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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

A YEAR OF CIVIC IMPROVEA^ENT 



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CONCORD NEW HAMPSHIRE 
ANNUAL REPORT - 1953 










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NEW HAMPSHIRE TRAILS 



The mountains call the river 

and the river seeks the sea. 
And granite hills forever 

call in whispered tones to me. 
The lakes are flashing jewels 

that reflect the sunlit sky; 
The wild birds love the birches 

where the wood-winds pause to sigh; 
Through the pale green leaves of springtime, 

the hermit thrushes sing. 
And golden-throated orioles 

their songs to heaven fling. 
The splendor of the wilderness 

still lives for him who walks 
With Nature's God, and learns to read 

the romance of the rocks. 



Go forth and shout in autumn 

ye balsam-scented gales, 
peaks that burn with beauty 

on the great New Hampshire trails; 
Of trees that wear their crimson 

like a coat-of-arms of old; 
Of trees that dress in garments 

trimmed with rose and green and gold 
The Old t.^an of the fountain stands 

with weather-beaten face. 
While far beneath, the fairy ferns 

are gowned in creamy lace. 
The splendor of the wilderness 

still lives for him who walks 
With Nature's G-od, and learns to read 

the romance of the rocks. 



Zuella Sterlln 



PROGRESS REPORT 

OF 
NEW HAMPSHIRE'S 



ff 



CAPITAL CITY 



>> 



GOVERNMENT 

For The 
Year Ending December 3i, i953 




A YEAR 



OF CIVIC IMPROVEMENT 



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YOUR CITY OFFICIALS - 1953 

CITY COUNCIL 






Shellty 0. Walker, Mayor 
M 7 /^ Howe Anderson, Mayor Pro-tem 



Councilmen-at -Large 



Howe Anderson 


Herbert Rainie 


Wayne Gardner 


William A. Stevens 


Leigh S. Hall 


Shelby 0. Walker 




Ward Councilmen 



James P. Ferrin Ward 1 Conrad Robinson Ward 5 

Harlan F. Johnson Ward 2 Clarence L. Clark Ward 6 

Charles C. Hoagland Ward 3 Milton J. Barnes Ward ? 

Louis G. K. Clamer Ward h- Edwin R. Langevin Ward 8 

Thomas B. Jennings, Ward 9 



CITY ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the City Manager Woodbxiry Brackett , City Manager 

Airport Department V'oodbury Brackett , City Manager 

Assessing Department C. Fred Moulton, Assessor 

Sidney Dach, Assessor 
John J. Hallinan, Assessor 

City Hall Department Arthur E. Rohy, City Clerk 

Civil Defense Department ..Lawrence Riis, Sr. , Civil Defense Dir. 

Engineering Department Wesley E. Haynes, City Engineer 

Ellsworth B. Philhrick, Engineering Inspector 
J. Sheperd Norris, Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Finance Department Archie N. Gourley, City Auditor 

Amos B. Morrison, City Collector 
Wallace W. Jones, City Treasurer 

Fire Department Clarence H. Green, Fire Chief 

Henry E. Drew, Deputy Fire Chief 

Duncan M. Murdoch, 2nd Deputy Fire Chief 

Joseph F. Greenough, Jr., 2nd Deputy Fire Chief 

Health Department Pierre A. Boucher, M.D., City Physician 

Austin B. Preshy, Sanitary Inspector 

Legal Department Gordon M. Tiffany, City Solicitor 

Library Department Siri M. Andrews, Librarian 

Personnel Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Planning Department Gustaf H. Lehtinen, Planning Director 

Police Department Arthur W. Mclsaac, Police Chief 

J. Edward Silva, Deputy Police Chief 

Public Works Department .... V/. E. Haynes, Supt. of Public Works 

Edward L. Howland, Cemetery Superintendent 

William H. Murphy, Sewer Superintendent 

Purchasing Department Woodbury Brackett , City Manager 

Records Department Arthur E. Roby, City Clerk 

Recreation & Parks Dept. . .Donald F. Sinn, Recreation & Parks Dir. 

4 " " City of Concord 



Water Department G. Arthur Panevif, Water Superintendent 

Welfare Department Gertrude E. Watkins, Welfare Director 

Charles P. Coakley, Overseer of Poor, Ward I 



MtMICIPAL COUKT 

Judiciary Donald G. Matson, Judge 

Peter J. King, Special J\idge 
C. Murray Sawyer, Clerk of Court & Probation Officer 

MUNICIPAL BOARDS 



Board of Building Appeal 

Eugene F. Magenau, Chairman 
Carrol Garland 
William Johns 
Arnold Perreton 



Board of Health 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. 
Thomas M. Dudley, M. D. 
William D. Peahale, M. D. 



Lihrary Board 

May land H. Morse, Jr., Chairman 

Joseph J. Comi 

Otis Kingshury 

Harold MacHeil 

Mrs. Eugene Magenau 

Mrs. Paul Shaw 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederic Upton 

Timothy Woodman 



Recreation Advisory Coxmcil 

Robert 0. Blood, M. D. , Chairman 

Mrs. Homer Lawrence, Vice-Chair. 

Roland E. Allen 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. 

Mrs. Lewellyn Boutwell 

Edson F. Eastman 

Clarence E. Huggins 

Mrs. Harlan F. Johnson 

Mrs. Winslow E. Melvin 

Mrs. Maurice W. Mullen 

Peter J. Murphy 

Samuel S. Richmond 

Walter B. Sweet 

Sulo J. Tani 

Mrs. Alfred W. Tovey 



City Planning Board 

Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 
Woodbury Brackett 
Charles C. Davie 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Douglas Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
Wesley E. Haynes 
A. Clifford Hudson 
John B . Jameson 

Board of Plumbing Examiners 

Arthur W. Sargent, Cliairman 
George E. Young 
Ellsworth B. Phllbrick 

Trustees of Trust Fxands 

Robert M. Beyer 
Wallace W. Jones 
Leon Merrill 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Lawrence J. Moynihan, Chairman 
Frederick Hall 
Raymond Y. Lapointe 
Donald G. Matson 
Frank J. Preston 

Board of Revision of Assess ments 

Archie Gourley, Chairman 
Wesley E. Haynes 
Allan N. Leavitt 
Lawrence J. Riis, Sr. 
Gordon M. Tiffany 

Personnel Advisory Board 

Douglas B. Whiting, Chairman 
William H. Macurda 
J. Mitchell Ahem 



Annual Report 




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£ (£,en£^^^ 



"^^ ^,TV MANAGER 



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n-1 ritv Council 
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coca scve--- *Sn1^n"e;W^^^^ 

your atten ^^^^.^ 

happenings ess an^ 

iQ(S3 v/as one ^-a celebra^c^ 

come nei'^ 

anted on the City's o«nfP^3, 

TMs «P<''-\ra%'u"s"n*^^^ saving over 
^f;:iru-nnual reports. ^,,^ 

° '^ ui^en support, a eo°P loyees 

Co-'-^tle Stlful f "tt^er Sy to live .n. 
council, and ^^ ^„^,„d a bett 
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City Manager 



ckett 



CITY COUNCIL 



MEMBERSHIP: 

Councilmen-at-Large. . . .6 
Ward Councilmen 9 



EXPENDED $3,000 



As the policy making body of your city government, the 
City Covmcil meets regularly to adopt city ordinances and reso- 
lutions, discuss city problems, and see that the City Manager 
conducts the affairs of the City in the best interests of the citizens. 

The CityCou-ncil met in twelve regular sessions and eight 
special meetings during 1953. As a result of Council delibera- 
tions 19 ordinances and 73 resolutions were passed. In addition, 
four finance committee meetings were held and 19 hearings were 
conducted. 

Important matters considered by the City Council in 1953 
were as follows: 

* By a vote of 8-5 approved the opening of Long Pond for 
ice cutting ; 

* Approved two water main extensions on Black Hill and 
on Abbott Road in 



Concord Manor; 

* Passed the largest 
bond issue in the 
City's history --a 
loan of $700, 000; 

* Granted a sum of 
$35, 000 to Concord 
Hospital to help it 
meet its deficit ; 

* Byavote of 8-7 re- 
jected the reopen- 
ing of Long Pond 
for St. Paul's School 
boating; 

* Rejected a proposal 
to borrow $200, 000 
to construct a park- 
ing lot at the Low 
Avenue site by a tie 
vote of 7-7; 

* Purchased the Bea- 
ver Meadow Golf 
Course property 
from the Concord 
Electric Company 
for $5,000. 



Mayor Walker officially opened 
North State Street parking lot 
on September 14th. 




Annual Report " " 7 



CITY CLERK 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 2 

Part-time 1 



EXPENDED $9 , 582 . 98 



The City Clerk serves as secretary to the City Council; 
custodian of documents; chief of elections; supervisor of City 
Hall, the municipal auditorium, and the ward houses; and hand- 
ler of city licenses. In each of these capacities, his duties are 
varied and numerous. 

Various Kinds of Licenses Issued 

During the year, the City Clerk's Office issued eight types 
of licenses, including marriage, theatre, dog, taxicab, ball alley, 
music machine, pool table and bowling, and boxing licenses. 

Marriages, Deaths, and Birt hs Show Increase Over Prior Year 
Dan Cupid was quite active and accurate with his bow and 
arrow during 1953, scoring a total of 357 buUseyes. This was 
an increase of 30 marriages over the previous year. Likewise 
deaths showed an increase over the same period of one year ago; 
643 were recorded as compared to 623 in 1952. The legendary 
stork, on the other hand, did his best to counteract the death rate 
by blessing many Concord homes during the year . A total of 902 
visi,ts were,ma4eby,J5firTi.i^^ of births since 1947 ." 

Municipal Election Helped Make 1953 an Exciting Year 

In accordance with the provisions of the City Charter, the 
city election was held onNovember 3rd. There were seven filings 
for Councilman-at-Large and 20 for Ward Councilman. Howe 
Anderson, Wendall F. Grant and Charles C. Davie were elected 
Councilmen-at-Large for a term of four years, and the following 
Ward Councilmen were elected for two year terms: Ward One, 
James P. Ferrin; Ward Two, Harlan F. Johnson; Ward Three, 



tn'.r Ki Vr; 



1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951. 1952; 1953 



BIRTHS — CITY OF CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 




587 563 85 



27 866 902 



" " City, of Concord 



■/U ,C<f %C1, 




Concord's government was studied by officials 
from Germany, shown being welcomed, in November. 



William H. Hunneyman; Ward Four, John C. White; Ward Five, 
Conrad W.Robins on; Ward Six, James Ross; Ward Seven, William 
P. Gove; Ward Eight, Edwin R. Langevin; Ward Nine, Thomas 
B. Jennings. 

