(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures : with report of the selectmen and other town officers"

Shelf 



Uo.i£M£*.¥- 
IWl 




Given By 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofrehyde11 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN. TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31st, 1880. 




'<44MA£*' 



HYDE PARK: 
PRESS OF THE NORFOLK COUNTY GAZETTE, 

1880. 



TWELFTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 
LIBRARY AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS 



YEAR ENDING JANUABY 31st, 1880. 




HYDE PARK: 

PRESS OF THE NORFOLK COUNTY GAZETTE, 

1880. 



«J ■ SJ tfYVi . 



>-> U v U 



yjk? 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 

For the year ending March 1, 1880. 



SELECTMEN, SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS, AND BOARD OF HEALTH: 

CHARLES H. COLBY, STEPHEN B. BALKAM, 

HENRY C. STARK. 

ASSESSORS AND OVERSEERS OF THE POOR: 

RANDOLPH P. MOSELEY, JOEL F. GOODWIN, 

JOHN M. TWICHELL. 

TOWN CLERK : 

HENRY B. TERRY. 

TOWN treasurer: 

HENRY S. BUNTON. 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES : 

JOSEPH B. QUIMBY. 

school committee: 

EDMUND DAYIS term expires 1882. 

HENRY H. SMITH term expires 1882. 

ANDREW WASHBURN term expires 1881. 

CHARLES G. CHICK . . term expires 1881. 

R. W. HUSTED term expires 1880. 

Rev. FRANCIS C. WILLIAMS term expires 1880. 

SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS: 

HENRY GREW, HENRY BLASDALE, 

WILLIAM J. STUART. 

TREASURES, OF SINKING FUND : 

HENRY S. BUNTON. 

AUDITORS: 

AUGUSTUS A. PAGE, A. G. MACOMBER, 

GEORGE B. KERR. 

CONSTABLES : 

E. W. MOFFATT, J. B. QUIMBY, J. R. NUTE, 

WILLIAM JORDAN, CHARLES JACOBS. JOHN P. DUNN, 

W. H. CUMMINGER, H. P. BUSSEY. 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES : 

WILLIAM HEUSTIS. 

fire department: 

WARREN W. HILTON, Chief Engineer, 

C, L. FARNSWORTH and J. W. BEAN, Assistant Engineers, 



INDEX. 



PAGE 

Applicants for aid 31 

Appropriation for the current year 38 

Assessors, Report of. 33 

Auditor's certificate *. 40 

Births '. 45 

Board of Health, Report ot '13 

By-Laws 60 

Collector of Taxes, Report of 34 

Deaths.... 49 

DobtotTown S3 

Engineers, Report of 41 

Expenditures, Detailed statement of 14 

" for the current year 38 

Fire Department 24 

«* " List of officers 44 

Fires, List of. 43 

Fuel and Janitors (Schools) 16 

Highways, Selectmen's report ot 3 

" Expenditures on. 21 

Incidentals, Expenditures lor 19 

Licenses 13 

Marriages 46 

, List of Town 5 

i of Poor, Report of 31 

.aided by town, List of. 31 

Expenditures for 25 

Poor, Expenditures on account of 28 

Public Library, Expenses of 30 

** ** Report of Treasurer of. 59 

« «* «* Trustees of 53 

Report ot Committee on «* Happy Valley " "1 

i©f Town Officers 2!7 

ehers* Salaries), .... is 

School Committee, Report ot 89 

SehooHncidental Expenses 17 

Selectmen, Report of 5 

Sinking Fund, Report of Commissioners of 39 

Street Lamps .. 9 

Taxation, rate of.-... 33 

TaxBeed statement.... 35 

Tax Payers, List of Resident (Si 

■* *• Son-Resident. 16 

Town Clerk, Report of 45 

Town HaM Building...... KB 

Town Treasurer, Report of.... 36 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Fellow Citizens :— 

Among the last official acts devolving* upon your execu- 
tive officers, is their report of the manner in which the 
business of the town has been conducted during the past 
year, with the present condition of the various departments 
of the town. We herewith present you the reports of the 
heads of those departments, inviting your careful consider- 
ation of the same. 

HIGHWAYS. 

Before the appropriations were voted, the surveyors 
of highways personally inspected every street in town, 
making careful estimates, and recommended a somewhat 
larger appropriation for highways than you saw fit to grant. 
Owing to the small amount of money expended by our 
immediate predecessors, the streets were not in as good 
condition at the beginning of the present financial year as 
they have been, heretofore consequently more money was 
required. The funds at our command have been expended 
where, in our judgment, it was most needed. Hyde Park 
avenue, considering the large amount of travel it receives, 
was found in better condition than expected, with the 
exception of that part near Clarendon Hills, which required 
one hundred loads of stone and between three and four hun- 
dred loads of gravel, grading it up from two to four feet ; 
it is now solid and permanent. 

River street, taking the heaviest travel of all our streets, is 
entitled to and should receive the best gravel dressing to be 
had — unfortunately there is none accessible in that part of 
the town — and our highway appropriation being so limited, 
we did not feel warranted in taking gravel from the pit, the 
long distance we would be obliged to cart it making it very 
expensive. We therefore gave it a heavy dressing of coal 
ashes from the paper mill to the Boston line • this, however, 
proved very unsatisfactory, and we recommend that in 



6 

future nothing but the best gravel be placed on that street. 
Much complaint having been made of the mud at corner 
of Central avenue and West street, also West and Elm street, 
iron pipe was laid across the avenue and street graded up 
over it, since which time we have had no trouble. One 
gutter in Everett square has been paved for a distance of 
one hundred and sixty feet. Central Park avenue, near 
Glover & Willcomb's, has long been in bad condition, par- 
ticularly in the spring. This has been remedied, and it 
now compares favorably with other streets in town. Charles 
street having been neglected since its acceptance, received 
attention, the easterly end being put in thorough repair. 
Milton street has been gravelled nearly its entire length, 
and a culvert built near estate of D. L. Davis, Esq. River 
street near the Declham line has been gravelled, but nothing 
of consequence done upon it in or near Everett Square, or 
from the square to the paper mill. It should receive a good 
coat of gravel the coming spring. The streets on Fair- 
mount avenue are in fair condition, more or less work hav- 
ing been done on most of them. Water street received a 
good gravelling, of which it was much in need. Williams, 
Dana, and ISeponset avenues received some attention ; the 
glitter on Williams avenue being paved from the Blake 
School to where it empties into the culvert, a distance of 
some two hundred and fifty feet. Summit street was in 
bad condition. This has been made good, and the gutter 
paved from Mount Pleasant street to Williams avenue. A 
culvert has been rebuilt on Beacon street, corner Milton 
avenue. More or less work has been done on streets in 
different sections of the town not enumerated above. 

Our streets have in the past been favorably noticed by 
strangers, and in order to keep them up to a high standard 
more money must be expended than has been thought neces- 
sary the past two years, as, with the revival of business, 
they will be more used, and consequently more worn. The 
present open winter is very hard upon them, and they are 
badly rutted in many places. 

The great difficulty in most parts of the town is the lack 
of good gravel. Our only dependence has been the pit 
near West street, and it is very expensive carting from this 
to the extremes of the town, so much so that we considered 
it economy to buy gravel instead of teaming from the pit. 
At the beginning of the year this pit was so choked with 



stone that it was necessary to employ a large force to re- 
move them in order to get at the gravel. This alone cost 
nearly two hundred dollars. The supply of gravel from 
this source is very limited, considering the prospective 
wants of the town ; and in this connection we would call 
your attention to. the report of Committee on Happy Valley 
property hereto annexed. From that report you will ob- 
serve that the town purchased the estate after much delibera- 
tion and many futile attempts to collect its|claim for taxes. 
The Selectmen had the hill on the premises examined, and 
found that it contained practically an inexhaustable supply 
of gravel suitable for streets. This decided them to buy it, 
and in so doing have been charged with establishing a bad 
precedent. In answer to this, they have^only to say that 
a town officer lacking the moral courage to perform an act 
of vital importance to the town through fear of establishing 
a precedent, is no more fit to hold office than he who would 
use such a precedent to the town's disadvantage. "We trust 
the purchase of this estate will meet your approval. We 
would call your attention to the fact that the amount of pur- 
chase money, twelve hundred dollars, was taken from the 
appropriation for incidentals, thus reducing the balance of 
the appropriation that amount. 

The report cited above follows : — 

REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE 

Appointed Dec. 21. 1878, "with full powers to arrange and adjust 
the amount to be paid to the town by Cyrus Brewer, trustee, or 
those for whom he acted as trustee in taking a mortgage of 
land at Happy Valley, (so called,) and thereupon to convey to 
him or them the interest of the town in said land." 

The Committee found the interest of the town in the above es- 
tate to be $2191.28, of which sum $207.19 represented the taxes 
for 1877 and '78, with accrued interest thereon ; the remainder, 
$1984.09, represented the taxes of the years '72, '73, '74, '75, and 
'76, ($1,235.02,) with accrued interest and costs, ($749,07,) and 
was secured by five tax deeds, (aggregating $1,462.61,) — one for 
each of the said years. An examination of these deeds satisfied 
the Committee that the three oldest ones, representing the amount 
of $1,516.14, were absolutely valueless from errors connected 
with the sales as well as the defects in the deeds themselves ; they 
however submitted the questions involved to John P. Healey, 
City Solicitor of Boston, by whom the conclusions already reached 
by the Committee were fully endorsed and sustained. This re- 



duced the actual value of the town's claim to $467.95, exclusive 
of the taxes lor '77 and '78, with which the Committee had noth- 
ing to do. It is true that the taxes for the years represented by 
the worthless deeds inight be re-levied ; but in that event all the 
accrued interest and costs, ammounting to $611.12, would be lost, 
and all just claims of excessive valuation fur those years would 
be in order ; and it was claimed, not without reason, that the for- 
mer valuation was excessive. 

In the mean time the Committee had been constantly in nego- 
tiation, and frequently in consultation with Asaph Churchill Esq., 
who represented the several parties interested in the Happy Valley 
estate, and who was not ignorant of the faulty nature of a large 
part of the town's claim ; by whom, at length, the sum of $800 
was offered in full settlement of all the claims of the town. This 
was agreed to by the Committee, and they congratulated them- 
selves on so favorable an adjustment. But payment of said sum 
was, for one reason and another postponed from time to time, until 
at last it became necessary to close up the tax for 1877 by sale, 
which was done, and the deed taken by the town. 

After this it seemed probable that the only course left to the 
town would be to take possession under its deeds, good and bad, 
and await the suit which would follow. But at this juncture the 
Selectmen became convinced of the value of the. propertj- to the 
town as a gravel deposit, and, with the full concurrence of the 
Committee, negogiated and effected a purchase of the same, in 
which the sum of 1800 above agreed on, went in as part of the 
purchase mone} 7 . 

The title thus acquired by the town, merged in itself all the 
other claims of the town on the propert} 7 , and, by thus removing 
the subject-matter on which they were appointed to act, relieved 
the Committee from further service. 

Respectfully submitted. 

JOHN M. TWICIIELL, 
EDMUND DAVIS, 
HENRY S. BUNTON, 
JOEL F. GOODWIN, 
R. P. MOSELEY. 

Committee. 

BPwIDGES. 

The several bridges in town have received attention. Cen- 
tral Avenue bridge has been slightly repaired, as has 
River Street bridge near the Cotton Mill. This bridge 
ought to be entirely rebuilt next year. Bridge Street bridge 
received necessary repairs ; it will have to be rebuilt at an 
early day. Fairmouht Avenue Bridge has been newly 



9 

planked, and is in fair condition. The bridge at Clarendon 
Hills has been replanked, and will need no more repairs for 
some time. 

SIDEWALKS. 

These are not in as good condition as they should be, not 
having received the attention they deserve, and are not 
a credit to the town. We would respectfully recommend 
that an appropriation be made each year for their exclusive 
benefit. 

STREET LIGHTS. 

A contract was made with the Dedham & Hyde Park 
Gas Co. to light our streets during the year, in which they 
agreed to connect all lamps on the line of their mains, num- 
bering about seventy, and light them with gas, using burn- 
ers consuming not less than four cubic feet per hour. The 
balance (eighty) to be lighted with gas generated from naph- 
tha. The consideration was $1,900 per year, $400 less than 
was paid last year for all naphtha. The first part of the 
season the gas was unsatisfactory, for which discounts were 
claimed and allowed. That being remedied, our attention 
was given to the naphtha lamps, which were in a less satis- 
factory condition than the gas. Claims were made and al- 
lowed, but no improvement made in the light. Finally a 
communication notifying the contractors that unless better 
lights were furnished the contract would be annulled com- 
mandecl attention, and but few complaints have since been 
made ; yet the naphtha lights have not been what we had a 
right to expect. Iron lamp posts have been substituted for 
wooden ones between the depots, and allow us to suggest 
that m the future none but iron be used. During the year 
twelve new lamps have been put up by the citizens at pri- 
vate expense, making- the total number at present 162. 

■ STREET SIGNS. 

These have not received the attention desired, the limited 
amount of the appropiation for highways not permitting. 
They are very much out of repair, the names on some being 
entirely obliterated, and on many others very indistinct. 
They should all be repainted where whole, and worthless 
ones replaced by new. On Unaccepted streets we have put 
up about eighty signs, "Private Way — Dangerous Pass- 
ing" thus relieving the town of liability in case of accident 
on those streets. 



10 

TAX DEEDS. 

A committee was appointed by the town, April 7, 1879, 
" with full powers to arrange, adjust and compromise any 
and all doubtful or disputed tax titles held by the town, and 
to execute and deliver all necessary deeds and releases." 
That Committee has received propositions for the compro- 
mise of tax deeds having a nominal value of $785.43, and in 
view of their defective character, have settled the same very 
advantageously to the town, a discount of $100.45 being al- 
lowed on the face value. 

The town now holds tax deeds to the amount of $1,044.14, 
of which $809.45 has been acquired the present year, and is 
considered unquestionably good. At our suggestion the 
Town Treasurer has prepared a report showing our past 
and present tax deed interests, to which the citizens are 
referred for future information. 

TOWN HALL BUILDING. 

Very many of our citizens have been opposed to any effort 
to lift this building from its obscurity, and place it on an 
equal footing with other halls in town ; consequently the 
present executive officers found it in bad condition and in ill 
favor. They at once set about removing the difficulty. 
The hall was thoroughly cleaned and painted, walls tinted, 
&c, a reflector placed over the stage, and an elegant twelve- 
light chandelier hung in the centre of the hall in place of 
the old gas fixture, which was neither useful nor ornamental. 
The ante-rooms were entirely remodeled, and several minor 
improvements made. Subsequently you instructed the Se- 
lectmen to procure new settees, and in accordance with those 
instructions eighty settees of Morse's patent have been 
bought, giving the hall a seating capacity of five hundred 
and forty. And in this connection we desire to make an 
explanation of the items, — $27 for chairs, and $85.81 for 
shades. After the appropriation for settees was voted, we 
found that we could buy them at a less price than was at 
first given us, and as chairs and shades were needed, we 
decided to pay for them from the unexpended balance of this 
appropriation, rather than have it go into the sinking fund, 
particularly as the chairs were practically a part of the seats 
contemplated and the shades a necessary part of the hall 
equipment. We trust this action will meet your approval. 
Very recently the stage has been widened three feet, and 



11 

window shades put up. The expense of the improvements 
lias been paid from the receipts of the hall, except as before 
stated. At the commencement of the present financial year, 
the Selectmen requested the Treasurer to open an account 
with the Town Hall Building. They also placed the hall in 
the charge of Mr. Joel F. Goodwin, under whose efficient 
management it has been better patronized than ever before. 
The expense of alterations and repairs has been large, and 
therefore the account shows a very small balance covered 
into the treasury ; but in its present good condition the town 
stiould receive a fair income from it the ensuing year, and, 
with the amount saved by occupying the lower floor for town 
offices, the building will yield a fair interest on its value. 

Receipts from Town Hall Building, , $831 81 

Expenditures for repairs and permanent improvements, . 817 13 

Net balance, . . . . . . . $14 68 

TOWN OFFICES. 

By vote of the town, October 1st, 1879, the Selectmen 
were authorized to fit up rooms in Town Hall building for 
town offices. This they have done in a manner which they 
trust will merit your approbation. The work has been done 
in a thorough manner under the personal supervision of the 
Selectmen, without any attempt at show, but with the sole 
aim to have them convenient, pleasant and comfortable. A 
fire proof vault has been built, 6x8 feet inside and 7 feet 
high ; commencing in the cellar 12 inch walls were carried 
to first floor, with an iron door to entrance from cellar ; the 
first floor was covered with railroad iron and brick on top to 
a depth of 12 inches, then a tier of brick laid on edge in 
cement to form floor of vault. Walls above first floor are 
eight inch brick, an air space of two inches, then a second 
wall of eight inches, plastered on each side of air space. 
The top is covered in same manner as first floor, with 
an air space on top, same as in side wall ; above air 
space is a second covering of railroad iron with brick above 
to a depth of 12 inches. It is plastered two coats inside 
and out. In its construction practical safe builders were 
consulted, and we received the benefit of their experience. 
From one firm we procured two double iron doors, with 
steel lining and combination lock, in exchange for three old 
safes owned by the town. These doors open from Treas- 



12 

urer's room, and are easily accessible from Town Clerk; 
and Assessors' rooms. The Treasurer's safe has been placed 
in the vault, and the space above and on either side fitted 
with cases for the use of the several departments. This 
vault is believed to be absolutely fire-proof and supplies a 
long felt want, as there is ample room for the storage of 
books, plans and other valuable papers which are constantly 
accumulating, and in case of loss could not be replaced. 
The plan of the rooms was the result of much care and 
thought and we think will be found well adapted to their 
intended use. They have been thoroughly repaired and 
painted, walls tinted and shades put up. 

Most of you are aware that in alterations of this kind 
there are many things to be done that are not thought of in 
the original estimate but are developed as the work pro- 
gresses, one alteration suggesting another. This has proved 
to be no exception as a great deal has been done which Avas 
not contemplated. The vacant land on westerly side of 
building has been graded and loam put on. The cellar 
windows bricked up on the outside to prevent the earth from 
rotting the woodwork ; a fence built across passage-way ; 
coal-bin built, etc., etc. Some of the ceilings had to be 
partty taken clown and all newly skimmed ; a water closet' 
put in for use of town officers and others using the rooms ; 
the force-pump in cellar repaired in order to supply water 
for this and one in ante-room to main hall as well as for 
steam boiler. The officers have moved into their several 
rooms, and express themselves as well pleased with their new 
quarters, and we think they will prove to be the most attrac- 
tive as well as the most convenient rooms the town has 
ever occupied. 

STEAM HEATING. 

By vote of the town, December 23d, 1879, the Selectmen 
were instructed to procure steam heating apparatus for Town 
Hall building. After receiving many proposals, we con- 
tracted with Andrew G. Paul of Boston, for all material and 
labor except setting boiler. This is of about seventeen horse- 
power, warranted and insured for one year, and is connected 
with all the offices, and corridor leading to the same, store 
occupied by Mr. Miles, main hall and anterooms, also 
Masonic Hall and ante-rooms. In the whole building there 
are twenty radiators and one coil, making a total radiating 



13 

surface of 1044 square feet. At the present time of writing 
the work has not been accepted and we therefore omit any 
details. 

Permit us to congratulate you upon now being the owners 
of a Town Hall building complete in all its arrangements, 
admirably adapted to all the requirements of the town, con- 
taining all needed improvements, easy of access, commod- 
ious and attractive. The Hall is now, without question, the 
most convenient of any in town for entertainments and 
exhibitions. It is your property — will you give it your 
patronage ? 

BOARD OF HEALTH. 

There have been no important duties required of this 
Board during the past year as the town has been entirely 
free from epidemics, their attention having been called to a 
few simple cases of nuisances which have been easily dis- 
posed of. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

We have nothing to add to the report of the Board of 
Engineers except to corroborate their statement as to the 
present efficient condition of the Department. 

LICENSE. 

It was well known previous to the election of the present 
town officers, that a majority of the Board of Selectmen 
were in favor of granting licenses for the sale of intoxicat- 
ing liquors, contrary to what appears to be the sentiment of 
the town; but honest in their convictions, they were gov- 
erned by them, and the several applications were granted. 

Early in March the Chief of Police reported twenty-seven 
places where intoxicating liquors were being sold, as they 
had been for a year past. Most of these were doing this 
in direct violation of law, without let or hindrance.. Their 
business was open and independent, and sales made at any 
time, day or night, Sunday not excepted, and it mattered 
not whether the purchaser was man, woman or child, drunk 
or sober. This was the exact condition of the liquor busi- 
ness when we came into office. These places were visited 
by us, and the proprietors informed that they must either 
close their places, procure a license, or suffer the conse- 
quences. This summons was promptly heeded, with one 
■exception. This place was closed, the proprietor leaving 
town before his arrest could be effected.. Applications for 



14 

license were mad'e and granted, and the applicants informed 
of the nature of the contract they were asssuming. They 
were required to give satisfactory bonds to your treasurer 
for the fulfilment of their contract. 

The Treasurer was requested to accept no bonds except 
such as were perfectly responsible, and from his well-known 
careful business habits we were confident of their being ad- 
equate. All parties were notified that any known violation 
of the conditions of their license would rec eive the extreme 
penalty of the law. With scarcely an ex eeption the busi- 
ness has been conducted in an orderly and quiet manner, 
with rarely a complaint from any source. A drunken per- 
son on our streets has seldom been seen, and in almost every 
instance of arrest for drunkenness it appeared from the 
evidence given at the trial that the liquor was not purchased 
in our town, In two instances only have parties been known 
to sell without license. They were promptly arrested and 
their places closed. During the year thirteen places have 
been selling under a license against twenty-seven places 
indiscriminately the year, previous. 

In conclusion permit us to say that while having no 
sympathy with or desire to encourage the traffic in intoxi- 
cating liquors, our judgment compels us to believe Prohib- 
ition to be practically impossible under our National laws, 
and from our observation has the appearance of favoring ancl 
increasing the business as was plainly demonstrated in 1878. 

This subject received from us all the time and attention 
we could possibly give it, and from the knowledge thus, 
obtained, together with that obtained from other sources, we 
fail to understand how any unprejudiced person cans but 
believe a license law, uneter which the traffic m controlled; 
and all violations thereof visited with severe penalties, is not 
the most direct, if not the only source of protection from the 
evils of intemperance. 

Respectfully submitted. 

CHAS. H. COLBY, 
S. R BALKAM, 
H. C. STARK, 

Selectmen of Hyde Pavh^ 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



SCHOOLS. — Teachers' Salaries. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 




Paid John F. Elliot . 


$1,525 00 


Miss Fannie E. Lord 


184 80 


Miss Minnie C. Clark 


395 00 


Miss Mary M. Coleman 


575 00 


GREW SCHOOL. 




Paid Franklin H. Dean 


$1,100 00 


Miss Fannie J. Emerson . 


440 00 


Miss Lucina Dunbar 


440 00 


Miss Mary Morey . 


400 00 


Miss Martha A. Alexander 


440 00 


Miss Genevieve Brainard . 


440 00 


Miss Sarah S. Lancaster . 


90 00 


Miss Lelia E. Perry 


320 00 


Miss Florence E. Leadbeater 


21 94 


BLAKE SCHOOL. 




Paid Henry F. Howard 


$1,150 00 


Miss Annie L. Howe 


420 00 


Miss Caroline Howard 


381 00 


Miss J. Gertrude Tilton 


21 94 


Miss Annie L. Eddy 


407 50 


Miss Jennie S. Hammond . 


440 00 


Miss Helen A. Perry 


407 50 


Miss Abbie Howard 


3 00 


Miss Margaret E. Bertram 


16 50 



$2,679 80 



1,691 94 



1,247 44 



16 



DAMON SCHOOL. 




Paid Edward W. Cross .... 


SI, 150 00 


Miss Lizzie D. Bunker 


440 00 


Miss Julia E. Donovan 


440 00 


Miss Sarah A. Crosby 


440 00 


Miss Alice E. Gage 


150 00 


Miss Minnie C. Clark 


120 00 


Miss Alice B. White 


280 00 


GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 




Paid J. Langdon Curtis 


$1,150 00 


Miss Lucy S. Currier 


440 00 


Miss Harriet J. Folsom . . . 


440 00 


Miss Mary E. Libby 


■ 440 00 


Miss Carrie E. Walker 


397 00 


Miss Agnes L. Adams . , 


40 00 



$3,020 00 



EVERETT SCHOOL. 

Paid Miss Mary E. Rogers 



MUSIC. 



Paid Henry J. Whitternore 



FUEL AND JANITORS. 

Paid S. B. Balkam, 200 tons coal at $4.80 
S. B. Balkarn , labor trimming coal at 

High School . . . 

McAvoy & Co., 8 tons furnace coal . 
S. B. Balkam, 5 cords pine wood 
Robert Scott, Jr., janitor, High and 

Grew Schools .... 

George James, janitor, Blake School . 
Albert C. Clapp, janitor, Damon School 
John P. Emery, janitor, Greenwood 

School ..... 



$2,907 00 



$407 50 



$160 00 
816,113 68 



$960 00 



3 
46 
32 


00 
00 
50 




271 

135 

1 150 
1 


40 
70 
00 




135 


70 


$1,734 30 








117,847 98 



17 



Ck. 

By amount of appropriation . . $17,800 00 
By amount expended from the income of 

the Massachusetts School Fund . . 47 98 



$17,847 98 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



Paid Rev F. C. Williams, services as Clerk 


of Schoo 




Committee . $100 00 


S. B. Balkam, lumber, &c. 






45 05 


John Beaty, labor .... 






17 12 


J. M. Williams, labor 






19 61 


G. W. Hanscom, " 






29 70 


L.H.Russell. " .* , 






20 80 


J. P. Emery, " • 






38 49 


John White, " . 






2 81 


A. D. Rooney, " ... 






23 00 


Thomas Meegan, ' ; . 






6 56 


Benj. E. Phillips, repairing black boards 




4 75 


Chas. E. Palmer, " " " 




26 10 


Zimmermann & Co., shades 




30 00 


L. C. Swett & Co., " . 




50 40 


Quincy Dyer, hardware .... 




30 34 


Geo. H. Ellis, printing .... 




13 40 


S. R. Moseley, printing and advertising 




40 50 


Thomas Cobbett, locks and keys 




3 24 


R. F. Boynton, blocks .... 




2 09 


Wm. Pring, repairs on roof 




19 00 


S. P. Crossman " 




8 40 


W. U. Tel. Co., telegraphing 




1 00 


R. Corson, expressing . , 




42 50 


R. Cox. «.' 




75 


A. Raymond, expressing and carriage hire . 




8 00 


"The Nursery," books and papers 




9 24 


J. L. Hammett, school supplies 




7 00 


O. F. Howe " ... 




21 48 


A. G. Whitcomb " . . 






18 80 



18 



Paid H. T. Johnson & Co., school supplies . . $7 00 

D. Appleton & Co., " . . . . 1 89 
N. E. School Furnishing Co., school supplies . 23 02 
A. G. Stockin, school supplies .... 1 50 
Lockwood, Brooks & Co., school supplies . . 17 90 
Knight, Adams & Co., " . 2 12 
Boston School Supply Co., ' " . .13 29 

E. S. Ritchie & Son, " . 9 67 
J. H. Daniels, diplomas ..... 12 50 
George James, cleaning , . . . . 25 20 
James McNabb, cleaning and repairs . . . 25 00 
Boynton & Rogers, dusters, brushes, &c. . . 36 54 
Henry C. Stark, repairs on furnaces, &c. . . 107 21 
M. E. Nash, " " . 78 00 

C. H. Crumett, use of well .... 1000 

D. F. Smith & Co., glazing .... 4 00 
Henry P. Busse}^ painting .... 125 21 

Michael Leahey, " 12 95 

J. G. Hamblin, Jr., " . . . . . 97 23 
Joel F. Goodwin, ascertaining names and ages of 

children . . . . . . . 25 00 

R. Scott Jr., repairs, &c. .... . . . 46 20 

O. Lappen & Co., mats . . . . . 12 00 

Geo. E. Partridge, use of hall . . . 9 00 

J. H. Knibbs, seating, chair . . . . 75 

C. P. Vaughan, repairing clock . ... 1 50 

Isaac Bullard, tuning piano . . . . 1 50 

Palmer & Graham, labor and material . . . 20 12 

David Higgins, repairs . . . . . 17 00 

Roberts Bros., plants . . . . . ■ 3 00 

M. E. Noble, books 327 91 

H. C. Chamberlain, ribbons, &c. . . . 36 52 

Chadwick Lead Works, lead and oil . . . 149 33 

A. C. Clapp, labor and material . . . . 75 81 

Dexter Bros., paint 14 00 

S. F. Tower, music ...... 10 00 



$2,000 00 



19 



Cr. 

By amount of appropriation . .$1,500 00 
" " transferred from appropria- 
tion for State and County tax . $500 00 



$2,000 00 



INCIDENTALS. 

