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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

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ANNUAL REPORT • 1965 





CONCORD, S 

1765* BICENTENNIAL* 1965 

Home of the Concord Coach--It Opened the West! 



H 



ANNUAL REPORT • 1965 





CONCORD, S 

1765* BICENTENNIAL* 1965 

Home of the Concord Coach- -It Opened the West! 






CITY OF CONCORD 
NEW HAMPSHIRE 

ANNUAL REPORT 

for the 
Year Ending December 31, 1965 



Mayor's Foreword 

Board of Aldermen - 1965 

Your City Officials - 1965 

City Boards - 1965 

Progress Report - 1965 

Personnel & Purchasing Department 

Planning Department 

Records Department 

Civil Defense 

Fire Department 

Police Department 

Sanitary Inspection 

Health Department 

Welfare Departmient 

Public Library 

Recreation & Parks Department 

Engineering Department 

Building &c Inspection Depart ment 

Concord Airport 

Public Works Department 

Water Department 

Assessing Department 

Collection Department 

Finance Department 

Forecast for 1966 

Financial Statements - 1965 

Annual Audit - 1965 
Your City Serving You- -A Telephone 

Directory of Public Services 



Page 

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66 
Inside 
Back Cover 



The illustration on the front cover was designed by the 
Bovie Screen Process Printing Company of Concord, and was 
used on a poster publicizing the Bicentennial celebration. 



MAYOR'S FOREWORD 






During their regular June meeting, the Board of Aldermen participated 
in a Flag Day observance at the State House Plaza by invitation of the 
Concord Lodge of Elks. 



rm^^f- 



Charles C. Davie, Mayor 



ALDERMEN- AT -LARGE 



Robert D. Branch 
William P. Gove 
Edna C. McKenna 



Winfield J. Phillips 
Williann A. Stevens 
David E. Tardif 



WARD ALDERMEN 



Ward 1 John E. Walters 

Ward 2 Karl G. Neuman 

Ward 3 George A. Stohrer, Jr. 

Ward 4 Malcolm McLane 



Ward 5 Roland E. Fletcher 

Ward 6 Joseph C. Musumeci 

Ward 7 C. Edwin Howard 

Ward 8 William H. Perry 



Ward 9 Thomas B. Jennings 

The Board of Aldermen consists of 15 elected members, 
six Aldermen-at-Large and nine Ward Aldermen. Aldermen-at- 
Large are elected for terms of four years, with three of the six 
elected every two years. The Mayor and Ward Aldermen are 
elected for terms of two years each. 

The Mayor presides at Board meetings, and the City Clerk 
acts as Clerk of the Board. The City Solicitor is available for 
legal advice on city problems before the Board and is usually 
present at its meetings. Regular meetings of the Board of Alder- 
men are held on the second Monday of each month in the Council 
Chamber, at City Hall. Special meetings may be held on call of 
the Mayor or at least five members of the Board. 

* Held 12 regular meetings (totaling over 4 1 hours), eight 
special meetings, one recessed nneeting and 10 hearings. 

* Passed 32 ordinances and 58 resolutions. 

2 



ASSESSORS 

Edward L. Bartlett 
Richard L. Towle 
Graham E. Fogg 

CEMETERY SUPERINTENDENT 
Edward L. Rowland 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

Walter H. Carlson 

CITY CLERK 

Mrs. Marjorie B. Foote 

CITY ENGINEER & SUPT. 
OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Ronald H. Ford 

CITY LIBRARIAN 

Mrs. Lois R. Markey 

CITY SOLICITOR 

Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Richard D. Brodeur 

DIRECTOR OF WELFARE 
Gertrude E. Watkins 

ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 
Herman E. Burt 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Verne F. Santas, Jr. 



DISTRICT COURT 

Donald Matson, Justice 
Francis E. Perkins, 

Assoc. Justice 
Marie MacPhail, Clerk 



OVERSEER OF THE POOR 
Edward H. York 

PERSONNEL & PURCHASING 
DIRECTOR 

Thomas S. Pingree 

PLANNING DIRECTOR 

Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

POUND KEEPER 

Charles C. Hoagland 

PROBATION OFFICER 
James M. Ceriello 

RECREATION DIRECTOR 
Robert H. Ayer 

SANITARY INSPECTOR 
George A. Hill 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & 
MEASURES 

Harold G. Fletcher 

TAX COLLECTOR 
George West 



FIRE CHIEF 

Earl G. Giles 



TREASURER 

Violet P. Constant 



HEALTH OFFICER 

William W. Frost, Jr., M. D. 



WATER SUPERINTENDENT 
G. Arthur Faneuf 



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Special City Boards, composed of citizens and city officials 
who serve by appointment, donated many hours during the year 
to consideration of the city's current problems, its future plans 
and policies. 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY 
BOARD 

Robert J. Jewell 
James D. Bell 
Richard W. Eddy 

BOARD OF PLUMBING 
EXAMINERS 

Herman E. Burt 
George E. Young 
Earl A. Banks 

TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS 

Violet P. Constant 
Richard G. Williamson 
Robert M. Beyer 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

William W. Frost, Jr., M.D. 
W. D. Penhale, M.D. 
T. J. Halligan, M.D. 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 

Douglas N. Everett 
Lt. Gen. EdwardH. Brooks 
Warren H. Greene 
Pas quale V. Rufo 
Dudley W. Orr 
John Swenson 
Ex Officio: 

Mayor Charles C. Davie 
Ronald H. Ford 

City Engineer 
Robert D. Branch 

Alderman- at -Large 

ZONING BOARD OF 
ADJUSTMENT 

Richard N. Peale 
Raymond K. Perkins 
Bernard McAlpine 
Roy V. Lang 
Frank J. Preston 



BOARD OF APPEAL 

Arnold Perreton 
Everett Munson 
Carroll Garland 
Robert A. Foster 
William Johns 



BOARD OF LIBRARY 
TRUSTEES 

Chester G. Larson 
Mrs. Mary Farnum 
Mrs . Mildred T. Melvin 
J. Bernard Halligan 
George E. McNeff, Sr. 
Atlee F. Zellers 
Mrs. Nyleen Morrison 
Mrs. Walter S. Newton 
W. Duer Thompson 



BOARD OF REVISION OF 

ASSESSMENTS 

Verne F. Santas, Jr., 

Chairman 
Ronald H. Ford 
Daniel E. Donovan, Jr. 
James A. Taylor 
Archie N. Gourley 



LICENSING BOARD 

Mayor Charles C. Davie 
Walter Carlson 
Earl G. Giles 



BOARD OF HOUSING 
STANDARDS 



Ronald H. Ford 
William W.Frost, Jr. 
Earl G. Giles 



M.D. 




The $1,4 million J. F. Ken- 
nedy Memorial Apartments, 
Concord's first high-rise 
apartment building, provides 
office facilities for the Con- 
cord Housing Authority and 
urban renewal agency, Con- 
cord social service agencies, 
an auditorium and 84 housing 
units for low -income elderly 
persons . 



Celebrated Concord ' s 
200 th anniversary with a 
year-long series of Bicen- 
tennial events. 



Started construction on three major City building projects 

Water Department office building on Penacook Street, Heights 
Fire Station on Loudon Road and an addition to the Concord 
Public Library Main Building at a total cost of $436, 910. 

Completed and published a Community Facilities Plan, con- 
taining information and recommendations for development of 
community facilities in Concord. This is the third report of 
the long-range Comprehensive General Plan being prepared 
by the Planning Board. 

Received a study grant for expansion of the proposed area of 
Capitol Plaza North, urban renewal project, to include the 
Bridge Street area. 

Increased the basis of assessment on taxable property from 
47% to 100%. 

Created the Building and Inspection Department, to handle in- 
spection and enforcement duties previously a function of the 
Engineering Department. 

Conducted, through the State Department of Personnel, the 
first competitive examination for the position of Fire Chief 
ever given by a city or town in this state. 

Saw a boom in public and private construction projects 

among them, completion of the J. F. Kennedy Apartments 
(above), the N. H. Technical Institute, the Douglas N. Everett 
Ice Skating Arena, the Concord Coach Motor Inn, and King's 
department store and shopping center; also start on construct- 
ion of a $3.5 million Federal building, a new State liquor 
store and warehouse, renovation of and addition to YMCA 
facilities, a new service building by Concord Electric Company, 
and other projects. 



On March 16, 1965, this department marked its first an- 
niversary as an independent city department. With continued 
good cooperation of all other municipal departments, it is expect- 
ed that its services will become increasingly valuable to our city. 

The Director must be constantly alert regarding new prod- 
ucts and techniques being developed. In this connection, he 
travelled to California in August to attend the convention of the 
American Public Works Association, primarily to view and ob- 
tain information on the vast amount of new equipment on display. 

He attends all meetings of the Personnel Advisory Board 
in an advisory capacity. 

* Handled some 3,000 purchase orders for goods and services. 

* Purchased over $230,000 worth of vehicles and equipment 
through competitive bidding. 

* Participated in the selection of three key city officials. 

* Arranged for competitive examination, through the State De- 
partment of Personnel, for the position of Fire Chief the 

first time an examination for this position was ever given in 
this state. 




A major purchase was this 85-foot 
snorkel, costing $55, 000 , w h i c h 
was delivered to the Concord Fire 
Department in October, 1965. 




The Planning Director makes a careful study of each pro- 
posed new development and reports his findings to the Planning 
Board. The Board then presents its recommendations to the 
Board of Aldermen. In this way, they work together to help 
build a better Concord. 

* Prepared the annual application for recertification of Con- 
cord's Workable Program for Community Improvement for 
submission to the Department of Housing & Urban Develop- 
ment. This was approved by the Board of Aldermen on 
October 11, 1965, and the Workable Program was recertified 
by Robert C. Weaver, Secretary of Housing & Urban Develop- 
ment, for one year ending December 1, 1966. 

* Sought appropriation and filed application for the preparation 
of an Economic Base Study of Concord and its environs with 
the Housing & Home Finance Agency, under the Federal 701 
local planning assistance program. 

* Completed work, with the assistance of planning consultants, 
on the Comnnunity Facilities Plan, which was adopted and 
certified to the Board of Aldermen on October 4, 1965. 

* Joined with other communities in seeking amendatory State 
legislation to improve the minimum housing code enabling 
law, and recommended updating of the City Building Code. 




Started work on a comprehensive revision of the Concord Zoning 
Ordinance, last revised in its entirety in 1941, with Federal 701 
assistance. 

Contracted with planning consultants under the Federal 701 program 
for the preparation of a complete new set of planning base maps 
covering the city as a whole and urbanized sections; these to be 
used to prepare new zoning maps. 

Cooperated in the survey and planning phase of Capitol Plaza North 
urban renewal project. 

Recommended relocation of Bridge Street from North Main Street to 
Interstate 93 as a Federal Urban Aid highway project, and prepared 
a preliminary plan for redesign of the intersection of Hall, Man- 
chester and Water Streets to improve traffic conditions at this 
location. 

Recommended support for State legislation to set up a joint state- 
city planning agency to guide the orderly development of the central 

government area of Concord the Planning Director was nominated 

to represent the City on this board. 

Recommended favorable action on an ordinance authorizing the Con- 
cord Housing Authority to seek reservation of 150 units of low-cost 
public housing from the Public Housing Administration. 
Prepared a Civil Defense Shelter Plan for Concord with assistance 
of consultants. 

Mapped lines of future streets and relocation of streets involved in 
proposed extensions of Northwest and East Concord By-passes, and 
Storrs Street. 

Recommended construction of a new Water Department office build- 
ing and reallocation of office space in City Hall. 

Recommended to the Board of Aldermen that the State of New Hamp- 
shire should be made fully aware of the trend toward abandonment 
of great dams by utilities, as in the case of the Sewall's Falls power 
development, and of its potential effect on the State's recreational 
resources. 

Advised the City acquire land for diverting water from a portion of 
the Ash Brook watershed into Penacook Lake. 

Recommended three amendments to the Zoning Map and opposed one. 
Approved three new subdivision projects. 

Recommended new or additional traffic controls at four locations, 
on-street parking limitations at several locations within the city 
proper, and off-street parking be established on Prince Street and 
Odd Fellows Avenue, 

Recommended acceptance of 775 feet of street (Poplar Avenue, 225 
feet, and Island Road in Penacook, 500 feet); discontinuance of 
Whittridge Avenue, a portion of Curtisville Road, and an unnamed 
pas sway in the North End. 

