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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

JHanip 
J52.07 
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957 



CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 




ANNUAL 
REPORT 



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2.07 
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57 



CONCORD 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 




KHF 



ANNUAL 
REPORT 




Page 

Aerial Photo of the City of Concord 1 

Introducing Your City Council 2 

City Council Actions 3 

Your City Officials 4 

Municipal Boards 5 

Administrative Departments 6 

Finance Department 8 

Planning 10 

Protections of Persons & Property 13 

Municipal Court of Concord 17 

Health and Welfare Services 18 

Engineering and Public Works 21 

Public Service Departments 27 

Water Department 32 

Finance Index 33 

A Telephone Directory of Public Services Inside Back Cover. 

University of 
^^Jlew Hampshire 
^2J library 




INTRODUCING YOUR CITY COUNCIL 



MAYORS 

Howe Anderson Jan. to May 

Charles C. Davie May to Aug. 
Herbert W. Rainie Aug. to Dec. 



COUNCILMEN-AT-LARGE 

Howe Anderson * 
Charles C. Davie * 
Conrad W. Robinson 
Wendell F. Grant 
Herbert W. Rainie 
William A. Stevens 
Eugene C. Struckhoff 
John Swenson 



WARD COUNCILMEN 

Ward 1 James P. Ferrin 

Ward 2 Paul M. Cunningham 

Ward 3 William H. Hunneyman 

Ward 4 Malcolm McLane 

Ward 5 LeroyW. Davis 

Ward 6 Clarence L. Clark 

Ward 7 William P. Gove 

Ward 8 Paul E. Madden 

Ward 9 Thomas B. Jennings 






CITY CLERK 
Arthur E. Roby 



CITY MANAGER 
Woodbury Brackett 

* Resigned 



City Council Actions - 1957 

Held twelve regular meetings. 

Six Special meetings. 

Eight public hearings. 

Enacted twenty-five ordinances. 

Adopted fifty-six resolutions 

Adopted a total budget of $1,680,335.00 



CITY COUNCIL ACTIONS 



1957 HIGHLIGHTS 



Purchased land for expansion of the municipal airport. 

Adopted comprehensive zoning regulations to protect the approaches to 

the municipal airport. 

Closed Pickering Street and Dexter Lane to permit construction of new 

bank building. 

Purchased land to expand areas of Rolfe Park, East Concord and Concord 

Heights Playgrounds. 

Adopted a six-year program of budgeting capital improvements. 

Commenced construction of a new storm sewer system on Concord Plains. 

Authorized construction of a new bath house-skate house in White Park. 

Installed a new high intensity runway lighting system at the Municipal 

Airport. 

Rebuilt North State Street from city proper to West Concord. 

Floated bonds in the sum of $145,000.00 to pay for a new public parking 

area in the downtown section of the city, also $315,000.00 for other 

improvements. 

Completely revised the Concord Building Code. 

Rezoned extensive areas in the vicinity of the new Everett Turnpike from 

Bow to East Concord. 

Acquired the Kimball School from the School District and leased it to the 

State Employment Security Agency for temporary office use. 

Appointment of Deputy City Clerk. 

Increased water and sewer rates. 

Increased salaries. 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS 



ASSESSORS 

John Hyde 
Shelby O. Walker 
A. Harold MacNeil 



CITY AUDITOR 

Archie N. Gourley 



CITY TREASURER 

Wallace W. Jones 



CITY COLLECTOR 
Amos B. Morrison 
George West 



CITY SOLICITOR 
Atlee Zellers 



CITY ENGINEER 

Howard Raymond 



CHIEF OF FIRE DEPARTMENT 
Henry Drew, Acting 



CHIEF OF POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Walter Carlson 



SUPT. OF CEMETERIES 
Edward L. How I and 



SANITARY OFFICER 

P. A. Boucher, M. D. 



CITY PLANNING DIRECTOR 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 



MILK INSPECTOR 
Austin B. Presby 



WATERWORKS SUPT. 
G. Arthur Faneuf 



ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 
Ellsworth B. Phi I brick 



SUPT. SEWERS 

William H. Murphy 



OVERSEERS OF POOR 

Charles P. Coakley, Ward 1 
Gertrude E. Watkins, City 



SEALER, WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 
James S. Norris 



RECREATION DIRECTOR 
John B. Penney 



LIBRARIAN 

Siri Andrews 



CIVILIAN DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
John H. Sanders 



POUND KEEPER 

Charles C. Hoagland 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Donald Matson, Judge 

Francis E. Perkins, Asso. Judge 

C. Murray Sawyer, Clerk 



PROBATION OFFICER 
C. Murray Sawyer 



CITY PLANNING BOARD 
Appointed by Manager — April 

(Six year term) 
Ex Officio: Woodbury Brackett 

Dudley W. Orr, Chmn 1956 

Gardner G. Emmons 1957 

John B . Jameson 1 957 

Douglas N. Everett 1958 

Lt. Gen. Edward Brooks 1959 

A. Clifford Hudson 1960 

Warren H. Greene 1961 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 
Appointed by Council — January 
(Five year term) 

Allan Evans 1962 

Roy Y. Lang 1958 

Frank J. Preston 1959 

Frederick Hall, Chmn 1960 

Enoch Shenton 1961 



BUILDING CODE — BOARD OF APPEALS 
Appointed by Council — January 
(Five year term) 

Carroll Garland 1957 

Eugene Magneau, Chmn 1958 

William Johns 1959 

Arnold Perreton 1960 

Donald H. Wells 1961 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 

Appointed by Manager — January 

(Three year term) 

William H. Macurda 1956 

Herbert E. Kimball 1957 

John H . Symonds 1 958 



BOARD OF PLUMBING EXAMINERS 

Appointed by Manager — January 

(One year term) 

Robert F. Keane, Sr 1957 

G eorge E. Young 1957 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick 1957 









MUNICIPAL BOARDS 


TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS 






Appointed by Manager 






(Unlimited term) 






Leon Merrill Wallace W. 


Jones 




Robert M. Beyer 






BOARD OF HEALTH 






Appointed by Manager 






(Two year term) 






Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , Chmn. . 


1958 




William D. Penhale, M.D 


1958 




Homer E. Lawrence, M.D 


1958 




BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 






Appointed by Manager — May 






(Three year term) 








1956 






1956 






1956 






1957 






1957 




Timothy Woodman 


1957 






1958 






1958 




Mayland H.Morse, Jr. , Chmn. .. 


1958 




BOARD OF REVISION OF ASSESSMENTS 




Archie N. Gourley, Chmn. 






Atlee Zellers 






Howard Raymond 






Clifford Higgins 






Stewart Nelson 




5 



ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENTS 



1957 ANNUAL REPORT OF THE ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 
ADMINISTRATIVE CODE — ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 



(a) The assessing department shall consist 
of one full-time assessor and two part- 
time assessors, who shall be known as 
the Board of Assessors, and such cler- 
ical staff as may be recommended by 
the said board and approved by the 
Mayor. 

(b) The Board of Assesors shall perform 
the following functions: 

(1) Carry out all the duties relative 
to taking the inventory and the 
appraisal of property for taxation 
and in regard to the assessment and 



abatement of taxes and issuing war- 
rants for the col lection of taxes as 
are now or may hereafter be re- 
quired by law of assessors of cities 
and towns. 

(2) Prepare all assessment and tax rolls 
and tax notices as required by law. 

(3) Check all property transfers and 
maintain all property records. 

(4) Prepare and maintain all records 
pertaining to the assessing func- 
tion. 

(5) Perform other related functions as 
required. 



4. 



John L. Hyde, Assessor, was appointed 

in June, 1957 to replace C. Fred 

Moulton who died in March, 1957. Two 

part-time Assessors, Shelby O. Walker 

and A. Harold Mac Neil resigned as 

members of the Board of Assessors in 

December, 1957. Two new part-time 

Assessors were appointed subsequently 

in 1958. 

The total number of meetings of the 

Board of Assessors during the year was 

nineteen (19). 

The total number of appeals on real 

estate and personal property received 

and processed during the year was one 

hundred and twenty-one (121). 

The total number of property transfers 

processed during the year was eight 

hundred and one (801). 

Tax warrants were issued as follows in 

the amounts shown: 



WARRANT 






DATE 




AMOUNT 


Poll Tax 






June 3, 


1957 


$ 23,458.00 


Head Tax 






June 3, 


1957 


75,180.00 


Bank Stock 






June 28, 


1957 


6,249.67 


Property (Real 


& Pei 


sonal) 


Sept. 10, 


1957 


2,880,122.58 


Timber Yield 






Nov. 29, 


1957 


4,426.07 



6. The number of veterans exempt from 
the payment of Poll Tax on the 1957 
list was 3, 307. 

7. The Tax Rate for 1957 was as follows: 



PENACOOK 

City Budget $26.13 

School Budget ... 30.95 

County Budget ... 2.98 

$60.06 



CONCORD 
City Budget. . . 
School Budget 
County Budget 



$26.13 
27.29 

2.98 
$56710 



10. 



The total assessed value on real estate 
and personal property for 1957 was 
$540,829,002.00. 

The total number of real estate appli- 
cations for exemption received from 
veterans and blind was 1,485. The 
number of exemptions granted on the 
1957 tax warrant was 1,480. 
Tax abatements were allowed during 
1957 as follows: 



Real Estate $12,002.99 

Personal Property 10, 105. 27 

Bank Stock 

Yield Tax 12.60 

H ead Tax 8,002.70 

Poll Tax 2,899.45 



11. Taxes added during the year were as 
follows: 

Real Estate $ 558. 37 

Personal Property 6,021 .83 

Bank Stock 17.00 

Yield Tax 27.69 

Head Tax 1,240.00 

Poll Tax 420.30 



12. John L. Hyde, Assessor, Gordon W. 
Stevenson, Appraiser, and John H. 
Ambrose, Clerk, attended the annual 
convention of New Hampshire Asses- 
sors at Wentworth-by-the-sea at New- 
castle, New Hampshire on September 
14-15, 1957. 

13. John L. Hyde, Assessor, attended the 
annual convention of the National As- 
sociation of Assessors at Dallas, Texas 
on September 29 through October 2, 
1957. 