Election expenses totaled $4,108.88. This included the 
printing of ballots and check lists, salaries of election officials 
and custodial help, rent of buildings, and lunches for the election 
officials. 

Certified Records and Mortgages Still Increasing 

The demand for certified copies of records was again on 
the increase during the past year due to the continued demand to 
provide documents for the federal government, social security, 
old age retirement, and induction into the various branches of 
the armed forces. 

The recording of chattel mortgages and conditional sales 
by the City Clerk continued to show a slight increase over the 
previous year. State law requires that all personal property 
purchased on time payments be recorded in the City Clerk's 
Office. 



Total Vote 


at the 


Municipal Election 


War 


d 


Ballots Cast 


1 




543 


2 




215 


3 




264 


4 




940 


5 




614 


6 




597 


7 




1472 


8 




352 


9 




532 
5529 



Annual Report " 







North State Street, before and after 
the construction of the parking lot. 



PLANNING DEPARTMENT 




PERSONNEL: 

Full-time. 



EXPENDED $9, 843. 92 



The function of the Planning Department is to recommend 
action deemed advisable in the interest of the orderly develop- 
ment and growth of the City. It develops surveys, collects and 
analyzes data, and prepares reports and plans concerning land 
use, traffic control, subdivision regulation, economic base, and 
a wide variety of other matters of importance to the community . 

Main Street Reconstruction Project the Result of Detailed Plan- 
ning Studies 

Various problems affecting the design of the Main Street 
reconstruction project were considered by the Department early 
in 1953. Detailed construction plans for this major highway im- 
provement project were completed and approved by city, state, 
and federal authorities in June and work was started in mid- July. 
Nearly a year will be required to complete the reconstruction 
which will cost approximately $700, 000. 

Support of New Hampshire Expressway Recommended 

Plans for a central New Hampshire expressway running 
from the Massachusetts line south of Nashua to Concord were 
presented to the state legislature by the Commissioner of Pub- 
lic Works and Highways early in the year. The Planning De- 
partment recommended to the City Council that it actively sup- 
port the expressway proposal in the interest of an orderly de- 
velopment of the City's major street plan. 

Street Discontinuances Kept the Department Active 

In keeping with the City' s policy of discontinuing abandoned 
rural roads to relieve the City of any further responsibility for 
their maintenance, the Department recommended that 14 miles 
of street involving 16 roads be publicly closed. In each instance 
the Planning Director was the petitioner and, as such, served 
notice of hearing on all owners of property abutting on the high- 
ways to be discontinued. 



10 



City of Concord 



Parking L ot Studies Consume Considerable Time 

The Planning Board continued to devote considerable time 
and study to the off-street parking problem. During the year, 
amendments to the official map were recommended to the Council 
in connection with proposed parking lots on Low Avenue and on 
Freight Street. Plans were prepared fixing the arrangement of 
car spaces in the North State Street and Freight Street lots. A 
parking plan was prepared for the widened portion of Canal Street 
in Penacook in connection with the reconstruction of this street. 

Water andSewer Extensions Present a Serious Financial Problem 
Petitions for a Z, 000-foot extension of the municipal water 
system in Old Turnpike Road on Concord Plains, and a 615-foot 
extension of the sanitary sewer system in Auburn Street in the 
West End section of the City proper were considered. Recom- 
mendation of extension was made to the Council on condition that 
the owners of property abutting on the sections of street in which 
these facilities are constructed participate in the cost of such 
construction through the established special assessment financ- 
ing procedure. 

War Memorial Dedicated in 1953 

On Armistice Day the City of Concord dedicated a granite 
memorial to its citizens who, as members of the Armed Forces , 
were killed during World War II and during the Korean strife. 
The memorial, which was erected on the Plaza area in front of 
the State House, is impressive both from the standpoint of size 
and simplicity of design. The Planning Department assisted the 
Mayor's War Memorial Committee in selecting the design of the 
memorial, collecting and checking the names of the war dead to be 
inscribed thereon, and supervising the erection of the monument . 

Mayor Walker unveils the war memorial. 




Annual Report " " 11 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED $14, 103. 16 

Full-time 3 

Part-time Z 



The Assessing Department is responsible for determining 
and recording the kind, value, and ownership of taxable property 
within Concord in order to spread the tax levy equitably among 
property owners. The Board of Assessors, consisting of two 
part-time and one full-time member, meets to keep appraisals 
up to date and to hear appeals of property owners concerning the 
values placed upon their properties. The Board heard 64 tax- 
payers during twelve regular and 39 special meetings in 1953. 
This was only 35 per cent of the number of taxpayers heard dur- 
ing the previous year, indicating the success of the newly in- 
stalled assessing systems and records. 

Property Tax Warrant of $2, 315, 632. 73 Submitted 

County, city, and school tax warrants submitted to the col- 
lector in 1953 totaled $2, 315, 632. 73. The 1953 tax rate, based 
on $1, 000. 00 of assessed valuations, was $47. 90 in the City and 
$55.36 in Penacook as compared with 1952 tax rates of $47.50 
and $52. 53 respectively. 

The 1953 asses sed valuationof property in Concord totaled 
$47,828,712.00, an increase of $438, 350. 00 over the previous 
year. Poll and head tax warrants amounted to $95, 884. 00. 

File of Poll Taxpayers of Invaluable Aid 

A master file of poll taxpayer s , developed in 1952, was of 
invaluable assistance during the last year. Through referral to 
these modern records, it is possible to determine who is re- 
quired, and who is exempted from paying a poll tax. 

The annual poll tax census was completed by members of 
the Police Department during April. 

Annual Meeting Held with State Officials 

On several occasions the Board viewed various properties. 
Inmany cases a field check was made of the property concerned 
in the hearing by a member of the Board. On March 14th the 
Board of Assessors at- 
tended the annual meet- 
ing of the State TaxCom- 
nnission, as required by 
state law, held at the State 
House. These meetings 
are held so that assess- 
ing authorities may re - 
ceive instructions on the 
proper assessment of real 
estate, timber, and other 
property. 

12 " " City of Concord 





tion a-rV'.^ -records th^f^ f • -^r-— -=_j___^ 




Annual Report 



13 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED. $42,040.51 

Full-time 9 



The Finance Department consists of the divisions of audit- 
ing, treasury, collection, and central duplicating and office sup- 
ply stores; and performs the functions of accounting and budget 
control, auditing receipts and expenditures, financial reporting, 
debt arrangennent, collecting and disbursing monies, custodian 
of all funds, and operating an office supply and duplicating service. 

Major Accomplishments 

During the year the following was accomplished: 

Delinquent poll taxes outstanding were reduced from $19,092 to 
$8,299 and delinquent property taxes from $273,206 to $223,917. 

* 
The date of the collector's sale was advanced by four weeks . 

* 
The issuance of auto permits was speeded up by streamlining the 
operation. 

* 
Considerable savings were made in postage and time by combin- 
ing head and poll tax bills and rolls. 

A ten-year bond issue of $200, 000 for parking areas was sold at 
one and one -half per cent interest. 

A twelve-year bond issue of $700,000 for construction and pur- 
chase of new equipment was sold at two per cent interest. 

Cash discounts announting to $2,372 were taken on bills. 

A sum of $666 was realized through the investment of temporar- 
ily idle funds . 

A new offset machine was installed, making possible the process- 
ing of a greater variety and volume of forms and reports , includ- 
ing this Annual Report, 

A year-end general fund budget surplus of $51, 200 was realized, 
comprising unexpended appropriations amounting to $29,913 and 
revenues of $21,287 in excess of budget estimates. 

* 
Auto Permit Revenue Still Increasing 

Revenue from auto permits totaled $95,603 in 1953, an in- 
crease of $7,360 over the previous year. Pre-war (1941) reve- 
nue from this source was $37, 779 or only 40% of the present level. 
During the sanne period revenue from the interest and dividends 
teix has risen from $49,840 to $76, 221, an increase of 53%, while 
the savings bank teix revenue has fallen from $34,447 to $14,401, 
a decrease of 58%. The railroad tcix has decreased slightly from 
$14,270 to $12,905, a drop of 10%. 

14 " " City of Concord 



Debt Increased in 1953 

Debt for municipal purposes increased during the year 
from $373,000 to $1,169,000. Of this increase, $200,000 is 
payable from parking meter revenue and $187,000 from state 
highway grants, leaving $408,800 to be paid from local taxes. 
With the granting of state and federal highway funds, the City 
is securing over $1, 000, 000 worth of construction and approx- 
imately $170, 000 worth of new equipmentin returnfor the above- 
mentioned addition to future tax bills. 



THE- 1953 BUD6E-T 




Does not include Parking Meter, Sanitary Sewer , or Water 
Funds which are completely self-supporting. 

Includes all school expenses (operating costs, debt, and 

capital outlay. ) 

Includes all county expenses (operating costs, debt, and 

capital outlay, ) 

Annual Report " " 15 




The Board of Health meets to protect your health. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED 

Full-time .4 

Part-time 2 



$48, 190. 13 



The aim of the Health Department is to keep the residents 
of Concord in good health by holding health clinics, inspecting 
establishments where food is handled or served, and taking every 
precaution possible to prevent the spread of disease. 

Seven Health Clinics Held 

A total of 494 children attended seven health clinics to re- 
ceive protective treatment against diphtheria, whooping cough, 
tetanus, and small pox. These clinics were held in January, 
February, March, April, May, June, and December. 

New Drugs of Great Help 

One case of poliomyelitis and nine cases of infectious hep- 
atitis were recorded in 1953. Doctors also reported cases of 
measles and mumps. New drugs have been of great help in com- 
bating scarlet fever and other infectious diseases. 

Daily Average Consumption of Milk in Concord was 14, 500 Quarts 
To determine the quality and cleanliness of milk delivered 
by the dairyman to the milk plant, samples of milkwere collected 
by the sanitary inspector directly from the cans of producers as 
the milk entered the weigh room. Other sannples of milk and 
cream were collected periodically from distributors in the ori- 
ginal capped bottles and subjected to a variety of laboratory tests 



16 



City of Concord 



establishedby law to determine the quality of milk and cream sold. 
During the year the daily total average consumption of milk 
in Concord was 14,500 quarts. Of this amount, 12,500 quarts 
or 88. 9 per cent was sold as pasteurized milk, and 1 , 600 quarts 
or 11. 1 percent was sold as raw milk. The sale of pasteurized 
milk increased over the previous year, but the per cent of raw 
milk on the market increased. The total daily average sale of 
heavy cream was 344 quarts, slightly more than a year ago when 
336 quarts were sold daily. 



