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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures : with report of the selectmen and other town officers"



BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



EECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 
AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1887. 







3Z22/^ 



HYDE PARK: 

CUPPLES, WILSON, AND COMPANY, 

2Hje p^e Park ^xzm. 

1887. 



NINETEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



OF THE 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 



WITH 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1887. 




vzfrf^ 7 



HYDE PARK: 

CUPPLES, WILSON, AND COMPANY, 

Cfje f^foe Park P«gg. 

1887. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 

For the Year ending March y, l88j. 



SELECTMEN AND SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS : 

DAVID PERKINS, JOHN H. TUCKERMAN, 

HOBART M. CABLE. 



ASSESSORS : 

GEORGE SANFORD, GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 

JOEL F. GOODWIN. 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



CHARLES C. HAYES (resigned), GEORGE F. DOWNES, 
JOEL F. GOODWIN. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR : 

JOHN TERRY . ... term expires 1889 

term expires 1888 



ROBERT W. KARNAN 



JOEL F. GOODWIN 

TOWN CLERK : 

HENRY B. TERRY. 



term expires i< 

. TOWN TREASURER : 

HENRY S. BUNTON. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES : 

GEORGE SANFORD. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

JAMES E. COTTER 
BENJAMIN C. VOSE 
EDMUND DAVIS . 
GEORGE M. FELLOWS 
CHARLES G. CHICK 
ANDREW WASHBURN 



term expires 1889 
term expires 1889 
term expires 1888 
term expires 1888 
term expires 1887 
term expires 1887 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONERS 



WILLIAM J. STUART 
HENRY GREW 
HENRY BLASDALE 



term expires 1889 
term expires 1888 
term expires 1887 



AUDITORS : 

JOHN H. RUSSELL, WALLACE D. LOVELL, 

CHARLES P. VAUGHAN. 



G. FRED GRIDLEY 
EDMUND DAVIS . 
GALEN L. STONE . 
CHARLES C. HAYES 
AMOS H. BRAINARD 
CHARLES F. JENNEY 
SYLVANUS COBB, Jr. 
HENRY B. MINER 
HOBART M. CABLE 



CONSTABLES : 

GEORGE SANFORD, WILLIAM F. CURTIS, 
GEORGE F. DOWNES, JEREMIAH CORBETT, 

CHARLES E. JENNEY, PATRICK J. DONLAN, 
DANIEL O'CONNELL, CHARLES JACOBS, 



THE PUBLIC LIBRARY : 


term expires 1889 






term expires 1889 






term expires 1889 






term expires 1888 






term expires 1888 






term expires 1888 






term expires 1887 






term expires 1887 






term expires 1887 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES : 

CHARLES F. MORRISON. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

HENRY G. BALKAM . 

RINALDO WILLIAMS, > 
REUBEN CORSON, } 



Chief Engineer 
Assistant Engineers 



REPORT OF THE SELECTMEN. 



Fellow Citizens of Hyde Park: — 

At the last annual town meeting-, twelve prominent citi- 
zens were appointed to confer with the Selectmen and 
School Committee in regard to the appropriations for the 
current year. 

The result of this conference was the unanimous recom- 
mendation that the following amounts should be appropriated 
to be expended by the Selectmen : — 

For permanent improvements ..... $10,000 

" sidewalks . . . . . . . 10,000 

" incidental expenses ....... 4,500 

" outstanding bills and necessary repairs on the 

streets . . . . . . ... 5, 000 

And we have given our best judgment in the expenditure 
of the same. 

SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 

D. W. Phipps was appointed Superintendent of Streets, at 
a salary of $1,000 per year. The great benefit derived from 
his management of the work, and the thorough and impartial 
manner in which he has performed all the duties pertaining 
to the office, will, we trust, secure to the town in the future 
the services of some competent person to have the entire 
care and building of our streets. 

SURVEYING STREETS. 

With an outlook for some practical system of sewerage, 
which must be provided for within a few years, and with a 
view of establishing a permanent grade on all of our principal 



streets, Percy M. Blake, a civil engineer of marked ability 
and large experience, was employed to survey at least twenty 
miles of streets at $100 per mile. 

All work performed during the year has been done with 
the above objects in view, and in accordance with the survey 
and grades established by him. And when his work is fully 
completed, we trust that it will be entirely satisfactory to the 
town. 

SIDEWALKS. 

Bids were solicited and received from various parties for 
furnishing curbstone, setting the same, and laying the con- 
crete. The contract for curbstone was awarded to J. E. 
Piper, at 57 cents per lineal foot, delivered on the streets ; 
and setting the same, to J. E. Piper and F. Gore, at 13 cents 
per lineal foot, and the concreting to Kirk W. Dodge, at 
50 cents per square yard. 

By a careful estimate made in consultation with our Engi- 
neer, and with the full belief that abutters could be assessed 
for one-half the cost of construction, as they have been in 
previous years, instead of not above one per cent, of the last 
assessed valuation, which is a statute law, we expected to 
build with the sum appropriated, together with the amount 
collected from assessments, the following line of sidewalks : 
Complete the work on the we£t side of West River street to 
Gordon avenue ; both sides of Gordon avenue to Austin 
street ; the east side of Central Park avenue from River 
street to Walnut street ; both sides of Maple street to Pine 
street ; one side of Oak street ; both sides of Hyde Park 
avenue to Everett street ; one side of Central avenue to 
West street ; the east side of East River street to Arling- 
ton street ; both sides of River street and Fairmount avenue, 
between the Providence Railroad bridge and the N. Y. & 
N. E. R. R. Crossing ; both sides of Fairmount avenue to High- 
land street ; the west side of Beacon street to Metropolitan 
avenue ; the west side of Water street to Dana avenue ; one 



side of Arlington street, between the Hazelwood station and 
Hyde Park avenue. 

The following statement is taken from the last town re- 
port in regard to the side-walk on West River street : — 

"Although every arrangement had been entered into with 
Mr. K. W. Dodge, for concreting the entire distance where 
stone has been located, and having arranged for the stock, he 
will be prepared to fulfil his part of the agreement promptly 
in the early spring." 

Hence work was commenced at the corner of Cleveland 
and West River streets. Cost of construction to Gordon 
avenue, $1,271.68. Assessed for $356.07. 

GORDON AVENUE. 

Sidewalks have been built on both sides of this avenue. 
Cost of construction, $1,972.29. Assessed for $699.53. 

RIVER STREET AND FAIRMOUNT AVENUE. 

Between the Boston and Providence Railroad Bridge and 
the N. Y. & N. E. R. R. crossing. — A permanent grade has 
been established and a continuous line of sidewalk built 
between the above-named points. Cost of construction, 
$1,063.43. Assessed for $483.72. 

MAPLE STREET. 

A sidewalk has been built on both sides of this street, 
from Everett square to Oak street, and on the west side from 
Oak street to the Unitarian Church. Cost of construction, 
$1,223.75. Assessed for $561.22. 

OAK STREET. 

As the estate of W. J. Case is situated on both Maple and 
Oak streets, the sidewalk was completed in front of his prop- 
erty, and as the street had to be excavated to conform to the 
grade given by the engineer, it became necessary to put 
down a walk on the opposite side, in front of the estate of 



William A. Wood. Cost of construction, $353.47. Assessed 
for $168.20. 



HYDE PARK AVENUE. 

A sidewalk has been built on both sides of this avenue, 
from Everett square to Everett street, and on the west side 
from Everett street to Clay street. Cost of construction, 
$1,402.29. Assessed for $533.40. 

CENTRAL AVENUE. 

A sidewalk has been built on the west side of this avenue, 
from Everett square to Webster street, and on the east side 
from Webster street to West street. Curbstone has also 
been set on the east side, from Everett square to Winthrop 
street, a distance of about 300 feet. Cost of construction, 
$2,050. 1 5. Assessed for $659. 5 1 . 

EAST RIVER STREET. 

A sidewalk has been built on the east side of this street, 
from Everett square to Arlington street. Cost of construc- 
tion, $2,446.96. Assessed for $809.53. 

FAIRMOUNT AVENUE. 

A sidewalk has been built on the north side of this ave- 
nue, from the Neponset river to Beacon street. Cost of con- 
struction, $291.60. Assessed for $97.00. 

WATER STREET. 

About 300 feet of curbstone has been set on this street, 
but no concreting has been done. 

BEACON STREET. 

A sidewalk has been built on the west side of this street, 
from Fairmount avenue to the estate of George M. Rice. 
Cost of construction, $1,761.55. Assessed for $501.97. 



RECAPITULATION. 

Entire cost of sidewalks . . . . . .. $13,837 17 

One-half of this sum (the amount we supposed could 

be assessed, as was done on the sidewalks built in 

1884 and 1885 6,918 58 

Actual legal assessment, which is to be paid to the 

Town Treasurer ....... 4,871 15 

Difference between one-half cost of construction and 

legal assessment . . . . . 2,047 43 

The amount of these two sums — $4,871.15 and $2,047.43 
equals $6,918.58 — approximates the special appropriation, 
$7,000.00 asked for at the special town meeting held on the 
17th of November, 1886. 

We very much regret that we could not complete the side- 
walks on Fairmount Avenue and Water Street, and we 
earnestly recommend that our successors give them prompt 
attention. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS. 

Early in the year a communication was received from Mr. 
Hamblin requesting the Selectmen to remove within thirty 
days the two twelve inch pipes used for carrying off surface 
water, from Fairmount Avenue, west of the railroad, to the 
Neponset River. 

This request was accompanied by an agreement signed by 
the former Selectmen to perform the same on thirty days no- 
tice. At a large expense, a twenty-fotir inch Akron pipe was 
laid from west of the N. Y. & N. E. R. R. Crossing on Fair- 
mount Avenue to the river, which will in the future carryall 
surface water naturally coming from the hill on Oak Street, 
and also from all that portion of Fairmount Avenue between 
Everett Square and the railroad crossing. 

For several years it has been a serious question how to 
dispose of the surface water of Walter Street, East Win- 
throp Street, and that portion of East River Street between 



IO 

Everett Square and Walter Street, and since the removal of 
the lumber yard of S. B. Balkam & Co., to its present loca- 
tion, it became necessary to take it from the foot of Walter 
Street underneath the N. Y. & N. E. R. R. to the Nepon- 
set River. 

Permission was granted by the Railroad Corporation to lay 
a twenty-four inch pipe underneath their tracks, which has 
been done at a large expense on condition that the town 
would build a drain to the river according to a plan and 
specifications to be furnished by them. 

This plan is now on file in the town clerk's office, but did 
not reach us until after the ground was frozen, so that the 
work could not be done this year. 

This work must be completed early the coming year, else 
the town will forfeit all privileges thus far gained. 

A vast amount of work has been clone by the Superin- 
tendent of Streets in regradi7ig the streets where curbstone 
has been set — supplying sand and paving stone for paving 
gutters, and adjusting the claims of abutters. 



PAVING. 

Gutters have been paved on both sides of River Street and 
Fairmount Avenue between Central Park Avenue and the N. 
Y. & N. E. RR. Crossing. Both sides of Maple Street from 
River Street to Oak Street. West side of Maple Street from 
Oak Street to the Unitarian Church. Both sides of Hyde 
Park Avenue from River Street to Winthrop Street. West 
side of Central Avenue from Everett Square to Winthrop 
Street. East side of East River Street from Everett Square 
to Walter Street. North Side of Fairmount Avenue from 
the river to Beacon Street. West side of Beacon Street from 
Fairmount Avenue to Milton Street. East side of Highland 
Street from Fairmount Avenue to near Milton Street. About 
four hundred feet upon Metropolitan Avenue, and about two 
hundred feet on the north side of Perkins Avenue. 



1 1 



CROSS WALKS. 

Granite Crosswalks have been put across the following 
streets : — 

Webster Street at the junction of Central Avenue. Ev- 
erett Square from Central- Avenue. River Street at the junc- 
tion of Hyde Park Avenue. Hyde Park Avenue at the junc- 
tion of River Street. River Street at the junction of Cen- 
tral Park Avenue, and both sides of Central Park Avenue at 
its junction with River Street. 

Approximate cost of the above work is as follows : — 

Pay Roll . -,•■■• ■ • • $5,000.00 
Granite for Crosswalks, Paving Stone, 

and Circle around Flagstaff . 1,100.00 

Paving . . . . . 1,000.00 

Akron Pipe . . . . . . 500.00 

Surveying Streets .... 1,400.00 

Land on Central Avenue . . . 300.00 

Street Roller 300.00 

Repairing Flagstaff .... 125.00 

Repairing Fences of Abutters . . . 275.00 



$10,000.00 



HIGHWAYS. 



Owing to the great freshet in February and also to the 
fact that the contractor for laying the water pipes neglected 
to make proper repairs, we found the streets in an unusually 
bad condition, and in onder to restore them, even to their 
former condition, required a large expenditure of the fund ap- 
propriated for highways. 

The first work of the year was done in the Fairmount Dis- 
trict by placing not less than twelve hundred loads of gravel 
east of the Neponset River. Corresponding work was also 
done in the central section of the town, including Pierce street, 
Davison street, East River street, Arlington street, Elm street, 



12 

West River street, Central avenue, Winthrop street, Lincoln 
street and Central Park avenue as far as Mother Brook. 

Work of the same nature has also been done on West 
River street from Glenwood avenue to the Dedham line, the 
entire length of Business street, the entire length of Read- 
ville street, and certainly not less than two thousand and five 
hundred loads of gravel was placed on the streets in the 
Readville District. Central Park avenue from Mother Brook 
to Milton street, Milton street from the Dedham line to the 
Milton line, and Sprague street, all in the Readville District, 
are in need of like repairs. 

It was the intention of the Selectmen to thoroughly rebuild 
Hyde Park avenue from the Boston line to Everett Square, 
and two large banks of gravel were purchased for this purpose, 
but before the work could be commenced the appropriated 
funds were so far expended that necessary repairs were simply 
made. We earnestly recommend that this street, with others 
in the Clarendon Hills District, including Metropolitan avenue 
and East River street, from the Butler School house to the 
Boston line, receive the careful consideration of the citizens 
and our successors. 

We also wish to make particular mention of Gordon avenue 
and Central avenue. 

The following in regard to Gordon avenue is taken from 
the last town Report: — 

"Therefore the final part is left to our successors, and we 
hope it will be the first to receive their attention." 

A large amount of money was spent on this avenue last 
year, but unfortunately the grade established would not carry 
the surface water into Stony Brook, hence our Engineer in 
re-establishing the grade carries the water into Austin street, 
and while the expense of rebuiding the avenue has been 
large, we trust that it will be satisfactory to the town. 



13 



CENTRAL AVENUE. 



It was with much misgiving that we began the widening 
and rebuilding of this avenue. 

A former Board of Selectmen commenced the work but 
left several important matters unsettled. We found the 
avenue varying from twenty-nine to thirty-eight feet in width 
between Everett Square and Everett street, and at an expense 
of nearly a thousand dollars for land have made it forty 
feet wide and established a grade that is fairly satisfactory to 
all parties concerned. 

POLICE. 

This Department has been under the skillful management 
of Officer Jenney and his assistants, and we believe that they 
have performed all duties in a thoroughly commendable man- 
ner. 

For details see report of Chief of Police. 

GUIDE POSTS. 

Fifty chestnut guide posts and eighty sign-boards have 
been placed on the corners of the more prominent streets. 

If the town could have twenty-five more guide posts and 
forty sign-boards, it would be completely supplied. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Last year the Selectmen appointed five engineers, and, 
because we believed the efficient management of the de- 
partment required only three, it became our unpleasant duty 
to reduce the number accordingly. 

A Hose-house has been built in the Readville District and 
is in the possession of the Department. 

We believe that our Fire Department is well equipped and 
as efficiently managed as any in New England. 

For details see Engineer's report. 



14 
STREET LIGHTS. 

The streets have been lighted in the same manner and by 
the same parties as last year. Many complaints have been 
made of the unsatisfactory lights furnished by the Dedham & 
Hyde Park Gas Light Co., and we are of the opinion that the 
use of Electric Lights as a street illuminant would be a great 
advantage to both the citizens and town. 

While in the Western States Electric Lights have been used 
for years, New England was somewhat conservative in their 
adoption, but as the advantages in the safety of travel upon 
the streets of cities and large towns was made apparent by 
the use of Electric illumination, New England has finally 
pronounced in its favor, and nearly one hundred of its cities 
and large towns are using Electric Lights on their streets. 

ACTIONS AT LAW. 

On the twenty-sixth day of April last, two suits of im- 
portance to the citizens and tax-payers, were commenced 
against the town : one by Abner G. Hill, in which he claimed 
damages in the sum of four thousand dollars ; the other by 
Daniel W. Simmons, in which he claimed five hundred dollars. 
Both are citizens of Pembroke, Mass. These claims for 
damages grew out of an accident which occurred on the Cen- 
tral Park Avenue bridge over Mother Brook, on the evening 
of November 6th, 1885, by reason of the carriage, in which 
Mr. Hill was riding, colliding with one of the iron arches or 
girders, which project above the planking or covering of the 
bridge. As a result of this collision it was claimed that one 
of Mr. Hill's legs was broken, and that he was permanently 
injured ; and that damage was done to Mr. Simmons' team 
in which he was riding at the time of the accident afore- 
said. We were advised that upon the claims and evi- 
dences of the plaintiff, the result of a trial in Court was 



15 

somewhat uncertain ; thereupon negotiations were com- 
menced with, a view of settling the case, providing terms 
could be agreed upon that in our judgment would be advan- 
tageous to the town ; but we soon found that the margin was 
so great between .what we felt at liberty to give and the 
lowest sum that would be accepted by the plaintiff in settle- 
ment, that we deemed it prudent to have the suits disposed of 
in Court. The two cases were tried together at the September 
sitting of the Superior court, at Dedham, before Judge 
Aldrich and a jury, and as a result of that trial, after lengthy 
deliberation by the jury, a compromise verdict was rendered 
for the plaintiff Hill in the sum of five hundred dollars, and 
for Simmons, in the sum of thirty dollars, as damages. 

The plaintiffs' costs in these two suits amounted to$i35.07 
making the total amount of the judgments in their favor 
$665.07. The town paid $157.20 to experts, engineers, and 
witnesses. 

While the aforesaid suits were pending in Court, last sum- 
mer, Henry W. Beckwith & Co., of Jamaica Plain, made claims 
for damages done to a horse, carriage and harness, on ac- 
count of a collision, in the night time, on the same bridge 
that happened, as was alleged, in substantially the same 
manner as the accident heretofore described, and out of which 
grew the two suits aforesaid. Miss Carrie A. Seaver who was an 
occupant of the carriage of Beckwith & Co., at the time of 
this alleged accident, made a claim for damages to her wear- 
ing apparel. The parties making these claims brought suits 
against the town on the seventeenth day of last August, and 
entered the same at the Superior Court, at Dedham. After 
various consultations and conferences with counsel, we found 
that these two last suits could be adjusted for $235.62. 
This amount was paid to the counsel for the last named 
plaintiffs and the suits consequently disposed of. 

During our term of service, the case James W. Bean vs. 
Hyde Park, where the plaintiff sought to recover about one 



\6 

thousand dollars for alleged labor, was argued in the Sup- 
reme Court, and a final decision in favor of the town has been 
rendered by that tribunal. 

NEW STREETS. 

Petitions have been received from citizens : For the ex- 
tension of Davison street from West street to Arlington 
street, and for the laying out of other streets as follows : 
Cleveland street from Child street to Brainard street ; 
Brainard street from Cleveland street to Glenwood avenue ; 
Beaver street from Cleveland street to Glenwood avenue ; 
Arlington street from East River street to Pierce street, and 
Charles street (Readville District) from Readville street to 
the Boston & Providence Railroad ; also, to have the name 
of this street changed to Damon street, as there is another 
Charles street in the Sunnyside District. 

We should have been glad to have considered all of the 
above petitions, but it was impossible for us to get the plans 
from the Engineer in time to do so ; therefore we refer the 
matter to our successors for their early consideration. 

HEARINGS BEFORE THE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS. 

During the year, the County Commissioners were peti- 
tioned to view and relocate East River street, from the 
Butler School to the Boston line ; West street, from East 
River street to Hyde Park avenue ; Fairmount avenue, from 
the easterly bank of the Neponset river to the N. Y. & N. 
E. R. R. 

We understand that the Commissioners have directed 
their engineer to place suitable bounds on East River street; 
and Fairmount avenue, showing the present true location of 
these streets, between the points aforesaid ; and according to 
their relocation, or bounds, the building on the southerly 
side of Fairmount avenue, between the river and railroad, 
projects into the street about five feet ; and the citizens are 



17 

at liberty to determine what action may be taken in regard 
to its removal. Surveys have also been ^made on West 
street. 

The Commissioners have also been petitioned to lay out 
Dana avenue as a County way, from Summit street to Brush 
Hill road, in Milton. 

Various hearings were had before the same body, at which 
the town was represented, on petition of citizens in the 
Clarendon Hills District, and others, to construct a bridge 
over the Boston and Providence railroad at Metropolitan 
avenue ; and we believe that whenever a bridge can be built 
at this point, that will be satisfactory to both the town and 
Railroad Corporation, that will not cost the town more than 
$5,000, it will be for its best interests to provide for the 
same, and we make the same recommendation in regard to a 
bridge at White's Crossing. 

BRIDGE STREET BRIDGE. 

It was the intention of the Selectmen to build a bridge on 
oak piles, but on a careful examination by experienced 
bridge-builders it was believed that they could not be driven 
in this soil, hence we were obliged to build a more expensive 
bridge and ask for an extra appropriation of $1,000, which 
we did at the last special town meeting. 

We believe that this bridge (constructed by W. W. Hil- 
ton), is a substantial structure and a great credit to the town. 

OUTSTANDING BILLS. 

Only $4,500 was appropriated last spring for incidental 
expenses, as against $6,000 last year, and we have approved 
outstanding bills in this department to the amount of about 
$900. 

The excessive amount of snow this year has somewhat in- 
creased our expenses, and we have approved outstanding bills 
in this department to the amount of about $1,000. 

We have no knowledge of any other outstanding bills. 



Our contract with the Engineer provides that the work 
shall be completed in about five months from April ist, 1886, 
and as the work, at the present time, is not so far advanced 
as to be ready for our examination or acceptance, we are un- 
able to give any definite information in regard to what 
further claims ($1,400 having already been paid) the Engi- 
neer may have against the town. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID PERKINS, 
JOHN H. TUCKERMAN, 
HOBART M. CABLE, 

Selectmen. 

Hyde Park, Mass., January 31st, 1887. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS. 

Number of births registered in Hyde Park in 1886 

Males 

Females ... . . 



197 

84 

113 



The parentage of the children 
Both parents American 



is as follows : 



93 

Irish 27 

Scotch 4 

English 3 

Sweedes 3 

Germans ........ 1 

of British Provinces ...... 14 

Mixed, one parent American ....... 42 

Both parents of other nationalities ...... 10 

Born in January, 10; February, 18; March, 16; April, 16; May, 15 
June, 15; July, 12; August, 19; September, 20; October, 20; Novem- 
ber, 13; December, 23. 

MARRIAGES. 

Number of intentions of marriage issued in 1886 ... 76 

" " marriages registered in 1886 ..... 86 

Oldest groom 65 

br ; de 54 

Youngest groom 19 

" bride 17 

Both parties born in United States 43 

" " Ireland ....... 7 

" " British Provinces . . . . 6 

" "' England 1 

" " Scotland 1 

" " other foreign countries .... 6 

Foreign and American ....'.... 22 

Married in January, 7; February, 3; March, 6; April, 4; May, 6; 

June, 8; July, 13; August, 7; September, 8; October, 10; November, 

11 ; December, 3. 



20 

The following are the names and residences of the parties whose 
marriages were solemnized in 1886 certificates of which have been 
filed in this office: — 

Jan. 1. John B. Guinazzo of Hyde Park, and Ellen M. Breen of 
Boston. 
" 7. Louis E. Hill and Florence E. Carr, both of Hyde Park. 
" 10. George W. Abbott and Ida F. Hunt, both of Canton. 
" 12. James Hickey and Maggie L. Curley, both of Hyde Park. 
" 17. Lewis C. Orcutt and Sarah Shutt, both of Hyde Park. 
" " Martin Leonard of Hyde. Park, and Delia F. Toole of Boston. 
" 28. Patrick Curley and Nora Mahoney, both of Hyde Park. 
Feb. 6. James S.Richardson and Nellie L. Glidden,both of Hyde Park. 
" 17. James E. Lee and Margaret Durant. both of Hyde Park. 
" 20. Herman Kupke and Lena Erler, both of Hyde Park. 
Mar. 1. Charles H. Kohl and Mary A. O'Neil, both of Hyde Park. 
" 4. Daniel W. Bonney and Eva M. Wetmore, both of Dedham. 
" 8. Eldridge G. Tucker of Sangerville, Me., and Mary L. Hol- 

brook of Hyde Park. 
" 11. Daniel H. Cooey and MaryE. Campbell, both of Hyde Park. 
" 16. Charles H. Fisher of Salem, and Lyclia M. Ayer of Hyde 

Park. 
'• 18. William F. Badger and Susan C. Timson, both of Hyde 
Park. 
Apr. 3. Charles R. Ladd and Ella M. Weaver, both of Springfield. 
" 8. Charles F. Sargent of Somerville, and Ella F. Parkhurst of 

Hyde Park. 
" 12. Robert Johnson and Frieda Andalene. both of Hyde Park. 
" 21. Malcolm Stewart of Hyde Park, and Julia A. Campbell 
of Boston. 
May 15. David Cunningham and Kitty B. Eddy, both of Boston. 
" " Fred E. Wheeler of Hyde Park, and Martha D. Wiggin of 

Somerville. 
" 19. James Marsden and Ellen Reilly, both of Cambridge. 
" 21. Thomas Tobin and Mary J. Tobin, both of Hyde Park. 
•' 25. John H. Beasley of Hyde Park, and Theresa M. McDermott 

of Boston. 
" 27. Patrick J. Dwyer and Sarah J. Forrest, both of Hyde Park. 
June 1. Leonard W. Hall and Ida May, both of Hvde Park. 
•' 13. John Norton and Margaret Dooley, both of Hyde Park. 
" 16. John O'Neal and Mary A. Horrigan, both of Hyde Park. 
" 19. Thomas H. Risk of Hyde Park, and Mary J. Coffin of New- 
bury. 



21 

" 24. Charles McGraw of Douglas, and Elizabeth Keyes of New 

Brunswick. 
" " Frank G. Durkee of Hyde Park, and Mary E. Dane of 

Hamilton. 
" 25. Michael Thompson of Hyde Park, and Mary A. Gargan of 

Dedham. 
" 30. George Newland of Hyde Park, and Mary F. Armstrong of 

Newton. 
July 1. Daniel Allen and Catherine M. Maguire, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 3. Francis Hurley and Mary A. Shannon, both of Hyde Park. 
" 4. George W. Lombai'd and Rachael E. Chadderton, both of 

Hyde Park. 
" 7. William F. Hargrave of Dedham, and Annie M. Case of 

Hyde Park. 
" " Alfred L. Berry and Lillie A. Mason, both of Hyde Park. 
" 8. Barney Connor and K-itie Hayes, both of Hyde Park. 
" " Archibald McMillan and Barbara Roberts, both of Hyde Park. 
•' 15. James B. Hickey and Catherine E. Dray, both of Hyde Park. 
" 22. Levi Tuttle of Boston, and Susan L.JShaw of Hyde Park. 
*' 25. William S. Lodge and Ellen A. Mullen, both of Hyde Park. 
" 26. Frank K. Hubbard cf Dedham, and Julia E. Neai of Leray 

N. Y. , 
" 29. Harold B. Gray of Hyde Park, and Ida D. Stevens of Solon, 

Me. 
" " John J. O'Brien of Hyde Park, andjAnnie McGrea : of Boston. 
Aug. 5. Michael J. Cullen and Bridget T. Dvv-3'er, both of Hyde Park. 
" " A. Judson Emery and Mary L. Higgins, both of Boston. 
" 8. George E. Leason and Emma B. Cooper, both of Hyde Park. 
" 9. George S. Taylor and Annie J. Matthewson, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 11. John H. Black of Portland, Me., and Ann E. Kilroy of Hyde 

Park. 
" 19. Philippe de Senancour of Brookline, and Elizabeth D. Bunker 

of Hyde Park. 
" 26. Thomas M. Galvin and Margaret V. Kivlen, both of Hyde 

Park. 
Sept. 7. Frederick W. Rogers of New York, N. Y., and Mary K. Leach 

of Hyde Park. 
" " Thomas Clapperton and Betsey Hisler, both of Hyde Park. 
" 22. Eugene M. Stubbs of Rockland, Me., and Leila E. Perry of 

Hyde Park. 
" 23. JohnM. O'Brien of Quincy, and Kate J. Harrington of Hyd e 

Park. 



22 

Sept. 23. Dennis H. Coleman and Catherine H. Sullivan, both of Hyde 
Park. 
" 25. Elmer P. Libbey of Waltham, and Nettie A. Thayer of Hyde 

Park. 
" 27. Isaac Murdock of Boston, and Maria J. Grant of Hyde Park. 
'" 30. Thomas J. Casey of Norwood, and Mary A. Rogers of Hyde 
Park. 
Oct. 2. Charles H. Fraser and Margaret I. Forrest, both of Hyde 
Park. 
" 4. Charles H. Augur of Brooklyn, N. Y., and Emma F. Higgins 

of Hyde Park. 
" " Frank Kelleypant and Mina Dupieu, both of Hyde Park. 
" 10. Hugh Grant and Annie M. Gallagher, both of Hyde Park. 
" 12. Charles F. Jenney and Mary E. Bruce, both of Hyde Park. 
" 17. Hugh McDougall and Kate McNeil, both of Hyde Park. 
" 20. Willis A. DeLano of Portland, Me., and Francena I. Sanders 

of Ossipee. N. H. 
" " Frederick W. Osborne of Hyde Park, and Nellie M. Tibbetts 

of Bradford. 
" 26. John L. Nutting of Fitchburg, and Frances M. Baker of Hyde 

Park. 
•' 28. J.Randolph Coolidge, Jr. ofBrookline, and Mary H. Hill of 
Hyde Park. 
Nov. 3. Thomas W. Mayo and Augusta S. Halliday, both of Hyde 
Park. 
" 4. Cornelius Lucy and Margaret Murphy, both of Hyde Park. 
" " William H. Harlow and Mary E. Bleakie, both of Hyde Park. 
" 6. Eugene Murphv of Norwood, and Ellen Hayes of Hyde Park. 
" 10. William H. Barritt of Hyde Park, and Katharine Muhe of 

Boston. 
" 18. Frank E. McManus and Katie F. Russell, both of Hyde Park. 
" 22. Clarence E. Brooks of Boston, and Agnes Athe-ton, of Hyde 

Park. 
" 23. Sherman G. Bonney of Hyde Park, and Nannie B. Little of 

Lewiston, Me. 
" 24. James W. Leonard and Alice Brady, both of Hyde Park. 
" 25. Thomas Connelley and Maggie Curran, both of Hyde Park. 
" 29. John W. Matthews and Sadie E. Eastman, both of Dedham. 
Lee. 1. Alden D. Wheeler, and Sarah O. Holway, both of Hyde Park. 
" 11. Albert B. Leason, and Mattie L. Pert, both of Hyde Park. 
" 14. William L. Wright of Springfield, and Annie L. Sheffield of 
Hyde Park. 



23 



DEATHS. 

Number of deaths in Hyde Park in 18 

Males 

Females .... 
Born in the United States . 

" Ireland 

" British Provinces 

" Scotland . 

Birthplace Unknown . 



J 45 

64 
81 

XI 3 

22 

5 

1 

4 



AGES. 










Stillborn ........ .12 


Under one year . 
Between 1 and 5 years 

5 " 10 " 
10 " 20 












41 

12 

4 
6 


20 " 30 " 












20 


" 30 " 40 " 












14 


40 " 50 

50 " 60 " 












9 
6 


60 " 70 " 












8 


70 " 80 

80 " 90 " 












9 
3 


90 " 100 . " 






* 


1 




1 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



Accident .... 
Consumption, pneumonia or 

other lung diseases . 
Cholera infantum, or other 

bowel diseases 
Diphtheria .... 
Throat diseases (other than 

diphtheria) . 
Cancer and tumor 
Brain diseases 



44 

J 3 

o 



Marasmus . 




• 3 


Convulsions 




. 6 


Meningitis . 


, 


• 3 


Heart disease 




• 9 


Scarlet fever 




. 


