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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

City of 
CONCORD 



New Hampshire 



1962 
ANNUAL REPORT 



City of 
CONCORD 



New Hampshire 



1962 
ANNUAL REPORT 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Mayor's Message 3 

City Cioxeninient 4 

City Boards 5 

Planning _.. 6 

Engineering and Public Works _ 11 

Engineering Inspection 15 

Library 16 

Recreation and Parks 21 

Police 25 

Municipal Court __ 28 

Fire 29 

C;i\il Defense 31 

Cemeteries _ 36 

Welfare 36 

Sanitary Inspection 37 

Health _ 39 

Records _ 40 

Elections 40 

Water 41 

Legal 43 

Collection _ 44 

Assessing 45 

Finance 46 

Certificate of Audit 73 

State Audit 73 




FROM THE MAYOR'S OFFICE 



TO THE CITIZENS OF CONCORD: 

This 110th Annual Report of the City 
of Concord is the fifth Annual Report 
under Concord's Mayor-Aldermen char- 
ter, and it summarizes the major accom- 
plishments and activities of your city 
government during the past year. 

The year 1962 was one of community 
progress and improvement contributing 
to the convenience and welfare of the 
citizens of Concord. Significant accom- 
plishments included construction of the 
downtown bypass and the Durgin Street 
parking lot. Also noteworthy was the 
completion of the city's long-range pro- 
gram for safe and sanitary bathing ac- 
commodations in its parks and play- 
grounds by the construction of new bath- 
houses and filtration plants at John Kim- 
ball Playground and Carrison Park. 

Thanks to an able Planning Board and a fully competent Director we have been 
able, with the cooperation of our citizens, to meet the challenge of constant 
change in an orderly manner. 

Other important activities successfully completed during the year were the 
presentation of the case for Concord as the site for the proposed New Hamp- 
shire Technical Institute, and the preparation of a workable program for com- 
munity improvement. 

This brief review of the year 1962 would be incomplete without mention of 
Concord's new regional shopping center. The opening of this major shopping 
facility marks the beginning of a new era in local merchandising and fore- 
shadows the promise of future progress by private enterprise toward a better 
community. 

While the demand for municipal services continues to grow, your city govern- 
ment has been mindful of the need to practice strict economy in full knowledge 
of the heavy tax burden placed on property by New Hampshire's narrow-base 
ta.x structure. Nevertheless, no effort has been spared to provide those services 
which are essential to the health, safety and general welfare of the citizens of 
the community. 

The item of taxes is an all important one, and although my recommendation 
that a complete revaluation by an outside appraisal firm was turned down, I 
still feel that the City will eventually come to it, or as an alternative, furnish the 
Assessing Department with enough office space to engage additional personnel 
to complete the job ourselves. 

It has been a pleasure to have again had the opportunity to serve the citizens of 
Concord, and to work with a cooperative Board of Aldermen and a dedicated 
group of city employees. 

Charles C. Davie 
Mayor 



CITY GOVERNMENT 

1962-1963 



MAYOR 

Charles C. Davie 

ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE 

Robert D. Branch 
Wilham P. Gove 
Wilham T. Jordan 
Wilham Arthur Stevens 
Edna C. McKenna 
Winfield J. Philhps 



WARD ALDERMEN 

Ward 1 Edward H. York to 9-3-62 
John H. Morrill, 10-1-62 

Ward 2 Paul M. Gunningham 

Ward 3 George A. Stohrer, Jr. 

Ward 4 Malcolm McLane 

Ward 5 Roland E. Fletcher 

Ward 6 David E. TardifF 

Ward 7 G. Edwin Howard 

Ward 8 Samuel J. Ghapman to 
12-10-62 
William H. Perry, 12-27-62 

Ward 9 Thomas B. Jennings 



YOUR GITY OFFIGIALS 



GEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 
Edward L. Howland 

GHIEF OF POLIGE 
Walter H. Garlson 

GITY ASSESSORS 

Ravmond D. Daigle 
Gli'fford H. Higgins 
Nathan Wechsler, 3-13-62 

GITY AUDITOR 
Archie N. Gourley 

GITY GOLLEGTOR 
George M. West 

GITY ENGINEER & SUPT. 
OF PUBLIG WORKS 
Howard E. Raymond 

GITY LIBRARIAN 
Lois R. Markey 

GITY PLANNING DIREGTOR 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

GITY SOLICITOR 

Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 



GITY TREASURER 
Verne F. Santas, Jr. 

DIREGTOR OF GIVIL DEFENSE 
Rev. John I. Johnson to 6-6-62 
Richard D. Brodeur, 8-17-62 

ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 

FIRE CHIEF 

Duncan M. Murdoch 

HEALTH OFFICER 

Pierre A. Boucher, died Feb. 

1962 
Dr. William W. Frost, Jr., 
3-28-62 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

James M. Ceriello, Probation 

Officer 
Marie MacPhail, Clerk 
Donald G. Matson, Judge 
Francis E. Perkins, Assoc. Judge 

OVERSEER OF POOR 
Charles P. Goaklev 
9-3-62 Edward H.' York 



POUND KEEPER 

Charles C. Hoagland 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 

John B. Penney to 9-1-62 
Robert H. Aver— Appointed act- 
ing 9-1-62 

SANITARY INSPECTOR 
George A. Hill 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND 
MEASURES 

Arthur W. Mclsaac 

WATER SUPERINTENDENT 
G. Arthur Faneuf 

WELFARE DIRECTOR 
Gertrude E. Watkins 



CITY BOARDS 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

William W. Frost, M.D., 

Chairman 
Thomas J. Halligan, M.D. 
William D. Penhale, M.D. 

BOARD OF LIBRARY TRUSTEES 
Chester G. Larson, Chairman 
William L. Dudley, Mav 22 to 

Sept. 10 
J. Bernard Halligan 
James Lynch 
Mrs. Mildred Melvin 
Mrs. Nyleen Morrison 
Mrs. Walter S. Newton 
Mrs. Harry Spiegel 
W. Duer Thompson, 3rd 
Mrs. Frederick K. Upton 

BOARD OF PLUMBING 
EXAMINERS 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
J. Barry O'Brien 
George E. Young 

BOARD OF REVISION OF 
ASSESSMENTS 

Archie N. Gourley, Chairman 
Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 
Robert W. Potter 
Howard E. Raymond 
J^mes A. Taylor 



BUILDING CODE-BOARD OF 
APPEALS 

Robert Foster, Chairman 
Carroll E. Garland 
William Johns 
Everett R. Munson 
Arnold Perreton 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 
Dudley W. Orr, Chairman 
Lt. Gen. Edward H. Brooks 
Gardner G. Emmons 
Douglas N. Everett 
A. Clifford Hudson 
Pasquale Ruto 
Ex Officio 

Charles C. Davie, Mayor 
Howard E. Raymond, City 

Engineer 
Robert D. Branch, Alderman-at- 
large 

PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
James D. Bell 
Robert J. Jewell 
John H. Symonds 

TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS 
Robert M. Beyer 
Leon S. Merrill 
Verne F. Santas, Jr. 



ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT 

Frank J. Preston, Chairman 
Allan Evans 
Roy Y. Lang 
Donald G. Rainie 
Enoch Shenton, II 



PLANNING DEPARTMENT 

Highways Recommended City of Concord record itself in favor of State High- 
way Commissioner's petition to relocate a portion of N. H. Route 106 in Con- 
cord and Loudon. 

Recorded approval of state plans to build a 12-mile northward extension of In- 
terstate Highway 93 (Senator Styles Bridges Highway) from Tilton to North 
Hampton. 

Streets and Sidewalks Approved City Engineer's petition for the laying out of 
North Curtisville Road in East Concord. 

Recommended granting of a petition for a 46()-foot extension of Cross Street in 
Penacook. 

Recommended relocation of the traveled way of lower Broadway at its inter- 
section with South Main and Wiggin Streets, including acquisition of land to 
effect intersection betterment. 

Favored the release of Prescott Street westerly of Thomas Street from public 
servitude. 

Mapped the lines of a future major street connecting South Main Street at 
Allison Street with Water Street at Hall and Manchester Streets. 

Mapped the widening of Storrs Street along its westerly side from Depot Street 
to Hall's Court, so-called. 

Adopted a preliminary master plan of the location of highways for a 9()0-acre 
triangular section of Black Hill bounded by Manchester Street, Old Turnpike 
Road and Airport Road. 

Recommended hard-surfacing of 210 feet of sidewalk on High Street in Pena- 
cook adjacent to the Immaculate Conception Church. 

Recommended the building of a 425-foot-long asphalt sidewalk on the northerly 
side of Shawmut Street in East Concord leading from Eastman Street to the 
Eastman School. 

Traffic Control and Parking Approved a traffic circulation and parking plan 
for the newly-constructed downtown bypass (Storrs Street) and related facili- 
ties, including connecting streets and the Freight Street parking lot. 

Recommended channelizing the intersection of Broadway and West Street in 
the interest of traffic safety by constructing three traffic islands in the traveled 
way of Broadway. 

Recommended that it be the policy of the City of Concord to deny private 
vehicular use of city land situated (ju the westerly side of Storrs Street between 
Depot Street and Hall's Court in the interest of promoting public convenience 
and travel safetv. 



Favored granting of a petition requesting the establishing of one-way traffic on 
Chapel Street. 

Approved establishing stop intersections at the following locations: Bow Street 
at Rockingham Street in the South End, Branch Turnpike at Loudon Road on 
Concord Plains, Lawrence Street at Airport Road on Concord Plains, Shaker 
Road at Mountain Road in East Concord, Fowler Street at Borough Road in 
Penacook, and Charles Street at Warren Street in Penacook. 

Approved establishing yield right of way intersections on Eastman Street at East 
Side Drive, and on Cemetery Street at Shaker Road, both in East Concord. 

Recommended that all parking on Chandler Street be prohibited, that parking 
be restricted to one side only on Sexton Avenue, and that parking be eliminated 
on a portion of Depot Street. 

Proposed that four-hoiu- metered parking be established on portions of Centre 
and Green Streets in the vicinity of the civic district. 

Advised amending the Traffic Code to change permitted parking time on Con- 
cord and Thompson Streets between South Main and South State Streets from 
two-hour to unlimited duration. 

Favored the request of the Postmaster that short-term (20-minute) parking be 
established in front of the new Penacook post office on Washington Street. 

Advised against establishing 15-minute parking on a section of South Main 
Street. 

Recommended that the City of Concord acquire land on Prince Street when 
funds are available to establish a 69-car-space all-day metered parking lot im- 
mediately adjacent to the City Auditorium and the Community Center. 

Favored the granting of a request of downtown merchants that the parking 
time limit in a portion of the Durgin Street parking lot be increased from one to 
two hours. 

Recommended that further consideration of a proposal to acquire property at 
Boudreau Square in Penacook for off-street parking be dropped. 

Utilities Advised favorable action on six petitions requesting extensions of the 
municipal water system totaling 2,210 feet of water main as follows: Fort Eddy 
Road— 800 feet, Columbus Avenue— 540 feet. Cross Street, Penacook— 400 feet, 
Sewalls Falls Road, West Concord— 175 feet, Burns Avenue, Concord Plains— 
170 feet, and Columbus Avenue (additional)— 125 feet. 

Recommended that the City of Concord seek State Water Pollution Commission 
approval of plans for the construction of a sanitary sewer system to serve the 
Old Turnpike Road-Airport Road-Manchester Street area. 

Favored the granting of a petition to extend the Concord Plains sanitary sewer 
system 680 feet to serve residential development on Burns Avenue. 

Recommended favorable action on a petition to construct an extension of the 
north-end storm sewer from Rumford Street via Walker and High Streets to 
the Franklin Street area involving 3,100 feet of 15-inch trunk sewer. 



Recommended that a proposed storm sewer in Canterbury Road and Dudley 
Drive on Concord Plains be programmed for early construction in the six-year 
capital improvement program. 

Subdivision Approval \^oted final approval of a six-lot section of the Roger W. 
Guay subdivision located northerly of Moorland Avenue in the south-end sec- 
tion of the city proper. 

Zoning Amendments Recommended the rezoning of a 40-acre tract in the 
north-end section of the city proper from a general residence to an apartment 
house district. 

Recommended the rezoning of a 15-acre area in Penacook from a general resi- 
dence to an apartment house district. 

Recommended the rezoning of the approved Roger W. Guay subdivision in the 
south-end section from an agricultural to a single residence district. 

Recommended the rezoning of a 700-foot-long section on Fisherville Road in 
West Concord from an agricultural to a limited commercial district. 