Great Dec rease in Nuisance Complaints since 1952 

During 1953 there were 49 nuisance complaints investi- 
gated, a 50 per cent decrease from 1952 when 97 complaints 
were received and investigated. The most common type of com- 
plaint was that of refuse scattered in alleys or dumped on pri- 
vate landnear highways. Complaints were received by the Board 
of Health relative to owners of dwellings located within 100 feet 
of public sewers and not connected thereto, as required by state 
law. Three complaints were received of strong food odors en- 
tering apartments located in the vicinity of restaurants. 



Eating Establishments Inspected 370 Times in 1953 

It has been the duty of the sanitary inspector to see that 
unsanitary practices, poor protection of foods, and vending of 
foods of inferior quality are corrected and eliminated. A total 
of 370 inspections were nnade of eating establishments during 
1953 to safeguard your food supply. In stores and markets, 
fresh fruits and vegetables, nneats, and canned goods were in- 
spected and condemned if they did not meet standards. During 
the year 165 pounds of meat, 149 cans of food-stiiff s, and other 
foods were condemned and destroyed. 



(Left) A bottle washer in one of Concord's most modern milk 
plants. (Right) This maze of pipes pasteurizes your nnilk. 




LEGAL DEPARTMENT 

PERSONNEL: EXPENDED $3,185.26 

Part-time 1 



The City Solicitor acts to aid the City in all legal matters. 
Since practically every action involving the City requires careful 
legal study and research, this Department is constantly working 
with resolutions, ordinances, contracts, and other transactions 
requiring sound legal attention. 

Land for Parking Lots Acquired by Voluntary Deeds 

During 1953 resolutions, options, and deeds were drafted 
for the acquisition of sites for parking lots on North State Street, 
Hall Street, Freight Street, and Low Avenue. In the first in- 
stance it was proposed to acquire these lands by condemnation 
proceedings as provided under the laws relating to parking areas 
and highways. As it turned out, however, all land has been ac- 
quired by voluntary deed. 

Legal papers were drafted in connection with widening Main 
Street and acquiring property in the California Field area of Pen - 
acook. 

Small Claims Procedure Used in Collecting Delinquent Poll and 
Head Taxes 

During 1953 the City undertook the collection of delinquent 
poll and head taxes by using the small claims procedure estab- 
lished for the collection of small debts in the Municipal Court. 
From April through December a minimum of five cases per week 
were instituted, resulting in approximately 175 poll and head tax 
collections varying in amounts up to $60 each. When the trustee 
process appeared more suitable than the small claims procedure, 
trustee writs were instituted in the Supreme Court. 

Title was searched in connection with 19 3 parcels of land 
acquired by the City through tax sales, and notices of such sales 
were served on all mortgagees of the property. Five claims 
cases were argued before the Referee in Bankruptcy. 

City Loses Hood Case 

Although Hood v. Concord was competently argued bySpecial 
Counsel in the State Supreme Court, the City was unsuccessful 
in sustaining its position denying a license for the sale of milk. 
The Court, nevertheless, made several suggestions which will 
make it possible for the City Board of Health to carry on its in- 
spections at minimum expense. 

The City has been successfully represented in Walker v. Con- 
cord regarding the validity of a tax title. 

Sale of Christmas Trees in Residential Areas Results in Suits 
The sale of Christmas trees in residential areas has been 
enjoined by the Court in the cases of Concord v. McAllister and 
Concord V. Angwin. Appearance has been entered in the City's 
interest in Muldoon v. Concord, which involves an appeal fronn 
action taken by the Zoning Board of Adjustment, 

18" " City of Concord 



\r\ 



Citizens through a public hearing discuss the merits and dis- 
advantages of a Low Avenue parking lot. 

MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 



PERSONNEL: 

Part-time 



EXPENDED $9,223.47 



The Municipal Airport came into being in 1936 when the 
Concord Airport Corporation sold out to the City of Concord. 
Major airport improvements were made in the late 1930' s when 
a modern administration building, t^vo hangars, a radio range 
station, and three landing strips were constructed. Serviced by 
NortheastAirlines, direct flights are regularly scheduled to Bos- 
ton, New York City, and Berlin and Laconia, New Hampshire. 

Number of Passengers Outbound Increased in 1953 

The total number of passengers enplaned in 1953 was 1,639, 
an increase of 105 over 1952. The number of pounds of mail han- 
dled by the airline was 3, 892, express amounted to 2,794 pounds, 
and freight was 3,787 pounds. Totals for these three categories 
were 3,035, 3,067, and 6,902 respectively in 1952, showing an 
increase in mail service but a decrease in express and freight 
activity. 

Physical Improvements Made at the Airport 

During 1953 a new oil-burning heating plant was installed 
to replace the old coal stoker previously in use. The runway 
lights were rebuilt at a total cost of $1,036, $600 of which was 
borne by the State. With these improved lights, night conditions 
have been greatly improved. 

The grassed area of the airport was naaintained during 1953 
by the State Aeronautics Commission using their own equipment. 

Northeast Electronics CorporationRentedSpace in Administration 
Building 

Space in the basement of the administration building was 
rented out in 1953 to the Northeast Electronics Corporation, a 
company engaged in research activities. With the addition of 
this rental, every "nook and cranny" of the building is being used 
by one aviation group or another. 

Annual Report " " 19 



RECREATION & PARKS DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time , 
Part-time, 



EXPENDED $67,722.41 



.10 
.46 



The Recreation and Parks Department functions to provide 
a comprehensive year-round recreation program and to maintain 
and improve all city parks, playgrounds, and recreation facili- 
ties. Operating under a reorganized Department and an increased 
budget in 1953, expanded and improved recreation services were 
provided, well-qualified leadership was furnished, and extensive 
repairs and renovations were made to facilities. 



The Year 1953 a Constructive One in Recreation 

During the year many capital improvements were made at 
the municipal parks and playgrounds. At Rolfe Park a multiple- 
use play area was constructed, the baseball outfield was rebuilt 
and seeded, and a five -foot fence was installed around the wading 
pool. Multiple-use play areas were also c6nstructed at Garrison, 
Rollins, and White Parks providing facilities for tennis, basket- 
ball, volleyball, badminton, shuffleboard, dancing, roller skating, 
and other sports. 

In addition, the recreation administration building at White 
Park was renovated to include facilities for an office, mainten- 
ance shop and tool storage room, recreation lounge, game room, 
general craft shop, pottery shop, and supply room. A new drink- 
ing fountain and ski-jump were also constructed at White Park. 
Improvements were made to the grandstand, turf, ball diamond, 
and parking area at Memorial Field. Repairs made at Beaver 
Meadow Golf Course included painting the locker rooms , renovat- 
ing the front porch and repairing the roof of the club-house, and 
other improvements. 

(Left) One of Concord's younger citizens learns to float. 
(Right) Woodworking classes have proven popular among adults. 

n \ ifi a s 1 ij 




New Purchases Make Department One of Best-Equipped in State 

During the year many units of modern equipment were pur- 
chased by the Department. These included two trucks with snow- 
plows, a gang mower, two rotary mowers, a power saw, a paint 
sprayer, and other units. With the addition of this equipment, 
the Department is able to provide more and better services to 
meet its aim of a comprehensive, year-round community recre- 
ation progrann. 

Routine Affairs Keep Maintenance Division Busy 

With increased manpower and new equipment, it was possi- 
ble to assign groundsmen for daily maintenance to Rolfe, White, 
and Rollins Parks, Memorial Field, and Beaver Meadow Golf 
Course. A separate crew performed mowing operations and 
clean-up work in these areas and in six playgrounds and 20 
roadside park areas. Six ball diamonds were conditioned and 
marked out for an estimated 480 games. Ice skating rinks re- 
quired nightly spraying and regular clearing of snow and slush. 
The six tennis courts at Memorial Field were swept and rolled 
daily to provide facilities for tennis enthusiasts. 

Many and Varied Activities Added in 1953 

Among the activities supervised by the Department were 
Softball, flytying, woodworking, tennis, archery, teenage dances , 
evening square dances, Nevers Band concerts , baseball and soft- 
ball, a Halloween program, figure skating, skiing, hockey, oil 
painting, basket weaving, water color painting, block printing, 
textile stenciling, basketball, and football. This list is but a 
small indication of the work of the Department to prepare and 
administer a diversified program. 

New Recreation Groups Organized in 1953 

At the request of the Recreation Director, a Community 
Recreation Advisory Council of fifteen citizens was appointed to 
serve in anadvisory capacity to the Recreation and Parks Depart- 
ment. Youth Activities Council members were selected by each 
high school to represent the interests of the youth of Concord in 
planning and conducting appropriate programs. All baseball and 

(Left) Red, juicy, and tasty! ! ! (Right) Adult art class instruc- 
tor teaches fundamentals of abstract painting. 




Softball leagues and the high schools were invited to send repre- 
sentatives to form the Baseball-Softball Advisory Council. 

With the assistance of the Department, the Penacook Neigh- 
borhood Advisory Council was formed to co-ordinate recreation- 
al and community activities in Penacook. Assistance was also 
given to reorganizing the Council of Youth-Serving Agencies. It 
is the purpose of this organization to create better understanding 
among agencies and to co-operate in youth work. The Sunset 
Club, an organization for people 60 years or older, and the Con- 
cord Trail Study Committee were also organized in 1953. 

Playgrounds Attract Many Children 

The nine playgrounds were open during the summer months 
under the supervision of a well- qualified staff of instructors and 
directors. Swimming activities included water games and races, 
and swimming instruction for beginner s , intermediates , and jun- 
ior and senior lifesavers. Baseball teams and tournaments in 
horseshoes, checkers, volleyball, and archery introduced zeal 
through competition. Arts and crafts classes included instruc- 
tion in hobbies that may be useful in later life. The Recreation 
Revue, held at White Park with Nevers Band as accompaniment, 
attracted an estimated 1,000 spectators. 



1949 



1950 



1951 



1952 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE 
Cost to City Compared With Average Number of Cases 



Each coin represents $1,000 
Each figure represents Z5 cases 



Jf_ .^ JL ^^ JL ^&_ jL.^_m_^ 





rffj^ m nf% m rm 



m nHJ JK. Jo lrJ^ m rk% m S% m 




m rfhmJhmmmr^mjk m 



1953 




Jf_^^ JL_^ JL.^^ JL_^.^.xS_Jl 



22 " " City of Concord 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 2 

Part-time 1 



EXPENDED $91,795.59 



The basic responsibility of the Welfare Department is to 
provide relief for those individuals who cannot obtain financial 
assistance elsewhere. The programs administered by the De- 
partment include general relief, aid to dependent soldiers, board 
and care of adults and children, hospitalization and medical care, 
aftd old age assistance. Need is the basic criterion for eligibil- 
ity for public assistance. 



