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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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1961 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Mayor ' s Message. » o...c.. 3 

City Government .<>... <,..o..o.o..<> 3 

City Boards 6 

Planning ...o 7 

Engineering and Public Works. 10 

Engineering Inspection .............11 

Library .......ool4 

Recreation and Parks. .....17 

Police , . o . o . . 20 

Municipal Court. 22 

Fire 23 

V#XVxX l/CrCnSG* •**»o**«oa«oooao*o««**«*«o«*ooo***o*««e**o«oooo*oo«o*^^ 

Cemeteries 28 

Welfare. „ . . 28 

Sanitary Inspection. ......29 

Health. 30 

Records, 31 

Elections. 32 

Water. 33 

Legal 34 

Collection. ...,,. ..o 35 

Assessing. .........36 

Finance .........37 

Certificate of Audit. , 39 

State Audit .40 

-1- 



FROM THE MAYOR'S OFFICE 



In the termination of my service with the City of Concord on January 8, 1962, 
after four years as Mayor, I want to again express my sincere thanks and grati- 
tude to all heads of departments, all employees, aldermen and to the citizens 
of Concord for their co-operation, consideration and patience in assisting me 
in working out city problems and in doing the regular day by day work that 
keeps our city healthy, clean and safe. 

The last several years have been years of transition; many changes have taken 
place; many are in process and I feel that many more will occur in the years to 
come. 

In my opinion the City of Concord is becoming more and more the nerve center of 
New Hampshire and northern New England, not only as the capital of the state, 
but as a manufacturing and retail center it is extending its field of activity. 
All of this is being accomplished in an orderly manner by the co-operation of 
our citizens with the expert advice of our Planning Board and able Director. 

Of interest to every citizen is the item of taxes. Property of all kinds is 
subject to constant change in value, so, to keep our city on a fair and equal 
valuation I have come to believe that in view of the many changes that have 
occurred that either a complete revaluation of the city or additional personnel 
in the Tax Assessor's office is necessary at once to keep valuations on an 
equalized basis. 

In closing, I want to say that only as Mayor can one fully sense the resourcefvl- 
ness, goodness, and quality of Concord's citizens, who, as a whole, are meeting 
the heavy demands for civic duty that they may make this city greater, better 
and more beautiful. 



Charles P. Johnson 
Mayor 1958-1961 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



1961-1962 

MAYOR 

Charles P. Johnson 

ALDERMEN- AT- LARGE 

Robert D. Branch 
William P. Gove 
William T. Jordan 
William Arthur Stevens 
Eugene C. Struckhoff 



WARD ALDERMEN 

Ward 1 John M. Allen 

Ward 2 Paul M. Cunningham 

Ward 3 George A, Stohrer, Jr, 

Ward 4 Malcolm McLane 

Ward 5 Roland E. Fletcher 

Ward 6 David E. Tardiff 

Ward 7 C. Edwin Howard 

Ward 8 Samuel J. Chapman 

Ward 9 Thomas B. Jennings 



CITY CLERK 
Arthur E. Roby 



YOUR CITY QPFICIALS 



CEMETERY SUPERIliTENDENT 
Edward L. Rowland 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Walter H. Carlson 

CITY ASSESSORS 

John Hyde to June 2 

Raymond D. Daigle from Sept. 29 

Clifford H. Higgins 

Charles A. Bartlett, died Nov. 7 

FINANCE DIRECTOE-CITY AUDITOR 
Archie N. Gouriey 

CITY COLLECTOR 
George M. West 

CITY ENGINEER & SUPT. OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Howard E. Raymond 

CITY LIBRARIAN 
Lois R. Markey 

CITY PLANNING DIRECTOR 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

CITY SOLICITOR 

Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 

CITY TREASURER 

Verne F. Santas, Jr. 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 

Rev. George J.W. Pennington to Mar. 1 
Rev. John I. Johnson from July 10 

ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick 



FIRE CHIEF 

Duncan M. Murdoch 

HEALTH OFFICER 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

James M. Ceriello, Probation 

officer 
Marie MacPhail, Clerk 
Donald G. Matson, Judge 
Francis E. Perkins, Assoc, Judge 

OVERSEER OF POOR 

Charles P. Coakley 

POUND KEEPER 

Charles C. Hoagland 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 
John B. Penney 

SANITARY INSPECTOR 

Austin B. Presby, to Aug. 4 
George A. Hill from Aug, 4 

SEALER OF W!:iCHTS AND MEASURES 
Arthur W. Mc Isaac 

V/ATSP SUPERINTENDENT 
G. Arthur Faneuf 

WELFARE DIRECTOR 

Gertrude E. Watkins 



CITY BOARDS 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 

Pierre A. Boucher, M. D. , Chairman 
Thomas J. Halligan, M.D. 
William D. Penhale, M.D. 



BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES: 

Chester G. Larson, Chairman 

Jean Cummings to May 16 

William L. Dudley, May 22 to Sept. 

J. Bernard Halligan from May 16 

Otis Kingsbury to May 16 

James Lynch 

Mrs. Nyleen Morrison from May 16 

Mayland H. Morse, Jr. to May 16 

Mrs. Walter S. Newton from May 16 

Mrs. Harry Spiegel 

W. Duer Thompson, 3rd 

Mrs. Frederick K. Upton 



BUILDING CODE-BOARD OF APPEALS: 
Robert Foster, Chairman 
Carroll E. Garland 
William Johns 
Everett R. Munson 
Arnold Perreton 



CITY PLANNING BOARD: 
10 Ex Officio 

Charles P. Johnson, Mayor 
Howard E. Raymond, City Engineer 
Robert D. Branch, Alderman-at-large 
Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 
Lt. Gen. Edward H. Brooks 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Douglas N. Everett 
A. Clifford Hudson 
Pasquale Rufo 



BOARD OF PLUMBING EXAMINERS: 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
J. Barry O'Brien 
George E. Young 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD: 
James D. Bell 
Robert J. Jewell 
John H, Symonds 



BOARD OF REVISION OF ASSESSMENTS: 
Archie N. Gourley, Chairman 
Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 
Robert W. Potter 
Hov;ard E. Raymond 
James A. Taylor 



TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS: 
Robert M. Beyer 
Leon S. Merrill 
Verne F. Santas, Jr. 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT: 
Frank J. Preston, Chairman 
Allan Evans 
Roy Y. Lang 
Donald G. Rainie 
Enoch Shenton, Jr. II 



PLANNING 

HIGHWAYS During 1961, the Planning Department and the Planning Board devoted considerable 
time and effort to highway matters. Special attention was given to legislation permitting 
municipalities to lay out limited access highways, an ordinance regulating building in the 
bed of mapped streets, and proposals to extend Interstate Highway 93 north of Concord. 

In addition to new, relocated and discontinued streets, the Planning Board approved con- 
struction of 760 feet of hard-surfaced sidewalk on East Side Drive in East Concord, and 
naming of the intersection of Broadway, South and Clinton Streets McKee Square in honor 
of the late Mayor Charles J. McKee. 

TRAFFIC AND PARKING The Planning Department's work load in handling traffic and parking 
problems increased markedly in 1961. Under established procedure, these matters are 
investigated by the department in cooperation with the Police Department, with subsequent 
review and recommended action by the Planning Board. Many recommendations were made in 
regard to traffic patterns, stop intersections and parking. 

WATER FACILITIES A petition for a 1,200-foot extension of the municipal water system 
in Manor Road easterly of Abbott Road was approved by the Planning Board with the recommen- 
dation that cost of the extension be shared equally by the petitioner and the city. 

SEWER FACILITIES During the year, the Planning Board made two major recommendations 
affecting the master plan of sanitary sewers. One of these involved joint action by the 
City of Concord and the Town of Boscawen in applying to the Housing and Home Finance 
Agency of the federal government for a loan to study the feasibility of a combined sewage 
treatment plant in Penacook. The other involved a recommendation that the Mayor seek the 
cooperation of Saint Paul's School in action that would abate city-school pollution of 
Turkey River by extending the west-end trunk sanitary sewer system westerly to the Millville 
area. 

PUBLIC AND SEMI-PUBLIC BUILDING SITES No mean effort of the Planning Department was 
expended in assisting federal and state officials in the selection of sites for public 
buildings. Location studies were conducted in connection with the proposed construction 
of a new post office-federal building and a new state office building in Concord. A 
report was prepared for submission to the State Board of Education outlining the advantages 
of a Concord location and suggesting possible local sites in connection with the proposed 
New Hampshire Technical Institute to be established by the state. 

The Planning Department assisted the Concord Housing Authority in its search for sites 
in the city proper and Penacook for 100 units of public housing for the elderly. 

The department also worked with representatives of the Roman Catholic Bishop of Manchester 
investigating possible sites for a regional parochial high school in Concord. 

LAND TRANSACTIONS Several land transactions were processed by the Planning Board in 1961. 
In addition to its annual review of tax-deeded property to determine whether or not the 
city has present or foreseeable future use for any of the tracts taken for non-payment 
of taxes, the board recommended acquisition of a small parcel of land on Loudon Road for 
addition to the Concord Plains playground, and the acquisition of the Concord-Claremont 
Railroad's interest in the abandoned railroad right of way across the city quarry lot 
in West Concord. 



Two requests by private interests to purchase city land were investigated by the 
board. Sale of a small parcel of land on Pembroke Road easterly of Sheep Davis 
Road, surplus from a recently-completed highway relocation project, was approved, 
while a request to purchase a part of the Canal Street parking lot was turned 
down. In addition, the Planning Board recommended favorable action on a request 
of the Concord American Little League to lease city land on High Street for 
little league ball park use. 

Two electric utility transmission line easements over city land were granted 
by the Board of Aldermen on recommendation of the Planning Board. 

HOUSING CODE The adoption of a comprehensive housing code stands high on the 
list of municipal accomplishments in 1961. The code was prepared by the plan- 
ning staff and approved by the Planning Board for submission to the Board of 
Aldermen. 

The New code, which was enacted on June 19, 1961, provides the city government 
with the necessary authority to take positive steps to prevent blight and 
eliminate slums by enforcing minimum standards for use and occupancy of dwellings, 
It is expected that enforcement of the code will start in 1962 after funds for 
inspection staff are provided by the Board of Aldermen. 

ZONING Tato changes in the Zoning Map of the City of Concord were recommended 
to the Board of Aldermen in 1961. These included the rezoning of a 50-acre 
tract on Black Hill from an agricultural to a limited commercial district, and 
the rezoning of a section of Manor Road in West Concord from an agricultural 
to a single residence district. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES Other important activities of the Planning Board included 
a review of project priority in connection with the preparation of a six-year 
capital improvement program, preparation of plumbing code amendments that 
placed the installation of water piping under municipal plumbing control and 
which prohibited the use of bituminous fibre pipe in building drains. 

The board also recommended that the city seek enabling legislation at the 1963 
session of the General Court to permit municipalities to adopt nationally- 
recognized mobile home construction standards by reference. 




ARCHITECTS DRAWING OF THE NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE OFFICE BUILDING 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



ENGINEERING - The Engineering Department has been extremely active this year with 
design and coordination work for all the subdivision work, sewers, highways, 
streets, parking lots and buildings in addition to our routine records. 

We designed and supervised construction on two filter plant -bathhouses for the 
Recreation Department, designed a relocation project for Horse Hill Road, and 
designed and provided field engineering for the Town Road Aid projects. 

The field work and design for the Storrs Street By-Pass was done during the 
year and with it the coordinating and approval of work designed in the Shopping 
Center area. 

At the Airport, an addition was built on the Administration Building and a new 
parking lot designed for spring construction. 

PUBLIC WORKS - Concord has been stirred by a definite building and development 
expansion, a growth beyond anything experienced in the past. This year builders 
are at work on five separate subdivisions in addition to the individual building 
of dwellings. These subdivisions required streets, sewers, drainage, trees, 
refuse collection and all municipal services. 

