(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures : with report of the selectmen and other town officers"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofrehyde10 



TENTH -.ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOW. OF HYDE PARK, 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF THE 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS, 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31st, 1878. 




HYDE PARK: 

PRESS OF THE NOKFOLK COUNTY GAZETTE, 

1878. 



TENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF THE 
PUBLIC LIBRARY, AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS, 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31st, 1878. 




HYDE PARK: 

PRESS OF THE NORFOLK COUNTY GAZETTE, 

1878. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 

For the year ending March 4th, 1878. 



SELECTMEN, SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS, OVERSEERS OF THE POOR AND BOARD 

OF HEALTH : 

EDWIN R. WALKER, CHARLES L. FARNSWORTH, 

AMOS H. BRAINARD. 

assessors: 

RANDOLPH P. MOSELEY, JOEL F. GOODWIN, 

JOHN M. TWICHELL. 

town clerk: 
HENRY B. TERRY. 

town treasurer: 
HENRY S. BUNTON. 

collector: 
HENRY A. RICH. 

school committee: 

R. W. HUSTED term expires 1880 

Rev. FRANCIS C. WILLIAMS . . term expires 1880 

HOBART M. CABLE term expires 1879 

W. H. H. ANDREWS term expires 1879 

HENRY C. CHAMBERLAIN term expires 1878 

EDWARD M. LANCASTER term expires 1878 

SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS : 

HENRY GREW, WILLIAM J. STUART, 

HENRY BLASDALE, chosen to fill vacancy caused by the resigna- 
tion of Alpheus P. Blake. 

auditors : 
BENJAMIN C. VOSE, HOWARD M. HAMBLIN, 

D. W. C. ROGERS chosen to fill vacancy caused by resignation of 

B. H. Jones. 

constables : 

E. W. MOFFATT, CHARLES JACOBS, W. H. CUMMINGER, 

JEROME MATTHEWSON, BEN J. F. KIDDER, 

JEREMIAH CORBETT, REUBEN CORSON. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES : 

WILLIAM HEUSTIS. 

FIRE department: 

WILLIAM U. FAIRBAIRN, Chief Engineer, 
LEVI A. RUNNELLS and WARREN W. HILTON, Asst. Engineers. 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Aim shouse 30 

Applicants for aid 29 

Appropriations for the current year 44 

Auditors certificate 46 

Births 50 

Board of Health, Report of.. . 11 

By-Laws 65 

Collector of Taxes, Report of \ 41 

Deaths , . , . . 54 

Debt of town 44 

Engineers , Report of 47 

Evening Schools 15 

Exempt from taxation, List of property 96 

Expenditures, Detailed Statement of 13 

" for the current year 44 

Eire Department 23 

" " List of officers 49 

Fires, List of 48 

Fuel and Janitors (Schools) , 14 

Gravel land 28 

Highways, Expenditures on 20 

Incidentals, " lor 17 

Insane persons 29 

License law .... 10 

Marriages 50 

Massachusetts School Fund, Expenditures from Income of 15 

Officers, List of town 5 

Overseers oi the Poor, Act of 1877 concerning 34 

" " " Reportof 29 

Pauperism, Increase of 31 

Persons aided by town, List of 37 

Police, Expenditures for. , 26 

" Report of Chief 57 

Poor, Expenditures on Account of. 25 

Public Library, Expenses of 28 

" " Report of Treasurer of 64 

" " " Trustees of. 58 

Salaries of town officers 27 

Schools (Teachers' Salaries) 13 

School Committee, Report of. 99 

School Incidental Expenses 16 

Selectmen, Report of. 7 

Settlement, Laws of. 31 

Sinking Fund, Report of Commissioners of 45 

Street lamps 9 

Taxation, rate of 96 

Tax Payers, List of Resident..... 73 

" " " Non-Resident 87 

Town Clerk, Report of .... 50 

Town Hall 9 

Town Property, Schedule of 46 

Town Treasurer, Report of 42 

Tramps 31 

Unexpended Balance Account 44 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Fellow Citizens : — 

Although an examination of the reports of the various de- 
partments, as set forth under their appropriate heads, will in- 
form every citizen in what manner the money appropriated 
has been expended, during the past year ; yet in accordance 
with established custom, the Selectmen present for your con- 
sideration, the following statement of facts. 

HIGHWAYS. 

A large amount of work has been done upon the principal 
streets of the town. 

River street throughout its entire length has been covered 
with screened gravel, and is in excellent condition ; Hyde 
Park, and Central Park Avenues, have also received extensive 
repairs. 

On Fairmount, Williams Avenue has been thoroughly re- 
built, a large culvert of iron and stone pipe constructed from 
the corner of Summit street, to a point below the Blake school 
house, and the large accumulation of water at this point, is 
now safely conducted under ground, thus avoiding the liability 
of washouts, which in the past, have been a source of frequent 
expense to the town. 

Considerable work has been done on Milton, Fairmount, 
Williams, Neponsef, and Dana Avenues, and many of the less 
traveled streets in the town have received our attention dur- 
ing the past year. 

It is the opinion of strangers, as well as of our own citizens, 
that our streets are now in better condition than in the 
neighboring towns, and a moderate expenditure each year 
will keep them in good order. 



8 

All of the bridges are believed to be in a safe condition, 
and no extra expenditure on their account is anticipated dur- 
ing the coming year. 

We would suggest the propriety of dividing the highway 
appropriations, setting aside each year a certain sum for the 
purpose of re-building sidewalks, an improvement in this di- 
rection would be appreciated by every citizen, it being a well 
recognized fact that at the present time our streets offer 
superior attractions to the pedestrian, than the sidewalks pro- 
per in many sections of the town. 

A large stone culvet has been built on the east side of 
Fairmount Avenue, at its intersection with Beacon street ; 
and if as is confidently expected this proves to be a substan- 
tial improvement, a similar culvert should be built at the 
corner of Fairmount Avenue and Water street. 

During the past year all of the maps and plans of the 
streets, have been carefully copied on cloth, and filed in a 
convenient manner for ready reference ; the originals should 
now be placed in a fire proof vault, as their loss would occa- 
sion not only great inconvenience, but in the future, posibly a 
considerable expense, should the question of street lines re- 
quire the inspection of the original plans. 

The town having by vote on several accasions authorized 
the Selectmen to purchase gravel land suitable for use on the 
streets, in October last we purchased 52,307 feet of land at 
an expense of $1,733.97. This land is favorably situated 
on Providence street with entrances also from West and 
Arlington streets, the gravel is the best in town, having been 
used on many of our principal streets during the past year 
and we have no doubt that when the gravel is removed, the 
land will be worth more for building purposes than the origi- 
nal cost. 

GUIDE BOARDS. 

We are compelled to admit that our guide boards are not 
altogether a credit to the town, nearly all of them require re- 
painting ; quite a large number are so defaced that they should 



9 

be replaced by new ones, and there are several important 
points destitute of the proper signs, as required by law. 

In making the estimates for the coming year this subject 
should not be overlooked ; we would add that it was our in- 
tention to have remedied these defects, but the large expendi- 
tures on the highways, prevented the completion of our plans 
in this particular. 

STREET LAMPS. 

We have now 142 lamps, which are lighted at an expense 
of $ 1 7,oo§ each, yearly by the Globe Gas Light Co., of Boston. 
We are fully satisfied with the services rendered during the 
past year, the light is excellent in quality, the lamps promptly 
lighted, and the lanterns kept in good order ; but few com- 
plaints, have been received, and in every instance, when re- 
ported to the Agent, immediate attention has been given, 
and the cause for complaint removed. 

We would suggest that a separate appropriation be made 
for this branch of the public service. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

We have nothing to add to the report of the Engineers, as 
published, except to second the suggestions embodied in 
their report, as their practical knowledge of the wants of the 
department, render their opinions worthy of careful consid- 
eration. 

TOWN HALL. 

During the past year $662.00 has been received from 
rentals less expenses incurred for repairs, care of building, &c, 
$327.19 ; net amount paid to Town Treasurer, $33481. We 
have been to some expense for plans and specifications, in 
view of the proposed alterations of the lower hall into the offices 
for the use of the Town Officials ; but the town having voted at 
its last meeting not to appropriate money to carry out the pro 
visions of its former action, the matter of remodelling has been 
indefinitely postponed. 



10 



INCIDENTALS. • , 

The impression seems to prevail in certain quarters, that 
the incidentals are wholly under the control of the Selectmen, 
and that it is a convenient account in which to cover such 
expenditures as might not meet with the approval of the citi- 
zens ; we desire to call especial attention to it. 

It will be seen that but a small proportion of the items 
therein, originated with our Board, and none of them are of 
doubtful necessity. 

The Selectmen may indeed, refuse to approve a bill, but it 
is very seldom that one is presented, which can be danied ap- 
proval, for any well considered objection, and even in such a 
case the experience- of towns who have contested such ac- 
counts, has usually resulted in the enforced payment of such 
claims, with the additional costs of a lawsuit. The, proper 
remedy is, for every individual to consider before incurring 
expense at the cost of the town, whether they would justify 
the expenditure if it were made by an individual, as Agent 
for a Trust Estate, whose acts would be carefully examined 
before receiving the approval of the Trustees, whose interests 
they were expected to guard. 

LICENSE LAW. 

The citizens having voted to request the Selectmen not to 
issue any licenses for the sale of intoxicating liquors, and at 
the same time declined to make such appropriations for the 
Police Department, as would be necessary for the thorough 
enforcement of the law, we have been unable to adopt such 
measures as the situation demanded, and although at all 
times ready to enforce the provisions of the law, upon the 
presentation of the proper evidence, we have not had within 
our control, the money necessary to obtain that knowledge 
of the violation of the law which would result in conviction ; 
and furthermore, our previous experience has led us to the 
conclusion, that the plan usually pursued, of obtaining by 
false represent ations liquor ol dealers, for the purpose of using 



11 

such sale in evidence against them, is, to say the least of 
very doubtful expediency, and is degrading in its tendencies 
to all engaged in it. 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

As no contagions disease, requiring the attention of the 
Board, has prevailed during the year, but little has been done. 
An occasional nuisance has been reported, and so far as pos- 
sible the cause for complaint removed. The custom of leav- 
ing the dead bodies of animals in unfrequented places cannot 
be too strongly condemned ; and the Board should in all 
cases be promptly notified upon the discovery of such re- 
mains. 

tax-collector's Salary. 

Town of Hyde Park ; — 

To HENRY A. RICH, Dr. 

Amount due January 31, 1878, for collecting taxes, 

viz: 1875, balance of $800.00 salary, $300 00 

vo ( Collected year ending, Jan. 31, 'yy, $55,557 07 
°o / Collected year ending, Jan. 31, 'y8, 27,349 34 



Total, .... $82,916 41 
3-4 per cent., $621.87, of which $365.00 was paid 

last year, balance due on account of 1876 taxes, $246 87 
1877. Collected year ending, Jan, 31, 'y8, $58,832 91 

3-4 per cent, of which is, . . 441 25 



12 

By the above statement it will be seen that there was due 
the Collector at the close of the current year, for the collec- 
tion of taxes for the years 1875, 1876, and 1877, the sum of 
$988.12. 

The incidental account having been exhausted, the Select- 
men and Treasurer, in concurrence, have taken the responsi- 
bility to pay said amount, from the net unexpended balance 



12" 

of the appropriations, which amount otherwise would have 
been paid into the Sinking Fund, in accordance with the By- 
Law of the town. We have assumed that our action would 
be sustained by the town, in view of the fact that otherwise 
this amount would have to be raised the coming year ; but 
being in full sympathy with the general desire to reduce the 
burden of taxation to the minimum we have made this pay- 
ment. Should the town disapprove of our action, it may be 
remedied by raising said amount by taxation, the same to be 
paid into the Sinking Fund. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWIN R. WALKER,) Selectmen 
C. L. FARNSWORTH. ) of 
AMOS H. BRAINARD, ) Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park, Jan. 31, 1878. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OE EXPENDI- 
TURES. 



SCHOOLS — Teachers' Salaries. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Paid John F. Elliot 

Miss Sarah L. Barnes 
Miss Eliza P. Parsons 
Miss Sarah L. Miner 



GREW SCHOOL. 



Paid George M. Fellows 
Franklin H. Dean 
Miss Fannie J. Emerson 
Miss Lucina Dunbar 
Miss Martha A. Alexander 
Miss Marian F. Smith 
Miss Genevieve Brainard 
Miss Sarah S. Lancaster 



BLAKE SCHOOL. 



Paid Henry F. Howard 
Miss Elmina L. Oliver 
Miss Jennie S. Hammond 
Miss Belle M. Roper 
Mrs. Martha S. Lake 
Miss Emma A. George . 
Miss Ida M. Pratt 
Mrs. M. C. Howard 



,550 00 
625 00 
250 00 
300 00 



8600 00 
503 00 
450 00 
450 00 
450 00 
430 00 
447 50 
450 00 



.,150 00 
450 00 
450 00 
402 50 
356 36 
90 00 
204 00 
9 00 



!,725 00 



3,780 50 



14 

Paid Miss Helen A. Perry . . . $101)98 

Miss Caroline Howard . . . 40 00 



$3,261 84 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



Paid Edward W. Cross . . . $1,150 00 

Miss Carrie E. Walker . . . 450 00 

Miss Lizzio D. Bunker . . 450 00 

Miss Sarah A. Crosby . . . 447 50 

Miss Julia E. Donovan . . . 412 50 

Miss Agnes L. Adams ... 3 00 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 



Paid J. Langdou Curtis . . . $1,140 00 

Miss Lucy S. Currier ... 450 00 

Miss Harriet J. Folsom . . . 450 00 

Miss Mary E. Libby . . . 450 00 



EVERETT SCHOOL. 




Paid Miss Carrie P. Barnes 




MUSIC. 




Paid Henry J. Whitteniore 


8125 00 


Charles E. Whiting 


150 00 



FUEL AND JANITORS. 

Paid A. II. Brainard, coal ... . $898 96 

Henry S. Holtham, wood . . . 72 30 
E. B. Simpson, janitor, High and Grew 

Schools 59 00 

Robert Scott, Jr., janitor, High and 

Grew Schools . . . . 190 50 



2,913 00 



2,490 00 



412 50 



275 00 



L5,857 84 



15 



Paid George James, janitor, Blake School $142 79 
John McDonough, janitor, Damon 

School ..... 

Thomas Thompson, janitor, Greenwood 

School ..... 

John P. Emery, janitor, Greenwood 

School 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



136 


79 






45 


84 






61 


51 










$1,607 


69 










$17,465 


53 






$18,500 


00 






1,034 


47 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 



Paid William C. Kellogg, teaching 
Franklin H. Dean, teaching 
John McDonough, janitor 
Robert Scott, Jr., janitor . 
A. C. Clapp, arranging desks 
George Miles, supplies 



5136 


00 


96 


00 


11 


75 


11 


75 


4 


00 


2 


54 



$262 04 



Cr. 

By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended . 



$400 00 
137 96 



EXPENDITURES FROM INCOME OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS SCHOOL FUND. 



Paid Mark E. Noble, books 



$60 07 



16 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 

Paid Nichols & Hall, books and stationery . 
Ward & Gay, " 

W. H. Phillips, Jr., " 

J.L.Fairbanks, " 

Ginn & Heath, music charts 
J. H. Daniels, 100 diplomas 
J. F. Mooar, filling out diplomas 
Charles B. Tower & Co., ink 
N. T. Cottelle, 1 piano and tuning piano 
Edward Roberts, use of flowers, and services 

of one man ..... 

Mark E. Noble, books, &c. 
J. F. Elliot, " 

Albert Snow, pen-holder racks 

C. P. Vaughan, repairs on clocks , . 
Chas. H. Colby, brooms, bushes, &c. 
S. R. Moseley, printing 
J. L. Hammett, black boards, settees, &c. 
H. C. Chamberlain, tassels, cord, &c, and 

superintending repairs on School Houses 
Journal Newspaper Co., advertising 
J. M. Merrick, analysis of water 
O. Lappen & Co., brushes 
W. H. H. Andrews, services as Clerk of 

School Committee .... 
Thomas Gately, repairing pipes, &c. 
R. Corson, use of teams and expressing 
Geo. Miles, wood saw, &c. 
O'Neill Bros, horse and buggy 
H. J. Whittemore, teaching music 
L. H. Russell, carpenters work and material 
W. W. Hilton, " " 

E. B. Simpson, " " " 

Rinaldo Williams, " " " 

D. H. Graham, " " " 
R. Scott, Sen., " " " 
J. P. Emery ';' " 

S. B. Balkam, lumber, lime, &c. 



113 


26 


8 


80 


1 


00 


14 


00 


36 


00 


25 


00 


9 


00 


9 


00 


84 


00 


5 


00 


190 


20 


5 


25 


3 


75 


8 


25 


3 


25 


78 


00 


131 


65 


45 


80 


3 


50 


10 


00 


3 


50 


100 


00 


5 


50 


48 


20 


1 


62 


5 


00 


1 


80 


25 


83 


92 


00 


1 


75 


90 


85 


20 


40 


6 


66 


35 


26 


52 


49 



17 



Paid E. & F. King & Co., oil, lead, &c. 
Quincy Dyer, " " 

Richard Murray, cement, lime and labor 
S. R. Swett, labor on school-house 
H. C. Stark, repairs on furnaces and work on 

school-house 
Boynton & Rogers, repairs on furnaces and 

work on school-house .... 

Thos. Thompson, cleaning school-houses 
George James, " " 

Thomas Sweeney, " " 

Julia McDonough, " " 

R. Scott, Jr., " " 

John Beatey, mason work and material 

A. R. Glass, repairing roofs 

D. F. Smith & Sons, painting and glazing . 
J. G. Hamblin, " " 

B. E. Phillips, " " 
H. Reed, use of well . . . . 
J. Mathewson, truant officer 

E. W. Cross, repairs on pump 
W. J. Hughes, carting coal 

Joel F. Goodwin, ascertaining names and 

ages of school children 
W. H. H. Andrews, legal services and cash 

paid out 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 
Excess of expenditure . 



$186 99 

10 05 

4 45 

6 00 

40 08 

204 48 

3 00 
28 50 
52 75 
20 00 
32 00 

182 92 

104 66 

115 97 

104 96 

65 20 

10 00 

1 00 

65 

4 50 

35 00 

36 93 

$2,523 66 

$2,500 00 
$23 66 



INCIDENTALS. 

Paid Globe Gas Light Co., lighting street lamps . $2,354 26 

Dedham & Hyde Park Gas Co., gas . 122 80 

Samuel R. Moseley, printing and advertising 781 50 



18 

Paid G. Henry Perkins, insurance 

Charles M. Chapin, " ... 

Henry A. Day, " ... 

Henry S. Bunton, preparing list of tax-payers 

for town report, and cash paid for postage, &c. 
Herbert A. Whittier, distributing town reports 
William T. Britton, janitor, posting notices, &c. 
William Danforth, copying plans 
Reuben Corson, expi*essing, &c. 
"Ward & Gay, gavel, stationery, baskets, &c. 
J. B. & N. Niles, printing ballots 
Charles Jacobs, serving warrants, examining 

signboards, &c. ..... 

S. B. Balkam, coal . 

Coleman & Maxwell, transfer books . 

A. W. Wright, rent of town offices 

E. W. Moffatt, care of lock-up, repairs on 

pumps, &c. ..... 

J. H. Knibbs, repairs on chairs 
Edmund Davis, legal advice to Collector 
Fitts & Ryan, expressing .... 

R. P. Moseley, refreshments at town meeting 
Sanford & Runnells, oil, chimneys, brooms, &c. 
W. H. Phillips, Jr., stationery 

McAvoy & Co., coal 

Erastus Worthington, entering and copying 

by-laws ...... 

M. E. Noble, 2 sponges .... 

C. G. Chick, copying transfers and examining 

records for Assessors and Collector . 88 00 

Henry B. Terry, cash paid to magistrate, 

jurors, witnesses and officer, in fire inquest 54 04 

J. F. & C. M. Tilley, labor and material . 11 97 

George L. Richardson, surveying . . 9 80 

Henry B. Pierce, register of voters . . 2 00 

J. M. Williams, carpenter work . . 13 97 

Jas. O'Hearn, » " 50 

I. B. Samuels, plans of alterations in town 

hall 35 00 



$375 65 


145 


37 


100 


00 


25 


75 


4 


25 


278 


11 


140 


00 


1 


50 


3 


85 


12 


00 


19 


50 


21 


75 


30 


00 


600 


00 


13 


82 


3 


75 


20 


00 




95 


17 


00 


12 


06 


73 


53 


15 


50 


4 


40 




35 



19 

Paid J. D. Bradlee & Co., 3 Elm trees, for Everett 

square $15 00 

Henry B. Briggs, cash paid fire police, July 
4th, 1877 

Warren W. Hilton, labor and material 

M. R. Warren, check book for treasurer, one 
book and one box ..... 

George Tacey, labor on reservoir 

John Beatey, work on lock-up 

J. Johnston, iron tree guards, hinges, bars, 
&c • . . 

Boston & Providence R.R. Co., freight 

Boynton & Rogers, pumps, pails, brooms, dus- 
ters, i*epairs, &c. .... 

H. C. Stark, map case, stove, pipe and labor 

O. Q. Brown, sign board and posts 

Jones, Robinson & Co., coal 

William Donovan, building fence 

John A. Soule, lumber, &c. 

Delia White, refreshments at town meeting . 

Frank B. Rich, posting voting lists 

Henry B. Terry, extra services in preparing 
the registry of voters, and recording and re- 
turning births, marriages and deaths 

Sprague Pond Ice Co., ice ... 

Alfred Hale & Co., rubber stamp . 

L. F. Upham, lettering boxes 

Henry A. Rich, postage . . . 

S. P. Blodgett, P. O. box rent 

Quincy Dyer, brush ..... 

Rinaldo Williams, repairs on safe and voting 
list board ...... 



Cr. 



36 


00 


50 


99 


24 


00 


6 


75 


9 


50 


25 


24 


6 


00 


44 


43 


12 


85 


5 


50 


46 


37 


20 


13 


13 


59 


25 


00 


1 


25 


163 


00 


6 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


12 


85 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


50 



>,925 88 



By amount of appropriation, $6,500, — $800 trans- 
ferred to highways $5,700 00 



Excess of expenditure $225 88 



20 
HIGHWAYS. 

Paid Charles L. Farns worth, cash paid out on account 

of Highways, as follows : — 
To John B. Farrington, men and teams 

John Corrigan, " 

Thomas Corrigan, " 

John Downey, 



Owen Hughes, ' 

P. Curley, 
Thomas Rooney, 
E. McKenna, 
M. Donlan, 
P. Brennan, 
J. Corbett, 
Patrick Rooney, 1st, 

Patrick McDonough, labor 

Martin King, " 

Michael Connolly, " 

Patick Barrett, 1st, " 

Patrick Barrett, 2d, " 

Martin McDonough, " 

John McGee, " 

Michael Bo wen, " 

Peter McCarty, " 

Daniel Bo wen, " 

Patrick Rooney, 2d, " 

Worthy Macomber, " 

Patrick Welch, " 

Richard Timpenny, ■" 

John Bowen, " 

M. Griffin; " 

Patrick Butler, " 

John Donovan, " 

Edward Jordan, " 

Florence Mahoney, " 

Dennis O'Grady, " 

Henry Jenkins, " 

Patrick Glenn, " 



$243 49 
118 12 

15 00 

60 62 
63 12 

50 00 
31 24 

61 25 

36 25 
71 87 
10 00 

55 23 
5 00 

19 06 
61 56 

52 81 

51 56 
43 74 

53 69 

3 12 

16 87 
7 50 

54 05 
28 75 

23 31 

24 68 
2 50 

17 49 
10 00 

4 37 

56 25 
53 74 
43 12 
63 12 

37 18 



21 



To Thomas Brown, 


labor 


$30 62 


Thomas Dolan, 


u 


58 74 


Dennis Foley, 


C( 


69 68 


Lawrence McAuliffe, 


a 


22 50 


William Hulihan, 


u 


8 00 


John Regan, 


cc 


1 25 


J. Scott, 


u 


10 50 


Thomas Kelly, 


ti 


15 25 


M. Rogers, 


u 


7 18 


J. Sweeney, 


it 


6 56 


Thomas O'Keefe, 


a 


18 63 


M. McGovern, 


a 


1 25 


James Rooney, 


a 


54 37 


William Quealey, 


a 


35 93 


James Connolly, . 


u 


55 62 


Peter Rooney, 


<ft 


18 12 


Thomas Murphy, 


it 


10 00 


John White, 


a 


16 87 


James Feehan, 


a 


10 00 


William Thompson, 


a. 


8 75 


Hugh McGinley, 


a 


88 78 


John Jenkins, 


a 


63 12 


John Norton, 


a 


24 69 


Lawrence Rooney, 


(i 


12 50 


John Murray, 


a 


9 37 


T. Gately, 


a 


17 50 


J. McCullough, 


a 


10 00 


Dennis Dee, 


a 


1 25 


Peter Cannon, 


a 


3 00 


Frank Hobart, 


a 


3 75 


Thomas Kingston, 


a 


3 75 


Cornelius Cleary, 


a 


36 56 


Andrew D. Rooney, 


a 


13 12^ 


Patrick Sweeney, 


a 


12 00 


George Clapp, 


a 


2 50 


Isaac Woods, 


a 


9 37 


William Donlan, 


a 


21 24 


Adam Boyce, 


a 


9 37 


M. Cannon, 


a 


16 50 



22 



To M. Hurley, 
John Lennon, 



labor 



$9 69 
8 27 



A. H. Brainard, cash paid on account of high- 
ways, as follows : — 

To John B. Farrington, labor of self, men 
and teams ..... 

