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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures of the city of Concord"

^Hamp 
352.07 
:74 
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.NNUAL REPORT 

i FOR 

THE ^YtAR 1966 



^ 



THE 
CITY OF CONCORD 




SALUTES OUR 

FIGHTING MEN 

IN VIETNAM 



ANNUAL REPORT 
FOR 



THE 



^' 



THE 
CITY OF CONCORD 




SALUTES OUR 

FIGHTING MEN 

IN VIETNAM 



Umuersity of 

Tlew Hampshire 

Library 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Board of Aldermen — 1966 4 

Your City Officials — 1966 6 

City Boards — 1966 7 

Progress Report — 1966 8 

Personnel & Purchasing Department 10 

A "New Look" at City Hall 12 

Planning Department 14 

Records Depar tmen t 1 6 

Elections 17 

Civil Defense 19 

Fire Department 22 

Police Department 24 

Health Department -j-.- — -— : 26 

Sanitary Inspection - r. 27 

Public Library ^.'l.'-.:, .„J 29 

Recreation & Parks Department-— ir-—^ 32 

Welfare Department 35 

Concord Airport 36 

Building & Inspection Department 38 

Engineering Department 40 

Pid^lic Works Department 41 

Water De})artment , 45 

Concord's Historic Past — Its Modern Future 48 

Assessing Department 5 1 

Collection Department 52 

Finance Department 54 

Financial Statements — 1966 57 

Annual Audit — 1966 80 



DEDICATION 

This 1966 Annual Report 

of the 

City of Concord, New Hampshire 

is dedicated to 

the members of our armed forces 

serving in Vietnam, 

and especially 

to the memory of those Concord men 

who have given their lives in this 

conflict, 

that freedom and democratic 

government may 

be the right of all people 




Mayor Quinn proclaims May, 1966 Official Savings Bank Month 

as little Penny Hondrogen deposits her coins in the Bunny 

Bank and Eugene Woodivard, representing the Concord mutual 

savings banks, looks on. 



BOARD OF ALDERMEN 




MEMBERS OF THE 1966-67 BOARD OF ALDERMEN. First roiv: 
Alderman Edna C. McKenna, Mayor Quinn. Marjorie B. Foote, 
Clerk. Second roiv: Aldermen David E. Tardif. Winfield J. Phil- 
lips. William A. Stevens. Clyde E. Wilber, Malcolm McLane, 
former City Solicitor Dayiiel E. Donavon, Jr. Third row: Alder- 
men Allen R. Wiren, Joseph C. Musinneci, Roland F. Fletcher, 
John H. Morrill. Fourth row: George A. Stohrer, Jr., William H. 
Perry, William P. Gove, Robert D Branch. 



The Board of Aldermen consists of 15 members, six Aldermen-at-Large 
elected for terms of four years, with three of the six elected every two 
years, and nine Ward Aldermen elected for terms of two years each. The 
Mayor is chief executixe of the city and is elected for a two year term. 
In addition to his many other duties, he presides at all meetings of the 
Board. 

Regular meetings of the Board of Aldermen are held on the second 
Monday of each month in the Council Chamber at City Hall. Due to 
the increased volume and jjressure of matters requiring Board action, 
a resolution was adopted at the regidar June meeting providing for an 
additional meeting to be held each month, excepting June, July and 
August. 



Held 12 regidar meetings, 12 special meetings, eight recessed meetings 
and 11 public hearings. 

Adopted 90 resolutions and 46 ordinances. 



YOUR CITY OFFICIALS - 1966 



ASSESSORS 

Edward L. Bartlett 
Richard L. Towle 
Graham E. Fogg 

CEMETERY SUPERIN- 
TENDENT 
Edward L. Rowland 

c:hief of police 

VV^alter H. Carlson 

CITY CLERK 

Mrs. Marjorie B. Foote 
City Clerk Emeritus 
Arthur E. Roby 

CITY SOLICITOR 
Verdi McKay 

CITY TREASURER 
Mrs. Violet P. Constant 

CIVIL DEFENSE DIRECTOR 
Richard D. Brodeur 

DIRECTOR OF RECREATION 
& PARKS 
John W. Keach 

DIRECTOR OF WELFARE 
Miss Gertrude E. Watkins 

DISTRICT COURT 

Donald Matson, Justice 
Francis E. Perkins, 
Associate Justice 
Mrs. Marie MacPhail, Clerk 

ENGINEERING INSPECTOR 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 

FINANCE DIRECTOR 

Verne F. Santas, Jr. 



FIRE CHIEF 
Earl G. Giles 

HEALTH OFFICER 

William W. Frost, Jr., M.D. 

JUVENILE OFFICER 
James M. Ceriello 

LIBRARY DIRECTOR 
Mrs. Lois R. Markey 

OVERSEER OF THE POOR 
Edward H. \'ork 

PERSONNEL & PURCHASING 
DIRECTOR 

Thomas S. Pingree 

PLANNING DIRECTOR 
Gustaf H. Lehtinen 

POUND KEEPER 
Charles C. Hoagland 

SANITARY INSPECTOR 
George A. Hill 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS &: 
MEASURES 
Harold L. Bradford 

SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PUBLIC WORKS & 
CITY ENGINEER 
Ronald H. Ford 

TAX COLLECTOR 

George VV^est 

WATER SUPERINTENDENT 
G. Arthur Faneuf 



CITY BOARDS - 1966 



PERSONNEL ADVISORY 
BOARD 

Samuel I. Schneider 
Gerard M. LeBron 
Allan L. Mitchell 

BOARD OF PLUMBING 
EXAMINERS 
Ellsworth B. Philbrick 
Joseph J. Keane 
Earl A. Banks 

TRUSTEES, TRUST FUNDS 
Violet P. Constant 
Richard G. W^illiamson 
Robert M. Beyer 

CITY PLANNING BOARD 
Pasquale V. Riifo 
Dudley W. Orr 
fohn Swenson 
Douglas N. Everett 
Lt. Gen. Edward H. Brooks 
Stuart Hancock 
Ex Officio: 
Mayor }. Herbert Quinn 
Ronald H. Ford, 

City Engineer 
Robert D. Branch, 

Alderman-at-Large 

BOARD OF HEALTH 
William W. Frost, Jr., M.D 
A. Craig Campbell, M.D. 
BurtonR. Nault, M.D. 

ZONING BOARD OF 
ADJUSTMENT 
Carl G. Bartlett 
Frank J. Preston 
Richard N. Peale 
Bernard McAlpine 
Raymond K. Perkins 



BOARD OF APPEAL 

Carroll Garland 
Robert A. Foster 
W^illiam Johns 
Arnold Perreton 
Preston W. Colbroth 

BOARD OF LIBRARY 
TRUSTEES 
Mrs. Nyleen Morrison 
Mrs. Walter S. Newton 
\V. Duer Thomj^son 
Chester G. Larson 
Mrs. Mary Farnum 
Mrs. Mildred T. Melvin 
Mrs. Genevieve Soule 
Dr. Maurice Green 

BOARD OF REVISION OF 

ASSESSMENTS 
Verne F. Santas, Jr. 

Chairman 
Ronald H. Ford 
James A. Taylor 
Archie N. Gourley 
Verdi McKay 

LICENSING BOARD 
Mayor J. Herbert Quinn 
Walter H. Carlson, 

Police Chief 
Earl G. Giles, Fire Chief 

BOARD OF HOUSING 
STANDARDS 
Ronald H. Ford 
William \\^ Frost, Jr., M.D. 
Earl G. Giles 



PROGRESS REPORT - 1966 






'i'^*"' 







New Merrimack Ri\er Bridge and overjja.ss with ramps, taking Inter- 
state Highway 93 over Bridge Street, comjileted and opened to traffic. 

Planning continued on Cajjitol Phi/a North urban renewal jjroject. The 
proposed Concord project received federal apjjroval and 51.8 million in 
federal fimds set aside. The project woidd include an area of approxi- 
mately 20 acres at the north end of the downtown business area, also 
relocation of Bridge and Centre Streets to jjrovide an imbroken flow of 
traffic across North Main Street. The Concord Housing Authority will 



take a formal request tor ap])ro\al of the j^roject to the Board of Alder- 
men early in 1967. 

South End Highwa) Imjjrovement Project study made for relief of 
traffic congestion at \\ ater. \\'est and South Main Streets; also, a study 
made of traffic conditions in the vicinity of the new Federal Building. 

A site selected and Camp, Dresser & iMcKee, considtants, authorized to 
proceed with j^lans and specifications for construction of a water filtration 
plant. 

Durgin Street Parking Lot enlarged and altered to jjermit orderly 
traffic flow for new drive-in banking facilities. 

Complete reappraisal of real estate in Concord contracted for, field 
work comj)leted and revieAv j^hase of the project started. 

Land acquired, construction jjlans drawn and bond issue secured for 
ex])ansion of Beaver Meadow Golf Course. 

The City piuchased jjroperty on Iron Works Road and on Penacook 
Street for future recreation use. 



New Water Department office building, Concord Heights Fire Station 
and addition to Concord Public Library completed and occu])ied. 



PERSONNEL AND PURCHASING 
DEPARTMENT 

The Personnel & Purchasing Department is responsible for all city 
pmchases, personnel actions, maintenance of City Hall and Auditorium 
and booking events to be held in the Auditorium. 

Processed some 3,900 pmxhase orders, covering the legion of items needed 
for the efficient operation of a city, as well as construction of buildings, 
sewers, sidewalks and streets. 

Handled more than $260,000 in new construction and major equipment 
pmchases through formal bidding procedures. 

Negotiated for sale of used equipment and timber on City forest lands, 
realizing almost $9,000 on the sales. 

Processed 550 personnel actions for permanent and temporary positions. 

Particij:)ated in one major dejjartmental apjjointment in 1966 — that of 
John Keach to the position of Director of Recreation & Parks. 

Ran continuing examinations for Firefighters through cooperation with 
the State Department of Personnel — filling 18 vacancies in the de- 
partment. 

Held examinations for Fire Department Captains and Lieutenants — 
Of 23 men tested, 1 1 qualified and existing vacancies were filled. 

An ordinance was passed giving city employees Friday off when a holi- 
day falls on a Saturday and to observe Monday as a holiday when the 
holiday occurs on a Sunday. 

The Director was authorized to interview appraisal firms for the cost 
of revising the city employee Classification and Compensation Plan. 

City employees received a 16^^, salary increase, effective in May, 1966. 

10 




City Engineer Ronald H. Ford presents a card and gift certificate 

from City Hall workers to Shirley Clark, a 40-year veteran ivith 

the Public Works Department, who retired in December. 



11 



A "NEW LOOK" AT CITY HALL 




City Hall took on a neiv external look also. Here a Public Works 
creiv install neiv gra^iite curbing in front of the building to pro- 
tect the lawn from misuse and wear. 



Transfer ot the Water Department office to the new Flanders BuikUng 
and two jnibHc service organizations to the Kennedy Ajxntment Build- 
ing, plus the need for more work and storage space by several city depart- 
ments, made necessary extensive renovation of offices at City Hall. The 
sum of SI 8,000 was allocated for this pinpose. The work was jierformed 
by skilled emj^loyees of the Public Works Dej^artment. 

In late spring the City Clerk and stall mo\ed into the former Water 
Department rooms on the southeast corner of the building. This arrange- 
ment vastly imj^roved working conditions and jjrovided much needed 

12 



additional storage space, as well as a private office for the Clerk. The 
Assessing Department office was expanded into the old City Clerk's 
office, proxiding necessary additional work space and a new conference 
room. Redecorating was done in the Mayor's Office and a new rug and 
drapes installed. 

On the second floor, the Personnel R; Purchasing Department office, 
created the j^revious year, was expanded to include two rooms and the 
area formerly occupied by the Visiting Ninse Association was renovated 
to accommodate the new Building & Inspection Department. The ladies 
room on the second floor was relocated. 

Family Service vacated the space it had long occupied on the north side 
of the third floor. New offices were created there for the N. H. Tubercu- 
losis Association, relocated from the second floor, and for the new 
Office of Economic Opportunity. 



13 



PLANNING DEPARTMENT 

The physical and human city requires well prepared plans ii it is to 
function at its economic and asthetic best. By its consideration of 
immediate and long-range j:)rojects the Planning Board attemjits to pro- 
mote the orderly develoj^ment of the city. Its recommendations are 
forwarded to the Board of .Vldermen for their information and appro- 
priate action. 

