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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

City of 
CONCORD 

New Hampshire 



1963 
ANNUAL REPORT 



!.07 
3 



City of 



'4 jp^ iP^U 



CONCORD 
New Hampshire 




ANNUAL REPORT 



MH 
C74 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Mayors Message 3 

City Go\ernment — 4 

City Boards 5 

Planning 6 

Engineering and Public Works .- 13 

Engineering Inspection 16 

Library 17 

Recreation and Parks 23 

Police - 27 

Municipal Court 31 

Fire 33 

Ci\il Defense 35 

Cemeteries 39 

Welfare 40 

Sanitary Inspection 41 

Health __ 43 

Records 43 

Elections 44 

Water _ 45 

Legal 47 

Collection ._ 49 

Assessing __ 51 

Finance — _ 52 

Ciertificate of Audit 79 

State Audit ..— 79 




City Hall 




FROM THE MAYOR'S OFFICE 

To THE Citizens of Concord: 

This annual city report continues the 
Mayor's responsibility ot keeping the 
citizens of Concord informed ol the 
functioning of their municipal gov- 
ernment. Its purpose is to place at 
their disposal a concise publication 
covering the many facets of city gov- 
ernment operation. 

The year 1963 was one of progress 
and many mimicipal improvements. 
Concord maintained a high standard 
of pid^lic service in providing for the 
safety, health and welfare needs of 
the community. Every municipal ex- 
penditiue was carefidly scrutinized to 
assure full value for each tax dollar 
spent. 

^, , ^ ^ . Because local government is closest to 

Mayor Charles E. Davie , i v • i ^^v,^ v-^.,.^« 

the people, it is perhaps more respon- 
sive to their demands and needs than any other level of government. It 
is much easier for citizens to see, understand and benefit from the services 
rendered by their city government. This being so. Concord's elected 
city officials and the various municijial departments ha\'e worked dili- 
gently to provide the many services which make the community a better 
place in which to live and work. 

While the role of city government is historically that of a strictly service 
or "housekeeping" agency, it is nevertheless true that in recent years the 
number, variety and complexity of municipal functions have increased 
markedly. This is especially so with respect to the trend toward federal 
involvement in urban affairs and in such areas as the workable program 
for community improvement, public housing and urban renewal pro- 
grams. In consequence of this trend. Concord stands at the threshold 
of far-reaching changes in the pattern of its urban development. 

Proper direction in meeting current municipal problems and in pro- 
moting sound future growth will require greater responsibility by the 
city government than ever before. This poses a challenge which Con- 
cord will gladly accept in achieving its goal of building a better com- 
munity life for its citizens. 

Once again it has been a pleasure to have had the opportunity to serve 
the citizens of Concord and to work with a cooperative Board of Alder- 
men and a dedicated group of city employees. 

Charles C. Davie 
Mayor 



CITY GOVERNMENT 



1963-1964 



MAYOR 
Charles C. Davie 

ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE 
Robert D. Branch 
William P. Gove 
Edna C. McKenna 
Winfield J. Phillips 
William A. Stevens 
David E. Tardif 



WARD ALDERMEN 



W^ard 1 John E. Walters 

W^ard 2 Karl G. Neuman 

Ward 3 George A. Stohrer, Jr 

Ward 4 Malcolm McLane 

Ward 5 Roland E. Fletcher 

Ward 6 Joseph C. Musmneci 

Ward 7 C. Edwin Howard 

Ward 8 William H. Perry 

Ward 9 Thomas B. Jennings 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS 



CEMETERY SUPERIN- 
TENDENT 
Edward L. Rowland 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Walter H. Carlson 

CITY ASSESSORS 
Raymond P. Daigle 
Robert W. Potter 
Nathan Wechsler 

CITY CLERK 
Arthur E. Roby 

CITY ENGINEER & SUPT. 
OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Howard E. Raymond 

CITY LIBRARIAN 

Lois R. Markey 

CITY SOLICITOR 

Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Richard D. Brodeiu- 

DIRECTOR OF WELFARE 
Gertrude E. Watkins 



ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Verne F. Santas, Jr. 

FIRE CHIEF 

Duncan M. Murdoch 

HEALTH OFFICER 
Dr. William W. Frost, Jr. 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Donald Matson, Judge 
Francis E. Perkins, Assoc. Judge 
Marie MacPhail, Clerk 

OVERSEER OF POOR 
Edward H. York 

PERSONNEL AND PUR- 
CHASING DIRECTOR 

Thomas S. Pingree 

PLANNING DIRECTOR 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

POUND KEEPER 
Charles C. Hoagland 

PROBATION OFFICER 

James Ceriello 



RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Robert H. Ayer 

SANITARY INSPECTOR 
George A. Hill 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES 
Harold G. Fletcher 



TAX COLLECTOR 

George West 

TREASURER 
Violet P. Constant 

WATER SUPERINTENDENT 
G. Arthur Faneuf 



CITY BOARDS 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY 
BOARD 

Robert J. Jewell 
James D. Bell 
John H. Symonds 

BOARD OF PLUMBING 
EXAMINERS 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
George E. Yovnig 
Earl A. Banks 

TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS 

Violet P. Constant 
Richard G. Williamson 
Robert M. Beyer 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
\Villiam W. Frost, Jr., M.D. 
W. D. Penhale, M.D. 
T. J. Halligan, M.D. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 

Lt. Gen. Edward Brooks 
Warren H. Greene 
Pasqiiale Rufo 
Dudley W. Orr 
John Swenson 
Douglas N. Everett 
Ex-Officio: 
(Jharles C. Davie, Mayor 
Howard E. Raymond, 

City Engineer 
Robert D. Branch, Alderman- 

at-large 



ZONING BOARD OF 
ADJUSTMENT 
Donald G. Rainie 
Enoch Shenton. II 
Allan V. Evans 
Roy V. Lang 
Frank J. Preston 

BOARD OF APPEALS 
Arnold Perreton 
Everett Munson 
Carroll Garland 
Robert A. Foster 
William Johns 

BOARD OF LIBRAR^ 
TRUSTEES 
Chester G. Larson, Chairman 
Mrs. Mary Farnum 
Mrs. Mildred T. Melvin 
J. Bernard Halligan 
James Lynch 
Atlee F. Zellers 
Mrs. Nyleen Morrison 
Mrs. Walter S. Newton 
\V. Duer Thompson 

BOARD OF REVISION OF 
ASSESSMENTS 
Verne F. Santas, Jr., Chairman 
Howard E. Raymond 
Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 
James A. Taylor 
Archie N. Gourlev 



PLANNING DEPARTMENT 

Major ThoroiigJifare Plan — Adoj^ted a Major Thoroughlare Plan, one 
of the essential elements ot a comprehensive plan lor the City of Concord, 
as a guide to the orderly develojjment of major streets in the city and its 
environs. 

Community Faciiities Plan — Authorized the preparation of a Com- 
miniity Facilities Plan required under the Workable Program for Com- 
munity Improvement, and interviewed planning consultants for the 
purpose of selecting a competent firm to prepare this important element 
of the city's master plan. 

Applied for an urban planning assistance grant from the Housing and 
Home Finance Agency to iniderwrite a portion of the cost of preparing 
the plan. 

Workable Proo^ram — At the request of the Mayor, prepared an apjilica- 
tion for recertification of the Workable Program for Community 
Improvement for submission to the Housing and Home Finance Agency. 

Neighborhood Analyses — Conducted an analysis of Concord Neighbor- 
hoods and published the results in a report entitled "Neighborhood 
Analyses, Concord, New Hampshire," an element of the Workable 
Program for Comminiity Inq^rovement. 

Urban Rencival — Recommended to the Board of Aldermen that the 
Concord Housing Authority be designated the Relocation Housing 
Agency for the City of Concord. 

Recommended that the Concord Housing Authority be designated as the 
city's Urban Renewal Agency. 

General Neighborhood Renewal Plan — Recommended favorable action 
by the Board of Aldermen on submission of an ajjjilication by the Con- 
cord Housing Authority to the Urban Renewal Administration for the 
allocation of survey and planning funds for the preparation of a Gen- 
eral Neighborhood Renewal Plan covering the downtown section of the 
city proper. 

Recommended that the City make funds available to the Authority for 
the preparation of a General Neighborhood Renewal Plan. 

Streets — Recommended acceptance of 2,930 feet of new street as fol- 
lows: Dover Street — 950 feet. Canton Street — 800 feet. Partridge Road 
— 600 feet. Chase Street — 240 feet. Jay Drive — 170 feet, all located on 
Concord Plains, and Dubois Avenue in the central business district — 170 
feet. 



Recommended relocation of portions of Columbus Aacuuc, Old Turn- 
j)ike Road and Little Pond Road. 

Proposed the widening of a portion of Pleasant Street to create a decelera- 
tion lane at the entrance to Concord Hospital. Also approved widenings 
on Low Avenue at its intersection with Dubois Avenue, and at the inter- 
section of Eastman and Shawmut Streets in East Concord. 

Favored releasing three dedicated ways from public servitude as follows: 
Sheaff Street and Suncook Street off Sheep Davis Road on Concord 
Plains, and a proposed street easterly oft lower South Street in the south- 
end section. 

Favored adoption of city policy permitting construction of superstruc- 
tures from one building to another over the city alley system where such 
facilities represent orderly community development. 

Opposed granting a petition to reconstruct Appleton Street, a dead-end 
country road, in East Concord. 

Recommendetl street name changes at the newly relocated intersection 
of South Main Street, Broadway and Wiggin Street. 




City Planner Gustaf H. Lehtinen ivith tourists from 
Pennsylvania. 



Mopped Lines of Future Streets — Mapped ihe lines of iuture streets 
for a 900-acre triangular section of Black Hill boinicled by Manchester 
Street, Old 7 urnpike Road and Airport Road. 

Mapped the lines of a proposed circumferential highway connecting 
Pleasant Street and Rumford Street northerly of the city proper. 

Mapped the location of proposed streets in the area bounded by East 
Side Drive, Loudon Roacl, Ormond Street and the Sugar Ball Embank- 
ment on Concord Plains. 

Sidezvalks — Recommended construction of a half-mile-long hard- 
surfaced sidewalk along Columbus Avenue and Penacook Street leading 
from the new Bishop Brady High School to the north-end area at Rinn- 
ford Street. 

Recommended construction of 800 feet of hard-surfaced sidewalk on 
lower South Street from Rockingham Street to a point opposite Moore- 
land Avenue. 

Traffic Control — Recommended widening of traveled way of Pitman 
Street to facilitate traffic How on this narrow downtown street. 

Proposed the construction of traffic islands on North Spring Street at 
Washington Street, and on Old Turnjjike Road at Manchester Street. 

Favoretl establishing one-way traffic in a westerly direction on Union 
Street in Penacook. 

Approved establishing stop intersections at the following locations: 
Dubois Avenue at Storrs Street in the central business district, North 
Spring Street at Washington Street, Cohmibus Avenue at Auburn Street 
and at Penacook Street, and the Bishop Brady High School driveway at 
Auburn Street. 

Approved establishing yield right of way intersections on South Ciutis- 
\ ille Road at Portsmouth Street. 

Recommended that Dubois Avenue from North Main Street to Low 
Avenue be closed to vehicidar traffic and made a pedestrian walk. 

On-Street and Ofj-Street Parking — Recommended that one-hoiu" park- 
ing be substituted for unlimited parking on North Main Street between 
Franklin and Bouton Streets. 

Recommended that parking be prohibited at all tiines on the newly- 
constructed jjortion of Dubois Avenue between Low Avenue and Storrs 
Street. 



Recommended tliat ilie Bridge Street and North Main Street passways 
leading to the Bridge Street miniiciixd parking lot be made one-way 
streets for in-bound traffic. 

Opposed proj3osed changes in traffic patterns at the entrance to the 
supermarket located at North State and Penacook Streets, and recom- 
mended imjMoved officer control to lacilitate traffic movements at this 
location. 

Found that a free-token jiarking plan proposed by downtown merchants 
was not practical for C^oncord at this time, and recommended that the 
petitioners be given leave to withdraw their petition. 

Cooperated with the Greater Concord Chamber of Commerce and its 
Parking Committee in sinveying downdown parking procedures and 
needs. Recommended a stepped-up enforcement program to discovnage 
"meter-stuffing" by parkers working in the downtown area, erection of 
directional and site signs to guide parkers to the city's three central 
business district parking lots, and adoption of policy encouraging pri- 
vate investors to provide parking facilities in the downtown area. 

Utilities — ]Vater Systo?! — Advised favorable action on seven petitions 
recjuesting extension of the mimicipal water system totaling 7,325 feet 
of water main as follows: Portsmouth Street, East Concord — 350 and 
2,200 feet. East Side Drive, East Concord — 900 feet, Hutchins Street, 
"West Concord — 150 feet, Sewalls Falls Road, West Concord — 300 
and 825 feet, and Garvins Falls Road, Black Hill — 2,(iOO feet. 

Opposed proposed water main extensions in Moimtain Road and Apple- 
ton Street at East Concord due to lack of economic justification for 
sizable expenditmes involved in system expansion to serve these remote 
locations. 

Utilities — Sanitary Sewer System — Recommended four extensions of 
the sanitary sewer system totaling 1,180 feet of main as follows: East Side 
Drive, East Concord — 580 feet, Chase Street, CJoncord Plains — 240 
feet, Branch Tinnpike, Concord Plains — 160 feet, and Hutchins Street, 
West Concord — 200 feet. 

Recommended that a 350-foot section of the sanitary sewer in East Side 
Drive at East Concord be relaid to permit the orderly easterly extension 
of the system to the vicinity of East Sugar Ball Road. 

Utilities — Storm Sewer System — Favored the granting of a petition to 
extend the Concord Plains storm sewer system 320 feet to serve the resi- 
dential development on Dudley Drive. 