IPaid Wm. Heustis, distributing reports 

J as. Patterson, refreshments at Town meetin 

John B. Guicazzo " " 

Jas. W. Bean, ice 

Wm. Wadsworth, window shades 

Goodwin & Stillman, chandeliers 

Charles M. Chapin, insurance 

C. G. Chick, making transfers for Assessors 

R. P. Moseley, shade and burner 

L. F. Upham, painting sign boards 

Henry A. Rich, bal. for collecting taxes of 1877 

Hills, Turner & Co., glass 

H. H. Westgate, mechanics' risk 

Milton Clark " 

"George L. Richardson, plan for water committee 

J. Johnston, storage of hearse 

F. C. Graham, returning deaths 

H. C. Chamberlain, strap 

■Quincy Dyer, hardware 

Charles E. Palmer, paint 

Benjamin E. Phillips, painting in Town Hall 

A. D. Rooney, labor 

John Donlon, " 

Wm. Shedd, " 

Frank Shedd " 

Peter Rooney " » 

Thomas Rooney " 

George H. Clapp " 

R. Scott, Jr., repairing lanterns and setting posts 

R. M. Pulsifer & Co., advertising 



$5 00 

21 50 

19 00 

6 00 

21 99 
28 50 

10 00 
60 00 

3 25 
24 00 
37 99 

4 00 
3 50 
3 50 

"30 00 

5 00 

22 25 
75 

11 82 
2 00 

115 83 



1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


50 


1 


05 


2 


25 



20 



Paid Geo. W. Chapman, clerical work 
Adams Express Co., expressing 
Ryan's Express, " 

R. Corson, expressing and carriage hire 
A. Raymond, . " " " 

J. P. Healey, legal advice 
James E. Cotter, " ... 

Edmund Davis, " and costs in Kennedy suit 
O. Q. Brown, locks, keys, etc. 
T. P. Swift, carpenter's work , 
James F. Peppeard, i(r ... 

George W. Hanscom, " . 

John A. Paine, " . 

J. M. Williams, work and materials . 
Michael Leahey, glazing .... 
S. P. Rlodgett, stamps <, 
Coleman & Maxwell, blank books 
Ward & Gay, " 

W. H. Allen, posting notices 
Charles Jacobs, serving warrants, &c. 
Chas. H. Colby, postage, shovel, brooms, &c. 
Andrew Fisher, stationery 
C. P. Vaughan, repairing clock . 
Henry C. Stark, repairing pumps, labor, &c. 
M. R. Warren, license blanks 
H. S. Bunton, postage and cash paid out 
Boynton & Rogers, labor and material 
S. B. Balkam, coal and wood 
H. B. Terry, returning births, marriages and deaths 

and for insurance, &c. 
S. R. Moseley, printing and advertising 
Wm. TI Britton, janitor, and for posting bills 
Joel F. Goodwin, janitor .... 
A. W. Wright, rent of offices 
Globe Gas Light Co., lighting street lamps 
©eclham and Hyde Park; Gas Co., lighting street 

lamps and offices 



$2 50 

1 45 

15 

6 40 

12 00 

3 00 
50 00 

197 28' 

1 60 

7 95 
25 33 

7 50 
43 40 

4 20 
6 15 

2 00 
33 50 

1 85 

2 25 
15 00 

13 87 

17 26 
1 00 

28 20 
4 83 
9 12 

18 21 
43 13 

131 57 
541 50 
82 90 
144 00 
600 00 
488 88 

1509 63 



•21 

Paid Henry S. Bunton, money applied to the purchase 

of a mortgage on the Happy Valley Lands . $1150 00 
J. B. Quiruby, for collecting taxes of 1879, and 

cash paid for postage, &c. .. 436 21 



Cr. 

<By amount of appropriation . . .$6,000 00 

Cash received from sale of buildings, &c, 

on Happy Falley estate .. .. . 113 50 



HIGHWAYS. 



1,113 50 



1,113 50 



faid Thomas Sweeney, labor . 

James McNabb, labor and stone . 83 40 

D. W. Phipps, labor . ..... 644 30 

J. B. Farringten, " 27 50 

Thomas Donnovaa, " ...... 22 50 

Dennis Crowley, " . . . . . 23 44 

R. Mullally, " . , . ... 25 37 

.J. McMahon, -" .. „ .. .. . 35 00 

J. Corrigan, •"..... .120 62 

William Bowen, " ..... 20 00 

P. Donlan, ?* . . . . . 2 50 

Peter Rooney^ u 23 IS 

Owen Hughes, "..... 20 00 

Edward Rooney, •" . . . . . 10 00 

J. Nash, "..... -48 13 

P. Clancy, -'.' 18 12 

Patrick Rooney, "... . . 135 55 

Thomas Rooney, ■■" ...... #5 25 

Thomas Brown, -" 34 99 

M. Rogers, " . . . .. _ . 17 50 

James P. Carroll, •" . .. ... . . 52 09 

John Downey, •** . .. .. ./ . 67 75 

H. McGinley, "....'. 33 75 

Thomas McGowan, " . . . . . 23 75 

Patrick Feehan, "...-.. 24 38 



Paid David Barry, labor 

Daniel Harrington, " 

William Shea, " 

John Jenkins, " 

Thomas Meegan, " 

Edward McKenna, " 

John Haney, " 

M. Griffin, " 

C. Foley, " 
Peter Grant,. "• 
A. P. Collins, " 
John Bowen, " 
John Hart, " 
P. Brennan, Ci 
John Haney, Jr., " 
Thomas O'Keefe, " 
J. D. McAvoy, " 
J. Mbnahan, u 
A. Galligan, **■ 
Edward O'Connell, " 
John White, "- 
Jeremiah Corbett " 

D. Mahoney, "• 
James Booney, " 
P. Butler, "- 
J. Donovan* "r 
J. Reagan, "- 
Patrick Feehan,. " 
N. Conlan, " 
Con. Cleary,. "• 
P. Gilmartin,, "- 
P. Curley, " 
P. S. Conlan,. "- 
James Hickey, "■- 
J. Collins, "■ 
M. MeCarty, "; 
John Dunn, " 
M. Hurley, " 
Elias Gallup, "■ 



and graved 



Si 2' 509 
27 50 
24 37 
26 25. 
SO 00 

40 32 
1 88 

15 62 
35 28 

41 25. 
15 6» 

11 25 
21 25. 
37 50 
20 62 
24 37 

18 63 
9 37 

19 38 

20 Oft 
15" 01 
26 88- 
23 75- 

18 74 
6 00 

20 00 
41 62 

12 50 
6 25. 

43 75* 

6 24- 
58 74 

7 50 
10 63- 

19 37" 
32 46. 

1 25* 

1 87T 

12. 3S 



23 



Paid W. J. Graham, labor 
Richard Barry, " 

M. McDougal, " 

* Pring & O'Hern, " 
J. W. Bean, " 

Thomas Scrivens, " 
James Olive, " 

J. H. Shafton. " 

J. H. Nay, damage to horse and carriage 
Morss & Whyte, gravel screen 
A. Laird, blacksmith work . 
¥m. H. Durrell, drain pipe 
W. J. Case, repairing side-walk 
Quincy Savings Bank, gravel 
David W. Lewis, drain pipe 
F. Brown, repairing pick 
C. I. Conway, expressing . 
Rinaldo Williams, labor and materials 
H. M. Cable, plan of Perkins Avenue 
J. Johnston, culvert grate . 
L. F. Upham, lettering signs 
T. H. Malcom, blacksmith work . 
A. Raymond, use of teams 
S. B. Balkam, lumber, &c. . 
Boston & Providence R. R. Co., freight 
R. Corson, expressing „ 
Boynton & Rogers, pipe, &c. 
Quincy Dyer, shovel, pick, nails, &c. . 



Cr. 

By amount of appropriation . . . $2,500 00 
By amount transferred from appropriation 

for State and County tax . , . 500 00 



$2 


00 


2 


50 


5 


63 


13 


50 


8 


00 


1 


00 


3 


75 


5 


00 


20 


00 


8 


00 


2 


50 


71 


27 


1 


50 


42 


30 


14 


76 




30 


2 


25 


2 


60 


5 


00 




85 


5 


00 


9 


55 


30 


63 


102 


30 


2 


94 


8 65 


11 


18 


4 


60 



5,911 12 



3,000 00 



Balance unexpended 



24 



on account 1880 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid Goodwill Engine Co., No. 1, pay roll 

Rough and Ready, Engine Co., No. 2, pay roll 
Norfolk Hook and Ladder Co., No. 1, pay roll 
Splicer Hose, " " " 

R. Corson, use of horses, &c. . ... 

Joshua Wilder, services as steward, and cash paid 
out . . . . ... 

"Warren W. Hilton, engineer (May 1, 1879) 

Levi A. Runnells, " " 

Wm. U. Fairbairn, " « 

Warren W. Hilton, " 

James W. Bean " 

Chas. L. Far ns worth, " 

Wm. H Cumminger, engineman 

Peter McClellan, " 

Herbert E. Hunt, " 

F. A. Sweet, 

John Johnston, repairs 

T. H. Malcolm, " 

Spring & Robinson, " 

Boynton & Rogers, " 

Sanford & Runnells, coffee, sugar, &c. 

Chas. H. Colby, " " 

S. B.Balkam, coal 

Jas. Boyd & Son, repairs on hose 

John McNamara, labor 

Cole Bros., 1 four-wheel hose carriage 

" repairs on engines, . 

C. W. Brewster & Son, springs. 
Geo. W. Simmons & Son, 2 fire hats, 
C. P. Vaughan, 2 badges . 
L. F. Upham, painting 
W. W. Hilton, labor and material 
Wm. Wads worth, shades 
C. L. Farnsworth, milk 



and repairs 



6512 25 
503 13 
442 77 
196 70 
226 92 

494 37 
25 00 
25 00 
25 00 
37 50 
37 50 
37 50 
48 75 
13 34 
12 50 
37 91 

11 56 

7 00 

8 00 

20 30 

21 11 

12 66 
84 40 
56 00 

7 26 
350 00 
169 45 

13 75 
11 50 

4 50 

1 50 
11 13 
30 25 

2 00 



5,498 47 



25 

Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



. $3,500 00 
81 53 



POLICE. 
Paid S. B. Balkam, coal . . . , 
J. M. Lewis, bug poison, &c. 
H. C. Stark, pipe, labor, &c. 
Joshua Wilder, cash paid for sundry articles 
Charles Jacobs, police duty and keeper of lock-up 
James R. Nute, police duty 
Wm. H. Cumminger, " 
A. D. Rooney, " 

Henry P. Bussey, " 
Robert Scott, Jr., «« 
J. C. Freeman, " 

John P. Dunn, " 

Wm. W. Davis, « 

Daniel O'Connell, " 
William Jordan, " 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



$16 50 

4 25 

15 00 

8 75 

379 07 

577 50 

12 50 

2 00 

13 50 
12 00 

1 50 

3 00 

1 00 

2 50 

3 00 



£1,052 07 

1,200 00 

$147 93 



TOWN HALL. 

Paid Peters & Jones, dusters 

Levi Bolles & Son, doors .... 
James McNabb, cleaning .... 
Henry L. Willard, repairing lightning rods, etc. 

James Nash, labor _ 

H. S. Bunton, contracts . 

M. Mulcahey, plastering .... 

L. W. Lord, labor . . . . , 



U 50 


12 


76 


3 


00 


10 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


4 


75 


6 


00 



26 



Paid D. A. McDonald, labor .... 
John Lennon, labor . . . 
E. H. Brabrook, table, glass, etc. 
Quincy Dyer, hardware .... 
Spring & Robinson . t pipe, labor, etc. . 
Henry C. Stark, " " 

J. M. Twichell, care of hall and cash paid out 
Joel F. Goodwin, " " " 

I. B. Samuels, plan of hall 
M. W. Pierce & Co., curtains 
R. Hollings & Co., gas fixtures 
R. Corson, expressing 
E. M. Lucy, cloth 
S. P. Crossrnan, repairing roof 
H. B. Terry, insurance 
George W. Noyes, paint and labor 
Palmer & Graham, extending stage 
George W. Hanscom, carpenter work 
Benjamin E. Phillips, painting . 
Dedham & Hyde Park Gas Co., gas 
S. B. Balkam, lumber and coal . 

Cr. 

By cash received as follows : — 

Rent of Free Mason's hall, Oct. 1, 1878, 

to Feb. 1, 1880 . . . . $245 83 

George Miles, rent of store, 1 year to 

Feb. 1, 1880 . . . . . 300 00 

For use of Town Hall . . .. 285 98 



$14-50 
63 

11 50 

23 00 

12 70 
34 75 
56 10 
88 62 
10 00 

3 25 
63 00 

1 65 

2 35 
30 00 
66 00 

6 15 

24 00 
24 12 

107 30 

91 35 

100 65 



$817 13 



831 81 



Balance unexpended 



$14 68 



TOWN HALL ALTERATION. 

Paid James F. Peppeard, carpenter work . . . $72 50 

Joel F. Goodwin, " . . . 12 90 

William J. Graham, " . . . 47 50 

A. H. Richardson, " . . . 57 50 



27 



Paid. John Beatey, brick and mason work 
Levi Boles & Son, doors, etc. 
S. B. Balkam, lumber, etc. 
H. C. Stark, repairing pumps, etc., 
Milton Clark, mechanics' risk 
H. H. Westgate, " 

H. B. Terry, " 

S. C. Jones, iron door and frame 
John Corrigan, teaming brick 
Norway Iron Works, railroad iron 
Taunton Brick Co., 24,000 brick 
Lorenzo Carberg, gas-fitting 
Quincy Dyer, hardware 
Michael Leahey, glazing 
M. C. Warren & Co., lock 
Ryan's Express, expressing 
J. Johnston, iron 
William Monahan, labor 
T. O'Keefe, " 

John Downey, " 

Patrick Clancy, " 

J. H. Shafton, 
James P. Carroll, " 
Benj. E. Phillips, painting 



Cr. 

By amount of appropriation 

Balance cash received for safes 



. 




. $213 98 




17 25 






282 94 






7 25 






3 50 






3 50 






2 50 






17 00 






6 30 






99 23 






168 00 






27 85 






17 00 






4 65 






1 68 






23 00 






80 






6 75 






3 75 






24 50 






1 25 






2 50 






73 87 






21 17 




$1,220 62 


$1,200 0( 


) 


20 6: 


1 

ft1 990 fi9 



SALARIES. 

Paid Charles H. Colby, services as Selectman, Sur- 
veyor of Highways, and member of the Board of 
Health . $100 00 

Stephen B. Balkham, services as Selectman, Sur- 
veyor of highways, and member of the Board of 
Health . . . ' 100 00 

Henry C. Stark, services as Selectman, Surveyor 

of Highways, and member of the Board of Health 100 00 



28 



Paid Henry B. Terry, services as Town clerk and Clerk 
of Selectmen ...... 

Henry S. Bunton, services as Town Treasurer and 

Treasurer of Sinking Fund 
Joel F. Goodwin, services as Assessor and Overseer 

of Poor 

Randolph P. Moseley, services as Assessor and 
Overseer of Poor ...... 

John M. Twichell. services as Assessor and Over- 
seer of Poor ...... 

Andrew Washburn, services as School Committee 
Richard VV. Husted, " " 

Francis C. Williams, " " 

Henry H. Smith, " " 

Edmund Davis, " " 

Charles Chick " " 

A. G. Macomber, services as Auditor 
Geo. B. Kerr, " " 

A. A. Page, " " 



$200 00 
350 00 
200 00 
200 00 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



POOR. 
Paid Taunton Lunatic Hospital Board of Lunatics 
Bridget Conroy, board of Pat. McGlynn 
N. P. Sullivan, board of Mrs. Johnston 
Stephen A. Howe, board of Mrs. Lombard 
Maggie Fitzgerald, board of Bridget Fitzgerald 
Mary Gannon, board of Bridget Conolly 
Sarah A. Lovell, board of poor children 
Peabody & Co., groceries for poor 
M. Galligan, " " 

S. S. Clark, 

L. J. French & Co., " 

George Miles, " " 

Chas. H. Colby, « 

Chas. L. Farnsworth, bread and crackers for 
Henry S. Holtham, provisions for poor 



poor 



ovv 
50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


50 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


$1,925 


00 


$1,925 


00 


$1,267 95 


25 


50 


113 


37 


51 


44 


16 


00 


5 


00 


8 


00 


32 


15 


16 


50 


3 


00 


197 


00 


256 


72 


35 


50 


109 


36 


11 


26 



29 



Paid M. M. Donlan, milk for poor 
J. M. Lewis, Medicine 
M. E. Noble, " 
David Evans, " 
W. S. Everett, " 
J. N. Bullard, flour 
City of Boston, aid for poor 
L. Adler, boots and shoes 

E. M. Whittemore, clothing 
Sears & Co., coal and wood 
McAvoy & Co., " 

F. D. Bullard, " 
Martin O'Brien, house rent 
C. C. Hayes, medical attendance 
H. C. Chamberlain, cloth 
J. B. Fall, stove 
J. M. Twichell, cash paid out 
Charles Jacobs, removing poor and lunatics 
F. C. Graham, burial of poor 



etc 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



APPROPRIATION FOR SETTEES. 

Paid L. Morse & Sons, settees 

A. Raymond, express and freight 
Brooks & Walbridge Bros., chairs 
William Wodsworth, shades 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



$1 08 

50 

12 64 

5 05 

1 65 

6 57 
45 10 
27 85 
31 75 

235 50 

9 00 

24 00 

15 00 

150 00 

5 10 

2 50 
14 91 
10 15 
20 00 

£2.766 60 

3,500 00 

$733 40 



HOSE. 
Paid James Boyd & Sons, 700 feet hose 

American Fire Hose Manufacturing Co., 600 feet 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



. $410 29 

21 90 

. 27 00 

85 81 


$545 00 


$545 00 


$500 00 
t 500 00 


$1,000 00 


. $1,000 00 



30 



STEAM HEATING. 

Paid George Tacey, mason work 
H. C. Stark, pipe, labor, etc. 
S. B. Balkam, brick, lime, etc. 
Andrew G. Paul, steam heating apparatus 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



$34 00 

89 90 

74 00 

1,002 10 

$1,200 00 
$1,200 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

Paid Mrs. H. A. B. Thompson, Librarian 
Miss Mary A. Hawley, services 
John Scrivens, janitor 
A. W. Wright, rent 
S. B. Balkam, fuel 
Jones, Robinson & Co., fuel 
Sanford & Runnells, oil, etc. 
Charles M. Chapin, insurance 
Noyes, Snow & Co, books, stationery, etc. 
Ward & Gay, stationery 
J. D. F. Brooks, binding 
S. R. Moseley, printing 
F. Leypoldt, subscription, " Library Journal 
American Library Association, membership 
L. H. Russell, labor and material 
E. S. Hathaway, cash paid out 
Mrs. H. A. B. Thompson, cash paid out 
Ryan's Express, expressage 
Adam's Express Company, expressage 
L. Adler, box 
Hyde p ark Post Office, box rent 



Cr. 
By amount of appropriation 

From County Treasurer on ac- 
count of dog licenses for 1878. 



$349 92 

12 00 

130 00 

310 00 

23 79 

16 00 

15 64 
30 00 
40 57 

78 
30 40 

16 00 
5 00 
2 
7 
3 
1 
1 



00 
00 
48 
50 
40 
85 
30 
25 



$997 38 



$650 00 

347 38 

— — ■ $997 38 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF POOR. ' 



The following is a detailed statement, together with the names 
of persons aided, with the amount set opposite their names :— 





PARTIAL SUPP< 


)RT. 








For aid 


to Henry Weed en . $17 00 




Patrick Welch 








26 00 




James Conolly 








21 00 




Mary Donovan 








7 00 




William Hanson 








9 60 




Ann Sweeney 








20 00 




Stephen A. Davis 








1 00 




Cornelius A. Weeden 








13 00 




Margaret McGowen 








38 50 




Bridget Conroy 








6 00 




Thomas Wallace * 








4 00 




Ann Hickey 








16 00 




Catherine Sweeney 








10 40 




Margaret Howe . 








20 50 




Mary Cahill 








11 00 




Catherine Fox v . 








1 00 




Patrick McDonough 








5 00 




Charles Carlsun 








1 00 




Levina McDonaugh 








1 00 




H. M. Bowers 








21 00 




Mrs. L. Broderick 








13 00 




Sarah E. Clark 








24 00 




Bridget Conolly, 








39 00 




Catherine Fitzgerald 








38 50 




E. Joyden 








2 00 




Mary O'Leary 








19 10 




Caroline Mahoney . 








16 00 




Ann Dana 








19 00 



32 



For aid to Patrick McGlynn 
J. W. White 
Mrs. G. Wells 
Patrick Welch, 2nd 

Due from other Towns for aid 

Due from other sources 

Money refunded for aid rendered 



FULLY SUPPORTED. 



Thomas Allen 
Mary A. Johnson 
Sarah A. Barrett, insane 
Mary Crowley, 
Clara E. Clapp, 
Johanna Hickey 
Henry Hammond 
Henry E. Hutchinson 
P. B. Whitemore 
Rose McCabe 





$34 00 


3 00 


3 50 


. . 7 00 


$46 00 


55 33 


12 00 


. $355 70 




297 64 




176 03 




173 18 




175 85 




145 97 




177 31 




213 10 




34 10 




172 39 



Of this number, three have died within the past year ; — 
Henry E. Hutchinson, at Taunton Insane Asylum. 
Johanna Hickey, '.' " 

Mary A. Johnson, at Hyde Park. 

JOHN M. TWICHELL, 

Chairman Overseers of Poor. 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT 



Mat 1, 1879. 


.-"3 

a? a) 


a 
o 

a> 


o 

Pn 

o 
6 
15. ■ 


bo 

6 


GQ 

o 

H 

o 
c 


& 

o 
O 

o 

d 


o ^ 

<D_'5 

6 <J 




$3,752,337 00 


$427,729 00 


1683 


1198 


251 


169 


2406 


May 1, 1879. 


State Tax. 


County Tax. 


Town Tax. 


Total Tax. 




$1,745 00 


$4,561 67 


$60,596 94 


$66,903 61 



















EXEMPTED PROPERTY 



MAY 1, 1879. 



Churches. 



$105,487 00 



Harvard College. 



$225 00 



Total. 



$105,712 00 



RATE IPIER, $1000, 



$15.30. 



Reduction in Real Estate, 
Increase in Personal Property 



$501,948 00 
7,183 00 



R. P. MOSELEY. 
JOEL F. GOODWIN, 
JOHN M. TWICHELL, 

Assessors .of Hyde Park. 



34 



COLLECTORS' REPORT 



Town of Hyde Park 

In Account with HENRY A. RICH, Collector of Taxes, 

for the Year 1877. 



By uncollected Taxes, as per account current, dated 

February 1, 1879. 
Assessed in 1877 $5,239 84 

Less abatements 867 41 



Interest collected 



$4,372 43 
693 33 



To cash paid to Town Treasurer at sundry times. 




$5,065 76 
$5,065 76 



HENRY A. RICH, Collector of Taxes. 



Hyde Park, February 1, 1880. 



Town of Hyde Park, 
In Account with JOSEPH B. QUIMBY, Collector of Taxes. 



By uncollected Taxes, as per account current dated Febru- 
ary 1, 1879. 

Assessed in 1878 

Less abatements $454 70 

Less Uncollected 3,929 09 



Interest collected 



Assessed in 1879 $66,903 62 

Additions 330 92 

Addition, Woman's Poll Taxes 168 00 



Less abatements $286 38 

Less Uncollected * 22,175 87 



Interest collected 

To cash paid to Town Treasurer at sundry times. 



$15,550 02 
4,383 79 



11,166 23 
943 46 



67,402 54 



22,462 25 



44,940 29 
80 95 



$12,109 69 



45,021 24 



$57,130 93 



35 
TAX DEED STATEMENT. 

J^lSTTJ^RY 31, 1880. 



Tax Deeds have been acquired by the Town, viz : — 



February 9, 1872.. 
January 0, 1873.... 
August 23, 1873.... 
December 31, 1873. 
August 24, 1874 ... 
December 31, 1874.. 

August 16, 1875 

August 28, 1875.... 
December 31, 1875. 

March 15, 1877 

September 20, 1877. 
December 31, 1877.. 

July 27, 1878 

March 4, 1879 

July 21, 1979 

December 30, 1879. 



Sale lor 1870 Tax. 

" 1871 " . 

" 1871 " . 

" 1872 " . 

1872 " . 
" 1873 " . 
" 1873 " . 

1873 «' . 
" 1874 " . 
" 1875 " . 
" 1875 " . 
" 1876 " . 
" 1876 " . 
" 1877 " . 
" 1S77 " . 
" 1878 " . 

Total amount... 



$140 52 

1,247 83 

158 56 

8,263 14 

72 62 

1,976 85 

161 12 

276 96 

6,090 37 

2,834 90 

31 61 

281 66 

276 16 

468 76 

158 15 

730 42 



— $23,169 63 



Settlements have been effected, viz : — 
Cash received for releases: 

Yea.i ending January 15, 1874 $226 58 

" January 15, 1875 3,442 62 

" January 15, 1876 2,940 81 

" January 31, 1877 906 32 

*' January 31, 1878 6,474 29 

" January 31, 1879 3,586 68 

" January 31, 1880 ... 1,876 51 

$19,453 81 $19,453 81 

Interest has been collected on the above at the rate of 

ten per cent, per annum, viz : $2,993 33 

Total cash received $22,453 14 



Tax Deeds annulled by reason of non-existence of 
the property on which the tax was assessed, viz :— 

Year ending January lfi, 1875..,. $16 05 

" January 31, 1878 300 84 

" January 31, 1879 483 S8 

" January 31, 1880...,. 150 20 

Happy Valley Deeds merged in Town's Title, 

September 4, 1879 

Discount allowed by Town Committee 

Tax Deeds held by the Town, January 31, 1880 



$950 47 

$1,620 76 
100 45 



$22,125 49 



$1,041 14 



HENEY S. BUNTON, 

Town Treasurer. 



36 
TREASURER'S 
Dr. HENRY S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer, in 

Cash in the Treasury, February 1, 1879 ......... 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED 
DURING THE TEAR ENDING JANUART 31, 1880: 

Fro m Treasurer's Notes , - 

Henry A. Rich, Collector, Taxes for 1877 

Joseph B. Quimby, Collector, Taxes for 1878 ... 

Joseph B. Quimby, Collector, Taxes for 1879' - 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, tor Corporation Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for National Bank Tax...^ 

Treasurer,Commonwealth,for Income Massachusetts School Fund 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for State Aid, 1878 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Relief of Indigent Soldiers and Sail- 
ors, 1878 ,. 

County Treasurer, dog licenses, 1879. .- 

County Treasurer, rent of room occupied by Probate Court to 
January 1, 1880 -.. 

Return ol cash advanced for Support ot Poor in 1878 

Town Hall building, rents collected » 

Liquor licenses , „ 

Miscellaneous licenses . , .... - 

Sale of buildings and material on Happy Valley property 

Sale of safes in Town Offices - ...... 

Lampposts sold . ^... 

Old jun k sold I — 

Release of Tax D eeds 

Interest on Tax Deeds 

Interest on Bank balances ..- « 



Account 



$15,669 45 



7,500 00 


5,065 76 


12,109 69 


45,021 24 


979 23 


806 55 


215 IS 


400 00 


737 00 


368 68 


166 67 


30 00 


831 81 


1,926 00 


62 50 


113 50 


20 62 


17 00 


1 97 


3,747 92 


•232 30 


236 35 


$96,259 40 



37 
REPORT. 

■Current with the Town of Hyde Park. 

AMOUNTS DISBURSED* 

<©n account of Treasurer's Notes . ... 

Interest -. - 

Schools -. . • , 

Income Massachusetts School Fund...... 

School Incidentals. . 

Incidentals — ........ ^.. .. 

Highways ........ .. — 

Fire Department 

Support of Poor . 

Police . .. .. ... 

Salaries — , . . 

Public Library 

-State Tax for 1S79..« . ... 

County Tax for 1879 

Sose ...-. ... 

Town Hall, Alteration.... 

Town Hall, Steam Heating Apparatus ........ 

Town Hall, Settees 

Town Hall, current expenses ........ ............ . 

■Defective Tax Deeds .-. 

Abatement of amount due on Tax Deeds ......... ... 

Allowance by Town Committee in settlement of TaxDeeds 

Happy Valley Tax Deeds merged in 'title acquired by 
the town 

State Aid 

.Liquor Licenses, paid Treasurer Commonwealth, 
one- fourth of amount received in 1878 

'Liquor Licenses, paid Treasurer Commonwealth, 
one-fourth of amount received in 1879 

Sinking Fund, amount of appropriation 

Sinking Fund, unexpended balance of appropriations.... 

Tax Deeds received from Collector...... ... 

Cash in the Treasury, January 31, 1880 



Or. 



$7,500 06 


14,524 17 


17,800 00 


47 98 


2,000 00 


6,113 50 


2,911 12 


3,498 47 


2,766 60 


1,052 07 


1,925 00 


997 38 


1,745 00 


4,581 67 


1,000 00 


1,220 62 


1,200 00 


545 00 


817 13 


250 98 


150 2.0 


100 45 


1,620 76 


419 75 



481 50 


.3,000 00 


1,356 75 


1,357 33 


§80,983 68 


15.275 72 
$96,259 40 



38 



Appropriations and Expenditures for the Current Tear. 



Accounts. 



Interest 

Schools 

School Incidentals 

Incidentals 

Highways 

Fire Department 

Support of Poor ... 

Police 

Salaries 

Public Library 

State and County Tax 

Hose '. 

Town Hall Alteration 

Town Hall Steam Heating Apparatus 

Town Hall Settees 

Sinking Fund 



Appropriation. 



$14,500 00 
17.8C0 00 
!2,000 00 
6,000 00 
23,000 00 
3,500 00 
3,500 00 
1,200 00 
1,925 00 
3997 38 
4 6,499 50 
si 000 00 
61,200 00 
'1,200 00 
8 545 00 
3,000 00 



$67,865 88 



Expenditure. 