JOHN L. HYDE 
Assessor 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



The year 1957 ended with a budget surplus of $41,673. as a result of unspent ap- 
propriations amounting to $34,999. and revenue of $6,674. in excess of estimates. Ad- 
justment of reserves resulted in a net amount of $34,870. available for reduction of the 
1958 Tax Rate. 

While the amount raised by property taxes in 1957, including school and county as- 
sessments, increased by $212,866. over the year 1956, this was partially offset by an 
increase in assessed valuations amounting to $1,650,207., resulting in a tax rate in- 
crease of only 73<: for municipal purposes, $1,48 forthe Union School District, and 49<J 
for county purposes. The Penacook School rate decreased by $2.35 as a result of a re- 
duction in the amount raised for that district. 

Long term debt increased during the year by $223,000. New debt of $507,000. was 
incurred, and $284,000. was paid off, as detailed in the following schedule: 





Balance 




Payments 


New Debt 


Balance 




Dec. 31, "56 


di 


jring 1957 


Issued 1957 


Dec. 31, '57 


Municipal 


$ 656,000. 


$ 


112,000. 


$ 315,000. 


$ 859,000. 


School 


1,871,000. 




124,000. 


47,000. 


1,794,000. 


Water 


210,000. 




18,000. 




192,000. 


Sanitary Sewers 


90,000. 




10,000. 




80,000. 


Parking Areas 


140,000. 




20,000. 


145,000. 


265,000. 




$2,967,000. 


$ 


284,000. 


$ 507,000. 


$3,190,000. 



In keeping with past experience, Concord enjoyed the benefit of a triple A rating. 
Bonds issued during the year were sold at a coupon rate of 2.9%. 

Interest rates on tax anticipation borrowings continued to rise; reflecting the gen- 
eral trend. The following table is presented to show the trend forthe past several years. 





Low 


High 


1952 


86% 


1.08% 


1953 


1 . 24% 


1.65% 


1954 


.47% 


.78% 



1955 
1956 
1957 



Low 
1.03% 
2.05% 
2.00% 



High 
TT60% 
2.19% 
2.48% 



Careful forecasting of cash balances enables us to keep our total of such borrow- 
ings to 34.2% of the total expended. This compares with 36.1% in 1956, 36.5% in 



5, and 50, 


.8% ten years ago. 


See 1 


able below: 








Total Expended 




Borrowed in Antici 


ipation 






(Incl. School & County) 


of Tax Collecti 


ions 


Per Cent 


1947 


1,762,541 




700,000 




39.7 


1948 


1,968,573 




1,000,000 




50.8 


1949 


2,194,763 




1,000,000 




45.6 


1950 


2,206,716 




1,000,000 




45.3 


1951 


2,384,657 




920,000 




38.6 


1952 


2,507,022 




950,000 




37.9 


1953 


2,640,468 




950,000 




36.0 


1954 


2,757,945 




1,000,000 




36.3 


1955 


2,738,799 




1,000,000 




36.5 


1956 


3,115,162 




1,125,000 




36.1 


1957 


3,299,581 




1,130,000 




34.2 



Tax collections, on account of the current year levy, increased by $184,179.; but 
in terms of percentage of the amount levied there was a slight decrease from 90% in 
1956 to 88.9% in 1957. 

While uncollected taxes on account of prior year levies have been reduced to a neg- 
ligible amount, the total amount of unredeemed tax liens held by the City increased 
rather sharply in 1957. Below is a table showing the trend in recent years: 



Year 
7952 
1953 
1954 



Liens Held 
End of Year 
$ 18,492. 

24, 1 31 . 

28,866. 



Year 
1955 
1956 
1957 



Liens Held 
End of Year 
$ 28,170. 

24,820. 

42,532. 



The City Solicitor represents the City in all legal matters, presents the City's cases 
in Court, and defends the City in suits against it. He prepares legal papers, reviews the 
agenda, and attends Council Meetings and Hearings. When requested, he supplies legal 
opinions and advice to all City Departments, Boards, and members of the Board of Alder- 
men. In the year 1957 he 

* Participated in 19 court actions. 

* Prepared 24 legal documents (deeds, leases, etc.) 

* Collected $3165.02 in delinquent taxes. 

* Searched 10 titles to property, in addition to the title searches required for tax sales. 

* Attended 13 Council Meetings. 

* Wrote 9 formal legal opinions. 

* Attended numerous conferences with department heads and other officials. 

* Attended 2 meetings of the Board of Revision of Assessments. 



PLANNING 



The year 1957 was an active one for the Concord Planning Board and its staff. Of 
all the planning activities in which the board engaged, none commanded more time and 
effort than the task of coordinating ten miles of superhighway construction with various 
elements of the city plan. Other important activities of the board include revision of 
the Concord building code, preparation of a comprehensive parking lot study, and in- 
vestigation of the future school building needs of the Concord Plains area. 
Major Highways 

Because of the city's strategic location in relation to the northward extension of ex- 
pressways in New Hampshire, the major portion of interstate highway construction pro- 
jects started in 1957 was located in the Concord area. As a result, the Planning Board 
devoted considerable time and effort to correlating the state highway department's Con- 
cord area expressway plans with the city's long range plans for orderly community de- 
velopment. Numerous conferences were held with state officials in connection with 
these highway location plans. 
Future Streets 

One of the Planning Board's major recommendations of the year concerned the map- 
pingof the lines of future streets in the vicinity of the new Rundlett Junior High School . 
The future street from South to Clinton Street was proposed as an integral part of an in- 
town circumferential route which would greatly facilitate travel between the south and 
the west-end sections of the city. 
Streets and Rural Roads 

Petitions for the acceptance of approximately one mile of new streets were processed 
for City Council consideration during 1957. 

Reconstruction fo a 6,600 foot section of Shaker Road in East Concord was recom- 
mended to the City Council as part of the city's continuing program of rural road better- 
ment. 



Traffic and Parking 

During 1957, the Planning Board recommended the adoption of a number of changes 
designed to facilitate the movement of vehicular traffic on Concord streets including al- 
terations in the traffic islands at the intersection of Bouton and North State Streets, wid- 
ening the traveled way of North State Street from Walker Street to the Ward 9 voting 
place, and establishing one-way traffic on School Street between North State and Green 
Streets. 

On recommendation of the board, 19 new on-street parking spaces were established 
in the civic district in the immediate vicinity of the abandoned Parker School. The board 
also recommended that the maximum motor vehicle speed limit on North State Street be- 
tween the city proper and West Concord be increased from 25 to 35 miles per hour. 

At the request of the City Council, the Planning Board undertook a study of possible 
public parking lot locations in the central business district. A report entitled "Down- 
1A town Parking Lot Study" was transmitted to thecouncil for its consideration. Subsequent- 

ly, the board prepared a special assessment study of the proposed Durgin Street parking 
lot outlining detailed procedures for financing a portion of the cost of the parking lot by 
assessing the owners of property especially benefited by the facility. 



Zoning 

Construction of the Frederic E.Everett Highway from Bow to East Concord resulted in 
substantial disruption of the established pattern of land use and the zoning plan in the 
general vicinity of the new road. Due to this situation, the Planning Board recommend- 
ed changes in zoning districts affecting most of the land abutting the four-mile length 
of the expressway at this location. 

In cooperation with the Engineering Department, comprehensive regulations govern- 
ing the height and use of structures in the vicinity of the airport were prepared and sub- 
mitted to the City Council for adoption. 

Four new residential areas, three in East Concord and one on Concord Plains, were 
rezoned from agricultural to single residence districts. In addition, an 80-acre area on 
Black Hill Road in the Manchester Street section was rezoned from an agricultural to a 
local business district. 



Recreation 

Approximately 40 acres of landwere added to the city's recreational plant during the 
year on recommendation of the planning Board. A 19-acre wooded area, acquired by 
tax deed, was added to Rolfe Park in Penacook. 

The area of the East Concord playground was substantially enlarged by the purchase 
of a 10-acre parcel of land on the north side of the existing play area. 

In other actions, the board recommended purchase of theDunstane property on South 
Fruit Street as an addition to the Memorial Athletic Field, and the acquisition of the 
Kimball School property for development as a play area for small children. 
Water and Sewer Facilities 

Five petitions for city water service, involving 2,700 feet of water main, were pro- 
cessed by the board during 1957. 

Work was started on a federally-financed program to determine the city's long-range 
sanitary sewer needs. Preliminary plans will be developed for sewage treatment facili- 
ties, including treatment plants and intercepting sewers. 
Other Activities 

Other matters considered by the planning agency included a revision of the Concord 
building code, the order of priority of projects in the capital budget program, enactment 
of flood control legislation, and a survey of school building needs on Concord Plains. 





Records Department 




* The City Clerk attended all meetings and hearings of the City Council in 




the capacity of clerk. 




* Prepared and distributed copies of the minutes of all proceedings. 




* Received and turned over to the City Treasurer $12,086.15 in licenses 




and service fees during the year. 




* Issued 2,305 dog licenses. 




* Recorded approximately 1,500 mortgages and 1,200 conditional sale a- 




greements and 375 discharges. 




* Issued 320 marriage licenses. 




* Issued approximately 1,048 copies of vital statistic records. 




* Vital statistics recorded, compared with 1956, were as follows: 




1957 1956 




Births "978 995 




Marriages 320 319 




Deaths 629 659 



Elections 

This was the year in which a municipal election was supposed to be 
held, and the Legislature passed a bill, known as Chapter 429, relative 
to the government of the City of Concord, known as the Mayor-Alderman 
Charter, which was approved by the Legislature, July 31, 1957. 

A referendum as required in said bill was held on September 24,1957, 
and the total vote cast was 5,970. The present Council-Manager Charter 
received 2,982; themargin being so close the ballots were under lock and 
key until September 30, when a recount was held. The final recount showed 
the Council-Manager form of Government had 2,974 votes, the Mayor- 
Alderman form of government had 2,976 votes. The Mayor- Alderman 
Charter was adopted by the recount by a margin of two votes. 

The Municipal Election was held November 5, 1957, the filings con- 
sisting of four candidates for mayor, nine for aldermen-at-large, and the 
following for ward alderman: ward 1, four; ward 2, two; ward 3, three; 
ward 4, two; ward 5, four; ward 6, four; ward 7, four; ward 8, four; ward 
9, three. 

