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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

CITT OF CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



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ANNUAL REPORT -1954 



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Annual 



Repotf 

CITY OF 
CONCORD 



NEW HAMPSHIRE 




1954 



N 



35Z.07 
(174 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS - 1954 



CITY COUNCIL 

Howe Anderson, Mayor 
Herbert W. Rainie, Mayor Pro-tern 



Councilmen-at-Large 
Howe Anderson Wendell F. Grant 

Charles C. Davie Herbert W. Rainie 

Wayne K. Gardner William A. Stevens 

Ward Councilmen 

James P. Ferrin Ward 1 Conrad W. Robinson Ward 5 

Harlan F. Johnson Ward 2 James Ross Ward 6 

Wm. H. Hunneyman Ward 3 William P. Gove Ward 7 

John C. White Ward 4 Edwin R. Langevin Ward 8 

Thomas B. Jennings , Ward 9 

CITY ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the City Manager Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Airport Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Assessing Department C. Fred Moulton, Assessor 

Sidney Dach, Assessor 
A. Harold MacNeil, Assessor 

City Hall Department Arthur E. Roby, City Clerk 

Civil Defense Department -- Laurence Riis, Sr., Civil Defense, Dir. 

Engineering Department Wesley E. Haynes, City Engineer 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick, Engineering Inspector 
J. Shepard Norris, Sealer of Weights &: Measures 

Finance Department Archie N. Gourley, City Auditor 

Amos B. Morrison, City Collector 
Wallace W. Jones, City Treasurer 

Fire Department Clarence H. Green, Fire Chief 

Henry E. Drew, Deputy Fire Chief 

Duncan M. Murdoch, 2nd Deputy Fire Chief 

Joseph F. Greenough, Jr. , 2nd Deputy Fire Chief 

Health Department Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , City Physician 

Austin B. Presby, Sanitary Inspector 

Legal Department Atlee F. Zellers, City Solicitor 

Library Department Siri M. Andrews, Librarian 

Personnel Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Planning Departmient Gustaf H, Lehtinen, Planning Director 

Police Department Arthur W. Mclsaac, Police Chief 

J. Edward Silva, Deputy Police Chief 

Public Works Department W.E. Haynes, Supt. of Public Works 

Edward L. How land, Cemetery Supt. 
Williann H. Murphy, Sewer Supt. 

Purchasing Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Records Department Arthur E. Roby, City Clerk 

Recreation & Parks Dept. - Donald F. Sinn, Recreation & Parks Dir. 

Water Department G. Arthur Faneuf, Water Supt. 

Welfare Department Gertrude E. Watkins, Welfare Dir. 

Charles P. Coakley, Overseer of Poor, Ward 1 

4 * * City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judiciary Donald G. Matson, Judge 

Peter J. King, Special Judge 
C. Murray Sawyer, Clerk of Court & Probation Officer 



MUNICIPAL BOARDS 



Board of Building Appeal 

Eugene F. Magenau, Chairman 

CarroUGarland 

William Johns 

Arnold Perreton 

Donald Wells 

Board of Health 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , 
Homer E. Lawrence, M. D. 
William D. Penhale, M. D. 



City Planning Board 

Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 
Woodbury Brackett 
Edward H. Brooks 
Gardner G. Emnnons 
Douglas Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
Wesley E. Haynes 
A. Clifford Hudson 
John B. Jameson 

Board of Plumbing Examiners 



Library Board 

MaylandH. Morse, Jr. , Chair. 

Joseph J. Comi 

Otis Kingsbury 

Chester Larson 

Mrs. Eugene Magenau 

Mrs. Paul Shaw 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 

Mrs. Frederic Upton 

Timothy Woodman 

Recreatio n Advisory Council 

Roberto. Blood, M. D., Chair. 
Russell B. Tobey, Vice-Chair. 
Roland E. Allen 
Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. 
Mrs. Lewellyn Boutwell 
Edson F. Eastmian 
Clarence E. Huggins 
Mrs. Harlan F. Johnson 

Mrs. Winslow E. Melvin 

Mrs. Maurice W. Mullen 

Peter J. Murphy 

Samuel S. Richmond 

Walter B. Sweet 

Sulo J. Tani 

Mrs. Alfred W. Tovey 



Arthur W. Sargent, Chairman 
George E. Young 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Robert M. Beyer 
Wallace W. Jones 
Leon Merrill 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Lawrence J. Moynihan, Chair. 
Frederick Hall 
Raymond V. Lapointe 
Donald G. Matson 
Frank J. Preston 

Board of Rev is ion of Assessments 

Archie N. Gourley, Chairman 
Wesley E. Haynes 
Allan N. Leavitt 
Laurence J. Riis, Sr. 
Atlee F. Zellers 

Personnel Advisory Board 

Douglas B. Whiting, Chairman 
William H. Macurda 
J. Mitchell Ahern 



Annual Report * * 5 



^ct<f 0^ (^^mcond, Ttccu ^<^^Pt^l4Alne 



To the Honorable City Council 
and Citizens of Concord: 



This r^:^^^t^ attempts to present in summary a record of 
the improvements ind services rendered by your city government 
in 1954. An intelligent, /well inforn^ed citizenry is the surest way 
to preserve gC^od governmient. Toward this end the cooperation of 
the newspapers .-^nd radio ^ta^^j^ ^S'-been nnost valuable. Ad- 
ditional nneansy^Q^ cornnfiuftirc hav-V. i>^en talks before civic 
groups, moftfrily- repjir^s, pamp'tilets, direct contact by Council- 
men and, of'course, the fiver present relationship of the horror eds of 
city employees irLVt^ur •siervici4«-/,lj:_ 'N i' ^X'\ 

\ W/th p^ardo€&.bTe' pride Concr^rd is accepting^ its ^Viale 
progressive cit^"". In Now Hannpshirc its leader shipfri!n\tl ' 
municipal government ib well established, C ities 'fr^n^\^uit^iae as 
wrll as within the^Stfite arc becominf,' nn o r e interestie 
"Concord way". --»-* '-s<t,-™. 

outorcitys bifsiness is big busines's. It has most hi. the 
probl^r|nfe^0rf-p|f^ivat|j bu^ines b in addition to rrany special on^s. 
is thes purpose' of youf city government to secure full value* for 
each tax dollar and to serve the health and welfare needs of the 
con^mi\n.ityi'wiSt]ji^ fa^rtegns t©.al-l. 

rep^yrX is- 3. rs^siJie^ of u year~ of a 
)f the s^ond century of th^ f^\Kj5 

'nfai(^'"e,^Jth^<i-e-^re signs and voices 
rr tilings arid greater opportunitie^in the 






Brackett 
anager 



CITY COUNCIL 



MEMBERSHIP: EXPENDED $3,243 

Councilmen-at-Large. . . 6 
Ward Councilmen 9 



The City Council consists of 15 elected representatives 
of the people who are charged with the vital responsibility of 
setting city policy. The Council is made up of six councilmen- 
at-large who serve for four years and nine ward councilmen 
elected for two year termis. 

Thirty-nine Meeti ngs Held 

During 1 9^4 the Council held a total of 39 meetings con- 
sisting of 12 regular meetings, seven special nneetings, 14 hear- 
ings and six finance meetings. Regular Council nneetings are 
held on the second Monday of each month at 7:00 P. M. Special 
meetings maybe called upon written notice at the written request 
of the manager or at least eight councilmen. Hearings are held 
as prescribed by law. 

Highlights of Council Action During 1954 



* Passed general government budget of $1,465,718 to 
provide a program of services and improvennents for 
1954. 

* Passed $35,225 salary raise for municipal employees. 

* Authorized sale of $285, 000 in school bonds. 

* Banned through trucking on North and South State 
Streets. 

* Purchased land fronn Boston and Maine Railroad at Rail- 
road Square for parking. 

* Purchased Kelley property to establish parking lot next 
to City Hall. 

* Authorized widening of South Main Street and Water 
Street. 

* Purchased property at Long Pond. 

* Authorized revision and classification of nnunicipal 
ordinances. 

* Approved plans for new playground at Concord Heights. 

* Sold property at the Airport to Richard D. Brew & C o. 

Annual Report * * 7 



CITY CLERK 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 2 

Part-time 1 



EXPENDED. 



$9, 914. 75 



Your City Clerk has the important duties of serving as 
Clerk of the CityCouncil, arranging for all elections, maintain- 
ing all election records, maintaining vital statistics, and issuing 
several city licenses and permits. 



Sonne Important Licenses Issued 
Dog 2, 082 

Marriage 333 

Taxi Operator 74 

Taxi Cab 24 



Music Machine 

Ball Alley 

Theatre 

Bowling Alley-- 



23 
13 

4 
2 



Pool Table 1 



State Election Held November 2, 1954 

The State prinnary was held September 14, and the State 
bienniel election was held November 2, 1954. Due to the late 
primary election and the early biennial election the City Clerk 
was presented with a difficulty in the mailing of absentee ballets. 
On October 18, the Clerk mailed out a total of 246 absentee 
ballots, all but two of which were returned in time to be counted 
on Election Day, November 2. 

Demand for Records Continues 

One of the most important functions of the City Clerk 

is his responsibility for keeping records. Due to the increased 

need for records in con- 
Voters turn out on Election Day. nection with the armed 

services, social secur- 
ity and retirement bene - 
fits, the demand for 
record information con- 
tinued heavy during 1954. 

Birth Rate Continues High 
The figures below 
show a decrease in deaths 
and miarriages, but an in- 
crease in births. The 
birth rate continues to 
grow each year with the 
death rate falling off each 
year. 

1954 1953 

Births 916 902 

Deaths 615 643 

Marriages 327 357 




«^^i i 



Repairs and Improvements Made to City Hall and Auditorium 
in 1954 

Several improvements were made in your city buildings 
during the year. Much needed roof repairs were made on the 
city hall and auditorium. The city auditorium was thoroughly 
redecorated, with walls in the auditorium proper, hallways and 
dressing rooms cleaned and painted in a new and attractive color 
scheme. Sturdy plastic tile was laid in the vestibule and foyer 
leading into the auditorium. These improvements should greatly 
increase the value of the auditorium as a center of civic activity 
for the citizens of Concord. 

Other improvements include the laying of plastic tile 
floors in the offices of the City Engineer and Planning Director 
and on the second floor hallway in the city hall. Walls were 
painted in some of the second and third floor offices. 