HIGHWAYS - Under our street maintenance program we resurfaced 32 miles of high- 
way in the west and south-end sections of the city. We surfaced with hot bitu- 
minous asphalt on South Main Street from Maitland Street to West Street, on 
Pleasant Street from Fruit Street to Fiske Road and Washington Street, Penacook, 
from Main Street to the Giant Store. These projects were surfaced with an 
asphalt emulsion-mix which should make quite a change in the street surfacing 
program of the state. 

In addition, we scarified and treated a total of two miles of highway on Elm 
Street, Penacook, Walker Street, St. John and Vernon Streets and Westbourne 
Road. 

New streets constructed during the year were an extension of Bow Street, Fellows 
Street, a portion of Springfield Street, Midland Street and Temi Road. 

Under our Town Road Aid program we built a total of 1.2 miles of highway on 
Birchdale Road and Hooksett Turnpike. 

Gravel streets surfaced during the year by our asphalt emulsion stabilization 
program include Loop Road, a portion of Chase Street, Mill Street, North and 
South Curtisville Road and a half mile of Hot Hole Pond Road for a total of 
4.8 miles of hard-surfaced highway. Adding this figure to the T.R.A. figure, 
gives us six miles of gravel roads surfaced during the year leaving only seven 
miles in the city out of a total of 215 miles. 

SIDEWALKS - Our sidewalk resurfacing program was concentrated within the area of 
Concord proper this year. 10,000 square yards were resurfaced for $9,500, or 
just under a dollar per square yard. 

We tried a new program of rehabilitating concrete sidewalks and repaired all of 
the walks around the State House, a total of 1,040 square yards, at a cost of 
$2,700, for a unit cost of $2.50 per square yard compared to new construction 
cost of $5.00 per square yard. 

BRUSH AND WEED CONTROL - Our highway maintenance brush control program consisted 
of cutting brush on Shaker Road, Hot Hole Pond Road, Silk Farm Road, Iron Works 
Road and W. Iron Works Foa^. 

-10- 



The chemical control program is operating very successfully with only occasional 
spot touching of previous work and very little unhappiness from abutters of new 
areas. In ten years we will have all our highway cut back to the right-of-way 
lines. 

The tree program is becoming more acute yearly. Our tree crews removed 100 
Dutch elm trees and 25 dead maples. We planted only a hundred new trees. We 
are in the future planting a replacement for every tree taken down. For next 
year we have ordered several varieties of flowering trees to plant in confined 
areas. Our tree crews transplanted several full size maples this spring, trees 
10" in diameter and thirty feet high and they lived through the summer. 

BRIDGES - Our bridge maintenance program is operating successfully with a 
trained crew developed for the future. The Sewalls Falls Bridge was completed 
and the small bridge on Washington Street over the canal was painted. 

AIRPORT - An interesting project completed during the year was the reroofing of 
the metal hangar at the airport. This building had leaked for some years and we 
were successful in making the roof storm proof. 

The airport lighting system was damaged during the summer and considerable work 
was done to repair the wiring before winter. 

SEWER SYSTEM - We had a very busy year in sewer construction and maintenance. 
3,400 feet of new mains were built and sixty new house connections were made. 
In addition, the mains in Penacook and Concord Manor were cleaned. 

PARKING LOTS - Two parking lots were constructed. One of these was on Warren 
Street for the Fire Department and an addition to the Ford Avenue lot at City 
Hall. The work on Ford Avenue provided eight additional spaces and made the 
Ford Avenue lot the lowest in cost per car space of off-street parking. 



ENGINEERING INSPECTION 

Concord has had a consecutive year of near-record building construction totaling 
$4,321,904. This represented $3,624,562 of new building and a total value of 
$697,342 for repairs and alterations. 

Although new work accounted for the major part of the expansion and was non- 
residential construction, the remodeling was divided almost equally between moder- 
nization and expansion of the older and also the smaller homes. 

During the year a total of 15 permits were issued for fallout shelters. 

ZONING 57 cases were appealed to the Zoning Board of Adjustment. These cases 
were processed and public hearings were held for the purpose of determining 
questions of special exception and variance involving the use of premises, as re- 
quired under the terms of the Zoning Ordinance. 

BUILDING INSPECTION A total of 318 building permits were issued by this depart- 
ment. 18 permits were issued for swimming pools and 21 permits for mobile homes. 
In addition, the following miscellaneous work was completed: 866 building inspec- 
tions, 197 sign inspections, 324 plumbing inspections and 1,003 electrical inspec- 
tions. 

-11- 




DEMPSTER 
DUMPMASTER 
New City Rubbish 
Collector 



CONCORD PROGRESSES 

Two men, two horses, and hours .... 

One man, one truck, and minutes .... 





READY FOR WINTER 



(above) Mayor Johnson, Harold Ayer of Northern Salt 
Service, and City Engineer Howard Raymond pictured 
beside rock salt purchased in April. 



(below) New snow removal equipment in operation. 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 




City Librarian Lois Markey receives national award for achievement as State Executive 
Chairman of National Library Week. With her are Paul Goode, Librarian of St. Paul's 
School and Herbert Kimball, Lay Chairman of National Library Week. 



BOOKS AND MATERIALS This year 6,500 books were added to the library making a 
total of 97,500 books in the collection, of which 18,500 are for children below 
the seventh grade. There are now 450 recordings in the library. Extensive work 
has been done on the pamphlets in order to make a vital and usuable collection. 
A library of about 300 films is available, as well as 200 magazines and 14 news- 
papers. 

USE OF MATERIALS Of the total population of Concord, 757o are registered borro- 
wers. This is an increase of 8% over last year. Of the total registration, 22% 
are children below the seventh grade. Borrowers used a total of 302,500 items 
(excluding films) in 1961. This is an increase of 1,000 items per month over the 
previous year. It represents a circulation of 10.5 books per capita. The cir- 
culation of recordings indicates a 507o increase over 1960 and a 907. increase over 
1959. 

However, the greatest increase the library has felt is in the requests for infor- 
mation and specific books. In 1960 the figure was 20,000. This year it is over 
30,000 (100 per day) in the main adult library alone. 

BUILDINGS The Main Library has been improved by new lighting in the Circulation 
Area. The installation of a new telephone and intercom system has resulted in 
much greater efficiency of operation for staff and public. One area of the 
library has been sound proofed. The outside walls have been waterproofed. 



■ 14. 



SERVICES In addition to the usual service to individuals and groups within the 
library, there have been many others such as short "spot" book reviews on WKXL, 
many Concord Monitor articles and features, and over thirty talks on the library 
and books given to Concord groups. About 3,000 adults used 250 films. 1,000 
children attended 50 story hours and film programs. Two groups of pre-school 
children and their mothers each received instruction for a period of six weeks. 
About 200 children made school class visits. 

Over 300 groups used the two meeting rooms. Adult film programs, sponsored 
by the Friends of the Library were held in the City Auditorium. Changing ex- 
hibits of books, articles and paintings were maintained. 

The Concord Library activities were extensively filmed for a New England film 
called "The Day The Books Went Blank." 




Filming the Children's Room for "The Day the Books Went Blank." 



PERSONNEL The City Librarian serves as Executive Chairman of the Independent 
Schools Education Board, as Vice-President of the New England Library Associa- 
tion, and on the Governor's Committee on Better Libraries for New Hampshire. 
She served as Executive Chairman for New Hampshire National Library Week in 
1961. 

The Library Board has been very active in both local and state library endeavors, 
one member is an officer in the State Trustee's Association, another is Chairman 
of one of the Governor's committees. 

The Friends of the Library were helpful in the celebration of National Library 
Week as well as at the adult film programs. 

The Staff is active in community affairs as well as in the performance of their 
professional or clerical duties. 



-15- 




Pre-school youngsters enjoy a story hour at the City Library. 



Popular exhibit of articles used for bookmarks and found in books returned to the 
City Library. 




RECREATION AND PARKS DEPT, 

RECREATION PROGRAM - Summer Playgrounds and Pools: 

A ten week program was conducted at ten supervised playgrounds and seven pools 
which included crafts, games, sports, tournaments, dramatics, trips, special 
events. Red Cross swimming instruction, and swim team competition. 

Special Summer Features: July 4th celebration, trip to Bear Brook, teen-trip. 
Sunset Club trips. Sidewalk Art Show, Junior Swim Meet, Rotary Swim Meet, State 
Swim Meet trip. Peanut Carnival, Talent Show, Water Ballet, Beauty Contests, 
Junior Champ Track Meet, Teen dances, B^nd concerts. 

Children and Youth Programs: Craft classes, trampoline classes, teen record hops, 
youth activities council, two youth hockey leagues, five boys basketball leagues, 
girls basketball, figure skating class, ski lessons, two play schools, boys foot- 
ball league, tennis clinics, junior golf tournament, neighborhood square dance 
series at eight schools, judo class, ballet class, art class, trampoline classes, 
swim team practice at Manchester Y, games periods, badminton, tumbling. 

Adult Programs: Industrial Men's basketball League, Industrial Men's Softball 
League, Women's Basketball, iVomen's softball. Women's slimnastics, men's and 
women's badminton, women's volleyball, two housewives' bowling leagues, house- 
wives' golf league, city employees' bowling league. Sunset Club for older adults, 
sewing, woodworking, oil painting, amateur radio, bridge, indoor g©lf lessons, 
women's and men's judo, tennis clinics, indoor tennis. 

Special Features Year-round: Winter Carnival ski meet, silver skates derby, sled 
races, hockey games, carnival ball and queen coronation, Easter Egg Hunt, Benson's 
Animal Farm Trip, Square dance festivals, Halloween parties and Jack 0' Lantern 
Ball. 

Attendance: Skating i^/hite Park - 43,905; other skating areas - 10,000 estimated; 
July 4th fireworks - 10,000; playgrounds - 30,374; pools - 41,705; indoor - 25,938; 
other outdoor programs and special features - 20,357. These figures are actual 
peak counts, and do not allow for the number of participants coming before and 
after the count was made. 

GOLF COURSE OPERATION - For the second year in a row the revenue at the Beaver 
Meadow Municipal Course exceeded operating expenses. The excess in 1961 was 
almost $2,500. 5917 daily tickets were sold. Season membership: adult 190, 
special 31, junior 61, total 282. Estimated individual rounds played by daily 
fee and season ticket players was 31,297, vjhich compares with 27,007 rounds in 
1960 and 15,757 rounds in 1957. 

AREAS AND FACILITIES MAINTENANCE - Facilities Maintained: Beaver Meadow Golf 
Course, Memorial Atheletic Field, Rolfe, Isliite and Rollins Parks, Merrill, 
Heights, Garrison, Kimball, Fletcher-Murphy, West Street, Doyen, Thompson, and 
Hall Street Playgrounds. '-Thite Park administration building and garage. West 
Street Ward Houso, East Concord Community Center, Community Center, in old 
Concord Armory, seven svinning an'' one wading pools, '.fliite Park skating pond 
and hockey rink, and ten other neighborhood rinks, over 20 other small park, 
T.onumpnt, and roadside araas. Use was made of the Penacook Youth Center and 
Concord Public School multipurpose rooms and gyms in various schools for depart- 
m.Pt activities. The new Community Center in the old armory opened for use in 
late October and proved immediately popular. Over 7,000 people used the center 
during December. 