On November 5, the following were declared elected: 

Mayor, Charles P. Johnson, two years. 

Aldermen-at-Large, Robert D. Branch, Eugene C. Struckhoff and John 
Swenson, four years. 

Ward Aldermen, to serve two years: Ward 1, John M. Allen; Ward 2, 
Paul M.Cunningham; Ward 3, George A. Stohrer, Jr.; Ward 4, Malcolm 
McLane; Ward 5, Leroy W. Davis; Ward 6, Clarence L. Clark; Ward 7, 
William P. Gove; Ward 8, Paul E. Madden, Ward 9, Thomas B. Jennings. 

The total vote cast at this election was 8,794. 



12 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 



CONCORD POLICE DEPARTMENT 



Personnel: 

There were eleven permanent- officers appointed during 1957, ten of 
these members were previously appointed as special officers. Seven reg- 
ular officers resigned during the year. One regular officerwas reinstated. 
Twelve special officers were appointed during 1957. Five special officers 
resigned during the year. Three special reserve officers were appointed. 

Captain Abbott is in charge of the Reserve Police Units and is respon- 
sible for their training. The Reserves are divided into two units, one unit 
in Penacook and the other in Concord. The two units consisting of fifty- 
two men, make available a valuable amount of manpower which could be 
used to a great advantage in case of an emergency. Captain Abbott meets 
with each unit once a month to instruct and answer any questions that may 
be brought up. 
Parking Meters: 

Fifteen meters were reset, fifty-eight meter posts were straightened and 
six tightened. At present, the City has 826 meters in operation, having a 
yearly col lection of $56,793.58 — making anaverageof $68,757 permeter. 
When construction of the new bank is completed, we will have seven me- 
ters replaced, making a total of 833 meters. 




13 



Walter H. Carlson Chief of Police 




Training Program: 

Chief Walter H. Carlson attended a four weeks course in Police Man- 
agement at the Northwestern University in Evanstown, Illinois. 

Captain Joseph G. Andrews was assigned to go to Washington, D. C. 
to assist with detail at the Presidential Inaugural. 

In January, Lieutenant Jason Hines and Sergeant Francis Sullivan at- 
tended the Federal Bureau of Investigation Academy Associates Luncheon 
in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In April, Lieutenant Hines and Sergeant 
Sullivan attended the monthly Firearms practice sponsored by the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation at Wakefield, Massachusetts. 

Captain Daniel C. Abbott attended a two weeks Traffic Law Enforce- 
ment course at the Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts. Cap- 
tain Abbott was also in charge of a Police Training School course held at 
St. Paul's School from March 18 through March 22, 1957. The following 
Officers attended this school: George Swain, Norman Lavoie, Robert Lo 
Prest, Roy Reynolds, Douglas Schinella, Arthur Hugron, Thomas Perry, 
Carl Carpenter and Edgar Frost. 

Captain Richard Moreyand Sergeant Richard Campbell attended a one 
week school on Police Administration which was held in Boston, Massa- 
chusetts. In November, Sergeant Campbell and Officer Edward Manning 
completed a seven day course in "Photography for Beginners" which was 
held at the University of New Hampshire. 

Chief Carlson attended the Yale Traffic Court four day conference 
which was held in New Haven, Connecticut, sponsored by the American 
Bar Association. 

Six members of the Police Department completed taking the City Cen- 
sus. The final count is: the total number of persons in Concord — 28,675 
and there are 1,726 dogs in the city. 




14 



A new re-loading machine was added to the department's equipment. 
Members of the department re-loaded 4000 rounds of .38 caliber ammun- 
tion in preparation for Firearms Training during the month of May. All 
members of the Concord Police Department received firearms training in 
the use of the shot gun, hand gun, Thompson sub machine gun, and rifle. 
This training was held from May 20th through May 24th, under the super- 
vision of Lieutenant Hines. 

In October the Concord Police Pistol team was organized, which cre- 
ated a great deal of interest and enthusiasm among the Officers. 

The following four officers, Lawrence Sullivan, Claffee May, Jack 
LaCroixand Peter Call ioras attended the two weeks Police Training School, 
sponsored by Chiefs of Police Association in Nashua, New Hampshire. 

Lieutenant Hines and Sergeant Sullivan attended the three day New 
England Conference of the National Academy Graduates held at Cape 
Cod, Massachusetts. 

During the year Chief Carlson and Captain Abbott have spoken on fif- 
teen occasions before several civic groups. 

The Officials of the Police Department have completed ten weeks of 
the fourteen weeks course in "Municipal Police Administration" which was 
started in October, 1957. 



Activities of the Concord Police Benevolent Association Boys' Club: 

During the year of 1957, basketball teams, baseball teams were organ- 
ized for the members of the CPBA Boys' Club. On February 10, 1957, the 
Midget Basketball team played the annual game at the Boston Gardens. 

On June 26th, 36 boys attended the Boys' Camp for two weeks through 
the courtesy of St. Paul's School Camp in Danbury, N. H. , under the su- 
pervision of Officer James Ceriello. 

The Boys' Club Day Camp which was inaugurated in 1956 by Concord 
Police Boys' Club accommodated 38 boys per day. All expenses were paid 
by Police Boys' Club. This program consisted of daily trips to the follow- 
ing Recreation areas: Bear Brook, Rolfe Park, Webster Lake, Wallis Sands, 
Wellington Beach, Benson's Wild Animal Farm and Mt. Kearsarge. 

The gym at the Club was completely refinished and repainted. New 
gym doors were installed and floors refinished, also a new tile floor was 
laid in the lobby. The shower was re-modeled and re-painted. The an- 
nual two Hallowe'en Parties were held at the West Street Ward House and 
Boys' Club on Highland Street. Prizes were awarded for costumes and re- 
freshments were served. The annual Xmas Party for the membersof the Club 
was held. A turkey dinner and movieswas enjoyed by 120 members. 
New Equipment: 

A new stretcher was purchased by City of Concord for the Police De- 
partment. This stretcher can be used in the station wagon in an emergency 
ambulance call . 



EXPLANATION ON ACCIDENTS 



NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS IN 1956: 468 ) 

) shows decrease of .932% 
NUMBER OF ACCIDENTS IN 1957: 436 ) 

FEBRUARY 22, 1956 IS THE DATE OF THE LAST FATAL ACCIDENT IN 

THE CITY OF CONCORD, MAKING A TOTAL OF 686 DAYS. 



Duncan M. Murdoch 
Henry E. Drew 
Arthur R. Lee 
Chester S. Blake 



Fire Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 
Deputy Chief 



Fire Losses 

Value Loss Insurance Insurance Paid Net Loss 

Buildings 407,959.00 57,949.44 447,269.00 57,949.44 

Contents 192,000.00 59,123.44 192,000.00 59,123.44 

Concord Fire Department responded to a total of 531 alarms ranging from the cover- 
ing with sand of a leaking gasoline tank to a multiple alarm Odd Fellows Hall fire. Of 
the 531 alarms recorded during 1957,467 were still alarms and 64 were box alarms. This 
represented an increase of 14 over the total for the previous year. 

The major fire of 1957 occurred at the Odd Fellows building with a total loss of 
$49,652.72. In addition there were two other serious fires. They were at the Fitch 
Murray Drug Store and the stables on Greenwich St. 

Personnel 

There were two members of long standing whom retired from the department. They 
were Fire Chief Clarence Green and Captain Frank D. O'Brien. 



Fire Prevention 

Fire Department officials know through experience that carelessness is the major 
cause of countless fires every year. As a result of this knowledge the department con- 
tinued with its intensified fire prevention program during 1957. In addition to routine 
inspection activities, fire drills were conducted in all the city schools and students were 
instructed in fire prevention. A new program on fire evacuation was set up at the Con- 
cord Hospital by the fire marshal I and his deputies, Chief Murdoch and Fire Department 
personnel . 

Apparatus and Equipment 

In September a new GMC 750-gallow pumper was purchased by the City of Concord 
and put in service at Fire Department Headquarters. Also a new Cities Service ladder 
truck was put in service at the Penacook Station. 




© 



16 



1 

At the close 


of the 


year, Concord 


was 


still 


without a 


Director. 








A volunteer 


is urgently needed. 






AM credit 


is 


due to 


Penacook that has es- 


tablished 


one of th 


e best surviva 


un 


ts in 


the state. 













MUNICIPAL COURT OF CONCORD 



Total number of cases for the year 1957 - 11, 175 



Breakdown: 



Criminal 



Park 



mg 



Civil 

Small Claims 

Juvenile 



2517 

7972 

128 

504 

54 



Receipts - $34,093 - less than 1956 by $1,603.00 

Remitted to the City Treasurer - $15,578.48, an increase of $117.48 

Remitted to the State Motor Vehicle Dept. - $14,012.38, which is an 
increase of $1,981.38 over 1956. 

The Judge appoints his own Clerk of Court, Probation Officer and Bail 
Commissioners. 



17 



HEALTH & WELFARE SERVICES 



538 children attended health clinics held during the year to receive 
protective treatment against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus and 
smallpox. 

1298 children attended the poliovaccine clinics held during the year. 

Seventy-one complaints were received during the year and checked. 
As usual, most of these pertained to plumbing. 

The number of communicalbe diseases reportedwas low, as follows: 16 
cases chicken pox, 1 case German measles, 2 cases infectious hepatitus, 
33 cases measles, 31 cases mumps, and 1 case scarlet fever. 

There was also one case of poliomyelitis reported, the first case since 
1955. This case was non-paralytic, as the child had had two polio shots. 

The death rate in Concord dropped a little from last year. Of the 617 
deaths reported in 1957, 260 were resident and 357 were non-resident. 
124 bodies were brought here for burial and 12 stillbirths were reported . 



Table of causes of deaths if residents (most common causes) 



Diseases of the circulatory system 
Cancer and other malignant tumors 
Diseases of the nervous system 
Pneumonia 
Accidental deaths 



953 


1954 


1955 


1956 


1957 


149 


126 


129 


129 


^22 


48 


42 


45 


47 


37 


26 


27 


44 


36 


41 


7 


6 


11 


16 


15 


11 


11 


11 


8 


2 



18 



SANITARY INSPECTOR 

About 2400 dairy and rinse samples were collected and analyzed, and written re- 
ports sent to the dairy companies. 