Recommended to the Board of Aldermen that the City of Concord ap- 
jjrove the proposed relocation of Bridge Street from North Main Street 
to tlie Interstate 93 Interchange as a Federal-tuban highway project, 
and that tlie Board authorize construction of this four-lane downtown 
access highway. 

Reviewed the engineering consultant's rejDort on the Soiuh End Highway 
Improvement Project, and recommended to the Board that the Mayor 
be authorized to recpiest the State Highway Commissioner to program 
construction of this expanded highway system as a Federal-mban high- 
way project. 

Ap}iro\ed the pioposed widening of a jjortion of Pleasant Street easterly 
of Concord Hospital to pro\ ide a deceleration lane for traffic entering 
the hosjjital grounds. 

Recommended that the City of Concord purthase the Woods jjroperty 
on Penacook. Street for future highway use in connection with the mapped 
lines of the Northwest By-j3ass, so-called, and for jjossible recreation use. 

Sought authorization from the Board of Aldermen to map the lines 
of futine streets in accordance with the long range i:)lan of the South 
End Highway Improvement Project. 

Studied future traffic and j^arking requirements in the vicinity of tlie 
new Federal Building, and recommended guidelines for futme action 
by the Board of Aldermen in this regard. 

Recommentled negotiation with the Concord National and Concord 
Savings Banks to exchange land at the Durgin Street parking area to 
j:)rovide additional jjarking caj^acity and imjjrove space and aisle 
arrangement. 

Recommended establishment of a municijjal jxnking lot in the Pleasant- 
Fremont-Green Street area ojjjjosite the new Federal Buikling. 

Prepared the annual application for recertification of Concord's Work- 
able Program for Community Improvement for submission to the Depart- 
ment of Housing &: Urban Development. 

14 



Recommendetl that the City enter into a cooperation agreement with 
the Concord Housing Authority for the construction ol 100 units of 
j)ubh( housing for low-income families. 

AtlojJtcd a resolution appro\ing the Capitol District Plan as a refinement 
of the Master Plan of the Clity of Concord, and adojjting the Plan as a 
guide for the develoj:)meni of the district in which the urban renewal area 
is located — Re\ ie^ved and concurred with proposed zoning changes to 
effectuate and implement and the Urban Renewal Plan. 

Recommended that the City seek the cooperation of the U. S. Corps of 
Engineers in conducting a Flood Plain Information Study of the Merri- 
mack River Valley fiom the Bow townline northerly to Sewalls Falls. 

Prepared a complete new set of planning base maps, assisted by consult- 
ants imder the Federal 701 planning assistance program. 

Started comprehensive re\ision of the Concord Zoning Ordinance late 
in 1966, assisted by consultants under a Federal planning assistance grant 
— A preliminary draft of the revised ordinance was received in December. 

Recommended that the City seek admittance to membership in the 
Southern New Hamjjshire Planning Commission. 

Recommended purchase of property in the South End and at a location 
midway between East Concord and Concord Plains, in cooperation with 
the Concord Union School District for future playgiound - school 
facilities. 

Favored introduction of legislation at the 1967 session of the General 
Court to secure the recreational potential of the Merrimack River above 
Sewalls Falls, by having the State acquire and maintain the dam formerly 
ojjerated by Concord Electric (Company. 

E\aluated proposals and recommended a site for the proposed water 
filtration jjlant. 

Advised favorable action on three jietitions for water system extensions 
totalling 1,770 feet of main — Denied proposed 4,200 foot water exten- 
sion in South CJurtisville and Curtisville Roads, due to lack of sufficient 
residential develojMiient there. 

Recommended creation of a committee to meet Avith the Selectmen of 
Boscawen to study j:)lans for a joint sewage disposal system. 

Recommended favorable action on petitions for construction of 2,600 
feet of sanitary sewer extension in South Main Street, Penacook, and for 
construction and relaying of sewer mains in other locations. 

Recommended that the Bradley Monument on Pleasant Street be moved 
to a new site to be acquired from Concord Hospital, and that it be main- 
tained by the City as a historical marker. 

15 



RECORDS DEPARTMENT 



As guardian of the city's records, the City Clerk's Office probably deals 
more directly and intimately with the personal lives of Concord citizens 
than any other city department. Need for a certified cojjy of a birth, mar- 
riage or death record; a license for the family pet; the successful discharge 
of a chattel mortgage; a question regarding voter registration and many 
other matters bring hundreds of jjeople to the Clerk's Office each year. 



Recorded vital statistics for the year 1966, compared with 1965, as 

follows: 

1966 1965 

Births 989 963 

Marriages 412 398 

Deaths' 648 725 

Filed 2,497 uniform commercial codes, and recorded 163 discharges of 
same. 

Received anil tinned over to the C^ity Treasurer a total of .Sl(i,302.95 in 
simdry fees. 

Issued 2,442 dog licenses. 

Issued 415 marriage licenses. 

Furnished 1,658 certified coj^ies of \ ital records. 



The City Clerk, as Clerk of the Board of Aldermen, attends all meet- 
ings and participates by reading each item on the agenda as it is taken 
iijj. Her voice is familiar to everyone who listens in on radio broadcasts 
of Board proceedings. 

Attended 43 meetings of the Board of Aklermen. 

Prepared agenda for all regular and special meetings of the Board of 
Aldermen, providing all members of the Board and news media with 
copies of agenda items. 

Prepared and distributed minutes of meetings to members of the Board 
of Aldermen, department heads and other interested persons. 



16 



ELECTIONS 




City Clerk Marjoiie Foote sivears in Paul Rinden 
as City Solicitor 



19()() wds a state-Avide (biennial) election )ear in -which top offices oi the 
state government were voted on as well as many minor officials. The 
State Primary was held on Sej)tember 13, and the Biennial Election on 
Novembers, 1966. 

The City Clerk is resjjonsilile lor conducting elections in Cx)ncorcl. In 
addition to keeping accmate recoids thereof, she must arrange for the 
jihysical materials needed such as the setting uj) of voting booths, meals 
for election officers on Election Day, distribution of ballots and clerical 
materials to the various polling jjlaces, and other details. 

Ihis year Concord became the only city in the state to have its super- 
visors of the checklists elected for staggered terms of two, foin- and six 



years. The State y\ttorney General ruled that the same state law which 
requires this in the towns ol the state applies to Concord, since there is 
no specific provision regarding the checklists in the city charter and it 
states that "the general laws" shall be applicable. 



Received filings lor elected offices as follows: 

Representative to the General Court 31 

Ward Officials (Clerks, moderators and supervisors) 59 

Delegates to State Convention 24 

Received 515 applications for absentee ballots — Received 
451 completed ballots in tmie for delivery to the various wards 
j)rior to closing of the polls on election night. 

A total of 10,3-^2 votes were cast at the Biennial Election representing 
approximately 66% of the eligible voters in the City of Concord. 



18 



CIVIL DEFENSE 




A Rescue Squad member, wearing one of the government sur- 
plus canister masks secured for CD use. 



Concord's Civil Defense organization conlinued to operate out of its 
headquarters in the basement of City Hall. This was a busy year for the 
director and staff with much jxiper work in addition to the following 
activities. 

Held Shelter iNhmager's Course conducted under the CD Training 
Program of UNH; Disaster Seminar for city department heads, CD staff 
and Resue officials; adult education and Medical Self-help courses. 

Published the Monthly Newsletter and annual CD Progress Report and 
distributed both to a mailing list of over 250 — Our Newsletter took 
second j)rize in the national contest. 

Submitted rea)iplication for matching fluids to create an emergency 
operating center in basement of C>entral Fire Station, which was approved 
—Plans include fimds for control center, utilities and emergency genera- 
tor. 

19 




Movie and slide shoivs are an important part of the CD public 
information program. Training Ojjicer Lawrence Beede prepares 
to show a training film using the CD projector lohile Al Brochii 

looks on. 



Started conversion oi Gonset Communicators used in the RACES net- 
work to crystal control of the transmitting and receiving circuits — • This 
project will be completed in 1967. 

Installed Rollins Park siren on a single pole and standardized this with 
the other five units in operation. 

Set up and operated a booth at the Kiwanis Trade Fair. 

Conducted checkerboard test alerts at frecpient intervals. 

20 



Penacook Rescue Squad resjjoncled to 84 calls during 1966: 14 oxygen 
calls, 21 emergency calls, eight fires, nine auto accidents, 17 calls to pro- 
vide transportation to hospital, 12 standby emergencies and six non- 
emergencies. 

Initiated alerting of Rescue Squad by 2100 cycle per second tone over 
Fire Department radio. 

Compiled and distributed 1000 fire alarm cards. 

Tested sirens every Saturday at 1 1:00 a. m. 

The Rescue Squad conducted 24 training sessions. 

Added the following new ecjuipment: Davis explosion meter to deter- 
mine explosive qualities of gas and air mixtures, two Back Pak acetylene 
cutting torches and a walkie-talkie on Fire Department frequency. 



21 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

A fast, efluicnt fire fighiing lorce helps limit major damage to both 
property and peo]:)le. Concord's Fire Dei:)artment strives to provide the 
best fire protection through training courses tor dei:)artment personnel, 
the latest in fire fighting ecjuipment meticulously maintained and a con- 
tinous j^rogram ol public cdutation in fire safety. 

Added 1-i new Fire Department positions, raising the total force to 79 
men. Lack of cjualified candidates to fill all the new positions made it 
necessary for existing personnel to work extra tluty to provide adequate 
coverage for ajjjxuatus. 

Seveial members of the department attended training courses in fire 
fighting methods — Staged a demonstration at the annual training ses- 
sion sponsored by the New Hampshire Fire (Chief's C^lub at Fit/william, 
N. H.. in September. 




Firefighters face personal danger many times in the course of 

their work. Above, firefighters with axes and water attack an 

attic fire in a dwelling at 30-32 Walker Street. Three firefighters 

ivere injured before this fire icas extinguished. 

22 



Ck^ntimiecl exj^iaiision of the fire alarm system on Concord Heights; also, 
installed 1300 feet of cable on Elm Street, Penacook, and 900 feet on 
the New Merrimack Ri\er Bridge. 

Completed and opened new Concord Heights Fire Station officially in 
August — a two-bay station housing Engine 7, and two men; also, Ladder 
7, a 19.S9 aerial ladcler placed in reserve. 

Assigned four dispatchers to handle all telephone and radio calls and 
alarms 2^-hours per day, relieving regular fire fighters from this duty. 

Ckimjileted purchase of new 1000 gpm pumper, 1500 gallon tank truck 
and fire alarm bucket truck for delivery in 1967 — 1000 gpm pumper 
ordered in 1965 is to be deliAered earh in 1967. 

Observed Fire Prevention Week in Concord with a jjarade consisting of 
28 jjieces of fire apparatus from Concord and 20 neighboring communities, 
on the e\ening of October 14. 

Set uj) and manned pri/e-winning display booth on fire safety at Concord 
Kiwanis Trade Fair. 

ResjK)nded to 50S still alarms, 51 box alarms and 38 false alarms. 

Conductetl 100 in^estigalions and 85 serA'ice calls. 

Dispatched apparatus in response to 22 calls for mutual aid from other 
conmiunities. 

Fire losses during 1966: 

Esl. f'dluc of hi.siinnirc Iiisiiraucc 

Property Im'olved Fire Damage Carried Paid 

Buildings Sl,549.400.00 $ 87,578.61 $2,151,650.00 $ 87,578.61 

Contents 247,700.00 20,718.45 113.900.00 20,718.45 



total $1,797,100.00 S108.297.06 $2,265.5.50.00 $108,297.06 

While value of property involved in fire increased more than 50% over the 
1965 figiue, fire damage resulting increased only 9% over last year. 



23 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Concord's Police Department, composed of 43 regular officials and patrol- 
men, is dedicated to the protection ol Concord citizens — their lives and 
property. A force of 52 reserve and special policemen is available for 
emergency or special duty. Eight persons are employed as school crossing 
guards. 

In spite of the best efforts of our police force crime in Concord, as in 
other cities, continues to increase yearly. We find the sharpest increase 
in the biaglary and auto theft categories. 