Recommended numerous land transactions and innprovements , 
among them: conveyance of City land on Loudon Road for the pro- 
posed skating arena, and 19 acres off South Main Street for develop- 
ment by Concord Industrial Park; purchase of property in Penacook 
for use as a Public Works yard; exchange of land on Loudon Road 
with the State; demolition of city-owned Gifford's Store and land- 
scaping of the area. 



The City Clerk is custodian of the city's vital records. 
She must be able to furnish them on request for research study 
or current information, many times in the form of certified 
copies, to public officials, the press and interested private 
citizens. 

■■' Recorded vital statistics for the year 1965, compared to the 
year 1964, as follows: 

1965 1964 

Births 963 1, 102 

Marriages 398 41Z 

Deaths 725 685 

* Filed 2,388 uniform commercial code statements and recorded 
178 discharges of same. 

* Received and turned over to the City Treasurer $15,688.80 
in receipts. 

* Issued 2, 290 dog licenses. 

* Issued 395 marriage licenses. 

* Issued 1,617 copies of certified records. 

-'- Issued other licenses and permits for such things as operation 
of taxicabs, pinball machines, junk yards, bowling alleys, 
theaters, billiard tables and pawn shops, and the setting of 
utility poles . 

As Clerk of the Board, the City Clerk participates in all 
meetings of the Board of Aldermen, She prepares the agenda 
and furnishes copies of the items listed to the Mayor, members 
of the Board, the City Solicitor, press and radio representatives 
for each meeting. Copies of the minutes are prepared for dis- 
tribution following the meetings. 

The City Clerk is responsible for conducting ELECTIONS 
in Concord for all public offices, and keeping the records thereof . 
A total of 30 candidates filed for 13 municipal offices contested 
at the Municipal Election, held on November 2, 1965: four for 
the office of Mayor; seven for three seats on the Board as Alder- 
man-at-Large; three each fromWards 1, 4 and 7; two each fronn 
Wards 2, 5, 6 and 8; and one each from Wards 3 and 9. A total 
of 8, 425 votes were cast at this election. 

Two recounts were conducted by the Board of Aldermen 
at the recessed meeting on November 9. As a result of the 
recounts, J. Herbert Quinn was declared elected to the office of 
Mayor for a term of two years, and Malcolm McLane was re- 
turned as Aldernnan from Ward 4. 

At the request of the Board of Aldermen, the Planning De- 
partment investigated the need for better protecting the original 
City of Concord records stored in various vaults in the City Hall. 
Itwas recommended that these records be preserved and secured 
in a fireproof vault in the City Clerk's office under the direct 
supervision of the City Clerk; also that a committee expert in 
the techniques of record keeping be appointed by the Mayor to 
assist the City Clerk in reviewing the status of all city records . 



10 




1 



Concord has a 
well organized civil 
defense program , 
operating from ad- 
ministrative headquarters in the basement of City Hall. 



Rescue squadman, Loren Magee, 
demonstrates the Walkie-Talkie. 




* Stocked several shelters and surveyed buildings for 

new shelter sites a total of 66 sheltered areas 

have been located in Concord. 

* Cooperated with the Planning Director and outside 
consultants on preparation of a Community Shelter 
Plan for Concord, as part of the Office of Civil De- 
fense nation-wide "50-City" Connmunity Shelter Plan 
Program. 

* Installed five Federal air raid sirens at North End, 
Heights, East Concord, West Concord and Penacook 
locations bringing the total to six in the city. 

* Set up two-way radio equipment at headquarters. 

* Selected the basement of Central Fire Station as an 

Emergency Operations Center adequately protected against 

fallout radiation, it will be outfitted for use. 

Conducted a shelter manager's course, which included an 
overnight stay in the City Hall basement as part of the train- 
ing experience. 

Stressed medical self-help in the training program set up 

a display on this subject at the Merrimack County Savings 
Bank. 

Held several "checkerboard" test alerts. 

Obtained thousands of dollars in matching Federal funds for 
the purchase of new rescue equipment. 

Noted a decided increase in clerical load, with project ap- 
plications for matching funds, equipment and shelter supply 
inventories and records added to routine duties. 
Carried on public relations activities, including movies and 
slide programs, monthly release of the "Newsletter" to 250 
individuals and firms, and newspaper and radio items. 



The Penacook Civil Defense Rescue Squad was organized 
in 1955. Since then, it has become an extremely active and 
vital part of our preparedness program, as well as an indispens- 
able source of emergency service to the community. 

* Travelled 700 miles in response to 70 emergency 

calls and training sessions including 15 oxygen 

calls, 20 fires, nine accidents, 11 hospital runs, 
two emergency first aid calls, four dogs in the 
river and several flooded cellars. 

* Conducted training sessions at regular inter- 
vals. 

Ronald Rose receives an emergency tele- 
phone communication at CD headquarters. 

11 




Firemen Herbert Smith, Malcolm Palmer, Henry Miner 
and Edward Keane lay a hose line to a burning garage at 
44-46 Jackson Street on the afternoon of July 16. 








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The Concord Fire Department operates with a staff of 66 
permanent men, working on a scheduled 56-hour week, assisted 
by 55 call firemen. Firemen on duty are ready to respond 
instantly when called to combat a fire or other related emer- 
gency in the city, or when called upon for assistance by an adja- 
cent community. 

Fire Chief Duncan Murdoch, Deputy Chief Chester S. 
Blake, and 2nd Deputy Chief Melvin G. Davis retired from duty 
during 1965. These three men's total accunnulation of employ- 
ment represents more than 109 years of service to the City. 
Deputy Chief Earl G. Giles, of the Nashua Fire Department, 
was appointed Concord Fire Chief on November 1, as a result 
of open competitive examinations. The two deputies' positions 
were filled by promotion from within the department. 

* Installed new FM two-way radio system operating on a high 
band frequency at all stations and in all vehicles. 

* Constructed and out-fitted a photo lab for use as a training 
aid in fire prevention and investigation work. 

■•- Constructed a new chief's office at the Central Fire Station, 
and converted the old office into a dispatch office. 



12 



Established a new fire alarm dispatch center at Central Fire Station, 

handling all telephone, fire alarm and radio communications for all 

stations. 

Had electrical systems at Penacook and West Concord Stations 

rewired. 

Started construction of a training site on Loudon Road near the 

Merrimack River pole type drill tower and storage building were 

erected. 

Received and put into service an 85-foot snorkel fire truck, expected 
to prove invaluable in rescue and heavy stream operations involving 
large buildings. 

Purchased a new high expansion foam system, which is being carried 
on Engine 2. 

Purchased 500 feet of 2 1/2-inch and 50 feet of 3-inch hose. 
Performed, with the assistance of the Public Works Department, 
maintenance of all apparatus and equipment, except repairs to the 
hydraulic system of Ladder 2 (aided by factory representative) and 
body repairs on Tank 1. 

Installed approximately two miles of new fire alarm cable and eight 
new fire alarm boxes on Airport Road from Loudon Road to Man- 
chester Street. 

Responded to 65 box alarms, 511 still alarms and 27 false alarms. 
Responded to a total of 715 emergency calls, and 60 non-emergencies. 
Furnished mutual aid on 12 occasions to other towns and cities. 
Made 100 fire safety inspections. 
Held fire losses for the year at $98,690.69, down approximately 

$4, 000.00 from the previous year following is a summary of fire 

losses during 1965: 

Fire Insurance Insurance 

Damage Carried Paid 



Est. Value of 
P rope rty Involved 
in Fire 



Buildings 
Contents 
Total 



$853, 500.00 
36, 000.00 



$84, 075. 63 
14, 615. 06 



!51, 900. 00 
36,000. 00 



$84, 075. 63 
14, 615. 06 



$889,500.00 $98,690.69 $887,900.00 $98,690.69 



* No deaths occured as a result of fire in Concord during 1965. 



Construction of the 
Concord Heights Fire 
Station was started in 
the fall of 1965, and is 
expected to be com- 
pleted in April, 1966. 
This station will house 
a pumper with crew 
and a 1939 aerial lad- 
der truck being placed 
in reserve. 




The year 1965 was a very busy one for the men of the Con- 
cord Police Department in their constant effort to provide the 
best of police protection for Concord residents and their property. 

-'= Conducted the annual city census the final count showing an 

increase of 239 adults and children. 
■'- Held riot and crowd control training at the State Armory. 

* Booked 328 serious crimes (including aggravated assault, 
breaking and entering, larceny, auto theft, forgery, em- 
bezzlement and fraud) 43 more than last year. 

='.= Received reports of 674 missing persons ; located 522 persons. 

='= Brought 35 juvenile cases before the Juvenile Court; a de- 
crease of 85 cases from last year may be partially explained 

by the fact that the State law was changed, lowering the age 
of juveniles from 18 to 17. 

-•= Cleared 96% of all cases handled in 1965. 

-•= Received and turned over to the City Treasurer $3, 180. 25 in 
fees for licenses and permits, and ambulance charges. 

■'- Made 1,429 ambulance calls. 

■'- Recovered $53, 085. 77 (61%) in stolen property out of a total 

of $76, 349. 00 worth reported stolen in 1965 the theft of 

$20, 000.00 in valuable coins not recovered accounts for most 
of the unrecovered loss. 

A tremendous increase in traffic volume and the need for 
improved street patterns at certain intersections made traffic 
control an ever more important and time consuming function of 
the department. 

* Recorded 728 motor vehicle accidents, resulting in 225 per- 
sonal injuries and one fatality; compared with 693 accidents, 
217 injuries and five fatalities in 1964. 

■'- Arrested a total of 13,210 persons in connection with motor 

vehicle violations; an increase of 1,741 over last year 

12, 029 of these violations involved illegal parking. 

* Made 77 arrests for operating a motor vehicle while under 

the influence of liquor, 

* Collected some $3,000.00 more than 
last year in parking meter fees. 

* Repaired 1,816 parking meters at a 
cost of $60.55; a decrease in volume 
and cost of 1,145 repairs and $ 263, 38 
from 1964 this due primarily to the 



/ 



f' 



E, George Moses (right), Deputy Di- 
rector of State Civil Defense, presents 
a check to Police Chief Walter Carlson 
and Concord CD Director Richard 
Brodeur, for the Federal government's 
matching share in the cost of the new 
$11,500 Police - Civil Defense rescue 
truck. 



14 




Patrolman Thomas Roy, with 
ancient helmet and billy club, 
helps Janice Ouellette alight 
from the Concord coach during 
exercises formally opening the 
Bicentennial celebration in 
front of the State House. 




the large number of new 
Duncan-Miller meters pur- 
chased late in 1964. 

* Installed poles and span 
wire for a red and amber 
flasher to be installed at the 
intersection of Canterbury 
and Pembroke Roads in 1966. 

* Placed 4, 000 linear feet of 
"Perma-line" plastic street 
marking on Main and Storrs 
Streets to outline crosswalks 
and traffic lanes. 

* Painted or stenciled over 
2, 400 individual traffic con- 
trol items (parking spaces, 
crosswalks, stop bars, 
driveways, etc. ) and signs on city streets. 

* Furnished supervision and materials for painting of 127, 690 linear 
feet of centerline on city streets by a State Highway crew. 

In addition to the regular force, the Police Department has two 
fully uniformed Reserve units; the Concord unit with 33 men and the 
Penacook unit of 19rnen. They are trained in the same subjects as the 
regular members of the department and can be counted on to render 
valuable service in any emergency. The department also employs six 
women and two men who have been thoroughly trained in traffic control 
and assigned as school crossing guards. The presence of these dedi- 
cated men and women at dangerous crossing points near schools has 
prevented any child from being injured while they have been on duty. 

Tribute was paid to Deputy Chief Joseph G. Andrews, retiring 
after 40 years of service, at a testimonial dinner held in November. 
Captain Daniel C. Abbott was promoted to Deputy Chief. 

An important activity of the Police Department is the Boy's Club 
offering opportunity for wholesome recreation and guidance to all boys 
of the community. A club house is maintained on Highland Street and 
summer camping facilities, known as Camp Andrews (named after 
Deputy Chief Andrews), are located in Danbury, N. H. 

