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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures : with report of the selectmen and other town officers"

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in 2011 with funding from 

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http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofrehyde28 



CEORCE SANFORD, 

Collector of Taxes, 

HYDE PARK, - MASS. 



THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY ji, 1899. 




HYDE PARK: 

Press of the Hyde Park Gazette. 

1899. 



THIRTY-FIRST ANiNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



REPORTS OF THE SELECTMEN, TRUSTEES L OF THE 

PUBLIC LIBRARY, SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND OTHER TOWN OFFICERS 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY' 31, 1899. 




I2^6£/^ 



, . . HYDE PARK: 

Pkess o£ jhe Hvdf, : rl'pjc Gazette. 



OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK, 

For the Year Ending March 6, 1899. 



SELECTMEN AND SURVEYORS OF 

FRANK B. RICH, 
STILL MAN E. NEWELL, 

FRED Y. FRENCH. 



HIGHWAYS : 

EDWARD Q. DYER, 
JOHN JOHNSTON, 



ASSESSORS : 

THOMAS E. FAUNCE, GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 

CHARLES F. MORRISON. 



TOWN CLERK : 

HENRY B. TERRY, 



TOWN TREASURER: 

HENRY S. BUNTON, 



OVERSEERS UF THE POOR : 

GEORGE W. CHAPMAN term expires 1901. 

•CHARLES LEWIS, term expires 1900- 

GEORGE E. HAVEN, term expires 1899. 

BOARD OE HEALTH : 

EDWIN' C. FARWELL, terra expires 1901. 

WILLIAM W. SCOTT, term expires 1900. 

WILLARD S. EVERETT, .... term expires 1899. 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES : 

GEORGE SANFORD. 

s:hool committee: 
ELLA F. BOYD, 
SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT, . 
EDWARD I. HUMPHREY, 
AUGUSTA L. HANCHETT, . 
WILLIAM G. COLESWORTHY, 
CHARLES G. CHICK, . . .. 
ANDREW WASHBURN, 
EDWARD S. FELLOWS, 
FRANK F. COURTNEY, 







term expires 1901 




term expires 1901 






term expires 1901 






term expires 1900 






term expires 1900 






term expires 1900 






term expires 1899 






term expires 1899 






term expires 1899 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS : 

FRANK O. DRAPER. 

auditors : 

CALVIN P. FELLOWS, HOWARD JS. THOMPSON,. 

JOSEPH J. HOUSTON. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 

G. FRED GRIDLEY, 
FREDERICK L. JOHNSON,. 
WILLIAM H. ALLES, . 
AMOS H. BRAINARD, . 
CHARLES F. JENNEY, . 

* DAVID C. MARR, (deceased) 

* JOHN W. GRIFFIN, . 
EDWARD S. HAYWARD, 
HENRY B. MINER, 
JAMES R. CORTHELL, 



LIBRARY : 

term expires 1901. 
term expires 1901. 
term expires 1901. 
term expires 1900. 
term expires 1900. 
term expires 1900. 
term expires 1899. 
term expires 1899. 
term expires 1899. 
term expires 1899. 



PARK COMMISSIONERS : 

JOHN J. ENNEKING, 

LAWSON B. BIDWELL, 

WILBUR H. POWERS 



term expires 1901. 
term expires 1900. 
term expires 1899. 



BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS : 



WILLIAM U. FAIRBAIRN, 
FERDINAND A. WYMAN, 
DAVID PERKINS, 



term expires 1901. 
term expires 1900. 
term expires 1899. 



CONSTABLES 



FRED C. BIGELOW, 
JOHN M. BROWN, 
JAMES A. CULLEN, 
CHARLES E. JENNEY, 



JAMES McKAY, 
DANIEL O'CONNELL, 
ALEXANDER SCHWAB, 
WILLIAM W. SCOTT, 



ELMER P. RUNNELLS. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Li 



Chiel Engineer. 
Assistant Engineers. 



BENJAMIN RAFTER . 
JOHN C. McDOUGALD 
JOHN H. WETHERBEE 

*John W. Griffin chosen by the Trustees and the Selectmen to 
fill vacancy caused by death of David C. Marr, until another is chosea 
in his stead by the town. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



Fellow Citizens of Hyde Pakk : 

The past year has been one of great importance to the 
town. The work of abolishing the o-rade crossings at 
Readville and changes in streets made necessary by it. 

The erecting of a building for the Public Library. 

The widening of parts of Hyde Park avenue. 

The completion of several streets recently accepted. 

These are all enterprises of great importance and great 
•expense. 

The Board of Selectmen present for your consideration 
the following as the annual report for the year ending Jan- 
uary 31, 1899. 

NEW" STREETS. 

In 1897 the town voted to accept Greenwood avenue, 
Westminster street, Huntington avenue, Easton avenue, 
Franklin Terr.ace and Garfield avenue. An appropriation 
was made and work commenced, but delayed on account of 
the winter season, and carried over to last summer for 
completion. 

In September last the town voted to accept Norway Park, 
and appropriated $1200 for the same. 

It was constructed under the direction of the Superin- 
tendent of Streets and is well and substantially built. 

All of the above mentioned streets have been laid out 
under the betterment law. Assessments have been made 
and many have already been paid. 



STREET DEPARTMENT. 
For the head of this important department the Selectmen re- 
appointed Mr. Henry M. Phipps, Superintendent of Streets. 

He has given general satisfaction and we regard him well 

so o 

qualified for the position. 

The highway appropriation was the same as for the pre- 
vious year, $15,000, and as an exception to the custom of 
several years past, we did not ask the town for a second 
appropriation. The streets have been kept up to a good 
standard and many improvements have been made during 
the year. The Superintendent of Streets' report will be 
found on another page, which, for the first time, is made by 
him and separate from the Selectmen's report. 

STREET WATERING. 
During the past summer a new watering cart was pur- 
chased and assigned to the Fairmount district, making four 
carts in use in the town. The Superintendent of Streets 
had charge of the work, which was well done and within 
the appropriation. 

STREET LIGHTS. 

By vote of the town there have been added during the 
year five arc and two incandescent lights, making a total 
of 128 arc and 63 incandescent lights now furnished the 
town by the Hyde Park Electric Light Company under its 
ten-year contract. 

TELEPHONE WIRES AND POLES. 
In the early part of our term arrangements were made 
with the New England Telegraph and Telephone Company 
for the transfer of a portion of. their wires to an under- 
ground system. During the summer conduits were laid 
through the centre of the town from Hyde Park avenue to 
Beacon street, with branches on the side streets. By our 
agreement with them the company constructed and bore all 
the expense of this change, and also give to the town the 



7 

free and exclusive use of one of the conduits for the fire 
alarm service. The company are now using the system and 
gradually removing the overhead wires. 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 

Under the new By-Laws recently adopted by the town, 
the new office of Inspector of Buildings was created. The 
Selectmen appointed Mr. R. F. Boynton to that position. 
He entered upon his duties May 1, and has well and faith- 
fully performed the work of this important department. 
His report will be found on another page of this book. 

HYDE PARK AVENUE. 

In response to a petition the County Commissioners 
visited the town last spring to view Hyde Park avenue, 
where the question of widening had been agitated for many 
years. They held public hearings in Hyde Park April 23 
and June 25, 1898. A decree was issued July 26 ordering 
that Hyde Park avenue, from the Boston line to Metropoli- 
tan avenue, then 50 feet, be widened to 80 feet ; and from 
the private way leading to the Hyde Park station of the N. 
Y., N. H. & H. R. R. to Pine street, then 50 feet, to 80 
feet; also the rounding of the southeast corner of Hyde 
Park avenue and West River street. The decree called for 
the work to be completed Dec, 26, 1898. 

At a town meeting held September 7 list, the town ap- 
propriated $17,000 to pay for the land damages and con- 
struction ; work was soon after commenced, and is now 
practically complete except part of the new bridge over 
Stony Brook, delayed by the unfavorable weather. We 
expect to complete it within the appropriation. 

In the widening, land was taken from twenty different 
estates, and a settlement has already been made with most 
of the owners. The Selectmen have personally attended to 
this matter, and expect an early settlement with all without 



the expense and delay of law. When all claims are settled, 
and the construction approved by the commissioners, the 
county of Norfolk is to pay to the town $5908. 

RE.1DVILLE GRADE CROSSINGS. 

The work of abolishing the grade crossings at Readville 
and building the new bridge at Allen street has been pushed 
rapidly forward during the past year, and is now nearing 
completion. By the State Auditor's report it appears that 
for- these changes there has been expended in Hyde Park to 
Nov. 1, 1898, about $600,000, and it is estimated that when 
completed the cost will be about $1,000,000, exclusive of 
land damages. According to the Act of Legislature the 
town's proportion is 13 1-2 per cent., divided into annual 
payments covering 20 years. The first payment is due in 
1899. Realizing the great importance of this work and the 
large expenditure involved, experts have been employed by 
us to protect the town's interests. 

TOWN PROPERTY. 

In June authority was voted the Selectmen to sell the 

Thatcher street land. As no offer satisfactory to the Board 

was received, no sale was made. The stone crushing plant 

is in good condition and has done satisfactory work during 

the year. About 200 tons of crushed stone are now on 

hand. The steam roller has been of great benefit to the 

town in completing the new streets. Two new carls were 

purchased this year and an addition built to the carriage 

shed of the street department. The valuation of the town 

property is about the same as given in the inventory of last 

year. 

TOWN ROOMS. 

The increase in town business and accommodations need- 
ed tor our new officials, Superintendent of Schools and In- 
spector of Buildings, made it necessary to have additional 



room in Union Block. Rooms were rented and fitted up 
for town purposes. The vault for the storage of the town 
records is now inadequate to the needs, and Ave call the at- 
tention of the town to the necessity of providing additional 
vault room for the proper arrangement and protection of 
the towu records, as required by law. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

The Selectmen reappointed James McKay as Chief of 
Police and the patrolmen of last year, all of whom have ren- 
dered the town efficient service and to the satisfaction of 
the Board. The Chief's report in detail will be found on 
another page. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The Board appointed as Engineers Benjamin Rafter, J. 
C. McDougald and John H. Wetherbee, and under their 
able management the department is in a most satisfactory 
condition, always ready to promptly respond and faithfully 
perform the difficult work whenever summoned. The report 
of the Engineers, with a list of the fires, will be found on 
another page. 

ACTIONS AT LAW. 

Lomelia A. Bickford, admrx. of the estate of Levi B. 
Bickford, vs. Town of Hyde Park. Action to recover taxes 
paid by deceased on real estate on East River streets, not 
owned by deceased, more fully described in last Town re- 
port, was argued at the November sitting of the Supreme 
Judicial Court. No. decision has been rendered. 

Lomelia A. Bickford vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Petition that she be awarded damages for the injuries to 
her premises and well thereon, more fully described in last 
Town report, was tried at the May sitting of the Superior 
Court at Dedham, and a verdict ordered for the Town. The 
plaintiff's exceptions to the Court's rulings were argued at 



10 

the November sitting of the Supreme Judicial Court on 
questions of law. No decision has yet been rendered. 

Emily R. Hawes vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Petition returnable, Norfolk Superior Court, August, 
1898, that she be awarded damages for injuries done to her 
premises and to a well thereon by reason of the construction 
of a sewer on Dana avenue. This petition is still pending. 

Mary A. White vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Action of contract to recover $1000, more fully described 
in last Town report, was tried at the May sitting of the 
Superior Court at Dedham, and a verdict returned by the 
jury for the Town. Plaintiff filed a motion for new trial 
and same was overruled by the Court after hearing and 
judgment has been entered on the verdict. 

Daniel A. Murray vS. Town of Hyde Park. 

Susan M. Harlow vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Willam H. Tooher vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Draxanna Fairbairn vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Four land damage petitions described in the last Town 
report, all growing out of a decree of the County Commis- 
sioners, were settled in November, 1898, by filing a disclaimer 
and upon payment to petitioners of taxable costs. 

Patrick Hayes vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Action of tort, claiming damages in $2000 by reason ot 
plaintiff falling over a rail on Walnut street, more fully 
described in last Town report, was tried at the October sit- 
ting of the Superior Court at Dedham, the jury returning a, 
verdict for the Town. 

November 12, 1896, betterment petitions were filed in 
Norfolk Superior Court by the following named persons? 
appeals from assessments on account of the construction of 
Warren avenue and Highland street, more fully described 
in last Town report : 



11 

George S* Lee, Trustee Antoinnette N. Higgins 

Warren S. Hill Fannie M. Frost 

Bessie L. Alden Fred A. Foster 

Stuart F. Weld Edward P. Church 

Warren avenue. 

Alfred Foster Carrie L. V. White 

Helen Bryant Frank E. Bowie 

Lydia M. Hatch 

Highland street. 

These cases have been settled by compromise pursuant 
to the direction of the Selectmen. 

Mary A. E. Murphy vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

John J. Loud vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Are petitions for land damages on account of the con- 
struction of Westminster street. 

These petitions were entered in the Superior Court in 
November, 1898, and are now pending. 

Eliza G. Washburn vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Maria A. Eustis vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Jennie F. Hurter vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Mary M. Bursch vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Four land damage petitions returnable Norfolk Superior 
Court, November, 1898. Petitioners claim damages on ac- 
count of constructing a town sewer through their land near 
the Neponset river in the Fairmount district. These peti- 
tions have been referred to Charles A. Williams, Esq., of 
Brookline, as auditor. 

Forty-nine other petitions were brought, and are now 
pending in the Superior Court for Norfolk County, against 
the Town, for the purpose of determining the amount of 
damages to the petitioners' real estate on account of the abol- 
ishment of grade crossings. Under the provisions of the 
statute the Town pays 13 1-2 per cent., and the Common- 
wealth and the Railroad the remainder of the expense of 



12 
i;he abolishment of the grade crossings at Readville and the 

© © 

extension of Glenwood avenue. All petitions on account 
of change of grade and extension of street have been refer- 
red to Charles A. Williams, Esq., of Brookline, and Daniel 
-C. Linscott, Esq., of Boston, as auditors. 

The construction and extention of Glenwood avenue 
across the N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. and the improvements 
in relation to the abolishment of grade crossings necessitated 
the taking of land from the following named persons. Pe- 
titions were brought in the Superior Court in the name of 
the Town for the purpose of determining the amount of 
the damage to which each respondent is entitled : 

James Nolan George Whitcomb 

James Collins John P. Dunn 

Patrick Gilmartin Susan Mullen 

Rebecca B. Slafter Timothy Burns 
Dennis Burns 

The cases of Collins, Gilmartin, Dunn, Whitcomb and 
Mullen were settled without trial, amounts being agreed 

© © 

upon. The cases of Timothy Burns and Dennis Burns were 
heard by the auditor. Timothy Burns desired a jury to 
pass upon his case, and it was heard at the January, 1899, 
sitting, the jury assessing damages at $1839, which includes 
interest. The case of Slafter is pending before the auditor, 
but has not been heatd. The case of Nolan has been heard 
by the auditor, who assessed damages in $621.61, including 
Interest. 

George S. Lee, Tr., vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

George S. Lee, Admr., vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Lola B. Page vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

James S. Coveney vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Lemuel B. French vs. Town of Hyde Park. 

Real Estate & Building Co. vs. Town of Hyde Park. 



13 

Petitions for damages by decree of County Commission- 
ers in December, 1896, relocating and changing grade of 
Hyde Park avenue. The cases of French and Coyeney have 
been disposed of by payment of petitioners' taxable costs. 
The other four cases are still pending. 

Inhabitants of Hyde Park vs. Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts. 

To the taking in 1894 by the Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sioners of about 10 acres of land within the Stony Brook 
Reservation, more fully described in previous town reports. 
This case was entered for trial. The Selectmen called a. 
town meeting for instruction, and it was voted that they ac- 
cept $500 per acre for the same, which they have done. 

In conclusion we call attention to the several assessments 
for Metropolitan improvements ; payments have been made 
on the High level sewer, for the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict, and the Metropolitan sewer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK B. RICH, 
STILLMAN E. NEWELL, 
EDWARD Q. DYER, 
JOHN JOHNSTON, 
FRED Y. FRENCH, 

Selectmen of Hyde Park. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE TOWN CLERK'S RECORD 
OF TOWN MEETINGS. 



The following statement shows in a condensed form the 
action of the town on the various articles which have been 
before it for consideration the past year. 



February 2, 1898, a Town Meeting was held in Casino 
Hall, when the following articles were acted upon : 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Charles G. Chick, Esq., was chosed moderator. 

Art. 2. "To see if the town will vote to increase the 
number of the School Committee from six, as now consti- 
tuted, to nine, by adding one to each class to hold office ac- 
cording to the tenure of the class to which they are severally 
chosen." 

Voted to so increase. 

Art. 3. "To see if the town will ratify the vote passed 
by it December 15, 1897, providing for the issue of bonds 
for Public Library purposes, to the amount of $25,000, and 
will authorize the issue thereof accordingly, and to take any 
other action with regard to such bonds or the issue and pro- 
ceeds thereof." 

Voted to so ratify and authorize; and "that treasurer be also auth- 
orized and instructed to pay over the entire proceeds of said bonds 
for the purposes authorized by said vote." 

Adjourned. 



15 

March 30, 1898, a Town Meeting was held in Waverly 
Hall, when the following Articles were acted upon, viz. : 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Charles G. Chick, Esq., was chosen moderator. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will accept the list of jurors 
as prepared by the Selectmen and posted according to law. 

The list was amended and accepted. 

Art. 3. To hear the report of the Selectmen in regard 
to guide boards, and act thereon. 

Report made and accepted. 

Art. 4. To see what disposition the town will make of 
the money received from dog licenses for the year 1897. 

To the public library for purchase of new books. 

Art. 5. To see what compensation the town will vote 
to pay for collecting its taxes the current year. 

Same as last jear. (1 per cent.) 

Art. 6. To fix the salaries of the town officers for the 
current municipal year. 

Board of Health, $25 each ; no salary voted for School Committee ; 
all of her officers same as last year. 

Art. 7. To determine what compensation shall be 
allowed the Clerk of the Board of Sewer Commissioners for 
the ensuing year. 

Six hundred dollars allowed. 

Art. 8. To fix the compensation of the engineers and 
the several members of the fire department, for their ser- 
vices the current municipal year. 

Chief Engineer, $150; two Assistants, $75 each; four permanent 
men (to include one atReadville), $700 each ; Call Men, $50 each. 

Art. 9. So see what discount the town will vote to 
allow on all taxes paid on or before October 1, 1898 ; and 



16 

what interest the town will vote to charge on taxes for the 

current year, when the same shall be overdue. 

No discount; interest at rate of six per cent, per annum on over- 
due taxes. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will appropriate one hun- 
dred and fifty dollars to Post 121, Grand Army of the Re- 
public, for the expense of decorating the graves of deceased 
soldiers. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 11. "To see what sum the town will appropriate 
for the celebration of the 'Fourth of July,' 1898." 

$250 appropriated therefor. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will appropriate the money 
now in the hands of the Treasurer, received by him as side- 
walk, street or Board of Health assessments or betterments, 
and all money which shall be received by him the cur- 
rent vear on account of such assessments or betterments, 
for the purpose of constructing or repairing public ways. 

So appropriated. . 

Art. 13. To see if the town will appropriate the money 
to be received this year by the Town Treasurer, for or on 
account of Corporation and National Bank Taxes, for the 
payment of the tire hydrant service of the town. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 14. "To see if the Town will vote to appropriate 
a sum not exceeding Two Thousand Dollars ($2,000) for 
park purposes." 

Indeflnately postponed. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will authorize its Select- 
men to contract with the Hyde Park Electric Light Co., for 
the remainder of the term of our Street Lighting contract, 
for one arc light to be placed on Huntington avenue, be- 
tween River and Westminster streets. 

So authorized. 



1' 



Art. 16. "To see if the town will authorize and in- 
struct the School Committee to appoint a Superintendent of 
Schools." 

So authorized and instructed. Yes 257 ; No 13. 

Art. 17. To see what amount the town will vote to 
raise by taxation, to meet the expenses of the town the cur- 
rent year, the deficiences of last year, and the notes and 
bonds of the town maturing the present year, and how the 
same shall be appropriated. 

Voted to raise by taxation the current year the sum of One hundred 
fifty-three thousand five hundred sixty-five dollars, and to ap- 
propriate the same as follows : 
Support of Schools : 

For Salaries and Fuel, . . . $39,840 00 



" Incidentals, .... 


5,300 00 




" Texc Books and Supplies, 


4,250 00 




" Evening Schools, 


700 00 




" Industrial Schools, 


200 00 


$50,290 00 






For Bonds and Notes maturing 




$10.600 00 


" Interest 


. 


9,000 00 


" Highways 




15,000 00 


" Street Watering, .... 




2,500 00 


" Incidentals, 




9,500 00 


" Police, 




7,500 00 


" Fire Department, .... 




9,075 00 


" Overseers of Poor, . . . . 




6,500 00 


•' Street Lights, ..... 




8,850 00 


" Public Library 




3,f 00 00 


•' Salaries, ...... 




2,950 00 


" Board of Health, .... 




4,000 00 


'• G. A. R. Post 




150 00 


" Insurance, 




800 00 


" Fourth of July . 




250 00 


Voted in 1897, and payable in 1898, 




13,600 00 



$153,565 00 

Art. 18. To see if the town will ask permission of the 
General Court of Massachusetts to issue bonds, notes or 



18 

script to the amount of One Hundred Thousand Dollars 
($100,000.00) under the provisions of the Acts of 1896, 
Chapter 287, Section 9, in addition to the amount provided 
for by said Section. 

Sewer Commissioners authorized to ask for such permission. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will make and adopt By- 
Laws relating to Truants and Neglected Children. 

On motion of Mr. E. I. Humphrey the following By-Law was 
adopted : — 'Habitual truants and children between seven and fifteen 
years of age who may be found wandering about in the streets or pub- 
lic places in the town, having no lawful occupation or business, not 
attending school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children as 
ersistently violate the reasonable rules and regulations of the public 
schools, shall be committed to the Union Truant School at Walpole 
as a place of confinement, discipline and instruction, or to such other 
place as may now or hereafter be provided by law. 1 ' 

Art. 20. To see if the town will vote to choose its Park 
Commissioners by ballot. 

Voted so to choose them. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will authorize its Collector 
of Taxes to use all means of collecting the taxes which a 
Town Treasurer, when appointed a collector may use. 

So authorized. 

Art. 22. To see what amount the town will authorize its 
Treasurer to borrow, in anticipation of the tax to be levied 
the current year. 

Authorized to borrow 190,000 in anticipation of taxes, with approv- 
al of the Selectmen. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will authorize its Treasurer 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money to re- 
new or replace any loan or loans. 

So authorized. 

Adjourned at 9.13 P. M. 



June 22, 1898, a Town Meeting was held in Casino 
Hall, when the following Articles were acted upon : 



19 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Charles G. Chick, Esq., was chosen moderator. 

Art. 2. "To see what action the town will take with 
reference to the purchase of additional land between the 
Hoogs lot, so called, and Everett street, on or near the cor- 
ner of Everett street and Harvard avenue, for the site for 
the Public Library building, aud to appropriate money for 
the purchase of the same, and to authorize the issue of the 
bonds or notes of the town in payment for same." 

The Trustees of the Public Library were authorized to purchase 
this land at a price not exceeding $6500, and said amount was appro- 
priated therefor, to be raised by taxation next year. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will vote to issue any bonds, 
notes or script, and fix the amounts, times of payment, aud 
rate of interest thereof and thereon, and the form thereof, 
pursuant to the provisions of Chapter four hundred and nine- 
teen of the Acts and Resolves of the General Court of Mas- 
sachusetts for the year 1808, the same being entitled "An 
Act to authorize the town of Hyde Park to incur additional 
indebtedness for sewerage purposes," and pass any votes 
relating thereto. 

Voted to issue bonds to the amount of $100,000 of the denomination 
of $1000 each, bearing interest at the rate of 4 per cent, per annum, 
payable in lawful money of the United States, as follows : — Four bonds 
payable each year for sixteen years from date of issue, and three bonds 
payable each year for twelve years next following said sixteen 
years, the loan covering a period of twenty-eight years. Proceeds of 
sale of bords to be applied to defraying expenses incurred in extend- 
ing the sewerage system in this town. (The vote stood 64 Yes ; 14 No.) 

Art. 4. To see if the town will vote to borrow any 
money pursuant to the provisions of said Chapter 419, or of 
Chapter 287, of the Acts and Resolves of the General Court 
of this Commonwealth for the year 1896, the same being 
"an act to authorize the town of Hyde Park to construct 



20 

a system of sewerage and to provide for the payment 
therefor. 

Treasurer authorized to borrow not exceeding $75,000 in anticipa- 
tion of the proceeds from sale of bonds authorized under Article 3» 
above. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen 
to contract with the Hyde Park Electric Light Co., for the 
remainder of the term of our Street Lighting contract, for 
one arc light to be placed on the corner of Neponset avenue 
and Summit street. 

So authorized. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen 
to sell at private sale or public auction, a lot of land situated 
on southerly side of Thatcher street, in this town, and 
known as the "gravel lot," the unused hose house being now 
thereon, and authorize its Selectmen to sign, seal, acknow- 
ledge and deliver in its name and behalf, proper deed or 
deeds to convey the same to the purchaser of said land. 

So authorized. 

Art. 7. To hear the report of the Selectmen laying out 
Norway Park between Summit street and Warren avenue, 
as a public town way, and to see if the town will accept and 
allow said lajnng out, with the boundaries and admeasure- 
ments of said way, as shown by report, plan and profile now 
on file in the town clerk's office, and appropriate money to 
construct the same. 

Report presented and accepted. The layout was allowed and the 
sum of $1200 appropriated (o construct said street ; said amount to be 
raised by taxation next year. 

Adjourned at 9.26 P. M. 



September 7, 1898, a Town Meeting was held in Casino 
Hall, when the following Articles were acted upon : 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

David W. Murray, Esq., was chosen by ballot. 



21 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money sufficient to cany into effect the 
decree of the Couuty Commissioners, dated July 26,1898, 
relocating Hyde Park avenue. 

$17,000 appropriated for this purpose, the same to be raised by 
taxation in 1899. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will authorize its Select- 
men to contract with the Hyde Park Electric Light Co., 
for the remainder of the term of our Street Lighting con- 
tract, for two arc lights ; one to be placed near the corner 
of Garfield avenue and Water street, and one near the cor- 
ner of Warren avenue and Beacon street. 

So authorized. 

Art. 4. To hear the report of the committee appointed 
Dec. 15, 1897, to consider the abolishment of the grade 
crossing of Fairmount avenue and the New England Rail- 
road. 

Report of "progress" made and received. Report recommends 
that town do not "take the initiative in the abolishment of said 
crossing, at the present time." 

Art. 5. "To see if the town will authorize its Board of 
Health to make and enforce in this town such regulations as 
said Board may deem necessary for the safety and health of 
the people with reference to house drainage and its connec- 
tion with public sewers where a public sewer abuts the es- 
tate to be drained." 

So authorized. 
.Art. 6. To see what names, if any, the town will give 
to the 'following "Squares" so called : One at the junction 
of Central avenue. Greenwood avenue, Westminster street 
and Metropolitan avenue; and one at the junction of Hyde 
Park avenue and West River street. 

The first square mentioned in this Article to be called "Greenwood 
square;" and the last square mentioned thereinto be called "Cleary 
square." 

Adjourned at 8 45 P. M. 



22 

November 30, 1898, a Town Meeting was held in Wav- 
erly Hall, when the following Articles were acted upon : 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

David W. Murray, Esq., was chosen by ballot. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will vote to transfer to the 
incidentals the unexpended balance of the street watering 
appropriation. 

So transferred. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will raise and appropriate an 
additional sum for police. 

$500 appropriated to be taken from money in the treasury received 
from fines in criminal cases. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will authorize the Selectmen 
to contract with the Hyde Park Electric Light Company for 
the remainder of the term of our Street Lighting contract 
for lights to be placed as follows : 

One arc light on Summit street; between Milton avenue 
and Fairmount avenue. 

One incandescent light on Wood avenue. 

One incandescent light on Fairmount avenue, between 
Summit street and Prospect street. 

So authorized. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen 
to contract wilh the Hyde Park Water Company for the re- 
mainder of the term of the town's contract with said Com- 
pany for a fire hydrant to be located near Cleary square. 

So authorized. 

Art. 6. To see what action the town will take in relation 
to case entitled "inhabitants of Hyde Park vs. Common- 
wealth," pending in Superior Court, Norfolk County, for 
the value of about ten acres of land in what is known as 



23 

"Happy Valley," taken by the Metropolitan Park Commis- 
sioners as a part of the Stony Brook Reservation. 

Selectmen instructed to accept the offer ol $500 per acre, made by 
the defendent in this case. 

Adjourned at 10 P. M. 



A NEW BY-LAW. 

By-Law, adopted by the town since the publication of the 
By-Laws in the "Town Report" of last year : 

Habitual truants and children between seven and fifteen years of 
age who may be fount wandering about the streets or public places 
in the town, having no lawful occupation or business, not attending 
school, and growing up in ignorance, and such children as persis- 
tently violate the reasonable rules and regulations of the public 
schools, shall be committed to the Union Truant School at W alpole, 
as a place of confinement, discipline and instruction, or to such other 
place as may now or hereafter be provided by law. 

The foregoing By-Law was adopted by the said town of 
Hyde Park, at a meeting of its legal voters held in Waverly 
Hall, in said town, March 30, A.D., 1898, and was approved 
by the Superior Court for the County of Norfolk, on May 
23, A. D., 1898. Attest: 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF STREETS. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — I herewith submit my report for the year 
ending January 31, 1899. 

During the year there have been extensive repairs made 
on many of our streets. Good material was obtained from 
the town stone crushing plant ; 4500 feet of new paved 
gutters have been laid and 1800 feet of old gutters relaid. 
I recommend that the work of repairing old gutters be con- 
tinued as many are in very bad condition, and I also sug- 
gest more new ones. Twenty-two new cross-walks have 
been put down in various parts of the town. We have con- 
structed four new catch-basins and rebuilt several of the old. 
ones which were found too small to take care of the water. 
There were about 450 feet of edge stone set and new side- 
walks constructed. Nineteen new iron sign posts have been 
erected to replace the old wooden ones. One new push 
cart was purchased, making two in use during the summer. 
They have done good work keeping the papers and rubbish 
out of the gutters. I recommend the extension of this ser- 
vice. The water carts, double and single carts, and' stone 
jigger are all in first-class repair. The five horses in this 
department are in excellent condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY M. PH1PPS, 
Superintendent of Streets. 



SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PARK 
COMMISSIONERS. 



1. We do not recommend the appropriation of any 
money for park purposes this year, for the reason that the 
taxes must necessarily be large owing to the appropriations 
already made for the public library and for widening Hyde 
Park avenue. 

We feel it proper to ask, however, that any sum of money 
which may be paid to our town by the Metropolitan Park 
Commission for land taken, shall be appropriated to park 
purposes. We had an appropriation in 1894 of two thou- 
sand dollars, which is all we ever had ; and of that, there 
is now an unexpended balance of $1571.35. 

The expenses of the Board the past year, as usual, have 
been light. Our hearings have been held in the Select- 
men's room, and our usual meetings at the house of one of 
the members, and, consequently, we have had no rent to 
pay, and the custom of permitting the Chairman and Secre- 
tary to defray all the expenses for stationery and postage 
has again prevailed. Members also have, as usual, either 
walked or paid their own car fare when travelling upon 
business in relation to parks or trees on public grounds. 

Many meetings have been held and much labor performed 
since this Board was first organized. We have never had 
any salary. Our present Secretary has, free of charge, 
even posted notices of hearings in seven public places and 
one on each tree which petitioners desired to cut. While 
we have been willing to look over the town roads to ascer- 



26 

tain just where limbs ought to be cut on shade trees, not 
being furnished with an axe, either public or private, we 
have been obliged to hire a man to trim a few trees, and 
have also paid for copying for publication the stenographic 
report of the admirable speech of Mr. de Las Casas, Chair- 
man of the Metropolitan Park Commission, delivered at 
Hyde Park on September 22, 1898. The total expenditure 
of the past year has been fifteen dollars. 

2. We have had before us during 1898 five petitions for 
permission to cut shade trees. In every case the statutory 
notices were given and a public hearing held. In all but 
one case it was clear to the Board that the petitions should 
be granted. 

The Selectmen asked leave to cut a tree on Dana avenue, 
and one of our Board took pains to see the residents living 
in that neighborhood about it, and yet only one person ap- 
peared in opposition at the hearing, and he, after listening 
to the evidence of the petitioners, concluded that it was best 
to permit the cutting of the tree rather than to impede the 
work of the Selectmen, who proposed to pave the gutters if 
the tree was cut. However, after permission was granted 
by a majority vote of the Board, a petition was started in 
that vicinity asking that the tree should not be removed. 
But the tree was cut before any remonstrance was fully pre- 
pared, and therefore neither our Board uor the Selectmen 
were officially informed of the character or weight of the 
objections. This shows the necessity of attending the public 
hearings if any one has objections to the cutting of a tree. 
The Board has to act on the evidence befere it, but invites 
the fullest discussions at all its hearings. 

3. The Metropolitan Park Commissioners have taken all 
the land in Hyde Park necessary for a parkway connecting 
Stony Brook Reservation, by way of Paul's Bridge, with the 
Blue Hills. It has always seemed to us that this ought to 



27 

have been done in connection with the abolition of grade 
crossings at Readville, and we urged this in all proper ways ; 
but, as it was not then done, we commend the taking of 
the land (most of which is not valuable), and hope that, at 
some time, the way will be constructed. 

The Metropolitan Park Commission have also constructed 
a road through Stony Brook Reservation, commencing at 
Brainard street in Hyde Park, and ending at Washington 
street, Boston. The work is well done and we find here 
just such a use of money as the public like to commend. 
This furnishes to our town another very delightful walk or 
drive. 

4. From its inception this Board has favored a parkway 
along the banks of the Neponset river. Last spring, by in- 
vitation of Dr. Samuel A. Tuttle, our Representative in 
1898, the Metropolitan Park Commission and the Committee 
on Metropolitan Affairs of the Legislature, came out to look 
over the situation in connection with the Blue Hills, the 
Neponset river and the Canton meadows. With many of 
our citizens, we joined with Dr. Tuttle in urging upon the 
Committee on Metropolitan Affairs the importance of this 
work. The Committee was convinced of the necessity of 
taking the banks of the Neponset river, from the standpoint 
of health, and of the value of a boulevard along its borders 
which were made beautiful by the Creator, but are marred 
at some points by the handiwork of man. 

Upon the recommendation ot the Committee, a general 
appropriation of one million dollars was made, having in 
view the expenditure of several hundred thousand dollars of 
it along the Neponset. Many of our citizens united in in- 
viting the Chairman of the Metropolitan Park Commission 
and others to address us upon this and kindred subjects. 
It is no disparagament to the other able speeches made at 
the time of the public meeting held in response to this in- 



28 

vitation, to say that his speech placed the subject before us 
in a clear, forcible and practicable way and ought to be 
read by all our citizens. We append to this report extracts 
relating to the Neponset river, and regret that there is not 
room for the whole speech. 

While the construction of this proposed boulevard will 
cost something, it will increase the value of land which it 
will develop, and cause buildings to be put up so that we 
shall at once begin to realize upon the investment. We 
heartily favor the taking of the land now and the construc- 
tion of the roadway in the near future. 

The Metropolitan Park Commission have manifested a 
strong desire to undertake this work in accordance with the 
spirit of the appropriation, but, at the same time, are un- 
willing to pay exhorbitant prices for the land needed. 
They have prepared a plan of all the land they desire along 
the banks of the Neponset, and have prepared for each 
owner a description and a plan of his land which they wish 
to purchase, and have requested them to give them an option. 
Some of the owners have been generous, and most of them 
have only asked such prices as they would expect from their 
neighbors for the same land. In a few cases, no option has 
been given. , We feel that this is an inprovement which is 
very desirable for Hyde Park and Boston, as well as neces- 
sary to a proper completion of the parkways uniting the 
Boston Park System to the Blue Hills. 

The trial at Dedham of a case brought to determine the 
value of certain land taken in Stony Brook Reservation, 
tends to prove that Norfolk juries will not burden the Com- 
monwealth with exhorbitant claims for damages where land 
is taken for public use, and a recent decision of a jury 
in relation to land taken in Milton for park purposes seems 
to confirm this idea. We, therefore, hope that the Metro- 
politan Park Commission will take the land along the Ne- 



29 

ponset by the right of eminent domain, and where owners 
ask too much, will bring it before a jury to fix a fair price. 
At the same time, we hope that all the owners will finally 
be willing to accept what is reasonable and thus aid the 
town and the Commonwealth to improve and make attrac- 
tive the community iu which we live. 

EXTRACT FROM SPEECH OF WILLIAM B. de LAS CASAS 
CHAIRMAN OF METROPOLITAN PARK COMMISSION, DE- 
LIVERED IN HYDE PARK, MASS., SEPTEMBER 22, 189S. 

Last year the Metropolitan Park Commission recom- 
mended that provision be made lor acquiring lands in 
addition to those on Charles river, tor those on Mystic 
and Neponset rivers, considered as spots of particular . 
beauty. It' only the shores of one such place were to be 
provided, naturally the Charles river is the first river in 
the district; naturally the Commission reported and 
said that that must be attended to first. Everybody ac. 
quie^ced in that and recognized it, just as they did when 
we said: If there is to be but one beaoh, when all con- 
siderations are taken into account, Revere Beach is the 
beach which can be most easily reached, which is the 
best when you get to it and can be of use to the largest 
number of people. But the Commission last year went 
to the Legislature and said that "If the work is to <>o 
any further they recommend that provision be made to 
enable something to be done upon the Neponset river 
and upon the Mystic river." As I understood it, it is 
quite true that, when the matter carae into considera- 
tion before the committees, it was understood on all the 
bills that were there, and they united them into a general 
appropriation, that they were making provision which, 
on an estimate of tax values and of a percentage of cost 
for the lands upon the river, those which seemed to be 
available, was sufficient to provide for acquiring lands, 
substantially all that would be required upon the Mystic 
and the- Neponset rivers. In that spirit the Metropolitan 
Park Commission, I will say frankly to you to-day, take 
you into their confidence and say that the Metropolitan 
Park Commission have proceeded diligently with their 



30 

study and consideration of how they could best apply 
those funds, make them go the farthest and produce the 
greatest benefit to the district and to this community in 
the acquirement of lands along the Neponset river, 
(applause.) 

I am not hear by any means to have you draw from 
what I say the conclusion that the Metropolitan Park 
Commission is not going to spend any money on the 
Neponset river unless you come forward and show your 
interest by appropriating $50,000, or doing something 
of that sort. That is not our business at all. ')ur busi- 
ness is to consider the problem and do the very best we 
can. We know there is a bad problem here. We have 
been up and down the river. We know what the state 
board of health said. We know that there is a matter 
here that ought to be remedied and ought to be con- 
sidered. But, I have said, as trustees of the state it is 
our business, not to acquire this particular spot or that 
particular spot along this river, but to acquire that 
which will give the people the largest amount of the 
river for the money which we are able to devote to the 
purpose and which will acquire, as far as possible, the 
most critical points where there is pollution or where 
there are bad effects to be seen from the shore, and that 
is what we are trying to study and trying to figure out. 
You, gentlemen, can co-operate, not by making appro- 
priations, unless you are disposed to do it, but by mak- 
ing it j'our business to stir up a public sontiment which 
shall demand that the shores of the river, where they are 
wanted, shall be sold at as reasonable prices as individ- 
uals sell those to other individuals. 

********** 

The Neponset river is naturally beautiful. It is nat- 
rally a playground, a pleasure ground, a breathing space, 
which you ought to have in its beauty, in its purity, and 
in all that goes to mate you happy and blessed in it. 
That does not mean, gentlemen, (for sometimes people 
get false impressions in their minds), that does not 
mean that industries are to be interfered with. It does 
not mean that there is any spirit on the part of the Com- 
monwealth or of the state to come here and wipe out in- 



31 

dustries that happen to be located along the river. It 
does not mean that you are to have to go somewhere else 
to find your job or that the people who own those facto- 
ries and buildings along the river are to be obliged to 
give those up and go elsewhere. Nothing of the sort. 
That never enters into it. Where the people are ready 
and willing and desirous to abandon those, then it be- 
comes a fair question whether they shall be purchased or 
not ; but the park business should never interfere with 
the legitimate business of the community. But when it 
becomes a question of whether you shall locate confec- 
tionery shops or something else out over the edge of 
your river, then I tell you, gentlemen, it does become a 
question of common interest (applause), and I take it 
that you can decide whether such improvements as that 
are legitimate and may be advantageously carried out in 
your midst. I thank you for your attention. (Great 
applause). 

WILBUR H. POWERS, Chairman. 
LAWSON B. BIDWELL, Secretary. 
JOHN J. ENNEKING. 

Park Commissioners of Hyde Park. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE HYDE 
PARK PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



For many years, it has been customary in the annual re- 
port of the Trustees to allude to the lack of suitable accom- 
modations for our Public Library. It is a great pleasure to 
us to be permitted to omit this annual subject in this year's 
report, and it is a far greater pleasure for your Trustees to 
call your attention to the new library building now in pro- 
cess of erection on Harvard avenue. 

As stated in last year's report, we issued to architects 
our circular letter of requirements, of which the following 
is a copy : — 

HYDE PARK, MASS., January 21, 1898. 

The Committee appointed by the Trustees of the Hyde 
Park Public Library to obtain designs for a new library 
building offer the following suggestions to architects de- 
siring to enter an open competition tor such Design. 

SITUATION.— The lot is 100 feet square, level, and on 
the same grade as the adjoining streets. It is bounded 
westerly by Harvard avenue, 40 feet wide; and southerly 
by Winthrop street, about 35 feet wide. The building 
should front on Harvard avenue. 

BASEMENT. — The basement should contain the heat- 
ing apparatus and fuel room ; also a portion of the stack- 
room aS hereinafter specified. 

THE FIRST FLOOR.— This should contain (a) a 
reading room, (6) a juvenile reading room, each to have 
cases for reference and other books around the walls and 
under the windows, (c) a delivery room, (d) a librarian's 
room, (e) a stack-room. 

The reading room and delivery room, while they need 
not be in wholly separate rooms, should be so far discon- 
nected that slight noise or conversation in one may not 
seriously disturb the occupants of the other rooms. 



33' 

The stack-room should be twenty-one feet in height, 
seven feet of which is to be below the level of the first 
floor, i. e. in the^basement. The outside walls of this 
room should contain an air space. 

The centres ot the windows on the sides of this room 
should be 52 inches apart, and the ground floor area 
should be not less than 900 square feet. 

THE SECOND FLOOR.— This should contain a small 
hall with a floor-area of 1000 square feet more or less ; 
also a trustees 1 room. 

The stairway leading to the second stoiw should be so 
arranged that it can be shut off from the rooms of the 
first floor. 

There must be two toilet rooms in the building. 

MATERIAL. — The material is to be brick with stone 
or terra-cotta trimmings, 

COST— The cost is not to exceed $20,000 exclusive of 
the book-stacks, which lorm "ro part of this design. 

The plans should be on a 1-4 inch scale and are to con- 
sist of 

(a) The elevations of each side in outline. 

(6) The basement and two floor plans. 

(c) Across section of the reading room and of the 

hall. 

(d) A perspective view of the street sides. 

There should accompany each set of plans a type-writ- 
ten description giving information concerning materials, 
methods of construction, decoration, lighting, heating, 
ventilation, etc. 

There shall also be an estimate of the cost, and in case 
such estimate shall be exceeded by over 15 per cent, by 
the estimate? of such contractor or contractors as the 
Committee may select the design may be rejected. 

Each drawing and the description shall be distinguished 
only by a motto or device which shall be repeated on the 
outside of a sealed envelope containing the author's 
name and address. 

TIME.— All designs and descriptions are to be de- 
livered at the Hyde Park Public Library Rooms, Hyde 
Park, Mass., not later than 9 o'clock P. M., Monday, 
February 21, 1898, directed to the Committee on Plans 
and Estimates. 



34 

No plans not conforming to the foregoing will be con-, 
sidered and the Committee reserve the right to reject 
any and all designs which may be submitted. 

The Committee will decide as quickly as possible 
which design they select and notify the authors of other 
designs that their designs are ready to be returned and 
await their orders. 

COMPENSATION.— The Committee agree to pay 5 per 
cent, on the cost of the work executed from the selected 
architect's design for full professional services, and no 
compensation shall be given to those whose designs are 
not accepted. 

For the Committee, 

VVM. H. ALLES, Secretary. 

Our invitation was rewarded with thirty-five (35) sets of 
plans. 

We had submitted to us very many excellent designs, 
though a careful figuring proved that some of them were far 
beyond the amount of our appropriation. After many 
weeks' consideration, during which we sought the aid of 
expert advice, your Board unanimously selected the plans 
of Messrs. Clark and Russell of Boston, as being on the 
whole best suited to our needs, both exterior and interior 
beino; considered. 

The contract for construction was awarded to Mr. George 
Howard of Brockton, Mass., who was the lowest bidder 
and whom we found on investigation to bear a most excel- 
lent reputation as a builder. The contract was signed June 
29, 1898, and work immediately commenced and, barring 
some unavoidable delays, has progressed in an exceedingly 
satisfactory manner, leading us to hope that the dedication 
of the new building will occur in May of the present year. 

It soon became evident to the Trustees that the original 
lot purchased was too small to contain a suitable building, 
and on their recommendation the Town generously added 
the adjoining lot, and we think no one will regret that this 
action was taken. 



35 

In June, 1898, we employed an expert cataloguer to take 
charge of the re-classification of the books and the formation 
of a classified card catalogue. This work has been going 
on under her direction, with the aid of the regular force, 
and we hope it may be successfully completed without the 
necessity of closiug the library on this account. 

Early in the year we lost by death the assistance and co- 
operation of Mr. David C. Marr, who had been for many 
years one of our fellow-trustees. He was a man of genial 
manners and wide reading, and was always fertile in his 
suggestions for increasing the facilities of the library. The 
vacancy was filled by the unanimous election of Mr. John 
W. Griffin. 

In April, 1898, the following letter was received from 

Mr. Henry S. Grew : — 

BOSTON, April 4, 1898. 
Chairman of the Board ol" Trustees o: Hyde 
Park PuMic Library : 
Dear Sir: 

Understanding that the appropriation made at a recent 
town meeting is not likely to coverall the cost of erect- 
ing and fitting up the new library building, I wish as a 
citizen of Hyde Park, to contribute the sum ot one 
thousand dollars toward that object or the purchase of 
books, as may seem best to its Trustees. I am 
Yours very truly, 

HENRY S. GREW. 

At a meeting held by the Trustees, April 9, 1898, it was 
voted to accept the gift, and the Secretary was instructed to 
return the thanks of the Board for same. 

The Trustees wish to publicly express their gratitude to 
Mr. Grew for his gift to the Library, and venture to hope . 
that this gift is the forerunner of other recognition, by 
present and former residents of the town, of the benefits of 
the Public Library. 

A summary of the Librarian's reports for the past year is 
as follows : 



36 

Number of books returned, . . . . 35,318 

Number of books borrowed 35,268 

Amount received in fines $35.46 

Number of cards issued 427 

N.imber of magazines used in the reading room, 1,085 
Number of books used in the reading room, . 624 

The number of books borrowed in excess of 1897-98 was 1258. 
The number of cards issued exceeds the number issued in 1897-98 
by 27. 

681 books were added to the Library, Including 28 bound volumes 
of magazines and a few books were donated. 138 books were re- 
placed in addition to the above 681. 

The following is a list of the additions to the Library by 

gift: 

United States, 33 vols., 3 pamphlets. 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 21 vols. 1 pamphlet. 
Robert C. Winihrop, 1 vol. 
Charles M. Smith, 1 vol. 

Somerville Public Library, 1 catalogue, 2 pamphlets and monthly 
bulletin. 

Boston Transit Commission, 2 vols. 

Walter G. Chase, 1 pamphlet. 

Mass. Institute of Technology, 1 catalogue. 

Salem Public Library, 2 class lists. . • 

Concord, (Mass.) Public Library, 1 pamphlet. 

Forbes Public Library, Northampton, 1 pamphlet. 

Fall River Public Library, 1 pamphlet. 

Hatch Experimental Station, 1 pamphlet. 

Charles F. Light, 1 vol. 

Fleming H. Revel Co., 1 vol. 

Trustees of Public Reservation, 7th annual report. 

City of Chelsea, 1 vol. 

Walter A. Davis, 1 vol. 

Scots' Charitable Society, 1 vol. 

Joseph Semms, 1 vol. 

Soldiers' Home, 1 pamphlet. 

Respectfully submitted, for the Trustees, 

WM. H. ALLES, Chairman. 



37 













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-i 

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Co 
















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B 

B 





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*■ I 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS' REPORT. 



The receipts and expenditures for the financial year end- 
ing January 31, 1899, have been as follows : 



ReCEIPTS. 








Sale of lots, 




$1,565 00 




Sale of single graves, 




295 00 




Interment and receiving tomb chai 


■ges, 


542 00 




Foundations for monuments, 




198 89 




Sewer award, 


' 


120 25 




Wood, 




4 00 




Balance from last year, 




4,065 64 


$6,790 78 


- 




EXPENSES. 