To Thomas Rooney, for building culvert on, 
and repairing Cleaveland street 

Paid D. W. Phipps, labor, men and teams 
Hugh McGinley, labor on streets 
John Jenkins, " 

Thomas Corrigan, " 
Patrick Gilmartin, " 
Thomas Sweeney, " 

Michael Rogers, " 

Francis Hobart, " 

John Hughes, " 

Thomas Kelly, " 

Dennis Foley, " 

James Connolly, " 

Thomas Keefe, " 

Owen Hughes, " 

John McAuliffe, " 

Michael Barry, " 

Richard Murray, " 

Thomas Meegan, " 

John Graham, " 

Timothy Clark, " 

M. Connolly, " 

James Fitzgerald, " 

Patrick Rooney, 2d, " 
Patrick Rooney, 1st, labor and material 
John Moyle, covering stone 
Lewis & Willett, drain pipe 
Miller & Hanscom, iron pipe 
John Bleakie, gravel 
II. Holmes, Jr., " 
L. J. Bird, Trustee, gravel 



$2,385 81 



$44 62 




100 00 




i\ii 


62 


f 1 ** 




722 


82 


385 


24 


271 


25 


22 


00 


2 


00 


8 


70 


18 


50 


4 


50 


19 


50 


10 


00 


11 


00 


19 


50 


9 


75 


25 


00 


21 


87 


21 


87 


6 


88 


12 


00 


21 


87 


2 


00 


1 


87 


1 


25 


6 


25 


. . 65 


08 


12 


00 


223 


98 


297 88 


11 


44 


10 


10 


17 


80 



23 



Paid Metropolitan Land Co., gravel . . . $384 00 

Morss & Whyte, gravel screen . 8 00 

A. H. Brainard, " ... 8 00 

George W. Simmons, repairs on harness . 5 75 

James F. Hackett, blacksmith work and material 3 05 

Keren Curley, " " " 30 29 

J. Johnson, " " " 3 55 

T. H. Malcom, " " " 15 42 

Stewart McKenzie, " " " 17 00 

Rinaldo Williams, carpenter work and material 41 76 

O. Q. Brown, " " " 20 51 

J. M. Williams, " " ■ " 7 72 

W. A. Mason, " " 1 50 

Charles Haley, " " 2 75 

G. H. Loud, stone 42 49 

J. N. Bullard, hay .... 3 84 

George E. Whiting, hay .... 7 42 

E. D. Savage, hay and grain ... 50 69 

McAvoy & Co., " " . . . 77 14 

Peabody & Co., " " . . . 20 36 

H. Whiting, " 7 21 

Fitts & Ryan, expressing ... 3 45 

Alfred Hale & Co., rubber boots . . . 9 00 

R. Corson, men and teams and expressing . 66 04 

Quincy Dyer, shovels, rakes, &c. . . 34 61 

S. B. Balkam, lumber .... 124 36 

James Hennessy, coal screen ... 8 00 

John A. Soule, lumber .... 4 05 



Cr. 

By amount of appropriation 
" " transferred from Incidentals 



$5 


$5,802 

,000 
800 


29 
00 







Excess of expenditure 



$2 29 



fire dp:partment. 

Paid members of Goodwill Engine Co., No. 1 for services $576 57 



24 

Paid members of Rough and Ready, No. 2 for services $641 25 

" Hook and Ladder, "1 «• 608 73 

" Splicer Hose, " 1 " 558 75 

Peter McClellan, services as engineman . 67 48 

William H. Cumminger, " " 67 75 

William U. Fairbairn, services as engineer . 90 00 

L. A. Runnells, " " . 90 00 

Warren W. Hilton, " " 45 00 

Charles W. Paul, " " . . 45 00 
Joshua Wilder, services as steward and cash paid out 667 74 

Reuben Corson, use of horses and men . 185 65 

Warren W. Hilton, labor and material . 15 68 

J. Johnston, repairs on steamers, ect. . 40 24 

Spring & Robinson, repairs on steamers, etc. 15 77 

Herbert E. Hunt, " «» . 15 00 

F. A. Sweet, " " . 6 50 

Boynton & Rogers, grates, repairs, ect. . . 14 86 

H. C. Stark, dampers, labor, etc. . . 7 75 

Downer Kerosene Oil Co., oil . . . 29 65 
The Adams Nickle Plating Manfg. Co., 49 fire badges 24 50 

T. J. Sheehan, repairs on engine house roof 12 44 

S. B. Balkam, lumber .... 9 65 

Joseph F. Smith, one 50 foot Bangor ladder . 125 00 

J. Ellery Piper, coal .... 55 53 

A. H. Brainard, coal ..... 75 00 

Quincy Dyer, oil, spirits, etc. ... 3 93 

S. R. Moseley, printing .... 10 00 

Geo. W. Simmons & Son, fire hats . . 9 00 

J. A. Caldwell, lanterns, etc. ... 26 30 

C. L. Farnsworth, milk .... 1 80 

George Miles, cheese .... 3 06 
Sanford & Runnells, blocks, straps, rope, soap, 

oil, coffee, sugar, etc 107 22 

$4,252 80 

Cr. 

By amount of appropriation . . . $4,500 00 

Balance unexpended .... 247 20 



25 



POOK ACCOUNT. 

Paid A. H. Brainard, fuel &c. for poor, and Cash 

paid out as per vouchers on file . . $1181 70 

Taunton Lunatic Hospital, board of Lunatics 1187 90 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, support of poor 115 00 

City of New Bedford, " " 12 00 

" " Springfield, " " 62 86 

Geo. Bass, house rent for " " 12 00 

Agnes Hooker, board of Miss Withington . 20 00 

Octavia Phillips, nursing J. F. Olive . 5 71 

J. J. O'Neill medicine .... 3 40 

M. E. Noble, " 54 88 

W. S. Everett, medicine and examination of 

lunatics 15 54 

Joshua Wilder, meals for sick tramps &c, 

cash paid out ..... 12 22 

Edward McCabe, lodging two travellers . 1 00 

John M. Twichell, expense committing lunatics 7 25 

Charles Jacobs, " " " 7 85 

Hyde Park Boot & Shoe Co., boots and shoes 136 13 

A. C. Bass, " " 3 65 

C. L. Farnsworth, flour and bread for poor 166 70 
L. J. French & Co., groceries . . . 236 00 
French & Co., "..... 8 75 
George Miles, " . . 629 37 
Sanford & Eunnells, " . . . 529 35 
S. S. Clark, « ..." 22 25 
Charles E. Bunker, " . . . 196 75 

D. D. Burns, 6t . . . . 62 25 
Martin O'Brien, " . . . . 29 50 

E. D. Savage, "...-..-. 13 00 
Charles H. Colby, " .... 167 14 
J. N. Bullard, " . . . 29 48 
Jane Joyce, " .... 9 50 
Peabocty & Co., " 15 00 
Palmer Merritt, provisions ... 59 50 
Henry S. Holtham, " . • . , 25 39 

F. D. Brigham, » . . . . 39 81 



26 



Paid Owen Hughes, milk .... 
Jones Robinson & Co., fuel 
N. H.Tucker, " . 

S. B. Balkam, " 

McAvoy & Co., " . 

Boynton & Rogers, stove &c. 
H. C. Stark, " . . . 

C. L. Edwards, examination of lunatics 
C. C. Hayes, medical attendance 
P. B. Whitemore, burial of poor 
Jonas Stone, hacks at 3 funerals . 
H. C. Chamberlain, dry goods for poor 
Ward & Gay, stationery and books . 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



$3,500 00 
" . . 2,000 00 

Cash refunded for board of insane persons, &c. 178 29 

Balance unexpended 



$63 19 
13 25 
72 90 

22 30 

11 50 
9 17 
4 00 

10 00 

146 16 

69 00 

12 00 
4 00 

23 75 

►,540 05 



$5,678 29 

$138 24 



POLICE. 




Paid Charles Jacobs, police duty 


$510 98 


Elijah W. Moffatt, " . . . 


834 00 


W. H. Cumminger, " . . 


12 50 


Henry P. Bussey, " ... 


6 75 


Calvin Callahan, " . . . 


2 50 


Benjamin F. Kidder, "... 


3 00 


Daniel O'Counell, " . . . 


3 00 


Henry B. Briggs, " 


3 00 


Luther Neal, " . 


3 00 


Andrew I). Rooney, "... 


1 00 


A. M. Mitchell & Co., badges 


6 00 


A. II. Brainard, coal .... 


16 80 



27 

Paid Boynton & Rogers, slop pail ... $1 25 

H. C. Stark, grate and lining . . . 2 50 

E. W. Moffatt, services as keeper of lock-up . 37 53 



Cr. 



SALARIES. 



,443 81 



By amount of appropriation . . . $1,500 00 

Balance unexpended .... 56 19 



Paid Edwin R. Walker, services as Selectman, Sur- 
veyor of Highways, Overseer of Poor and 
Board of Health . . . . • . $200 00 

Charles L. Farns worth, services as Selectman, 
Surveyor of Highways, Overseer of the 
Poor and Board of Health ... 200 00 

Amos H. Brainard, services as Selectman, Sur- 
veyor of Highways, Overseer of the Poor 
and Board of Health .... 

R. P. Moseley, services as Assessor 

Joel F. Goodwin, " ... 

John M. Twichell, " . 

Henry B. Terry, services as Town Clerk, and 
Clerk of the Selectmen .... 

Henry S. Bun ton, services as Treasurer 

Henry C. Chamberlain, " Schoel Committee 

Hobert M. Cable, " " 

Edward M. Lancaster, " " 

Richard W. Husted, " " 

Rev. Francis C. Williams," " 

William H. H. Andrews, " " 

Howard M. Hamblin, " Auditor 

Benj. C. Vose, " " 

• DeWitt C. Rogers, " " 

$2,590 00 
Cr. 

By amount of appropriation . . . $2,590 00 



200 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


200 


00 


300 


00 


400 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 



28 

GRAVEL LAND. 

Paid the Real Estate and Building Company for a 

lot of gravel land in the Arlington district $1,733 97 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation . . $1,733 97 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



Paid Mrs. H. A. B. Thompson, Librarian, and 

extra services 1390 87 

Miss Mary A. Hawley, Assistant Librarian . 49 25 

Lockwood, Brooks & Co., stationery and binding 214 98 

A. W. Wright, rent 284 17 

S. B. Balkam, fuel 18 15 

N. H. Tucker » 8 00 

John Scrivens, janitor 102 60 

Ward & Gray, stationery . . . . . 29 03 

Noyes, Snow & Co., magazines and papers . 46 89 

F. Leypoldt, 'The Publisher's weekly ' 3 20 

S. R. Moseley, printing 45 00 

R. F. Boynton, carpenter's work . . . . 1 00 

C. P. Vaughan, clock 4 50 

Henry C. Bird & Co., table .... 14 00 

Sanford & Runnells, oil and chimneys • 30 68 

Sundry small bills 32 35 

81,274 67 
Cr. 

By net amount received for liquor licenses 

in 1876 $1,275 00 

Balance unexpended .... $0 33 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. 



The past year has been one of unparalleled destitution 
among the poorer classes. The absence of employment 
of any kind for either men or women, has not only obliged 
those who have heretofore been aided by the town to call for 
continued and increasing aid, but has added large numbers 
to the list from those who have heretofore been able to main- 
tain themselves. It became evident to the Board at an early 
day after their accession, that without a revival of business 
the poor appropriation must be largely increased above pre- 
vious years, yet, reluctant to add to the burdens of the tax 
payers, and in the hope of better times, it was decided to call 
for only the same amount as last year, but times growing 
worse rather than better, the appropriation as was feared* 
proved insufficient. 

To show the increase, we quote from the previous reports 
the number of applicants, the number of persons represented 
by the applicants, and the amounts expended. The report 
for 1876 does not give these numbers, and we therefore are 
able to use only those for 1874, and 1875- 
For 1874, applicants, 61, individuals represented and aided, 

125 : amount expended, $2,678.18. 
For 1875, applicants, 56, individuals represented and aided, 

176; amount expended, $3,168.45. 
For 1877, applicants in, individuals represented and aided, 

359; amount expended, $5,540.05. 

INSANE PERSONS. 

The number of insane persons boarded by the town at the 
Taunton Lunatic Hospital, the last financial year was 4 ; this 



30 

year 8 ; 2 other persons, are boarded in town, and one family of 
8 are entirely maintained ; the head being incapacitated by dis- 
ease from earning anything, and the wife and mother having 
quite sufficient to do to care for the children, all of whom are 
too young to do anything towards their own support. 

As all the persons who are boarded whether at Taunton or at 
home, cost the town an average of at least $200 each, it will 
be seen that an appropriation of quite respectable size is re- 
quired merely for those whom the town fully supports, and 
yet they constitute but about one twentieth of the whole num- 
ber assisted. 

AMOUNTS EXPENDED. 

The whole amount expended on the poor account for the 
financial year, ending, January, 31st, 1878, was $5,540.05 in- 
cluding bills for preceding year to the amount of $236.24. 
There is due from the Commonwealth, and from other towns 
on account of parties aided by us $636.67, reducing the net 
cost of support of the poor for the year to $4,358.85. 

ALMS HOUSE. 

The heavy expense of boarding the insane at Taunton, most 
of whom are not at all violent ; the difficulty of providing 
suitable boarding places for helpless people not insane, 
together with the imminent contingency of having whole 
families of children thrown upon us by the sickness or death 
of a parent, led the board to seriously consider the feasibility 
of establishing an alms house. The matter being brought 
before the town, a committee was appointed to take the mat- 
ter in hand and report at the next town meeting. A careful 
investigation resulted in finding but one suitable place, and a 
difficulty about the title to this rendered it unadvisable to take 
any further, action at that time. 

For the reasons given, and others that might be named, 
the Board are still of the opinion that an alms house should 
be established in town as soon as practicable. 



31 



TRAMPS. 

This ignoble array shows no sign of diminution, but as 
the refreshments provided by the town consist merely of cold 
water and crackers, the taxes are not very largely increased 
on their account. The number lodged and reported was 
1705, and the expense to the town was $65.72. 

INCREASE OF PAUPERISM. 

The rapid increase of pauperism everywhere is a startling 
fact that excites serious apprehension as to the future. 
Hyde Park has heretofore been singularly favored in this 
respect ; a recently settled locality, with no heritage of pau- 
pers, the poor expenses of the town during its first year 
were so trifling that no report was made by the Overseers, 
beyond the necessary figures ; the whole amount being but 
little more than is now annually expended on one -person 
at Taunton. 

The large amount of building, and other inprovements, 
gave ample employment to all requiring it, and destitution 
was almost unknown for some years. 

Now, however, with the entire cessation of building, the 
stoppage of manufacturies, and the pressure of the times upon 
the employing classes, the laboring part of the population is 
generally in extreme poverty, and aid to a large extent becomes 
necessary. To render this aid judiciously is a serious pro- 
blem. Humanity and the law both require that the needy 
should be relieved ; while yet the necessary and increasing 
expenses of the poor department add materially to the bur- 
dens of tax payers. A system, therefore that may have 
worked well when calls for aid were few and expenses small, 
may not be the best when calls are numerous and expenses 
heavy. \ 

THE LAW OF SETTLEMENT. 

The theory of law is, that every person has a " settle- 
ment " somewhere, and the place of such person's settlement 



32 

is chargeable with the expense aiding him (or her) when in 
need. The laws governing settlements are intricate, in some 
cases obscure, and in others apparently conflicting ; while new 
laws are enacted almost yearly, without repealing old ones, 
the general drift of new laws being to increase the facilities 
for acquiring a settlement, and to turn upon the various 
cities and towns paupers belonging to the State or out of it. 
Every case has also its own peculiarities, and it is sometimes 
the work of months to get at all the facts necessary to decide 
upon it. The laws provide for rendering aid to paupers hav- 
ing settlements in other municipalities within the State, 
and for recovering the amount of such aid rendered, but until 
recently the State has refused to pay for aid given paupers 
having no settlement within the State, unless too sick to be 
removed ; the only alternative for Overseers of the Poor be- 
ing to expend the money of their town upon persons hav- 
ing no claims on them, or, to send them to the State Alms 
House at Tewksbury. The manifest hardship of this last 
alternative, causing Overseers generally to assist such per- 
sons until their demands grew too persistant to be borne. 

At the last session of the Legislature, however, the Com- 
monwealth adopted another course ; an act being passed, that 
allows Overseers to aid persons having no settlement within 
the State, for a space of four weeks, at an expense not to ex- 
ceed weekly one dollar for each person, or five dollars for a 
family. This very humane law is, however, coupled with sev- 
eral provisions that go far to neutralize it. It being left entirely 
with the general Agent of the State Board of Charities to de- 
cide whether this aid shall be continued after he is notified, 
or whether the persons aided shall be sent to Tewksbury. And 
also that no bill shall be paid by the State without his ap- 
proval. To fully investigate all the cases throughout the 
State is evidently an impossible task, and the General Agent 
therefore usually decides that all these persons are permanent 
paupers, do not come under the provisions of the act, that if 
the State is to support them they must be sent to Tewksbury, 
and that no bills will be paid by the State on their account. 



33 

The principal effect of the law therefore, is merely to shift the 
responsibility of sending persons or families to the State Alms 
House, from the Overseers of the Poor, to the State Board of 
Charities. 

OUR PRESENT SYSTEM. 

And now having presented such facts as may be of interest 
bearing on the administration of the Poor Laws, it may be 
well to speak of our present system of administration, and 
make such suggestions for the future as seem called for. 
At present our Overseers of the Poor are elected for one year 
only, and the office is attached sometimes to the Assessors, 
sometimes tojjthe Selectmen, and with the same result in 
each case. At the first meeting of the Board of Assessors or 
Selectmen, for organization, one of their number is chosen 
Chairman of Overseers of the Poor. The other members, 
happy in the consciousness that they have made a good 
choice, and provided their colleague with an amount of busi- 
ness that will astonish him, leave him to manage matters to 
suit himself, and acquiesce in his desire to be relieved of 
some of the labor of his other, and as he had supposed, princi- 
pal office. The new incumbent devotes himself to making 
the acquaintance of his numerous callers and with their ante- 
cedents, he wrestles with the difficulties of the settlement laws, 
reading carefully volumes of laws and decisions for long years 
back. Devizes and keeps a system of accounts with each of 
the hundred applicants who regularly besiege him, visits and 
catechises the new candidates for aid, notifies the various towns 
and cities, or the State, of persons having no claims upon 
us ; investigates the claims of other towns upon ours, and de- 
cides upon them, and after months of hard study and much 
labor, begins to master the situation and to realize at the same 
time that his year is nearly out and the uncertainties of 
another election are at hand. 

A BETTER SYSTEM NEEDED. 

This system is evidently wrong. The proper administration 



34 

of the poor business of this town has become of sufficient im- 
portance to occupy the attention of a separate board, and it 
should not be tacked to some other board as an incidental 
or unimportant matter. 

Neither should there be frequent changes in the constitu- 
tion of the board. The same reasons which forbid the pos- 
sibility of an annual revolution in the school board, apply with 
equal or greater force to that of the poor. 

Nor should the whole burden be put upon one man. A 
board having no other official duties, with its meetings at 
stated times for the transaction solely of business connected 
with the Poor Department, would, we think, be more efficient, 
economical, and satisfactory to the town, than is possible 
under the present system. 

There is of course no objection to putting upon the board 
individuals who may happen to hold some other town office, 
but the board as a whole should be an independent one. 

An Act passed by the General Court last year, meets the 
case so admirably that we quote its principal provisions and 
recommend them to the acceptance of the town. 

"Sect. i. Any town in this Commonwealth, which shall 
have accepted the provisions of this act at any annual meet- 
ing thereof, may at such or any annual meeting thereafter, 
elect by written ballot from the inhabitants thereof, three 
persons to be overseers of the poor in such town, one per- 
son for one year, one person for two years, and one person 
for three years, and thereafter at the annual meeting in like 
manner may elect one person to serve for three years, and 
these persons so chosen shall constitute the board of over- 
seers ot the poor in such town. 

Sect. 2. (Provides for filling vacancies.) 

Sect. 3. Said boards shall meet and organize annually 
within seven days after the annual town meeting, by the 
choice of a chairman and secretary, which last named officer 
may be from their own number or otherwise. 

Sect. 4. Said boards shall cause books to be kept, where- 
in shall be entered in a neat and methodical style, all informa- 
tion in regard to such needy persons as shall have been aided 
under their direction, that is required by the general laws of 
this Commonwealth, and also all further information in re- 



35 

gard to every individual case of relief given, asked for or re- 
fused, as may be of importance to their towns or the Com- 
monwealth to preserve, stating the amount and kind of aid 
given, and the reasons for giving such aid or of refusing the 
same ; such information to be so arranged as to be readily re- 
ferred to upon the books. 

Sect, 5. The acceptance of this act by any town may at 
any subsequent annual meeting thereof be revoked by such 
town, and thereupon this act shall cease to be operative in 
such town." 

The act, it will be seen provides for both permanence and 
rotation in office ; for an effective organization, which includes 
not only a chairman but a secretary, and makes it obligatory 
upon the board to keep a full pauper record. This last obli- 
gation is one of great importance ; the want of such a record 
having greatly increased the labor of the present board and 
added to the expenses of the department. When it is con- 
sidered that towns and cities are obliged to support paupers 
whose settlements sometimes come through, not only parents, 
but grand-parents, and even great-grand-parents, the neces- 
sity of pauper records becomes obvious, and yet this town 
is absolutely without any proper record, except'of the most 
fragmentary character, and, previous to the year 1873, there 
are no poor records whatever, unless we except the brief 
mention of names and amounts in the annual reports. The 
result of this want of system is that confirmed paupers origi- 
nally known to have no settlement here, gradually pass into 
the list of " doubtful " and finally, as belonging to the town ; 
one of this class, who has been assisted for years, became so 
clamerous and exacting, that a determined and searching in- 
vestigation into the matter was instituted, which finally re- 
sulted in defeating the settlement, and turning the family 
upon the State. The labor of a single hour, entering this case 
at the proper time in a record book, would have saved the 
town a very respectable sum of money. 

The present board, impressed with the growing importance 
of suitable records, have procured a proper book, and com- 
menced entering in it the names and all obtainable informa- 
tion in relation to every resident applicant for aid since the 



36 

organization of the town. This task is not yet completed, 
but when brought up to the present time and properly con- 
tinued, the work will prove of great and constantly increas- 
ing value. 

CONCLUSION. 

The position of Overseer of the Poor is one of peculiar re- 
sponsibility, involving the exercise of nice discrimination 
and sound judgment ; as upon his decisions may rest the 
welfare of hundreds of poor and needy persons. The 
statute laws require him to assist all needy and destitute ap- 
plicants, and the town places at his disposal the necessary 
means to carry out the requirements of the laws, and the 
dictates of humanity. To distribute with fidelity and wise 
economy these funds, to correctly investigate each case of real 
or apparent poverty, and carefully decide as to the amount 
and character of aid to be rendered ; to see that no suffering 
fellow creature is deprived of the necessary aid that he should 
bestow, and yet to protect his town from imposition from 
any quarter ; to make himself familiar with the circumstances 
and history of the numerous applicants, and to keep the 
numerous accounts required, make his office anything but a 
sinecure. 

We have spoken more fully of these matters, than 
has heretofore been customary in our town reports, but so 
little is generally known of the workings of the Poor Depart- 
ment that we have thought it well to present them to our 
fellow citizens. The expenses of this department though 
large the past year are still low as compared with other mu- 
nicipalities. The annual report of fifteen other towns in the 
county show that their poor expenses range from 7 to 25 per 
cent, of the whole town expenses ; the average being over 15 
per cent. In our case they are a little over 6 per cent. 

Following is a detailed statement of the expenses of the 
Poor Department, and the amount of aid rendered various 
persons as set against their names. Where the name is 
not followed by that of some town, or of the State, it does 



37 



not imply that such person has a settlement here ; many of 
these cases being doubtful, and still undergoing investigation. 



For aid to Allen, Thomas .... 


$273 31 


Anderson, Mary, Gloucester 


2 88 


Adams, Samuel, State 


8 00 


Bond, John R. 


2 00 


Boweal, John .... 


50 


Butler, John J., Boston 


56 53 


Bell, Catherine " . . 


2 78 


Barrett, Sarah S. 


207 55 


Butler, Fannie .... 


22 37 


Butler, Henry, State . 


60 44 


Barrett, Mary . 


45 


Briscoe, Mary . . , . 


16 00 


Cannon, Ann . . . • 


32 97 


Campbell, Mrs. Alex. 


1 90 


Conroy, Bridget 


60 71 


Conolly, James, State 


44 23 


Conley, Patrick, Canton 


40 89 


Clapp, Clara E . ... 


135 60 


Cahill, Mary Boston 


49 25 


Claffee, Keran .... 


1 40 


Crowley, Mary .... 


203 70 


Coughlin, Ellen, Canton 


199 10 


Curley, James . . . 


35 


Carter, Michael 


3 35 


Christy, Hannah , 


5 50 


Driscol, James .... 


25 


Davis, Thomas, State 


3 00 


Davison, Margaret, Boston . 


45 74 


Donovan, Mary 


3 50 


Dempsey, John, State . 


5 56 


Davis, Stephen A., Boston 


24 36 


Daily, John, State 


20 50 


Foley, Dennis .... 


18 65 


Fleming, Margaret 


72 66 


Foley, Cornelius .... 


2 00 


Farrow, John .... 


55 


Gill, John 


49 11 



3H 



For aid to Hurley, Michael .... 


$26 08 


Holt, John, State .... 


6 00 


Hanson, William .... 


32 84 


Hollis, Charles ..... 


9 00 


Hobart, Frank .... 


12 25 


Howe, Patrick ..... 


95 93 


Holmes, Sarah, State 


141 43 


Hutchinson, Henry .... 


246 31 


Hickey, Ann ..... 


103 19 


Hickey, Johanna . 


94 54 


Haskell, Mrs. Henry A. 


4 00 


Hammond, Henry .... 


208 20 


Illsley, William, State 


22 21 


Jordan, Edward, State 


100 06 


Johnson, Mary A. . 


195 98 


Kelly, Mary ..... 


43 26 


Kelly, Thomas 


129 20 


King, Martin . . 


20 41 


Laird, Artemas .... 


76 34 


Lyons, Edward ..... 


13 00 


McDonough, Patrick, State 


144 92 


McCabe, Rosa 


152 50 


McGowan, Mary .... 


3 50 


McGowan, Margaret . . 


110 23 


McGovern, Margaret 


33 64 


McGee, John, State .... 


105 72 


McManus, Philip, Dighton. 


3 50 


Moore, John T., State 


5 13 


Miller, Margaret, Gloucester 


46 43 


Meehan, Mary T., State 


3 00 


Murphy, Thomas " . . 


12 16 


Nay lor, Huldah " 


68 98 


O'Brian, Margaret 


21 78 


O'Keefe, Richard, 2d, State 


11 86 


Olive, James F 


14 00 


O'Neal, Margaret .... 


3 51 


Powell, Mrs. John W. 


13 80 


Quigley, Catherine .... 