Opposed a petition to re-route the proposed High Street trunk storm 
sewer to accommodate private drainage currently served by the Franklin 
Street storm sewer system. 



Recommended that a proposal to cover Bow Brook by constructing 
a large storm sewer from the vicinity of Clinton Street to Noyes Street 
be indefinitely postponed. 

Airport — Favored submitting a proposal to the Federal Aviation Agency 
to house personnel and equipment of its New England area Flight 
Inspection District Office at the Concord Municipal Airport. 

Land Trausactious — Recommended an amendment to the ordinance 
regulating sale of tax-deeded property which woidd give the Board of 
Aldermen greater authority in the conveyance of such property. 

Reviewed property acquired in non-payment of taxes in 1963 to deter- 
mine possible present or future public use of this property. 

Recommended that the City of Concord look with favor on a Y.M.C.A. 
request to occupy city land for building expansion above passway leading 
to the rear of the Central Fire Station. On later request by the Y.M.C.A., 
recommended that the Mayor be authorized to enter into negotiations 
with Y officials to finalize plans to convey fire station land to the associa- 
tion for expansion of its building on condition that all relocation costs 
incurred by the City be underwritten by the Y.M.C.A. 




Laxorence Deyinen, custodian at City Hall, at new lighting control 
console at City Auditorium. 



10 



Ap]:)rovecl the granting of an exj^anded pole-line right of way to the 
local electric utility over city lantl easterly of South Main Street in the 
south-end area. 

Recommended that a parcel of city-owned land with a 2,450-foot front- 
age on Airport Road be withheld from sale imtil such time as mimicipal 
sanitary sewer facilities are installed in said road. 

Opposed licensing use of city land on North Main Street for ice vending 
machine on grounds that granting of such a license woidd set a j^oor 
l^recedent. 

Recommended that a site for a proposed Concord Plains fire station be 
acquired at the corner of Loudon Road and Newton Avenue. 

Zoning — Recommended favorable action on an ordinance amending the 
zoning map to establish a 60-acre apartment house district on C^oncord 
Plains. 

Recommended the re/oning of the a)jpro\ed portion of the Hillcrest 
Park sid^division on Concortl Plains from an agricullmal to a single 
residence district. 

Recommended that a 24-acre area bordering exjjressway and railroad 
facilities off Hall Street in the south-end section be rezoned for heavy 
industrial uses. 

Ojjposed a zoning amendment that would have permitted certain types 
of signs for religious, fraternal organizations and service clubs in all 
zoning districts. 

Authorized the planning director to appear in opj^osition to the granting 
of a zoning variance permitting the location of a public utility service 
building on East Side Drive in an area reserved for single-family 
residence in the land use plan. 

Subdivision Approval — Approved the preliminary plat of the 64-Iot 
Palazzi Corporation subdivision located northerly of Centre Street in 
the West-end. 

Approved the application of Roger W. Guay for a redesign of the pre- 
liminary plat of the 82-lot Hillcrest park subdivision on East Side Drive 
at Concord Plains. 

Voted final apjjroval of a 13-Iot section of Hillcrest Park. 

Voted final approval of a six-lot section of the Roger W. Guay sub- 
division located northerly of Mooreland Avenue on Meadow Street in 
the south-end section of the city proper. 

11 



Codes — Recommended that the City of Concord seek enabling legisla- 
tion at the 1963 session of the General Court permitting municipalities 
to adoj)t nationally-recognized fire jjrevention codes by reference. Sup- 
ported passage of this legislation. 

Supported passage of legislation j:)ermitting miuiicipalities to adopt 
nationally-recognized mobile homes and travel trailer construction stan- 
dards by reference. 

Appointed an advisory committee to assist in preparation of a building 
code amendment adopting a fire prevention code. 

In response to a request made by the Board of Aldermen, prepared a 
schedule of proposed fees for building, electrical and plumbing permits. 

Other Activities — Recommended favorable action by the Board of 
Aldermen on a resolution relative to the use of granite in the exterior 
construction of the jjroposed post office - court house - building. 

Recommended favorable action by the Board of Aldermen on a resolu- 
tion relative to providing a pidolic way between South and South Spring 
Streets at the site of the proposed new federal building, said resolution to 
be directed to the Administrator of the General Services Administration. 

Prepared jMans for reallocating sjKice in CAiy Hall occuj^ied by the 
Records, Assessing and Water Dei:)artments, and recommended remodel- 
ing space at the water works j^umping station on North State Street for 
office use by the Water Department. 

Recommended that the City of Concortl refrain from underwriting a 
share of the production cost of a motion picture. Concord, Capital City, 
which is oriented toward business and industry. 

Conducted annual surveys of housing vacancies and utilization of vacant 
land for biulding construction on streets served by all essential municipal 
facilities. 



12 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

Public Works — This year was another year of general growth in Con- 
cord. There were many new projects that required attention ot the 
Public Works and Engineering Dejjartments in addition to our routine 
maintenance items. Three large projects were the new high school, the 
technical school and the new state office building. These all required 
streets, sanitary sewers, storm drainage, snow removal, refuse removal, 
engineering and all miuiicipal services. 

Highways — - Our highway maintenance program resurfaced 46 miles of 
streets in the north and west end. hi addition we hard surfaced with 
emulsion stabilization on Island Road, Hot Hole Pond Road, Batchelder 
Mill Road, Wier Road and Sandquist Street for a total of I1/2 miles. 
We built Columbus Avenue from Auburn Street to Penacook Street. 

Sideivalks — We continued our sidewalk maintenance program by re- 
surfacing 3300 sqviare yards of sidewalks in the South End area. In addi- 
tion we laid 260 feet of granite curb and built traffic islands at West and 
Broadway. Our concrete sidewalk program consisted of building a walk 
from W^arren to School Streets out the east side of North State Street. 




Opening frozen sewer at Chase and Drew 

Streets. David Feathers and Watson Burk 

on truck. 



13 



Bridges — Our bridge maintenance jMogram consisted of painting 
the small bridges throughout the city as necessary. In the legislature an 
act was passed to turn "three of our bridges on state highways back to 
the state. They are two bridges on Clinton Street at Turkey Pond and 
the bridge on the Mountain Road over Hackett Brook. 

Trees — The Dutch Elm problem is still with us. We removed nearly 
100 elm trees this year. In addition, we are losing many maples. We re- 
moved 202 stumps during the year and still have many stumps through- 
out the city. 

Our flowering tree program is in its second year. This year we planted 
150 new small trees. We lost about 5()'''^ due to the unusual dry weather. 

Oiu- roadside brush control is becoming very acceptable. We have the 
roadsides under control to the point that our spraying is only s}wt spray- 
ing and is not objectionable. In fact our country roads are in better con- 
dition now than our residential streets. 

Toxvn Forest — In our town forest program we are rej^lanking the Mem- 
orial Field Stadium for the Recreation Department. This will utilize our 
own lumber and provide a considerable saving to the city. 




Abiuido)ied Toof Laundry well now part of Durghi 

Street Municipal Parking Lot. Harvard Scientists 

checking temperature of earth's crust. 

14 



Refuse — Our weekly refuse collection for the entire city is progressing 
very well. The container system is relieving us of much labor in the clown 
town area. The cost of refuse collection and (lisj:)Osal for the year is ap- 
proximately SI 2.00 per residence. 

Engineeritio; Departnioit — The Engineering Department was engaged 
in many new projects this year, from a swimming pool at West Concord, 
the Memorial Park Stadium, the Technical School development, to 
Columbus Avenue, to records and maintenance. The value of the out- 
side projects was as great as the engineering salaries for the year. 

We continued our routine records for streets, .sewers, assessor's maps, 
buildings, etc. Our sewer records are in better condition than they have 
ever been, yet yearly we continue to find errors or omissions. We are 
averaging completion of a street layout return a month, but we still 
have about a himdred miles to go. W^e are establishing the state co- 
ordinate system of smveying in Concord. We are the first community 
to use the system in the state although it is in wide use in other areas. 
The coordinate system will provide much more precise work in future 
years. 




Penacook Rescue Squad personnel joined 
with Police, Fire and Public Works to free 
PW employee caught in packer. Fireman 
Dana Morrison, left, and Rescue Ralph San- 
ders, Jr., right, assist Fireman Joe Wescott 
and Rescue Weldon Hoyt in back of truck. 
Rescue equipment used to free victim. 

15 



ENGINEERING INSPECTION 

There was continued expansion in all jjhases of construction and build- 
ing activities, especially in new housing imits, dining the past year. It 
should be jjointed out that building, housing, electrical, plumbing and 
zoning laws for the control of building operations and land use are not 
regidations that our government seeks to impose on its citizens, but rather 
are in response to demands from people to their government to guaran- 
tee their safety and protect health during the large part of their lives 
spent in buildings in which they live and work. 

Most of these laws are of a technical natme, based on sound engineering 
practice, constantly being changed through scientific advances, and 
require alertness on the part of the administrative officer. 
Major construction projects completed during 1963 were the State Office 
Building, the new Records and Archives Building for the State of New 
Hampshire, Concord Hospital alterations and Bishop Brady Higli School. 
Permits issued during the year consisted of Lexington Manor, Inc., 72 
unit ajiartment, Sprague Electric Company addition, Concortl Housing 
Authority for the Elderly, Penacook, and three housing developments — 
one each off East Side Drive, Pembroke Road and Airport Road. 

The estimated cost of tonstiuction for 1963 was as follows: 

Total Valuation of New Work S^.O'jIi.OOL' 

Total Valuation of Additions and Alterations 821. OK) 

Total estimated cost of Construction ,1$2,877,()4S 

53 Permits for New Housing Units — Estimated Cost $1. 695.200 

363 Permits for other buildings — Estimated Cost .'151,181.848 

Permits issued during the year as follows: 

Building Permits 416 

Plumbing Permits 1 25 

Electrical Permits (Changes, additions & new service) 800 

Sign Permits (including billboards) 77 

Razing of Dilapidated Buildings (including those 

taken for public improvements) 32 

Moving of Buildings 2 

In addition the following miscellaneous inspections were made: 

Building Inspections 953 

Sign Inspections 258 

Trailer Inspections 78 

Plumbing Inspections . _. 392 

Electrical Inspections 1 936 

Zoning Inspections 1 89 

Housing Code Inspections 235 



16 



CITY LIBRARY 

Books and Materials — During the past year 6,179 books were added to 
the library making a total of 107,531 books in the collection, of which 
21,491 are for children below the seventh grade. This represents slightly 
more than four books per capita. There are now 979 recordings in the 
library, as well as 319 magazines and newspapers. Borrowers used 319,345 
items in 1963, which represents a circidation of twelve items per capita. 
Nineteen framed prints and 300 films are available for loan. 

Buildings and Equipment — A new look, warm and welcoming, greets 
the eye as one enters the library. In the area formerly dominated by the 
circidation desk with its apparent "busyness", one sees, arranged on a 
red rug, comfortable chairs of Danish design, in olive-green, blue-black, 
and beige. A folding screen of pegboard separates this lounge area from 
the office beyond and serves as display space for a few attractive books 
and pictmes. 

Patrons are registered and books charged from a small compact counter 
to the left. A discharge desk has been built into the area originally 
intended for a cloakroom. A part of the wall between this area and the 
vestibule has been replaced with sliding glass panels; two slots permit 
return of books from the vestibule, and a third from the outside of the 
building. Beneath each slot is a book truck especially designed to collect 
and hold these materials, without damage. In addition to their aesthetic 
and psychological value, these changes provide additional space for 
leismely reading. 

Installation of better lighting fixtures throughout the building, begun 
in 1962, has continued in 1963. 

Changes in facilities for children also provide additional space needed 
for books and patrons: Conversion of the children's librarian's office to a 
reference room, also housing a special sixth-grade collection; replacing the 
catalog along the wall with a new free-standing case, making the wall area 
available for shelving; replacing window seats with book shelves, capping 
them with colorfid, durable formica; installation of a new check-out 
desk. 

Fmniture was repainted, and sent to Penacook Branch, where walls and 
floors were refinished and bulletin boards added. 

Services — 1963 circidation figures, indicating a gain of 12,500 (4i4 per- 
cent) over 1962, highest in the library's history, represent to some extent, 
the increased use of the library's resoiaxes; but they cannot measure the 
extent to which reference and advisory services have grown in quantity, 
complexity, and diversity. 

17 




A preschool story hour in the Library. 



During the day, a telej^hone call may bring a request for material to be 
put aside, for easier selection dining a patrons limch hour, or it may be 
an inquiry such as "Where can I rent a typewriter with the Turkish 
alphabet?", "How can I find a camp for my diabetic child? ' or "What 
term of address should I use for a Supreme Court Judge?" 

In addition to adults, high school and college students come from an 
ever widening area; this is especially true during evening hours and on 
Saturdays. It has been exciting to see these students develop initiative 
and imagination in the use of library materials. 

With the cooperation of WKXL, the C^oncord Monitor, and the Manches- 
ter Union, the library has publicized its special services and programs. 
Thimib-nail book reviews and annoimcements were taped, and released 
at intervals dining the broadcasting day; articles on books and reading, 
written by staff members, have appeared in the Monitor each week, along 
with a list of new books and records. The Concord Chamber of Com- 
merce has included in its monthly Newsletter information on books and 
programs of special interest to business men. 

By way of keeping the public informed, the library has had these forms 
mimeographecl or printed for distribution: 

18 



1. Letter and flier on the Concord Public Library Foundation. 

2. Catalog of films available for loan. 

3. Children's film programs, October-December 1963 and 

January-April 1964. 

4. Adult film program for 1963-1964. 

5. Summer Hours and "What the Library Has to Ofter, June- 

September 1963." 

