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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures : with report of the selectmen and other town officers"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS, 



Year Ending January 31, 1895. 




HYDE PARK: 

NORFOLK COUNTY GAZETTE JOB PRINT. 

1895. 



TWENTY-SEVENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 

AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS, 



FOR THE 



Year Ending January 31, 1895, 




>5&£4Jl££" 



HYDE PARK: 

NORFOLK COUNTY GAZETTE JOB PRINT. 

1895. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 

For the Year Ending March 4, 1895. 



SELECTMEN AND SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS : 

AMOS H. BRALNARD, SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT. 

GEORGE E. WHITING, GEORGE MILES, 

THOMAS S. WATERS. 



ASSESSORS : 

RANDOLPH P. MOSELEY, GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 

CHARLES F. MORRISON. 



TOWN CLERK: 

HENRY B. TERRRY. 



TOWN TREASURER: 

HENRY S. BUNTON. 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR: 



JOHN TERRY 
GEORGE E. HAVEN 
CHARLES LEWIS . 



term expires 1895. 
term expires 1896. 
term expires 1897. 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 

JOHN C. LINCOLN, EDWIN C. FARWELL, 

ALVIN D. HOLMES. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES: 

GEORGE SANFORD. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE: 



LOUISE M. WOOD 
JOSHUA F. LEWIS 
CHARLES G. CHICK 
HELEN M. DEAN 
RICHARD M. JOHNSON 
AUGUSTA L. HANCHETT 



term expires 1895. 
term expires 1895. 
term expires 1896. 
term expires 1896. 
term expires 1897. 
term exDires 1897. 



AUDITORS : 

WALLACE D. LOVELL, ASA J. ADAMS, 

WALLACE M. RHODES. 

(3) 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC LIBRARY : 



G. FRED GRIDLEY 
EDMUND DAVIS . 
FREDERICK N. TIRRELL 
EDWARD S. HAYVVARD 
HENRY B. MINER 
JAMES R. CORTHELL 
AMOS H. BRAINARD . 
CHARLES F. JENNEY 
DAVID C. MARR . 



CHARLES E. JENNEY, WILLIAM W. SCOTT, 

DANIEL O'CONNELL, JEREMIAH CORBETT, 

SAMUEL P. SMITH, ANDREW L. SHERMAN, 

GEORGE E. ANDERSON, HENRY K. CHAPMAN, 

JAMES McKAY. 







term 


expires 


1895 






terra 


expires 


1895 






term 


expires 


1895 






term 


expires 


1896 






term 


expires 


1896 






term 


expires 


1896 






term 


expires 


1897 






term 


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1897 






term 


expires 


1897 


ONSTA 


BLES : 







FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

FREDERICK A. SWEET 
WILLIAM HOLTHAM 
FREDERICK T. GREENLOW 



. Chief Engineer. 
Assistant Engineers. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS : 

WILBUR H. POWERS, JOHN B. BACHELDER, (deceased), 

JOHN J. ENNEKING. 

LAWSON B. BIDWELL, (to fill vacancy.) 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Fellow Citizens of Hyde Park ; 

Your Board of Selectmen chosen to administer the affairs 
of the town for the year just closed herewith presents its re- 
port for your consideration. 

We have endeavored in all respects to carry out the line 
of policy settled six years ago by an overwhelming public 
sentiment. This policy being to avoid increasing the pub- 
lic debt ; to reduce as rapidly as possible existing liabilities 
with their corresponding interest ; to devise and carry out 
a definite plan for the improvement of the town ways, both 
streets and sidewalks. 

The town policy as interpreted by the successive Boards 
from the time mentioned, has been on the one hand to avoid 
any large expenditures which would increase the rate of tax- 
ation, and on the other hand to procure for the Town those 
modern conveniences and comforts possessed by the leading 
cities but often lacking in towns ; such as well built and well 
kept roads, good sidewalks, good street lights, &c. In brief 
a systematic, progressive, far sighted policy combined with 
a "wise economy." 

The street lights were of course in use previously, but 
these have been extended to cover the town more perfectly 
to meet the wants of an increasing population. 

HIGHWAYS. 

Within the past few years a general movement has been 
in progress throughout the country, looking towards better 
roads and sidewalks. 

This movement, in connection with more and heavier trav- 
el, and the growing scarcity of suitable gravel in town, led 

(5) 



6 

the Selectmen of six years ago to procure a Stone Crushing 
Apparatus, and to lease a suitable ledge of rock. 

The experiment proved an immediate success, and streets 
are now built which will stand for many years with few or 
no repairs. 

A Steam Roller was desired to supplement the Stone 
Crusher, but pressing calls in other directions deferred its 
purchase until the present financial year, when the Town 
made an appropriation for this purpose, and the Board was 
enabled to purchase one at a very low price. Two Steam 
Road Rollei' Builders volunteered to exhibit their machines 
in actual service, and Business street, being nearest the 
ledge, and badly in need of repairs, was selected as the scene 
of operations, one roller being placed at each end, and the 
entire street reconstructed. 

An object lesson in modern road building in Hyde Park 
was thus for the first time afforded the Selectmen, and a 
large number of interested citizens. Both machines per- 
formed their work so admirably that after an extended test 
the Board was for a time in doubt which to select, finally 
however deciding upon that made by the O. S. Kelly Co. of 
Springfield, Ohio, which was considerably heavier than the 
other made by the Harrisburg Foundry & Machine Co., of 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

As in the case of the Stone Crusher, the purchase of a 
Steam Road Roller has proved a valuable investment, and 
after using it for the season we are satisfied that the town 
could hardly have made an expenditure which would yield 
better returns than by the purchase of this machine. 

Pierce street has in the past given much trouble, being in 
places wet and spring}", and was in such condition that it 
was necessary to dig out some parts of it to a depth of 18 
inches and to fill with crushed stone. Drains of loose stones 
were also put in to carry off the flow of water, and the whole- 
street was put in good order. 



Central avenue from West Eiver street to Webster street 
has had a covering of crushed stone, carefully rolled. 

Beacon street from the Milton line has been thoroughly 
built to Metropolitan avenue. Much of this street was but 
little better than a bog, and required to be dug out to an av- 
erage depth of about two feet, the loam or mud being re- 
placed by broken stone, and as in the case of Pierce street, 
suitable Drovision was made for drainage. The town of Mil- 
ton at considerable expense, had built its part of the street 
to the Hyde Park line, and as several building contracts 
(amounting as we were told, to over $20,000,) awaited the 
action of the Selectmen, it was deemed judicious to make 
this improvement, though the expense was considerable. 
Riverside square has also received much needed attention. 

Much other needed work has been done on the highways 
of less extended character, and the utmost pains have been 
taken to have all the town ways kept up to the highest stand- 
ard, so far as the available means would warrant. 

LEDGE. 

The town in the past has been fortunate in leasing at a 
nominal price from the heirs of Geo. Hail, a ledge located 
near Brainard street and Glenwood avenue, of excellent stone 
with ample ground room for the operation of the Crushing 
Apparatus. 

It was anticipated that this and neighboring ledges would 
afford the town aU the stone required for the building and 
repairing the streets for many years to come. The Metro- 
politan Park Commissioners have, however, taken this and 
the other ledges. It will therefore be necessary the coming 
year to make other arrangements, and to buy or lease a 
ledge in some other locality. 

STONE CRUSHER. 

Since the present apparatus was purchased, valuable im- 
provements have been made in this class of machinery, and 



it might prove true economy to dispose of the present crush- 
er and purchase one of later design, with facilities for de- 
livering ;the crushed stone of different sizes into bins, from 
which it can be drawn out to fill stone teams as they are 
driven under them. 

It is ^quite probable that the present plant could be dis- 
posed]of to the Park Commissioners, it being all ready in 
position and located where they will need stone for their 
extensive improvements, and the matter may be arranged 
to the mutual advantage of both parties, should the town 
decide to sell, and to purchase a new crushing plant. 

SIDEWALKS. 

These have caused past Boards considerable trouble, es- 
pecially in the absence of a sidewalk appropriation. Where 
curbstones only have been desired the town has usually set 
them without cost when citizens have paid for the stone. 
This rule has been modified, and now the town furnishes 
curbing, and also makes either a gravel or concrete sidewalk 
when the abuttors agree to waive all claims for damages, 
and to pay within thirty days after completion, one half the 
total cost. This rule of course presupposes that there are 
funds available and that the season is not too far advanced. 

The town has usually voted that the betterments thus 
paid shall go back into the Highway appropriation, but at 
the last annual appropriation meeting this vote was changed, 
making all money received from any betterments applicable 
to sidewalks only. This seems to us unwise action, taking 
as it does money from the Permanent Improvement appro- 
priation to make sidewalks, and then preventing the bet- 
terment money from going back to the appropriation from 
which it was taken. 

A larger amount of sidewalk building than usual has been 
done. 

There has been laid : — 



In Summer street, 1133.42 square yards of concrete, 729.25 feet 
of straight curbing and 12 corners. 

On Hyde Park avenue, 893.70 square yards of concrete, 743.70 
feet of straight curbing, 70.45 feet curved curbing and 22 corners. 

On Davison street, 108.67 square yards of concrete, 280.59 feet of 
straight curbing and 4 corners. 

OnFairmount avenue, 73.33 square yards of concrete, 85.23 feet of 
straight curbing and 2 corners. 

On Walter street, 76.85 feet of straight curbing. 

On Westminster street, 40 28 square yards of concrete, 44 8 feet of 
curved curbing. 

On Greenwood avenue, 77. 63 square yards of concrete, 4 feet of 
straight and 57.5 feet of curved curbing. 

On some other streets small amounts of sidewalk have 
been built, all under petitions from the abuttors who as- 
umed one half of the cost of such construction, and which 
have very materially added to the appearance of those streets, 
as well as to the list of Permanent Improvements of the 
town. 

In the Readville district a large amount of excellent grav- 
el having been offered the town free of cost, the opportunity 
was improved to repair a very considerable extent of side- 
walks on Readville and Damon streets, a portion of Central 
Park avenue was re-rolled and Damon street repaired. 

As always, a large amount of highway work awaits im- 
proving or rebuilding. Metropolitan avenue between East 
River street and Riverside square remains unfinished, and 
will require blasting to an average depth of about three feet 
through solid ledge. There is little or no travel over this 
part of the avenue, but the decree of the County Commis- 
sioners still requires its completion. There is also a liabili- 
ty to accidents, which might involve a cost to the town of 
far more than the amount necessary to complete this part of 
the avenue, which it is estimated will cost $1500 ; other parts 
of Metropolitan avenue also need considerable work done to 
bring it up to grade. 

Warren avenue has been accepted by the town, but no ap- 



10 

propriia.ti.on has ever been made for building it. As this av- 
enue was unsafe for public travel at the time of its accept- 
ance, the Board has done what was necessary to make it 
safe, but in the absence of an appropriation were unable to- 
properly build it. 

Hyde Park avenue from Westminster street to Post Office 
square has given rise to more thought and worriment to the 
present and preceeding Boards of Selectmen than probably 
any other piece of highway in the town, from the fact that 
for a length of 800 feet there is a fall of but six inches to the 
hundred teet, which is utterly insufficient to drain the street. 
It seems impossible to cut it down to a proper grade, as heavy 
damages would result. We think the only solution of the 
difficulty would be to sink a large pipe the entire length 
upon one side of the street with suitable catch basins, and 
with connections from the opposite side of the street. To 
do this properly would cost at least $2000. 

From the junction of Hyde Park avenue and Central Park 
avenue, and thence to a point in Readville above the Morris 
Safe works, the grades and bounds are indefinite, and the mat- 
ter is now on application of the Board, in the hands of the 
County Commissioners. Meanwhile, though large amounts 
have in preceeding years been spent upon Central Park 
avenue, it is still in bad condition and scarcely safe. After 
the grades and bounds are properly defined nearly the whole 
avenue should be completely rebuilt and macadamized. 

The condition ot these two avenues, involving a stretch 
of road nearly two and a half miles long, and about to be 
traversed by the tracks of the Norfolk Suburban Street 
Railroad Co., seemed to the Selectmen so important, that 
advantage was taken of a town meeting, called for another 
purpose, to bring the matter before the town for consulta- 
tion. The Selectmen simply stated the case, but declined 
to ask for an appropriation. The town, after some discus- 
sion, decided to let the matter lie over. 



11 

The Board sold a considerable amount of road material 
to the Norfolk Suburban Street Railroad Co., and also sold 
at its original cost, a lot of gravel land on Dana Ave., fronx 
which all the available gravel had been removed ; as also 
a small lot of land on Thatcher St. It becoming necessary 
to buy gravel in other localities, they asked that this money, 
amounting in all to about $1,500, might be transferred to 
the highway appropriation, which was done, and this addi- 
tion proved ample to complete all the necessary work con- 
templated for the financial year. 

ACTIONS AT LAW. 

In the case of Sarah S. Fuller, of Boston, against the 
town, the jury rendered a verdict in behalf of Mrs. Fuller 
in $3,633.33, debt or damage at the October sitting of the 
Superior Court, 1893. The exceptions taken in behalf of 
the town were argued at the March sitting of the Supreme 
Judicial Court. On the following July, that Court over- 
ruled the exceptions, and thereupon judgment was entered 
upon the verdict of the jury, which, with the plaintiff's tax- 
able costs and interest to that date, amounted to $3,962.74. 

The suit by William H. Ruddick against the town, in 
which the plaintiff claimed $1,500 damages in consequence 
of certain injuries received by the plaintiff near the junc- 
tion of River street and Wood avenue, which suit has been 
pending for about two years in the Superior Court, has 
been disposed of in the town's favor. 

The case of- Nancy Bohannon, in which the plaintiff sought 
to recover $4,000, pending in the Superior Court, Suffolk 
County, and described in the last annual report, was trans- 
ferred to Norfolk County, and was tried at the October sit- 
ting of that Court, and a verdict rendered against the town 
in the sum of $500, debt or damage, which, with plaintiff's 
taxable costs amounted to $551.27. 

For a fuller description of the suits hereinbefore described,. 



12 

reference may be had to the two preceeding annual reports. 

A suit was brought against the town in the Superior 
Court, Norfolk County, by John Haney, in which the plain- 
tiff claimed $8,000 for injuries sustained as alleged in his 
declaration, and claimed by him to be on account of the 
defective condition of the engine used in connection with 
the stone crusher, iu November, 1892. The town denied 
that there was any defect in the engine, or in anything con- 
nected with the stone crusher. This case was set for trial 
for the present January sitting of the Superior Court, but 
after conferences by the respective counsel, the Board 
authorized the town's attorney to settle the suit without 
trial, for $420. 

Lomelia A. Bickford, Aclmx. of the estate of Levi P. 
Bickforcl on the 27th of December, 1894, brought an action 
against the town to recover $204.47, with interest on the 
same, for cash which the plaintiff claimed was paid by mis- 
take for taxes during the lifetime of the said Levi P. Bick- 
ford. The suit is made returnable to the Superior Court, 
Norfolk County, on the first Monday of February of the 
present year. 

The Commissioners of the Metropolitan Park District, 
in May of last year, brought a petition in the Supreme Ju- 
dicial Court, praying to have three commissioners appointed 
to determine how the expense incurred in connection with 
the park and boulevard system of that district should be 
apportioned among the different cities and towns within the 
district. At a hearing to determine how commissioners 
should be appointed, every city and town in the district 
was represented. After conferences between the counsel 
representing the different cities and towns, and hearings 
before the Court, Hons. Geo. F. Richardson, of Lowell, 
Clhas. W. Clifford, of New Bedford, and Hiram P. Harri- 
man, of Wellfleet, were appointed by the Court as com- 
missioners to determine how the amount of expense incurred 



13 

and to be incurred in connection with the park and boule- 
vard system, shall be apportioned between the different 
cities and towns in the district. This is a subject of impor- 
tance to Hyde Park, as well as to other municipalities in the 
district. Various hearings, have been held before the com- 
missioners thus appointed, and the case now stands contin- 
ued until the third of May next, for further consideration. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

At the last annual meeting the Selectmen were authorized 
to contract with the Hyde Park Water Company, for addi- 
tional hydrants in accordance with the recommendation of 
of the Fire Engineers. After consultation and correspon- 
dence with the officers of the Company, we found that no 
additional hydrants would be furnished except at the origi- 
nal price named in the contract now in force, viz : $50 per 
hydrant. We did not deem it best to contract for the extra 
hydrants at that price, and the appropriation for that pur- 
pose being insufficient, the matter was dropped. 

Fortunately the year has been free from large conflagra- 
tions, and the absence of the extra hydrants has not been 
severely felt. We believe, however, that these extra 
hydrants should be provided to protect the property of citi- 
zens whose buildings and improvements in those localities 
have added very materially to the taxable property of the 
town. It is to these same localities that the town must look 
for a large part of its future growth, and the corresponding 
increase in real estate values. 

The report of the Engineers will be found on another 
page. 

STREET RAILROAD. 

The Norfolk Suburban Street Railway Company began to 
operate its cars over the Dedham and Mattapan line on 
May 21st, 1894. Owing to changes of construction required 



14 

by this Board in the Summer, it was impossible for the Com- 
pany to complete the Keadville and Forest Hills line, within 
the time allowed, and a further extension of two months 
was granted. The cars began running regularly over this 
line, September 14, 1894, since which time the service has 
been uninterrupted. 

Your Board has been convinced that considerable extra 
expense will be entailed upon the town in the matter of 
maintaining in good condition, the streets through which 
these cars run. but it is quite probable that the public con- 
venience will be served to such an extent, as to more than 
offset this additional expense. 

POLICE. 

Early in the year Mr. Chas. E. Jenney, who had served 
the town for many years as Chief of Police, resigned his 
office, and Mr. James McKay was appointed to the posi- 
tion for a term of three months. His services during this 
term proved so acceptable that at its close he was unani- 
mously elected to the office for the balance of the year. 
Mr. McKay has proved himself a careful, wise and ener- 
getic officer, and his administration of the office has been 
entirely satisfactory. 

The increase of appropriation for this department has en- 
abled the Board to call upon any desired number of special 
police, for any special duty, the special police receiving no 
salary except when actually on duty. 

Further particulars of this department will be found in 
the report of its Chief. 

DRUGGISTS LICENSES. 

The Board decided this year to grant 6th class liquor 
licenses to all the druggists who applied, and to put them 
all under the immediate supervision of the Chief of Police, 
who was instructed to report every month to the Board, the 



15 

entire number of sales by each druggist. He was also in- 
structed to notify each holder of a license, that any known 
violation of its provisions, would result in its cancellation. 
Under this plan sales have decreased, and no complaint 
from any quarter has been heard. Active efforts have also 
been made to stop the illegal selling of intoxicating liquors, 
and it is believed with a good degree of success. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

For the guidance of the town we present in parallel col- 
umns the amounts voted at the last annual appropriation 
meeting, for the various departments, together with an 
estimate of the sums required for the present year. 

1894. 1895. 

Schools, $38,950 00 838.950 00 

Bonds and Notes, 7.500 00 7.000 00 

Interest, 3,500 00 3,000 00 

Public Library, 1,850 00 1,850 00 

Highways, Current Expenses, 4,000 00 7,000 00 

Highways, Permanent Improvements, 10,000 00 7,000 00 
Warren, Hyde Park and Central Park 

Avenues, 6,500 00 

Steam Boiler, 3,500 00 

Board of Health, 2,500 00 2,500 00 

Incidentals, - 7,100 00 7,100 00 

Salaries, 3,475 00 3,475 00 

Police, 5,500 00 6,500 00 

Support of Poor, 3,000 00 3,000 00 

Street Lights, 7,700 00 8,000 00 

Fire Department, 6,500 00 6,500 00 

Grand Army, 150 00 150 0C 

Fail-view Cemetery, 6,000 00 2,000 00 

Voted in 1893, payable in 1894, 3,500 00 

Voted in 1894, payable in 1895, . 4,514 01 



$114,725 00 $114,539 01 

It will be noted that for highways we have changed the 

relative amounts required* for Current Expenses and for 

Permanent Improvements. In the earlier years of the town, 



16 

$4,000 answered for patching the streets, cleaning out gut- 
ters, filling washouts and clearing snow, but with the addi- 
tion of some thirty or more streets, the vastly increased 
travel, the salary of the Supt. of Streets, and the expense 
of a horse and carriage for his use, it is evident that a much 
larger sum is needed for highway current expenses, than has 
usually been appropriated. Were the line between the two 
parts of the highway appropriation less shadowy, great in- 
convenience would have resulted. 

We think it wise for the town to settle just what it will 
undertake each year, in the way of Permanent Improve- 
ments, after appropriating the amount necessary for Current 
Expenses, which we estimate as above. 

We renew the recommendation of the previous year, that 
the proceeds of the corporation and national bank tax be 
appropriated for fire hydrant service. 

It may prove of interest to quote the rates of taxation for 
each year since the town was organized, as also the amount 
of the tax levy, and the total valuation. The table below 
furnishes this information. 



YEAR. 


VALUATION. 


TAX LEVY. 


RATE PER M, 


1868 


$2,913,657 


$30,302 04 


$10 40 


1869 


3.714,478 


45,253 94 


11 60 


1870 


4,857,214 


51,084 14 


10 00 


1871 


5,955,925 


66.210 08 


10 50 


1872 


7,329,527 


86,934 00 


11 40 


1873 


7,509,815 


97,506 68 


12 50 


1874 


7,069,323 


99,805 06 


13 66 2-3 


1875 


6,942,284 


86,521 42 


12 00 


1876 


6,545,767 


88.106 97 


13 00 


1877 


5,707,632 


85,766 29 


14 50 


1878 


4,674,871 


68,468 19 


14 00 


1879 


4,180,106 


66,903 61 


15 20 


1880 


4,123,490 


71,475 00 


16 50 


1881 


4,378,116 


75,034 14 


16 30 


1882 


4,597,771 


80,360 00 


16 80 


1883 


4,855,402 


81,546 43 


16 00 


1884 


5,059,613 


83,999 88 


15 80 



17 



1885 


5,202,085 


85,298 52 


15 60 


1886 


5,627,688 


91,425 16 


lb 50 


1887 


5,969 004 


95,803 76 


15 30' 


1888 


6,874,500 


113,579 10 


15 80 


1889 


7,120,543 


118,838 69 


16 00 


1890 


7,470,115 


121,439 79 


15 60' 


1891 


7,725,590 


117,841 11 


14 60' 


1892 


8,125,291 


127,101 37 


15 00 


1893 


8,320,215 


128,539 13 


14 80 


1894 


8,531,630 


130,361 79 


14 60' 



The Board in conclusion, congratulates the town on its 
present satisfactory financial condition. The bonded debt 
has now become reduced to $25,000, the last of which will 
be paid within three years, and $6,000 of this, on the Cem- 
etery Account, will be met by sales of lots, etc., leaving 
but $19,000 to be raised by taxation. The interest account, 
which in 1874 and 1875 exceeded $19,000 per year, was 
reduced last year to $3,500, and is now but about $1,000 
on the bonded debt, though each year a certain amount has 
to be paid by the treasurer, for money borrowed for current 
expenses in anticipation of taxes. The rate of taxation has 
gradually decreased since 1882, and the past year has seen 
the lowest rate for many years, excepting in 1891, when it 
was the same as now. 

Each year brings with it its own responsibilities and 
duties, and we bespeak tor our successors the same kind 
and courteous treatment which has been accorded to us, and 
which has in no small measure, lightened the burdens which 
must naturally devolve upon your public servants. 
Respectfully submitted, 

AMOS H. BRAINARD, 
SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT, 
GEORGE E. WHITING, 
GEORGE MILES, 
THOMAS S. WATERS, 

Selectmen of Hyde Park. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



BIRTHS. 

Number of births registered in Hyde Park in 1894 

Males 

Females 

The perentage of the children i 
Both parents American . 

Irish 

Scotch . 

English 



as follows : 



313 

166 
147 

116 

37 

6 

6 

9 



Swedes 

Russian 

Germans .... - 6 

Italian 

of British Provinces 25 

Mixed, one parent American 63 

Both parents of other nationalities ..... 32 
Born in January, 32; February, 30; March, 30 ; "April, 21; May, 
25 ; June, 21 ; July, 30 ; August, 26 ; September, 27 ; October, 26 ; 
November, 14; December, 31. 

MARRIAGES. 

Number of intentions of marriage issued in 1894 . . 113 

" *• marriages registered in 1894 .... Ill 

Oldest groom 73 

bride , 62 

Youngest groom . . , 20 

bride . 17 

Both parties born in United States 49 

'• " " " Ireland 8 

" " " England 1 

" " " Scotland 2 

" " " Sweden 4 

" " " Russia 1 

" " " British Provinces 6 

" " " other foreign countries ... 10 

Foreign and American 29 

(18) 



19 

Married in January, 8 ; February, 7 ; March, 5 ; April. 7 ; May, 5 ; 
June, 10; July, 12; August, 7; September, 10; October, 14; No- 
vember, 16; December, 9. 

The following are the names and residences ot the parties whose 
marriages were solemnized in 1894, certificates of which have been 
filed in this office : — 

Jan. 4. John A. Rosen and Jerda C Johnson, both of Hyde Fark. 
2. Benjamin Lipsky of Roston, and Bebecca Jackson of 
Hyde Park. 
" 1. Joseph P. Groves and Mary Feeney, both of Hyde Park. 
" 26. Edward P. MeKenna of vv oburn, and Mary E. Mungan 
of Hyde Park. 
18. John W. Galvin and Mary J. Daveny, both of Hyde Park. 
" 11. Frank G. Perkins of Newark, N. J., and Mary E. Pierce, 

of Hyde Park. 
" 16. John Appell and Sarah A. Winchenbaugh, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 5. Alexander Workman and Margaret Morrison, both of 
Hyde Park. 
Feb. 20. George B. May, Jr., and Cora L. Arnback, both of Hyde 
Park. 
14. Joseph VV. Chadsey and Louise Elliott, both of Hyde Park. 
" 5. Francis Mulligan and Isabella Welch, both of Hyde Park. 
" 21. Warren J. Adams and Cecelia B. Chamberlain, both of 
Hyde Park. 
17. John R. Wade of Hyde Park, and Helen M. Tarbell of 

Quincy. 
22. J. Herbert Day and Ruth A. Maxwell, both of Hyde Park. 
" 16. Ira W. Jonah and Cora M. Delano, both of Hyde Park. 
Mar. 7. John C. Halden of Hyde Park, and Edna R. White of Paw- 
tucket. R. I. > 
" 31. Charles Sodergren and Olivia Fredrickson, both of Hyde 
Park. 
28. Charles Weimer of Hyde Park, and Millie A. Russell of 
Dedham. 
" 22. Lewis S. B. Jefferds of Hyde Park, and Eva M. Bobbins, 

of Somerville. 
" 6. Edson D. Sawyer of Milton, and Amelia J.Johnson of 
Boston. 
April 18. John H. Stanney and Adelaide A. Quigley, both of Hyde 
Park. 
" 21. Oscar Lofgren and Erika Malm, both of Hyde Park. 



20 

April 10. William Wood of Boston, aad Nellie Cheesbro of Hyde 

Park. 
" 10. Martin J. Foley and Mary A. Dolan, both of Hyde Park. 
" 10. Charles J. Anderson of Boston, and Margaret G. Walsh of 

Hyde Park.* 
" 16. James C. Cox of Camden, N. J., and Elizabeth C. Fardy, 

of Hyde Park. 
" 12. Fred Bnrbidge and Ella Watson, both of Hyde Park. 
May 1. Frederick Hawley of Beverly, and Nellie G. Snow, of Hyde 

Park. 
" 29. Robert C. Johnson and Nellie P, Jenkins, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 27. Frank H. Baker of Hyde Park, and Alwilda M. LeCain of 

Kentville, N. S. 
" 31. Thomas Green of Hyde Park, and Mary T. Byrne of 

Boston. 
22. Joseph D. Wall and Mary Maloney, both of Hyde Park. 
June 5. Edward P. Grant and Annie M. Killeen, both of Hyde Park 
" 6. Thomas E. Jackson and Katherine Burns, both of Hyde 

Park. 
26. Daniel W.Paquette of Boston, aad Mary A. White of Hyde 

Park. 
'• 13. Harrie C. Farnsworth and Florence G. Page, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 14. James H. Emery and Flora McQuarrie, both of Hyde 

Park. 
,s 10. Patrick D. Collins of Hyde Park, and Margaret A. Collins 

of Brookline. 
" 27. Walter Ritchie of Hyde Park and Margaret E. Morgan of 

Boston. 
" 26. George A. Long of Hyde Park, and Ella F. Ellis of Nor- 
wood. 
" 7. Edward C. Tripp and Grace L, Hamblin, both of Hyde 

Park. 
6. William M. Thomas of Hyde Park, and Addie B. Carver 

of No. Haven, Me. 
July 4. George Chalmers and Elizabeth B. Ness, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 25. Isaac Wisansky of Boston, and Bessie Waterman of Hyde 

Park. 
" 6. Albert L. Barteaux of Boston, and Bessie L. Blenkhorn 

of Hvde Park. 



21 

July 26. John J. Kelley of Dedham, and Agnes F. Kavney of Hyde 
Park. 
1. David H. Cochran of Hyde Park, and Susie M. Wilson of 
Boston. 
" 22. Thomas F. McMahon of Hyde Park, and Mary A. McNa- 
mara of Brookline. 
22. Fred Bowles of Boston, and Albertha Blaisdell of Hyde 
Park. 
" 31. Wallace E. Cobb and Helen R. Cobbett, both of Dedham. 
" 4. William Egan and Josephine McPhee, both of Hyde Park. 

16. David Walsh and Mary Warren, both of Hyde Park. 

" 3. Martin Ryan and Bridget Noonan, both of Hyde Park. 

17. George P. Dennis of Taunton, and Ada H. Hiltz of Hyde 

Park. 
Aug. 23. James Laughlin and Catherine Joyce, both of Hyde Park. 
" 22. Charles H. McMorrow of Boston, and Catherine B. Roon- 

ey of Hyde Park. 
" 14. John Crowley and Delia Trainor, both of Hyde Park. 
" 1. Thomas J. Clarey and Elizabeth A. Jennings, both of 

Hyde Park. 
" 6. Charles W. Killam and Amy E. Whittemore, both or 

Hyde Park. 
il 15. Louis H. Sargent of Hyde Park, and MaryE. Turnbull of 

Boston. 
" 29. Charles E. Roberts and Fannie F. Bird, both of Hyde 

Park. 
Sep. 2. William O. Seaward of Everett, and Rosaline Coleman of 

Hyde Park. 
" 12. Archibald Scotl and Annie T. Dyer, both of Hyde Park, 
" 3. Neil McFadyen and Selina McClenaghan, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 3. Robert Duckworth and Elzabeth A. Howarth, both of 

Hyde Park. 
29. Frank Page and Maud M. Rowell, both of Hyde Park. 
" 22. Lucius S. Haven and Sophronia N. Hardy, both of Hyde 

Park. 
4( 27. George H. McKenzie of Hyde Park, and Matilda Manning 

of Boston. 
J< 23. Harry Harris and Minnie Myers, both of Hyde Park. 
" 18. Hardy A. Moulton and Grace A. Wheeler, both of Boston. 
" 3. James F. Conley and Catherine F. Wallace, both of Hyde 

Park. 



22 

Oct. 7. George A. Canon and Lydia G. Capen, both of Milton. 
" 29. Sumner L. Osborne and Isabel Durell, both of Hyde Park. 
10. Herbert H. Wingfleld of Charlottesville, Va., and Mabel 

E. Piper of Hyde Park. 
" 17. Samuel Gray and Jennie Robertson, both of Hyde Park. 
" 15. Frank C. Rogers and Edith E. Dunham, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 17. Brotherton B. Barton and Maud A. Beatey, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 16. Samuel E. Goddard and Lizzie Cochran, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 27. Melville Whitten ot Hyde Park, and Annie Cannare of 

Dedham. 
" 3. Frank W. Howard and Mabel E. Besse, both of Hyde Park. 
18. Samuel A. Cranton and Florence E. Leighton, both of 
, Hyde Park. 
" 9. Alvah L. Stinson of Boston, and Florence E. Hamblin, of 

Hyde Park. 
" 31. Martin T. Lennon of Milton, and Katharine Hayes of 

Hyde Park. 
" 30. Thomas Flynn and Catherine Dalton, both of Hyde Park. 
" 4. David Halloran of Hyde Park, and Mary A. Murray of 

Boston. 
Nov. 29. Charles A. Hoffman of Milton, and Julia M.Recike of Hyde 

Park. 
" 21. Charles E. King of Dedham, and Lillie H. Barrows of 

Marlboro, N. H. 
" 24. Walter I. Webber and Lizzie S. Connor, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 14. Francis J. Googins of Hyde Park, and Gertrude A. Gray 

of Chelsea. 
" 28. Walter W. Hentz of Hyde Park 4 and Louisa E. Hecker of 

Boston. 
" 28. Elmer Mooers of Hyde Park, and Jennie Raftrey of 

Boston. 

27. Wallace Wilson of Hyde Park, and Eleanor R. Buswell of 

Oakland, Cal. 

28. George J. Meade and Mary F. Quinlan, both of Hyde 

Park. 

29. Joseph B. Clarke of Pawtucket, R. I., and Mary A. Bag- 

well of Hyde Park. 
29. John J. Battle and Mary F. McGuire, both of Hyde Park. 



23 

Nov. 23. William J. Kennedy and Sarah Chisholm, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 29. Michael Barry and Nellie Duggan, both of Hyde Park. 
" 7. George L. Bragan of Hyde Park, and Martha J. Rogers of 

Cambridge. 
" 13. Charles Truelson and Catherine McCartin, both of Hyde 

Park. 
li 28. Horace E. Tupper and Catherine Shea, both of Hyde 

Park. 
13. Patrick Foley and Mary Cusick, both of Hyde Park. 
Dec. 13. Frederick A. Devlin and Mary A. Kennedy, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 24 Henry A. Vincent and Henrietta Wood, both of Hyde 

Park. 
24. Stewart T. Allen and Alice M. Towner, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 5. Frank H. Brewer and Jennie McLelian, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 31. Abbott L. Dill of Boston, and Louella Southwick of Hyde 

Park. 
" 31. William C. Delano and Anna C. Anderson, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 18. Eberhard Anderberg and Ingeborg Ohlson, both of Hyde 

Park. 
" 31. Wesley Carpenter and Mabel G. Gray, both of Hyde 

Park. 
•' 27. Lindley W. Morris of Toledo, Ohio, and Fannie May 

Darling of Hyde Park. 

DEATHS. 
Number of deaths in Hyde Park, and of residents of this town who 

died elsewhere in this Commonwealth In 1894 . . 192 

Males 85 

Females 107 

Born in the United States 143 

Ireland 23 

" British Provinces 11 

Scotland 2 

" England 4 

" Germany 3 

Italy 1 

" Sweden 1 



24 



" India . . 

Isle of Malta . . , 
Birthplace unknown 

AGES. 

Stillborn 

Under one year .... 

Between 1 and 5 years 
5 " 10 

" 10 " 20 

" 20 " 30 

" 30 " 40 

" 40 " 50 

" 50 " 60 

" 60 " 70 

" 70 "80 . . . . 

" 80 " 90 



17 

46 

12 

3 

6 

13 
14 
13 
14 
25 
14 
14 



CAUSES OF DEATH. 



Accident .... 


4 


Meningitis 


9 


Consumption, pneumonia 




Heart disease . 


12 


or other lung diseases 


38 


Typhoid fever . 


3 


Cholera infantum or other 




Paralysis and apoplexy 


10 


bowel diseases 


10 


Stillborn . 


17 


Diptheria .... 


2 


Old age . 


7 


Throat diseases (other than 




Bright's disease 


3 


diptheria) . 


4 


Inanition . 


8 


Cancer and tumor 


8 


Convulsions 


5 


Marasmus 


3 


Various other diseases 


49 



25 



The following are the names of those who died in Hyde Park 
and of residents of Hyde Park who died elsewhere, during the year 
1894. 



Jan. 



Feb. 



Mar. 



5 

5 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

12 

15 

17 

17 

19 

20 

22 

24 

25 

27 

25 

27 

30 

31 

31 

31 

Apr. 15 



Emma L. Williamson 

Sweeney 

John H. Ryan 

Jerome Mathewson... 

Melissa Crippen 

Sarah D. Pnelps 

Mary J. N. Tooker — 

Mary Keegan.- 

John W. Dempsey 

James F. O'Neal 

Peter Grant 

James Mather 

Delilah Crowell 

Vincent J. Kennedy.. 
William J. Gallagher. 

Gueriglia 

Rogers 

O'Keefe 

Annie M . Stevens 

Sarah E. Rich 

Mary J. Stark 

Amos Webster 

Hall 

Silas Howe 

Harriett Gilmartin 

Annie M. Wymer 

William Fenno 

Margaret Buckley 

McGrath 

Evelyn M. Stayner... 
Thomas McDonough. 

Nannie Gridley » 

Thomas Cleary 

Marv J. Halloran 

William M. Hall 

Charles S.Davis 

John Feeney 

Patrick J. O'Donnell.. 

Arvilla Holland 

Thomas Shea 

Patrick Cox 

Harry J. Loonev 

Hazel E.Edse..". 

Helen M. Gray 

Maria Kennedy 

Winifred Burk 

Ariadna S. Peterson.. 
Perkins E. Baldwin... 

Lester P. Jigger 

Mary Wallace 

Mary M. Goodspeed.. 

Thomas Hawkins 

Prudence Crane 

John S. Gunn 

Hoggins 



1-2 

12m 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



11 20 
6 28 



Cancer. 

Inanition. 

Pneumonia. 

Bright's disease. 

Paralysis. 

Cancer. 

Paralysis. 

Paralysis of heart. 

Multiple neuritis. 

Capillary bronchitis. 

Pneumonia. 

Heart disease and influenza. 

Heart disease. 

Pneumonia. 

Inanition. 

Inanition. 

Stillborn. 

Stillborn. 

Broncho pneumonia. 

Typhoid pneumonia. 

Pneumonia. 

Prostration. 

Umbilical hemorrhage. 

Consumption of the Bowels. 

Pneumonia. 

Consumption. 

Heart disease. 

Bronchitis. 

Stillborn. 

Inanition. - 

Typhoid fever and pnenm'a. 

Bright's disease. 

Fatal syncope. 

Convulsions. 

Apoplexy. 

Gangrene. 

Catarrhal pneumonia. 

Asphyxiation. 

Heart disease. 

Pneumonia. 

Pneumonia. 

Convulsions. 

Heart disease. 

Malignant disease. 

Intestinal nephritis. 

Catarrhal pneumonia. 

Lobar pneumonia. 

Suicide. 

Whooping cough. 

Phthisis. 

Cerebral Apoplexy. 

Chronic dementia. 

Old age. 

Cancer. 

Stillborn. 



26 
Deaths — Continued. 



Apr. 



May 



June 



July 



Hoggins 

Michael Ouilimane 

Harold Walker 

Welch 

Dorothy R Sim son 

Maud R. Millar 

Annie Wright 

John E. McAuliife 

John E. Drav.... 

Helie Gilbert 

William B.Hilton 

Willie S.Jonah 

Annie Rooney 

Sophia R. Putnam 

Ernst Kuehn 

Faith C. Hodsdon 

Walter Jordan 

Louisa Jalbert 

McN aught 

Sarah Heaps 

Elder E. Jonah 

Thomas W. Carroll 

Annie E. Hill 

Mary E. Mitchell 

Lilla E.Gray 

Michael Cullinane 

Annabella McMillan 

A ddicco Beatrice 

Clara H. Foster 

Chn'stena Corrigan 

Maud Walsh 

Eliza W. Carr 

Irena F. McKenna 

Bolles 

Harriet P. Caldwell 

Willism F. Dray 

Bridget A. Lyons 

Elizabeth O'Neil 

Harriet W. Chamberlain 

Lottie D. Smalling 

Frank D. George 

Jane F. Fennessy 

Mary E. Connick 

Harrold L. Howe 

Mildred O.Howe 

Bridget Estabrook 

Harry C. Foley 

Nellie C. Lowe 

Mary E. McDougald 

John R. Corbett 

Powers 

Jonathan L. Cilley 

Joseph W. Adams , 

Marion E.Hodges 

Edith M. Washburn 

Frederick C. Foster 

Maiy Bowlin 

Marv H\ Reid ... 

Howes 



43 



45 



21-2 
19 
27 
8 



10 

6 

10 

28 

9 

l-2h 

29 

12 
16 
22 



CAUSE OF DEATH. 



Stillborn. 
Trachealis. 
Meningitis. 
Stillborn. 
Heart disease. 
Pneumonia. 
Pneumonia. 
Tubercular meningitis. 
Phthisis. 

Accidental burning. 
Pulmonary oedema. 
Inanition. 

Disease of supra'l capsules* 
Consumption. 
Renal sclerosis. 
Sarcoma. 

Tubercular meningitis. 
Septicemia. 
Stillborn. 
Colitis. 
Inanition. 
Bronchitis. 
Phthisis 
Inanition. 
Oedemia. 
Cancer. 
Heart disease. 
Railroad accident. 
Ramolissement. 
Addison's disease. 
Phthisis. 

Nervous Prostration. 
Cerebro spinal meningitis*. 
Pulmonary hemonhage. 
Old age. 

Cholera morbus. 
Pul. phthisis. 
Hemorrhage. 
Paralysis. 

Pulmonary oedema- 
Meningitis. 
Cancer. 
Meningitis. 
Diphtheria. 
Diphtheria. 
Meningitis. 
Cholera infantum. 
Cholera infantum. 
Heart disease. 
Accidental drowning. 
Inanition. 

Old age and paraphlegia. 
Syncope. 
Convulsions. 
Cholera infantum. 
Cholera infantum. 
Bright's d sease. 
Cholera infantum. 
Stillborn. 



27 



Deaths — Continued. 



Cox 

Elizabeth Millet 

Dexter Sherman 

Elizabeth Jirard 

Wirth 

Herron 

Mary A. Kelleher 

Annie A. Fish. 

Fennessey 

Chauncey Conant 

Mary H. Gray 

Maria J. W holey 

Josephine B. Dyer, 

Howard S. Storer 

Syrena C. Oliver 

Horace 15. Reed 

Elizabeth A.Young... 

Mary Gadson 

Mary E. Mahoney.. . .. 