Typhoid fever 




1 


Paralysis and 


apoplexy 


• 5 


Stillborn 


, 


• J 3 


Old age 




• 4 


Various other 


diseases 


• 2 5 



24 



DEATHS — {Continued) 



Laura E. Foote 

Margerson 

Cecelia Marks 

Edward Bergeron 

Owen Fox 

Marion E. (Jhipman. ... 

Mar}' E . Morrison 

Mary Towle 

Edward Hankard 

Josiah I?. Richardson... 

Clara T. Wandless 

Thomas Daly 

Margaret Flaherty 

Carrie N. Chandler 

Frank F. Steward 

Eva A. Oliver 

Brown 

Barton 

Ernest H. Hardy 

Remick 

Nellie Karney 

Annie L. Farnham 

Martha J. Hammond 

Mary E. Sculley 

Jennie R. Montgomery.. 

Annie L. S. Rich ".. 

Mary O'Neil 

Sarah A. Clark 

Herbert L. Randall 

Bridget E. Hunt 

Elsa E. Loid 

Caroline O. Tyler. 

Horace Fisher 

Catherine Harkins 

Edith G.Adams 

Ganzhorn 

Frederick Brustle 

Michael Cannon 

Rebecca Corbett , 

James L. Dadley 



17 .. 

18 [ Bridget Boland 

19 Max. Pincsohn 

30 Fannie G. Davis 

21 ' Eliza A. Woodman 

25 Mary O'Donnell 

25 Bridget Driscoll 

26 Johanna Driscoll 

1 Welch 

1 Simon Connolly 

7 Mary Legre 

13 Jennie A. Stone 

17 Michael O'Mally 

17 Roger'Clancy 

21 Lewis J. Guinazzo 

27 Julia Beausang 

2S Caroline A. G. Stockbridge 

30 Carpenter 

1 I Evelyn C. M. Cromwell.... 

2 Frank O. Ditson 

4 Julia Siegel 

10 Hennessey 



6+ 



So 



57 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Apoplexy. 

Stillborn. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Cholera infantum 

Cholera infantum 

Cholera Infantum. 

Convulsions. 

Cancer. 

Railroad accident. 

Bright's disease. 

Cholera infantum. 

Cholera infantum. 

Diarrhoea. 

Cholera infantum. 

Pneumonia. 

Meningitis. 

Stillborn. 

Premature birth. 

Diarrhoea. 

Stillborn. 

Phthisis. 

Convulsions. 

Cholera infantum. 

Water on the brain, 

Convulsions. 

Endocarditis. 

Phthisis. 

Hepatitis. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Cholera infantum. 

Marasmus. 

Consumption. 

Whooping cough. 

Heart disease. 

Cholera infantum. 

Premature birth. 

Congestion of lungs. 

Old age. 

Old age._ 

An semi a". 

Chronic diarrhoea. 

Gun-shot wound. 

Endocarditis. 

Peritonitis. 

Premature birth. 

Phthisis. 

Marasmus. 

Stillborn. 

Consumption. 

Consumption. 

Epilepsy. 

Ilio colitis. 

Meningitis. 

Anaemia. 

Debility. 

Softening of the brain. 

Stillborn. 

Gastro enteritis. 

Consumption&paralysis of heart. 

Meningitis. 

Stillborn. 



25 

The following are the names of those who died in Hyde 
Park during the year 1886, viz : — 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



April 



May 



June 



July 



William E. Hammond ... 

Mary Rooney 

Margaret Maguire 

Bridget Newcomb 

Janet D'Arcy 

Mary McAuliffe 

Charles O. Benton 

Laura E. Keeler 

Hugh Gardner 

Francis E. Guinan 

Hugo J . Bloom 

Jennie P. Carlton 

Ezekiel F. Hincks 

Shute 

Mary J. Colburn 

William Tilly 

William F. Haynes 

John W. Collins 

Lizzie H. Bartlett 

Patrick Mulcahy 

Matilda Farrell 

Patrick Conroy 

Mary Sheehan 

Thomas J. Kelley 

George J. DeLuce 

William Donohue 

John S. Collins 

Samuel H. Merritt 

George H. Kent 

Mabel Winn 

Agnes McAuliffe 

Josephine F. Allen 

John Coughlan 

Walter J. Mertens 

John Higgins 

Eunice E. D. Somerby 

Patience Bowen 

Bridget Coughlan, 

Marv A. Lynch 

William P. : Merrill 

Francis S. Richardson . . . 

Betsey B. Brown 

Thomas Burke 

Otis Marlowe 

George A. Badger 

Martha S. Dunlap 

Rose A. Quigley 

Jeremiah Lucey 

Mary Keliher 

Jane E. Bates 

Owen Scrivens 

Louisa Z. J. Carpenter 

Merrill Bigelow 

Lillian Soule 

Amittai H. Howes 

Ellen Brady 

Thomas P. Donohue 

John M. Donohue 

Catherine A. Woods 

Frederick Scrivens , 

Bernard A. Mertens , 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Hepatic abscess. 
Old age. 
Apoplexy. 
Pneumonia. 
Croup. 

Angina pectoris. 
Consumption. 
Consumption. 
Congenital syphilis. 
Blood poisoning. 
Congestion of brain. 
Pneumonia. 
Heart disease. 
Stillborn. 
Cancer. 
Drowned. 
General debility. 
Convulsions. 
Consumption, 
Pluro pneumonia. 
Dropsy. 

Concussion of brain. 
Pleurisy. 

Chronic hephritis. 
Typhoid fever. 
Tuberculosis. 
Pulmonary phthisis 
Paralvsis. 

Phthisis pulmonalis. 
Pneumonia, 
Cyanosis. 

Osteosarcoma of femur. 
Stillborn. 

Inflammation of brain. 
Senile debility. 
Anasarca. 
Pneumonia. 
Hydro thorax. 
Pneumonia. 
Pneumonia. 
Pneumonia. 

Septicarmia from parametritis. 
Pneumonia, 
Convulsions. 
Phthisis. 
Consumption. 
Phthisis'. 
Phthisis. 
Phthisis. 
Hepatitis. 
Convulsions. 
Tuberculosis- 
Inflammation of bowels 
Pneumonia. 
Heart disease. 
Consumption. 
Railroad accident. 
Railroad accident. 
Phthisis. 
Meningitis. 
Consumption. 



26 



DEATHS— {Concluded) 





NAMES. 

* 


AGES. 






Y. 


M. 


D. 






McCrillis 












Eliza E McCriliis 


26 
79 
44 
26 


6 


29 


Childbirth 




Julia T Veno 


Apoplexy. 
Consumption. 


" 21 




iS 


27 
" 2S 








54 
63 


6 

7 
S 
6 


9 
16 
13 
13 


Encysted tumor. 


Dec. i 




" 6 


Esther M. Pike 


Congestion of lungs. 


\\ 9 




3 
76 

Si 

S 










10 


23 

16 

3 
11 


Phthisis puhnonalis. 
Laryngitis. 


« J 3 

IS 

" 16 




Nellie Cundall 






7 


Hydrocephalus. 












54 

72 


10 


24 


Typhoid pneumonia. 
Hydro pericarditis. 
Acute bronchitis. 
Stillborn. 




Abby O'Callahan 

Sarah Coullahan 


24 

25 

25 

" 29 

" 31 


3 


7 




26 

74 


S 
3 


20 

14 
S 


Angina pectoris. 

Apoplexy. 

Marasmus. 





The Town Clerk requests information of any omission or 
error in the above tables, in order that the registration may- 
be as complete as possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



The Board of Health takes pleasure in making this annual 
report. It is well known that two members have done the 
work for the past year, Dr. C. C. Hayes having resigned 
about April ist. We have answered all calls by a personal 
inspection in every case. We congratulate the inhabitants 
upon the healthful condition of the^town. 

For the year ending January 31st, there have been reported 
to us the following cases of contagious diseases : Diphtheria, 
five cases ; scarlet fever, ten cases ; typhoid fever, three 
cases, (with only one death ; against diphtheria, twenty-four 
cases ; scarlet fever, sixty-eight cases ; typhoid fever, eighteen 
cases, (with four deaths,) for the year 1 885. 

We believe this decrease in sickness and death is due to a 
great extent to the introduction of pure water. 

The Board has done but little that required the expendi- 
ture of the town's money. A few dogs have been buried, 
the ditch in the rear of Raymond's stable has been cleaned, 
and a hollow in the rear of Green street was filled. 

The Board has discouraged the keeping of swine when 
consistent, and the usual number of permits has not been 
granted. There have been many calls upon the Board to 
remove swill We have tried the experiment of having i; 
removed for its value, but it has proved a failure. We be- 
lieve the next Board will be called upon to do this at the 
expense of the town. 

We have been called upon to examine several wet cellars ; 
we believe that all such should be cemented ; it is the only 
remedy against sickness. A perfect system of drainage is 
very much needed. 

No ashes, garbage, or dirt of any kind, should be allowed to 
remain in any cellar during the summer months ; and pure 



28 

air should be allowed to circulate through the cellar at all 
seasons, in pleasant weather. Our experience teaches us 
that many cases of sickness might be avoided if the above 
suggestions, were strictly complied with. 

REGULATIONS. 

Public Statutes, Chapter 80, Section 18. — The Board of Health 
of a town shall make such regulations as it judges necessary for the public 
health and safety, respecting nuisances, sources of filth and causes of 
sickness within its town. Whoever violates any such regulation shall 
forfeit a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

In accordance with the foregoing provision of law, this Board adopts 
the following regulations, which will be strictly enforeed : — 

Regulation i. — No person will be permitted to keep any swine within 
the limits of the town of Hyde Park without a written permit from the 
Board of Health. 

Regulation 2. — No person shall place, or cause to be placed, or by 
any means empty, or cause to be emptied, any sewage, the drainage of 
any sink or stable, or the contents of any cesspool or privy well, in or 
upon any public street or way of this town. 

Regulation 3. — No person shall remove, or carry in or through any 
of the streets, lanes or avenues, places or alleys, within the town of Hyde 
Park, the contents of any cesspool, vault, privy, or privy well, unless a 
permit be granted by the Board of Health. 

Public Statutes, Chapter 80, Section 79. — When a physician 
knows that a person whom he is called to visit is infected with small-pox, 
or any other disease dangerous to the public health, he shall immediately 
give notice thereof to the Selectmen or Board of Health of the town; 
and if he refuses or neglects to give such notice, he shall .forfeit for each 
offence not less than fifty nor more than one hundred dollars. 

Regulation 4. — The following diseases are considered contagious 
and dangerous to the public health: Small Pox, Diphtheria, Scarlet 
Fever and Typhoid Fever. 

The Board intends, by personal supervision, to see that the above 
regulations are carried out, and desires the inhabitants of Hyde Park to 
assist in the work of frequently cleaning out the cesspools and removing 
all noxious matter from their premises. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE F. DOWNES, Chairman. 
& JOEL F. GOODWIN, Secretary. 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



The library has been open, during the past year, for five 
hours every clay, except holidays -and Sundays, up to Dec. 
23d, when it was closed for reasons we'l known to the pub- 
lic. Doubts as to the stability of the building have existed 
in the minds of some ever since its erection; and, before the 
library was removed to its present quarters, the trustees took 
the precaution of having the building thoroughly examined 
by persons thought to be competent judges, and a number of 
changes made to render it more secure ; as appears by the 
twelfth report of the trustees. But, when the building was 
officially inspected and pronounced unsafe for occupancy, we 
felt that we had no further option in the premises, and that 
a decent regard for the feelings and the security of the 
library's patrons, compelled the immediate closing of the 
rooms. We sought for other suitable ones at once, but could 
find none. So we are forced to ask the public to wait until 
the repairs and changes, now in progress, shall be completed; 
which, under favorable circumstances, may be before this re- 
port is published. Of course, no rent will be expected for 
the rooms while thus unavailable. The librarians, during this 
time, will be busied in re-covering and rearranging books, 
making up lists of new books for publication in the local 
papers, writing up the accession and shelf catalog les, and 
in many other necessary details for which scant time is found 
during the busy hours of distribution. 



30 

Books having accumulated considerably in excess of the 
capacity of those shelves which could be easily reached from 
the floor, and the constant use of a step-ladder, to reach the 
higher shelves, being very onerous and somewhat dangerous 
to the librarians, and attended with delay, the trustees em- 
braced an opportunity to secure, at a low price, a nearly new 
iron gallery formerly used by the late firm of Lockwood, 
Brooks & Co., at its book-store on Franklin street, Boston. 
This was purchased and put in place in our library rooms at 
a total cost of $183.55; an d by means of it all our shelf-room, 
and about one-fifth of our books, are now readily accessible, 
and the future needs of the library in that respect anticipated 
for a considerable period. 

The number of volumes now in the library is 8702, of 
which 592 have been added during the past year; 482 by pur- 
chase, and 1 10 by gift. Of these books about 6000 titles are 
contained in the general catalogue compiled in 1881; from 
1200 to 1500 are to be found in the two supplements since 
issued; the most of the remainder have been published in the 
local papers, from time to time. The necessity of referring 
to so many different sources for a knowledge of the books 
obtainable at the library is, undoubtedly, a limitation of its 
usefulness as well as an inconvenience to its patrons. The 
only remedy is a new catalogue, bringing the lists up to date, 
which would cost about $900. It will be for the tax-payers 
to say when they think the necessity great enough to war- 
rant the outlay. 

The use of the library books by the scholars of the public 
schools, as supplemental to exercises in their class-rooms, 
continues to increase, and is one of the gratifying benefits 
conferred by a public library. 

The reading-room has been fairly well attended during the 
year, the average monthly number of magazines used there 
being 146, and of books, 56. The following periodicals and 
papers are always to be found there: 






3i 



MAGAZINES. 



Harper's, Atlantic, Century, Scribners', Lippincott, New 
England, Living Age, St. Nicholas, Wide Awake, Harper's 
Young People, North American Review, Popular Science, 
Magazine of Art, Art Amateur, Art Interchange, #\meri- 
can Library Journal, Magazine of American History. 

PAPERS. 

Harper's Weekly, Scientific American, Literary World, 
Youth's Companion, N. Y. Semi-Weekly Tribune, Boston 
Daily Journal, Boston Daily Transcript, Norfolk County 
Gazette, Hyde Park Times. 

In all 25,527 books have been given out during the ten 
months when the library has been open, making the circula- 
tion a trifle less than that of the year ending in 1 885, which 
was the best on record. Probably, the circulation has been 
somewhat lessened, during the last two years, by the change 
in the rules fixing the minimum age at which children can take 
books at 14, instead of 12 years, as was the case before. Of 
the circulation about 80 per cent has consisted of fiction, 10 
per cent of history, 5 per cent of travels, and 5 per cent of 
all other matter. 

The number of new cards issued during the year is 291; 
the amount of fines, $32.13; the number of books covered and 
re-covered, upwards of 1000, and those bound and re-bound, 
266. The present value of the library fund is $4930.80. 

The librarians have performed their duties faithfully and 
conscientiously, and, so far as we are aware, to the satisfac- 
tion of the public. 

In November last the resignation of Sylvanus Cobb, Jr. 
was tendered on account of continued ill-health, which, in his 
judgment, rendered him unable to give further service on the 
Board of which he had been, for so many years, a valued and 
efficient member. The regret felt and expressed by the 
trustees will be fully shared by the citizens of the town. 



32 

The following donations have been received: 

From Mrs. W. J. Stuart 63 vols. 

" " J. F. Loughlin (6 unbound) 12 " 

" " I. E. Porter 2 " 

" Mr. C. F. Allen 1 vol. 

" T. D. Weld 1 " 
" " Erastus Worthington (of Dedham) 1 " 

" Rev. J. Huxtable 1 " 

" The United States 6 pamphlets and 8 vols. 

" The City of Boston 4 " "9 " 

" Mr. C. F. Jenney 1 pamphlet 

" " E. G. Chamberlain 1 " 

For the Trustees, 

EDMUND DAVIS, 

Chairman. 



33 









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^ 



POLICE REPORT. 



To the Board of Selectmen : — 

Gentlemen, — The following is a record of the arrests 
made during the year ending February ist, 1887. .Classi- 
fied as follows : 



Drunkenness .... 

Assaults .... 

Breaking and Entering and Larceny 

Liquor Nuisance . • . 

Keeping Liquor with intent to sell 

Vagrants .... 

Tramps . . . 

Embezzlement . ... 

Peddling without License . 

Cruelty to Animals 

Setting Fire • 

Exploding Fire Works 

Larceny ..... 

Arrested and turned over to officers from other places 

Insane persons committed to Hospitals 

Number of search warrants for intoxicating liquor 
Cases investigated without arrest 
Stores found open at night . . 



37 

15 

6 

10 

r 

25 

2 
1 
6 

3 

1 
1 
2 
3 
5 



118 

12 

127 

4 



Stolen property recovered 



$390.00 



In adddition to the above, 1,069 travellers have been 
lodged in the station house over night, being discharged the 
following day. 



35 

There can be no doubt that the town needs a larger police 
force. The officers now under pay have conscientiously en- 
deavored to enforce the laws, and have done as well as pos- 
sible with the limited means at [their control ; and with a 
good measure of success, yet with a larger force much more 
might be accomplished and the property of the citizens more 
thoroughly protected. The town would in my opinion, be 
fully compensated for the extra outlay occasioned by the in- 
crease. 

CHARLES E. JENNEY, 
Chief of Police and Keeper of Lock-up. 



ENGINEER'S REPORT 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen: — 

Gentlemen : — Herewith we present our report for the 
year ending January 31st, 1887. 

It is with great pleasure that we call your attention to the 
high state of efficiency in which our Department stands and 
we can truly say that each and every man has done his duty 
in a satisfactory manner to the board of Engineers. 

The addition of a Fire Alarm System has thus far been of 
great help to the Department and cannot fail to prove valuable 
to the best interests of the town. As statistics show, the 
better a place is supplied in this respect, the incendiary fires 
correspondingly decrease. We would respectfully recom- 
mend the further increase of our alarm system by the addi- 
tion of a Tower Striker on the Methodist church bell, and 
five street boxes. The present equipment of the Fire Alarm 
Telegraph is as follows : 8 miles of wire with Brackets 
Insulators, &c. : 5 Street Boxes; 1 15-inch Gong and 
Punch Indicator; 3 Tappers; I Battery; 30 Cells; 1 Gal- 
vonometer. 

On the completion of the Hose House at Readville we 
stationed a hose wagon there fully equipped with hose, lad- 
ders, &c, and the company, under the command of Capt. 
James H. O'Brien, are in good condition to render effective 
service in their district, and also report at the Central Station 
at all alarms for fires which are out of their limits. The Hy- 
drant Service we have found first-class in all respects. 



37 

The Apparatus belonging to the Town is as follows : 

Two Steam Fire Engines. 

One Chemical Engine, (double tank). 

One Hook and Ladder Truck, (fully equipped). 

Two Hose Carriages, (four wheel). 

One Hose Wagon. 

Four Thousand Feet of Cotton Hose, in fair condition. 

Three Hundred Feet of Rubber and Cotton Hose for 
Chemical Engine. 

Four Sets of Swinging Harness. 

One Single Harness. 

Two Shut-off Nozzles. 

One Relief Valve, together with the requisite number of 
Play Pipes, Wrenches, Bursting Straps, Hose Lines, Lanterns, 
etc., etc. 



The Engine House is in great need of repairs, and should 
be attended to at once in order to save the town a much 
larger sum in the very near future. We would urgently 
recommend an appropriation for iooo feet of hose, for should 
we have a fire requiring several streams at once we would be 
crippled in that important respect from the start, and without 
a good supply of hose we cannot successfully fight fire. Be- 
cause we have been so greatly favored by freedom from fires 
for the past two or three years let us not rest in fancied se- 
curity, but be prepared to fight the enemy at all times, and 
bear in mind that every dollar (expended judiciously) for the 
Fire Department is money well invested. 

Appended is a list of the officers of the several com- 
panies with the number of men in the Department. 

Appended find list of fires for the year, with insurance and 
loss. The small number of fires as well as the very small loss 
is a matter of pride to the departments and should be so 
thought by the underwriters and citizens. When we have 



38 



more than two thousand wooden structures in the town and 
have only six fires in a year and a total loss of but $1230, 
we may well take pride in the record and have it published 
that Hyde Park does not depend on kind neighbors for pro- 
tection against fires as too many towns do to their shame. 



Yours respectfully. 

H. G. BALI 

R. WILLIAMS, 

R fOR^ON ( Assistant Engineers. 



H. G. BALKAM, Chief Engineer, 
R. WILLIAMS, 



39 



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40 



OFFICERS AND NUMBER OF MEN. 



The following is a list of the officers of the several companies, 
together with the number of men in the employ of the department. 

Hook and Ladder Co. No. i. 
ROBERT SCOTT, Jr., Foreman. 
WILLIAM HOLTHAM, Assistant Foreman. 
ROBERT P. HOLMES, Clerk and Treasurer ; and seven 
men. 



Chemical Engine. 

HENRY I. SOMES, Foreman. 

A. W. STORY, Clerk and Treasurer ; and two men. 



Hose Co. No. i. 

A. R. WILLIAMS, Foreman. 

C M. WANDLASS, Assistant' Foreman ; and six men. 



Hose Co. No. 2. 

F. T. GREENLOW, Foreman. 

M. ROGERS. Assistant Foreman. 

J. T. GREENLOW, Clerk and Treasurer ; and five men. 



Hose Co. No. 3. 

JAMES H. O'BRIEN, Foreman. 

M. GALLIGAN, Clerk and Treasurer ; and three men. 
There are ten Substitutes, who are paid by the several Com- 
panies such compensation as they may direct. 
M. J. FOLEY, Engineman. 
JOSHUA WILDER, Steward. 
Number of Men in the Department ... 40 



4i 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 





a3 




p 

o 




ri 1 m ' 


o 


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a 




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£? ™ 












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223 


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$4,939,437 00 


$688,251 00 


$5,627,688 00 


2,098 


1,468 392 


2,406 


State Tax. 


County Tax. 


Town Tax. 


Overlayings. i 


Total. 


$4,275 00 


$2,900 76 


$82,175 00 


$2,074 40 

1 I 


$91,425 16 



EXEMPTED PROPERTY 



Mat 1, 1886. 


Churches. 


Harvard College. 


Total. 




$155,350 00 


$225 00 


$155,575 00 



RATE RER $1,000, - $15. 50. 



Mat 1. 


Val. Real Estate. 


Val. Personal Property 


Total. 


1885 


$4,577,150 00 
4,939,437 00 


$624,935 00 
68S.251 00 


$5,202,085 00 
5,627,688 00 


1886 






$362,287 00 


$63,316 00 


$425,603 00 





JOEL F. GOODWIN, 
GEORGE SANFORD, 
GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 



Assessors of Hyde Park. 



REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : — 

Before going into a detailed report of the receipts and ex- 
penditures in our department for the "town year" ending 
Jan. 31, 1887, we would state that the number of persons re- 
ceiving aid (to any amount) is about the same as last year. 

There has been more sickness requiring the attention of 
the town physician than for some years past, it being attribu- 
table, in several cases, to old age and its accompanying 
decrepitude. One person, Mrs. Michael Griffin, died Jan. 
13th, 1887, after a long illness. A commendable feature in the 
case and worthy of mention is the fact that the husband, who 
survives his wife, and who, on account of feebleness, is 
wholly supported by the town, insisted upon paying the 
burial expenses out of a little fund which they had for some 
time been saving up for that purpose. 

We would publicly acknowledge a contribution of $25.00 
from some generous person whose name is unknown to us, 
which was used by request to provide Thanksgiving dinners 
for the poor residing in our midst and which were grate- 
fully received by the families thus provided for. 



REPORT IN DETAIL. 



Whole number of persons aided 
Insane fully supported 
Sane " " ... 

Number of persons partially supported 
Tramps lodged .... 

Tramps otherwise aided . 



1,205 



13 

116 

1,069 

4 



1,205 



43 



Statement of aid rendered, with settlement in each case, 
and number in the family, the settlement being H^de Park, 
unless otherwise stated : — 



FOR FULL SUPPORT. 



INSANE. 



Sarah J. Barrett, at Taunton Lunatic Asylum 
Clara E. Ciapp, "' " 

Henry W. Hammond, " " " 



$191 23 
186 69 

190 56 



James Conley ...... 

Kate Gibbons, at St. Vincent's Asylum 
Mary M. Gibbons. " " " 

Delia Tierney, •' " 

John Tierney, at House of the Angel Guardian 
Martin Tierney, " " " " 

Thomas Tierney. " " " u 

John P. McCabe, " " " " 

Rose McCabe, at Charles McCabe's, Roxbury 
Michael Griffin and wife .... 

Louisa Withington, at Quincy Poor Farm . 
Elizabeth A. Gilbutts, at Fall River 



197 50 
108 00 
108 00 
108 00 
152 52 

48 41 
122 75 
137 65 

40 71 
201 08 
263 07 
156 00 



PARTIAL SUPPORT. 

Ellen Walsh .... 

Catharine Quigley . 

Margaret Howe and child 

Mary Foley and five children 

Catharine Fox and three children 

Mary Cahill and one child 

John Gill and six children 

James Conley, Jr. 

Martha A. Fountain 

Mary O'Leary 

Ellen Rourke 

Bridget Kane and two children 

John Coyne and tour children 

Eugene McCormack and two childra 

Henry Weeden .... 



SETTLEMENT. 

Newburyport 
Hyde Park 



Boston 



$ 55 00 

17 34 
14 40 

111 28 

113 63 

52 00 

19 00 

43 83 

99 38 

22 10 

1B6 70 

3 50 

7 00 

18 10 
60 



44 



Annie E. Whelan and two children 
Mary A. Collins and three children 
Sarah Scott ..... 
Bessie M. Kivlin and lour children 
Michael Fisher and seven children 
Ellen Kenney and two children 

Francis Tuck 

Ellen Linton ..... 
Lizzie Wilkinson and six children 
Bridget Morrisy .... 
Elizabeth Plant and three children 
William Murray and wife 
Sarah Ann Ward and five children 
Lizzie Scelry and four children 
William Clark and six children 
Mrs. Geo. Gardner and five children 
Sarah Phalan and five children 
Mary Ann McDavitt . 
Jennie Merton and one child 
Bernard Adrian Merton 
Thomas Edgar Hutchings 

Mary Legre 

Temporary aid (returned) 
Tramps 



Milton 


96 85 


Dedham . 


146 53 


. 


11 63 


Walpole . 


9 25 


Oxford 


148 40 


Worcester 


22 25 


Watertown 


50 


State 


1 75 


. 


1 80 


. 


3 25 


. 


3 90 


. 


4 00 


. 


19 75 


. 


29 30 


. 


20 40 


. 


6 65 


. 


9 25 


. 


1 50 


. 


4 50 


. 


9 93 


. 


56 00 


. 


16 00 




10 00 




30 00 



INCIDENTALS. 



Dr. C. C. Hayes, salary .... 
Stationery, stamps, printing, advertising, etc. 



Deduct bill included above (unpaid) 
Total expenditures . 



$150 00 
21 28 



171 28 



$3,790 70 
6 75 

$3,783 95 



Cash on hand with Town Treasurer to balance 



180 27 



$3964 22 



45 





RECEIPTS. 


Received appropriation 


. $3,000 00 


Commonwealth 


67 07 


" Cities and towns . 


. 696 40 


4i Individual debtors 


. 169 00 




964 22 



3,964 22 
Respectfully submitted, 

JOEL F. GOODWIN, 
JOHN TERRY, 
ROBERT W. KARNAN, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



SCHOOLS. 

SUPERINTENDENT'S SALARY. 
Paid David Bentley . . . . . $1,800 oo 



Cr. 



By balance from last year 
amount of appropriation 



Balance unexpended 



$965 00 
1000 00 



il,000 00 



1,965 00 

$165 00 



TEACHERS' SALARIES. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Paid John F. Elliot $1,800 00 

Samuel W. Culver . . . 700 00 

Miss Sarah L. Miner . . . 600 00 

" Fanny G. Merrick . . . 600 00 



DAMON SCHOOL. 

Paid Edward W. Cross 

Mrs. Lizzie de Senancour 
Miss Julia E. Donavan 

" Harriet E. Tower 

" Margaret E. Bertram 

" Emma F. Brown 

" Maria V. Rooney 

" Edith H. Sears 

" Louise L. Sears 



,200 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


402 


5° 


45° 


00 


402 


5° 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


40 


00 



,700 00 



$4,295 00 






47 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Paid Henry F. Howard 

Miss Helen P. Cleaves 
Mrs. Mary C. Howard 
Miss Minnie I. Coggeshall 
Mrs. Matilda H. P. dishing 
Miss Hattie F. Packard 

" Jennie S. Hammond . 

" Helen A. Perry 

" Marion S. Piper 

GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Paid Daniel G. Thompson 
Miss Mary F. Perry . 
" Adalaide L Dodge 
" Ellen M. Farnsworth 
" Lillie M. Beede 
" Sarah A. Remick 
" Sarah E. Roome 
" Belle D. Curtis 
" Lucia Alger 
" Grace B. Gidney 



GREW SCHOOL 

Paid Frank H. Dean 

Miss Mary A. Winslow 

" Harriet Foster 

" Lucina Dunbar 

" Clara M. Colcord 

" Elma A. Stone 

" Hattie, M. H. Darling 

" Annie M. Clark 

" Jennie H. Soule 

" Fanny E. Harlow 

" Agnes J. Campbell 

" Genevieve Brain ard 

" Mary E. Rogers 

" Leila E. Perry 

" Bertha E. Messer 



$1,200 


00 


402 


5° 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


312 


5° 


. $1,200 


00 


437 


5° 


442 


5° 


337 


5° 


100 


00 


4°5 


00 


40 


00 


435 


87 


416 


25 


20 


00 


. $1,250 


00 


437 


5° 


310 


00 


123 


75 


22 c 


00 


100 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


225 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


45° 


00 


225 


00 


200 


00 



L,6iq CO 



$3,834.62 



$5796 25 



4 8 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 



Paid Miss Marion S. Piper . . . $10000 

" Emily Woods . . . 300 00 



MUSIC. 

Paid Henry J. Whittemore 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

Paid George E. Webb 



FUEL AND JANITORS. 

Paid McAvoy & Co., 2 cords wood at $6.00 $ 12 00 

" J. B. Carter, 10 tons coal at 6.00 . 60 00 
" S. B. Balkam & Co., 223 tons of coal 

at 5-35 ^93 05 

" S. B. Balkam 1 ton coal and putting in 7 25 

" J. Willett 14 cords wood at 5.35 . 74. 90 
" Robert Scott, Jr. janitor of High and Grew 

Schools ..... 350 00 

" M. Kappler, janitor of Damon school 135 00 

" John R. Bond " " 15 00 
" Frank W. Howard, janitor Fairmount school 150 00 

" Calvin P. Fellows " Greenwood " 75 00 

" Swan J. Lingren " " " 75 00 

" George Roundy " Butler " 65 00 



#>boc 


> 00 










$600 


00 


S97 


5° 










$97 


5° 



2,212 20 



$25-55° 57 



Cr. 
By amount of appropriation . . . 26000 00 



Balance unexpended .... $449 43 



49 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 
Paid Samuel VV. Culver, teaching 

Wales R. Stockbridge, teaching 

Henry W. Kil'.am, teaching drawing 

John R. Bond, janitor 

M. Kappler, .... 

Robert Scott, Jr., . 

George Miles, oil and lamps . 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co., paper 

John S. Browning, advertising 

Ck. 

By amount of appropriation 
" " of unexpended balance from last year 

Balance unexpended $241 32 



. $282 00 




. 136 00 




. 150 00 




8 00 




20 00 




32 25 




10 15 




6 70 




1 80 






$646 90 




$600 00 




year 288 22 






$8882 22 



EXPENDITURES FROM THE INCOME OF THE MASSACHU- 
SETTS SCHOOL FUND. 



Town of Dedham 

Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co. 



$50 00 
13 00 



$63 00 



REPAIRING HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. 
Paid Rinaldo Williams, stock and labor . . $172 91 

John Ballou, furnaces 265 00 

Hyde Park Water Co., 112 05 

James R. Brown, stock and labor . . . 15 00 
Rinaldo Williams, stock and labor . . 27 29 



Ck. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



$7C0 CO 



$592 25 



$107 75 



FIRE ESCAPES. 
Paid P. J. Dinn, putting on escapes 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation . 
Balance unexpended 



. $268 33 



$650 CO 



$268 33 



5381 67 



5o 



TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES, 

Paid M. T. Rogers & Co., Latin lessons 
Boston School Supply, cards 
Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, Brand's Lesson! 
Adams & Ingraham, supplies 
J. W. C. Oilman & Co., writing- books 
Van Antweip, Bragg & Co., readers , 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co., supplies 
Dennison Manf'g Co., paper 
Porter & Coates, readers 
Geo. F. King & Merrill, supplies 
A. Storrs & Bement Co., paper . 
Perfect Pencil Sharpener Co.. . 
Thomas Hall, supplies . . 