Relief Expenditures ShowedSub- 
stantial Decrease in 1953 

The year 1953 brought a 
sharp decrease in the number of 
families receiving financial as- 
sistance from the City, causing 
relief expenditures to be reduced 
considerably. This decrease can 
be attributed to the many employ- 
ment opportunities created by 
the various construction pro - 
jects carried on throughout the 
City. 

The average number of cases 
during 1953 including Penacook 
totaled 50, representing 101 per- 
sons, compared with a case level 
of 61 during 1952, representing 
123 persons. 




A sum of $3, 300. 00, or 3.6 
percent, of the Department's 
total expenditures for relief, 
was spent in providing food 
for needy persons during the 
year 1953. 



Incr eased Medical Costs Cause Expenditures for Old Age Assist- 
ance to Rise 

The cost of the old age assistance program continued to in- 
crease during 1953, although the average case load was 273, 
three less than 1952 and six less than 1951. The increased cost 
of this program can be mainly attributed to increased medical 
costs. In 1952 the City expended $47, 156 for old age assist- 
ance cases, and $49,977 for the year 1953. 

City Spends $2, 054. 77 for Aid to Permanently and Totally Dis- 
abled 

Tin. 1952 a new program known as aid to the permanently 
and totally disabled (A. P. T . D. ) was put into effect. Adminis- 
tered by the State Welfare Department, the City of Concord pays 
35% of the total grant. When this program was first originated 
there were two cases receiving assistance and at the end of 1953 
there were seven such cases. During the year 1953 the City 
spent $2, 054. 77 on this program. 



Annual Report " 



23 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED $309. 80 

Part-time. . . 206 (volunteers) 



During 1953Wilbert F. Cameron resigned as Civil Defense 
Director and was succeeded in July by Lawrence J. Riis, Sr. 
To carry on the important work of preparedness in the event of 
an enemy attack, a staff organization headed by the following cit- 
izens was founded: 

Deputy Director Henry C. Newell 

Warning and Communication 

Unit Malcolm J. Edmunds 

* 

Grovuid Observer Unit Carl M. Holmgren 

Refugee Unit Stanley F. Little 

Fire Fighting Unit Fire Chief, Clarence H. Green 

* 

Police Unit Police Chief, Arthur W.McIsaac 

& Police Sgt. , Daniel C.Abbott 

Warden Services Unit Col. James H. Johnston 

Engineering Unit Howard E. Raymond 

Transportation Unit Nile E. Faust 

Health and Sanitation Unit . . .Dr. Thonnas M. Dudley 

* 
Medical Nursing and 

First Aid Unit Dr. Robert O. Blood 

Public Information Officer . . .John D. Orr 

* 

Much Planning and Organizing Done in 1953 

The year 1953 was one of organization and planning in Civil 
Defense. A city-wide meeting was held with leaders of Concord 
women's organizations to explain the purposes and aims of Civil 
Defense. Numerous meetings were conducted to develop a Con- 
cord Civil Defense Plan, soon to be completed. Conferences with 
sound engineers pointed out the needs of a dependable alert sys- 
tem. 

Recruits Needed for Civil Defense Program 

An estimated 800 to 900 volunteers are needed to nnake 
the Civil Defense organization complete. At present there are 
about 250 to 275 citizens participating in the city -wide program. 
If you personally wish to do your share in preparing Concord in 
case of attack, please volunteer your services to the Civil De- 
fense Director or any other official connected with the organi- 
zation. 

24 " " City of Concord 




The State Civil Defense truck is ready for emergency use. 



MUNICIPAL COURT 



PERSONNEL: 
Part-time 



EXPENDED $5,668.09 



Regular sessions of the Municipal Court are held each week 
day beginning at 9:00 A.M. Criminal cases are heard first, fol- 
lowed by civil cases. During 1953 the Court considered a total 
of 6, 766 cases, an increase of 32 per cent over the previous 
year when 5, 113 cases were heard. 

Felonies Increase 116% Over 1952 



Of the more than 6, 000 cases considered by the Court, 1 , 404 
were misdemeanors, 327 small claims cases, 107 civil cases, 
and 4, 863 traffic cases. During the previous year these totals 
were 1, 102; 215; 105 and 3, 661 respectively. There was an in- 
crease in the number of cases in all categories, and a notable 
increase in traffic cases. Sixty-five felonies occurred in 1953 
compared with 30 such cases in 1952. Felonies are cases of 
such a serious nature that the Municipal Court has only initial 
jurisdiction, and include those cases where the sentence may be 
more than a year in prison or a fine greater than $500. These 
were turned over to the Superior Court for final disposition. 

Juvenile Cases Remain the Same 

In 1953 the number of arraignments before the juvenile court 
was 38, an increase of only one in number over the year 1952. 
Of these arraignments, four involved thefts; two, property dam- 
age; six, breaking, entering, and larceny; five, sex offenses; 
twelve, malicious mischief; fiV^e, thefts of cars; three, setting 
fires; and one unruly child. 



Annual Report 



25 







The book trailer made seven stops weekly in distributing books, 



LIBRARY 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 15 

Part-time 10 



EXPENDED $74, 130.21 



One of the principal objectives of the Concord Public Li- 
brary is to provide a well-rounded collection of books for chil- 
dren and adults--books that will entertain, inform, and chal- 
lenge the mind. 

New System of Charging Books Successful 

Important changes made in the past year to simplify every- 
one's use of the Library was the charging of all, except new 
books, for four weeks instead of two, and the dropping of limit- 
ations on the number of books that may be borrowed. The first 
change has resulted in a lower circulation figure but one which 
is a better indication of the nunnber of books borrowed than the 
earlier method of counting renewals as part of the circulation. 

Another change was the closiiig of the West Concord Branch 
Library and the substitution of a book trailer stop in West Con- 
cord. The circulation per month at the book trailer was consid- 
erably higher than it had been at the branch and the registration 
increased by 50% at a lower cost than the maintenance of the 
branch. The books which had been idle on the branch shelves 
were absorbed by the Branch Division and put to wider use. 

Badly Needed Repairs M ade to J_,ibrary 

For the first time since it was opened in 1940, the Library 

26 " " City of Concord 



roof was repaired, the walls were weatherproofed, and the in- 
terior was painted. New lights and more powerful light bulbs 
have improved the evening lighting considerably. 

62% of Concord Residents Are Book-Borrowers 

During the year 1,411 new adult borrowers and 678 child- 
ren were issued library cards. With the withdrawal of 2,095 
inactive cards, there are now 17,390 active registrants; this 
comprises 62% of the population of Concord. 

During 1953 there were 5,593 books added to the Library. 
Including children's books, the library collection now totals 
64,713 volumes. The total number of periodicals regularly re- 
ceived is 128 . 

Library Sponsored 190 Meetings During the Year 

The total attendance at all Library -sponsored meetings 
numbered 4,646 compared to 4,045 in 1952. These meetings 
Included two American Heritage discussion groups, a World Af- 
fairs group, two Great Books groups, two series of classes for 
mothers of pre-school children, 38 weekly story hours, 25 film 
programs, and various other discussion groups. 

Adults Read 44,822 Non-fiction Books in 1953 

During the last year adults read: 
44,822 Non-fiction 
14,297 Periodicals 
109, 699 Fiction 

168,818 Total 

During the last year juveniles read: 
15,045 Non-fiction 
536 Periodicals 
43,612 Fiction 

59, 193 Total 



(Left) A familiar sight in the Young People's Room. 
(Right) Four of the 15,494 adults and young people registered 

as borrowers. 








POLICE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 43 

Part-time 62 



EXPENDED $165, 713. 19 



The aim of the Police Department is to prevent crime and 
maintain peace and order , enforce laws and ordinances, and pro- 
tect lives and property from malicious damage and injury. In 
siimmary, it does all that is possible to check the spread of 
crime and immorality and to promote public safety. 

A Request for Police Assistance Was Answered Every Hour and 
Seven Minutes in 195 3 

During 1953 a total of 7,812 requests for police assistance 
were answered by the Department; this amounted to one request 
for every hour and seven minutes. A total of 2,841 complaints 
were investigated in 1953, compared to 1,934 investigations 
made in 1952. 

A major offense was reported every 3 1/3 days during the 
last year, or a total of 109 major crimes. This was an increase 
of 26. 7% over the preceding year, when 86 major offenses were 
reported. 

An Accident Occurred Every 20 1/2 Hours in 1953 

A total of 424 vehicular accidents occurred in the City dur- 
ing the twelve month period. In terms of time, this meant that a 
mishap took place every 20 1/2 hours. This was a decrease of 
60 accidents from 1952. As a result of these accidents, 116 peo- 
ple were injured as compared with 124 in 1952. However, two 
deaths were recorded, an increase of one over the preceding 
year. Your assistance is needed if this auto accident toll is to 
be decreased. 



(Left) A well earned reward- -license plate No. 1. 
(Right) The Police and Fire Departments jointly sponsor scrap 
drives to aid worthy causes. 




A Car Was Illegally Parked Every Hour and 48 Minutes During 
the Last Year 

During 1953 parking tickets totaling 4,879 were issued, as 
compared to 3,851 given out in 1952. This meant that for every 
hour and 48 minutes of 1953 a car was illegally parked. Every 
police officer is charged with achieving the objective of law ob- 
servance. He needs your co-operation to prevent violations of 
this kind. 

An Ambulance Call Was Answered Every Seven Hours and 49 
Minutes 

Calls for the ambulance kept the Department busy in 1953. 
A total of 1, 118 calls were made or, on the average, one every 
seven hours and 49 minutes. This was an increase of 142 re- 
quests for ambulance service during the previous year. 

The Department Recovered 84.6% of All Property St olen in Con- 
cord 

During 1953 property announting to $30,535.64 was re- 
ported stolen. Of this, $25, 838.23, or 84. 6%, of the stolen pro- 
perty was recovered. This is proof that the police are doing 
everything possible to restore your property to you. 

Training Keeps Personnel Informed of Latest Developments 

A nine-hour refresher course in first aid was held for all 
members of the Department during last year. This course also 
included instruction in the use of the resuscitator . During March 
a training school concerning police techniques was held for all 
the members of the Department. An FBI Agent provided fire- 
arms instructions during the month of May. 

Concord's First Policewoman Hired 

The year 1953 saw Concord's first Policewoman, and the 
first such officer in the State of New Hampshire, hired. Her 
duties are mainly confined to parking meter enforcement. 