Council Channber Renovation Completed 

One of the major accomplishments during 1954 was the 
complete alteration of the Council chamber in the city hall. A 
new lower ceiling of acoustical nnaterial and a panel of the same 
miaterial at one end of the channber were installed, making it 
much easier for both participants and spectators t o follow 
Council proceedings. The walls were painted and a new plastic 
tile floor was laid. New plastic upholstered chairs and a 
circular council table add space and dignity to theCouncil 
chamber. 



The newly renovated Council chamber in the city hall. 







I i 



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Annual Report * * 9 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED ...$16,831.59 

Full-time 4 

Part-time 2 



Over 80% of the revenues received by Concord are 
based on the work of the Assessing Department. Ma j or responsi- 
bilities include appraising all property for taxation, issuing 
warrants for the collection of taxes, preparation of tax rolls, 
and the maintenance of all property records. 

1954 Property Tax Warrant Submitted 

The county, city and school tax warrants subnnitted to 
the Tax Collector totaled.$2, 422,610. 91. The tax rate, based on 
$1,000 of assessed valuation was $50. 30 and $55. 7 5 in Penacook . 

The 1954 assessed valuation of property in Concord was 
$47, 795, 222 a slight decrease of $33,490 under the 1953 total. 
This decrease was attributed to lower stock-in-trade assessments. 
Poll and head tax warrants amounted to $96, 425, a slight in- 
crease over 1953. 

Board of Assessors Hears Fewer Taxpayers 

The three-man Board of Assessors heard appeals from 
57 taxpayers during 12 regular and 45 special meetings during 
1954. This was a decrease of seven from the previous year, 
and of 125 from the total taxpayers heard in 1952. 

Annual Meeting Held with State Officials 

The State House was the scene of the annual meeting, 
held March 12th, of the Boards of Assessors and the State Tax 
Commission. Local Assessors are given instruction on the 
proper assessment of real estate, timber and other property 
at these meetings. Valuable suggestions on assessment proced- 
ure are also given by state officials. 

Percentage of Tax Exempt Property High in City 

Approximately 25% of the assessed valuation of the City 
of Concord is tax exempt. This means that all property taxes 
must be collected from the remaining 75% of assessed property. 
Examples of tax exempt property include schools, government 
buildings, non-profit groups and religious institutions. 

Total Assessed Valuation in Concord 



Year 

$38, 782,440 

1945 32,963,846 1951 47,013,784 

1946 33,622,496 1952 47,490,362 

1947 36,457,539 1953 47,828,712 

1948 - 37,330,320 1954 47,795,222 

1949- 

10 * * City of Concord 







1944. 


-1954 
Year 


33, 


083, 


027 


1950- 


32, 


963, 


846 


1951- 


33, 


622, 


496 


1952- 


36, 


457, 


539 


1953- 


37, 


330, 


320 


1954- 


38, 


765, 


980 





CIVIL DEFENSE 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED $212.65 

Part-time. . 200 (volunteers) 



President Eisenhower, speaking of civil defense, said 
recently that "the city has moved from a position of support in 
the rear. It has moved out in a very distinct way to the front 
line." In order to defend Concord in case of an attack a civil 
defense organization is set up under the direction of Laurence 
J. Riis, Sr. Other officers in the CD organization are as fol- 
lows: 

Deputy Director Henry C. Newell 

Deputy Director for Women's Affairs Mrs. Lucie Weston 

Ground Observer C orps Maurice E. Fcirley, Supv. 

Mrs. Maurice E. Farley, 
Chief Observer 

Refugee Unit S tanley F. Little 

Fire Fighting Unit Fire Chief, C. H. Green 

Police Unit Police Chief, A. W.McIsaac 

Police Sgt. DanielC. Abbott 

Warden Services Unit Col. James H. Johnson 

Engineering Unit Howard E, Raymond 

Transportation Unit Nile E. Faust 

Charles W. Fletcher, Deputy 

Health & Sanitation Unit Dr. Thomas M. Dudley 

MedicalNursing & First Aid Unit Dr. Robert O. Blood 

Public Information Officers --Robert Swenson & John D. Orr 
Warning & Communications Unit Malcolm J. Edmunds 

Alert Siren Ordered 

Matching funds from the Federal government have en- 
abled the Civil Defense organization to order a siren for the 
South-end of the city. With the acquisition of this siren the alert 
system for the entire city will be complete. 

Hurricanes Test Defense System 

The hurricanes of 1954 offered an opportunity to test 
the CivilDefense communications system. Working closely with 
State officials and city departments all equipment responded well 
and a high degree of cooperation was achieved. 



Public Kept Posted of CD Need 

An active public information effort was made to acquaint 
the public with Civil Defense needs. Speeches were miade to civic 
and fraternal groups, using movies and demonstrations to explain 
Concord's defense arrangements. Our greatest need is for 
ground observer personnel. Any citizen of C oncord wishing to 
join the Ground Observer Corps is urged to call Mrs, Maurice E. 
Farley, CA4-1513. 



Annual Report * * 11 



LEGAL DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED $4,468.93 

Part-time 1 



The City Solicitor is the city's legal officer and repre- 
sents the city in all litigation in the courts. He is available to 
the Council and administrative officers for legal research, legal 
opinions and advice and the drafting of legal documents. 

Solicitor Aids in Purchase of Property 

The City Solicitor assisted in the purchase of the Moody, 
Jordan and Griffin properties around Penacook Lake. 

He also represented the City in the purchase of 123 acres 
of land upon which much of the Concord Airport had been built. 
Previously leased from the State, theCouncil deemed it desirable 
to purchase this land in connection with Concord's program for 
encouraging new industries. In this transaction the city deeded 
to the State a snnall piece of land underlying the State Armory be- 
hind the city hall. 

Other land acquired with the assistance of the Solicitor 
included property purchased from the Boston & Maine Railroad 
for the Freight Street parking lot. 

Zoning and Building Cases Settled 

Several cases involving the Z oning Ordinance and Build- 
ing Code were settled with the aid of the City Solicitor. An in- 
junction was obtained in Superior Court in Concord v. Beres to 
prevent the removal of a frame structure into a fire zone, con- 
trary to the Building Code. The Solicitor also represented the 
city before the Superior Court in the case of Concord v. Reardon, 
and an injuction was granted against the defendant's conduct- 
ing a mioving business in a residential area on South Main 
Street. 

Legal Opinions Offered 

The Solicitor offered legal opinions to the City Council 
and Manager in connection with such nnatters as the rennodeling of 
theCouncil chamber, and insurance policies carried on city per- 
sonnel and property. He was available at all Council meetings to 
render legal advice. 

Investigations Made by City Solicitor 

Concord's City Solicitor conducted title search on 206 
individual pieces of property during the course of tax sales action 
for delinquent taxes. He also investigated and gave opinions on 
two dangerous pits or holes, recommending action to remove the 
hazards in both cases. Investigations were made into clainns 
of property damage during the reconstruction of Main Street. 
The Solicitor also checked several personal injury clainns during 
1954. 



12 * * City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 



PERSONNEL: 
Part-time. 



EXPENDED $8,430. 62 



Concord Airport has been owned by the City since 1936. 
Three hard surface runways, two hangers and a radio range 
station are located on the 300 acre site. 

Airport Serves as Center of Air Activity 

Full use is nnade of city-owned facilities at the Airport. 
The two hangers are leased to flying services and the adminis- 
tration building houses the following organizations, employing 33 
persons: Civil Aeronautics Administration Airways Communi- 
cations Station and District Safety Office, United States Weather 
Bureau, New Hampshire Aeronautics Commission, Northeast 
Electronics Corporation, Northeast Airlines, Inc. and Fern's 
Flying Service office. 



Large Increase in Airport Use During 1954 

1954 

Passengers Enplaned 1,839 

Cargo Handled: Mail 2,948 lbs. 

Express 3,898 lbs. 

Freight 6, 156 lbs. 

TotalCargo Handled 13,002 lbs. 



1953 
1, 639 
3,892 lbs. 
2,794 lbs, 
3,784 lbs, 
10,470 lbs. 



Industrial Land Acquired 

The City of Concord purchased 123 acres of land, form- 
erly leased from the State, during 1954. This land, on which part 
of the Airport is already situated, will be used for runways and 
the balance sold for industrial developmient. The area is desir- 
able for industrial purposes since it is located near a convenient 
shipping point and is well removed from residential areas. 
RichardD. Brew & Co. has already located near the Airport. 

Northeast Airlines' planes line up at the Airport. 




Annual Report * * 13 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 
Full-time. 



EXPENDED. 



$42, 322, 64 



The Finance Department is responsible for accounting, 
budget control, auditing receipts and expenditures, debt arrange- 
ment, financial reporting, collecting and disbursing nnonies, cus- 
tody of all funds, and operation of office supply and duplicating 
services. 



Some Important Accomplishments During 1954 

* Delinquent poll taxes outstanding were reduced from 
$3,861.38 to $1,830.98, the lowest point in many years. 
Collected 89% of current year property tax warrant. 
Collected 75% of 1954 poll tax warrant. 
Collected 75% of 1954 head tax warrant. 
Issued 13, 284 auto permits yielding $106, 321, 56. 
Realized $1, 278. 26 through investment of temporarily idle 
funds. 

Borrowed $285, 000 for Union School District. 
Held hearings on three special assessment projects. 
Established revolving fund for equipment maintenance and 
replacement. 



New Duplicating Machine Cuts Costs 

1954 was the first full year theCity's offset duplicating 
machine was in operation. Examples of the work produced by the 
nnachine were the 1953 annual report, the 1953 and 1954 budgets, 
monthly activities reports and numerous forms, envelopes and 
form letters. Over 500 reams of material were duplicated at a 
substantial saving to the city. 

Citizens receive friendly service at the Finance Office. 