6. Booklets containing synopses of more than 300 films owned by 

the North Country Libraries Film Cooperative. 

A new book plate designed by Mel Bolden is being used as new materials 
are processed. 

New ventures in adidt education were planned and carried out in 1963, 
in response to popular demand. Early in the year, the librarian began a 
series of weekly lessons on how to use the library. This group became a 
nucleus for a Wednesday morning book discussion group starting the 
following November. Many of the discussions are based on the INVITA- 
TION TO LEARNING series sponsored by the American Library 
Association. Through the cooperation of WKXL, these discussions on 
current books were taped at the studio. The library now has them ready 
for use at any time a discussion leader wishes to use them. 

Films — Augmenting with free sponsored films the titles available 
through the North Coimtry Libraries Film Cooperative, the library 
planned an hour-long program for adults each Tuesday evening. 

The Friends of the Library sponsored foin- outstanding films for family 
viewing at the auditorium. 

439 films were loaned to organizations during the year. 

Films were also used for a weekly program of the children's department 
on Saturday mornings for grades 4-6, and, once each month, lent variety 
to the Wednesday afternoon story hour for yoimger children. 

Other programs of the children's department included: a series of six 
classes for preschool children and their mothers, in the spring and again 
in the fall: school visits and talks to parents and other groups: a sum- 
mer reading program stressing cpiality and individual interests, rather 
than number of books read; story hours during the summer at the city's 
playgrounds; and cooperation with Girl Scout troops in meeting require- 
ments for reading, story-telling, and other badges. 

Print Collection — Interest in the framed print collection has mush- 
roomed since its small beginning in 1962 with a group of eighteen fine 
reproductions donated by the Friends of the Librar). Learning that 
the available prints are reserved for as much as two years ahead, the 
Friends of the Library group has ordered more prints. 

19 




The New Look in the Library. 

Music Room — During 1963, all materials in the Ruth May Music Room 
have been cataloged. These gifts of the Concord Music Club include 25 
books on music, 20 scores of musicals and symphonies, and 280 fine 
recordings. To help music lovers in selecting records, the jackets have 
been color-tabbed for identification by type — s)mphony, chamber music, 
opera, vocal, etc. A roster kept at the Readers Advisor desk indicates an 
average of fifty persons use the room each month, with greatest interest 
evidenced dining college vacations. 

Exhibits — Outstanding display of the year was the April exhibit called 
"Paris", on loan from the French Cultinal Coiuiselor in New York. This 
included a hinidred beautiful books and brochures. 

Interlibrary Loan — Interlibrary loan records indicate a 26% gain o\er 
1962, with 424 items loaned and 179 borrowed. 



Concord Public Library Fou)iclatio)i — Brochures and letters sent to 
individuals and business firms have brought some gifts for the Concord 
Public Library Foundation, established in 1962 to foster donations for 
specific needs and programs not available on the regular library budget. 

20 




Cloak Room remodeled for the return of hooks at the City Library. 



Personnel — In addition to the librarian's participation in professional 
organizations, members of the staff and board of trustees serve as officers 
and committee members in local, state, and national organizations. Stalf 
members" activity in local cultural and recreational j)rograms provides 
contacts with potential resource persons as well as j^atrons. 



21 




Boys enjoying craft project during summer playground 

program. 



\ '■ 




Skating at one of the eight neighborhood rinks maintained 
by the Department. 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

Municipal recreation has been one ot the fast growing services of muni- 
cipal government in recent years. Today the demand, and need, is appar- 
ent in all age groups — senior citizens, family groups, unmarried adults, 
teen-agers, and children. Your city Recreation and Parks Department 
has tried to keep up with the demand by providing facilities, leadership, 
and programs. 

RECREATION ACTIVITIES 

Personjiel — Two full-time supervisors, twenty-one summer playground 
and pool instructors, over twenty part-time and volunteer leaders. 

Children and Yotitli Programs Offered — Two play schools for ages 
three and four, midget football, neighborhood square dances, open 
house program East Concord Commiuiity Center, oj^en house program 
Penacook Youth Center, pee wee and bantam hockey leagues, figure and 
ice dancing lessons, organ class, ski classes, boys' basketball program, 
tennis lessons, golf lessons, games periods, and softball games. Attendance 
14,405. 

Adult Programs Offered — Western Square Dance class, women's physical 
fitness class, women's ten-pin bowling, women's candle-pin bowling, 
woodworking class, sewing class, organ class, women's basketball, men's 
industrial basketball league, men's industrial softball, tennis clinic, 
housewives' golf, and indoor golf lessons for men and women. Attend- 
ance 9,321. 




Children swimming at one of the department's seven 
sivimming pools. 

23 



Sufntncr Fhiyii;r()ii}ids and Pools — A ten-week program was conducted at 
ele\en jjlaygroimds and seven jjools including programs of games, sjjort 
toinnaments, crafts, swimming instruction and competition, trips, story- 
telling and dramatics, and special events. 

Attendance: Playgrounds 54,097; Pools, 87,266 

Year-Round Special Events Offered — \\'inter Carnival events; ski meet, 
skating events, sled races, hockey games, c]ueen coronation and dance; 
Easter egg himt. Benson's Animal Farm trijj, square dance festivals, ski 
and skate exchange, Halloween parties and Jack O'Lantern ball, band 
concerts, Foiuth of Jidy fireworks, Bear Brook trip, teen trip, Simset 
Clid3 simimer trips, sidewalk art show. Rotary swim meet, state swim 
meet, water ballet and talent show, Jimior Champ track meet, and the 
Peanut Carnival. Attendance 24,172. 

Coinnnniity Center — Programs offered October 1 through April SO. 

Children and Youth Program — Open hotise }jrograms for all ages, 
jimior i^adminton, judo, children's art, teen dances, basketl^all leagues, 
chess clidj, youth activities council, boys' model airplane club, childrens 
modern dance class, youth theater, gym classes, J^ing pong tournaments. 

Adtilt Programs — Industrial basketball league, judo, casein painting, 
oil painting, creative design class, co-ed badminton, bridge class, women's 
basketball, Simset Club for senior citizens, women's physical fitness class. 
Attendance 26,880. 

Attendance — Skating Attendance — White Park Pond, 58,110; Neigh- 
borhood rinks (8) , "f 0,000; White Park hockey rink, 12,000. The 
attendance is based on peak counts taken three times a day. Total at- 
tendance of programs both indoor and outdoor in facilities oj^erated 
and maintained by the department was estimated at 302,148. This 
does not include non-schedule walk-on use of parks or attendance of 
organized grouj3s using oiu' facilities for their programs. 

Golf Course Operation — For the fourth )ear in a row the revenue at the 
Beaver Meadow Municipal Course exceeded operating expenses. The 
excess in 1963 was $1,832.11. Daily tickets sold in 1963 were 5,652. 
Season membership: Adult 203, special 34, junior 66, total 303. Estimated 
individual rounds played by daily fee and season ticket players were 
36,500 which comj^ares with 36,205 rounds in 1962. 

Areas and Facilities Maintained — Beaver Meadow Golf Course, Mem- 
orial Athletic Field; Rolfe, Rollins, and White Parks; Doyen, Fletcher- 
Murphy, Garrison, Hall Street, Heights, Kimball, Thompson, and West 
Street Playgrounds; White Park Administration Building and Garage, 
West Street Ward House, East Concortl Community Center, Community 
Center, seven swimming and two wading pools, White Park skating pond 

24 



and hockey rink, eight other neighborhood rinks, and over fifteen other 
small park, monument and roadside areas. 

Groups Using DeptirtDwnt luuilitics — Over 450 organized groups both 
adult and youth groups used the department's indoor and outdoor 
facilities in 1963. This represents over 35 different groups each month. 

Major Capital Improvefnents 1963 — New shower and locker facilities at 
the Commtmity Center, White Park garage addition, Grandstand 
reconstruction at Memorial Field, Hockey Rink improvements (light- 
ing) at White Park, Kimball Playground improvements (fencing) and 
installation of new playground equipment on Hall Street Playgroimd. 




Soccer game at Merrill Playground. 



25 




Don Hulbert has WKXL "Coffee Chat" with Police Chief Walter Carlson. 




Captain Daniel Abbott, CD Attack Warning Officer, receives 

severe weather alert at Police Headquarters from U. S. 

Weather Bureau. Alert then fans out to all city emergency de- 

partynents, Civil Defense and Penacook Rescue. 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Parking Meters — A sum ot 852,023.69 was collected from parking 
meters during 1963 compared with $57,159.03 in 1962 and a total of 
19,049 collected in parking fines. The drop from 1962 to 1963 is par- 
tially due to the fact that the Capital Shopping Center is open to un- 
limited free public parking. Furthermore the State moved about 400 
employees to another location outside the downtown area. This move 
considerably diminished the demand for parking in the metered section 
of North State Street. 

The cost of repairing meter j)arts during 1963 was S347.36 and there were 
a total of 2,767 meters repaired comjxired with 3,933 in 1962. This may 
be partially explained by the fact that a new-type meter is being used on 
Warren Street (the Duncan type meter) which recjuires little or no main- 
tenance other than cleaning. 

At the present time there are 1,169 meters in operation in the City of 
Concord. 

Traitiiug Prograin — Two officers completed a two-week special inves- 
tigation course on "Investigation Procedures" during the month of Febru- 
ary. 

Six officers successfully completed a 16-week course on "Criminal and 
Accident Investigation" during the month of February. 

A fotn-week training school for new recruits was started in March under 
the direction of Chief Carlson. 

A total of 19 members of this department completed a six-week typing 
course at Concord High School. 

Two officers completed a two week training school during the month 
of May held in Durham. Two officers completed a sixteen week course 
on "Criminal Law." One officer completed a two week training course 
on "Police Administration." Others attended a "Training Seminar" at 
the American Mutual Insinance Company, an FBI firearms training 
course; a sixteen week evening course on "Police Supervision" and 
"Criminal Investigation and Case Preparation" at Northeastern Univer- 
sity, a sixteen week course on "Police Interrogation," a three week train- 
ing course in general police work sponsored by the State Police, N. H. 
Police Chiefs Assoc, and the F. B. I. in Concord. 

Miscellaneous — The annual city census got under way April 1st, with 
completion being made in record breaking time of 897 man hours com- 
l^ared with last year's 950 man hours. Total figures revealed an increase 
in population of 444 persons over 1962. 

27 




Police Skin-diving School. 



The Merrimack River was oj^ened to boating on Jul) 18th, 1963 after 
a public launching ramp had been installed by the Public Works Depart- 
ment. Chief Carlson was in charge of the grand opening. 

There were two testimonial banquets held at the Police Boys Club for 
two fellow employees who retired during 1963. One in January for the 
late Sergeant Francis Sullivan, who retired after having been with this 
department 28 years. The other testimonial was in October for Lieu- 
tenant Mark Casey who had served 33 years as a regular member of the 
Concord Police Department. 

Emergency Activities — A total of 28 regular, special and reserve police 
were used during the protracted Winsor Hotel Fire on North Main 
Street on September 24, 1963. By controlling traffic, evacuating the 
building, keeping citizen observers out of the danger area and administer- 
ing oxygen to some firemen who were bothered by smoke inhalation, 
personal injury and property damage were kept to a minimum. 

A delegation of 20 men from this department particijjated in the Mem- 
orial services for our late President of the Unitetl States, John Fitzgerald 
Kennedy, who was assassinated on November 22, 1963. The service was 
held at the State House Plaza on Monday, November 25th. 

28 




Officer Philbrick irispecting bicycles at Walker School. 

Officer Philbrick is at this time inspecting Mark Diissaiilt's 

bicycle. 



Boys Club and Camp Andrews — A complete cleaning job was done at 
the Boys Club in preparation for the September opening. A new stn- 
face was put on the gym floor and the back exit stairs on the west side 
of the biulding were redone. 

Three groups of boys (the Midgets, the Juniors, and the Intermediates) 
particijjated in 18 schedided basketball games during 1963. All three 
age groups particij^ated in the tournament held in (^laremont at the 
Goodwin Community Center. The Midgets and junior age group both 
won first place trophies. 

Two separate Christmas parties for the boys were held in December, 
one for 8th grade and imder and the other for older boys. These were 
served in the form of a buffet-type turkey supper. Movies and enter- 
tainment were furnished after the meals. A total of 145 boys attended. 

|u\enile Officer James Ceriello, Director of the Police Boys Clid3 was 
selected as the winner of the State Jaycees Leadershijj Medalion Award 

29 



in November. Officer Ceriello was chosen from a field of eight outstand- 
ing cancUdates for the State-wide lionor. 

Camp Andrews in Danbiny was operated for tlie tliird consecutive year 
as a full scale simimer camp for boys. The program was divided into four 
periods of two weeks each for 36 boys, thus making it possible for 144 
boys to participate in the program. The staff consists of Camp Director 
James Ceriello, a fidl time cook and helper, and 5 coiuiselors. 

The baseball diamond and jjlaying field at Camp Andrews was com- 
pletely graded, loamed and seeded during the fall months.. The beach 
area was also enlarged and impioved. 

The Board of Directors gratefully acknowledges the help and coopera- 
tion of the Concord Reserve Unit of the Army Engineers and Merrimack 
Coimty Division of the United States Soil Conservation Service in these 
projects. 

A combination asphalt basketball and tennis comt is contemplated in 
the spring. These improvements shoidd result in a vastly improved 
athletic program next summer. 



30 



MUNICIPAL COURT 



Nuinlxr of arrests for driving while intoxicated in 1962 — 'U 

Number of arrests for dri\ing while intoxicated in 1963 — - 68 

(shows an increase of .352%) 
The following are the known cases for a two year period (excluding 

parking violations) 1962 1,670 

1963 1.655 

Closed cases for 1962 - -- 1,566 (shows 93% cleared) 

Closed cases for 1963 - 1,560 (shows 94%, cleared) 

In 1962 there were 248 serious crimes including: aggravated assault, burglary, larceny, 
auto theft, forgery, and fraud. Of these 144 or 58% were cleared by arrests. 