Labor, etc., 




$1,503 98 




Paid for land, 




764 47 






hand, 




2.268 45 


Balance on 


$4,522 33 



A detailed statement of the receipts and expenditures 
accompanies this report. 

Grading and preparing lots has been continued during 
the year, completing work commenced last year. Beech 
avenue has been opened, but owing to the cold weather 
early in the season no lots have been completed on this 
avenue. 

The Commissioners feel that it is now time that some 
action should be taken to provide a permanent fund to be 
taken from the funds from the sale of lots, and invested, the 
income to be used for>the care and adornment of the cem- 
etery. Proper regulations will be submitted for the ap- 
proval of the town during the coming year. 



39 



STATISTICS. 












1892 


1893 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 


total 


No. of lots sold, 16 


16 


19 


29 


21 


27 


17 


148 


No. of single graves sold, 










81 


59 


140 


Interments in lots, ' 10 


40 


16 


39 


28 


39 


27 


199 


Interments in singie graves, 


22 


32 


59 


9S 


6S 


78 


357 


In receiving tomb, 




11 


9 


15 


9 


27 




Removals, 










2 


3 


5 


CLARENCE 


u. 


MEIGGS, 





CHARLES F. JENNEY, 
GEORGE E. WHITING, 

Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — Following is a report of the business trans- 
acted in the office of Inspector of Buildings for the nine 
months of the year from May 1, 1898, to January 31, 1899 : 

Permits issued for the erection of new buildings, . 62 
Permits issued for extensions and alterations, * . . 15 
Notices issued in writing- to persons who had com- 
menced operations without a permit, ... 17 
Visits made to the various buildings in process of 
erection, extension and alteration; waste boxes, back 
yards, wood working and machine shops, . . . 170 

There has been a decided improvement in the construc- 
tion of buildings, and the care of combustible material since 
the new By-Laws have been in force, and when it becomes 
generally known that such laws are in effect we shall have 
very little trouble in having the law complied with as in- 
tended. 

I wish to extend my sincere thanks to the Board of 
Selectmen for the courtesy shown me, to the contractors 
and others whom I have met in my official capacity, and to 
Henry B. Terry, Esq., who has been ready at all times to 
render legal advice. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD F. BOYNTON, 

Inspector of Buildings. 



POLICE REPORT. 

To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — The annual report of this Department for 
the financial year ending January 31, 1899, is respectfully 
submitted herewith : 



Whole number of persons arrested, 


255 


Males, 


244 


Females, 


11 


CAUSES FOR ARREST. 




Assault and battery, 


39 


Assault on an officer, 


1 


Assault (felonious), 


1 


Assault with a dangerous weapon, 


3 


Arson, 


3 


Bastardy, 


2 


Being armed with a dangerous weapon, 


1 


Being present whare cards were played on the 


Lord's day, 


8 


Committing a nuisance, 


1 


Concealing mortgaged property, 


1 


Disturbing the peace, 


7 


Disturbing a public meeting, 


1 


Drunkenness, 


99 


Escaped prisoner, 


1 


Evading car fare, 


2 


Embezzlement, 


2 


Fast driving, 


2 


Indecent exposure, 


1 


Insane, 


5 


Keeping unlicensed dog, 


1 


Lewd and lascivious, 


1 


Loiterer, 


1 


Larceny, 


9 


Malicious injury to personal property, 


1 


Malicious injury to real estate, 


4 


Run-away boys, 


3 



42 

Riding a bicycle on the sidewalk, 19 

Stubborn child, 2 

Suspicion, 1 

Tramp, 1 

Truancy, 2 
Unlawful appropriation, • 2 

Vagabond, 1 

Vagrancy, ' 9 

Violation of the liquor law, 17 

Trespass, 1 



NATIVITY t OF PERSONS ARRESTED. 

Australia, 2 

Canada, 7 

England, 4 

Germany, 2 

Italy, 29 

Ireland, 49 

Norway, 1 

Newfoundland, 2 

Nova Scotia, 8 

New Brunswick, 2 

Poland, 1 

Prince Edward Isle. 2 

Scotland, 12 

Sweden, 6 

United States, 128 



255 



255 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Travellers lodged in station house over night, 3,316 

Cases investigated without arrest, 197 

Cases investigated for other officers, 11 

Stores found open and made secure, 14 

Lost children found and restored to parents, 18 

Dead bodies found, 3 

Defects in streets and sidewalks reported, 42 

Street lights reported not burning, 457 

Search warrants served for stolen goods, . 3 

Search Warrants served for gaming implements, 2 

Search Warrants served for intoxicating liquors, 27 
Amount of fines imposed by Court, $1,716.00 



43 



Number of persons fined 
Imprisonment imposed by Court, 
Average of lines imposed, 
Amount of liquor seized, 



134 

5 years, 8 months, 10 days, 
$12.80 
132 gallons. 



FINAL DISPOSITION OF CASES. 

Paid fines, 89 
Committedd to House of Correction for non-payment fines, 40 

Committed to House of Correction by Court, 17 

Cases placed on file, 26 

Nol prossed, 1 

Committed to Insane Asylum, 4 

Turned over to parents, 3 

Ended by marriage, 1 

Cases dismissed for want of prosecution, 5 

Discharged, 13 

Held for grand jury, , 9 

Appealed. 6 

Turned over to other officers, 5 

Committed to Lyman school for boys, 3 

Placed on probation, 30 

Committed to Dipsomaniac hospital, 1 

Defaulted, 1 

Committed to Walpole truant school, 1 



255 



The police force during the past year has consisted of 
seven men, five being assigned to all night duty, and I 
would respectfully recommend that it be maintained at that 
number at least. I would also renew my recommendation 
of last year that the fines received by the town in criminal 
cases be placed to the credit of the Police Department for 
maintenance of the station house and for criminal expenses. 

I desire to express to the members of the police force my 
appreciation of the cordial relations existing among them, 
and to the Board of Selectmen my sincere thanks for their 
aid and courtesy upon all occasions. 

JAMES McKAY, 

Chief of Police. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Number of births registered in Hyde Park in 1898 . . 391 

Males 196 

Females • 195 

The parentage of the children is as follows : 

Both parents American 136 

Irish 41 

Scotch 9 

English . . . . . . . . . 6 

Swedes 1 

Russian . . 7 

* 

German 7 

Italian 8 

of British Provinces 46 

Mixed, one parent American . . . . . . . 100 

Both parents ot other nationalities 30 

Born in January, 36; February, 35: March, 33; April, 35; May 

23; June, 41; July, 38 ; August, 31 ; September, 32 ; October, 28 ; 

November, 30; December, 29. 

MARRIAGES. 

Number of intentions of marriages issued in 1898 . . . 122 

" marriages registered in 1898 125 

Oldest groom 52 

Oldest bride 44 

Youngest groom : 19 

Youngest bride 18 

Both parties born in United States 57 

Ireland 6 

England 1 

Italy 2 

Sweden 1 

British Provinces 16 

other foreign countries .... 9 

Foreign and American .... 33 
Married in January, 12; February, 4; March, 8; April, 9; May, 1; 
June, 24; July. 7; August, 2; September, 20; October, 17; Novem- 
ber, 19 ; December, 2. 



45 

The following are the names and residences of the parties whose 
marriages were solemnized in 1898, certificates of which have been 
filed in this office : 

Jan. 11. James D. Grant of Hyde Park and Katherine C. Farrell, 
of Dedham. 
19. Willis B. Rodders and Mary E. C. Boardman, both of 

Hjde Park. 
26. Harry L. -»yan and Mamie L. Wood, both of Hyde Park. 
12. James R. Wagner of Taunton and Minnie E. Millbury of 
Hyde Park. 
6. Knut R. Blomquist of Boston and Regin i Anderson of 
Hyde Park. 
11. Thomas J Ray and Mary McLean, both of Hyde Park. 

4. Victor Houlle and Agnes Cantin, both of Hyde Park. 
25. John J. Wallace and Eliza Dennette, both of Hyde Park. 
22. Joseph Cote and Ida Diett, both of Hyde Park. 
18. William C. Deagle and Letitia J. Paquette, bo;h of Hyde 

Park. 
22. Thomas F. Mahoney and Sarah T. Dwyer, both of Hyde 

Park. 
22. Robert Proctor and Mary E. McCaffrey, both of Hyde 
Park. 
Feb. 2. John Cummings and Katie Hailoran, both of Hyde Park. 
9. Herbert F.' Higgins of Dedham and Etta G. Smith of Hyde 
Park. 

22. John Whitburn of Hyde Park and Mary Cotter of Boston. 

23. George A. Collins of Boston and Mabel E Taylor of Hyde 

Park. 
Mar. 6. John L. Diaz and Letitia Jordan, both of Hyde Park. 

30. Albert Cotterill of Hyde Park and Lizzie J. Priestly of 

Dedham. 
23. Mark Googins of Hyde Park and Sara L. Bowen of Men- 

don. 
17. Judson D. Jonah of Hjde Park and Bertha Carlton of 

Ran gel ey. Me. 

2. Harry D. B. Emery and Jennie M. Will, both of Hyde 

Park. 

3. Robert Sheridan of Boston and Margaret Cusick of Hyde 

Park. 
9. William Crawford and Jennie Howard, both of Hyde 

Park. 
2. Albert Derochea and Mary Beau dry, both of Hyde Park 



46 

Apr. 18. Michael P. Lambert nnd Susan Martin, both of Hyde Park. 
12. Daniel McLaine and Sadie McPhee, both of Hyde Park. 
4. Roscoe L. Hill of Hyde Park and Ella McGee of Haver- 
hill. 

19. Charles F. Brewster and Clara L. Walter, both of Hyde 

Park. 

27. Calvin P. Fellows of Hyde Park and Carrie A. York of 

Dedham. 

20. Allan J. Barber of Bellingham and Gertrude C. Hemmen- 

way of Hyde Park. 

28. Joseph S. Ambrose and Emma G. Buckler, both of Hyde 

Park. 
26. Harry VV. White and Floretta M. Jones, both of Hyde 

Park. 
30. James E. Cox and Elizabeth Shea, both of Hyde Park. 
'May 11. George Hill and Almira J. Thomas, both of Dedham. 
June 29. Elmer E. Williams and Clara M. Druison, both of New 

York. 
24. Evan W. D. Merrill and Mary E. Colburn, both of Hyde 

Park. 
9. John A. Johnston of Boston and Maude I. Kazar of Hyde 

Park. 
30. Joseph C. Googins, Jr., of Hyde Park and Anna F. Evans 

of Edmore, Mich. 
30. James L. Dolby of Hyde Park and Elizabeth Cohen of 

Boston. 

22. Thomas F. Derby of Lawrence and Ellen E. Mullen of 

Hyde Park. 

23. John Cavanaugh and Mary Moylan, both of Hyde Park. 

29. John E. McCarthy and Nellie M. Gallagher, both of Hyde 

Park. 

30. Edward J. Hopkins of South Boston and Mary E. McDon- 

ongh of Hyde Park. 
16. Michael Flynn of Boston and Margaret Cullen of Hyde 

Park. 
10. Thomas F. McCaffrey and Mary E. McCarthy, both of 

Hyde Park. 

2. Patrick Hart and Margaret McDonough, both of Hyde 
Park. 

5. Thomas Morrissey of Boston and Annie O'Brien, both of 
Hyde Park. 

27. William Coggiil and Hannah Connole, both of Hyde Park. 



47 

June 16. Hugh G. Rooney and Annie T. Kelley, both of Hyde Park, 

2. James J. Goggin and Mary E. McCarthy, both of Hyde 

Park. 
27. George P. Freeman of Boston and Henrietta Carrington 

of Hyde Park. 
27. Herbert Greenwood and Helen A. Perry, both of Hyde 

Park. 

15. Charles S. Foote and Amelia Higgins, both of Hyde Park. 

16. Charles F. Brown of Hyde Park and Susan L. VVonson of 

Gloucester. 
15. Gustavus T. Peterson of Norwood and Georgianna A. 

Childsof Hyde Park. , 

5. Joseph Elicks of Hyde Park and Mary Thorp of E. Cam- 
bridge. 

3. George W. Bartlett, Jr., and Alice M. Smith, both of Hyde 

Park. 
20. James S. Rafter and Mary M. McKenzie, both of Hyde 
Park. 
July 4. Joseph Aeillo and Louisa Cerensi, both of Hyde Park. 

5. Grant \V. E. White of West Bridgewater and Jessie M. 

Thomas of Hyde Park. 
2. Robert B. Hill of Hyde Park and Lizzie D. Farrell of 

Stoughton. 
20. Walter C. Scrivens of Hyde Park and Hannah E. A. Hay- 
den of Quiucy. 
31. Abraham S. Brodie ot Hyde Park and Mary Epstein of 

Boston. 
25. Fred A. Petit and Mary Gagnon, both of Hyde Park. 

20. Lemuel B. McKinnon of Norwood and Maggie Maguire of 

Hyde Park. 
Aug.1 25. William T. Dann and Grace M. Carroll, both of Hyde 
Park. 

25. Michael S. Flanagan of Boston and Katharine Burl*e of 
Hyde Park. 
Sept. 20. Adolphns J. Shepherd and Lillie Rousseau, both of Hyde 
Park. 

21. James E. Britton of Boston and Abbie H, Foley of Hyde 

Park. 
14. Fred R. Hill and Josephine O. Wilder, both of Hyde Park. 
12. j.Blanchard K. Harding of Boston and Flora E. Andrews of 

Hyde Park. 
10. John|A. Carlson and Mary E. Freeto, both of Hyde Park. 



48 

Sept. 11. Clarence W. Rose and Iola Fowler, both of Hyde Park, 

19. Henry Mathus of Providence. R. I., and Addie M. Hiller 

ot Hyde Park. 
14. Edward M. Fritts of New York and Lizzie A. Hibbard of 

Hyde Park. 

7. VV. Ellery Bullard of Hyde Park and Clara T. Fisher of 

Canton. 
5. John H. Elliot and Lottie M. Price, both of Hyde Park. 
1. Lewis C. Orcntt and Hattie M. Russell, both of Hyde Park. 
3. Daniel S. Taylor and Florence M. Simpson, both of Hyde 

Park. 
1. Herbert L. Savage of Hyde Park and Ida M. Mayo of 

Boston. 

8. Owen P. Hughes and Martha A. E. Ramus, both of Hyde 

Park. 

28. John F. Watson of Boston and Catherine E. Butler of 

Hyde Park. 
7. William J. Ellis of Hyde Park and Melvina H. Bemis of 
Dedham. 

20. Fred A. Gilman of Brownsville, Me., and Daisy Messen- 
ger of Hyde Park. 

13. Ernest W. Higgins of Somerville and Lottie M. French of 

Hyde Park. 
27. Frank Thayer and Carrie B. Titcomb, both of Hyde Park. 

14. George Morrison of Cambridgeport and Lucy A. Morse 

of Hyde Park. 
Oct. 3. Frank A. Hamilton of Boston and Alexina E. Tuckerman 

of Hyde Park. 
26. Joseph Goldbach of Boston and Katie L. Ziegler of Hyde 

Park. 
26. Army P. Gait and Callie I. Jackson, both offtHyde Park. 

4. Henry P. J. Earnshaw of Boston and Mabel A. Page of 

Hyde Park. 
19. Frederick A. Raymond and Nellie G. Norling, both of 
Hyde Park. 

5. Robert Roberts and Ann J. Thompson, both of Milton. 
12. William A. Wheeler of Dedham and Isabella W. [Finethy 

Hyde Park. 
16. D. Homer Mackintosh and Alice E. Bird, both of Hyde 

Park. 
4. William P. Brown of Hyde Park and Abbie R. Hoxie of 
Roxbury. 



49 . 

Oct. 17. Arthur C. Burr and Myrtie M. Waldron, both of Hyde 
Park. 
15. Frederick Lavis of Chihuahua, Mex., and Lucy M. Adams 
of Hyde Park. 

26. Thomas F. Fallon of Hyde Park and Margaret F. Murray 

of Boston. 

27. Daniel McKinnon of Hyde Park and Mrry E. Scanlon of 

Milton. 
26. Charles H. Sullivan cf Westwood and Bridget T. Rooney 

of Hyde Park. 
11. Frank T. Meagher of Milton and Catherine A. Barry of 

Hyde Park. 
29. William Cain ot P. E. Isle and Anastasia Donahoe of Hyde 

Park. 
15. Ernest E. Phinney and Lena R. Dame, both of Hyde Park. 
Nov. 15. Horace G. Bussey of Dedham and Kate Ward of Hyde 

Park. 
3. Peter Trainor and Mary Harvey, both of Hyde Park. 

21. Frank L„ Prince of Portland, Me., and Carrie A. Hodgdon 

of Hyde Park. 

18. Diego Montemurro and Guiseppina L, Greco, both of Hyde 

Park. 

22. Terrence F. McGowan and Bridget L. Roonev, both of 

Hyde Park. 

23. Patrick Hicks and Mary Kiley, both of Hyde Park. 

21. John J . Glynn of Boston and Katie J. Flynn of Hyde Park. 

3. Bartholomew Dunn and Ellen Horrigan, both of Hyde 

Park. 

4. John McHugh and Annie Conway, both of Hyde Park. 
23. Daniel Kelleher of Hyde Park and Julia Lynch of Cam- 
bridge. 

23. James Decoff of Hyde Park and Elizabeth O'Brien of 
Boston. 

23. Walter H. Stewart and Ethel M. Jeffers, both of Hyde Park. 

24. John L. McKeon of Hyde Park and Florence M. Eichornof 

Boston 
1. Joseph W. Paine of West Lynn and Ella M. Stentiford of 
Hyde Park. 

19. Harry L. King and Emma King, both of Hyde Park. 

23. Mathew J. Hehir and Frances C. Kelly, both of Hyde Park- 
23. James E. Richards of Hyde Park and Maggie J. Downie of 

Milton. 
23. Gustav Schellschmidt and Bridget Jenkins, both of Hyde 

Park. 



50 



Dec. 



23. Edward Morhoff of Dedham and Lena Switzenberg of 

Hyde Park. 
14. Charles S. Evans and Linda Jones, both of Hyde Park. 
14. Thomas B. Cooper of Boston and Elsie Hand ley of Newton. 









DEATHS. 










Number 


Df deaths in Hyde 


Park, and of residents of th 


is town who 


died el 


sewhere in this Co 


mmonwealfch in 1898 • 


214 


Males 






115 


Females 


. . 










99 


Born in the United States 










165 


" 


Ireland 










24 


" 


British Provinces 










12 


" 


Scotland 










3 


1 1 
1 1 


England 
Germany 
Italy 

Sweden . 
Austria . 


• 








4 
3 
1 
. 1 
1 






AGES. 




Stillborn 


. 




21 


Under one 


year . 












52 


Between 1 and 5 years 












17 


«• 5 


" 10 












7 


" 10 


" 20 












7 


" 20 


" 30 












15 


" 30 


" 40 












11 


" 40 


" 50 












8 


" 50 


" 60 












16 


'« 60 


" 70 












28 


«' 70 


" 80 












20 


" 80 


'• 90 












10 


" 90 


" 100 












2 


The number of deaths from 


some of the well-known ( 


jauses is as 


follows : 








Accident ... 
Consumption 




11 
17 


Paralysis and Apople 
Stillborn . 


xy . 5 
21 


Pneumonia 






15 


Old Age . 




10 


Cholera Infantum 




4 


Brights Disease 




5 


Diphtheria . 
Cancer and Tumor 




7 
5 


Typhoid Fever 
Inanition . 




1 
9 


Heart Disease 




15 













6 


w 




1-2 




22 


4 


29 


3 


26 


3 


21 


9 


5 



51 

The followiug are the names of those who died in Hyde Park, and 

of residents of Hyde Park who died elsewhere, during the year 1898. 

AGE. 

DA TE. NAMES. YRS. MOS. DYS. 

Jan. 7. John H. Black _ _ 3 

9. Schroeder — — 4 

11. Eusev Pitpeit 60 — 

14. (Stillborn) ' — _ _ 

15. Mary E. Barry , 22 6 

15. Bridget Dooky 58 

19. (Stillborn) _ _ _ 

22. Patrick F. Fleming 16 

29. Henry Keaso 1 

29. (Stillborn) _ 

31. Lavangie — 

Feb. 3. Harold E. Cheek _ 

4. James D. Lawson 55 

4. Quincy Dyer 87 

5. John E. Dowley 64 

7. Charles H. Warren 72 

8. (Stillborn) — 

15. Carrie H. Woodbury 67 

14. Mary L. Cogan 76 

11. Daniel McC. Moore 64 

11. Margaret A. Cullen .. . 31 

11. Joseph Burke. . . — 

22. (Stillborn) _ 

22. Agnes Hines 22 

23. Charles H. Brown 64 

24. Henry Cote 3 

25. Joseph Roman — 

26. Emma Boettcher 17 

28. Minnie E. Currier 39 

Mar. 1. Joseph Mahoney — 

2. Jame& O'Brien 64 

2. John Flaherty 56 

2. Julia Kimball 88 

3. Stella E. Ryder — 

4. John Armstrong 1 

4. Harriett W. Hammond 81 

5. Margaret Fitzpatrick 68 

5. Elina Martell 8 

8. (Stillborn) — 

9. Lewis F. Smith 51 — 11 



10 


16 


1 


— 


— 


28 


— 


7 


3 


25 


5 


4 


9 


— 


2 


25 


3 


14 


8 


7 


8 


19 


11 


21 


6 





AGE. 




MOS. 


DYS 


— 


I 


6 


4 


10 


19 



2 


20 


11 


— - 


6 


4 


— 


2 


5 


14 


3 


12 


2 


8 


— 


4 


6 


— 


7 


23 



52 



DATE. NAMES. YRS. 

Mar. 10. Harry A. Norris, Jr 

10. Eunice W. Kendall 78 

10. Edward T.Bolles 25 

11. (Stillborn) _ 

14. Effie Johnson . . — 10 26 

14. Margaret E. Hauey 75 

15. Charles H. White — 

16. Bessie L. McNaught , ... 20 

17. Harriet E. O'Coune'.l 48 

18. Lucy A. Jeffers 85 

24. Michael Cavanaugh, Jr — 

26. David C. Marr... 58 

28. George Hastings 63 

28. Nineio Guariglio — 

Apr. 4. John Hartuett. .■ .< 2 

4. Robert Scott • 82 

5. Pauluus — 7 

8. (Stillborn) _ _ _ 

9. Margaret Donayan 67 

12. Ptrsis T. Leighton 90 6 1 

10. Hannah H. Bryclen 77 _ 

10. (Stillborn) _ __- _ 

18. Ann E. Peare 59 3 10 

19. MaryRourke , 36 — 

21. (Stillborn) _ __ _ 

21. Annie J. Johnson 8-10 

22. Anton Burger 73 28 

26. (Stillborn) _ _ _ 

26. Lester E. Gatchell 2 

May 1. Catherine B. Beatey. ..\., 55 

3. Charles J. Brown — 

8. Joseph B. Monroe 57 

11. Mary A. Seery : — 

12. Gustavus A. Meister 73 

14. .Catherine M. Larkin 64 

15. James Higgins < 65 

15. Louisa J. Manuel 84 

10. Eliza Podbury 90 

22. Tobias Stackpole 72 

24. Helen L. Blanchford 5 

31. Elizabeth King — 

June 1. Winifred E. Gilmore 22 



1 


3 


9 


9 


9 


10 


6 


11 


3 


7 


3 


IS 


7 


m 


9 


15 


5 


6 


3 


19 


10 


— 



AGE. 




MOS. 


DYS, 


10 


19 


10 


— 



DATE. • NAMES. YRS. 

June 2. Edwin S. Brooks 34 

6. Anna D. Riley .* 24 

B. (Stillborn) — 

7. James K. Morrison — ■ 

18. Eben Cobb 70 

19. Lillian E. D. McKenzie 2 

19. Margaret H. Bnrke 27 

19. Giovanni Pietropiccoli 35 

23. Martha M. Davis 64 

26. Martha E. Dodge 85 

27. Mabel L. Collyer 19 

28. Jerome Kenney 49 

28. James F. Jennings 41 

30. William J. Mahoney 14 

July 7. (Stillborn) — 

10. Patrick Ga<ran 79 

13. Walter McLaughlin — 

15. Mary A. Brown 74 

18. Josephjne Mahoney • — 

20. Martin Ryan — 

21. Andrew Feeney — 

26. Ethel Phillips — 

27. Annie L Roaei'd 61 

30. Margaret A. McGrath 4 

31. Mary M. Clark 78 

Aug. 1. (Stillborn) — 

1. Frederick Carr — 

1. Charlie M. Perry 7 

3. Mary A. Monica . . — 

3. Lillian Clotilda — 

4. Margaret E. Cooper 69 

6. Elizabeth M. Pratt _ 

8. Anunie Nash 31 

9. Susan A. Trainor 18 5 — 

9. (Stillborn) _ _ _ 

13. Gertrude M. Cooper 

13. John A. Jackson ^. 

15. Mary K. Chish.)lm _ 

17. Charles A. Milne 34. 

17. William A. Walker 49 

18. Norman B. Robinson 

19. -Francis F. Glllis _ 



11 


9 


5 


19 


3 


14 


1 


14 


1 


17 


— 


23 


4 


22 


2 


25 


6 


5 


10 


23 


7 


14 


— 


1-2 


8 


— 


— 


5 


8 


12 


4 


— 


4 


20 


5 


10 


1 


17 


1 


17 


2 


— 


9 


13 


11 


18 



10 


9 


10 


1 


— 


17 


7 


16 


4 


21 


6 






5 


4 


6 


2 


7 





1 


15 


2 


16 


1 


3 




24 


8 


23 


3 


4 



54 

AGE. 

DATE. NAMES. YRS. MOS. DYS. 

Aug. 26. Effie E. Farquhar 27 — 9 

27. (Stillborn) — _ _ 

31. Peter Miller 48 — 

31. Maximillian Nold 58 7 1 

Sept. 1. (Stillborn) _ _ _ 

6. Sophronia N. Haven 66 

6. Herbert McK Bills 1 

7. Thompson — 

7. Richard H. O'Brien — 

7. Martha H. Noyes 72 

7. Stephen B. Stuart , 78 

8. Bridget Mahouey 48 

11. Alexander Christie 1 

14. William Mitchell _. 

14. Eliza A. Whittemore 84 

16. John B. Eoscoe — 

17. (Stillborn) _ 

20. Philip W. De Young _ io 

20. Catherine Reardon 56 

20. Faunie Mitchell 17 

21. Ruth M. Duquet 3 

22. Clement Shea — 

12. Mary L. Schiller — 

24. CeJia M. Durkin _ 

27. John L. Veuo 8 

29. Margaret Trainor : — 

29. Bertha Laf ranee 2 

29. Hugh McGinley 78 

16. Michael Higgins : 67 

17. Mary J. Estes 49 

7. Leon I. Thompson 29 

Oct. 3. Lawrence Meehan 52 

4. ■ (Stillborn) — , 

4. Harold S. Johnson 21 

4. Alfred Rescoe . . . ." — 

6. Alexander McLean 59 

9. David White _ 

10. Mary G. Jeffrus — 

10. Margaret O'Tool 22 

11. Samuel Arnold 83 

13. (Stillborn) . _ 

14. John J. Downey 53 



9 


25 


8 


20 


2 


24 


8 


14 


5 


8 


3 


— 





— 


4 






10 


3 


8 


11 


4 


9 


3 


23 


11 


4 


3 


16 


6 


16 


— 


26 



00 



DATE. NAMES. YRS. 

Oct. 18. James J. Savage 54 

18. Bridget F. Feehari 21 

22. Lucy II. Gibbs 76 

24. Catherine G. Bonvie 

24. Amanda Routley 56 

5. George Cooper G7 

28. Melioda P. La Bree 02 

29. Georue Lord G8 

29. Catherine L. Kilroy 21 

29. Annie B. McKeDzie 35 

30. Margaret H. Mills , 3 

Nov. 1. William J. Sweeney 30 

6. Harry F. Newall 20 

7. Ruth Lewis — 

10. Jones F. Pratt 62 

11. Mary A. Norton 1 

13. Gertie Friedberg : — 

13. Ruth Smith 66 

14. Delvina Peano 33 

17. Michael J. Sullivan 28 

20. Emulous F. Sullivan , i 

20. Margaret Furdon 60 

21. Thomas H. Washurn 52 

22. Helen G. Clark _ 

23. Violetta Freeman 70 — 

24. David W. Fitzgerald 44 — — 

24. George W. Gustafsou — — 1-2 

26. Addison Churchill 67 — — 

29. (Stillborn) _ ._' _ 

29. Adolf Vietze 6 8 21 

30. John E. Belcher 61 4 26 

Dec. 1. Isabella Leason — — 6 

15. Albert S. Adams 73 5 6 

15. Mark Hickey — 6 — 

16. Roderick Chisholm 55 

19. William Richardson 63 — 

23. Margaret Timpaney t . 79 — — 

23. Lucy A. Patterson 68 6 

23. Sarah F. Newton 62 2 9 

23. Richard P. Kendall 19 4 

24. James Fitzpatrick 83 — 

24. Alfred J. D. Mathias 4 8 5 



AGE. 




MOS. 


DTS 


8 


10 


2 


17 


— 


1 


2 


8 


10 


23 


4 


— 


— 


13 


2 


.13 


4 


23 


10 


19 


— 


12 


5 


8 


10 


— 


— 


7 


2 


— 


6 


4 


1 


13 


1 


16 


11 


6 


4 


— 



56 



DATE. NAMES. YRS. 

25. Russell D. Courtney 7 

26. Samuel Gray 2 

28. A. - Eudora Webster -. 70 

28. Anna James — 

28. Gladys L. Hodsdon 1 

12. Michael J. Gallagher 30 



AGE. 




MOS. 


DYS 


3 


6 


2 


26 


6 


28 


"— 


13 


3 


1 



The Town Clerk requests information of any omissh.n or errors in 
the above tables, in order that the registration may be as complete as 
possible. Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — The Board of Engineers respectfully submit 
the following report of the condition and of the Fire De- 
partment for the year ending January 31, 1899. 

The Department has responded to 38 alarms during 
the past year. Of these, 36 were for fires in buildings and 
two brush fires. The total loss by lire was : 

Value. Damage. Insurance. 

Buildings, $139,805 00 $40,292 00 $133,900 00 

Contents, 87,509 00 ■ 36,004 00 62,210 00 

One permanent man and horse have been added to the 
Department in the Readville district, and a storage battery 
has been placed in the central fire station on trial, and two 
more alarm boxes have been added to the system. The 
changing of the grades in Readville has caused us much ex- 
pense and annoyance on account of having to change the 
the wires so often. The horses, apparatus, etc., are in 
good condition. 

There are at present five permanent men in the Depart- 
ment, drivers of the chemical, hook and ladder, hose No. 1, 
hose No. 3 at Readville, and Supt. of fire alarm. 

BENJAMIN RAFTER, Chief, 
J. C. McDOUGALD, 
J. H. WETHERBEE, 

Board of Engineers. 



58 
DEPARTMENT OFFICERS AND NUMBER OF MEN. 



Board of Engineers. 
BENJAMIN RAFTER, Chief Engineer. 
J. C. McDOUGALD, Clerk. 
J. H. WETHERBEE. 

Hook and Ladder Co.. No. 1. 
WM. R. McDOUGALD, Captain. 
J. H. TUCKERMAN, Jr., Lieutenant, and;8jmen. 

Hose Co. No. 1. 
E. N. BULLARD, Captain. 
W. W. SCOTT, Lieutenant, and 8 men. 

Hose Co No. 2. 
STEWART McKENZIE, Captain. 
J. G. BOLLES, Lieutenant, and 8 men. 

Hose Co. No. 3. 
J. H. O'BRIEN, Captain. 
FRANK KUNKEL, Lieutenant and 4 men. 

Chemical Co. No. 1. 

F. L. MERCER, Captain. 

WARREN W. MORSE, Lieu enant and 2 men. 

Drivers. 

G. W. LOMBARD, W. P. WHIiTEMORE, 
ROWLAND WARD, JAMES COLLINS, 

EDWARD A. HAWLEY, Superintendent of Fire Alarm and Steward. 



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REPORT OF THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



The work of the Poor Department increases with the 
growth of the town and in the changes in the laws relating 
to pauper settlements. According to the law enacted by 
the Legislature of 1898, all settlements not fully acquired 
subsequent to Ma}' 1, 1860, are defeated and lost ; provid- 
ed that whenever a settlement acquired by marriage has 
been defeated, the former settlement of the wife, if not de- 
feated by the same provision, shall be thereby revived. 
All persons absent from the State for ten years in succes- 
sion shall lose their settlement. 

The purpose of the above very decided change in the law 
was to relieve cities and towns, and especially towns, from 
liability for the support of indigent persons who had deriva- 
tive settlements in Massachusetts through their grand-parents 
and great-grand-parents. Many such indigent persons 
who, with their parents, were born outside the state, had 
derivative settlements through their ancestors acquired 75 
to 100 years ago. Two and three generations had never 
resided or been in their place of settlement, perhaps had 
never even heard of such a town, yet by the laws of the 
Commonwealth when they fell into distress and became a 
public charge, the place of settlement had to pay necessary 
expenses incurred for their relief. 

It is estimated that about three per cent, of all settlements 
in Massachusetts were defeated by the recently enacted law. 
Persons whose settlements were defeated become state cases 
should they again apply for public aid. 

The ten-year feature of the new law is not retroactive, 
but it will, after July 1, 1908, be very helpful in cutting off 



62 

the settlements of those who in the prime of life leave the 
state, to return only in their decliuing j'ears when they need 
aid from the public treasury. Their children and children's 
children will also be cut off. 

Another important, and to the cities and towns very satis- 
factory change, is that the same legal obligation to support 
her pauper children shall rest upon the mother as formerly 
rested by law upon the father, provided, however, that the 
mother shall not be liable to criminal prosecution for the 
enforcement of such legal obligation. 

Subjoined is the list in detail of the expenditures during 
the past year, together with the number of persons receiv- 
ing aid. 

Whole number of persons aided, 
Number of persons fully supported, 

«' " partially supported, 

" tramps lodged, 

Barrett, Sarah S. insane, 

Bedlington, Harriet, 

Bell, Dorinda E. 

Carter, Eva F. " 

Carter, Inez, " 

Carter, Ralph, " 

Clapp, Clara E. 

Connor, Kate, " 

Crawford, Walter, " 

Kibler, Edmund J. " 

Rafter, Sarah, " 

Overell, Wm. D., epileptic, 

Pollock, John T., 

King, Martin and wife, 

Connor, Ellen, 

Withington, George, 

Cremin, John, 

Griffin, Richard, 

Reilly, Patrick J., wife and 3 children, 

Battles, Mary and 1 child, 

Tate, Elizabeth, and 1 child, 





3529 




27 


ed, 


186 




3316 


SETTLEMENT. 


COST. 


Hyde Park, 


$169 46 


i% 


169 46 


n 


169 46 


n 


169 46 


1 1 


169 45 


• I 


169 45 


" 


169 45 


" 


169 46 


" 


146 40 


" 


169 47 


" 


146 00 


* c 


111 39 


" 


24 11 


" 


67 00 


■«■■ 


27 15 


• • 


161 10 


" 


12 00 


" 


20 00 


1 1 


8 15 


" 


26 60 


• i 


.72 45 



63 

SETTLEMENT. COST. 

Page, FranK B. Hyde Park, $128 45 

Hutching, Ella M. and 2 children, " 93 38 

Williams, Amanda, • " 51 50 

O'Leary, Mavy, " 17 77 

Coveney, Daniel, " 15 00 

Murray, Richard and wife, " 24 00 

Walsh, James P. " 45 CO 

Voight, Mrs. F. T. and 6 children, " 2U8 93 

Howland, Abner and wife, " 1:30 81 

Sweeney, Julia and 1 child, " 52 90 

Welch, Isabella and 5 children, " 200 90 

Allen, Thomas J., wife and 3 children, " 119 25 

Cameron, James F., wife and 4 children, " 29 00 

McAuliffe, John, " 282 66 

Boyce, George H., wife and 2 children, " 9 75 

Welch, Michael T. J., wtfe & 7 children, •• 3 00 

O'Reilly, Bridget A. " 58 00 

Bragan, Rosella, '* 25 15 

Gates, Mrs. A. W. and 3 children, " 12 00 

Conran, Kate, " 70 00 

Boyle, Mary, " 79 28 

Maxwell, Mary J. " ' 180 00 

Robinson, Jane and 2 childien, " 78 00 

Hui t, Mary, " 57 00 

Sullivan, D. C., wife and 6 children, ■« 113 23 

Anderson, Mrs. Charles, " 1 00 

Grant, Mrs. Hu^h, and 4 children, . " 23 20 

McGovern, James, " L31 41 

Welsh, Jennie, " 11 73 

Lynch, Mrs. J. P , and four children, " 127 00 

Downes, Hannah M. and 1 child, " 84 55 

Norton, Mary E. and 2 children, " 43 65 

Curran, Ellen and one child, " 91 10 

Emery, Mrs. H D. B. and 1 child, ' " 48 00 

Bunker, Charles E. " 57 00 

Norton, John, " 10 00 

Leason, Isabella, " 10 00 

Hickey, Mark, " 10 00 

Rich, Mrs. Chas. H. and 3 children, " 8 39 

Babb, Ernest R. and wife, " 3 50 

Munless, Mrs. Neil and daughter, " 81 80 



64 



SETTLEMENT 



Hyde Park 
Boston 



Southbiidge, 
Somerville, 

Ware, 

Watertown, 

Lawrence, 

Taunton, 

Salem, 

Salem, 

State, 



Gilson, Ella, 

Johnson, Mary E. and 6 children, 

Thomas, Almiia.J. and 1 child, 

Zapff, William, 

Fessenden, Joshua R. and wife, 

McGrath, Mary, 

Elder. Win. J. wile & 2 children, 

Brodeur, Carl C. wile & 3 children, 

Cunningham, Pbilip, and wife, 

BarratL, iMrs. John & 4 children, 

Hunt, George E. wile and 3 children, 

Sullivan, Michael J. 

Sullivan, Emeline, 

McGuiie, Jas. S. wife & 2 children, 

Watson, Christina, 

Monica, Mary A. 

Burnley, Mary and 3 children, 

Perry, Herman C. wife & 2 children, 

Clark, Ira A. wife & 2 children, 

Hines, Bridget A. 

Hagenburg, John, wife and 4 children, 

McLaughlin, Annie, 

Reai don, Beatrice and 1 child, 

Miscellaneous acct. 

Military aid acct. 

Lock-up acct. 

Temporary aid acct. 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash balance on hand, 

Received appropriation, 

Returned by State, etc., acct. temporary aid, 

Cash on hand with Town Treasurer, 



COST. 

129 97 
28 lb 
24 10 
14 00 

2 25 
14 56 

1 50 
4 48 
69 55 
24 72 
4 60 
21 00 
10 00 

3 60 
13 28 
10 00 
18 51 

4 15 
1 50 

10 00 

7 49 

10 00 

3 10 

348 56 

180 00 

91 10 

619 58 



$6,846 12 



\ 56 86 

6,500 00 

435 68 



$6,992 54 
146 42 



CHARLES LEWIS, 
GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 
GEORGE E. HAVEN, 

Overseers of the Poor. 



REPORT OF BOARD OF HEALTH, 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

We herewith present the following as "our annual report 
for the year ending Jan. 31st, 1899. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

The continued reduction in the number of contagious 
diseases is a condition upon which the citizens can well be 
congratulated. 

The total number of deaths from contagious disease dur- 
ing the year was 11, divided as follows : 

Diphtheria, 7 ; membraneous croup, 3 ; typhoid fever, 1 ; 
and none from scarlet fever, measles or whooping cough. 

The total number of cases of contagious diseases reported 
was 142 as against 160 in 1897 and 173 in 1896 as follows : 

Membraneous croup, 7 ; measles, 39 ; scarlet fever, 26 ; 
typhoid fever ; diphtheria, 61. 

The remarkable decrease in the death rate from diph- 
theria from 27 per cent, in 1896 to 11 per cent, in 1898 
can surely be credited to the free use of Anti-Toxine and 
thorough and systematic disinfection. This valuable and 
expensive remedy for that dreaded disease having been 
furnished by the Board of Health to the physicians in all 
cases when requested, thereby giving every one the benefit 
and unlimited use cf the same free of charge. 

The disinfection and fumigation by the use of formal- 
deheyde gas has been continued with gratifying results, 
as there has not been a second case reported from houses 
where this process has been applied. Early in September 
of 1898 several cases of diphtheria appeared in the vicinity 



66 

of the Greenwood school and the disease seemed to bid fair 
to become an epidemic. However, by the assistance of those 
in whose homes it appeard, in complying with the rules of 
the Board of Health, and after a careful examination of the 
houses in which the diseases originated, probable cause of 
the source of infection from defective plumbing being found, 
and ordered remedied, the books used in the schools by 
those affected with the disease being destroyed, and the 
balance disinfected, and also the several school rooms in 
the district having been thoroughly fumigated, the 
spread of the disease w T as almost immediately checked. 

The custom of placarding every house containing a case 
of scarlet fever or diphtheria was followed during the year, 
and the prejudice manifested by householders against hav- 
ing their houses placarded is fast disappearing in proportion 
as the object for which it is done is becoming understood. 

We desire to express thanks to the medical profession of 
this town for the promptness and accuracy with which they 
have reported all cases of contagious disease coming under 
their observation. 

In the number of cases of scarlet fever there has been a 
decrease from that of last year of 44 per cent. The im- 
proved method of disinfection has been used in all cases of 
scarlet fever during the year, and it is readily seen that the 
results are most gratifying. 

The fact that the large buildings used for school purposes 
may need disinfection at any time, and the great length of 
time necessary to do the work with the single machine which 
we have, and the liability of its having to be repaired, makes 
it imperative that an additional one be purchased. 

We have the pleasure also of reporting a decrease in the 
number of cases of typhoid fever as against those in 1896 
and 1897 of 45 per cent., which goes to prove that by care- 



67 

fill inspection of all plumbing and other sanitary appliances 
and the removal of all possible causes of infection, that the 
general decrease in preventable diseases will continue. 

COMPLAINTS AND SANITARY CONDITIONS. 

There have baen many complaints of unsanitary condi- 
tion in various parts of the town during the year. 

A great majority of them being made verbally, these 
places have all been visited, and all have either been 
remedied, or arranged to be put in shape as soon as the con- 
ditions will allow. 

If all persons who made complaints to the Board of 
Health would do so in writing and, sigu the same, it would 
facilitate matters very much, and could work no possible in- 
jury to the signer ; anonymous complaints received are not 
worthy of attention. Sanitary rules cannot be ignored if 
we would escape disease. With the abolition of privy 
vaults and cess-pools on several streets in which there is a 
sewer, and the better attention given^to their construction 
and location on new streets and those which have no sewers, 
(the only condition under which their erection is per- 
missable,) if the cleaning and removal of their contents are 
properly conducted, there is no reason why typhoid fever 
and other preventable diseases cannot be reduced to a 
minimum. 

Although many years have passed since a case of small pox 
has been reported in the town, still it is liable to occur at any 
time. Should small pox appear we should be prepared by 
being provided with facilities to control it. As it is we are 
not even provided with a place where the patient might be 
safely isolated and cared for. A sectional building which 
could be stored in some convenient place, and which could 
be erected in a few hours should be provided. In case the 
emergency should arise we would then be able to meet it 
successfully. 



68 

The vaccination of all children who attend the public and 
parochial schools should be insisted upon as the public 
statutes provide. On the whole the sanitary condition of 
the town may be considered very fair, although privy vaults 
and cesspools continue to be an intolerable nuisance and 
are, we believe, directly responsible for a great deal of 
sickness. 

The custom pursued in abolishing vaults and cesspools on 
the streets in which there are sewers has been as follows : 
when a complaint of the premises is made, or a case of con- 
tagious disease is reported to exist, the premises, plumbing, 
and drainage system is thoroughly examined. If the sys- 
tems are found defective an order is'issued directing the re- 
construction of the plumbing and abolishing the vaults or 
cesspools. 

All abutters on a street in which there is a public sewer, 
are requested to connect their premises with the same, and 
to abolish their cesspools and vaults. While the majority 
of the citizens comply readily with all orders issued by the 
Board of Health after the premises are inspected, there are 
others who are seemingly unwilling to do so, which makes 
it necessary to proceed carefully and surely in taking the 
proper steps, to be prepared (in the event that legal pro- 
ceedings become necessary ) with proper evidence to sus- 
tain the action. 

VAULTS AND CESSPOOLS. 

The present method of cleaning vaults and cesspools 
which from a sanitary point of view is fairly good, still it 
is not directly under the control of the Board of Health. 
The cost of emptying cesspools has been reduced from that 
of last year, but that of the vaults remains the same. If 
the town owned the apparatus and had a safe and proper 
place for the disposal of that class of waste matter, the ob- 
jections to the present method would be completely over- 
come. 



69 

GARBAGE AND SWILL. 

We again call your attention to present methods of the 
disposal of garbage and house and store dirt that prevails 
here, and the unsightly dumping places which are -a dis- 
grace to our town, and a menace to the health of the corn- 
unity in which they are located. 

The town is becoming more thickly settled every year 
and the need of some better system of disposal of house and 
store dirt is apparent. It is utterly useless to endeavor to 
keep the places used as common dumps in decent condition, 
and the waste material, must be disposed of in some other 
manner. 

The collection of swill has been continued in the same 
manner as last year, but owing to the increased number of 
houses and collection from places which had formerly dis- 
posed of swill in some other way, refuse from stores that 
could be classed as swill, such as decaying vegetables, etc., 
it was found necessary to add another team to the working 
force in order to make two collections each week during the 
latter part ot the summer and early fall, and it will be im- 
possible to do this work in a proper manner next year with- 
out an additional team for at least four months during the 
warm weather. The complaints from the swill dumps have 
ceased since the erection of the building over it, and it is 
believed that this place may be maintained for some years 
to come without trouble or inconvenience to those who maj 
reside near it, however, sooner or later the location or 
method of disposal will have to be changed when there are 
many more buildings in the immediate vicinity. 

SEWERAGE. 

The extension of the sewer system of the town has 
nfforded much relief to citizens whose property abuts on 
those streets where sewers have been built. There is 
a marked difference between the sanitary condition pre- 



70 

sented now on those streets, and what formerly prevailed 
before the sewers were put in. We urge the continuance of 
the sewerage system to completion as fast as possible, as 
much inconvenience and hardship will have to be endured 
by residents of many sections of the town until they are en- 
abled to enter the sewers and their branches. 

DISEASE IN ANIMALS. 

There were several cases of glanders reported and notices 
were published and posted warning horse owners .and others 
of the danger of contagion. 

In cases of tuberculosis in cattle the usual ten-day quar- 
antine has been maintained only ; owing to the lack of 
funds by the State Board of Cattle Commissioners, how- 
ever, as all cases were either cleared up or were properly dis- 
posed of before expiration of the time,- the town or its in- 
terests did not suffer. 

DRAINAGE. 

In continuation of the policy of last year in the line of 
draining wet, rotten and spongy land, a short drain has 
been put in on Central avenue near Page street, which was 
badly needed as there was no outlet for the surface water, 
and it ws.s fast becoming a nuisance and source of disease. 
Thie section needs better drainage across Central avenue 
and the land and streets beyond and continuing to the river. 
But it was thought not advisable to take any steps at pres- 
ent in that direction as it is expected that the sewer will be 
built this year on the line of the ditch or nearby, and a suf- 
ficient under-drain will probably obviate the trouble to a 
great extent. During the changes of grade crossings at 
Readville the drain from the land on Regent street near 
Chesterfield street was destroyed, the land becoming over- 
flowed to a great extent. Upon explaining the matter to 



71 
railroad authorities their engineer ordered the old drain re- 
placed with a much larger and' better one, and since then 
there has been no complaint. 

Between Blake street and Radclifie Road in Rugby dis- 
trict, a large pond and swamp filled with stagnaut water 
has existed for years and large number of dwellings have 
been built near the same. From the drainage of houses 
and surrounding land it had become very filthy, and a prob- 
able source of sickness. It was decided that this nuisance 
should be abated in some manner. After consulting with 
the owners of the land in the immediate vicinity we pro- 
ceeded to remove the nuisance. A ditch 1700 feet in length 
and of sufficient depth to lower the water in the pond so 
that it would not again be liable to become offensive was 
dug, and three culverts of a size sufficient to provide for 
any sudden flow of water were built and the water drained 
from the pond, thereby not only preventing causes of dis- 
ease that might arise from stagnant water in the pond, but 
rendering passable all roads in that district so far as any 
floods in that water course are concerned, tiud draining a 
large area of land along the ditcb, which was formerly al- 
ways swampy and wet. 

While the town can well afford to invest money in such 
improvements, getting its pay not only by having produced 
better sanitary condition in these places, but in the in- 
creased value in real estate and additional land suitable for 
building purposes, still the owners have guaranteed to pay 
two-thirds of the cost. The work of improving the sanitary 
condition of the town in this line should £0 on as there are 
many places which need it badly, and the whole town needs 
the addition of all values that may be increased by improve- 
ments on such lines as can be done from year to year with- 
out great expense. 