Bethia S.Haigb 

Catherine Bates 

Martin Riley 

M artin Flaherty 

George Bass 

Martha J. Dray 

Alice K. Kendall 

Gillis 

William G. Adams 

Robert W. Lincoln 

Bridget A. Donohoe... 

Scott 

Ellen C. Rosen 

Maud Boyer 

Chamberlain 

Sarah S. Humphrey 

Mary P. Sanborn 

Louisa May 

Thomas Ahern 

George J. Collins 

Hannah W. Merrill.... 

Mary Gannon 

Ellen V. Brady 

John J. Coyle 

James rf. Savage 

Emma V. Hedges 

Geneva J. F. Lucignan 

Ernest O. Olsson 

James S. Rooney 

Johanna S. Larson...., 

Annie M. Shanks , 

Kate Bowen , 

Fannie L. Gunn 

Flora L. McLeod 

Etta L. Rich , 

Edwin F.Bacon 

Robert E. Taylor 

Benjamin F. Radford. . . 

Albert G.Worden 

John Crowley 



so 



23 



NAME OF DISEASE. 



Stillborn. 

Entero collitis. 

Epithelioma. 

Cholera infantum. 

Stillborn. 

Stillborn. 

Heart disease 

Consumption. 

Stillborn. 

Old age. 

Convulsions. 

Pul. phthisis. 

Apoplexy. 

Stillborn. 

Senile diarrhoea. 

Marasmus. 

Leucorythaemia. 

Cancer. 

Cholera infantum. 

Cancer. 

Gastritis. 

Laryngitis stridulus. 

Typhoid fever. 

Cancer. 

Consumption. 

Consumption. 

Premature birth. 

Apoplexy. 

Marasmus. 

Malaria. 

Stillborn. 

Entero collitis. 

Acute nephritis. 

Stillborn. 

Phthisis. 

Bronchitis. 

Pneumonia. 

Phthisis pulmonalis. 

Anemia. 

Old nge. 

Senile debility. 

Consumption. 

Haemoptysis. 

Marasmus. 

Hydroephalus. 

Infantile debility. 

Tubercular meningitis. 

Phthisis. 

Atrophy of liver. 

Acute meningitis. 

Pulmonary phthisis. 

Typhoid fever. 

Pulmonary tuberculosis. 

Meningitis. 

Septicaemia. 

Convulsions. 

Diabetis. 

Typhoid fever. 

Pneumonia. 



28 



Deaths — Concluded. 



DATE. 


NAMES. 


AGES. 


CAUSE OF DEATH. 




T. 


M. 


D. 




Nov. 29 




30 
60 
66 
39 
29 

72 
69 
86 
31 
13 
78 
53 
67 
81 
18 

30 


10 

2 
8 

11 

9 

1 
11 


1 

25 
23 
23 

13 

3 

19 

27 

2h 




Dec. 1 
3 




Apoplexy. 

Nephritis. 

Phthisis pulmonalis. 

Puerperal lever. 

Stillborn. 


4 
6 

7 


O'Brien 


14 
22 




Diabetis. 


23 




Old a°-e. 


24 




Phthisis pulmonalis. 
Diabetis melitus. 
Paralysis. 
Phthisis. 


25 
25 


Winifred I. Riley 


27 
21 




29 
29 
30 


Scott 


Pulmonary apoplexy. 
Pulmonary tuberculosis. 
Stillborn. 


30 






9 




Gas poisoning. 



The Town Clerk requests information of any omission or error in 
the above tables, in order that the registration may be as complete 
as possible. 

Respectlully submitted, 

HENRY B. TERRY, 

Toivn Clerk. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE TOWN CLERK'S RECORD 
OF TOWN MEETINGS. 



The following statement shows in a condensed foim the 
action of the town on the various articles which have been 
before it for consideration the past year. 



March 29, 1894 a Town Meeting was held in Waverly 
Hall, when the following Articles were acted upon, viz :— 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

James E. Cotter Esq., was chosen. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will accept the list of jurors 
as prepared by the Selectmen and posted according to law. 
Amended by several substitutions and accepted as amended. 

Art. 3. To hear the report of the Selectmen in regard 

to guide boards, and act thereon. 

Report made and accepted, and the several boards therin men- 
tioned voted to be maintained. 

Art. 4. To see what disposition the town will make of 
the money received from dog licenses for the year 1893. 
Voted to the Public Library for the purchase of new books 

Art. 5 To see what compensation the town will vote to 
pay for collecting its taxes the current year. 
One per cent, of amount collected. 

Art. 6 To fix the salaries of the town officers for the 
current municipal year. 

Voted that they remain the same as last year, and assessors are au- 
thorized to employ a clerk, at an expense not exceeding $100. 

(29) 



30 

Art. 7. To fix the compensation of the engineers, and 
several members of the fire department, for their services 
the current municipal year. 

Voted that the compensation be the same as last year. 

Art, 8. To see what discount the towu will vote to al- 
low on all taxes paid on or before October 1, 1894; and 
what interest the town will vote to charge on taxes for the 
current year, when the same shall be overdue. 

No discount allowed, and interest at the rate of six per cent, per 
annum to be charged. 

Art. 9. To see if the town will appropriate one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars to Post 121, Grand Army of the He- 
public, for the expense of decorating the graves of deceased 
soldiers. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will appropriate the money 
now in the hands of the Treasurer, received by him as side- 
walk, street; or Board of Health assessments or betterments, 
and all money which shall be received by him the current 
year on account of such assessments or betterments, tor the 
purpose of constructing or repairing sidewalks, streets or 
highways. 

Appropriated for construction and repairs of sidewalks. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will appropriate the money 
to be received this year by the Town Treasurer, for or on 
account of Corporation and National Bank taxes, for the pay- 
ment of the fire hydrant service of the town. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 12. To see what action the town will take with ref- 
erence to lighting the whole, or a part of its streets with 
electricity all night. 

Motion to authorize Selectmen to contract for an all-night service 
of thirty-eight arc and thirty-eight incandescent lights, at an addi- 
tional expense of $2,000, lost. 



31 

Art. 13. To see if the town will set apart a portion of 

Fan-view Cemetery for the burial of persons of the Roman 

■Catholic faith. 

Voted, that the Cemetery Commissioners be instructed to set apart 
a portion of Fairview Cemetery, so that the same may be duly conse- 
crated and reserve the same when so consecrated, exclusively for 
such Roman Catholics as may purchase burial privileges therein, the 
Cemetery Commissioners being hereby authorized to determine the 
location of such part. All deeds of lots shall be made in the form 
prescribed by the regulations, and the same shall remain under the 
care, superintendence and management of the Cemetery Commission- 
ers, and shall be subject to the same regulations, and shall be man- 
aged and provided for in all respects, in the same manner as other 
portions of said cemetery. 

Art. 14. To see if the town will authorize the Cemetery 

Commissioners to use part of the appropriation for the care 

of the Fairview Cemetery, for the purchase of land for the 

use of the Cemetery. 

Voted that the Cemetery Commissioners be, and they hereby are, 
authorized to use a part of any appropriation made for the care of the 
Cemetery, for the purchase of land adjoining the same, if in their 
judgment it is expedient to do so. 

Art, 15. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen 

to contract in behalf of the town, with the Hyde Park 

Water Company, for additional fire hydrants. 

So authorized, provided that any contract so made, shall expire 
at the same time that the existing contract expires. 

Art. 16. To hear the report of the Selectmen laying out 
Warren avenue, between Highland and Summit streets, as 
a public town way, and to see if the town will accept and 
allow said laying out with the boundaries and measurements 
of said way as shown by report, plan and profile now on file 
in the Town Clerk's office, and appropriate money to con- 
struct the same. 

Report made and said "laying out" accepted and allowed. 

Art. 17. To see what amount the town will vote to raise 



$32,300 

600 

100 

3,200 

2,750 



$38,950 00 



ements 



by taxation, to meet the expenses of the town the current 
year, the deficiencies of last year, and the notes and bonds 
of the town maturing the present year, and how the same 
shall be appropriated. • 

Voted to raise $114,725.00, and appropriate same as follows: — 
For support of schools, by items: — 

Salaries and Fuel 

Evening Schools . 

Industrial Schools 

School Incidentals 

Text Books and Supplies . 
For Bonds and Notes maturing 
" Interest .... 
" Public Library . 
" Highways — Current Expenses 
" Highways — Permanent Improv 
" Board of Health 
" Incidentals 
" Salaries 
" Police 
" Poor . 
" Street Lights 
" Fire Department 
" Grand Army 

" Care and Improvement of Cemetery 
' ' Steam Road Roller and Crusher repairs 
" Sum voted in 1893 (additional) for schools 
" Sum voted February 6, 1894, for highways 

Art. 18. To see if the town will authorize its Collector 
of Taxes to use all means of collecting the taxes which a 
Town Treasurer, when appointed a collector, may use. 

So authorized. 

Art. 19. To see what amount the town will authorize 
its Treasurer to borrow, in anticipation of the tax to be 
levied the current year. 

$80,000 so authorized. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will authorize its Treasurer 



7,500 00' 


3,500 00 


1.850 00 


4,000 00 


10,000 00 


2,500 00 


7,100 00 


3,475 00 


5,500 00 


3,000 00 


7,700 00, 


"6,500 00 


150 00 


6,000 00 


3,500 00 


1,500 00 


2,000 00 



with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money to 
renew or replace any loan or loans. 

So authorized. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen to 
sell at private sale or public auction a lot of land situated on 
Dana avenue, in this town, being land described in deed of 
Samuel S. Somes to this town, dated March 20, 1889, and 
recorded with Norfolk Deeds, lib. 618, fo'l. 614, and author- 
ize its Selectmen to siirn, seal, acknowledge and deliver in 
its name and behalf, proper deed/ or deeds to convey' the 
same to the purchaser of said land. 

So authorized. 

Adjourned at 10 :22 p. m. 



July 31, 1894, a Town Meeting was held in the Young 
Men's Christian Association Hall, and the following articles 
were acted upon : — 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

William S. O'Brien chosen by ballot. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to choose by ballot 
at the next annual meeting, a Board of Health, consisting 
of three persons, to serve, one for the term of three years, 
one for the term of two years, and one for the term of one 
year, beginning with the first Monday in April then next 
ensuing and until their respective successors are chosen and 
qualified ; and thereafter at its annual town meeting, choose 
in the same manner one person who shall hold office for 
three years from the first Monday of April then next ensu- 
ing, and until another is chosen and qualified in his stead. 

Voted to choose the Board of Health in this manner. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to discontinue the 
choice of Sinking Fund Commissioners by ballot. 

Indefinately postponed. 



34 

Art. 4 To see if the town will make and adopt by-laws 
relative to the supervision of the business of plumbing, as 
required by the provisions of Section 7, of Chapter 455 of 
the Acts of the Legislature of the present year. 

Referred to a committee to consider and report to town at a future 
meeting. 

Art. 5. To hear the report of the Selectmen laying out 
Chesterfield street as a public town way, and to see if the 
town will accept and allow said laying out with the bound- 
aries and measurements of said way as shown by the report, 
plan and profile now on file in the Town Clerk's office, and 
appropriate money to construct the same. 

This street was accepted as a public way, and $300 appropriated 
to build the same. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 
money sufficient to satisfy the judgment recorded against 
this town in the Superior Court for the County of Norfolk, 
in the suit of Sarah S. Fuller vs. Hyde Park, and also the 
expenses incurred in defending said suit, and how the same 
shall be raised. 

Treasurer authorized to borrow in anticipation of taxes of next 
year, a sum not exceeding $4,000 with which to satisfy said judg- 
ment.. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will make an additional, ap- 
propriation of money for use in building, repairing and 
draining streets and highwa}^s,and how said money shall be 
raised. 

Indefinately postponed. 



Nov. 28, 1894, a Town Meeting was held in the- Y. M. 
C. A. Hall, when the following articles were acted upon viz : 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Charles F. Jenney chosen moderator by ballot. 



35 

Art. 2. To see if the town will appropriate money to 
pay the judgment rendered in the Superior Court, Norfolk 
County, at the last October sitting thereof, case of Nancy 
Bohannon vs. Hyde Park, for damages and plaintiff's taxa- 
ble costs amounting to $551.27. 

Said amount was appropriated ; to be raised by taxation next year, 

and the Treasurer authorized to borrow vsaid sum in anticipation of 

said taxes. 
i 

Art. 3. To see if the town will transfer to the highway 
appropriation the moneys now in the hands of the Town 
Treasurer, received from the sale of land, and road material. 

Said transfer was vote 1, 

Art. 4. To see if the town will appoint a committee to 
take into consideration the subject of water supply for the 
town, to confer with the Hyde Park Water Company with 
view of ascertaining value of plant and franchise of the com- 
pany, and terms on which contract between the town and 
the water company in relation to hydrant service expiring 
next year, may be renewed ; said committee to report at a 
future town meeting. 

Charles F. Jenney, Samuel T. Elliott, George E. Whiting, Charles 
L. Farnsworth, Galen L. Stone, George M. Rice and Stephen B. Bal- 
kan! were appointed a committee with full power to make such in- 
vestigation as they deem proper, and to report at the next annual 
appropriation meeting, or at an earlier town meeting, first publishing 
their report in print, at least two weeks before its submission to the 
town at such meeting. This committee was authorized to incur 
any resonable expense in connection with their investigation and 
report. 

Art. 5. To hear the report of the Selectmen laying out 
Regent street as a public town way, and to see if the town 
will accept and allow said laying out with the boundaries 
and measurements of said way as shown by the report, plan 
and profile now on file in the Town Clerk's office, and ap- 
propriate money to construct the same. 

Said laying out was accepted, and the sum of $600 appropriated 
.to build said street ; said sum to be raised by taxation next year. 



36 

Art. 6. To hear the report of the committee on by-laws 
relative to the supervision of the business of plumbing, and 
to see if the town will adopt by-laws relating thereto. Also 
to see if the town will make and adopt by-laws relating to 
the purchase, sale or barter of juuk, old metals or second 
hand articles, and the license of persons to be dealers in 
such articles. i ' 

The committee reported a code of by-laws, which were adopted by 
the town. The clause of the article relating to junk etc., was indefl- 
nately postponed. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will vote to discontinue the- 
choice ofJS inking Fund Commissioners. 

Voted to discontinue the choice of such commissioners. 
Adjourned. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

In giving this our annual report, we would call attention 
to the many changes which have been made in different parts 
of the work, either to comply with laws of the State or 
with what in the opinion of the Board was for the best in- 
terest of the town. 

MEETINGS AND ORGANIZATION. 

The regular meetings of the Board have been held as in 
previous years with such additional meetings as were neces- 
sary to do the work required. At the first meeting the 
Board organized by choice of J. C. Lincoln, M. D., as 
Chairman and Edwin C. Farwell as Secretary, 

SEWERAGE. 

Again we wish to urge the importance of sewerage for the 
"town. We have had a system of water supply for ten years, 
and it is the opinion of the Board that unless a system ot sew- 
erage is soon adopted to take care of the large supply of 
w T ater, the soil will become so infiltrated with the same, 
that trouble will ensue. The money which is paid for 
clearing vaults and cesspools would pay the interest on a 
Jarge portion of the money it would take to build the sewer. 

VAULTS AND CESSPOOLS. 

Owing to the complaints of many of our citizens, the 
Board thought best to make a change in the manner of 
clearing vaults and cesspools. The old method made it nec- 
essary to have this work done in the night for about one- 
half of the year. One objection to this was that the air be- 
ing heavy and lying low, the bad odors would remain much 

(37) 



38 

longer than in the daytime, and at that season of the year 
when windows are open, must fill the house and form apart 
of the atmosphere we breathe, whether asleep or awake. 
Another reason was that in the season when this work was- 
allowed in the daytime, some of our places of business were 
very much damaged for a time by the foul odors which come 
from this method of doing the work, to say nothing of the 
stench that was left in the streets as these teams went to and 
from their work. The attention of the Board was called to- 
the work done by the apparatus known as the Odorless Ex- 
cavator, and after a thorough examination, this method was 
adopted. The cost of fitting up for this S3^stem was so great 
that neither of those who had formerly done the work cared 
to undertake it (or at least so the Board understood) and 
the permit was given to one party who is under the direc- 
tion of the Board. It is not intended that the expense shall 
be much in excess of previous years, although in our opinion 
each individual can better afford to pay more than to go back 
to the old method. 

INSPECTOR OF PLUMBING. 

Early in the year to conform to the laws of the State the 
Board took up the matter of the appointment of Inspector 
of Plumbing. Applications were received from several for 
the position, which was finally decided by civil service ex- 
amination, and given to the one who received the largest 
per cent, in rank. Afterwards the Board appointed an as- 
sistant. 

BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 

In compliance with the law, a Board of Examiners was ap- 
pointed consisting of the Chairman of the Board of Health 
and two local plumbers. This board reported to the Board 
of Health five master plumbers and nine journejmien plumb- 
ers. Licences were granted to the same and they registered 
as did also all out of town plumbers doing work in town^ 



39 

Rules aucl regulations were, after careful consideration by 
the Board of Health and Examiners, adopted, and the parts 
relating to material and work were with a few changes 
adopted as by-laws of the town. Eighty one permits have 
been granted for new and old work, and one hundred and 
seventy three cases were found where rules were not corn- 
complied with, which after attention was called to them were 
made right. It is hardly fair to expect that mistakes would 
not be made at this, almost the commencement of the work. 
The Board have tried to be just to all, and still maintain that 
the law must be complied within all cases. It is for the next 
Board to perfect what has been so imperfectly started. 

COMPLAINTS. 

Nearly one hundred complaints have been investigated 
and most of the places have been attended to ; some have 
had to be put over until another season on account of the 
cold weather. The land at the corner of Gordon avenue 
and Childs street has been drained and we hope will give 
no further trouble. There are several other places in town 
which need attention and parties have been notified to that 
eftoct. 

DUMPING ASHES. 

We wish to call attention to the dumping of rubbish on 
land situated between Central Park avenue and the Hyde 
Park station on the N. Y. N. H. & H. R. P., which was 
lately put in good condition, by the Building Co. It seems 
as though any one who has the good of the town at heart 
would refrain from spoiling the work so recently done. 
There should be some place in town less conspicuous where 
such matter can be put. 

CONTAGEOUS DISEASE. 

The town is to be congratulated on the comparitively 
small number of cases of contageous disease, only about 



Diptheria, 




15 


cases 


Scarlet Fever, 




25 


" 


Measles, 




29 


" 


Typhoid Fever, 




14 


' 


Membraneous Cr 


oup, 


1 


" 



40 

three-fifths of the number we had last year, which are as 

follows : 

with 2 deaths. 



3 

Making total of 4 cases and 5 deaths. 

COLLECTING OFFAL. 

The contracts for collecting offal were given to the sama 
parties that have clone the work for several years. Read- 
ville district was included this year for the first time and 
with some few exceptions the work 'has been satisfactory. 

SWINE. 

Many complaints come from parties that live in the vicin- 
ity of those that keep swine, and few permits have- been 
granted, and those with the understanding that they would 
be revoked if complaint was made. It is the opinion of the 
Board that swine should not be kept in the thickly settled 
portions of the town. 



REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 
OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK. 

Public Statutes: Chapter 80, Section 18.— The Board of Health 
of a town shall make such regulations as it judges necessary for the 
public health and safety, respecting nuisances, sources of filth, and 
causes of sickness within its town. Whoever violates any such reg- 
ulation shall forfeit a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

In accordance with the foregoing provision of law, this Board 
makes the following regulations, which will be strictly enforced. 

Regulation 1. Privy Vaults and Drains. Section 1. Every ten- 
ement shall be provided with a water-tight underground drain to 
carry off the waste waters, also with a suitable privy or water-closet 
sufficient for the accommodation of all those inhabiting the premises. 

Section II. All privy vaults, unless water-tight, shall be so con- 
structed that the inside of the same shall be at least five feet distant 



41 

from the line of any adjoining lot or street, and at least twenty feet 
from any dwelling house, and shall be provided with a ventilation 
through the roof. The same shall not be used as cesspools nor 
receive drainage from the premises. Their contents shall not be 
allowed to leak out or otherwise become offensive. All privy vaults 
shall be of a size sufficient to satisfy the Board of Health. 

Section IIL All waste water shall be conveyed through sufficient 
drains under ground to a cesspool sunk under ground, which shall be 
of sufficient size to contain at least eighty cubic feet, and when not 
water-tight must be at least twenty feet from the cellar wall of any 
tenement or dwelling, and at least five feet distant from any adjoin- 
ing lot or street. Cesspools shall be built in a thorough and substan- 
tial manner as shall be approved by the Board of Health. 

Section IV. No person shall allow any drain or the overflow ©f 
any cesspool to enter any running stream, or any drain constructed 
for surface water, and no person shall suffer any house drainage or 
other offensive water to remain in any cellar, or upon any lot or va- 
cant ground by such person owned or occupied. All privy vaults 
and cesspools within one hundred and fifty feet of any well or spring, 
the water of which is used for domestic purposes, must be water- 
tight. 

Section V. All privy vaults or cesspools must be thoroughly 
cleansed at least once in each year, and oftener if necessary tor the 
public health, the expense to be borne by the owner of the property. 

Regulation 2. Section I. The Board, when satisfied upon due 
examination that a cellar, room, tenement or building in the town 
occupied as a dwelling place, has become by reason of the number 
of occupants, want of cleanliness or other cause, unfit for such pur- 
pose, and a cause of nuisance or sickness to the occupants or to the 
public, may issue a notice in writing to such occupants, requiring 
the premises to be put in proper condition; or if the Board see fit 
they may require the premises to be vacated, and the same shall not 
be again occupied without the written permission of the Board. 

Section II. No person shall throw or put into any public place or 
pond, or running stream or body of water, or in any other place 
where the Board of Health may deem it a nuisance, any dead animal, 
animal matter, decayed fruit or vegetables, dirt or rubbish whatever; 
nor shall any person throw into or upon any flats within the juris- 
diction of the town, any dead animals, filth or offensive matter. 

Regulation 8. Swill and Offal. Section I. No person shall re- 
move or carry in or through any of the streets, lanes or avenues, 
-places or alleys within the town of Hyde Park, the contents of any 



42 

cesspool, vault or privy well, swill or house offal, (either animal or 
vegetable,) or grease or bones, unless a permit be granted by the 
Board of Health upon such terras and conditions as said Board may 
deem necessary. 

Section II. No person shall bury swill or house offal, or the con- 
tents of any cesspool, vaults, privy or privy well within the limits of 
the town of Hyde Park unless a permit be granted by the Board of 
Health. 

Section III. Parties will be- licensed by the Board of Health to 
collect swill aud refuse matter from houses in Hyde Park twice a 
week or oftener, and all housekeepers and others are directed to de- 
liver the same to those duly authorized to make such collections. 

Regulation 4. Diseased Meat and Provisions. Section I. No- 
person shall bring into the town, keep or offer lor sale any diseased,, 
putrid, stale or unwholesome meat, vegetables or provisions. 

Regulation 5. Swine. Section I. No person will be permitted' 
to keep any swine within the limits of the town of Hyde Park, with- 
out a written permit from the Board of Health. 

Regulation 6. Contagious Diseases. Section 1. Any person sick 
witn the small pox or other contagious disease, together with all 
persons in attendance upon them, and the premises where such 
sick person is.will be subject to the control of the Board, and no 
person shall enter or leave a house wherein a person is or has been 
sick with the disease, or in any way come in contact with the in- 
mates of such house, except by permission of the Board. 

Section II. Whenever thp Board of Health shall ascertain that 
any person is sick with small pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or any 
other disease dangerous to the public health, the Board shall at tbeir 
discretion, hare full control of said person or premises, and shall, if 
they deem proper, order the premises vacated. 

Section 3. All persons 'are warned not to approach a house or the 
surrounding premises whereupon is displayed a disease flag by day,, 
or a red light at night. 

Section IV. The bodies of all persons dying of small pox, scarlet 
fever, typhus fever or diphtheria must be immediately disinfected 
and placed in a tight coffin, which shall not be reopened, and the bed, 
bed clothing, and other clothing used by any such person, and by 
those in attendance on him, and all the furnishings of the sick room, 
thoroughly disinfected before being taken Irom said room. In the 
above case no public funeral will be allowed without permission 
from the Board of Health. 

Section V. The owner, or persons having charge of any vehicle,. 



43 

public or private, used at a funerel in the foregoing cases, to carry 
the deceased, or any of the family or attendants of the deceased, shall 
forthwith report the fact to the Board of Health, and shall thoroughly 
disinfect such vehicle before the same is again used, and take such 
precaution as the Board of Health shall direct. 

Section VI. Any person in the town of Hyde Park, who knows or 
suspects any domestic animal has contagious disease (such as glan- 
ders in horses or cholera in swine) must immediately report the same 
to the Board of Health. The penalty for neglect to do so is fine or 
imprisonment. The above is in accordance with the provisions of 
Chapter 252 of the Acts of 1887. 

Regulation 7. Section I. All complaints in relation to nuisan- 
ces and sources of filth injurious to the public health and safety, must 
be made in writing to the Board of Health, with a description of said 
nuisance and of the premises on which it exists, with the owner's 
name, if known to the complainant. Such complaints must bear the 
signature of the complainant. Whenever such complaint shall 
be made as aforesaid, the Board of Health will proceed to examine 
the premises complained of, and will take measures to abate the nui- 
sance, if such is found to exist. 

Regulation 8. Section I. No person, firm or corporation not 
now engaged in or working at the business of plumbing shall here- 
after engage in or work at said business in the town of Hyde Park,, 
either as a master or employing plumber or as a journeyman plum- 
ber, unless such person, firm or corporation first receives a license 
therefor, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 477 of the Acts- 
of the year 1893 of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Acts 
amendatory thereof, or supplementary thereto. 

Section II. Any person desiring to engage in or work at the busi- 
ness of plumbing, either as a master or employiug plumber, or as a 
journeyman plumber, shall apply to the Board of Health and shall at 
such time and place as may be designated by the board of examiners 
appointed by the Board of Health, as provided for in said Acts to 
whom such application shall be referred, be examined as to his qual- 
ifications for such business. In the case of a firm or corporation the 
examination and licensing of any one member of the firm, or the 
manager of the corporation shall satisfy the requirements of this 
regulation. 

Section III. The board of examiners shall examine said appli- 
cants as to their practical knowledge of plumbing, house drainage 
and plumbing ventilation, and if satisfied of the competency of the- 
applicant shall so certify to the Board of Health. 

Said Board will thereupon issue a license to such applicant author- 



44 

izing him to engage in or work at the business of plumbing. The fee 
for a license for a master or employing plumber shall be two dollars, 
for a journeyman plumber it shall be fifty cents. Said licenses shall 
be issued annually, expiring on the thirty-first day of May next ensu- 
ing, and shall be conditioned on skillful work, and a strict obser- 
vance of the rules governing plumbing. 

Section IV. No person shall carry on the business of plumbing 
unless he shall have first registered his name and place of business in 
the office of the Board of Health; and notice of any change in the 
place of business of a registered plumber shall be immediately given 
to said Board. 

Section V. No person shall proceed to construct, add to, or alter 
any portion of the drainage system (except to repair leaks) of any 
building in the town of Hyde Park, until plans showing in detail the 
whole drainage system, shall have been filed at the office of the 
Board of Health, upon blanks in such form as the Board may deter- 
mine ; no person shall commence work on such drainage system unti 
the plans are accepted by the inspector of plumbing and a permit of 
approval granted. Plans and specifications shall be approved or re- 
jected within five days of the time of the filing. 

Rules and regulations for material, construction, etc., may be 
found in town by-laws. 

Fully believing that a large proportion of contagious diseases orig- 
inate from unsanitary conditions, we trust that we shall have the aid 
of all citizens and property owners in carrying out the above regula- 
tions, which are based on statute laws, and the sanitary rules of our 
large towns. 

For burial permits apply to F. C. Graham, 10 Hyde Park avenue. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

To Appropriation, 

Balance from last year, 

Paid C. H. Crummett, collecting offal, 
Mrs. F. Hukin, 
Edwin C. Farwell, services as Secretary 

and cash paid out, 
F. E. Langley, printing, 
S. K. Moseley, printing and box rent, 
Lord & Dodge, posting notices, 
H. R,. Hitchcock, M. D., consultation, 
W. D. Ward, stationery and book, 



$2,500 


00 


120 


46 





— $2,620 46 


1,086 


75 


630 


00 


153 


00 


38 


50 


48 


00 


1 


5o 


5 


00 


3 


50 



12 


00 


2 


50 


25 


00 


8 


40 


1 


00 


7 


00 


4 00 


1 


00 


7 


40 


106 


75 


27 


50 


2 


00 


1 


00 


25 


00 


3 


00 




— $2,199 80' 



45 



Paid F. W. Gleason, examiner and paid ont, 
J. Snellgrove, hack hire, 
J. G. Ruggles, printing. 
C. W. Farwell, posting notices, 
W. D. Esterbrook, burying animal, 
J. G. Tiugley, sign and burying animal, 
R. W. Gould, burying animal, 
S. P. Smith, 
T. Brown, labor, 
C. T. Lovell, inspector, 
J. C. Savage, assistant inspector, 
J. Crowley, hack hire, 
T..M. Minnis, " 
Edmund Davis, legal services, 
A. D. Holmes, M. D., professional services, 



Balance on hand, $420 66 

We have kept the expenses this year as close as possible. 
Some of the contracts were taken at less figures than for- 
merly, and owing to the fact that building and repairs have 
not been carried on quite as extensively as in former years, 
also not being able to start on the inspection of work as 
soon as was expected, we are able to report a good balance 
on hand, and feel sure that with the appropriation of another 
year the work can be carried on with that degree of success 
which will compare favorably with other towns. 
Eespectfully submitted, 

J. C. LINCOLN, M. D., 
A. D. HOLMES, M. D., 
EDWIN C. FARWELL, 
Board of Health of the Town of Hyde Park, Mass. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 

LIBRARY. 



In submitting our annual report, your Trustees respect- 
fully call your attention once again to the pressing need in 
the near future of larger and better accommodations. It is 
.possible, by adopting, from time to time, as we are, tem- 
porary rearrangement of cases and books, to carry on the 
business of the library a very few years longer in our pres- 
ent quarters, but each year is rapidly exhausting our re- 
sources, and each move now detracts somewhat from the 
efficiceny of the library. 

The town has each year voted all money received from 
dog licenses to the purchase of books, and will.no doubt 
continue this liberal policy. Your Trustees would recom- 
mend that in future any unexpended balance of this account 
each year in the hands of the Treasurer shall be transferred 
to the Library Fund, which at this time, as noted by the 
Treasurer's statement, amounts to 16,945.17. 

If this policy is adopted, with the rapidly increasing in- 
terest added, within a very few years at longest, in connec- 
tion with a public demonstration that could easily be ar- 
oused, a suitable Public Library building can be obtained 
without any perceptible increase in the tax burden. 

The past year has not been an exception to the steadily 
increasing popularity of the library, as is evidenced by the 
following facts : 

The number of new cards issued was 426. 

The total home circulation for the year ending Jan. 1, 
1895, has been 34,369. 

There were 2,084 magazines and 1,390 books taken out 
for use in the reading room, besides books of reference, 

(46) 



47 



which are' in constant use, and can be obtained at any time 
without application to the librarian. To this department 
-valuable additions have been made the past year. 

The number of volumes added to the library the past 
year is 550. 

The followino- is a list of donations received : 



United States Government 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
United States Government 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Smithsonian Institute 



9 volumes 
25 volumes 
63 pamphlets 
2 pamphlets 
1 pamphlet 



FREDERICK N. TIRRELL, 

For the Trustees. 



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s 


- 










P 




































j: 












C5 






















- 











REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



The report of the year shows but little change. Not- 
withstanding the hard times, the number of persons receiv- 
ing out-door relief has decreased, as compared with last 
year. Some families have become self-supporting, and 
there are but few new names on the list of those regularly 
relieved. Nothing tends more to degrade and pauperize 
than too liberal giving, and it is important that an effort 
should be made to obtain an equivalent for all beyond the 
bare necessaries of life, and even these should be given 
only after careful investigation, and with constant over- 
sight. The insane now number eight, and there seems 
little prospect of any decrease in this list. The tramp 
nuisance shows an abatement of about twenty-five percent., 
which is doubtless due to the new police regulation requir- 
ing the detention of the wayfarers in the lockup until 11 
o'clock in the morning. In this connection, the Overseers 
desire to enter their protest against the present condition of 
the quarters provided for lodgers. Accommodations for 
tramps should not be in connection with the lockup, for 
sanitary reasons alone ; and the Overseers heartily endorse 
the recommendations incorporated in the report of the 
Chief of Police, advising separate quarters for those who 
seek lodgings for the night. 

Number of persons aided, 

" " " fully supported, 

" " partially " 
" " " tramps lodged, 



Barrett, Sarah J. insane, 

Bell, Dorinda E. 

Carter, Eva F. " 





3511 




8 




92 




3411 


SETTLEMENT. 


COST. 


Hyde Park, 


$169 46 


" 


111 88 


a 


103 53 



(49) 



50 



Carter, Ralph insane, 

Clapp, Clara E. " 

Connor, Kate " 

Cunningham, Jos. Jr., " 
Smith, Herbert V., died June 13, '94, 
Withington, George, 
Dunn, Bridget 
Connor, Ellen 
Springer, Fannj r 
' O'Leary, Mary 
Boyce, William H. 
Coveney, Daniel 
Howland, Abner 
Gilson, Ella A. 
McAuliff, John 
O'Reilly, Bridget A. 
Conran, Kate 

Kohl, Charles H.. account burial of, 
Benson, Lena and 7 children, 
Hutchings, Ella M., and 3 children, 
Welch, Mrs. J. E. F. " 3 
Scannell, Bridget "3 " 
Grant, Mrs. Hugh "3 
Moore, Kate "2 

Howard, Clara " 2 " 

Gordon, Katherine *' 3 " 
Gates, Mrs. A. W. " 3 
Curran, Ellen " 1 child, 

Murray, Richard and wife, 
Corscadden, George, wife and 4 children, 
Lynch, Ellen and son, 
Kino-, Martin wife and 2 children 

King, James and wife, 

Walsh, Ellen 1 

Bowlin, Mary 

Hendrickson, Herman wife, 4 children, 

Cunningham, Philip and wife, 

Thomas, Almira J. and 1 child, 

Morrisey, Bridget 

Wheeler, Rudolph wife and 5 children, 

Norman, Mrs. P. G. and 3 children, 

Expense account, 



Hyde Park, 


169 43 


" 


169 46 


" 


169 46 


" 


169 46 


" 


92 40 


" 


156 43 


" 


130 34 


(£ 


52 73 


66 


4 50 


" 


32 51 


"• 


4 00 


C t 


31 37 


" 


99 25 


(i 


130 33 


" 


145 36 


" 


35 00 


i' 


95 56 


" 


10 00 


" 


15 50 


" 


70 10 


" 


30 87 


" 


100 72 


" 


35 00 


" 


79 43 


" 


13 88 


" 


116 26 


" 


67 02 


" 


121 60 


" 


44 55 


a, " 


4 00 


" 


4 75 


i * 


77 50 


" 


4 00 


fewburyport, 


72 00 


Attleboro, 


25 00 


Walpole, 


58 50 


Water town, 


33 00 


Boston, 


12 06 


State, 


2 88 


6t 


6 89 


it 


4 19 




349 18 



51 



Lockup, 

Military aid, 
Tempoary aid, 



■Cash balance on hand, 
Received appropriation, 
Received from State, etc. 



<Cash on hand with Town Treasurer, 

CHARLES LEWIS. 



95 


25 


180 


00 


214 


39 


$3,920 


98 


$1,409 98 

3,000 00 

705 89 


$5,115 87 
$1,194 89 



JOHN TERRY, 
GEORGE E. HAVEN, 

Overseers of the Poor 



POLICE REPORT. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — I respectfully submit herewith the annual 
report of this department for the year ending Jan. 31 r 
1895: 

Whole number of persons arrested, 185 
Males, 174 
Females, 11 

CAUSES FOR ARREST. 

Drunkeness (simple), 45 

Drnnkeness (common), 10 

Disturbance of the peace, 43 

Assault, 15 

Vagrancy, 19 

Breaking, entering and larceny, 8 

Cruelty to animals, 2 

Malicious mischief, 4 

Larceny, 5 

Assault with intent to kill, 5. 

Assault on officer, 1 

Stubborn child, 1 

Embezzlement, 2 

Desertion from army, 1 

Adultery, 1 

Bastardy, 2 

Violation of liquor law, 7 

Gambling, 1 

Escaped prisoner from Westboro 1 , 1 

Keeping unlicensed dog, • 3 

Insane, 5 

Other offences, 4 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



185 



Cases investigated without arrest, 246 

Stores found open afc night, 22~ 

(52) 



53 

Search warrants for intoxicating liquors, 6 

Lost children restored, 3 

Amount of fines imposed by court, $1,104 00 

Number of persons fined, 84 

Amount of imprisonment imposed by court, 20 years, 5 months. 

FINAL DISPOSITION OF* CASES. 

Committed to House of Correction, 79 

Committed to State Prison, 1 

Committed to Concord Reformatory, 3 

Committed to Lyman School Westboro 1 1 

Committed to Insane Asylum, 7 

Taken by State Board of Lunacy and Charity, 1 

Turned over to U. S. military authorities, 1 

Let off on payment of fine, 53 

Let off on probation, 36 

Awaiting disposition of Superior Court, 3 

185 

Entering upon the duties of this office April 1, 1894, I 
found the following property, viz. : Seven police badges, 
1 pair handcuffs, 1 pair twisters, 13 chairs, 2 lanterns, 1 
criminal record book, 1 desk (in poor order), 2 lockup 
keys. There have been added during the year : One roll- 
top desk, 1 criminal record book (to replace one filled up), 
1 short club- 3 long clubs and belts, 3 38-calibre revolvers, 
3 badges, 12 lockup keys. Considerable property has been 
recovered during the year, and the total is enumerated 
below, viz. : Forty badges, 4 pairs handcuff's, 3 pairs 
twisters, 2 short clubs, 3 long clubs and belts, 22 lockup 
keys, 4 revolvers (1 useless), 2 desks, 2 criminal record 
books, 2 lanterns, 8 chairs. A record of all town police 
property in the hands of the regular and special officers is 
on file in this office. 

Regular officers are equipped with winter and summer 
uniforms, and six special officers are equipped w T ith summer 
uniforms. 

The police headquarters have been thoroughly renovated 
and painted, and the office has been equipped with an 



54 

electrical signal showing when a telephone call has been: 
made during the absence of officers from the headquarters. 
When in use at night, a call upon the telephone displays a* 
red light upon Odd Fellows' Hall, which is visible from the 
Old Colony Railroad Bridge and from near the New Eng- 
land Railroad Crossing. Trouble at any point in town con- 
nected by telephone can in a very few minutes be com- 
municated to the night officers by this device. The citi- 
zens are invited to avail themselves of its usefulness. 

The lockup has been put in as good order as consistent 
under existing conditions. The old wooden bunks in the 
cells have been torn out and burned, and the walls and 
floors freed from vermin. Iron bedsteads with new mat- 
tresses have been substituted. The room in front of the- 
cells has been used for many years as a lodging place for 
tramps, very much to the annoyance of the officers in the 
discharge of their duties. During the financial year ending' 
Jan. 31, 1894, 4,731 travellers were cared for. During the 
year ending Jan. 31, 1895, 3,411 were cared for, a decrease 
of 1,320. This large decrease is probably caused to a great 
extent by the adoption of a rule by which the tramps are 
kept in confinement until 11 A. M. each day. 

I would recommend that the unused hose house on 
Thatcher street be moved to the engine house lot and fitted 
up as a lodging place for tramps, thus placing at the dis- 
posal of the Overseers of the Poor a suitable place, as pro- 
vided by law, and relieve the Police Department from a 
burden and a duty not belonging to it ; and enable it to pro- 
vide a lockup free from stench or vermin, and a safe place 
for the custody of prisoners. Several attempts have been 
made by tramps during the past year to liberate prisoners 
confined in the cells, but fortunately without success. This 
recommendation can be carried out at a small expense, and 
will save a further outlay for several years. 

During the past Summer and Fall three special officers 



55 

have been on duty Saturday nights and Sundays in the 
Clarendon Hill, Fairmount and Corriganville and Everett 
Square districts. There has also been a special officer in 
the Square every night until 10 : 30 P. M. Since Dec. 1, 
1894, there have been two officers ou the Central District 
all night. 

There has been a great many calls for officers during the 
year to protect private interests, for which the parties hav- 
ing them have paid the expenses. 

The large number of complaints made to this department 
which have been investigated without arrest attests the 
great amount of work done unknown to the general public. 
Attention has been given to all complaints, and assistance 
rendered whenever possible. 

The introduction of the electric railroad has very largely 
increased the duties of the officers, and it is but fair to 
presume that the travel over the roads during the coming 
months will prove the need of an increase in the police 
force. I would earnestly recommend that the permanent 
force be increased by two additional officers, one for day 
and one for night service. 

In conclusion, permit me to extend to the Board of 
Selectmen my grateful appreciation for their uniform cour- 
tesy and cooperation, and also to the citizens generally for 
their generous support during the first year of my official 
efforts. 

JAMES McKAY, 
Chief of Police and Keeper of Lockup. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



To the Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen : ,We present herewith our report of this de- 
partment for the year ending Jan, 31st 1894. 

The hose house at Readville has been enlarged, giving 
a room for the men to hold their meetings, and a stall 
where a member of the company keeps his horse nights, and 
in the daytime when not using it, by which arrangement the 
company is enabled to make much better time in getting 
out, than in the past. 

800 feet of hose was bought in April last and was put in 
service. 1000 feet are needed this year to replace hose 
which have been in use for several years, and would not 
safely stand the hydrant pressure. 

The tire alarm has been extended, by adding 10 boxes 
requiring 4 miles more line wire and an increased battery, 
at a cost of $900, giving 28 street boxes and 1 special box 
in Central Station from hich all numbers can be runs;. 

The boxes are located so as to cover all parts of the town 
as well as can be done. 

During the year there have been 26 alarms rung in and 3 
still alarms, being nearly twice as many as last year. 

