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Full text of "Annual report of the receipts and expenditures : with report of the selectmen and other town officers"

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http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofrehyde33 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES 



-OF THE 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



Reports of the Selectmen, 

Trustees of the Public Library, School Committee, 

and Other Town Officers, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY ji, 1904. 




\ 
m 



HYDE PARK: 

Hyde Park Gazette Press. 

1904. 



THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUALrR$0K*F*7Y 0l 

TJ 

1 I / ? if 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES ^ 






OF THE *** ^-' 


1 





TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



Reports of the Selectmen, 

Trustees of the Public Library, School Committee, 

and Other Town Officers, 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY ji, 1904. 



J> 




o 

HYDE PARK: 

Hyde Park Gazette Press, 

1904. 



n 









OFFICERS OF THE TOWN OF HYDE PARK 

For the Year ending March 7, 1904. 



SELECTMEN AND SURVEYORS OF HIGHWAYS: 

ALONZO W. DUNBAR (Chairman), JAMES F. PRING, 

JOHN JOHNSTON", EDWIN C. JENNEY, 

CHARLES E. PALMER. 



ASSESSORS : 

CHAS. F. MORRISON (Chairman), GEO. V. CHAPMAN, 

FRANK GREENWOOD. 



TOWN CLERK : 

HENRY B. TERRY 



TOWN treasurer: 
HENRY S. BUNTON 



OVERSEERS OF THE POOR: 

CHARLES LEWIS (Chairman), - - term expires 1906 

GEORGE E. HAVEN, - - - term expires 1905 

GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, - - - term expires 1904 



BOARD OF HEALTH: 

WILLIAM W. SCOTT, 

WILLARD S. EVERETT (resigned), 

CHARLES F. STACK (Chairman), 

* EDWIN M. WALKER (resigned), 

* BENJAMIN G. BATES, - 



term expires 1906 
term expires 1905 
term expires 1904 
term expires 1904 
term expires 1904 



COLLECTOR OF TAXES: 

RANDOLPH P. MOSELEY 



SCHOOL committee: 
CHARLES G. CHICK, 
WILBUR H. POWERS (Chairman), 
FRED J. HUTCHINSON, - 
ANDREW WASHBURN (resigned), • - 
EDWARD S. FELLOWS, - 
FRANK F. COURTNEY, - 
ELLA F. BOYD, 
SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT, 
EDWARD I. HUMPHREY (resigned), - 
ALVIN D. HOLMES (chosen to fill vacancy), 
GILBERT BALKAM (chosen to fill vacancy), 



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superintendent of schools: 
FRANK O. DRAPER. 



* Mr. Edwin M. Walker was first chosen by the Board of Health and Selectmen 
to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Willard S. Everett. Mr. Walker 
resigned shortly afterwards and Mr. Benjamin G. Bates was chosen in his stead, ;to 
serve until another is chosen by the town. 



AUDITORS : 

FEED C. STONE (Chairman), WILLIAM J. DOWNEY, 

FREDERICK G. KATZMANN. 



TRUSTEES OF THE PUBLIC 

CHARLES E. JENNEY, 
AMOS H. BRALNARD, 
JOHN W. GRIFFIN, 
EDWARD S. HAYWARD, - . - 
HENRY B. MINER (Chairman), - 
JAMES R. CORTHELL, 
CHARLES G. CHICK, 
G. FRED GRIDLEY, 
FREDERICK L. JOHNSON, 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

GEORGE E. WHITING, 
CHARLES F. JENNEY, 
JOHN O'CONNELL, - 



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PARK COMMISSIONERS 

LAWSON B. BIDWELL, - 

FRANK B. RICH, 

JOHN J. ENNEKING (Chairman), 



term expires 1906 
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BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS: 



CHARLES HALEY, - 
DAVID PERKINS (Chairman), 
WILLIAM U. FAIRBAIRN, 



term expires 1906 
term expires 1905 
term expires 1904 



CONSTABLES : 



ROBERT E. GRANT, 
WILLIAM W. SCOTT, 

WILLIAM 
WILLIAM WRAGG, - 
CORNELIUS A. COUGHLIN, 
FRANK S. NORTON, 
ALEXANDER G. CHILDS, 



JOHN M. BROWN, 
DANIEL O'CONNELL, 
K. PEABODY. 

appointed by Selectmen 
appointed by Selectmen 
appointed by Selectmen 
appointed by Selectmen 



CHIEF OF POLICE: 

WILLIAM WRAGG. 



fire department: 
JOHN H. WETHERBEE, 
JOHN C. McDOUGALD, 
DENNIS W. MAHONEY, 



Chief Engineer 
Assistant Engineers 



INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS: 

RICHARD F. BOYNTON. 



SELECTMEN'S REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

Your Board of Selectmen present to the citizens of Hyde 
Park their annual report for the fiscal year ending January 
31, 1904. 

FINANCE. 

The funded debt of the town January 31, 1903, was as 
follows : 

School buildings, $ 2,000 

Sewerage, 125,000 

Public Libiarj building, 17,000 

High School building, 57, 000 

Tresoott School building, 16,000 

Furniture and furnishings, High School, 6,000 

$223,000 

In addition to the interest payments made during the year, 
$14,000 of the above has been paid. 

Under authority of vote of the town June 22, 1898, and in 
accordance with Chapter 419 of the Acts of the Legislature 
for the year 1898, Sewerage bonds to the amount of $40,000 
have been issued during the current year, the proceeds from 
which have been used to retire $40,000 previously borrowed 
in anticipation of such issue. 

This makes the funded debt of the town January 31, 1904, 
as follows : 



Sewerage, 






•$160,000 


Public Library building, 






15,000 


High School building, 






54,000 


Trescott School building, 






15,000 


Furniture and furnishings, 


High 


School 


5,000 



$249,000 

During the coming year $15,000 of the above matures, 
which will have to be provided for in the tax levy for the 
coming year. 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT. 

Our Board reappointed Clarence G. Norris as Superintend- 
ent of Streets. During the year the large amount of work 
upon our highways has been under his supervision and con- 
trol. We refer you to the report of the detailed workings of 
his department found in another part of this report. As a 
Board we desire to state that Mr, Norris has performed his 
duties in a manner highly satisfactory to us and as we believe 
to our townspeople. 

The supply of gravel in our town for resurfacing or build- 
ing of streets is practically exhausted. The increased cost 
of procuring what remains and the poor quality has compelled 
the town to use crushed stone. We have been enabled to 
obtain a supply of gravel for the Fairmount and Readville 
districts from Milton- and Dedham, but from these sources 
the supply available is limited and at no distant day will also 
be exhausted. 

By reason of the construction of the Metropolitan sewer 
through the easterly part of our town we have been enabled 
during the last two years to buy crushed stone from the con- 
tractors at a reasonable cost. This work having been com- 
pleted, we are forced to fall back on our only other available 
source, the ledge on Gordon Avenue leased from year to year 
from George E Whiting, and which, by reason of the char- 
acter of its surroundings, can be but a temporary source for 
such material. Already complaints have been lodged with 
us that the ■ blasting is annoying to the residents in that 
vicinity, and in some instances has caused slight damage to 
their property. 

There are two remedies for this condition of things, cne is 
to buy stone already crushed, another for the town to procure 
a ledge either by purchase or lease remote from the residential 
section and crush the stone, as we are doing at the present 
time. We refer this subject to the careful consideration of 
our successors and the town. 



The question of what rights corporations, boards of public 
works, individuals or other parties have to dig up the surface 
or a part of any public street or way within our town, without 
first obtaining the authority of the Board of Selectmen and 
Surveyors of Highways, has been carefully considered, and we 
are of the opinion that the board at any early date should 
cause rules and regulations to be adopted and enforced in 
this matter. 

The By-Taws of the town, approved by the Superior Court 
Jan. 2J, 1898, contain the following: 

" No person except the selectmen, the surveyors of highways, 
the sewer commissioners in the lawful performance of their 
duties, or those acting under their orders, except such other 
persons as are or maybe authorized by statute, shall break or dig 
up the ground in any street or public way in the town, without first 
obtaining a written permit from the selectmen ; and all persons 
acting under such permit shall put up and maintain a suitable 
railing or fence around the part of the street so broken up, so 
long as the same shall remain unsafe or inconvenient for 
travellers, and he or they shall keep one or more lighted lanterns 
fixed to such railing or fence, or in some other way exposed every 
night from twilight in the evening through the whole night, so 
long as such street or way shall be or remain unsafe or inconveni- 
ent for travellers," 

We have considered carefully, under legal advice, this 
entire question, and desire to set forth in our report a general 
resume of the question, for future action and enforcement. 

Upon an examination of all the provisions of law rela- 
tive to this subject, except where the rights of the Sewer 
Commissioners, Tree Warden and County Commissioners 
are involved, the statutes expressly reserve to the Selectmen 
a right of reasonable supervision, and in some instances 
absolutely lequire their consent, and in others require the 
work to be done under their direction. 

So far as our knowledge extends, the Selectmen have 
never required any of the corporations using our streets, in 
cases of repair or otherwise, where it was necessary to dig up 
the same, to do so under any authority or supervision. 



8 

It is very clear that unless authorized by law, with the ex- 
ceptions as above set forth, no corporation, or individual, 
except perhaps in cases of imminent danger to life and 
property, have the right to open any street or public way in 
the town without having first obtained the written permit of 
the Board of Selectmen. 

We recommend the enforcement of the laws in relation to 
these matters. 

THE APPROACH TO WEST RIVER STREET BRIDGE NEAR 
CLEARY SQUARE. 






It was suggested early in the past year to our Board that 
the approach to the West River Street bridge near Cleary 
Square should be repaired and put in a substantial and perma- 
nent condition. The Board considered this question and the 
probable expense of paving, but before entering into any con- 
tract to carry out what seemed to be a permanent improve- 
ment upon this much-used way, the question of the expense 
and the relation of the railroad to this work was carefully con- 
sidered. The Board found upon investigation that by a 
decree entered the twenty-fourth day of February, 1883, the 
following order was made : "That the Boston and Providence 
Railroad shall carry into effect the aforesaid decision of the 
County Commissioners, and shall pay the charges and ex- 
penses of making the alterations as aforesaid and all future 
charges for keeping said crossing and approaches thereto in 
order and repair, including not only the charges and expenses 
of alterations made by the decree, but all future charges for 
keeping said crossing and approaches thereto in repair . . . 
and surfaced with good gravel." 

This decree was called to the attention of the railroad 
authorities, and after submitting the same to counsel, they 
agreed to pay the sum of four hundred dollars for the repair 
of this piece of street. Although the decree set forth that 
the same should be constructed with gravel, the railroad 



officials arranged that the street should be macadamized like 
the adjacent highway and paid for the work to be done in 
that manner. The railroad people informed our Board that 
they had not been called upon in recent years by the town 
to make any repairs upon this section of the street. We 
make this report that the facts may be permanently before 
our citizens. 

LINWOOD STREET. 

At a town meeting held December 9, 1903, the town 
voted to lay out Linwood Street as a public town way in 
accordance with plans which had been approved and the 
layout which was recommended to the town by the Selectmen. 
To carry out this work the town appropriated the sum of four 
hundred (400) dollars and transferred this amount from the 
current year's highway appropriation. This work will be 
carried out at an early date. 

KNIGHT STREET. 

In the last annual report of this Board the question of the 
acceptance of Knight Street as a public way was considered. 
It has long been recognized that it would be of great con- 
venience to the public if this short street was open for 
general use, and in recognition of this situation the Select- 
men at an early date caused to be prepared plans to carry 
out this work. We met in conference with the only parties 
who would be affected by this work as abuttors, The Man- 
chaug Company or their representatives, and a hearing was 
held at our office to consider the proposed layout. At first 
said corporation was favorable to our going across substan- 
tially where the present Knight Street is constructed, but 
after further consideration they determined that they would 
not consent to our building this street as a public highway 
unless the same was constructed entirely across what is now 
the Cotton Mill Pond. This work, upon estimation, we 
found would cost the town in the vicinity of $50,000, and we 



10 

•did not, under the circumstances, think it proper to call upon 
the town at that time, with other public works going on, for 
this appropriation. If the street was built as a public way 
over the present Knight Street it would involve the construc- 
tion of at least two new bridges, which in itself would be 
quite an expense, even if the abuttors were favorable to our 
taking the street as a public way. We refer this entire 
matter to the consideration of the town at some future time. 

NEW DAMON, REGENT AND WATERLOO STREETS. 

In the last annual report this Board presented to the con- 
sideration of the town the conditions which prevailed upon 
New Damon, Regent and Waterloo Streets, in the Readville 
section. 

The town has taken no action, up to the present time, con- 
cerning the acceptance of these streets. Said streets are 
important in the development of this section, as they are 
adjacent to and near the new Sturtevant Blower Company's 
works, which are nearing completion. In order to carry off 
the surface water from these streets and vicinity it will be 
necessary to make some connection with Readville Street 
drain, hereinafter referred to. Before this action can be taken 
we deem it necessary that the town should accept one or all 
of these streets as public highways, and we recommend to 
our successors the urgency of this question. 

READVILLE STREET. 

It has been long recognized that some action should be 
taken by the town to permanently construct Readville Street. 
The condition in which said street has been suffered to re- 
main for many years has been a great source of inconvenience 
to citizens in that vicinity and has been subject to the criti- 
cisms of our town officers. This matter was brought before 
the town for a direct appropriation last year, and upon con- 
sideration, as the town sewer had not been constructed in 



1 1 

the street at that time, the town voted to indefinitely post- 
pone the article. Our Board of Sewer Commissioners, since 
that time, recognizing the necessity of this work, have, during 
the past year, caused a sewer to be built the entire length of 
this street. This work was done so late in the year that our 
Board did not deem it proper to do anything further until the 
street h;d become thoroughly settled. The advisory com- 
mittee, hereinafter referred to, have recognized, upon our 
recommendation, the necessity of such permanent construc- 
tion, and make a report baser] upon the supposition that this 
street is to be constructed the coming year. 

READVILLE STREET DRAIN. 

At a town meeting held December 9, 1903, the town voted 
as recommended by the Selectmen to lay out and construct a 
public drain from a point on old Damon Street to Mother 
Brook, a distance of about five hundred (50c) feet, along and 
over land owned by the Sturtevant Blower Company and 
The Manchaug Company, The necessity of this work was 
made manifest from the 'act that it was a part of the drainage 
system for Readville and adjacent streets. Readville Street 
can not be drained nor built until this main drain is con- 
structed, neither can New Damon, Regent and Waterloo 
Streets be constructed until such time as this main drain is 
built so as to receive the surface drainage from this territory. 
As explained to the town, the Selectmen consider the 
necessity of the future needs of this territory and they have 
caused this work to be commenced and anticipate the com- 
pletion thereof at an early date. To carry out the expense of 
the construction of the Readville Street main drain the town 
appropriated the sum of $[,450, which amount was transferred 
from current year's highway appropriation. 

GARFIELD STREET DR<UN. 

Our predecessors have had presented to them for several 
years the question of the surface drainage in the vicinity of 



12 

Washington and Loring Streets and Garfield Avenue. In 
many instances the surface water from these streets has been 
suffered to flow upon private land and in some cases has 
caused people to complain, with justice, that their cellars and 
land were receiving the surface water from the town high- 
ways. 

We caused the necessary surveys to be made to see what 
could be done to relieve this embarrassing situation. Upon 
investigation we found that there was in existence an old 
drain from Water Street to the Neponset River, commencing 
at a point near the intersection of Garfield Avenue and 
Water Street. 

The town voted December 9, 1903, upon the recommenda- 
tion of the Selectmen, to appropriate the sum of $2,300 for 
the purpose of building and draining this territory. This 
amount was transferred by the town from the curreut year's 
highway appropriation. The work, under this vote, was duly 
commenced and will be completed at an early date. 

GLENWOOD STATION CROSSING. 

In the last annual report the Selectmen called the attention 
of the town to the fact t'.at a crossing over the railroad at 
Glenwood Avenue on the New England Division was neces- 
sary. At the town meeting which was held December 9, 1903, 
the town voted to appoint a committee to consider this entire 
question and make its report at a future town meeting. We 
are informed that the committee has given attention to this 
proposed work and will present their report to the town for 
consideration at an early date. 

PERAMBULATION OF BOUNDARY LINES. 

Perambulations were made as required by statute during 
the past year of boundary lines between our town and the 
town of Milton. Representatives of each town were present 
and went over the boundary lines between, the respective 
towns as required by law. The question of the placing in 



13 

position of a new boundary stone between this town and 
Milton, on Beacon Street, was considered and it was voted 
that such a stone be prepared, and action thereon will be 
taken immediately. Following is the report : 

We, the undersigned Selectmen of Milton and Hyde Park, met by ap- 
pointment this tenth day of October, 1903, to perambulate the line between 
Milton and Hyde Park, beginning at a point in the centre of the Neponset 
River, opposite a stone post located on the easterly bank of said river on 
the boundary line between the Towns of Milton and Canton and marked 
M. C, thence easterly and northerly by the centre of said river to a point 
opposite a stone post marked M. HP., on land of the Commonwealth, 
formerly of Van Brunt; thence easterly to a stone post on Dana Avenue 
marked M. HP., thence easterly to a stone post on Williams Avenue 
marked M HP., thence easterly to a stone post on Fairmount Avenue 
marked M. HP., thence easterly to a stone post marked M. HP . on land 
of Skinner, near the reservior of the Hyde Park Water Company; thence 
northerly to a stone post on Metropolitan Avenue marked M. HP., thence 
northerly to a stone post on land of Whiting marked M. HP., thence 
northwesterly to Beacon Street, where we this day voted to erect a stone 
post marked M. HP , thence northwesterly to a stone post on the easterly 
bank of the said Neponset River. 

John F. Brown, ) c , , r .,..,, 

J > selectmen of Alilton. 

Maurice A. Duffy, > 

Alonzo W. Dunbar, a . . 

_ „, T I Majority of Selectmen 

Edwin C. Tenney, \ J r __ , _ 

_ ;!. ^ of Hyde Park. 
Charles E. Palmer, J 

OLD COLONY STREET RAILWAY. 

When the Boston Elevated Railway Company began, in 
July last, to operate over the tracks in Boston of the Old 
Colony Street Railway Company, serious trouble was at once 
caused by reason of the unsatisfactory service rendered, and 
because many transfers, formerly issued at Cleary Square, 
were abolished. The rates of fares and operation of cars 
were also so readjusted as to render a continuous trip impos- 
sible between Hyde Park and Milton Lower Mills, and also 
put in force a double fare between those points. Similar 
inconveniences and loss cf transfer and other privileges were 
also suffered by the citizens of Dedham. 



14 

The Selectmen immediately proceeded to consider these 
matters and to take action to protect the interests of our 
citizens as far as possible. The matter ot transfers was taken 
up with the officials of the Old Colony Street Railway Com- 
pany, who were advised that the Selectmen intended to pro- 
ceed, if necessary, to promptly bring the matter before the 
Railroad Commissioners. On the ioth day of July, 1903, 
the transfers from.Cleary Square were re-established by the 
Company, but the service continued unsatisfactory and the 
double fare to Milton Lower Mills still remained in force. 
The latter difficulty could not be remedied except with the 
co-operation of the Boston Elevated Railway Company. A 
petition was presented to the Railroad Commissioners com- 
plaining of the increase of fares and the failure to furnish 
reasonable and proper accommodations and a continuous trip 
to Milton Lower Mills. The Town of Dedham at the same 
time presented a petition complaining as to the abolition of 
its transfer privileges and school tickets in Dedham and as 
to accommodations furnished. A joint hearing was held on 
these petitions in July Jast, and the decision of the Commis- 
sioners upon the same reserved. In November the Board 
sent down its decision, from which we quote : 

" The irregularities and delays in service, with overcrowd- 
ing of cars, of which complaint has been made, have been 
largely, if not wholly, due to the great increase of travel, 
which has proved too large for the safe operation of a single 
track railway. To remedy this the Board has approved a 
double track construction in streets which we ordinarily 
consider too narrow for two tracks. The exception has been 
made as a measure for safeguarding the public under the 
peculiar circumstances of this case. Nearly all of the addi- 
tional track has been laid, and we are confident that with the 
completion of this improvement a satisfactory service will 
be given." 

The poor service, however, still continues, but may be 



i5 

relieved considerably upon the completion of the double track 
between Forest Hills and the Hyde Park line. Until this is- 
done it is difficult to tell what the ultimate result of the lease 
will be upon travel on' this line. Further application to the 
Commissioners m?.y be necessary. 

The Commissioners referring to the double fare to Milton 
Lower Mills, state that a route with a single fare will be 
furnished as soon as the newly-constructed tracks in Blue 
Hill Avenue are connected with the rest of the Old Colony 
system at Mattapan, and state that the completion of this 
track is waiting only the granting of location for connecting 
curves in Milton. We hope that this work will also be com- 
pleted in the spring. Up to this date the citizens of Dedham 
have been unable to secure a return of the transfers abolished 
at the time when the lease took effect. 

In 1898 a statute was passed establishing an excise tax on 
a percentage of the gross receipts of street railway corpora- 
tions, which tax was apportioned according to the length of 
track operated in public ways. The statute further provided 
as follows : 

" Street railway companies shall not be required to keep 
any portion of the surface material of streets, roads and 
bridges in repair, but they shall remain subject to all legal 
obligations imposed in original grants of locations." 

The Old Colony Street Railway Company claims that 
under this statute it is not compelled to keep any portion of 
the streets in repair, although the original location in Hyde 
Park provided that the Norfolk Suburban Street Railway 
Company, its predecessor in title, should keep the portions 
of the streets and highways included between its tracks, and 
for a distance of eighteen inches outside thereof, at all times 
flush with the top of the tracks, and in repair to the satis- 
faction of the selectmen. Early in October, citizens petitioned 
the selectmen, representing that public safety and conveni- 
ence required that the tracks and roalbed of the railway 



i6 

company be reconstructed by replacing T rails, where the 
same are now in use, with girder rails, and by paving between 
the rails and for eighteen inches outside thereof. The 
original location of the Norfolk Suburban Street Railway 
Company provided that it should reconstruct its track and 
roadbed by laying down such different material therefor as the 
selectmen, after public hearing, adjudged that public safety 
and convenience required. 

On this petition, the selectmen issued an order for a public 
hearing to be held on November nth, and on that date such 
hearing was had. The Old Colony Street Railway Company 
appeared by counsel and claimed that it was relieved from 
the obligation of reconstruction, paving, and repair by the 
statute of 1898, that the selectmen had no right to put such 
requirements in the original location granted to the Nofolk 
Suburban Street Railway Company, and that the same were 
illegal and of no binding effect. 

At the close of this hearing, the matter was taken under 
advisement, and the selectmen, believing that public safety 
and convenience did require the reconstruction of the tracks 
and roadbed of said Company, and that it should if possible 
be obliged to comply with the original stipulations voluntarily 
accepted by its predecessor in title, on December 19, 1903, 
■passed an order of which the following is a part : 

Ordered and decreed, and the Board of Selectmen do hereby adjudge 
that public safety and convenience require that said Old Colony Street 
Railway Company shall reconstruct the track and roadbed, now main- 
tained and operated by it as the successor in right and obligation under 
the original location granted to the Norfolk Suburban Street Railway 
Company by the Selectmen of said Hyde Park and dated March 3, 1893, 
in the manner following, to wit: by reconstructing said track with new 
■girder rails weighing not less than ninety pounds to the yard and not less 
than sixty feet in length, and by paving the part of the streets occupied 
by it under said original location between its tracks and for a distance of 
eighteen inches outside thereof on both sides, with paving stones equal 
to the best quality of Quincy granite, not less than ten or more than 
;twelve inches in length on the surface when set; not less than three and 



i7 

one half or more than four inches in width on the surface when set, and 
not less than seven or more than eight incnes in depth from the surface 
when set, to be laid with plenty of clean, sharp paving gravel well covered 
off with the same quality of grave!, using in said reconstruction sleepers 
of chesnut or hackmatack. All of said reconstruction hereby ordered shall 
be done to the satisfaction of the Board of Selectmen for the time being. 
No reconstruction shall be required under this order where the present 
construction conforms to that prescribed in this order. 

It is further ordered and decreed by the Board of Selectmen that the 
parts of said reconstruction hereby required on River Street between 
Everett Square and West Street, and on Hyde Park Avenue between 
River Street and Arlington Street, be completed within sixty days from 
this date and that the reconstruction of the remainder of said tracks and 
roadbed be within such time or times as may hereafter be determined by 
this board, or its successors in office. 

And whereas said Old Colony Street Railway Company has not kept 
the portion of the streets and highways included within said original 
location in repair between its tracks and for a distance of eighteen inches 
outside thereof, and at all times flush with the top of its tracks, now 
therefore, it is 

Ordered, that such legal preceedings as may be deemed necessary or 
advisable, be taken for the purpose of determining and enforcing the 
obligations of said Old Colony Street Railway Company under said 
location, and for the purpose of compelling it to keep and perform the 
terms of said original location as to the keeping said portions of the 
streets and highways last hereinbefore referred to, in repair and at all 
times flush with the top of its tracks. 

The time limit placed in this order had at the time cf writ- 
ing this report not elapsed, but it is evident that the Railway 
Company do not intend to comply with the same except 
under order of the court. A petition will be filed in the 
Supreme Judicial Court to have this order carried into effect. 
This is a matter of much importance, and while the statute 
of 1898 has not as yet been construed in a similar case, the 
selectmen believe the interests of the town require a test 
case to be made. In case the application does not meet with 
success, the town will be in no worse position than it is at 
present, and if successful, the result will be of great benefit 
not only to the town in its corporate capacity, but to all 
citizens. 



BLUE HILL STREET RAILWAY COMPANY. 

The directors of the Blue Hill Street Railway Company 
petitioned our Board previous to October I, 1903, that the 
time granted in their charter for the operation of their road 
be extended for one year. Upon consideration of the entire 
question the Board voted to extend the time to November 1, 
1903. Previous to the expiration of the thirty days, as above 
set forth, we were again petitioned to extend the time for one 
year. The Selectmen granted the petitioners a hearing in 
regard to the matter, and upon careful consideration the 
Selectmen refused to extend the time for the operation of 
this road. So far as our Board is concerned, no other action 
has been taken in relation to the operation by this company 
of this part of their system. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT. 

Our police force during the past year has been under 
William Wragg, as Chief of Police, with Robert E. Grant as 
Lieutenant, together with James A. Cullen, Elmer P. Run- 
nells, Andrew W. Henderson, George H. Tucker, Elbredge 
H. Dyer, Edward J. Welch, Alexander Herring and Robert 
M. Sampson, with many special officers assigned for Sunday 
work and other special duties. A detailed report of this 
department is to be found in another part of this report. We 
commend this department for the efficient and satisfactory 
manner in which they have carried on their work. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The Selectmen appointed the engineers for our fire depart- 
ment for the current year, John H. Wetherbee, John C. 
McDougald and Dennis W. Mahoney. The engineers duly 
organized with the choice of John H. Wetherbee as chief. 
The detailed report of this department, by our engineers, is 
to be found elsewhere in this report. We desire to thank 
this department in the name of the town, for their faithful 
service. 



19 

INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS, 

By a vote of our Board, Richard F. Boynton was appointed 
Inspector of Buildings, for the current year, and we refer to 
his report for the detailed working of his department. 

JURY LIST. 

The Selectmen present to you with this annual report a 
list of jurors prepared for submission to the town at our town 
appropriation meeting, for the ensuing year. The list is 
published in the town report at the present time in compli- 
ance with the law. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEE. 