Groups Using Department Facilities - Indoor-over 40 different adult and youth 
groups including scouts and 4-H clubs. Outdoor - eleven varsity sports teams from 

-17- 



Concord High Schook, St. John's and Penacook in football, baseball, cross-country, 
track, tennis, golf, hockey; over 30 boys' baseball teams from Little League, 
Minor League, Babe Ruth, Junior Legion, Small Fry, C.Y.O,, Sunset League Baseball; 
Capital City and Industrial Softball Leagues; womens' and girls' Softball teams; 
State Hospital Swim classes; Y.M.C.A. day camp; New England College, N.H.I. A. A. 
and Penacook Indian Baseball games; C.H.S. and Morrill School physical education 
classes; numerous church and school outings. Attendance by organized groups; 
Indoor - 20,400; Outdoor - 99,080. Does not include non-schedule walk-on use 
of parks. 

CAPITAL INPROVEMENTS - New cement-block bathhouses and pool water filtration and 
recirculation installations under construction at Merrill and Heights pools to 
be completed for 1962 season. Completed fairway improvement program at Beaver 
Meadow. Some work done at Hall Street Playground with more scheduled for 1962. 
Rollins, '.\'est Street, and Heights fence installations; and IThite Park fence repair 
Play equipment installed at Thompson Playground. 




City Recreation Director John Penney makes Youth Hockey Awards. 



-18- 




Volunteer instructors teach a children's ski class. 



Kimball Playground's Water Ballet Troupe. 




POLICE DEPARTMENT 

PARKING METERS - The collection of money from the parking meters was $58,411.47 
with cost for repairs in parts $451.36 for 1961. A total of 4,528 meters wero 
repaired during this year compared with 4,567 meters in 1960, There was a total 
of 73 meters converted and installed in three parking lots. The total number of 
meters in operation at the present time is 1190. 

TRAINING PROGRAM - The annual firearms training of all regular officers was held 
during June under the direction of Sgt. Percy Davis. Eight members attended a 
week-long Police Training School at the Rundlett Junior High under the direction 
of two FBI agents and under the supervision of Capt. Daniel Abbott. Chief 
Carlson and Sgt. Richard Campbell attended an FBI Law Enforcement Conference on 
"Bank Robbery" in Manchester during November. Nine officers attended various 
training courses. 

MISCELLANEOUS ACTIVITIES - The annual census was taken during March by seven 
members of the department. An increase of 192 persons over last years' figures 
was reported. Bicycle registration was held as usual during 1961. A total of 
2519 bicycles have been registered compared with 2302 in 1960. Four Police 
School crossing guards distributed approximately 2000 "Safety Leaflets" on Main 
Street during the Christmas Holidays. 

EMERGENCY ACTIVITIES - In January, we experienced the tragic loss of one of 
St. Paul's School landmarks. The "Big Study Hall" was completely destroyed by 
fire. The Police took an active part in the patroling and guarding of this and 
surrounding buildings. 

The City underwent a most tragic experience in June. Three small boys perished 
in a home freezer in the West Concord area. Police worked for hours trying to 
revive the boys, but to no avail. 

ACTIVITIES OF BOYS'CLUB AND CAMP ANDREWS - The Boys' Club enrolled 200 boys. The 
Club participated in both Midget and Junior Basketball with the teams entering 
the Twin-State Basketball Tournament in Claremont. No honors were won, but good 
sportsmanship was enjoyed by both teams. The annual Christmas party was enjoyed 
by 175 boys at the Club. Refreshments and a good time were enjoyed under the 
supervision of the Club Director James Ceriello, Some of the boys from the club 
participated in the annual Fund Drive, and a large number of boys took part in 
the annual drive for Camp Andrews. 

The 1961 season at Camp Andrews got under v^ay the end of June for a period of 
eight weeks. 144 boys were able to attend this camp for a two week period lasting 
into the middle of August. The boys participated in all of the out-of-door sports 
under the direction of their director, James Ceriello and seven counselors. 

Minor repairs of the building were aade including needed new siding and painting 
on one wall of the gym and numerous small paint jobs. 



•20- 







m M 



SAFETY PROGRAM: Officer 
Thomas Perry distributes 

safety literature to Walker 
School student. Principal 

Lawrence Perkins looks on. 




NUKBER OF ARRESTS FOR DRIVING V.'HILE INTOXICATED IN I960 
NUMBER OF ARRESTS FOR DRIVING IffllLE INTOXICATED IN 1961 



88 
61 



THE FOLLOWING ARE THE KNOTJN CASES FOR A T!TO YEAR PERIOD 1960 1,591 
(excluding parking violations) 1961 1,673 



CLOSED CASES FOR 1960 



1,482 CLOSED CASES FOR 1961 1,562 



In 1960 there were 216 serious crimes including: manslaughter, robbery, burglary, 
larceny and auto theft, of these 101 or 477, were cleared by arrests. 

In 1961 there were 274 serious crimes including the above - of these 163 or 597» 
were cleared by arrests. 



THE AMOUNT OF PROPERTY REPORTED STOLEN IN 1961 
THE AMOUNT OF PROPERTY RECOVERED FOR 1961 



$33,734.60 
$25,652.36 



AMBULANCE CALLS 1960 1,297 AMBULANCE CALLS 1961 1,417 

TOTAL COMPLAINTS 1960 10,195 TOTAL COMPLAINTS 1961 9,553 

TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 1960 501 TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS 1961 580 

TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS 1960 11,770 TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS 1961 10,164 




School Crossing Patrol. 



• 22- 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



PERSONNEL - The Fire Department operated with a staff of 55 permanent men and 60 
call firemen. This represents an addition of two permanent men and a decrease 
of 18 call men. 



APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT - No additional fire apparatus was purchased during 
1951. Engine //8, a 1932 Ahrens-Fox 500 gallon pumper was replaced by engine 
i-6, a 750 gallon American Lafrance 1941 pumper, and was relocated at the West 
Concord station from headquarters with personnel. The department has in service 
20,000 feet of fire hose. Three skill saws were added to each ladder truck. 



MAINTENANCE - Through the use of the facilities available at the department 
workshop, the Fire Department has continued the practice of making its own 
repairs and replacements. All buildings have been maintained by the permanent 
personnel at West Concord Fire Station, new overhead doors, additional sleeping 
quarters and aluminium combination windows and screens have been installed. 
There were 430 fire extinguishers re-charged at the Central Station. The Police 
and Fire alarm systems have been maintained and tested as in previous years. 

FIRE PREVENTION - Fire prevention is one of the most important activities of the 
Department. Although *.his work lacks the color of actual fire fighting, never- 
theless it plays an important part in keeping fire losses at a minimum. In fact, 
this program has resulted in a decrease of fire loss in the city for the year 
1961, The regular inspections of schools, convalescent homes, places of public 
assembly have been made. 376 oil burners and several gasoline tanks and pump 
installations complied with all rules and regulations and permits were issued 
for them. 



FIRE LOSS - The major fire for 1961 occurred at the St. Paul's School study, 
with loss of over $250,000.00 During the year of 1961 the Department responded 
to 517 alarms, of which 62 were box alarms, 455 stills and investigations. 



VALUE 



FIF.E LOSS SWi'lARY 
LOSS 



INSURANCE 



INSURANCE 



BUILDING: 
CONTENTS: 
TOTAL: 



$953,000.00 

$132.000.00 

$1,085,000.00 



$196,302.00 
$ 96.312.00 
$292,614.00 



$557,027.00 
$256.723.00 
$813,750.00 



$196,302.00 
$ 96.312.00 
$292,614,00 



•23- 



^•^. 



\! 







,.. \ 




Problems of Fighting Fire 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



ALERTS - Civil Defense has one major alert each year, at which time all Civil 
Defense Agencies participate. Concord's role this year was varied. The major 
part was the hourly reports of radiological data to Area Headquarters via RACES. 
VJe also stood by as military aircraft were going to use Concord Airport as an 
emergency field. We were asked to send police personnel to the Portsmouth area 
to aid security, and prepare to assume responsibility for refugees from that 
area. A problem was prepared with Boscawen which involved rescue operation of 
several injured persons. All problems were readily worked out and our responses 
were fully accepted by the State of New Hampshire Civil Defense. Public coopera- 
tion in this alert was rated very good. Supper was provided by the Salvation 
Army for members at the Control Center. 

During the hurricane season we were placed on alert. This means that Police, 
Fire, Public Works and Rescue were advised of the condition and made aware that 
their services might be required. Intra-Service cooperation has always been the 
finest. 



COOPERATIVE EFFORTS - At least once a year Concord Hospital tests its Disaster 
Plan. We had an active part in that we assisted in the make-up of the injured 
and provided trained rescue personnel. Our RACES network was also tested during 
this alert. 

In cooperation with the local Fire Department a test was made of the Rollins 
Park warning siren to determine the actual area in which this unit could be 
heard. Following this test a meeting was held with a sound engineer who reported 
back that, to get minimum coverage, five additional units should be located 
throughout the city. 

EQUIPMENT - Again we have made use of available Civil Defense surplus materials 
as well as the Federal Matching Funds Program. A combination public address 
system and siren was secured for the Police Department, and the first part of 
our RACES network was secured under the Matching Funds program. Office furniture 
and equipment were secured from surplus materials. Several other city departments 
secured valuable equipment as well. 

PENACOOK RESCUE SQUAD - Our most outstanding public relations service is the 
Penacook Rescue Squad. Their willingness to be of assistance in any way has 
made them a very valuable group not only to our city but also to the surrounding 
communities. They continue to be one of the top rescue units in our entire state. 

PERSONNEL - During the year the Reverend George J.W.Pennington resignsd as 
Director and his Deputy, John I. Johnson, was subsequently appointed as Director 
by Mayor Johnson. The office has been open full time and is in charge of the 
Administration Officer, Mrs. Ruth Maxham. Due to the stress on shelters, 
Mr. Willis D. Thompson, Jr., was appointed Assistant Director in charge of 
shelters. His knowledge and vision of this area of concern has been greatly 
appreciated by those citizens with whom he has worked. Mr. Richard Brodeur, 
one of the originators of the Penacook Rescue Squad, continues to serve as 
Deputy Director in charge of rescue operations. Members of the staff have given 
of their time in providing programs for many of the organizations in our com- 
munity. The have participated in many meetings, called by the State organization. 



-25- 



PROBLEMS - In reviewing the activities of the past year several problems emerged 
and are as follows: 1. The confused attitude of the public towards the entire 
Civil Defense Program. This is caused by conflicting views made by "authorities' 
in newspapers, magazines, books and on radio and TV. 2. The incompleted PACES 
radio net hinders us from intra-service tests. 3. The inadequate warning 
system for the city. 

It is hoped that these problems may not prove insurmountable, and that as the 
public is made aware of the necessity of being prepared, a great obstacle to 
adequate community preparedness will be overcome. 




Concord Civil Defense RACES Radio Network: Malcolm Spoor, Power Company rep- 
resentative, and Robert Wright, Concord CD Communications Officer operate during 
a Test Alert. 



•26- 



Searchlight and Heavy Duty 
Generator in Operation. 




Penacook Rescue Squad 
practice rescue operations 
down the vertical sides of 
abandoned gravel pit. 



CEMETERIES 



There were a total of 368 interments made during the year. In our city cemeteries 
253, Calvary 93 and Penacook Calvary 21. We had 19 in our receiving tomb which 
were removed in the spring. 

There was a total of 95 lots sold, 85 in the city and 10 in Calvary. 8 trusts 
were put on old lots of which 1 was a flower trust. 

A total of 96 liners were used, 78 in the city cemeteries and 18 in Calvary. 

Each year we put a great number of foundations; set posts and markers. Total 
number of foundations poured were 95, 67 in the city and 28 in Calvary. Total 
number of posts set was 142, 106 in the city and 36 in Calvary. Markers set 
were 158, city cemeteries 135 and 23 in Calvary. 

The flower beds are set out each spring in time for Memorial Day. 