J. L. Hammett 
Carroll W. Clark 
Hopkinson & Marden . 
Clark & Maynard, books 
Cyclostyle Co., paper 
S. R. Winchell, supplies 
Wm. Ware & Co., spellers, etc., 
Geo S. Perry, supplies . 
Prangs, Ed. Co., drawing books 
F. M. Ambrose, dictionaries 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books . 
Cowperthwait & Co., geographies 
D. Appleton & Co., Astronomies 
Lee &Shepard, temperance text books 
Thompson, Brown & Co.. arithmetics . 
A. H. Andrews & Co., supplies . . 
Harper & Bros., dictionaries 
Chas. H. Whiting, histories 
A. C. Stocking, dictionary 
John Allyn, text books . . 

Oliver Ditson, music readers « 
Harrison Hume, books , . 

Estes & Laurat, selections 
Frost & Adams, drawing paper, ect. . 
Carl Schocnoff, text books 
Ginn & Co. ..... 



$10 

6 

17 

27 

60 

187 

6 

1 

3 

44 

7 

4 

103 

11 

6 

2 

12 

1 

3 

55 

458 

72 

16 

8 

141 

7 

28 
130 

4 
367 



9 

11 

8 

30 
44 



00 

00 

92 

60 

60 

47 

70 

10 

34 

■15 

03 

00 

60 

50 

48 

00 

00 

00 

33 

21 

22 

80 

50 

50 

30 

01 

00 

34 

60 

38 

61 

82 

00 

30 

17 

90 

96 

00 

24 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



Cr. 



$2000 00 



$1997 28 



$2 72 



5i 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid David Bentley, office rent . 

A. W. Chamberlain, printing 
Cvclostyle Co., paper 
R. Corson, expressing 
S. R. Moseley, printing 
H. J. Whittemore, music 
Boston Piano Co., car fares . 
Quincy Dyer, oil, etc., . . 
J. H. Daniel, diplomas 
J. W. Payson, filling diplomas ■ . 
Mark E. Noble, stationery . 
Ryan's Express, expressing 

B. C. Vose, Sec. salary 
John S. Browning, labels . 
Thos. Sweeney, moving ashes, etc.. 
Journal News Co.. advertising, 
J. F. Goodwin, taking census, etc., 
Mrs. E. S. Clark, dinners for teachers 
A. Raymond, moving settees, etc., . 
S. B. Balkan], lumber 
H. E. Hunt, printing and advertising 
I, J. Brown, insurance 
Fred Barry, record book 
Geo. E. Webb, labor 
R. W. Karnan, ribbon 
Hopkinson & Marden, supplies 
Winkley & Dresser, record book 
Geo. S. Perry, supplies 
O'Connor's Express . • • 
Hyde Park and Boston Express Co. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Paid J. G. Hamblin, painting . 

C. P. Vaughan, supplies 

Mark E. Noble, supplies . . . 

Geo. S. Perry, floor brush . . , 

J. H. Tuckerman, shades and fixtures, etc., 
S. B. Balkain & Co., lumber, . • 

Thomas Hall, supplies . , • 

Roberts Bros., decorations . . . 



$147 0f> 


5 75- 


16 00 


46 05 


85 50 


•3 08 


81 


83 


37 50 


13 50 


80 


15 20 


100 00 


8 00 


29 50 


2 00 


40 00 


6 75 


58 00 


8 32 


21 50 


15 00 


3 50 


4 00 


9 68 


10 59 


75 


11 18 


85 


25 


$5 00 


1 05 


10 00 


1 95 


31 33 


2 20 


13 50 


4 00 



$701 89 



52 



high school (Continued.) 
Paid Boston Piano Co., tuning pianos 
W. F. Curtis, use of hall 
H. H. Poore, ribbon 
Quincy Dyer, supplies 
R. Scott, Jr., labor . 
James Peppeard, stock and labor . 
George M. King, fitting key, etc. . 
Frost & Adams, supplies 
A. G. Whitcomb, desks, etc., 
F. Boynton, furnace work . 
H. P. Water Co., water 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 

Paid Chas. E. Palmer, glazing . 
J. H. Tuckerman, labor 
Quincy D} T er, mats . 
Chas. Lewis, labor and stock 

F. H. Dean, repairing blackboard 

G. W. King, key, etc. 

DAMON SCHOOL 

Paid Charles Haley, stock and labor 

Charles A. Littlefield, repairing pirmo 

E. W. Cross, cash paid binding books 

C. P. Vaughan, clock door . 
A. W. Chamberlain, printing 
Mrs. A. M. Cowdrey, book covers . 
S. Grossman, stock and labor 
George M. King, repairing, etc. 

D. F. S. Patten &*Sons. window tightener 
S. B. Balkam, lumber 
Perfeet Pencil'Sharp. Co., wheel 
S. S. Bunker, repairing pump . 
Boston Piano Co., tuning jMano 

F. H. Dean, repairing black boards 
John McDonough,- cleaning well 
James F. Tilley, pencil sharpener 
Boston School Supply Co., models 
John Beatey, labor . 
Quincy Dyer, hardware • 
W. Keppler, stock and labor 



$1 50 


17 50 


3 10 


6 63 


37 50 


63 65 


75 


2 04 


96 50 


4 75 


5 20 


$1 35 


75 


5 23 


4 80 


2 20 


50 


$10 95 


2 50 


3 01 


15 


1 00 


4 05 


25 31 


1 10 


•s. 9 99 


5 63 


20 


75 


1 50 


52 15 


5 00 


3 50 


2 00 


21 25 


34 91 


40 05 



$308 15 



$14 83 



53 



damon school — (Continued.) 

Paid P. S. Conlan, Truant Officer . . $49 25 

Charles Lewis, supplies . . . 15 60 

F. M. Paine, tuning and repairing piano, . 4 00 

R. W. Karnan, flannel . . . 67 

James B. Fall, labor on furnace . . 31 00 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Paid A. G. Whitcomb, tables, etc. 

C. P. Vanghan, clocks, etc. 

J. B. Fall, repairing pump, eic. 
J. W. Jigger, stock and labor 

D. F. S. Patten & Sons, window tightener 
S. B. Balkam, lumber 

L. J. Bird, book case 

Geo. E. Webb, table and labor 

H. N. Allen, keys, etc. 

John Rogers, labor . 

H. F. Howard, cash paid out 

Boston Piano Co., tuning piano 

J. H. Tuckerman. shades, etc. 

F. H. Dean, repairing blackboards 

H. P. Water Co. . 

Rinaldo Williams, stock and labor . 

Hopkiuson, Marden & Co., mats, etc. 

F. W. Howard, labor 

P. S. Conlan, Truant Officer 

J. G. Hambliu, painting 

Quincy Dyer, hardware 

F. A. Perry, glazing, etc. 

David Higgins. stock and labor 

C. E. Lewis, labor, etc. 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Paid J. H. Tuckerman, shades, etc. . . $9 46 

J. W. Jigger, labor, etc. . . . 22 92 

D. F. S. Patten & Sons, window tighteners 13 05 

Geo. E. Webb, stock and labor . . 44 88 

Charles E. Lewis, supplies . . . 48 

George L. Bragan, labor . . . 3 75 

Boston Piano Co., tuning piano . . 1 50 

F. H. Dean, repairing blackboards . . 30 67 



$123 88 


5 


75 


7 


00 


14 


80 


15 


12 


3 


45 


21 


00 


9 


85 


85 


4 00 


2 


00 


1 


50 


13 


60 


12 


60 


55 


28 


38 


32 


20 


64 


28 


80 


16 


50 


18 


18 


4 92 


37 


88 


43 


80 


265 


75 



$325 52 



$765 47 



54 





$3 50 


32 


50 







50 




3 


00 




8 


02 




19 


61 




3 


00 




2 


70 




2 


50 




1 


60 



greenwood school — (Continued.) 

Paid James F. Tilley, pencil sharpener 
S. Lingren, cleaning 
G. M. King, repairs 
James B. Fall, repairing furnace 
Quincy Dyer, hardware 
Francis Boynton, furnace work 
Charles E. Palmer, glazing . 
Richardson & Rafter, repairs 
C. A. Littlefield, tuning piano 
John H. Chipman 

GREW SCHOOL. 

Paid A. G. Whitcomb, desks and chairs 
Francis Boynton, labor 
J. Peppeard, stock and labor 

C. P. Vaugh:m, repairing clocks, etc. 
H. S. Crover, labor 
James B. Fall, labor on furnace 
Frank Hukin, labor 
John W. Chipman, painting 

D. F. S. Patten & Sons, window tightener 
George Miles, pails . 
Thomas Sweeney, labor 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber 

,P. Rooney, putting in water 
J. McDermott, plumbing 
F. H. Dean, repairing blackboards . 
Geo. E. Webb, labor 
H. P. Water Co. 

Charles E. Lewis, labor and supplies 
Charles Haley, labor and stock 
Charles E. Palmer, glazing . 
Dennison Manufacturing Co., supplies 
Boston Piano Co., tuning piano 
E. F. Nightingale, labor 
Geo. M. King, keys, etc. 
Geo. W. D. Simmons, feather dusters 
P. S. Conlan, Truant Officer 
J. A. Paine, stock and labor 
Quincy Dyer, hai'dware . . 

R. Scott, Jr., labor . 



$101 


25 


24 


37 


5 


60 


31 


10 


2 


95 


97 


00 


2 


00 


13 


00 


s, 19 44 


1 


00 


7 


00 


21 


98 


94 99 


419 15 


35 00 


16 


05 


47 


16 


41 


10 


12 48 


9 00 


3 


03 


1 


50 


9 


00 


4 


95 


7 


50 


28 75 


86 


62 


16 


85 


, ' 49 


25 



$203 64 



55 



grew school — (Conti?tned.) 

Paid John H. Tuckerman, book case, etc. 

J. Johnson ..... 
H. P. Congregational Society 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



Ck. 



$16 50 
3 65 

50 00 



$1,279 22 
$3,598 72 
$3,600 00 



1 28 



PUBLIC LIBRARY 



CURRENT EXPENSES. 



Paid Mrs. H. A. B. Thompson, librarian 

Miss Mary A. Hawley, assistant librarian 

J. S. Conant, rent ..... 

Geo. F. Eldridge. janitor 

Frank R. Heustis, " 

I. J. Brown, insurance .... 

' rent ot room 

Ryan's Express ..... 

Adams Express . . . . 

Corson's Express ..... 
S. R. Moseley, printing .... 
H. D. Noyes & Co., periodicals and stationery 
Thomas Megan, labor .... 
L. H. Russell, labor on gallery .and materials 

B. E. Phillips, glazing .... 
J. W. Smith, ice ..... 
Cle;ives, McDonald and Co., gallery 
Mrs. Thos. Kingston, labor 

C. P. Holmes. " ... 
Boston School Supply Co., paper 

J. S. Biowning, subscription Hyde Park Times 

F. W. Gleason and Co., supplies 

Joseph Willett, fuel .... 

Putnam and Worden, oil, etc. 

H. C. Stark, P. M., postage, etc. 



$399 96 

300 00 

300 00 

36 50 

84 00 

140 00 

10 00 

4 59 

2 21 

1 20 

56 50 

103 79 

25 
74 80 

1 75 

2 50 
110 25 

1 28 

1 62 

4 58 

2 00 

5 85 
19 50 
26 62 

1 25 



$1,691 00 



56 
Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended, 1885 — 6 

Balance unexpended 



$1,700 00 
46 11 



PURCHASE OF NEW BOOKS. 



Paid Cleaves, McDonald and Co. 
M. Maverick 
F. Gilpatric 
H. C. Nash, manager 
E. W. Whitefield 
Houghton, Mifflin and Co. 
Geo. Bowen and Co. 



Cr. 

Bv amount ot appropriation (dog licenses 1885), 
By balance unexpended. 1885 — 6 



61-6 77 
74 51 



Balance unexpended 



INCIDENTALS. 



Paid S. R. Moseley, printing and advertising 
H. E. Hunt, printing and advertising 
Asa W. Chamberlin, printing and advertising 
John S. Browning, printing and advertising . 
R. M. Pulsifer & Co., printing and advertising 
Joel F. Goodwin, janitor, etc. .... 
H. S. Bunton, trustee, rent of office 

W. F. Curtis, rent of hall 

S. B. Balkam & Co., lamp posts, coal, etc. 
Dedham and Hyde Park Gas Co., gas 
Geo. San ford, collection ot taxes and extra clerical 
R. Corson, watering streets in 1885, expressing, etc 
A. W. Stoiy, building fence at engine house and 

labor . . . . . 
Quincy Dver, hardware . 

D. W. C. Rogers, services as registrar of voters 
John S. Brackett, " " " 



,746 11 



11 



(S439 37 


4 75 


5 75 


6 00 


15 00 


16 50 


7 00 



$494 37 



$721 28 
$226 91 





$712 00 




43 00 




10 00 




31 50 




1 50 




224 17 




283 60 




85 00 




137 93 




169 61 


work 


675 91 




129 95 


other 






152 35 




5 16 




30 00 




30 00 



57 



Paid Fred S. Sullivan, services as registrar of voters 

Henr} 7 B. Terry, services as registrar of voters and extra 
clerical work ....... 

R. J. Gordon, refreshments at two town meetings 
George F. Downes, distributing town reports, etc. 
Cyclostyle Co., cyclostyle .... 

Ward & Gay, stationery and books . 
Winkley, Dresser & Co., stationery and books 
M. R. Warren & Co., 

E. Worthington. recording by-laws . 
Standard Cancelling Box Co ., ink . 
Thomas Meegan, labor 
Frank Hukin, "... 
Charles Lewis, , 

F. Ruoney, "... 
A. J. Rich, "... 
R. Williams, 

Benj. E Phillips "... 
W. W. Hilton, labor and material . 
David Higgins, " " 

G. M. King, 
F. W. Gleason & Co, 
Ryan's Express, expressing 

C. C. Hayes, balance of salary as Board of Health 
H. C. Stark, stamps, envelopes, etc. 
Charles H. Lord, posting bills . 
Norcross, Mellen & Co., lanterns 
Jenney Manufacturing Co., oil 
Charles F. Morrison, measures 
I. J. Brown, insurance 
C. M. Chapin, " ... 

H. B. Terry, " ... 

A. Raymond, carriage hire, expressing, etc. . 
S. S. Woodcock, plan for fire escape and bridge 
W. W. Hilton, balance on contract to build bridge 
Hyde Park Assessors, copy of valuation book . 
H. B. Terry, recording deaths and marriages, and for 

extra clerical and legal services 
Ruth S. Blake, use of land for pound 
John Hurley, carriage hire .... 
Edmund Davis, listing transfers for assessors . 
P. A. Bachelder, oil . 
L. J. French & Co., dusters, etc. 



$30 00 



55 


00 


44 50 


16 


50 


13 


00 


21 


50 


35 


25 


1 


00 


5 40 




50 


7 


00 




75 


5 


50 


3 


50 


4 00 


4 50 


1 


50 


5 


80 


32 


85 




50 


1 


15 


7 


60 


6 


05 


76 


83 


2 


00 


22 


00 


3 


98 


3 


00 


448 50 


418 50 


117 


30 


58 


50 


35 


00 


1,100 


00 


30 


00 


119 


10 


5 


00 


4 


00 


50 


00 




28 


7 


25 



58 



Paid H. T. Somes, hook .... 
John W. Smith, ice . 
1!. A. Rich, perambulating town lines 
S. M. Thompson, " 
Underhay & Co., oil . 
Sampson, Davenport & Co.. directory 
F. C. Graham, returning deaths 
Physicians, for returning births 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation . 
By amount of additional appropriation 



$1 00 









5 00 








5 00 








5 00 








4 03 








5 00 








35 00 








13 25 






$5,600 00 


$4,500 00 


1,100 


00 








$5,600 00 



HIGHWAYS. 

Paid for labor and teams as per pay l'oll 

J. Corbett, posts, stone and labor on bridge 

A. J. Rich, watching at bridge 

Charles A. Devlin, watching at bridge 

James Fife, •' " 

Timothy McCarty, paving 

Peter Trainor, labor and use of boat 

David Higgins, carpenter work, etc. 

W. H. Pmmmer, carpenter work 

Charles E. Palmer, lettering signs . 

Thomas Corrigan, blasting 

A. Howland, blacksmith work . 

.J. Johnston, " '■ 

G. F. Macdonald, " " . . 

R. C.rson, watering streets, expressing, etc 

S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber . 

Q.uincy Dyer, shovels, rope, etc. 

I). D. Burns, oil .... 

George Miles, oil . 

F. W . Gleason & Co., lanterns 

Charles Lewis, lanterns, shovels, etc. 

Ceorge Z. Adams, attorney, balance claim for 

.1. G. Hamblin, gravel 

Ryan's Express, " 

Quincy Savings Bank, gravel . 

Ruth S. Blake, 



gravel 



t,435 67 
11 40 
24 00 

24 00 
30 20 
77 07 

8 00 
40 78 

2 00 
81 00 

25 00 
11 88 
58 70 
77 90 

26 77 
6 17 

27 27 

5 73 

2 20 
1 90 

6 40 
1 93 

94 32 

28 40 
69 60 

3 00 



59 



Paid John R. Thompson, gravel 
Oliver Whyte & Co., screens 
Morss, Whyte & Co , " . . . 
W. F. Bacon, snowplow .... 
J. Willett, posts ..... 
I. L. Benton, setting steps 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation .... 
By balance of "hose house" appropriation, trans- 
ferred to "highway'' appropriation by vote of 



$5,000 00 



the town 



272 04 



$35 00 

15 00 

8 00 

25 00 

2 75 

5 00 

5,272 04 



$5,272 04 



Appropriation for permanent improvements on streets and 

sidewalks : 

(STREETS,) 

Paid for labor and teams as per paj rolls .... $4,817 83 

Henry J. Rice, stone and setting same .... 463 90 

Albert A. Libby & Co., stone and setting same . . 778 56 

Fred S. Gore, paving and setting stone . " . . 448 06 

J. Q. A. Field, paving stone 183 13 

Timothy MeCarty, paving and building wall . . 158 39 

Nancy Whitcher, land on Central avenue . . . 291 70 

P. M. Blake, maps and surveying .... 1,399 75 

Charles D. Capen, surveying , 36 25 

S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber and drain pipe . . 574 23 

Quincv Dyer, shovels, etc. ...... 13 20 

Patrick Rooney, drilling ...... 41 10 

A. W. Story, moving fences, etc. ..... 127 35 

Waldo Bros., shovels ....... 25 25 

Real Estate and Building Co., gravel .... 50 00 

Davis & Farnum Manufacturing Co., road roller . 300 00 

John Beatey, Agent, labor and material ... 82 40 

R. Williams, " •' ... 101 04 

Charles E. Palmer, " " ... 24 75 

George H. Peare, " '• ... 17 48 

Charles Lewis, " '• ... 26 00 

G. F. Macdonald, blacksmith work . . . . 16 00 

N. Y. & N. E. R. R. Co., protecting track over drain . 23 63 

$10,000 00 



6o 



SIDEWALKS. 

Paid labor and teams as per pay rolls . 

Albert A. Libby & Co., edgesione and setting 

H. J. Rice, 

Fred S. Gore, setting- stone . 

Kirk W. Dodge, co-icreting . 

A. W. Story, moving and repairing fences 

Jas. F. Peppeard, " " " 

P. M. Blake, surveying .... 

N. Y. & N. E. R. R. Co., freight . 

Richardson & Rafter, labor and material 

John Beatey, " " 

Nathaniel Shepard, moving fence , 

John Rogers, moving trees . 

Jenuey Manufacturing Co., oil 



Total . 
By amount of appropriation 



Cr. 





$1,102 59 


ing 


4.979 06 




82G 95 




372 46 




2,308 54 




119 29 




19 20 




160 00 




51 Of) 




33 12 




8 76 




12 00 




5 00 




2 03 


$10,000 00 




$20,000 00 






$20,000 00 



STREET LIGHTS. 

Paid Dedham and Hyde Park Gas Co., lighting street lamps, 
"Wheeler Reflector Co., " " 

Charles Lewis, repairing lanterns . 

Joseph Scrivens, setting posts . 
R. Corson, expressing '' . . . . 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



$1,637 


36 


2,253 


74 


95 


90 


9 


50 


3 


50 


$4,000 00 


. $4,000 00 







POOR. 




Paid Town of Dedham, 


board 


of poor 


$166 70 


City of Boston, 


" 


•' 


22 10 


Town ol Quincy 


'• 


" 


263 07 


W. H. Donley, 


" 


" 


39 00 


Allen Dwelley, 


" 


" 


117 00 


John F. Murray, 


" 


" 


136 18 


J. B. Guinazzo, 


" 


ii 


14 25 



6i 



:1 Patrick Welch, board of poor 






$72 00 


Ghas. McCabe, 






33 34 


Edward Kane, " " 






52 50 


J. Wilder, 






1 50 


St. Vincent's Asylum " " 






324 00 


House of Angel Guardian " 






372 21 


Mass. General Hospital " 




> 


21 00 


Taunton Lunatic Hospital, care of insane 






561 52 


Westborough Insane Hospital " " 






6 96 


W. H. Norris, agent, rent for poor, 






56 00 


John Murray. " " " 






23 50 


Elizabeth Trainor, " " " 






55 00 


Jas. F. Pring, " " 






5 00 


George Miles, groceries " " 






127 96 


E. D. Savage, " " " 






11 00 


Putnam & Worden. " " " 






99 00 


Peabody & Co., " " " 






59 25 


M. Galligan. 






92 00 


C. L. Alden & Co., «' " " 






114 80 


Johu O'Brien, " " " 






51 00 


E. W. Lyon. " " " 






17 00 


L. J. French & Co., " " " 






19 69 


E. O. Taylor, " " " 






22 00 


Ward Bros., provisions " " 






43 82 


C L. Farnsworth, bread " " 






35 50 


S. B. Balkani & Co., coal " " 






30 85 


McAvoy & Co. 






59 35 


J. Willett, " «' " 






50 83 


J. B. Carter, 






82 14 


Patrick Shine, wood " " 






18 00 


J. Corbett, " " '• . . 






7 51 


S. C. Ferry, milk " " 






8 60 


C. C. Hayes, medical attendance 






150 00 


M. E. Noble, medicine for poor 






12 85 


William Batho, " " . 






9 70 


H. G. Balkam, " . 






11 30 


H. M. George, " . . 






10 60 


R. W. Karnan & Co., clothing, etc. 






14 44 


E. M. Whittemore, " 






20 90 


Walter Henderson, " 






7 00 


D. F. Kendall & Son., shoes 






4 50 


A. C. Bass. " . . 






8 25 


Jennie Swan, nursing 






45 00 



62 



Paid F. C. Graham, burial of poor 
R. Corson, carriage hire 
S. R. Mosely, printing 
Thomas Kingston, removing furniture 
Town of Milton, cash refunded 
Hyde Park Overseers of Poor, cash paid out 



Cr. 

By amount of appropriation .... $3000 00 

By cash refunded by the Commonwealth, cities and 

towns 964 22 



$44 00 
21 15 
10 75 
6 00 
42 85 
71 53 

$3783 95 



$3964 22 



Balance unexpended 



$180 27 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid Rough and Ready Engine Co., No. 2. services 
Chemical Engine Co. No. 1. 
Hook and Ladder Co., No. 1. " 

Hose Co., No. 1. " 

Hose Co., No. 2. " 

Hose Co., No. 3. 
Hose Co., No. 4. 
H. C. Blue, money due members of the Fire 

Department for services, (on order) 
Edward McKenna, engineer 1885 
F. A. Sweet, engineer 1885 
C. L. Farnsworth, engineer 1885 
John Beatey, engineer 1885 
Stewart McKenzie, engineer 1885 
R. Corson, engineer 1886 
R. Williams engineer 1886, 
H. G. Balkam, engineer 1886 
H. G. Balkam, extra services . 
M. J. Foley, repairs and services 
H. I. Somes, repairs and services 
Malcolm Rogers, repairs and services 
Joshua Wilder, services as steward and cash paid out 
Dedham and Hyde Park Gas Co., gas 
Francis Boynton, repairs, etc. 



$100 00 


129 


17 


381 


22 


308 


36 


212 


50 


187 


50 


125 


00 


436 84 


37 


50 


37 


50 


37 


50 


18 


75 


42 


75 


37 


50 


37 


50 


37 


50 


25 


00 


57 


61 


26 


60 


39 


25 


500 


27 


42 


55 


16 


51 



63 



Paid J. Johnson, repairs, etc. 

American Tool & Machine Co., repairs, etc 
G. M. King, repairs, etc. 
Charles Lewis, repairs, etc. 
Geo- W. D. Simmons, repairs, etc. 
Charles E. Bunker, repairs,, etc. 
Hugh Grant, repairs, etc. 
R. Williams, repairs, etc. 
Frank Kunkle, repairs, etc. 
J. H. Chipman, painting and glazing 
R. Corson, use of horses, etc. 
M. Galiigan, use of horses, etc. 
J. H. Tuckerm.in, use of horses, etc. 
Underhay & Co., oil 
Bent & Bush, fire hats 
S. B. Balkam & Co., coal 
Waite, Williams, & Co., oil 
Keren Curie} 7 , repairs 
Andrew S. Jackson, lanterns, etc 
D. W. Cashing, stove 
A. W. Mitchell & Co.. badges 
Winkley Dresser & Co., books 
Murray & Scott, wrench . 
J. B. Fall, lamp 
S. R. Mosely, printing 
H. E. Hunt, printing 
Ryans Express, expressing 
Andrew Galiigan, storage 
Bishop & Bro., ladder 
J. S. Browning, advertising 
G. M. Stevens, bal. on account, fire alarm and 
Andrew J. Morse & Son, repairs . 
L. M. Crane & Co., oil, 
Boston Woven Hose Co., hose 
Hyde Park Water Co., service pip^ 
Jones, McDuffie & Stratton, lamps 
Cornelius Callahan, valves, nozzles, etc 
C. P. Taylor, labor . * 

W. H. Plummer, labor 
O. G. Dalton, labor 
C. M. Wanclless. labor and material 
A. W. Story, labor and material 
James Brennock, labor . 



$6 02 


45 


4 00 


22 65 


1 50 


3 50 


1 50 


4 73 


5 75 


10 10 


239 85 


11 95 


2 00 


10 10 


13 50 


110 00 


4 00 


1 35 


32 38 


15 00 


80 50 


5 50 


4 00 


5 00 


2 50 


2 50 


1 55 


12 00 


7 75 


2 25 


69 92 


4 62 


3 00 


55 49 


16 27 


11 54 


50 00 


4 75 


7 30 


4 00 


8 02 


2 21 


1 50 



6 4 



W. F. Donlan, labor 
A. E. Marsters, labor 
J. D. Green low, labor 
J. A. & W. Bird & Co., chemicals 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation 



$1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
8 12 

$3750 00 
$3750 00 



POLICE. 








Paid Charles E. Jenney, police duty, and cash paid out, . $1,038 10 


Patrick J. Donlan, " " . 


615 00 


Andrew D. Rooney " " . 






456 00 


Benj. E. Fog<j, " " . 






277 50 


Sargent M. Thompson, 






170 98 


Daniel O'Connell, " " . 






37 00 


William F. Curtis, " " . 






14 70 


E. B. Oliver, " " . 






6 00 


John B. Burns, " " . 






8 00 


E. W. Moffatt, " •« . 






4 50 


J. A. Brown, " " 






33 50 


John O'Connell, " " . 






6 00 


J. Corbett, " " . 






32 00 


M. N. Cage, " " . 






7 50 


Jas. R. Brown, " " . 






6 00 


Thomas Mulcahy. " " . 






6 00 


Frank Greenwood, " " . 






6 00 


Samuel P. Smith, " " . 






42 50 


S. B. Balkam & Co., coal 






33 00 


R. Corson, carriage hire 






12 50 


G. M. King, keys, etc. 






65 


R. W. Gould, washing 






4 00 


Geo. Miles, oil 






1 30 


George R. Fowler, attorney, on account of claim of 


Beckwith vs. Town 






165 30 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation . 
Balance unexpended 



$2,984 03 

3,000 00 
$15 97 



65 



APPROPRIATION OF NOV. 17th, 1886, TO PAY THE OUT- 
STANDING CLAIMS AGAINST THE TOWN ON 
ACCOUNT OF STREETS AND SIDEWALKS. 



Paid Kirk W. Dodge, concreting 

Albert A. Libby & Co., curb stones 
Henry J. Rice, " 

Fred S. Gore, paving arid setting stones 
Thomas Corrigan, carting stone 
J. G. Hamblin, gravel . 
J. S. Covenev, gravel 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, pipe, etc. 
Labor as per pay rolls 
P. M. Blake, on account maps . 
Geo. R. Fowler, attorney, part of claim of Bicknell et 
al. for damages . 



Cr. 



$3,134 06 


1,671 


06 


186 


50 


552 


11 


16 


00 


52 40 


159 


00 


126 01 


832 


1)1 


200 00 



69 92 



By amount of appropriation 



$7,000 00 
. $7,000 00 



APPROPRIATION FOR PAYING JUDGEMENTS AND EXPENSES 

IN SUITS OF SIMMONS vs. HYDE PARK AND 

HILL vs. HYDE PARK. 

Paid A. B. Coffin, attorney, ain't, of judgements in said suits 
Charles E. Jenney, cash Daid witnesses and expenses 
Charles D. Capen, surveying and attendance at court 
Frederick Endicott, " " " 

Dr. C. L. Edwards, services as an expert 
E. II. Hewins, 
Patrick J. Rooney, witness fees . . , 



Ck. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



$665 07 


57 50 


21 00 


23 95 


50 00 


25 00 


3 70 


$846 22 


$850 00 



$3 78 



66 



APPROPRIATION OF MARCH 20th, 1886, FOR FIRE ALARM 

PURPOSES. 



Paid Charles L. Bly, labor, battery, wire, etc. 
George M. Stevens, alarm boxes, gong, 
Cutler Bros., chemicals 
R. Williams, labor and materials 
G. M. King, " 
John H. Chipman, signs 
John Welch, carriage hire 



ndicator, etc. 



Ck. 



By amount of appropriation 



$308 00 
263 85 
15 03 
5 62 
1 50 
3 00 
3 00 

$600 00 
$600 00 



BRIDGE OVER RIVER AT BRIDGE STREET. 

Paid Warren W. Hilton, on account of contract to build 

bridge ...... $1,000 00 

Ck. 
By amount of appropriation ..... $1,000 00 



HOSE CARRIAGE HOUSES AT READVILLE AND 
CLARENDON HILLS. 



Paid Henry A. Haskell, building hose house at Readville . 
R. Williams, labor and material 

Transferred to Highway appropriation by vote of the town, 
Nov. 17, 1886 . . . • . 



Ck. 



By amount of appropriation 



$302 00 
25 96 

$327 96 

272 04 

$600 00 

$600 00 



APPROPRIATION FOR COMPLETING CHILD AND CLEVE- 
LAND STREETS (made April 22, 1884). 

Paid George Z. Adams, attorney, in settlement of suit of 

Maria B. Talbot vs. Town (for gravel) . . $173 07 

Ck. 
By balance of appropriation unexpended last year . . $173 07 



67 



APPROPRIATION FOR POST 121, G. A. R., FOR USE ON 
MEMORIAL DAY. 

Paid Post 121, G. A. R $100 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation ..... $100 00 



APPROPRIATION FOR FIRE HYDRANT SERVICE. 
Paid Hyde Park Water Co. for use of hydrants . . $5,016 66 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation ..... 5,150 00 

Balance unexpended . . . . $133 34 



APPROPRIATION OF 1885, FOR REPAIRING AND DRAINING 
GORDON AVENUE. 

Paid J. B. Bachelder, damages . . ... $250 00 

Cr. 
By balance of appropriation unexpended from last 

year . . . . .• $241 72 

" Cash received for stone . . . 11 25 

252 97 



Balance unexpended . . . . . $2 97 



SALARIES. 



Paid David Perkins, services as Selectman and Surveyor 
of Highways ..... 

John H. Tuckerman, services as Selectman and Sur- 
veyor of Highways .... 