(Left) The ambulance receives a strip of night reflection tape . 
(Right) Aportable ultra-violet black light was purchased in 1953 
to uncover invisible evidence on paper, cloth, and other articles. 





(Left) The Fire Department answers various calls for assist- 
ance- -here it helps install an antenna on the roof of the Pub- 
lic Works garage. (Right) Fire fighters quickly bring a blaze 

under control. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 45 

Part-time. 78 



EXPENDED. . . $188, 994. 98 



In order to safeguard life and property against loss or 
damage from fire, the City maintains four fire stations, one 
in the City proper and three in outlying wards and operates 17 
trucks and two official cars. A new 750-gallon American La 
France purnper was purchased in 1953 and is scheduled for de- 
livery in the innmediate future. 

Fire Losses the Second L owest Since 1916. 

In 195 3 the Fire Department answered 703 alarms, of 
which 489 were fires within the City limits and ten fires out- 
side the City; 96 were rescue or emergency calls; 96 were 
smoke scares and 12 were false alarms. The fire loss totaled 
approximately $33, 318. 71, the second lowest since 1916. Two 
serious fires accounted for most of the loss, with both blazes 
occurring in rural areas. The lowest fire loss figure, recorded 
in 1916, amounted to $19,626. In 1951 the total was $21,777, 
the next lowest total. 



Training Important in Fire Fight ing 

The training program conducted by the Department kept 
the personnel informedof the mostmodern fire fighting tactics. 



30 



City of Concord 



Classes were held for the permanent force and drills were con- 
ducted during the summer months for both the permanent and 
call forces . 

Fire Prevent ion an Essential Phase of the Work of the Depart- 
ment 

^Through fire inspections many fire hazards were elimin- 
ated. A total of 1,196 inspections were made during 1953 of 
hospitals, convalescent homes, churches, theatres, schools, 
establishments in the high value district, and other buildings. 
This program of fire prevention can only be possible with the 
continued co-operation of you, the citizens of Concord, 

Fir e Hose Adequate to Nearly Reach Penacook from the City 
Proper ~~ ~ 

During 1953 all hose in the Department was tested. Lengths 
failing to pass the test were rejected and transferred to other 
departments not needing it for emergency use. The Department 
now has in service 17, 500 feet of Z 1/2 inch hose, 2, 850 feet of 
1 1/2 inch hose, 2,250 feet of 3/4 inch booster hose, and 200 
feet of 3 inch hose. If laid end to end, this hose would very 
nearly extend from the City Proper to Penacook! ! ! 

Firemen Give Assistance to Worthy Causes 

The Department personnel participated in the building of 
miniature fire trucks for underprivileged children at Christmas . 
This project is made possible through the co-operation of local 
merchants and businessmen who make donations of money and 
materials. Other worthy causes given assistance by the fire- 
men included the March of Dimes annual paper drive and the 
Jimmy Fund scrap drive. 

Fires by Classification 



Class 


1952 


1953 


Building 


27 3 


237 


Grass and Brush 


161 


137 


Auto Fires 


89 


115 


Smoke Scares 


48 


96 


Alarms Outside City 





10 




371 


595 





1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 




THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS 

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200 

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180 I 

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160 g 

140 2 
tn 
120 

100 ° 

O 
60 r 

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40 3J 
CO 

20 











Li 




















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i k 












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Li 




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FIRE LOSSES - CITY OF CONCORD 






(Left) Ol '' A'Ooden pipe dug 
up during the reconstruction 
of Main Street. 
(Below) Timber cut at Long 
Pond is stacked and stored 
for later use. 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 27 

Part-time 6 



EXPENDED 



$172,813.93 



The Water Departmentis responsible for the construction, 
operation, and maintenance of the water supply system of the 
City including the water shed area, the reservoir, four pumping 
stations, two elevated tanks, a stand pipe, 104 miles of mains, 
and 821 hydrants. In addition, the Departnnent performs auxi- 
liary functions such as reading water meters and preparing and 
distributing bills for water use and sewer rental. 

Much Time Devoted to Main Street Reconstruction 

Before the reconstruction of Main Street was begun, the 
Department checked 1,084 feet of main and recaulked 112 joints 
to prevent dig-ups of the new street surface because of leaks. 
When the actual excavation began, two employees of the Depart- 
ment were kept busy locating mains and service connections and 
digging test holes to prevent damage to the system. Even with 
these precautions , considerable damage was done as a result of 
the excavation, making necessary 44 repairs to service connect- 
ions and 1 5 to the six, ten, and 16 inch mains. Due to a change 
in the grade of the new street surface, it was necessary to lower 
930 feet of pipe. 

32 " " City of Coacord 



(Right) Ice cutting opera- 
tions were supervised by the 
Department during the win- 
ter months. 

(Below) Work at Boudreau 
Square necessitated the lay- 
ing of new mains. 




^»»*' -'^ 




3,657,438 Gallons of Water Consumed Daily 

In 1953 a total of 1, 334, 965, 000 gallons of water was con- 
sumed, or an average of 3,657,438 gallons daily. Of this, 64%, 
or 853,720,000 gallons, was pumped to the user and only 36% 
was delivered by the inexpensive gravity feed method. Even with 
a severe drought during the summer months , it was not necessary 
to curtail service as the level of Penacook Lake remained rel- 
atively high throughout. 



Timber Cut at Penacook Lake 

Timber was harvested from the area around Penacook 
Lake during the year, trucked to the saw mill, and sawed into 
lumber. This operation yielded 9,747 board feet of lumber which 
is used to meet the Department's needs. 

The shore line and water shed of the Lake were patrolled 
regularly in 1953. 



Hydrants Tested at Regular Intervals 

During the winter months the 821 water hydrants were test- 
ed weekly to guard against freezing and to assure that they were 
in good working order . Throughout the year, eight hydrants were 
dug up and replaced, 13 were repaired, and two new ones were 
connected. A total of 432 water meters were repaired in 1953 , 
50 were replaced.and 62 new ones added. 

City forces also laid 64 new service connections and relaid 
134 existing ones. 

Annual Report " " 33 



PUBLIC WORKS & ENG. DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full -time 90 

Part-time 2 



EXPENDED $537,804.53 



The Public Works and Engineering Department performs 
such familiar services as constructing and repairing roads , 
bridges, and sidewalks; reraoving snow, and salting and sanding 
highways; planting, removing, and spraying trees; operating 
municipal cemeteries; constructing, repairing, and maintaining 
sanitary and storm sewers; collecting and disposing of refuse; 
designing, laying out, and mapping all municipal public works 
projects; inspecting new construction and weighing and measur- 
ing devices; and other functions. 

Civic Improvement Becomes a Reality in 195 3 

Numerous new construction projects were supervised by 
the Department during the year. The reconstruction of 9,000 
lineal feet of Main Street by contract forces was begun in July 
and continued well into December, reaching a stage of approx- 
imately 70% completion. The reconstruction required extensive 
revisions to the existing sewers and the construction of a new 
storm water drainage system throughout. One feature of the 
project was the closing of Gulf St. and the re -establishment of 
this street to enter Water St. several hundred feet south of its 
former location. 

The reconstruction of Main St. and East Canal St. in Pena- 
cook was begun by the contractor in June and essentially com- 
pleted by winter. The approaches to the new bridge, beyond 
Crescent St. , were graded and the construction of the newbridge, 
across the Contoocook River was readied for the erection of 
structural steel in the spring of 1954. The Penacook project also 
involved extensive repair s to sewers and the extension of sewers. 
A feature of this work was the channelizing of traffic and the 

Workmen set granite curbings as City launches major sidewalk 
repair and construction progrann. 




(Left) Early stage of construction of Penacook- Boscawen bridge 
over the Contoocook River. (Right) Public Works forces are al- 
ways ready to repair damage such as this. 



establishment of a controlled traffic pattern in Boudreau Square. 

Construction and engineering costs of the State St. and 
Freight St. parking lots, providing metered parking for 208 cars, 
totaled $108, 737. 

Thirteen-hundred lineal feet of reinforced concrete pipe 
storm sewer was constructed on Mooreland Avenue, discharging 
into Turkey River. Contract cost of this work was $7,600. 

Through a program of sidewalk improvement, a total of 
595 squareyards of asphalt sidewalk was constructedby contract 
at a cost of $1, 307, half of which was borne by the abutters. 

Construction with Town Road Aid Fiinds 

Work on rural roads, using Town Road Aid Fvinds, pro- 
vided by the State with the required financial participationby the 
City, progressed during the year. This work was accomplished 
with City forces and equipment, supplemented by some rental e- 
quipment as required. The total amount of highway completed 
under tbis program in 1953 was 1.94 miles at a cost of approxi- 
mately $21, 000. 

Engineering Surveys an Integral Part of Construction 

A myriad of surveys were completed by the city engineers 
during the year. These included surveys in connection with pos- 
sible storm water outlets, proposed sanitary sewer extensions. 
White Park wading pool reconstruction, improving South Main St. 
in Penacook, rebuilding a retaining wall on Hanover St. , a re- 
vised street lighting plan along Main St. , the installation of storm 
sewers and culverts, and others. 

Routine Activities Performed by the Department 

Routine activities carried on by the Department included 
the following: 

* During the winter 30.4 inches of snow made necessary 
the plowing of 975 miles of roads and 150 miles of sidewalks. 
City forces scattered 197 tons of salt and 7,710 cubic yards of 
sand in combating hazardous traveling conditions. 

* Cold patch material laid to repair roads totaled 1,700 tons. 

Annual Report " " 35 




Public Works equipment stands ready to meet winter storms, 



* A total of 71,883 cubic yards of refuse was collected by 
refuse vehicles which traveled 38, 108 miles. Boiling of all gar- 
bage used for hog-feeding was begun inOctober by the contractor . 

* The number of cubic yards of gravel spread to improve 
unpaved roads amounted to 5, 175. 

* A total of 560 minor and 33 major repairs were made on 
trucks and equipment at the city garage. 

* A sum of 285,000 gallons of asphalt and 86,000 gallons 
of tar were used in improving 54. 8 miles of highways. 

* Street and sidewalk patching took 275 tons of hot bitu- 
minous concrete. 

* Street signs replaced numbered 98. 

* A total of 336 interments were made in the several ceme- 
teries of the City. Extensive repairs and improvements were 
made in the Old North Cemetery. 

New Eqmpment Bought through a Bond Issue 

New equipment received and placed in service during the 
year included a shop compressor, two pick-up trucks, seven 
dump trucks, three reconditioned dump truck bodies, two trac- 
tors, three sanders, a rotary broonn, and an elevator for salt 
loading. Most of this equipment was financed through a bond 
issue. 