»$14 287 82 

1017,800 00 

2,000 00 

"6,000 00 

2,911 12 

3,498 47 

2,766 60 

1,052 07 

1,925 00 

997 38 

6.326 67 

1,000 00 

121,200 00 

1,200 00 

545 00 

3,000 00 



$66,510 13 



Unexpended. 



$212 18 



1 53 
733 40 
147 93 



172 83 



$1,358 75 



1 Including $500.00 transferred from State and County Tax. 

2 Including $500.00 transferred from State and County Tax. 
8 Including $347.38 received for dog licenses in 1878. 

I After deducting $2500.50, transferred by vote of town. 
6 To be raised by taxation next year. 

"From liquor license money, 1879. 

7 $244.50 from liquor license money, 1879; $955.50 transferred from State and 
County Tax. 

8 Transferred from State and County Tax. 

9 Amount of expenditure, less interest on Treasurer's bank balances. 

10 Amount of expenditure, less amount paid from Income Massachusetts School 
Fund. 

II Amount of expenditure, less cash received for buildings and material on Happy 
Valley property. 

12 Amount of expenditure, lees cash received from sale of safes in Town Offices. 



TOWIST DEBT, JJLNTJAJEl-Y' 31, X880. 
FUNDED LOAN. 

TOWN BONDS. 

One hundred and two bonds, Nos. 1 to 102 inclusive, of one 
thousand dollars each, payable to bearer, with interest at 
six per cent, per annum, due November. I, 1885, redeemable 
after November 1, 1880 $102,000 OS 

NOTES. 

Treasurer's Note (Hyde Park SinkingFund) six per cent, interest, 

due June 1, 1881 $20,000 00 

Franklin Savings Institution, Greenfield, seven per cent, interest, 

due July 22, 1881.. 20,000 00 

Franklin Savings Institution, Greenfield, seven per cent, interest, 

due September 12, 1881 20,000 00 

Institution for Savings, Newburyport, five per cent, interest, 

due January 1, 1882 5,000 00 

Treasurer's Note (Hvde Park Sinking Fund) five par cent.interest, 

due August 15, 1882 - 12.000 00 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, seven per cent, interest, 

due January 8 , 1884 30,000 00 

Home Savings Bank, Boston, seven per cent, interest, due Feb- 
ruary 28, 1884 ..... 20,009 0& 

$127,000 00 

Total indebtedness $229,000 00 

HENE5T S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer. 
Hyde Park, February 1, 1880. 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK SINKING FUND. 



COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 

Amount of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1879 $19,178 82 

receipts, viz: 

From Town of Hyde Park, annual appropriation $3,000 00 

From Town of Hyde Park, unexpended balance of appropriations 1,356 75 

Income from investments $2,600 46 

Less premium and accrued interest on bonds of cities of 

Cambridge and Newton, purchased during the year. 607 00 

1,993 46 

6,350 21 

Amount of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1880 $55,529 03 

INVESTED, VIZ: 

Note, Town of Hyde Park, six per cent interest, 

dated June 1, 1876, due June 1, 1881 $20,000 00 

Note, Town of Hyde Park, five per cent interest, 

dated August 15, 1877, due August 15, 1882 12,000 00 

Note, Town of Woburn, five per cent interest, 

• dated July 2, 1877, due July 1,1887 10,000 00 

Six United Stales Four Per Cent Bonds of 1907, 

Nos. 76,537 to 76,542 inclusive, of oue thousand dollars each 6,000 00 

Four City of Newton Five Per Cent Bonds, Water Scrip, 

dated December 9, 1879, due July 1, 1906, Nos. 832 to 835, inclu- 

»ive, of one thousand dollars each 4,000 00 

Two City of Cambridge Six Per Cent Sewer Loan Bonds, 

dated October 1, 1873, due July 1, 1903, Nos. 48 and 49, of one 

thousand dollars each 2,000 00 

Deposit with New England Trust Co., Boston 1,529 03 

HENRY GREW, 
WILLIAM J. STUART, 
HENRY BLASDALE, 

Commissioners . 
HENRY S. BUNTON, 

Treasurer Sinking Fund. 

Htde Park, February 1, 1880. 



AUDITOR'S CERTIFICATE. 



In compliance with the By-Laws of the Town, the under- 
signed have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, School 
Committee, Collector of Taxes, Town Treasurer, Commis- 
sioners of the Sinking Fund, Trustees of the Public Library 
and Overseers of the Poor, and hereby certify that the same 
are correct, and all payments accompanied by proper 
vouchers. The original bills and pay rolls have been care- 
fully examined to ascertain the correctness of the same. 



AUGUSTUS A. PAGE, 
A. G. MACOMBER, 
GEO. B. KERR, 



Auditors. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT. 



Engineer's Office, H. P. F. Department, 
Hyde Park, Feb. 1, 1880. 

To. the Honorable Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen : — It is with much satisfaction that we lay 
before you this, our annual, report for the year 1879. 

At the beginning of the year the town passed a vote, 
whereby they voted to raise the pay of the members of this 
department to forty-five ($45) dollars per annum. It 
became very evident to us that we should be obliged to do 
something to keep within the amount of the appropriation ; 
therefore we have reorganized the department, by reducing 
the number of members from sixty-three (63) to forty-five 
(45.) In order to do so we were obliged to disband one 
company, — viz., the Splicer Hose Company, — and- have 
given each steamer company its own line of hose to handle. 
That necessitated the purchase of a new hose-carriage ; 
therefore we have exchanged the two old carriages, that 
were attached to each steamer, for a new one-horse hose- 
carriage, by paying three hundred and fifty dollars ($350) 
for the exchange. 

Both steamers have been thoroughly repaired, and are 
now in excellent condition. The department is in first-class 
working order, and we have no doubt, should the occasion 
require, but that they will give good satisfaction to all ; and 
we would take this opportunity to heartily thank each and 
every member of the department for their gentlemanly 
conduct, and hearty co-operation in the reorganization of 
the department, and also to your honorable Board for your 
assistance in the same. 



For the thousand dollars that the town voted to the 
department, at the last town meeting, for the purchase of 
hose, we have placed in the department thirteen hundred 
(1,300) feet of cotton hose, warranted to stand a pressure 
of four hundred (400) pounds to the square inch, which we 
are satisfied will give perfect satisfaction. 

We have now in the department about five thousand 
(5,000) feet of hose, of which three thousand (3,000) is of 
first quality, two steamers, one hook and ladder carriage, 
two hose carriages, all equipped and in good repair, and 
hose as above described. 

We would call your attention to the fact that there are 
many places in the town where water cannot be obtained 
for fire purposes ; namely : — Parts of Fairmount, Sunny- 
side, and Clarendon Hills district. 

You will find, connected with this report, a list of fires, 
alarms, etc. : also, the officers and number of men to each 
company. 

Very respectfully, 

W. W. HILTON, 

Chief Engineer. 

J. W. Bean, 

C. L. Farnswoeth, 

Assistant Engineers. 



4o 



H 




■e 


s 






-3 d : 


a 




5 




a S 


? 


o 

p 


§ a & < 




jS g 


o 

a 


o 
CO 


g t»> a o a - - 






ce 


.a 




ro — 


■? ' 


fcj 




"5 €» 


a 












ce 

g 




P>H 


1= 






En P 


P 




o o 'S 


o 


— 


o ■£ o o £: 


CO 


O O ifl 


m 


o 


o -a o o £ 




EC 


o o to 


CI 


o 


1C5 tfi lO lO — 


O 


O m S 




of 


CO — 


of 


a 


i-< 


0» 


£0 








CO 
























tJ 










CO 




















cd 




"qo 






























» « 






a 




60 

'S 

P, 
■a 

a 

oj 
3 

a 






o o ■; 


: o 




o 

H 
•a! 

O 


01 © 

5 5 o 

=3 a S 
•* £ a 
3 5 g 

Ph CO 5 

« 5 * 

SH--.5 fc" 

a S a 


CB 

a 
a 

CD 

> 
oS 

CB 

a 
o 
& 


c 
a 

t 
\ 


.2 .2 « .2 " ^ 

n3 -C ^, -C p 

'3 ~ to '3 „ r 9 

a -s J a t, 
a cs £ a os 




Q P a 


£ 


CD 


S 


a CB .- 3 CB 
CO Ph Ph CO 2i 






cb • 






















3 










































a 




Ph 


>> 






ts 


k. 




a o a 


b 






*2 P 


- 






CO 


& £ & 


oj 


5s 




.2 - 


.5 






o -3 o 




o 




-a e 


> S ^ 




d 


a u a 


a 






a e 


£ 




.3 £ ^4 

a <u a 
P P. P 


0> 
O 

a 


a 
P 




CD I 

a i= 


o 

» £ 






















M 








.Q 














s 








s 














Ph 








o 






















M 


o 












a 


5 






O 


1 -s 

dg a 

C5 ? 


cu 

S 

CD 




CD 

a 
ffl 
A 
ft 


ei 
o 

CO 

o 

•-5 


c 
p 

c 

y- 

2 
C 


> 

E 

i 

p. 


E 
< 

c 


73 
>> 


'.a 
I 

■ 




a 


























- H 




















































Ph 


























& 


























o 

o 


> 

c 












m 

t 


I 


^ 


c 






£ 


t 

a 


& 


) 




bo 

a 






v- 




^ i 


a 5 


o 


h 


£ 






™ 






> 5 

r- 


£ 


a 




Ph 


i- 


c 


* 


a 


"3 


= 


a 


C 
C 

7 


c 


"3 

Be 




& 


e 




w 







H 


2 


P 




t- 


»- 


IM 


oa 


lO 


Cl 


r^ 


a 


T 


-^ 


w t- 


« 


"" 




SI 




IH 


t> 


IM 








e> 
























£h 
























<! 
























Q 


00 


























1 




- 




;- 




> 


. b 


o > 


> > 




a 


a! 


a. 


a 


P 


H S 


< 5? 




c 


o o 




f=. 


a 


<? 


<? 


< 


< 


2 


< 


a 


?5 Sz 





44 



OFFICERS AND NUMBER OF MEN. 



The following is a list of officers of the several companies, 
together with the number of men in the employ of the 
department : — 



Goodwill Steam Fire Engine Co., No. 1. 

W. H. DARLING, Foreman. 

WILLIAM MATTHEWS, Assistant Foreman. 

D. T. CONLAN, Clerk. 

J. EDWARD RADFORD, Treasurer. 

HERBERT E. HUNT, Engineman, and ten men. 



Rough and Ready Steam Fire Engine Co., No. 2. 

STEWART McKENZIE, Foreman. 

A. L. BOYNTON, Assistant Foreman. 

L. F. UPHAM, Clerk. 

E. A. MOORE, Treasurer. 

W. H. CUMMINGER, Engineman, and nine men. 



Hook and Ladder Co., No. 1. 

GEORGE E. CARLTON, Foreman. 

H.'F. WRIGHT, Assistant Foreman. 

W. F. RADFORD, Clerk and Treasurer, and nine men. 



Number of Firemen, . . . . -. . ..'■'-. 41 



JOSHUA WILDER, Steward of the Department. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT 



The following are the statistics of Births, Intentions of 
Marriage, Marriages and Deaths, in Hyde Park, for the 
year ending December 31, 1879 : — 



BIRTHS. 

Number of Births registered in Hyde Park in 1879—177 

Males 87 Females........... . 90 

The parentage of the children is as follows : — 

Both parents American 80 

English 1 

" Irish. 37 

" Swedes 4 

" of British Provinces 5 

Mixed — One parent American 38 

Both parents of other nationalities 12 

Born in January, 14; February, 10; March, 19; April, 16; May, 15, 
June, 11; July, 11; August, 13; September, 15; October, 12; November, 
20; December, 21. 

MARRIAGES. 

Number of Intentions of Marriage issued in 1879 — 55. 
Number of Marriages registered in 1879 — 59. 

Oldest Groom 65 Youngest Groom 21 

Bride , 49 " Bride... 16 

Both parties born in United States 38 

" " Ireland 2 

" of other foreign nationalities 5 

Foreign and American '. . 14 

Married in January, 3j February, 4; March, 2; April, 3; May, 3; 
June, 6; July, 3; August, 8; September, 3; October, 7; November, 9; 
December, 8. 



46 

The following are the names, ages and residences of the 
parties whose marriages were solemnized in 1879, certificates 
of which have been filed in this office : — 



Date. 



Names. 



Jan, 9. 

" 15. 

" 28. 
Feb. 8. 

" 19. 

" 20. 

" 23. 
Mar. 8. 

" 12. 
Apr. 17. 

" 20. 
May 15. 

" 16. 

" 26. 
June 3. 

" 4. 

" 11. 

*' 12. 



William McCormley.. 
Mary Bannan 



John H. Chipman. 
Marie Weymouth.. 



Charles E. Gardner.... 
EllaM.LeCain , 



Lewis Totmau, Jr. 
Fannie Grant 



Allen Robie 

Jennie B. Morrison. 



Lindsay M. Coleman.. 
Mary L. Timberlake.... 



John Fallon, Jr. 
Bridget Hughes. 



Victor E. Haserick. 
Evangeline Wood.. 



Edward T. Earle .... 
Florence E. Wilson 



Kdward Dennis. 
BosaE. White.. 



Chauncy S. Churchill. 
Grace A. Churchill.. 



John E. Brooman. 
Mary A.Higgins... 



Charles A. Chace. 
Nellie Chesley 



George G. Morrell- 
Nellie F. Whitney. 



Franklin C. Graham.... 
Lilla C. Crane 



William Kenneley. 
Ma>-y McDonough. 



Frederic M. Haynes.. 
Annie L. Rogerson.. 



John Murray. 
Annie J. Fox. 



Residence. 



Hyde Park 



Hyde Park 
Canton 

Hyde Park 
Boston 



Hyde Park 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Milton 

Hyde Park 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Lowell...... 

Hyde Park 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Dedham... 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 
Carmel.Me 



Dedham... 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 
Boston 



Canton. 



Thomas Downs. 
Kate Norton.... 



Dedham... 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 



Hyde Park 
Newton 



1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 

1st. 
2d. 

1st. 
1st. 

2d. 
1st. 
1st. 
let. 



By whom Married. 



Rev. J. H. Conlan. 

Rev. F. C. Williams. 

Rev. Henry J. Fox. 

Rev. Henry J. Fox. 

Rev. P. B. Davis. 

Rev. C. M. Southgate. 

Rev. J. H. Conlan. 

Rev. P. B. Davis. 

Rev. D. C. Eddy. 
Rev. Z. A. Mudge. 
Rev. F. C. Williams. 
Rev. J. H. Conlan. 
Orin T. Gray, Esq. 
Rev. W. N. Richardson 
Rev. E. A. Rand. 
Rev. F.T. H. Horsfield. 
Rev.F.T.H. Horsfield. 
Rev. J. H. Conlan. 
Rev. Michael Dolan. 



47 



Eegistky of Marriages m 1879 — (Continued.) 



Date. 



June 14. 

" 19. 
July 2. 

" 5. 

" 30. 

Aug. 4. 

6. 

" 12. 

" 13. 

it (i 

" 18. 

" 21. 

" 31. 
Sept. 17. 

" 25. 

" 30. 
Oct. 1. 

" 8. 

" 15, 

" 16. 



Names. 



Nathaniel A, Cushman. 
EllaR. Clifford 

John T. McCormack... 
Rosanna Duggan 



Arthur B. Stockbridge 
Amalia L. Aberg 



James Davis... 
Ellen E.Fagan. 



William H. Malaney.. 
Ellen F. Lock 



William A. Robinson. 
Marion Ray 



Laurence M. Gould - . 
Annie M.Choate 



John Putnam 

Helen M. Domett. 



James W. Hilton . . . 
Susan F. Kimball. 



Joseph Carter 

Eva F. Whittemore.. 



John Dean 

Elizabeth Roonev. 



William J. Sc, tt. 
Rose A. Coontz. 



John E. Rose 

Hattie C. Johnston- 



Caleb D. Dunham 
Sarah M. Atwood, 

William J. Farrall. 
Matilda Haney 



Charles W. Leslie. 
Elizabeth Dizell... 



Fred. C. Bigelow.... 
MaryE. Walmsley. ... 

Charles B. Stearns.... 
Marietta H. Chapin.. 



Frank R. Merrill. 
Cora E. Hibbard. 



Residence. 



Taunton... 
Boston .... 

Maynard... 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 
Sweden 

Hyde Park 



Boston ... 
Hvde Park 



William Creaser... 
Elizabeth Buchan. 



Boston . 



Stoughton. 
Hyde Park 

Fitchburg.. 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 
Lynn 

Boston — 
Hyde Park 

Canton 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 



Dedham... 
Hyde Park 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 
Boston .... 

Hyde Park 



Boston ... 
Hyde Park 

Hyde Park 



Dedham... 
Hyde Park 



a 



1st. 

1st. 

let. 

3d. 
2d. 

1st. 
1st. 
1st. 
2d. 
1st. 



3d. 
1st. 



1st. 



2d. 
1st. 



1st. 
1st. 



By whom Married. 



27 
30 


1st. 


55 

25 


2d. 
1st. 


21 

IS 


1st. 


25 
26 


1st. 


25 

20 


1st. 


40 

31 


1st. 



Rev. W. N. Richardson. 
Rev. H. R. O'Donnell. 
Rev. P. B. Davis. 
H. B. Terry, Esq. 
Rev. J. H. Conlan. 
Rev. W. Hamilton. 
Rev. N. T. Whittaker. 
Rev. O. T. Walker. 
N.E. Silsbee, Esq. 
Rev. M. P. Alderman. 
Rev. J. H. Conlan. 
Rev. W. N. Richardson. 
Rev.^V. N. Richardson. 

Rev. John Wright. 

Rev. J. H. Conlan. 

Rev. P. M. Macdonald. 

Rev. F. C. Williams. 

Rev. P. B.Davis. 

Rev. P. B. Davis. 

Rev. P. B. Davis. 



48 



Eegistky of Marriages in 1879 — (Continued.) 



Date. 



Names. 



Oct. 


22. 


ic 


28. 


u 


30. 


Nov 


2. 



Dec 



10. 
13. 

20. 

26. 
12. 
24. 
it 

25. 



Fred. Y. French 

Alice G. Piper 

Patrick V. Rourke... . 
Mary V. Donovan 

Robert P. Holmes 

Helen Davenport , 

James A. Gninan.. .., 
Margaret J. Collins..., 

George H. Bateman..., 
Martha L. McLeod..., 

Patrick F. McGrath.... 
Mary E. McClellan..., 

Charles S. Swett 

Sarah A. Farrington,... 

Charles F.Lewis 

Cora H. Spear 

Benj. F. Stoddard 

Ella Palmer 

Irving C. Webster 

Mary E.Allen 

George E. Shute 

Mary A. Scrivens 

George N. Hibbard 

Lizzie Prati 

Judson D. Van Slyck... 
Susan P. Searles 

William Ames... 

Adelia McArthur 

Benj. H. Hodgdon 

Helen B. Decoster 

George H. Drake 

Nellie P. Morse 

William H. Garland.... 
Sarah Bragd on, '.. 

JohnF. Videto 

Clara W. Cook 

George W. Richardson 
Ann Cannon 

George H. Stackpole.... 
Mary E. Davis 







3 




Residence. 


6 
be 
< 


3 


By whom Married. 


Boston .... 
Hyde Park 


26 
2J 


1st- 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 


Boston .... 
Hyde Park 


26 
24 


1st. 


Rev. J. H. Conlan. 


Hyde Park 


22 
23 


1st. 


Rev. F. C. Williams. 


Hyde Park 


24 
22 


1st. 


Rev. J. H. Conlan. 


Norwood .. 
Hyde Park 


32 
25 


1st. 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 


Hyde Park 


26 
24 


1st. 


Rev. J. H. Conlan. 


Hyde Park 


21 
20 


1st. 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 


Windsor,Ct 
Suffield, Ct 


41 
21 


26i: 

1st. 


Rev. M. P. Alderman.. 


Hyde Park 


36 
24 


1st. 


Rev. E. S. Bolles. 


Hyde Park 


22 

21 


1st. 


Rev. A. Webster. 


Hyde Park 


26 
18 


1st. 


Rev. W. N. Richardson 


Hyde Park 


27 
20 


2d. 
1st. 


Rev. W. N. Richardson 


Boston 


40 
49 


2d. 
1st. 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 


Hyde Park 
Boston .... 


46 
33 


2d. 

1st. 


Rev. W. R. Clark. 


Boston .... 


32 

38 


1st. 


Rev. W. N. Richardson. 


Boston .. . 
Hyde Park 


25 

18 


1st. 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 


Porter, Me. 
Boston .... 


39 
40 


2d. 
1st. 


Rev. P. B. Davis. 


Hyde Park 


21 
17 


1st. 


Rev. D.C.Eddy. 


Sharon 

Boston .... 


21 
21 


1st. 


Rev. J. J. McNulty. 


Hyde Park 


25 

18 


1st. 


Rev. J. H. Tilton. 



49 



DEATHS. 

Number of deaths in Hyde Park in 1879—111. 
Males 52 Females. 



59 



Bora in the United Stites. 90 

" Ireland 13 



England 

Germany 

British Provinces. 

Scotland 

Uukuown 



AGES. 

Stillborn 8 

Under one year 22 

Between land 5 years 20 

" 5 and 10 years 7 

10 aud 20 years 2 

" 20 and 30 years 4 

" 30 and 40 years 7 

" 40 ami 50 years 13 

" 50 and 60 vears 6 

" 60 aud 70 years 9 

" 70 and 80 years 6 

" 80 and 90 years 7 

Died in January, 10; February, 15; March, 9; April, 9; May. 9; 
June, 4; July, 5; August, 17; September, 8; October, 6; November, 9; 
December, 10. 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



Accident, 4 

Acute tonsilitis 1 

Abscess 1 

As tli ma 1 

Childbirth 1 

Cholera infantum 3 

Chronic cerebral meningitis 1 

Chronic Rheumatism 1 

Congestion of lungs 3 

Consumption - . . 4 

Convulsions 2 

Croup 4 

Debility 4 

Diphtheria 7 

Diphtheritic croup 1 

Dropsy.. 3 

Dysentery 1 

Exhaustion .1 

Gastritis 1 

Heart disease 6 

Hydrocephalus 3 

Inflammation of bowels 4 



Jaundice. 1 

Marasmus 5 

Membranous croup 4 

Meningitis 2 

Old age 5 

Paralysis 5 

Paralytic debility 1 

Phthisis 2 

Phthisis pulmonalis 1 

" tuberculosa 1 

Pneumonia 3 

Premature birth 1 

Pysemia 1 

Scarlet fever 5 

Softening of brain 1 

Spasms 2 

Spinal disease 1 

Stillborn 8 

Suicide 2 

Traumatic peritouitis 1 

Tun. of 1 

Typhoid fever 1 



50 

The following are the names of those who died in Hyde 
Park during the year 1879 : — 



Jan. 


4. 


i< 


5. 


" 


6. 


" 


8. 


" 


10. 


<i 


13. 


" 


14. 


■< 


16. 


" 


24. 


" 


30. 


Feb. 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


1. 


" 


6. 


" 


6. 


" 


7. 


" 


9. 


" 


15. 


" 


17. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


19. 


" 


23. 


" 


24. 


March 9. 


" 


18. 


" 


18. 


" 


23. 


" 


25. 


" 


28. 


. " 


29. 


" 


30. 


" 


31. 


April 1. 


" 


2. 


" 


2. 


" 


3. 


" 


7. 


" 


11. 


■« 


13. 


" 


26. 


" 


29. 


May 


1. 


" 


2. 


" 


4. 


" 


5. 


" 


6. 


" 


6. 


" 


7. 


" 


10. 


tt 


12. 


June 


3. 


<' 


9. 


" 


12. 


" 


24. 


July 


9, 


. " 


11. 



Alexander C Kubasch 

Alice G. Noble 

Charles H. Moody 

Joshua Young ■ 

Frederick J. Harrington 
Wm. H. Nightingale.... 

Emerson Pitts. 

Charles P. Searles 

Oliver C. Laird 

James E. Howard 

Adler 

Ovvard P. Theulen 

Mary P. Stearns 

Stearns.... 

Mary Connelly 

Leo Theulen 

Walter Blasdale 

Bridget Ware.... . .. 

Clara L. Cable 

Charles A. Ludgren.... 

Mary A. Gately 

Jennie M. Cowles 

James J. Gately 

Curran 

Ida A. Theulen 

Margaret Costello 

Catherine Burns.. 

Mary S. Dyer 

Gertrude A. Barritt. ... 
Frederick L. Munroe.... 

John P.Olson 

Mary Warren 

Reuben C. Rich. 

Sarah S. Lancaster 

Sheehan 

Catharine A. Mair 

Richard Timpenny 

Helen L. Blodgett 

Bo wen 

Margaret O'Brien 

Mary Donovan 

Mary S. Hinds 

Henry H.. Gould 

Henry Hislop 

Mary Hickey 

Maud A. Cowles 

Alfred Hale 

Nancy B. Moore 

Bessie P. Moyle 

Emily F. Sturtevant.... 
Henry P. dishing 

Mclnnis 

Emma C. Lawson 

Emma A. Dunbar 

George A. Clark 

Mary N. Timmins .. . 

William H. Smith 

Catherine Sandeen 



Y. 


M. 


3 


7 


3 





42 


6 


54 


3 


23 


6 


63 


10 


63 


— 


29 


6 


3 


3 


- 


2 


5 


5 


35 


10 


1 


9 


1 





5 


2 


38 


— 


4 


3 


3 


1 


2 


9 


9 


11 


2 


9 


7 





84 


— 


85 


— 


31 


8 


11 


— 


5 


4 


3 


4 


80 


10 










48 


— 


41 


6 


60 


— 


1 


8 


70 





72 


— 


45 


6 


88 


7 


60 


— 


50 


— 


1 


6 


48 


— 


70 


7 


3 


5 


67 


1 


42 


7 


1 


2 


— 


3 


— 


4 


52 


7 


— 


9 


47 


11 



_ 1 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Diphtheritic croup. 

Scarlatina. 

Consumption. 

Chronic cerebral meningitis 

Fractured scull. 

Softening of brain. 

Heart disease. 

Railroad accident. 

Croup. 

Spasms. 

Stillborn. 

Membranous croup. 

Child birth. 

Stillborn. 

Abscess. 

Diphtheiia. 

Pneumonia. 

Scarlatina. 

Croup. 

Diphtheria. 
Croun. 
Stillborn. 
Diphtheria. 
Old age. 

Inflammation of bowels. 

Scarlatina. 

Diphtheria. 

Old age. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Tumor. 

Stillborn. 

Plithi&is. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Pncum >nia. 

Asthma. 

Paralysis. 

Inflammation of bowels. 

Phthisis tuberculosa. 

Paralysis. 

Inflammation of bowels. 

Heart disease. 

Dipi theria. 

Pneumonia. 

Jaundice. 

Scarlet lever. 

Heart disease. 

Railroad accident. 

Premature birth. 

Spasms. 

Consumption. 

Marasmus. 

Dropsy. 

Gastritis. 

Heart disease. 



51 

Deaths— (Continued.) 



July 


16. 


" 


ID. 


•' 


21. 


Aug. 


2. 


" 


5. 


"- 


«. 


M 


6. 


if 


r 


'• 


7. 


"■ 


11. 


"- 


12. 


" 


15. 


" 


16. 


" 


22. 


'«. 


22. 


" 


28. 


" 


23. 


" 


25. 


it 


26. 


"■ 


28. 


Sept 


1. 


" 


H. 


" 


7. 


" 


S. 


" 


9. 


" 


17. 


" 


18. 


'< 


2° 


Oct. 


9. 


" 


26. 


" 


26. 


" 


28. 


" 


28. 


" 


30. 


J>ov. 


8. 


■' 


9. 


" 


10. 


" 


10. 


" 


13. 


•■' 


17. 


" 


18. 


*•* 


22. 


" 


25.. 


.Deo,. 


4. 


•i 


n 


" 


u. 


" 


18. 


l< 


22. 


" 


26. 


" 


i-1- 


" 


28. 


" 


28. 


v 


3.0. 



Helena C.Tebay 

.Michael Milan .. 

Daniel H. Buck , 

George H. Tyler , 

Nellie Foley , 

Margaret la F. Gallup.. 

Mary A.C. O'Neill 

Prince H. Taylor 

Mary A.Johnson , 

Annie L. Kenny 

Katie A. Bonai), 

Frank W". Geratf 

William Small 

William H, Gran 

Eliza A. Lincoln 

John Wieman 

Abby K.Stone , 

Margaret E. Guptill ... 

Lawrence Broderick 

Collins 

M&ry E. Burke , 

John Lynch 

Rebecca Billiard 

Mary G, Feehan 

William Rooi ey 

Preston B, Whittemore, 

David Gledhill 

Margaret Fagan 
Elizabeth P. Williams ., 

Angelina G.Weld 

Charles Ryan , 

Frederick J. Harrington. 

Annie M, Hill 

Mary T, Meehan. ..... ... 

Agnes A. Larsson , 

Isaiah F, Arnold 

Elizabeth Quinn. ... , 

Minnis , 

Eliza C. P. Gushing 

Loretto Collins........... 

Patrick Gibbous 

Effie A. Lul'kin 

Ann B, Pogers 

Tin-ell 

Herman W, Ketchum . 
James Foley.,...,.,.. .. 

George A. Scott 

Michael Carter 

Marian B, Rob ins oil 

Lydia A. Wilson..., 

Eliza P. Gardner 

Mabel P. Smith 

— i Gardner 



Y. 


M. 