The Selectmen realizing that in many large towns, either 
under by-law or otherwise, a warrant .committee or other 
public body of citizens were appointed annually to consider 
appropriations and other public matters. Having no such 
by-law, it was impossible for us to have such a committee 
appointed under authority of law ; but the Selectmen, recog- 
nizing the public desire to ascertain, by close study, the 
needs and requirements of our various town departments, 
assumed the responsibility, and on the 29th day of December, 
1903, passed unanimously the following vote : " That a 
committee of fifteen be appointed by this Board to act in 
connection with the Board of Selectmen and the Town 
Treasurer, together with the Chairmen of the following 
Boards, viz.: School Committee, Public Library Trustees, 
Board of Health, Overseers of the Poor, and the Board of 
Assessors, to consider the question of our municipal obliga- 
tions ; the administration of our various departments ; the 
coming year's annual appropriations ; property values and 
assessments ; also to make such report and recommendation 
to the town concerning the administration of any and all 
departments that the circumstances and requirements may 
justify." 



20 

At the first meeting of the committee appointed under 
authority as above set forth, it was voted to increase the 
membership by adding nine citizens to such committee and 
that said new appointees be chosen by a sub-committee, 
which action was duly taken. The full c( mmittee as above 
constituted have had a large number of meetings, including 
a public one. Various sub-committees have considered the 
needs and requirements of our various departments as far as 
appropriations for the ccming year were considered, and 
other matters. 

A partial report of this committee and their work, together 
with their recommendations to the town, to be presented 
at the next annual appropriation meeting, is herewith pre- 
sented, and we cheerfully indorse and refer our citizens to 
the same. 

ACTIONS AT LAW. 

Sawtelle v. Hyde Park, the last of the fifty-one petitions 
for land damages growing out of the abolishment of grade 
crossings, more fully described in previous annual reports, 
and pending in the Supreme Judicial Court at the date of 
the last report, was subsequently settled by payment to the 
plaintiff of $1,000, without costs, and the case was disposed 
of by an entry on the court records to that effect in 
February, 1903. 

Peter Rogers v. Hyde Park, suit on account of personal 
injuries, more fully described in previous reports, is still 
pending in the Supeiior Court. The case is in order for 
trial on the present January trial calendar. 

Catherine E. Stanford v. Hyde Park, action for personal 
injuries caused by an alleged defect in the highway on the 
northerly side of River Street near Monponset Street, more 
fully described in previous reports, was tried before a jury 
in Februaiy, 1903, in the Superior Court, and a verdict for 
$1,250 rendered for the plaintiff. The case is now pending 



21 

in the Supreme Judicial Court on exceptions by the town, 
and is in order for argument on the present January calen- 
dar of that court. 

Thomas Rooney v. Hyde Park, action of tort arising from 
alleged defect in the highway in Damon Street, more fully 
described in previous annual reports, was tried before a 
jury in the Superior Court last May. Verdict for the town, 
and judgment entered thereon. 

The cases of Mary D. Hammond v. Hyde Park, and 
J. Forest Hammond v. Hyde Park, minors, two actions for 
alleged unlawful expulsion and exclusion from the public 
schools of the town, more fully described in the last annual 
report, were tried together in the Superior Court last May, 
and again in the following November, each trial resulting in 
a disagreement of the jury. Our citizens have manifested 
great interest, and continue to do so, in these causes grow- 
ing out of the action of the school committee at the time of 
the small-pox epidemic in the winter of 1901-2. The cases 
are on the present January trial calendar of the court. 

Joseph J. Dunn v. Hyde Park, more fully described in 
the last annual report, is pending in the Superior Court, on 
demurrer by the town. 

Philip Rosenberg v. Hyde Park, action for personal 
injuries alleged to have been received by plaintiff being 
thrown from his wagon by a collision with a wooden horse 
in the highway on Hyde Park Avenue, pending in the 
Superior Court at the date of the last report, when reached 
for trial in December, 1903, was nonsuited, and was thus 
disposed of. 

The petition of Alonzo W. Dunbar, et al., selectmen, 
against the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
Company, et al., for the abolition of the grade crossings at 
Fairmount Avenue and Bridge Street is still pending. 
Several hearings have been held before the Commissioners 



22 

appointed by the Superior Court, and it is expected that 
these hearings will soon be closed. 

An action has been brought by William L. Holmes against 
the Board of Health to recover damages caused by an 
alleged wrongful removal of the plaintiff from the building 
where he was staying under claim that he had the small-pox. 
Mr. Holmes claims that he did not have the disease and that 
the Board of Health was negligent and did not act with good 
faith in endeavoring to ascertain the true cause of his 
sickness. The Board of Health claims that whatever was 
done by it was done in good faith after having proper 
medical examination and advice and that whatever was done 
was done because the protection of the public demanded it. 

George A. Tillson has brought suit against the town in 
the District Court of Northern Norfolk, setting his damages 
at $900, claiming that he has received injury by reason of a 
defect in Hyde Park Avenue, near Kennedy's Block. This 
case probably will be tried within a few weeks. 

Andrew Roman has also brought suit against the town to 
recover damages claimed by him to be $4,000 for an alleged 
defect in Metropolitan Avenue, between East River and 
Westminster Streets. This action is returnable on the first 
Monday of February in the Superior Court for this County. 

Ethel A. L. Smith of Hyde Park, a minor, has sued the 
town, claiming damages of $10,000, alleging that she was 
wrongfully excluded from school during the existence of 
small-pox in the town. This action was returnable on the 
first Monday of May last, but has not been upon the trial 
list and may not be tried until the final disposal of the cases 
of Mary D. Hammond and others against the town, which 
are of somewhat the same character as this case. 

In September last the Selectmen petitioned the County 
Commissioners for an order to compel the New England 
Railroad Co. and the New York, New Haven & Hartford 









23 

Railroad Co., its lessee, to comply with the original decree, 
passed in April, 1865, as to the construction of the 
approaches to the highway bridge over said railroad in the 
East River Street District. A contested hearing was had 
upon said petition before the County Commissioners and 
the Commissioners reserved their decision. The railroad 
companies claimed that the old decree had so far lapsed that 
proceedings could not now be instituted to compel its 
enforcement and there was also considerable controversy 
and doubt as to whether the original decree required a width 
of 30 feet including sidewalks, or 30 feet exclusive of side- 
walks. The railroad companies finally agreed to construct 
the approaches to the full 30 feet ordered by the original 
decree and to build one sidewalk within that distance ; and, 
after careful consideration, in view of the many difficulties 
both of construction and enforcement of the original decree, 
this proposition was accepted and the work has been sub- 
stantially completed. 

ALONZO W. DUNBAR, 
JOHN JOHNSTON, 
JAMES F. PRING, 
CHARLES E. PALMER, 
EDWIN C. JENNEY, 
Selectmen and Surveyors of Highways of Hyde Park. 



REPORT OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 
APPOINTED BY THE SELECTMEN. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

On the 29th day of December, 1903, the Board of 
Selectmen passed the following vote : " That a committee 
of fifteen be appointed by this Board to act in connection 
with the Board of Selectmen and the Town Treasurer, 
together with the chairmen of the following Boards, viz. : 
School Committee, Public Library Trustees, Board of 
Health, Overseers of the Poor, and the Board of Assessors, 
to consider the question of our municipal obligations; the 
administration of our various departments ; the coming 
year's annual appropriations ; property values and assess- 
ments ; also to make such report and recommendations to 
the Town concerning the administration of any and all 
departments as the circumstances and requirements may 
justify." 

At the first meeting of this committee, held on Friday 
evening, January 1st, it was voted to add nine citizens, 
none of whom should hold town office, to the committee, 
thus making thirty-five members. Organization was 
effected by the election of Francis W. Darling, Chairman, 
and William E. Norwood, Clerk. The full committee 
consists of the following gentlemen : 

A, W. DUNBAR, J. G. McCARTER, 

CHAS. E. PALMER, WILLIAM E. NORWOOD, 

JOHN JOHNSTON, CHARLES HALEY, 

JAMES F. PRING, GEO. JEFFERS, 



25 



EDWIN C.JENNEY, 
HENRY S. BUNTON, 
W. H. POWERS, 
CHARLES LEWIS, 
CHAS. F. STACK, 
HENRY B. MINER, 
C. F. MORRISON, 
W.J. W. WHEELER, 
ALBERT DAVENPORT, 
F. N. TIRRELL, 
JAMES A. TILDEN, 
J. F. LOCKWOOD, 
E. L. BARRETT, 



W. H. NORRIS, 
W. D. PRESTON, 

D. W. MURRAY, 
L. P. HOWARD, 

E. S. HATHAWAY, 
J. S. COVEN EY, 

F. J. KENNEDY, 

L. P. WINCHENBAUGH, 
GEORGE B. DOWLEY, 
OSCAR BURSCH, 
ALFRED FOSTER, 

G. H. HASKELL, 
W. H. HARLOW, 



FRANCIS W. DARLING. 

This committee, having duly considered that portion of 
the investigations intrusted to them having reference to 
the appropriations of the Town of Hyde Park for the 
current municipal year, beg leave to make, in part, the 
following report. 

The committee realized that a grave defect in the con- 
duct of our municipal affairs, was the method of making 
the annual appropriations. No information of the amounts 
to be recommended was to be obtained by the citizens 
until the evening arrived. Thus there was no opportunity 
for investigation, and it is fair to say that only the most 
general and often the most meagre information was to be 
obtained at the meeting. We think that the impression, 
however, was very general and reassuring that all of the 
proposed appropriations had been carefully scrutinized and 
approved by the Board of Selectmen. It will be news to 
most citizens, we think, as it was to most of us, that as a 
rule the other Boards have submitted no figures to the Se- 
lectmen until the latest possible moment when the aggre- 
gate sums could be printed for circulation at the meeting. 
This does not refer to the estimates for the fire and police 
departments, which are under the immediate jurisdiction of 



26 



the Selectmen. We realize that the other boards of our 
town government, elected by the people, are not subordi- 
nate to the Selectmen, but co-ordinate boards with circum- 
scribed but supreme powers. Yet it seems to your 
committee that all boards, including the Selectmen, should 
submit their estimates to some authority for examination 
and possible revision, sufficiently early in advance of the 
appropriation meeting to enable some responsible body 
outside of their own membership to discuss the facts intelli- 
gently there. It was presumably on account of this defect 
in our town's system of finance, which had been the cause 
of our excessive tax-rate in 1903, as well as on account of 
the rate itself, that the Board of Selectmen appointed our 
committee. We felt that whatever the results at which we 
arrived, they should, if possible, be spread before the 
citizens sufficiently early to enable them, before the meet- 
ing, to become familiar with our conclusions, and, to some 
extent at least, the conditions which seemed to us to 
warrant them. In order that this distribution should be as 
complete as possible, we publish the results of our labors, 
in this direction, in the Town Report. We have also ex- 
pressed to the Board of Selectmen the sense of this com- 
mittee that provision be made, in the warrant of the next 
appropriation meeting, for the appointment of a similar 
advisory committee for the coming year. 

The committee appointed by the town to investigate and 
report upon some new form of town government may 
evolve some better method to accomplish the desired result ; 
but, until such method is made practicable and acceptable, 
we urge the adoption of our suggestion above. 

At its first meeting, your committee asked the chairmen 
of all boards requiring annual appropriations to prepare 
and submit to us at once their estimates of expenses for 
the coming year. This request was cheerfully and 



27 

promptly complied with, and it is fair to state that each 
board realized as fully as did your committee, the need of 
economy in expenditure, and the estimates submitted 
were, in almost every case, less than the sums appropri- 
ated for last year. The additional assurance was given to 
your committee that if, in its judgment, after careful in- 
vestigation, the estimates should be still further reduced, 
the boards would cheerfully acquiesce. We assured them 
all that we should be guided in our action by no spirit of 
economy that would in any way impair the efficiency of 
their departments, and we wish to impress upon all citizens 
that we have kept this assurance at all times in view, and 
that, if our recommendations are adopted, no board of our 
town government will be hampered in the proper discharge 
of all its duties. 

Each estimate as made was at once referred to a sub- 
committee for careful investigation, and the recommenda- 
tions of these sub-committees have been the basis upon 
which our report is made. 

In the matter of requirements for bonds, notes and 
interest, these being fixed and obligatory charges, the 
amount required, as stated by the Town Treasurer, twenty- 
five thousand dollars, is approved. This is the same in 
the aggregate as last year. 

The amount appropriated last year for a new steam- 
roller ($2,650) and the Police Signal System ($3,750) 
are of course unnecessary this year. 

The amount required for salaries will presumably be the 
same as last year, viz : — $5,685, as also the amount for 
the Grand Army Post, viz. : — $200. 

There was also appropriated last year the sum of 
$6,900 to pay for moneys voted in 1902 to be paid from 
the tax-levy of 1903. No such moneys were appropriated 
in 1903 to pay from the tax-levy of 1904. 



28 



Last year the sum of $350 was voted to be expended in 
the patriotic observance of the Fourth of July. We re- 
commend that no money be so appropriated by the town 
this year. 

We come to a consideration of the requirements of the 
several boards of the town government. The board 
requiring the largest appropriation is the Board of Select- 
men. 

The amounts voted last year were : 



Highways, 

Incidentals, 

Police, 

Fire Department, 

Street Lighting, 

Street Watering, 



•$35 000 
10,000 
12,900 
12,400 
1 1 ,000 
5,000 



i,oo£ 



We recommend the following appropriations for these 
purposes for the present year : 



Highways, 

Incidentals, 

Police, 

Fire Department, 

Street Lighting, 

Street Watering, 



22,000 
10,000 
11,201 
11,700 
10,850 
4,500 



70,251 



We also recommend that the sum of two thousand 
dollars be transferred from the amount now in the hands of 
the Town Treasurer and received by him on account of 
excise and street railway franchise tax, to the Board of 
Selectmen for use upon the highways. This will give the 
Board the sum of $24,000 for the purpose, and in the aggre- 
gate will make a reduction of over $16,000 in the taxable 
requirements for all departments under the present author- 
ity of the Selectmen. This reduction is large, but it meets 
with the full approval of the present Board, and we can 



2 9 

safely say that the efficiency of the several departments, 
as at present maintained, will not be reduced or injured. 

In considering the appropriation for streets, and that for 
the use ol the Board of Health for the collection of ashes 
and garbage, we were impressed with the evident lack of 
economy in a system which permitted two town boards to 
maintain separate establishments for work which could 
even more satisfactorily be performed by one. At the 
present time, the Board of Health collects the ashes and 
garbage with an equipment under its own charge in a 
stable rented for the purpose. The expense of this system 
thus administered by this Board is not far from six thousand 
dollars per year. We believe the work should be put 
under the management of the street department and that a 
saving will result from such transfer. We also recommend 
that, in connection with the collection of garbage, the Se- 
lectmen shall advertise for bids, as is done in neighboring 
towns, and if in their judgment a contract can be made 
promising a saving in expense and satisfactory service, that 
they make such contract, otherwise that they continue to 
collect with the town teams. We recommend that there be 
appropriated for the use of the Board of Selectmen for the 
work thus transferred the sum of $5,300. 

The Board requiring the next largest expenditure is the 
School Committee. The appropriations for this department last 
year were $55,600, including $2,000 expended for plumbing at 
the Fairmount School. The committee intend this year to 
expend about the same amount on the Greenwood School for 
plumbing as was expended last year on the Fairmount. Ihis 
action is approved by the Advisory Committee on condition 
that the amount so expended be taken from fines collected 
from defendants in criminal cases, and if such amount be not 
sufficient that the balance be taken from the department's in- 
cidental fund. We further recommend that, if an additional 



30 

teacher be needed at the Trescott School, as advised, one be 
transferred from the Amos Webster School, and if a teacher 
is needed elsewhere, transfer should be made from the Damon 
or Fairmount. We recommend that no additional teacher be 
provided for the High School. We also recommend that the 
industrial school be discontinued. We recommend that the 
head-master of the Damon School be given an additional 
salary of one hundred dollars. 

Under these conditions, which meet the full approval of the 
School Committee, we recommend the appropriation for 
Schools of $52,200, being $3,400 less than last year. 

The next department to be considered is that of the Over- 
seers of the Poor. The expenditures of this department are 
mainly in the nature of fixed charges which must be paid. 
On account, however, of the fact that hereafter the insane 
poor are to be cared for by the state, instead of the town as 
heretofore, we recommend an appropriation for this depart- 
ment of $8,200, a decrease of $1,800 from last year. The 
department approve this recommendation. 

The next department is that of the Board of Health. This 
department last year had an appropriation of $6,800, which 
was not sufficient to meet its expenses, there being a defi- 
ciency in the business year of somewhat over one thousand 
dollars. This deficiency must, of course, be provided for. 
On account of the transfer which we have recommended of 
the collection of ashes and garbage to the street department, 
we advise the appropriation of $1,400 for the Board of Health, 
which should be sufficient to meet its requirements for the 
year. We further recommend that the sum of $1,143 be 
transferred from funds now in the haads of the Town Treas- 
urer and received by him from the State on account of 
small-pox expenditure, to the Board of Health to cover the 
deficiencies in the department during the past year. These 
recommendations meet the approval of the Board. 

For the Public Library we recommend the appropriation 



3i 

of $3,800, being $20,0 less than last year, with the full 
approval of the Board of Trustees, 

A comparative statement of the amounts appropriated last 
year to be raised by taxation and those advised by us as 
above for the current year, is as follows : 





1903. 


1904. 


Selectmen, 


$86,300 


$70,251 


(Transfer trom Board of Health J 




5.300 


Schools, 


55,600 


52,200 


Poor, 


10,000 


8,200 


Health, 


6,800 


1,400 


Library, 


4,000 


3,Soo 


Bonds, Notes and Interest, 


25,000 


25,000 


Salaries, 


5,685 


5,685 


Grand Army, 


200 


200 


Fourth of July, 


350 




Voted in 1902 payable in 1903, 


6,900 




Police Signal System, 


3-750 




Steam Roller, 


2,650 





$207,235 $172,036 

This is a reduction of $35,199. 

There are two matters not considered above which will 
have a bearing on the tax rate. These are, first, the State 
and County taxes and Metropolitan District charges, which 
will probably be somewhat larger than last year, and, second, 
the increase in taxable property. The latter should certainly 
more than offset the former and leave the entire decrease in 
appropriations noted above, which is about one-seventh of the 
total requirement last year, to apply to the tax rate. 

In closing, we beg to state that in all the work of this 
committee, we have had the hearty co-operation of all depart- 
ments, and, in our ultimate findings, their approval. It is 
also a great pleasure to be able to say that the recommenda- 
tions herein made were adopted by this Committee without 
dissent. 

For the Citizens' Advisory Committee. 

FRANCIS W. DARLING, Chairman. 
WILLIAM E. NORWOOD, Clerk. 



JURY LIST. 



NAME AND OCCUPATION. 

Abbott, Elmer E , machinist, 
Adams, Asa J., book-keeper, 
Albee, Frank S., clerk, 
Allen, James W., carpenter, 
Amback, Charles A., woolen, 
Andrews, Joseph C, draughtsman, 
Archibald, diaries H., carpenter, 
Arnold, Henry F., jr., clerk, 
Baker, Frank H., produce dealer, 
Bartholomew, William F., 

financial reporter, 
Bass, George G., stenographer, 
Beals, Charh s, clerk, 
Elackey, Herbert I., farmer, 
Blake, Herbert D., salesman, 
Bodfish, William H., printer, 
Boylan, Stephen, carpenter, 
Brackett, Frank T., druggist, 
Bradford, George F., mason, 
Brown, Walter £ , rubber, 
Buck, Henry M., piano finisher, 
Cabot, George-S., salesman, 
Campbell, Arthur E., director, 
Canon, George A., engineer, 
Carle, Heury A M real estate, 
Carlton, George E., clerk, 
Carpenter, James, horse trainer, 
Carter, Austin F., moulder, 
Chandler, Edwin J., retired, 
Chase, Edward M., provision dealer, 
Childs, Alexauder G , druggist, 
Coughiin, John F., conductor, 
Coveney, Denis J., real estate, 
Cowperthwaite, Stanley D., 

stenographer, 
Cross, Edward W., teacher, 
Crowley, John A., druggist, 
Crumett, Charles H., real estate, 
Cundall, Emmon McL., merchant, 
Curtis, Joseph N., retired, 
Darling, Harold D , clerk, 
Davenport, Harry F., laborer, 
Dawson, Frederick H., driver. 



NAME AND OCCUPATION. 

Dillingham, Walter S., undertaker, 
Drinkwater, Jos. W , iron worker, 
Edwards, Joseph, merchant, 
Ellis. Charles W., organs. 
Ellis, William J., undertaker, 
Estes, Gardner F., real estate, 
Fairbairn, William U. 

mechanical engiueer, 
Farwell, Edwin C, insurance, 
Faunce, Thomas E., insurance, 
Fellows, Leslie H., 3crist, 
Fisher, Charles H., retired, 
Hale, George B., charcoal worker, 
Hall, Caleb, wood dealer, 
Hall, George, clerk, 
Hall, Herbert E,, machinist, 
Hall, William 1)., machiuist, 
Hathaway, Edward S., insurance, 
Hill, Fred R., merchant, 
Hill, Warren S., electrical engineer, 
Holmes, Edgar T., clerk, 
Holtham, Henry S,, poultry, 
Holway, Edwin F., steam fitter, 
Hope, James D., clerk, 
Horr, Jervis E , treasurer, 
Hultzberg, Frans 0., watchmaker, 
Jackson, Robert L , sexton, 
Jennings, Charles E. T., machinist, 
Jigger, John W., carpenter, 
Johnson, Richard M., clerk, 
Jones, Frank, packer, 
Jones, Parker, machinist, 
Joubert, Lndger A., varnisher, 
Kaupman, Max, unknown, 
Kelheur, Rutledge, stenographer, 
Kelheur, Daniel, machinist, 
Kennedy, Daniel S., harness maker, 
Kenney, Arthur W., iron monlder, 
Kenney, Minot M., rubber worker, 
Kiggeu, John A., salesman, 
King, George M., salesman, 
Kingston, James, laborer, 
Kuapp, Herbert R. , compositor, 



33 



NAME AND OCCUPATION. 

Kreutler, Max, cigar manufacturer, 
Lewis, Charles, real estate, 
Lewis, David W.. merchant, 
Liscomb, William H., tinsmith, 
Lishmau, Clarence, rubber, 
Long, Geo. A., paper worker, 
Lovering, George R., bookkeeper, 
Luce, Charles W., painter, 
MacGregor, Archibald, bookkeeper, 
Mackintosh, John S., milk uealer, 
Mahoney, Dennis W., contractor, 
Marshall, David, mason, 
Mason, Daniel W., clerk, 
MacAfee, John W,, carpenter, 
McDonald, David A., carpenter, 
McGinley, Joseph B., overseer, 
McMahon, John W , 

renovator of carpets, 
Melzarcl, John H , jauitor, 
Merrow, Chas. E. A., artist, 
Milne, John, baker, 
Mitchell, James S., salesman, 
Morrison, Wm. J., clerk, 
Munroe, Walter H., machinist, 
McDowell, Gordon H. J., clerk, 
Murray, Wra. H., oil dealer, 
Noble, Edwin V., druggist, 
Norton, Frank S , bookkeeper, 
Noyes, George E., carpenter, 
Nunn, William J., cutter, 
O'Hearn, Cornelius J., merchant, 
Osborne, Sumner L., insurance, 
Perry, Edward E., carpenter, 
Phillips, Benjamin E., painter, 
Pothecary, Harry, shipper, 
Preston, William D., merchant, 
Preston, John A., retired, 
Putnam, Chas. E., clerk, 



NAME AND OCCUPATION. 

Rattigan, John P., dentist, 
Raush, George H., salesman, 
Raymond, Fred A., stable keeper, 
Rich, Fred A., merchant, 
Robinson, John A., machinist, 
Rodgers, Wm. W., insurance, 
Rogers, Frank W., clerk, 
Schwartz, Gardner, moulder', 
Scott, James D., engraver, 
Scott, Robert, jr., mason, 
Scrivens, Walter C, machinist, 
Sears, Horace, dentist supplies, 
Sheehan, John T., mercl ant, 
Sheppard, William A., concreter, 
Slocomb, Eugene F., printer, 
Smalling, William E., plumber, 
Smith, S. Lawson, pa nter, 
Snow, Henry E., painter, 
Sparrell, William P., clerk, 
Stevens, Clarence L., paper hanger, 
Stevens, Robert G., paper hanger, 
Sumner, Horace, machinist, 
Swallow, Darwin F., salesman, 
Taylor, James, painter, 
Tibbetts, Albert E., electrician, 
Tileston, Arthur G., charcoal, 
Tower, Clement B., jr., 

manufacturer, 
Waters, Clarke, painter, 
Weil, Victor M., publisher, 
Whiting, George E., retired, 
Whittemore, Henry J., 

music teacher, 
Whittier, George F., electrician, 
Williams, Rinaldo, carpenter, 
Williams, Nathauiel, painter, 
Williams, Arthur W., painter, 
Winward, Walter, shipper. 



ALONZO W DUNBAR, 
JOHN JOHNSTON, 
JAMES F. PRING, 
CHARLES E. PALMER, 
EDWIN C. JENNEY, 

Selectmen of Hyde Park. 



SYNOPSIS OF THE TOWN CLERK'S 
RECORD OF TOWN MEETINGS. 



The following statement shows in a condensed, form the 
action of the town on the various articles which have been 
before it for consideration the past year. 



March 2, 1903. The annual meeting for choice of town 
officers was held in Waverly Hall ; no other business was 
transacted. The number of votes received for each person 
voted for at this election was as follows : 



Selectmen and Surveyors 
Highways. 



* 


Alonzo W. Dunbar, 


941 




Charles Friede, 


216 




James D. Graut, 


576 




J. Frank Hayward, 


247 


* 


Edwin C. Jenney, 


726 


* 


John Johnston, 


934 




Thomas J. McKenna, 


315 


* 


Charles E. Palmer, 


928 




William D. Prestou, 


698 


* 


James F. Pring, 


847 




Howard S. Thompson, 


550 




Albert E. Tibbetts, 


185 




Town Clerk. 




* 


Henry B. Terry, 


1425 



Town Treasurer. 

* Henry S. Bunton, 1382 

Collector of Taxes. 

* Randolph P. Moseley, 1443 



Assessors. 

* George W. Chapman, 1211 
William C Dearie, 334 

* Frank Greenwood, 1091 
William E. Keane, 319 

* Charles F. MorrisoD, 1286. 

Overseer of the Poor, 3 years. 

John J. Gallagher, 501 

* Charles Lewis, 1055 

Board of Health, 3 years. 

* William W. Scott, 1307 

Auditors. 

Patrick J. Conley, 436 

* William J. Downey, 1193 

* Frederick G. Katzmann, 1123 

* Frederic C. Stone, 1066- 

School Committee, 3 years. 

* Charles G. Chick, 1217 

* Fred J. Hutchinson, 1161 

* Wilbur H. Powers, 1203- 



35 



Trustees of the Public Library, 
3 years- 

* Amos H. Brainard, 1189 

* John W. Griffin, 1198 

* Charles F. Jenney, 1238 

Sewer Commissioner, 3 years. 

* Charles Haley, 1009 
John C. Savage, 530 

Park Commissioner, 3 years. 

* Lawson B. Bidwell, 1199 

* Declared elected. 



Tree Warden. 

* Edwin J. Chandler, 1195 

Constables. 

* John M. Brown, 936 

* Robert E. Grant, 1249 

* Daniel O'Connell, 953 

* William K. Peabody, 882 

* William W. Scott, 1149 
William Wragg, 875 



" Shall licenses be granted for the sale of intoxicating liquors in 
town?" Yes 563; No 1047. 



this 



The following were chosen, by viva voce vote, to the office set against 
their names : 

Bartholomew B. Kivlin, } 

Andrew J. Monroe, [-Fence Viewers. 

