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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

City of 
CONCORD 



New Hampshire 



1964 
ANNUAL REPORT 



2.07 

4 

14 



City of 
CONCORD 



New Hampshire 



1964 
ANNUAL REPORT 



33^.0 
C74 
i 9b4 



University of New Hampshire 

T iKramr 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Mayor's Message _ 3 

Cilv Go\einment — 4 

Citv Boards 5 

I'lamiing .._ _ 6 

Engineering and Public Works 13 

Library 19 

Recreation and Parks ..- 2:> 

Police 27 

Municipal Court 29 

Fire . 31 

Ci\il Defense 33 

Cemeteries 36 

^Velfare 37 

Sanitary Inspection 38 

Health 40 

Records - 41 

Elections 42 

\\ater 43 

Collection 46 

Assessing 48 

Finance 54 

Certificate of Audit 77 

State Audit 77 




City Hall 



FROM THE MAYOR'S OFFICE 



To THE CnizEiNs oi- CJon'Cord: 
During the year 1964, 1 have had am- 
p\e oj)j)ortunily to leai n the needs and 
desires ot the peojjle of Concord. 
While yoin- public servants have gone 
about the business ol keejiing the city 
clean, sale, and healthy, they have also 
been considering how they may best 
j)rovide the additional facilities and 
services which discriminating citizens 
are seeking. 

The past )ear has brought especially 
heavy responsibilities to your Board of 
Aldermen and the Planning Board. 
CJity planning has grown steadily more 
complex, with increased federal and 
state involvement in civic affairs here 
in the capital and "nerve center" of 
New Hampshire. 

The face of the city is changing. Our good roads, fine libraries and recrea- 
tional facilities have proved attractive both to industry and to home 
owners. Two recent fires on Main Street have accelerated the face-lifting 
process there; an urban renewal project is under consideration; a new 
federal building, the N. H. Technical Institute, and new homes in fringe 
areas have recjuired access roads and extension of city facilities. 

Continuing citi/en sup})ort and cooperation will, I am sine, meet the 
challenges that face the city as we plan for the Bicentennial in 1965 and 
for the years ahead. 




Mayor Charles C. Davie 



Charles C. Davie 
Mayor 



CITY GOVERNMENT 

H)(il-H)(i5 



MAYOR 
Charles C. Davie 

ALDERMEN-AT-LARGE 

Robert D. Branch 
William P. Go\'e 
Edna C McKenna 
Winfielcl J. Phillips 
William A. Ste\'ens 
David E. Tardif 



WARD ALDERMEN 

Ward 1 John E. \Valters 

Ward 2 Karl G. Neuman 

W^ard 3 George A. Stohrer, Jr. 

\\'ard 4 Malcolm McLane 

Ward 5 Roland E. Fletcher 

Ward 6 foseph C. Musumeci 

^V^ard 7 (]. Edwin Howard 

^\^ard 8 William H. Perry 

\\'aitl 9 Thomas B. Jennings 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS 



CEMETERY SUPERIN- 
TENDENT 
Edward L. Rowland 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Walter H. Carlson 

CITY ASSESSORS 
Raymond P. Daigle 
Robert W. Potter 
Nathan Wechsler 

CITY CLERK 

Arthur E. Roby 
Mrs. Marjorie B. Foote 
(Appointed 12-1-64) 

CITY ENGINEER & SUPT. 
OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Howard Raymond 

CITY LIBRy\RIAN 
Lois R. Markey 

CITY SOLICITOR 
Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Richard D. Brodeur 

DIRECTOR OF WELFARE 

Gertrude E. Watkins 



ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 

Ellsworth B. Philbrick 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 
Verne F. Santas, Jr. 

FIRE CHIEF 

Duncan M. Minxloch 

HEALTH OFFICER 
Dr. ^Villiam W. Frost, Jr. 

MUNICIPAL COURT 

Donald Matson, Judge 

Francis E. Perkiirs, Assoc. Judge 

Marie MacPhail, Clerk 

OVERSEER OF POOR 
Edward H. ^'ork 

PERSONNEL AND PUR- 
CHASING DIRECTOR 

Thomas S. Pingree 

PLANNING DIRECTOR 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

POUND KEEPER 
(>harles C Hoagland 

PROBATION OFFICER 

fames Cerriello 



RECREATION D1REC:T0R 
Robert H. Aver 

SANITARY INSPECTOR 
George A. Hill 

SEALER OF ^VEIGHTS 
AND MEASURES 
Harold C. Fletcher 



TAX COLLECTOR 

George West 

TREASURER 
Violet P. Constant 

WATER SUPERINTENDENT 

G. Arthin- Faneiif 



CITY BOARDS 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY 
BOARD 

Robert J. Jewell 
James D. Bell 
John H. Symonds 

BOARD OF PLUMBING 
EXAMINERS 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
George E. Young 
Earl A. Banks 

TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS 
Violet P. Constant 
Richard G. \\'illianison 
Robert M. Beyer 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
W illiam ^V. Frost, Jr., M.D. 
\V. D. Penhale, M.D. 
T. J. Halligan, M.D. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 

Douglas N. Everett 

Lt. Gen. Edward Brooks 

AA^arren H. Greene 

(Apjiointed 7-27-64) 
Pascjuale Ruio 
Dudley \V. Orr 
John Swenson 

Ex Officio: 

Mayor Charles C. Da\'ie 
Howard E. Raymond, 

City Engineer 
Robert D. Branch, 

Alderman-at-Large 



ZONING BOARD OF 
ADJUSTMENT 

Richard N. Peale 

(Appointed 10-13-64) 
Enoch Shenton, II 
Allan V. Evans 
Roy V. Lang 
Frank J. Preston 

BOARD OF APPEALS 
Arnold Perreton 
Everett Munson 
C^arroll Garland 
Robert A. Foster 
W^illiam Johns 

BOARD OF LIBRARY 
TRUSTEES 
Chester G. Larson, Chairman 
Mrs. Mary Farnimi 
Mrs. Milclred T. Melvin 
J. Bernard Halligan 
James Lynch 
Atlee F. Zellers 
Mrs. Nyleen Morrison 
Mrs. Walter S. Newton 
\\^ Duer Thompson 

BOARD OF REVISION OF 
ASSESSMENTS 
Verne F. Santas, Jr., Chairman 
Howard E. Raymond 
Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 
James A. Taylor 
Archie N. Gourley 



5 



PLANNING DEPARTMENT 

Workable Froo^rani — At ihe request ol the Mayor, the Phmnhig Depart- 
ment prejjarecl an appHcation lor recertification ol the Workable Program 
tor Community Imj^rovement ior submission to the Housing and Home 
Finance Agency. Subsequently, the program submission was approved by 
the Board ol Aldermen, and the Workable Program was recertified by the 
U. S. Housing Administrator for one year ending October 1, 1965. 

Codes — Recommended that the Building Code ol the City of Concord 
be amended to adopt by lelerence two nationally-recognized standards 
for the installation of phmibing, heating, and electrical systems in mobile 
homes and travel trailers used as dwellings in the city. 

Recommended amending the Building Code of the City of Concord with 
reference to means of egress by substituting the 1963 edition of the Build- 
ing Exits Code of the National Fire Protection Asssociation in place of the 
1959 edition in force. 

Recommended amending the Building Code of the City of Concord to 
adopt by reference the 1960 edition of the Fire Prevention Code recom- 
mended by the National Board of Fire Underwriters. This action resulted 
in the atloption of Concord's first comjjrehensive fire prevention regula- 
tions. 

Recommended revising the Phmibing Code of the City of Concord by 
adopting by reference the American Standard National Plumbing Code. 

Recommended favorable action on an ordinance amending construction 
standards for mobile homes and traxel trailers to recjuire better construc- 
tion of power sujjply assemblies leatling from public utility lines to mobile 
homes and travel trailers. 

Appro\ed the adoption of an ordinance amending the Building Code 
requiring that all water-cooled air conditioning systems of more than five- 
ton capacity include approved cooling and recircidating aj^paratus to 
conserve water. 

Economic Base Study — Recommended that the Planning Board be 
authorized to schedule the preparation of an Economic Base Study of 
Concord as jiart of its 1965 master planning activities in connection with 
the Workable Program for Communii) ImjMo\ement. 

Land Use Plan — Prepared and adopted a master plan report on land use, 
a revision of the Land Use Plan for the City of Concord prepared in 1956. 
The revised ])lan was imdertaken in compliance with requirements of the 
W^orkable Program for Community Improvement for periodic updating 
of elements of the comprehensi^e (ommuniiy plan. 



Conmiunity Facilities Fhni — \Vork was started on the preparation of a 
Community Facilities Plan under the federal 701 local ])lanning assistance 
jDrogram. The j)lannino consulting firm of Edwards and Kelcey, Boston, 
Massachusetts. Avas retained to prepare this master plan report as an ele- 
ment of the Workable Program for CJommunity Improvement. 

Coinmtmily Shelter Fl(ni — At the request of the Mayor, the City Plan- 
ning l^oarcl undertook the jMCj^aration of a Community Shelter Plan for 
Concord as part of the Office of Civil Defense nationwide "50-City" Com- 
mimity Shelter Plan Program being developed by Stanford Research 
Institute of Menlo Park, California. The firm of Edwards and Kelcey, Inc., 
Engineers and Consultants, of Boston, Massachusetts was retained as 
subcontractor to assist the Planning Board in developing this "pilot 
project" shelter plan. 

Zotujio; — Recommended that the City of Concord appropriate fvnids 
to imdertake a comprehensive revision of the Concord Zoning Ordinance 
with financial aid from the federal government under its 701 local plan- 
ning assistance program. 

Advised amending the Zoning Map of the City of Concord to expand the 
Civic District in a southerly direction to include the site and immediate 
vicinity of the proposed new post office-federal building on Pleasant Street 
between South and South Spring Streets. 

Proposed to incorporate provisions for historical district zoning of the 
Old North End in the comprehensive revision of the Concord Zoning 
Ordinance to be completed in 1965. 

Subdivision Control — Recommended that the city's subdivision regula- 
tions adopted as ordinances in the late 1950s be struck from the Munici- 
jxil Code of Ordinances to clear the way for adoption of new regulations. 

After pidilic hearing, adojJted revised Subdivision Regidations for the 
City of Concord in substitution of regulations originally adopted by the 
board in 1950. The new regidations are in substantial accord with land 
subdivision regulations suggested by the Housing and Home Finance 
Agency. 

Apj^roved the aj)j)lication of Roger W. Guay for the redesign of a portion 
of the preliminary jilat of the Hillcrest Park subdivision on East Side 
Drive in the Concord Plains area. 

Voted final approval of 12-lot and 21 -lot sections of Hillcrest Park. 

Capital linproiienunit Frogram — At the recjuest of the Mayor, reviewed 
the project priority schedule of the six-year Capital Imj^rovement Program 
for the City of Concord, 1964-1969, as prepared by the Mayor with the 
assistance of the City Auditor. 



Neigliborliood Analyses — Conducted a study to develop factual data to 
provide a general picture of those families who reside under substandard 
conditions in each of Concord's Neighborhoods and its rural areas. The 
results of this study were published in a report entitled "Neighborhood 
Analyses, C^oncord, New Hampshire, Characteristics of Families Affected 
by Poor Housing," an element of the Workable Program for Community 
Improvement. 

Urban Renewal — After careful stud) and analysis, adopted a resolution 
that the Caj)itol Plaza North area, hing between the State House and the 
County Com t House, be declared suitable for urban renewal, and recom- 
mended that the City of Concord through its Housing and Urban Re- 
newal Authority take the necessary steps to apply to the Housing and 
Home Finance Agency for an advance of funds to survey and plan this 
area for urban renewal treatment, and for an allocation therefor of capital 
grant funds. 

Recommended to the Concord Housing Authority that it gi\e serious 
consideration to requesting the Urban Renewal Administration to ap- 
prove an extension of the Capitol Pla/a North Project to include the 
area on the easterly side of North Main Street in the vicinity of Bridge 
Street. 

Major Thoroughfares — Recommended that the City of Concord record 
its approval of the proposals of the Commissioner of Public Works and 
Highways for alterations in the locations of Routes 4, 9, 202 and Inter- 
state 93 in Concord, and that the Mayor be authorized to make the City's 
position in this matter known to the Special Committee of the Covernor 
and Council considering the same. The proposed changes include con- 
struction of a new Merrimack River bridge at Bridge Street, elimination 
of the Bridge Street traffic circle in favor of a grade separation and full 
interchange at this location, and the laying out and accpiisition of the 
right of way for the Concord Plains bypass, so-called. 

Mapped Lines of Future Streets — Mapped the lines of a future relocation 
of portions of Broadway and West Street in the vicinity of South Street. 
Mapped the lines of a proposed widening of Warren Street along its 
northerly side from the Central Fire Station property to Green Street. 

Streets — Recommended acceptance of 2,365 feet of new street as follows: 
Cricket Lane — 800 feet, B Street Extension — 350 feet, Roy Street Ex- 
tension — 575 feet and Marion Street — 640 feet, all located on Concord 
Plains. 

Recommended widening existing streets at six different locations. These 
included a 10-loot widening of North State Street from the C^hristian 
Science Chinch to Pleasant Street, a 10-foot widening of Storrs Street 



I'loin DejK)t Street to Freight Street, an 11-f'oot widening of Warren Street 
in front of the Central Fire Station, a six-foot widening of Sonth Spring 
Street adjacent to the new federal building site, a widening of the inter- 
section of Pleasant and A\'arren Streets, and a minor widening of a por- 
tion of Lawrence Street on Concord Plains. 

Advised the reconstruction of Marshall, Fuller and Oak Streets by the 
Public ^Vorks Department during the 1965 construction season. 

Ojjposed a request of the American Legion for permission to encumber 
the sidewalk on School Street in front of the Legion l^uilding by the erec- 
tion of a flagpole. 