The Department recorded 800 auto accidents last year, an all time high. 
There was, however, no notable increase in resulting personal injuries 
and only one fatality. 

Investigated 2,409 crimes during 1966, 264 more than last year — 90% 
cleared by arrest. 

Of crimes reported, 499 were classified as major crimes (including 
forgery, burglary, larceny, auto theft, robbery, etc.) — 52% cleared by 
arrest. 




Concord Police, Civil Defense and Fire Department personnel 
work closely together on many occasions. Here Police Officer 
Ray Weatherbee briefs members of the Rescue Sqioad and Fire- 
men participating in a search for a lost person in the Broad 
Cove Drive area. 



24 



Made 2,139 arrest (excluding parking violations), an increase of 84 
over 1965. 

Made 91 arrests with convictions for dri^ ing while intoxicated. 

Recovered S80,992.65 in stolen jnoperty out of property valued at 
S114,049.91 stolen in 1966. A swindling case and larceny of old coins 
from a coin dealer not reco\ered reduced the recovery rate from previous 
years. 

Brought 78 cases before the Jmenile Court — a sizeable increase over 
35 cases last year, but fewer than in 1964. 

Collected $57,671.93 in jjarking fees from meters, an increase of $1,544.32 
over 1965 revenue. 

Issued 13,547 tickets for j^arking \iolations, an increase of over 1,500 
from last year. 

Installed four-way flasher at Fisherville Road and Snow Street — 
Revamped traffic lights at North Main and Bridge Streets in connection 
with new construction j^rogram on Route 93 and Bridge Street. 

Received and turned over to the City Treasurer $3,139.25 in license, 
permit and ambulance fees antl charges for photostats and photography. 

Continued the training program in police skills. Twenty officials and men 
participated in training courses outside the department. Special training 
for veteran and new men was given in firearms, juvenile delinquency, 
police procedmes, etc. by officials of the department. 

The Concord Police Pistol Team won the trophy awarded in the 1966 
South Central N. H. Pistol League competition. 

Held a testimonial dinner to honor Lt. Campbell and Boy's Club Direc- 
tor James Ceriello on their completion of 25 years service with the 
dejjartment. 

Operated an eight-week summer program at Camp Andrews — attended 
by 144 boys. 

Enrolled 360 boys in the Police Boy's Club during 1966 — 70% inider 
1 3 years of age. 

Conducted a Club program consisting of holiday parties, basketball team, 
essay contest, bowling league, BB gun shoot and other activities. 



25 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 



The Health Department aims to jMomote the heakh of the community 
by making immimization a\aihible to all children at nominal cost, re- 
ceiving and investigating complaints ol health law violations, isstiing 
licenses and j^ermits recpiired by law and keejiing vital records. 

Held 10 pidDlic immuni/ation clinics lor children at the City Auditorium 

— 636 persons recei\ed protective treatment: 

Smallpox, vaccination 128 

Diphtheria, whooping cough and tetanus toxoid . 284 

Diphtheria and tetanus toxoid 39 

Sabin oral polio vaccine 185 

Received and investigated 34 complaints of health law violations — Most 
common complaint was lack of projjer receptacles for the disposal of 
refuse. 

Issued 219 licenses: 

Convalescent homes 3 

Milk sales 117 

Restaurants or bakeries 99 




Concord Hospital completed its 10th year of service to the 
citizens of Concord and surrounding communities during 1966. 

26 



Recorded 639 deaths, a decrease of 71 from the preceeding year (305 
were Concord residents, 334 nonresidents) — The month of April, 1966, 
saw the smallest number of deaths recorded dining one month for several 
years. 

Most common causes of death in 1966 compared with 1965 were: 

1966 1965 

Diseases of the circulatory system 17(S 155 

Cancer and other malignant timiors 55 50 

Diseases of the nervous system 17 24 

Diseases of the respiratory system 14 14 

Diseases of the digestive system 13 13 

Issued ])ermits for binial of 141 j^ersons brought into CJoncord for burial 
in city or j)ri\'ate cemeteries. 

Maintained the public comfort station at \\'arren Street and Odd Fellows 
Avenue. 



SANITARY INSPECTION 

The Sanitary Inspector is responsible for safeguarding the health of 
consimiers through strict enforcement of local and state health laws 
governing the handling and storage of food, and equipment involved in 
its prej:)aration and serving. He also deals with problems such as im- 
proper rubbish disposal; rodent control; inadequate lighting and sani- 
tation in schools, restaurants and milk rooms. 

Many complaints received dining 1966 dealt with suspected cases of food 
]:)oisoning. Some 20 or 30 years ago the chief source of contamination of 
canned foods was poor construction of containers. With improved con- 
tainers this jMoblem was reduced, however, today an increase in this type 
of comj:)laint is noted about foods canned, frozen and otherwise preserved, 
probably due to poor sanitation and carelessness on the part of personnel. 

Made 530 tests on samples of milk, cream and other dairy products. 

Made the following inspections during 1966: 

Dairies 60 Milk plants . . . . — . 10 

Stores ... - _. ......— 143 Eating establishments .. — . 95 

Bakeries . 12 ^Vholesale meat houses ... . 4 

Trailer parks 23 Schools and nurseries . .. 40 

Foster homes -- 6 Complaints 77 

27 



Condemned and destroyed o\er .SS,00() in stock following a grocery 
store fire, and $4,400 worth ol groceries contaminated by material used 
to seal down a new floor in a local market. 

Distributed a publication called "Know Vom- Health Officer," stating 
resijonsibilities of food ser\ice ojjerators and the inspector, to 88 foocl 
handling establishments licensed by the City Health De}3artmeni — 
Lectured to Building & Inspection Department personnel on the Hygene 
of Housing. 

Attended an orientation worksho]:) in Environmental Health and Related 
Housing Code Administration at the Uni\ersity of Connecticut, May 4-6; 
and a coinse by Boston University on Management of Local Health 
Agencies at Andover Academy, during the week of September 18. 




The Sanitary Inspector checks the temperature of dishivater 
in a local restaurant. 



28 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



The major eveni of this year was the completion of the new addition 
to the main hbrary building. Its official opening will be held in January, 
1967. This addition has added some 10,000 scpiare feet to the total 
library, including an auditorium with seating capacity of approximately 
100. It also includes housing for the bookmobile, which previously had no 
shelter, and work space for loading and imloading the vehicle. There are, 
in addition, exjianded work areas for the ordering and processing of 
books and other library materials. 

Features of the re-tlesigned library are a refurnished Children's Room 
adjoining the new Yoiuig Peoj^le's Room and a Parent-Teacher's Room, 
with their own entrance; new catalog cabinets and tables; a larger and 
more secluded Reference Room; a Business and Science Room, containing 
materials on these subjects and study space reserved for adults; and a 
special Arts and Music Room, housing books on art and music and all 
audiovisual equipment. 

Increased book collection by 5,935, making a total of 121,225 books in 
the library. 




* -^msz^ 






iiiiiiiii 

ipiif II 



The neiv library entrance and garage on Prince Street. 
29 




Renovation of the entire library structure unade possible tico 
neiv "living room" areas toith connjortable chairs (one of which 
is sho^on above) at either end of the main library room. 

Enlarged collection ol liametl jjiints by 22, making a total ot 91 prints 
a\ ailable lor circulation. 

Added two new tajjes to the collection of ta]je recordings ot book dis- 
cussions, now numbering 36. 

Maintained a collection ol .^31 recordings, 17 scores and ajjproximately 
50 books on music and musicians in the Ruth May Music Room. 

Subscribed to 350 magazines and 20 newspaj^ers. re])resenting di\ersified 
interests and wide geographical co\'erage. 

Held stor\ hours lor children weekly at the main librar\ and Penacook 
Branch during the school year, and at eight ol the city jila\grounds during 
the summer. 

Circidated 31(S,222 books in 19()(i to 27,314 registered borrowers. 

C^ircidatetl 77,r)99 \olumes to oiulying areas ol the city \ ia bookmobile. 

Circulated 1,1-1() Khnm films during 1966 lor the enjo)nient ol 57,3()() 
viewers — a remarkable increase over 418 films circulated and \iewed b\ 
only 17,516 j^ersons just two years ago in 1964. 

Noted continued stepped-up acti\ity at relerence and reader's advisor 
desks, indicating the growing demand lor inlormation and increased pub- 
lic awareness ol available librarv materials and services. 



30 



The Friends of the Concord PubHc Library is a citizen's grouji organized 
in 1960. Its objecti\es are: To maintain an association ot persons in- 
terested in books and Hbraries; to promote a better understanding in 
the community of hbrary facihties, services and needs; and to stimulate 
interest in the giving of endowments and bequests to the library. During 
1966 the "Friends" activities included sponsorship of four foreign film 
shows, a coffee hour and torn- of the new construction area during Na- 
tional Library Week, and a very successful book fair in October, at which 
more than S2,600 was realized toward pmchase of new equipment for the 
library. 



^^^ 1^^, 




Children make a previature inspection of skating conditions 

at White Park pond. Ice thick enough for skating rarely forms 

until early December. 



RECREATION AND PARKS 




The function ot the Recreation & 
Parks Department is to provide for 
tlie citizens of Concord a variety of 
opportunities for wholesome and in- 
teresting use of their leisme time. To 
this end the department conducts a 
comj3rehensi\e j^rogram of year-round 
activities. 

Recreation c^- Parks Director Robert 
Aver resignetl to take a jjosition in 
Pennsyhania. The post was tempo- 
rarily filled by Miss Betty Abbott imtil 
the appointment of John Keach, of 
Penacook, who took over as director 
on July 1, 1966. 

Conducted j^rograms for children and 
youth — sports lessons and competi- 
tions; scjuare tlances; playschools; mu- 
sic school; jjlay sessions for retarded 
and handi(apj:)ed children; etc. 

(Conducted adidt j^rograms — physi- 
cal fitness classes; golf, bowling, basket- 
ball and Softball leagues; clog obe- 
dience classes; Sunset Club; etc. 

Featiuetl s|:)ecial events — bank con- 
certs, holiday observances, art show, 
group trips, winter carnival, Silver 
Skates Derby, Elk's Field Day, Jiuiior 
Ohmjjics, etc. 

Maintained and operated the Concord 
CJommimity Center for full-time use 
October 1 to April 30; with total 1966 
j:)articipation in all activities at the Center estimated at over 51,245 per- 
sons, an increase of 1 1,665 over last year. 

Provided facilities for many private group activities at the Community 
Center, West Street Ward House, East Concord Community Center, 
White Park Administration Building, Memorial Field and several j)lay- 
groimds — Scout groups; local high school athletics; basketball and base- 
ball leagues; bridge, camera and mineral clubs; rifle and pistol practice; 
Nevers Band rehearsals, Concoixl Artists, 4-H Extension groups; East 
Concord Lamplighters and many others. 







A fountain adds movement and 

beauty to the ivater of White 

Park Pond. 



32 



Provided skating facilities at AN'hite Park and eight neighborhood areas 
lor an estimated 29,557 j^ersons. 

Conducted summer playground activities at 12 playgrounds tor an esti- 
mated 55,176 children, an increase of (i64 over 1965. 




Youngsters at Kimball Playground make hats with their names 

on them — one of many creative craft projects carried out at 

city playgrounds diiring the past summer. 



Maintained seven swimming jjools and one wading pool and provided 
swimming lessons for an estimated 151,844 children, an increase of 
38,915 over last year. 

Sponsored 4th of fidy fireworks viewed by an estimated ]4,{)(K) persons. 

Assisted the East Concord Women's Club in completion of Merrill Park 
shelter and jiond. 

Built shelters at Thompson and Reed Playgrounds, storage shelter at 
Memorial Field, fence and baseball diamond at Heights Playground, a 
hard-surface court at Kimball Playground, and placed log siding on 
Rolfe Park barn. 



33 




Concord points with pride to the fact that Beaver Meadoiv Golf 

Course is the oldest golf course in New Hampshire, having its 

beginning in 1896. The present clubhouse (shown above) was 

built in 1899. 

Maintained, in addition to major recreation lacilities, 20 small j:)arks 
and roadside monument areas. 

Cleared roadway and site lor new Beaver Meadow clubhouse. 