Jotham C. Rockwood, ) 

Bartholomew B. Kivlin, 1 

Jotham C. Rockwood, Y Field Drivers. 

Henry V. Harwoocl, J 

Bartholomew B. Kivlin, Pound Keeper. 
Adjourned at 10.30 P.M. 



On March 25th, 1903, a town meeting was held in Waverly 
Hall, when the following articles were acted upon : 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Charles G. Chick, Esq., chosen. 

Art. 2. To see if the town will accept the list of jurors 
as prepared by the Selectmen and posted according to law. 

The list was amended and accepted. 

Art. 3. To hear the report of the Selectmen in regard 
to guide boards, and act thereon. 

Report made and accepted. 



36 

Art. 4. To see what disposition the town will make of 
the money received from dog licenses in the year 1902. 
Given to the public library for purchase of books. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will appropriate the money 
now in the hands of the Treasurer, received by him as side- 
walk, street or Board of Health assessments or betterments, 
and all money which shall be received by him the current 
year on account of such assessments or betterments, for the 
purpose of constructing or repairing public ways. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will appropriate the money 
to be received this year by the Town Treasurer for or on 
account of Corporation and National Bank Taxes for the 
payment of the fire hydrant service of the town. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will authorize its Collector 
of Taxes to use all means of collecting the taxes which a 
Town Treasurer, when appointed a collector, may use. 

So authorized. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will authorize its Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money to 
renew or replace any loan or loans. 

So authorized. 

Art. 9. To see what compensation the town will vote 
to pay for collecting its taxes and other assessments levied 
the current municipal year. 

Same as last year, $1500. 

Art. 10. To fix the salaries of the town officers for 

the current municipal year. 

Selectmen, $200 each; Assessors, $300 each; Overseers of Poor, $150 
each; Town Clerk, $250; Town Treasurer, $600; Board of Health, $100 
each; Auditors, $25 each; Cemetery Commissioners, $50 each; Sewer 
Commissioners, $100 each. All other town officers to be paid " same as 
last year." 






37 

Art. 11. To determine what compensation shall be 
allowed the Clerk of the Board of Sewer Commissioners for 
the ensuing year. 

Same as last year, .§600. 

Art. 12, To see what compensation the town will 
vote to pay the Secretary of the Board of Assessors, and 
for extra clerical services for the Board, for the current 
municipal year. 

Secretary, $250; and for extra clerical services the same as paid last 
year. 

Art. 13. To fix the compensation of the engineers and 

the several members of the fire department for their services 

the current municipal year. 

Chief Euijiueer, $175; Two Assistant Engineers, $150 each; for 
" Permanent Men," $900 each ; " Call Men," $100 each. 

Art. 14. To see what discount the town will vote to 
allow on all taxes paid on or before October 1, 1903 ; and 
what interest the town will vote to charge on taxes for the 
current year when the same shall be overdue. 

No discount allowed ; interest at rate of five per cent per annum on 
overdue taxes. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will appropriate two hun- 
dred dollars to Post 121, Grand Army of the Republic, for 
the expenses of decorating the graves of deceased soldiers. 

So appropriated. 

Art. 16. To hear the reports of any outstanding com- 
mittees, and act thereon. 

The report of the committee on "police signal system" was pre- 
sented in writing (see report on file). Voted that the report be accepted 
and its recommendations adopted. 

The report of the committee on "municipal coal yards" was pre- 
sented in writing (see report on file). Voted that "this report be re- 
ceived and placed on file for future reference." 



38 

Art. 17. To see if the town will authorize its Select- 
men to contract with the Hyde Park Electric Light Co., for 
the remainder of the term of our street lighting contract, 
for two arc lights to be placed on East Milton Street. 

So authorized. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will authorize the Select- 
men to purchase a new steam road-roller and appropriate 
money therefor. 

#2,650 appropriated therefor. 

Art. 19. To see what sum of money the town will 
appropriate for a police signal system for the town. 

$8,750 appropriated therefor. 

Art. 20. To see what sum of money the town will 
appropriate for the celebration of the fourth day of July 
next. 

$350 appropriated therefor. 

Art. 21. " To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
not exceeding $950 to reslate and repair the roof of the 
Grew School." 

So appropriated. 

Art. 22. "To see if the town will appropriate a sum 
not exceeding $2,000 to put in sanitaries, change the 
plumbing, and make the necessary connection with the 
sewer at the Fairmount School, and how the same shall be 
raised." 

So appropriated. 

Art. 23. To see what action the town will take con- 
cerning the widening of East River Street, near the River 
Street Station, to appropriate money therefor, and how the 
same shall be raised. 

Indefinitely postponed. 

Art. 24. To see what amount the town will vote to 
raise by taxation to meet the expenses of the town the 



39 

•current year, the deficiences of last year, and the notes and 

bonds of the town maturing the present year, and how the 

same shall be appropriated. 

Voted to raise by taxation the current year the sum of two hundred 
and seven thousand two hundred and thirty five dollars ($ 207, 235. 00), 
and to appropriate the same as follows : — 



SCHOOLS: 






Salaries and Fuel, 


$42,200 




Incidentals, 


5,500 




Text Books and Supplies, 


3,750 




Evening Schools, 


1,000 




Industrial Schools, 


200 


$52,650 
14,000 


Bonds and Notes Maturing, 




Interest, 




11,000 


Highways, 




35,000 


New Steam Road Roller, 




2,650 


Street Watering, 




5,000 


Incidentals, 




10,000 


Police, 




12,900 


Fire Department, 




12,400 


Overseers of Poor, 




10,000 


Street Lights, 




11,000 


Public Library, 




4,000 


Salaries, 




5,685 


Board of Health, 




6,800 


G. A. R. Post, 




200 


Repairs Grew School, 




950 


Plumbing Fairmount School, 




2,000 


Police Signal System, 




3,750 


Voted last September, payable in 1903, 




6,900 


Celebration, Fourth of July, 




350 



$207,235 

Art. 25. "To see if the town will appoint a committee 

to investigate and report as to whether a change in the 

present location of the Damon School is necessary, and if 

it is, to report as to the best location, and the approximate 

cost of making such change." 

Messrs. Samuel T. Elliott, Alonzo W. Dunbar, Fred J. Hutchinson, 
Edward S. Hathaway, and Stillman E. Newell, were appointed a commit- 
tee to consider this subject. 



40 

Art. 26. "To see if the town will appoint a committee 
to act with the Selectmen in drafting a suitable bill to ac- 
company a petition to the General Court for a new form 
of municipal government for large towns." 

Messrs. Charles G. Chick, Wilbur H. Powers, Frank W. Darling, 
Edward S. Fellows, Frank B. Rich, and J. Kins; Knight, were chosen as 
a committee under this article. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to purchase the 
franchise, corporate property, and all the rights and privil- 
eges of the Hyde Park Water Company, in accordance 
with the provisions of Chapter ninety-one (91) of the Acts 
of the year 1884 of this Common wealth, and to take any 
action relating thereto. 
Indefinitely postponed. 

Art. 28. "To see if the town will vote to have all 
printed matter used by the town done by Union Labor, and 
have same bear the Allied Printing Trades Council Union 
Label." 

Indefinitely postponed. 

Art. 29. " To see if the town will authorize its Board 
of Selectmen to petition the General Court for necessary 
legislation, so that the town may consider the question of 
abolishing the Board of Sewer Commissioners." 

Indefinitely postponed. 

Art. 30. " To see if the town will authorize its Board 
of Selectmen to petition the Supreme Judicial Court, asking 
to have the rates fixed which the Hyde Park Water Com- 
pany may charge the citizens of Hyde Park for water rates 
until the further order of said Court." 

Indefinitely postponed. 

Art. 31. To see what amount the town will authorize 
its Treasurer to borrow, in anticipation of the tax to be 
levied the current year. 

Authorized to so borrow $125,000. 

Adjourned at 10.22 P. M. 



4i 



November 3, 1903. The annual election of State, Dis- 
trict and County officers was held in Waverly Hall. No 
other business was transacted. 

The polls were opened at 6 o'clock A.M., and closed at sunset. 
The number of votes received for the various candidates was as 
follows : 



1 Democratic," 
Socialist Labor,'.' 



For Governor : 

John L. Bates, " Republican," 
Thomas F. Brennan, " Socialist Labor 
John C. Chase, " Socialist," 
Oliver W. Cobb, "Prohibition," 
William A. Gaston. "Democratic," 
Blanks, 35 

For Lieutenant Governor : 

John Quincy Adams, " Socialist," 
Curtis Guild, Jr., "Republican," 
William F. Merrill, " Prohibition," 
Richard Olney, 2d, 
Moritz E. Ruther, 
Blanks, 93 

For Secretary : 

Olof Bokelund, "Socialist," 
John F. Coyle, " Socialist Labor," 
Alfred L. Cutting, " Prohibition," 
Ezekiel M. Ezekiel, " Democratic," 
William M. Olin, "Republican," 
Blanks, 148 

For Treasurer and Receiver-General : 
John A. Billings, " Socialist," 
Edward S. Bradford, "Republican," 
Napoleon B. Johnson, "Prohibition," 
Frederick A. Nagler, 
Thomas C. Thacher, 
Blanks, 172 

For Auditor : 

John H. Hagan, " Socialist Labor," 
Joseph Orr, " Socialist," 
Alfred E. Steele, " Prohibition," 
Francois X. Tetrault, "Democratic," 
Henry E. Turner, " Republican," 
Blanks and scattering, 203 



' Socialist Labor," 
1 Democratic," 



1091 
28 

209 
18 

616 



253 
1089 

28 

508 

26 



222 
46 
31 

430 
1120 



239 

1088 

30 

38 

430 



65 

210 

37 

407 
1075 



42 

For Attorney-General : 

John A. Anderson, " Socialist Labor," 63 

William J. Carroll, " Socialist," 218 

Henry M. Dean, " Prohibition," 90 

John J. Flaherty, " Democratic," 414 

Herbert Parker, " Republican," 1054 

Blanks and scattering, 158 
For Councillor — Second District : 

Gustave B. Bates, " Socialist," 245 

Frederick S. Hall, " Republican," 992 

Augustus Hem men-way, " Democratic," 534 

Blanks and scattering, 226 
For Senator — First Norfolk District : 

Albert A. Brackett, "Republican," 1021 

William M. Packard, " Socialist," 259 

Felix Rackemann, " Independent," " Democratic," 556 

Blanks, 161 
For Representative in General Court — Third Norfolk District: 
William H. Boclfish, " Democratic," 274 

Alonzo W. Dunbar, " Republican," 830 

Edward Q. Dyer, " Republican Ind. Nom. Paper," 610 

John J. Gallagher, " Socialist," 212 

Scattering, 6 Blanks, 65 
For County Commissioner : 

Daniel H. Coleman, " Socialist," 357 

James Hewins, " Democratic," " Republican," 1273 

Blanks and scattering, 367 
For Register of Probate and Insolvency : 

Johu D. Cobb, " Democratic," " Republican," 1295 

Clarence H. Deane, "Socialist," 337 

Blanks and scattering, 365 
For Register of Deeds : 

John H. Burdakin, " Democratic," " Republican," 1251 

J. Frank Hay ward, "Socialist," . 428 

Blanks and scattering, 318 
For County Treasurer : 

Albert G. Coffin, " Socialist," 332 

Charles H. Smith, " Democratic," " Republican," 1308 

Blanks and scattering, 357 

Shall an act passed by the General Court in the year 
nineteen hundred and three, entitled "An Act to 
provide for joiut caucuses or primaries of all 
political aud municipal parties," be accepted? 
Yes, 802 No, 455 Blanks, 740 

1997 ballots were cast at this election. 



A3 

On December 9th, 1903, a town meeting was held in 
Waverly Hall, when the following articles were acted 
upon : 

Art. 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said 
meeting. 

Charles G. Chick, Esq., chosen by ballot. 

Art. 2. To hear the report of the Selectmen laying out 
a part of Linwood Street as a public town way, and to see 
if the town will accept and allow said laying out with the 
boundaries and measurements of said way as shown by re- 
port, plan and profile now on file in the town clerk's office, 
and appropriate money to build the said street. 

Keport made and laying out accepted ; $400 appropriated therefor, the 
same to be taken from present " highway " appropriation. 

Art. 3. To hear the report of the Selectmen laying a 

main drain, for the drainage of Readville Street and other 

streets, and to see if the town will accept and allow said 

laying, with the boundaries and measurements of the land 

taken for said main drain, as shown by report, plan and 

profile now on file in the town clerk's office, and appropriate 

money to lay said drain. 

Report made and accepted; $1,450 appropriated therefor, the same to 
be taken from present "highway" appropriation. 

Art. 4. To see if the town will appropriate a sum of 

money not exceeding $2,300, for the purpose of draining 

Washington Street, Loring Street, and Garfield Avenue. 

$ 2,300 appropriated for this purpose, the same to be taken from the 
present "highway" appropriation. 

Art. 5. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen 
to contract with the Hyde Park Electric Light Company, 
for the remainder of the term of our street lighting contract, 
for lights to be placed as follows : one incandescent light 
on Beaver Street, and one incandescent light on Metropoli- 
tan Avenue near the Boston line. 

Selectmen were so authorized. 



44 

Art. 6. To see if the town will authorize its Selectmen, 
in behalf of this town, to make and execute an agreement 
with the town of Milton, to allow said town of Milton to 
use, in common with this town, so long as the drain shall 
be maintained by this town, on a strip of land ten feet wide 
and extending from a point near Beacon Street to land of 
the New England Railroad Company and adjoining or near 
the Hyde Park and Milton division line, such drains as 
may be constructed by this town on said land, said town of 
Milton to pay for such privilege a sum equal to one-half 
the expense incurred by this town in the purchase of said 
land, and the construction of a drain thereon, and also one- 
half the expense to be incurred by this town in enlarging or 
repairing said drain ; and " to convey by said agreement to 
the town of Milton equal rights, as nearly as possible, with 
Hyde Park in the future use and maintenance of said 
drain." 

Selectmen were so authorized. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will appoint a committee to 

consider the subject matter of a crossing for pedestrians, 

over the river and over or under the railroad, at or near 

Glenwood Avenue station, and report their conclusions to 

the town at a future meeting. 

The moderator appointed Messrs. Lester P. Winchenbaugh, Edwin 
E. E. Bartlett, James R. Corthell, William D. Preston, and Henry M. 
Roberts, as a committee of Ave under this article. 

Art. 8. To hear and act upon the report of any out- 
standing committee. 

The committee on removal of Damon School-house made a report of 
progress. Report received and committee given further time. 

Adjourned at 8 P. M. 



REPORT OF THE BOARD OF ENGINEERS 
OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 



To the Honorable Board op Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — The Board of Engineers herewith present 
their annual report for the year ending January 31, 1904. 

The department has responded to one hundred and ten 
alarms during the past year, sixty-one bell and forty-nine 
still ; there have been eighteen " no schools," and we have 
answered three Dedham, one Milton and one Boston alarm. 
The department has travelled 750 miles, laid 17,200 feet 
of hose, 14,500 feet of chemical hose, raised 5,000 feet of 
ladders, used 5,500 gallons of chemicals, at forty-nine fires 
have used the chemical engine onlv'. 





Value. 


Loss. 


Insurance. 


Buildings, 


$368,100 


$23,100 


$240,500 


Contents, 


99,625 


22,292 


90,600 



$467,725 $45,392 $331,100 

We have extended the fire alarm, have replaced four miles 
of wire, have purchased five miles of covered wire and one 
thousand feet of hose, and have added five new fire-alarm 
boxes, having now everything in first-class shape. 

The apparatus now consists of three hose wagons, one 
hose reel, one chemical engine, one ladder truck, two five- 
gallon hand chemical tanks, seven horses, five sets of double 
swinging harness, one single harness, six thousand feet of 
good hose, two thousand feet of poor hose, one Eastman 
deluge set, a storage battery, forty-three fire-alarm boxes, 
thirty miles of wire and ten single beds complete, all in 
good condition. 



4 6 

The work of the department is increasing every year, 
more alarms having been answered than in any previous 
year, and great credit is due the men for their very 
efficient work. 

The Board of Engineers wish to extend their thanks to 
the department for their faithfulness during the past year, 
and to the citizens for their words of encouragement. 

The department now consists of Chief Engineer, two as- 
sistants, five permanent men, and thirty-four call men, 
making a total of forty-four members. 

JOHN H. WETHERBEE, Chief. 
JOHN C. McDOUGALD. 
DENNIS W. MAHONEY. 



DEPARTMENT OFFICERS AND MEN. 



Board of Engineers. 
JOHN H. WETHERBEE, Chief, 

JOHN C. McDOUGALD, Clerk, 

DENNIS W. MA HONEY. 



Ladder Company No 1. 
WILLIAM R. McDOUGALD, Captain, 

JOHN H. TUCKERMAN, Jr., Lieutenant, and 10 men. 



Hose Company No. 1. 
EDWARD N. BULLARD, Captain, 

WILLIAM W. SCOTT, Lieutenant, and 9 men. 



Hose Company No. 2. 
MICHAEL J. FOLEY, Captain, 

LOUIS C. MERCER, Lieutenant, and 5 men. 



Hose Company No. 3. 
FRANK KUNKEL, Captain, 

ARCHIBALD COCHRANE, Lieutenant, and 4 men. 



Chemical Engine No. 1. 
FRANK L. MERCER, Captain, 

WARREN. C. MORSE, Lieutenant, and 2 men. 



Drivers. 
WILLIS P. WHITTEMORE, CHARLES M. WANDLESS. 

FRED A. HAWLEY, JAMES COLLINS. 



EDWARD A. HAWLEY, Supt. of Fire Alarms and Steward. 



LOCATION OF HYDE PARK FIRE ALARM BOXES. 



12. Cor. Business St. and Barrv PI. 

13. Grew School. 

131. Gordon Ave., Beaver St. 

14. Cleveland and Childs Sts. 

15. Alden's Store. 

16. Cotton Mill. 
161. New Damon St. 

17. Galligan's Store, Readville. 

18. Car Sheds, River St. 
181. Stark Avenue. 

19. Hose 3 House, Readville. 

23. Unitarian Church, Mt. Neponset. 

24. Woolen Mill, Special Box. 

25. American Tool. 

26. Hair Factory. 

27. Wolcott Square. 

28. Hyde Park Ave., entrance Trotting Park. 

31. N. Y. & N. E. Crossing, Fairmount Ave. 

32. Beacon St., and Milton Ave. 

33. Electric Liaht Station, Bridge St. 

34. Neponset Ave. and Water St. 

35. Highland St. and Fairmount Ave. 
351. Williams Ave., Fairmount School. 

36. Summit St. and Fairmount Ave. 

37. Dana Ave. and Loring St. 

38. Tyler and Washington Sts., Corriganville. 

42. Everett Square. 

43. Pierce and Walter Sts. 

45. West and River Sts. 

46. Metropolitan Ave. and River St. 

47. Paper Mill, East River St. 

48. Rugby. Blake St. 
481. RadcliffRoad, Rugby. 

49. Holmflelcl, East River St. 

51. Central Fire Station. 

52. Webster Square. 

53. Harvard Ave. and Hyde Park Ave. 
531. Cor. Hyde Park Ave. and Arlington St. 

54. Arlington St. and Central Ave. 

55. Metropolitan Ave., opp. Greenwood School. 

56. Thatcher St. and Hyde Park Ave. 

57. Huntington Ave. and Thatcher St. 

58. Colby's Store, Clarendon Hills. 

59. Huntington Ave., Clarendon Hills. 
2. All out. 22 No School. 



49 





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REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF POLICE. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — I herewith submit for your consideration the 
annual report of this department for the fiscal year ending 
January 31, 1904, together with some recommendations 
which I consider necessary. 

Whole number of persons'arrested, 490 

Males, 455 

Females, 35 

CAUSE OF ARREST. 



Assault and battery. 


21 


Assault on officer, 


3 


Assault with a^dangerous^weapon, 


1 


Adultery, 


3 


Assault with intent to rape, 


1 


Bastardy, 


3 


Breaking glass, 


4 


Cheating, 


2 


Drunkenness, 


203 


Disturbing the peace, 


35 


Fornication, 


5 


Insane, 


9 


Illegal sale of liquor, 


2 


Illegal transportation of liquor, 


4 


Keeping and exposing liquor, 


6 


Larceny, 


30 


Liquor nuisance, 


19 


Malicious mischief, 


6 


Nuisance, 





Neglect of child, 


1 


Night walking, 


2 


Non-support, 


3 


Biding bicycle on sidewalk, 


5 



54 



Rape, 2 

Kef using to pay car fare, 4 

Stubborn child, 1 

Stoning railroad trains, 5 

Tramp, 1 

Truancy, 2 

Vagrants, 72 

Violation of town by-laws, 4 

Violation park laws, 6 

Unlawful us e of registered milk cans, 4 

Walking on railroad track, 1 1 

Violation of process butter law, 4 

NATIVITY OF PERSON'S ARRESTED. 

Canada, 12 

England, 21 

Germany, 9 

Ireland, 98 

Italy, 13 

New Brunswick, 3 

Nova Scotia, 18 

Newfoundland, 2 

Prince Edwards Island, 4 

Poland, 11 

Eussia, 4 

Scotland, 12 

Sweden, 4 

Japan, 1 

United States, 288 



490 



490 



OCCUPATION. 



Architect, 

Blacksmiths, 

Brass finishers, 

Barbers, 

Brakemen, 

Brick masons, 

Cotton workers, 

Carpenters, 

Clerks, 

Compositors, 

Coachmen, 



1 

3 

2 

6 

2 

5 

27 

14 

11 

2 

3 



55 

Currier, 1 

Dressmakers, 4 

Dancing master, 1 

Engineers, 3 

Expressmen, 4 

Electrician, 1 

Florists, 2 

Firemen, 6 

Farmers, 9 

Grocers, 4 

Gardeners, 3 

Hair workers, 8 

Housekeepers, 29 

Hostlers, 14 

Horse traders, 3 

Hotel keepers, 2 

Harness makers 5 

Designers, 3 

Iron moulders, 12 

Iron melters, 5 

Junk dealers, 4 

Laborers, 110 

Milk dealers, 4 

Machinists, 30 

No occupation, 27 

Nurses, 2 

Painters, 10 

Plumbers, 2 

Peddlers, 2 

Pattern makers, 3 

Printers, 2 

Rubber workers, 6 

School boys, 12 

Stone masons, 6 

Salesmen, 7 

Storekeepers, 5 

Station agents, 2 

Sailors, . 2 

Tinsmiths, . 2 

Teamsters, 9 
Telegraphers, .2 

Typewriter, 1 

Woolen workers, 37 
Waiters, , . 3 



' 56 

Wire worker, 1 

Shoemakers, 4 



FINAL DISPOSITION OF CASES. 

Awaiting trial, 5 
Appealed, 6 
Committed to the House of Correction for non- 
payment of fines, 62 
Committed to the House of Correction, 69 
Committed to Truant School, 4 
Committee to State Prison, 1 
Committed to Kef ormatory, 4 
Committed to Insane Hospitals, 9 
Committed to Woman's Home, Dedham, 2 
Discharged, 14 
Discharged for want of prosecution, 7 
Fines paid, 159 
Probation, 21 
Placed on file, 114 
Turned over to other officers, 10 
Turned over to State Board of Charities, 3 



490 



490 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Amount of fines imposed by Court, $3,034 00 

Amount of liquor seized, 472 1-2 gallons 

Amount of property stolen, 862 00 

Amount of property recovered, 703 00 

Cases investigated without arrest, 5 11 

Cases investigated for other officers, 17 

Defects in streets reported, 28 

Doors found open and secured, 46 

Dead bodies found, 7 

Dogs killed, 62 

Fire alarms given, 12 

Injured persons provided for, 21 

Imprisonment imposed by Court, 29 years 

Lost children found and restored to parents, 19 

Notified Water Company of leak in pipes, 12 

Number of persons fined, 245 

Runaway boys found and restored to parents, 17 

Street lights reported not burning, 720 



57 

Search warrants served for intoxicating liquors, 39 

Search warrants served for stolen property, 3 

Stray horses taken care of, 12 

Travelers lodged over night, 3,198 

Windows found open and secured, 9 

Lost articles found and restored to owners, 7 

Lights hung on obstructions, 59 

RECOMMENDATIONS. 

I wish to recommend that some one be appointed to the 
office of Chief of Police who can devote his whole time to 
the business ; also that the Town adopt the law in relation 
to placing the officers under civil service. 

At the present time the police force consists of nine 
regular men and five Sunday men. 

Requests have been made for an officer to be stationed at 
Readville, on the east side of the railroad tracks ; also to 
divide that section, including Hazelwood and Clarendon 
Hills, which is now patroled by one officer. To do this it 
will be necessary to appoint two more men, and I would 
so recommend. The police station has been cleaned and 
painted throughout. The signal system has been installed 
and is in good working condition, and has proved a great 
benefit to the department. I recommend that the tramp 
room be abolished, and that four new cells be put into 
that room. 

I wish to thank the officers for the excellent work they 
have done during the year, and hope they will receive the 
support of the citizens which they deserve. 
Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM WRAGG, 

Chief of Police. 



REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT 
OF STREETS. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen: — I herewith submit to you my report 
as Superintendent of Streets for the year ending January 31, 
1904. 

Streets Built — 22,600 square yards with crushed stone ; 

18,100 square yards with gravel. 
Streets Resurfaced — 5,950 square yards with crushed stone ; 

45,450 square yards with gravel. 
Sidewalks Constructed — 5,830 square yards with gravel 

or cinders ; 530 square yards with tar concrete ; 285 

square yards with granolithic. 
Sidewalks Resurfaced — 4,800 square yards with gravel; 

36,500 square yards with crushed stone dust ; 6,360 

square yards with tar concrete. 
Crosswalks — 625 square yards with tar concrete; 130 

square yards with granite flagging. 
Gutters — 2,000 ft. have been constructed of tar concrete; 

100 ft. paved with stone ■ 1,055 &• repaved with stone. 
Edgcstone — 1,330 ft. have been set and 2,200 ft. reset. 
Drains and Basins — 13 catch basins have been built, 

1,350 ft. of drain pipe laid and 180 ft. relaid. 
Road Material used upon Streets and Sidewalks — 7,300 

tons of crushed stone, of which 3,720 tons came from the 

town plant and 3,580 tons from the Sallie's Rock Tunnel, 

4,300 double loads and 998 single loads of gravel. 400 

large loads of cinders. 



59 

Gutterings — From the gutters and catch basins there were 

removed 504 double loads and 3,560 single loads of 

waste material. 
Bridges — $600 have been expended in repairs. 
Fences — 1,600 ft. were built at a cost of $225. 
General Repairs — $5,060. 
Removal of Snow and Ice — $2,505 65. 
Steam Roller — In use 26 weeks, and cost for supplies, 

labor and repairs $[,176. 
Stone Crushing — Supplies, labor and repairs cost $3,237.30. 
Maintenance of Tools and Wagons — $1,082.75. 
Repairs on Watering Carts and Cranes — $602.30. 
Added to Plant — Five snow ploughs at a cost of $26085. 

Street sweeper at a cost of $250. 

DETAILED STATEMENT. 

Arlington St. — Resurfacing sidewalks $200. 

Austin St. — Resurfacing siiewalk $40. 

Beaver St. — Building sidewalks $120. 

Business Si. — Resurfacing sidewalk $165, Building and 
repairing catch basins $105. 

Central Ave, — Resurfacing street $875. Resurfacing side- 
walks and crosswalks $175- 

Childs St. — Resurfacing sidewalks $70. 

Cleveland St. — Resurfacing sidewalk $60. 

Dana Ave. — Rebuilding street $2,300. 