Recommended favorable action on a request of residents that a road lo- 
cated oft Old Turnpike I'load be designated Spring Hill Drive. Also ap- 
proved the request of East Concord residents for adjustments in street 
names affecting Eastman Street, Mountain Road and Melvin Hill Road. 

Sidewalks — Recommended construction of 265 feet of hard-surfaced 
sidewalk on the westerly side of Storrs Street from the end of the existing 
sidewalk north of Depot Street to the newly-constructed extension of 
Dubois Avenue. 

Recommended construction of approximately 3,300 feet of hard-surfaced 
sidewalk along the westerly side of Mountain Road in East Concord 
beginning at a point ojiposite Fernald Street and ending at the foot of 
The Mountain northerly of Bowens Brook. 

Traffic Control — Approved establishing stop intersections at the follow- 
ing locations: West Street at Broadwa) ; Fremont Street at Pleasant and 
Warren Streets; Gale and Tuttle Streets at Redington Road; Abbott 
Road, Concord Manor, at South Main Street; Manor Road, south of Con- 
cord Manor, at Abbott Road; and West Main Street, Penacook, at South 
Main Street. 

Approved establishing a yield right of way intersection on Redington 
Road at South Fruit Street, and recommended against changing the stop 
intersection on AViggin Street at Broadway to a yield intersection. 

Recommended that North Fruit Street from Pleasant Street to Woodman 
Street, and ^\'oodman Street from North Fruit Street to Westbourne 
Road, be established as one-way streets for travel in northerly and easterly 
directions, respectively. 

Favored establishing one-way traffic in a northerly direction on Rollins 
Street. 

9 



Recommended that Marshall Street be returned to the status ol" a two- 
way street, but advised against such action on Fuller and Oak Streets. 

Favored j)assage ot an ordinance banning through trucking on Hall 
Street. 

Recommended that the Police De))artment be directed to place east- 
west streets in the Ward Six residential neighborhood under surveillance 
to minimize their use by through traffic traveling at speeds which con- 
stitute a hazard to the safety ot the resitlents ot the area. 

Concurred in the findings of the State Highway Di\ision Engineer that 
existing urban development on lowei- Manchester Street did not justify 
a requested reduction in the s})eed limit from 40 to 25 miles j)er hour. 

Proposed the construction of a traffic island at the intersection of Pleas- 
ant and Warren Streets to facilitate traffic channelization ami signal 
placement at this location. 

On-Strcct Parking — Recommended that no jxirking be jjermitied at the 
following on-street locations: west side of Colbiun Avenue; north side of 
Pitman Street from North Main Street to courthouse driveway; north side 
of Warren Street from high school driveway to North Fruit Street; and 
south side of Pembroke Road from C^anterbury Road to Branch Tmn- 
pike. 

Recommended that two-hour jxirking be substituted for no parking 
on the easterly side of South State Street from Fayette Street to .Monroe 
Street, due to the recent widening of the traveled way of the street. 

Appro\ed changing the jarking limit on the westerly side of South State 
Street between Fayette and Thomj)son Streets from two to one-hour dura- 
tion as an accommodation for j^atrons of a suj)ermarket at this location. 

Favored correcti\e measines on the southerly side of Washington Street 
in Penacook involving street grade and curbing for the convenience of 
Post Office patrons using on-street jxnking accommodations. 

Utilities — ]]^atey System — C>oncurretl in the fnulings and recommenda- 
tions of the s]:)ecial inter-agency Water Sujjjj1\ Study Committee relative 
to emergency ste})s to be taken to insure an atlecjuate water suj)j)ly until a 
permanent solution to the water sujijjh jjroblem is develojjed. 

Advised favorable action on three petitions requesting extensions of the 
municipal water system totaling 1,0{)() feet of ^vater main as follows: 
Garvins Falls Road, Black Hill — 700 feet. Burns Avenue, Concord Plains 
— 170 feet, and Linden Street, Penacook — LSO feet. 

10 



Opposed an additional l,(S()()-loot water main extension in (iarvins Falls 
Road on Black Hill, due to lack ol economic justification based on exist- 
ing and jjotential residential de\elopment at this remote location. 

L^tilitics — Sdiiittny Scivrr System — in connection with the long- 
standing jjroposal tor joint sewage treatment in Penacook by Boscawen 
and C^oncord, recommended that the City ol Concord advise the Town 
ol Boscawen that the C;ity ex])ects definite action by the 1 Own relative to 
submission ol an apjjlication to HHFA for fimds to luidertake the joint 
sewage treatment study, and that failing such action by the Town, the 
City will feel free to jjroceed on its own to imijlement its j)lans for sewage 
treatment in Penacook. 

]n the foregoing matter, further recommended that the C^ity of Concord 
give the Town of Boscawen whatever assurances are proj^er that the City 
favors the joint treatment project, and will cooperate in every way pos- 
sible toward this end. 

Recommended fa\orable action on a petition for the construction of 350 
feet of sanitary sewer main in Linden Street at Penacook. 

Recommended favorable action on the request of the Beede Electrical 
Instrimient Company for extension of the sanitary sewer system in South 
Main Street at Penacook. 

ApjM o\ecl a reduction of the width of the right of way of the Prison Sewer, 
so-called, from 66 to 33 feet in connection with Concord Electric Com- 
pany's plans for a ne^v service building easterly of McGuire Street. 

Land Transactions — Recommended that the City of Concord acquire a 
32-acre tract of land situated oft Old Turnj)ike Road for storm drainage, 
sanitary landfill and park purposes. 

Recommended that the City acquire one acre of cleared land situated be- 
tween Island Road and the Outlet Canal of the Contoocook River for 
use as a boat latmching area. Also recommended that the City obtain op- 
tions to acquire the dams on the Contoocook River opposite The 
Island and on the Outlet Canal for the purpose of conveying the dams, 
land and related facilities to the State of New Hampshire for restoration. 

Advised against a Chamber of Commerce recommendation that the 
City pinchase the President Franklin Pierce residence on South Main 
Street for preservation and operation as a significant historical point of 
interest. Further advised that acc|uisition of the Pierce residence should 
be a matter of primary concern to the State of New Hampshire rather 
than to the City, and recommended that the Chamber's suggestion be 
brought to the attention of State authorities. 

11 



Recommendetl that parcels of Cii\ land be licensed for use bv the Farm 
Btneau Muttial Insurance Company for employee parking, and h\ Sanel 
Realtv. Inc. for a pedestrian Asalk. The former involves land on North 
State Street at Cimimings Avenue, and the latter, land on Storrs Street 
at Dubois Aa enue. 

At the request of the Board of Aldermen, revie^ved all lands owned by 
the Citv to determine ^vhether any such holdings could be declared sur- 
plus. In this connection, recommended that the City proceed with the 
sale of t^vo parcels of tax-deed land consisting of 20 acres of Avoodland 
off Heights Road on Concord Plains. This land was formerly held for use 
as an Arm\ Reserve armory site. 

Approved a request of Concord Ice Skating Arena, Inc. that it be per- 
mitted to acquire a parcel of City land situated on Loudon Road easterly 
of the Merrimack River for use as the site for an arena. 

Approved the convevance of three small parcels of stnplus land situated 
on the 'vvesterlv side of Stons Street bet^seen Depot Street and Freight 
Street to the o^vners of adjacent property. 

Fire Protection — While supporting the proposed construction of a fire 
station on Concord Plains at this time, opjjosed a suggestion advanced by 
the Board of Aldermen that a portion of the Cioncord Plains Playground 
on Lotidon Road be used as the site of the j.nojjosed ne^\■ fire facility. 

Advised against a proposal that red lights be installed over all fire alarm 
boxes in the city on the grounds that the substantial annual cost involved 
in maintaining such a lighting system made it impractical to imdertake 
the added fire protection service at this time. 



12 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

The buikling. lemodelino; and changing in Concord continues at a 
moderate pace but w'nh more activity than the previous year. The growth 
is noted in all areas — stores and commercial buildings, residences and 
apartments, subdivisions, streets, utilities, parking lots, and public build- 
ings. Concords first professional building with off-street parking has 
now been completed. 

Growth continues to a large extent east of the Merrimack in East Concord 
and the Heights. Two new apartment buildings were added to the Lexing- 
ton Manor. There is a ne\v subdivision off East Side Drive. The new 
State Office Building opened on the Heights and, with all the industry 
there, the greatest employment of labor is now on the East side. The 
gro^\th to the East is very evident in the traffic problem at Bridge 
and Manchester Streets at 8:00 a. m. and 5:00 p. m. 

PUBLIC A\ ORKS 

In addition to routine maintenance, the Public A\'orks Department 
was involved in several imique projects. We biult the road and set the 
pumping station for the \\'ater Department at Turkey Pond: the Me- 
morial Field stands Avere conij^leted: and in addition we excavated the 
old floor of the Community Center and installed the concrete subfloor 
when the Recreation Dejjartment needed help. 

A\'e are in serious trouble with trees. This is the third dry year and 
many trees are dying; the rej^lacements are drying up and dying, and the 
Dutch Elm is increasing, ^\'e must expend considerably more on trees 
or become a treeless city. 

The Sewer Department, under Mr. Emmons, is conducting an inspec- 
tion, cleaning and repair program that is eliminating plugged lines, 
providing better service, and jMomoting better public relations as -well as 
saving mone\. We are continuing the separation of storm drains Avhen- 
ever possible. 

The Refuse Department is continuing to show improvement in opera- 
tion and service. ^Vith a hundred and fifty containers out, we have 
eliminated one of the four dailv collection trucks, ^\'e plan to go to con- 
tainer trains next year for further savings. 

The Public A\orks Department started a ne^\- idea in highwav main- 
tenance this year — the use of a grid roller to break up the existing 
pavement and reclaim it for reuse. The method ^vas tried on South State 
Street, Portsmouth Street and Country Club Lane with excellent results. 

13 



This machine will sa\e the Cit\ thousands ol dollars and piovide better 
riding streets. 

/. Street (Ujjistntctioii 

A. Reconstruction ol South State Street — under contract 

B. N. H. Technical Institute Road — 650 leet — comj)leted 
C Old Turnpike Road — change in right of way — 1750 feet 

D. Dover Street — 300 feet — completed 

E. Lincoln Street — 350 feet — completed 

F. Cricket Lane — 633 feet — imder construction b) subdivider 

G. Traffic Islands at Pleasant &: Fruit Streets — completed 

H. 1 raffic Islands at \\'ashington & North Sjjring Streets — com- 

pleted 
1. Traffic Islands at A\'est & Broadway — completetl 
J. Proposed Pleasant Street widening 
K. Proposed North Fruit Street Avidening 
L. Partridge Road — 400 feet — conijileted 
M. Jay Drive — 250 feet — completecl 




What is Being Done With Our Tax Money? 

Above photo is centered on the Neiv Hampshire Technical 
Institute site. Several commitments by the City of Concord have 
made possible an additional educational ceyiter located in our 
city. The commit^nents involved and coinpleted were construc- 
tion of a sanitary sewage system and an access road. Total cost 
for these projects was $39,300.00. 

14 




This photo indicates 0.3 of a mile on realignment of 

Old Turnpike Road traveling east from Manchester 

Street to one of Concord's neivly developing indris- 

trial centers. Total cost for this project 

was $23,200.00. 



II. Sanitary Seiver 

A. Dover Street — 500 feet of 8" A.C.P. — completed by sub- 

divider 

B. Partridge Road — 375 feet of 8" A.C.P. 

C. Red W^ing Drive — 200 feet of 8" A.C.P. 

D. Oriole Street — 600 feet of 8" A.C.P. 

E. Jay Drive — 120 feet of 8" A.C.P. 

F. Robin Road — 230 feet of 8" A.C.P. 

G. Old TurniMke Road — 243 feet of 15" E.S.V.C.P. for future 
sanitary sewer 

H. St. Paid's School — plans drawn 

I. Langley Sewer Connection, North of Brick Tower Motel — 
plans drawn 



15 



///. Storm Sexver 

A. Dover Street — comiJleied 

B. Cricket Lane — 550 leet 12" R.C.P. — completed by siibdivider 

IV. Sidcxvalk Cu)i.strtictio)i 

A. Penacook Street — under contract 

B. New Post Office — cmb and sidewalk 

C. South Street — Mooreland Avenue to Rockingham Street — 

completed 

V. Drainage Construction 

A. Penacook Street, Penacook — - completed 

B. Sewall's Falls Road 

C. South Fruit Street — completed 

VI. Street Descriptions and Returns 

A. Intersection oi Eastman and Shawmut Streets 

B. Dover Street 

C. Dubois Avenue 

D. Storrs Street 

E. Low Avenue 

F. Penacook Street 

VII. Miscellaneous 

A. Processed 720 new deeds 

B. Renumbering of Moiuitain Road 

C. Revising Ward ALip 

D. Revising Sewer Records 

E. Printing 

F. Description of City land Pleasant and Depot Streets 

G. Preliminary traverse line for East Concord By-Pass 
H. Boimds set — 51 

L Sewer investigations — 10 
J. Driveway problems — 17 
K. Street lines — 47 

VIII. Water Department 

A. Garvins Falls water assessment 

B. Turkey Pond — elevation for pump house 

IX. Recreation Department 

A. Plans and specifications — Community Center gym floor — 

com])leted 

B. Plans and specifications for irrigation system at l^eaver Meadow 

Golf Coinse — completed by contract 

16 



C. Plans and specifications lor shelters — completed 

D. Men-ill Park — jkmkI 

A'. Planning Dcp(nliiicnl 

A. Mapped lines ol a luture street — East Concord By-Pass 

B. Mapped lines ol liitme streets at intersection W^est, South & 

Broadwa) 

XI. Assessors D('partii}cnt 

A. Plotting new building construction and additions 



17 



BBIIH^H! 


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I^^^^^^^^^^^^B 


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Library staff places more books in Penacook Branch. 




Hardie Gramatky, Author of "Little Toot," arrives with Nelson 
Whipple, President of The Friends of the Library and Mayor Davie. 



