofessional and Occupational Licenses 



liegislralion Lees and I'trniits: 

Ahirriage Licensc-s 

Recording Fees — Legal Documents 

Filing Fees 

Sundiy Fees, Clity Clerk 

Dog Licenses 



Dt'/iailnitiildl Seii'iie Clunges: 

Rent of Buildings 

Ciondort Station Concession 

Coif Fc-es 

Memorial Field, Royalties fv- Concess. 
Police Dept. — Ambulance Charges.. 

.Airport, Rent and Concessions 

Fines and Forfeits 

Cit\ FLill — (Concessions 

.Misc. Depl. Sei\ice Cliaiges 

Weights and .Measures, Fees 



ified 



Total Rc\c-nuc's . . . 

40 « « Clily of Cotuord 



Hud gel 


Revenues 






Est nn ale 


Realized 


Excess 


Deficiency 


$2,237,228.23 


$2,242.1 14.02 


.$4,885.79 




23.000.00 


22,090.00 




910.00 


(>,300.00 


(i,320.7o 


26.70 






(i25.58 


025.58 




400.00 


258.00 




142.00 


9,000.00 


9,415.21 


415.21 




88,000.0(1 


88,243.17 


243.17 




500.00 


30.78 




463.22 


2,000.00 


1,289.12 




710.88 


$2,300,428.23 


$2,370,398.58 


$3,970.35 




$12,000.00 


$13,125.(i3 


$1,125.03 




13,000.00 


12,803.98 




190.02 


7(i,000.00 


74,293.90 




1,700.04 


30.00 


55.92 


25.92 




$101,030.00 


$100,279.49 




$750.51 


$550.00 


.$557.75 


$7.75 




300.00 


598.00 


298.00 




350.00 


392.00 


42.00 




4,700.00 


3,403.50 




1 ,236.50 


200.00 


1 50.50 




49.50 


40.00 


:ii.5o 




8.50 


$0,140.00 


$5,193.25 




$940.75 


$900.00 


$1,008,00 


$108.00 




2,100.00 


2,470.15 


370.15 




90.00 


94.00 


4.00 




500.00 


434.80 




05.20 


4,100.00 


4,228.75 


128.75 




$7.f>90.oo 


$8,235.70 


$545.70 




$1,(>00.00 


SI, 522. 50 




$77.50 


2:i(».oo 


174.27 




55.73 


4.000.(J(» 


4,410.50 




189.50 


800.00 


1,014.32 


214.32 




1,200.00 


1 ,027.50 




172.50 


8,0t>5.00 


8,072.01 




85.20 


5,700.00 


(i,572.47 


872.47 




15.00 


1.85 




13.15 




3,310.58 


3,310.58 




370.00 


300.78 




9.22 


$22,580,00 


$20,400.78 


$3,880.78 




$1,300.00 


$680.77 
$2,511,260.57 




$013.23 


.$2,505,168.23 


.'80,092.34 





TAX ACCOUNTS 



Yf.ar Endinc; December 31, 19,52 



Statemetil of Taxes Receivable 



1952 
Levy 

balance, January 1, 1952 

Taxes Committed to Collector in 1952 
(Incl. Supplemental); 

Real Estate and Personal Property $2,275,371.73 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,326.70 

Timber Sexerante Tax 1,289.12 

Poll Taxes 24,090.00 

Head Taxes — 1951 and 1952 

I otal Charges to Collector *$2,307,077.55 

.\ccounte(l for as follows: 

Collections to Treasurer (Net of Refunds) .$2,021,737.38 

Authorized .Abatements 1 1,440.41 

Balance lincolleitcd December 31, 1952 273,899.76 

$2,307,077.55 

•Taken as Cuiient Revenue $2,271,819.84 

Reserve for .Abaienieiits and Adjustments 35,257.71 

$2,307,077..55 
f.Age Analysis of L luoilected Taxes of Prior Years. 