32 03 


Rooney, Patrick. 3d, State 


6 13 


Scott, John 


45 49 



39 



For aid to Scoggins, Elizabeth .... $4 00 

Sweeney, Catherine .... 64 78 

Smith, Honora ..... 65 02 

Sullivan, Naomi, State . . . . 49 72 

Shedd, Margaret, Boston . . . 17 00 

Shedd, Frank . ... . . 6 00 

Sheehan, Edward .... 8 26 

Springer, Fanny, State .... 36 59 

Silvers, George 7 50 

Silvers, Sarah . . . . . 7 50 

Tierney, John . . . . . 16 11 

Timberlake, Elias . . . . 5 20 

Tyler, Charles H., Easton ... 18 48 

Wilkinson, Anna . . . . . 11 25 

Welsh, James 18 20 

Welsh, Patrick, 2d, State ... 23 58 

Wood, John, "... 7 00 

Wood, Isaac, " ... 8 00 

Wing, Betsy A., Waltham . . . 5 00 

Withington, Louisa . . . . 175 70 

White, William 27 61 

Aid to sundry insane persons, expense refunded . 145 65 

" " other persons " " . 32 64 

" " " not elsewhere enumerated 60 30 

'.' " 1,705 tramps 56 72 

" " James Nash, in 1876 ; paid City of 

Springfield this year ... 62 86 

Sundry other bills contracted in 1876, paid this year 303 38 
C. C. Hayes, services as Town Physician, to Feb. 1, 

1878" 150 00 

C. L. Edwards, medical examinations ... 10 00 

W. S. Everett, " " ... 10 00 
Boynton & Rogers, stove and funnel for use of Mary 

A. Johnson 9 17 

Stationery and Printing . . . . . 16 50 

Postage stamps and car fares ..... 4 25 



>,540 05 



40 

SUMMARY. 

Bills of 1876 paid in 1877 $366 24 

Aid rendered, and expense repaid . . . 178 29 
Due from other towns and from the State for amounts 

paid out in 1877 ...... 636 67 

Net expenses of Poor Department for the year . 4,358 85 



AMOS H. BRAINARD, 
C. L. FARNSWORTH, 
EDWIN R. WALKER, 



$5,540 05 

Overseers 
of the Poor. 



41 



COLLECTOR'S REPORT. 

Town of Hyde Park, 
in account with HENRY A. RICH, Collector of Taxes. 



By uncollected Taxes, as per 


account current, 




. 


dated February 1, 


1877. 








$10,420 83 








931 74 














$9,489 09 






1,860 82 










$11,349 91 










«98 K9S ns 






" " (additional) 26 77 








$28,554 80 






$3,050 11 








721 28 














$24,783 41 






2 565 93 










27,349 84 










$85,874 34 








$1,499 25 








2,538 43 

23,076 87 
$27,114 55 














$58,759 79 










58,842 93 






To cash paid to Town Treasurer at sundry'times. . 


$97,542 18 


$97,542 18 



HENRY A. RICH, Collector of Taxes. 



Hyde Park, February 1, 1878. 



42 

TREASURER'S 



Dr. HENRY S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer, in Account 



Cash in the Treasury, February 1, 1877 



AMOUNTS RECEIVED 
DURING THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1878: 

From Treasurer's Notes, Funded Loan 

Treasurer's Notes, Temporary Loan 

Henry A. Rich, Collector, Taxes for 1875 

Henry A. Rich, Collector, Taxes for 1876 

Henry A.Rich, Collector, Taxes for 1877 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Corporation Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for National Bank Tax 

Treasurer Commonwealth, for State Aid 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for State Paupers 

Treasurer Commonwealth, for Income Mass. School Fund 

County Treasurer, dog licenses, 1877 

fElizabeth Bryant $4 94 

I 
City of Boston, for aid to < Mary Caliill 22 57 

[ Stephen A. Davis 8 40 



City of Cambridge, for aid to - 



[.John Dixon $8 31 

William Killian. '. 19 50 



Town of Easton, for aid to Charles H. Tyler 

John M. Twichell, rents from Town Hall Building. 

Sale of school books 

Sale of trees 

Release of Tax Deeds 

Interest on Tax Deeds 

Support of Poor, for board ol'insane persons, &c. 
Interest on bank balances 



$66 87 



13,000 00 

33,500 00 

11,349 91 

27,349 34 

58,842 93 

545 40 

964 91 

433 70 

28 25 

139 96 

39C 58 



35 91 



27 81 

6 35 
334 81 

7 71 
1 00 

6,775 13 

1,344 63 

178 29 

148 87 



$155,478 36 



43 

REPORT. 



Current with the Town of Hyde Park. 



Cr. 



amounts disbursed: 

On account of Treasurer's Notes, Funded Loan 

Treasurer's Notes, Temporary Loan , 

Interest 

Schools 

Evening Schools 

Income, Massachusetts School Fund 

School Incidentals ,. 

Incidentals 

Highways 

Fire Department • 

Support of Poor 

Police 

Salaries . 

Public Library, current expenses , 

Public Library Fund, paid Trustees. 

amount received for dog licenses in 1876 , 

State Tax for 1877 

County Tax for 1877 

Gravel Land 

Henry A. Rich, Collector of Taxes 

Defective Tax Deeds 

Abatement of amount due on Tax Deeds 

State Aid 

Sinking Fund, amount of appropriation 

Sinking Fund, unexpended balance of appropriations 
Tax Deeds received from Collector. . , 

Cash In the Treasury, January 31, 1878 , 



$16,000 00 


48,500 00 


15,715 99 


117,485 53 


262 04 


60 07 


2,523 66 


5,925 88 


5,802 29 


4,252 80 


5,540 06 


1,443 81 


2,590 00 


1,274 67 


542 69 


5,235 00 


5,374 40 


1,733 97 


988 12 


194 35 


300 84 


366 00 


4,000 00 


487 06 


3,148 17 


$149,727 39 


6,750 97 


$155,478 36 



44 



Appropriations and Expenditures for the Current Year. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Interest 

Schools 

Evening Schools.. 

School Incidentals.. .. 

Incidentals 

Highways , 

Fire Department 

Support of Poor 

Police , 

Salaries , 

Public Library 

State and County Tax. 

Gravel Land 

Discount on Taxes 

Sinking Fund 



Appropriation. 


Expenditure. 


Unexpended. 


Deficiency. 


$16,000 00 


*$15,567 12 


$432 88 




18,500 00 


17,465 53 


1,034 47 




400 00 


262 04 


137 96 




2,500 00 


2,523 66 




$23 66 


5,700 00 


5,925 88 




225 88 


5,800 00 


5,802 29 




2 29 


4,500 00 


4,252 80 


247 20 




5,500 00 


f5,361 76 


138 24 




1,500 00 


1,443 81 


56 19 




2,590 00 


2,599 00 






1,275 00 


1,274 67 


33 




11,500 00 


10,609 40 


890 60 




1,733 97 


1,733 97 






2,500 00 


2,538 43 




38 43 


4,000 00 


4,000 00 






$83,998 97 


$81,351 36 


$2,937 87 


$290 26 



*Amount of expenditure, less interest on Treasurer's bank balances. 
tAmount of expenditures, less cash received for board of insane persons, &c. 



Unexpended Balance Account, viz: 

Amount of same (excepting the school appropriations) $1,765 44 

Deficiency as shown above. 290 26 

Net unexpended balance $1,475 18 

Which has been paid, viz : 

Henry A. Rich, Collector of Taxes, (see Selectmen's report) $988 12 

Sinking Fund 487 06 



TOW3ST DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1878. 

FUNDED LOAN. 

TOWN BONDS. 

One hundred and two bonds, Nos. 1 to 102 inclusive, of one 
thousand dollars each, payable to bearer with interest at six 
per .cent, per annum, due November 1, 1885, redeemable 
after November 1, 1880 $102,000 00 

NOTES. 

Teasurer's Note(Hyde Park Sinking Fund)six per cent, interest, 

due June 1, 1881 20,000 00 

Franklin Savings Institution,Greenfield,seven per cent, interest, 

due July 22, 1881 20,000 00 

Franklin Savings Institution, Greenfield, seven per cent, interest, 

due September 12, 1881 20,000 00 

Institution for Savings, Newburyport, five per cent, interest, 

due January 1, 1882 5,000 00 

Treasurer's Note(Hyde Park Sinking Fund)five per cent, interest, 

due August 15, 1882 12,000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, seven per cent, interest 

due January 8, 1884 30,000 00 

Home Savings Bank, Boston, seven per cent, interest, 
due February 28, 1884 J0,0_00_00 ^^ 

Total inuebtidness $229,000 00 

HENRY S BUNTON, Town Treasurer. 

Hyde Pahk, February 1, 1878, 



TOWN OF HYDE PAEK 

SINKING FUND. 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

Amount of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1877 $36,193 71 

receipts, viz: 

From Town of Hyde Park, annual appropriation $4,000 00 

From Town of Hyde Park, unexpended balance 

of appropriations 487 06 

Income from investments 1,929 71 

$6,416 77 

Amount of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1878 $42,610 48 

INVESTED, VIZ : 

Note, Town of Hyde Park, six per cent, interest, 

dated June 1, 1876, due June 1, 1881 , $20,000 00 

Note, Town of Hyde Park, five per cent., interest, 

dated August 15, 1877, due August 15, 18S2 12,000 00 

Note, Town of Woburn, five per cent- interest, 

dated July 2, 1«77, due July 1, 1887.. 10,000 00 

Deposit with New England Trust Co., Boston 610 48 



HENRY GREW, 

WILLIAM J. STUART, \ Commissioners. 

HENRY BLASDALE, 



■•) 



HENRY S. BUNTON, 

Treasurer Sinking Fund. 

Htde PARK, February 1, 1878. 



46 

AUDITOR'S STATEMENT AND CERTIFICATE. 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY. 

Grew School Building, Land and.Personal Property $36,000 00 

Blake " " " '• 30,000 00 

Greenwood " " " " 30,000 00 

Damon " " •' " 28,350 00 

Everett ■■' " '« '« 20,000 00 

Town Hall " " " " 22,000 00 

Fire Department , 25,000 00 

Butler School Building and Land 1,000 00 

Furniture, Safes, etc., in Town Offices 1,000 00 

Town Team, etc., etc 800 00 

Lock-up, Fixtures and Bedding 600 00 

Hearse , 450 00 

Weights and Measures 850 00 

Law Library and Book Case 3U0 00 

$195,850 00 

OTHER ASSETS AS FOLLOWS. 

Taxes due and Unpaid, as per Collector's Report $23,798 15 

Sinking Fund, as per Commissioner's Report .• ,. 42,610 48 

Tax Deeds 7,228 63 

Due from the Commonwealth, State Aid advanced 366 00 

Treasurer's Cash Balance, January 31, 1878 5,750 97 

79,754 23 

Total Assets, January 31,11878 $275,604 23 



Total Indebtedness of the Town of Hyde Park, January 31, 1878, as per 
Treasurer's Report '. $229,000 00 

LESS. 

Taxes Due -n 

Sinking Fund 9 

TaxDeeds \ 79,754 23 

State Aid I 

Treasurer's Balance J 

Leaves Net Indebtedness ... $149,245 77 



CERTIFICATE. 



In compliance with the By-Laws of the Town, the undersigned have examined 
the accounts of the Selectmen, School Committee, Treasurer, Collector of Taxes, 
Commissioners of the Sinking Fund, Trustees of the Public Library, Overseers of the 
Poor, and Custodian of the Town Hall, and hereby certify that the same are correct, 
and all payments accompanied by proper vouchers. The^original bills and pay rolls 
have been carefully examined to ascertain the correctnessjof the same. 

B. C. VOSE, ) 

HOWARD M. HAMBLIN, > Auditors. 
D.,W. C. ROGERS, > 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen, — It is with satisfaction that we inform you 
that during the past year the demands upon the Fire De- 
partment have been light, compared with the previous year. 
We feel as if the torch of the incendiary had been stayed, 
yet our firemen have always been ready to discharge their 
duties. The building law passed last March has been en- 
forced in every case brought to our notice ; it is a step in the 
right direction. 

The machines of the departmet are in good condition, all 
necessary repairs having been made. The hose is in about 
the same condition as last year. A Bangor Extension Ladder 
ha's been added to the department, and we consider it a valu- 
able addition. In the last report a Chemical Fire Engine was 
recommended ; when the matter was brought before the citi- 
zens, it was laid on the table ; we hope it will be favoraby con- 
sidered soon, for it would be a great help to the department, 
particularly where there is an insufficient supply of water, or 
in the early stages of a fire. In conclusion we again call your 
attention to the lack of water in both the Fairmount and 
Sunnyside districts. 

Very respectfully yours, 

WM. U. FAIRBAIRN, Chief Engineer. 
L. A. RUNNELLS, 
W. W. HILTON, 

Asst. Engineers. 



48 



. 


<a O O O rg O 

5000 CD 


O 



H 


Jr bo 





V 


3 3 O 







CO CN O iO CO CO 



cm" 


K 


"" ■» 












(3 


>1 




>►> 






EC 




























g 


3 




a 








fa 




fa 








000000 







0000c 


; 





to 


00 c. 


3000 





00 


10 





O 


i-l 00 O 0_ 0_ CO 


o_ 


h) 


• sT 0" ef h 


rH 
















CD 
















£ 
















O 




















CD 




CD 




CO 


00 


a a a a 3 a 

CE3. CO CO CO S3 CO 


CD 


p 


0) Jh ^ ^4 CD *■! 


CD 


<( 


t> S3 o3 oi ^ 03 


O 


S 'O T3 'O *■" ^ 


,3 




a a a 9 fl 


CD 
> 




£ CD CD CD £ CD 

o5 g 2 2 <3 2 




P 5 £ 5 P 5 


O 






t* ►.- 
















ea >■' 














Q 
O 


;tern avenue.. 

Centra] Park 

[liams a 

.Pond st&W 

lroad avenue. 

River street.. 

;iness street .. 


3 is 

3 CO 

3 >- 

h 03 




cs ia, 03 *3 3 'J 


3 £ 




fa" O O « O P & 


< ed 


















t»> 


K 
W 
55 


PC 

a 


=5 : 

5 


a 


a 
a 


P 

c 
C 




CD 


O 


« I 


p: 


C 


P 




g 




c. 

a 


03 r* 

03 C 

1 1 


PC 


a 

f 

E- 


P 
e 
,c 
c 
1-: 




CO 
CD 

s 

5 




a 


.a 


a 




a 


a 

cc 




03 




a 


CO c/ 






1 




CO 






3 = 


c- 










5 


c 


c 


K 




O 




.c 


.3 £ 


,c 




a 




Si 


3 bo b 


i ► 


> 6j 


a a 




60 






P C 






0! 




a 








~- 


3 


E 


13 




"a 


o> a 


I 


a 


S 


F- 


03 




6 


& & 


P 


a 

CD 


■ 


& 




P 


P P 


h? 


P 


H 


< 


R 




? 


% % 


a 


& 


£ 


a 


B 




< 


< < 


Ph 


■« 


«« 


P- 


Ph 


G 


>o 

rH cc 


?! 


?, 


"9 

O 


ir; 


- 




at 


rH C= 


E 


e4 


oi 


OS 


t> 






Ol "O 


CM 


■*< 


c , 


IO 


M< 


W 


ft 


CM rH 






»™ 


r- 




H 
-< 

R 


* 


"3 t> 
ft 03 


CD 

C 
3 


. 


. 


C 







1 


<l 


a 


1-1 






O 


& 



49 
OFFICERS AND NUMBER OF MEN. 



The following is a list of officers of the several companies, 
together with the number of men in the employ of the de- 
partment : — 

Goodwill Steam Fire Engine Co., No. I. 

HENRY B. BRIGGS, Foreman. j 

CHAS. I. CONWAY, Assistant Foreman. 
DANIEL T. CONLON, Clerk and Treasurer. 
PETER McCLELLAN, Engineman and nine men. 



Rough and Ready Engine Co., No. 2. 

MALCOM ROGERS, Foreman. 
WILLIAM HOLTHAM, Assistant Foreman. 
HENRY A. BURNETT, Clerk and Treasurer. 
W. H. CUMMINGER, Engineman, and nine men. 



Norfolk Hook and Ladder Co., No. i. 

GEORGE E. CARLTON, Foreman. 

F. A. HAWLEY, Assistant Foreman. 

W. H. HARLOW, Clerk and Treasurer, and eleven men. 



Splicer Hose Co., No. i. 

JOHN B. GUINAZZO, Foreman. 

JOSEPH J. O'NEILL, Assistant Foreman. 

JAMES A. GUINAN, Clerk and Treasurer, and eleven men. 

Total number of firemen, fifty-two. 



JOSHUA WILDER, Steward of the Department. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



The following are the statistics of Births, Intentions of Mar- 
riage, Marriages and deaths in Hyde Park, for the year ending 
December 31, 1877: 

BIRTHS. 

Number of Births registered in 1877—166. 

Males 87 Females 79 

The parentage of the children is as follows :— 

Both parents American 79 

" English 4 

" Irish 39 

" German 3 

" of British Provinces .'. 4 

Mixed — One parent American 29 

Both parents of other nationalities 8 

Born in January, 10; February, 21; March, 10; April, 16; May, 8; June, 
14; July, 15; August, 22; September, 14; October, 12; November, 13; 
December, 11. 

MARRIAGES. 

Number of Intentions of Marriage issued in 1877 — 48. 
Number of Marriages registered in 1877 — 44. 

Oldest Groom 48 Youngest Groom 21 

Bride 42 •' Bride 17 

Both parties born in the United States 28 

" " Nova Scotia 2 

" " Ireland 6 

" of other foreign nationalities 1 

Foreign and American 7 

Married in January, 5; February, 2; April, 8; May, 2; June, 2; Sep- 
tember, 4; October, 10; November, 8; December, 3. 



51 



The following are the names, ages and residences of the parties 
whose marriages were solemnized in 1877, certificates of which 
have been filed in this office : — 



Date. 



Jan. 


4 


" 


7 


•' 


10 


" 


17 


•' 


30 


Feb. 


18 


" 


18 


April 3 


'• 


9 


II 


11 


" 


12 


l< 


15 


» 


21 


'• 


26 


II 


28 


May 


15 


- 


19 


June 16 


« 


30 



Names. 



I. Bruce Shute 

Ella A. Baseom 

Thomas Lawton 

Frances T. Fitzgerald 

WillardS. Everett 

Laura A. Dutton , 

Gideon H. Haskell 

Uuth C Stone 

Thomas McGrath , 

Mary Howard 

Bartlett Crowley , 

Annie Tempany 

Thomas Kivlin 

Bessie M. O'Donnell. 

Henry A. Haskell , 

Jennie B. Moore 

Edward J. Dempsey..... 
Bridget Agnes JJolau.... 

James McDouough 

Levine Curley 

Charles H. Wiggin , 

Magdalena Ungerer , 

Frederick J. Harrington 
Ann Booney 

Edward H. Smiley 

Ella L. Hutchinson 

John F. Smith 

Jennie W. Stackpole. .. 

William Duxbury 

Susan E. Simpson 

Joseph Gilpatric 

Sarah E. Everaon 

Charles E. Peaslee 

Emma A. Chase 

Stephen S. Welsh 

Celia M. Fallon 

James B. Fall 

Louise Pond 



Residence. 



Quinoy 

Hyde Bark 

Boston 

Hyde Park 



Boston 

Hyde Park 



Boston. 



Hyde Park 

[Me 
Waterville, 
Winslow, Me 

Hyde Park 



Berkeley ,R.I. 
Hyde Park 



Milton , 



Hyde Park 
Pittsfield.N H 

Hyde Park 



39 



1st. 
2d. 



By whom Married. 



2d. 
1st. 



2d. 
1st. 



Rev. P. B. Davis. 
, Kev. W. J. Corcoran. 
Rev. F. C. Williams. 
Rev. Geo. F. Warren. 
Rev. James O'Doherty 
Rev. W.J. Corcoran. 
Rev. W. J. Corcoran.. 
Henry B. Terry, Esq. 
Rev. W. J. Corcoran. 
Henry B. Terry, Esq. 
Rev. P. B. Davis 
Rev. W. J. Corcoran. 
Rev.J. S. Whedon. 
Rev. J. S. Whedon. 
Rev. R. B. Van Kleeck 
Rev. M. P. Alderman 
Rev. P. B. Davis. 
Rev. W. J. Corcoran. 
Rev. M. P. Alderman. 



52 



Registry of Marriages in 1877 — (Continued.) 



Date. 


NAMES. 


Residence. 


6 

Ml 


a 


By whom Married. 


Sept. 3 
" 10 
" 13 


Everett B. Chester... . 
Lewis H. Halden.... .. 


Hyde Park. 
York, Me... 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park. 

Lowell.. ... 
Hyde Park. 

Hyde Park. 

Sturbridge. 

Hyde Park. 

Hinsdale.N.H 
Keene, N.H. 

Hyde Park. 
Newton. ... 

Hyde Park. 
S. Canton. 

Hyde Park. 

11 

i. 

ti 
11 

Brookline. 
Hyde Park. 


24 
20 

23 
19 

29 
18 

33 
33 

27 
24 

47 
36 

21 
21 

28 
82 

30 
18 

48 
42 

30 
20 

26 
21 

24 
19 

21 
21 

26 

23 

24 

26 

35 
21 

28 
26 

28 
22 

38 
37 


1st. 

(1 

2d. 
1st. 

2d. 

1st. 

3d. 
1st. 

it 
ic 

u 

«( 

11 
a 

a 

2d. 

1st. 


Rev. David B. Sewall. 
Rev. P. B. Davis. 
Rev. R. G. Seymour. 


" 30 

Oct. 2 

" 6 


Henrietta B. Richardson 


Rev. W. J. Corcoran. 
Rev. R. B. Van Kleeck 
Rev. D. C. Eddy. 


" 10 
" 13 


Isaac H. Goodwin. ....... 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 
Rev. Clarence Fowler. 


" 15 




Rev. F. C. Williams. 


" 17 
11 !Y 


Jennie P. Wood 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 
Rev. P. B. Davis 


" 25 
" 31 


JohnD. White 


Rev. I. H. Gilbert. 
Rev. Jesse Wagner. 


" 31 




Rev. D. C. Eddy. 


Nov. 1 
" 21 
« 21 


William P. Bodwell 

Henry E.Farnsworth.... 


Rev. J. R. Peirce. 
Rev. Horatio Alger. 
Rev. P. B. Davis. 


*' 22 
" 29 
" 29 


John P. Dunn 


Rev. F. C. Williams. 
Rev. W. J. Corcoran. 
J. C.Harrington. 



53 



Registry of Marriages in 1877 — (Continued.) 



Date. 


Names. 


Residence. 


6 
be 
< 


J3 ■ 
V 

be 
_«« 

2 


NAMES. 


Nov. 29 
" 29 

Dec. 6 
" 25 


William H. Hathaway.... 
Isabella Hutchinson.. . . 

Adolphus W. Waldron,Jr 
Caroline H. McFarland.. 

George W. Chapman 


Hyde Park. 

N. York, N.Y. 
St. Paul.Minn 

Hyde Park. 
Provd'ce.R.I. 

Hyde Park. 
Stbughton. 

Hyde Park. 


26 
23 

28 
32 

27 

28 

24 
22 

25 
18 


1st. 


Rev. Wm. B. Wright. 
Rev. Henry J. Fox. 
Rev. William Phillips. 


" 28 


Henry J. Kahlmeyer. . . . 


Rev. T. F. Clary. 



54 



DEATHS. 

Number of deaths in Hyde Park in 1877—88. 

Males 47 Females 41 

Born in United States 72 

" England 1 

" Ireland 11 

" France 1 

" British Provinces 2 

Birth place unknown 1 

AGES. 

Stillborn 4 

Under one year 17 

Between land 5 year 14 

" 5 and 10 years 4 

" 10 and 20 years 8 

•« 20 and 30 years 8 

" 30 and 40 years 8 

" 40 and 50 years 3 

" 50 and 60 years 8 

" 60 and 70 years 6 

" 70 and 80 years 5 

" 80 and 90 years 3 

Died in January, 9; February, 8; March, 2; April, 12; May, 6; June, 
11; July, 10; August, 11; September, 4; October, 3; November, 8; 
December 4. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



Albuminuria 1 

Apoplexy 2 

Anaemia 1 

Cancer in the stomach 1 

Congestion of brain < . . 2 

" lungs 1 

Cholera Infantum 3 

Consumption 17 

Convulsions 1 

Croup 2 

Dropsy 2 

Diphtheria 7 

Dysentery 1 

Exhaustion 2 

General congestion 1 

" debility 2 

Heart disease 2 

Hydrophobia 1 

Hypertrophy of the heart 1 

Inflammation of bowels 1 

" lungs 1 



Mesenteric disease 

Marasmus 

Meningitis (Basilar) 

Obstruction of bowels 

Old age 

Phthisis pulmonalis 

" Laryngea 

Pneumonia 

Paralysis 

Phthisis 

Railroad accident 

Scarlet fever 

Suicide 

Stillborn 

Scrofula 

Spasms 

Suffocation (accid«ntal) 

Scalding (accidental) 

Teething 

Typhoid fever 4 

Tumor on the brain 1 



55 



The following are the names of the persons deceased in Hyde 
Park in 1877 :— 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 
April 



May 



June 



July 



Boston A. Campbell.., 

John B. Gilman 

Georgie A. McDonald. 

John C. Foster 

Fear Atkins 

William Bullard 

Andrew Simpson 

Salley Newhall , 

Eliza H. Blanchard.... 

Etta S. Patch 

Mary A. Conley 

Bertha E. Patch 

Caleb H. Tyler 

Charles H. Snaith. ...... 

Annie J. Bragdon 

Annie Wallace 

Arthur Savage . 

Michael Kilroy 

Bettie Scoggins 

Henry McF. Millar .... 

James Dolan 

Josiah Saville 

Alice A. A. Foster 

Hannah Drought 

Caroline Sweat 

William H. Curley. ... . 

Dunn 

Margaret Butler 

Minnie H. Straw 

Morrill 

William E. Shepard.... 

Winfield Wyman .. 

Thomas Dolan -. 

Bridget Tierney 

Harriet A. Cheney..... 

Patrick MoyJan 

George Garron 

Thomas F. Howe, Jr.., 

Barrett 

Annie McL. Husted... 

Michael Downey 

Charlotte N. Wiggin. . . 

Josiah Nye 

Richard O'Keele 

Edith Whittier 

David H. Cook 

George W. Tilley 

Elizabeth Mealia 

Martin Burke 

Patrick Connelly....... 

William H. Conway... 

Henry Madden 

Lucy C. Emery 

Mary E. Brisco 



12 



23 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Dropsy. 

Typhoid fever. 

Anaemia. 

Apoplexy. 

Mesenteric disease. 

Apoplexy. 

Typhoid fever. 

Consumption. 

Old age. 

Croup. 

Consumption. 

Diphtheria. 

Pneumonia. 

Albuminuria. 

Hydrophobia. 

Scarlet fever. 

Teething. 

Convulsions. 

Accidental scalding. 

Pneumonia. 

Marasmus. 

Pneumonia. 

Consumption. 

Phthisis pulmonalis. 

Dropsy. 

Consumption. 

Still born. 

Diphtheria. 

Consumption. 

Still born. 

Consumption. 

Exhaustion. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Consumption. 

Phthisis. 

Suicide. 

Consumption. 

Congestion of brain. 

Stillborn. 

Diphtheria. 