CITY LIBRARY 

Books and Materials — 1 lie )ear 1964 was another vintage year at the 
library — materials, circulation, registration and services hit new peaks. 
The book collection was increased to a total of 111,600, with 5,003 new 
books being added. The music and record collection was greatly en- 
larged by the addition ot almost 300 recordings, making a total of 1286 
reconlings in the librar\. 1 he j)rint collection gained eleven new prints, 
and there are now thirt)-one framed j^rints for circidation. Ajij^roximately 
350 films were available for circulation during the year. 

A new featine in materials was the addition of twenty-nine taped record- 
ings of book discussions. These lajDes were cataloged and placetl on shelves 
available to borrowers. 

C^irculation figures were at a new high with 323,774 items circulated. 
There are 24,817 registered borrowers, which rejiresents about 86 percent 
of the jiopulation of (Joncord, a phenomenal figure by library standards. 

BuildiuiTs and Equipincnl — Except for the areas which might be in- 
volved in the contemplated addition to the library, the relighting project 
begun in 1962 has now been completed. All of the woodwork in the 
library has been waxed; the walls of the first floor ha\e been painted. 
New chairs and tables ha\e been jnuchased for the adidt reading room. 

Penacook Branch has all new lighting, a new charge desk and new floor 
co\ering. 

An architect, Mr. Guy K. C. Wilson, was engaged to draw preliminary 
plans for the proposed addition. The City Librarian wrote a jMogram for 
this addition and worked with the Library Board and Mr. Wilson on the 
jDlans for this addition which have been j^resented to the Concord Board 
of Aldermen. 

Serx'iccs — Reference and advisory services continued to increase in all 
departments of the library. In addition to borrowing a record number of 
books and other materials, more people, many from other towns, availed 
themselves of the library's resources in the reference room, reading room, 
and the new public browsing area, judging from the large nimiber of 
telephone requests for information, some I^y long distance, more and more 
jieople are finding this a convenient and expedient way to use the library. 

Dining 1964 the library loaned 447 books and other materials through 
the inter-library loan system, while borrowing only sixty-one, approxi- 
mately a third of the number borrowed in 1963. 

19 



The public was kept informed ol the resources of the library through 
articles, book reviews, and lists of ne-w books and records which aj:)peared 
in the Concord Monitor, the Manchester Union, Concord Shoppers News, 
and the Newsletter of the (Joncord Chamber of Commerce. Many re- 
quests, and some new borroAvers, came to the library as a result of the 
taped book revie^vs. spot annoimcements, and informal talks on W'KXL. 

The Librar\ ftn ther publicized its services and sj^ecial programs with the 
distribution of the following catalogs and leaflets: catalog of films avail- 
able for loan 1964-(i5; listings of film jjrograms, both for athdts and for 
children; fall and simimer bidletins giN ing the libiar\'s hoins and listing 
the resources and special programs otferetl: \\eekly listings of ""Dates ^vith 
your Public Library. " 

By request the Librarian repeated a series of six lessons on the Use of the 
Library for Adidts. The Adtdt Book Discussion Grotq) was continued by 
pojDular demand, meeting Aveekly from No\ ember to April. The Librarian 
and other members of the staff responded to frequent requests to talk to 
groujjs and organizations. 

Twelve classes for mothers of jne-school thildren ^vere held in the Chil- 
dren's Room, -^vith special stories and acti\ ities for the jMe-school children. 
Weekly story hoius were held in the Main Librar\, ami at the Penacook 
Branch. During the simimer seven weekly stor\ hours were held at play- 
grotmds in different sections of the cit). 

The Bookmobile added six new stops to its regular schedide dining the 
simimer and four additional stops after school started, enabling the library 
to reach man\ more readers in oiith ing areas of the city. This resulted in a 
gain in circulation of 4.910 in the six months after the new schedule was 
put into effect. 

Films — In line with the library's growth from a book-lending institution 
to an educational center, use of audio-visual materials has increased sub- 
stantially in the past year. Since March 1. 1964, the library has recorded 
the number of viewers, as well as the number of films loaned for home use; 
and l^y December .SI of 1964, 17.516 persons had vie\\ed our films. 481 
films Avere loaned for grou]3 sho^vings during 1964. To meet the increased 
demand, sponsored films ha\e been secured on long-term loan, thus in- 
creasing the number of films available. Members of the staff have attended 
preview sessions of the North Coimtr\ Co-ojjerative Film Group, to assist 
in reviewing and selecting purchases for the tri-state area. 

A\'ithin the library, films ^vere used for t\\o -weekh programs. October 
through April — a Saturday morning series for grades four to six, and 
a Tuesdav evening program for adults and \oung peo]:)le. In the Chil- 
dren's Room and at Penacook Branch, occasional film programs ha\e lent 

20 



variety to the stor)-hoin. 1 he Friends of the Library presented three full- 
length fdnis at the (^ity Viiditorium, j^lanned for e\enings when children 
Avould not be in scliool the follo\\ing day. 

Print Coll<'< lion — The framed jjrint collection remained highly active 
in 1964. 1 he Friends of the Library donated tAvelve new prints to our 
existing collection, making a total of thirty-one copies of j^aintings by a 
grouj) of heterogeneous artists. We now have prints dating back to Leo- 
nardo da Vinci and many of the masters through the centmies, includ- 
ing contemj)orary artists Paul Klee and Grant \\'ood. 

In May, the Friends of the Library made good use of our redecorated 
loimge area Avhen they jjresented a showing of oin- new jjrints with com- 
ments by a member of their group. The collection of prints was re- 
sponsible for 28-^ loans during the year. Each pictine has reserves; many 
ha\e twenty or more borrc^wers waiting to use them. 

Music Room — 1 he Ruth Ma) Music Room Ijecame increasingly popular 
in 1964 as more people became aware of the room and its collection. 
Several users presented recordings to the library as tokens of their ap- 
preciation for the use of the room. The record collection in the room has 
increased to 309. Dining the year, the Music Room was used for a series 
of Satinclay morning classes in music ajJ):)rec!ation for children, and for 
several aclidt sessions, all sponsored by the Concord Music Club. The 
Music Room is becoming well known to students and the general public; 
in the words of one user, "an oasis where one can go and listen to good 
music." 

Exhibits — With the cooj^eralion of generoirs and talented people in the 
greater Concord area, the library has had some fine exhibits, requiring a 
minimum of time and effort from the staff. Authentic models of aircraft 
used by many nations in World ^\'ar II attracted much interest among 
men and boys. Another friend tinned his collecting hobby into an inter- 
esting display of British soldiers in regimental dress, and a small replica 
of the Coronation scene. Stencilled furniture and trays were among the 
pieces made by a crafts class, and attractively jMacecl in the Blanchard 
Room, for a week in May. Young j^eojile's talents were evident in a fine 
rock collection, a window filled with Origami originals; a Girl Scout trooj) 
did an appealing show-case for the children's room, and a children's pa- 
triotic group arranged a Thanksgiving scene for the main floor vestibule. 
Two most attractive shows, one featuring artifacts from Africa, the other 
gay Christmas crafts, toys, and figurines from Norway, were loaned and 
arranged by a library friend who had li\ed briefly in Europe and Africa. 



21 




Dress-Up Day at Fletcher-Mtirphy Play Lot. 




Competitors in the Junior Champ track meet. 



RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT 

The Recreation antl Parks Department conducts a comprehensive pro- 
gram ol acti\ities lor all ages and both sexes on a year-round basis, and 
maintains and operates parks, playgrounds, recreation iacilities and 
buildings so as to provide a variety of oj^portunities for wholesome and 
interesting use of leisure time for the citizens of Concord. 



l^KCREATION ACTIVITIES 

Personnel — T^\•o full-time supervisors, twenty-three summer playground 
and pool instructors, over twenty part-time and volunteer leaders and 
instructors. 

Children and Youth Programs Offered — Two play schools for ages three 
and four, neighborhood square dances at six schools, organized games at 
East Concortl Community (Center, figure skating class, ski lessons, pee-wee 
and bantam hockey, midget football, tennis lessons. 

Adult Programs Offered — Women's fitness, women's ten-pin bowling, 
women's candle-pin bowling, golf lessons, housewives' golf, industrial 
Softball, retired citizens' bowling, badminton, women's activities at Pena- 
cook \'outh (Center, \A'estern scpiare dance class. 




Two White Park residents. 
23 




Peanut Carnival fun. 

Summer Playo^youiids and Pools — A ten-week program was conducted at 
twelve playgrounds and seven pools including programs of games, 
athletics, arts and cratts, music and dancing, dramatics, storytelling, swim- 
ming instruction trips, and special events. 

Attendance: Playgrounds 57,761; Pools 83,908 

Year-Roiind Sprcial Events Ojjered — \\^inter Carnival e\ents, ski and 
skate Exchange, Easter egg hunt, Benson's Animal Farm trip, square 
dance festivals. Elks' field day, Junior Champ track meet, sidewalk art 
exhibit, water ballet, Rotary swim meet, State swim meet, summer band 
concerts. Fourth of Jidy fireworks. Sunset Club summer trips, Hamjiton 
Beach Teen trip. Children's Bear Brook trip, and the Peanut Carnival. 

Community Center — The Center is open for full-time use from October 
1 until A\n\\ 30. The total attendance for people actually involved in 
activities, not including sjDCctators at events or general ^\'alk-in, was 
25,746. 

Children and Youtli Programs Offered — Senior High chess club, jimior 
badminton, judo, children's art, youth council, commimity high basket- 
ball, midget basketball, tumbling, tramjioline, free play, copj^er enameling 
class, Hallowe'en party, Christmas dance, Teen-Canteen dance, charm 
school, film ]:)rograms, Christmas craft classes. 

24 




America's strength lies in its children. 



Adult Programs — Co-ed badminton, women's fitness, women's badmin- 
ton, ^Vomen's Day Open House. Sunset Club, advanced ait, adult oil 
]xiinting, cieati\e design, Russian class, bridge club, industrial basketball, 
Western square dance, men's night, make-up lecture (street and theater) , 
money matters class, nightworkers' gym. 

C.olf Course Operaiiou — With the installation ot a water sprinkling 
system a great stej) lorward was made in improving the condition of the 
Beaver Meadow Municipal Coiuse. Total receipts in 1964 were $14,187.25. 
There were 192 adult, 34 special, and 64 junior season ticket holders for a 
total of 290. Estimated individual rounds played by daily fee and season 
ticket players were 35,000. 

Areas and Facilities Maintained — Beaver Meadow Golf Course; Me- 
morial Athletic Field; Rolfe. White and Rollins Parks; Merrill, Heights, 
Garrison, Kimball, Fletcher-Minphy, A\'est Street, Doyen, Thompson, and 
Hall Street Playgrounds; \Vest Street ^\'ard House; East Concord Com- 
munity Center; Community Center, one wading and seven swimming 
pools, White Park skating pond and hockey rink, and eight other neigh- 

25 



borhood rinks; over fifteen other small park, momnnent. and roadside 
areas. Use was made ol the Penacook ^ outh Center and C>)ncord Pidjlic 
School multi-pmpose rooms and gyms in various schools lor department 
activities. 

Attetidancr — Total attendance ot department-sponsored programs, both 
indoor and outdoor, in facilities operated and maintained by the depart- 
ment (not including non-schedide walk-on irse of parks or attendance of 
organized groups using oin- facilities for their programs) reached 231,142. 



26 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Efneyiyeucics and Special Asslij^ninoits — Sent 6 officers under Sgt. Man- 
ning to assist with Labor Da) crowtls at Hampton Beach; hiter, when 
word was received that the rioters were out ot control, detailed a squad 
of reinforcements, midei Chief Carlson. 

Pro\ ided j^rotection and escort services for several presidential candidates 
during the 1964 camj^aigns. 

Completed the annual city census in April, with a staff of 4 patrolmen, 
fi firemen, and 2 crossing guaids. 

Distributed door-to-door throughout Concord in November, 8,500 copies 
of a booklet, "Guardians of Your Property and Welfare," aimed at giving 
the people of Concord a better understanding of the police-private citizen 
relationship. 

Loaned to the Attorney Cieneral's office the services of a patrolman detec- 
tive for a three-week period dining the investigation of the Pamela Mason 
and Sandra Valade murder cases. 

Aided in recovering the body of a 2-year-old child who drowned in the 
Contoocook River — a service rendered by cooperation with the Penacook 
Rescue Scjuad, the Merrimack Comity Recon, the Concord and Boscawen 
Civil Defense, the National Guard, and local firemen. 

Assisted in recovery of a vehicle which had gone into the Merrimack 
River near the Highway Hotel. 

Person )iel, Training, and Equipment — 4 staff members attended a 
skin diving training comse in Laconia; four were enrolled in a 15-week 
law enforcement course at Lebanon College; three received a two-week 
training session; two received 16 weeks' training at Northeastern, in 
criminal investigation and case preparation, police supervision, and in- 
troduction to criminalistics; one staff member had training at the State 
Police Training Academy, another studied 3 months at the FBI Academy 
in Washington, and a third took a 15-week course in crime prevention 
at St. Anselm's. 

In addition to office equipment, the police department acquired 5 cruisers, 
535 new parking meters, 4 sets of diving equipment, a portable generator, 
heavy duty hack saw, 25 new helmets, 2 large portable spot lights, and new 
traffic light control at the junction of Pleasant, Fruit and Warren Streets. 



Parki?ig Meters — The sum of S52. 929. S8 was collected Irom the jjarking 
meters during 1964, an increase of 8909.19 from 19(io. 

The cost of repairing meter parts was S.H23.93, down .S23.43 from 1963, 
with a total of 2,961 meters repaired in 1964 compared with 2,767 in 
1963. A total of 1,347 man hours was spent rei)airing these meters by our 
meter repairman. 639 Dimcan-type parking meters were installed dining 
the year, giving the city 796 on-street meters, and 346 oft-street meters in 
municipal parking lots. 