A copy ot report of Health Officer and Inspector of 
Plumbing is appended herewith : 



72 
REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

W THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK. 



Public Statutes: Chapter 80, Section 18. — The Board of Health 
of a town shall make such regulations as it judges necessary for the 
public health and safety, respecting nuisances, sources of filth, and 
causes of sickness within its town. Whoever violates'any such regu- 
lation shall forfeit a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars. . 

tu accordance with the foregoing provision of law, this Board makes 
the following regulations, which will be strictly enforced : 

Regulation 1. Privy Vaults and Drains. Section I. Every tene- 
ment shall be provided with a water-tight underground drain to carry 
off the waste waters, also with a suitable privy or water-closet sufficient 
for the accommodation of all those inhabiting the premises. 

Section II. All privy vaults, unless water-tight, shall be so con- 
structed that the inside of the same shall be at least Ave feet distant 
from the line of any adjoining lot or street, and at least twenty feet 
from any dwelling house, and shall be provided with a ventilation 
through the roof. The same shall not be used as cesspools nor receive 
drainage from the premises. The contents shall not be allowed to leak 
out or otherwise become offensive. All privy vaults shall be of a size 
sufficient to satisfy the Board of Health. 

Section III. All waste water shall be conveyed through sufficient 
drains uuder ground to a cesspool sunk under ground, which shall be 
of sufficient size to contain at least 80 cubic feet, and when not water- 
tight must be at least twenty feet from the cellar waif of any tenement 
or dwelling, and at least five feet distant from any adjoining lot or 
street. Cesspools shall be built in a thorough and substantial manner, 
as shall be approved by the Board of Health. 

Section IV. No person shall allow any drain or the overflow of any 
cesspool to enter any running stream, or any drain constructed for sur- 
face water, and no person shall sutler any house drainage or other offen- 
sive matter to remain in any cellar, or upon any lot or vacant, ground by 
such person owned or occupied. All privy vaults and cesspools within 
one hundred and fifty feet of any well or spring, the water of which is 
used for domestic purposes, must be water-tight. 

Section V. All privy vaults or cesspools must be thoroughly cleansed 
at least once in each year, and oftener if necessary for the public health, 
the expense to be borne by the owner of the property. 

Regulation 2. Section 1. The Board, when satisfied upon due ex- 
amination that a cellar, room, tenement, or building in the town occu- 



73 

pied as a dwelling place, has become by reason of the number of occu- 
pants, want of cleanliness, or other cause, untit for such purpose, and a 
cause of nuisance or sickness to the occupants or to the public, may issue 
a notice in writing to such occupants, requiring the premises to be put 
in proper condition, or if the Board see fit they may require the same to 
be vacated, and the same shall not be again occupied without the written 
permission of the Board. 

Section II. No person shall throw or put into any public place or 
pond, or running straam or body of water, or in any other place where 
the Board of Health may deem it a nuisance, any dead animal, animal 
matter, decayed fruit or vegetables, dirt or rubbish whatever; nor shall 
any person throw into or upon any flats within the jurisdiction of the 
town, any dead animals, filth, or offensive matter. 

Regulation 3. Swill and Offal. Section I. No person shall re- 
move or carry in or through any of the streets, lanes, or avenues, places 
or alleys within the town of Hyde Park, the conteuts of any cesspool, 
vault or privy well, swill or house offal (either animal or vegetable), or 
grease or bones, unless a permit be granted by the Board of Health upon 
such terms aud conditions as said Board may deem necessary. 

Section II. No person shall bury swill or house offal, or the contents 
of any cesspool, vault, privy or privy well within the iimits of the town 
of Hyde Park, unless a permit be granted by the Board of Health. 

Section III. Parties will be licensed by the Board of Health to collect 
swill and refuse matter from houses in Hyde Park twice a week or ofteu- 
er, and all housekeepers and others are directed to deliver the same to 
those duly authorized to make such collections. 

Regulation 4. Diseased Meat and Provisions. Section I. No per- 
son shall bring into the town, keep or offer for sale any diseased, putrid, 
stale or unwholesome meat, vegetables or provisions. 

Regulation 5. Swine. Section I. No person will be permitted to 
keep any swine within the limits of the town of Hyde Park, without a 
written permit from the Board of Health. 

' Regulation 6. Contagious Diseases. Section I. Any person sick 
with the small pox or other contagious disease, together with all persons 
in attendance upon them, and the premises, where such sick person is, 
will be subject to the control of the Board, and no person shall enter or 
leave a house wherein a person is, or has been sick with the disease, or 
in any way come in contact with the inmates of such house except by 
permission of the Board. 

Section II. Whenever the Board of Health shall ascertain that any 
person is sick with small pox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or any other dis- 
ease dangerous to the public health, the Board shall, at their discretion, 
have full control of said person or premises, and shall, if they deem 
proper, order the premises vacated. 



74 

Section III. All persons are warned not to approach a house or the 
surrounding premises whereupon is displayed a disease flag by day or a 
red light at night. 

Section IV. The bodies of all persons dying of small pox. scarlet 
fever, typhus fever or diphtheria, must be immediately disinfected and 
placed in a tight coffin, which shall not be re-opened, and the bed, bed 
clothing, and other clothing used by any such person, and by those in 
attendance upon him, and all the furnishings of the sick room, thor- 
oughly disinfected before being taken from the room. In the above 
case no public funeral will be allowed without permission from the Board 
of Health. 

Section V. The owner or person having charge of any vehicle, public 
or private, used at a funeral in the foregoing cases, to carry the de- 
ceased, shall forthwith report the fact to the Board of Health, and shall 
thoroughly disinfect such vehicle before the same is again used, and take 
such precaution as the Board of Health shall direct. 

Section VI. Any person in the Town of Hyde Park who knows or 
suspects any domestic animal has contagious disease (such as glanders 
in horses or cholera in swine), must immediately report the same to the 
Board of Health. The penalty for neglect to do so is fine or imprison- 
ment. The above is in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 252 of 
of the Acts of 1887. 

Regulations- 7. Section 1. All complaints in relation to nuisances 
and sources of tilth injurious to the public health and safety, must be 
made in writing to the Board of Health, with a description of said nuis- 
ance and of the premises ou which it exists, with the owner's name, if 
knowu to the complainant. -Such complaints must bear the signature of 
the complainant. Whenever such complaint shall be made as aforesaid, 
the Board of Health shall proceed to examine the premises complaiued 
of, and will take measures to abate the nuisance if such is found to 
exist. 

Regulation 8. Section 1 No person, firm or corporation not now 
engaged in or working at the business of plumbing shall hereafter en- 
gage in or work at said business in the town or Hyde Park, either as a 
master or employing plumber or as a journeyman plumber, unless such 
person, firm or corporation first receives a license therefor, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Chapter 477 of the Acts of the year 1893 of 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and Acts amendatory thereof, or 
supplementary thereto. 

Section II. Any person desiring to engage in or work at the business 
of plumbing, either as a master or ernployiug plumber, or as a journey- 
man plumber, shall apply to the Board of Health, and shall at such time 
and place as may be designated by the Board of Examiners appointed by 
the Boaid of Health, as provided for in said Acts, to whom such appli- 



7o 

cation shall be referred, be examined as to his qualifications for such 
business. In the case of a firm or corporation the examination and 
licensing of any one member of the firm, or the manager of the 
corporation, shall satisfy the requirements of this regulation. 

Section III. The Board of Examiners shall examine said applicants 
as to their practical knowledge of plumbing, house drainage and plumb- 
ing ventilation, and if satisfied of the competency of the applicant, shall 
so certify to the Board of Health. Said Board will thereupon issue a 
license to such applicant authorizing him to eugage in or work at the 
business of plumbing. The fees for a license for a master of employing 
plumber shall be two dollars; for a journeyman plumber it shall be fifty 
cents. Said license shall be issued anuually, expiring on the thirty-first 
day of May next ensuing, and shall be conditional on skilful work, and a 
strict observance of the rules governing plumbing. 

Section IV. No person shall carry on the business of plumbing unless 
he shall have first registered his name and place of business in the office 
of the Board of Health ; and notice of any change in the place of busi- 
ness of a registered plumber shall be immediately given to said Board. 

Section V. No person shall proceed to construct, add to, or alter any 
portion of the drainage system (except to repair leaks) of any building 
in the town of Hyde Park, until plans showing in detail the whole drain- 
age system shall have been filed at the office of the Board of Health, upon 
blanks in such form as the. Board may determine; no person shall com- 
mence work on such drainage system until the plans are accepted by the 
Inspector of Plumbing and a permit of approval granted. Plans and 
specifications shall be approved or rejected within five days of the time 
of filing. 

Rules and regulations for material, construction, etc., may be found in 
town by-laws. 

Regulation 9. The Board of Health hereby adjudges that the deposit 
of sputum in street cars, public buildings, or churches is a public nuis- 
ance, source of filih and cause of sickness, and hereby orders : That 
spitting upon any floor of any street car. public buildiug or church be, 
and hereby is. prohibited. 

Fully believing that a large proportion of contageous diseases origi- 
nate from unsanitary conditions, we trust that we shall have the aid of 
all citizens and property owners in carrying out the above regulations, 
which are based on statute laws, and the sanitary rules of our large 
towns. 

W. S. EVERETT, Chairman, 
E. C. FARWELL, Secretary, 
WM. W. SCOTT, 

Board of Health. 



76 

To W. S. Everett, Chairman and Member Board of 
Health, Hyde Park, Mass. 

I herewith submit to you my second annual report as 
Agent and Plumbing Inspector : 

The duties of this position have greatly increased during 
the year, but this of course was to be expected in order to 
bring the sanitary affairs of the town up to the standard of 
communities similarly situated to ours in the demands of the 
citizen for improvement. Also the desire of the Board of 
Health to have all work done by day labor and by residents 
of the town has in no small measure increased the responsi- 
bilities. Agreeable to your orders there has been built 
a frame building 37x14 to be used as a dump for swill at 
Eeadville. 

There was also constructed a drain to remove stagnant 
water on Central avenue near Page street. Realizing the 
costly errors that could occur by lack of absolute know- 
ledge in regard to putting in drains, ditches, etc., and 
feeling that such work was of vital importance in improving 
the sanitary condition, I recommended the purchase of 
suitable instruments to obtain grades and levels, which 
recommendations were adopted and instruments purchased. 
Since then studies nave been made as to the practicability 
of draining and putting in a healthful condition several lo- 
calities in the town, and subscriptions were recieved from 
owners in the Rugby district in order that the territoryfrom 
from Blake street to the Boston line at Rugby station, 
might be drained. 

This work was done under my immediate supervision and 
proves to be of great benefit in the maintenance of healthful 
conditions and personal comfort of all persons who live in 
or have occasion to pass through that district, and materially 
increasing the value of the real estate, rendering land that 
would otherwise be useless, suitable for occupation. 



77 

There have been posted notices of contagious diseases on 
94 houses, and upon recovery or death of patients, 165 
rooms have been fumigated with Formaldeheyde gas. The 
Greenwood and Amos Webster schools have been thorough- 
ly disinfected, and the books used in the same schools have 
also been specially treated. I have also disinfected several 
houses, on request of householders, when infected by dis- 
eases and conditions which are not reported under the 
statutes. 

Your attention is respectfully called to the decrease in 
the number of cases of preventable diseases from that of 
previous years when no systematic method of controlling 
them was followed. 

There have been made to this office, both verbally and in 
writing, 160 complaints which I have investigated, and 
reported to the Board of Health those which were not 
settled at once without further action. 

The collection of swill presented new difficulties over last 
year, not only on account of natural growth, but from the 
fact that we had to collect store refuse of this class to pre- 
vent its becoming a nuisance on the common dump. How- 
ever, by the help of an extra team during the warm months 
the work w<is done satisfactorily. I would repeat my sug- 
gestion of last year that the citizens of the town be requested 
to provide suitable water-tight receptacles for swill, and to 
refrain from putting into them cans, bottles, or any material 
that cannot be disposed of as swill. 

INSPECTION OF P'LLMBING. 

There have been 233 applications to do plumbing, filed at 
this office during the year ending Jan. 31, 1899, for which, 
permits were granted, for work amounting to about $30,000, 
and which necessitated over 500 tests and inspections. The 
changes in the by-laws adopted by the town, governing 



plumbers, which went into effect near the commencement 
of the year ; have proven practical and easily followed. The 
class of work done in the town was far above the average of 
that in neighboring cities and towns. All violations of the 
rales, and mistakes, have been cheerfully rectified as soon 
as called to the plumber's attention. I desire to express to 
them my thanks for their efforts in the line of better sanitary 
work. Respectfully submitted, 

C. T. LOVELL, 
Health Officer and Inspector of Plumbing. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURES. 



INCIDENTALS. 



Paid Wm. F. Dodge, janitor and cash paid out, 
Win. F. Dod^e, rent Waverly hall, 
Delia Long, soldier's relief, 
S. II. Moselej', printing and advertising, 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, 
Dedham & H. P. Gas & EI. Lt Co., lighting, 
Corson Ex. Co., carriage hire & expressing, 
A. Raymond, carriage hire, 
M. R. Warren, stationer}-. 
Thorp & Martin Co., stationery, 
F. L. Hodgdon & Co., " 
Greenongh, Adams & dishing, stationery, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., coal, 
F. W. Darling Co., coal, 
H. F. Arnold, receiver, electrical work, 
Little, Brown & Co , Mass. digest, 
Edwin C. Jenney, postage, 
Edwin C. Jenney, professional services, 
Henry A. Rich, rent, 
Dodge & Tyler, paper, 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service, 
Dr. J. M. Kiggen, inspecting animals, 
Frank A. Townsend, land damages, 
Storey & Thorndike, professional services,, 
Henry S. Biinton, pay-roll ballot clerks and 

tellers at election, 
Soley & Smith, labor, 

Geo. W Chapman, copying & cash paid out, 
Geo. Sanford, collecting taxes, 
L. Louise McKay, clerical work, 
James E. Cotter, professional services, 
Hyde Park Times, advertising, 
Daniel J. Hanlon, M. D., birth returns, 
L.M.Gould, 



$438 


65 


210 00 


195 


00 


1,788 


65 


120 00 


16 


49 


69 


40 


25 


00 


24 71 


24 


35 


14 76 


72 


25 


32 


50 


43 


50 




70 


7 


00 


' 19 


90 


50 


48 


956 


62 


3 


00 


262 


20 


150 


00 


39 


75 


40 


00 


196 


00 


100 


00 


28 


00 


1,603 


08 


25 


00 


930 


42 


178 


25 


28 


75 


2 


25 



80 

E. H. Baxter, M. I)., birth- returns, 
Lucy B. Hall, 

C. C. Partridge " 

H. R. Hitchcock, 

F. L. Babcock, 
J. T. Tibbetts, 

J. II. O'Connor. " " 

A. D. Holmes. " " 

J. C, Lincoln, " " 

Forbes Lithograph Co., bonds, 
Henry B Terry, obtaining, recording and 

indexing births, marriages and deaths, 
Wni. H. Mummer, labor, 
library Bureau, index cards, 
Hyde Bark Ice Cream Co., lunches at election, 

E. M. Farnsworth, typewriting, 
A. L. Fisher, stationery, 
Ryan's Express Co., expressing, 
H. C. Dimond Co., stencils, 
Alfred and-H. F. Hersey, damages, 
Quincy Dyer, supplies, 

Orpin Bros., table, 

H. A. Haskell, keys, 

L W". Parkhurst, keys, 

Sampson, Mnrdock Co., directory, 

George H. Adler, shades, 

Wm. K. Howe, rent Casino hall, 

C. C. Hoffman & Co., stamp, 

Win. J. Ellis, burial soldiers, 

A. W. Dunbar, painting, 

Adams Express Co., expressing, 

John Mahoney, carriage, 

James McKay, serving dog warrants, 

M. A. Chase, copying, 

Magee Furnace Co , stove, 

F. C. Graham, ambulance, 

Henry B. Terry, registrar of voters and cler- 
ical services, 
J. B. Chadbourne, registrar of voters, 
A. T. Rogers, 
Wm. S, O'Brien, 
Daniel O'Connell, serving notices, 



$;s 


75 


1 


00 


5 


25 


9 


50 


1 


00 


7 


00 


2 


75 


8 


75 


3 


25 


40 


00 


221 


95 


30 


80 


2 


40 


112 


60 


2 


00 


3 


05 


5 


92 


1 


50 


50 


00 


14 


50 


32 


00 




75 




90 


5 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 




75 


35 


00 


17 


47 


1 


30 


2 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


12 


00 


100 


00 


40 


00 


40 


00 


40 


00 


11 


70 



81 

Paid J. W. Mills, supplies, $1 95 
S. P. Ferguson, witness fees, 10 00 
John Johnston, repairing carriage, 25 00 
W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 32 90 
Henry B. Terry, ^services to'selectmen, 200 00 
Mahoney's Express, expressing, 20 
Henry M. Meek, blanks, 3 00 
C. E. Davenport, ice, 13 89 
F. F. Hodges, assignee, hardware, 40 
John Crosby, death returns, - 15 50 
Geo. L. Richardson, plans, 6 00 
Geo. W. Stadly & Co., atlas, 25 00 
Hartford Steam Boiler Ins. & Ins. Co., insur- 
ance premium, 172 50 
L. W. Berry & Co., supplies, 3 83 
Commenwealth of Mass., inspecting boiler, 4 00 
Hyde Park. Furniture Co., furniture, 48 50 
Pekin Tea Co., pitcher, 88 
George W Lockwood, Secretary Board ol 

Selectmen, 150 00 
U. Hulzer, binding, 136 50 
County of Norfolk, entry fee, 3 00 
Geo. W. Chapman, Sec. of Assessors, 150 00 
Elizabeth K. Jenney, cleiical work, 60 00 
PaineFurniture Co., furniture, 37 00 
F. C Graham, burial of soldiers, 210 00 
R. F. Boynion, salary Inspector of Build- 
ings and cash paid out, 225 58 
Hyde Park Ice Co., ice, 3 00 
Charles F. Jenney, professional services, 1U8 22 
Murphy, Leavens & Co., brushes, 6 50 



--$10,314 85 



Ck. 

By balance unexpended from last year, $ 492 00 

Appropriation, March 30, 1898, 9,500 00 

Transfer from Street Water acct. Nov. 30, '98, 904 85 



-$10,896 85 



Balance unexpended, $582 00 

Note.— Of this balance, $471 set apart by town for Assessors' 
plans. 



82 

POLICE. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton, treasurer, police service 

as per pay roll, $7,693 03 

Richard W. Gould, steward and cash paid 

out, 249 60 

James G. Bolles, labor and stock, 3 90 

Charles E. Yeaton, labor and stock, 5 00 

F. W. Darling Co., coal, 106 25 

Hyde Park Elec. Lt. Co., lighting, 103 52 

W. H. Flummer, labor and stock, 77 

A. P. Bickmore, mattresses, 1 50 

F. L. Hodgdon & Co., stationery, 3 02 

H. F. Arnold, receiver, electrical work, 85 

A. Raymond, carriage hire, 17 00 

Corson Express Co*., carriage hire, 15 00 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service, 91 65 

J. Snellgrove, carriage hire, 4 00 

L. W. Berry & Co., supplies, 1 10 

Charles E. Palmer, labor and stock, 16 03 

E. Q. Dyer, supplies, 18 91 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 3 50 
Hyde Park Furniture Co., furniture, 5 00 
Wm. H. Barritt, photograph, 1 50 
R. D. Colburn & Co., electrical work, 3 25 
J. Johnston, labor, 1 50 
Lyon Electric Novelty Co., lamps, 13 80 
W. E. Smalling, labor, 1 75 
W. W. Poole, laundry, 3 95 
Chas. E. Davenport, ice, 14 76 
A. D. Holmes, M. D., services, 5 00 

F. C. Graham, embalming, 6 00 



$8,391 14 



Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, $ 585 50 

Appropriation, March 30, 1898, 7,500 00 

Appropriation, Nov. 30, 1898, 500 00 



,585 50 



Balance unexpended, $194 36 



• 83 

HIGHWAYS. 

Paid Henry S Bunton, Treas., labor as per pay 
rolls, 
Jeremiah Corbett, removing snow, 
John Jolinston, blacksmithing, 
M. O'Connor, 
F. W. Conn, 
Frank Kunkel, '• 

E. J. Chandler, hardware, 

E. Q. Dyer, 

F. L. Hodgdon & Co., stationery, 
Thomas Corrigan, removing snow, 
D. W. iMahoney, " 
C. E. Davenport, " 
Thomas Sweeney, " 
A. W. Dunbar, labor and stock, 
Benjamin Rafter, " 
A. Raymond, shipping horses, 
Hyde Park Elec. l.t. Co., lighting, 
.lames Mackintosh, repairing, 
C. C. Chisholm, concreting, 
Peter Shepherd, " 
S. B. Balkam & Co., l.imber, etc., 
Dodge & Tyler, hay and feed, 
H. A. Collins, 

Ryan's Express, expressing, 
Union Road Mch. Co., plow, 
Corson Express Co., use of horses and ex- 
pressing, 

Miies & Morrison, supplies, 

W. S. Weston, tools 

George H. Sampson, forcite, etc., 

Kivlin & (Jo., labor, 

Henry S. Bunton, Treas., cash paid out for 

freight, 
Walworth Mfg. Co., pipes, 
Hyde Park Water Co., pipes, 
James H. Cooke, stone, 
A. J. Wellington, hardware, 
Brainard Foundry, guide posts, 
James Russell Boiler Works, repairing 

boiler, 45 00 



,977 


74 


57 


43 


751 


14 


42 


00 


26 


35 


3 


25 


2 


35 


674 


68 


1 


47 


51 


76 


56 


87 


12 


00 


50 


90 


62 


35 


330 


47 


2 


50 


44 


72 


91 


50 


207 


65 


464 


15 


361 


44 


654 


33 


50 


85 


12 


00 


50 


00 


101 


05 


2 


33 


50 


00 


82 


25 


58 


20 


65 


35 


4 


78 


42 


63T 


51 


51 


152 


33 


236 


50 



84 
Paid J. H. Houghton, repairing roller, 

E. A. VV. Hammett, engineering, 
Peter Fallon, labor, 

Hyde Park Marble & GranHe Works, stone, 

Ames Plow Co.. patrol cart, 

Brainard Milling Mach. Co., repairing, 

American Tool & Mach. Co., labor and stock, 

Boston B lower Co., plates, 

Leon I. Thompson, supplies, 

F. VV. Darling, coal and hay, 
W. E. Sjnalling, labor, 

S. A. Tucker, gravel, 

S. A. Tuttle. Elixir, 

John .1. Turner, stone, 

Boston Lightning Rod Co., hay, 

Imperial Harness Oil Co., oil, 

James S. Coveney, gravel, 

W. S. Kelley Co., roller apparatus, 

Ordway, Kimball & Loring, harness supplies, 

James Hayes, land damages and labor, 

Ellen A. Corbett, damages, 

Edward Hankard, " 

Walters, Governor Co., post braces, 

Thomas H. Corrigan, gravel, 

Clark, Brown & Co., oil, 

W. 1>. Preston, stone, 

E. J. Coleman, labor, 

Cutter, Wood & Stevens Co., belt, 

Metropolitan Harness Oil Co., oil, 

James Tucker, stone, 

W. G. Robinson, labor, 

J. A. Whhtemore Sons & Co., stone, 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone, 

F. F. Hodges, ass igee hardware, 
Patrick H. Rooney, labor, 

A. H. Richardson. Jr., land damages, 
Thorp, Martin Co., stationery, 
J. L. & H. K. Potter, brake, 
Dr. A. M. Soule, services, 
H. C. Dimond Co., stencil, 
George E. Whiting, use of ledge, 
William E. Keane, gravel, 



$48 34 
97 68 
22 42 

145 25 

24 00 

4 00 
3 59 

43 80 
17 90 
73 50 
58 87 
160 27 

2 00 
11 75 

3 15 

5 50 
180 75 

13 00 

34 44 
40 00 

25 00 
50 00 

2 80 
47 00 

4 75 
2 25 

25 00 
15 02 

1 00 
11 10 
65 00 
33 60 

10 

4 85 

10 00 

75 00 

2 00 
15 00 
15 50 

50 
150 00 

35 00 



— $16,512 *1 



85 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, 
.Appropriation, 
Street assessments, 
Sidewalks, 



$686 85 

15,000 00 

2,450 38 

227 63 



$18,364 8Q 



Balance unexpended, 



$1,852 35 



HYDE PARK 


AVENUE 






Paid Henry S. Bunton, treasurer, 


^abor as per 






pay rolls, 


$4,6(>9 


72 


Wm. H. Barritt, photograph, 




5 


00 


James S. Coveney, gravel, 




48 


25 


E. A. VV. Hammett, engineering, 


244 


30 


Henry S. Bunton, trustee, land 


damages, 


300 


00 


Geo. E. Whiting, 




246 


00 


Alex. Blackwood, ' 




100 


00 


James McGuinness, ' 




109 


00 


Lydia M. Fisher, ' 




40 


00 


Mary J. Risk, ' 




8 


00 


Wm. McDonald, ' 




86 


00 


Howard White, ' 




75 


00 


Heirs of Catherine Pfaff, ' 




30 


00 


A. P. Blake, agt., 




700 00 


Geo. S. Lee, trustee, ' 




1.847 


00 


Israel Nesson, ' 




375 


00 


Est. James L. Little, ' 




175 


00 


Wm. Lynch, • 




90 


00 


Edward A. Turner, ' 




100 


00 ' 


Hannah L. Ward, ' 




500 


00 


S B. Balkam & Co., lumber, etc. 




111 


18 


W. G. Robinson, labor, 




41 


75 


Hyde Park Marble & Granite Works 


, stone, 


178 


70 


Geo. E. Whiting, gravel, 




853 


00 


Soley & Smith, labor, 




55 


80 


F. M. Colby, bags, 




32 


40 


Wm. McDonald, gravel, 




56 


50 


Austin McGinness. gravel, 




112 


30 


T. H. Corrigan, stone, 




200 


00 

$11,329 90 



86 




Cr. 




By amount of appropriation, $17,000 00 


Balance unexpended, 


$5,670 10 


EASTON AVENUE. 




Paid Benj. Rafter, labor, $ 10 00 
Jeremiah Corbett, labor, 65 00 


$75 00 


Cr. 


By balance unexpended from last year, 


$75 00 


GREENWOOD AVENUE. 




Paid L. T. Corrigan, labor, $205 00 
E. A. W. Hammett, engineering, 12 75 
Hyde Park Marble & Granite Works, stone, 1 60 
James McKay, serving notices, 5 99 


$225 34 



Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, $443 34 



HUNTINGTON AVENUE. 

Paid Hyde Park Marble & Granite Works, stone, $ 22 20 

L. T. Corrigan, labor, 598 20 

E. A. W. Hammett, engineering, 19 75 

Elizabeth R. McLellan, land damages, 36 00 

Geo. H. Rausch, " 15 00 

Alice G. Rausch, " 15 00 

James McKay, serving notices, 5 50 



Balance unexpended, $218 00 



'11 65 



Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, $720 34 

Balance unexpended, $ 8 69 



87 

WESTMINSTER STREET 

Paid L. T. Corrigan, labor, 

E. A. W. Hammett, engineering, 

Hyde Park Marble & Granite Works, stone, 

Charles E. Palmer, labor, 

Daniel O'Connell, serving notices, 

Wm. E. Norwood, land damages, 

Ewen MeSwain, " 

James S. Coveney, " 

Patrick M. Donohne, " 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, 

Balance unexpended, $382 69 



2,350 00 




64 50 




59 40 




8 00 




3 90 




50 00 




50 00 




50 00 


- 


100 00 






$2,735 80 
$3,118 49 





GARFIELD AVENUE. 

Paid T. H. Corrigan, labor, $186 25 

E. A. W. Hammett, engineering, 16 75 

Honora J. MeGrath, land damages, 15 00 

James McGraih, " 15 00 

Arthur T. Rogers, " 25 00 

James R. Rogers, " 25 00 

Hyde Park Marble & Granite Works, stone, 2 40 

Benj. Rafter, labor, 21 08 

James McKay, serving notices, 4 60 

$311 08 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, . $366 12 

Balance unexpended, $55 04 



FRANKLIN TERRACE. 

Paid Jeremiah Corbett, labor, $25 00 

E. A. W. Hammett, engineering, 3 00 

Hyde Park Marble & Granite Works, stone, . 80 

James McKay, serving notices, 1 25 



$30 05 
Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, $132 62 

Balance unexpended, $102 57 



NORWAY PARK. 

Paid E. A. W. Haminett, engineering, $ 82-80 

James McKay, serving notices, 1 75 

Henry S. Bunion, treasurer, labor as per pay 

rolls, 1,165 45 

$1,200 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, $1,200 00 



FIRE HYDRANTS. 



Paid Hyde Park Water Co., hydrant service, $5,622 23 
" " removing hydrants, 16 93 

$5,639 16 

Cr 
By amt. of appropriation, $5,639 16 



STREET WATER. 



Paid Henry S. Bunton, treasurer, labor as per 

pay-rolls, $1,281 50 

Walworth Mfg. Co., valves, 29 05 

Hyde Park Water Co., water and removing 
cranes, 434 17 

J. L. & H. K. Potter, water cart, 356 25 



Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, $ 505 82 

Amount of appropriation, 2,500 00 



,100 97 



5,005 82 



Balance unexpended, $904 85 

Note.— This balance transferred to Incidental act. Nov. 30, 1898. 



STREET LIGHTS. 

Paid Hyde Park Elec. Lt. Co., lighting, $8,999 13 

Chas. T. Peck, lighting and cash paid out, 161 64 

Geo. W. Morse, repairing lights, 3 50 

$9,167 27 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, $ 516 08 

Amount of appropriation, 8,850 00 

$9,366 08 



Balance unexpended, $198 81 



89 



SALARIES. 

Paid Frank B. Rich, services as selectman, 
Stillman E. Newell, " 

Edward Q. Dyer, 
John Johnston, " 

Fred Y. French, " 

Henry B. Terry, services as town clerk, 



Henry S. Bunton, 
Charles F. Morrison, 
Thomas E. Faunce, 
Geo. VV . Chapman, 
Charles Lewis, 
Geo. E. Haven, 
Geo. VV. Chapman, 
W. S. Everett, 
Edwin C Farwell, 
Win. W, Scott, 
Charles F. Jenney, 
Geo. E. Whiting, 
Clarence U. Meiggs, 
Ferdinand A. Wymah, 
David Perkins, 
Wm. U. Fairbairn, 
Calvin P. Fellows, 
Joseph J. Houston, 
Howard S. Thompson, 



By amount ot appropriation, 



treasurer, 
assessor, 



overseer of poor 



board of health, 



cemetery com'sr, 



sewer com s n r, 



auditor, 



Cr. 



frlOO 00 
100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

250 00 

400 00 

300 00 

300 00 

300 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



Paid Richard M. Kennedy, labor, 
Chas. M. Wand lass, " 
Suannage Bros , " 

Geo. H. Whittier, electrical work, 
J. A. & A. M. M. Soule, services, 
H. H. Ostrom & Co., electrical work, 
Charles A. Swinton, driver, 
Stewart McKenzie, repairing, 
J. J. Mackey, labor, 
J. Barritt, labor, 



$2,950 00 



$2,950 00 



! 3 20 

42 55 

1 50 

195 50 

12 00 

30 00 

5 00 

3 50 

4 50 
9 00 



90 

Paid E. Q. Dyer, snpplies, $74 78 

Margaret. Jenkins, washing, . 47 61 
Geo. M Stevens & Co., fire alarm supplies, 454 18 

John Johnston, blacksmithing, etc., 151 44 

James Mackintosh, harness work, 115 70 

Henry S. Bunton, treas , pay rolls, 3,119 03 

Frank Kunkel, labor and use of horse, 73 20 

Dodge & Tyler, hay, etc., 443 29 

N E. Tel. & Tel. Co , telephoning, 50 99 

Corson Ex. Co., express and use of horses, 195 05 

F. W. Sawtelle & Co., hay, etc., 47 74 

H. A Colliins & Co., hay, etc., 26 06 

W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 9 25 

Hyde Park Elec. Lt. Co., lighting, 200 72 

S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber and coal, 192 22 

Hose Co. No. 1, 350 00 

2, 395 83 

3, 283 32 
Hook & Ladder Co., 487 50 
Chemical. 150 00 
Benj. Rafter, chief engineer, 112 50 
J. C. McDougald engineer, 75 00 
Wm. H. Holtham, " 37 50 
J. H. Wetherbee, " 37 50 
J. S. Rafter, clerk and cash paid out, 28 50 
Revere Rubber Co., repairing hose, 11 00 
A. W. Dunbar, labor and stock, 16 47 
Benj. Rafter, labor and stock, 11 23 
J. A. W. Bird & Co., chemicals, 40 56 
Hyde Park Furniture Co., furniture, 22 82 
Gifford & Bolles, labor and stock, 2171 
W. H. Moulton & Co , extinguisher, 55 00 
C. W. H. Moulton, ladder, 125 00 
Boston Woven Hose & Rubber Co., hose, 35 00 
Rich Bros., dry goods, 14 90 
Hyde Park Times, printing, 12 00 
J. A. Crowley, medicines, 1 50 
Mark E. Noble, bottles, 79 
L. G. Stone, packing, 10 00 
Chas. E. Berry, names, 18 00 
S. A. Tuttle, elixir, 4 00 
O. A. Kelley & Co., horse, 145 00 



91 



Paid Samuel Eastman & Co ., nozzles, 
Cornelius Callahan & Co., hose, 
B. B. Kivlin, labor, 
Goodhue Electric Co., protector, 
W. G. Robinson, labor, 
Mark W. Cross & Co., knives, 
F. F. Hodges, assignee, hardware, 
M. Galligan, supplies, 
E. W. Lombard, labor, 
Harry Tufts, labor, 

Broad Guage & Iron Works, planking, 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 
Mrs. Foley, washing, 
Dr. J. M. Kiggen, services, 
T. Murphy, blacksmiching, 
L. J. French & Co.. supplies, 
Hyde Park Caramel Co., lunches, 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, 
Amount of appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



$135 00 




21 70 




32 17 




100 00 




4 00 




5 00 




3 27 




9 22 




4 00 




2 00 




8 10 




2 75 




2 25 




4 00 




6 00 




31 46 




2 20 







$8,383 76 


$ 157 58 




9,075 00 






$9,232 58 





$818 82 



ADDITIONS TO ENGINE HOUSE. 



Paid E. N. Billiard, driver, 

W. P. Whittemore, driver, 

Cr. 
Balance unexpended from last year, 

Balance unexpended. 



$50 00 
50 00 



$100 00 

$130 17 
$30 17 



PUBLIC PARKS. 

Paid S. R. Moseley, printing, 
Arthur T. Lovell. copying, 
John Haigh, trimming trees, 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, 

Balance unexpended, 



2 50 
12 50 

3 50 



$18 50 



$1,586 35 
$1,567 85 



92 

G. A. R. . 

Paid Timothy Ingraham Post, 121, G. A. R., $150 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, $150 00 



FOURTH OF JULY COMMITTEE. 

Paid T. C. Thompson, treas. committee, $250 00 

Cr. 

By amount of appropriation, $250 00 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



CURRENT EXPENSES. 

Paid Elizabeth Ainsworth, Librarian, 400 00 

Mary A. Hawley, asst. " 300 00 

H. A. Rich, agent, rent, 400 00 

F. D. Taylor, janitor, 30 84 

J. E. Ainsworth, janl or, 26 00 

R. B. Moseley, 24 00 

R. G. Cherringion, 53 00 

Mary Booth, cleaning, 38 93 

H. P. Electric Light Co., lighting, 129 02 

S B. Balkam & Co., coal, 68 50 

Library Bureau, cases and cards, 180 07 

F. J. Barnard & Co., binding, 196 30 

W. B. Kollock, insurance, 175 00 

E. Louise Jones, cataloguing, 374 61 

E. Ainsworth, " 151 86 

M. L. Cooey, " 92 90 

S. R. Moseley, printing, 75 00 

A. R. Andrews, lypwriter, 106 27 

Ryan's Express, expressage, 17 95 

E. M. Cundell, expressage to Readville, 22 00 

F. W. Gleason & Co., plumbing, 1 43 

G. L. Hemmenway, cataloguing, - 20 00 
J. A. Paine, carpenter, 1 25 
Dennison Mfg. Co., tags, 2 60 
C. A. Cummings, examining plans, 25 00 
Whitney Bros., paper, 3 .84 



93 



Paid Miss Andrews, typewriting. 
Hyde Park Times, advertising, 
Higgins, Snow& Co., paper, 
Clark & Russell, architects, 
A. C. Libby & Son, blank book, 
Carter, Rice & Co., paper, 
Rich Bros., dry goods, 
F. L. Hoclgdon, ink, etc., 
Incidental supplies, 



Cr. 



By balance unexpended, 
Appropriation, 
Rec'd for fines, 



Balance unexpended, 

PDBIIC LIBRARY BUILDING. 

Appr. June 22,:,1898, 
Sale of Bonds, 

Paid for Hoogs' lot, . ■ 

Additional land, 
Clark & Russell, 
S. B. Balkam & Co , 
Account of Bonds, 
G. L. Richardson, 
H. P. Clark, 
George Howard, 



$4 50 
4 00 
y 92 

12 60 
1 30 

19 00 
I 85 
1 75 

23 00 



4 95 

3,000 00 

35 46 



,994 34 



5,040 41 

$46 07 



BOOKS. 



Paid A. W. King, 
Little, Brown & Co., 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., 
J. H. Stark, 
David Bentley, 
D. Appleton & Co., 
T. D. Tooker, 
Jordan, Marsh & Co., 
Smith & Cance, 



6,500 


00 


26,292 


50 





— $32,792 50 


$6,000 00 


6,500 


00 


550 


98 


5 


59 


20 


59 


50 


50 


220 


00 


9,750 00 


471 


00 





— $23,568 66 




$9,223 84 


16 


00 


676 


29 


,6 


00 


V 


50 


2 


00 


6 


00 


1 


00 


75 


40 


3 


00 



94 

PaidH. D. Noyes & Co ., 

F. J. Barnard & Co., binding, 
E. Ainsworth, cataloguing, 
M. L. Cooey, " 

E. L. Jones, " 



Cr. 



By balance unexpended, 
Licences, 



$156 


10 






i 50 


37 






23 


07 






20 


00 






60 


00 








— 


$1,102 


73 




582 


94 






803 


20 











$1,386 14 



Balance unexpended, $283 41 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

To appropriation, 
Balance last year, 

Paid E. C. Farwell, services as sec'y, 

C. T. Lovell, inspector, health officer, 
P. Anderson, collecting swill, 

A. G. Matthews, 
. Mrs. F. Hukin, " 

J. Barry, " 

W. D. Ward, blank book, 

M. O'Connor, shoeing, repairing, 

J. Johnston, sled, shoeing, repairing, 

C. H. Leeds, printing, 

D. W. Mahoney, stone work, 
J. Faulkner, labor, 
C. M. Wandlass, labor, 
Studley & Simpson, corregated iron, 
Mass. Boards of Health, 
W. E. Smalling, galvanizing pipe, 

B. E. Phillips, painting, 
S. B. Balkam & Co.. lumber, 

E. J. Chandler, hardware, 
J. Corbett, gravel, 
U. Gray, labor, 
Corson's Express, 
L. I. Thompson, jug, 



$4,000 00 


67 


41 




«84. 0fi7 4.1 






$200 00 


973 


76 


633 


66 


633 


66 


648 


00 


31 


50 


1 


38 


22 


50 


81 


05 


16 


50 


20 


00 


22 


05 


28 


35 


55 


24 


10 


00 


9 


20 


1 


to 


29 


71 


4 


75 


3 


75 


3 00 


4 


90 




45 



95 

Paid Ditch 01 Central avenue, $18 00 

C. E. Jenney, service of notice, 

E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 
W. S. Everett services & cash paid out, 
G. Adler, window shades, 
J. A. Crowley, chloride of lime, 

F. A. Sawtelle, cement, 
F. L. Hodgdon, baskets, 
J. J. McCarthy, labor, 

D. O'Connell, serving notices, 
C. W. Farwell. labor, 
H. F. Arnold, letter press and fixtures, 
Paine Furniture Co., furnishing for room, 
F. A. Hall, Gurley level, 
J. Farwell, book-case, labor on tables, etc., 
A. M. M. Soule, services, 
J. Quigley, painting, 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 
W. W. Scott, horse, money paid out, 
F. P. McGregor, printing, 
Drain at Rugby, 

Balance unexpended, $ 5 94 

Received from sale ot swill from May 1, 1897, to 

Jan. 31, 1899^ 
Received from Selectmen for drains, 



1 


65 


10 


78 


29 


95 


3 


00 




19 


6 


90 


1 


24 


5 


00 


5 


20 


15 


00 


6 


25 


61 


50 


50 


00 


31 


00 


2 


50 


4 00 


10 


00 


19 


90 


4 


25 


347 


25 




— $4,061 47 



Paid P. Martin, labor, 
F. Rogers, labor, 
D. W. Mahoney, stone work, 
T. Quigley, painting, 
P. Anderson, collecting swill, 

A. G. Matthews, collecting swill, 

B. Benari, boots, 

C. Leeds, printing, 

F. L. Hodgdon, books, 

D. O'Connell, serving notice, 
W. E. Smalling, oil can, etc., 

E. Jenney, typewriting, 
Box rent, 

Mahoney's Express, 
Adams Express, 



$305 


25 


11 


75 


12 


00 


2 


15 


5 


00 


9 


30 


37 


CO 


37 


00 


19 


00 


4 50 


1 


20 


4 85 




35 




75 


2 


50 




35 




90 



$317 00 



96 

Paid A. Gault, burying dog, $ 1 00 

E White, labor, 24 00 

C. Booth, burying dog, 1 00 

S. B. Balkam, 46 19 

W. W. Scott, cash paid out, 10 50 

F. Kunkel, repairs, 6 70 

E. C. Farwell cash paid out, 16 75 

Mass. Association B. of H., 7 50 

S. R. Mos.eley, printing, 1 50 

C. T. Lovell, postal cards, 10 00 

J. Johnston, repairs, 6 90 

$268 89 

Cash on hand, $48 11 



CEMETERY EXPENDITURES. 

Paid, land purchased, $764 47 

Pay roll. 848 70 

Schlegel & Fottler, grass seed, 9 00 

F. W. Darling, cement, 30 00 
Hyde Park Water Co., 16 99 
Quinnipiac Co., fertilizer, 32 00 
Perry Nursery Co., plants, 5 00 
A. W. Dunbar', painting, 11 92 
Ames Plow Co., shovels, etc., 16 31 
A. M. Norton Co., pipe, 8 81 
Boston Blower Co., repairs, 1 00 
R. & J. Farquhar & Co., bulbs, 15 25 
Town of Hyde Park, H. S. Bunton, treas., 

use of steam roller, 10 00 

James W. Vinal & Co., hinges, etc., 4 14 

W. H. Rice, agent, corner posts, 19 50 

S. R. Moseley, printing books, 18 50 

Phi. Allen, markers, 12 00 

E. A. W. Hammett, surveying, 62 65 

American Powder Co., dynamite, 13 50 

S. B. Balkam & Co , pipe and cement, 32 56 

Ryan's Express, 2 90 

Q. Dyer, sundries, 2 35 

Wellington & Co., fuse, 2 00 

J. Hudson, sharpening tools, 4 30 

G. E. Webb, making bier, 7 30 
Burt Bros., oak plank, 1 00 



97 
Paid Hotchkinson, sawing, 

James Kingston, cutting wood, 
Patrick Mack, cutting wood. 
Superintendent's salary, 

Cr. 
Balance on band Jan. 31, 1897, 
Sale of lots. 
Sale of graves, 
Interments and tomb lees, 
Foundations, 
Wood. 
Award from Sewer Commissioners, 

Balance Jan. 31, 1899, 



$ 80 




8 00 




8 00 




300 00 







$2,268 45 


84,065 64 




1,565 00 




295 00 




542 00 




198 89 




4 00 




120-25 






16,790 78 






$4,522 33 



INSURANCE. 

Paid Wm. H. Norris & Son, insurance, $502 50 

Henry S. Bunton. " 4 00 

Henry B. Terry, " 216 00 

Hartford Steam Boiler Ins. & Ins. Co., ins., 77 50 

$800 00 

Cr. 

By amount of appropriation, $800 00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



SALARIES. 



Paid F. O. Draper, 

Paid W. H. Angleton, 
Em?rson Rice, 
A. W. Lowe, 
M. C. Howard, 
A. M. Linscott, 
Ruby Bridgman, 
M. E. Wood worth, 
E. A. Nichols, 



Paid A. W. Armstrong, 

E. De Senancour, 
J. E. Donovan, 

F. E. Barker, 
M. A. Keilly, 
J. K. Farnum, 



SUPERINTENDENT. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



L,581 00 



DAMON SCHOOL. 



Paid D. F. Hastings, 



Paid G. B. Gidney, 



HEMENWAY SCHOOL. 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 



i2,000 


00 


1,300 


00 


800 


00 


800 


00 


800 00 


60') 


00 


600 


00. 


600 


00 





— $7,500 00 


1,400 


00 


500 


00 


490 


00 


450 00 


150 


00 


10 


00 







WELD SCHOOL. 




Paid N. 
M. 


L. Ballou, 
Merrow, 


FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. - 


$225 00 
166 00 






Paid E. 
H. 
D. 


W. Cross, 
P. Cleaves, 
MacDonald, 




$1,400 00 
550 00 
435 00 



$3,000 00 



$450 00 



$500 00 



$391 00 



93 



Paid R. M. Morrell, 


$400 00 


M. L. Le Bourveau, 


450 00 


S. A. Coggeshall, 


450 00 


H. F. Packard, 


500 00 


J. S. Hammond, 


500 00 


H. A. Perry, 


250 00 


H. O. Thompson, 


500 00 


N. L. Ballou, 


225 00 


N. T. Mellen, 


107 50 


S. L. Gile, 


50 00 




?t 117 ?\0 




tpy,01i v\J 


GREW SCHOOL. 




Paid F. H. Dean, 


$1,400 00 


E. J. Strongman, 


550 00 


E. W. Harvey, 


487 50 


M. E. Bertram, 


500 00 


L. A. Littlefield, 


475 00 


" B. L. Bright, 


250 00 


J. G. Wardwell, 


437 50 


F. E. Harlow, 


500 CO 


A. J. Campbell, 


500-00 


M. M. Howes, 


500 00 


J. F. Ellis, 


. 450 00 


B. C. Sparrell, 


500 00 


A. F. Gragg, 


200 00 




$6,750 00 


GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 




Paid D. G. Thompson, 


$1,400 00 


F. A. Putnam, 


550 00 


H. L. Littlefield. 


500 00 


I. H. Murray, 


250 00 


<J. E. Johnson, 


437 50 


Emily Wood, 


260 00 


M. L. Raeder, 


317 50 


M. L. Wyman, 


450 00 


L. A. Richardson, 


380 00 


H. H. Dodge, 


225 00 


W. D. Ballou, 


212 50 


A. L. Childs, 


200 (0 


B. J. Rich, 


80 00 


M. C. McDonough, 


80 00 




$5,352 §• 



100 




AMOS WEBSTER SCHOOL. 




Paid G. L. Tilden. 


$500 00 


E. G. Plummer, 


450 00 


S. W. Mentlell. 


450 00 


A. F. Harrington, 


200 00 


E. J. Jones, 


200 00 




$1,800 00 



Paid B. H. Harnblin, 



Paid H. V. Harwood, 



MUSIC. 



TRUANT OFFICER-IN CHIEF. 



JANITORS. 
Paid O. A. Cook, High, 

A. W. Henderson, Damon, 
J. Kenney, Hemenway, 

G. F'. Wellington, Hemenway, 
Albert Cook, Butler, 
J. T, McConnell, Weld, 

B. H. Howes, Fairmount, 
J. A. Peterson, Grew, 
George McDonald, Greenwood, 

I. H. Winchenbaugh, Amos Webster, 



Paid F. 
E. 
S. 
J. 
F. 
J. 
F. 
E. 
J. 

E. 
F. 



FUEL. 
W. Darling Co., 30 tons of coal, High, $153 00 

C Jenney, trustee, 1 1-2 cords wood, High, 6.75 

B. Balkam & Co., 27 tons coal, " 139 28, 

B. Hamblen & Sons, 2 1-4 cords wood, " 11 25 

W. Darling Co., 49 1-2 tons coal, A's Web'r, 251 20 

B. Hamblen & Sens, 1 cord wood, " 5 00 
W. Darling Co., 46 tons coal, Greenwood, 232 55 

C. Jenney, trustee, 3-8 cord wood, " 1 69 

B. Hamblen & Sons, 2 14 " " 11 25 

2 1-2" Damon, 12 50 

C. Jenney, trustee, 1 " '« 4 50 
W Darling Co., 4 > tons coal, " 202 00 

63 1-5 " Fairmount, 319 06 

B. Hamblen & Sons, 3 c'ds. wood, " 15 00 

1 Weld, 5 00 



$700 J)0 



$250 00 



$540 00 
480 00 
100 00 
100 00 
65 00 
237 50 
540 00 
540 00 
540 00 
400 CO 



$3,542 50 
137,634 50 



101 

Paid S. B. Balkam &Co., 15 tons coal, " $ 75 7&. 

