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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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NEW HAMPSHIRE 




ANNUAL 
REPORT 




the 
Year 



1956 




ANNUAL 
REPORT 




CITY OF CONCORD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ANNUAL REPORT 

for the 
Year Ending December 31, 195 6 




******** 

Page 

City Manager's Foreword 1 

Introducing Your City Council 2 

City Council Actions-1956 3 

Your City Officials-195 6 4 

Municipal Boards-1956 5 

Progress Report-1956 6 

Administrative Departments 8 

Protection of Persons & Property- 15 

Health & Welfare Services 20 

Public Service Departments 22 

1956-A Year of Industrial & Civic 

Growth 28 

Water Department 30 

Engineering & Public Works 

Departments 32 

Planned for the Future 36 

Financial Tables-Index 37 

Concord's New City Flag 56 

A Telephone Directory of Public 

Services Inside Back Cover 



****************** 



The cover features a sketch of City 
Hall's familiar steeple and an aerial view 
of the city's business district. 








CITY OF CONCORD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 



To the Honorable City Council 
and Citizens of Concord: 



CITY 
MANAGER'S 
(FOREWORD 



This seventh annual report under Con- 
cord's Council-Manager charter presents a 
brief review of the more significant happenings 
of the year 195 6. 

Your city government exists for one pur- 
pose. That sole purpose is to provide the 
services essential to the protection and wel- 
fare of the citizen of the community, which he 
cannot practically provide for himself. 

In the growing complexity of our age much 
more is expected of our local government and 
the demands for services are growing faster 
than our ability to finance them, especially 
in view of our narrow tax base under which 
property bears nearly nine-tenths of the total 
cost of local government. 

Much progress is in evidence, however, 
and the future looks bright. Concord's po- 
litical stability and model Council-Manager 
charter is attracting more and more attention 
to our community as a desirable place to live 
and establish a business. 

It has been a pleasure to have had the 
opportunity to serve under a fine City Council 
and to work with a group of loyal city employ- 



ees. 



J^C^^^ 



WoodburyBrackett 
City Manager 




INTRODUCING YOUR CITY COUNCIL 



Howe Anderson, Mayor 
Herbert W. Rainie, Mayor Pro -tern 

COUNCILMEN-AT-LARGE 
Howe Anderson Herbert W. Rainie 

Charles C. Davie Conrad W. Robinson 

Wendell F. Grant William A. Stevens 



WARD COUNCILMEN 
James P. Ferrin 
Paul M. Cunningham, Jr. 
William H. Hunneyman 
Malcolm McLane 
Leroy W. Davis 
Clarence L. Clark 
William P. Gove 
Paul E. Madden 
Thomas B. Jennings 



Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 
Ward 5 
Ward 7 
Ward 8 
Ward S 



Membership: 15 
Expenditure: $3,355.95 

Elected: Biennially on the second Tuesday following the first Mon- 
day in November. 
Meetings: Regular -Held on the second Monday of each month. 

Special -Held on call of the City Manager or a majority 

of the council. 
Finance Committee - (consisting of the entire member- 
ship) Held on call of the City Manager or a 
majority of the council. 
Place: Council Chamber, City Hall. 

Mayor: Elected for a two year term by the council from among its 
members. 



CITY COUNCIL ACTIONS-1956 



Enacted 30 ordinances. 
Adopted 46 resolutions. 



Held 12 regular meetings. 

Met for five special meetings. 

Conducted 10 public hearings. 

Adopted a record budget of $1,889,352.00 (including General, 

Water, Sanitary Sewer and Parking Meter Funds). 

Approved reorganization of the Police Department. 

Rejected a proposal to increase parking meter fees on North 

Main Street. 

Voted to reopen the Low Avenue Parking Lot issue and studied 

proposed special assessment financing of the project. 

Authorized the City Manager to obtain options on land for the 

Heights playground. 

Granted a supplemental budget appropriation of $96,900. 00. 

Approved extension of the Heights Road sewer. 

Authorized purchase of 80 acres of land for airport improvement. 

Rejected an ordinance relating to taxi meters and rate fixing. 

Amended the Classification Plan to provide a new salary schedule 

for the Police and Fire Departments and wage adjustments for 

other employees. 

Approved sale of a 126 acre tract of land on Pembroke Road to the 

Concord Regional Development Corporation. 

Rejected purchase by condemnation of a house on Green Street for 

addition to parking area. 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS-1956 



City Manager 



City Clerk 

Civil Defense Director 

City Engineer 

Building Inspector 
City Sealer 

City Auditor 

City Collector 
City Treasurer 

Fire Chief 

City Physican 

Sanitary Inspector 

Librarian 

Planning Director 

Police Chief 

City Solicitor 

Supt. of Public Works 

Recreation Director 

Water Superintendent 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Judge 

Special Judge 
Clerk of Court & 
Probation Officer 



Woodbury Brackett 

C. Fred Moulton 
A. Harold MacNeil 
Shelby O. Walker 

Arthur E. Roby 

John H. Sanders 

Howard E. Raymond 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
J. Shepard Norris 

Archie N. Gourley 
Amos B. Morrison 
Wallace W. Jones 

Clarence H. Green 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. 
Austin B. Presby 

Siri M. Andrews 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 
Walter H. Carlson 
Atlee F. Zellers 
Howard E. Raymond 
Donald F. Sinn 
G. Arthur Faneuf 



Donald G. Matson 
Francis E. Perkins 

C. Murray Sawyer 



MUNICIPAL BOARDS-1956 



Eugene F. Magenau, Chairman 
Carroll Garland, William Johns , 
Arnold Perreton, Donald Wells 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , Chairman 
Homer E. Lawrence, M. D. 
William D. Penhale , M. D. 

Mrs. Eugene F. Magenau, Chairman 
Mrs. Roger W. Barney, Joseph J. Comi, 
Otis Kingsbury, Chester G. Larson, 
Mayland H. Morse, Jr. , Willis D. 
Thompson, Jr. , Mrs. Frederic K. Upton, 
Timothy Woodman 

Walter B. Sweet, Chairman 
Gen. Edward H. Brooks , Pierre A. 
Boucher, M. D. , Edson F. Eastman, 
Irving Edelstein, Mrs. Harlan F. 
Johnson, Kenneth W. Jones, Walter M. 
May, Mrs. Winslow E . Melvin, 
Mrs. Maurice W. Mullin, Peter J . 
Murphy, Mrs. Frank Perron, Samuel S. 
Richmond, Mrs. Alfred W. Tovey 

Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 
Woodbury Brackett, Gen. Edward H. 
Brooks, Gardner G. Emmons, 
Douglas Everett, Warren H. Greene, 
A. Clifford Hudson, John B. Jameson 

Robert F. Keane, Sr. , Chairman 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick, George E. Young 

Robert M. Beyer, Wallace W. Jones, 
Leon Merrill 

Lawrence J. Moynihan, Chairman 
Frederick Hall , Roy Y. Lang, 
Frank J. Preston, Enoch Shenton 

Archie N. Gourley, Chairman 
Allen N. Leavitt, Howard E. Raymond, 
Stewart Nelson, Atlee F. Zellers 

Herbert E. Kimball, Chairman 
William H. Macurda, John H. Symonds 



Board of Building 
Appeals 



Board of Health 



Library Board of 
Trustees 



Recreation Advisory 
Council 



Planning Board 



Board of Plumbing 
Examiners 

Trustees of Trust 
Funds 

Zoning Board of 
Adjustment 

Board of Revision of 
Assessments 



Personnel Advisory 
Board 



PROGRESS REPORT-1956 



Modern highways fan out in 
four directions from this modi- 
fied cloverleaf (shown below) 
where the new throughpass 
crosses Manchester Street. 
The completed overpass, center, 
ties roads north and east of 
Concord with the F. E. Everett 
Highway, n e a r i n g completion 
south of the city. 



* Progress was made by State 
contractors on the Manchester- 
Concord section of the F. E. 
Everett toll highway. The 
freeway section, connecting 
the Concord by-pass with 
Route 3A was opened to traffic. 

* Reorganization of the Police 
Department wa s accomplished, 
bringing promotions through 
the ranks to several young 
officers. 



Plans were drawn for a new 
Concord Heights playground. 
Negotiations were carried on 
and some land was purchased 
for this purpose. 



?*? 




Construction of a new $1,0 7 3, 
000 junior high school 
was started in the South End. 
Contracts were awarded by 
the school board; city water 
and sewer mains were laid to 
serve the new building. 

Water main extensions on 
Airport Road and Manchester 

Street were completed the 

firstmajor special assessment 
project in New Hampshire 
history. 

A new room was completed at 
the Concord Public Library 
and dedicated to the memory 
of Miss Grace Blanc hard, city 
librarian for many years. 
Created out of three small 
study rooms, this new room 



■HHR 



The new hangar 
under construct- 
ion at Concord 
Airport. 





2$ Jfi 



^/^Ifrfea^ _ 



will seat 70 persons and is available to the public by reservation. 

* Evans report on review of the Classification & Compensation Plan 
was accepted and studied, resulting in pay increases for uniform- 
ed personnel and salary and wage adjustments for other employees. 
City employees approved intergration of the retirement system with 
the Federal Social Security program; the new plan adopted July 1 , 
retroactive to January 1, 1955. 

* Heights Road sewer contract was let to Samuel Aceto Company, 
for $10,770; construction to begin immediately. 

* Reconstruction of North State Street was started, involving ap- 
plication of hot asphaltic concrete paving from Roger Avenue to 
a point eight-tenths of a mile south. 

* Expansion of the municipal airport was begun, with construction 
of a $40,000 hangar and a runway extension program and high- 
intensity lighting system to cost $36,000. Both projects were 
well underway at the end of the year. 



The Library 

Board of 

Trustees, 

meeting in the 

newly completed 

Blanchard Room. 




ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 4 Full-time 

2 Part-time 
Expended $18,980.54 

FINANCE DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 9 Full-time 

Expended $49,068.58 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 1 Part-time 

Expended $ 3,493.04 

PERSONNEL & PURCHASING 
DEPARTMENT 
Expended $ 609. 17 

PLANNING DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 2 Full-time 

Expended $11,079.5 3 

RECORDS DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 2 Full-time 

Expended $33,139. 72 



:'■ :;•••■'. ■';■; wXi 




Your ASSESSING DEPART- 
MENT is charged with maintain- 
ing up-to-date records on all 
taxable property in the city. It 
systematically appraises and re- 
appraises this property for tax- 
ation, issues warrants for tax 
collection and prepare s tax rolls 
for poll and head tax collection. 

The department is headed 
by a Board of Assessors, one of 
whom is a full-time employee in 
charge of the department office. 

* Held 29 meetings of the Board 
of Assessors heard 74 ap- 
peals. 