The room occupied in the basement of the Central Station 
by the Police Department takes up more than half of the 
room which is needed by this department. There is not 
room enough to care for our hose properly, especially in 
winter when the hose is frozen and very hard to handle, as 
we found after the fire in the Damon schoolhouse, when we 
had nearly 3000 feet of wet and icy hose to care for. We 
earnestly hope this condition can be changed by taking the 
lockup out of the premises of the Fire Department 

(56) 



57 

Last spring the Town authorized the Selectmen to con- 
tract for 16 additional hydrants. The Selectmen were un- 
able to come to any agreement with the Water Company, 
consequently the hydrants were not put in. 

We have the same opinion as a year ago, that the hydrants 
are a necessity, for better protection against destructive 
fires, in certain localities, especially in that section between 
Milton and the Trotting Park, which is without a hydrant 
except on the corner of Central Park avenue and Milton 
street. 

The cost of horses for hauling the apparatus to fires has 
been $603.50 for the year, double the amount for last year. 
The Board are of the opinion that horses should be placed 
in the Central Station, at least 2 pair. There would be no 
expense for harness as every piece of apparatus has swing- 
ing harnesses. 

We have increased the membership of the department by 
adding 7 men, making the membership, 3 engineers , 44 men, 
Superintendent of fire alarm and Steward of the Central 
House, 48 in all. 

LOCATION OF HYDE PARK FIRE ALARM BOXES. 

13. Grew School. 

14. Cleveland and Childs streets. 

15. Alden's Store. 

16. Cotton Mill. 

17. Buckingham and Readville streets. 

18. Car Sheds, River street. 

19. Hose 3 house, Milton street. 

23. Unitarian Church, Mt. Neponset. 

24. Woolen Mill, Special Call. 

25. American Tool. 

26. Hair Factory. 

28. Corner Stanley street and Central Park avenue. 

31. N. Y. & 1ST. E. R. R. crossing, Fairmount avenue. 

32. Beacon street and Milton avenue. 
34. Neponset avenue and Water street. 
So. Highland street and Fairmount avenue. 



58 

36. Summit street and Fairmount avenue. 

37. Dana avenue and Loring street. 

38. Tyler and Washington streets, Corriganville. 

42. Everett Square. 

43. Pierce and Walter streets. 

45. West and River streets. 

46. Paper Mills, East River street. 

47. Huntington avenue and Hubbard street. 

52. Central Fire Station. 

53. West street and Hyde Park avenue. 

54. Arlington street and Central avenue. 

56. Thatcher street and Hyde Park avenue. 

57. Colby's Store, Clarendon Hills. 

2. All Out. 22. No School 

Telephone 28-2. 

F. A. SWEET, 
WILLIAM HOLTHAM, 
F. T. GREENLOW, 

Engineers. 



59 



DEPARTMENT OFFICERS AND NUMBER OF MEN, 



F. A. SWEET, Chief Engineer. 

WM. HOLTHAM, Assistant Engineer and Clerk 

F. T. GREENLOW, Assistant Engineer. 



Hose Co. No 1. 

E. N.BULLARD, Foreman. 

C. M. V\ ANDLASS, Assistant Foreman. 

A. J. BOSWELL, Clerk, and seven men. 



Hose Co. No. 2. 

STEWART McKENZIE, Foreman. 
A. E. MASTERS, Assistant Foreman. 
W. G. ROBINSON, Clerk, and seven men. 



Hose Co. No. 3. 

J. H. O'BRIEN, Foreman. 

D. W. MAHONEY. Assistant Foreman. 

FRANK KUNKEL, Clerk, and three men. 



Hook and Ladder Co. No. 1. 

BENJ. RAFTER, Foreman. 

W. R. McDOUGALD, Assistant Foreman. 

J. H. TUCKERMAN, JR., Clerk, and nine men. 



Chemical Engine Co. No. 1. 



J. C. McDOUGALD, Foreman. 

M. J. FOLEY, Engineman. 

R. WARD, Clerk, and three men. 



10 
05 
00 



60 



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CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



The Cemetery Commissioners submit their third annual 

report for the financial year ending Jan. 31, 1895. They 

have received $9,267.98, as follows : 

Sale of lots, 

Single grave, 

Interment and receiving tomb charges, 

Foundation for monuments, 

Sale of wood, 

Balance from last year, 

Total, 
Appropriation, 

Expense, labor, etc., 

Paid Town Treasurer for lots and single 

graves, 
Paid for land, 

Balance on hand, $959 25 

For detailed statement of .Receipts and Expenditures, 
see financial statement accompanying this report. 

The past year the commissioners have completed the 
Receiving Tomb, and believe they have one which is ex- 
actly suited to the present and future needs of the town. 
They have built parts of Fairview drive, Aspen and Poplar 
avenues, as well as Magnolia, Laurel, Linden and Hyacinth 
paths, and graded a large plot for siugle graves. They 
have been instructed by the town to set apart a portion of 
the Cemetery for the use of the Catholic citizens, which 
they have done, and by the Spring they will have ready 
for use in this part of the Cemetery fifty lots, with avenues- 
and paths graded to these lots. 

(61) 



$1,975 00 




120 


00 




229 


00 




91 


25 




49 


75 




802 


98 




$3,267 98 




6,000 


00 








$9,267 98- 


$5,587 


73 




2,095 


00 




626 






i 


S,8,338 73- 







62 

By the additional work done the past year on the avenues 
and paths in the older part of the Cemetery, they have been 
able to grade many lots, and they have sixty- five ready for 
s€te . The town voted to give them the right to buy interven- 
ing lots for cemetery purposes, and during the past year they 
have purchased land from George A. Rowe and others, 
Dennis Mahoney and Jennie Swan. The Commissioners 
think it would be for the best interests of the town to finish 
Aspen Avenue, on which the plot for single graves is situ- 
ated. When completed, it will join Fairview Drive. They 
also advise the continuance of Fairview Drive to Elm 
Avenue, so that it will connect with White Oak Avenue, 
thus making a drive through the Cemetery. 

To make these improvements, together with the other 
necessary expenses, the Commissioners recommend an ap- 
propriation of $2,000 by the town. 

STATISTICS. 

1892. 1893. 1894. Total. 

Number of lots sold, 16 16 19 51 

Interments in lots, 10 40 16 66 

Interments in single graves, 22 32 54 

Removal from other cemeteries, 15 2 8 

In receiving tomb, 11 11 

GEORGE M. RICE, 
GEORGE E. WHITING, 
CHARLES F. JENNEY, 

Commissioners. 
Hyde Park, Feb. 1, 1895. 



SECOND ANNUAL REPORT OF PARK COM- 
MISSIONERS. 



For the same reasons as given last year, we recommend an 
appropriation of $2,000, for Park purposes. 

In our first annual report we stated that the Metropolitan 
Park Commissioners had voted to take Stony Brook Reser- 
vation and that probably the exact lines would be defined 
before our report was in print. While this statement was 
upon the best authority, yet the Board, entering upon its 
duties this year were destined to meet the opposition of a 
strong, interested influence, against all the outlines at the 
time proposed by the Metropolitan Commission. All pre- 
vious plans had taken some part of Grew's Woods border- 
ing on West street, between the corner of Austin street and 
the Boston line. 

The beautiful pine grove, north of Mr. Homan's house 
was included in one plan. We are informed that only a few 
years ago this grove was sold at a small price per acre. 
But we understand that it was represented to the Metropol- 
itan Commission that this land was all very valuable for 
house lots and would be very expensive. Of course, if this 
land is on the border of an improved Park, it does become 
valuable. In other words, if Stony Brook Reservation is 
cleared of underbrush, roads built and the public become 
better acquainted with the beauties of this locality, land 
just outside the park and opened up by park ways will be 
greatly enhanced in value. 

Other towns discovering that it was not known how the 
cost would be assessed, that the assessment was just as lia- 
ble to be upon the valuation of all the towns and cities in 

(63) 



64 

the Metropolitan district, as upon the benefit received by 
each municipality and also waking up to the importance of 
such a permanent improvement as a park, became sharp ri- 
vafj and urged the advantage to the public of taking certain 
land in their vicinity and in furtherance of their ideas in 
some cases offered to give money and land. Their argu- 
ments were good. When some urged the advantgage of 
taking beach land where so many of our people delight to go 
in summer, these arguments became dangerous to our in- 
terests. There was a time when a combination of owners 
interested to keep sufficient lands on the borders where it is 
supposed roads will be built, and of rivals wisely anxious 
to secure parks in their midst seemed likely to prove us to 
be false prophets, and to absolutely prevent our securing* 
any Metropolitan Park in our town. We discovered that 
eternal' vigilance is the price of a park as well as the price 
of liberty. 

However, on June 25th we were informed officially that 
Stony Brook Reservation had been taken by the Metropol- 
itan Commission, and that we must assent to or reject their 
taking at once. 

While we can recommend and advocate the selection of 
desirable locations, we have only the veto power when land 
is taken by the Metropolitan Commission. We cannot 
change lines nor accept a part, but must either accept or re- 
ject the whole. 

Our chairman, Col. Bachelder, was away and the feeling 
of the other members ot the Board are expressed by the fol- 
lowing resolutions copied from our records. 

Whereas we were this day (June 25,) at about two 
o'clock p. m., informed by the Secretary of the Metropoli- 
tan Park Commission that unless we assent to the taking of 
Stony Brook Reservation as outlined by it, and upon a plan 
never before seen by any member of our Board, so that such 
assent may be recorded at Dedham on the 27th inst., that the 



65 

taking by it in the town of Hyde Park would become void 
and of no effect, and that the money to be used therefor 
would be applied to the purchase of park land in another 
town and 

Whereas it leaves us no time to appeal to the Metropolitan 
Board, to have a conference and suggest needed changes,. 
now therefore 

Resolved, that we are of opinion that other land in our town ought 
to be added to Stony Brook Reservation and we protest against the 
method of giving us virtually one day only to consider this important 
question and no opportunity to consult with them, and that too after 
a radical change was made in the lines originally proposed by the 
Metropolitan Park Commission. 

Resolved, that we assent under protest, rather than run the chance 
of losing the Metropolitan Park in our town. 

Mr. Enneking was authorized to appear before the Met- 
ropolitan Commission to point out some of the mistakes 
made and urge needed changes. 

Oct. 15th while Mr. Ennekino' was on his vacation an 
amended plan w r as presented to the board which merely con- 
nected certain lines and made one or two of the changes 
suggested by us, and to this we also assented. The Metro- 
politan Reservation contains four hundred and seventy five 
acres, two hundred and eighty five acres of which are in 
Hyde Park. 

Land has already been taken and at no distant day a park 
w T ay will connect this Reservation with the Arnold Aboretum 
and one can then drive from Hyde Park to Boston Common, 
all the way in a park or on a park way. Before many 
years a park way will also connect this Reservation with 
Blue Hills. While we have not obtained everything we de- 
sired or hoped, yet we have secured substantially all that 
was requisite. 

A connection, in Hyde Park, with West street is very de- 
sirable, and we were especially anxious to add the pine 
grove before referred to, as it would be directly on the 



6Q 

shore of the old Mill Pond, of which the Smith Ice Poud 
forms a part. Few realize what a beautiful lake, at small 
cost, may here be developed. 

But on the whole we feel like congratulating the town 
upon securing this magnificent park with its grand possibili- 
ties of beauty and future developement. 

By the wise action of our town in adopting at an early date 
the Park Act and electing a Board of Commissioners to look 
out for her interest, we are now in a position to congratu- 
late ourselves while neighboring towns which were less ac- 
tive begin to fear they have lost their opportunity. 

The Metropolitan Commission has not yet determined any 
of the interior roads or paths in this Reservation, but there 
will be a road on the outside boundary from Washington 
street, in Boston to River street in Hyde Park, which will 
probably be constructed the coming year, but not in an ex- 
pensive manner. The woods will be cleared of dead limbs 
and debris, but no other changes or improvements are like- 
ly to be made in the immediate future. 

The Park Commissioners of Dedham are anxious to se- 
cure a park way from their town to be connected with the 
park way to be built in Stony Brook Reservation and thus 
with Hyde Park. This necessitates the taking of more land, 
a part of which is in our town. We do not expect the Met- 
ropolitan Commission to take any more land in this vicinity 
out of their present appropriations, but if the abuttors on 
the proposed way are alive to their own financial interests 
they will offer to give the land for such a way, as it will 
make their remaining land more valuable. The plan is an 
excellent one and of mutual advantage to both towns, though 
doubtless of more importance to Dedham than to H}^de 
Park. 

The advantages of a park way along Stony Brook con- 
necting Franklin Park with Hyde Park at West street near 
Austin were presented to our Board. Upon investigation 



67 

it appeared so desirable that we voted to request the Boston 
Park Commission to name a time and place for a conference 
to consider the question. 

They replied that such a meeting at this time would be of 
little use, as owing to the lack of funds their Board could 
not now consider the matter. 

This subject is of importance, not only loeally, but from 
the Metropolitan standpoint. 

To transfer Stony Brook from private to public control 
and keep it from pollution would be wise, if not a necessary 
sanitary precaution. 

By a succession of dams, beautiful ponds could be con- 
structed for skating and boating. 

At the present time the land along the proposed route can 
be purchased at so reasonable a price, many abuttors being 
willing to give it outright, that it seems to us immediate ac- 
tion ought to be taken to secure that part of Stony Brook 
not now under control of the Metropolitan Commission, or 
of the city of Boston, but it is only by joint action that any 
thing can be accomplished. 

On Dec. 22nd, we were pained to learn of the death of 
our Chairman, John B. Bachelder. The Board called a 
meeting and adopted the following resolutions : 

Whereas, in God's appointed time and in the fullness of 
years, death has cut down our chairman and our friend John 
B. Bachelder, therefore 

Resolved, that in his death our Committee lose a wise and enthsi- 
astic member, our town an upright, progressive citizen, who was 
ever ready to plan for its development and improvement, and our 
country a man of foresight and perseverance, grandly successful in 
his life work, the perpetuating by picture story and marble, historic 
memories of patriotism, valor and heroism at Gettysburg. 

JOHN J. ENNEKING, Chairman, 
WILBUR H. POWERS, Secretary. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES, 



INCIDENTALS. 



Paid Henry A. Rich, rent of town offices, $812 50 

Henry A. Rich, rent of Waverly Hall, 30 00 

Y. M. C. A., rent of hall, 131 50 

S. R. Moseley, printing town reports, adver- 
tising, stamps, etc., 832 60 

F. E. Langley, printing and advertising, 60 00 

Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting town 

offices, 138 34 

Dedham and Hyde Park Gas and Electric 

Light Co., lighting town offices, 14 70 

W. F. Dodge, services as janitor and cash 

paid out, 358 39 

Henry B. Tenw, obtaining, recording, return- 
ing and indexing births, marriages and 
deaths, 

Adams Express Co., expressing, 

United States Express Co., expressing, 

Henry Todd, Jr., dinners at election, 

Hyde Park Ice Cream Co., dinners at elec- 
tion, 

A. F. Hay ward, repairing clock, 

W. H. Plummer, labor and stock, 

J. V. Lufkin, labor and stock 

A. Raymond, carraige hire, 

R. Corson, carriage hire and expressing, 

A. Fisher, stationery, 

A. W. Story, stationery, 

F. L. Hodgdon & Co., stationery, 

Thorp, Martin Co., stationery, 

M. R. Warren, stationery, 

Counters and ballot clerks at elections, 

F. C. Graham, returning deaths, 

F. C. Graham, expense burial of Patrick Far- 

rington, 35 00' 

(68) 



187 30 


2 90 


50 


37 90 


14 75 


2 50 


15 70 


4 30 


25 00 


43 25- 


1 80 


4 50 


25 86 


46 52 


1 25 


128 00 


49 75 



69 



Paid H. C. Dimcmd & Co., stamp and pad, 
Swett & Blasdale, wireing, 
Henry B. Terry, services to Selectmen, 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., Telephone service, 
C. E. Palmer, painting town offices, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., coal, 
John Crosby, returning deaths, 
John Crosby, expense burial Patrick Cox, 

A. G. Worden, supplies, 
W. W. Hilton, labor and materials, 
-George Sanford, collecting taxes, 1893-94 

1894 
copying, 
Henry B. Terry, insurance premiums, 
Sampson, Murdock & Co., directory, 
Henry S. Bunton, insurance premiums, 
Little, Brown & Co., book, 
Edmund Davis, transmitting assessors' deeds, 
C. H. Lord, bill posting, 

B. F. Tyler, supplies, 
Zimmerman & Co., window shades, 
Geo. W. Chapman, services clerk to assessors, 
E. J. Chandler, supplies, 
•Chas. Lewis, stove and repairing, 
U. Holzer, binding town reports, 
Henry M. Meek, assessors blanks, 
I. J. Brown, rent of hall, 
Hartford Steam Boiler and Inspection Insur- 
ance Co., insurance premiums, 

A. W. Story, raising building, 

L. P. Winchenbaugh, register of voters, 

A. T. Rogers, register of voters, 

Wm. S. O'Brien, register of voters, 

Henry B. Terry, register of voters and cleri- 
cal services, 

J. M. Kiggen, examining cows, 

.John W. Smith, ice, 

W. H. Barritt, photographs, 

Commonwealth of Mass., ink, 

Chas. E. Jenney, witness case Bohannon vs. 

town, 22 20 

E. A. W. Hammett, witness case Bohannon 

ys. town., 6 85 





75 




60 


200 00 


47 


30 


13 


81 


46 


00 


15 


00 


35 


00 


1 


25 


27 


01 


388 


31 


1000 


00 


40 


00 


171 00 


5 


00 


13 


75 


6 


50 


50 


00 


7 


00 


2 


00 


7 


00 


100 


00 




70 


67 


79 


21 


85 


8 


00 


5 


00 


62 


50 


40 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 


30 


00 


90 00 


80 


00 


12 


00 


7 


00 


6 


17 



70 



Paid W. S. Everett, witness case Bohannon vs. 

town, 15 00* 

A. S. Holmes, returning births, 5 00 

C. H. Hallowell, «• " 50' 
Chas. C. PartriQge, " " 3 75 
W. S. Everett, " " 4 25- 
Lucy R. Barney, " " 2 25 
J. T. Tibbetts, " " 4 00 
J. C. Lincoln, " " 6 75 
H. R, Hitchcock, " " 4 50 

E. H. Baxter, " " 7 50 

D. J. Hanlon, " " 9 00 
M. Ratter, removing halliards, 3 00' 
H. M. Stowers, cash paid out, 2 42 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and materials, 20 51 
Library Bureau, index cards. 2 40' 
Geo W. Lockwood, clerk to Selectmen, 150 00' 
James E. Cotter, professional services, 800 39 
Cyrus Gorman, services case Haney vs. town, 133 00 
Dennis P. McDermott, services case Haney 

vs. town, 7 50 
Win. U. Fairbairn, services case Haney vs. 

town, 25 00 
Edward F. Stone, services case Haney vs. 

town, 20 00 

County of Norfolk, entry of bj- laws and copy, 4 00 



Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, 
Amount of appropriation, 



$ 501 38 
7,100 00 



5,932 87 



$7,601 38 



Balance unexpended, $668 51 

Note. — Of this balance on incidentals $500 was set apart by the 
town for assessors plans. 



POLICE. 

Paid Chas E. Jenney, services as Chief of Police 

and keeper of lockup and cash paid_out, 174 98 
James McKay, services as Chief of Police, 

and keeper of lockup and cash paid out, 1,161 35- 



71 



Paid Andrew D. Rooney, police duty and cash 
paid out, 
John M. Brown, police duty and cash paid 

out. 
Police duty as per pay-rolls, 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co.. lighting, 
W. H. Plumber, repairing, 
R. Corson, use of teams, 
A. Raymond, use of teams, 
S. B. Balkham & Co., coal, 
F. W. Darling & Co., coal, 
W. J. Ellis, roll top desk, 
S. R. Moseley, printing and stamps, 
F. E. Langley, printing, 
Chas. Lewis, supplies, 
E. J. Chandler, supplies, 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service, 
John P. Lovell Arms Co., arms, etc., 
J. C. Tingley, lettering, 
Hyde Park Clothing Co., uniforms. 

A. P. Bickmore, cots and mattresses, 
John A. Monroe, stamps and pad, 
Quincy Dyer, hardware, 

C. L. Farnsworth, lunches, July 4th, 
Richard VV. Gould, whitewashing, 
L. TV. Berry & Co., supplies, 
Thorp, Martin Co., stationery, 
J. Johnston, removing iron frame, 

B. F. Tyler, supplies, 

Geo. W. Simmons & Co., uniforms, 

Chas. E. Palmer, setting glass, 

A. W. Mitchell Mfg. Co., badges, 

Swett & Blasclale, wireing electric signal, 

Matthew McPherson, police duty, 

R. Williams, labor and stock, 

L. W. Farkhurst, keys, etc., 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year. 
Amount of appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



1,050 56 



1,058 50 


1,031 21 


36 74 


3 77 


65 00 


21 50 


57 25 


18 00 


25 00 


14 50 


4 25 


2 65 


6 43 


23 50 


29 35 


1 00 


61 86 


42 00 


75 


93 


3 40 


6 00 


1 05 


8 00 


2 50 


98 


103 25 


1 00 


6 00 


18 00 


142 00 


6 40 


2 40 


$5,192^06 


$ 387 26 


5,500 00 


$5,887 26 



$695 20 



72 



HIGHWAYS. 

Paid labor as per pay rolls, $3,946 48 

J. S. Coveney, building sidewalk, 79 56 

R. Corson, use of teams, etc., 52 35 

E. A. W. Hammett, surveying, 159 00 

C. E. Davenport, removing sand, 81 15 
P. Eooney, labor, 23 05 

D. W. Mahoney, labor, 133 50 
Smith, Collins & Co., supplies, 7 59 
Stewart McKenzie, snow plow, 15 00 
W. H. Plummer, repairing, 20 09 
Boston Blower Co., repairing and supplies, 18 43 
American Tool & Machine Co., crusher ap- 
paratus, 62 87 

S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, etc. 508 31 

Cleary & Downey, sand, 120 00 

■Quincy Dyer, hardware, 92 10 

Geo. H. Sampson & Co., supplies, 83 34 

David Higgins, labor and stock, 146 77 

Conn & Glynn, blacksmithing, 108 31 

H. M. Stowers, use of horse, 187 50 

Mary M. Stevens, land damages, 127 38 

A. Raymond, use of team, 12 00 

Cornelius Callahan, jacket, 17 50 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and materials, 7 02 
Ames Plow Co., harrow, 7 67 
The Brainard Foundry, crusher apparatus, 44 08 
S. C. Nightingale & Childs, crusher appa- 
ratus, 128 46 

Brainard Milling Machine Co., labor and 

supplies, 10 15 

Perrin, Seaman & Co., plow and screen, 57 25 

Wm. Gallison, pipes, 4 67 

A. J. Wellington, powder, 93 49 

Miles & Morrison, oil, 4 44 

Hill, Clark & Co., inspirator, 11 25 

E. J. Chandler, hardware, 14 09 
M. O'Connor, labor, 1 00 
Chas. Lewis, labor and materials, 28 28 
Jas. Ahem, vice, 2 00 
Waite, Williamson & Co., cylinder oil, 31 85 

G. L. Richardson, surveying, 10 00 



73 



IPaid Arch R. Sampson, rubber boots, 
N. Y&N. E. R. R., freight, 
Underhay Oil Co., grease, 
Geo- Tacey, repairing sidewalk, 
Wm U. Fairbairn, inspecting boiler, 

E. R. Morrison, labor and stock, 

F. W. Sawtelle & Co., coal and wood, 
Norfolk County entry fee for relocating Hyde 

Park and Central Park avenues, 
N. Y. TSi H. & H. R. R., ties, 
C. L. & E. S. Alden, salt, 
C. H. Cruminett, labor, 
Heirs of Geo. Hail, use of ledge, 
S. A. Tuttle, loam and paving, 
Stephen A. Tucker, stone and gravel, 
George W. Fowle, labor, 
W. F. Wheeler, snow plow, 

A. B Black, snow plow, 

B. H. Hardy, concrete, 
F. E. Langley, printing, 
Thomas Corrigan, cutting and laying curb- 
ing, 

Cr. 
By balance from last year, $ 10 86 

Appropriation Feb. 6th, 1894 (unemployed), 2,000 00 
Mch 29th, 1894, 4.000 00 

Nov. 28tn. 1894, from sale of 
land, $1,100 00; from sale of road ma- 
terial, $426 80, 1,526 80 

Balance unexpended, $475 04 



9 


00 


99 


00 


1 


50 


3 


00 


10 


00 


13 


48 


7 


63 


6 


00 


3 


00 




50 


2 


70 


100 00 


13 


31 


16 


20 


9 


00 


75 


00 


40 


00 


22 


45 


1 


50 



$7,062 62 



$7,537 66 



PERMANENT IMPROVEMENT. 

Taid labor as per pay rolls, $6,813 10 

Geo. W. Fowle, Agt., gravel, 150 00 

Cleary & Downey, sand, 4 00 

Thomas Corrigan, cutting and laying stone, 142 72 

Thomas Corrigan, gravel, 200 00 

K. W. Dodge, concrete, 682 96 
W. R. Fleming & Co., expense of exhibiting 

steam roller, 50 00 



74 



Paid Stephen Tucker, stone and gravel, 
Thomas Burns, gravel, 
The Brainard Foundry, repairs to crusher. 
H. F. Hawkes, curbing, 
Portland Stone Ware Co., drain pipes, 
A. E. W. Hammett, surveying, 
N. Y. N. H. & H. R. R. freight, 



Cr 



By amount of appropriation, 



136 


05 


71 


80 


3 


90 


1,196 


17 


161 


60 


362 


20 


25 


50 




<siio nno no 








$10,000 00 



SIDEWALKS. 



Paid B. H. Hardy, concrete, 
Kirk W. Dodge, concrete, 
E. A. W. Hammett, surveying, 

Cr. 

By cash received from street assessments, 
Cash received from sidewalk assessments, 

Balance on hand, 



$682 


05 


442 


41 


60 


48 


$ 194 55 


1,029 


93 



$38 91 



FAIRMOUNT BRIDGE. 

Paid S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid Hook and Ladder No. 1, pay roll, 
Chemical, " " 

Hose Company, " " 

Hose Company No. 2, 
Hose Company No. 3, " 

Frank Kunkel use of horse, 
F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and material, 
E. A. Hawley, services as steward, and cash 

paid out, 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, 
R. Corson, use of horses and expressing, 
A. W. Mitchell Mfg. Co., badges, 
E. V. Ensign, labor and supplies, 



$566 


66 


282 


00 


479 


15 


483 


32 


279 


12 


83 


75 


3 


65 


978 


70 


167 


34 


656 


51 


30 50 


13 


82 



1,185 57 
L,224 48 

$53 75 

$53 75 



75 



Paid Sawyer, Walbridge & Briggs, chairs, 
Chas. Galligan, supplies, 
J. H. Tuckerman, linoleum and laying same, 
L. J. French, brushes, 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., lantern 

holders, 
Quincy Dyer, hardware, 
F. A. Sweet, services as engineer, 
Wm. Holtham, " 
F. T. Greenlow, " 
R. Corson, " " 

S. I. Sweet, clerk to engineers, 
Geo. M. Stevens, fire alarm apparatus, 
A. W. Story, electric bell, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 
J. Johnston, repairing, 
Fabien Fire Hose Co., hose, 
Wm. Rafter, labor and stock on Readville 

House, 
J. Mackintosh, repairing and supplies, 
J. A. & W. Bird & Co., chemicals, 
Edward F. Stone, electric gong, 
Chas. Lewis repairing, 
Wm. Galligan. labor, 

E. B. Oliver, painting, etc., 
McBarron & Co., screws and washers, 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service, 

F. E. Langley, printing, 
Cornelius Callahan Co., repairing hose, 
Greenlow & Cutting, mason work, 
Swett & Blasdale, electrical supplies, 
F. L. Hodgdon & Co., stationery, 
American Tool & Machine Co., repairing en- 
gine, 

Scrannage Bros., repairing chemical, 
A. S. Jackson, lanterns, 
Hyde Park Water Co., moving hydrant, 
F. W. Sawtelle & Co., coal and wood, 

Cr. 

By balance from last year, I 

Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, $1 06 



12 


00 




10 


09 




20 


17 

70 




6 


00 




21 


79 




75 


00 




75 


00 




37 


50 




37 


50 




25 


00 




785 


69 




2 


00 




44 


17 




64 


15 




400 


00 




403 


59 




16 


80 




32 


88 




9 


00 




17 


33 




40 


95 




21 


00 




12 


95 




63 


90 




9 50 




42 


67 




26 


43 




12 


70 
35 




12 


96 




70 


39 




24 00 




26 


79 




13 


75 

<!fifi 4-99 


22 










28 




6,500 


00 

fifi .oftf) 


9,R 



76 



FAIRVXEW CEMETERY. 



Paid labor as per pay rolls and cash paid out, 
Geo. H. Peare, mason work, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, cement etc., 
Prank Rogers, labor, 
B. H. Hardy, concrete, 
American Tool & Machine Co., picks, 
W. F. Badger, gates, 

E. A. W. Hammett, surveying, 
Brainard Milling Machine Co., draughting, 

F. E. Langley, printing, 
Philander Allen, stones, 
James N. White, posts, 
H. J. Rice & Co., posts, 
Lots in Fairview Cemetery, 

Cr. 

-By balance unexpended from last year, 
Amount of appropriation, 
Money received year ending Jan. 31, 1893: 
Interments, $53 00 

Wood sold, 3 00 

Year ending Jan 31, 1894 : 
Interments, $166 00 

Foundations, 89 59 

Labor on G. A. R. lot, 32 00 
Year ending, Jan. 31, 1895: 
Interments, 229 00 

Foundations, 91 25 

Wood sold, 49 75 

Balance unexpended, 



$4,270 38 

322 31 

69 59 

384 60 

121 22 

5 00 

30 00 

153 38 

56 75 

4 50 

50 00 

60 00 

60 00 

626 00 



$ 459 39 
6,000 00 



56 00 



237 59 



SALARIES. 

Paid Amos H. Brainard, services as Selectman, 
Samuel T. Elliott, 

George E. Whiting, " " 

Thomas S. Waters, " " 

George Miles, " " 

Henry B. Terry, services as Town Clerk, 
Henry S. Bunton, services as Town Treas- 
urer, 



5,213 73 



370 00 



$7,172 98 



$959 25 



$100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
100 00 
250 00 

400 00 



77 



Paid R. P. Moseley, services as Assessor, 
Geo. W. Chapman, " " 

Chas. E. Morrison, " " 

John Terry, services Oversseer of Poor, 
Charles Lewis, " " " 

Geo. E. Haven, " " " 

A. D. Holmes, services on Board of Health, 
J. C. Lincoln, " " " 

E. C. Farwell, 

Chas. G. Chick, services on School Committe, 
R. M. Johnson, 
J. F. Lewis, 
Louise M. Wood, 
Augusta L. Hanchett, 
Helen M. Dean, 
Geo. E. Whiting, services as Cemetery Com. 
Chas. F. Jenney, " " " 

Geo. M. Rice, 

W. D. Lovell, services as Auditor, 
W. M. Rhodes, 
Asa J. Adams, " " 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation, 



300 


00 


300 


00 


300 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


100 00 


100 


00 


100 


00 


50 


00 


50 00 


50 00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 




W 47^ OD 




^po,*±( o yj\j 




$3,475 00 



STEEET LIGHTS. 

Paid Hyde Park Electric Light Co., $7,966 41 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, $ 266 41 

Amount of appropriation, 7,700 00 



FIRE HYDRANTS. 
Paid Hyde Park Water Co., 



Cr. 



By amount of appropriation, 



STEAM ROAD ROLLER. 

Paid A. S. Kelley Co., 



By amount of appropriation, 



Cr. 



$7,966 41 

$5,250 00 
$5,250 00 

$3,500 00 
$3,500 00 



78 



POST 121, G. A. R. 

[Paid Post 121, Grand Army of the Republic, 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, 



CLAIM OF NANCY BOHANNON 

Paid judgment, 
By appropriation, 



Cr. 



CLAIM OF SARAH S. FULLER 

Paid judgment, 



Cr. 



By appropriation, 



POOR ACCOUNT. 



Paid Taunton Lunatic Hospital board of insane, 
Worcester " " " " 

Mass. School for Feeble Minded, " 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts, " 

Mrs. Emeline Blackmail, board of insane, 
Mrs. A. F. Kenny, board of poor, 
Mrs. John Kennedy, " 
Mrs Sarah Armour, " " 

City of Boston, aid to poor, 
City of Lowell, " " 

City of Cambridge, aid to poor, 
City of Taunton, 
City of New Bedford," 
Town of No. Attleboro, aid to poor. 
Town of Attleboro, " " 

Alfred Foster, " " 

S. B. Balkam & Co., fuel, 
F. W. Darling & Co., " 
F. W. Sawtelle&Co., " 
Cemetery Commissioners, fuel, 
C. L. & E. S. Alden, groceries, 
Miles & Morrison, " 

Smith, Collins & Co., 
E. D. Savage, " 

.A. G. Worden, " 





$150 00 




$150 00 


fNON. 






$551 27 




$551 27 


,LER. 


$3,962 74 




$3,962 74 


$652 29 




261 86 




169 43 




121 21 




169 46 




156 43 




64 63 




87 94 




229 34 




4 50 




7 02 




95 56 




81 50 




■ 30 00 




5 00 




130 33 




43 86 




27 53 




4 05 




28 25 




1 50 




22 00 




42 00 




104 00 




3 00 





79 



C. C. Howland & Co., Boston, groceries and 

provisions, 
Tyler & Berry, groceries and provisions, 
William Holtham, provisions, 
G. F. Estes, rent, 
Elizabeth Murray, rent, 
Margaret J. Hickey, admx., rent, 

E. D. Brooks, (Cambridge) rent, 
T. D Mulrey, Boston, rent, 

C. E. Jenney, Agt., rent, 

John A. Crowley, medicine, 

Mark E.Noble, 

Alexander G. Childs, " 

Dr. A. D. Holmes, services as town physician, 

G. W. Chapman, clerical services and cash 
paid out, 

Chas. Lewis, car fares, etc., 

Geo. E. Haven, car fares, etc., 

H. R. Hitchcock, M. D., examination of in- 
sane person, 

F. C. Graham, burials, 
R. Corson, express, 
Ryan's Express, 

Frank E. Langley, printing, 

Thorp, Martin Co., order book, 

J. L. Fairbands & Co., record book, etc., 

J. D. Kazar, boots, 

C. E. Jenney, cash paid out care of lodgers 

at lockup. 
James McKay, cash paid out care af lodgers 

at lockup, 
C. L. Farnsworth, crackers for lockup, 
Military aid, 
Cash paid as per vouchers on file, 



116 


26 


55 


53 


11 


73 


96 


00 


24 00 


79 


00 


60 00 


45 


75 


15 


50 


27 


65 


4 85 


2 


15 


150 


00 


101 


85 


13 


00 


10 


20 


4 00 


25 


00 




50 




35 


2 


00 


6 


67 


11 


00 


3 


00 



8 00 

44 

43 25 

180 00 

237 05 



$3,920 98 



Cr. 



By cash balance on hand, 

Amount of appropriation, 
Amount received from State, etc., 

Cash balance on hand, 



$1,409 98 

3,000 00 

705 89 

$1,194 89 



$5,115 87 



80 
PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 

Paid H. A. B. Thompson, librarian, 

Mary A. Hawley, assistant librarian, 

Henry A. Rich, agent, rent, 

P. H. Blodgett, janitor, 

M. E. Taylor, janitor, 

Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting rooms, 174 28 

William B. Kollock, insurance, 

H. D. Noyes & Co., stationery, etc., 

Post office, Hyde Park, 

Carter, Rice & Co., paper, 

S. B. Balkam & Co., fuel, 

Corson's Express, 

Adams 1 Express Co., 

Ryan's Express, 

A. G. Worden, supplies, 
J. A. Paine, carpenter work, 
W. H. Plummer, hanging sign, 
F. J. Barnard & Co., binding, 
E. J. Chandler, floor brush, 
Swett & Blasdale, changing switch, 

B. E. Phillips, painting sign, 
Quincy Dyer, hardware, 
National Binder Co., binding, 
H. C. Dimond & Co., stamp, 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, $148 70 

PURCHASE OP BOOKS. 

Paid DeWolf, Fiske & Co., 404 71 

J. G. Cupler &Co., 2 50 

Daniel T. Taylor, 7 50 

D. Eldridge, 5 00 

Lee & Shepard, 2 00 

Estes & Lauriat, 10 10 

John C. Crane, 1 00 



400 


00 


300 


00 


400 


00 


96 


50 


34 00 


5, 174 


28 


156 00 


16 


84 


7 


25 


13 


72 


52 


00 


26 


50 




30 


4 


05 


1 


60 


31 


37 


1 


15 


31 


27 


1 


10 




75 


11 


00 




73 


4 50 


5 


00 


37 


50 

flJ1 £07 AT* 




^pljOUf ^£1 


£ 106 


11 


1,850 00 

$1,956 11 



81 



Paid Oliver Ditson & Co., 

Chas. Jacobus, general agent, 

H. D. Noyes &Co., 

Balcli Bros., 

J. B. Miller & Co., 

The National Tribune, 

W. Barton, 

D. Appleton & Co., 

J. H. Lamb, general manager, 

F. J. Barnard & Co., 



Cr. 



By balance unexpended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



6 78 




21 00 




158 70 




12 50 




10 00 




1 00 




1 00 




6-00 




27 00 




32 86 







$712 65 


$ 60 12 




710 05 




: 


£ $800 17 



$87 82 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 

TEACHERS' SALARIES. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Paid Jere M. Hill, 

Emerson Rice, 
W. M. Cannon. 
S. G. Greenwood, 
A. W. Lowe, 
P. J. Flanders, 
Anna M. Linscott, 
Anna W. Edwards, 
Lillian E. Downes, 
Mary C. Howard, 
Marion K. Dean, 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



Paid VV. F. Sayward, 

Arthur W. Armstrong, 
E. de Senancour, 
Julia E. Donovan, 
Dora F. Hastings, 
Dora M. Wiggin, 



$2,000 00 
1,000 00 
600 00 
150 00 
300 00 
210 00 
600 00 
600 00 

30 00 
570 00 

30 00 



$200 00 
800 00 
515 00 
500 00 
450 00 

200 oo- 



,120 00 



82 

Paid Florence E. Barker, 200 00 

Grace M. Tuxbury, 80 00 

W. A. Boardman, 60 00 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 




Paid E. W. Cross, 


$1,400 00 


Mary C. Howard, 


27 50 


Helen P. Cleaves, 


547 50 


Marg. E. Roe, 


486 25 


M. P. Winckenbaugh, 


430 00 


Florence A. Dunbar, 


200 00 


H. E. Henry, 


427 50 


M. E. Le Bourveau, 


200 00 


H. F. Packard, 


500 00 


J. S. Hammond, 


500 00 


Helen A. Perry, 


500 00 


Helen O. Thompson, 


450 00 


D. A. Preston, 


60 00 


GREW SCHOOL. 




Paid Frank H. Dean, 


$1,400 00 


Mary A. Wins low, 


275 00 


Eda M. Perry, 


200 00 


E. M. George, 


450 00 


Marg. A. Hanlon, 


500 00 


Marg. E. Bertram, 


500 00 


Fannie E. Hirlow, 


500 00 


Blanche L. Bright, 


457 50 


Agnes J. Campbell, 


500 00 


Jennie F. Ellis, 


425 00 


Nellie M. Howes, 


450 00 


Bessie C. Sparrell, 


450 00 


Adah F. Whitney, 


435 00 


Nellie J. Wentworth, 


50 00 


W. A. Boardman, 


60 00 



$3,005 00 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Paid D. G. Thompson, $1,400 00 

Annie B. Davis, 495 00 

Cora J. Buker, 50 00 

F. A. Putnam, 480 00 



'28 75 



,652 50 






83 



Paid M. L. Butland, 




487 50 




Sarah E. Roome, 




450 00 




Emily Woods, 
A. E. Batchelder, 




475 00 
450 00 




E. B. Freeman, 




450 00 




E. S. Howes, 




450 00 




Lena B. Winter, 




437 50 




Ella J. Brown, 




160 00 




D. A. Preston, 




60 00 


$5,845 00 




BUTLER SCHOOL. 




Paid Grace B. Gidney, 




1416 25 




Ella J. Brown, 


MUSIC. 


40 00 


$456 25 






Paid Elizabeth M. Dodge, 


TRUANT OFFICER. 




$700 00 


Paid Andrew D. Rooney, 
Henry V. Harwood, 




$125 00 
100 00 


$225 00 



FUEL AND JANITORS. 

Paid Hyde Park Times for advertising, 
F. W. Darling^ Co., foi- 
ls tons coal, Fairmount, 
16 tons coal. High, 
15 tons coal, Greenwood, 
1 ton stove coal, Butler, 
1 1-4 cords wood, High, 
1 cord wood, Grew, 

1 cord wood, Greenwood, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., for 

50 tons coal, Fairmount, 
30 2-3 tons coal, High, 
40 tons coal, Greenwood, 
65 tons coal, Grew, 
40 tons coal, Damon, 
F. W. Sawtelle & Co., for 

2 cords wood, Fairmount, 
2 cords wood, High, 

2 cords wood, Greenwood, 
2 cords wood, Grew, 
2 cords wood, Damon, 



$■ 2 50 



84 


60 


90 


24 


84 60 


6 00 


7 


19 


5 


75 


5 


76 


241 


50 


147 


99 


193 20 


313 


95 


193 


20 


9 


50 


9 


50 


9 50 


9 


50 


9 


50 



84 

Paid O. A. Cook, janitor, High, 
J. A. Peterson, janitor, Grew, 
M. Kappler, janitor, Damon, 
A. Lord, janitor, Greenwood, 

A. Cook, janitor, Butler, 

B. H. Howes, janitor, Fai'rmount, 
John Haigh, janitor, Greenwood, 



Deficit from last year, 

$32,349 22 

Cr 
Appropriation, $32,300^00 

Deficit, $ 49 22 



300 


00 




360 


00 




200 


00 




324 


00 




60 


00 




360 


00 




36 


00 








$3,068 98 








$31,801 48 






547 74 



EVENING SCHOOLS. 