SUf^l-IAEY OF HIGHWAY & SILEWikLK MAIimiNANCS & CONSTRUCTION— 1953* 



Miles of Sq. Yds. of 



Hjflrhways 

Maintained by City ^otcqb 5^.80 

fieoonstrunted bv TEA 1.9^ 

New Coistruction -55 

i<e3urf aced by Contrant 2.k^- 

Constr., Reconstr., & Resiirfarjed by City 

Forces •••• 

Constr. <% Reconstr. by Contract .... 

Constr. & Reconstr. by Contract 

(Incidental to Major Highway Projects) _*jjj. 

Total 59.73 



Sidewalks 
500 



1356 
595 



2416 
4867 



♦Does not include any work either completed or in progress as a 
part of the Main St. project. 



36 " " City of Concord 



ZONING, BUILDING, PLUMBING 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED $179. 20 

Part-time 1 



The purpose of the zoning ordinance is to regulate the use 
of land and buildings, the height of buildings, and area require- 
ments in order to promote health, safety, morals, and the gen- 
eral welfare of the community. The plumbing and building codes 
insure that the safety of life and property is promoted. It is the 
responsibility of a full-time engineering inspector to check new 
construction, alterations, and land use for conformation to the 
building, zoning, and plumbing codes. 

Any person wishing to erect, alter, or move a structure 
must obtain a permit from the engineering inspector. In grant- 
ing or denying a permit, the actions of the inspector are fixed 
quite specifically by law; if the ordinance allows the use for which 
the applicant is petitioning, the permit will be granted. How- 
ever, if the ordinance does not allow that use, the inspector 
must deny the permit. Permits so denied may then be appealed 
by the applicant to the Zoning Board of Adjustment, a quasi- 
judicial body of five citizens. 

Zoning Board of Adjustment Hears 31 Appeals 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment conducted 13 hearings 
and considered 31 appeals from the decision of the zoning admin- 
istrator. In 1952 the number of appeals was 45. Of the 31 ap- 
peals, 21 were granted, seven were denied, one was dismissed, 
and two were continued indefinitely. 

Building Activity Still at a High Level 

The number of building permits issued in 1953 was 257, 14 
more thanin 1952 and 43 more than in 1951 . Of these, 160 were 
for new construction, 29 more than in 1952, and 97 were for al- 
terations and repairs. The estimated total value of work repre- 
sented by these permits was $1, 077, 206, of which $865, 211 was 
for new construction and $211,995 for alterations and repairs . 
A total of 80 single-family dwelling units was built. 

Noteworthy construction projects authorized in 1953 and 
their estimated costs were as follows: 

Rumford Press Warehouse $62, 000 

Rumford Press Office and Storage Building. . . . 32,463 
Concord Police Boys' Club Gymnasium and 

Assembly Hall 22,000 

State of New Hampshire Fish and Game 

Department Warehouse 23,000 

Plumbing Permits Increase Over 1952 

The total number of plumbing permits issued last year was 
110, compared to 95 given in 1952. A total of 31 master plumb- 
ers and 20 journeymen were licensed during the year; in 1952, 
33 masters and 20 journeymen were licensed. 

Of the five applicants for new journeymen licenses, four 
failed the examination. Only one examination was given for a 
master's license, in which the applicant was successful. 

Annual Report " " 37 



FINANCIAL TABLES 



COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 



General Fund Assets 



Cash : 

First National Bank - General Account $'+30,175.^3 

Imprest Funds 1,087.20 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons 336.25 $ii31,598.88 

Taxes Eeceivahle : 

Current Year Levy - Property $217,873.75 

Current Year Levy - Polls ^.^^37. 50 

Total Current Year $222,311.25 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 23.6l3.60 $198,697.65 

Prior Year Levies - Property $6,0')-3.15 

Prior Year Levies - Polls 3 . 86l . 38 

Total Prior Years $9,90'+. 53 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realleation 9.90^.53 -0- 

Taxes Bought by City - Unredeemed $24,130.55 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 24.130.55 -0- 198,697.65 

Miscellaneous Accounts Receivable : 

Water & Sewer Rentals $49,712.08 

Departmental Receivables 18,596.^ 

Cemetery Receivables 2.691.64 $71,000,20 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 16.000. 00 55,000.20 

Stores Accounts: 

Public Works Inventory $28,860.ii5 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 1,989.96 

Postage Meter Inventory 151.01 $31,001.42 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 31.001.^2 -0- 

T ax-Deeded Properties $2 , 158. 77 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 2.158.77 -0- 

State Bead Taxes Receivable : 

Levy of 1953 $15,967.70 

Levy of 1952 3.525.00 19.492.70 

Total General Fund Assets $704,789.43 

Trust Fund Assets 

National State Capital Bank Trust Fund Acct.. $8,216.22 

Investments (See Schedule Page 47) 599.005.15 607,221.37 

Capital Fund Assets (Municipal & School ) 

Bond Bequiremente - Future Years : 

Municipal $969,000.00 

School 188.000.00 1.157.000.00 

Bond Fund Assets 

Cash - National State Capital Bank $125,980.01 

Cash - In Other Banks 50,000.00 

Investments 199,246.00 

Accounts Receivable 2.314.00 377. 540. 01 

$ 2.846.550.81 

38 " " City of Concord 



GENEEAl AND BELATED PtJNDS 



31. 1953 

General Tand Llatllltles and Stirplus 

Accoimts Payable : 

Unpresented Coupons $336.25 

Ciirrent VoucherB Payable 57,092.18 

Tax Refimds Payable 61.00 $57.'i89.U3 

Unejcpended Approprlatlone : 

Union School DiBtrict $'«)1.325.00 

Penacook School District 27,213.66 

Interest School Bonds 3.570.50 '^32,109.16 

Due to Other Funds ; 

Water Fund $36,608.16 

Sanitary Sewer Fund '♦■7,353.82 

Parking Meter Fund U4. 672.2^4- 128,63'4..22 

Advance Deposits ; 

Timber Yield Taxes $370.00 

Other Taies 136.00 

Miscellaneous 2.643.0i4^ 3,3^+9.0'* 

Reserve s: 

For Encvunbrances $1,285.51 

For Future Timber Yield Tax Loss 6 , 166.32 7,'*51.83 

Taxes Due t o State : 

Head Tax Levy of 1953 $21, 224.^19 

Special $3.00 Poll Taxes 1.869.60 23.094.09 

Total General Fund Liabilities $652,127.77 

Current Surplus 52. 661.66 

Total General Fund Liabilities & Surplus $70i»,789.'*3 

Trust Fund LiabilitieB 

Principal $586,067.91 

Accximulated Income 21.153. i»6 607,221.37 

Capital Fund Liabilities (Municipal & Scho ol) 

Long Term Debt : 

Bonded Debt (See Schedule Page 40) $1,137,000.00 

Long Term Hotes (See Schedule Page 40) 20.000.00 1.157.000.00 

Bond Fund Liabilities 

Construction or Equipment Authorized $374,243.09 

Vouchers Payable 3.296.92 

377.540.01 
$ 2.846.5^0.81 

Annual Report " " 39 



GENEBAL FUIID 

Statement of Cvirrent Sxirplus 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1953 

Balance. January 1. 1953 $16 ,585 .27 

Deduct portion of Opening Balance used to reduce Tax Hate. 16.585. 27 

-0- 

Add 1953 Budget Surplus : 

Unencvunbered Balances of Appropriations $29,912.86 

Excess of Actual over Estimated Revenues 21.287.5^ $51, 200. ^K) 

Add Prior Year Reserves Liquidated ; 

Bal. of Amt. Reserved from 1952 Budget for Legal Services. $293.70 

Excess reserves for Prior Year Taxes 19,077.93 

Excess reserves for Tax Deeded Property 706.19 

Excess reserves for Water Works Accounts Receivable 80'+. 05 

Reserves for State Head Taxes 2.872.89 23.75^.76 

$7^^,955.16 

Deduct Portion used to Incr ea se Reserves : 

For Non- Realization of Unredeemed Taxes $5 , 756.46 

For Non-Realization of Stores Accounts 6,001.42 

For Non-Collection of Accounts Receivable 10.535.62 22.293.50 

Balsjice December 31, 1953 Available for Reduction of 1954 Tax Rate $52.661.66 



STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT 
December 31, 1953 



Municipal : 

Central Fire Station. 

Sewers 

Sewers 

Storm Sewers 

Airport 

Signal System 

Equip. & Improvements 

Equip. & loiprovements 
* Equip. & Improvements 



School : 

High School 

Dame School (Note) 



Self -Liquidatin g: 

Water Constr. & Land. 
Parking Areas 



te of 


Date of 


Int. 


Balance 


Paid in 


1953 


ssue 


Matxirity 


Rate 


Dec. 31, 1953 


Principal 


Interest 


1934 


1954 


3^ 


$1,000.00 


$1,000.00 


$52.50 


1934 


1954 


3* 


1,000.00 


1.000.00 


52.50 


1934 


1954 


3 


3,000.00 


4,000.00 


150.00 


1937 


1956 


2-3- 


21,000.00 


7.000.00 


630.00 


1942 


1954 


il 


3,000.00 


3,000.00 


75.00 


1948 


1958 


i-t 


115,000.00 


23,000.00 


1,581.25 


1948 


1953 


1^- 


-0- 


iiO.OOO.OO 


250.00 


1949 


1958 


1^ 


125,000.00 


25,000.00 


2,062.50 


1953 


1965 


2 


700.000.00 

$969,000.00 


-0- 
$104,000.00 


-0- 




$4,853.75 


1925 


1965 


H- 


$168,000.00 


$14,000.00 


$7,735.00 


1953 


1954 


1.99 


20.000.00 
$188,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 




$14,000.00 


$7,735.00 


1949 


1969 


1 3/^ 


$160,000.00 


$10,000.00 


$2,887.50 


1953 


1963 


1* 


200.000.00 
$360,000.00 


-0- 


1,500.00 




$10,000.00 


$4,387.50 



Approx. $167,200 to te paid from State Highv/ay Grants 



Analysis of Debt MatTirities 

Parking 

Due in: Municipal School Water Areas 

1954 $123,000.00 $34,000.00 $10,000.00 i';2o,ooo.oo 

1955 115,000.00 14,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1956 115,000.00 14,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1957 108,000.00 14,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1958 108,000.00 14.000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1959 60,000.00 14.000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

i960 60,000.00 14,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1961 60,000.00 14,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1962 60,000.00 14,000.00 10,000.00 20,000.00 

1963 60,000.00 14,000.00 10.000.00 20,000.00 

Beyond I963 100.000.00 28.000.00 60.OOO.OO -0- 

$969,000.00 $188,000.00 $l60,000.00 $200,000.00 



40 " " City of Concord 



GENTERAl FUND 



Statement of Revenues 



For the Tear Ending December 31. 1953 



Local Taxes ; 

Property Taxes (Current Tr. Levy) . . 