* Submitted property, bank 
stock and yield tax warrants 
totaling $2,674,22 5.28 in 

1956 a 6% increase over 

the total of 1955 warrants. 

* Prepared poll and head tax 
warrants totaling $98, 961. 37. 

* Assessed total gross valu- 
ation of real and personal 

property at $49,178,815 

a $900,000 increase over 
the 195 5 figure. 

* Assessed 5 3 families living 
in house trailers at $68,800 
the biggest item in tax- 
able personal property. 

Assessor, C. Fred Moulton 
(right) , and Appraiser, Gordon W. 
Stevenson, check the last of 
some 10,000 property appraisal 
cards, the final step before 
starting computation of Con- 
cord's 195 6 tax rate. 




Set 1956 tax rate at 






CONCORD 






City Budget 


$25. 


40 


School Budget 


25. 


81 


County Budget 


2. 


49 


Tax Rate 


$53. 


70 


PENACOOK 






City Budget 


$25. 


40 


School Budget 


33. 


30 


County Budget 


2. 


49 


Tax Rate 


$61. 


19 



Received 1 , 509 applications 
for tax exemption from vet- 
erans and blind citizens 

158 applications denied, 
mostly due to tax delin - 
uency. A law passed by the 
1955 Legislature limits vet- 
erans exemptions to $1,000 on "residential real estate 
Allowed $33,911. 70 in tax abatements during 1956. 
Added $2,909. 30 in taxes during the year. 



HOW YOUR PROPERTY TAX WAS 
USED IN 1956 

Average home assessment 
in Concord $5,000. 00. 
@ $53. 70 per $1,000. 00 
= $2 68. 50 property tax. 




//School 

fa 

m 




County 
Services 

5% 



Municipal 

47% 
Services 



$129.05 $127.00 $12.00 



For the first time in history, 
city property owners paid more 
for operation of the School Dist- 
rict than for all functions of city 
government controlled by the 
City Council. 



only. 



The FINANCE DEPARTMENT serves as a clearing point for all 
financial transactions of your city. All income, money borrowed 
and expenditures are recorded in detail. Each and every bill against 
the city is carefully audited and classified before payment is made. 

Special assessments and property, poll and head taxes are 
billed and collected. Budgetary control is a continuous and daily 
chore. Auto permit fees, water and sewer rents, departmental re- 
ceivables and many other revenues are collected. 

Borrowings are timed to take advantage of favorable interest 
rates. Investment of temporarily idle funds yields many thousands 
of dollars in interest income. Trust funds are accounted for, in- 
vested and the income disbursed. 

Interest rates on temporary borrowing increased sharply, aver- 
aging 2. 10%, compared to the 1955 average of 1. 33%. 

The bonded debt decreased during the year by a net amount of 
$2 39 ,000; $40 ,000 in new debt was incurred and $279,000 was paid 
off, as shown in the debt schedule on the following page: 



The Board of Revision of Assessments (above) conducted hearings on 
two special assessment projects during 1956. Bills totaling $3, 795 
were issued for the first of 10 annual payments on eight projects cost- 
ing a total of $15 0, 1 12; the first billing of its kind in New Hampshire . 

Balance Payments New Debt Balance 

Dec. ,1955 During 195 6 Issued 1956 Dec, 1956 

Municipal $ 731,000 $115,000 $40,000 $ 656,000 

School 1,995,000 124,000 1,871,000 

Water 220,000 10,000 210,000 

Parking Areas 160,000 20,000 140,000 

Sanitary Sewe rs 100,000 10,000 90,000 

Total $3,206,000 $279,000 $40,000 $2,967,000 

* Assembled and printed the annual budget for 195 6. 

* Issued 12,700 auto permits, yielding $128,856 an increase of 

6% over 1955. 

* Collected 90% of the 1956 property tax levy and 76% of the poll 
tax levy. 

* Collected State head taxes totaling $70,854. 

* Secured tax liens amounting to $32 , 65 6 $8, 944 less than in 1955. 

* Received redemptions of tax liens totaling $34, 95 7 compared 

with $31,622 in 1955. 

* Borrowed $40,000 for the new airport hangar at 2. 6% interest. 

* Realized $36,444 from investment of temporarily idle funds bor- 
rowed for the Union School District income being applied to- 
ward payment of interest on bonds. 



The LEGAL DEPARTMENT, represented by the City Solicitor, 
safeguards the city's interests in legal matters. He represents the 
city in all court actions, prepares legal papers, reviews agenda 
and attends council meetings and hearings. He i s available for 
legal opinions, advice and research to all city departments, special 
boards and members of the City Council. 

* Participated in 19 court actions during 195 6. 

* Prepared 98 legal documents (deeds, writs, agreements, lease s,etc.) . 

10 



* Collected $9,625.32 in delinquent taxes and insurance claims 
through legal action. 

* Searched 35 6 titles to tax sale property. 

* Attended 15 meetings and hearings of the City Council. 



The PERSONNEL & PURCHASING DEPARTMENT is administered 
by the City Manager. 

The administration of personnel procedure is governed by the 
Personnel Rules & Regulations and Compensation & Classification 
Plan, adopted in 1950. The Personnel Board acts in an advisory 
capacity on all important personnel matters and as a board of appeal 
when an employee desires a hearing. 

City employees joined State workers in approving intergration 
of the former retirement system with the Federal Social Security pro- 
gram, providing additional benefits. City employees participated 
in balloting on the referendum during April. Social Security cover- 
age,, effective July 1, 1956, was provided retroactive to January 1, 
1955, by requiring payment of contributions for the previous 18 month 
period. The City paid in $18,138, and acted as agent in collecting 
the same amount from employees. During September, 15 3 city em- 
ployees received cash refunds ranging from $30 to $1,025, repre- 
senting the difference between employee contributions under the old 
retirement plan and reduced retroactive contributions. 

A review of the Classification & Compensation Plan was con- 
ducted by Charles Evans Associates of Boston. Comparisons were 
made with the same jobs in three state governments, 1 1 other cities, 
and 4,016 jobs in private industry. Recommendations were made 
and adopted by the City Council, for correction of inequities in many 
job sepcifications and ratings. As a result, wage and salary in- 
creases amounting to $22,220 were made effective July 1 , 1956, in- 



Part of a group of 14 candidates which participated in a written ex- 
amination for police patrolmen in December. Chief Walter H. Carl- 
son (standing) served as proctor. 




eluding a two step ($240) increase for uniformed personnel of the Fire 
and Police Departments and increases ranging from $60 to $1,200 
for other employees. 

The Employees Credit Union completed its third year of oper- 
ation in September, with a membership of 148 employees of the City 
and School District. A 4. 8% dividend was voted for the 1955-56 
fiscal year. 

* Held four meetings of the Personnel Advisory Board to study the 
Classification & Compensation Plan. 

* Compiled and administered examinations for firefighter, police 
patrolman and police chief. 

* Processed 350 personnel actions during the year. 

City purchasing is done through a centralized purchasing 
system in open competition. Sealed bids are received on major 
items , and many for which there is a constant demand are contracted 
for on a yearly basis. 

* Wrote over 2,800 purchase orders. 

* Spent $378,519 on purchase of supplies and services during 195 6. 

* Saved $2,241 by taking advantage of cash discounts for prompt 
payment on many purchases. 



The PLANNING DEPARTMENT renders a service that often can 
be measured only in terms of the future. Although planning is a 
necessary part of the entire city administration this job is done 
primarily by the Planning Department. Such planning is not con- 
fined to the physical aspects alone, but takes into account eco- 
nomic, sociological, educational and recreational factors, all of 
which enter into the development of a city as a better place in which 
to live and work. 

The department is headed by a planning director who studies 
each problem carefully and reports his findings to the Planning Board 
which, in turn, makes its recommendations to the City Council. 

* Held 12 meetings of the Planning Board in 1956. 

* Prepared a preliminary plan showing locations of existing and 
proposed major traffic arteries by type, as part of a master plan 
of major highways. 

* Prepared a plan for financing the proposed Low Avenue parking lot 

by special assessment procedure the first plan of its kind ever 

considered by any New Hampshire community. 

* Completed a land use plan for the City of Concord a major ac- 
complishment of 1956. 

* Devoted more time and effort to zoning matters in 1956 than dur- 
ing any year since the Board's establishment 14 zoning changes 

were studied. 



12 



* Began work on revision of the Concord building code to bring it 
into line with recent advances in building materials and methods 
a special advisory committee was appointed. 

* Studied and recommended highway improvements in the Concord 
Plains section, including reconstruction of Loudon Road. 

* Prepared and certified a plan showing mapped locations of future 
streets in the lower South Street area. 

* Investigated the need for rural road improvement recommended 

rebuilding of East Sugar Ball Road and relocation of a section of 
Carter Hill Road for early construction. 

* Continued cooperation with the Concord Regional Development 
Corporation, including preparation of a large promotional map. 

* Recommended five petitions, involving 2,500 feet of new water 
main and 1,800 feet of sanitary sewer main, under condition of 
special assessment financing. 

* Recommended proposals to install school caution lights on Loudon 
Road at two locations near the Dame School and on North State 
Street opposite the Walker School. 

* Approved extension of Wilson Avenue and Chase Street, and wid- 
ening of intersections at Broadway, Wiggin and South Main 
Streets, at Hall and Manchester Streets, at Clinton and South 
Streets and at Penacook and Rumford Streets. 

* Surveyed possible sites for a new playground in the Hall Street 
section. 

A typical Planning Department project was the preparation of this 
completely new master plan of the Concord Airport. It inolves a 
complete relocation of airport facilities and is necessarily a long- 
range project; however, it sets up a pattern for development a s 
major improvements are required. Progress is currently being made 
on runway improvements in line with the plan shown here. 




Although vital administrative decisions are not made here, 
the RECORDS DEPARTMENT might be called the "heart" of the city, 
for it is centered in the mainstream of the city's affairs and sooner 
or later all details of the city's life flow through its records. 

* The City Clerk attended all meetings and hearings of the City 

Council in the capacity of clerk prepared and distributed copies 

of the minutes of all proceedings. 

* Received and turned over to the City Treasury $11,359.85 in 
license and service fees during 195 6. 

* Issued 2,014 dog licenses. 

* Recorded 2, 676 mortgages and conditional sales agreements, and 
436 discharges. 

* Conducted three elections: 

Presidential Primary, March 13; 2 ,928 votes cast(43%of 1952 vote). 

Direct Primary, September 11; 6,111 votes cast. 

National & State General Election, November 6; 12 , 650 votes cast. 

* Filled requests for absentee ballots, between October 15 and 
November 6 810 ballots were returned and counted. 