Pneumonia. 

Diphtheria. 

Consumption. 

Spasms. 

Tumor on the brain. 

Basilar meningitis. 

Phthisis. 

Railroad accident. 

Cancer in the Stomach. 

Diphtheria. 

Congestion of brain. 

Phthisis laryngea. 

Consumption. 



56 

Deaths — (Continued.) 





[NAMES, j 


AGES 






DATE. 


T. 


M. 


D. 


CAUSE OF DEATH. 


July 17 




56 
50 
84 
53 
76 

1 

3 
55 

34 

1 

1 
38 

51 

20 

19 

67 
56 

1 
30 
20 

1 

80 


9 

8 

4 
4 

11 
4 
3 

11 

4 
1 

4 
7 
6 
5 

10 

7 

2 
3 

2 
10 
1 

5 
10 


10 
10 

1 

12 
18 
13 
15 
5 

19 
19 

i 
9 

15 
23 

22 


Paralysis. 
Typhoid fever. 
General debility. 
Consumption. 
Debility. 




" 24 
" 29 




Aug. 3 
" 16 




" 16 






" 18 






19 
" 20 




Marahmus. 


" 20 




Consumption. 
Hypertrophy of heart. 


" 22 
" 23 




" 29 

" 31 

Sept. 6 

16 

ii 17 




Consumption. 
Marasmus. 
Dysentery. 
Cholera infantum. 




" 21 

Oct. 18 

19 

«' 30 

Nov. 5 
" 6 




" lungs. 
Heart disease. 
"Still born. 
Typhoid fever. 
General congestion. 


" 9 




Obstruction of the bowels. 


" 10 
" 12 
" 21 
" 23 

25 
Dec. 2 

12 
" 22 
ii 24 


Drewery F. Snow 

Betsey A. VVithington 

Harold C. Furwell 


Exhaustion. 
Consumption. 

Diphtheria. 

Suffocation in a gravel bank. 

Consumption. 

Diphtheria. 

Membranous croup. 

Old age. 









The Town Clerk requests information of any omission or error 
in the above tables, in order that the registration may be as com- 
plete as possible. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen, — I herewith submit my annual report for the 
year ending December 31, 1877, together with the record of 
crimnal arrests and prosecutions ; number of persons arrest- 
ed, 118, for the following crimes: — assault and battery, 21 ; 
larceny in buildings, 3 ; larceny, 10 : common drunkards, 6 ; 
simple drunkness, 17 ; adultery, 2 ; keeping unlicensed dogs, 
8 ; single sale of liquor, 10 ; keeping open shop on the Lord's 
day, 4 ; cruelty to animals, 1 ; illegal keeping liquor, 9 ; liquor 
nuisances, 7; breaking and entering in day time, 4 ; vagrants, 
10 ; perjury, 1 ; juvenile offenders, 5. 

Property belonging to Police Departments : 7 pairs hand- 
cuffs ; 4 billies ; 3 pairs toggles ; 4 rattles ; 2 lanterns. The 
number of tramps lodged in the lock-up, has increased 
nearly 500 in number over that of 1876, and nearly 900 more 
than in 1875. There are no open bars in the town, for the 
sale of intoxicating liquor, and if any liquor is sold, it is done 
in out of the way places and back rooms. By the report of 
E. W. Moffatt, keeper of the lock-up, the number of tramps 
providvd for in 1877 was 1705. The station house is in good 
condition. Property belonging to station house : 24 pairs 
blankets ; 7 pillows ; 6 tin dippers ; 1 water pail ; 1 slate ; 5 
slop pails ; 1 broom ; 1 table ; 1 stove ; 1 dust brush ; 1 pan ; 
1 lamp. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES JACOBS, 

Chief of Police. 
Hyde Park, Dec. 31, 1877. 



THE SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



HYDE TAEK LIBEAEY BOAED. 



In their previous reports, the Board have considered, at 
length, those practical questions which rarely fail to beset 
the earlier years of all * similar institutions. The necessity of 
further discussion upon similar topics no longer exists. The 
Board see nothing in the near future beyond the usual 
library routine, which will be likely to call for special con- 
sideration in their reports hereafter. 

At the organization of the Library Board, a vote of the 
town ordered its reports to be made at the annual Town 
meeting for appropriations. This fixed the date of the li- 
brary year some weeks later than the town year ; conse- 
quently the annual town report, published in February, 
could not contain the report of the library, made to the 
town a month afterward. At its last meeting the town made 
the library-year the same as the town-year, and ordered that 
thereafter the library report should be included in the an- 
nual report of the town. Thus the town report for the 
present year contains, for the first time, the Annual Report 
of the Hyde Park Public Library. Its five previous reports 
remain, in manuscript, in the office of the Town Clerk. 

On account of the change in time, this sixth report of the 
doings of the library covers but little more than ten months. 
During these ten months 18,427 books have been! delivered 
by the Librarian, and 17,954 returned to the library. The 
number of new books purchased in the same time is 125. 



59 

The number 'rebound and repaired, 300. The number re- 
covered has been, upon an average, 18 per day, making more 
than 5,000 for the ten months. The number of new cards 
issued, 411. The whole number of volumes now belonging 
to the library is 5,420. 

The fines collected since the last report amount to $S7-3 2 - 

Additional shelves have been added to the accomodations 
of the library, thus filling all the available room remaining. 
The Librarian has long suffered great inconvenience, and ap- 
plicants for books much annoyance, from delay occasioned 
by the lack of sufficient conveniences near the delivery desk ; 
these have now been supplied, thus preventing much loss of 
time. Another inconvenience always severely felt, but, for 
lack of means, never till now removed, has been a complete 
shelf list of the entire library. That has been prepared, 
and is now in constant use, greatly facilitating- the work of 
the Librarian, and enabling applicants to be far more expe- 
ditiously served than was possible before. 

As the library is now firmly established, and as the town 
has just restored to its permanent fund the amount unwit- 
tingly taken from it two years ago, the interest of that per- 
manent fund will henceforth be sufficient to purchase all the 
new books needed from year to year, as well as all the 
monthly magazines, papers and ' other periodicals for the 
reading room. 

Consequently, the appropriation of the annual dog tax to 
the library fund being no longer necessary, the Board recom- 
mend to the town that the said tax be hereafter applied to- 
ward the running expenses of the library. Thus, as in the 
past, the town has never yet raised by tax a single dollar to 
purchase books for the library or periodicals for the reading 
room, so, in the future, the interest of the library fund .will 
permanently exempt the citizens of Hyde Park from .taxation 
for those purposes. 

Two years since the number of persons holding library 
cards each in his own name, was 2,447 > during the last ten 
months it has risen to 2,851. It is thus seen that the number 



60 

of persons taking books from the library, each, either upon his 
own card or that of some other member of his family, is more 
than double the number of all the families in town. The en- 
tire population of our town was, on the first of last May, 
5,879 ; in that number are included all, from the babe of a 
day to the adult of a century. Probably no child under the 
age of seven years, can read any library book ; the number 
under that age can hardly be less than 600 ; to this number 
add those of any age over seven who either cannot read at 
all, or cannot read understandingly, the volumes in the li- 
brary, and the whole number cannot be less than 900 ; this, 
subtracted from the whole population, leaves 4,979. Therefore 
those who have taken out library cards in their own names, 
and thus may be presumed to have its books in common, if 
not habitual use, are nearly two-thirds of the inhabitants who 
can read understandingly the library books. 

If knowledge is power (and who doubts it ?), this fact re- 
veals the incalculable value of the library as an educational 
force, thus constantly developing the intelligence of the town 
and casting its character. 

The library has received since our last report the following 
donation of books : — 

From the State of Massachusetts, Public Documents 12 volumes. 
" Mr. W. F. Este^ . . . . . . 4 " 

" Mr. E. M. Lancaster 1 " 

" Lockwood & Brooks . . . . . 1 " 
" MacMillan & Co 1 " 

The Norfolk County Gazette and the Dedham Transcript 
have each been sent gratuitously to the library from the 
office of publication during the entire year. 

The ease with which persons can get from a library what they 
seek, is a test of its practical value. The printed catalogue of 
our library contains the titles of 3,000 books ; 2,500 have been 
added since that was printed. The borrower must know the 
titles, shelf-numbers, etc., of these before he can draw them. 
How can he get this knowledge ? To find it he must exam- 



61 

ine the four manuscript catalogues. Failing there, he must 
explore the bulletin ; if that gives no light he must con over 
the weekly lists in the Gazette. These six sources are 
open to him ; but, probably, before he has gone through 
half of them his time is out, and his patience too, and he 
asks, as scores have done before, " Why does n't the Board 
print a supplement to the catalogue, and thus supply our 
need, instead of mocking it ? " The " why " is plain. Had 
the Board the means, the printed supplement would be upon 
the tables in a week. 

• In the last year's report the Board dwelt at length upon this 
great hindrance to the usefulness of the library. We did not 
then, nor do we now, ask the town to vote the money needed to 
remove it. Great as this need is, more urgent ones, which can- 
not be postponed, have prior claims. The times counsel 
economy, to the utmost in all expenditures ; the public can 
far better afford to wait for this much needed relief, than it 
can now afford to give it ; but, as it is the right of the town 
to know the exact condition of the library, the Board states 
it, and for the present leaves it there. 

The practical value of the library to our citizens depends 
greatly upon the character, culture, and general adaptations 
of the Librarian. The position demands rare endowments of 
head, heart and hand, a large acquaintance with books, and 
extensive general knowledge. The multiform details of the 
Librarian's work necessitate exactness, system, uniformity and 
methodical arrangement ; activity, punctuality, quick insight, » 
manual dexterity and rapid execution ; haste without hurry, 
care without worry, and that power of efficient and sustained 
accomplishment which administers complicated affairs with- 
out confusion. To preside effectively in a free Public Library 
and reading-room, one should have sound judgment and 
common sense, a quiet firmness with a gentle manner, prompt 
action, natural tact, a cheerful, courteous air, kindly ways, and 
that unjostled balance and self control without which there 
can be no adequate control of others. As numbers of all 
ages and grades are at all times. liable to be present, common 



62 

necessities consecrate the place to silence, and exact it. 
Hence the law of the library requiring it. If the frequenters 
of the room find that the movements of the Librarian are free 
from noise and bustle, his voice low, words few, aspect and bear- 
ing quiet and self-poised, — his daily practice and example thus 
embodying the rules of the library, — they will naturally fall 
into line and become co-workers with him in preserving 
silence and order. Even the roughest boys will, in time, 
grow smoother, and the hardest, softer, in the mellowing air 
of the room, until each, at length, will come to feel some re- 
sponsibility as one of its custodians. Thus the Librarian 
may become largely a public educator, training daily the 
youth of the town in good breeding, good manners, good 
habits, and kindly courtesies. 

During its first two years the library was in charge of Mr. 
W. E. Foster, now the Librarian of the Free Public Library 
in the city of Providence, R. I. Mr. Foster's services during 
those two years were invaluable to the town. Upon his re- 
signation the Board made a provisional arrangement, by 
which Mr. J. J. Reeves was put temporarily in charge of the 
library. Upon Mr. R.'s retirement, Mrs. H. B. Thompson 
was unanimously elected Librarian. She found the Library 
in such confusion throughout, that thoroughly to re-establish 
the reign of systematic method was a tedious task. By the 
energy and thoroughness with which she then routed chaos 
and brought back the reign of order, and has ever since with 
» heartiness and fidelity given herself to her work, Mrs. Thomp- 
son has won the emphatic commendation of the Board. 

The annual report of the Treasurer of the Board for the 
year ending January 31, 1878, is herewith subjoined, with the 

official certificate of the Town Auditors. 

In conclusion, the Board will only add that the town holds 

now, in trust for the free use of its citizens, 5,400 volumes. 
In executing this trust, it assumed at the outset the running 
expenses of the Library. In estimating these for this year, 
the Board, ruling out every expense not indispensable, has 



63 

fixed the limit at $ 1,000, and ask the town to vote that sura. 
Nearly half that amount has usually been covered by the 
annual dog tax. 

Respectfully submitted, 

In behalf of the Library Board, 

Theodore D. Weld, Chairman. 

Edward S. Hathaway, Secretary. 



64 






er 


e 


c 






D- 




c 


M "I 


ec 


■* 


c 






C 




a: 


00 


<y> 


r- 


(S 






CC 




if 

o- 


3 
















a 


^ 


& 








«■ 


ec 


-* 


















•» 




















a 


i 














c 


c 














c 


7 








a 
















p 




G 


,£ 


- ff 












Ja 












c 
PC 




c 
c 




C 










pc 

5 


■= 

a 


c 








a 




a 


| 


5 








IS 




a 


£ 


t 








X 




£. 


c 


t 










" 


C 


ft 


1 








a 






K 










r- 






-- 


C 








a 




P. 


5 


c 












* 












■-/ 




a 
















a 


- 










cv 




t. 
















> 


1 










c 




PC 












>- 








O 


■r 




ea 


ec 


CO 




er 


C 




CD 


C£ 


C/3 


if 


t- 


■>d 




e> 




e 


— < 


1C 


IC 


IT 




*** 




si 


e- 








IT 




*~ 


lH 


er 














^ 


■9 


>■ 












«& 








„ 




„ 




























a> 




(U 
















t* 
















3 












to 




U3 












eS 




03 












© 




QJ 












h 




Sh 












H 




H 












fl 




a 










c 

E 


> fS 




o 










a 


> 




o 










P 


§ 




c 


> 






c 


a 




c 


£ 


> 






c 


pa 




pi 


<4- 

c 








a 
















a 


> as 




aj 


c 




c 

c 
I 


1 


c 

3 


n 


u 
'1 


1 


3 




T 


c 


„ 






g 






"c 


V 


* 


" 


i 









( 








e 




e 




C 


'5 


M 


z 


E- 


c 




a 


> t 






t> 


D "S 






c. 


c 






c 


S 






c 


>■ 






C 


& 


C 





















c 

p: 


> 1 




- 




- 






c 


> 














& 


( 

















£f* 



M 

"SO 

d££ 
.o . 



E-" P 
< a. 

a5^ 



S 5 

O o 
O 03 



5^ 

.fl g 
cp £ 



BY-LAWS. 



At a meeting of the legal voters of the town of Hyde Park, 
held August 2, 1875, it was voted to adopt the following By-Laws, 
to wit : — 

NOTIFICATION OF TOWN MEETING. 

Every town meeting shall be notified by posting copies of the war- 
rant calling the same, in ten public places in the town, seven days, 
at least, before the day appointed for said meeting ; and a copy of 
the warrant shall be published in the local newspapers of the town 
once, at least, before said meeting. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING. 

The annual town meeting shall be held on the first Monday of 
March of each year. The meeting shall be opened at eight o'clock 
a.m., and the polls shall be kept open until sunset. 

RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF TOWN MEETINGS. 

1. — Every meeting shall be opened with prayer. 

2. — All questions submitted for the consideration of the town, in- 
volving the expenditure of money, shall be in writing. 

3. — No vote fixing the period for closing a ballot shall be reconsid- 
ered after such ballot shall have commenced ; but it may be in order 
to extend the period without such reconsideration. 

4. — When a question is under debate, motions shall be received to 
adjourn, to lay on the table, the previous question, to postpone to a 
certain time, to postpone indefinitely, to commit, or to amend ; which 
several motions shall have precedence in the order in which they are 
herein arranged. 

5. — The powers and duties of the presiding officer, not especially 
provided for by law, or by the foregoing rules, shall be determined 
by the rules of practice contained in "Cushing's Manual," so far as 
they are adapted to the condition and powers of the town. 

6. — No vote shall be reconsidered except upon a motion made 
within one hour after such vote has passed, unless such reconsidera- 
tion is ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the voters present. 



66 



FINANCIAL YEAR. 

The financial year of the town shall begin with the first day of Feb- 
ruary in each year, and end on the thirty-first day of the following 
January. 

MEETINGS OF TOWN OFFICERS. 

The selectmen, overseers of the poor, board of health, surveyors of 
highways, and school committee shall post in some conspicuous place 
at their official rooms, a notice of the times of their respective meet- 
ings, and shall also give notice of the same through the local news- 
papers. 

COLLECTION OF TAXES. 

1. — The assessment of taxes shall be completed, and a list of the 
same delivered to the collector, on or before the first day of August 
of each year. 

2 — All taxes which may be assessed, if paid on or before the first 
day of October next after the assessment, shall be entitled to such 
discount as the town shall vote at its annual meeting. All persons 
who may be assessed a poll-tax only, shall pay the same on demand. 
All taxes shall be paid in full on or before the first day of November 
next following the assessment of said taxes, and if not so paid, inter- 
est shall be paid at a rate not exceeding twelve per cent, per annum, 
if so voted by the town. 

3. — The assessors shall annually, on or before the first day of July, 
post a copy of the list of poll-tax payers on the outside of the build- 
ing containing their office. 

4. — It shall be the duty of the selectmen to insert the following 
article in the warrant calling the annual meeting, viz : "'To see what 
discount shall be allowed on all taxes paid on or before the first day 
ol October next." 

DUTIES OF THE AUDITORS. 

1. — The auditors shall examine the accounts of the selectmen, 
school committee, treasurer, collector, trustees of the public library, 
and the custodian of the town hall, and all other officers or commit- 
tees entrusted with the expenditure of money, and shall certify as to 
the correctness of the same in the printed annual report. 

2. — Before certifying to the accounts of the selectmen and school 
committee, they shall examine the original bills and pay rolls, and 
ascertain that they are correct and properly receipted. 

3. — Before certifying to the accounts of the treasurer-, they shall 
examine his cash-book, wherein shall be entered his receipts and 



67 

payments, as they occur from day to da} r , shall see that he has paid 
out no moneys except on proper vouchers, carefully examine all pay- 
ments for interest, and see that the funds on hand are intact. 

4. — Before certifying to the collector's accounts, they shall examine 
his cash-book, showing the amounts collected from day to day, and 
showing when the same were paid over to the treasurer ; shall see 
that he has collected interest on all taxes overdue, and shall see a 
complete list of abatements, and also a list of unpaid taxes. 

5. — They shall see that the accounts ol the trustees of the public 
library, and the custodian of the town hall, are kept in a correct 
manner, and that all payments are accompanied with proper 
vouchers. 

6. — The auditors shall have access to the accounts of the several 
officers at such stated times as said auditors shall deem for the inter- 
est of the town, and shall audit the accounts of the treasurer and 
collector quarterly. 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS. 

All unexpended balances ol the regular annual appropriations 
shall, at the close of each financial year, be paid into the sinking 
fund to be used in extinguishing the town debt. 

MEASURERS OE WOOD AND BARK. 

It shall be the duty of the selectmen to appoint measurers of wood 
and bark. 

REMOVAL OF BUILDINGS AND OBSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS. 

1. — No building shall be removed over a public street without the 
written permission of the selectmen. 

2. — The owner of such building, or the person or persons removing 
the same, shall pay the town all damages, costs, and expenses for 
which the town may be liable or compelled to pay by reason of said 
street being obstructed or encumbered. 

3. — No person shall place, or cause to be placed, in any of the 
public streets, sidewalks, lands, or upon any of the common lands of 
the town, without a written license from the selectmen, any manure 
dirt, gravel, stones, building materials, wood, coal, barrels, boxes, 
merchandise, or any rubbish of any kind whatever, and suffer the 
same to remain for twenty-four hours 

4. — All persons who shall obstruct the sidewalks or streets of the 
town to the molestation of travelers shall be subject to arrest as 
offenders against the public peace. Constables and police officers are 
instructed to enforce this rule rigidly. 



68 

5. — No person shall ride or drive ahorse in any street in the town 
at a rate faster than eight miles an hour. 

6. — No person shall play at ball, or throw balls, snow-balls, or 
stones, or discharge any gun or fire-arm, or make any bonfires or 
other fires, in any of the streets or public places in the town. 

COASTING. 

Coasting on any of the public streets of the town is prohibited, 
except upon such streets as the selectmen shall designate each year 
by publie notice. 

PASTURING OF CATTLE OR OTHER ANIMALS ON STREETS OR WAYS. 

1. — The town hereby adopts and avails itself of the provisions of 
chapter 45 of the general statutes, relating to the pasturing of cattle 
or other animals in streets or ways. 

2. — No person shall be allowed to pasture any cattle, goat, or other 
animal upon any street or way in said town, either with or without a 
keeper, except within the limits of such way adjoining his own prem- 
ises, and field drivers are instructed to enforce this b3 r -law. 

TRUANCY. 

The proper officers of the town shall rigidly enforce the provisions 
of the truant laws of the commonwealth. 

JUNK DEALERS. 

Every keeper of a shop for the purchase, sale, or barter of junk, old 
metals, or second-hand articles within the limits of this town shall 
keep a book, in which shall be written at the time of every purchase 
of any such articles a description of the article or articles purchased, 
the name, age, and residence of the person from whom, and the day 
and hour when such purchase was made ; such book shall at all times 
be open to the inspection of the selectmen, and any person by them 
authorized to make such inspection ; every keeper of such shop shall 
put in some suitable and conspicuous place on his shop a sign, having 
his name and occupation legibly inscribed thereon in large letters I 
such shop, and all articles of merchandise therein, may be examined 
by the mayor and alderman of any city, or the selectmen of any 
town, or by any person by them respectively authorized to make such 
examination, at all times ; no keeper of such shop shall, directly or 
indirectly, either purchase or receive by way of barter or exchange 
any of the articles aforesaid, of any minor or apprentice, knowing or 
having reason to believe him to be such; and no article purchased or 
received shall be sold until a period of at least one week from the 
date of its purchase or receipt shall have elapsed. 



69 

The selectmen are required to incorporate the above by-laws in 
every license which shall be granted for dealing in the articles therein 
mentioned, and shall revoke the same on reasonable proof of any 
violation thereof. 

LIST OF TAX-PAYERS. 

The names of all persons paying a tax on real or personal property 
shall be published annually in the town report, together with the 
amount of tax assessed upon each, and whether the same is paid or 
unpaid. 

PUBLICATION OP BY-LAWS. 

The selectmen shall publish these by-laws annually in connection 
with the town report. 

PENALTIES UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Every violation of any of the foregoing by-laws shall be punished 
by a fine of not less than one dollar nor more than twenty dollars, to 
be recovered by complaint before any trial justice in the County of 
Norfolk, or any other court having jurisdiction. 

PROSECUTION UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Any citizen may, and the selectmen and constable shall, prosecute 
every violation of any of the foregoing by-laws, by complaint before 
any trial justice in the County of Norfolk, or any other court having 
jurisdiction. 

REPEAL OP OLD BY-LAWS. 

All former by-laws of the town are repealed on approval of these 
by-laws, as provided for in the following section : — 

BY-LAWS, WHEN TO TAKE EFFECT. 

These by-laws shall go into effect from and after their passage and 
their approval by the superior court within and for the County of 
Norfolk. 

Attest : 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



Norfolk, ss. Superior Court, September Term, to wit : October 5, 
1875. The foregoing By-Laws are approved. By the Court. 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk, 
A truly copy. Attest: 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk. 



70 

At a meeting of the legal voters of the town of Hyde Park, 
Mass., held March 29th, 1877, it was voted to so alter the By-Laws 
of this town, that the Section entitled, 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS, 

Shall, instead of the present reading, read as follows, to wit : 
" Any unexpended balance of the regular annual appropriations, 
excepting the school appropriations, shall at the close of each 
financial year, be paid into the sinking fund, to be used in extin- 
guishing the town debt." 

And at a meeting held April 10th, 1877, by adjournment of the 
above-mentioned meeting, it was voted to adopt the following 

BY-LAWS IN RELATION TO THE PREVENTION OF FIRES, TO WIT : 

It shall be the duty of every person who shall commence the erection 
of any building within the town of Hyde Park to notify the Board of 
Engineers thereof before he shall commence building the chimneys 
therein. 

All chimneys in wooden buildings shall be built of brick, stone, or 
other fire-proof non-conducting material. All brick flues shall be 
smoothly plastered inside with mortar from top to bottom and outside 
below the roofing. 

In no case shall chimneys rest upon any flooring without a footing 
of masonry or iron supported by iron beams, having a secure bearing 
of masonry or iron at either end. 

All flues shall be topped out at least four feet above the roof of the 
building to which they belong. The brick topping out of chimneys 
shall not have more than two inches projection, unless covered by a 
cap of metal or stone properly secured. 

Hearths of fireplaces or grates shall be laid upon brick or other 
trimmer arches, or upon bars of iron supporting a bed of brick-work. 

No wood-work of any kind shall be placed at a less distance than 
one inch from the outside brick-work of any flue. In no case shall 
a nail be driven into the masonry of any flue. 

No wood-work shall be placed at a less distance than one inch 
from any tin or other metal flue or flues, pipe or pipes, used or in- 
tended to be used to convey heated air or steam in any building, un- 
less such flues or pipes shall be cased with metal, leaving a free 
circulation of air all around the same. 

No smoke-pipe in any such wooden or frame building shall here- 
after enter any flue, unless the said pipe shall be at least twelve in- 



71 

ches from either the floors or ceiling ; and in all cases where smoke- 
pipes pass through stud or wooden partitions of any kind, whether 
the same be plastered or not, they shall be guarded by either a double 
collar of metal, with at least four inches of air space and holes for 
ventilation or by a soap-stone ring, not less than three inches in 
thickness and extending through the partition. 

The Board of Engineers shall examine into all shops and 
other places where shavings or other combustible material 
may be deposited or collected, and at all times be vigilant 
in the removal ot the same, whenever, in the opinion of 
any majority of them, the same may be dangerous to the security of 
the town from flres ; and direct the owner, tenant, or occupant of 
said shops, or other places, to remove the same ; and in case such 
owner, tenant, or occupant's refusal or neglect, so to do, to cause the 
same to be removed at the expense of such owner, tenant, or oc- 
cupant. 

It shall also be the duty of said Engineers to take cognizance of all 
buildings in the town in which any steam engine shall be used, and of 
all buildings in the town in process of erection or alteration, and to 
make a record of such thereof as in their judgment may from any 
cause be dangerous, and report the same to the Selectmen forthwith. 
And whenever in the opinion of a majority of the Board of Engineers, 
any chimney, hearth, oven, stove, stovepipe, fire-frame or other fix- 
ture, or any camphene or other explosive or inflammable fluid or 
material, or whatever else may give just cause of alarm, should be 
altered, repaired or removed, they, the said Engineers, shall forth- 
with notify and direct the owner, tenant or occupant of the 
premises upon which the same are situated, to alter, repair or 
remove the same, as the said Engineers shall direct. And 
in case such tenant, owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect 
so to do, the said Engineers shall cause the same to be remov- 
ed, altered or repaired at the expense, of such owner, tenant, or 
occupant, who shall also be liable to a penalty, not exceeding fifty 
dollars for such neglect or refusal. And any person who shall ob- 
struct the Engineers, or any of them, in carrying out the provisions 
of this section, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars. 