This year marked the beginning of the first jjhase in a .$275,000 three- 
phase program for improvement and exjjansion of Bea\er Meadow Mu- 
nicipal Golf (Jourse. This program will include construe tion of a new club- 
house, entrance road and parking lot and land ac(|uisition for eventual 
expansion of the course from nine to 18 holes. At the end of 1966 the 
City had pmchased the major portion of the land needed; however, plans 
for construction of the new clubhouse were temjjorarily slowed for 
modification of design when it appeared that cost of construction would 
drastically exceed the aj:)propriated simi. 

Estimated 4S,()00 lounds of golf played at Beaver Meadow during 1966. 

Noted a sizeable increase in junior season ticket sales — Sold season 
tickets: j^^.^. j,,^,^ 

Adult 222 229 

Junior 69 49 

Special . 45 33 

Total _.. 336 311 



34 



WELFARE DEPARTMENT 

The City Weliaie Depaiiment is responsible for providing assistance to 
those persons in the conimunit) who do not have the financial resources 
to meet their basic needs. 

Marital difficulties and insufficient income continued to be the major 

causes of relief need in 1966. Reasons for relief and the approximate 

|)er cent of cases in each category dining 1966, compared with 1965, 
were: 

IQ66 1961 1966 1965 

Marital (iiflicultirs 2?,% ?,1% rncmploynu'iit 13% 12% 

InsuRiciciit inconif 27 24 I'licniplovablc 6 9 

Sickness 21 9 Alcoholism .5 9 

The City, State and Federal government share in the total cost of welfare 
aid. Although there was a decrease in Old Age Assistance cases the ex- 
penditure increased some SI 0,000 over 1965 due to rising cost of musing 
home cave. .Vverage monthly caseloads with total payment by the City, 
comj)ared with the previous \ear, were: 

1966 1965 

Cases Amount Cases Amount 

(.cMUTal Relief 28 S 28.643 32 $33,195 

Old Age Assistance* - - 162 63.202 169 52.449 

Aid to Permanentlv &: Totally Disabled** 29 15,791 21 11,774 



Total .- - - - - 219 S107,636 222 .$97,418 

* Citv pays 25%, of cost for citizens and 50% foi aliens. 
** City pays 35%, of cost. 



35 



CONCORD AIRPORT 

Concord's Municipal Airport conLinuecl operation under super\ision 
of the City Engineer, with physical maintenance by the Public \Vorks 
Department. 







The new Doppler, UHF-VHF, directional finder atop its 40-foot 
tower will aid lost aircraft to "home in" at Concord Airport. 

36 



Space in the Administration Building is rented to the U. S. Weather 
Bureau, the U. S. Coast R: Geonetic Survey, N. H. Aeronautics Commis- 
sion and the FAA FHght Service Station. The airport's three hangers are 
lented to a private flying service. 

Ihere were no regidarly scheduled commercial flights operated in or 
out of Concord dining 1966. Approximately 20 private aircraft were based 
at the airport. 

Logged 257 instrument ajjproaches. 

Recorded 24,000 aircraft take-ofls and landings — 13,000 by itinerate 
aircraft and 9,000 local operations. 

The N. H. Aeronautics Commission studied the activity level at the air- 
port, using data obtained from highway traffic counters and spot surveys. 
An increase in tempo of airport activity was observed during the latter 
jjart of the year. 

Installation of a low frequency radio beacon in Pembroke by the State 
of New Hampshire j^rovided Concord Airport with a second instrument 
approach facility. 

The FAA converted its facility (VOR to VORTAC) to enable pilots not 
only to receive azimuth information (bearing to and from the station) 
but also to ascertain their distance from the station in nautical miles. 
The new equipment (see ]3age 36) , when used in conjunction with 
similar facilities located in Montjielier, Vermont, and Augusta, Maine, 
will aid in locating lost aircraft within a three-point "directional finding 
net." 



37 



BUILDING & INSPECTION DEPARTMENT 



This department mo\ed into its newly renovated offices on the second 
floor of City Hall in June, thus, completing its physical as well as func- 
tional separation Irom the Engineering Department. 

Home building in Concord, as in other parts of the coimtry, slowed down 
from previous years due to the tight mortgage money situation which 
developed during 1966. Twelve fewer permits were issued for construc- 
tion of 32 fewer housing imits than in 1965, .^12,550 short of the 1965 
figme. 




A citizen speaks in opposition to the Concord Heights rezoning 
ordinance at a public hearing at City Hall. 



Construction activity on ci\ ic and commercial structures continued high. 
Some projects completed, continued or started dtuing 1966 included the 
new Federal Building, Concord Electric Comjjany service building, N. H. 
State Liquor Commission store and warehouse. United C^htnch of Christ 
retirement commimity on the Heights, Merrimack Valley Regional High 
School in Penacook, arts center and skating arena at St. Paid's School; 
additions to the Public Library, Concord VMCA, and Beede Electrical 
Company in Penacook. 



38 



Issued 34.S permits tor building construction during 1966: 

Number of Estimated Cost 

Permits Issued of Construction 

New housing 37 $ 682,100 

Other construction .. . „ . - - 66 4.615,851 

Additions, alterations & conversions . 239 2,098,824 

Relocation . ..^ . H 17,000 



Totals - .- - -- 343 $7,413,775 

Continued the house to house inspection program — checking for mini- 
mimi housing standards — made 2,397 such inspections. 

Made the following other inspections: 

Buildings 875 Electrical . 1,711 

Signs . - 113 Zoning , . 177 

Plumbing 432 

Issued the following work permits: 

Electrical (changes, additions, new scr\ices, signs, oil burner 

and T\' installations) ...... . 995 

Plumbing .. 101 

.Signs (including billboards) .. .. .. . — —. - .- — - 76 

Demolition . "i7 

Stepped-up enforcement program to eliminate all junk cars stored in 
violation of the Zoning Ordinance. 

The Zoning Board of Adjustment heard 92 appeals, 80 of which were 
approved. 



.39 



ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 



Between the conception of a public improvement project and the com- 
mencement of work by city crews or private contractors, a vast amount 
of work must be done. It is the job of the Engineering Department to 
provide field surveys, designs, jjlans, sjjecifications ancl inspection ser- 
vices for all city construction work. 

The majority of engineering projects undertaken are in connection with 
Public Works Department activities — Dining 1966 these involved: 

1,850 lineal feet of street construction — 1,600 lineal feet of this recon- 
struction between Roy and Guay Streets. 

1,022 lineal feet of sanitary sewer. 

3, 099 lineal feet of storm sewer — 2,200 lineal feet of this in Christian 
Avenue. 

Reconstruction of the westerly apjjroach to Sewalls Falls Bridge. 

9,150 lineal feet of sidewalk — 5,300 lineal feet of this on Pembroke Road. 

6,733 lineal feet of street descriptions and returns — including 2,920 lineal 
feet of Airport Road (widening at northerly end), 1,178 lineal feet of 
Christian Avenue, 1,160 lineal feet of Curtisville Road (southerly 
portion) . 

Layouts for driveway and proposed one acre addition at Soucook Ceme- 
tery. 

Engineering services rendered to other city departments included: 

Main extension in Curtisville Road, and topography and detail jilan for 
proposed filtration plant for the Water Department. 

Layouts for McKee Square and j^arking lot at Memorial Field, and 
topography and detail for jjroposed golf comse club house for the 
Recreation & Parks Department. 

Mapped lines for future streets for the Planning Department. 

Plotted new buildings and additions on the Assessor's majjs. 

The Engineering Department is custodian of a variety of data in the 
form of permanent files, maps, aerial photography, etc., kept accurately 
up-dated and available for reference by other departments and the 
general public. 

Processed 550 deeds. 

40 



Revised ward maps, sewer records and maps, city owned land maj)s and 
street line maps. 

Printed Assessor's maps for public distribution. 

Set bounds lor 80 streets. 

Made 60 street line investigations. 

Established a U.S.G.S. Bench Mark System in the South End and Heights 
areas. 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 




Special spring and fall clean-np campaigns are conducted each 

year, picking up laivn, garden and other refuse unsuitable for 

collection in the packers. 



The Public Works Department is the city's largest department in terms 
of personnel and expenditure. It consists of six divisions each performing 
a vital function in the imjjro\ement and maintenance of the jjhysical city. 

41 



This marked the fourth year in the HIGHWAY DIVISION'S program 
of resurfacing heavil) travelled streets. Sections of several streets in the 
city proper were resurfaced by the Lane Construction Company, contrac- 
tors, with an emulsion type asj^halt surface which "heals" itself and cuts 
the cost of maintenance and patching. .\ mix-in-j)lace sinface was apj)lied 
prior to sealing on many streets in the Penacook area. 

Reconstruction of the West Concord approach to the Sewalls Kails 
Bridge was completed by E. D. Sweat CA:)mpany, contractors. The britlge 
was closed to traffic for three months while the western approach was 
shortened by about 80 feet in a land-fill ojjeration and the old timber deck 
on the western end was rej:)laced with a concrete deck. 

Continued the North State Street widening jMogram toward Pleasant 
Street as far as the ^'MCA building. 

Constructed new asjjhalt sidewalks and continued asphalt overlays in 
the central areas of Concord and Penacook — Continued to rej)lace old 
asjjhalt sidewalks with concrete in the heavily travelled downtown areas. 

Performed extensi\e reno\ation woi k at C^ity Hall. 

Controlled roadside brush with non-toxic spray and moAved loadsides 
along all coimtry roads. 

Sandblasted and applied three coats of ]:)aint to Sewells Falls Bridge. 

Repaired Horse Corner Bridge with plank ciu by city forces. 

Did plowing, sanding and salting of highways and sidewalks as required 
— Put out and ]jicked up snow fence and sand boxes. 



The SEWER DIVISION maintains the city's vast network of sanitary 
and storm sewer lines. This may involve any service from major repairs 
to a sewer line to silencing a noisy manhole cover. 

The following sanitary sewer maintenance work was performed by Sewer 
Division personnel: 

Cleaned 22,706 feet of main. 

Built 13 manholes and repaired 37 manholes. 

Added 39 new house connections and discontiiuied nine. 

Set 144 lateral plugs and 24 main line JJlugs. 

Repaired main at 19 locations. 

Sewer Division crews constructed 360 feet of storm sewer line in Pem- 
broke Road and 133 feet in Garvins Falls Road at a considerable saving 
of money to the city. Other work was performed on storm sewer lines: 

42 



Built 13 catch basins and reiJaiied 56 catch basins. 
Built two manhc:)les and repaired 10 manholes. 
Laid six catch basin connections and icj^aired foin-. 
Cleared 43 j^lugged catch basins. 
Cleaned 22,750 feet of main. 

The REFUSE DIVISION performs the vital, if unglamorous, task of 
city scavanger, remo\ing tons of unwanted material and de])ositing it in 
the sanitary land fill area. This year the city opened a new dimij) site off 
Ft. Eddy Road, the third such area since the sanitary fill method of 
refuse disjiosal was adoj)ted in 1957. 

Tra\elled 43.000 miles with city trucks and jxickers on collection routes. 

Picked up and disjKised of (i7,000 cubic yards of refuse. 

Maintained the sanitar) land-fill area o]:)en to the |)ublic every day of the 
)'ear. 

The FREE DIVISION carried on its constant battle against the Dutch 
elm disease. This year the city launched a preventive health care pro- 
gram in an attemjn to j^rotect its 300 healthy elm trees. A recently de- 
veloped chemical, Bidrin insecticide, was injected into the sap stream ol 
each tree. About 100 dead elms are removed from city jjrojjerty every year. 

Sjjrayed the foliage on all city elm trees Avith methoryclor once during 
the summer season. 

Continued the usual remo\al, j)runing and planting program. 

The GARAGE & STORAGE DIVISION performs emergency and routine 
maintenance on all city vehicles. A stockroom is maintained so that 
frec]uentl) used items may be readily available and the city may take fi- 
nancial achantage of quantity j^inchasing. 

Received delivery on 1 1 new pieces of etjui]:)ment purchased through the 
Ecjuij)ment Replacement Fund. 

The CEMETERY DIVISION of the Public Works Department main- 
tains 1 1 public and two private cemeteries. This includes all the neces- 
sary tasks invohed in keeping our cemeteries clean and attractive, build- 
ings and equipment in good rejDair, construction of new blocks, preparing 
lots for burials and setting of memorial stones, and keeping of accurate 
records. 