1954 Saw Decrease in General Government Debt 

Debt for general municipal purposes decreased during 
the year from $969,000 to $846,000, a reduction of $123,000. 
The first payment of $Z0, 000 on the $200,000 issue for parking 
areas was nnade. A new bond issue of $285, 000 for school con- 
struction and payments of school bonds amounting to $34,000 
resulted in a net increase of $251,000 in the school debt. In 1954 
the Water Department debt was reduced from $ 1 60,000 to $ 1 50,0 00, 



The 1954 Budget 

Estimated Revenues 

General Property Tax - $2, 396, l62. 00 

State Tax Contributions 103,930.00 

Auto Permiits 95,000.00 

Service Charges - 61,600.00 

Trust Fund Income 34, 72 5. 00 

Poll Taxes 22, 370. 00 

Other Local Taxes 16,045.00 

State Aid (Highway) --- 20,800.00 

Surplus From 1953- 52.000.00 

Total $2,802, 632. 00 

Estimated Expenditures 

Protection of Persons & Property $ 370, 567. 00 

Highways & Sidewalks 327, 123. 00 

Health k Sanitation 183, 564. 00 

Debt Payment & Interest 140,572.00 

General Administration 132, 407. 00 

Charities 102,965.00 

Recreation 71, 316. 00 

Library 72,652.00 

Cemeteries --- 55, 399. 00 

Miscellaneous 48,788.00 

Capital Outlay 31, 820. 00 

Schools 1, 094, 522.00 

County Tax - 170, 937. 00 

Total $2, 802, 632, 00 



85. 5% 
3.7% 



4% 
2% 
2% 
8% 
6% 
7% 
9% 



100. 0% 



13.2% 

11.7% 

6.6% 

5.0% 

4.7% 

3.7% 

2.5% 

2.6% 

2.0% 

1.7% 

1.1% 

39. 1% 

6. 1% 

100. 0% 



This chart shows Concord's debt reduction program. 



►140,000 



MUNICIPAL 

BOND RETIREMENT 

1954—1965 




1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 



1962 1963 1964 1965 




Fast action by firemen helps save a honne. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 45 

Part-time 78 



EXPENDED... $192,990.42 



Concord's Fire Department is on 24 hour duty to protect 
your home and property against the ravages of fire. Full-time 
and auxiliary fire fighters are trained and equipped to fight every 
known type of blaze. 

Fires Decrease in 1954 

Ninety-eight fewer calls were received in 1954 than in 

1953. Of the 605 calls received 73 were box alarms and 532 were 

still alarnns. A breakdown of these calls reveals the types of fires 

responded to during 1954: 

Residential 213 Manufacturing 15 

Grass and Brush 108 False Alarms 14 

Auto Fires 89 Alarms Outside City 8 

First Aid and Emergencies 68 Non-residential 7 

Smoke Scares 62 Storage 3 

Mercantile 18 Total 605 

Fire Losses Total $63,236.48 

1954 fire losses totaled $63,236.48, 31%of which occur- 
ed in the blaze at Dr. Robert O. Blood's farm on October 12th, 
Of the $63,236.48 total, $59,936.68 was covered by insurance , 
leaving a net fire loss for the year of $3, 299. 80. The total fire 
loss was only 5% of the total property valuation, of $1, 301 , 591 , 
involved in fires during the year. 



Equipment in Good Working Order 

Good equipment is invaluable to the work of fire fighting, 
and Concord's Department is well equipped to handle its import- 

16 * * City of Concord 



ant responsibilities. In 1954 a new 750 gallon Annerican LaFrance 
pumper was delivered and put into service. An inventory of Fire 
Departnnent equipnnent shows that the Department maintains 16 
trucks and two official cars, housed in four fire stations. 

Fire Department personnel performed all necessary- 
maintenance and repair work at the city fire stations during the 
year. All hose and hydrantswere tested to make certain they could 
pass the high maintenance standards set for fire fighting apparatus . 

Concord Firemen Well Trained 

Modern conditions require up-to-date fire fighting nnethods. 
During 1954 an extensive training progrann was held for all fire 
fighters, with officers of the Department as instructors. Demon- 
strations and lectures were used to acquaint the personnel withnew 
techniques . 

Principal Causes of Fires Revealed in 1954 Survey 

In a state-wide survey, it w a s revealed that careless 
smoking caused the greatest number of fires, with lightning, 
faulty chimneys, wiring defects and oil ranges ranking next in 
that order. Every citizen can reduce the fire danger in his own 
home by making sure that cigarettes and cigars are completely ex- 
tinguished and that electtic circuits are not overloaded. 

Fire Prevention Ennphasized During 1954 

In order to mininnize fire hazards, 1 ,078 inspections were 
made during the year at all hospitals, convalescent homes, schools, 
churches, theatres and establishments in the high value district. 
All oil burner installations were also inspected. These inspect- 
ions served to reflect the Department's opinion that "an ounce of 
prevention is worth a pound of cure". 

Fire Fighters Aid Drives 

Always aware of their responsibilities as citizens of 
Concord, the firefighters aided in raising funds for the March of 
Dimes, the Jimmy Fund Drive and the Muscular Dystrophy Cam- 
paign. They also continued their successful project of building 
miniature fire trucks for under-privileged children at Christmas. 

Firemen erect sign to initiate Muscular Dystrophy Drive. 



F\OEF\G\\Tt«S 



-ftL-^'^^l 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 4 

Part-time 2 



EXPENDED. . . , $38, 6Z6. 64 



Safeguarding your health is the job of the Health Depart- 
ment. By making regular inspections of eating establishments 
and dairies, testing food products and holding clinics, the City 
Health Officer and Sanitary Inspector wage a continous war on 
disease. 

Over 300 Children Attend Six Health Clinics 

From January to June, 1954, 322 Concord children at- 
tended clinics to receive protective treatment against diphtheria, 
whooping cough, tetanus and smiall pox. These clinics are held 
on the second floor of City Hall and are free of charge. 

Five More Polio Cases in '54 

Six cases of poliomyelitis were reported during the year, 
as compared with one case reported in 1953. Six cases of infect- 
ious hepatitis, two cases of tuberculosis and several cases of 
mumps were also reported. New drugs are aiding the fight against 
communicable diseases, resulting in fewer cases in recent years. 

Fewer Nuisance Complaints Reported 

Forty-seven nuisance complaints were received and in- 
vestigated during the year, a decrease of 50 from 1952, and of 
two from 1953. Most complaints dealt with refuse dumped in 
alleys and on private property and faulty plumbing. Speedy action 



The Board of Health maps out health clinic procedure, 








Sanitary Inspector dictates results of tests to Department clerk, 
was taken a,'7ainst violators of health regulations. 

Most Comnnon Causes of Deaths 

As medical science makes rapid strides toward finding 
cures for many heretofore fatal diseases, it is interesting to note 
the most frequent causes of deaths in Concord during the year: 

1954 1953 

Diseases of the Circulatory System 126 149 

Cancer and Other Malignant Tumors 4Z 48 

Nephritis 5 9^ 

Accidental Deaths 11 11 

Pneumonia 6 7 

Diabetes Mellitus 9 8 

Tuberculosis 0_ 1 

Total 199 233 

Sanitary Inspector Made 1,355 Inspections 

Inline with his responsibility for local health conditions, 
the Sanitary Inspector made 1,355 inspections during the year. 
Inspection sites included homes, stores, dairies, eating estab- 
lishments, schools, slaughter houses and any areas about which 
complaints were received. A total of 247 written notices were 
sent to violators, and re-inspections were made to assure com- 
pliance with the sanitary laws. 

Dairy Cleanliness of Particular Concern 

Included in the above total were 598 inspections of dairies 
and 129 inspections of milk plants. Dairy inspections insure that 
all milk sold in the city comes from tuberculin and Bangs Diseas e 
free herds, that minimunn health standards are maintained at 
dairies and milk plants and that methods of milk handling and pro- 
duction are satisfactorily met. 

Samples of milk, ice cream and other dairy products are 
collected from all producers and analyzed periodically for quality. 
The size of this job is illustrated by the fact that approximately 
14, 700 quarts of milk were sold daily in Concord during 1954, 



Annual Report * * 19 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 14 

Part-time 10 



EXPENDED $71, 617. 62 



"Good reading for everyone" is the miotto of your Public 
Library. Over 68, 000 volumes are available for citizens of all 
ages and interests. Besides serving as a center for book distri- 
bution the Library carries on such services as reading clubs, 
film programs, story hours and discussion groups. 

Circulation Figures Climb 

In 1954, 230,210 books were borrowed, an average of 
eight books per resident of Concord. Children's total circulation 
averages were even higher with 27 books borrowed for each Con- 
cord child. 

A total of 8,925 Concord residents, 67% of the population, 
are registered at the Library, an increase of 5% over last year. 

New Books Added 

During 1954, 5,741 books were added to the Library. Of 
this total 962 volumes were given to the Library by residents. 
Over 100 periodicals are received by the Library each year. 

Fiction Books Top List 

The following analysis of borrowing habits reveals that 
most Concord residents borrow fiction books: 

Volumes Percent 

Adult Fiction 108,488 

Adult Non-Fiction h Periodicals- 62, 005 

Children's Books 59, 717 

Total 230, 210 



47% 
27% 
26% 

TooTo 



There has been noted; however , a decided increase in the 
circulation of non-fiction during recent years. 

No Concord resident is forgotten by your Library. 




Branch Libraries Have Busy Year 

As a result of Concord Library's branch activities 69,9'7Z 
books were borrowed from branch sources. This was 30% of the 
total circulation of 1954. Library facilities are available to 
Concord residents in outlying areas through the many trips of the 
Bookmobile. The Penacook Branch Library and the library facil- 
ities offered patients of the Concord Hospital also were well used 
during the year. 

Exhibits Prove Popular 

Over a dozen colorful and interesting exhibits were 
featured in the Public Library's program during 1954. Nora 
Unwin's exhibit of her engravings and drawings were shown as was 
an exhibit of the Concord Artists, Inc. In cooperation with the 
public schools a showing of children's art work was given. Dur- 
ing 1954 articles made in craft classes of the City Recreation and 
Parks Department were also exhibited. The Children's Room was 
decorated with arrangements for such holidays a s Christma s , 
Easter and Washington's Birthday. 

Reference Division Renders Valuable Service 

The Reference Division of the Library is available to all 
persons in quest of information. It handled over 4, 000 inquiries, 
on an unlimited variety of subjects during 1954, some of which 
required considerable research. 

Over 200 Meetings Held at Main Library 

Meetings of such groups as the Great Books discussion 
group brought hundreds of Concord residents to the Library dur- 
ing 1954. Classes for mothers of pre-school children and 72 film 
programs sponsored by the Library staff proved very popular dur- 
ing the year. 

Story Hours Encourage Interest in Good Reading 

The Library conducted a total of 62 story hours at the 
Library, playgrounds and other locations during the year. In 
cooperation with the Y. M. C.A. , Y. W. C. A. and Boy and Girl 
Scouts, the Library staff attempts to encourage an appreciation 
of good books by Concord's younger residents. 