The removal, extension or essential alteration of any building; 
also, the rebuilding or repairing of any building which has been 
partially destroyed by fire, shall be subject to the same restrictions 
which are iinposeu by the foregoing By-laws on the erection of build- 
ings. 

PENALTIES UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Every violation of any of the foregoing By-laws shall be punished 
by a fine not exceeding fifty dollars, to be recovered by a complaint 



72 

before any trial justice in the county of Norfolk or any other court 
having jurisdiction. 

PROSECUTION UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Any citizen may, and the Board of Engineers and constables, shall, 
after five days notice in writing to the violator thereof, which notice 
shall contain a definite statement of the matter complained of, prosecute 
every violation of any of the foregoing By-laws, by complaint before 
any trial justice in the county of Norfolk or any other court. 

BY-LAWS WHEN TO TAKE EFFECT. 

These By-laws shall go into effect upon their passage and approval 
by the superior court within and for the county of Norfolk. 

Attest : 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



Norfolk, s.s. Superior Court, April Term, 1877. The foregoing 
By-laws relating to fires, and also relating to unexpended balances 
are approved by the court. 

JOHN W. BACON, J. S. C. 

A true copy. Attest : 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk. 



RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


A 

Adler, Leonard ...... 




16 67 




Alderman, M. P. 














76 85 






Aldrich, E. C. 














63 80 






Allen, Abbie F. 














79 75 


2 90 




Allen, Charlotte M. 














10 15 






Allen, Orville, 














59 45 






Allen, Thomas 














10 15 




10 15 


Allen, Zenas 














56 55 






Andrews, J. R. 














33 35 




33 35 


Andrews, W. H. H. 














S3 37 


4 35 


39 32 


Anderson, Lydia 














39 15 






Anderson, VV. P. 
















2 90 




Arentzen, J. W. 














23 93 






Am and, Augusta M 














44 95 




44 95 


Arnold, Isaiah F. 














50 75 






Arnold & Hibuard 














31 90 




31 9C 


Artault, Louis E. 














37 70 






Atenberger, George 














27 55 






Aborn, Eliza M. 














40 60 


1 45 




Ayer, George Heirs of 


E» 










16 67 






Badger, Susan C. . 


130 50 




130 50 


Bailey, G. G. Jr. 
















2 17 


2 17 


Baker, E. V., Estate c 


V 












31 90 






Balcom, D. 0. 














46 40 


2 90 




Bass, George 














37 70 




37 70 


Bass, George J. 














71 05 


1 45 




Bass, G. Walter 
















1 45 




Bardan, Michael 














• 


43 




Balkam, S. B. 














90 63 


74 68 




Baptist Church First 














76 85 




76 85 


Barney, J. E. 
















15 23 


15 23 


Barney, J. O. 














56 55 






Barrett, C. H. 














95 70 


2 90 


2 90 


Barrett, Hannah 










* 




10 15 




10 15 


Barrows, Harriet M. 














31 17 




15 59 


Barritt, W. H. 
















4 35 




Barry, Michael 














21 00 






Bartlett, Elizabeth 














27 55 




27 55 


Bartlett, Elkenah 














23 20 


2 18 


25 38 


Bartlett, Mrs. H. S. 














29 00 


1 45 




Bartlett, W. B. 














33 35 






Bascom, J. T. 
















14 50 


14 50 


Bates, Annie 














33 35 






Bates, Leslie 














30 45 




30 45 


Bates, J. C. 














76 85 


17 40 




Baker, John S. 
















2 17 


2 17 


Beatey, John 














33 35 


1 45 


34 80 


Bean, J. W. 














23 20 


6 67 


29 87 


Becker, Ernst 














31 90 






Bennett, John 














24 65 






Bent, G. W. 














44 95 






Bennett, B. F. 
















2 90 




Bemis, Mrs. 
















1 45 




Berger, Antoine 














34 07 


43 


34 51 


Bishop, Samuel 
















2 90 


2 90 


Bird, Lewis J. 
















6 89 




Bickford, L. B. 














115 27 






Bickmore, A. P. 














43 50 







74 

Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



Bigelow, F. 
Blackmer, Seth M. 
Blake, A. P. 
Blake. A. P., Trustee 
Blake, E. E. 
Blake & Can- 
Blake & Webster 
Blake E. E. & Barnes, 
Blanchard. Richard, Heirs of 
Blasdell, Henry 
Bleakie, Robert 
Bleakie, John 
Blurae, Julius 
Blodgett, S. P. 
Bodwell, William P. 
Bodwell, Nathaniel 
Bonnell, H. C. 
Bonnell & Hood 
Bonney, Susau 
Bowen, Patience 
Bowers, Sarah 
Bovvker, Perry G. 
Boyd, Francis 
Boyd & Bovd, 
Boyle, Nellie D. 
Boynton, Francis 
Bovnton & Rogers 
Bowen, H. M. 
Broad, J. Otis 
Brackett, John S. 
Brady, John 
Bragdon, J. F., Heirs of 
Brainard, An. os H. 
Brainard Milling Machine Cc 
Brigham, F. I). 
Brennan, Patrick 
Brown, I. J. 
BrowD, P.. J. 
Brown James 
Brown, O.Q. 
Brown, J. W. 
Brooks, A. H, 
Budlong, J. S. 
Buliard, Isaac, 
Bullard, William, Estate of 
Buliard, William A. 
Bunker, Charles E. 
Bunker, S. S. 
Bun ton, Henry S. 
Burke, Patrick 
Burke, Thomas 
Burke, Thomas, 2d 
Burke, John 
Burnett, Marshall 
Burnett. Nancy D. 
Burns, D. D. 
Burns, Deniw 
Burns, Timothy 
Butler, George H. 
Butler, O. W. 
Buzzell, Mattie G. 
Bussey, Charlotte A. 



Cable, H. M. 
Caffin, Elizabeth 



C 



Real 

Estate. 



78 30 
121 80 

21 75 
92 80 

232 110 
825 52 

13 05 
132 68 

89 90 
508 95 

46 40 

39 88 
7 97 

46 40 
26 10 
39 15 
39 15 
39 15 

26 10 
53 65 
94 25 

27 55 
46 40 
60 90 

17 40 

22 47 
21 02 

18 85 
181 22 
130 50 

27 55 

381 35 

36 25 

44 95 

84 82 



47 13 

60 90 

415 43 

46 40 

42 05 
10 15 
14 50 
13 05 
10 15 
2 90 
36 25 
23 20 
34 80 
50 75 

69 00 

31 17 

28 27 



129 05 
101 50 



Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


2 90 
6 24 




29 00 


261 00 


1 45 
10 15 
4 35 




2 17 
2 17 


10 14 
46 40 


2 90 


39 15 


2 18 
21 75 


96 43 

21 75 


18 85 
1 45 
17 40 




6 67 

181 25 

17 40 

1 45 

3 63 




2 18 

1 45 

2 17 


34 97 


2 90 
5 80 

7 25 . 


421 23 
46 40 

42 05 




14 50 


3 62 




9 42 
2 90 
14 50 






28 27 


2 90 





75 

Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



Caldwell, John A. 
Campbell, W. A. 
Campbell, Josiah W 
Cancannon, Patrick 
Cannon, Michael 
Cannon, Michael, 2d 
Cannon, Michael, 3d 
Case, Eliza L. 
Case, W. J. 
Case, Samuel T. 
Carlton, Hiram 
Carter, A. F. 
Carty, Peter 
Cai.dall, G. A. 
Cassidy, James 
Chamberlain, fcT. C. 
Chamberlain, Thomas 
Cliapin, Mrs. A. 
Chapman, Mrs. Lucy A 
Chapman, George Vv. 
Chesley, S. A. 
Choate, W. P. 
Churchill. E.S. 
Cilley, J. L. 
Clark, Sarah A. 
Clark, Marcus, Heirs of 
Clark, Heman A. 
Clark, L. C. 
Clark, Mary, 1st 
Clark, Mary. 2d 
Clark, S. £>. 
Clark, T. Emery 
Clapp, Mrs. S. 
Clifford, Charles 
Cleveland, E. A. 
Cobb, Sylvanus, Jr. 
Cobb, Mrs. Eben 
Cochran, Mary J. 
Cochran, Adelaide L. 
Cochran, Andrew 
Corcoran, W. J. 
Coffin, S. B. 
Colby, Charles H. 
Coleman, E. J. 
Conlan, P. S. 
Connell, Patrick 
Connolly, Michael 
Connolly, Michael, 2d 
Congregational Society, Fir, 
Conway, GeorgianaF, 
Conway, Charles I. 
Collins, Rebecca M. 
Collins, Edward W". 
Collins, .Laura 
Cook, Emily A. 
Cook, Jacob 
(Joan, Eugene N. 
Coleman, George W. 
Cooper, Fannie W. 
Corbett, Jeremiah 
Corrogan, Mrs. John 
Corrogan, Thomas 
Corson, Reuben 
Cowles, Lyman B. 
Cothell, Nathan T. 
Coverley, James 
Crummet Charles H. 



Real 


Per- 


Unpaid. 


Estate 


sonal. 
5 95 




78 30 






43 




17 40 






18 85 






27 55 


1 00 


28 64 


23 20 




7 25 


20 30 


8 70 


20 30 


69 60 


7 25 




39 90 






181 25 


16 43 




30 45 






29 00 








2 90 


2 90 




4 35 




55 83 


30 09 




42 05 


2 90 




78 30 


3 63 




8i 10 


79 03 




29 00 






33 35 






39 15 


1 45 




43 50 


2 17 


45 67 


33 35 


2 17 
24 14 




47 85 


44 95 




60 90 


3 63 


64 53 


4 35 


1 45 




33 35 


29 00 




36 97 






72 50 


5 07 


5 07 


28 27 




28 27 




1 45 


1 45 


27 55 






116 00 


33 35 




39 15 






36 25 






39 15 


2 90 


39 15 


15 23 


7 25 




49 30 


10 87 




76 85 


21 40 




42 05 


6 96 


49 01 


32 62 


4 06 




15 95 




15 95 


49 30 






15 95 




15 95 


56 55 






29 00 


2 17 
1 45 


29 00 


53 65 


2 90 


56 55 


24 65 




24 65 


36 25 




36 25 


60 90 






47 85 






23 20 






50 03 






52 20 


3 05 


55 25 


23 92 


4 35 


28 27 




2 90 


2 90 


55 10 


23 20 


78 30 


17 40 


7 25 
2 17 


17 40 


95 70 


6 24 


101 94 



76 

Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 





NAMES. 










Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


^1^1 ^1^1 


10 15 






Ciiiiey, Patrick 
















3 34 


3 34 


Curley, Sabina 














21 75 


1 45 


23 20 


Currier, Charles 
















2 90 




Cutter, Isaac 














27 55 


2 17 


29 72 


D 








Damon, Roscoe ...... 


5 07 






Darling, Henry A. 














53 65 


4 35 


58 00 


Darling, W. H. 














58 00 




58 00 


Davis, Alonzo . 














44 95 






Davis, David L. 














204 45 


104 40 




Davis, E. P. 














4 35 


1 45 


4 08 


Davis, Edmund 
















2 17 




Davison, Delos 














76 71 




76 71 


Day. Sarah R. 














33 35 




33 35 


Dee, Dennis 














29 00 




29 00 


D'Eutremont, Miss 














36 25 






Dill, Martin L. 
















2 18 




Dolan, Patrick 














11 60 




11 60 


Dolan, Thomas, 2d 














26 10 




26 10 


Dodge, Annie F. 














37 70 






Dodge, Mary K. 
















1 45 




Downs, S. S. 














25 37 






Donlau, Malachi 














46 40 


4 35 


50 75 


Domett, J. W. 
















1 45 




Dowse, George S. 














49 30 


2 17 




Dow, J. G. 














40 60 




5 80 


Downey, John 








y 








1 45 


1 45 


Downey, Michael 














27 55 






Downey, Michael 
















4 35 




Downing, Alfred 














130 50 


68 87 




Downing, Belinda 
















75 34 




Dyer, William 
















4 35 




Dyer, Quincy 














49 30 


20 30 




Dunham, Ella 














32 63 






Dunn, J. P. 














7 97 




7 97 


Dunn, William 














66 70 






Durell, J. M. 














79 75 


3 63 




E 








Eagan, William ..... H9I 


43 50 


1 45 




Edwards, C. L. H 












79 75 


29 00 


29 00 


Edwards, E. E. 












50 75 






Edwards, Lovey L. . 












79 75 






Ellis. Charles, Estate of 












81 20 




81 20 


Eliis.J. I>. 












59 45 


2 90 




Emory, J. P. 












45 67 






Ennaking, John J. 












52 20 






Englehardt & Roslyn 












34 80 






Estes, G. F. 












136 30 


6 52 




Estey, WillardF. 












69 60 




69 60 


Everett, W. S. 












78 30 


26 10 




Evans, T. C. 












133 40 


21 75 




Ewins, Alexander 












65 25 






F 








Fairbairn, W. U. 


62 35 


4 35 




Fall & Fisk 














14 69 




Fallon, Bridget 












13 05 




13 05 


Fallon, Peter 












24 65 






Fallon, Hngh, Estate of 














12 62 




Fame worth, C. L. 












104 40 


26 10 




Farrington, John B. . 












79 75 


4 35 


84 10 



77 

Resident Tay-Payers 



(Continued.) 



NAMES, 










Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Farrington, G. E. ...... 




4 35 




Faunce, Thomas E. . 












33 35 






Farwell, E. C. 














2 90 




Fardy, William 














1 45 


1 45 


Fevnalcl, George M. . 












34 80 




34 80 


Fellows, George M. . 












46 40 




46 40 


Fessenden and Crane, Misst 


!S 










7 '25 






Fife, James 












5 80 


1 81 




Fisher, Sophia 












58 00 






Fiske, H. C. 












160 22 


3 33 




Fitts, Frank 














10 15 




Fitton, Maurice N. 












42 05 


2 18 


44 23 


Foster, Alfred 












118 90 


43 




Foster, Mrs. S. A. 












27 55 


1 45 




Folev, James 












31 90 




31 90 


Fowler, W. W. 












27 55 




27 55 


Fowler, VV. C. 












40 00 






Foote, Charlotte L. . 












50 75 






Folsom, Miss Harriet 














1 45 




French, L. J. 














55 10 


13 60 


Frame, John 














2 18 




G 








Gardner, Joseph H. ..... 


34 08 






Gallagher, Andrew 












27 55 


7 97 


36 52 


Gallagher, John, Estate of 












31 91 




31 91 


Gargan, Julia 












2 17 




2 17 


Garron, George, Estate of . 












43 50 






Gateley, James, Estate of 












2 90 






Gateley, Thomas. Estate of 












29 00 






Gateley, John 














1 16 




Gav, R. L. 












42 05 


2 90 




Gerald, F. L. 












52 92 


2 90 




Gerry, C. F. 












102 40 


8 70 




Giles, Alfred E. 












75 40 


17 40 




Giles, Henry 












42 05 






Gilson, W. N. 












36 25 






Gibbons, Patrick 












7 25 






Gladwin, Dollie H. 












33 35 




33 35 


Gordon, Mary D. 












34 07 






Golding, Adeline S 














15 95 




Goodwin, Joel F. 












39 15 


15 23 




Goss, Daniel J. 












40 60 


6 96 




Goss & Williams 












14 50 




14 50 


Gould, H. H. 












42 05 


72 




Graham, John 












29 00 






Grant, Peter 












19 57 


1 30 




Grant, William 












88 45 


2 90 




Gray, O. T. 












66 70 




66 70 


Gray, W. A. 














1 45 




Greeley, John D. 












30 45 






Greeley, John H. 












43 50 






Gregg, Clark C 












39 15 


2 17 




Grew, Henry 












2047 40 


119 63 




Grew, Henry S. 














206 63 




Green, Lewis A. 














1 45 




Gridley, Susan P. 












47 85 






Gribben, Jeremy 












36 25 






Greenwood, Elihu, Estate o 


f 










321 17 


98 31 




Greenwood, Phebe H. 












23 20 






Greenwood, Frank 












15 95 






Gunnison, George W. 












50 75 


7 25 


58 00 


H 








Hale, Alfred 


60 18 


26 82 





7« 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 





NAMES. 










Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 

2 17 


Unpaid. 


Haldeu, John MMB 


39 15 




Haley, Charles . . 












319 72 


2 17 


321 89 


Haley, Elizabeth M. 














80 45 






Halliday, Geo. W. 














56 55 




56 55 


Hall, Isaac H. 














32 63 


1 82 


34 45 


Hall, Joseph R. 














36 25 






Harding, D. J. 
















1 45 




Hamblin, Benj. L. 














94 98 






Hamblin, J. G. 














222 57 


4 06 




Hamblin, K. W. 














26 10 






Hamblin, Joseph G., Jr., 














1 45 




Hanchett, George W. 












46 40 






Hanscomb, Gior^e VV. 












46 40 


1 45 


47 85 


Hardy, Elizabeth 














168 93 


4 78 


173 71 


Harlow, Philander 














60 90 


2 18 




Hardy, Elmira W. 














47 85 




47 85 


Harris, Thomas 














42 05 






HaskelJ, G. H. 














79 02 






Haskell, David 
















2 17 




Hatch, Freeman 














46 40 






Hathaway, E. S. 














42 78 


7 25 




Hatlinger, J. J. 














39 87 


2 90 




Hayes, C. C. 














55 10 


1 45 




Hazelton, David 














39 15 






Hadley, Brooks 
















2 17 




Hayward, E. S. 
















2 90 




Hebbaid, Nathaniel 














126 15 


3 05 




Heudersou, Mary 














42 77 




33 47 


Hewins, Harriet 














50 75 


2 90 


53 65 


Heustis, C. P. 














82 65 


2 90 


85 55 


Hill, Hamilton A. 
















20 30 




Higgins, David . 














94 25 


87 . 


95 12 ■ 


Hillborn, sarah 














43 50 




43 50 


Hill, Joseph 














89 90 


2 90 




Hill, Joseph, Jr. 
















2 90 


2 90 


Hill, W. S. 














101 50 


7 25 


108 75 


Hill, Sarah J. 














36 25 






Hilton, VV. B. 














36 25 




36 25 


Holwav, A. H. 














475 60 


3 63 


479 23 


Hodges, A. S. 














27 55 


2 90 




Hollis, Stephen 














33 35 






Holmes, Ellis H. 














40 60 




40 60 


Holmes, C. P. 














44 95 






Holmes, Mary 














21 75 




21 75 


Holtham, H. S. 














46 40 


7 69 


7 69 


Holt, C. E. 














69 60 






Hood, Georgiana 














7 25 






Hoogs, William H. 














58 00 


1 09 




Hopkirk, Jane 














127 60 


2 17 


68 87 


Horn, Ernst' Estate o 


' 












14 50 






Horn, Olive 














21 75 






House, Annie 
















2 90 


2 90 


House, Nettie F. B. 














46 40 


2 90 


49 30 


Hovey, Solomon 














121 80 


91 35 




Howard, George L., I 


Estate 


of 










42 05 


2 90 




Howe, H. J. 














38 42 




38 42 


Holden, T. B. 














49 30 






Hodgkinson, John 














16 67 






Holdriworth, Squire 














29 00 






Hunneweil, W. N. 
















2 18 




Hughes, Elizabeth 














50 75 


2 17 




Hughes, Owen 














44 95 


6 67 


51 62 


Huggins, Charles E. 














34 80 






Hunt, L.B. 














89 90 


2 90 


92 80 


llurd, VV. J. 














40 60 






Hurter, George C. 














49 30 






Hutchinson. H. E. 














20 30 




20 30 



79 

Resident Tax- Payers — (Co7itinued.) 



NAMES. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Husted. R. W. 




2 90 




Hyde, James R. ...... 


59 45 






Hyde Park Savings' Bank ..... 


49 30 






Hyde, George M. ..... 

I 
ingersoll, William H. ..... 


Hi 15 




10 15 


63 07 


22 47 




Ireland, John, Estate of 


44 95 






Ireland, Cory don ...... 


36 25 






J 








James, George H!H 


34 SO 


44 




Jenkins, Howard 












43 60 


2 17 


45 67 


Jigger, John VV. 












5 80 






Jigger, Robert 












4S 50 






Johnson, John J. 












65 25 


17 40 


80 65 


<i~oyce, Jane 












43 50 




43 50 


Jones, B. H. 












41 33 






Jones, Robinson & Co. 














44 95 




Joubert, D. Z. 












31 90 






Joubert, L. A. 












29 00 






Jordan, Susan L. 












52 20 






K 








Kelley, M. F. ... 




1 45 




Kelley, Archibald 












2 90 






Kelleher, Daniel 














1 45 




Keenan, Catharine 












26 10 






Kendall, D. F. 












50 75 


31 90 




Kendall, E. A. 












46 40 


10 15 




Ken d rick, H. C. 












36 97 


17 40 




Kennedy, Mary 














11 60 


11 60 


Keyes, J. C. 












44 95 






Kelsey, E. R. 














1 45 




Eiggen,John 












21 75 






Kiggen, Michael 












46 40 


118 32 




Kingston, Thomas 














2 90 


2 90 


Knowles, H. W. 












56 55 






Kubasch, H. C. W. . 












59 45 






Kuhn, Ernst 












5 80 






Kuhn, Richard E. 












42 05 






Ii 








Lancaster, E. M. 


44 95 


6 52 




Lanahan, Robert 












3 62 




3 62 


Lane, Edward 












20 10 






Lane, Marcus 












20 30 






Lane, Charles E. 












44 95 


2 17 




Lawler, Patrick 












29 00 


1 45 




Lake, Martha S. 












31 90 






Leadbeater, Charles . 












26 10 






Laughlin, John F. 














1 45 




Leach, B. F. 












107 30 




107 30 


Lee. Bridget 












30 45 


1 45 


31 90 


Lenfest, Mary G. 












7 25 






Lentell, John 












69 60 


14 50 




Leonard, Charlotte . 












4H 40 






Leonard, Martin, Estate of 












18 85 




18 85 


Leseur, B. F. 












75 40 


11 32 




Leseur, Horatio 












107 30 


2 17 




Leveretr, J. W. 












40 60 






Lowis, Mary C. 












34 80 


2 90 




Lord, L. W. 












10 87 


44 


11 31 



80 

Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



KAMES. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Logan, Annie ...... 


29 00 




29 00 


Lovell, Sarah A. ..... 


40 60 




40 60 


Lowrv, J. G. ...... 


30 45 






Lucy,"E. & M. 




5 80 




M 








Macomber, Amos ...... 


H 60 


% 




Macomber, Edward A., Estate of 










66 70 






Macomber, Martha D. 










55 10 






Macomber, A. G. 














1 45 




Magu ire, Margaret 












19 21 




19 21 


Maguire, Richard 












35 53 


2 17 




Mahoney, Dennis 












4 35 


3 77 




Mahoney, Florence 












8 79 


44 


9 14 


Mandell, A. A. 












36 97 


44 




Mansfield, Oliver VV. . 












60 90 


72 




Marr, Adeline M. 












108 75 


4 35 




Mason, D. W. 














2 90 




Mason, W. D. . « . 














1 45 


1 45 


Mallon, Mrs. M. H. . 












34 80 






Mahar, Patrick 














2 54 


2 54 


Martin, Thomas H. 














2 90 


2 90 


Mathewson, Jerome . 












44 23 




44 23 


Maynard, William M. 














2 90 




Magee, John 














72 




McAvoy, J. D. 












61 62 


14 96 




MoCabe, Patrick 












17 40 




17 40 


McCarty, Daniel, Estate of 












29 00 




29 00 


McOarty, John 












7 25 




7 25 


MoCormick & O'Brien 












79 75 






McCormick, John J. 














3 63 




McDonald, D. A. 












5 80 






McDonough, Martin 














44 




McDonough, Margaret 












11 60 


44 




McDonough, John 












;;4 so 




34 80 


McGillcnddy. John 












17 40 






McGovern, Thomas . 














44 




McKenna, Edward 












56 55 


1 45 




MoKenna, J. H. 














2 17 




McKenzie, Stuart 












5 80 




5 80 


WcKnabb, James 












29 00 


72 


29 72 


McNamarra, John 












42 05 


1 88 




McMa-ter, Bernard . 












17 40 


2 03 


19 43 


McMahon, James 












13 05 




13 05 


Merritt, Palmer 














13 78 




Mercer, Emily 














2 17 




Merrill, S. A. 














2 90 




Methodist E. C. Society 












60 17 




00 17 


Miles, George 














25 38 




Milan, Patrick, Estate of 












1 45 






Miller, George H. 












66 70 


52 


73 22 


Miller, Annie 












29 00 




29 00 


Miner, Henry B. 












108 75 


5 07 




Mitchell, W. D. 












27 55 






Morrow, Rebecca E. 












18 85 






Morrill, W. 














1 45 




Morrill, M. P. 














1 45 




Moeher, John II. 












14 50 




14 50 


Moseley, U. P. 












30 45 






Mosteley, 8. R. 














29 00 




Moffatt, E. W. 












39 15 






Monahan, James 












29 00 


43 




Mooar, James E. 












39 15 






Moody, C. H. 












27 55 






Morela»d,D. 8. 












60 90 




15 95 


Morrison, E. R. 












27 55 







81 
Resident Tay-Payers 



(Continued.) 



Morrison, Henry 
Murray, John 
Murray, Thomas 
Murrow, Eunice M. 



Neal, Mrs. A. B. 
Neal, J. B. 
Neal, Luther 
Neal, Oliver L. 
Nelson, T. L. 
Newcomb, Edward 
Newall, Miss S. E. 
Newton, R. D. 
Newall, Alary A. 
Nichols, Nancy H. 
Nightingale, W. H. 
Noble, Mark E. 
Norling, C. G. 
Norris, William H. 
Norton, Susan M. 
Nott, Gordon H. 
Noyes, A. M. 
Noyes, M. H. 
Nye, David B. 
Nye, Josiah, Estate of 



O'Brien, Martin 
O'Oonnell, John 
O'Connell, Michael 
O'Donnell, Edward 
O'Donnell, Edward 
O'Keefe, Thomas 
O'Neal, Arthur 
O'Neal Brothers 
O'Neal, P. 
Orcutt, F. H. S. 
Orr & Butman 
Orpan, Samuel 
Osgood, A. M. 
Overell, Louisa M. 



Page, A. A. 
Page, E. B. 
Page, Harriet J. 
Paine, John A. 
Parker, George 
Partridge, Sewall 
Palmer, L. H. 
Payson, J. W. 
Peabody & Co. 
Peabody, Mary L. 
Perie, George H. 
Peck, Mary Ann 
Perkins, David 
Perkins, Ezra G. 
Perkins, G. H. 
Perkins, Louisa R. 
Perry, Mrs. Ira 
Phelps, Henry 
Phelps, Henry B. 
Phipps, D. W. 