In 1963, there were 270 serious crimes including the above. Of these 175 or 64%, were 
cleared by arrests. 

The amount of property reported stolen in 1963 was .S64,668.77 

The amount of property recovered for 1963 was ,§61,551.35 

(or 95% recovered.) 



31 




Lucia fire. Nine-year-old girl saved baby. 




Firemen shovel out hydrant on Pembroke Road. 
Left to right, Clayton Higgins and Charles Wilcox. 




Winsor Hotel Fire — Sept. 24, 1963 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



The Department responded to 667 alarms ranging from grass fires to 
multiple alarm fires such as the Winsor Hotel. Of the 667 alarms 
recorded during 1963, 601 were stills and 66 were box alarms. Two lives 
were lost in a fire at the residence of Michael Annicchiarico, 28 Pine St. 

Personnel — Six additional men were hired to put the force on a fifty- 
six hoin- work week. The Department now operates with a staff of sixty- 
six. The permanent staff was assisted by sixty call men. In the sudden 
death of Charles Scott, veteran fire fighter who had over twenty-one years 
of service, the C^ity of Concord lost a capable and faithfid servant. 

Apparatus and Equipment — The Department's "rolling stock" consists 
of thirteen fire trucks of various types, two official cars, one inspector's 
car, one service truck, one fire alarm truck and one station wagon. Several 
breakdowns on fire apparatus were experienced during the year. 



Mainlciunirc — Through the facilities available at the Department 
Workshop, the fire force has continued the practice of making its own 
repairs and replacements. The police and fire alarm systems were tested 
monthly with no serious interference of service. 379 extinguishers were 
checked and recharged by the Department staff. 

Fire Prevention — Regular inspections of schools and a series of fire 
drills and special instructions in fire prevention were conducted in the 
city schools. Inspection of convalescent homes and places of public 
assembly were carried on as in previous years. Power oil bmners and 
several gasoline tanks and pimip installations were also inspected. 

Fire Losses — 

Insurance 
I'alue Damage Insurance Paid 

BUILDING $1,430,334.00 $312,293.00 $1,225,118.00 $310,793.00 

CONTENTS 715,166.00 64.031.00 565.039.00 64,031.00 



TOTAL $2,145,500.00 $376,324.00 .SI, 790.157.00 .$374,824.00 



34 




Mayor Davie mounts first fallout shelter sign on N. H. Savings 

Bank. Looking on from left Robert Hill, Bank President, 

Willis D. Thompson, Jr., Shelter Coordinator and Richard 

Brodeur, CD Director. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Concord Civil Defense, in keeping with a policy of utilizing local govern- 
ment departments along with Civil Defense and utility imits, has strived 
for a coordinated, well organized plan of ojjerations to cope with natmal 
or man-made disasters and to provide post attack recovery as rapidly as 
possible. Only with the continued support of all departments and per- 
sonnel is such a plan possible. 

Shelters — "The great leap forward" was experienced in the fallout 
shelter j:)rogram, both public and private, during the past year. Shelter 
Coordinator Willis D. Thompson, Jr., after getting the program well 
off the groimd and fimctioning smoothly, resigned from the staff on 
September 23. Since that time the enormous task of marking and stock- 
ing public shelter areas has been carried out by State CD personnel with 
assistance of our Administration Officer. 

Included in the many buildings in Concord that qualified as fallout 
shelters and soon to be marked and stocked with supplies are Concord Na- 
tional Bank, New Hampshire Savings Bank, U. S. Post Office, Acquilla 
Building, Farm Bureau, N. H. State Public Health, Concord Library, 

35 




An electronic megaphone iised to 
amplify instructions at scene of disaster 
or during a drill, is tested by Rescue 
Squad Assistant Director. Vincent 
Ritchie. 



State House, State House Annex, State Library, Odd Fellows Home and 
Masonic Temple and New Hampshire Historical Society, Patriot Build- 
ing and Eagle Convalescent Center. 

Mr. Stanley Chapman of N. H. Savings Bank completed the Shelter Man- 
agers' Cotnse in Keene last Jime and planned a coinse tor Concord early 
in 1964. 

Administration — The Administration Officer continued on a full time 
basis at CD headquarters at City Hall. The work load increased throiigh- 

36 



out the year as the air raid siren jjrogram develojiecl into an active 
jilanning stage, recjiiiring much corresjjondence. Forms with several 
cojjies of each, to take advantage ol matching lunds and equij^ment from 
government surphis, added to the routine chities of this office that inchide 
huncheds of other minor details. 

Corntniinicatious — RACES Radio Network functioned well and was used 
several times during severe weather and other emergencies. One unit was 
placed in operation on the east side of the Merrimack River, made pos- 
sible by eliminating a mobile imit. Radio across the Merrimack from 
the city projjer completes an essential phase of the entire high frequency 
radio set up. 

A base radio on the Fire Department frecjuency was also secured the 
latter part of 1963 ))rovitling two-way communication between head- 
(juarters and the fire stations and vehicles surrounding us. A walkie- 
talkie on the fire band was also purchased during the serious forest fire 
season last fall. 

Radiological — Additional radiological siuvey instruments were dis- 
tributed to pidjlic shelters that were already stocked. These imits are 
supplied by the federal government as part of the standard shelter sup- 
1^1 ies and equipment. 




Truckload of shelter supplies iinloading at N. H. Savings Bank. 

Stanley Chapman, left, Bank Shelter Manager, Willis D. 

Thompson. Jr., right, CD Shelter Coordinator. 

37 



Concord Fireman Francis LaClair, CD Radiological Officer, conducted 
classes at Central Station and at Penacook following the week long 
coinse he took at Nashua which was conducted by the Atomic Energy 
(Commission and covered radiation hazards in the fire service. 

Public hiforinatiu)! — - Handouts on the many phases ol Civil Defense 
were still in demand and readily available at CD headquarters. Home 
fallout shelter information led the list of most frequent requests. Public 
Information Officer Robert Lauze carried the major activities of the 
Concord CD and Penacook Rescue over the local radio station. News- 
paper coverage showed a marked increase over a year ago. Several colored 
slide programs weie presented to local groups throughout the year by 
members of oiu- staff and the Rescue Squad. Speakers were also supplied 
from State CD headquarters for some of the schedided lectines. 

Progress Report — A Progress Report was distributed in August covering 
the first year's activities under the new director. Major emergencies in 
the area and news of Civil Defense interest make up the main portion 
of oin- monthly CD newsletter. 

Penacook Rescue Squad — Nimierous emergencies including accidents, 
fires and a double drowning were responded to by our unit in Penacook. 
Working side by side with Police, Fire and Public Works Department 
personnel the squad used its electric hacksaw and hydraidic rescue jack 
to free a city employee who was caught in a rubbish packer at Concord's 
south end. In May a double drowning at the Cove in Penacook brought 
Concord Police and Penacook Rescue racing through the black, wet 
night to the scene with their rescue boats. The grim task, conducted 
imder the j^iercing beams of the Rescue search light unit, came to an end 
as om- Squad boat crews brought both victims of the tragedy ashore. 
Several runs to the city proper were made with the search light imit dur- 
ing several of the major "night" fires. Liaison between this office and 
Penacook Rescue Squad was carried on by \A^eldon Hoyt, Rescue Officer. 

Set ere Weather Alerts — On July 2nd and again on October 3rd, a severe 
weather alert was received at Concord Police Headquarters and from 
there fanned out to all city emergency departments and on to Penacook 
informing the Rescue Squad of possible tornadoes. Captain Daniel 
Abbott, Attack Warning Officer, put the alerting plan into effect uj:)on 
being notified by U. S. Weather Bureau at Concord Airport. Hurricanes 
are watched in this area after crossing the 31st degree north latitude 
and 67th degree west longitude. 

Air Raid Sirens — The weekly Satiuday morning Air Raid Siren test, 
that was inaugurated in 1962, is still in effect. Testing in this manner 
weekly is an excellent check on the equipment. Progress was reported on 
the plan to add five additional sirens to cover Concord's North End, the 
Heights, East Concord, West Concord and Penacook. A test alert, not 

38 



imolving the public or sounding the sirens, was held on November 26 to 
determine time required to alert each community in the comjjlete county. 

Nc'tv Eqitipnwnt — Two smoke ejectors, two 1500 watt generators, an 
electronic bull horn were purchased on matching funds. One smoke 
ejector was put in service at Central Station and the other in Penacook. 
One emergency generator was installed at West Concord fire station. 
Numerous smaller items were pmchased throughout the year including 
a navy wire basket stretcher, first aid equipment and material available 
from government surplus stock. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

There was a total of three hiuidred and lorty-ioiu- interments made in 
1963; two hundred forty-two in the city cemeteries, ninety-one in Cal- 
vary, nine in Penacook Calvary and two out of town. 

A total of eighty lots were sold and fifteen trusts put on old lots. 

Total foimdations poiued were 125, an increase of twenty; markers set 
were f50, an increase of twenty-nine. Posts set were 152, an increase of 
forty-foin-. There were thirty fewer binials in 1963 and thirteen less lots 
sold. 

New blocks were made: Blossom Hill — two grave lots in Block HH 
and a new single grave in the Annex. ^Voodlawn — foiu' grave lots in 
Block I and extended Block H. Calvary — two grave lots in Block P. Pine 
Grove — extended Block A. 

New water lines were laid in Maple Grove Cemetery. 

Flower beds were set out as usual for Memorial Day. Lot owners who 
did not have a trust for this were billed. This service has increased m 
popularity in recent years. 



39 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

The Welfare Department renders financial assistance to the people oi 
Concord and Penacook who are in need due to unemployment, sickness, 
marital difficidties and other adversities. 

Welfare Cosls — In 1963 an average ol 33 cases representing 95 jjersons 
were aided at a total cost of $33,885, in comparison to 35 cases in 1962 
representing 112 persons with expenditures of $33,534. 

It is interesting to note that in 1963, relief expenditines were $11,000 
greater than in 1958. However, the same nimiber of cases and persons 
were aided. This is a reflection of the cost of living rise over the last five 
years. 

Sickness is still the leading cause of relief need in 1963, as shown by the 
following chart: 

SICKNESS 
UNEMPLOYMENT 
MARITAL DIFFICULTIES 
INSUFFICIENT INCOME 
UNEMPLOYABLE 

Old Age Assistance — In 1963 Old Age Assistance including aliens num- 
bered 173 with expenditines of $60,337. In 1962, 177 cases were aided at 
a cost of $61,026. The city shares 25% of the cost of Old Age Assistance 
and 50% of aliens. 

Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled — In 1963 aid to the per- 
manently and totally disabled cases nimibered 20 with expenditures of 
$9,415. In 1962, 13 cases were aided at a cost of $5,203. The city shares 
35% of the cost of aid to the permanently and totally disabled. 



1963 


1962 


35% 


33% 


23% 


18% 


21% 


23% 


14% 


18%, 


7% 


8% 



40 



SANITARY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

1,187 samples of milk, cream, llavoied milks, non-fat milk, buttermilk, 
cottage cheese and friut drinks were collected and analyzed during the 
year. Standard j^late coimts, B Coli, Thermoduric, and Psychrophilic 
counts were made, as well as butter fat tests. Specific gravity tests were 
made on milk to detect watering as were tests to detect the presence of 
penicillin and other antibiotics. Other tests are sediment tests, micro- 
scopic examinations, and the Whiteside tests to detect mastitis in dairy 
cows. The Phosphatase test is carried out on pasturized products to 
eliminate any products that have not been heated to the proper tempera- 
tines at the correct holding time. 

The following inspections were made during the year. 

Dairies 176 Milk Plints 57 

Stores — - 213 Eating Establishments 172 

Bakeries 25 Wholesale Meat Houses 6 

Tourist Courts 16 Schools and Nurseries — .^6 

Foster Homes 11 Beauty Parlors 4 

The following foods were condemned, forfeited and destroyed as inifit 
for human consumption: 1-3 pound can of ham, 6 jjounds stew beef, 4-40 
quart cans of raw milk, 2 pork loins, 8 pounds pork chops, 3 hams, 80 
poimds hambing, 130 pounds steak and 5 j^oiuids butter. 

A lecture was given to the fifth grade of the Conant School on "Milk and 
Bacteria" on March 15, 1963. 

This department testified at a hearing of the N. H. Legislative Committee 
on Public Health and Welfare in favor of an amendment to an act rela- 
tive to toilet facilities in public eating jjlaces on February 7, 1963 and 
also in favor of the licensing of foster day homes on March 28, 1963. 

Dining November a bulletin was prepared by this department and 
mailed out to dairy farmers in this area on simple methods of testing 
water hardness and the wetting power of detergents. 

On June 26, 1963 a conference on milk sanitation was attended at Bran- 
deis University. This conference was sponsored by the New England 
Health Institute. 

During the week of October 29, 1963 a Food and Drug Basic Civil De- 
fense course, presented by a staff from the Washington office of the U. S. 
Food and Drug Administration was attended and a certificate received. 
This course offered extensive lectures supplemented by films and demon- 
strations on the subject of biological agents and defensive measures; 
chemical agents and defensive measures; nuclear weapons; radioactivity; 
bio-medical aspects of nuclear radiation, radioactive dose and measure- 
ments; radioactive instrument calibration; natural disasters; emergency 

41 



radioactive standards for food and water and a class exercise in moni- 
toring, testing, decontaminating and release of food items and packaging 
materials contaminated with radioactivity. 