F. W. Darling Co., 2 " " 10 20 

" 4 foot wood, Grew. 3 50 

S. B. Balkam & Co., 71 1-4 tons coal, " 359 81 

J. B. Hamblen & Sons, 2 cords wood. Weld, 10 00 
*' 1-2 " Hemenway, 2 50 

S. B. Balkam & Co., 10 1-5 tons coal, " 51 00 

F. W. Darling Co., 3 " Butler, 18 00 

$1,900 79 



RECAPITULATION. 
Paid for Salaries, $37,634 50 

For Fuel, 1,900 79 



-$39,535 29 



Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, $ 610 50 
" amount of appropriation, 39,810 00 



$40,180 50 



Balance unexpended, $915 21 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Paid H. A. Collins & Co., sundries, $1 02 

W. McElwain, reflating blackboard, It 50 

J. V. Luf'kin, labor and stock, 8 95 

L. W. Park-hurst; keys, etc., 3 05 

B. Rafter, labor and stock, 7 05 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., flag, 4 50 

F. W. Gleason &Co., labor and stock, 53 39 

E. J. Chandler, hardware, 42 
Q. Dyer, sundries, 23 39 

D. & H. P. Gas & Electric Lt. Co., gas, 38 95 
Eklurfd & Emmons, moulding, 35 37 
A. W. Williams, glazing, 3 85 
H. A. Haskell, labor, 4 00 
J. J. Williams, tuning piano, 2 00 
W. D. Ward, frame, 3 00 

F. P. Rafter, care of guns, 12 00 
Hyde Park Furniture Co., table, 2 55 
H. H. Poore, dry goods, 6 60 
P. Sweeney, labor, , 17 00 

F. P. McGregor, printing, 3 00 

G. H Peare, plastering and painting, 50 00 
J. T. McConnell, carpentering, 28 75 
L. H. Fellows, use of plants, 10 00 
R. E. Cherrington. labor and stock, 6 30 
H. McElwain, restating blackboard, 20 00 
A. L. Hanchett, cash paid, 5 00 

E. J. Seavey, lumber, 12 51 
Jdayward Bros., school furniture, 152 08 

Wm. Read & Sons, repairing guns, 27 29 

Con. Clary, labor, 3 00 

HEMENWAY SCHOOL, 

Paid J. Kenney, labor and stock, $ 32 33 
Bobrick School Funiture Co, school furni- 
ture and labor, 5 45 



$556 47 



103 

Paid W. E. Smalling, labor and slock, $23 75 

Walker & Pratt Mfg. Co., grates & damper 7 10 

G. F. Wellington, labor and stock, 24 90 

E. S. Alden, sundries, 2 45 



AMOS WEBSTER SCHOOL. 

Paid J. Kenney, labor and stock, 
C. S. Davis & Co., dry goods, 
J. H. Winchenbangh, labor, 
J. Keith, cups and oil, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 
A. Raymond, teaming, 
W. D. Ward, repairing clock, 
Bobrick School Furniture Co., school fur- 
niture, 

E. J. Chandler, hardware, 
W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 
Eklund & Emmons, moulding, 
H. F. Arnold, labor and stock, 
A. P. Bickmore, settees and chairs, 
R. D. Colburn, labor, 
J. H. Hammett Co., mats, &c, 
Rich Bros., dry goods, 
H. McElwain, reslating blackboards, 
Q. Dyer, sundries, 
J. W. Jigger, labor, 
C. T Griffith, sundries. 
W. G. Coleswortby, cash paid for expressing, 

GREW SCHOOL. 

Paid Jenkins Bros., valves, $ 6 01 

G. H. Haskell, dry gcods, 16 47 

S. B. Ralkam & Co., lumber, 32 09 

Zimmerman & Co., shades and labor, 13 75 

F. H. Dean, reslating blackboards, 66 60 
U. Holzer, rebinding books, 4 25 
H. H. Ostrom, labor and stock, 11 50 

G. S. Perry & Co., dusters and mats 18 60 
F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 28 04 
E- J. Chandler, hardware, 24 97 
E. J. Peterson, labor, 41 15 



4 


25 




31 


82 


85 


1 


55 


5 


65 


4 


00 


2 


10 


60 45 


15 


46 


16 


57 


2 


55 


1 


84 


36 


60 


2 


15 


14 


26 




67 


32 00 


1 


35 


1 


85 


1 


80 




20 



$95 98 



$288 46 



104 

Paid H. M. Saunders, hardware, $15 72 

A. F. Haywood, repairing clocks, 5 50 

F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 2 00 

F. H. Dean, travelling expense, 6 30 
W. G. Robinson, masonry, 16 75 
M. E. Noble, oxalic acid, 25 
J. Ahern, repairing roof and stock, 89 50 
P. Sweeney, labor, 13 00 
P. Shinn, labor, 4 70 
Q. Dyer, Sundries, 9 19 
Brainard Foundry, grates, 9 00 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 2 00 
Exeter Machine Co., labor and stock 11 23 

G. S. Perry & Co., school furniture and labor, 211 83 
Miles & Morrison, sundries, 7 07 
L. W. Parkhurst, keys, &c, 1 90 
R. D. Coburn, labor and stock, 1 84 
W. G. Colesworthy, cash paid for expressage, 30 



FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Paid B. H. House, repairing flags, 
G. E. Webb, carpentery, 
W. D. Ward, repairing clock, 
M. E. Noble, chemicals, 
L. J. French, sundries, 
G. S. Perry, repairs 
F W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 
Q. Dyer, sundries, 
L. VV. Parkhurst, labor and stock, 
W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 
W. J. Wright, drum head, &c, 
J. J. Williams, tuning piano, 
C. T. Griffith, kejs, 
G. H. Haskell, dry goods, 
P. Sweeney, labor, 
J. G. Hamblin, painting and glazing, 
J. McKenna, labor, 
C. J. Higgins & Co., carpentry, 
F. W. Dean, reslating blackboard, 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 
W. McElwain, reslating blackboard 



3 


50 


14 


70 


1 


00 




48 


7. 


45 




50 


18 


88 


25 


9.3 


1 


70 


68 


85 


1 


53 


2 


00 




50 


12 


40 


5 


00 


L28 


75 


19 


00 


32 


50 


17 


55 


1 


75 


18 


00 



'1 51 



ft)5 

Paid Exeter machine Co., labor and stock, 

D. Field, labor, 

Haywood Bros., school furniture, 

E. W. Cross, traveling expense, 
Julius Schmitt, labor, 

G. W. Morse, labor, 

WELD SCHOOL. 

Paid W. McElwain, reslating blackboard, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 
L. J. French, sundries, 
G. W. McConnell, labor, 
Q. Dyer, sundries, 
W. E. Smalling, labor, 
J. T. McConnell, labor, 

GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Paid A. L. Perry, sundries, 
G. H. Haskell, dry goods, 
J. W. Jigger, labor and stock, 
G. D. McDonald, labor and stock, 
L. J. French, sundries, 
Q. Dyer, sundries, 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock 
H. H. Poore, dry goods, 

F. H. Dean, reslating blackboards, 

W. D. Estabrook, painting, 

F. P. McGregor, printing, 

P. Sweeney, labor, 

J. Ahern, labor on roof, 

Rich Bros., dry goods, 

A. F. Hayward, repairing clock, 

S. R. Moseley, printing, 

W. G. Robinson, masonry, 

S. B. Balkam &Co., lumber, 

W. G. Colesworthy, cash paid expressing, 



BUTLER SCHOOL. 

Paid A. F. Haywood, repairing clocks, $2 00 

Q. Dyer, sundries, 4 13 

R. Fillmore, plastering, 1 50 



$ 90 


22 


00 


337 


95 


1 


64 


1 


00 


7 


00 


$ 22 


87 


2 


60 


1 


60 


5 


00 




95 


1 


80 


30 


00 


$ 


60 


1 


98 


156 


24 


12 


35 




92 


16 


36 


8 


46 


4 


68 


42 


56 


535 00 


1 


50 


7 


00 


77 


10 




60 


9 


00 


1 


50 


38 


60 


1 


48 




25 



$760 28 



$64 82 



H6 18 



106 

Paid Jordan, Marsh & Co., flag, 
G. H. Peare, plastering, 
Albert Cook, labor, 

DAMON SCHOOL. 

Paid J. Kenney, labor and stock, 

A. W. Henderson, labor and stock, 
W. G. Robinson, repairing boiler, 
Boston Branch Store, sundries, 
Readville Cash Store, sundries, 

E. J. Chandler, hardware, 

W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 

L. W. Parkhurst, repairs, 

Q. Dyer, sundries, 

J. Ahem, repairing roof, 

H. H. Poore, dry goods, 

P. Sweeney, labor, 

F. H. Dean, restating blackboards, 
Rich Bros., dry goods, 

A. W. Dunbar, painting, 
L. I. Thompson, sundries, 
W. G. Robinson, masonry, 
J. A. Crowley, candles, 
S. B. Balkam, lumber, 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Coburn Stationery Co., blank book, 

S. R. Moseley, printing, stationery & adv., 
A. A. McBride, typewriting, 
F. P. McGregor, printing, 
W. G. Colesworthy, salary as sec. and agt., 
A. A. Dinsmore & Co., 51 gallons germol, 
J. Crowley, carriage hire, 
W. H. Smith, service?, 
Mahoney's Express, expressage, 
W. E. Smalling, sundries, 
Corson's Ex. Co., expressage, 
Ryan's Express, expressage, 
H. P. Elec. Lt. Co., electric lighting, 
A. L. Hanchett, traveling expenses, 
C. G. Chick, 
W. G. Colesworthy, " and tel. 



$6 50 


6 


00 


7 


30 


$10 25 


23 


35 


5 


0® 


1 


45 


1 


40 


8 


43 


21 


95 




40 


23 


80 


116 


92 




32 


13 00 


25 


00 


3 


60 


196 


26 


2 


61 


20 


94 


2 


00 


2 


54 


$ 7 00 


186 


25 


5 


00 


21 90 


200 


00 


77 


50 




50 


3 


00 


6 


70 


21 


75 


95 


07 


39 


40 


20 


00 


1 


50 


13 


56 


14 


01 



|27 43 



$482 22 



• 107 

Paid F. F. Courtney, traveling expenses, $ 2 13 

A. Washburn, " 3 25 

W. F. Dodge, salary as janitor, 51 00 

J. H. Daniels & Son, diplomas, 14 60 
W. G. Colesworthy, cash paid for stamps, 

express and music. 9 72 

H. W. Stone, lettering diplomas, 27 25 

Masten & Wells Mfg. Co., flags, 1 80 

C. H. Leeds, printing, 10 00 

F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 2 00 
W. W. Hilton, building stage, 15 00 

G. H. Haskell, dry goods, 90 
R. E. Cherrington, labor and stock, 17 95 
Joseph Farwell, screens and repairs, 4 75 
C. E. Davenport, emptying vaults, 32 00 
Houghton & Dutton, carpet, 53 56 
Hammond T. W. Co., typewriter & supplies, 59 90 
Kate Farlin, taking census and book, 50 75 
Clarke Mfg. Co., stationery, 13 58 
Q. Dyer, sundries, 4 So 
A. P. Bickmore, hatrack, 12 50 
W. F. Dodge, Waverly hall and services, 80 60 
F. L. Hodgdon, stationery, 3 75 
H. A. Haskell labor and stock, 14 75 
C. H. McKenney Co., chandelier, 11 53 
R. H. White & Co., rug, 1 95 
Hammond T. W. Co., mineograph & sup.. 16 76 
Magee Furnace Co., stove, 24 26 
W. B. Badger, table, chair and desk, 132 50 
F. W. Gleason & Co., stove and labor, 23 52 
J. L. Hammett Co., book covers, 2 88 
J. T. Hanchett, typewriting, 4 00 
E. L. Kellogg & Co., periodicals, 1 00 
L. W. Parkhurst, labor and stock, 1 45 



- $1,432 35 



RECAPITULATION. 

Paid High school, $556 47 

Hemenway school, 95 98 

A. Webster " 288 46 

Grew " 671 51 

Fairmount " 760 28 



108 



Paid Weld school, 

Greenwood school, 
Butler " 

Camon " 

Miscellaneous, 



By balance from last year. 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



Cr. 



$64 82 




916 


18 




27 


43 




482 


22 




1,432 


35 









$5,294 65 


* 1 


33 




5,300 


00 










$5,301 33 



$ 6 68 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 

Paid S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber, 

G. E. Webb, instruction and labor, 

S. R. Moseley, advertising, 

Q. Dyer, supplies, 

Clarke Mfg. Co., labels, 

F. R. Hill, dry goods, 

Kate Farlin, instruction, 



Balance from last year, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



Ck. 



$ 21 57 




144 95 




4 00 




6 03 




95 




1 10 




46 00 






$224 60 




$■ 37 67 




200 00 






$237 67 





$ 13 07 



EVENING SCHOOL. 

Paid A. W. Lowe, instruction, $188 00 

E. A. Stone, " 123 00 

E. C.Tourtelotte, '■ 51 00 

A. H. Howard, " 52 50 

E. K. Jenney, " 55 50 

M. E. Bertram, " 13 50 

O. A. Cook, janitor, 77 CO 

Robert Scott, repairs, 6 50 

S. R. Moseley, printing and advertising, 11 50 

Frost & Adams Co., supplies, 17 41 



109 



Paid J. A. Richardson, services, 


$ 5 50 


D. & H. P. Gas & Elec. Lt. Co., gas, 


25 90 


" 2 burners, 


1 60 


H. P. Elec. Lt. Co., electric lighting, 


14 69 


Clarke Mfg. Co., supplies, 


4 46 


F. P. McGregor, advertising, 


5 25 


E. E. Babb & Co., text books, 


- 6 00 


G. F. Kins & Co., supplies, 


75 


Cr. 




Balance unexpended from last year, 


$145 33 


Appropriation, 


700 00 



$660 06 



$845 33 
Balance unexpended, $185 27 



TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid Clnrke Mfg. Co., supplies, $251 75 

T. H. Castor & Co., text books, 11 02 

E. E. Babb & Co., supplies, 620 54 

G. S. Perry & Co., " 264 50 

W. G. Colesworthy, cash paid out, 90 

W. L. Palmer, text books, 120 00 

Wm. Ware & Co.. " 23 46 

Leach, Shewell& Co., " 76 59 

Werner School Book Co., " 243 76 

U. Holzer, rebinding, " 46 67 

Emerson Rice, cash paid out, 25 

W. M. Belcher, typewriter, 65 00 

Hammond T. W. C, " and supplies, 165 00 
Typewriter & Supply, typewriter & repairs, 90 00 

Phonographic Institute Co., text books, 20 25 

Billings, Clapp & Co., chemicals, 3 49 

Thorpe & Martin Co., supplies, 1 80 

B. H. Hamblin, music charts, 10 00 

American Book Co., text books, 552 77 

Oliver Ditson Co., " 2 55 

W. P. Tenney, " 101 43 

E. Hallock, " 3 20 

Thompson, Brown & Co., " 27 33 

L. E. Knott App. Cy., laboratory supplies, 77 69 

L. E. Sherwin, maps and globe, 20 50 



110 



Paid Prang Educational Co., text books & sup., $ 128 72 

G. F. King & Co., supplies, 51 27 

Ginn & Co., text books, 215 26 

Educational Pub. Co., text books, 16 67 

J. L. Hammett Co., supplies, 139 06 

Western Publishing Co., text books, 420 45 

Boston School Supply Co., " 5 78 

Allyn & Bacon, " 51 71 

D. C. Heath & Co , " 4 35 

Silver, Burdett & Co., " 250 95 

Houghton, Mifflin & Co., " 6 80 

Cr. 

Balance unexpended from last year. $ 75 94 

Appropriation, 4,250 00 



$4,091 54 



$4,325 94 



Balance "unexpended, 



$234 40 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES FOR 
THE CURRENT YEAR. 



ACCOU-NTS. 



Interest 

Schools 

Evening Schools 

Industrial Schools 

School Incidentals 

Text Books and Supplies 

Public Library, current expenses. . . . 
Public Lib'ry, purchase of new books 

Public Library Buil ling, 

Incidentals 

Police 

Highways 

Hyde Park avenue 

Easton avenue 

Greenwood avenue 

Huntington avenue 

Westminster street 

Garfield Avenue 

Franklin Terrace 

Norwav Park 

Fire Hydrant Service 

Street 'Watering 

Street Lights 

Salaries > 

Fire Department.... 

Additions to Engine House 

Publis Parks 

Post 121, G. A. E 

Fourth of July celebration 

Insurance 

Sewer Commissioners 

Overseers of the Poor 

Board of Health 

State and County Tax 

Metropolitan Sewer 

High Level Sewer 

Metropolitan Water 

Abolition Grade Crossing 



Appropriation 



2810,392 89 

40,480 50 

845 33 

237 67 

5,301 33 

4,325 94 

33,040 41 

1,386 14 

32,792 50 

H0.896 85 

5S.585 50 

18,364 86 

17,000 00 

75 00 

443 34 

720 34 

3,118 49 

366 12 

132 62 

1,200* 00 

5,639 16 

82,100 97 

9,366 08 

2,950 00 

9,232 58 

130 17 

1,586 35 

150 00 

250 00 

800 00 

U7,35S 21 

86,992 54 

4,067 41 

12,763 93 

4,421 93 

. 2,664 00 

506 12 

56 50 



$240,941 78 



Expenditures 



$ 9,667 72 

39,535 29 

660 06 

224 60 
5,294 65 
4,091 54 
2,994 34 
1,102 73 

23,568 66 
10.314 85 
8,391 14 
16,512 51 
11,329 90 
75 00 

225 34 
711 65 

2,735 80 

311 08 

30 05 

1,200 00 

5,639 16 

2,100 97 

9,167 27 

2,950 00 

8,383 76 

100 00 

18 50 

150 00 

250 00 

800 00 

14.134 42 

6,846 12 

4,061 47 

12,763 93 

4,421 93 

2,664 00 

506 12 

56 50 



$213,991 06 



Balance. 



$ 925 17 

945 21 

185 27 

13 07 

6 68 

234 40 

46 07 

283 41 

9,223 84 

582 00 

194 36 

1,852 35 

5,670 10 

218 00 

8 69 

382 69 

55 04 

102 57 



198 81 

848 82 

30 17 

1,567 85 



3,223 79 

146 42 

5 94 



$26,950 72 



1 Including unexpended balances from last year. 

2 Ineluding-interest on Treasurer's bank balances and accrued interest on Public 
Library Building Bonds. 

3 Including amounts received for fines credited to current expenses by vote of 
Trustees. 

* Including $904.85 transferred from street watering Nov. 30, 1898. 
6 Including $500.00 appropriated Nov. 30, 1898, from "fines from defendants in 
criminal cases." 

6 Less $904.85 transferred to Incidentals Nov. 30, 1898. 

7 Including $10,000 borrowed in anticipation of the issue of bond* or collection of 
assessments. 

8 Including cash refunded and received. 



ASSESSOR'S REPORT. 



TABLE OF AGGREGATES. 



















_ 


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$9,022,025 


$944,500 


$9,966,615 


3,209 


2,264 


515 


2,061 



1898. 


State Tax. 


County Tax. 


Town Tax. 


Overlayings. 


Total. 




$12,778.55* 


$7,633.93 


$153,565.00 


$1,854.97 


$175,832.45 



♦Including Metropolitan Sewer Tax, etc. 

EXEMPTED PROPERTY. 



Churches. 


Harvard College 


St. Raphael School 

Association. 


Total. 


$247,900 


$875.00 


$22,725 


$271,500 



IRITIS PES $1,000, 



$17. OO. 





Valuation Real Estate. 


Valuation of 
Personal Property. 


Total Valuation. 


May 1, 1898 
" 1, 1897 


$9,022,025.00 
8,337,950.00 


$944,590.00 
990,285.00 


$9,966,615.00 
$9,328,235.00 


Increase . . 
D ecrease 


$684,075.00 


*$45,695.00 


$638,380.00 



THOMAS E. FAUNCE, 
GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 
CHARLES F. MORRISON, 



Assessors. 



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TREASURER'S 



DR. 



HENRY S. BUNTON, TOWN TREASURER IN ACCOUNT 



Cash in the Treasury, February 1, 1898 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR ENDING JAN. 31, 1899. 

From Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds — Public Library B'ld'g.. 

Treasurer's Note — In anticipation of Sewerage Loan 

Treasurer's Notes— In anticipation of the tax for the year 1898 

Treasurer's N'>tes— Payable in the year 1899 

Premium on Four Per cent. Bonds, five and seventeen one-hun- 
dredths percent 

George Sanford, Collector, Taxes lor 1895 

George Sant'ord, Collector, Taxes for 1896 

George Sant'ord, Collector, Taxes for 1897 

George San ford, Col'ector, Taxes for 1898 

George Sanfon', Collector, Street Assessments 

George San ford, Collector, Sidewalk Assessments 

George Sanford, Collector, Street Watering Assessments 

Selectmen, Sidewalk Assessments 

Fairview Cemetery, Sale of Lots 

Fair view Cemetery, Sa'e of Graves 

Fairview Cemetery, Interments and Tomb Fees 

Fairview Cemetery, Foundations .... 

Fairview Cemetery, Sale of Wood 

Fairview Cemetery, Damage by reason of construction of Metro- 
politan Sewer through Cemetery 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Corporation Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for National Bank Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for State Aid, 1897 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for bur'ai of soldiers 

County Treasurer, dog licenses, 1898 

County Treasurer, rent of room occupied by Probate Court, eight 
months to Sept. 1, 1898 

A. B. En licott, Sheriff, flues paid at Jail and House of Correction . 

Henry Hyde Smith, Esq., Trial Justice, fines from defendants in 
criminal cases 

Edward S. Fellows, Esq., Clerk District Court of Northern Norfolk 

Liquor Licenses 

Milk Licenses 

Miscellaneous licenses. 

George Sanford, Collector, deposit on account Tax Sale 

Charles A. Haskin 

L. P. Howard for crushed stone 

Norfolk Suburban Street Railway Co. for crushed stone 

E. D. Brigham, for crushed stone 

Cemetery Commissioners, for use of steam roller 

Thomas Corrigan, for crushed stone 

H. E. Gleason, tor stone 

New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., for use of steam roller 

Thomas Corrigan, for Thatcher St. Hose House 

T. Stuart and Son, for paving stone 

Poor— Cash refunded by Commonwealth, cities, towns, etc, 

Interest on Bank balances ■. 

Accrued interest on Public Library Building Bonds 

Trustees Public Library, amount received from fines, to be credited 
to current expenses 



3,115 59 



25,000 00 


10,000 00 


78,000 00 


24,700 00 


1,292 50 


171. 78 


16.1S6 48 


25,066 69 


13,966 40 


2,450 38 


149 54 


565 26 


78 09 


1,565 00 


295 00 


542 00 


198 89 


4 00 


120 25 


5,793 95 


1,090 52 


1,3-22 00 


70 00 


805 84 



298 00 

569 09 

154 72 

7 00 

12 00 

50 00 

4 8S 
12 03 

5 25 
257 50 

7 00 

10 00 

10 50 

50 

7 76 

55 00 

28 50 

435 68 

349 44 

333 33 

35 46 



$320,260 41 



REPORT. 



CURRENT WITH THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



CR. 



AMOUNTS DISBURSED. 

On account of Hyde Park Four per cent, Coupon Bonds due May 1, 1S9S. . 

Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds due Sept. 1, 189S, 

Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds due Nov. 1, 189S. 

Treasurer's Nete— Stone Crushing Plant, due July 1, 1893... 

Tr asurer's Note— Lock-up, due Oct. 1, 1898 *. 

Treasurer's 'Note— Payable in the year 189S 

Treasurer's Notes— In anticipation of the tax for the year 
1898 

Interest.... 

Schools — salaries, fuel and janitors 

Evening schools 

Industrial schools 

School Incidentals 

Text Hooks and Supplies 

Public Library — current expenses 

Public Library— purchase of new Looks 

Public Library Building 

Incidentals 

Police .. 

Highways 

Hyde Park Avenue 

Easton Avenue 

Greenwood Avenue 

Huntington Avenue 

Westminster st 

Garfield Avenue 

Franklin Terrace 

Norway Park 

Fire Hydrant service 

Street Watering 

Street Lights 

Salaries 

Fire Department , 

Additions to Engine House 

Public Parks 

Po 1 121, Grand Army of the Republic 

Fourth of July Celebiatiou 

Insurance 

Cerneter\ Commissioners 

Sewer Commissioners 

Overseers o I the Poor 

Board of Health 

State Tax tor 18 8 

Countv Tax for 1898 

Metropolitan .-ewer, paid Treasurer Commonwealth:— 

Sinking Fund, Requirement $ 830 63 

Cost of Malitenan.e., 355 10 

Interest Requirement 3,236 20 



High Level Sewer, paid Treasurer Commonwealth 

Metropolitan Water, Sinking Fund Requirement 

Abolition Grade Crossing, paid Treasurer Commonwealth : 

Expense Requirement $;>2 35 

Interest Requirement 24 15 

Liquir Licenses; paid Treasurer Commonwealth one- 
fourth of the amount received in 1898 

State Aid. 

Tax Deeds received from Collector 



Cash In the Treasury, Jan. 31,*1899. 



$5,000 00 

2,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

600 00 

13,600 00 

78,000 00 

9,667 72 

39,535 29 

660 06 

224 60 
5,294 65 
4,091 54 
2,994 34 
1,102 73 

23,568 66 
10,314 85 
8,391 14 
16,512 51 
11,329 90 
75 00 

225 34 
711 65 

2,735 80 

311 08 

30 05 

1,200 00 

5,639 16 

2,100 97 

9,167 27 

2,950 00 

8,383 76 

100 00 

18 50 

150 00 

250 00 

800 00 

2,268 45 

14,134 42 

6,846 12 

4,061 47 

5,130 0Q 

7,633 93 



4,421 93 

2,664 00 

506 12 



56 50 

1 75 

1,416 0© 

99 2S 



$319,976 54 
283 87 

$320,260 41 



TOWN DEBT, JANUARY 31, 1899. 



FUNDED LOAN. 
STONE CRUSHING PLANT. 



Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

four per cent, interest, dated July 1, 1895, due July 1, 1899 $1,000.00 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

Ten Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each dated Nov. 1, 1895, due $2,000.00 annually. 1899-1903 10,000 00 

SEWERAGE. 

One Hundred and Forty-five Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated May 1, 1897, due $5,000.00 annually, 1899-1927 145,000 J)0 

PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING. 

Twenty-Five Hyde Park four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated May 1, 1898, due $2,000.00 annually, 1899-1903; $1000 

annually, 1904-1918, $25,000 00 

Total Funded Lo:m $181,000 00 

"DEBT IN ANTICIPATION OF SEWERAGE LOAN. 

Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

lour per cent, interest, dated Jan. 31, 1899, due May 31, 1899 $10,000 00 

i DEBT PAYABLE IN THE YEAR 1S99. 

Hyde Park Savings Bank, 

four per cent, interest, due May 30, 1899 7,700 00 

Home Savings Bank, Boston, 

four per cent, interest, due May 21, 1899, — '. 17,000 00 

Total indebtedness $215,700 00 

HENEY S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer. 

Hyde Park, February 1, 1899. 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



We have examined the books of the several Departments of the Town, 
and while we have nothing adverse to report, we do not feel that the 
auditiug, as at present conducted, warrants us in subscribing to a full 
and favorable report, and would recommend that the Town take such 
action as would be the means of giving to this office the consideration 
that the same requires. 

HOWARD S. THOMPSON. 
CALVIN P. FELLOWS, 
JOSEPH J. HOUSTON, 

Auditors. 



RESIDENT TAX PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


Per- 

sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 








Abbott, Elmer E. . . 




$42 50 


$42 50 


Aborn, Elizabeth, 












42 50 




Adams, Charlotte H. . 












55 25 




Adams, William E. B. 












39 95 


39 95 


Adams, Josephine G. heirs, 












102 85 


102 85 


Adams, Mary H. 












26 35 


26 35 


Adler, George H. 










$17 00 




17 00 


Altfee, Florence W. ". 












25 50 




Albee, Samuel, 










13 60 


49 30 


13 60 


Alden, Charles L. & Co. 










29 75 






Alden, Bessie E. 












110 50 




Alden, Edward S. 










23 80 






Alden, Francelia M. . 












56 95 




Alderman, Lucy A. . ' . 












47 60 




Allen, Charles F, 










34 00 


296 65 




Allen, Emma W. 












6S0O 




Allen. AdeliaS. 












42 £0 




Allen, Bates aD(l Whiting, trustees 












276 25 




Allen, Stewart T. 










170 




1 70 


Allen, S. T. and H. L. 












5 10 


5 10 


Alles. William H. 










43 


317 05 




Alexander, Helena B. 












49 30 




Aril back, Frank H. 












96 90 




Amback ami Hodsdon, 










9 35 






Ambrose, James, 












32 30 


32 30 J 


Anderson, George E. 












62 90 


62 90 


Anderson, George B. 












22 10 




Anderson, William, 










5 10 






Anderson, Peter, 












3315 




Anderson, Margaret E; 












39 10 




Andrews, Marietta G. 












34 85 


34 85 


Andrews, M. G. and C. M. . 












5 95 


5 95 


Andrews, Ellen L. 












72 25 




Andrews, Jane, 












15 30 


15 30 


Andrews, Theodore F. 












73 10 


73 10 


Annis, Augustus K. . 












37 40 


37 40 


Appell, Sarah A. 












76 50 


76 50 


Ardini, Stephen A. . 












2.) 75 




Arentzen, Christiana, heirs, 












32 30 




Armour, Sarah A. 












39 10 




Armstrong, David W. 












3910 




Arnold, Ellen F. 












42 50 




Arnold, Henry F. 












62 90 




Ash, Agnes A. 












3 40 




Atkinson, Ida M. 












59 50 




B 

Babb, Sarah E. 




5 95 




Badger, Miss Susan C 














229 50 


229 50 


Badger, Mrs. S. C. 






- 








78 20 




Baessler, Henry, 














27 20 


27 20 


Bain, Alexander T. 














28 05 




Baker, Frank H. 












1 70 


57 80 


59 50 


Balkam, Stephen B. 












2 55 


204 85 




Balkam, S. B. & Co. 












214 20 


263 50 




Balkam, Charles H. . 












2 55 






Bannister, George W. 










85 




85 


Baptist Church Society, 












76 50 




Barden, Elizabeth A. 












59 50 




Baime, Charlotte 












228 65 


228 65 


Barrett, John F. 












1105 


1105 


Barrett, Margaret V, 












32 30 


32 30 



119 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



Barrett, Edmund L. . 
Barritt, William H. . 
Barritt, Katharine 
Barry, Patrick and Catherine 
Barry, Michael, heirs . 
Barry, William 
Bartholomew, Myron H. 
Bartholomew, Eva L. 
Bartlett, Elizabeth E. 
Bartlette, Alma M. 
Bass, George W. 
Bass, Lizzie L. . 
Bates. Emma M. 
Bates, Henry N. . . 

Bates, James 
Bate^, Lizzie C. 
Batho, William . 
Baxter, Edward H. . 
Beatey, Catherine B., heirs, 
Beatey, Annie J. 
Beausang, Patrick 
Beausang, Rosanna . 
Becker, Charles 
Beebe, Robert O. 
Benari, BeDnett 
Bennett, Bred C. 
Bennett, John C. 
Bent, Catherine, heirs, 
Bent, George W. 
Benthara, Elizabeth M. 
Bentham, Harry G. 
Benton, Jessie S. 
Benton, Mary A. 
Berry, Louisa M. 
Berry, Le nar 1 W. 
Berry, L. W. & Co. . 
Berry, Ada P. . 
Berry, Joseph K. 
Berry, Sarah A. 
Bewer, Leopold R. 
Bickl'ord, Lomella A. 
Bicklonl, Leroy M. 
Bickmore, Albion P. . 
Bickmore, Elizabeth C. 
Bidwell, Lawson B. 
Bigelow, Fred (J. 
Billings, Henry J. 
Bingham, Charles H. . 
Bither, Annie L. 
Bither and Conley 
Black, James I. 
Blackey, ^arah S. 
Blackmer, Hannah H. 
Biaisdell, Albeit J. . 
Blaisdell and Bartlette 
Blake, Phebe E. 
Blake, Percy M. . • 

Blasdale, Henry 
Bleakie, Robert Co. 
Bleakie, Robert 
Blodgett Anna E. 
Bloom, Julius R. 
Board man, Mary E. . 
Bodfish, William EI. . 



Per- 
sona!, 



$3 40 



4 25 



20 40 
2 55 



2 55 



34 00 
5 10 



13 60 



34 00 

12 75 
3 40 

63 75 

1 27 

14 45 



3 40 
43 



17 CO 
8 50 



8 50 
1 70 



Real 

Estate. 



$62 05 

45 90 
32 30 
25 50 
37 40 
117 30 
60 35 
39 10 
51 85 

44 20 
86 70 

480 25 

45 90 
93 50 



40 80 
ISO 20 
28 90 
22 95 
74 80 
111 35 



46 75 
136 00 
85 
45 90 
29 75 

51 85 

3 40 
36 55 

44 20 

42 50 

4 25 

5 10 

45 90 
112 20 
100 30 

75 65 
29 75 
142 80 
33 15 

62 90 
66 30 
103 70 
18 70 
48 45 
65 45 

52 70 
15 30 
85 00 

151 30 
1875 10 
1238 45 
59 50 
59 50 
50 15 
55 25 



Unpaid. 



$37 40 
117 30 



39 10 
51 85 



480 25 
4 25 



93 50 



40.80 
1S2 75 



74 80 



34 00 
5 10 



45 90 
29 75 



13 60 

42 50 

4 25 

34 00 
112 20 

79 05 



14 45 



107 10 

18 70 
48 45 
65 88 

15 30 

85 00 
17 00 



59 50 



120 
Resident Taxpayers — {Continued.) 



Borlwell, William P. 

Boland, Michael C. 

Bolles, James G. 

Bolton, Eliza J. 

Bond, John R. 

Honnell, John D. 

Bonney, Peter I. 

Boothby, Asa S. 

Bouffard and Casey, 

Bo wen, Daniel S. 

Bo wen, Mary E. 

Bowie, Frank E. 

Boyd, Ella F. 

Boyd, Joseph H. 

Boylan, Stephen 

Boynton, Charles A. 

Boyn on, Sarah J. D. V. 

B --ad lord, Sophia I. 

Bradley, Kate E. 

Bradley, Edmund 

Bradley, Sabina F. and Ella F. Redwav 

Brady, William J. 

Brady, Ellen M. 

Town of Hyde Park Tax Title, 

Brady, John 

Brady, John, 2nd 

B;agan, Thomas P. . 

Bragan, Sarah 

Brainard, Amos H. 

Brainard, Elizabeth C. 

Brainard Foundry Co., 

Brainard Milling Machine C 

Bran, well, William C. 

Breingan, Alison 

Breingan, Andrew 

Brennan, Patrick 

Bresnahan, Hanuah . 

Brewer, Evins J. 

Brewer, E-ther A. 

Brewer, Frank H. 

Bridgman, Annie E. . 

Bridgnnm, Allied F. 

Bridge, Sam W. 

Brigham, Franklin D. 

Brigh mi, Helen A. heirs, 

Brightman. Cordelia 

Broderick, Pauline M. 

Brooks, AnnieM. 

Brooks, Clarence E. . 

Brooks, Charles S. 

Brostrom, Andreas J. heirs, 

Brown, Walter H. 

Brown, James R. 

Brown, Isaac J. 

Brown, I. J. Trustee 

Brown, Emily M. 

Brown, Bart.ett J. 

Brown, John Adams 

Bruce, Miss Annetta 

Brundage, Martha McL. 

Brunette, John and Virginia A 

Biyant, Helen A. 

Bryant, Walter C. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$3 40 



5 10 

6 80 



5 10 



49 30 
680 00 
27 20 

5 10 



4 68 



3 40 
91 SO 



Real 
E state. 



$55 25 
50 15 

141 10 
22 10 

59 50 
75 65 



53 55 
49 30 

54 40 
66 30 
24 65 
49 30 

3 40 
68 00 
42 50 
51 85 

6 80 
40 SO 



4 25 

61 20 
18 70 

51 00 

5 10 
27S SO 
156 40 

390 15 
156 -,0 

62 05 

34 85 

102 00 

33 15 

5 95 

18. 00 

70 50 

26 35 

105 40 

52 70, 
28 90 
37 40 

37 40 

47 60 

5 95 

122 40 

603 50 

38 25 
52 70 
43 35 
51 00 
62 05 

27 20 

71 40 
15 30 



121 
Resident Tax- Paters — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Re.il 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Bryce, Alexander ...... 




$32 30 




Buchan. Mary F. 








43 35 




Buck, Laura A. .... 








42 50 


$42 50 


Buckler, Mary A. .... 








47 60 




Bullard, Susan A . ' . 








65 45 




Bullard, John D. . . . . 




< 




93 50 




Ballard, Mary A. . 






$1 70 


201 45 




Bullard, Lucy B. and Martha G. Stock well 








65 45 




Bullard, William E., trustee 








47 eo 




Bullard, Isaac ..... 








244 80 


244 80 


Bunion, Henry S. . . . . 








113 90 




Bunton, Henry S., trustee for Robert Bleakie 








1361 70 




Bunton, Hen>y S., trustee for Rout, & John S. Bleakie 




2962 45 




Bunton, Henry S., trustee for Robert Bleakie, John S. 








S. Bleakie, C. F- Allen and B. F. Radford . 




280 50 




Burger, Anton, heirs .... 








56 95 


56 95 


Burgess, Ada C. 












73 95 




Burgess. Isaac C. 










2 55 






Burke, John J. . 












32 30 




Burke, .John 












40 80 




Burke, Thomas, 2nd. . 












32 30 




Burke, Thomas 2d. and Margaret 












32 30 




Burke, Marsraret'H., heirs . 












13 60 




Burke, Mary E. . 












17 tO 


7 00 


Burke, Mar in J. 












48 45 


48 45 


Burnett, Marshall, heirs 












49 30 


49 30 


Burns, Tini' thy 












86 70 


86 70 


Burns, Timothy and Dennis 












52 70 


52 70 


Burns, James M. 












23 80 




Burns, Michael . 












79 90 


79 90 


Burns, Jules M. 










8 50 






Burns, Catherine, 












34 00 




Burns, Annie C. and Eliza R. 












5 95 




Burseh, Mary M. 












76 50 




Burleigh, Henry T. . 










17 00 






Caffin, Ruth P. . ; 


85 


62 90 


63 75 


Caldwell, Alexander 














23 80 




Caller, Ella A. . 














59 50 


59 50 


Caller, Fie lericK E. 














91 80 


91 80 


Ca'ler, Joseph . 














39 45 


39 45 


Cameron, Jane L. 














32 30 


32 30 


Campbell, Carrie 














29 75 




Campbell, Amies 














78 20 




Canavan, Al ce N. 














37 40 




Cane, Eimnnd . 














23 80 


23 80 


Carberry, William 














. 24 65 




Carberry, Elizabeth A 














317 05 


317 05 


Carle, Henry A. 












2 55 




2 55 


Carlis e, Julius A. 














66 30 


66 30 


Carlton, Clara M. 














40 80 


40 80 


Carpent'T, Abbie H. 














32 30 




Carr, Allan P. . 














40 30 




Carrinston, Frances C 














88 40 


88 40 


Carroll, Hannah M. 














42 50 


25 50 


Carro'l, Philip W. 














30 60 




Carter, Austin F. 














45 90 




Carter, Elizabeth B., heirs . 












61 20 




Carter, J. B., eatate, trustee 












47 60 


44 20 


Case, Wilbert J. 












113 90 




Cashman,. Ellen F. ■ . 












33 15 


33 15 


Cass, Franeis W. 














41 65 





122 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 

sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Cass, John M. ...... 




$25 50 




Chadbourne, John B. 












26 35 


$26 35 


Chaddock, James C. 










$13 60 




13 60 


Chaffee, Mary M. 












68 00 




Chaisson, Robert, 












18 70 


18 70 


Chaisson, Peter, 












19 55 


19 55 


Chamberlain, Thomas, 










8 50 


52 70 




Chamberlain, Henry J. 












41 65 




Chamberlain, Martha A. H. 












42 50 


42 50 


Chandler, Edwin J. 










13 60 


28 90 


42 50 


Chandler, Julia St 










1 70 


16 15 


17 85 


Chandler, Emeline N. 












65 45 




Chandler, Abram F. heirs 












27 20 




Ch pman, Annie S. 












145 35 


145 35 


Chapman, Marv 












40 80 


40 80 


Chapman, Henry K. 












8 50 




Chase, Lizzie B. 












48 45 


48 45 


Cheever, Hattie N. 












33 15 


33 15 


Cherrington, RobertJE. 












42 50 


42 50 


Chick, Charles G. * . 










S 50 


74 80 




Chick, C. G. trustee for Ruth 


S. Blake, 










90 95 




Childs, Alexander G. 










34 00 


56 95 


90 95 


Chisholm, Colin C. 










2 55 




2 55 


Chisholm. Mary Ann 












47 60 


47 60 


(Jhittiek, James J. 










2 13 






Christy, Annie F. 












25 50 




Church, Emma J. 












74 80 


74 80 


Church, Edward P. 












40 80 


40 80 


Church and Company. 










36 55 




36 55 


Churchill, Addison 










13 60 




13 60 


Cilley, Jonathan L. heirs 












37 40 




Clapp, Eugene R. 












34 00 




Clapp, Albert C. and Louise 


A. ! 










30 60 


30 60 


Clark, Mary 












34 S5 




Clark, Arthur F. 












132 60 




Clark, Leonard C. 












8 50 


8 50 


Clark, Sarah A. 












111 35 


111 35 


Clark, Rose L. 












23 80 


23 80 


Clark, Eugene H. 










2 55 


51 00 


53 55 


Clarke, Marcus, heirs 












64 60 




Clary, Mary 










1 70 


32 30 




Clark, Ida E. . 












5 95 




Cleveland, Alden T. . 












32 30 




Clough, Octavia N. 












57 80 




Coan, Caroline A. 












51 00 


51 00 


Cobb, Mary Jane 












. 54 40 




Cobb, Annie R. 












147 05 


147 05 


Cochran, David H. 












57 80 


57 80 


Cochran, George II. 










85 




S5 


Cochran, Fannie A. 












40 80 


40 80 


Coes, Charles S. 












■ 5 80 




Cogan, Thomas 












95 20 




Cogan, P. Andrew 












4 25 




Cohen, Almeda W. 












38 25 


3 25 


Colbv, Frank M. 










15 30 




15 30 


Colby, Martha H. 












85 00 




Colburn, Ralph D. 












35 70 


35 70 


Coleman, Elizabeth S. 










2 55 


211 65 


214 20 


Collins, Annie B. 












76 50 




Collins, James 












19 55 




Col ins, Patrick D. 












133 45 




Collins, H. A. and Co. 










57 80 






Concannou, Patrick 












28 90 




Condon, Mary 












112 20 


112 20 



123 
Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued) . 



Down 



Conley, Elizabeth A. 

Conlev, Michael, heirs 

Conley, Mrs. James 

Conley, Stephen 

Conn, Etta E. 

Connelly, Michael 

Connick, James A. 

Connick, Ann 

Connolly, Mary 

Connors, Timothy and Mary 

Conroy, Patrick 

Cook, Emily A. 

Cook, Jacob 

Cook, Edith J. . 

Cook, Frank J. 

Corbett, Alexander W 

Corbett, Jeremiah 

Corbett. Ellen C. 

Corbett, Margaret 

Corbett, John . 

Corcoran, Mary J. and Bridget A 

Corcoran, Mary J. and Edward, heirs 

Corliss, Annie C. 

Corrig n, Bridget 

Corrigan, Rose . 

Corrigau, Thomas 

Corrigan, Thomas H. 

Corson, Clara 

Corson, Reuben, heirs 

Corson Express Co. 

Corthcll, Jame's R. 

Costello, Alexander 

Costello, James . 

Cotter, John 

Cotter, Henry and Timothy 

Cotter, James E. 

Coughlan, Bridget A. 

Coullahan, Charlotte A. 

Coullahan, Margaret 

Couitney, Llizabeth B 

Coveney, Augusta E. 

Coven ey, Mary . 

Coveney, Mary 

Coveney, James 8. 

Coweu, William C. and Matilda 

Cox, John W. . 

Cox. Hugh 

Cox, Nellie and Lizzie 

Crawford, John 

Cremin, Jeremiah 

Cromwall, Peter J. 

Crosby, Marcia M. 

Crosby, John 

Cross, Edward W. 

Crowley, Mary A. 

Crowley, John A. 

Crowley, John A. & Co 

Crowley, John . 

Crumett, Lucy T. 

Ci umett, Charles H 

Cull, Catherine E. 

Cull, Elizabeth'. 

Cu len, James A. 

Cullen, John H. 



ey, trustee 



Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate- 


Unpaid. 




$52 70 


$52 70 




47 60 






22 10 






39 10 


39 10 




66 30 


66 30 




79 90 






5 95 






37 40 






26 35 






39 10 






32 30 






47 60 






88 40 






20 40 


20 40 




42 50 


42 50 


$5 10 




5 10 


4-25 




4 25 


" 


40 80 
34 00 
34 00 


40 80 




64 60 


64 60 




27 20 


27 20 




48 45 


48 45 




102 00 


102 00 




22 10 


22 10 


12 50 


421 60 


436110 


3 40 


56 10 
102 00 
73 10 


59 50 


76 50 


61 20 


76 50 




21 25 


21 25 




5 10 


5 10 


10 20 


59 50 
197 20 




56 52 


198 05 






34 b5 


.34 85 




11 90 


11 90 




22 95 


22 95 




56 95 






4t 20 






56 10 


56 10 




51 00 


51 00 


1 70 


1488 35 
45 90 


1,490 05 




40 80 


40 80 




29 75 






28 05 






31 45 






42 50 


42 50 


1 70 


35 70 
41 65 


37 40 


11 48 




11 48 


1 70 


63 75 
47 60 




17 00 


4 25 


21 25 


17 00 




17 00 


5 10 




5 10 




25 50 


25 50 


1 70 


236 30 


238 00 




29 75 


29 75 




41 65 






32 30 






27 20 





124 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Cullen, Matthew A. 


$3 40 


$49 30 


$52 70 


Cullen, Michael and Bridget 












25 50 


25 50 


Cullinane, John F. 












31 45 


31 45 


Cummings, B idget 














11 90 




Cundall, Phebe A. 














37 40 


37 40 


Cunningham, Mary 














3 40 




Cunningham, Joseph . 


• 












44 20 




Curran, Morgan 














45 90 




Currier, Azelia . 














17 85 


17 85 


Currier, Charles H. 












115 60 






Curten, John 














8 50 


8 50 


Curtis, J. Langdon 














52 70 




Curtis, Joseph N. 












2 55 


76 50 




Cutting, Charles II. 














43 35 


43 35 


D 








Dadley, James . ... 




90 10 




Daley, B rtholomew . 














45 05 


45 05 


Damon. Roscoe 














47 60 


47 60 


Damon, Nancy . 














37 40 


37 40 


Darling, Anna E. 














144 50 




Darling, Francis W. . 














60 35 




Darling, F. W. & Co. . 












55 25 






Darling, Mary M. 














59 50 




Darling, Willis A. 














283 05 




Davenpoit, Albert 












S 50 


73 10 




Davenport, A . and C. E. 














3 40 


3 40 


Davenport, Warren J. 














10 20 


10 20 


Davie, Annie G. 














85 85 




Davis, Alonzo . 












S 50 


255 85 




Davis, Arris H. 














35 70 




Davis, David L. 














154 70 




Davis. Harriet S. 














176 80 


176 80 


Davis, A Ivan L. 














53 55 


53 55 


Deagle, William C. . 














45 05 


12 05 


Dean, Alexis C. 












34 00 






Dean, Ellen C. . 














90 10 


90 10 


Dean, Helen M. T. 














4 25 




Dean, Henry M. 












1 70 


122 40 




DeEntremont, Matilda 














4ii 8U 




DeLuc, George B. 














13 60 


13 60 


Devlin, Ellen . 














64 60 


64 60 


Devlin, Mary A. 














25 50 


25 &0 


Dierkes, Joseph 














56 10 




Poane, Clara J. 














251 60 


251 60 


Doane, James A. 












2 55 


34 00 


36 55 


Dockham, Chloe D. 














' 93 50 




Dodge, Bertha H. 














68 00 


68 00 


Dolan, Thomas J. 












2 98 




2 98 


Dolan, Thomas P. 














26 35 




D Ian, Bri.iget . 














119 00 




Donahoe, Patrick M. . 














39 45 


39 45 


Don Inn, Hannah, 














66 30 




Donnelly, Thomas H. 














31 45 




Do nelly, Margaret E. 














5 95 




Donohoe, Bridget A., heirs 














78 20 




Donohoe, John 












85 


11 90 




DooJey, Catherine, heirs 














32 30 


32 30 


Dorr, Mary E., heirs . 














25 50 


25 50 


Doty, George K. 














55 25 


55 25 


Dowley, Augusta L. . 