E. River St . — Resurfacing sidewalks $730. Resetting 
curbs $120. Building catch basin $35. Granite cross- 
walk $65. 

Everett St. — Granolithic sidewalks $436,05- Resurfacing 
sidewalk $35. Curb stones $180. Rebuilding street 

$350- ,, . , 

Fairmount Ave, — Resurfacing sidewalks and'crossings $225. 

Curbstones $15. Repairs to bridge $150. 

Franklin St. — Resurfacing street $60. 



6o 

Franklin Terrace — Resurfacing street $75.' 
Green St. — Resurfacing street $55. 
Greenwood Ave.— Resurfacing sidewalks $40. 

Harvard Ave.'— Rebuilding" street $1,550. Catch Basins 
$165. Sidewalks $125. Curbstone and paving $235. 

Highland St. — Repairs to street $1 ro. 

Huntington Ave.— Building and resurfacing sidewalk $90. 

Hyde Park Ave.— Resurfacing sidewalks $350. Gutters 
and curbstone 8196. Resurfacing street $80. 

Maple St. — Resurfacing street $425. Building catch basins 
$100. 

Metropolitan Ave. — Resurfacing street $420. Resurfacing 
sidewalks $170. 

Milton .5V. — Resurfacing street $560. 

Milton Ave. — Resurfacing street $205. Resurfacing side- 
walks $15, 

Alt. I leasant St. — Rebuilding sidewalk $65. 

Oak St. — Resurfacing street $90. Curbstone $90. Side- 
walk $35. 

Perkins Ave. — Curbstone $200. Catch basins and gutters 
$110. 

Pierce St. — Rebuilding street $650. Catch basins and 
cuibstones $150. 

Riverside Sq. — Resurfacing street $70. 

Water St. — Resurfacing sidewalk $160. 

Walter St. — Draining and resurfacing street $130. 

Warren Ave. — Resurfacing street $190. 

West St. — Rebuilding $1,000. Resurfacing sidewalks $85. 
Gutters and catch basins $365. Curbstone $35. 

W. River St. — Resurfacing street $1,320. Rebuilding 
street $630, Curbstone $260. Sidewalks $400: 

Williams Ave. — Resurfacing street $300, Resurfacing 
sidewalks $100. 

CLARENCE G. NORRIS, 

Superintendent of Streets. 



REPORT OF CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS. 



In the warrant for a town meeting held on the twenty- 
fifth day of March, 1891, there was an article authorizing the 
taking of action to provide for a suitable place of burial for 
"persons dying within the limits of this town." Under this 
article the town appointed a Committee. At a rr.eeting held 
December 30, 1891, this Committee reported, and an appro- 
priation of $10,000 was made for the purpose of establishing 
a Cemetery, and the Committee was authorized to continue 
in the performance of its duties. 

February 17, 1892, the selectmen were authorized to buy 
the whole or any part of the Gilman Farm for cemetery pur- 
poses, and to make application to the proper authorities for 
the condemnation of the whole or part of said land Proper 
proceedings were instituted, and the town became the owner 
of a large part of the land now held by it as a cemetery, at a 
cost of $7,457. In addition to the expenditure for the land, the 
Committee spent for expenses of survey, legal services, print- 
ing and advertising, $836.98. The name, Fairview Cemetery, 
was given by this Committee. 

September 7, 1892, Cemetery Commissioners were ap- 
pointed by the selectmen, and thereupon entered upon their 
duties. Work upon the cemetery was at once commenced, 
and the Commissioners expended during the remainder of the 
year $1,582.42, leaving a balance unexpended of the original 
appropriation of $123.60. 

For the same period the Commissioners received from the 
sale of lots, etc., $1,706. 

The first interment was made November 9, 1892. 

Under vote of the town in early years, all moneys received 
from the sale of lots were turned over to the town treasurer, 
to be used in payment of the debt incurred at the outset. 



62 

In 1893, an additional appropriation of $4,500 was made, 
the larger part of which was used in the construction of a re- 
ceiving tomb. The tomb was ready for use early in 1894. 

In March, 1894, the town instructed the Commissioners to 
set apart a portion ot the cemetery for the burial of persons 
of the Roman Catholic faith, and also authorized the Com- 
missioners to use money received by them for the purchase 
of land for the use of the cemetery, and to meet the ex- 
penses necessary for the purpose of constructing avenues and 
paths and preparing the land. In order to carry the first vote 
into effect, an appropriation of $6,000 was made. 

In 1895, an additional appropriation of $2,000 was made, 
and in 1896 and 1897, $500 was appropriated in each year, 
Since 1897, no appropriation has been made by the town. 

The entire amount appropriated by the town has been 
$23,500. 

Since 1893, the Commissioners have purchased additional 
lands as the same came from time to time into the market, 
paying therefor $2,820.84, from the funds in the possession 
of the town. The receipts also reimbursed the town in 
payment for the land originally purchased to the amount 
of $8,000, so that the net cost of the cemetery to the 
town to date, apart from interest charges, amounts to 
$15,500. 

As will be seen later in this report, the Commissioners now 
have on hand a fund of $10,633.06, an increase of $1,161.20 
from last year. 

This fund, as will be seen by reference to previous reports, 
is increasing rapidly, but considerable of it will be required 
within a few years for the purchase of additional land in order 
to round out the holdings of the town, and the completion of 
the main avenue, Fairview Drive. In years to come, when 
the older part of the cemetery will be less used, the money 
received from sales of lots will be required in adapting for 
use other parts of the cemetery. The annual receipts will 



63 

probably not be sufficient to pay the running expenses of the 
cemetery, and the interest on the fund may be required for 
that purpose. 

During the past year the retaining wall on Fairview Drive 
has been extended, the area prepared for single graves has 
been increased, and otherwise the work done has been in the 
care of lots already sold and the gradual extension of the area 
ready for use. 

The receipts and expenditures for the financial year ending 
January 31, 1904, are as follows : 

RECEIPTS. 

From sale of lots, 

From sale of single graves, 

Interment and receiving tomb charges, 

For foundations and labor, 

For wood, stone and grass, 

For interest on fund, 



Total, 
Balance on hand January 31, 1903, 



$1,620 


00 


280 


00 


623 


00 


151 


55 


127 


2 5 


37S 


S3 


$3.iSo 


63 


9.471 


86 


$2,019 43 


10,633 


06 



$12,652 49 



EXPENSES. 

Labor, etc., 

Balance on hand January 31, 1904, 

$12,652 49 

Details of expenses are given elsewhere in the Town 
Report. 

STATISTICS. 
I903. 

Lots sold, 21 

Single graves sold, 26 

Interments in lots, 36 

Interments in single graves, 77 

In receiving tomb, 30 

Removals, 5 

JOHN O'CONNELL, 
CHARLES F. JENNEY, 

Commissioners. 



REPORT OF THE PARK COMMISSIONERS. 



We herewith submit the report of the board as follows : 

The property under our care is the same as in last 
report, namely, Camp Meigs Memorial Park in Readville. 

At the request of a special committee from the Readville 
Improvement Association, a hearing was given them on the 
condition of the Park and the following vote was passed ; 
"That the sum of sixty dollars be appropriated for the 
purchase and planting of shrubbery in Hamilton Park on 
condition that the Readville Association assume the care 
and maintenance of the shrubbery and that the same be 
placed under the supervision of the Association so that the 
work would be done to the satisfaction of this board." 

The above vote was carried out faithfully, greatly improv- 
ing the appearance of the Park. 

A petition was received from the Camp Meigs Memorial 
Association asking that the name of Hamilton Park be 
changed to "The Camp Meigs Memorial Park." We voted 
"That so far as this board has the authority, the name is 
approved and adopted." 

On July 4th, public exercises were held to dedicate this 
Park under the above name. Mr. Augustus S. Lovell of 
Brookline delivered the historical address. Dnring the 
year the board concurred with the Metropolitan Park Com- 
mission in the abandonment of three small parcels of land, 
namely, as shown on plan No. 430 at Wilton Street, plan 
No. 435 near Fairmount Avenue, and plan No. 346 near 
Station Street. 

JOHN J. ENNEKING, Chairman, 
FRANK B. RICH, Secretary, 
LAWSON B. BIDWELL, 

Park Commissioners. 






REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF BUILDINGS. 



To "the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — Following is the report of the Inspector 
of Buildings from May 1, 1903, to January 30, 1904. 

Whole number of permits granted, 28 

For new buildings, 20 

For additions and alterations, 8 

Number of notices issued to those not com- 
plying with the law, 2 
Number of visits made to the various build- 
ings in process of erection and altera- 
tion, work shops, back yards, dance 
halls, billiard rooms, bowling alleys, and 
stables, 193 

I have submitted my annual report to Rufus R. Wade, 
Chief of District Police, State House, Boston, Mass. 

Respectfully submitted, 

RICHARD F. BOYNTON, 

Inspector of Buildings. 



REPORT OF TREE WARDEN. 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen : 

Gentlemen — I herewith submit the report of the Tree 
Warden for the year ending January 31, 1904. 

On application, public hearings were held for the removal 
of trees on Neponset Avenue, West Street, Hyde Park 
Avenue, East River Street and Metropolitan Avenue. 

At the hearings no opposition appeared, and permission 
was given to remove two on Neponset Avenue, two on 
Metropolitan Avenue and one on Hyde Park Avenue. 

Trees have been trimmed where complaints have been 
made of low hanging limbs, but a thorough trimming over 
the whole town should be done ; but as there is no appropria- 
tion made for this work, I did not feel like going to'any 
great expense. 

Respectfully submitted, 

EDWARD J. CHANDLER, 

Tree Warden. 



TOWN CLERK'S REPORT. 



Number of births registered in Hyde.Park in 1903 392 

Males 197 

Females 195 

The parentage of the children is as_follows : 

Both parents American 132 

Irish 34 

Scotch 6 

English 5 

Swedes 7 

Russian 11 

Danes 3 

German 2 

Syrian 1 

Italian 24 

Poles 5 

Swiss 1 

Of British Provinces 50 

Mixed, one parent American 88 

Both parents of other nationalities 23 

Born in January, 42; February, 29; March, 39; April, 35; May, 23; 
June, 26; July, 44; August, 42; September, 31; October, 23; Novem- 
ber, 30; December, 28. 

MARRIAGES. " : 

Number of intentions of marriagesjjissued in 1903 144 

" marriages registered in 1903 149 

Oldest groom 69 

Oldest bride 66 

Youngest groom 17 

Youngest bride 16 

Both parties born in United States 76 

Ireland 5 

England.. 1 

Poland 1 

Italy 2 

S weden 3 

Germany 1 

British Provinces ; 11 

Other foreign countries 12 

Foreign and American 37 



68 

Married in January, 12; February, 12; March, 3; April, 13; May, 8; 
June, 26; July, 11; August, 10; September, 14; October, 22; Novem- 
ber, 12; December, 6. 

The following are the names and residences of the parties whose 
marriages were solemnized in 1903, certificates of which have been filed 
in this office : 

Jan. 1. Carleton Estey Preston of Hyde Park and Matilda Hersey 
Wales of Milton. 
1. Alonzo Perry Orcutt and Mary Rebecca Tibbetts both of 

Hyde Park. 
1. Owen McDermott and Mary Fitzserald both of Hyde Park. 

5. George Cuihbert Ferrier of Hyde Park and Margaret Ann M. 

Balmain of Wakefield. 

6. Percy E. Tisdale of Hyde Park and Gertrude M. Rerolck of 

Berwick, Me. 

13. Fred G. Zeigler of Dedham and Lilian Mary Schwab cf Hyde 

Park. 

14. Albert Ernest Cutler and Nellie Frances Blake both of Leo- 

minster. 

15. William J. McCaffrey and Catherine G. Porter both of Hyde 

Park. 
17. Albert Ayer of Hyde Park and Maude E. Doige of Quincy. 
17. Edward Murray and Mary I. Hankerd both of Hyde Park. 

28. Michael M. Conley and Bridget A. Manning both of Hyde Park. 

29. Frank E. Wildes of Kennebunkport, Me. and Minnie Johnson 

of St. Louis. 
Feb. 1. Aaron Waldo Rockwood and Anna Lucinda Durfee both of 
Hyde Park. 
3. Harry Edward Tilden and Ruth Elsie Crocker both of Hyde 

Park. 
5. Fred B. Anderson of Hyde Park and Maria K. Johnson of 

Brookliue. 
12. Nestor Wilbur Davis of Somerville and Alice Louise Cham- 
berlain of Hyde Park. 
16. Thomas Maley of Hyde Park and Ellen MacKenzie of Cam. 

bridge. 
22. Filippo Fiantacaof Boston and Maria G. Stella of Hyde Park. 

22. George Recie Liddell of Hyde Park and Mary Katharine 

McDonald of Boston. 

23. William Ion and Mary A. O'Keefe both of Hyde Park. 

23. Perley Winthrop Smith of Hyde Park and Emma Blanche 

Jacobs of Dedham. 
23. Charles Henry Bullock of Hyde Park and Mattie Holway Hill 

of Canton. 



6 9 

Feb. 24. John Ardell Carey of Dedham and Margaret Josephine 

Maguire of Hyde Park. 
25. Harry E. Hanson and Edith Florence Tingley both of Hyde 

Park, 
Mar. 19. Ernest Hoyle and Jessie F. Walford both of Hyde Park. 

19. Robert T. Hathaway and Alice C. Balkara both of Hyde Park. 
29. Robert H. Henderson of Hyde Park and Annie E. Sloane of 

Milton. 
Apr. 14. Arthur J. Coleman and Josephine Dangerfield both of Hyde 

Park. 
15. Joseph H. Barton of Hyde Park and Mary A. Hackett jof 

Dedham. 
15. Thomas F. Sullivan and Hannah T. McGrath both of Hyde 

Park. 
15. William F. Jordan and Mary A. Basquil both of Hyde Park. 
15. John B. Bullman and Catherine J. Sheeban both of^Hyde Park. 
15. William O'Brien of Hyde Park and Norah Hayes of Milton. 
15. Edward A. Livermore of Chelsea and Ella O. Hunter of Hyde 

Park. 
22. James Mulvey of Hyde Park and Alice Hagley of East 

Dedham. 
29. Joseph F. Carnes and Mary E. McGrath both of Hyde Park. 
29. Dennis J. Shugrue and Hannah V. Conley both of Hyde Park. 
29. Angus A. MacPherson of Arlington and Belle McRae of Hyde 

Park. 
29. Lewis Otto Robertson and Susan W. Elliot both of Hyde 

Park. 
29. John M. Gordon and Margaret Graham both of Hyde Park. 
May 1. Charles A. Hathaway of Someiville aud Grace May Shackley 

of Norwood. 
12. Fred L. Sumner of Dedham and Cora B. Garland of Hyde 

Park. 

12. Alphonsus L. Boylan of Indian Orchard aud Julia A. Coleman 

of Hyde Park. 

13. Robert E. Swallow of Boston and Bertha L. Andrews of 

Hyde Park. 

22. Charles Chandler of Fryeburg, Me. and Isabella J. Tuell of 

Hyde Park. 

23. Clarence A. Beard of Charlestown and Lottie M, Stormes of 

Roxbury. 

27. Frederick Haley of Boston and Margaret McCarthy of Hyde 

Park. 

28. Patrick J. Devlin of North Attleborough and„Sarah J. Marks 

of Hyde Park. 



70 

June 2. Aloysius J. Murphy of Norwich, Conn, and Julia Anna 
Gleason of Hyde Park. 
3. Daniel D. Dame of Hyde Park and Bertha T. Kaymes of 
Needham. 

7. Stanislow Hryniewirki and Anna Alicka both of Hyde Park. 

8. Edward Obin of Blackstone and Laura Lapoint of Hyde Park. 
10. George W. Withingtou of Dedham and May Ward of Hyde 

Park. 
10. Leon Forest Orcutt and Bertha Louise Packard both of Hyde 

Park. 
10. Edward F Brennan and Mary Helleu O'Rourke both of Hyde 

Park. 

14. Charles Frederick Eager of Hyde Park and Lulu May Barden 

of Boston. 

15. Edwin W Halden of Hyde Park and Mary Elizabeth Higgins 

of Boston. 

16. Bernard H. Seifert of Hyde Park and Mabel T. Newberry of 

Dedham. 

17. Almont R. Geyer of Hyde Park and Gracia M. DeEll of 

Berwick, N. S. 
17. Heibert L. Gleason and Jeanie D. McDonald both of Hyde 
Park. 

17. James P. Richardson and Florence L. Gardner both of Hyde 

Park. 

18. Sanford A. Frost of Hyde Park and Elizabeth Fuchs of 

Boston. 
20. William J. Dare of Boston and Norah Coffey of Hyde Park. 
22. Frank William Smith and Evelyn Mercy Rich both of Hyde 

Park. 

22. Edgar H. Wright, Jr. of Hyde Park and Nelly J. Kelley of 

Boston. 

23. Harry W. Banckman and Mabel W. Roberts both of Boston. 

24. Henry Alexander Perry of Somerville and Emma Gertrude 

Henderson of Hyde Park. 
24. Thomas Costello of Hyde Park and Msry A. Ryan of Boston. 
24. Thomas M. White of Hyde Park and Mary E. Walsh of 

Boston. 
24. David L. Smith of Hyde Park and Elizabeth T. Mulvehill of 

Westwood. 
24. Alton H. Edmunds and Myrtle L. Thomas both of Hyde Park. 

24. Harry D. Lockhart of Boston and Mary J. Barrett of Hyde 

Park. 

25. Charles A. Peterson and Ellen 0. Bjorkman both of Hyde 

Park. 



7i 

June 30. Percy Waldron Lone of Cambridge and Florence M. Enneking 

of Hyde Park. 
July 1. Marvin Whittier Sherwin and Elizabeth Agnes Harkins both 

of Leominster. 

14. John Allen McKay and Clara Susan Harris both of Hyde Park. 

15. George Benjamin DeLue of Hyde Park and Ella Frances 

Stewart of Charlestown. 
15. Franklin Sadd Nevers and Florence Ethel McLaine both of 

Hyde Park. 
15. John Joseph McDermott of Boston and Elsie Maude Flanders 

of Hyde Park. 
15. David John Rafter and Flora M. Whitney both of Hyde Park. 
21. William Herbert Davis of Boston and Elizabeth May Hardy 

of Hyde Park. 
27. Eric William Nelson of Hyde Park and Mabel Lear Smith of 

Boston. 
27. Dennis A. Demers and Annie B. Shepherd both of Hyde Park. 
29. James S. Whitelock of Hyde Park and Louise J. Doherty of 

Boston. 
29. Guy Handson Miller and Maud Irene Bryant both of Hyde 

Park. 
Aug. 17. Joseph Broderick of Hyde Park and Margaret Tobin of 

Grafton Centre. 

18. Roy Willis Brown and Jennie Mildred Flanders both of Hyde 

Park. 

19. Giuseppe Lo Dico and Giusepina Carapezza both of Hyde 

Park. 
21. Albert Jones of Hyde Park and Carolina Lundiu of Milton. 
26. Walter H. Brown and Harriet M. Crocker both of Hyde Park. 
26. Norman P. Rogers and Marion H. Sawyer both of Canton. 

26. John Brady of Hyde Park and Jane Lydon of Norwood. 

27. Murray K. Patten of Hyde Park and Martha J. McLellan of 

Maiden. 
27. William Fanning of Hyde Park and Lillian Grace Wheeler of 

Scituate. 
31. Harry Wilbur Porter and Lenna May Hamblin both of Hyde 

Park. 
Sept. 1. Fred P. Jewett and Mary Gillespie both of Hyde Park. 

7. Amede Rochloux and Edie Geauvreau both of Hyde Park. 

8. William P. Boland of Hyde Park and Mary R. Murphy of 

Milton. 
8. Ozias Henry McMurdie of Hyde Park and Olga Marie 

Mortenson of Everett. 
11. George Scott and Mary Nolan both of Hyde Park. 



72 

Sept. 13. Edmund Bouchie and Elizabeth Le Vangia both of Hyde Park. 

15. Christopher Miles O'Reilly of Ireland and Nora Loretto 

Cover ey of Hyde Park. 

16. Frank Dana Sears of Hyde Park and Mabel Esther Whitcomb 

of Holbrook. 

19. William A. Rockwood and Lottie B. Farnsworth both of 

Hyde Park. 

20. Daniel T. Felch and Lillian I. Shattuck both of Hyde Park. 

23. Clarence Clifton Dodge and Emily Alveita Jordon both of 

Hyde Park. 
27. Charles E. McClarty of Hyde Park and Mary A. Martin of 

Milton. 
30. Luther B. Fairbrother of Lowell and Laurinda M. Vincent of 

Hyde Park. 
30. Jesse Herbert Wilson of Hyde Park and Maud Elizabeth 
Williams of Chester, Conn. 
Oct. 1. Irving A. Seavey and Hilma E. Miller both of Hyde Park. 
1. Melvin E. Butler and Anuie L. Amback both of Hyde Park. 
3. Edward W. Merritt of Cohasset and Ethel A. McKenney of 
Hyde Park. 

5. B. Harold Hamblin of Hyde Park and Marion G. Phinney of 

Boston. 

6. Charles Arthur Platts of Woburu and Bertha Lillian Rice of 

Hyde Park. 

7. Henry Currier, Jr. and Mary McDougall both of Hyde Park. 
7. Godfrey M. Obuchon and Anna T. Lemire both of Hyde Park. 
7. Gardner F. Estes of Hyde Park and Abbie A. Peavey of 

Boston 
11. Charles Henry Osgood of Hooksett, N. H. and Daisy Anna 
McClarty of Hyde Park. 

13. George Folsom Hiller of Hyde Park and Hattie Lowe Little- 

field of Boston. 

14. Henry H. Baker of Hyde Park and Mary C. Glawson of 

Boston. 
14. William Francis Fitzgerald of Hyde Park and Annie Rita 
. Reddish of Boston. 

14. Walter E. Brown and Ella V. Dunlop both of Hyde Park. 

15. George R. Sparrell of Hyde Park and Ella Bailey of Dedham. 
19. James O'Donnell and Mary L. Berger both of Hyde Park. 

21. Frank W. Chapman and Anna Riley both of Hyde Park. 

21. Frank Albert Amback of Hycle Park and Annie Dailey of 

Dedham. 

22. William J. Shea and Catherine Cullen both of Hyde Park. 

24. Albion Carter Russell and Susie May Mason both of Hyde 

Park. 






73 

Oct. 28. Andrew R. Bloom of Hyde Park and May Flora Maxwell of 
Boston. 
28. John Maley of Maynard and Theresa Quinn of Hyde Park. 
28. Loran F. Lockhart and Anna L. Allsopp both of Hyde Park. 
Nov. 6. Peter M. Moody and Frances S. Olmstead both of Hyde Park, 
8. Jan Alicki and Marianna Luidvin both of Hyde Park. 
16. George W. Eastly of^Boston and Effie I. Phipps of Dedham. 
18. John F. Daly of Hyde Park and Mary E. McLaughlin of 
Boston. 

18. John F. Sheehan of Hyde Park and Katherine A. Mullen of 

BostOD. 
. 18. John E. Olson and Anna Marion Kalgren both of Hyde Park. 
22. Herman Krug and Ida Kock both of Hyde Park. 
25. Matthew McPherson of Dedham and Clara McEachran of 
Hyde Park. 

25. Thomas D. MacPherson and Catherine Spencer both of Hyde 

Park. 

26. Charles F. Tucker and Isabel O'Connor both of Hyde Park. 
26. Francis M. Boteilho and Catharine F. Harrington both of 

Hyde Park. 
26. August Basel and Rosie Petrin both of Hyde Park. 
Dec. 4. William C. Welch and Mary A. Marron both of Hyde Park. 

8, William F. Edgecomb and Eunice H. Ruby both of Hyde Park. 

9. John A. Crowley of Hyde Park and Annie E. Wood of New 

Bedford. 
15. Frederick J. Lindsay and Alice F. Renton both of Hyde Park. 

19. Franklin A/Ferguson of Biddeford, Me. and Maud C. Faulk- 

ner of Hyde Park. 
31. Paul Hunt of Hyde Park and Charlotte McCracken of Boston. 

DEATHS. 
Number of deaths in Hyde Park, and of residents of this town who died 

elsewhere in this Commonwealth in 1903 220 

Males , 108 

Females 112 

Born in the United States 139 

" Ireland . , 38 

" British Provinces 11 

" Scotland 3 

England 10 

" Germany 5 

Italy , 2 

" Sweden i 

Poland 1 



74 



Born in Finland. 

"• Norway 

" Java 

Birthplace unknown, 



AGES. 



Stillborn and premature birtb , 

Under one year 

Between 1 and 5 years 



5 

10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
70 



10 
20 
30 
40 
50 
GO 
70 
80 
90 
100 
of 



90 
The number 
follows : 

Accident 6 

Consumption 21 

27 
3 

13 
13 
5 
3 
4 

9 



1 

1 

1 

4 

19 

37 

17 

" 5 

" 4 

" 14 

" 20 

" • • *..'... 17 

" 21 

" 20 

" 30 

" 14 

" 2 

deaths from some of the well-known causes is as 



Pneumonia 

Cholera Infantum 

Diphtheria 

Cancer and Tumor 

Heart Disease 

Grippe 

Paralysis and Apoplexy. 

Convulsions 

Nephritis 

Colitis 



Stillborn, premature birth... 

Old Age 

Bright's Disease 

Typhoid Fever 

Inanition 

Scarlet Fever 

Smallpox 

Suicide 

Appendicitis 

Marasmus 

Malaria 



19 
16 
2 
2 
4 
5 

1 
3 



The following are the names of those who died in Hyde Park, and 
of residents of Hyde Park who died elsewhere, during the year 1903. 

AGE. 
DATE. NAMES. YKS. MOS. DTS. 

Jan. 2. John J. Harrington 40 6 

3. John J. Bowen 50 

3. Mary A. Blair 76 10 27 

5. Louise E. Dunne 2 6 

5. Eiiza Brooks 87 4 6 

10. Bernard Fallon 68 

12. (Stillborn) 



75 

Jan. 12. William H. Dwyer 28 

16. A very M. Foster. , . .. 

17. Edward F. McAuliffe 65 

18. Annie Fletcher 46 

21. Charles Becker 60 

27 Thomasina Milne 24 

28. Demarso 

30. Albert D Trask 60 

31. Helen M. Bullard 71 

Feb. 1. Lois McDowell 

2. Margaret Fife 55 

6. Mary A. Connor 33 

7. John Carroll 

7. Lucy Floyd 91 

8. Harris > 

11; Lena Lacouture 15 

11. (Stillborn) 

13. Lawrence G. Smalliog 3 

16. Timothy M. Curran 3 

17. Harriet A. Hyde 4 

17. Lawrence Sullivan 70 

18. George Sanford 72 

21. (Stillborn) 

21. Patrick Monahau 38 

22. Frances A. Stockford. 80 

26. Isaac Julian Burgess 83 

27. Ralph T. Jackson 77 

27. (Stillborn) 

27. Theresa G. Shea 1 

Mar. 1. William J. Lappin 30 

2. Mary G. Morrison 2 

2. James Henderson 79 

3. Elvira Catharine Stevens 78 

3. Elizabeth L. Gallagher 30 

4. Josephine A. Morean 50 

5. Edith Jane Fennessey 1 

5. Mary Elizabeth Warren 82 

6. Andrew J. Rich 37 

6. Caroline Paulman 72 

8. Margaret Hoefiing 70 

10. Elizabeth Burk 41 

11. Anna Grant 63 

11. Merritt Hubbell Wellman 80 

15. Hudson Earl Ostrom 1 



2 


7 


3 


13 




2 


5 


10 


6 


25 


7 


15 


2 


6 




1 hr 


5 


4 




2 hrs 


2 


8 


8 


19 


6 




10 


24 





25 


1 


22 




22 


5 




3 


■ 4 


3 




10 




6 


6 


4 


2 


9 


.. 