Properly 
Taxes 

1951 $1,558.62 

1950 1,085.17 

1949 484.37 

1948 291.56 

1947 259.68 

1946 260.63 

1945 57.85 

1944 7.04 

1943 13.40 

1942 43.30 

1941 67.23 

1940 20.42 

1 9.39 



Prior 

Years 

$351,264.78 


Slate Head 

Taxes 
$14,445.00 


625.58 




258.00 


$77,065.00 


$352,148.36 


$91,510.00 


$318,076.94 

15,673.03 

118,398.39 


$65,710.69 

4,300.00 

21,499.31 


$352,148.36 


$91,510.00 



$4,149.27 



Poll 

Taxes 

$1,710.00 

1,573.80 

1,233.70 

1,091.00 

1. 034, 87 

99ti.40 

2,700.90 

1,961.20 

448.80 

435. (io 

36X.20 

349.00 

345.65 

$14,249.12 



Total 

$3,268.62 

2,658.97 

1,718.07 

1,382.56 

1,294.55 

1 ,257.03 

2,758.75 

1,968.24 

462.20 

478.90 

435.43 

369.42 

345.65 

$18,398.39 



Statement of Tax Sale Accounts 



Balances LInredeeined January 1, 1952: 

Levy of 1947 ' 

Levy of 1948 

Levy of 1949 

Levy nl I '(51) 

Levy of 1951 ( I a\ Sale of 1952) 

-Accounted for as follows: 

tiolletlions to Treasurer 

.■\uthori/ed .Abatements 

Deeded to City 

Total Credits 

Uahiiue Unredeemed Deieiiiber 31, 19,' 



$72.21 

622.02 

6,907.29 

12,812.38 


$20,413.90 
■20,809.64 




$21,885.25 

84.47 

762.30 


$41,223.54 




$22,732.02 
18,491.52 




$41,223.54 



Anrnial Report » » 41 



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Annual Report » » ^5 



TRUST FUNDS 

Statemeut of Changes in Balances 

loR I UK Vfar Ended Dkcembkr ;il, 1!).")2 



PRixciPAi, .A(:c;oi!\ r 

Balanre January 1 , 19.52 

Xevv Trusts Rcteived 

Portion of Proceeds from Sale of Ceme- 
tery Lots 

Capital (iains on .Securities 



Cemetery 
Funds 
.■ii;4.'i 1,365. 19 
6,972.50 

970.00 
943.40 



Total A\ailable. 



Dishursemenls: 

Transfer to Cemeteries 

Transfer to Library 

Transfer to Schools 

Direct Grants and Expenses Paid to 
Outside Parties 

Lotal Disbursements 



.S36,223.51 



.? 18,5 19.57 



71.73 



Balance of Accumulated Income De- 
cember 31, 1952 



.'518,591.30 



.117,632.21 



library 
Fnnrl.s 

■ltd 29,654.22 



Other 
funds 

$4,961.73 



Balance of Princii.al December 31, 1952 $440,251.09 $129,654.22 

INCOME ACCOUNT 

Balance of .Accumulated Income |anuarv 
1, 1952 

Interest and Dividends on Investments 

Portion of Proceeds from Sale of Ceme- 
tery Lots 

Income from Trusts where Principal 
held by Other Trustees 



.$22,209.71 



$17,794.35 



$17,794.35 



$4,415.36 



.$877.54 



$30.00 
80.38 



$110.38 



$767.16 



Total 
$565,981.14 
6,972.50 

970.00 
943.40 



$4,961.73 .$574,867.04 



$21,417.96 
12,869.55 


$5,350.93 
3,619.24 


$716.03 
161.51 


.$27,484.92 
16,650.30 


1,936.00 






1,936.00 




13,239.54 




13,239..54 



.$59,310.76 



$18,519.57 

17,794.35 

30.00 



152.11 



$36,496.03 



$22,814.73 



WATER FUND 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1952 

ASSETS 
Fixed Assets net of ntrriied drpu-riliiiou: 

Water and Houage Rights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping and Purifying Equipment 

Distribution Mains, .Services and Meters 

Other Equipment 

Lnfinished Construction 

I olal Ii\ed .Assets 

finnd linid Assets: 

Cash — First National Bank 

Investments (See Schedule Page 5il) 

Materials and Supplies Inventory 

T otal Bond Fund Assets 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule lage 511) 

Materials and Supplies Inventory 

Contracts Receivable 

T otal Current Assets 

T otal Assets 

LIABILITIES AM) FINDS 

Ciipitiil Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 

Iiniil tialaiur and Surl>lus: 