68 


6 


65 


1 





9 





3 


— 


9 


11 


4 


44 


11 


80 


— 


1 


5 


1 


5 


— 


H 


32 


7 


— 


4 


40 


2 


40 


— 


80 


3 


— 


10 


36 


— 





11 


88 


— 


82 


3 


2 


S 


— 


4 


53 


2 


2 


10 


'M 


— 


67 


8 


74 


7 


3 


2 


42 


1 


72 


— 


— 


2 


56 


1 


75 


9 


— 


5 


43 


— 


■ — 


9 


69 


8 


23 


7 


2 


10 


53 


— 


5 


11 


35 


7 


46 


11 


5 





~ 





28 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Chronic rheumatism. 
Debility. 
Exhaustion. 
Marasmus. 

Cholera Infantum, 

Phthisis. 

Heart disease. 

Debility, 

Marasmus. 

Convulsions. 

Hydrocephalus, 

Suicide, 

Meningitis. 

Consumption. 

Old age. 

Cholera infantum. 

Traumatic peritonitis. 

Stillborn, 

Cholera infantum. 

Paralysis. 

Old age. 

Membranous croup. 

Meningitis. 

Paralysis. 

Dysentery. 

Spinal disease. 

Dropsy. 

Paralytic debility. 

Inflammation of bowels. 

Debility. 

Heart disease. 

Marasmus. 

Suicide. 

Convulsions. 

Stillborn. 

Paralysis. 

Hydrocephalus. 

Accidental poisoning. 

Hydrocephalus. 

Acute tonsilitis. 

Stillborn. 

Typhoid fever. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Scarlet fever. 

Dropsy. 

Membranous croup. 

Phthisis pulmonalis. 

Pyaemia. 

Membranous croup. 

Stillborn. 



52 

The Town Clerk requests information of any omission or 
error in the above tables, in order that the registration may 
be as complete as possible. 

Kespectfully submitted, 

HENRY B. TERRY, 

Town Clerk. 



THE EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



HYDE PARK LIBRARY BOARD. 



In presenting their report for the year ending January 
31st, 1880, the Trustees have endeavored to incorporate 
therein only such facts and information as will be of interest 
to the general public, in the hope that its perusal will lead 
our fellow citizens to become interested to a greater degree 
in the Library and its success. 

When the Library was opened to the public, March 4th , 
1874, it contained something less than 3,000 volumes. 
Additions have been made from time to time, until at 
present it numbers 5,600. 

During the past year, 63 books have been added to the 
Library, 41 by purchase and 22 by donation. 

The donations have been as follows, viz :. — 

Irish Wit and Humor, by M. A. Dykes. The Hyde Park 
Directory, by Prescott Robinson. A package of 12 books, 
by Mrs. H. W. Bidwell. Catalogue of the Beebe Town 
Library, of Wakefield, from the Library. Three periodicals 
have been contributed to the Reading Room. Appleton's 
Journal, by Dr. Chas. Sturtevant. The Penn Monthly, and 
several numbers of The Western, by Henry Giles, Esq. 
The balance of donated books consists of Public Documents, 
from the State House. The Norfolk County Gazette and 
the Dedham Transcript have been furnished gratuitously, as 
in former years, by the publishers. 

The Library has also been the recipient of a donation of 
$25.00 in cash, from Mr. David Perkins ; this was expended 
in the purchase of new books. 



54 

The number of books given out for the year was 17,231, 
an average of 70 books daily, and of this number, thanks to 
the fidelity of the Librarian, Mrs. H. A. B. Thompson, not a 
single volume has been lost. The book reported lost in the 
last annual report has since been returned, so that, for the 
space of two years, not a single book has been lost, a fact 
which is alike creditable to the watchfulness of the Librarian 
and the care of the patrons of the Library. 

One serious drawback to the highest efficiency of our 
Library is the want of a proper catalogue. This fact has 
been mentioned in the last three reports of the Trustees* 
Since the opening of the Library, nearly 3,000 books have 
been added to it, a number greater than that appearing in 
the original catalogue. These books are practically beyond 
the reach of most of its patrons, as they are to be found only 
in manuscript supplements at the Reading Room. As most 
of those who use the Library prepare their lists of numbers 
at home, it will be seen that the new books are not brought 
to their notice, and so far as any practical benefit they derive 
from them, might as well remain on the publishers' shelves. 
Whether it would not be for the best interests of all con- 
cerned to appropriate the necessary amount to print a new 
catalogue, is a question which the Trustees ask the Town to 
seriously consider. 

For the last two years the Library has been nearly crip- 
pled, so far as the purchase of new books has been con- 
cerned. When the Savings Bank panic occurred, the entire 
Library Fund, amounting to about $4,000, was deposited in 
the Hyde Park Savings Bank, and for two years no income 
has been derived from that source. The ten per cent» 
dividends paid by the Bank have been drawn* as fast as they 
became payable, and invested in Government Bonds, until 
at the present time $i,700 is thus invested, about equally 
divided between the four and four and one-half per cent. 
Bonds, This, at an average of four and one-qnarter per 
cent., gives us an income of only $72.25 from that source, 



55 

which constitutes all the income available for the use of the 
Board, only about enough to pay the yearly subscriptions 
for the magazines and periodicals constantly on file at the 
Reading Room. The balance of the Fund remaining in the 
Savings Bank may, and probably will, pay an income for 
the coming year, so that the prospect of our ability to secure 
new books is rather better than it has been at any time dur- 
ing the past two years. The Library Fund itself has suffered 
a reduction of $438.27, by the scaling of the Savings Bank 
deposit twelve and one-half per cent., which became neces- 
sary in ordei\to avoid a greater loss. It has been the policy 
of the Trustees thus far to keep the Fund at $4,000, but 
owing to this unavoidable loss, we find it reduced on the 31st 
day of January to $3,583.58. Allowing that this entire 
amount pays an income of four per cent, the coming year, 
we shall have only $143.34 to expend in increasing the 
Library, while, as already stated, one-half of that amount 
will be required to pay the subscription list alone. That 
some means should be devised by which the Library shelves 
can be kept supplied with the publications of the day to a 
greater extent than is possible with our present limited 
means, is apparent to both the Trustees and the public. How 
it shall be done is the question. 

The statement of the Treasurer of the Trustees will be 
found accompanying this Report. 

Another point deserving attention is the fact that with 
each succeeding year the wear upon our Library is becoming 
more apparent. This is particularly the case in the depart- 
ments of juvenile literature and fiction. The number of 
books to be rebound is constantly on the increase, and at no 
distant day quite a sum must be expended to replace books 
which can no longer be kept in circulation ; quite a number 
of books have already been withdrawn, being so much worn 
as to be unfit for further service. To the extent of their 



56 

ability, the Board are on the alert to overcome these diffi- 
culties, but with the means at their hands, it is simply im- 
possible to surmount them wholly. Like the Israelites of 
old, we have not yet learned the art of making bricks with- 
out straw. 

Much to the regret of the Trustees, and we will say, 
without fear of dispute, of the Town also, oiir beloved asso- 
ciate, Theodore D. Weld, has felt called upon to resign his 
membership of the Board of Trustees. For the period of 
nine years, as a member first of the Library Committee , 
and afterwards of the Board of Trustees, he has been inti- 
mately connected with the working of the Library. He was 
the first and only chairman of our Board, and has discharged 
the duties of the position with a fidelity worthy of emulation. 
Since the organization of this body, on the 15th of July, 
1872, up to the meeting at which his resignation was pre- 
sented, he has never missed a single meeting, and by his 
untiring interest in all things pertaining to the affairs of the 
Library, has done more than any other person to place it in 
the position it holds to-day, an honor alike to itself and the 
town. To Mr. Weld, more than to any other one man, the 
citizens owe the existence of their Library. It was with re- 
gret that his associates accepted the resignation, which his 
advancing years and a multiplicity of other cares and en- 
gagements forced him to present, and we congratulate him 
and the town upon the success which has attended his labors 
in connection with the Hyde Park Free Public Library. 

Attached to this Report will be found Mr. Weld's letter 
of resignation, and the reply in behalf of the Board, by our 
fellow member, Mr. Sylvanus Cobb, Jr. 

In closing this Report, the Trustees have to suggest that 
the Town appropriate not less than $1,100 as the amount 
absolutely necessary for the expenses of the Library the 
coming year. The renewal of policies of insurance, which 



57 

expire in February, renders it necessary that we should ask 
for a larger amount than we have called for the last two 
years. Should it be deemed advisable to cause the catalogue, 
so much needed, to be printed, a still larger amount will be 
required. 

In behalf of the Board of Trustees, 

E. S. HATHAWAY, 

Secretary. 

MR. WELD'S LETTER OF RESIGNATION. 

Hyde Park, January 1st, 1880. 
To the Hyde Park Library Board : — 

Gentlemen, — I hereby resign my chairmanship and membership 
of our Library Board. Having, as its chairman for the last nine 
years, attended all its monthly and other meetings, I find now that 
I can do it no longer. As other responsibilities, which I cannot 
lay aside, so tax my time as to leave me no alternative, I accept 
the necessity and resign. 

Regarding membership in the Board as a sacred trust, I cannot 
retain it, unless I perform the duties it presupposes and enjoins. 

Rejoicing with you in the great good already done, by our Free 
Public Library, and in the assurance that, as the years go on, it 
will bless more and more each generation coming aft«r us here, I 
am, dear friends, in all heartiness, 

Affectionately and faithfully yours, 

Theodore D. Weld. 

MR. COBB'S REPLY. 

Hyde Park Public Library, Trustees' Room, 
Feb. 2d, 1880. 
Theodore D. Weld : — 

Dear Sir, — At the last stated meeting of our Board, a letter 
was received from you, tendering your resignation of membership 
of the Board of Trustees of Hyde Park Public Library. The 
earnest and emphatic manner of your communication left us no 



58 

alternative save that of acceptance. It was felt, however, that we 
could not suffer you thus to leave us, without tendering to you, in 
return, an expression of our feelings on the occasion. The emo- 
tion was spontaneous and unanimous, and the writer of this was 
directed to perform that fraternal duty. 

He well remembers that evening, in the years now long agone, 
when the first committee appointed b} r the town to consider the 
matter of a " Free Public Library," held its first meeting at the 
dwelling of our late lamented fellow townsman, Alanson Hawley ; 
and he remembers, also, that you presented the draft of a plan of 
establishment, drawn by j^our own hand, which was adopted. 
And, sir, we believe we trench upon the claim of no other person 
when we say that, from that time to the present, you have been 
the prime mover and the guiding spirit in the establishment and 
successful conducting of the beneficent work. 

Dear brother, we sorrow in this parting. The vacant chair at 
the head of our Board, which you have filled since our organization, 
is not a pleasant object of contemplation. We can easily fill it 
with a presiding officer ; but we cannot duplicate the old familiar 
face, nor can we feel, ever again, that the father of our cherished 
institution is in his proper place, — to guide and direct. 

Nevertheless, you have well rounded out the measure of your 
work, and you leave your post with the heartfelt satisfaction of 
having met every need, and performed every duty, promptly and 
effectively. In short, in all your relations with Hyde Park Public 
Library, most emphatically have 3^011 kept the faith. 

And now, permit us, in view of this severance of official rela- 
tions, to extend to you our sincere love and esteem. That God 
may bless you, now and evermore, is our earnest prayer. 

In behalf of the Board, 

Sylvanus Cobb, Jr. 

Committee. 



59 



^9 « t- 


M 5? 


t— 


OS OH CM 




CO 


i-i o ao 


J- <N 




•* to CO 


"5 y v. 


OS 










r*t 


£ ■ 






M 






- 






























CS 












05 












CO 












SO 












a 












CS 
09 












f£ 


t/ 


• 






c 


: ffl 


s 


; 








■ S 


ps 


i : 
















t 


> > 




a 


; 




« 


> 5 


> J2 








a 


2 


'3 


t 


' i 




£ 




: o 


V 


< o 




c. 


3 


i a. 


c 


> a 




j 


« 


a) 


c 


> £ 












C3 






'S 




r 


^ 






g 


a 








i 


3 ^ 


« 


ft 




c 

c 


« 




\ 


CO 
• CS 








CQ 


; 


>-> 




fJ 








M 












a S3 












00 












°° s 












H CS 












►S 




1* 


c 


o 


c 




t» 


of 


IT 


o 


c 




CO 




(X 


S§ 


ir 




_- 




1 


o 




-* 


5 










ca_ 


e- 










cf 


# 










€» 




















E 






















m 


!E 


















e 


a 


a 


P. 








1 


a 






c 


s 


B 


t 






e 


£ 


S 


"i 






C 


c 


> 


P 








s 


! s 


c 


. 




e 





o 


s 






a 


a 


> CD 


c 






l 
t 

a 




; i 


3 


! 




c 


I ! 


i a 


c 


3 




J 


2 ! 


3 M 


- 






c 


3 










h 


4 










a 


i 










t- 















D 










•f- 


H 





















i. 










'l 










t>, 
















£S 




CD 




■>s 






ffi 


fe 




Pi 




o 


h 

£3 

h 




a 

o ■ 


CS 

M 




M 

d 




2 

a) 


£ 






DQ 










iH 










U 




fl'ts 


hi 




§s 


K 


^ 




e« 




5<» 




» 




oo 


CD g 




•H 
I— ( 


0) 



W 1 


^ 


CO 


fl 


OD 


5 53 ' 


ft 

h 

ft 


•H 
> 
H 
fl) 

03 
Eh 

, 

a 




mo 

»"3i 

03 


2 ? 

>>CB 




ja 
p 

s 

CD 

a 

M 

CD 


C C^ 
03 CM 

1.1 

S *> 

O H 




H 


M 
CD 
-P 

•H 




-» o 

<e co 


CO 

a 

cS 
o 

es 
> 


CD 

■J 

"> 

43 
<& 

o 


c 
a 


CD 
O . 

> 00 

*- GO 
CDi-H 
CQ „ 

*-,co 
o 






82 


£ 


si 

IS 

o 

a 

CS 


66 


2 
t-i 

CD 
EH 




a& 


0«3 


h 




fl 

CO 




^ 


CD 
CD 




b 




s 


s 

o 

CD 




^ 


a 

CD 


ZT3 






M 


— 




d 

* 




OS 






00 












CO 






lO 












>c 






CO 












CO 






s 












s 






wa" 












CO 






«» 












» 








t> 








o 








t- 






o 


00 




<& 






ib 






¥-1 


CO 




s 






o 






•O 


CM 








CO 






!>_ 






? 






tH 












fr 






» 


a 


cb 


S 1 














CS 


3 


° 










,1. 




o 

s 


a 
1 


S 




c« 






02 




«> 








fi 






* 
















a 






O 






, 










hi 






o 




a 












<+H 










CD 

















o 

CO 


CO 




O 


« 










fl 




e 

a 




S 












id 




a 
a 
o 
3 

CS 




4 

a 
s 
5 


a 


-* 


a 








fn 











o 




cS 








a 




T3 




a 


M 




CO 


tj 




a 
a 


" 


> 


a 




a 
o 


a 

C3 






U 


E 


■5 


a 


CD 

s 
a 


S 


g 

a 

a 

CD 


a 
o 
a 










a 


O 






CS 






3 


'< 


J 


fc 




»H 


p 






0) 


















J3 




















SH 





















BY-LAWS 



At a meeting of the legal voters of the town of Hyde Parfe,. 
held August 2, 1875, it was voted to adopt the following By-Laws/ 
to wit : — 

NOTIFICATION OF TOWN MEETING. 

Every town meeting shall be notified by posting copies of the war- 
rant calling the same, in ten public places in the town, seven days, 
at least, before the day appointed lor said meeting ; and a copy of 
the warrant shall be published in the local newspapers of the town 
once, at least, before said meeting. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING. 

The annual town meeting shall be held on the first Monday of 
March of each year. The meeting shall be opened at eight o'clock 
a.m., and the polls shall be kept open until sunset. 

RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF TOWN MEETINGS. 

1. — Every meeting shall be opened with prayer. 

2. — All questions submitted for the consideration of the town, in- 
volving the expenditure of money, shall be in writing. 

3. — No vote fixing the period for closing a ballot shall be reconsid- 
ered after such ballot shall have commenced ; but it may be in order 
to extend the period without such reconsideration. 

4. — When a question is under debate, motions shall be received to 
adjourn, to lay on the table, the previous question, to postpone to a 
certain time, to postpone indefinitely, to commit, or to amend ; which 
several motions shall have precedence in the order in which they are 
herein arranged. 

5. — The powers and duties of the presiding officer, not especially 
provided for by law, or by the foregoing rules, shall be determined 
by the rules of practice contained in "Cushing's Manual," so far as 
they are adapted to the condition and powers of the town. 

6. — No vote shall be reconsidered except upon a motion made 
within one hour after such vote has passed, unless such reconsidera- 
tion is ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the voters present. 

FINANCIAL YEAR. 

The financial year of the town shall begin with the first day of Feb- 
ruary in each year, and end on the thirty-first day of the following 
January. 

MEETINGS OF TOWN OFFICERS. 

The selectmen, overseers of the poor, board of health, surveyors of 
highways, and school committee shall post in some conspicuous place 
at their official rooms, a notice of the times of their respective meet- 
ings, and shall also give notice of the same through the local news- 
papers. 



61 

COLLECTION OF TAXES. 

1. — The assessment of taxes shall be completed, and a list of the 
same delivered to the collector, on or before the first day of August 
of each year. 

2. — All taxes which may be assessed, if paid on or before the first 
day of October next after the assessment, shall be entitled to such 
discount as the town shall vote at its annual meeting. All persons 
who may be assessed a poll-tax onlj r , shall pay the same on demand. 
All taxes shall be paid in full on or before the firstMay of November 
next following the assessment of said taxes, and if not so paid, inter- 
est shall be paid at a rate not exceeding twelve per cent, per annum, 
if so voted b}^ the town. 

3. — The assessors shall annually, on or before the first day of July, 
post a copy of the list of poll-tax payers on the outside of the build- 
ing containing their office. 

4. — It shall be the duty of the selectmen to insert the following 
article in the warrant ealling the annual meeting, viz : *^To see what 
discount shall be allowed on all taxes paid on or before the first day 
of October next." 

DUTIES OP THE AUDITORS. 

1. — The auditors shall examine the accounts of the selectmen, 
school committee, treasurer, collector, trustees of the public library, 
and the custodian of the town hall, and all other officers or commit- 
tees entrusted with the expenditure of money, and shall certify as to 
the correctness of the same in the printed annual report. 

2. — Before certifying to the accounts of the selectmen and school 
■committee, they shall examine the original bills and pay rolls, and 
ascertain that they are correct and properly receipted. 

3. — Before certifying to the accounts of the treasurer, they shall 
examine his cash-book, wherein shall be entered his receipts and 
payments, as they occur from day to day, shall see that he has paid 
out no moneys except on proper vouchers, carefully examine all pay- 
ments for interest, and see that the funds on hand are intact. 

4. — Before certifying to the collector's accounts, they shall examine 
his cash-book, showing the amounts collected from day to day, and 
showing when the same were paid over to the treasurer; shall see 
that he has collected interest on all taxes overdue, and shall see a 
complete list of abatements, and also a list of unpaid taxes. 

5. — They shall see that the accounts of the trustees of the public 
library, and the custodian of the town hall, are kept in a correct 
manner, and that all payments are accompanied with proper 
vouchers. 

6. — The auditors shall have access to the accounts of the several 
officers at such stated times as said auditors shall deem for the inter- 
est of the town, and shall audit the accounts of the treasurer and 
•collector quarterly. 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS. 

All unexpended balances of the regular annual appropriations 
shall, at the close of each financial year, be paid into the sinking 
iund to be used in extinguishing. the town debt. 

MEASURERS OF WOOD AND BARK. 

It shall be the duty of the selectmen to appoint measurers of wood 
and bark. 



62 



REMOVAL OF BUILDINGS AND OBSTRUCTION OF HIGHWAYS. 

1. —No building shall be removed over a public street without the- 
written permission of the selectmen. 

2. — The owner of such building, or the person or persons removing? 
the same, shall pay the town all damages,, costs, and expenses for 
which the town may be liable or compelled to pay by reason of said 
street being obstructed or encumbered. 

3. — No person shall place, or cause to, be placed, in any of the 
public streets,, sidewalks, lands, or upon any of the common lands of, 
the town, without a written license from the selectmen, any manure 
dirt, gravel, stones, building materials, wood., coal, barrels, boxes, 
merchandise, or any rubbish of any kind whatever* and suffer the 
same to remain for twenty-four hours 

4. — All persons who shall obstruct the sidewalks or streets of the- 
town to the molestation of travelers shall be subject to arrest as 
offenders against the public peace. Constables and police officers are 
instructed to enforce this rule rigidly. 

5. — No person shall ride or drive ahorse in any street in the towiii 
at a rate faster than eight miles an hour. 

6. — No person shall play at. ball, or throw balls, snow-balls, or 
stones, or discharge any gun or fire-arm, or make any bonfires or 
other fires, m any of the streets or public places in the town. 

COASTING. 

Coasting on any of the public streets of the town, is prohibited,, 
except upon such streets as the selectmen shall designate each year 
by public notice. 

PASTURING OP CATTLE OR- OTHER ANIMALS ON STREETS OR WAYS. 

1. — The town hereby adopts and avails. itself of the provisions of 
chapter 45. of the general statutes, relating to the pasturing of cattle- 
or other animals in. streets or ways. 

2. — No person shall be allowed to pasture any cattle, goat^or other 
animal upon, any street or way in said town, either with or without a* 
keeper, except within the limits of such way adjoining his own prem- 
ises, and field, driver* are instructed to enforce this by-law. 

TRUANCY, 

The proper officers of the town shall rigidly enforce the- provisions- 
of the truant laws of the commonwealth-, 

JUNK DEALERS. 

Every keeper of a shop for the purchase,, sale, or barter of junk, old, 
metals, or second-hand articles within the limits of this town shaB 
keep a book, in which shall be written at the time of every purchase 
of any such articles a description of the article or articles purchased, 
the name, age, and residence of the person from, whom,, and the day 
and hour when, such purchase was made ; such book shall at all times 
be open to the inspection of the selectmen, and any person by them, 
authorized to make such inspection ; every keeper of such shop shall 
put in some suitable and conspicuous place on his shop a sign, having 
his name and occupation legibly inscribed thereon in large letters^: 
such shop,, and- all articles. of merchandise therein*, may be examined:. 



63 

by the mayor and alderman of any city, or the selectmen of any 
town, or by any person by them respectively authorized to make such 
examination, at all times; no keeper of such shop shall, directly or 
indirectly, either purchase or receive by way of barter or exchange 
any of the articles aforesaid, of any minor or apprentice, knowing or 
having reason to believe him to be such ; and no article purchased or 
received shall be sold until a period of at least one week from the 
date of its purchase or receipt shall have elapsed. 

The selectmen are required to incorporate the above by-laws in 
every license which shall be granted for dealing in the articles therein 
mentioned, and shall revoke the same on reasonable proof of any 
violation thereof. 

LIST OF TAX-PAYERS. 

The names of all persons paying a tax on real or personal property 
shall be published annually in the town report, together with the 
amount of tax assessed upon each, and whether the same is paid or 
unpaid. 

PUBLICATION OP BY-LAWS. 

The selectmen shall publish these by-laws annually in connection 
with the town report. 

PENALTIES UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Every violation of any of the foregoing by-laws shall be punished 
by a fine of not less than one dollar nor more than twenty dollars, to 
be recovered by complaint before any trial justice in the County of 
Norfolk, or any other court having jurisdiction. 

PROSECUTION UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Any citizen may, and the selectmen and constable shall, prosecute 
every violation of any of the foregoing by-laws, by complaint before 
any trial justice in the County of Norfolk, or any other court having 
jurisdiction. 

REPEAL OF OLD BY-LAWS. 

All former by-laws of the town are repealed on approval of these 
by-laws, as provided for in the following section : — 

BY-LAWS, WHEN TO TAKE EFFECT. 

These by-laws shall go into effect from and after their passage and 
their approval bv the superior court within and for the County of 
Norfolk. 

Attest • 

HENRY B. TERRY, Toion Clerk. 



Norfolk, ss. Superior Court, September Term, to wit : October 5, 
1875. The foregoing By-Laws are approved. By the Court. 

ERASTUS W ORTHING TON, Clerk, 
A true copy. Attest: *" 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk. 



64 

At a meeting of the legal voters of the town of Hyde Park, 
Mass., held March 29th, 1877, it was voted to so alter the By-Laws 
of this town, that the Section entitled, 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS, 

Shall, instead of the present reading, read as follows, to wit : 

"Any unexpended balance of the regular annual appropriations, 
excepting the school appropriations, shall at the close of each 
financial year, be paid into the sinking fund, to be used in extin- 
guishing the town debt." 

And at a meeting held April 10th, 1877, by adjournment of the 
above-mentioned meeting, it was voted to adopt the following 

BY-LAWS IN RELATION TO THE PREVENTION OF FIRES, TO WIT : 

It shall be the duty of every person who shall commence the'erection 
of any building within the town of Hyde Park to notify the Board of 
Engineers thereof before he shall commence building the chimneys 
therein. 

All chimneys in wooden buildings shall be built of brick, stone, or 
other fire-proof non-conducting material. All brick flues shall be 
smoothly plastered inside with mortar from top to bottom and outside 
below the roofing. 

In no case shall chimneys rest upon any flooring without a footing 
of masonry or iron supported by iron beams, having a secure bearing 
of masonry or iron at either end. 

All flues shall be topped out at least four feet above the roof of the 
building to which they belong. The brick topping out of chimneys 
shall not have more than two inches projection, unless covered by a 
cap of metal or stone properly secured. 

Hearths of fireplaces or grates shall be laid upon brick or other 
trimmer arches, or upon bars of iron supporting a bed of brick-work. 

No wood-work of any kind shall be placed at a less distance than 
one inch from the outside brick-work of any flue. In no case shall 
a nail be driven into the masonry of any flue. 

No wood-work shall be placed at a less distance than one inch 
from any tin or other metal fiue or flues, pipe or pipes, used or in- 
tended to be used to convey heated air or steam in any building, un- 
less such flues or pipes shall be cased with metal, leaving a free 
circulation of air all around the same. 

No smoke-pipe in any such wooden or frame building shall here- 
after enter any flue, unless the said pipe shall be at least twelve in- 
ches from either the floors or ceiling ; and in all cases where smoke- 
pipes pass through stud or wooden partitions of any kind, whether 
the same be plastered or not, they shall be guarded by either a double 
collar of metal, with at least four inches of air space and holes for 
ventilation or by a soap-stone ring, not less than three inches in 
thickness and extending through the partition. 



65 

The Board of Engineers shall examine into all shops and 
other places where shavings or other combustible material 
may be deposited or collected, and at all times be vigilant 
in the removal ot the same, whenever, in the opinion of 
any majority of them, the same may be dangerous to the security of 
the town. from fires; and direct the owner, tenant, or occupant of 
said shops, or other places, to remove the same ; and in case such 
owner, tenant, or occupant's refusal or neglect so to do, to cause the 
same to be removed at the expense of such owner, tenant, or oc- 
cupant. 

It shall also be the duty of said Engineers to take cognizance of all 
buildings in the town in which any steam engine shall be used, and of 
all buildings in the town in process of erection or alteration, and to 
make a record of such thereof as in their judgment may from any 
cause be dangerous, and report the same to the Selectmen forthwith. 
And whenever in the opinion of a majority of the Board of Engineers, 
any chimney, hearth, oven, stove, stovepipe, fire-frame or other fix- 
ture, or aity camphene or other explosive or inflammable fluid or 
material, or whatever else may give just cause of alarm, should be 
altered, repaired or removed, they, the said Engineers, shall forth- 
with notify and direct the owner, tenant or occupant of the 
premises upon which the same are situated, to alter, repair or 
remove the same, as the said Engineers shall direct. And 
in case such tenant, owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect 
so to do, the said Engineers shall cause the same to be remov- 
ed, altered or repaired at the expense of such owner, tenant, or 
occupant, who shall also be liable to a penalty, not exceeding fifty 
dollars for such neglect or refusal. And any person who shall ob- 
struct the Engineers, or any of them, in carrying out the provisions 
of this section, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding fifty dollars. 

The removal, extension or essential alteration of any building; 
also, the rebuilding or repairing of any building which has been 
partially destroyed by fire, shall be subject to the same restrictions 
which are imposed by the foregoing By-laws on the erection of build- 
ings. 

PENALTIES UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Every violation of any of the foregoing By-laws shall be punished 
by a fine not exceeding fifty dollars, to be recovered by a complaint 
before any trial justice in the county of Norfolk or any other court 
having jurisdiction. 



PROSECUTION UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Any citizen may, and the Board of Engineers and constables, shall, 
after five days notice in writing to the violator thereof, which notice 
shall contain a definite statement of the matter complained of, prosecute 
every violation of any of the foregoing By-laws, by complaint before 
any trial justice in the county of Norfolk or any other court. 



66 



BYLAWS WHEN TO TAKE EFFECT. 



These By-laws shall go into effect upon their passage and approval 
by the superior court within and for the county of Norfolk. 
Attest • 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



Norfolk, s.s. Superior Court, April Term, 1877. The foregoing 
By-laws relating to fires, and also relating to unexpended balances 
are approved by the court. 

JOHN W. BACON, J. S. C. 
A true copy. Attest : 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk. 



RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


A 








Adler, Leonard ... ... 




$13 68 




Alderman, M. P. H 












194 24 




$33 72 


Aklrich, K.C. . 












54 72 






Allen, Abbie F. 












79 04 


3 04 


82 08 


Allen, Charlotte M. . 












6 08 






Allen, Orville . 