The popular Bookmobile extends library services. 

2 




PLANNING DEPARTMENT 



I n II III 




ea Bi 



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jl^gtr 



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The Planning Department encourages new industries such as the 
new plant of RichardD. Brew &;Co. , shown above. 



PERSONNEL: 
Full-time. 



EXPENDED. 



$10, 015.86 



Your city Planning Department is organized to study the 
future of Concord, and to regulate and plan the development of the 
community. In order to study physical, economic and social 
growth problems, the Department conducts research activities 
and reports on its findings. The Planning Board consists of nine 
citizens who advise and direct the full-tinne Planning Director. 

F. E. Everett Highway Plans Affect Concord 

Authorization for construction of the F.E.Everett High- 
way from Massachusetts to Concord was voted by the General Court 
in 1954. The Planning Board studied and approved of this project, 
as it will assure construction of the southerly extension of the 
Concord throughway in accordance with planned development of the 
city's major highway system. New streets and improvements in 
the South End street system will result from the new highway. 

Another major highway project which received active sup- 
port from the Planning Board concerned a proposed improvennent 
of the Daniel Webster Highway from Airport Road in Concord to 
Sheep Road in Pembroke. This project will result in a substantial 
improvement in highway grade and width over the Soucook River 
Valley section of this major traffic artery. 

Action on Streets Taken During the Year 

As a result of planning surveys, street widenings were 
recommended by the Planning Board in connection with highway 
reconstruction projects. Widening of South Main Street at its 
intersection with Water and West Streets and of East Street in 
Penacook were completed during 1954. The Board also 



22 * * City of Concord 



advised the discontinuance of two streets: a dedicated way running 
southerly from Clinton Street in the Conant Park Sub-division and 
the closing of a portion of Spring Street in Penacook to vehicular 
traffic. Both of these recommendations, together with recom- 
mended new rules for street acceptance, were passed by the Council. 

Planning Board Acts on Traffic and Parking Problems 

The Board recommended that West Washington Street, 
between Holt and Liberty Streets, be limited to one-way traffic; 
and that two-way traffic be permitted on West Street, between 
South Main and South State Streets. The Board also drew up a 
plan for increased parking facilities near the City Hall. 

Twelve Miles of Vacant Improved Frontage in Concord 

In a study of land-use in Concord, the Planning Board 
found 12 miles of vacant frontage existed in areas benefiting from 
all utilities. This survey also revealed 190 vacant dwelling units, 
22 more than the total for 1953. During 1954, 78 new dwelling 
units were built as compared to a total of 71 for the previous year. 

Planning Board Considered Two Sub-divisions 

The Board voted final approval of the Eastern Sub -divisio n 
plat, consisting of five lots, located easterly of East Side Drive in 
the Concord Plains section; and tentative approval of a preliminary 
plat of the Tow-Path Overlook Sub-division, consisting of 1 1 lots, 
situated on Mountain Road in East Concord. 

Improvement Projects and Industrial Development Studied 

The Planning Board studied the facilities of the city yard 
and the open dunnp during 1954. Yard innprovement recommend- 
ations were nnade, based on a report written by the City Engineer. 
Attention was given to a new site for city refuse disposal, and the 
sanitary-fill type of disposal operation was recommended. 

Industrial development was advanced by the Planning 
Board, cooperating with the Concord Regional Developnnent Corp- 
oration in its efforts to promote industrial growth. A preliminary 
plan was written for an industrial area on the Airport Road. 

Substantial progress was made in the construction of the new 
Concord Hospital in 1954. 







^ 



j»" .• 




Annual Report * * 23 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 43 

Part-time 62 



EXPENDED. . . $170, 852. 15 



Your Police Department is on duty to protect your life 
and property and to enforce city ordinances. It is concerned with 
preventing crime and promoting public safety. 

Offenses Increase in 1954 

Although there was a decrease in serious felonies during 
1954, there were 2,268 more misdemeanors in 1954 than in the 
previous year. This is an increase of 35. 5% over 1953's total of 
6,374. Violations of parking, road and driving laws were res- 
ponsible for most of the increase in nnisdemeanor offenses. Fel- 
onies dropped-off from 109 in 1953 to 103 in 1954. The Police 
Department also investigated 7,822 connplaints, a decreaseof 175. 
Ambulance calls decreased fronn 1 , 1 1 8 calls in 1 953 to 995 in 1 954. 

Safety Programs Stressed 

In order to acquaint Concord residents with the need for 
increased emphasis on safety the Police Department continued its 
program of safety education. Safety lectures were given by Police 
officers in every city school, and the school traffic patrols , estab- 
lished in 1946, were contin- 
Policemen nnake periodic ued. 

collections from parking meters. 

Most Stolen Property Re- 
covered 

During the year 
$23,185.9 1 worth of stolen 
property was reported to 
your Police Department. This 
was a decrease of $7, 349. 73 
from 1953. Of the 1954 total 
64.4% was recovered. Police 
officers are still working on 
these cases and will not be 
satisfied until all the stolen 
property is returned to its 
rightful owners. 

Training Rates High Priority 
Believing that the 
best police officers are the 
besttrained, your Police De- 
partnnent continued its pro- 
grams of training in first aid 
and police techniques. A nine 
hour refresher course in first 
aid was held for all members 





^0S2mesa^t''Si3& 



Your Police Department attempts to prevent accidents like this. 

of the Department. Five officers attended the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation's four day Fingerprint Training School held inCon- 
cord. All members of the Department received firearn-is training 
in the use of sub-machine gun, shot gun, gas gun and revolver. 
The Police Chief served as an instructor at the Nashua Police 
School, from which four officers received diplomas after an in- 
tensive two week course. 



1954 An Active Year for the Boy's Club 



The Concord Police 
Benevolent Association Boy's 
Club organized sports and 
gym classes. The midget 
basketball team travelled 
to the Boston Garden to com- 
pete with teams from other 
communities. Classes were 
held at the club house in box- 
ing, wrestling and tumb- 
ling. 

Other activities of 
the Club included movies 
and Hallowe'en and Christ- 
mas parties. 

Innprovements Made at Sta- 
tion House. 

The ceilings and 
walls in the Chief's office, 
Inspector's room and front 
hall were painted. New tile 
floors were installed in the 
Deputy's office and front hall, 
and another section of the 
garage ceiling was completed. 



Stores are protected 
at night by police inspections. 




MUNICIPAL COURT 



PERSONNEL: 
Part-time. 



EXPENDED $6, 000. 00 



The Municipal Court holds regular sessions each week 
day beginning at 9:00 A. M. for the disposition of criminal cases. 
Civil sessions are held following the criminal cases. 

Court Hears 40% More Cases in 1954 

A total of 9,408 cases were heard by the Municipal Court 
in 1954, an increase of 40% over the 1953 total of 6,766 cases. 
Felonies dropped from 65 in 1953 to 20 in 1954. There was an in- 
crease in all other types of cases, with the largest increases 
found in misdemeanors and parking violations. A breakdown of 
court activity shows the following figures for cases handled by 
your Municipal Court: 

Parking Violations-- 6, 528 

Misdemeanors 2, 158 

Small Claims 592 

Civil Cases 110 

Felonies 20 

Total 9,408 

Court Income Up During the Year 

Total income of the Court during 1954 was $26,623.08. 
A sum of $9,442.80 was paid to the New Hampshire Motor Vehicle 
Department as required bylaw. A total of $1 2, 736. 88 was given 
to the City Treasury by the Court. This total income figure for 
1954 represented a 47% increase in income over 1952. 

Juvenile Program Continues 

The MunicipalCourt attempts to steer juveniles onto the 
right side of the law by holding private meetings with those accused 
of minor offenses and counseling them to encourage good citizen- 
ship. These meetings often include the juvenile's parents, teachers 
and the Municipal Judge and Probation Officer. Approximately 50 
of these meetings were held during 1954 with favorable results. 

Your Court in action during 1954. 





WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED ...$89,721.35 

Full-time 2 

Part-time 1 



Relief is given by the Welfare Department to those 
citizens of Concord and Penacook who need financial help, and 
who cannot receive such assistance elsewhere. Examples of the 
type of relief offered include general relief, aid to the perma- 
nently disabled, aid to dependent soldiers, board and care of 
adults and children, hospitalization and medical care and old age 
assistance. All the relief programs are administered on the basis 
of need. 

General Relief Continues Downward Trend 

In 1954 an average of 4 1 cases representing 81 persons 
were aided at a total cost of $25,462.81. In terms of case load 
this is a decrease of nine cases from 1953 and 20 from 1952. The 
amount of money spent for relief has decreased 42% since 1952. 
New growth in Concord and increased employnnent openings may 
be credited with the decrease in relief payments. 

Old Age Assistance Given 

During 1 954, 265 persons were given old age assistance. 
Although this was a decrease of eight cases from 1 953, expendit- 
ures increased from $46,542.31 to $50, 219. 11. The rising cost 
of medical supplies and services may be cited as a reason for 
this increased total. Alien old age assistance increased by one 
case over the 1953 total of six, with expenditures of $2, 439.26 in 
1954. 

Aid to Permanently and Totally Disabled Increases 

In the second year of its operation, this program of aid 
to permanently and totally disabled citizens saw a slight increase 
in cases and expenditures. Under the program the State ad- 
ministers the relief and the city pays 35% of the costs. During 
1954 an average of seven cases received $2,496.67 in city relief 
funds. This was an increase of three cases and $441. 90 over 
1953. 

Reasons for Relief Need Cited 

Reasons for Relief Need Approx. Percentage of Cases 

Sickness 35% 

Insufficient Income 30% 

Unemployment 20% 

Partially Handicapped 5% 

Maritial Difficulties 5% 

Unemployable 5% 



Annual Report * * 27 



ROLL i NS 




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PUBLIC WORKS & ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: EXPENDED... $523,935.66 

Full-time ,90 

Part-time 2 



The Public Works and Engineering Department is charged 
with the responsibility for constructing and repairing roads, bridges 
and sidewalks; designing, laying out and mapping all public works 
projects; constructing, repairing and maintaining sanitary and 
storm sewers; removing snow and sanding and salting highways; 
planting, removing and spraying trees ; operating nnunicipal ceme- 
teries; collecting and dumping refuse; inspecting new construction 
and weighing and measuring devices; plus many other important 
functions. 