.Municipal Investment 

Contributions in .\id of Construe tion 

Surplus — Ba'ance lanuarv 1 , 1952 $474,671 .94 

Net Profit for the year 1952 18,470.61 

T Otal Fund Balance and Surplus 

1 otal Liabilities, Surplus and Funds 

46 « « ility of Concord 



$167,663.1 I 

172,664.53 

293,612.42 

54,261.86 

7.54,578.01 

28,758.44 

129.60 



$1,790.27 
48,000.00 
26,619.75 



$19,767.17 

32,256.62 

96,499.98 

714.24 



$963,194.74 
70,978.71 



493,142.55 



$1,471,667.97 



$76,410.02 



$149,238.01 
$1,697,316.00 



$170,000.00 



$1,527,316.00 
$l,(i97,316.0O 



WATER FUND 

Statement of Operations 

liscAi. Vkar Enuki) Ubc;F.MBER 31, 19rj 



01'KRAIIN(; REVENUES 

Commercial Sales — Flat Rate $3,344.22 

Clommercial Sales — Metered 137,678.22 

Industrial Sales — Metered 25,881.32 

Sales to Other Water Utilities 599.46 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues 188.00 

Total Operating Revenues 



$167,091.22 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Walei Supply: 

Source of Supply Labor $3,895.48 

Pumping Station Labor 14,275.41 

Purification Labor 1,479.00 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,405.23 

(iravity System Supplies and Expenses 220.08 

Pumping Station Supplies and Expenses 2,421.57 

Purification System Supplies and Expenses 1,826.53 

Fuel tor Power 122.39 

Power Purchased 9,047.43 

Repairs to Pumping Station Buildings and Equip. 286.84 

Repairs to Purification Buildings ancl F.c|uipment.. 287.53 



$36,267.49 



Dislrihiilioii: 

Distribution Labor $24,487.93 

Meter Department Labor 3,584.30 

Meter Department Supplies and Expenses 7.72 

Other Distribution Supplies and Expenses 917.44 

Repairs to Distribution Structures 2,234.27 

Repairs to Mains 1,809.78 

Repairs to Services 2.092.78 

Repairs to Hydrants 901.62 

Repairs to Meters 3,400.47 

Adniinislriilion: 

tlonimercial Office Salaries $1,841.11 

Meter Reading Salaries 5,231.42 

Commercial Supplies and Expenses 526.35 

Salaries of General Officers 5,555.00 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 3,020.00 

(ieneral Office Rent and Expenses 326.56 

Repairs to General Office Structures 39.25 

Other (ieneral Expenses 450.35 

Insurance 1 ,736.39 

Stationery and Printing 11.04 

Longevity, Annual and Sick Leaves 9,094.74 

Retirement Fund Payments 6,250.26 

Stores Department and Shop Expenses 737.97 

(iarage Flxpenses 2,041.80 

hixed Charges: 

Depreciation $30,008.82 

Taxes 38.10 

Interest 3,062.50 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

\on-()pe>alintr Incuine: 

(iain on Sale of Depreciated Assets 

Interest on Investments 

Other Interest Income 

M iscellaneous 

Total Non-Operating Income 

Net Profit for the Year 



i39,436.31 



136,862.24 



39,109.42 



$302.01 

1,602.69 

9.90 

540.25 



$151,675.46 
$16,015.76 



2,454.85 
$18,470.61 



Annual Report » » 47 



PARKING METER FUND 

Balance Sheet 

Decembik 31, 1952 



Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page 50). 

/ iiibilities: 

Appropriations Unexpended 

I nappropriated Surplus 



$64,659.27 
36,908.13 



$84,885.00 
16,682.40 



$101,567.40 



$101,567.40 



Statement of Operations 

Fur the Year Ending Dece.mber 31, 1952 

Revenue: 

Meter Ciollcuious $48,141.35 

Interest on Invested Funds 457.00 

E\/)fiulilin(f.'i: 
Salaries 

Meter Repairs $1 .060.22 

C:olleilions 542.06 

1- nlorienient 12.463.49 

M.n king .Streets 153.60 

$14,219.37 

Supplies 

Melei Repair Parts $545.53 

Olliei .Meter Supplies 221.61 

liilor(enient 238.51 

M.uking Streets 418.03 

$1,423.68 

K( liiciiicnt ((iMlril)Utioiis 768.00 

l.ixts, lusni.Mue, Ftc 1,067.00 

Capilal Oullax 

Meier (leaning Maihilie .$262.50 

I'uiiliase ol Parking Areas 6,395.82 6,658.32 

.\el ImoMie lor 1952 

Statement of SitrlAus 

For ihi ^'iar F.niiin(; 1)k( kmbkr 31. 1952 

Balan(e januarv 1. 19,52 $117,572.63 

'less Deprei iaicd \alue of Meters and Oilier Kiiuiidnenl 40.467.21 

Adjusted Surplus jaiuiarv 1 , 1952 

Add: Net liuonie tor 1952 $24,461.98 

DeducI: I nexpended Appropriation 84.885.00 

Net Reduction of Surplus in 1952 

I'napproprialeil Snrjdus 

' 1 his adjustment was made for the purpose of (hanging records to <ash hasis. 