On December 10 and 11, 1963 a training course on High Temperatine 
Short Time Milk Pasteurization Controls and Tests was attended in 
Manchester. This course was sponsored by the Milk Sanitation Section 
of the U. S. Public Health Service. Fundamental principles of operation 
of pasteurization controls were described in lectures, supplemented with 
A'isual aids. Class discussions and problem sessions constituted an imj:)or- 
tant j)art of the course. A series of tests on pasteurization equipment 
and controls were made. 

A check was made of food stores in Concord for fish products from the 
Great Lakes Area, luiwrapped or wrapj^ed in plastic containers. These 
products have caused five deaths in the nation due to botulism food 
jjoisoning. The stores had no whitefish or chubs, and other fish products 
j^roduced in the Great Lakes Area were destroyed as a precautionary 
measme. 

Four restaiuants were found to be using iminspected beef shortening and 
lard supplied by an interstate shipjjer, which is a violation of the U. S. 
Department of Agricidtiue Laws. The Federal Meat Inspector was noti- 
fied, and the users and the supplier were warned and no punitive action 
was taken as this was their first offense. 

-A ^£Ua.ur^jU chai with aji-infecied finger was ])rohibited from handling 
food until he had received a doctor's certificate stating that the infection 
had completely healed. 

Three girls were admitted to the Concord Hospital reportedly suffering 
from food poisoning from eclairs purchased at a local store. A bacteriolo- 
gical test was made on the eclairs at the N. H. State Laboratory, and 
they were found to be negative. Two other suspected cases of food 
poisoning were reported. In one case, a caterer was foiuid to be holding 
roasted turkey at room temperatine for foiu" hours and was warned to 
refrigerate food immediately after cooking. In the other case a bacterial 
examination of the suspected chocolate ice cream was found to be nega- 
tive. 

This department has been correcting the improper handling of poten- 
tially hazardous foods by retail stores in the city. It has been the practice 
with such cooked foods as stuffed lobster and shrimp, chicken, pork loins, 
spare ribs, fish, roast beef, ham, fish cakes and other foods to display 
and/or hold at temperatures which are conducive to the progressive 
growth of infections and toxigenix micro-organisms. 

Fortimately, due to our repeated warnings and poor consumer acceptance 
of such merchandising, the few cooked foods now ofTered for sale are 
being held in display cabinets with temperature below 45 degrees or 
above 140 degrees F. 

42 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Health Clinics — 899 persons attended health clinics at the City Audi- 
torium in Concord during the year to receive protective treatment against 
diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, smallpox, and poliomyelitis. 515 
of those attending recei\'ecl Sabin Oral Polio Vaccine. 

Licenses — Three convalescent home licenses were issued in March. 149 
milk licenses and 94 restaurant and bakery licenses were issued during 
the year. 

Complaints — 25 complaints were received during the year and checked. 

Vital Statistics — The death rate decreased slightly from last year. Of the 
718 deaths reported in 1963, 295 were resident and 423 were non-resident. 
121 bodies were brought here for burial. 16 stillbirths were reported. 

Table of most common causes of deaths of residents: 

7959 1960 1961 1962 1961 

Diseases of circulatory system 165 121 I'M 1(J2 Ifi'i 

Diseases of nervous system 45 41 -IS ■?(') 2(i 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 42 39 39 31 28 

Diseases of digestive system 7 13 11 15 13 

Diseases of respiratory system __._ 16 17 13 22 18 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 

The City Clerk attended all the meetings and hearings of the Board of 
Aldermen during the year in the capacity of clerk. Prepared and dis- 
tributed the minutes of all meetings together with agenda in advance of 
the meetings. 

Received and turned over to the City Treasurer the siun of $12,449.25 
from licenses and service fees during the year. 

Issued 2,226 dog licenses; received and filed approximately 1,320 com- 
mercial codes; recorded 130 discharges; issued 346 marriage licenses; and 
issued approximately 1,200 copies of vital statistics records. The require- 
ments of Social Security and Old Age Assistance to collect the payment 
for death claims accounts for a great many of the above records issued. 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Vital statistics recorded as compared with 1962 were as follows; 

1963 1962 

Births 1,079 1,107 

Marriages 348 346 

Deaths 735 761 

43 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 

The Board of Aldermen held 12 regular meetings; () special meetings; 2 
adjoinned meetings; and II hearings. 

During the year there were 78 resolutions jjassed and 28 ordinances 
passed. 

Among the resolutions passed by the Board were the following; 
Temporary loan not exceeding ,'iji2,.^00,000.00 for expenses in anticipation 
of taxes; Relative to use of granite in the construction of the New Post 
Office-Comt House; Relative to a petition to the General Comt of the 
State of N. H. and the Concord Delegation requesting legislation which 
will provide additional revenue to the City of Concord to relieve the tax 
biuclen on real estate; Authorizing the acceptance of a conveyance of 
land from the Concord Housing Authority; Designating Concord Hous- 
ing Authority as the relocation housing agency for the City of Concord; 
Relating to the services of the late William T. Jordan, Alderman-at- 
Large; Authorizing the construction of Dubois Avenue; Appropriating 
195,000.00 for highway construction and .$35,000.00 for storm sewer con- 
struction, and authorizing the issue of $130,000.00 of bonds for these 
purposes; Property tax exemption for St. Patd's School; Authorizing the 
Mayor to submit to the Federal Aviation Agency a j^roposal for locating 
its Federal Inspection District Office at the Concorcl Mtmicipal Airport; 
Authorizing the Mayor to appoint a Study C^ommittee on Concord's 
futine water supply; Relative to the services of Gustaf H. Lehtinen, 
Director of Planning for the City of Concord; and a resolution honoring 
Reverend Richard O. Boner. 

Ordinances relating to amendments to the Zoning Ordinance and amend- 
ments to the Traffic Regidations and binning of refuse and garbage were 
among Ordinances passed. 



ELECTIONS 

The city election was held November 6, 1963. There was one filing for 
the office of mayor; seven filings for aldermen-at-large; and ward alder- 
men filings as follows: Ward One, two; Ward Two, two; Ward Three, two; 
Ward Four, one; Ward Five, two; Ward Six, four; Ward Seven, two; 
Ward Eight, two; Ward Nine, two. 

The residts of this election were that Mayor Charles C. Davie was re- 
elected unopposed; ^\^illiam P. Gove, David Tardif and William Arthur 
Stevens were elected Aldermen-at-Large for four years. Ward Aldermen 
elected were as follows; Ward One, John ^X'alters; ^A^^rd Two, Karl G. 
Neuman; Ward Three, George A. Stohrer, Jr.; Ward Four, Malcolm Mc- 
Lane (unopposed) ; Ward Five, Roland E. Fletcher; Ward Six, Joseph 
C. Musumeci; Ward Seven, C. Edwin Howard; Ward Eight, William H. 
Perry; Ward Nine, Thomas B. Jennings. 

The total vote cast was 4,226. 

14 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

Water Consumptio)} — Consumption for 1963 amounted to 1,435,057,150 
gallons; this represents an average daily consum]:)tion of 3,931,663 gallons, 
(about 136 gallons per person per day). Of the total amount used 
1, 024,267, 150\gallons were jKuiiped and 410,790,000 gallons were supplied 
by gravity direct from Penacook Lake. This consimiption for 1963 was 
33,832,350 gallons more than the consumjjtion for 1962. 

Water Supply — Concord faced a real crisis in its water supply during 
1963 and at the end of the year the elevation of Penacook Lake was 10 
feet below spillway elevation which was the lowest point on record for 
the corresponding time of year since the dam was built in 1898. Several 
factors contributed to this situation. First, the lake was 6i/o feet below 
spillway elevation on January first, second, the highest elevation reached 
during the year was still four feet below overflow, and third, the total 
amount of precipitation during the year was only 281/2 inches, 10 inches 
below normal and the smallest amount of precipitation in 100 years. 
At the end of the year the Water Study Committee was working with 
Consulting Engineers on a plan for an emergency water supply to be 
constructed and placed in operation as soon as possible in 1964. 

Sanders Well Field — Continuing the 1962 project of locating wells, a 
fifth eight inch test well was driven and proved to be satisfactory. To- 
gether with the three other satisfactory wells found in 1962, this made the 
fourth good well required, so plans and specifications were prepared and 
a contract awarded to install two 18 inch gravel packed wells and two 18 
inch gravel developed wells. The installation of these wells was completed 
in September and they were placed in service. During construction the 
eight inch test wells were kept in place and pumped as the lack of water 
was very serious. During the year the total yield from the test wells and 
the new 18 inch wells was 309,008,150 gallons and without this extra water 
from this soinxe the water supply crisis would have been desperate 
indeed. 

Major Construction Projects — Water main extensions were laid in Cross 
Street (in Penacook) Sewalls Falls Road and Hutchins Street (in West 
Concord) Portsmouth Street (in East Concord) Partridge Drive, Jay 
Drive, Dover Street, Guay Street and Dudley Drive (on The Heights) 
and Bow Street Extension, Norwich Street and Conant Park Drive (in 
the South End) . On these j^rojects 5,749 feet of cement lined cast iron 
pipe were laid in six and eight inch sizes, (114 miles of mains now in 
system) . Seven new hydrants were set and three old hydrants were re- 
placed with new hydrants, (808 hydrants now in system) . Twelve main 
line valves and seven valves on hydrant branches installed, (1,743 valves 
now in system). Sixty-seven new service connections were laid and 13 

45 



old service connections were cliscontiniied, (6,333 service connections now 
in system) . Eiglity-nine new meters were installed. 42 old meters were re- 
placed and 24 old meters were discontinued, (5,746 meters now in sys- 
tem) . 

Major Replacement Projects — In Manor Road (in Penacook) 1,450 
feet of eight inch, cement lined cast iron pipe were laid rej^lacing old two 
inch galvanized iron pipe laid in 1925 and 355 i/o feet of eight inch, 
cement lined cast iron pipe were laid in Hutchins Street (in West Con- 
cord) replacing old I14 inch iron jjijje laid in 1941. Forty-six old service 
connections were relaicl with copper tubing. 

Water Main Cleaning Program — Lack of water and low pressure condi- 
tions in East Concorcl called for investigation and How tests showed that 
the flow capacity of the unlined eight inch cast iron main supplying East 
Concord was very low. Accordingly 6,600 feet of this main were cleaned 
from Page Belting Company to Shawmut Street solving this problem 
nicely. As the water supply was very low and cleaning uses a lot of water 
this was the only cleaning done during the year. 

Flushing Program — Due to the critical water supply problem the regu- 
lar flushing of all hydrants and mains in the system had to be omitted 
and instead spot flushing Avas clone in areas where rusty water appeared. 

Major Maintenance Projects — Ten hydrants were repaired and one 
hyclrant was set in a new location; 220 meters were repaired and returned 
to service. Each and every hydrant in the system was tested weekly be- 
tween December 15 of the previous year to March 15 of the current year 
to guard against freezing and to assiue projjer operation of all hydrants. 
All electrical equipment and recording ecpiipment in the torn- pumping 
stations was checked, serviced and rejjaired if necessary. 

New Equipment — The department acc]uired two half ton pickup trucks. 

Leaks — Thirty-six leaks were rejjaired dining the year, 16 on mains 
and 20 on service connections. 



46 



LEGAL DEPARTMENT 

As is usual during the biennial session ot the General Court, the City 
Solicitor devoted a substantial amoiuit of time in the drafting of pro- 
posed legislation directly affecting the (Jity, attended numerous com- 
mittee hearings and conferred with numerous members of the legisla- 
ture. Among other things, the Legislatme passed amendments to the 
Concord City Charter which permitted giving notice of special meetings 
by use of the mails, divorced the function of fiscal control from the 
City Clerk and granted "home rule" in the matter of fixing salaries for 
the mayor and members of the Board of Aldermen. 

The matter of condemnation of land for highway purposes continues to 
be a perplexing problem to local communities. Because the landowner 
has a right under the law to aj^peal matters of procedine and necessity 
to the Court, the City is subjected to costly delays or to paying exorbitant 
amoimts for land acquisition. Accordingly, aj^propriate legislation 
was prepared and introduced into the General Comt giving the muni- 
cipality powers similar to those already possessed by the State in the 
matter of highway layouts and limiting the appeal of the land owner to 
the question of damages. However, the bill failed to pass. 

Because we consider this legislation extremely important to the progress 
and financial welfare of the community, the bill will again be introduced 
into the 1965 session of the Legislature and the assistance of the New 
Ham])shire Municipal Association as well as other communities will 
be solicited. 

Still pending in the Superior Court at the end of the year is the first pro- 
ceeding instituted imder the Housing Code. The case involves the 
question of the right of the City to require demolition of property found 
unfit for human habitation. Although an early hearing is expected, it 
is safe to assume that the matter will be referred to the Supreme Court 
for final determination as the constitutionality of the ordinance has 
been challenged. 

In an unusual zoning case, the zoning permit granted to the owner of 
an automotive repair garage was revoked when it was established that 
the conditions of the permit were being violated. Injunctive proceedings 
were instituted in the Superior Court but were eventually withdrawn 
when the garage ceased operation. 

The authority of the City and its Building Inspector to order demolition 
of an unsafe building was again challenged. This time the City ordered 
removal of a downtown hotel building when an inspection disclosed it 
was unsafe following an extensive fire. Subsequently, in two separate 

47 



Court proceedings brought by insurance companies, injundions were 
denied and the orders of demohtion were carried out. 

Still pending in the Courts are three zoning cases, the most important of 
which involves the operation of a wholesale meat supply house in a 
general residence area. Because of neighborhood interest and concern, 
it is hoped that a hearing can be held early in the year. 

Routine matters such as the jjreparation of deeds, agreements and con- 
tracts as well as the rendeiing of legal ojjinions for \'arious departments 
and members of the Board of Aldermen again required a considerable 
amoimt of the Solicitor's time. In addition thirty-one hearings and 
meetings of the Board of Aldermen were attended excluding informal 
meetings where no action was taken. 