Some Highlights of the Year's Activities 

* Completed reconstruction of Main Street. 

* Plowed a total of 43. 5 inches of snow accunnulation. 

* Cleaned city after hurricane damage. 

* Repaired 37 miles of city streets. 

* Replaced 153 street signs. 

* Removed 8,600 cubic yards of refuse in street cleaning 
operations. 

* Collected 62, 575 cubic yards of refuse. 

* Installed 65 new house sewer connections. 

* Improved grounds of municipal cemeteries. 

* Conducted surveys on city dump and city yard facilities. 

Main Street Reconstruction Finished 



The MainStreet reconstruction project was completed on 
September 28th. This project provided the city with 9,000 feet of 

Frost action in streets means work for the Public Works Department. 







30 * * City of Concord 



newly constructed highway, built to exacting design and construct- 
ion standards. New sidewalks were constructed nearly the entire 
length of Main Street, and a new storm sewer system was installed 
throughout the project. Increased traffic width was provided, and 
the approaches of intersecting streets were greatly improved par- 
ticularly along South Main Street. The relocation of Gulf Street 
and the construction of islands to channelize traffic at the inter- 
section of South Main, Water and West Streets developed as a re- 
sult of the reconstruction project. 

Radio System Connects All Vehicles 

This was the first full year during which Public Works 
vehicles were connected by radio. Twelve mobile units in Public 
Works vehicles , four units in Water Department vehicles, a trans - 
mitterat the city yard and a receiver at the Superintendent's office 
comprise the system. It immediately proved its worth during 
snow removal operations and, again, during the hurricane and 
severe storms of early fall. 

New Heating System Installed at City Yard 

A new heating system was installed at the city yard dur- 
ing 1954, including a central, oil-fired steam boiler and new space 
heaters in the machine shop and sewer shed. City forces assisted 
in the rennodeling of the boiler roonn. Other maintenance work 
accomplished by city forces at the yard included 766 minor repair 
jobs, 32 overhaul jobs on equipment and the painting of seven units 
of equipment. 

Public Works Department Fights Hurricanes 

On August 31st, hurricane "Carol" visited Concord, and 
the Public Works Departnnent was called out to clean up the debris 
left in its wake. Heavy rain and high winds brought minor wash- 
outs, slight flooding of streets and many fallen branches. Hun- 
dreds of calls for action were received by the Department, and 

Hurricane damage was quickly repaired by Public Works employees. 




Annual Report * * 31 



Public Works personnel worked into the night opening blocked 
streets and cleaning out sewers. No street in Concord was blocked 
for more than 40 minutes. Three hundred loads of limbs and 
branches were rennoved fronn the streets. The excellent work of 
the Department was dennonstrated again in the hard stornn of Sept- 
ember 1 1th. 

Major Engineering Surveys Completed 

Many important surveys on suchprojects as sewers, con- 
struction and sub-divisions were conducted by the Departnnent dur- 
ing 1954. Exannples of such work include studies of the city dump, 
the reconstruction of a wading pool at White Park, the reconstruction 
of a portion of Hannah Dustin Drive, resurfacing Main Street, the 
Auburn Street sanitary sewer, location nf the original layout of 
Branch Turnpike and a study of culvert capacities along Bow Brook 
between School and Rockinghann Streets. Whenever possible the 
Engineering Departnnent performis these surveys itself ; but private 
consultants were brought in to study the sewer requirennents of 
Concord Hospital, the drainage situation in Conant Park, the 
Christian Avenue sanitary sewer and several other projects. 

Cemetery Improvements Made 

In addition to maintaining all cemietery land in its usual 
excellent condition, the roads in Blossom HillCennetery were re- 
surfaced, re grading was done at the Old North C e meter y and much 
repair work completed. A total of 317 interments were made in 
the ten cemeteries maintained by the c ity. 

(Left) Radio equipment connects all Public Works vehicles, sav- 
ing time and nnoney. 



(Right) A steam shovel aids in rebuilding Main Street. 




3Z * * City of Concord 



ZONING, BUILDING, PLUMBING 



PERSONNEL EXPENDED $5,938.1; 

Full-time 1 



The full-time Engineering Inspector has the important 
responsibility for administering the Zoning Ordinance and Build- 
ing and Plumbing Codes. Permits to erect, alter or move a 
structure are given by the Inspector. The Board of Building Ap- 
peals and the Zoning Board of Adjustment are organized to hear 
appeals from the Inspector's decisions. 

More Building and Plumbing Permits Issued in 1954 

A total of 274 building pernnits were issued during 1954, 
an increase of 17 over the total for 1953. Of these permits 160 
were for new construction equaling the high mark set in 1 953. The 
estimated value of this new construction was $3,091,250, or 85% 
of the total value of all building permits issued. Ninety-two new 
single fannily units were started in 1954, 12 more than in 1953. 
Plumbing permits issued in 1954 numbered 113, an in- 
crease of two over the previous year. Thirty-five master plumb- 
ers and 24 journeymen were licensed during the year. 

Major Construction Projects Begun 

Rumford School (Addition)--- $155,000. 

Richard D. Brew &Co. (Factory) 70,000. 

South Main Street Corp. (Bank, Penacook) 45,000. 

Millville School (Addition) 44, 000. 

Garrison School (Addition) 32,000. 

Burton M. Wheeler (Printing establishment) 30, 000. 

Zoning Board of Adjustment Hears 40 Appeals 

Eleven hearings were conducted by the Zoning Board of 
Adjustment and 40 appeals were considered. Of the 40 appeals 
36 were granted, three denied and one tabled. 

Building Permits Show Steady Rise (1944-1954) 

Year Total Building Permits Issued for 

Issued New Construction 

1944 51 18 

1945 110 46 

1946 212 115 

1947 222 137 

1948 230 133 

1949 203 133 

1950 212 118 

1951 214 123 

1952 243 - 131 

1953 - - 257 -- 160 

1954 - 274 160 



Annual Report * * 33 



RECREATION & PARKS DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 11 

Part-time 26 



EXPENDED $70,793.58 



Concord's Recreation Departnnent attempts to provide 
year-round service for all age and interest groups in the com- 
munity, programs of sports, dances, movies, arts and crafts 
and many other activities are carried on by qualified leaders. 

Highlights of 1954 

* Two expert full-time supervisors of boy's and men's activ- 
ities and girl's and women's activities employed. 

* Plans proposed for new Heights pre-school playground. 

* Action taken toward cleaning up Contoocook River for recre- 
ational use. 

* National Guard announced that Concord Armory may soon 
be available for recreational use. 

* Penacook Comnnunity Youth Center completed and opened. 

* New basketball and baseball facilities installed at White Park. 

* Play school for three and four year-old children initiated. 

Variety Keynotes Program 

Thousands of Concord residents enjoyed the facilities of 
the Recreation Department during the year. Nevers'Band played 
to an estimated 11,880 people during the summer. Square dances 
were held throughout the year. The Concord Sunset Club for older 
residents held bi-monthly meetings and enjoyed high attendance 
throughout 1954. Several community groups were assisted by 
the Recreation Department in staging their programs. The Girl 
and Boy Scout Troups, Concord Ski Club, Concord Camera Club, 
"Y" Wives and the Chamber of Commerce all cooperated with 
the Department to provide healthy activities for their members. 

Winter Sports 

Concord residents flocked to the floodlighted pond at 
White Park for skating and hockey. Fifteen streets were set 

All ages benefit from Concord's recreation program. 




)^^Lt'..« i J 





\ ^ >V t,ip - , s^. 



m 



The beauty of White Park is shown in this winter scene. 

aside with barricades for coasting. New skills were developed 
at the ski school, figure skating school and men's and junior 
hockey schools. A winter carnival featured competition in all 
winter sports, climaxed by the first Winter Carnival Ball at the 
Concord Armory. 

Summer Sports 

With the close of school, playgrounds and sports fields 
were crowded with participants in Recreation Department pro- 
grams. Girl's and men's softball was sponsored throughout the 
sumnner, and few Concord children missed the opportunity for 
fun at the city's playgrounds. The best trained staff inConcord's 
history supervised programs of sports, games, golf, arts and 
crafts, outings and special events. Lessons in swimming, bad- 
minton, archery and baseball were but a few of the courses offered 
to Concord residents of all ages during the year. A record total 
of 67, 953 participants had registered at the end of the season . 

Craft Activities Throughout the Year 

Besides winter and sunnmer sports, arts and crafts 
classes continued during the year with high attendance. Painting 
and pottery classes were held on a year-round basis. Aid and 
advice were given to interested community groups. 

Maintenance of Facilities Increased 

A capable maintenance staff engaged in many services 
during the year. Baseball diamonds were prepared for use on some 
1,500 occasions, 20 roadside parks were cleaned and major repairs 
were made at the White Park wading pool, the Beaver Meadow Golf 
Course, and at White Park, Rollins Park and Memorial Field. 

Advisory Councils Aid Program 

The fifteen member Community Recreation Advisory 
Council aided the Recreation Department in its work during 1954. 
Two young people's councils also aided in carrying out recre- 
ation functions. The Youth Activities Council, made up of 
teen-age representatives, held several dances and meetings to 
aid in devr^loping teen-age programs. The Penacook Youth 
Activities Council staged dances and sang for shut-ins during 
the year. 



Annual Report * * 35 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL: 

Full-time 27 

Part-time 6 



EXPENDED. . . $180, 154. 56 



Construction, operation, and nnaintenance of the water 
supply system is the responsibility of the Water Department. This 
Department, unlike all others, is entirely self-supporting and re- 
ceives its revenue from water charges rather than from other 
sources of city revenue such as the property tax. 

City Boasts Huge Investment in Water System 

Your city water system is valued at $2,420,412.82. Itcon- 
sists of the main source of supply at Penacook Lake and an aux- 
iliary supply located in Pembroke consisting of a pumping station 
and 150 driven wells, distributed to the city through 102 l/2 miles 
of nnain. An inventory of the Department's assets includes four 
pumping stations, two elevated tanks, 714 public hydrants, 740 
acres of land, 18 trucks and a gasoline powered shovel. 

Concord Residents Used 135 Gallons of Water Per Person Daily 

Each resident used an average of 135 gallons of water 

daily during 1954. The total consumption of water was 1,373,473,000 

gallons of which 60% was pumped and 40% was supplied by gravity. 

Constant checks on water pressure are made in the remodeled 
North State Street pumping station. 