48 « « City of Concord 



$48,.598.3.- 



$24,136.37 
$24,461.98 



$77,105.42 



,$60,423.02 
$16,682.40 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1952 

ASSETS 
Fixed Aistti: 

Land and Rights of Wav $199.97 

Sewer Mains 929,21 7. 7(i 

Manholes 1 03,208.83 

Customer Connections 136,550.49 

Sundry Equipment 1,745.1 1 

$1,170,922.16 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 600,431.42 

Total Fixed Assets 

H repaid Engineering Expenses 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund 135,521.09 

Investments (See Schedule Page 5U) 47,146.91 

Total .Assets 

I.IABII rriES AND FUNDS 

Current Eiabilities: 

.■Xdvance Deposits on Customer Connei lions 

Eiind Balance and Surplus: 

Municipal Investment $481,337.71 

C;ontributions in Aid of Const lui lion 144,734.45 

Earned Surplus: 

Balance — Januarv 1, 1952 $26,640.27 

Net Proht — for year 1 952 5,488.92 

1 otal Surplus Balance 32,129.19 

Total Fund Balance and Suipliis 

Total Liabilities, Suiplus and liinds... 



1570,490.74 
5,115.11 



82,668.00 
$658,273.85 



$72.50 



658,201.35 
$658,273.85 



Statement of Operations 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1952 

OPERATING REVENUES 

Sewer Rents — General 

Sewer Rents — Industrial 

1 olal Operating Revenues 

OPERATING EXPENSES 

('•eiieral Ojieralion: 

Engineering Expense $55.25 

Main and Manhole Oper. Labor and Expense 5,513.29 

House C:onnection Oper. Labor and Expense 1,509.16 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 1,074.32 

Mainlenance of Manholes 235.17 

Miscellaneous General Expenses 52.37 

Customers' Expense: 

Meter Reading and Billing 

Administration: 

.\udit Fees $160.00 

Employee's Retirement Fund 675.32 

Depreciation 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Son-Operating Income: 

Interest on Investments 

Net Profit for the Year 



.$24,798.69 
4,975.68 



58,439.56 
1,488.72 



835.32 
14,803.76 



$29,774.37 



25,567.36 

$4,207.01 

1,281.91 

$5,488.92 



Annual Report » » 49 



BOND FUNDS 

Disposition of Proceeds 

I'oR THE Year Ending December 31, 1952 

BOND FUND — GENERAL 

Balance available January 1, 1952 $16.44 

Expenditure for Equipment 16.44 



Balanie December 31 , 1952 

BOND FUND — WATER 

Balance available January I, 1952 .«;83,872..39 

E\peiidilures: 

Purchase of Land $23,992.38 

Construction of 24-inch Main No. Stale Street 10,089.74 34,082.12 



Balaiue Dc-i ember 31, 19.52 $49,790.27 



STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT 

1)1 < FNIBl K 31 , 1952 

Dale oj Dale of Int. Balance Paid in J9i2 

MUNICIP.AL hiiie Maturity Hale Dec. 31, 19^2 Principal Interest 

Central Fire Staticm 1934 1954 3'/2 $2,000.00 $1,000.00 $87.50 

.Sewers 1934 1954 31/2 2,000.00 1,000.00 87.50 

.Sewers 1934 1954 3 7,000.00 4,000.00 270.00 

Storm Sewers 1937 1956 2'/4 28,000.00 7,000.00 787.50 

Airport 1942 1954 I M 6,000.00 3,000.00 1 12.50 

Signal Svstem 1948 1958 1 1/4 138,000.00 23,000.00 1,868.75 

Equipment and Improvements. . 1948 1953 I '/4 40,000.00 40,000.00 750.00 

K(|uipiiient and Improvements. . 1949 1958 111' 150,000.00 25,000.00 2,437.50 



$373,000.00 $104,000.00 $6,401. 2.i 

$182,000.00 $14,000.00 $8,330.0f 

Conanl School (.Serial Notes) .. . 1949 1952 I '/i! 25,000.00 218.75 



SCHOOL 

High School 1925 1965 41/4 $182,000.00 $14,000.00 $8,330.00 



$182,000.00 $39,000.00 $8,548.75 

WATER 
I and and Construction 1949 1969 13/4 $170,000.00 $10,000.00 $3,062.50 



lolall.ong leniiDdil $725,000.00 $153,000.00 $18,01 

Analysis oj Debt Maturities 



Due in 

1953 ... 