47 12 






Allen, Zeuas 












44 08 






Anderson, Lydia 












36 48 




36 48 


Arenizen. J. W. 












19 76 






Arnold & Hibbard 












27 36 




27 36 


Art an It, Louis E. 












30 40 






Attenberger, George . 












16 72 






Aborn, Henry F. 












31 92 






Ayer, George, Estate of 












15 20 




15 20 


Alexander, Martha 














7 60 




Ahlborn, Henry A. 












42 56 






Archer, Oelia 














1 52 


1 52 


Arnold, Isaiah F. 












47 12 






B 








Badger, Susan C. ..... . 


106 40 




106 40 


Baloom, D. O. 












34 20 






Bardan, Michael 














46: 




Balkan), S. B, 












69 16 


57 76 




Baptist Church 












63 82 




63 82 


Barrett, Hannah 












6 84 






Harrows. Harriett M. 












27 36 




27 36 


Barry, Michael 












15 96 






Bartlett, Elizabeth 












23 56 




23 56 


Bates, Annie 












28 88 






Bates, J. C. 












60 80 






Bass, George J. 












59 28 






Bailey, Annie E. 












46 36 




46 36 


Barr, Eleanor S. 












34 2 (J 






Bean, J. W. 












18 24 


3 49 


21 73 


Beatey, John 












30 40 




30 40 


Bennett, John 












22 04 






Benton, Ira L, 














1 21 


1 21 


Bickmore, A. P. 












;I9 52 






Bioklord, L. B. 












76 00 






Bird, L.J. 














3 80 




Bigelow, F. C. 














3 04 




-Blackmer, Seth M. 












60 80 


3 50 


64 30 


Blake, Ruth S. 












95 76 


91 


96 67 


Blake, K. K, 












75 24 






Blake & Barnes 












9 88 




9 88 


Blanchard, Richard, Estate c 


>t" 










99 56 






Blasdell, Henry 












80 56 


7 60 




Blodgett, a. P. 












6 84 




6 84 


Bloom, Julius 












33 44 






Bleakie, John 












27 36 






Bteakie, Robert & Co.. 














228 00 




Bleakie, Robert, 












1050 70 


278 IS 


38l> 


B e ;kie, Robert, Trustee 












109 44 






Bouweil, Nathaniel 












47 12 




47 12 


Bonnell & Hood 












31 26 






Bonney, Susan 












36 48 






Boweu, Patience 












31 92 




31 92; 


Bowers, Sarah F. 












28 88 




28 881 


Boyd, Francis 












84 36 


3. 04 


87 4ft 



66 

Resident Tax-" ayers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 










Real 
Estate. 


Pei- 

sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Boyle, Nellie D. 


$22 80 






Boynton, Francis 












41 04 






Boynton «& Rogers 












49 78 


$1710 




Bracket!, John S. 












19 00 




$19 00 


Brady, John 












15 96 




15 96 


Bragdon, Julia A. 












21 28 






Braiiiard, Amos h". 












109 44 


46 




Brainard Milling Machine C< 












106 40 


197 61) 




Brown, I. J. 












414 96 


3 80 


50 16 


Brennan, Fatrick 












25 84- 




25 84 


Brigham. F. D. 














16 72 


16 72 


Brown, James 












IS 24 


91 


18 24 


Brown, O. Q. 












6 08 




6 08 


Britton, W. T. 














1 82 


1 82 


Brown, A. M. 














2 28 


2 28 


Brown, John 














2 28 


2 28 


Bussey, H. P. 












1 52 




1 52 


Bussey, Charlotte 












24 P2 




24 32 


Budlong, J. IS., Eatate of 












38 00 






Bullard, Isaac 












44 08 






Bullard, William, Estate of 












342 76 






Bullard, William A., Estate 


31' 










44 84 






Bunker, S. S. 












33 44 




33 44 


Bunker, Charles E. 














7 60 


7 60 


Bunton, Henry 8. 












7 60 






B irger, Antoine 












31 16 


1 98 


33 14 


Burk, Pal rick 












7 60 




7 60 


Bark, Thomas, 1st. 












9 88 






Burk. Thomas, 2d. 












6 84 






Burnett, Marshall 












31 92 






isurns, Dennis 












36 48 






Burns, D. i>. 












29 64 


3 80 




Burns, Timothy 












7 60 






Bullaid, JohnN. 














22 80 


22 80 


Buzzell, Mattie G. 












25 84 






Butler, George H. 








63 08 






C 








Cable, Hobart M. . . . 


149 72 






Caflin, F. H. 












79 04 






Caldwell, J. A. 












72 96 


46 


73 42 


Campbell, .losiah W. . 












13 68 






Cannon, Michael 












8 3'i 


46 


8 36 


Cannon, Michael 2d, Estate ( 


>i 










4 56 




4 56 


Case, Eliza L. 














9 12 


9 12 


Carter, A. F. 












24 32 






Case, W. J. 












63 08 


7 60 




Case, Samuel T. 












24 32 






Candall, C. A. 














46 


46 


Campbell, Agnes 












33 44 






Gary, Harrison 












6 84 






Carlton, W. F. 












. 15 20 






Gassidj , James 














2 28 


2 28 


Cilley, J. L. 












21 28 






Ghambeilain, H. C. 












46 36 


22 80 


69 16 


Chamberlain, Thomas 












35 72 






Chapin, Mrs. A. 












72 96 






Chapin, Mrs. S. F . 














S3 60 




Cbapman, Lucy A. 












166 44 






Chesley, S. A. 












32 68 






Chase, F. A. 












W 60 






Chadwick, Joseph ,H. 














3 80 


3 80 


Chipman, Benjamin 












13 68 




13 68 


Choate, W. P. 












33 44 






Churchill, E. S. 




, 






1 52 




1 52 


Clapp, Charles F. 










25 84 




25 84 



69 

Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



ISAMES. 










Uea 1 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Clark, Hem an A. 


$50 16 


$4 18 


$54 34 


Clark, Marcus, Estate of 












41 80 


45 60 




Clark, Mrs. Mary, 1st. 












21 28 




21 2S 


Clark, Mrs. Mary, 2d. 














30 40 




Clark, S. D. 












31 92 




31 92 


Clark, Sarah A. 














25 31 


25 31 


Clary, Mary 












39 76 


1 98 




Cleveland, E. A. 












22 04 






Cox. lieu ben 














2 28 


2 28 


Cobb, Sylvanus Jr.. 












106 40 


30 40 




Cochran, Mary J. 












28 8S 






Cochran, Adelaide L. . 












31 92 




31 92 


Coan &Co. (K. NO 














63 08 


63 08 


Collin, s. B. 












45 60 


9 12 


54 72 


Colb\, C. H. 












69 92 


18 24 




Coleman, E. J. 












4 56 


2 43 


6 90 


Collins, Edward VV. . 












48 64 






Collins, Laura 












19 00 




19 00 


Concannon, Patrick 












14 44 






Congregational Society 












57 76 






Conlan, P. S. 












30 41) 


2 28 




Connolly, Michael L. . 












6 84 




6 84 


Connolly, Michael 












41 04 






Conway, Georgianna F. 












22 04 




22 04 


Conway, C. I. 














2 28 


2 28 


Conoly, Stephen 












6 08 




6 08 


Cook, Emilv A. 












29 64 




29 61 


Cook, Jacob 












5'i 24 


2 28 




Corbett, Jeremiah 












3'j 48 


1 14 


37 62 


Corrigan, Mrs. John . 












18 24 


2 74 


20 98 


Corrigan, Thomas 












12 92 


3 49 


16 41 


Corson, Reuben 












71 44 


30 40 


101 84 


Cottelle, Nathan T. 














(i 08 




Conlan, J. H. 














3 04 


3 04 


Connor, Barney 














2 28 


2 28 


Cobb, Mrs. J. L. 














22 8) 




Cook, C. VV. ... 












18 24 


4 26 


22 50 


Conroy, Patrick 












4 56 


* 




Coveuy, Augustus E. 












26 60 






Coveney, James S 1 












30 40 




30 40 


Cowies, Luman W". 












13 68 




13 6^ 


Crummet, C. H. 












81 32 


3 50 


84 82 


Cullen, Ann 












12 91 






Curies , Sabina 












17 48 


76 


18 24 


D 








Damon, Koscoe .... NHfSil 


3 04 




3 04 


Darling, Henry A. • . 












41 04 






Darling, W. H. 












47 12 




47 12 


Davis, Alonzo 












38 00 






Davis, David L. 












153 52 


106 4u 




Davison, Delos 














3 80 




Day, Sarah B. 












31 92 




31 92 


Davis, A F. 














6 84 




DeEntremont, Miss 












30 40 






Dee, Dennis, Estate of 












24 32 






Dean, F. H. 












62 32 




62 32 


«Doulan, Malachi 












41 04 


6 08 


47 12 


Doherty, Joseph H. 












31 92 






Dolau. Patrick 












9 11 




9 12 


Dolau, Thomas 












23 56 






Dooly, Robert 














1 52 


1 52 


Downs, G. S. 












20 52 






Dowse, George S. 












42 56 






Downey, John 












17 48 


1 52 


19 00 


Downing, Alfred 










139 OB 


57 76 





Resident Taxpayers — «- (Continued.) 



Real. 
Estate. 



Per- 
sonal 



Unpaid. 



Downing', Belinda 
Dunn, J. I'. 
Dunn, William 
Downey, Michael 
Durell, it, IVh 
Dyer, Qnincy 
Dyer William 



Eagan, William 
Edwards, C L> 
Edwards, Loi ing L> 
Eddys D. t\ 
Ellis, Joseph Dw 
Emrry> J. P. 
Enueking, John J. 
Euslis, Maria A. 
Edenburg, John 
Bate's, Q.F. 
Evans, Joseph 
Evans, Thomas C. 
Evans, Perley M. 
Everett, W. 9-. 
Ewins, Alexander 



Faii-ba'irn, Win, W. 
Fall, J. B-. 
Fallen, Bridget 
Fallen, Peter 
Farnsworth, C. L. 
Farrington, J. B. 
Farrington, Gi E. 
F.iunce, Thomas E. 
Fernakl, G. M. 
Fellows, G. M; 
File, Jam.es 
Fisher, Sophia 
Fisher, Andrew 
Fisk. H. G. 
Field, Thomas G. 
Foster, Allied 
Foster, Mrs. Si A. 
Foster, Charles A. 
Foss, (J. J. 
Flaherty, Roger 
Flemming. J -mes 
Floyd, Miss Lucy 
Frame, John 
French, L. J. 
Freeman, F. J-. C. 
Frost, Fannie M. 
Frost G. W. 
French, L. B k & W. 
Fry. Jane E. 



Gay, Richard L. 
Galligan. John, Estate of 
Galligan, Andrew 
Galligan^ Matthew 
Gardner, C. E. 
Garron, George, Estate of 
Gately, Thomas, Estate of 



6 08 
54 72 
22 04 
65 3fi 
41 04 
49 40 



39 52 

69 16 
63 08 
51 68 

40 28 
47 12 
63 84 
27 36 

109 44 

104 12 
115 52 

76 00 
63 84 



50 16 

9 12 

17 48 

85 12 

61 56 

34 20 
25 St 
36 48 

3 04 
41 04 

116 28 

12 92 
145 16 

22 04 

4 56 
27 36 

5 32 

13 68 
65 36 



2? 36 



33 44 
31 16 



38 00 
25 84 
25 84 



32 68 
24 32 



$72 90 



IS 24 
2 28 



1.37 



10 61 
2 28 
2 96 

50 16 

22 80 



2 28 
14 06 
46 
12 !6 
27 3(i 
1 52 
4 56 



3 27 

15 20 

91 

15 20 

1 37 



1 14 



34 96 

9 88 



$6 C8 



5 32 

2 28. 



2 96 

98 80 



14 06 
9 58 

29 64 
112 48 

4 56 

25 84 

30 48 



27 36 



1 H 
13 6S 



60 80 
33 44 



25 84 
25 84 



Resident 


Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 






NAMES, 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Giles, Henry « i . i 


$-36 48 






Giles, Alfred $. 




225 48 


618 8k 


$148 96 


Giles, Susannah Ri H. 








44 54 




Gilson, W, \V. 






28 88 






Gilson, John i 






34 !)6 


3 04 


38 00 


Gilson, Sarah 






4 58 






Gibbons, Patrick i 






6 34 






Goodwin, Emeline N. j 






32 68 






Gordon, Mary D. 






27 36 






Goss, Daniel J. 






38 00 


4 26 


42 26 


Goss, Eliza A. 






64 22 




64 22 


Gould, H. H., Estate of 






34 96 


2 66 




Grant, Peter . i 






12 16 


3 05 




Gray, O, T. S" ' 






59 28 




59 28 


Gregg, Clarke C, 






33 44 






Greeley, John D. i 






22 80 






Greeley, S. C. 






30 40 






Graham, Frank C. . , 








7 60 




Greenwood, Prank . v . 






6 08 






Green wi od, Elihu, Estate ot 






192 28 


103 51 




Greenwood, Phsebe Hi , 






15 20 






Greene, Lewis A. . 






19 76 






Grew. Henry 






1331 52 


122 82 




Grew, Henry Si 








216 60 




bridley, Susan P. . 






47 12 






Griffin, Fannie M. 






38 76 


38 76 




Goodrich, William B. 


i i • . 




1 52 






Gunnison, George W. 


. 






1 97 


1 97 


H 








Halden, John i . . , , 


38 76 






Hale, Alfred, Estate of . , » 




53 20 






Haley, Charles ..... 




192 28 


2 28 


194 58 


Hall, Isaac H. 








30 40 




30 40 


Hall, Joseph R. 








32 68 






Hall, Caleb 










2 28 


2 28 


Hall, William, Trustee 










38 00 


38 00 


Hamblin, B* L. 








S3 60 






Hamblin, J. G. 








142 28 


46 


142 74 


Hamblin, Frank H. . 








25 84 




25 84 


Hanchett, George W. 








38 00 






Hanscomb, George W. 








37 24 


1 52 




Hardy, Elizabeth 








3 04 


2 73 


5 77 


Harlow, Philander 








51 68 






Harm an, Benjamin 








15 98 






Haskell, Gideon H. 








60 80 




60 80 


Haskell, Maria 








34 20 






Hatch, Freeman 








33 44 






Hathaway, E. S. 








88 00 


4 56 




Hathaway, W. H. 










1 52 


1 52 


Hatlinger, J. J. 








3 04 






Hayes, C. C. 








47 12 






Haseltine, David 








34 96 




34 96 


Hawes, W. L. 








21 28 






Hebbard, Nathaniel 








89 68 


3 19 


92 87 


Hedge, Elizabeth 








34 96 






Heustes, C. P. 








74 48 




74 48 


Higgins, David 








76 76 


91 


77 67 


Higgins, Henry M. 










2 28 




Hilborn, Sarah A. B. 








32 68 




32 68 


Hill, Joseph 








41 80 






Hill, Sarah J. 








34 96 






Hill, W. S. 








18 24 


3 04 


3 01 


Hill, Hamilton A. 










6 08 


6 08 


Hilton, W. B. 








31 92 




31 92 


Henderson. Mary 








3 04 


, 


. 



72 

Resident Tax-Papers 



( Continued.) 





NAMES. 










Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Hodgluuson, John ^^^1 


$13 68 






Holmes, C. P. 














3S UiJ 






Holmes, Mary 














Hi 72 




$16 72 


Holden, Mrs. L. B. 














41 (14 




41 04 


Holdsworth, .squire 














27 36 






Hollis, Elizabeth S. 














27 36 






Hood, Georgiauna 














4 56 






Hoogs, W. H. 














53 20 






Hopkirk, Martha 














1.) 44 






Hopkirk, Jane 














48 64 






Holt, 0. F. 














52 44 




52 44 


Hoi way, A. H. 














4l!l 52 






Holzer, Annie M. 














8 36 






Holtham, W. 8. 
















$6 08 


6 08 


Horn, Ernest, Estate ( 


>f 












16 72 






Horn, Olive ' 














18 24 




18 24 


House, Annie 














1 52 




1 52 


House, Nettie F. B. 














36 48 






Hovev, Soloman 














92 72 


95 76 




Howes, H.J. 














33 4t 




33 44 


Howard, Margaret B. 














38 06 






Howard, E. D. 














17 48 






Hughes, EliZiibeth 














44 08 




44 08 


Huggins Charles E. . 














28 t8 






Hughes, Owen Mrs. 














36 48 


6 38 


42 86 


Hunt, Mary H. 














77 52 






Hind, VV. J. 














34 20 






Hurter, George 0. 














36 48 






Hutchinson, H.E. 














19 76 




19 76 


Hyde, James R. 














53 95 






Hyde, George M. 














4 56 




4 58 


Hyde Park Savings Bank. 










145 46 






I 
Ingersoll, W. H. 


42 18 






Ireland, Alice ...... 


32 68 






J 








Jacobs, Charles KSK .... 




1 52 




James, George 














28 88 


46 




Jaquith, Andrew 














30 40 






Jenkins, Howard 














36 48 






Johnston, John J. 
















12 16 


12 16 


Johnson, John W. 














63 84 




63 84 


Jordon, William 
















1 14 


1 14 


Jordon, Susan L. 














50 16 




50 16 


Joubert, D. Z. . 














27 36 






K 








Kendall, I), V. . IS9I 


42 56 


27 36 




Kendall, E. A. , ■ 














41 04 


7 60 




Kendrick, H. C. 














34 96 






Keene, Mary A. 














30 40 




30 40 


Kelley, Archibald 














2 28 






Kelley, Mary A. 














18 24 






Keyes, J. C. 
















1 93 


1 90 


Kiggen, John 














18 24 






Kiggen, Michael 














41 04 


199 6.1 




Kingston, Thomas 














4 56 




4 56 


Kellogg, Clara VV. 
















7 60 




Kubasch, H. C. VV. 














39 52 






Kuhn, Ernst 














33 44 






Kuhn, Richard E. 














4 56 







73 

Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued-) 



Heal 
Estate. 



Lake, Rlavthi S. 
Lancaster, E. M. . 
Lanahan, Robert 
Lane, Edward . 
Lane, Marcus M. 
Lane, Charles E. 
Laughlin. Mrs. A. L. 
Larson, P. H. 
Lawler, Patrick 
Lawrence, Catherine 
Lead beater, Charles 
Lee, Br dgel 
Leonard, Charlotte 
Leonard, Martin, Est 
Leslie, Charles . 
Leseur, 15. F. 
Lese'ur, Horatio 
Leland, Rice & Co. 
Leverett, J. W. 
Lewis, Mary C. . 
Loomis, Mrs. Jane 
Lovell, Sarah A. 
Lucy, Misses E. M. 
Lucas, Amasa . 



M 

Macomber, Amos 
Macomber, Edward, Estate of 
Macomber, Martha D . 
Maguire, Margaret 
Malionej', Dennis 
Mahoney, Florence 
Mandell, A. A. 
Mannheimer, Herman 
Manslield, Olivia W. . 
Marr, Adaline M. 
Martin, Bridget 
Mason, J. P. 
Mathewson, Jerome . 
Mathews, Praiiz 
McAvoy, J. D. 
McCabe, Patrick 
McCarty.John 
McCormick and O'Brien 
McDonaM, D. A.. 
McOonough, Margaret 
McDonough, John 
McGaw, Robert 
McGilcuddy, John, Estate ot 
McGowau, Thomas 
McKenna, Edward 
McKenna, J. H. 
McKeuzie, Stuart 
McKimley, Hugh 
MeNabb, James 
McMasters, Bernard . 
McMahon, James 
McNaruaia, John 
Meserve, Emily 
Meserve, A. J. 
Meserve, Eliza P. 
Meister, Gusiavus 
Methodist Church Societv 
Mellen, Laura W. 



B26 60 

40 20 
3 04 

20 52 
17 48 

41 04 
41 04 
14 44 
25 08 
34 96 

17 48 
25 84 
33 44 

18 24 
17 48 
6!) 92 
93 48 

38 00 
31 92 

82 08 
36 48 



9 88 
50 16 
48 (14 
13 68 

3 80 

6 84 
21 28 

56 24 
106 40 

7 60 

27 36 
30 40 
59 66 

13 68 
9 12 

68 40 
3 04 
16 72 
30 40 
34 20 

14 44 

24 32 

3 80 
12 16 

12 92 
12 16 

34 20 



41 04 
13 08 
47 88 
19 00 



Per- 
sonal. 



$2 2S 
6 OS 



1 52 

22 80 



15 20 
15 20 



5 32 
1 97 



3 95 

46 
1 52 

3 04 

46 

11 44 



46 



46 

1 97 

2 28 



76 

1 23 

91 

1 97 

2 28 

2 28 



Unpaid. 



$3 04 



41 04 
14 44 



25 84 

33 44 

18 24 

1 52 



33 48 
1 97 



9 8S 



21 74 
1 52 



7 60 
27 36 

13 68 

68 40 
3 04 

30 83 

14 44 
26 29 

76 

13 07 

2 28 

2 28 

41 04 

13 6S 

47 88 



74 

Resident Tax-Payers — { {Continued.) 



Miner, Henry B. 
Morse, Leonard 
Miller, George H. 
Miller, Annie 
Mile-, George . 
Milan, Patrick, Estate of 
Mitchell, Walter B. 
Moody, Mrs. C. H, 
Moody, F. 
Monroe, Fannie B. 
Moselev, K. P. 
Moseky, S. R- 
Morrison, Henry 
Morrison. E. R. 
Mooar, James. F. 
Monahan. James 
Morton, E. J. . 
Morgan, Ira > 
Moulton, Caroline 
Mnlvery, Francis 
Morrow, Eunice 
Mosher, t rederick 
Mu ray, John * 
Murray , Thomas 



Nay, Henry A, 
Nelson, T. L. * 
Newton, R. D. , 
Newell, Mary A. 
Nichols, Nancy H. 
Nightingale, Abbie C. 
Noble, Mark E. 
Norris, W. H. . 
Norling, C. G. * 
Norton, Susan N. 
Noyes, A.N. 
Noyes, Mrs. Hi H. 
Noyes, Geo. W. 
Nye, David B. 



O'Brien, Martin 
t/'Brien, Daniel 
O'Connell, John 
O'Donnell. Edward 
O'Keefe, Thomas 
Olson, Martin 
O'Neal, Arthur 
Orcutt, F. H. S. 
Oir & Butman 



Page, Augustus A. 
Page, E. B. 
Page, Harriet J. 
Partridge, Sewell 
Partridge, Misses C. A. & A 
Payson, J. W". 
Peabody & Co. 
Peabodv, Mary C. 
Peck, Mary Ann 
Pendleton, E. B. 



C. 



Real 
Estate. 



$104 12 

199 12 

57 76 

16 72 

6 OS 

27 36 
25 08 

3 04 
35 72 

4 56 

22 80 
19 70 
34 96 
25 84 

33 82 
31 92 

22 8C 

19 00 
9 12 



10 64 
59 28 
2 28 
98 42 
44 08 

33 44 

25 84 

26 60 

34 20 
9 12 

63 84 
18 24 
13 98 



41 04 

3 04 

25 08 
15 2d 
21 28 
27 36 
30 40 
74 48 



41 80 
54 72 
22 SO 

63 84 
71 44 

10 64 

36 48 
21 28 



Per- 
sonal. 



Unpaids 



$3 04 

!40 92 

3 80 



18 24 



46 
1 52 



45 

48 
76 

2 75 



22 80 

1 90 



3 04 



3 04 

36 48 



75 

Resident Tax-Payers 



{Continued.) 



Perkins, Louisa B. 
Perkins, David 
Perry, Mrs. Ira 
Perry, F> A. 
Pickett, John N. 
Pierce, J. Eddy 
Pierce, George . 
Pierce, Job A» ■. '•, 

Pierce, Ira C. . • . 
Pierce, John 
Pierce, Elizabeth 
Pinchon, Moses . 

Piper. J. Ellery 
Phelps* Henry 
Phelps, Henrv B. 
Phillips, B. E. . 
Phipps, D. W. „ 
Pliimuier, I. U. 
Pollaid, Geo., Estate of 
Poole* William 
Porter, Ira C. * 

Pope, George H., or Hall 
Pothecary, Mrs* H. 
Preide, Thomas M. 
Price, William 
Price, Susan H. k 

Provinsliee, A» W. 
Putnam, S. C. 
Putnam & Bent ■. 



Quimby* J. B» 



R 



Radford, B. F. 
Reader, Henry 
Raynes, John J. 
Reed, Edwin 
Reynolds, S. H. 
Rhodes, C. H. 
Rice, Norman 
Rich, Henry A. 
Rich, Harriet F. 
Rich, A. J. 
Rich, Frank B. 
Richardson, A. P. 
Richardson, George Ij 
Richardson, A.M. 
Richards, Annie F. 
Richards, R. A. 
Riley, Joseph 
Roberts, Edward 
Robinson, John T. 
Rogers, John A., Estate of 
Rogers, William, Estate of 
Rogers, Annie L. 
Rogers, & Denham. 
Rouland, E. R. 
Rogers, Michael 
Roome, David B. 
Roome, W. H. 
Rooney, Patrick 
Rooney, Patrick J. 
Rooney, Mary 
Rooney, Rosa 



Real 
Estate. 



$22 80 

138 84 

44 84 

19 76 

SI 92 

50 16 

1 52 

36 48 

25 84 

3S 00 

13 64 

63 84 

6 C8 

48 64 

1 52 

89 68 

72 96 

71 44 
33 44 
33 44 

31 92 

72 30 

44 08 
31 92 
38 00 
6S 40 

38 76 



44 08 



1<54 16 


62 32 


63 08 


53 20 


42 56 


47 12 


41 04 


91 20 


6 08 


18 24 


4 56 


41 04 


57 76 


226 48 


324 52 


4 56 


56 24 


63 08 


90 44 


71 44 


33 44 



Per- 
sonal. 



$13 68 



1 37 
91 



8 51 



19 76 

22 80 



25 34 
1 52 
1 52 



76 



48 64 



Unpaid. 



40 80 



6 53 

45 60 

3 Ql 



22 80 



1 52 

6 84 

9 50 

40 



$50 16 

37 85 
25 84 

4 14 

63 84 

6 08 

1 52 
76 91 



33 44 

76 



31 92 

38 00 



38 76 



62 32 

63 S>9 
53 20 



41 04 



18 24 


47 57 


226 48 
103 46 


63 08 

1)0 44 



22 80 



24 32 

a 84 

9 50 
26 30 



76 

Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Rooney, Thomas . . 


$21 28 


$1 52 


$22 80 


Kooney, Elizabeth . 






1 52 






•Roundy, S. R. . . - . 






6 84 






Roundy, W. E. 






23 56 






Routley Henry . . . 








3 04 


3 04 


Runnells, L. A. . 






33 44 




33 44 


Russell, D. W. . 








91 20 


91 20 


Russell, Ellen H. 






17 48 






Russell, Ann . 






16 72 




16 72 


Ryan, Isaac L. . 








18 24 




Ryder, Calvin ..... 






75 72 


4 56 




Samuels, Sarah B. . . . 


38-76 




38 76- 


Sanford & Runnells ..... 








31 16 




Sanborn, Mary J. . 








9 12 




Sanders, Catherine, Estate of 






9 12 




9 12 


Savage, E. D. ..... 






47 12 


22 04 




Savage, James F. 






3 04 




3 04 


Savage, Mary E. 






32 68 




32 68 


Saville, Josiah, Estate of 






33 44 






Sawtelle, Mary M. . 






25 84 






Sawtell, Geo. W. 






1 52 






Sawyer, Edwin W. .... 






38 00 




38 '00- 


Sawyer, Daniel .... 






28 88 






Sayer, W. H. .... 






39 52 






Schell, Mrs. E. A. . . 






41 04 






Schofleld, Hannah .... 






22 80 




22 80 


Scott, N. WV ..... 






22 80 






Scott, Rooert ..... 






101 84 




36 87 


Sears & Co. . . ... 








12 16 




Sears, Bartlett .... 






5 32 






Sears, Eben T. .... 






48 64 






Shaw, Mary ..... 






6 84 






Shea, Edward . . . 






10 64 




10 64 


Shea, Annie M. .... 






7 60 






Shea, William ..... 






3 04 






Shea, Cornelius . 








2 43 


2 4» 


Shea, John S. .... 








1 52 


1 52 


Shea, Margaret .... 






48 64 






Sheedy, Daniel . 








3 19 




Sheehan, Bridget .... 






10 64 




10 64 


Sheehan, Dennis .... 








4 56 


4 56 


Smith, Annette C. . 






29 64 




29 64 


Smith, Henry H. 








5 32 




Smith, J. E. 






3 04 


1 52 


4 56- 


Smith, W. A. . 






28 88 




28 88- 


Smith, W. S 








152 00 




Smith, Maria E. 






28 12 




28 12 


Snow, Albert . . . 






26 60 






Snow, Aaron W. .... 








1 52 




Soule, John A. . . . . 






18 24 


12 92 




Soule, W. T. .... 






28 88 




28 88 


Sparrell, W. P. 






62 32 


19 76 




Spring, Charles . . 






165 68 






Spring & Robinson .... 








22 80 




Stack, John . . . . . 






17 48 






Stanley, Miss M. A. . . 








7 60 


7 60 


Stark, Henry C 








12 61 




Stark, Mrs. Mary 






58 52 






Stearns, C. G. . 








5 70 




■ Stevens, Julia A. 






79 04 


5 01 




Stevens, J. N. 






29 64 






Stewart. Joseph .... 






13 £8 




-13 68 


Stockford, H. J. 






27 39 






Stocking, George L. . 