* Registered 700 new voters increases in Wards 2, 3 and 8 re- 
flect suburban movement of population. 

* Vital statistics recorded, compared with 1955: 

1956 1955 

Births 995 892 

Marriages 319 302 

Deaths 659 691 

* Furnished certificates of record (birth, marriage, death) in de- 
mand slightly greater than last year. 



All appointees must report to the City Clerk to be sworn in before 
assuming a city office. Here City Clerk Arthur E. Roby, (right) 
administers the oath of office to Roy Y. Lang, on his appointment as 
a member of the Zoning Board of Adjustment. 





\ 




/ 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Personnel 2 00 Volunteers 

Expended $ 396.43 

FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Personnel 50 Full-time 

78 Part-time 

Expended $225,977.00 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Personnel 3 Part-time 

Expended $ 6,000.00 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Personnel 38 Full-time 

Part-time 

Expended $197,589.83 



Concord attempts to do its 
part in the CIVIL DEFENSE effort. 
The city organization, with a full 
staff of volunteer unit leaders, 
participated in test alerts and 
operated the local aircraft obser- 
vation post atop the State Office 
Building. 

Citizens wishing to donate 
time to aircraft observation work, 
or indicate their willingness to 
assist in other capacities should 
contact: Mrs. Ruth L. Brown at 
CA 5-2 698, or Henry C. Newell, 
Deputy Director, at CA 4-0922. 




Participated in a limited alert 
held May 2 , to test state-wide 
communications , and a 15 
minute state -wide test on July 
20, with satisfactory results. 
Distributed 28,000 air raid 
warning instruction cards. 
Provided over 2,800 man hours 
of coverage at the local obser- 
vation post. 

Laurence I. Riis, Sr. resign- 
ed as local CD Director. He 
i s shown (right) receiving 
a citation from Adm. C. A. 
Brinkmann, State CD Chief , 
in recognition of his contri- 
butions over the past four years. 

An independent group, known a s 
the Penacook CD Rescue Squard, 
carried on well organized activ- 
ities and participated in several 
local emergencies. A group i s 
shown here operating communi- 
cations equipment during a drill. 



15 








Firemen are shown fighting 
flames on the Pickering Street 
side of the building occupied 
by the Superior Electric Com- 
pany and Bridge & Bryon, 
printers. 



Date 
May 25 
March 11 
July 2 
October 21 
* 



Concord's FIRE DEPART- 
MENT maintains a 24 hour vigil, 
ready instantly to respond to an 
alarm of fire within the city or 
a call for assistance from a 
neighboring community. 

As important as its work 
in fighting fires is the depart- 
ment's contribution to fire pre- 
vention. Constant inspection of 
oil burner installations, the high 
value district and public build- 
ings of all kinds, plus fire 
patrols at all places where large 
numbers of people congregate 
reduce the number of fire 
hazards. 

Firemen spend many hours 
studying the latest fire fighting 
methods. Classes are held for 
permanent personnel and drills 
for both permanent firemen and 
call men during the summer 
months. This year, some mem- 
bers attended drill school at 
Fitz William, N. H. 

* Responded to 517 calls during 
1956; 55 box alarms and 462 

still alarms a decrease of 

107 calls from the 1955 total. 

* Held gross fire loss at $183, 
775 out of property involved 
in fire valued at $821,250; 
$178,775 recovered in in- 
surance benefits, leaving a 
net loss from fire of $5,000. 

Two persons died a s the 

result of fire in 195 6. 

* Major fires in 1956: 
Approximate Loss 

$77,500 



Location 
J. C. Pitman Co. 

Concord Photo Engraving Co. 50,000 

Kodockadee Farm 50,000 

Superior Electric Co. and Bridge & Byron 25,000 

Made 1,403 fire hazard inspections. 

* Inspected 764 oil burner installations. 

* Maintained in excellent condition at all times 17,050 feet of 
hose purchased 45 feet of new hose in 195 6. 



16 



12 


19 


2,529 


4,256 


116 


193 


8,402 


8,445 


1,047 


1,589 



* Recharged 2 74 fire extinguishers at the Central Fire Station. 

* Tied in traffic lights at Bourdour Square, Penacook, with fire 
station controls to assure right-of-way for emergency vehicles. 

* Constructed 600 minature fire trucks for distribution to under- 
privileged children at Christmas. 

The MUNICIPAL COURT plays a vital roll in the governing of 
our community, by dispensing justice to those accused of violating 
its laws. The municipal judge is appointed by the governor and 
council to serve until he attains the age of 70. He, in turn, ap- 
points a special judge and court clerk. 

Concord's Municipal Court sets in the court room at police 
headquarters, in regular sessions every weekday between 9:00 A. M. 
and 12:00 Noon. When the case load is especially heavy afternoon 
sessions are held. 

* Heard a total of 12 , 180 cases 2 , 322 fewer cases than in 1955: 

1956 1955 

Criminalcases: Felonies 

Misdemeanors 
Civil cases 
Parking violations 
Small claims 

* Handled 74 juvenile cases nine less than last year. 

* Received $35, 690 in court income $2 ,298 less than received 

in 1955, due to a $3,911 decrease in fines paid. 

* Remitted $15,461 to the City Treasurer compared with$18,722 

in 1955 and $12,031 to the State Motor Vehicle Department. 

The Concord POLICE DEPARTMENT aims to enforce the law by 
prevention of violations whenever possible, as well as by appre- 
hension and arraignment of violators. 

School traffic patrols and safety programs and activities of 
the Concord Police Boy's Club attempt to develop law-abiding young 
people. Road checks are made to promote safer driving. Constant 
patrol of city streets and prompt investigation of all suspicious or 
unusual circumstances reported prevent many law violations and 
personnal injuries. Talks and discussions are conducted before 
local civic and church groups in an attempt to educate the public to 
a better understanding of police problems and the law. 

Police efficiency is constantly being improved through exten- 
sive training courses carried out locally and at special schools of 
instruction for permanent, reserve and auxiliary forces. During 1956 
instruction was provided in the use of firearms, first aid, care and 
operation of the alcometer and general police methods. 

Reorganization of the Police Department was carried out, abol- 
ishing the position of deputy chief and adding two more captains 
and one lieutenant. Appointments were made in line with results 
of an examination held in December, 1955. 

17 




Above: Four police officers, 
three of them advanced in 
rank for the second time with- 
in a year, are sworn in by 
the City Clerk. They are : 
2ndCapt. Daniel C. Abbott, 
3rd Capt. Richard J. Morey, 
Lt. Jason D. Hines and Sgt. 
Richard J. Campbell. 

Right: Retiring Police Chief 
Arthur W.McIsaac (left), con- 
gratulates Walter H. Carlson , 
who became Concord's new 
police chief on October 1. 



CONCORD POLICE DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION CHART 



CHIEF 



#3 Capt. 



Equip. 
Mechanic 



Gen. 
Maint. 



#1 Capt 



Lieut. 



#2 Capt 



Lieut 



Patrol Sgt Patrol Sgt Patrol Sgt 



Foot & Motor Patrolmen 



Auxii. 
Police 



Meter 
Maint. 



Juvenile 
Officer 


Records 
Bureau 



House- 
man 



18 



Booked 75 major offenses (58 larcenies, 11 burglaries, six auto 
thefts) and 10,784 secondary offenses for a total of 10,859 of- 
fenses 877 less than the 1955 total. 

Recorded 10,352 traffic violations 8,402 parking violations 

(80% of all law violations) 465 traffic accidents (135 injured , 

one death). 

Collected $61,988 in parking meter fees a $1,000 increase 

over the 1955 collection. 

Reset 36 parking meters straightened 385 meter posts. 

Conducted 10 road checks. 

Replaced verbal orders to appear in court for traffic violations 
with written notices, giving the court legal power to punish of- 
fenders for failure to appear. 
Inspected and registered over 2,400 bicycles. 
Recovered 86% of all property reported stolen. 

Conducted the annual police census during April 2 8,134 persons 

and 1,550 dogs listed. 

Inaugurated C. P. B. A. Boy's Club day camp program attendance 

averaged 40 boys per day. 



Modern equipment promotes more efficient Police Department oper- 
ation. Below: (Right) Mrs. Rhea Woodman, of the Records Bureau, 
uses the new photocopy machine, which saves many hours of typing 
in duplicating police records. (Left) Former Chief Mclsaac and 
Mechanic Patrolman, Thomas J. Roy, inspect the new Cadallic am- 
bulance. This new vehicle was purchased at a cost of approximately 
$7,000 plus trade-in allowance on the old 1950 ambulance. The 
police made more than 1,200 free ambulance trips in 1956, at an 
average annual cost 
of 50 cents to each "^.-^"j . f 

property taxpayer. 







HEALTH & WELFARE SERVICES 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 4 Full-time 

1 Part-time 
Expended $14,983. 15 

WELFARE DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 2 Full-time 

1 Part-time 
Expended $84,630.57 



Shown below are part of the 480 
persons who filled the city audi- 
torium on July 25, to receive 
first or second shots of Salk 
polio vaccine. This was the 
largest attendance at a clinic 
on record to that date, and 
the second largest heldinl956. 




The City HEALTH DEPART- 
MENT functions to protect the 
health of Concord citizens. Its 
activities include free public 
polio clinics, operation of a 
public downtown comfort station 
and sanitary inspection ser- 
vices. 

The City Sanitary Inspect- 
or investigates all complaints 
promptly, makes routine inspec- 
tions and issues notices for cor- 
rection of conditions when 
necessary. He maintains lab- 
oratory facilities at the city 
hall, where samples of dairy 
products are analyzed for clean- 
liness and quality. He fre- 
quently visits dairies and food 
hand ling establishments 
throughout the city. 

The NewConcord Hospital 
serving Concord and surround- 
ing communities with the latest 
in medical care facilities, was 
completed and opened in May, 
195 6. The city contributed 
$28,235 to the Concord Hos- 
pital, its proportional share 
of the hospital's operating 
deficit also, $4,700 to- 
ward support of the Concord 
Visiting Nurse Association's 
work in Concord and Pena - 
cook. 

* Administered 4,318 shots of 
polio vaccine , to children , 
young people (up to 19 years 
of age) and pregnant women 
at 17 clinics. 

* Treated 376 children at 



HOWCOSTOFASSISTANCETOTHEAGED 
& INFIRMED WAS SHARED IN 1956 



1 


Did Age Assistance (Citizens) 






CITY 
25% 


STATE 
25% 


FED. GOV'T 
50% 




< 


Did Age Assistance (Aliens) 






CITY 
5 0% 


STATE 
15% 


FED. GOV'T 
35% 




Aid to Permanently & Totally Disablec 


I 




CITY 

35% 


STATE 
15% 


FED. GOV'T 
50% 











nine vaccination 
- immunization 
clinics. 