Hobart M. Cable, services as Selectman and Surveyor 
of Highways ..... 

Henry B. Terry, services as Town Clerk and Clerk of 
Selectmen ...... 

Henry S. Bunton, services as Treasurer of town and 
sinking fund ..... 

George Sanford, services as Assessor 



!100 


00 


100 00 


100 


00 


200 


00 


350 


00 


300 


00 



68 



Paid Joel F. Goodwin, services as Assessor . 
George W. Chapman, " 

Joel F. Goodwin, services as Ovei'seer of the Poor 
Robert W. Karnan, " " " 

John Terry, " " " 

Joel F. Goodwin, services on Board of Health 
George F. Downes, " " " 

John H. Russell, services as Auditor 
Wallace D. Lovell, ■« 
Charles P. Vaughan, " 



Ck. 



By amount of appropriation 
Balance unexpended 



$300 00 


300 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


50 00 


25 00 


25 00 


25 00 


$2,075 00 


$2,375 00 



$300 00 



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7o 



TREASURER'S 



DR. 



HENRY S. BUNTON, TOWN TREASURER, IN ACCOUNT 



Cash in the Treasury, February 1, 1886: 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR ENDING JANUARY 81, 1 887: 

From Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds 

Premium on Four per cent. Bonds 

Treasurer's Notes — Temporary Loan 

George Sanf ord, Collector, Taxes for 18S4 

George Sanf ord, Collector, Taxes for 1885 

George Sanf ord, Collector, Taxes for 1886 

Betterments — Sidewalks 

Betterments— Child and Cleveland streets 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Corporation Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for National Bank Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Income Massachusetts School Fund 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for State Aid, 1885 

County Treasurer, dog licenses, 1886 

County Treasurer, rent of room occupied by Probate Court 

Liquor Licenses 

Miscellaneous Licenses 

Lock-up fees • 

Rents from Happy Valley property 

Release of Tax Deeds 

Interest on Tax Deeds 

Real Estate sold under Sec. 58, Chap. 12, Public Statutes 

Highways— cash refunded 

John Beatey, for stone — Gordon avenue 

Poor— cash refunded by Commonwealth, cities and towns, etc 

Interest on bank balances 



$S,941 16 



20,000 00 


675 00 


50,000 00 


152 23 


16,313 35 


71,879 46 


2,250 88 


52 00 


2,245 87 


846 69 


107 S3 


529 00 


767 86 


100 00 


4 00 


4 00 


12 50 


6 50 


S 53 


96 


35 11 


9 18 


11 25 


964 22 


154 57 


$176,072 10 



7i 



REPORT. 



CURRENT WITH THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK. 



CR, 



AMOUNTS DISBURSED: 

On account of Hyde Park Four per cent Coupon Bond due Aug. 1st, 18S6. 

Treasurer's Notes— Temporary Loan 

Interest 

Support of Schools 

Superintendent of Schools 

Evening Schools 

Income of Massachusetts School Fund 

School Incidentals 

Text Books and Supplies 

Repairs on High School Building 

Fire Escapes 

Incidentals 

Highways 

Permanent Improvements on Streets and Sidewalks 

Street Lights 

Poor 

Fire Department 

Police 

Deficiency on Streets and Sidewalks, appropriation, No- 
vember 17, 1886 

Simmons & Hill, lawsuits 

Fire Alarm 

Bridge over River at Bridge street 

Hose carriage houses 

Child and Cleveland streets, appropriation, April 22, 1884.1 

Post 121, Grand Army of the Republic 

Fire Hydrant Service 

Repairing and draining Gordon aveuue, appropriation, 
1885 

Salaries 

Public Library, current expenses 

Pub ic Library, purchase of new books 

Sinking Fund, amount of appropriation 

State Tax for 18S6 '. 

Coun ty Tax for 1S86 

Tax Deeds 

Liquor Licenses, paid Treasurer Commonwealth one- 
fourth of the amount received in 1886 

State Aid 

Cash in the Treasury January 31, 1887 



$500 00 



50,000 00 


S,154 57 


25,550 57 


1,800 00 


646 90 


63 00 


3,598 72 


1,997 28 


592 25 


268 33 


5,600 00 


5,281 22 


20,000 00 


4,000 00 


3,783 95 


3,750 00 


2,984 03 


7,000 00 


846 22 


600 00 


1,000 00 


327 96 


173 07 


100 00 


5,01C 66 


250 00 


2,075 00 


1,691 00 


494 37 


3,000 00 


4,275 00 


2,900 76 


20 28 


1 00 


496 00 


$168,838 14 


$7,233 96 


$176,072 10 



72 



Appropriations and Expenditures for the Current Year. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Interest 

Support of Schools 

Superintendent of Schools 

Evening Schools 

School Incidentals 

Text Books and Supplies 

Repairs on High School Building — 

Fire Escapes 

Incidentals 

Highways 

Permanent Improvements 

Street .Lights 

Poor 

Fire Department 

Police 

Deficiency on Streets and Sidewalks 

Simmons and Hill, law suits 

Fire A laim 

Bridge 

1 ose Carriage Houses 

Child and Cleveland Streets 

Post 121, G. A. K 

Fire Hydrant Service 

Repairing and Draining Gordon Ave. . . 

Salaries 

Public Library, current expenses... 

Public 1 ibrary, new books 

Sinking Fund 

State and County Tax 




I Including $965.00, balance from last year. 
- Including $ !88.22, balance from last year, 
s To be raised bv taxation next year. 

4 Inc uding $-272.04, transferred from ho-e-cirriage houses. 

B At er deducting $'272.04, transferred by vote of town, Nov. 17, 1886; 

u B ilance of appr >pr ation made April 22, 1834. 

7 Balance from last year. 

8 Including $46.11, balan:e from iast year. 

9 Jncliuli g $74.51, balance from la t year. 

10 Amount of expenditure, less interes' on Treasurer's bank balances. 

II Amount of expenditure, less cash refunded and received. 



TOWN DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1SS7. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 

four per cent, interest due November 1, 1890 $50,000 00 

South Boston Savings Bank, 

four per cent, intc est, due July 1 , 1891 5,000 00 

Thomas T. Wyman, Boston, 

four per cent, interest, due July 1, 1891 10,000 00 

Sinking Fund, Cambridge Water Works, 

four per cent, interest, due July 1, 1891. 5,000 00 

Chelsea Savings Bank, 

four per cent interest, due November 1, 1891 lo,000 00 

Treasurer's Note (Hyde Park Sinking Fund), 

four per cent interest, due November 1, 1891 5,000 00 

Treasurer's Note (Hyde Park Sinking Fund), 

four percent, interest, due February 1, 1894 85,000 00 

Eight Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$500.00 each, dated August I, 1884, due $ 00.00 annually, 1SS7— 18.14 4,000 00 

Twenty Hvde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds 

$1,000.00 each, dated July 31, IS86, due $2,000.00 annually, 18S7— 1896 20,000 00 

Total indebtedness $199,000 00 

HENRY S. BUNION, Town Treasurer. 
Hyde Park, February 1, 1887. 



73 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK SINKING FUND. 



COMMISSIONERS REPORT. 



Amount of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1886 $97,056 09 

receipts, viz.: 

From Town of Hyde Park, annual appropriation $3,000 00 

Income from investments 3,760 74 

6,760 74 
Amount of Sinking Fund, January 31, 1887 $103,816 83 

INVESTED, viz.: 

Note, Town of Hyde Park, four per cent, interest, dated November 1, 

18S1, due November 1, 189L $5,000 00 

Note. Town of Hyde Park, four per cent, interest, dated February 1, 

1831, due February 1, 1891 85,030 00 

Deposit with New England Trust Company, Boston , 13.816 83 

HENRY GREW, 
WILLIAM J. STIJART, 
HENRY BLASDAi E, 

Commissioners. 
HENRY S. BUNTON. 

Treasurer Sinking Fund. 

Hyde Park, Febi-uary 1, 1887. 



AUDITORS' CERTIFICATE. 



In compliance with the By-Laws of the Town, the under- 
signed have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, School 
Committee, Collector of Taxes, Town Treasurer, Commis- 
sioners of Sinking Fund, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Overseers of the Poor, and Board of Health, and hereby cer- 
tify that the same are correct, and all payments accompanied 
by proper vouchers. 

WALLACE D. LOVELL, 
CHARLES P. VAUGHAN, 
JOHN H. RUSSELL, 

Auditors. 



B Y-L A W S. 



At a meeting of the legal voters of the town of Hyde Park, Mass., 
held Dec. 14th, A. D. 1882, it was voted to adopt the following By- 
Laws, to wit : — 

NOTIFICATION OF TOWN MEETING. 

Every town meeting shall be notified by posting copies of the war- 
rant calling the same, in ten public places in the town, seven days, 
at least, betore the day appointed for said meeting; 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETINGS. 

The annual town meeting for the election of town officers shall be 
held on the first Monday of March of each year. The meeting shall 
be opened at seven o'clock a. m., and the polls shall be kept open 
up til sunset. 

A town meeting shall also be held annually between the first Monday 
of March and the first Monday of April, for appropriating such sums of 
money as may be necessary lor town purposes, and for transacting 
such other business as may legally be brought before said meeting. 

RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF TOWN MEETINGS. 

1. — All questions submitted for the consideration of the town, in- 
volving the expenditure of money, shall be in writing, when so required 
by any legal voter. 

2. — No vote fixing the period for closing a ballot shall be reconsid- 
ered after such ballot shall have commenced; but it may be in order to 
extend the period without such reconsideration. 

3. — When a question is under debate, motions shall be received to 
adjourn, to lay on the table, the previous question, to postpone to a 
certain time, to postpone indefinitely, to commit, or to amend; which 
several motions shall have precedence in the order in which they are 
herein arranged. 

4 - — The powers and duties of the presiding officer, not especially 
provided for by law, or by the foregoing rules, shall be determined by 
the rules of practice contained in '"Cushing's Manual," so far as they 
are adapted to the condition and powers of the town. 

5. — No vote shall be reconsidered except upon a motion made 
within one hour after such vote has passed, unless such reconsideration 
is ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the voters present and voting. 



7 6 

FINANCIAL YEAR. 

The financial year of the town shall begin with the first da}- of Feb- 
ruary in each year, and end on the thirty-first day of the following 
January. 

MEETINGS OF TOWN OFFICERS. 

The selectmen, overseers of the poor, board of health, surveyors of 
highways, and school committee shall post in some conspicuous place 
at their official rooms, a notice of the times of their respective meet- 
ings. 

COLLECTION OE TAXES. 

1. — The assessment of taxes shall be completed, and a list of the 
same delivered to the collector, on or before the first day of August of 
each year. 

2. — All taxt-s which may be assessed, if paid on or before the first 
day of October next after the assessment, shall be entitled to such 
discount as the town shall vote at its annual meeting. All taxes shall 
be due and payable on or before the first day of November next follow- 
ing the assessment of said taxes. 

3. — On the first secular day ot each month, the Collector shall pay 
over to the town Treasurer all the taxes collected by him ; and he shall 
on or before the first day of February in each year, make up his account 
and render the same to the Auditors. 

DUTIES OF THE AUDITORS. 

1. — The auditors shall examine the accounts of the selectmen, 
school committee, treasurer, collector, trustees of the public library, 
and all other officers or committees entrusted with the expenditure of 
money, quarterly, and shall certify as to the correctness o£ the same in 
the printed annual repoit. 

2. — Before certifying to the accounts of ihe treasurer, they shall 
examine his cash-book, wherein shall be entered his receipts and pay- 
ments, as they occur from day to day, and see that he has paid out no 
moneys except on proper vouchers, carefully examine all payments for 
interest, and see that the funds on hand are intact. 

3. — Before certifying to the collector's accounts, they shall examine 
his cash-book, showing the amounts collected from day to da,y, and 
showing when the same were paid over to the treasurer; shall see that 
he has collected interest on all taxes overdue, and shall see a complete 
list of abatements, and also a list of unpaid taxes. 

4. — They shall see that the accounts of the trustees of the public 
library are kept in a correct manner, and that all payments are ac- 
companied with proper vouchers. 



77 

COASTING. 

Coasting on any of the public streets of the town is prohibited, ex- 
cept upon such streets as the Selectmen may designate each year by 
public notice. 

HIGHWAY AND POLICE REGULATIONS. 

1.; — No building shall be removed over a public street without the 
wiitten permission of the Selectmen. 

2. — The owner of such building, or the person or persons removing 
the same, shall give a bond in such penal sum, and with such sureties 
as the Selectmen shall determine, with condition to reimburse the 
town for all sums of money which it may be liable or compelled to pay 
in consequence of such use of the highways. 

3. — No person except the Selectmen or the Surveyors of highways, 
in the lawful performance of their duties, or those acting under their 
orders, shall break' or dig up the ground in any street or public way 
in the town, without first obtaining a written permit from the Select- 
men ; and all persons acting under such permit, shall put up and main- 
tain a suitable railing or fence around the part of the street so broken 
up, so long as the same shall remain unsafe or inconvenint for trav- 
ellers, and he or they shall keep one or more lighted lanterns fixed to 
such railing or (ence, or in some other way exposed every night from 
twilioht in the evening through the whole night, so long as such street 
or way shall be or remain unsafe or inconvenient for travellers. 

4. — No person shall ride or drive a horse in any street in the town at 
a rate faster than eight miles an hour. 

5.— No person shall, without the written consent of the Selectmen, 
play at any game in which a ball of any kind is used, or fly a kite, or 
throw or shoots tones, arrows, balls, snow-balls, or other missiles, or 
discharge an}- gun, cannon, or firearm, or make any bonfire or other 
fires in any street or way where the public have a right to pass. 

6. — No person shall propel, drive, wheel or draw any buycle, 
tricycle, cart or vehicle of any kind whatsoever except a child's car- 
riage drawn by hand, nor use roller skates upon or over any sidewalk 
in this town, nor permit nor suffer any horse, cattle, swine or sheep, 
belonging to him or under his care or keeping to go upon or over the 
same, nor suffer any horse to remain hitched across, or upon, or other- 
wise obstruct or injure, any such sidewalk. 

7 — No person shall hitch or fasten any horse to any urnamental tree 
standing or growing on or near any sidewalk, or to the boxing or 
guard about said tree, without the consent ot the owner thereof. 

8. — No person shall without a written license from the Selectmen, 
place or caused to be placed, or suffer to remain witnin the limits of a 



78 

street or upon any sidewalk, so as in any manner to obstruct the travel 
thereon, any vehicle, wood, coal, manure, dirt, gravel, stone, building 
material, barrels, boxes, merchandise, or any rubbish or obstruction 
whatever. 

9. — No person shall carry in a public street, house-offal, either 
animal or vegetable, or grease, or bones, or the. contents of cesspools 
or vaults, unless he has been expreesly licensed therefor by the Board 
of Health, upon such terms and conditions as said board may deem 
that the health and interests of the town require. 

10. — Loud ciwing of wares or merchandise, or hollooing, hooting or 
making loud and unseemly noises on the public streets or squares of the 
town, to the annoyance of the citizens, is prohibited. 

11. — No person shall behave in a rude, indecent, or disorderly man- 
ner, or use profane, indecent, or insulting language, in any public 
place, or on any sidewalk or street in the town, to the annoyance 
or disturbance ot any other pei'son there being or passing in a peace- 
able manner, or be or remain upon any sidewalk, street, or crossing, 
or about doorways or places of business, to the annoyance or distur- 
bance of any person. 

12. — Three or more persons shall not continue to stand or remain in 
a group or near to each other, on any sidewalk or street or crossing, or 
in any public place, in such a manner as to obstruct a free passage for 
foot passengers, after having been requested by a constable or police 
officer to move on 

13. — No person shall be or remain in any doorway, or upon any 
stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection from any house or building 
or upon any wall or fence on or near any street or public place, after 
having been requested by the owner or any occupant of the premises 
or by any constable or police officer to remove therefrom. 

14. — No person shall make any indecent figures, or write, print, 
paint, or cut any obscene word or words upon, or deface, break or in- 
jure in any manner, any fence, post, sign, street lantern, building or 
isructure; or commit a nuisance upon any sidewalk or other place 
aesorted to by the public, or against any tree, building or structure ad- 
joining a sidewalk. 

15. — No person shall extinguish any street light, or extinguish or re- 
move any light placed to denote an obstruction or a defect in any street 
or way, without proper authority. 

16. — No person shall swim or bathe in any of the waters within the 
limits of this town, so as to be exposed in a nude state, to the view of 
any person passing or being upon any railroad or street or in any 
dwelling-house in this town. 

17. — No person shall intermeddle with any hydrant, gate, gate-box 



79 

or water pipe placed or located within the limits of any public way in 
this town, without permission from the Selectmen or the Hyde Park 
Water Company. 

PASTURING OF CATTLE OK OTHER ANIMALS ON STREETS OR WAYS. 

No person shall pasture any cattle, goat or other animal upon any 
street or public way in said town, either with or without a keeper, ex- 
cept withinthe limits of such way adjoining his own premises, and field 
drivers are instructed to enforce this by-law. 

TRUANTS. 

1 — The town hereby avails itself of the several provisions of the 
statutes of this Commonwealth, now in force, relating to habitual 
truants and absentees from school. 

2. — All children convicted of habitual truancy hereunder, and chil- 
dren between the ages of seven and fifteen years, residing in said town, 
and who may be found wandering about the streets or public places of 
said town, having no lawful occupation or business, not attending 
school, and growing up in ignorance, may be committed to the 
Lawrence Industrial School, at Lawrence, Mass., or to any house of 
reformation which has been or may hereafter be established by the 
County Commissioners of the County of Norfolk, or to any place pro- 
vided by this town within its limits, for confinement, instruction and 
discipline. 

3. — Two or more truant officers shall be appointed annually, whose 
duty it shall be to inquire into all the violations of the truant laws, and 
of the law relating to compulsory education, and to do all the acts re- 
quired of them by the laws of the Commonwealth. 

4. — It shall be the duty of every truant officer, previous to making 
any complaint under these laws, to notify the truant, or absentee fiom 
school, also his parent or guardian, ot the offence committed, and of 
the penalty therefor, and, if the truant officer can obtain satisfactory 
pledges for the restraint and reformation of the child, he may, at his 
discrecion, forbear to prosecute so long as such pledges are faithfully 
kept. 

5 — It shall be the duty of the School Committee, the teachers o 
the public schools, and the citizens generally, to aid the truant officers 
as far ?s possible in the discharge of their duties. 

6. — It shall be the duty of the truant officers to keep a full record of 
all their official acts, and make an annual report thereof to the School 
Committee who shall publish the same with their own report. 

7. — Nothing in these by-laws shall be so construed as to alter or im- 
pair the obligation and duty of teachers to enforce punctuality and legu- 
larity of attendance, and to preserve good order and discipline. 



8o 



LIST OF TAX-PAYEKS. 

The names of all persons paying a tax on real or personal properly 
shall be published annually in the town report, together with the 
amount of tax assessed upon each, and whether the same is paid or un- 
paid. 

DUTIES OF TOWN CLERK. 

The Town Clerk shall keep a file of all town reports, reports of all 
committees cho'.en by the town, and all original documents relating to 
the affairs of the town which may come into his possession ; he shall, as 
soon as practicable, after any election has been held by the town, in 
addition to the notices he is now directed to give to officers who are re- 
quired to take an oath of office, also issue a written or printed notice to 
all persons who have been elected to any other office, or chosen to 
serve on any other committee, stating the office to which such person 
has been elected, or the duties which such committee was ctosen to 
perform. 

CONTRACLS MADE IN BEHALF OF THE TOWN. 

Every contract exceeding- one thousand dollars shall be accompanied 
by a suitable bond lor the performance of the same, or by the deposit 
of money or security to the amount of such bond. 

ACTIONS AT LAW. 

The Selectmen shall have mil authority, as agents of the town, to 
employ counsel to institute and prosecute suits in the name of the town, 
and appear for and defend suits brought against it, unless otherwise 
specially ordered by a vote of the town. 

CONVEYANCING. 

Whenever it shall be necessary to execute any deed conveying land, 
or any other instrument required to carry into effect any vote of the 
town, the same shall be executed by the Selectmen, or a majority of 
them, in behalf of the town, unless ike town shall otherwise vote in any 
special case. 

BY-LAWS IN RELATION TO THE PREVENTION OF FIRES. 

1. — It shall be the duty of every person who shall commence the 
erection of any building within i he town of Hyde Park to notify the 
Board of Engineers thereof before he shall commence building the 
chimneys there' n. 

2. — All chimneys in wooden buildings shall be bui't'of brick, stone, 
or other fire-proof non-conducting material. Ail brick flues shall be 
smoothly plastered inside with mortar from cop to bottom, or lined with 
earthen pipe, and shall be plastered oidside below the roofing. 



3. — In no case shall chimneys rest upon any flooring without a foot' 
ing of masonry or iron supported by iron beams, having a secure bear- 
ing of mas"nry or iron at either end. 

4. — All flues shall be topped out at least four feet above the roof o* 
the build'ng to which they belong. The brick topping out of chimneys 
shall not have more (lian two inches projection unless covered by a cap 
of metal or stone properly secured. 

5. — Hearths or fireplaces or grates shall be laid upon brick or other 
trimmer arches, or upon bars rf iron supporting a bed of brick- work. 

6. — No wood-work of any kind shall be placed at a less distance than 
one inch f.-om the outside brick work of any flue. In no case shall a 
nail be driven into the masonry of any flue. 

7. — No wood-work shall be placed at a less distance than one inch 
from any tin or other metal flue or flues, pipe or pipes, used or intended 
to be used to conve\ T healed air or steam in any building, unless such 
flues or pipes shall be cased with metal, leaving a free circulation of air 
all around the same. 

8. — No smoke-pipe in any such wooden or frame building shall 
hereafter enter any flue, unless the said pipe shall be at least twelve 
inches from either the floors or ceiling; and in all cases where smoke 
pipes pass through stud or wooden partitions of an} 7 kind, w r hether the 
same be plastered or not. they shall be guarded by either a double col- 
lar of metal, with at least four inches of air space and holes for ventila- 
tion, or by a soap stone ring, not less than three inches in thickness and 
extending through the partition. 

9. — The Board of Engineers shall examine into all shops and other 
places where shavings or other combustible material may be de- 
posited or collected, and at all times be vigilant in the removal of the 
same, whenever, in the opinion of a majority of them, the same may be 
dangerous to the security of the town from fires; and direct the owner, 
tenant, or occupant of said shops, or other places, to remove the same; 
and in case such owner, tenant, or oeeupnt refuses or neglects so to do, 
shall cause the same to be removed at the expense of such owner, 
tenant, or occupant. 

10. — It shall also be the duty of said Engineers to take cognizance 
of all buildings in the tpwn in which any steam engine shall be u«ed, 
and of all buildings in town in process of erection or alteration, and 
to make a record of such buildings as in their judgment ma} T from any 
cause be dangerous, and report the same to the Selectmen forthwith. 
And whenever in the opinion of a majority of the Board of Engineers, 
any chimney, hearth, oven, stove, stovepipe, fire-frame or other fix- 
ture, or any camphene or other explosive or inflammable fluid or 
material, or whatever else may give just cause for alarm, should be 



82 

altered, repaired or removed, they, the said Engineers, shall forth- 
with notify and direct the owner, tenant or occupant of the premises 
upon which the same ai - e situated, to alter, repair or remove the same, 
as .the said Engineers shall direct. And in case such tenant, owner 
or occupant shall refuse or neglect so to do, the said Engineers shall 
cause the same to be removed, altered or repaired at the expense or 
such owner,, tenant or occupant. And any person who shall obstruct 
the Engineers, or any of them, in carrying out the provisions of this 
section, shall be liable to the penalty hereinafter stated. 

11. — The removal, extension or essential alteration of any building; 
also the rebuilding or repairing of any building which has been 
partially destroyed by fire shall be subject to the same restrictions as 
are imposed by the foregoing By-laws on the erection of buildings. 

PUBLICATION OF BY-LAWS. 

The Selectmen shall publish these By-Laws annually in connection 
with the town report. 

PENALTIES UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Every violation of any of the foregoing B} 7 -laws shall be punished by 
a fine of not less than one dollar nor more than twent} 7 dollars, to be 
recovered by complaint before any trial justice in the County of Nor- 
folk, or any other court having jurisdiction. 

PROSECUTION UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Any citizen may, and the selectmen, constables and police officers 
shall, prosecute every violation ot the foregoing By-laws, by complaint 
before any trial justice in the County of Norfolk, or any other court 
having jurisdiction. 

LIMITATIONS OF ACTION. 

No person shall be prosecuted or tried for any breach of the provis- 
ions of any By-laws of this town, unless the complaint for the same 
shall be instituted and commenced within six months from the time of 
committing such breach. 



All By-laws or parts of By-laws of this town heretofore existing are. 
hereby repealed, and these By-laws of the town of Hyde Park shall go 
into effect from and after their adoption by the town and their appro- 
val by the Superior Court or any Justice thereof. 



83 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Norfolk, SS. 

Hyde Park, November 17, 1886. 

At a meeting of the legal voters of said town of Hyde Park, held in 
Everett Hall, on Wednesday the seventeenth day of November, in the 
year of our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty-six, the foregoing By- 
laws were adopted by said town. 

Attest : 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Norfolk, SS. 

Superior Court, December Sitting, 1886, To wit : January 26, 1887 
The foregoing By-iaws are hereby approved. 

By the Court. 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON. Clerk. 



True copies. Attest : 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk. 



RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 










Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 








Aborn, Elizabeth M. . 




$38 75 




Adams, Charlotte H. . 














34 87 




Adler, George H. 












$9 30 






Adler, Franklin H. 












12 40 






Alrlen, Charles L. & Co. 












6J 90 




69 90 


Aldei), Charles L. 














41 C7 


41 07 


Alderman, M. P. 














15 50 




Alderman, Lucy A. 














51) 5S 




Aid' ich. Philena 














33 32 




Allen, Zenas 














52 31 




Allen, Orville 














55 80 




Allen, Charles F. 












16 04 


191 43 




Allen, Francis S. 














117 80 




Allen. Mat k 












4 65 




4 65 


Anderson, Lvdia 














45 73 




Arentze.n. Christiana . 














27 '.10 




Arey, Mrs. John W. . 














3-> 36 




Arnold, Isaiah F., heirs of 














52 70 




Atkinson, [sanelia 














35 65 




Atkinson, Robe t 












54 






Ayer, George, heirs of 














15 89 




B 








Bachelder, John B. ... 


84 32 






Bactielder, Lizzie B, . 












26S 15 




Ktu-bekler, Phillip A. . 












20 15 




20 15 


Badger, Susan C, Miss 














172 05 




Badge) 1 , William F. 












4 65 






Badger, Susan C, Mrs. 














71 30 




Badger, •*. C, and S. C. Fostt 


:r 












18 6:) 




Barsler, Henry . 














1 55 




Bailey, Annie E. 














54 25 


54 25 


Bn on, Ruth T. . 














r,9 14 




Baker, Charles . 












4 65 




4 65 


Balkana, Stephen B. . 














105 40 




Balkani, S. B. & Co. . 












184 45 


128 65 




B ilkam. Henrv G. 












15 50 




15 50 


Baptist Church Society 














70 52 




Barker, James H. 














29 45 


29 45 


Barme, Charlotte 














51 25 


54 25 


Barney, Amanda M. 














31 78 


31 78 


Barritt, William H. '. 












5 43 






Barry, Michael 














23 25 




Barry, Patrick and Caiherin 














29 45 




Barry, Richard J. 














116 25 




Bartlett, h lizabeth K. . 














28 67 


28 67 


Bartlelt, Hannah S., heirs of 














31 77 




Bass, Arthur C. 












54 25 






Bass, George W. 














73 62 




Bass, Elizabeth . . 














68 59 




Bates, Fmroa M. 














135 63 




Bates, Sarah L. 














39 53 




Batho, William 












12 40 






Bean, Gerlfudi B. 














2 71 


2 71 


Beatey, John 










2 33 




2 33 


Ben ley Annie J. . , 












58 90 


5S 90 


Beansnng, Patrick and John 












20 54 


20 54 


Bennett. John 












31 78 




Benson, Lena 














46 50 


46 50 


Bern, Catherine D. 














41 85 




Benton, Ira L. . 














1<5 40 


105 40 


Benton, Jesse S. 














41 85 





86 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 










Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Berry, Nathaniel F. 




$29 45 


$29 45 


Bicktoi-d, Levi B. 














85 25 


85 25 


Bickmore, Albion P. 














47 28 


47 2» 


Bickneli, Mary J. 














54 25 




Bidwell, Lawson B. . 












.$43 71 


93 00 




Bigelow, Fred C. 














17 44 


17 44 


Bills. James P. 












3 10 




3 10 


Blackey, Herbert I. 












2 83 






Blackmer, Hannah H. 












3 41 


75 95 


79 36 


Blaisdell, Albert J. . 












54 






Blaisdell, Angie H. . 














34 10 




Blake, E. E. & Barnes 














15 50 




Blake, Ruth S. 














81 37 


73 62 


Blake, Phoebe E. 














68 20 


68 20 


Bl.-ike, Win Held 














130 97 


130 97 


Blasdale, Henry 












7 75 


96 10 




Bleakie, Robert 












624 05 


2,049 10 




Bleakie, Robert & Co. . 












411 59 






Bleakie, Robert, Trustee, 














116 25 




Bleakie, John S. 














199 95 




Bleakie. Margaret. F. 












13 95 


147 25 




Blodgett, Anna E. 














51 15 


51 15 


Bloom, Julius R. 














40 30 




Bodwell, William P. . 














5 43 




Bond, John R. 












78 


15 50 




Bonnell, John D. 














52 70 




Bonney, Susan 














44 17 




Bowen, Patience, heirs of 














33 33 


33 33 


Boyce, Guy L. 












6 20 






Boyden, George E., heirs of 












2 32 


44 17 


46 49 


Boynton, F., and H. C. Roge 


■s, hei 


•s of 










52 70 




Boynton, Fiancis 












18 60 


41 85 




Biaekett, Bet ey E. 














22 86 




Bradley, Edmond & S. F. 














31 00 


31 00 


Bradley, Katie E. 














37 59 




Brady, John 














18 2' 


18 21 


Bragan, Thomas P. 












54 


34 88 




Bragan. Sarah . 














3 S8 




Bragdou, Julia A. 














21 70 




Brainard, Amos H. 












18 60 


145 70 




Brainard. Elizabeth C. 














106 95 




Brainard Milling Machine C< 


>. 










325 50 


163 B 3 




Brannon, Patrick 












] 55 


25 96 




Bvamwell, William C. 












172 05 


250 32 




Brigham.F. D. . 












15 50 






Brigham, Helen 














72 85 




Biigham, Laura E. 


* 












3 10 


3 10 


Brooks, John L. 














29 06 




Brostrom , A. J. 














31 78 




Brown. James R. 












54 


21 31 


21 85 


Brown, Isaac J. 












3 88 


563 42 




Brown, Baitlett J. 














44 95 




Brown, Kufus G. 














(8 20 




Bryant, Walter C. 












2 87 


15 50 




Bryant, Helen . 














40 30 




Bryant, Nai cy A. 














22 47 




Buchan, Thomas 














3 10 




Buck. Laura A. 














41 08 




Bullard, Isaac 














77 50 




Bullard, William A., heirs ol 














38 5 




Bullard, William, heirs of 














323 95 


122 21 


Bullard, John N. 












31 00 


82 92 


113 92 


Bullard, Edward N. . 












1 55 




1 55 


Bunker, Stephen S. 














35 65 


35 65 


Bunkt-r, Emily C. 














21 70 


21 70 


Bunton, Henry S. 














68 20 




Bunion, Henry S., trustee 














173 60 





87 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Bunton, Henry S., trustee 
Hun ton, Henry S., trustee 
Burger, Anton . 
Burke, John 
Burke, Thomas, 1st 
Burke, Thomas, 2d 
Burnett, Marshall 
Bums, Timothy 
Burns, Duncan D. 
Burns, James M. 
Butler, George H., heirs of 
Butler, Harriet P. W. 