53 20 


7 60 


60 80 



77 

Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal, 


Unpaid. 


Stone, W. P. ....... 


$65 36 


$4 56 




Stone, Jonas, Estate of ..... 




3 04 


$3 U 


Stone, Franklin ...... 


76 00 






Strout, Henry E. ..... 




2 28 


2 28 


Stuart, W. J. . . . . . . . - ■ 


82 08 


88 16 




Sumner, Miss Sally ...... 


469 68 


6 53 




Sumner, W. F. . . . . . 


41 04 






Swallow, E. D. ...... 


41 80 




41 80 


Swan, A. L. ....... 




46 


46 


Swanburg, C. G. T. . 




4 56 




Swanstrum, A. 


27 36 






Sweeney, Patrick ...... 


18 24 




18 24 


Sweeney T. VV. 


26 60 


1 52 




Swett, L. C, Jr. 




4 56 


■4 56 


Swett, L. C. . 




1 52 


1 52 


Swift, T. P 


76 00 


1 52 


39 52 


Swinton, William ...... 


28 S8 






Sykes, Joseph, Estate of .... 


77 52 




77 52 


Sykes, Louisa M. ..... 


44 08 




12 06 


Silvery, George, Estate of . ... 


9 12 




9 12 


Simmons, James ...... 


33 44 , 


12 16 




Simmons, George W. ..... 




3 04 




T 








Tacy, George ....... 


25 84 | 




25 84 


Taylor, P. II. 


33 44 






Tibbetts, Mark ....... 


10 64 






Tibbetts, Ella D. ..... 


23 56 






T.'rry, Jihn . . 


79 80 






Terry, Henry B. ...... 


19 00 | 






Terry, Marion S. ..... 




7 60 




Terry, \bbie A. ..... 




4 56 




Tewksbury, F. W. 


34 20 






Tilden, Edwin ....... 


41 04 






Tilley, Emily . . . . . . . 


16 20 






Tillev, C. M. . 


29 64 




29 64 


Tilton, Eliza T. ...... 


57 76 






Timpeunv, Richard, Estate ot . 


21 28 






Timson, Herbert and Minnie B., .... 


44 84 


65 36 




Timson, Susan 0. and Sarah Foster 


13 68 






Timson, Susan C. ...... 


6{ 84 


27 36 




Tin-ell, Federick N. ..... 


31 92 


2 28 


34 20 


Tnrell, Nathan T. ..... 


29 64 




29 64 


Thompson, Mrs. H. A. B. ..... 


30 40 




30 40 


Thayer, lieorge D. . •■-■'. 


33 44 




33 44 


Tocman, Louis, Jr. ...... 


5 32 




5 3- 


Tower, Harriet L. . . . 


41 04 




41 04 


Towle. Annie E. ..... . 


39 52 






Townsend, George M. ..... 


48 64 






Trainer, Elizabeth ...... 


15 96 






futtle, Annie M. . ..... 


56 24 


46 


56 70 


Tucker, N. H. . . . , 


121 60 






Tuckerman, John H. ...... 


28 88 




28 88 


Tucker, C. H. 


69 92 






Twichell, John M. ...... 


44 08 


3 04 




Tyler, Caroline O. ..... 


32 68 






V 








Underbill, Merrill ...... 


41 04 


3 04 




Utley, It. G., Estate of . . 


47 12 






V 








Va'ughan, C. P. 




12 16 




Virleto, Kebecca, H. . 


63 84 




* 



78 

Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.)") 



NAMES. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid,. 


Vivian, Roxanna . . . .. ^ 


$39 52 




$39 52 


Vose, Sarah & Mary ...... 


66 8S 






Vose, Mary E. ...... 


38 00 






V,ose, B.C. . . 


186 96. 


$3 49. 




W 








Walker,. E. R. . ... 


35 72 






Walker, E. A.. ... ....... 


28- 12 




28 12; 


Wallace, Richard' ... . . ... 


11 40 






Walmsley, Harriett M. ' .„ 


18 24 




IS 24 


Walter„LouisaT. . - ... .. • .. 


86-64 


4 56 




Ward, Waldo F. . . . 


97 28 






Warren,. Daniel, EsSate of ...... 


50 16 


44 08 




Washburn, Eliza G. . ...... 


110 96 


18 70 




Washburn,. Andrew . . ... 


15 20 


48 64 




Webster,, Amos ....... 


127 68- 


2 28 


129 96, 


Webster, Irving C. ..... 


42 56 




42 56.. 


Weimer, John .-«.-. ..... 


12. 16 


1 59. 




Weimer, Annie M. . 


1 52 




1 52, 


Weld, Joseph M. 


32 68 






Weld, Thtwdore D. ..... 


184 68 






Welch, Michael ...... ... 


8 36, 


46 




Wellington, C..W. W. . 


| 41 04 






Wescott,. Edward . .. ... 


. 95 76 


56 24 




Wescott,. Edward J. . . , 


18 24 






Wheeler, George S.. ...... 




15,20 


15 20- 


Wnicher, M. L., Estate of ... 


264 48 


15 20 


279 m- 


Whicher, Nancy ....... 


60 80 






Whitaker, D.. .. . ~ • . 




1 97 




White,,Ann . . .-.,.-. . .. 


15 96 






White, Georgiaima ...... 


31 92 


3.04 


34 96. 


White, J. D. ..... 


27 36 






White, Joseph H.. ..... . ... 


69 92: 






White, Samuel L. ..... 


19 76 






Whitney, E. A. . .. .. ' . 


24 32 




24 32: 


Whitney, A. H. ....... 


34 96 






Whittemore, P.B. ...... 


\ 25 OS 




25 08 


Whititemore, Henry .. .. .. . .. 


| 30 40 






WhittieivA. R. ...... 


■" 174 98 


22 04 


196 .84) 


Whittier, Carrie . .. . . ..... 


7 60 




7 60 


Weisbro I, Simon # ....... 


- 41 04 


6 08 


47 12; 


Wiggin^G«orge t!.. . .. 


31 16 






Wisley, John .. . 


24 32 






Wilder. Joshua . ... . ... 


6 84 


19 76 




Willard, Henry L. 


2 28 


4 56 


6 84; 


Willett, Elizabeth T. ■ ..... 


m 60 


91 20 


47 12- 


Willett,.Joseph, ..... ... 


7 60 


39 52 




Williams. Amanda . ..... 


42 56 


6 03. 




Williams, Mary M. . . . . " . 


! 2128 






Williams, Elizabeth ........ 


31 92 






Williams, F. C. . . . ...... 


i 39 52 






Williams, Phoebe A. . 


15 20 






Williams, John M. ... 


- 82 84 


2 28 


45 60- 


Williams, Kinaldo ...... 


60 80 


2.28 


63 08- 


Wiawall, Julia ...... 


' 13 68 






Winchman, Charles . . . .... 


! 11 40 






Wadsworth, William . .. .. . . 


; 9 12- 






Wood, Joseph . ... - f 


1 31 92 






Wood, E. Frank. . - 


i 68 40 


3 SO- 




Wright,. Richard ....... 


101 08 


3 04 




Wright Eliza H. ......... 


30 40 




ao m 


Wright & Paine, Trustees ....•-. 




109 4* 




Y 








Yeaton, C. H. ... . , 


30 40 






Y,oung, Joshua, Estate of . 


44.08 







NON-RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


A 










Acroyd, Harriett . 


Unknown 


53 20 




$53 20 


Alden, Otis 


Needham 


27 36 






Allen, John 


(Tnknown 


"3 04 




3 04 


American Tool and Machine Co. 


Boston . 


304 SO 


98 SO 




Ames, George H. 


Lowell . 


7 60 




7 60 


Ambler, Francis, Trustee 


Weymouth 


295 <i4 






Anstan, David 


Readfleld 


6 08 




6 08 


Arnold, Sarah H., Estate of 


Unknown 


28 88 






Ayer, Ezra C. . . . 


Unionville 


44 OS 






Atkinson , Robert 

B 
Badger, Thomas H ... 


Providence, R.I. 


2S 88 




28 88 


Boston . 


16 72 




16 72 


Badger, Mary C. . , 


Boston . 


22 04 




22 04 


Badger, Mrs. M. A. 


Maiden . 


1 90 






Bailey, A. H. . . . 


Soinerville 


3 04 






Bailey, D. W. 


Washington, D. C. 


2S 88 




28 8S 


Baker, Michael A. 


South Dartmouth 


6 08 






Baker, Alice T . . . 


Boston . 


31 16 






Baldwin. Amelia . 


Boston . 


65 36 




21 28 


Baldwin & Webster 


Boston . 


201 78 




201 7S 


Bancroit, George 


Boston . 


76 00 






Barnard, Henry 


South Ware, Me. 


1 52 






Barnes, Ward is Co. 


Boston . 


1 52 






Barnwell, John 


Valley Falls, R.I. 


3 04 






Barry, Laura B. . 


Geneva. N. Y. . 


49 40 






Barney, J. O. 


Unknown 


51 68 




4 56 


Bartle'tt, Elkemih . 


Plymouth 


18 24 




18 24 


Barton, Hannah 


Cambridge Port 


13 68 






Bartlett, Mrs. H. f. 


Boston . 


25 84 






Bass, Charles H. 


Unknown 


33 44 




33 4t 


Beemis, Sarah (J. 


Brockton 


38 00 






Bell, Catherine 


Hyde Park 


12 16 






Bell, John 


Uedhani 


3 04 






Billings, W. H. . - - 


Waipole 


44 84 






Binney, Matthew 


Boston . 


' 60 80 






Bishop, Jane 


Boston . i 


11 40 






Blake, r arjient and J. R. Churci ill 


Boston . . 


76 00 






Blake, A. P. Trustee 


Boston . 


19 76 






Blake, J. R. ... 


Boston . 


3 04 




3 04 


Black, George N., Trustee 


Boston . 


106 4u 






Bolton Charles S. 


Boston . 


17 42 






Bowles, Ellen T. 


Boston . 


5 32 




5 32 


Bo wen, Hosea B. 


Boston - 


45 60 




45 60 


Bonnell, II. C. . . 


Dedbam 


IS 00 






Boyd, Samuel 


Booth Bay, Me. 


1 52 






Boyden, E. & C. E. . 


Worcester 


41 80 






Boyden, Mary I>. 


Unknown 


25 84 






Boston & Providence R. R. Co. 


Boston . 


506 02 






Bracl.ett, F. B. 


Boston . 


1 52 






Bradlee, J. Walter 


Milton . 


57 76 






Branncn, James . 


Jamaica Plain . 


12 16 




12 16 


Brackelt, S. E. 


Unknown 


45 60 




45 60 


Bradhurv, S. A, 


San Francisco, Cal. 


256 12 






Bradlee, Catherine C. 


Milton , 


3 8J 






Bragan, Thomas P. 


Boston . 


26 60 






Brazier, W. S. . . 


Unknown 


25 08 




25 C8 


Brenner, Christian. . , 


Unknown 


3 04 






Brett, Eveline F. 


Unknown . 


6 08 







80 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Brewer, E. J. 
Brewer, Cyrus 
Brigss, Sarah M. . 
Brooks, Mrs. S. C. 
Brooks & Converse 
Brostram, Andrew J 
Brown, Mary Jane 
Brown, James VV. . 
Brown, Amos 
Brown, B. F. 
Brown, B.J. . 
Bryant, Nancy A. 
Buchan, Thomas . 
Buckminster. E. T. 
Burgess Orvis 
Burns, G. VV. 
Bui lingame, Benj. 
Burke, John 
Butler, Fannie S. Estate 
Brooks, Annie F. 
BYancha.nl, S. S. . 
Barney, G-orge T. 



Campbell, Lucy A. 

Campbell, James 

Capen, E.N. 

Ca'pen.E. VV. 

Capen, Samuel J., Estate of 

Carpenter E. B. . 

Carbon, Edward E. 

Carlion, Hiram 

C irr A. VV. 

( arty, Peter 

Caulaeld, Bridget . 

Chamberlain. Charles E. 

Chamberlain, C. E. 

Chandler, Emeline N. 

Chase, Ella A. 

Chase, Waldo 

Cneney, Horace R. Estate of 

Churchill, Asiph . 

Churchill, J. R. & Asaph 

Churchill, J. R. . 

Churchill C. C. . 

Churchill, C S. . 

Cilley & Stimson 

Clap|j, Elizabeth . 

Clark, Henry 

Clark, L. C. 

Cobb, Mis. Eben 

Colby;. J.. F. 

Colburn, James . 

Colburn, Allen 

Colburn, Howard. 

Colburn, Waldo . 

Co e, Charles A. 

Cochran, Samuel Q. 

Coffin, John VV. . 

Coffin, C. H. 

Coleman, Endicott & Stone 

Coleman, George VV. . 

Coleman, Lewis . 

Codman, Henry, Estate of 

Conant, J. S. 

Como, Franklin 



RESIDENCE. 



Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston „ 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston 
Boston 
Newton . 
Boston 
Canada . 
Hyde Park 
E. Kochester, N 
Boston 
Bedford . 
Med lord . 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Boston 
Boston . 



Boston . 
Boston 
Boston . 
Milton 
Dorchester 
Providence, R. 
Norwood 
Woods Hole 
Franklin 
Hyde Park 
Boston 
Boston . 
Worcester 
Boston . 
Dedham . 
I « dham . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Dedham . 
Dedham . 
Boston 
Dorchester 
Boston . 
Hyde Park 
Hyde Park 
Boston . 
Dedham . 
Dedham . 
Dedham . 
Dedham . 
Scituate . 
Boston- . 
Unknown 
Newbury port 
Dedham . 
Boston . 
Bos on . 
Boston 
Boston . 
Bellsvous Cove,NY. 



Real 
Estate. 



$10 64 
31 92 
12 16 
19 76 
27 S6 
22 04 
21 28 
21 28 

9 12 
10 64 
34 96 
19 00 

1 52 
27 36 

3 04 

3 04 
15 20 

1 52 

2 2S 
31 16 
31 92 
41 80 



28 88 
18 24 

76 

11 40 
25 84 

3 04 

12 16 
12U 16 

31 96 

24 32 
2 28 

29 64 
7 60 

4 56 

4 56 
14 44 

7- 60 

30 40 
18 24 

25 88 

6 08 

7 60 
77 52 

5 32 

2 66 

3 04 
34 96 
17 48 
27 36 
47 S8 

17 48 

18 24 
So 12 
39 52 
33 44 

104 88 
1 52 
54 72 
3 04 
3 04 
38 00 
3 04 



Per 
sonal. 



Unpaid. 



$ 10 64 



9 12 



1 52 

2 28 
31 16 
31 92 



25 84 
12 16 



34 96 
24 32 



29 64 



7 60 
30 40 
18 24 

28 88 



3 04 



17 48 
27 36 



3 04 

38 00 



81 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Connell, John 

Connolly, Martin J. 

Connolly, Eliza 

Connell, Patrick . 

Connor, Mary C. . 

Converse, B. B. 

Convvav, Hiram 

Cony, Mary, Estate of 

Cook, H. P. 

Coolidge, Mary 

Corcoran, W. J. 

Costello, W. C. 

Cothell, Joan J. 

Cofhell, John R. . 

Cripps. M. A. 

Crowell, Edmund . 

C'rowell, Albert or Pratt 

Crowningshield, B. W., Trustee 

Crumpler, Arthur . 

Cummings, Louisa F. 

Cunane, William . 

Cunningham, Mary E.. 

Curtis, James W. . 

(Jushiug & Ladd . 

D 

Dalton,John 
Damon, Harriet A. 
Davis, E. P, 
Davis, Amanda A. 
Davis, Sarah J. 
Davis, Mrs. A. P. . 
Davenport & Foster 
Day, Ida L. 
Dearborn, S. G. 
Dedham Savings Bank 
Dexter & Haven 
Denny, H. G., Trustee 
Dill, T. R. 
Doane & Murray . 
Dodge, Annie F. . 
Doe, Edgar J. 
Donahue, Patrick . 
Dorchester, Second Church 
Downes, VV. E. 
Dowd, John J. 
Dorchester Savings, Bank 
Dowse, Amos W. . 
Draper, Mary A. . 
Drew, J. F. 
Duulap, Martin 
Durell, H. G.. Estate of 
Durgin, Obediah . 
Doyle, Austacia 

E 

Eastman, George A. 
Eastman, J. S. 
Eastman, J. B. 
East Boston Savings Bank 
Eaton, A inert S. . 
Edsou, Nathaniel . 
Ell is, John 
Ellis. Fred A. 
Eldridge, Daniel 



KESIDEXCE. 



Unknown 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Jamaica Plain 
Boston . 
Boston . 
So. Boston 
Hyde Park 
Boston . 
Chelsea . 
Haverhill 
Hingham 
Boston . 
Fall River 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Hyde Park 
Boston . 
Groveland 
Dover, N. H. 
Boston . 
Boston . 



Framingham 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Nashua, N. H. 
Dedham 
Boston . 
Boston . 
No. Britton 
Hyde Park 
Philadelphia 
Provincetown 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Jamaica Plain 
Unknown 
Dorchester 
Lowell . 
Jamaica Plain 
Boston . 
Roxbury 
Dorchester 
Saco, Me. 
Boston . 



Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
WaRham 
Med field 
Washingion, D 
Boston . 



Real 
Est ate. 



$51 68 
1 52 
51 8 
3 04 
3 SO 
33-44 
•1 52 

1 52 
36 48 
24 32 

3 04 
3 04 

2 28 
28 12 

3 04 
89 OS 
10 64 
45 60 

7 6(1 

35 72 
6 08 

17 48 

36 4S 
3 SO 



3 04' 
34 90 

3.04 
1 52 
24 32 
36 18 
21 32 
50 16 
27 36 
70 6S 
61 56 
83 60 

4 56 
6! 08 
32 OS 
47 12 

9 12 
6 46 
14 44 
27 36 
47 12 
129 20 
30 40 
34 20 
1 52 
41 80 
34 96 
20 52 



44 84 
72 96 
83 60 
100 32 
40 28 

3 04 
72 20 
50 16 

3 04 



Per- 
sonal. 



Unpaid. 



22 80 



$16 72 

51 68 
3 04 



3 04 



28 12 
3 04 



17 48 



3 04 
34 96 



24 32 

36 48 



4 56 

47 12 



43 93 



72 20 
50 16 



82 



Non-Resident Tax-Payees — (Continued.) 



Emigrant Savings Bank 
Emmons, Mary B. 
Eugiehardt & Rosyln 
Esterbrook, Rufus 
Ewins, Margaret . 

F 

Fabyan, Abbie M. 

Fairbanks, J. A. . 

Fairbanks, John R. 

Farrar, J. H 

Farrington, W. S: . 

Farrington, Mary and Eliza 

Fav, W. H. 

Ferry, E. B. 

Ferry, Rhoda 

Fessenden & Crane 

Fineld, W. 

First National Bank of Hyanni 

Fisher, George, Trustee 

Fisher, Clarissa 

Fiske, Samuel C. . 

Fiske, David 

Fitzpatrick, James 

Fitzpatrick, William 

Flagg, S. S. 

Flint, Charles L. . . 

Flint, Francis 

Fogg, Roxanna 

Ford, James 

Fos'ter, George E. . 

Foster, Ruehael 

Foster, James 

Fowler, W. C. 

Foxboro Savings Bank 

Foye, Ada A. 

Frost, Geoige II. 



Galligher, Daniel F. 
Gerry, C. F. 
Giles, Deltina 
Giles, A. W. 
Giles, George S. 
Gil. s, Oiville 
Gillingham, Albert 
Gill, Dominick 
Gilmau, Charles H. 
Gladwin. Dolly H 
Gleason, Josiah B. 
Glover & VVilcomb 
Gooch, John B. 
Gould, Simon 
Greeley, John H. 
Green, Charles G. .. 
Green, Reuben 
Greenhood, Mary . 
Greenlow, J. P. 
Griffin, P. J. 
Guilford, Bridget . 
Gunnison, W. S. 
Gurney, Silas 



RESIDENCE. 



Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Newton . 
Hyde Bark 



Boston . 
Melrose . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Salem, N.H. 
Dedham 
Chester . 
Milton . 
iMilton . 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Hyannis . 
Hyde Park 
liosiindale 
St. Albans, Vt. 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Littleton 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Portsmouth, N 
Boston 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Dorchester 
Unknown 
Foxboro'.. 
Lynn 
Neponset 



Boston . 
Sudbury 
Indian Orchard 
Detroit, Mich. 
Wiuthrop 
Weymouth 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Lexington 
Boston . 
Unknown 
Walpole 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Unknown 
E. Dedham 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Unknown 
Hyde Park 
Boston . 



Real 

Estate. 



$46 36 
18 24 
27 :;6 
in 64 
95 00 



31 16 

3 04 
7 60 

32 68 

4 56 
15 20 

39 52 

2 28 

3 04 
3 80 
3 04 

80 56 

43 32 

3 04 

53 96 

18 24 

1 52 

1 52 

124 64 

62 32 

25 84 

47 12 

40 28 
25 S4 
30 40 
30 40 

1 52 

126 16 

13 68 

7 60 



4 56 
124 64 

3 04 
22 80 
38 76 
30 40 

7 60 

3 04 
54 72 
16 72 
34 96 
310 08 
19 76 
12 16 
41 04 

11 40 
34 96 
25 84 
16 72 

12 92. 
2 28 

33 44 
7 60 



Per- 
sonal 



203 68 



Unpaid. 



$27 36 
10 64 



2 28 



2 28 

3 04 
3 80 
3 04 


53 9H 
18 24 
1 52 
1 52 



30 40 
1 52 



13 68 
7 60 



54 72 
16 72 
34 96 

19 76 
12 16 



34 96 
25 84 
18 72 

2 28 
39 52 



83 



Non-Residknt Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 







NAMES. 


KESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


H 










Hail, George, Estate of . 


Providence, E.I. 


$554 04 






ilaines, C. O. 






Dedham 


1 52 






Hale, Sarah F. ' . 






Brockton 


49 40 






Hall, Eliza M. 






Milton 


6 08 






Hall, Joseph E. . 






Milton . 


08 






Halliilay, George W. 






Boston . 


38 VQ 




$38 00 


Ham, Joseph 






Koxburv 


7 60 






Hammetc. Charles 






Med field 


49 40 






Hapgood, Lyman S. 






Boston . 


15 20 






Hapgood, Salome H. 






Boston . 


5 02 






Haradon, E. E. 






Unknown 


9 12 






Hartwell, W. li. . 






E. Cambridge . 


12 92 




12 92 


Haitwell & -Telts . 






K. Cambridge . 


38 00 




3S 00 


Haskell, B. B. 






Wilmington, Conn. 


21 28 




21 28 


Haskell & Lul'kjn 






Unknown 


10 64 




10 64 


lialton, Emma E. . 






E. Pembrook, Me. 


28 12 






Haven, Frank 






Unknown 


10 (i4 




10 64 


Havden, Henry C. 






Boston . 


44 08 




44 08 


Hayden, Hannah B. 






Unknown 


GO 80 






Hayward, llenrv . 






Unknown 


1 52 




1 52 


Harmon, J. W. ' . 






Boston . 


3 04 






Henshaw, F. H. . 






Boston . 


17 48 






ffeustis, Warren 






Belniont 


37 24 




37 24 


Hewins Harriet 






Hyde Park 


44 08 






Higgius, Solomon It. 






Welltteet 


33 44 






Hodges, Gamaliel 






Boston . 


40 28 






Hodges A. S. 






Unknown 


26 60 






Hodges, Samuel 






Boston . 


1 52 






Hollingsworth, Z. T. 






Boston . 


322 24 






Holland, William A. 






Boston 


7 60 






Holmes, R. G. 






Boston 


16 72 






Hood Hesmione 






Boston . 


15 96 




15 96 


lloxie, Timothy W. 






Boston . 


li7 04 






Hunt, Lueie:> 






Falmouth 


7 (10 






Hunt, Rebecca T. 






Soinerville 


29 G4 






Humphrey, James 






Weymouth 


117 04 






filiated, J. 15. 






Unknown 


44 OS 




44 OS 


Hutchins, H. C. 






Unknown 


4 56 




4 56 


Hutchins & Wheeler 






Boston . 


30 40 




30 40 


Hutchinson, Elizabeth 






Unknown 


33 44 






Jackson, Robert 


Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Joi'nson, R. A. 






Boston . 


3t 96 




34 96 


Jones, Edward J. . 






Boston . 


6 08 






Judge, J. D. & * o. . 






H de Park 




$22 80 




Josslyn, Aodie M. 






Unknown 


33 44 




33 44 


K 










Kaufman & Josephy 




New York City 


41 04 






Karcher, Michael . 






jW, Roxbury 


3 04 




3 04 


Keene, Mali am 






aDedham 


2 28 






Kelley, George W. 






Washington, D. C. 


3 04 




3 04 


Kelley, James : 






Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Kelley, Thomas 






Boston . 


25 08 






Kelley, William 






Lowell . 


13 63 






Ken n aid, George F. 






Unknown 


3 04 






King, Mary J. , 






Lynn 


19 00 




19 00 


Kingman, R. P. 






Brockton 


34 20 






Kingsley, E. G. 






Boston . 


1 52 






Kingsbury, Jesse F. 






Boston . 


17 48 






Knowles, H. W. . 






Chicago, 111. 


50 16 


i 


50 16 



84 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Ileal 

Estate. 


Per 

sonal. 


Uii|>ai|}. 


i, 










Lane, Frank A. 


Boston . 


£59 28 






Lane, Peter 






Boston . 


4 56 






Lawrence, Marianna P. 






Boston . 


50 92 






Lang, Benjamin J. 






Unknown 


18 24 




18 24 


Leach, Ellen P. and Sara 


h F. 




Boston . 


50 16 






Lenfest, Mary G. . 






Boston . 


6 08 






Leonard, William ■ 






Boston . 


31 92 






Leverett, George W. 






Boston . 


31 96 






Lewis, J. C. 






Holyoke 


51 72 




4 56 


Lewis, Isaac 






Dorchester 


15 20 






Libby.G. W. 






Marlboro' 


11 40 






Lingren, Swan 






Unknown 


16 72 




HI 72 


Litcli, James P. 






Maiden . 


11 40 




11 40 


Litch, Samuel W. 






Maiden . 


14 44 




14 44 


Litclilield, John H. 






Boston . 


10 64 






Littlelield. Abbie 






Unknown 


3 80 




3 80 


Loring, David 






Unknown 


3 80 




3 80 


Loring, Christiana W. R 






Unknown 


22 80 






Loud, John J. 






Weymouth 


39 52 






Loud, Emily V. 






Weymouth 


m 52 






Loud, Martha B. . 






Weymouth 


51 (i8 






Loud, J. W. Estate of 






Weymouth 


71 44 






Lovell, John P. 






Boston . 


41 04 






Lyforrl, Thomas J. 






Boston . 


7 60 






Lyiord, By ley 






Bangor, Me. 


42 56 




42 56 


Lynch, William 






Jamaica Plain . 


6 08 






Lyon, John 






Boston . 


25 84 




25 81 


M 










Mndigan, Ellen J. 


Boston . 


37 24 






Maguire, Richard 






Boston . 


24 32 






Mahoney, John 






Boston . 


15 23 






Mm honey, John 






Boston . 


12 16 






Mallou, Mrs. M. D. 






Weymouth 


28 12 






Mann, Alexander 






Charlestown 


9 12 






Mann, H. V. 






Eastern, Md. . 


153 52 






Marshall, J, H. . 






Boston . 


2 28 






Martin, Eliza 






Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Maxim. Jane 






Unknown 


7 60 






Mayo, C. H. 






Wellesley 


56 24 




56 21 


Mayo, Mrs. E. S. . 






New York City 


33 44 






MeCallum, James 






Jamaica Plain . 


2 28 




2 28 


McClaffee, Ann 






St. Louis 


3 04 




3 01 


McCormack, Thomas 






Boston . 


112 48 




112 48 


McDowell, Jane . 






Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


McElroy, John 






Boston . 


3 04 




3 04 


Mc.Leod, John 






Unknown 


3 04 






MeN ally. Ann 






Jamaica Plain . 


6 08 






McNulty, Ellen 






Dorchester 


22 80 






MeLaughlin, Daniel 






Boston . 


2 28 






Mead, Albert 






Boston . 


27 36 






Melladieu, George . 






Boston . 


9 88 






Merriain, F. P. 






Danvers 


27 38 






Merriam & Philbrook, 






Boston . 


31 92 




31 92 


Merrill, William . 






Boston . 


3 81" 






Meserve, Sarah W. 






Carlton . 


45 6i) 






Mercantile Savings Bank 






Boston . 


2325 6S 




363 86 


Metr. politan Land Co. 






Boston . 


10 80 




60.80 


Mills, James C. 






Bosion . 


4 56 






Miller, Amos H. 






Boston . 


3 04 






Miller, Ella E. 






Boston . 


102 60 




102 60 


Monigan, John 






Berry Mills 


1 52 






Monroe, C. W. 






E. Cambridge . 


12 16 






Moore, John W. 






B6ston . 


1 52 







Non-Residbkt Tax- Paters — (Continued) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Moore, Mrs. E. J. 


Boston . 


1 52 






Moreiand, D. S. . 


Unknown 


12 1(5 




12 16 


Morgan, Sarah E. 


Boston . . 


12 92 




12 92 


Morse, E.J. VV. . 


South Eastou . 


3 04 






Morse, Leonard . 


Hyde Park 


199 12 210 92 




Morse, Luther, Estate of 


Dedham . 


38 






Morton, Joseph, Estate of 


Mil ton . 


81 92 






Moylan, Michael . 