Collected and an- 
alyzed 2,507 dairy 
and rinse samples 

sent 243 reports 

of analyses to pro- 
ducers and dealers. 
Condemned as un- 
fit for human consumption and destroyed approximately 350 pounds 
of foodstuff. 

Made 1,426 environmental inspections and investigations 

issued 259 written notices to correct unsatisfactory conditions. 
Noted the frequency of colds, pneumonia and other respiratory 
illnesses during 195 6 to be far above average. 



The WELFARE DEPARTMENT maintains offices in Concord and 
Penacook. Food, fuel, medical care, boarding home care, etc. 
are provided in cases where no other source of assistance is avail- 
able. The merits of each case are thoroughly investigated before 
welfare aid is granted. 

* Average monthly case loads, with total costs: 

1956 1955 

Cases Amount Cases Amount 



#General Relief (Including 
Board &Care Hospital-Medi- 
cal, Dependent Soldiers) 
##01dAgeAssistance (Citizen 

& Alien) 
##Aid to Permanently & Totally 
Disabled 
# City bears the entire cost. 
## Chart above shows how this cost is distributed. 



32 $22,487.16 36 $22,818.70 

238 49,148.52 259 47,775.90 

7 2,500.57 6 2,335.73 



* An increase of $3. 00 in medical pool payments, effective July 1 , 
1956, caused an increase in Old Age Assistance expenditures 
in spite of the reduced case load. 

* Sickness and marital difficulties were the leading causes of re- 
lief need in 1956. 



21 



PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 



' : i --■■'■ 



m 



AIRPORT 
Personnel 
Expended 



1 Full-time 
$13,948. 14 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Personnel 16 Full-time 

Expended $78,383.40 

RECREATION & PARKS 
DEPARTMENT 
Personnel 12 Full-time 



Expended 



$90,874. 07 




For the past 20 years 
CONCORD AIRPORT has been 
operated by the City as a 
municipal service. More 
recently, it has become an 
important factor in the in- 
dustrial economy of the area. 

The airport occupies 
approximately 600 acres of 
land on Concord Heights. In 
addition to three hard-sur- 
faced runways, there are two 
hangars leased to private fly- 
ing services and a brick ad- 
ministration building, hous- 
ing Civil Aeronautics Admin- 
istration , U. S. Weather 
Bureau, State Aeronautic s 
Commission and air transport- 
ation offices. 

The Northeast Electron- 
ics Corporation, which has 
operated in the basement of 
the administration building 
since 1953, plans to start 
construction of its own build- 
ing adjacent to the airport, 
early in 1957. 

The City Public Works Depart- 
ment performs the necessary 
maintenance work at the air- 
port. Here the Sno-Go removes 
snow to free parked cars fol - 
lowing a heavy snowfall. The 
City received commendation 
from Northeast Airlines, Inc. , 
on its winter maintenance of the 
airport. It was necessary to 
cancel only one flight dur- 
ing the 1955-5 6 winter season 
due to field conditions here. 




State Aeronautics Commission chief inspector, Gardner Mills (left), 
and City Engineer, Howard E. Raymond, discuss plans for airport 
improvement. In the background can be seen a large area already 
cleared at the south end of the main runway. 



Served by Northeast Airlines, Inc., operating daily flights be- 
tween Concord and New York additional summer service was 

provided to points in northern New Hampshire. 

Enplaned 2,348 passengers compared with 1,614 passengers 

last year. 

Loaded nearly double the volume of cargo handled in 1955: 



Mail 

Express 

Freight 

Total 



1956 

9,484 lbs. 
18,232 lbs. 

8,850 lbs. 
36,566 lbs. 



1955 

3,22 6 lbs. 

5,466 lbs. 
10,409 lbs. 
19,101 lbs. 



Started construction in July on a new $40,000 steel frame hangar 
to be leased to Fern's Flying Service. 

Awarded the contract for installation of a high-intensity lighting 
system, clearing of land and pavement removal to the Seaward 
Construction Company of Portsmouth, N. H. ; to cost $36,272 in 

city, State and Federal funds. Work was started in December 

to be completed in 1957. 

Negotiated for and acquired part of the land necessary for ex- 
tension of the NE/SW instrument runway 1,000 feet clearing 

of land was started by a sub -contractor in December. 

Filed a petition with the New Hampshire Aeronautics Commission 

for designation of Concord Airport in the express catagory 

would make available more Federal aid for runway construction 
to accommodate larger type aircraft. 



23 



Concord's PUBLIC LIBRARY is a source of pride, both for its 
physical facilities and service rendered. The year 1956 marked the 
completion of 100 years of library service to the citizens of Concord. 

A large meeting room, created out of three small study rooms, 
was completed and dedicated in April, 1956. It is known as the 
Grace Blanchard Room, honoring Miss Blanchard who served the 
city as librarian for over 40 years. This room has a seating capacity 
of 70 persons and is a valuable addition to the library's space for 
library functions and public use. 

Fewer books were purchased during 1956, due to the increased 
cost, but emphasis was placed on broadening the collection and add- 
ing duplicates of popular titles. 



Initiated a circulating phonograph record collection. 

Doubled hospital library service books were also supplied to 

several nursing homes and the alcoholic ward. 
Displayed art and craft exhibits by local artists and groups. 
Arranged book displays on a variety of subjects. 
Four staff members prepared weekly articles on library activities 
for the local newspaper. 

Three staff members represented the library at 133 meetings. 
The Assistant Librarian gave a course in children's literature at the 
University of New Hampshire. 
Sponsored three public discussion groups. 

Added 5,612 volumes (459 gifts), discarded 1,750 volumes; for 
a net gain of 3,862 volumes in 1956 (718 volumes less than in 
1955), and a total book collection of 75,619 volumes. 
Circulated 252,020 volumes (an average of 14 books per regis- 
tered borrower) 12,613 more than in 1955. 

Circulated 57,648 books (2 3% of the total circulation) from 

the booktrailer. 

* The booktrailer made weekly 

stops at five schools 

circulating 35,080 books to 
children. 

* Loaned 2,658 books to ele- 
mentary schools. 

* Had 969 volumes rebound. 

A projection magnifier, capable 
of enlarging print five times 
for the individual reader, was 
presented to the library. Miss 
Siri Andrews, Librarian, (right) 
is shown here accepting the 
gift from Dr. Harry Volkel, 
chairman of the sight conser- 
vation committee of t h e Lions 
Club. 





A talk by Oliver Butterworth, 
author of "The Enormous Egg" 
and other books for children, 
highlighted the library's ob- 
servance of Book Week. Mr. 
Butterworth is shown at left 
talking with two members of 
the Junior Reading Club. 



Recataloged 2,283 volumes 

20,000 cards typed and 

filed. 

Revised the registration 

file 16,912 citizens hold 

library cards. 

Answered 6,221 reference 

questions nearly 1,000 

more than in 1955. 

Held two series of classes for mothers of pre-school children. 

Showed 30 film programs to 1,008 children. 

Told 150 stories to 1,2 01 children at 68 story hours. 

Awarded prizes for summer reading 330 children participated 

compared with 30 participants in 1952. 

The Junior Reading Club met 36 times, reaching approximately 

1,500 high school pupils. 

Authors Oliver Butterworth and Rosamond Du Jardin, author of 

teenage fiction, spoke to audiences of children and young people 

about books. 

Maintained the library at a cost to the city of approximately $1. 90 

per resident less than the price of one hard-bound book. 



Providing parks and recreation activities for its citizens gives 
the city both pride and pleasure. Services performed by the RECRE- 
ATION & PARKS DEPARTMENT include operation of a municipal golf 
course, athletic field, nine playgrounds , seven swimming pools 
and two indoor centers. Sports and holiday events, dances, clubs 
and instruction in sports and skills provide recreation and enter- 
tainment for all ages. 

* Operated a ten week summer playground and swimming instruc - 
tion program for children estimated attendance at 78,000. 

* Conducted special summer events: 



Band Concerts 

Junior Swim Meet 

4th of July Celebration 

Weirs Teenage Trip 

Outdoor Basketball League 



Peanut Carnival 
Rotary Club Swim Meet 
Recreation Review 
Baseball League 
Inter-playground Sports Day 



* Conducted fall and spring after-school and Saturday programs 



25 




This "Jungle Gym" is one of the 
items purchased with a $400. 00 
gift to Rolfe Park from the Town 
of Boscawen in appreciation of 
use of the park by Boscawen 
children. 

(baseball, girl's softball, 
tennis and playground games). 

* Held year-round and seasonal 
events: 
Neighborhood Square Dances 

#City-wide Square Dance Party 

Halloween Events 

Archery Classes 

Cooperative Play Schools 

Easter Egg Hunt 
#Junior Theatre 
#Junior Chorus 
#Indoor Golf Classes 
#Bridge Instruction 
#Minerology Club 

Record Hops 

Sunset Club 

Boy's Football League 

Men's & Boy's Basketball Leagues 

Children's & Adult's Arts & Crafts Classes 
#Events inaugurated during 1956. 

* Maintained seven skating rinks in addition to White Park pond 

and hockey rink, for a record-long 79 day season an estimated 

50,000 skaters used White Park facilities. 

* Conducted special winter events: 
Children's Skating & Skiing Lessons 
Winter Carnival Events 

JayCee Silver Skates Derby 
(attracted over 1,000 par- 
ticipants and spectators. 
* Prepared and maintained 
facilities for use of over 50 
different community organi - 

John B. Penney (left) , who will 
become Concord's new Recre- 
ation Director on February 1 , 
1957, is shown conferring with 
the City Manager and the pres- 
ent director, Donald F. Sinn 
(right), whose resignation was 
received effective December 31 , 
1956. 





Children of the Cooperative 
Play School enjoy a Christmas 
party. The playschool, for 
three and four year-olds, com- 
pleted its third successful sea- 
son at the White Park recreation 
building. Anew play school was 
started at the West Street Ward 
House. 

zations and school athletic 

programs some 3 0,0 

persons made use of park 
facilities during the year. 

* Made extensive renovations 
at West Street Ward House 
for its use as an indoor center 
(painting, carpentry, rewir- 
ing, toilet facilities, heating 
system and rifle range). 

* Operated Beaver Meadow 
Golf Course at the lowest 

net cost in history comparative figures for 195 6 and five years 

ago show an increase of 57. 2% in revenue. 

Revenue Expenditures Net Cost to City 

$2,009.00 
974. 00 



1952 



$6,419.00 



$4,410. 00 
1956 6,924.00 7,898.00 

Constructed a practice green at the golf course. 
Installed night lighting at White Park outdoor basketball court. 
Created an island in White Park pond. 