Made 378 interments — 264 in city cemeteries, 92 in Calvary and 22 
in Penacook Cahary — an increase of 22 over last year. 

43 



Sold 85 lots, an increase of only two over last year. 

Received 15 trusts on old lots, including additions to existing trusts and 
flower trusts. 

Set 224 markers, plus an midetermined number of Government markers. 

Set 208 corner posts, 24 more than last year. 

Lowered a great number of old markers and corner posts for improved 
appearance and easier maintenance of lots. 

Removed 15 diseased elm trees. 

Used about 500 cubic yards of loam for grading lots — Hauled approxi- 
mately 3,000 cubic yards of fill for the extension of new blocks. 

Laid 600 feet of plastic water pipe in Beth Jacob section of Blossom Hill 
Cemetery. 

Set out flowers in cemeteries for Memorial Dav. 




\-i^fm -^sISw . 



«*^^x*^%* 



A historical marker has been erected on North State Street to 

assist tourists in locating the grave of U. S. President Franklin 

Pierce in the Old North Cevieterij. 



44 



WATER DEPARTMENT 




-*" 



- llllllllf^fflM^ 



For the first time in four years our ivater supply tvas sufficient 
to permit flushing of all hydrants and mains in the system. 



Concord still faced a serious water supply problem at the beginning of 
19()6, with the elevation of Penacook Lake 10' 4" below spillway eleva- 
tion and another dry year predicted. The years 1960 through 1966 saw a 
total deficit of 49.22 inches of precipitation. However, due to installation 
of the new and larger piunp at Turkey Pond and a smaller deficit in 
precipitation than in 1965 the elevation of Penacook Lake on December 
31, 1966 was less than fi\e feet below spillway elevation. 

Pumping continued on a 24-hour basis from Turkey Pond, January 1 
through May 31. Without this supply, and that pumped from the 
Sanders W^ell Field, the situation would have been very serious. 

Jn order to ease the water shortage, Brezner Tannery in Penacook re- 
stored its old water system, bringing water from the Contoocook River 
into their plant for the initial j)rocess of washing and cleaning hides. 
This made possible a saving of more than 500,000 gallons of water per 
day. Water consumption during 1966 fell 3,969,000 gallons below the 
1965 figure, reflecting conservation measures by businesses and house- 
holds. 



45 



By action of the Board of Aldermen, the firm of Camp, Dresser & McKee 
was engaged to design and prepare j^hms for the proposed filtration plant 
and underground storage tanks to be located at Penacook Lake. 

C^oncord's water lates. last adjusted in 1957, came under close scrutin\ 
during 19(i6. A study by CJamjj, Dresser R: McKee, consultants, revealed 
Concords rates to be among the lowest in the East. The considtants rec- 
ommended doubling the existing rates (84.00 minimum quarterly charge 
for 1,.500 cubic feet of ^vater used) and raising rates on a sliding scale 
to water consumers using greater quantities. The Board of Aldermen 
at a meeting in September, 1966, aj3]jro\ed a 50% increase in water rates 
(to 36.00 minimum quarterly charge for first 1,000 cubic feet used), 
efiective on October 1, 1966. 

The major replacement construction |)roject of the )ear was carried out 
in connection with the rebuilding of Interstate 93 at the intersection of 
Bridge Street and construction of the ne^v bridge across the Merrimack 
Ri\er. 

Supplied 1,439,194,000 gallons of water during 1966, or an average of 
3,942,997 gallons j)er da\ (about 131 gallons per person a day). 

Pumj:)ed (S()0.7 million gallons of water from lurke) Pond into Penacook 
Lake — 60'^' (, of the total consinujition ioi" the year. 

Pumped 42() million gallons from the Saiuulers Well Field — 30% of 
the cit\"s total water consumjJtion. 

Laid water main extensions in Ft. Edch Road and McGuire Street (city 
jjropei ) , Bog Road and Sewalls Falls Road (West Concord) and Cherry 
Street, Christian Avenue and Cricket Lane (on the Heights) — using 
5,234 feet of cement lined cast iron jMj)e in six and eight inch sizes 
- — making a total of 115.8 miles of main now in the system. 

Relaid nearly 1,000 feet of eight, ten, twelve and fourteen inch cement 
lined cast iron pipe in connection with the Interstate 93 project, replac- 
ing pipe laid in 1905 and 192S — also replaced two and set 11 new 
h\(lrants, relaid 2(S ser\ ices and replaced (i7 meters. 

Laid 520 feet of 11 inch welded steel jmjk^ across the new Merrimack 
River Bridge. 

Installed 17 main line valves and six valves on hydrant branches — a 
total of 1,798 \alves in the system. 

Installed 82 new meters and discontinued 15 old meters — for a total of 
5,937 meters now in the system. 

16 



Rej)airc(l and returned to service 868 meters. 

Drained and cleanetl the reser\oir on Penacook Street lor the first time in 
]5 \ears. 

Treated Penacook Lake with coj)j:)er sulfate to retard the growth ot algae. 

Tested and ser\iced all heating equipment, electrical and recording 
equipment. 

Started a remodeling project in the basement oi the North State Street 
shop to provide locker, limchioom and toilet facilities for the men of 
the department. 




The new Water Department office huilding, knoum as the Fland- 
ers Building for retired Assistajit Sxiperintendent Ralph W. 
Flanders, u-as completed and occupied in May, 1966. 



47 



CONCORD'S HISTORIC PAST 




The Pierce hotise at 18 Montgomery Street as it looks 
today. 




^:> 



The house restored to its 1842 condition, as viS2ialized 
by the citizens tvho hope to preserve it. 



48 



IT'S MODERN FUTURE 




Probably the best indication of a city's economic progress is its new 
building construction. Similar!), the manner in which a city preserves its 
buildings of historical or architectural imjjortance may indicate its cul- 
tural standards. This year Concord has made what may prove to be 
significant advances in both directions. 

Due principally to the efforts of a group of Concord citizens, known as 
the Pierce Brigade, an effort is being made to remove the family home 
and only house in Concord owned by U. S. President Franklin Pierce 
from the proposed Capitol Pla/a North urban renewal area and to 
restore it to its 19th Century appearance. 

\Vork was started or completed on several major building projects dur- 
ing 1966. The largest project, the .15 million dollar Federal Building at 
the corner of Pleasant and South Streets (shown under construction 
above) , will be ready for occupancy early in 1967. 



49 




The new addition to the YMCA building (above), icith its gym 

and sicimming facilities, contributes substantially to Concord's 

recreational opportunities. 



(Below J The X. H. State Liquor Co^mm:ssion's new retail store 
and warehouse icas completed and opened for business this year. 




50 



ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 



The Assessing Department is administeied by a three-man Board of 
Assessors, two part-time Assessors and a full-time City Assessor who super- 
\ ises the office. 

A reorganization of personnel in the Assessing Department was accom- 
jjlished dining 1966, resulting in the upgrading of three positions, changes 
in titles of several positions and the reduction of one staff position. 

The examination of all assessable property for revaluation by Associated 
Sur\e\s was started in April and completed in October. The firm then 
started the review ]:hase which will complete the work in time for the 
1967 tax roll. 



Issued tax warrants dining 1966 as folloAvs: 



Property — Real and personal 
Poll Tax _ 

Bank Stock 

Timber Yield Tax - 

Head Tax 



.S5 .769.640.38 

23.952.00 

10.914.95 

3.121.06 

73.615.00 



(The above figures include original, jeopardy and supplemental war- 
rants through December S\. 1966.) 

Computed city tax rate based on propertv valuation (100<^'j-) : 

Gross \aluation before exemptions _ 5138.705,221.00 

War Service Exemptions . . 

Blind Exemptions 

Meat Stock Exemptions 

Poultn. exemptions 

Net \"aluation 

Set tax rates for 1966 as follows: 



Municipal 
School _ 
Count V 



51.709.050.00 




4.000.00 




18.800.00 




2j71.00 


1.734.421.00 




$136,970,800.00 


Concord 


Penacook 


S18^8 


S18.58 


21.86 


20.36 


1.76 


1.76 



542.20 



^40.70 



Allowed 2,728.00 poll tax exemptions to veterans, compared with 
2,703.00 in 1965. 

Allowed S24, 690.41 in abatements through December 31, against the 
1966 real estate, personal property and poll tax levy. 

Mailed more than 8,000 inventory forms to Concord and Penacook 
property owners. 

Received 200 appeals against 1966 assessments. 



51 



Processed 694 transfers of real estate. 

The Board of Assessors held 21 meetings dining 1966. 

Mr. Saleh Dahabrah. official Assessor of the country of Jordan, came to 
this dejjariment \ia the Uni\ersity of Connecticut in conjunction with 
the Federal Agency for International Develoj.mient for instruction in 
assessing procedures. His visit was most jileasant and the mutual ex- 
change of informaiton proved most interesting and informative to all. 

Chief Assessor Edward L. Bartlett, was ajjjjointed New Hampshire 
Representative of the International Association of Assessing Officers for 
1966. Mr. Bartlett won the Association's International Donehoo Essay 
Award, which was presented to him at the International C^onference at 
Toronto, CJanada, in Sejitember. 



COLLECTION DEPARTMENT 

The Collection Department is the centralized collection agency for many 
city services. Payments for real estate, poll and head taxes; interest 
charges; water bills; motor vehicle jjermits; rent of buildings and facil- 
ities; ambidance charges; service charges for water and sewer connections; 
new street construction; and sj)ecial assessment le\'ies are received, re- 
corded and deposited. 

Received 1966 tax warrants with supjjlementals from the Board of 
Assessors as follows: 

Total Bab nice 

Debits December 31, 1966 

Real and Personal Property S5.769.720.33 S889.617.3(i 

Bank Stock 10,914.85 

Timix'r Yield . .. 2,248.96* 53.94 

Total Property ^ .... .... $5,782,884.24 .1>889,671.30 

Poll Tax 23,9,52.00 5,.522.00 

Total Property and Polls 5,806,836.24 $895,193.30 

State Head Taxes 73,615.00 18,160.00 

Total .$5,880,451.24 .$913,353.30 

* Includes special warrants for collection of 1967 taxes. 

Opened the Collectoi s Office on three Friday evenings for the convenience 
of the public in obtaining motor vehicle permits (March 25) and pay- 
ing property taxes (November 18 antl 25) . 

52 



Advertised unpaid 19(i5 j^roperty taxes, and held collector's sale — 178 
accoinits offered and bought by the City for 564,481.47 — owner's have 
two )ears to redeem their pro])erty. 

Addressed and mailed 15,000 combination head and poll lax bills. 

Processed and mailed 544 sj^ecial assessment bills covering 31 projects. 

Prepared and mailed 8,782 real estate bills for Concord and Penacook. 

Entered 61 cases in small claims court against delinquent poll and head 
taxpayers. 

Issued 18,607 motor vehicle permits amounting to $241,760.23 — made 
refunds of S757.41, for a total of S241,002.82 — an increase of .$16,315.94 
o\er last year. 

CA)llected .S29,252.70 in Sj^ecial Assessments. 

Collected .S4, 952, 585. 64 in current year real estate, head and poll taxes. 

Collected .SI, 185,007.28 in jjrior year taxes, water bills and miscellaneous 
revenue. 

Collected from all sources in 1966 compared with 1965: 

1966 1965 

Number of Accounts .^ - -. 87,064 88,848 

(.loss Total - -- -- $6,408,605.85 86.004,360.14 

Refunds -43,786.07 -12.334.29 



Net Total .'li;6.364,819.78 $5,992,025.85 

The Tax Collector attended the annual meeting of tax officials con- 
ducted by the State Tax Commission, the N. H. City and Town Clerk's 
Association, and the annual meeting of the N. H. Tax Collector's Associa- 
tion. As in previous years, he headed the City Government Section for 
the (Concord United Fund Drive. 



FINANCE DEPARTMENT 

The control function in the management of the finances of the City is 
the chief responsibilit\ of the P^inance Department. Budgeting, accoimt- 
ing, and rejjorting of all exj^enditures and revenues of the City, as well 
as the custody ancl investment of all fimds, make up the daily challenge 
to the dedicated personnel of the department. An extremely efficient op- 
eration has been achieved throtigh the adoption of the present system 
recommended b) accoiniting consultants. 