The general work of mowing, trimming shrubs and trees, making over lots and 
cleaning up was done. New construction is being done each year to make new 
areas available for future burials. Some of the new work included shingling 
the roof of the tool house in Maple Grove Cemetery and painting the flag pole. 
In Penacook Calvary we lowered markers and corner posts making the lots over 
for easier maintenance. 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 



GENERAL TREND - In 1961 an average of 31 cases representing 101 persons were 
aided at a total cost of $29,470.85 in comparison to 24 cases in 1960, represen- 
ting 75 persons with expenditures of $22,004.76. This is the first time since 
1953 that welfare costs showed a marked increase. In that year 101 persons were 
aided with expenditures of $31,848.76. 

The following shows the reasons for relief and the approximate per cent of cases 

in each catagory during 1961 compared with 1960: 

1961 1960 

SICKNESS 357o 28% 

UNEMPLOYMENT 22% 19% 

MARITAL DIFFICULTIES 21% 19% 

INSUFFICIENT INCOME 12% 18% 

UNEMPLOYABLE 10% 13% 

PARTIALLY HANDICAPPED --- 3% 

Sickness is still the major cause of relief need as it has been for several years 
rather that unemployment which is commonly thought of as being the primary reason 
for assistance. 

CLD ACE ASSISTANCE - In 1961 Old Age Assistance cases including aliens numbered 
182 vith expenditur?s of $55,118.42 and in 1960, 177 cases wore aided at a cost 
of $49,736.54. An increas3 of $4.50 in medical pool payments effective July 1, 
1961. 

AID TO THE PEF>J\NENTLY AND TOTALLY DISABLED - In 19&1 aid to the permanently and 
totally disabled cases numbered 13 with expenditures of $5,070.25. In 1960 
an averag? of 14 cases we-e ai''.d at a cost to the city of $5,165.00. 

-28- 



SANITARY INSPECTION 



INSPECTIONS 1431 samples of milk, cream, chocolate drink, coffee drink and 
orangeade were collected and analyzed during the year. Also 169 rinse samples 
from clean milk bottles were collected and analyzed. 

The following inspections were made during the year; 

Dairies 221 Milk Plants 79 

Stores 236 Eating Establishments .173 

Bakeries 39 Wholesale meat houses 6 

Tourist Courts 17 Schools and Nurseries 34 

Foster Homes 13 

148 complaints were investigated and 169 notices were given to producers, stores 
and eating establishments to improve conditions. 796 written reports were sent 
to milk dealers and producers. 

SANITARY MILK PROGRAMS The sanitary quality of milk shipped interstate, as well 
as intrastate, has been a matter of concern to receiving states and municipalities 
for many year. Lack of a national approach to a solution of this problem promp- 
ted the Association of State and Territorial Health Officers to request the U. S. 
Public Health Service to assist the states in the development and conduct of a 
program for the certification of interstate milk supplies. The present volun- 
tary cooperative State-Public Health Service program for certification of inter- 
state milk shippers was developed by the First National Conference on Interstate 
Milk Shipment in response to this request. 

The agreements accepted by the First Conference in 1950 have been used to advan- 
tage by many states in developing sound and more uniform milk sanitation programs. 
The agreements have been used as a guide for organization and administrative 
action, and have led to the development of a greater degree of reciprocity bet- 
ween states on acceptance of inspection and laboratory results. These agreements 
have also been used by many states as a basis of programs for the supervision 
and certification of intrastate milk sources, and have assisted many states and 
municipalities to secure better milk supplies for their people. This department 
has been cooperating with the N. H. Health Department by split-sampling and 
other procedures to carry out this program. 

An investigation was made by this department of the testing of milk for radio- 
activity and it was found that the equipment alone costs $14,000. However, a 
physicist at Harvard, in cooperation with a research man of a large dairy, has 
developed an instrument to measure Iodine 131, With this inexpensive instrument, 
your inspector can check milk right at the farm for fal.l-out and protect the 
health of the consumer. At present, milk from this area is being tested at the 
U.S. Government Laboratory in Alabama. 

SURVEYS In 1961, with the cooperation of the State Department of Health, the 
Sanitary Inspector from the U, S. Public Health service and the Concord Sanitary 
Inspector conducted a rating survey of all eating and drinking establishments in 
Concord. A similar survey was also made on dairies and plants serving the 
Concord area by an inspector from the U. S. Public Health Service, the State 
Inspector and the local inspector. 

CONFERENCES This department attended two meetings in April, 1961 of all State 
Board of Health Officers at 61 South Spring Street, discussing problems associa- 
ted with general milk plating techniques. A Dairy Farm Sanitation In-Service 
Training Conference was attended, which was sponsored by the U. S. Public Health 
Service and the New Hampshire State Department of Health on November 28 and 29. 

-29- 



SEPTIC TANKS In May, 42 registered letters were mailed to residents of Concord 
whose premises are located within 100 feet of a municipal sewer line but not 
connected with the line. Their attention was called to the fact that under the 
Revised Ordinances of the City of Concord, Chapter 27, Section 21, use of a 
septic tank must be discontinued and that they are required to provide readily 
accessible toilets and lavatory facilities, properly ventilated and constructed 
to suitable drains and sewer for conveying water waste and sewage away from their 
premises into a public sewer system; and that legal action would be taken in 
failure to do so. 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

HEALTH CLINICS 1715 people attended health clinics during the year to receive 
protective treatment against diphteria, whooping cough, tetanus, smallpox and polio- 
myelitis, 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES The following communicable diseases were reported: 5 cases 
chicken pox, 16 cases german measles, 5 cases infectious hepatitis, 59 cases measles, 
1 case meningococcal meningitis and 15 cases scarlet fever. 

LICENSES Four convalescent home licenses were issued in March and 201 milk 
and 84 restaurant and bakery licenses were issued in May and June. 

COMPLAINTS 75 complaints were received during the year and checked. As usual, 
the most common complaint was that of refuse thrown in alleyways or dumped 
on private land. There were also several complaints regarding plumbing, 

VITAL STATISTICS The death rate in Concord dropped a little from last year. 
Of the 640 deaths reported in 1961, 276 were resident and 364 were non-resident, 
138 bodies were brought here for burial and 23 stillbirths were reported, 

TABLE OF CAUSES OF DEATHS OF RESIDENTS (most common causes) 

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 

Diseases of circulatory system , 122 154 165 121 137 

Diseases of nervous system , 41 42 45 41 48 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 37 48 42 39 39 

Diseases of digestive system 15 10 7 13 14 

Pneumonia 15 15 15 13 6 



-30- 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 



f 



0f- m 







City Clerk Arthur Roby shares his City Government experiences with the League of 
Women Voters. 



The City Clerk attended all meetings and hearings of the Board of Aldermen in the 
capacity of clerk. Prepared and distributed the minutes of all meetings. Received 
and turned over to the City Treasurer the sum of $12,821.75 from licenses and service 
fees diring the year. Issued 2,200 dog licenses. Recorded approximately 926 mortgages 
to July 1, and 468 conditional sales to July 1, and beginning July 1, 1961, when the 
Uniform Commercial Code became effective, filed 807 contracts. Recorded approximately 
170 discharges, issued 332 marriage licenses and issued approximately 1152 certificates 
of vital statistics. 

Vital statistics recorded as compared with 1960 were as follows: 

1960 1961 

Births 1069 1124 

Marriages 296 328 

Deaths 661 665 

BOARD OF ALDERMEN ACTIONS 

The Board of Aldermen held 12 regular meetings, 9 special meetings, 12 hearings, 
making a total of 33 meetings. The Board also, during the year, passed 29 ordinances 
and 85 resolutions. 

RESOLUTIONS 

Relative to service of the late Joseph Comi; budget, 1961; appropriating $20,000 
bonds, departmental equipment; naming McKee Square; naming William P. Thompson play- 
ground; appropriating $110,000 bond issue; authorizing creation of Concord Housing 
Authority; services of Austin B. Presby; to grant agreement, federal Aviation Agency; 
to services of John Hyde; to fallout shelter survey; authorizing $135,000 bond issue, 
Union School District; authorizing $250,000 for highway construction; appropriating 
$6,600 for fallout shelter survey; authorizing purchase of land. Concord Baby-By-Pass; 
to construction of sidewalk, Washington Street, Penacook; naming McGuire Street; to 
proposed N. H. Technical Institute; naming Hyland Square; to late U.S. Senator Styles 
Bridges. 
ORDINANCES 

Relative to licensing of taxicabs and taxicab operators, passage of Housing code, 
relating to Traffic Code, relating to Personnel Code, relating to zoning. 

-31- 



ELECTIONS 

The city election was held November 7, 1961. There were six filings for the office 
of Mayor, five filings for Alderman-at-Large, and Ward Alderman filings were as follows: 
Ward 1, had two; Ward 2, had three; Ward 3, had one; Ward 4, had two; Ward 5, had two; 
Ward 6, had three; Ward 7, had two; Ward 8, had two; Ward 9, had one. 

The result of this election was that former Mayor Charles C. Davie was elected Mayor; 
Robert D. Branch, Winfield J. Phillips and Edna C. McKenna were elected Aldermen-at- 
Large for four years. This was the first time a woman had been elected to the Board 
of Aldermen. 

The Ward Aldermen elected were as follows: Ward 1, Edward H. York; Ward 2, Paul M, 
Cunningham; Ward 3, George A. Stohrer, Jr.; Ward 4, Malcolm McLane; Ward 5, Roland E. 
Fletcher; Ward 6, David E. Tardif; Ward 7, C. Edwin Howard; Ward 8, Samuel J. Chapman; 
Ward 9, Thomas B. Jennings. The total vote cast was 8,059. 




MRS. EDNA McKENNA, wife, moth- 
er and head nurse at the State 
Prison, is the first woman to be 
elected to the City Council. Elected 
Alderman-at-large, in November 
of 1961, she will serve a four-year 
term beginning January 1962. 



-32- 



WATER DEPARTMENT 



WATER CONSUMPTION for 1961 amounted to 1,448,271,300 gallons, this represents 
an average dally consumption of 3,967,867 gallons (about 137 gallons per person 
per day). Of the total amount used, 972,041,300 gallons were pumped and 
476,230,000 gallons were supplied by gravity. This consumption was 74,838,100 
gallons more than the consumption for 1960. 

WATER SUPPLY Penacook Lake filled to the spillway elevation on April 23, but on 
December 31 the elevation of the lake had dropped to 179,15 which was 1^ feet below 
normal and was still going down, whereas at this time of year the lake is usually 
rising. The greatest cause of this condition is the fact that the total precipita- 
tion for the year 1961 was only 32 inches which is almost Sig inches below the ave- 
rage yearly precipitation. With the lake at this elevation and still going down it 
will take a generous amount of precipitation in the spring of 1962 to assure an 
ample supply for the year. 

ALGAE PROBLEM Once again the waters of the lake were treated with copper 
sulfate in late November to prevent the growth of algae under the ice during the 
winter. At the end of the year microscopic tests of the water of the lake showed 
that the water was clear of algae. 

FLUSHING PROGRAM All hydrants and mains were flushed in the fall to clear rust 
accumulations out of the mains. It was also necessary to flush dead end mains 
in several sections of the city periodically for the same purpose. Each and 
every hydrant in the system was tested weekly between December 15 and March 15 
to guard against freezing and to assure proper operation of all hydrants. 

WATER MAIN CLEANING PROGRAM Under this program 10,190 feet of 12 inch pipe 
were cleaned, beginning at the corner of Pleasant Street at Liberty Street and 
running out Pleasant Street and down through the main street of Saint Paul's 
School. The capacity of this main was increased approximately 100 percent by the 
cleaning. 

MAJOR CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Laid 9,744 feet of cement-lined cast iron pipe. Set 

13 new hydrants, replaced three old hydrants, (797 hydrants now in system.) Set 

14 new main line valves, (1708 valves now in system), laid 80 new service connec- 
tions, relaid 38 old service connections, discontinued one service connection, 
(6217 service connections now in system consisting of 28.9 miles of service pipe), 
set 81 new meters, replaced 97 old meters, repaired 215 old meters, discontinued 
nine meters, (5626 meters now in system). 

