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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"


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ANNIM 
REPORT 

TO THE 

111 CITIZENS 

OF THE 

CITY 

OF 

CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



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1355 
ANNUAL 
REPORT 

TO THE 

IU CITIZENS 

OF THE 

CITY 

OF 

CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 




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On June 23, Concord was honored by a 
visit from Dwight D. Eisenhower, Presi- 
dent of the United States. He is shown here 
as he addressed the GeneralCourt and the 
public assembled on the State House Lawn. 



Annual Report 



for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1955 




CONTENTS 



Page 

Your City Officials - 1955 4 

City Manager's Forward 6 

City Council Actions - 1955 7 

General Government 9 

Protection of Persons & Property 16 

Public Health & Welfare 24 

Public Services 26 

A Municipal Utility 32 

City Housekeeper 34 

Capitol Improvements 36 

Financial Tables 38 



Index 



Back Cover 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS-1955 

CITY COUNCIL 
\C 

Howe Anderson, Mayor 
Herbert W. Rainie, Mayor Pro-tem 

Councilmen-at-Large 
Howe Anderson Wayne K. Gardner Herbert W. Rainie 

Charles C. Davie Wendell F. Grant William A. Stevens 

Ward Councilmen 

James P. Ferrin Ward 1 Conrad W. Robinson Ward 5 

Harlan F. Johnson Ward 2 James Ross Ward 6 

Wm. H. Hunneyman Ward 3 William P. Gove Ward 7 

John C. White Ward 4 Edwin R. Langevin Ward 8 

Thomas B. Jennings Ward 9 

CITY ADMINISTRATION 

Office of the City Manager Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Airport Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Assessing Department C. Fred Moulton, Assessor 

A. Harold MacNeil, Assessor 
Shelby O. Walker, Assessor 

City Hall Department Arthur E. Roby, City Clerk 

Civil Defense Department-- Laurence Riis, Sr. , Civil Defense Dir. 

Engineering Department-Howard Raymond, (Acting) City Engineer 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick, Engineering Inspector 

J. Shepard Norris, Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Finance Department Archie N. Gourley, City Auditor 

Amos B. Morrison, City Collector 
Wallace W. Jones, City Treasurer 

Fire Department Clarence H. Green, Fire Chief 

Henry E. Drew, 1st Deputy Fire Chief 
Duncan M. Murdoch, 1st Deputy Fire Chief 
Arthur R. Lee, 2nd Deputy Fire Chief 

Health Department Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , City Physician 

Austin B. Presby, Sanitary Inspector 

Legal Department Atlee F. Zellers, City Solicitor 

Library Department Siri M. Andrews, Librarian 

Personnel Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Planning Department Gustaf H. Lehtinen, Planning Director 

Police Department Arthur W. Mclsaac, Police Chief 

J. Edward Silva, Deputy Police Chief 

Public Works Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Edward L. Howland, Cemetery Supt. 
William H. Murphy, Sewer Supt. 

Purchasing Department Woodbury Brackett, City Manager 

Records Department Arthur E. Roby, City Clerk 

Recreation & Parks Department --Donald F. Sinn, Recreation Dir. 

Water Department G. Arthur Faneuf, Water Supt. 

Welfare Department Gertrude E.Watkins, Welfare Dir. 

Charles P. Coakley, Overseer of Poor, Wird 1 



4 * * City of Concord 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judiciary Donald G. Matson, Judge 

Francis E. Perkins, Special Judge 
C. Murray Sawyer, Clerk of Court & Probation Officer 



MUNICIPAL BOARDS 



Board of Building Appeals 

Eugene F. Magenau, Ch. 
Carroll Garland 
William Johns 
Arnold Perreton 
Donald Wells 



Board of Health 



Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , Ch, 
Homer E. Lawrence, M. D. 
William D. Penhale, M. D. 



Library Board of Trustees 

Mrs. Eugene F. Magenau, Ch, 
Joseph J. C omi 
Otis Kingsbury 
Chester G. Larson 
Mayland H. Morse, Jr. 
Mrs. Paul Shaw 
Willis D. Thompson, Jr. 
Mrs. Frederic K. Upton 
Timothy Woodman 



Recreation Advisory Council 

RobertO. Blood, M. D. , Ch. 

Russell B. Tobey, Vice-Ch. 

Roland E. Allen 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. 

Mrs. Lewellyn Boutwell 

Edson F. Eastman 

Clarence E. Huggins 

Mrs. Harlan F. Johnson 

Mrs. Winslow E. Melvin 

Mrs. Maurice W. Mullen 

Peter J. Murphy 

Samuel S. Richmond 

Walter B. Sweet 

Sulo J. Tani 

Mrs. Alfred W. Tovey 



City Planning Board 

Dudley W. Orr, Ch. 
Woodbury Brackett 
Edward H. Brooks 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Douglas Everett 
Warren H. Greene 
A. Clifford Hudson 
John B. Jameson 

Board of Plumbing Examiners 

Robert F. Keane, Sr. , Ch. 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
George E. Young 

Trustees of Trust Funds 

Robert M. Beyer 
Wallace W. Jones 
Leon Merrill 

Zoning Board of Adjustment 

Lawrence J. Moynihan, Ch. 
Frederick Hall 
Raymond V. Lapointe 
Donald G. Matson 
Frank J. Preston 

Board of Revision of Assessments 

Archie N. Gourley, Ch. 
Howard E. Raymond 
Allan N. Leavitt 
Laurence J. Riis, Sr. 
Atlee F. Zellers 

Personnel Advisory Board 

Herbert E. Kimball, Ch. 
William H. Macurda 
John H. Symonds 



Annual Report * * 5 



CITY OF CONCORD, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



To the Citizens of Concord: 

This report attempts to summarize in a 
human interest way the highlights of the 
1955 municipal year. 

Probably at no time in the one hundred 
and two years since Concord became a city 
have signs of progress been more evident. 
Years of planning, insistence on maximum 
local control of an efficient city government 
and recent concerted citizen effort toward 
industrial and general business growth is 
bringing recognition to Concord as a city of 
prosperity and opportunity. 

The accomplishments of our city depart- 
ments, in their day to day and round the 
clock jobs of making our community a safe, 
clean and healthful place to live, are made 
possible by a cooperative City Council and 
an alert citizenry. 

The future holds great promise and also 
great responsibility--! believe we can meet 
the challenge. 



Sincerely, 



Woodbury Brackett 
'City Manager 



CITY COUNCIL ACTIONS-1955 



Your City Council meets in the Council Chamber at the 
ity Hall on the second Monday of each month and at such other 
times as it may be called by the City Manager or a majority of 
its 15 members. These meetings are open to the public. 

During 1955, the Council held 12 regular meetings, five 
special meetings and 14 hearings. The Finance Committee, con- 
sisting of the entire Council, held five meetings to consider the 
budget. A total of 59 resolutions and 20 ordinances were adopted. 

Jan. 10 Authorized City Manager to negotiate for sale of city 

owned land on Airport Road for airport-related in- 
dustrial uses. 

Jan. 24 Adopted record budget of $1, 494, 006. 

Feb. 7 Held joint meeting with Board of Education on plans for 

new junior high school. (First joint meeting ever held. ) 

Feb. 14 Authorized Manager to hire engineers to survey Long 

Pond and all other phases of the city water system. 
Voted to abandon present open dump and undertake 
sanitary fill operations. 

Authorized Manager to sell land on Sheep Davis Road 
for industrial development. 

Adopted resolution deeding West Garden back to heirs. 
Authorized Manager to sign agreement with Concord 
Electric Company covering street lighting for next ten 
years at a cost of approximately $56, 500. per year. 
Went on record favoring proposed State legislation for 
greater flood protection in the Merrimack Valley. 

Mar. 14 Rezoned Heights area for commerical use to permit 
industrial development on land transferred for this 
purpose. (Meeting held at Penacook. ) 

Apr. 11 Preliminary approval given sanitary sewer construct- 

ion on East and West Sides under special assessment 
procedure. 

Voted to extend and connect Freight Street andPleasant 
Street Extension. 

May 9 Authorized $1, 600, 000. bond issue for use of Concord 

Union School District for school construction purposes. 
Authorized Manager to obtain option to purchase Parker 
School lot when no longer required for school use. 
Authorized sale of 50 acres of land near Pembroke and 
Canterbury Roads for industrial development. 

June 13 Approved extension of East Side sanitary sewer system. 

Approved Black Hill water main extension. 
Passed ordinance enlarging local business zone, on 
South Street in the vicinity of Avon Street, reversing 
previous position. 



Annual Report * * 7 



July 11 Approved extension of water system in Christian Ave- 

nue and authorized $80,000. bond sale for construction. 

Aug. 8 Approved construction of West Side sanitary sewer 

and bond sale of $100, 000. to finance same. 

Sept. 12 Passed ordinance regulating building within bounds o f 

mapped streets. 

Requested Manager to negotiate with State forimprove- 
ment of North State Street with aid of State and Federal 
funds. 

Passed ordinance permitting referendum on Sunday 
bowling at November election. 

Oct. 10 Authorized purchase of Enright land for future sewage 

disposal plant for $25,000. 

Unanimously approved $40,000. bond issue to finance 
construction of hanger at airport. 

Approved motion indicating willingness to convey a por- 
tion of Memorial Field, at a"nominal fee'.'for construct- 
ion of a new YMCA building within five years. 

Nov. 14 Authorized Manager to renew lease with Northeast Air- 

lines, Inc. , for facilities at airport, at $200. a month. 
Authorized review of compensation plan. 
Authorized sale of 18 acres of land between Lawrence 
Street and Heights Road to Defense Department as site 
of new Army Reserve Training Center. 

Nov. 29 Received 1956 Budget. 

Dec. 12 Passed resolution commending Deputy Silva on his 

long and faithful service to the City. 

Restored name"01d Loudon Road"to section of Branch 
Turnpike and Portsmouth Street. 

Authorized negotiation with County for exchange of land 
for widening Court Street and additional parking in Doyen 
Park. 



Concord's busy Main Street. 




GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 

CITY CLERK REQUIRED TO 
CERTIFY APPLICATIONS FOR 
KOREAN WAR BONUS 

A statute passed by the 
New Hampshire State Legis- 
lature required all city and 
town clerks to certify as to the 
residence of all applicants for 
the Korean War bonus. The City 
Clerk handled a total of 527 ap- 
plications for Concord veterans 
between September 1 and De- 
cember 31, 1955. 

MUNICIPAL ELECTION HELD 
ON NOVEMBER 8, 1955 

A total vote of 4, 252 was 
recorded at the semi-annual 
municipal election, one of the 
lowest number of votes cast at 
a city election in many years. 
Councilmen elected At-Large for a term of four years were; Her- 
bert W. Rainie, Conrad W. Robinson and William A. Stevens. 
Councilmen elected from the several wards were: James P. Ferrin, 
Ward l;Paul M. Cunningham, Ward 2; William H. Hunneyman, 
Ward 3; Malcolm McLane, Ward 4; Leroy W. Davis, Ward 5; 
Clarence L. Clark, Ward 6; William P. Gove, Ward 7; Paul E . 
Madden, Ward 8; Thomas B. Jennings, Ward 9. 

An ordinance passed by the Council permitting Sunday 
afternoon bowling in Concord was submitted to the voters in a special 
referendum at this election. An affirmative vote was received. 




City Clerk Arthur E. Roby com- 
pleted 35 years of service to the 
City on January 27, 1955. 



CLERK MAY NOW LEAVE NOTICES AT HOMES OF COUNCILMEN 
The City Clerk, acting as Clerk of the City Council, must 
prepare and deliver notices advising members of the Council of all 
meetings and hearings. Formerly these notices were required by 
law to be delivered to each Councilman in person. An act of the 
Legislature passed in 1955 made it legal for the Clerk to leave 
these notices at the homes of Councilmen. 