Cable, Hobart M. 
Cafflii, Francis H. 
Caldwell, Emily L. 
Caldwell, Alexander 
Caller, Ellen A. 
Caller, Frederick E. 
Cameron, Jane L. 
Campbell, Josiah, heir 
Campbell, Agnes 
Campbell, John 
Caiicannon, Patrick 
Cannon, Michael 
Carberry, William 
Carlton, William F. 
Carlton, Clara M. 
Carpenter, Oscar II. 
Carrington, Henry B 
Carter, Austin F. 
Cartel-, John B. 
Carter, Elizabeth 15. 
Carter & Churchill 
Case, Wilbert J. 
Case, Samuel T. 
Cashman, Ellen F. 
Cass, Francis W. 
Chaffee, Mary M. 
Chamberlain, Thomas 
Chandler, Edwin J. 
Chandler, Emetine H. 
Chandler, Abram F. 
Chandler, Julia S. 
Chapin, Mrs. A. M. 
Chapman, Annie S. 
Cherrington, R. E. 
Cnesley, Samuel A. 
Chick, Charles G. 
Chipman, Benjamin 
Chi oni an, John H. 
Choate, Wane:; P. 
Christopher, James K 
Cilley, Jonathan L. 
Clapp, Henrietta E. 
Claik, Heinan A. 
Clark, Mary, 1st 
Clark, Joseph Q. 
Clark, Leonard C. 
Clarke, Marcus, heirs of 
Clarke, Mary 
Clary, Mary 
Cobb, Sylvanus. Jr. 
Cochran, Mary j. 
Cochran, Adelaide L. 



Per- 
sonal. 



£2 09 



1 55 
31 00 



40 30 
4 65 



3 88 
3 10 



31 00 

2 33 

23 25 

2 33 



Real 
Estate. 



$606 83 

401 90 

31 77 

3 88 

8 52 

11 63 
34 87 
10 85 
33 32 

12 40 
2 33 

63 55 



146 47 
90 10 
94 55 
13 18 
51 15 
6! 32 
24 02 
10 08 
55 80 

18 60 
il 24 

7 75 
276 29 

19 37 
28 67 



30 23 

10 85 
17 05 
77 50 
26 74 
26 35 

31 39 
3 42 

43 40 
19 76 

43 4tl 
17 05 

9 30 
90 67 
138 34 

36 80 

37 97 

44 95 
19 38 
29 45 

164 30 

25 57 
31 39 

24 80 

48 05 

5 04 

51 Id 

24 '0 
111 60 
3 J 87 
43 40 



Unpaid. 



$33 86 



96 10 



18 6 
II 24 

.7 75 

19 37 

28 67 



26 35 
5 42 



36 SO 



10 38 
29 45 
164 30 

3 S8 

31 39 
3 10 



45 73 



Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sona'. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Coffin, Sarah A. ...... 


$7 75 




$7 75 


Cogan, Thomas 










$23 64 




Cogswell, Euella 








9 84 


S7 57 




Col burn, Oliver 










39 53 




Colbv, Frank M. 








11 70 






Coleman, E. J. 








51 


24 SO 


25 34 


ComstocU, Rosa L. 










20 54 


20 54 


Condon, James 








8 29 


65 10 




Congregational Society, 1st 










71 30 




Conlan, Peter S. 










3") 25 




Conley, James 










15 (-9 




Conlev. Stephen 










19 37 




Conn, Freeman VV. 








54 




54 


Connolly, Michael 










56 19 




Conrov, Patrick 










19 38 




Cook, Emily A. 










32 55 


32 55 


Cool;,. Jacob 








2 33 


51 15 




Corbeit, Ellen E. 










3b 75 


38 75 


Corbett, Jeremiah 








7 06 




7 06 


Corbett, John . 










3 22 




Corcoran, Mary, John, Edward am 


1 Bridf 


;et Dolan 






2d 04 




i. orcoran, John 










IS 99 




Corcoran, Mary and Edward 










22 4S 




Corrigan, Bridget 








S 30 


46 50 


54 80 


Corngan, Thomas 








11 07 


90 6S 




Corrigan, Hose 










n 4u 




Corson, Clsi a . 










S7 58 


87 58 


Corson, Reuben 








69 90 


17 S3 


87 73 


Cortbell, James R. 










37 10 




Cotter, John 








!i 30 






Cotier, James E. 








7 52 


142 60 




Couiilian, Charlotr.e A. 










12 40 


12 40 


Coveney, Augusta E. 










34 8, 




Coveney, Mary 










2u^ 28 




Coveney, James S. 










4S 44 


6 98 


Cowan, VV. C. & Matilda 










35 6.) 




Crooke, Dabella 










7 75 




Crooker, Frank VV., heirs of. 










32 55 




Cross, Lori u 








:> 10 






Cross, Edward \V. 








2 .,2 






Crowley, Jolin, Jr. . . , 








6 20 




6 20 


Cruinmet, Carrie F. 










36 04 




Cruinett, Chas. H. 








5 19 


191 4.. 


196 62 


Crumell, Lucy T. 










1 55 




Cundall, Phoebe A. 










30 23 


30 23 


Cunninjiham, Mary T. 










27 51 




Cllrley, Sabina 










S 91 


8 91 


Cm ley, Mrs. Keren 










1 55 


1 55 


Curi en, Ellen . 










6 20 




Curtis, Jason L. 










48 82 




X> 








Dadley, James . ...... 




34 10 




Damon, Itogooe 










33 71 




Darling, Mary M. 










91 .5 




Davenport, Cn.irles E. 








20 15 


36 *1 




Davenport, Albert 










li s3 




Davis, Alonzo 








4 65 


139 50 




Davis, Edmund 










4!l 60 




Davis Arris H. 










23 64 




Davis. David L. 








1C6 17 


137 ..6 




Da\, Herbert N. 








54 




54 


Dean, Ellen C. 










6S 20 


6S 20 


Delano. Alphonzo F. . 










39 52 




Desmond, Margar et . 










38 75 


28 75 



8 9 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Dodge. Kirk W. 
Dodge, Louisa A. 
Dolan, Patrick 
Dolau, Bridget . 
Donalioe, Patrick M. 
Donahoe, John 
Donlan, Hannah 
Doty, George E. 
Downes, Florence 
Downes, George F. 
Downey, John 
Downey, Michael 
Downey, Rose 
Downing, Alfred 
Downing, Belinda 
Downing, Elizabeth C 
Dowse. George S., heir 
Dray. Bridget . 
Duggan, Dennis 
Dunliar, Hannah J. 
Dunn, John P. 
Dunn, William, Jr. 
Dure] I, James McD 
Dwyer, Patrick J. 
Dyer, Quincy 



E 



Eastwood, A. J. and Isabella H. 

Edenborg, John 

Edwards, Lovey L. 

Elliot, Margaret B. 

Elliott, Samuel T. 

Elliott, Marv C. 

Elliott, Albert E. 

Ellis, Joseph D. 

Ellis, Hatlie E. 

Emei son, Fannie B. 

Emery, John P. 

Emery, Betsey 

Enneking, John J. 

Esles, Gardner F. 

Eustis, Maria A. 

Everett, Willard S. 



F 



Fairbairn, Tin. U. 
Fairbairn, Draxana 
Fairbanks, Caroline N. 
Fall, James B. 
Fallon, Bridget 
Fallon. Peter & Michael 
Fallon, Peter 
Farnswonh, Charles L. 
Faunce, Josephine 
Fellows, George M. 
Fennell, \V lliam 
Fennessy, Carrie & Rosa M, 
Fo'nald, George M. 
Ferry, Simon E. 
Field, Thomas G. 
File, James 
Fife, Margaret 
Fisher, Sophia 
Fisher, Andrew 
Fisk, Elvira A. 
Fisk, H. C. & Philena A. 



Per- 
sonal. 



i-2 33 

3 10 

54 



78 
4 96 



1 09 

2 09 



57 94 
40 31 



54 



38 75 



3 34 

15 50 

3 87 

7 75 

13 17 

7 75 
24 42 
46 73 



54 
1 55 



23 25 
2 09 



Real 
Estate. 



$34 49 
9 69 
30 22 
34 87 
10 85 
54 25 
37 97 
25 96 

18 60 
29 45 

2 33 
86 80 
40 30 
43 40 
48 82 

6 20 
25 58 
25 58 

130 20 
82 J 5 
29 45 
51 15 



19 37 
31 39 
75 95 
41 85 
30 22 
78 
2 33 
66 65 
39 52 
75 95 
48 05 
37 20 
60 45 
173 U9 
98 42 
83 70 



55 80 
35 65 
43 40 

8 14 

18 99 
93 00 

49 21 
54 64 
22 09 

4 65 
29 84 

15 11 

4 65 

27 90 

50 37 



Unpaid. 



11 63 
59 21 



6 20 

54 



177 86 



8 14 



4 65 

29 84 



6 20 

27 90 



90 



Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 










Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Fiske, Mary ...... 




48 05 




Fitton, Lucy B. 














37 20 


37 20 


Fittdii, John 














28 29 




Flaherty, Koger J. 












4 80 


8 90 




Foley, lionora . 














27 52 




Foote, Charlotte L. 














53 85 




Forbes, John, heirs of 














28 29 


28 29 


Forbes, Mlas H. 












2 32 




2 32 


Forbes, Helen M. 














43 40 


43 40 


Foss, Cyrus D. 














29 07 


29 07 


Foster, Alice G. 














55 80 




Foster, Sarah E. 














91 06 




Foster, Alfred 












5 59 


55 80 




Foster, Samuel A. 














4 27 




Fowle, Francis A.. 














33 71 




Fox, Catharine 














12 79 




Fradenburg, Morris 














20 54 




Frame, John 












3 10 






Frame, Annie M. 














84 46 




Fram p toil. Robert L. . 












•27 13 


102 30 




Freeiu n, Sarah A. 














16.67 




Freeman, Charles T. . 














64 32 




French, L. J. & Co., . 












46 50 






French, Amanda M. . 














63 55 




French, Caroline A. . 














31 00 


31 00 


French, Lemuel B. 














3D 22 


30 22 


French, Josephine M. . 














31 01) 




French, Alice C. 














27 52 


27 52 


Frost, George W. 














55 80 




Frost, Fannie M. 














37 97 




Frye. Jane 














41 08 


41 08 


Frye, Amanda P. 














18 99 


18 99 


Furclon, Margaret, trustee , 












3/ 98 




Furdon, John .... 








54 




54 


Cr 








Gaffney, Bridget ..... 




31 00 




Galligan, Matthew 












11 63 






Galligau, Andrew 














29 84 




Gannon. Mary 














14 72 




Gately, Ellen 














25 19 




Gay, Daisy E. . 














S 52 




George, Hawley M. 




- 








15 50 




15 50 


Giles, Allied E. 












31 00 


65 87 




Giles, Alfred E. 














248 0u 




Giles, Susannah R. H. 












31 00 






Gilligan, Mary 














29 4 5 




Gilson, John 














54 64 




Gilson, Sarah 














6 97 


6 97 


Gleasou, Frank W. 












30 22 




30 22 


Goodspeed, Charles F. 












2ii 66 


6!i 27 




Goodspeed, Mary M. , guard" 


an 










18 99 






Goouspeed, Mary M. . 












7 75 






Goodwin, Emerline N. 














42 24 


42 24 


Gordon, hobei t J. 












7 75 




7 75 


Gormley, William 












1 86 


11 24 


13 10 


Goss, Eliza L. 














63 55 


63 *5 


Goss, Daniel J. 












4 65 


62 77 


67 42 


Goss, Josiah 














1 55 




Gould, II. H., heirs of 














45 73 




Gould, Mary L. 














6 98 




Graham, Kranklin C. . 












57 35 


27 90 




Graham, Mrs. Geurge A. 














43 79 


43 79 


Giant, Peter 












54 


28 29 




Gra\ , Louisa U. 














87 57 


87 57 


Gray, Oriu 1'., trustee 














48 05 


48 05 



9 i 



Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



Greeley, Sema C. 
Greeley, John H. 
Greenwood, Frank 
Greenwood, Phoebe H 
Greenwood, Lucy S. 
Gregg, Ciaik C. 
Grew, Henry S. 
Grew Henry, 
Gridley, Nannie 
Gridley, G. Fred 
Griflen, Sarah . 
Griffen, Fannie M. 
Cuy , Charles W. 



H 

Habberly, Martha A. 
Haigh, George . 
Halderi, John 
Halden, Mrs. S. C. 
Hale, Allied, heirs of 
Haley, Charles 
Haley, Elizabeth A. 
Hall, Augusta 
Hall, Caleb 
Hall, Sarah C. 
Hainblin, Joseph G. 
Hamblin, Benjamin L 
Hammond, Joseph W. 
Hammond, Ada A. 
Hanchett, George W. 
Harding. George. M. 
Hardy, B. H. 
Hardy, Elizabeth 
Harlow, Philander 
Harlow, Susan M. 
Harmon, Benjamin 
Harris, L. E. 
Halt, Bridget M. 
Hasli -11, Maria heirs of 
Haskell, Gideon H. 
Haskell, H • . 
Haskell, Elmer W. 
Hassam, Rosa P. 
Hatch, Freeman 
Hathaway, E (ward S 
Hatlinger, J. J. & M. E, 
Haven, George E. 
Hawes, Emily R. 
Hawes, Charles E. 
Hayes, Charles C. 
Hay ward, EuWard S. 
Hayward. Arthur F. 
Ha.-eltine, H. F. heirs of 
Hedge, E. & S. H. Webster 
blender.- on, Walter 
Henderson, Mary 
Heustis, Charles P. 
Heydecker, Louis 
Hieliey, Edward J. 
Hickey, Margery A. 
Higgins, Antoinette N 
Higgins, David 
Higgins, Henry M. 
Highland, Alice 
Hill, Joseph 
Hill, Sarah J. 



Per- 
sonal. 



Real 
Estate. 



$2 87 
13 17 



775 00 
132 45 



7 75 



4 26 
3 10 

3 10 
6 97 
2 33 

2 32 



3 10 
2 33 



4 65 

6 20 

2 33 

2 86 



$28 29 

43 40 
6 20 

239 85 

44 95 
39 53 

1,655 97 
73 62 

31 00 
41 85 
39 53 



44 18 
27 90 
79 S3 
4 65 
54 25 

322 79 
49 60 

171 Oti 

10 85 
35 26 

2 6 75 
239 86 

29 84 
53. 47 
58 90 

4 65 
66 65 

31 00 
24 42 

.13 55 

11 24 
40 30 

239 48 

3 10 
52 31 
40 69 
45 72 

4 27 
52 70 

30 22 

32 55 
52 30 
96 10 

34 87 
83 31 

8 53 

87 57 

29 07 

8 53 

168 56 

8 14 

93 00 

180 58 

49 60 

49 60 

37 98 



Unpaid, 



£28 29 



44 18 



171 66 



239 86 



2 33 
4 65 



26 74 
13 55 
11 24 



3 10 



45 72 



52 70 
30 22 



87 57 



92 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Per- Real 

sonal. Estate. un P aitl - 



Hill, Hamilton A. 

Hill, Frederick R. 

Hill. Warren S. . 

Hiller, Lucy E. 

Hilton, Oriasa P. 

[lobby, Mary A. 

Hodgdon, Laura E. 

Hodges, Joseph F. 

Hodgkins, Annie M. 

Hodgkins, Luther D. 

Hodgkinson. John 

Hodgkinson, John & Son 

Hodsdon, David M. 

Holbi ook, Joseph B. 

Holmes, Christopher P. 

Holmes, Marv 

Holt, Charles F. 

Holtham, Henry S. 

Holway, Alexander H 

Holway, Alexander H 

Holway, Alexander H 

Holway, Emma A. 

Holway, E. A. & A. R. Whittle* 

Holzer, Ulrich 

Hood, Georgiana 

Hood, John 

Hood & Reynolds 

Hoogs, Hannah M. 

Hooga, William H. 

Hope, James D. 

Hopkirk, Martha 

Horn, Ernest, heirs of 

Horn, Olive 

Homer, Sarah J. 

House, Nettie F. B. 

Hovey, Solomon 

Howard, Henry F. 

Howe, Lucy M. 

Howes, H. J. 

Huggins, Charles E. 

Hughes, Catherine 

Hughes, William J. 

Hukin, Frank . 

Hurley, John 

Hurter, Jennie F. 

Hurter, George C. 

Husted, Richard W. 

Hutchinson, Elizabeth H 

Hyde Park Waier Co 



Ingersoll, William H. heirs of 



James, George 
Jaquith, Andrew 
Jeffrey, Dora M. 
Jenkins, Eliza B. 
Jenkins, Howard 
Jennings, Edward L 
Jennings, C. E. P. & Etta H 
Jennison, Charles S. 
Jermon. Henry V. 
Johnson, Richard M 
JohDston, John 
Johnston, Roland 



1 09 



1 16 

7 75 



18 75 



54 

46 50 



93 00 



8 52 

3 88 
6 20 

4 65 



7 75 
130 20 



$46 50 
57 35 
:!4 48 
70 52 
57 35 
43 79 

123 22 

27 52 
23 64 
16 28 

14 34 

37 20 
41 85 

8 53 

64 32 

92 22 

370 84 

38 36 
64 33 
57 74 
85 25 
51 54 

6 20 
55 80 

117 02 
35 25 

39 91 
13 95 
11 24 
21 32 

28 68 
49 60 
96 10 
13 95 
20 54 
41 07 
34 10 
47 28 



89 12 

41 08 



34 10 
310 78 



96 87 



37 20 

43 01 
48 05 

44 17 

3 88 
5 04 

34 10 
24 80 
34 87 
144 15 
63 55 

4 65 



$7 75 

34 48 
57 35 

27 52 



14 34 

37 20 



64 32 
75 32 



41 07 



55 80 
3 88 



4 65 



48 05 



93 



Resident Tax-Payers . — ( Continued.) 



Joice, Jane 
Jones, Antoinette C. 
Jordan, Ellen 
Jordan, Patriots J. 
Jordan, Edward J.. 
Joubert, D. Z. 
Joubert, Mrs. F. A., 



Kappler, Meinrad 
Karnan, R. W. &Co., 
Kearney, John, heirs of 
Keene, Mary A. 
Keith, Louisa . 
Keith, James 
Kelley, Mary A. 
Kelley. Annie E. 
Kendall, Daniel F. 
Kendall, D. F, & Son 
Kendall, Edward A. 
Kennedy, John 
Kennedy, Michael 
Kent, Arabella B. 
Kent, James A. 
Kerr, t»eorge B. 
Kibler, Phdemone 
Kibler, Louis 
Kiggen, Michael 
Kiggen, John 
Kincston, Thomas 
Knight, Angit, L. 
Kollock, Arthur O. 
Kuhn, Clara 



Lake, Martha S. 

Lally, Michael 

Lanahan, Itobert 

Lane, Edward 

Lane, Marcus M. 

Lane, Mrs. Ann 

Lane, Charles E. 

Larrson, Peter 

Lawrence, Catherine 

Lee, Br dget 

Leeds, Catharine E. 

Leonard, Martin, heirs of 

Leonard. Thomas F. heirs o 

Leonard. D- Ambrose 

Leseur, Horatio 

Lesenr, Benjamin E. 

Leslie, S. Z. & Co. 

Leufgren, O. J- & P. A. Carlson 

Leverett, James W. 

Lewis, Mary C. 

Lewis, Charles . 

Lewis & Washburn 

Lincoln, Jennie 

Lincoln, Alice M. 

Lincoln, Alv : n C 

Lindgren, Swan J. 

Linuham, Charles T. 

Lord, Elizabeth L. 

Loughlin, Mrs. A. L. 

Lovell, Sarah A. 

Lucey,E. & M. 

Lyons, Emerson VV. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$1 09 

77 50 



31 00 
2 32 



40 30 
15 50 



15 50 
2 32 



1 55 
13 18 



54 



10 85 
31 00 



2 33 



9 30 
10 07 



Real 


Estate. 


$32 94 


6 20 


3 10 


20 15 


17 05 


30 23 


36 42 


26 35 


29 45 


35 65 


89 90 


18 99 


41 07 


48 05 


139 50 


8 52 


8 14 


58 90 


48 05 


44 18 


149 18 


18 99 


4 27 


56 96 


31 77 


51 15 


6 98 


18 99 


25 19 


22 09 


29 45 


46 89 


20 92 


37 59 


30 22 


26 35 


10 85 


252 65 


65 10 


174 37 


71 30 


16 66 


43 40 


40 30 


38 75 


26 35 


21 31 


24 80 


19 76 


90 68 


45 73 


43 40 



Unpaid. 

$32 94 
3 10 

36 42 



15 50 
2 32 



46 89 



31 00 



21 31 



90 68 
45 73 



94 



Resident Tax-Payers — (.Continued.) 



Macomber, Sarah Ann 
Mackrille, Harriet 
Maguirej Margaret, heirs of 
Mahoney, Dennis 
Mahoney, Florence 
Mandell, Albert A. 
Man ley, Mary E. 
Marr Adeline M. 
Man- & Ward . 
Martin, Robert B. Jr. 
Mason, Dmiel W. 
Mason, Abby 3. 
Maihus, Frantz 
Matthewson, Jerome . 
Maxim, Jane 
Maynard, William M. 
McAsUell, Kenneth 
McAuIiffe, Edward and Brid 
McAvoy, James D. 
McAvoy. Mary E. 
McCarty, Peter 
McCarty, Mary . 
McClell.m, Peter 
McCormick, Mary L. 
Mcl'ermott, Joseph F. 
McDonald, David A. . 
McDonald, George F. . . 
McDonald, William I. 
McDonough, Margaret 
McDonough, John 
McDonongh, Martin 
McDonough, Peter 
McDonough, Mary C. 
McDonough, Thomas J. 
McDuffie, Lucy L. 
McFarland. James B. 
McGillicuddy, John, heirs o 
McGinley, Hugh 
McGovvau, Thomas 
Melntvre. Hatiie J. 
Mclntyre, Hannah T. . 
Mdnlyie, Harriet F. . 
McKendry, Susan M. . 
McKenna, Edward 
McKenna, John H. 
McKenzie Stewart 
M.cMahon, James E. . 
McMahon, Mary 
McMillan, Archibald 
McNally.Ann 
McNa.nara John 
Meisier, Gnscavus A. 
Mercer, Emily J. 
Merrill, LydiaB. 
Meirow, Susan A. 
Metcalie, Stephen R. . 
Methodist Church Society 
Millar, Alexander 
Miller, Annie . 
Miller, George H. 
Miles, George . 
Miner, Henry B. 
Mitchell, Sarah L. 
Mitchell, Walter D. . 
Moltedo, Joseph 
Monahan, James 



M 



Per- 
sonal. 


$11 01 
1 55 


1 55 

4 65 


7 75 


38 75 



Real 
Estate. 



Unpaid. 



4 18 



2 09 
1 09 



1 55 



54 



4 65 
3 88 
1 55 
3 02 


1 55 


2 33 


3 88 
51 15 
9 30 


1 94 

54 



$35 65 

26 7( 
15 89 
95 71 
15 II 
23 fi'4 

27 12 
183 67 

3 49 



32 94 

29 84 
70 72 

29 45 
19 77 
63 55 
36 04 
31 77 
22 (.8 
10 07 

134 85 

30 22 
34 87 

31 00 
29 84 
10 08 
40 09 

21 32 

2:i 84 

25 58 
18 00 
17 44 



19 77 


29 06 


40 30 


31 39 


42 62 


34 87 


44 18 


29 45 


9 69 


25 96 


34 87 


58 00 


39 52 


16 28 


34 10 


96 10 


67 42 


50 37 


55 80 


22 47 


88 35 


20 54 


130 20 


09 75 


32 55 



£15 89 

16 66 
23 64 
27 12 



34 40 

31 00 



1 09 



18 60 
17 44 

19 77 
29 60 
40 30 



1 55 



41 07 
16 28 

96 10 

67 42 

2 33 

50 37 

22 47 

92 23 



35 65 



95 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 










Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Monahan, William J. ..... 




$3 10 


$3 10 


Mooar, James F. 










$3 87 


9li 10 




Moody, Frelinghuysen , 












3 49 




Morrison, Henry, iieirs of 












27 13 




Morrison. Elisha It. . 












23 25 




Morrison, Michael 










64 






Morse. George W. 












18 60 


18 60 


Morse, Annie B. 












55 03 




Morton, Ellis J. 










4 65 






Moselty, Samuel R. 










31 00 




31 00 


Moylan, Michael 










54 


3 10 


3 64 


Moylan, Michael F. 












4? 01 




Mulcahv, Michael 










1 16 






Mnlcahy, Isabella V. 












3 88 




VIuDen. Ellen A. anil Anna 












8 52 




ttu.ngan, Patrick 










1 55 


23 64 




Murphy, Stephen . , 












63 55 




Murray, Thomas, 1st 










2 09 


9 30 


11 39 


Murray, Elizabeth 












25 57 


25 57 


Murray, Jennie L. 












22 86 




Murray , George F. 










2 33 


36 42 




Murrav. Rachael 










3 41 


86 80 




Murrow, Eunice 












20 93 




iv 








Neale, Marianna B. ..... 




44 95 


44 95 


Newton, Russell D. 










2 33 


• 64 32 




Nichols, Nancy H., heirs of . 












106 95 




Nicholson, Charles E, 












38 75 




Noble, Mark E. 










31 00 


39 14 




Norling, Charles G.. 












28 68 




Norling, Augusta VV. 












42 62 




Norris, Wm. H. 












127 87 


58 89 


Norris, Charles S. 












45 73 




Norris, Frank E. 










27 90 






Norton, Susan M. 












38 75 




Noyes, Martha H. 












49 60 




Noyes, Maria H. 












77 50 




Noyes, Charles W. 










5 81 


57 74 




O 








O'Brien, Martin, heirs of 




51 54 


51 54 


O'Brien, Daniel 










54 






O'Brien, John . 










7 75 


117 03 




O'Brien, Catharine . ' 












13 17 




O'Brien, James H. 










6 20 




6 20 


O'Connor, John T. 










5 43 






O'Connor, Elizabeth M. 












72 85 


72 85 


O'Hern, Mary M. 












40 30 




O'Keet'e, Thomas 










4 34 


17 44 


21 78 


O'Neill, Arthur 












37 20 




O'Toole, Michael 










54 


19 37 




Olson, Martin 












24 80 




Orcutt, F. S. H. 












31 78 


31 78 


Osborne, Arthur 












52 70 




Osborne, Frederick VV. 












50 37 




P 








Page, Augustus A. ..... . 




58 90 




Paine, Edward S. 












57 35 




Paine, Francis M. 










4 65 


41 85 


46 50 


Paine, Mary A. ... 












36 04 




Paine, Charles F. . . . 












43 79 




Palmer, Catharine L. 












28 29 


28 29 


Palmer, Charles E. . 








2 32 




2 32 


Parkhuist, Frederick A. 








3 88 






Parsons, George W". . 








1 


4 65 




4 65 



9 6 



Resident Tay-Paters — {Continued.) 



* 

NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Partridge, Sewell ...... 


$1 09 






Partridge, Misses C. A. & A 


. C. 












$&5 25 




Payson, Jesse W. 














75 95 


$75 95 


Peabody E. S.& J. M. 














57 35 




Peabody & Co. 












55 03 






Peabody, M D. & M. J. 














103 07 




Peabody, Mary D. 














6 97 




Peure, George H. 












2 32 




2 32 


Peck, Mary Arm 














38 75 




Perkins, David 












3 88 


258 07 




Perry, Mrs. Ira 














52 31 




Perry, Mary H. 














24 02 


24 02 


Peters, Henry . 












54 






Phelps, Henry 














6 20 


6 20 


Phelps, Henry B. 














58 90 




Phillips, Benjamin E . 














2 33 




Phillips, Mary V. 














(> 98 




Phipps, Daniel W. . ■ 














114 70 




Pickett, Eliza D. 














34 10 




Pierce, 1- rank H. 














102 30 




Pierce, Elizabeth J., heirs ot 














86 80 




Pierce, Catharine 














32 94 


32 94 


Pincsohn, Mo»es 












2 09 


15 50 




Piper, J. Ellery 














31 39 




Piper, Abide F. 














43 40 


48 40 


Plummer, Isaac C. 














89 12 




Plummer, Annie J. 














34 88 




Poland, Samuel VV. 














15 50 




Pollard, George, heirs of 














78 66 




Poole, William 














40 30 




Poore, Harrison H. 












46 50 






Porter, Ira C. . 


, 












35 65 




Porter, Frances E. 














34 88 




Pothecary, Mrs. Harry 














39 53 




Pothecary, Harry 














78 




Preston, Sarah V. 












1 09 


32 55 




Preston, William D. . 












2 32 


31 00 




Pring, James F. 














41 07 




Pririg, J. F. & Thomas F. 














29 45 


29 45 


Provonchee, Clara 














48 05 


48 05 


Putnam, Sidney C. 












35 65 


99 20 




Putnam & Worden 












53 47 






Price, Sophia C. 














27 90 




<* 








Quinn, Richard ...... 




35 26 


25 51 


Quinn, Richard ...... 




6 20 




Quinn, James ....... 




18 99 




R 








Radford, Benjamin F. ..... 


31 00 


209 25 




Raeder, Clara E. 














64 32 




Rafter. James . 














13 17 


13 17 


Rafter, John 














33 32 


33 32 


Rafter, Benjamin 














21 70 


21 70 


Rand. David C. 














17 83 




Ray, John G. . 












2 09 


69 75 




Rnynes, Martha A. 














24 SO 


24 80 


Raynes, John J. 














22 48 


22 48 


Raynes, Elizabeth H. , 














52 70 




Reardou, Ellen 








SSft^f. 






13 17 




Reagan, Mary . 














17 05 




Remick, Moses A. 












12 40 




12 40 


Reynolds, Stephen H. 












2 32 


50 38 




Rhodes, Marion W. 














43 40 


43 40 


Rhoades, Charles H. . 














62 00 




Rice, George M. 














64 33 





97 



Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



Rice, Florence R. 

Rice, Henry J. 

Rich, Henry A. 

Rich Brothers . 

Rich, Martha L. 

Rich, Harriet N. 

Rich, HitfusK. 

Richardsou. A. H. 

Richardson, George L 

Richardson, John 

Richardson & Rafter 

Riley, Joseph 
Riley, Joseph and Bridget 
Risk, Thomas H. 
Ritchie. John 
Roberts, Elizabeth 
Roberts, Edward 
Robinson, Julia F. 
Robinson, J. T. & Co 
Robinson, John A. 
-iobinson, Sarah A. I 
Rogers, Emma A. 
Rogers, Anna L. 
Rogers, William N. 
Rogers, Michael 
Rogers, Margaret 
Rogers, Francis P. 
Rogers, Lewis F. 
Rollins, Fred. E. 
Roome, David B. 
Roome, Bridget E. 
Rooney, Patrick 
Rooney, Patrick J. 
Rooney, Patrick M. 
Rooney, Catherine 
Rooney, Mnry . 
Rooney, Elizabeth 
Rooney, Bridget 
Rooney, Andrew D. 
Rooney, Lawrence A. 
Rooney, Maria V. 
Ross, Jane M. 
Rossney, William C. 
Rounriy, Samuel R. 
Roundy, Will'am E. 
Rowell. Henry A. 
Rudolph, AgnesC. 
Runnells, Levi A. 
Russell, Prudence W. 
Russell, Ann 
Rvan, Isaac L. 
Ryder, Calvin 



Samuels, Isaac P.., heirs of 
Sanford, <-.eorge 
Sanford, Oliver S. 
San lord, Martha l*. 
Sanger, Sarah J. 
Sanger, David C. 
Savage, Eben D. 
Savage, Mary E. 
Savage, Mary 
Saville, Grace R. 
Sawtelle, Mary M. 
Sawtelle, George W. 
Sawyer, Edwin W. 



Per- 
sonal. 



Real 
Estate. 



$3 88 
38 75 



7 75 
1 55 



1 09 
1 55 



2 32 
88 85 



4 27 



3 64 
6 97 



■29 



1 55 



38 75 
4 65 


15 50 


8 29 
46 50 


3 88 



$13 95 

189 10 
10 85 

18 99 

19 76 

37 59 
60 45 
3l 39 
55 02 
4 65 
13 95 
60 84 
18 99 
49 60 

75 17 

44 95 
91 45 
100 75 
57 35 
31 39 

82 16 
3 10 
51 15 
40 30 
3 49 

26 35 

27 51 
19 77 

6 20 
182 51 

8 52 
1 91 

9 69 
19 37 

32 16 
58 90 
14 *4 
10 46 
29 06 

47 2* 
45 34 
37 20 
44 56 

48 05 
51 93 

108 50 



44 17 
29 45 
96 10 
100 75 
60 45 
35 05 
10 46 
44 17 

3 49 
40 69 
26 74 

1 94 
43 40 



Unpaid. 