Paid Frost & Adams, for drawing paper, 

Thompson, Brown & Co., book-keeping blanks, 
Geo. E. Webb, making drawing frame, 
Dedham & Hyde Park Gas & Electric Light 

Co., gas, 
S. R. Moseley, advertising and printing, 
H. V. Harwood, services as police, 
O. A. Cook, cleaning Everett Building, 
W. H. Plummer, labor and stock, 
F. W. Gleason & Co., gas piping, 
Hyde Park Times, advertising, 
Chas. H. Lord, circulars and posting, 
W. D. Ward, stationery, 
Damrell & Upham, stenography books, 
Walter E. Piper, teaching, 
A. E. Upham, " 

P. H. Blodgett, 
J. W. Phelan, 
A. W. Lowe, " 

E. C. Tourtellotte, " 
O. A. Cook, janitor, 



$3 20 


7 90 


4 12 


32 45 


12 25 


4 00 


4 00 


5 50 


14 17 


2 50 


7 00 


85 


8 00 


134 00 


34 50 


63 00 


64 50 


84 00 


147 00 


74 00 



$706 94 



85 

Cr. 

By balance from last year, $264 84 

Appropriation, 600 00 861 34 

Balance unexpended, $157 40 

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOLS. 

Paid Geo. E. Webb, for 38 lessons in carpentry, 

$95 00 
Extra labor and materials, 16 25 



$111 25 




9 55 




1 05 




15 26 


$137 11 


$ 53 06 




100 00 


153 06 




$15 95 



M. C. Warren, for knives and fixtures, 

Quincy Dyer, for supplies, 

S. B. Balkam & Co., for lumber, 

Cr. 

Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 

HIGH SCHOOL LABORATORY. 

Paid Miller & Weltch, for 1 mer. barometer, $12 00 

Cr. 
Balance from last year, . 

Balance unexpended, 

HIGH SCHOOL FURNITURE. 

Balance from last year, unexpended, $5 57 

MASSACHUSETTS FUND. 

Balance from last year, unexpended, $7 cl 




SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Paid Young Men's Ch. Association, for rent, $22 50 

Swett & Blasdale, electrical work and repairs, 41 55 
A. W. Dunbar, painting and glazing, 42 55 

F. W. Gleason & Co., plumbing, piping, etc., " 16 74 



86 

R. Corson, expressing, 

Ryan's Express, expressing, 

J. McDermott, plumbing, 

Smith & Collins, 5 gals, oil, 

Norfolk Connty Gazette, printing, 

Jere M. Hill, cash paid out for expenses, 

O. A. Cook, extra labor, 

Dedham & Hyde Park Gas and Electric Co., 

gas, 
Thorp & Martin, mimeo. supplies, 
Hyde Park Times, printing, 
Adams, Express, expressing, 
C. H. Fogg, filling 45 diplomas, 
G. H. Haskell, ribbon for diplomas, 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 
C. R. Higbee, jr., services as armorer, 
C. E. Palmer, glazing, 
Thos. Sweeney, labor in school yard, 
John McKenna, labor in school yard, 
Quincy Dyer, borax and oil, 

F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 

G. H. Peare, work on boiler, 
A. Raymond, sleigh hire, 
A. H. Richardson, removing partition, etc., 

E. J. Chandler, hardware supplies, 
Geo. S. Perry & Co., 16 desks and chairs, 
L. W. Parkhurst, keys, 
W. H. Plumber, oak lumber, 
Alex. McLean, painting tin roof, 
L. J. French, supplies, 
J. A. Cross, repairing slate roof, 
J. V. Lufkin, labor and materials, 
Rinaldo Wiliiams, work on windows, 
P. B. Taylor, care of arms, 
J. H. Tuckerman, repairing chairs and flag, 
H. H. Poore, 1 dozen towels, 

FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Paid Quincy Dyer, hardware supplies, 
L. W. Parkhurst, keys and labor, 

F. W. Gleason & Co., steam piping and 

plumbing, 79 32. 



12 


50' 


6 


60 


2 


00 




50 


3 


50 


3 


90 


37 


05 


48 


15 


5 


00 


18 


50 




80 


6 


99 


7 


15 


8 


00 


20 00 


3 


85 


3 


50 


29 


97 


1 


09 


2 


00 


5 


38 


1 


00 


106 


19 


6 


45 


69 


60 




50 




50 


6 


00 


2 


50 


23 


70 


11 


98 


2 


80 


10 


00 


3 


85 


1 


38 


$14 52 


7 


40 



87 

Paid R. Corson, expressing, 
Ryan's Express, expressing, 
Norfolk County Gazette, printing, 
Geo. E. Webb, labor and material, 

B. H. Howes, extra labor, 
W. H. Plummer, labor and materials, 
G. H.Haskell, ribbon for diplomas, 
Irving P. Fox, examination records, 
F. H. Dean, slating blackboards, 

C. E. Palmer, glazing, 
U. S. Express, expressing, 
E. J. Chandler, supplies, 
Chas. Lewis, plumbing and material, 
Hammond Typewriter Co., 1 desk, 
Adams Express, expressing, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 
P. Rooney, labor on school yard, 
R. E. Cherrington, 1 shade, 
S. M. Foy, rubber stamps, 
Hubbard & Co., germicide, 
L. J. French, supplies, 7 02 $490 04 



DAMON SCHOOL. 

Paid Quincy Dyer for supplies, 
L. W. Parkhurst, keys, 

F. W. Gleason &Co., plumbing, 
C. L. & E. S. Alden, supplies, 
R. Corson, expressing, 
H. M. Dunning, labor and materials for fur- 
nace, 

Ryan's Express, expressing, 
Library Bureau, book covers, 
M. Kappler, extra labor, 

G. H. Haskell, ribbon for diplomas, 
Irving P. Fox, examination records, 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 
Chas. Lewis plumbing, 
Geo. E. Webb, labor and materials, 
Mrs. R. Wheeler, cleaning building, 20 00 $279 53 



1 


50 


4 


75 


9 


00 


157 


87 


69 


00 


2 


25 


5 


40 


6 


75 


20 


00 


36 


40 


2 


00 


14 


55 


16 


10 


20 


00 




50 


5 


76 


5 


25 


2 


00 


3 


70 


6 


00 


7 


02 



34 85 




20 


9 


39 




99 


1 


50 


34 


23- 


2 


30 


2 


60 


10 


90 


2 


16 


3 00 


1 


75 


122 


25 


63 41 


20 


00 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 

Paid Quincy Dyer, for saw and axe, $1 63 

Irving^P. Fox, examination records, 75 

F. W. Gleason & Co., disinfectants, etc., 3 40 

G. H. Peare, whitewashing, 3 00 
Pi. Corson, expressing, 50 
Ryan's Express, expressing, 15 
A. Cook, cleaning building, 8 40 

S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 8 00 $25 83 



GREW SCHOOL. 

Paid Quincy Dyer, for supplies, 

L. W. Parkhurst, locks and keys, 

F. W. Gleason^& Co., germicide, plumbing 

and piping, 
R. Corson, expressing, 
Ryan's Express, expressing, 
Thos.JMinnis, carriage hire, 
Hubbard & Co., repairing atomizers, and 

germicide, 
Norfolk County Gazette, printing 
S. M. Foy, rubber stamps, 
J. A. Cross, work on roof, 

E. J. Peterson, work on windows, 
M. Rafter, work on windows, 
Jas. Martin & Son, 1 flag, 

J. A. Peterson, extra labor and cleaning, 
Swett & Blasdale, repairing bells, 
A. W. Dunbar, glazing, 

G. II. Haskell, ribbon for diplomas, 
Irving P. Fox, examination records, 

F. H. Dean, slating blackboards, 

G. S. Perry & Co., desks and chairs, 

J. M. Gunst Disinfectant Co., I gal. phen- 

oleum, 
Exeter Machine Works., grates, 210 lbs., 
A. H. Richardson, labor and material, 
Miles & Morrison, supplies, 
S. R. Moseley. printing, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 
E. J. Chandler, supplies, 



$7 


75 


5 


65 


33 


68 


2 


00 


6 


25 




75 


13 


50 


1 


25 


4 


08 


28 


90 


5 


50 


7 


35 


4 


20 


100 


90 




90 


13 


30 


12 


91 


S 


25 


68 


06 


158 


60 


1 


50 


8 


65 


26 


62 


2 


40 


1 


75 


1 


10 


18 


65 



89 

Paid P. Roone} r , labor on yard, and material, 30 90 

J. A. Cross, labor on roof, 114 70 

W. D. Ward, repairing clocks, 2 25 $692 30 

GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Paid Qnincy Dyer, for supplies, $35 05 

F. W. Gleason & Co., grates, etc., 77 87 
Dennis Gunn, labor carting snow, 3 25 
A. Lord, extra labor, 97 95 
Ryan's Express, expressing, 6 85 
Smith, Collins & Co., supplies, 1 40 
Jas. Martin & Sons, 1 flag, 5 75 
M. Ratter, labor and materials, 30 37 
J. W. Jigger, labor and materials, 85 07 
Adams Express Co., expressing, 1 00- 

G. H. Haskell, ribbon for diplomas, 10 80 
Irving P. Fox, examination of records, 7 50 
Paine Furniture Co., 1 book case, 6 35 
A. F. Hay ward, cleaning 8 clocks, 15 00 
W. D. Ward, 1 clock, 5 00 
Alex. McLean, painting blackboards, etc., 40 90 
Geo. S. Perry & Co., desks and chairs, 43 50 
J. V. Lufkin, labor and material, 9 00 
R. Corson, expressing, 3 00 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 6 51 
Hubbard & Co., 1-2 gal. germicide, 6 00 $498 12 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid J. Snellgrove, for carriage hire, $ 1 00 

S. R. Moseley, stamps, printing, etc., 57 95 

C. S. Davis & Co., sewing supplies, 6 34 

Norfolk County Gazette, printing, 92 40 

S. M. Foy, rubber stamps, 4 25 

R. M. Johnson, services as secretary, 200 00 

Hyde Park Times, printing, 16 25 

H. D. Noyes & Co., blank book, 60 

H. W. Stone, filling 106 diplomas, 15 90 

Boston Regalia Co., 20 badges for ushers, 2 40 

Ryan's Express, expressing, 5 20 

R. Corson, " 13 75 

Adams Express Co.. " 40 

W. F. Dodge, care of committee room, etc., 26 00 



90 

W. W. Hilton, labor on exhibiton stage, 10 00 

Rolfe M. Ellis, taking school census, 50 00 

Waverly Hall, rent tor exhibition, 40 00 

H. W. Leeds, 10 dinners for teachers, 3 50 

■Odorless Ex. Co., removing offal, 24 00 

C. H. Fogg, lettering 4 diplomas, 60 

J. H. Daniel & Son, 175 grammar diplomas, 43 75 

Wm. White, removing ashes, 10 00 

$624 29 

$3,206 33 
Cr. 

Balance from last year, $ 8 90 

Appropriation, $3,200 00 $3,208 90 



Balance unexpended, $2 57 

TEXT BOOKS AXD SUPPLIES. 

Paid G. F. King & Merrill, for school sup- 
plies, 

Geo. S. Perry & Co., for school supplies, 

S. G. Greenwood, labor and supplies, 

Silver, Burdett&Co., music readers, etc., 

American Book Co., drawing and other 
books, 

University Publishing Co., Davis 1 readers, 

J. L. Hammett, kindergarten supplies, 

D. C. Heath & Co., text books, , 
Thorp & Martin Co,, school supplies, 
Thompson, Brown & Co., arithmetic and 

bookkeeping, 

Ginn & Co., text books, 

Maynard, Merrill & Co., text books, 

H. D. Noyes & Co., books and supplies, 

Billings, Clapp & Co., laboratory sup- 
plies, 8 29 

DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books of refer- 
ence, 

Whitall, Tatum & Co., chemical supplies, 

Franklin Education Co., laboratory sup- 
plies, etc. 

Carl Schoenhof, text books, 

E. E. Babb. & Co., school supplies. 
Carter, Rice & Co., stationery, 



350 


09 


264 


15 


5 


91 


248 


28 


126 


97 


65 


04 


7 


92 


170 


21 


2 


51 


52 


80 


93 


71 


3 


75 


146 


07 



01 


57 


21 


3o 


23 50 


15 


37 


22 


44 


3 


15- 



91 



Paid D. Appleton & Co., law lessons, 
C. E. Boyd, music, 
Boston Tea & Grocery Co., supplies, 
The Fairbanks Co., 1 scale, 
M. E. Noble, laboratory supplies, 
Estes & Lauriat, dictionary and encyclo- 
pedia, 

E. Rice, cash paid out, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., text books, 
Crocker Manf. Co. number wheels, 

F. L. Hodgdon & Co., school supplies, 
Allyn & Bacon, text books, 

U. Holzer, binding books, 
Boston School Supply Co., books and sup- 
plies, 
Geo. F. Hiller, 1 foot blower, 
Prang Education Co., drawing books, 
S. S. Packard, commercial arithmetic, 
Phonographic Ins. Co., note books, 
Irving P. Fox, record book, 
II. B. Carrington, "Battles of American 

Revolution," 
Albert, Scott & Co., reference book, 
Leach, Shewell & Sanborn, text books, 
Emerson Col. of Oratory, " 

W. M. Belcher & Co. typewriter ribbons, 
The C. A, Nichols Co., "History for Ready 

Reference," 
Stenographic Pr. Pub. Co., text books, 
W. D. Ward, stationery, 
Qaincy Dyer, chemicals, 
Damrell & Upham, books of reference, 
Dexter Bros., alcohol, 
N. H. Crowell, supplies, 



Cr. 



Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



1 67" 


9 98- 


74 


5 25 


55 


37 00- 


2 20 


9 06 


15 00 


1 75 


5 00 


26 49 


153 15 


2 50 


133 21 


38 SO 


14 1& 


59 75 


3 50 


2 50 


146 45 


2 00' 


5 00 


15 00 


7 50 


48 


08 


29 79 


1 30 


1 50 


$2,424 47' 


B 35 84 


2,750 00 $2,785 84 


$361 37 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES. 





















r- 




<D 


















OS 


"gH 


o3 ' 


o 


=h"o 


o 




fe 




c ea 


s 


CH 






°?H 


°.a o 


°o 


°6 


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os- 9 






























<S 


a o^ 


SB 


© 


o 




!>> 


cS a 


1 ?,• 




■5 


-2 ^ 


-2 


.a 


J2 


2~ o"^ 


— : 


,5£ 






rj 


5P 


^ 


a 


5 


c o 




> 


j> -» 


H 


£ 


fc 


£ 


177 


21 


fc 




$7,532,775 


$998,855 


$8,531,630 


2,900 


2,010 


574 


2,356 


1894. 


State Tax. 


County Tax. 


Town Tax. 


Overlayings. 


Total. 




$6,6SO,00 


$7,655.87 


$114,725.00 


$1,300.92 


$130,361.79 



EXEMPTED PROPERTY 



Churches. 


Harvard College. 


St. Raphael School 
Association. 


Fairview 
Cemetery. 


Total. 


$224,645 


$300. 00 


$19,375 


$20,000.00 


$264,320 



IR-A-TIE HPIEIR, $1,000. 



$14. GO. 





Valuation Real Estate. 


Valuation of 
Personal Property. 


Total Valuation. 


May 1, 1894 
" 1, 1893 


$7,532,775.00 
7,333,650.00 


$998,855.00 
986,565.00 


$8,531,630.00 
$8,320,215.00 


Increase . . 


$199,125.00 


$12,290.00 


$211,415.00 ' 



RANDOLPH P. MOSELEY", 
GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 
CHARLES F. MORRISON, 

Assessors. 



(92) 



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TREASURER'S 



DR. 



HENRY S. BUNTON, TOWN TREASURER IN ACCOUNT 



■ Cash in the Treasury, February 1, 1894 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED DURING THE TEAR ENDING JAN. 31, 1895. 

jFroin Treasurer's Notes— In anticipation of the tax for the year 1894... 

Treasurer's Note — Payable in the Year 1S95 

George Sanford, Collector, Taxes for 1892 

George Sanford, Collector, Taxes for 1893 

George Sanford, Collector, Taxes for 1894 

George Sanford, Collector, Street Assessments 

Selectmen, Sidewalk Assessments 

Fairview Cemetery, Sales of Lots 

Fairview Cemetery, Sales of Single Graves 

Fairview Cemetery, Interments 

Fairview: Cemetery, Foundations 

Fairview Cemetery, wood sold 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Corporation Tax 

Treasurer Commonwealth, for National Bank Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for State Aid, 1893 

County Trea surer, dog licenses, 1894 

County Treasurer, rent of room occupied by Probate Court 

A. B. Endicott, Sheriff, fines paid at Jail and House of Cor- 
rection 

Henry B. Terry, Esq., Trial Justice, fines from defendants in 
criminal cases 

Thomas H. Wakefield, Esq., Trial Justice, fines from defendants 
in criminal cases 

Liquor Licenses 

Milk Licenses 

Miscellaneous Licenses 

Lester P. Winchenbaugh, for 22,225_square feet of land on Dana 
Avenue 

Worcester Construction Company, for crushed stone and use of 
steam roller 

S. T. Elliott, for crushed stone 

A. Hemenway, for crushed stone 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway Company, for crushed stone, 
gravel and use of steam roller 

G. F. Washburn, for forty-eight loads loam 

Eliza Howes, for loam 

Walter C. Bryant, for loam 

Poor— cash refunded by Commonwealth, cities, towns, etc 

Interest on Bank balances 



8222,724 98 



(94) 



REPORT. 



CURRENT AVITH THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



CR. 



AMOUNTS DISBURSED: 

On accountjof Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds due Aug. 1, 1894, 

Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds due Sept. 1, 1894, 

Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds due Nov. 1, 1894, 

Treasurer's Notes— Funded Loan 

Treasurer's Notes — In anticipation of the tax for the year 
1S93 

Treasurer's Note— Payable in the year 1894 

Treasurer's Notes — In anticipation of the tax for the 
year 1894 

Interest 

Schools, — salaries, fuel and janitors 

Evening Schools 

Industrial Schools 

School Incidentals 

Text Books and Supplies 

.Laboratory for High School. .• 

Public Library, current expenses 

Public Library, purchase of new books 

Incidentals 

Highways 

Permanent Improvements 

Sidewalks 

Fairmount Bridge 

Police 

Fire Department 

Fairvie w Cemetery 

Salaries 

■ Street Lights 

Fire Hydrant Service 

;Steam Road Boiler 

Post 121, Grand Army of the Republic 

Law Suits, 

Overseers of the Poor 

Board of Health 

State Tax for 1894 

County Tax for 1894 

Liquor Licenses, paid Treasurer Commonwealth, one- 
fourth of the amount received in 1894 

State Aid 

Tax Deeds received from Collector 



=Cash in the Treasury January 31, 1895. 



$ 2,500 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


3,000 00 


2,500 00 


1,500 00 


75,000 00 


3,107 08 


32,300 00 


706 94 


137 11 


3,206 33 


2,424 47 


12 00 


1,807 41 


712 65 


6,932 87 


7,062 62 


10,000 00 


1,185 57 


53 75 


5,192 06 


6,499 22 


6,213 73 


3,475 00 


7,966 41 


5,250 00 


3,500 00 


150 00 


4,514 01 


3,920 98 


2,199 80 


6,680 00 


7,655 87 


1 50 


1,167 00 


9 42 


$222,543 80 


181 18 


$222,724 98 



(95) 



TOWN DEBT JAN. 31, 1895:. 



FUNDED LOAN. 



Pour Hyde Park four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000 00 each, dated July 31, 1SS6, due $2,000 00 annually, 1895—1896 4,000 00" 

Six Hyde Park four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000 00 each, dated November 1,18S7, due $2,000 00 annually, 1S95— 1897, 6,000 00 
Eight Hyde Park four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000 00 each, dated September 1, 1888, due $2,000 00 annually, 1895—1898, 8,000 00 
Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

four per cent, interest, dated July 1, 1SS9, due July 1, 1S95 1,000 00 

Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

four per cent, interest, dated March 1, 1892, due $2,000 annually 1895— 1S97. 6,000 00 

Total Funded Loan $25,000 00 

DEBT IN ANTICIPATION OF THE TAX FOR THE YEAR 1S94. 

Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

four per cent, interest, payable on demand 2,000 00 

DEBT PAYABLE IN THE YEAR 1S95. 

Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

four per cent, interest, due May 1, 1895 4,514 01 

Total indebtedness $31,514 01 

HENRY S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer. 

Hyde Park, February l, 1895. 



(96) 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 
THE CURRENT YEAR. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Interest 

Schools 

Evening Schools . 

Industrial Schools . . ° 

School Incidentals . . . 

Text Books and Supplies ..... 

Laboratory for High School 

Public Library, current expenses 

Public Library, new books 

Incidentals 

Highways •■ 

Permanent Improvements 

Sidewalks 

Pairmount Bridge > 

Police 

Fire Department 

Fairview Cemetery 

Salaries -•.-. 

Street Lights = 

Fire Hydrant Service ■, 

Steam Road Roller 

Post 121, G. A. R 

Law Suits 

Overseers of the Poor 

Board of Health 

State and County Tax 



Appropriation 


Expenditures. 


Unexpended. 


' 2$3,756 41 


$ 3,107 08 


$649 33 


32,300 00 


32,300 00 




864 34 


706 94 


157 40 


153 06 


137 11 


15 95 


3,208 90 


3,206 33 


2 57 


2,785 84 


2,424 47 


361 37 


75 00 


12 00 


63 00 


1,956 11 


1,807 41 


148 70 


800 47 


712 65 


87 82 


7,601 38 


6,932 S7 


668 51 


7,537 66 


7,062 62 


475 04 


10,000 00 


10,000 00 




1,224 48 


1,185 57 


38 91 


53 75 


53 75 




5,S87 26 


5,192 06 


695 20 


6,500 28 


6,499 22 


1 06- 


7,172 98 . 


6,213 73 


959 25 


3,475 00 


3,475 00 




7,966 41 


7,966 41 




5,250 00 


5,250 00 




3,500 00 


3,500 00 




150 00 


150 00 




34,514 01 


4,514 01 




45,115 87 


3,920 98 


1,194 89 


2,620 46 


2,199 80 


420 66 


14,335 87 


14,335 87 




$13S,805 54 


§132,865 88 


$5,939 66 



1 Including unexpended, balances from last year. 

2 Including interest on Treasurer's hank balances. 

3 Debt payable in the year 1895. 

4 Including cash refunded and received. 



(97) 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



In compliance with the By-laws of the Town the under- 
signed have examined the accounts of the Selectmen, School 
Committee, Collector of Taxes, Town Treasurer, Commis- 
sioners of Sinking Fund, Trustees of the Public Library, 
Overseers of the Poor, and Board of Health, and hereby 
certify that the same are correct, aud all payments accom- 
panied by proper vouchers. 

WALLACE D. LOVELL, 
ASA J. ADAMS, 
WALLACE M. RHODES, 

Auditors. 



(98) 



BY-LAWS. 



NOTIFICATION OP TOWN MEETING. 

Every town meeting shall be notified by posting copies of the 
■warrant calling the same, in ten public places in..*he town, seven 
days, at least, before the day appointed for said nieeung. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETINGS. 

The annual town meeting for the election of town officers shall be 
held on the first Monday of March of each year. The meeting shall 
be opened at seven o'clock a. m.. and the polls shall be kept open 
until sunset. 

A town meeting shall also be held annually between the first 
Monday of March and the first Monday of April, for appropriating 
such sums of money as may be necessary for town purposes, and foi 1 
transacting such other business as may legally be brought before 
said meeting. 

RULES FOR THE GOVERNMENT OF TOWN MEETINGS. 

1.— All questions submitted for the consideration of the town, 
involving the expenditure of money, shall be in writing, when so 
required by any legal voter. 

2. — No vote fixing the period for closing a ballot shall be recon- 
sidered after such ballot shall have commenced ; but it may be in 
order to extend the period without such reconsideration. 

3. — When a question is under debate, motions shall be received to 
adjourn, to lay on the table, the previous question, to postpone to a 
certain time, to postpone indefinitely, to commit, or to amend; 
which several motions shall have precedence in the order in which 
they are herein arranged. 

4. — The powers and duties of the presiding officer, not especially 
provided for by law, or by the foregoing rules, shall be determined 
by the rules of practice contained in ♦' Cushing's Manual," so far as 
they, are adapted to the condition and powers of the town. 

5. — No vote shall be reconsidered except upon a motion made 
•within one hour after such vote has passed, unless such reconsidera- 
tion is ordered by a vote of two-thirds of the voters present and voting 

(99) 



100 



FINANCIAL YEAF. 

The financial year of the town shall begin with the first day ot 
February in each year, and end on the thirty-first day of the follow- 
ing January. 

The selectmen, overseers of the poor, board of health, surveyors 
of highways, and school committee shall post in some conspicuous 
place at their official rooms, a notice of the times of their respective 
meetings. 

COLLECTION OF TAXES. 

1. —The assessment of taxes shall be completed, and a list of the 
same delivered to the collector, on or before the first day of August 
of each year. 

2.— All taxes which may be assessed, if paid on or before the first 
uay of October next after the assessment, shall be entitled to such 
discount as the town shall vote at its annual meeting. All taxes 
shall be due and payable on or before the first day of November next 
following the assessment of said taxes. 

8.— On the first secular day of each month, the collector shall pay 
over to the town treasurer all the taxes collected by him , and he 
shall, on or before the first day of February in each year, make up his 
account and render the same to the auditors. 

DUTIES OF THE AUDITORS. 

1 . — The auditors shall examine the accounts of the selectmen, 
school committee, treasurer, collector, trustees of the public library, 
and all other officers or committees entrusted with the expenditure 
of money, quarterly, and shall certify as to the correctness of the 
same in the printed annual report. 

2. — Before certifying to the accounts of the treasurer, they shall 
examine his cash-book, wherein shall be entered his receipts and 
payments, as they occur from day to day, shall see that he has paid 
out no moneys except on proper vouchers, carefully examine all pay- 
ments for interest, and see that the funds on hand are intact. 

3. — Before certifying to the collector's accounts, they shall examine 
his cash-book, showing the amounts collected from day to day, 
and showing when the same were paid over to the treasurer ; shall 
see that he has collected interest on all taxes overdue, and shall see 
a complete list of abatements, and also a list of unpaid taxes. 

4. — They shall see that the accounts of the trustees of the public 
library are kept in a correct manner, and that all payments are ac 
companied with proper vouchers. 



101 



COASTING. 

Coasting on any of the public streets of the town is prohibited, 
except upon such streets as the selectmen may designate each year 
by public notice. 

HIGHWAY AND POLICE REGULATIONS. 

1. — islo building shall be t-etnoved over a public street without the 
written permission of the selectmen. 

2.— The owner of such building, or the person or persons removing 
the same, shall give a bond in such penal sum, and with such sure 
ties as the selectmen shall determine, with condition to reimburse 
the town for all sums of money which it may be liable or compelled 
•to pay in consequence ol such use of the highways. 

3. — No person except the selectmen or the surveyors of highways, 
in the lawful performance of their duties, or those acting under their 
orders, shall break or dig up the ground in any street or public way 
in the town, without first obtaining a written permit from the select- 
men ; and all persons acting under such permit shall put up and 
maintain a suitable railing or fence around the part of the street so 
broken up, so long as the same shall remain unsafe or inconvenient 
for travellers, and he or they shall keep one or more lighted lanterns 
fixed to such railing or fence, or in some other way exposed every 
night from twilight in the evening through the whole night, so long 
as such street or way shall be or remain unsafe or inconvenient for 
travellers. 

4.— No person shall ride or drive ahorse in any street in the town 
at a rate faster than eight miles an hour. 

5.— No person shall, without the written consent of the selectmen, 
play at any game in which a ball of any kind is used, or fly a kite, or 
throw or shoot stones, arrows, balls, snow balls, or other missiles, 
or discharge anj' gun, cannon, or firearm, or make any bonfire or 
other fires in any street or way where the public have a right to 
pass. . 

6. — No person shall propel, drive, wheel or draw any bicycle, tri- 
cycle, cart or vehicle of any kind whatsoever except a child's car- 
riage drawn by hand, nor use roller skates upon or over any side- 
walk in this town, nor permit nor suffer any horse, cattle, swine or 
sheep, belonging to him or under his care or keeping, to go upon or 
over the same, nor suffer any horse to remain hitched across, or 
upon, or otherwise obstruct or injure, any such sidewalk. 



102 



7.— No person shall hitch or fasten any horse to any oniamerval 
tree standing or growing on or near any sidewalk, or to the boxing 
or guard about said tree, without the consent of the owner thereof. 

8. — No person shall without a written license from the selectmen 
place or cause to be placed, or suffer to remain within the limits of a 
street or upon any sidewalk, so as in any manner to obstruct the 
travel thereon, any vehicle, wood, coal, manure, dirt, gravel, stones, 
building material, barrels, boxes, merchandise, or any rubbish or 
obstruction whatever. 

9.— No person shall carry in a public street, house-offal, either 
animal or vegetable, or grease, or bones, or the contents of cesspools 
or vaults, unless he has been expressly licensed therefor by the , 
Board of Health, upon such terms and conditions as said board may 
deem that the heallh and interests of the town require. 

10. — Loud crying of wares or merchandise, or hallooing, hooting 
or making loud and unseemly noises on the public streets or squares 
of the town, to the annoyance of the citizens, is prohibited. 

11. — No person shall behave in a rude, indecent or disorderly 
manner, or use profane, indecent, or insulting language, in any 
public place, or on any sidewalk or street in the town, to the annoy- 
ance or disturbance of any other person there being or passing in a 
peaceable manner, or be or remain upon any sidewalk, street, or 
crossing, or about doorways or places of business, to the annoyance 
or disturbance of any person. 

12.— Three or more persons shall not continue to stand or remain 
in a group or near to each other, on any sidewalk or street or crossing, 
or in any public place, in such a manner as to obstruct a free 
passage for foot passengers, after having been requested by a con- 
stable or police officer to move on. 

13. — No person shall be or remain in any doorway, or upon any 
stairs, doorstep, portico or other projection from any house or build- 
ing, or upon any wall or fence on or near any street or public place, 
after having been requested by the owner or any occupant of the 
premises or by any constable or police officer to remove therefrom. 

14.— No person shall make any indecent figures, or write, print, 
paint, or cut any obscene word or words upon, or deface, break or 
injure in any manner, any fence, post, sign, street lantern, building 
or structure; or commit a nuisance upon any sidewalk or other place 
resorted to by the public, or against any tree, building or structure 
adjoining a sidewalk. 



103 



15. — J?o person, shall extinguish any street light, or extinguish or 
remove any light placed to denote an obstruction or a defect in any 
street or way, without proper authority. 

16. — No person shall swim or bathe in any of the waters within the 
limits of this town, so as to be exposed in a nude state, to the view 
of any person passing or being upon any railroad or street or in any 
dwelling-house in this town. 

17. — No person shall intermeddle with any hydrant, gate, gate-box 
or water pipe placed or located within the limits of any public wa3 ;p 
in this town, without permission from the selectmen or the Hyde 
Park Water Company. 

PASTURING OF CATTLE OR OTHER ANIMALS ON STREETS OR WAYS. 

No person shall pasture any cattle, goat or other animal upon any 
street or public way in said town, either with or without a keeper, 
except within the limits of such way adjoining his own premises, and 
field drivers are instructed to enforce this by-law. 

TRUANTS. 

1. — This town hereby avails itself of the several provisions of the 
statutes of this commonwealth, now in force, relating to habitual 
truants and absentees from school. 

2. — All children convicted of habitual truancy hereunder, and 
children between the ages of seven and fifteen years, residing in said 
town, and who* may be found wandering about the streets or public 
places of said town, having no lawful occupation or business, not 
attending school, and growing up in ignorance, may be committed 
to the Lawrence Industrial School, at Lawrence, Mass., or to any 
house of reformation which has been or may hereafter be established 
by the County Commissioners of the County of Norfolk, or to any 
place provided by this town within its limits, for confinement, 
instruction and discipline. 

3. — Two or more truant officers shall be appointed annually, whose 
duty it shall be to inquire into all the violations ot the truant laws, 
and of the law relating to compulsory education, and to do all the 
acts required of them by the laws of the Commonwealth. 

4.— It shall be the duty of every truant officer, previous to making 
any complaint under these laws, to notify the truant, or absentee 
from school, also his parent or guardian, of the offence committed, 
and of the penalty therefor, and if the truant officer can obtain satis- 



104 



luetoiy pledges for the restraint and reformation of the child, he amy, 
At his discretion, forbear to prosecute so long as such pledges are 
faithfully kept. 

5. — It shall be the duty of the School Committee, the teachers of 
the public schools, and the citizens generally, to aid the truant 
officers as far as possible in the discharge of their duties. 

6. — It shall be the duty of the truant officers to keep a full record 
of all their official acts, and make an annual report thereof to the 
School Committee, who shall publish the same - with their own 
report. 

7.— Nothing in these by-laws shall be so construed as to alter or 
impair the obligation and duty of teachers to enforce punctuality 
and regularity of attendance, and to preserve good order and dis- 
cipline. 

LIST OP TAX-PAYEES. 

The names of all persons paying a tax on real or personal property 
shall be published annually in the town reports, together with the 
amount of tax assessed upon each, and whether the same is paid or 
unpaid. 

DUTIES OF TOWN CLEKK. 

The Town Clerk shall keep a file of all town reports, reports of 
all committees chosen by the town, and all original documents relat- 
ing to the affairs of the town which may come into his possession ; he 
shall, as soon as practicable after any election has been held by the 
town, in addition to the notices he is now directed to give to officers 
who are required to take an oath of office, also issue a written or 
printed notice to all persons who have been elected to any other 
office, or chosen to serve on any other committee, stating the office 
to which such person has been elected, or the duties which such 
committee was chosen to perform. 

CONTRACTS MADE IN BEHALF OF THE TOWN. 

Every contract exceeding one thousand dollars shall be accom- 
panied by a suitable bond for the performance of the same, or by 
the deposit of money or security to the amount of such bond. ' 

ACTIONS AT LAW. 

The selectmen shall have full authority, as agents of the town, 
to employ counsel to institute and prosecute suits in the name of the 
town, and appear for and defend suits brought against it, unless 
otherwise specially ordered by a vote of the town. 



105 



CONVEYANCING. 

Whenever it shall be necessary to execute any deed conveying 
land, or any other instrument required to carry into effect any vote 
of the town, the same shall be executed by the selectmen, or a 
majority of them, in behalf of the town, unless the town shall other- 
wise vote in any special case. 

BY-LAWS IN RELATION TO THE PREVENTION OF FIRES. 

1. —It shall be the duty of every person who shall commence the 
erection of any building; within the town of Hyde Park to notify the 
Board of Engineers thereof before he shall commence building the 
chimneys therein. 

2.— All chimneys in wooden buildings shall be built of brick, stone, 
or other fire-proof non-conducting material. All brick flues shall be 
smoothly plastered inside with mortar from top to bottom or lined 
with earthen pipe, and shall be plastered outside below the roofing. 

3.— In no case shall chimneys rest upon any flooring without a 
footing of masonry or iron supported by iron beams, having a secure 
bearing of masonry or iron at either end. 

4.— All flues shall be topped out at least four feet above the roof ot 
the building to which they belong. The brick topping out of chim- 
neys shall not have more than two inches projection unless covered 
by a cap of metal or stone properly secured. 

5.— Hearths ol fireplaces or grates shall be laid upon brick or 
other trimmer arches, or upon bars of iron supporting a bed of brick- 
work. 

6.— No wood-work of any kind shall be placed at a less distance 
than one inch from the outside brick- work of any flue. In no case 
shall a nail be driven into the masonry of any ilue. 

7. —No wood-work shall be placed at a less distance than one inch 
from any tin or other metal flue or flues, pipe or pipes, used or in- 
tended to be used to convey heated air or steam in any building, 
unless such flues or pipes shall be cased with metal, leaving a free 
circulationof air all around the same. 

8.— No smoke pipe in any such wooden or frame building shall 
hereafter enter any flue unless the said pipe shall be at least twelve 
inches from either the floors or ceiling; and in all cases where smoke 
pipes pass through stud or wooden partitions of any kind, whether 
the same be plastered or not, they shall be guarded by either a 



106 



double collar of metal, with at least four inches of air space and 
holes for ventilation or by a soap-stone ring, not less than three 
inches in thickness and extending through the partition. 

9. — The Board of Engineers shall examine into all shops and other 
places where shaviugs or other combustible material may be de- 
posited or collected, and at all times be vigilant in the removal of the 
same, whenever, in the opinion of a majority of them, the same may 
be dangerous to the security of the town from fires ; and direct the 
owner, tenant, or occupant of said shops, or other places, to remove 
the same ; and in case such owner, tenant or occupant, refuses or 
neglects so to do, shall cause the same to be removed at the ex- 
pense of such owner, tenant or occupant. 

10.— It shall also be the duty of said engineers to take cognizance 
of all buildings in the town in which any steam engine shall be used, 
and of all buildings in town in process of erection or alteration, and 
to make a record of such buildings as in their judgment may from 
any cause be dangerous, and report the same to the selectmen forth- 
with. And whenever in the opinion of the majority of the Board of 
Engineers, any chimney, hearth, oven, stove, stovepipe, fire-frame 
or other fixtures, or any camphene or other explosive or inflammable 
fluid or material, or whatever else may give just cause for alarm, 
should be altered, repaired or removed, they, the said engineers, 
shall forthwith notify and direct the owner, tenant, or occupant of 
the premises upon which the same are situated, to alter, repair or 
remove the same, as the said engineers shall direct. And in case 
such tenant, owner or occupant shall refuse or neglect so to do, the 
said engineers shall cause the same to be removed, altered or re- 
paired at the expense of such owner, tenant or occupant. And any 
person who shall obstruct the engineers, or any of them, in carrying 
out the provisions of this section, shall be liable to the penalty here- 
inafter stated. 

11. — The removal, extension or essential alteration of any ound- 
ing ; also the rebuilding or repairing of any building which has been 
partially destroyed by fire, shall be subject to the same restrictions 
as are imposed by the foregoing By-laws on the erection of buildings.. 

PUBLICATION OF BY-LAWS. 

The Selectmen shall publish these By-laws annually in connection 
with the town report. 



107 



PKNALTIKS UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Every violation of any of the foregoing By-laws shall be punished 
by a fine of not less than one dollar nor more than twenty dollars, 
to be recovered by complaint before any trial justice in the County 
of Norfolk, or any other court having jurisdiction. 

PROSECUTION UNDER THE BY-LAWS. 

Any citizen may, and the selectmen, constables, and police officers 
shall, prosecute every violation of the foregoing By-laws, by com- 
plaint before any trial justice in the County of Norfolk, or any other 
court having jurisdiction. 

LIMITATION OP ACTIONS. 

No person shall be prosecuted or tried for any breach of the pro- 
visions of any By-laws of this town, unless the complaint for the 
same shall be instituted and commenced within six months from the 
time of committing such breach. 



All By-laws or parts of By-laws of this town heretofore existing 
are hereby repealed, and these By-laws of the town of Hyde Park 
shall go into effect from and after their adoption by the town and 
their approval by the Superior Court or any Justice thereof. 



Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Norfolk, SS. 

Hyde Park, November 17, 1886. 
At a meeting of the legal voters of said town of Hyde Park, held in 
Everett Hall, on Wednesday, the seventeenth day of November, in 
the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and eighty-six, the foregoing 
By-laws were adopted by said town. 
Attest : 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Norfolk, SS. 

Superior Court, December Sitting, 1886, to wit: January 26, 1887.. 

The foregoing By-laws are hereby approved. 

By the Court. 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk. 

True copies Attest : 

ERASTUS WORTHINGTON, Clerk 



BY-LAWS 

Prescribing Rules and Regulations for the materials, con- 
struction, alteration and inspection of all pipes, tanks, fau- 
cets, valves and other fixtures, by and through which waste 
water or sewage is used and carried, in any building within 
the limits of the town of Hyde Park, Massachusetts, pre- 
pared in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 477 of 
the Acts ot the year 1893, and Chapter 455 of the Acts of 
the vear 1894 of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



Section 1. The plumbing of every building shall be separately 
ana independently connected with a proper cesspool 

Section 2. Pipes and other fixtures shall not be covered or con- 
cealed from view until approved by the inspector of plumbing ap- 
pointed by the Board of Health, who shall examine same within two 
working days after notice that they ave ready for inspection. 

Section 3. Plumbing work shall not be used unless the same has 
first been tested in the presence of the inspector with the water test, 
or if that is not practical, with the peppermint or other reliable test, 
and approved by him in writing. All soil and drain pipes must be 
in position before the test is made, otherwise the work will not be ap- 
proved. The practicability of any test will in all cases be decided by 
the inspector. 

Section 4. Drain and connecting ventilating pipes shall be of suf- 
ficient size and made of cast' iron within the building, and for a dis- 
tance of at least ten feet outside, except that lead pipes may be used 
for short connections exposed to view. Such pipes shall- be of uni- 
form thickness throughout, and shall have an average weight not 
less than below specified, viz: — 

2 inch pipe 5 1-2 lb. per ft. 

3 inch pipe 9 1-2 lb. per ft. 
i inch pipe 13 lb. per ft. 

5 inch pipe 17 lb. per ft. 

(i inch pipe 20 lb. per ft. 

Drain pipes shall be properly secured by irons to the walls, laid in 
trenches to uniform grade, or suspended to floor timbors by strong 

(108) 



109 

iron hangers. Every drain pipe shall be supplied with a suitable- 
trap with brass eleanout screw and connected with Y branch, also 
provided with brass eleanout between all fixtures, connections, etc , 
and cesspool or vaults, and inside as near to cellar wall as practica- 
ble where it leaves the building, and shall have a proper fall. 
Changes in direction shall be made with curved pipes, and all con- 
nections with horizontal or vertical pipes shall be made with Y 
branches. All drain pipes shall be exposed to sight where practica- 
ble within the building, and shall not be exposed to pressure where- 
they pass through walls, and in no case to be carried in plastered 
partitions unless provided with removable covers on wall. Every part 
of every drain pips below a cellar floor shall be laid in a brick trench 
with a concrete base and shall be accessible through sufficient unat- 
tached covers. 

Section 5. Whenever rain water conductors are connected with 
any pipe oi the drainage system of the house, that portion within the 
house or underground shallbe of cast iron pipe with lead joints, and 
in all cases provided with an extra deep trap where it enters house 
drain. No rain water conductor shall be used as a soil pipe. 