5 




7 


4 


10 


17 


1 


29 


1 


26 


4 


6 



76 

Mar. 16. Katherine Rooney 70 

19. George Howlett 88 

19. Hannah Cook Lesenr 82 

20. Oliver French Bullard , 

20. John Stack 50 

24. Marion Josephine Monroe 7 

25. Herman Kupke 47 

25. Samuel Rowe'll Glauville 7 

27. Mary E. Marcy 75 

30. Catherine flicks ■. 68 

Apr. ]. Alexander F, Zigler 

3. John J. Rogers 

4. Phillip Nolan 51 

5. Joanna Hall Aldrich 79 

7. Joseph S. Hill 

7. Elizabeth M. Twitchell 82 

10. Ann Wright 72 

12. Joseph Cochrane 59 

15. Eliza Carr 64 

20. Howard Clayton Wood 

21. Matthew Jordan 57 

25. (Stillborn) 

25. William B. Davis 63 

27. Charles Alonzo McAlpine.. -. 54 

28. Catherine Ray 77 

30. Pasquale Campia 2 

May 1. 'Michael Luke Riley 70 

3. Carrie Fisher Smith 50 

4. Bruce Mclver 

, 4. Henry A. Gltasou 74 

4. James Walmsley 57 

8. Max Geyer 31 

8. William Ryan 37 

11. Lydia Rude 6 

13. Mary Foley 81 

13. Katherine Donahue 30 

15. Mary F. Hunt 45 

17. Timothy Cullen 50 

19. William Shaw 73 

19. Jennie Frances Gleason 16 

24. Mary E. Brady 36 

24. Harold Christopher Hayes 3 

27. Mary Alice Sweeney 

28. Joseph A. Schotield 60 



10 


12 


1 






1 


9 


24 


1 


24 


9 


14 



19 

1 





28 


3 


10 


10 


15 


5 


7 




16 


7 


2 


7 
3 


W 9 

20 


3 


25 



13 



14 

12 

25 

5 

1 



77 



July 



May 28. 
31. 
June 1. 
19. 
19. 
22 
24. 
24. 
26. 
28. 
29. 
30. 

2. 

2. 

2. 

3. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 



10. 
11. 
11. 
13. 
19. 
23. 
28. 
Aug. 2. 

3. 

5. 

8. 
10. 
10. 
10. 

11. 
11. 

12. 
14. 
15. 
17. 
25. 



Ada Burgess 51 

Eliza Mabsou 85 

Harold George Beatey * 25 

Alice J. Sweeney 26 

Eva M. Goucher 4 

Clara Lillian Johnson 7 

Robert G. Burgess 58 

Andrew Cushman Remick 37 

(Stillborn') 

Edwin Christie 

Harriet Caffiu 76 

Anna Caroline Peterson 47 

(Stillborn) 



17 



Baker. 



Charles Howes 76 

Josephiue M. Nelson. . . 66 

Milia Angelia 23 

Margaret Kigseu 75 

Joseph M. Drinkwater 73 

Alfred Firth 59 

Winifred A . Couilahan 33 

Tony Cigerett 18 

Lazer M. Wolfe 

Ruth Smith 

(Stillborn) 

Michael Ross 

(Stillborn) 

Patrick Corcoran , 53 

Edie Marion George 38 

George Ross Williams 

John J. Mackey 37 

John Petroski 28 

Mary Wills 42 

Miriam Greeley 90 

Thomas Burke 47 

Gerald A. Hunt 

Alice M . Klock 

Alice A . Paul 

(Stillborn). 

John J. Degnan 

Edwin C. Foss : 

Lillian M. Love 

John Edenborg , 64 



6 


24 


4 






24 


4 


27 


5 


29 


9 


10 


4 


1 


3 


22 


10 


11 




4 hrs 


8 


9 


9 


29 



11 

9 



10 
22 



13 

28 



20 



1 


5 


9 




4 


6 


•• 


9 


21 


29 




. m 


56 


4 


23 




6 


21 


64 


2 


13 



78 



Aug. 



Sept 



26. 
26. 
28. 
28. 
30. 
31. 
31. 
31. 
2. 
5. 
5. 
6. 
10. 
14. 
17. 
18. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
25. 
26. 
26. 
28. 
28. 
30. 
30. 
Oct. 4. 
6. 
9. 
12. 
16. 
16. 
17. 
19. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
27. 
30. 
31. 
2. 
2. 
4. 
5. 



Nov. 



(Stillborn) 

CI 

Mary Daley gq 

John Carey 

Mary Mahoney 29 

"Margaret Hanlon 

Kathei ine M. Bertram 73 

John Peter Scott 26 

Ruth Bearse 

Emily R. Hawes , 62 

Edward Cadden 36 

Sarah Bush 69 

(Stillborn) ,-. 

Herman Heudrickson. 53 

Elsa Dorothea Lundgren i 

Guiseppe Andreozzi 

John Wigley 75 

(Stillborn) 

Lillian Monico 

Mariou George Elas 

James J. Anderson 

(Stillborn) 

Mary B. Hickey 1 

Elizabeth La wlor 41 

Margaret Rogers 

Abbie Eliza Mitchell 6Q 

George Cross 63 

Stanley M Stiachan 4 

J. Thomas White ...:. 25 

George Howard Alexander 41 

William Michael McKenna 21 

Grace Attenasia 

Seth M. Blackmer 84 

Mary Kingston 32 

William Thomas McGrath 3 

Karl Ludvig Larssen 31 

George E. Cox 33 

Catherine Mary Rooney : 

Katherine Scanlon 26 

John Maitene 40 

Louisa Peterson 65 

Rose L. Kelley 

Mary Annie Coyle 20 

Elizabeth Murray 76 



9 




2 




3 


9 


11 


10 


9 


10 


10 


28 



2 


6 


8 


22 




15 


4 


6 


4 


15 


5 


25 




3 



19 





2hrs 


9 


27 




25 




15 




14 


5 


17 


1 


10 


2 


4 


4 


. . 


2 




2 


14 


2 


25 


9 


1 


•■ 


4 


3 


25 


11 


2 


10 


4 



79 

Nov. 7. Catherine McMillan 71 7 

10. Angeline M. Rich 67 2 12 

10. Lucy Steadman , 85 1 1 

12. Bridget M. Lambert 43 

13. Norman E. Wade 7 25- 

16. Annie Dunderdale 50 1 3 

18. Samuel W. Green 73 10 27 

22. Bridget Marron 47 

24, Martha A. Howorth 23 

24. Peter Keating 61 

25. (Stillborn) 

26. Ann Sullivan 73 4 11 

28. Robert L. Carnes 9 8 20 

28. Annie C. Williams.. 34 2 2& 

Dec. 2. Mava A. Bicknell , 31 9 28 

2. Frederick Elmer Collett 2 

5. Margaret Elliott 67 5 4 

5. Mary Greely .. 9 8 

7. Harry E. Ward 30 2 22 

8. Charlotte Frances k Leonard 79 10 

11. Harriet Newell[Knight 50 .. 5 

12. Charles Fraser 44 10 9 

12. James C. Fox 45 

14. Catherine T. Magee 1 3 

16. David C. Long.. 79 11 28 

21. Annie Cosignol. 18 6 

22. (Stillborn) 

23. Honora A. McGillicuddy 47 6 

24. Julia O. M. Hartwell 51 1 1 

24. Margaret Haywood 2 25 

25. (Stillborn) 

26. Catherine Adams 72 1 

29. Catherine O'Brien 73 

29. James D. McAvoy 79 3 7 

31. Julian S. Greenlaw 55 

31. William H. Stanney 49 11 23 

31. Mary J. T. Nader.... 1 3 

The Town Clerk requests information of any omission or error in 
the above tables, in order that^the registration may be as complete a& 
possible. 

Respectfuliy submitted, 

HENRY B. TERRY, Town Clerk. 



REPORT OF OVERSEERS OF THE POOR. 



Whole number of persons aided, 
Number of persons fully supported, 
Number of persons partially supported, 
Number of tramps lodged, 

PAID ON ACCT. OF 

Barrett, Sarah S. insane, 

Bedlington, Harriet B. " 

Bell, Dornida E. 

Clapp, Clara E. " 

Connor, Kate " 

Cook, Cora F. 

Cowan, John F. " 

Gilson, William H. 

Gould, Euth E. 

Griffin, Michael J. 

Manuel, Mary F. 

McGrath, Martin F. 

McGrath, John 

McLean, Teresa " 

Eafter, Sarah " 

Scanlon, Catherine " 

Ward, Ellen 

Alexander, Harry J. feeble minded, 

Carter, Inez " ' 

Carter, Ralph 

Chamberlain, Martha A. H. epileptic, 

Miller, Rose C. " 

Overell, William D. 

Wandless, Grace F., hospital cottage, 

Paid Mass. Hospital for Dipsomaniacs, 

Mass. State Hospital, 

Mass. General Hospital, 

Boston City " and supi 

PAID ON ACCT. OF 

Withington, George, board and nursing, 
Williams, Amanda, " " " 

Hunt, Mary, 





3,618 




48 




372 




3,198 


SETTLEMENT. 


COST. 


Hyde Park. 


$169 46 


a 


143 91 


<< 


169 46 


tt 


169 46 


(C 


146 00 


<( 


146 00 


it 


43 65 


a 


169 45 


a 


59 89 


a 


147 17 


it 


169 45 


a 


169 46 


a 


120 24 


a 


107 71 


a 


146 00 


a 


143 18 


a 


169 46 


tt 


169 45 


ct 


169 45 


it 


169 45 


1 1 


197 79 


tt 


169 46 


a 


169 46 


a 


169 46 




70 57 




55 29 




95 00 


ies furnished, 


578 88 


Hyde Park, 


181 42 


" 


347 08 


* t 


166 78 



PAID ON ACCT. OF 

O'Keilly, Bridget A. 

Bunker, Chas. E. 

McGovern, James 

Farren, Michael 

Curran, Ellen 

Gilson, Ella 

Ewell, William F. 

Conran, Kate 

Murray, Margaret 

Tracy, Catherine 

Todd, Kuth 

Halloran, Mary 

Hulstrand, Matilda 

King, Martin 

Clarry, Elmira 

Fletcher, John 

Conway, Elizabeth A. 

Conway, Mary 

Cunningham, Mary 

Mulqueeney, Ellen 

Melia, Bridget 

Collins, Julia A. 

McKeen, Frank, truant school, 

Cunningham, William " 

Aubert, George " 

Foley, George E. " 

Sweet, George L. 

Soule, Isabella 

Hickey, Michael 

Corscadden, Mary 

Lennon, Mary 

Dance, Emma J. 

McDonald, James 

Murphy, Timothy 

Angelia, Melia 

Martine, John 

Monahan, Patrick 

Shea, Patrick M. 

Conley, Martin 

McDermott, Francis 

Walmsley, James 

Cullen, Timothy 

Bush, John 



SETTLEMENT. 


COST. 


Hyde Park. 


$ 63 88 


' " 


144 00 


" 


128 00 


" 


121 80 


" 


90 00 


" 


141 40 


tt 


96 00 


" 


92 00 


ft 


99 00 


" 


66 55 


ti 


11 48 


it 


48 00 


1 1 


24 00 


t i 


68 50 


it 


54 00 


tt 


101 79 


" 


6 00 


" 


49 00 


" 


89 10 


" 


48 00 


" 


90 00 


tt 


114 11 


" 


32 85 


" 


52 13 


C( 


52 13 


( t 


7 14 


If 


29 00 


tt 


11 00 


tt 


6 00 


It 


5 00 


tt 


80 80 


tt 


16 00 


I i 


13 03 


i t 


10 00 


tt 


20 00 


" 


20 00 


" 


15 00 


" 


22 86 


tt 


21 43 


it 


3 50 


tt 


8 00 


a 


15 00 


tt 


38 00 



82 

PAID ON ACCT. OF SETTLEMENT. COST. 

Shea, Edward Hyde Park, $ 24 25 

Lynch, Timothy " 31 43 

McMasters, M. A. " 21 00 

Bcettcher, Mrs. T. M. and 1 child, " 35 60 

Brennan, Mrs. Cora and 4 children, " 50 00 

Hunt, George E., wife and 1 child, " 7 00 

Welch, M. T. J. wife and 8 children, " 62 70 

Cummings, John, wife and 1 child, " 83 22 

Tate, Elizabeth and 3 children, " 9 50 

Voight, Selma and 6 children, " 19 1 00 

Burnley, Mary and 3 children, " 86 90 

Eraser, Eliz. and 3 children, " 98 38 

Haley, Margaret and 2 children, " ill 10 

Norton, Mary E. and 2 children, " 110 50 

Bragan, Rosella and 2 children, " 56 88 

Lahey, Catherine and 8 children, " 234 00 

Grant, Annie and 4 children, " 133 85 

Kiley, Mrs. P. J. and 3 children, " 112 25 

Lynch, Mary and 4 children, " 168 00 

Bich, Florence L. and 2 children, " 85 90 

Hendricksen, H. wife and 2 children, " 96 00 

Downes, Hannah M. and 1 child, " 77 63 

Baxter, Albion F., wife and 3 children, " 5 50 

Bolfe, Mary and 5 children, " 18 00 

Elder, Mattie and 3 children, " 62 01 

Temporary aid acct. 293 33 

Medical attendance, 200 00 

Lockup acct. tramp room, 61 50 



RECEIPTS. 

Cash on hand with Town Treasurer, 

Appropriation, 

Cash refunded by State, towns, etc. 



Balance, $405 48 

CHARLES LEWIS, 
GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 
GEORGE E. HAVEN, 

Overseers of the Poor. 







$9,853 51 


$ 91 


81 




10,000 


00 




167 


18 


$10,258 99 







REPORT OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

We have the honor to present to you the following report 
of the work of this Board, for the year ending January 31, 
1904. 

CONTAGIOUS DISEASES. 

There have been reported to the Board during the year 
ending December 31, 1903, 132 cases of contagious diseases, 
divided by months as follows . 





D 


iph 


theria. 


Scar! 


let Fe 


ver. 


M. 


easles. 


Typhi 


aid Fever. 


January, 






3 




1 











2 


February, 






2 




43 














March, 






1 




25 














April, 











9 














May, 






1 




8 






1 




1 


June, 






4 




1 






1 




3 


July, 






2 




2 














August, 






1 




4 











2 


September, 











1 











3 


October, 























4 


November, 











3 














December, 











3 






1 








14 100 3 15 

No deaths from diphtheria or from measles, 5 from scarlet 
fever and 2 from typhoid fever. 

During the month of February the town was threatened 
with a very serious epidemic of scarlet fever. On February 
nth, one case was reported; on February 12th, 4 cases; 
February 13th, 5 cases; February 14th, n cases. These 
cases were not confined to any particular part of the town, 
but were scattered throughout all sections. On February 
14th investigation was made as to the probable source of in- 



8 4 

fection, and it soon developed that the infection came from a 
common source, namely, the milk supply. This milk supply 
was investigated on the same day, and it was found that at 
one of the dairies from the which milk was brought to the 
town, there existed one or more cases of scarlet fever 
This dairy was located in an adjoining town. The dealer 
was required to destroy all milk in his possession, thoroughly 
sterilize all cans, and such utensils, etc., as were used in 
handling the milk, and the milk from said dairy he was for- 
bidden to bring into the town. Time proved that this means 
of stopping the infection was effectual, as new cases did not 
appear after the time of incubation had passed, to any great 
extent. 

It is but fair to say of the milk dealer that it appears that 
he was unaware of the presence of the disease at this place, 
and that he assisted in every possible way to discover the 
source of the contagion and to prevent its recurrence. 

During the latter part of June, the Board was notified of 
what appeared to be a case of su.all-pox, and located in the 
Fairmount House. Owing to the location it was absolutely 
necessary to provide some place where the case could be 
taken care of until it should develop. To comply with this 
necessity there was established a temporary hospital consist- 
ing of a platform, over which was erected a tent. Later on, 
the disease proved to be other than small-pox, but we were 
obliged to maintain the patient until recovery. 

The Grew, Fairmount, Damon, Greenwood and High 
Schools were also thoroughly fumigated at this time by the 
School Committee co-operating with the Board of Health, 
and we wish at this time to thank them for their assistance. 

There have been but fourteen cases of diphtheria during 
the past year, with no deaths. Anti-toxine has been fur- 
nished free of charge to all who require it, and is no doubt re- 
sponsible to a great degree in bringing about the above 
result, and we trust that no act of the Legislature will pre- 



85 

vent the State Board of Health from the production of this 
protection from a disease which at times has been a scourge 
to the community. 

The Board would request that in all cases of consumption 
where death takes place, or where the person afflicted with 
consumption is removed from one house to another, that the 
Board be notified of the same, and that they be allowed to 
disinfect the premises, because we feel that in so doing it 
will be a step towards holding the disease in check. The 
Board would advise that in all cases of contagious diseases 
that the patient be isolated as completely as possible, and 
that every affort be made to prevent contagion. The Board 
is connected with the Mass. Association of Boards of Health, 
which is of great advantage in that we are able to compare 
notes and acquire information concerning all matters pertain- 
ing to the duties of a Board of Health, 

COMPLAINTS. 

Again the Board would request that all complaints made 
to us be made in writing and signed, as these communica- 
tions are confidential and the names of the complainants will 
not be divulged. We would also request that knowledge of 
any matter which would require the attention of the Board be 
immediately communicated to us so that it may be attended 
to, remedied or prevented before any evil results occur. 

SA.NITARIES, 

The need of a central station in or near the centre of the 
town for the use of the public in general is becoming more 
and more apparent, and we trust that the time is not far dis- 
tant when this very necessary accommodation may be fur- 
nished for the use of the people. 

SURFACE DRAINS. 

For several years the policy of the Board has been to elim- 
inate as far as possible all places where stagnant water lies, 



86 

and the Readville and Garfield Avenue districts have needed 
attention in regard to surface drains for many years. This 
matter has been referred to and recommended in previous 
reports, and we are pleased to be able to say at the present 
time that steps have been taken and work begun which will 
furnish the means for the effectual abatement of these nui- 
sances. This will render the adjoining territory more habi- 
table and furnish the town with more available building 
surface. 

SEWERAGE. 

The number of connections with the public sewer is about 
the same as in former years, but a small proportion only 
of houses to which the sewer is available are at present con- 
nected. The Board would strongly recommend that the 
advantages of connection with the sewer be availed of as 
rapidly as possible ; also that sewers should be provided in 
Reddy Avenue and Rosa Street, Holmfield and Readville 
districts, where in the former place the ground is not suitable 
for the maintenance of proper cesspools, many of those now 
in use being constant sources of complaint, and in the latter 
where the unoccupied territory will in all probability be 
rapidly built upon, the sewers should be provided, so that 
connection with them could be made when the buildings are 
erected, thus saving expense in the future. 

COLLECTION OF ASHES AND RUBBISH. 

The collection of ashes and rubbish has been continued in 
the same manner as last year, and the number of loads col- 
lected during the year amounts to 3,704, divided by months 
as follows : 





1903-04. 


1902-03. 




1903-04. 


1902-03 


February, 


2S7 


26S 


August, 


199 


206 


March, 


414 


406 


September, 


263 


192 


April, 


375 ' 


399 


October, 


190 


213 


Ma j, 


303 


337 


November, 


330 


249 


June, 


337 


2 59 


December, 


393 


296 


July, 


2S7 


271 


January, 


326 


357 



§7 

THE COLLECTION OF SWILL. 

The collection of swill has been carried on this year the 
same as last, partly by contract and partly by the town teams. 
The work of collecting swill and ashes is not, strictly speak- 
ing, one of the duties of the Board of Health, and we would 
recommend that this work be done by the Street Depart- 
ment or by some Board having under control the public work 
in the town. 

NEW REGULATIONS. 

We would call your attention to new regulations adopted 
by the Board from time to time during the year, which 
appear herewith. 

REGULATIONS OF THE BOARD OF HEALTH OF THE 
TOWN OF HYDE PARK. 
Public Statutes : Chapter 80, Section 18. — The Board of Health 
of a town shall make such regulations as it judges necessary for the 
public health and safety respecting nuisances, sources of filth, and 
causes of sickness within its town. Whoever violates any such regulation 
shall forfeit a sum not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

In accordance with the foregoing provisions of law, this Board makes 

I the following regulations, which will be strictly enforced : 
Regulation i. Privy Vaults and Drains. Section I. Every tene- 
ment shall be provided with a water-tight underground drain to carry 
oft" the waste waters, also with a suitable privy or water-closet sufficient 
for the accommodation of all those inhabiting the premises. 
Section II. All privy vaults, unless water-tight, shall be so constructed 
that the inside of the same shall be at least five feet distant from the line 
of any adjoining lot or street, and at least twenty feet from any dwelling 
house, and shall be provided with a ventilation through the roof. The 
same shall not be used as cesspools nor receive drainage from the 
premises. The contents shall not be allowed fo leak out or otherwise 
become offensive. All privy vaults shall be of a size sufficient to satisfy 
the Board of Health. 

Section III. All waste water shall be conveyed through sufficient 
drains under ground to a cesspool sunk underground, which shall be of 
sufficient size to contain at least So cubic feet, and when not water-tight 
must be at least twenty feet from the cellar wall of any tenement or dwell- 
ing, and at least five feet distance from any adjoining lot or street. 
Cesspools shall be built in a thorough and substantial manner, as shall be 
approved by the Board of Health. 



Section IV. No person shall allow any drain or the overflow of any 
cesspool to enter any running stream, or any drain coustructed for 
surface water, and no person shall suffer any house drainage or other 
offensive matter to remain in any cellar, or upon any lot or vacant ground 
by such person owned or occupied. All privy vaults or cesspools within 
one hundred and fifty feet of any well or spring, the water of which is 
used for domestic purposes, must be water-tight. 

Section V. All privy vaults or cesspools must be thoroughly cleansed 
at least once in each year, and oftener if necessary for the public health, 
the expense to be borne by the owner of the property. 

Regulation 2 Section I. The Board, when satisfied upon due 
examination that a cellar, room, tenement or building in the town occupied 
as a dwelling place, has become by reason of the number of occupants, 
want of cleanliness, or other cause unfit for such purpose, and a cause of 
nuisance or sickness to the occupants or to the public, may issue a notice 
in writing to such occupants, requiring the premises to be put in proper 
condition ; or if the Board see fit they may require the same to be vacated, 
and the same shall not be again occupied without the written permission 
of the Board. 

Section II. No person shall throw or put into any public place or 
pond, or running stream or body of water, or in any other place where 
the Board of Health may deem it a nuisance, any dead animal, animal 
matter, decayed fruit or vegetables, dirt or rubbish whatever ; nor shall 
any person throw into or upon any flats within the jurisdiction of the 
town, any dead animals, filth, or offensive matter. 

Regulation 3. Swill and Ojfal. Section I. No person shall remove 
or carry in or through any of the streets, lanes or avenues, places or 
alleys within the town of Hyde Park, the contents of any cesspool, vault, 
or privy well, swill or house offal (either animal or vegetable), or grease 
or bones, unless a permit be granted by the Board of Health upon such 
terms and conditions as said Board may deem necessary. 

Section II. No person shall bury swill or house offal, or the con- 
tents of any cesspool, vault, privy or privj 7 well within the limits of the 
town of Hyde Park, unless a permit be granted by the Board of Health. 

Section III. Parties will be licensed by the Board of Health to collect 
swill and refuse matter from houses in Hyde Park twice a week or oftener, 
and all housekeepers and others are directed to deliver the same to those 
duly authorized to make such collections. 

Regulation 4. Diseased Meat and Provisions. Section I. No 
person shall bring into the town, keep or offer for sale any diseased, 
putrid, stale or unwholesome meat, vegetables or provisions. 

Regulation 5. Szvine. Section I. No person will be permitted to 
keep any swine within the limits of the town of Hyde Park, without a 
written permit from the Board of Health. 






8 9 

Regulation 6 Contagious Diseases. Section I. Any person sick 
with the smallpox or other contagious disease, together with all persons 
in attendance upon them, and the premises where such sick person is, 
will be subject to the control of the Board, and no person shall enter or 
leave a house wherein a pevson is or has been sick with the disease, or in 
any way come in contact with the inmates of such house except by per- 
mission of the Board- 

Section II. Whenever the Board of Health shall ascertain that any 
person is sick with the smallpox, scarlet fever, diphtheria, or any other 
disease dangerous to the public health, the Board shall, at their discre- 
tion, have full control of said person or premises, and shall, if they deem 
proper, order the premises vacated. 

Section III. All persons are warned not to approach a house or the 
surrounding premises whereupon is displayed a disease flag by day or a 
r*d light by night. 

Section IV. The bodies of all persons dying of smallpox, scarlet fever, 
typhus fever or diphtheria, must be immediately disinfected and placed in 
a tight coffin, which shall not be reopened, and the bed, bed clothing, and 
other clothing used by any such person, and by those in attendance upon 
him, and all the furnishings of the sick room, thoroughly disinfected 
before being taken from the room. In the above case no public funeral 
will be allowed without permission from the Board of Health. 

Section V. The owner or person having charge of any vehicle, public 
or private, used at a funeral in the forgoing cases, to carry the deceased, 
shall forthwith report the fact to the Board of Health, and shall tho- 
roughly disinfect such vehicle before the same is again used, and take 
such precaution as the Board of Health shall direct 

Section VI. Any person in the Town of Hyde Park, who knows or 
suspects any domestic animal has contagious disease (such as glanders in 
horses or cholera in swine), must immediately report the same to the 
Board of Health. The penalty for neglect to do so is fine or imprison- 
ment. The above is in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 252 
of the Acts of 1887. 

Regulation 7. Section 1. All complaints in relation to nuisances 
and sources of filth injurious to the public health and safety, must be 
made in writing to the Board of Health, with a description of said nuis- 
ance and of the premises on which it exists, with the owner's name if 
known to the complainant. Such complaint must bear the signature of 
the complainant. Whenever such complaint shall be made as aforesaid, 
the Board of Health shall proceed to examine the premises complained 
of, and will take measures to abate the nuisance if such is found to 
exist. 

Regil\tion 8. Section I. No person, firm or corporation not now 
engaged in or working at the business of plumbing shall hereafter engage 



90 

in or work at said bus-iness in the town of Hyde Park, either as a master 
or employing plumber or as a journeyman plumber, unless such person, 
firm or corporation first receives a license therefor, in accordance with the 
provisions of Chapter 477 of the Acts of the year 1893 of tne Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, and Acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto. 

Section II. Any person desiring to engage in or work at the business 
of plumbing, either as a master or employing plumber, or as a journey- 
man plumber, shall apply to the Board of Health, and shall at such time 
and place as may be designatedj]by the Board of Examiners appointed by 
the Board of Health, as provided for in said Acts, to whom such applica- 
tion shall be referred, be examined as to his qualification for such busi- 
ness. In the case of a firm or corporation, the examination and licensing 
of any one member of the firm, or the manager of the corporation, shall 
satify the requirements of the regulation. 

Section III. The Board of Examiners shall examine said applicants 
as to their practical knowledge of plumbing, house drainage and plumb- 
ing ventilation, and if satisfied of the competency of the applicant, shall 
so certify to the Board of Health. Said Board will thereupon issue a 
license to such applicant, authorizing him to engage in or work at the 
business of plumbing. The fees for a license for a master or employing 
plumber shall be two^dollars; for a journeyman plumber it shall be fifty 
cents. Said license shall be issued annually, expiring on the thirty-first 
day of May next ensuing, "and shall be conditional on skillful work and a 
strict observance of the rules governing plumbing. 

Section IV. No person shall carry on the business of plumbing unless 
he shall have first registered his name and place of business in the office 
of the Board of Health : and notice of any change in the place of busi- 
ness of a registered plumber shall be immediately given to said Board. 