1260 inspections were made of eating establishments, grocieries, etc. and 151 
written notices were sent to improve unsatisfactory conditions. 50 pounds of meat, 70 
pounds flour, some cooked food and gravy plus 450 pounds of foodstuff were condemned 
and destroyed. 

Ten nursery schools were inspected prior to issuing license and 2 cider mills were 
inspected together with the State Board of Health Inspector. Also regular inspections 
were made of alleys and comfort station. 

Quite a few complaints were checked, and where necessary, registered letters 
were sent to correct. These complaints were mostly pertaining to plumbing. Eight resi- 
dences were notified to abolish privies and install toilets connected with thesewerdis- 
posal system. 

During March 169 samples of milk were collected from 29 cows and milk examined 
by special tests for mastitis. Six cows were found to have mastitis and the milk from 
these animals was eliminated from the milk supply shipped to the Concord market. In 
October 76 samples of milk were collected from 19 cows and examined for mastitis. 
None were found to have mastitis. 

Over 100 notices were sent to milk producers reminding them that stables must be 
white-washed at least once a year. 

The Sanitary Inspector was appointed by the New Hampshire State Committee for 
Improving Consumer Acceptance of Milk to act as one of four judges to check all pro- 
ducers' milk in Merrimack County for flavor and odor. 




Helpful advice is periodically given 
to local dairy farmers. 



CONCORD & PENACOOK 

Total Relief Costs: $82,259.89 (Includes administration costs) 

The basic function of the Welfare Department is to render financial 
assistance to the poor and needy persons of Concord and Penacook who 
have virtually no resources. A careful investigation of each request is 
made before any assistance is granted. 



General Trend 

In 1957 an average of 31 cases representing 77 persons were aided at 
a total cost of $21,483.90 in comparison to 32 cases in 1956 with ex- 
penditures of $22,487.16, which indicates that General Relief continues 
its downward trend. 

The following chart will show the downward trend in General Relief 
(which includes board & care, Hospital & Medical and dependent soldiers) 
from 1950 - 1957. 

Year Cases Persons Expenditures 

$57,009.23 
38,506.44 
44,107.65 
31,848.76 
25,462.81 
22,818.70 
22,487.16 
21,483.90 

Unemployment increased 5% over 1956, however, sickness continues 
to be the leading cause for relief. 



1950 


90 


223 


1951 


60 


118 


1952 


60 


123 


1953 


49 


101 


1954 


41 


81 


1955 


36 


81 


1956 


32 


72 


1957 


31 


77 





1957 


1956 


1955 


Sickness 


36% 


26% 


23% 


Marital Difficulties 


22% 


26% 


19% 


Unemployment 


17% 


12% 


21% 


Insufficient Income 


12% 


21% 


23% 


Unemployable 


10% 


9% 


10% 


Partially Handicapped 


3% 


6% 


4% 



Old Age Assistance 

In 1957 Old Age Assistance including Aliens numbered 210 Cases with 
expenditures of $46,577.38 and in 1956, 238 cases were aided at a cost 
of $49,148.52. The city shares 25% of the cost of Old Age Assistance 
cases and 50% of Aliens. 
Aid to the Permanently & Totally Disabled (A. P.T.D.) 

In 1957 A. P.T.D. cases numbered 11 with expenditures of $4,060.02 
20 ar, d in 1956 an average of 7 caseswere aided at a cost of $2,500.57. The 

City shares 35% of the cost of A. P.T.D. 



ENGINEERING AND PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 



The year 1957 was a year of firsts for 
the Concord Public Works Department'. 
During the year we started our first sani- 
tary landfill and eliminated the old open 
dump in the center of the Heights area. 
We built the first section of soil cement 
highway in the state, 0.4 mile on Old 
Turnpike Road at a cost of 96<£ a square 
yard, which appears very favorable if the 
gravel shortage cannot be solved. A third 
first was the planting of trees on city-owned 
land, a program which has been carried on 
by the Water Department on their lands for 
some years. This year we planted 10,000 
red pines on land held for a future sewer 
disposal site. 

Other construction items completed 
during the year were 6,300 feet of storm 
sewer on the Heights, a large 54" inter- 
ceptor which will provide an outlet for the 
area. New sewers were built in Wilson 
Avenue, Springfield Street, Putney Ave- 
nue, Heights Road and Overlook Road. 

Highway construction under T. R. A. 
saw the completion of 0.4 mile of reloca- 
tion on Carter Hill Road, the construction 
of 0.3 miles of E. Sugar Ball Road and the 
beginning of construction of Shaker Road. 

Serious clay pockets were removed from 
West Street, Liberty Street and Penacook 
Street. These reconstruction projects have 
greatly improved these streets. North State 
Street was hot topped by contract from 
Dolan Street to Curtis Avenue. This com- 
pletes the traveled way of this major street 
and gives a new riding surface from Con- 
cord to Penacook . 

The first airport project, providing high 
intensity lighting for the N. S. runway, 
was completed this year. A project to ex- 
tend this runway 1000 feet south was be- 
gun. This project will give Concord a 5000 
foot runway with high intensity lights and 
will provide as good airport facilities as any 
airport in the State. 



Our routine Public Works functions have 
been carried on as usual. We were fortu- 
nate this Winter to have a light snow fall, 
with snow removal expenses running to only 
$75,151. 

Our refuse and garbage collection at 
$112,000 for a population of 28,000, giv- 
ing a per capita cost of $4, is a low cost 
for the State or New England. At the same 
time we are now operating a sanitary land- 
fill that is used as an example throughout 
the State. 

Our Cemetery Department operation 
has been improved through the use of addi- 
tional equipment. 

The Engineering Department in addi- 
tion to maintaining the routine records of 
the office, the Assesor's Maps, the Sewer 
Maps, Street maps, etc., provided engi- 
neering services for the projects built by 
the Public Works Department and for the 
contract construction. 



VITAL STATISTICS 



Building Permits 
Property Transfers 
Sewers Added 
Streets Added 
Snow Fall 



250 

801 

2 Miles 

1 Mile 

54" 



21 




Sanitary landfill operations being carried out by Dept. 
of Public Works 



22 



«£*** 




Constant maintenance work is performed by Engineer crew 
of Public Works Department 




23 



24 



CEMETERY DIVISION 

The regular work of maintaining the local cemeteries was carried on in 
the usual way. The following are some of the items of service performed, 
the materials and equipment furnished by the cemetery for each interment. 
Office Labor - The telephone orders for interments are taken in the office, 
checking records, recording on the daily cost sheets, writing orders and in- 
formation, drawing grave diagrams, entering information from permits, re- 
cording on maps and books, locating graves for florists, vault companies, 
relatives and friends and funeral directors. Opening the Interment - The 
work of laying out the grave location, trucking planks and tools to grave 
side, excavating grave, removing excess earth, setting lowering device 
and grass matting, assistance on concrete vaults, filling in the grave, seed- 
ing and fertilizing, removing dead flowers and containers at a later date is 
all necessary for an interment. Directing the Interment - It is necessary 
to wait for the funeral and direct and escort the funeral cortege to the 
grave, and take care of the arrangements so they will reflect credit not 
only upon the Director in charge, but also upon the Cemetery Personnel. 
The more people that speak favorably of your cemetery the greater will be 
its importance, influence, and success. Then too, every consideration 
should be shown families whomay have loved ones interred, and the friends 
who come to the cemetery to pay their respects. Tenderness and sincere 
understanding of these situations makes our job a real service to the pub- 
lic. Return of Equipment - The driver of the truck and the helper must 
pick up planks, canvass, lowering device and grass, return compressor if 
used and other tools to the garage. 



The law requires permanent interment records to be kept. They must be legible for 
use over a long period of years. These records are kept in detail and are properly in- 
dexed for references. The maps on file in the office have the complete layout of the 
property and the individual place of interment of each person interred. 

Flower beds were set out for the summer, and each year there is a greater number be- 
ing requested. These are charged for to both local and out of town residents on family 
lots. Many are made available by trusts which are established for that purpose. 

Eighty foundations were set for new monuments in all the cemeteries, also one-hun- 
dred fifteen markers were set by cemetery employees and one hundred corner posts. 

The general work of mowing, trimming shrubs and trees and cleaning up consumed 
a large part of the annual work. Snow removal and sanding in the winter was done to 
keep the road open. 

There were seventy lots sold in the different cemeteries, the largest number in Blos- 
som Hill. There are eleven trusts established on older family lots to help maintain their 
care. 

In Calvary Cemetery the upkeep which the department continues to perform has re- 
ceived much favorable comment. There were one-hundred and one interments in Cal - 
vary and twenty-two in Penacook Calvary Cemeteries during the year. All work is 
charged for on a monthly basis and payments are promptly made. 

A total of three-hundred and sixty interments were made in all the cemeteries dur- 
ing the year. There were one-hundred and seventy five in Blossom Hill, twenty-seven 
in Wood I awn, eleven in Maple Grove, nine in Pine Grove, seven in Millville, two in 
Old North, three in Soucook, two in Beth Jacob, and one in Horse Hill. (The total 
figure includes the interments in Calvary and Penacook Calvary Cemeteries.) There 
were four veterans, eleven reliefs, and seven cremations. 

Work is constantly being done to make new areas for future burials, and also to re- 
pair the older lots. Since it has been a requirement that a trust be established for the 
perpetual care of the lot at the time of purchase, the maintenance of the general ceme- 
tery work is being made much simpler for the workmen. 




Blossom Hill Cemetery 
Concord, New Hampshire 




25 




Branch division of Concord Public Librarymakes refer- 
ence books readily available to students of the new 
Junior High School. 



26 



PUBLIC SERVICE DEPARTMENTS 



CONCORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The outstanding event of 1957 in improving and extending library ser- 
vice was the opening of the South End Branch in the New Rundlett Junior 
High School late in October. This is a fine example of cooperation be- 
tween two city institutions in making city facilities more widely available 
to the people of the community. The school maintains its school library 
during school hours with one of the teachers in charge; Tuesday and Thurs- 
day afternoons after school hours, Tuesday evening, and Saturday after- 
noon the public library takes over to supply books to children and adults 
of the South End. 