DEMAND FOR VITAL STATISTIC RECORDS CONTINUED HIGH 
The City Clerk acts as custodian of all important docu- 
ments and vital records effecting the city and its residents. Birth, 
death and marriage records are kept here and certified copies of 
these are furnished to the public at a norminal fee. 

Vital statistics recorded during 1955, compared withl 954 
were as follows: 

1955 1954 

Births 892 916 

Marriages 302 327 

Deaths 691 615 



Annual Report * * 9 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

This department is responsible for the appraisal of all 
taxable property. It issues warrants for the collection of taxes; 
prepares tax rolls for poll, head, real and personal property, 
bank stock and yield taxes; assists with special assessment pro- 
cedure and maintains all records pertaining to taxes and taxable 
property. 

It is headed by a Board of Assessors, composed of one 
full-time and two part-time members, directly responsible to the 
citizens of Concord. 



1955 TAX WARRANTS SUBMITTED 

Country, poll and bank stock tax warrants submitted to 
the Tax Collector totaled $2, 534, 093. 19. The tax rate, based on 
$1,000. of assessed valuation was set at $51.40 in Concord and 
$56.48 in Penacook. 

The assessed valuation of property in Concord for 1955 
was $48, 278, 291. , an increase of $483,069. over 1954. (See chart 
on opposite page. ) 

Poll and head tax warrants amounted to $ 1 00, 1 24. , an in- 
crease of $3, 699. over 1954. For the first time an attempt was 
made to trace over 1,400 missing poll tax payers. Inquiry cards 
with postal return card forms attached were mailed to the last 
known addresses with good results obtained. 

ASSESSORS HELD 67 MEETINGS TO HEAR TAX APPEALS 

So that they may hear all citizens desiring to appeal 
their tax assessments, the Board of Assessors holds frequent 
meetings for this purpose. During 1955, 87 appeals were heard 

and resolved; 48 dealt with real 
estate assessments, 2 9 with 
stock-in-trade, six with ma- 
chinery and four with trailers. 

CITY ASSESSOR ELECTED 
TO STATE ASSOCIATION 
OFFICE 

At the 45th annual 
meeting of the Association of 
New Hampshire Assessors, 
Fred Moulton, full-time City 
Assessor, was elected First 
Vice-President of the Associ- 
ation. The year 1955 als o 
marked Mr. Moulton's 30th 
year as an employee of the 
City of Concord. 

NEW ASSESSOR APPOINTED 
Shelby O. Walker was 
appointed to the Board of Ass- 
essors on December 1 , to suc- 
ceed Sydney Dach, who resigned 
after more than five years of 
service to the city. 

"1 
State Tax Commission official, 
City Assessor and City Auditor 
prepare to release 1955 tax rate. 




TOTAL ASSESSED VALUATION IN CONCORD 1945-1955 

Year Year 

1945 $32,963,846 1951 $47,013,784 

1946 33,622,496 1952 47,490,362 

1947 36,457,539 1953 - 47,828,712 

1948 37,330,320 1954 47,795,222 

1949 38,765,980 1955 _ 48,278,291 

1950 --- 38,782,440 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

The Finance Department is responsible for accounting, 
budget control, auditing receipts and expenditures, debt arrange- 
ment, financial reporting, collection, custody and di sbursement 
of all funds, and operation of office supply and duplicating services. 

AUTO PERMIT FEES CONTINUE TO RISE 

A total of 12,715 auto permits were issued during 1955, 
yielding $121, 07 2. , an increase of almost 14% over the previous year. 

TAX COLLECTIONS IMPROVE 

The year ended with 90% of the 1955 property tax levy 
and 74% of the poll tax levy collected. The balance outstanding on 
account of property and poll taxes of prior years was reduced to 
$2,897. This compares with a balance of $9,804. at the end of the 
previous year. State head taxes outstanding decreased slightly, 
from $21, 218. to $20,465. 

COLLECTOR'S SALE DATE ADVANCED 

The Collector's tax sale has been moved ahead by easy 
steps during the past five years, from late September to the mid- 
dle of May. This change has increased collections during the 
early months of the year and enabled holding temporary borrow- 
ings at the same level as formerly despite increased budgets. 

NEW SCHOOL BONDS INCREASE DEBT 

A total of $1,780,000. in general obligation bonds were 
issued during the year, at the very favorable rate of 2, 10%. The 
greater portion, or $1,600,000. was for construction and equip- 
ment of schools; while $100,000. was borrowed for sanitary sewer 
construction, and $80, 000. for extension of water mains. A size- 
able portion (See page 55 ) of the sewer and water bonds will be re- 
tired from special assessments against benefitted property. The 
new debt, less payments made during the year resulted in a net 
increase of $1, 591, 000. Details of the change appear in the table 

foe low * 

Balance at Payments New Debt Balance at 

Purpose End of 1954 During 1955 Issued 1955 End of 1955 

Municipal $ 846, 000. $ 115, 000. $ None " $ 731,000. 

School 439,000. 44,000. 1,600,000. 1,995,000. 

Water 150,000. 10,000. 80,000. 220,000. 

Parking Areas 180,000. 20,000. None 160,000. 

San. Sewers None None 100,000. 100,000. 

$1,615,000. $ 189,000. $1,780,000. $3,206,000. 

INTEREST RATES HIGHER 

Interest rates on temporary loans in anticipation of taxes 

Annual Report * * 11 



collections were consistently higher than in previous years, rang- 
ing from 1, 03% to 1. 60%, compared to a low of ,47%and a high of 
. 78% in 1954. 

TRUST FUND YIELD INCREASE 

The principal amount in the hands of City Trustees for 
cemetery, library and other miscellaneous beneficiaries increased 
from $555, 977. in 1950 to $613,903. in 1955. The annual income 
from investments during the same period increased from $14, 057. 
to $20, 720. , brought about largely by increased yield on invest- 
ments from 2. 5% in 1950 to 3.4% in 1955. 

In addition to the funds in the hands of City Trustees, in- 
come distributions from outside trustees increased from $12, 260 . 
in 1950 to $14, 745. in 1955. The outside trusts are administered 
by the Mechanicks National Bank under the wills of Benjamin and 
Henry Kimball and by Dudley Orr & Frank Sulloway as trustees 
under the will of William Thayer, for benefit of the public library. 

SMALL BUT WORTHWHILE SAVINGS 

A total of $2, 504. was realized through taking cash dis- 
counts on accounts payable. Careful forecasting of cash balances 
enabled the investment of temporarily idle funds yielding interest 
income of $838. Savings made through quantity purchases of of- 
fice supplies amounted to approximately $300. By printing many 
forms, letterheads, etc. in the city's own shop and securing bids 
on the remainder, savings of approximately $3,200. were realized. 



LEGAL DEPARTMENT 

The City Solicitor safeguards the City's interests in legal 
matters. He is available for legal opinions, advice and research 
to all department heads, special boards and members of the City 
Council. He represents the City in all court actions and attends 
all Council meetings and hearings. 

$4, 535. 35 IN TAXES COLLECTED THROUGH LEGAL EFFORTS 
The Solicitor performs a valuable service in collecting 
delinquent taxes of all kinds, through court action and contact with 
persons involved. His efforts were aided by an act of the 1955 
Legislature removing restrictions on the number of cases which 
can be entered in Small Claims Court during a given period. 

He filed five claims in bankruptcy for recovery of taxes. 
His office conducted 203 title searches in connection with property 
tax sales for delinquent taxes. 

PREPARED MANY LEGAL DOCUMENTS DURING THE YEAR 

The Solicitor's office prepared 25 deeds, leases and agree- 
ments for the City, and drew up nine ordinances and resolutions. 

REPRESENTED CITY IN 13 COURT ACTIONS 

The Solicitor represented the City in eight appearances 
in Superior Court and five in Municipal Court. These cases in- 
cluded zoning appeals, claims for damage by dogs, a claim of 
illegal tax sale, trustee of wages of city employees and violations 
of the Plumbing Code, parking and zoning laws. This illustrates, 
in part, the variety of legal matters handled by the City Solicitor. 

12 * * City of Concord 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

The Engineering Department works closely with the 
Public Works and Planning Departments to improve city services 
and facilities and provide new ones. It is headed by the City Engi- 
neer, assisted by a staff who perform survey and design work for 
public works projects , issue building permits and administer local 
building and zoning laws, keep city maps up-to-date and furnish the 
public with needed information on street lines , sewer locations , etc. 

LONG POND ROAD T. R. A. MAJOR 1955 DESIGN PROJECT 

The department handled the survey, design, layout, 
right-of-way, acquisition and supervision of construction of one and 
two-tenths miles of highway, known as Long Pond or Crowley Road. 
Smaller projects designed by the Engineering Depart- 
ment were Blake Street reconstruction; Pleasant View Avenue 
street, sewer and water construction; Auburn Street, Columbus 
Avenue and Johnson Avenue sewer construction; traffic islands at 
the intersection of Auburn and Center Streets; the Ford Avenue 
parking lot and construction of Winant Street and Johnson Avenue. 

66 STREETS RENUMBERED 

As requested by the Post Office Department, to facilitate 
mounted carrier mail delivery in the Concord Heights area, 66 
streets were completely renumbered. The department worked with 
the Planning Department in reviewing street names in that area. 

SURVEY AND SUPERVISORY WORK DONE 

Surveys were made , plans drawn and descriptions writ- 
ten of lands sold by the city on Sheep Davis and Airport Roads 
and land taken for cemetery expansion. Surveys were also made 
and plans prepared for a sewer extension in the Heights Road 
area, for the proposed extension of Bow Street through Neville 
Street and for a future sewer main from the South Street area 
south of Mooreland Avenue easterly to the Merrimack River. 

Relaying of a collector sewer was necessitated by con- 
struction of the F. E. Everett Highway through the Water Street area. 
City supervision of this work, done by the State highway contractor, 
was provided, with the assistance of a temporary engineer. 

1955 A RECORD YEAR FOR BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

The Engineering Department must approve plans and 
specifications for all proposednew construction and alterations be- 
fore work can be started. Although fewer permits were issued for 
new construction, 126 compared with 160 last year, this year's total 
of 317 permits was 43 more than the 1954 total. Broken down as to 
types of construction, the following building permits were issued: 

Number Valuation 

New Construction: Single Houses 113 $1,054,125. 

Filling Stations 7 118,500. 

Stores - --- 2 5,700. 

Institutions 1 -- 149,000. 

Churches 2- - 265,000. 

Industrial 1 5,000. 

Alterations & Additions 109 531,410. 

Miscellaneous 82 183,400. 



Total 317 $2,335,305. 

Annual Report * * 13 



PLANNING DEPARTMENT 

The Planning Board seeks to guide the development of a 
more progressive and better ordered community. Its office staff 
is headed by a full-time Planning Director, who studies present 
and future civic problems and reports his findings to the Board, 
which submits its recommendations to the City Council. 

CONCORD LAKE PROJECT REVIVED IN 1955 

A bill authorizing construction of Concord Lake was in- 
troduced at the 1955 session of the State Legislature. The Plan- 
ning Board has favored construction of this potential recreation 
facility since 1945. The Director devoted much time to explaining 
the project to various civic and legislative bodies. A special Legis- 
lative commission was created to further investigate the project. 

PLANNING DEPARTMENT AIDS INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT 
The Planning Department supervised transfer of city 
owned airport land for industrial development, prepared prelim- 
inary plans for two industrial parks, advised rezoning of the air- 




A. 70 Acres -Zoned for Industry-City utilities adjacent to site. 

B. 450 Acres-Zoned for Industry &Commerce-City utilities adjacent. 

C. 6. 5 Acres -Zoned for Industry-City utilities adjacent to site. 

D. 90 Acres -Zoned for Industry-City utilities adjacent to site. 



14 * * City of Concord 



port area for commerical use and closely cooperated with the 
Concord Regional Development Corporation in its efforts to bring 
new industry to Concord. The map on the preceding page is the 
result of a combined effort of these two agencies. 