36 * * City of Concord 



Penacook Lake Provides Pure Water 

Concord's main source of water supply is Penacook Lake 
reservoir, or Long Pond as it is sometimes called, with a stor- 
age capacityof l,500,000,000gallons. The lake is approximately two 
and one -half miles long, one -fourth mile wide and has a sur- 
face area of 359 acres. Over 99% of the shore line is owned by 
the city. All recreational activity is prohibited on the lake to pre- 
vent possible contamination of the water. 

As many as 20 samples a month of Concord's water were 
tested by the State Board of Health. These tests revealed that 
Concord's water supply was pure at all times during 1954. 

Your water has been chlorinated since 1928 to protect its 
purity. Only four and one -half pounds of chlorine were used per 
8, 330, 000 pounds of water. Upon approval of local medical and 
dental authorities, the City Council voted to fluoridate the water 
in 1952, as a measure toward improving our children's teeth. 
Only one part of fluorine is used per 1,000,000 gallons of 
water. 

Maintenance Work at High Level 

To check the effects of frost, 820 hydrants were tested 
weekly between December 15th and March 15th, plus any hydrants 
which had been opened for fires or recreational use. Nine new 
hydrants were installed, seven old ones were replaced, and 17 
hydrants were repaired. New water mains, totalling 5, 551 feet 
of new cast iron pipe, were installed. The Department tested 425 
water meters, installed 78 new meters and repaired 322 meters. 
Maintenance crews repaired 21 leaks. 

The New Hampshire State Board of Health makes tests to insure 
the purity of Concord's water. 




Annual Report * * 37 



FINANCIAL TABLES 



COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 



December 



Cash: 

First National Bank - General Account 

Imprest Fronds 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons 

Taxes Receivable ; 

Current Year Levy - Property $2lK), 973-38 

Current Year Levy - Polls ^,076.00 

Total Current Year $2'f6,0l+9.38 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 5»917.8l 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Property $8, 073-^ 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Polls 1,830.98 

Taxes Bought by City - Unredeemed 26,86$-^l 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed $38,769.93 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 38, 7^9 -93 

Accounts Receivable : 

Water & Sewer Rentals $1*8,970.89 

Departmental Receivables I6, 58I. 50 

Cemetery Receivables 3 > 72U ■ 17 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Stores Accounts : 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory $3,050.67 

Postage Meter Inventory 50-25 

Recreation Dept . Inventory 100 . 38 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Tax-Deeded Properties : 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 

State Head Taxes Receivable ; 

Levy of 195'<- 

Levy of 1953 

Levy of 1952 

Total General Fund Assets 



$U27,808.82 
1,035.00 

203.75 $1+29,01*7.57 



$21*0,131.57 



-0- $21*0,131.57 



^69,276.56 
15,276.15 



$3,201.30 
3,201.30 

$3,237.28 
3,237.28 



$51+, 000. 1*1 



-0- 



$17,100.00 
2,869.60 
1,21*8.50 $21,218.10 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 



Cash - National State Capital Bank 
Investments 



$7,881.51* 
611,036.62 $618 , 918 . 16 



CAPITAL FUND ASSETS (MUNICIPAL & SCHOOIB ) 



Bond Requirements - Futxu^ Years ; 

Municipal 

School 



$81*6,000.00 
1*39,000.00 $1,285,000.00 



BOND FUND ASSETS 



Cash - National State Capital Bank 
Investments 



$101,589.72 

-0- $101,589.72 



GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 
38 " " City of Concord 



$2,71+9,905.^3 



GENERAL AND RELATED FUNDS 

31, 1951^ 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable ; 

Unpresented Coupons 

Current Vouchers Payable 

Unexpended Appropriations : 

Union School District 

Interest - Union School District Bonds .... 

Penacook School District 

Library Earmarked Income 

Due to Other Funds ; 

Equipment & Stores Fund 

Water Fund 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 

Parking Meter Fund 

Advance Deposits ; 

Taxes Collected In Advance 

Options , Plans , Etc 

Taxes Due to State ; 

Head Tax Levy of 1953 

Special $3 . 00 Poll Teixes 

Total General Fund Liabilities 



$203.75 
65,078.16 $65,281.91 

$1+25,796.21 

3,272.50 

22,578.62 

108. OI+ $'+51,755.37 



$3'+,l+ll.lU 
51^,93^.79 
53,196.80 
18,1+57.91 $161,000.61+ 



100,20 
175-19 



$275.39 



$22,609.25 

389.20 $22,998.1+5 

$701,311.76 



Current Surplus 

Total General P\md Liabilities & Surplus 



$1+3.085.89 
$71+1+, 397. 65 



TRUST FUMD LIABILITIES 

Principal $599,175-37 

Accumulated Income 19,71+2.79 $618.918. 16 

CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES (MUNICIPAL 8e SCHOOL ) 

Long Term Debt ; 

Bonded Debt $1,285,000.00 

Long Term Notes -0- $1,285,000.00 

BCMD FUND LIABILITIES 

Construction or Equipment Authorized $90,897.30 

Vouchers Payable 10,692.1+2 $101, 589-72 



GRAND TOTAL - LIABILITIES 



$5.71+9, 90^-53 
Annual Report " " 39 



GENERAL FUND 



STATEMENT OF CUREENT SURPLUS 



For the Year Ended December 31, 195'*^ 

Unappropriated Balance , Dec . 31, 1953 

Applied to 195*^ Budget 

Balance Remaining as of Jan . 1, 195^* 

195lf Budget Surplus 

Unencumbered Balances of Appropriations 

Excess of Actual over Estimated Revenues 

Plus: Excess Reserves Liquidated 

Reserve against Prior Year Taxes 

Reserve a/c Future Timber Yield T«uc Loss 

Reserve for Highway Construction 

Less: Additional Reserves Set Up 

To Increase Reserve Against Unredeemed Taxes to 100^ 

To Increase Reserve Against Tax-Deeded Property to lOO^ . . 
To Increase Reserve Against Stores Acccmts to 100^ 



$52,661.66 

52,000.00 

$661.66 



$32,521.82 

8,tt01.59 $1*0, 923. In 



$8,302.19 
6,166.32 
668. pit $ 15,136.55 
$56,721.62 



$11,^96.89 
1,078.51 
1,060.33 $13 > 635. 73 



Balance available for reduction of 195'<- Tax Rate 



$^3,08^.89 



STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT 

December 31, 195^ 



Date of 

Municipal ; Issue 

Central Fire Station. "1935 

Sewers 193^ 

Sewers 193^ 

Storm Sewers 1937 

Airport 19i^2 

Signal System 19^ 

Equip. & Improvements 19^+9 

Equip. 8c Improvements 1953 




Balance 
Dec.31,195^ 

-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
$lU,000.00 
-0- 
92,000.00 
100,000.00 
6U0,000.00 



Paid in 195^^ 



Principal 

$1,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,000.00 

7,000.00 

3,000.00 

23,000.00 

25,000.00 

60,000.00 

,000.00 $123,000.00 



Interest 

$17.50 

17.50 

U5.OO 

U72.5O 

37.50 

1,293.75 

1,687.50 

1U,000.00 

$17,571.25 



School ; 

High School 1925 1965 1+i 

Dame School (Bote) .. 1953 195'+ 1.89 

Add. & Renovations .. 195^+ 196U 1.2 



$15i+,000.00 
-0- 

285,000.00 

$^(■39,000.00 



$1^,000.00 $7,1^0.00 
20,000.00 30U.29 
-0- -0- 

$3^^,000.00 ^7Mh.29 



Self Liquidating : 
Water Constr. & Land. 19it9 1969 1-75 
Parking Areas 1953 1963 1-50 



Total 



$150,000.00 

180,000.00 

$330,000.00 



$10,000.00 
20,000.00 

$30,000.00 



$2,712.50 

2,850.00 

$5,562.50 



$1,61^,000.00 $187,000.00 $30,578.0^^ 



ANALYSIS OF DEBT MATURITIES 



Due in 

1955 ... 

1956 ... 

1957 ... 

1958 ... 

1959 ... 
i960 ... 

1961 ... 

1962 ... 

1963 ... 
I96U ... 

Beyond 1961* 



Municipal 

$115,000.00 

115,000.00 

108,000.00 

108,000.00 

60,000.00 

60,000.00 

60,000.00 

60,000.00 

60,000.00 

50,000.00 

?0,000.00 

,000.00 



^ 



School 
$111^,000.00 
Mt,000.00 
1^4,000.00 
1^1+, 000. 00 
1*4,000.00 
44,000.00 
44,000.00 
44,000.00 

44,000.00 

29,000.00 

14,000.00 

$439,000.00 



Water 
$10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,000.00 

50,000.00 
$150,000.00 



Parking 
Areas 
$20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
20,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 

$180,000.00 



40 



City of Concord 



GENERAL FUND 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 



For the Year Ending December 31, 19514- 



Local Taxes : 

Property Taxes (Current Yr. Levy). 
Poll Taxes (Current Yr. Levy) .... 

National Bank Stock Tax 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Prop 

" -Poll 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 

Auto Permits 

Rent & Profit Tax-Deeded Prop 

Timber Severance Tax 



Budget 
Estimate 



Revenues 
Realized 



$2,396,376.73 $2,397,287.91^ 
22,000.00 22,858.00 



6,300.00 

-0- 

300.00 

8,600.00 

95,000.00 

200.00 

800.00 



6,171.20 

102.51 

326.00 

6,7l6.0l4 

106,321.56 

H.02 

'^,889.35 



Excess Deficiency 
$911.21 
858,00 



102.51 
26.00 

11,321.56 

'i.089.35 



$128,80 



1,883.96 



195.^ 



$2,529,576.73 $2,51^,676.62 $15,099.89 



State Tax Contributions ; 

Railroad Tax 

Savings Bank Tax 

Interest & Dividend Tax 

Loss of Taxes - State Forest 



$13,000.00 

ll^, 1*00.00 

76,500.00 

30.00 

$103,930.00 



$11,952.78 

1^,368.36 

72,573.65 

75.85 



^^5.85 



$1,0^7.22 

10,031.6U 

3,926.35 

$1579593^ 



Licenses & Permits : 

Bicycle Registrations 

Taxi Licenses 

Health Licenses 

Amusement Licenses 

Police & Prot. Licenses 

Prof. & Occupational Licenses 



Registration Fees & Permits ; 

Marriage Licenses 

Recording Fees - Legal Dociments 

Filing Fees 

Sundry Fees, City Clerk 

Dog Licenses 

Departmental Service Charges ; 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concession 

Golf Fees 

Memorial Field, Royalties 

Memorial Field, Concessions 

Police Dept. - Ambulance Charges 

Airport, Rent 

Airport, Concessions 

Fines & Forfeits 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 

Comm. on Head Tax Collections . . . 