205 70 




Downey, Michael, heirs 














56 10 




Downey, Rose . 














56 10 





125 
Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Downey, John ....... 




$28 05 


$28 05 


Downing, Alired 












$55 25 


102 00 




Downing, Belinda 












36 55 


57 80 




Downing, E izabethC. 














51 00 




Dray, John E., heirs . 














8 50 


8 50 


Drummey, John J. 














41 65 




Duggan, "Dennis 














29 75 




Duggan, James arid Kate 














11 90 


11 90 


Duggan, Ann, heirs 














20 40 


20 40 


Dunbar, A lonzo 












. 1 70 






Dunbar, Hannah J. 














38 25 




Dunn, Lizzie 














29 75 




Dunn, Bartholomew . 














5 95 


5 95 


Dunn, Jane L. . 














42 .50 


49 50 


Duraut, Mary J. 














45 90 




Durell, James M>D. . 














85 00 




Duruing, Mary E. 




, 










34 00 




Dwyer, Patrick J., heirs 












3 40 


68 85 


72 25 


Dyer, Agnes P. 














47 60 


47 60 


Dyer, Edward Q. 












51 00 




51 00 


Dyer, Laura E. 














64 60 


64 60 


Dver, Q incy, heirs 














6 80 


6 80 


Dyer, M. J. and C. E. . 














66 30 




Dyer, Ida J. 














47 60 


47 60 


E 








Earle Benjamin M. . 


3 40 




3 40] 


Edenborg, John 














35 70 




Edge, Maude A. 














49 30 




Edwards, Jane B. 














49 30 


49 30 


Edwards, Sarah 












25 50 




25 50 


Elliot, Margaret B. . 














64 60 




Elliott, John F. 












S 50 






Elliot, Albert E. 














26 35 




Elliott, John H. 














48 45 


48 45 


Elliott, Irene G. 














4S 45 


48 45 


Elliott, Marv 0. 














86 70 




Elliott, Samuel T. 












43 






Elliott, Henry W. 












9 78 




9 78 


Ellis, Joseph D. 














78 20 




Ellis William J. 












3 40 






Ellis, Hattie E. . 














108 80 


IDS 80 


Elwell, Russell T. 














60 35 


60 35 


Emerson, Luther (). . 














135 15 


135 15 


Emerson, Fannie B. . 














93 50 


93 50 


Engli-h, William T. . 














79 90 




Enneking, John J. 














117 30 


117 30 


Espinola, Victor 












3 40 




3 40 


Estabrook, Eliza G. . 














39 95 


39 95 


Estes, Gardner F. 














456 45 




Estey, Francis H. 












9 35 




9 35 


Evans, Emily F. 














68 00 




Evans, Frank H. 














13 60 




Everett, Wiliard S. 












1 70 






Everett, Will ird S., H. C. Stark est. m'tg'e in process 




113 90 


113 90 


Ewell, Florence A. ...... 




42 50 


42 50 


F 








Fairbairn, Draxanna, ..... 




39 10 




Fairbairn, William U. . . . . 




68 00 




Fairbanks, Caroline 0. .... 




64 60 




Fairmount Mnfg. Co. . 












30 60 




30 60 



126 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



.Per- 
sonal. 



Real 

Estate. 



Unpaid. 



Fallon, Bridget . 
Fallon, Peter 
FaHon, Joseph F. 
Fallon, Thomas F. 
Fardy, Kate 
Farnsworth, Charles '. 
Farnsworth, Nellie D 
Farnsworth, John A. 
Farnsworth, Florence G. 
Farrell, Joseph E. 
Farwell, Eva S. 
Farrington, Laura A 
Faulkner, Mary C. 
Faunoe, Josephine 
Faunce, ChomasE. 
Feehan, Hannah 
Feleh, Sarah A. 
Fellsws, George M. 
Fellows, Leslie H. 
Fellows, Martha T, 
Fellows, Margaret S. 
Fennell, William 
Fennessey, John L. 
Fennessey, William A 
Kennesstty, Mary D. E 
Fenno, Annie R. 
Feuno, Mary L. 
Fenno, William, heirs 
Ferguson Mary I. 
Fernald, Johanna S. 
Fiffe, James 
Fiffe, Margaret . 
Fifleld, Frank I. 
Finn, Thomas, . 
Firstain, Minnie 
Firth, Abraham, Jr. 
Fish, Charles D. 
Fisher, Andrew 
Fisher, Sophia . 
Fisher, Lvdia M. 
Fisher, George . 
Fisher, Elizabeth D. 
Fisk, H. C. and P. A. 
Fiske, Charles F. 
Fisk , Mary 
Filton, Lucy B. 
Fitton, John 
Fitzgerald, Peter J. 
Fitzgerald, Sarah J. 
Five Associates, E. C. 
Flaherty, Roger J. 
Flanders, Chloe S. 
Fogg, Elizabeth 
Foley, Honora . 
Foley, Michael J. 
Foster, Alfred . 
Foster, Sarah E. 
Foster, Alice G. 
Foster, Samuel A., heir 
Foster, Fre i A. 
Fowle, Frances A. 
Fowler, Albert H. 
Fox, Catherine . 
Fradenburg, M >rris 



$5 10 
34 00 
34 00 



1 70 

1 70 

1 70 

27 20 



1 27 



4 25 



5 10 



S9 35 
106 25 

4 25 
45 05 

40 80 
149 60 
142 80 
108 80 

108 80 
42 50 
85 00 

27 20 
58 65 
51 85 

28 05 

109 65 

5 50 
85 00 

79 90 
49 30 
28 (:5 

39 10 
4 25 

38 25 
S8 40 
74 80 
136 00 

38 25 

41 65 
4 25 

18 50 
45 90 
25 50 
22 95 
28 90 
49 30 

56 10 
51 00 
53 55 
28 05 
188 70 

181 90 

40 80 

43 35 

S8 40 
3S9 30 

44 20 

39 10 
39 95 
34 00 
44 20 

311 10 

162 35 

79 90 

5 10 

39 95 

40 80 
51 00 
17 00 
28 05 



127 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Frame, Annie M. 
Frampton, Amelia 
Frampton, Robert L. 
Fratus, Cataun . 
Freeman, Sarah A . 
French L.J. & Co. 
French, Leroy J. 
French, Amanita M. 
French, L. B. and C. 
French, Alice G. 
Frieile, Charles 
Friend, Flora L. 
Frost, Fred L. . 
Frost, Walter T. 
Fulton, James . 
Furdon, Margaret 
Fury, Ellen M. . 
Fyler, W. E. 



Gallagher, John J. aiicl Nellie M. 

Galligan, Matthew 

Galligan, Andrew 

Galloupe, Mabel E. 

Gallup, Marian L. 

Galvin, Thomas 

Gardella. Antonio 

Gareley, Ellen . 

Gellewitz, Morris 

Georjre, Edie M. 

George, Frank L. 

G.rry, Otis P. . 

Gibbons, Mary J. 

Giles, Alfred E. 

Giles, Susannah R. H. 

Giles, Delphina 

Giles, Jason 

Gillette, Mary M. 

Gilmartin, 1'atrick 

Gilson/John 

Gleasou, F. W. & Co. 

Gleason, H. E. & Co. 

Gleason, Herman P. 

Gleason, Nellie G. 

Gleason, Mary J. 

Glover, Ida F. . 

Googins, Mark . 

Googins, Edward O. 

Gorman, Harriet B. 

Gormley, William 

Goss, ElliE. . 

Goss, Carrie C. . 

Goss, Daniel J. . 

Goss, Josiah 

Gosselin, John G. 

Gould, Henry H., heirs 

Gould, Mary L., heirs 

Gould, Jennie M. 

Graham, Franklin C. 

Graham, Lilla C. 

Graham, Florence A. 

Grant, George W. 

Grant, Peter, heirs 



Per- 


sonal. 


$30 60 
2 55 


59 50 


3 40 


34 00 
2 55 


2 55 


18 70 


4 25 


17 00 


1 70 


34 00 
70 55 


34 00 


1 27 


25 50 
17 00 


1 70 


11 05 


49 30 



Real 
Estate. 



& 119 85 

8 50 

121 55 

91 80 

30 60 

299 20 
75 65 
41 65 
55 25' 

28 90 



39 95 
76 50 
52 70 



37 40 

35 70 
132 60 
57 80 
45 90 
21 25 
53 55 

25 50 

51 85 

25 50 
108 80 



51 .00 
65 45 

52 70 



44 20 
47 60 
59 50 
51 00 
16 15 
51 00 
44 20 
14 45 
93 50 
51 00 

47 60 

41 65 

51 85 
13 60 
31 45 

83 30 

52 70 

53 55 

42 50 



Unpaic 



$8 50 

152 15 

2 55 



41 65 
3 40 



34 00 
2 55 



60 35 



132 60 



17 00 

25 50 

1 70 



48 45 

52 70 
25 50 
17 00 
44 20 

59 50 
51 00 



16 50 
93 50 
51 00 



41 65 



128 
Resident Tax-Payyers — (Continued.) 





NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Grant, James D, ...... 




$36 55 




Grant, Francis E. 














39 10 




Gray, Tobert 














$10 20 




$10 20 


Gray, Alexander H. 
















4 25 




Gray, Mary M. . 
















8 50 




Gr.iy, William A. 
















69 70 


69 -70 


Gray, Piank E. • 












56 10 




Greeley, John H. 














S3 30 


83 30 


Greeley, John D., heirs 














51 00 




Greenlaw, Amelia S. . 














58 65 




Greenwood, L cy S., heirs 














61 20 




Green woo' 1 , Georgianna 














39 10 




Greenwood, Herbert . 














120 70 




Greenwood, Frank 
















122 40 


22 40 


Grew, Henry, estate 














10 6i 


2,247 40 




Grew. Henry S. 














850 00 






Grew, Jane N. . 














170 00 






Grew, Edward W. 














85 00 






Gridley, Grorge Fred 
















103 70 




Griffin, Fannie M. 
















47 60 


47 60 


Griffin, John W. 
















57 SO 




Griffin, Seth B. 














2 55 






Griffin, >afah . 
















33 15 


33 15 


Griffiths, Charles T. 














3 40 




3 40 


Guerin, Ethel K. 
















37 40 




Guinan, Margaret J. 
















40 80 




Gnnn, Dennis . 














1 27 


24 65 


25 92 


Gunn, Klizabeth 
















42 50 




Gunn, Benjamin 














8 50 


8 50 


Gwillim, Edward J. 














79 90 




"B. 








Habberly, Martha A. ..... 




59 50 


59 50 


Haigh, Ge rge and Berthia S. heirs 










36 55 




Haigh, John A. 








1 70 


22 95 


24 65 


Hann, Lizzie 
















17 00 




Halden, John 
















115 60 




Halden, Lydia C. 
















62 90 




Hale, E.vlra F. 
















102 00 




Haley, Charles . 














1 70 


874 65 


876 35 


Haley, Eliza eth 
















62 90 


62 90 


Hall, Augusta, heirs 
















135 15 




Hall, Caleb 














2 55 


5> 95 


S 50 


Hall, .sarah C. . 
















48 45 


48 45 


Hall, Fred A. . 
















5 10 


5 10 


Hall, Maria E. . 
















88 40 


88 40 


Hall, E IwiTi A. 














1 70 




1 70 


Hall, George 
















51 00 




Hambiin, Benjamin L. 
















348 50 


348 50 


Hamblin, Carrie L. 
















49 30 


49 30 


Hau;blin, Elizabeth H. 
















742 05 




Hamilton, Charles 
















58 65 




H ummatt, Eilwar I A. 


W. .' 














6 80 


6 80 


Hummatt, Mary L. 
















54 40 


54 40 


Hammond, Joseph W. 
















S4 15 




Hamre, Tel let J. 
















3 40 


3 40 


Hanchett, George W. . 
















68 00 




Hankerd, Edmund 
















70 55 


70 55 


Hanlon, Daniel J. 














2 55 






Hanlon, Joanna 
















73 10 




Hannai'ord, Harry 
Haroing, George M. . 
















33 15 


















85 00 




Hardy, B. H., lieirs 
















113 90 


113 90 



129 
Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid, 


Haply, Eugene J. ..... 




$34 00 




Harlow, Mary E. 












238 00 




Harlow, William H. . . , 












IT 00 




Harlow, Susan M. 












53 50 




Harriman, Oren O. 












37 40 




Harrington, Ann 












7 65 


$7 65 


Harris, Minnie M 












,19 55 


19 55 


Hart, Bridget M., heirs 












17 85 


17 85 


Hart, Ella C. . 












59 50 


17 50 


Hartwell, Francis. W. . 












55 25 




Harwood, Henry V. . 












52 70 




Haskell, Maria, "heirs . 












51 00 




Haskell, Henry A. 










S3 40 




3 40 


Haskell, Gideon H. 










88 4ii 


•277 95 




Haskell, Elmer W., heirs 












4 25 


4 25 


Haskell, George R. 
Haslam, Frank H. P. . 












44 20 


44 20 












12 75 




Haslam, Blanche M. . 












32 30 




Hassani, Rose P., heirs 












73 10 


73 10* 


Hatch, Freeman, heirs 












45 90 




Hathaway, Edward S. 












45 90 




Haven, George E. 












69 70 




Hawes, Charles E. 












34 00 


34 00> 


Ha wee, Emily R. 












45 90 




Hawkins, -lames T. 












277 10 


277 10 


Hawkins, Maude A. . 












105 40 


105 40 


Hayes, James . 










2 55 


66 30 


68 85 


Havnes, Annie L. 












78 20 




Hay ward, Arthur F. . 










11 90 




11 90 


Hayward, Edward S. . 












136 85 




Hay ward, Eliza W. 












45 90 




Haywar 1, Maggie M. . 












56 10 


56 10 


Hazard, Edgar V. 












96 90 


96 90 


Healey, Patrick J. 












39 10 


39 10 


Heaps', Abby J. . . 












62 05 




Heaton, Anna F. 












59 50 




Heiltler, JaniPS . 












34 85 


34 85 


Henderson, Mary 












96 90 




Henderson, Frank 










1 70 


26 35 




Henderson, Elizabeth 












22 95 




Henderson, William R. 












5 95 




Hennessey, Michael . 












25 50 


25 50 


Heniz, Georgianna L. 












71 40 




Hevanghan, Mary A. . 












30 60 




Heydacker, Louis, heirs 












36 55 




Hickey, Margaret and Lavinia Cur 


ley 










17 00 




Higbee. Celia S. . . . 












42 50 


42 50 


Higgins, Antoinette N. 












102 85 




Higgins, David M., heirs 












85 00 




Higgins, Henry M. 












177 65 


177 65 


Higg;ns, Elizabeth A. 












46 75 




Higgins, Cornelius J. . 












59 50 


59 50 


Higgins, Flori. da B. . 












107 95 




Higgins, John .... 












25 50 


25 50 


Higgins, Margaret 












34 00 




Highland, Alice 












78 20 




Hill, Sarah J 












118 15 




Hill, Hamilton A. 










19 55 






Hill, Fred R 










51 00 


52 70 




Hill, Warren S. . . . 












98 60 


98 60 


Hill, Louis E. . 










2 55 




2 55 


Hiller, LucyE. .... 












47 60 


47 60 


Hilton, Orissa P. 












91 80 




Hilton, Lavinia J. . 












64 60 





130 
Resident Tax-Payers. 



{Continued.) 



Hines, Orin M. 
Hitchcock, Henry R. . 
Hodgdon. F. E. & Co., 
Hoclgdon, Mary E. 
Hodgdon, Flora J. 
Ho ikes, Ella A. 
Hodges, Hattie B. 
Lodges, Joseph F. 
Hodkins, Luther D. . 
Hodk nson, J. and T. Jr. 
Hodkinson, Tliomas J. 
Hodkinson, John 
Hodgson, Gertrude R. 
Hodsdon, David M. . 
Hoeffling, Anton 
Holmes, Mary A. 
Holmes, M ndana D. 
Holmes, A Ivan D. 
Holmes, Fred H. and Agnes 
Holmes, Thomas C. . 
Holmes, Margaret R. 
Holt, Charles F. 
Holtham, Georgianna F. 
Holtham, Henry F. . 
Holtham, William 
Holway, William H. . 
Holzer, Ulrich . 
Homans, Emma R., heirs 
Homans, frank B. 
Hood, Georgianna 
Hood, John 
Hood, John & Co. 
Hoogs, Hannah M. 
Hope, James D. 
Hop kirk, Jane 
Home, Olive 
Home, Ernest, heirs . 
Horr, Sarah E. 
House, Nettie F. B. 
Houston, Mary J. 
Hovev, Solomon, estate 
Howard, Henry F., heirs 
Howard, Losa P. 
Howe, Kittie M. 
Howes, Alfred E. 
Howes, Charles 
Howes, Mary A. P. 
Hudson, Maria 
Hudson, Mary . 
Hudson, John W. 
Huestis, Alice M. 
Huggan, Thomas 
Huggins, Charles E. . 
Hughes, Thomas J. 
Hughes, William J. . 
Hughes, Catherine 
Hukin, Emily R. 
Hultzwerg, Anna S. 
Humphrey, Jennie B. 
Humphrey, Edward I. 
Hunt, Ira J. and Gertrude 
Hunt, Karen 
Huntington, Harriet N. 
Hurley, Dennis and Mary 



Per- 

sonal. 



5 10 

8 5Q 



15 30 

1 27 



3 40 



8 50 
15 30 



43 



5 52 

68 00 



6 80 



1 27 



11 90 
4 25 
1 70 



R.al 
Estate. 



37 40 



62 05 

63 75 
4S 45 
51 85 

1 .1 50 
39 10 
35 70 
56 10 
22 10 
62 05 
IS 70 
22 95 

102 00 
45 90 

25 50 
2 55 

26 35 

79 90 
90 10 



64 60 
95 20 
74 80 
37 40 
22 95 
102 00 

117 30 
52 70 
22 10 
25 50 
20 40 
71 40 
68 00 

10 20 
^0 10 

51 00 
68 00 

32 30 
57 80 
85 00 
58 '65 
35 70 
20 40 

37 40 
12 75 
37 40 
62 90 

55 65 
44 20 

33 15 
81 60 

52 70 

56 95 
19 55 
76 50 

11 90 



Unpaid. 



131 
Resident Tax-Payers 



( Continued.) 



Hurley, Dennie 

Hurst, Mar 

Hurter, Jennie F. 

Hurter, George C. 

Hussey, Peter M. 

Hutctiins, Ella E. 

Hutchinson, Elizabeth 

Hutchinson, Eliza G. . 

Hyde Park Water Co. 

Hyde Park Electric Light Co. 

Hyde Park Firt Congregational Church 

Hyde ParK Savings Bank 

Hyde Park Co-operative Bank 

Hyde Park Ice Co. 

Hyde Park Cycle Co. . 

H\de Park Caramel Co. 



Ingersoll, William H., heirs 
Isabell, Florence 



Jackson, James W. 
Jackson, Thomas E. 
James, Mary 
Jank, Robert C. 
Jeffei-ds, Lewis S. B 
Jeffers, George . 
Jenkins, Eliza B. 
Jenkins, Howard 
Jenkins, Arthur H. 
Jenkins, Bridget 
Jenney, Charles F. 
Jenney, Charles E. 
Jenney, Edwin C. 
Jenney, E. C. and C. F 
Jennings, C. E. T. and 
Jennison, Charles S. 
Jigger, John W. 
Johnson, Richard M. 
Johnston, John . 
Jones, Antoinette C. 
Jones, John H. . 
Jones, Jessie P. 
Jones, Mary A. 
Jones, Annie 
Jordan, Ellen, . 
Jordan, Patrick J. 
Jordan, Mary A. 
Jordan, E iward E. 
Jordan, John C. 
Jordan, Edward W. 
Joubert, Frances A. 
Joubert, Didier Z. 
Julian, Mary A. 



and Ann M. Stark 
Etta A. 



K 



Kappler, Meinrad 
Katzman, Elizabeth . 
Kazar, John H. 
Keane, MargaretA., heirs 



Per- 

sonal. 



$1 70 
272 00 
12S0 10 



18 70 
8 50 
S 50 



23 80 



1 70 
3 40 



Real 




Estate. 


Unpaid. 


$8 50 


$8 50 


54 40 




155 00 




57 SO 




53 55 




' 31 45 


31 45 


37 40 




112 20 


113 90 


714 00 




589 90 




255 00 




90 10 




46 75 






IS 70 




8 50 




S 50 


51 00 




38 25 


38 25 


36 55, 




43 35 




53 55 


45 35 


27 20 




56 95 




45 90 




63 75 




8 50 




67 15 




30 60 


30 60 


68 00 




115 60 


115 60 


73 10 




85 00 




45 05 




47 60 




78 20 


78 20 


42 50 




119 00 


142 80 


13 60 




59 50 




4 25 




69 70 




44 20 


44 20 


22 10 


22 10 


28 90 


28 90 


19 55 


19 55 




1 70 


73 10 




37 40 


19 40 


106 25 


106 25 


38 25 




22 95 




39 10 




22 95 


22 95 


51 00 




24 65 


U 65 



132 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Kial 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Keane, William E. 




$28 05 


$28 05 


Kearney, John, heirs 












37 40 


37 40 


Keating, Edward J. and Theresa 1 


L. 










28 90 




Keet'e, Jjhn A. 












66 30 


p.i.-jj'*^ 


Keegan, Mary . , 












30 60 


30 60 


Keene, Charles W. 












9 35 




Keilv, Mary 














1 70 


1 70 


Keith, James 












$25 50 






Keith, Louisa . 














135 15 




Keileher, Hugh 














24 65 




Kelley, Mary A . 














22 10 




Kelley, Annie E. 














71 40 


71 40 


Kendall, Matilda H. 














204 00 


204 00 


Kendall, Edward A. 












33 15 




33 10', 


Kennedy, Frederick J 












42 50 




42 50 


Kennedy, Hannah 














57 80 




Kennedy, John 














25 50 


25 50 


Kennedy, Mary 














13 60 


13 60- 


Kenneiy, Daniel S. 












8 50 






Kennison, Nehemiah 5 














54 40 


54 40 


Kenyon, Ralph G. 














37 40 


37 40 


Kiggan, Michael 












3 40 


474 30 




Kiggan, Joseph M. 












5 10 






Kiggan, John, heirs 














21 25 




Kilty, John T., heirs 














45 90 


45 90 


Kirwan, William 














40 80 




Kilroy, Mary E. 














5 95 


5 95 


Kimball, Ellen . 














33 15 




King, Catherine 














23 65 


26 35 


King, George D. 














40 80 




Kingston, Thomas 














9 35 


9 35 


Killam, Horace W. 














32 30 


32 30 


Kivlin, Bartholomew 


B. 










4 25 




4 25 


Knapi>, William H. 














68 00 




Knight, L. Augie 














78 20 




Kolfock, Arthur C. 












10 20 






Kollock, William B. 














13 60 




Krua:, Elizabeth 












3 40 


16 15 




Rutin, Clara E. 














42 50 




Kunkel, Erank . 












1 70 


24 65 


26 35 


Kunkel, Victoria 














22 95 




Kunkel & Murphy 


. 












48 45 




L 








Lagner, Elinor ...... 




24 '65 




Lake, Martha S, 












57 80 




Lally, Michael 












10 20 




Lam bard Charles and Margaret 












25 50 




Lambert, John 












4 25 




Lanahan Kobert, heir 












21 25 




Landt, Henry . . , 












52"70 




Lane, Ann, heirs 












22 95 




Lane, Harriet L. 












59 50 




Lane, Emma L. 












57 80 




Lapham,' Elizabeth 












38 25 




Larrson, t'eter 










6 SO 


61 20 




Langhlin. Garrett 












27 20 




Lauppe, Charles F. 












56 95 




Lawrence, Catherine . 












38 25 




Lawson, James D. heirs 












73 95 




Leadbetter, Charlotte • . 












24 65 


24 65 


Lee, Bridget 












57 80 




Lee, Annie S. . 












142 80 





133 
Resident Tax-Paters 



(Continued.) 





NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Leeds, Catherine F. . . . . . - 




$e8 85 




Leighton, Henry H. . 










44 20 


$44 20 


Leonard,. James W. 










17 85 




Leonard, D. Ambrose 








$1 70 


260 95 


260 95 


Leonard, Katherine M. 










6S 85 


68 S5 


Leonard, Thomas F. and Jerusha, 


devises of 








346 80 




Lermon, A.. . 








1 70 




1 70 


Leseur, Benjamin F. . 










95 20 




Leseur, Horetio, heirs 










171 70 




J/eslie, Ida M. . 










76 50 




Leslie, Isabel L. . , 










11 90 




Leufgren, Oscar J. 










17 00 


17 00 


Lewis, Mary C, heirs 










47 60 




Lewis, Charles . 








4 68 






Lewis, Charles, tax title 










45 90 


45 90 


Lewis, Ellen D 










226 95 




Lewis, David W. 








17 00 






Lewis, E'izaheth T. . 










113 90 




Lewis, Madeline S. 










64 60 


64 60 


Libby, Samuel W. 










IS 70 


18 70 


Light, Charles F. 










124 95 




Lincoln, John C. 










176 80 


112 50 


Lincoln, John C, and W. U. and E 


. N. Fairbai 


•n 






23 90 




Lindgren, Swan J. 








4-68 


35 70 


40 38 


Lindsren, Alice 










35 70 


35 70 


Lindgren, OloC P. 








3 40 


46 75 


50 15 


Lindsay, Edgar 










31 45 


31 45 


Linshatn, Charles T. . 










29 75 




Little, Everett A. 










30 60 


30 60 


Littlefield, Lucretia . 










44 20 


44 20 


Lockhart, Bertha M. . 










30 60 


30 60 


Loder, Susan J. 










127 50 




Loftus. Julia 










40 80 




Lovtland, Helen H. 










79 90 




Loved, Wallace D. and Sarah A. 










49 30 




Lovejoy, John S. 








2S 05 






Lovejoy, Grace M. 










8 50 




Loverinar, Flora 










69 70 


69 70 


Luc'ey, Margaret 










54 40 




Lncey, Julia s. . 










13 60 


13 60 


Lufken, Joseph V. 








2 55 


48 45 




Lyford, Bvley .... 










62 90 


14 90 


Lynch, Margaret 










53 65 




Lynch, Bridget A. 










20 40 




Lynch, Catherine E. . 










38 25 


38 25 


Lyon, Emerson W. 










103 70 


103 70 


Lyons, Mary E. 










22 95 


22 9? 


Lyons, James E. . 


. v 








26 35 




M 








MacGrego--, Archibald ..... 




90 10 




Mackenzie, James B. . 










22 95 


22 95 


Mackintosh, James 








17 00 


142 80 




Macomber, Sarah, heirs 










34 00 


34 00 


Macomber, Amos, heirs 










16 15 




Mahoney, Dennis, heirs . , 










161 50 


161 50 


Mahoney, Dennis W. . 








11 05 




11 05 


Mahoney, Bridget, heirs 










26 35 




Mahmey, John W. 








1 70 




1 70 


Mahoney, William 








20 40 






Mahoney, Louisa T. . 










20 40 




Malley, Luke and Catherine 










39 10 


39 10 


Mandell, Henry C. . 










101 15 





134 
Resident Tax- Payers — (Continued.) 



Manley, George H. 

Mann, Catherine S. 

Mannion, Patrick 

Marks, Lena 

Marr, Adeline M. 

Martin, Robert B., Jr. 

Martin, Elizabeth F. . 

Martin, Patrick 

Marsden, Ellen . . 

Marshall, Mary 

Marsters, Lotten 

Mason, Mary E. 

Mathewson, Jerome, heirs 

Mathias, Jane T. 

Mathus, Franz . 

Maynard, William M. 

McAfee, John W. and Sarah M. 

McAndrew, Patrick, and Catharine 

McAskell, Kenneth 

McAskell, Annie 

McAuliife, Edward and Bridget 

McAvoy, Mary E. 

McBride, E. W. and J. M. 

McCarter, John G. 

McCarthy, Mary 

McCarthy, Michael 

McClellan, Peter 

McClenaghan, Joseph 

McConnell, John T. . 

McDermott, Joanna 

McDermott, Joseph F. 

McDermott, Margaret 

McDermott, John 

McDonald, Roderick A. 

McDonald, David A. . 

McDonaln, William I. 

McDonough, John, heirs 

McDonough, Rose A. 

McDonough, Margaret, heir 

McDonough, Mary C. 

McDonough, Patrick J. 

McDonough, Peter 

McDonough, Thomas J. 

McDougald, J. C. and G.*V. 

McDuffle, Clarence H . 

McElroy, Dorothy A., heirs 

McGllicuddy, John, heirs 

McGinley, Hugh, heirs 

McGinley, Joseph B. . 

McGowan, Andrew 

Mi Gowan, Margaret, 

McGowan, Thomas 

McGrath, Mary E. 

McGriith, James 

McGrath, Honora J. . 

McGrath, Margaret 

McGregor, Frank P. . 

Mc.Guire, John J. 

Mclnness, William 

Mclntyre, Harriet F. . 

Mclntyre, Hannah P. 

Mclntyre, Warren F. 

McKeeu, Horace E. 

McKetn, Lena D. . . 



McGrath 



Per- 
sonal. 



Real 
Estate. 



1 70 



5 10 



1 27 



25 50 



2 55 



$38 25 
27 20 
30 60 
57 80 

257 55 

30 60 

22 10 
66 30 
3"i 40 
46 75 

31 45 
57 80 
12 75 

43 35 

39 10 

44 20 
87 40 

26 35 

23 SO 
55 25 
66 30 
51 00 
25 50 

27 20 
18 70 

27 20 
8S 40 

17 00 

22 JO 

39 10 

38 25 
74 SO 
44 20 
25 50 
38 25 
3 40. 

28 90 

23 80 
51 00 
•28 05 
62 90 
22' 10 
35 70 
25 50 
17 00 

7 65 

29 75 

8 50 
10 20 
61 20 
56 95 

3 40 

30 60 
55 25 
35 70 
59 50 
33 15 
69 70 



Unpaid. 



135 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.} 



McKendry, Benjamin 

McKenna j John H., heirs 

McKenna , Mary A . 

McKenna, James, 2nd 

McKenna, Thomas 

McKenna, James 

McKenna, Catherine, heirs 

McLean, Alexander 

McLean, J hn S. 

McLean, John S. 

McLellan, Elizabeth , 

McLeod, Mary J. 

McLcod, Roderick A. 

McMahon, James E. 

McMahon, Joseph 

McMahon, Margaret 

McMahon, John W. 

McManus, Kathcrine F 

McMillan, Barbara 

McPherson, Alexander D. 

Meiggs, Clarence U 

Meister, Gustav A., heirs 

Melia, Bridget . 

Mercer, Emily J. 

Merrow, Susan A. 

Mertz, Mattie E. 

Methodist Church Society 

Middleton, Catherine 

Milan, Patrick, heirs 

Miles, George . 

Miles & Morrison 

Millar, Alexander 

Miller, Annie . 

Miller, George II. 

Miller, Peter 

Miller, Lois 

Miller, Edmund W. 

Miller, Mary E. 

Millett, Edward P. 

Mlllett, Emma J. 

Milne, John 

Miner, Hi nry B. 

Miner, Maud M. 

Miner and Crumett 

Mitchell, Abide E. 

Mitchell, Sarah L. 

Mitchell, George A. and Susan E 

Mogan, John J. 

Monahan, John H. 

MonahaD, William J 

Monahan, Mary J. 

Monahan, James 

Mooar, James F. 

Molte'lo, Joseph 

Moran, Mary E. 

Morrel), Harry E. 

Morris, Mary 

Morrison, Michael and Bridget 

Morrison, Ida A. 

Morrison, Gerald M. 

Morrison, Elisha R. 

Morrison, "William J. 

Morrison, Marv E. 

Morse, Theodora E. 



Per- Real 

sonal. Estate. 



§ 85 



59 50 
S 50 



5 10 

8 50 



6 80 

7 65 



2 55 



$51 85 
105 40 
66 30 
20 40 

30 60 
5 95 

28 05 
39 10 
96 90 
. 43 35 
34 00 
68 00 

31 45 

27 20 
47 60 

22 10 

33 15 

45 05 

41 65 
100 30 

23 80 

34 85 
44 20 
93 50 
64 60 
60 35 

162 35 
18 70 
81 60 

73 95 
68 00 
39 10 
90 10 

28 90 

42 50 

56 10 
119 00 

36 55 
3 40 

74 80 
149 60 

22 95 

37 40 

68 00 

75 65 
51 00 

32 30 
28 9i l 
31 45 
f 1 00 
30 60 

174 25 
95 20 
22 95 

27 20 

69 70 
37 40 

5 10 
41 65 
34 00 

57 80 
46 75 



Unpaid. 



85 95 
28 05 
39 10 
96 90 
43 35 

68 00 j 

27 20 

22 10 

85 

45 05 
41 65 



44 20 

93 50 



60 35 



39 10 
90 10 

42 50 
56 10 

36 55 
3 40 

79 90 
149 60 

37 40 



28 90 
31 45 
51 00 

174 25 

102 85 



37 40 
5 10 



136 
Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Morse, Mary A. ...... 




$47 60 


$47 60 


Morse, Annie B. 












76 50 




Morse, George W. 










$1 70 


33 15 


34 85 


Morten son, Ten a 












32 30 


32 30 


Moseley, Caroline M. . 












85 00 




Moseley, Samuel R. . 










25 50 






Mowry, Caroline E., heirs . 












74 SO 




Moylan, Michael F., heirs . 












44 20 




Mulcahy, Isabella 












117 30 


117 30 


Muleahy, Michaol 










2 55 




2 55 


Mulliern, Annie L. 












42 50 


42 50 


Mullen, Ann 












16 15 


16 15 


Mullen, Michael T. 










1 70 




1 70 


Mul en, Flora E. 


# 










23 80 


23 80 


Mullen, Susan . 












42 50 


42 50 


Mullen, Margaret M. 












212 50 




Mulvey, Jane . 












43 35 




Mungan, Patrick 










3 40 


32 30 




Murphy, Hannah 












20 40 




Murphy, M iry A. E. . 












81 60 




Murray, Bridget 












34 85 




Murray, Elizabeth 












31 45 


31 45 


Murray, Daniel A. 












28 SO 




Myers, Samuel 












56 95 


58 95 


Myers and Kontoff 










S 50 




8 50 


Myers, Samuel 2nd . ' . 












56 95 




N 








Nas,on, Joseph L. 


2 55 


5 10 




Nau.;hnan, John P. 












26 35 




Neai, Wallace 1. 










1 70 


19 55 




Neale, Marianna E. 












54 40 


54 40 


Neill, Annie H. . 












2 55 


2 55 


Neilson, David B. 












51 00 




Ness, Mary 












22 10 




Newell, Stillinan E. . 












36 55 


36 55 


Newell, Susan E. 












42 50 


42 50 


Newton, Sarah F. 










1 27 


88 40 




Newton, Susan M. 












73 10 




Nichols, Minnie 












51 85 




Nicholson, Sadie G. 












403 75 


403 75 


Nicholson, Henry A. . 










8 50 




8 50 


Noble, MarkE. 










34 00 


49 30 




Nolan, Ann 












26 35 




Noonan, Matthew , 












22 10 


22 10 


Norlin^c, Charles G., heirs 












35 70 




Norfolk Supply Co. 










14 45 




14 45 


Norris, Frank E. 










34 00 


S5 00 




Norris, Edwin S. 












45 90 


45 90 


Norris, George H. 












51 00 


51 00 


Norris, William H. and Harriet A. 












lsl 90 


181 90 


Norris, William H. . , 












428 40 


428 40 


Norris, Harry A. 












49 30 


49 30 


Norton, Susan M. 












48 45 




Norton, Mary 










4 68 


74 80 




Norton, Fannie A. 












62 05 




Norton, Frank S. 












21 25 




Norwood, William E. 












6,i 70 




Noyes, Martha H. 












57 80 




Noyes, Annie T. 












6 80 


6 80 


Noyes, Maria H. 












92 65 




Noyes, Jes;ie W- 












29 75 




Nunn, William J. 










48 45 





137 

Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued) 



O'Brien, Annie . 
O'Brien, Catherine 
O'Brien, John . 
O'Britn, Catherine E 
O'Brien, James, heirs 
O'Bri'en, Lawrence S. 
Oliouchon, Oscar A. 
O'Connell, Daniel 
O'Connell, Mary A. 
O'Connor, Michael 
O'Connor, John H. 
O'Connors, Patrick 
O'Donnell, James 
O'Flahertv, Martin O. 
O'Gradv, Delia A. 
O'Hullo an, MarvE. 
O'Hern, Mary M. 
O'Keefe, Th mas 
O'Rourke, James 
O'Rourke. Patrick 
O'Toole, Michael 
Olson, Martin 
Orcutt, Fred S. H. 
Orkin and Ruben 
Ormsbee, Priscilla B. 
Ormsbee, William W 
Os rom, Bernard P. 
Ot+ Katherine . 



Page, Mary E. . 
Page, Mary E., admx. 
• Page, Lola* B. . 
Pag inton, Mary A. 
Paginton, Thomas 
Paine, Francis M. 
Paine, John A. . 
Paine, Mary C. . 
Paine, Charles F. 
Palmer, Catherine L. 
Palmer, Charles E. 
Palmer, James R. 
Parkhurst, Frederick A. 
Parkhurst, Leonard W. 
Parks, Albert L. 
Partridge, Charles C. 
Pattee, Amelia, A. 
Pattee, Frank . 
Payson, Cordelia A. 
Peabody, Mary J. 
Peabody, Ephraim S., heirs 
Peabody, Mary D. and Mary J. 
Pearce, Alice J. C. 
Peare, Cora A. . 
Peck, Minnie E. 
Peck, Harriet A. 
Peck, Mary Ann 
Pierce, Catherine, heirs 
Pepper, Mary H. 
Perkins, Albert S. 



Per- 

sonal. 



Real 
Estate. 



$2 13 



1 70 

2 55 



5 10 

1 70 



8 50 
16 15 



3 83 



1 70 



2 55 
1 70 



1 27 

2 55 



$31 45 
39 10 

149 GO 
76 50 

22 95 
26 35 

4 25 
15 30 
59 50 
15 30 

17 00 
46 75 

23 SO 
8 50 

21 25 
48 45 

18 70 

35 70 

36 55 
50 15 
33 15 

37 40 

46 75 
8 50 



91 80 

39 95 

3 40 
51 85 
49 30 
49 30 
65 45 

56 95 
45 05 

68 00 
IIS 15 

57 80 
55 25 

21 25 

83 30 

38 25 

137 70 

246 50 

68 85 

103 70 

26 35 

51 00 

53 55 

48 45 
25 50 

49 30 



Unpaid. 



$31 45 
39 10 

149 60 
76 50 
22 95 

4 25 
15 30 



46 75 

23 SO 

8 50 

21 25 

21 -25 

36 55 
50 15 
33 15 

37 40 
5 10 



1 70 



3 40 
55 68 
49 30 
49 30 



45 05 

1 70 

68 00 



1 27 
21 25 



137 70 
68 85 
26 35 



48 45 
25 50 



138 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



title 



Perkins, David 
Perkins, David, tax 
Perkins, Hannah S 
Perry, Oria J., Minnie 
Perry, Mary H. 
Perry, Carrie E. 
Perry, Charles E. 
Peterson, Annie C. 
Pfoitfer, George W. 
Phelps, Henry B. 
Phillips, Mary V. 
Phillips, Benjamin E. 
Phipps, Daniel W. 
Phipps, Henry M. 
Pickett, Eliza D. 
Pierce, EmmaC. 
Pierce, George V. 
Pierce, Elizabeth V. 
Pierce, John E> dy 
Pineault, Joseph 
Pin co, Alice S, . 
Pineo, James C. 
Pingrce, Calista S. 
Hummer, Wilmot H. 
Podbury, Marion 
Podbnry, Marion 
Podbury, Thomas L. 
Podbnry, Thomas B. 
Pollock, Susan T. 
Pommer, Pobeit E. 
Pommer, Louisa A. 
Poole, William . 
Poole, Walter W. 
Poor, Ellen B. . 
Poore, Harrison H. 
Porter, Ira C. . 
Porter, Samuel F. 
Pqthecary, Harry 
Po'thecary, Patience 
Powers, Wilbur H. 
Powers, Wilbur H. 
Pratt, Harriett E. 
Prescott, Grace H. 
Preston, William D. 
Preston, Fannie H. " 
Price, Charles . 
Pring, James F. 
Pring, Mary E. . 
Pring, Johanna . 
Probert, Richard 
Putnam, Hannah A. 
Putnam, S- C, heirs 



Qnealey, AVilliam 
Quinlan, John . 
Quinn, James 



Radell, Emma L. 
Radford, Annie M. 
Rafter. John C. 
Rafter, Ruth H. 



A., and Helen A. Greenwood 



R 



Per- 
sonal. 



$1 70 
4 25 
2 55 
1 70 



2 55 

3 40 



5 10 
3 40 



9 35 
3 40 



2 55 

68 00 



1 70 



Real 

Estate. 



$348 50 
2 55 

115 60 
76 :0 
42 50 

5 10 
113 90 

34 00 

74 80 

65 00 

66 30 

139 40 

49 30 

75 65 

41 65 
56 10 
74 80 
22 10 
15 30 

42 50 
74 80 

40 SO 

8 50 

39 95 

28 90 

10 20 

214 20 

7 65 

54 40 

6 80 
52 70 
52 70 

103 70 

116 45 
56 10 

193 80 

76 50 
38 25 
48 45 

116 45 

68 85 

67 15 

91 80 
47 60 

69 70 
134 30 



20 40 
119 85 
22 95 



55 25 

201 45 

49 30 

13 60 



Unpaid. 



139 
Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued.') 



Rafter, Maria . 

Rami, Rachel P. 

Rand, Sarah A. . 

Rausch, George H. 

Rausch, Alice G. 

Ray, John G. 

Raynes, Martha A. 

Raynes, Elizabeth H. 

Reagan, Mary . 

Reardon, Ellen . 

Reynolds, Lucy A. 

Rhoades, Charles H. heirs, 

Rhodes, Marian W. 

Rice, Sarah W. . 

Rich, Heury A, . 

Rich, Frank B. . 

Rich Brothers . 

Rich, Florence "L. 

Richards, Fannie M. 

Richardson, John 

Richardson, Nellie E 

Richardson, Ella A. 

Richardson, Elizabeth 

Richardson, George L 

Richardson & Rafter, E. C. Jenney 

Riley, Joseph 1st 

Riley, Joseph, 2d, and Bridget 

Ri'ey, Thomas and Julia 

Riley, Nancy D. , 

Rimmer, Agnes E. 

Ritchie, John 

Ritchie, Mary J., heir 

Ritchie, Margaret 

Roberts, Edith E. 

Roberts, Elizabeth 

Robinson, Julia F. 

Robinson, Willis G. 

Robinson, George E. 

Robinson, John T. & Co 

Robinson, Henry B. 

Rockw 11, Lydia A. 

Rockwell, Hetty Ann 

Rockwell, Annie L. 

Rockwell, Belle . 

Rockwood, Estella C. 

Rogers, Annie L., heirs 

Rogers, Annie L., heirs 

Rogers, William N, 

Rogers, Margaret 

Rrgers, John 

Rogers, Catherine 

RogeTs, James R. 

Rogers, Peter . 

Rogers, Hugh E. 

Rogers, Eliza T. 

Rogers, Arthur T. 

Rogers, Viola M. 

Rogers, DeWitt C. and Sophia J 

Rogers, Arthur T. and Nellie A 

Rollins, Fred E. 

Roman, John 

Roome, B. Elizabeth 

Rooney, Patrick 

Rooney, Edward D. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$1 27 
1 70 



3 40 



Real 

Estate. 



51 00 



1 27 



5 10 
1 70 



178 50 
3 40 



1 70 



$49 30 
34 00 

16 15 
7 65 

51 00 
157 25 

42 50 
62 90 
25 50 

17 00 
325 55 

68 00 
50 15 

69 70 
196 35 

52 70 

25 50 
22 10 
38 25 

41 65 
45 90 
48 45 
71 40 

163 20 
17 85 
22 10 
50 15 

42 50 
45 05 
71 40 

110 50 
35 70 
58 65 
73 10 

218 45 

66 30 
263 50 
45 05 
9 35 
31 45 
45 05 
31 45 
54 40 
30 60 
41 65 

45 90 
54 40 

37 40 
35 70 
102 00 
39 10 
20 40 

46 75 

43 35 
62 90 

7 65 

45 90 

123 25 

44 20 
39 10 
37 40 



Unpaid. 



$50 57 
34 00 



7 65 
51 00 



325 55 



25 50 
22 10 



163 20 

23 37 
50 15 

45 05 

35 70 

223 55 
66 30 

31 45 

31 45 

30 60 
41 65 

45 90 
54 40 

1 27 

35 70 
102 00 
39 10 

46 75 

43 35 

7 65 
45 90 

44 20 



140 
Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Rooney, Patrick H. . 


$4 68 




$4 68 


Rooney, Alice F. 














$268 60 


268 60 


Rooney, Patrick J., heirs 














27 20 


27 20 


Rooney, Bridget 














13 60 




Rooney. Catherine 














417 35 


87 35 


Rooney, James, heirs 














17 00 




Rooney, Margaret V. . 














53 55 


53 55 


Rooney, Mary M. 














7 65 




Ross, Hugh E. . 












3 40 




3 40 


Roweli, Mary E. 














41 65 


41 65 


Rowell, Benjamin L. . 












1 27 




. 1 27 


Rudolph, Agnes C. 














42 50 




Ruiter, Myrtle S. 














45 05 




Runnells, L vi A. 














49 30 




Russell, Lizzie C. 














4o 05 


45 05 


Russell, Ann 














54 40 


54 40 


Ryan, James F. and Bridget 














37 40 




Ryan, Bridget, trustee 














5 95 




Ryan, Isaac L. . 














59 50 


59 50 


Ryan, Frances L. 














53 55 


53 55 


Ryan, Margaret J. 














30 60 




Ryan Express Co. 












30 60 




30 60 


S 

Sampson, Arch R. ..... 




79 90 


79 90 


Samuels, Isaac B., heirs 














51 00 


51 00 


Sanborn, Mary . 














27 20 


27 20 


Sanborn, John W. 
















28 90 




Sanf'ord, George 
















39 95 




San ford, OlivtrS. 














15 05 


166 60 




Sanger, Sarah J. 
















106 25 




Sargent, Gilbert L. 
















51 00 


51 00 


Savage, Eben D. 














33 15 


8 50 


41 65 


Savage, Mary E, 
















62 05 


62 05 


Savage, Mary . 
















8 50 




Savage, John C. 














2 97 


69 70 


72 67 


Savage, Henrietta L. 
















51 85 


51 85 


Sawtelle, G orge W. 
















11 05 




Sawtelle, Mary M. 
















34 00 




Sawyer, Edwin W. 
















54 40 




Sawyer, Daniel, heirs 
















47 60 




Saver, William H. 
















49 30 




Schell, Ellen A. 
















59 c>0 




Seheri. er, Joiin F. 
















37 40 


37 40 


Schofield, Hannah 
















■ 34 85 




Schultz, Gustav A. ■ 
















3t 00 




Scott, Jairus H. 














1 70 


115 60 




Scott, William W. 














5 95 






Scott, Jane W. . 














25 50 


178 50 




Scott, Robert, heirs 
















76 50 


76 50 


Scott, Robert 
















39 10 


39 10 


Ecott, Lelia A. . 
















52 70 




Scott, James D. 














S 50 


124 95 




Scrivens, Walter C. 
















30 60 




Scrivens, Hannah L. 
















32 30 




Scully, Mary E. 
















39 95 


39 95 


Sears, Harriet A. 
















40 80 




Sears, Susan A. . 
















52 70 


52 70 


Seavey, Edward F. 














37 40 




37 40 


Seymore. Thomas 
















8 50 




Shaw, Mary 
















39 95 




Shea, Ellen F. . 
















29 75 




Shea, William . 
















34 85 





141 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



Shea, Mary J. . 

Sheehan, MaryE. 

Sheehan, Wavy E. 

Sheehan, Patrick J. 

Sheehan, John F. 

Shepard, Asenath S. 

Shepard, Peter . 

Sheridan, James E. 

Sherman, Ella E. 

Sihley, Ella A. . 

Sibley, Luther W. 

Simmons, Sanies 

Simmons, Bridget A. 

Simmons, Erank J. 

Simson, Elizabeth 

Slalter, Charles S. 

Slocomb, Edwin L- 

Smalling, William E. 

Smith, John W. 

Smith, Herbert L. 

Smiih, Mary S. D. 

Smith, Reliance G. 

Smith, Beehe . 

Smith, William A., heirs 

Smith, Mary 

Smith, Mary A. 

Smith, William E. 

Smith, Lucy A ., and Lewis C. Orcutt 

Smith, Oscar C. 

Smiton, George . 

Smolansky, Jacob 

Snellgrove, John 

Snow, Lavinia, heirs 

Snow, George H. 

Soley and Smith 

Somes, Samuel S. 

Soule, John A. . 

Soule, Sadie L. . 

Soule, Mary Leach 

Sparrell, William P. 

Spear, Charles F. 

Spear, Sarah, heirs 

Speed, Leila M. 

Spencer, Charles H. 

Spencer, Timothy 

Spencer, James N. 