MAJOR REPLACEMENT PROJECT was in South Street from Rockingham Street southerly to 
near the Bow town line. The old pipe was replaced with 2,078 feet of 10 inch cement- 
lined cast iron pipe which will almost triple the capacity of the main in this area. 

MAJOR MAINTENANCE PROJECTS The 250,000 gallon elevated tank in Penacook was 
painted both inside and outside. The slate roofs at the North State Street pumping 
station shop and garage were checked and repaired where necessary. New signal wires 
were run from the North State Street pumping station to the reservoir on Penacook 
Street replacing wires which were over 50 years old. In Temi Street, 127 feet of 
six inch main were lowered because of change in grade of the street. Forty seven 
leaks were repaired. 

EQUIPMENT The department acquired four Ford ^ ton pickup trucks. 

-33- 



CITY SOLICITOR 



LAND DAMAGES The demand for new highways and reconstruction of existing high- 
ways in 1961 resulted in a substantial increase in cases involving land damages. 
In connection with the widening of Loudon Road, for example, seven property 
owners brought suit against the City of Concord during the year 1960. Four of 
these cases remained to be disposed of in the year 1961; three were finally settled 
before trial for the amount of the city's appraisals. As of the end of the year, 
one still remains in the Superior Court. 

LAND ACQUISITION During the year negotiation was begun for acquiring lands 
necessary for the construction of the downtown by-pass, which will extend from 
Chandler Street to Hall's Court, off North Main Street. All of this land was 
acquired by negotiation with the exception of the Fuller property, which was to 
have provided access to North Main Street. When the city found that the land 
could not be purchased for a reasonable price, condemnation proceedings were 
instituted. It is assumed that an appeal will be taken to the Superior Court 
sometime early in January. Because the proposed by-pass will be important to 
the area in which a new shopping center is to be located, it is hoped that the 
necessary property can be acquired without lengthy litigation. 

REASSESSMENT APPEALS One of the highlights of the year was undoubtedly the 
appeals that arose in connection with reassessments that were made in the 
Concord Heights area. The Board of Assessors had found that property values in 
that area had increased as the result of the location of new industries, together 
with an increased demand for house lots. An appeal was taken by some of the 
residents of the area to the State Tax Commission. After a public hearing was 
held, the appeals were dismissed and the action of the Commission was sustained 
by the Supreme Court. 

HOUSING CODE An important development that occurred during the year was the 
enactment of a housing code by the Board of Aldermen, For the first time, the 
city now has a right to oblige the landowner to remedy conditions affecting the 
safety and health of occupants. 

STATE LEGISLATION The City Solicitor represented the city on a number of 
occasions at hearings before legislative committees in matters in which the 
city had an interest. One of these hearings concerned the matter of amending 
the charter so as to provide an increase in the Mayor's salary as well as 
relieving the City Clerk of the necessity of giving personal notice to members 
of the Board of Aldermen when a special meeting is called. The bill was finally 
defeated, however, when some members of the Senate felt that the matter of deter- 
mining the Mayor's salary should be a matter of "home rule". Another rather 
important bill was that concerning the purchase of life and health insurance for 
city employees. The bill, as originally presented, would have made it mandatory 
for the city to provide such coverage. We were finally successful in amending 
the bill to make it merely permissive. 

ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS During the year a substantial amount of time was 
spent in again bringing the Municipal Code of Ordinances up to date. The new 
revision will be ready for the printers sometime early in 1962. 



-34- 



COLLECTION DEPARTMENT 



The total tax warrants with additions for the levy of 1961 submitted by the 
Assessors to the Tax Collector were as follows: 

Total Balance 

Debits Dec. 31, 1961 

Real and Personal Property $3,908,701.88 $416,948.60 

Bank Stock 6,997.52 -0- 

Titnber Yield 4.048.63 2.998.88 

Total Property $3,919,748.03 $419,947.48 

Polls 23.288.00 4.821.50 

Total Property 6< Polls $3,943,036.03 $424,768.98 

State Head Taxes 73.910.00 16.480.00 

TOTAL $4,016,946.03 $441,248.98 

In January notices were prepared and mailed to delinquent taxpayers relative to 
unpaid stock in trade, personal and real estate taxes. Also a list was prepared 
and given to local banks relative to unpaid 1938, 1959 and 1960 real estate taxes. 

The advertised list of unpaid 1960 property taxes was posted on May 1 and the 
Collector's sale of resident real estate was held on June 1 in the small conferance 
room on the second floor of the City Hall. Tho list contained 175 accounts, of which 
one was bought by an individual and thp rest were bought by the City of Concord for 
$75,287.11. The owners of record have two years in which to redeem their property 
from the Collector's sale. 

In May the so-called Hunneyman property on Pembroke Road was sold by bid for 
$1,850.00. 

In June 15,000 combination head and poll tax bills were addressed and mailed. In 
July and August 371 special assessment bills were processed and mailed. 

All property tax bills for the City and Penacook were mailed on September 22. 

The auction sale of tax title property acquired in 1961 was held on November 15 
and for the second year in succession all property has been sold. 

This department, with the cooperation of the City Solicitor, entered 101 cases in 
Small Claims Court against delinquent head and poll taxpayers. 

There were 15,904 automobile permits Issued, amounting to $189,030.78. 

Collections on special assessments amounted to $16,664.87, 

Collections received for prior year taxes, water bills and other miscellaneous 
revenue amounted to $1,069,105.23. 

The total collected from all sources amounted to $4 ,83'' ,049.06. 

In October a testimonial banquet was hold honoring employees with long tonurr of 
service to the City of Concord. This department is proud and pleased to repo-.-t 
Evelyn Lajoie received a twenty-six year pin at the banquet. '.v'e are indoed grateful 
to her for her faithful and conscientious work rendered tc the City. 

George West attended the N.H. Tax Collector's Association meeting held at the Bald 
Peak Colony Club in Tuftonboro on S-'ptember 3 and 9. At this meeting Mr, West wac 
elected Director at Large of th? Association for 19':l-1962. 

-35- 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 



TAX WARRANTS were issued as follows during the year: 

Property--Real and Personal 
Poll Tax 
Head Tax 
Bank Stock 
Timber yield 



$3,908,701.88 

23,288.00 

73,910.00 

6,997.52 

4,048.63 



(The above figures contain the added tax warrants and jeopardy warrants). 
3,111 exemptions from Poll Tax were granted compared to 3,167 granted in 1960, 



VALUATION Gross valuation before exemption amounted to 

Less Veterans exemption and exemption to blind 
Net valuation on which 1961 tax rate computed 



$57,371,690.00 

1.681.160.00 

$55,690,530.00 



EXEMPTIONS 1,711 applications for veterans and blind persons for exemption from 
property taxes were processed. Of this number 1,665 were granted. 



TAX RATES for 1961 are as follows: 
CONCORD: 

City Budget $30.28 
School 36.48 
County 3.24 



PENACOOK: 

City Budget $30.28 

School 38.80 

County 3.24 









$70.00 




$72.32 




COMPILATION 


ten year period: 












Tax Valuation 


Property Valuation 


Poll Tax 


Poll Exempt. 


Year 


R. 


E. & Pers. Prop. 


Exempt to Vets. 


Warrant 


to 


Vets. 


1952 




$47,490,362 


$1,076,015 


$23,462 




$6,174 


1953 




47,828,712 


1,172,550 


22,954 




6,218 


1954 




47,795,222 


1,280,588 


23,370 




5,852 


1955 




48,278,291 


1,367,195 


23,924 




6,556 


1956 




49,178,815 


1,334,410 


23,536 




6,636 


1957 




50,829,022 


1,461,270 


23,458 




6,614 


1958 




51,105,351 


1,486,320 


22,962 




6,586 


1959 




52,391,854 


1,554,890 


22,750 




6,580 


1960 




54,621,375 


1,628,620 


22,720 




6,334 


1961 




55,690,530 


1,691,160 


23,018 




6,222 



CONFERENCES AND MEETINGS The annual meeting of assessing officials with the State 
Tax Commission was held on March 17, 1961. These meetings, required by law, are 
held for the purpose of bringing to the assessing officials as much information and 
instructions as possible regarding their duties prior to the annual assessments 
which start April 1. 

PERSONNEL The resignation of John L. Hyde, Assessor, was accepted effective June 2, 
1961. Miss Eleanor F. Maguire retired at the end of 1961 after having served more 
than 31 years. Charles A. Bartlett, Assessor, died November 7, 1961. Raymond P. Daigle 
assumed the duty of City Assessor on October 2, 1961. 

MISCELLANEOUS There were fifteen meetings of the Board of Assessors during the 
year 1961. The total number of property transfers processed during the 1961 was 
744. Tax abatements allowed during the year amounted to $46,994.53; and taxes 
added during the year amounted to $8,187.94. The total number of appeals against 
assessments of real estate and personal property resolved during the year was 210. 



-36- 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 



In the financial section of this report will be found schedules which set forth 
the activity and the year end position of each of the several funds through 
which all the financial transactions of the City are handled. Below is a brief 
summary of activity of each fund during the year 1961 and condition at the end 
of the year. 

GENERAL FUND 

CURRENT SURPLUS resulting from 1961 operations amounted to $72,033. This sur- 
plus will be used to reduce the amount to be raised by property taxes in 1962. 

DEBT Outstanding debt payable from this fund increased $187,297. New debt 
amounting to $515,000 was incurred, while maturities paid during the year 
amounted to $327,703; as detailed in the following schedule. 

Balance Payments New Debt Balance 

Dec. 31. 1960 During 1961 Issued 1961 Dec. 31. 1961 

Municipal $ 974,023. 142,703. 380,000. 1,211,320. 

School 2.565.000. 185.000. 135.000. 2.515.000. 

Total $ 3,539,023. 327,703. 515,000. 3,726,320. 

INTEREST RATES declined steadily during the year. Our bonds sold at rates of 
2.87<, and 2.67. which compares with 2.97. for the 1960 issue. Rates on borrowings 
in anticipation of tax collections ranged from 1.47% in March to 1.047o in 
September, compared to a high of 2.12% and a low of 1.057o paid in the previous 
year. Total interest cost for the year on the short term notes was $9,021. 
compared to $10,144. for the previous year. Total interest paid on long term 
debt was $24,985. compared to $25,658. paid in 1960. 



VALUATIONS, TAXES, TAX RATES Below is a comparison of valuations, property 
taxes, and tax rates; showing changes from 1960 to 1961. 

Increase 

Property Taxes Raised 1960 1961 Amount Per Cent 

For Municipal Purposes $ 1,599,144. 1,686,465 87,321. 5.46 

For School Purposes 1,796,618. 2,040.344. 243,726. 13,57 

For County Purposes 191.427. 180.639. -10.788. -5.64 

Total 3,587,189. 3,907,448. 320,259. 8.93 

Assessed Valuation 

For Municipal Purposes $54,621,375. 55,690,530. 1,069,155. 1.96 

For Union School District.... 51,045,095. 52,044,750. 999,655. 1.96 

For Penacook School District. 3,591,780. 3,661,280. 69,500. 1.94 

For County Purposes 54,637,125. 55,706,280. 1,069,155. 1.96 

Tax Rates 

Municipal 29.27 30.28 1.01 3.45 

Union School District 32.32 36.48 4.16 12.87 

Penacook School District 40.89 38.80 -2.09 -5.11 

County 3.51 3.24 - .27 -7.69 

Total City Rate 65.10 70.00 4.90 7.53 

Total Penacook Rate 73,67 72.32 -1.35 -1.83 



COLLECTIONS improved, percentage wise; the year ending with 10.77. of the cur- 
rent property tax levy outstanding, compared to 12.87. outstanding at the end 
of the previous year. 