Recommended a minor extension of the East Concord local business district in 
the vicinity of the intersection of Eastman and Shawmut Streets. 

Opposed a proposal that an area on Old Loudon Road on Concord Plains be 
rezoned from an agricultural to a general residence district. 

Codes Recommended that the building code be amended to substitute the 
1962 edition of the National Electrical Code for the 1959 edition in force. 

Favored amending the building code to require pennits for the installation, ad- 
dition and alteration of electrical work in buildings and structvues. 

Recommended that the City of Concord seek enabling legislation at the 1963 
session of the General Court permitting municipalities to adopt nationally- 
recognized mobile home construction standards by reference. 

Workable Program At the request of the Mayor, prepared an application for 
approval of a Workable Program for Community Improvement for submission 
to the Housing and Home Finance Agency. 

N. H. Technical Institute Reviewed and approved suggested sites in the Con- 
cord area for submission to the Board of Aldermen and the State Board of Ed- 
ucation in connection with efforts to have the new state technical institute lo- 
cated in this city. 

Land Transactions Recommended that the city accept the gift of three parcels 
of land on Penacook Lake from St. Paul's School. 

Suggested that the city purchase approximately 13,500 square feet of land 
bordering the Contoocook River in the business section of Penacook for use as 
a snow dump in connection with Ward 1 snow removal operations. 

Approved a proposal that the city acquire land at the northerly end of Basin 
Street for use as a means of access to a 50-acre tract of city riverside land bor- 
dering the limited access Everett Turnpike northerly of Manchester Street. 



Recommended that the city convey land on High and Wyman Streets in the 
north-end section for use as part of the site of a Concord Housing Authority 
housing project for the elderly. 

Recommended that the city convey tax-deeded land on North Curtisville Road 
in East Concord to Concord Regional Development Corporation in connection 
with the corporation's efforts to provide apartment-type rental housing in 
Concord. 

Voted to favor a request by the State Aeronautics Commission that the city 
convey a small parcel of land at the municipal airport to the state for use as the 
site for a combined aeronautics commission office and maintenance building. 

Processed three requests to purchase minor parcels of city land on Turkey Pond, 
on Columbus Avenue and off Heights Road. 

Reviewed property acquired in non-payment of taxes in 1962 to determine pos- 
sible present or future public use of this property. 

Other Activities Voted to recommend that the city defer action on a proposal 
to fill a portion of the Outlet Canal in Penacook pending determination of 
procedure in connection with plans to construct sewage treatment and intercep- 
tor facilities in this area. 

At the reqviest of the Concord Housing Authority, approved sites for housing 
projects for the elderly in the city proper and Penacook. 

Recommended that the city seek the assistance of the U. S. Army Corps of En- 
gineers in conducting a survey to ascertain the condition of the Merrimack 
Power Company dams on the Contoocook River in Penacook, and to request the 
Corps to take such measures as may be required to return these dams to good 
repair. 

Recommended that the city introduce legislation in the General Court to place 
the responsibility of ownership and maintenance of the above-mentioned river 
facilities in the hands of the State Water Resources Board. 

Recommended that the city seek legislation giving municipal legislative bodies 
the right of final determination of public necessity in the laying out of highways 
and parking lots. 

Recommended that the city seek legislation setting up a joint state-city com- 
mission to consider future public use of the post office-federal building property 
when it is declared surplus by the federal government. 

Favored the State Aeronautics Commission's request for additional office space 
in the airport administration building. 

Opposed a proposal that Columbus Avenue be renamed. 




Cleaning up after the Penacook storm. 




ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Public Works Tlie Pul^lic Works Department engaged in more construction 
than we would like this year. Because of this, many maintenance items could 
not be scheduled. 

Highways Under our yearly street maintenance program we sealed 40 miles 
of town highways in the Penacook area this year. In addition we laid hot bitu- 
minous plant mix from the Veterans of Foreign Wars Building in Penacook to 
Sylvester Street in West Concord on Fisherville Road, a distance of 3 miles. 

Gravel roads hard surfaced during the year under our emulsion stabilization 
program were West Parish Road to the town line. Broad Cove Drive, Runnels 
Road, Lawrence Street Extension and Shaker Road from Hoit Road to the 
town line, for a total of 5 miles of highway. We now have only 3 miles of 
gravel roads left to be surfaced. 

Our Town Road Aid program this year consisted of replacing the railroad 
bridge on Horse Hill Road at Runnels Road and building the last mile of Snow 
Pond Road from Graham Road to Shaker Road. This ends our Town Road Aid 
work for 5 years as Town Road Aid funds are to be used to finance the Storrs 
Street Project. 

Sidewalks We continued our sidewalk program and rebuilt sidewalks between 
Tremont Street and Carter Street in the city. This year we built new concrete 
sidewalks on North State Street in connection with the street widening project 
from School Street to the State Street parking lot. 

Bridges Under our bridge maintenance program we painted the westerly 
bridge over the Outlet in Penacook, the Island bridge and the Penacook Main 
Street bridge. 

Brush Control This year we cut and sprayed brush on Garvins Falls Road, 
Locke Road, Horse Hill Road, Stickney Hill Road. The brush control program 
is showing very good results and is well accepted. We are getting very good 
cooperation from the electric and telephone companies. 

Trees The Dutch Elm problem is still with us. This year we began our selected 
planting program. We obtained a hundred trees of various species, flowering 
crab, hawthorn, mountain ash and sycamores. The small flowering trees are 
being planted under the utility wires to eliminate future maintenance. The 
sycamores are planted in the downtown area as they stand the crowding and 
jostling of city life better. We have also started a program of planting lilacs on 
a limited scale. In satisfactory locations we still plant maple, white birch, ash, 
pine, oak, catalpa, beech and other local trees. 

Town Forest Our town forest work continues. This year a fire east of the 
airport destroyed all our young white pine but we salvaged 50 thousand board 
feet of pine lumber. In addition we sold some hard pine posts from the burn 
so the fire was not a total loss. 

Wind Damage in Penacook On May 31, 1962 at about 6:45 P.M. a very local 
storm of wind, rain and hail struck in Penacook and did considerable damage to 
the trees, electric and telephone lines. 

11 





Cleaning up after the Penacook storm. 





Constrnctiou of '^Jkihji" By-Pass. 



Fortunately the storm lasted only about 10 minutes and covered only a path 
about a half mile wide from Elm Street to Sand Hill. 

In all, some forty trees were knocked down but practically every tree in the area 
suffered broken branches. The wind blew hard enough to embed hail in the 
clapboards of some houses. 

Residents of the community, The Penacook Rescue Squad, Concord Electric, 
The Telephone Company and The City Public Works Department worked to- 
gether to clear the area by midnight. 

Alan Shepard Day Alan Shepard Day was a state celebration in honor of our 
own astronaut. The ceremonies began at his home in Derry, went to Manchester 
and ended at the State House in Concord. Concord provided the manpower, 
equipment, loud-speakers and bands. 

Engineering Department The Engineering Department had the advantage of 
continuous employment of personnel this year, the first time in 3 years. The 
fact was reflected in the greater volume of work accomplished with fewer 
people. We have an outstanding group of college students who have worked 
with us and returned to continue with us. 

This year we designed and constructed $350,000 worth of contract projects in 
addition to the design and supervision of ovu- regular maintenance program. The 
big project of the year was the construction of Storrs Street from Chandler 

13 




Cleaning up after the Penacook storm. 




Street to Hall's Court. This street was built in cooperation with the State High- 
way Department. Cooke-Ross Corporation were the contractors and the city 
got an unusually good project for the money invested. This project was an 
example of the excellent working relations we have with the State. Other con- 
struction projects were the Dingin Street Parking Lot for 91 cars built by Man- 
chester Paving, the Airport Parking Lot, Clinton Street Storm Drain built by 
Landers & Griffin, a bath house and filter plant at Kimball Playground built by 
Johns & Johns, 2 new pools, filter plant and bath house at Garrison Park built by 
Paddock Pools, repairing of Penacook Main Street Bridge Deck by E. D. Swett, 
and a parking lot at the High School by Manchester Paving. 

In addition, routine records were maintained for the Assessors' maps, sewer, 
water and street records. This year we had new tracings made of the Assessor's 
records, retiring the original tracings made in 1914. 

ENGINEERING INSPECTION 

With the recently authorized Housing Code, Engineering Inspection employees 
are making good progress in the assault against substandard and blighted 
housing. 

The processing of complaints requires investigating and very often necessitates 
checking and re-checking. These complaints come to the attention of this de- 
partment because of hazardous conditions existing in residential, commercial, 
industrial, educational, storage and mixed occupancy buildings. Steady pres- 
sure has to be maintained in the area of dilapidated dwellings and the elimina- 
tion of fire hazards and unsanitary conditions. 

Among the building inspection projects for 1962 were the Capitol Shopping 
Center, Concord Hospital Nurses' Home and Training School, St. Paul's 
School Dormitories and the Wesley Methodist Church. Projects for which per- 
mits were issued and work started in 1962 are the State Office Building, Bishop 
Brady High School and the new Records and Archives Building for the State of 
New Hampshire. 

The estimated cost of construction for 1962 was as follows: 

Total valuation of New Work $3,282,319 

Total valuation of Additions & Alterations 1,181,737 



Total estimated cost of Construction $4,464,056 
63 Permits for new Housing Units-Estimated Cost $ 810,100 

324 Permits for other Building-Estimated Cost $3,653,956 

Permits issued during the year as follows: 

Building Permits 387 

Plumbing Permits 200 
Razing of Dilapidated Buildings ( including 

those taken for public improvements) 40 

Moving of Buildings 10 

Erection of Billboards and Signs 95 

Electrical installations 448 

In addition, the following miscellaneous work was completed: 

Building Inspections 1,053 

Sign Inspections 213 

Trailer Inspections 67 

Plumbing Inspections 288 

Electrical Inspections 960 

Zoning Inspections 223 

15 




A corner of the Ruth May Music Room. 



CITY LIBRARY 

Books and Materials This year 6,009 books were added to the Hbrary making 
a total of 102,209 books in the collection, of which 19,794 are for children below 
the seventh grade. This represents 3.6 books per capita. There are now 517 re- 
cordings in the library. A library of abovit 400 films is available, as well as 250 
magazines and newspapers. 

Use of Materials Of the total popnlation of Concord, 80% are registered borrow- 
ers. This is an increase of 5% over last year. Of the total registration, 22% are 
children below the seventh grade. Borrowers used 306,350 items (excluding 
films) in 1962. This is an increase of 350 per month over the previous year. It 
represents a circulation of 10.6 books per capita. 

Use of reference materials in the library and by telephone is very heavy, necessi- 
tating scheduling an additional staff member to this service. 

Buildings and Equipment The Main Library has had additional new lighting 
with about one half of the library now completed. New floor covering was in- 

16 




Lois Markey, Ellen DonjvAng, Mitzi Berman and Eugene Navias 
enjoy recordings given hy The Concord Music Club. 



stalled in the lobby. Shelving for 4,000 books was set up in the adult area and 
all the books on the main floor were moved and arranged more conveniently. 
The elevator was equipped with an inching device. The Catalog department 
was furnished with new work units. 

The Penacook Branch had a new boiler installed and the second floor was com- 
pletely cleaned and painted. 

Services The most important service the library offers is to find "the right book 
for the right person at the right time." This happens many, many times a day in 
the main library, the two branches and the bookmobile. It is being accomplished 
more and more by telephone calls. We are servicing more adults than formerly 
and particularly business men. The requests for informational and educational 
materials is becoming much heavier than strictly recreational materials. 

The short announcements on WKXL are to a large degree responsible for the 
recognition of the library's role in the community. The Concord Monitor articles, 
prepared by the Library Staft give a book review service to the public. Our film 
service, which is threefold gives Concord people the opportunity of viewing the 
finest sixteen millimeter films available. There are films for loan to organizations, 
adult film programs and special programs for children. 



17 



Story Hours for children, visits to schools, and book talks to parents are services 
which are offered on a regular basis and are incentives to good reading habits on 
the part of our boys and girls. 

The use of our two meeting rooms by community groups is heavy and is a service 
much appreciated. 

The Ruth Maij Music Room The major addition to the services which the Con- 
cord Public Library provides to the citizens of Concord was the establishment of 
the Ruth May Music Room. This occupies the former office of the Librarian. All 
of the equipment and furnishings were the gift of the Concord Music Club. Two 
headphone sets accommodating two listeners each and one loudspeaker set of 
the finest stereo equipment were installed. Also, about two hvmdred recordings of 
all types of music were given for use in the room. The Music Club purchased at- 
tractive tables, chairs and drapes for the room. The Library and the people of 
Concord are most fortunate to have this room and these services. 