Poll Taxes (Cxirrent Yr. Levy) 

National Benk Stock (Cur. Tr. Levy) 
Added Taxes, Prior Trs. -Property . ." 

Added Taxes, Prior Trs. -Polls 

Interest, Penalties and Costs 

Auto Permits 

Rent & Profit Tax-Deeded Property . 
Timber Severance Tax 



Budget 


Revenues 






Estimate 


Realized 


Excess 


Deficiency 


$2,285,938.73 $2,287,758.86 $1,820.13 




22,000.00 


21,562.00 




$438.00 


6,300.00 


6.330.70 


30.70 






164. 2if 


164.24 




300.00 


314.00 


14.00 




9,000.00 


8.613.33 




386.67 


88,000.00 


95.603.03 


7.603.03 




100.00 


310.90 


210.90 




800.00 


781.^1 




18.49 



$2.iH2.438.73 $2,421,438.57 $8,999.84 



State Tajc Contributions ; 

Railroad Tax 

Savings Bank Tax 

Interest & Dividend Tax 

Loss of Tajces - State Forest 



Licenses & Permits ; 

Bicycle Registrations 

Taxi Licenses 

Health Licenses 

Amusement Licenses 

Police & Protective Licenses 

Professional and Occupational Lie. 



Registration Fees & Permita : 

Marriage Licenses 

Recording Fees - Legal Doctiments 

Filing Fees 

Sundry Fees. City Clerk 

Dog Licenses 



Departmental Service Charges : 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concession 

Golf Fees 

Memorial Field, Royalties 

" " , Concessions 

Self-supporting Activities 

Police Dept. - Ambulance Charges .. 

Airport , Rent 

Airport , Concessions 

Fines & Forfeits 

Commission on Head Tax Collections. 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 

Weights & Measures, Fees 



$12,000.00 


$12,904.67 


$904.67 




13.000.00 


14,401.29 


1,401.29 




75,000.00 


76,220.87 


1,220.87 




27.00 






$27.00 


$100,027.00 


$103,526.83 $3,499.83 




$550.00 


$511.50 




$38.50 


500.00 


406.00 




94.00 


380.00 


404.00 


$24.00 




3,^0.00 


2,822.50 




577.50 


150.00 


80.50 




69.50 


35.00 


119.50 


84.50 




$5,015.00 


$4,344.00 


$671.00 


$1,000.00 


$1,047.00 


$47.00 




2.300.00 


2,550.21 


250.21 




75.00 


81.00 


6.00 




450.00 


535.20 


85.20 




4,200.00 


4.070.55 




$129.45 


$8,025.00 


$8,283.96 


$258.96 




$1,600.00 


$1,357.45 




$242.55 


200.00 


113.00 




87.00 


4.500.00 


5.765.55 $1,265.55 




550.00 


480.61 




69.39 


225.00 


112.00 




113.00 


-0- 


317.00 


317.00 




1,000.00 


992.00 




8.00 


8.000.00 


8,207.30 


207.30 




50.00 


60.63 


10.63 




7.000.00 


8,847.66 


1.847.66 




-0- 


5,832.68 


5,832.68 




2,500.00 


2,112.26 




387.74 


300.00 


381.90 


81.90 




$25,925.00 


$34,580,04 $8,655.04 





Unclassified: 

Interest Income -0- $666.67 $666.67 

Sale of Property $400.00 485.00 85.00 

All Other 300.00 93.20 $ 206.80 

$700.00 $1.244.87 $54'^ .87 

Total Revenues $2.552.130.73 $2.573.4l8.27$21,287.54 ^^^^^ 



Annual Report 



41 



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Annual Report " " 47 



TAX ACCOUNTS 



Tear Ending December 3I, 1953 



Statement of Taaces Beceiva^)le 



1953 Prior State Head 

Levy Tears Taxes 

Balance. January 1. 1953 $292,298.15 $21,^1-99.31 

Taxes Cominitte a to C oll ector in 1953 
(In cl. Supplemental) : 

Real Estate & Personal Property $2,315,Wi5.73 164. 2'J- 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,330.70 

Timber Severance Tax 3,630.91 

Poll Taxes 23,562.00 31iJ.OO 

Head Taxes - 1951. 1952, and 1953 75.855.00 

Total Ciaarges to Collector *$2,3^.972.34 $292,J^ _6.39 $97.35^.31 

Acc ounted for as follows : 

Collections to Treasurer (Net of Eefunds) . $2, 120, 58'+. 82 $271,523.08 $70,562.60 

Authorized Abatements 6,076.27 11,346.78 7. 296. 81 

Balance Uncollected December 3I, 1953 .... 222.311.25 # 9.90 4.53 19.492.70 

^2.348.972.34 $292.776.39 $_g7. 354.31 



Taken as Current Revenue 

Reserve for Abatements & Adjustments 



$2,316,433.07 

32 . .^39.2 2 

$2,348,972.34 



# Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes of Prior Years 



1952 
1951 
1950 
1949 
1946 
1947 
1946 
19'^5 
1944 
1943 
1942 
1941 
1940 
1939 



Property 


Poll 




Taxes 


Taxes 


Total 


$3,533.63 


$1,185.20 


$4,718.83 


1,102.82 


252.40 


1.355.22 


763.71 


354.00 


1.117.71 


318.08 


298.90 


616.98 


213.32 


258.08 


471.40 


41.47 


240.20 


281.67 


45.65 


234.70 


280.35 


10.10 


600.50 


610.60 




333.00 


333.00 




36.00 


36.00 


14.37 


31.40 


45.77 




21.00 


21.00 




8.00 


8.00 




8.00 


6.00 



$6,043.15 



$3,861.38 $9,904.53 



Statement of Tax Sale Accounts 



Balances Unredeemed January 1, 1953 : 

Levy of 1948 

Levy of I949 

Levy of 1950 

Levy of 1951 

Levy of 1952 (Tax Sale of 1953) 

Accounted for as follow s: 

Collections to Treasurer 

Authorized Abatements 

Deeded to City 

Total Credits 

Balance Unredeemed December 31, 1953 



$81.92 

1,966.94 

5.335.36 

11.107.30 



$26,649.91 
132.28 
206.52 



$18,491.52 

32.627.74 

$51.119.26 



$26,988.71 
$51.119.26 



48 



City of Concord 



SAHITAET SFrfER FUND 



Balance Sheet - December 31. 1953 



AssetB 

Fixed Assets : 

Land & Eights of Way 

Sewer Mains 

Msinholes 

Customer Connections 

Sundry Equipment 

Less; Reserve for Depreciation 

Total Fixed Assets 

Prepaid Engineeri n is: Expenses 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page i^7) 

Total Assets 

Liabilities and Funds 

F\md Balance aind Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Earned Surplus : 

. Balance - January 1, 1953 ^32,129.19 

Net Profit - for Year 1953 8.337.62 

Total Surplus Balance 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus . . . 



*199.97 
937.975.26 
104.368.32 
142,465.11 

1.745.11 

$1,186, 753 -77 
614. 756. 14 



S^. 516. 81 



Statement of Operations 
Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 195? 



.■5571.997.63 
7.772.33 



547,353.82 
48.568.97 95.922.69 
S675 .692.65 



':48l,337.71 
153.838.13 



$ 675.692.65 



!524, 706.38 
7.442.45 



Operating Revenues 

Sewer Rents : 

General 

Indus t rial 

Operating Expenses 

General Operation : ■• .; -. - : -^ " t ,:• .■■; :■; t • i .; c ■ - e .' iT 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor <S Expense $4,729.66 

House Connection Oper. Labor &■ Expense.... 1,630.32 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains , 1,026.75 

Maintenance of Manholes 234.96 

Miscellaneous General Expense 76.46 $7,698.15 

Customers ' Ex pense: •;■•: 

Meter Reading and Billing 

Admi nistration : 

Employees ' Retirement Fund 

Depreciatio n 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Non- Operati ng Incom e : 

Interest on Investments 

Net Profit for tfcg. .Xsaj . . .^ 



1,607.43 

993.79 
14,883.80 



S32.l48.83 



!^25,183.1 7 
$6,965.66 



1,421.96 



$8.387.62 

,. Annual Report " "49 



WATEE FOHD 

Balance Sheet 

December 31, 1953 

Assets 



Fixed Assets. Net of Accrued Depreciation : 

Water and Flowage Eights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping and Purification Equipment 

Distrih. Mains, Services, Hydrants & Meters. 

Other Equipment & Garage Equipment 

Unfinished Construction 

Total Fixed Assets 

Bond Fund Assets ; 

Cash - First National Bank • • 

Investments (See Schedule Page ^7) 

Materials 4 Supplies Inventory 

Total Bond Fund Assets 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schediile Page ^7) 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Contracts Beceivahle 

Total Current Assets 

Total Assets 



$167,663.11 

172.859.96 

289,838.52 

50.899.11 

76J^,22i^.88 

26,635.21 

167.38 



$922.52 
47,000.00 
25.653.32 



$36,608.16 
33,21i+.27 

88,738.81 
317.^ 



$1,472,288.17 



$73,575.84 



$158.876.68 
$1.704.742.69 



Llahilitles and Funds 
Capital Liahilities ; 

Bonded Deh t 

Fund Balance and Surplus : 

Kunicipal Investment 

Contrihutions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus - Balance January 1, 1953 $493. 1^+2. 55 

Net Profit for the Tear 1953 15.052.00 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus 

Total Liahilities, Surplus & Funds 



$963,194.74 
73.353.40 

508.194.55 



$160,000.00 



$ 1,544.742.69 
SI. 704. 742. 69 



BOND FOND - VATER - ISStJE OF I949 



D 1 spo 3 itlon of Proceeds 



Amoiint of Issue 

Premium 

Total Available 

Expenditures: 

During 1953 

During Prior Tears 

Total Expenditures to Date . . . 