In reviewing the activities of this department during the past several 
years, it is obvious that litigation has stibstantially increased. Looking 
to the future, it wotdd appear that substantially increased activity in 
the legal department will occin\ Local participation in federal housing 
and luban renewal programs will necessitate extensive enforcement 
of codes having to do with zoning, housing and construction. 



48 




Mayor Davie, Katherine Chase, George West. 
Miss Chase receives retirement gift. 



COLLECTION DEPARTMENT 

The total tax warrants with additions tor the levy ot 1963 submitted by 
the Assessors to the Tax Collector during the year were as follows: 

Total llii'diirc 

Debits Dccciiihcy 31 , 196- 

Real and Personal Property - $4,502,428.70 ,S'J()3 835.18 

Bank Stock '. 7,477.10 0- 

Timhcr Yield 2,458.07 2.153.'5() 

Total Property .54312.363.87 .S605.988.54 

Polls 23,956.00 5 800.00 

Total Property & Polls .'54,536,319.87 .S61 1,788.54 

State Head Taxes 74,135.00 18.862.80 

Total S4.610.45L87 .S630,651.34 

In January notices were prepared and mailed to delinquent taxpayers 
relative to impaid stock in trade, personal and real estate taxes. Also a 
list was prepared and given to local banks relative to unpaid 1960, 1961 
and 1962 real estate taxes. 

Starting on February 6 and continuing through May 28 your Tax Col- 
lector attended thirty-four legislative hearings pertaining to taxation. On 
March 4 Mayor Davie and your Tax Collector met with Governor King 
relative to the revenue from the head tax being retained on the local 
level. 

49 



The tax office remained open Friday, March 22, and Frichiy, March 29 
until 8:00 P.M. for the convenience of the pidDhc in obtaining their 1963 
motor vehicle permits. During February and March your Tax Collector 
had several meetings with Mr. Ralph Gould, Director of Motor Vehicles 
relative to the new form to be used in 1964 for registering motor vehicles. 

The advertised list of unpaid 1962 property taxes was postetl on April 
29 and the Collector's Sale of Resident Real Estate was held on June 3 
in the small conference room on the second floor of the City Hall. The 
sale contained 171 accounts of which one was bought by an individual 
and the rest were bought by the City of Concord for $82,062.80. The 
owners of record have two years in which to redeem their projjerty from 
the Collector's Sale. 

In June 15,000 combination head and poll tax bills were addressed and 
mailed. Also the national bank stock bills were mailed out and final 
notices were mailed to persons owing delinquent 1960 real estate taxes. 

In July two parcels of property were deeded to the City for non-payment 
of taxes and one to an individual. 

During July special assessment bills covering 32 projects were processed 
and mailed and work was started on property tax billing. All property 
tax bills were mailed September 6. 

Yoin- Tax Collector attended the New Hampshire Tax Collectors Asso- 
ciation meeting held in Pike, New Hampshire on September 6 and 7. 

On November 15 bids were opened on the two parcels of property 
acquired in Jidy by tax collectors deed and the City realized a profit of 
11,462.88. Also during the month, with the cooperation of the City 
Solicitor 71 cases were entered in Small Claims Court against delinquent 
head and poll tax accounts. During the month your Tax Collector at- 
tended the National Tax Association meeting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
On Friday, November 22 and Friday, November 29 the tax office was 
open luitil 8:00 P.M. for the convenience of the public in paying their 
1963 property tax bills. "^-— -^ 

On December 6 Katherine Chase terminated her services with this de- 
partment after twenty years of loyal and faithful service to the City of 
Concord. 

There were 16,525 motor vehicle permits issued amoimting to 5190,491.46. 

Collections on Special Assessments amounted to .$29,071.02. 

Collections received for prior year taxes, water bills and other miscel- 
laneous revenue amoimted to $1,206,033.60. 

The total collected from all sources amounted to $5,374,155.18 which 
was $410,257.73 more than collected in 1962. 

50 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

Tax Warrants were issued as follows during the year: 

Property — Real and Personal . 81,502,428.70 

Poll Tax - -- 23,956.00 

Head Tax 74,1 35.00 

Bank Stock - 7,477.10 

Timber Yield - 2,458.07 

Poll Tax exemptions to veterans were 2,849, compared to 2,988 granted 
in 1962. 

Property Valuation — 

Gross valuation before exemptions .._. .S02.67'5.57O.OO 

Less exemptions to veterans and blind (No. 1,651) - 1.673,260.00 

Net valuation on which 1963 tax rate computed .>;6 1.000,3 10 00 

Tax Rates for 1963 are as follows: 

CONCORD: PENACOOK: 

Minicipal $32.95 Municipal .1>32.95 

School 37.91 .School 37..58 

CoMMiv 2.94 Countv . 2.94 



S73.80 S73.47 

Co?npilatio)i ten year period: 

Net Valuation Property Vahidtion Poll Ttix Poll Exonpt 

Year R.E. & Pers. Prop. Exempt to Vets. Warrant to Vets. 

1954 $47,795,222 .$1,280,588 $23,370 .$5,852 

1955 48,278,291 1,367,195 23,924 6,556 

1956 49.178,815 1,334,410 23,536 6,636 

1957 50,829,022 1,461,270 23,458 6,614 

1958 51,105,351 1.486,320 22,962 6,586 

1959 52,391,854 1,554,890 22,7.50 6,580 

1960 54,621,375 1,628,620 22,720 6,334 

1961 55,690,530 1.691,160 23,018 6,222 

1962 59,283,860 1,661,760 22.678 5,976 

1963 61,000,310 1,673,260 23.9.56 5.698 

Activities — The sectional reappraisal of the City was continued during 
1963 with work by the Assessor and Appraisers in the south end. There 
were fourteen meetings of the Board of Assessors during 1963. There 
were 750 property transfers processed. Tax abatements allowed during 
the year on Property and Polls was $48,326.49 — this amount was against 
the levy of the year 1963 and includes abatements made in January, 1964. 
There were 111 appeals proce.s.sed and resolved during 1963. 

51 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

In the financial section oi this report will be lound schedules which set 
forth the activity and the year end position oi each ot the se\'eral lands 
through which all the financial transactions of the City are handled. 
Below is a brief summary of activity of each fund dining the )ear 19().H 
and condition at the end of the year. 

GENERAL FUND 

Curroit Surplus resulting from 1963 ojjerations amoimted to SI 12,722. 
This surplus will be used to reduce the amoimt to be raised by property 
taxes in 1964. 

Debt — Outstanding debt payable from this fimd decreased $274,375. 
New debt amoimting to SI 28, ()()() was incinred, while maturities paid 
dining the year amoimted to Sl()2,375 as detailed in the following 
schedide. 

Balance Paymoits Neiu Debt Balance 

Dec. 31, 1962 Duthig 1963 Issued 1963 Dec. 31, 1963 

Municipal .|1, 128,792 5202.375 S128,000 SI, 054,417 

School 2.315,000 200.000 2.115.000 



Total S3,443.792 .S402.375 SI 28.000 53.169.417 

Interest Rates rose sharply during the year. Our bonds sold at a rate of 
2.60% which compares with 2.375% for tlie 1962 issue. Rates on bor- 
rowings in anticipation of tax collections ranged from 1.42% in May 
to 1.78% in July compared to a high of 1.59% and a low of 1.40% paid 
in the previous year. Total interest cost for the year on the short term 
notes was $12,780 compared to ,$11,898 for the j:)revious year. Total inter- 
est jjaid on long term debt was S29,248 compared to $31,543 paid in 
1962. 

Valuations, Taxes, Tax Rates — Below is a comparison of valuations, 
property taxes, and tax rates; showing changes from 1962 to 1963. 

Property Taxes Raised 1962 

For Municipal Purposes — .U 1,958, 807 

For School Purposes 2,140,912 

For County Purposes 180,644 



Total .f4,280,363 

Assessed Valuation 

For Municipal Purposes .'i?59,283,860 

For Union School District _ 55,511,740 

For Penacook School District 3,787,620 

For County Purposes 59,299,610 

52 





Increase 




1963 


Amount 


Per Cent 


.1i;2.010.272 


$ 51,465 


2.6 


2,311.096 


170.184 


7.9 


179.138 


— 1 ,50() 


— .8 


$4,500,506 


.1>220,143 


5.1 


$61,000,310 


51,716,450 


2.9 


57,020,360 


1.508,620 


2.7 


3,995,380 


2()7,7()() 


5.5 


61,016,060 


1,716,150 


2.9 



7V/.V Rates 

Municipal $33.04 S32.95 — $ .09 — .3 

Union School District 35.71 37.91 2.20 fi.2 

Pcnacook School District 41.83 37.58 —4.25 —10.2 

County 3.05 2.94 — .11 — 3.fi 

Total City Rate .'>71.80 S73.80 S2.00 2.8 

Total Penacook Rate $77.92 $73.47 —.$4.45 —5.7 

CoUections increased, percentage wise; the year ending with 13.4% of 
the current property tax levy outstanding, compared to 14.8% outstand- 
ing at the end of the previous year. 

TRUST FUNDS 

Income received increased from $65,079, in 1962 to $66,272 in 1963. New 
trusts received amounted to $14,360. Gain on sale of securities amounted 
to S689, compared to $2,272 in 1962. Income transferred to General 
Fund was $63,210. 

PARKING METER FUND 

Meter Collections fell off by 10.7% from $58,268 in 1962 to $52,024 for 
the current year. Off-street collections decreased 14.3%, while on-street 
areas yielded 9.8% less than the previous year. 

linid Balance at the close of the year was $331. A decrease of $15,476 
tluring the year. 

Debt — Long term debt decreased from $54,000 to $32,000. No new debt 
was issued; while maturities amounted to $22,000. 

SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Revenue from sewer rentals totalled $85,646, compared to $86,814 
realized in 1962, a decrease of 1.3%. Receipts from all sources increased 
by 3.2% from $92,230 to $95,231. 

Surplus — The year began with a cash smplus of $107,191 and ended 
with $110,520, an increase of $3,329. 

Debt — Long term debt decreased by $26,000. Maturities paid during 
the year amovmted to $26,000. No new debt was incurred. 

WATER FUND 

Revenue — Water rentals yielded a total of $255,786, — .7%, above the 
$254,005 realized in 1962. Receipts from all sources amounted to $273,252 
or 1.6% lower than in 1962. 

53 



Surplus — Cash surplus increased from $201,92.S at the beginning of 
the year to $228,645 at the close of the year. 

Debt — Long term debt decreased by $20,000. Matinities paid amounted 
to .$20,000. No new debt was incurred. 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

Projects — Two water extensions, two sanitary sewer extensions and one 
storm sewer extension projects were approved for construction inider 
special assessment procedure at an estimated cost of 525,149. 

Receipts — ■ Total receipts of this fund were 890,722. Disbursements 
totalled $114,871. Cash balance at the end of the year was $29,708. 

Debt — Long term debt decreased during the year from $316,734 to 
$290,754. New debt amounting to $25,149 was incurred; while maturities 
paid totalled $51,129. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT FUND 

Profit — This fund showed a profit from this year's operations. Income 
from equipment rentals amoimted to $230,378; while operating expendi- 
tines and depreciation totalled S222,414; residting in a net profit of 
$7,964. 

Reserve — The reserve for replacement of equipment increased from 
$15,988 to $20,071. Expenditures for new equipment totalled $67,080; 
while additions to the reserve amounted to $71,163. This fund has no 
outstanding debt. 



54 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - 

(.ENERAL I I Xn 

Appro]Jiiations & Expenditures .... 62-65 

Assessments 61 

Balance Sheet 56-57 

Current Surplus 58 

In\cstments 68 

L-ong Term Debt 66-67 

Revenues ..-. 58-59 

Taxes Receivable — 60 

Tax Sale Accounts 60 

BOND FUND — GENERAL 

Balance Sheet 56-57 

Disposition of Proceeds 70 

TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet 56-57 

Changes in Balances 69 

Investments 68 

SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Balance Sheet 77 

Investments 68 

Long Term Debt 66-67 

Operating Statement 78 



FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 
& REPLACEMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet 73 

Cash Surplus 73 

Operating Statement 73 

Statement of Reserve Account ... 73 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet 71 

Long Term Debt 66-67 

Projects Authorized & 

Amounts Expended 72 

Receipts & Expenditures 72 

W ATER FUND 

Balance Sheet 75 

Long Term Debt 66-67 

Investments 68 

Operating Statements 76-77 

BOND FUND — WATER 

Disposition of Proceeds 75 

PARKING METER FUND 

Balance Sheet 74 

Long Term Debt 66-67 

Revenues & Expenditures 74 



BALANCE SHEET — GENERAL 

Dccembti 

C.ENERAL FUND ASSETS 
Cnsh: 

Mcchaiiicks National liaiik-Gcncral Actl. .. 2<).2r)r).S5 

Cloiicord National Hank-General Account 81,053.66 

Concord National Bank-Payroll Account „ 15,406.98 

Cash in other Banks-General Account 12,000.00 

Imprest Funds 1,249.41 

Cash for Payment of Bonds &: Coupons 3,357.00 

Temporary Investments 596.701.30 736,024.['O 

Taxes Receivable: 

Current Year Levy-Property 605,988.54 

Current Year Levy-Polls .J. 5,800.00 

Total Current Year 611.788.54 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 10,713.07 601,075.47 

Prior Year Levies-Property 16,062.64 

Prior Year Levies-Polls 408.00 

Tax Liens Bought by City-Unredeemed .... 43,042.53 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 59,513.17 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 33,687.65 25.825.52 626.900.99 

A ceo II }i ts Receii v; b le : 

Water & Sewer Rentals 74.721.29 

Departmental Receivables 7,781.33 

Cemetery Receivables 1,960.28 

Trunk Storm Sewer Assessments 2,233.00 86,695.90 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 11,974.61 74,721.29 

Stores Accounts: 

Public Works Mat. &: Supplies Inv 58,678.76 

Stationery K: Supplies Inventory 7,242.61 

Postage Meter Inventory 107.94 (i(i,029.31 

Less: Reserves for Non -Realization 66,029.31 

lax Deeded Properties: 869.93 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 869.93 

Slate Head Taxes Receixmble: 19,984.80 

Total General Fund Assets 1,457,631.28 

TRUST FUND ASSETS 

Investments 837,478.21 

C;ash-Concord National Bank 5,043.16 842.521.37 

*CAPITAL FUND ASSETS 

Debt Ret|uirements-Municipal 1.054,417.37 

Debt Recjuirements-School 2,115,000.00 3,169,417.37 

BOND FUND ASSETS 

Cash-Concord National Bank 12,010.34 

Temporary Investments 69,360.28 .S81, 370.62 

GRAND TOTAL — ASSETS ,5,550.940.64 

* Does not include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer. Parking Meter or Special Assess- 
ment Fluids. 