$3 88 


18 99 

19 76 
7 75 

39 14 


31 39 
55 02 


60 84 



2 32 



44 95 



100 75 
57 35 



3 10 



3 49 
26 35 
35 80 
19 77 
6 20 
182 51 

8 52 
I 94 

9 69 
19 37 

1 55 
32 16 

14 34 



37 20 
44 56 



90 68 



9 8 



Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 



Sawyer, Daniel 

Sayer, William H. 

Schell, Ellen A. 

Scliofleld, Hannah 

Scott, John 

Scott, Rooert 

Scott, M* rsaret 

Scott, Noi man W. 

Scott, Jarius H. 

Scott, John 

Scott, James D. 

Sci ivens, Jo-eph 

Shaler, Cushman B. 

Shaw, Mary 

Shea, Edward . 

Shea, William . 

Shea, MarvJ. . 

Shea, John S. . 

Sheedy, Daniel 

Sheedy, Daniel', guardian, 

Sheehan, Mary . 

Shepard, Sarah B. 

Sherman, Dexter 

Sherman, Marshall A 

Sherman, Ella E. 

Simmons, James 

Simmons, James, trustee, 

Simmons. George W. D. 

Smith, John W. 

Smith, Maria E. 

Smith, Jane 

Smith, David 

Smith, floury S. 

Smith, Mary A. 

Snow, Lavinia . 

Somes, Henry I. 

Somes, Herbert C. 

Soule, Mvra L. 

Soitle, William T. 

Sonle, John A. 

Soule, Sadie L. 

Spare, Samuel . 

Sparrell, William P. 

Stack, John 

Stanley, Richard 

Stanley, Miss M. A. 

Stanley. Edward E. 

Stark, Mary J. 

Stark. Ann Maria 

Stevens, Mary M. 

Stevens, John N. 

Steward, Joseph 

Stillman, Frances G. 

Stockbridge, Caroline 

Stocking, George L. 

Stockford, Hugh J. 

Stokoe, Robert H. 

Stone, William 1\ 

Stone, Edward 

Stone, Franklin, heirs of 

Stone, Henry A. 

Story, Arthur W. 

Stuart, William J. 

Stuart, Wm. J. & Elizabeth 

Sumner, Henrietta C. 

Sumner, Wm. F.. heirs of 

Sumner, Sally R. 



G. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$2 09 
46 50 



78 



5 73 



3 72 



16 27 
15 50 



1 55 
4 65 



78 
1 16 



2 71 



2 87 
9 30 



7 75 



Real'. 
Estate. 



33 32 



$34 10 
45 72 

126 33 
29 06 
61 23 
99 23 

12 40 
28 67 
35 65 
47 27 
53 09 

27 13 
44 IS 

28 67 
18 r!0 

31 00 

13 56 

32 16 

11 24 
6 59 

79 05 
31 78 

42 62 
42 24 

33 71 

39 52 

40 30 
28 29 

2 71 

6 98 
39 91 



36 42 
3 88 

23 25 
7 75 

72 08 
26 74 



29 45 
69 75 

61 22 
32 55 
43 01 
20 15 
77 oO 
45 34 

62 00 
36 81 
20 54 
75 95 

S4 47 

27 90 

10 85 

5 04 

104 62 
59 29 
40 30 

392 15 



Unpaid. 



99 



Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Sunderland, Mehitable ..... 




$131 75 




Swallow, Adeline E. 














44 95 


$44 95 


Swan, Jennie 














1 16 




Swanstrom, August . 














31 78 


31 78 


Sweeney, Patrick, heirs of 














22 48 




Sweeney, Thomas W. . 












$2 09 


53 85 


55 94 


Swett, L. Clinton 












78 




78 


Swinton, William 










» 




32 55 




T 








Tacey, George ....... 


1 55 






Tacey, Mary 














23 61 




Tarrant, Mary A. 












2 33 


7 75 


10 08 


Tasker Eii B. . 














138 72 




Tasker & Prescott 














71 30 




Tasker, Thomas J , Jr. 












4 42 




4 42 


Taylor, Prince H., heirs of 














37 59 




Taylor, Dauiel T. 














50 37 




Taylor, Elliot O. 












17 82 






Taylor, Charlotte A. . 














15 50 




Terry, Henrv B. 














84 47 




Terry. H. B.& Abbie A. 














20 15 




Terry. John 














118 58 




Tewksburv, Francis W. 














41 (18 




Thayer, S. B. . 














20 


e 20 


Thompson, H. A. B. , 














35 65 


35 65 


Thompson, James 














10 85 


10 85 


Thulan, Hans 














18 99 




Tibbetts, Mark 














15 89 




Tibbetts, Adeline 














34 49 




Tilden, Edwin 














44 95 




Tilden, Annie E. 














5 04 




Tilly, Charles M. 














37 20 




Timpany, liichard, heirs of 














23 64 




Tirrell, Frederick JS. . 












20 93 


5i 85 




Tirrell, Martha C. 














143 38 




Tower, Clement Bt 














47 27 




Townsend, Hiram J. . 














52 70 




Towusend & Kelley . 














13 95 




Trainor, Elizabeth 














20 54 




Trotter, James M. 














2b 35 


26 35 


Tucker, Charles H. 












3 10 






Tucker, Sarah E. 














51 15 




Tuckerman, John H. . 












10 85 


31 00 




Turner, Maria Louisa 














3 10 




Turner, John J. 












1 16 


31 00 




Tuttle, Annie M. 












8 91 


68 20 




Twilchell, John M. heirs of 














51 2r> 




Tyler, Caroline O. 














37 59 




Tyler, Harriet B. 














62 00 


62 00 


Tyler, Benj. F. 














34 10 




U 








Underhill, Merrill ...... 


9 30 


44 95 




Upham, Mary ....... 




40 30 


40 30 


V 








Vaughan, Charles P. ..... 


31 00 




31 00 


Videio, Rebecca H. 














82 92 


82 92 


Vivian, Uoxanna 














46 50 




Vo*e, Benjamin C. 












2 33 


230 95 




Vose, Sarah and Mary E. 














82 15 




Vose, Mary A. B. 














54 25 




Vose, Maw E. . 














49 60 




Vose, Sarah M. 










i 




30 23 





IOO 

Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



Names. 



Per- 
sonal. 



Real 
Estate. 



Walden, Nathan 

Walker, Dennis G. 

Wallace, Richard 

Walstab, Louis. 

Walmsley, Harriet N 

Walmsley, C arles R 

Walter, Louisa T. 

Ward, Waldo F. 

Ward, Hannah L. 

Ward, Samuel E. 

Ward, Thomas 

Warren, Maty E. 

Washburn, Andrew 

Washburn, Eliza G. 

Washburn, Gardner 

Waters, Thomas S. 

Waters, Maria A. 

Waters, Margaret A. & Nancy T. S 

Watson, Susan 

Webb, George E. 

Webster, Amos 

Webster, Amos 

Webster, Fannie P. 

Weisbrod, Annie E. 

Weisbrod, Simon 

Welch, Michael 

Welch, John 

Weld, Theodore D. 

Weld. Theodore D. 

Werner, Josephine A 

Wesley, Charles 

Wesley, Sarah J. 

Wheeler, George W. 

Whittaker, Daniel 

Whitcher, Oscar W, 

Whiteher, Nancy 

Whitcher, Martin L., 

White, Ann 

White, Jarvis D. 

White, Joseph H. 

While, Carrie L. V. 

Whittemore, E. M. & Co. 

Whitney, Martha A. 

Whitney, Albeit H. 

Whitney, Henry N. 

Whittier, George T. 

Wiggin, George T. 

Wiggin, Mary E. 

Wiggleaworih, Stephen N. 

Wigley.John 

Wild, Laura 

Wilder, Joshua 

Willard, Henry L. 

Wlllett, Elisabeth T. 

Willett, Joseph 

Willetl, Mary A. 

Williams. Amanda 

Williams, Alary M. 

Williams, Phoebe A. 

Williams, S"»an 

Williams, Rinaldo 

Williams, Frances A. 

Wilson, John 

Wilson, Johanna O. 

Wiswall, Julia A. hei 

Wood, Joseph, heirs of 



100 25 
30 07 

5 43 

37 85 
15 50 

6 20 
2 33 



7 75 
6 20 

3 10 

4 65 

3 88 



4 65 
26 89 
51 15 



3 10 
1 55 



$17 83 

62 00 

18 60 

13 56 

20 54 

129 04 

108 50 

228 62 

54 25 

128 65 

62 77 
124 78 
137 16 

30 23 
61 23 

18 60 

19 38 
2 71 

191 42 

12 40 
77 50 
48 05 

31 00 

185 22 

13 18 

42 62 

37 97 

39 53 
113 15 

81 38 
336 35 

17 82 

32 55 

43 78 
35 65 

42 62 
39 91 
13 18 
51 15 
I 55 
34 10 
37 98 

33 32 
77 50 
61 23 
45 73 
98 43 
31 00 
48 05 

23 64 
17 05 

71 30 



23 25 
15 89 
37 97 



IOI 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Wood, Louisa M. 

Wood, William A. 

Wood, Lydia W. 

Wood, Rachael P. 

Wood, Margaret 

Woodward, Reuben T. 

Worricfe, Laban 

W righi, Elizabeth II. heirs of 

Wright, Richard 

Wyman, Ferdinand A. 



Yeatou, Charles H. 



Zimmermann, Carl 



Per- 


Real 




sonal. 


Estute. 


Unpaid. 




SO 60 




$46 50 


114 70 






10 08 


10 08 




20 54 






47 27 




4 65 


36 42 






36 42 


36 42 


3 10 


86 80 




50 37 


101 53 
34 49 






57 35 


57 35 



NON-RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 










Acroyd, Hairiet 






$59 68 




Adams, Edward S. 


Fall River 




10 08 




Aldrich, Edwin C. 


Georgetown 




57 35 


$57 35 


Allen, Abby F. . 


Plaistow, N. H. 




108 50 




Allen, Granville C. heirs of 


Unknown 




19 37 




Allen, George H. . 


Boston 


$34 87 




'34 87 


Allen, Adelia J. . 


Bradford 




5 42 




Albright, Elizabeth . , 


Dedham 




1 55 




American Tool & Machine Co. . 


Boston . 


798 28 


852 50 




Ames, Fred. L. . 


Easton . 




H 20 ■ 




Anthony, Alice G. 


Bradford 




8 52 




Arnold, Sarah IT., heirs of 


Boston 




35 65 




Ayer, Ezra 0. 


Unionville, Conn. 




50 38 




B 

Bachellor, Anna M. 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




24 80 




Badger, Mrs. M. A. 


Ma Men 




2 71 




Badger, Mary C. . 


Boston 




24 03 




Bailey, A. 11. 


Somerville 




2 31 


2 33 


Baker, Michael A. 


S.out Dartmouth 




7 75 




Baker, John S. . . . 


New York 


7 75 






Balom, Damley 0. 


I)a\ tona, Fla. 




44 18 




Baldwin, Amelia . 


Boston 




39 52 




Baldwin & Rich . 


Boston & H. P. 




20 92 




Baldwin & Webster 


Boston 




292 5B 


292 56 


Bancrolt, George, heirs 


Boston 




78 27 




Barnes, Ward & (Jo. 


Boston 




1 55 




Barnwell, John 


Valley Falls, R. I. 




3 10 




Barr, Ellena S. . 


Cedar Rapids, Iowa 




44 95 




Barrows, tfoswell S. 


Jamaica Plain . 




37 20 


37 20 


Bartlett, Elkanali, heirs of 


Plymouth 




20 15 




Bartlelt, Harriet N. 






4 0'. 




Bates, Joseph C. . 






29 45 




Bates, James 






35 5 




Bean, Aaron H. . 


Roxbury 




26 35 




Beer-, Emma S- . 






38 7. 




Bell, John 


Dedham 




1 55 




Bellis, Albert H. . 


Walt ham 




.5 10 




Bemis, Sarah C. . 


Brockton 




46 50 




Berry, Julia 






40 3u 


40 30 


Black, George N., heirs . 


Boston 




108 50 




Blackwood, Alexander . 


Boston 




3 49 




Blanchard, Elizabeth H. heirs . 


Uambi'idgeDort. 




102 30 




Bonin, Abba B. . 


Portsmouth, N. H. 




37 20 




Boston Blower Co. 


Bo.ston 


325 50 


266 (i0 




Boston & Providence R. K. Co. 


Boston 




918 37 




Boyd, Samuel 


Booth Bay, Me. 




3 49 




Boyden, Mary D. 


Bdleric-i 




26 35 




Boyle, NeMie U. . 


Boston 




29 45 




Bradburv, Samuel A. 


Cleveland, 0. . 




:i 10 


3 10 


Bradbury, S. A. . 


" 




12 40 


12 40 


Bradburv, S. A. . 


" 




149 57 


4 65 


Bradlee.'j. Walter 


Milton 




8 52 




Bradlee, Nellie M. 


Milton , 




38 36 




Bradley, Henry E. 


Sharon . 




1 94 




Bragan, Isaac N. . 


New London, Conn 




2 71 




Brennan, James . 


Jamaica Plain . 




13 95 


13 95 



104 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Brewer, E.J. 


Charlestown 




$25 19 




Briggs, Elbridge G. 


So. Boston 




29 45 




Brooks, Addie H. . 


Kansas City, Mo. 




41 P5 




Brooks, Allied L. 


Somerville 




43 01 




Brooks, Mrs. S. C. 


Boston . 




22 48 




Brooks & Converse 


Boston . 




32 55 




Brown, John A. . 


Lowell . 




21 31 




Brown, James VV. , 


Wellesley 




25 58 




Brown, Charles 


Boston 




27 13 




Brown, Joseph D. 


Winterport, Me. 




15 50 




Brown, Mary E. . 


Pittsfleld, N. H. 




49 60 




Browne, Abel P. . 


Boston . 




79 05 




Burgess, Avis 


East Hampton, Ct. 




4 65 




Burns, G. W. 


Bennington, n. 11. 




1 55 


1 55 


Burns, Dennis 






38 75 


38 75 


Burt, Doicas B 


Boston . 




54 25 




C 

Cannon, Mary E. 


Norfolk 




41 85 


41 85 


Canton Paint* Oil Co. . 


Boston . 


$62 00 






Capen, Edward N. 


Dorchester 




78 




Carlton, Hiram 


E. Sandwich 




150 35 


150 35 


Carpenter, E. B. . 


Providence, R. I. 




4 27 


4 27 


Carr, A. W., heirs of 


Fall River 




36 04 




Can - , Jeremiah C. 


Portsmouth, N. H. 




41 85 




Carson, Samuel G. 


Winthrop,Me. . 




78 




Carter, Ruell VV., trustee 


Boston . 




11 62 


11 62 


Case, Samuel O. . 


Rum ford. R. I. . 




4 65 




Caulfield, Bridget . 


Jamaica Plain . 




2 71 




Chamberlain, H. C, heirs of 


Marlboro' 




51 25 




Cha^e, Francis A. 


Roxbnry 




45 72 




Churchill, C. C. 


Dedham . 




86 80 




Churchill, J. K. 


Dorchester 




68 20 




Churchill, C. S. 


Dedham . 




53 86 




Citizens' Mutual Ins. Co. 


Boston . 




34 87 




Olapp, R. Dexter . 


Dorchester 




4 27 




Clark, Henry, heirs of 


Dorchester 




2 71 




Clark, Fred. o. . 


South Boston . 




3 8a 




Clark, William B. 


Westboro 




32 55 




Clark, Lov.s L. . 


So. Abington . 




28 29 


28 29 


Claxton, Sarah E. L. 


Boston . 




10 46 




Cobb, Mary J. 


Beachmont 




41 85 




Cobb, Roscoe A. . 


Brookline 




2 71 




Codman, Henry, heirs of 


Dorchester 




3 10 




Coffin, Charles H. 


Newburyport . 




44 56 


6 20 


Colburn, Allen 


Dedham . 




35 65 




Colburn, Charlotte 


Dedham . 




27 90 


27 90 


Coiby, John F. 


Boston . 




23 63 




Cole Mary Ann 


Boston . 




1 55 




Coleman, Endicott & Stone 


Dedham . 




1 55 




Coleman, George VV. 


Boston . 




14 34 




Coleman, Lewis 


Boston . 




20 92 




Coino, Franklin 


Weymouth Br.N.S. 




4 27 




Conant, James S. . 


Boston . 


1ft 50 


492 90 


508 40 


Conboy, Michael 


Jamaica Plain 




3 49 




Cong. Shary Cedek 


Boston . 




1 94 


1 94 


Connell, John J. . 


Chicago, 111. 




3 48 




Connolly, Martin J. 


Roxburv 




1 16 




Connolly, Elizabeth 


Boston . 




55 80 


55 80 


Connor, Mary E. . 


Roxbury 




4 27 




Connors, Patrick . 


Boston . 




4 65 




Converse, B. B. 


Boston . 




37 20 




Conway, Hiram 


Boston . 




1 55 




Cook, Sarah C. . 


Stoneham 




17 44 


17 44 



105 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Corcoran, William J. 


South Boston . 




$10 07 




Corrijjan, Ellen 






4 27 




Coltelle, Sophia \V. 


Providence, R. I. 




59 67 




Costeliow, VV.C, heirs of 


Somerville 




3 49 




Crowell, Edmund . 


Boston . 




55 bO 




Crowell, Albert 


Boston . 




12 ol 




Crumple)-, Ai tliur . 


Boston . 




. 10 83 




Cunane, William . 


so. Groveland . 




7 30 




Cm it} , Joseph T. . 


si. Paul, Minn. . 




8 53 




Cushing, JLadd & Cashing 


Boston . 




6 20 




Culler, Harriet E. 


J..lliey, N. H. . 




15 11 


15 11 


D 










Dalton,John 


Framingham 




8 10 




Damon, Joseph N., trustee , 


Col. Springs, Col. 




32 1-5 




Dane, McClearn & Lovel), trus. 


Boston. . 




217 77 




Davis, E. S. ... 


Boston . 




5 04 




Davis, Sarah J. . 


Boston . 




32 55 




Deane, Henry M. . 


Uingham 




48 05 




Deane, Helen M. . 


Hingham 




2 3* 




Deane, Leila M. 


Randolph 




16 27 


16 27 


Dedliani & H. P. Gas Co. 


Delia m . 


$131 75 


54 25 




Dee, Dennis, heirs ol 


Brighton 




20 74 


26 74 


DeEiitreinonl, Matilda A. 


Boston . 




3+ 87 




Dennis, Ellen 


Jamaica Plains. 




31 39 




Denny, John VV. . 


Milton . 




17 05 




Derrv, Charles P. . 


Sharon . 




3 49 




Deshon, James 


Boston . 




13 18 


13 18 


Dicuertnt'ii, Annie H. 


i.ol. Springs, Col. 




37 59 




Dobson, HatiieN.. 


Providence, R. I. 




34 10 


34 10 


Due, Edgar-.J. 


Providence, R. I. 




52 70 




Donahue, Patrick . 


Boston . 




G 98 


6 98 


1) reliesler Second Church 


Dorchester 




(i 59 




Don, Mary E. . . . 


Boston . 




18 9s» 




Diake, Henrietta G. 


Borton . 




25 19 




Dunlap, Martin 


Boston . 




2 71 


2 71 


Dullon, Julia A. . 


Boston . 




33 32 




D}er, Mary J. & Caroline E. 

9 


New York, 




57 35 




E 










Eastman, Josiah S., heirs ol 


Boston . 




147 25 




Ellis, John 


Med Held. 




103 40 


103 46 


Ellison, William P., administrator 


Newton . 


$47 43 






Emmons, Minnie E. 


New London, Conn. 




4 05 




Eoierbio.yk, George W. . 


Bosion . 




31 78 


31 78 


Evans, I'eriey V. . 


Norwood 




109 28 


109 28 


Evans, Thomas C. 


Dorchester 




10 40 




F 










Fabyan, Sarah A. 


Boston . 




45 72 




Fairar, J. H. 


Jamaica Plain . 




35 20 




Fin-well, J. E. . 


Boston 




23 25 




Fa>, William H. . , 


Qiiuicy . 




52 70 




Feeliaii, Catherine E. 


.->i.-L<iui.-, Mo. . 




25 19 


25 19 


Fellows, Manila T. 


Boston . 




113 15 




Ferry, E. B., heirs 


Milton . 




4 27 




Ferry, Rlioila 


Mil Ion . 




8 n 




Field, James B. . 


Boston . 




4s 82 


48 82 


Fisliei, George A. trustee 


Boston . 




07 81 




Fiek, Samuel C, heirs of. 


So. Boston 




59 08 


59 r,s 


Vlsk, Fiances B. . 


Boston . 




31 78 


31 78 



io6 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Fiske, Fanny R. 

Fisk. Jerome H. . 

Flagg. s. s. 

Flagg, Dennis F., heirs of 

Flint, Charles L. . 

Flint, Francis 

Fogg, W.J. G. 

Folsom, William J. 

Foord, lames 

Foster, Kachael, heirs of 

Fowle, George VV. 

Fowler, William P. 

Foxboro Savings Bank 

Fretch, William S., Jr. 



Gallagher, Daniel F. 
Gay, Richard L. . 
Gerald, Francis L. 
Giles, Delphina 
Gil- s, Lucy Ann . 
Giles, EIL-ridge W. 
Gill, Dominick 
Gilman, Helen L. 
Gilmartin, Patrick 
Gleason, J. P.. 
Glover & Willcomb 
Goodnow, Daniel Jr. 
Gordon. Mary J. . 
Gordon, Nathaniel 
Gould, Simon 
Gray & Ward 
Graham, Matthew H. 
Grant, George W. . 
Greeley, John D. 
Green, Anna F. 
Green, Reuben 
Greeniiood, Morris 
Greenliuod, Abiam 
Greenhood, Mary . 
Gunn, John and Sarah 
Gunnison, Wm. S. . 
Gurney, Ansel F. . 



H 

Hail, George, heirs of 
Hale, Mary E. 
Hall, Eliza M. 
Hamnion I, James B. 
Haugood, -Mrs. S. H. 
Han enden, E. G. . 
Hartung, Gustave 
Hartweli, Win. H. 
Hartwell & Jelts . 
Hastings, Levi W. 
Haven, Alary L. 
Hawes, W. L. 
Hayden, Hannah R. 
Haynes, C. O. 
Hayne-, David 
Hayward, llenrv . 
Hazard, Edgar V. 
Heushaw, F. H. 



RESIDENCE. 



So. Boston 

Maiden . , 

Littleton 

Boston . 

Boston . 

Cambridge 

So. Boston 

Chelsea . 

Los Angeles, Cal. 

Dorchester 

Jamaica Plain . 

Boston . 

Foxboro 

So. Boston 



Lynn 

Boston . 
Laconia, N. H. 
Indian Orchard 
Norloik . 
Norfolk . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Milton . 
Lexington 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Roxburv 
Exeter. "N. H. . 
EastWalpole . 
Walpole & H. P. 
Boston . 
Cainbridgeport 
Canaan, N. H. . 
Hampden, Me. . 
Roxbury 
Dedham . 
Dedham . 
Dedham . 
Wliitingsville . 
Boston . 
Boston . 



Providence, R. I. 

Newton . 

Milton 

New York, N. Y. 

Boston . 

South Boston . 

Boston 

East Cambridge 

hast Cambridge 

Brookiine . 

Boston . 

Wakeiield 

Dedham . 

Dei I ha in . 

Midd letovvn, Conn. 

Boston . 

Providence, R. I. 

Boston . 



Per- 
sonal, 



$215 45 



100 75 



Real 
Estate. 



6 20 



$32 55 
29 84 
1(50 04 
llio 4u 
69 75 
25 97 
40 10 
37 59 
46 50 
31 00 
87 57 

1 55 
34 bl 

2 33 



3 49 

45 72 

61 22 

85 25 

37 20 

12 40 

78 

62 00 

7 75 
35 05 

381 30 

2 33 

46 50 
34 87 

9 30 
120 12 
51 15 

3 10 
26 35 
15 50 
41 85 
10 ss5 

78 
29 06 

8 52 
13 18 
51 54 



630 07 

6 9S 

7 75 
39 52 

3 10 
13 56 

•1 91 
12 40 
46 50 

4 65 
82 92 
27 52 
68 20 

1 16 

29 45 

1 !6 

7 75 

77 50 



Unpaid. 



$32 55 
29 84 



25 97 



37 59 



61 22 



62 00 

7 75 

35 65 



51 15 



10 85 
78 



19 38 



6 98 
39 52 



13 56 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Keal 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Healey, Samuel 


E. Weymouth . 




$6 20 




Bibbard, Salmon P. 


Boston . 




13 95 


$13 95 


Hoetling, Anton 


lioxbiuy 




9 .SO 




Hddswortn, Sarah H. 


Mdlonl . 




03 55 


< ; 3 55 


Holds wort.h, Squire . 


Milord . 




36 42 


36 42 


Holland, William A. 


Lorch ester 




5 42 




Hollingsworth, Z, T. 


Milton . 




32(1 85 




Holds, Elizabeth S., heirs of 


Roxbnry ' . 




34 49 




Holmes, H. K., M. A. & L, B. . 


Newton . 




30 63 




Holmes, Clarissa . 


Province town 




44 95 




Holwav, James O. . . 


Boston . 




2X 2 > 




Hood, Hermone 


Lynn 




19 "77 




Howe-, Solomon . 


Cambridge 




75 95 


75 95 


Hoy, Bridget 


Dedham . 




2i 09 


22 09 


Hovt Elizabeth G. 


Chelsea 




18 60 




Hunt, Lucie:i 


Ml. Vernon, N. H. 




7 75 




Hunt, Rebecca T. 


Cambridge 




41 85 




Hind, W.J. 


Boston . 




38 75 




Hasted, J. B. 

J 
Jackson, Robert . . . 


Wateitown 




54 25 




Boston . 




1 16 




Jackson, Caroline 


Dorchester 




14 73 




Jellison, .Jennie B. 


Biddefotd, Me. 




15 50 




Jenney, Mary F. . 


South Boston . 




1 55 




Jenness, George V. 


AUleboro Falls 




48 05 


48 05 


Jeniler, John T. , 


Boston . 




31 77 




Johnson, Albion H. 


Roslindale 




3 10 




Johnson, Edward A. 


Boston . 




96 10 




Johnson, Andrew . 


Omaha . 




26 Mo 




Jones, Paine M. C. 


Kings Ion 




3 10 




Jones, Edward J. 


Boston . 




9 30 




Jones, Sophia ('. . 


Boston . 




2 33 




Jones, Susan T. 


Boston 




20 15 




Jordan, James M., heirs 


Providence, R. I. 




35 26 


35 26 


K 










Keene, Nahum 


Dedham 




6 98 




Keith, Henrietta A. 






15 50 


15 50 


Kelley, William . 


Lowell . 




12 79 


12 79 


Kenyon, Jones & Leyland 


Bost n . 


$186 00 


121 00 




Keyes, Alalia F. 


Acton 




3 in 




Kiuslev, J. G. 


Denver, Col. 




1 16 


1 16 


Kious.'S. .... 


Bo-ton . 


93 00 






Knight, Harvey 


Lowel! 




49 60 


49 60 


T. 










Lancaster, E. M. . 


Boston . 




49 60 




Lane, Emma L. . 


Norton . 




44 95 




Lane, Peter . 


Bos: on 




3d 61 




Lang, Benjamin J. 


Boston . 




25 57 




Lawrence, Marianna P. . 


Nantucket 




58 ill) 


58 90 


Lawrence, 6. C. tiustee 


Medlonl , 




25 57 




Law^on, Eliza J. . 


Col. -springs, Col. 




2 71 




Lawton. Charles . 


Need ham 




10 08 




Leadbeater, Elizabeth N. 


Jaim ica I'lain . 




10 08 




Lewis, Isaac 


Dor hi'ster 




17 05 




Lewis, (Jeorge S. . 


Hohoke. 




7 75 




Litchfield, John H. 


Wollaslon 




12 40 




LittleUeld Abigail 


Wells, Me. 




4 27 




Liltle, James L. . 


Boston . 


15 50 


83 70 




Little. Janes L., Jr. 


Brookline 




60 45 




Loud, John J., Sarah and Annie, 










and Alice French 


Weymouth 




246 84 





io8 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 




Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Loud, Emily V. . 


Weymouth 




98 81 




Loud, Martha B. . 


Weymouth 






M> 25 




Lyl'oni, Thomas J. 


Oakland j.Cal. . 






9 80 


9 30 


Lylord, Biley 


Provincetown 






51 15 




Lynch, William 


South Boston 






(i 98 




Lyon, Evelyn 


Duxbury 






42 62 




M 










Mahoney, John 


Boston . 




3 88 


3 88 


ManchauK Company 


Providence, R. I. 


$S68 00 


1060 97 




Maney, Mary F. . 


Boston 




•20 92 


20 92 


Manger. Emily 


Jamaica Plain 






1 .5 




Mann, Alexander 


A rlington 






9 HO 




Mann, Jonathan 


Milton . 






158 10 




Mansfield, Pi:e.ston R. 


Dedham . 






21 70 




Marcy, Elizabeth . 


Newton 






6 98 


6 98 


Marshall, J. fit. . 


Boston 






2 71 




May & Ranney Ex. 


Boston . 






72 85 




Mayrard. George H. 


Waltham 






5t 25 




MoDougald, Archibald . 


Vova Scotia 






3 10 


3 10 


McFarnald, James and Charles 


Qnincv . 






4 i5 


4 65 


McGaw, Kobe, t 


Hurl-on . 






39 52 




McLaughlin, Daniel 


Koxbury 






78 




McLeod, Mary J. . 


West bud 






57 35 




McLeod, John 


South Boston 






2 3 5 


2 33 


MrSvvain, Ewen 


Milton . 






3S 80 




Median, Arthur 


Chariestown 






44, 17 




Melladew, Agnes . 


Boston . 






10 07 


10 07 


Mellen, Laura \V. 


Obetlin, O. 






29 45 




Merrill, William . 


Roxbury 






6 98 




Meserve, Abigail . 


Canton . 






51 15 




Metropolitan Land Co. . 


Boston . 






29 84 




Metropolitan Land Co. . 


Bo.-ton . 






3 4!) 


3 49 


Metropolitan Land Co. . 


Boston . 






9 30 


9 30 


Merviam . Henry VV. 


Ne A'ton, N. J. 






62 UO 




Meyer, Rachel, Sarah, Louisa and 












Rebecca ... 


Boston . 






7 75 




Miller, Amos H. . 


BrooKline 






3 ^9 




Mil s, Emma 


K.-xbury 






5 43 




Mitchell. George A. and Susan E. 


Worcester 






31 I, 




Monroe, C. W. 


East Cambndgi 






3 49 




Moodv, Mrs. C. H. 


Canada . 






29 06 




Moore, .Joseph W. 


Dorchester 






1 10 




Mo.'ie, Alice R. 


Newton . 






9 30 




Moriaily, W. H. . 


Koxbury 






28 68 


28 68 


Morrill, Mabel E. . ... 


Boston . 






3 411 




Morse, George W. 


Newtouville 






112 37 




Morse, Allivd L. . 


Milton • 






65 4!) 




Morse, E. .J. W., heirs of 


S"Uih Easton 






3 10 




Morse, Luther, heirs of . 


Da nve is . 






39 




Morse, Mary Ann . 


Dedhairi . 






(i 2o 




Morse, William B. 


Boston . 






50 37 




Morton, Joseph, heirs of . 


Milton . 






17 05 




Mi hi Ron Oliver, heirs oi . 


Jamaica Plain 






64 .12 


61 32 


&i mil ton, Edward E. 


Jamaica Plain 






4 ti"- 




Mullen, John 


Bo- ton . 






3 S8 


3 SS 


Mullen, John 


Boston . 






2 71 




Mullen, Ann . . 


Boston . 






4 >5 




Mungin, Margaret 


Groveland 






66 65 




Murphy, Thomas . 


East Dedham 






10 8, 




N 










Nash, Joseph D. . 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




40 30 




Nason, George VV. 


Bo>ton . 




27 90 




Newell, Lucien B. . 


Boudoinham, Me. 




46 50 





109 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued) 



NAMES. 






RESIDENCE. 




Per- 
sonal. 


i Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Newhall, Sarah E. 


Melrose . 




34 10 




N. Y. & N. E. It. R. Co. 




Boston . 




400 29 




Mies, Louville V. 




Spmerville 




101 52 


1 93 


Nolan, John E. 








4 27 




Nolan. James 




Boston . 




3 88 


3 88 


Northern Baptist Ed. Society 




Boston 




8 52 




Nott, Martha A. 




Saco, Me. 




38 75 


38 75 


Nowell, Chin les A, 




Lawrence 




2 71 




Nuun, William J. . 