Print CoUection Another innovation was the beginning of a loan collection of 
framed prints. This was a gift of the Friends of the Concord Public Library. 
Eighteen reproductions of fine paintings were chosen by a knowledgeable and 
hard working committee of the Friends. These prints are all reserved as much as 
eight months in advance. 

Concord Public Lihranj Foundation It had been felt for some time that be- 
quests to the library were lacking because there has been no positive identifica- 




Sherman Randlett and Albert Audet 
set up new shelving in The Library. 

18 



tion of such gifts with improvements in the Library. To help foster such gifts, The 
Concord Pubhc Library Foundation was estabhshed, and the bequest of Bertha 
M. Chase was turned over by the Board of Aldermen to this foundation. It is 
hoped that this Foundation, through an active program by its Board, will be able 
to attract substantia] gifts to the Library. 

Personnel Although every phase of the library program has increased substan- 
tially over the past five years, no additional staff has been added. Volunteers 
have been used whenever possible and some of our services would have been im- 
possible without the Friends of the Library and of course, this year, The Concord 
Music Club. 

Many of the Library Staff take active part in community affairs which have a 
direct relation to their library work. They are freqviently called upon for book 
talks and to serve as judges or on committees. The Librarian has played a respon- 
sible part in the Governor's Committee for Better Libraries and the final State- 
wide Plan for Library Development in New Hampshire by participating in 
panel discussions, talks, radio and TV programs. She is on the Board of the New 
England Library Association, The New Hampshire Library Association and a 
Councilor to the American Library Association. She also serves as Booklist 
Chairman for the National Association of Independent Schools and as such 
compiles and edits two annual booklists. 

The Library Board has been active in the forming of the Concord Public Library 
Foundation, in the Trustees Association, on the Governor's Committee, and in 
the issue of a brochure on Concord Public Library policy. One Board member is 
attending Graduate Library School. The Friends of the Library have supported 
the Adult Film Program, National Library Week and brought our Print Collec- 
tion into being. Particular mention should be made that several members of the 
Music Club were in reality part of library personnel for many months and plan 
to continue their activities. 



19 




Water Ballet Shotv at White Park. 




Midget football players receiving instructions from recreation leader. 




Mayor Davie with Miss Concord Platjground and her attendants. 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

The purpose of the Recreation and Parks Department is to provide a variety of 
opportunities for the wholesome use of leisure time on a year-round basis for the 
citizens of Concord of all ages and both sexes. To this end the department pro- 
vides facilities, leadership, and programs. 

Slimmer Playgrounds and Pools A ten-week program was conducted at eleven 
playgrounds and seven pools including program of games, sport tournaments, 
crafts, swimming instruction and competition, trips, storytelling and dramatics, 
and special events. 

Summer Special Events Band concerts. Fourth of July celebrations, trip to 
Bear Brook, teen trip. Sunset Club trips. Sidewalk Art Show, Junior Swim 
Meet, Rotary Swim Meet, State Swim Meet trip. Peanut Carnival, Talent Show, 
Water Ballet, Beauty Contest, Junior Champ Track Meet, teen dances. 

Children and Youth Programs other than Center Programs Two play schools, 
pee wee hockey league, bantam hockey league, children's organ classes, boys' 
basketball leagues, neighborhood square dances at six schools, midget football 
league, little tennis league, figure skating class, ski lessons, trampoline classes, 
junior golf tournament. 

Adult Programs other than Center Programs Two housewives bowling leagues, 
organ classes, women's physical fitness class, woodworking class, men's hockey 

21 



league, housewives golf, city employees bowling league, men's night basketball 
league at White Park under lights, adult tennis clinic, industrial softball league, 
amateur radio class, women's basketball, indoor golf lessons. 

Commimitij Center The Community Center is open for full-time use from 
October 1 until April 30. The total attendance for people actually involved in 
activities, not including spectators at events or general walk-in, was 29,306. 

Adult programs offered: Men and women's judo class, oil painting, adult 
sewing, Sunset Club for senior citizens, free play, co-ed badminton, men and 
women's badminton, bridge, industrial basketball, night workers' basketball, 
adult modern dance, indoor tennis, women's volleyball, women's physical fitness. 
Children and youth programs offered: Children's art class, free play, craft 
classes, community high school basketball league. Youth Activities Council, 
junior and senior high record hops, boys' model airplane club, children's 
modern dance, trampoline, judo, roller skating, games period, children's sketch- 
ing, children's copper enameling, midget basketball, junior basketball, bad- 
minton, volleyball. 

Special Events Year-round Winter Carnival— ski meet. Silver Skates Derby, 
sled races, hockey games, Carnival Ball and Queen Coronation; Easter Egg 
Hunt, Benson's Animal Farm Trip, Square Dance Festivals, Ski and Skate Ex- 
change, Halloween parties and Jack O'Lantern Ball. 




Tivist Contest at Rollins Park. 

22 



Attendance Skating White Park-58,110; neighborhood rinks-1 1,000 esti- 
mated; White Park hockey rink-12,000 estimated; July 4th fireworks-10,000; 
phiygrounds— 32,386; pools— 33,641. Total attendance of programs both indoor 
and outdoor in facilities operated and maintained by the department was esti- 
mated at one quarter of a million. This does not include non-schedule walk-on 
use of parks. 

Golf Course Operation For the third year in a row the revenue at the Beaver 
Meadow Municipal Course exceeded operating expenses. The excess in 1962 
was $410.00. 6,348 daily tickets were sold in 1962 as compared to 5,917 in 
1961. Season membership: adult 193, special 35, junior 73, total 301. Es- 
timated individual rounds played by daily fee and season ticket players was 
36,205 which compared with 31,297 rounds in 1961 and 27,007 rounds in 1960. 




Pet exhibitor during summer 
playground season. 



Areas and Facilities Maintained Beaver Meadow Golf Course, Memorial Ath- 
letic Field, Rolfe, White and Rollins Parks, Merrill, Heights, Garrison, Kimball, 
Fletcher-Murphy, West Street, Doyen, Thompson, and Hall Street Playgrounds. 
White Park administration building and garage. West Street Ward House, East 
Concord Community Center, Community Center, seven swimming and one 
wading pools. White Park skating pond and hockey rink, and eight other neigh- 

23 



borhood rinks, over fifteen other small park, monument, and roadside areas. Use 
was made of the Penacook Youth Center and Concord Public School multipur- 
pose rooms and gyms in various schools for department activities. 

Groups Using Department Facilities Indoor— over fifty different adult and 
youth groups including scouts and 4-H Clubs. Outdoor— eleven varsity sports 
teams from Concord High School, St. John's and Penacook in football, baseball, 
cross-country, track, tennis, golf, hockey; over thirty boys' basketball teams 
from Little League, Minor League, Babe Ruth, Junior Legion, Small Fry, 
C.Y.O., Sunset League Baseball, Capital City and Industrial Softball Leagues, 
women's and girls' softball teams. State Hospital swim classes, Y.M.C.A. day 
camp; New England College, N.H.I. A. A. and Penacook Indian Baseball games; 
C.H.S. and Morrill School physical education classes; numerous church and 
school outings. 

Capital Improvements New cement block bathhouse built and pool water 
filtration and recirculation systems installed at Kimball playground. New bath- 
house and pool under construction at Garrison playground to be completed for 
1963 season. Start of shower and locker facilities at the Community Center. Re- 
moved island White Park Pond; White Park Hockey Rink improvements; fenc- 
ing Garrison playground; playground equipment Hall Street playground. 

Personnel John B. Penney, Recreation Director since February 1, 1957, re- 
signed his position to become Recreation Commissioner in Newton, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Robert H. Ayer, Recreation Activities Supervisor with the department since 
September, 1959, became Acting Director oii September 1 and served in this 
capacity for the remainder of the year. 

Two full-time supervisors, twenty-one summer playground and pool instructors, 
over twenty part-time leaders and instructors, many volunteers. This division 
was without the services of a male recreation activities supervisor from Septem- 
ber to December, 1962. 



24 




Mayor Davie and Chief Carlson ivishing Sgt. Sullivan the 
best of luck on his retirement. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Parking Meters The collection of money from parking meters was $57,159.03. 
The cost of repairing meter parts for 1962 was $410.20. A total of 3,933 meters 
were repaired, compared with 4,528 meters in 1961. 

There were 96 meters installed in the new Durgin Street parking lot, and 5— 
2 hour meters installed on the Island by Storrs Avenue by the new Capital 
Shopping Center. [5 meters were taken out during the building of the new 
Baby By-Pass and one meter had to be taken out during the operation of the 
Durgin Street Lot.] 

Total number of meters in operation at the present time is 1,127. 

Training Prograjn Officers attended courses on public speaking, criminal in- 
vestigation, fingerprinting, fugitive investigation, photography, firearms, etc. 
Regular members of the department completed their regular firearms training 
the first week of June at the Pioneer Pistol Range in Dunbarton. 

25 



A total of 10 officers and officials attended a 2-day session on 
Seizure" School at the New Hampshire State Armory. 



'Search and 



A total of 10 members of this department attended a training lecture series held 
at the Boys Club sponsored by the Merrimack County Law Enforcement. 

Miscellaneous Activiiies The annual census was completed during April of 
1962 in a record breaking time limit of 3 weeks. [This can be attributed to the 
fact that there were a total of 9 persons taking part in this program; Shirley 
Kenahan, Mary Carlson, Pauline Bullock, and Margaret Ginnis, who are school 
crossing guards, and 4 regular officers, Lawrence Sullivan, Wesley Foote, Rich- 
ard Perkins and Worthen Muzzey, all under the supervision of Sgt. Richard 
Campbell.] The final tallv shows a total of 29,187 persons in Concord, a drop 
of 20 from 1961. 

Bicycle registrations were started April 14th in Concord, and on April 21st in 
Penacook. There have been 2,568 bicycle plates given out compared with 
2,519 in 1961, an increase of 49 plates. 

This department was awarded an Outstanding Citizenship Plaque, in behalf of 
the United Fund, in recognition of the increase of 128% over last year. 

A testimonial dinner in honor of Sgt. Percy Davis, who retired November 24th, 
after serving with this department for 31 years was held at the Boys Club. 




Officer Thowas Roy, president of C. P. B. A. presenting Mr. 

Sulloway, president. Board of Directors of Boys' Club, 

with check for $1,000.00. 



26 



Examinations for 2 Sergeants positions which became available upon the retire- 
ment of Sgt. Percy Davis and Sgt. Francis Sullivan, got under way in Decem- 
ber with a total of 17 members applying for the positions. 

Emergency Activities The department participated in re-routing and control- 
ling traffic at the woodland fire in the Heights Section of Concord on April 28th, 
which burned over a large area in that section. 

The Department was called to aid in the search for a 9 year old Boscawen girl, 
who drowned at the Hannah Duston monument on the Merrimack River in 
Penacook on April 28th. 

On May 31st, the Penacook Auxiliary was called upon to assist in an emergency 
caused by the freak tornado in Penacook, doing guard duty and controlling 
traffic throughout the Penacook area. 

Boys Club and Camp Andrews During 1962 approximately 215 boys were en- 
rolled at the Club. 

There were 26 boys who went out for Midget Basketball, 30 for Junior League 
and 15 in the Intermediate League. Both Midget and Junior were played at the 
Club, but the Intermediate League played at the Community Center. There 
were approximately 20 outside games played in all. They again participated in 
the Twin-State Basketball Tournament held at the Goodwin Community Cen- 
ter in Claremont and were the winners over the rival team of Claremont. 

A Christmas turkey dinner was served 170 boys at the Club in December with 
movies following. 

The building on Highland Street underwent several paint jobs during '62. The 
gym was completely painted, the entrance way and the game-room walls and 
floor were redone. The outside surface on the cement blocks was given a coat of 
paint. 

Camp Andrews got underway June 25th, with the first group of 36 boys going 
for a 2 week period. The Camp closed on August 18th, with a full capacity of 
180 boys in all attending. The staff consisted of eight leaders, with James 
Ceriello again as Camp Director. 



27 



MUNICIPAL COURT 



Number of arrests for driving while intoxicated in 1961 
Number of arrests for driving while intoxicated in 1962 

The following are the known cases for a two year period 
(excluding parking violations) 

Closed cases for 1961 
Closed cases for 1962 



1961 
1962 



61 
44 

1,673 
1,670 



1,562 (shows 93% cleared) 
1,566 (shows 93% cleared) 

In 1961 there were 274 serious crimes, including: aggravated assault, burglary, 
larceny, auto theft, forgery, and fraud. Of these 163 or 59% were cleared by 
arrests. 