The Board of Education has been most generous in its cooperation with 
the Board of Library Trustees in planning the library with the architects in 
such a way as to allow the general public to use it outside of school hours 
without going into the rest of the school building, which makes the room 
available during school vacations as well as during the school year. The 
public library supplies books for general reading for people of all ages, as 
it does at the Main Library and on the booktrailer; the school supplies its 
own reference and supplementaryreading material for the use of the junior 
high students and teachers. 

The opening of this branch made possible a booktrailer community stop 
at Rumford School, an area which has long wanted better library service. 
The total result has been an increase last year of over 3500 in circulation 
in the South End of the city; it has increased about 6800 in the past five 
years, an indication of the growth in population in that part of the city, 
as well as better library service there. 

The booktrailer makes five other community stops every week, at Con- 
cord Heights, Walker School, Millville School, East Concord, and West 
Concord. That this service is worth while is shown in the booktrailer cir- 
culation which was 65,310 in 1957, a gain of 22,841 since 1953. Con- 
cord is a wide-spread city and these books reach people of the city who 
are entitled to library service but who live too far from the Main Library 
to make us of that book collection. 

The Branch Division also includes Penacook Branch Library, as well 
as the South End Branch, service at the Concord Hospital, to the Alco- 
holics Division, and to several nursing homes in the city. Books are con- 
stantly being shifted from one Branch Divison outlet to another, making 
maximum use of the book collection. The Branch Division accounted for 
94,852 book circulation in 1957, nearly one-third of the total city cir- 
culation. 

In the city as a whole the circulation of books was the largest in the 
history of the library, 265,845. This was a gain of 13,825 over 1956. It 
also means fifteen books read by every registered borrower or nine books 
for every Concord resident, a high percentage compared with other libra- 
ries of similar size. Thepopulation of the city remains fairly stable, there- 
fore the increase in circulation and other use of the library indicates bet- 
ter book collection. 



27 






Adult non-fiction increased from 25% to 27% of the total circula- 
tion in the past five years, fiction decreased from 48% to 41%, and chil- 
dren's books increased from 27% to 32%. 

The total registrations of borrowers was 17,332 at the end of 1957, or 
61% of the population. 

The addition of a small record collection in 1957 resulted in the cir- 
culation of 1813 records during the year, another appreciated service. 

But book circulation is not the only standard of library service. Re- 
ference service is also one of the important parts of its activities. In 1957 
about 6300 questions were answered in the Adult Division and 2600 in the 
Young People's Division. Actually questions were also answered in the 
Children's and Branch Divisions, swelling the total considerably for the 
city as a whole. The questions range from simple statistical information 
to music, art, and cooking, car repair and nuclear physics. The variety 
of questions is almost unlimited. 




None of this would be possible without a good book collection. And 
a good book collection demands not only careful purchase of new books 
but frequent discarding of out-of-date and worn out books and rebinding 
of books and magazines of permanent value. No collection of books can 
serve the public properly unless the contents are made available by effi- 
cient cataloging, and this involves listing all materials received under 
subject as well as author and title, bringing subject headings up-to-date 
(changing Telegraphy, Wireless to Radio for instance), recataloging old 
material to make classifications and subject entries consistent, as well as 
getting new books on the shelves, fully cataloged, as quickly as possible. 
Our book collection now numbers 70,308 volumes. 

The library has also rendered a community service by providing meet- 
ing rooms for many boards, committees, discussion groups, and extension 
classes. There were 233 such meetings in 1957, plus weekly story hours, 
many film programs, meetings of the Junior Reading Club under library 
supervision, and classes for mothers of pre-school children, with a total 
attendance in the last four library programs of about 1800. 

The library had many exhibits in 1957, including one on the 50th an- 
niversary of the signing of the Federal Pure Food and Drug Act, the 100th 
anniversary of the founding of THE ATLANTIC MONTHLY, a Polish Post- 
age Stamp exhibit, the sixth annual show of the Concord Artists, Mrs. 
Rowell Sturm's drawings,the work of the art classes of the public schools, 
a display on the history of the Bible, the American Architectural Awards, 
both plans and photographs, old Valentines, photographs of Afrioa, and 
ship models, in addition to Christmas decorations and posters, and numer- 
ous special book displays. 

The Children's Room had a doll exhibit, a special Book Week display, 
paintings and drawings by Elizabeth Orton Jones of Mason, New Hamp- 
shire, illustrations from books by other popular authors, shells and appro- 
28 priate holiday displays. 



The library participated in the Hobby Show, and staff members took 
part in the New Hampshire Folk Festival in Franklin, a story telling Work- 
shop in Pembroke, talked to nine other groups, and attended 123 commun- 
ity meetings to represent the library, as well as meetingsof the New Hamp- 
shire and New England Library Associations. 

All these books and services for only $210 per resident of Concord 1 . 
One good book costs $3.50 to $10.00 these days, except for mysteries, 
westerns, and paperbacks. 

Mrs. Roger Barney and Mr. Willis D.Thompson, Jr. resigned from the 
Board of Library Trustees, and Mrs. Harry Spiegel and Mr. Willis Duer 
Thomson III were appointed to replace them. Mrs. Lois Markey, assis- 
tant librarian, adn Mrs. Roberta Young, resigned from the library staff 
during the year. Mrs. Martha Moses was appointed assistant librarian. 
The Board of Library Trustees, as well as the librarian, are grateful to 
these people for their valuable contributions to the advancement of li- 
brary service in Concord. 

The librarian is especially appreciative of the efforts of the staff mem- 
bers who have made the year a successful one. 

Respectully submitted, 

Siri M. Andrews, City Librarian 

for 
The Board of Library Trustees 




29 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 




Recreation and Parks Department Per- 
sonnel: Several personnel changes took 
place in the department during 1957: 
John B. Penney replaced Donald Sinn, 
who resigned in December 1956 as direc- 
tor; Arnold Kenniston was hired as super- 
visorof boys and mens activities; Patricia 
Hughes resigned as supervisor of girls and 
womens activities and was replaced by 
Lorraine Fournier; Roberta Faretra took 
over as secretary when Marion Joslin re- 
signed; Robert Newton was hired to re- 
place groundsman Edward Offhousewho 
retired. ChesterWheelerwashired as golf 
course Pro-Manager. 

Program: Summer: lOweek playground 
and swimming pool program of games, 
sport tournaments, crafts, swimming in- 
struction and competition, trips, storytell- 
ing and dramatics and special events. Spe- 
cial summer events included: bank con- 
certs, 4th of July celebrations, peanut 
carnival, recreation revue, Junior and 
Rotary Club City swim meets, Sunapee Lake 
train trip. Spring: after school and Satur- 
day playground programs, tennis instruc- 
tion, boys baseball, girls softball . Fall: 
midget boys football league, outdoor bas- 
ketball leagues for men and boys, Hal- 
loween parties and Jack O 1 Lantern Ball. 
Winter: (Some of these programs continue 
most of the year) Two (2) Cooperative 
Play School, Sunset Club, Junior Theatre, 
Talent Showcase, Children's Craft Classes, 
Archery, Neighborhood Square Dances , 
Teen- Age Record Dances, Children and 
Adult Ski Lessons, Junior Rifle Club, boys 
basketball, mens basketball league, in- 
door golf lessons, ballet lessons, junior 
chorus, adult classes in oil painting, wood- 
working, basic electronics, interior deco- 
rating, leather craft, rug hooking, rug 
braiding, copper enameling, pottery, 
square dancing, Special events included 



30 



Community Christmas Caroling program at 
the Plaza, Winter Carnival events, Junior 
Chamber of Commerce Si I ver Skates Derby. 
Facilities Maintained: Beaver Meadow 
golf course, Memorial athletic field , 
Rolfe, White, Rollins Parks, East Con- 
cord, Heights, Garrison, Kimball, Flet- 
cher, Murphy, West Street playgrounds, 
White Park building, West Street Ward 
House, seven swimming pools, White Park 
skating pond and hockey rink and six other 
skating rinks, over 20 other small park 
and roadside areas. 

Other Facilities Used: Conant, Dame, 
Eastman, Garrison, Kimball, Rumford, 
Walker and Concord High Schools, East 
Concord Fire Station, Penacook Youth 
Center, Heights Grange, Millville Grange. 



Groups Using Department Facilities: Con- 
cord, Penacook, ST Johns and Sacred 
Heart School athletic teams, Sunset league, 
Intermediate league, Little league, Jun- 
ior Legion and Police boys Club baseball 
teams, mens softball league, Sprague and 
Brew Company softball teams, girl scout 
and brownie troops, 4-H groups, boy scout 
troops, camera club, tow bar club, moth- 
ers and wives of war veterans, police and 
Merrimack sportsmens club, pistol and rifle 
groups, extension service groups and num- 
erous other groups not on a regular basis. 
Improvements: chain link fences erected 
around six swimming pools, new bleachers 
installed at Memorial Field and White 
Park, ball diamonds at Garrison and East 
Concord playgrounds substantially im- 
proved, started construction of new "2 
hole and new *5 tee at Beaver Meadow , 
unique children's apparatus area at White 
Park installed. 




31 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Water consumption for 1957 amounted to 1,429,285,200 gallons, or 
an aver age of 3,915,850 gallons per day (about 137 gallons per person 
daily). This consumption was 1 1,814,400 gallons more than in 1956. 

Lack of rain and the hot dry summer caused the level of Penacook 
Lake to drop to a point nine feet below the overflow spillway, this was 
the lowest the Lake had been since 1931. The well-field was put into 
operation July 1st and the 139,464,200 gallons pumped from this source 
saved Concord from suffering a serious water shortage. 

In accordance with recommendations in report of Camp, Dresser & 
VcKee, consulting engineers, the oddition of an alkali to the water sup- 
ply was approved to counteract the slight acidity of the water and to stop 
corrosion. A contract was awarded for an addition to the West Concord 
Pumping Station including the installation of equipment for said corrosion 
control. It is estimated that the plant will be ready for operation in June 
1958. 

A 25 percent increase in water rates was voted which went into effect 
on April 1st, 1957, the increased revenue to finance costs of improving 
and expanding the system. 

Laid 5,176 feet of cement lined cast iron pipe from six through 24 
inches in diometer. Extensions cnounted to 3,214 feet and relaid mains 
accounted for 1,962 feet. 

Major 1957 construction projects: 

* The most important project was the completion of the 24-inch trans- 

mission main from the Lake to the City Proper. 