* Served 338 boys during the year at the Boy's Club 70% of them 

under 14 years of age. 

* Conducted four sessions at Camp Andrews 144 boys attended. 

* Purchased a new bus with funds contributed by local citizens and 
organizations . 



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15 




I*. ^ CF 

. MUSICAL 

HiSTOm 



In addition to 
the usual problems, 
of crime, delinquen- 
cy and traffic, the 
Police Department 
was called upon to 
furnish protection 
and traffic control 

for many events associated with the Bicentennial year. The Memorial 
Day parade, one of the highlights of the celebration, called for the 
policing and control of traffic vital to the safety of over 50,000 spec- 
tators and participants. Thirty-six regular officers, 45 special offi- 
cers and 20 officers from the City of Manchester shared in this work. 

Chief Carlson and Officer Roy participated in opening exercises 
held in front of the State House in March. Other events requiring 
police participation were the 4th of July parade and drum and bugle 
corps competition, and the Bicentennial pageant at Memorial Field and 
the Odd Fellows parade in August. 



16 



The Sanitary Inspector keeps a close check on conditions 
of sanitation in all food producing and handling establishments . 
He checks all complaints of sanitary law violations referred to 
him by other city departments and the public. A laboratory is 
maintained for testing samples obtained in the field. 

He is often aided in his work by the U. S. Public Health 
Service, In cooperation with this agency, a sanitation rating 
of dairy farms in the Concord area was made, resulting in a 
71% rating (compared with 62% in 1961). An effort is being 
made to bring the rating to 90% by January 1, 1966. They also 
assisted in conducting a survey and evaluation of the Concord 
food sanitation control program, to determine the effectiveness 
of the current program and whether any improvements are 
needed to adequately protect the consuming public. An evalu- 
ation was made of the city's food service program, resulting in 
adoption of the U, S. Public Health inspection sheet and record 
sheet as a part of the department's record system. 

The Inspector attended an epidemiology course on the in- 
vestigation of food-borne outbreaks sponsored by the U. S. Pub- 
lic Health Service and the State Departnnent of Health, January 
27-28, at N. H. Hospital; the annual meeting of the International 
Association of Milk, Food & Environmental Sanitarians, in Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, September 13-16; and a five-day in-service 
training course in milk technology (under a training grant from 
the U. S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare), No- 
vember 15-19, at the University of Massachusetts. 

* Tested 804 dairy samples for butterfat content, watering, 
sediment, presence of penicillin and other antibiotics, 
presence of mastitis in dairycows, and for proper pasteuriz- 
ation of pasteurized products. 

* Made 499 health inspections during the year: 

Dairies 80 Milk plants 12 

Stores 156 Eating establishments 91 

Bakeries 11 Wholesale meat houses 4 

Trailer parks 18 Schools and nurseries 40 

Foster homes 23 Complaints 64 

* Condemmed, confiscated and destroyed as unfit for human con- 
sumption $11,500 worth of food and beverages following a 
fire at Alosa's Fpodland ($900 worth approved for salvage); 
also lOOpounds of dog food, eight cases of babyfood, and other 
items. 

* Continued the pigeon extermination program destroyed 

some 200 pigeons. 

* Purchased a black light contamination detection kit for better 

determining the presence of rodents also, a polaroid 

camera as an aid in proving and controlling sanitary law vio- 
lations . 

* Picked up and destroyed about 100 plastic ice balls for people 

unwilling or unable to safely dispose of them these balls, 

made in Hong Kong, were found to be contaminated with bac- 
teria by laboratories in other parts of the country. 



17 



The nursing staff is shown 
here in their new quarters 
at the Kennedy Apartments 
on South Main Street. The 
nurses made a total of 
8, 612 professional visits 
in Concord and Penacook 
during 1965. 




The VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION of CONCORD provides nurs- 
ing service, on a part-time basis, in private homes. Its objectives 
are: care and rehabilitation of the sick and disabled in their homes, 
under medical supervision; to teach families to secure and maintain 
environmental conditions that will prevent and control disease; and to 
disperse knowledge of available resources for guidance of individuals 
with social and emotional difficulties. 

The staff is .composed of registered nurses who are specialists 
in the field of public health. They work in close cooperation with Con- 

* >:< >|c * :{c >;c j|< sjc * jjc 

The Health Department is headed by the Health Officer, 
who gives of his time as public health matters require attention. 
Immunization clinics are held at the City Auditorium once a 
month during nine months of the year. A public comfort station, 
located at the Police Station on Warren Street, is operated for 
the convenience of shoppers and other persons in the downtown 
area. 

Diseases of the circulatory system remained the leading 
cause of death in 1965. The most common causes of death in 
Concord in 1965, compared with five years ago were: 

1965 
Diseases of the circulatory system 155 

Diseases of the nervous system 24 

Cancer and other malignant tumors 50 

Diseases of the digestive system 13 

Diseases of the respiratory system 14 



I960 
121 

41 
39 
13 
17 



Recorded 710 deaths, 37 nnore than last year. 

Held nine clinics with 708' persons attending 501 persons 

received protective treatment against diphtheria, whooping 

cough, tetanus and smallpox; and 207 received Sabin oral 

polio vaccine. 

Issued 224 licenses: Bakery or Restaurant 98 

Convalescent Home 3 

Milk Sales 123 

Received and checked 40 complaints during the year. 

Recorded 1 3 stillbirths and 127 bodies brought here for burial. 



li 




The Visiting Nurses entered 
a float in the Memorial Day- 
Parade. 



cord Hospital and the Concord Mental Health Center. The part-time 
services of a physiotherapist are also available. 

In June, 1965, nursing services of this agency were extendedto 
include the Penacook area. A pilot program of having a referral co- 
ordinator at Concord Hospital was undertaken, in an effort to provide 
more uniform and continuous nursing care from the hospital to the 
home. A three-day experience in public health nursing for each of 
Concord Hospital's senior nursing students was provided; also a one- 
day field trip for New Hampshire Hospital senior students. 

The Welfare Department renders financial assistance to 
the residents of Concord and Penacook who are without ade- 
quate resources to meet their basic needs. 

Marital difficulties replaced sickness as the major cause 
of relief needs in 1965. Reasons for relief and the approxi- 
mate per cent of cases in each category during 1965, compared 
with 1964 were: 1965 1964 

Marital Difficulties 37% 19% 

Insufficient Income 24% 22% 

Unemployment 12% 22% 

Sickness 9% 24% 

Unemployable 9 % 1 3 % 

Alcoholism 9% 0% 

The City, State and Federal government share in the total 
cost of welfare aid. Average monthly case loads with total 
payments by the City, compared with the previous year were : 



1965 
Cases Amount 



General Relief 

Old Age Assistance (Includ- 
ing Aliens) # 

Aid to Permanently & Totally 
Disabled ## 



32 



169 



21 



$33, 195 
52, 449 
11, 774 



1964 
Cases Amount 

32 $31, 159 

168 57,391 

23 12,036 



# City's share 25% of total cost for citizens and 50% for aliens. 
## City's share 35% of total cost. 



19 




The Concord Public Library entered a float in the Memorial Day- 
parade. The library also sponsored a candidate for Bicentennial 
Queen, who finished as second runner-up in the contest. 




Concord is justly proud of its fine public library. The 
year 1965 saw its continued growth in number of books, 
materials and diversified services; also the start on con- 
struction of an addition to its facilities. 



Broke ground in October for an addition to the Main Library, 
which will provide a small auditorium, music room, new and 
improved reference quarters, new young people's room, 
garage for the bookmobile, and larger and more convenient 
working space for the Extension Department, as well as other 
much needed facilities. 

Participated in Concord' s Bicentennial celebration furnish- 
ing information, advice, materials or personnel in connection 
with almost every display or program. 

Increased the book collection by 5,900 new books for a 

grand total of 116, 966 volumes. 

Enlarged the collection of framed prints to a total of 83 avail- 
able for circulation also started a small collection of out- 
sized art books. 

20 



* Increased the record collection by 350 records, making a total of 
1,619 recordings; including poetry and readings, instruction in 

languages, typing and shorthand, as well as music circulation 

hit a new peak of 8, 192 records this year. 

* Increased the collection of recordings and other material in the 
Ruth May Music Room its use continues high by people of all ages. 

* Offered 350 magazines and ZO newspapers, representing diversified 
interests and wide geographic coverage. 

Circulation continued to grow, with 325,930 items circulated 
during 1965; compared to 323, 774 items last year. There are 25, 902 
registered borrowers (92.6% of the population of Concord), a phe- 
nomenally high figure. The addition of six new bookmobile stops in 
the fall of 1964 resulted in a 16% jump in booknnobile circulation dur- 
ing 1965; 65, 783 in 1964 to 76, 685 this year. 

Stepped-up activity at reference and reader's adviser desks at- 
tests to a growing demand for information, and increasing public 
awareness of the materials and services available at the library. 

* Provided "take - home" leaflets regarding library activities and 
materials available, and released book reviews and lists of new 
books and records to radio and newspapers. 

* Installed music listening equipment in the Children's Room, with 
its own record collection. 

* Held spring and fall series, of six meetings each, for mothers of 
pre-school children; during which activities were provided for the 
children. 

* Conducted story hours weekly at the Main Library and Penacook 

Branch during the winter months in summer, at eight of the 

city's playgrounds. 

The library maintains a large collection of movie films for cir- 
culation. Use of these more than doubled in 1965, both in number of 
films loaned and viewers reported. Although still borrowed primarily 
for entertainment, a growing interest in their educational content is 
noted. 

* Offered weekly film programs on Saturday mornings for children, 
October through mid-April. 

* Presented four foreign films in the Friends of the Library series. 

The library takes pleasure in providing space for special ex- 
hibits by groups, businesses and individuals. Among the many excel- 
lent displays arranged during this past year were: a handsome collect- 
ion of Ceremonial Art objects fromi the Jewish Museum of New York; a 
display of Currier and Ives originals; a scene centered about the psalm- 
ist-shepherd of ancient Israel for the Easter-Passover season, con- 
structed by the Omer Luneau family; a fine model of the Concord coach, 
loaned by Dr. Ursula Sanders; also displays featuring Mental Health 
Week, antique dolls and toys. United Nation's Day, Concord Music Club 
activities, first-aid to animals, National Library Week, Christmas 
decorations and other subjects. 

21 







White Park at Midnight 



Our Recreation & Parks Department serves over a quarter 
of a million people annually. Its aim is to provide the opportun- 
ity for all the citizens of Concord to enjoy their leisure time on 
a year-round basis. 

-•- Conducted programs for children and youth twoplay schools, 

neighborhood square dances, tennis, skating and ski lessons, 
pee-wee and bantam hockey, midget football, summer music 
school and a puppet show. 

■•' Conducted programs for adults women's fitness program, 

golf and bowling for women, industrial softball and basketball, 
bowling for retired citizens, badminton, camping exhibition 
and dog obedience class, 

■'' Operated 10 -week summer program at 12 playgrounds and 

seven pools games, pet shows, athletics, arts and crafts, 

music and dancing, dramatics, storytelling, swimming in- 
struction, trips, a presentation by the Newington Children ' s 
Theater and nnany special events. 

Attendance: 1965 1964 

Playgrounds 54,512 57,761 

Pools 112,929 83,908 

* Offered year-round special events Winter Carnival, ski and 

skate exchange, Easter egg hunt, Benson's Animal Farm trip, 
square dance festivals. Elk's Field Day, Junior Champ track 
meet, sidewalk art exhibit, swim meets, band concerts, 4th of 
July fireworks, Sunset Club trips, Hampton Beach teen trip, 
children's Bear Brook trip and Peanut Carnival. 

* Participated in or provided facilities for many events associ- 
ated with the Bicentennial celebration. 

22 



The Concord Community Center is open for full-time use from 
October 1 until April 30. Total participation in activities at the Center 
was 39, 580 persons, an increase of over 1 3, 800 more than last year . 

* Conducted children's and youth program junior badminton, judo, 

children's art, Youth Council, midget and community high school 
basketball, tumbling, trampoline, free play, Halloweenparty, Christ- 
mas and New Year's dances. Teen Canteen dances, film programs, 
Christmas craft classes, theater make-up class, and other events . 