Real 


Per- 


Estate. 


sonal. 


24 65 




26 82 




14 50 


1 45 


18 85 




29 00 






3 62 


73 95 


1 45 


59 45 




46 40 




42 05 




58 55 




65 25 




2 90 




116 00 




46 40 




36 25 


21 75 


36 25 


2 17 


31 90 


7 25 


34 80 


2 90 


8 70 


4 85 


49 00 




76 49 


4 35 


20 30 




27 55 






24 65 


2 90 






72 


27 55 






44 


20 30 




31 90 


72 




8 42 




21 75 


33 35 




82 65 


72 


24 65 




34 80 


2 17 


28 10 




50 (12 


2 17 


65 25 


2 90 


39 15 




37 70 


2 17 


32 62 


2 18 


46 40 






2 90 


82 65 


2 90 




34 80 


14 50 




43 50 


1 45 


42 05 




158 06 


6 96 


259 55 




40 60 


2 90 


26 10 




46 40 


2 90 




7 25 


53 65 


72 


97 87 


13 05 



Unpaid. 



26 82 
15 95 



3 62 
75 40 
59 45 

42 05 



46 40 



81 90 



13 05 
49 00 



20 30 
27 55 



72 



44 

20 30 



36 97 



39 87 
34 80 
46 40 



43 50 
7 25 



82 

Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Phillips, W. H. Jr 




21 75 




Phillips, B. E. 












5.07 






Pierce, C. H., Heirs of 












22 48 




22 48 


Pierce, George 












104 40 


1 45 


105 85 


Pierce, Job A. 












2 90 






Pierce, Ira C. 












46 40 


5 80 


52 20 


Pierce, John 












40 60 


1 16 


40 60 


Pierce, Elizabeth 












58 00 


1 45 




Pinchon, Moses 












20 30 


44 


10 74 


Piper, Samuel N. 














72 




Piper, J. Ellery 












69 60 


2 89 




Pickett, John W. 












33 35 






Pittuck, Alfred 














1 45 


1 45 


Plummer, I. C. 












101 50 






Pollard, George, Estate of 












81 20 




81 20 


Poole, William 












42 05 






Porter, I.C. 












36 25 






Preble, Thomas M. 












20 30 






Pratt, Jairus 












98 60 




98 60 


Pratt, Mrs. 














1 45 




Prentice. A. P. 












47 85 


2 90 


50 75 


Price, William 












54 08 


2 90 




Price, Susan H. 












37 70 






Preston, A. D. 












30 25 






Provonshee, Abraham W. 












110 20 


2 90 


47 85 


Pray, J. F. . 














1 45 




Putman, S. C. 












87 00 


56 55 




Q, 








Quigley, Mary J. ..... . 


2 90 






Quimby, Joseph B. ..... 


50 75 






R 








Radell, Ellery 


21 75 






Radford, B. F. 












227 65 


44 75 




Raeder, Henry 












95 70 


4 35 


100 05 


Raymond, L. D. 












29 00 


4 35 


33 35 


Raynes, Horatio G. ». 












94 25 


1 45 




Raynes, John J. 












110 92 


9 42 


120 34 


Reed, Edwin 












06 70 




66 70 


Reynolds, S. H. 












47 85 


2 18 




Rhodes, C. H. 












66 55 






Rice, Norman 












43 50 




43 50 


Rich, Henry A. 












08 88 






Rich, Andrew J. 












24 65 




24 65 


Richardson, A. M. 














2 90 




Richardson, A. H. 












50 75 


6 23 


56 98 


Richardson, George L. 












B6 70 


44 95 




Risk, Thomas H. 












33 35 






Riley, Joseph 












5 80 






Robeits, Edward 












05 25 


72 




Rogers, Annie L. 












40 00 






Rogers, William, Estate of 












63 80 


1 45 




Rogers, John A., Estate of 












107 30 




107 30 


Rogers, Michael 












29 73 






Rollins, Mrs. R. T. . 












43 50 






Ross, John F. 














2 17 




Routley, Henry 














2 90 




Rooney, Patrick J. 












32 02 


44 


33 06 


Kooney, Patrick 












111 65 


7 09 


119 34 


Rooney, Hose 














2 90 


2 90 


Rooney, Thomas 












26 10 


1 45 


27 55 


Ronillard, Edwin R. . 












29 00 






Ronndy & Fields 












42 05 






Runnells, L. A. 












40 00 


2 90 





83 

Resident Tax-Payers 



{Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Russell, Sarah J. ..... 




14 50 


14 40 


Russell, Ellen H. 












21 75 






Russell, Arm 












21 75 






Ryan, Isaac L. 














8 70 




Ryder, Calvin 


s 










84 10 


18 85 




3 

Sanford, George ...... 


34 07 


2 90 




Samuels, Isaac B. 














2 90 




Sanford <& Runnells . 














34 80 




Sawyer, W. H. 












43 50 






Savage, E. D. 












87 00 


34 80 




Savage, James F. 












5 80 




5 80 


Saville, Josiata, Estate of 












40 60 


2 90 




Sawtell, Mary M. 












29 00 






Sawtell, George W. . 












3 90 






Sawyer, Edwin A. 












42 05 


2 90 




Schell, Mrs. E. A. 












49 30 






Schofield, Hannah 












28 28 






Schofleld, W. J. 












39 15 




39 15 


Scott, N. W. 












27 55 






Scott, Robert 












108,75 




108 75 


Scott, William 












42 05 


2 90 


44 95 


Shea, Cornelius 














1 88 




Shea, Edward 












7 25 




7 25 


Shea, Mrs. Annie 












34 80 






Shea, William 














2 90 


2 90 


Shaw, William 












30 45 






Sheedv, Daniel 














58 

1 45 




Shattuck, James 














1 45 


Shepard, N. F. 












38 42 






Shepard, Sarah B. 












131 85 




134 85 


Sherman, Mary A. 












44 95 






Silver, George, Estate of . 












10 15 






Simmons, James 












40 60 






Simmons, George W. 














145 




Small, Frank A. 












44 95 


2 90 


47 85 


Smith, Annette C. 












39 15 




39 15 


Smith, Honora 












31 90 






Smith, J. C. 












5 07 


2 90 


7 97 


Smith, Mary A. 












42 05 




42 05 


Smith, W. A. 












34 80 


1 09 


35 89 


Smith, W. S. 














145 00 




Smith, Henry Hyde . 














9 42 




Snow, Aaron W. 














1 09 




Snow, Albert . 












27 55 






Soule, John A. 












27 55 


46 40 




Sparrell, W. P. 












66 70 


21 75 




Spring, Charles 












186 40 


2 17 




Spring & Robinson . 














29 00 




Stearns, C. G. 














5 44 




Stack, John 












20 30 






Stanley, Miss M. A. . 














7 25 




Stark, Henry C. 












13 05 






Steele, John W. 












34 80 






Stevens, J. N. 












34 80 


4 35 




Stevens, Julia A. 












116 00 


3 35 


120 35 


Stocking, George L. . 












66 70 


31 90 




Stockford, H.J. 












37 75 






Stone, Basil 












20 30 






Stone, Franklin 












87 00 


2 17 




Stone, Jonas 














39 15 


9 15 


Stone, W. P. 












68 88 


4 35 




Stuart, W. J. 












102 95 


44 22 




Steward, Joseph 












19 57 






Stratton, T. William . 














1 45 


I 45 



Resident Tax-Paters 



{Continued.) 



NAMES. 










Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Sumner, Sallie ...... 


885 95 


7 25 




Sumner, W. F. 












47 85 






Swallow, E. D. 












50 75 


2 90 




Sweeny, Patrick 












33 35 




33 35 


Sweeny, T. W. 












29 72 


1 45 




Sweet, L. C. 














2 90 


2 90 


Sweet, L. C, Jr. 














8 70 




Sweet, William 














1 45 


1 45 


Swift, E. M. 














29 00 




Swift, T. P. 












233 45 


1 45 


216 05 


Swinton, William 












31 90 






Sykes, Joseph, Estate of 












139 20 




69 20 


Sykes, .Louisa M. 












17 40 




17 40 


J. - 

Taplin.W. H. 


44 95 


4 35 


49 30 


Tacy. George . 












24 65 


44 




Taylor, P. H. 












39 88 






Terrv,John 












116 00 






Terry, H. B. 














14 50 




Tewksbury, F. W. 












36 25 






Tewksbury, Mary C. 












44 95 






Tewksbury, Joseph H. 














1 45 




Tebbetts, Mark 












14 50 






Tebbetts, Ella D. 












24 65 






Thayer, George I). 












40 60 






Thompson, Mrs. H. A. B. 












36 25 




36 25 


Thompson, Clifton S. 












2 90 






Thompson, Harriet 












62 35 






Thompson, John R. 












44 95 


2 17 


2 17 


Thompson, W. 0. 












11 60 




11 60 


Tilden, Edwin 












52 20 






Tilly, Emily 












18 12 


1 45 


18 12 


Timpenny, Richard 
Timson & Foster Misses. 












29 00 
















17 40 






Timson Susan & Minnie B. 














98 60 




Timson, Susan C. 












79 75 


29 00 




Tlrrell, Fred N. 












40 60 


18 12 




Tirrell, Nathan F. 












* 34 07 






Totman, Lewis Jr. 












7 25 






Tower, Harriet L. 












43 50 


1 46 


44 95 


Towle, Annie E. 












49 30 


2 18 


5148 


Townsend, George M. 












29 00 






Townsend, Isabella . 












34 80 






Towne, Mary 11. , . 












10 87 






Trainor, Elizabeth 












10 87 






Tooker, T. D. 














2 90 




Tucker, Isaac 












81 20 




81 20 


Tucker, N. H. 












243 60 


1 45 




Tupper, A. R. 












30 45 


2 17 


2 17 


Turell, Elizabeth M. 












38 42 


4 35 




Tufts, Mary C. 












7 25 






Tuttle, Annie B. 












60 90 


1 88 


62 78 


Twichell, John M. 












53 65 


3 63 




Tyler, Caroline O. . . 


rr 










39 15 






Uudcrhill, Merrill . . 


47 85 




47 85 


Utley, K. G., Estate of 


50 75 


1 45 




V 








Vanghan, C. P. ...... 




13 05 




Verry, Frank W. ...... 


'' 


1 45 




Videto, Rebecca H. . 












79 39 


5 80 


85 19 



85 

Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



Real 
Estate. 



Per- 
sonal. 



Unpaid. 



Vivian, Ann 
Vivian, Roxanna 
Vose, Benjamin C. 
Vose, Sarah and Mary 
Vose, Mary E. 



W 



Walker, E. R. 

Walker, E. A. 

Wallace, Richard 

Warren, Daniel, Heirs of 

Warren, George B. 

Walmsby, Harriet M. 

Walter, Louisa Y. 

Ward, Waldo F. 

Watson, Thomas, Jr. 

Watson, William A. . 

Washburn, Eliza G. . 

Webster, Amos , 

Weimer, John 

Welch, Michael 

Wells, B. T. 

Wellington, C. W. W. 

Weld, Theodore D. . 

Wescott, Edward 

Wheeler, George S. . 

Whisher, Martin L., Heirs of 

White, Ann 

White, Georgiana 

White, J. D. 

White, Joseph H. 

White, William 

White, Nancy P. 

White, (Jhas. A. 

Whiteland, Isabella 

Whittemore, Henry J 

Whittemore, Henry 

Whittemore, P. B. 

Whitney, E. A. 

Whittier, A. II., 

Whittier, Carrie 

Whittier, N. B. 

Whiting, Mrs, G. W. 

Wiggin, George T. 

Wigley, John 

Wilder, Joshua 

Willard, Henry L. 

Williams, Amanda 

Williams, Mary M. 

Williams, Elizabeth P. 

Williams, Francis C. 

Williams, Rinaldo 

Williams, John M. 

Williams, Phoebe A, 

Willett, Elizabeth T. 

Wiswall, Julia A. 

Withington, George 

Wood, E. Frank. 

Wood, Jaseph 

Wood, William H. 

Workingmen's Land Associat'n, Robt. Bleakie 

Wright, Richard 

Wright, Eliza H. 

Wi ight, W. C. 

Wyman, H. B. 



Trustee 



29 00 
47 85 
282 02 
75 40 
50 75 



39 15 
30 45 

15 95 
65 25 

20 30 
101 50 
113 10 

36 25 

27 55 

147 90 

201 55 

14 50 

8 70 

50 02 
156 60 
113 10 

420 50 

21 75 
36 25 
36 25 

84 10 

44 95 

26 10 

34 80 

27 55 

29 00 
153 70 

11 60 
39 15 

33 35 

30 45 
10 88 

4 35 

34 07 

33 35 
46 40 
69 60 

118 90 

16 67 
89 90 
18 12 
39 87 
69 60 

34 80 
20 30 

200 10 
123 25 
42 05 

31 90 



2 90 
6 96 



5 80 



42 05 
2 18 

7 25 
2 90 
2 17 



1 45 

2 90 



61 62 
11 60 
14 50 



15 60 

72 

3 62 
2 90 

1 45 

2 90 
21 75 

44 



5 80 
2 90 
5 80 



2 17 

2 90 
5 44 

91 S5 

3 62 

2 90 
1 45 



50 75 



20 30 



27 55 



50 02 
11 60 



72 



29 00 

31 90 

175 45 

11 60 



7 25 
5 80 



72 50 



31 90 



86 

Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 




Y 








Yeaton, Charles H. 
Young, Joshua 
Young, Mrs. S. G. 


Z 


34 80 
48 57 

47 85 






Zimmerman, Carl 
Zollinger, Henry 





59 45 
37 70 


2 90 





NON-RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


A 

Adams, Henry 8. . 


Boston . 


33 35 




33 35 


Adams, Nancy J. . 


Winchester 


34 80 






Ameb, Dauiel 


Memphis, Tenn. 


143 55 




143 55 


Ames, George H. . 


Lowell . 


123 98 




1C 88 


Ambler, Francis, Trustee 


Weymouth 


349 45 






American Tool & Machine Co. . 


Boston . 


311 75 


94 25 




Ahlborn, Heury 


Boston . 


5(5 55 




56 55 


Allen, Charles H. . 


Boston . 


43 50 






Allen, John 


Colifornia 


5 80 




5 80 


Atkinson, Robert . 


Providence, R.I. 


31 17 






Alexander, John L. 


Boston . 


43 50 






Armstrong, AnDie 


Cambridge 


14 50 




14 50 


Austin, David 


Readfleld, Me. . 


11 60 




11 60 


Ayer, Ezra C. 

B 
Bailey, A. H. 


Unionville, Conn. 


49 30 






Somerville 


3 26 






Baker, Michael A. 


Dartmouth 


8 70 






Bancroft, George . 


Boston . 


76 85 






Barnard, Henry 


Boston 


1 45 




1 45 


Barnard, M try'E, . 


Boston . 


26 10 




26 10 


Barnes, Ward & Co. 


Boston . 


2 17 






Barnwell, John . . . 


Valley Falls, R.I. 


8 70 






Barry, Laura B. . 


Brockton 


63 80 






Bartlett, Alden 


Boston . 


86 28 




86 28 


Barton, Hannah . 


Boston . 


18 85 




18 85 


Badger, Thomas H. 


Boston . 


26 10 




26 10 


Baker, Alice T. . 


Boston . 


44 95 






Baldwin, J. Thomas 


Boston . 


9 43 




9 43 


Bassett, Joseph R. 


Boston . 


139 20 






Barnev, George T. 


Maiden . 


50 75 






Bell, John 


Dedham . 


4 35 






Beale, Francis 


Boston . 


7 25 




7 25 


Bishop, John O. 


Boston . 


31 9U 




31 90 


Bishop, Jane 


Boston 


14 50 






Billings, Warren H. 


Walpole 


52 20 




52 20 


Blackie, John 


Boston . 


65 22 






Blake, Sargent, Estate of 


Boston . , 


108 75 






Blanchard, Samuel J. 


Salem 


26 10 




26 10 


Blai3d.ll, O. P. 


Unknown 


37 70 






Blue Hill Land Co. 


Boston 


1080 25 






Bowles, Ella F. . 


Boston . 


8 70 




8 70 


Bolton, Charles S. . 


Boston . 


21 75 




21 75 


Boyden, E. & G. E. 


Worcester 


27 55 






Bo wen, Hosea 


Boston 


50 75 






Bolster, C. H. . 


Boston . 


21 83 




21 03 


Boyd, Samuel 


Boston . 




2 17 




Boston & Providence Railroad, 


Boston . 


784 45 






Bradlee, Henry E. 


Walpole 


73 95 






Bradlee, J. Walter 


Milton . 


23 20 




23 20 


Bradlee, Catharine C. 


Milton . 


50 75 




50 75 


Bradbury, Samuel A. , 


Boston . 


307 55 






Brewer, Cyrus . . 


Boston 


47 85 






Brewer, E. J. 


Plymouth 


5 80 






Brooks, Annie F. . 


Boston . 


68 15 




34 80 


Brooks, Mrs. S. C. 


Boston . 


23 20 






Brooks & Converse 


Boston . 


37 70 






Brown, Amos 


Newton, N.H. . 


14 50 




14 50 


Brown, Rebecca . 


Boston . 


18 12 




18 12 


Brown . Francis L. 


Canaan, N.H. . 


29 00 




29 00 



88 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Brown", Mary Jane 


Boston . 


33 35 






Brown, F. A. 


Newton . 




2 17 




Bragg, William M. 


Boston . 


71 05 






Bragg, Alonzo W. . . 


Boston . . 


75 40 




36 25 


Brenner, Christian 


Dedham 


5 80 




5 80 


Braokett, F. B. 


Boston . • 




1 45 




Brazer, William S. 


Boston . 


29 00 






Burditt, Charles A. 


Boston . 


4 35 




4 35 


Burgess, Avois 


Bedford . 


6 52 






Burns, G. W. 


Milford, N.H. . 


4 35 




4 35 


Busiel, Lucretia . 


Boston . . 


37 70 




37 70 


Butler, Fanny S. . 
Buchan, Thomas . 

C 

Capen, Edward N. 


Boston . 


5 25 






Chelmsford 


2 18 






Boston . 


72 






Capen, E. W. 


Milton . 


18 12 






Capen. Samuel J. 


Boston , , 


43 50 






Campbell, Frank H. 


Boston . 


66 70 




68 70 


Carpenter, E. B. . . 


Providence, R.l. 


5 80 






Cannon, William . 


Boston . 


8 70 






Carr, J. C. 


Portsmouth, N.H. 


146 45 






Carr, A. W. 


Franklin 


42 05 




42 05 


Cheney, Horace R., Estate of . 


Boston . 


14 50 






Churchill, Asaph . 


Boston . 


39 15 




39 15 


Churchill, J. R. . 


Boston . 


40 60 






Churchill, Asaph and J. li. 


Boston . 


43 50 




43 50 


Churchill, C. C. 


Dedham . 


8 08 






Chase, Frances A. 


Boston . 


24 65 






Chamberlain, C. E. 


Worcester 


14 50 






Chamberlain, Charles E. 


Worcester 


34 08 




34 08 


Chase, Waldo . . . 


Dedham 


21 03 






Chadbourne, Fanny E. . 


Boston . 


11 60 




11 60 


Cilley & Stimson . 


Boston . 


108 75 






Clapp, Elizabeth . . • 


Dorchester 


7 25 






Clark, Fred 0. 


No. Brighton . 


8 70 






Clark, Henry 


Boston . 


5 80 






Clisby, Alphonso E. 


East Dedham . 


7 25 






Coffin, C. H. 


Nowburyport . 


168 20 




168 20 ' 


Coffin, John W. . 


Cheirytleld, Me. 


32 63 






Codman, Henry, Heirs of 


Boston . 


5 80 






Coleman, Stedman & Stone 


Dedham 


1 81 






Coleman, George W. 


Boston . 


71 05 






Coleman, Lewis 


Boston . 


5 07 






Colburn, James . . . 


Dedham 


50 75 






Colby, John F. . , 


Boston . 


24 65 




24 65 


Como, Franklin . . , 


Newton . 


3 63 






Comey, Mary, Heirs of . 


Boston . . 




2 90 




Conway, Hiram . . , 


Boston 


1 45 




1 45 


Connolly, Martin J, 


Boston . . 


2 17 






Connolly, Eliza 


Boston . 


63 80 






Connell, John 


Boston . 


82 65 




82 65 


Converse, B. B. , . 


Boston . 


44 95 






Cook, William 


Boston . 


17 40 






Cook, Lycurgus B. 


Belchertown 


29 00 






Cook, H. P. 


Unknown 


44 95 






Cotbell, John Ft. . 


Hingham , 


32 62 




32 62 


Cothell, Joan J. . . 


Hingham 


3 63 




3 63 


Costello, W. C. 


Somerville . 


7 25 






Connor, Mary E. . , 


Boston . 


10 15 




10 15 


Colburn, Allen 


Dedham 


65 98 






Colburn, Abner 


Skowhegan, Me. 


42 05 




42 05 


Colburn, Howard . 


Dedham . 


23 06 






Colburn, Waldo . . 


Dedham 


24 29 






Cole, Charles A. . 


Scituate . 


111 65 




111 65 


Cogswell, vV alter C. 


Saco Me. 


159 50 







89 



Non-Resident Tax-Paters — ( Continued.) 



NAMES, 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Cripps, M. A. 


Fall River 


3 62 




3 62 


Crumpler, Arthur . 


Boston . 


2 90 






Crowell, Edmund . 


Boston . 


44 37 






Cutler, F. E. 


Newburyport . 


78 30 ' 




42 05 


Cuuimings, Louisa F. 


Boston ; 


42 05 




42 05 


Curtis, James W. . 


Boston . 


47 12 






Curtis, George, Heirs of . 


Nahant . 


149 35 






Currier, Abby A. . 
D 

Dalton, John 


Boston . 


4 35 






Framingham 


4 35 




4 35 


Damon, Harriet A. 


Somerville 


42 05 






Davenport & Foster 


Boston . 


29 00 






Davis, Amanda M. 


Boston . 


2 17 






Denny, H. G., Trustee . 


Boston . 


116 00 






Dean, Joseph F., Guardian 


Boston . 


78 30 




78 30 


Dexter, J. P. 


Boston . 


75 40 






Doe, Edgar J. 


Providence, R.I. 


49 30 




49 30 


Doe, Susan 


Boston . 


5 80 






Doane & Murray . 


Yarmouth, N.S. 


72 50 




72 50 


Dodge, Lydia F. . 


Dover, N.H. 


41 32 






Doherty, Joseph H. 


Weymouth 


42 05 






Donahue, Patrick . 


Boston . 


37 70 






Dorchester, Second Church 


Boston . 


12 33 






Dowd, Catharine . 


Boston . 


26 83 






Doyle, Austacia 


Boston . 


24 65 






Downs, W. E. 


Greenfield, N.H. 


23 20 






Dorchester Savings Bank 


Dorchester 


52 20 






Dowse, Amos W". . 


Lowell . 


155 15 






Draper, Mary A. . 


Jamaica Plain 


33 35 






Drew, John F. 


Boston . 


40 60 




40 60 


Dunlap, J. C. 


Boston . 


5 80 






Dunlap, Martin 


Boston . 


4 35 






Durell, H. G., Heirs of . 

B 
Eastman, George A. 


Milton 


63 80 






Boston . 


155 80 




49 95 


Eastman, Josiah S. 


Boston . 


142 09 




36 96 


Eastman, T. B. 


Boston . 


47 85 






Eaton, William 


Boston . 


17 40 




17 40 


East Boston Savings Bank . 


Boston . 


121 80 






Edson, Nathaniel . 


Waltham 


3 62 






Eldridge, Daniel . 


Boston . 


5 80 






Ellis, Fred A. 


Washington, D.C. 


59 45 






Eldridge & Smith . 


Boston . 


31 90 




31 90 


Emmons, Mary B. 


Boston . 


22 48 






Estabrook, Ru'ius . 


Newton . 


15 95 




15 95 


Evans, William 


Boston . 


87 60 






Evvins, Margaret . 
Fay, W. H. 


Providence, R.I. 


123 25 






Chester . 


49 30 






Farrington, W. S. . 


Lawrence 


7 25 




7 25 


Fairbanks, J. A. . 


Melrose . 


11 60 






Fairbanks, John R. 


Newton . 


14 50 






Ferry, C. B. 


Milton . 


2 90 






Ferry, Rhoda 


Milton . 


4 35 






Fitleld, W. ... 


Boston . 


5 07 




5 07 


Finlaia, Michael 


Boston . 


33 35 






Fisher, George, Trustee . 


Dedham 


50 75 






Fisher, Clarissa C. 


Roslindale 


7 25 






Fiske, Gordon M. 


Palmer . 


42 05 




42 05 


Fiske, Samuel C. 


Boston . 


66 70 




m 70 


Fitzpatrick, James 


Watertown 


2 17 




2 17 



90 



N on-Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Fitzpatrick, William 


Watertown 


2 17 




2 17 


Fitts.D. B. 






Holliston 


53 65 




53 65 


Flagg, Solomon 8. 






Littleton 


180 53 






Fletcher, J. N. 






Concord. N.H. . 


73 95 






Flint, Charles L. 








Boston . 


72 50 






Foster, George E. 








Boston . 


33 35 






Fogg, Roxanna 








Danvers . 


5t 38 






Foster, James 








Boston . 


65 25 






Foye, Ada A. 








Lynn 


13 05 






Frost, Salina 








Boston . 


26 10 




26 10 


Frye, H. B. 








Chelsea . 


31 90 






French, L. B. & W 








Boston . 


47 85 




47 85 


Gallagher, Daniel F. 


Boston • 


8 70 






Gates, Alb rt, Jr. . 






Boston . 


29 00 






Oilman, Charles H. 






Boston . 


58 00 




58 00 


Giles, Delphma 






Waltham 


4 35 






Gillingham, Albert 






Boston . 


10 87 






Gilson, John 






Webster 


7 25 






Giles, A. W. 






Detriot, Mich. . 


29 00 


1 45 


30 45 


Giles, Oiville 






South Weymouth 


33 35 






Gill, Dominick 






Boston . 


4 35 






Glass, James 






Boston . 


91 35 






Glover & Wilcomb 






Boston . 


391 50 


201 55 




Glennan, Edward 






F known 


42 05 




42 05 


Goodwin, Sarah E. 






Y. >ston . 


13 05 




13 05 


Gould, Simon 






Walpole 


17 40 




17 40 


Gould, A. S. 






Boston . 


33 35 






Green, Charles G. . 






Boston . 


21 75 






GriiHn, Patrick J. . 






Boston . 


21 75 






Greenhood, Morris 






Dedham 


58 i0 






Greenlow, J. P. 