-37- 



TAX LIENS Unredeemed tax liens increased 7.63% from $35,689. at the end of 
1960 to $38,411. at the close of 1961. 

AUTO PERMITS Revenue from auto permit fees increased by 15.25%, this source 
yielding $188,564., compared to $163,616. realized in 1960. 

PARKING METER FUND 

METER COLLECTIONS fell off by 2.697, from $61,339. in 1960 to $59,690. for the 
current year. Off-street collections were up 14.32/!, while on-street areas 
yielded 6. 377. less than the previous year. 

FUND BALANCE at the close of the year was $6,513.. decrease of $17,690. during 
the year. 

DEBT Long term debt decreased from $98,000. to $76,000. No new debt was 
lssued;while maturities amounted to $22,000. 

SANITARY SEWER FUND 

REVENUE from sewer rentals totalled $87,398. compared to $80,907. realized in 
1960, an increase of 8.02%. Receipts from all sources increased by 7.91% from 
$90,735 to $97,911. 

SURPLUS The year began with a cash surplus of $72,388 and ended with $93,349. 
an increase of $20,961. 

DEBT Long term debt decreased by $26,000. Maturities paid during the year 
amounted to $26,000. No new debt was incurred. 

WATER FUND 

REVENUE Water rentals yielded a total of $251,012., 5.71% above the $237,443. 
realized in 1960. Receipts from all sources amounted to $261,731. or 6.26% 
higher than in 1960. 

SURPLUS Cash surplus increased from $136,354. at the beginning of the year 
to $168,001, at the close of the year. 

DEBT Long term debt decreased by $20,000. Maturities paid amounted to 
$20,000. No new debt was incurred. 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

PROJECTS Two water extensions and one sidewalk project were approved for 
construction under special assessment procedure at an estimated cost of $40,260. 

RECEIPTS Total receipts of this fund were $87,556. Disbursements totalled 
$96,596, Cash balance at the end of the year was $86,557. 

DEBT Long term debt decreased during the year from $367,230. to $344,907. New 
debt amounting to $24,100 was incurred; while maturities paid totalled $46,423. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT FUND 

PROFIT This fund showed a small profit from this year's operations. Income 
from equipment rentals amounted to $209,084.; while operating expenditures and 
depreciation totalled $207,961.; resulting in a net profit of $1,123. 

RESERVE The reserve for replacement of equipment decreased from $13,541. to 
$13,009, Expenditures for new equipment totalled $53,591.; while additions 
to the reserve amounted to only $53,059. This fund has no outstanding debt. 

-38- 



DIVISION OF MUrnCIPAL ACCOUKTIKG 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 



May 22, I962 



Certificate of Audit 

This Is to certify that we have examined and 
audited the accounts and records of the City of Concord for 
the fiscal year ended December 31 > I96I. In our opinion, 
the Exhibits included herewith reflect the true financial 
condition of the City on December 31> 19^1 , together with the 
results of operations for the fiscal year ended on that date. 

Respectfully submiited, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 



0. Maurice Oleson) Auditors 
Lionel J. DeGrace) 

Charles T. Carroll) Accountants 
George L. Russell ) 



-39- 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUMTIKG 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 



May 22, I962 



To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 

Concord, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen : 

Submitted herewith is the report of an examination and 
audit of the accounts of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended Dec- 
ember 31* 1961, which was made by this Division as requested. Exhibits as 
hereafter listed are included as part of the report. 

SCOPE OF AUDIT 

The accounts and records of all city officials charged 
with the custody, receipt and disbursement of city funds were examined and 
audited. An examination was made of a sufficient number of vouchers, pay- 
rolls and cancelled checlcs to satisfy the requirements of accepted standards 
of audit procedure. Receipts were checl:ed by source insofar as possible. 
Book balances were verified by comparison with reconciled bank balances made 
from statements obtained from depository banl^. Verification of uncollected 
taxes was made by mailing notices to taxpayers whose accoxints appeared to be 
delinquent according to the Collector's records. The amounts of uncollected 
and unredeemed taxes as indicated in this report are therefore subject to 
any changes which may be necessitated by the return of verification notices. 

Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accounts) - December "^1. I960- December 
31. 1961 ; (Exhibit A-l) 

Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue 'Accounts) for the 
fiscal years ended December 31, I960 and December 31 > 19^1, are presented 
in Exhibit A-l. As indicated therein, the Surplus decreased by $UU,235.76, 
from $116,268.95 to $72,033.19, in I961. 

Analysis of Change in Cxxrrent Financial Condition ; (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change in the current financial con- 
dition of the City during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors 
which caused the change indicated therein. These were as follows: 

-40- 



Concoi^i 



5l22.l(>2 



Decrease in Surplus 

Surplus Used to Reduce Tax Rate $116,000.00 
Increase in Reserve Against Accounts 

Receivable 6,399-39 

Increase in Reserve Against Stores Account 157.23 
Increase in Reserve Against Prior Year's 

Uncollected & Unredeemed Taxes 10,391.U6 
Increase in Reserve Against Tax Deeded 

Property 183-73 
Increase in Reserve for Non-Realization of 

Public Works Inventory 22,620.70 

Loss on Sale of Tax Deeded Property 223 ^02 



$155,977.53 



Increase in Surplus 



Net Budget Surplus 

Outdated Checks Cancelled 

Advance Deposit Erroneously Applied 



Net Decrease 



$111,260.79 

417 . ^+5 

63.53 



111.741.77 
$ 44,235.76 



Increase in Long Term Indebtedness ; 

The long term indebtedness of the City (including Muni- 
cipal, Water and Union School District indebtedness) increased by $96,973-53 
in 1961, as shown herewith: 





Long Term 

Debt 

December 

31. i960 


Bonds 
& Notes 
Issued 
in 1961 


Bonds 
& Notes 
Retired 
in 1961 


Long Term 

Debt 

December 

31. 1961 


Municipal 


$1,5^3,430.00 


$380,000.00 


$225,843.00 


$1,697,587.00 


Water 


238,800.00 


24,100.00 


29,080.00 


233,820.00 


School (Union 
School Dis- 
trict) 


2,565,000.00 


135,000.00 


185,000.00 


2,515,000.00 


Airport Advance 
(Due State) 


23.023.36 
$4,370,253.36 




2.203.47 
$442,126.47 


20.819.89 




$539,100.00 


$4,467,226.89 


Statement of Long Term Indebtedness: (Exhibit 


A-6) 





A statement of outstanding long term indebtedness as of 
December 31, I961, showing annual debt service requirements, is contained 
in Exhibit A-6. 

-41- 



Concord - 3 - 5/^2/62 

Conparatlve Statements of Appropriations and Eypendltvires - Estimated and 
Actual Revenues ; (Exhibits A-U & A-5) 

Comparative statements of appropriations and expenditures, 
estimated and actual revenues for the fiscal year ended December 31; 19^1 , are 
presented in Exhibits A-U and A-5. As indicated by the budget summary (Ex- 
hibit A-5), a revenue surplus of $52,269.17, plus unexpended balances of ap- 
propriations of $58,991.62, resulted in a net budget surplus of $111,260.79- 

Tax Collections ; 

Tax collections (exclusive of State Head Taxes) of the 
current year's levy as compared to taxes assessed, for the years I960 and 
1961, were as follows: 

Levy of I960 Percent Levy of I961 Percent 

Taxes Assessed - Cxirrent 

Year's Levy $3,629,777.20 $3 , 9^5 > 56U . I8 



Taxes Collected - Current 

Year's Levy $3,lUl,770.76 86.6^ $3,507,863 18 88.9^ 

Taxes Abated - Current 

Year's Levy 22,782.18 .6^ 12,932.02 .3^ 

Uncollected Taxes - Cur- 
rent Year's Levy ii65.22U.26 12.8 ^ U2U.768.96 10.8 ^ 

$3,629,777.20 100.0^ $3,9U5,56U.i8 100.0^ 



Conclusion ; 

The provisions of Chapter I8U of the Laws of 1955, require 
that this report or the summary of findings and recommendations (letter of 
transmittal) shall be published in the next annual report of the City. 

We extend ovir thanlis to the officials of the City of Con- 
cord and their office staffs for the assistance rendered during the course of 
the audit. 

Yours very truly. 






Harold G. Fowler 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX CO^DMISSIOW 



0. Maurice Oleson) Auditors 
Lionel J. DeGrace) 

Charles T. Carroll) Accountants 

George L. Russell ) _42. 



INDEX -- FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



Page No, 

GENERAL FUND 

Appropriations & 

Expenditures VI 

Assessments V 

Balance Sheet I 

Current Svirplus II 

Investments XI 

Long Term Debt X 

Revenues Ill 

Taxes Receivable IV 

Tax Sale Accounts IV 

BOND FUND - GENERAL 

Balance Sheet I 

Disposition of 

Proceeds XIII 

Investments XI 

TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet I 

Changes in Balances XII 

Investments XI 

SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Balance Sheet XX 

Investments XI 

Long Term Debt X 

Operating Statement XX 



Page No. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 
& REPLACEMENT FUND 




Balance Sheet 


XVI 
XVI 


Cash Surplus 


Operating Statement 


XVI 


Statement of 
Reserve Account 


XVI 


SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 




Balance Sheet 


XIV 


Investments 


XI 


Long Term Debt 


X 


Projects Authorized 
& Amounts Expended 


XV 


Receipts & Expenditures.. 


XV 


WATER FUND 




Balance Sheet 


XVIII 


Long Term Debt 


X 


Investments 


XI 


Operating Statements. .... 


XIX 


BOND FUND - WATER 




Disposition of 
Proceeds 


XVIII 


PARKING METER FUND 




Balance Sheet. • 


XVII 


Long Term Debt 


X 


Revenues 8e Expenditures.. 


XVII 



BALANCE SHEET -GENERAL 

December 



Ca:NERAL FUND ASSETS 
Cash : 

Concord National Bank - General Account.. 
Concord National Bank - Payroll Account.. 
Mechanicks National Bank - General Acc't. 

Imprest Funds 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons 

Temporary Investments 

Taxes Receivable : 

Current Year Levy - Property kl<^,^k'J.kQ 

Current Year Levy - Polls 4,821.^0 

Total Current Year k2k,76ii.93 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 28,6^0.26 

Prior Year Levies - Property 16,135.22 

Taxes Bought by City Unredeemed 38,^10.65 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 5U-, 5^5.87 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 31,t4-99-^8 

Accounts Receivable : 

Water & Sewer Rentals 77,376.29 

Departmental Receivables l6,919'79 

Cemetery Receivables h, 7^2 . k-Q 

Trunk Storm Sewer Assessments 2,713'QO 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Stores Account : 

Public Works Mat. & Supplies Inv 51,U8l.l5 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 8,270. 57 

Postage Meter Inventory I68.87 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Tax Deeded Properties : 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

State Head Taxes Receivable : 

Due from Other Funds : 

Special Assessment Fund (Loam) 



80,051.73 

15,000.00 

90,173.08 

1,2*4-9.^1 

733,00 

598,9'^-2.92 



396,118.72 



101,751.56 
2i+, 375.27 



59,920.59 
59,920.59 

1,053.66 
1,053.66 



786,150.1i4- 



23,046.39 1^19,165.11 



77,376.29 



-0- 



-0- 



i6,i+8o.oo 



4,52*^.00 
1,303,^95.5^+ 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 



Cash - Concord National Bank 
Investments 



•^CAPITAL FUND ASSETS 



9,867.70 
80i,862.ii8 811,730.18 



Debt Requirements - Municipal 
Debt Requirements - School 

BOrro FUIID ASSETS 

Cash - Concord National Bank 
Cash in Other Banks 
Investments 
Accounts Receivable 

GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 

*Does not include Debt Payable from Vfeter, Sewer, 
Parking Meter or Special Assessment Funds 



1,211,319.89 
2,515,000.00 3,726,319. 