Section 6. Iron pipes used in plumbing shall, before being put in 
place, be first tested by the water or kerosene test, and then coated 
inside and outside with coal tar pitch applied hot, or with paint or 
with some equivalent substance. Joints shall be run full with Mol- 
ten lead, and thoroughly calked and made tight. Connections of lead 
pipes with iron pipes shall be made with brass ierrules properlv 
soldered and calked to the iron. Every joint in earthen pipe shall 
be made in hydraulic cement, care being taken that the inside and 
outside of the joints and of the pipe is properly cleaned out before 
connection is made with the house. Every joint in lead pipe shall 
made of solder, and wiped joints are to be used where practiable. 
No pa-int or putty is to be used on joints until they have been tested. 

Section 7. The waste pipe of each and every sink, basin, bath tub, 
water closet, slop hopper and of each set of trays or other fixtures 
shall be furnished with a separate trap, except that one five inch 
trap may be used for a bath tub and a bowl, or for a sink and set of 
wash trays provided the length of waste pipe from the fixtures does 
not exceed three feet. Traps- shall be placed as close to the fixtures 
as practicable and shall be protected from siphonage or air pressure 
by special cast iron air pipes of a size not less than the waste pipes 
they serve, placed outside or below the trap as near the crown of the 
trap as practicable. No trap vents shall be connected with earthen 
ware. Lead air pipes may be used where they are exposed to view. 
All round traps must have eleanout screws below the water line. 



110 

Air pipes for water closet traps shall be of two inch bore if thirty 
feet or less in length, and of three-inch bore if more than thirty feet 
in length. Air pipes shall be run as direct as practicable. Two or 
more air pipes may be connected together or with a drain pipe, but 
in every case of connection with a drain pipe, such connection shall 
be above the upper fixture of the building. 

Section 8. Drip or overflow pipes from safes under water closets 
and other fixtures or from tanks or cisterns, shall be run to some 
place in open sight and in no case shall any such pipe be connected 
directly with a drain pipe. 

No waste pipe from a refrigerator or other receptical in which 
provisions are stored shall be connected with a drain pipe or other 
waste pipe. 

Section 9. Every water closet, or line of water closets, on the, 
same floor, shall be supplied with water from a tank or cistern, and 
shall have a flushing pipe of not less than one inch in diameter ; but 
this requirement shall not apply to water closets substituted for vaults 
where the same are located outside of the building proper, and such 
water closets may be arranged so as to receive their supply directly 
from the main with proper fixtures approved by the inspector, the 
water company and the board of Health. No fixture, as a slop hop- 
per, etc., shall be set up unless it is provided with proper means for 
flushing. 

Section 10. No steam exhaust shall be connected with any soil or 
waste pipe. 

Section 11. Water pipes from traps shall equal or exceed in area 
of cross section the sum of areas of pipe entering sewer from fixtures, 
as inspector shall direct. 

The foregoing by-laws relating to plumbing, were adopted by the 
town, Nov. 28, 1894, and were approved by the Superior Court for 
.the County of Norfolk, Jan. 22, 1895. 
Attest : 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 





Per- 


Real 




NAMES. 


sonal. 


Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 








Abbott, Elmer E. . 


S 1 46 




$ 1 46 


Aborn, Elizabeth 












$ 35 04 




Adams, Charlotte H. . 












40 88 




Adams, Josephine G., heirs 












48 91 




Adams, Grace C. and Christianna 


B. 






- 




10 22 


10 22 


Addison, Harry 












45 26 




Adler. George H. 










14 60 




14 60 


Albee, Samuel . 










8 76 


39 42 


4S IS 


Ablen, C. L. and E. S. 










48 91 






Alden, Bessie L. 












102 20 




A.lden, Francelia M. . 












37 23 




Alderman, Merit P., heirs . 












16 06 




Alderman, Lucy A. . 












39 42 




Allen, Charles F. 










53 07 


260 61 




Allen, Emma W. 












59 86 




Allen, Adelia S. 












34 68 




Alles, William H. 










7 08 


271 56 




Amback, fc'rank H. 












83 22 




Anderson, George E. . 










2 19 


45 99 


48 IS 


Anderson, John J. 












25 91 




Andrews, Charles M. an u Frank J 


L. 










4 38 


4 3S 


Andrews, Marietta 












30 66 


30 66 


Andrews, Ellen L. 












36 14 




Andrews, Henry A. and Jane 












6 94 




Annis^ Augustus K. . 












32 12 


32 12 


Appell, Sarah A. 












64 24 


64 24 


Archibald, Andrew W. 










2 92 






Arentzen, Christiana, heirs' . 












30 66 




Armstrong, David W. 










51 


6 20 




Arnold, Ellen W. 












36 50 




Arnold, Henry F. 












52 56 




Atkinson, Isabella 












40 15 


40 15 


Atkinson, Ida M. 












40 52 


40 52 


Atkinson, Robert 










51 




51 


Atwood Delia . 












20 07 


20 07 


Batchelder, John B. . . - 


40 30 




40 30 
24 12 


Batchelder, Lizzie B. . 














324 12 


Badger, Susan C. Miss 














201 48 


201 4S 


Badger, S. C, Mrs. . 














71 54 




Baessler, Henry 














21 54 




Bailey, George G. 














58 40 


58 40 


Baker, Frank H. 












1 83 


11 68 


13 51 


Balkam, Stephen B. . 












2 55 


152 57 




Balkam, S. B. & Co., 












189 80 


216 81 




Baptist Church Society 














65 70 




Barme, Charlotte \ '. 
Barney, Amanda 


- 










1 02 


206 22 
33 58 


207 24 
33 58 


Barney, James E. 














2 96 


2 96 

2 19 

13 14 

4 14 


Barrett, M. W. and J. F. 














2 19 
13 14 

2 53 


Barrett, Michael W". . 
Barrett, John F. 












1 61 


Barritt, William H. 












3 65 




Barritt, Katherine 












39 42 




Barry, Patrick and Catherin 












29 20 




Barry, Michael, heirs 












21 90 
104 01 
42 34 
30 66 
58 40 




Bartholomew, Myron H. 
Bartlett, Alma M. 












104 01 
42 34 
30 66 


Bartlett, Elizabeth E. 
Barton, Walter 













(111) 



112 



Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Bass, Lizzie L. 

Ba-ss, Elizabeth 

Bass, George 

Bates, Emma M. 

Bates, Henry N. 

Bates, H. N., C. F. Allen, and G. Fred Gridley 

Bates, Lewis P. 

Bates, James 

Batho, William 

Baxter, Edward H. 

Bean, James W. 

Beatey, Catharine B 

Beatey, John 

Beatey, Annie J. 

Beatey, George A. 

Beatey, Ada F. 

Beausang, Patrick 

Beausang, Rosanua 

Becker, Charles 

Bell, Elizabeth . 

Bennett, Fred C. 

Bennett, John C. 

Bent, Catherine 

Bent, George W. 

Benton, Jesse S. 

Benton, Mary A. 

Benton, Martha A., estate, Town Hyde Park tax title 

Berry, Louisa M. 

Berrv, Leonard W. 

Berry, L.W. & Co. 

Bewer, Leopold R. 

Bickford, Lomelia A. 

Bickford, Leroy M. 

Bickmore, Albion P. 

Bidwell, Lawson B. 

Bigelow, Fred C. 

Billings, H. J. . 

Bingham, Charles H. 

Blackmer, Hannah H 

Blaisdell, Aluert ■) . 

Blaisdell & Bartlett 

Blackev, Sarah S. 

Blake, Emma E. 

Blake, Phoebe E. 

Blake, Percy M. 

Blasdale, Henry 

Bleakie, Robert 

Bleakie, Robert & Co 

Blanchard, J. C, Jr. 

Blodgett, Anna E. 

Bloom, Julius R. 

Bodflsh, William H. 

Bod well, William P. 

Boland, Michael C. 

Bo'ton, Eliza J. 

Bond, John R. . 

Bonnell, John D. 

Bonney, Susan . 

Bonney, Peter I. 

Boothby, Asa S. 

Bowen, Daniel S. 

Bo wen, Mary E. 

Bowie, Frank E. 

Boyd, Ella F. . 



Per- Real 
sonal. Estate. 



$ 6 57 



17 52 
2 92 

2 92 

3 65 

8 76 



6 50 
4 38 



12 41 

18 98 

14 60 
2 92 

55 12 
1 10 

10 95 

51 

51 



7 30 

7 30 

592 03 

378 87 
2 92 



$ 74 46 

73 00 

37 96 

416 83 

' 197 10 
80 30 
37 23 



67 16 

56 21 
19 71 
19 71 
62 41 
36 50 

43 07 
115 34 

44 53 
2 54 

105 12 
30 66 

35 77 

35 04 
96 36 
86 50 
81 03 
105 12 
26 28 

46 72 
65 34 

45 26 
7 30 

40 52 
122 64 
70 08 

110 96 
2,259 35 



51 83 
45 26 
47 08 
45 26 
40 88 
137 97 
15 33 
51 83 
40 52 
66 43 

6 57 
5 11 

43 80 
56 21 



Unpaid, 



$416 83 



2 92 
32 85 



8 76- 
56 21 



62 41 
36 50 

6 50' 
43 07 
115 34 

4 38 



54 02 
96 36 

83 95- 

27 38 
10 95 
46 72 
65 85 
45 77 
7 30 
40 52 

70 08 
7 30 



2 92 

51 83 



45 26 
15 33 



5 11 
56 21 



113 



Resident Taxpayers — {Continued.) 



Per- 
sona 1 



Real 

Estate. 



Unpaid. 



Boylan, Stephen 

Boynton, Charles A 

Bradford, Sophia I. 

Bradley, Kate E. 

Brady, John 

Brady, Ellen W. 

Bragan, Thomas P. 

Bragan, Saiah . 

Brainard, Amos H. 

Brainard, Elizabeth C 

Brainard Eoundry Co,, 

Brainard Milling Machine Co., 

Brainard, Marie L. 

Bramwell, William C. 

Brannon, Patrick J. 

Breingan, Andrew 

Bresnahan, Hannah 

Brewer, Evans J. 

Brewer, Esther A. 

Brewer, Frank H. 

Bridge, Samuel W. 

Bridgman, Annie E. 

Briggs, Mary E. 

Brigham, Franklin D 

Brigham, Helen 

Brooks, Annie M. 

Brooks, Clarence E. 

Brostrom, A. J. hcurs 

Brown, James R. 

Brown, Isaac J. 

Brown, I. J., Trustee 

Brown, Bartlett J. 

Brown, John Adams 

Brown, Walter A. 

Bruce. Anetta, Miss 

Bryant, Helen . 

Bryant, Walter C. 

Bryant, Albert L. 

Bryant, Harriet E. 

Buchan, Thomas 

Buck, Laura A. 

Bullard, Isaac . 

Billiard, Mary A. 

Bullard, Susan A. 

Bunton, Henry S. 

Bunton, Henry S., Trustee for Robert Bleakie 

S. Bleakie, C. F. Allen and B. F. Radford 
Bunton, Henry S., Trustee for Robert and 

Bleakie ..... 
Bunton, Henry S., Trustee for Robert Bleakie 
Burby, Charles E. 
Burger, Anton . 
Burgess, Ada . 
Burgess, Isaac C. 
Burke, John J. 
Burke, John 
Burke, Thomas, 1st 
Burke, Thomas, 2nd 
Burke, Mary E. 
Burnett, Marshall, heirs 
Burns, Timothy and Dennis 
Burns, Timothy 
Burns, James M. 
Burns. Michael . 



John 
J. S 



$18 25 



5 84 

584 00 



148 92 
1 46 



4 38 



14 60 



1 02 

5 84 

233 60 



1 46 



2 70 
1 46 



2 92 
51 



2 92 
1 46 



$ 41 25 
55 48 
36 50 
41 25 
18 98 

3 28 
43 44 

2 19 
210 24 
121 18 

36 50 
327 40 

4 01 
128 4$ 

29 20 
13 14 
69 35 
27 38 

3 65 

23 00 

169 36 
36 13 

90 52 
29 93 
35 04 
39 42 
85 78 
526 33 

45 99 

5 84 

43 80 
56 21 
10 95 

23 36 



3 28 


37 23 


162 43 


148 19 


56 21 


83 22 


183 96 


1,957 13 


1,163 26 


29 93 


60 59 


28 10 


33 58 


10 95 


19 71 


18 98 1 


42 34 


37 96 


65 70 


16 06 


16 06 



$55 48 



3 28 



30j66 



4 38 
69 36 



29 93 
35.04 



86 80 



1 46. 



1 46 

23 36 

J3 28 

37 23 

162 43 



1 



56 21 



30 44 
29 56 



37 96 
65 70 



16 79 



114 
Resident Taxpayers 



{Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate- 


Unpaid. 


Burns, Jules M. & Co. ..... 


$73 00 






Burns, Jules M. ... 










7 30 






Burns, Patrick, heirs, and James A 












$ 29 20 




Burns, Annie C- and Eliza R. 












4 38 




Burscn, Mary M. . . . 












65 70 




Buss, Mary C. . 












6 57 


$6 57 


Butler, Geo. EL, Heirs 












3 65 




Butler, Harriet P. W. 












71 54 




Butler, Mary A. 












50 37 


50 37 


Butler, Walter . 












7 30 


7 30 


Butler, Patrick . 










1 46 




1 46 


C 

'Caffin, Ruth P 


1 46 


52 56 




Cahill, James 














38 32 


38 32 


Caldwell, Alexander . 














18 98 




Caller, Ella A. . 














49 64 




Caller, Frederick E. 














59 86 




Caller, Joseph . 














54 02 




Cameron, Jane L. 














26 28 


26 28 


Campbell, Carrie 














25 55 




Campbell, Agnes 














74 46 




Campbell, John W. 












1 83 






Cane, Edmund . 














19 71 


19 71 


Carberry, William 














264 99 




Carberry, John W. 












3 65 






Carberry, Elizabeth A . 














131 40 




Carle, Henry A. 














11 6S 


11 68 


Carlton, Clara M. 














33 58 


33 58 


Carlton, George E. 












2 19 




2 19 


Carlisle, Julius A. 














6 57 


6 57 


Carr, Eliza W., heirs . 














42 34 


42 34 


Carracher, James 














IS 25 




Carrinajton, Henry B. 














75 92 




Carroll, Hannah M. 














12 41 




Carter, Austin F. 












2 19 


38 33 




Carter, J. B., Est. Tr. . 














40 88 




Carter, Elizabeth B., heirs, 














54 02 




Carter, O. B. . 












29 20 






Carver, James A. 












2 19 




2 19 


Case, Wilbert J. 












2 55 


100 74 




Cashnian, Ellen F. 














30 66 


30 66 


Cass, Francis W. 














36 13 




Cass, John M. . 














21 17 




Chaclbourne, John B. . 














21 17 


21 17 


Chadbourne Bros. 












1 46 




1 46 


Chaffee, Mary M. 














59 86 




Chamberlain, Thomas 












7 30 


45 99 




Chamberlain, Henry J. 














36 13 




Chamberlain, Martha A. H. 














36 50 


36 50 


Chandler, Edwin J. 












13 51 


23 36 




Chandler, Emeline N. 














52 56 




•Chandler, Abram F. . 














18 98 




Chandler, Julia S. 














"8 76 




Chapman, Mary 














33 58 


33 58 


Chapman, Annie S. 














127 02 


127 02 


Chase, Annie L. 














48 18 


48 18 


Cheever, Hattie N. 














28 11 


28 11 


Cherrin^ton, Robert E. 












1 46 


36 50 


37 96 


Chick, Charles G. 












7 30 


61 32 




Chick, Charles G., Tr. 














77 75 




Childs, Alexander G. . 












29 20 


48 91 




Chittick, James J. 












2 19 







115 



Resident Taxpayers — {Continued.) 





Per- 


Real 




NAMES. 


sonal. 


Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Church, Emma J. ..... . 




$ 62 24 


$ 62 24 


Church, Edward P. . 










3 65 


3 65 


Cilley, Jonathan L., heirs 










29 93 




■Clark, Mary .... 










29 93 




Clark, Arthur F. . . . 










45 26 




Clark, Leonard C. 










7 30 




Clark, Sarah A. 










102 20 




Clark, Eugene H. . . . 








$4 02 




4 02 


Carke, Frank B. . . . 








2 19 


52 20 




Clarke, Marcus, heirs . 










55 48 




Clary, Mary .... 






. - 


2 19 


27 74 




Cleveland, Alden T. . 










27 74 




Clough, Octavia N. . 










36 50 




Clough, Benjamin, Jr. 










2 19 




Coan, Caroline A. 










43 43 




Cobb, Mary Jane 










47 45 




Cochran, liavid H. 








2 19 


48 18 


50 37 


Coes, Charles S. . . . 








1 46 


48 18 




Coffin, Sarah A. 








5 84 




5 84 


Cogan, Thomas 

Colby, Frank M. ... 










80 30 










19 71 


3 65 




Colby, Charles H. 








9 12 






Colby, Martha H. 










70 08 




Coleman, Elizabeth S.. 








2 48 


191 99 


194 47 


Collins, Patrick D. 










115 34 




Collins, Charles A. 










43 80 


43 80 


Collins, William H. . 








5 11 


73 


5 84 


Collins, James .... 










16 06 


16 06 


Concannon, Patrick . 










18 25 




Condon, Mary .... 










3 65 




Conuon, John P. 










2 92 




Condon, James 








5 99 


73 00 


78 99 


Conley, Michael, heirs 










31 39 




Conley, James Mrs. . 










18 98 




Conn,*Freeman W. 








2 34 




2 34 


Conn, Etta E. .... 










58 40 


58 40 


Connick, Ann .... 










4 38 




Connick, James A. 








2 92 


4 38 


7 30 


Connelly, Michael .... 










54 75 




Connolly, Mary .... 










24 09 




Conroy, Patrick .... 










22 63 




Cook, Emily A. .... 










38 69 




Cook, Jacob, ..... 










59 86 




Cook, Edith J. . 










22 63 


22 63 


Cook, Frank. J. 










36 50 


36 50 


Cooley, Lydia H. 










38 69 




Corbett, A. W., Agt. .... 








2 19 




2 19 


Corbett, Ellen E 










38 69 


38 69 


Corbett, Jeremiah .... 








4 38 




4 38 


Corbett, John ..... 










28 47 




Corbett, Margaret . . . . 










29 56 




Corcoran, Mary, John, Edward and Bridg 


etDo 


an 






24 82 




Corcoran, Mary and Edward 










22 63 




Corcoran, John .... 










30 30 




Corrigan, Bridget 












98 55 


98 55 


Corrigan, Lillian M. 












17 15 


17 15 


Corrigan, Thomas 










15 12 


236 89 


252 01 


Corrigan, Rose . * 


» 










18 62 


18 62 


Corson, Clara 












81 76 


81 76 


Corson, Reuben 


... 








102 49 


58 40 


160 89 


Corthell, James R. 








i 




37 96 




Cotter, James E. 










48 91 


170 09 




Cotter, John, 










8 76 


51 10 




Cotter, Timothy G. and Henry 








29 20 





116 
Resident Tax-Paters 



{Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Coughlin, Bridget F. . 




$ 8 03 


$ 8 03 


Coullahan, Charlotte A. 












10 22 


10 22 


Coullahan, Margaret . 












18 25 




Courtney, E'izabeth B. 












49 64 




Coveney, Augusta E. . 












36 13 




Coveney, James S. 










$ 1 10 


759 57 


760 67 


Coveney, Mary . 












89 06 


89 06 


Cowan, William C. and Matilda 












40 88 




Cox, Hugh 












24 45 




Crabtree, Nancy E. 












43 44 


43 44 


Cremin, Jeremiah 












35 04 




Cromwell, Peter J. 










2 92 


30 66 


33 58 


Crooker, Francis W. . 










1 83 




1 83 


Crosby, John 










10 22 




10 22 


Cross, Edward W. 










2 19 


51 S3 




Crowley, John Jr. 










18 98 




18 98 


Crowley, John A. 










14 60 




14 60 


Crumett, Lucy T. 












1 46 




Crumett, Charles H. . 










5 63 


204 40 


210 03 


Grummet, Newton B., Jr. 












53 29 


53 29 


Grumpier. Arthur 












11 68 




Cullen, John H. 












23 00 




Cullen, James A. 












26 28 




Cullen, Matthew W. . 












4 38 


4138 • 


Cullen, Michael and Bridget 












21 17 


21^17 


Cummings, Bridget 












6 57 




Cundall, Phoebe A. 










1 46 


32 12 


33 58 


Cunningham, Mary 












2 92 




Cunningham, Joseph . 












34 31 




Curley, Sabina, heirs . 












19 71 




Curley, Patrick . 










1 10 




1 10 


Currier, Azelia . 












14 97 




Currier, Charles H. 










36 50 


64 24 




Curtis, J. Langdon 












43 80 


43 80 


Curtis, Joseph N. 










2 92 


62 78 




Dadley, James .... 




80 30 




Damon, Roscoe . 












40 88 




Damon, Nancy N. , , 












8 03 




Darling, Mary M. 












51 10 


51 10 


Darling, Willis A. 












249 66 




Darling, Frank W., & Co. . 










47 45 


11 68 




Davenport, Charles E. ., 










23 87 


42 34 


66 21 


Davenport, Albert 










8 76 


29 20 




Davenport, A. & C. E. 












2 19 


2 19 


Davenport, Warren J. 












5 84 


5 84 


Davis, Alonzo . 










7 30 


223 38 




Davis, Harriet S. 












158 41 




Davis, Charles S., heirs 












55 48 


55 48 


Davis, C. S. & Co., 










36 50 






Davis, Edmund 










120 OS 


5 11 




Davis, Edmund, Trustee 










6 94 






Davis, David L. 










54 46 


153 30 




Davis, Arris H. . 












29 20 




Dean, Alexis C. 










43 80 


• 




Dean, Ellen C. . 












78 84 


78 84 


Dean, Frank H. . , 










1 83 




1 83J 


Dean, Helen M. T. 












2 54 




Dean, Henry M. 












59 50 




Dean, Hubert T. 










51 






DeEntremont, Matilda 












35 04 




Deming, Emma E. 












40 88 


40 88 



117 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Deviin, Ellen 
Dickenson, Mary A. 
Diurkes, Joseph 
Dixon, Isaac S. . 
Doane, Clai*a J. 
Doane, James A. 
Dockham Chloe D. 
Dodge, Bertha H. 
Dolan, Catherine A. 
Dolan, Thomas J. 
Dolan, Th mas P. 
Dolan, Bridget . 
Dolan, Peter J. , 
Donahoe, Bridget 
Donahoe, Patrick M. 
Donlan, Hannah 
Dooley, Catherine, heir 
Doty, Geo. B. . 
Dowley, George B. 
Downey, John . 
Downey, Michael 
Downey, Rose . 
Downie, Annie H. 
Downing, Elizabeth C. 
Downing, Alfred 
Downing, Belinda 
Drake, Henrietta G. 
Dray, John E., heirs 
Drnmney, John J. 
Duggan, Dennis 
Duggan, Ann, heirs 
Duggan, James and Kate 
Dunbar, Hannah J. 
Dunbar, Alonzo W. 
Dunham, Thomas H. 
Dunn, John O. . 
Dunn, Lizzie 
Dunn, Harriet . 
Dunning, Henry M. 
Dnrant, Mary J. 
Durell, James McD. 
Duvning, MaryE. 
Dwyer, "Patrick J. 
Dyer, Quincy 
Dyer, Laui'a E. 
Dyer, M. J. & C. E. 
Dyer, Agnes P. 



Easton, Charles A. 
Edenborg, John 
Edge, Anthony . 
Edson, George A. 
Edwards, Joseph 
Elliott, Margaret B. 
Elliot, John F. . 
Elliot, Albert E. 
Elliott, Samuel T. 
Elliott, Mary C. 
Ellis, Joseph D. 
Ellis, Hattie E. . 
Ellis, William J. 
Elwel], Russell T. 



Per- 
sonal. 


§11 68 


1 46 


1 24 


12 12 


2 48 


65 77 
37 01 


2 19 


3 65 

43 80 


2 92 


8 76 


7 30 


3 43 


3 65 



Real 

Estate. 



$ 7S 84 

45 26 
51 10 

217 54 

27 74 
87 60 

61 32 
14 60 

21 90 
101 47 

40 15 
59 86 

41 61 

55 48 

29 20 

47 45 

54 02 
24 09 
71 IS 

46 72 

40 15 
46 72 

62 78 

48 18 

30 30 
6 20 

8 03 

23 36 
17 52 

9 49 

31 39 

65 70 
8 03 

24 82 

24 82 

56 94 

41 25 
73 73 

25 55 

66 43 
5 84 

55 48 
61 32 
43 SO 



30 66 

39 79 
16 06 

55 48 

21 17 

49 27 

1 46 

70 08 

40 88 

52 92 



Unpaid. 



$78 84 



217 54 



1 46 



40 15 

41 61 

67 60 
29 20 
47 45 

26 57 



17 52 
9 49 



8 03 
24 82 
24 82 



70 08 
49 64 
55 48 



S 76 



118 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES, 


Per- 
sonal 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid, 


Emerson, Luther O. . 




$124 10 


$124 10 


Emerson, Fannie B. 
















80 30 


80 30 


English, William T. 
















64 61 




Enneking, John J. 














$ 7 30 


99 28 




Estes, Gardner F. 














4 38 


288 71 




Estey, Francis H. 














9 49 




9 49 


Eustis, Maria A. 
















113 88 


113 8S : 


Evans, Emily F. 
















59 86 




Everett, Wil lard S. 














1 83 


86 14 




Ewell, George L. 


■ 


j> 












35 77 


35 77 


Fairbairn, Draxanna ...... 




32 12 




Fairbairn, William U. 














60 59 




Fairbanks, Caroline W. 














55 48 




Fairmount Manufacturing C 


3. 










26 28 




26 28 


Fallon, Bridget 














8 03 


8 03- 


Fallon, Peter 














55 85 




Fallon, Peter and Miehael 












14 24 






Farnswortn, John A. . 














94 90 


94 90' 


Farnsworth, Charles L. 












43 80 


250 39 




Farrington, Laura A. . 














22 63 




Far-well, Eva S. 














76 65 


76 65 


Faunce, Josephine 














44 53 




Feehan, Hannah 












1 53 


43 80 


45 33 


Felch, Sarah A. . 














5 84 




Fellows, George M. 












1 97 


6S 62 




Fellows, Horace E. 












2 92 






Fellows, Margaret I. . 














43 80 




Fellows, Martha T. 














70 08 




Fennell, William 














23 73 




Fennessey, Cassie and Rose 


M. 












6 57 


6 57 


Fennessey, Mary D. E. 














29 20 


29 20 


Fennessey, James 












1 46 




1 46 


Fennessey, John L. . 














33 58 


33 58 


Fennessey, William A. 














2 92 




Fenno, Mary L. 














68 62 




Fenno, William, heirs 












2 19 


115 34 


| 


Fenno, Annie R. 














74 46 




Ferguson, Mary I. 














32 12 




Fernald, Joanna S. 














32 85 




Field, Thomas G., heirs 














14 97 




Fifleld, Frank I. 














2 92 




Fiffe, James 












73 


2 92 


3 65 


Fiffe, Margaret . 














17 52 


17 52 


Finn, Thomas . 














21 17 




Firth, Abraham, Jr. . 














26 28 


26 28 


Fish, Charles D. 














43 80 




Fisher, Andrew 












27 74 






Fisher, Lydia M. 














43 07 




Fisher, -Sophia . 














46 72 




Fisher, George 














44 90 




Fiske, H. C. and P. A. 














153 30 




Fiske, Mary 














80 30 




Fiske, Charles F. 












2 55 






Fitch, Grace B. 














59 50 


59 50 


Fitton, Lucy B. . 














37 96 


37 96 


Fitton, John 














33 58 




Fitzgerald, Peter J. , 












3 65 




3 65 


Fitzgerald, Sarah J. . 














75 19 


75 19 


Flaherty, Roger J. 












51 


12 41 


12 92 


Foley, Honora . 














28 47 


28 47 


Foley, Michael J. 














36 50 





119 
Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Forbes, Mary M. 




$19 71 


$ 19 71 


Foss, Cyrus D. .~ 














31 39 


31 39 


Foster, Alice G. 














71 54 




Foster, Samuel A. 














4 01 




Foster, Edith E. 














1 46 




Foster, Fred A. 














30 66 




Foster, Sarah E. 














93 80 




Foster, Alfred . 












$ 5 63 


192 72 




Fowle, Frances A. 














36 86 




Fox, Catharine . 














13 87 


13 87 


Fradenburg, Morris 














23 73 




Frame, Annie M. 














114 61 




Frampton, Amelia E. 














7 30 


7 30 


Frampton, Robert L. 












38 69 


111 69 


150 38 


Franklin, John W. 












1 46 




1 46 


Fratus, Catano . 














56 58 


56 58 


Freeman, Sarah A. 














24 45 




Freeman, Charles T. 














70 08 




French, Leroy J., & C( 


). 










52 56 






French, Leroy J. 














65 70 




French, Amanda M. 














64 24 




French, Lemuel B. anc 


1 Caroline A 












33 22 


33 22 


French, Alice G. 














47 45 




Frost, George W. 














43 80 




Frost, Fannie M. 














54 75 




Frost, Edward N. 












2 55 




2 55 


Frost Brothers. 












36 50 




36 50 


Furdon, Margaret 














65 70 


65 70 


Fury, Ellen M. . 














33 58 




G 








Gallagher, John J. and Nellie M. . 




31 39 




Galligan, Matthew 










16 06 






Galligan, Andrew 














29 20 




Galknrpe, Mabel E. 












4 02 


56 21 




Gallup, Marian L. 














46 72 




Galvin, Thomas 














3 65 




Gannon, Mary . 














24 82 




Gardello, A. 












2 92 






Garrity, James . 














29 20 




Gateley, Ellen . 














50 37 




Gellewitz, Morris 












7 30 




7 30 


George, Frank L. 












51 






George, Edie M. 














19 71 




Gerry, Otis P. . 














44 53 




Gibbons, Mary J. 














21 54 




Giles, Alfred E. 












29 20 


93 44 




Giles, Susannah R. H. 












36 87 






Gillette, Mary M. 




i 










43 80 




Gilligan, Mary . 














26 28 


26 26 


Gilmartin, Patrick , 










1 97 


10 22 


12 19 


Gilson, John, 












49 28 




Gleason, F. W. & Co. 










31 39 




31 39 


Gleason, Harry E. & Co. 










12 41 






Gleason, Herbert L. . 












37 96 


37 96 


Gleason, Mary J. 












51 10 


51 10 


Glynn, John H. 










1 46 




1 46 


Goodspeed, Mary M., Guardian 












25 55 




Goodspeed, Charles F. 












8 03 




Gormley, William 










2 12 


12 41 


14 53 


Goss, Ella E. . 












75 92 


75 92 


Goss, Carrie C. . . . 












45 26 


45 26 


Goss, Daniel J. . . . ... 


12 05 




12 05 



120 
Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



Ooss, Josiah 
Gould, H. H., heirs 
Gould, Mary L., heirs 
Gould, Ida M. . 
Gould, Lawrence M. 
Graham, Franklin C. 
Graham, Charles F. 
Grant, George W. 
Grant, Peter, heirs 
Grant, James D. 
Gray, Orin T. . 
Gray Robert 
Gray, Margaret M. 
Greeley, John D., heir 
Greeley, John H. 
Greenlaw, Amelia S. 
Greenwood, Lucy S. 
Greenwood, Herbert 
Greenwood, Frank 
Greenwood, Georgiana 
Gregg, Clark C, heirs 
Grew, Henry, S. 
Grew, Henry, Estate 
Gridley, George Fred 
Griffin, Fannie M. 
Griffin, Sarah 
Griffin, John W. 
Guinau, Margaret J. 
Gunn, Dennis 
Gunn, Elizabeth 
Gunn, Benjamin 
Gurney, Cliarles K. 
Gwillim Edward J. 



Habberley, Martha A. 
Haigh, George and Bertha 
Hahn Lizzie 
Haldeu, John 
Ha'den, Lydia C. 
Hale, Elvira F. . 
Haley, Elizabeth 
Haley, Charles . 
Hale, Lizzie E. . 
Hall, Augusta . 
Hall, Caleb 
Hall, Sarah C. . 
Hall, Fred A. . 
Hall, George 
Hall, Maria E. . 
Hall, William R. 
Hamblin, Benjamin L. 
Hamblin, Elizabeth H. 
Hamblin, Carrie L. 
Hammett, Mary L. 
Hammett, Edwand A. W. 
Hammond, Joseph W". 
Hanchett, George W. 
Haney, Katie . 
Hankerd, Edmund 
Hanlon, Daniel T. 
Harding, George M. 
Hardy,"Bartlett H. 



Per- Real 

sonal. Estate. 



$30 oo 



7 30 
I 46 



730 00 
35 II 



2 48 



2 92 
2 19 



2 34 
6 94 



1 82 

2 92 



$ 33 58 
45 62 
11 68 
28 47 
51 S3 

25 55 
47 45 
32 12 

30 66 



7 30 
43 80 
72 27 
49 64 
53 29 
64 24 
205 13 
32 49 

35 04 

1,964 07 
91 98 
40 88 
29 93 
48 91 
43 44 
20 44 

36 50 
5 84 
2 92 

71 54 



49 64 
31 39 
13 14 
96 36 
53 29 
87 60 

53 64 
466 10 

168 63 

8 76 

40 88 

17 52 

40 SS 

75 92 

49 64 

296 38 

635 10 

39 42 

46 34 

4 38 

68 62 

54 02 
53 29 
43 07 

73 00 
103 66 



121 



Resident 


Tax-Payers 


— {Continued.) 




NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Hardy, Geoi'ge H., heirs .... 






$ 40 88 


$ 40 88 


Hardy, Eugene J. 












29 20 


29 20 


Harlow, Mary E. 












204 40 




Harlow, Susan M. 












115 34 




Harper, Nelson A. 










$ 5 84 




5 S4 


Harriman, Orrin O. 












29 93 




Harrington, Ann 












6 21 




Hart, Bridget M., heirs 












14 60 


14 60 


Hart, Ella C. . 












51 10 




Hartwell, Francis W. . 












47 45 




Harwood, Henry V. 












83 22 




Haskell, Maria, heirs . 












43 SO 




Haskell, Gideon H. 










61 32 


237 25 




Haskell, Elmer W., heirs 












2 54 


2 54 


Haskell, George R. 












36 50 




Ha slam, Frank H. P. . 












8 76 


8 76 


Haslam, Blanche M. . 












27 74 




Hassam, Rose P. heirs 












67 16 


67 16 


Hatch, Freeman, heirs 












40 88 




Hathaway, Edward S. 












39 42 


39 42 


Haven, George E. 












55 48 




Hawes, Charles E. 














29 20 


29 20 


Hawes, Emily R. 














39 42 




Hayes, James . 












1 46 


17 89 


19 35 


Haynes, Annie L. 














67 16 




Hayward, Arthur F. 












10 22 




10 22 


Hayward, Eliza A. 














7 30 




Hayward, Edward S. 
Hayward, Maggie M. 












5 84 


113 8S 
48 18 


4S 18 


Hazard, Edgar V. 














SI 76 


81 76 


Heaps, Windsor 














50 37 




Henderson, MissE. 












5 84 






Henderson, Mary 














48 18 




Henderson, Frank 












1 97 


20 SO 




Henderson, William E 














4 38 




Hennessey, Michael 














21 17 




Heustis, Charles P. 














90 52 


90 52 


Heydecker, Louis, heirs 












31 39 




Hickey, Edward J., Estate 


, T. J. 


Kenney an 


1 J. A 










Glass Assignees 












38 69 


38 69 


Hickey, Margery A. 














173 74 


173 74 


Higbee, Celia S. 














36 87 


36 87 


Higgins, Antoinnette ' 


<". 












89 06 




Higgins, David . 












1 46 


39 42 




Higgins, Henry M. 














156 95 




Higgins, Cornelius J. 














24 09 




Higgins, Josiah P. 












14 60 






Higgins, Florinda B. 














100 01 




Higgins, John . 














18 25 


IS 25 


Higgins, Margaret 














24 09 




Highland, Alice 














70 08 




Hill, Sarah J. . 














93 44 




Hill, Jere M. 














68 62 




Hill, Hamilton A. 












17 52 






Hill, Fred R. 














45 26 




Hill, Warren S. . 














67 16 


67 16 


Hill, Florence . 














27 74 


27 74 


Hiller, Lucy E. . 














40 88 


40 88 


Hilton, Orissa P. 














73 00 




Hilton, Lavinia J. 














52 56 




Hines, Orin M. . 














32 12 




Hitchcock, Henry R. 












2 92 






Hodgdon, Frank L., & Co. . 










7 30 




7 30 


Hodgdon, Mary E. 












52 56 


52 56 



122 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



Hodgdon, Flora J. 

Hodges, Ella A. 

Hodges, Joseph F. 

Hodgkins, Luther D. 

Hodgkinson, John, & T. J. 

Hodgkinson, John 

Hodgson, Edgar W. 

Hodsdon, David M. 

Hoefiiing, Joseph 

Hoeffling, Anton 

Holmes, Alvin D. 

Holmes, Mandana D. 

Holmes, Mary A. 

Holmes, Mary, heirs 

Holmes, Thomas C. 

Holmes, Margaret R. 

Holt, Charles F. 

Holtham, Georgiana F. 

Holtham, Henry F. 

Holtham, Henry S. 

Holtham, William 

Holway, Alexander H. 

Holway, Emma A. 

Holway, William H. 

Holzer, Ulrich . 

Homans Emma R. 

Homans, Frank B. 

Hood, Georgianna 

Hood, John 

Hood & Reynolds 

Hoogs, Hannah M. 

Hoogs, Thomas W. 

Hope, James D. 

Hopkirk Jane . 

Home, Olive 

Home, Earnest, heirs 

Horr, Sarah E. 

Horton, riarry E. 

House, Nettie, F. B. 

Houston, Mary J. 

Hovey, Solomon 

Howard, Henry F., hei 

Howard, Loea P. 

Howe, Kittle M. 

Howes, Eliza 

Howes Charles . 

Hudson, John W. 

Hudson, Maria . 

Heustis, Alice M. 

Huggins, Charles E. 

Hughes, William J. 

Hughes, Catherine 

Hugo, George B. 

Hukin, Emily R. 

Hultburg, Anna S. 

Humphrey, Jennie B. 

Humphrey, Edward I. 

Hiirley, Dennis and Mary 

Hurst, Henry . 

Hurter, Jennie F. 

Hurter, George C. 

Hussey, Peter M. - 

Husted Richard W. 

Hutchinson, C. F. and Henry O. 



Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 




$ 54 75 


$ 54 75 




42 34 


42 34 




140 89 






32 85 


32 85' 


$13 14 


28 47 




2 48 


18 25 






101 10 


101 10 




16 06 


16 06 




17 16 


17 16 




16 79 


16 79- 


1 46 




1 46 




40 88 


40 S8 




49 64 


49 64 




20 08 






2 19 


2 19 




22 63 






71 54 


71 54 




63 51 


63 51 




S 76 


8 76. 


8 98 




8 98 


8 76 




8 76 


1 46 


821 61 


823 07 




219 73 


219 73- 




55 48 


55 48- 


51 


65 70 

64 61 




1 46 


12 78 
8 03 




5 63 


102 93 




48 18 


89 79 
39 42 
45 26 
16 06 






21 90 


21 9a 




16 06 


16 06 




61 32 




1 46 




1 46 




58 40 


58 40 




8 76 






77 38 






43 80 






58 40 




11 68 


30 66 
48 18 
64 24 


42 34 


1 46 




1 46 




32 12 


32 12 




33 58 


33 58 




31 39 




7 30 




7 30 


5 11 


49 64 


54 75 


2 92 




2 92 


6 57 


39 42 






27 74 


27 74 




67 16 


67 16 




44 53 






10 22 


10 22 




45 26 






134 32 






48 18 






44 17 




14 60 








33 58 


33 58 



123 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Hutchinson, Elizabeth 
Hutchinson, Eliza G. . 
Hyde Park Club 
Hyde Park Company . , 

Hyde Park Cong'] Society, . 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co. 
Hyde Park Water Co. 



Ingersoll, William H, heirs , 



Jackson, James W. 

Jackson, John A. 

Jacobs, Charles 

James, Mary 

Jank, Carl Robert 

Jaquith, Andrew 

Jefferds, Lewis S. B. 

Jeifers, George 

Jenkins, Eliza B. 

Jenkins, HowaLd 

Jenkins, Arthur H. 

Jenney, Charles E. 

Jenney, Charles F. 

Jenney, Edwin C. 

Jenney, E. C. and C. F., and Henry C. Stark 

Jennings, C. G. T. and Etta A. 

Jennings, Edward L. 

Jennison Charies S. 

Jigger, John W. 

Johnson, Richard M. 

Johnson, Susan E. 

Johnston, John 

Jones, Antoinette C. 

Jones, John H. . 

Jones, Mary A. . 

Jones, Royal M. 

Jordan, Ellen . 

Jordan, John C. 

Jordan, Patrick J. 

Joubert, Francis A. 

Joubert, Didier Z. 

Joyce, Jane 

Judd, Mary E. . 

Julien, William H. 



K 



Kappler, Meinrad 
Kappler, Nicholas P. 
Katzman, Elizabeth 
Kazar, John H. . 
Kazar, Jessie T. . 
Keane, Margaret A., heirs 
Kearney, John, heirs 
Keene, Charles W. 
Keene, George R. 
Keith, James 
Keith, Louisa . 
Kelleher, Mary, heirs 
Kelley, Mary A. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$3 65 
14 60 
58 40 

1089 67 
233 60 



7 30 
1 83 

20 44 



4 38 



29 20 



Real 

Estate. 



$33 58 

97 82 



73 00 

276 67 
612 84 



43 80 
21 90 
37 23 

47 45 
40 15 
52 92 

6 21 

48 91 
102 20 

45 26 

46 72 
75 92 
34 31 

47 45 

37 96 
58 40 
36 50 

115 34 

S4 68 

8 76 

8 76 

61 32 

38 69 

17 52 
56 94 
23 36 
90 52 
32 85 

39 42 
58 40 

18 98 



30 66 
35 04 
18 98 
43 80 
55 48 
21 17 
29 20 
5 84 
25 55 

115 34 

21 17 
18 9S 



Unpaid. 



$ 101 47 



88- 

4 38 

43 80 



60 23 
36 50 
115 34 
105 12 



38 69 
17 52 



90 52 
39 42 



38' 



21 17 

29 20 



21 17 



124 



Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Kelley, Annie E. ...... 