Section V. No person shall proceed to construct, add to or alter any 
portion of the drainage system (except to repair leaks ) of any building 
in the town of Hyde Park, until plans showing in detail the whole drain- 
age system shall have been filed at the office of the Board of Health, upon 
blanks in such form as the Board may determine ; no person shall 
commence work on such drainage system until the plans are accepted by 
the Inspector of Plumbing and a permit of approval granted. Plans and 
specifications shall be approved or rejected within five days of the time 
ot filing. 

Rules and regulations for material, construction, etc., may be found in 
the town by-laws. 

Regulation 9. The Board of Health he r,eby adjudges that the deposit 
oi sputum in street cars, public buildings or churches is a public 
nuisance, source of filth and cause of sickness, and hereby orders : That 
spitting upon any floor of any street car, public building or church be, 
and hereby is prohibited. 



9* 

Regulation io. No privy, vault or cesspool shall be established either 
upon premises situated upon a public or private street, court or passage- 
way where there is a public sewer opposite thereto or upon premises 
connected with a public or private sewer, without permission in writing 
first being obtained from the Board of Health of this'town. And when- 
ever there is a privy vault or cesspool so'situated, which in the opinion 
of the Board of Health of this town is injurious to the public health, said 
Board of Health shall declare same to be a nuisance and forbid its 
continuance. 

Regulation ii. After the first clearing up of ashes, beginning May i, 
all rubbish, ashes, etc., to be removed by town carts are to be placed in 
receptacles not larger than an ordinary flour barrel, and in places easily 
accessible to the collector. Vault filth, offal, bricks and mortar, gravel 
and garden shrubbery are not included in the above, and will not be re- 
moved by the town. 

Regulation 12. A.U persons (who under Chap. 75, Art. 49 and 50 of 
the Revised Laws are required to report cases of contagious disease ) 
shall report each case of chicken-pox. 

Regulation 13. No person or persons shall remove from the premises 
where a case or cases of contagious disease exists, any milk vessel or 
container used in the sale or delivery of milk, when he or they know, or 
the Board of Health through their agent, shall give-due notice, by post- 
ing the same on the premises, that such disease exists. 

The foregoing rules and regulations were made under the Revised 
Statutes and are similar to those of other towns in the state; and a careful 
observance of the same will do much to prevent contagious disease 
within the town. 

Regulation 14. Hyde Park, April 6, 1903, the following regulation 
was adopted : 

No person can act as undertaker within the limits of Hyde Park who 
has not been licensed to perform that duty by the proper authority of 
some city or town in this^commonwealth. 

Public Statutes, Chapter 437, Acts of 1897. 

No disinterments or removals of dead bodies shall be allowed between 
May 15th and October 15th, except by special permit of the Board of 
Health, and under its direction. 

No person shall bury or inter, or cause to be buried or interred, the body 
or ashes of any dead person, at any other time of the day than between 
sunrise and sunset, except in accordance with a permit from the Board of 
Health. 

No person shall remove or canse to be removed the body of any dead 
person from its casket or coffin, for any purpose whatever, at any 
cemetery or burial ground within the limits of Hyde Park. 

No dead body shall be buried within three feet from the top of the box 
and the surface of the ground surrounding the grave. 



9 2 

Hyde Park, Nov. 16, 1903. 

Regulation 15. At a meeting of the Board of Health this day, the 
following regulation respecting barber-shops was adopted : 

The place of business, together with all the furniture, shall be kept at 
all times in a cleanly condition. 

Mugs, shaving brushes and razors shall be sterilized by immersion in 
boiling water, after every separate use thereof. 

A separate clean towel shall be used for each person. 

Alum, or other material used to stop the flow of blood, shall be so used 
only in powdered form, and applied on a towel. 

The use of powder puffs is prohibited. 

The use of sponges is prohibited. 

Every barber-shop shall be provided with running hot and cold water. 

No person shall be allowed to use any barber- shop as a dormitory. 

Every barber shall cleanse his hands thouroughly immediately after 
serving each customer. 

Hyde Park, Jan. 4, 1904. 

Regulation 16. At a meeting of the Board of Health this day, the 
following regulation was adopted : 

All children afflicted with either mumps, small-pox, or whooping- 
cough, shall be excluded from school during time of illness. 

CHAS. F. STACK, M.D., Chairman. 
WILLI \M W. SCOTT. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR OF PLUMBING. 



To Dr. C, F. Stack, Chairman, and Members of the 
Board of Health, 2 own of Hyde Park. 

Gentlemen — I have the honor to submit to you my 
seventh annual raport for the year ending January 31, 1904. 

There have been filed at this office 150 applications to do 
plumbing, with plans and specifications calling for the follow- 
ing* fixtures : water closets 210, wash bowls 75, bath tubs 55, 
wash trays 38, sinks 123, urinals 40. Traps to replace de- 
fective and inefficient ones 63. Total number of applications 
for sewer connections, 98. 

Although the total number of applications to do plumbing 
in the town was somewhat less than last year, doubtless 
owing to the inactivity in building lines, the number of fix- 
tures installed was greater. This department also prepared 
specifications for plumbing in the Fairmount School, which 
were executed during the summer vacation, under the super- 
vision of the Inspector. 

I wish at this time to thank the plumbers of the town for 
their courtesy and efforts to bring sanitary plumbing nearer 
to the desired standard. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CALEB T. LOVELL, 

Inspector of Plumbing, 



ASSESSORS' REPORT. 



VALUATION STATISTICS. 








May 1st, 1903. 


May 1st, 1902. 


Buildings, ... 


- 


$6,248,700.00 


$5,979,700.00 


Land, - 


;'■ 


4,353,075.00 


4,281,800.00 


Total, 


$10,601,775.00 


$10,261,500.00 


Personal, - 




1,473.550.00 


1,421,000.00 


Total Valuation, 


$12,075,325.00 


$11,682,500 00 




APP 


Tax Rate, $20.40 


Tax Rate, $18.10 




ROPKIATIOXS. 








1903. 


1902. 


Town Tax, including over 


aving 


s, $209,504 87 


$181,329.58 


State Tax, 


- 


8.775.00 


5,265 00 


County Tax, - 


- 


7,949.00 


7,042 95 


Metropolitan Sewer Tax, 


- 


7,941.00 


6,097.29 


Metropolitan Water Tax, 


- 


2,749,00 


2,187.72 


Grade Crossings Tax, - 


- 


11,319.00 


11,110.78 


Metropolitan Parks Tax, 


x Lev 


4,780.00 


5,076.94 


Total Amount of Ta 


y, $253,018.78 


$218,110 26 




1903. 


1902. 


Number polls assessed, 


- 


3,522 


3,408 


" dwellings, 


- 


2,405 


2,372 


" horses. 


* 


440 


475 


" cows, 


- 


57 


47 


" swine, 


- 


14 


10 


" acres land, 


- 


2,055 


2,031 



PROPERTY EXEMPT FROM TAXATION. 

Churches, $275,000.00 

St. Raphael's School Association, - - 23,500 00 

Y. M. C. A., 70,000.00 

Peabody Home, 25,500 00 

Harvard College, 875.00 

Total, $394,875.00 

CHARLES F. MORRISON, 
GEORGE W. CHAPMAN, 
FRANK GREENWOOD, 

Assessors. 



REPORT OF SUB-COMMITTEE CN VALUA- 
TIONS AND ASSESSMENTS. 



To the Members of the Advisory Committee. 

Gentlemen : The sub-committee appointed at your last 
meeting to consider the subjects of Valuations and Tax 
Assessments have attended to the duties assigned them as 
far as the time at their disposal has allowed, and respectfully 
submit the following report. 

In our interpretation of the scope of the duties assigned 
us we have not felt called upon to pass upon the personnel 
of the Board of Assessors, either as regards ability or fitness, 
but rather to consider the broader questions of values, 
methods of administration, principles of assessment, and 
whether any partiality or favoritism is shown in the 
assessment. 

In our consideration of the questions of Values and 
Assessments we have divided the real estate in town into 
four classes, viz : — 

4. Outlying Lands. 

3, Business Property in the centre of the Town. 

2. Manufacturing Plants. 

1. Residential Property. 

In regard to the first of these, the residential property, we 
believe, as the result of such investigation as our time has 
allowed, that the present assessed values are, as a whole, 
reasonably fair and equitable. It would be strange if there 
were not some inequalities ; but we have taken the estates 
on one side of certain streets where the valuation had been 
criticised, and have found that while the values of different 
estates varied, there appeared to be a good reason in each 
case for such difference. 



9 6 

Your Committee is also convinced that the residential 
property as a whole is already taxed to its fair market value, 
and cannot be further advanced without placing upon it a 
fictitious figure. Excessive valuation is not the policy of 
neighboring towns, nor has it been the policy of Hyde Park 
in recent years, and we are of the opinion that the real 
estate interest would suffer if there were any general in- 
crease in the value of residential property. That there are 
however, individual cases that' are exceptions to this rule 
we have no doubt. If we rightly understand the situation, 
it is some years since a detailed valuation resulting from a 
close inspection of the individual properties was made, and 
it is our opinion that such an inspection and re-valuation 
would result in an increase of the volume of taxable property 
of this class. Several instances have been brought to our 
notice where additions and improvements involving expendi- 
tures of from $ 1,000 to $2,000 have been made in a single 
year, but no increase in taxes has followed. We believe a 
closer survey of this class of property year by year, with 
perhaps an entire re- valuation once in a given term of years, 
would undoubtedly adjust any inequalities which may exist, 
and also increase the aggregate taxable value of this class 
of property. 

2. Manufacturing Plants. The advantages which Hyde 
Park offers as a manufacturing centre are more and more 
apparent. Towns at a remote distance from Boston feel 
obliged to rebate taxes on new enterprises in order to induce 
them to locate within their limits. Our natural advantages 
are such that no such inducement has ever been necessary, 
and it is the policy of the town to assess all such plants at a 
fair value. The value of such property is more difficult to 
ascertain than is that of residential property, and we con- 
sider the present methods entirely inadequate to determine 
just what may be the fair taxable value of any given piece of 
property of this class. The Assessors have not that definite 
information as to the cost of buildings, machinery, and the 



97 

value of stocks on hand, which will enable them to determine 
with confidence the actual value of the plant, and hence are 
placed at a great disadvantage in fixing the valuation. They 
are in no position to defend their figures from the charge 
of over-valuation from the agents of such plants, nor from 
that of under-valuation brought by some citizens of the town. 
The fear of expensive litigation is created by the lack of exact 
knowledge as to the real value of the plant, and this fear 
must operate to keep the assessment below what the prop- 
erty ought to bear. Nor do the returns of corporations filed 
at the State House furnish a reliable basis of values for 
taxable purposes. It must be borne in mind that values 
given in such returns cover many things which cannot be 
considered in fixing taxable values. Take a consolidation of 
two separate manufacturing interests, such as is represented 
by a manufacturing corporation in this town, as an illustra- 
tion of this point. Bonuses paid for acquiring an established 
business and name, franchises, royalties, patent rights, etc., 
which represent large values for business purposes, and for 
which large sums have been paid, but which have no value 
whatever except in that connection, must necessarily be in- 
cluded in balancing the books and in making the business 
statements of such corporation, but furnish absolutely no 
basis for taxation. 

It is important, however, that the Assessors should know 
with a fair degree of accuracy the value of such plants, that 
they may not be excessively taxed on the one hand, nor 
through their failure to pay on an equitable basis force an 
inequitable tax upon all other property in town. To ac- 
complish this end, it seems to us that in the appraisal of such 
property the Assessors would do well to avail themselves of 
the services of expert appraisers, men thoroughly familiar 
with factory and mill construction and machinery and stock 
values in the several manufacturing lines represented, and 
we recommend the adoption of this plan in future assess- 
ments, the expense of such expert services to be paid from 

7 



9 8 



the Incidental Fund of the Buard of Selectmen. It is as 
important that the town secure expert knowledge in the 
valuation of these large manufacturing plants as it is to seek 
legal advice in determining questions of law. 

As an illustration of the need of fixing some such basis *. f 
valuation, a single instance which has been reported to your 
committee will suffice. A certain concern reported the 
value of partial construction as $50,000. The Assessors 
deemed this figure inadequate, and raised it to $150,000, and 
on this amount the tax was paid without a word of dissent ; 
a clear indication that the property in question was really 
worth that much, and it is fair to infer that even that figure 
was less than the real value. On the basis of the 1903 tax 
rate, such an increase in valuation would mean an increase 
of $2,040 in taxes paid in that single case. What would it 
mean if proper values could be placed upon all such property 
in town ? So much new property of this class is being 
created that the importance of placing a proper valuation at 
the start, as affecting all future assessments, must appear to 
all. We are of the opinion that an application of the plan 
recommended to the 1904 assessment would add at least 
$500,000 or even $600,000 to the taxable property in this 
class. There is no doubt in the minds of this committee 
that certain properties of this description are not assessed up 
to the values they would bear if the plan suggested should 
be adopted. 

3. Business Property. Perhaps this class of property 
may be considered the hardest of all upon which to place 
proper values, As idle land it may be one thing ; as im- 
proved property it may be quite another. The value of a 
piece of land on our main street is largely dependent upon its 
ability to produce an income. The inability to get at ade- 
quate figures in this direction makes the tax value a hard 
problem to solve ; and these values are not fixed values, but 
change with changing conditions of development. A glance 



99 

at Fairmount Avenue will illustrate this principle. The de- 
velopment of the past few years has tended to lessen the 
value of store property from Everett Square to the New 
England R.R. crossing, while from the Square to the 
Providence R.R. bridge values for business purposes have 
largely increased, as is evidenced by the long line of 
vacant stores on the former section as against the fully 
occupied store property on the other. Under these condi- 
tions it would not be strange if inequalities existed in the 
assessements. Under such conditions taxable values be- 
come largely a matter of judgment. Assessors are not 
infallible; any three men, even experts, would.be liable 
to err in judgment. Doubtless inequalities do exist, but 
from such a close examination as we have been able to 
give to reports that have come to us along this line, we 
declare it our opinion that if so, they are matters of 
judgment, and in no way the result of favoritism or partial- 
ity. If certain pieces of property are assessed too little, 
it is equally possible that others are assessed too much. 
An entire re-valualtion of the business property located on 
the main street between the two rail ads would probably 
remedy existing inequalities, and result in an increase of 
the aggregate tax values of this class of property. 

In this connection we have thought best to compare the 
assessments on property located on West River Street 
between the Square and the Providence R.R. for the 
year 1903 with those of 1897 on the same property, taking 
the land values only, to see whether the increase has been 
proportional with the development of the town in that 
period. For the purposes of such comparison, twelve 
estates have been considered, including the corners of all 
the main avenues and one or two adjacent properties. 
These twelve estates, embracing 133,463 square feet, 
were assessed in 1897 on a valuation of $108,150; in 1903 



100 

the valuation had increased to $169,350, an advance of 
$61,200, or 56.58 per cent. On the several pieces the 
increase ranges from 6 per cent to 320 per cent. 

4. Outlying Lands. Our attention has not been 
turned to any great extent to this class of taxable property, 
and we are not familiar with the plans of the Assessors in 
treating such lands. In view of the improvements which 
have been made in the railroad and manufacturing section 
in Readville, the Metropolitan Park improvements in the 
western section of the town, and the fact reported to us 
that prices will not be given on some of this property by 
the owners, but that it is being held in anticipation of en- 
hanced values in the future, we suggest that particular 
attention be given to property of this class by the Assessors 
with a view of increasing the values where in their judg- 
ment such action shall be warranted. 

To summarize the results of our deliberations we would 
say, that whatever inequalities may exist in valuations and 
assessments, we find them largely chargeable to the 
system of assessment which has descended to the present 
Board through a long line of predecessors, rather than to 
any particular shortcomings of the present Board over and 
above any that have preceded them. The business has 
been carried on along certain lines because it has always 
been done so, and no Board has seen fit to step outside 
those lines. 

With the broad questton of the relative merits of a mode- 
rate valuation with a high tax rate, or a higher valuation 
with a lower rate, we do not consider that we are called 
upon to express an opinion or enter into a discussion. 
Taking things as they are, we find : That su far as resi- 
dential property is concerned, the values are, as a whole, 
fair in a majority of cases. That there are inequalities of 
assessment there is no doubt ; and we are also of the 



ior 

opinion that a more careful and systematic canvass and in- 
spection of this class of property would result in some in- 
crease of the total valuation. 

On manufacturing property, we are of the opinion 
that the assessed values are lower than they should be, 
and that a careful and intelligent revision under expert as- 
sistance should be made. We believe that such a course 
would largely increase the volume of taxes received from 
this class of property and remove many of the difficulties 
which now confront the Assessors. 

As regards business property, we find that the increase 
in the Assessors' valuation has apparently kept pace with 
the development of the town. Whether the values now 
attaching to such properties are adequate in every case 
may be a matter of opinion, as to settle that point intelli- 
gently would require a careful consideration of all the sur- 
rounding circumstances in each individual case. It is 
highly probable that such an investigation would reveal 
instances of under-valuation, and perhaps cases of over- 
taxation as well. To obviate the difficulties apparently ex- 
isting, we feel that a careful re- valuation of the entire town 
should be made, and that in addition to the usual annual 
changes which are made a new valuation should be made 
(or at least an entire revision of recorded values) as often 
as once in five years, and that the town should make such 
a plan a part of its established policy. We recognize the 
fact that such a system would largely increase the work of 
the Assessors and call for a larger pay for that service, but 
we feel that the results attained would many times com- 
pensate for the increased cost of the department. Indeed, 
we question whether even under the present system the 
pay of the department is commensurate with the service 
required. We have found it to be less than neighboring 
towns having a smaller valuation. 



102 

In the matter of outlying lands the suggestion made in 
the report comprehends all we have to say on that point. 

In the matter of favoritism or partiality on the part of 
the Assessors towards any tax-payer, your Committee 
emphatically declare that so far as their investigations 
have gone, there is no evidence to sustain and no grounds 
for such a charge. In this direction we would call your 
attention to the fact that in the increase of values of busi- 
ness property presented in this report, seven out of the 
twelve pieces of property cited are owned by one man, the 
largest property-holder on the street, and the name most 
frequently associated with the suggestion of favoritism 
on the part of the Assessors. These properties were 
assessed in 1897 for $47,000, while in 1903 the valuation 
was $94,000, an increase of over one hundred per cent., 
while the increase on the whole number cited has been 
only 56.58 per cent., a fact which ought to end all criti- 
cism of the Assessors in this direction. 

In conclusion, we wish to express our appreciation of 
the courtesies extended to us by the Board of Assessors in 
our inquiries, affording us every facility for our investiga- 
tions in a spirit of helpfulness which has been of great as- 
sistance to us in the prosecution of our work. 
Respectfully submitted, 

FRANCIS W. DARLING, 
LOEA P. HOWARD, 
EDWARD S. HATHAWAY, 
ALBERT DAVENPORT, 
GIDEON H. HASKELL, 

Sub-Committee. 

Hyde Park, February 23, 1904. 
Adopted by unanimous vote of the Advisory Committee 
at its meeting, February 23, 1904. 

W. E. NORWOOD, Clerk. 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF 
EXPENDITURES. 



INCIDENTALS. 

Paid Frank B. Bich, agent, rent offices, $ 999 96 

" Waverly Halls, 280 00 

William F. Dodge, janitor service, extra labor 

and cash paid out, 613 45 

Geo. W. Chapman, valuation list for tax pay- 
ers' list, 

Geo. B. Anderson, salary tree warden, 
" trimming trees, 

Frank P. McGregor, printing and advertising, 

Geo. H. Snow, salary building inspector, 

Bichard F. Boynton, " 

Thomas Sweeney, trimming trees, 

J. W. Mills, supplies, 

Adams, dishing & Foster, stationery, 
- Corson Express Co., expressing, 

A. Cochran, posting, 

Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, 

William K. Howe, lunches, 

Soldiers' Belief, Bevised Laws, Chapter 79, 

William H. Harlow, coal, 

Elizabeth K. Jenney, copying, 

A. Baymond, carriages, 

Mahoney's Express, expressing, 

Henry B. Terry, obtaining, recording and in- 
dexing births, marriages and deaths, 

Dr. H. A. Tuttle, salary inspector of animals, 

S. B. Moseley, printing, advertising and 

postage, 798 55 

Dedham & Hyde Park Gas & Elec. Lt. Co., 

lighting and supplies, 54 41 

Murphy, Leavens & Co., brushes, 10 79 

Geo. W. Lockwood, insurance premiums, 629 73 

Philip W. Carroll, printing, 1193 18 



50 00 


50 00 


11 


55 


152 


25 


100 


00 


225 


00 


5 


88 


12 


38 


110 


11 


4 10 


2 


00 


121 


20 


85 


50 


356 


00 


243 


89 


107 25 


55 


00 


2 


10 


253 


80 


100 00 



104 



Paid W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 
Union Stamp Works, stamps, 
Smith & Higgens, bnrial expenses, Revised 

Laws, Chapter 250, 
Adams Express Co.. expressing, 
Henry S. Bunton, pay rolls, tellers and ballot 

clerks at elections, 
Morss & White, iron grill work, 
J. H. Tuckerman, repairing furniture, 
A. W. Dunbar, labor and stock, 
Henry B. Terry, insurance premiums, 
R. E. Cherrington, labor and stock, 
J. H. ISTewbegin, clock, 
Boston Stencil Stamp Works, sealers' outfit, 
Maiden Specialty Co., sealers' marking acid, 
Warren W. Hilton, labor and stock, 
Merrill Underbill, repairing, 
Little, Brown & Co., law books, 
R. P. Moseley, cash paid out, 
Bridget Skerrett, cleaning, 

A. E. Mcintosh, directory, 

B. J. Brown, labor and stock, 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service, 

County of Norfolk, recording fees, 

J. E. Farrell, supplies, 

G. L. Richardson, plans, 

Rich Bros., flags and stationery, 

E. Q. Dyer, stationery, 

H. C. Demond & Co., stamps, 

Franklin C. Graham, burial expenses, Chapter 

250, Revised Laws, 
R. N". Burnes, furniture, 
Albert Davenport, damages to wagon, 
Geo. W. Chapman, salary as clerk of assessors, 
Geo. W. Morse & Son. painting band stand, 

" painting police station, 

E. W. Darling Co., coal, 
R. Scott, Jr., repairing police station, 
Geo. W. Lockwood, salary secretary Board of 

Selectmen, 
Dr. Philip C. Means, birth returns, 
Dr. D. J. Hani on, 
Dr. E. H. Baxter, 
Dr. Chas. E. Stack, 



15 


57 




75 


35 


00 




95 


251 


00 


■ 5 


25 


3 


40 


81 


49 


60 


60 


7 05 


9 


00 


4 


00 


1 


50 


63 


85 


5 


80 


4 


00 




60 


1 


50 


1 


50 


4 42 


455 73 


4 


25 


5 


40 


18 00 


4 


50 




80 


5 


12 


105 


00 


78 00 


10 


00 


250 


00 


12 


00 


212 


68 


35 


00 


18 


10 


250 


00 


1 


50 


17 


00 


5 


25 


4 


00 



105 

Paid Dr. A. D. Holmes, 

Dr. Eleanor Lagner, " 

Dr. John A. Morgan, " 

Dr. M. C. Grappner, " 

Chas. F. Jenney, professional services, 
^"' James E. Cotter, " 

Suffolk Engraving & Electrotyping Co., plans, 

Old Corner Book Store, dictionaries, 

Dr. J. H. O'Connor, birth returns. 

W. E. Decrow, police signal boxes-, 

Norfolk Cornice & Roofing Co., repairs police 
station, 

J. C. Chaddock, carriages. 

E. H. W. Hammett, services and plans, 

Sampson, Murdock & Co., directory, 

Franklin C. Graham, death returns, 

W. D. Ward, directories, 

Library Bureau, card and case, 

Woman's Relief Corps, lunch at elections 

John Johnston, labor and stock, 

A. E. Tibbetts, key, 

Review and Record Co., subscriptions, 

Timothy Ingraham Post 121, G. A. R., rent of 

hall, 7 00 

Henry B. Terry, extra services to registrars of 

voters, 70 00 

Hartford Steam Boiler Insurance and Inspec- 
tion Co., insurance premium, 

Benjamin Rafter, agent, labor and stock, 

H. M. Meek Publishing Co., blanks, 

Trank H. Bart, stenographic services, 

Hobbs & Warren Co., stationery, 

Frederic Endicott, services as engineer on 
grade crossing, 

Alice G. Morrison, copying, 

The Sentinel, advertising, 

Henry B. 'Terry, services to Selectmen, 

John Crosby, death returns, 

M. J, Carroll, 

Dr. Henry R. Hitchcock, birth returns, 

" fee, 



4 


25 


1 


50 


2 


25 




50 


719 


10 


1,101 


57 


10 00 


3 


50 


5 


75 


175 


00 


87 50 


3 


50 


200 


09 


7 


15 


40 


75 


4 50 


17 


70 


47 


80 


1 


25 




50 


5 


00 



62 50 


10 43 


2 90 


22 50 


2 75 


888 85 - 


50 00 


8 00 


200 00 


13 00 


7 50 


8 25 


5 00 


$12,260 13 



io6 



Cb. 



By balance unexpended last year, 
Amount appropriated, 



Balance unexpended, 

* Note. — Of this balance 
sors' plans. 



$3,063 07 
10,000 00 



$13,063 07 
12,260 13 

$ 802 94 
40 set apart by town for asses- 



POLICE. 

* Paid Henry S. Bunton, Treas., police services 

as per pay rolls, 
A. Kaymond, carriage service," 
F. W. Darling Co., coal and wood, 
Dr. Chas. F. Atwood. services, 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, 
Kich Bros., pillow cases, 
Dr. A. D. Holmes, services, 
E. Q. Dyer, supplies, 
Iver Johnston Sporting Goods Co., clubs and 

revolvers, 

A. E. Mcintosh, directory, 
Geo. E. Noyes, labor and stock, 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., telephone service, 
Corson Express Co. , expressing, 
Mitchell Mfg. Co., badges, 
S. B. Moseley, printing, 
Thomas J. Dolan, labor and stock, 
Wilton Laundry, laundry, 
S. A. Coffin, carriage, 

B. 1ST. Burnes, shades and furniture, 
Deagle & Deagle, labor and stock, 
Thomas Pallon, medicines, 
Norfolk Cornice & Booting Co., labor and 

stock, 
Wm. Bead & Son, use of harness, 
W- E. Smalling, labor and stock, 
Chas. E. Perry Co., paper, 

C. G. "Wheeler, printing, 
J. C. Chadclock, carriage, 
J. H- Xewbegin, clock, 



10,099 


59 


60 


50 


206 


70 


3 


00 


123 


10 




75 


5 


00 


6 

,3 


37 


CI 

57 


84 


1 


50 


23 


20 


84 


40 


10 


00 


40 


00 


17 


50 


5 


50 


8 


59 


2 


10 


16 


25 


2 


74 


1 


10 


1 

9 


66 


12 


00 


1 


65 


4 


10 


8 


00 


1 


00 


1 


25 






107 

G. W. Morse & Son, labor and stock, 

J. E. Farrell, supplies, 

F. G. Katzmann, assignee, labor and stock, 

T. S. Waters, labor and stock, 

Thorp, Martin Co., stationery, 

James Collins, carriage, 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, 
Appropriation, 



Balance unexpended, $ 3,396 35 

* Note.— Salary of Chief of Police is $60 00 per month ; Lieu- 
tenant $1100 per year; patrolman $960; Special officers $2 50 per 
day. 