Established fiscal policy provides for an annual balanced budget, and a 
projected six-year capital improvement program for the Ciity of Concord. 

Schedules in the financial section of this report set forth the activity and 
the year-end jjosition of each of the several fimds through which all the 
financial transactions of the City are handled. Below is a brief summary 
of acti\ity of each fimd during the year 1966 and condition at the end 
of the \ear. 



GENERAL FUND 

The General Eimd is the largest and most important in the operating 
budget of the Cit). It is from this fimd that expenditures are made 
for most of the essential City services, such as fire and police protection, 
sno\\- lemoval, street lighting, rej^air and cleaning, refuse collection and 
disposal, health and recreational facilities, and many other services. 

Current Surplus residting from 1966 operations amounted to 5137,671.73. 
Most of this sinplus will be used to reduce the amount to be raised by 
jjioperty taxes in 1967. 

Outstanding debt jja)able from the General Fund increased 5135,348. 
New debt amounting to 5518,000 was incurred, while maturities j)aid 
dining the year amounted to 5382,652 as detailed in the following 
schedule: 

HnUinrc Payments .\ev Debt Balmicc 

Dec. 31, 196': During 1966 Issued 1966 Dec. 31, 1966 

Municipal SI. 249.002 .S197,652 $518,000 51.569,350 

School 2.075.000 185,000 1.890.000 

Total S3.324.002 S382.652 S518.O0O S3.459.350 

Interest Rates rose dining the )ear. Our bonds sold at a rate of 3.60% 
which compares with 3% for the 1965 issue. Rates on borrowing in antic- 
ipation of taxes and other collections ranged from 3.10% in April to 
4.19% in September, compared to a high of 2.26% and a low of 2.21% 
paid in the previous year. Net interest cost for the year on the short 
term notes was 522,999 compared to .512,182 for the previous year. Total 

54 



interest paid on loni^ term debt Avas .S.H 1.790 comjjared to .S29,()45 jjaid in 
1965. 

Following is a tonij-'arison of valuations, property taxes, and tax rates 
sho^ving changes from 1965 to 1966. 

Property Taxes Raised 
F"oi Municipal Purposes 
For .School Purposes 
For Couiit\ Purposes 

Total 



196=^ 


19f>6 


Increase 
Amount Pe) 


Cent 


. S2. 185.61 3 

2.774.293 

216.095 


S2.546.660 

2.980,415 

240.484 


S36 1.047 

206.122 

24.389 




16.5 

7.4 

11.3 


.. S5. 176.001 


S5. 767. 559 


S59 1.558 


11.4 



Assessed t'alitdtioti 
For Municipal Purposes 
For Union School District 
For Pcnacook School District 
For Countv Purposes 

Trx Rates 

Municipal 

Union School District .. . 

Penacook School District 

Countv - - - --- - - - 

Total City Rate 
Total Penacook Rate 



/96i 1966 

S132.777.150 S136.970.800 

124.053.760 127.935.800 

8.764.850 9.078.450 



SI 6.4 5 

21.02 

19.24 

1.63 

.S39.10 
S37.32 



S18..58 

21.86 

20.36 

1.76 

S42.20 
S40.70 



Increase 
Amount Per Cent 
S4. 193 .650 3.2 
3.882.040 3.1 
313.600 3.6 



132.810.700 137,004.350 4.193,650 



S2.13 

.84 

1.12 

.13 

S3. 10 

S3.38 



3.2 

12.9 
4.0 
5.8 
8.0 



7.9 
9.1 



(Collections decreased percentage \\ise: the \ear ended with 15.4'^'^, of the 
current proj^erty tax levy otitstanding. compared to 12.3'^'^, outstanding at 
the end of the previotis vear. 

TRUST FUNDS 

Income recei\ed increased from 873,741 in 1965 to 577,291 in 1966. 
New trusts received amounted to SI 2,554. Gains on sale of securities 
amounted to S104,714 comparetl to S360 in 1965. Income transferred to 
General Fimd was S68.059. 



P.\RK1XG .METER FUND 

Meter Collections decreased by S86S from 557.339 in 1965 to 556,471 for 
the current year. Payment of 53.712 for meters pinchased per long term 
agreement reduced the net income from meters to 552.759, Income 
from parking penalties increased from 59.142 in 1965 to 510.193 in 1966. 

Fund Balance at the close of the vear was 511.126, a decrease of 51,055 
during the year. 

Long term debt increased from 528.000 to 544,500, and new debt of 
518,500 incurred. .Maturities amounted to 52.000. 



SANITARY SEWER FUND 

Revenue from sewer rentals totalled S92.827 compared to 390,568 realized 
in 1965, an increase of S2,259. Receipts from all sources increased by 
$1,899, from ,S1 12,223 to SI 14,122. 

The year began with a cash surplus of S93,434 and ended with $112,975, 
an increase of % 1 9,54 1 . 

Long term debt increased by S78,()00. Maturities jxiid during the year 
amounted to .S22.0()0. New debt was incurred amounting to 8100,000. 



SPECIAL ASSESSMENl FUND 

Two water extension projects were completed and two sanitary sewer 
extension i^rojects were aj^proved during 1966. 

Total receipts of this fund were S77,204. Disbursements totalled 886,986. 
Cash balance at the end of the )ear was 820,317. 

Long term debt decreased during the year from 8205,758 to 8174,071. 
New debt amounting to 818,580 was incurred. Maturities paid totalled 
$50,266. 



WAIER FUND 

Water rentals yielded a total rei>euue of .1ii300,934, which is 13.5% above 
the $265,251 realized in 1965. Receipts from all sources amounted to 
8312,645 or $31,151 more than in 1965. 

Cash surplus decreased from 8111,730 at the beginning of the \ear to 
897,497 at the close of the year. 

Net decrease of long term debt of this fund was 825,000. Matinities paid 
amounted to 825,000 in 1966. 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPLACEMENT FUND 

I)iconie from ecjuipment rentals amounted to $242,353, while operating 
expenditines and de})reciation totalled 8236,390, resulting in a net gain 
of $5,963 for the year. 

The reserve for replacement of ecjuijjment increased from 810,941 to 
815,102. Expenditures for new equij:)ment totalled 859,339; additions 
to the reserve amounted to 863,500. This fund has no outstanding debt. 



56 



TABLE OF CONTENTS - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 



(.ENERAL Fl \D 

ApproiJiiatloiis & Exptiuliturts 62-6 

lia lance Sheet ^ - 

Cimeiit Smpliis . . . .„ . 

Lono I eiin Debt 

Ri\eiuies 



HOM) FIND — GENERAL 

Balance Sheet ..... ... 58-59 

Disposition of Proceeds 71 





SANITARY SE^\ER FIND 




62-67 


Balance Sheet 


75 


58-59 


Long Term Debt ... 


. 68-69 


60 


Operating Statement 


76 


68-69 






60-61 







SPEC:L\L ASSESSMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet 
Long Term Debt 
Receipts & Expenditures 



68-69 
73 



TRl ST FUNDS 

Balance Sheet 
Cihanges in lialaiices 



)8-59 
70 



PARKING METER FUND 
Balance Sheet 
Long Term Debt 
Re\enues i<.- Expenditures 



76 

68-69 



EQL IPMENT MAINTENANCE 
& REPLACEMENT FUND 

Balance Sheet . 

Ciash Surplus . . . . . . 

()|:)erating Statement . 

Statement of Reserve .Account 



lA-1 



W ATER FUND 

B.ilance Sheet 78 

Bond Fund 78 

Lung Term Debt 68-69 

Revenues & Expenditures 78-79 



0/ 



BALANCE SHEET 



GENERAL AND RELATED FUNDS 

December 31, 1966 



GENERAL FUND .VSSET.S 
Cash : 

Mechanicks National Bank-General Acct. 
Concord National Bank-General .-Xccl. 
Concord National Bank-Payroll Acct. 
Cash in Other Banks-General Account 
Imprest Funds 

Cash for Payment of Bonds & Coupons 
Temporary Investments 



Taxes Receivable: 
Current Year Levy-Property 
Current Year Le\y-Polls 

Total Current Year 

Less: Reserve for Abatements 

Prior Year Levies-Property 

Prior Year Levies-Polls 

Tax Liens Bought by City-L^nredeemed 

Total Prior Years & Unredeemed 
Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Accounts Recewahle: 
Water &: Sewer Rentals 
Departmental Receivables 
Cemetery Receivables 
Trunk Storm Sewer Assessments 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Stores Account: 

Public Works Mat. & Supplies ln\. 
Stationery & Supplies Inventory 
Postage Meter Inventory 

Less: Reserves for Non-Realization 

Tax Deeded Properties: 

Less: Reserve for Non-Realization 

State Head Taxes Receivable: 

Total General Fund Assets 





13.500.92 

5,444.86 

15,000.00 

12,000.00 

1 ,2")9. 1 1 

592.00 

746,102.19 


793,899.38 


889,671.30 
5,522.00 


872,948.25 
34,796.56 




895,193.30 
22,245.05 




24,659.45 

108.00 

57,994.27 




82,761.72 
47,965.16 


907,744.81 


117,961.44 

23,347.56 

2,723.00 

1.273.00 


145,305.00 
27,343.56 






117,961.44 


80.635.97 

7,846.54 

258.61 


88,741.12 
88,741.12 










783.19 
783.19 








18.400.00 




1,838,005.63 



TRUST FUND ASSETS 



In\estments 

Cash-Concord National Bank 



992,099.72 

4,729.16 996.828.88 



*CAPITOL FUND ASSETS 



Debt Requirements-Municipal 
Debt Requirements-School 



1,569,350.07 

1,890,000.00 3.459,350.07 



58 



BOND FUND ASSETS 

Cash-Concoul National Hank 
Temporal \ Investments 
Accoimts Receivable 

GRAND TOTAL - ASSETS 
* Does not include Debt Payable from Water, Sewer. 
Parking Meter or Special Assessment Funds. 



.S3. 8.5 1.78 
593.462.97 

7,138.00 634.4."i2.73 



6.928,637.33 



GENERAL FUND LL\BILITIES 

Area tints Payable: 

Unprescnted Bonds & Goupons 
Payroll Deductions Payable 
Current Vouchers Payable 

I 'ucxpeuded Approlniatioiis: 

l^nion School District-Operating .\cct. 
Interest-Union School District-Bonds i>L- Notes 
Reserve for Encumbrances 
Merrimack X'alley School District 

Due la Other Fnnds: 
Water Funds 
Sanitary Sewer Fund 
Parking Meter Fund 
Equipment Maintenance & Replacement Fund 

A (It 'a nee Deposits : 

Taxes Due to State of A'. H.: 
Head Taxes 
Timber Yield Tax-a/c Debt Retirement Fund 

Total General Fund Liabilities 

Curt en t Surplus: 

Total (.eneral Fund Liabilities S: Surplus 

TRUST FUND LIABILITIES 

Principal 
Accumulated Income 



CAPITAL FUND LIABILITIES 



592.00 
6,899.56 
109,070.38 116.561.94 



1 .220,269.62 
26,595.00 
63,4.55.21 
46,134.06 1.3.56.453.89 



81,719.96 
86.886.37 
11,126.33 
25,227.97 



21,128.50 
518.11 



204,960.63 
710.83 



21,646.61 

1 ,700,333.90 

137,671.73 

1.838.005.63 



950,618.38 
46,210.50 996,828.88 



Bonded Debt 

Advance bv State for Airport Construction 



3,449,546.00 

9,804.07 3,459,350.07 



BOND FUND LIABILITIES 
Reserve for Constr. or Eciuipment Authorized 512,075.74 

Reserve for Encumbrances 122,377.01 



GRAND TOTAL 



LIABILITIES 



634,452.75 
6,928,637.33 



59 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT SURPLUS GENERAL FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 

Unappropriated Balance. December 31, 1965 98,109.23 

Applied to 1966 Budget 95,000.00 

Balance Remaining 3,109.23 

1966 Budget Surplus: 

UnenciUTibered Balance of Appropriations 
Revenue in Excess of Estimates 

Plus:Unenciunbered Balances of Prior Year Appropriations 
Excess Reserve Liquidated: 