Unexpended Balance December 31. 1953 



$200 . 000 . 00 
3.364.00 



$1,867.75 
153.573.73 



$203,364.00 

$155.441.48 
$47.922.52 



Analysis of Above Expenditures 

1953 Prior Trs. 

Penacook Pumping Station $8,067.01 

Purchase of Land $195.43 40.190.38 

24" Main from Penacook Lake 1,672.32 104,761.59 

Cost of Issuing Bonds 554.75 

$1 .367. 75 $ 153.573.73 

50 " " City of Concord 



Total 

$8,067.01 

40.385,81 

106.433.91 

554.75 

$155.441,48 



WATEH fUHD 

Statement of OperatlonB 
?l8cal Tear Ending Decemter 3I, 1953 

Operating Be venues 

Commercial Sales - Flat Rate 

Commercial Sales - Metered 

Industrial Sales - Metered 

Seles to Other Water Utilities 

Miscellaneous Viater Revenues 

Total Operating Revenues 

Operating Expenses 
Water Supply ; 

bource of Supply Labor $3,789.66 

Pumping Station Lator 15, 00?. '♦•3 

Purification Lator l,69'4-.87 

Miscellaneoixs Labor 1,958.88 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 155.9^ 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses 2, 059.88 

Purification System Supplies & Expenses 1,828.'4'5 

Power Purchased 9,952.97 

Repairs to Pumping Sta. Structvires & Equipment 1,239.83 

Repairs to Purification Structures & Equipment ^.06 

Distribution ; 

Distribution Labor $25,'*51.62 

Meter Department Labor 3,755-03 

Other Distribution Supplies & Expenses l,lW|..9i; 

Repairs to Distribution Structures 253.03 

Repairs to Mains 7,752.i^9 

Repairs to Services 2,7^*^2.77 

Repairs to Hydrants 5,163.53 

Repairs to Meters 3.311.06 

Admi nistration ; 

Commercial Office Salaries $1,916.13 

Meter Reading Salaries ^,&70.Qk 

Commercial Supplier & SxT'enses 37^^.21 

Salaries of Genersl Ofiicers 5,310.00 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 3,110.00 

General Office Expenses 296. 60 

Repairs to General Office Structures & Equip.. 175.10 

Other General Expenses 156. 83 

Insurance 3,047.03 

Stationery and Printing 9.14 

Longevity, Annual and Sick Leaves 8,193.53 

Retirement Fund Payments 7,105.06 

Stores Department and Shop Expenses 872.^5 

Garage Expenses 3 . 412 . 42 

Fixed Charges ; 

Depreciation $36,iK)0.25 

Taxes 44.04 

Interest 2.887.50 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

t.'on-Operating Income ; 

Gain on Sale of Depreciated Assets 

Interest on Investments 

Other Interest Income 

Miscellaneous 

Total Mon-Operating Income 

Ket Profit for the Year 



$3,146.56 

139,093.15 

33,964.72 

237.30 

219.00 



$176,660.73 



$37,735.97 



49,574.47 



39,348.54 



39.331.79 



$1,322.57 

2,025.15 

10.56 

1.023.76 



161,5 90 -77 
$10,669.96 



4.382.04 



Annual Report 



51 



PAE2ING METER RJND 



Balance Sheet 



December 31, 1953 



Assets: 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page '*7) 
Bond Eequirements 



$'44,672.24 

37,743.14 

200,000.00 



$282,415.^8 



Liabilities: 

Reserve for Encumhrances 
Bonded Deht 

Unappropriated Surplus . . 



$52,988.88 

200,000.00 

29.426.50 



$282.tH5.38 



Statement of Rev e nues & Expenditures 



For the Tear Ending December 31, 1953 



Cash Balance January 1. 1953 

Reven ues: 

Meter Collections - Street Parking $^,516.33 

Meter Collections - Off-Street Parking 2,756.86 

Interest on Investments 8 35.01 

Total Available 

Expenditures ; 

Salaries: 

Meter Repairs $627.03 

Collections 515.21 

Enforcement 13,047.5!+ 

Marking Streets 241.71 

Accounting ^7.85 

Supplies: 

Meter Repair Parts $36.40 

Other Keter Supplies 305-38 

Enforcement 271. 35 

Marking Streets 859-37 

Accounting 10.19 

Retirement Contributions. 

Taxes, Insurance, Etc 

Lighting 

Parking Area Maintenance 

Meter Maintenance - Overhauling 

Debt Service 

Capital Outlay: 

Sorting & Counting Machine $624.91 

Purchase & Construction of Parking Areas. 48.709.12 

* Total Expenditxires 

Cash Balance December 31. 1953 

Less Reserve for Encumbrances 

Unappropriated Surplus December 31. 1953 • • • . 

* Street Parking $18,496.53 

Off-street Parking 52,763-69 

$71,260.22 



$101,567.43 



52,108.20 



$153,675.60 



$14,479.34 



1,482.69 
768.00 
868.67 
556.73 
789.51 
1,481.25 
1,500.00 



49,334.03 



71,260.22 

$82,415.38 

52.988.88 

$29.426.50 



52 



City of Concord 



BOHD FUJID, PARKING AREAS - ISSDE OF 1953 

Diaposltlon of ProceedB 

For the Year Bnding December 31, 1953 

Amount of Bond Issue $200,000.00 

Premium on Sale of Bonds 672.33 

Total Available $200,672.33 

Expended: 

No. State Street Lot $112,367.06 

Freight Street Lot 88.305.2? 200.672.33 

Unexpended Balance December 31 • 1953 -0- 

Comblned Statement of Expenditures for Parking Areas 



No. £>tate Street Lot 
Freight Street Lot .. 

Low Avenue Lo t 

Ford Avenue Lot 



from 


from 


1952 from 


Total 


Bond Fund 


Current Funds 


Cur. Funds 


Expended 


$112,367.06 


$28, 09*^.79 


$57.50 


$140,519.35 


88.305.27 


12,2/^6.07 


57.50 


100,608.84 




6, 9^*8. 40 




6,948.40 




1.419.86 
*$4«,709.12 


6.280.82 
$6,395.82 


7.700.68 


$200,672.33 


$255,777.27 



* See Statement of Expenditures on Opposite Page 

BOND FUMD, GENERAL - ISSUE OF 1953 

Disposition of Proceeds 

For the Year Ending December 3I, 1953 

Amount of Issue $700,000.00 

Premium on Sale of Bonds 1 , 664. 38 

State Highway Grants 57.072.50 

Total Available $758,736.88 

Expenditures: 

Highway Construction 

West Concord ?15,080.00 

Boudreau Square 20,234.00 

Main Street 179.939.'+7 

Concord - Boscawen Bridge 21,549.00 

West Concord - Peaacook Road 2.800.27 $239,602.74 

Storm Sewer Construction 

Concord Heights $3,280.80 

West End Area 860.OO 

Mo or eland Avenue 7.038.30 11,179.10 

World War II Memorial 7,434.24 

Piiblic Works - Building Modifications 3.941.36 

Recreational Facilities 

White Park $7,337.93 

Rolfe Park 17,989.24 

Garrison Park 5,6l6.4l 

Rollins Park 6,122.70 

Golf Course (Purchase) 6.000.00 43,066.28 

New Equipment 

Finance Department $3, 060.12 

Public Works Department 59.211.55 

Recreation Department 15.253.10 77.524.77 

Cost of Issuing Bonds 1.745.30 

Total Expenditures 384.493.79 

Balance December 31, 1953 $374.243.09 

Annual Report " " 53 



CIVIC CALENDAR- 1954 

Water and Sewer Hental Bills Payable Jan. 1-31 

Passage of Municipal Budget On or "before Jan. 2? 

Plumber ' s License Renewal Period March - April 1 

Mailing of Property Inventory Forms On or "before Mar. 20 

Census of Polls "by Police Dept March 22 - April 

Dog Licenses Renewed April 1 

Assessment Date— Property, Poll, & Head Taxes April 1 

Junk Dealers' Licenses Renewed On or "before April 1 

Retiim of Property Inventory Forms April 1-15 

Veteran's Application for War Service Exemption .... April 1-15 

Exemption Claim for the Blind April 1-15 

Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable April 1-30 

Convalescent Homes' License Renewal Period ......... April 1-30 

Bicycle Licenses Renewed April 3 

Notice Posted of Tax Collector's Sale of Real Estate ... April 15 
Pool, Billiard Table, Bowling and Ball Alleys, 

and Music Machine Licenses Renewed On or before May 1 

Milk Licenses Renewed May 1-31 

Tax Collector's Sale (Interest Rate Increases After 

Tnis Date From ijix to Eight Per Cent) May 20 

Poll and Head Tax Warrants Submitted to Tax Collector. . .By June 1 

Prop. Tax Warrant Submitted to Tax Coll On or before Jiily 1 

Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable July 1-31 

Poll Tax Becomes Delinquent (20 Cent Cost to 

be Added as of This Date) Sept. l6 

Taxicab Licenses Renewed On or before Oct. 1 

Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable Oct. 1-31 

Head Tax and Property Tax Become Delinquent 
(50 Cent Penalty Added to Head Tax and Six 

Per Cent Interest to Property Tax as of This Date) Dec. 2 

City Council Meetings 7:00 P.M., 2nd Mon. each month 

Planning Board Meetings 7:30 P.M., 1st Tues. each month 

Library Board Meetings 7:30 P.M., it-th Mon. each month 

Personnel Advisory Board Meetings .... at request of City Manager 

or on call of any member 

Trustees of Trust Fund Meetings upon call of City Treasurer 

Board of Assessors upon call of full-time Assessor 

Board of Building Appeal upon call of Building Inspector 

Board of Health upon call of Chairman 

Zoning Board of Adjustment upon call of Chairman 

Board of Plxunbing Examiners upon call of Plumbing Inspector 

Board of Revision of Special Assessments . . upon call of Chairman 
Recreation Advisory Council upon call of Chairman 

54 " " City of Concord 



INDEX 

Page Page 

New Hcunpshire Trails 2 Recreation & Parks Department. 20 

Your City Officials - 1953- ^ Welfare Department 23 

Manager's Letter 6 Civil Defense Zk 

City Council 7 Municipal Court 25 

City Clerk 8 Liljrary 26 

Planning Department 10 Police Department 28 

Assessing Department 12 Fire Department 30 

Finance Department 14 Water Department 32 

Health Department l6 Public Works & Eng. Depts. . . . Jk 

Legal Department 18 Zoning, Building, Plumbing ... 37 

Municipal Airport 19 Civic Calendar - 1954 54 

Financial Tables 

Combined Balance Sheet - General and Related Funds 38 

General Fund - Statement of Current S\irplu8 40 

Statement of Long Term Debt UO 

General Fund - Statement of Revenues 4l 

General Fund - Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures ... 42 

Statement of Assessments for 1953 46 

Trust Funds - Statement of Changes in Balances 47 

Schedvde of Investments - All Funds 47 

Tax Accounts hQ 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 49 

Water Fund 50 

Parking Meter Fund 52 

Bond Fund - Parking Areas 53 

Bond Fund - General 53