Sreenan, Patrick 

Stack, John 

Stack, John 

Stack, Thomas . 

Stackpole, Eunice 

Stanberry, Richard, Jr. 

Stanley, Arthur 

Stanley, Edward E. 

Stark, Ann Maria 

Stevens, Mrs. E. C. 

Stevens, Albert G. 

Stevens, Mary M. 

Stevens, John N., heirs 

Steward, Ellen A. 

Stewart, Malcolm 

Stickney, Emma O. 

Stockbridge, Arthur B. 

Stocking, Mary M. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$25 50 



2 55 
9 35 



3 40 



8 50 
5 95 



1 70 



8 50 
5 10 



2 55 



Real 


Estat--. 


$24 65 


46 75 


16 15 


57 80 


52 70 


54 40 


102 00 


109 65 


22 95 


23 80 


54 40 


40 80 


45 90 


56 10 


42 50 


37 40 


38 25 


42 50 


52 70 


22 10 


49 30 


13 60 


52 70 


34 85 


20 40 


51 85 


34 85 


132 60 


99 45 


18 70 


120 70 


11 05 


63 75 


45 90 


39 10 


7 65 


35 70 


39 95 


76 50 


37 40 


34 00 


34 00 


19 55 


87 55 


98 60 


186 15 


96 05 


39 95 


52 70 


47 60 


47 60 


34 00 


62 90 


129 20 



Unpaid. 



$24 65 



57 80 
25 50 



54 40 



22 95 

23 80 
54 40 



8 50 



42 50 

1 70 



34 85 
51 85 



11 05 
63 75 

39 10 

7 65 
35 70 
39 95 



20 50 
87 55 
186 15 



47 60 
34 00 
62 90 
129 20 



142 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued) . 



Stockford, Hugh J. 

Stoddard, Hatherly A. 

Stoddard, Granville M. 

Stone, Franklin, heirs 

Scorer, Emma A. 

Story, Arthur W., heirs 

Strachan, Douglas 

Straw, Antoinette M. K. 

Strout, Barbara 

Strout, Martin V. B. . 

Stone, El ma A. . 

Stuart, William J. 

Stuart, William J. and Elizabeth G. 

Sullivan, Rachel F. 

Sullivan, Mary . 

Sumner, Henrietta C. . 

Sumner, William F., heirs 

Swallow, Adeline 

Swanstrom, August . 

Sweeney, Patrick, heirs 

Sweeney, Jane . 

Sweeney, Thomas W. . 

Swift, Emily H. 

Swinton, Jennie L. 



Tacey, George . 

Tacey, Mary 

Tarrant, Mary A. 

Taylor, Prince H., heirs 

Taylor, Daniel T. 

Taylor, Elliot O. 

Taylor, C. A. ux. of Elliot O. 

Taylor, Charlotte A. . 

Terry, Heury B. and Abbie A. 

Terry, Henry B. and Abbie A. 

Terry, Heury B. 

Terry, John 

Tewksbury, Francis W. 

Thompson, Mrs. H. A. B. 

Thompson, Arthur E. 

Thompson, John B. 

Thompson, Lejn I. 

Thompson, Elizabeth . 

Thompson, Howards. 

Tibbetts, James T. 

Tibbetts, Ella D. 

TicUnor, Sheridan F. . 

Tilden, Annie E. 

Tileston, Arthur G. 

Tilton, Josiah N. 

Tilton, Mary A. 

Timpany, Richard, heirs 

Tiriell, Fre lerickN. . 

Tooher, William H. . 

Tooker, Minnie M. 

Toole, Martin 

Tourtellotte, Ellis C. . 

Tower, Adeline B. 

Towle, Petir F. 

Towner, Thomas J. 



Per 

sonal. 



$3 40 
1 70 



R al 

Estate. 



3 40 



1 27 



8 50 



69 70 
•27 "20 



5161 50 
51 00 

an 55 

108 80 

32 30 

27 20 

7 65 

57 80 

68 00 

58 65 

145 35 

27 20 
27 20 
62 90 
44 20 
56 10 
30 60 

34 85 
62 05 
73 95 

69 70 

35 70 



79-90 
49 30 
36 55 

52 70 

49 30 

20 40 
70 55 
74 80 
130 05 
68 00 
54 40 

53 55 
58 65 
20 40 



69 70 

. 68 00 

7 65 

62 05 

22 95 

51 00 
35 70 
192 10 
64 60 
77 35 
33 15 
51 85 
73 95 
31 45 
33 15 



Unpaid. 



$161 50 



36 55 

108 80 



55 65 

27 20 
62 90 

56 10 
34 85 
77 35 



49 30 
8 50 



20 40 



69 70 



33 li 



31 45 

34 85 



143 
Resident Tax-Payers 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Townes, Elizabeth , . . . . ■ . 




$46 75 


$46 75 


Townsend, Hiram J. . 












23 80 


23 80 


Townsend, Betsey 












49 30 


49 30 


Trafton, Jesse A. 












27 '20 


27 20 


Trefrey, Elizabeth D. 












59 50 




Tripp, Emily A. 












71 40 


71 40 


Tripp, Abel W. 












33 15 


33 15 


Tucker, Charles H. 












99 05 




Tucker, Ella A. 












47 60 




Tuckerman, Johu H. . 










$5 10 


42 50 


47 60 


Turner, Maria Louisa 












3 40 




Turner, John J. 












28 90 




Tuttle, Annie M. 












123 25 




Tuttle, Samuel A. 










15 47 


60 35 




Twitchell, Elizabeth U., and Anna 


E.San 


lerson 








54 40 




Tyler, Charles H. 












18 70 


18 70 


Tyler, Harriet B., heirs 












130 90 




Tvler, Henry H. 












70 55 


70 55 


Tyler, Merion W. 












47 60 


47 60 


U 




- 




Underbill, Lizzie S. .. 




49 30 




Underbill, Merrill 










1 70 


45 90 


47 60 


Underbill, Lois A. 












5 10 


5 10 


Upham, Mary . 












47 60 


47 60 


Upham, L. Frank 












42 50 


42 50 


V 








Vincent, Henry ... ... 




32 30 


32 SO 


Vivian, Roxanna 












50 15 


50 15 


Yose, Amelia B. 












184 45 




Vose, Mary E. and Sarah M. 












95 20 




Vose, Sarah M. . 












34 00 




W 








Wadsworth, Nellie B. . . . . . 




60 35 


60 35 


Waldron, Charles E. . 












88 40 


88 40 


Waldron, Hiiam E. B. 












45 05 


45 05 


Walker, Dennis G. 












88 40 




AValker, Lucretia R. . 












47 60 


47 60 


Wallace, Hannah 












49 30 




Wallace, Richard T. and Ellen A. 












23 80 




Walley, James S. 












57 80 


57 SO 


Walsh, William P. 












23 80 




Walstab, Henrietta 












23 80 




Walter, Louisa T. 












103 70 




Walter, Theodore A. . 












65 45 


65 45 


Ward, William D. 










51 00 






Ward, Mary S. . 












85 00 




Ward, James 










6 80 






Ward, Charlotte 












66 30 


66 30 


Ward, Amy B. . 












53 55 • 




Ward, Patrick J. 










5 10 




5 10 


Warren, Mary E. 












88 40 


88 40 


Warren, Peter E. 












3 40 





144 
Resident Tax-Payters — (Continued.) 



Washburn, E'iza G. . 
Washburn, Andrew . 
Wasserboenr, Harvey P 
Waters, Thomas S. 
Waters, Maria A. 
Waters, Margaret and Nancy 
Watson, Susan, heirs . 
Waverly Club, 
Webb, George E. 
Webber and Wilson, . 
Webster, A. Ein.ora . 
Webster, Irving C. 
Webster, Frank B. Co. 
Weeks, Flora B. 
Welch, Mary 
Welch, Annie E. 
Welch. Stephen 
Weld, Theodore T>. heirs 
Wentworth, Eliza J. . 
West, Eleanor . 
Weston, Walter S. 
Weston, Minnie S. 
Wetherbee, Annie A. 
Wetherbee, J. H. & Co. 
Wheeler, George William 
Wheeler, Sarah O. 
Wheeler, Arthur O. . 
Wheeler, Mamie E. . 
Wheeler, William W. . 
Wheeler, Kate L. 
Whi taker, Daniel, heirs 
White, John 

White, Alvin C. and H. E. B 
White, Can ie L. V. . 
White, John D. . 
White, William E. 
White. E 'Ward F. 
Whiting, Geerge E. . 
Whittemore, Melinda C, hei: 
Whitteniore, Esther M. 
Whittier, George T. . 
Whittier, Sarah A. 
Whorf, George C. 
Wi^glesworth, Stephen N 
Wigley, John 
WigU'y, Mary . 
Wild, Laura 
Wilkinson, Jemima 
Willard, Henry L. 
Williams, Rinaldo 
Williams, Su~an 
Williams, Frances A. 
Williams, Phoebe A. . 
Williams, Frances E. . 
Wilson, Johanna O. . 
Wilson, Harriet, 
Winchenbaugh, Lester P. 
Winslow, Elizabeth 
Wirth, Wilhemina C. . 
Wolfe, Ananias 
Wolfe, Marck . 
Wood, Hannah, heirs 
Wood, .Joseph A. 
Wood, Daniel F., heirs 



T.S 



Waldron 



Per- 
sonal . 



$17 00 



17 00 



5 10 



11 90 
3 40 



1 70 
73 10 



17 00 
2 55 



5 95 



8 50 



Real 

Estate. 



$310 25 

79 05 
43 3o 
90 95 
29 75 
22 95 

45 05 
•32 30 

110 50 
26 35 
68 00 
33 15 
16 15 
19 55 
18 70 

144 50 
59 50 
22 10 

130 90 

68 85 



57 80 
61 20 

34 00 

35 70 

42 50 
26 35 
30 60 
17 00 
80 75 
15 30 

43 35 
380 80 

51 00 
56 95 
65 45 
17 00 
56 10 

50 15 
39 10 
11 90 
95 20 
41 65 

120 70 
32 30 
94 35 

51 00 

47 60 

48 45 
35 70 
68 S5 
90 10 
23 
3S 25 

37 40 
21 25 

38 25 
10 20 
37 40 



145 
Resident Tax-Paters. 



( Concluded. ) 



Wood, Louise M. 
Woorl, Rachel P. 
WoO'J, Margaret 
Wood, Charles L. 
Wor.ien, Albert G., heirs 
Worrick, Laban, heirs 
Wright, Richard W. 
Wyman, Ferdinand A. 
Wyman, Joseph G. 
Wymau, Mary A. 
Wyman, Eliza H. 



Youngren, Carl .... 
Young Men's Christian Association 



Zimmermann, Caroline 



Per- 


Real 


sonal. 


Estate. 


$93 50 




43 35 




32 30 


$3 40 






80 75 




54 40 




105 40 


51 00 


126 65 


85 






36 55 




33 15 




28 05 




85 00 




76 50 



Unpaid. 



$93 50 
43 35 



3 40 



33 15 



76 50 



NON-RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



Abbott, William D. 
Adams Express Co. 
Adams, Grace 0. and C. B. 
Alexander, Emilie . 
Allan, Matthew W. 
Allen, Belle P. 

American Tool & Machine Co. 
Ames, Fred L., heirs 
Anderson, John J. . 
Andrews, Mary A. . 
Archibald, Lewis C. 
Arlington Co-operative Bank 
Arnold, S.irah H. Heirs . 
Atwell. Charles F. . 



Badger, Mary C, heirs 
Bailey, A. H. 
Balcom, Laura 

Ball, Charles E. 

Bancroft, George, heirs 

Bangs, Louisa G. . 

Barney, Amanda . 

Barnwell, John 

Barrett, Michael W. 

Barrett, Sarah E. . 

Barton, Charles C, Jr. 

Bean, Aaron H. 

Beatie, Mary C. and Ann 

Beers, Emma S. 

Bell, John 

Bellis, Lucy L. 

Bennett, Benjamin J. 

Bennett, Josephine C. L. 

Benton, Josiah H., Jr. 

Berry, Jane . 

Blacker, J. E., and O. A. Shepar 

Blackwood, Alexander 

Blaisdell, James L. 

Blake, Archibald R. 

Blanchard, Eliza H., heii 

Bleakie, John S. 

Bliss, Julia M. 

Bohnson, Frank C. . 

BoDes, William T. . 

Boston Blower Co. . 

Bos worth, Hiram E. 

Boyden, Erastus E. 

Boy Ian, Lawrence A., heirs 

Bowman, William L. 

Bradbury, S. A., heirs 

Bradleee, Nellie M. 

Bradlee, J. Walter, heirs 

Brady, Henry J. 

Brmdeis, Louis D. . 

Breck, Charles, heirs 

Brewer, Sarah C. . 

Briggs, Clara L. 

Broc , Daniel W. . 

Bronsard, Albert . 



RESIDENCE. 



Dedham 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

tfostou 

Easton 

Allston 

Boston 

Boston 

Arlington 

Nantucket 

Kingston 



Boston 
Somerville 
Gilmartin Iron 
Works, M. H. 
Boston 
Boston 
Charlestown 
Dorchester 
Valley Falls, R. I 
Jamaica Plain 
E. Foxboro 
Boston 
Roxbury . 
New York, N. Y. 
Bridgeport, Conn 
Dedham . 
Walt ham . 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Somerville 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Everett 

Cambridgeport 
Boston 

Jamaica Plain 
New York, N. Y. 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Walpole . 
Philadelphia, Pa 
Dorchester 
So. Boston 
M ilton 
Milton 
Boston 
Boston 
Milton 

Cornwall, N. Y. 
Maiden 
Stoughton . 
Boston 



Per- 
sonal. 



$5 10 



765 00 



6 80 



11 90 
357 00 



Real 

Estae. 



$5 10 

15 30 

98 60 

32 30 

30 60 

1207 85 

.5 10 

30 60 

5 95 

1 70 

37 40 

45 05 

5 10 



28 90 

4 25 
11 90 

28 05 
74 80 

3 40 
41 65 
17 00 
20 40 

5 10 
71 40 

29 75 
27 20 
44 20 

1 70 
8 50 

41 65 

135 15 

39 95 

47 60 

8 50 

5 95 

36 55 

23 80 

58 65 

20 40 

3 40 

297 50 
25 50 

4 25 
44 20 

1 70 

3 40 
43 

96 90 

1 70 

64 60 

4 25 
31 45 
33 15 

201 45 
3 40 



147 

Non-Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued. ) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Brooks, Alfred L. . 


Boston 




$45 90 




Brooks & Converse 


Gardner 






34 00 




Brown, Wary A. 


Boston 






56 10 


$56 10 


Brown, John A. . 


Lowell 






28 90 




Brown, Joseph D. . 


Winterport, Me. . 






57 80 




Browne, Edward I. 


Boston 






613 70 




Bryden, James 


Chelsea 






23 SO 




Buckley, John W. . 


Boston 






56 95 


56 95 


Burr, Elizabeth A. . 


Atlantic 






80 75 


80 75 


Burt, John 11. 


Milton 






53 55 




Buss, Mary C. 


Winthrop . 






'8 50 




Butler, George H., heirs . 


Northampton 






4 25 




Butler, Mary A. . 


Fairmount, Ohio 




51 00 


51 00 


Butler, Walter 

C 
Caldwell, Emily L. 


Fairmount, Ohio . 




8 50 


8 50 


Boston 




260 10 




Canon, Lydia G. . 


Milton 






51 00 


51 00 


Canon, Ruth N. . 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 






3 40 


3 40 


Cantwell, Addie N. 


E. Boslo , . 






12 75 


12 75 


Carroll, Patrick J. . 


Boston 






1 70 


1 70 


Carroll, Kate A. . 


Boston 






5 10 


5 10 


Car on, Walter P. . 


Charlestown 






1 70 


1 70 


Carter, Clarence H., John C. Ken- 












nedy and Frances L. Coolidge, trs. 


Bosti n 






56 00 




Catlin, Arnol W. . 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 






22 10 


22 10 


Caulfield, Bridget . 


Jamaica Plain 






3 40 




Channell, Carlton J. 


Boston 






1 70 




Chappell. William G. . . 


Norwood . 






5 95 




Chase, Francis A. . 


R >xbury . 






54 40 




Chise, El wood N. .. 


West Newbury 






79 90 




Chelsea Savings Bank 


Chelsea 






46 75 




Chestnut, David 


Milton 






13 60 




Churchill, Chauncy S. 


Dedham . 






151 30 




Churchill, Joseph R. 


Dorchester 






29 75 




Clapp, Lois M. . 


Stoughton . 






40 80 


40 80 


Clapp, Ellery P. . 


Stoughton . 






172 h5 


172 55 


Clapp, Ellery P. 


Stoughton . 






23 80 


23 80 


Clark, Eleanor A., heirs . 


Bosion 






153 00 




Claxton, Sarah F. L. 


Boston 






al 4/> 


31 45 


Cleaves, William H. 


Quincy 






2 55 




Clifton Mfg. Co. 


Boston 




$34 00 






Cobb, Roscoe A. . 


Brookline . 






5 95 




Cobb, Sylvanus H. . 








58 65 




Cobe, Alden .... 


Boston 




25 50 






Codding, Eva M. . 


Somerville 






45 05 


45 05 


Codman, Henry, heirs 


Dorchester 






3 40 




Cole, Mary Ann 


Boston 






1 70 


1 70 


Collins, Charles A. . 


Sharon 






49 30 


49 30 


Conant, Albert . . . 


Boston 






48 45 




Condon, Mary 








41 65 


41 65 


Connelly, Martin J. 


Roxbury . 






2 55 


2 55 


Connolly, Owen 


Boston 






8 50 




Connors, Daniel and Mary 


Roxbury . 






4 25 


4 25 


Converse, Benjamin B. 


Boston 






32 30 




Conway, Hiram 


Worcester . 






1 70 




Cooper, Theresa 


Boston 






11 05 




Cooper, Carrie 


Boston 






2 55 




Corcoran, William J., estate 


So. Boston . 






7 65 




Corson, Julian 


Boston 






3 40 


3 40 


Cotter, Annie C. ' . 


Boston 






4 25 




Cox, Betsey, heirs . 


Mattapan . 






3 40 




Crabtree, Nancy E. . 


London, Eng. 






53 55 


53 55 



148 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


[RESIDENCE. 


• Per. 

sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Crane, Arthur W. . 


Boston 




$17 00 


$17 00 1 


Craplord, Robert A. 


Boston 




29 75 


29 75, 


Crocker, Henry E. . 


New York, N. Y. 




81 60 


81[60 , 


Crowell, Albert 


Boston 




12 75 


t 


Crowley, Patrick J. 


E. Boston . 




25 50 


25 50 


Grummet, Newton B., Jr. 


Dedham 




8 50 


8 50 ; 


Grumpier, Arthur. . 


Boston 




15 30 




Cunane, William, heirs 


So. Groveland 




12 75 


12 75 


Curry, Joseph T. . 


Cambridge 




22 95 


n i 


Curtis, Margaret A. 
D 
Daley, Eugene Q. , . . 


Mattapan . 




40 75 


46 75- 


Newton 




3 40 




Davenport, Charles E. . 


Dedham 




47 60 


47 60 


Davis, Sarah J. . 


Cambridge 




39 95 




Davis, Eii win 


Melrose 




6 40 


3 40 


Davit, Maiy E. 


Everett 




34 00 


34 00 


Dedham & Hvde Park Gas. Co. . 


Dedham . . , 


$170 00 


59 50 




Deming, EmmaE. . 


Gloversville, N. Y. 




49 30 




Dennis, Ellen 


Jamaica Plain 




34 00 




Denney, John W. . 


M lton 




8 50 




Deny, Charles T. . 


Sharon 




36 55 




Dickenson, Mary Lowe . 


New York, N. Y r . . 




51 00 




Dillaway, William E. L. . 


Boston 




326 40 


62 90 


Dimmock, Joseph C. . . 


Boston 




6 80 




Dimock, Elwin H. . 


Boston 




5 10 




Dodge, Albert 


Boston 


S 50 


139 40 




Dodge & Tyler 


Bosion & H. Park 


72 25 






Do <ge, Arthur C. and Curtis L. 






47 60 


47 60 


Donaher, Bridget . 


Milton 




50 15 




Dooley, James F. and Bridget . 


Boston & II. Park 




61 20 


61 20 


Do. Chester 2nd Church 


Dorchester 




28 05 




Dorgan, Edward 


Canton 




10 20 


10 20 


Dowd, John J. 


Boston 




4 25 




Dovvnie, Annie H. . 






51 00 




Dowle, Joseph 


Roxbury . 




5 10 


5110- 


Drake, Henrietta G. 


Dorchester 




35 70 


r.-q 


Diaper, Sarah C. . , . 


Norwood . 




39 10 


39 '10 ■ 


Driscoll, Sarah A. . 


Boston 




5 10 


5 10 


DunUerley, Margaret M. . 


Dedham . 




8 50 


8-50- 


Dnnning, Henry M. 
E 

Eastman, Josiah S., heirs - . 


Brookline . 




68 00 




Boston 




52 70 




Eaton, Luther A. . 


Dedham . 




85 00 




Eh is, Samuel 


Medfleld . 




51 00 


51 00 


Elwell, Miles T. 


Boston 




44 20 




Ensign, Elbert V. . 


Leominster 




58 65 




Envoy Associates . 


^Boston, 




24 G5 




Eustis, Maria A. . 
F 
Pales, William A. . 


Roxbury . 




129 20 


129 20 


Dedham 




6 80 




Farrell, J. R. & Co. 


Boston 


51 00 






Farrington, Horace, heirs, Town of 










Hyde Park, tax title 


Boston 




• 78 20 


78 20 


Farwell, James E., heirs . 


Boston 




6 80 


6 80 


Feeley, Mary Jane . 


Dorchester 




2 55 




Fennessey, Rose M. (Ronald) . 


Boston 




9 35 


9 35 


Field, James B. . . 


Boston 




59 50 


59 50 


Field, Thomas G., heirs . 


So. Kingston, N. H. 




19 55 





149 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers. — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Field, Carrie E. 


Stoughton 




$ 35 70 


$35 70 


Field, Daniel F. . . . 


Stoughton 






142 SO 


142 80 


Firarohr, Frederick, |heirs 


Boston 




$11 90 


28 90 


40 80 


Fisher, Harriet A. . 


Boston 






6 80 


6 80 


Fisher, Edgar G. . 


Mattapan °. 






5 10 


5 10 


Fisk, Frances B., heirs 


Topeka, Kan. 






51 00 


51 00 


Flagg, Dennis F., heirs . 


Boston 






136 90 




Flagg, S. S., N. E. R. R. Co. lesses 


Bjston 






40S 00 


408 00 


Fleming, Henora . 


Roslin lale 






2 55 


2 55 


Flint, Char-les Li., heirs 


Brookline . 






170 00 


170 00 


Folkins, Joseph W. 


Boston 






31 45 


31 45 


Folsom, Albina D. . 


Ch lsea 






45 90 




Forbes, J. Malcom . 


Milton 




30 60 


5 10 




Forbes, Mary JM .2d 


Boston - . 






22 95 


22 95 


Forbush, Clara F. . 


Boston" . r 






34 00 




Foss, Cyrus D. 


Jamaica Plain, 






35 70 


35 70 


Foster, Horace H. . 








47 60 


47 60 


Fowle, George W. . 


Jamaica Plain | 






102 00 




Fowler, William P. 


Boston . _ 






117 30 


117 30 


Freeman, Charles T. 


Boston 






81 60 




Frost, Fannie M. . 
G 
Gallagher, Daniel F. 


E. Tilton, N/H. 






64 60 




Lynn . 




11 05 




Gary^Frank E. H., trustee 


Boston 








102 00 


102 00 


Gateley, Edward . 


Newton 








182 75 


51 00 


Gay, Richard L. . 


Boston 








47 60 


47 60 


Gay. Daisy E. 


Farmhiffto 


i, Me 






54 40 




Gibbons, John 


Sharon 








54 40 




Giberas, George I. . 


Boston 


T ;£ 






7 65 


7 65 


Gibnev, Thomas 


Boston 








2 55 




Giles, Elbridge W. . 


Norfolk 








54 40 


54 40 


Giles, Lucy Ann 


Nor 1 oik 








44 20 


44 20 


Gill, Dominick 


Boston 








3 40 


3 40 


Girdler, John L. . 


Med ford 








40 80 




Glover & Willcomb 


Boston 






238 00 


749 70 - 




Goldsmitn, Benjamin H. . 


Boston 








4 25 




Gordon, Stella B. . 


Milton 








5 95 


5 95 


Gould, William H. . 


Mattapan 








25 50 




Grand burg, H. . . . 


Boston 






4 25 




4 25 


Gray, Thomas H. . 


W.ilpole 






153 00 


173 40 




Gre g, Clark C, heirs 


Brookline _ 






40 80 




Greene, Annie F. . 


Brewer, Me. 






15 30 




Greenhood, Mary . . . * 


Dedham . 






54 40 




Greenwood, Albert, heirs 


E. Jordan, Mich. 






93 50 


93 50 


Guernsey, Mary H. . . 


Boston 






43 35 


43 35 


Gunn, John and Sarah 


Whitinsville 






10 20 




Gunn, John .... 


Whitinsville 






10 2J 




Gurney, Ansel F., heirs . 

H 
Haddock, William H. 


Boston 






59 50 




Boston 




45 05 


45 05 


Hail, George, heirs 


Philad.,Pa. 






379 10 




Hale, Eizzie E. . . . 


Mansfield . 






51 85 


51 85 


Hall, Frederick S. . 


Taunton 








13 60 




Hall, L. Wallace . 


Boston 








17 85 




Hamblen, Isiah B. . 


Boston 








34 00 


34 00 


Hamilton, George A. 


Boston 








47 60 


47 60 


Hammond, James B. 


New York, N. Y. 






45 90 




Hannah, S. Dudley, and Nathan 


Cambridge 










G. Nicker son 


Quincy 






627 30 




Handy, Seth N. . . . 


Cotuit 




1 


6 80 





150 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — [Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate 


Unpaid. 


Hapgood, Salome H. . 


Boston 




$ 17 00 


$17 00 


Harmon, William E. 


Lexington 




154 70 




Harmon, Jennie May 


Lynn 




3 40 




Harriden, Elbridge G. 


So Boston . 




22 95 


22 95 


Hartney, Mary A . . 


Dedham 




47 60 




Hartwell, Abbie L. 


Bedford . 




64 60 




Harwell, Elisha tr. 


Rockland . 




149 60 


149 60 


Hatlinger, Marie E. 


Jamaica Plain 




5 10 




Hawes, W. L. 


Wakefield 




28 05 


28 05 


Hay den, Lucy J. 


Boston 




50 15 




Hayden, Ada T. 


Milton 




30 60 


30 60 


Haynes, C. 0.. heirs 


Dedham 




2 55 




Hay ward, Harry . 


Boston 




2 55 


2 55 


Hemenway, Augustus 


Canton 




314 50 




Herr, Adam 


Dedham . 




27 20 


27 20 


Hickev, Margery A. 


Boston 




263 50 




Hill, Jere M. ... 


Groveville, Me. . 




88 40 


28 40 


Hilton G. Arthur, . 


Boston 




64 60 


. j 


Hodges, Samuel 


Boston 




5 10 


5 10 


Hodkins, Fitz 


Wakefield . 




7 65 


7 65 


Hodkins, Annie M. 


Wakefield . 




42 50 


42 50 


Hogardt, Eliza 


E. Boston . 




5 10 


5 10 


Holmes, Clarissa 


Provincetown 




62 90 


62 90 


Holmes, Hugh and Agnes, trus. 










of House of Angel Guardian 


Boston 




5 95 


5 95 


Horton, O. W. 


Boston 




28 90 


28 90 


Howard, William . 


' Maiden 




3 40 




Howard, George H. 


Boston 




46 75 


46 75 


Howes, Eliza 


Quincy 




61 20 


'j 


Hugo, Jennie 

J 
Jackson,' Caroline, heirs . 


Boston 




21 25 


21*25 


Dorchester 




59 '50 




Jackson, Robert 


Boston 




4 25 


4 25 


Jaquith, Andrew, heirs 






45 90 




Jeffrey, Edwin A. . 


Med ford . 




98 60 


98 60 


Jenm y, Mary F. - . 


So. Boston , 




5 10 




Jenks, Katherine L. 


FrankKn . 




44 20 




Jenifer, John T. . 


Chicago, 111. 




49 30 


49 30 


Jewell, Albert L. . 


Bosp n 




17 85 


17 85 


Johnson, Albion H., 


Roslindale 




3 40 




Johnson, Edward A., heirs 


Boston 




93 50 


93 50 


Johnson, E. A., heirs 






30 60 


30 60 


Jones, Aaron T. . 


E.Douglass 




51 85 




Jones, Susan T. . 


Mattapan . 




35 70 




Jones, Charles H.v Jr. 


Charlestown 




29 75 




Jordon, Edward W. 


Roslindale 




6 80 


6 80 


Joy, Mary Kinsley 


Boston 




3 40 


3 40 


Jo v, Charles E. 


Cambridge 




13 60 


13 60 


Judd, Mary E. . . . 


Troy, N. Y. 




68 85 




Juergi ns, Frederick 
K 
Kane, Felix .... 


Roslindale 




1 70 


1 70 


New Bedford 




1 70 


1 70 


Keay, Freeman L. 


So. Boston 




4 25 




Keenan, Mary T. . 


Dorchester 




5 95 




Keene, Mahum, heirs 


Dedham 




17 00 




Keene Natii nal Bank 


Keen.', N. H. - . 




52 70 


52. 70 


Keith, Constance S. 


Sharon 




4 25 


*-- ~~*i 


Kellogg, Henry 


Boston 




29 75 




Kelley, William, heirs 


Lowell 




32 30 


32130 


Kelley, Neil . 


Charlestown 




2 55 





151 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.') 



Kenne 'y, Erailv R. 
Kenney, MaryT. . 
Kenyon & Crabtree 
Ketcham, Haitie V. 
Kibler, Phiiemone . 
Kibler, Louis 
Ril am, Charles W. 
Kimball, H. C, heirs 
King, George O. 
Klous, Simian 
Knight, Adelbert C. 
Knowh-s, Ella E. . 
Rnowlton, Frederick W. 
Koelble, Catherine . 
Kruiger, Louis . - 



Lake, Elmer O. 

Lancaster, Edward M. 

L iwler, Emma G. . 

Lee, Geerge W., estate, trustee . 

Lee, George S., trustee tor Norfolk 

& Suffolk Real Estate Co. 
Lindsay, Mary B. . 
Little, James L., estate . 
Litchfield, Charles A. 
Litchfield, Henry, admr. . 
Litchfield, George A. 
Lockhart, Eliza 
Lord, Mary E. D. . 
Lothrop, Francis E. 
Loud, J. J., Sarah M., Annie F. and 

A. B. L. French . 
Loud, Emily Y. . 
Loud, Martha B. . 
Loucee, AmandaM. 
Lynch, William 

M 



Mackintosh, Joseph B. 

Mackrille, Harriet . 

Maddigan. Thomas H. and Mary 

Maddigan, Mary J. 

Magee Furnace Co. . 

Masree, Frank, 

Mauchaug Co., B. B. & R. Knight 

Manley, Mary E. . 

Marchetti, A.'& Co. 

Marcy, Elizabeth . 

Margison, Isabella . 

Martin, Albert E. . 

Martin, Fernand A. 

Matthews, William A., tr. 

Matthews, William A. 

Maxim, Jane 

Maynard, George H. 

McCann, James G. . 

McConnell, Frances A. 

McCue, Mary E. 

McDonald, William 

McDonald, James H. 

McDougald, Archibald 



RESIDENCE. 



Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Roslindale 

Roslindale 

Boston 

Brookline 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Chicago, III. 

Foxcroft, Me. 

Roslin dale . 

Jamaica Plain 



Vermont 
Boston 
Boston 
Revere 

Boston 

Dei 1 ham 

Boston 

Nor well 

Plymouth 

Wollaston 

Canning, N. 

Boston 

Boston 

Weymouth and 

Brooliline . 

Weymouth 

Weymouth 

Boston 

Roxbury . 



S. 



Boston 

New Haven, Ct. 

Bos. on 

Boston 

Boston 

Winchester 

Providence, R. I 

Hyde Park 

Newton U. Falls 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Hart lord, 

Methuen 

Boston 

Boston 

Milton 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Nova Scotia 



Ct. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$255 00 



467 50 



1 70 
1752 70 
3 40 



Real 
Estate 



$2 55 
4 25 
272 00 
38 25 
66 30 
54 40 



Unpaid. 



5 95 


90 10 


5 10 


510 00 


6 80 


25 50 


23 80 


1 70 


1 70 


89 25 


57 80 


10 20 


30 60 


1,076 95 


29 75 


79 90 


69 70 


45 05 


110 50 


4 25 


34 00 


59 50 


283 90 


93 50 


100 30 


81 60 


5 95 


5 10 


28 05 


48 45 


45 05 


25 50 


1,530 00 


34 00 


5 10 


29 75 


3 40 


3 40 


223 55 


40 80 


132 60 


68 00 


4 25 


3 40 


74 80 


16 15 


5 10 


5 10 



$2 55 
4 25 



5 10 



25 50 
16 00 



57 80 
10 20 
30 60 



69 70 
45 05 
110 50 
4 25 
34 00 



5 95 



5 10 

28 05 



25 50 



34 00 
3 40 



4 25 

16 15 

5 10 



152 

Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



McFariand, James and Charles 
Mc Far Ian' I, James B. 
McGuinness, Jane . 
McKeen, John H. . 
McKilvey, Frank . 
McKenna, Rev. John 
McLaughlin, Daniel 
McLellan, Henry . 
McMahon, Ellen 
McNally, Ann '. 

McNeil," Joseph H. . 
McQuaid, Rosanna . 
McSorley, Michael . 
McSorley, Eleanor J. 
McSwain, Ewen 
Merrill, Eugene A. 
Miller, Willi un J. . 
Mill'sr, Sarah J. 
Miller, Susan 
Mitchell, William S. 
Moir, Florence L. . 
Maore, Alice R. 
Moore, Rebecca H. 
Moo e, Hannah 
Moores, William F. 
Morgan, D.inii-1 
Moriartv, William H. 
Morrill, Mabel E. . 
Morris, Arthur 
Morse, E. J. W., heirs 
Morse, Clara R. 
Morse, George W. . 
Morse, Samuel A. . 
Morton, Joseph, heirs 
Moultjn, Harriet M., heirs & Ed. E 
Moynahan, Jeremiah G. S 
Mullen, William A. 
Munroe, C. W. 
Munroe, Jane 
Murdock, William E. 
Murray, Jeunie L. . 
Murray, Ra ha el 
Murray, Grace 

Myers, Rachael, Sarah, Rebecca 
and Louisa 

N 

Nesson, Israel 

Neweomb, George K. 

Newell, Lucian B. . 

Newhall, Sarah E.. heirs . 

New En dan 1 R. R. Co., N. Y., N. 

H. & H. R. R., lessees . 
New Eugland Trotting Horse 

Breeders Association . 
New York & New Eng. R. R. Co., 

N. Y., N. & H. R. R. Co., lesses 
Ni hols, George C, trustee 
Nichols, Elizabeth E. 
Niles, Louville V. . 
Nolan, James 

Norfolk Suburban St. Railway Co. 
Nourse, George H. . 



sonal. eK. Un P aW - 



Woburn 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Lowell 

Boston 

Bost .11 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Worcester . 

Del ham 

D.-dham . 

Milton 

Boston 

Jamaica Plain 

Roxbury . 

Worcester 

Boston 

Charlcstown 

Newton 

Roxbury . 

Milton 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

So. Easton 

Newtonville 

Newtonville 

Miltou 

Milton 

•Jamaica Pi; 

Boston 

Boston 

E. Cambrii 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 



Cambridgeport 
Norwood 



ain 



Bowdoinha 
Melrose 

Boston 

Boston 

B ston 
Boston 
New York, N. 

Somerville 
Boston 
m 
W. Roxburv 



m, Me 



$17 00 



$5 95 

27 20 

10 20 
1 70 
4 25 

61 20 
1 70 

28 90 
37 40 
32 30 
47 60 

11 90 
23 80 

6 80 
51 00 
51 00 

4 25 
35 70 

42 50 
4 25 

43 35 
15 30 

1 70 
11 90 
87 55 

1 70 
37 40 

4 25 

4 25 

5 95 
235 45 

81 60 

69 70 

59 50 

200 60 

3 40 

4 25 

7 65 
1 70 

168 30 

42]50 

1 70 

1 70 

v 17 00 



30 60 
40 80 
45 05 
40 80 

245 65 

743 75 

971 55 
92 65, 

129 20 
57 80 
5 95 

210 SO 
22 95 



153 



Nok-Eesident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


O 

Oakwood Park Trust, G. Edward 










Smith, tr. .... 


Boston 




$153 00 




Old Colonv R. R. Co., "V. T., X. H. 










& H. R. R. Co., lessees . 


Boston 




1,196 SO 




Old Colonv R. R. Co., lesses'of B. 










& P. R. R. Co. . . " . 


Boston 


$8 50 


1.7S6 70 




O'Hearn, Daniel 


Brookline 




2 55 




O'Learv, Thomas . , 


Boston 




13 60 




O'Neil, "Sarah F. . . . 


Boston 




55 25 


$ 55 25 


Osborne, Arthur 






79 90 


79 90 


Osgood, Mary H. . 


Brattleboro, Vt. . 




72 25 




Oxton, Maria 

P 
Page, James H. . 


Milton . . 




51 00 




Boston 




2S 05 




Park, Elizabeth M., heirs 


Wo burn 




3 40 


3 40 


Parker, Benjamin W. 


Brookline . 




68 00 




Parker, Maynard W. 


Pittsfleld . 




4 25 




Parker, Edmund M., tr. . 


Cambridge 




8 50 




Parker, Samuel D. . 


Milton 




116 45 


116 45 


Parkin, Robert 


Boston 




16 15 




Pai triage, Cornelia A. 


Boston 




23S 00 


238 00 


Partridge, Helen D. 


Walnut Hill 




70 55 




Peavey, Franklin M. 


Milton, N. H. 




90 10 




Penny, John J., Jr. 


Xewton, 




3 40 




Perry", Arthur L. 


Milton 


17 00 






PerrV, Isaiah S. . 


Roxbury . 




2 55 


2 55 


Pette*e, Otis T. 


Newton Up. Falls 




8 50 




Peterson, Louisa . 


Boston 




48 45 




Pfaff, Anna .... 


Boston 




50 15 


50 15 


Philbriek, William B. 


Boston 




14 45 




Phillips, Frank Z. . 


Holbrook, . 




5 10 


5 10 


Pierce, Marv A. . 


Dorchester 




37 40 


37 40 


Pierce, Frank II. . 


Boston 




134 30 




Pineo, J. Henry 


Brookline . 




3 40 




Pinkham, Elliott & Eitchiield, trs. 


Boston 




600 10 




Pinkham, Walter S. 


Bnston 




70 55 


70 55 


Pinkham, Herbert W. 


Woliaston . 




35 70 


35 70 


Piper, Abby F. 


Maiden 




51 00 


51 00 


Piper, Sarah M- . 






75 65 




Pollard, Catherine L. 


Brookline . 




33 15 




Pond, E.G. . 




4 25 




4 25 


Poole, Samuel R. . 


Milirn 




47 60 




Poore, Hiram R. 


W. Xewburv 




48 45 


48 45 


Poore, George AY. . 


Waltham ." 


42 50 


63 75 




Pope, John T. . . . 


Boston 




59 50 


59 50 


Porter, A. Wallace 


Woliaston . 




11 90 


11 90 


Pratt, Isaac, Jr. 


Boston 




362 10 




Prescott, Henry Elden 


Boston 




33 15 


33 15 


Prescott, John W., heirs . 


Boston 




34 00 




Preston, Jotn Aiken 


Man -hester 




89 25 




Prior, Alfred M. & Walter A. Dixon 

a 

Quigley, Mary J. . 


Boston 




42 50 




■Tamaica Plain 




3 10 




Quincy Savings Bank 


Quincy 




374 00 





154 



Xox-Resedext Tax-Paters — {Concluded.) 



SA3IES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Randolph, Annie F. 


Cincinnati, Ohio . 




S3 40 




ftaymond, Artemas S. 




Dedham 




$S1 60 


284 75 




Raymond, Mary 




Dedham 






57 SO 




Read, Spurdon"A. M. 




Boston 






66 30 




Eeal Estate & Building Co. 




Boston 






1,377 00 




Real Estate & Building Co. 




Boston 






513 40 




Eeddic. Isaac H. 




Charlestown 






So 


S 85 


Beddv, Thomas F. . 






Boston 






191 25 




Reddy, Thomas F. . 






Boston 






51 00 




Seed. Horace 






Whitman . 






56 10 


56 10 


Seed, Bev rley S. . 






Dorehester 






148 75 


148 75 


Beutman. Charles . 






Boston 






4 25 




Bhodes, Wallace M. 






Boston 






56 10 


56 10 


Bibero, William F. 






Chelsea 






10 20 


10 20 


Bice. William B. . 






Quincy 






39 10 




Bice, George M., estate 










230 35 




Bich. Harriet >.. heirs 










61 20 




Bich, Mc lissa E. . 






Boston 




2 55 




Bich, Harriet L. 






Billfold, X. H. 






76 50 




Richards, William B. & Elsie B 




Boston 






356 15 


356 15 


Bichardson, Alonzo H., Jr. 




Mansfield . 






51 85 


51 85 


Richmond, Emma C. - . 










43 35 




Bidlev. E'dthL. . 






Fhiladelphia, Fa 






36 55 




Bisk, Thomas H. . 






Dorchester 






61 20 


61 20 


Bisk. Mary J. 






Dorchester 






132 60 


£8 60 


Riga, Elida S. 






Springfield 






5 10 


5 10 


Roberts, Sarah A. E. 






Boston 






88 40 


88 40 


Boberts, Francis R. 






Boston 






22 10 




Robinson, Lucy M. . 






Boston 






5 10 


5 10 


Robinson, Sarah A. K. 






Northampton 






102 00 




Rogers, Johannah . 






De'ihani 






50 15 


50 15 


Rogers, Abraham T. 






Boston 






30 60 


30 60 


Rooney, Francis ML. 






Chicago, 111. 






28 05 




Booney, Katherine H. 






"W. Roxbury 






168 30 




Booney, John A. . 






W. Roxbury 






34 85 




Boss. Joseph. 






Ipswich 






10 20 


10 20 


Ross. Jane M. 






Somerville 






169 15 




Roundy, "William E. 






Boston 






32 30 


32 30 


Bo -well", Henrv A. . 






Conticook, X. H. 






51 00 


51 00 


Rowell, Ada C. 






Boston 






34 00 




Rudman, Joseph 






Chelsea 






60 35 


60 35 


Byan, William B. . 






Bo st r. 






115 60 


U5 60 


Byder, Margaret J. 






Boston 






42 50 




S 

Saco & Biddeford Savings Institu- 










tion ..... 


Saco, Me. . 




181 05 




Saiford, Xathaniel M. 






Milton 






78 20 




Sale. Ephraim 






Charlestown 






85 




Sawtelle, W. H. & F. "W. 






Dedham 






130 90 




Sawtelle. W. H. & F. W. 






Dedham 






52 70 




Sawtelle, F. W. & Co. 






Dedham 




71 40 






Scaife, Helen A. 






Boston 






13 60 




Schwater, Frederick 






Unknown . 




23 SO 




Schwabe, Oscar A. . 






' Roxbui v . 






5 95 




^crannage, Matthew 






Mediord . 






23 80 


23 80 


Scrivens" Joseph 






Woburn 






27 20 




Scrivens, Emily M. . 






Woburn 






39 10 




Searles, John E. . 






Brooslyn, X. Y. 






595 00 


595 00 


Seaver, Jacob W. . 






Boston 






7 65 




SeaTerns, Granville S. 






Rosimdale . 






28 90 





loo 



Xox^ Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 





XAMES. 


HESIDESCE. J^V E f t e a f e 

[ 


Unpaid. 


Sharp, J. C, heirs . 


Dorchester . | 


$1 70 




Sharp, W. C. . 


Dorchester 




1 70 




Shaughuessey. Edward . 


Roslindale 




5 10 


$ 5 10 


Shaugbnessey, James C. . 


Nahant 




4 25 




Shea, Edward 


Brookline . 




26 35 


26 35 


Shepard, James S., heirs . 


Canton 




120 70 




Shepard, Otis A. . 


Brookline . 


32 30 




Silva, Frank M. 


Piovidence/R. I 


3 40 




Simmons, John O. . 


Boston 


47 60 


47 60 


Simmons, Walter E. 


Quincy 


6 SO 




Sinclair, Alfred P. . 


Medford . 


28 90 




Skinner, Frederick 


Boston 


11 90 




Slafter, Rebecca B. 


Dedham 


212 50 


212 50 


Smith, Orlando A., heirs . 


Pawtucket, : R. I. 


5 10 




Smith, C. Frea 


Lynn 


3 40 


3 40 


Smith, Maria A. . 


Barre 


72 25 




Smith, John and Ann 


Saugus 


32 30 


32 30 


Smith, Ann . 


Saugus 


21 25 


21 25 


Snow, Annie C. . 


Boston 


4 25 


4 25 


Solev, Sarah J. 


Chelsea 


55 25 




Sore'll, Arthur C. F. 


Newton 


16 15 


16 15 


Spencer, "Walter A. 


Bost< n 


5 95 


5 95 


Spencer, William, trustee 


Providence, R. I 


.54 40 


54 40 


Spiller, Benjamin L. 


Wellesley . 


51 S5 


51 So 


Spittell, Audrey C. . 


Boston 


2 55 


2 55 


Springer, George H. 


Boston 


38 25 




Springfield. Nathaniel, heirs 


Boston 


4 25 


4 25 


Sproiile, Nettie E. . 


Everett 


17 00 


17 00 


Stanley, Phoebe 


Boston 




10 20 




Stanley. James 


Boston 




5 10 




Stark. John 11.. heirs 


Boston 




11 90 


6 SO 


Stetson, Ellen F. . 


Boston 




20 40 




Stevens, Char!e-,fheirs 


Marlboro . 




72 25 




Stevenson, W. G. . 


Mattapan . 




60 35 


60 35 


Stockwell, J. A. 


Stoneham . 




3 40 


3 40 


Stoddard, Arthur E., and Fred H. 










Grouse .... 


Boston 




15 30 


15 30 


Strangman, Harry W. 


Dorchester 




1 70 




Streeter, Catherine W. 






39 10 


39 10 


Strout, Erastus G. and M.jT. B. 


Chelsea &|H. P. 




71 40 




Sullivan, Margaret . 


So. Boston 




4 25 


4 25 


Sumner, Sally R., estate,' Samuel 










Crane adm. 


Quincv 




654 50 


654 50 


Summit Knitting Co. 


Boston 


$17 00 




17 00 


Sykes, Louisa, heirs, 

T 
Talbot, J. Elmer . 


Brootline . 


46 75 


46 75 


Stoughton . 




40 SO 


40 SO 


Tasker & Prescott . 


Boston 






ISO 20 




Tatro, Fred W. . 


Boston 






4S45 


4S 45 


Tavlor, George W. . 


Boston 






13 60 


13 60 


Teed, Addison 


Walpole . 






56 10 


56 10 


Temple, Fisher, Talbot andBart- 












lett, trustees 


Boston 






355 30 


312 SO 


Thayer. Augusta H. 


Boston 






S3 30 


83 30 


Thayer, John E. and Bayard 


Boston 






20 40 




Thompson, W. >. and C. S. 


Brockton . 






2 55 




Thompson, Mary A. 


Dorchester 






4 25 




Thompson, William J. 


Wollaston . 






S 50 




Thompson, Robert . 


Gardner, Me. 






79 90 




Thompson, Frank I. and Peter 












Williams .... 


Boston 






17 00 


17 00 


Thompson, Frank, et als . 


Boston 






22 95 


22 95 



156 
Non-Resident Tax- Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Thurston, Philander, heirs 


1 

Sutton 




$39 10 




Tibbetts, Ei-nest C, heirs . 


Mansfield . 






25 50 




Tileston, Hollingsworth Co., 


Boston 






3,240 20 




Tilley, Charles M. . 


Laredo, Tex. 




$3230 00 


71 40 




Tilton, William B. . 








5 95 


$ 5 95 


Tirrell, Caroline 


Boston 






40 SO 




Tirrell, George E. . 


Boston 






56 10 




Towan, William P. 


P. E. Isle. 






11 90 




Tower, Abby T. & Annie T. Taibell 


Dedham . 






2S 05 




Tower, Isaac H., heirs 


Dedham . 






117 30 




Towle, Loren D. . 


Boston 






34 00 


34 00 


Townsend & Kelley 


Boston 






68 00 


68 00 


Traugott, Sarah H. 


Brockton . 






7 65 


7 65 


Trescott, Ebenzer, heirs . 


New York, N. Y. 






1 70 


1 70 


Trotter, Virginia . 


Roxbury . 






34 00 


34 00 


Trotter, James M., heirs . 


Roxbury . 






171 70 


171 00 


Tucker, James 


Milton 






95 20 




Tucker, Mary T. 