WATER AND SEWER PROJECTS STUDIED 

Three petitions for water extensions, totalling 1,900 
feet, and community sanitary sewer needs, including selection of a 
site for a future sewage disposal plant, were studied by the Board. 

ANNUAL SURVEY SHOWED 7, 560 FEET OF FRONTAGE OCCU- 
PIED DURING YEAR ENDING JUNE, 1955 

Construction on streets with full city services nearly 
doubled the 1954 total of 4, 380 feet. This definitely reflects the 
current accelerated trend in building construction. The annual 
housing survey showed 216 vacant dwelling units, 26 more than in 
1954. Sixty new dwelling units were completed during 1955. 

Final plats for new portions of two existing subdivisions 
were approved, subject to payment of the total cost of all required 
municipal facilities by the subdivider. 

FIRST COMPLETE REVIEW OF TRAFFIC LAWS SINCE 1951 

In cooperation with the Police Department, the Board 
studied the need for changes in Concord's traffic regulations, with 
special emphasis on downtown traffic and parking problems, and 
recommended several major changes to the Council. 

Investigations and recommendations were made on such 
subjects as banning through trucking on Broadway and South Fruit 
Street, advising postponement of action; relocation of the Freight 
Street taxicab stand to Storrs Street which was favored, and a re- 
quest to allow all day parking in a section of the Freight Street lot 
which was opposed. 

MUCH ACTION BY PLANNING BOARD CONCERNING STREETS 

During 1955 the Board processed five petitions for ex- 
tensions of the city's residential street system, recommending 
four and rejecting one. Three street widenings, one relocation 
and four petitions for discontinuance of streets were considered 
and approved. It forwarded 18 recommendations relating to street 
names to the Council, half of which were prompted by a request of 
the post office for review of streets in the Concord Heights area. 

A proposed ordinance, based on state statutes, regulat- 
ing the placing of buildings within the bed of mapped streets, was 
framed, transmitted to the Council and approved. 

A plan was prepared showing the mapped lines of a future 
street connecting Bow and Neville Streets and land southerly thereof, 
and acquisition of land for this purpose was recommended. Lay- 
outs of Industrial Park Drive on Concord Plains and of Storrs 
Street in Railroad Square were approved. 

New residential streets added to the city's directory of 
street names during 1955 were Springfield and Meadow Streets in 
the South End, Tow Path Lane in East Concord and Eastern Avenue 
on Concord Plains. The recently purchased way between Pleasant 
Street Extension and Freight Street was named Storrs Street for 
the late Mayor John Storrs. Access roads off Hall Street were 
named Basin and Nashua Streets and another renamed Osgood Street. 

Annual Report * * 15 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS & PROPERTY 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

ACTIVITIES EXPANDED DURING 1955 

Under Civil Defense Director, Laurence J. Riis, Sr. , 
Concord's Civil Defense organization increased its activities. 
Warden service was greatly expanded, and in Penacook a rescue 
squard, under the Engineering & Rescue Unit, was organized and 
functions for all local disasters. Hours of coverage at the ground 
observer post were also increased through the efforts of Ground 
Observer Corps Unit leaders. 

Other officers in the Civil Defense organization are: 

Deputy Director Henry C. Newell 

Deputy Director for Women's Affairs Mrs. Lucie Weston 

Ground Observer Corps Maurice E. Farley, Supv. 

Chief Observer Mrs. Maurice E. Farley 

Warning & Communications Unit Paul A. Carlson 

Refugee Unit Stanley F. Little 

Fire Fighting Unit Fire Chief, C. H. Green 

Police Unit Police Chief, A. W. Mclsaac 

Police Capt. , Daniel C. Abbott 

Warden Services Unit Edwin DeAngelis 

Engineering & Rescue Unit Howard E. Raymond 

Transportation Unit Nile E . Faust &Chas. W. Fletcher 

Health & Sanitation Unit Dr. Thomas M. Dudley 

Norman Brown 

MedicalNursing & First Aid Unit Dr. Robert O. Blood 

Mildred Taylor 

Official Photographer Robert Swenson 

Public Information Officer Ralph H. Morse 

CONCORD CD PARTICIPATES IN TEST ALERTS 

Concord's Civil Defense organization participated suc- 
cessfully in a nation-wide test alert on June 15, and in two state- 
wide test alerts. Civil Defense headquarters was also activated 
on a 24 hour basis for two hurricane alerts. 

SIREN INSTALLED IN SOUTH END 

A large siren was installed at Rollins Park on Broadway 
at a cost of $3, 850. , one-half of which was assumed by the Fed- 
eral government. This completes warning coverage of the South 
End section not reached by the whistle at the CentralFire Station. 

CLOSE COOPERATION WITH RED CROSS ASSURED 

Stanley F. Little, Chief of the Refugee Unit, was appointed 
Disaster Chairman of the local Red Cross to assure the closest 
cooperation between these two emergency agencies. 

VOLUNTEERS BADLY NEEDED 

Unit leaders and the director held many meetings, and 
spoke to various civic groups in an attempt to recruit volunteers . 
Any citizens interested in contributing their services for any type 
of Civil Defense activity should not hesitate to contact any of the 
unit leaders listed above. 

16 * * City of Concord 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Concord's Fire Department ranks among the best in 
equipment, training and fire loss average. It operates from one 
central and three outlying fire stations with 16 pieces of motor- 
ized fire fighting equipment. 

HIGHEST FIRE LOSS SINCE 1948 

Property valued at $425,425. was involved in fire caus- 
ing a total property loss of $123, 393. 46. This is almost double 
Concord's very low fire loss figure of $63,236.48 in 1954. The 
increase was largely due to the serious fire at the Concord Hard- 
ware & Supply Company on June 4, causing $81, 526. 39 damage. 

Of the total loss, $117, 143.46 was compensated for by 
insurance coverage, making a net loss of $6, 250. , or only about 
5% of the total property consumed by fire a complete loss. 

19 MORE CALLS RESPONDED TO IN 1955 

The Fire Department responded to 624 calls during 1 955, 
compared with 605 in 1954. Of the 624 calls received 76 were 
box alarms and 548 were still alarms. Classification shows the 
following types of fires occurred in Concord during 1955: 

Residential 200 Mercantile 16 

Grass & Brush 130 Out of Town Alarms 16 



First Aid & Emergencies- 89 

Smoke Scares 72 

Auto Fires 68 

False & Malicious Alarms 17 



Manufacturing 9 

Non-residential 4 

Storage 3 

Total-- 624 



Chief Green and Fireman George 
Livingston are shown here on the 
occasion of the latter's retirement 
August 7, 1955, after 50 years of 
service. 




ONE DEATH FROM FIRE IN 
1955 

The first death in Con- 
cord from fire in five years 
occurred when a man was trap- 
ped in the Fanaras block fire 
on February 20. Firemen re- 
moved the victim alive, suffer- 
ing from severe burns, but he 
died two days later at the hos- 
pital. 

PERSONNEL OF FIRE DE- 
PARTMENT INCREASED 

Action of the City 
Council, reducing the 84 hour 
work week to approximately 
74 hours (amounting to two ex- 
tra days off per month) for 
permanent firemen, made it 
necessaryto add five new men 
to the department, thus raising 
the number of permanent 
members to 50. Examinations 
were administered and pro- 
bationary appointments made 
on April 1, 1955. 



LARGE CALL FORCE AVAILABLE 

In addition to regular members of the department there 
are 78 call firemen. These men respond to box alarms and other 
emergency calls to supplement the regular force. Drills are held 
for call as well as permanent firemen. 

MAINTENANCE WORK CARRIED ON BY FIREMEN 

The Fire Department maintains in top condition its appa- 
ratus and buildings at all times. This work is done almost en- 
tirely by members of the department. 

Allfire hose is tested periodically. Any lengths failing 
to pass the test at required pressure are rejected and passed on 
to other departments not requiring hose for emergency work. A 
total of 22, 500 feet of hose are currently in service. 

LEE PROMOTED TO 2ND DEPUTY 

Arthur R. Lee, a member of the department for 19 years, 
was promoted to 2nd Deputy on Feburary 1, 1955, to fill a vacancy 
caused by the resignation of Joseph Greenough, Jr. on January 1 , 
1955. 



CHIEF GREEN HONORED BY RE-ELECTION TO EXECUTIVE 
BOARD OF NEW ENGLAND FIRE CHIEFS' ASSOCIATION 

At the 33rd annual conference of the New England Fire 
Chiefs' Association held in June, Chief Clarence H. Green was 
made State Director of the association from New Hampshire. 

CHARITIES AIDED BY FIREMEN 

In addition to their regular schedule of work, the firemen 
participated in several chari- 



table and civic projects. Chief 
among these was their well 
known annual project of build- 
ing toy replicas of fire trucks 
for Christmas giving to under- 
priviledged children. Over 
500 of these trucks were 
turned out in 1955, using 
materials and money donated 
by local merchants and 
businessmen. The Fire De- 
partment aerial ladder was 
used in assisting the local 
Chamber of Commerce with 
its annual arrival of Santa 
Claus program. 

A very successful 
drive was conducted for bene- 
fit of the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association. This depart- 
ment cooperated with the 
Police Department in a paper 
drive and benefit basketball 
game for the March of Dimes 
and in the Jimmy Fund cam- 
paign. 



Firemen are shown battling 
the Concord H a r d w a r e & 
Plumbing Supply Company 
blaze, Concord's worst fire 
since 1948. 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Your Police Department is dedicated to protecting and 
assisting the citizens of Concord in the most efficient, equitable 
and courteous manner possible. 

FEWER MAJOR OFFENSES IN 1955 

An encouraging note was a decrease of 37% in the num- 
ber of major offenses, from 103 in 1954 to only 65 in 1955. Lar- 
cenies accounted for 54 out of the total number compared with 75 
last year. 

INCREASED NUMBER OF TRAFFIC OFFENSES COMMITTED 

Of the 1 1 ,736 offenses committed in Concord during 1955, 
11, 139 were traffic violations, compared with 8, 128 traffic vio- 
lations out of a total of 8,642 offenses in 1954. The number of 
parking violations increased by nearly 2, 000 over last year. 

There were 404 traffic accidents this year, resulting in 
injuries to 1 30 persons. This is 39 more accidents than last year, 
but 13 fewer injuries. Four persons died as a result of traffic 
accidents, the same number as in 1954. 

845 PARKING METERS IN CITY PATROLLED & MAINTAINED 

During 1955, 26 meters were reset, 13 due to a change 

made in parking on Pleasant Street Extension, 37 posts were 

straightened and 17 heads tightened. 

A survey, on which the Police Department cooperated 

with the Planning Department, disclosed a total of 2,395 parking 

spaces in the city. Of these, 1,013 were on-street and 1,382 

were off-street spaces, and approximately one-fourth, or 657, 

downtown parking spaces were in metered areas. 

RESPONDED TO OVER 1,000 AMBULANCE CALLS IN 1955 

The Concord Police Department furnishes free night 
and day ambulance service within the city limits. Atotal of 1,130 
ambulance trips were made in 1955, 135 more than in 1954. 

ONE-THIRD OF ALL STOLEN PROPERTY RECOVERED 

It is interesting to note that your Police Department 
recovered $3,330.80 in stolen property of the $9, 941. 56 worth 
reported missing during 1955. 




City Manager and 

Police Chief view 

new police service 

truck. 



Deputy Chief 
Edward J. Silva 




DEPUTY CHIEF RETIRED AFTER 48 YEARS SERVICE 

Veteran policeman, Edward J. Silva, retired on De- 
cember 31, 1955, after 48 years of service to the department and 
citizens of Concord. Deputy Silva started police work in 1907 as 
a special officer, became a regular member of the department in 
1911 and rose through the ranks to become Deputy Chief in 1935. 
He was instrumental in initiating finger print work in this depart- 
ment. 