In 1962, there were 248 serious crimes, including the above. Of these 144 or 
58% were cleared by arrests. 



The amount of property reported stolen in 1962 
The amount of property recovered for 1962 
or 77% recovered. 



$38,373.17 
$29,544.17 




Neiv design crossivalk installed at Main and Pleasant Streets. 



28 




Yule lights at Penacook Fire Station. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Fire Loss The two major fires of the year were a brush fire on the Concord 
Heights binning over a thousand acres with no building loss, the other was the 
Masonic block on the corner of Main and Pleasant Streets with a loss of over 
$224,600.00. 

One life was lost in a fire at the residence of Charles Odette, on Broken Bridge 
Road. 

Personnel The Fire Department operated with a staff of sixty permanent men, 
assisted with sixty call-men. This shows an addition of five permanent fire fight- 
ers which put the department on a sixty-two hour work week program. 

In the sudden death of veteran fire fighter Winthrop Clark on Sept. 13, 1962, 
who had over twenty-five years of call and permanent service, the City of Con- 
cord lost a capable and faithful servant. 

Apparatus and Equipment A new chassis for the fire alarm truck and a new 
dodge station wagon were purchased during 1962. 

Several breakdowns on fire apparatus were experienced during the year. 

Three hundred feet of two and half inch hose was purchased during the year 
making a total of twenty thousand three hundred feet which has been tested 
and found serviceable. 

Maintenance As in previous years through the use of the facilities available at 
the department's work shop, the apparatus and equipment was repaired. 



29 



Four hundred and eight fire extinguishers were checked and re-charged. 

The pohce and fire alarm systems were tested monthly with no serious inter- 
ference of service. 
I 

Pn the fire alarm system one new box was installed and eighteen hundred feet 
of new cable laid. 

The first installation of its kind in the eastern section of the United States was 
that of the new transistor power supply which eliminates all local batteries and 
rectifiers. 

A new signal alarm system of the siren type was installed at Engine #8 Co. in 
West Concord. 

A new Diaphone horn was added to the Penacook system. 

Fire Prevention Regular inspections of schools, convalescent homes, places of 
public assembly were carried on as in previous years. 

Summary of Fire Loss 

Insurance 
Value Damage Insurance Paid 

BUILDING $710,000.00 $200,409.66 $508,300.00 $200,409.66 

CONTENTS $140,000.00 $ 93,111.19 $ 99,500.00 $ 91,111.19 



TOTAL $850,000.00 $293,520.85 $607,800.00 $291,520.85 



30 




f 


I 


.^% 


s\ 


p^ 


'•'■* 


wtMH 


-J) 



The V\! easel attached to our Rescue Squad is being inspected hy 

John Barchey and Shirley Clark as Harold Harris 

gives it a trial run. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

Shelters In the Concord area both pubhc and private shelters developed into a 
very active phase of Civil Defense as the year progressed. The New Hampshire 
Savings Bank became the first marked Public Shelter in New Hampshire. Own- 
ers of other buildings that qualified as public shelters under the Federal Survey 
soon signed and returned licenses to the Shelter Coordinator, permitting the 
stocking and marking of these buildings. 

Headquarters In January we moved from the third floor in City Hall to more 
convenient quarters at ground level. Minor renovations were made and new 
fluorescent lighting installed to complete the project, thus providing an at- 
tractive, more readily accessible control center. 

RACES Radio Network Concord Civil Defense Control Headquarters tied in 
Public Works, Police, Central Fire Station, West Concord and Penacook Fire 
Stations and Concord Electric Company (Bridge Street Plant) thereby putting 
the RACES Network into operation. Two mobile units also operate on this 
frequency. More of these short wave radios are needed to complete the network. 

Communications The Communications Officer regularly tests communications 
from Concord Control Center with Area VI Headquarters located in Penacook 
Fire Station. This network operates on a different frequency than Concord 
RACES Network and provides a means of channeling and receiving informa- 
tion to Area and State Civil Defense Headquarters. 



31 




RACES Radio Net connecting all city departments with Civil 

Defense headquarters was installed. In photo Frank Morono and 

Warren Peterson, attached to Engine 8, West Concord, place a 

call over the set in that station. 




Francis LaClair, right, Radiological Survey Officer of Concord Civil 
Defense, conducted throughout the year frequent classes on radio- 
logical defenses in the fire service. Firemen Mead. Potter and Edes 
study the detection equipment. 



Radiological Radiological Survey Instruments were distributed to West Con- 
cord and Penacook Fire Stations and Concord Hospital. One set was also 
placed in operation at CD Headciuarters, City Hall. 

Public Information This service which parallels Public Relations in impor- 
tance, was given new impetus during the year with the many lectures on Civil 
Defense. Rescue programs were conducted frequently by members of the Squad 
with a showing of colored slides depicting their activities. 

A program telling the story of Civil Defense in the Concord complex is being 
arranged with colored slides to better illustrate the organization structure and 
operational plans. 

Handouts on shelter construction and various phases of survival were distributed 
from CD headquarters and made available from other sources as well as direct 
mailing. The peak of requests for information was reached during the Cuban 
crisis in October. 

Personnel In July Reverend Johnson resigned as Director. Pressing church 
duties and an ever increasing work load in the local Civil Defense office forced 
this decision on him. Deputy Director Richard Brodeur was appointed Director. 




The line throxving gun is ready to be test fired 

by a member of Penacook Rescue Squad. Gun 

will fire line across open water, thin ice or over 

a building. 



33 




Civil Dejense personnel from Rescue Squad carry 

casualty into Concord Hospital duriyig "Doctor 9" 

disaster drill. Edgar Erode ar is left, Francis 

LaClair right. 



Penacook Rescue Squad This group iust completed another active year 
responding to accidents, fires and numerous other emergencies. The Squad 
teamed up with Manchester Fire equipment during the serious forest fire at 
Concord Heights in May, covering the Old Loudon Road area and providing 
communication with the local fire department on its two-way radio. An urgent 
call was received while working this fire to return to Penacook as a drowning 
had just taken place at Hannah Duston Island. 

Newsletter Last August we sent out our first Newsletter telling of the month's 
activities of Concord Civil Defense. The first issue went to the City Government, 
Civil Defense Staft and Rescue Squad members. 

Air Raid Siren In September the Air Raid Siren at Rollins Park was tested to 
more accurately determine the range of this particular alerting system. A 
critique was held following the test. Five additional sirens to completely alert 

34 



the Concord complex are included in the Civil Defense budget for the coming 
year. A 30 second test of the Rollins Park siren is sounded each Saturday noon 
from the control equipment at Central Fire Station. 

Civil Defense Chairmen Civic, Fraternal and Veteran organizations were 
asked to name a Civil Defense Chairman to act as liaison for their group. The 
response was good and these chairmen have been placed on our mailing list 
and receive the monthly Newsletter and any other information this office feels 
would be of value to them. 

Cuban Crisis In October the Cuban situation prompted an emergency meeting 
to be called at CD Headquarters. A basic plan to cope with mass feeding, shel- 
ters and rescue were formulated by personnel from the various City Depart- 
ments, Schools, Hospital, Rescue, Utilities, Red Cross and others. A course of 
action, should this turn into sudden war, was established. Many problems that 
could arise were also discussed. 

Severe Weather Alert System With the approach of the hurricane and tornado 
season we set in motion a Severe Weather Alerting Plan coordinating the U.S. 
Weather Bureau, Concord Civil Defense, Police, Fire and Public Works. Such a 
system would have tremendous value to all concerned should one of these 
ravages of nature bear down upon us. 



35 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

There were a total of 374 interments made during the year. In the city ceme- 
teries, 257, 96 in Calvary, 5 out of town, and 16 in Penacook Calvary Cemetery. 
A total of 98 new lots were sold during the year. Four trusts were put on old 
lots and one flower trust was put on a lot. 

The curbing was removed from thirty-six lots in Calvary Cemetery and a large 
section was regraded. We are continuing to make new plots in several sections 
of the cemeteries. Quite a few diseased trees were removed during the winter. 
The large garage building was shingled during the summer when there was a 
lull in the mowing. 

There were a great number of foundations poured and markers and corner posts 
set during the year. The flower beds were set out in the spring in time for 
Memorial Day. 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Edward H. York was appointed Overseer of the Poor in Penacook on Septem- 
ber 3, 1962, replacing Charles P. Coakley, who died June 19, 1962. 

The basic function of the Welfare Department is to administer financial assist- 
ance to the citizens of Concord and Penacook who are without resources and 
with no visible means of support. 

In 1962 an average of 35 cases representing 112 persons were aided at a total 
cost of $33,533.77 in comparison to 31 cases in 1961 representing 101 persons 
with expenditures of $29,470.85. Although welfare costs show an increase again 
this year, as they did last, the figure is well below that spent ten years ago 
when an average of 60 cases representing 123 persons were aided at a total 
cost of $44,107.65. 

Sickness and marital difficulties were the leading causes of relief need in 1962 
as they were in 1961. 

SICKNESS 

MARITAL DIFFICULTIES 

UNEMPLOYMENT 

INSUFFICIENT INCOME 

UNEMPLOYABLE 

Old Age Assistance In 1962 Old Age Assistance cases included Aliens num- 
bered 177 with expenditures of $61,025.59 and in 1961, 182 cases were aided 
at a cost of $55,118.42. The City shares 25% of the cost of Old Age Assistance 
cases and 50% of Aliens. 

Aid to the Permanently ir Totally Disabled In 1962 Aid to the Permanently & 
Totally Disabled cases numbered 13 with expenditures of $5,202.88 and in 
1961, 13 cases were aided at a cost of $5,070.25. The City shares 35% of the 
cost of Aid to the Permanently & Totally Disabled. 

36 



1962 


1961 


33% 


35% 


23% 


21% 


18% 


22% 


18% 


12% 


8% 


10% 





Carl Nason, George Hill. John Ho^vard. toitness hurial 
of entire stock of pharmaceuticals. 



SANITARY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

Inspections 1269 samples of milk, cream, chocolate milk, coffee drink and 
orangeade were collected and analyzed during the year. Standard plate counts, 
B. Coli and Thermoduric plate counts were made, as well as butter fat tests. 
Specific gravity tests were made on milk to detect watering as were tests to 
detect the presence of penicillin and other antibiotics. Other tests are sediment 
tests and the Whiteside tests to detect mastitis in dairy cows. Microscopic 
tests are also made of milk. 

The following inspections were made during the year: 



Dairies 182 

Stores 213 

Bakeries 28 

Tourist Courts 15 

Foster Homes 11 



Milk Plants 68 

Eating Establishments 168 

Wholesale Meat Houses 6 

Schools and Nurseries 32 



Several inspections have been on the sanitary violations of the Housing Code. 
Two notices were sent to landlords that their properties were unfit for human 
habitations, and two other landlords have voluntarily closed their multi-family 
dwellings. 



37 



137 complaints were investigated and 112 notices were given to producers, 
stores and eating establishments to improve conditions. 638 written reports were 
sent to milk dealers and producers. 

The following food and drugs were condemned, forfeited and destroyed as unfit 
for human consumption; 6 cans of spinach, 3 jars coffee syrup, 1150 pounds 
flour, 7 dozen doughnuts, 4 dozen coffee rolls, 13 one gallon cans pastry flour- 
ings, 61 pounds coffee, 2 frozen pizzas, 9-6 ounce cans chicken, 1-9 ounce 
candied yams, 1-8 ounce tuna fish sticks, 3-6 ounce cauliflower, 2-8 ounce 
lima beans, 3-6 ounce squash, 4-10 ounce chicken pie, 3-12 ounce turkey 
pie, 6-4 ounce shrimp, 8-10 ounce meat balls and sauce, $12,000 worth of 
drugs and 17-20 quart cans raw milk. 

Food establislmients in city— retail, wholesale, manufacturing, and food de- 
partments of institutions were supervised in 1962 with emphasis on five areas 
of major significance in preventing food-borne illness. These are ( 1 ) the pro- 
tection of the purity of the food; (2) the health and habits of the food handling 
personnel; (3) the construction and cleanliness of equipment; (4) maintenance 
of the physical structures of the premises; and (5) the compliance with City 
Laws. The importance of this achievement in relation to the health of this 
community is emphasized when we note that, although the incidence of the 
infectious diseases has declined over the past decade, such has not been the 
case with food-borne illness. The level of reported outbreaks has risen steadily 
between 1952 and 1959, the last year for which figures are available. 