Milton 






96 90 




Turnbuil, Flora 


Boston 






1 70 


1 70 


Turner, Miss Abby 


Duxburv . 






4 25 




Turner, William H., heirs 


W. Pe.erb'o, N. I 


r. 




76 50 




Twitchell, Charles M. A. . 


Somerville 






69 70 


69 70 


Tykeson, John C. . 


Boston 






8 50 




Tyler, Caroline, heirs, 
U 


Boston 






60 35 


60 35 


Underlich, Gustav 


Boston 




60 35 


60 35 


Utley, Joseph 


Roxbury . 




5 10 


5 10 


Universal Loom Company 




255 00 






V 


• 








Van Derlip, William C. . 


Boston 




81 60 


81 60 


Veazie, John H. h.irs 


Quincy 






57 80 


57 80 


Viles, Frank T. . . . 


Boston 






6 80 


6 80 


Vinal, Henry S. 


Scituate ■ 






45 90 




Vincinnas, Dominick 


Boston 






17 00 


17 50 


Vose, Ellen F. . . . 


Milton 






17 85 




Vose, Hattie M. 


Milton 






17 S5 




Vose, Jessie .... 


Milton 






18 70 




Vose, Joshua, heirs 


Milton 






153 00 




W 










Wade, John R. . . . 


Quincy 




51 00 




Walker, George A. 


Boston 






93 50 


93 50 


Walter, Clifton E. 


Dedham 






6 80 




Wall, Bertha S. 


Boston 






44 20 


12 20 


Wares, Phebe D. . 


Dorchester 






5 10 




Watson, Paul Barron 


Milton 






28 90 




Way, C. Granville 


Br okline 






612 00 




Webber, Gushing, heirs . 


Boston 






103 70 


103 70 


Webster, Elizabeth H. heirs 


So. Boston 






.49 30 


49 30 


Webster, Stephen, heirs . 


Boston 






8 




Weimer, Charles 


Walnut Hill 






20 40 


20 40 


Welch, James 


So. Boston 






8 50 


8 50 


Welch, Patrick 


Dorchester 




96 90 




Wentworth, Sarah J. 


Chelsea 




13 60 


13 60 



157 



Xon-Resident Tax-Payers — (Concluded.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Wethers. Truman . 


Cambridge 




$176 80 


$176^80 ,' 


Weymouth Savings Bank 


Weymouth 




33 15 




Whaley, Samuel L. 


Milton 




76 50 


76^50 


Wheaton, Georsianna 


Boston 




1 70 




Whitcher, Martin L., heirs 


Mass. and Montana 




448 80 


44S So' 


Whitcher (Barstow) & Wells. . 


Mass. and Montana 




119 00 




White, Charles G. . 


Milton 




10 20 




White, Katherine S. 


Boston 






9 35 




White, Geortrianna 


Cambridge 






51 00 


51[00 
8 50 


White, Howard 


Beaver City, Neb 






8 50 


Whitt'ord, George H. 


Waltbam . 






5 10 




Whiting, Alvan 


Lancaster . 






6 80 




Whiting, Joseph, heirs 


Dedham 






3 40 




AVhitneV, Albert H. 


Boston 








Whitnev, Alvan C, and William A. 












Walters .... 


Beachmont 






44 20 




Whittier, Albert "R. 


Boston 






595 00 




Wiggin, Mary E. 


Durham, N. H. 






49 30 


49 30 


Wight, Lawrence T. 


Reading 






40 80 


40 SO 


Wilder, Fannie L. 


Newtou, X. H. 






13 60 




Wilkinson, James F. 


Newton 






98 60 


98 00 


Willard, Francis L. 


Boston 






8 50 


8 50 


Willett, Joseph 


Needham . 






64 60 




Williams, John J. (Archbishop) 


Boston 






137 70 




Williams, William H. 


Boston 






79 90 




Williams, Mary M. • . 


Boston 






33 15 




Wilson, Alice L. . 
Woefle, William 


Boston 




$8 50 


59 50 


59150 
8_50 


Wolcott, J. Huntington, heirs . 


Milton 




119 S5 


Wol.aston Co-operative Bank . 


Wollaston 






45 90 




Wood, Frank 


Boston 






20 40 




Wood, Lydia W. . 


Boston 






164 90 




Wood, Alfred 


Cambridgeport 






35 70 




Woodworth, Thomas H. . 


Milton 






125 SO 




Wyman, Isaac C. . 

Y 
Young, Orson and Hiram E. 


Boston 






96 05 




E. Somerville 




12 75 


12 75 


Z 

Zeigler, Alfred 


Boston 




66 30 





THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



THE SCHOOL YEAR 



ENDING JANUARY 31, 1899. 



- I r?irw*?az > . 




r^ZXJLlS 



HYDE PARK : 

HYDE PARK GAZETTE PRESS. 

I 89*9. 



SCHOOL BOARD. 



FRANK F. COURTNEY, 
32 Dell Avenue. Term Expires 1899. 



EDWARD S. FELLOWS. 
208 West River Street. Term Expires 1899. 



ANDREW WASHBURN. 

165 Fairmount Avenue. Term Expires 1899. 



CHARLES G. CHICK. 
212 West River Street. Term Expires 1900. 



WILLIAM G. COLESWORTHY. 

7 Elm Street. Term Expires 1900. 



AUGUSTA L. HANCHETT. 
168 East River Street. Term Expires 1900. 



ELLA F. BOYD. 
313 Hyde Park Avenue. Term^Expires 1901. 

SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT. 
947 Hyde Park Avenue. Term Expires 1901. 

EDWARD I. HUMPHREY. 

19 Cleveland Street. Term Expires 1901. 



ORGANIZATION. 



EDWARD I. HUMPHREY, Chairman. 
WILLIAM G. COLESWORTHY, Secretary 



FRANK O. DRAPER, Superintendent. 

Residence : Office : 

24 Albion Street. Room 10, Union Block. 

Office Hours: 

School Days, 1 to 2. Monday Evenings, 7 to 8. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 



ACCOUNTS. 

S. T. Elliott, E. S. Fellows, C. G. Chick, W. G. Colesworthy, 

A. L. Hanchett. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. « 

C. G. Chick, F. F. Courtney, A. Washburn, E. S. Fellows, 

S. T. Elliott. 

COURSE OE STUDY, TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

W. G. Colesworthy, E. I. Humphrey, A. Washburn, 

F. F. Courtney, E. F. Boyd. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING AND MILITARY DRILL. 

A. Washburn, A. L. Hanchett, E. S. Fellows, 



E. I. Humphrey, 



TRUANCY. 

E. F. Boyd, 



C. G. Chick. 



LOCAL COMMITTEES. 



High School, A. 

Damon, 

Hemenway, 

Grew. 

Creenwood, 

Amos Webster, 

Butler, 

Fairmount, 

Weld. 

Vacation Industrial, 

Evening, 



L. Hanchett, E. S. Fellows, W. G. Colesworthy. 

C. G. Chick, E. I. Humphrey. 

S. T. Elliott. 

E. F. Boyd, C. G. Chick. 

S. T. Elliott, A. L. Hanchett. 

E. S. Fellows, W. G. Colesworthy. 

A. L. Hanchett. 

A. Washburn, F. F. Courtney. 

A. Washburn. 

A. Washburn, E. F. Boyd. 

F. F. Courtney, W. G. Colesworthy. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR, 1898-99. 



FIRST TERM. 

Begins Monday, Sept. 5th; ends Friday, Dec. 23rd— 16 weeks. 

SECOND TERM. 
Begins Monday, Jan. 2nd; ends Friday, March 31st. — 13 weeks. 

THIRD TERM. 
Begins Monday, April 10th ; ends Friday, June 23rd.— 11 weeks. 

Christmas Vacation. 
Begins Monday, Dec. 26th; ends Friday, Dec. 30th. — 1 week. 

Spring Vacation. 
Begins Monday, April 3rd; ends Friday, April 7th— 1 week. 

Holidays. 

Sept. 5th and 6th, Nov. 24th and 25th, Feb. 22nd, March 31st, 
April 19th and May 30th. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE'S REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

It is our duty and pleasure to present in brief outline the 
more important events connected with school supervision 
during the year. We may reasonably hope that our report 
will secure an interested perusal, for we shall refrain from 
any undue theorizing and address ourselves to the practical 
work in hand. For statistical data, and for more elaborate 
view, we invite attention to the tables published, a:;d to the 
Superintendent's report. The first question which pressed 
for an answer at the commencement of the year was, "Shall 
we have a Superintendent of Schools?" The question had 
been pretty thoroughly discussed by press and people prior 
to the spring election, and it then crystallized to a definite 
issue. After proper deliberation we voted unanimously to 
ask the town to instruct us to elect a Superintendent, and 
the town so instructed. We at once entered upon the diffi- 
cult task of selecting, and after examining about fifty appli- 
cants our choice centered, without division, upon Mr. Frank 
O. Draper, of Central Falls, Rhode Island, who, at that 
time, was iu charge of the schools in that place. 

He promptly accepted and entered upon his duties July 
1st, 1898, although prior to that time, in a purely informal 
wa} r , he visited our schools and familiarized himself with 
the methods employed. This preparatory work was pro- 
ductive of excellent results : it took from the incoming 
term much that would have caused delay, and served to 
establish pleasant personal relations with the whole working 
force of the schools. We highly appreciate the services 
thus far rendered by Mr. Draper ; he has brought to the 



164 
position positive fitness for leadership, superior educational 
power, constructive force, conservative method and an emi- 
nently worthy character. Y\fe have in him a highly valued 
official, and the town can well congratulate itself upon hav- 
ing secured his services. It is gratifying to note the very 
strong endorsement he is receiving from the town's people y 
and the general acquiescence in the movement so recently 
inaugurated. 

This change in school government in no way reflects upon 
past methods ; it is simply the natural sequence of the zeal 
and interest which preceded it. Now that we have entered 
upon a new school policy, we feel that it is especially 
incumbent on each and every one to do all possible things 
to secure unification of public sentiment. On subjects af- 
fecting our school interests we cannot afford to divide ; 
whatever else distracts us, these should be considered 
calmly and dispassionately, and with an eye single to our 
children's educational welfare. Our children have but one 
royal opportunity, and this should be fully accorded them 
whatever else fails. 

The revival of the High School Battalion is notable 
among the changes of the year. We hope that this action 
will be productive of good results, and that it will give an 
increased zeal and dignity to the students' effort and impart 
added grace and vigor to the school itself. 

One unpleasant duty devolved upon us during the year, 
which was the temporary closing of the Weld school. We 
hesitated to so act, but the meagre attendance made it 
imperative. Very soon after it was closed a protest from 
residents of the district came to us, and we decided, after 
their strong presentation and their assurance that the full 
quota of pupils should attend the school, to re-open it. We, 
in common with those protesting, considered it a calamity 
to close a public school, and yet we were acting from a 
sense of duty, and so could not properly be guided solely 



165 

by inclination. Even now the attendance is numerically 
small, but we feel strongly assured that the popular desire 
is that the school be continued, and we fully hope that the 
■coming year will justify this course. 

The Industrial School, in its sewing and carpentry de- 
partments, has increased in interest and numbers. In the 
sewing division the attendance has advauced from an aver- 
age of 11 to nearly 40, and in the carpentry from 40 to 100. 
This, of course, adds to its expense, but it is an outlay 
which will bring its compensation by giving to many homes 
a skillful and economical handling of matters which, when 
properly managed, contribute so largely to e very-day com- 
fort and convenience. . 

At the last appropriation meeting the town made liberal 
provision for the maintenance of the schools, and we have 
endeavored to make careful expenditure of the same. Some 
unusual expenses were incurred in the renovating of the 
school buildings and in furnishing the rooms of the Commit- 
tee and Superintendent. 

In the direction of school affairs we have no doubt pur- 
sued, in some instances, the course not conducive to the 
best results, and have failed to correct all errors, even some 
of those of which we were cognizant. Our aim has been to 
make safe and sure progress, having in mind the mandate, 
" make haste slowly." 

In closing, we cannot refrain from making one recommen- 
dation which to us seems of vital importance. We earnestly 
urge a new building for the High School. This has been a 
subject of controversy for a long time, and it may not be 
wise to bring it anew to your attention. We know that 
there has been a wide divergence of "opinion in the past 
which may possibly now exist, and yet we feel that we 
should be derelict to the best interests of the town, as well 
as to the schools, if we did not endeavor to revive public 
sentiment along the line of renewed advocacy of this project. 



166 

Our present building has had many alterations made at a 
considerable financial outlay, and yet it is insufficient for 
our needs, and it does not, as a public structure, creditably 
represent the town. At the risk of reading the town a 
homily on wise action in this, and in other cases of public 
improvements, we shall venture to advocate a new building 
as a measure of economy. 

There is a belief, already too strongly rooted, that to 
avoid spending money on needed improvements makes the 
town a point toward which capital and population will nat- 
urally gravitate. Our belief runs on exactly opposite lines. 
We are confident that omitting to make needed improve- 
ments results in degeneracy and loss. This is as true when 
applied to individual as to town affairs. At this time in our 
history this becomes an especially valuable truth to consider, 
for we feel it to be unquestionably true that just now we are 
in danger of suffering irreparable loss by neglecting to make 
public improvements, which our natural situation and our 
competitive relation to other municipalities demand. 

It is always well to defend the town when any one tries 
to defame it, but we should not carry our defense so far as 
to multiply our lines of weakness. Evade the matter as we 
may, the fact remains that the present High school building 
militates against the best interests of the town as well as of 
the schools. The value of a town as a place of residence or 
as a place to invest capital is estimated largely on the char- 
acter of its public buildings and on the attractiveness of its 
streets. On these two excellencies hinge its material pros- 
perity more than on any others. We trust that our plead- 
ing: for a new High school building will not be in vain. 

o o o 

Respectfully submitted, 

E. I. HUMPHREY, 

Chairman. 



SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT, 



To the School Committee of the Town of Hyde Park : 

My first annual report as Superintendent of the Hyde 
Park Public Schools is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Following is a summary of school statistics for the statis- 
tical school year last completed, ending June 30, 1898 : 

GENERAL STATEMENT. 



SCIIOOLHOUSES. 



No. 1. 

" 9 



High School 
Damon " 



Everett street 
Readville •"' 



nine rooms, 

eight " . 
(lour occupied) 

one room, 

eleven rooms, 

nine " 

four " 

one " 

nir e ' ' 

two " 

(one occupied) 
Number of school rooms occupied, 

" " buildings, .... 

" containing high school department, 
" " eighth (highest grammar) grade, 

" " primary grades only, 

TEACHERS. 



3. 

4. 
5. 
6. 
7. 
8. 
9. 



Hemenway sch 1 ! 
Grew school, 
Greenwood sch'l 
Amos Webster " 
Butler school. 
Fairmount sch'), 
Weld school, 



Wolcott " 
Gordon avenue 
Metropolitan avenue 
Hilton street 
East River street 
Williams avenue 
Highland street 



Number of teachers regularly employed, .... 

Supervisor, 

Men teaching in day schools 

Women *' " ...... 

Men " in evening schools (teaching also in day schools), 

Women " " " 

Men " in vacation schools, 

Women " " "...... 



49 
9 
1 
4 
4 



56 
1 
7 

43 
1 
2 
1 
1 



168 



Number of day school teachers who have attended college, 

" college graduates, 

Number who have attended normal school, 

" of normal school graduates, . . ' . 

" who have attended training school, 

" of training school graduates, 



12 

10 

13 

9 

7 
1 



SCHOOL CENSUS. 



Popu 


latic 


n of 


Hyde Part 


(estimated), 


13,000 


Tota 


number 


of persons 


4to2L 


3,360 


<< 

IC 






" boys 
<• girls 


5 to 15, 


2,096 
1,049 
1,047 


<( 
it 






" persons 


8 to 15, 

4 years, . . . ... 

14 " ■ 

4 to 21 in school, 


1,615 
221 
195 

2,344 


<< 

* i 






" boys 


" in Hyde Park public schools, 


1,546 
764 


it 






" girls 
" persons 

it ti 

a it 


tt it a 

" in Hyde Park private schools, 

" " parochial school 

" in schools out of town, 

" not in school, 


782 

23 

s, 683 

92 

1,016 



MEMBERSHIP AND ATTENDANCE 



Total number of pupils registered, 
Average membership, 
Average attendance, 
Per cent, of attendance, 
Pupils under 5 years of age, 

" over 15 " . 

" between 8 and 14 years of age, 



1,935 
1,586 
1,471 

92.3 
1 

236 
1,064 



STATISTICS. 

The statistics of membership, attendance, etc., given in 
this report are for the school year ending June 30, 1898. 
As heretofore given the statistics covered a part of two 
school years and were based on two years' classes. Fiuan- 



169 

cial reports must be based on the fiscal year of the town, 
but the natural school year is a more satisfactory basis for 
all other returns. 

TEACHERS. 

Thirty-two teachers have attended college, normal school, 
or training school. Of these, twenty, are graduates. Still 
others have attended courses of educational lectures and 
have taken private courses of professional reading which in 
connection with successful experience in teaching may be 
regarded as, in a fair measure, taking the place of the work 
of the schools. As a whole, our corps of teachers is above 
the average in professional spirit and attainment. It is to 
be regretted that the relatively low scale of salaries paid .is 
inadequate to retain many of our most progressive teachers 
who are constantly sought by those in charge of school sys- 
tems more highly favored in this respect. That we do not 
lose a greater proportion each year is surprising, but is in 
part due to personal reasons which render change of resi- 
dence distasteful to teachers who might be induced other- 
wise to seek promotion. Under present conditions, as va- 
cancies occur they must be filled largely by teachers from 
smaller towns who come to our schools as a vantage ground 
from which to win promotion. 

ORGANIZATION. 

As at present organized, each elementary school of more 
than four rooms is under the direction of a super- 
vising principal. The primary schools in each district are 
now without this form of supervision. While this change 
is attended with some loss to" these schools, the Masters are 
free to devote their whole attention to the pupils within 
their respective buildings and can give a greater share of 
their time than formerly to the pupils of the grammar 
grades where their influence is most needed. This is a dis- 
tinct gain and cannot fail to be productive of good. I re- 



170 

gard the Master's influence as essential to the complete 
development of character in pupils of the higher elementary 
grades. Our schools are fortunate in possessing this ele- 
ment of strength which is too often lacking in any. but the 
largest towns. 

No change has been made in grading. The numbering 
of the grades has been reversed to correspond with the sys- 
tem in common use — the first grade becoming the first 
primary school year, and the twelfth grade the senior class 
of the high school. 

In the Fairmount school the first-year pupils are divided, 
the younger and more immature pupils forming a beginner's 
or sub-primary class. I recommend that this division be 
extended to all 'the first grade classes having a sufficient 
number of pupils, and that a relatively large portion of the 
course for the lower division consist of kindergarten occu- 
pations. This sub-primary class has been given a five 
years' trial in schools under my direction and is a marked 
improvement upon the plan of two divisions of equal attain- 
ments, nearly one-half of whose pupils in some cases re- 
main more than one year in the first grade or are pro- 
moted without adequate preparation. 

KINDERGARTENS. 

The Committee are agreed, I believe, that a system of 
kindergartens in connection with the public schools is desir- 
able, and I hope that such a system may be established as 
soon as provision for it can be made by the appropriation of 
the neccessary funds and by the opening of additional 
school rooms. Meanwhile, the sub-primary grade recom- 
mended above will, to a limited extent, provide the needed 
preparation for first-grade work so keenly felt in the case of 
those pupils who enter school at the age of live years. Un- 
doubtedly the best kindergarten is a good home and the 
best kindergartner is a devoted mother. Most children are 



171 

too 3 T oung at five years of age to take up primary school 
work with profit. At this age bodily activity is an essen- 
tial condition of proper development. Very young children 
derive greater injury than benefit from the neccessary re- 
straints and formal occupations of the school. It is far bet- 
ter that children should enter school at six than at five. . At 
an earlier period only the home or the kindergarten can 
provide suitably for their needs. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

Early in the year, grade meetings were held and the 
year's work was planned with as little departure from 
that of the past year as was consistent with a uniform plan. 
The ideal course of study demands the greatest possible 
freedom in method and in order of presentation of topics, 
for each teacher. In practice, it will be advisable for some 
time to come to make the course somewhat definite, laying 
out the work for each term, and determining to some extent 
the order of topics. This development of the course should 
proceed from the present work of the schools and mast be 
based upon it, in the interest of teachers and pupils alike. 
Changes should be made gradually and time given for 
readjustment to new conditions. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The Master of the high school reports a year of steady 
progress and of earnest work on the part of all the teachers 
and most of the students. His recommendations include 
the addition of physical geography and mechanical drawing 
to the general courses. With these recommendations I am 
in hearty accord. The high, school should provide adequate 
preparation for the college and the technical school, but the 
importance of the preparatory course should not be unduly 
emphasized. The general courses reach by far the greater 
number of pupils and should be strengthened and broad- 
ened. 



172 

The commercial course is of but two years iu length. I 
recommend the addition of a third year to this course as 
desirable, and hope this matter may receive the early con- 
sideration of the Committee. The several courses of the 
high school are given in the appendix to this report. 

It is interesting to note that the last graduating class is 
represented in the freshman classes of Harvard and Boston 
Universities, and of Tufts, Smith, Mt. Holyoke, and Boston 
College. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The Masters' reports deplore the frequent loss of our best 
teachers who seek more remunerative positions in other 
communities. I am aware that the Committee would gladly 
remove this source of detriment and loss to the schools if 
such a step seemed warranted. 

The need of modern indoor sanitary arrangements is also 
strongly presented. This need is strongly felt by the Com- 
mittee and by many parents and other citizens interested in 
the public health of the town, and I trust that steps will be 
taken to connect with the sewer svstem all school buildings 
situated on or near the lines. 

The matter of the proper sanitation of schools is a most 
important one. "We have recently passed through a period 
of grave danger to the pupils of the Greenwood district, 
and, in fact, to the children of the entire communuy. Only 
the prompt and efficient action of the Board of Health, 
through their agent, Mr. Lovell, prevented the rapid devel- 
opment of an epidemic of diphtheria. In connection with 
this subject, I wish to recommend for your consideration 
the plan of limited inspection of the schools by a competent 
physician. This idea of school inspection is not by any 
means a new one. It has been for some years an estab- 
lished feature of many city school systems. On account of 
the item of expense, I recommend only a modified form of 



173 

inspection, limited to such times and such schools as are in 
danger of infection from known cases of infectious disease. 
In my opinion such an arrangement could be made with a 
local physician as would add greatly to the security of 
school attendance without undue expense. 

YOCAL MUSIC. 

This department is in excellent condition, is well organ- 
ized, and is rapidly developing under the direction of the 
Supervisor, Mr. B. Harold Hamblin, whose work is to be 
highly commended, as is that of the teachers whose earnest 
and intelligent efforts to carry out his plans are meeting 
with well earned success. If vocal music were taught solely 
as an accomplishment its importance as such would entitle 
it to an honorable place in the public schools. But it is not 
thus limited in its scope. It is a valuable means of govern- 
ment and discipline, and of moral and aesthetic education. 
The moral tone of schools in which music is seriously taught 
is distinctly higher than in those schools in which there is no 
music deserving the name. The proper rendering of well 
chosen songs is of untold value as a means of inculcating" 
patriotism and all the nobler sentiments and emotions which 
it is so difficult to reach by methods of direct instruction. 

Following is the report of the Supervisor : 

•REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 
Mr. Frank O. Draper, Supt. of Schools. 

Dear Sir : — It has been a source of much satisfaction to 
note the progress the schools have been making in music 
during the past year. Many parents have informed me of 
the interest and intelligence their children have developed 
in music. Such interest has been quite general among the 
classes and together with the kindly feeling and splendid 
efforts of the teachers, my work has been thoroughly 
enjoyable. 



174 

Commencing in October, '98, I formed a class for teach- 
ers", in music as applied to teaching in our public schools. 
All of the teachers were invited to attend, free of any ex- 
pense. The class has met at my rooms in Plummer Block 
once in every two weeks, and most of the teachers availed 
themselves of the opportunity. My aim has been to assist 
the teachers to a uniform method of teaching the problems 
in music. During the latter part of December a test exam- 
ination in music was given to the six upper grades with 
gratifying success. 

Pupils are marked in music as in drawing, and it has 
certainly strengthened my department. I take pleasure in 
expressing my appreciation of the support given to me by 
the Superintendent of Schools, the School Committee and 
the masters and teachers. 

Yours respectfully, 

B. Harold Hamblin. 

Hyde Park, Feb. 3, ; 99. 

DRAWING. 

Freehand drawing has been made uniform in plan 
throughout the elementary schools by the adoption of a 
standard series of drawing books and manuals. This subject 
is, on 'the whole, in the least satisfactory condition. A 
special supervisor is an essential to the best results in 
drawing as in music. Until the services of such a super- 
visor are secured the books in use must be depended upon 
for guidance. A beginning has been made in the study of 
type forms by the teachers, and this elementary preparation 
for correct teaching will be continued during the year. 

The importance of drawing need not be urged here. No 
department of school work has a more direct value for the 
pupils, while educationally it has also very great value as 
the only representative in our schools of that important 
phase of modern education to which the name "manual 



175 

training" is applied. Manual training is not merely hand 
training. It is rather the exercise and development of the 
motor areas of the brain upon whose activity and capacity 
must depend the future bread- winning power of a great 
'number of our pupils. Neglect of this important side of 
education is fatal to the great aim of the public schools — 
symmetrical development of the powers of the child. 

READING AND SPELLING. 

One of the most pressing needs of the elementary schools 
is a liberal supply of books for reading. One set. sufficient 
for a division, has been placed this year in each room. Asa 
different set is placed in each school they may be exchanged 
and thus give a considerable range of reading. I recom- 
mend that additional sets be purchased when this is possible. 

Much attention is given to the teaching of reading in the 
lower grades, and the results obtained by a considerable 
number of our teachers are excellent. At my request a 
special teacher representing the author of the series of 
readers and of the method of teaching reading used in our 
schools for the past two years, visited the sch olsand tested 
the several classes, giving, in connection with these visits, 
a series of addresses to the teachers. In accordance with 
her recommendations the phonic work of the first year has 
been modified and reduced in quantity, admitting the use of 
supplementary reading matter in the latter part of the year. 

By the method of teaching reading employed in our pri- 
mary grades, the pupils are led from the first to observe the 
structure of each new word, and to refer to their respective 
classes words susceptible of classification. This analysis 
and classification of words may be made an effective aid to 
the mastery of spelling, special attention being given to the 
words which fall outside the classes formed. In addition 
to this process of word study, which is this year extended 
through the eight elementary grades, the teachers in all 



176 

grades are compiling lists of words used by the pupils in 
their daily work. These lists will receive constant addi- 
tions, and will soon embrace most of the words in the pupils' 
vocabulary which present difficulties in spelling. To these 
words may be added a considerable number of words com- 
monly found in spelling books which will be met later in 
general reading. 

The spelling of English words is, for most persons, a 
difficult art, and is of sufficient importance to be given a 
prominent place throughout the elementary course. The 
graduates of our grammar schools should show excellent 
ability in correct spelling of all words commonly employed 
in oral speech. 

REPORT OF TRUANT OFFICER. 

Mr. Frank O. Draper, Supt. of Schools. 

Dear Sir : — Please find below an account of my services 

as Truant Officer for eight school months, ending Dec. 31, 

1898: 

Total number of cases investigated, 183 

truants, 39 

" prosecuted, 1 

" committed, 1 

" placed on probation, 1 

" absent with parents 1 permission, 76 

" absent on account of sickness, 39 
" absent on accr. of lack of clothing, 12 

" removed from town, 3 

" attending private schools, 8 

" absent from other causes, fi 



On January 19th I arrested Michael Cannon, 13 years of 
age, for habitual truancy. January 20, at Dedham, Judge 
Grover sentenced said Cannon to six months in the Truant 
School at Walpole. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Henry V. Harwood, 
Hyde Park, Dec. 31, 1898. Truant Officer. 



177 
EEPORT OF VACATION SEWING SCHOOL. 

The sewing school for the summer of 1898, commenced 
Tuesday, July the twelfth, with an attendance of twenty- 
five pupils. At the next session the attendance increased 
to thirty-three and the ne*t to forty-two, necessitating a 
a division of classes. The school was divided into three 
classes, the division based on age and ability. The older 
girls made samplers which includ ed if finished all the differ- 
ent kinds of stitches, patches, hems, etc., that one would 
need to know in order to do plain sewing. The younger 
girls made work aprons which included the plain stitches, 
running, hemming, etc., while the intermediate class learned 
to darn stockings and linen and to make buttonholes. 

Twenty-three sessions were held, the younger class hav- 
ing their session in the morning and the two older classes 
in the afternoon, giving each child, if present every session 
of their class, fourteen sessions. Seventy children attended 
and the average attendance for one day was thirty-five, 
making the per cent, of attendance fifty. The smallest 
number present at any session was ten ; and the largest num- 
ber thirty-nine. 

At the close of the summer's work an exhibition was held 
and parents and friends of the pupils attended it. 

Kate Farlin. 



THE PUBLIC AND PUBLIC EDUCATION. 

Education is not a matter of schooling, merely, nor is the 
teacher the only educator of youth. The child's education 
for good or ill is perpetual. It is not a matter of time or 
place. The education of the intermission is, many times, 
more potent than that of the school session, and the one 
may neutralize the other as many a discouraged teacher can 
testify. It is of supreme importance that the distinctively 
educative forces of the community should work in complete 



178 

harmony, and this result can be brought about only by in- 
telligent cooperation. The reception to our teachers and 
parents recently arranged and conducted by the Maternal 
Association of the town was a long step in the right direc- 
tion. To continue the work thus well begun I have pub- 
licly and privately advocated the formation of a permanent 
association of citizens of Hyde Park interested in the great 
work of the education of its youth ; and this suggestion is 
meeting the approval of many public spirited men and 
women. 

In conclusion allow me to express my appreciation of the 
many courtesies extended to me personally, and of the ex- 
cellent "school spirit" which characterizes Hyde Park and 
its School Committee as thoroughly as it does its public 
schools. Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK O. DRAPER, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



Hyde Park High School. 



GRADUATING EXERCISES 



OF THE 



CLASS OF '98, 



AT 



Waverly Hall, 

vVednesday Evening, June 22, 1898. 

AT EIGHT O'CLOCK. 

PROGRAMME. 

1 '• Revel of the Leaves," . . . . . . . Veazie 

High School Chorus. 

2 ^Salutatory, Miss Burgess 

3 Essay, Culture is Power, . ; . . . C. W. Farwell 

4 Essay, Two Extremes, Miss Paiue 

5 Declamation, " Patriot and Traitor," . . . Lippard 

F. P. Rafter. 

6 Essay, _ f Miss Hanscom 

7 Essay, . . f L. Heydacker 

8 " And the Glory of the Lord," from " the Messiah," Handel 

High School Chorus. 

9 Essay, Power of the Ideal, Miss Davis 

10 Recitation, " The Legend of the Organ Builder," Dorr 

Miss Ambrose. 



181 

11 * Class History, . . . . . . G.L.Coleman 

12 * Class Prophecy Miss Higbee 

13 Music, " Crossing the Bar," Macy 

Selected Chorus. 

14 * Valedictory - . Miss Tower 

15 Class Ode, ........ 

16 Presentation of the master's prize, 

17 Presentation of diplomas, . . . Mr. E. I. Humphrey 

" Chairman of the School Committee, 

18 " The King's Champion," Watson 

High School Chorus. 
Benediction. . . Rev. Henry N. Hoyt, D. D. 

* Honors by rank. 
t Excused. 



GRADUATES. 



FOUR YEARS' COURSE. 



Florence May Arentzen, 
Louis Marshall Burnett, 
Mary Ballard Childs, 
William Joseph Chisholm, 
Grace Edith Damon, 
George Henry Elliot, 
Chester Warren Farwell, 
Alice Mabel 'Haascom, 
Carrie Cecilia Higbee, 
Elizabeth Hall Middleton, 
Gertrude Sargent Mitchell, 
Frank Pearson Rafter, 
Mary Bates Tower, 



Bertha Jane Burgess, 
Jennie Carberry, 
Lulu Weymouth Chipman, 
George Latourette Coleman, 
Bertha Corrinne Davis, 
Edward Keith Ellis, 
Emily Davis Foss, 
Alice Mina Hersey, 
Caroline Elizabeth Hodgdon, 
Ethel Margaret Millar, 
Alice Ceeile Paine, 
Grace Lorna Russell, 
Alice Woodworth. 



TWO YEARS' COURSE. 



Mary Esther Ambrose, 
Eben G. Brown, 
Louise Henry Gosselin, 
Louis Heydacker, 



Isabell Becker, 
Frank Milton Fraser, 
Sadie Elizabeth Gould, 
Louis J. Malay, 
Robert A. Topham. 



182 

CLASS ODE, 1898. 
Words by Mart B. Tower. Music by Edward K. Ellis. 

Ninety-eight brings to its close 

Our High School-life's career. 
And now we sing our last farewell 

To the class we hold so dear. 
Regrets that these school days are o'er 

Fast fill our hearts to-night; 
O may the future of our class 

Be filled with radiance bright. 

Life with its hours, its days, its years, 

Is calling for our best, 
In higher aims, in noble works, 

Our God will do the rest; 
Though Glory only few acquire, 

Yet all of us can aim, 
To live a life of nobleness, 

Far preferable to fame. 

Glory in your victories, 

Despair not in defeat ; 
Life holds its many problems, 

Which every one must meet ; 
But wrapped in wisdom's mantle, 

Surely we must win, 
If our.aims are always worthy, 

And free from taint ot sin. 

We know that tears and partings 

Will often times be given, 
To show with clearer vision, 

The better way to Heaven. 
But classmates dear, if we must part, 

What e'er betides our fate, 
We'll ever cherish in our hearts, 

The class of Ninety-eight. 



Hyde Park Grammar School. 



GRADUATION EXERCISES 



CLASS OF '98, 



Waverly Hall, 

Thursday Evening, June 23, 
at 7.30 O'CLOCK. 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC BY THE GREW SCHOOL ORCHESTRA. 

Mk. Geo. E. M. Dickinson, Instructor. 

First Violins, Misses Simmons, Paine, E. and A. Rollins. 

Second Violins, Misses Chase, Gould, Burgess, Masters Drechsler aud Tibbets. 

Clarionets, Masters Staekpole, Bass and Orcutt. 

Flute, Master Baessler. Cornet, Mister Post. 

Cellos, Masters Hibbert and Stockbridge. 

Bass, Miss Berth i Simmons. Piano, Miss Parkhurst. 

Drums and Traps, Master Carberry. 



PROGRAMME. 

PART I. 

March, " King Bacchus, " R. Qruenivald 

Orchestra. 

Recitation, " Abraham Lincoln,'' . . James Edmund Gibbon 

Recitation, " The Small Boj' Elandicapped," Eugene Field 

Minnie Barbara Weston. 

Chorus, " The Wanderer's Greeting," Abt 

Classes. 



185 



Declamation, " Touissaint L'Overture." .... Phillips 

Alonzo C. Dunbar. 
Original Essay, " Spain and Her Colonies," Arthur Lodge Bishop 

Chorus, " Charming Little Valley," Boberti 

Classes. 
Composition' " Alaska." . . Girls of the Fairraount Class 



Selection, 
Declamation, 



Auber 
Gougli 

Co wen 



PART II. 

Fra Diavolo," 

Orchestra. 
The Power of Habit," 

Claude Hartwell Adams. 
Composition, Student Lite in the Graduating Class, 
Florence Elizabeth Spaans. Greenwood. 
Chorus, " In Our Boat," ...... 

Classes. 
Recitation, " Eulogy on America, . Ralph Joseph Thompson 

Recitation, Voyage of the Good Ship Union, . . . Holmes 

Marcia Anna Parkhurst. 
Declamation, "Massachusetts Volunteers," Master Albert Holzer 
Two Step, " America up to Date," . . . J. S Davis 

Orchestra. 

Awarding Diplomas, E. I. Humphrey 

Chorus, '■ Star Spangled Banner," . . . . F. S. Keyes 



GRADUATES. 



DAMON. 



Merton Ridgway Alden, 
Julia Emma Daggett, 
Alonzo Corness Dunbar. 
Theresa Jane Fentori, 
Edna Magdalene Mclveon, 
Edna Mabel West, 

James Francis Quealy, 
Helen Louise Aborn, 
Arthur Huguenin Armstrong, 
Henry Lewis Baessler, 



GREW 



Catherine Anna Statia Christy 
Mary Patience Daly, 
Patrick Joseph Feeney, 
Mary Helena Hartnett 
Fannie Nathalia Ryan 
Frederick Wood, 

John Philip Olson 
Claude Hartwell Adams, . 
Fritz Albert Armstrong, 
Gertrude May Tozer Benton, 



Arthur Lodge Bishop, 
William Michael Carter, 
Edgar Orr Urinkwater, 
Ethelinda Viele Higgius, 
Lewis Truman Little, 
Mary Pauline Moltedo, 
Selwin Howard Orcutt. 
Marcia Anna Parkhurst, 
Harry Forest Stackpole, 
Clarence Edward Tucker, 
Annie Elizabeth Williams, 

Bessie Isabelle Beach, 
George Edward Carlton, 
Anna Victoria Cromwell, 
Philip Fuller, 
Alfred Nelson Hamilton, 
Albert Holzer. 
Charles Edward Howes, 
Nella Annie Kraus, 
Mabelle ttose Lynch, 
Colin Dorward McKenzie, 
Ashton Earl Oliver, 
Chester Conrad Rausch, 
Myra Inez Stickney, 
Marion Isabel! Topham, 
Waldo Ward Williams, 



John Alden, 
Sigrid Lillian Bloom, 
Anna Mary daffy 
Maude Ethel Cro<s. 
Wallace Osborne Durel, 
Maud Edna Greeley, ■ 
Harriet Beatrice Hanscom, 
Walter S.Henderson, 
Joseph Orin Hutchings, 
Gertrude Almy Kelley, 
John Joseph McDonald, 
Edith Mabel Shute, 
Gertrude Dix Tileston, 
Harriet Pauline Wasserboehr, 
Harry Chester Wood, 



186 

Helen Lydia Burgess, 
Ralph Avard Doane, 
Annie Haniet Ford, 
Cora Belle Knapp, 
Flora Marion Lovering, 
Edna Elizabeth Moseley, 
Florence Lou Paine, 
Edna Selina Runnells, 
Joseph Francis Sweeney, 
Ida May Wetherbee, 
Mary Copeland Williams, 

GREENWOOD. 

Florence Nickerson Boyd, 
George Telfer Corbett, 
Helen Asenath Davis, 
Lucile Helena Gravestein, 
May Davenport Hammond, 
Chester Lewis Howe, 
Sadie Jane Keene, 
Wilfrid Kraus, 
Clara Louise McDougald, 
David Belford Neilson, Jr. 
Chella Manly Perkins, 
Florence Elizabeth Spaans, 
Charles Miller Taylor, 
Minnie Barbara Weston, 
Mabel Alice Wolle. 

FAIRMOUNT. 

Ethel Morse Bates, 
Ida De Vebber Boynton, 
Bessie Young Clark 
Faustina Maud Davis 
James Edmond Gibbons, 
Richard Fox Hammatt, 
Warren Haskell, 
Walter Domling Huestis, 
John James Jones, 
William J. Mahoney, 
Frank Ernest Merrow, 
Bessie Smith, 
Ralph Joseph Thompson, 
Frances Ellis White, 
Lillian Addison Burnett, 



A TEACHERS' INSTITUTE 

UNDER THE DIRECTION OF THE 

State Board of Education 



WILL BE HELD IN THE 



HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING, HYDE PARK, 

MONDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1898. 



PROGRAMME. 
9.00 a. m. Opening Exercises. 
9.10 a. m. The Mutual Relation of Educational Forces, 

Samuel P. Dutton, Sapt. of Schools, Brookline 

10.10 a. m. Story Telling, (Primary Section), 

Mrs. Elizabeth Y. Rutan, Boston 

10.10 a.m. Drawing, (Grammar Section), 

L. Walter Sargent, Ass't State Supervisor of Drawing 

10.10 4. m. Geometry, (High School Section), 

James W. MacDonald, Agent of the Board 
11.10 a. m. The Human Body, (Primary Section), 

Mrs. Ella B. Hallock, New York 
11.10 a. m. Language and Grammar (Grammar Section), 

John T. Prince, Agent of the Board 
11.10 a. m. Physics (High School Section), 

J. C. Packard, High School, Brookline 

INTERMISSION. 

(Lunch will be provided at small cost for those who desire it.) 
1.15 p. m. Drawing (Primary Section,) . . . Mr. Sargent 
1.15 p. m. Geography (Grammar School Section), 

Philip Emerson, Principal of Corbett School, Lynn 



188 
1.15 p.m. Latin (High School Section), . . Mr. MacDonald 
2.15 p. m. Language, (Primary Section), 

Miss Sarah L. Arnold, Supervisor of Schools, Boston 
2.15 p. m. History (Grammar Section), 

George I. Aldrich, Superintendent of Schools, Newton 
2.15 p. m. History (High School Section), 

Miss Anna B. Thompson, Thayer Academy, Braintree 
3 15 p. m. Elements of Geography, (Primary Section,) Mr. Emerson 
3.15 p.m. 'Physiology, Hj'giene and Temperance, 

(Grammar Section), . . . Mrs. Hallock 

3.15 p. m. English Literature, (High School Section), 

Andrew J. George, High School, Newton 

Members of School Committees, Superintendents of Schools and all 
others interested in education are cordialy invited to attend the 
meetings. 

FRANK A. HILL, 
JOHN T. PRINCE, Secretary of the Board. 

Agent of the Board. 



PROGRAMME-Supervisor of Music. 





1st, 3rd, 5th, 


ETC. weeks. 








Grew. Tuesday a. m. 


Grade, 1 A 


9.10 


to 


9.30 






" IB 


9 35 


to 


9.55 






" 2 


10.00 


to 


10.30 






" 3 


10.50 


to 


11.20 






" 3&4 11.25 to 


11.55 


Grew. Tue 


sday p. m. 


Grade, 4 


1.50 


to 


2.20 






" 5 


2.25 


to 


2.55 






" 5&6 


3.00 


to 


3.30 


Weld. Wednesday a. m. 


Grade, 1 & 2 


9.30 


to 


10.00 


High. 


" A. M. 




11.15 


to 


12.45 


Webster. Wednesday p. m. 


Grade, 3 


1.45 


to 


2 15 






" 4 


2.20 


to 


2.50 






1 


2.55 


to 


3.15 






" 2 


3.15 


to 


3.45 


Butler. Thursday a. m. 


Grade, 1 


9.10 


to 


9.30 


Grew 


" A. M. 


Grade, 6 


10.00 


to 


10.30 






" 7 


10.50 


to 


11.20 






" 8 


11.25 


to 


11.55 


Hemenway. 


" P. M. 


Grade 1 & 2 


2.00 


to 


2 30 


Greenwood 


Thursday p. m. 
2nd, 4th, 6th. 


Grade, 5 

ETC. WEEKS. 


3.15 


to 


3.45 


Fairmount. 


Tuesday a. m. 


Grade, 3 


9.10 


to 


9 40 






1 A 


9.45 


to 


10.1)5 






" 1 B 


10.10 


to 


10.25 






" 2 


10.50 


to 


11.20 






" 4 


11.25 


to 


11 55 


Fairmount. 


Tuesday p. m. 


Grade, 5 


1.50 


to 


2.20 






" 6 


2.25 


to 


2.55 






" 7 


3.00 


to 


3 30 


Fairmount. 


Wednesday a. m 


. [Grade, 8 


9.10 


to 


9.40 


High. 






11.15 


to 


12 45 


Damon. Wednesday p. m. 


Grades 1, 2, 


1.45 


to 


2.05 






" 3, 4, 


2.10 


to 


2.40 






, 6, 


2.45 


to 


3.10 






" 7, 8, 


3.15 


to 


3 45 


Greenwood. 


Thursday a. m. 


Grade, 1 


9.05 


to 


9.25 


" 




" 2 


9.30 


to 


9.55 


1 1 




" 3 


10.00 


to 


10.30 


" 




" 4 


10.50 


to 


11.20 


" 




" 5 


11.25 


to 


11.55 


" 


" P. M. 


" 6 


1 50 


to 


2.20 


" 




.« 7 


2.25 


to 


2.55 


" 




" 8 


3.00 


to 


3.30 



HIGH SCHOOL COURSES OF STUDY. 



FOUR YEARS' COURSE. 

GENERAL COURSE. SCIENTIFIC. 



CLASSICAL. 



First Year. 






Algebra (year) 

Eng. Comp. (3-5 year) 

Latin (year) 

Greek and Roman His- 
tory (2-5 year) 

Physiology (one period 
per week) 


Same 


Same 


Second Tear. 






Geom. (plane) (year) 
Caesar (year) 
Eng. Hist. 1-2 year. 
Civil Gov. 1-2 year. 
*Botauy (2-3 year) 


Geometry 

Caesar or Typewriting 

or Stenography 
Eug. Hist. 1-2 year 
Civil Govt. 1-2 year 
Botany 2-3 year 


Geometry 
Caesar 
Greek 

♦Eng.'Hist. 1-2 yr. 
♦Civil Govt. 1-2 yr. 
♦Botany 2-3 year 


Third Year. 






Physics 

Rhet. & College Eng. 
Cicero or Ger. or Fr. 
Advanced Algebra 


Physics 

Rhet. and Col. Eng. 
French or German 
Advanced Algebra 
First three or last three 
required 


Rhet. & Col. Eng. 

Cicero 

Anabasis 

French or German 


Fourth Year. 






Chemistry or Vergil 
Gen. Hist. & Col. Eug. 
French or German 


Chemistry 

Gen. Hist. & Col. Eng. 

♦Astronomy 1-3 year 

Solid Geometry 

U. S. Hist. 1-3 year 

♦Trigonometry 


Gen. His. & Col. Eng. 

Vergil 

Iliad 

French or German 



* Optional. 

In all courses the other studies being pursued by members of the class 
can be elected by those wishing to do more work when the recitation 
program can be arranged to allow it. 

Note. — In the first two years a pupil can omit Latin, taking instead 
Commercial Arithmetic in the first year and Stenography or Zoology in 
the second year, and follow the Scientific Course for the third and 
fourth years. 



191 

BUSINESS COURSE' 

First Year. 
Lockwood's English Composition, 3-5 year. 
Greek and Roman History, 2-5 year. 
Algebra-, "year. 

Commercial Arithmetic, year. 
Physiology, one period per week throughout the year. 

Second Year. 
Book-keeping. 2-3 year. 
Commercial Law, 1-3 year. 
English History, 1-2 year. 
Civil Government, 1-2 year. 
Typewriting, a year. 
Stenography, year. 



PUPILS PERFECT IN ATTENDANCE. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Florence Arentzen, Chester Farwell, Carrie C. Higbee, Florence 
Fowle, Robert C. Fiske, Fred Y. French, Jr., Louis Heydacker, Ed- 
gar Holmes, Elsie Greenwood, Clara Hodgkins. Bertha Mooar, John 
D. Post, Josephine VVasserboehr. 

DAMON SCHOOL. 

First Term ; — Mabel Blood, Albert Blood Gertrude Dunbar, Carrie 
Stevens, Louisa Dunbar, William Wood, Claire Paige, Harold Shreve. 

Second Term: — Albert Blood, Frank Lawrence, Mary Morgan, 
Eva I sherwood, Willard Lawrence, Fred Shreve, Harold Shreve. 

Third Term:— Alonzo Dunbar. Edna McKeon, Mabel Blood, Al- 
'bert Blood, Michael Mack, Edmond Slafter, Harry Ray, James Pi- 
ard, Willard Lawrence, Mabel Morgan, Harold Shreve. 

Pupils Perfect in Attendance for the Year :— Albert Blood, Harold 
Shreve. 

HEMENWAY SCHOOL. 

First Term :— Henry Hardy. 

Second Term: — Clarence Stewart, Henry Hardy. 

Third Term : Clarence Stewart, Harry McArdle. 

GREW SCHOOL. 

First Term : — Edna Moseley, Ella Rollins. Claude Adams, Fritz 
Armstrong, Arthur Armstrong, Arthur Bishop, William Carter, Fred 
Crowley, Lewis Liltle. Howard Orcutt, Harry Stackpole, Ciarence 
Tucker, George Killam, Bernice Chittick, Mary Eliot, Marjorri 
Mitchell. Helen Newell, Amy Rollins, Fanny Rooney, Meriam Loder. 
William Lange, Harold Lingham, Charles O'Connell, William 
Boettcher, William Jank, Albert Beal, Addel Meister, Annie Kupke, 
Pearl Sproul, Avis Wallace, Frank Downey, Lucius Weymouth, Har- 
old Lockwood. 

Second Term : -Helen Aborn, Helen Burgess, Margaret Crocker, 
Ida Wetnerbee, Maybelle Lovell. William Aborn, William Carter, 
Fred Crowley, Howard Orcutt, Helen Newell. Amy Rollins, Fannie 
Rooney. Ethel Smith, Edith Webster, Lillian Wyman, Meriam Loder, 
Charles (TConnell, Walter Shroeder, John Towne, Flora Holtham, 



193 

Chester Webster, William Curley, Carle Meister, Annie Kupke, Avis 
Wallace, Pearl Sproul, William Geyer, Ruth Crowell, Lucius Wey- 
mouth, Ray Howe, Ralph Benton. Elbert Li tie, Jennie Snellgrove, 
Gretta Snellgrove, Helen Rooney, Robert Jank, Raymond Tuck, 
Chester Tucker, Eben Fisher, Addel Meister, Lena Erler, Bertha 
Schroeder, Grace Sandow. 