$64 24 


$ 64 24 


Keltv, John T., heirs . 














43 07 


43 07 


Kendall, Edward A. . 












$28 47 


128 48 


156 95 


Kendall, Matilda H. . 














96 36 


96 36 


Kennedy, Fred J. 












2 92 




2 92 


Kennedy, Hannah 














49 64 




Kennedy, John 














23 36 


23 36 


Kennedy Mary . 














10 22 




Kenniso'n, Nehemiah S. 














47 45 


47 45 


Kent, Arabella B. 














62 78 




Kenyon, Kalph G. 














4 38 


4 38 


Ketcham, W. W. and F. A., 1 


eirs 












35 77 




Kiggen, John, heirs. . 














18 25 




Kiggen, Michael 












2 55 


319 74 




Kiiru'en, Joseph M. 












2 92 






Kilner, William B. 














41 25 


41 25 


Kimball, Ellen . 














28 47 




King. Catherine 














27 01 




Kingston, Thomas 












1 46 


6 57 


8 03 


Knight, Angie L. 














62 78 




Knights, John • 














21 90 




Kir-wan, John S. 














31 39 


31 39 


Kirwan, William 














31 39 




Kivan, B. B. 












2 92 


29 20 


2 92 


Kollock, Arthur C. 












7 30 






Kraus, A. Robei-t 














54 02 


54 02 


Kruge, Elizabeth 












1 61 


13 87 




Kuhn Clara E. . 














37 96 




Kunkel, Frank. 












1 46 


22 27 


23 73 


Kunkel, Victoria E. 














17 52 




J j 
Lagner, Elinor ....... 




21 90 




Lake, Martha S. 














94 90 




Lally, Michael . 














7 30 




Lambard, Charles and Marg 


iret 












21 90 




Landt, Henry . 














45 26 




Lane, Carrie E. 














37 96 


37 96 


Lane, Harriet L. 














54 02 




Lane, George E. 








V 




2 55 




2 55 


Lane, Ann., heirs 














18 25 




Lane, Emma L. 














49 64 




Lanahan, Robert 














18 25 


18 25 


Langley, Frank E. 












21 90 






Larrson, Peter . 














45 26 


45 26 


Law, Samuel 














43 07 


43 07 


Lawrence, Catherine . 














32 85 




Lawson, James D. 












1 83 


58 40 




Lawson, Theop'l, heirs 














13 14 




Leadbeater, Charlotte 














18 25 


18 25 


Lee, Bridget 












1 46 


47 45 




Leeds, Catherine 














54 3S 


54 38 


Leonard, Thomas F., heirs 














269 01 




Leonard, D. Ambrose 












1 46 


83 95 




Leonard, James W. 














15 33 




Leseur, Horatio, heirs 














152 57 




Leseur, Benj. F. 














65 70 




Leslie, Ida M. . 














65 70 




Leslie, Sylvester Z. 












32 12 






Leslie, Isabel L. 














9 49 




Leufgren, Oscar J. 














14 60 


14 60 


Lewis, Mary C. 














40 88 




Lewis, Charles . 












6 57 







125 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 






Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 

$ 120 81 


Unpaid. 


Lewis, Ellen D. ..... . 






Lewis, David W". 








$14 60 






Lewis, Madeline S. 










54 02 


$ 54 62 


Libby, Samuel W. 










14 60 




Light, Charles F. 










63 88 




Lincoln, Alice M. 










21 90 


21 90 


Lincoln, John C. 










197 83 




Lincoln, J. C, and W. U. & ( 


). N. Fairbairn 








24 82 




Lindgren, Olef P. 








3 65 




3 65 


Lindgren, Swan J. 








1 53 


30 66 


32 19' 


Lindsey, Mary B. 










25 55 




Lingham, Charles T. . 










25 55 




Little, Everett A. , 










26 28 




Littlefleld, Alonzo 








1 S3 




1 83- 


Littlefleld, Lucretia 










42 34 


42 34 


Loi'tus, Julia 










35 04 




Lord, Linda C. . 










54 02 




Loveland, Helen H. 










71 54 




Lovell, Sarah A. 










40 15 




Lovell. Caleb T. 








1 46 




1 46 


Lovejoy, John S. 








13 51 






Lovering, Flora 










56 94 




Lucey, Misses E. and M. 








7 30 




7 30 


Lucey, Julia E. . 










11 68 


11 68 


Lucey, Cornelius J. , 








51 




51 


Ludiam, Albert 










27 74 




Lul'kin, Hettie R. 










23 36 


23 36 


Lufkin, Joseph V. 








2 92 


37 96 




Lynch, Margaret 










54 75 




Lynch, Bridget A. 








1 60 


16 42 




Lyon, Emerson W. 








10 95 


100 74 


111 69' 


Lyons, Alary E. 










39 42 


39 42. 


Lyons, Louis E. & James E 










2 92 




MacGregor, Archibald 




78 84 




MacKenzie, James P. 










16 06 




Mackintosh, James 








14 60 


47 45 




Macomber, Sarah A. . 










27 01 




Mahoney, Dennis 








19 21 


106 57 


125 78 


Mahoney, Bridget 










22 63 




Mahoney, John W. 








3 65 




3 65 


Malley, Luke and Catherine 










36 50 




Mandell, Albert A. 










29 57 


29 57 


Mandell, Henry C. 










11 30 




Manley, Mary E. 










29 20 


29 20' 


Manley, George H. 










32 12 


32 12 


Mann, Catherine S. 










24 46 


24 46 


Mannion, Patrick 










24 82 




Marks, Lena 








4 38 


54 02 




Marr, Adelaide M. 










227 76 


227 76 


Marr, Addie, A. 










5 84 


5 84 


Marron, Mary . 










13 87 


13 87 


Marsden, Ellen . 










86 14 




Marshall, Mary . 










32 12 




Martin, Robert B. Jr. . 








1 83 


18 25 


20 08 


Martin, Geo. A. . 








1 46 






Mason, Abby S. 










33 58 


33 58 


Mason, Mary E. 










24 09 


24 09 


Mather, Sarah A. 










55 48 




Mathewson, Jerome, heirs 










36 50 




Mathias, Jane T. 










9 49 


9 49 


Mathus, Franz . 










37 96 





126 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Maxim, Jane 

Maynard, William M. 

McAskell, Kenneth 

McAuliff, Edward and Bridget 

McAvoy, Mary E. 

McAvov, James D. 

McCarthy, Mary 

McCarthy, Michael 

McClellan, Peter 

McClure, Mary . 

McConnell, John T. . 

McDermott, Joseph P. 

McDermott, Margaret . 

MMcDonald, David A. 

McDonald, William I. 

McDonough, John, heirs 

McDonongh, Margaret, heirs 

McDonough, Mary C. . 

McDonough, Patrick J. 

McDonough, Peter 

McDonough, Thomas J. 

McDougaid, John C. and George V 

McGillicuddy, John, heirs . 

McGinley, Hugh 

McGowan, Andrew 

McGowan, Thomas 

McGowan, Margaret . 

McGrath, James 

TVIcInness, Annie E. . 

Mclnnes, William 

Mclntyre, Harriet P. . 

Mclntyre, Hattie J. 

Mclntyre, Hannah P. . 

Mclntyre, Warren P. . 

McKendry, Benjamin . 

McKenna, John H. heirs 

McKenna, James 

McKenna, James 2d . 

McKenna, Catharine . 

McKenzie, Stewart 

McLaughlin, Garrett . 

McLean, Alexander, . 

McLean, John S. 

McLellan, Elizabeth . 

McLeod, Mary J. 

McMahon, James E. . 

McMahon, Joseph 

McMahon, Maggie 

McMahon, Ellen 

McMillan, Barbara 

McNamara, John 

McNamara, Ellen, heirs, and Ellen A. Butler 

McPherson, Alexander D. . 

Meiggs, Clarence U. . 

Meister, Gustav A. . 

Melia, Bridget . 

Mercer, Emily J. 

Merrill, Eugene A. 

Merrow, Susan A. 

Mertz, Mattie E. 

Methodist Church Society 

Middleton, Catharine J. 

Milan, Patrick, heirs . 

Miles, George . 



Per- 
sonal. 



$ 6 94 



15 33 

51 



7 30 
6 36 



1 10 

2 19 



Peal 

Estate. 



51 



$ S3 22 

32 12 

20 44 

44 53 
67 16 
22 63 
24 09 

16 06 

21 90 
73 00 

13 87 

33 58 
32 12 
55 48 

17 52 
32 85 

2 92 
21 90 

20 44 
43 80 

18 25 

21 90 

14 60 

27 01 
6 57 

11 68 

35 69 
26 28 
46 

45 99 
29 20 
54 02 
39 42 
79 57 

5 11 
17 52 
23 36 

36 50 
23 73 
29 20 

121 91 

28 47 
56 94 
23 00 

4 38 
9 49 

32 12 

37 96 

48 18 

5 11 
86 14 
20 44 

29 20 
37 96 
43 80 
67 16 
54 75 
50 37 
37 96 

7 30 
70 81 



127 
Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Miles, George, Trustee ... . ... 




$ 21 17 




Miles and Morrison, . 












$56 04 


23 36 




Millar, Alexander 












7 30 


58 40 




Miller, Annie 














33 58 


$ 33 58 


Miller, George H. 














80 30 


80 30 


Miller, Mary E. 














105 12 




Milne, John 












7 30 


65 70 


73 00 


Miner, Henry B. 












7 30 


125 56 




Miner, Maud M. 














19 71 




Miner & Crumett 














39 42 


39 42 


Minnis, Thomas M. 












S 76 




8 76 


Misener, Matthew, Agent 












2 92 






Mitchell, Abbie E. 














58 40 




Mitchell, Sarah L. 














64 97 




Moltedo, Joseph 












5 11 


68 62 




Monahan, John H. 














23 36 




Monahan, William J. . 














17 52 




Monahan, James 














35 04 




Mooar, James F. 












10 00 


149 65 




Moran, Mary E. 














23 73 




Morrell, Harry E. 












1 46 






Morris, Mary 














24 82 




Morrison, Gerald M. . 














4 38 


4 38 


Morrison, Elisha R. 














32 12 




Morrison, Mary E. 














40 88 




Morrison, Michael 














17 15 




Morrison, Henry, heirs 














32 12 


32 12 


Morse, George W. 












1 46 


22 63 


24 09 


Morse, Annie B. 














55 4S 




Morse, Theodora E. . 














41 61 




Mortenson, Tena 














29 20 


29 20 


Moseley, Samuel R. 












17 52 






Mowry, William A. 














63 51 




Moylah, Michael 












51 




51 


Moylen, Michael F., heirs 














36 50 


36 50 


Mulcahy, Michael 












• 3 29 




3 29 


Mulcahy, Isabella 














77 38 


77 38 


Mullen, Ann 














13 87 




Mullen, Margaret M. . 












7 22 


179 58 




Mungan, Patrick 














27 74 




Murphy, Hannah 














13 14 




Murray, Bridget 












1 10 


17 52 




Murray, Elizabeth 














28 47 


2S 47 


Murray, Daniel A. 














26 28 




Murray, Thomas, 












1 46 


43 SO 


45 26 


Murray, Rachael 














1 46 




Myers, Samuel . 


"*T 












7 30 


7 30 


Nash, Addie F. . 




4S 91 


4S 91 


Nason, Joseph L. 










2 19 






Naughman, John P. 














22 63 




Neal, Marianne E. 














46 72 


46 72 


Neil], Annie H. . 














2 19 


2 19 


Neilson, David B. 














45 26 




Ness, Mary 














16 79 




Newcomb, George K. . 














20 44 




Newell, Susan E. 














36 50 




Newell, Stillman E. 














31 02 




Newton, Russell D. 












1 S3 


75 92 




Newton, Susan M. 














65 70 




Nicholson, Charles E. . 












14 60 


37 23 


51 83 


Nicholson, Jessie 














9 49 


9 49 



128 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Noble, Mark E 


$36 50 


$ 43 80 




Noonan, Matthew 














17 52 




Norling, Augusta W. . 














41 61 




Norling, Charles G., heirs 














32 12 




Norris, William H. 














252 58 


252 5S 


Norris, Frank E. 












29 20 






Norris, Edwin S. 














39 42 


39 42 


Norris, George H. 














43 44 


43 44 


Norris, Harry A. 














43 80 


43 80 


Norton, Susan M. 














41 61 




Norton, Fannie A. 














51 10 




Norton, Mary 














64 24 


14 24 


Norwood, William E. 














56 21 




Noyes, Martha H. 














49 64 




Noyes, Annie T. 














6 21 


6 21 


Noyes, Maria H. 














82 49 




Nunn, William J. 














40 52 




O'Brien, Catharine ...... 




' 33 58 


33 58 


O'Brien, John . 














160 60 


160 60 


O'Brien, Catharine E. 
















45 26 


45 26 


O'Brien, James . 
















18 62 




O'Brien, Lawrence S 
















2 19 




O'Connell, Harriet E. 
















40 15 


40 15 


O'Connell, Mary A. 
















44 16 




O'Connors, Patrick 
















10 95 




O'Donnell, James 
















3 29 




O' Flaherty, Martin 
















20 44 




O'Gradv, Delia H. 
















5 84 


5 84 


O'Halloran, Mary E. 
















18 25 


18 25 


O'Hern, Mary M. 
















42 70 




O'Keefe, Thomas 














4 67 


16 06 


20 73 


O'Rourke, Patrick 
















30 66 


30 66 


O'Rourke, James 
















30 66 




O'Toole, Michael 














51 


59 13 


59 64 


Olson, Martin 














1 46 


30 66 


32 12 


Orcutt, Fred. S. H. 
















30 66 


30 66 


Ormsbee, Priscilla B, 
















40 15 




Osborne, Arthur 
















70 81 




Osgood, Mary H. 
















62 05 




Ostrom, Bernard P. 


T 


» 












48 55 


48J55 


Page, Augustus A., heirs ..... 




71 54 




Page, Mary E. . 












7 30 






Page, Mary E., Guardian 












13 87 






Pagington, Thomas 












1 61 


21 17 




Paihe,'Francis M. 
















43 80 


43 80' 


Paine, Mary A., heirs 
















42 34 


42 34 


Paine, John A. . 














1 46 




1J46 


Paine, Charles F. 
















41 61 




Palmer, Catharine L. 
















37 96 


37 96 


Palmer, Charles E. 














3 65 




3 65 


Palmer, James R. 
















57 31 


57 31 


Parkhurst, Fred A. 
















90 52 




Parkhurst, Leonard W 














1 46 






Payne, Agnes M. 
















37 23 


37 23 


Pay son, Cordelia A. 
















83 95 


83 95 


Peabody, Ephraim S. 














7 30 


118 62 




Peabody, Mary D. & Mary J. 








214 62 




Peabody, Mary J. 
















32 48 





129 



Resident Tax-Payers 


— {Continued.] 






NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Peabody, Mary A. . . 




$ 51 83 


$ 51 83> 


Peare, Cora A. . 










80 30 




Peare, George H. 








$4 38 




4 38- 


Peck, Charles T. . . . 








2 19 


19 71 


21 90- 


Peck, Harriet A. 










51 10 




Peck, Mary Ann 










43 80 




Peirce, Catharine, heirs 










41 61 


41 61 


Pepper, Mary A. 










21 17 


21 17 


Perkins, Albert S. 










39 42 




Perkins, David . . . . , 










283 97 




Perkins, Hannah S. . 










99 28 




Perry, Helen A., Oria J. and Minnie A. 










57 67 




Peny, Mary H. . 










33 58 


33 58 


Perry, Charles A. 








2 92 






Peters, Henry .... 








1 02 






Peterson, Annie C. 










27 74 


27 74 


Phelps, Henry B. . . . 










55 48 


55 48 


Phillips, Benj.E. 








2 19 




2 19 


Phillips, Mary V. . . . 










54 02 


54 02 


Phipps, Daniel W. 








5 84 


118 99 




Pickett, Eliza D. 










42 34 




Pickett, John N. ... 








1 46 






Pierce, Mary E. & Emma C. 










52 56 




Pierce, Elizabeth U. . 










56 94 


56 94 


Piper, Sarah M. 










70 81 




Piper, Abby P. ... 










40 88 


40 88 


Plummer, Wilmot H. . 








5 84 




5 84 


Podbury, Marion 










33 58 




Pollock, Susan T. . . . 










5 11 


5 11 


Poole, William .... 










46 72 




Poore, Harrison H. . 








36 50 






Porter, Ira C. . 










45 26 




Porter, Samuel F. 










90 52 




Porter, James W. 








4 38 






Pothecary, Harry 










98 91 




Pothecary, Patience . 










44 17 




Powers. Wilbur H. 








21 90 


75 92 




Pratt, Harriet E. 










32 85 


32 85. 


Pratt Mabel D. 










33 5S 


33 58. 


Preston, William D. . 










55 11 




Preston, Sarah V. 










59 86 




Preston, Fannie H. . 










102 93 




Preston, John A. 








2 19 






Price, Sophia 










26 28 


26 28 


Price. Charles .... 








15 70 


59 86 


75 56 


Pring, James F. 








3 65 






Pring, Mary E. . 










78 84 




Pring, Johanna 










40 88 


40 88. 


Probert, Richard 










61 32 




Provonchee, Clara .... 










49 64 


49 64 


Putnam, Nathaniel M., heirs 










62 78 




Putnam, Sidney C, heirs 








61 32 






Putnam Hannah H. . . , 










122 64 




Putnam, Charles H. 










66 43 


11 12 


Q 








Queally, William ...... 




17 88 




Quinlan, John ....... 


2 92 


67 16 




Quinn. James ....... 




19 71 




K 








Radford, Benjamin F. ..... 




433 98 





130 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



Radell, W. E. F. and Emma L. 

Raclell, Emma L. 

Raeder, Clara E. 

Rafter, John C. . 

Rafter, Maria 

Rand, Rachael P. 

Rand, George H. 

Rand, Sarah A. . 

Rausch, George H. 

Ray, John G. 

Raynes, Martha A. 

Raynes, Elizabeth H. 

Reagan, Mary . 

Reardon, Ellen . 

Reid, Peter J. . 

Reynolds, Stephen IT. 

Reynolds, S. H. and Edgar W. Hodgson 

Rhoades, Charles H., heirs, 

Rhodes, Wallace M. . 

Rhodes, Marion W. 

Rice, George M. 

Rice, Sarah W. . 

Rich, Henry A. . 

Rich, Brothers, . 

Rich, Harriet N. 

Rich, Florence L. 

Richardson. Emeline E. 

Richardson, Alonzo H., Jr. 

Richardson, John 

Richardson, Nellie L. . 

Richardson, Ella A. . 

Richardson & Rafter., E. C. Jenney 

Richardson, George L. 

Ridley, Edith L. 

Riga, Martin J. . 

Riley, Joseph, 1st 

Riley, Joseph, 2d, and Bridget 

Riley, Thomas and Julia 

Risk, Thomas H. 

Risk, Mary J. 

Ritchie, John 

Ritchie, Margaret 

Roberts, Elizabeth 

Robinson, Julia F. 

Robinson, John T. & Co. 

Robinson, Henry B. . 

Robinson, John A. 

Rockwood, Jotham C. 

Rogers, Annie L. 

Rogers, William N. 

Rogers, D.W. C.and Sophia 

Rogers, Margaret 

Rogers, John 

Rogers, Catherine G. . 

Rogers, James R. 

Rogers, Peter . 

Rogers, Hugh E. 

Rogers, Arthur T. and Nellie 

Rogers, Arthur T. 

Rogers, Eliza T. 

Rogers, Viola M. 

Rollins, Fred E. 

Roome, B. Elizabeth . 

Roome, B. Elizabeth, Adminstratrix 



A. 



, Trustee 



Per- 
sonal. 



$2 19 



1 02 
1 46 



2 19 

4 16 



2 19 

44 97 

43 80 



2 19 
5 11 



1 10 
1 46 



8 76 

153 30 

2 92 

1 46 



1 53 



Real 
Estate. 



5 35 77 

5 11 

71 54 

37 96 

40 S8 
26 28 

13 87 
46 72 
74 46 

36 50 
56 58 
21 17 
13 14 

2 19 
145 27 

50 01 
5S 40 
48 54 

42 34 
249 30 

62 05 
192 72 

54 38 
21 90 

43 07 

44 53 
32 85 
35 77 
39 05 

178 85 
61 32 

28 47 

3 65 
11 68 
17 52 

41 61 
50 73 

114 98 

61 32 
30 66 

62 78 
184 69 
206 59 

29 20 
43 07 

66 43 

37 96 
54 02 

45 99 

32 49 

30 66 

42 34 
32 12 

5 11 
39 42 
13 14 
35 04 
39 42 

31 39 
3 65 



131 

Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



Tlooney, Patrick 
Rooney, Patrick H. 
Rooney, Patrick J. 
Booney, Elizabeth 
Rooney, Bridget 
Rooney, Catharine 
Rooney, James, heirs . 
Ttooney, Andrew D. 
Rooney, Margaret V. . 
Rooney, Francis M. 
Rooney, Mary M. 
Ross, Jane M. . 
"Ross, John F. 
Rossney, William E. . 
Rowell, Benjamin L. . 
Rudolph, Agnes C. 
Ruggles, Judson G. 
Runnells, Levi A. 
Russell, Ann 

Hyan, James F. and Bridget 
Ryan, Isaac L. . 
■Ryan, Frances L. 
"Ryan, Bridget, Trustee 
Hyder, Margaret 



Sampson, Arch R. 
Samuel Isaac B., heirs 
Sanborn, Mary . 
Sanford, George 
Sanford, Oliver S. 
Sanger, Sarah J. 
Sargeant, Gilbert L. 
Savage, Eben D. 
Savage Mary E. 
Savage Mary 
Savage, John C. 
Savage, Henrietta L. 
Sawtelle, Mary N. 
'Sawtelle, George W. 
Sawtelle, F. W. & Co. 
Sawyer, Edwin W. 
•Sawyer, Daniel, heirs 
Sayer, William H. 
Schell, Ellen A, 
Schofleld, Hannah 
Schultz, Gustave A. 
Scott, Jane W. . 
Scott, William W. 
Scott, Robert 
Scott, Robert, Jr. 
Scott, Jairus H. 
Scott, James D.. 
Scrivens, Hannah L. 
Scrivens, Walter C. 
Scully Mary E. . 
Searle, Charles E. 
Sears, Harriet N. 
Sears, Susan A. . 
Shaw, Mary 
Shea, William . 
Shea, Mary J. . 
Sheedy, Daniel . 



Per- 
sonal. 



$ 4 3S 
5 62 



Real 

Estate 



2 19 



8 76 



45 26 



44 90 



34 31 



2 92 



61 32 



30 66 
8 03 



2 34 



1 60 



5 11 



$ 58 77 

22 63' 

2 19 

10 22 

294 92 

14 60 

24 82 

45 99 

24 09 

5 84 

148 19 

16 06 
36 50 
39 42 

43 80 
48 18 
26 2S 
78 48 
14 60 
3 65 
34 67 



70 08 
43 44 
21 17 
34 31 
151 11 
77 38 
43 80 
7 30 
54 75 
6 94 

41 61 

26 28 
2 54 
26 28 
46 71 
40 88 
45 26 
49 28 

28 84 

30 66 
97 82 

65 70 

32 12 

93 44 

102 20 

29 20 
26 28 

34 31 

35 04 
43 80 

31 75 
29 93 

13 87 



Unpaid. 



$ 63 15 

5 62 

22 63 

2 19 

10 22 

294 92 

14 60 



16 06 
36 50 
39 42 

8 76 

48 18 
123 74 

34 67 



43 44 
21 17 



43 80 



2 92 
41 61 



35 70 
32 12 



29 20 

34 31 
1 60 

35 04 



29 93 

13 87 



132 
Eesident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Sheehan, Mary . 

Sheehan, Thomas S. 

Sheene, Adeline S. 

Shepard, John H. 

Sherman, Dexter, heir 

Sherman, Ella E. 

Sibley, Ella A. . 

Simmons, James 

Simson, Elizabeth 

Slafter, Charles S. 

Slocomb, Edwin L. 

Smith, Ann 

Smith, John W. . 

Smith, Collins & Co. 

Smith, Maria E. 

Smith, Jane 

Smith, Marv S. D. 

Smith, Reliance G. 

Smith, Mary 

Smith, William A., heirs 

Smith, Mary A. 

Smith, Beebe 

Smith, Lucy A. and L. C. Orcutt 

Smith, David 

Snellgrove, John 

Snow, Eavinia . 

Snow, George H. 

Somes, Samuel S. 

Soide, John A. . 

Soule, Sadie L. . 

Soule, William T. 

Soule, Myra L. . 

Sparred. William P. 

Spear, Sarah 

Spiller, Benjamin L. 

Sreenan, Patrick 

Stack, John 

Stack, Thomas . 

Stackpok, Eunice 

Stanberry, Richard Jr 

Stanley, Miss M. A. 

Stanley, Arthur 

Stanley, Edward E. 

Stark, Ann Maria 

Stark, Mary J., heirs 

Stark, Henry C. 

Stevens, Albert G. 

Stevens, Mary M. 

Stevens, John N., heirs 

Steward, Ellen A. 

Stewart, Malcom 

Stickney,Emma O. 

Stockbridge, Wales R. 

Stockford, Hugh J. 

Stocking, Mary M. 

Stoddard, Hatherly A. 

Stoddard, Granville M 

Stoddard, Frederick A 

Stone, Franklin, heirs 

Storer, Emma A. 

Story, Arthur W. 

Stowers, Herbert M. 

Strachan, Douglas 

Straw, Antoinette . K 



Per- 
sonal 



$3 28 
2 19 



17 52 

56 94 



1 60 

10 95 



16 79 
8 03 



3 21 
1 46 



1 46 



7 30 



3 65 
1 46 



1 83 

2 92 



Real 
Estate. 



$35 77 

44 53 

27 74 
51 10 
90 52 
48 55 
46 72 
£2 85 

35 04 

18 25 
105 85 

42 34 
29 56 

36 50 
33 58 

45 26 
36 50 

19 71 
33 22 
42 34 



44 53 
29 57 
135 41 

76 65 

54 02 
101 11 

54 75 
43 07 
35 04 
90 52 

28 11 

29 20 
16 79 

78 11 
71 54 
64 97 
89 06 
73 73 
78 11 
37 96 
46 72 
21 90 
40 88 
27 01 
49 64 
140 16 
116 80 
42 34 
31 39 

83 22 

23 36 

139 07 

4 3S 

57 67 



133 
Resident Tax-Payers ■ 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Strout, Martin V. B. . 




$ 4 38 




Strout, Barbara .... 












54 02 




.Stone, Galen L. 










$3 65 






Stuart, William J. 












1 46 




Stuart, William J. and Elizabeth G 












147 46 




Sullivan, Fred S. 












26 28 


$26 28 


Sullivan, Rachel F. 












23 36 


23 36 


Sullivan, Mary . 












24 45 


24 45 


Sumner, Henrietta C. . 












58 40 


58 40 


Sumner, William F., heirs . 












36 50 




Sumner, Sally R., heirs 












715 40 


715 40 


Swallow, Adeline E. . 












46 72 


46 72 


Swanstrom, August 












25 65 




Sweeney, Patrick, heirs 












31 02 


31 02 


Sweeney, Jane . 












48 91 


48 91 


:Sweeney, Thomas W. . 










3 21 


60 59 


63 SO 


Sweet, Martha C. 












52 20 




Swinton, Jennie S. . 












30 66 




.Sykes, Louisa M. 






• 




36 50 


36 50 


X 

Tacey, George .... 


2 54 






Tacej, Mary 














30 30 




Tandy, Louis D. 














73 00 


73 00 


Tarrant, Mary A. 














41 61 


41 61 


Tasker, E. B., and Prescott, < 


:.s. 












102 20 




Taylor, Prince H., heirs 














33 58 




Taylor, Daniel T. 














48 18 




Tavlor, Elliot O. 












16 79 




16 79 


Taylor, Charlotte A., ex-E. C 


. 












49 64 




'Taylor, Charlotte A. . 














17 52 




Terry, H. B. and Abbie A. 














82 49 




Terry, H. B. and Abbie A. 














67 16 




Terry, Henry B. 














42 34 




Terry, Henry B. 














11 68 




Terry, John 














58 40 




Tewksbury, Francis W. 














45 99 




Thompson", Mrs.H. A. B. 














38 69 




Thompson, Howard S. 














57 67 




Thompson, Elizabeth . 












23 00 






Thompson, William J. 














5 11 


5 11 


Tibbetts, James T. 












2 19 






Tibbetts, J. T, and Ella D. 














54 02 




Tierney, Patrick J. 












1 10 




1 10 


Tilden, Annie E. 














50 74 




Tilton, Josiah N. 














18 25 




Tilton, Mary A. 














41 25 




Timpenny, Richard, heirs 














24 82 




Tirrell, Frederick, ST. 












15 33 


161 69 




Tobin, Thomas D. 














21 17 


21 17 


Todd, Henry, Jr. 












5 84 




5 84 


Tooher, William H. . 














51 10 




Toole, Martin 














6 57 


6 57 


Tourtelotte, Ellis C. . 














43 SO 




Tower, Clement B. 














49 64 




Towle, Peter F. 














25 91 


25 91 


Towner, Thomas J. 














27 74 


27 74 


Townes, Elizabeth 














38 69 


30 00 


Townsend, Hiram J. . 














20 44 


20 44 


Townsend, Betsey 














40 88 


40 88 


Townsend & Kelley . 














19 71 


19 71 


Tripp, EmilyA. 














61 32 


61 32 


Tucker, Sarah E. 














54 02 


54 02 



134 

Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Tucker, Ella A. . » 




$40 88 




Tuckerman, John H. . 








$5 48 


35 40 


$40 88 


Turner, Maria Louisa 










2 92 


2 92 


Turner, John J. 








1 10 


27 01 


28 11! 


Turner, Willliam H., heirs . 










225 94 




Tuttle, Annie M. 










98 55 




Tuttle, Samuel A. 








9 71 


50 37 




Tuttle, J. Marshall 








12 78 






Twichell, Elizabeth U. and Annie ] 


E. Sanderson 






49 64 




Tyler, Caroline E., heirs 










52 56 




Tyler, Harriet B. 










110 96 




Tyler, Benjamin F. 








3 29 






Tyler, Charles H. 

TT 










15 33 


15 33' 


Underbill, Edward M. 


11 6S 






Underbill, Lizzie S. . 




42 34 




Underhill, Merrill 


1 46 


43 80 




Upham, Mary . ...... 

V 
Vincent, Henry ...... 




40 88 


40 88 




27 74 


27 74 


Vivian Roxanna 












43 07 


43 07. 


Vose, Benjamin C, heirs 












159 S7 




Vose, Sarah M. and Mary E. 












84 68 




Vose, Sarah M. 












30 66 




W 








Wadsworth, Nellie B. . .... 




51 10 


51 I0> 


Waldron, Charles E. 














70 45 




"Walker, Dennis G. 














77 38 




Walker, Lucretia R. 














36 50 




Wallace, Richard 














16 06 




Walsh, Patrick 














15 69 


15J69 


Walstab, Henrietta, 














18 25 


18 25 


"Walter, Louisa T. 














90 52 




Walter, Theodore A. 












2 19 


54 75 


56 94 


"Ward, "William D. 












43 80 






"Ward, James & Son 












5 84 




5 84 


Ward, Charlotte 












2 92 


50 37 


53^29 


Ward, Patrick J. 














8 03 


8103 


"Warren, Marv E. 














S7 60 


87^60 


Washburn, Eliza G. 














279 59 




"Washburn, George F 












3 65 


86 14 




Wasserboehr, Harvey P. 










2 19 


67 16 




Watterman, Archibald 










1 10 




1 10 


Waters, Thomas S. . 










2 92 


37 96 


40 88 


"Waters, Maria A. 












78 11 


78 11 


"Waters, Margaret and Nancy T. S 












24 46 


24 46 


"Watson, Susan .... 












' 19 71 


19 71 


Waverlv Club .... 










29 20 




29 20 


Webb, George E. 












40 15 


40 15 


Webber & Wilson 












27 74 




Webster, A. Eudora . 












94 90 


94 90 


Webster, Amos, heirs 












68 62 


68 62 


Webster, Elizabeth H. 












43 80 




Webster, Sarah S. . . . 












61 32 


61 32 


Webster, Frank B. Co. 










29 20 


58 40 


87 60 


Weimer, Mary A., heirs 












16 06 




Welch, Michael .... 












34 6S 


34 68. 


Weld, Theodore D. . 










| 




216 08 





135 
Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



Wentworth, Eliza J. 
West Eleanor 
Weston, Walter S. 
Weston, Minnie . 
Weston, Ella A. 
Weatherbee, Annie A. 
Wetherbee, John H. & Co., 
Wheaton, Burpee B 
Wheeler, George W. 
Wheeler, Sarah O. 
Wheeler, A Men D. 
Wheeler, Mamie E. 
Wheeler, Kate L. 
Whitaker, Daniel., heir 
White, William E. 
White, Carrie L. V. 
Whiting, George E. 
Whittemore, Melinda C, heir 
Whittier, George T. 
Whorf, George" C. 
Wiggles^¥orth, S. N. 
Wigley, John 
Wild, Laura 
Willard, Henry L. 
Willett, Elizabeth T. 
Williams, Mary M. 
Williams, Susan 
Williams, Frances E 
Williams, Leonard 
Williams, Rinaldo 
Williams, Frances A 
Williams, Phosbe A. 
Wilson, Johanna O. 
Wilson, Harriet . 
Wilson, Alice L. 
Winchenbaugh, Lester P. 
Wirth, Carl 
Woll'e, Ananias . 
Wolfe, Marck . 
Wood, Hannah . 
Wood, Joseph A. 
Wood, Daniel F., heirs 
Wood, Louisa M. 
Wood, Rachael P. 
Wood, Margaret 
Worden, Albert G. 
Worrick, Laban., heirs 
Worrick, Ella E. 
Wright, Richard, heirs 
Wyman, Ferdinand A. 
Wyman, F. A., Trustee 
Wyman, George 



Yeaton, Charles H. 

Young, John B. and Annie M. 

Youngren, Carl . 



Zimmermann, Caroline 



Per- Real 
sonal Estate. un P alcl - 



§ 3 29 



11 68 
3 65 
3 65 



1 60 

61 69 



4 38 
3 65 



5 03 



52 56 



43 80 
4 02 



51 10 
5 11 

51 10 

4S IS 
62 41 



49 64 
94 17 

29 20 
36 50 
44 53 

68 24 
282 51 
48 18 

56 21 
43 07 

42 34 
33 58 
81 76 
93 44 

105 12 
27 01 

77 38 
40 51 

23 36 

43 80 
39 42 

30 66 
58 40 

47 45 
67 89 

24 09 
5 84 

35 77 
8 39 

33 58 
80 30 

36 50 
27 74 

78 11 

48 13 
14 23 
87 60 

113 15 

57 60 



32 12 
24 82 



67 89 



5 11 
3 29 
51 10 

48 18 



3 65 

87 24 



44 53 
1 60 



48 18 
42 34 

108 19 

77 38 

29 01 

39 12 
35 69 

47 45 
67 89- 



36 50 



87 60 
4 02 



32 12 
24 82 



67 89 



NON-RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES, 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 
Adams Express Co. 


Boston 


$3 65 






Adams, William L. B. 


Boston 






28 10 


28 10 


Adrich, Portia W. 


Hillsgrove, B. I. 






55 48 




Alexander, Emilie 


Boston 






52 56 


52 56 


Allen, Abby F. 


Terryville, Conn 






112 79 




American Tool & Machine Co. 


Boston 




949 00 


1,120 55 




Ames, Fred. L., heirs 


Easton 






2 92 




Anderson James . 


Newtonville 






65 70 




Anthony Alice G. . 


Bradford . 






128 48 




Arnold, Sarah H., heirs . 


Nantucket . 






39 42 




Atwell, Charles F. 


Kingston . 






4 38 




Ayer, George, heirs , 

B 
Bacheller, Annie M. . 






16 43 


16 43 


Philadelphia, Pa. 




20 44 




Badger, Mary C. . 


Boston 






21 90 




Bailey, A. H. . 


Somerville. 






3 28 


3 28 


Balcom, D. O., heirs 


Dayton, Fla. 






53 64 




Bancroft, George, heirs 


Boston 






59 86 




Barnwell, John 


Vailey Falls, R. I 






4 38 




Barrett, Sarah E. . 


E. Foxboro 






2 92 




Bean, Aaron H. . 


Roxbury . 






27 74 




Beattie, Mary E. and Annie 


New York, N. T 






20 44 


20 44 


Beers Emma S. . 


Newtown, Conn. 






37 96 




Bell, John .... 


Dedham 






1 46 




Belli?, A. H. 


Waltham . 






2 92 




Berry Jane .... 


Somerville 






35 04 




Black, George X., heirs . 


Boston 






178 85 




Biackwood, Alexander . 


Boston 




V 


4 75 


4 75 


Bllake, Alpheus P. 


Boston 






802 64 


802 64 


Bllanchard, Eliza H., heirs 


Cambridgeport 






18 25 


18 25 


Bleakie, John S. . 


Boston 






41 98 




Bliss, Julia M. . 


Boston 






16 79 


16 79 


Boston Blower Co. 


Boston 




306 60 


255 13 




Bosworth, Hiram E. 


Boston 






21 90 




Boylan, Lawrence A. 


Philadelphia, Pa 






36 50 


36 50 . 


Boynton, Arthur L., heirs 


Asnby 






54 02 




Bradbury, Samuel A. 


Cleveland, Ohio 






2 19 




Bradlee, Nellie M. 


Milton 






37 




Bradlee, J. Walter, heirs 


Milton 






80 66 




Bragan, Isaac N. . 


NewLondon,Com 


1. 




3 65 




Breck, Charles, heirs 


Milton 






2 19 




Brennan, James, heirs . 


Jamaica Plain 






13 14 




Brewer, Joseph 








1 46 


1 46 


Brooks, Alfred L. 


Gardner . 






42 34 




Brooks & Converse 


Boston 






29 20 




Brown, Elizabeth W. 


Boston , . 






33 95 




Brown, John A. . 


Lowell " . 






24 45 




Brown, James W. 


Wellesley . 






30 66 




Brown, Joseph D. 


Winterport, Me. . 






49 64 




Browne, Edward I. 


Boston 






386 90 




Bryden, James 


Chdsea 






10 95 




Bunker, Ingalls . 


Candia, N. H. 






32 12 


32 12 


Burleigh, Henry T. 






14 60 






Burr, Frederick L. 


Atlantic 






31 02 


31 02 


Burr, Elizabeth A. 


Atlantic 






35 77 


35 77 


Bussey, Henrietta L. 


Medfleld . 






25 92 


25 92 



(136) 



137 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers. — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


KESIDENCE. 


Per 

sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Uupaid. 


C 

Caldwell, Emily L.. 


Roxbury . 




$226 30 




Cannon, Mary E. . 


Norfolk 






43 44 


$43 44 


Carpenter, E. B. 


Providence, R. I 






4 38 




Carson, Walter P. . . 


Winthrop, Me. 






73 


73 


Catiin, Arnold W. . 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 






18 98 


18 98 


Cauldfleld, Bridget 


Jamaica Plain 






2 92 




Chase, Francis A. . 


Boxbury . 






45 26 




Chestnut, David . . , 


Milton 






5 84 




Churchill, C. S. 


Dedham 






121 IS 




Churchill, J. R. 


Dorchester 






47 81 




Clark, Eleanor A. . 


Boston 






73 00 




Claxton, Sarah E. L. 


Boston 






10 95 


10 95 


Clifton Manf'g Co. 


Boston 




$29 20 






Clisby, Robert S. . 


Dedham 




24 82 




24 82 


Cobb, Roscoe A. . 


Brookdne . 






5 11 




Codman, Henry, heirs 


Dorchester 






2 92 




'Colburn, Elizabeth C, Mary E. 












and Annie F. Hodgdon. 


Dedham 






39 79 




Cole, Mary Ann 


Boston 






1 46 


1 46 


•Condon, John P. . 








2 92 




•Converse, Benjamin B. . 


Boston 






27 3S 




Conant, Albert 


Boston 






39 42 




Connolly, Martin J. 


Roxbury . 






1 82 




Conway, Hiram 


Worcester . 






1 46 




Cook, E. A., trustee, and Sabina 


Boston and 










Bradley 


Hyde Park 






33 58 


33 58 


Cook, Sarah C. . . . 


Wakefield . 






16 79 


16 79 


•Corcoran, William J. 


South Boston 






5 84 




•Cotter, Annie C. . 


Boston 






3 65 


3 65 


Cox, George D., Jr. 


Boston 






2 92 


2 92 


Cresto, John S. 


Boston 






10 95 


10 95 


Crocker, Henry E. 








70 08 


70 08 


Crowell, Albert 


Boston 






10 95 




Crowley, Patrick J. 


Somerville 






24 09 


24 09 


Cunane", William 


South Groveland 




8 03 


8 03 


Curry, Joseph T. . 

D 
Davie, Annie G. f. 


St. Paul, Minn. . 




12 41 


12 41 


Plymouth . 




60 94 




Davis, Sarah J. 


Cambridge 




34 31 




Deane, Delia A. . 


Portland, Me. 




16 06 


■ 16 06 


Dedham & Hyde Park Gas Co. 


Dedham 


116 80 


51 10 




Dennis Ellen 


Jamaica Plain 




27 74 




Denny, John W. 


Milton 




11 68 




Derry, Charles T. . 


Sharon 




31 39 




Dimmock, Joseph C. 


Boston 




2 12 




Dobson, Hattie N. . 


Providence, B. I. 




40 88 


40 88 


Dodge, Albert 


Boston 


7 30 


97 82 




Dodge & Tyler 


Boston and H. Park 


43 80 






Dorchester 2nd Church 


Dorchester 




6 20 




Dorr, Mar j' E., heirs, (Kenney) 


Hyde Park 




24 46 


24 46 


Dowd, John J. . 


Boston 




2 92 




Downer, Francis E. , 






14 60 




Doyle, Joseph 

E 
Eastman, George A. 


Roxbury . 




3 28 




Boston 




1 46 




Eastman, Josiah S., heirs 


Boston 




85 41 




Eaton, Luther A. . 


Dedham 




70 08 




JSuwards, Jane B. . 








39 42 


39 42 



138 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Ellis, Samuel 


Medfleld . 