51,800.)+8 
12,000.00 
314-0,000.00 
51,096.6^ 1+54,397.12 



6,296,642.73 



AND RELATED FUNDS 

31, 1961 



GENERAL FUTTO LIABILITIES 
Accounts Payable : 

Unpresented Coupons 

Payroll Deductions 

Current Vouchers Payable 

Unexpended Appropriations : 

Union School District.. 

Interest - Union School District Bonds 

Penacook School District 

Reserve for Encumbrances 

Due to Other Funds : 

Water Fund 

Sajiitary Sewer Fund 

Equipment Operating, Maint. & Rep. Fund 

Parking Meter Fund 

Advance Deposits : 

Taxes Due to State : 

Head Tax Levy of I96I 

Timber Yield Tax -a/c Debt Retirement Fund 

Total General Fund Liabilities 



733.00 
997.85 
6,630.04 8,360.89 



8i^9,84l.30 
3i+,i+80.50 
62,014-9.23 
3,250.00 91+9,621.03 



157,^66.65 
66,886.1+1+ 
19,775.69 
6,512.61 250,61+1.39 



1,381.02 



20,720.50 

937.52 21,658.02 



1,231,662.35 



Current Surplus : 

TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 

Accumulated Income 

CAPITAL FUND LIABILIi'lES 

Bonded Debt 

Notes Payable 

Advance by State - Airport Construction 

BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Construction or Equipment Authorized.... 

Reserve for School Construction Authorized 

Reserve for Encumbrances 

Due to Other Funds 

GRAND TOTAL - LIABILITIES 

I 



72,033.19 
1,303,695.5'+ 



778,757.'+'+ 
32, 972. 7^+ 



811,730.18 



3,61+1,500.00 
61+, 000.00 
20,819.89 3,726,319.! 



288,072.18 

11+2,000.00 

2i+,80i.8o 

23.11+ 



i+5i+,897.12 
6,296,61+2.73 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS GENERAL FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31^ I96I 

Unappropriated Balance, December 3I, I96O 116,268.95 

Applied to 1961 Budget 116,000.00 

Balance Remaining 268.95 

1961 Budget Surplus 

Unencumbered Balance of Appropriations 58,905.06 

Excess of Actual Over Estimated Revenue 52,269.17 lll,lT'+-23 

Plus: Miscellaneous Credits 

Unencumbered Balance - Prior Year Appropriations 86.56 

Outdated Checks Cancelled ^17 • ^5 

Advance D- posit Not Applied to Construction 63.53 567 '5^ 

112,010.72 



Less: Reserves Increased 

Against Prior Year Taxes & Unredeemed Tax Liens 10,'^91.k6 

Against Accounts Receivable 6,399-39 

Against Tax Deeded Property I83.73 

Against Stores Accounts 22,777-93 39,752-51 

72,258.21 
Less : Loss on Sale of Tax Deeded Property 225.02 

72,033-19 
To be Applied to I962 Budget 72,000.00 

Balance Remaining 33 • 19 



II 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 
GENERAL FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, I961 

Budget Revenues 

Local Taxes-Excl.Curr.Yr.Prop.&Polls Estimate Realized Excess Deficiency 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Prop. ., -0- 3,593.56 3,593-56 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Poll... 5OO.OO 518.OO 18.OO 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 15,000.00 lk,26k.28 735-72 

Auto Permits 155,000.00 188,563.71 33,563.71 

Timber Severance Tax 1,000.00 3,373.86 2,373.86 

171,500.00 210,313.i+l 39,5^9-13 Y35-Y^ 

State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax 2,000.00 7,091.17 5,091.17 

Savings Bank Tax 3,000.00 i;,507.08 1,507-08 

Interest & Dividend Tax 87,000.00 82,7*4-3.12 U, 256. 88 

Loss of Taxes-State Forests 25. 00 28.78 3.78 

92,025.00 914-, 370.15 6,602.03 i+,256.88 

Licenses & Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 6OO.OO 63I.5O 31-50 

Taxi Licenses 1+00.00 378.50 21.50 

Health Licenses 500.00 6OO.OO 100.00 

Amusement Licenses 1,900.00 2,336.00 '+36.00 

Police & Protective Licenses... 250.00 172.00 78. 00 

Prof. & Occupational Licenses.. 100.00 89. 50 10. 50 

3,750.00 4,207-50 

Registration Fees & Permits 

Marriage Licenses 9OO.OO 996. 00 

Rec. Fees-Legal Documents 3,100.00 3,191.50 

Filing Fees I5O.OO 355-00 

Svmdry Fees-City Clerk 1,200.00 1,208.60 

Dog Licenses k,'p00.00 k,6k'J.lh 

9,850.00 10,398.2'+ 

Departmental Service Charges 

Rent of Buildings 2,000.00 1,893.00 

Comfort Station Concessions 1+00.00 69*+. 79 

Golf Fees 11,500.00 13,599-50 

Mem-Field Royalties & Concess.- 5O.OO 200.00 

Police Dept. Ambulance Charges. 1,300.00 1,1+39.05 

Airport - Rent 10,182.00 10,197.62 

Airport - Concessions 200.00 199-'4-7 

Fines & Forfeits 5,000.00 8,367.12 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 1,800.00 1,519.19 

Weights & Measures Fees 350.00 384.50 

Comm. on Head Tax Collections.. 6,200.00 6,215.70 

38,982.00 44,709.94 

Unclassified 

Interest Income 2,000.00 3,035.68 

Sale of Property 6OO.OO 2,355.10 

Sub Div. Assess. Pr. Yr. Constr 6OO.OO 640.00 

Sale of Ordinances 12.00 

3,200.00 6,042.7^' 

TOTAL MISC . REVENUES 319, 307 - 00 370,042-02 

Current Yr- Prop. & Polls 

Property Tax 3,869,170.97 3,869,4l9.60 

Poll Taxes .' 20,500.00 20,988.00 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,200.00 6,997-52 

3,895,870.97 3,897,405.12 

TOTAL REVENUES 4,215,177.97 4,267,447.14 



567-50 


110.00 


96.00 




91.50 




205.00 




8.60 




147-11+ 




548.24 






107-00 


29^+. 79 




2,099-50 




150.00 




139-05 




15-62 






-53 


3,367-12 






280.81 


3^-50 




15.70 




6,116.28 


388.34 


1,035.68 




1,755.10 




40.00 




12.00 




2,842.78 




56,225.96 


5,490.91+ 


248.63 




488.00 




797.52 




1,53'^. 15 




57,760.11 


5,1+90.9^ 



STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE--GENERAL FUND 

December 31, I96I 



BALANCE JANUARY 1, I96I 

Committed to Collector in 196I 
( Incl . Supplemental ) : 

Real & Personal Property 

National Bank Stock 

Timber Yield 

Polls 

Heads (For State ) 

Total Charges to Collector 

Accoxmted for as Follovs : 

Collections (Net of Refunds ) 

Authorized Abatements 

Balance Uncollected Dec. 3I, I961. 
Total Credits & Balance 



1961 


Prior 


State 


Levy 


Years 


Head Taxes 




i+77,ll6.i+6 


17,350.54 


3,908,701.88 
6,997.52 

k,ok&.63 
23,288.0c 


3,586.36 

7.20 
518.00 





3,943,036.03 Wl,22ii.02 



3,505,335.03 445,106.08 

12,932.02 19,986.72 

424,768.98 16,135.22 

3, 943,036 ."03 401,225.02 " 



75,375.00 
92,725.54 



69,840.54 

6,405.00 

16,480.00 

92,725.54 



Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes 

Real & Personal Timber 

Property Yield Polls 

1957 36.10 

1958 475.19 

1959 397.03 246.27 

i960 14 , 980 . 63 

1961 4l6,948.60 2,998.88 4,821.50 

Grand Total 432,837.55 3,245.15 4,b21.50 



Heads 



16,480.00 
16, 480.66 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS-GENERAL FUND 



Baleince Unredeemed January 1, 1961 

Tax Levy of I956 

Tax Levy of 1957 

Tax Levy of I958 

Tax Levy of 1959 

1961 Tax Sale (Tax Levy of I960) 

Total Charges 

Accounted for as Follovs ; 

Collections 

Authorized Abatements 

Deeded to City 

Balance Unredeemed December 3I, 1961 



4,680.12 

2,843.97 

10,267.06 

17,898.06 



35,689.21 

75,287.11 

110,976.32 



64,295.05 

7,680.79 

589.83 

38,410.65 

110,976.32 



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XV 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE & REPLACEMENT FUND 



STATEMEIfT OF OPERATIONS 



For the Year Ended December 31> I96I 



Equipment Earnings 

Operating Expenditures 

Direct Labor 

Indirect Labor 

Leaves & Longevity 

Building Repair 

Gasoline, Oil & Antifreeze. 

Parts 

Tires 

Batteries 

Miscellaneous Hardware 

Grease & Lubricants 

Supplies 

Hand Tools 

Fuel & Utilities 

Insurajice 

Retirement Contributions. . . 
Shop Equipment 

Depreciation 

Net Gdn for Period 



209,083.87 



33, 
17, 

^, 

1, 

18, 

8, 
1, 
2, 
1, 
2, 

5, 
6, 
3, 



850.^^3 
223.3^ 
279-07 
5^3.81 
95^.55 
878.57 
Wo. 79 
371.91 
890.70 

9ij-9.72 
598.32 
936.66 
375.72 
938.28 
973.11 



15i+,901.i+7 
53,059.63 



207,961.10 
1,122.77 



BALANCE SHEET 



December 31, I96I 



Assets: 

Equipment 

Due from General Fund 



550,920.58 
19,775.69 



570,696.27 



Liabilities & Funds: 



Municipal Investments 

Capital Reserve Fund 

Surplus, December 3I, I96I. 



551,^^84.37 

13,008.79 

6,203.11 



570,696.27 



STATElvENT OF CASH SURPLUS 



Net Operating Profit for I96I, as above.. 

Accumulated Surplus, January 1, I96I 

Accumulated Surplus, December 31, I96I. 



1,122.77 
5,o8o.3i<- 
6,203.11 



STATEMENT OF RESERVE ACCOUNT 



Balance, January 1, I90I. 
Additions 

Depreciation. 

Equipment Sold 



E4.uipment Purchased (as per detail) 
Balance, December 31, I96I 



53,059.63 
115.00 



13,540.58 



53,174.63 
66,715.21 
53,706.42 
13,008.79 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED 



1 Loader 

3 Pickup Trucks.... 

1 Dump Truck 

1 Tractor 

1 Station Wagon. . . . 

1 Bus- type vehicle. 

2 Passenger Cars... 



19,690.00 
4,975.92 
7,000.00 
4,523.50 
1,701.76 
1,601.25 
2,583.08 



1 Roller. . 

Plows 

Mowers. . . . 
Sander. . . . 

Rake 

Tamper. . . . 
Power Saw. 



1,806.87 
5,035.80 
2,288.30 
513.94 
886.00 
800.00 
300.00 



TOTAL. 