Third Term:— Helen Aborn, Gertrude Benton, Helen Burgess, 
Margaret Crocker, Cora Knapp, Mirian Lovering, Maybelle Lovell, 
Edna Moseley, Claude Adams, Arthur Armstrong, Fritz Armstrong, 
Henry Baessler, Fred Crowley, Ralph Doane, Lewis Little, John Ol- 
son, Howard Orcutt, James Quealy, Harry Stackpole, Clarence 
Tucker, Hernice Chittick, Marjorie Mitchell, Helen Newell, Fannie 
Rooney, Ethel Smith, Mabel Tourtellotte, Edith Webster, Lillian 
Wyman, Harold Lingham, Edith Mauley, Charles O'Connell. Walter 
Schroeder, Willie Taylor, Mary Knapp, Marion Beal, Flora Holtham, 
Essie Marks, Marian Nunn, William Jank, Chester Webster, William 
Curley, James Sweeney, Annie K ipke, Avis Wallace, Ella Wyman, 
Arthur Wetherbee, Angeline Creaser, Mildred Collyer, Fred Cross- 
man, William Geyer, Fred McDougall, Mildred Moltedo, Helen 
Rooney, Gretta Snellgrove, Clifford Post, Robert Devine, Harry 
Costley, George Carter, Robert Jank, Edgar Noyes, John Rooney, 
Chester Tucker, Grace Manley, Leo Marks, Harold Smith, Willie 
White, Lena Erler, Mabel McConnell, Bertha Schroeder, Ruth 
Humphrey, Alois Schmalz, Allan Kiley, Adolph Vietze, Howard Bib- 
bins, Alice Shewell. 

GREENWOOD SCHOUE. 

First Term:— George Corbett. Laura Ccrbett, Albert Holzer, Nella 
Kraus, Wilfred Kraus, David Neilson, Jr., Marian Topham, Elsie 
Downie, Louis Gerry, Laura Googins, Alice Graham, Chester Green- 
law, Bessie Gunn, Anna Riley. Lucy Fitton, Maud Hersey, Lizzie 
Plummer, Arthur Anderson, Albert Mclntyre, Daniel Mahoney, Wal- 
ter White, Victor Wigijlesworth, William Wright, Foster Cass, John 
Chamberlin, Charles Dame, Clara Grant, Emily Halzer, Roberta 
Kraus, Ruth McGregor, Charles Wigglesworth, William Corbett, 
James Cass, Walter Dame, Josie Fisher, Frank Gunn, Moses Long, 
James McPherson, Annabel Phinney, Chester Topham, Sidney An- 
drews, Edith Anderson, Sophora Bliss. Walter Carlton, Thomas Cass, 
Carl McConnell, Theodore Donahoe, Hattie Gunn, Arthur Neilson. 
Harriet Pammer, John Roman, Edgar Noyes, Robert Clapp, Mildred 
Howes, Marian Googins. Jessie McVitae, Frank Cass. 

Second Term : — Nella Kraus, Minnie Weston, Bessie Gunn, 
Josephine Kiander, Anna Riley, Harry Buck, Mark Clogston George 



194 

Greenlaw, Florence Greenlaw, William Bodwell, Finlay Bryce, 
Charles Norwood, Allan Cameron, Emily Holzer, Mabel Jeffers, Les- 
ter Reid, Laura Crudgington, Ella Gerry, Annabel Phinney, Thomas 
Cass, Earl Simpson, Jessie McVitae. Frank Cass. 

Third Term :— George Corbett, Helen Davis, Lucile Gravestein, 
May Hammond, Charles Howes, Nella Kraus, Colin Mackenzie, Chel- 
la Perkins, Chester Riusch, Myra Stickney, Minnie Weston, Annie 
Caffln. Helen Courtney, Alice Graham, Bessie Gunn, Josephine Kian- 
der, Rose Odell, Anna Riley, Carrie Strout, Clement Bradley, Harry 
Buck, Rae Cowperthwaite, George Greenlaw, Carabel Gazan, Jennie 
Lockman, Mary Mogan, Lizzie Plum me r, Genie Sargent, Edith 
Waters, Albert Mctntyre, Daniel Mahoney, Charles Norwood, Frank 
Savage, John Savage, Ralph Strout. Walter White, Victor Wigsles- 
worth, Foster Cass, Mar Donahoe, George Greenwood, Gina Mor- 
tonson, Mary Neilson, Clarence Pinder, Margaret Townsend, Charles 
Wigglesworth, George Anderson, Laura Crudgington, William Cor- 
bett, Josie Fisher, Frank Gunn, James McPherson, Harry Peck, An- 
nabel Phinney, Alma Pommer, Anna Ra'isch, Frank White, Edith 
Anderson, Thomas Cass, Dora Ferguson, Jessie Grant, Hattie Gunn, 
John Roman, Olive Story, Jessie McVitae, Bertha Elwell, Jessie 
Googins, Bertha Handley, Lizzie McLean, Willie McDonough, Frank 
Cass, Glee May, Edna. Wilcox, Arthur White, Wilfred Kraus. 

AMOS WEBSTER SCHOOL. 

First Term: — Janet Brundage. Franklin Hillier, Harry Lord, Lil- 
lian LocVman, Alfred Wheeler, Mori is Goldberg, Olga Mortonson, 
Arthur Savage, Edith Smith, Clarence Somes, Myron Haskell, Syd- 
ney De Young. Allan Graj% Harold Hill, Clifford May, May Bryce, 
Lilly Watson, Lyde Partridge. Mary Strachan, Alice Spear, Thomas 
Bryce. 

Second Term:— Howard Fogg, Harold Hill, Florence Adler, May 
Bryce. 

Third Term :— Bernard Courtney, Howard Fogg, Lillian Lockman, 
Olga Mortonson, Florence Newell, Kitty Riley, Edith Smith, Alfred 
Wheeler, Clarence Somes, Stanley Wheeler, Herbert Ford, Allie 
Strachan, Florence Adler, May Bryce, Ellinor Clogston, Frances 
Mclntyre, Morton Mortonson, Ellinor Somes, Mary Strachan, Walter 
McLoon, Warren Smith, Douglas Strachan, Dorothy Ticknor, Ethel 
Jones, Sarah Dyer. 

BUTLER SCHOOL. 

First Term : — Lester A. Cloutman. 
Third Term : — Alice J. Anderson. 



195 

FAIHMOUNT SCHOOL. 

First Terra: — Ora Chadbourne, Alden Cleveland, Arthur Crowe, 
Ethel Gibson, Wallace Gibson, William Haigh, Maude Howe, Etta 
Milne, John Tileston, Robert White, Ella Nims, Elsie Proctor, Fred 
Paine, Mary Wilkinson, Alexander McAfee, Walter McAfee, Bessie 
Robinson. Harold Davie, Terrence Marron, Maggie Keane, Herbert 
Scott, Priscilla Alden, George Cunningham, Ma): el Fratus, Ellery 
French, Lizzie Hall, Francis Hammatt, Harry Hinds, William Mc- 
Kelligan, Elinor Roberts, Inez Biubridge, Florence Damon, John 
Fratus, Ruth Hope, Royal Sibley. Alan Mclntire, Michael Pezzine, 
Mildred Perry, Mildred Rogers, Ernest Richardson, Fannie Sprague, 
Harvey VVasserboehr, Andrew Cleveland, Grace Forsythe, Kenneth 
McAskill, Faustina Davis, John Jon< j s, William Mahoney, Harriet 
Wasserboehr, Minna Hope, Miriam Preston. 

Second Term: — Cora Boynton, Margaret Dunn, Edna Felch, El- 
lery French. Francis Hammatt Bertha Mclntyre, Fred Maurer, Win- 
nie Milne, Mary Mulhern, John Scrivens, Annie Scott, Altha Berry, 
Ora Chadbourne, Alden Cleveland, Ethel Gibson, Prescott Hayward, 
William Hai^h, Edith Hall, Clitton Hope, Maude Howe, John Tiles 
ton, Robert White, Ethel Fratus, Alexander McAfee, John McKelli- 
gan, Herbert Scott, Mary Maurer, Joseph Proctor, Helen Howes, 
Agnes Hurley, Joseph Lodge, Frank Maurer, Freddie Pazini, John 
Thomson, Mary Wilkinson, Edith Wilbur, Inez Murbridge, Florence 
Damon, Prescott Emerson, Mabel Hamilton, Reuben Hamilton, Clary 
Jackson, Lucretia Mayo, Mildred Rogers, Harvey Wasserhoehr, 
Percy Boyd, Walter McAfee, Minna Hope, Kenneth McAskill, Miriam 
Preston. 

Third Term:— Ora Chadbourne, Alden Cleveland, Prescott Hay- 
ward, Laura Hall. Winnie Milne, William Haigh, Altha Berry, Nellie 
Beard, Ethel Gibson, Prescott Hayward, William Haigh, Clif- 
ton Hope, Maude Howe. Dean Preston, Paul Tyler, Robert White, 
Pearl Wheeler, Fred Wilbur, Alexander McAfee, Walter McAfee, 
Charles Alden, Ray Alexander, Harold Chadbourne, Helen Howes, 
Kenneth Maclntyre, Percy Worrick, Andrew Cleveland, Miriam Pres- 
ton, Alfred Maurer, Mary Price, Grace Kerwin, Joseph Lodge, Char- 
lie Rich, Percie Worrick, Mildred Weston, Frank Hurley, Percy 
Boyd, Arthur Rogers, Mabel Farley, Mary Fiske, Magg ; e Keane 
Mary Maurer, Bennie Wolfe, Minna Hope, Laura Hall. 

Perfect Attendance for the Year* — Andrew Cleveland, Minna Hope> 
Miriam Preston, Alexander McAfee, Walter McAfee, Wobert White' 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 
Master:— W. H. Angleton. 

Science :— Emerson Rice. 

Stenography and Type Writing :— Alonzo W. Lowe. 
Mathematics :— Maky C. Howard. 

French and Algebra : — Anna M. Linscott. 
German and Latin : — Ruby P. Bridgman. 
English :— Mabel E. Woodworth. 

Greek and English: — Edith R. Nickees. 











, Jj 




^ 






g 


••2 


a3 




o^ 


3 


rs 


Sept. 1, 1897, to June 30, 1898. 


3 

a 

a 

■ "o 


CS 3 
> (0 


4s 


4i =1 

o a 


a* 

» 3 
u a 


c3 
o 

3 


O 

a 




£1 




o3 




p-t a 


6 


o 
izi 




200 


173 


168 


97.3 


98 


23 


71 
1 



197 



SCHOOL STATISTICS — ( Continued). 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



s 


■- 


d 




(A 


3 
















sec 


fcca 


fl OS 


fi s 






a 3 




ojr-3 


CD 3 


«3 

o 

a 

6 
'A- 


a 

O 


OJ " 


S 2 
SI 

OS 


op. 

OJ±g 

PhcS 

O 


o 



DAMON SCHOOL. 

A.W. Armstrong, Prin. 

E. de Senaucour 

Julia E . Donovan 

Florence E. Barker. .. 

HEMENWAY. 

Dora F. Hastings 



GREW. 

Frank H. Dean, Prin 
Elizabeth Strongman 
Erlua W. Harvey . 
Margaret E. Bertram 
Blanche L. Bright.. 
Lucy H. Littlefleld.. 
Jennie J. Wardvvell. 
Fannie E. Harlow.. 
Agnes J. Campbell.. 
Nellie M. Howes . .. 

Jennie F. Ellis 

Bessie C. Sparrell- . 

GREENWOOD. 

D. G. Thompson, Prin 
Frances A. Putnam. 
Hattie L. Littlefleld 
Isabelle H. Murray 
Madge D. Ballou.. . 
Carrie E.Johnson.. 

Mary L Kaeder 

Margaret L. Wyman 
Lillian A. Richardsoi 



14 


12.8 


12 


93.4 


98 


1 


23 


21.4 


20.4 


95.1 


98.2 


2 


17 


15.6 


14 


93.4 


98 





21 


18.9 


17.8 


94.7 


98.7 





23 


18.7 


17.8 


95.9 


98.6 





19 


15.9 


15.2 


95.3 


99 





17 


12.2 


10 7 


87 


98.7 





29 


18 


15.5 


86 


98.2 





17 


13.9 


13.3 


95 6 


99.3 


1 


20 


14 5 


13.3 


91.7 


99 





42 


41 


39.6 


96 


99 


1 


53 


45 


42 


93 


99 


2 


42 


36 


34 


94 


99 


1 


32 


30 


27.3 


85.3 


99 





47 


44 


40.7 


86.6 


99 


2 


39 


34 


31 


91 


99 





44 


42 


39 


93 


99 





43 


36 


33 


92 


99 





49 


42 


39 


93 


99 





49 


43 


39 


90 


97 





49 


39 


30 


76.9 


92 





35 


32 


31.5 


98 


100 


1 


41 


37 


36 


97 


99.5 


4 


49 


43 


41 


95 


99 9 





61 


55 


49 


89 


99.2 


1 


54 


48 


46 


96 


99.6 


3 


67 


48 


45 


94 


99.6 


2 


54 


43 


39 


91 


99.6 


1 


46 


36 


34 


94 


99.6 


1 



16 

11 
3 
5 

7 
7 
7 



7 
10 



21 
18 
18 
10 
28 

8 
23 

9 
20 
31 
11 



34 
23 
26 
20 
25 
27 
25 
39 



198 



SCHOOL STATISTICS— {Concluded). 






Sept. 1, 




5 






cS 




a 


>, 


1897. 




,Q 


• ■9 


(I) o 
CCS 


O o 


CO 


-a 




















NAMES OF TEACHERS. 




fc ri 






S-S 






to June 30, 




o 


> » 


>S 


c o 


O 


o 








<j; O 


<;s 










1898. 




£ 


^ 


53 


a 


«a 


o 


fc 



GRADE 

IV. 

III. 

II. 

I. 



VII. 
VI. 

V. 

IV. 

III. 

II. 

I. 

I. 



I. &II. 



AMOS WEBSTER. 

Gertrude L. Tilden 

Sarah W. M end ell.... 
Alice F. Harrington.. 
E. Gertrude Plummer. 

BUTLER. 

Grace B. Gidney 



Fairmount. 

Edward W. Cross, Prin 

Helen P. Cleaves 

Eugene Collins 

Dillie Macdonald 

Rosa M. Morre!! .. 

M. Edith LeBourveau 
Susie Coggesball . . . 
Hattie F. Packard... 
Jennie S. Hammond. 

Helen A. Perry 

Helen 0. Thompson . . 

WELD. 

Nettie L. Ballou 



39 


30.5 


28.1 


92 


99.2 





32 


29.5 


27.8 


94 


99 


1 


54 


37 


34 6 


92 


99.1 





53 


33 


28.6 


85.6 


99.6 





39 


23 


20 


87 


99 





31 


36.6 


29 


94.7 


99 


7 


32 


29 


27 


93.1 


99 


3 


58 


50 


46.5 


93 


99 


41 


51 


41 


39.5 


96.3 


99 


10 


50 


40 


38 


95 


99 


29 


47 


40 


38 


95 


99 


6 


33 


31 


28.5 


91.9 


99 


6 


38 


28 


26.5 


94.6 


99 


6 


37 


28 


24.5 


87.5 


99 





32 


28.8 


27.3 


94.8 


99 






17 
10 
12 
17 



14 



27 

23 
38 
37 
43 
26 
29 
24 
29 



THIRD ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Sewer Commissioners 



TOWN OF HYDE? PARK 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1899. 




HYDE PARK: 
Press of the Hyde Park Gazette. 

1S99. 



ORGANIZATION. 



FERDINAND A. WYMAN, Chairman 
DAVID PERKINS . WILLIAM IT. FA1RBAIRN. 



RICHARD M. JOHNSON, Clerk. 

A. D. NICKERSON, Eugineer. 
GEORGE A. KIMBALL, Consulting Engineer, 



BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS' REPORT 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

Your Board of Sewer Commissioners is pleased to report 
that the}^ have had the services of the same engineers as in 
the previous year, — Mr. A. D. Nickerson as Engineer to 
the Board and Mr. George A. Kimball, member of the 
Metropolitan Sewer Commission, as consulting Engineer. 

By vote of the Town in Town Meeting of June 22, 1898, 
a loan of $100,000 tor the construction of sewers was auth- 
orized iu pursuance with Chapter 287, Acts of 1896. Your 
Board have to report that they have not yet taken steps to 
issue the bonds provided for under that Act, and that the 
necessity of a vote therefor did not arise during the year 
past; but that such issue will duly be made when needed. 
Also, by vote of the Town in Town Meeting, March 24th, 
1897, the money to be obtained from time to time from the 
assessments on account of the cost of sewers to owners of 
estates benefited, is to be expended under the supervision of 
your Board for the construction and maintenance of the 
sewerage system. 

Under the supervision of your Board there has been ex- 
pended for the year ending Januarv 31st, 1899, $14,134.42 
as per vouchers on file and exhibited in table No. 1, an- 
nexed to this report. The value of stock on- hand is $8,- 
803.00 as shown in table No. 2, annexed to this report. 
There remains due to contractors the sum of $218.15. 

Your Board reports in its third annual report the con- 
struction of 4,351 feet of sewers. Aside from one extra- 



202 

ordinary section, the average depth has been 8.8 feet. 
The details of that construction are as follows :* 

STREET. FROM. TO. SIZE. LENGTH. AV. DEPTH 

Warren Av. Highland St Norway Pk. 

Norway Pk. Warren A v. Summit St. 

Highland St. Williams Av. Pond St. 

Walnut St. Metro. Sewer. Fairmount Av. 

" Hyde Pk. Av. summit 

Everett St. " Harvard Av. 

Business St. Barry St- Glenwood Av. 

Hyde Park A v. at Readville, 

Total, ...... 



8 in. 


310 


10.3 


6 in. -8 in. 


700 


9.5 


Sin. 


294 


9.0 


8 in. 


220 


7.2 


8 in. 


255 


9.7 


6 in. 


280 


8.7 


8 in. 


1292 


8.1 


»0in. 


3351 
1000 


88 



The most important work accomplished during the past 
year, it will be noted, was at Readville. The railroad im- 
provements there were of such a nature that it was impera- 
tive for your Board to construct a portion of its sewer in 
advance of the changes to be made in Hyde Park avenue. 
Plans tvere made .at once for the construction of about 1000 
feet of 20 inch sewer. Upon due advertisement bids were 
received and awarded January 18th, 1898. Great difficul- 
ties were encountered in this work, as part lies under 40 
feet of earth and part under masonry abutments 30 feet 
high. Special pipe and reinforcement of concrete was 
found necessary. The consulting Engineer was much ad- 
vised with upon this work. 

The plans of your Board in relation to sewer construction 
other than that required by this special exigency have been 
made largely in deference to the written recommendations 
of the Board of Health. In accordance with these your 
Board has deemed it best to construct sewers in the streets 
above mentioned, viz. : Warren avenue, Norway Park, 
Highland street, Walnut street, Everett and Business 
streets ; and the construction of a sewer in Child street 
is under contract. The contract for all of the above work 
was awarded after due advertisement. 

Your Board would further report that the work next 



203 
contemplated is in the Page street district, the Board of 
Health having asked for sewers in this area. A trunk 
sewer is planned which must in some portions cross private 
lands. Construction will not, however, be begun until 
options for these easements at reasonable rates shall be 
obtained. The design includes a sub-drain with permanent 
discharge into the Neponset river. This, as has been proved 
the case everywhere in the town, will have a decided effect 
in relieving this area by drying out the low ground. 
The Board also looks forward to the relief of the Claren- 
don Hills district in connection with the proposed Metro- 
politan High Level Gravity Sewer. 

Your Board would urge upon all citizens the importance, 
from a sanitary point of view, of connection with the system 
of sewers. As announced in our second annual report : — 

"House connections with common sewers and all other 
construction of particular sewers are made under the super- 
intendence of your Board. Section 14 of Chapter 287 
authorizes the Board to prescribe rules and regulations for 
connecting estates and buildings with main drains and 
sewers. .Rules and regulations have accordingly been 
formed and promulgated by your Board. Printed copies 
of these rules and form of application for connection with 
the common sewers can be obtained at our office, or will be 
sent by mail upon request." 

During the year just ended 116 house connections have 
been made aggregating 6090 feet in length. The total 
number made to date is 199; total length, 10,412 feet. 
The average cost per lineal foot has been 60 cents, exclu- 
sive, however, of man-holes and rock excavation. Your 
Board keeps this work under its strict supervision. It is 
estimated that 1475 persons are now served by our system 
of sewers. 

Your Board would call the special attention of citizens to 
the assessment upon owners of estates benefited by the sew- 



204 
erage sysem soon to be completed. Under Chapter 
287, Acts of the Legislature for the year 1896, Section 6, the 
Town of Hyde Park shall by vote determine what part of 
the cost of the system of sewers the Town shall pay ; and 
the remaining cost of the system shall be assessed to the 
owners of the estates benefited upon a proportional basis 
of the average cost estimated by the Board of Sewer Com- 
missioners. Such assessment shall be paid to the Col- 
lector of Taxes of the said Town within three months after 
notice, unless written request by the owners shall be filed 
with the said Board within three months to apportion the 
said assessment into proportional parts not exceeding five, 
with interest at six per centum per annum. 

Iu Town Meeting, March 24, 1897, the Town of Hyde 
Park voted to pay one-half of the cost of the said system of 
sewers. 

The further attention of citizens is directed to a vote of 
the Board of Sewer Commissioners, January 25, 1899, 
whereby pursuant to the said Act the assessment of the re- 
maining cost of the said system of sewers is to be made up 
as follows : 

The fixed uniform rate pursuant to Chapter 287 of the 
Acts of 1896 and the vote of the Town of Hyde Park passed 
March 24, 1897, to be assessed upon estates benefited, is 
hereby established at 47 cents upon each foot of frontage on 
any street or way in which a sewer has been constructed, 
and 5 mills upon each square foot of area within a fixed 
depth of seventy feet from such street or way, the said 
rates having been so found and determined, and based upon 
the estimated average cost oi all the sewers comprising 
said system. 

Proper forms for the administration of this assessment 
are now being prepared by your Board, and written notice 
of the assessment will in clue time be served upon the own- 
ers of all estates benefited. 



205 

In conclusion your Board wish to assure the citi- 
zens of Hyde Park that upon the experience of otherjtowns, 
upon the information already obtained in three seasons' 
work in this town, and upon estimates at hand, it is believed 
that as the system nears completion the average cost will be 
materially less than it is at present. 

FERDINAND A. WYMAN, 
DAVID PERKINS, 
WILLIAM U. FAIRBAIRN, 

Feb. 1, 1899. Sewer Commissioners. 





101 30 
5 00 




45 00 




96 00 


$150 00 




- 2 35 




35 




50 





Feb. 


10. 


351. 


Mar. 


8. 


352. 


" 


21. 


353. 


" 


25. 


354. 


Apr. 


1. 


355. 



153 20 



206 
TABLE NO. 1 

LIST OF BILLS AND AMOUNTS PAID. 

Vouch. 
1898. No. 
Jan. 25. 341. R. D. Wood & Co., 6 ps. 20 in. iron pipe coated, 1410 

lbs. at $20.25 per 2240 lbs., less freight, $106 32 

Feb. 25. 342. Corson Ex. Co., carting pipe at Reailville, 8 20 

28. 343. S. B. Balkam & Co., pipe fittings, lumber and carting, 2 37 

■ '• " 344. R. M. Johnson, salary one month, $100 00 

pd. bill M. R. Warren & Co-, stationery, 50 

carfare and expenses to Medford, 80 

Mar. 1. 345. W. F. Dodge, care of room 1 mo., 
" " 346. C. / 5. Norris, inspection, 18 ds. at $2.50, 
" " 347. F. M. Leonard, " 24 4.00, 

" " 348. A. D. Nick erson, salary, chief engineer, 1 mo., 

pd. car fares $1.85, stationery supplies .50, 

express ch. on maps, 

cluster and plumb bob, 

Apr. 1. 349. Boston Construction Co. Cash paid to W. H. Doran 
on acct. of miscellaneous supplies purchased by 
him for sewer at Readville, as lollows: 
Feb. 15. Cash paid for nails, $ .25 

16. " for diaphragm by J. Doyle, 2.15 

19. " for nails, .40 

23. " " and lines, .55 

26. " f cr cheese cloth, 1.00 
Mar. 1. " ch. cloth $1.00, spikes .50, 

nails 50, 2.00 

3. " ch. cloth, by Minetti, 1.00 

3. " nails and twine line, 35 

7. " ch. cloth, 1.00 

8. " " 1.00 

10. " " $1.00, oil, 25, , 1.25 

11. " " 1.00 

12. " diaphragm, 2 50 
Feb. and Mar. F. W- Sawtelle, coal, 16.00 
Mar. 3. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R., frt. on lum'r, 54.47 

2. " " cemenl, 3.00 

Feb. 21. N. E. R. R., frt. on iron fittiugs, 2.25 

Mar. 5. B. Kivlin, gravel, 9.00 

cheese cloth, 3.00 

102 17 

Apr. 2 350. Boston Construction Co. Cash furnished T. H. 
Bryne on account, to complete Readville sewer, 
as agreed between the Boston Cons. Co., and the 
Board of Sewer Com'rs. (See vouch. 364.) 1,400 00 

I). W. Lewis, 200 ft. 20 in. pipe at $2.25, less 68 per ct. 144 00 

The Frost & Adams Co., metal tape & plumb bob, 5 80 

J. M. Poole, repairs on transit, aud express, 25 40 

Guy C. Emerson, rent of transit 2 wks. at $2.50, 5 00 

S. R. Moseley, printing and binding an. rep., $12.00 

1000 bill heads to order, 5.50 

17 50 





Vouch 


1898. 


No. 


Apr. 


1. 356. 


u 


" 357. 


" 


" 358. 


" 


6. 359. 


" 


" 360. 



207 



Geo. A. Kimball, services as consulting engineer, 

Jan. 15 and Mar. 3, 30 00 

W. F. Dodge, care of room, 5 00 

Chas. F. Paine, rent office Feb. and Mar. 10 00 

Clarence G.Norris, inspection 27 dys. at 83.00, 81 00 

A. D. Nickerson, salary 1 month, 8150 00 

car fares, 5 95 

telephones, 1 65 

mirrors .50, rope .60, pulley .50, target 25, 1 85 

159 45 

361. P. M. Leonard, inspection, 30 ds. at 84.00, 120 00 

362. R. M. Johnson, salary, 8100 00 

cash pd. Ryan & Co., express, 1 55 

" M. R. Warren & Co., stationery, 1 15 

'■ F. L. Hodgdon & Co., stationery, 88 

" Dan'l O'Connell, legal expenses, 2 00 

" L. W. Parkhurst. repairing lock, 50 

Buff & Berger's bill leg for tripod, 2 50 

" S. B. Balkam & Co., lumber & carting, 1 20 



Mar. 31. 363. Corson Ex. Co., express, $ 25 

carriage hire, 1 50 

carting pipe at Readville, 27 00 

Apr. 18. 365 S. R. Moseley, printing 1000 letter heads, $4.50 

500 note " 2.50 

1500 gov. envelopes, 34.50 

" 20. 361. Boston Cons. Co. Cash furnished T. H. Bryne, bal. 
due to complete Readville sewer, as agreed be- 
tween Boston Cons. Co. and Board of Sewer 
Commissioners, as follows: 
To T. H. Bryne, anat. pi. for 

labor as per pay-roll, $1,721 06 
F. W. Sawtelle, material : 

Mar. 14. 1 ton Cumb. coal , $ 4 00 

" 16. lton ". 4 00 

" 17. 12 bbls. Norton cement, 12 00 

" 18. 1 ton Cumb. coal, 4 00 

" 18. 8 Dbls. Nor. cement, 8 00 
6 " Atlas " at $2.30, 13 80 

•' 21. 9 " " " 20 70 

" 21. 14 " Nor. " 14 00 

" 21. 1 ton Cumb. coal, 4 00 

" 22. 6 bbls. Nor. cement, 6 00 

" 22. 4 " Atlas Port, cement, 9 20 

" 23. 14 " " " 32 20 

10 " Norton " 10 00 

" 24. 67 " " " 67 00 

" 24. 14 " Atlas Port. " 32 20 

'• 25. 12 " " " 27 60 

" 23. 2100 lbs. Cumb. coal, at $4, 4 20 

" 26. 2470 " 4 94 

" 29. 2 bbls. Atlas Port, cement, 4 60 

1 ton Cumb. coal, 4 00 



109 78 



28 75 



41 50 



208 

Mar. 30. 15 bbls. Nor. cement at $1, 

2 " Atias Port. " $2.30, 
" 31. 2120 lbs. (Jumb. coal at $4, 
Apr. 2, 1100 

6 bbls. At. Port, cement, 
4. 5 



Cr. by 16 bbls. Eg. pt. Port. cem. at $2.30, 

S. B. Balkam & Co. : 

Mar. 17. 10 bbls. Nor. cem. at $1.13, 
3 " Atlas " 2.30 

1481 ft. spruce at $17, 
253 ft. furring at $20, 
" 18. 4437 ft. spruce at $17, 
" 19. 2513 
" 22. 2818 " 

28 ft. furr. at $20, 
■ " 23. 1716 ft. spruce, 

14 bbls. Nor. cem. 

24. 12 " Atlas " 
2028 ft. spruce, 

25. 1746 
3 bbls. Atlas cement, 

" 29. 15 " Nor. " 
" 29. 14 

G. H. Haskell : 

Mar. 16. ' 102 3-4 yds. ch. cloth at 4c. $ 4 11 
" 18. 2 pr. rub. bts. at $3.50, $7 00 
1 " 2.75, 2 75 

$9 75 



15 00 


4 60 


4 24 


2 20 


13 80 


11 50 


4 60 


$342 3S 
36 80 


$11 30 

6 90 

25 18 


5 06 


75 43 


42 72 


47 91 


56 


29 17 


15 82 


27 60 


' 34 48 


29 68 


6 90 


16 95 


15 82 





10 per cent. 


98 

8 77 


" 21. 


102 3-4 y s.ch. cloth at 4c, 


4 11 


" 23. 


1 pr. men's boots, 


3 00 


" 24. 


102 1-2 yds. ch. cloth, 


4 10 


" 26. 


54 yds. ch. cloth, 


2 16 


" 28. 


97 1-4 " 


3 89 




repairing boots, 


1 50 


" 29. 


54 yds. ch. cloth, 


2 16 


" 30. 


54 " 


2 16 


" 12. 


54 


2 16 


lincy Dyei 






Mar. 17. 


lOlbs. red., 


$0.30 




ball twine, 


10 
75 


" 18. 


2 axes, 


2 00 




oiler, 


20 


" 21. 


10 lbs. spikes, 


30 




1 dipper, 


08 




2 gals, cylinder oil, 


1 80 




handle, 


20 



305 58 



391 48 



38 12 



209 



Vouch. 










189S. No. 




2 lbs. nails, 


$ 06 






Mar. 22. 


6 handles, 


1 20 






" 23. 


rattan wired broom, 


75 






" 26. 


2 Disston saws, 


2 66 


10 40 




M. H. Stack 
Mar. 31. 


42 gals, oil at 9c, 




3 78 




Samuel H. Capen : 








Mar. 24. 


Lot lumber, pur. at sheriff' 


s sale, 


25 00 




W. G. Nash : 










Mar. 16. 


25 bbls. Nor. cement, 


$28 25 






" 22. 


25 " Port. " 


57 50 






" 23. 


25 " Nor. " 


28 25 






" 25. 


25 " " 

1500 J. A. G. brick, 

1500 " 
1500 


28 25 
15 00 
15 00 
15 00 






" 24. 


25 bbls. Nor. cement, 
25 " 


28 25 
28 25 






" 29. 


1500 J. A. G. brick, 

3000 " 

1250 

1250 " , 


15 00 
30 00 
12 50 
12 50 






" 31. 


4500 " 


45 00 








1500 


1 15 00 


373 75 




B. B. Kivlin 










120 double Ids. gravel at $1.25, 


$150 00 






153 single " .62 1-2, 


95 63 


245 63 




Corson Ex. Co. : 








Mar. 16. 


tools to Readville, 


$ 2 00 






" 17. 


lever .50, express .25, 


75 






" 18. 


tools to Readville, 


1 50 






" 26. 


derrick to " 


50 






" 30. 


sharpening four chisels, 


40 






Apr. 4. 


double Id, tools f'm R.dvill 


e, 2 00 






5. 


2 '* lumber " 
boiler and pump to S. Bos. 


4 00 
12 00 





23 15 
Geo. G. McLaughlin Mfg. Co. : 

Apr. 5. 23 ds. use engine & pump, $69 00 
1 gov. pulley broken by eng. 2 00 

71 00 

$3,208 95 
Add 15 per cent, as per agreement, 481 35 

$3,690 30 
Paidonacct. (Voucher 350). 1,400 00 

2,290 30 

Apr. 1. 366. N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., service & tolls 3 mo., 25 95 

•' 2. 367. John T. Langford. Lead & yarn in joints made in 

20 in. iron pipe, 160 lbs. at 6c. 9 60 

" 18. 368. Patrick Rooney. Repairs on sewer trenches, streets 

and lawns, and for gravel, loam and sand, IS 00 



189S. 


No. 


26. 


369. 


" 27. 


370. 


Hay 2. 


371. 



210 

Vouch. 

Geo. H. Lincoln & Co. 2 20-in. iron covers & rims, 
J. W. Gurley. Labor, 2 men & team 1 1-2 ds. 
A. D. Nickerson. Salary, 
Cash paid for car fares, 
" " grade poles, oil & chimneys, 

" " lighting, manhole & lumber, 

" 2. 372. W.F.Dodge. Care of room, 
" 4. 373. R. M. Johnson. Salary, 

Cash pd. for pict. moulding, glue, etc., 

" A." Raymond for carriage hire, 

" V. C. Nichols, typewriting, 

" Ryan & Co., express, 

" H. C. Dimond & Co., hand stamp, 

" for 200 2c. stamps 

" S. B. Balkam & Co., carting and pipe, 

'• Corson Ex. Co., carting pipe, 

Apr. 19. 371. J. H. McKnight. Pd. bal. of acct. (contract.) 
June 1. 375. A. D. Nickerson. Salary, 

Cash pd. C. G. Norris as asst. 1 day, 
" carfares, 

oil, 
" lighting at Readville, 19 ds. at 50c. 
" stacking lumber at Readville, 

376. R.M.Johnson. C sh pd. N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. for 

frt. on cement and brick, 

Hyde Park Water Co. Water ser. for flushing sewer 

A. Raymond, carriage hire, 

W. F. Dodge, care of room, May and June, 

A. D. Nickerson, salary, $150 00 

car fares, SO 

cash pd. E. Q. Dyer, rope $1.58, mirror .20, 1 78 

June 24. 381. Boston Construction Co. Paid H. B. Terry for ap- 
pearance, making and filing trustees answer 
19 suits against the town, etc., as trustee, 

July 1. 382. N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., service 3 mo. 

July 11, 3S3. Patrick Rooney, labor flushing sewers in Pond st,, . 
Labor and material at sundry times and places, 

The Frost & Adams Co., for ink, paper, pencils, etc., 
S. R. Moseley, 100 specification books, 
T. Howard Barnes, use of transit, 
C. A. Hollingsworth, 1 Buff & Berger transit, 
A. D. Nickerson, salary, i 

Carfares and t xpenses, 
Cash paid bill Q. Dyer for hardware, 
" " J. Mackintosh, 1 tool bag, 

" " F. W. Conn, 2 shoes for grade 

poles, 
Cash paid bill G. H. Walker, mounting map, 



May 


24. 


377. 


June 


30. 


378. 


July 


1. 


379. 
380. 





$ 6 75 




12 00 


$150 00 




70 




2 25 




13 00 




— — 


165 95 




5 00 


100 00 




1 90 




6 50 




4 00 




1 00 




50 




4 00 




80 




7 00 






125 70 
178 29 




$150 0^ 




3 00 




70 




20 




9 50 




1 50 







164 90 




35 98 


rs, 


38 76 




5 50 




10 00 



" 21, 


384. 


ug. 1, 


385. 


" " 


386. 


" " 


387. 


" 3, 


388. 



152 58 





15 00 




25 50 


i 1 38 




10 56 


11 94 




9 73 




90 00 




6 67 




175 00 


50 00 




2 35 




1 25 




2 25 




1 00 




1 25 





211 



Touch. 



1S9£ 




No. 


Aug. 


3, 


389. 
390. 
391. 


Sept. 


1, 


392. 


June 


•29, 


393. 


July 


23, 


394. 


Aug. 


23, 


395. 


■, 


•26, 


396. 
397. 


Sept. 


1. 


398. 
39'. 
400. 

4iH. 
40-2. 



A. H. Xorris, roilmau 11 days at 81-50, $ 16 50 

C. G. Xorris, asst. eng., 25 dys. at S3, 75 00 
W. F. Dodge, care of room, 5 00 
P. H. Rooney, paid on acct. contract, 500 00 
X. Y., X. H. & H. R. R. Co., freight on carload pipe, • 50 12 

D. W. Lewis, 2134 tt. 5 in. pipe, less freight, 83 25 
Blanehard Mach. Co., 10 S-in. gates at $2.75, 27 50 
Buff & Berger, 1 Phlla rod, 14 00 
A. S. Morse, ir >n chain and hooks, 5 30 
George A. Smith, inspector, 3 dys. at S3, 9 00 
A. H. Xorris, rodman, 16 dys. at $1.50, 24 00 
C. G. Xorris, asst. eng., 13 dys. at 83, 39 00 

" inspector, 14 " 83, 42 00 

W. F. Dodge, care of room, 5 00 

A. D. Xickerson, salary, $150 00 

Cash paid W. W. Hilton, 2 grade poles, 2 50 

" F. W. Conn, shoes for same, 50 

F. L. Hodgdon & Co., 2 blank books, 63 



403. R. M. Johnson, clerk, for disbursements for labor, 
Board, etc., in consequence of the failure of the 
Boston Construction Co., (contractors), to carry 
out their contract, the Town becoming respon- 
sible thereby :— 

June 8. W. H. Doran. 6 wks at 815, S90 00 
suit cost, 8 50 



9S 50 



10. H. Sharkey, 72 hrs at 15c, $10 SO 
105 " " 17c, 17 85 



$28 65 
less store bill, 14 

28 51 

" R. Manning, 14S hrs at 15c 22 20 

" " John Doyle, 210 " " 31 50 

" " M. Callahan, 30 1-2 dys, at $2.50, 76 25 

" " D. Hamilton, 18 dys. at $2.50, 45 00 

" 9 W. F. Feeney,113 hrs. at 15c, $16 85 
less store bill, 3 05 

13 80 

July 11. Xick Feeney, 33 dys. at 50c, $16 50 
less store bill, 2 81 

-1 13 69 



June 20, J. McCarthy, 231 hrs at 15c, $37 65 
less store bill, $1.75, 1 75 

35 90 

" " J. Broderick, 196 hrs at 15c, 29 40 

" " J. Driscoll, 287 hrs at 15c, 43 05 

" " J. E. Kelliher, 260 hrs at 15c, 39 00 

". " J. Leary, 33 hrs at 15c, 4 95 

" " J. O. Connell, 54 hrs at 15c, $8 10 
less store bill, 10 



J. Maguire, 116 hrs at 15c, $17 50 
less store bill, 25 



17 25 



$153 63 



J. McGrath, 280 hrs at 15c, $42 00 



212 



1898. 



Touch. 
No. 



less store bill, 



$3 



" " M. Carey, 91 hrs at 15c, 
" " M. C. Hurley, 254 hrs at 15c, $38 10 
less store bill, 3.75 

Cost of suits, 10 of above, 

Sept. 28, 404. P. H. Rooney, paid on acct. contract, 
" 24, 405. A. H. Norris, rodman, 18 dys at $1.50, 
" 30, 406. Corson Express Co., for ex. on sundries, 

Carriage hire, 

Carting pipe and unloading car, 

Express on 10 valves, 

Carting manhole castings, 

" 30, 407. Hyde Park Water Co., water service: 
28,000 gals at 10c, 
attendance 5 1-2 hrs at 40c, ' 

Oct. 1, 408. W. V. Dodge, care of room, 
" " 409. A. D. Nickerson, salary, 

Cash paid bill W. W. Hilton, 

" '' J. Scott, labor on manhole, 
" " car fares and telephone, 

" " 410. C. G. Norris, asst. eng., 25 dys at $3, 
" " 411. G. A. Smith, inspector, 23 1-2 dys at $3, 
" 5. 412. R. M. Johnson, salary 5 mos., 
carfare and expenses, 
Cash paid V. C. Nichols, typewriting, 

" F. L. Hodgdon & Co., stationery, 

" A. Fisher, daily paper, 

,' Frost & Adams Co., ste 'ltape, 

Sept. 27, 413. R. M. Johnson, cash paid fr't on 2 carloads pipe, 
Oct. 5, 414. Patrick Rooney, labor with man and horse, flush- 
ing sewers and digging pit, 
Cement, carting and labor at Readville, 

" 31, 415. Hyde Park Water Co., repairing service 
connection in 8 streets 
Water service in various streets, 



D. W. Lewis, 378 ft. 20 in. pipe and fittings, 

The Frost & Adams Co., 4 black prints and rubber, 

New E g. Tel. & Tel. Co., service 3 mos., 

S. B. Balkam & Co., pipe and fittings, 

C. G. Norris, asst. eng., 26 dys at $3, 

Geo. A. Smith, inspector, 24 1-2 dys at $3, 

W. F. Dodge, care of room, 

A. D. Nickerson, salary, 

carfares and expenses, 

Cash paid F. W. Conn's bill, irons for sewer, 
W. W. Hilton's bill, 4 plugs, 



$39 00 
13 65 



34 35 
90 50 



4 00 
33 60 

2 50 

3 75 



Sept. 22. 


416. 


" 17, 


417. 


Oct. 1, 


418. 


" 31, 


419. 


Nov. 1, 


420. 


" " 


421. 


" 


422. 


« .• 


423. 



684 50 

476 18 

27 00 



44 65 






5 00 




5 00 


$150 00 




1 12 




2 00 




2 70 






155 82 
75 00 






70 50 


$250 00 




3 30 




2 25 




40 




4 00 




30 







260 25 




99 84 


$14 25 




2 88 







17 13 


$117 39 




12 20 . 







129 59 




273 69 




4 20 




26 00 




19 72 




7S 00 




73 50 




5 00 


$150 00 




85 




1 50 




40 





152 75 





Touch, 


1898. 




No. 


» 


2, 


424. 


" 


1, 


425. 


Sept. 


•29, 


426. 


Nov. 


9, 


427. 



213 



R. M. Johnson, salary, * $ 50 00 

P. H. Rooney, paid on acct. contract, 936 43 

W. A. Snow & Co., 1 manhole cover, 1 frame, 3 50 

R. M. Johnson, services as asst. eng. May 1, 1S9S, to 
Nov. 1, 189S: 750 cards with frontages and areas 
on, and 750 cards with names and streets, 300 00 

" 30, 428. R. M. Johnson, ca-h p iid Library Bu. "guides" $ 7S 

Cash paid F. L. Hodgdou & Co., paper, 25 

" carriage hiie. 2 00 

bill F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and 
" fittings on flu h tanks, 
" ft on manhole castings, 
" carfare and expenses. 
" 200 2c stamps, 
" freight on pipe, 

Dec. 1, 429. P. H. Rooney, paid on acct. contract, 
" " 430. A. D. Nickerson, salary, 

Cash paid bill S. R. Moseley, printing, 
" " V. C. Nichols, typewriting, 

'• 13, 431. Boston Constructon Co., paid laborers on acct. 
their contract, 
Attilio Silvielto, claim, 
Costs of suit, 

Joseph Saggese, claim, 
Costs of suit, 

Nov. 30, 432. Corson Express Co., carting pipe, 
carting casting, 



Oct. 10, 433. Chelmsford Foundry Co., 25 manhole covers, 
4500 lbs. at 1 l-2c, 
less freight, 

D. W. Lewis, 194 ft. 20 in. pipe less freight, 
Nov. 30, 435. R. M. Johnson, services asst. eng., 

" clerk, 
S. B.Balkam & Co., sundry pipes and fittings, 
Dec. 1, 438. C. G. Norris, asst. eng. 26 dys at $3, 
Geo. A. Smith, inspector 20 dys at $3 
"W. P. Dodge, care of room, 
P. H. Rooney, extra work on sewer contract, 
Geo. A. Kimball, consul ing eng., 
personal, 3 dys at $25, 
assistants, 

" 28. 443. P. H. Rooney, paid on acct. contract, 
Sept. 15, 444. J. V. Lufkin, labor on broken walk, 
lumber and nails, 

Dec. 31, 445. S. R. Moseley, printing 500 blanks, 



14, 


434. 


30, 


435. 


" 


436. 


" 


437. 


1, 


438. 


" 


439. 


" 


440. 


" 


441. 


12, 


442. 



3 50 




2 10 




60 




4 00 




61 45 






74 68 
412 00 




$150 00 




2 00 




4 25 







156 25 




70 39 


$29 37 




8 01 







37 38 


$25 00 




8 01 






33 01 


$16 00 


3 50 




1 00 







20 50 


$67 50 




2 10 







65 40 




86 33 




50 00 




50 00 




25 98 




78 00 




60 00 




5 00 




57 00 


$75 00 




12 50 







87 50 




300 00 


$1 93 




1 10 







3 03 




5 50 



19, 


451. 


1, 


452. 


2, 


453. 


33, 


454. 


1, 


455. 



214 

Vouch. 
1899. No. 
Jan. J2, 446. W. F. Dodge, care of room, 
i " " 447. C. G. Norris, services as asst. elg. 21 dys at $3, 
" " 448. A. D. Nickerson, salary, 
travel and expenses. 

" 4, 449. R. M. Johnson services asst. eng M 
" " 450. " " clerk, 

Jan. 4, 450. R. M. Johnson, cash paid stationer}', supplies, etc., 
carfare and expenses, 

T. H. Bryne & Co., bal. of acct. contract, 
S. B. Balkam & Co., rent of pipe yard S inos., 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., service of tel. 3 mos., 
Geo. W. Stadiey & Co., 2 Atlases of Hyde Park, 
Feb. 1, 455. R. M. Johnson, salary 1 mo., 

cash paid for rubber bands, 
•' blotting paper, 

456. R. M. Johnson, services as asst. eng. 1 mo., 

457. W. F. Dodge, care of room, 

458. Hyde Park Ice Cream Co., collation for counsel, 
auditor and others at hearing on land dam- 
ages, intercepting sewer, 4 50 

459. A. D. Nickerson, services as Ch. Eng. 1 mo. 
Cash pd. Geo. H. Walker for clip, 

" F. W. Barry, Beale & Co., file, 

" car fares, 



Jan. 21, 460. A. Fisher, daily paper, 



TABLE NO 2. 

VALUE OF STOCK OX HAND. 

Flush gates and siphons, $ 56 00 

ManJiole frames and covers, 462 00 

Sewer pipe, 8,225 00 

Iron pipe, 60 00 





$5 00 




63 00 


$150 00 




1 75 







151 75 




50 00 




50 00 


$1.05 




60 






1 65 
241 61 






66 67 




25 75 




50 00 


$50 00 




25 




24 







50 49 




50 00 




5 00 



$ 


150 00 


.45 




.75 




.75 






1 95 




151 95 




2 00 




$14,134 42 



SS,803 00 



INDEX. 



Alarms and Fires Record of 

Appropriations, 

Assessors 1 Report, 

Auditors 1 Report. 

Board of Engineers' Report, 

Board of Health Report, . 

Cemetery Commssioners 1 Repo 

Collector's Report, 

Courses of High School Stud}', 

Expenditures, statement of 

Grammar School Graduation, 

High School Graduation, . 

Inspector of Buildings Report. 

Non-resident Tax Payers, 

Overseers 1 of Poor Report, 

Park Commissioner's Report, 

Police Report, 

Progam, Supervisor of Music, 

Public Library Trustees' Report, 

Pupils Perfect in Attendance, 

Recapitulation, , 

Regulations, Board of Health, 

Resident Tax Payers, 

School Committee's Report, 

School Incidentals, 

School Statistics, 

Selectmen's Report, . 

Sewer Commissioners' Report, 

Synopis of Town Meeting, 

Supervisor of Music Report, 

Superintendent of Streets Report, 

Teachers' Institute, . 

Town Clerk's Report, 

Town Debt, . 

Town Officers, 

Town Treasurer's Repoi t, 

Town Treasurer's Statement 

Truant Officer's Report, 

Vacation School Report, . 



59 
111 
112 
117 

57 

65 

38 
113 
190 

79 
184 
180 

40 
146 

61 

25 

41 
189 

31 
192 
101 

72 
118 
160 
103 
196 
5 
199 

14 
173 

24 
187 

44 

116 

3 

114 

37 
176 
177