$4-2 34 


$42 34 


Ellison, William P., Administrator 


Newton 




$34 68 






Emery, John P, . , 


Kennebunk, Me 






•21 90 




Ensign, Elbert V. . 


Leominster 






4S 91 




Envoy Associates . 

F 

Fales, William A. . 


Boston 






21 17 


21 17 


Dedham . 




2 92 




Farrington, Horace, heirs 




Boston 






86 51 


86 51 


Far well, James E. 




Boston 






3 65 




Field, James B. 






Boston 






51 10 


51 10 


Firurohr, Frederick 






Boston 






2 19 


2 19 


Fisher, George A. Trustee 






Boston 






54 02 


54 02 


Fisk, Frances B. . 






Topeka, Kan. 






43 07 


43 07 


Flas-g, Dennis F., heirs 






Boston 






116 SO 




Flagg, S. S. (N. Y. & N. E 


R. R. 




Boston 






146 00 




Fleming, Hanorah . 






Roslindale 






1 46 


1 46; 


Flint, Charles L., heirs 






Boston 






16 06 




Fogland, Augustus G. 






Medford . 






1 46 




Folsom, Albina D. . 






Chelsea 






40 80 




Foord, James 






Los Angeles, Cal 






39 42 




Forbush, Clara F. . 










28 47 




Fowle, George W. 






Jamaica Plain 




82 49- 




G 

Gallagher, Daniel F. 


Lynn 




7 30 




Garst, Sebastian 




Providence, R. I 






54 02 


54 02 


Gay, Richard L. 




Boston 






43 80 


43 80 


Gay, Daisy E. 




Farmington, Me 






47 45 


12 45 


Gibbons, John 




Sharon 






45 26 




Giles, Delphina 




Indian Orchard 






103 66 




Giles, Lucy Ann 




Norfolk . 






37 96 




Giles, Elbridge W. . 




Boston 






44 53 




Gill, Dominick 




Boston 






73 




Glover & Wilcomb 




Boston 




205 86 


505 89 




Goodnow, Daniel, Jr. 




Norfolk . 






2 54 




Gorman, Harriet B. 




Acme, Fla. 






36 50 




Gould, William H. . 




Mattapan . 






21 90 




Gray, Thomas H. . 




Walpole . 




131 40 


157 68 




Green, Annie F. 




Bangor, Me. 






11 68 




Greenhood, H. (McGrath) 




Hyde Park 






5 48 


5 4S 


Greenhood, Mary . 




Dedham 






46 72 




Greenwood, Albert, Estate 




E. Jordan, Mich 






54 75 




Gridler, John L. 




Cambridge 






13 14 


13 14 


Gunn, John and Sarah 


/ 


Whitinsville 






8 76 




Gunn, John . 




Whitinsville 






8 76 




Gurney, Ansel F. . 




Boston 






49 64 




Hail, George, heirs 


Providence, R. I. 




624 15 




Hammond^ James B. 






New York, N. Y 






40 52 


40 52 


Harare, Tellef J. . 






Boston 






2 54 


2 54 


Hansen, Ormund . 






Boston 






2 19 




Hapgood, Salome H. 






Boston 






9 49 




Harmon. Benjamin 






Springfield 






24 82 


24 82- 


Harmon, William E. 






Lexington 






102 20 




Harraden, E.G. 






South Boston 






14 60 


14 60 


Hartney, Mary A. . 






Dedham 






48 IS 


48 18 


Hatlinger, Maria E. 






Jamaica Piain 






3 65 




Hawes, W. L. 






Wakefield . 






23 36 




Hawkins, James T. 






Boston 






76 65 


- 55 48 



139 



N on-Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid 


Hawkins, Maude A. 


Boston 




$19 35 




Haynes, C. O. 






Dedham 




1 82 




Hayward, Harry . 






Boston 




2 19 


$2 19 


Hemmenway, Augustus 






Canton 




160 60 




Henshaw, F. H., heirs 






Newton Highlands 




6 20 




Herr, Adam 






Dedham 




21 17 


21 17 


Hodges, Samuel 






Boston 




2 92 




Hodgkins, Fitz 






AVakefield . 




2 92 


2 92 


Hodgkins, Auuie M. 






Wakefield . 




35 77 


35 77 


Hogardt, Eliza 






E. Boston . 




2 19 




Holdsworth, Squire 






Stoneybrook, Ct. . 




41 25 


41 25 


Holdsworth, Sarah H. 






Stoneybrook, Ct. . 




48 18 


48 IS 


Hollingsworth, Z. T. 






Milton 




87 60 


87 60 


Holmes, Clarissa 






Provincetown 




56 94 


56 94 


Holmes, Hugh and Agnes 






Boston 




15 33 


15 33 


Hoyt, Elizabeth G. 






Belmont 




21 90 




Husted, J. B., heirs 






Water town 




62 78 




J 

Jackson, Robert 


Boston 




1 82 


1 82 


Jackson, Caroline, heirs 






Dorchester 






29 20 




Jennifer, John T. . 






Chicago, 111. 






39 42 




Jenness, George O. 






W. Gloucester 






51 83 


51 83 


Jenney, Mary F. 






South Boston 






2 92 




Jewell, Albert L. . 






Boston 






13 14 


13 14 


Johnson, Albion H. 






Roslindale . 






2 92 




Johnson, Edward A. 






Boston 






71 54 


71 54 


Johnson, E. A., heirs 












25 55 




Jones, Aaron T. 






E. Douglass. 






43 80 




Jones, Sophia C. 






Boston 






2 19 




Jones, Susan T. 






Mattapan . 






21 90 




Joy, Mary Kinsley 






Boston 






1 46 


1 46 


Juergens, Frederick 






Roslindale . 






4 75 




Keene, Nahnm, heirs 


Dedham 




12 41 




Kelley, William, heirs 






Lowell 






23 36 


23 36 


Kellogg, Henry 






Boston 






26 28 




Kenyon & Crabtree 






Boston 




$219 00 


262 SO 




Kibbler, Philemone 






Boston 






54 02 




Kibbler, Louis 






Boston 






43 80 




Kill am, Horace W. 






Worcester . 






28 47 




Kimball, Henry C, heirs 










77 38 




King, Armeda E. . 










88 33 




Klous, Seman 






Boston 


394 20 


365 00 




Lake, Elmer A. . 






73 73 




Lancaster, Edward M. 




Boston 




49 64 


49 64 


Lancey, Dustin and Grant 




Boston 






14 60 


14 60 


Lawler, EmmaG. . 




Boston 






4 38 




Leatherbee, Andrew F. . 




Boston 






114 61 


114 61 


Lee, George W. 




Revere 






23 36 




Lekebusch, Herman 




Boston 






17 52 




Little, James L. . 




Boston 






75 92 




Lichfield, George A. 




Wollaston . 






33 58 




Litchfield, Charles A. 




Nor well 






62 78 




Litchfield, Henry, adms'tr 




Plymouth . 






38 69 




Lothrop, Francis E. 




Boston 






46 72 




Loud, John J., Sarah, Annie and 










Alice French 


Weymouth 




236 15 





140 



Non-Resident Tax- Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE, 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Loud, Emily V. . . 


Weymouth 




$83 22 




Loud, Martha B. . 


Weymouth 






80 30 




Loughlin, Mrs. A. L. 


Boston 






84 68 




Lyford, Biley 


Provincetown 


J 




51 10 




Lynch, William 


Roxbury . 






2 92 




M 

Majdonald, George F. 


Cordaville . 




37 23 




Mackintosh, Joseph P. 






4 74 




Mackrille, Harriet . 


New Haven, Conn. 




23 73 


$23 73 


Maddigan, T. H. and Mary J. . 


Boston 




41 61 




Macldigan, Mary J. 


Boston 




38 69 




Mauchaug Company, B. B. and R. 










Knights .... 


Providence, R. I. 


1,185 52 


1,355 -61 




Marcy, Elizabeth . . 


Newton Up. Falls 




8 40 




Margeson, Isabella 


Boston 




25 18 




Marshall, Emma G. 


Qu ncy 






40 88 


40 88 


Matthews, Wm. A., Trustee 


Boston 






186 88 


186 88 


Maynard, George H. 


Waltham . 






48 18 




McCann. James G . 


Boston 






3 65 




McCormack, Mary L. 


Boston 






153 30 


153 30 


McDougald, Archibald 


Nova Scotia 






4 38 


4 38 


McElroy, Dorothy A. 








54 02 


14 02 


McFarland, James and Charles . 


Wollaston . 






5 84 




McFarland, James B., heirs 


Somerville 






23 36 




McGreal, James 


Boston 






27 01 


27 01 


McGuiness, Jane 


Boston 






2 92 




McKeen, John H. and David J. . 


Boston 






2 19 




McKenna, Rev. John 


Lowell 






42 34 


42 34 


McLaughlin, Daniel 


Boston 






1 46 




McNally, Ann "... 


Boston 






31 39 




McSorley, Michael 


Dedham 






20 44 




McSwain, Ewen 


Milton 






37 96 




Mecham, Arthur, heirs . 


Dorchester 






43 44 




Merriam, Henry W. 


Newton, N J. 






68 62 




Miller, William J. . 


Jamaica Plain 






2 19 




Miller, Sarah J. 


Roxbury . 






29 20 




Miller, Susan 








33 58 




Mills, Miss Emma . . , 


Dorchester 






6 57 




Mitchell, G. A. and Susan E. 


Worcester . 






37 96 




Moore, Alice R. . 


Newton 






8 03 




Moore, Rebecca H. 


Roxbury . 






1 46 




Moriartv, William H. 


Boston 






30 66 




Morrill, Mabel E. . 


Boston 






3 65 




Morrill, Frank O. and L. E. Cobb 


Dorchester 






6 57 


6 57 


Morse, Clara R. . 


Newtonville 






215 35 




Morse, George W. . 


Newtonville 






38 69 




Morse, E. J. W., heirs 


South Easton 






2 92 




Morris, E. C, Safe Co. - 


Boston 




584 00 


584 00 


1,168 00 


Morton, Joseph, heirs 


Milton 






25 55 




Moulton, Harriet M. and Edw'd E. 


Jamaica Plain 






126 29 


126 29 


Mullen, Flora E. . 


Boston 






2 19 


2 19 


Mullen, John, heirs 


Brookline . 






3 29 




Mullen, William A. 


Ruxbury . 






3 29 


3 29 


Munroe, C. W. . 


E. Cambridge 






5 11 




Murdock, William E. 


Boston 






162 06 




Murphy, Mary A. E. 


Boston 






70 08 




Murray, Jennie L. 


Boston 






36 13 


36 13 


Myers, Rachel, Sarah, Rebecca and 










Louisa .... 


Dedham 




7 30 


7 30 



141 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued. ) 



N 



Newell, Lucian B. 

Newhall, Sarah E. 

New York & New England R. R. Co. 

Nichols, George C, Trustee 

Niehols, Elizabeth E. . , 

Niles, Louville V. 

Nolan, James 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway 

Company 
Northern Baptist Educational S'y. 
Northrup, Theodore F., Trustee 
Nourse, George H. 
Nye, James H. 

O 

Old Colony R. R. Co., N. Y„ N. H. 

& H. R. R. Co. Lessees 
O. C. R. R. Co., Lessees of B. & P. 

R. R. Co. . 
Oxton, Maria 



Page, Annie A. 
Page, Gilman 
Page, Charles J. 
Palmer, Susan A. . 
Parmer, Ransellier L. 
Park, Elizabeth M. 
Parker, Benjamin W. 
Parker, Sarah, heirs 
Parker, M. W. 
Parker, Charles H. . 
Partridge, C. Augusta 
Perry, John E. 
Perry Arthur L. 
Perry, Joseph L. . 
Peterson, Louisa . 
Pfaff, Anna . 

Pfaff, Henry, heirs, and Jacob 
Pierce, Mary A. 
Pierce, Frank H. . 
Pierce, Myron E. . 
Pierce, John Eddy . 
Pinkham & Lovell, Trustees Home- 
stead Land Asseciation 
Pinkham, Herbert W. 
Poland, Samuel W. 
Pommer, Louisa A. 
Pope, John T. 
Porter, A. Wallace . 
Pratt, Edmund T. . 
Pratt, Isaac, Jr. 
Prescott, Henry E. . 
Prescott, Mrs. S. C. heirs 
Price, William 
Puddington, Arthur W. 



EESIDENCE. J^ ^^ Unpaid. 



Bowdoinham, Me 

Melrose 

Boston 

Boston 

Staten Island, N.Y 

Somerville 

Boston 

Dec! ham 
Boston 

W Roxbury 
Brockton . 



Boston 



Q 



Quigley, Mary J. 



Boston 
Milton 



Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Charlestown 

Boston 

\V oburn 

Brookline . 

Roxbury . 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Milton 

Providence, R. I 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Dorchester. 

Boston 



Boston 
Wollaston 

Boston 

Neponset 

Wollaston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Sussex, N. B. 

Roxbury . 

Somerville 



Jamaica Plain 



$2 92 



7 30 



14 60 



21 90 



$3S 69 


34 31 


448 95 


81 03 


58 40 


46 72 


4 38 


55 85 


13 87 


8 76 


11 68 


35 04 



930 02 

26 28 



43 07 
35 04 

28 84 



25 92 


4 75 


1 82 


55 4S 


4 38 


3 65 


31 03 


2J6 22 


45 99 


56 94 


41 60 


39 42 


13 14 


33 58 


127 75 


12 41 


73 73 


450 41 


27 01 


17 52 


4 38 


51 10 


5 48 


5 11 


342 37 


4 38 


61 32 


8 76 


2 92 



4 38 



56 94 
39 42 
33 58 



27 01 



4 3S 
51 10 



4 38 
21 90 



142 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Quimby, J. B., heirs 


Dubuque, Iowa . 




$53 29 




Quincy Savings Bank 

R 
Kay, Ellen F. 


Quincy 




347 48 




Woburn 




9 12 


$9 12 


Raymond, Artemas S. 


Dedham 




$86 14 


209 SS 




Real Estate & Bunding Co. 


Boston 






1,583 74 




Reardon, Dennis A. 


South Boston 






7 30 




Reddie, I. H. 


Charlestown 






73 


73 


Reed, Horace 


Whitman . 




i 


44 53 




Reed, Spurdon, A.M. 


Boston 






54 02 




Reed, Beverley S. . . . " 


Dorchester 






87 60 


87 60 


Remick, Timothy. . 


Boston 






43 80 




Reuteman, Charles . 


Boston 






3 65 




Rice, William B. . 


Quincy. 






29 93 




Rich, Harriet L. . 


Milford, N. H. 






63 51 




Richards, William R. and Elsie B. 


Boston 






167 94 


167 94 


Richards, Daniel, estate . 


Danvers 






14 60 




Roberts, Sarah A. E. 


Boston 






75 92 


75 92 


Roberts, Francis R. 


Boston 






18 62 




Robinson, B. F., heirs 


Concord, N. H. 






22 27 


22 27 


Robinson, Sarah A. K. 


Northampton 






90 52 




Robinson, George E. 


Chelsea 






4 38 




Rogers, Francis P. . 


Dedham 






41 25 


41 25 


Rogers, Abram, and Annie T. 












Faunce .... 


Boston 






21 90 




Rollins, James W. . 


Boston 






221 92 


221 92 


Rooney, John A. . 


W. Roxbury 






49 64 




Roundv, Samuel R., heirs 


Ellis 






10 58 




Roundy, William E. 


Ellis 






29 20 




Rowell, Henry A. . 


Contocook, N. H 






45 26 


45 26 


Ryan, Margaret J. . , 


Charlestown 






27 01 


27 01 


Ryan, William B. . 

S 
Saco & Biddeford Savings Bank 


Boston 






61 32 


61 32 


Saco, Me. . 




181 04 




Safford, Naihaniel M. 


Milton 






89 79 




Saulsbury, Jotham . 


Weymouth 






87 60 


87 60 


Scaife, Hellen A. . 


Boston 






10 95 


10 95 


Schroater, Fredei-ick 








7 30 


7 30 


Scrannage, Matthew 


Medford . 






13 14 




Scrivens, Joseph 


Woburn 






23 36 




Scrivens, Emily M. 


Woburn 






27 37 




Seaver, Jacob W. . 


Boston 






5 48 




Seaverns, Granville S. 


Roslindale 






14 60 




Seavey, H. D. 






1 46 




1 46 


Sharp, J. C 


Dorchester 






1 46 




Sharp, W. C. 


Dorchester 






1 46 


1 46 


Shaughnessey, Edward . 


Nahant 






1 46 


1 46 


Shaughnessey, James C. . 


Nahant 








1 46 




Shea, Edward 


Brookline 








25 55 


25 55 


Shepard, James S. . 


Canton 








93 44 




Simes, George 


Maiden 








2 92 




Simmons, John O. . 


Boston 








40 15 




Sinclair, George B. 


Wakefield 








24 82 




Singer Manufacturing Company 


Boston 






3 65 






Skinner, Frederick 


Boston 








10 22 




Skolfield, Samuel, 2nd 


Boston 








75 92 




Slafter, Rebecca B. 


Dedham 








143 08 




Sloan, Catherine F. 


Arlington 








21 90 




Smith, Orlando A. heirs . 


W. Medford 






5 84 


2 19 


Smith, Maria A. . . 


Barre 


1 




55 48 





143 
Non-Resident Tax-Payees 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Smith, James, 


Bridgewater 




$24 45 


$24 45 


Smith, Emery W. . 


Boston 




3 29 


3 29 


Snyder, C. B., heirs 


New York, N.Y. . 




9 12 




Spicer, Eliza 






3 29 




Springer, George H. 


Boston 




20 44 


20 44 


Springer, Charles C. 


St. Paul, Minn. . 




8 03 


8 03 


Springfield, Nathaniel 


Boston 




2 19 




Standard Glass Insulator Co. 


Boston 


§80 30 






Stanwood, J. E. 


Topsfield . 




38 69 




Stark, John H, heirs 


Boston 




7 30 




Stark, Mary .... 


Boston 




21 17 




Stevens, Elizabeth W. 


Boston 




560 27 




■Stevens, Charles, heirs 


Marlboro . 




62 78 




Stevenson, W. G. . 


Mattapan . 




37 23 


37 23 


■Stevenson, Hemenway & Warren 


Milton 




94 90 




Streeter, Catherine W. 


• 




32 49 


Sturtevant Mill Co. . 


Boston 


29 20 






Sullivan, Margaret 


South Boston 




3 65 




Sykes, Josepb, heirs 

T 
Taber Art Company 


Boston 




28 47 


28 47 


New Bedford 


14 60 






Tafft, Gardner, Shepard Company 


Boston 


54 40 


47 45 


105 85 


Talbot, William J. and Fred W. 






44 90 


44 90 


Tatro .... 


Boston 




54 02 


18 98 


Talbot, Jabez 


Stoughton . 




5 S4 


5 84 


Taylor, George 


Boston 








Temple, F. F.; Fisher, G. A.; and 










Dudley Talbot and J. B. L. 


Boston, 








Bartlett .... 


"Holinfielcl" . 




313 90 


313 90 


Thompson, C. S. and W. N. 


Brockton . 




1 46 




Thompson, Robert 


Gardner, Me. 




75 92 




Thurston, Philander, heirs 


Sutton 




33 21 




Tibbetts, Ernest C, heirs . 


Mansfield . 




26 28 


26 28 


Tibbetts, Mark 


Boston - . 




19 71 


19 71 


Tileston, Hollingsworth Co., 


Boston 


1460 00 


1,900" 92 




Tilley, Charles M. . 


Laredo, Tex. 




61 32 




Tirrell, Caroline 


Boston 




35 04 




Tirrell, George E. . 


Boston 




45 26 




Towan, William P. 






10 22 




Tower, Isaac H., heirs 


Dedham 




122 64 




Townsend, Eliza J. 


Saugus 




5 84 




Traugott, Sarah H. 


Brockton . 




6 57 


6 57 


Trescott, Ebenzer, heirs . 


New Y'ork, N.Y. 




1 46 


1 46 


Trotter, Virginia . 


Koxbury . 




26 28 




Trotter, James M., heirs . 


Roxbury . 




146 00 


146 00 


Tucker, James 


Milton 




66 80 




Tucker, Mary T. . 


Milton 




83 22 




Tuttle, Edward P. . 


Newton 




4 01 




Twitchell, Charles M. A. . 

U 
United States Express Company 


Somerville 




58 40 


58 40 


Boston 


3 65 






Utley, Joseph 

V 
Van Derlip, William C. . 


Roxbury . 




2 92 




Boston . . 




68 62 


68 62 


Veazie, John H. 


Quincy 




52 56 




Viles, Frank T. 


Boston 




5 84 


5 84 


Vinal, Henry L. 


Scituate 




39 42 




Vose, Joshua 


Milton 




131 40 





144 



Non-Resident Tax- Payers — (Concluded.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Vose, Ellen F. . . . 


Milton 




$14 96 




Vose, Hattie M. . 


Milton 




14 96 




Vose, Jessie .... 


Milton 




15 70 




W 










Wade, John R. . . . 


S. Boston . 




40 88 




Walker, George A. 






68 62 


$68 62. 


Walley, James S. . 


Boston 




48 18 




Webster, Stephen, heirs . 


Boston 




2 92 




Welch, James 


S. Boston . 




7 30 




Welch, Patrick 


Dorchester 




81 76 




Weld, Aaron D. . 


W. Roxbury , 




1 46 




Wentworth, Sarah J. 


Chelsea 




12 41 


12 41 


Werner, Josephine A. 


Roxbury . 




43 80 




Weymouth Savings Bank 


Weymouth 




63 51 




Whipple, J. A., trustee 


Cambridge 




2 92 


2 92 


Whitcher, M. L.. heirs 


Mass. and Montana 




369 38 




Whitcher (Barstow) & Wells. . 


Mass. and Montana 




86 14 




White Sewing Machine Co. 


Boston 


$2 19 






White, Amos S., heirs 


Weymouth 






8 39 




White, Charles A. . 


Jamaica Plain 






11 68 




White, Charles G. . 


Milton 






7 30 




White, Georgiana . 


Roxbury . 






45 26 


45 26- 


White, Katherine S. 


Boston 






8 03 




White, Howard 


Heudley, Neb. 






4 38 


4 38- 


Whiting, Joseph, heirs 


Dedham 






1 46 




Whiting, A Ivan 


Clinton 






4 38 




Whitney, Henry N. 


[Boston 






17 52 


17 52 


Whitney, Albert H. 


Boston 






40 15 




Whittemore, C. W., heirs 


Roslindale . 






7 30 




Whittier, Carrie A. 


Boston 






207 32 




Whittier, Albert R. 


Boston 






239 44 




Wight, Lawrence T. 


Reading 






35 04 


35 04 


Wiggin, Mary E. . 


Durham, N. H. 






39 42 




Wilder, Fannie L. 


Newton, N. H. 






10 22 




Williams, John J. (Archbishop) 


Boston 






137 97 




Willett, Joseph 


Needham . 






43 80 




Williams, William H. 


Milton 




2 19 


74 46 




Wittekind, Julius . 


Roslindale 




14 60 




14 60' 


Wolcott, J. Huntington., heirs . 


Milton 






105 85 




Wood, Frank 


Boston 






9 49 




Wood, Lydia W. . 


Boston 






138 70 




Wood, Alma E. 


Brookline . 






21 17 


21 17 


Woodworth, Thomas H. . 


Milton 






80 30 




Wright, Isaac S., heirs 


Roxbury . 






14 60 




Wright, Richard W. 


Jamaica Plain 






6 07 




Wyman, Isaac C. . 

Y 
Young, Edwin C. . 


Boston 






82 12 




Dorchester 




35 04 




Y'oung, Orson and Hiram E. 

Z 
Zeigler, Alfred 


E. Somerville 




8 76 


8 76 


Boston 




45 26 





REFORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

Early in the history of this country, our ancestors found 
it necessary for the proper protection of the rights of per- 
sons and property, to use a good degree of intelligence in 
the management of their public concerns. So essential did 
they find the use of wisdom that the question of properly 
training their children for the duties which must in after 
years devolve upon them, came early and forcibly to their 
attention, and demanded their immediate action. It was 
a 'matter that could not be left for the next, or any succeed- 
ing generation. 

This problem was solved by the establishment of public 
schools, wherein all children could be properly trained and 
fitted to intelligently assume the direction of public affairs 
at the proper time. For two hundred and fifty years this 
system with modifications made necessary by the increase of 
numbers, and the complication of demands upon individu- 
als by scientific and industrial development, has held its 
sway. The urgency for each generation to prepare its suc- 
cessor for intelligent control of affairs has never abated, but 
rather increased as the country has broadened and developed 
in civilization and resources ; and now it has fallen upon us 
to see that the next generation does not fall below that de- 
gree of intelligence required to maintain during its time a 
government by the people. 

During the past year these matters have received the at- 
tention of this committee. In the performance of this duty 
laid upon us by your confidence, we have found that there 
are two elements which require constant care and the exer- 

(145) 



146 

cise of a wise discretion ; and a mistake in either one is 
quick to touch the people who support by taxes the schools 
in our charge. 

The first is the kind and quality of instruction to be given; 
and second, the fair ability of the community to meet the 
expense of school training. It is a matter of no small mo- 
ment, at the present time, to decide just how far the public 
schools are to be used in behalf of all demands that may be 
made upon the future men and women of the community. 
Each new development in science bringing new industrial 
pursuits is made the basis of a demand for an addition to the 
public school education. To make such addition calls for 
increased facilities, special instructors* and added expense. 
It w uld be easy to heavily increase the cost of the public 
schools if they are to be made to fully prepare the children 
for the business of life. There always exists a sentiment 
which would demand that each pupil should be substantial- 
ly fitted for active business when he graduates from our 
schools. 

If this sentiment should control, then the public burden 
of taxation must be increased to meet such requirement. 
Buildings, instructors, tools and supplies must be furnished 
at public expense, and the child must be taxed mentally 
and physically, to acquire not only the rudiments of those 
sciences which tend to develop his reason and add to his in- 
telligence and general information, but the exact scientific 
knowledge and the method of application to specific subjects 
must be so mastered that immediately upon graduation the 
boy or girl may enter fully prepared upon his lifework. 
We have not as yet felt that the child should be taxed in his 
early years with so much exacting mental labor. We have 
not felt that the people at large desired to assume such ex- 
pense, and therefore have been content to give the children 
as good a drill as possible in those branches of study which 
years of experience have proved best for the mental growth 



147 

of the child ; and which gives him much general informa- 
tion of value, whatever may be his choice of occupation. 

The public school has become so much a part of the sys- 
tem of the development of the children into responsible and 
thinking men, that many seem to give its work any thought 
except where it fails to touch some individual want or need 
of their own. The children at five years enter the public 
schools entirely untaught except to some extent about per- 
sonal care of themselves. As they grow in stature with- 
out physical effort, so they appear to the world to grow 
mentally until the end of their course ; meantime develop- 
ing their powers to reason, and storing their minds with use- 
ful facts of value. 

This change from a mere child to a well informed man 
having been made under public care and expense, is it ask- 
ing too much of the graduated young man, or those imme- 
diately interested in his future, that they shall go on with 
his special training for his business life ? 

Is there not a danger that we shall lean too heavily upon 
public assistance in these matters, and that our young men 
and women will fail to gain that degree of self-reliance 
necessary for the success of our people ? 

It is certainly the duty of the public to bring all of the 
children to that degree of intelligence necessary for a right 
understanding of our institutions; and to develop, as far as 
possible those traits of character, requisite for their perpet- 
uation. Children should be taught to be law-abiding and 
useful members of the community in which they live. But 
it seems questionable whether the public should be expected 
to establish a system where it will be largely responsible for 
the selection of the business and the training therefor of 
each individual. It is because of the young man's own tact 
and efforts that he becomes a practical business man, and 
these qualities are best developed when exercised in the 
presence of actual business enterprise. 



148 

The time given for education in the schools under our 
charge seems very short in which to instruct the child gen- 
erally. In many instances the capacity of the children for 
mental work does not develop until near the age when they 
are expected to leave our schools. To insist upon special 
training must, therefore, be at the expense of the general, 
and also at a further risk of overtaxing the mental and im- 
pairing the physical powers of the children. There seems 
to be too much haste to crowd the boys and girls into active 
business, and thus rob them of their time to obtain proper 
mental strength, which comes only with age and good 
physical condition . 

Whatever tends to overtax and strain the powers of the 
little ones in our schools works permanent injury to them 
from which they and the community must suffer hereafter. 
If special instruction in the arts, science or mechanics is- 
demanded at the public expense, then the time for public 
school education should be extended so as to embrace those 
years in which the child shall have acquired by age, powers 
of mind and body sufficient to enable him to reap full bene- 
fit from such public provisions. 

Before this, however, the children must be developed 
into reasoning beings, with a good general knowledge 
which will enable them to become true citizens, irrespective 
of the character of their business pursuits. Our public 
schools must do this ! 

When we cease to have a great care as to the kind of 
citizens our schools tend to train, we shall be departing 
materially from the motives which impelled our fathers in 
founding them. 

ORGANIZATION. 

The committee organized at the beginning of the year as- 

follows : 

Chairman— Charles G. Chick. 
Secretary —Richard M. Johnson. 



149 

Purcasing Agent — Richard M. Johnson. 

School Committee— Charles G. Chick, Helen M. Dean, Augusta 
L. Hanchett, Richard M. Johnson, Joshua F. Lewis, Louise M. 
Wood. 

Sub Committees— High School, Mr. Johnson, Mrs. Wood, Dr. 
Lewis ; Damon School, Mrs. Dean, Mr. Chick ; Fairmount School, 
Dr. Lewis, Mrs. Hanchett ; Greenwood School, Mrs. Hanchett, Mr. 
Chick; Grew School, Mrs. Wood, Mr. Johnson; Butler School, Mr. 
Chick; Evening School, Dr. Lewis, Mrs. Wood; Industrial School, 
Mr. Chick, Mrs. Dean. 

SCHOOL ORGANIZATION AND STATISTICS. 
HIGH SCHOOL. 

Mr. Jere M. Hill, Principal; Mr. Emerson Rice, Mr. William 
'Cannon, Mr. Arthur Lowe, Miss Anna W. Edwards, Miss Anna M. 
Linscott, Mrs. Mary C. Howard, since Feb., 1894, Teachers. 

Graduates— Four years course, Elsie M. Burgess, Harriet P. But- 
.ler, Albert B. Carr, Walter L. Cherrington, Otis E. Dunham, Nettie 
M Farnsworth, Bessie B. Frame, Robert T. Hathaway, Charles R. 
Higbee Jr., George F. Hiller, Arthur H. Howard, Chester B. Hum- 
phrey, Mabelle C. Jenney, Edwin V. Noble, Ada J. Poore, Arthur C. 
Poore, Leona M. Ramsdell, George W. Rice, John T. Robinson Jr., 
Laura J. Rollins, John L. Sanborn, Susie Sanborn, Gertrude L. 
Savage, Martha B. Stephens, Hattie B. Tasker, Mark E. Taylor, 
William E. West, Margaret L. Wyman ; two years course, William 
'O. Bursch, Frederick A. Carlton, Thomas F. Downey, William J. 
Downey, Warren Y. Scott, Myrtle Sherman, Edgar L. Wood. 

Whole number of different pupils, 278 

Average " " " 196 

Average attendance, 189 

Per cent, of attendance, .96 

Amount paid for teachers' salaries, $6,120 00 

janitors' salaries, 300 00 

incidentals, 596 22 

fuel, 254 92 

BUTLER SCHOOL. 

Miss Grace B Gidney, Teacher. 

Whole number of different pupils, 49 

Average " " " 34.3 

Average attendance, 29.6 

Per cent, of attendance, 86.3 



150 

Amount paid for teachers' salaries, $456 25* 

<l " janitors 1 salaries, 65 00 

incidentals, 23 83 

fuel, 6 00 

DAMON SCHOOL. 

Mr. A. W. Armstrong. Master ; Mrs. E. DeSenancour, Master's 
Assistant; Miss Julia E. Donovan, Miss Dora F. Hastings, Miss 
Florence E. Barker, Miss Grace M. Tuxbury, Teachers. 

Graduates— William Bradley, Albert D. Bullard, Alexander Foley, 
Gussie Kahlmeyer, Emma Lawrence, Lillie Motte, Walter Queen, 
John White. 

Whole number of different pupils, 203 

Average " " " 143.2 

Average attendance, 132.7 

Per cent, of attendance, 92.6 

Amount paid for salaries, $3,005 00 

janitors,; 200 00 

incidentals, 279 53 

fuel, 202 70 

FA1RMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Mr. Edward \V. Cross, Master; Mrs. Mary C. Howard, (till Feb. 
14, '94,) Miss Helen P. Cleaves, Miss Margerita G. Roe, Miss Hattie 
E. Henry, (since Feb. 14, '94,) Miss Mattie P. Winchenbaugh, Miss- 
Florence A. Dunbar, (till June '94,) Miss Edith Le Bourveau, (since 
Sept. '94,) Miss Hattie F. Packard, Miss Jennie S. Hammond, Miss 
Helen A. Perry and Mrs. Helen O. Thompson, teachers. 

Graduates. — J. Ross Bates, Louis M. Burnett, George H. Elliot, 
Edward R. Ellis, Arthur H. French, Rutledge M. Kelheur, John S. 
McAskill, Herbert B: Norris, Frank P. Rafter, Robert Scott, Wilbur 
Wallace, Arthur W. Ring, Alfred W. Millar, William A. Raynes, 
Wilbert N. Williams, Robert S.Worrick, Alfred R. McGregor, Grace 
Damon, Lou. E. Hamblin, Ethel M. Millar, Agnes L. Paine, Mamie 
Tower, Edith E. Williams, Alice M. Wood, Minnie Porter, Susie W. 
Elliot, Annie B. Scott. 

Whole number of different pupils. 482 

Average number of pupils, 370 

Average attendance, 350 

Per cent, of attendance, 94.5- 






151 

Amount paid for teachers' salaries, $5,728 75 

" " janitors, 360 00 

" " incidentals, 490 04 

fuel, 335 60 

GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Mr. Daniel G. Thompson, Master ; Miss Annie B. Davis, (till Jan. 
"95.) Miss Cora J. Buker, (since Jan. '95,) Misses Frances A. Putnam, 
Minnie L. Butland, Sarah E. Roome, Emily Woods, Alma E. Batchel- 
der, Elizabeth B. Freeman, Evelyn S. Howes, Lena B., Winter, Ella 
J. Brown, (since Sept. '94,) teachers. 

Graduates.— Aleck S. Holt, J. Neale Boyd, Harold Fish, Harry E. 
Tilden, Sanford Gillette, J. O. Sartwell, Horace Wood, P. Addison, 
Willie.Fitzgerald, J. Rafter, Frank L. King. Walter Weston. Ralph 
Waldron, Guy Crooker, P. A. Burger, [Fred Annis, George Fisk, 
Carl Baker, H. Arnold, Louise Benw, Grace Granger, Lottie French, 
Emily Foss, Lulu Chipman, Mabel Bradley, Alice Walter, Bertha 
Davis, Edith Newman, Mary Landt, Margaret Oeberst, Alice M. Han- 
scomb, Alice Hersey, Ethel Bod well, Grace Cowperthwait, Bertha 
Holzer. 

Whole number of different pupils, 538 

Average number of pupils, 405 

Average attendance, 379 

Per cent, of attendance, 93.5 

Amount paid for teachers 1 salaries, $5,845 00 

janitors, 360 00 

incidentals, 498 12 

fuel, 293 06 

GREW SCHOOL. 

Mr. Frank H. Dean,. Master ; Miss Eda M. Perry, (till Dec. '94,) 
Miss Nellie A. Wentworth, (since Dec. '94,) Miss Margaret A. Han- 
Ion, Miss Margaret E Bertram, Miss Blanche L. Bright, Miss Emma 
M. George, Miss Adah F. Whitney, Miss Frances E. Harlow, Miss 
Agnes J. Campbell, Miss Nellie M. Howes, Miss Jennie F. Ellis, Miss 
Bessie C. Sparrell, teachers. 

Graduates.— Kenneth Archibald, William H. Blasdale, Annette F. 
Blasdale, Emma C. Brown, Bertha J. Burgess, Esther D. Benson, 
Mabelle G. Beatey, Robert B. Campbell, William Carberry, George 
S. Coleman, Mary B. Childs, Susan E. Chittick, Elsie M. Drinkwater, 
Charles S. Evans, Chester W. Farwell, Pearl C. Graham. Carrie C. 
Higbee, Caroline E. Hodgdon, Lewis E. Johnson, William Jonah, 



152 

Carrie M. Johnson, Grace L. Lowell, Hoberfc E. Martin, Robert B. 
Moseley, Harriet P. Martin, Elizabeth H. Middleton, Gertrude S. 
Mitchell, Alice C. Paine, Samuel D. Randall, Minerva H. Randall, 
Alice V. Rogers, Walter F. Sanborn, Lillian S. Shattuck, Josephine 
A. Upham, Walter F. Wyman. 

Whole number of different pupils, 471 

Average number of pupils, 447 

Average attendance, 410 

Per cent, of attendance, 92. 

Amount paid for teachers' salaries, $6,652 50 

" " incidentals, 692 30 

janitor, 360 00 

fuel, 329 20 

Incidentals ;— Expended for miscellaneous purposes. 624 29 

Last Spring the Committee prepared careful estimates as 

to the reqmrments of the schools for the current year. At 

the annu'al meeting the citizens voted the amounts asked, 

and the following statement will give in brief the amounts 

we have received and expended : — 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

For salaries, janitors and fuel, $32,300 00 

School incidentals, 3,200 00 

Text-books and supplies, 2,750 00 

Evening Schools, 600 00 

Industrial Schools, 100 00 

Unexpended balances from last year : 

Salaries, janitors and fuel, 

School incidentals, $ 8 90 

Text-books and supplies, 35 84 

Industrial Schools, 53 06 

Evening Schools, 264 34 

High School and laboratory, 87 00 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

For salaries janitors and fuel, $32,349 22 

School incidentals, 3,206 33 

Text-books and supplies. 2,427 47 

Evening Schools, 706 94 

Industrial Schools, 137 11 

High School laboratory, 12 00 



153 

Vouchers for all payments have been submitted to the 
auditors, and are now on file with our secretary. 

It will be seen that we have been able to carry the schools 
through the year upon the appropriations made at the 
annual town meeting, and the bills of this department at the 
close of the financial year are substantially paid. The un- 
expended balances would more than pay them, if we had 
the power to transfer appropriations. 

Not only do the old buildings require added expenditure 
each year, but new buildings for the accommodation of the 
pupils are demanded, and at once, unless we are to be con- 
tent with crowded rooms and poor instruction. That the 
exact situation may be seen at a glance, we here give the 
cumbers now enrolled in each grade of the primary and 
.grammar schools : 



V class 

VI class 

VII class 




Butler. 



32 



XII class 



two 
rooms 



163 396 398 467 32 

This gives an actual enrollment at the present time of 
1456 in the grammar and primary schools. These figures 
do not give the whole number of different scholars con- 
nected with the schools for the past year, but the number 
actually upon the rolls at this time. In April, it is safe to 
say, from 10 to 25 new pupils must be provided for in the 
twelve classes of each of the large schools. When these 
are added to the numbers already enrolled in these classes, 



154 

it is easy to see that more rooms will be an absolute- 
necessity. 

BUILDINGS. 

The large school buildings owned by the town are nearly 
all of wooden construction, and with one exception have 
been now in use nearly twenty-five years ; consequently, the 
annual cost for repairs is likely to increase. In a previous 
report the condition of the roof of the Damon building, 
and the necessity for reslating, w r as called to your notice. 
The work has been so far avoided by repairs, but at any 
time the roof may become a source of a large expenditure. 
At the Grew the local committee reports that a special ap- 
propriation of $1,000 should be made to thoroughly repair 
the building. New gutters are needed upon large portions 
of the roof; new stairs and new floors in several places ; 
new furniture for one or more rooms. The local com- 
mittees do not report the need of extra appropriations for 
repairs at the High and Fairmount buildings the coming 
year. 

Since this report was adopted the Damon School Building 
has been damaged to an extent that renders it useless for 
the school until after action can be had in Town Meeting as 
to repairing the same. Meantime, the committee have 
made temporary arrangements for the pupils. 

The sacrifice of the halls at the Greenwood and Fairmount 
Schools would give two or three more rooms, and would 
tide over for another year ; but it must be borne in mind 
that in those buildings one class is already upon the third' 
floor, and to add another class will make it absolutely neces- 
sary to provide fire escapes, which we are advised must be 
covered stairways outside of the buildings, and will cost quite 
considerable sums of money, and detract from the appear- 
ance of the building. Another evil of such a course is that 
it will subject many pupils to the danger ot physical injury 






155 

resulting from going up and down two long flights of stairs 
several times each day, a practice always accompanied with 
hazard to children, especially girls, of this school age. 

Small buildings in each of the crowded districts for one 
or more primary rooms, or a central primary building that 
can be used for the overflow of each school, would afford 
other means of relief. It would seem very, hard to deprive 
the large schools of their halls, in which they can assemble 
for exhibitions and general exercises, and such a course 
would not be in the best interest of the schools, and is not 
recommended by this committee. The benefits of these 
halls have been realized by all connected with our school 
work, and have been provided and maintained in the past 
notwithstanding the burden of debt upon the town. We 
are now substantially free from debt. Shall we deprive 
our sehool children henceforth of these advantages? We 
trust our citizens will not want to economise in this manner. 

A central building will afford better opportunity for full 
classes, as the overflow from each building can be easily 
transferred to and massed at the centre of the town. It 
would seem that one lot, and one building to be warmed 
and cared for, so situated that it would relieve each of the 
now overcrowded grades, would be in the interest of 
economy and afford opportunity for maximum classes, which 
always tends to reduce the cost of instruction. This mat- 
ter will be placed before the town at the annual meetiug, 
with a recommendation that a competent committee of citi- 
zens investigate the whole subject, and report some plan 
for immediate relief. 

In this connection, the local committee, of the Greenwood 
district reports that outside accommodations must be fur- 
nished in April. The past year has been one of expedient* 
in that district. In September a division of the twelfth 
class was necessary, and the sixth class was temporarily 
placed in the hall. Efforts were made to secure a room' 



156 

'Outside as cold weather approached, but nothing could be 
found that seemed less objectionable than the use of the 
hall, and so we were forced to locate this class on the third 
floor until the beginning 1 of the winter term. At that time, 
by reason of a change of employes in one of the factories 
in that district, the numbers were reduced in the- Butler 
School so that a consolidation of three classes into two was 
possible, and the sixth class was removed to its former 
room. The twelfth class at the Greenwood is now over- 
crowded, and fails of its best work. When the usual April 
increase comes, some expedient must be found for the 
overflow. 