POLICE TRAINING CARRIED ON 

In a constant effort to improve police efficiency, train- 
ing courses are carried on for police personnel. During 1955, three 
members of the department completed a course in public speaking 
conducted by the University of New Hampshire, nine officers at- 
tended a refresher course in first aid and all members of the depart- 
ment received firearms training under a special agent of the F.B.I. 

POLICE CHECK BICYCLES BEFORE REGISTRATION 

During the month of April each year, the Police Depart- 
ment checks all bicycles and issues registration plates. A fee of 
25£ is charged. All bicycles must have a light, horn or bell and 
red reflector. A total of 2, 06 1 bicycles were registered in 1955. 
This year for the first time, a crew of police made 
scheduled inspections at city school years. This was to speed 
registrations and protect many children from having to bring 
their "bikes" through heavy traffic to the police station. 

ANOTHER BUSY YEAR FOR C. P. B. A. BOY 'S CLUB 

The Police Boy's Club provides healthful and character- 
building activities for boys who might not otherwise be reached. 
It maintains a club house on Highland Street with modern gym- 
nasium facilities. 

Basketball teams are organized which compete with 
teams throughout the area. In February, the 100 pound midget 
team played the Dover team at the Boston Garden court. Classes 
are conducted in boxing, wrestling and tumbling and weekly movies 
are shown during the winter and spring seasons. Parties are held 
at Hallow'een and Christmas. 

Annual Report * * 21 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

The Municipal Court sets on six days each week, between 
9:00 A. M. and 12:00 Noon, to hear criminal and then civil cases. 
It is frequently necessary to hold sessions in the afternoon as 
well, due to the increasing number of cases to be heard. 

1955 RECORD YEAR FOR COURT RECEIPTS--UP 30%OVER 1 954 
Municipal C ourt receipts for the year totaled $37,988.32, 
of which $36, 362. was received from fines, $59. 50 from entry 
fees and writs and $1, 566. 82 from miscellaneous sources. 

Court costs and miscellaneous expenses amounted to 
$6, 421. 58. $12, 843.90 was turned over to the State MotorVehicle 
Department as its share in motor vehicle fines and the City of 
Concord retained $18, 722. 84. 

NUMBER OF COURT CASES CONTINUES TO RISE 

An increase of almost 50% was seen in the number of 
criminal cases heard during 1955. Increases in these and other 
types of cases over 1954 are shown as follows: 

1955 1954 

Criminal: Felonies 

Misdemeanors 
Civil cases 
Parking violations 
Small claims 

Total 14,502 9,408 

The court handled 83 cases involving juveniles, 33 more 
than during 1954. 

SPECIAL JUSTICE KING RETIRED 

On October 9, 1955, Special Justice Peter J. King retired. 
Attorney Francis E. Perkins was appointed to succeed him as 
Special Justice on October 10, 1955. 

Concord's Municipal Court is one of the few in the State 
staffed entirely by practicing lawyers. 



19 


20 


4, 256 


2, 158 


193 


110 


8,445 


6, 528 


1. 589 


592 



INSPECTIONS 

Hardly a day goes by that inspections, investigations or 
tests are not carried on in the interest of a safer, healthier and 
more attractive community. City departments doing the major 
share of this work are the Health, Fire and Engineering Depart- 
ments. 




Are promoted by frequent inspection of alleys 
by the Sanitary Inspector. 



1, 840 DAIRY SAMPLES COLLECTED & ANALYZED DURING 1955 
The Sanitary Inspector collects dairy food samples from 
all producers distributing in the Concord market and analyzes 
these for purity and quality. He also collects rinse samples from 
clean containers which he tests for bacteria content. During 1955 
he issued 340 written reports of analyzes to producers and dealers. 
He also makes periodic inspections of dairy herds and facilities. 
Another phase of the Sanitary Inspector's work is investi- 
gation and inspection of possible health hazards throughout the city. 
He makes regular checks of stores, restaurants, schools and all 
other places where food is handled commerically, checking for 
quality and sanitary conditions of storage, display and handling. 
He makes investigations at every site where a complaint is re- 
ceived. No barber shop, restaurant, boarding home, food market 
or dairy producer is allowed to operate in Concord before the 
establishment has been inspected and licensed by the Health De- 
partment. During 1955 the inspector made a total of 1 ,345 inspect- 
ions and investigations , and issued 329 written notices for correct- 
ion of sanitary law violations. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT INSPECTORS ACT TO PREVENT FIRE 

It is impossible to measure in terms of money and lives 
the amount saved :-ach year through fire prevention efforts, but it 
is certain that the sum would be impressive. A total of 1, 257 in- 
spections for fire safety were made throughout the city during 
1955. These include monthly inspections at all convalescent 
homes and frequent inspections in the high value district of the 
city and at churches, hospitals, schools, theatres and all public 
buildings. Fairs, carnivals and all other places where large 
numbers of people congregate are patrolled by fire details. 

All new and conversion oil burner installations must be 
inspected before they are put into operation, due to the combusti- 
ble nature of the fuel. The department made 913 of these inspect- 
ions during 1955. 

BUILDING INSPECTOR ADMINISTERS BUILDING LAWS 

In addition to examining plans for new construction and 
alterations, the Building Inspector visits all buildings and sites 
where complaints of violations or unsafe conditions are received, 
often accompanied by fire and health inspectors. 

He rules on all violations of the Zoning Ordinance and 
Building and Plumbing Codes according to rules set forth in these 
laws. Appeals from his decisions may be taken to the Zoning 
Board or Board of Building Appeals. During 1955 the Zoning 
Board held 28 meetings and heard 76 cases; notable among these 
were the Foy filling station, S. P. C.A. animal shelter and McKee 
super market petitions. The Board of Building Appeals held four 
meetings, hearing four cases. 

The Board of Plumbing Examiners, of which the Build- 
ing Inspector is a member, seeks to protect the city and the public 
by requiring all plumbers to be examined and licensed. It issued 
licenses to 23 journeymen and 30 master plumbers in 1955, and 
administered examinations to two new applicants. 

The City Sealer of Weights & Measures works closely 
with the State Department of Agriculture, in testing for accuracy 
weighing and measuring devices of all kinds throughout the city . 

Annual Report * * 23 



PUBLIC HEALTH & WELFARE 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

The Health Department, headed by the City Physican, 
maintains a clerk in the city hall to answer questions, receive 
complaints and handle clerical details. The Sanitary Inspection 
Division is in constant touch with health conditions throughout the 
city. Laboratory facilities for chemical testing are provided in 
the city hall. (See page 23 ) The public comfort station on Warren 
Street is also operated by the Health Department. 

415 CHILDREN ATTENDED HEALTH DEPARTMENT CLINICS 
Free immunization and vaccination clinics are held at 
the city hall, with assistance of the Concord Visiting Nurse As- 
sociation staff. Seven such clinics were held during 1955. 

CONCORD ACTS TO CONTROL POLIO 

Concord had 14 cases of poliomyelitis during 1955, an 
increase of eight cases over 1954. With release of the Salk polio 
vaccine, this community joined others in taking steps to combat 
the disease. Four polio clinics, directed by the City Physican, 
were held at local schools for administering the vaccine to first 
and second grade children. Approximately 1,500 children re- 
ceived first and second shots. 

A tot3.1 of 7 57 cases of communicable disease were 
reported to the Health Department during 1955. An infection of 
measles reached epidemic proportions during February. 

CITY AID TO CONCORD HEALTH AGENCIES 

Concord Hospital was aided by the City's usual financial 
contribution. The Hospital's request for aid is based on the 
amount of its deficit apportioned among the communities which it 
serves according to the total amount of service rendered the citi- 
zens of each during the previous year. In 1955 Concord contri- 
buted $25,000. toward support of this important community service. 
1955 saw the near completion of the new Concord Hospital struct- 
ure on Pleasant Street. 

The city government 
also contributed $4,700. to sup- 
port the work of ,the Visiting 
Nurse Association inConcord 
and Penacook, and continued 
to furnish rent free accommo- 
dations in the city hall for its 
office and clinics. 



City Physican administers 
diphtheria -tetanus - whooping 
cough anti-toxin at Health 
Department clinic. 




WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



Relief on the municipal level is handled by the City Wel- 
fare Department, administered by the Welfare Director in Con- 
cord and by the Overseer of the Poor in Penacook, with offices 
in both places. Each request for assistance is thoroughly investi- 
gated before relief is granted. 

STATE CONTRIBUTION FOR WELFARE MEDICAL EXPENSES 
REDUCED 

The State of New Hampshire's sharply curtailed appro- 
priation for welfare purposes caused it to reduce its contribution 
for welfare medical expenses on September 1, shifting these ex- 
penses to local sources. 

GENERAL RELIEF COSTS LOWEST IN FIVE YEARS 

As seen on the chart below, city welfare expenses con- 
tinued to decline for the fifth successive year. In 1955 the De- 
partment aided 36 cases, representing 81 persons, at a cost of 
$22, 818. 70. This is a decrease of five cases from last year, al- 
though the number of persons aided remained the same, and a de- 
crease of $2, 644. 1 1 in expenditures. 

WELFARE AID RENDERED AGED AND INFIRMED WITH AS- 
SISTANCE OF STATE AND FEDERAL GOVERNMENTS 

In 1955 Old Age Assistance cases, including aliens, 
numbered 259 with expenditures of $47,775.90 in City funds; 
$4,882.47 less than last year. Where the recipients were citi- 
zens the State and Federal governments assume 75% of the total 
cost, and 50% of the total in the case of aliens. 

Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled cost the 
City $2,335.73, a slight decrease from last year, with six persons 
aided. The State and Federal governments also participate in 
this program, together assuming 65% of the entire cost. 

CAUSES OF WELFARE NEED CITED 

The following shows the reasons for relief need and the 
approximate per cent of cases in each catagory during 1955 com- 
pared with 1954. 



Sicknes s 

Insufficient Income 
Unemployment 
Marital Difficulties 
Unemployment 
Partially Handi- 
capped 



1955 


1954 


23% 


3 5% 


23% 


3 0% 


21% 


20% 


19% 


5% 


10% 


5% 



4% 



5% 



CITY DONATION TO FAMILY 
SERVICE AGENCY 

The City aided the 
valuable work of the Concord 
Family Service Bureau with an 
appropriation of $350. , plus 
rent free office space in the 
city hall. 



TREND IN CITY WELFARE COSTS 1946-55 
•46 '47 '48 '49 '50 '51 '52 '53 '54 '55 




PUBLIC SERVICES 



MUNICIPAL AIRPORT 

For 19 years the City of Concord has owned and operated 
the Concord Airport as a service to its citizens and visitors. 

Airport maintenance work, consisting mainly of plowing 
the runways in winter and care of grounds in summer, is handled 
by the City Public Works Department. 

IMPROVED FLIGHT SCHEDULE INAUGURATED 

Northeast Airlines, Inc. , which serves Concord Airport, 
scheduled daily round-trip service directly to and from New York, 
beginning in September, 1955. InOctober another flight was added 
via Boston, making three flights stopping at Concord daily. 



MORE CARGO HANDLED DURING 1955 

Passengers Enplaned 
Cargo Handled: Mail 

Express 

Freight 
Total Cargo Handled 



1955 

1, 614 

3, 226 lbs. 

5,466 lbs. 
10,409 lbs. 
19, 101 lbs. 



1954 
1,839 

2, 948 lbs, 

3, 898 lbs, 
6, 156 lbs, 



13, 002 lbs, 



C. A. P. TO ERECT NEW BUILDING 

In an exchange of land with the City, a small lot at the 
northwest corner of the airport was deeded to the local Civil Air 
Patrol unit as a site for its new building. 