Self-Supporting Activities 

Weights & Measures, Fees 



Unclassified: 



Interest Income . 
Sale of Property 
All Other 



TOTAL REVENUES 



$500.00 


$515.00 


$15.00 




1+50.00 


1+17,00 




$33.00 


1+00,00 


383,00 




17.00 


2,900.00 


2,752,00 




1I+8.OO 


100.00 


86.50 




13.50 


100.00 


121+.00 
$1+. 277. 50 


21+.00 




$u, 1+50,00 


$172.50 


$1,000,00 


$999.00 




$1.00 


2,600.00 


2,936.55 


$336.55 




80.00 


98.00 


13.00 




500.00 


513.25 


13.25 




1+, 100,00 


?, 963.1^3 
$5,510.23 




136.57 


$8,280,00 


$230.23 




$1,1+00.00 


$1,553.00 


$153.00 




ll+O.OO 


156,15 


16.15 




6,000.00 


5,075.00 




$925.00 


100.00 


79.^^1+ 




20.56 


100.00 


137.60 


37.60 




1,000.00 


1,069.00 


69.00 




8,500.00 


8,519.80 


19.80 




100.00 


72.53 




27.1+7 


7,500.00 


12,736.88 


5,236.88 




2,000.00 


1,398.01 




601.99 


5,000.00 


6,895.77 


1,895.77 




-0- 


3.35 


8.35 




1+00.00 


1+01+.70 


1+.70 




$32,21+0,00 


$38,106.23 


$5,866.23 




-0- 


$1,278.26 


$1,278.26 




500.00 


600.00 


100.00 




200.00 


1,158.81+ 

$3,037.10 


953.81+ 
$2,337.10 




700.00 





$2,679,176,73 $2,687,578,32 $8,1+01,59 



Annvial Report " " 1+1 



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Annual Report " "h^ 



TAX ACCOUNTS 

Year Ending DecemlDer 31> 195'<- 

STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 

195U Prior State Head 

Levy Years Taxes 

Balance, January 1, 195"^ $232,215-78 $19,1+92.70 

Taxes Committed to Collector Id 195*+ 
(Incl. Supplemental) : 

Real Estate & Personal Property $2,^23,619-36 102-51 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,171.20 

Timber Severance Tax 1+, 889. 35 

Poll Taxes 23,858.00 326.00 

Head Taxes __„, .,-___^,-,_ 73,585-00 

Total Charges to Collector *$2,458,537.91 $232,6M+.29 $95,077-70 

Accoimted for as follows ; 

Collections to Treasurer (Net of Refunds) $2,191,071+. 92 $207,765-55 $69,0l+9.60 

Authorized Abatements 21,1+13-61 ll+,97l+.32 l+,8l0-00 

Balance Uncollected December 31, 1951+ - - • 2l+6,OU9.38 # 9,90lt.l+2 21,218.10 

Total Credits & Balance $2,1+58,537^91 $232 , 61+1+ . 29 $95,077-70 

* Taken as Current Revenue $2,1+31,206.1+9 

Reserve for Abatements & Adjustments — 27,331-1+2 

$2,1+58,537.91 

# Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes of Prior Years 



1953 
1952 
1951 
1950 
191+9 
191+8 
I9I+7 
I9I+6 
I9I+5 
I9I+I+ 



Property 


Poll 




Taxes 


Tsixes 


Total 


$3,291-28 


$901.20 


$1+, 192.1+8 


2,6ll+.59 


l+i+1.20 


3,055-79 


1,037.71 


67.00 


l,10l+-71 


698.71 


71.60 


770.31 


170.1+5 


68.70 


239.15 


173-58 


51.38 


22I+.96 


1+1.1+7 


1+1.00 


82.1+7 


1+5.65 


1+7.70 


93.35 




86.80 


86.80 




5I+.I+0 
$1,830.98 


5I+.I+0 


$8, 073. 1+1+ 


$9,901+. 1+2 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS 

Balances Unredeemed January 1, 195^ ' 

Levy of 19I+8 $81.92 

Levy of 1950 l8l,51 

Levy of 1951 3,665.77 

Levy of 1952 20,201.35 $2l+, 130.55 

Levy of 1953 (Tax Sale of 195^+ ) 32,293-70 

$56,1+21+. J 

Accounted for as follows ; 

Collections to Treasurer $19,170.57 

Authorized Abatements 6, 761.93 

Deeded to City 1,626.21+ 



1^6, 1+21+. 25 



Total Credits $27, 558.71+ 

Balance Unredeemed December 31, I95I+. . 28,865.51 

f5^,l+2l+.25 

l48 " " City of Concord 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 3I, 19^U 



ASSETS 

Fixed Assets ; 

Land & Rights of Way 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Custonjer Connections 

Sundry Eq.\jlpment 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 

Prepaid Engineering Expenses 

Current Assets ; 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page hj) 

Total Assets 



$199.97 
91+7,612.33 
105,71+5.06 
11*8, 1+36. 37 
1,71+5.11 
$1,203,738.81+ 
629,56^.90 



$53,196.80 
50.033.73 



$571+, 173. 91+ 
13,050.77 



103.230.53 
$690,1+55.21+ 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Fund Balance and Surplus ; 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Earned Surplus ; 

Balance - January 1, I95U $1+0, 512.20 

Net Profit - for Year I95I+ 7,589.18 

Total Surplus Balance 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus . . . 



$1+81,337.71 
161,016.15 



$1+8,101.38 



,1+55.21+ 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 



Fiscal Year Ended December 31, I95I+ 



OPERATING REVENUES 



Sever Rents : 
General . . . 
Industrial 



$25,712.1+1+ 
8,188.58 



$33,901.02 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

General Operation : 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor & Expense 

House Connection Oper. Labor & Expense . . . 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 

Maintenance of Manholes 

Miscellaneous General Expense 

Customers' Expense : 

Meter Reading and Billing 

Adml nistration : 

Employees ' Retirement Fund 

Depreciation 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Non-Operating Income : 

Interest on Investments 

Net Profit for the Year 



$5,387.18 

2,087.61+ 

1,321+. 1+7 

1,119.02 

3I+3.05 



$10,261.36 

1,695.05 

736.53 
15,083.76 



$27,776.70 
$6,121+. 32 



1,1+61+. 86 
$7, 589. id 



Annual Report 



1+9 



WATER FUND 



BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, 1951+ 



ASSETS 



Fixed Assets, Wet of Accrued Depreciation : 

Water and Flowage Rights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping and Purification Equipnent 

Distrib. Mains, Services, Hydrants & Meters. 

Other Equipnent & Garage Equipment 

Unfinished Construction 

Total Fixed Assets 

Bond Fund Assets ; 

Cash - First National Bank 

Investments 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Total Bond Fund Assets 

Current Assets ; 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (SEE Schedule Page 1+7) 

Loaned to Special Assessment Project 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Contracts Receivable 

Total Current Assets 

Total Assets 



$167,663.11 

206,372.50 

289,27it.l9 

1+7,536.36 

787,510.81+ 

25,359.58 

129.60 



660.03 
11,700.00 
18.805.67 



13,028.52 

21,155.00 

75,568.1+1 

36l+.5t+ 



$1,523,81+6.18 



$31,165.70 



$165,051.26 
$1,720,063.11+ 



LIABILITIES AMD FUNDS 

Capital LiabilitlBS ! 

Bonded Debt ^150,000.00 

Fund Balance and S urplus : 

Municipal Investment $963 . ^-9^. 7^ 

Constributioas in Aid of Construction 78,366.1+8 

Surplus - Balance January 1, 1951+ $508,19l+.35 

Less Uncollectable Accounts Written Off .... 2l|-.'^'5 

$508,169.00 

Net Profit for the Year 1951+ 20,332-32 $ 528.501.92 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus $ 1. 570.063. II+ 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds ... $ 1.720.063.11+ 



BOND FUND -WATER - ISSUE OF 1949 

Disposition of Proceeds 

Balance - Januaiy 1, 1951+ $1+7,922.52 

Expenditures; 

Purchase of Land $31,212.51+ 

2l+" Main 2,01+9.95 

Moving Pavilion 2,300.00 

Total Expenditures to Date $35.562.1+9 

Unexpended Balajice December 31, 1951+ $12.360.03 

50 " " City of Concord 



WATER FUND 



STATEMEMT OF OPERATIONS 



Fiscal Year Ending December 31> 195^ 
OPERATIMG REVENUES 



Commercial Sales - Flat Rate 

Commercial Sales - Metered 

Industrial Sales - Metered 

Sales to Other V/ater Utilities 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues 

Total Operating Revenues 

OPERATING EXPENSES 



$3,09'f.52 

139,819.55 

36,3^5.71 

135.06 

207.00 



$179,601.81f 



Water Supply ; 

Source of Supply Labor $3,820.68 

Pumping Station Labor li|,8oU.l6 

Purification Labor l,6ll4-.32 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,688.73 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 92.88 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses 1,987-39 

Purification System Supplies & Expenses 2,098.99 

Fuel for Power 112.30 

Power Purchased 10,296.61 

Repairs to V/ater Supply Structixres & Equip. .. lit. 12 

Repairs to Pimping Station Str. & Equip 2,73^-29 

Repairs to Purification System Str. & Equip .. tol . 66 $kO,666.6'i 

Distribution ; 

Distribution Wages $23,83^.8^ 

Meter Department Labor 3,^4-09.70 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 22.12 

Other Distribution Supplies & Expenses 1,3^4-2.21 

Repairs to Distribution Structures h'Jh.S'y 

Repairs to Mains 3, 623 . 52 

Repairs to Services 2,552.12 

Repairs to Hydrants 1,013.80 

Repairs to Meters 2,UU8.11 $38,721.37 

Administration ; 

Commercial Office Salaries $1,982.88 

Meter Reading Salaries 5,867.8U 

Commercial Supplies and Expenses 311.90 

Salaries of General Officers 5,870.00 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 3,155.00 