Constructed portable bleachers and permanent park benches. 
Performed routine work of mowing, trimming and caring for shrubs 
and flowers at parks, playgrounds, athletic field, golf course 
and roadside areas. 
Maintained buildings, 
fences and playground ap- 
paratus in good condition. 



Square dancing is a popular 
activity with both young and 
old. Here a group of young- 
sters learn the "Virginia Reel" 
at a neighborhood square dance 
party sponsored by the depart- 
ment in cooperation with school 
mother's clubs. Considerable 
enthusiasm for square dancing 
was shown by members of the 
Sunset Club, a group of our 
elder citizens. 





Completed in 1956, the new Transistor Division plant 

JH of Sprague Electric Company added 32,000 square feet 

of production space to Concord's industrial capacity. 




Thedevek. lt( 
dustrial park one.' ,rc 
continued throu ! 
by the decision c 
trie Company to 

Another 
Cornwallis Cra:! 11 
builders moved . n 
quarters on Nor. ft 



1956-A YEAR OF INDUS 



Completion of the new $1, 073,000 
junior high school, in 1957, will add 
50 newclassrooms and allow conversion 
of the present junior high, on North 
Spring Street, to an elementary school. 
The old Kimball and Parker Schools will 
then be abandoned. 

A $100,000 addition was built 
onto the high school at Penacook. 



The Richard D. Brew Compa: 
firm on Airport Road, doubled:: 
construction of a 6,000 squai 



isiM* 




Construction was begun on the new junior high school 
in Conant Park. In the foreground below is the Conant 
School, one of Concord's modern elementary schools. 




-*?• 





■ i 



Several est. |i ( 
moved intoorsta: 
tionof new build. 

Such other : 
construction as I 
cord Hospital, a 
restaurant, a dry- 
conversion of th< 
Hospital to State 
ment offices and 
stations were co 
90 new homes we 
in Concord durin 



opmentof an in- 
3oncord Heights 
?h 1956, spurred 
>f Sprague Elec- 
locate there. 

new industry, 
.ft, Inc. , boat 

into renovated 
Ith State Street. 




This new market, on South Street, was one of three 
super markets under construction in Concord during 1956. 



5TRIAL & CIVIC GROWTH 



', electronics research 
its production space with 
are foot addition in 195 6. 



1 




:ablished firms 
rtedconstruc- 
lings, 

^on-industrial 
:'the New Con- 
|| major chain 
-leaning plant, 
8 old Memorial 
Health Depart - 
| several filling 
f mpleted. Over 
\*e constructed 
[g 1956. 



195 6 saw construction of two new 
Catholic churches in Concord and reno- 
vation of two Protestant churches. An 
act of the City Council granted transfer 
of a portion of Fiske Park, at the inter- 
section of North Main and Bouton Streets, 
for erection of the new Concordia Lu- 
theran Church. 



St. Peter's Catholic Church, on North State 
Street, was completed and dedicated in 1956. 

rmn 




WATER DEPARTMENT 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Personnel Full-time 

Expended $208,038.09 



The Water Department crew lays 
pipe in Manchester Street, a 
part of the "Black Hill" project 
which was started in 1955 and 
completed this year. 






m v 







! ' A 




+ 



'«W 



Concord's WATER DEPART- 
MENT is its only municipal util- 
ity, operating exclusively on 
revenue received from its own 
services. 

A study of Concord's 
water supply with particular re- 
ference to "causes of taste, odor 
and corrosive effect" was com- 
pleted by Thomas R. Camp, con- 
sulting engineer. His report was 
accepted and approved by the 
City Council in May. A thorough 
pipe cleaning program, which 
will be undertaken in the near 
future, was recommended to im- 
prove the taste and odor of our 
water. The addition of an alkali 
to the water supply was recom- 
mended to counteract the slight 
acidity common to all soft sur- 
face water and the corrosive ef- 
fect reported on certain metals. 

He also predicted a vast 
increase in the demand for water 
in line with Concord's expected 
population growth and r e c o m- 
mended serious consideration of 
the acquisition of an additional 
source of supply before 1960. 

An increase in water and 
sewer rates was proposed to 
finance costs of improving and 
expanding the system. 

* Supplied 1,417,470,800 gal- 
lons of water consumed during 
195 6, or an average of 3,872, 
870 gallons per day (about 138 

gallons per person daily) 

19,013,200 gallons less than 
were used in 1955. 



Additional work 
was created for 
the Water De- 
partment crew 
when a power 
digger on the 
North State 
Street recon - 
struction pro- 
ject broke into 
the 18 inch 
water main, 
flooding the 
street. 





m 



Laid 16,338 feet of six through 12 inch cement lined cast iron 
pipe, making 1956 the largest year for water system construction 
since 1940. 
Major 1956 construction projects: 

"Black Hill" project completed laid a new water main in Man- 
chester Street and relaid the six inch main in Airport Road using 
12 inch pipe. 

Relocation of the main in South Main Street under the F. E. 
Everett Highway. 
Old Turnpike Road extension. 
Eastside Drive extensions. 

Extension off South Street main to serve the new junior high 
school in Conant Park, laid for the Concord School District. 
Set 24 hydrants (totaling 757 hydrants in system). 
Installed 34 mainline valves (totaling 1,606 valves in system) . 

Laid 129 new service connections 72 old services replaced 

with copper tubing (totaling 5,963 services now in use). 

Set 134 new meters on new services (5,245 meters now in service) . 

Repaired 43 leaks 18 on mains and 25 on service connections. 

Solved a long standing problem when it was decided that the 75 H. P. 
motors at the We st Concord Pumping Station would not stand up un- 
der 4,000 volt across the board starting operation the motors 

were rewound to 440 volts and transformers installed to cut the 
voltage to a safe degree. 



31 



ENGINEERING AND PUBLIC WORKS 
DEPARTMENTS 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 






Personnel 4 Full-time 


The ENGINEERING DE- 


Expended $ 21,541. 


33 


PARTMENT provides the tech- 


INSPECTION DIVISION 




nical know-how that goes into 


Personnel 1 Full-time 


public works construction of 


1 Part-time 


all kinds. It is constantly be- 


Expended $ 6,658. 


01 


ing called upon by the public 
and other city departments to 


PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 


provide information, ranging 


Personnel 85 Full-time 


from requests for street lines 


Expended $681,028. 


68 


and utility locations to design 


CEMETERY DIVISION 




and supervision of major con- 


GARAGE & STORAGE 




struction projects. 


DIVISION 






HIGHWAY DIVISION 




* Prepared construction plans 


REFUSE DIVISION 




and specifications and ad- 


SEWER DIVISION 




vertised for bids on the fol- 
lowing major projects: 
Reconstruction of 4,000 feet 
of North State Street. 
Heights Road sewer. 
High-intensity lighting sys- 
tem at the airport. 




Airport runway extension. 



*-* 



'*** £Vl 






a 



Engineering Aide Newton Sweet, Jr. (extreme left) and City Engines 
Raymond explain details of surveying to college students employed fc 
the department for summer work. 




Each year the Cemetery Di- 
vision provides community 
Christmas trees for Concord 
and Penacook. At right, a 
crew from the Concord Elec- 
tric Company set up and dec- 
orate the tree in the square 
at Penacook. This year Con- 
cord's tree on the State 
House Plaza was awarded 
first prize in the first annual 
Christmas Tree Judging by the 
Roadside Improvement As- 
sociates. 

Supervised clearing of land 
for airport runway extension. 
Laid out the corner of Airport, 
Loudon and Pembroke Roads 
for reconstruction. 
Drew a plan, with assistance 
of E. N. Roberts, for a new ac- 
cess road at the intersection of Hall and Water Streets. 
Renumbered houses on South Street, Rockingham Street to the Bow line. 
Made a general survey of sidewalks and a plan for 195 6 repair work. 
Made extensive surveys at the following locations: 
City owned land east of Hall Street to determine area and bounds. 
North Pembroke Road to determine the feasibility of constructing 

a storm sewer drew plans to establish the area to be serviced. 

South Street, south of Mooreland Avenue drew up plans for the 

Planning Department's street and sewer studies in this area. 

Crowley Road T.R.A. project prepared final construction grades 

and layout for its completion. 

Joffre, Haig and Nivelle Streets furnished grades and street 

lines for construction of these streets to accepted standard by the 

State laid out a service road between Haig and Joffre Streets. 

Made a preliminary survey and secured bounds for a T. R. A. pro- 
ject on Carter Hill Road. 

Prepared the layout for construction of a new hangar at the airport. 
Set grades for the following special projects: 

Sewers on Fellows Street, Conant Park and beyond the accepted 
end of Wilson Avenue (to serve a proposed sub-division). 
Future construction of Eastern Avenue. 

Extension of Conant Drive to intersect with Springfield Street. 
Construction of an island in White Park pond and a skating rink 
at West Concord for the Recreation & Parks Department. 
Prepared maps for special assessment projects, and maintained 
sewer and Assessor's maps. 
Issued new street map folders for public distribution. 



33 



1 


m BET; E= CT- 


1 


nr -r ■* «■ *» 


1 


a* '. 1 VI ""^ 


■ 


r .1 IP ' > lei 



HOIM 




Highway Foreman Nelson Byers 
and City Manager Brackett in- 
spect the new Elgin street 
sweeper delivered in June. 



~ ~*~>mmmmmmmmmm 



*s-w 



The IN- 
SPECTION DI- 
VISION of the 
Engineering De- 
partment exper- 
ienced a busy 
year, with a p - 
plic a t i o n s for 
building permits 
and construction 
at a high level. 
This division is 
responsible for 
admini s te ring 
the building and 
zoning laws, 
issuance of 
building permits 
and inspectionof 
all local construction, plumbing and weighing and measuring devices. 

* Issued a total of 293 building permits (158 for new construction 

and 135 for alterations and additions), valued at $4,096,627 

issued 24 fewer permits, but nearly doubled last year ' s value, 
due mainly to approval of the new $1,037,000 junior school dur- 
ing 1956. 

* Inspected 360 weighing and measuring devices. 

* The Zoning Board held 2 7 meetings heard 71 cases. 

* The Board of Plumbing Examiners issued 22 journeyman and 29 
master plumbers licenses, and examined five new applicants. 

The city PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT is organized into five 
divisions, each contributing its share toward keeping out city safe , 
clean and attractive. 

The principal highway project during 1956 was reconstruction 
of . 786 mile of North State Street in West Concord, by the Man- 
chester Sand, Gravel & Cement Company, successful bidder on the 
project. Three-fourths of the cost of this $70, 000 job was borne by 
the State and Federal governments. 

Mix-in-place bituminous concrete paving was laid on Center 
Street, North Main to North State Streets, Pleasant Street, State to 
Spring Streets, and on newly reconstructed Blake Street. This was 
applied by a contractor under agreement with the city, and is ex- 
pected to stand up for at least 20 years without retouching. 