* Extensions were laid in South Main Street, Putney Avenue, Guay Street, 
3:" "gfield Street, Wilson Avenue and New Dunbarton Road. 

* Perry Avenue main was relaid. 

* New 8-inch pipe laid under Everett Turnpike at Fan Road and Ferry 
Street. 

* New pumps and recording meters installed at Columbus Avenue Station. 

* Pump Room and equipment painted at Sanders Well Field. 

* Laid 84 new service connections, 99 old services relaid, (5,927 ser- 
vices now in use). 

* Set six new hydrants, replaced two old hydrants, (763 hydrants in sys- 
tem). 

* Set 116 new meters, replaced 48 old meters, (5,211 meters now in 
service). 

* Repaired 46 leaks - 19 on mains and 27 on service connections. 

* Acquired 1/2 yard trench-hoe and two pick-up trucks. 



32 



INDEX 

Combined Balance Sheet - General and Related Funds 1-A 

General Fund - Statement of Current Surplus 3-A 

Statement of Long Term Debt 3-A 

General Fund - Statement of Revenues 4-A 

General Fund - Statement of Appropriations and Expenditures 5-A 

General Fund - Statement of Assessments for 1957 9-A 

Trust Funds - Statement of Changes in Balances for 1957 10-A 

Schedule of Investments - All Funds 10-A 

General Fund - Tax Accounts 1 1 —A 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 12-A 

V.cter Fund - Balance Sheet 13-A 

Bond Fund - V. ater I 3-A 

V.ater Fund - Statement of Operations 14- A 

Parking Meter Fund 15-A 

Special Assessment Fund io-A 

Equipment and Stores Fund 17- A 

Bond Func - General 13-A 




f 

:--:■-■?■ 




33 



COMBINED BALANCE SHEET 



DECEMBER 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 
Cash : 

Concord National Bank - General Account . 306,014, 

Imprest Funds 1,039, 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons 296, 

Cash in Other Banks 1,782 

Temporary Investments 191,467 

Taxes Receivable 

Current Year Levy - Property 298,925.78 

Current Year Levy - Polls 4,750.96 

Total Current Year 303,676.74 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 8,622.02 295,054 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Property 2,229.45 

Prior Yrs. Levies - Polls 856. 90 

Taxes Bought by City Unredeemed 42, 531-5^ 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 45,617.69 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 45,617-89 -0- 

Accounts Receivable 

Water & Sewer Rentals 73,205.75 

Departmental Receivables 21, 689.24 

Cemetery Receivables 3,550-33 98, 445 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization .. 12,175 

Due from Equipment & Stores Fund 

Stores Accounts 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 5,192.44 

Postage Meter Inventory 273 • 59 

Recreation Dep't. Inventory 269.94 5,735 

Less: Reserves for Non -Realization .. 5,735 

Tax-Deeded Properties . ., 1,433 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 1,433 

State Head Taxes Receivable 

Current Year 17,257 

Prior Years 2,503 

Total General Fund Assets 

TRUST FUND ASSETS 

Cash - Concord National Bank 11,115 

Investments 720, 325 , 

CAPITAL FUND ASSETS (Municipal & School) 

* Bond Requirements - Future Yea rs : 

Municipal 859,000, 

School 1,794,000, 

BOND FUND ASSETS 

Cash - Concord National Bank 17,851 . 

1-A Cash " In other Banks 4, 

Investments 31,745. 

GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 

* Does not Include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer, Parking Meter or 



65 

4l 
00 
07 
58 500,599.71 



72 



99 
99 



295,05^.72 



32 

25 86,270.07 

14,630.83 



-0- 



-0- 



85 19,761.65 



916,316. 



22 

93 731,^1.15 



00 

00 2,653,000.00 



71 

^3 

92 49,602.06 
4,350,360TI9 

Spec. Assess. Funds 



31, 1957 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable : 

Unpresented Coupons 

Current Vouchers Payable 

Payroll Deductions 

Unexpended Appropriations : 

Union School District 

Interest - Union School District Bonds . . . 

Penacook School District 

Library Earmarked Income 

Reserved for Encumbrances 

Due to Other Funds : 

Water Fund 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 

Parking Meter Fund 

Advance Deposits : 

Taxes Collected in Advance 

Options, Plans, Etc 

Taxes Due to State : 

Head Tax Levy of 1957 

Timber Yield Tax - a/c Debt Retirement Fund 

Total General Fund Liabilities 



296.00 
73,^77-35 
-35 73,773-70 



536,656.76 
18,670.00 
3^,033.26 

13^.17 

821-55 590,315.7^ 



113,603.1+1+ 
30,l6l.6l 
1+8,137.90 191,902.95 



10.00 

2,11+2.78 



2,152.78 



22,1+98.80 

802.81+ 23,301.61+ 



831,1+1+6.81 



Current Surplus 3l+,870.17 

Total General Fund Liabilities 916,316.98 

TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 705,80l+.95 

Accumulated Income 25,636.20 731,1+1+1.15 

CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES (Municipal & Schools) 

* Long-Term Debt : 

Bonded Debt 

Long-Term Notes 

BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Construction or Equip. Authorized-General 31,8l6.11 2-A 

Reserve for Encumbrances 3, 706. 66 

Vouchers Payable 13,695.07 

Due to Other Funds 3 81+. 22 l+9,6O2.06 

GRAND TOTAL - LIABILITIES 1+, 350,360.19 



2,617,000.00 

36,000.00 2,653,000.00 



GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS 



For the Year Ended December 31, 1957 

Unappropriated Balance, December 31, 195° 

Applied to 1957 Budget 

Balance Remaining as of January 1, 1957 

1957 Budget Surplus 

Unencumbered Balance of Appropriations 3^,999-08 

Excess of Actual over Estimated Revenues 6,674.69 

Plus: Excess Reserves Liquidated 

Reserve Against Tax-Deeded Property- 



Less: Additional Reserves Set up 

To Increase Res. for Non-Realization of Stores A/C to 
100$ 

To Increase Reserve Against Prior Yrs. Taxes to 100$. 

Balance Available for Reduction of 1958 Tax Rate 



996.1+6 
7,61+5-01 



38,11+0.1+6 

37,110.00 

1,030.1+6 



1+1,673.77 



807. 1+1 
1+3,511.64 



8,61+1.1+7 
31+ ,870. 17 



STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT 



December 31, 1957 





Date of 


Date of 


Int. 


Paid 


in 1957 


Balance 


Municipal: 


Issue 


Maturity 


Rate 


Principal 


Interest 


Dec. 31, 1957 


Signal System . . . 


19W 


1956 


1.25 


23,000.00 


1+31.25 


23,000.00 


Equip. & Improve 


191+9 


1958 


1.50 


25,000.00 


562.50 


25 000.00 


Equip. & Improve 


1953 


1965 


2.00 


60,000.00 


10,1+00.00 


1+60,000.00 


Airport Hangar . . 


1956 


1966 


2.60 


l+,000.00 


1,01+0.00 


36,000.00 


Pub . Improve . & 














Land Acquis. . . . 


1957 


1968 


2.90 


-0- 
112,000.00 


4,567.50 
17-001.25 


315,000.00 
859,000.00 


School : 
















1925 


1965 


1+.25 


ll+,000.00 


5,355-00 


112 . 000 . 00 


Additions & Renov 


1954 


1961+ 


1.20 


30,000.00 


2,700.00 


195,000.00 


Jr. High & Other . 


1955 


1975 


2.10 


80,000.00 


31,920.00 


1,1+40,000.00 


Dame School Add. ■ 


. 1957 


i960 


3.00 


-0- 


-0- 


1+7,000.00 




124,000.00 


39,975-00 


1,79^,000.00 


Self -Liquidating : 














Water Const. &Land 


191+9 


1969 


1-75 


10,000.00 


2,187.50 


120,000.00 


Parking Areas . . . 


1953 


1963 


1.50 


20,000.00 


1,950.00 


120,000.00 


*San. Sewer Const.. 


1955 


1965 


2.10 


10,000.00 


1,890.00 


80,000.00 


#Water Const 


1955 


I966 


2.10 


8,000.00 


1,680.00 


72,000.00 


#Parking Areas . . . 


1957 


1968 


2.90 


-0- 


2,102.50 
9,810.00 


145,000.00 




1+8.000.00 


537,000.00 



Total 



*Approx. 6fp payable from Special Assessments 
#Approx.50% payable from Special Assessments 



ANALYSIS OF DEBT MATURITIES 



3-A 



Due in 

Municipal 

1958 112,000.00 

1959 95,500.00 

i960 95 . 500 . 00 

1961 95,500.00 

1962 95.50O.OO 

1963 95,500.00 

1964 85,500.00 

1965 85,500.00 

1966 35,500.00 

1967 31,500.00 

Beyond 1967 •• 31,500-00 

Total 859,000.00 



284 , 000 . 00 66,786.25 3,190,000.00 











Parking 


School 


Water 


San, 
10 


.Sewers 
,000.00 


Areas 


140. 000. 00 


18,000.00 


20,000.00 


140,000.00 


18,000.00 


10 


,000.00 


34,500.00 


139,000.00 


18,000.00 


10 


,000.00 


34,500.00 


124,000.00 


18,000.00 


10 


,000.00 


34,500.00 


124,000.00 


18,000.00 


10 


,000.00 


34,500.00 


124,000.00 


18,000.00 


10 


,000.00 


34,500.00 


109,000.00 


18,000.00 


10 


,000.00 


14,500.00 


94 000.00 


18.000.00 


10 


,000.00 


14,500.00 


80,000.00 


18 000.00 




-0- 


14,500.00 


80,000.00 


10,000.00 




-0- 


14,500.00 


640,000.00 


20,000.00 
192,000.00 




-0- 


14,500.00 


1,794,000.00 


80, 


,000.00 


265,000.00 



GENERAL FUND 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES 



For the Year Ended December 31, 1957 





Budget 


Revenues 








Local Taxes : 


Estimate 
2, «52,o56.96 


Realized 


Excess 
5,792.27 


De: 


ficiency 


Property Tax 


2,058,449.23 




Poll Taxes 


22,000.00 


21,672.00 






328.00 


National Bank Stock Tax 


6,000.00 


6,266.67 


266.67 






Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Frop. 