28 



MUNICIPAL COURT 

Xuinbci of arrests for diivins while intoxicated in 1'.I6'5 .. . -^ 08 

Number of arrests for driving while intoxicated in 1%4 — 76 (increase of 10%) 

The following arc the known cases for a two \ear perioil (excluding 

parking violation) 1963 — 1,655 

1964 — 1.863 

Closed cases for 1963 _. 1,560 (shows 94% cleared) 

Closed cases for 1<)64 1.766 (shows 95% cleared) 

In 1963 there Avere 270 serious crimes, including: aggravated assault, breaking, entering 
and larceny, auto theft, larceny, forgery, embezzlement and fraud. Of these, 175 or 64% 
were cleared by arrests. 

In 1964 there were 285 serious crimes including the above. Of these 188 or 66% were 
cleared by arrests. 

The amount of property reported stolen in 1964 was .'546.780.06 

The amount of property recovered for 1964 was - .'§32,712.18 

(or 69%, reco\ered) 

In July 1964, Concord's local courts took over jurisdiction in 3 surrounding communities, 
transforming the Miniicipal Court into a District Court and greatly increasing its 
\\ork load. 



29 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

Fire Loss — There were no extremely heavy fire losses during 1964. The 
largest single loss recorded was inider $21,000. The Fire Department re- 
sponded to a total of 714 emergency calls and 39 non-emergency calls. 
Tinder dry woods conditions prevailing throughout the summer and 
fall, combined with a water shortage, left this department faced with 
an explosive situation. Through the aid of press and radio coverage the 
jjublic was made aware of these dangerous conditions, and brush and grass 
fires were kept to a minimimi. The Oak Hill Tower watchman also con- 
tributed greatly to controlling this situation by early spotting of fires. 

Personnel — The Fire Department operated with a staff of sixty-six 
jjermanent men and fifty-five call firemen. Permanent Fire Department 
personnel presently work on a scheduled 56-hour week. Deputy Melvin G. 
Davis was appointed as Fire Department Training Officer on Jtme 1, 
1964, to conduct a training program for all permanent fire fighters and 
call men. 

Apparatus and Equipment — A new Chief's car and a new Deputy's car 
were put into service late in the year to replace 1959 models that had been 
in use. 

An order was placed in October 1964 for an 85-foot aerial platform (or 
snorkel) type truck to replace Ladder No. 1, a 1939 model. 

Two more smoke ejectors were purchased this year bringing our total to 
three. This equi})ment has proved invaluable both by minimizing smoke 
losses in buildings and by enabling fire fighters to work their way into a 
building more quickly. 

Maintenance — Maintenance of vehicles and equipment has been per- 
formed by the department mechanic at Central Station except in some 
instances where the facilities at the City Highway Department have been 
utilized. 

The fire alarm box system was extended to the Concord Heights area this 
year and new cable installed from Bridge Street easterly to Loudon and 
Canterbury Roads and then southerly on Canterbiny Road terminating 
at Pembroke Road. 

Summary of Fire Loss 

Insurance 

Est. Value Damage Insurance Paid 

BUILDING -- S534.200.00 S61. 884.89 .S523,700.00 .S61. 884.89 

CONTENTS 194,800.00 40.877.64 194,800.00 40,877.64 



TOTAL .5729,000.00 .S102,762.53 .S718,500.00 5102.762.53 

31 




Preparations at Community Roon, N. H. Savings Bank, for 
Shelter Managers' Course ivere 7nade hy Basil Broadhurst, left, 
State CD Training and Public Information Officer, Stanley Chap- 
man, center, N. H. Savings Bank Shelter Manager, and Ken Field, 
State CD Field Representative. 




Neir Rescue Truck purchased by Penacook Rescue Squad, 




Equipment carried on Rescue Truck includes Scott Air Packs, 
Resuscitator, Water Pump, Smoke Ejectors, Air Compressor to 
fill Air Pack tanks and assortment of drills, saios and hand tools. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Concord Civil Defense Administration — In April 1964, Civil Defense at 
the national level was transferred from the Department of Defense to the 
Department of the Army. A state of preparedness exists in the city, main- 
tained with the support of city emergency forces and the Penacook Rescue 
Squad. 

In January, Mayor Davie attended a Civil Defense Conference at U.N.H., 
called to keep city officials informed, and to evaluate programs being 
maintained at state and local levels. Mrs. Ruth Maxham, administrative 
officer for Concord Civil Defense has answered requests for information 
on various phases of the work, particularly on shelter construction. 

Public Relations — In addition to information issuing from the office by 
mail or telephone, numerous lectures illustrated by colored slides and 
movies have kept the public informed. A display of Civil Defense equip- 
ment was set up at the Kiwanis Trade Fair, and the Penacook Rescue 
Truck has made frequent visits and provided demonstrations for Scout 

33 



and service groups. As the i)laygroiincl season ojiened, a safety training 
session was held for instructors. 

/ics(ii<- l^iilt — The Penacook (a\il Defense K^escue S([uad responded 
to numerous emergencies, inckicHng fires, auto accidents, lost persons, and 
drownings. Highlight of the year for the Squad was the arrival of a new 
rescue truck; the group had raised $5,000 for this project, and Fetleral 
Civil Defense j:)rovided matching funds. 

Air Raid Sirciis — In compliance with the State C^ivil Defense directive, 
the air raid siren at I^ollins Park is now heard at 12 noon rather than 11 
o'clock, a steady signal for a full minute, followed by ()0 seconds of 
silence, then another 60 seconds of soimd. 

Five additional air raid sirens have been placed in the following loca- 
tions: at the north end, near the Water ^\'orks; at Hutchins Street in 




High ivinds caused this Uvib to fall bri^iging down cables and 
snapping off pole. Penacook CD Rescue Squad assisted Power 
Company employees at scene by roping off area, keeping pedes- 
trians away, and directing traffic. 



34 



West Concord; at RoHe Park in Penacook; at the Eastman School in East 
Concord; and at the Dame School on Concord Heights. All six are to be 
sounded simultaneoush Irom the Emergency Ojierating Cienter located 
at the Central Fire Station. 

Communications — Radio equi|iment operating at headquarters includes 
a Fire Radio, a Citizens Band, and a RACES net. The local C^ivil Defense 
headquarters was tied in direct!) with State Headquarters by RACES 
radio during the Hallowe'en weekend, lor instant communication shoidd 
an emergency arise. 

Shelters — Equipping and licensing ol shelters has gone on around the 
calendar, as indicated by this outline: 

januavy — Shelter Managers' C^ourse conducted in Concord, by State 
Civil E)etense; licenses signed by Gov. King for State House, Annex 
and Librar^. 




One of five air raid sirens being installed in city. Electric Com- 
pany bucket truck was used to raise siren more than forty feet 

in the air. 



35 



March — 8 tons of shelter supplies arrived. 

June — St. Paul's School established a liaison with Concord Civil 
Defense, signed licenses for \arious buildings on campus, and jjro- 
vided their own manager; Penacook Fibre Comjjany signed a license 
for the first fallout shelter in the Penacook area. 

/;//v — Meeting held at Cit\ Hall to inform Cit) officials regarding 
details of the Shelter Utilization Plan. 

October — Eight buildings at St. Paul's School stocked with shelter 
supplies, sufficient for all students and staff. 

November ■ — William Arnold, Concord's electrical inspector, was 
named Shelter Coordinator. 

Additional Equipment — Pinchases through Matching Funds and Sur- 
plus Property included an air compressor for Air Pak tanks, a 21/0" water 
pump, and two Super Vac Smoke Ejectors. 

A\'ith the purchase of a 16mm movie camera, the department is able to 
take, dining emergencies as they occin, on-the-spot action films illustrat- 
ing the various phases of Civil Defense work. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

There were a total of three-hiuidred and thirty-five interments; two- 
himdred thirty-one in the City cemeteries, eighty-nine in Calvary and 
fifteen in Penacook Calvary cemeter). Two disinterments were made. 

A total of sixty-five lots were sold and nine trusts put on old lots. The 
figmes show a decrease from last year. 

Total foundations poined were 104, a tlecrease of 21; markers set were 120, 
a decrease of 30. A decrease in burials and sale of lots would account for 
this. A total of one-hundred seventy-five j^osts set, an increase of 23. 

New roads in Pine Grove cemeterx were matle, and old ones resmfaced. 

Additional water lines were laid in .\f aple Cro\ e cemeter\ in blocks A and 
B. 

Flower beds were set out for Memorial Day, as has been the practice for 
many years. Owners of lots not included in the Flower Trust are billed 
for this service. 

36 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

Personnel 

CionconI 2 Full-time 
Pcnacook 1 Part-time 

TOTAL WELFARE COSTS: SI 13.512. (Includes Administration Costs) 

The ^\'eliare Department renders financial assistance to the residents of 
Concord and Penacook who are without adequate resources to meet their 
basic needs. Each request lor assistance is thoroughly investigated before 
relief is granted. 

Welfare Costs — In 1964 an average of 32 cases representing 86 persons 
were aided at a total cost of S3 1,1 59, in comparison to 33 cases in 1963 
representing 95 persons with expenditures of 533,885. 

The following chart shows the causes for relief need and the aj^proximate 
percentage of cases in each category dining 1964 compared with 1963: 





1964 


1963 


SICKNESS 


940? 

-^ /o 


35% 


L'XEMPLOYMENT 


99 (T- 


23% 


INSUFFICIENT INCOME 


22% 


14% 


MARITAL DIFFICULTIES 


10% 


21% 


UNEMPLOYABLE 


13% 


7% 



Sickness represents 24% of the total relief cost. This can be partially ex- 
plained by the fact that the indi\iduals are not eligible to draw Unem- 
j^loyment Compensation benefits Avhile ill and have no personal insurance 
or other resomces. 

Old Age Assistance — In 1964 Old Age Assistance including Aliens num- 
bered 168 with expenditures of S57.391; and in 1963, 173 cases were aided 
in the amount of S60.337. The City shares 25*^'^ of the cost of Old Age 
Assistance ami 50% of Aliens. 

Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled — In 1964 Aid to the 
Permanently and Totally Disabled cases nimibered 23 with expenditines 
of 512,036; and in 1963. 20 cases were aided in the amoimt of 59.415. 
The City shares 35'^'^ of the cost of Aid to the Permanently and Totally 
Disabled. 



37 




George Hill looking for acidity in milk. 



SANITARY INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 

648 samples of milk, cream, flavored milks, non-fat milk, buttermilk and 
fruit drinks were collected and analyzed dining the year. Standard jjlate 
coimts, B Coli, Thermodinic and Psychrophilic coimts were made, as 
well as biitterfat tests. Specific gravity tests were made on milk to detect 
Avatering, as were tests to detect the presence of penicillin and other anti- 
biotics. Other tests are sediment tests, microscopic examinations, and the 
Whiteside test to detect mastitis in dairy cows. The Phosjjhatase test is 
carried out on pasteurized jModucts to eliminate any products that have 
not been heated to the jjroper tenijjeratmes at the correct holding time. 

The following insjiections were made dm ing the year: 



Dairies 
Stores 
Bakeries 
Trailer Parks 
Foster Homes 
Complaints 



124 
192 

18 
16 
3() 
92 



Milk Plants 

Eating Establishments 
AN'holesale Meat Houses 
Schools and Nurseries 
Beaiitv Parlors 



36 

165 

. 4 

40 

6 



The following foods were condenmed, forfeited and destroyed as unfit for 
hiunan consumjjtion: 120 ])ounds of sugar, () 8-ounce packages of cheese, 



38 



.S (i-jjound j:)Oik loasts, 20 j^ounds of lamb, 5 pounds frankfurts, 5 pounds 
ol pork shoulder ham, 5 jjounds salami, -1 quarts lemon base, as well as 6 
saucers and 12 collee cuj3s. 

A number of cocktail bars have been opened in Concord recently, and 
insjjections re\ealed that some were using cold-water glass washers which 
are not ajijjro\ed in this cle]:artment; the OAvners were instructed in the 
]>ro]jer methods and ec|uipmcnt. 

The buildings on the site ol the new housing project tor the elderly, and 
those on the site ol the new United States Post Office were inspected, and 
certified to be rodent-free after a baiting campaign was carried out accord- 
ing to Federal Law. 

On February \:\ I9()4 a meeting was attended at the State Board of 
Health Building whh local, state, and federal health officials holding a 
round table discussion of the New Hampshire Sanitary Food Code. A 
course in insjjection technic|ues in Boston, Massachusetts on April 8-10, 
1964, under the sponsorshij) of the United States Food and Drtig Ad- 
ministration, dealt with inspection ecjuipment, technicpies, and docu- 
mentation. 

After 2 courses of instruction, the Sanitary Insj^ector was appointed the 
agent to carry out the local pigeon control program for the United States 
\\'ildlife Office and the Ne^v Ham])shire Fish and Came Department. 
This program is planned to reduce the j^optdation of the pigeons, not to 
exterminate them. About 200 pigeons were eliminated this year and 
most of them were picked up by this department, the Police Department, 
and the Department of Public ^\'orks. Two such programs are planned 
tor next year. 

According to an estimate by this department there are about 100 riding 
horses stabled in the Concord Area. There have been only a few com- 
|)Iaints as to their sanitary conditions and their owners' cooperation has 
been very good except in a few cases. 

One milk producer was banned from selling milk in the (Concord Area 
because of {persistently high bacteria coinits, imsanitary conditions and 
lesions on the hands and face. 

Many sanitar) inspections were made of foster day care homes as re- 
quired by a new licensing law passed by the New Hampshire Legislature. 
The nimiber of nursery schools to be inspected in Concord has increased 
from fom in 19(i2 to fifteen in 1964. 

39 



Local restaurams were checked, following a report from the United 
States Department of Agricidiiu-e that horse meat Avas being sold in the 
New England area. No horse meat was found in the local area, al- 
though it is ver\ difficult to find, especially when mixed wiih ground 
beef. The local merchants were warned to purchase their meat from reli- 
able dealers. 