The people of this district have complained, and justly 
so, that their children were inconvenienced, but when the 
situation has been explained they have borne the matter 
cheerfully, believing efforts would at once be made for more 
school accommodations. 

The High School opened with 215 scholars, but the num- 
ber has fallen to 205, with classification as follows : — 

Senior class - - \ - - - - 27 

Second " 47 

Third " ------ 49 

Fourth " ------ 82 

This number of pupils fills the building. It has been 
found necessary during the past year, in view of the large 
fourth class, to take down partitions in order to afford class- 
rooms of sufficient size. The building is poorly arranged 
for the work of the school. We have now reached the 
time when a new modern building for our High School has 
been publicly recommended. Shall we have it? If so, the 
old building will serve for a central primary school, and 
solve the problem of more accommodation for these grades. 

TEACHERS. 

The teaching force of the town remains substantially the 



157 

same as at the time of our last report. A few changes have 
occured. 

At the Damon School, Mr. W. F. Sayward resigned the 
position he had held for several years as master, to accept 
a more lucrative situation elsewhere. Mr. Sayward had 
been very successful in his work at the school, and he had 
the confidence of the people of that district. His resigna- 
tion was a loss to the school. Mr. Arthur W. Armstrong 
was employed as his successor, and gives evidence of being 
a successful teacher. During the summer Miss Dora M. 
"Wiggin resigned, and at the opening of the school in Sep- 
tember, Miss Donovan was sriven the class of Miss Wio-o-in, 
and Miss Florence E. Barker, of this town, was employed 
in the grade formerly instructed by Miss Donovan. In De- 
cember, the numbers at the school having largely increased,. 
a new room was opened and a separation of grades arranged. 
Miss Grace M. Tuxbury was employed in the positson thus 
created. 

At the Fairmount School, Miss Florence A. Dunbar, 
teacher of the ninth grade, accepted a position elsewhere, 
and Miss M. Edith Le Bourveau, a graduate of Hyde Park's 
High School with supplemental training, was appointed 
to this vacancy. 

Miss Annie B. Davis, master's assistant at the Greenwood 
School resigned at the end of December ; this was unfortu- 
nate as Miss Davis was a very strong teacher and her loss 
in the middle of the year must result in loss to the class. 
Miss Cora J. Buker, a normal graduate, with several years 
of experience has been appointed to the vacancy. In Sep- 
tember it was found necessary to employ an additional 
teacher, for a division of the XII grade at this school. 
Miss Ella J. Brown a normal graduate, was selected by the 
local committee for this position. 

At the Grew School, Miss Mary Winslow. for a long time 
one of its most successful instructors, and for several years 



158 

past holding the position of master's assistant, asked in 
September for a leave of absence during the year on account 
of ill health. In deference to her faithful service and her 
great ability as a teacher, her request was granted. The 
local committee was authorized to select a teacher in her 
place for the year. Miss Eda M. Perry was selected and 
held the position during the Fall term, at the end of which 
she resigned, and Miss Nellie J. Wentworth has been em- 
ployed and now fills the position with promise of success. 

The suggestions of the Committee of the High School 
contained in their last report as to teaching of stenography 
by a teacher having other classes has been adopted, and 
Mr. Arthur W. Lowe now gives instruction in this branch 
of the course, and also has charge of other classes of the 
school. 

Miss Gidney, teacher of the Butler School, has been 
given a leave of absence during the Winter term because of 
ill health. Miss Brown of the Greenwood School was trans- 
ferred with a portion of her class, when the consolidation of 
classes was made as above stated. A substitute for Miss 
Gidney was thus made unnecessary. 

In connection with this subject it may be well said that 
the demand for trained teachers increases each year, and it 
is not now an easy matter to procure at the prices we can 
pay, teachers of known ability. The selection of teachers is 
the most responsible duty that rests upon a school commit- 
tee, as to a great degree the success or failure of the school 
will depend upon a right choice. The State Board of Edu- 
cation has come to recognize the difficulties that beset the 
ordinary committeeman in the performance of this impor- 
tant duty, and has succeeded in obtaining legislation which 
authorizes that board to issue certificates to such persons 
as it deems qualified to teach in our public schools. This 
will aid committees very materially to obtain satisfactory 
teachers, and seems to be a step in the right direction. 



159 

Great pains should be taken to adopt a practical system so 
that committees may readily receive the benefits possible 
from the State certification of teachers. 

Much credit is due to our corps of instructors the past 
year. We believe they have been faithful in the discharge 
of their duties and merit the approbation of the patrons of 
the schools as well as of the committee. We believe that 
great good would come to our schools if the parents and cit- 
izens generally would take an active interest in the work of 
the teachers, and give them an occasional word of sympathy 
and encouragement. It is often the case that all words are 
reserved for criticism. If your child does well in school 
take a little pains to let his teacher know of your approba- 
tion. It will help that teacher very much. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

This remains substantially the same as last year with a 
change of text-books in English Grammar, Miss Hyde's 
Advanced Lessons, having been substituted for Harvey's. 
A brief course in arithmetic has been adopted for the lower 
grammar grades. Instruction in physical culture for the 
young ladies at the High School, has been added to the 
work at that School, and Miss Dean of the Emerson School 
of Oratory, has been employed as instructor. Miss Dean 
is a Hyde Park lady and enters upon her duties with an 
enthusiasm which betokens success. 

REFERENCE BOOKS. 

Last Spring the town voted upon our recommendation 
the sum of $250 to be used in purchasing reference books, 
for the various schools. The several local committees after 
conference with the teachers have made selections of proper 
books and the same have been placed in the libraries of each 
school. Further sums should from time to time be expen- 
ded under this head. At the Damon School a large num- 



160 

ber of valuable books were donated by a person who has- 
previously contributed to this school in similar manner. By 
request Ave do not give the name but wish to place upon 
record our appreciation of this person's act. 

Among the valuable additions to our supplemental list we 
must not fail to mention the Beacon Lights of Patriotism, 
a new reader by our distinguished townsman, Gen. Henry 
B. Carrington. This reader is full of matter of great value 
to the children of our public schools, and should be freely 
used in all of the classes of the Grammar grades as well as 
in the High School. 

MUSIC. 

Miss Dodge has been continued in charge of the instruc- 
tion in this branch of the course, and her work has been 
fully up to its previous standard, and has been satisfactory 
to the committee. 

ATTENDANCE. 

While many of our neighboring towns have been closing 
schools because of epidemic disease, Hyde Park has been so 
far spared these serious conditions. It is one of our first 
duties to see that the health of the children shall be well 
protected by clean and wholesome surroundings. Disinfec- 
tants are freely used upon books and in the school rooms as- 
well as in the outbuildings. This care of the health of the 
scholars tends to make a good average attendance, and keep 
the schools free from contagious disease. The buildings are 
all well warmed by steam, except at the Damon and Butler, 
and little complaint is now heard of cold rooms at any school 
building. 

JANITORS. 

The excellent janitor for the past eight years at the 
Greenwood School, Albert Lord, resigned on the 2d of 
December. The local committee regretted very much 



161 

that Mr. Lord felt obliged to leave the position, as he has, 
for many years so faithfully performed all of his duties- 
and always with great regard for the interests of the town. 
in the care of its property. Mr. John Haigh has been 
employed and now fills the position in an acceptable man- 
ner. 

At the Damon School, Mr. Kappler feeling that he 
should receive more salary tendered his resignation, much 
to the regret of the committee in charge. Mr. Wheeler, a 
reliable man, offered to assume work at the established 
price, and he was given the position. Janitors elsewhere 
remain as last year. 

TRUANT OFFICER. 

For a number of years Mr. Andrew D. Rooney has 
faithfully performed the duties of truant officer. As re- 
ported last year, the committee changed the method of 
compensation, and fixed the duties of the officer. In 
May last, Mr. Rooney tendered his resignation. In view 
of his efficient services and knowledge of his duties, this 
was a misfortune- In September, Mr. Henry V. Har- 
wood was employed as truant officer in chief, and has thus 
far conducted his duties with discretion. Mr. Harwood 
bids fair to make a very efficient officer. 

SCHOOL MANUAL. 

We have often been asked for a manual showing our 
rules, the names, residences, and salaries of our teachers. 
During the year a sub-committee prepared a small book 
containing these matters and other useful information, and 
by order of the committee several hundred were printed. 
Any citizen desiring a copy will find it at the rooms of the 
committee. 



102 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 



The School for Carpentry was opened as usual during 
the summer. Mr. Webb who has for a long number of 
years had charge of the school, was again employed as 
instructor. The school was well attended, and the work 
was carried on with much interest and success. 

In the judgment of the committee in charge, more boys 
would avail themselves of the benefits of such iustruction 
if accommodations and facilities were furnished. 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

We submit herewith the report of the work of these 
schools, as made to the sub-comrnittee in charge by the 
principal instructors. Believing these statements full and 
reliable, and of interest to our citizens, we print them in 
full. These schools, aside from the mechanical drawing, do 
not have the attendance they ought to have. This fact has 
often been called to your notice. We try to make the 
schools efficient by employing good instructors and provid- 
ing good accommodations. A few pupils have interest 
enough to attend regularly, and ot course get the benefit of 
your generous provision. More should do so. 

To the Committee on Evening Schools of the Town of 
Hyde Park: 

This year the work of the evening school has followed the 
same general plan as is outlined in the report of last year. 
In addition, however, a class in stenography and typewriting 
has been conducted by Mr. A. W. Lowe. I am informed 
that the work in this branch has been very encouraging. 

This year the school opened Monday, Nov. 5, 1894. The 
first term of seven weeks closed the latter part of December. 
The second term began Jan. 7, 1895, of which we have just 
finished the fourth week. The total number of names on 
the register for the first term is 74. The average attend- 



163 

.ance is 40 pupils. The second term there are 40 names, 
and an average attendance of 16. The average age is 19 
years. Forty per cent, of the pupils are women. This last 
is a marked increase over last year. 

This year a very large number came to learn the rudi- 
ments of our language. Many were foreigners. Five dif- 
ferent nationalities were represented. The earnestness and 
perseverance with which these people worked was most 
gratifying to every teacher. Arithmatic also seemed to be a 
favorite study. The class in book-keeping has worked well 
and accomplished much. 

In comparing this year's work with that of last year, there 
seems to be improvement. For, although the number of 
pupils has been slightly less, the work accomplished by 
the majority of those attending has been of a far more 
substantial and lasting character. 

Respectfully submitted. 

WALTER E. PIPER, Principal. 

February 31, 1895. 



To the Committee on Evening Schools of the Town of 
Hyde Park: 

Hoping this may convey an idea of the work done in the 
Evening Drawing School in the past year, I submit the fol- 
lowing report : — 

From the time of writing the last report, Feb. 14, 1894, to 
April 1, the work assumed a very marked advancement, as 
was shown by the exhibition held at that time, which exhibit, 
I am loth to say, was visited by only too few of the citizens 
who should be interested in this work. 

The twelfth term opened under the most pleasing circum- 
stances. The Everett building in the High School yard 
is equipped with benches for the industrial school, and these 
are also used as tables. The instalment of the sixteen 
electric lights made the lighting perfect. 



164 

On Nov. 5 twenty young men were enrolled, and this- 
number increased so that sixty-two names were on the roll,, 
divided into three classes, elementary advanced, mechanical 
and architectural; the architectural advanced meeting with 
the others until Jan. 18, when it was thought best to give 
them a separate evening. 

Monday evening, at 7:30, the elementary meets, being the- 
largest of the three, and a more interested class it would be 
hard to find. Wednesday evenings, at the same hour, the 
class in architectural work meets. Thursday evening the 
advanced mechanical class, which is devoted to the construc- 
tion of machinery, meets. At the beginning of the term an 
engine was loaned us by the Boston Blower Company, to be 
used as a model, but unfortunately this could be used but as 
short time, as it had to be returned. 

The lack of interest shown by citizens last year dis- 
courages effort to get out drawings for our exhibition this 
year, but if it is thought best we will try and enthuse the 
pupils to make another exhibition. 

The work being done by all the classes seems to be of a 
very satisfactory nature, and the interest is very marked _ 
When we see the positions held by a good number of the 
young men from this branch of our school, as mechanical 
and architectural draughtsmen, and others who have even 
taken higher positions, we can but feel that the appropria- 
tions made for this purpose have been well spent. 

Respectfully submitted. 

E. C. TOURTELLOTTE, Instructor. 



WASHINGTON S BIRTHDAY. 

This is not the first time we have had occasion to ex- 
press our appreciation of the efforts of the Grand Army 
Post in this town, to properly impress upon the children a 
love of country and the duty of patriotic devotion to its in- 
stitutions. 



165 

We were pleased to be present in Waverly Hall and 
•witness the excellent programme provided for the proper 
■celebration of the birthday of the immortal Washington, 
under the auspices of Timothy Ingraham Post. By invita- 
tion many of the school children of the town were present 
.and heard patriotic music and addresses fitting for that day. 
It is very gratifying to school authorities to have public 
occasions of such a nature, as they strongly show the chil- 
dren the love a free people have for their institutions, and 
express the gratitude we owe to those who have secured 
them for us by the sacrifice of life and property. 

The children of Hyde Park should especially take pride 
in this anniversary, as Washington in his efforts to drive 
the British oppressor from Boston in 1776, secured from our 
territory part of the material used in the fortification of 
Dorchester Heights. 

One danger of the present time results from the fact that 
large numbers of people come to our country who under- 
stand nothing of our institutions, and many of them do not 
even become citizens. From such we cannot expect a 
great regard for our system of government. 

Where we can teach our children in such matters it calls 
for greater care, that somewhere among our citizens may 
be found an "old guard" of rightly trained and patriotic 
men and women to stand on all occasions for our constitu- 
tion and flag. 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

The work of the schools has been carried forward on 
lines similar to those of preceeding years. We realize that 
it is dangerous to experiment with all new theories and 
methods that are brought forward by different educators of 
the day. The time of the children is of great importance, 
and great care must be taken that none of it be wasted in 
..he school course. 



166 

r 

We believe that under good instructors with comfortable 
and cleanly surroundings, our present course is capable of 
developing well trained and educated men and women. 

Fellow citizens, we should fail in our duty should we not 
impress it upon you to guard these schools carefully, and 
make every effort possible to secure for them all the 
advantages of a generous support. Let no indifference to 
them or the cause of education gain a foothold in our town. 
Such a course will not only injure our good name abroad, 
but will be of irreparable loss to us and our children at 
home. 

We do not recommend extravagant expenditures, but a 
broad generous policy which shall ensure to our pub- 
lic schools all that is necessary to give our youth the great 
advantage of good opportunities for early education. 

In this department it requires constant effort that our 
standard be kept steadily advancing. Should you become 
careless or indifferent to the importance of their work, it 
would be very easy for our schools to deteriorate and our 
children suffer in consequence. 

In submitting this report we do so with the thanks of 
this committee to our citizens, for their many acts of kind- 
ness and forbearance toward us as we have tried througfh- 
out the past year to superintend the work of educating the 
children of our town. , 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHARLES G. CHICK, Chairman. 
Hyde Park, Feb. 4, 1895. 



Feb. 4, 1895. 
At a meeting of the full Board it was voted to adopt the 
annual report as prepared and read by the Chairman as 
the report of the Board. 

R. M.JOHNSON, Secretary. 



REPORT OF SCHOOLS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal — Mr. Jhre M. Hill. 

Sub-Master: Mr. Emerson Rice. Assistants: Miss Anna 

W. Edwards, Miss Anna M. Linscott, Mr. 

Wm. N. Cannon, Mrs. Mary C. 

Howard, Mr. A. W. Lowe. 



January to June inclusive 

September to December inclusive 



£ 


£ 




o 


o 




■p 


9% 










rt 


S« 


S'2 


z 






t 


- 





192 
211 



187 
209 



176 
204 



97 
98 



19 

49 



Pupils not absent or tardy from January to June inclusive : Otis O. 
Dunham, Arthur C. Poore, Mark E. Taylor, Addie M. LeBourveau, 
Edwin Sutermeister, Clara B. Vaughan, ElveraM. Bloom, Minnie G. 
Farwell. William S. Hartt, Harold VV. Mason, Joseph A. McDonough, 
Edgar L. Wood, Frank W. Crowe, Daniel T. Felch, Edward K. Judd, 
Percy A. Katzman, Frank K. Mitchell, Walter B. Norris, Harry E. 
Pring. 

Pupils not absent or tardy from September to December inclusive : 
Helen Balkam, Addie M. LeBourveau, Edwin Sutermeister, Elvera 
M. Bloom, Ethel E. Boynton, William S. Hartt, Addie M. Hiller, 
Harold W. Mason, Arthur H. Norris, Lillian G. Rogers, Jessie C. 
Williams, Lulu M. Williams, Warren Archibald, Elise M. Barme, 
Frank W. Crowe, Daniel T. Felch, Maud A. Fennell, Carl C. Fish, 
Frank K. Mitchell, David D. Murrav, Walter B. Norris, Arthur li. War- 
ren, Fred H. Annis, CarlE. Baker, Nettie F. Bksdale, Ethelind S. Bod- 
well. F. Neale Boyd, William Bradley, Emma C. Brown. Bertha J. 
Burgess, Louis M. Burnett, George L. Coleman, Francis J. Corbett, 
Grace E. Damon, Edward K. Ellis, Harold C. Fish, George F. Fisk, 
William H. Fitzgerald, Sanford E. Gillette, Frank L. King, Hobert 
E. Martin, Gertrude S. Mitchell, Herbert B. Norris, Agnes L. Paine, 
Harry E. Pring, James O. Sartwell, Lillian I. Shattuck, John White, 
Edith E. Williams. 

Pupils not absent or tardy during the year: Addie M. LeBourveau, 
Edwin Sutermeister. Elvera M. Bloom, William S. Hartt, Harold W. 
Mason. Frank W. Crowe, Daniel T. Felch, Frank K. Mitchell, Wal- 
ter B. Norris, Harry E. Pring. 

(107) 



168 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 



[January 1 

to June 30, 

1893. 



NAME OF TEACHER. 



-„■ 








2 


o 




® "P 


o s 




oC;= 


6C2 






C5 c - 










O " 


O rf 


o 


> O 


<S 


o 


< O 








!> 


>- 











-{ 



VIII. 
IX. 
X. 
XI. 

xii. A 
xii. B 

Sept. 1 
to Dec. 31, 

1894. 

VI. 
VII. 
VIII. 
IX. 
X. 
XI. 

xii. A 
xii. B 



Edward W. Cross... 

Mary C. Howard 

Helen P. Cleaves 

Helen P. Cleaves.... 
Margerita G. Roe.. . 
Margerita G. Roe. . . 

Hattie E. Henry 

Mattie P. Winchenb" 
Florence A. Dunbar. 
Hattie F. Packard... 
Jennie S. Hammond. 

Helen A. Perry 

Helen O. Thompson. . 



Edward W. Cross. . . \ 
Helen P. Cleaves.... | 
Marguerita G. Roe-.. 
Hattie E. Henrv 



Mattie P 
M. Edith 
Hattie F. 
Jennie S. 

Helen A. Perry 

Helen O. Thompson. 



Winchenb'h 
LeBourvean 

Packard 

Hammond.. 



30 


28.5 


27.9 


83 


30.8 


29 


34 


33 


32 


56 


46.5 


44.3 


57 


50 


49 


50 


46.5 


43.2 


54 


44.5" 


42.2 


47 


45 


41.3 


47 


43.8 


39.3 


31 


26.7 


25.5 


23 


22.6 


21.7 


47 


45 


42 


49 


45 


43.3 


52 


47.5 


45.5 


46 


43.7 


42.3 


42 


40.5 


38.8 


48 


43.1 


40.8 


58 


53.5 


48 



97.8 

94.1 

99 

95.3 

98 
92.8 
94.8 
91.7 

87 



95.5 

96 

93 

96.2 

95.7 

96.8 
95.8 
94.6 

89.7 



99.7 

99.5 

98.5 

99.8 
99.6 
99.5 
99 
99.9 
99.5 



99.9 

98.9 
99 
99.7 
98.4 
99.5 
99 
99.4 
99.7 



19 



28 

29 

39' 
36 
37 
20 
40 
49 



15 
34 
42 
33 
28 
29 
35 
45 



PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE. 

First Term: J.Ross Bates, Louis M. Burnett, Grace Damon, El- 
ward H. Ellis. Lou. Ella Hamblin, Rutledge M. Kelheur. John S. Mc- 
Askill. Alfred Millar, Herbert B. Norris, Asrnes L. Cain. Winnie 
Porter, Robert L. Scott, Wilbur Wallace, Edith" E. Williams. William 
Carnes. Alice Hackett, Susie Kelley, Stanley Millar, Minnie McNeil, 
Clara Noyes, Ellis Pierce, Alice Williams, Grace Alexander, Annie 
Bonney. Maude Cross, Edwin Fiske, Walter Henderson, Fred Mc- 
Kenna. Francis Mullen, Ina Milne, Carrie McAskill, Mabel Roberts, 
Maud Banks, Chas. Graham, Winnif'red Heustis, William Millar, 
Bessie Richardson, Alexander Stockwell, Ellie Smith. Florence Sum- 
ner, Edward Williams, Harry Hall, John Fratns Harry Wasserboehr, 
John Bennett, Gertrude Cox, Mary Ellis. Alice Graham, Minnie Hope. 
Archie Scrivens. Winnie Smith, John Tileston, Arthur Crowe, Ora 
Chadbourne, Earl Williams. Joseph Guinazzo, Walter Scott, Herbert 
Scott. Harry Hinds. Edward McNeal, Lulu Scrivens, Ralph Thomp- 
son, Harriet Wasserboehr. 



169 



Second Term : Geo. Banister, Gertrude Cox, Mary Ellis, Alice 
'Graham, Minnie Hope, Audrey Kelley, Milton McGregor, Winnie 
Milne, Alice Ryan, Archie Serivens, Winnie Smith, Florence Shute, 
Mabel Hamilton, Harvey Wasserboehr, Carleton Babb, Chas. Graham, 
Winnefred Heustis, Ellie Smith, Florence Sumner, Grace Alexander, 
Annie Bonney, Edwin Fish, Fred McKenna, Abner Scott, Mabel 
Wolfe, Georgie Wright, Arthur Wheeler, John Smith, Josephine 
Wasserboehr, Alice Hackett, Robert Henderson, Susie Kelley, Stan- 
ley Millar, Alice Williams, Louis M. Burnett, Grace Damon, Edward 
H. Ellis, Arther H. French, Alfred R. McGregor, Agnes L. Paine, 
Wilbur Wallace, Edith Williams, Roberts. Worrick, Frank B. Rafter. 

Third Term : Carleton A. Babb. Hildur S. Bloom, Amy C. Blod- 
gett, Charles Graham, Winnifred Heustis, Florence M. Piper, Flor- 
ence Sumner, Grace Alexander, Annie Barney, Annie Bonney, Ethel 
Falkner, John Smith, Arthur Wheeler, Mabel Wolfe, John Alden, 
Faustina Davis, Gertrude Kelley, Lulu Serivens, Ralph Thompson, 
Ida Boyuton, Carl Falkner, Willie Mahoney, Lizzie Tingley, Annie 
Williams, Gertrude Tileston, Susie Kelley, Carrie Mackintosh, Alice 
Hackett, Fred French. Maggie A. Keane, John Fratus, Wallace Gib- 
son, Harold Millar, John Murray, Florence Shute, Norman Scott, 
Mabel Hamilton, Katharine Naugnane, Frank Finn, Bradford Jones, 
Thomas Jones, Warren Withington, Willie Wright, May Wallace, 
Annie Scott, P. B.. Jones, Mabel Fratus, Frank Flinn. Mary Ellis, 
Alice Graham, Precilla Alden. Minnie Hope, Audrey Kelley, Hattie 
Lailer, Archie Serivens, Mary Thompson, Kenneth McAskill, Alice 
Ryan. 

PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE FOR THE YEAR. 

Clara Noyes, Stanley Miller, Alice Williams, Charles Graham, 
Winnefred Heustis Florence Sumner, Grace Alexander, Annie Bon- 
ney, Susie Kelley, Alice Hackett, Minnie Hope, Alice Graham, 
Audrey Kelley, Archie Serivens, Winnie Smith. 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 



January 1, 

to June 30, 

1S94. 



NAME OF TEACHER. 



CD 


^"2 


6 

spa 


a 


o >> 


a 




ci ~ 


T~ ci 


« a 


a cs 




a> 


i> 13 

< 2 


>« 
*% 


e H 




o 


si 


c3 


3"" 


P-i a 


£ 


^ 


^ 




Ph 







CLASS 

XI. 
XII. 

Sept. l 
to Dec. 31, 
1894. 
XI. 
XII. 



Grace B. Giduey. 
Grace B. Gidney: 

Grace B. Gidney. 
Grace B. Giduey. 



10 


10 


9 


87 


99.8 





31 


26 


22 


82 


99.5 


1 


14 


13 


]2 


92 


99.6 


3 


21 


18 


16 


87 


99.2 


2 



6 
22 



9 
13 



170 



PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE. 

First Term: Frank R. Gunn, Charles E. Stowers, Winslow 
Stowers. 

Second Term : Gertrude M. Greenlaw, Jane McKenzie, Josephine 
Fisher. 

Third Term : George Morris, Montgomery Rav, Gertrude M. 
Greenlaw, Josephine Fisher. 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



January 1 

to June 30, 

1894. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 





























o" 




bcG 


CJjfl 






03 cj 


a 


S3* 






>• CD 


gg 


o 


<i O 


<S 








£ 


£ 





fc« Pna 



CLASS 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

x. A 
x.B 

XI. 
XII. 

Sept. l 
to Dec. 31 
1894. 
V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

x. A 
x. B 

, XI. 
- XII. 



*W. F. Sayward, Mrs. 

E. de Senancour 

W. F. Sayward, Mrs. 

E. de Senancour 

W. F. Sayward, Mrs. 

E. de Senancour 

W. F. Sayward, Mrs. 

E. de Senancour 

Dora M. "Wiggin 

Julia E . Donavan 

Dora F. Hastings 



A. W 

Mrs. 
A. W 

Mrs. 
A. W 

Mrs. 
A. W 

Mrs. 
Julia 



Armstrong, 
E. de Senancour 

Armstrong, 
E. de Senancour 

Armstrong, 
E. de Senancour 
. Armstrong, 
E. cle Senancour 
E. Donovan. .... 



Florence Barker. 

's " 

Dora F. Hastings. 



8 


8 


7.6 


95 


99 


3 


5 


4.2 


3.9 


94.3 


99 





8 


4.6 


4.2 


91.6 


98 





16 


14.5 


13.2 


90.9 


99 





26 


22 


19.7 


89.6" 


98.6 


2 


11 


10.3 


9.3 


90.2 


97.9 





17 


14.9 


13.8 


93.2 


97.8 





25 


19.5 


17.7 


90.7 


99.6 


1 


45 


34.2 


31.2 


91.4 


99.5 


4 


4 


3.6 


3.3 


91.7 


100 





5 


5 


4.8 


96 


99 


1 


18 


15.1 


13.7 


90.5 


96 


1 


24 


18.6 


17.4 


93.4 


99 


2 


34 


32.1 


30.3 


94.2 


99.2 


7 


8 


8 


7.8 


97.5 


99.2 


1 


19 


10.5 


9.9 


94 


99.7 


1 


30 


28.5 


26.9 


94 


99.8 


3 


35 


32.9 


30.8 


93.9 


99.2 


8 



10 

12 



4 

4 

12 

13 

17 

1 

4 

17 

18 



* From April 1st, A. W. Armstrong. 

Since Dec. 1st another room has been opened and Class VIII. given to 
Miss Donovan, and Classes IX. and X. to Miss Grace Tuxbury; the 
other Classes remaining as before. 



171 



PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE. 

First Term: Willie Bradley, Lillie Motte. Walter Queen, John 
White, Alexander Foley, Julia Daggett, Fred Wood, Frank Lawrence, 
Mildred Spencer, Ellsworth Jelley ^George Wheeler, William Wheel- 
er, Fred Cogan. 

Second Term : Willie Bradley, Walter Queen, John White, Henry 
Cogan, Alonzo Dunbar, John McLeod, Fred Wood, Albert Blood, 
Ellsworth Jelley, William Wood. 

Third Term: Henry Cogan, Alonzo Dunbar, Katie Cristy, Mich- 
ael Mack, Gertrude Dunbar, Albert Jelley, Charles Jelley, Frank 
Lawr ence, Sadie Wheeler, Mattie Cochran. Amy Shrieve, Willie 
Hartnett, Willie Wheeler, Fred Cogan, Gertrude Sowers. 



GREW SCHOOL. 



January 1 
to June 30, 

1894. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 












^3 


6 


" 


'o >> 












C££3 








$ a 


*= § 


5 S 


CS 


o 5 




eg 


O 


o S 


s§ 


C 


C3 




k p. 


6 




Ch 




fc 



CLASS 



VI. 

vir. 

A T II, Till. 

VIII. 

IX. 

IX, X. 

X, XI. 
XI. 

XII. 
XII. 

Sept. 1 
to Dec. 31, 

1894. 



VI. 
VII. 

vn, viii. 

VIII. 
IX. 

IX, x. 

X, XI. 
XI. 

XII. 
XII. 



Frank H. Dean. Mary 

A. Winslow 

Margaret A. Hanlon 
Margaret E. Bertram 
Blanche L. Bright. 
Emma M. George. . 
Adah F. Whitney. . 
Fannie E. Harlow. 
Agnes J. Campbell. 
Nellie M. Howes . . 

Jennie F. Ellis 

Bessie C. Sparrell. 



Frank H. Dean, Nell 

J. WentAvorth 

Margaret A. Hanlon 
Margaret E. Bertram 
Blanche L. Bright. 
Emma M. George. . 
Adah F. Whitney... 
Eannie E. Harlow. 
Agnes J. Campbell. 
Nellie M. HoAves.. 

Jennie F. Ellis 

Bessie C. Sparrell. 



41 

45.5 

36.5 

43 

41 

36 

35.4 

32 

44 

42 



39.9 
40 
47 
42 
44 
38 
40 
38 
37 
46 
47 



35 
38 
43.5 
34 
40 
39 
34 
32 
29 
35 
34 



37.7 
37 

45.5 
40 
41 

35.7 
34 

35.7 
34 
42 
42 



95 


99 


4 


92.5 


99.7 


2 


95.6' 


99.7 


4 


93 


99 


4 


93 


99 


2 


94 


99 


5 


94 


99 


2 


91 


99.9 


7 


91 


99 


1 


80 


99 





80 


99 





94 


99 


13 


92.5 


99.9 


8 


96.8 


99 


9 


95 


99 


10 


93 


99 


7 


93.9 


99 


8 


85 


99 


12 


93.9 


99 


3 


92 


99 


5 


91 


99 


8 


89 


98 


3 



23 
28 
33 
26 
28 
29 
22 
22 
21 
36 
18 



27 
32 
28 
30 
25 
24 
26 
21 
22 
33 
23- 



172 



PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE. 

First Term: Emma Burgess, Elsie Drinkwater, Carrie Higbee, 
Caroline Hodgdon, Kenneth Archibald, Wm. Blasdale. Robert Camp- 
bell, George Coleman, Chester Farwell, Isabell Becker, Harriet 
Hodgdon, Lillie Benson, Lillie Baessler, Carie Doane, Helen Holtham, 
Annie McDonough, Cecil Archibald, Arthur Benson, Ernest Hibbard, 
Willie Monarch, Helen Burgess, Florence Kappler, Mabel Lowell, 
Edward Gwillim, John Olson, Emma Boettcher, Lena Drechsler, 
Karl Alen, Willie Brown, John Coullahan, Howard Orcutt, David 
Burns, Mary Kenney, Fannie Rooney, Lillian Schwab, Merton Alden, 
John Alden, Edgar Drinkwater, James Ingles, Lewis Little, Harry 
Stackpole. Amy Lowell, Fred Becker, Walter Drechsler, James Has- 
kell, Annie Morgan, Mary Partridge, Madison Jordan, George Barry, 
Wm. Boettcher, Ernest Dawson, Walter White, Robert L-willim, Win. 
Jank, William Taylor. 

Second Term: Emma Burgess. Elsie Drinkwater, Carrie Higbee, 
Caroline Hodgdon. Kenneth Archibald, Wm. Blasdale, Robert Camp- 
bell, George Coleman, Chester Farwell, Mowry Lockwood, William 
Tooher, Ernest Tucker, Ethel Belcher, Mary White, Rena Dawson, 
Helen Holtham, Isabelle McCausland, Willie Benson, Thomas Bu- 
chan, Ernest, Hibbard, George Knapp, George Sanbprn, Minnie 
Adams, Helen Burgess, Mabel Lowell, Edith Lingham, Ellen Rosen- 
,gren, Gertrude Sweet, Cora Fierce, Fannie Rooney, John Olson, Ed- 
gar Holme&, Helen Aborn, Emma Boetcher. Rosa Downey, Belle 
Dunn, David Burns, John Coullahan, Albert Forbes, Herbert Hay- 
ward, Willie Wells, Amy Rollins, Francis Rooney, Mable Tourtelotte, 
Merton Alden, Arthur Bishop, Lewis Little, Edgar Drinkwater, Amy 
Lowell, May Mullen. Fred Becker, Bennie Wandless, Gertrude Dunn, 
Mary Partridge, Sarah Runnells. George Barry, Wm. Boetcher, 
Ernest Dawson*, Walter White, Robert "Gwillim, Mary Ide, Susie 
Roone}^. 

Third Term: Orton Andrews, Henry Pringle, Ernest Tucker, 
Frank Taylor, Willie Tooher, Edward Williams, Arthur Stockbridge, 
Harding Armstrong, Everett Ellis, Blanche Baldwin, Emma Burgess, 
Anna Peterson, Gertrude Sto.ckwell, Harriet Hodgdon, Heniw Eden- 
burg, Kate Rooney, Lillie Benson, Helen Holtham. Gertrude Maguire 
Alice Williams, Galen Hill, Harry Robinson, Willie Towle. Leon 
Wether bee, Bridget McCaffrey. Berj. Boardman, George Knapp, 
Howard Orcutt, Oscar Richter, Minnie Adams, Helen Burgess. Mabel 
Lowell, Edith Lingham. Ellen Rosengren, Gertrude Sweet. Cora 
Pierce, Fannie Rooney, John Olsen, Edgar Holmes, Minnie Queen, 
Arthur Bishop. Willie Carter, James Ingalls, Lewis Little, George 
Pagington, Clarence Tucker, Marion Beale. Anna Morgan. Ella 
Briggg, Helen Newell, Fred Becker, Robert Beebe, living Sibley, 
Bennie Wandless, Mary Morgan, Joseph White, Wm. Boetcher, 
George Barry, Willie Costley. Robert Ingalls, Susie Roonev, Albert 
Flanders, Walter Schroder, Charles Lord, Arthur Wetherbee, Ange- 
line Creaser, Robert Jank, Etta Heath, Willie Geyar, Fred McDoug- 
all, Robert White. 



173 
GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 



January 1 

to June 30, 

1894. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



6 




03 


03 








037: 






















53 " 


53 


> a 


O 


^o 










* 












c£> 


53 






















°o 




r 1 o 










o 




fc 



W 03 H p. 



VI. 
VII. 
VIII. 
IX. 
IX. 
X. 
XI. 
XII. 

Sept. l 
to Dec. 31. 
1394 
V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

XII. 

XII. 



Daniel G. Thompson, 

Annie B. Davis .... 

Frances A. Putnam . . . 

Minnie L. Butland .... 

Sarah E. Roome 

Emily Woods 

Alma E. Batchelder. . . 
Elizabeth B. Freeman. 

Evelyn S. Howes 

Lena B. Winter 

Daniel G. Thompson, 

Annie B. Davis 

Frances A. Putnam. . . 

Minnie L. Butland 

Sarah E . Roome 

Emily Woods 

Alma E. Batchelder. . . 
Elizabeth B. Freeman 

Evelyn S. Howes 

Lena B . Winter => 

Ella J. Brown , 



38 


36 


44 


40.1 


48 


40.4 


52 


48.4 


48 


45.7 


45 


38.3 


50 


47.7 


oo 


51 


67 


53 


36 


35 


46 


44.S 


52 


47.7 


45 


42.2 


43 


36 


40 


38 


59 


55.2 


48 


41.8 


39 


36 


33 


29 



34.6 
33.4 
42.1 
45.7 
42.9 
35.7 
45.6 
46.3 
48.2 



33.5 

42.3 

46 

41 

34.4 

36.4 

53.5 

40 

33.4 

23.2 



96 
33 
95 
94 
94 
93 
96 
91 
91 



100 


8 


99.6 


5 


99.6 


7 


99.8 


9 


99.7 


9 


99.6 


7 


99.8 


13 


99.7 


8 


98.3 


1 


99.9 


8 


99.7 


15 


99.7 


7 


99.9 


13 


99.9 


9 


99.7 


9 


99.8 


8 


99.3 


7 


98.7 


2 


97.5 


3 



37 
33 
21 
43 
30> 
32 
39 
24 
23 



3L 
35- 
29 
38 
27 
35- 
4& 
22 
18 



PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE. 

First Terra : Fred Annis, Ethelind Bodwell, Harold Fish, Sanford 
Gillette, Stillman Griffin, Alice Hanscom, Alex. Holt, James Sartwell 
Harry Tilden. Charles Arentzen, Anna Barme, Arthur Brown, Wil- 
liam Downie, Hortense Fowle, Grace Fuller, Edwin Halden, Mary 
Wood, John Bryce, Charles Cahill, William Gunn, Louis Heydecker, 
Everett Hiller, Richard Merryman, George Stowers, Robert Topham, 
Florence Annis, Gertrude Fisher, Ida Gates, Fanny Gunn, Lulu 
Hiller, Elizabeth Pring, Emma Ray, Raymond Caller, George Carl- 
ton, William Chandler, Norman Clogston. Andrew Corbett, Laura 
Corbett, Kenneth Elwell, Andrew Fisher, Chester Greenlaw, Clara 
Hodgkina, Nellie Langley, Arthur Stowers, William Strachan, Eliza- 
beth Wallace, William Wood, William Wyman, Snsette Gravestein, 
Willie Barme. George Corbett, Mark Clogston, Nellie Kraus, Joseph 
Stowers, Frank Chandler, George Greenlaw, Bessie Gunn, Colin 



174 

McKenzie, Harry Buck, Helen Courtney, Philip Fuller, Lizzie 
Griggs, Charles Griggs, Louis Gerry, lna Jennings. Bertie Newman, 
Minnie Weston, Daniel McCarty, Emma Baker, Clement Bradley, 
Emma Chandler, Eva Davenport, Elsie Downie, Maud Hersey, Ethel 
Holbrook, Lizzie Plummer, Walter Ramsay, Pansy Woodward, 
Charles Wigglesworth. John Chamberlain, Frank Crooker, Chester 
McVitae, Monroe Marshall, Jane Sargent. 

Second Term : Fred Annis, Carl Baker, Ethelind Bodwell, Harold 
Fish, George Fisk. Sanf'ord Gillette, Stillman Griffin, Alice Hanscom, 
Alice Hersey, Bertha Holzer, James Sartwell, Harry Tilden, Walter 
Weston, Charles Arentzen, Anna Barme, Hortense Fowle, Edwin 
Halden, Mary Wood, John Bryce, Charles Cahill, Louis Heydacker, 
Bsrron Kenison, Edgar Waters, Florence Annis, Gertrude Fisher, 
Lulu Hiller, Margaretha Holzer, Raymond Caller, George Carlton, 
Norman Clogston, Willa Crooker, Andrew Fisher, Clara Hodgkins, 
Nellie Langley, Ethel Palmer, Stuart Towne, Elizabeth Wallace, 
William vVooa, Mark Clogston, George Corbett, Charles Gallup, Wil- 
frid Kraus, George Kenny, Christine Stevens, Helen Courtney, Philip 
Fuller, Charles Griggs, Laura Googins, Louis Gerry, Warren Haskell 
Bertie Newman, Minnie Weston, Emma Baker, George Brown, Annie 
Caffln, Emma Chandler. Eva Davenport, Elsie Downie, George Mon- 
tena, Lizzie Plummer, Walter Ramsay, Charles Wigglesworth, Edith 
Waters, Norman Arnold, Willie Bodwell, Foster Cass, Frank Crooker 
Florence Greenlow, George Kelley, Mary Morgan, John McKenzie, 
Bernard Courtney. Kate Morgan, Bessie Wheeler, Roberta Kraus, 
Lizzie Griggs, David Neilson, Joseph Stowers, Walter Gallup, Albert 
Holzer, Nellie Krause. 

Third Term : Charles Arentzen, Anna Barme, William Downie, 
Frances Fowle, Grace Fuller, Berthilde Joubert, Cornelius Spaans, 
Mary Wood, Florence Annis. John Bryce, Emily Colburn, Charles 
Cahill, Gertrude Fisher, Miriam Fisher, Ida Gates, Louis Heydacker, 
Everett Hiller, Lulu Hiller, Barron Kenison, George Stowers, Fred 
Townsend, George Carlton, Andrew Corbett, Kenneth Elwell, Wil- 
liam Wood, Willa Crooker, Nellie Langley, Hilma Miller, Christena 
Stevens. Amy Harwood, Grace Brown, Chella Perkins, Nellie Kraus, 
Wilfrid Kraus, William Chandler, Joseph Stowers, William Barme, 
Helen Courtney, Philip Fuller, Helen Mclntyre, George Greenlaw, 
Colin McKenzie, Carl Stowers, Emma Chandler, John Countway, 
Elsie Downie, Bertie Payne, Perc/ Davenport, Fmlay Bryce, Burn- 
ham Stowers, George Brown, Clement Bradley, Norman Arnold, 
Willie Bodwell, Emily Holzer. Albert Mclntyre, Nathaniel Rafter, 
Grace Brown, Willie Corbett, Clara Grant, Roberta Kraus, Francis 
Miller, Arthur Savage, Bessie Wheeler, Charles Wheeler, Ella Nims, 
Marjory Eryce. 



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