Reserve against Tax Deeded Property 

Sub Total 

Less: Additional Reserves Set Up: 

To increase reserve against Prior Year Taxes to 100% 
To increase reserve for Non-Reali/ation of Stores 

Accounts to 100% 
To increase reserve for Non-Realization of 

Accounts Receivable 

Unappropriated Surplus. December 31, 1966 
Less: Amount Reserved for Adjustment 

Amount Available for Reduction of 1967 Tax Levy 



136,863.55 
26,538.69 


163,402.24 


17,058.71 




86.74 


17,145.45 




183,656.92 


31.914.11 




6,625.30 




7,445.78 


45,985.19 


137,671.73 
12,671.73 




125,000.00 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 



Local Taxes-Exc. Curr. Yr. Prop. & Polls 
Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Prop. 
Added Taxes, Prior Yrs.-Poll 
Interest, Penalties & Costs 
Auto Permits 

Rent & Profit Tax Deeded Prop. 
Timber Severance Tax 



Budget 


Revenues 




Estimate 


Realized 


Excess Deficiency 




649.07 


649.07 


500.00 


928.00 


428.00 


16,000.00 


17,185.94 


1,185.94 


214,000.00 


241,002.82 


27,002.82 




9,390.55 


9,390.55 


1 .200.00 


1,874.13 


674.13 



231,700.00 271,030.51 39,330.51 



State Tax Contributions 

Railroad Tax 1,000.00 2,670.64 1,670.64 

Savings Bank Tax 32,000.00 34,285.47 2,285.47 

Interest & Dividend Tax 92,000.00 98,613.88 6,613.88 

Loss of Taxes-State Forest Lands 40.00 584.98 544.98 



125,040.00 136.154.97 11,114.97 
60 



Licenses & Permits 



Budget Rexienues 
Estimate Realized Excess Deficiency 



Bicycle Registrations 


550.00 


478.00 




72.00 


Taxi Licenses 


400.00 


910.50 


510.50 




Health Licenses 


580.00 


576.00 




4.00 


Amusement Licenses 


2.350.00 


2,627.75 


277.75 




Police & Protective Licenses 


270.00 


416.00 


146.00 




Prof. & Occupational Licenses 


60.00 


44.00 




16.00 



4,210.00 



5,052.25 



934.25 



Registration Fees & Permits 
Marriage Licenses 
Recording Fees-Legal Documents 
Filing Fees 

Sundry Fees-City Clerk 
Dog Licenses 



Departmental Service Charges 
Rent of Buildings 
Comfort Station Concessions 
Golf Fees 

Memorial Field Royalties & Concess. 
Other Recr. Dept. Revenues 
Police Dept. Ambulance Charges 
Airport-Rent 
Airport-Concessions 
Fines & Forfeits 
Misc. Dept. Service Charges 
Weights & Measures Fees 
Comm. on Head Tax Collections 
Community Center Revenue 



Unclassified 
Interest Income 
Sale of Property 

Sub. Div. Assess. Prior Yrs. Constr. 
Sale of Ordinances 
All Other 
Pavmcnt in Lieu of Taxes 



TOTAL MISC. REVENUES 



92.00 



1 ,200.00 


1,245.00 


45.00 




4,000.00 


4,667.00 


667.00 




100.00 


121.00 


21.00 




1 ,500.00 


2,029.50 


529.50 




4,700.00 


5.070.70 


370.70 




11,500.00 


13,133.20 


1,633.20 




2,600.00 


1,688.10 




911.90 


650.00 


605.76 




44.24 


14.900.00 


14,623.50 




276.50 


300.00 


250.00 




50.00 


1,000.00 


481.88 




518.12 


950.00 


1,223.00 


273.00 




15,318.00 


15,617.96 


299.96 




122.00 


82.38 




39.62 


22,500.00 


28,252.12 


5,752.12 




2,350.00 


2,448.04 


98.04 




500.00 


675.55 


175.55 




6,600.00 


6,002.50 




597.50 


1,500.00 


1,284.81 




215.19 


69,290.00 


73.235.60 


6,598.67 


2,653.07 


5,000.00 


11,595.26 


6,595.26 




500.00 


39.76 




460.24 


160.00 


480.00 


320.00 




10.00 


6.00 




4.00 


40.00 


17.55 




22.45 




734.81 


734.81 




5,710.00 


12,873.38 


7,650.07 


486.69 


447,450.00 


511,479.91 


67,261.67 


3,231.76 



Current Year Property & Polls 
Property Tax 
Poll Tax 
National Bank Stock Tax 



TOTAL REVENUES 



5,764,140.49 5,725,182.32 38,958.17 

21,800.00 21,352.00 448.00 

9,000.00 10,914.95 1,914.95 



5,794,940.49 5,757,449.27 1,914.95 39,406.17 
6,242,390.49 6,268,929.18 69,176.62 42,637.93 



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IS 



EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE & REPLACEMENT FUND 

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 



Equipment Eaniings: 

Operatitig Expenditures: 
Direct Labor 
Indirect Labor 
Leaves & Longevity 
Building Repairs 
Gasoline, Oil Jt Antifreeze 
Repair Parts 
Tires 
Batteries 
Misc. Hardware 
Grease & Lubricants 
Supplies 
Hand Tools 
Fuel & Utilities 
Insurance 

Retirement Gontri but ions 
Shop Equipment 



44,04.5.62 

25,198.38 

7,282.86 

832.98 

16.777.16 

46,249.36 

7,599.58 

1,181.77 

2,530.10 

91.80 

2,697.26 

749.17 

6,097.72 

6,801.27 

6,828.11 

155.46 



242,353.52 



175.118.60 



Depreciation 

Net Gain for Period 



61,271.79 236.390.39 



5,963.13 



Assets: 

Equipment 

Due from General Fund 



BALANCE SHEET 

December 31. 1966 



797,005.16 
25,227.97 



822,233.13 



Liabilities cr Funds: 
Mmiicipal In\estment 
Capital Reserve Fund 
Surplus, Deccmljer 31, 1966 



797,568.95 
23,197.04 
1,467.14 822,233.13 



STATEMENT OF CASH SURPLUS 

Net Operating Profit for 1966, as abo\e 
Deficit, December 31, 1965 

Acciuiiulated Surplus, December 31, 1966 



5,963.13 
4,495.99 



1,467.14 



.STATEMENT OF RESER\E ACCOUNT 
Balance, Januarv 1, 1966 

Additiotis: 

Depreciation 61,271.79 

Equipment Sold 2,228.85 



55.736.94 



63,500.64 
119,237.58 



74 



Equipment Purchase (as per detail) 
Current Year 
Prior Year (1965) 

Balance, December 31, 1966 



51,244.10 
44,796.44 



DET.ML OF EQUIPMENT PURCH.\SED 



2 Pick-up Trucks 

1 Crew Cab Pick-up 
.'5 Sedans 

3 One Ton Dumps 

2 21/^ Ton Dumps 



3,317.00 5 Five-Ton Dumps 

2,494.00 I Truck Tractor 

5,976.51 1 Tow Behind Compressor 

9,226.00 1 Tilt Top Trailer 

7,424.72 1 Tractor with Mower 

1 Sidewalk Tractor 



96,040.54 



23,197.04 



49,843.37 
9,688.00 
2,249.10 
1,321.68 
3,655.40 
844.76 

96,040.54 



BALANCE SHEET — SANITARY SEWER FUND 

December 31. 1966 



ASSETS 



Fixed Assets: 

Land & Right of Way 

Sewer Mains 

Manholes 

Customer Connections 

Sundry Equipment 

Unfinished Construction 



Less: Reserve for Depreciation 

Deferred Engineering Charges 

Bond Fund Assets: 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fund 

Investments 

Loan to Special Assessment Fund 



38,274.97 

1,471,620.15 

217,488.45 

243,283.61 

9,618.60 

566.54 

1,980,852.32 
866,926.58 1.113,925.74 



11,678.40 
99,642.41 

86,886.37 
32,881.76 
13.544.42 133,312.55 



1,358,559.10 



LIABILITIES & FUNDS 



Long Term Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 

Share in Special Assessments 



134,000.00 
15,567.71 



149,567.71 



Fund Balance & Surplus: 
Municipal Investment 
Contributions in Aid of Construction 
Surplus Balance: Jan. 1, 1966 
Net Profit for the vear 1966 



464,871.96 
310,322.23 
396,200.96 
37,596.24 433,797.20 1,208,991.39 



1,358.559.10 



/£> 



STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS — SANITARY SEWER FUND 

For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 

OPERATING REVENUES 

Sewer Rents: 

General 66,911.66 

Industrial 25,915.37 92,827.03 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

General Operalions, Admin., etc.: 

Main and Manhole Operating Expense 15,737.87 

House Conn. Operating Expense 4,050.67 

Maintenance of Mains 3.501.69 

Maintenance of Manholes 3,067.12 

Misc. General Expense 207.10 

Meter Reading & Billings 2,634.07 

Employees Retirement Fund 1,733.66 30,932.18 



Depreciation 24,232.68 55,164.86 

Operating Income 37,662.17 

Add: Non-Operating Income: 

Interest on In\cstments 1,556.30 



39,218.47 



Deduct: Non-Operating Expenses: 

Interest Expense 1,622.23 

Net Profit for the Year 37,596.24 



BALANCE SHEET — PARKING METER FUND 

December 31, 1966 
Assets: 

Due from General Fund 11,126.33 

Debt Recjuiremcnts — Special Assessment 4,996.30 

Debt Requirements — Other 44,500.00 60,622.63 

Liabilities: 

Bonded Debt 44,500.00 

Share in Special Assessments 4,996.30 

Unappropriated C:urrent Surplus 11,126.33 60,622.63 

76 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES AND EXPENDITURES 
PARKING METER FUND 



Cdsh lialniice 



For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 
januarv 1 , 196(i 



Rcx'cnues: 

Meter Collections — On Street 
Meter Collections — Off Street 
Parking Penalties 



43,177.99 
9,570.62 
10,193.00 



12,180.91 



62,941.61 



75,122.52 



OlH'iiitiiig Expenditures: 
On Street 

Meter Repairs & Maintenance 

Enforcement 

Collecting and Accounting 

Marking Pa%ements 

Insurance 

Retirement C ion tri but ions 

Off Street 

Meter Repairs 

Enforcement 

Clollections 

Marking Pa\emeiits 

Maintenance of Parking Areas 

Lighting 

Insurance ^- Miscellaneous 

Retirement Contributions 



Debt Sen'ice — Off Street;, Areas: 
Payment of Bonds 
Interest on Bonds 



5,038.89 




14,120.82 




1,680.13 




164.35 




259.88 




1,376.73 


22.640.80 


1.268.92 




7.250.93 




735.04 




1,300.00 




2,573.20 




1,997.55 




138.18 




413.16 


15,676.98 


2,000.00 




1,093.75 


3,093.75 



Share of Sfyecial Assessment Projects: 
Principal 

Caf)ital Outlay: 

Equipment — On Street 

Construction & Equipment — Off Street 

Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance — December 31, 1966 



436.10 
7,315.85 



14,832.71 



7,751.95 



63,996.19 



11,126.33 



// 



BALANCE SHEET — WATER FUND 

December 31. 1966 



ASSETS 

Fixed Assets: 

\Vatcr & Flowage Rights 

Land 

Structures 

Pumping S: Purification Equipment 

Distribution Mains, Services, Hydrants &.- Meters 

Other Equipment and Garage Equipment 

Misc. Expenditures during Construction 

Emergency Pumping Station Facilities 



Less: Reserved for Depreciation 

Current Assets: 

Due from General Fimd 

Investments 

Bond Construction Account 

Materials & Supplies — In\entorv 



LIABILITIES AND FUNDS 

Long Term Liabilities: 
Bonded Debt 
Share in Special Assessment Projects 

Fund Balance and Siirphis: 
Municipal Investment 
Contributions in Aid of Construction 