Maine 


20 30 




20 30 


Gurney, Silas 






Boston . 


13 05 






Gullbraudson, G. & Oldson 




Boston . 


7 25 






H 










Haines, CO. 


Milton . 




1 81 




Hall, Eliza M. 






Milton . 


10 15 






Hail, George, Estate of 






Providence 


843 90 






Hale, Sarah F. 






Brockton 


5S 00 






Hapgood, Salome H. 






Boston . 


8 70 




8 70 


Hapgood, Lyman S. 






Boston . 


26 10 






Ham, Joseoh 






Boston . 


14 50 






Hammett, Charles 






Medfiold 


02 35 






Harmon, Benjamin 






Springfield 


20 30 




20 30 


Harmon, J. W. 






Boston . 


2 90 




2 90 


Harney, Thomas . 






Boston . 


20 55 






Haraden, E. G. 






Bos on . 


7 25 






Harrison, Larkin A. 






Boston . 


1 45 






Hart well, W. II. . 






Littleton 


20 30 




20 30 


Hartwell & Jet'tS . 






Littleton 


58 00 




58 00 


Hazeltine. W. B. 






Brookline 


76 85 






Haskell, B. B. 






Willimantic, Conn. 


20 30 




20 30 


Haven, A. S. 






Boston . 


17 40 




17 40 


Hatton, Frank E. . 






Pembroke 


39 15 






Hayward, Henry . 






Boston . 




2 17 


2 17 


i laj den, Michael . 






Dedham . 


85 55 






Hayden, Henry C. 






Boston . 


44 95 






Harrington, Abigail P. 






Boston . 


38 42 




38 42 


Henshaw, F. II. . 






Boston . 


40 60 






Heustis, Warren 






Belmont 


47 85 




47 85 


Higgins, Solomon it. 






Boston . 


42 05 




42 05 


Hodges, Samuel 






Unknown 




1 45 


1 45 


Hodges, Gamaliel 








Boston . 


43 50 







91 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Hollingsworth, Z. T. 


Milton . 


456 03 






Holmes, R. C 


Boston . 


43 50 






Homer. Rebecca T. 


Boston . 


43 50 






Hoxie, Timothy W. . . 


Boston . 


143 55 






Hogan, John J. 


Cambridge 


39 15 






Holt, Daniel S. . 


Boston . 


S3 35 






Hubbard, W. H. . 


Boston . 


2 18 






Hubbard, Charles 


Boston . 


39 15 






Hutchinson, Eliza 


Boston . 


37 70 






Humphrey, James . 


Weymouth 


142 10 






Hunt, Lucien 


Falmouth 


13 04 






Hutchins, Joseph B. 


Boston . 


4 35 




4 35 


Httsted.J.B. 


Watertown 


50 75 






Hyde, H. P. . 


Boston . 


36 25 






Hyde, Robinson & Child, Trustees 


Boston . 


30 45 




30 45 


Hyde Park Woolen Co. . , 

J 
Jackson, Robert 


Boston . 


1199 83 


145 00 




Boston . 


2 17 




2 17 


Jackson, Charles E. 


Boston . 


52 20 






Jenney, Edwin E. 


Vermont 


30 45 




30 45 


Jenney, Edwin E. 


Vermont 


2 90 




2 90 


Joyce, Patrick J. . 


Unknown 


11 00 




11 60 


Jormson, R. A. . 


Saugus . 


40 60 






Jordan, Matthew . 
K 
Kaufman & Josephy 


Fall Rivet- 


36 25 






New York City 


46 40 






Karcher, Michael . 


Dedham 


2 90 




2 90 


Keen, IS ahum 


Dedham 


4 35 






Kelly, GeoigeW. . 


Washington, D.C, 


5 80 




5 80 


Kelly, James 


Boston 


2 90 




2 90 


Kelly, Thomas 


Boston 


27 55 






Kelly, William 


Lowell . 


23 20 






Kelly, Mary A. 


Newton . 


20 30 






Kelly & Kimball, Trustees 


Boston . 




121 80 




Kingman, R. P. 


Brockton 


43 50 






Kingman, Maria L. 


Unkuown 


39 15 






King, Samuel H. . 


Monmouth, Me. 


20 50 






Kingsley, J. C 


Boston . 


2 17 






Kingsbury, John F. 
Lane, Frank A. . 


Boston . 


15 95 






Valisca, Iowa . 


63 07 




63 07 


Lane, Peter 


Boston . 


7 25 






Lawrence, Marianna P. . 


Boston . 


69 60 




69 60 


Lawrence, Catharine 


Boston . 


34 80 






Lang, Benjamin J. 


Boston . 


27 55 






Leary, Mrs. Cornelius 


Brigthon 


15 22 




15 22 


Leverett, George B 


Boston . 


43 50 






Lewis, J. C. 


Holyoke 


58 00 




58 00 


Lewis, Isaac 


Boston . 


24 65 






Lewis, Albert B. . 


Coventry, R.I.. 


49 30 






Leonard, William . 


Boston 


33 35 






Leach, Ellen P. and Sarah F. . 


Boston . 


53 65 






Littlefield, John H. 


Boston . 


17 40 






LittleHeld, Julia F. 


Boston . 


5 80 






Litch, James P. 


Maiden . 


20 30 






Libby, C. W. 


Boston . 


20 30 






Loomis, Sarah H. . 


Chelsea . 


. 39 88 




39 88 


Lodge, Adam 


Boston . 


18 85 






Lo veil, John P. 


Boston . 


49 30 






Lowe, William W. 


Unknown 


23 20 




23 20 


Loud, Emily V. 


Weymouth 


107 30 







92 



Non-Resident Tay-Payers — (Contimied.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Loud, J. W., Estate of . 


Weymouth 


94 25 






Loud, Martha B. . 


Weymouth 


84 10 






Lord, O. M. 


Lunenburg 


21 75 






Locke, William 


Somerville 


17 40 






Lombard, Annie J. 


Boston . 


52 20 






Lylord, Thomas J. 


Boston . 


11 60 






Lyford, By ley 

M 
Mahoney, John 


Boston . 


43 50 






Boston . 


11 60 






Mahouey, John 


Boston . 


18 85 






Mann, Alexander . 


Boston . 


14 5 






Mann, H. (J. 


Boston . 


216 05 






Marshall, J. H. 


Boston . 


4 35 






Madigan, Ellen J. 


Boston . 


44 95 






Mayo, Mrs. M.S.. 


New York 


39 15 






Mayo, C. H. 


Wellesley 


73 95 




73 95 


Manning, W. F. . 


Boston . 


5 07 




5 07 


Maxim, Jane 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


10 15 




10 15 


Matthews, Franz . 


Boston . 


36 25 






McCallnm, James . 


Jamaica Plain 


4 35 






McClaffee, Ann 


St. Louis, Mo. 


4 00 




4 00 


McCormick, Thomas 


Boston . 


153 70 






McDowell, Jaue . . . 


Boston . 


2 17 




2 17 


Mc Don aid, John . 


Boston . 


3 62 




3 62 


McElroy, John W. 


Boston . 


4 35 




4 35 


McLaughlin, Daniel 


Boston . 


2 17 






McLeod, John 


Boston . 


4 35 




4 35 


McNally, Ann 


Jamaica Plain 


7 25 






Mead, Albert 


Boston . 


36 25 






Merriam, Francis P. 


Boston . 


36 25 




36 25 


Mechanics' Savings Bank 


Boston . 


121 80 




26 10 


Merrill, William . 


Boston . , 


5 80 






Melladeu, George . 


Boston . 


13 05 






Mercantile Savings Institution . 


Boston . 


328 28 






Merriam & Vhilbrook 


Boston . 


46 40 






Merrill, Joshua 


Boston . 


72 50 






Meserve, Sarah W. 


Canton . 


52 20 






Meister, G. A. 


Amesbury 


20 30 




20 30 


Metropolitan Land Co. . 


Boston . 


145 00 






Miller, Amos H. . 


Boston . 


3 62 






Mills, James C. . 


Boston . 


4 35 






Monigan, John 


Perryville 


1 45 




1 45 


Moor, John W. . 


Boston . 


2 18 






Moody, Frelinghuysen . 


Boston . 


4 35 






Morse, Bushrod 


Boston . 


203 00 




203 00 


Morse, Leonard 


Milton . 


92 08 






Morse, E. J. W. . 


South Easton . 


5 80 






Morse. Luther, Estate of 


Dedham 


72 






Morton, Joseph, Estate of 


Milton . 


43 50 






Moseley, T. W. H. 


Scrauton, Pa. . 


79 75 






Moylan, Michael . 


Milton . 


2 90 




2 90 


Moyle, John 


Canton . 


46 40 




46 40 


Morgan, Sarah E. 


Boston . 


20 30 




20 30 


Monroe, C. W. . 


East Cambridge 


14 50 






Monroe, Joshua, Jr. 


Boston . 


92 80 






Mullen, John 


Jamaica Plain 


2 90 






Mullen, Robert 


Boston . 


2 17 






Mungan, Margaret 


Lowell . 


75 40 






Munbon, N. C. 


Shirley . 


29 00 






Murphy, Thomas . 


Dedham 


8 70 






Muzzey,D. W. . ... 
Neal, Alonzo F. . 


Lexington 


37 70 






Boston . 


49 30 







93 



Non-Kesident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid . 


New England Iron Co. 


Boston . 


210 25 


43 50 




New York & New England R.R. Co. 


Boston . 


233 43 






Newhall, Horatio . , 


Boston 


2 90 




2 90 


Nolan, James 




Boston . 


4 35 






Nolan, J. P. 




Dedham 


7 25 




7 25 


Noiling, Franz E. . 




Boston . 


34 SO 




34 80 


Norwood, Lucy C. 




Lynn 


5 80 




6 80 


Northern Bapt. Educational Sy 
O 




Boston . 


10 87 






Obrey, Madison 


Boston . 


52 92 






Osgood, John C. 

P 
Page, Charles J. . 


Salem 


6(5 70 






Boston . 


29 00 






Parker, Newman A. 






Boston . 


11 60 




11 60 


Palmer, Susan A. . 






Boston . 


28 27 






Parker, LSeuj. W. . 






Boston . 


63 80 






Parker, George J., Estat< 


! 01' 




Boston . 


8 70 






Parker, Mrs. M. W. 






West Dedham . 


2 17 






Park, H. F. 






Boston . 


3 26 






Pattee, Thomas E. 






Boston . 


20 30 






Pattee, W. 8. 






Boston . 


3 63 




3 63 


Patterson, George C. 






Boston . 


2 17 






Paul, Ebenezer 






Dedharn 


13 05 






Paul, J. F. 






Boston . 


56 55 






Partridge, Mrs. H. S. 






Newport, Ky. . 


98 60 




98 60 


Perry, Solon 






Leominster 


58 00 






Perry, Baxter E. . 






Medio rd 


32 62 




32 62 


Peck, Phoebe W. . 






Somerville 


19 b8 






Perkins, Hiram 






Mount Vernon, N.H 


18 13 




18 13 


Peterson, Orlena . 






Boston . 


42 05 






People's Ice Co. 






Boston . 


79 75 






Piaff, William 






Boston . 


46 40 




46 40 


Pierce, J. 






Boston . 


2 18 




2 18 


Pierce, John 






Boston . 


102 95 






Preston, T. B. 






Unknown 


49 30 




49 30 


Pratt, Edmund T. 






Boston . 


153 70 






Pratt, Laban 






Boston . 


18 85 






Pratt, Isaac, Jr. 






Boston . 


195 75 






Prescott, Mrs. S. E. 






Goose Creek, N.B. 


55 10 






Pulsifer, R. M. 






Boston . 


59 45 




59 45 


Q, 










Quincy Savings Bank 

R 
Ranlett, D. D. 


Quincy . 


603 20 






St. Albans, Vt. 


46 4C 






Ray, M. L. 




Melrose . 


2 17 




2 17 


Ray, Ellen F. 




Woburn 


10 15 




10 15 


Ray, Margaret 




Unknown 


27 55 






Radwin, C. & J. A. 




Cliltondale 


49 30 






Ranger, Susan 




Boston . 


2 90 






Keed, Charles 




Philadelphia 


44 95 






Reed, Hammond . 




North Brooktield 


58 00 






Reed & Richards .. 




Boston . 


29 00 






Reed, Samuel G. . 




Boston . 


7 25 






Ret ton, Peter, Estate of. 




Boston . 


29 00 






Real Estate & Building Co. 




Boston . 


2579 65 




2579 65 


Rhodes, A. H. 




Boston . 


43 50 






Richardson, Thomas H. . 




Mount Vernon, N.H 


26 10 






Richardson, Thomas H. . 




Boston . 


37 70 




37 70 


Rictardson, Lucretia T. . 




Boston . 


1 45 







94 



Non-Resident Tay-Payers — {Continued.) 



\ 

NAMES. 


\ 

KESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Richardson, Wm. M., Estate o 




Boston . 


65 97 






Richards, Austin S. 




oanvers 


11 60 






liic hards, Joseph R. 






Cambridge 


26 10 






Richards, Daniel 






Dan vers 


18 85 






Richards, George E. 






Boston . 


29 00 






Richards, L. Lather 






Brockton 


11 60 






Richards, Reuben A. 






Milton . 


453 85 






Richards, W. B. . 






Boston . 


349 45 






Rich, Lathely, Estate of 






Watertown 


43 50 






Rich, R. K. 






Boston . 


75 40 






Itidgway, Edwiu W. 






Boston . 


52 20 






Rowe, Samuel W. . 






Boston . 


49 30 






Rowe Brotliers 






Boston . 


2 17 






R llins, James W. 






Boston . 


258 10 




252 30 


Rollins, James M. 






Cambridgeport 


21 75 






Robinson, Frank F. 






New York City 


91 35 






Liobinson, Benjamin F. 






St. Albans, Vt. 


65 25 






Robinson, Martha A. 






Boston . 


28 28 






Roberts, D. S. 






Boston . 


5 80 




5 80 


Safford, Aaron H. . 


Cambridge 


224 75 






Safford, N. F. 






Boston . 


34 80 






Sahline, David H. . 






New York City 


29 00 






Saco & Biddeford Saving 


a Ban 


k 


Saco, Me. 


472 70 






Saulsbury, Jotham 






Weymouth 


69 60 






Samuels, Sarah B. 






Boston . 


43 50 






Scair'e, Lauriston . 






Boston . 


11 60 






Schlesinger, Sebastian B 






Boston . 


63 80 






Scott, E. A. 






Boston . 


59 45 




59 45 


Sears, B. F. 






Boston . 


40 60 




40 60 


Sears, Eben,, Trustee 






Boston . 


145 00 






Sears, Johannah . 






Boston . 


55 10 






Seavcr, Jacob W. . 






Boston 


10 87 






Sharp, J. C. 






Boston . 


2 90 






Shaw, Joseph P. . 






Boston . 


4 35 




4 34 


Shaw, Thomas 






Boston . 


43 50 




43 50 


Shaw, 0. C.g 






Palmer . 


94 25 






Shaw, Lydia A. 






Boston . 


36 25 






Shattuck, Milo H. 






Groton 


14 50 




14 50 


Shute, James M. . 






Boston . 


145 00 






Simmons, Mrs. E. P. 






West Newton . 


7 25 






Smith, Charles F. . 






Boston . 


21 75 






Smith, J.N. 






Boston . 


17 40 






Smith, John 






Boston . 


4 35 




4 35 


Smith, O. A. 






Newton Centre 


5 80 






Smith. George M. . 






Medfleld 


36 25 






Smithlield Manufacturing 


Co. 




Providence, H.I. 


1270 92 


1232 50 




Smallage, Andrew J. 






Boston . 


3 62 






Snyder, C. B. 






Boston . 


43 50 






Sneader, Edmund A. 






Unknown 


33 35 






Southworth, Mason S. 






Wakefield 


101 50 






Span] ding, Reuben 






Worcester 


21 75 






Springfield, Nathaniel 






Boston . 


4 35 






Straw, John B. 






Lewistou, Me. . 


58 00 




58 00 


Stanwood, FI. P. . 






Boston • 


39 15 






Stedman, Daniel B. 






Bosion . 


52 20 






Stark, Mary 






New Vineyard, Me. 


97 15 






Stevens, Elizabeth 






Boston 


377 00 






Stevens, Elizabeth W. 






Boston . 


129 05 




129 05 


Stevenson, Charles E. 






Boston . 


36 25 






Stevenson, Mary F. 






Boston • 


1 45 






Storey, J. C. 






Boston . 


34 80 






Stoddard, Richard 






Rockland 


55 10 






Stoddard, Hannah W. 






Unknown 


36 25 






Stone, Jenny G. 






Germany 


21 75 







95. 

Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Stone, A. J. 


Cambridge 


123 25 






Stone, Mary A. . 


Lynn 


21 75 




21 75 


Sullivan, Margaret 
T 
Taft, Samuel 


Boston . 


3 02 






Holliston 


71 05 






Talbot, Miss M. B. 


Boston . 


4 35 






Taylor, John B. . 


Cambridge 


63 65 






Tapley, Gilbert 


Unknown 


20 30 






Tewksbury, Robert H. 


Lawrence 


-2 'JO 






Thorndike, Sarah W. 


Boston . 


57 27 






Thorndike, James 


Boston . 


21 75 






Thompson, Charles, Estate of . 


Boston . 


50 75 






Thompson, Asa 


Mattapan 


120 35 






Tirrell, George W". 


Boston . 


7 25 




7 25 


Tileston & Holliugsworth 


Boston . 


445 15 


725 00 




Towne, W. J. 


Newton 


8;) !)0 






Towne, Isaac, H. . 


Boston . 


58 110 






Torrey, Francis 


Boston 


34 08 






Townsend, Eliza . 


Saugus . 


7 25 






Tolman, Nathaniel 


Boston . 


63 80 




63 80 


Tobey, Susan H. . 


Athol 


16 67 






Tobey, J.J. 


Boston . 


5 80 






Todd, Robert M. . 


Milton 


52 20 






Trow Thomas F. . 


Hudson . 


21 75 






Trescott. Ebenezer, Estate of . 


Bangor, Me. 


1 45 




1 45 


Tucker, Mary T. . 


Milton 


34 80 






Tucker, (jilman H. 


Boston . 


33 35 




33 35 


Tucker, James 


Milton . 


29 00 






Tucker, Mrs. Timothy 


Milton 


23 20 






Tucker, Nathan, Estate of 


Milton 


2:) 00 






TueUer, Dana, Estate of . 


Milton . 


116 (10 






Tucker, Elijah 


Milton . 


65 25 






Turner, R. VV. 


Boston . 


439 35 




439 36 


Turner, John J. 


Boston . 


5 80 






Turner, G. VV. 


Boston . 


4 35 




4 35 


Turner, Mary H. . 


Boston . 


72 60 




72 50 


Twombley, Albert T. 

U 
Utley, Joseph 


Milton 


75 40 






Boston . 


2 90 






Union Institution for Savings . 


Boston . 


110 20 






V 










Vanderlip, W. C. . 


Boston . 


72 50 






Ventres, VV. H. 11. 


Hudson . 


43 50 






Vose, - — , Heirs of 


Milton 


43 50 






Vose, Joshua 


Milton . 


58 00 






Vose, John 


Milton 


31 90 






W 










Wadswort.h, William 


Boston . 


65 25 






Wainwright, John 


Brooklyn, N.Y. 


52 20 




52 20 


Wakefield, Enoch H. 


Cambridge 


101 50 




7 25 


Walters, E. F. . 


Boston . 


33 35 






Waldron, Charles F. 


Cnelsea . 


8 70 






Wellyn, Martin J. . 


Boston . 


2 17 




2 17 


Weston, Seth 


Revere . 


34 80 






Weston, Ellen 


Revere . 


43 50 






Weeman, William E., Est.ile of 


Boston . 


5 80 




5 80 


Weller, Annie E. . , 


Boston . 


4 3ft 




4 35 


Webster, John G. . 


Boston . 


87 00 






Wetherell, Abigail B. 


Newton, Upr. Falls 


34 80 







.96 

Non-Resident Tax-Paters 



{Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Wellington, Henry W. 


Boston . 


198 65 






Wei don, John A. 


Boston . 


29 00 






Weld, Aaron D. . 


Boston . 


2 18 






White, Emeline , 


Dedham 


21 75 






White, E. P. 


New York City 


5 80 




5 80 


White, Amos S. 


Weymouth 


24 65 






White, Benj. F., Heirs of 


Boston . 


159 50 






White, George H. . 


Boston . 


11 60 






White, Howard 


Boston . 


4 35 






White, James C. . 


Boston . 


1S5 60 




121 80 


White, C. H. 


Weymouth 


85 55 




85 55 


White & Richards, Trustees 


Boston . 


377 00 




377 00 


Whittington, Alfred 


Cohasset 


14 50 






Whitney, A. H. . 


Mattapan 


10 15 






Whitehead, Joseph 


Saugus . 


8 70 






Whiting, Joseph . 


Dedham 


2 90 






Whiting, Alvan 


Clinton . 


5 80 






Willard, Huldah . 


Newton . 


58 00 




58 00 


Wilde, Joseph 


Amesbury 


10 15 






Williams, John J., Archbishop . 


Boston . 


16S 92 






Wiley, Nellie M. . 


Boston . 


44 95 






Winch Brothers 


Bost >n . 


71 05 






Wise, Henry 


Boston . 


2 90 




2 90 


Wilder, Hannah 


Enfield . 


49 30 




49 30 


Wilkins, E. J. . 


Boston . 


2 18 






Winchm an, Charles 


Dedham . 


12 76 






Wiswall, Annie L. 


Boston . 


30 45 






Woodward, James H. 


Cambridge 


13 05 






Woodward, Maria L. 


Attleboro' 


40 60 






Woodward & Brown 


Boston . 


17 40 






Worthington, Gad 


Cleveland, Ohio 


41 3> 




41 32 


Wood, William 


Maynard 


15 95 






Wood, William 


Brookline 


5 80 




5 80 


Woods, Geo. M. Estate of 


Boston . 


21 75 






Wogan, John T. . 


Boston . 


29 00 






Wright, Isaac L. . 


Boston . 


8 70 






Wright, A. W. . 


Boston . 


404 55 




404 55 



VALUATION OF PROPERTY EXEMPTED FROM TAXATION. 

Baptist Church $30,000 00 

Christ Church ( Episcopal) 19 500 00 

First Congregational Church 26,500 00 

Methodist Episcopal Church 26,500 00 

Roman Catholic Church 6.462 00 

Second Congregational Church (Unitarian) 12,300 00 

Harvard College 450 00 

Norfolk Agricultural Society 12,000 00 

$133,712 00 



iE^Rate of taxation for 1877, $14.50 per thousand. 



REPORT 



OF 



THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



E. M. Lancaster, Chairman. 
W. H. H. Andrews, Secretary. 
H. M. Cable. 



F. C. Williams. 

R. W. Husted. 

H. C. Chamberlain. 



EEPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



THE GENERAL CONDITION OF THE SCHOOLS. 

In discharge of the duty devolving upon them, your Com- 
mittee herewith present their Annual Report. 

It may be said that, in school matters in general, the 
year now drawing to a close has been one of unexampled 
prosperity. It has been marked by comparatively few 
changes, and has passed without the occurrence of any- 
thing specially exciting. The amended course of study — the 
excellent old one with such modifications and improvements 
as experience had shown to be needful — is working satisfac- 
torily. There have been- harmony in the consultations of 
the Board of School Committee, and a cheerful co-operation 
of one member with another in devising and putting into 
operation measures for the government of the schools. The 
teachers have been faithful and zealous in the performance of 
their duties. They have exhibited skill in their methods of 
instruction, and tact and judgment in the government of 
pupils. They have shown the ability not only to maintain 
the schools in the high position to which they had attained, 
but to advance them to a still higher standard of excellence. 
That our school machinery has, during the year, run noise- 
lessly and almost without friction, is an indication to your 
Committee — however it may seem to unthinking observers 
who measure the amount and rapidity of motion by the at- 
tendant jar and jostle — of the better adjustment and more 
harmonious working of its various parts. 

THE IMPORTANCE OF PERMANENT TEACHERS IN A SYSTEM OF 
GRADED SCHOOLS. 

Your Committee attribute much of the success of the year 



102 

to the fact that many of the teachers have been long in the 
service of the town, and, in addition to a better understand- 
ing of its educational system, they have shown that greater 
skill and more matured judgment which naturally come from 
a larger experience. 

Your Committee have been impressed more than ever be- 
iore with the importance, in such a system as ours, of a per- 
manent and experienced corps of teachers. There is an 
immense difference, in this respect, between the old ungraded 
and the new graded system of public schools. In the former 
each school and term was, in a sense, complete in itself. A 
change of teachers from one term to another did not neces- 
sarily involve a very serious interruption in its progress. But 
in a system of graded schools, in which one part is prepara- 
tory to another, and in which, in consequence, the successful 
working of one part is dependent upon the proper working 
of another, a thorough acqaintance with the details of that 
system, as well as general experience on the part of the 
teachers who directly administer it, becomes a matter of the 
first importance. 

There are those, even among intelligent men, who affect to 
believe that the school system of to-day is not equal to that 
of the fathers. They point to certain eminent men who 
received their education in the mixed ungraded schools of 
the olden time as conclusive arguments in favor of the 
superiority of those schools. As if the schools of to-day had 
ceased to produce eminent men ! or as if eminent men were 
wholly the creatures of circumstance ! The fact is, inborn 
genius or greatness always has asserted itself and always 
will, with good schools, or poor schools, or no schools. If 
men have risen to eminence under unfavorable circumstances, 
they have done so not by virtue of but in spite of their dis- 
advantages. It is proverbially characteristic of a certain cast 
of conservative minds to look with favor upon anything that 
has the stamp of antiquity upon it, and with a corresponding 
disfavor upon everything that is new or modern. Under the 
old system the teachers' time and interest were chiefly de- 



103 

voted to the brilliant few who needed them least, to the 
neglect of the moderate many who needed them most. If 
the principle of the " greatest good to the greatest number" 
applies to educational as well as political systems, then the 
schools of to-day, in which all the children have the same and 
equal advantages, are superior to those of the past. 

CHANGES IN THE CORPS OF TEACHERS. 

But few changes have been made in the corps of teachers 
during the year. In the High School the second assistant, 
Miss Parsons, did not present herself for re-election. Your 
Committee were able to secure the services of Miss Sarah L. 
Miner, whose return to the position she once held in the 
High School with so much credit to herself, has, they believe, 
given great satisfaction both to pupils and to parents. Miss 
Miner's studies in the higher departments of learning since 
her first term of service, having graduated from the Boston 
University, have given her exceptional qualifications for the 
peculiar requirements of High School work. 