-0- 


1,107.76 


1,107.76 






" -Poll 


200.00 


206.30 


6.30 






Interest, Penalties & Costs 


8,000.00 


9,231.73 


1,231.73 






Auto Permits 


135,000.00 


l4o, 461.78 


5,^61.78 






Rent & Profit Tax -Deeded Prop. 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 






Timber Severance Tax 


1,000.00 


3,688.39 


2,688.39 








3,024,056.96 


3,041,003-06 


16,226.90 






State Tax Contributions 












Railroad Tax 


12,000.00 


-0- 




12 


,000.00 


Savings Bank Tax 


13,000.00 


11,558.57 




1 


,441.43 


Interest 8b Dividend Tax 


82,000.00 


85,227.37 


3,227.37 






Loss of Taxes-State Forest 


15.00 


14.17 






.83 




107,015.00 


96,000.11 




10 


,214.09 


Licenses & Permits 












Bicycle Registrations 


500.00 


521.00 


21.00 






Taxi Licenses 


400.00 


287.00 






113.00 


Health Licenses 


400.00 


372.00 






28.00 


Amusement Licenses 


2,500.00 


2,545.90 


45.90 






Police & Protective Licenses 


100.00 


132.00 


32.00 






Prof. & Occupational Licenses 


130.00 
4,030.00 


135.OO 
3,992.90 


5.00 












37.10 


Registration Fees & Permits 












Marriage Licenses 


900.00 


960 . 50 


60.50 






Recording Fees -Legal Documents 


3,200.00 


2,907.75 






292.25 


Filing Fees 


70.00 


390.00 


320.00 






Sundry Fees-City Clerk 


600.00 


578.60 






21.40 


Dog Licenses 


4,000.00 

0,770.00 


4,787.5^ 
9,624.39 


787.5^ 
054.39 












Departmental Service Charges 












Rent of Buildings 


1,300.00 


1,842.00 


542.00 






Comfort Station Concession 


350.00 


381.53 


31.53 






Golf Fees 


7,000.00 


6,409.00 






591.00 


Mem. Field Royalties & Concess. 


300.00 


124.10 






175.90 


Misc. Dept. Service Charges 


1,000.00 


2,155 M 


1,155-^ 






Police Dept. Ambulance Charges 


1,400.00 


1,3^3.00 






57.00 


Airport-Rent 


12,000.00 


8,610.43 




3,3c 


Airport -Concess ions 


100.00 


177.11 


77.11 






Fines 3= Forfeits 


18,000.00 


15,578.48 




2 


,421.52 


Comm. on Head Tax Collections 


7,000.00 


6,108.22 






891.78 


Weights & Measures, Fees 


500.00 


467-95 






32.05 




40,950.00 


43,197.26 




5 


,752.74 


Unclassified 












Interest Income 


-0- 


^,932.27 


^,932.27 






Sale of Property 


1,000.00 


810.00 






190.00 


All Other 


200.00 
1,200.00 


1,055.86 
6,798.13 


855.86 
5,590.13 












TOTAL REVENUES 


3,19^,821.96 


3,201,496.65 


6,674.69 




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10- A 



GENERAL FUND 

TAX ACCOUNTS 

Year Ended December 31, 1957 

STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE 



1957 Prior State Head 
Levy Years Taxes 

Balance January 1, 1957 

Taxes Committed to Collector in 1957 
( Incl . Supplemental ) : 

Real Estate & Personal Property 2,885,622 .71 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,266.67 

Timber Severance Tax 1*, 426. 07 27.69 

Poll Taxes 23,672.00 206.30 

Head Taxes 76,420.00 

Total Charges to Collector 2,919,987-45 274,888.53 95,721.65 



273,574.47 19,301.65 



1 080.07 



Accounted for as follows : 

Collections to Treasurer (Net of Refunds) 2,595,759.25 267,942.82 

Authorized Abatements 20,551.46 3859.36 

Balance Uncollected December 31, 1957 .. _ 303,676.74 3,086.35 

Total Credits & Balance 2,919, 987 TfrJ 2 (%, 888.53 

*Taken as Current Revenue 2,890,076.29 

Reserved for Abatements & Adjustments ... 29,173-48 
Reserved for Forest Conservation Aid .... 737-68 

2,919,987.45 

#Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes of Prior Years 



67,937-30 

8,022.70 

i9.76l.65 

95,721.65 



1951 
1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 



Property 
Taxes 

90.25 

91.10 
1,111.33 
2,229.45 



Poll 


Total 


Taj 


ces 
.20 




18 


18.20 


76 


.00 


166.25 


130 


.00 


130.00 


107 


.50 


198.60 


434. 


.00 


1,545.33 


856 


,90 


3,086.35 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS 



Balance Unredeemed January 1, 1957 : 

Levy of 195^ 

Levy of 1955 

Levy of 1956 (Tax Sale of 1957) 

Accounted for as fol lows : 

Collections to Treasurer 

Authorized Abatements 

Deeded to City 

Total Credits 

11 A Balance Unredeemed December 31, 1957 



6.584.73 
18,235.29 



33,473-14 

609.49 

17.40 



24,820.02 
51,811-55 
7b,o31 -5 7 



34,100.03 
42,531-54 
76,131-57 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 



ASSETS 
Fixed Assets: 

Land and Rights of Way 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Customer Connections 

Sundry Equipment 

Less : Reserve for Depreciation 

Prepaid Engineering Expenses 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page 47) 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 



25,199-97 

1,139^57.92 

110,162.17 

172,706.38 

1,7^5-11 

1,^9,271.55 

678,986.13 



30,l6l.6l 
22,853.64 
18,129.78 



770,285.^2 
9,122A0 

71,145-03 
050,552.85 



Long Term Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt 

Share in Special Assessment 

Fund Balance & Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction . . . 
Surplus - Balance January 1, 1957 
Net Profit for Year 1957 

Total Fund Balance & Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 



53,321.04 
30,726.39 



32,000.00 
43,315.99 



481,337.71 
209,851.72 

84,047.43 



75,315.99 



775,236.86 
850,552.85 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1957 

OPERATING REVENUES 
Sever Rents : 

General 50,627-03 

Industrial 15,242.24 

OPERATING EXPENSES 
General Operation: 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor & Expense .... 8,290.39 

House Connection Oper. Labor & Expense .. 2,849.84 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 1,597-55 

Maintenance of Manholes 817.25 

Miscellaneous General Expense 83.20 13,63^-23 

Customers ' Expense : 

Meter Reading & Billing 1,890.80 

Administration : 

Employees ' Retirement Fund 834 . 96 

Depreciation : 

Total Operating Expenses 17,694.50 

Operating Income 

Non-Operating Income : 

Interest on Investments 

Non -Operating Expense : 

Interest Expense 

Net Profit for the Year 



65,869.27 



34,058.49 
31,810.78 



694.95 
32,505.73 

1,779.34 
30,726.39 



12- A 



WATER FUND 

BALANCE SHEET 

December 31, 1957 
ASSETS 



Fixed Assets, Net of Accrued Depreciation : 

Water and Flowage Rights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping & Purification Equipment 

Distrib. Mains, Services, Hydrants & Meters . 

Other Equipment & Garage Equipment 

Unfinished Construction 

Total Fixed Assets 

Bond Fund Assets: 

Cash - First National Bank 

Investments 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Total Bond Fund Assets 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 

Investments (See Schedule Page 1+7) 

Loaned to Special Assessment Projects 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 

Contracts Receivable 

Total Current Assets 

Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Current Liabilities : 

Voucher Payable Bond Fund 

Long Term Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt 

Share in Special Assessments 

Total Liabilities 

Fund Balance and Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus - Balance January 1, 1957 592,793-9** 

Less Uncollectable Accounts Written Off .... 23.66 

592,770.28 

Net Profit for the Year 1957 58,1+1+9.62 

Total Fund Balance and Surplus 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Ponds 



167,663.11 
205,595.63 
276,925.98 

1+6,609.39 
981,892,61 

1+0,330.09 
896.71 



158.75 
5,900.00 
3,513.05 



113,603.1+1+ 

ll+,273-88 

12,861.03 

62,636.71 

228.70 



6.63 



1,719,913.52 



9,571. 



203,603.76 
1,933,089.08 



6.63 



120,000.00 
33,209.67 153,209.67 



153,216.30 



963,19^.7^ 
165,1+58.11+ 



651,219.90 



1,779,872.78 
1,933,089.08 



BOND FUND-WATER 

DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 



Balance - January 1, 1957 • • 
14 * Expenditures : 

l0 " M Land 

2l+" Main 

Balance - December 31, 1957 



625.00 
5,591.^1 



12,268.93 



6,216.1+1 
6,052.52 



WATER FUND 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 1957 
OPERATING REVENUES 



Commercial Sales - Flat Rate 

Commercial Sales - Metered 

Industrial Sales - Metered 

Sales to Other Water Utilities 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues 

Total Operating Revenues 

OPERATING EXPENSES 

Water Supply : 

Source of Supply Labor 3,188. 52 

Pumping Station Labor 18,291.47 

Purification Labor 1,822.88 

Miscellaneous Labor 1,896.62 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 121.80 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses 2,276.14 

Purification System Supplies & Expenses ... 4, 826. 48 

Fuel for Power 96.65 

Power Purchased 13,158. 4-7 

Repairs to Pumping Station Str. & Equip. .. 4, 572.00 

Repairs to Purification System Str. & Equip. 380.04 

Distribution: 

Distribution Wages 21, 892 . 96 

Meter Department Labor 3, 320 . 40 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 39-38 

Other Distribution Supplies & Expenses .... 1,1^9. Oil- 
Repairs to Distribution Structures 294.78 

Repairs to Mains 2,813.85 

Repairs to Services 3,155.87 

Repairs to Hydrants 1,778.83 

Repairs to Meters 3,762.24 

Ad mi nistration : 

Commercial Office Salaries 1,973.92 

Meter Reading Salaries 6,238. 54 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 514-3.40 

Salaries of General Officers 6,300.00 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 3,1+50.00 

General Office Expenses 1+35 . 33 

Repairs to Gen. Office Structures & Equip. 130.10 

Other General Expenses 391. 96 

Insurance 4,630.12 

Stationery & Printing 129. 55 

Longevity, Annual & Sick Leaves 9,1+01.88 

Retirement Fund Payments 5, 349.41 

Stores Department & Shop Expense 709.24 

Garage Expense 2,805.05 

Fixed Charges : 