Milk Sanitation Outside competition has caused serious concern in the dairy 
industry in the Concord area as well as in other areas of the state. Local and 
state regulators of milk sanitation codes have set up recommended standards 
for the sanitary production of milk. Milk and milk products from points beyond 
the limits of routine inspections by the local and state officials may not be sold 
in this state unless produced and pasteurized under provisions which are sub- 
stantially equivalent to the requirements of the standards, and which are en- 
forced with equal effectiveness, as determined by a milk sanitation rating. This 
system will prohibit low quality milk from outside the state and will not use 
health standards as an economic barrier. 

Other Activities A meeting of state and local health officials was attended by 
this department at the State Department of Health in Concord to discuss the 
new recommended standards on July 11, 1962, and on October 23, 1962, a 
similar meeting was attended in Keene, New Hampshire. An address was given 
to the members of the Odd Fellows on the duties of the sanitary inspectors on 
January 23, 1962. 



38 




Dr. William Frost. Jr., is sivorn in as Health Officer by 
Mayor Davie and Arthur Roby, City Clerk. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Health Clinics 2,292 persons attended health cHnics in Concord during the 
year to receive protective treatment against diphtheria, whooping cough, tet- 
anus, smallpox and poliomyelitis. 1,491 of these persons received Sabin Oral 
Polio \'accine which was given for the first time this year. On August 23rd, a 
special clinic was held at the Penacook High School because of a probable 
polio diagnosis of a Penacook child. 365 persons received Sabin Oral Vaccine 
and 643 persons received Salk Vaccine at that time. 

Communicable Diseases The following communicable diseases were reported: 
8 cases of infectious hepatitis, 1 case of paralytic polio and 4 cases of scarlet 
fever. 

Licenses Three convalescent home licenses were issued in March, 190 milk 
licenses and 91 restaurant and bakery licenses were issued from May through 
October. 

Complaints 45 complaints were received during the year and checked. 
Vital Statistics The death rate increased by 102 from last year. Of the 742 
deaths reported in 1962, 309 were resident and 433 were non-resident. 130 
bodies were brought here for burial and 19 stillbirths were reported. 
Table of causes of deaths of residents (most common causes) 

1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 

Diseases of circulatory system 154 165 121 137 162 

Diseases of nervous system 42 45 41 48 36 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 48 42 39 39 31 

Diseases of digestive system 10 7 13 14 15 

Diseases of respiratory system 22 16 17 13 22 

39 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 

The City Clerk attended all meetings and hearings of the Board of Aldermen 
in the capacity of clerk. Prepared and distributed the minutes of all proceedings. 

Received and turned over to the City Treasurer the sum of $12,961.20 from 
licenses and service fees during the year. 

Issued approximately 2,240 dog licenses. 

Recorded approximately 1,374 Commercial Codes. 

Recorded 154 discharges. 

Issued 349 marriage licenses. 

Issued approximately 1,304 copies of records of vital statistics. Due to the 
requirements of Social Security and Old Age Assistance, the issuance of cer- 
tificates of birth records and marriage records is increasing each year. 

Board of Aldermen Actions 

The Board of Aldermen held 12 regular meetings, 9 special meetings, and 4 
hearings during the year. 

The Board passed 65 resolutions and 35 ordinances during the year including 
the following: 

Resolution, relative to Technical Institute Facilities. 

Resolution, relative to purchase of Durgin Street property from Rogers Garage. 

Resolution, conveyance of land to Concord Housing Authority. 

Resolution, issuance of licenses for fallout shelters of city buildings. 

Resolution, relative to services of Pierre A. Boucher. 

Ordinance, amending Building Code relative to electrical work. 
Ordinance, providing for restraint and control of dogs. 
Several ordinances relative to Personnel, Traffic and Zoning. 



ELECTIONS 

1962 was a busy year for elections. The state primary was held September 11, 
1962 with a total of 15,605 names on the checklist. Votes cast were 7,282 Re- 
publican and 723 Democratic ballots. 

Filings received for this election were as follows: 

Representatives in the various wards 25 

Other ward officials (ward clerks, moderators and 

supervisors of the checklist) 45 

Filings for delegates to state convention 11 

The Ceneral Election was held November 6, 1962. The total number of names 
on the checklist was 15,964. The total vote cast at this election was 11,101. 
For this election there were 511 absentee ballots prepared, mailed and deliv- 
ered. Of this total, 476 were returned in time to be counted as part of the total 
vote cast. 

40 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Water Consumption tor 1962 amounted to 1,401,224,800 gallons, this repre- 
sents an average daily consumption of 3,838,972 gallons, (about 132 gallons 
per person per day). Of the total amount used 1,034,321,800 gallons were 
pumped and 366,903,000 gallons were supplied by gravity. This consumption 
tor 1962 was 47,046,500 gallons less than the consumption for 1961. 

Water Supply Penacook Lake failed to fill to spillway elevation during the 
year, in fact it reached the lowest elevation since 1931 at which point it was 
iiine feet below overflow. Several factors contributed to this situation, first, the 
lake was 5V2 feet below spillway elevation on January first, second, lack of rain- 
fall to melt the snow and carry the water into the lake, third, the amount of 
precipitation for the year was two inches below average. The 100,444,800 gal- 
lons pumped from the 8 inch test wells at the Sanders Well Field in Pembroke 
helped materially in preventing the situation from becoming a serious emer- 
gencv. At the end of the year the elevation of the lake was 6y2 feet below 
overflow and therefore a generous amount of precipitation will be necessary in 
1963 to assure an ample supply for the year. 

Algae Problem In July a musty, woody taste appeared in the water. Samples 
were at once taken to the N. H. State Board of Health for Algae tests which 
showed a heavy growth of Algae of several different types. The entire lake was 
treated with Copper Sulfate which cleared up the condition in a very satisfac- 
tory manner. Tests taken at the end of the year showed the lake to be entirely 
free from Algae. 

Flusliing Program Due to the low elevation of the lake the regular flushing of 
all hydrants and mains in the system had to be omitted and instead spot flush- 
ing was done in areas where rusty water appeared. 

Major Construction Projects The largest project during the year was on Storrs 
Street where a water main was laid from Pleasant Street Extension to Halls 
Court completing a loop which will be a great asset to the system. Laid 4,808 
feet of cement lined cast iron pipe. (113V2 miles of mains now in system). Set 
5 new hydrants, replaced three hydrants, discontinued one hydrant. (801 hy- 
drants now in system). Set 16 main line valves (1,724 valves now in system). 
Laid 77 new service connections, relaid 39 old services, discontinued 15 old 
services (6,279 services now in system). Set 76 new meters, replaced 24 old 
meters, repaired 175 old meters, discontinued 21 old meters (5,681 meters 
now in system ) . 

Sanders Well Field A contract was awarded for the driving and testing of 8 
inch test wells. Four 8 inch wells were driven and tested and three tested out 
very well, the fourth was not satisfactory. Computations were not complete at 
the end of the year but the tests would seem to show that with four gravel pack 
wells as much water could be pumped as from the 150 - 2V2 inch wells formerly 
in use, (iy2 million gallons per day) . 

Major Replacement Project Laid 644 feet of 8 inch cement lined cast iron pipe 
in Abbott Road (in Penacook) replacing old two inch pipe laid in 1928. This 
project completes the relaying of 3,000 feet of old two inch pipe laid in 1928. 

41 



Major Maintenance Projects New loading platfoi-m built and overhead door 
installed at storehouse. Roof repaired at West Concord pumping station. Chim- 
neys rebuilt at Pumping Station and shop at North State Street. All hydrants 
painted during summer. Twenty-five hydrants repaired, three hydrants set in 
new locations. Each and every hydrant in the system was tested weekly be- 
tween December 15 of the previous year and March 15 of the current year to 
guard against freezing and to assure proper operation of all hydrants. Nineteen 
leaks were repaired. 

New Equipment A new telemetering system was installed at the elevated tank 
in East Concord and now it is possible to know how much water is in that tank 
at all times. 

Personnel Mr. Stanley A. Buchanan retired after 40 years of service and Miss 
Edna C. Bean retired after 26 vears of service. 



42 



CITY SOLICITOR 

Stons Street Project The year 1962 saw the completion of Stons Street. As 
with other highway construction projects, there was involved a considerable 
amount of work for the City Solicitor. Except for difficulties encountered in the 
acquisition of one parcel of land, we found property owners cooperative and 
public-spirited in providing necessary land for the right-of-way at reasonable 
cost to the City. The one exception resulted in an appeal to the Court with 
settlement finally being made before the case was disposed of. 
Zoninp, One Superior Court Case, involving an appeal from the zoning board, 
was disposed of. The appellant had been operating a fruit and produce busi- 
ness in a general residence area having failed to secure a variance. Prior to a 
hearing on the matter, however, the appellant withdrew his appeal, closed his 
business, and moved to a near-by city. There are, presently, four other zoning 
cases, most involving non-conforming uses. 

Legislation Legislation has been prepared to be introduced into the coming 
session of the General Court which should be of benefit to the City of Concord. 
The most important are bills amending the statute relating to layout of class 3 
and 4 highways, a bill authorizing the Water Resources Board to acquire dams 
on the Contoocook River in Penacook, and a bill amending the Concord City 
Charter. So far as the highway bill is concerned, we shall seek to limit appeals 
from highway lay-outs and condemnation to the matter of damages; thus, the 
City would then have the same right as does the State in the lay-out of Class 1 
and 2 Highways. Because the land owner presently has a right to appeal matters 
of procedure and necessity, the City has been subjected to considerable delays 
in the completion of at least two projects. The matter of dams in the Contoocook 
River in Penacook has been a matter of concern to the City for some years. They 
are now no longer in use, and if abandoned and left to fall into disrepair would 
undoubtedly result in a substantial decrease in up-stream property values. In 
addition, we believe that one of our greatest natural resources may be in danger 
and may involve other dams in the near future which will no longer be needed. 
We, therefore, believe that the State should develop some definite policy in 
acquiring these dams as they fall into disuse. 

The Charter revisions concern giving of notice to the members of the Board of 
Aldermen on the holding of a special meeting. The present provision requires 
serving of notice on each alderman. We believe that considerable time and 
money could be saved by sending the notice by ordinary mail. A second 
Charter revision involves the changing of Fiscal Control from the supervision 
of the City Clerk to the Finance Director. Fiscal Control and the duties of City 
Clerk are quite incompatible, and we believe that fiscal matters appropriately 
belong in the Financial Department. 

Housing Code This year saw the first case brought under the provisions of the 
Housing Code. Two properties were found to be vmsuitable for human habita- 
tion and the owner was served with notice to repair or remove the residents 
therefrom. As of the end of this year, the matter is still in litigation, although 
the premises involved have been substantially vacated. 

Miscellaneous In addition to such routine tasks as the preparing of deeds, 
leases, contracts, agreements and other documents, and the writing of numerous 
legal opinions for various departments, as well as the Board of Aldermen, we 
attended the usual number of meetings of the Board of Aldermen. 
The City Solicitor also sits as a member of the Revision of Assessments; al- 
though, this Board was not especially busy during the year, it appears that its 
activities will be much increased this coming year. 

43 



COLLECTION DEPARTMENT 

The total tax warrants with additions for the levy of 1962 submitted by the 
Assessors to the Tax Collector were as follows: 

Total Balance 

Debits Dec. 31, 1962 

Real and Personal Property $4,285,556.99 $634,720.11 

Bank Stock ' 7,287.40 -0- 

Timber Yield 3,034.97 2,701.40 



Total Property $4,295,879.36 $637,421.51 

Polls ' 23,186.00 5,050.00 



Total Property & Polls $4,319,065.36 $642,471.51 

State Head Taxes ' 73,075.00 17,007.80 



TOTAL $4,392,140.36 $659,479.31 

In January notices were prepared and mailed to delinquent taxpayers relative 
to unpaid stock in trade, personal and real estate taxes. Also a list was prepared 
and given to local banks relative to unpaid 1959, 1960 and 1961 real estate 
taxes. 

The tax office remained open Friday, March 23 until 8:00 P.M. to allow the 
public extra time in obtaining their 1962 motor vehicle permits. 
The advertised list of unpaid 1961 property taxes was posted on April 30 and 
the Collector's Sale of Resident Real Estate was held on June 1 in the small 
conference room on the second floor of the City Hall. The sale contained 169 
accounts, of which three were bovight by individuals and the rest were bought 
by the City of Concord for $105,648.59. The Owners of record have two years 
in which to redeem their property from the Collector's Sale. 

In June 15,000 combination head and poll tax bills were addressed and mailed. 
Also the national bank stock bills were prepared and mailed out during the 
month. On June 20 final notices were mailed out to delinquent 1959 real estate 
taxes. 