The High School at the present time is well equipped, and 
is performing its part in our educational scheme in a most 
satisfactory manner. The teachers are thorough and enthus- 
iastic, and a most excellent spirit pervades the whole school 
manifesting itself in an improved deportment as well as in- 
creased interest in the performance of school work. 

During the summer vacation Mr. George M. Fellows, who 
had been connected in one capacity and another with the 
schools of Hyde Park ever since its incorporation as a town 
and who was universally esteemed as a pains-taking and 
successful teacher, resigned to take an Ushership in a Boston 
school. His place in the Grew School was filled by the ap- 
pointment of Mr. F. H. Dean, who came with a good record 
from a- graded school in Putnam, Ct. The advent of a new 
master is always a critical period in the history of a school, 
but Mr. Dean has acquitted himself with great credit in the, 
performance of the duties of his new position. Although 



104 

calm and dispassionate in disposition, he is an enthusiastic 
instructor and a strict disciplinarian. Your Committee are 
particularly pleased with the vigilance and fidelity Mr. Dean 
has exhibited in attending to the minutest details of his work, 
and in his efforts to improve the manners and morals of his 
pupils out of school as well as in. 

Of the other principals of our schools it seems almost 
needless to speak, so well and favorably are they known to 
our citizens. They are men of solid worth as well as capable 
school managers, and their continuance in our service at the 
reduced salaries which we pay them, can only be accounted 
for by the continuance of " hard times." 

In the Blake school, which has suffered more than any 
other by a change of teachers, Miss Pratt was compelled by 
continued illness to resign, and Miss C. F. Howard, a well- 
qualified and experienced teacher from Franklin, was selected 
to fill the vacancy. Miss Belle Roper, one of the very best 
teachers of this school, has been recently called to a school 
in the city, and her place temporarily filled by the appoint- 
ment of Miss Howe, of Holden. 

DISTRICT LINES. 

During the early part of the year the attention of your 
Committee was called to the fact that many children were 
attending school out of their own districts. An investigation 
disclosed the fact that the district lines were becoming practi- 
cally obliterated. In one school, the Grew, there were found 
to be about seventy-five scholars belonging to other districts. 
This irregularity arose, in part, from the failure of pareni*s 
moving from one district to another to change the schools of 
their children ; in part, from the fact that new comers, igno- 
rant of district lines, had sent their children to the nearest 
school, naturally supposing that to be the right one ; and, in 
part, from the fact that many parents sent their children to 
the most convenient school, fully conscious that it was not 
their own. An order was passed requiring the masters to 



105 

discharge all scholars belonging to other districts. Chairmen 
of districts were, however, empowered to make exceptions in 
favor of little children, so as to allow them to attend the most 
convenient school. Special exception was also made in 
favor of those living on certain streets in the Sunnyside dis- 
trict, who seemed specially inconvenienced by the order. 

Your Committee have given this subject considerable at- 
tention, with a view to re-arrange the district lines. These 
lines form a curious and interesting feature of our school 
system. They were evidently run to make an even distribu- 
tion of pupils to the different school buildings. In organ- 
izing its schools the town began at the wrong end. It mis- 
placed the school buildings,— probably to meet its prospective 
wants, — compelling the Committee to draw unnatural district 
lines to suit the misplaced buildings, and the people to send 
their children to school to suit the misplaced lines ; that is, 
the people were compelled to accommodate themselves to the 
buildings which were not located to accommodate them. On 
the one side children living within sound of the Grew gong 
are compelled to cross a river and a railroad, both dangerous, 
to attend the Blake school, or a still more dangerous railroad 
to the Damon ; on the other, children are compelled to go 
almost from the centre of the town, where the sidewalks are 
good and safe at all seasons, over bad roads to an unsettled 
region where the Greenwood awaits in dreary solitude the 
coming of a distant posterity. Your Committee have brought 
this matter forward for the purpose of making a recommenda- 
tion, which will be a remedy for the inconveniences arising 
from the present district lines. That recommendation is that 
the hall of the Grew building be remodeled so as to furnish 
two school rooms and a hall. Should the town decide to 
make the change here suggested, your Committee can see 
their way clear to so re-arrange the district lines as to better 
accommodate the people. The river and railroad can be 
made the boundary line between the Blake and other dis- 
tricts. Children living near the centre of the town, but at- 
tending the Blake or Greenwood schools, can then be 



106 

assigned to the Grew, and those living on Central Park Avenue, 
in the vicinity of the woolen mill, now attending the Blake 
or Damon schools, can also be assigned to the Grew. Such 
an arrangement of rooms as is here suggested is very com- 
mon in modern buildings. The halls in all our school-houses 
are a sheer waste of room, being too large for any practical 
purpose. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

In accordance with a vote of the town authorizing the 
establishment of evening schools, and appropriating money 
therefor, your Committee early in October opened such 
schools in the Grew and Damon buildings, Mr. H. F. 
Dean being placed in charge of the former, and Mr. W. C. 
Kellogg of the latter. Although ample notice was given in 
the local paper of the opening of these schools, the attend- 
ance has not been as large as in former years. The whole 
number attending the Grew was 18, with an average attend- 
ance of 10 2-3 ; the number in the Damon 46, with an average 
attendance of 16 1-2. It seemed advisable that there should 
be some rule in regard to the number of pupils requisite for 
the continuance of a school, and an average attendance for a 
month of 10 pupils was fixed upon. The Grew school fell 
below that average after a nine weeks' term, and was accord- 
ingly closed. The whole number at the present time in the 
Damon school is 24, all but two of these being in ordinary 
times factory operatives. A standing rule of the Board for- 
bids the members of day schools attending the evening 
schools. After the closing of the factory at Readville, many 
of the operatives desired to attend both day and evening 
schools. It seemed unwise to your Committee to limit school 
advantages to those temporarily and providentially thrown 
out of employment, and the rule referred to above was sus- 
pended in their behalf. Many of the pupils of this school 
have left town to seek employment, which explains the present 
reduced number. Unusual interest has been taken this year by 
the pupils in both evening schools. Mr. Kellogg reports " that 



107 

the deportment of the pupils in his school has been equal to 
that which has prevailed in any day school he has ever 
taught," and " that nowhere has he observed a more eager 
desire for self-improvement." Your Committee were happy 
to comply with Mr. Kellogg's request to be allowed to close 
his school with a literary exhibition. This will take place on 
the evening of the 22d of March. 

SCHOOL GOVERNMENT. 

The subject of school government has long agitated the 
public mind. The result of this agitation has been a rapid 
growth, in nearly all our communities, of a public sentiment 
more or less unfavorable to the harsher methods of govern- 
ment. It is, we believe, a sign of an advancing civilization. We 
have but to contrast the methods of discipline in vogue under 
the old regime of school management with those generally 
prevalent at the present time, to be abundantly assured of 
this fact. Under the old, corporal punishment in some form 
or other, sometimes with weapons as dangerous as a police- 
man's billy, and sometimes in forms of physical torture^more 
exquisite than that of blows, was the almost unvarying 
means of government. And it was used not only to secure 
order, and enforce obedience to school regulations, but to 
stimulate intellectual activity. In the country especially, in 
many parts of New England, as many of our citizens will 
remember as they recall the days of their boyhood, the school 
room, at the beginning of every new term, became the arena 
of an inevitable struggle between the " big boys" and the " new 
master " as to who " should hold the fort," while parents and 
committee looked complacently on, awaiting the issue of this 
muscular contest. If the master lost the battle he was pro- 
nounced inefficient, and a man of more grit and better muscle 
was hunted up to take his place. 

Nothing but a low state of public sentiment on the subject 
of school management made such a state of things possible. 
With the dissemination of more enlightened views on the 



108 

legitimate objects for which the public school was instituted, 
and the means best adapted for their accomplishment, a 
change began to take place in the public mind. Corporal 
punishment as it was then conducted, that had been regarded 
by parents, committees and teachers as the never failing 
panacea for all the ills the school-room is heir to, began to be 
regarded as a very defective remedy. It was at last seen to 
be what it was and is, an appeal to the lowest motive that 
can actuate rational beings to do right, the fear or the suf- 
fering of physical pain. Public opinion, starting at the one 
extreme of this question, began to swing rapidly towards the 
other. The number of those opposed to every species of 
corporal punishment in the public schools has increased in 
every community. Committees have discussed the feasibility 
of its entire abolition. In some places it has been dispensed 
with, as a matter of experiment, but with results so unfavor- 
able or doubtful as to lead to a new discussion in favor of its 
restoration. 

We do not believe there is an intelligent educator in New 
England who would, for a moment, defend the system under 
which the rod was the chief instrument of school government. 
We believe that, on this question, teachers have kept fully 
abreast, in theory and practice, not of extremists, but of 
thoughtful people, whose opinions constitute what we call 
public sentiment. Great injustice has been done to them* 
first, on account of the reckless course of a few of their own 
number, who, although unable to govern their own tempers 
and so their own actions, yet attempt the responsible work of 
training the young, and disgrace themselves and their profes- 
sion by acts of downright brutality ; and, second, by false or 
exaggerated reports of brutality, which, beginning in ignor- 
ance or malice, are heralded over the country, through the 
medium of the public press, keeping the people in a state of 
chronic excitement, and creating a public sentiment on the 
subject of school discipline not at all justified by the facts. 
Tardy investigation reveals the falsity of the reports, but too 
late to undo the mischief which they have wrought. 



109 

Now, if this mode of discipline is wrong in itself, it should 
be everywhere discarded, at once and forever. It is but a 
means to an end ; and if it will not accomplish the end in 
view, then it should be abolished at once and for good. 

The public school is an institution of the State. It originat- 
ed and continues to exist only through legislative enactment. 
Its primary object is to educate the young to become good and 
useful citizens. The welfare of the State then lies at the basis 
of the public school. That means a great deal. The welfare 
of the State depends upon the intelligence and material pros- 
perity of the people. It means the storing of the minds of the 
young with useful knowledge and their education to practical 
business habits. The welfare of the State depends upon the 
virtue of the people. It means the cultivation in the young 
of the principles of honesty, integrity, and personal purity. 
The welfare of the State depends upon the loyalty of the peo- 
ple to settled principles of government. It means the train- 
ing of the young to respect for law and a ready submission to 
constituted authority. The public school, then, is the nursery 
of the State. It is no exaggeration to say that the teacher 
in preparing the young for the duties and responsibilities of 
the future performs a work second to no other in moulding 
the destinies of the Republic. He takes a very narrow view of 
his mission who, standing in the teacher's place undertakes no- 
thing in the line of government but to secure a quiet school 
room, nothing in the line of instruction but the teaching of 
technical knowledge. A silence like the silence of death may 
reign among youthful ranks, and every exercise may be con- 
ducted with military precision, and a school not have the best 
government. Nor is he the best instructor who has the most 
learning or the greatest facility in communicating it. He is 
the best disciplinarian who awakens in his pupils the disposition 
and establishes in them the power to govern themselves. And 
he is the best instructor who kindles in the minds of the young 
the desire to learn, and who confirms them in the habit of self- 
application. Above and beyond the mere routine work of the 
school-room the conscientious teacher will remember — and the 



110 

remembrance will give inspiration to his labors — that he is 
dealing with immortal minds, that he is not merely shaping 
youthful moods for a passing hour, but moulding deathless char- 
acter. This is putting the teacher's work upon a high plane, 
but is it not the correct theory? It is undoubtedly true that 
the teacher who is the most thoroughly imbued with the gran- 
deur of his mission, will, other things being equal, achieve 
the best results. Such a teacher will study his pupils, will 
seek to adapt his methods to their differing dispositions and 
temperaments, and even to their circumstances and associa- 
tions. Of necessity he will seek to govern chiefly by moral 
means. Both reason and experience will teach him to appeal 
to the better natures of his pupils, and, first of all, to that 
highest motive that can actuate human beings, — the sense 
of right. 

But however earnest and untiring his efforts in this direc- 
tion, and however successful in the main, every teacher will 
learn, sooner or later, that there are pupils in all our public 
schools who are not amenable to reason, who cannot be re- 
strained from evil and made to do right by moral means 
alone. If the experience of the past is worth anything, so 
long as many of the young are not governed or are misgov- 
erned at home, so long as the corrupting lessons of the even- 
ing street schools undo the best work of the day schools, so 
long as children inherit from depraved and vicious parents 
proclivities which will almost inevitably develop into mis- 
chievous habits, if not a wicked life, so long will moral means 
alone fail to wholly accomplish the object for which he 
labors. 

A certain degree of school room order, and an unquestion- 
ing obedience on the part of the pupil, are essential to a good 
school. While we concede that the teacher should secure 
these, if possible, by moral means or the more agreeable 
modes of punishment, rather than fail he should appeal to the 
lower motives and to any proper methods of discipline, how- 
ever uninviting. To be specific, and give an illustration that 
can be found in almost any public school. When a teacher 



Ill 

cannot awaken in the mind of a malicious and troublesome 
boy a sense of right so as to lead him to act from it, when 
appeals to his honor, pride, ambition, love of praise, and the 
like, have been in vain, when such a boy cannot be shamed 
into good behaviour, and has endured all minor punishments 
and penalties with stolid indifference, we believe that corporal 
punishment, whether we consider the good of the boy or that 
of the school, administered in sorrow, not in anger, is both 
wise and necessary, and it is one of the heresies of the pres- 
ent day to seek to give to such a boy entire immunity from 
its infliction. To be still more specific. A boy has long 
been guilty of the most outrageous conduct, in school and 
out. He has made light of all the milder measures used to 
restrain and correct him, has publicly flaunted his defiance in 
the face of the teacher, and has even boasted to his mates 
that he is going to behave in such a manner as to get him- 
self expelled. Now the teacher who knows just how to punish 
such a boy, calmly, carefully, properly, so as to reform him, is 
a public benefactor. We have no defence to make of the 
frequent or excessive use of the rod. The resentment that 
pervades the community in cases of real brutality on the part 
of teachers is perfectly natural and worthy of all respect, but 
not a little of the " hue and cry " made over the " sufferings of 
childhood," when a perverse and reckless boy is only properly 
punished and made to mind, is mere sentiment, and some of 
it of the most maudlin kind. It is near akin to the demon- 
strative sympathy that is so often expended on convicted 
felons lying in prison cells, and that transforms even murder- 
ers bound to the scaffold into demi-heroes. 

If the mode of punishment which we are considering had 
generally proved ineffectual, it might well be abandoned, but, 
as a matter of fact, physical pain, if administered in a right 
spirit, generally accomplishes at least one of its objects, the 
outward reformation of a wayward pupil. But submission so 
gained may not be merely outward. Many teachers, and 
parents as well, can attest to the fact that such an experience 
is often the turning point in a boy's career, the period from 



112 

which dates a true and lasting reformation. Physical pain is 
not a pleasant medicine for a parent or teacher to give, nor for 
a child to take, but it is often wholesome and sometimes a per- 
fect cure. It may not be complimentary to human nature to 
say it, but nevertheless we believe it to be true, that physical 
pain both in young and old will sometimes arouse the moral 
sense when nothing else will. 

Parents sometimes say that they are not obliged to punish 
their children in order to govern them and they cannot under- 
stand why teachers should. Now it is possible that there are 
children in the world on the road to ruin, because in 
the matter of child training their parents are not as wise 
as Solomon ! And it is very probable that, if such pa- 
rents had the care, for six hours a day, of some of 
the children who are found in almost every public 
school, they would speedily grow wiser, and their ideas 
of school government undergo a sudden revolution. 
If teachers could wait for weeks and months for the 
results of purely moral training, as parents can, moral means 
might, perhaps, be left to do their perfect work in the school, 
but when, in every case of discipline, a hundred bright eyes 
are watching to see whether school regulations can be broken 
with impunity or not, and when half as many youthful hearts 
are ready to be more or less demoralized, if they can, a little 
delay is sometimes dangerous, and a long delay fatal, to the 
teacher's authority. 

But those opposed to corporal punishment in schools have 
a very summary way of disposing of all difficult cases — by 
expulsion. And what is that ? It is to deprive of school 
government the very children who need it most, for the chil- 
dren who would suffer, expulsion, generally have no govern- 
ment, or what is worse misgovernment, at home ; it is to for- 
bid to so many children the education that would fit them to 
gain a livelihood ; it is to turn out into the streets so many 
children almost inevitably to grow up in ignorance and vice 
and become a curse to the community in which they live ; 
hence it is to defeat the beneficent as well as self-protecting 



113 

purpose of the State in the original institution of the public 
school, to train the young to become good and useful citizens. 
We believe that expulsion is justifiable only when all proper 
means of discipline — the lowest as well as the highest — have 
been exhausted, and reformation seems hopeless. It is better 
then that one should be sacrificed than that a whole school 
should be infected and injured by his pernicious example 
A grave responsibility rests upon parents in regard to 
the attitude which they take in this matter, both towards 
their children and towards teachers. At the present time 
thoughtful parents, wise for the welfare of their children, do not 
demand the abolition of corporal punishment as a means of 
school discipline. They only demand the abolition of its 
abuses. 

It seems almost needless for your Committee, in closing, to 
call your attention to the importance of the public school in 
the Republican system under which we live, and to remind 
you that intelligence and virtue on the part of the people are 
inseparable from the success and permanence of republican 
institutions. This is not the occasion to enlarge upon the 
dangers that menace the Republic, but that there are dangers, 
increasing in number and magnitude, is patent to every 
thoughtful observer, and that of these an illiterate suffrage 
stands among the foremost. The pulpit, the press, and the 
school have been called the conservators of American liberty. 
The most dangerous elements are scarcely reached by the 
pulpit, imperfectly by the press, but the young, into whose 
hands the destinies of the Republic will, in due time, be com- 
mitted, can be reached in the public school. Let the standard 
of education among us never be lowered. Let it rather be 
elevated and strengthened by every means within our power. 

Edward M. Lancaster, Chairman. 

W. H. H. Andrews, Secretary. 

H. M. Cable, 

R. W. Husted, 

H. C. Chamberlain, 

Francis C. Williams. 



114 



REPORT OF ATTENDANCE AT THE HIGH SCHOOL. 





c 

05 

a 


oj 
q 55 


d 

05 • 


° 6 

. o 


° r? 


a 

05 


>> 


"a >» 

05 -c 


Jan. 2 to 
June 29. 


s 

05 


£s 


5 ° 


a ea 


05 a 

w o 


< 


03 


.a 08 




O 

is 


$* 


u -^ 




o 


o 


o o 
fca 


I 


5 


5 


4.9 


99 


99 


2 


2 


2 


II 


23 


21 


20 


95 


99 


3 


10 


1 


III 


24 


21 


19 


91 


99 


3 


10 


o 


IV 


35 


31 


29 


91 


99 


1 


19 


1 


Sep. 3 to 


















Dec. 22. 


















I 


17 


17 


16 


97 


99 


3 


13 


3 


II 


15 


15 


14 


97 


99 


5 


13 


5 


III 


22 


21 


20 


98 


99 


7 


18 


6 


IV 


46 


44 


42 


96 


99" 


14 


2'i 


10 



NOT ABSENT NOR TARDY FROM JAN. 2, '77 TO JAN. 2, '78. 

Second Class— Abbie L. Sanger; Third Claps— Willie H. Sanger, Nellie F. Rogers. 



REPORT OF ATTENDANCE AT DAMON SCHOOL. 



^t- 






V 

VI 

vir 

VIII 
IX 

x 

XI 
XII 



v 

VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

X 

X 

XI 

XII 



TEACHERS. 



E. W.Cross 

E. W.Cross 

L. D. Bunker 

L. D. Bunker 

J. E. Donovan 

S. A. Crosby 

S. A. Crosby 

C. E. Walker 

From Sept. 1 to Dec. 31, 1877. 

E. W. Cross 

E. W. Cross 

L. D. Bunker 

L. D. Bunker 

J.E.Donovan 

J. E. Donovan 

S. A. Crosby 

8. A. Crosby 

C. E. Walker 



^ 






H-, 






.a 


05 . 


a 


O 05 


o >, 


*jj 


s 


233 


*■> . 


J. a 


.w''— 


05 


z 


£1 




a « 


5 a 


.a 
< 


c 


$* 


< 


gjq 


o* P 





8 


79 


77 


96 


100 


3 


15 


12 


12 


88 


99 





12 


10 


9 


94 


98 





21 


20 


16 


95 


99 





47 


42 


41 


87 


99 


2 


33 


30 


24 


71 


99 


2 


30 


27 


25 


92 


99 


1 


02 


48 


38 


85 


99 


1 


_ 


6 


5 


75 


100 





17 


14 


13 


96 


100 


3 


17 


14 


13 


96 


99 





40 


31 


31 


91 


98 





40 


31 


32 


80 


98 


2 


18 


17 


16 


88 


99 


2 


25 


24 


22 


93 


99 


3 


33 


30 


29 


97 


99 


4 


86 


42 


37 


87 


99 






13 



23 
21 
25 
29 



NAMES OF PUl'ILS NOT ABSENT OR LATE. 



Josie Conlon, 
Daniel Twomey, 



Nicholas Kappler, 
Archie Stevens, 



John Thompson, 
George Morgan. 



115 



REPORT OF ATTENDANCE AT BLAKE SCHOOL. 



03 - 

g-g 



v 

VI 

VI 1 
VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 
XII 



V 
VI 
VII 

VIII 



X 

XI 
XII 



Henry F. Howard 

Henry F. Howard 

Belle M. Roper 

Belle M. Roper IX 

Emma A. George ) 

Helen Perry ( 

Elmina I . Oliver 

Jennie S. Hammond 

Mrs. M. S.Lake 

From Sept 1, to Dec. 31, 1877. 

Henry F. Howard 

Henry F. Howard 

Belle M. Roper- 

One division with VII ) 

One division with IX ( " 

Ida Pratt I 

Almira Cross ( 

Elmina L. Oliver 

Jennie S. Hammond 

Mrs. M. S. Lake 



c 












,S 


& . 


a 


O 43 


o t>> 


B 


s 

!§ 

o 

S3 


2S 


03 

±5 oj 

^ B 
. CB 


jj a 


<o E 


01 

■a 
<1 

o 


17 


16.8 


16.3 


97 


90.2 





21 


20.3 


18.5 


91.1 


93.6 


1 


18 


17.1 


16.7 


97.6 


97.5 


1 


35 


33.6 


30.6 


91.3 


90.5 


4 


34 


26 


24.6 


94.6 


96.8 





40 


34 


29 


85 


98 





33 


27 


26 


96 


99 





65 


44 


39 


89 


98 





14 


13.1 


12.5 


95.4 


98 


1 


26 


22.2 


21 


95.5 


99 


8 


33 


31.3 


30.9 


98.7 


95.7 


5 


38 


33.5 


30.2 


90.1 


96.5 


3 


38 


36.4 


31 


85.1 


93.8 


2 


39 


37 


31 


84 


98 


3 


37 


36 


34 


94 


99 


3 


61 


56 


48.5 


86.7 


98 






7 
12 

32 



Eric Roslins 



PERFECT ATTENDANCE FOR ONE YEAR. 

Lorena Drake, 



Loretta Drake. 



REPORT OF ATTENDANCE AT GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 



Jan. 2 to 
June 29. 



V 

VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 

XII 

Sept 3 to 
Dec. 22. 

V 

VI 

VII 

AM 1 1 

IX 

X 

XI 

XII 



NAME OF TEACHER. 



J. L. Curtis.. 
J. L. Curtis.. 
L. S. Currier 
L. S. Currier 
H. J. Folsom 
H. J. Folsom, 
M. E. Libby. 
M.E. Libby. 



J. L. Curtis.- 
J. L. Curtis.., 
L. S. Cunier. 
L. S. Currier. 
H. J. Folsom. 
H.J. Folsom 
M. E. Libby. 
M. E. Libby 



£ 




























^3 






c 








£ 


*£ 


— 0) 


o u 


es 


a 






O) 13 












a) 




it .2 
oS'w 


a o3 
°a 


a 2 


03 


03 








- 03 


u - 






£ 






53 " 


03 s 




O 


< 


< 


^ 


ChO. 


Z 


fc 


20 


20 


19 


.95 


.99 


2 


6 


16 


16 


15 


.94 


.99 


4 


6 


14 


12 


11 


.91 


.99 


2 


8 


22 


19 


17 


.90 


99 





4 


21 


17 


15 


.91 


.99 


1 


6 


42 


35 


31 


.89 


.99 





13 


26 


20 


18 


.90 


.99 





10 


49 


36 


31 


.89 


.98 





12 


14 


14 


13 


.94 


.99 


4 


7 


22 


20 


19 


.94 


.99 


3 


13 


IS 


14 


13 


.93 


.99 


3 


14 


26 


21 


19 


90 


.99 





5 


32 


27 


25 


.92 


.9a 


2 


19 


46 


39 


35 


.91 


.9.) 


2 


31 


30 


24 


23 


.93 


.99 





12 


45 


38 


3a 


.88 


.98 





19 



NOT ABSENT OR TARDY FROM JAN 2, 1877, TO JAN. 2, 1878. 

Fifth Class— Francis Williams, Edward Gage, Isabel Gregg. Sixth Class— Maud 
Laurison. 



116 



REPORT OF GREW SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1 to 
July 1, 

1877. 



'V 

VI 

VII 

VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 

XII 

Sept. 1 to 
Dec. 31. 

V 

VI 

vn 

VIII 

IX 

X 

XI 

XJI 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



G. M. Fellows 

G. M. Fellows 

F. J. Emerson 

Lucina Dunbar 

M. A. Alexander 

M. F. Smith 

Genevieve Brainard, 
S. S. Lancaster 



F. H. Dean 

F. H.Dean 

F.J.Emerson 

Lucina Dunbar .. .. 
M. A.Alexander.... 

M. F. Smith 

Genevieve Brainard. 
S. S. Lancaster 





a> 




S 


o 




3 




o 


a 


bD-3 


<x> s 




si g 


s-a 








x: 


> a 


>i 




<j 


< 


14 


13 


11 


25 


24 


22 • 


43 


36 


35 


39 


36 


3.: 


5(5 


48 


46 


52 


42 


37 


47 


22 


32 


56 


42 


39 


20 


J8 


16 


30 


26 


24 


40 


34 


38 


49 


39 


33 


49 


46 


33 


55 


39 


34 


47 


22 


32 


53 


40 


32 



12 
16 
36 
28 
31 
18 
14 
12 



NAMES OF PUPILS NOT ABSENT OR TARDY. 

Eddie Newcombe, Fred. Rich, Ralph Vose, 

Fred Waldron, Florence Lane, Clement Sticknev, 

MaudFairbairn, Lizzie Neal, Addie Chesley, - 

Ellie Gray, Horace Fellows, Sadie Stackpole, 

Thaddy Fairbairn, Henry Humphrey, Frank Upham, 

Edna Pierce, Alice Scrivens, Olive Humphrey. 



H