56 



AND RELATED FUNDS 

31, 1963 

CENKRAL HIND LIABILITIES 
.Iccumits Pax able: 

I'liprcsciitcd Bonds &: Coupons 3,357.00 

Payroll Deductions Payable _.- - 1,019.94 

Current \'ouchers Payable - 10,674.40 

I ')U'\peuded Appropriations: 

In ion Sctiool District -Operating Acct. 929,685.64 

Interest-U;iion School District-Bonds 

& Notes - 29,446.50 

Penacook Union School District 60,000.47 

Reser\e for Encumbrances 36.732.33 

Dne lo Oilier Funds: 

Watei Fund 131,176.38 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 81.774.30 

Parking Meter Fund 330.76 

Eciuipnient Maintenance &: Replacement 

Fund ____ 34,594.99 

Adi'ancc Deposits: 

Taxes Due to State of X. H.: 

Head Taxes 24,780.70 

Timber Yield Tax-a/c Debt Retirement 

Fund 899.73 

Total General Fund Liabilities 

Current Surplus: 

Total General Fund Liabilities & Surplus 



15,051.34 



1,055,864.94 



247.876.43 



436.03 



25,680.43 

1.344.909.17 

112.722.11 

1,457,631.28 



TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 807,664.08 

Accumulated Income 34,857.29 842,521.37 

CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Bonded Debt 3,128.500.00 

Notes Payable 24,000.00 

.\dyance by State of N. H. — Airport 

Construction 16,917.37 3,169,417.37 

BOND FUND LIABILITIES 
Reser\e for Construction or Equipment 

Authorized - 80,866.62 

Reserve for Encumbrances - 504.00 81,370.62 

GRAND TOTAL — LIABILITIES 5,550,940.64 



57 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS GENERAL FUND 

For the Year Ended December .^1. 196.'? 

Unappropriated Balance, December 31, 1962 

.\pplied to 196.'? Budget 

Balance Remaining 

1963 Budget Surplus: 

Unencumbered Balance of Appropriations 

Revenues in Excess of Estimates 

Plus: Excess Reserves Liquidated: 

Reserve for Non-Realization of Accounts Receivable 

Reserve for Non-Realization of .Stores .Accounts 

Phzs: Outdated Checks Cancelled — 

Sub-Total - 

Less: 

Increase in Reserve for Non-Realization of Prior Year 

Taxes 1 2,952.23 

Cancelled check presented for Payment 2.00 12,954.23 



112..567..34 
112.000.00 


567.34 
123.425.91 


112.280 81 
11,145.07 


275.25 
1 .000.86 


1.276.11 
406.98 




125 ,676. .34 



112.722.11 
To be Applied to 1964 Budget 112.000.00 



Balance Remaining -. 722.1 1 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1963 

Budget Rex>euu('s 

LocalTaxes-Excl.Curr.Yr.Prop.&Polls Estimate Realized Excess Deficiency 

Added Taxes. Prior Yrs. — Prop. 2,079.97 2.079.97 

Added Taxes. Prior Yrs. — Poll 500.00 670.00 170.00 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 14,500.00 19.153.71 4.653.71 

Auto Permits .„ 188,000.00 190.018.77 2.018.77 

Rent & Profit Tax Deeded Prop 1.679.53 1.679.53 

Timber Severance Tax 1.500.00 2.048.40 548.40 



204.500.00 2 1 5,650.38 11.1 50.38 

State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax 4.000.00 81.94 3.918.0(i 

Savings Bank Tax 49,000.00 49,000.21 .21 

Interest & Dividend Tax - -- 84,708.00 84,707.98 .02 

Loss of Taxes-State Forest Lands -- 25.00 29.60 4.60 



137,733.00 133,819.73 4.81 3.918.08 

58 



Licenses ir Permits 

Bicycle Registrations 

Taxi Licenses -. 

Health Licenses _ _ 

Amusement Licenses 

Police & Protective Licenses .. 
Prof. & Occupational Licenses 



500.00 


643.75 


14.-5.75 




400.00 


450.50 


50.50 




650.00 


598.00 




52.00 


2.600.00 


2.414.75 




185.25 


250.00 


280.00 


.'iO.OO 




90.00 


96.00 


6.00 





4,490.00 



4,483.00 



230.25 



237.25 



Registration Fees & Permits 

Marriage Licenses 

Recording Fees — Legal Documents 

Filing Fees -- 

Sundry Fees — City Clerk 

Dog Licenses — 



Departmental Sen'ice Charges 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concessions 

(.olf Fees 

Mem. Field Royalties & Concess. 

Other Recr. Dept. Revenues 

Police Dept. Ambulance Charges 

Airport — Rent 

Airport — Concessions 

Fines & Forfeits .— 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 

Weights & Measures Fees 

Comm. on Head Tax Collections 
Community Center Revenue 



1,0.50.00 


945.00 




105.00 


3,100.00 


2.918.00 




182.00 


300.00 


170.00 




130.00 


1 ,200.00 


1 .277.25 


77.25 




4,550.00 


4,210.00 




339.30 



10,200.00 



9,520.95 



756.30 



2,600.00 


2.287.00 




313.00 


700.00 


525.86 




174.14 


15,600.00 


14,982.75 




617.25 


300.00 


315.00 


15.00 




2,800.00 


2,056.21 




743.79 


1,000.00 


995.00 




5.00 


13,925.00 


16,187.15 


2.262.15 




200.00 


85.60 




114.40 


8,200.00 


12,559.97 


4.359.97 




2,000.00 


2,381.95 


381.95 




340.00 


396.48 


.56.48 




6.300.00 


6.784.80 


484.80 




2,500.00 


1 ,606.57 




893.43 


56,465.00 


61.164.34 


7.560.35 


2.861.01 



Unclassified 

Interest Income 2.500.00 975.28 1.524.72 

Sale of Property 500.00 20.00 480.00 

Sub. Div. Assess. Prior Yrs. Constr. .... 320.00 320.00 

Sale of Ordinances 6.50 6.50 

All Other 500.00 83.90 416.10 

3,820.00 1,405.68 6.50 2.420.82 

TOTAL MISC. REVENUES - 417,208.00 426,044.08 19,029.54 10.193.46 

Curreyit Yr. Prop. & Polls 

Property Tax 4,454,788.01 4,455,077.90 289.89 

Poll Tax _-_- 20,800.00 22,042.00 1.242.00 

National Bank Stock Tax ..._ 6,700.00 7,477.10 777.10 

4,482,288.01 4,484,597.00 2.308.99 

TOTAL REVENUES 4,899,496.01 4,910,641.08 21,338.53 10,193.46 



59 



STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE — GENERAL FUND 

Decern bei 31. 19();5 

1963 Prio) Stale 

Lex'y Ycay.s Henri Taxes 

BALANCE JANUARY 1. 1963 ()-,6,466.74 17.017.80 

Committed to Collector i)i 1963 

(Inch Stipplemental): 

Real & Personal Property 4,502,428.70 1 .9,3 L(;() 

National Bank Stock 7,477.10 

Timber Yield 2,458.07 145.31 

Polls 24,342.00 670.00 

Heads (For .State) 77.300.00 

Total Charges to Collector 4,536,705.87 659.216.71 94,317.80 

Accounted for as Folloies: 

C:ollections (Net of Refunds) ._. 3.885,979.60 617,691.71 68.858.00 

Authorized Abatements 38.937.73 25 051.33 5.^:75.00 

Balance Uncollected Dec. 31, 1963 611,788.54 l(i.-i70.61 19,984.80 



Total Credits R: Balance 4.536,705.87 659,216.71 94,317.80 



Age A7inl\sis of Uncollected Taxes 

Real & Personal Timber 

Property Yield Polls Heads 

1958 456.89 

1959 355.32 

1960 1 1,427.89 

1961 186.20 8 00 

1962 3,636.34 400.00 1.122.00 

1963 603.835.18 2,153.36 5.800,00 18,862.80 

Grand Total 619,897.82 2,153.36 6,208.00 19.984.80 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS — GENERAL FUND 

Balance Unredeemed January 1, 1963 

Tax Levy of 1960 12,867.43 

Tax Levy of 1961 25,879.54 38,746.97 



J963 Tax Sale (Tax Levy of 1962) 82,062.80 



Total Charges 120,809.77 



Accounted for as Folloies: 

Collections 75,347.47 

Authorized Abatements 1,795.00 

Deeded to City 624.77 

Balance Unredeemed December 31, 1963 43,042.53 120,809.77 



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EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE & REPLACEMENT FUND 

^ STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

For the Year Eiulctl DccfmbcT 31. UKi^ 

Equipment Earnings 230.377. 7() 

Ojterntiiig E\()enditures 

Direct Labor _ 37,4 18.23 

Indirect Labor 19.808.90 

Leaves & Longevity 5,806.1;") 

Building Repairs 763.34 

(iasoline. Oil & Antifreeze 20,358.38 

Repair Parts 49,617.08 

Tires 8,174.91 

Batteries 1 ,596.07 

Miscellaneous Hardware 3,217.52 

Grease & Lubricants 571.36 

Supplies 1 ,764.29 

Hand Tools 799.18 

Fuel & Utilities 5,611.68 

Insurance 5,583.42 

Retirement Contributions 5.233.84 

Shop Equipment 784.00 167,108.35 



Depreciation 

Net Gain for Period 



55,305.39 222,413.74 



7,964.02 



Assets: 

Equipnien t 

Due from General Fund 



BALANCE SHEET 

December 31. 1963 



634.956.50 
31,594.99 



669,551.49 



Liabilities d- Funds: 

Municipal Investments 

Capital Reser\e Fund — 

Surplus, December 31, 1963 



STATEMENT OF CASH SURPLUS 

Net Operating Profit for 1963, as above 

-Accumulated Surplus, January 1, 1963 .. 

Less: Transfer to Capital Reser\e Fund 



635,520.29 
20.070.70 
13,960.50 669,551.49 



20,996.48 
15,000.00 



.Accumulated Surplus, December 31, 1963 

STATEMENT OF RESER\'E ACCOl'N T 

Balance, Januar\ 1. 1963 

Additions 

Depreciation 

Equipment Sold 

Transfer from Capital Reserve Fund 



55.305.39 

858.22 

15,000.00 



Exjuipment Purchased (as per detail) 

Balance, December 31, 1963 

DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED 

1 Snow Plow 970.20 1 Load Packer ..... 

1 Salter 971.73 

2 Tractor Attachments 1,380.00 

3 Mowers 1.587.50 

1 Street Sweeper 10,521.00 

TOTAL - --. 67,080.43 

73 



3 Pick-up Trucks 

2 5 Ton Dump Trucks 
1 Sidewalk Tractor 



7.964.02 
5.996.48 
13, 960. .50 

15.987.52 

71,163.61 

87,151.13 
67,080.43 

20,070.70 

11,600.00 
4,710.00 

27,500.00 
7,840.00 



BALANCE SHEET— PARKING METER FUND 

Decern bei 31, 1963 

Assets: 

Due from General Fund 33().7() 

Debt Requirements -- 32,OOU.OO 32.33U.7() 

Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt -- 32,000.00 

Unappropriated Current Surplus 330. 7() 32,330.76 



.STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES — 
PARKING METER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1963 

Cash Balance — January 1, 1963 .-. 15,806.74 

Rex'eyjues: 

Meter Collections — On Street '. 42,025.94 

Meter Collections — Off Street 9,997.65 

Parking Penalties 6,022.00 58,045.59 73,852.33 

Operating Expenditu res: 
On Street 

Meter Repairs & Maintenance 4.335.90 

Enforcement - -- 10,818.96 

Collecting & Accounting 1,555.70 

Marking Pavements 75.00 

Insurance 192.23 

Retirement Contributions 988.87 17,966.66 

Off Street 

Meter Repairs 1,039.48 

Enforcement 4,259.66 

Collecting 520.00 

Maintenance of Parking Areas 6,283.95 

Lighting 1 ,607.76 

Insurance & Miscellaneous 97.00 

Retirement Contributions 307.60 14.115.45 

Debt Service-Off Street Areas: 

Payment of Bonds .-. 22,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 1,085.00 23,085.00 

Share in Special Assessmeiits 18,354.46 

Total Expenditures 73,521.57 

Cash Balance — December 31, 1963 330.76 

74 



BALANCE SHEET — WATER FUND 

December 31, 1963 

ASSETS 
Fixed Assets: 