53,706.42 



BALANCE SHEET - PARKING METER FUND 

December 31> 19^1 

Assets ; 

Due from General Fund 6, 512 . 6l 

Debt Requirements 76,000.00 82,512.61 

Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt 76,000.00 

Unappropriated Current Surplus 6, 512.61 82,512.6l 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES - PARKING METER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31^ I96I 

Cash Balance - January 1, 196I 2^4-, 202. 95 

Revenues : 

Meter Collections - On Street 14-7,219.25 

Meter Collections - Off Street 12,14-70-39 

Parking Penalties 6,776.00 66,k6'^.6k 90,668.59 

Operating Expenditures : 
On Street 

Meter Repairs &, Maintenance 4,522.55 

Enforcement 9,730.31 

Collecting & Accounting 1,14-37.17 

Maxking Pavements 1, 7l8. 70 

Insxirance I2I4- . 15 

Retirement Contributions 818.8I 18,351.69 

Off Street 

Meter Repairs 1,037.96 

Enforcement 3,601.l6 

Collecting 531-70 

Maintenance of Parking Areas 1+, 550. 5^ 

Lighting 1,607.76 

Insurance & Miscellaneous 71«'+3 

Retirement Contributions 272.14-0 11,672.95 

Debt Service - Off Street Areas ; 

Payment of Bonds 22,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 1,795.00 23,795-00 

Share of Special Assessment Projects ; 

Principal 27,500.00 

Interest 1,836.31^ 29, 336. 3^+ 

Capital Outlay ; 

Parking Lot Construction 1,000.00 

Total Expenditures . ; 8l4-,155.98 

Cash Balance - December 31, I961 6, 512.6I 



XVII 



BALANCE SHEET -'WATER FUND 

December 31> I96I 

ASSETS 

Fixed Assets : 

Water & Flowage Rights 167,663.11 

Land 212,525.37 

Structures i)-30,2l<-1.17 

Pumping & Purification Equipment 89,259.00 

Distribution Mains, Services, Hydrants, 

& Meters 1,920,612.85 

Other Equipment & Garage Equipment 8l,0Ul,l6 

Unfinished Construction 1,822-72 

2,903,165.30 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 1,0^8,97^-99 1,854,190.39 

Bond Fund Assets : 

Cash - Concord National Bank 10,001.13 

Investments 25,000.00 35,001.13 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 157,i<-66.65 

Investments 16,530.88 

Loajied to Spec. Assessment Fund 22,113.03 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 5^1,003.25 250,113.81 

Total Assets 2,139,305.33 

LIABILITIES AM3 FUM)S 

Long Term Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt I60, 000. 00 

Share in Special Assessments 28,8^4-8.72 188,8^4-8.72 

Fund Balance and Surplus : 

Municipal Investment 963, 19^+ . 7^ 

Contributions in Aid of Construction... 210,310.55 

Surplus - Balance Jan. 1, I96I 733,938.6^4- 

Net Profit for the Year I961 il3,012.68 776,951.32 1,950,^56.61 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 2,139>305.33 

BOND FUND, WATER - DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 
For the Year Ended December 3I, I96I 



Issue of Issue of 

19^49 1959 Total 

Balance January 1, I961 2,635.43 47,251.50 49,006.93 

Expenditures (See Detail Below) __^_^ l4,885.80 l4,885.80 

Unencumbered Balance December 31, I961... 2,635.43 32,365.70 35,001.13 

Detail of Expenditures 

Pest Hole Control-Sanders Station 132.90 132-90 

Misc. Extension & Replacement l4 , 752 . 90 l4 , 752 - 90 



14,885.80 14,885.86 



XVIII 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS -- WATER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31j I96I 



OPERATING REVENUES 

Commercial Sales - Flat Rate 

Commercial Sales - Metered 

Industrial Sales - Metered 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues 

OPERATING EXPENSES 
Water Supply : 

Source of Supply Labor Ij 356.93 

Pumping Station Labor 15,771.9^)- 

Purification Labor 2,600.63 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,2^k.'^k 

Gravity Supplies & Expenses 16U.76 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses.... 2,h06.8h 

Purification Supplies & Expenses 6,820.79 

Fuel for Power 10.i4-6 

Power Purchased 12,256.75 

Repairs to Water Supp. Str. & Equip 62. 1^^ 

Repairs to Pump. Sta. Str. & Equipment. 2,1+58.32 

Repairs to Purification Str. & Equip... 63. 60 



Distribution : 

Distribution Wages 

Meter Dept . 0; eration 

Meter Dept. Supplies & Expenses 

Other Supplies and Expenses 

Repairs to Structures 

Repairs to Mains 

Cleaning Mains 

Repairs to Water Storage Structures. 

Repairs to Services 

Repairs to Hydreints 

Repairs to Meters 

Administration : 

Commercial Office Salaries 

Meter Reading Salaries 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 

Salaries of General Officers 

Salaries of General Office Clerks... 

General Office Expense 

Repairs to Gen. Office Str. & Equip. 

General Expense 

Insurance 

Longevity & Annual & Sick Leave 

Retirement Fund Payments 

Stores Dept. & Shop Expenses 

Garage Expense 

Fixed Charges : 

Depreciation 

Taxes 

Total Operating Expenses 

Operating Income 

Non-Operating Income : 

Income from Invested Funds 

Other Interest Income 

Miscellaaieous 

Non-Operating Expense : 

Interest Expense 

Net Profit for the Year... 



28,392.07 
6,226.11 

»+o.50 
1,083.08 
i+96.92 
3,062.33 
6,851^.51 
i+,711.10 
3,550.8i+ 
2,630.08 
3,582.89 



2,661.01 

7,i+33.38 

91^.23 

7,850.00 

i+, 350.00 

535.06 

3Ul.i4-l<- 

7I+6.OI 

2,9^2.71 

11,969. 1+7 

7,971.71 

1,130.38 

965.86 



^l,392.kk 
37.00 



3,054.07 

199,691.68 

i+7,062.71 

297.72 



250,106.18 



i+6,227.50 



60,630.43 



49,811.26 



47,429.44 



1,548.03 

.26 

905.25 



204,098.63 
^+6,007.55 



2,453.54 
48,461.09 



5,448.41 



43,012. 



BALANCE SHEET--SANITARY SEWER FUND 

December 31, 1961 

ASSETS 

Fixed Assets ; 

Land & Right of Way 3Q,2lk.9J 

Sewer Mains 1, kYJ, 691 . 77 

Manholes 113,796.69 

Customer Connections 2lk,lk'^. 66 

Sundry Equipment 9,107.i4-5 

Unfinished Construction 28J+0 

l,793,04i^.9^ 
Less: Reserve for Depreciation.... 7^7,^0^.3'^■ 1,035,639.60 

Deferred Engineering Charges 11,678.^0 

Bond Fund Assets : 

Cash-Concord National Bank 3, 621.93 

Investments 10,000.00 13,621.93 

Current Assets : 

Due from General Fund 66,QQ6.kh 

Investments 26,^62.58 

Loaji to Special Assessment Fund... ' ,■ 51>987.l6 
Due from Special Assessment Fund - 

Trunk Sewer Cost 3,296.00 1^8,632.18 

1,209,572.11 

LIABILITIES AM) FUNDS 

Long Term Liabilities : 

Bonded Debt l60,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 48,184.68 208,184.68 

Fund Balance and Surplus : 

Municipal Investments 481,337.71 

Contributions in Aid of Construction... 273,223.39 

Surplus -Balance Jan. 1, 1961 206, 045.26 

Net Profit for the Year, I961 40,78l.07 246,826.33 1,001,387.43 

1,209,572.11 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS - SANITARY SEWER FUND 



For the Year Ended December 3I, I96I 

OPERATING REVENUES 
Sewer Rents: 

General 63, 527. 03 

Industrial 23,871.45 

OPERATING EXPENSES 
General Operations, Admin, etc. : 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor & Exp 9^331.87 

House Conn. Oper. Labor & Exp 3,094.90 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 92 . 98 

Maintenance of Manholes 3, 661.27 

Misc . GeneraJ. Expense 393 . 61 

Meter Reading & Billing 2,621.96 

Employees Retirement Fund 1, 180.47 20, 377.06 

Depreciation : 22,295.08 

Operating Income 

Add Non-Operating Income ; 

Interest on Investments 

Deduct Non-Operating Expenses: 

interest Expense 

Net Profit for the Year 



87,398.48 



42,672.14 
44,726.34 

1,324.88 
46,051.22 

3,270.15 
40.781.07 



EMERGENCY NUMBERS 



Service 



Administration, General 

Airport (Maintenance) 

Ambulance 

Assessments 

Auditorium, Renteil 

Auto Permits 

Bicycle Licenses 

Beano Licenses 

Birth Certificates 

Bookmobile 

Building Permits 

Cemeteries 

City Council 

Civil Defense 

Dance Licenses 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Elections 

Engineering- City 

FIRE- CONCORD 

FIRE-PENACOOK 

Garbage Collection 

Golf Course 

Health, Public 

Laboratory 

Legal Matters 

Library 

Maps, City 

Marriage Certificates 

Milk Licenses & Inspection 

Mortgages & Conditional Sales 

Oil Burner Inspection 

Old Age Assistance 

Ordinances & Resolui-ions 

Parks 8: Recreation 

Payments by City 

Personnel - City 

Planning 

Playgrounds 

Plumbing Permits 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Refuse Collection 

Relief 

Sanitation, Public 

Sewers 

Snow Plowing & Sanding 

Soldier's Relief 

Special Benefit Assessments 

Street Lights-Reported Out 

Street Maintenance 

Taxes - Payment of 

Trees, City 

Water - Service 

Water Bills - Payment of 

Weights 8c Measures 

Zoning Permits 8c Changes 

Welfare 



DIRECTORY OF CITY SB3?VICES 



Department 



Phone 



Mayor 

Engineering 

Police 

Assessors 

City Clerk 

Collector 

Police 

Police 

City Clerk 

Library 

Engineering 

Cemetery 

City Clerk 

Civil Defense 

Police 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

Engineering 

FIRE 

FIRE 

Garbage Contractor 

Recreation &- Parks 

Health 

Health 

City Solicitor 

Library 

Engineering 

Records 

Health 

City Clerk 

Fire 

Welfare 

City Clerk 

Recreation 8c Parks 

Finance 

Personnel 

Planning 

Recreation 8c Parks 

Engineering 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation 8: Parks 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Health 

Public Works 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Finance 

Concord Electric Co. 

P>ublic Works 

Collector 

Engineering 

Water 

Collector 

Weights Sc Measures 

Engineering 

Welfare 



CA-5-3591 
CA-I+-1955 

CA-5-3232 

CA-l+-02ltl 
CA-1*-0591 
CA-k-k26l 
CA-5-3232 
CA-5-3232 
CA-I+-O59I 

CA-5-27'^3 
CA-u-1955 
CA-5-3911 
CA-u-0591 
CA-u-4342 
CA-5-3232 
CA-it-0591 
CA-1^-0591 
CA-U-0591 

CA-lt-lQ5S 

CA- 5-3355 
PL-3-6622 

CA- 5-6771 
CA.lt -0951 
CA-i)-0521 
CA-lt-0521 
CA-5-3OIH 
CA- 5-271^3 
CA-5-1955 

CA-i)-059i 

CA-4-0521 

CA-i*-059i 
CA-5-3355 
CA-U-1091 
CA-4-0591 
CA-U-0951 

CA- 5-2775 

CA-5-3591 
OA-1+-1955 
CA-u-0951 
CA-lt-1955 
GA-5-3232 
CA-5-3591 
CA-1+-0951 
CA-4-1955 
CA-I4-1091 
CA-4-0521 
CA-4-1955 
CA-4-1955 
CA-I+-1091 
CA-5-2775 
CA-5-36IH 
CA-14-1955 
CA-lt- 1+261 
CA-4-1955 
CA-5-557it 
CA-I+-4261 

CA-5-2861t 

CA-5-1955 
CA-it-1091 



For prompt attention to 
COMPLAINTS dial the 
SERVICE INVOLVED. If 
you are uncertain about 
where to call, dial the 
MAYOR'S OFFICE 5-3591 




Be sure to give your NAME 
AND ADDRESS as well as 
the NATURE OF THE 
EMERGENCY clearly. DO 
NOT HANG UP until you 
are sure that your MES- 
SAGE HAS BEEN UNDER- 
STOOD. 



Printed in CITY HALL SHOP