A description of the duties of the Sanitarv Inspector was given to the Con- 
cord Hi?h School Futiu-e Nurses on December 9. 1964. 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Health Clinics — 6S6 persons attended ten health clinics at the City 
Auditorium in Concord during the year. 508 of those attending received 
protective treatment against diphtheria, whooping cough, tetantis, and 
smallpox. This is an increase of more than lOJ over the previous year. 
178 persons received Sabin Oral Polio X'accine. 

Licenses — Three convalescent home hcenses. 131 milk hcenses, and 97 
restaurant and bakery licenses were issued during the year. 

Complaints — 20 complaints were received duringuthe year and checked. 

Vital Statistics — There Avere 45 fewer deaths in 1964 than in 1963. Of die 
673 deaths reported, 277 were residents and 396 were non-residents. 
Twelve stillbirths were rejxjrted and 117 bodies were brought here for 
biu-iaL 

Table of causes of deaths of residents (most common causes) 



Diseases of ciicalalory s^^tem 

Diseases of nerroas system 

Cancer and other malignant tnmois 

ISseases of digestive system 

Diseases of lespiratorv svstem 

40 



1960 


1961 


1962 


1963 


1964 


121 


137 


162 


166 


135 


41 


48 


36 


26 


20 


39 


39 


31 


28 


45 


'^ 


14 


15 


13 


13 


- 


13 


22 


IfJ 


12 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 

The City Clerk attended all the meetings and hearings of the Board of 
Aldermen durincr the year in the capacitN of clerk, and prepared and dis- 
tributed the minutes of the meetings. The agenda was furnished the mem- 
bers in advance of these regular meetings. 

Arthur E. Roby, City Clerk since 1920. terminated his services with the 
city November 30, 1964. Mavor Davie appointed the Depur\ City Clerk. 
Marjorie B. Foote, who has worked in the City Clerks Office approxi- 
mately seventeen years, as the new City Clerk, effective December 1. 1964. 

Received and turned o\er to the City Treasurer the sum of SI 3,47 7. 15 
from the a arious licenses and ser\ ice fees during the year. 

Issued 2.024 dog licenses: filed approximately 1,890 commercial codes: 
recordetl 171 discharges: issued 423 marriage licenses and approximately 
1,326 \ital statistics records. The demand for copies of vital statistics 
records is still increasing. 



\ IT-AL STATISTICS 
\'ital statistics recorded as compared with 1963 were as foUows: 

Births 



Marriages 
Deaths _ 



1964 


1963 


1.102 


1.079 


412 


348 


685 


734 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 



The Board of Aldermen held the tA\elve regular monthly meetings, nine 
hearings and five sjDedal meetings. 

The regular December meeting consisted of a two-night session. Due to 
the length of the meeting, the Board recessed at 11:10 p. m. on the night 
of the meeting and met the next evening at 7 p. m. to finish the remain- 
ing business. 

51 resolutions and 32 ordinances were passed diuing this yeai. :>ome of 
the principal resolutions passed are as follows: 

Budget — S2.072.512: To appropriate SI 00.000 for construction of emer- 
gencs pumping facilities on Tiukey River: relative to extension of 
propertv tax exemption for St. Pauls School: approring imdertaking of 
sursevs and plans for urban renewal project and filing of application: 

41 



relati\e to (Concord Bicentennial C^onimittee; ielati\e to investigation 
ol permanent souice ol watei- ,su]:)jjI\: ielati\e to leceitification ol work- 
able program toi" (ommunity improxement; relati\e to developing tom- 
munit) shelter jjlan; opposing (liscontinuance ol rail passenger service 
by the Boston and Maine Railroad; authorizing borrowing of S35(),(K)0 
lor use of Concord Union School District for alteration and enlargement 
of Dame and Eastman Schools; authorizing Mayor to enter into agreement 
^vith StatCAvidc Airlines; in recognition of ser\ ice of (litv Clerk Arthur E. 
Rob). 

The majority of ordinances jjassed were amendments to the various codes 
— building, |jlumbing. traffic and jjersonnel. 



ELECTIONS 

The Presidential Primary was held March 10. There Avere three ballots 
used at this election: 1. Presidential Primary to elect delegates to the 
National Con\ention; 2. To elect candidates to the Constitutional Con- 
vention; 3. S\veepstakes referendum — whether or not sweejjstakes tickets 
can be sold. 1 here were 3,399 yes \otes and 2,704 no Aotes on this sweej)- 
stakes referendum. 

The Presidential Primary ballot was very lengthy. Ihere were over a 
hundred candidates listed on the RepidDlican ballot and about a third 
as many on the Democratic ballot. The total vote cast was 6,193. The total 
number of names on the checklists was 16,14(S. 

The Direct Primary was held September 8. Ninety-four filings were re- 
ceived by the City Clerk for representatives, ward officers and delegates. 
The total I^epidjlican vote cast was 4,332 and the total Democratic vote 
cast was 544. 

The General Election Avas held November 3. The total vote cast was 
12,621. The total nimiber of names on the checklists was 17,031. At this 
election there were 842 apjjlications recei\ed for absentee ballots, which 
were prepared and mailed or delivered to the applicants. 78() of these bal- 
lots were recei\ed in time to be counted with the total ballots cast, 

42 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

]Valcr Consumption — Consuinjjtion lor l'J()4 amoiintetl to 1,450,541,500 
gallons, this rej:)ieseiuing an average daily consumjition of 3,963,228 
gallons, (about 137 gallons per person per clay) . Of the total amount used 
1,083,909,500 gallons were pumped and 366,632,000 gallons were supplied 
by gra\it) directly from Penatook Lake. This consumj^tion for 1964 was 
15,484,350 gallons more than the consumption for 1963. 

Water Supply — Concord still faced an acute crisis in its water supply at 
the beginning of the year, as the ele\ation of Penacook Lake was 10 feet 
below spillway ele\ation with no heavy precipitation predicted. The 
W^ater Study Committee and Camp. Dresser and McKee, Consulting 
Engineers, recommended to the Board of Aldermen that an Emergency 
Water Supply be constructed at Turkey Pond as soon as possible, to pump 
water into Penacook Lake. This recommendation was approved on Feb- 
ruary 17th and construction was started at once. A sheet metal pumping 
station was erected over a manhole in Tmkey Pond, a three million 
gallon per day pimip was installed, and 6,000 feet of 18-inch pipe were 
laid, most of it on top of the ground to save time. The pump was 
started on April 23rd and continued imtil June 1st when the water 
stopped running over the dam at Turkey Pond. Dining this period 114 
million gallons were pimiped into Penacook Lake from this source, 
holding the lake at the same elevation during the month of May and 
making it possible to go through the summer season without reaching the 
danger point. 

The Board of Aldermen approved 320,000 for an engineering study and 
investigation of all possible sources of a permanent additional water 
supply, and at the end of the year the consulting engineers were pre- 
l^ared to confer Avith the AN'aier Study Committee on the results of their 
investigation. 

Once again precipitation was below normal for the year and in November 
the Lake again reached 10 feet below spillway elevation. St. Paid's School 
again granted permission to jiumj) from Turkey Pond e\en though water 
was not running over the clam. Showers brought Turkey Pond u]) and 
pumping was continued the rest of the year. During this period 133 mil- 
lion gallons were pumped, making a total of 247 million gallons jjumped 
from Tmkey Pond in 1964. 

This supply from Turkey Pond was one sixth of the total year's con- 
simiption. ^N'ithout it the lake would have been two feet lower at the end 
of the year and only two and one half feet abo\e the intake, which woidd 
really have been a critical situation. Since the total cost of this emergency 
supply from Turkey Pond was 570,400, it has j^roved to be one of the best 
investments the city ever made. 

43 



Sfuidcrs ]Vcll field — The ele\;ition of ihc ground water table held up 
surprisingly well in the well field during the year and 400 million gallons 
were pumped from the foin- new 18-inch wells at this location. This 
amoinit was a little over one fourth of the total consumption lor the 
year so it is easy to see that without this the water supply jMoblem woidd 
have been even more critical. 

Major Construction Projects — Water main extensions were laid in Fan 
Road and Marginal Road (to the new Technical Institute) ; Burns 
Avenue, Caicket Lane, Dover Street, Garvins Falls Road, jay Drive, 
Partridge Road and Robin Road (all on the Heights) ; Abbott Road and 
Sewalls Falls Road (in West Concord) ; and Wilson Avenue (in the South 
End) . On these projects 9,308 feet of cement-lined, cast-iron pipe were 
laid, (114.7 miles of mains now in system). Eleven new hydrants were 
installed, (819 hydiants no^v in system) . Twehe new main line \alves and 
1 1 valves on hythant branches were installed (1,7(^6 vahes now in system) . 
Ninety new service connections were laid antl 34 old service connections 
were discontinuetl ((3,389 service connections now in system) . Eighty- 
three new meters were installed and 17 old meters were discontinued 
(5,812 meters now in system) . 

Major Replacements Projects — In Abbott Road (West Concord) 152 
feet of 10-inch, cement-lined cast-iron pipe were laid replacing old six- 
inch pi|je laid in 1934; in Center Street (in Penacook) 258 feet of six-inch 
cement-lined cast-iron pii:>e were laid replacing old two-inch l>ipe laid in 
1933; and in Glatlstone Street (in city projjer) 1 17 feet of six-inch cement- 
lined cast-iron pipe were laid replacing old 114-inch J^ipe laid in 1912. 
Thirty-nine old service connections were relaid with copper tubing. Foiu' 
old hydrants were replaced with new Indrants. Eighty-nine old meters 
were rejjlaced with new meters. 

Personnel — Ralph W. Flanders, Assistant Superintendent, completed 50 
years of faithful and efficient service on July 20th, which is a record few can 
hope to ecpial. 1 he dej^artment lost two faithfid veteran employees, in 
the sudden deaths ol Robert D. Prescott, Sr. after 34 years' service, and 
Bernard L. 7 ownes after 14 years' service. 

Water Main Cleaniii'^ and Flushing Program — Due to the critical water 
supply problem cltning the year, no mains were cleaned and the regtdar 
flushing of all hydrants in the system had to be omitted as both oj^era- 
tions use a very large amotmt of water. 

Major Maintoianee Projects — Fifteen hydrants were rej^aired and two 
hydrants were set in new locations, 148 meters were rej^aired and re- 
tiuned to service. Every hydrant in the system was tested weekly between 
December 15th of the pre\'ious year and March 15th of the current year 
to guard against freezing and to assine proper operation of all hydrants. 

44 



All electrical |)unii)ing etjuipment and recording ecjuijjment in the four 
pimij^ing stations and emergency station was checked, serviced and re- 
paired il necessary. The oil burners and heating boilers were serviced at 
the same locations. Department personnel painted the combination Ward 
Nine Wardhouse and Storehouse, rebuilt the brick wall in the rear ol a 
two-stall garage at North State Street, and installed new flashing and reset 
the cap stones on roofs at the Sanders jjinnping station in Pembroke. 

Nciv EquipfiK'iit — The dejxntmeni acquired two Ford i/o-ton pickup 
trucks and a (Jhe\ rolet Ciarryall wagon. 

Leaks — Thirty-t\\'o leaks were rej)aired, 11 on mains and 21 on service 
connections. 



45 



COLLECTION DEPARTMENT 

1 he total tax warrants with additions for the lev\ ol 1964 submitted by 
the Assessors to the Tax Collector dining the year were as follows: 

Total Balance 

Debits December 31, 1961 

Real and Personal Property S4,836.563.81 $598,564.79 

Bank Stock ' 10,692.50 

Timber Yield 1,762.30 246.29 

Total Property .1>4 ,849,0 18.61 .1>.598,811.08 

Poll Tax -. 23,982.00 5,624.00 

Total Property & Polls 54.873,000.61 .S604,435.08 

.State Head Taxes . 74.130.00 18,300.00 

Total .S4. 94 7, 130.61 .S622,735.08 

Dining January and Februai) notices were prepared and mailed to 
delinquent taxjjayers relative to unj:)aid stock in trade, personal and real 
estate taxes. Also a list was given to local banks relative to unpaid 1961, 
1962 and 1963 real estate taxes. 

Since March is always busy with the issuing of motor vehicle permits, two 
j)art-time employees were engaged to assist the regular staff during this 
jjeriod. The office lemained ojjen on Friday, March 27 until 8:00 p. m. 
lor the con\enience of the public in obtaining their motor vehicle per- 
mits, and sixt\-one took acKantage of the ojjportunil). During the month 
6,48S motor \ehicle permits were issued comparetl with 6,445 for the 
same period last )ea! . 

The advertised list of un])aitl 1963 property taxes was posted on A]:)ril 28, 
and the Collector's sale of resident real estate was held on June 1 in 
the conference room on the second floor of the City Hall. The sale con- 
tained 177 accounts of which one was bought by an individual and the 
rest were bought by the City of (Concord for ,S51,357.57. The owners of 
record have two years in which to redeem their property from the Col- 
lector's sale. 

In May 15,000 combination head and poll tax bills were addressed and 
mailed. Also the national bank stock bills were mailed out. Your tax 
collector attended the spring meeting of all tax collectors, clerks, treas- 
urers and finance officers of this area conducted by the .State Tax Com- 
mission. 

Timber yield bills were mailed in |une and se\'eral meetings were held 
with l^alph Goidd, Commissioner of Motor Vehicles, relative to the ]:)ro- 
jiosed registration and permit forms to be used for the 1965-r)6 registra- 
tion ])eriod. 

46 



Usually in July the ciiy lakes lille to property for impaid taxes but in 
H)()l, lor the first lime in many years, all projjerly was ledeemecl by the 
oAvners ot record. 

During .Vugust special assessment bills coverino IM) projects weie piocessed 
and mailed, and work was started on |jroperly tax billing. 1 he billing of 
8,508 property tax bills was comijleted the first of September with all bills 
mailed out September 9. 