In July the special assessment bills were processed and mailed. Also during the 
month three parcels of property were deeded to the City for non-payment of 
taxes and two parcels of tax title property were deeded to individuals. 
All property tax bills for the City and Penacook were mailed on September 21. 
During the month your tax collector attended the National Tax Association 
meeting in Miami, Florida and the New Hampshire Tax Collectors Association 
meeting held in Keene. 

There was no auction sale of tax title property held on November 15 as the 
owners of the three parcels of property acquired by tax deed in July redeemed 
their accounts in full. 

This department, with the cooperation of the City Solicitor, entered 105 cases 
in Small Claims Court against delinquent head and poll taxpayers. 
There were 15,088 motor vehicle permits issued, amounting to $180,424.05. 
Collections on Special Assessments amounted to $18,856.27. 

Collections received for prior year taxes, water bills and other miscellaneous 
revenue amounted to $1,055,164.03. 
The total collected from all sources amounted to $4,963,897.45. 

44 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

Tax Warrants were issued as follows during the year: 

Propertv-Real and Personal $4,285,582.89 

Poll Tax 23,186.00 

Head Tax 73,075.00 

Bank Stock 7,287.40 

Timber Yield 3,034.97 

(The above figures contain the added tax warrants and the jeopardy warrants 

through December 31, 1962.) 

Poll Tax exemptions to veterans were 2.988 compared to 3,111 granted in 1961. 

Property Valuation 

Gross valuation before exemptions amounted to $60,945,620.00 

Less veterans and blind exemptions 1,661,760.00 

Net valuation on which 1962 tax rate computed $59,283,860.00 

Property Exemptions 1,694 applications from veterans and blind persons for 
exemption of real estate tax were processed. Of this number 1,647 were granted. 

Tax Rates for 1962 are as follows: 





CONCORD: 


PENACOOK: 






City Budget 


$33.04 Citv Budget 




$33.04 




School 


35.71 School 




41.83 




County 


3.05 County 




3.05 




$71.80 


$77.92 


Compt 


\lation ten year period : 










Net Valuation 


Property Valuation 


Poll Tax 


Poll Exempt 


Year 


R.E. & Pers. Prop. 


Exempt to \^ets. 


Warrant 


to Vets. 


1953 


$47,828,712 


$1,172,550 


$22,954 


$6,218 


1954 


47,795,222 


1,280,588 


23,370 


5,852 


1955 


48,278,291 


1,367,195 


23,924 


6,556 


1956 


49,178,815 


1,334,410 


23,536 


6,636 


1957 


50,829,022 


1,461,270 


23,458 


6,614 


1958 


51,105,351 


1,486,320 


22,962 


6,586 


1959 


52,391,854 


1,554,890 


22,750 


6,580 


1960 


54,621,375 


1,628,620 


22,720 


6,334 


1961 


55,690,530 


1,691,160 


23,018 


6,222 


1962 


59,283,860 


1,661,760 


22,678 


5,976 



Activities The sectional reappraisal of the City by regular personnel was con- 
tinued with work principally in the area of the South End in the vicinity of 
Rollins Park. There were nineteen meetings of the Board of Assessors during 
1962. There were 728 property transfers processed— the use of photostat copies 
of deeds was started in February which is a definite advantage over copies on 
small cards, (transfer information is now exact and complete.) Tax abatements 
allowed during the year on Property and Polls was $41,348.05; and Property 
and Poll taxes added during the year amounted to $6,310.35. The total number 
of appeals against assessments of real estate and personal property received 
and resolved during the year was 195. Work was started late in 1962 on a new 
system of handling poll and head tax census and record cards— system of "key- 
sort" cards— to be used for the first time in the 1963 census. 

45 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

In the financial section of this report will be found schedules which set forth 
the activity and the year end position of each of the several funds throvigh which 
all the financial transactions of the City are handled. Below is a brief summary 
of activity of each fimd dining the year 1962 and condition at the end of the 



GENERAL FUND 

Current Surplus resulting from 1962 operations amounted to $112,567. This 
surplus will be used to reduce the amount to be raised bv propertv taxes in 
1963. 

Debt Outstanding debt payable from this fund decreased $282,528. New debt 
amounting to $110,000 was incurred, while maturities paid dining the year 
amounted to $392,528, as detailed in the following schedule. 

Balance Pavments New Debt Balance 

Dec. 31, 1961 During 1962 Issued 1962 Dec. 31, 1962 

Municipal .... $1,211,320 192,528 110,000 1,128,792 

School 2,515,000 200,000 -0- 2,315,000 



Total $3,726,320 392,528 110,000 3,443,792 

Interest Rates declined during the year. Our bonds sold at a rate of 2.375% 
which compares with 2.8% and 2.6% for 1961 issues. Rates on borrowings in 
anticipation of tax collections ranged from 1.59% in July to 1.40% in September, 
compared to a high of 1.47% and a low of 1.04% paid in the previous year. 
Total interest cost for the year on the short term notes was $11,898. compared 
to $9,021. for the previous vear. Total interest paid on long term debt was 
$31,543. compared to $24,985. paid in 1961. 

Valuations, Taxes, Tax Rates Below is a comparison of valuations, property 
taxes, and tax rates; showing changes from 1961 to 1962. 

Property Taxes Raised 1961 

For Municipal Purposes $1,686,465 

For School Purposes 2,040,344 

For County Purposes 180,639 

Total $3,907,448 

Assessed Valuation 

For Municipal Purposes $55,690,530 

For Union School District . . . 52,044,750 

For Penacook School District . 3,661,280 

For County Purposes 55,706,280 

46 



1962 


Increase 
Amount Per Cent 


1,958,807 

2,140,912 

180,644 


272,342 

100,568 

5 


16.1 
4.9 


4,280,363 


372,915 


9.5 


59,283,860 

55,511,740 

3,787,620 

59,299,610 


3,593,330 

3,466,990 

126,340 

3,593,330 


6.5 
6.7 
3.5 
6.5 



Tax Rates 

Municipal 30.28 33.04 2.76 9.1 

Union School District 36.48 35.71 -.77 -2.1 

Penacook School District 38.80 41.83 3.03 7.8 

County 3.24 3.05 -.19 -5.9 

Total Citv Rate 70.00 71.80 1.80 2.6 

Total Penacook Rate 72.32 77.92 5.60 7.7 

Collections decreased, percentage wise; the year ending with 14.8% of the cur- 
rent property tax levy outstanding, compared to 10.7% outstanding at the end of 
the previous year. 



TRUST FUNDS 

Income received increased from $61,462. in 1961 to $65,079. in 1962. New trusts 
received amounted to $13,495. Gain on sale of securities amounted to $2,272, 
compared to $96,374. in 1961. Income transferred to General Fund was 
$61,394. 



PARKING METER FUND 

Meter Collections fell off by 2.4% from $59,690. in 1961 to $58,268. for the cur- 
rent year. Off-street collections decreased 6.5% while on-street areas yielded 
1.3% less than the previous year. 

Fund Balance at the close of the year was $15,807. An increase of $9,294. dur- 
ing the year. 

Debt Long term debt decreased from $76,000. to $54,000. No new debt was 
issued; while maturities amounted to $22,000. 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Revenue from sewer rentals totalled $86,814. compared to $87,398. realized in 
1961, a decrease of .07%. Receipts from all sources decreased by 5.8% from 
$97,911. to $92,230. 

Surplus The vear began with a cash surplus of $93,349. and ended with 
$107,191. an increase of $13,842.00. 

Debt Long term debt decreased by $26,000. Maturities paid during the year 
amounted to $26,000. No new debt was incurred. 

WATER FUND 

Revenue Water rentals yielded a total of $254,005., 1.2% above the $251,012. 
realized in 1961. Receipts from all sources amounted to $277,694. or 6.1% higher 
than in 1961. 

Surplus Cash surplus increased from $168,001. at the beginning of the year 
to $201,923. at the close of the year. 

47 



Debt Long term debt decreased by $20,000. Maturities paid amounted to 
$20,000. No new debt was incurred. 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

Projects One water extension and sidewalk project were approved for con- 
struction under special assessment procedure at an estimated cost of $4,500.00. 

Receipts Total receipts of this fund were $92,129. Disbursements totalled 
$124,829. Cash balance at the end of the year was $53,857. 

Debt Long term debt decreased during the year from $344,907. to $316,734. 
New debt amounting to $20,660. was incurred; while maturities paid totalled 
$48,833. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT FUND 

Profit This fund showed a profit from this year's operations. Income from 
equipment rentals amounted to $228,496.; while operating expenditures and 
depreciation totalled $213,703.; resulting in a net profit of $14,79.3. 

Reserve The reserve for replacement of equipment increased from $13,009. 
to $15,988. Expenditures for new equipment totalled $47,985.; while additions 
to the reserve amounted to $50,963. This fund has no outstanding debt. 



48 



TABLE OF CONTENTS — FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



(.EXERAL FUND 

Appropriations & 

Expciuliturc's 56-50 

Assessments -, 55 

Balance Sheet 50-51 

Current Surplus - .- 52 

Investments 62 

Long Term Debt 60-61 

Revenues 52-53 

Taxes Receivable 54 

Tax Sale Accoinits 54 



BOND FUND — GENERAL 

Balance Sheet 50-51 

Disposition of Proceeds 64 



TRl ST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet 50-51 

Changes in Balances 63 

hnestments 62 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Balance Sheet 71 

Investments 62 

Long Term Debt 60-61 

Operating Statement 72 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 
& REPLACEMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet .__ 07 

Cash Surplus 67 

Operating Statement 67 

Statement of Reserve Account 67 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet 65 

Long Term Debt 60-61 

Projects Authorized it 

Amounts Expended 66 

Receipts & Expenditures ._ - 66 

^\ AlER FUND 

Balance Sheet 60 

Long Term Debt - 60-61 

Investments 62 

Operating Statements 70-71 

BOM) FUND — WATER 

Disposition of Proceeds 69 

PARKING METER FUND 

Balance Sheet - 6S 

Long Term Debt — 60-61 

Revenues & Expenditures 68 



BALANCE SHEET-GENERAL 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 
Cash: 

Concord National Bank— General Account . 
Goncord National Bank— Payroll Account . . 
Mechanicks National Bank— General Acc't. 

Imprest Funds 

Gash for Payment of Bonds & Goupons .... 
Temporary Investments 

Taxes Receivable: 

Gurrent Year Levy— Property 637,42L51 

Gurrent Year Levy-Polls 5,050.00 

Total Gurrent Year 642,471.51 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 18,087.73 

Prior Year Levies— Property 13,981.23 

Prior Year Levies-Polls 14.00 

Tax Liens Bought by Gity— Unredeemed . . 38,746.97 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 52,742.20 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization .... 29,494.02 

Accounts Receivable: 

Water & Sewer Rentals 73,685.45 

Departmental Receivables 11,611.03 

Gemetery Receivables 858.07 

Tnmk Storm Sewer Assessments 2,553.00 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization .... 

Stores Accounts: 

Public Works Mat. & Supplies Inv 55,985.41 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 10,525.05 

Postage Meter Inventory 519.71 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization .... 
Tax Deeded Properties: 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization .... 

State Head Taxes Receivable: 

Gurrent Year 

Prior Year 

Due from Other Funds: 

Special Assessment Fund ( Loan ) 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 
Gash— Goncord National Bank 
Investments 

^GAPITAL FUND ASSETS 
Debt Requirements— Municipal 
Debt Requirements— School 



December 



.36,968.48 

15,000.00 

30,801.03 

1,249.41 

2,495.00 

597,313.31 



624,383.78 



683,827.23 



23,248.18 647,631.96 



88,707.55 

15,022.10 73,685.45 



67,030.17 



67,030.17 -0- 
869.93 
869.93 -0- 



17,007.80 

10.00 17,017.80 



4,524.00 



1,426,686.44 



8,434.62 
815,076.42 823,511.04 



1,128,792.16 
2,315,000.00 3,443,792.16 



Gash— Goncord National Bank 
Gash in Other Banks 
Accounts Receivable 



BOND FUND ASSETS 



41,486.76 
12,000.00 
1,365.00 54,851.76 



GRAND TOTAL-ASSETS 
* Does not include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer, 
Parking Meter or Special Assessment Funds. 