The Heights Road sanitary sewer project was awarded to the 
low bidder, Samuel Aceto Company of Portland, Maine, for $10,770, 
in December. This job will consist of laying 1,350 feet of eight 
inch pipe and installing 10 manholes, connecting Heights Road and 
Bridge Street. 

Heavy snowfalls, frequently occurring on weekends, pushed 
the cost of winter highway maintenance far above last year. The 



34 




■*»? 



Lettering is completed on two new 2 cubic yard 
jfuse packers added to the city fleet this year. 

city spent $104, 
000 on this work 
during the first 
three months of 
195 6, 65% more 
than during the 
same period last 
year. 

* Plowed streets, 
side wa Iks 
and the air - 
port 14 times. 

* Removed 167, 
00 cubic 
yards of snow. 

* Spread over 
6 tons of 
rock salt and 

6,250 cubic yards of sand on streets and sidewalks. 
Graded and shaped 86 miles of gravel road. 
Built new culverts on Oak Hill and Shaker Roads. 
Repaired the floor of the Federal Bridge. 

Planted 94 new street trees removed 39 trees. 

Began work on the Carter Hill Road T.R.A. project straighten- 
ing a dangerous curve at the Jackman estate. 
Set 540 linear feet of granite curbing. 

Applied more than 228,500 gallons of asphalt and 5,400 cubic 
yards of sand for surface treatment on 40 miles of streets and 
roads. 

Used 4,150 tons of cold patch on streets. 

Collected 71,813 cubic yards of waste material in packers and 
open trucks, traveling 35,100 miles. 

Constructed 149 new street signs and repaired numerous others. 
Completed over 1,200 repair jobs on motorized equipment. 
Made 42 fibre and 25 steel brooms for the sweepers. 
Maintained over 172 acres of cemetery grounds. 
Set foundations for 93 new monuments and 109 new markers. 
Made 340 interments. 
Sold 89 new cemetery lots. 

Started work on two new blocks in Calvary Cemetery for future 
use: 

Serviced 30 main line and 109 lateral sewer plugs. 
Built five new manholes and repaired 15. 
Built or relayed sanitary sewers in Wilson Avenue, PutneyAvenue, 

Fellows Street and Grover Street built a storm sewer in Wilson 

Avenue. 

Built six catch basins, repaired 28, cleaned 42 and thawed 46. 
Raised mahholes in connection with the reconstruction of North 
State Street. 

35 



PLANNED FOR THE FUTURE 






1956 saw what 
promises to be only 
the beginning of a 
vigorous construc- 
tion and business ex- 
pansion trend which 
will bring far reach- 
ing changes to the 
physical and eco- 
nomic character of 
our city. The years 
immediately ahead 
will be vital ones 
in shaping the future 
of Concord. 



Completion by State contractors of the 
Manche ster-Concord section of the 

F. E. Everett Highway. Widening of 

the Concord by-pass to four lanes for 
1,882 feet, including construction of 
two new bridges. 

A Federal Highway Bill, making avail- 
able millions of dollars for interstate- 
highway construction, will permit con- 
tinuation of the central New Hampshire 
expressway north through Concord, and 
another new highway from Bow Mills 
passing west of Concord to Lebanon. 
Projects under construction or scheduled 
will soon place Concord on a network 
of 70 miles of four-lane highway. 

Completion of the high-intensity light- 
ing system and construction of a 1,000 
foot runway extension at Concord Airport. 

Complete acquisition of Heights play- 
ground land and a new play area site in 
the Hall Street section. 

Completion of the North State Street re- 
construction project south to Blossom 
Hill Cemetery. 

Initiation of the sanitary-fill method of 
refuse disposal. 

Construction of a new bathhouse-skate- 
house at White Park. 

Construction of a storm sewer system 
on Concord Heights. 




A water main cleaning and acidity con- 
trol program; also relaying of much un- 
der sized water main. 






FINANCIAL TABLES 



INDEX 

Page 
Combined Balance Sheet-General 

& Related Funds 38 

General Fund-Statement of Current 

Surplus 40 

Statement of Long Term Debt 40 

General Fund-Statement of Reve- 
nues 41 

General Fund-Statement of Appro- 
priations & Expenditures 42 

Statement of Assessments for 

1956 46 

Trust Funds-Statement of Changes 

in Balances 47 

Schedule of Investments -All 

Funds 47 

Tax Accounts 48 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 49 

Water Fund 50 

Parking Meter Fund 52 

Bond Fund-General 53 

Equipment & Stores Fund 54 

Special Assessment Fund 55 





. a m 89 ■ >im 



COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 

Concord National Bank - General Account . 524,559-19 

invest Funds 1,050.00 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons JQJ-O 50»W:.tH 

Taxes Receivable: 

Current Year Levy - Property 266,563.37 

Current Year Levy - Polls 4,74l.60 

Total Current Year 271,304-97 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 15,352-21 255,952.76 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Property 1,481-95 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Polls 787-55 

Taxes Bought by City - Unredeemed 24,820.02 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 27,089.52 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 27,089.52 -0- 255,952.76 

Accounts Receivable : 

Water & Sewer Rentals 50,797-30 

Departmental Receivables 11,520.05 

Cemetery Receivables 5,441.40 67,758-75 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization ... 12, 577 -0 1 * 55,181.71 

Stores Accounts : 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 4,113.15 

Postage Meter Inventory 313-15 

Recreation Dept. Inventory 313-21 4,739-51 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization ... 4,739.51 -0- 

Tax-Deeded Properties : 2,653-63 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 2,653.63 -0- 

State Head Taxes Receivable : 

Current Year 17,235-00 

Prior Years 2, 066.65 19,301.65 

Total General Fund Assets 856,428.56 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 

Cash - Concord National Bank Il,6l8.66 

Investments 628,309.06 639,927-72 



CAPITAL FUND ASSETS (Municipal & School) 

* Bond Requirements - Future Years : 

Municipal 656,000.00 

School 1,871,000.00 2,527,000.00 



BOND FUND ASSETS 

Cash - Concord National Bank 137,137-06 

Cash - In Other Banks 6,394.00 

Investments 793,606. 00 937,137-06 

GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 4,960, 493 -3^ 

* Does not Include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer, Parking Meter or Sp. Assess. Funds 
38 



GENERAL AND RELATED FUNDS 



31, 1956 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES 



Accounts Payable : 

Unpresented Coupons 

Current Vouchers Payable 

Payroll Deductions 

Unexpended Appropriations : 

Union School District 

Interest - Union School District Bonds 

Penacook School District 

Library Earmarked Income 

Reserved for Encumbrances . 

Due to Other Funds : 

Equipment & Stores Fund 

Water Fund 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 

Parking Meter Fund 

Special Assessment Fund 

Advance Deposits : 

Taxes Collected in Advance 

Options, Plans, Etc 

Taxes Due to State : 

Head Tax Levy of 1956 

Timber Yield Tax - a/c Debt Retirement Fund 

Total General Fund Liabilities 



383.25 
73, 3*6. 95 
13,669-Ul 87,396.61 



1480,812.92 

13,637.36 

40,130.80 

87.15 

ll*,5l6.68 



25,1*1*5.67 
71,799-57 
15,820.1*3 
39,219.31 
2,382.96 



21+.00 
5,313-93 



5l+9,l8i*.91 



15i*,667-9i* 



5,337-93 



21,1*86.00 

21U.71 21,700.71 



818,288.10 



Current Surplus 

Total General Fund Liabilities & Surplus 



38,11*0.1*6 
856,1*28.56 



TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 



Principal 

Accumulated Income 



618,883.26 
21,Ql*l*.l*6 



639,927.72 



CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES (MUNICIPAL & SCHOOL) 



* Long-Term Debt : 
Bonded Debt 
Long-Term Notes 



2,1*87,000.00 

1*0,000.00 2,527,000.00 



BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Construction Authorized -School .... 900,000.00 

Reserve for Construction or Equip. Authorized - General 7,1+11.68 

Reserve for Encumbrances 17, i *5 1+ .05 

Vouchers Payable 1, 000 . 00 

Due to Other Funds 11,271.33 

GRAND TOTAL - LIABILITIES 



937,137.06 
1*. 960, 1*93 .& 



39 



GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1956 

Unappropriated Balance, December 31, 1955 

Applied to 1956 Budget 

Balance Remaining as of January 1, I956 

1956 Budget Surplus 

Unencumbered Balances of Appropriations 13,884.87 

Excess of Actual Over Estimated Revenues 10,197-36 

Plus: Excess Reserves Liquidated 

Reserve Against Tax-Deeded Property 112 .34 

" " Taxes Receivable, Prior Years 16,297.69 

Dept . Receivables 532.25 

Less: Additional Reserves Set up 

To Increase Reserve for Non-Realization of Stores Accts. 

to 100$ 870.70 

Adjustment of Dept. Receivables (1955 Accounts) 2,016.32 

Deeded Property Used for Highway Purposes 75. 03 

Balance Available for Reduction of 1957 Tax Rate 



98,278.00 

98,200.00 

78.00 



24,082.23 



16,942.28 
41, 102 . 51 



2,962.05 
38,140.46 



STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT 



December 31, 1956 





Date of 


Date of 


Int. 


Paid 


in 1956 


Balance 


Municipal: 


Issue 


Maturity Rate 


Principal 


Interest 


Dec .31, 1956 


Storm Sewers . . . 


1937 


1956 


2.25 


7,000.00 


157.50 


-0- 


Signal System . . 


1948 


1958 


1-25 


23,000.00 


718.75 


46,000.00 


Equip. & Improve 


1949 


1958 


1.50 


25,000.00 


937.50 


50,000.00 


Equip. & Improve 


1953 


1965 


2. 


60,000.00 


11,600.00 


520,000.00 


Airport Hangar 


1956 


1966 


2.6 


-0- 


-0- 


40,000.00 




115,000.00 


13,413-75 


656,000.00 


School: 














High School 


1925 


1965 


4.25 


14,000.00 


5,950.00 


126,000.00 


Additions & Renov. 1954 


1964 


1.20 


30,000.00 


3,060.00 


225,000.00 


Jr. High & Other. 


1955 


1975 


2.10 


80,000.00 
124,000.00 


33,600.00 
42,610.00 


1,520,000.00 
1,871,000.00 


Self Liquidating: 














Water Constr.&Land 1949 


1969 


1-75 


10,000.00 


2,362.50 


130,000.00 


Parking Areas 


1953 


1963 


1.50 


20,000.00 


2,250.00 


140,000.00 


*San. Sewer Constr, 


■ 1955 


1965 


2.10 


10,000.00 


2,100.00 


90,000.00 




• 1955 


1966 


2.10 


-0- 


1,680.00 
8,392.50 


80,000.00 




40,000.00 


440,000.00 


Total 


6$ payable 


; from Special Ass 


279, 000 . 00 


64, 416.25 


2,967^000.00 


*Approx. 


essments 






#Approx . 