Unknown 


3 04 




3 04 


Mullen, John 


Jamaica Plain . 


1 52 






Mullen, Robert 


Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Mungan, Margaret 


Groveland 


48 64 






Murphy, Thomas . 
N 
Nantucket Savings Bank 


E. Dedham 


3 80 






Nantucket 


80 56 






Neal, Alonzo F. . 


Boston . 


40 28 




40 28 


Nelson, Thomas 


Boston • 


60 04 






Newhall, Horatio . 


Melrose 


18 24 






Newhall, Mrs. S. E. 


Unknown 


1 52 




1 52 


Newhall, Henry B. 


Unknown 


30 40 




SO 40 


N. Y. & N. E. R. R. Co. 


Boston . 


322 24 


45 60 




Nolan, J. F. ... 


Dedham . 


3 (-0 




3 80 


Nolan, James 


Dorchester 


3 80 






Norling, Franz E. . 


Boston . 


30 40 




30 40 


Northern Baptist Society 


Boston . 


7 b0 




7 M) 


Norwood, Lucy C. 


Lynn 


3 80 




3 80 


Nott, Gordon H. 


Ciiicago HI. 


6 08 




6 08 


Nott, Margaret 


Saco, Me. 


68 40 




68 40 


Newman, A. Parker 

O 
Odiorne, Thomas C. 


Unknown 


7 BO 




7 60 


Boston . 


16 72 




16 72 


Osgood, John C. . 

P 

Paine, Frederick N. 


Salem 


42 56 






Mansfield 


11 02 






Palmer, Susan A. . 


Charlestown 


25 08 






Papauti, Augustus 


Unknown 


24 32 




24 32 


Parker, Banjaniin VV. 


Boston . 


53 20 






Parker, George J., Estate of 


Boston . 


4 56 






Parker, M. VV. . 


Boston . 


1 52 






1'arker, H. F. 


Weymouth 


1 90 






Parmlee, Loring G. , 


Unknown 


42 56 






Pattee, VV. S. . . . 


Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Patterson, George 0. 


Unknown 


2 2S 




2 28 


Paul, Ebenezer 


Dedham . 


11 40 






Paul, Joseph P. 


Boston . 


27 36 






Pearsons, John 


Boston . 


42 56 






Peavey,F. M. 


Boston . 


35 72 






Peck, Phuj'ie VV. . 


Somerville 


15 20 






Perkins, Ezra G., Estate of 


Unknown 


144 40 






People's Ice Co. 


Boston . 


76 00 






Perrv, Baxter E. . 


Boston , 


28 88 






Peel, Elizabeth P. 


Unknown 


74 48 




74 48 


Peterson, Olive 


Boston . 


28 12 






Pierce, J. . . . . 


Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Pierce, John 


Boston . 


59 28 






Pierce, Samuel B. . 


Boston . 


12 16 






Pierce, Nichols and Crafts, Trustee 


5 Boston . 


39 52 






Pfaff, William . 


Boston . 


36 48 






Pratr, Edmund T, . 


Boston . 


2U9 76 






Pratt, Isaac, Jr. 


Boston . 


161 88 






Pratt, Aaron B. 


Boston . 


36 48 






Pratt, Laban 


Boston 


54 72 







86 



Non-Resident Tax-Papers — (Continued.) 



NAJIES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpapi. 


Pvescott, Mrs. S. E. 


Boston . . 


$33 44 






Proctor, Thomas P. 


Boston . . 


74 48 




66 68 


Putnam, John 


Boston . 


29 64 




29 64 


Q, 










Quigley, Mary J. . 


Boston . 


1 52 






Qiiim by, Monroe T. 


Boston . 


101 84 






Quincy Savings Bank 


Quincy . 


459 04 






R 










Radwin, C. W. 


Med ford . . 


45 60 






Ranlett, D. D. 




Boston . 


33 44 






Ray.M.L. 






Melrose . 


2 28 




2 28 


Kay-, Margaret 






Unknown 


21 '28 






>■ ay, Ellen F. 






Mediield 


7 60 




7 60 


Raymond, Lucy A. 






Bath, Me. 


3 04 




3 04 


Raymond, A. 






Dedham 




36 48 


36 48 


Reed, Charles 






Boston b 


41 80 






Reed, Hammond . 






Brookfield 


45 00 




45 60 


Rhoades, A. FT. 






Boston . 


71 44 






Richards, L. A. 






Unknown . . 


6 08 




6 08 


Richards, George E. 






Unknown 


13 68 




13 €8 


Richards, Daniel . 






Unknown 


21 28 






Richards, Joseph R. 






Danvers . 


12 16 






Richards, Austin S. 






Danvers. 


9 12 






Richardson, Lucretia T 






Boston . 


1 52 




1~52 


Rich, Mary B. 






Boston . . 


22 80 




22 80 


Rich, R. K. 






Boston . 


47 12 






Ridgway, Edwin W. 






Boston . 


50 16 






Ringer, Susan 






Bos on . 


1 52 






Risk, Margaret J. . 






Boston . 


25 >4 






Robinson, B. Frank 






St. Albans 


21 28 




21 23 


R"binson , Benj. F. 






St. Albans 


30 40 




30 40 


Robinson, Frank F. 






Boston . 


(16 12 




60 12 


Robinson, Charles, Jr. 






Boston , 


51 68 






Robbing, Royal E. 






Unknown 


65 36 




65 36 


Rollins, James W. 






Souil) Boston . 


100 32 






Rollins, James M. 


, 


Cambridge 


15 20 






Ryan, Margaret J. 


' 


Boston - 


25 84 






Saco & Biddeford Savings Bank 


Saco, Me. 


325 28 






Safford, A.. H. 


Boston . . 


19i) 00 






Safford, N. F. 






Boston . 


42 56 




42 56 


Subline, David H. 






New York 


19 00 






Sampson, Mehitable B. 






Boston . 


10 72 




16 72 


Santord, MissE. A. 






Boston . ,» 


68 40 






Saulsbury. Jotham 






Weymouth 


68 40 






Senile, Lauriston . 






Boston . 


7 60 






Schk'singer, S. B. 






Boston . 


57 76 




57 76 


Scott, E. A. 






Boston . 


44 OS 






Scrannage, Matthew . 






Boston . 


12 16 






Seaver, Jac< b W, 






Boston . 


5 70 




5 70 


Sewall & Uop/es, Triibtccfr 






Boston . 


41 80 






Simonds, W. C. • . 






Newport ?,. T . 


4 56 






Simonds, Susan M. 






Newpoit, K. i. . 


39 52 






Sharp, J. C. 






Dm cheater 


1 52 






Shattuck, George M. 






Gi'oton . 


9 12 




9 12 


Shaw, Joseph P. . 






Boston . 


3 04 






Shaw, C. C. 






Palmer . 


73 72 






Shaw, Lydia A. 






E. Somerville . 


30 40 






Shaw, Thomas 






Boston . 


32 68 




32 68 


Shaw & Shattuck, Trustees 




Boston . 


144 40 






Snepard, N. F. . 


* 


Dedham 


3 04 







87 



Non-Hesident Tax-Payks — {Continued.') 



NAMES. 






RESIDENCD. 


Real 

Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Shepard, Sarah B. . . 


Milton 


$76 00 






Shute, James M. . 






Boston ■. 


106 40 






Slater, Perley 






Boston . 


47 88 






Smallage, Matthew 






Unknown 


7 60 




7 69 


Smith, Annette <J. 






Unknown 


31 i)2 




31 92 


Smith, Charles W, 






Boston . 


17 48 






Smith, George M. 






Medfield 


28 88 






Smith, Harriet and Ellen 


F. 




Dedham . 


18 24 






Smith, J. A. 






Unknown 


12 92 




12 92 


Smith, 0. A. 






Unknown 


3 04 




3 04 


Smithlield Mf'g Co. 






Hyde Park 


756 SJ6 


486 40 




Sneeder, Ed ward O. 






Boston . 


•33 44 




33 44 


Snyder, C. P. 






Boston -. 


30 40 




30 40 


South worth, Mason W. 






Wakefield 


88 16 






Spaulding, Reuben 






Worcester 


"21 28 






Spooner, W. H> 






Unknown 


30 40 






Stan wood, J. C. 






Boston . 


34 20 






Stark, Mary 






Unknown 


1 52 




1 52 


Steadmau and Davy 






Boston . 


42 56 






Stevens, Elizabeth. 






Boston . 


259 92 






Stevens, Elizabeth W. 






Boston . 


98 80 




98 80 


Stevenson, Charles E. 






Boston . 


22 80 






Stevenson, Mary F. 






Boston . 


76 






Stevens, Albeit G. 






Waipole 


33 44 






Stoddard, Hannah W. 






Boston . 


34 20 






Stoddard, Richard, 






Brocktx)n 


49 40 




49 40 


Stone, Jeunie G. . 






GeVtaauy 


12 16 




12 16 


Story, J. C. 






Boston . 


30 40 




30 40 


Straw, J. B. 






Boston . 


52 44 




52 44 


Sullivan, Margaret. 






Unknown 


3 04 




3 04 


Sumner, M. P. 






Unknown 


30 40 




30 40 


Taft, Samuel 


Holliston . 


66 88 






Talbot, Miss M. B. 




Dorenester 


2 2o 






Taylor, George B. 




Boston . 


34 20 






Taylor, John B. . 




Boston . 


31 16 






Tewlisbury, P. H. 




Lawrence 


1 52 






Thompson, Asa 




Mattapan 


S6 64 






Thompson, Charles, Estate of. 




Boston . 


38 00 






Thompson, C. S. . 




Boston . 


1 52 






Thompson, Humphrey , 




Unknown 


3 04 




3 04 


Thomdike, James. 




Boston . 


9 12 






Thorndike, Sarah W. 




Boston . 


51 68 




51 68 


Tileston & Hollingsworth 




Boston . 


42S 64 


684 00 




Terrell, George W. 




Unknown 


6 08 




6 08 


Tobey , J.J. 




Boston . 


4 56 






Tobey, Susannah H. 




At hoi 


20 52 






Todd, Robert M. 




Milton . 


41 (14 






Toleman, Nathaniel 




Unknown 


54 72 






Torrey, Everett 




Boston . 


23 56 






Tower, Isaac H. . 




Reidville 


63 84 






Towne, W.J 




Boston . . 


68 40 






Townsend, Eliza , 




Saugus . 


3 04 






Treseott, Ebenezer, Estate of 




Bangor . 


38 






Trow, Thomas F. 




Unknown 


16 72 






Tucker Dana, Estate of . 




Milton 


68 40 






Tucker, Elijah 




Milton . 


43 32 






Tucker, C. H. 




Milton 


30 40 






Tucker, James 




Milton 


38 00 






Tucker, Nathan 




Mjlton . 


18 24 






Tucker, S. A. 




Milton . 


19 76 






Tucker, Mary T. . 




Milton 


25 84 






Tucker, Mis. Timothv 




Milton 


15 20 






Tun-ell, Elizabeth Ml 




Milton . 


33 44= 




33 44 


Turaer, R. W. . ~ . 




Boston . 


31/ 12 




83 64 



88 



Non-Residrnt Tax- Paters— {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Real 
Estate. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Unpaid. 


Turner, John H. . 


Unknown 


$4 56 




$4 56 


Twombley, Albert T 


Milton . 


57 76 






Tyler, W. B. . , 
V 

Union Institution for Savings . 


Uuknovvn 


65 36 






Boston . 


69 92 




69 92 


Utley, Joseph 

V 
Vanderlip, W. C. 


Boston . 


1 52 






Boston . 


51 68 




51 68 


Ventres, \V. H. H. 


Boston . 


22 80 






Vivian, Ann 


Hyde Park 


tl 36 




27 36 


Vose, Joshua 


Milton . 


38 00 






Vose, John 


Milton . 


25 84 






Vose, . Heirs of 


Milton . 


30 40 






W 










Wadsworth, Thomas T. 


Milton . 


30 40 






Wakefield, E. H . 


Cambridge 


76 00 




39 55 


Walter, E. P. . . 


Unknown 


29 64 




29 64 


Webster, Stephen 


Boston . 


2 28 






Weld, Aaron D. ■ . 


Boston . 


1 52 






Weldon, John A. 


Boston . 


18 24 






Weller, Annie E. . 


Boston . 


1 52 




1 52 


Wellington, Henry W. . 


Boston . 


146 68 




146 68 


Wellman, Martin J. - . 


Unknown 


1 52 




1 52 . 


Weeman, William. E. Estate of. 


Boston . 


3 80 






Wetherell, Abigail B. 


Newton . 


29 64 






White, Amos S . 


Weymouth- 


15 20 






White, Benj. F. 


Boston . 


110 96 






White, E. P. 


New York 


3 80 




3 80 


White, George 


Unknown 


9 12 






White, Catherines. 


Boston . 


1 52 






White, Howard 


Nebraska. 


. 3 04 






VVhittmgton, Alfred ' 


"Unknown 


9 12 






Whitceiuore, C. S. 


Ko&ton . 


34 96 






Whittemore, C. S. 


Boston . 


25 84 




34 96 


Whitehead, Joseph 


Saugus . 


3 04 




25 84 


Whitney, Joseph . 


E. Somerville . 


1 52 






Whitney, A Ivan 


Clinton . 


3 i'4 






Wightman, L. (J. Trustee 


Boston 


20S 24 






Wild, Joseph A. . 


Amesbury 


7 60 






Wilder, Hannah . 


Unknown 


38 76 






Wilder. John 


Cambridge 


1 52 






Willard, Huldah 


Boston 


48 G4 






Williams', John J. . 


Boston . 


129 20 




48 64 


Wilkins, E..I. 


Unknown 


1 52 




1 52 


Winch Brothers 


Boston . 


49 40 






Wise, Henry 


Unknown 


1 52 




152 


Wilhington, George 


Boston . 


31 92 






Wogan, John T. 


Boston . 


26 60 






Woods, George W., Estate of . 


Unknown 


18 21 






Woods, Mrs. William 


Maynard 


12 92 




12 92 


Woodard & Brown 


Boston . 


12 92 






Woodard, James H. . . . 


North Cambridge 


6 08 






Woodarcl, Maria L. 


Unknown 


33 44 




33 44 


Wright, A. W. 


Hyde Park 


323 76 




323 76 


Wright, Isaac L. 


Boston 


4 56 





REPORT OP SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 

FOR SCHOOL YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 3l8T, 1879. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : — 

The School Committee of this Town respectfully submit 
the following as their annual report : — 

ORGANIZATION OF COMMITTEES. 

For conveniency and efficiency Sub-Committees were or- 
ganized at the first meeting of the year, viz. : — 
.: Rev. F. C. Williams, R. W. Husted, H. H. Smith, High 
School; Andrew Washburn, Edmund Davis, Blake School; 
Edmund Davis, H. H. Smith, Damon School; C. G. Chick, 
A. Washburn, Grew School; R. W. Husted, C. G. Chick, 
Greenwood School ; Rev. F. C. Williams, Everett Primary 
School. 

Each sub-committee has special charge of the school desig- 
nated, and their reports presented herewith are founded 
upon careful personal examinations. 

In general, our schools have been unusually successful 
during the year. Teachers have been faithful and devoted ; 
pupils have made creditable progress ; parents have visited 
the schools in larger numbers than during previous years. 
The number of pupils in the different schools has consider- 
ably increased. 

We believe the schools of Hyde Park compare favorably 
with those of any town in this vicinity. 

It has been the policy of the Committee to make as few 
changes of teachers as possible. We believe one old teacher 
worth two new ones of the same capacity. 

Several changes have been forced upon us by resignations 
of teachers. Some have found more lucrative situations. 
We are unfortunately near Boston, and are not in a situation 
to compete with that city in salaries paid. Some have 
entered domestic life. 

In one case, with sorrow we record that death has called a 
teacher, one who was a model of kindness, and gentleness, 



90 

and painstaking devotion, to The Teacher, whose disciple she 
was. For about eleven years Miss S. S. Lancaster had taught 
in this town. Her very life was given to her chosen work. 
Even in her last illness she never lost her interest in her 
school, nor her love for her pupils, 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

Last year the services of a special teacher in this depart- 
ment were dispensed with. On the whole, this was a notice- 
able loss, although some masters were able to do creditable 
work in this department in their own schools. This year 
the Committee secured the services of Mr. H. J. Whitte- 
more, at a very moderate compensation, and find the good 
results fully justify the expense incurred. 

REDUCTION OF SALARIES. 

At the commencement of the year the Committee very un- 
willingly reduced somewhat the salaries of all the teachers, 
as the only means to save over-running the appropriations 
made by the town for school purposes. 

NEW SCHOOLS. 

It was expected that the increase of population, caused by 
a revival of business, would make it necessary to open 
another school in the Damon district. This expectation has 
been realized, and in addition, the crowded state of the Grew 
school forced the Committee to require a more careful ob- 
servance of district lines between the Grew and Damon dis- 
tricts. The remonstrances of the people against being 
forced to send their children across the railroad, where there 
was no legal crossing, and where fences rendered passing 
almost impossible, led the Committee to add another school in 
the Grew building, for the accommodation of pupils whose 
residence for the most part is within the Damon limits. 

It is to be hoped that a safe and convenient crossing over 
the railroad will soon be established in the vicinity of the 
Damon school ; and also that steps will be taken to secure a 
safe fence upon both sides of the dam and bridge at the .cot- 
ton mill. It is true that this is not a town way, but it is also 
true that the situation is such that it will be used daily by a 
large number of children, and that it should be made safe 
for them. 



TEMPERANCE TEXT-BOOKS . 

The Committee have examined with care a number of 
text-books upon Temperance, and settled upon Richardson's 
Manual as the most suitable for introduction into the schools. 
This book was then submitted to Dr. I. EL Bowditch for his 
examination. The Dr. reported strongly in favor of 
Dr. Richardson's general scientific accuracy, but claimed 
that certain statements in the book were somewhat over- 
drawn, and others given as settled where scientists are still 
in doubt. A part of the Committee favored putting the 
book into the hands of the pupils for class recitations ; but 
the vote finally prevailed to adopt Richardson's Manual as a 
text-book to be placed in the hands of the teachers for use 
in oral lessons upon temperance. 

PUNISHMENTS. 

Recent events have called attention of parents and others 
to the modes of corporal punishment allowed in the public 
schools. The following extract is from the *' Rules and 
Regulations" furnished each teacher, for guidance in this 
important matter, and all are required to follow the rule, 
both in letter and spirit ; — 

xxxh. " All teachers shall aim at such discipline in their 
schools as would be exercised by a kind, judicious parent in 
his family, avoiding corporal punishment in all cases where 
good order can be preserved by milder measures. Corporal 
punishment shall be inflicted only after the nature of the of- 
fence has been fully explained to the scholar; and shall be 
restricted to blows on the hand with a rattan ; but if any 
pupil refuses to submit to this, some other proper punish- 
ment may be used." 

AMUSEMENTS. 

It is a great pity that our play grounds are so small, and 
a greater pity that they are in such bad condition. Some of 
them are so covered with loose, sharp stones that any child 
who falls down is almost certain to be cut or badly scratched. 
The wear and tear of shoes must be something fearful. 
What shall be done ? The incidental appropriation is not 
sufficient to remedy the difficulty, and we see no way with- 
out a special appropriation for grading the school yards and 
covering them with fine, binding gravel. 



92 

A good chance for a run or for a game of ball is probably 
the best gymnasium for a public school. It is much safer 
for a large number of children than the machines and appli- 
ances of the ordinary gymnasium. Another point in favor 
of a good play ground is that where apparatus is used, two 
or three only, who chance to be expert, exercise, and the 
rest stand still and look on. 

VACCINATION. 

The utility of vaccination has of late been questioned in 
some quarters. Our laws require it as a pre-requisite of ad- 
mission to the public schools, and it has been a matter of 
considerable interest to ascertain whether the opposition to 
it was well founded. If vaccination does not protect from 
disease, but rather entails frightful ills upon its victims, the 
fact ought to be known. 

The report of Dr. James B. Taylor, Inspector of Vaccina- 
tion, city of New York, seems to answer satisfactorily and 
authoritatively all suspicions and anxiety. This report 
covers careful aucl systematic observation of 126,000 cases of 
vaccination, and fully establishes the following points ; — 

1. That in no easy is disease of any kind transmitted 
when proper care is exercised in selecting vaccine matter. 

2. That vaccination is absolute protection against .small- 
pox when the primary vaccine vessicle is of proper size and 
character, and has run its proper and normal course, and 
also when re-vaccination is performed at proper intervals, 
viz., within five years after the primary, and again soon after 
puberty in those who are vaccinated in infancy ; and at least 
one vaccination in those whose first vaccination was after 
maturity. 

THOEOUGHNESS. 

We feel that the pupils of our schools pass through them 
and go out into the world knowing a little, and but a little, 
of a large number of branches of study. How can we ex- 
cuse our present extended course of study, and the compar- 
atively little time devoted to each branch? 

Scholars, that is, learned men, are not made in schools of 
any grade. 'What school taught Erricson mechanics, or 
Agassiz geology, or Edison electricity? Real men are 
always self-made. What, then, ought the school to accom- 
plish ? Principally this : reveal the pupil to himself, show 



93 

him his possibilities, give him such a general view of the 
world's knowledge that he may ascertain his own aptitudes 
and tastes, and in what line his success lies, and stimulate 
him to effort in that direction. And, so, we must look for 
thoroughness, not so much in the schools, as in the results of 
personal individual labor in some direction hinted at, or 
pointed out, in the school course. 

GROWTH. 

In a conversation with a famous breeder of horses, some 
time ago, the writer was struck with some opinions ex- 
pressed, and especially with the zeal and positiveness with 
which he urged them. Said he : " Do everything for the 
first three years to make the colt grow; give him the best 
care and the best food, and let him exercise freely, but 
without special restraint ; give him a chance to make the 
most of himself, and help him to do so, before you require 
service or begin to train him, and the chances are you will 
have something worth training when the right time comes." 

This man spoke the truth, and it is equally true that one- 
half the annoyance and disappointment in school work comes 
from requiring service too early. We pick unripe fruit and 
complain that it is not sweet, and then in our disappointment 
w r e branch-prune and root-prune the tree until the chances 
are that both the tree and its fruit are permanently injured. 

Growth is the first duty of childhood, and education ought 
not to interfere with it. But it does, especially where our 
school system is supposed to be most perfectly carried out. 
The " infant phenomenon " is quite common in the city ; but 
pupils of eighteen years of age, in the country, stand head 
and shoulders above city pupils of that age, and the differ- 
ence increases with increasing years. The city system pro- 
duces early precocity and middle-aged mediocrity, and 
injures most the fine, but delicate, organizations that need 
only strength, to be of some real and positive value to the 
race. 

Already the forcing 'system of education tells against us 
in our popular characteristics. To outsiders we appear 
more sectarian than religious. In learning, we are finical. 
In polities, we are quibblers and impractical. In general, we 
are sharp rather than strong, keen rather than broad. We 
need more stock, even if at some expense of polish. 



Our children go to school at too early an age ;■ they are 
confined too long in the school room, and mind and body- 
alike suffer. 

The following, from the medical authority of the State- 
Board of Education, is in point, and' its recommendations 
contrast strongly with the hours required in this and sur- 
rounding towns : " Below the age of 12 years, 4 hours are: 
probably sufficient ; below 10 years, 3 or 3 1-2 ; below 7' 
year&, 2 1-2 or S. In regard to children under 10 years of 
age, my opinion is. strongly in favor of this restriction.. 
The arrangement by which these young pupils are kept in 
school the same number of hours as those of the age of 17 is 
absurd from every point of view, except one. That one is,, 
however, the one taken by a majority of parents, who con- 
sider that they pay to have their children taken- out of their- 
way for a given number of hours, and are annoyed by their 
presence at home. Every attempt to cut down, the hours of* 
attendance for yamig children will be met by prejudices; 
based upon this belief." 

We must do something' in New England to build up our 
boys and girls into stronger men and women. The men of 
the West already out-average us some inches in height, and 
are also getting a reputation for broader mental powers, as 
well as stronger arms and. tougher sinews. More and more 
we must look to the schools to counteract the defects in 
parents. Children belong to the public more than to their 
parents. The public must stand ready to make the most of" 
its inheritance. 

On behalf of the Committee, 

A. WASHBURN, 

CJiairman* 



BLAKE SCHOOL . 

Tour Committee beg leave to submit the following report 
upon the Blake School for the past year. We are glad to 
announce a manifest improvement in discipline and general 
work over the preceding year, and to call attention to the fact,, 
that, whereas in 1878 the Blake stood lowest in rank, based 



95 

upon the annual examination, in 1879 it stood second, and 
first, averaging the annual with the bi-monthly examination 
for the year. 

We congratulate the several teachers, and especially Mr. 
Howard, the principal, upon a result so satisfactory, and 
wish it understood that the Committee fully appreciate the 
skillful, patient labor which has contributed to it. We find 
in the principal a teacher identified with his school, and en- 
tirely devoted to its welfare, working at all times fully up to 
his strength, and frequently a little beyond it, and exhibit- 
ing an unusual degree of personal interest in each pupil in 
his care. 

In the Seventh and Eighth classes Miss Howe is a model 
teacher. Her method of instruction and her discipline are 
alike excellent, and the results of her work entirely satisfac- 
tory. 

The Ninth class has just lost, in Miss Howard, a very 
popular teacher, and the place has been filled by Miss Tilton, 
who gives good promise of ultimate success. 

In the Tenth class Miss Eddy, who is serving her first 
year, shows many sterling qualities, and already succeeds 
admirably, and gives many hints of greater possibilities. 

The Eleventh class is well taught and governed by Miss 
Hammond, and her classes come up to the next grade better 
fitted than the average. With a little more enthusiasm this 
might be made a model room. 

Miss Perry is as kind and patient and motherly with her 
little flock as a primary teacher ought to be. She shows a 
good degree of ingenuity, also, to secure progress without 
weariness, and a readiness to adopt new plans and ideas, 
and to seize opportunities for instruction. These are, we 
think, characteristics of a good primary school teacher. 

In this school a trial has been made for a part of the year 
of half-day sessions, with very satisfactory results. The 
little ones made better progress than when attending the 
full day. The attendance was better, with less tardiness, 
and the pupils evidently enjoyed the three hours spent in 
the school-room. 

We have introduced, with excellent success, into this 
grade, a play table with blocks and splints and dissected 
pictures and similar appliances. The same idea has also 
been carried into the other grades, by putting in, as seemed 
advisable, multiplication blocks, dissected maps, suitable 



96 

magazines for sight reading, etc. We wish the means at 
our command would allow still further experiments in this 
direction. 

ANDREW WASHBURN, 
EDMUND DAVIS, 

Local Committee. 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



When we entered upon our first official acquaintance with 
this school, we were struck by the evidence which it pre- 
sented of the absence of supervision. The registers showed 
that a visitor, either committee-man or parent, was a very 
unusual innovation ; the startled and apprehensive look of 
the scholars, suddenly taking the place of an apathetic, list- 
less demeanor, when a caller entered, gave ocular proof that 
they were seldom subjected to such surprises ; while the de- 
lapidated appearance of the building, its manifest need of 
repair, and its many defects, internal and external, all testi- 
fied to the absence of those having authority to remedy these 
things. 

That this had caused deterioration in the schools was no 
matter of surprise. The ablest teachers, the most studious 
scholars, cannot do so well when they know that their work 
is unnoticed. The most conscientious will relax a little 
when the pressure of public observation is removed. The 
spirit of emulation is weakened if no one is ever present to 
make comparisons and commend excellence. Without hints 
and suggestions from outside sources routine becomes fixed ; 
the wheels ruu in one rut ; a desirable method, or practice, 
or exercise, is by degrees dropped and lost, and an undesir- 
able one is as imperceptibly substituted, and languor and 
dawdling will take the place of the alert, brisk, wide-awake 
deportment which we expect to see in the young, and 
which is certainly requisite to a decent improvement of edu- 
cational advantages. 

Though they were not universal, all these appearances 
were to be seen at our first visits ; now we look in vain for 
them ; and though it has cost much additional effort by 
teachers, much time from the Committee, and called many 
dollars from the treasury, the improvement manifest will pay 



97 

amply for much greater sacrifices. In our opinion, no 
school can boast better teachers than the Damon, or point to 
better results of the year's work. We are decidedly satis- 
fied Avith the progress made in knowledge and in orderly 
deportment, and with the present comparative standing of 
the school ; and we shall confidently expect yet greater ex- 
cellence during the coming year. We know that many of 
the pupils here are unfitted by home life and training to take 
full advantage of the facilities provided for them; also, that 
the necessity, on the part of many, of leaving school and 
earning money as soon as their ages will permit, is a serious 
obstacle to the attainment of the best results ; and the ex- 
tent to which these disadvantages have been neutralized by 
the earnest and intelligent work of the teachers is the best 
proof of their fitness for their respective positions. 

In repairing the defects of the building, and its appurten- 
ances, we have been obliged to make considerable outlays, 
but these will result in future savings. Grading about the 
building has saved the foundation from further destruction ; 
a very thorough painting has not only beautified the struc- 
ture, but protected it from damage by the elements ; exten- 
sion of the ventilators through the roof (they having been 
originally built only to the attic floor,) has so modified the 
currents of air through the rooms as to render them fresh 
and healthy, and so much more easily and economically 
heated that two furnaces now do effectively what three here- 
tofore failed to accomplish ; and in many minor respects im- 
provements have been made which have added greatly to the 
comfort and health of the schalars and to the efficiency of 
the schools. We hope that hereafter more of the parents 
and friends of the pupils will visit the school, and see for 
themselves the advantages given to the children, the care 
and kindness bestowed on them, and the benefits which they 
derive from it all. 