Vour tax collector attended the National Tax Association meeting held in 
Pittsbing, Pa., the N. H. Town k City Clerks annual meeting held at Sugar 
Hill and the N. H. Tax Collectors' Association meeting held at Jackson, 
N. H. At the meeting in Jackson the method of billing head and poll taxes 
in the City of Concord was discussed. Samples of our bills and tax roll 
were on display as Concord is considered one of the most progressive 
cities in the state relative to tax billing. 

October was the month lor the annual dri\e on behalf of the Concord 
United Fiuid and yoiu" collector was ajjpointed as chairman of the City 
Government section. Also during the month as provided in the Special 
Assessment ordinance a list of all lui] aid accounts was prejoared and given 
to the City Solicitor. .\lso during the month Evelyn Lajoie, Madeline 
Heath and Virginia Philbrick comjjleted a streamlined coinse in credit 
and collection, sponsored by Concord National Bank and Concord Credit 
Btneau. On completion of the course they were jjresented certificates by 
Mayor Charles C. Da\ ie. 

The month of November as usual is a very busy one with the collection 
of proj^erty and head taxes increasing as the month progressed. On Friday, 
November 20 and Friday, No\ember 27 the tax office was open until 
8:00 p. m. for the convenience of the |)ublic in paying their jjioj^erty taxes. 
With the cooperation of the City Solicitor 71 cases were enteied in small 
claims court against delinquent poll and head taxpayers. 

December is taken up posting the large volimie of work leceived in No- 
vember and also starting to dose the books for the year. 

Dining the year your tax collector spoke at county meetings throughout 
the state, relative to proposed legislation and sponsored by the N. H. Tax 
Collectors' Association. 

There were 17,207 motor vehicle permits issued, amounting to .S203,079.86 
(gross) ; refunds 3460.65, net of .S202,6 19.21. 

C;ollections on Special Assessments amoimted to 832,828.47. 

Collections received from prior year taxes, water bills and other mis- 
cellaneous revenue amounted to SI. 125, 74 1.60. 

The total collected from all sources amounted to S5,661,916.12 which was 
8287,760.94 more than collected in 1963. 

47 




City employees receive Credit School diplomas from Mayor Davie. 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

Tax Wtirxints were issued as follows clurino the year: 

Property — Real and Personal $4,836,631.66 

Poll Tax .--.-. =^^. - 24,100.00 

Head Tax - ^ 74,475.00 

Bank Stock Tax -..- 10,692.50 

Timber Yield Tax — 1 ,762.30 

(The above figures include: A — Original warrants; B — jeopardy war- 
lanls; and C — added taxes thiough February 1965 — all on the 1964 
le\y.) 

Poll Tax exemptions to \eterans were 2,(S01, compared to 2,84f) in 1963. 

Profycyty \'ahiatio)i 

(iross valuation before exemptions .. .... .. . S()3, 390,901. 75 

War Service Exemptions .... 81,740,680.00 

Blind Exemptions . . 8,000.00 

48 



Neat Stock Exemptions .-. 19.'K)().()0 

Poultry Exemptions 1,291.75 1,769,271.75 

Net xaluation on which 1964 tax rate computed 861,621,630.00 

Tax Rates lor 19()1 are as iollows: 

CONCORD: PENACOOK: 

Municipal .S34.77 Municipal .*;34.77 

School 40.95 .School 33.70 

County 3.18 County , . - 3.18 



S78.90 .§71.65 

Compilation ten year jjeriod: 





\'('t ]'uluatiun 


Properly Valuation 


Poll Tax 


Poll Exempt 


Yciir 


R.E. d- Pers. Prop. 


Exempt to Vets. 


Warrant 


to Vets. 


1955 


.1>48.278.291 


.'!> 1,367, 195 


.$23,924 


$6,556 


1956 


49,178.815 


1,334,410 


23,536 


6,636 


1957 


.50.829,022 


1,461.270 


23.458 


6.614 


1958 


51,105.351 


1 ,486,320 


22,962 


6,586 


1959 


52.391,8,54 


1,. 554. 890 


22,750 


6.580 


1960 


54.621,375 


1,628,620 


22,720 


6,334 


1961 


55,690,530 


1,691,160 


23,018 


6,222 


1962 


59,283,860 


1,661.760 


22.678 


5,976 


1963 


61,000,310 


1,673,260 


23,956 


5,698 


1964 


61,621,630 


1 ,740.680 


23,544 


5,602 



Activities — The sectional reappraisal of the City was continued during 
1964 with work by the Assessor and Appraisers still in the south end. 
There were nineteen meetings of the Board of Assessors during 1964. 
There were 696 real estate transfers processed. Tax abatements allowed 
dtuing the year against the 1964 le\ y on Property and Polls was .'>27,998.95. 
This amoimt includes those abatements made dining January and Feb- 
ruary, 1965. There were 149 appeals processed and resolved during 1964. 



49 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

In the financial section ol tiiis report will be found schedules which set 
forth the activity and the year-end position of each of the several funds 
through which all the financial transactions of the City are handled. Be- 
low is a brief simimary of activity of each fimd dining the year 1964 and 
condition at the end of the ^ear. 



GENERAL FUND 

Current Surplus residting from 19(54 ojjerations amounted to 897,264.83. 
This smplus will be used to reduce the amount to be raised by jMoperty 
taxes in 1965. 

Debt — Outstanding debt payable from this fund increased .S 197,348. 
New debt amoimting to 8580,000 was incurred, while matinities |jaid 
dining the year amounted to 8382,652 as detailed in the following sched- 
ule: 

Balance Payments Nexv Debt Balance 

Dec. 31, 1963 During 196f Issued 1961 Dec. 31, 196^ 

Municipal ^ .Sl,054,417 S197,652 S230.000 81,086,765 

School ....- 2.115,000 185.000 350.000 2.280,000 



Total . 83.169,417 8382.652 .8580.000 83.366.765 

Interest Rates rose sharply during the year. Our bonds sold at a rate of 
2.90% which compares with 2.60^'^ for the 1963 issue. Rates on borrow- 
ings in anticipation of tax collections ranged from 1.98%, in March to 
1.89% in September, compared to a high of 1.78% and a low of 
1.42% paid in the previous year. Total interest cost for the year on the 
short term notes was $13,850 compared to .$12,780 for the j^revious year. 
Total interest paid on long term debt was .827,431 compared to .829,248 
])aid in 1963. 

Valuations, Taxes, Tax Rates — Below is a comparison of valuations, 
property taxes, and tax rates, showing changes from 1963 to 1964. 

Increase 
Property Taxes Raised I'^6'^ l^bt Amount Per Cent 

For Municipal Purposes .?2,010,272 82,142,456 8132,184 6.6 

For School Purposes 2,311.096 2.494,428 183,332 7.9 

For County Purposes _-_. 179.138 196,186 17.048 9.5 



Total 84.500.506 84,833.070 8332,.564 7.4 

Assessed Valuation 

For Municipal Purposes §61,000.310 861.621.630 8621.320 1.0 

For Union School District 57,020.360 57.649.820 629.460 1.1 

50 



For Pcnacook School District 3.995,380 

lor County Purposes (il, 016,060 

Tax Rates 

Municipal - 832.95 

Inion .School District 37.91 

Pcnacook School District 37.58 

County .. 2.94 

Total City Rate .S73.80 

Total Pcnacook Rate ._. .S73.47 



3.987.240 


—8.140 


2 


61,637,380 


621,320 


1.0 


S34.77 


SI. 82 


5.5 


40.95 


3.04 


8.0 


33.70 


—3.88 


—10.3 


3.18 


.24 


8.2 


.S78.90 


.S5.10 


6.9 


S71.65 


—SI. 82 


—2.5 



Collcctious increased, percentage wise; the year ended with 12.4% ot the 
current property tax levy outstanding, compared to 13.4% outstanding at 
the end of the previous year. 



TRUST FUNDS 

Income recei\ed increased from $66,272 in 1963 to .$69,233 in 1964. New 
trusts received amounted to .SI 0.434. Gain on sale of securities amounted 
to .SI, 145, compared to ,$689 in 1963. Income transferretl to General Fund 
was $67,607. 



PARKINC; METFR FUND 

Meter CoUectwm increased by 1.7^'^ from $52,024 in 1963 to ,S52,929 for 
the current year. Off-street collections decreased .8%, while on-street areas 
yielded 2.4% more than the previous year. 

Fund Balance at the close of the year was $2,083, an increase of $1,752 
dining the year. 

Debt — Long-term debt decieased from $32,000 to $30,000, and no new 
debt was issued. Maturities amoinited to $2,000. 



SAN1TAR^ SEWER FUND 

Revenue from sewer rentals totalled $84,817 comjjared to $85,646 real- 
ized in 1963, a decrease of 1.0%. Receipts from all sources decreased by 
4.8%, from $95,231 to .S90,646. 

Surplus — The year began with a cash surplus of $110,520 and ended 
with $127,400, an increase of 816,880. 

Debt — Long-term debt decreased by $26,000. Maturities paid during the 
year amounted to $26,000. No new debt was incurred. 

51 



\\ATKR FUND 

Revenue — Water rentals xiekled a total ol .S26 1.578. 2.V'^, above the 
.S255,786 reali/etl in 196'5. Receipts iiom all sources amounted to 8279,152 
or 2.2"(, more than in 19(i->. 

Surplus — Cash siujjIus decreased I'rom .S22(S.()-15 at the begiiniing ol the 
)ear to .'^136,28^ at the close ol the year. 

Debt — Long-term debt decreased b\ S2(),()0(). Maturities paid amoinitetl 
to 820,000. No new debt was incinred. 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

Projeets — Two water extension jjrojects were ajjpro\ed lor coirstruction 
uncler special assessment piocedure at an estimated cost ol 822.000. 

Receipts — Total leceijjts ol this lund were 892,788. Disbinsements 
totalled .'Jii78,993. Cash balance at the end ol the year was ,1^43,503. 

Debt — Long-term debt decieased duiing the \ear hom 8290,751 to 
§258, 966. New debt amounting to 822.000 was incuried; maturities jxiid 
totalled .1i;53,788. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCT AND REPLACEMENT FUND 

Profit — This fund showed a jjrofit from this year's operations. Income 
from ecpiii^ment rentals amoimted to 8243,099, while operating expendi- 
tures and depreciation totalled .'>224,657, residting in a net profit of 
.1?1 8,442. 

Resewe — The reserve for rej^lacement of equipment decreased from 
$20,071 to .811,807. Exjienditmes for new ecjuij^ment totalled 875,810; 
additions to the leserxe amoimted to 8()7,576. This funtl has no outstand- 
ing debt. 



52 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



69 
64-65 

70 
70 



GENERAL FIND EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE 

" & REPLACEMENT Fl'ND 

Appropriations S: Expcndilurcs 60-63 

Balance Sheet 71 

Assessments _ _ _ 50 

Cash Suiphis 71 

Halance Sheet - - - 54-55 

Operating Statement - 71 

Cnrrent Surplus .. _ 56 

Statement of Reserve Account 71-72 

liiNcstments . (■)6 

Long Term Debt .. 64-65 

Rexenues . . 56-57 

SPEC:L\L ASSESSMENT FUND 

Taxes Receivable 58 

Balance Sheet ^ . 
Tax Sale Accounts 58 

Long Term Debt - - - 

Projects Authorized &.- 

Amt)inits Expi-nded - - 
BOND FUND — GENERAL 

Receipts & Expenditures 

lialance Sheet 54-55 

Disposition of Proceeds _. 68 

\\ ATER FUND 

TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet 

lialance Sheet 54-55 

Long Term Debt 

C:hangcs in Balances 67 

Investments 

Investments _ — fiG 

Operating Statements 

SANITARY SE\\ER FUND 

Balance Sheet 75 PARKING METER FUND 

Investments - 66 Balance Sheet 72 

Long Term Debt 64-65 Long Term Debt 64-65 

Operating Statement - 76 Revenues &: Expenditures 72-73 



73 
64-65 

6(1 
74-75 



BALANCE SHEET — GENERAL 

December 



GENERAL FUND ASSETS 

('(isli : 

Mechanicks National Bank-General Acct. .. 
Concord National Bank-General Account 
Concord National Bank-Payroll Account .. 
Cash in other Banks-General Account 



26.742.88 
68,611.06 
15.000.00 
12,000.00 
1,249.41 



Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons - 
Temporary Investments „ ... 


598,811.08 
5,624.00 


736.25 
697.222.10 


821,561.70 


Taxes Recewable: 

Current Year Levy-Property 

Current Year Levy-Polls 


586.640.24 
28,556.15 




Total Current Year 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 


604.435.08 
17.794.84 




Prior Year Levies-Property - 

Prior Year Le\ies-Polls . . . . — 

Tax Liens Bought by City-Unredeemed ... 


26,574.29 

611.50 

47,593.58 




Total Prior Years li: Unredeemed ... .. 
Less: Reserves for Non -Realization 


74,779.37 
46,223.22 


615,196.39 


Accounts Recewable: 

Water & Sewer Rentals 

Departmental Receivables 

Cemetery Recei\ abies .. 

Trunk Storm Sewer Assessments 


76,633.51 
8,269.86 
2,331.12 
2,073.00 


89,307.49 
12.673.98 




Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 


73,620.54 

8,210.86 

374.32 


76,633.51 


Stores Accounts: 

Public Works Mat. Sc Supplies Inv. . 

Stationery & Supplies Inventory 

Postage Meter Inventory 


82,205.72 
66.029.31 




Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 




16.176.41 


Tax Deeded Properties: 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 


869.93 
869.93 




State Head Taxes Receivable: 


ASSETS 


852,724.16 
2,648.63 


19,980.30 


Total Genera! Fimd .Assets 


1,549,548.31 


TRUST FUND 

Investments . . . . .. 

Cash-Concord National Bank 


855,372.79 



*CAPITAL FUND ASSETS 



Debt Requirements-Municipal 
Debt Requirements-School .. . 