50$ payable from Special As 


sessments 










ANALYSIS OF DEBT 


MATURITIES 






Due in 












Parking 




Municipal School 
112,000.00 124,000.00 


Water 
18,000.00 


San. Sewers 
10,000.00 


Areas 


1957 


20,000.00 


1958 


112,000. 


,00 124, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


1959 


64,000. 


,00 124, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


I960 


64,000. 


,00 124, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 




64,000. 


.00 124, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


1962 


64,000. 


,00 124, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


1963 


64,000. 


,00 124, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


20,000.00 


1964 


54,000, 


,00 109, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


-0- 


1965 


54,000, 


.00 94, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


10,000.00 


-0- 


1966 


4,000, 


.00 80, 


000.00 


18,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 


Beyond 1966 . 


-0- 


720, 


000.00 
000.00 


30,000.00 
210,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 




656,000 


.00 1,871, 


90,000.00 


140,000.00 



40 



GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1956 

Budget Revenues 

Local Taxes : Estimate Realized Excess Deficiency 

Property Taxes-Current Yr. Levy .. 2,637,435-31 2,638,1+93.23 1,057-92 

Poll Taxes -Current Yr. Levy 22,000.00 21,740.00 260.00 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,000.00 6,011.67 11. 67 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs. -Prop. ... -0- 325-92 325-92 

" ' " " -Poll 300.00 178.00 122.00 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 7,000.00 8, 412.03 1, 412.03 

Auto Permits 132,000.00 128,856.29 3, 143-71 

Rent & Profit Tax -Deeded Prop. .. 200.00 51-58 148.42 

Timber Severance Tax 1,200.00 _ 1,073.66 126.34 

2,806,135-31 2,805,142.38 992.93 



State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax 12,000.00 12,304.04 304.04 

Savings Bank Tax 10,000.00 12,949.05 2,949.05 

Interest & Dividend Tax 72,000.00 81,991.95 9,991-95 

Loss of Taxes -State Forest 30.00 12. 87 17.13 

94,030.00 107,257.91 13,227.91 



Licenses & Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Taxi Licenses 

Health Licenses 

Amusement Licenses 

Police & Protective Licenses . 
Prof. & Occupational Licenses 



Registration Fees & Permits 

Marriage Licenses 

Recording Fees-Legal Documents 

Filing Fees 

Sundry Fees-City Clerk 

Dog Licenses 



Departmental Service Charges 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concession 

Golf Fees 

Memorial Field Royalties & Concess 

Misc.Dept. Service Charges 

Police Dept. Ambulance Charges .. 

Airport - Rent 

Airport - Concessions 

Fines & Forfeits 

Coram, on Head Tax Collections . . . 
Weights & Measures, Fees 



Unclassified 

Sale of Property 500.00 317-92 182 .08 

All Other 200.00 350.35 150.35 

700.00 668.27 31-73 



500.00 


555-00 


55-00 




450.00 


350-00 




100.00 


400.00 


375-00 




25.00 


2,400.00 


2,506.00 


106.00 




90.00 


146 . 50 


56.50 




140.00 


115.00 




25.00 


3,980.00 


4,047.50 


67-50 





900.00 


981.00 


81.00 




3,000.00 


3,165.55 


165.55 




90.00 


93.00 


3.00 




500.00 


641.10 


141.10 




4,000.00 


3,325.71 




674.29 


8,490.00 


8,206.36 




283.64 



1,500.00 


1,528.00 


28.00 




300.00 


376.37 


76.37 




6,500.00 


6,924.00 


424.00 




100.00 


473.46 


373-46 




2,000.00 


1,454.74 




545.26 


1,200.00 


1,357-50 


157.50 




8,500.00 


8,544.80 


44.80 




100.00 


89.42 




IO.58 


17,000.00 


15,461.47 




1,538.53 


6,600.00 


5,708.36 




891.64 


400.00 


492.13 


92.13 




44,200.00 


42,410.25 


1,789-75 



TOTAL REVENUES 2,957,535.31 2,967,732.67 10,197.36 



41 



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^7 



GENERAL FUND 

TAX ACCOUNTS 

Year Ended December 31, 1956 



STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 

1956 
Levy 

Balance January 1, 1956 

Taxes Committed to Collector in 1956 
( Incl . Supplemental ) : 

Real Estate & Personal Property 2,667,831.62 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,011.67 

Timber Severance Tax 1,288.37 

Poll Taxes 23,740.00 

Head Taxes _________ 

Total Charges to Collector * 2, 698,871. 66 

Accounted for as f ollovs : 

Collections to Treasurer (Net of Refunds) 2,1+11,580.51 

Authorized Abatements 15, 986 .18 

Balance Uncollected December 31, 1956 • • . 271,304.97 

Total Credits & Balance 2,698,871755" 

*Taken as Current Revenue 2,667,318.56 

Reserved for Abatements & Adjustments .... 31,338-39 

Reserved for Forest Conservation Aid 214.71 

2,698,871.66 

#Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes of Prior Years 



Prior 

Years 

250,226.91 



325.92 



178.00 
250,730-03 



238,060.19 

10,401.11+ 

2,269.50 

250,730-83" 



State Head 

Taxes 

20,464.80 



76,720.00 
97,184.80 



70,854.85 

7,028.30 

19,301-65 

97,184.80 



1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 



Property 


Poll 




Taxes 


Taxes 


Total 




32.20 


32.20 


90.25 


130.00 


220.25 




210.00 


210.00 


91.10 


179-10 


270.20 


1,300.60 


236.25 


1,536.85 


1,481.95 


787-55 


2,269.50 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS 



Balance Unredeemed January 1, 1956 : 

Levy of 1952 

Levy of 1953 

Levy of 1954 

Levy of 1955 (Tax Sale of 1956 ) 

Accounted for as follows : 

Collections to Treasurer 

Authorized Abatements 

Deeded to City 

Total Credits 

Balance Unredeemed December 31, 1956 



1,379-16 

6,752.52 

20,038.63 



34,956.99 
496.08 
553-71 



28,170.31 
32,656.49 
60,826.80 



36,006.78 
24,820.02 
60,826.80 



48 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31, 1956 

ASSETS 
Fixed Assets : 

Land and Rights of Way 25,199.97 

Sewer Mains 1,121,053.30 

Manholes 107,71^-29 

Customer Connections l61+, 1+20.68 

Sundry Equipment 1,7^5-H 

1,^20,133.35 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 661,616.63 758,516.72 

Prepaid Engineering Expenses 9,122.1+0 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 15,820.1+3 

Investments (See Schedule Page 1+7 ) 22,158.69 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund 18,129.78 56,108.90 

Total Assets 823,71+8.02 

LIABILITIES AMD FUNDS 

Long Term Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt 36,000.00 

Share in Special Assessment 58,367.07 9^,367-07 

Fund Balance & Surplus : 

Municipal Investment l+8l,337>71 

Contributions in Aid of Construction ... 19l+,722.20 

Surplus -Balance January 1, 1956 52,337.28 

Less Adjustment of Prior Year Account .. 1.20 

52,336.08 

Net Profit for Year 1956 98!+. 96 53,321.01+ 

Total Fund Balance & Surplus " 729,380.95 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 823,71+8.02 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1956 

OPERATING REVENUES 
Sewer Rents: 

General 26,037- W 

Industrial 8,108.1+6 

OPERATING EXPENSES 
General Operation : 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor & Expense ... 6,65l+.09 

House Connection 0P er - Labor & Expense . 2,1+10.31 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 1,262.06 

Maintenance of Manholes 761. 52 

Miscellaneous General Expense 121.00 11,208.98 

Customers ' Expense : 

Meter Reading & Billing 1,707-^6 

Administration : 

Employees' Retirement Fund l,380.l!+ 

Depreciation : 17,503-20 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Non-Operating Income : 

Interest on Investments 

Non-Operating Expense : 

Interest Expense 

Net Profit for the Year 



3l+,ll+5.90 



31,799.78 
2,346.12 



615-87 
2,961.99 

1,977-03 
951+796" 



h9 



WATER FUND 

BALANCE SHEET 

December 31, 1956 
ASSETS 

Fixed Assets, Net of Accrued Depreciation : 

Water and Flowage Rights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping & Purification Equipment 

Distrib. Mains, Services, Hydrants & Meters. 

Other Equipment & Garage Equipment 

Total Fixed Assets 

B ond Fund Assets : 

Cash - First National Bank 

Investments 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Total Bond Fund Assets 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page 1+7) 

Loaned to Special Assessment Projects 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Contracts Receivable 

Total Current Assets 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Current Liability : 

Share in Special Assessments 

Long Term Liability : 

Bonded Debt 

Total Liabilities 

Fund Balance and Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus - Balance January 1, 1956 565,988.96 

Less Uncollectable Accounts Written Of f . . . 20.00 

565,968.96 
Net Profit for the Year 1956 26, 82*+. 98 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 



167,663.11 
20U,961+.00 
282,0^6.91+ 

J+7,178.66 
93^,271.3^ 

22,6ll+-75 



568.53 
11,700.00 
18,805.67 



71,799-57 
13,799- ^2 
12,861.03 
76,305.16 
273.98 



1,658,738.81 



31,071+. 20 



175,039-16 
1,861+, 852. 17 



30,927-98 
130,000.00 



963,19^-7^ 
11+7,935-51 



160,927.98 



592,793-9^ 



1,703,921+. 19 
l,86i+, 852. 17 



BOND FUND-WATER-ISSUE OF 1949 



DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 

Balance - January 1, 1956 

Expenditures - 1956 

Unexpended Balance December 31, 1956 



12,360.03 

91.50 

12,268.53 



50 



WATER FUND 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Fiscal Year Ending December 31, 1956 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Commercial Sales - Flat Rate 2,960.79 

Commercial Sales -Metered 1^8,918.27 

Industrial Sales -Metered 35,030.02 

Sales to Other Water Utilities -0- 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues 1+70.05 

Total Operating Revenues 187,379.13 

OPERATING EXPENSES 

Water Supply : 

Source of Supply Labor 1, 510.11 

Pumping Station Labor 16,639.57 

Purification Labor 1,683.81+ 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,050.12 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 130-33 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses 2,61+1.71 

Purification System Supplies & Expenses .... 4,273.17 

Fuel for Power 119-67 

Power Purchased 11,174.22 

Repairs to Pumping Station Str. & Equip. ... 1,31+0.25 

Repairs to Purification System Str. & Equip. 120.18 1+1,683.17 

Distribution : 