Depreciation 1+0,1+90.75 

Taxes 31. 08 

Interest 3,594-5;: 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Non-Operating Income : 

Gain on Sale of Depreciated Assets 

Interest on Investments 

Other Interest Income 

Miscellaneous 

Total Non -Operating Income 

Net Profit for the Year 



3,355-39 

180,370.90 

1+1,01+3.77 

-0- 

288.80 



225,058.86 



50,631.07 



38,207.35 



1+2,1+88.50 



1+4,116.36 



7,293.57 
790.15 

4.88 
745.44 



175,443.28 
49,015.58 



14- A 



8,834.04 
58,449.62 



PARKING METER FUND 

BALANCE SHEET 



Assets: 

Due from General Fond . 
Bond Requirements 

Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt 

Unappropriated Surplus 



48,137-90 
120 000.00 



120,000.00 
1*8,137. 90 



166,137-90 



158,137-90 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 



For the Year Ended December 31, 1957 

Cash Balance - January 1, 1957 39,219-31 

Revenues : 

Meter Collections - Street Parking 45,466.65 

Meter Collections - Off Street Areas . . . 11,326.93 5^93-58 

Total Available 96,012 .89 

Current Expenditures : 
Salaries: 

Meter Repairs 2,3«1.50 

Collections 860 .00 

Enforcement 15,126.59 

Accounting 287-71 

Marking Pavements 209. lo 18,884.96 

Supplies: 

Meter Repairs Parts 222-90 

Other Meter Supplies 309-35 

Enforcement 351 .08 

Marking Streets 566-70 1,450.03 

Retirement Contributions 1,039-87 

Taxes, Insurance, Etc 1,096.84 

Lighting 1,607-76 

Parking Area Maintenance 1,845.53 

Total Current Expenditures 25,92^-99 

Debt Service: 

Payment on Bonds 20,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 1,950. PC 21,950-00 

* Total Expenditures 4~,674.99 

Cash 3alance December 31, 195^ 48,137-90 

1 5-A * Street Parking 17,883 .99 

Off Street Areas 29, 991. PC 

47, 87^-99 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 



Assets 

Investments 

Cash in Commercial Banks 

Improvements Authorized-Not Completed. . . . 

Assessments Receivable - Current 

Assessments Receivable - Deferred 

Due from Other Funds: 

Water Fund Shire of Construction Costs 
San. Sewer Fond Share of Ccnstr. Costs 



33,209.67 



1143,8148.70 
21,697.214 

155,268.00 

43.40 

5*4,946. 88 



76,525-66 1+52,329.68 



Liabilities i- Surplus 

Vouchers Payable 

Reserve for Authorized Improvements . . 
Long Term Debt : 

Bonds Payable 

Loan Payable to Water Fund 

Loan Payable to Sanitary Sewer Fund 
Reserve for Payment of Interest 



265,000.00 
12,861.03 

18,129.78 



7.60 
1514,500.06 



295,990.81 
1..831A1 



1*52-329.88 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



For the Year Ended December 31, 1957 

Unexpended Balance January 1, 1957 

Receipts: 

From General Fund 

Proceeds of Bond Issue 

Current Assessments (Incl. Interest)... 
Deferred Assessments Paid in Advance . . 
Sanitary Sewer Fond Share of Cost (incl. 

Interest ) 

Water Fund Share of Cost (incl. Int.) .. 
Interest on Investments 



9,^52-37 



2 382.96 

1145,000.00 

7,776.80 

769.62 

22,1814.76 
5,0114.36 

3,005-^7 186,1314.27 
195,p5o.o4 



Expenditures : 

Water Main Extensions 

Manor Road 

Branch Turnpike Road 

Downtown Parking Area 

Sanitary Sewer Extension 

Heights Road 

3cnds Paid 

Interest on Bonds 

Unexpended Balance: 

Cash in Mechanicks Nat. 3ank 

Investments 

Less Vouchers 



1,1487.51 

7.60 


1,1495.11 
760.34 






8,876.35 

14,000.00 

4,916.50 


30,048.30 


21,697.214 
1-5.5-:. " 


165,545.94 

■ . : : 


165,536.3^ 



16- A 



EQUIPMENT & STORES FUND 



Assets 

Equipment 

Materials Inventory 

Total Assets , 



39^,161.90 
1+9, 611 -31 



Liabilities £ Funds 

Municipal Investments 

Due to General Fund 

Capital Reserve Fund 

Deficit 

Total Liabilities & Funds 



ij-23,586.lU 
ll+,630.83 
26,^72.92 
20,916.68 



^3,773-21 



OPERATING STATEMENT 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1957 



Equipment Earnings 

Operating Expenditures : 

Direct Labor 

Indirect Labor 

Leaves & Longevity 

Building Repair 

Gas, Oil & Repair Parts . 

Grease & Lubricants 

Supplies 

Hand Tools 

Fuel & Utilities 

Insurance 

Retirement Contributions 

Shop Equipment 

Depreciation on Equipment . 
Net Loss for Period . 



21,k21.k5 

15,602.82 

14- ,061. 8U 

3,565.39 

56,355.7^ 

893.91 

1,076.17 

570.37 

5,253-33 

1+, 055. 0*4- 

2, 14-67. 'a 

1,786.38 



123,109.85 
14-5,781.28 



15^,18^.1^ 



168,891.13 
n+,706.99 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASES 



1 Traxcavator 

1 Sprayer 

1 Pick-up Truck 

1+ Dump Trucks - 5 Ton 

Plows & Wings System & Frames 

1 70 Power Mower 

I4- 21" Power Mowers 

1 21 " Greens Mower 

1 Country Sedan 

1 1/2 ton truck - 14- wheel drive 

1 Front end loader for Tractor 

1 Generator 

1 Salt Spreader 

1 Utility Body 

1 Pontiac Sedan 

1 Tractor 

1 John Deere Tractor 

1 Snow Thrower 

1 Pick-up Truck 

Total Expended from Reserve Fund 

17- A 



12,000.00 

3,585.00 

2,300.00 

23,200.00 

3,739.^5 

730.10 

14.96.14.7 

377.30 

1,14-514-. 50 

1,599.00 

731.62 

150.00 

5^7.29 

14-I45.00 

2,600.00 

683.06 

1,9314.00 

175.96 

2,225.00 



58,973.73 



BOND FUND-GENERAL 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1957 





Issue of 
1953 


Issue of 

1956 


Issue of 
1957 


Total 




7,218.25 


17,61+7.1+8 


315,000.00 
315,000.00 
280,772.29 

3*+ -227-71 
3,706.66 

30,521.05 


2^,865.73 
315,000.00 




7,215.25 

5,9^1-27 

r 1,276.95 


n,bk7.kti 

17 629 Ao 
lb. Ob 


339,b65.73 

30k, 3I+2.96 

35,522.77 

3,706.66 




Unexpended Balance Dec.31 '5' 
Encumbrances Outstanding 


Unencumbered Balance 


1,276.9b" 


18.08 


31^.016.11 



EXPENDITURES 



Highway Construction - W.Conc. 5,901.77 128,81+6.12 13I+ , 7^7 . 89 

Airport Hangar 17 629. 1+0 17,629.1+0 

New Equipment ( Pub . Wks . Dept ) . . . 39-50 39-50 

Bath-Skate House-White Park 8O9.3O 8Q9.3O 

Storm Sewer -Heights 97,981.81+ 97,981.81+ 

Airport Land 3= Runway Extension. 53,135-03 53,135-03 

Total 5 9^1-27 17,629- t + , Q 280,772.2 9 301+ , 31+2 . 90 ' 



18- A 







5 - ! -\5-.V 






.3& 



Dr. Blood's farm and part of his stock. Mt. Kearsarge 
in the distance. 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 



FIRE, City CA 5-3355 

Penacook PL 3-6622 



POLICE CA 5-3232 



Be sure to give your NAME AND ADDRESS as well as the NATURE OF THE 
EMERGENCY clearly. DO NOT HANG UP until you aresure that your MESSAGE 
HAS BEEN UNDERSTOOD. 



************ 



For prompt attention to COMPLAINTS dial the SERVICE INVOLVED. If you are 
uncertain about where to call, dial the MAYOR'S OFFICE 5-3591 




TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 
OF PUBLIC SERVICES 



AIRPORT administration 5-3591 

AMBULANCE service 5-3232 

ASSESSMENT information — 4-0241 

AUDITORIUM, rental 4-0591 

AUTO PERMITS 4-4261 

BICYCLE registration 5-3232 

BIRTH certificates 4-0591 

BOOKMOBILE, city 5-2743 

BUILDING code & permits — 4-1955 

CEMETERY information 5-391 1 

MAYOR 5-3591 

CIVIL DEFENSE, city 4-4342 

DEATH certificates 4-0591 

DOG licenses 4-0591 

ELECTION information 4-0591 

EMPLOYMENT, city 5-3591 

ENGINEERING, city 4-1955 

FIRE insp. & permits 5-3355 

GARBAGE collection 5-6771 

GOLF COURSE, city 8-8954 

HEALTH insp. & clinics 4-0521 

LAWS, city 4-0591 

LIBRARY, city 5-2743 

MAPS, city 4-1955 



MARRIAGE cert. & licenses — 4-0591 

MILK insp. & licenses 4-0521 

OIL BURNER inspections 5-3355 

PARK FACILITIES, use of 4-0951 

PAYMENTS, by city 5-2775 

PLANNING, city 4-1955 

PLUMBING insp. & licenses — 4-1955 

RECREATION activities 4-0951 

REFUSE collection 4-1955 

SEWERS 4-1955 

SIGNS, street 4-1955 

SNOW plowing & sanding — 4-1955 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS 5-2775 

STREET LIGHTS burned out — 5-3641 

new installations 4-1955 

TAXES, property, poll, head — 4-4261 

TRAFFIC signs & signals 5-3232 

TREES, city 4-1955 

VOTING registration 4-0591 

WATER service 4-1711 

bills 5-2775 

WELFARE, City 4-1091 

Penacook PL 3-4211 

ZONING laws & permits 4-1955