* Conducted adult program badminton, Women's Day open house, 

Sunset Club, art classes, men's nights', night worker' s gym, physical 
fitness classes, weight lifting, judo and volleyball. 

The department operates and maintains Beaver Meadow Munici- 
pal Golf Course. An estimated 45, 000 individual rounds of golf were 
played there in 1965. Plans were completed for expansion of the course. 

* Received $14, 76Z in golf and other service fees during 1965, an 
increase of $575 over last year. 



Sold season 


ti( 


ckets: 








1965 


1964 


Adults 




229 


192 


Special 




33 


34 


Junior 




49 


64 






311 


290 




This department is re- 
sponsible for maintenance of 
grounds and repairs to faciliiies 
at Concord's 12 parks and play- 
grounds, golf course. Memorial 
Field, West Street Ward House , 
and Community Center. In ad- 
dition to routine work, significant 
capitol improvements were made: 

Installed new ceiling, wir- 
ing, ceiling lights and loud 
speaker system in gym, 
and painted gym area in 
Community Center. 




Crowning the White Park 
Playground Princess 




i 



% 



Fun in the Pool at 
Kimball Playground 



Hard surfaced courts for basketball at three playgrounds. 
Enlarged and fenced parking area at Memorial Field. 
Constructed a new skating rink at Heights Playground. 
Made major repairs to the barn and lime shed at Rollins Park. 
Completed pond with bridge and general landscaping at Merrill Park. 



This department provided field surveys, design, plans, 
specifications and inspection on the following construction: 

-■' 5,594 linear feet of street major project 3,900 linear feet 

of South State Street. 
■•' 1,519 linear feet of sanitary sewer line principal projects 

in Linden Street, Penacook; Redwood Avenue; East Side Drive; 

and at the Concord Coach Motor Inn. 

* 3,024 linear feet of storm sewer line largest projects in 

Sewalls Falls Road; Loudon Road; School Street; Canterbury 
Road; and Haig and Nivelle Streets. 

■■' 14,453 linear feet of sidewalk on Mountain Road; South 

State Street; Penacook Street; Marshall, Oak and Fuller 
Streets; and Thompson Street. 

A major function of the Engineering Department is provid- 
ing engineering services for other city departments. 

-•'■ Provided Assessment Plans for water extensions in Bog Road, 
Cherry Street and Sewalls Falls Road, and did a Watershed 
Property Survey for the Water Department. 

* Drew plans for construction of a parking lot at Memorial Field, 
and culverts at Merrill Park Pond for the Recreation & Parks 
Department. 

■'- Mapped lines of future highway work a new intersection of 

Hall, Manchester, Water and Gulf Streets; widening of Ceme- 
tery Street; relocation of intersection at Auburn and Penacook 
Streets and Little Pond Road; and extension of Storrs Street 
and the Northwest By-pass for the Planning Department. 

* Laid out 300 new lots for the Cemetery Division. 

* Plotted new building construction and additions for the Assess- 
ing Department. 



1^. 





The multi-million dol- 
la r New Hampshire 
Technical Institute was 
opened in September, 
1965. It of f e r s two- 
year courses in com- 
puter programing, and 
electrical and mechan- 
ical technology. 



* Processed 710 deeds. 

* Revised the ward map and sewer records. 

* Set grades for 33 new driveways or reconstruction of existing ones. 

* Set 49 street bounds and 62 street lines. 

* Investigated 29 requests for sewer extensions or house connections. 



^:ff:/Ji::i:Ji:^ii:^^ 



In August, 1965, the Building and Inspection Department 
was created by act of the Board of Aldermen. It removed the 
vital functions of zoning, building, plumbing, electrical and 
housing inspection, and enforcement of the various codes and 
ordinances related thereto, from the Engineering Department. 

This new department is staffed by the Building Inspector, 
the Assistant Building Inspector, the Electrical Inspector and 
two Housing Inspectors. A new office in the City Hall will be 
outfitted for their use during the coming year. 

1965 saw continued expansion in public and industrial 
building, but a sharp reduction in the number of new homes and 
private housing developments. There was the usual activity of 
conversions by investors and home owners in an effort to assist 
in their tax problems. Despite the large amount of building 
activity to be seen throughout the city, a downward trend is 
noted in dollar volume and number of permits issued this year. 

* Issued 49 permits for 84 new housing units at an estimated 
cost of $694,650, and 359 permits for other construction 

costing approximately $3,543,046 $1,993,246 was in new 

construction and $2, 244, 450 in additions and alterations to 
existing structures. 

* Issued 149 plumbing permits, 1,080 permits for electrical 
work (changes, additions, new services, signs and TV an- 
tennas), 90 sign permits (including billboards), and 85 demo- 
lition permits. 

* Made 998 building inspections, 103 sign inspections, 329 
plumbing inspections, 1,452 electrical inspections and 112 
zoning inspections. 

* Continued the house to house inspection program, checking 
for minimum housing standards made 1,362 housing in- 
spections . 

* The Zoning Board of 
Adjustment heard 101 

appeals 77 of these 

cases were approved. 



The library addition i s 
one of several public 
building projects under 
way in Concord. 




City-owned Concord Airport is supervised by the City En- 
gineer, and maintained by the Public Works Department. The 
administration building and three hangars are also owned by the 
City. 

Space in the administration building is rented to the U. S. 
Weather Bureau; the U. S. Coast &; Geonetic Survey; the N. H. 
Aeronautics Commission; and the FAA Flight Service Station, 
servicing air flight navigational aids for the entire state. A 
waiting room is also provided for passengers taking commer- 
cial flights. Concord's only commercial air carrier, Statewide 
Airlines, served 437 revenue passengers during 1965. 

The three hangars are rented to a private flying service , 
which offers sight-seeing and charter flights and aircraft sales 
and service. 

-'■' Provided take-off and landing facilities for: 

4,400 itinerant operations by 22 private aircraft based at 

Concord Airport. 

8, 760 operations by transient aircraft. 

7, 000 local operations. 

■•' Logged 267 instrument approaches. 




g IS 



26 



Our Public Works Department is dedicated to making Con- 
cord a cleaner, safer and more attractive city in which to live. 

Under its planned maintenance program the HIGHWAY 
DIVISION performs a great variety of tasks besides the ever 
present one of keeping Concord's streets as safe as possible 
and open to traffic at all times. 

* Repaired and repainted the Main Street Bridge in Penacook. 

* Stabilized six streets with emulsified asphalt Garvins Falls 

Road; West Main Street, Penacook; Poplar Avenue; Old Sun- 
cook Road; B Street; Field Street; and portions of Marion 
and Ormond Streets. 

* Continued the resurfacing program on downtown streets, 

started in 1964 applied hot asphaltic emulsion mix on 

Green Street and on School and Warren Streets, from South 
Spring to South State Street. 

* Renovated the brick storage building in Penacook with lumber 
cut from the Town Forest in Riverhill, 

* Painted two airport hangars and the City Hall Council Chamber. 

* Continued the tree program tree removal, pruning, plant- 
ing and brush cutting. 

* Enlarged and paved additional parking facilities at Memorial 
Field for the Recreation & Parks Department. 

* Conducted spring and fall cleanups along all city streets 

picking up tons of lawn and garden debris and other items too 
bulky to collect in the packers. 

* Cut brush and cleaned the area along the east bank of the 
Merrimack River known as John Terrill Park. 



The SEWER DIVISION completed the following maintenance 
and construction work during 1965: 



Cleaned 32, 874 feet, or over six miles, of sewer line. 
Installed 34 main line and 202 lateral plugs on sewer lines. 
Laid 48 new house connections, and relaid four house con- 
nections. 

Constructed 515 feet of sanitary sewer line major projects 

in Redwood Avenue, East Side Drive and Fisherville Road. 

Repaired 151 feet of sanitary sewer line. 

Built 18 catch basins. 

Laid 400 feet of catch basin connection. 

Constructed 550 feet of storm sewer line more than half of 

this in Garrison Park. 

Inaugurated a program of photographing areas inside trouble- 
some sewer lines to indicate the exact location of needed 
repairs. 



TheGARAGE AND STORAGE DIVISION services and main- 
tains all city vehicles. Vehicles are checked at regular inter- 
vals for possible repairs as part of the garage's policy of pre- 
ventive nnaintenance. Cost records are maintained for each 
piece of equipment. 

27 




A Public Works crew install a 
30-inch in dianneter reinforced 
concrete pipe at the inter- 
section of Bridge Street and 
Interstate Route 93, which is 
presently under construction. 
This is a portion of a proposed 
sanitary sewer interceptor 
to be located on the westerly 
side of Interstate 93, The in- 
terceptor will eventually con- 
nect to a sewage filtration 
plant to be located 
on the easterly 
side of Hall 
Street. The 
proposed 
sewage fil- 
tration 
system and 
i nt e rceptor 
are being de- 
signed by a con- 
sulting engineering firm. 

The following major items 
of equipment were purchased 
and put into service in 1965: 
Three four-door sedans, an 
aerial boom and bucket (for 
tree work), a snow blower, two 
five-ton dump trucks with four- 
wheel drive, two standard five- 
ton dump trucks, a truck tractor 
with fifth wheel, and a platform 
truck. 

The REFUSE DIVISION 

collected and placed into sani- 

tary landfill approximately 

55,000 cubic yards of waste 

material. The first of the year 

the daily pickup routes were 

revised in such a manner that the number of packers in the fleet could 

be reduced from four to three, with a resulting saving of about $10, 000 

to the City. 



Howard Raymond, City Engineer and Superintendent of Public 
Works since 1957, resigned. He left in September for Tanganyika, in 
Africa, to take a position as consulting engineer. Ronald Ford, Assist- 
ant Superintendent of Public Works, was advanced to fill the combined 
top position in these two departments. 



28 



A peaceful scene in Blossom 
Hill Cennetery. 




The CEMETERY DI- 
VISION maintains 1 1 city cenne- 
teries and two private ceme- 
teries. The cemetery crew 
performs all the necessary 
tasks of making and keeping 
our cemeteries attractive and 
their facilities in good repair. 
They prepare lots for burials 
and for the setting of memorial 
stones . 

In addition to routine spring and summer maintenance, cemetery 
workers set out flowers for Memorial Day. These are set in beds 
where the public may enjoy them and on private lots where flower 
trusts are provided. Flowers may be set out on other lots at the re- 
quest and expense of the owners. 



Made 356 interments Z42 in city cemeteries, 97 in Calvary and 

17 in Penacook Calvary 21 more than last year. 

Sold 83 lots, an increase of 18 over last year. 

Received seven trusts on old lots, two additions to old trusts and 

one flower trust. 

Poured 112 foundations, an increase of eight from last year. 

Set 120 miarkers and 144 posts, a sharp decrease in both markers 

and posts set this year. 

Opened a new block in Blossom Hill Cemetery and extended the 

Annex Block. 

Painted and repaired the fence in the Old North Cemetery. 

* Shingled and painted the tool 
house in Calvary Ceme- 
tery and made over lots in 
Block C. 

* Extended Block F in Pena- 
cook Calvary. 




The Old North Cemetery is 
Concord's oldest burial ground. 
Franklin Pierce, 14th Presi- 
dent of the United States, lies 
among many persons promi- 
nent in local and state history 
buried there. 



atmOUti 



This was another dry year, taxing Concord's water re- 
sources to the hilt. Precipitation fell 14.63 inches short of 
normal, making a cumulative five year deficit of 43.02 inches. 

The elevation of PenacookLake was 10 feet two inches be- 
low spillway elevation at the beginning of the year. Water was 
pumped from Turkey Pond on a 24-hour basis from January to 
November. During this period, St. Paul's School granted 
several extensions of permission to draw water from the pond. 
An ultimate level of three feet below the crest of the Turkey 
Pond Dam was reached on November 8, and pumping had to be 
discontinued. The original pump was removed and a new and 
larger pump was installed, and pumping was resumed on De- 
cember 30. The elevation of Penacook Lake was 10 feet five 
inches on December 31, three inches lower than at the beginning 
of the year, but the new pump should improve the situation 
greatly in 1966. 

An investigation into all possible sources of permanent 
additional water supply by consulting engineers was completed 
and presented to the Board of Aldermen with their recommend- 
ations on April 30, 1965, but no definite decision was made after 
extensive consideration. The Board of Aldermen appropriated 
$20,000.00 from the Water Fund surplus for use in obtaining 
water from the Contoocook River under emergency conditions, 
however, this action did not prove necessary. 