3(i 04 




O 










O'Donnell, Edwavd 


Naiick, R. I. . 




29 06 


29 06 


■Oxtou, Maria 


Milton . 




17 05 




P 










Page, Harriet J. heirs of 


Boston . 




206 92 




Page, GiliiKin 




Boston . 






31 39 




Page, Charles J. . 




Boston . 






125 55 


114 70 


Palmer, Susan A. . 




Charlestown 






28 29 




Palmer, Kan ellier L. 




Boston . 






4 27 




Parker, Benjamin VV. 




Brookline 






57 35 




Parker, George J., heirs of 




Roxbury 






4 05 




Parker, 11. VV. 




Boston . 






3 10 




Park, 11. F., heirs of 






Boston . 






1 94 


1 94 


Parsons, Henry 






Boston . 






48 t-2 




Patch, Charles J. 






Boston 






29 45 




Pattee, Martha K. . 






Boston 






2 71 




Paul, Ebenezer 






Endicott . 






11 62 




Peck, phoahe A. 






E. Souierville 






17 44 




Peck, Hai i iet A. . 






E Greenwich,! 


..I. 




51 15 




Peck, fc^tella V. . 






Cambridge 






9 3ll 


9 30 


People's Ice Co. 






Boston . 




$15 50 


94 55 


110 05 


Perkins, Louisa R. 
Peterson, Olive 






Boston . 
Everett . 






27 90 
37 20 




Plaff, William C. . 
Plaff, Henry & Jacob 






Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Bos on 






37 2 
9 30 




Pickard. Daniel D. 










46 li 




I'teiee, Nichols & Craft, 


austee 








80 99 




Pierce, Mary A. 










3J 10 


32 16 


Pierce, Job A. 
Pinkham & Liichfield 
Pommer, Uobert E. 
Poninier, LouUa A. 
Pope, Albeit A. 






Boston . 
Wollaston 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Wollaston 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Bos on . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
New Brunswick 
Roxbury 
Boston . 






1 55 
20 (fi 

9 69 

2 71 
69 75 


20 92 
9 69 
2 71 


Porter, A. Wallace 
Porter, Thomas O. 










4 05 
10 8-> 


4 65 

10 85 


Porter, John M. , 
Pratt, Luban 
Pratt, Isaac, Jr. 
Pratt, Edmund T. 
Pratt, Edmund T. . 
Pre=-cott, Mrs. S. C. 
Pi :ce, W llliam 








48 05 


54 25 

29 07 
177 48 
220 87 

2 71 
42 03 

3 )0 


42 63 


Price, Fitz James . 










31 00 


31 00 


a 










Quincy Savings Bank 


Quincy . 




36S 12 




Quigley, Mary J. . 


.Jamaica Plain . 




1 94 




Quiinby, Monroe T. 


Melrose . 




108 50 




Quiinby, J. B., heirs 


Dubuque, Iowa. 




51 92 




R 










Ray, Margaret 


Boston . 




26 35 




Kay, Ellen E. 


Woburn 




5 Si 


5 81 



no 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


1 Per- 
sonal. 


I Real 
Estate. 


Dnpaid. 


Raymond, Artema* S. 


Dedham . 


$70 22 


$41 95 




Real Estate & Building Co. 


Boston . 




1531 79 




Reardon Dennis A. 


S". Boston 




78 




Reddic, I. H. 


Charlestown 




78 


$0 78 


Reed, Edwin 






46 50 




Reeve*, Mary 


Boston . 




28 67 




Remick, rimbthy . 


Roston . 




52 70 




Rich. Harriet L." . 


Fall River 




58 90 




Richard.*, Elise B. & Win. R. . 


Bos'on 




85 25 


85 2& 


Richards, Joseph R. 


Cambridge 




24 41 




Richards, Daniel . 


Da livers 




10 08 




Robinson, John B. 


Littleion Common 




57 35 




Robinson, Benj. F., heirs 


New York, N. Y. 




39 14 


39 14 


Robinson, Charles, Jr. 


West Newton . 




62 00 




Rouillard, E. R. . 


Arlington 




2 71 




Rowe Brothers 


Boston . 




1 16 




Russell Ellen H. . 


Boston . 




22 86 




Ryan, Margaret J. 


Charlestown 




29 06 


29 06 


Ryan, William B. . 


Boston . 




49 60 


49 60 


Saco & Biddeford Savings Bank 


Saco, Me. 




287 91 




Saco & Biddelord Savings Bank 


Saco, " 




14 72 




S afford, F.H. 


Charlestown 




lit 70 




safford, N. F. 


Milton . 




45 72 




Safford, N. F., trustee 


Milton . 




28 29 




Sandeen, Catherine, heirs of 


Ron bury 




J2 40 


12 40» 


Saulsbury. Jotham 


We\ mouth 




88 35 




Scaife, Helen A. . 


Boston . 




10 08 




Scrannage, Matthew 


Meal'ord 




9 30 




Seaver, Jacob W. . . 


Boston . 




5 81 




Severance, George E. 


Cambridge 




3 10 




Sharp, J. C. 


Dorchester 




1 55 




Shaw, Joseph P. . 


Jamaica Plain . 




4 27 




Shaw, Lydia A. . 


Somerville 




72 46 




Shepard, James S. 


Canton . 




69 75 




Shute, J. M. ... 


Boston 




77 50 




Simmons, John O. 


Boston . 




32 55 




Simmons, William A. 


New York, N. Y. 




58 90 


58 90 


Simmons. Harriett 






43 79 


43 79- 


Sinclair, GeoigeB. 


Wakefield 




26 74 




Skinner, Frederick 


Boston 




10 07 




Smith, Oliver A. . 


Newton . 




3 88 




Smith, W. A 


Norwood 




34 10 




Smith, Harriet E. & Ellen F. . 


Dedham . 




3 10 




Smith, Maria A. . . . 


Barre 




43 79 




Snyder, C. B., heirs of 


New York, N. Y. 




41 07 




Somes, Samuel S. . 


Milton " . 




160 42 




So. Scituate Savings Bank 


So. Scituate 




60 45 




Spring, Rebecca B. 


Perth Amboy, N. Y 




18 60 


18 60 


Springer, George H. 


Boston . 




18 10 




Springer, Charles C. 


St. Paul, Minn. 




6 97 




Springlield, .Nathaniel 


Boston . 




2 33 




Stanwood, J. E. . 


lops field 




3d 52 




Stark, Mary 


Boston . 




1 16 




Stark, John H. , heirs 


Boston 




8 91 




Stark, John H,, heirs 


Boston • 




32 55 


32 5 6 


Stark, John H., heirs 


Buston 




5 43 




Stephenson . W. G. 


Boston . 




20 15 




Stevens, Elizabeth W. . 


Boston 




342 55 




Stevens, Elizabeth W. 


Boston . 




34 88 


34 88 


Stevenson, Hemenway & Russell 


MllON . 




69 75 




Stratton, Charles C. 


Fitchburg 




37 59 




Stratton Charles E., trustee. 


Boston . 




34 10 





I II 



Non-Resident Tax-Fayers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Straw, John, B. 


Lewiston, Me. . 




$62 77 




Sullivan, Frank E. 


Dorchester 




24 41 




Sullivan, Margaret. 


South Boston . 




3 88 




Sumner, VI. P. 


Di dham . 




35 26 




Suter, Hales W., Trustee 


Boston 




41 85 




Sykes, Joseph, heirs 


Boston 




29 84 




Sykes, Louisa M. . 

T 

Taft, Amariah A. . 


Boston 




37 20 




Milford . 




4 65 




Talbot, Miss M. B. 


Dorchester 




5 43 




Talbot, Jabez, Jr. . 


Sti'Ughton 




20 54 


$20 54 


Talbot, Jabez 


Stoughton 




60 05 


60 05 


Taylor, George 


Bosloii 




5 81 




Thomson, Umphray 


So. Boston 




2 33 


2 33 


Thompson, C. S. & VV. M. 


Brockton 




1 55 




Thompson, E eanora 


Somerville 




5 04 


5 04 


Thompson, Robert 


Gardner . 




120 90 




Thompson, Almira 


Boston 




31 00 




Thorndike, James P., heirs of . 


Boston 




9 30 




Thorndike. Sarah W. 


Boston . 




57 35 




Thurston, Philander 


Sutton 




36 04 




Tiles ton & Hollingsworth 


Boston , 


$806 00 


750 20 




Tilton, Eliza T. . ... 






69 75 




Tirrell, Caroline . 


Boston . 




32 55 




Tondorf, Joseph 


Boston 




21 70 




Torrey, Everett 


Boston 




27 90 




Tower, Isaac H. . 


Dedhara . 




99 20 




Townsend, George M. 


Boston . 




6 20 




Town send, Eliza J. 


Saugii8 . 




3 49 




Trescott, Ebenezer, heirs of 


New York, N. Y. 




39 




Tripp, Emily A. . 


Fairhaven 




62 00 




Tucker, Elijah, heirs of 


Milton . 




46 50 




Tucker, Nathan, heirs of 


Mdton 




2i, 15 




Tucker, Mary T. . 


Milton . 




105 40 




Tucker, James 


Milton 




48 82 




Tucker, G. H. 


New York, N. Y. 




33 71 




Tucker, S. A. 


Milton 




24 02 




Tuits, John VV. . 


Boston 




15 50 




Turner, William H. 


Boston . 




93 00 




Turner, R. VV. 


Boston . 




3 10 




Tultie, Edward P. 


Newton . 




4 65 




Tyler, VV. B. 

U 

Utley, Joseph 


Boston 




36 81 




Roxbury 




2 71 




Underwood, Orison 


Milltord . 




1 30 


9 30 


V 










Vanderlip. VV. C. . 


Boston . 




63 55 


63 55 


Vicker\ , HeiMiann F. 


Boston . 




87 57 




Vose, Joshua 


Milton . 




72 08 


*. i 


Vose, Jessie, heirs of 


Miltou 




60 45 




W 










Wadham, Helen J. 


Roxbury 




35 26 




Wadsworth, E. D. 


Milton 




32 55 




Walker, Lucretia 


Lexington 




36 42 




Walker, Eunice A. 


Chicago, 111. 




42 62 


42 62 


Walley, James S. . 


Boston . 




8 53 




Ward & Crumett . 


Boston & H. P. 




40 30 


40 30 


Wardwell, Jarvis C. 


Boston . 




78 





I 12 



Non-Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



Warren, Winslow, trustee 
Warren-, Harriet B. 

Washburn, William 
Webster, John G., heirs 
Webster, Stephen . 
Welch, F. C, Trustee 
Weld, Aaron D. . 
Wellington, C. W. W., heirs of 
Weseo'tt, Edward, heirs of 
Wescott, Cath -,rine L. 
West, Clara E. 
Weymouth Savings Bank 
Whipple. John A., Trustee 
White, Charles A., heirs 
White, Amos S 
While, Charles G. 
White. George H. 
White, Georgianna 
White, Howard . 
White, Catharine S. 
White, Mary 
Whittemore, C. W. 
Whittiugton, Alfred 
Whittier, uarrie A. 
Whittier, A. R. 
Whiting, Joseph, heirs of 
Whiting, a Ivan 
Whitnev, Cnarles . 
Wild, Joseph 
Wilder. William W. 
Willifims, John J., archbishop 
Williams, Francis C. 
Williams, Wm. H. 
Wihna th, Naaman V. 
Woods John 
Woodward, Mary E. 
Woudworth, Thomas H 
Wright, Isaac L. . 
Wright, Richard W. 
Wyman, Isaac C, trustee 

Y 

Young, John B. and Annie M, 



RESIDENCE. 



Oedham 
Attleboro 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
Boston . 
W. Box bury 
Boston . 
South Boston 
Boston . 
Bra in tree 
Weymouth 
Boston 

Weymouth 

Milton 

Boston . 

Boston . 

Spring Green, Neb. 

Boston . 

Boston . 

Ro^lindale 

Boston . 

Boston . 

Boston . 

Dedham . 

Clinton . 

Boston . 

Georgetown 

Ne - ton.-N. H. 

Boston . 

Roxbury 

B flion," . 

Walpole 

Bo?ton . 

Fall River 

Milton 

Roxbury 

Hilishoro, 

Boston 



Dedhatn 



Pak 



Per- 
sonal. 



$4 65 



5 43 



Real 
Estate. 



$27 12 
37 20 
58 90 

57 35 
2 71 

19 38 

1 55 
52 70 
13 It) 
55 02 

5 Hi 
152 68 

2 71 
78 

8 53 
13 !>5 

<) 30 
39 5.5 

3 49 

2 S3 
1 55 

5 01 

9 SO 
164 3d 
141 83 

1 55 

3 10 
62 00 
12 40 

3 49 
110 82 
48 4t 

58 90 
28 08 

46 50 
27 90 

6 98 
9 30 

80 20 



19 76 



Unpaid. 



$5 81 



5 43 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

At the beginning of the year your Committee effected the 
following organization: — 

Charles G. Chick, Chairman. 
Benjamin C. Vose, Secretary. 

For convenience sub-committees were then appointed an d 
approved by the Committee, namely: — 

High School. — George M. Fellows, Andrew Washburn, 
Benjamin C. Vose. 

Grew School. — -James E. Cotter, Benjamin C. Vose. 
Fairmount School. — Andrew Washburn, Edmund Davis. 
Greenwood School. — Edmund Davis, James E. Cotter. 
Damon School. — Charles G. Chick, George M. Fellows. 
Butler School. — Benjamin C. Vose. 

Evening School. — James E. Cotter, Andrew Washburn. 
Industrial School. — Andrew Washburn. 

With this organization the work of the Committee has 
been harmonious, and no effort has been spared to provide 
the best accommodation and facilities for the comfort and 
education of the children, consistent with the exercise of 
that degree of economy made desirable by the present tax 
rate of the town. 

In this connection we are pleased to report that the gen- 
erous appropriation of last year has enabled us to employ 
good teachers, open new schools when necessary, and to keep 
the buildings well warmed and in good repair during the 
year. 



ii 4 



We are further able to say that the unexpended balances 
standing to the credit of this department, are sufficient, if so 
applied, to meet all outstanding obligations. 

It seems proper at this time to call your attention to cer- 
tain matters which have received attention, during the past 
year, and to make some suggestions as to the future needs 
of this department. 

HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. 

For several years past, and especially since the school- 
room has been enlarged, it has been difficult to warm the 
various rooms, during the winter weather, so that at all times 
they would be comfortable for the students in attendance. 
Last year a special appropriation was made to furnish better 
facilities for heating and for other needed repairs. The 
expenditure of this appropriation was referred to the sub- 
committee in charge of this school; and during the summer 
vacation two new furnaces were substituted for the old ones, 
and other needed improvements were made. 

The result of the change in furnaces is very satisfactory, 
and the building itself is in good repair. The yard and 
fence, however, are not in a suitable condition, and will 
demand attention the coming year. 

FIRE ESCAPES. 

r 

In June, 1883, the Legislature enacted a law providing 
that "all school buildings, three or more stories high, and 
accommodating, or having the means of accommodating 
thirty or more persons, . . . shall be supplied inside 
thereof, with proper and sufficient means and appliances for 
escape in case of fire, or apparatus for that purpose, properly 
constructed upon the outside thereof, connecting through 
doors or windows," etc. 

At that time the large hall on the third floor of the Grew 
Building was occupied by Mr. Dean's classes, then number- 



i}5 

ing upwards of sixty pupils, and the Committee at once con- 
sidered the matter of placing escapes upon this building, and 
experiments were made. 

In the summer of 1884 the annex was built and occupied 
by Mr. Dean's classes, and the hall was vacated. The third 
floor of the building has not been used permanently, until 
about a year ago, when it was found necessary to transfer 
the sixth class to the upper room in the addition, which it 
now occupies. The occupation of this room rendered a fire 
escape necessary. While experimenting at the Grew Build- 
ing, the matter of furnishing additional means of exit at the 
High School building had been considered but no action 
taken. In the summer of 1885, the number of pupils hav- 
ing increased to above one hundred, it became necessary to 
enlarge the room for their better accommodation. The stair- 
ways leading from this large room, often filled with students, 
being narrow, the means of escape, in case of accident, 
seemed inadequate. 

Last Spring the town made an appropriation for the pur- 
pose of providing the two school buildings, above-named, 
with fire-escapes. The matter was at once referred to the 
sub-committee having these buildings in charge, and a care- 
ful investigation was made by the gentlemen of those com- 
mittees. 

After full consideration of the merits of the various sys- 
tems, and with the approval of the full Committee, the 
system in use in many of our neighboring cities and towns 
was adopted, and during the summer vacation escapes were 
placed upon the outside of both the Grew and High School 
buildings. The fire-escapes consist of iron platforms and 
stairways, protected by strong railing of the same materials, 
all firmly fixed to the outside of the buildings, and afford 
a safe and convenient means of exit in case of necessity. 
They have been inspected and approved by the Inspector of 
Buildings. 



n6 



WATER. 

During the year contracts have been made with the Hyde 
Park Water Company, and water has been introduced into 
the High, Grew and Fairmount School buildings. The cost 
of introducing the water into these buildings appears among 
the expenditures of this department. This improvement in- 
sures a supply of pure water for use in these schools, and is 
much appreciated by teachers and pupils. The annual cost 
to the town is $25 for each building. We recommend that 
water from the same source be supplied at the Greenwood 
and Damon schools in the near future. 

HEATING. 

The subject of heating our large school buildings demands 
careful attention. Many of the furnaces which have been 
long in use will soon need to be replaced by new ones. It 
would be well to consider the subject of steam heating before 
making any large expenditure for new furnaces in any one 
building, as no change of system should be made until a 
careful investigation as to the comparative merits of the 
systems in use is had, in order that no mistake be made in 
this important matter. 

Your Committee would suggest the appointment of a 
special committee to examine this subject, that all the facts 
may be obtained and placed at the disposal of the town. 

ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The growth of the town is nowhere more clearly evidenced 
than by the rapidity with which the large buildings provided 
by the town for school purposes are being occupied. Thirty- 
six rooms, in various parts of the town, have been provided 
for the Grammar and Primary schools, and with one excep- 
tion they are now used by the schools. 

Additional accommodations must be provided at an early 
day. This matter should at once receive the careful con- 



ii7 

sideration of the town, that the future requirements of the 
schools may be met with as much advantage to the town as 
possible. 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 

There is a strong belief among educators of the present 
day that the hands should be educated to be useful, and that 
national success depends largely npon the training of skilled 
laborers. Our townsman, Henry A. Grew, Esq., being 
interested in this subject, generously presented this depart- 
ment with a number of carpenter benches and the necessary 
tools, in order that a School of Carpentry might be opened 
as an experiment. A school was opened for a short time 
last year with good success. 

In view of the importance of this subject, and the interest 
displayed by the pupils who attended the school while open, 
your committee feel justified in recommending a small ap- 
propriation for the support of this school during a part or 
the whole of the coming year. 

SUPERVISION. 

The supervision of the schools during the past year has 
continued in charge of Mr. David Bentley, Superintendent of 
Schools. In the performance of his duties he has had the 
co-operation of this Committee, and his suggestions have at 
all times received respectful consideration. 

It has been his province to examine and recommend 
teachers, visit and examine the schools, to make promotions, 
purchase all the books and supplies, and generally to be 
familiar with the condition of the schools. His report to this 
Committee upon these matters is herewith submitted for 
your careful consideration. 

Respectfully submitted, in behalf of the School Committee, 
CHARLES G. CHICK, Chairman. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of Hyde Park : 

Gentlemen, — The following report is respectfully sub- 
mitted : — 

SUMMARY OF STATISTICS. 

Population of Hyde Park (Town census, 1886) . 8,463 

Number of children in town between 5 and 15 

years of age, May 1, 1886 .... i>704 

Increase over number returned May 1, 1885 . 98 

Valuation of School buildings and grounds, May e 

1, 1886 $115,000 

Approximate value of other School property, as 

furnaces, desks, pianos, books of reference, etc., $6,000 

Assessed valuation of real and personal property 

of Hyde Park, May 1, 1886 . . . . 5,627,688 
Amount raised by taxation for support of Schools, 

including incidentals, text-books and supplies . $32,800 
Percentage of valuation expended for Schools, . .00582 

Cost of instruction for each pupil, based on the 

average whole number, including incidentals, 

text-books and supplies . . . . . $18.70 

Cost of text-books and supplies for each pupil, 

based on the average whole number . . $11.68 

Whole number of different pupils enrolled in all 

the schools for the year ..... 2,041 

Average whole number for the year . . . 1,711 

Average attendance for the year . . . l tS°9 

Per cent, of attendance in all the Schools for the 

year . . . . ..... . 88.2 



ii9 



Per cent, of the average whole number for the year : — 
In the High School ...... .063 

Grammar Schools ..... .468 

Primary Schools (10th, nth and 12th 

classes) ...... .469 

Average number of pupils to each teacher : — 
In High School ..... 
In Grammar Schools .... 
In Primary Schools .... 
Number of teachers in High School 

" " " " Grammar Schools 

" " " " Primary Schools 
Special teachers (Music) 



27.5 
43-6 
48.7 

4 
19 
17 

2 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Organization. — Committee : George M. Fellows, Andrew Wash- 
burn, Benj. C. Vose. 
Mr. John F. Elliot, Master. 
Mr. Samuel W. Culver, Sub-Master. 
Miss Sarah L. Miner and Miss Fannie G. Merrick, Assistants. 

Whole number of different scholars during the year . 161 

Average whole number of scholars during the year . 103 

Average attendance during the year .... 98 

Percentage of attendance during the year . . . 95.1 

Graduates from Four Years' Course. — William Morgan Cannon, 
Annie Mabelle Case, Emilie Isabel Currier, George Frederic El- 
dridge, Harry Clifford Farnsworth, Grace Bonnell Gidney, Mary 
Violet Habberley, Charles Edward Hathaway, Frank Reed Heustis, 
Grace Mabel Home, Josie Howard, Maggie Isabella Parker, Lizzie 
Edwards Richardson, Louise Leaman Sears, Abbie Elizabeth 
Wiggin. 

Graduates from Two Years' Course. — William Henry Home, Wil- 
liam Joseph Kennedy, Hildreth George Macfarland, Arthur Claflin 
Savage, Daniel Smith Taylor. 

Amount of teachers' salaries during the year . $3,700 00 

" of janitor's salary during the year . . 150 00 

" expended for fuel during the year . . 9° 95 

" expended for incidentals during the year, 308 15 



120 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 



Organization. — Committee : Benjamin C. Vose. 
Miss Marion S. Piper (to April), Miss Emily Woods (since April), 
Teachers. 

Whole number of different scholars during the year . 53 
Average number of scholars during the year ... 36 
Average attendance during the year . . . -31 

Percentage of attendance during the year . . . .861 

Amount of teachers' salaries during the year . . $400 00 

" of janitor's salary during the year . , 65 00 

" expended for fuel during the year . . 21 40 

" expended for incidentals during the year . 14 83 

FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Organization. — Committee : Andrew Washburn, Edmund Davis. 
Mr. Henry F. Howard, Master. 

Miss Helen P. Cleaves, Miss Mary C. Howard, Miss Minnie I. 
Coggeshall, Mrs. Matilda H. P. Cushing, Miss Hattie F. 
Packard, Miss Jennie S. Hammond, Miss Helen A. Perry, and 
(since April) Miss Marion S. Piper, Teachers. 

Whole number of different scholars during the year . 432 

Average number of scholars during the year . . 351 

Average attendance during the year . . . .318 

Percentage of attendance during the year . . . 90.6 

Graduates. — Harriet H, Badger, Ethel M. Barker, Mabe 
E. Besse, Edith A. Blackmer, Albertha L. Blaisdell, John 
M. Corrigan, Sarah L. Elliott, Mamie E. Foster, George F* 
Frost, Albert N. Habberlye, Winnifred Kendall, Cora B. Morrelh 
Walter E. Piper, Alice G. Noyes, Walter W. Poole, Charles D. 
Smith, Jessie L. Swinton, Abigail L. Toole, William M. Trotter, 
Blanche S. Werner. 

Amount of teachers' salaries during the year . $4,615 00 

" of janitors' salaries during the year . 150 00 

" expended for fuel during the year . . 256 80 

" expended for incidentals during the year 765 47 



121 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 



Organization. — Committee : Edmund Davis, J. E. Cotter. 

Mr. Daniel G. Thompson, Master. 

Miss Mary F. Perry, Miss Adelaide L. Dodge, Miss Ellen M. 
Farnsworth (to November), Miss Lillie M. Beede (since No- 
vember), Miss Sarah A. Remick, Miss Belle D. Curtis, Miss 
Lucia Alger, Teachers. 

Whole number of different scholars during the year . 388 

Average number of scholars during the year . . 331 

Average attendance during the year .... 300 

Percentage of attendance during the year . . . 90.6 

Graduates. — Charles Herbert Balkam, George Lawrence Bragan, 
Thomas Francis Fallon, George Francis Fiske, Allen Morris Fra- 
denburg, Isabelle Nicholas Griffin, Alice King Kendall, William 
Arthur Morse, Mabel Augusta Page, Arthur Durgin Sherman, John 
William Towle, Susie Dutton Waldron, Alice Lomelia Williams, 
Jennie Louise Winchenbaugh. 

Amount of teachers' salaries during the year . $3,834 62 

" of janitor's salary during the year . . 150 00 

" expended for fuel during the year . . 230 70 

" expended for incidentals during the year 203 64 

GREW SCHOOL. 

Organization. — Committee : J. E. Cotter, B. C. Vose. 

Mr. Frank H. Dean, Master. 

Miss Mary A. Winslow, Miss Harriet Foster (since April), Miss 
Lucina Dunbar (to April), Miss Elma Stone (from April to 
July), Miss Clara M. Colcord (since Sept. 1st), Miss Hattie 
M. H. Darling, Miss Jennie M. Soule (to July), Miss Annie 
L. Clark, Miss Fannie E. Harlow, Miss Agnes J. Campbell 
Miss Genevieve Brainard, Miss Mary E. Rogers, Miss Leila 
E. Perry (to July), Miss Bertha E. Messer (since July) 
Teachers. 

Whole number of different scholars during the year . 576 
Average number of scholars during the year . . 525 

Average attendance during the year . . . .479 
Percentage of attendance during the year ... 92 



122 



Graduates. — Bessie Blanche Bleakie, William Paul Brown, Amy- 
Bell Bryant, Martha Augusta Cable, Helen McGregor Campbell, 
Eugene Henry Clark, Wallace Leseur Collins, Florence Wadleigh 
Davis, Patrick Francis Dolan, Edith May Farnsworth, Edward 
Elmer Hall, Lillian Mabel Harlow, Charles Benjamin Harmon, 
Susie Henchman, Emma Gertrude Henderson, Florence Genevieve 
Hoogs, Lucy Wellington Howard, Richard Lee Jackson, Emma 
Louise Samuels, John Stone Hale Sears, Amy Gertrude Sloan, 
Emily Frances Sturtevant, May Bertha Thompson, Annie Tooher, 
Roxana Hayward Vivian, Amy Edna Whittemore. 

Amount of teachers' salaries during the year . $5,796 25 

" of janitor's salary during the year . . 200 00 

" expended for fuel during the year . . 369 15 

" expended for incidentals during the year 1,279 22 

DfMON SCHOOL. 

Organization. — -Committee : C. G. Chick, George M. Fellows. 
Mr. E. W. Cross, Master. 

Mrs. Lizzie de Senancour, Miss Julia E. Donavan, Miss Harriet 
E. Tower, Miss Margaret E. Bertram, Miss Emma F. Brown, 
Miss Maria V. Rooney, Miss Edith H. Sears, Teachers. 

Whole number of different scholars during the year . 431 
Average number of scholars during the year . . 365 

Average attendance during the year .... 283 
Percentage of attendance during the year . . -77-5 

Graduates. — Anastatia V. Kennelly, Mary A. Lambert, James 
Augustin Kingston, Patrick Hickey, Frank Thatcher Austin, Mary 
I. Foley, Frank E. Conley, Isabell Estha King, Matthew Henry 
Stack, John Patrick Conroy. 

Amount of teachers' salaries during the year . $4,295 00 

" of janitor's salary during the year . . 150 00 

" expended for fuel during the year . . 370 30 

" expended for incidentals during the year 325 52 



123 



STATEMENT CONCERNING THE SCHOOLS. 



SCHOOLS. 



TEACHERS, Feb., 1887. 



High. 



John F. Elliot 

Charles W. Culver. 

Sarah L. Miner 

Fanny G. Merrick. . 



Greenwood ' Daniel G. Thompson. 

| Mary F. Perrv 

I Adelaide L. Dodge. . . 

Lillie M. Beede 

Sarah E. Roome .... 

Belle D. Curtis 

Lucia Alger 

Grace B. Gidney 



Fairinount 



Damon 



Grew. 



Henry F. Howard 

Helen P. Cleaves 

Mary C. Howard 
Minnie 1. Uoggeshall 
Matilda H. P. Cushinj 

Hattie F. Packard 

Jennie S. Hammond. . 

Helen A. Perry 

Marion S. Piper , 



Edward W. Cross 

Lizzie de Senancour . . 

Julia E. Donovan 

Margaret E. Bertram. 

Maria V. Roo ey 

Emma F. Brown 

Edith H. Sears 

Louise L. Sears 



Butler. 



Frank H. Dean 

Alary A. Winslow . 

Harriet Foster 

Clara M. Colcord. . 
Hattie M. Darling . 

Annie E. Clark 

Fanny F. Harlow . . 
Agnes J. Campbell 
Grace M. Hoi' leu . 

Mary E. Rogers 

Bertha E. Messer . . 



Fanny Woods 



BEGAN SERVICE. 



Sept. 1876 
18S4 
1S82 

April, 18S5 

Jan. 1883 

Sept. 1885 

May, 18S4 

Nov. 1886 

Dec. 18S6 

Sept. 18S4 
April, 18S5 

Jan. 1887 

Sept. 1875 

Jan. 1886 

April, 1884 

Dec. 1385 

April, 1SSJ 

Sept. 1883 

1871 

1879 

1885 

1875 

1874 
1876 
1S76 
188L 
Jan. 1886 
" 1882 
1887 

Sept. 1877 
Jan. 1885 
April, 1886 
Sept. 1886 

1880 
Oct. 1883 

1883 

" 1883 

Feb. 1887 

Sept. 1878 

1886 

April, 1S86 



PRESENT 


SALARY. 


$1,800 00 


600 00 


600 00 


600 00 


1,200 00 


450 00 


450 00 


400 00 


400 00 


450 00 


425 00 


2C0 00 


1,200 00 


425 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


425 00 


1,200 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


425 00 


450 00 


400 00 


1,300 CO 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


450 00 


400 00 


450 00 


400 00 



124 



PRIMARY AND GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 



There are now in these Schools 1,657 pupils, arranged in 
classes as follows : — 



Fifth classes 




80 


Sixth "... 




134 


Seventh " ... 




175 


Eighth " . 




206 


Ninth " 




233 


Tenth "... 




213 


Eleventh " .... 




210 


Twelfth "... 




406 


Number in High School 




1 10 


" all the Schools 




• 1,769 


Gain in the Grammar and Primary for yeai 


25 


" " High School for yea 


r 


7 



12$ 



EXAMINATIONS. 

One of the most difficult things connected with the con- 
duct of our Public Schools is to decide upon the frequency, 
character and value to be attached to the examinations. No 
doubt, in many instances, too much time is spent in the en- 
deavor to discover what the pupil knows or what he does not 
know rather than in the legitimate work of imparting instruc- 
tion. The present hue and cry against examinations is simply 
a reaction against an excess rather than a condemnation of 
all tests. Most thoughtful schoolmen are agreed that under 
the present constitution of our schools some way of testing 
the quality and extent of the work is indispensable. As I 
have said, the practical questions to be determined are, their 
frequency, character, and the influence they should have in 
determining the pupil's rank and promotion. During the 
past school year I have prepared written questions for three 
examinations. One of these was held in December at the 
close of the fall term, another at the close of the winter term 
at the first of April. Two of the examinations, of which 
there are five during the year, are in the hands of the 
teachers and are based on the daily work of the pupils. 
One of these applies to the months of September and Octo- 
ber, the other to the work of January and February. 

These four examinations are averaged and the results 
combined with the third written examination held in June, 
the result of which determines, in a large degree, the annual 
promotion of the pupils. This method, while attaching special 
importance to the June examination, still brings into account 
the pupil's record for the whole year. The only question 
would seem to be whether too much value is not given to 
the June examinations. 