General Office Expenses U56.21 

Repairs to Gen. Office Structures & Equip. ... ^43-30 

Other General Expenses 157 .02 

Insurance 1^,715.20 

Longevity, Annual and Sick Leaves 11,1+01+. 27 

Retirement Fund Payments 6, 5U7 . kk 

Stores Department and Shop Expense 57 .26 

Garage Expense 2,583.87 $1+3,152.19 

Fixed Charges ; 

Depreciation $36,1+67.00 

Taxes l+<3 . 00 

Interest 2,712.50 $39,227-50 

Total Operating Expenses $161,767.69 

Operating Income $17,83^.15 

Non-Operating Income : 

Gain on Sale of Depreciated Assets $368.01 

Interest on Investments 1,563.63 

Other Interest Income 7.35 

Miscellaneous 559-18 

Total Non-Operating Income $2,1+98.17 

Net Profit for the Year $20, 332.32 

Annual Report " " 51 



PARKING METER FUND 



BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, 195U 



Assets: 



Due fran General Fund $18,1|5T.91 

Bond Requirements l80,000.00 



Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt $l80,000.00 

Unappropriated Surplus 18,^^7-91 



$83. 91^ 


50.70 


180.00 


39.89 



$198,^57.91 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 
For the Year Ending December 31 » 195^ 

Cash Balance - Jantjary 1, I95U $82,!4-15.38 

Revenvtes : 

Meter Collections - Street Parking $^^3, 383.72 

Meter Collections - Off -Street Parking 9,829.78 

Interest on Investments 9^9 • '^■3 $ 5^^,162.93 

Total Available $136,578.31 

Current Expenditures : 
Salaries: 

Meter Repairs $lUl.62 

Collections ii-63.22 

Enforcement l6,i4-88.59 

Marking Streets 11^9.07 $17,214-2.50 

Supplies : 

Meter Repair Parts 

Other Meter Supplies 

Enforcement 

Marking Streets 39.89 $35*^.53 

Retirement Contributions 882.62 

Taxes, Insurance, Etc 923.16 

Lighting 1,716.92 

Parking Area Maintenance 2, 512 . 36 

Meter Overhauling 1,93'4-.3U 

Total Current Expenditures $25,566.93 

Debt Service: 

Payment of Bonds $20,000 .00 

Interest on Bonds 2,850.00 $22,850.00 

Capital Outlay: 

Painting Machine $690.00 

Purchase & Construction of Parking Areas . 69,013.^7 $ 69,703.^7 

* Total Expenditures $ ll8,120.l4O 

Cash Balance December 31, 19514- $18,14-57.91 



* Street Parking $18,732.93 

Off -Street Parking 99,387.147 

$118,120.1+0 

52 " " City of Concord 



PARKING METER FUND 



CCMBINED STATEMEOT OF EXPENDITURES FOR PAR1Q3IG AREAS 

Expended 

Total Expended 19514- from Total 

Prior Years C\jr. Funds Expended 

No . State Street Lot $lliO,519.35 $12.00 $mo, 531.35 

Freight Street Lot 100,6o8.81+ 18,157.00 118,765.814- 

Low Avenue Lot 6,9^.1*0 I4OO.I+4 7,31+8.811 

Ford Avenue Lot 7,700.68 lU,2U5.23 21,9lv5.91 

Railroad Square Area 36,198.80 36,198.80 

$255,777-27 *$6 9,013.li7 $32lt,790.7l4- 

* See Statement of Expenditures on Opposite Page. 



BOND FUND - GENERAL - ISSUE OF 1953 



DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 



For the Year Ending December 31, 195I+ 



Balance January 1, 19514- $37^,21+3.09 

Contribution in Aid of Construction . . 6,000.00 

Total Available $380,21+3.09 



Expenditures: 

Highway Construction 

West Concord (No. State St.) $72.88 

Boudreau Square 61. 00 

Main Street 178,130.03 

Concord-Boscawen Bridge (Reimb.) ... - 370-19 $177,893.72 

Storm Sewer Construction 

Conant Drive $21,769.32 

Pleasant View Home 2,1+56.67 2l+,225.99 

World War II Memorial 306 . 82 

Public Works - Building Modifications. 20,970.81+ 

Recreational Facilities 

White Park $5,25l+.96 

Rolfe Park 61+. 39 

Rollins Park 661.65 

Memorial Field 1,815.1+5 

Garrison Park 31+.05 7,830.50 

Fire Dept . - Main Street 39-90 

New Equipment 

Fire Department $15,01+0.00 

Public Works Department l+2,00l+.57 

Recreation Department l,033-'+5 58,078.02 

Total Expenditures $289, 3I+5 .79 



Balance December 3I, 195I+ $90,897-30 



Annual Report " " 53 



EQUIPMENT & STORES FUND 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEI-ffiER 31. 193^ 



Assets 



Due f rem General Fund 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Equipment 

Total Assets 

Liabilities & Funds 

Municipal Investment 

Capital Reserve Fund 

Surplus Deficit 

Total Liabilities & Funds 



$3^,'H1-1'+ 

25,81^.13 

275,037-9^ 



$335.297-21 



$303,898.39 

32,876.17 
l,'^77-35 - 



$335,297-21 



OPERATING STATEMENT 
For Year Ended December 31, 195^; 
Equipment Earnings 

Operating Expenses: 

Direct Labor $20,5^0.21 

Indirect Labor l'+,33'+-23 

Leaves & Longevity 3,969.20 

Outside Services (Building Repair) 3,513-27 

Gas, Oil & Parts ^^,37^-35 

Grease & Lubricants 323 • 35 

Small Tools & Supplies l,9'<-0.50 

Fuel & Utilities 3, 997 - 84 

Insurance h, 065 . k8 

Employees ' Retirement Contribution 2,275-92 

Depreciation on Equipment 

Net Loss for Period 



$13^^,11^*- 



$99,33i+-35 
36,257-98 



$135,592-33 
$1.^^77-35 - 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASES 



1 Ford Custom Sedan 

1 Worthington Tractor 

1 Body for Leaf Loader 

Less Eguipnent Sold 

Net Expended from Reserve Fund 



$1,100.00 

2,675.20 

525.^3 



$lt, 300.63 

918.82 

$3,381-81 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 



BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 195*^ 

Assets ; 

Cash - Mechanicks National Bank 

Improvements Authorized 

Liabilities ; 

Reserve for Authorized Improvements 

Due to Water Fund 

STATEMENT OF CASH RECEIPTS & DISBURSEMENTS 

Receipts-Cash Advanced by Water Dept 

Payments-Account of River Road Water Main 

Cash Balance - December 31, 195lt 

'^h " " City of Concord 



$12,7^9-13 
21,155.00 



$12,7^^9-13 
21.155-00 



$33,901^-13 

$ 33^1^-13 

$21,155-00 

8,405.&7 

$12.7^9-13 



INDEX 

Page Page 

Aerial View of Concord 2 Health Department 18 

Your City Officials-1954 -- 4 Library 20 

Manager's Letter 6 Planning Department 22 

City Council 7 Police Department 24 

City Clerk 8 Municipal Court 26 

Assessing Department 10 Welfare Department 27 

Civil Defense 11 Public Works & Eng. Depts. 30 

Legal Department 12 Zoning, Building, Plumbing 33 

Municipal Airport 13 Recreation & Parks Dept. - 34 

Finance Department 14 Water Department 36 

Fire Department 16 Civic Calendar -- Back Cover 

FINANCIAL TABLES 

Combined Balance Sheet -General and Related Funds 38 

General Fund -Statement of Current Surplus 40 

Statement of Long Term Debt 40 

General Fund - Statement of Revenues 41 

General Fund - Statement of Appropriations & Expenditures 42 

Statement of Assessments for 1954 46 

Trust Funds -Statement of Changes in Balances 47 

Schedule of Investnnents - All Funds 47 

Tax Accounts 48 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 49 

Water Fund - 50 

Parking Meter Fund 52 

Bond Fund - General 53 

Equipment and Stores Fund 54 



CIVIC CALENDAR - 1955 

Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable Jan. 1 - 31 

Passage of Municipal Budget On or before Jan. 27 

Plumber's License Renewal Period March - April 1 

Mailing of Property Inventory Forms On or before Mar. 20 

Census of Polls by Police Department March 22 - April 

Dog Licenses Renewed April 1 

Assessnnent Date--Property, Poll and Head Taxes April 1 

Junk Dealers' Licenses Renewed On or before April 1 

Return of Property Tax Inventory Forms April 1-15 

Veteran's Application for War Service Exemption April 1-15 

Exemption Clainn for the Blind April 1-15 

Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable April 1 - 30 

Convalescent Homes' License Renewed On or before April 1 

Bicycle Licenses Renewed April 3 

Notice Posted of Tax Collector's Sale of Real Estate April 15 

Pool, Billiard Table, Bowling and Ball Alleys, and 

Music Machine Licenses Renewed On or before May 1 

Milk Licenses Renewed On or before May 31 

Tax Collector's Sale (Interest Rate Increases After 

This Date From 6% to 8%) - - May 20 

Poll & Head Tax Warrants Submitted to TaxCoUector-- By June 1 
Property Tax Warrant Submitted to Tax Collector -On or before July 1 
Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable July 1 - 31 

Poll Tax Becomes Delinquent (20 Cent Cost to be 

Added as of This Date) Sept. 16 

Taxicab Licenses Renewed On or before Oct. 1 

Water and Sewer Rental Bills Payable - Oct. 1 - 31 

Head Tax and Property Tax Become Delinquent 
(50 Cent Penalty Added to Head Tax and 6% 

Interest to Property Tax as of This Date) Dec. 2 

City Council Meetings 7:00 P. M, 2nd Mon. each month 

Planning Board Meetings 7:30 P.M., 1st Tues. each month 

Library Board Meetings 7:30 P.M., 4th Mon. each month 

Personnel Advisory Board Meetings --At request of City Manager 

or on call of any mennber 

Trustees of Trust Fund Meetings Upon call of City Treasurer 

Board of Assessors Upon call of Full-time Assessor 

Board of Building Appeal Upon call of Building Inspector 

Board of Health ---Upon call of Chairman 

Zoning Board of Adjustment Upon call of Chairman 

Board of Plumbing Examiners Upon call of Plumbing Inspector 

Board of Revision of Special Assessments Upon call of Chairnnan 

Recreation Advisory Council Upon call of Chairman