1,086,765.04 

2,280,000.00 3,366,765.04 



BOND FUND ASSETS 



Cash-Concord National Bank 
Temporary Investments 



GRAND TOTAL — ASSETS 



98,331.56 
342,317.58 



440,649.14 



6,212,335.28 



Does not include Debt Payable from \Vater, Sewer, Parking Meter or Special Assess- 
ment Funds. 

54 



AND RELATED FUNDS 

31, 1964 

GENERAL KIM) IIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable: 

Unprescntcd Bonds & Cloupoiis 736.2;") 

Payroll Deductions Payable - 1.207.4.5 

Current \'ouchers Payable .-_ 25,569.63 27,513.33 



Unexpended Appropriations: 

Union School District-Operating Acct. 1,039,784.33 

Interest -Union School District-Bonds & Notes 27,019.50 

Penacook Union School District 74,177.35 

Reserye for Encumbrances 20.263.32 1.161,244.50 



Due to Other Funds: 

Water Fund -- 102,239.75 

Sanitary Sewer Fund 97,404.93 

Parking Meter Fund - 2,082.55 

Equipment Maintenance & Replacement Fund 36,772.86 238,500.09 



Advance Deposits: - 512.42 

Taxes Due to State of N. H.: 

Head Taxes - -- 23,730.28 

Timber Yield Tax-a/c Debt Retirement Fund 782.86 24,513.14 



Total General Fund Liabilities 1,452,283.48 

Current Surplus: 97,264.83 

Total General Fund Liabilities &: Surplus 1,549,548.31 



TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal -- - - -- 820,248.83 

Accumulated Income _._ -.- 35,123.96 855,372.79 



CAPITAL Fl ND LIABILITIES 

Bonded Debt 3,338,182.00 

Notes Payable 14,000.00 

Advance by State-Airport Construction 14,583.04 3.366.765.04 



BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Construction or Equipment Authorized 141,724.13 

Reserve for School Construction .. 245,000.00 

Reserve for Encumbrances - - 52,995.00 

Due to Other Funds - -- 930.01 440,649.14 



GRAND TOTAL — LIABILITIES -.- - -- - 6,212,335.28 

55 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS GENERAL FUND 

lor the \ci{\ Eiukd l)cccml)ci 31, 19(34 

Unappropriated Balance, December 31, 1963 112,722.11 

Applied to 1964 Budget 112,0()0.()() 

Balance Remaining - 

722.1 1 
1964 Budget .Surplus: 

Unencumbered Balance of Appropriations 89,466.04 

Revenues in Excess of Estimates ., .. 38,136..'j9 127.602.63 



Plus: Miscellaneous Credits: 

Unenciunbered Balance — Prior Year .Appropriation „.. 621.40 

Prior Year Payable Liquidated 134.50 7,5.5.90 

Sub-Total 129,080.64 

Less: 

Increase in Reser\e for Xou-Reali/ation of 

Prior Year Taxes . . - 30,749,10 

Increase in Reser\e for Non-Realization of 

Accts. Receivable — . 1,041.27 

Prior Year Yield Taxes Paid to State of N. H. 2.5,44 31,815.81 

97.264.83 
To be Applietl to 19(i5 Budget 95,000.00 

Balance Remaining 2,264,83 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 

lor the Year Ended December 31, 1964 

It 11(1 get Rex'emies 

Local Tdxes-Excl. Curr. Yr. Prop, d- Polls Kslimntc Realized Excess Deficiency 

Added Taxes. Prior Yrs, — Prop. ...... 73.80 73.80 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs, — Poll 500.00 528.00 28.00 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 15,000.00 17,397,08 2,397,08 

Auto Permits 190.000.00 202,619.21 12,619.21 

Rent & Profit Tax Deeded Prop, 5,000,00 5,000.00 

Timber .Severance Tax 1,500.00 1.959,68 459.68 



207.000.00 227,577,77 20,577.77 

State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax 4.000.00 2.092.26 1.907.74 

Savings Bank Tax 25,000.00 29.525.34 4.525.34 

Interest & Dividend Tax . . . 83.000.00 90.162.32 7,162.32 

Loss of Taxes-State Forest Lands 30.00 40.61 10.61 



112.030.00 121.820.53 11.698.27 1.907.74 

56 



Licenses & Pennits 

Bicycle Registrations .. 

Taxi Licenses 

Health Licenses — 

Amusement Licenses 

Police &: Piotectixe Licenses „ 
Prof. & Occupational Licenses 



5S().0() 


64 1.00 


(ii.OO 




3S().()() 


;{70.00 




10.00 


OOO.OO 


58(i.00 




14.00 


2,500.00 


2,250.50 




249.50 


250.00 


260.00 


10.00 




90.00 


59.10 




30.90 



4,400.00 



4.166.60 



■ 1 .00 



304.40 



Registration Fees & Permits 

Marriage Licenses 

Recording Fees-Legal Dociunents 

Filing Fees 

Smiclry Fees — City Clerk 

Dog Licenses 



1 ,050.00 
3,000.00 
200.00 
1,300.00 
4,500.00 

10,050.00 



1,269.00 219.00 

3,995.50 995.50 

98.00 102.0(1 

1,368.00 68.00 

4,066.11 433.89 



10,796.61 1.282.50 



535.89 



Dejxirtiiieutal Service Charges 

Rent of Buildings 

Comfort Station Concessions 

Golf Fees . 

Mem. Field Royalties & Concess 
Other Recr. Dept. Revenues 
Police Dept. Ambulance Charges 

Airport — Rent 

Airport — Concessions - 

Fines & Forfeits 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 

Weights & Measures Fees 

Comm. on Head Tax Collection 
Community Center Revenue 



2.700.00 


2.828.50 


128. ,50 




600.00 


616.30 


16.30 




15,600.00 


14,297.50 




1,302.50 


300.00 


300.00 






2,000.00 


1,929.89 




70.11 


970.00 


979.49 


9.49 




15,320.00 


15,593.06 


273.06 




120.00 


165.81 


45.81 




1 1 ,800.00 


19,236.36 


7,436.36 




2.100.00 


2,363.87 


263.87 




350.00 


391.46 


41.46 




6.500.00 


6.601.70 


101.70 




600.00 


1,540.72 


940.72 





}8,960.00 



66,844.66 9.257.27 1,372.61 



Unclassified 

Interest Income 2,600.00 5,262.94 2,662.94 

Sale of Property 580.00 9,268.00 8,688.00 

Sub. Div. Assess. Prior Yrs. Constr 320.00 160.00 160.00 

Sale of Ordinances 22.25 22.25 

3.500.00 14,713.19 11,373.19 160.00 

TOTAL MISC. REVENUES 395,940.00 445,919.36 54.260.00 4.280.64 

Cur rent Yr. Prop, c- Polls 

Property Tax - 4,813,216.09 4,796,998.82 16.217.27 

Poll Tax 21,000.00 21,682.00 682.00 

National Bank Stock Tax 7,000.00 10,692.50 3,692.50 

4,841,216.09 4.829,373.32 4,374.50 16,217.27 

TOTAL REVENUES 5,237,156.09 5,275,292.68 58,634.50 20,497.91 



57 



STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE — GENERAL FUND 

December 31. 1964 

196i Prior State 

Levy Years Head Taxes 

BALANCE JANUARY 1. 1964 628,259.18 19,984.80 

Committed to Collector in 1964 

(Incl. Sul)plemental) 

Real & Personal Property 4,836,563.81 73.80 

National Bank Stock - - 10,692.50 

Timber Yield - 1,762.30 543.45 

Polls . -^-. 23,982.00 528.00 

Heads (For State) 75,620.00 

Total Charges to CoUectoi 4,873.000.61 629,404.43 95,604.80 

Accounted for as Folloirs 

Collections (Net of Refunds) 4,244,495..38 574,044.61 68,869.50 

Authorized Abatements ^ 24,070.15 28,174.03 6,755.00 

Balance Uncollected Dec. 31, 1964 604,435.08 27,185.79 19,980.30 

Total Credits &: Balance 4,873,000.61 629.404.43 95.604.80 



.\gc Analysis of L'ncoUected Taxes 

Real & Personal Timber 

Property Yield Polls Heads 

1958 -.-- 456.89 

1959 109.05 246.27 

1 960 -- - 1 1 ,427.89 

1961 1 16.20 

1962 - 3.136.34 356.00 1,007.00 

1963 10,712.05 369.60 255.50 673.30 

1964 . . 598,564.79 246.29 5.624.00 18.300.00 



Grand Total 624,523.21 862.16 6,235.,50 19,980.30 



STATEMENI OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS — GENERAL FUND 

Balance Unredeemed January I . I^h-f 

Tax Levy of 1961 .. . -. .- 13,620.91 

Tax Levy of 1962 - 29,421.62 43,042.53 

1964 Tax Sale (Tax Lex'y of 1963) 51,357.57 

Total Charges 94,400.10 

Accounted for as Folloies: 

Collections . .... ....... 46,027.57 

Authorized Abatements 778.95 

Deeded to City . 

Balance Unrecleemed December 31, 1964 47,593.58 94,400.10 



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70 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE R: REPLACEMENT FUND 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 



For the Year Eiukd December 31, 1961 

F(jiiipineiit Edttiiiigs _. _ 

Operating Expenditures 

Direct Labor 30.459.99 

Indirect Labor 20.524.61 

Leaves &: Longe\itv . _. _ 5,556.64 

Building Repairs 2,312.78 

Gasoline, Oil & Antifreeze 20,131.25 

Repair Parts 44,069.93 

Tires 9.597.76 

Batteries . 1 ,326.42 

Miscellaneous Hardware _ 2,501.98 

642.40 

.- 2,185.31 

^ ...__ 465.86 

.- 5.556.60 

. - . 6,015.75 

-. 5.333.80 



Crease & Lubricants 

Supplies .. . 

Hand Tools ._. 

Fuel & Utilities 

Insurance 

Retirement Contributions 

Shop Equipment 



Depreciation 

Net Gain for Period 



243,099.13 



165,681.08 



58,976.10 224,657.18 



18,441.95 



Assets 

Equipment 

Due from Cieneral Fund ... 

Liabilities d- Futids 

Miuiicipal Investment 

Capital Reserve Fund 

Surplus, December 31, 1964 



BALANCE SHEET 

December 31. 1964 



.STATEMENT OF CASH SURPLl'S 



681,144.44 
36,772.86 



717,917.30 



Net Operating Profit for 1964, as above . 
Accumulated Surplus, January 1, 1964 
Less: Transfer to Capital Reserve Fund 



Accunudated Surplus. December 31. 1964 

SFATEMENT OF RESERVE ACCOUNT 

Balance, January 1, 1964 ... . 

Additions 

Depreciation 

Equipment .Sold .. .. 

Transfer from Capital Reserve Fund _ .. 



Equipment Purcha.ses (as per detail) 
Halance, December 31, 1964 



681,708.23 




11,806.62 




24,402.45 


717,917.30 




18,441.95 


13,960.50 




8,000.00 


5.960.05 




24.402.45 


T 






20.070.70 


58,976.10 




600.00 




8,000.00 


67,576.10 




87.646.80 




75,840.18 



1 1 ,806.62 



71 



DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED 

1 Street Swtcpcr , 9.200.00 1 2i/,-Ton Dump Truck 4,480.00 

1 Load Packer -. . -- 18.193.00 2 5-tou Dump Trucks 17.008.00 

1 Front End Loader -- 15,239.00 1 Crew Cab Pick-up 3,176.24 

1 Tractor w/Backhoe 4,903.94 2 Snow Plows & Frames 3,640.00 

TOTAL .- 75,840.18 



BALANCE SHEET — PARKING METER FUND 

December 31, 1964 

Assets: 

Due from General Fund 2,082.55 

Debt Requirements — Special Assessment 34,661.72 

Debt Requirements — Other 30,000.00 66,744.27 



Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 30,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments . . 34,661.72 

Unappropriated Current Surplus .. 2,082.55 66,744.27 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 
PARKING METER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1964 

Cash Bahmce — JimuAY) I. \96A 330.76 

Reve7Jiies: 

Meter Collections — On Street 43,014.68 

Meter Collections — Off Street 9.914.20 

Parking Penalties 7,247.00 60,175.88 60,506.64 

Operating Expendilines: 
On Street 

Meter Repairs & Maintenance 4,553.58 

Enforcement . 12.068.18 

Collecting & Accounting 1,559.40 

Marking Pavements 100.00 

Insurance 205.78 

Retirement Contributions 1,145.78 19,632.72 

Off Street 

Meter Repairs 1,052.00 

Enforcement 4.594.42 

Collections 528.00 

Marking Pavements 1.200.00 

Maintenance of Parking Areas 3,210.96 

Lighting 1,607.76 

Insurance 75.00 

Retirement Contributions 298.42 12,566.56 

Debt Semice — Of] Street Areas: 

Pavment of Bonds 2.000.00 

Interest on Bonds 880.00 2.880.00 



72 



Share of Special Assessment Projects: 

Principal 14.832.71 

Interest _ 3,521.75 18.354.46 

Capital Outlay: 

Equipment: On Street 4,990.35 



Total E.xpenditures _.__ 58,424.09 



Cash Balance — December 31. 1964 . 2,082.55 



BALANCE SHEET — WATER FUND 

December 31. 1964 

ASSETS 
Fixed Assets: 

Water & Flowage Rights 167,663.11 

Land 2 1 1 .975.37 

Structures __ 472.662.75 

Pumping & Purification Equipment 86,277.37 

Distribution Mains. .Services. Hydrants & Meters 1.834.723.47 

Other Equipment and Garage Equipment 79.433.18 

Misc. Expenditures during Construction 1,567.62 

Emergency Pumping Station Facilities 70,377.54 

2,924,680.41 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 898,992.37 2.025,688.04 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund ]()2,239.75 

Investments 57.416.52 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund .— - 8,822.03 