I am well aware that the character of the tests applied 
governs, in a large degree, the character of the teaching. If 
questions are framed testing the student's knowledge of the 
principles in their practical application, and going possibly a 



126 



little outside the narrow limits of the text-book, the tendency 
is to broaden the range of teaching, while, on the other 
hand, if you follow loyally the well-beaten track of " thus 
saith the book," the result is compression, a narrowing of the 
general scope of investigation, with but few excursions into 
the regions beyond. The teacher and the pupil both need 
the stimulus which comes from well directed investigation. 
It gives variety, reality and freshness in their work, and the 
tests applied should lead in this direction. I believe such a 
method of examination as we have carried out the past year 
forms a comparatively safe basis for promotions. Excep- 
tional cases, however, will frequently arise, and should always 
be carefully considered. 

All the members of the graduating classes of the Grammar 
Schools in June received diplomas, seventy in all. Fifty of 
these became members of our High School in September, 
making, I believe, the largest entering class in the history of 
this School. 

The promotions through all the grades were made in ac- 
cordance with the required standard, with the exception of 
one or two rooms, in which frequent changes of teachers had 
taken place, with the usual result of lowering the standard of 
scholarship for the time being. I see no good reason to 
change our present method of conducting the examinations. 
They have the advantage of being uniform, the same ques- 
tions being used in corresponding grades in all the schools. 
The results on the whole have been satisfactory, showing no 
marked difference in the several schools. In some cases a 
few have been left behind, as the result of irregular attend- 
ance or the want of interest or ability on their part. 

The annual examination of candidates for teachers was 
held on the 21st of August. An extended notification was 
given through our local press and in Boston papers, and in 
addition to these quite a large number of personal notices 
were sent, all of which contributed to the bringing together' 
of a much larger number than last year. 



127 

The questions prepared for this examination covered, in a 
general way, the studies in our Primary and Grammar 
schools, and had also special reference to methods of teach- 
ing and school management. 

This examination brought together a class of young ladies 
who were generally well prepared for their profession, so far 
as a knowledge of the subjects is concerned, but the examina- 
tion of those having a professional training such as is fur- 
nished by our best Normal Schools was very much more 
satisfactory with reference to methods of instruction and 
general school management. This difference was very 
marked, and, in my judgment, should have a controlling in- 
fluence in the choice of teachers for our schools. There is 
such a thing as science in teaching, as a normal method of 
instruction, as a natural development of the power of the 
mind. 

Nineteen young ladies successfully passed this exami- 
nation, and their testimonials being satisfactory, by your 
vote, their names have been added to the approved list of 
candidates for teachers. It gives me great pleasure to say 
that two of this number were graduates of our own High 
School in the class of last June. One of these, Miss Louise 
L. Sears, after assisting without remuneration during the 
Fall term in the Damon School, has now received a regular 
appointment as teacher in the same school. The other, Miss 
Grace B. Gidney, in a similar way, has been assisting in the 
Greenwood School, and has recently received the appoint- 
ment as assistant of the Principal of that School. Two others 
of this number, both graduates of the State Normal School 
at Salem, have been teaching in the Grew School since Sep- 
tember ist, Miss Clara M. Colcord in the eighth class and 
Miss Bertha E. Messer in the twelfth. Both are doing 
well. 

Our schools are suffering in a very marked degree from 
the frequent loss of our more experienced and successful 
teachers. Hyde Park is regarded by the school officers 



128 

of our neighboring cities and more wealthy towns as 
most excellent foraging ground, and so month by month 
we are called to say a professional good-bye to those 
whom we would gladly retain for the sake of our schools, but 
in whose increased material prosperity we cannot but rejoice 
At the rate of change for the past year, our entire teaching 
force would be renewed every four years. The remedy is not 
far to seek, but whether it can be applied in our present cir- 
cumstances as a town is for you, gentlemen, to decide. I 
should hope that at least an effort might be made to retain 
our experienced and valuable teachers. 

The town is fortunate in having it the head of her High 
and Grammar Schools men of experience and ability. I 
hope the time is near at hand when these gentlemen shall 
receive a compensation more nearly commensurate with the 
value of their services. 

In my report of last year I spoke somewhat at length upon 
the several subjects of study in our Primary and Grammar 
schools. At present I believe this to be unnecessary, as 
most of the suggestions then made you have since authorized 
me to carry out. 

The text-book in Arithmetic heretofore in the hands of 
the pupils of the eleventh class has been discontinued. It 
was found the scholars could not read sufficiently well tO' 
comprehend the written statements of problems. At present 
the work of this class is simply an extension of the method 
of the first year, namely, familiarizing the pupil with the four 
operations on numbers as far as fifty. This is clone, in the 
first place, by the use of objects in the hands of both teacher 
and pupil, so that the conception of what is done may be as- 
vivid and real as possible, the purpose being to do away with 
the use of objects as soon as the child is able to grasp the 
abstract notion of numbers. This plan gives much more 
time for drill in oral and slate work, and, we believe, will re- 
sult in greater facility and accuracy in the handling of small 
numbers. The results secured in the study of Arithmetic in 



129 

our elementary schools are probably less satisfactory than in 
any other study. We are apt to become impatient, forgetting 
that the power of abstract reasoning is of later development 
than most other faculties of the mind. 

Until the present year the course of study in Geography 
has extended through a .period of six years. In September 
last we commenced on a five years' course, the text-book 
being first used in the ninth class instead of the tenth. 

I believe that, with the use of one text-book containing 
only the essentials to be memorized, and with good physical 
wall maps, the time might with advantage be reduced to a 
four years' course. With such a plan in operation our pre- 
sent text-books could be used for reference and general read- 
ing on the subject. It would also give time for the fifth 
class to take up the subject of Physical Geography or Eng- 
lish History. 

The introduction of Barnes' U. S. History into the three 
upper classes of our Grammar Schools a year ago has proved 
highly satisfactory. The topical arrangements of the sub- 
jects, the numerous maps and copious foot-notes, the many 
beautiful illustrations and portraits, leave little to be desired 
in the way of a first-class text-book. 

The course of study in Languages and Grammar has been 
modified as you directed, the Elementary Grammar being 
discontinued in the seventh and eighth classes and the larger 
Grammar, which has been used only in the fifth and sixth, 
is now begun in the seventh class. I believe, on the whole, 
this was a movement in the right direction, though I still 
think the seventh class could be more profitably employed in 
simple practice in the use of language, rather than in the 
more formal study of its grammar. I regard the subjects as 
fundamentally distinct, one being the practice in the use of the 
language either oral or written, with the purpose to become flu- 
ent and correct in its use, while the other pertains to the scien- 
tific examination of written composition to ascertain its con- 
formity with certain established rules. A man may be utterly 



130 



ignorant of anatomy and yet be a skilled gymnast, so it is 
possible to become skilled in the use of language without a 
knowledge of its grammar. The student, of course, needs 
both, but in this practical age, for the average man, it is 
more important to know how than to know why. With a 
well-arranged preparatory course in Language, which would 
give to the student facility and correctness in oral and writ- 
ten expression, the study of grammar, as such, need not 
occupy a very large amount of time. In this connection I 
wish to call your attention to the need of a greater variety of 
books suitable for use as the basis of Language work. These 
books should be interesting and instructive, but not scientific, 
in their character, such as books - of travel and stories, so that 
the pupil's mind may be free to clothe his ideas in the best 
possible manner, and not be burdened with the effort neces- 
sary in making an exact statement of fact. A few books of 
this kind have been furnished, and more are needed. 

Some additional reading matter of a very simple kind has 
been provided for the first and second year in the Primary 
Schools, and with excellent results. These classes need a 
great deal of practice in reading which comes within the 
range of their understanding, in order to encourage ease and 
naturalness of expression. 

The work in Spelling has been changed, one book only 
being used, and beginning with it in the tenth class. This 
arrangement makes the work systematic and progressive 
throughout. Teachers are encouraged to have their classes 
spell orally a part of the time, thus giving variety, and also a 
rapid way of reviewing. 

In accordance with the law of the State, instruction in 
Physiology and Hygiene is given in all our schools. A good 
degree of interest is shown by teachers and pupils. The 
regular examinations in these subjects show that intelligent 
and thorough instruction is given. So far as a knowledge of 
the evils of intemperance is concerned, the pupils, even in 
our Primary Schools, are fully advised. But this knowledge, 



i3i 

I fear, will avail but little unless supplemented both by pre- 
cept and example, so that the moral nature of the child may- 
be so developed and strengthened as to lead him to resist 
temptation to indulgence in any form of evil. Such a result 
we can only hope to reach through the combined influence of 
a good home, a good school, and proper Sabbath and church 
training. A person thus trained should have within himself 
the elements of safety ; the very warp and woof of his inner 
self should lead him to choose the right and avoid what is 
vicious. Some one has said that such a character " is the 
highest product of education, and its attainment the best 
and surest safeguard to society ; more potent as a conserva- 
tor of virtue and morality than fear of all the pains and pen- 
alties which reality can present or imagination can picture." 
I desire to call your special attention to a course of in- 
struction in drawing prepared by Mr. Charles M. Carter for 
primary and grammar schools. It coverse a period of eight 
years. Mr. Carter is in the employ of the State Board of 
Education, having the subject of drawing under his super- 
vision. This course has been prepared with- reference to its 
adoption by the cities and towns of the State. In a note in- 
troducing the course the author says: "Industrial drawing as 
here presented is regarded by many educators as the foun- 
dation of industrial training. It gives skill in the use of 
hand and eye. Drawing and designing are here combined 
with the construction of objects." This method begins with 
the examination of simple forms, such as the cube, cylinder 
and sphere. The pupil is taught to observe, to use his eye 
and hand in making the object out of clay or some other 
convenient substance, and then to construct a drawing of it. 
This plan is followed through the entire course, so far as 
possible. The result is the pupil gets his knowledge first-hand, 
what he sees he is able to draw. Our present work is sim- 
ply copying {xom flat drawings which have no connection in 
the mind of the pupil with the objects themselves, and gives 



132 



to him no power to draw what may be placed before him. 
The adoption of this or a similar course, with the aid of a 
special teacher to introduce it, would, in my judgment, 
give practical value to our work in drawing. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 
The present classification is as follows : 

First class . . . . 19 

Second " . . . . 16 

Third " . . . . 28 

Fourth " .... 47 

Whole number . . . .110 

Second Year's Business Course . . 7 

First " " *.'•■- . 12 

During the past year the work of this School has been 
carried on without interruption by change of teachers. 

The graduating class numbered twenty, fifteen having 
taken the four years' course and five the two years.' 

Three of these graduates successfully passed the entrance 
examination for college, one at Harvard and two at Boston 
University, in each case without conditions, and one with 
honors. Two others entered the Institute of Technology 
also without conditions. Such results are very creditable to 
the school and furnish good evidence of the character of the 
work so far as the purpose of the school is to prepare 
students for advanced study. 

In regard to the two years' course little can be said in com- 
mendation. Observation of the work done the past year con- 
firms me in my opinion expressed in my last report, that it is 
at best " a poor substitute for a thorough education." 

Mr. Martin, of the State Board of Education, in his report 
upon the high schools of the State says: "This short course 
meets with little favor from either pupils or teachers. I have 
found but one teacher who shows any decided interest in it. 



133 

Few students choose it, and these, I have been told, are usual- 
ly of the weaker sort. So far as the true end of High 
School instruction is concerned, I consider the course almost 
valueless." 

A thorough English Course of three years, which would in- 
clude practical business instruction, would undoubtedly be 
a great improvement upon the present two years' Business 
Course, and, I believe, would meet with general favor. It 
would give the student time for a better general prepara- 
tion and hence, increase the probabilities of his success in 
life. 

MUSIC. 
In introducing to you the report of the Instructors of 
Music in our Schools, I am glad to bear testimony to their 
earnest efforts in awakening an increased interest in this sub- 
ject. Its importance, as a branch of school instruction, is 
more and more fully recognized, and also the need of more 
systematic work based on true educational principles. 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

At the beginning of the September term, a printed course 
of instruction in vocal music for all grades, including the 
high, was placed upon the desk of each teacher. 

The object in preparing this course was to systematize the 
method of teaching in the several grades, thereby enabling 
teachers to examine and classify their pupils in music as is 
done in other studies. 

This plan has already been attended with beneficial re- 
sults. 

For several years past the grammar school graduates, 
upon entering the high school, have been examined indivi- 
dually, and it gives me pleasure to state that a much larger 
per cent were able to pass the examination for entrance into 
the advanced class in music this year, than ever before. 



134 

In the primary schools, both teachers and pupils have 
manifested great interest in the music lessons, — consequently 
some excellent work has been accomplished. 

Adopting the theory that " practically every child may 
learn to sing," no pains have been spared in awakening and 
developing tone perception in the naturally unmusical 
children, and the results are certainly very gratifying. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Henry J. Whittemore, ) 

Mary E. Whittemoer, y^tructors in Music. 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Organization, — Committee, J. E. Cotter, Andrew Wash- 
burn. Teachers, S. W. Culver, Principal; Wales B. Stock- 
bridge, Jr., Assistant. 

The regular winter term of this school closed about the 
middle of March, but, at the special request of a class of 
young men connected with our manufacturing establishments, 
it was reopened and continued through the spring and early 
summer with good results. 

The present session of this school began November 8th, 
in the Damon School house. Some sixty-five persons joined 
the school during the first two weeks, but the attndance 
rapidly fell off so that up to the Christmas vacation the 
average attendance did not exceed seventeen. Upon inquiry 
it was found more convenient for those who attended most 
constantly to meet at the High School house. Under these 
circumstances permission was granted by your committee for 
its removal to the High School building, where it opened 
January 3d. The change has resulted in an increase in 
the average attendance to over twenty, and the school is now 
in a prosperous condition. 



135 



EVENING DRAWING SCHOOL. 



The following report by Mr. H. W. Killam, the teacher of 
this school, is of so much general interest that I submit it for 
publication. This school deserves commendation. The 
young men appreciate your generosity in sustaining it, and 
are improving its opportunities by regular attendance and 
faithful application to study. 

To the Superintendent of Schools: 

On the opening evening, Nov. 8th, over forty persons pre- 
sented themselves. As only three wished to take up archi- 
tectural study it was decided not to form a class in this branch 
of work. Three classes were formed, each meeting once a 
week. 

The elementary class, meeting on Friday evening, com- 
menced the study of practical geometry, passing from that 
to Prolection. There have been from twelve to twenty 
pupils present at each session. 

The intermediate class, meeting on Wednesday evening, 
have studied various details of machinery. The construc- 
tion of screws, elementary study of toothed gearing, cams, 
etc. There have been from twelve to eighteen pupils 
present at each session. 

The advanced class, meeting on Monday evenings, devoted 
its time to the special study of toothed gearing, com- 
prising cut or finished spur, bevel and worm gears. 
There have been from eight to thirteen pupils present at each 
session. 

The majority of the pupils are apprentices or young jour- 
neymen employed in the various manufactories in town, with 
several from the public schools who have a taste for mechan- 
ical work. 

The aim has been to make the work thorough and practical, 
the advanced course being founded on the practice of one of 
the largest machine tools works in the country. 



136 

While it is not expected all will make drawing their pro- 
fession, still the knowledge obtained in this course will be of 
great advantage to them in any mechanical work they may 
vish to follow. 

The results of the work in the past are seen in the cases of 
several of our pupils who are receiving considerable more 
wages than they would if they had not received this pre- 
paratory instruction. 

I would recommend an increase in the appropriation for 
the support of the school, so as to enable the formation of a 
class next winter for the study of machine construction and 
design. 

A class in architectural drawing would seem desirable, but 
our experience in the past has been that we must rely more 
on machinists then carpenters to support such a class. 

Horace W. Killam. 

The " Industrial School" for the instruction of boys in sim- 
ple carpentry was opened in April and continued through 
May and June. It was also opened in July and continued to 
the middle of August as a, vacation school. Both terms 
were fairly well attended, especially the latter, and many of 
the boys acquired considerable skill in the handling of tools 
and the construction of pieces of work. I believe the school 
supplies an actual need and should receive the support of the 
town. 

Our efficient truant officer, Mr. P. S. Conlan, is doing 
o-ood service in the way of preventing truancy and also in 
returning to school occasional wanderers. He reports some- 
times finding children whose parents are unable to provide 
them with suitable clothing for attending our schools. 
These are generally the children of parents not having a 
legal residence in town. Some method of supplying their 
necessities should be provided. 

I desire to call the attention of the Committee to the 



immediate need of increased school accommodations and 
also to the subject of the proper warming of our school 
buildings. In connection with this last subject I should 
hope that the proper ventilation of our school houses would 
receive careful consideration. In our attempts to keep out 
the cold by outside windows and storm doors we increase 
the necessity of special provision in this direction. Only 
during a small part of the school year is it safe to open freely 
the windows. An abundance of warm, pure air is an abso- 
lute necessity to the health and comfort of growing children. 
This breathing over and over again the vitiated air of our 
school-rooms is, undoubtedly, a far greater and more perma- 
nent injury to our children than the very occasional falling of 
the thermometer to below 68°. Some means should be provided 
for an ample supply of pure warm air. This can be done by 
means of heated ventilating shafts or chimneys connected 
with the various rooms. They require to be heated to secure 
proper circulation. The rooms should also be provided with 
registers properly located for carrying off the impure air. 

It has been my purpose during the past year to study and 
observe the best methods of instruction for public school 
purposes and to use these, so far as possible, in the improve- 
ment of our system of education. A good teacher is the 
great essential to a good school. In filling the vacancies 
which have occurred, I have tried to inform myself as fully 
as possible in regard to those I have recommended for your 
choice. They are all doing satisfactory work, with promise of 
increasing usefulness. 

Our schools are not deteriorating, but positive progress is 
being made, giving proof of better things to come. 

I wish to commend the teachers for their fidelity to the im- 
portant trusts committed to their care and their hearty co- 
operation in all that pertains to the well being of our schools. 

I gratefully acknowledge the courtesy and consideration 
shown me by you, gentlemen of the school committee. 

DAVID BENTLEY. 



REPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



REPORT OF ATTENDANCE AT THE HIGH SCHOOL FOR 1886. 





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103 


97 


92 


94 


99.3 


14 


69 





Sept. 1 to Dec. 31 


118 


112 


10S 


95.0 


99.5 


34 


80 


27 







Perfect in attendance from January 1 to July 1, 1SS6. — Wil liam M. Cannon, William 
J. Kennedy, Nellie M. Sanger, Charles A. McDonough, Francis E. McKenna, Charles 
F. Stack. 

Perfect in attendance from September 1 to December 31, 18SG. — Walter F. Bryant 
George D. Bussey, Rose E. Hughes, Frank H. Waters, Fred Wood, George M. Butler, 
Annette Elliott, Nellie M. Sanger, Frank W. Howard, Howard Noyes, Dora E. Snow, 
May S. Bent, Francis E. McKenna, Jessie L. Swinton, George B. Magrath, William 
P. Brown, Martha A. Cable, Florence W. Davis, Edith M. Farnsworth, George F., 
Fiske, Albert N. Habberley, Lilla M. Hilton, Richard L. Jackson, Walter E. Piper 
John W. Towle, William M. Trotter. 

Perfect in attendance for the yeai. — Nellie M. Sanger, Francis E. McKenna. 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 









3 












Jan. 1 to June 30, 
1886. 


• 
Teachers. 


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7.5 


93.7 


98.5 


1 


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XII 




35 


28.5 


22 


77.1 


9S 





3 


Sept. 1 to Dec. 31. 






XI.) 




8 


7 


6.5 


92.8 


97.8 


1 


3 


( 




2S 


26 


21 


87 


97 







XII.) 




12 



From January to June, not absent — Jo. Barme. 

From September to December, not absent — Ewen Cameron. 



139 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1 to 
June 3U, 

1886. 



Classes. 



V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XL 

XLI. 

XII. 

Sept. 1 to 

Dec.31. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XII. 



Teachers. 



E. W. Cross 

and 
L. D. Bunker. . . 
J. E. Donovan. . 
H. E. Tower.... 
M. ft. Bertram. . 

E. F. Brown 

M. V. Rooney . . 
E. H. Sears 

E. W. Cross.... 

ami 
L. fte Senancoui' 
J. ft. Donovan.. 
H. E. Tower.... 
M. E. Bertram.. 
E. F. Brown... 
M. V. Rooney... 
E. H. Sears 



10 

14.7 

21.2 

35 

35 

41 

41.4 

53.5 

50.9 



10.3 

14.2 

25.3 

31.2 

37.G 

46 

43.2 

61.5 

58.7 



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9.7 


97 


13.1 


89 


19 


S9.6 


32.2 


92 


30 


85.7 


35 


85 


36.3 


87.6 


46.4 


S6.7 


45.2 


88.8 


9.4 


91.2 


13.4 


94.3 


23. S 


94 


28.4 


91 


33 


87.7 


42 


91.3 


37.2 


86.5 


54.4 


85.2 


51.9 


S8.4 



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100 
99.7 
99 
98.2 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99.9 



99.5 

99.7 

99 5 

99.2 

99 

99 

99 

99 

99. 



Perfect iu attendance from January 1 to June 30, 1886. — Frank Austin, Dannie 
Quinn, George Lynch, Katie Broderick, Maggie Flaherty, Bertie Austin, Thomas 
Quinn, Emery Desilets, Joseph Broderick, Patrick Cogan, Lawrence Broderick. 

Perfect in attandance from September 1 to December 31, 1886. — Joseph Broderick, 
Mary Burke, John Daley, Freddie Wood, James Burns, John White, Minnie Hoefling, 
George Lynch, Willie O'Connell, Thomas Cogan, Katie Broderick, John Hickey, 
Frank Lynch, John Hourhan, Maggie Flaherty, George Brady, Robert Burns, Martin 
Jordan, Patrick Cogan, Lawrence Broderick. 

Perfect in attendance for the year. — Katie Broderick, Joseph Broderick, Lawrence 
Broderick, Patrick Cogan, Maggie Flaherty, George Lynch. 

Master Joseph Broderick has not been absent or tardy since he first entered the 
school in the 12th class. He is now a member of the 8th class. 



140 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1 to 
June 30, 

1886. 
Classes. 



V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XL 

XII. 

Sept. 1 to 

Dee. 31. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

xi r. 



TEACHERS. 



D. G. Thompson. 
IV. G. Thompson. 



16 
29 

JVI. P. Perry'. 38 

A. L. Dodae , 

E. M. Farnsworth . 

S. A. Kemiek 

15. D. Curtis -. ... 

L. Alger 



I). G. Thompson 26 

D. G. Thorn oson 32 

M, F. Perry 45 

A. L. Dodge 61 

E. M. Farnsworth ... 61 
8. A. R. nvili 51 

R. D, Curtis I 41 

L.Alger I 50 









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14.6 


13.6 


93.1 


98.4 


1 


27 


25 6 


94.8 


5 9.7 


4 


3ti.3 


32.9 


90.6 


98.3 


4 


45 


43 


95.6 


99 


4 


55.9 


51.2 


91.6 


99.1 


5 


5o 


51 


93 


99 


4 


39.S 


33.3 


83 


99 





46 


3S 


83 


98 


1 


24.8 


23 2 


93.5 


99.4 


6 


31.7 


29.0 


93.4 


99.3 


4 


42.2 


40 Jj 


95.9 


99 


4 


58 


5+' 


93 


99 5 


9 


56.7 


53,3 


93.4 


99.8 


4 


47 


45 


95 


99 


6 


36.9 


30,5 


82 


99 


3 


44 


35 


80 


99 






Perfect in attendance from January 1 to July 1, 1886. — Alice Williams, Clara 
Pressy, Grace Brostrom, George Reynolds, Clara Wilson, Berthilde Joubert, John 
Towle, Cora Lincoln, Warren Reynolds, Gilbert Balkam. 

Perfect in attendance from September 1 to December 31, 1886. — Harry Bent, Leon 
Pratt, Charlie Coveney, Albert Curtis, Fred Dyer, Henry Higgins, Ralph Balkam, 
Dovglass Keilson, Clark Waters, Edgar ftlcDuffee. Herbert Clogsion, Walter Gage 
Frans Goss, Ella Williams, Freddie Annis, Harold Bradley, Willie Kendall, Ida 
Beaty, Florence Arentzen, John Gidney, Allie Wilson, Carlton Cameron, Maud Fen- 
nell, Gertie Waters. 

Perfect in attendance during the year. — Alida Arentzen, Willie Arentzen, Henry 
Holzer, Sarah Ingersoll, Eugene Slocomb, Hattie Williams, Hai-ry Willard, Walter 
Corbett, Henry Barme, Winnie Coveney, Fred Granger. 



Hi 



GREW SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1 to 

June 30, 

1886. 



V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

VIII. IX. 

X. 

X. XI. 

XI. 

xn. 

XII. 
Sept. 6 lo 
Dec. 31. 
1S8(5. 
V. 
VI. 
VII. 
VIII 
VIII. IX. 
IX. 
X. 
X.XI. 
XI. 

K.n. 

xu. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



Frank H. Dean 

Hattie M. Darling t 

Mary A. Wins low 

t Lucina Dun bar , Harriet Fos- 
( ter and Alma Stone. 

Annie M. Clarke 

Janet Soiile 

Fannie E. Harlow 

Agnes J. Campbell 

Genevieve Brainard 

Mary K. Rogers 

Leila Perr> , 

FrankH. Demi 

Maty A. Winslow 

Harrli- 1 Foster 

Clara M. Colcord 

Hattie 'I. Darling 

Annie M. Clarke 

Fannie E. Harlow 

Agnes .1 Campbell 

Genevieve Brainard 

Maw E Rogers 

Bertha E. Messer 





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26 


26 


25 


96 


34 


33 


31 


91 


55 


54 


48 


89 


68 


60 


55 


93 


54 


53 


51 


96 


56 


51 


48 


94 


46 


43 


3q 


90 


4q 


43 


38 


89 


48 


45 


3S 


85 


68 


50 


44 


88 


68 


52 


45 


S3 


33 


30 


28 


94 i 


50 


48 


45 


90 


56 


56 


51 


91 


53 


49 


47 


96 


58 


54 


51 


95 


54 


52 


50 


95 


55 


50 


45 


90 


52 


49 


45 


90 


48 


42 


38 


90 


60 


57 


49 


86 


61 


53 


47 


88 



99 

97 
<9 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 
99 



29 
20 

47 
38 
44 
42 

40 

35 

36 
30 
25 



Perfect in attendance from January 1 to June 30, 1886. — Bessie Bleakie, Edith 
Farnsworth, Edward Hall, Lillie Harlow, Susie Henchman, William Higbee, Irving 
Humphrey, August Swanstrom, Perley Taylor, Joseph Rooney, Josie Bleakie, Esther 
Cotter, Adolf Edenborg, Alice Fowler, Henry Hill, Clarence Malcolm, Alice Rooney 
John Sweeney, Mark Taylor, Harry Tuttle, Charles Higbee, Annie Olsen, Nettie 
Farnsworth, Lulu Wood, George Whittier, Edith Higbee, Lillie Richardson, Mamie 
Knight. 

Perfect in attendance, from September 6 to December 31, 1886. — Arthur Gorman, 
Willliam Higbee, Mabel Snow, Hai'ry Vose, Grace Brown, Stanley Cowperthwait, 
Adolt Edenborg, Maud Ford, Harry Higbee, Lizzie Small, Willie Small, Mamie Tacey, 
Josephine French, Joseph Rooney, George Howe, Marcus Alexander, John Downey, 
Mark Taylor, Clarence Malcomb, Alma Cran, Mary Rooney, Earle Cochran, Arthur 
Shaw, Louisa Turlene, Cora Amback, Alice Rogers, Walter Buchan, Daniel Ford, 
Frank McCormick, Perley Taylor, Florence Huxtable, Charles Higbee, Annie Olson, 
Nora Quealey, Laura Rollins, John Shea, Nellie Somes, George Whittier, Edith Higbee 
John Capron, Orin Corson, Charles Scrivcns, George Walter. 

Perfect in attendance for the year. — William Higbee, Adolf Edenborg, Mark Taylor, 
Perley Taylor, Annie Olsen, Clarence Malcomb, Charles Higbee, Edith Higbee, George 
Whittier. 



I 4 2 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 



Jan. 1 to 
June 30, 

1860. 



Classes. 



V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XII. 

Sept. 1, to 

Dec. 31, 'SO. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XII. 



Teachers. 



Henry F. Howard. . . 

Helen P. (leaves 

Mary C. Howard 

Minnie I. Coggeshall. 
Matilda H. P. Cushim 
Hattie P. Packard. . . 
Jennie S. Hammond. 

Hel«n A. Perry 

Marion S. Piper 

Henry F. Howard . . . 

Helen P. Cleaves 

Mary C. Howard 

Minnie I. < oggeshal. 
Matilda H. P. Cushin: 
Harriet F. Packard. 
Jennie S. Hammond. 

Helen A. Perry 

Marion S. Piper 



15 
39 

4S 
44 
50 
47 
39 
57 
43 



® -2 



21.1 
2S.4 
38.5 
42.0 
43.3 
44.4 
44.5 
50.8 
30.1 



15 

38.5 

40.3 

41.7 

40.2 

42.0 

35.1 

47.8 



19.9 
26.7 
30.0 
38.9 
39.9 
39.4 
40.4 
46.0 
28.7 



14.5 
35.8 
J3.7 
38.6 
42.6 
39.2 
32.2 
41.0 
32.5 



Ph ce 



94.3 
94.0 
93.5 
92.6 
92.1 
88.7 
90.7 
80.9 
95.3 



96.6 
93.2 
94.4 
92.5 
92.2 
93.3 
91.7 
85.7 
&5.0 







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6 




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97.8 


4 


98.2 


5 


99.3 


3 


99.2 


3 


98.3 


1 


98.4 





99.0 


2 


99.0 





98.5 


1 1 


98.9 


7 


99.2 


8 


99.2 


3 


99. S 


9 


98.0 


3 


99.0 


11 


98.0 





99.0 


2 


98.5 






Perfect in attendance from January I to June 30, 1886. — Ethel Barker, Clernniie 
Dubey, Perley Blodgett, Maud Trotter, Henry KUbourn, .lessie Swinton, Joseph 
Andrews, Ada Barker, Charles Hunter, Eva Barker, Lawrence Peck, Annie Jones, 
Harold Mason. 

Perfect in attendance from September 1 to December 31, 18S6. •- Eva Barker, Harry 
Hay ward, Joseph Andrews, Fred Whipple, Maud Trotter, Lewis Wells, Mabel Fall, 
Andrew Richardson, Mary Evans, Clemmie Dubey, Samuel Badger, Rolfe Ellis, Ada 
Barker, Grace Perry, Elveira Bloom, Harold Mason, George Peabody, Lou Ella 
liamblin, Mary Corbett, Selwyn Hardy, Clement Tower, Annie Jones, Gertie Savage, 
Lulu Coan, Edgar Wood, Annie Scott, Bertha Robinson. 

Perfect in attendance for the year. — Eva Barker, Ada Barker, Clemmie Dubey, 
Harold Mason, Joseph Andrews, Annie Jones. 



INDEX 



PAGE 

Applican ts for aid 43 

Appropriation for the current year 72 

Assessors, Report of 41 

Auditor's certificate 74 

Births 19 

Board of Health , Report of 27 

By-laws 75 

Collector of Taxes (George Sanford), Report of 69 

Deaths 23 

Debt of Town 72 

Educ ational Statistics 138 

Engineers, Report of 36 

Expenditures, Detailed statement of 46 

' • for the current year 62 

Fire Department 62 

" " List of officers 40 

Fires, List of 39 

Fuel and Janitors (Schools) 48 

Highways, Selectmen's report of 11 

" Expenditures on 58 

Incidentals, Expenditures for 56 

Marriages 19 

Massachusetts School Fund, Expenditures from Income of 49 

Officers, List of Town 3 

Overseers of Poor, Report of 42 

Persons aided by Town, List of 42 

Police, Expenditures for 64 

Police Report 34 

Poor, Expenditures on account of 60 

Public Library, Expenses of 55 

" " Report of Treasurer of 33 

" " " Trusteesof 29 

Salaries of Town Officers 67 

Schools (Teachers' Salaries) 46 

School Committee, Report of 113 

School Incidental Expenses 51 

Selectmen, Report of 5 

Sinking Fund, Report of Commissioners of 73 

Street Lights 60 

Superintendent of Schools, Salary of > 46 

" " Report of 118 

Taxation, rate of 41 

Tax Payers, List of Resident 85 

" " Non-Resident , 103 

Town Clerk, Report of 19 

Town Treasurer, Report of 70