Distribution Wbges 2l+,802.69 

Meter Department Labor 3,193-53 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 12.11+ 

Other Distribution Supplies & Expenses 67I+.OI 

Repairs to Distribution Structures 225. 9I+ 

Repairs to Mains 1,91+7.01 

Repairs to Services 2,483.99 

Repairs to Hydrants 908.10 

Repairs to Meters 2,258.76 36, 506 .17 

Administration : 

Commercial Office Salaries 1,91+5.87 

Meter Reading Salaries 4,62l+.58 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 505.1+7 

Salaries of General Officers 6, 067 . 50 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 3,296.25 

General Off ice Expenses 395-69 

Repairs to Gen. Office Structures & Equip. . 2-30 

Other General Expenses 4,6l4.59 

Insurance 2,1+81-98 

Stationery & Printing 58. 00 

Longevity, Annual & Sick Leaves 8, 557-82 

Retirement Fund Payments 8,425 .03 

Stores Department & Shop Expense 1,826.1+7 

Garage Expense 1,009-93 1+3,811.1+8 

Fixed Charges : 

Depreciation 38, 51+6 -79 

Taxes 28 .86 

Interest 2,362.50 1+0,938.15 

Total Operating Expenses 3_g2 938.97 

Operating Income 21+ 440 . 16 

Non-Operating Income : 

Gain on Sale of Depreciated Assets 1,005-69 

Interest on Investments 755-36 

Other Interest Income 5 -71 

Miscellaneous 618.06 

Total Non-Operating Income 2,381+. 82 

Net Profit for the Year 26,82l+.98 



51 



PARKING METER FUND 



BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, 1956 



Assets : 

Due from General Fund . 
Bond Requirements 

Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt 

Unappropriated Surplus 



39,219.31 

140,000.00 



1^0,000.00 

39,219.31 



179,219-31 



179,219-31 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



For the Year Ended December 31, 1956 
Cash Balance - January 1, 1956 25,1+63.73 



Revenues : 

Meter Collections - Street Parking 50,645. 414- 
Meter Collections - Off Street Parking .. 11,343.02 
Total Available 



61,988.46 



87,452.19 



Current Expenditures : 
Salaries : 

Meter Repairs 

Collections 

Enforcement 

Accounting 

Supplies : 

Meter Repairs Parts 

Other Meter Supplies 

Enforcement 

Marking Streets 

Retirement Contributions 

Taxes, Insurance, Etc 

Lighting 

Parking Area Maintenance 

Total Current Expenditures 
Debt Service: 

Payment on Bonds 

Interest on Bonds 

* Total Expenditures 



Cash Balance December 31, 1956 



2,581.33 




669.79 




15,198.02 




205.95 


18,655.09 


359.00 




279.01 




652.47 




591-20 


1,881.68 




953-35 




1,089.41 




1,613.60 




1,789-75 




25,982.88 


20,000.00 




2,250.00 


22,250.00 



Street Parking 18, 577 . 93 

Of f -Street Parking 29,654.95 

48,232.88 



48,232.88 
39,219-31 



52 



BOND FUND-GENERAL 

ISSUE OF 1953 

DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 

For the Year Ended December 31> 1956 
Balance January 1, 1956 15,430.24 

Expenditures : 

Highway Construction : 

Boudreau Square 838.12 

Storm Sewer Construction 462 .36 

Public Works Building Modifications. 2, 4-17.72 

World War II Memorial 84.90 

New Equipment : 

Finance Department 29. 00 

Public Works Department 4,379.89 4,4o8.89 

Total Expenditures 8,211.99 

Balance December 31, 1956 7, 218.25 



BOND FUND-GENERAL 

ISSUE OF 1956 

DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 

For the Year Ended December 31> 1956 

Amount of Issue 40,000.00 

Expenditures - Airport Hangar 22,352.^2 

Balance December 31, 1956 17,647.48 



53 



EQUIPMENT & STORES FUND 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31. 1956 



Assets 

Due from General Fund 25,1+45.67 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 37, ^^ 

Equipment 3^,150-20 

Total Assets 



411,030.12 



Liabilities & Funds 

Municipal Investment 377, 57 ^.^ 

Capital Reserve Fund 39, 665 .37 

Deficit 6,209.69 

Total Liabilities & Funds 



411,030.12 



OPERATING STATEMENT 

For Year Ended December 31, 1956 



Equipment Earnings 

Operating Expenses: 

Direct Labor 26, 456 . 57 

Indirect Labor 11,281.26 

Leaves & Longevity 3, ^51-79 

Building Repair 5,778.20 

Gas, Oil & Repair Parts 56,081.16 

Grease & Lubricants 1,006.38 

Supplies 2,064.09 

Hand Tools 272.41 

Fuel & Utilities 5,121.43 

Insurance ^,596-79 

Retirement Contribution 2,873.45 

Minor Shop Equipment 1,281.59 

Depreciation on Equipment 

Net Loss for Period 



160,456.94 



120,265.12 
48,135-88 



168,401.00 
7,944.06 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASES 



1 Elgin Street Sweeper 

2 GMC Load Packers 

1 Fordson Deisel Tractor 

1 Ford Tractor 

1 Gravely Tractor-Mower 

1 Ford Sedan 

2 Chevrolet 3/4 ton Pick-up Trucks 

1 National Triplex Power Mower 

3 Jacobsen Power Mowers 

1 GMC Pick-up Truck 

1 Snow Bucket for Tractor #5 

1 Gravely Tractor 

Total Expended from Reserve Fund 



10,500.00 

22,837.00 

7,785.00 

4,915.00 

335-99 

1,081.33 

3,171-18 

965.30 

311.33 

1,793-00 

98.OO 

276.97 



54,070.10 



5^ 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

BALANCE SHEET-DECEMBER 31. 1956 



Assets 

Cash for Construction 

Improvements Authorized -Not Completed — 

Assessments Receivable - Current 

Assessments Receivable - Deferred 

Due from Other Funds: 

Water Fund Share of Construction Costs 30,927.98 

San. Sewer Fund Share of Constr. Costs 58,367.07 

Due from General Fund 2 , 382 . 96 

Liabilities & Surplus 

Vouchers Payable 

Contracts Payable 

Reserve for Authorized Improvements 

Reserve for Encumbrances 

Long Term Debt: 

Bonds Payable 13^,000.00 

Loan Payable to Water Fund 12,861.03 

Loan Payable to Sanitary Sewer Fund . . 18,129.78 

Deficit 



10,771-97 

23,863.00 

97. 0U 

51,681.83 



91,678.01 178,091-85 



1,294.60 
25.00 

2,737-91 

9,527.00 



164,990-81 
U83A7 



178,091.85 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



Unexpended Balance January 1, 1956 

Receipts: 

Current Assessments 

Deferred Assessments Paid in Advance 
Reimb. from Sanitary Sewer Fund 

Total Available 

Expenditures: 

Water Main Extensions 

Manchester St. & Airport Road 

Old Turnpike Road , 

East Side Drive , 

Sanitary Sewer Extension 

Heights Road 

Bonds Paid , 

Interest on Bonds , 

Unexpended Balance : 

Cash on Hand 

Less Vouchers & Contracts Payable . . . 



3,676.73 

4,897.21 

79^-15 



10,209.18 

10,290.5'+ 

1,919-91 



22,1+19.63 

1,307-55 
6,000.00 

2,91+0.00 



10,771.97 
1,319-60 



32,751.1+6 



9,368.09 
1+2,119.55 



32,667.18 



9,^52-37 



55 



This winning 
design, selected 
by a committee of 
three judges, was 
submitted by Miss 
Norma Willey of 
Penacook, then a 
pupil at Concord 
High School. 




In 1952, a contest was con- 
ducted among the high school art 
pupils of Concord to obtain a new 
design for our city flag. A $25. 00 
prize was made available by an 
anonymous donor. 

The new flag, made of rayon, 
hand sewn, size 4 1/3 x 5 1/2 feet, 
with gold fringe, cords and tassels , 
was delivered and hung in the City 
Council Chamber, in December, 
1956. 

A new United States flag of 
matching material, size and trim was 
also purchased and installed. 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 



FIRE, City 

Penacook — 



- CA 5-3355 

- PL 3-6622 



POLICE CA 5-3232 



Be sure to give your NAME AND ADDRESS as well as the NATURE OF 
THE EMERGENCY clearly. DO NOT HANG UP until you are sure that 
your MESSAGE HAS BEEN UNDERSTOOD. 



* ******** 



For prompt attention to COMPLAINTS dial the SERVICE INVOLVED. 
If you are uncertain about where to call, dial the CITY MANAGER'S 
OFFICE CA 5-3591 



&9L 



w 



fe 



A TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 
OF PUBLIC SERVICES 



AIRPORT administration- 5-3591 

AMBULANCE service 5-3232 

ASSESSMENT information 4-0241 

AUDITORIUM, rental — 4-0591 

AUTO PERMITS 5-2775 

BICYCLE registration — 5-32 32 

BIRTH certificates 4-0591 

BOOKMOBILE, city 5-2743 

BUILDING code&permits 4-1955 

CEMETERY information - 5-3911 

CITY MANAGER 5-3591 

CIVIL DEFENSE, city -- 4-0922 

DEATH certificates 4-0591 

DOG licenses 4-0591 

ELECTION information - 4-0591 

EMPLOYMENT, city — - 5-3591 

ENGINEERING, city — - 4-1955 

FIRE insp. & permits 5-3355 

GARBAGE collection — - 5-6771 

GOLF COURSE, city — - 8-8954 

HEALTH ins p. & clinics - 4-0521 

LAWS, city 4-0591 

LIBRARY, city 5-2743 

MAPS, city 4-1955 



MARRIAGE cert. & licenses 4-0591 

MILK insp. & licenses 4-0521 

OIL BURNER inspections - 5-3355 
PARK FACILITIES, use of - 5-3281 

PAYMENTS, by city 5-2775 

PLANNING, city 4-1955 

PLUMBING insp.& licenses 4-1955 
RECREATION activities — 5-3281 

REFUSE collection 4-1955 

SEWERS 4-1955 

SIGNS, street 4-1955 

SNOW plowing & sanding - 4-1955 
SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS — 5-2775 
STREET LIGHTS burned out 5-3641 

new installations 4-1955 

TAXES, property, poll, he ad 5-2775 
TRAFFIC signs & signals - 5-3232 

TREES, city 4-1955 

VOTING registration 4-0591 

WATER service 4-1711 

bills 5-2775 

WELFARE, City 4-1091 

Penacook PL 3-4211 

ZONING laws & permits — 4-1955