AIRPORT BECOMING CENTER OF INDUSTRIAL GROWTH 

Much of the approximately 300 acrss of land transferred 
this year for industrial development borders directly on the airport. 
The new plant of Richard D. Brew & Company located nearby was 
completed. In line with anticipated greater use of the air port, the City 
plans future improvements in lighting, runways and other facilities. 



The Airport Administration Building is filled to capacity with 
State and Federal government and industrial air-related activ- 
ities, as well as airline offices. Two private flying services 
operate from city leased hangers shown at the left. 




CEMETERIES 

A service too seldom recognized is that performed by 
the Cemetery Division of the Public Works Department. Ten city 
cemeteries, at widely separated locations, are cared for, lots 
sold and the public assisted in locating lots and graves. Also, 
two private cemeteries, Calvary on North State Street and Pena- 
cookCalvary, are maintained and the city reimbursed for the cost. 

CEMETERY CREW MOWS 137 ACRES 

A total of 202 acres of land is held by the city for ceme- 
tery purposes, of which 119 acres are currently in use. Constant 
mowing and trimming are required to k e e p 137 acres mowed 
short. The crew also cares for lots, shrubs, trees and flower 
beds, and attends to leaf and snow removal in season 

ASSISTED WITH 377 INTERMENTS--60 MORE THAN IN 1954 

The Cemetery Division assisted undertakers with 377 in - 

terments in local cemeteries, including Calvary. Seventy lots of 

varying sizes were sold in city cemeteries and 29 in Calvary. 
In addition, city crews assisted contractors in setting 96 

foundations for monuments in all cemeteries. 

NEW BLOCKS COMPLETED IN 1955 

Blocks MM and OO in Blossom Hill Cemetery were sur- 
veyed, pinned out, graded and seeded ready for sale of lots. 
Other improvements included an island built in the center of the 
pond at Blossom Hill for protection of the wild life and a new 
rubber tile floor laid in the cemetery office. 

MANY TRUSTS FOR CEMETERY CARE 

The Trustees of Trust Funds hold 3, 120 trusts for ceme- 
tery care, of which 80 new ones were added in 1955, amounting 
to$10,321. A total of $481 ,202. 17 is now held in cemetery trusts. 
This money is used for care, repair and decoration of lots. 




The main gate and office at Blossom Hill, Concord's largest 

cemetery. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 

A CENTURY OF LIBRARY SERVICE 

With the year 1955 the library completed 100 years of 
service to the citizens of Concord. A city supported public library 
was established by ordinance adopted August 25, 1855, a Board of 
Trustees was organized and $1,500. appropriated. Gifts of 
money and books were received from generous citizens. In 1857 
the library had a collection of 2,291 books housed in one room. 

From this beginning your public library has grown to 
occupy a modern building with reference, children's, young 
people's and periodical sections, offices and meeting rooms; 
maintaining a branch library in Penacook and a booktrailer visit- 
ing seven different sections of t h e city weekly; also providing 
book service at the Concord Hospital and constantly making loans 
to the elementary schools. 

Over the years the aim of your public library has re- 
mained the same as that expressed in 1856 by its Board of Trust- 
ees, that the library be "the cherished institution of the city; of 
all the people of the city;--its benefits --equally accessible to all". 



LIBRARY CIRCULATION CONTINUED UPWARD TREND 

Concord's 20,223 borrowers circulated a total of 239,407 
books during 1955, an increase of 9,197 books over the 1954 total. 
In line with this, the book collection was increased by 6, 330 vol- 
umes, making a total collection of 72,044 books. To keep the card 
catalog up to date it was necessary for the Catalog Division to 
type and file 21, 887 new cards during the year. 



Award winners in the 1955 
summer reading program 
are shown here with their 
leader. 




PER CAPITA COST OF MAIN- 
TAINING LIBRARY RELA- 
TIVELY SMALL 

The library was main- 
tained during 1955 at a total 
cost of $73,062., of which 
$18,850. was supplied by in- 
come from Trust Funds and 
$54,211. was appropriated by 
the City. This cost to t h e 
public amounted to approxi- 
mately $1.86 per resident-- 
considerably less than the 
price of one good book! 

INITIATED HONOR SYSTEM 
OF CHARGING OUT PAPER 
BOUND BOOKS 

All a borrower must 
do is report the number of 
such books taken and return 
the same number with no fixed 
time limit imposed. 

LIBRARY SERVES ALL AGE 
GROUPS 

The Children's Di- 



vision sponsored 63 story 
hours and 29 film programs 
during the year. Classes in 
children's books for mothers 
of pre-school children proved 
increasingly popular. Forty 
school classes visited the 
library for instruction in its 
use and staff members visited 
the schools frequently. Good 
reading by children and young 
people is encouraged by the 
Junior Book Club, and a 
library sponsored summer 
reading program in which 175 
boys and girls participated 
this year. 

The library sponsored 
32 discussion group meetings 
and provided facilities for 142 
other meetings. The library 
staff delivered 15 talks before 
groups and represented the 
library at 103 meetings dur- 
ing the year. Weekly articles 
about books, lists of new books 
and news items on library 
activities were prepared for 
newspaper publication. 

The Reference Division answered 5, 300 questions and 
filled 3,000 requests for books. 




The Young People ' s Room is 
a scene of much activity after 
school each day. 



CHILDREN ENTERTAINED AT LIBRARY BY C. W. ANDERSON 
Mr. C. W. Anderson of Mason, well known artist and 
author of books about horses, entertained a capacity audience of 
children with stories and sketches, on November 2. Mr. Ander- 
son presented the library with a portfolio of his paintings of 
horses. 

LIBRARY EXHIBITS ATTRACT MUCH ATTENTION 

The main library provides an attractive setting, easily 
accessible to all for the display of many types of art work. Ex- 
hibitions this year included: ceramics by Isobel and Frederick 
Karl of Peterborough; wood engravings by Herbert Waters of 
Holderness; drawings and engravings by Harry E. Thompson of 
Pittsfield; water colors by Mrs. Marion Rawson of East Alstead; 
paintings by children of many lands, known as the "Art for World 
Friendship" exhibit; oil paintings by Concord Artists, Inc. and 
work by public school art and craft classes. 

FIRST WOMAN TO SERVE AS CHAIRMAN OF LIBRARY BOARD 
Mrs. Eugene Magenau was elected Chairman of the Board 
of Library Trustees this year, becoming the first woman to hold 
this office in the history of the board. 



AnnualReport * * 29 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

SUMMER PLAYGROUND SEASON MOST SUCCESSFUL 

Nine playgrounds were operated for 10 weeks. Attend- 
ance was estimated at 75,460, up 10% over 1954. A varied pro- 
gram of activities in athletics, arts and crafts, dancing, music, 
nature, etc. was carried on plus the following special events: 
Rotary Club City Swim Meet Playground Circus 

Lake Sunapee Train Trip Tennis Tournament 

Playground Water Circus Weirs Train Trip 

Be Kind to Aminals Week Baseball League 

Playground Talent Shows Peanut Carnival 

Beginners Swim Lessons Recreation Revue 

4th of July Field Days Archery Tournament 

SPECIAL CITY -WIDE EVENTS ENJOYED BY THOUSANDS 

Jaycee Silver Skates Derby* Winter Carnival Ball 

Easter Egg Hunt* New Year's Eve Ball 

Do-It-Yourself Hobby Show* Jack O'Lantern Ball 

Sports Night Show* Eddie Moylan Tennis Clinic 

Jaycee FoulShooting Tourney* 4th of July Fireworks 
* Inaugurated in 1955 

REGULAR PROGRAMS & SERVICES IMPROVED & EXPANDED 

After-school sports (baseball, Softball, tennis, hockey, etc.) 

Four Basketball Leagues for Men &; Boys 

Men's Touch Football under floodlights 

Physical Education Class for Handicapped Judo Class 

Children's & Adult's Arts & Crafts Classes Concord Sunset Club 

Children's & Adult's Archery Classes Concord Play School 

Record Hops (41 conducted) 

Family Night Neighborhood Square Dances (46 conducted) 

WINTER SPORTS CONTINUED POPULAR 

An estimated 50, 000 persons of all ages skated at White 
Park alone during 78 days of skating. Children's and adult classes 
were conducted in skiing, ice skating and figure skating. A hockey 
rink was maintained and hockeyteams organized. Certain streets 
in the city were set aside for coasting. 

GOLF COURSE RECEIPTS UP IN 1955 

Income at Beaver Meadow Municipal Golf Course totaled 
$6, 126. , an increase of more than 18% over 1954. The Beaver 
Meadow Social Club was organized. 

ESTIMATED 300,000 USED RECREATION FACILITIES 

Facilities were maintained for use of more than 50 organ- 
izations and hundreds of individuals in 150 acres of parks, play- 
grounds, athletic fields, etc. Ball diamonds were maintained for 
434 practices and games. 

1955 saw substantial improvements,- among them removal 
of the pavillion to Garrison Park; renovation of West Street Ward 
House for recreation use; fencing of asphalt court and layout of 
archery range at White Park; fencing of Doyen Park with cedar 
posts ; construction of portable bleachers, rustic benches and signs; 
oil burner installed for better heating at White Park administration 
building; drinking fountains installed; 7,000 feet of lumber cut for 
construction purposes; shrubs planted and park walks improved. 

30 * * City of Concord 




Hi m* 




A hockey game 
at the White Park rink 




Winners at 

a playground 

pet show 



A MUNICIPAL UTILITY 



Concord's Water Department, unlike other city depart- 
ments, operates like a private company in respect to finance, de- 
riving its revenue exclusively from income from its own services. 
Its aim is to provide a constant and abundant supply of pure water 
for the citizens of Concord. 

1955 BIGGEST CONSTRUCTION YEAR SINCE 1940 

A total of 15,245 feet of water main was laid, making 
this the largest construction year since the 14 inch main was laid 
from West Concord to Penacook 15 years ago. The end of 1955 
saw a network of 106.3 miles of water mains in operation through- 
out the city. 

The largest construction projects were the so-called 
"Black Hill" extension on Airport Road and Manchester Streets, 
and the River Road and Abbott Road extensions in Penacook. 
In connection with this new construction, 18 new hydrants were 
set, six hydrants replaced and 34 main line valves installed. 
Several smaller extensions were laid and old mains relaid in 
some sections. All pipe used was cement lined cast iron, rang- 
ing in size from six to 12 inches. 

RECORD NUMBER OF SERVICE CONNECTIONS INSTALLED 

During 1955, 117 new service connections were laid and 
77 old services were replaced, using copper tubing on all. This 
is the largest number of new services laid during a single year 



WATER CONSUMPTION IN CONCORD 
1945-1955 








and makes a total of 5,739 
services and 5, 111 meters 
now in use. Unmetered 

services include municipal 
buildings and facilities, un- 
completed construction and 
flat rate customers, using 
less than the minimum 
amount of water a year. 

INCREASED WATER CON- 
SUMPTION 

Water consumption 
during 1955 was 1,436,484, 
000 gallons, or a daily aver- 
age of 3,935, 373 gallons. Of 
the total amount consumed 
943,171,000 gallons were 
pumped and 493,313,000 gal- 
lons were supplied by gravity. 
The chart on the preceding 
page shows the rate of in- 
crease in Concord's water con- 
sumption over the last 10 
years. 

The extremely hot 
month of July set a r e c ord 
for water consumption in a 
single month, with 145 , 000, 
000 gallons used. 

Inspite of a very dry 
year and record water con- 
sumption the water supply 
was ample and no restrictions 
of any kind were imposed on 
its use. 




Water Department crew lays 
new main in River Road, 
Penacook. 



PENACOOK LAKE SOURCE 
OF CITY WATER 

Penacook Lake, 
often called Long Pond, is the principal source of Concord's 
water supply. It has been restricted exclusively for this pur- 
pose since 1951. It is patrolled regularly by department em- 
ployees and permission for outside agencies to make use of it 
for any purpose must be granted by act of the City Council. 
The council granted requests during 1955 for ice cutting oper- 
ations on the lake and for the State Fish & Game Department 
to trap game fish for transfer to other ponds. 