5,748,841.40 



AND RELATED FUNDS 

31, 1962 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payohle: 

Ihipresented Coupons & Bonds 2,495.00 

Payroll Deductions Payable 975.79 

Current Vouchers Payable 61,240.26 64,711.05 

Unexpended Appropriations: 

Union School District-Operating Acc't . . . 866,407.53 

Interest-Union School Dist. Bonds & Notes 31,963.50 

Penacook School District 78,445.66 

Reserve for Encumbrances 19,952.86 996,769.55 

Due to Other Funds: 

Water Fund 95,842.13 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 79,633.14 

Equipment Maintenance & Replacement 

Fund 37,547.79 

Bond Fund-General 1,365.00 

Parking' Meter Fund 15,806.74 230,194.80 

Advance Deposits: 445.42 

Taxes Due to State of N. H.: 

Head Taxes 20,952.80 

Timber Yield Tax— a/c Debt Retirement 

Fund 1,045.48 21,998.28 

Total General Fund Liabilities 1,314,119.10 

Current Surplus: 112,567.34 

1,426,686.44 



TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 791,067.38 

Accumulated Income 32,443.66 823,511.04 



CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Bonded Debt 3,381,000.00 

Notes Payable 44,000.00 

Advance by State of N. H.— Airport Con- 
struction 18,792.16 3,443,792.16 



BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Construction or Equipment 

Authorized 41,839.50 

Reserve for Encumbrances 12,946.06 

Vouchers Payable 66.20 54,851.76 

GRAND TOTAL-LIABILITIES 5,748,841.40 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS GENERAL FUND 

F^or the Year Ended Decemlier 31, 1962 

Unappropriated Balance, December 31, 1961 

Applied to 1962 Budget 

Balance Remaining 

1962 Budget Surplus 

Unencumlx>red Balance of Appropriations 82,414.23 

Excess of Actual Over Estimated Revenue 17,279.42 

Plus: Excess Reserves Liquidated 

Reserve for Non-Realization of Taxes Receivable .... 14,677.58 

Reserve for Non-Realization of Accounts Receivable . . 5,092.47 

Reserve for Non-Realization of Tax Deeded Property . 186.63 



Less : 

Increase in Reserve for Non-Realization of Stores 

Accounts 

Cancelled Checks Presented for Payment 

To be Applied to 1983 Budget 

Balance Remaining 



7,109.58 
6.60 



72,033.19 
72,000.00 

33.19 
99,693.65 

19,956.68 
119,683.52 

7,116.18 

112,567.34 
112,000.00 

567.34 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 
GENERAL FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 

Budget Revenues 

Local Taxes— Excl.Ciirr.Yr. Prop. ir Polls Estimate Realized Excess Deficiency 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Prop. ... -0- 77.85 77.85 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Poll 500.00 522.00 22.00 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 14,400.00 14,843.73 443.73 

Auto Permits 185,000.00 180,424.05 4,575.95 

Timber Severance Tax 2,0()().00 2,529.15 529.15 

Rent & Profit Tax Deeded Prop. ... -0- 96.23 96.23 

201,900.00 198,493.01 1,168.96 4,575.95 
State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax -0- 6,026.62 6,026.62 

Interest & Dividend Tax 80,823.00 80,822.94 .06 

Loss of Taxes-State Forests 25.00 -0- 25.00 

80,848.00 86,849.56 6,026.62 25.06 



52 



Licenses ir Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Taxi Licenses 

Healtli Licenses 

Amusement Licenses 

Police & Protective Licenses . . 
Prof. & Occupational Licenses 



Registration Fees 6- Permits 

Marriage Licenses 

Rec. Fees— Legal Documents 

Filing Fees 

Sundry Fees— City Clerk . . . . 
Dog Licenses 



Departmental Service Cliarges 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concessions . . . . 

Coif Fees 

Mem. Field Royalties & Concess. . 
Police Dept. Ambulance Charges 

Airport— Rent 

Airport— Concessions 

Fines & Forfeits 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges . . . . 

Weights & Measures Fees 

Comm. on Head Tax Collections . 
Other Recr. Dept. Revenues . . . . 
Communitv Center Revenue . . . . 



Unclassified 

Interest Income 

Sale of Property 

Sub. Div. Assess. Pr. Yr. Constr. 

Sale of Ordinances 

All Other 

3,140.00 7,759.91 5,099.91 480.00 

TOTAL MISC. REVENUES . . 354,328.00 365,904.95 19,494.27 7,917.32 

Current Yr. Prop, ir Polls 

Property Tax 4,239,290.04 4,244,319.11 5,029.07 

Poll Taxes 20,800.00 20,886.00 86.00 

National Bank Stock Tax 6,700.00 7,287.40 587.40 

4,266,790.04 4,272,492.51 5,702.47 
TOTAL REVENUES 4,621,118.04 4,638,397.46 25,196.74 7,917.32 



600.00 


522.25 




77.75 


400.00 


380.50 




19.50 


600.00 


639.00 


39.00 




2,100.00 


2,675.50 


575.50 




150.00 


219.00 


69.00 




100.00 


122.55 


22.55 




3,950.00 


4,558.80 


706.05 


97.25 


1,000.00 


1,047.00 


47.00 




3,300.00 


3,206.00 




94.00 


100.00 


95.00 




5.00 


1,100.00 


1,188.65 


88.65 




4,600.00 


4,535.89 




64.11 


10,100.00 


10,072.54 


135.65 


163.11 


2,000.00 


2,830.36 


830.36 




700.00 


723.77 


23.77 




13,500.00 


14,486.50 


986.50 




200.00 


311.12 


111.12 




1,400.00 


940.50 




459.50 


13,940.00 


11,904.41 




2,935.59 


200.00 


197.38 




2.62 


8,400.00 


9,100.52 


700.52 




1,400.00 


4,086.31 


2,686.31 




450.00 


385.56 




64.44 


6,800.00 


6,786.20 




13.80 


1,500.00 


2,453.04 


953.04 




3,900.00 


3,965.46 


65.46 




54,390.00 


58,171.13 


6,357.08 


2,575.95 


2,000.00 


6,.354.36 


4,354..36 




500.00 


515.60 


15.60 




640.00 


160.00 




480.00 


-0- 


6.50 


6.50 




-0- 


723.45 


723.45 





53 



STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE-GENERAL FUND 
December 31, 1962 

1962 Prior State 

Levy Years Head Taxes 

BALANCE JANUARY 1, 1962 440,904.20 16,480.00 

Committed to Collector in 1962 

{Incl. Supplemental): 

Real & Personal Property 4,285,556.99 77.85 

National Bank Stock 7,287.40 

Timber Yield 3,0.34.97 

Polls 23,186.00 522.00 

Heads ( For State) 74,555.00 



Total Charges to Collector 4,319,065.36 441,504.05 91,035.00 

Accounted for as Follows: 

Collections (Net of Refunds) 3,651,143.70 411,608.92 67,937.20 

Authorized Abatements 25,450.15 15,899.90 6,080.00 

Balance Uncollected Dec. 31, 1962 642,471.51 13,995.23 17,017.80 



Total Credits & Balance 4,319,065.36 441,504.05 91,035.00 

Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes 

Real & Personal 
Property 

1958 456.89 

1959 355.32 

1960 12,561.22 

1961 607.80 

1962 634,720.11 



Crand Total 648,701.34 



Timber 
Yield 


Polls 


Heads 


2,701.40 


14.00 
5,050.00 


10.00 
17,007.80 


2,701.40 


5,064.00 


17,017.80 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS-GENERAL FUND 

Balance Unredeemed January 1, 1962 

Tax Levy of 1959 10,535.97 

Tax Levy of 1960 27,874.68 38,410.65 

1962 Tax Sale ( Tax Levy of 1961) ' 105,648.59 

Total Charges 144,059.24 

Accounted for as FoUotvs: 

Collections 102,379.04 

Deeded to City 2,933.23 

Balance Unredeemed December 31, 1962 38,746.97 

144,059.24 

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66 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE & REPLACEMENT FUND 

STATEMEiNT OF OPERATIONS 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 

Equipment Earnings 228,496.10 

Operating Expenditures 

Direct Labor 34,431.30 

Indirect Labor 19,797.49 

Leaves & Longevity 5,661.17 

Building Repairs 3,154.71 

Gasoline, Oil & Antifreeze 19,945.64 

Parts 48,525.37 

Tires 8,806.71 

Batteries 1,201.34 

Miscellaneous Hardware 3,346.91 

Crease & Lubricants 525.19 

Supplies 2,084.68 

Hand Tools 343.17 

Fuel & ITtilities 5,542.91 

Insurance 5,129.87 

Retirement Contributions 4,702.08 

Shop Equipment 705.92 163,904.46 

Depreciation ' 49,798.27 213,702.73 

Net Cain for Period 14,793.37 



Assets: 

Equipment 

Due from Ceneral Fund . . . 
Liabilities ir Funds: 

Municipal Investment 

Capital Reserve Fund 

Surplus, December 31, 1962 



BALANCE SHEET 
December 31, 1962 



593,674.08 

37,547.79 



631,221.87 



594,237.87 
15,987.52 
20,996.48 631,221.87 



STATEMENT OF CASH SURPLUS 

Net Operating Profit for 1962, as above 

Accumulated Surplus, January 1, 1962 

Accumulated Surplus, December 31, 1962 



14,793.37 
6,203.11 

20,996.48 



STATEMENT OF RESERVE ACCOUNT 

Balance, January 1, 1962 

Additions 

Depreciation 49,798.27 

Efjuipment Sold 1,165.00 

Equipment Purchased ( as per detail ) 

Balance, December 31, 1962 



13,008.79 



50,963.27 
63,972.06 
47,984.54 

15,987.52 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED 



1 Gallion Roller 8,995.00 

1 Mower 314.58 

2 Passenger Cars 3,550.00 

3 5 Ton Dumps 16,072.00 



1 Jeep Pick-up . . . . 
1 Sidewalk Tractor 
1 Lodal Dump . . . . 

3 Plows 

3 Pick-up Trucks . . 



1,802.22 
5,056.31 
5,800.00 
809.97 
5,584.46 



TOTAL 47,984.54 



67 



BALANCE SHEET-PARKING METER FUND 

December 31, 1962 

Assets: 

Due from General Fund 15,806.74 

Del)t Requirements 54,000.00 69,806.74 



Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 54,000.00 

Unappropriated Current Surplus 15,806.74 69,806.74 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES- 
PARKING METER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 

Cash Balance-January 1, 1962 6,512.61 

Revenues: 

Meter Collections— On Street 

Meter Collections— Off Street 

Parking Penalties 

Operating Expenditures: 
On Street 

Meter Repairs & Maintenance 

Enforcement 

Collecting & Accounting 

Marking Pavements 

Insurance 

Retirement Contributions 

Off Street 

Meter Repairs 

Enforcement 

Collecting 

Maintenance of Parking Areas 

Lighting 

Insurance & Miscellaneous 

Retirement Contributions 

Del)t Service— Off Street Areas: 

Payment of Bonds 

Interest on Bonds 

Capital Outlay: 

Equipment— On Street 

Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance— December 31, 1962 

68 



46,603.67 

11,664.65 

7,180.00 


65,448.32 


71,960.93 


4,405.65 

10,611.99 

1,578.63 

1,244.48 

157.86 

904.88 


18,903.49 

11,979.89 

23,440.00 
1,830.81 




1,068.23 
4,071.72 

536.66 

4,272.83 

1,607.76 

83.47 

339.22 




22,000.00 
1,440.00 












56,154.19 




15,806.74 



BALANCE SHEET-WATER FUND 

December 31, 1962 

ASSETS 

Fixed Assets: 

Water & Flowage Rights 167,663.11 

Land 211,975.37 

Structures 437,022.49 

Pumping & Purification Equipment .... 87,369.72 
Distrilnition Mains, Services, Hydrants, 

& Meters 1,743,328.38 

Other Eciuipment & Garage Equipment . 75,804.68 

Unfinished Construction 200.96 

2,723.364.71 
Less: Reserve for Depreciation 829,777.34 1,893,587.37 

Bond Fund Assets: 

Cash— Mechanicks National Bank 300.17 

Investments 34,500.00 34,800.17 

Ctirretit Assets: 

Due from Ceneral Funds 95,842.13 

Investments 98,993.79 

Loaned to Special Assessment Fund .... 12,441.03 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 67,086.72 274,363.67 

Total Assets 2,202,751.21 

LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Long Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 140,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 38,704.38 178,704.38 

Fund Balance and Surplus: 

Municipal Investment 963,194.74 

Contributions in Aid of Constmction . . 237,522.86 

Surplus-Balance Jan. 1, 1962 776,951.32 

Less: Uncollectable Accounts 403.54 

776,547.78 
Net Profit for the Year 1962 46,781.45 823,329.23 2,024,046.83 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 2,202,751.21 