13 


50 






4 


50 






22 


56 






25 


15 






8 


25 






1 


00 

$10 888 


23 


a 


1,384 


57 






12,900 


00 

$14 284 -* 7 














FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton Treas., drivers, steward, 

andsupt. of Are alarms, as per pay rolls, $4,728 75 
John Johnston, blacksmithing and carriage 

work, 96 69 
Daniel S. Kennedy, harness goods and repair- 
ing, 57 10 
H. A. Collins & Co., feed, 318 92 
George Miles, supplies, 37 88 
J. J. Mackey, labor, 32 90 
Corson Express Co., expressing; 15 20 
A. Raymond, use of horses, 192 65 
Dr. Charles F. Stack, services, 12 00 

A. W. Dunbar, labor and stock, 29 63 
E. Q. Dyer, supplies, 45 61 
Mahoney's Express, use of pung, 23 00 
M. Jenkins, washing, 34 97 
M. Hudson, blacksmithing, 101 20 

B. H. Abbott, extinguishers, 55 50 
E. W. Lombard, labor, 10 50 
R. H. Abbott, wire, 160 00 
Hyde Park Electric Light'Co., lighting, 177 14 
W. E. Decrow, fire alarm supplies, 428 17 
Edward J. Peterson, agent, oil, 7 35 
H. & N. Morrison, cambric, 2 82 
John Taylor, harness, supplies, 8 00 



ioS 



Paid George Noyes, labor and stock, 
John O'Connell, labor and stock, 
Tyler Grain and Coal Co. feed, 
J. E. Farrell, supplies, 
J. A. & W. Bird, chemicals, 
Jas. F. Faulkner, labor and stock, 
Alden D. Wheeler, wire, 
Henry K. Barnes, hose and supplies, 
Kich Bros., supplies, 
Thos. F. Fallon, medicines, 
W. H. Harlow, coal and lumber, 
F. W. Sawtelle & Co., coal and feed, 
J. A. Crowley, medicines, 
J. H. Wetherbee, services as chief engineer, 
J, C McDougald. services as engineer, 
J. C. McDougald, services as clerk and cash 

paid out, 
Dennis Mahoney, service as engineer, 
Willis G. Kobinson, services as engineer, 
Pay roll, Hose Co. No. l, 
Pay roll. Hose Co. No. 2. 
Pay roll, Hose Co. No. 3, 
Pay roll, Ladder Co. , ' 
Pay roll, Chemical Co., 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., service, 
M, Steward, labor, 
C- T. Buckman & Co., flags, 
Dr. J. M. Kiggen, professional service, 
S. B. Moseley, printing, 
P. Murphy & Co., blacksmithing, 
F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 
C. C. Callahan Co., supplies, 
F. W. Darling Co., coal and feed, 
Geo. E. Noyes, labor and stock, 
Walter Kunkel, labor, 
S. W- Spencer Mfg. Co., badges, 
W. K. Howe, lunches, 
Frank Kunkel, labor, 
W. L. Durant & Co. , labor and stock, 
C. L. Bedding, labor, 

Geo. M. Stevens & Co., Are alarm supslies, 
L. W. Bills, labor on alarms, 
Edward J. Peterson, supplies, 
H. L. Willard, use of horse, • 



27 


48 


31 


00 


355 


79 


17 


88 


22 


01 


30 


40 


146 


25 


608 


60 


2 


25 


7 


50 


202 


66 


229 


52 


1 


50 


162 


50 


1S7 


50 


42 


00 


72 


00 


62 


50 


867 


75 


477 75 


489 


75 


1061 


25 


290 


25 


87 


21 


18 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


4 


75 


26 


75 


15 


72 


7 


50 


146 


73 


10 


08 


54 


34 


7 


50 


17 


04 


16 


90 


2 


30 


25 


50 


17 


80 


102 


00 


5 


75 


6 


00 






109 



PaidEobt. Burnes, mats, 

Harry Walter, fire alarm supplies, 

M. Galligan,sup plies, 

J. H. Newbegin, repairing clock, 

Wilton Laundry, laundry, 

N. Y., N. H. & H. B. B. Co , rent of land, 

Warren C. Morse, labor, 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriations, 



Balance unexpended, 

* Note. — Drivers and permanent men receive 
steward anud sperintendent of alarm, $1,000 per year 



2 00 


4 47 


7 44 


1 00 


4 65 


15 00 


6 00 


if i° ^7 in 


tp 1 £ ,00 t HJ 


$1,416 80 


12,400 00 




$1,259 40 


seive $900 per year ; 



HIGHWAYS. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton, Treas., labor as per 

pay-rolls, $16,735 04 

Hyde Park Electric Light Co. , lighting, 23 65 

F. W. Darling Co., pipe, cement etc., 506 81 

Albert Dodge, feed, 258 27 

A. J. Wellington, crusher apparatus, 96 75 

Tyler Grain & Coal Co., feed, 396 85 

C. T. Griffiths, hardware, 32 00 

E. W. Everson & Co., stone, 789 33 
W. T. McLaughlin & Co., feed, 49 37 
Dr. H. 1ST. Hill, services, 14 50 
Caleb Hall, removing trees, 5 00 

F. Hodgman, surveyors' supplies, 2 25 
E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 199 62 
Daniel S. Kennedy, harness goods, and re- 
pairing, 73 10 

J. W. Hudson, blacksmithing, 115 35 
J. E. Earrell, supplies, 97 73 
H. A. Collins & Co., feed, 96 81 
C. G. Korris, cash paid out, 11 15 
M. O'Connor, blacksmithing, 55 00 
John Johnston, wagon work and black- 
smithing, 227 54 
W. H. Harlow, lumber, etc., 956 85 



no 



PaidJSoley & Smith, raising building, 
Boston Belting Co., lacing, 
C. A. Claflin & Co., supplies, 
Corson Express Co., expressing, 
Henry S. Grew, gravel, 
Geo H. Sampson & Co., supplies, 
Mt. Pleasant Quarry Co., stone, 
Bay State Belting Co-, lacing, 
American Tool & Machine Co , labor and 

stock, 
L M. Crane & Co., oil, 
The Clinton Oil Co., oil, 
J, H Kazar, inspecting boiler, 
Geo. E. IsToyes, labor and stock, 
M- H. Stack, oil, 
Walworth Mfg. Co.. supplies, 
S. & B. J. Lombard, stone, 
W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 
M. Gelewitz, boots, 
Frost & Adams, supplies, 
E. E. Gray, molasses, 
K Y., N". H. & H. B. B., freight, 
Hyde Park Water Co , pipes, 

C. W. H. Moulton, steps, 
H. L. Bond & Co., packing, 
Underhay Oil Co., oil, 

J. H. Stahl, gravel, 

John A. Chapman, labor and stock, 

New England Tel. & Tel. Co-, telephone 

service, 
Peter Shepherd, concreting, 
Barbour Stock well Co., grates, 
Edwin C. Jenney, et al., stone, 
A Currier, oil, 
Kingsley Iron & Machine Co , supplies, 

D. W- Lewis, pipes, 

T- H- Corrigan, teaming stone and paving, 
H- Johnson, granolithic walks, 
Deagle & Deagle, labor and stock, 
12 A. W- Hammett, plans, 
Frank Kunkel, labor, 
E- S- Alden, supplies, 
Mahoney's Express, expressing, 
Boston Broom Co., brooms, 



35 


00 


1 


40 


15 


77 


29 


07 


164 


20 


29 


64 


38 


05 


2 


40 


34 


30 


30 


60 


5 


70 


4 


00 


262 


39 


]7 


36 


2 


22 


913 


03 


24 


73 


3 


50 


18 


28 




95 


59 


14 


10 


06 


4 


80 


93 


34 


39 


44 


449 


00 


100 


52 


37 


30 


2,858 


17 


31 


50 


2 


00 


3 


60 


31 


88 


363 


21 


1,990 


15 


286 


05 


17 


60 


200 


00 


7 


25 


3 


92 


4 


75 


7 


50 



1 1 1 

Paid M.D. Jones, fountain, 

W- W. Hilton, labor and stock, 

Austin Ford & Son, stone, 

C. C. Chisholm, concreting, 

George Miles, supplies, 

A. E. Mcintosh, stationery, 

Dr. A. M. M. Soule, services, 

Andrew Bloom, gravel, 

George E. Whiting, rent of ledge, 

Good Koad Machinery Co., sweeper, 

E. D. Savage, feed, 
Becker-Brainard Co , labor and stock, 
E.G- Katzman, assignee, labor and stock, 
Benjamin Kafter, labor and stock, 

F. "W . Conn, blacksmithing, 
S- R Moseley, postage, 
Thorp, Martin Co., stationery, 
A- B- Black, snow plows, 
J. BE- Harris, Mgr. shovels, 
E J Chandler, trimming trees, 

Cb. 

By balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriation, 
Street assessments, 
Sidewalk assessments, 

Transferred to account of Lin- 
wood Street, $ 400 

Transferred to account of Reacl- 
ville Street Drain, 1,450 

Transferred to account of Gar- 
field Avenue Drain, 2,300 $4,150 00 



82 


40 


36 


71 


258 


33 


172 


03 


13 


72 




50 


11 


75 


27 


00 


400 


00 


250 


00 


20 


00 


40 


99 


4 


22 


2 


30 


18 


30 


2 


00 


4 


35 


260 


85 


2 


94 


10 


00 





— $30,594 73 


$ 901 


11 


35,000 


00 


515 


96 


149 


57 



-$32,416 64 



Balance unexpended, $1,821 91 



STREET WATER. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton, Treas., labor as per pay rolls, $2,989 44 
John Johnston, blacksmithing and wagon work, 160 75 
L. F. Upham, painting and stock, 202 25 

Frank Kunkel, labor aud stock, 13 05 

Crosby Steam Guage Valve Co., valves, 49 58 



112 



Paid W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 

Hyde Park Water Co., repairing cranes, 
Hyde Park Water Co., water, 
F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 
Barbour Stock well Co., grate, 



Cr. 



By balance unexpended last year. 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



28 


59 






8 


00 






921 


48 






3 


10 






27 


75 









— 


#4,403 


99 


$ HI 


79 






5,000 


00 










$5 111 


79 









$707 80 



READVILLE STREET DRAIN. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton Treas., labor as per pay rolls, $80 35 

N. Y., N. H.& H. R. R. Co., freight, 42 75 

John Johnston, labor and stock, 75 47 

J. W. Hudson, labor, 19 72 

F. W. Darling Co , cement, 147 25 



Cr. 



By amount appropriation, 
Balance unexpended 



$365 54 
$1,450 00 
$1,084 46 



GARFIELD AVENUE DRAIN. 

Paid Heury S. Bunton Treas., labor as per pay roll, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. Co., freight, 
David W. Lewis, cement, 
W. H. Harlow, lumber, 



Cr, 



By appropriation, 
Balance unexpended, 



15 


65 




97 


50 




198 


89 




21 


72 








—$333 76 
$2,300 00 



,966 24 



STREET RAILWAY TAX. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton Treas , labor as per payrolls, $2,754 45 
John Johnston, labor and stocks, 21 95 



Cr 



By balance unexpended last year, 
Balauce unexpended, 



■12,776 40 
52,895 10 

$118 70 



H3 
STEAM ROLLER. 

Paid Buffalo Pitts Steam Roller Works, steam roller, $2,485 00 

Cr. 
By amount appropriation, $2,650 00 

Balance unexpended, $165J)Q 



WEST RIVER STREET. 

Paid Henry S. Bunton Treas., labor as per pay rolls, $65 15 
F. W. Sa-wtell, gravel, 87 80 



Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, $1,736 72 

Appropriation, 11,000 00 



$152 95 



Cr. 
By balance unexpended last year, 

Balance unexpended, $43 93 



LINWOOD STREET. 

Appropriation, $400 00 

Balance unexpended, 400 00 

STREET LIGHTS. 

Paid Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, $10,167 51 

Dedham and Hyde Park Gas and Electric Light 

Co., lighting, 212 24 

Chas. T. Peck, lighting and supplies, 185 04 

C. A. Claflin Co., supplies, 10 80 

$10,575 59 



-$12,736 72 



Balance unexpended, $2,161 1£ 



PUBLIC PARKS. 

Paid Samuel R. Moseley, printing, $2 00 

Geo. Leddell, furnishing Camp Meigs, 60 00 

$62 00 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, $1,459 00 



Balance unexpended, $1,397 00 



ii4 
POLICE SIGNAL SERVICE. 

Paid Gamwell Fire Alarm and Telegraph Co., installing 

police signal service as per contract, $3,750 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, $3,750 00 



FIRE HYDRANTS. 

Paid Hyde Park Water Co., hydrant service, $5,700 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, $5,700 00 



G. A. R. 



Paid Timothy Ingraham Post 121, G.A.R., $200 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, $200 00 



JULY FOURTH. 

Paid James E. Sheridan, Treas. Committee appointed by 

Selectmen, $350 00 

Cr. 
By amount of appropriation, $350 00 





SALARIES. 






Paid Alonzo W. Dunbar, salary 


selectman, 




$200 00 


John Johnston, 


a 


" 




200 00 


James F. Pring, 


a 


" 




200 00 


Edwin C. Jenney, 


(( 


(i 




200 00 


Charles E. Palmer, 


<< 


" 




200 00 


Henry S. Bunton, 


<( 


treasurer, 




600 00 


Henry B. Terry, 


<( 


clerk, 




250 00 


Geo. W. Chapman, 


(c 


assessor, 




300 00 


Charles F. Morrison, 


ft 


t < 




300 00 ' 


Frank Greenwood, 


If 


( c 




300 00 


Charles Lewis, 


(i 


overseer of poor, 


150 00 


George E. Haven, 


<( 


CI (( 




150 00 


Geo. W. Chapman, 


1 1 


11 (1 




150 00 


Randolph P. Moseley, 


" 


tax collector 


1901, 


200 00 


<< (i 




(< << 


1902, 


400 00 


(i a 




it a 


1903, 


350 00 



n5 



Paid Geo. R. Lovering, tax collector for estate of 
George Sanforcl, 
Dr. Charles F. Stack, salary, board of health, 
William W. Scott, " " 

E. M. Walker, 
Dr W. S. Everett, 

Benj. G. Bates, " " 

Fred C. Stone, 
Frederick G. Katzman, 
Wm. J. Downey, 
Henry B. Terry, 
J. B. Chadbourne, 
W. F. Mclotire, 
Arthur T. Rogers, 
Chas. F. Jenney, 
Geo. E. Whiting, 
John O'Connell, 
David Perkins, 
Charles Haley, 
Wm. W. Fairbairn, 



auditor, 



registrar of voters, 



cemetery commiss'r 



sewer commissioner, 



100 00 

100 00 

100 00 

25 00 

33 33 

41 67 

25 00 

25 00 

25 00 

40 00 

40 00 

40 00 

40 00 

50 00 

50 00 

50 00 

100 00 

100 00 

100 00 



By balance unexpended last year, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



Cr. 



$1,700 00 
5,685 00 



i,235 00 



$7,385 00 



3,150 00 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Balance on hand, January 1, 1903, $ 957 04 

Amount of appropriation, 6,800 00 

Cr. 
Paid C. T. Lovell, salary as Health Officer and 

Plumbing Inspector, $1,085 06 

C. T. Lovell, expense account, cash paid out, 23 40 

John Corrigan, collecting ashes, 600 00 

Oliver Denette, " 600 00 

Patrick Martin, " " 600 00 

James McCarthy, " " 600 00 



,757 04 



u6 

Paid Peter Anderson, collecting swill, 
A. G. Mathews, " " 

E. Hukin, " 

W. S. Everett, services as clerk, etc., 

Thomas Shea, collecting ashes, 

M. A. Gaynor, clerical services, 

Dr. Charles F. Stack, medical attendance, 

H. N. Hill, veterinary attendance and medicine, 

William H Harlow, lumber, 

Dr. A. D. Holmes, medical attendance, 

A. Klipstein, formaldehyde, 

John Kane, nurse, 

F. W. Sawtelle & Co., hay and grain, 

J. C. Chaddock, use of horse and carriage, 
Tyler Grain & Coal Co., hay and grain, 
Adams Express, 
Dedham & Hyde Park Gas & Electric Light Co., 

E. Q. Dyer, hardware and supplies, 
Deagle & Deagle, office fittings and repair- 
ing furniture, 

J. E. Farrell, hardware and supplies, 
W. G. Lugton, horse shoeing, 

F. P. McGregor, advertising and printing, 
George Lock wood, insurance, 

^ Allen Bros., rubber stamp, 
Thompson & Co., prescription, 
Kostont Brink, milk for hospital, 
J. S. Coveney, lumber and labor, 
Thorp, Martin & Co., supplies, 
A. E. Tibbetts, locks 1 and keys, 
William Wragg, serving notices, 
W. T. McLaughlin, hay and grain, 
A. Dodge, hay and grain, 
D. S. Kennedy, repairing harnesses and . 

blankets,- etc., 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 
W. D. Ward, directory, 
Rich Bros., supplies for hospital, 
A. E. Mcintosh, office supplies, 
Dr. Shea, medical services, 
N. E. Towel Supply, 
Mark E. Noble, medicines, 
J. A. Crowley, medicines, 
M. O'Connor, horse shoeing, 



576 


00 


576. 


00 


648 


00 


131 


67 


6 


75 


51 


93 


31 


90 


40 


45 




20 


100 


00 


79 


81 


50 


00 


285 


67 


27 


00 


221 


12 


2 


95 


8 


58 


26 


00 


48 56 


12 


76 


58 


85 


12 


75 


60 


00 


1 


50 


1 


05 


6 


50 


40 00 


2 


00 


2 


25 


4 40 


52 


95 


96 


80 


42 


56 


17 


50 


1 


50 


8 


40 


2 


50 


25 


00 


■5 


00 


1 


50 


4 


95 


23 


00 



ii7 

Paid Wm. W. Scott, services as clerk and cash 

paid out, 63 65 

Myer Abrams, horse, 185 00 

Mass. Association Board of Health, 8 00 

D. W. Murray, legal services, 10 00 
Owen McMahon, police duty, ,3 00 
J. S. Trowbridge, scales, 12 00 
N. E. Tel. & Tel. Co., (1902-1903), 185 92 
Amesbury Carriage Co., J. Johnston, Agent, 

wagon, 118 50 

William Crawford, care of contagious disease, 25 00 

E. N. Bullard, rent of stable, 135 00 
Morris-Ireland Safe Co., safe, 30 00 
John Johnston, repairs on wagons, 15 35 
P. Murphy, horse shoeing, 8 00 
Joseph Mills, provisions for hospital, 16 16 
Mahoney's Express, 1 85 
R. N. Bnrnes, beds and bedding, 8 50 
R. W. Karnan, clothing destroyed and replaced, 8 00 
Geo. N. M. Brewer, medicine, 3 70 
C. H. Batchelder, tent, 4 50 
Corson's Express, 1 95 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, Jan. 31, 1904, 8 45 

$7,757 04 

CASH RECEIVED FROM SALE OF SWILL AND SALE OF HORSE. 

Amount due for swill sold, Feb. 1, 1903, $56 75 

Amount on hand, Feb. 1, 1903, $ 28 23 

Cash received from sale of swill, 193 20 

Received from sale of horse, 85 50 



$306 93 



Cr. 

Paid W. S. Everett, cash paid out, 19 35 
S. R. Moseley, Postmaster, stamped envelopes, 10 60 

N. E. Towel Supply, 5 00 
Myer Abrams & Co., commission for selling horse, 8 55 

Wm. W. Scott, cash paid out, 4 50 

C. T. Lovell, " " 21 11 

Mass. State Board of Health Association, 7 50 

Peter Anderson, collecting swill, 36 00 

A. G. Mathews, " " 36 00 

E. Hukin, " " 27 00 

Oliver Denette, " ashes, 12 00 

C T. Lovell, on account of salary, 69 25 



u8 

Paid M. A. Gaynor, on account of salary, 11 53 

John Corrigan, collecting ashes, 12 00 

Patrick Martin, " " 12 00 

Jas. McCarty, " " 12 00 

Balance on hand, " " 2 54 

$306 93 

Due and unpaid for swill sold, Feb. 1, 1904, $60 70 

Cr. 

Cash received for Plumbers' Licenses : 

From John F. Roouey, master plumber, 2 00 



Paid C. T. Lovell, services as examiner, $2 00 



CEMETERY EXPENDITURES. 

Paid pay-roll, $974 25 

Superintendent's salary, 
Land, (Jackson Lot), 
Schlegel & Fottler, grass seed, 
Union Hardware Company, 
James Kingston, cutting wood, 
Patrick Mack, " 

Mrs. James Kingston, washing and repairing, 
William H. Harlow, lumber and supplies, 
Ames Plow Company, 

Hyde Park Water Company, water service, 
N. Y., N. H. & H. R. R. Co., freight, 
M. B. Mishler, markers, 
G. K. Newcomb, shrubbery, 
Battle Creek Implement Co., 
George H. Webb, 
Caleb Hall, 

Philander Allen, markers, 
W. H. Rice, granite steps, 
Telephone service, 
E. A. W. Hammett, surveying, 
J. Hudson, work at sundry times, 
E. Q. Dyer, supplies at sundry times, 
Mahoney's Express, expressage, 
Keys, 

Daniel S. Kennedy, 
Money order, 
Account book, 



$2 00 
$2 00 



£2,019 43 



ii 9 

Ck. 
By Balance in treasury, Feb. 1, 1903, 
Sale of lots, 
Sale of single graves, 
Interments and receiving tomb charges, 
Foundations and labor, 
Wood, stone and grass, 
Interest on fund from Town of Hyde Park, 



Balance unexpended, 



$9,470 


86 






1,620 

280 


00 
00 






623 


00 






151 


55 






149 


25 






378 


83 
< 


$12,673 
2,019 


49 
43 




* 




$10,654 06 



PUBLIC LIBRARY. 

CURRENT EXPENSES. 

Paid Elizabeth Ainsworth, librarian, $600 00 

Nellie A. Stone, assistant librarian, 400 00 

Gertrude L. Adams, " 350 00 

E. J. Chandler, janitor, 83 32 

Wm. Paul, janitor, 483 32 

C. C. Higbee, assistant in library, 17 50 

E. V. Ainsworth, assistant in library, 87 10 
H. G. Higbee, photographs, 14 50 

F. W. Darling Co., heating, 421 25 
Hyde Park E. L. Co., lighting, 182 7 
Dedham & H. P. G. & E. L. Co., lighting, 91 56 
F. J. Barnard & Co., binding, 238 35 
H. D. Noyes & Co., periodicals, 194 45 
Little, Brown & Co., books, 177 96 
F. W. Gleason & Co., radiators, 82 68 

E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 25 06 
S. R. Moseley, printing, 77 50 
S. R. Moseley, postmaster, 4 00 
Damrell & Upbam, books, 41 71 
Williams & Everett, framing, 10 00 
Carter, Rice & Co., paper, 57 84 
P. W. Carroll, printing, 31 00 
Desmond Publishiug Co., books, 16 20 
Library Bureau, supplies, 36 76 

F. P. McGregor, printing, 11 25 
E. Ainsworth, books, 19 00 
Chas. Haley, carpenter, 47 75 
J. A. Paine, " 7 46 



120 

Paid Jordan, Marsh & Co., books, 
DeWolfe, Fisfee & Co., " 
Dodd, Mead & Co., encyclopedias, 
W. W. Hilton, carpenter, 
Mahoney's Express, expressage, 
Corson's Express, " 

J. A. Haigh, gardener, 
Vose & Fellows, florists, 
R. E. Cherrington, supplies, 
Hawkes & Maglalblin, books, 
Hammond Type Writer Co.. supplies, 
E. J. Chandler, supplies, 
Pilgrim Press, printing, 

Suffolk Engraving & Electrotype Co., printing, 
A. Storrs & Bement Co., paper, 
O. Anderson, supplies, 
C. W. Thompson & Co., supplies, 
E. A. Mcintosh, periodicals, 
Chas. Scribner's Sons, books, 
Essex Publishing Co., books, 
Library Art Club, subscription, 
J. J. Smalley, supplies, 
Silver, Burdett & Co., periodicals, 
J. Breck & Co., gardening, 
W. D. Ward, supplies, 
Morss & Whyte, supplies, 
Thorpe & Martin Co., supplies, 
W. F. Smalling, supplies, 
A. Duncan, repairs, 
T. W. Hammond & Co., supplies, 
J. E. Farrell, supplies, 
R. J. Tomlinson, supplies, 
J. W. Hudson, supplies, 
W. A. Gray, supplies, 
Hyde Park Times, newspaper, 



By Balance unexpended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 

Paid Little, Brown & Co., 

Appropriation, 



Cr. 

BOOKS. 
Cr. 



13 00 




2 50 




90 00 




12 60 




9 90 




8 00 




5 50 




4 50 




6 50 




3 50 




4 15 




4 25 


! 


15 00 




5 05 




4 80 




2 25 




4 95 




4 75 




4 50 




6 00 




5 00 




4 00 




50 




9 00 




3 50 




1 00 




1 30 




3 25 




8 60 




6 18 




1 65 




1 93 




1 50 




1 25 




1 00 


$4,071 67 




79 20 




$4,000 


$4,079 20 
$7 53 






|965 29 




$965 29 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT. 



SALAEIES. 



Paid F. 0. Draper, 

Paid M. S. Getchell, 
E. Eice, 
M. C. Howard, 
E. P. Bridgman, 
M. E. Houston, 
E. L. Bishop, 
L. T. Wood, 

A. M. Twigg, 
1ST. E- Titus, 

S. E. McCready, 

B. L. Nichols, 
C W. French, 
E. E. Palmer, 

J. M. Weatherbee, 
M. J. Brooks, 
L. E. Cyr, 



SUPERINTENDENT. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



$2,5u0 00 

$2,000 00 
1,300 00 
800 00 
700 00 
650 00 
650 00 
650 00 
627 50 
471 25 
600 00 
369 00 
400 00 
100 00 
100 00 
159 00 
22 50 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL. 




Paid D. G- Thompson, 


$1,400 00 


A. I. Childs, 


500 00 


H. Balkani, 


135 00 


B. J. Rich, 


135 00 


H. F. Packard, 


500 00 


H. M. Gidney, 


500 00 


A. E. Haley, 


475 00 


L. M. Foss, 


500 00 


S. D. Waldron, 


90 00 


J. E. Barker, 


80 00 


C A. Amback, 


200 00 


E.O.Poland, 


200 00 



J, 599 25 



1,715 00 



122 



AMOS WEBSTEK SCHOOL. 



Paid L- J- Davis, 






$500 00 




E. G. Plummer, 






455 00 




G. S. Mitchell, 






450 00 




M. E. Gray, 






450 00 


$1,855 00 








TRESCOTT SCHOOL. 






Paid H. P. Cleaves, 






550 00 




E. M Burgess, 


GREW 


SCHOOL. 


412 50 


$962 50 


Paid E. H. Dean, 






$1,400 00 




M. E. Bertram, 






500 00 




M. J. Sedgwick, 






487 50 




A. B. Farrisworth, 






412 50 




A. J. Campbell, • 






500 00 




]ST. M. Howes, 






500 00 




J. F. Ellis, 






500 00 




B. C. Sparrell, 






500 00 




L. G. Albee, 






412 50 


$5,212 50 








FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL. 






Paid A. W. Armstrong, 






$1,400 00 


/ 


S. L- Gile, 






500 00 




K. T. Mellen, 






500 00 




S. A. Coggeshall, 






450 00 




J. S. Hammond, 






500 00 




N- L. Ballou, 






450 00 




H. 0. Thompson, 






500 00 




G. M. Stanley, 






372 50 




M. Litchfield, 






40 00 


$4,712 50 








WELD 


SCHOOL. 






Paid M. E. Merrow, 








$450 00 




HEMENWAY SCHOOL. 






Paid D. E- Hastings, 


DAMON 


SCHOOL. 