STUDY OF WATER SUPPLY AUTHORIZED 

Thomas R. Camp of Boston, one of the country's lead- 
ing authorities on water supply, was engaged to investigate 
ways of improving Concord's water supply, and began work on 
this project during March. At the end of the year this survey 
was practically completed and a report is expected early in 
1956. 



Annual Report * * 33 



CITY HOUSEKEEPER 

The City Public Works Department sweeps, disposes of 
wastes, sprays and trims trees, removes snow, paints and makes 
repairs on a city wide scale as carefully as one would care for a 
home and garden. 

EXCESSIVE CRACKING UP OF PAVEMENTS DUE TO UNUSUAL 
WINTER WEATHER 

Lack of snowfall early in the winter allowing frost to 
penetrate deep into the ground followed by warm days, cold nights 
and occasional rain softening the soil under pavements together 
with the weight of vehicles above caused the pavements to break 
up. City street crews used as much as 80 tons of cold patch in a 
single day in an effort to keep streets safe and relatively smooth. 

An abnormal number of calls to thaw out culverts, catch 
basins and ditches kept the steamer in almost constant use during 
February. 

STREET IMPROVEMENTS MADE 

The Public Works Department crews rebuilt Pleasant 
View Avenue, amounting to 600 feet of street between Pleasant 
and School Streets. 

South Spring Street was widened at a point near Concord 
Street. This involved purchase and cutting away of a piece of land 
formerly jutting out into the street and obstructing vision. Both 
the street and sidewalk at this point were straightened and resur- 
faced. 

The Crowley Road was rebuilt to New Hampshire 
secondary road standards and completed except for cleaning up 
and surfacing. This project was handled entirely by city crews 
under the State Town Road Aid program. 

A fire hazard, which had existed in the center of the city 
for many years, was eliminated with the rebuilding of Blake Street. 
Its original 10 foot width was increased to 16 feet with 18 inch 
sidewalks on either side. 



A 
city crew 
builds traf- 
fic islands 
at the in- 
tersection 
of Center 
and Auburn 
Streets, 
a project 
undertaken 
primarily 

for the 

safety of 

children 

attending 

the Dewey 

School. 




7, 000 SQUARE YARDS OF SIDEWALK RESURFACED 

Badly needed sidewalk repairs were undertaken during 
1955, with about 7,000 square yards of the worst sections resur- 
faced. This begins a sidewalk improvement program which it is 
expected to take several years to complete. 

OVER 1,200 FEET OF NEW SANITARY SEWER MAIN LAID BY 
CITY SEWER DIVISION 

In addition to three large sewer jobs handled by con- 
tractors, several smaller sanitary sewer projects were laid by 
the Sewer Division crew. These included 600 feet of Auburn 
Street, 500 feet on Pleasant View Avenue, 110 feet on Columbus 
Avenue and 30 feet connecting a subdivision off East Side Drive. 
All these projects were paid for either wholly or in part by those 
benefitting. 

CITY COLLECTED AND DISPOSED OF SOME 37,000 CUBIC 
YARDS OF REFUSE DURING 1955 

City refuse packers supplemented frequently by open 
trucks traveled a total of 37, 000 miles collecting approximately 
68, 000 cubic yards of refuse. Table garbage collection is furn - 
ished by a private contractor at a cost to the city of $8, 000. a year. 

CITY ENGINEER & SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC WORKS RE- 
SIGNED 

Wesley E. Haynes resigned in June from the position of 
City Engineer & Superintendent of Public Works, which he had 
held for the past three years. Howard E. Raymond was appointed 
Acting City Engineer. 

TREE CREW FIGHTS DUTCH ELM DISEASE 

The Dutch Elm disease continued to spread promoted 
by a heavy infestation of elm beetles. Nine city trees were re- 
ported infected by the State entomologist, and these were sched- 
uled for removal in an attempt to curb the disease. It is unfortu- 
nate that many infected trees are located on private property and 
cannot be ordered removed. 




The city 
tree crew 

is kept 
busy with 
spraying, 
trimming 
and re- 
moval of 
city trees. 
Over 70 
maple sap- 
lings were 
set out, and 
49 large 
trees were 
removed 
during 
1955. 



CAPITAL IMPROVEMENTS 



FORD AVENUE PARKING LOT COMPLETED 

City off-street parking facilities were increased by 22 
parking spaces with completion of the Ford Avenue parking lot 
adjacent to the city hall. New type four-hour parking meters 
were installed at a cost of only $12. 50 per car space, out of a 
total cost of $1,274. per space. Use of and receipts from the 
lot were quite satisfactory during the approximately four month 
period which the meters were in operation during 1955. 

PURCHASE OF LAND FOR FUTURE SEWAGE DISPOSAL PLANT 

Anticipating future needs, the City purchased for $25,000 

50 acres of land off Hall Street at a bend in the Merrimack River, 

from C . T. Enright for future use as site of a sewage disposal plant . 

PLANS FOR AIRPORT EXPANSION 

The City undertook to provide for construction of a new 
hangar at the Concord Airport to be used by Fern's Flying Service. 
Plans were drawn, bids received, and plans revised in an attempt 
to keep costs under the $40,000. appropriated for the project. 

A request for Federal Airport Aid was filed in November 
with the State Aeronautics Commission for a new lighting system and 
other needed improvements at the airport. The total estimated cost 
of this project is $50,000., of which the City will pay one-fourth. 

SANITARY SEWERS CONSTRUCTED 

Two extensive new sanitary sewer projects were com- 
pleted during November in the East Side and West Side sections of 
the city, totalling over 10,000 feet of sewer main laid at a cost of 
$150,000., part of which will be recovered under special as- 
sessment procedure. 

The East Side project, laid in East Side Drive, Ormond 
Street and Christian Avenue, was built by the Manchester S and, 
Gravel & Cement Company. It is designed to ultimately serve 300 
homes and places of business. 

The West Side sewer was constructed to meet the needs of 
the new Concord Hospital, and also serves the Carmilite Monastry 
and residences on Pleasant Street. Laid by the Samuel Aceto Com- 



The 
Ford Avenue 
Parking Lot 



36 * * City of Concord 




Laying the 

sewer in 

Pleasant Street 

near the new 

Concord Hospital 




pany of Portland, Maine, it starts at Clinton Street, runs across 
Memorial Field and other property to reach Pleasant Street just 
east of the Pleasant View Home and extends along Pleasant Street. 
This sewer may eventually be extended to serve the St. Paul 1 s 
School area and the presently undeveloped section north of Pleasant 
Street. 

PROGRESS ON STATE TOLL ROAD PROJECT 

Continued progress on construction of the F. E. Everett 
Toll Highway resulted in considerably changing the appearance of 
the Hall Street-Water Street section of the city. It was necessary 
for the State to purchase and have moved or demolished 34 houses 
and other buildings to clear right-of-way for the new highway. A 
new street, known as Basin Street, was created to provide access 
to property located between the Merrimack River and the highway. 
From a traffic interchange located just north of the Concord-Bow 
line, the toll road becomes a freeway extending to Manchester 
Street where it connects with the Concord thru-pass. Involved in 
its construction are overpasses over Hall Street, the Boston 8z 
Maine Railroad tracks and Manchester Street and an underpass 
under South Main Street at the interchange. 




Construction of 
an overpass to 
carry freeway 

traffic over Hall 
Street 



Annual Report * * 37 



FINANCIAL TABLES 



COMBINED BALANCE SHEET- 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 



December 



Cash : 

First National Bank - General Account 

Imprest Funds 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons 

Cash in Other Banks 

Taxes Receivable: 

Current Year Levy - Property $2l*2,Ull-33 

Current Year Levy - Polls U, 918.80 

Total Current Year 21*7,330.13 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 23, 217. 3U 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Property 1,573.80 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Polls 1,322.98 

Taxes Bought by City - Unredeemed 28,170.31 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 31,067.09 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 31,067.09 

Accounts Receivable : 

Water & Sewer Rentals U9,396.37 

Departmental Receivables 19,939.11 

Cemetery Receivables U, 338. 93 

Less: Reserves for Non- Realization 

Stores Accounts : 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 3,387.77 

Postage Meter Inventory 86.90 

Recreation Dept. Inventory 39U. lU 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Tax-Deeded Properties : 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 

State Head Taxes Receivable : 

Current Year Levy 

Prior Yrs. Levies 

Total General Fund Assets 



$315,723.38 
1,035.00 
75.00 
175,000.00 $^91,833.38 



22U.112.79 



-0- 



73,67U.Ul 
15.075.U7 



3, 
3, 


,868.81 
,868.81 


2. 
2. 


,765.97 
,765.97 


16 
3. 


,899.15 

,565.65 



22U.112.79 



58,598. 9U 



-0- 



20.U6U.80 
$795,009.91 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 



Cash - National State Capital Bank 
Investments 



U.826.U3 
633,760.85 



638,587.28 



CAPITAL FUND ASSETS (MUNICIPAL & SCHOOLS) 



»Bond Requirements - Future Years : 

Municipal 

School , 



731,000.00 
1,995,000.00 2,726,000.00 



BOND FUND ASSETS 



Cash - National State Capital Bank 

Cash - In Other Banks 

Investments 



19,095.37 
3.895.00 
1.U96, 105.00 1.519,095.37 



GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 



5.673,692.56 



*Does not Include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer, Parking Meter or Sp. Assess. Funds 
38 * * City of Concord 



GENERAL AND RELATED FUNDS 

31, 1955 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable : 

Unpresented Coupons 

Current Vouchers Payable 

Unexpended Appropriations ; 

Union School District 

Interest - Union School District Bonds .... 

Penacook School District 

Library Earmarked Income 

Due to Other Funds : 

Equipment & Stores Fund 

Water Fund 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 

Parking Meter Fund 

Advance Deposits : 

Taxes Collected in Advance 

Options, Plans, Etc 

Head Taxes Due to State 

Total General Fund Liabilities 



$75.00 
10,078.5b 


$10,153.51* 


1*1*9,763.00 

20,505.00 

39,988.614 

32*5.16 


510,1*01.80 


51,1*22. 81 

67,382.53 

8,31*5.81 

25,1*63.73 


152, 611*. 88 


78.11 
580,1*8 


658.59 




22.903.10 



,731.91 



Current Surplus 

Total General Fund Liabilities & Surplus 



98,278,00 
795,009,91 



TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 613 , 903 . lit 

Accumulated Income 2l*,681*.ll* 638,587.28 

CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES (MUNICIPAL & SCHOOL ) 

*Long-Term Debt : 

Bonded Debt 2 , 726 , 000. 00 

Long-Term Notes ^_ 2.726,000.00 

BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Construction Authorized - School 1,500,000.00 

Construction or Equipment Authorized 15, 1*30.21* 

Vouchers Payable 2,932.10 

Contracts Payable 733.03 1,519,095.37 

GRAND TOTAL - LIABILITIES 5,678,692.56 



Annual Report 



39 



GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS 

For the Tear Ended December 31. 1955 

Unappropriated Balance, December 31, 195k 1*3,085.89 

Applied to 1955 Budget 1*3, 000. 00 

Balance Remaining as of January 1, 1955 85789 

1955 Budget Surplus 

Unencumbered Balances of Appropriations 70 , 967 . 88 

Excess of Actual over Estimated Revenues 1*3,533.97 llli.501.85 

Plus: Excess Reserves Liquidated 

Reserve Against Tax Deeded Property 935. 1*1 935.1*1 

115,523.15 

Less: Additional Reserves Set Up 

To Increase Reserve Against Stores Accounts to 100$ 667.51 

To Increase Reserve Against Taxes Rec. Prior Yrs. to 100$ 16,577.61* 17,21*5. 15 

Balance Available for Reduction of 1956 Tax Rate 98,278.00 



STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT 

December 31, 1955 





Date of 


Date of 


Municipal: 


Issue 


Maturity 




1937 


1956 


Signal System 


191*8 


1958 


Equip. & Improve. . 