The Water Superintendent was empowered to restrict the 
use of water, by the Board of Aldermen. In August he declared 
a water emergency. The use of city water was prohibited for 
watering lawns with automatic sprinklers, and the use of hand- 
held hoses limited to one hour per day. The private use of 
water to wash autos and the further filling of private swimming 
pools were also forbidden. With cooler weather reducing the 
demand for water, the ban was lifted in November, 

Ralph W. Flanders, Assistant Water Superintendent, re- 
tired after 51 1/2 years of dedicated service. Three other 
veteran employees also retired, two of them with over 35 years 
of service to the department. 

* Supplied 1,443, 163 gallons of water during 1965, or an aver- 
age of 3,953,871 gallons per day (about 132 gallons per person 
per day) 7, 378, 500 gallons less than used in 1964. 

* Pumped 941,000,000 gallons of water from Turkey Pond into 
Penacook Lake amounting to 65% of the city's total con- 
sumption for the year. 

* Pumped 403, 750, 000 gallons of water from the Sanders Well 
Field 28% of the total water consumption during 1965. 

* Installed a new 5. 7 million gallon per day pump at Turkey 
Pond. 

* Broke ground for the new Water Department office building, 
to be known as the Ralph W. Flanders Building. 

-'•= Laid water main extensions in Chase Street, Dover Street, 
Garvins Falls Road, Jay Drive and Oriole Road, all on the 
Heights; and in Linden Street, Penacook using 1,448 feet 



30 



■m>*<%. ^:% 




Water Superintendent 
G. Arthur Faneuf and 
Gordon Stevenson, Water 
Department Engineer, 
watch precious water flow 
out of a broken connection 
at the site of State highway 
construction on Bridge 
Street. This break, one of 
several which occured dur- 
ing the project, was caused 
when a cofferdam being used 
in construction of supports 
for the new bridge gave way. 
Temporary repairs were 
made in about two hours, 
restoring service to the 
Highway Hotel and the 
Heights area, and permanent 
repairs were made the fol- 
lowing day. 



of cennent lined cast iron 
pipe in six- and eight- 

inch sizes making a 

total of 115 miles of water 
main now in the system. 
Replaced 1,049 feet of 
pipe in Loudon Road, 474 
feet in Bridge Street in 
connection with highway 
work at the traffic circle, 
and 400 feet in Haig 
Street. 

Laid 68 new service con- 
nections, and discontin- 
ued 50 old services. 
Installed 86 new meters, 
and discontinued 2 8 old 

meters 5,870 meters 

now in the system. 
Installed five new main 
line valves and four valves 

on hydrant branches 

1, 775 valves now in the system. 

Repaired 26 leaks nine on mains and 17 on service connections. 

Tested, serviced and repaired when necessary all electrical pump- 
ing and recording equipment at the four pumping stations and at the 
emergency station at Turkey Pond. 

Tested every hydrant in the system weekly during the winter to guard 
against freezing and assure proper operation. 



31 







The Board of Assessors consists of three men, a fxill-time 
Chief Assessor, who has charge of the office, and two part-time 
members. During 1965 the entire personnel of the Board 
changed. RaN^mond P. Daigle resigned and Edward L. Bartlett, 
former City Assessor for the City of Benton Harbor, Michigan, 
assiimed the job of Chief Assessor on July 19. Nathan We chsler 
and Robert Potter resigned, and were replaced by Richard Towle 
and Graham Fogg as part-time Assessors. 

An evaluation report on the status of the City's assess- 
ment condition was presented to the Mayor and Board of Alder- 
men, recommending a city-wide revaluation project which was 
approved. 

For the 1965 assessment year, the Assessors used a 
gross multiplier to increase the current 47% of assessment to 
100%, in conformity with State law. 

Property Val\iation (at 100% ) 
Gross valxiation before exemptions $134,497,345.50 

War ser\-ice exemptions $1,690,200.00 

Blind exemptions 5, 000. 00 

Meat stock exemptions 22, 400. 00 

Poultry exemptions 2,595.50 1, 720, 195. 50 

Net valuation on which 1965 tax rate computed $132, 777, 150. 00 

* Compiled and issued tax warrants as follows: 

Property Real and Personnel $5, 188, 216. 77 

Poll Tax 24, 524. 00 

Bank Stock 10,784.25 

Yield Tax 1, 728. 73 

Head Tax 75, 015. 00 

Total $5,300,268.75 

(The above figures include original warrants, jeopardy war- 
rants and supplemental warrants through December 31, 1965.) 



Set tax rate for 1965 at: 




Concord 

Municipal $16.45 

School 21.02 

County 1 . 63 

$39. 10 

Penacook 

Municipal $16.45 

School 19.24 

County 1 . 63 

$37. 32 

* Re c e i V ed 443 
appeals against 
1 965 assess- 
ments . 

* Allowed a total 
of $23,095.24 in 
tax abatements 
against the 1965 
property and 
poll tax levy. 

* Started a p r o- 



Setting the tax rate for 1965 are Tax Commission 
Assistant, Wallace Jones : Finance Director, Verne 
Santas, Jr.; and City Assessor Edward Bartlett. 



grarr. to rr.a.<e assessors maps mane 

* Processed 745 real estate transfer deeds. 

* Held 22 meetings of the Board of Assessors. 



Map-i;lock-Lot system 



The Assessing Departnnent forwards the tax warrants to 
the Tax Collector for billing and collection of taxes. The Col- 
lector also receives motor vehicle permit fees, special assess- 
ment payments and water rents. 

* Received warrants with additions for the leT 

Total 



Real & Personal Property 
Bank Stock 
Timber Yield 

Total Property 
Poll Tax 

Total Property & Polls 
State Head Taxes 

Total 



Debits 

$5, 188, 216. 77 

10,784.25 

2,805.47 = 

$5, 201,806.49 

24. 524.00 

$5,226,330.49 

75, 015.00 



of 1965: 

Balance 

Dec. 31, 1965 

$640. 554. 3C 

-0- 



5o40, 


5-1 . "- 


5, 


57c 


S646, 


167. 74 


17, 


645. OC 



55,301.345.49 $663,812.74 

7f Includes special warrants for the collection of taxes for the 
year 1966. 

* Prepared and mailed notices to delinquent taxpayers. 

* Opened the Collector's Office on three Friday evenings for t:ie 
convenience of the public in obtaining motor vehicle permits 
(March 26), and pa>T.ng property taxes (November 19 and 26). 

* Advertised the list of iinpaid 1964 property taxes, and held 

the Collector's sale of resident real estate on June 1 15C 

accounts offered .vere bought by the City of Concord for 

$57. 943. 19 owners have two years in which to redeem this 

property. 

* Addressed and mailed 15,000 combination head and poll tax bills. 

* Deeded three parcels of property to the City for non-pa>-m.ent 
of 1962 taxes. 

^ Processed and mailed soecial assessr-.ent bills covering 3- 
projects. 

* Prepared and mailed 7, 722 Concord real estate bills in Aug- 
ust, and 933 bills for Penacook in Septen-.her. 

* Entered 62 cases in small claims court against delinquent 
poll and head tax payers. 

* Issued 18, 403 motor vehicle permits, amounting to $225,536.23 

made refunds of $849.35. for a net total of $224,686. 88 ; 

an increase of $22. 067. 67 over last year. 

In addition to his regular duties, the Tax Collector attenue- 
the annual meeting of tax officials conducted by the State Tax 
Commission; the N. H. City &: Town Clerk's Association meet- 
ing, at Dix\-ille Notch; the annual meeting of the N. H. Tajs Col- 
lector's Association, held at North Conway; and 78 hearings of 
the General Court during 19o5. He also acted as chairman oi 
the Citv Governm.ent Section for the Concord United Fund drive. 



33 




This 100-year old Concord coach, with Mayor Davie and 
Richard Morton (owner) of Concord aboard, participated 
in Concord Day activities at the New York World's Fair 
in April. This is one of three coaches, built by the Abbot- 
Downing Company, which were restored by Mr. Morton 
for the Bicentennial observance. 



celebration. 

This year w 
every Concord cit 
celebration reach 
when special eveij 
Bend in the River, 



mmmmmmmmm 




w \ 



jdi 



An estimated total of 15, 000 spectators attended the Bicent, 
a cast of 567 local persons. 



I IIWIIWB— ■aBWIMIJi'lI'MIIIW 




V * "* 




'):^- 



i II Ml if 



IT 



^mf-'^u 



MMl 



The Concord Coachmen, V. F, W. Drum & Bugle Corps was host for 
a parade and Class A drum and bugle corps contest on July 4th. . 



fs^AACHiT-^n;;" 




umarked by a series of events which reached nearly 
jn, regardless of age, occupation or interests. The 
jits peak of activity during the week of August 14th, 
liwere held daily and a pageant, entitled "At the 
,vas presented at Memorial Field each evening. 



mu.^m^^ 



ial pageant, staged by 



u 




t 




John P. Harrington, known 
as "Mr. Concord, " joined 
many citizens donning 
colonial attire for the 
occasion. 



.«V 




saTi 




A^-A 



The City of Concord operates a centralized finance depart- 
ment through which all revenues and cash receipts and disburse- 
ments are accounted for. A system of appropriation control 
over budgetary accounts i s maintained, and has proven to be 
extremely effective. 

Schedules in the financial section of this report set forth 
the activity and year end position of each of the several funds 
through which all the financial transactions of the City are 
handled. Following is a brief summary of activity of each fund 
during the year 1965 and its condition at the end of the year. 

GENERAL FUND 

The current surplus resulting from 1965 operations 
amounted to $98, 109. 23. Most of this surplus will be used to 
reduce the amount to be raised by property taxes in 1966. 

Outstanding debt payable from the General Fund decreased 

$42, 763. New debt amounting to $360, 000 was incurred, while 

maturities paid during the year amounted to $402, 763, detailed 

as follows: 

Balance Payments New Debt Balance 

Dec. 31, 1964 During 1965 Issued 1965 Dec. 31, 1965 

Municipal $1,086,765 $197,763 $360,000 $1,249,002 

School 2, 280, 000 205, 000 -0- 2, 075,000 

Total $3,366,765 $402,763 $360,000 $3,324,002 

Interest rates rose during 1965. Our bonds sold at a rate 
of 3%, compared with 2.9% for the 1964 issue. Rates on borrow- 
ing in anticipation of taxes and other collections ranged from 
2. 21% in April to 2. 26% in August, compared to a high of 1. 98% 
and a low of 1.89% paid in 1964. Total interest cost for the year 
on short term notes was $12, 182, compared with $13, 850 last 
year. Total interest paid on the long term debt was $29, 045, 
compared to $27,431 paid in 1964, 

Below is a comparison of valuations, property taxes, and 
tax rates, showing changes from 1964 to 1965: 



Increase 



Property Taxes Raised : 1964 1965 

Municipal Purposes $ 2,142,456 $ 2,185,613 $ 

School Purposes 2,494,428 2,774,293 

County Purposes 196,186 216,095 
Total 



Amount 
43,157 
279,865 
19,909 



% 

2.0 


11.2 


10.1 



$ 4,833,070 $ 5,176,001 $ 342,931 7.1 



Assessed Valuation: * 

Municipal Purposes $61,621,630 $132,777,150 $71, 155,520 115.5 



Union School Dist. 


57, 


649.820 


124,053,760 


66,403,940 


115.2 


Pena. School Dist. 


3, 


987,240 


8,764,850 


4,777,610 


119.8 


County Purposes 


61, 


637,380 


132,810,700 


71,173,320 


115.5 


Tax Rates:* 








Decrease 


Municipal 


$ 


34.77 


$ 16.45 


$ - 18.32 


52.7 


Union School Dist. 




40.95 


21.02 


- 19.93 


48.7 


Pena. School Dist. 




33.70 


19.24 


- 14.46 


42.9 


County 




3.18 


1.63 


- 1.55 


48.7 


Total City Rate 


$ 


78.90 


$ 39.10 


$ - 39.80 


50.4 


Total Pena. Rate 




71.65 


37.32 


- 34.33 


47.9 



* Reflects change from 47% to 100% assessment in 1965. 