1954 ... 

1955 . . . 

1956 ... 

1957 ... 

1958 ... 

1959 ... 

1960 ... 

1961 ... 

1 962 . . . 
■vorid 19(i2. 



$373,000.00 $182,000.00 $170,000.1)0 
SCHEDULE OF INVESTMENTS - ALL FUNDS 

Trusl Parking Sanitary Water Water 

hn'eshnent linuh Meter fund Sewer Fund Fund Bond Fund 
Sai'iniis Hanh.s: 

Loan and 1 ruM Savings Bank $85,228.34 .$9,227.20 $13,199.27 $9,155.58 $12,000.00 

Merrimack Clounlv Savings Bank.... 88,332.33 13,320.89 3,383.19 

N. H. Savings Bank 84,040.74 18,453.95 13,323.80 13,116.42 24,000.00 

Union Trust Company 92,745.52 9,226.98 7,302.95 6,601.43 12,000.00 

v. S. CurerNnient Bonds: 

U. S. Ireasuiy — Series "C" $161,700.00 

Storks: 

.Mutual Investment Funds $58,457.58 

Public Utilities 2,220.00 

Banks and luMirance 14,067.30 



$586,791.81 $36,908.13 .$47,146.91 $32,256.62 $48,000.00 



50 « « City of Concord 



SERVICES AS CLOSE AS YOUR TELEPHONE 

A Handy Check-List and Directory of Often-Used City Services 
FIRE 1960 POLICE 783 

Service Department Phone 

Administration. General City Manager 3129 

Airport Airport 3129 

Ambulance Police 783 

Assessments Assessors 209 

Auditorium. Rental Records 3128 

Auto Permits Finance 4407 

Bicycle Licenses Police 783 

Bills and Accoiuits Finance 4407 

Beano Licenses Police 783 

Birth Certificates Records 3128 

Bookmobile Library 3700 

Building Permits Engineering 282 

Cemetery Public Works I673-W 

City Council City Manager 3129 

City Solicitor Legal 178 

Dance Licenses Police 783 

Death Certificates Records 3128 

Dog Licenses Records 3128 

Elections Records 3128 

Engineering, Cit\ Engineering 282 

Fire Fire 1960 

Garbage Collection Public Works 256 or 282 

Golf Course Recreation & Parks 427 

Health, Public Health 39 

Laboratory Health 39 

Library Library 3700 

Maps — City Engineering 282 

Marriage Certificates Records 3128 

Milk Licenses ^- Inspection Health 39 

Mortgages & Conditional Sales Records 3128 

Nursing, Public Health District Nursing Office 703 

Oil Burner Inspection Fire 1960 

Old Age Assistance Welfare 3363 

Ordinances &: Resolutions. City Records 3128 

Parks Recreation .^- Parks 1529 

Payments by Citv Finance 4407 

Personnel. Citv Personnel 3129 

Planning Planning 282 

Playgrounds Recreation & Parks L529 

Pliunbing I'ermits & Licenses Engineering 282 

Police " Police 783 

Purchasing Purchasing 3129 

Refuse Collection Public Works 256 or 282 

Relief Welfare 3363 (Penacook 16) 

Sanitation. Public Health 39 

Sewers Public Works 256 or 282 

Snow Plowing & Sanding Public Works 256 or 282 

Soldiers" Relief Welfare 3363 

Street Liglits. Out Electric Conipanv 462 

Street Ma ntenance Public Works 256 or 282 

Subdivisions Planning 282 

Tax Collection Finance 4407 

Trees, City Engineering 282 

Water Water 117 

Water Bills Finance 4407 

Weights & Measiues Engineering 282 

Zoning Permits Engineering 282 

Zoning Changes Planning 282 

FOR INFORIVIATION ON OTHER SERVICES NOT LISTED — 3129