One large item of expense of this school is the books, etc., 
furnished by the town for poor scholars. It exceeds that of 
all the other schools together. In many cases, doubtless, 
the parents are able to make provision, but are unwilling to 
do so. In such cases, the Committee must furnish what is 
wanting, or see the scholars sit idle. The only remedy 
lies with the Assessors, who may assess the cost of supplies 
so furnished to the father or guardian, in all cases where 
they deem him able to pay for them, and the same may be 



98 

collected as other taxes are. We understand that this has 
not been done for several years, which, if the fact be so, will 
account for the constantly increasing number of those who 
neglect or refuse to provide books for their children. 

Taking up now the several grades in detail, we will com- 
mence with the Twelfth Class, which was under the care of 
Miss M. E. Clarke till the latter part of May, when she was 
promoted to the vacancy made in the High School by the 
retirement of Miss Lord. She had won the hearts of the 
little ones while with them., and it was with great reluctance 
that we consented to lose her services in this place ; but her 
loss has been fully restored by her successor, Miss Alice B. 
White, who still continues im charge of the school, and 
whose fitness for the position is unmistakable. Under her 
care the advancement of these youngest of our scholars is 
marked and most gratifying. This room was so overfilled 
at the beginning of the Fall term that it became necessary 
to relieve it, as well as Miss Crosby's room, by opening 
a n'ew school, which was done in October, this, as the 
Eleventh Class was put under the charge of Miss Alice E. 
Ga«'e. Miss Gage had previous experience as a teacher, 
and, as her testimonials showed, a favorable one. The 
examination which she passed here was excellent ; conse- 
quently, in selecting her for this place, the Committee did 
so with high anticipations. It is enough to say that these 
have been fully realized. Her class is in fine condition, and 
its discipline and progress all that could be expected. 

The Tenth Class has had the benefit during the whole 
year of the experience and care of Miss S. A. Crosby, who 
has in past years, in the same place, demonstrated her 
capacity as a teacher. The condition of the school is good, 
and it has in some respects made noticeable progress. 

Miss J. E. Donovan, who has been in charge of the Ninth 
Class, is one of the most painstaking and successful teachers 
in our schools. She is fully up to the times in her methods 
of instruction, is prompt, energetic and thorough; and her 
earnest efforts are repaid by the interest displayed by her 
pupils, and their rapid progress. 

The Eighth and Seventh Classes, which are in the care of 
Miss Lizzie D. Bunker, constitute, probably, the most 
trying and wearisome school in the building, simply because 
the scholars in them have reached the ages when they are 
most trying, restless, captious and impatient of restraint. 



99 

Therefore, Miss Bunker has been subjected to a severe test 
here. Our observations lead us to the belief that she has 
put in an amount of labor and effort which, in a more favor- 
able spot, would have secured golden results. As it is, they 
have been by no means fruitless ; her school has made fully 
average progress, and in deportment shows decided improve- 
ment. It has been tilled to its utmost capacity all the time, 
and during a portion of the year was over-crowded. This 
led the Committee, at the beginning of the Fall term, to 
draw off from the Seventh Class a number of its more prom- 
ising members, and to make of them an advanced Seventh 
Class, which, with the Sixth and Fifth Classes, has been 
under the immediate care of the Principal, Mr. E. W. Gross. 
This has, of course, largely increased Mr. Cross' labors, but 
it has resulted most favorably to the scholars themselves, 
and to the appearance and efficiency of the school. All these 
classes are doing remarkably well, and exhibited an ac- 
quaintance with the course which they have gone over, an 
interest and attention while at recitation, and a diligence 
when at study, which prove a conscientious, intelligent and 
thorough training in the school-room. It is an especial mis- 
fortune here, in this school, that many of its most promising 
members are obliged to leave prematurely to engage in work ; 
yet we think it will bear favorable comparison with other 
schools of the same grade, here or elsewhere. Mr. Cross' 
ability as a teacher is of a high order, and has been, doubt- 
less, fully proven during his previous years of service in our 
town. We think the past year has, however, been more to 
his satisfaction, as well as that of parents and of the Com- 
mittee, than any former one. 

EDMUND DAVIS, 
HENRY HYDE SMITH, 

Local Committee* 



EVERETT PRIMARY. 

The Everett Primary School continues to be an excellent 
one, and the Committee anticipate a steady improvement in 
the future, under the faithful direction of Miss M. E* 



Rogers. 



100 

The School Is now well situated m the High School- 
Building, and it has been much aided by the frequent visits- 
of the parents and friends of the children. 

The improvement in singing is very gratifying, 

FRANCIS C.WILLIAMS, 

Local Committee r- 



GEEENWOOD SCHOOL. 

The Committee are glad to speak in terms of commenda- 
tion as to the general appearance of the various classes, and. 
the results of the year's work, at this school. In penman- 
ship and reading, which have received special attention,, 
marked progress is apparent in all the grades. A daily drill 
in physical culture has been introduced, and the importance 
of a correct position and carriage of the body insisted upon 
with good results. There have been but few cases of cor- 
poral punishment during the year. 

The school is fortunate in being under the supervision of 
Mr. J. L. Curtis, a teacher who unites to training and ex- 
perience those natural endowments which eminently qualify 
him for the exercise of his profession, and without which no 
amount of application can secure the highest success. The 
Fifth and Sixth classes are under his immediate instruction*. 
From the first-named a well-prepared class entered the High 
School in September. By a series of carefully considered 
addresses on miscellaneous topics, on Friday afternoons, an 
attempt has been made to stimulate the ambition of his pupils, 
and to impress upon them lessons which shall have a whole- 
some influence upon their future lives. A good piano ha& 
been introduced into this room in place of the inferior instru- 
ment which has been long in use, and the change must have 
a marked effect in the promotion of, musical culture in the 
school. 

The Seventh and Eighth classes are under the charge of 
Miss Lucy S. Currier? a zealous and energetic teacher, who 
has been connected with the school since it was first opened. 
The large number of pupils in this room has demanded her 
utmost care and attention, and but little opportunity has been 
afforded for trying new methods. Improvement in writing,, 
already alluded to, is particularly noticeable in this room. 



101 

Class Nine, and the upper division of class Ten, are in charge 
<of Miss Harriet J. Folsom, whose earnest devotion to her 
work has been attended with good results. In the study of 
geography, this teacher has made use of a large tray of wet 
sand, by the aid of which she has been able to impart to her 
pupils tolerably correct ideas respecting the forms of land 
and water, which have passed under consideration. Light 
reading from various periodicals has been practised, dictation 
exercises in writing given, and letter writing and short com- 
positions have received attention. 

Miss Mary E. Libhy, who has charge of the lower section 
of the Tenth, and the entire Eleventh class, has now an en- 
viable rank as a primary teacher. She possesses in a re- 
markable degree those qualities which are required to fix the 
attention and arouse the enthusiasm of young children- Pic- 
ture cards to talk and write about have been introduced in 
her room, and some very creditable compositions have been 
produced, as a result. 

Miss Carrie E. Walker, who had taught the Twelfth class 
with great acceptance during the year, resigned her position 
at its close, and her place has been tilled by Miss Adams, a 
graduate of our High School, and of the State Normal School 
at Salem, and whose subsequent record, as a teacher, gives 
promise of excellent success. 

The building of a suitable fence, and the grading of the 
grounds around this school house are improvements greatly 
needed; and it is hoped that the town will make an appro- 
priation for these purposes at an early day. 

E. W. HUSTED, 
€. G. CHICK, 

Local Committee*, 



«REW SCHOOL. 

Franklin H. Dean,* Master ; Fannie J. Emerson, Lucina 
Dunbar, Mary Morey, Martha A. Alexander, Genevieve 
Brainard, Leila E. Perry and Florence E. Leadbeater, As- 
sistants. 

The renewed business prosperity of our town has served 
to add largely to the number of pupils attending this school, 



1C2 

the. registers now showing an increase of nearly one hundred 
during the past year. This large increase has affected all 
grades, and added much to the care and labor of the master,. 
Mr. F. H. Dean ; hut being a systematic worker and a fine 
disciplinarian, he lias the school as a whole, in fine working 
order. 

As the teacher of the Fifth and Sixth classes, Mr. Deans 
strives for practical results and aims to instruct his pupils- 
not only to know, but also to give them the reasons why 
they should know, and the application of their knowledge in 
the affairs of life. 

The work of Miss Emerson in the Seventh class is of a 
high order. The ease with which, she controls hex school 
and the interest shown by her scholars in recitation call for 
special mention. 

Miss Dunbar, in the Eig'hth class, shows zeal in her posi- 
tion, and the promptness with which this class does its work 
indicates that the pupils receive careful instruction. 

The Ninth class is now in charge of Miss Morey, who. 
succeeded Miss Smith. Miss Morey is an active and onthus- 
iastic teacher ; she brings to her position the wisdom of ex- 
perience, and her school is making good progress. 

The Tenth class is to be commended for interest in recita- 
tion and study. The distinctness of utterance in reading 
and reciting is very marked. Miss Alexander is deserving- 
of much credit for her care in this respect, as well as for her 
discipline. 

In the Eleventh class, the utmost harmony seems to pre- 
vail between teacher and scholars. Miss Brainard has the- 
interest of her class at heart, and is doing good work. 

Miss Perry, in the Twelfth class shows much tact in her 
control of small children, and develops rare adaptation for 
the work of this grade. She was elected to fill the vacancy 
eaused by the death of Miss Lancaster, who for a long time- 
faithfully taught this class .. 

The Tenth and Eleventh classes registering about seventy 
scholars each at the close of the autumn term , the full com- 
mittee decided it best to open a new school for divisions of" 
each of these grades. This was accomplished with small in- 
cidental expense, as fortunately the town had enough unused 
furniture stored at the Damon school to nearly furnish 
the room in this building formerly used for an evening 
school,, but until now unused for other purposes * Miss 



103 

Florence E. Leadbeater, of this town, has been placed in 
charge of the school thus opened, and is doing satisfactory 
work. 

Drawing and penmanship have received much care during 
the past year. Reading has been carefully taught, and the 
rank of the pupils is good in all branches through the various 
grades. Cleanliness of the rooms and the efforts to decorate 
and render the same cheerful and attractive throughout this 
building call for special notice, as steps in the right direction. 

WANTS. 

This building being now fully utilized and the number of 
pupils steadily increasing, will render the subject of a safe 
and convenient approach to the Damon School of pressing- 
importance. By providing a passage across the B. & P. 
Railroad at or near White's crossing, and making proper 
expenditures on Readville street, many scholars who for 
safety now attend the Grew would be as well or better 
accommodated at the Damon School. Had these avenues of 
approach to the Damon School been seasonably provided, 
the opening of the new school here would have been avoided. 
Another matter which demands the attention of the town 
is the condition of the yard and play-grounds connected with 
this school ; the surface being of coarse gravel and stones is 
the cause of frequent injury to the children, and is highly 
destructive to their clothing. A coating of loam or similar 
substance would be a great improvement and one which 
would be much appreciated by all directly interested in this 
school. We ask the early attention of the town to this 
matter. 

CHARLES G. CHICK, 
ANDREW WASHBURN, 

Local Committee. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

The High School continues to be under the care of Mr. 
John F. Elliot, who is an accurate scholar, courteous and 
gentlemanly in his deportment, an excellent, faithful in- 
structor, and a good disciplinarian. The school has made 
one important change during the year. Miss F. E. Lord 



suddenly resigned her position, as assistant teacher, to act 
as substitute in a Boston Public school ; unci though this loss 
caused temporary harm to the High School, yet, the commit- 
tee was powerless to retain her very valuable services. Miss 
M. C. Clark who held the certificate of excellent scholarship 
from the Boston Board of Supervisors, and who had shown 
herself particularly energetic and successful in the Damon 
school, was appointed in the place left vacant by-Miss Lord, 
and she is proving herself well fitted for the position. Miss 
M. M. Coleman is a very efficient assistant, and her classes 
show steady improvement from term to term. Thus the 
Principal is ably and harmoniously sustained by the assistant 
teachers. This is an important feature of the school. For, 
while the Principal is the head, and is to exert his personal 
influence on each pupil of every class, and is to know the 
progress of every scholar in the school, yet, it is necessary 
that entire sympathy and active cooperation between himself 
and his assistants, in discipline and methods of study, be 
maintained. 

The High School has at present two hindrances to its per- 
fect success, of which the parents of the pupils are more or 
less aware. One difficulty lies in the poor preparation of the 
scholars admitted from the Grammar schools. These pupils 
are often too young (the average is between fourteen and 
fifteen years of age), and too ignorant, to go on with advan- 
tage in the High School course as now laid down. This is 
due to the shortness of the time given to the Grammar schools. 
Why that time was arranged to be briefer by one year than 
the time required for the Grammar course in other towns, it 
is not important now to ask. But, plainly, another year 
and a more extended coure of preliminary study is neces- 
sary, both for those who enter the High School and for those 
who do not. There are many pupils whose education will 
end with the Grammar School course, and who would con- 
tinue for another year, if the course were lengthened. On 
the other hand, a more thorough preparation in the element- 
ary branches is essential to High School success. Other- 
wise the higher mathematical work is marred by blunders in 
arithmetic, the translations from the Latin and Greek, are 
rendered into ungrammatical, misspelled and almost illegible 
English, and accuracy in the use both of the foreign lan- 
jmao-es and of the mother tongue is lost. 



105 

The other hindrance to a satisfactory condition of the High 
School is the number and variety of the studies gone over. 
It is hardly possible for the average scholar profitably to 
pursue the course as now laid down. Too often he has failed 
fairly to complete one study when the time has come for the 
next ; and he must drop his incomplete work, and take up the 
next thing in the appointed order, otherwise he has no place 
in his class. The teacher has the alternative of putting the 
scholar back a whole year, (which is objectionable), or of 
pushing him forward as best he may. Thoroughness, in at- 
tainment and in habit, does not come in that way. Earnest- 
ness in the pursuit of knowledge, and hearty, healthy enthu- 
siasm in study (instead of a mere effort to pass an examina- 
tion) are impossible. The knowledge gained is superficial, 
the little interest excited is transient. This applies to our 
average boys and girls. The exceptional cases will take care 
of themselves. The school is not so much for the splendid 
exceptions as for the ordinary, the careless, and the dull. 
They are to be trained to habits of mental discipline. We 
are to interest them, to animate them, to bring out capaci- 
ties which will, if rightly encouraged and guided, be more 
useful to the community, in the long run, than the more pre- 
cocious minds. 

These difficulties are in the High School system. They 
are not peculiar to our town. A bill has been presented 
this session to the Legislature, by the member from Milton, 
aiming to relieve High Schools by allowing towns to send 
advanced pupils to Academies, under certain, proper re- 
strictions. The trouble is generally felt. An experienced 
friend of our Public Schools gives his published opinion, 
that "a High School in which the education and true interests 
of ninety per cent, of the boys and girls in attendance are 
neglected, in order that ten per cent, of the boys may be 
prepared to pass a College examination in Greek, is a thor- 
oughly unrepublican institution." He describes the average 
school, and he points to a dangerous tendency from which 
all suffer more or less. Is the High School the proper place 
to teach Latin and Greek, and to fit boys for college ? Some 
of our best educators say distinctly and decidedly, No. As , 
the standard of college admission now is, the work of fitting 
four or five boys is in itself enough for any teacher. He 
cannot do justice to all. If the preparation is conducted in 
close connection with a larjre number of other studies and of 



106 

other pupils, the care of the few must absorb a very large 
proportion of the teacher's time and attention. In our own 
case, it may be feasible to send the Latin and Greek scholars 
(certainly in the last year) into the Boston Latin School, 
and thus, to lift the weight and end the present confusion of 
our school. Let it furnish a complete course of the higher 
English branches and of the modern languages. Let the 
classical training be supplied, (if the town should supply it. ) 
where it can be done to the best advantage of those pupils 
seeking it, and without depriving the large number of other 
scholars of their proportion of instruction. This would not, 
of necessity, add to the expense, but would rather be an 
economical plan for the town, while it would be better for 
the few boys sent to Boston, and vastly better, as well as 
more just and fair, to the rest of the school. For though 
two assistants would then be desirable, yet, with an amend- 
ed Grammar School course, and with consequently better 
preparation of the scholars admitted to the High School ; 
and with the Greek and Latin taken off, the school would 
be more efficient with but one assistant than it can be with 
two under the present system. The High School is an im- 
portant and expensive part of our school system, expensive 
in money and in the time of the pupils. A very general 
conviction is, that its results are not in proportion to its 
cost. It is to be hoped, that during the coming year some 
judicious changes in the Grammar and High School arrange- 
ments may benefit them both, and may enable the High 
School to become all that the teachers, the committee and 
the parents of its pupils desire it to be. 

FRANCIS C. WILLIAMS, 
RICHARD W. HITSTED, 
HENRY HYDE SMITH. 

Local School Committee. 



REPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal,— Mr. J. F. ELLIOT. 

Assistants,— Miss M. M. Coleman and Miss M. C. Clark. 









3 




cS 




c 


>, 


C 






£> 


^3 


cd *" 




^ is* 


0) 


° 








c 


6(3 




c o 


iijS 


is 


-£> 


&v 




Jan. 1, to June 30, 1879. 






5*w 


5 c 




o 


o 


re c| 
c u 






o 


<o 


<a 


u a. 


5 s 


c 


• 








Si 


$ 


a 


a 


Ph 3, 


o 


K 


c 


r, 




13 


12 


11 


92 


99 


■71 


9 


1 


n 


Class 


9 
20 

22 


8.3 
18 
20 


7.5 
10 5 
18 


9) 
92 
90 


97 
98 
98.7 


2 
6 
6 


5 
15 
14 


2 


in 


Class 


4 


IV. 


Class 


4 




Sept. 1, to Dec, 31, 1879. 


















i. 




9 


8.6 


S.l 


94 


97 


5 


7 


1 


11. 




20 


18.2 


16.4 


90 


99 


fi 


19 


6 


in. 




13 


12 


11 


92 


98 




P>, 


4 


IV 


Class 


37 


34 


31.3 


92 


97 


9 


27 


9 









PUPILS NEITHER ABSENT NOR TARDY FROM JAN. 1 TO DEC. 31. 

Nellie F. Rogers, Fannie E. Harlow, Eda F. Mitchell, 

A. P. Davis, F. C. Williams, Jr. 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



From JMn. 2, to 
July 27. 1879. 



V. E. W. Cross... 

VI. E.W.Cross... 

Vli. L. I). Bunker.. 

VIII. L. I . ISnnkei.. 

IX. J. E. Donovan 

X. S. A. Crosby.. 

XI. S. A. Crosby.. 

XII. A. 15. Wr.ite... 

From Sept. 1. to 
Dtc. 2t, 1879. 



V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

XI. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 



E. W. Cross.... 
E. VV. Cross... 
L. D. Hunker.. 
L. D. Bunker.. 
J. E. Donovan. 
S. A Crosbv.. 
A. K. Gage.'... 
A. B. White.... 







a3 










a 


o 


r 


= oi 


c &». 


« 






«"§ 


-2 




£— 


o 


<u 


■E 






z£ 


cT ^ 


,o 


— 


















> o 


— ; 




n 


*j 


o 


c 


<! 5 


t>° 


CO «j 

C-i a 


S 5 


izi 


ft 


^ 


8 


"^ 










9 


7.7 


9S.2 


100 


1 


. 8 


10 


8 


7.5 


88.9 


99.9 





8 


14 


U 


9 


95 


99 


1 


11 


15 


12 


11 


92 


99 





7 


51 


49 


4! 


87 


98 


9 


34 


28 


22 


19 


86 


9B 





11 


37 


35 


29 


83 


98 


1 


22 


78 


55 


49 


89 


9S 





49 


7 


7 


6.4 


90.3 


99.9 





r 


25 


25 


23.2 


93.2 


99 


3 


23 


32 


28 


27 


89 


98 


■2 


18 


3!i 


30 


28 


94 


98 





IS 


42 


39 


37 


95 


98 


1 


24 


15 


35 


S3 


95 


99 


1 


36 


29 


25 


- 22% 


89 


99 


1 


11 


81 


71 


48 


87.fi 


99 


4 


49 



-C OS 



Names of Pupils nut absent or late during the year.— Owen Dunn, EJddie Riley,, 
Hannah Probert, Effle McDonald, Nellie Riley, Katie McDonongh, Annie Hanghney, 
Delia Kiley, Maggie On Hen, John Gallagher. Michael Gleason, Michael Barrett, Eddie 
Quinn, Ceo. Riley, Willie Weeden, Katie MeDoaough, George Ei« elL Katie Kearna-y, 
Wesley Carpenter and Bertie Austm^ 



108 

GREW SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1 to 
July 1, 

1879. 



V. 
VL 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

xn. 

Sept. I to 
Dec. 31. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



F. H. rean.. 

F. II. Dean 

F. J. Emerson 

Lucina Dunbar 

M. A. v lexaiider.. ... . 

Mai y Morey 

Genevieve Brain.ii d. . . 
L. E. Perry 



F. H. Dean. 

F. ... Dean 

F. J. Emerson 

Lni'ina DiinU ir 

Mary iMorev 

M A. Alexander 

Genevieve B ainar<t.. 
L. E. Perry 



a> 


o 

03*9 


03 

oj H 


'c b 


"c = 


S 


a 


? cs 


c - - 




Z - 


u 


c 


o - 


5 


. ~ 


■a -, 


*5 


>■ 


*J 


> 


n 


£ 






< 


— ' 


~ 




19 


17 


IS 


86 


99 


1 


24 


22 


21 


112 


99 


5 


41 


38 


3;:; 


87 


99 


12 


44 


40 


37 


82 


99 


1 


4! 


41 


38 


88 


99 





42 


34 


31 


89 


96 


U 


(10 


47 


41 


88 


99 





S2 


54 


14 


81 


99 


3 


21 


17 ' 


17 


84 


99 


1 


32 


3J 


27 


DO 


99 


6 


45 


3i) 


38 


89 


99 


7 


51 


45 


4J 


80 


9!) 


7 


47 


45 


42 


S8 


98 


8 


liO 


61 


56 


81) 


99 


1 


SO 


57 


5J 


l! 


99 


6 


77 


02 


53 


85 


99 






NAMES OP PUPILS NOT ABSENT NOIi TAHDV. 

First Terra— Grace Madden. Fanny Oapron, Willie Lewis, Miry Madden, Gussie 
■Clark, Laura Holmes, Willie Hall, Tliad. Fairbairn, John Madden-. 

Second Term— Grace Madden, Frank TJpham, Plii lip Oapron, Alec's Keltie, Clara 
WiJ.ey, Everett Lewis, Everett Angell, Arthur Simmons, Eddie Fellows, Elmer 
Strom, Katie Burns, Fred Warren, Fred Uorl mil, Florence Line, Lizzie Ne.i), Nor- 
iiinn iscolt, Asa Burlani, .John Kenned*', Willie Lewis, Thomas Clan, Maggie S'oley, 
Eddie Bryant. Bertha Kubaseh, Ralph Vose, Florence Reinis, JoUu Madden, Blanche 
Whittier, Willie Scott, Alice O'Brien. 

Third Ter"— Grace Madden, John F. Kennedy, Charles 11. Lonl. Katie Rnonny, 
Thomas a. Hearn, Bertha Kubaseh, Everett Angell. Marv Madden, Bessie M. K.-lsey, 
Thos. J. Clary, Terrance MeGowan, Albeit H. "Rhodes, Frank L. Wiswall, "Edward 
St. Clair Fellows, Willie Lewis, John Robinson, James K<dtie, Fred Kion, Gussie 
Clark, Irving Heal, Eddie Bryant, Charlie Haruian, Lilian F. Malcom, Blanche G- 
Gridley, Lizzie Neai. 



EVERETT PRIMARY SCHOOL. 









03 


^ 


ji 


























.Jan. 1 to 




.a 


%~i 


03 




V,_j 


■ „■ 


. 


Dec. 24, 


NAME OP TEACHER. 


a 


bc = 

S3 G 
> 

< 


b a 


03 3 


S o 


03 

.3 


5 


1879. 




o 


s 

> 


ft 


._ p. 
ft 


b 
A 


O 

z 


Class XL 


Marv E. Rogers 


23 


IS 


19 


.84 


96 




7 


ClassJXlI. 


Mary E. Rogers 


32 


25 


24 


.75 


91 







109 

BLAKE SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1, to Ju'y 1, 1879. 


la 
£ 
c 


o _. 
c 3 

> s 


6 
o 

S 
> 


o a ' 

3 c 


° f? 

3 s 
° 2 


5 

a 

a 

6 
'A 


93 

6 


3 
^ o 


(J LASH. 


n 

2!) 
25 
25 
51 
35 
40 
71 

15 
27 
12 
44 
48 
41 
45 
60 


11 

25.8 
2uft 
2;. 6 

48 

2!>.'i 

3 .6 

- (il 

14.7 
25.4 
11.6 

39.2 

4i 

35.7 

44.7 

50.7 


104 
25.4 
18.2 
21.(1 
43.4 
26.6 
U.l 
46.6 

14 5 

24.5 

11 

36.1 

42 

32 

42.5 

42.7 


94.5 

98.4 

87 

91.5 

90.4 

89.8 

9.1.1 

70 

98 

96 

94.8 


o;).3 

96 5 

99.1 

99.1 

94.9 

97 

99 

99 

99.4 
99 
ion 


3 



2 

■2 
1 


6 
6 

3 

3 
■2 

6 



5 
6 

10 
13 
9 
li 
10 
39 

12 

17 
12 
32 
15 
IS 
12 
45 


3 

1 



3 


X. Annie I,. Eddy... 

Xll. Helen^A'. Perry. 

Sept. 1, to Dec.' 31, 1870. 


1 

2 
1 


5- 
5 




92 99 
91.3 94.8 
89.6 98 

95.1 99 

81.2 99 


3 


IX. Carrie HowaH 

XI. Jennie S. Hammond 

Xll. Helen A. Perry 


1 

2 
6 



1 



Names of pupils neither absent nor late from jan. l to july 1>. 
Lnta K.yes, Elinor- Roberts, Belle Whittier, Eric Rosling,. Louisa Elliot, Paul Gid- 
pey, Mabel Wrighi, Sadie Smith, Willie Mallard, Hattie Davenport, Josie Howard. 

neither absent nor late from SEPT. 1- TO DEC. 31. 

Marias Whipple, Maggie Swinton,, Lorena Drake, Loretta Drake, Army Gait, Pran- 
ces. Davenport, Clarence Morris, Eddie Badger, Nellie Chamberlain, Hattie Daven- 
port, Josie Howard, Sadie Smi'h, Charles Swinton, Clara Davenport, Isabel Currier,, 
Willie Eustis, Jessie Swinton, Herbert Timson, Lizzie Beatey, Addrew Bloom, 
Wanen Davenport, Oren Nute, Ernest Dykes, Paul Gidney, Estetla Beatey. 

PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE IN 1879. 

Paul Gidney,. Hattie Davenport, Josie Howard, Sadie Smith. 



110 

GREKNWOOD SCHOOL. 



. 


— 







— 




— 






~ 


Jan. 2, to 
June 27, 1879. 


TEACHERS. 


S 

C 
1 




■* S 
|| 

< 


c3 
to 

5 

< 


, 

PS 





33 
.3 

c 
21 


c3 


^ a 


Classes. 


— 
'5 


V. 


J. L. Curtis... 


19 


17 


Hi 


96 


99 


2 


12 


1 


VI. 


J. L. Curtis... 


25 


22 


21 


90 


99 


1 


13 


1 


VII. 


L. S,. Currrier.. 


14 


13 


12 


91 


94 


IS 


4 





VIII. 


L. S. Currier.. 


97 


23 


22 


95 


98 


2 


I*. 


2 


IX. 


H.J. Folsom.. 


39 


35 


29 


90 


98 


2 


7 





X. 


H. J. Folsom.. 


17 


15 


13 


S4 


99 





4 





X. 


M. E. Libby... 


30 


24 


22 


91 


98 





7 


fl 


XI. 


M. K. L,ibbv... 


23 


IS 


16 


91 


99 


1 


10 


1 


XII. 


C. E. Walker.. 


45 


37 


31 


811 


99 


2 


24 


1 


Sept. 1. to 
Dec. 24. 




















V. 


3. L. Curtis.... 


18 


13 


16 


96 


99 


6 


11 


6 


VI. 


J. L, Curtis 


19 


15 


13 


89 


99 


1 


11 


1 


VII. 


L. S. Currier.. 


26 


20 


18 


95 


99 


2 


14 


2 


VIII. 


L. S. Currier.. 


3t 


31 


29 


92 


90 


2 


27 


2 


IX. 


II. J. Folsom. 


52 


42 


41 


92 


99 


4 


23 





X. 


M. K. Libby... 


3) 


29 


27 


92 


9:) 





23 





XI. 


M. B. Libby... 


27 


21 


21 


90 


99 


2 


19 


2 


XII. 


<J. E. Walker.. 


51 


44 


35 


79 


99 


1 


33 


1 



Perfect in attendance from Jan. 2 to June 27. lSJd. — Maud Laurison, Annie Miller, 
Harry Gurney Theodore Williams, Cora Morrell. 

Perfect in attendance from Sept. 1 to Dec. 24, 1879.— William Tilley, Maud Laurison, 
Theodore Williams, Abbie Sumner, Sarah Roome, Mavy Roome, Carrie Gregg, Jessie 
Cochrane, Carrie Goss, ^Nellie Jenkins, Ernestine Eidredge, Lina IngersoU, Charles 
Day, Albert Day, Maud Day, Mabel Brown.