36 



Collections increased percentagewise . The year ended with 
12. 3% of the current property tax levy outstanding, compared to 12.4% 
outstanding at the end of the previous year. 

TRUST FUNDS 
Income received increased from $69,233 in 1964 to $73, 741 in 
1965. New trusts received amounted to $9,933. Gains on sale of 
securities amounted to $360, compared to $1, 145 in 1964. Income 
transferred to the General Fund was $69, 161. 

PARKING METER FUND 

Meter collections increased by $4, 410, from $52, 929 in 1964 to 
$57,339 this year. Off-street collections increased $661, and on- 
street collections increased by $3, 749. Payment of $4, 347 for meters 
purchased by long-term agreement reduced the net income from meters 
to $52, 992. Income from parking penalties increased $1, 895. 

The fund balance at the close of 1965 was $12, 181, an increase 
of $10, 098 during the year. 

The long term debt decreased from $30,000 to $28,000, and no 
new debt was issued. Maturities paid amounted to $2, 000. 

SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Revenue from sewer rentals totalled $90,568, compared to 
$84,817 realized in 1964, an increase of $5,751. Receipts from all 
sources increased by $21, 577, from $90, 646 to $1 12, 223. 

The year began with a cash surplus of $127, 400 and ended with 
$93,434, a decrease of $33, 966. 

The long term debt decreased by $26,000. Maturities paid dur- 
ing the year amounted to $26, 000. No new debt was incurred. 

SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 

One water extension project was completed and one sanitary 
sewer project was approved during 1965. 

Total receipts of this fund were $73, 504. Disbursements totalled 
$86, 907. The cash balance at the end of the year was $30, 099. 

The long term debt decreased from $258,966 to $205,758. New 
debt amounting to $2, 780 was incurred. Maturities paid totalled $55,988. 

WATER FUND 

Revenue from water rentals totalled $265,251, which is 1.9% 
above the $260,392 realized in 1964. Receipts from all sources 
amounted to $281, 494, or $2, 342 more than last year. 

The cash surplus decreased from $136,284 at the beginning of 
the year to $111, 730 at the close of the year. 

Net increase of the long term debt was $35,000. Bonds in the 
amount of $55, 000 were issued for construction of an office building 
for the Water Department. Maturities paid amounted to $20,000 in 1965. 

EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT FUND 
Income from equipment rentals amounted to $21 7,956, while oper- 
ating expenditures and depreciation totaled $231,854, resulting in a 
net loss of $13, 898. This was due to less use of snow removal equip- 
ment during the winter and increased operating costs in 1965. 

The reserve f or replacement of equipment decreased from $1 1,807 
to $10,866. Expenditures for new equipment totalled $73,417; additions 
to the reserve amounted to $72,476. This fund has no outstanding debt. 

37 



* Start of a city-wide revaluation project under supervision of 
the Assessing Department. 

* Initiation of a Flood Plain Information Study by the Planning 
Department. 

* Completion of City building projects Water Department 

office, Heights Fire Station and Library addition. 

* Establishment of a complete new personnel classification 
system for the Fire Department. 

-'' Completion by State contractors of the new bridge across the 
Merrimack River, and extensive highway construction, taking 
Interstate 93 over Bridge Street with ramps and traffic lights. 

* Further consideration and planning relative to Capitol Plaza 
North, urban renewal project. 

* Acquisition of land for expansion of Beaver Meadow Municipal 
Golf Course. 

* Continued comprehensive review of Concord's Zoning Ordin- 
ances, under a Federal local planning grant. 

* Acquisition of two sites for future school playgrounds to be 
undertaken by the City and Concord School District. 

* Entrance into planning phase for the relocation of Bridge 
Street. 

* Progress on plans for the new Merrimack Regional High 
School, to serve Penacook and adjacent towns. 



t^w«r 



The Concord Public Library, as it will look from Prince Street, 

when the addition, presently under construction, is completed M^^. ■ 

in 1966. :^€- 




INDEX 



GENERAL FUND 

Appropriations & Expenditures 

Assessments 

Balance Sheet 

Current Surplus 

Investments 

Long Term Debt 

Revenues 

Taxes Receivable 

Tax Sale Accounts 



Pages 

47-51 

45-46 

40-41 

42 

55 

52-54 

42-43 

44 

44 



BOND FUND- -GENERAL 
Balance Sheet 
Disposition of Proceeds 



40-41 
57 



TRUST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet 
Changes in Balances 
Investments 



40-41 
56 
55 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 
Balance Sheet 
Investments 
Long Term Debt 
Operating Statement 



64 

55 

52-54 

65 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE & REPLACEMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet 60 

Operating Statement 60 

Statement of Reserve Account 60 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENT FUND 
Balance Sheet 
Long Ternn Debt 

Projects Authorized &z; Amounts Expended 
Receipts & Expenditures 



58 

52-54 

59 

59 



WATER FUND 

Balance Sheet 
Bond Fund- -Water 
Investments 
Long Term Debt 
Operating Statements 



62 

62 

55 

52-54 

63-64 



PARKING METER FUND 
Balance Sheet 
Long Term Debt 
Revenues &; Expenditures 



61 

52-54 

61 



39 



BALANCE SHEET --GENERAL 
Deceniber 

GEHERAX FUND ASSETS 
Cash; 

Mechanicks Nat'l Bank-Gen. Acct. kO,'^9k.kh 

Concord Nat'l Bank-General Acct. 61,971.17 

Concord Nat ' 1 Bank- Payroll Acct . 15 , 000 . 00 

Cash in Other Banks-Gen. Acct. 12,000.00 

Imprest Funds 1,2^^-9. Ul 

Cash fbr Payment of Bonds & Coupons ^,238 . 25 

Temporary Investments 898.910.^7 l,033.963.7l<- 

Taxes Receivable ; 

Ciirrent Year Levy- Property 6^40,591.7^ 

Cxirrent Year Levy-Polls 5,576.00 

Total Current Year 6^46,167.7^ 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 21,339.76 62'+, 827. 98 

Prior Year Levies-Property 35,273.07 
Prior Year Levies- Polls 316.OO 

Tax Liens Bought ly City-Unredeemed 1|2,639.86 

Total Prior Years & IMredeemed 78,225.93 

Less; Reserve for Non^ealization 52.6^5.01 25.583.92 65O.Ull.9O 

Accoijnts Receivable ; 
Water & Sewer Rentals 
Departmental Receivables 
Cemetery Receivables 
Trunk Storm Sewer Assessments 
Less : Reserve for Non- Realization 

Stores Accounts ; 

Public V7orks Mat. & Supplies Inv. 
Stationery & Supplies Inventory 
Postage Meter Inventory 

Less: Reserve fbr Non- Realization 

Tax Deeded Properties : 

^ Less : Reserve for Non- Realization 

State Head Taoces Receivable : 

Total General Fund Assets 

TRUST FUND ASSETS 
Investments 868 , 236 . 77 

Cash-Concord National Bank 2,1^9.95 870,386.72 

^CAPITAL FUND ASSETS 
Debt Requirements-Municipal 1,2^4-9,002.28 

Debt Requirements-School 2.075,000.00 3,32l4-,002.28 

BOND FUND ASSETS 

Cash-Concord National Bank 117,630.58 

Temporary Investments 2^*8,988.25 

Accounts Receivable 50,000.00 Ul6,6l8.83 

GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 6,391,710.18 

*Does not include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer, 
Parking Meter or Special Assessment Funds . 

uo 



77,786.71 

16,698.96 

2,275.69 

1,753.00 


98,51'+.36 
20,727.65 


77,786.71 


75,033.02 
6,939.25 

1^43.55 


82,115.82 
82.115.82 

869.93 
86?.?3 


18.5^+0.00 
1,780,702.35 



AND RpLATED FUNDS 
31, 1965 



GENERAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable ; 

Uhpresented Bonds & Coupons U, 238. 25 

Payroll Deductions Payable 1,^461.56 

Current Vouchers Payable 26,137.35 31,857.16 

Unexpended Appropriations ; 

Union School District- Operating Acct. 1,225,122.11 

Int. -Union School Dist. -Bonds & Notes 29,013.75 

Penacook Union School District 9^,101.86 

Reserve for Encumbrances ^2,639.19 

Merrimack Valley School District 6,223.79 1,397,100.70 

Due to Other Funds; 

Water Fund 7^,189.83 

Sajiitary Sewer Fund 92,551.i+6 

Parking Meter Fund 12,l80.91 

Equipment Maint. & Replacement Fund 51,80^.714- 230,726.914- 

Advance Deposits; 646.03 

Taxes Due to State of N. H.; 

Head Taxes 21,651.00 

Timber Yield Tax-a/c Debt Ret. Fund 611.29 22,262.29 

Total General Fund Liabilities 1,682,593.12 

Current Surplus; 98,109.23 

Total Gen. Fund Liabilities & Surplus 1,780,702.35 

TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 5"31,898.38 

Accumulated Income 38,k8d.3k 870,386.72 

GAPrCAL FUND LIABILITIES 

Bonded Debt 3, 307,86)4-. 00 

Notes Payable 4,000.00 

Advance by State for Airport Constr. 12,138.28 3,32l4-,002.28 

BOND FUND LIABILITIES 

Reserve for Constr. of Equip. Authorized kO,931.k6 

Reserve for School Construction 7,300.00 

Reserve for Encvunbrances 368,0^7.37 

Current Vouchers Payable 320.00 ^4-16,618. 83 

GRAKD TOTAL - LIABILITIES 6,391,710.18 



in 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS- -GENERAL FUND 
For the Year Ended December 31, 19^5 



Unappropriated Balance, Decen±>er 31, I96U 
Applied to 1965 Budget 
Balance Remaining 

1965 Budget Surplus: 

Unencumbered Balance of Appropriations 
Revenue in Excess of Estimates 



Plus Unencumbered Balances of Prior Year Appropriations 
Sub Total 

Less: 

1. Increase in Reserve for Non- Realization of Prior 
Year Taxes to 100^ and Unredeemed Taxes to kOPJo. 

2. Increase in Reserve for Non- Realization of Accounts 
Receivable to lOOfo. 

3. Increase in Reserve for Non-Realization of Stores 
Accounts, 

Unappropriated Surplus, December 31j 19^5 

Less: Amount Reserved for Adjustments 

Amount Available for Reduction of I966 Tax Levy 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 
For the Year Ended December 31, I965 



$ 97,26U.83 
95,000.00 


1 
$ 2,26U.83 1 


8l,Ul8.11 
1+5,792.86 


1 

127,210.97 ! 


996. 6i+ 


996. 6U j 




1 
$130,1+72.41+ 

1 


7,1+70.33 


1 

! 


8,806.37 


1 

1 


16,086.51 


32,363.21 




$ 98,109.23 




3,109.23 




$ 95,000.00 



Budget Revenues 

Estimate Realized Excess Deficiency 



Local Taxes-Excl. Cur. Yr. Prop. & Polls 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Prop. 268,09 268.09 

Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Poll 500.00 672.00 172.00 

Interest, Penalties & Costs 16,000.00 17,819.12 1,819. 12 

Auto Permits 19l+,000.00 22l|,666.67 30,666.67 

Rent & Profit Tax Deeded Prop. 33-09 33-09 

Timber Severance Tax 1,500.00 2,337-89 837-89 

212,000.00 21+5,796.86 33,796.86 



State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax 1,000.00 2,1+88.90 1,1+88.90 

Savings Bank Tax 29,500.00 32,1+17-90 2,917.90 

Interest & Dividend Tax 90,000.00 92,620.25 2,620.25 

Loss of Taxes-State Forest Lands 1+0.00 1+0.00 

120,51+0.00 127,527.05 7,027-05 1+0.00 



ks. 