BOND FUND, WATER-DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 

Issue of Issue of 

1949 1959 Total 

Balance January 1, 1962 2,635.43 32,365.70 35,001.13 

Expenditures (See Detail Below) 200.96 200.96 

Unencumbered Balance December 31, 1962 2,635.43 32,164.74 34,800.17 

Detail of Expenditures 

Water Supply Structures- Wells 200.96 200.96 

69 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS-WATER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 

OPERATING REVENUES 

Commercial Sales-Flat Rate 3,041.37 

Commercial Sales-Metered 206,308.97 

Industrial Sales-Metered 43,113.30 

Miscellaneous Water Revenues 334.28 252,797.92 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Water Sitpphj: 

Source of Supply Labor 4,892.41 

Pumping Station Labor 18,696.48 

Purification Labor 2,610.99 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,219.76 

Gravity Supplies & Expenses 747.66 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expenses . . . 3,173.79 

Purification Supplies & Expenses 4,967.79 

Fuel for Power 137.89 

Power Purchased 13,188.41 

Repairs to Pump. Station Str. & Equipment 2.247.57 

Repairs to Purification Str. & Equipment . 222.05 53,104.80 

Distribution: 

Distribution Wages 29,245.54 

Meter Department Labor 5,959.53 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses . 82.39 

Other Supplies & Expenses 748.18 

Repairs to Stmctures 465.01 

Repairs to Mains 2,033.76 

Repairs to Water Storage Equipment .... 78.80 

Repairs to Services 2,551.09 

Repairs to Hydrants 2,276.94 

Repairs to Meters 3,865.70 47,306.94 

Administration: 

Commercial Office Salaries 3,327.42 

Meter Reading Salaries 6,977.60 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 913.94 

Salaries of General Officers 8,250.00 

Salaries of General Office Clerks 4,570.00 

General Office Expense 630.37 

Repairs to Gen. Office Str. & Equip 459.65 

General Expense 440.02 

Insurance 2,743.01 

Stationery & Printing 5.12 

Longevity & Annual & Sick Leave 13,618.01 

Retirement Fund Payments 8,743.95 

Stores Dept. & Shop E.xpenses 1,965.66 

Garage Expense 2,993.28 55,638.03 

Fixed Charges: 

Depreciation 48,440.85 

Taxes 39.07 48.479.92 



Total Operating Expenses 204,529.69 

Operating Income 48,268.23 

70 



Non-Opcratinfi Income: 

Iiicomt' from Invested Funds 
Miscellaneous Income 

Non-0))cratin^ Expense: 

Interest Expense 

Net Profit for the Year 



2,775.41 
1,206.77 



3,982.18 
52,250.41 

5,468.96 
46,781.45 



BALANCE SHEET-SANITARY SEWER FUND 



December 31, 1962 

ASSETS 
Fixed Assets: 

Land & Right of Way 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Customer Connections 

Sundry Equipment 

Unfinished Construction 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 

Deferred Engineering Charges: 

Current Assets: 

Due from Ceneral Fund 

Investments 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund 

Due from Special Assess. Fund— Trunk 
Sewer Cost 



38,274.97 

1,433,463.70 

113,796.69 

219,326.97 

9,107.45 

28.40 

1,813,998.18 
779,884.38 1,034,113.80 

11,678.40 

79,633.14 
27,557.83 
51,987.16 

3,298.00 162,474.13 



1,208,266.33 



LIABILITIES & FUNDS 

Long Tenn Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 

Share in Special Assessments 

Fund Balance ir Surplus: 

Municipal Investments 

Contributions in Aid of Construction . . . 

Surplus-Balance Jan. 1, 1962 246,831.90 

Net Profit for the Year, 1962 43,.322.11 



134,000.00 
41,757.78 175,757.78 

464,871.93 
277,482.58 

290,154.01 1,032,508.55 



1,208,266.33 



71 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS-SANITARY SEWER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1962 

OPERATING REVENUES 

Sewer Rents: 

General 63,816.15 

Industrial 22,997.38 86,813.53 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

General Operations, Admin, etc.: 

Main & Manhole Open Labor & Exp. . . 4,913.38 

House Conn. Oper. Labor & Exp 4,167.18 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains 3,098.49 

Maintenance of Manholes 1,735.50 

Misc. General Expense 88.29 

Meter Readint^ & Billinjf 2,608.95 

Employees Retirement Fund 966.81 17,578.60 

Depreciation: 22,479.04 40,057.64 

Operating Income 46,755.89 

Add Non-Operating Income: 

Interest on Investments 1,157.75 

47,913.64 
Deduct Non-Operating Expenses: 

Interest Expense 4,591.53 

Net Profit for the Year 43,322.11 



72 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 

July 10, 1963 

Certificate of Audit 

This is to certify that we have examined and audited the accounts and records 
of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1962. In our 
opinion, the Exhibits included herewith reflect the true financial condition of the 
City on December 31, 1962, together with the results of operations for the fiscal 
year ended on that date. 

Respectfuly submitted, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

O. Maurice Oleson) Auditors 

Lionel J. DeGrace ) 

Laurence M. Bean ) Accountants 

Frederick E. Laplante) 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 

July 10, 1963 

To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
Concord, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of an examination and audit of the accounts 
of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1962, which was 
made by this Division as requested. Exhibits as hereafter listed are included as 
part of the report. 

Scope of Audit 

The accounts and records of all city officials charged with the custody, 
receipt and disbursement of city funds were examined and audited. An exami- 
nation was made of a sufficient number of vouchers, payrolls and cancelled 
checks to satisfy the requirements of accepted standards of audit procedure. 
Receipts were checked by source insofar as possible. Book balances were veri- 
fied by comparison with reconciled bank balances made from statements ob- 
tained from depository banks. 

73 



Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accounts) —December 31, 1961— Decem- 
ber 31 A962: ( Exhibit A-1) 
Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accounts) for the fiscal years 

ended December 31, 1961 and December 31, 1962, are presented in Exhibit 

A-1. As indicated therein, the Surplus increased bv $40,534.15, from $72,033.19 

to $112,567.34, in 1962. 

Analysis of Change in Current Financial Condition: (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change in the current financial condition of the City 
during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors which caused the 
change indicated therein. These were as follows: 

Increase in Surphis 

Net Budget Surplus $99,693.65 

Decrease in Reserve Against Taxes Receivable 14,677.58 

Decrease in Reserve Against Accounts Receivable 5,092.47 

Decrease in Reserve Against Tax Deeded Property 186.63 



$119,650.33 



Decrease in Surphis 

Surplus Used to Reduce Tax Rate $72,000.00 

Increase in Reserve Against Stores' Account 7,109.58 

Cancelled Check Honored 6.60 



79,116.18 



Net Increase $40,534.15 

Decrease in Long Term Indebtedness: 

The long term indebtedness of the Citv (including Municipal, Water and 
Union School District indebtedness) decreased by $378,700.73 in 1962, as 
shown herewith: 





Long Term 


Bonds 


Bonds 


Long Term 




Debt 


& Notes 


& Notes 


Debt 




December 


Issued 


Retired 


December 




31, 1961 


in 1962 


in 1962 


31, 1982 


Municipal 


$1,697,587.00 


$116,470.00 


$275,843.00 


$1,538,214.00 


Water 


233,820 00 


14,190.00 


31,490.00 


216,520.00 


School (Union 










School District ) 


2,515,000.00 


-0- 


200,000.00 


2,315,000.00 


Airport Advance 










(Due State) 


20,819.89 


-0- 


2,027.73 


18,792.16 




$4,467,226.89 


$130,660.00 


$509,360.73 


$4,088,526.16 



Statement of Long Term Indebtedness: (Exhibit A-6) 

A statement of outstanding long term indebtedness as of December 31, 
1962, showing annual debt service requirements, is contained in Exhibit A-6. 

74 



Com{)aiafive Statciiicufs of Appropriations and Expenditures— Estimated and 

Actual Revenues: (Exhibits A-4 & A-5) 

Comparative statements of appropriations and expenditures, estimated and 
actual re\'enues for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1962, are presented in 
Exhibits A-4 and A-5. As indicated by the budget summary (Exhibit A-5), a 
revenue surplus of $17,279.42. plus unexpended balances of appropriations of 
$82,414.23, resulted in a net budget surplus of $99,693.65. 

Tax Collections: 

Tax collections (exclusive of State Head Taxes) of the current year's levy 
as compared to taxes assessed, for the years 1961 and 1962, were as follows: 

Levy of 1961 Percent Levy of 1962 Percent 

Taxes Assessed— Cur- 
rent Year's Levy $3,945,564.18 $4,324,125.57 

Taxes Collected— Cur- 
rent Year's Levy 3,507,863.18 88.9% $3,656,061.18 84.5% 

Taxes Abated— Cur- 
rent Year's Levy 12,932.02 .3% 25,448.15 .6% 

Uncollected Taxes- 
Current Year's Levy 424,768.98 10.8% 642,616.24 14.9% 



$3,945,564.18 100.0% $4,324,125.57 100.0% 



Conclusion: 

The provisions of Chapter 184 of the Laws of 1955, require that this re- 
port or the summary of findings and recommendations (letter of transmittal) 
shall be published in the next annual report of the City. 

We extend our thanks to the officials of the City of Concord and their 
office staffs for the assistance rendered during the course of the audit. 

Yours very truly, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 



O. Maurice Oleson) Auditors 
Lionel J- DeGrace ) 
Laurence M. Bean ) Accountants 
Frederick E. Laplante) 



75 



DIRECTORY OF CITY SERVICES 



Service 



Administration, General 

Airport (Maintenance) 

Ambulance 

Assessments 

Auditorium, Rental 

Auto Pennits 

Bic\cle Licenses 

Bciiiio Lici'nses 

Birth Certificates 

Bookmobile 

Building Permits 

Cemeteries 

City Council 

Civil Defense 

Dance Licenses 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Elections 

Engineering— City 

FIRE-CONCORD 

FIRE-PENACOOK 

Golf Course 

Health, Public 

Laboratory 

Legal Matters 

Library 

Maps, City 

Marriage Certificates 

Milk Licenses & Inspection 

Mortgages & Conditional Sales 

Oil Burner Inspection 

Old Age Assistance 

Ordinances & Resolutions 

Parks & Recreation 

Payments by City 

Personnel— City 

Planning 

Playgrounds 

Plumbing Permits 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Refuse Collection 

Relief 

Sanitation, Public 

Sewers 

Snow Plowing & Sanding 

Soldier's Relief 

Special Benefit Assessments 

Street Lights— Reported Out 

Street Maintenance 

Taxes— Payment of 

Trees, City 

Water— Service 

Water Bills— Payment of 

Weights & Measures 

Zoning Permits & Changes 

Welfare 



Department 

Mayor 

Engineering 

Police 

Assessors 

City Clerk 

Collector 

Police 

Police 

City Clerk 

Library 

Engineering 

Cemetery 

City Clerk 

Civil Defense 

Police 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

Engineering 

FIRE 

FIRE 

Recreation & Parks 

Health 

Health 

City Solicitor 

Library 

Engineering 

Records 

Health 

City Clerk 

Fire 

Welfare 

City Clerk 

Recreation & Parks 

Finance 

Personnel 

Planning 

Recreation & Parks 

Engineering 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Health 

Public Works 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Finance 

Concord Electric Co. 

Public Works 

Collector 

Engineering 

Water 

Collector 

Weights & Measures 

Engineering 

Welfare 



Phone 

225-3591 
224-1955 
225-3232 
224-0241 
224-0591 
224-4261 
225-3232 
225-3232 
224-0591 
225-2743 
224-1955 
225-3911 
224-0591 
224-4342 
225-3232 
224-0591 
224-0591 
224-0591 
224-1955 
225-3355 
753-6622 
224-0951 
224-0521 
224-0521 
225-3041 
225-2743 
224-1955 
224-0591 
224-0521 
224-0591 
225-3355 
224-1091 
224-0591 
224-0951 
225-2775 
225-3591 
224-1955 
224-0951 
224-1955 
225-3232 
225-3591 
224-0951 
224-1955 
224-1091 
224-0521 
224-1955 
224-1955 
224-1091 
225-2775 
225-3641 
224-1955 
224-4261 
224-1955 
225-5574 
224-4261 
225-2864 
224-1955 
224-1091 



For prompt attention 
for SERVICE dial the 
DEPARTMENT IN- 

VOLVED. If you are un- 
certain about where to 
call, dial the MAYOR'S 
OFFICE 225-3591 




Be sure to give your 
NAME AND ADDRESS 
as well as the NATURE 
OF THE REQUEST 
clearly. DO NOT HANG 
UP until you are sure 
that your MESSAGE 
HAS BEEN UNDER- 
STOOD.