Materials & Supplies — Inventory 56.628.14 225,106.44 



Total Assets 2.250,794.48 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 
Lons, Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt -- 100,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 33.701.00 133.701.00 

Fund Balance and Surplus: 

Municipal Investment 963.194.74 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 269.005.67 

Surplus Balance — Jan. 1, 1964 864.102.18 

Less: Uncollectable Accounts 19.65 

864,082.53 
Net Profit for the Year 1964 20,810.54 884,893.07 2,117,093.48 



Total Liabilities. Surplus & Funds 2,250,794.48 

73 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS — WATER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31. 1!K)4 
OPERATING RE\'EXUES 

Commercial Sales — Fiat Rate .-. 2.813.74 

Commercial Sales — Metered 210,079.85 

Industrial Sales — Metered .._ 47,233.22 

Miscellaneous ^Vater Revenues - 265.40 260,392.21 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Water Supply: 

Source of Supply Labor __ 2,579.71 

Pumping Station Labor 27,238.55 

Purification Labor 3,150.49 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,483.12 

Gravity Supplies & Expenses 71.36 

Pumping Station Supplies & Expense . 2.969.87 

Purification Svstem Supplies & Expenses 6,721.92 

Power Purchased - -- 19,870.02 

Repairs to \Vater Supply Str. & Equip 132.38 

Repairs to Pumping Station Str. & Equip. 3,060.81 

Repairs to Purificaiton System Str. & Equip. 304.23 68,582.46 

Distribution: 

Distribution Wages 38.201.30 

Meter Department Labor 6,392.32 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 83.35 

Other Supplies &: Expenses 1,000.34 

Repairs to Structures .. - 455.22 

Repairs to Mains 4,096.40 

Repairs to Services 3,196.69 

Repairs to Hydrants 852.91 

Repairs to Meters 1,758.68 56,037.21 

Adiniuistration: 

Commercial Office Salaries 4,135.25 

Meter Reading Salaries .. 8,385.14 

Commercial Supplies & Expenses 1,422.72 

Salary of General Officer 8,800.00 

Salary of Account Clerk ....._. ._..... 1,800.00 

General Office Expense . 706.86 

Repairs to General Office Str. & Equip. 534.72 

General Expense 667.11 

Insurance .. . ... 3,279.61 

Longevity, Annual and Sick Leaves 16,320.32 

Retirement Fluid Payments 11,219.64 

Stores Dept. & Shop Expense 4,464.24 

Garage Expense 3,249.80 67,985.41 

Fixed Charges: 

Depreciation 47,325.84 

Taxes 38.48 47,364.32 



Total Operating Expenses 239,969.40 

Operating Income -- 20,422.81 

74 



\o)i-Oj>erathig Income: 

Income- from In\cstecl Fiiiuls . .. — . 3,556.23 

Miscclhiiicous Income _.- 1.185.40 4,741.63 



25,164.44 



Xon-Opeialiug Expetises: 

Interest Expense — 4,353.90 

Net Profit for the Year ._. ._ . . 20,810.54 



BALANCE SHEET — SANITARY SEWER FUND 

December 31, 1964 

.ASSETS 
Fixed Assets: 

Land &.- Right of Way 38,274.97 

Sewer Mains ..- 1 ,423,267.33 

Manholes 180.870.85 

Customer Connections - 227,598.67 

Sundry Equipment — - 6,335.01 

1,876,346.83 

Less: Reserve for Depreciation 820,068.01 1.056,278.82 

Deferred Engineering Charges 11,678.40 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund 97,404.93 

Investments 29,994.65 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund 33.744.42 

Due from Special .Assess. Fund — Trunk 

Sewer Cost 512.70 161,656.70 



1,229,613.92 



LIABILITIES c<: FUNDS 

Long Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 82,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 28,079.41 110,079.41 

Fund Balance d- Surplus: 

Municipal Inxestment . 464.871.96 

Contributions in Aid of Construction 290,459.79 

Surplus Balance: Jan. 1, 1964 332,778.77 

Net Profit for the Year. 1964 ._ _.. 31,423.99 364,202.76 1,119,534.51 



1,229,613.92 



75 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS — SANITAR\ SKWER FUND 

loi the Year Ended l)ecciiil)ci 31. 1964 

OPERATINC. RENENUES 

Sewer Jleiils: 

General -- 61 .878.S7 

Industrial 22.937.87 84.816.74 

OPERATINC. EXPENSES 

General Operalions, Admin, etc.: 

Main and Manhole Oper. Expense 15,635.55 

House Conn. Oper. Expense - 2,949.96 

Maintenance of Mains -- 3.865.20 

Maintenance of Manholes 1,615.65 

Misc. Cieneral Expense — - 116.12 

Meter Readings )^- Billings 2,592.83 

Employees Relirenitnt Fund .-- 1,223.26 27.998.57 

Depreciation ._„... 23.443.12 51.441.69 

Operating Income — 33,375.05 

Add: Non-Operating Income: 

Interest on Investments ._ 1,248.49 

34,623.54 

Deduct: N(ni-()pcruling Expenses: 

Interest Expense 3,199.55 

Net Prolit for the Year 31,423.99 



76 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, Ncav Hampshire 

June 4, 1965 

Certificate oj Audit 

This is to certify that we have examined and audited the accoimts and 
records of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1964. In our opinion, the Exhibits included herewith reflect the true fi- 
nancial condition of the City on December 31, 1964, together with the 
results of operations for the fiscal year ended on that date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

O. Mainice Oleson ) 

Lionel }. DeGrace ) Auditors 

Hugh J. Cassidy ) 

George L. Russell, Accountant 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX ClOMMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 

June 4, 1965 

To the Mayor and Board ol Aldermen 
Concord, New Hamjishire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the rejjort ol an examination and audit of the 
accounts of the City of CJoncord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1964, which was made by this Di\ision as recjuested. Exhibits as hereafter 
listed are included as p'dvt of the report. 

Scope of Audit 

The accounts and records of all city officials charged with the cus- 
tody, receipt and disbursement of city funds were examined and audited. 
An examination was made of a sufficient number of vouchers, i:)ayrolls 
and cancelled checks to satisfy the recpiirements of accepted standards of 
audit procedure. Recei})ts were checked by source insofar as possible. 
Book balances were verified by comparison with reconciled bank balances 
made from statements obtained from depository banks. 

77 



Cott}pnrative Balauce Sheets {Revenue Aceo\iuts) : December ?/, 196^- 

Deeember 31, 1964: (Exhibit A-1) 

Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accoinits) tor the fiscal years 
ended December 31, 1963 and December 31, 1964, are presented in Ex- 
hibit A-1. As indicated therein, the Surplus decreased by S15,461.27, from 
.§112,726.11 to ,897,264.84, in 1964. 

Analysis of Chatige in Ciirient Financial Condition: (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change in the cinrent financial condition of the 
City during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors wliich caused 
the change indicated therein. These were as follows: 

Decrease in Surplus 

Surplus Used to Reduce Tax Rate .-- ,S1 12,000.00 

Increase in Reserve .\gainst Taxes Receivable _. ... ... .... 30,749.10 

Yield Tax .Vdjustment .. . 25.44 

Increase in Reserve .Against .Accounts Recei\able ... ... 1,041.27 



.SI 43 ,8 15.81 



Increase in Siirjdus 

Net Budget Surplus . . S128,220.03 

Excess Credit — Tax Collector _. — .. .. .... 01 

Head Tax Liabilitv .Adjustment .. .. ..— 134.50 



128,354.54 
Xet Decrease S 15,461.27 



Increase in Long-Term Indebtedness: 

The long-term indebtedness of the City (including Municipal, AV'ater 
and Union School District indebtedness) increased by .5117,559.47 in 
1964, as shown here^vith: 

Long Term 
Debt 
December 
31,1963 

-Municipal .. 81.389.644.00 

Water 198.610.00 

School (Union School 

District) 2.115,000.00 

.Airport Advance 

(Due State) 16,917.37 



Bonds 
i~ Xotes 
Issued 


Bonds 
d- Xotes 
Retired 

ill IQf,l 


Long Term 

Debt 

December 

31,1961 

81,357,362.00 

185,785.80 


.S230,000.00 
22,000.00 


S262 ,282.00 
34,824.20 


350,000.00 


185,0()0.()() 


2.280,000.00 




2,334.33 


14.583.04 



S3,720,171.37 §602,000.00 .S484,440.53 .'S3,837,730.84 



Statement of Lonir-Term Indebtedness: (Exhibit A-6) 

A statement of outstanding long term indebtedness as of December 
31, 1964, showing annual debt service requirements, is contained in 
Exhibit A-6. 

78 



Coinparatixie Statements of Appropriations and Expenditures — 
Estitnated a)id Actual Ret'enues: (Exliibits A-4 R: A-5) 
Com])arati\e statements of apjMojjriations and exjjenclitines, esti- 
mated and actual rexeniies for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1964, 
are jjresented in Exhibits A-4 and A-5. As indicated b) the budget simi- 
mar\ (Exhibit A-5) , unexjjended balances of aj^propriations of 
.S9(),()(S7.M, j)his a re\entie smjjhis of 838,132.59, residted in a net budget 
surplus of $128,220.03. 

Tax Collections: 

Tax collections (exclusive of State Head Taxes) of the ctirrent 
) ear's levy as compared to taxes assessed, for the years 1963 and 1964 
were as follows: 



Taxes Assessed — Cluirent 
Years Levy — 

Taxes Clollcctcd — Cliirieiit 
Years Lew .. 

Taxes Abateci — Currciil 
Years Le\y 

Uncollected Taxes — 
Current Years Lew 



Conclusion: 

The pro\isions of Cihapter 181 of the Laws of 1955, reqtiire that this 
report or the stmimary of findings and recommendations (letter of trans- 
mittal) shall be published in the next annual rejjort of the city. 

We extend oin- thanks to the officials of the C^ity of Concord and their 
office staffs for the assistance lendered dining the coinse of the audit. 

\'oins ver\ truh, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Dnector 
DI\'IS10N OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX CO.NfMlSSION 

O. Maurice Oleson ) 

Lionel J. DeGrace ) Auditors 

Hugh j. Cassidy ) 

George L. Russell. Accountant 



Levy of 1963 


Percent 


I.ex<y of 196) 


Percent 


$4,546,521.17 


85.7% 


.$4,876,303.42 




.S3,895,788.9() 


$4,247,796.19 


87.1% 


.38,9.^7.73 


.9% 


24,070.15 


Kcr; 

"^ /o 


611.794.54 


13.4-. 


604.437.08 


19 lor 


.$4,546,521.17 


100.0% 


$4,876,303.42 


100.0% 



79 



DIRECTORY OF CITY SERVICES 



Service 



Administration, General 

Airport ( Maintenance ) 

Ambulance 

Assessments 

Auditorium, Rental 

Auto Permits 

Bicycle Licenses 

Beano Licenses 

Birth Certificates 

Bookmobile 

Building Permits 

Cemeteries 

City Council 

Civil Defense 

Dance Licenses 

Death Certificates 

Dog Licenses 

Elections 

Engineering— City 

FIRE-CONCORD 

FIRE-PENACOOK 

Golf Course 

Health, Public 

Laboratory 

Legal Matters 

Library 

Maps, City 

Marriage Certificates 

Milk Licenses & Inspection 

Mortgages & Conditional Sales 

Oil Burner Inspection 

Old Age Assistance 

Ordinances & Resolutions 

Parks & Recreation 

Payments by City 

Personnel— City 

Planning 

Playgrounds 

Plumbing Permits 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Refuse Collection 

Relief 

Sanitation, Public 

Sewers 

Snow Plowing & Sanding 

Soldier's Relief 

Special Benefit Assessments 

Street Lights— Reported Out 

Street Maintenance 

Taxes— Payment of 

Trees, City 

Water— Service 

Water Bills— Payment of 

Weights & Measures 

Zoning Permits & Changes 

Welfare 



Department 

Mayor 

Engineering 

Police 

Assessors 

City Clerk 

Collector 

Police 

Police 

City Clerk 

Library 

Engineering 

Cemetery 

City Clerk 

Civil Defense 

Police 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

City Clerk 

Engineering 

FIRE 

FIRE 

Recreation & Parks 

Health 

Health 

City Solicitor 

Library 

Engineering 

Records 

Health 

City Clerk 

Fire 

Welfare 

City Clerk 

Recreation & Parks 

Fmance 

Personnel 

Planning 

Recreation & Parks 

Engineering 

POLICE 

Purchasing 

Recreation & Parks 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Health 

Public Works 

Public Works 

Welfare 

Finance 

Concord Electric Co. 

Public Works 

Collector 

Engineering 

Water 

Collector 

Weights & Measures 

Engineering 

Welfare 



Phone 

225-3591 
224-1955 
225-3232 
224-0241 
224-059 r 
224-4261 
225-3232 
225-3232 
224-0591 
225-2743 
224-1955 
225-3911 
224-0591 
224-4342 
225-3232 
224-0591 
224-0591 
224-0591 
224-1955 
225-3355 
753-6622 
224-0951 
224-0521 
224-0521 
225-3041 
225-2743 
224-1955 
224-0591 
224-0521 
224-0591 
225-3355 
224-1091 
224-0591 
224-0951 
225-2775 
224-2111 
224-1955 
224-0951 
224-1955 
225-3232 
224-2111 
224-0951 
224-1955 
224-1091 
224-0521 
224-1955 
224-1955 
224-1091 
225-2775 
225-3641 
224-1955 
224-4261 
224-1955 
225-5574 
224-4261 
225-2864 
224-1955 
224-1091 



For prompt attention 
for SERVICE dial the 
DEPARTMENT IN- 

VOLVED. If you are un- 
certain about where to 
call, dial the MAYOR'S 
OFFICE 225-3591 




Be sure to give your 
NAME AND ADDRESS 
as well as the NATURE 
OF THE REQUEST 
clearly. DO NOT HANG 
UP until you are sure 
that your MESSAGE 
HAS BEEN UNDER- 
STOOD.