Bicycle Registrations 


600.00 


Taxi Licenses 


370.00 


Health Licenses 


600.00 


Amusement Licenses 


2,330.00 


Police & Protective Licenses 


250.00 


Prof. & Occupational Licenses 


80.00 




i|,230.00 


Registration Fees & Permits 




I^rriage Licenses 


1,050.00 


Recording Fees-Legal Doc-uments 


3,200.00 


Filing Fees 


170.00 


Sundry Fees-City Clerk 


1,300.00 


Dog Licenses 


i+,300.oo 




10,020.00 


Departmental Service Charges 





Licenses & Permits 

536.75 63.25 

518.50 li+S.50 

587.00 13.00 

2,1460.67 130.67 

358.00 108.00 

33-00 ______ U7.OO 

i+,i+93.92 387.17 123.25 

1,185.00 135.00 

5,006.50 1,806.50 

270.00 100.00 

1,710.10 UlO.lO 

^,696.17 396.17 

12,867.77 2,81+7.77 

Rent of Buildings 2,500.00 3,091.75 591.75 

Comfort Station Concessions 650.OO 68O.58 30. 58 

Golf Fees ll+,500.00 lif,783.50 283. 50 

Memorial Field Royalties & Concess. 30O.OO 250.00 50.00 

Other Recr. Dept. Revenues 1,900.00 1,755.77 lMi.23 

Police Dept. Ambulance Charges 9OO.OO 1,137.00 237.00 

Airport- Rent 15,318.00 15,318.00 

Airport-Concessions 112.00 100.22 11. 78 

Fines & Forfeits 21,500.00 23,726.85 2,226.85 

Misc. Dept. Service Charges 2,100.00 3,105-66 1,005.66 

Weights & Measures Fees i+00.00 583. lU I83.IU 

Comm. on Head Tax Collections 6,6O0.00 6,6l6.00 I6.OO 

Community Center Revenue 1,000.00 2,1^3.92 1,1^3.02 ^__ 

67,780.00 73,292.39 5,7l8.J+0 206.01 

Unclassified 

Interest Income 3,000.00 10,397.18 7,397.18 

Sale of Property 500.00 2,001.00 1,501.00 

Sub. Div. Assess. Prior Yrs. Constr. 320.00 320.00 

Sale of Ordinances 10.00 12.00 2.00 

All Other 5O.OO 50.OO 

3,560.00 12,730.18 9,220.18 50.00 

TOTAL MISC. REVENUES i+l8,130.00 1+76,708.17 58,997-^3 i+19.26 

Current Year Property & Polls 

Property Tax 5,162,675-33 5,l^,08i+.67 16,590.66 

Poll Tax 21,200.00 22,22^.00 l,02U.OO 

National Bank Stock Tax 8,000.00 10,781.35 2,781.35 

5,191,875.33 5,179,090.02 3,805.35 16,590.66 



TOTAL REVENUES 5,610,005.33 5,655,798.19 62,802.78 17,009.92 



h3 



STATEMENT OF TAXES RECEIVABLE- -GENERAL FUND 
December 31, I965 



BALANCE JANUARY 1, I965 

Committed to Collector in I965 
( Incl. Supplemental ) 

Real & Personal Property 

National Bank Stock 

Timber Yield 

Polls 

Heads (For State) 

Total Charges to Collector 

Accounted for as Follows; 

Collections (Net of Refunds) 
Authorized Abatements 
Bal. Uncollected Dec. 31, 1965 
Total Credits & Balance 



1965 


Prior 


State 


Levy 


Years 
631,620.87 


Head Taxes 
19,980.30 


5,188,216.77 

10,784.25 

2,805.1+7 

2U,52l+.00 


268.09 
672.00 





5,226,330.1+9 632,560.96 



4,557,067.51 

23,095.21+ 

646,167.74 

5,226,330.49 



579,648.75 
17,323.14 
35,589.07 

632,560.96' 



76,935.00 
96,915.30 



69,457.80 

8,917.50 

18,540.00 

96,915.30 



Age Analysis of Uncollected Taxes 



1958 
1959 
i960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 

TOTAL 



Real & Personal 
Property 
35O9 

11,170.17 

2,778.89 

6,187.01 

13,957.95 

640,554.30 

675,005.21 



Timber 
Yield 

206.27 



369.60 

246.29 

37.44 



Polls 



316.00 
5.576.00 



Heads 



895.00 
17,645.00 



859.60 5,892.00 18,540.00 



STATEMENT OF TAX SALE ACCOUNTS- -GENERAL FUND 



Balance Unredeemed 


Jan. 1, 


1965 


Tax 
Tax 


Levy of 
Levy of 


1962 
1963 






1965 Tax Sale 


(Tax 


Levy of 


1964) 


Total 


Charges 








Accoimted for 


as follows: 





Collections 

Authorized Abatements 

Deeded to City 

Bal. Unredeemed Dec. 31, I965 



17,478.22 
30,115.36 



47,593.58 

57,943.19 

105,536.77 



60,905.91 
968.52 
1,022.148 
42,639-86 105,536.77 



44 



STATEMENT OF ASSESSMENTS- -GENERAL FUND 



For the Year Ended December 31 > 19^5 



SUMMAHY OF VALUATIONS & TAXES TO BE RAISED 



Warrant for 

Municipal Purposes 
Union School District 
Penacook School District 
Merrimack County 



Net Assessable Amount to 
Valuations Be Raised 



132,777,150.00 

12U,053,760.00 

8,761+, 850. 00 

132,810,700.00 



2,185,613.00 

2,605,967.86 

168,325.65 

216,09^.82 

5,176,001.33 



Rate per $1000 
City Pen. 



l6.i+5 
21.02 

1.63 
39.10 



16.1+5 

19.21+ 

1.63 

37.32 



DETAIL OF VALUATIONS 



Residential & Commercial 

Land 

Buildings 
Mill Props. (Land, Bldgs. & Mach) 
Elec. Util. & Gas Trans. Lines 

Total Real Estate 
Personal Property* 

Total Real & Personal 

Less: Exempt to Vets & Blind 
Valuation for Municipal Warrant 

Add: Prop. -School Tax Only 
Veiluation for School Warrants 
Val. for Municipal Warrant as 
above 

Add: Prop.-Co\mty Tax Only 
Valuation for County Warrant 



City 

21,573,080 

78,095,300 

9,137,7^ 

5,200,650 

114,006,770 

11,509.520 

125,516,290 

1,1+91+, 890 

121+, 021,1+00 

32,360 

12l+,053,766 



Penacook 

1,201,850 
5,287,1+00 
1,086,030 

193,650 
7,768,930 
1,212,125 
8,981,055 

225,305 

8,755,750 

9,100 

8,764,850 



12l+,021,l+00 8,755,750 

33,550 ^ i_ 

124,051+, 950 8,755,750 



Total 

22,771+, 930 

83,382,700 

10,223,770 

5,39^,300 

121,775,700 

12,721,61+5 

13I+, 1+97, 345 

1,720,195 

132,777,150 

41,460 

132,818,610 

132,777,150 

33,550 

132,810,700 



■^Analysis of Personal Property 

Mobile Homes, House & Travel Trailers 
Cows, Other Cattle, Poultry 
Boats & Launches 
Vtood, Lumber, etc. 
Portable Mills 

Road Building & Construction Machinery 
Gasoline Punrps & Tanks 
Stock-in-trade 

Total Personal Property 



909,350 

83,195 

37,750 

2,31+0 

750 

79,290 

131,230 

11.1+77.71+0 

12,721,645 



h^ 



STATEMENT OF ASSESSMENTS- -GENERAL FUND - Continued 



COMPUTATION OF PROPERTY TAX REQUIREMEIW FOR 
MUNICIPAL PURPOSES 



Budget 

Operating 
Concord Hospital 
Debt Service 
Capital Outlay- 
Total 



2,308,i+88.00 

13,^0.00 

205,16^4.00 

187,505.00 



2, 71)+, 617. 00 



Deductions 

Surplus from Prior Year 
Misc. Revenues (Estimate) 
Poll Tax Warrant 
Natl. Bank Stock Tax Warrant 

Net Budget Requirement 

Add: Res. for Abatement & Adjustment 

To be Raised on Real & Personal Prop. 



95,000.00 

UU3,668.00 

23,990.00 

10,781.00 



573,^39.00 

2,lUl,178.00 

UU,U35.00 

2,185,613700 



SUMMARY OF WARRANTS SUBMITTED TO COLLECTOR 



City, School & County 

Real & Personal Prop. 

National Bank Stock 

Timber Yield 

Polls 

Total Curr. Yr. Levy 

Prior Years- Property 

Prior Years-Timber Yield 

Prior Years- Polls 
Total City, School & County 



Original Supplemental 

5,178,5^+3.^40 9,673.37 

10,771.^5 12.80 

1,728.73 1,076.7*+ 

23,990.00 53*4.00 

5,215,033.58 11,296.91 

268.09 

672.00 
5,215,033.58 12,237.00 



Total 

5,18H;215.77 

10,78*4.25 

2,805.*47 

2*4,52*4.00 

5,226,330.*49 

268.09 

672.00 

5,227,270.58 



State Head Taxes 
Current Yr. Levy 
Prior Yrs . Levies 

Total State Head Taxes 



73,*490.00 
73,*490.00 



1,525.00 
1,Q20.00 
3,^5.00 



75,015.00 

1,920.00 

76,935.00 



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59 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE &: REPLACEMENT FUND 

STATEMEINT OF OPERATIONS 
For the Year Ended December 31 3 19^5 

Equipment Earnings; 217,955.83 

Operating Expenditiores ; 

Direct Labor ^+,533-95 

Indirect Labor 21,737.08 

Leaves & Longevity 6,101.27 

Building Repairs 1,693-92 

Gas, Oil & Antifreeze 15,67^.75 

Repair Parts i+6,983.^ 

Tires 11,131. 9*+ 

Batteries 1,623.89 

Misc. Hardware 2,2^7.95 

Grease & Lubricants 505.93 

Supplies 2,775.68 

Hand Tools 895. 91 

Fuel & Utilities 5,561.87 

Insurance 7,Oi+8.8l 

Retirement Contributions 6,0^0.22 

Shop Eqviipment 973.09 175, 529. 7^^ 

Depreciation ^6,32^.53 231,8^^.27 

Net Loss for Period 13,898.^^ 

BAIANCE SHEET 



December 31, 19^5 



Assets: 



Equipment 705 , 273 . ^7 

Due from General Fund 51,8oU.7'^ 757,078.21 

Liabilities & Funds; 

Municipal Investment 705,837.26 

Deficit, December 31, 1965 - ^,^95.99 

Capital Reserve Fund 55,736.9^ 757,078.21 

STATQffiNT OF RESERVE ACCOUNT 

Balance, January 1, I965 ll,8o6.62 

Additions ; 

Depreciation 56,324.53 

Equipment Sold 1,152.20 

Transfer from Capital Reserve Fund 15,000.00 72,^76.73 

84,283.35 

Equipment Purchases (as per detail) 28,^U6.Ul 

Balance, December 31, I965 55,736. 9^ 

DETAIL OF EQUIPMENT PURCHASED 

2 Five ton dump trucks 25,422.00 

1 Four door sedan 1,982.71 

1 Wacker Ranmer (Pavement Breaker) 857. 50 

1 Greens mower 284.20 



28,546.41 



60 



BALANCE SHEET --PARKING METER FUND 
December 31, I965 

Assets; 

Due from General Fund 12,l80.91 

Debt Requirements-Spec. Assess. 19,829.01 

Debt Requirements-Other 28,000.00 60,00 9.92 

Liabilities : 



Bonded Debt 28,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 19,829.01 

Unappropriated Current Sirrplus 12 , I80 . 91 60,009.92 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 
PARKING METER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, I965 

Cash Balance - January 1, I965 2, 082.55 

Revenues : 

Meter Collections-on street i4-2,i+17.29 

Meter Collections-off street 10,575-32 

Parking Penalties 9,l'^2-00 62,13^.61 6k, 211.16 

Operating Expenditures: 
On Street 

Meter Repairs & Maintenance U, 02^.13 

Enforcement 11,792.95 

Collecting & Accounting 1,69^4-. 00 

Marking Pavements 100.00 

Insurance 2^+9.32 

Retirement Contributions 1,277-63 19,138.03 

Off Street 

Meter Repairs 1,000.00 

Enforcement 5 > 569 -56 

Collections 596.00 

Marking Pavements 1,200.00 

Maint. of Parking Areas 2,573-35 

Lighting 1,880.57 

Insur anc e 111 . 70 

Retirement Contributions 339-89 13,271-07 

Debt Service- Off Street Areas: 

Payment of Bonds 2,000.00 

Interest on Bonds 825-00 2,825-00 

Share of Special Assess. Projects: 