191*9 


1958 


Equip. & Improve.. 


1953 


1965 



Int. 
Rate 

T 

if 



Principal 

7,000.00 

23,000.00 

25,000.00 

60,000.00 

115,000.00 



Paid in 1955 



Interest 

315-00 

1,006.25 

1,312.50 

12,800.00 

15, 1+33-75 



Balance 

Dec. 31, 1955 

7,000.00 

69,000.00 

75,000.00 

580,000.00 

731,000.00 



School : 

High School 1925 1965 1*| 

Additions & Renov. 1951* 1961* 1.20 

Jr. High & Other . 1955 1975 2.10 



ll+,000.00 
30,000.00 

-0- 
1+1+,000.00 



6,5 1 +5-00 
3,1+20.00 
-0- 

9,965-00 



lU0,000.00 

255,000.00 

1,600,000.00 
1,995,000.00 



Self Liquidating : 

Water Const. & Land 19l*9 1969 1.75 

Parking Areas 1953 1963 1.50 

*San. Sewer Const .. 1955 1965 2.10 

#Water Const 1955 1966 2.10 



10,000.00 
20,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 



2,537-50 
2,550.00 
-0- 
-0- 



30,000.00 5,087.50 



11+0,000.00 
160,000.00 

100,000.00 

80,000.00 
1*80,000.00 



Total 189,000.00 

*Approx. 6% payable from Special Assessments 
#Approx. 50$ payable from Special Assessments 



30,1*86.25 3,206,000.00 



ANALYSIS OF DEBT MATURITIES 



Due in 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961 

1962 

1963 

1961* 

1965 

Beyond 1965 .. 

* * City of Concord 











Parking 


Municipal 


School 


Water 


San sewers 

10,000.00 


Areas 


115,000.00 


121* , 000.00 


10,000.00 


20.000.00 


108,000.00 


12l*,000.00 


18,000.00 


10.000.00 


20.000.00 


108,000.00 


121*. 000. 00 


13,000.00 


10.000.00 


20.000.00 


60,000.00 


121* , 000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


60,000.00 


12l*,000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20.000.00 


60,000.00 


12l*,000.00 


18,000.00 


10.000.00 


20.000.00 


60,000.00 


12U,000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


60.000.00 


121*. 000. 00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


50,000.00 


109,000.00 


18,000.00 


10.000.00 


-0- 


50,000.00 


91*, 000. 00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 


800,000.00 
1,995,000.00 


1*8,000.00 
220,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 


731,000.00 


100,000.00 


160,000.00 



Revenues 






Realized 


Excess I 
3,586.96 


leficiencj 


2,1*71,070.96 




22,072.00 


72.00 




5,976.87 




223.13 


60.78 


60.78 




268.00 




32.00 


7,656.23 


1,656.23 




121,071.80 


11,071.80 




352.28 


352.28 




1,358.53 


358.53 
16.903.U5 




2,629,887.1*5 





GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES 
For the Tear Ending December 31, 1955 



Budget 
Local Taxes : Estimate 

Property Taxes-Current Yr. Levy . . 2, 1*67, 1*81*. 00 

Poll Taxes-Current Yr. Levy 22,000.00 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,200.00 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs. -Prop -0- 

" " " " -Poll 300.00 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 6,000.00 

Auto Permits 110,000.00 

Rent & Profit Tax-Deeded Prop. ... -0- 

Timber Severance Tax 1,000.00 

2, 612,981*. 00 



State Tax Contributions ; 

Railroad Tax 13,000.00 12,288.61 711.39 

Savings Bank Tax 1*,000.00 ll*, 1*31. 12 10,1*31.12 

Interest & Dividend Tax 72,000.00 76,705.20 1*, 705.20 

Loss of Taxes - State Forest 30.00 31.08 1.08 

b9\030.oo 103,1*56.01 11*, 1*36. 61 



Licenses & Permits : 

Bicycle Registrations 500.00 515.00 15.00 

Taxi Licenses 1*00.00 1*52.50 52.50 

Health Licenses 1*00.00 391.00 9.00 

Amusement Licenses 2,700.00 2,1*1*6.00 251*. 00 

Police & Prot. Licenses 80.00 92.50 12.50 

Prof. & Occupational Licenses 120.00 127.00 7.00 

k, 200. 00 h, 021*. 00 " 176.00 



Registration Fees & Permits; 

Marriage Licenses 1,000.00 873.00 127.00 

Recording Fees - Legal Documents . 2,700.00 3,115.20 1*15.20 

Filing Fees 80.00 72.00 8.00 

Sundry Fees, City Clerk 500.00 508.55 8.55 

Dog Licenses 1*, 000. 00 3,592.39 1*07.61 

8.280.00 8 l6l.ll* 118.86 



Departmental Service Charges : 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concession 

Golf Fees 

Memorial Field, Royalties & Concess. 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 

Police Dept. - Ambulance Charges . 

Airport, Rent 

Airport, Concessions 

Fines & Forfeits 

Comm. on Head Tax Collections .... 
Weights & Measures, Fees 



Unclassified : 

Interest Income . 
Sale of Property 
All Other 



TOTAL REVENUES 



1, -1*00. 00 


1,315.00 




85.00 


150.00 


31*3.31* 


193.31* 




6,000.00 


6,068.00 


68.00 




100.00 


357.75 


257.75 




1,800.00 


3,889.70 


2,089.70 




1,000.00 


1,277.50 


277.50 




8,500.00 


8, 81*1*. 80 


3U1*. 80 




100.00 


77.19 




22.81 


10,000.00 


18,722.81* 


8,722.81* 




6,800.00 


6,661.01* 




138.96 


300.00 


1*26.71* 
1*7,983.90 


126.71* 
11,033.90 




36,150.00 




-0- 


51*6.20 


51*6.20 




500.00 


1,006.00 


506.00 




500.00 


113.27 




386.73 


1,000.00 


1,665.1*7 


665.U7 




2, 751,61*1*. 00 


2,795,177.97 


1*3,533.97 





Annual Report * * 1+1 



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Annual Report 



^7 



TAX ACCOUNTS 

Year Ending December 31, 1955 

STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 

1955 Prior State Head 

Levy Years Taxes 

Balance, January 1, 1955 255,953.80 2lT2lB7lO 

Taxes Committed to Collector in 1955 
( Incl. Supplemental ): 

Real Estate & Personal Property 2,502,357.01 60.78 

National Bank Stock Tax 5,976.87 

Timber Severance Tax 1,358.53 

Poll Taxes 2l*,072.00 268.00 

Head Taxes 77,575.00 

Total Charges to Collector »2,533,761* .lq 25^282. 58 98,793.10 

Accounted for as follows : 

Collections to Treasurer (Net of Refunds). 2,276,365.57 233,288.1*7 72,002.90 

Authorized Abatements 10,068.71 20,097.33 6,325.1iO 

Balance Uncollected December 31, 1955 21*7,330.13 #2,896.78 20.1*61*. 80 

Total Credits & Balance 2, 533, 76Jj.ZjT 256,282.5b 1 98,793.10 

♦Taken as Current Revenue 2,500,1*78.36 

Reserved for Abatements & Adjustments 33,286.05 

2, 533, 761*. 1*1 

#Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes of Prior Years 



19U8 
191*9 
1950 
1951 
1952 
1953 
1951* 



Property 


Poll 




Taxes 


Taxes 


Total 


89.1*3 


30.08 


119.51 


77.79 


36.00 


113.79 


95.81 


39.60 


135.1*1 


300.83 


38.20 


339.03 


318.25 


256.00 


571*. 25 


382.03 


550.00 


932.03 


309.66 


373.10 


682.76 


1,573.80 


1,322.98 


2,H96.78 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS 



Balance Unredeemed January 1, 1955 : 

Levy of 1952 7.673.52 

Levy of 1953 21,191.99 28,865.51 

Le vy of 1 951* (Tax Sale of 1955) 1*1.600.0** 
70,1*65.55 



Accounted for as follows : 

Collections to Treasurer 31. 622.1*2 

Authorized Abatements 10,082.96 

Deeded to City 589.86 

Total Credits 1*2,295.21* 

Balance Unredeemed December 31, 1955 ... 28,170.31 

70.1*65.55 



1*8 * * City of Concord 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 



BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1955 



Fixed Assets ; 

Land and Rights of Way . 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Customer Connections . . . 
Sundry Equipment 



ASSETS 



Less: Reserve for Depreciation 
Prepaid Engineering Expenses 



CurrentAssets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page ^7) 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund . . , 

Total Assets 



25,199.97 

1,1111,335.15 

106,976.16 

156. 677.11 

1,71*5.11 

1,UOli.93U.10 

6aii.33B.li3 



8, 31*5.81 
21,51*2.82 
61,736.66 



760,595.67 
8,739.33 



91,625.29 
860,960.29" 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 



Current Liability : 

Share in Special Assessment 

Long Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 

Share in Special Assessments 

Fund Balance & Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus - Balance January 1, 1955 

Net Profit for Year 1955 

Total Fund Balance & Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds. 



18,101.38 
1*, 235. 90 



3li,570.50 



1*0,000.00 
63,781.56 



1*81. 337.71 
188,933.21* 

52,337.28 



138,352.06 



722.608.23 

860,960.2$ 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1955 

OPERATING REVENUES 



Sewer Rents: 



General . . . 
Industrial 



26,315.11 
8,061.57 



3li,376.68 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



General Operation : 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor & Expense .. 
House Connection Oper. Labor & Expense 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 

Maintenance of Manholes 

Miscell aneous General Expense 

Customers' Expense : 

Meter Reading and Billing 

Administration : 

Employees' Retirement Fund 

Depreciation : 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Non-Operating Income : 

Interest on Investments . 

Premium on Bonds 

Net Profit for the Year 



9,21*9.76 

2.666.05 

1,1*32.36 

251*. 79 

59.56 


13.662.52 

1,718.85 










1,091.53 






15,298.53 


31,771.1*3 
2,605.25 




1,509.09 
121.56 


1,630.65 
U, 235. 90 



Annual Report 



1+9 



WATER FUND 



BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, 1955 
ASSETS 

Fixed Assets, Net of Accrued Depreciation: 

Water and Flowage Rights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping & Purification Equipment 

Distrib. Mains, Services, Hydrants & Meters. 

Other Equipment & Garage Equipment 

Total Fixed Assets 

Bond Fund Assets : 

Cash - First National Bank 

Investments 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Total Bond Fund Assets 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments ( See Schedule Page i ', ) 

Loaned to Special Assessment Projects 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Contracts Receivable 

Total Current Assets 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Current Liability: 

Share in Special Assessments 

Long Term Liability : 

Bonded Debt 

Total Liabilities 

Fund Balance and Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus - Balance January 1, 1955 528,501.92 

Net Profit for the Year 1955 37.187.0J4 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 



167.663.11 
201,872.50 
287,167.90 

UU, 173.61 
8Uo,119.3U 

23,320.58 



660.03 
11,700.00 
18,805.67 



67.382.53 
13.U17.06 
26,935.00 
75,369.85 
319.26 



13,llU.02 
liiO,000.00 



963.19U.7U 
99,608.72 

565.988.96 



1.567. 317.01 



31.165.70 



183.U23.70 
1,781, 906. UU 



153.11U.02 



1.628, 792. U2 
1.781, 906. UU 



BOND FUND-WATER-ISSUE OF 1949 



Disposition of Proceeds 

Balance - January 1, 1955 

Expenditures - 1955 

Unexpended Balance December 31, 1955 



12,360.03 
-0- 

12,360.03 



',0 



City of Concord 



WATER FUND 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1955 

OPERATING REVENUES 



Commercial Sal es - Flat Rate . . . 