Surplus — Balance Jan. 1. 1966 900,357.66 

Net Profit for the year 1966 23,848.29 



167,663.11 
211,975.37 
529,894.13 

92,170.13 
1,881,261.27 

83,736.35 

18,128.49 

89,030.67 

3,073,859.52 
907,604.17 2.166,255.35 



81,719.96 

16,023.63 

536.24 

61,182.83 



110,000.00 
31,967.19 



963,194.74 
296,350.13 



159,462.66 



2,325.718.01 



141,967.19 



924,205.95 2,183,750.82 



2.325,718.01 



BOND FUND, WATER — DISPOSITION OF PROCEEDS 
For the Year Ended December 31, 1966 

Unexpended Balance. December 31, 1965 32,306.97 

Expenditures — Office Building Construction 31.770.73 

Unexpended Balance December 31, 1966 536.24 



STATEMENT OF OPERATION — WATER FUND 

For the year ended December 31, 1966 



OPERATING REVENUE 



Commercial Sales — Flat Rate 
Commercial Sales — Metered 
Industrial Sales — Metered 
Miscellaneous Water Revenues 



3.036.26 

243,205.60 

54,468.09 

223.65 



300,933.60 



78 



OPERATING EXPENSES 

Water Siipf)ly: 

Source of Supply Labor 3,297.00 

Pumping Station Labor 3L366.75 

Purification Labor 5,380.63 

Miscellaneous Labor 2,370.84 

Gravity System Supplies & Expenses 32.77 

Piniiping Stations Supplies & Expenses 3,699.73 

Purification System Supplies & Expenses 8,942.84 

Power Purchased 26,057.21 

Repairs to Water Supply Structures & Equip. 416.40 

Repairs to Pumping Station Str. & Equip. 3,014.01 

Repairs to Purification Str. &: Equip. 511.91 85,090.09 

Distribiilion: 

Distribution Wages 43,683.82 

Meter Department Labor 7,620.20 

Meter Department Supplies & Expenses 163.69 

Other Supplies and Expenses 1,207.28 

Repairs to Structures 389.17 

Repairs to Mains 1,678.80 

Repairs to Services 3,489.89 

Repairs to Hydrants 2,166.62 

Repairs to Meters 2,818.11 63,217.58 

Administration: 

Commercial Office Salaries 4,070.63 

Meter Reading Salaries 10,524.98 

Commercial Supplies &: Expenses 2,253.09 

Salary of General Officer 10,350.00 

Salary of General Office Clerk 5,600.00 

General Office Expense 2,293.81 

Repairs to General Office Str. JL- Equip. 517.40 

General Expense 5,890.77 

Insurance 6,350.72 

Longevity, Annual & Sick Lea\es 11,558.77 

Retirement Fund Payments 12,635.67 

Stores Dept. & Shop Expense 2.401.52 

Garage Expense 1,655.72 

Stationery & Printing 8.10 76.111.18 

Fixed Charges: 

Depreciation 50,634.99 

Taxes 40.70 50,675.69 

Total Operatijig Expenses 
Operating Income 

Son-Operating Income: 

Income from In\ested Funds 2,064.70 

Miscellaneous Income 956.46 

Interest on Extension 13.11 



Son-Operating Expense: 
Interest Expense 

Net Profit for the year 



275,094.54 
25,839.06 



3.034.27 
28,873.33 

5,025.04 
23,848.29 



79 



DU'ISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 

STATE TAX COMMISSION 

Concord, Ne\\' Hampshire 

June 26, 1967 

Certificate of Audit 

This is to certih that we have examined and audited the accounts and 
records of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1966. In our opinion, the Exhibits included herewith reflect the true 
financial condition of the City on December 31, 1966, together with the 
residts of operations for the fiscal year ended on that date. 

Resjjectfully submitted, 

Harold G. Fowler 
Director 

DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 

O. Maurice Oleson ) 

Lionel J. DeGrace ) 

Edgar O. Pasquera ) Auditors 

Hugh J. Cassidy ) 



DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL .ACCOUNTING 

STATE TAX CO.MMISSION 

Concord, New Hampshire 

June 26, 1967 

1 o the Mayor and Board ol .\ldermen 
Concord, New Hampshire 

Gentlemen: 

Submitted herewith is the report of an examination and audit of the 
accounts of the City of Concord for the fiscal year ended December 31, 
1966, which was made by this Division as requested. Exhibits as here- 
after listed are included as part of the report. 

Scope of Audit 

The accounts and records of all city officials charged with the custody, 
receipt and disbinsement of city funds were examined and audited. 
An examination was made of a sufficient number of \ouchers, payrolls 
and cancelled checks to satisfy the requirements of accepted standards 
of audit procedure. Receij^ts were checked by somxe insofar as possible. 
Book balances were verified by com]:arison with reconciled bank balances 
made from statements obtained from depository banks. 

80 



Comparathe Balance Sheets {Rej>enue Accounts) — December 31 , 1965 — 

December 31, 1966: (Exhibit A-1) 

Comparative Balance Slieets (Revenue Accoinits) tor the fiscal years 
ended December 31, 1965 and December 31, 1966, are presented in 
Exhibit A-1. As indicated therein, the Surplus increased bv 539,562.50, 
from 598,109.23 to 5137,671.73, in 1966. 

Analysis of Change in Current Financial Conditions: (Exhibit A-2) 

An analysis of the change in the current financial condition of the 
City during the year is made in Exhibit A-2, with the factors which 
caused the change indicated therein. These were as follows: 

Increase in Surplus 

Net Budget Surplus SI 80.460.95 

Decrease in Reser\e Against Tax Deeded Property . . . 86.74 



5180,547.69 



Decrease in Surplus 

Surplus Used to Reduce Tax Rate S95.000.00 

Increase in Reserve Against .\ctoiuits Recei\able . 7.445.78 

Increase in Reser\e .\gainst Stores .\ccoimts 6,625.30 

Increase in Reser\e .Against Prior Years' Property, Poll Jc 

Unredeemed Taxes . _.. . . . - .. 31,914.11 



140.985.19 



Xet Increase 



S 39,562.50 



Increase in Long Term Ifidebtedness: 

The long term indebtedness of the City (including Mimicipal. 
Water and Union District indebtedness) increased by 5173,161.59 in 
1966, as shown herewith: 



Municipal 

Water .... 

School (Union School Dist.) 
.\irport .\th ance (Due State) 



I.vng Term 


Bonds 


Bonds 


Long Term 


Debt 


L- Notes 


i~ Notes 


Debt 


December 


Issued 


Retired 


December 


31, 196^ 


in 1966 


in 1966 


31. 1965 


81,457.860.00 


5640.660.00 


5252.560.00 


51,845.960.00 


203,761.60 


14.420.00 


42,024.20 


176,157.40 


2.075.000.00 




185,000.00 


1.890.000.00 


12.138.28 




2,334.21 


9,804.07 


53,748,759.88 


5655,080.00 


5481,918.41 


53,921,921.47 



Statement of Long Term Indebtedness: (Exhibit A-6) 

A statement of outstanding long term indebtedness as of December 
31, 1966, showing annual debt service requirements, is contained in 
Exhibit A-6. 



d 



Comparative Statements of Appropriations and Expenditures — Estimated 

and Actual Revenues: (Exhibits A-4 & A-5) 

Comparative statements of aj^projiiiations and expenditures, es- 
timatetl and actual revenues for the fiscal year ended December 31, 1966, 
are presented in Exhibits A-4 and A-5. As indicated by the budget 
summary (Exhibit A-5) , iniexpended balances of appropriations of 
.'!!; 153,922.26, plus a revenue surplus of S26,538.69, resulted in a net budget 
surplus of 1180,460.95. 

Tax Collections: 

Tax collections (exclusive of State Head Taxes) of the current 
year's levy as comparecl to taxes assessed, for the years 1965 and 1966 were 
as follows: 





Levy of 196^ 


Percent 


l,e7'y of 1966 


Percent 


Taxes Assessed — Current 
Year's Levy . .. 


$5,229,807.53 




S5,820,804.42 




Taxes Collected — Current 
Year's Levy 


S4.560,544.55 


87.2% 


84,900.918.7! 


84.2% 


Taxes Abated — Current 
Year's Levy 


23,095.24 


.4% 


24,690.41 


■4% 


Uncollected Taxes — Current 
Years Levy 


646,167.74 


12.4% 


895,195.30 


15.4% 




15,229,807.53 


100.0% 


$5,820,804.42 


100.0% 



Cottclusion: 

The provisions of Chapter 184, of the Laws of 1955, recjuire that this 
report or the summary of findings and recommendations (letter of 
transmittal) shall be published in the next annual report of the City. 

We extend our thanks to the officials of the City of Concord and 
their office staffs for the assistance rendered during the course of the 



audit. 



Yours very truly, 

Harold G. Fowler 

Director 
DIVISION OF MUNICIPAL ACCOUNTING 
STATE TAX COMMISSION 



O. Maurice Oleson ) 

Lionel J. DeGrace ) 

Edgar O. Pesquera ) Auditors 

Hugh J. Cassidy ) 



82 





1966 marked the observance of the 100th anniversary of the 

foimding of Christian Science by one-time prominent Concord 

resident Mary Baker Eddy. 



83 




The Door of City Hall 

As Near as Your Telephone 

Be sure to give your NAME AND AD- 
DRESS as well as the NATURE OF THE 
REQUEST clearly. DO NOT HANG UP until 
you are sure that your MESSAGE HAS BEEN 
UNDERSTOOD. 



A TELEPHONE DIRECTORY OF CITY SERVICES 



Service 
Administration, General 
Airport (Maintenance) 
Ambulance 
Assessments 
Auditorium, Rental 
Auto Permits 
Bicycle Licenses 
Birth Certificates 
Bookmobile 
Building Permits 
Cemeteries 
Civil Defense 
Dance Licenses 
Death Certificates 
Dog Licenses 
Elections 
Engineering 
FIRE 

Golf Course 
Health, Public 
Library 
Maps, City 
Marriage Certificates 
Milk Licenses & Inspection 
Mortgages & Conditional Sales 
Oil Burner Inspection 
Old Age Assistance 
Ordinances it Resolutions 
Parks & Playgrounds 
Payments, by City 
Personnel, City 
Planning 

Plumbing Permits 
POLICE 
Purchasing 
Recreation & Parks 
Refuse Collection 
Sanitation, Public 
Sewe rs 

Snow Plowing & Sanding 
Street Lights. Reported Out 
Street Maintenance 
Taxes, Payment of 
Trees, City 
Water, Service 
Water Bills, Payment of 
Weights & Measures 
Welfare, Concord 

Penacook 
Zoning Permits & Changes 



Department Phone 

Mayor 224-2391 

Engineering 224-1955 

Police 225-2706 

Assessors 224-0241 

City Clerk 224-0591 

Collector 224-4261 

Police 225-2706 

City Clerk 224-0591 

Library 225-2743 

Building & Inspection 224-2397 

Cemetery 225-3911 

Civil Defense 224-4342 

Licensing Board (Mayor) 224-2391 

City Clerk 224-0591 

City Clerk 224-0591 

City Clerk 224-0591 

Engineering 224-1955 

FIRE 225-3355 

Recreation k Parks 224-0951 

Health 224-0521 

Library 225-2743 

Engineering 224-1955 

City Clerk 224-0591 

Health 224-0521 

City Clerk 224-0591 

Building & Inspection 224-2397 

Welfare 224-1091 

City Clerk 224-0591 

Recreation & Parks 224-0951 

Finance 225-2775 

Personnel 224-2111 

Planning 224-1955 

Building & Inspection 224-2397 

POLICE 225-2706 

Purchasing 224-2111 

Recreation & Parks 224-0951 

Public Works 224-1955 

Health 224-0521 

Public Works 224-1955 

Public Works 224-1955 

Concord Electric Co. 225-3641 

Public Works 224-1955 

Collector 224-4261 

Engineering 224-1955 

Water 225-5574 

Collector 224-4261 

Building & Inspection 224-2397 

Welfare 224-1091 

Overseer of the Poor 753-4211 

Engineering 224-1955 



For prompt SERVICE dial the DEPARTMENT 
INVOLVED. If you are uncertain about where to 
call, dial the MAYOR'S OFFICE, Z24-2391 . 



w«^; 








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A SPOT OF BEAUTY AT 
A BUSY INTERSECTION 

In 1961 the Board of Aldermen designated the inter- 
section of Broadway, South and Clinton Streets as McKee 
Square. This year the tip of the triangle between Broadway 
and South Street, former site of Gifford's Store, was land- 
scaped and rededicated on October 1, in honor of the late 
Concord Mayor Charles J. McKee.