Principal ll+,832.71 

Interest 955-00 15,787-71 

Capital Outlay: 

Eqxiipment: On street 1,01^4-.^^^ 

Total Expenditures 52,036.25 

Cash Balance - December 31, I965 12,l80.91 

61 



BALANCE SHEET- -WATER FUND 



December 31 > 19^5 



ASSETS 



Fixed Assets; 

Water & Flowage Rights 167,663.11 

Land 211,975.37 

Structures i+72,662.75 

Pujirping & Purification Equipment 86,529-21 

Distr. r-Iains, Services, Hydrants & Meters 1,870,729-86 
Other Equipment and Garage Equipment 83,639-51 
Misc. Expenditures during Construction 66,825-2^ 
Emergency Pumping Station Facilities 78 , 915 . 35 

3,038,9i+0.iU) 
Less: Reserved for Depreciation 



9^1,028.39 2,097,912.01 



Current Assets; 

Due from General F\md 

Investments 

Bond Construction Accotmt 

Materials & Supplies - Inventory 

Total Assets 



7l+,l89.83 
59,958.93 
32,306.97 



215,2140.36 
2,313.152.37 



LIABILITIES AKD FUNDS 



Long Term Liabilities; 
Bonded Debt 
Share in Spec. Assess. Projects 

F\md Balance and Surplus; 
Municipal Investment 
Contrib. in Aid of Construction 
Surplus-Bal. Jan. 1, I965 88U,893.07 
Net Profit for year I965 15,^^-59 

Total Liabilities, Surplus & Funds 



135,000.00 
33.558.29 



963,19^.71+ 
281,01+1.68 

900,357.66 



168,558.29 



2,li+l+,59l+.08 
2,313,152.37 



BOND FUND, VJATER - DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 
For the Year Ended Deceniber 31, 19^5 



Proceeds of Bond Issue 

Expenditures - Office Building Construction 

Unexpended Balance December 31, 1965 

Encumbrances Outstanding 

Unencumbered Balance, December 31, I965 



55,000.00 
22,693.03 
32,306.97 
30,162.28 
2, 114-14-. 69 



62 



STATEMENT OF OPERATION- -WATER FUND 



For the Year ended December 31 > 19^5 



OPERATION REVENUE 



Commercial Sales - Flat Rate 
Commercial Sales - Metered 
Industrial Sales - Metered 
Miscellaneous Water Revenues 



2,614-7.1+1 

211,511.81 

50,893.06 

198.80 265,251.08 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



Water Supply; 

Source of Supply Labor 

Pumping Station Labor 

Purification Labor 

Miscellaneous Labor 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 

Pumping Sta. Supplies & Expenses 

Purification System Supplies & 

Expenses 
Power Purchased 

Repairs to Water Supply Str.&Equip. 
Repairs to Pump. Station Str.&Equip, 
Repairs to Purification System 
Str. & Equipment 

Distribution; 

Distribution Wages 
Meter Department Labor 
Meter Department Supplies & 

Expenses 
Other Supplies & Expenses 
Repairs to Structures 
Repairs to Mains 
Repairs to Services 
Repairs to Hydrants 
Repairs to Meters 

Administration; 

Commercial Office Salaries 
Meter Reading Salaries 
Commercial Supplies & Expenses 
Salary of General Officer 
Salgiry of Account Clerk 
General Office Expense 
Repairs to General Office Str. 

& Equipment 
General Expense 
Insurance 

Longevity, Annual & Sick Leaves 
Retirement Fund Payments 
Stores Dept. & Shop Expense 
Garage Expense 



2,022.86 

25,096.^2 

3,827.6i+ 

2,881.60 

238.55 

3,283.26 

7,768.35 

23,71^.76 

1,176.16 

U, 024. 88 

314. 50 74,346.98 



37,913.82 
7,020.88 

66.05 
675.04 
1,172.27 
4,564.95 
4,035.35 
1,044.76 
2.099-39 



3,480.31 
8,783.72 
1,223.08 
8,800.00 
4,800.00 
671.68 

508.75 
1,650.57 
4,046.27 
11,819.24 
12,979.07 
3,023.83 
5,179-76 



58,592.51 



66,966.28 



63 



Fixed Charges; 

Depreciation i+9,58l.76 

Taxes 38.33 ^9,620.09 

Total Operating Expenses 2^^9,^27-86 



Operating Income 15,723.22 

Non- Operating Income; 

Income from Invested Fimds 2,5ll2.1+l 

Miscellaneous Income 1,113-^9 

Accrued Interest on Sale of Bonds 103-^7 3,759-37 

19,1*82.59 

Non-Operating Expense; 

Interest Expense U, 018.00 

Net Profit for the Year 15,^^64.59 



BALANCE SHEET --SANITARY SEWER FUND 

December 31, 1965 
ASSETS 

Fixed Assets; 

Land & Right of Way 38,27^.97 

Sewer Mains l,i+37,898.17 

Manholes 196,959.01+ 

Customer Connections 238,577-71+ 

S\mdry Equipment 9,259-25 

1,920,969-17 

Less; Reserve for Depreciation 81+3,295.83 1,077,673-31+ 

Deferred Engineering Charges 11,678.1+0 

Current Assets; 

Due from General Fund 92,551.1+6 

Investments 31,325.1+6 

Loan to Special Assessment J'und 23,61+1+. 1+2 ll+7,521.3l<- 



1,236,873.08 



LIABILITIES & FUNDS 



Long Term Liabilities; 

Bonded Debt 56,000.00 

Share in Special Assessments 19,116.28 75,116.28 

Fimd Balance & Surplus; 

Municipal Investments 1+61+,871.96 

Contributions in Aid of Constr. 300,683.88 

Siu-plus Balance; Jan. 1, I965 361+,202.76 

Net Profit for the year 1965 31,998.20 396,200.96 l,l6l, 756.80 



1,236,873.08 



6k 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS --SANITARY SEWER FUND 



For the Year Ended December 31, I965 



OPERATING REVENUES 



Sewer Rents; 

General 65,980.95 

Industrial 2^1, 587 A3 90 , 568 . 38 



OPERATING EXPENSES 



General Operations, Admin., etc; 

Main & Manhole Operating Expense 17,627-53 

HoTise Conn. Operating Expense 4,11+8.21 

Maintenance of Mains 4,1+65.69 

Maintenance of Manholes 2,362.67 

Misc. General Expense 852.21 

Meter Readings & Billings 2,717.1+3 

Employees Retirement Fund 1,779-87 33,953.61 

Depreciation 23.536.1+8 57 » 1^90. 09 

Operating Income 33,078.29 

Add; Non- Operating Income; 

Interest on Investments 1,330.81 

3l+,l+09.10 

Deduct; Non-Operating Expenses; 

Interest Expense 2,1+10.90 

Net Profit for the Year 31,998.20 



65 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 
Concord, New Hampshire 

May 20, 1966 

Certificate of Audit 

This is to certify that we have examined and audited the 
accounts and records of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended 
December 31, 1965. In our opinion, the Exhibits included herewith 
reflect the true financial condition of the City on December 31, 1965, 
together with the results of operations for the fiscal year ended on 
that date. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 

DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 

O. Maurice Oleson) 

Lionel J. DeGrace ) Auditors 

Edgar O. Pesquera) 

Stephen D. Plodzik, Accountant 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 
Concord, New Hampshire 

May 20, 1966 

To the Mayor and Board of Aldermen 
Concord, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of an examination and audit 
of the accounts of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended De- 
cember 31, 1965, which was made by this Division as requested. Ex- 
hibits as hereafter listed are included as part of the report. 

Scope of Audit 

The accounts and records of all city officials charged with the 
custody, receipt and disbursement of city funds were examined and 
audited. An examination was made of a sxifficient number of vouchers, 
payrolls and cancelled checks to satisfy the requirements of accepted 
standards of audit procedure. Receipts were checked by source inso- 
far as possible. Book balances were verified by comparison with 

66 



reconciled bank balances nnade from statennents obtained from deposi- 
tory banks. 

Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accounts): December 31, 1964- 
December 31, 1965: (Exhibit A-1) 

Comparative Balance Sheets (Revenue Accounts) for the fis- 
cal years ended December 31, 1964 and December 31, 1965, are pre- 
sented in Exhibit A-1. As indicated therein, the Surplus increased by 
$844.39, from $97, 264. 84 to $98, 109. 23, in 1965. 

Analysis of Change in Current Financial Condition: (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change in the current financial condition 
of the City during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors 
which caused the change indicated therein. These were as follows: 

Increase in Surplus 
New Budget Surplus $128, 207. 61 

Decrease in Surplus 
Surplus Used to Reduce Tax Rate $95, 000. 00 

Tax Collector's Excess Debit 01 

Increase in Reserve Against Taxes 

Receivable 7,470.33 

Increase in Reserve Against Accounts 

Receivable 8,806.37 

Increase in Reserve Against Stores Accounts 1 6, 086. 5 1 

127, 363.22 

Net Increase * g^^ -^n 



Decrease in Long Term Indebtedness: 

The long term indebtedness of the City (including Municipal, 
Water and Union School District indebtedness) decreased by $88,970.96 
in 1965, as shown herewith: 

Long Term Bonds Bonds Long Term 

Debt & Notes St Notes Debt 

December Issued Retired December 

31, 1964 in 1965 in 1965 31, 1965 

Municipal $1,357,362.00 $362,780.00 $262,282.00 $1,457,860.00 

Water 185,785.80 55,000.00 37,024.20 203,761.60 
School (Union 

School Dist.) 2,280,000.00 -0- 205,000.00 2,075,000.00 
Airport Advance 

(Due State) 14,583.04 -0- 2,444.76 12,138.28 

$3,837,730.84 $417,780.00 $506,750.96 $3,748,759.88 



Statement of Long Tertn Indebtedness: (Exhibit A- 6) 

A statement of outstanding long term indebtedness as of 
December 31, 1965, showing annual debt service requirements is 
contained in Exhibit A-6. 

67 



Compara tive Statements of Appropriations and Expenditures- -Estimated 
and Actual Revenues : (Exhibits A-4 St A-5) 

Comparative statements of appropriations and expenditures, 
estimated and actual revenues for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1965, are presented in Exhibits A-4 and A-5. As indicated by the bud- 
get summary (Exhibit A-5), unexpended balances of appropriations of 
$82, 414. 75, plus a revenue surplus of $45, 792. 86, resulted in a net 
budget surplus of $128,207.61. 

Tax Collections: 

Tax collections (exclusive of State Head Taxes) of the cur- 
rent year's levy as compared to taxes assessed, for the years 1964 and 
1965 were as follows: 

Levy of 1964 Percent Levy of 1965 Percent 
Taxes Assessed--Current 

Year's Levy $4,876,303.42 $5,229,807.53 

Taxes Collected--Current 

Year's Levy $4,247,796.19 87. 1% $4,560,544.55 87.2% 

Taxes Abated--Current 

Year's Levy 24,070.15 .5% 23,095.24 .4% 

Uncollected Taxes --Current 

Year's Levy 604,437.08 12.4% 646,167.74 12.4% 

$4,876,303.42 100.0% $5,229,807.53 100.0% 



Conclusion: 

The provisions of Chapter 184 of the Laws of 1955, require 
that this report or the summary of findings and recommendations 
(letter of transmittal) shall be published in the next annual report of 
the City. 

We extend our thanks to the officials of the City of Concord 
and their office staffs for the assistance rendered during the course of 
the audit. 

Yours very truly, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 

DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 

O. Maurice Oleson) 

Lionel J. DeGrace ) Auditors 

Edgar O. Pesquera) 

Stephen D. Plodzik, Accountant 



68 




Be sure to give your NAME AND AD- 
DRESS as well as the NATURE OF THE 
REQUEST clearly. DO NOT HANG UP until 
you are sure that your MESSAGE HAS BEEN 
UNDERSTOOD. 



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call, dial the MAYOR'S OFFICE, 224-2391 




■^y. 




Although it is no longer a significant factor in the 
community's economic existence, the "bend in the river" at 
Concord was the scene of considerable activity during 1965. 
The New Hampshire Technical Institute on its west bank (see 
page 24), and an ice skating arena and a shopping center east 
of the river were completed and opened. Construction was 
started on the new Merrimack River Bridge and Interstate 
Route 93 at the traffic circle.