Water & Flowage Rights 167,663.11 

Land 21 1 ,975.37 

Structures 472,662.75 

Pumping & Purification Equipment 86,360.12 

Distribution Mains, Services, Hydrants & Meters 1,788,908.31 

Other Equipment & Garage Equipment - 72,311.12 

Unfinished Construction 1,947.91 

2,801,828.69 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 859,261.50 1,942.567.19 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund 131,176.38 

Investments 103,860.29 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund 8,822.03 

Materials & Supplies Inventory 53.608.66 297,467.36 

Total Assets 2,240,034.55 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Lons, Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 120.000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 39,479.08 159.479.08 

Fujid Bald/ice and Surplus: 

Municipal Investment 963,194.74 

Contributions in Aid of Construction .. 253,258.55 

Surplus — Balance Jan. 1. 1963 . 823,329.23 

Less: Uncollectable Accounts 12.24 

823,316.99 
Net profit for the Year 1963 40,785.19 864,102.18 2,080,555.47 



Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 2,240,034.55 

BOND FUND, WATER — DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1963 

Issue of Issue of 

19-t9 19=^9 Total 

Balance January 1, 1963 2,635.43 32.164.74 34.800.17 

Expenditures (See Detail Below) 2,635.43 32,164.74 34.800.17 

Balance December 31, 1963 



Detail of Expenditures 
Water Supply Structures — Wells 2,635.43 32,164.74 34,800.17 

75 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS — AVATER FUND 

For the Year Ended Decemljei 31. 1963 
OPERATING REXENUES 

Commercial Sales — Flat Rate 2,900.611 

Commercial Sales — Metered 208.726.12 

Industrial Sales — Metered 42,716.91 

Miscellaneous XVater Revenues 264.34 254.608.06 



OPERATING EXPENSES 
Water Supply: 

Source of Supply Labor 1,080.66 

Pumping Station Labor 25,592.68 

Purification Labor .— 2,613.60 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,714.57 

Gra\itv Supplies & Expenses 1,504.84 

Pumping Station Supplies c^ Expenses 2,777.78 

Purification Supplies & Expenses 4,792.34 

Power Purchaseti 17.527.21 

Repairs to Water Supply Str. & Equip 25.94 

Repairs to Piunp. Station Str. &: Equip. 1,394.78 

Repairs to Purification Str. & Equipment — _ 411.17 60,435.57 



Distribiitio7i: 

Distribution Wages 27.566.55 

Meter Department Labor 6,864.29 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 71.52 

Other Supplies Jv: Expenses 715.07 

Repairs to Structures 480.64 

Repairs to Mains 4.007.88 

Cleaning Mains 3,901.91 

Repairs to Services 3,290.04 

Repairs to Hydrants 957.30 

Repairs to Meters 2,802.07 50.657.27 



Administration: 

Commercial Office Salaries 2,849.09 

Meter Reading Salaries 8,435.63 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 1,235.57 

Salaries of General Officer --. 8,250.00 

Salaries of General Office Clerk .._ 4,570.00 

General Office Expense 558.98 

Repairs to Gen. Office Str. & Equipment 480.77 

General Expense 548.11 

Insurance 6,020.84 

Longe\ity, Annual and Sick Leave 13,259.01 

Retirement Fund Pavments 9,528.48 

Stores Dept. & Shop Expenses 1,028.31 

Garage Expense 2,554.52 59.319..SI 



Fixed Charges: 

Depreciation 45,466.64 

Taxes 39.96 45,506.60 



Total Operating Expenses 215,918.75 

Operating Income 38,689.31 

76 



\on-Operatiug Income: 

Income fi(jiii In\ested Funds 
Miscellaneous Income 



.\oii-Operathig Expense: 

Interest Expense 

Net Profit for the Year 



r).7 12.78 

1.177.()7 6,890.4r 



45.579.7(1 

4.794.57 

40,785.19 



BALANCE SHEET — SANITARY SEWER FUND 

December 31, 1963 
ASSETS 



Fixed Assets: 

Land & Right of ^Vay 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Customer Connections 
Sundry Equipment ._.. 



Less: Reser\e for Depreciation 

Deferred Engineering Charges ... 



Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund 

Investments 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund — - 

Due from Special .\ssess. Fund — Trunk 
Sewer Cost 



LIABILITIES & FUNDS 

Long Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 

Share in Special Assessments 

Fund Balafice 6- Surplus: 

Municipal Investment 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus Balance: Jan. I. 1963 290.154.01 

Net Profit for the Year. 1963 42,624.76 



38.274.97 

1.398.621.23 

202.804.99 

223,085.96 

6.335.01 

1.869,122.16 
797,005.93 



81,774.30 
28,746.16 
33.744.42 



072,116.23 
1 1 .678.40 



512.70 144,777.58 



1,228,572.21 



108.000.00 
37.042.47 145.042.47 



464,871.96 
285,879.01 



332.778.77 1.083.529.74 



1,228.572.21 



// 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS — SANITARY SEWER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31. 1963 
OPERATING REVENUES 

Seifej- Retits: 

General - - 63 ,000.34 

Industrial 22,646.14 85,646.48 



OPER.\TING EXPENSE.S 

General Operations, Admin, etc.: 

Main & Manhole Oper. Labor & Exp 6.814.38 

House Conn. Oper. Labor & Exp 2,946.33 

Maintenance of Sewer Mains ^ 3,089.87 

Maintenance of Manholes 949.93 

Misc. General Expense 300.00 

Meter Reading & Billing 2,570.01 

Employees Retireinent Fund .... 984.31 17,654.83 



Depreciation 22,736.91 40,391.74 

Operating Income ' 45,254.74 

Add: Non-Operating Income: 

Interest on Investments 1,188.33 



46,443.07 
Deduct: Non-Operating Expenses: 

Interest Expense -- 3,818.31 



Net Profit for the Year 42,624.76 



78 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 

May 28, 1964 
Certificate of Audit 

This is to certify that we have examined and audited the accoimts and 
records of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1963. In our opinion, the Exhibits included herewith reflect the true 
financial condition of the City on December 31, 1963, together with the 
results of operations for the fiscal year ended on that date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold G. Fowler, 
Director 

DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 
O. Maurice Oleson ) 
Lionel J. DeGrace ) Auditors 

Frederick E. Laplante ) 
Laurence M. Bean, Accountant 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 

May 28, 1964 
To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
Concord, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of an examination and audit of the 
accounts of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1963, which was made by this Division as requested. Exhibits as here- 
after listed are included as part of the report. 

Scope of Audit 

The accounts and records of all city officials charged with the custody, 
receipt and disbursement of city funds were examined and audited. 
An examination was made of a sufficient number of vouchers, payrolls 
and cancelled checks to satisfy the requirements of accepted standards of 
audit procedure. Receipts were checked by source insofar as possible. 
Book balances were verified by comparison with reconciled bank balances 
made from statements obtained from depository banks. 

79 



Coinparathw Balance Sheets {Revenue Accounts) — December 5/, 1962- 

December 31, 1963: (Exhibit A-1) 

Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accounts) lor the fiscal years 
ended December 31, 1962 and December 31, 1963, are presented in 
Exhibit A-1. As indicated therein, the Surplus increased by SI 58.77, from 
3112,567.34 to 3112,726.11 in 1963. 

Analysis of Change in Current Financial Conditio)!: (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change of the current financial condition of the 
City during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors which 
caused the change indicated therein. 1 hese were as follows: 

Increase in Surj)lns 

Net Budget Surplus S123,429.9l 

Decrease in Reserve Against Accounts Receivable 275.2:") 

Decrease in Reserve Against Stores Account 1.000.80 

Outdated Checks Cancelled 406.98 



5125.113.00 



Decrease in Su) l)ln 



Surplus l^sed to Reduce Tax Rate - - .SI 12,000.00 

Cancelled Check Honored -.- 2.00 

Increase in Reserve Against Taxes Receivable 12,952.23 

.•^124,954.23 
Net Increase 1 58.77 



Decrease in Long Tertn Indebtedness: 

The long term indebtedness of the City (including Mimicipal, Water 
and Union School District indebtedness) decreased by ,3368,354.79 in 
1963, as shown herewith: 

Long Term Bonds Bonds Long Term 

Debt & Notes & Notes Debt 

December Issued Retired December 

31, 1962 in 1963 in 1963 31, 1963 

Municipal .___ $1,538,214.00 .S137,920.00 .S286,490.0O .SI. 3 89, 644 .00 

Water .. _.. .. _... 216,520.00 15,229.00 33.139.00 198,610.00 

School (Union School 

District) 2,315,000.00 200,000.00 2,115.000.00 

Airport Advance 

(Due State) 18,792.16 1,874.79 16,917.37 

$4,088,526.16 $153,149.00 .$521,503.79 .$3,720,171.37 



Statement of Long Term Indebtedness: (Exhibit A-6) 

A statement of outstanding long term indebtedness as of December 
31, 1963, showing annual debt service lequirements, is contained in 
Exhibit A-6. 

80 



Comparatkie Statements of Appropriatiois and Expenditures — 
Estimated and Actual Rex'enues: (Exhibits A-4 h A-5) 

Coniparati\e statements of appropriations and expenditures, esti- 
mated and actual re\enues for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1963, 
are presented in Exhibits A-4 and A-5) . As indicated by the budget 
summary (Exhibit A-5), a revenue surplus of |1 1,149.07, plus un- 
expended balances of appropriations of $112,280.84, residted in a net 
budget surplus of .SI 23,429.91. 

Tax Collections: 

Tax collections (exclusive of State Head Taxes) of the current 
year's levy as compared to taxes assessed, for the years 1962 and 1963 
were as follows: 

Ta.xts .Assesscil — Current 
Year's Levy 

Taxes Collected — Current 
Year's Le\y 

Taxes .Abated — Current 
Years Levy ._„ 

Uncollected Taxes — Cur- 
rent Year's Levy 



Lex<y of 1962 


Fore III 


L('r'\ of I9hl 


Percent 


.S4, 324, 125.,-) 7 




.S4,546,52I.17 




,'{,()5().()()1.1S 


84.5% 


3.895,788.90 


85.7% 


25,448.15 


.0% 


38.937.7.". 


.5>% 


642,616.24 


14.9% 


611,794.54 


13.4% 


.154,324,125.57 


100.0% 


,'t54346,.521.17 


100.0% 



Conclusio}i: 

The provisions of Chapter 184 of the Laws of 1955, require that this 
report or the summary of findings and recommendations (letter of trans- 
mittal) shall be published in the next annual report of the City. 

We extend om- thanks to the officials of the City of Concord and 
their office staffs for the assistance rendered during the course of the 
audit. 

Yoins very truly, 

Harold G. Fowler, 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

O. Maurice Oleson ) 
Lionel J. DeGrace ) Auditors 

Frederick E. Laplante ) 
Laurence M. Bean, Accountant 



81 



DIRECTORY OF CITY SERVICES 



Service 



Administration, General 

Airport ( Maintenance ) 

Ambulance 

Assessments 

Auditorium, Rental 

Auto Permits 

Bicycle Licenses 

Beano Licenses 

Birth Certificates 

Bookmobile 

Building Permits 

Cemeteries 

City Council 

Civil Defense 

Dance Licenses 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Elections 

Engineering— City 

FIRE-CONCORD 

FIRE-PENACOOK 

Golf Course 

Health, Public 

Laboratory 

Legal Matters 

Library 

Maps, City 

Marriage Certificates 

Milk Licenses & Inspection 

Mortgages & Conditional Sales 

Oil Burner Inspection 

Old Age Assistance 

Ordinances & Resolutions 

Parks & Recreation 

Payments by City 

Personnel— City 

Planning 

Playgrounds 

Plumbing Permits 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Refuse Collection 

Relief 

Sanitation, Public 

Sewers 

Snow Plowing & Sanding 

Soldier's Relief 

Special Benefit Assessments 

Street Lights— Reported Out 

Street Maintenance 

Taxes— Payment of 

Trees, City 

Water— Service 

Water Bills— Payment of 

Weights & Measures 

Zoning Permits & Changes 

Welfare 



Department 

Mayor 

Engineering 

Police 

Assessors 

City Clerk 

Collector 

Police 

Police 

City Clerk 

Library 

Engineering 

Cemetery 

City Clerk 

Civil Defense 

Police 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

Engineering 

FIRE 

FIRE 

Recreation & Parks 

Health 

Health 

City Solicitor 

Library 

Engineering 

Records 

Health 

City Clerk 

Fire 

Welfare 

City Clerk 

Recreation & Parks 

Fmance 

Personnel 

Planning 

Recreation & 

Engineering 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Health 

Public Works 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Finance 

Concord Electric Co. 

Public Works 

Collector 

Engineering 

Water 

Collector 

Weights & Measures 

Engineering 

Welfare 



Parks 



Phone 

225-3591 
224-1955 
225-3232 
224-0241 
224-0591 
224-4261 
225-3232 
225-3232 
224-0591 
225-2743 
224-1955 
225-3911 
224-0591 
224-4342 
225-3232 
224-0591 
224-0591 
224-0591 
224-1955 
225-3355 
753-6622 
224-0951 
224-0521 
224-0521 
225-3041 
225-2743 
224-1955 
224-0591 
224-0521 
224-0591 
225-3355 
224-1091 
224-0591 
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225-277.=; 
224-2111 
224-1955 
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224-0951 
224-1955 
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224-1955 
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225-3641 
224-1955 
224-4261 
224-1955 
225-5574 
224-4261 
225-2864 
224-1955 
224-1091 



For prompt attention 
for SERVICE dial the 
DEPARTMENT IN- 

VOLVED. If you are un- 
certain about where to 
call, dial the MAYOR'S 
OFFICE 225-3591 




Be sure to give your 
NAME AND ADDRESS 
as well as the NATURE 
OF THE REQUEST 
clearly. DO NOT HANG 
UP until you are sure 
that your MESSAGE 
HAS BEEN UNDER- 
STOOD.