Commercial Sales - Metered 

Industrial Sales - Metered 

Sales to Other Water Utilities . 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues ... 

Total Operating Revenues 



2,930.82 

150,132.12 

35.U57.UO 

U9.92 

333.00 



188,903.26 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



Water Supply : 

Source of Supply Labor 

Pumping Station Labor 

Purification Labor 

Miscellaneous Labor 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses 

Purification System Supplies & Expenses 

Fuel for Power 

Power Purchased 

Repairs to Pumping Station Str. & Equip. . . . 
Repairs to Purification System Str. & Equip. 

Distribution : 

Distribution Wages 

Meter Department Labor 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 

Other Distribution Supplies & Expenses 

Repairs to Distribution Structures 

Repairs to Mains 

Repairs to Services 

Repairs to Hydrants 

Repairs to Meters 

Administration : 

Commercial Office Salaries 

Meter Reading Sal aries 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 

Salaries of General Officers 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 

General Office Expenses 

Repairs to Gen. Office Structures & Equip. . 

Other General Expenses 

Insurance 

Stationery & Printing , 

Longevity, Annual & Sick Leaves , 

Retirement Fund Payments , 

Stores Department & Shop Expense 

Garage Expense 

Fixed Charges : 

Depreciation 

Taxes , 

Intere st 

Total Operating Expenses . 

Operating Income , 

Non-Operating Income : 

Gain on Sale of Depreciated Assets , 

Interest on Investments , 

Other Interest Income , 

Miscellaneous . 

Total Non-Operating Incone , 

Net Profit for the Year 



3,035.70 

15,051.80 

1,721.30 

2,320.95 

93.99 

2,365.11 

3,815.09 

199.21) 

11,255.38 

3.012.28 

91.21 



19, 729.7k 

1*. 217. 89 

25. Ill 

1,2814.82 

506.61 

2,152.76 

2,ii08.20 

681.76 

1,911.97 



2,052.32 

5,239.50 

385.71* 

5,930.00 

3,200.00 

379.31 

61.65 

310.58 

2,351.33 

35.00 

10,095.60 

6,5^2.56 

299.98 

1,610.33 



1)2,965.05 



32.922.16 



38,1*93.90 



37,065.72 
29.60 
2,537.50 39,632.82 



1.276.73 

681.01) 

6. 51) 

633.1*0 



151), 013 . 93 
31). 889. 33 



2,597.71 
37, 1)87. Oli 



Annual Report 



L ;l 



PARKING METER FUND 

BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, 1955 

Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Bond Requirements 

Liabiliti es: 

Bonded Debt 

Unappropriated Surplus 



25,1*63.73 
160,000.00 



160,000.00 
25,1463.73 



185.163.73 



185,1*63.73 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 

For the Year Ending December 31, 1955 

Cash Balance - January 1, 1955 

Revenues : 

Meter Collections - Street Parking 51, 225.71* 

Meter Collections - Off-Street Parking ... 9,715.0° 

Total Available 

Current Expenditures : 

Salaries: 

Meter Repairs 163 . 77 

Collections 569.11 

Enforcement 16, 852. 3l* 

Marking Streets 199.61 

Supplies: 

Meter Repair Parts 189 . 97 

Other Meter Supplies 66.13 

Enforcement 29l*.31 

Marking Streets 1,189.98 

Retirement Constributions 

Taxes, Insurance, Etc 

Lighting 

Parking Area Maintenance 

Meter Overhauling 

Total Current Expenditures 

Debt Service: 

Payment on Bonds 20, 000 . 00 

Interest on Bonds 2,550.00 

Capital Outlay: 

Purchase & Construction of Parking Areas 

* Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance December 31, 1955 

* Street Parking 19,182.69 

Off-Street Parking 3l*. 752.32 

53,935.01 



18,1*57.91 



60,91*0.83 



17, 731*. 83 



1,71*0.39 

995.1*9 

1,102.77 

1,525.63 

615.22 

1,500.00 

25, 291*. 33 



22,550.00 
6,090.68 



79.398.71* 



53,935.01 
25.1*63.73 



52 * * City of Concord 



PARKING METER FUND 



COMBINED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES FOR PARKING AREAS 



No. State Street Lot 
Freight Street Lot .. 

Low Avenue Lot 

Ford Avenue Lot 

Railroad Square Area 



Total Expended 

Prior Tear s 

11*0,531.35 

118,765.81* 

7,31*8.81* 

21,915.91 

36,198.80 

321*. 790. 71* 



Expended 
1955 from 
Cur r. Fund s 

9.3k 

6.081.3U 

* 6.090.68 



* See Statement of Expenditures on Opposite Page. 



BOND FUND-GENERAL-ISSUE OF 1953 

DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 
For the Year Ending Decejnber 31, 1955 



Total 

Expended 

11*0.531.35 

118,775.18 

7,31*8.81* 

28,027.25 

36,198.80 

330, 881. 1*2 



Balance January 1, 1955 



90,897.30 



Expenditures: 
Highway Construction: 

Main Street 

Concord-Boscawen Bridge 

Boudreau Square 

Storm Sewer Construction 

Public Works-Building Modifications 

Recreational Facilities 

New Equipment 

Fire Department 

Public Works Department 

Total Expenditures 

Balance December 31, 1955 



1*1*, 613. 1*0 

12.788.27 

5,798.32 



1.952.50 
5,1*22.59 



63,199.99 

3,893.92 

105.00 

893.06 



7,375.09 



75.1*67.06 



15,U30.2U 



Annual Report * 



53 



EQUIPMENT AND STORES FUND 

BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1955 



Assets 

Due from General Fund 5l,U22.8l 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 25,335.39 

Equipment 299,989.85 

Total Assets 



376.7h8.05 



Liabilities & Funds 

Municipal Investment 329,hm.09 

Capital Reserve Fund U5.599.59 

Surplus 1,73^.37 

Total Liabilities & Funds 



376.7^8.05 



OPERATING STATEMENT 
For Year Ending December 31. 1955 
Equipment Earnings 

Operating Expenses: 

Direct Labor- 19, 131. U 

Indirect Labor 12, 769. lit 

Leaves & Longevity 2 , 516 . I4O 

Outside Services (Building Repair) 3 , 7li7.75 

Gas, Oil & Parts Iil.800.l6 

Grease & Lubricants 67li . 17 

Small Tools & Supplies 2,139.01 

Fuel & Utilities 3,631.U8 

Insurance la, 8 32. 53 

Employees Retirement Contribution 2,158.92 

Depreciation on Equipment 

Net Profit for Period 



13l4.7u9.72 



93,U00.97 
38,137.03 



131.538.00 
3,211.72 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASES 



1 Worthington Compressor 

1 Ford 5 Ton Truck 

1 Rex Pump 

1 Ford Country Sedan 

1 Caterpillar Tractor - Bulldozer 

1 Gabb Sidewalk Roller 

2 70" Locke Power Mowers 

3 21" Jacobsen Power Mowers 

1 21" Toro Power Mower 

1 Side-Mounted Mower for Tractor 

Less Equipment Sold 

Net Expended from Reserve Fund 



2,1478.91 

ij.877.70 

396.89 

996.00 

15.725.00 

h9h. 00 

1.W6.77 

3014.29 

330.75 

279.30 



27,339.61 

1,926.00 

25,1*13.61 



^ 



City of Concord 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 



BALANCE SHEET - DECEMBER 31, 1955 



Assets 

Cash for Construction 

Improvements Authorized-Not Completed . . . 

Assessments Receivable-Deferred 

Due from Other Funds 

Water Fund Share of Construction Costs 
San. Sewer Fund Share of Constr. Costs 



13.1LU.02 
98,352.06 



12,659.69 
68,132.00 
33,232.38 



111,1*66.08 255,1*90.15 



Liabilities & Surplus 

Vouchers Payable 

Contracts Payable 

Reserve for Authorized Improvements . . 
Long Term Debt 

Bonds Payable 

Loan payable to Water Fund 

Loan payable to Sanitary Sewer Fund 
Surplus 



7,926.58 

1,981.65 

16,1*85.22 

11*0,000.00 
26,935.00 

61,736.66 228,671.66 
1*25. Ol* 



255,1*90.15 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 4 EXPENDITURES 



Cash Balance January 1, 1955 

Receipts: 

Cash Advanced by Water Fund 

Cash Advanced by Sanitary Sewer Fund 
Proceeds of Bond Issue 

Total Available 

Expenditures: 
Water Main Extensions 

River Road 

Abbott Road 

Manchester St. & Airport Road 

Christian Avenue 

Pleasant View Avenue 

Abbott Road (2nd Project) 

Sanitary Sewer Extensions 

Auburn Street 

Christian Ave. & East Side Drive .. 

West End (to Vicinity of Hospital) 

Pleasant View Avenue 

Unexpended Balance 

Cash on Hand 

Less Vouchers & Contracts Payable ... 



7,807.71 
2,607.12 
51,61*6.78 
2,962.12 
2,156.20 
2,289.03 

8, 631*. 02 
1*3,1*20.50 
69,636.59 

2,192.61* 



12,71*9.13 



5,780.00 
67,150.00 
11*0,1*25.01* 213,355.01* 



226.10^.17 



69,1*68.96 



123,883.75 193,352.71 



1*2,659.69 
9,908.23 



32,751.1*6 



Annual Report * * 55 



INDEX 



CITY OF CONCORD , 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Your City Officials -1955 4 

Manager's Forward 6 

City Council Actions-1955 7 

Administration 

Records Department 9 

Assessing Department 10 

Finance Department 11 

Legal Department ■-- 12 

Engineering Department 13 

Planning Department 14 

Protection of Persons & Property 

Civil Defense 16 

Fire Department 18 

Police Department 20 

Municipal Court 22 

Inspections 22 

Public Health & Welfare 

Health Department 24 

Welfare Department 25 

Public Services 

Airport 26 

Cemeteries 27 

Public Library 28 

Recreation & Parks Depart- 
ment 30 

A Municipal Utility (Water De- 
partment) 32 

City Housekeeper (Public Works 

Department) 34 

Capitol Improvements 36 

Financial Tables: 

Combined Balance Sheet- 
General & Related Funds -- 38 
General Fund -Statement of 

Current Surplus 40 

Statement of Long Term Debt -- 40 
General Fund -Statement of 

Revenues 41 

General Fund -Statement of Ap- 
propriations & Expenditures - 42 
Statement of Assessments for 

1955 - 46 

Trust Funds -Statement of Changes 

in Balances 47 

Schedule of Investments -All 

Funds 47 

Tax Accounts 48 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 49 

Water Fund 50 

Parking Meter Fund 52 

Bond Fund-General 53 

Equipment & Stores Fund 54 

Special Assessment Fund 55 



Population (1950) 

— -- 27,988 

Area -64 Square Miles 

Streets^ 180 Miles 

Water Main 

___ 106 Miles 

Sewers 87 Miles 

Assessed Valuation - 
$48,278, 291.00 

Tax Rate: 

Concord - $51.40 
Penacook -56.48 

Form of Government 
Council-Manager 

Capital City of the 

State of 

New Hampshire 

County Seat of 
Merrimack County 



TELEPHONE 

DIRECTORY OF 

CITY DEPARTMENTS 



Assessors - 
Cemetery — 
City Manager 
Engineering 

Finance 

Fire 

Health 

Legal 

Library 

Planning 

Police 

Public Works 

Records 

Recreation & 

Parks 

Water 

Welfare 



CApitol 
4-0241 
5-3911 
5-3591 
4-1955 
5-2775 
5-3355 
4-0521 
5-2531 
5-2743 
5-1955 
5-3232 
4-1742 
4-0591 

5-3281 
4-1711 
4-1091