$500 00 


Paid E. S. King, 






$1,000 00 




E. de Senancour, 






500 00 




G. M. Webster, 






437 50 




C L. Webber, 






370 00 




S- D. Waldron, 






40 00 


t9. 5U7 50 






PaidB.H. Hamblin, 



Paid A. T. Boardman, 



123 

MUSIC 
DRAWING- 



TRUANT OFFICER-IN-CHIEF. 

Paid H. U. Harwood, $50 00 

jS". F. Dodge, 200 00 

















FUEL. 




Paid F. W. Darling Co.*, wood 


, High, 


$11 00 


A. S. Ferry, 


" 


" 


10 00 


H. McNulty, 


" 


" 


12 00 


M. E. Galloup, 


t t 


" 


18 00 


<< 


i6 


Grew, 


15 00 


F. W. Darling Co., 


(6 


" 


4 50 


" '• 


a 


Trescott, 


2 50 


it tt 


a 


Greenwood, 


4 50 


M. E. Galloup, 


a 


Trescott, 


6 00 


" 


tt 


Greenwood, 


12 00 


it 


a 


Fairmount, 


12 00 


a 


a 


Damon, 


12 00 


i i 


1 i 


Webster, 


6 00 


" 


16 


Weld, 


6 00 


" 


" 


Hemenway, 


3 00 


O. S. Godfrey & Co., 


coal, High, 


72 00 


(< a 


" 


Trescott, 


36 00 


it 't 


tt 


Greenwood, 


96 00 


1 < it 


a 


Fairmonnt, 


96 00 


F. W. Sawtelle & Co., 


" 


Damon, 


86 44 


F. W. Darling Co., 


(C 


Grew, 


558 75 


it 1 




a 


Trescott, 


253 50 


a i 




it 


Greenwood, 


234 00 


a c 




" 


Fairmount, 


340 95 


it t 




tt 


Damon, 


239 85 


H i 




i 6 


Webster, 
Weld, 


306 50 

87 75 


(< ( 




t I 


Hemenway, 


42 41 


«< ( 




<( 


High, 


1,926 06 



$700 00 
$550 00 

$250 00. 



1,510 71 



124 

JAKITORS. 
Paid J. G. Hamblin, High, 
H. Ash, Greenwood, 
J. A. Peterson, Grew, 
G. F. Wellington, Damon, 
B. H. Howes, Fairmount, 
I. H. Winchenbaugh, Amos Webster, 
J. T. McConnell, Weld, 
G. F. Wellington, Hemenway, . 
E. C. Cameron, Trescott, 



$1,000 00 


540 


00 


540 00 


480 


00 


540 


00 


400 00 


250 00 


200 


00 


300 


00 



EE C AP1TUL ATIO K 
Paid salaries, $38,604 25 

fuel, 4,510 71 



Ck. 
Balance unexpended from last year, $1,041 20 

Amount of appropriation, 42,200 00 



$4,250 00 



5,114 96 



$43,241 20 



Balance unexpended, $126 24 



SCHOOL INCIDENTALS. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Paid E. A. W. Hammatt, services, " $187 25 

A. G. Childs, sundries, 60 

John Alden, labor and stock, 67 72 

Peter Shepard, concreting, 189 10 

T. H. Corrigan, labor, 15 50 

Seth W. Fuller Co., labor and stock, 357 00 

. Charles Haley, outside windows, 238 40 

J. B. Hunter & Co., hardware, 14 47 

Wm. Bead & Co., silk flag, 46 50 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 93 79 

A. E. Tibbetts, labor, 18 25 

Murphy, Leaven & Co., sundries, 9 13 

Oliver Typewriter Co., labor, 1 95 

Weld Manufacturing Co., labor and stock, 9 50 

F. W. Constantine & Co., sundries, 12 50 

J. W. Jigger, labor and stock, 8 40 

Ingalls & Kendricken, labor and stock, 705 63 

E. Waters, services, 2 00 

A. W. Williams, paint, 2 50 
J. Johnson, labor and stock, 1 03 
P. H. Bowen, grading, 294 98 

B. W. Burnes, sundries, 10 95 

F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 2 00 
H. A. Collins, sundries, 9 19 
J. A. Paine, labor and stock, 4 15 
J. E. Farrell, hardware, 40 

B. Scott, labor and stock, 154 75 
S. & J. Lombard, curbstone, 138 60 

G. E. M. Dickinson, orchestra, 23 25 
A. H. Armstrong, armorer, 15 00 

C. E. Palmer, labor and stock, 1 60 
Baeder & Co., flowers, 12 00 
G. W. Morse & Son, labor and stock, 36 71 
J. G. Boiler, labor and stock, 6 50 
E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 40 31 



126 

Paid Blodgetl Bros. & Co., labor and stock, 68 60 

Police Department, services, 3 00 

J. G. Hamblin, sundries, 5 21 

F. B. Kich, rent, , 35 00 

Atkinson & Mentzer* flag, 3 80 

F. P. McGregor, printing, 13 50 

W. J. Wright, labor, 3 85 

Bich Bros., sundries, 25 

W. H. Hilton, vise of stage, 10 00 

McKenny & Waterbury, labor, 15 20 

A. E. Elliot, labor and stock, 7 00 
Dedham & H. P. Gas Co., gas, 32 12 

B. "Williams, labor and stock, 182 11 

C. T. Lovell, cash paid, 48 51 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, 12 30 
Bryan Marsh Co., lamps, 121 40 



GBEENWOOD SCHOOL. 

Paid J. S. Lovejoy, sundries, 
C. T. Griffiths, keys, 
H. B. Stone, sundries, 

E. Q- Dyer, hardware, 
Mahoney's Express, expressing, 
J. Johnston, wrench, 

P. Sweeney, labor, 

C. T. Lovell, cash paid, 

Bich Bros., cloth, 

H. Ash, labor and stock, 

F. H. Holmes, labor, 

F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 

J. "W. Jigger, labor and stock, 



$1 83 


1 00 


2 25 


25 


25 


2 25 


30 50 


18 45 


60 


6 50 


1 70 


2 00 


10 85 


27 80 



AMOS WEBSTEB SCHOOL. 



Paid E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 

W. E. Smalling, labor and stock, 
B. Scott, labor and stock, 
I. H. Winchenbaugh, labor, 
J. W. Jigger, labor and stock, 
H. A. Collins & Co., sundries, 



$1 20 


22 60 


15 10 


29 00 


2 50 


4 03 



,293 46 



$106 23 



$74 43 



12/ 

TRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Paid C. T. Griffiths, keys, $1 25 

J. G. Bolles, labor and stock, 3 50 

D. Gunn, loam, 1 25 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 25 03 

J. E. Farrell, hardware, 3 95 



DAMON" SCHOOL. 

Paid E. S. Alden, sundries, $5 69 

C- E. Davenport, labor, 
C. T. Lovell, cash paid, 
G. F. Wellington, labor and stock, 
F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 
F. M. Davis, labor and stock, 
E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 



4 


00 


11 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


3 


25 


2 


50 



HEMENWAY SCHOOL. 

Paid E. S. Alden, sundries, $ 75 

G. F. Wellington, labor and stock, 6 50 

Chandler Desk Co., desks, 22 75 

F. M. Davis, labor and stock, 5 50 

W. H- Harlow, stock, 1 44 



GREW SCHOOL. 

Paid J. E. Farrell, hardware, $30 70 

Buckman & Co., flag, 6 00 

E. J. Peterson, labor and stock, 81 25 

F. W. Swett, gongs, 14 50 
P. H. Rooney, labor, 20 50 
F. H. Dean, reslating blackboards, 32 82 
H. W. Berry, tuning piano, 2 50 
R. Scott, labor and stock, 24 95 
T. Sweeney, labor, 5 00 
W . D. Ward, cleaning clocks, 2 50 
W. J. Griffiths, labor and stock, 24 00 
E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 2 11 
Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lights, 33 23 
Mahoney's Express Co , expressing, 15 



$32 44 



$36 94 



128 

Paid W. H. Harlow, lumber, 

F. W. Gleason & Co., labor and stock, 

Exeter Machine Co., grate, 

Corson's Express, expressing, 

A. E. Tibbetts, labor, 

F- G. Katzmann, assignee, labor, 



1 64 


10 23 


3 64 


15 


1 50 


4 98 



FA1RMOUNT SCHOOL. 

Paid C J. Higgins, labor and stock, 

E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 
C. T. Lovell, cash paid, 
W. H. Harlow, lumber, 
H. P. Sewer Department, sewer connections, 

F. M. Paine, tuning piano, 
F. H. Dean, reslating blackboards, 
T. Sweeney, grading, 
F. A. Perry, labor and stock, 
F. W. Gleason & Co. , labor and stock, 
P. H. Rooney, labor and stock, 
P. Sweeney, labor, 
R. Damon, labor and stock, 
C. Hall, labor, 
Rich Bros., cloth, 



$32 


10 


1 


60 


14 


15 


2 


01 


S, 40 04 


2 


00 


16 60 


13 00 


15 


43 


13 


36 


125 


00 


5 


00 


142 


75 


1 


50 




60 



WELD SCHOOL. 

Paid E- Q. Dyer, hardware, 

J. T. McConnell, labor and stock, 
R. Williams, labor and stock, 



$302 35 



$425 14 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

Paid Globe-Wernicke Co., book-case, $38 70 

P. W. Carroll, printing reports, 86 50 

S. R. Moseley, printing and stamps, 107 25 

N. E. Tel. & Tel Co., telephone, 41 75 

Suffolk Eng. & Elect. Co., printing, 60 00 

Paine Furniture Co., carpet and chairs, 204 77 

Mahoney's Express Co , expressing, 67 55 

E. S. Fellows, services as secretary, 150 00 



$7 60 

29 00 

314 85 


$351.„45 





129 

Paid F. P McGregor, printing, 

H. W. Stone, rilling in diplomas, 

W. D. Ward, sundries, 

H. H Mclntyre, taking census, 



Paid for incidentals, 



Cr. 



By balance unexpended from last year, 
Appropriation, 



16 75 




24 45 




10 85 




50 00 






$858 57 






$5,515 99 


$15 99 




5,500 00 


<&K K1K QO 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL. 

Paid G- E. Noyes, instruction, 

G. E. Noyes, labor and stock, 
S. E. Moseley, advertising, 

F. P. McGregor, advertising, 
N. M. Howes, instruction, 
N. M. Howes, supplies, 

M, E. Bertram, instruction, 
H. & 1ST- Morrison, supplies, 
N. E. Reed Co. , supplies, 
W. H. Harlow, lumber, 
J. E Farrell, hardware, 

G. H. Haskell, supplies, 
E. Q. Dyer, hardware, 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, 
Appropriation, 

Balance unexpended, 



$130 25 


42 


50 


2 


50 


3 


00 


66 


00 




48 


66 00 


5 


87 


46 


00 


34 


62 


5 


25 




56 


4 


70 


$255 74 


200 


00 



$407 73 



$455 74 
$48 01 



EVENING SCHOOL. 

Paid Charles Haley, tables. $79 27 

Hyde Park Electric Light Co., lighting, 120 60 

S. R. Moseley, printing, 15 00 

E. Bentley, supplies, 2 64 
A. Fisher, supplies, l 50 

F. P. McGregor, printing, 11 50 



130 



Paid American Book Co., supplies, 
F. F. Courtney, books, 
Carter, Rice & Co., supplies. 
Hooper, Lewis & Co., supplies, 
B. M. Ohittick, instruction, 
E. J. Foljambe, 
E. A. Stone, 
M- E. Bertram, 
M. T. Rowe, 

E. Bentley, 
J. M. Stone, 
M. E. Ambrose, 

F. P. Rafter, 
A. C- Lincoln, 
J. & S. Everett, 
W. W. Lewis, 

Cr. 
By balance unexpended from last year, 
Appropriation, 



20 


74 


4 80 


1 


00 


1 


52 


137 


32 


78 00 


120 00 


120 00 


40 50 


160 00 


67 


50 


17 


00 


15 


00 


1 


50 


33 


00 


114 


00 


$162 


39 


1,000 00 



$1,162 39 



,162 39 



TEXT BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

Paid Franklin Lab. Co., supplies, $14 19 

J. L. Hammatt Co. , supplies, 611 45 

Kenney Bros. & Wolkins, 625 02 

Remington Typewriter Co., supplies, 75 50 

D. C. Heath & Co., books, 57 79 
Silver, Burdett & Co., books, 160 48 
Ginn & Co., books, 138 98 
W. A. Knowlton, assignee, books, 37 16 
G. B. Anderson, supplies, 65 

E. S. Foljambe, " 84 
L. E. Knott Apparatus Co., supplies, 146 61 
J. H. Daniels, diplomas, 55 50 
Thompson, Brown & Co., supplies, 11 63 
R. W. Karnan, supplies, 6 40 
Dodd, Mead & Co., supplies, 85 00 
DeWolfe, Fiske & Co., books, 288 47 
W. C. Bramwell, supplies, 21 25 
E. S. Alden, " 2 05 
E. Q. Dyer, " 97 28 



i3i 

Paid Wadsworth, Howland & Co., supplies, 
Milton, Bradley & Co., paper, 
Central School Supply Co., supplies, 
Boston Music Co., music, 
Continental Brush Co., supplies, 
S. B. Moseley, supplies, 
A. E. Tibhetts, 
YamanakaCo., paper, 
John McCabe, supplies, 

F. A. Perry, 

Jordan, Marsh & Co., supplies, 
Wm, Bead & Co., supplies, 
Bent & Bush, book, 
Cochran Chemical Co , supplies, 
G- H. Adler, 

G. H- Haskell, 
. J. C. White, 

Oliver Ditson Co., music books, 
J. W. Jigger, supplies, 
American Oxygen Co., supplies, 
Beadville Electric Co., " 
A. J. Lloyd, supplies, 
F. J. Barnard, books, 
Hobbs & Warren Co , supplies, 

D. Appleton & Co., books, 

E. P. McGregor, supplies, 
Blodgett Bros. & Co., supplies, 
Carter, Bice & Co., paper, 

A. Peat & Co., supplies, 
Globe- Wernicke Co., cards, 
Prang Ed. Co., books, 
Houghton, Mifflin & Co., books, 
H. Goldberger, books, 
Cupples, Schoenhof Co., books, 

F. Macey Co., supplies, 
Allyn & Bacon, books, 
Bich Bros , supplies, 
A. S. Perry, 

E. J. Peterson, agent, supplies, 

J. E. Farrell, 

S. W. Fuller Co., 

J. C Haynes & Co., books, 

E. E. Babb, books, 



11 


80 


59 


11 


1 


50 


15 


50 


6 


50 


105 05 


6 50 




99 


60 50 


78 32 


2 


50 


16 


05 


2 


32 


4 38 




(35 


18 63 


1 


30 


2 


85 


6 


60 


2 


50 


55 


94 




75 


59 26 


13 


25 


16 95 


45 


50 


12 


97 




78 


1 


05 


27 


31 


22 


46 


9 04 


3 


50 


2 


80 


13 


03 


44 


15 


8 


65 


7 


56 


6 


25 


17 


11 


1 


50 


16 


68 


72 


07 



132 

Paid E Eice, cash paid, supplies, 5 05 

Paine Furniture Co., " 8 00 

F. H. Merrill, jr. . " 2 50 

J. A. Boyle & Co , paper, 8 73 

Shattuck & Jones, supplies, 75 

American Kibbon & Carbon Co., paper, 2 35 

Chandler & Farquhar, supplies, 5 67 

L. G. Albee, books, 2 50 

G- A- Weld Co,., supplies, 7 80 

Billings, Clapp Co., supplies, 6 04 

J. W. Staniford & Co., supplies, 2 00 

Smith Premier Typewriter Co., supplies, 1 75 

J. Johnston, supplies, 3 30 

G- F. Wellington, supplies, 23 37 

Gould Storage Battery Co., supplies, 21 06 

American Book Co., books. 415 49 

A. E- Tibbets, supplies, 3 75 

Cr. 

By balance unexpended from last year, $69 57 

Appropriation, 3,750 00 



Balance unexpended, $3 41 



!,816 16 



,819 57 



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TREASURER'S 



DR. 



HENRY S. BUNTON, TOWN TREASURER IN ACCOUNT 



Cash in the Treasury, February 1, 1903 

AMOUNTS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR ENDING JAN. 31, 1904: 

From Hyde Park Four per cent Coupon Bonds— Sewerasre Loan 

Treasurer's Notes— In anticipation of the tax for the year 1903.... 

Premium on Four per cent Bonds, two and one hundred and 
seventy -nine one thousandth percent 

George Sanford, Collector, Sewer Assessments 

George R. Covering, Collector pro tern, Taxes for 1898 

George R. Lovering, Collector pro tern, Taxes for 1899 

George R. Lovering, Collector pro tem, Taxes for 1900 

George R. Lovering, Collector pro tem, Sewer Assessments 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Taxes for 1901 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Taxes for 1902 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Taxes for 1903 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Street Assessments 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Sidewalk Assessments 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Street Railway Excise Tax 

Randolph P. Moseley, Collector, Sewer Assessments 

Fairvie w Cemetery, Sale of Lots 

Fairview Cemetery, Sale of Graves. 

Fairview Cemetery, Interments and Tomb Fees 

Fairview Cemetery, Foundations and fiabor 

Fairview Cemetery, Sale of Wood 

Fairvi w Cemetery, Sale of Gras- 

Fairview Cemetery, Sale of Stones 

Fairview Cemetery, Interest paid by Town, four per cent on 
$9,470 86 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Corporation Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for National Bank Tax 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Street Railway Tax . . 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Contagious D seases 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for State Aid, 1902 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Metropolitan Water Loan 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for burial of soldiers 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Water Receipts 

Treasurer, Commonwealth, for Education ot Children 

County Treasurer, dog licenses, 1903 = 

Samuel H.Capen,Sheriff,fines paid at Jail and House of Correction 

Edward S. Fellows, Esq., Clerk District Court of Northern 

Norfolk: Fines from defendants in criminal cases.. $1,261 75 
Less fees and expenses paid officers, as certified by 
Clerk of Court ■ 36114 

Liquor Licenses 

Milk Licenses 

Miscellaneous Licenses 

Underhay Oil Co 

M. D. Jones & Co., freight on water fountain 

Poor — Cash refunded by Commonwealth, cities, towns, etc 

Interest on Bank balances 



$401,597 21 



REPORT. 



CURRENT WITH THE TOVVX OF HYDE PARK 



CR. 



AMOUNTS DISBURSED: 

On account of Hvde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds due May 1, 1903 

Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds flue July 1,1903 

Hyile Park Four per cent. Coupon B< nds due Nov. 1, 1903 

Treasurer's Note — High School furniture and furnishings 

Treasurer's Notes— In anticipation of S -werage Loan 

Treasurer's Notes— In anticipation of the tax for the year 
1903 

Interest 

Schools — salaries, fuel and janitors 

School Incidentals 

Industrial school 

Evening- schools 

Text i ooks anil Supplies 

Trescott School Building 

Sanitary Improvement — Fairmount School Building.... 

Kepairs — Giew School roof 

Pub ic Library — current expenses 

Public Library — purchase of new boons 

Incidentals.. . .' 

Police T 

Fire Department. . . 

Highways 

Street Watering 

Readville Stieet Drain 

Garfield Avenue Drain 

Highways — Street Railway Tax 

Steam Roller 

West Ri ver Street 

Street Lights 

Public Parks 

Police Signal service 

Fire Hydrant service 

Pot 121, Grand Army of the Republic 

Fourth of July Celebration 

Salaries 

Cemetery Commissioners 

Sewer Commissioners 

Overseers o t the Poor 

Board of Health 

State Tax lor 1903 , 

County Tax for 1903 

Corporation Tax, paid Treasurer Commonwealth 

Naitonal Bank Tax, paid Treasurer Common wealth 

Abolition Grade Crossings, paid Treasurer Common- 
wealth : — 

Loan Fund $ 7,182 07 

Interest on 4,137 85 



Metropolitan Park3 Loan, paid Treasurer Common- 
wealth : — 

Sinking Fund $1,09173 

Interest on Parks 1,926 61 

Interest on Boulevards 279 01 

Cost of Maintenance Parks 1,061 28 

Cost of Maintenance Boulevards 300 67 

Cost of Maintenance Nantasket 120 82 

Metropolitan Sewer, South Meti-opolitan System, paid 
Treasurer Commonwealth : — 

Sinking Fund $1,095 39 

Interest on 979 65 

Cost of Mai tenane.. 5,866 61 



Metropolitan Water Loan.paid Treas. Commonwealth:— 

Sinking Fund $ 560 33 

Interest on 1,735 48 

Cost of Maintenance 454 11 



Liquor Licenses; paid Treasurer Commonwealth, one- 
fourth of the amount received in 1903 

State Aid 

Tax Deed received from George R. Lovering, Collector 
pro tern , 

Defective Tax Deeds — Surrender and discharge of Tax 
Deeds given byGeorge Sauford.Gdlecter— Sally Sumner 
Estate— pursuant to opinion from James E. Cotter, Esq. 

Paid John D. Bullard $ 1,935 61 

Harlow ri. Rogers 809 34 



Cash in the Treasury, Jan. 31, 1904. 



£ 7,000 00 

4,000 00 

2,000 00 

1,000 00 

40,000 00 

73,900 00 

12,342 51 

43,114 96 

5,515 99 

407 73 

1,162 39 

3,816 16 

218 00 

1,995 00 

950 00 

4,071 67 

965 29 

12,260 13 

10,888 22 

12,557 40 

30,594 73 

4,403 99 

365 54 

333 76 

2,776 40 

2.4S5 00 

152 95 

10,575 59 

62 00 

3,750 00 

5,700 00 

200 00 

350 00 

5,235 00 

2,019 43 

12,113 40 

9,853 51 

7,748 59 

8,775 00 

7,949 91 

18 97 

3 57 



11,319 92 



4,780 12 



7,941 65 



2,749 92 

1 00 
1,498 00 

37 55 



2,744 95 

$384,705 90 
16,891 31 

$401,597 21 



APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDITURES 
FOR THE CURRENT YEAR. 



ACCOUNTS. 



Interest - 

Schools — salaries, fuel, and janitors. 

School Incidentals 

Industrial Schools. 

Evening Schools 

Text Books and Supplies — 

Trescott School Budding 

Prescott School Building— furnishing 
Sanitary Improvement — Fairmount 

School Building- 

Repairs -G.ew School Roif 

Public Library, current expenses. 
Public Lib'ry, purchase of new books 

Incidentals . 

Police 

Fire Department 

Highways 

Street Watering 

Rea ville Street Drain 

Garfield Avenue Drain 

Highways — Street Railway Tax.. 

Steam Roller 

West River Street 

Lin wood Street 

Street Lights 

Public Parks 

Police Signal Service 

Fire H vdrant Service 

Post 121, G. A. R 

Fourth ot July Ceehration 

Salaries — 

Sewer Commissioners 

Overseers of the Poor 

Board of Health 

State Tax for 1903 

County Tax f'ot 1903 

Abolition Grade Crossings 

Metropolitan Park Loan — 

Met. Sewer, South Met. Sy.-tem... 
Metropolitan Water Loan 



* Appropria- 
tions. 



t$14,258 17 

43,241 20 

5,515 99 

455 74 

1,162 39 

3,819 57 

301 35 

76 32 

2,000 00 

950 00 

4,079 20 

965 29 

13,063 a 

14,284 57 

13,816 80 

J32.416 64 

5,111 79 

§1,450 00 

§2,300 00 

2,895 10 

2,650 00 

196 88 

§400 00 

12,736 72 

1,459 00 

3,750 00 

5,700 00 

200 00 

350 00 

7,385 00 

||23,992 02 

1110,258 99 

7,757 04 

8,775 00 

7,949 91 

11,319 92 

4,". 80 12 

7,941 65 

2,749 92 



Expenditures. 



$12,342 51 
43,114 96 
5,515 99 
# 407 73 
1,162 39 
3,816 16 
218 00 



1,995 00 

950 00 

4,071 67 

965 29 

12,260 13 

10,888 22 

12,557 40 

30,594 73 

4,403 99 

365 54 

333 76 

2,776 40 

2,485 00 

152 95 

10,575 59 

62 00 

3,750 00 

5,700 00 

200 00 

350 00 

5,235 00 

12,113 40 

9,853 51 

7.748 59 
8,775 00 
7,949 91 

11,319 92 
4,780 12 
7,941 65 

2.749 92 



S2.v_>,515 36 



$250,482 43 



Balances. 



$1,915 66 
126 24 

48 01 

3 41 

83 35 
76 32 

5 00 

7 53 



802 94 


3,396 35 


1,259 40 


1,821 91 


707 80 


1,084 46 


1,966 24 


118 70 


165 00 


43 93 


400 00 


2,161 13 


1,397 00 


2,150 00 


11,878 62 


405 48 


8 45 



$32,032 93 



* Including unexpended balances from last year. 

t Including interest on Treasurer's bank balances. 

% After deducting $4,150.00 transferred by vote of the town December 9, 1903, as 
follows: Readville Street Drain 1,450; Garfield Avenue Drain 2,300; Lin wood Street 
400. 

§ Transferred from Highways, December 9, 1903. 

|| Including Sewer Assessments collected and amount realized from sale of 
Sewerage Bonds. 

IT Including cash refunded and received. 



TOWN DEBT, JANUARY 31, \ 904. 



FUNDED LOAN. 

SEWERAGE. 

One Hundred and Twenty Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated May 1, 1897, due $5,000.00 annually, 1904-1927 $120,000 00- 

Forty Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated May 1, 1903, due $4,000.00 annually, 1904-1913 40,000 00 

PUBLIC LIBRARY BUILDING. 

Fifteen Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated May 1, 1898, due $1,000.00 annually, 1904-1918. ..... $15,000 00 

HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING. 

Fifty-four Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated July 1, 1901, clue $3,000.00 annually, 1904-1921 54,000 00 

TRESCOTT SCHOOL BUILDING. 

Fifteen Hyde Park Four per cent. Coupon Bonds, 

$1,000.00 each, dated July 1, 1901, due $1,000.00 annually, 1904-1918 15,000 00 

HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING, FURNITURE AND FURNISHINGS. 

$5,000.00— Treasurer's Note, dated October 1, 1902, due $1,000.00 
annually, 1904-1908 : 5,000 CO 

Total Indebtedness $249,000 00 

HENRY S. BUNTON, Town Treasurer. 

Hyde Park, February 1, 1904. 



RESIDENT TAX PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 








Abbott, Elmer E 




$53 04 




Aborn, ElizaDeth, 














55 08 




Adams, Charlotte H. . 




1 . 










67 32 




Adams, William L. B. 














48 96 


$48 96 


Adams, Grace C. and C. B. . 














20 40 




Adams, Mary A. 














32 64 


32 64 


Adams, William G. 












$3 06 




3 06 


Ad'er, George H. 












20 40 




20 40 


Aggott, Annie . 














36 72 


36 72 


Albee, Samuel 












15 30 






Albee, Florence W. . 














230 52 




Alden, Charles L. & Co. 












35 70 






Alden, Edward S. 












55 08 






Alden, Francelia M. . 














78 54 




Alden, Bessie L. 














122 40 




Alderman, Lucy A. . 














57 12 




Allen, Charles F. 












102 00 


97 92 




Allen, Emma W. 














71 40 




Allen, Adelia S. 














51 00 




Allen, Stewart T. 


L 








1 02 


20 40 


21 42 


Allen, Bella P. 












36 72 


36 72 


Alexander, Helena B. 












55 08 




Amback, Frank H. . 














116 28 




Ambrose, James 














33 76 




Amarican Brass Foundry Cc 


. 










20 40 






Anderson, George B. . 








' 




10 20 


99 96 




Anderson, Peter 














39 78 


39 78 


Anderson, Ma> garet E. 














6S 34 




Anderson, Otis A. 












3 06 






Anderson, William 












12 24 




12 24 


Andrews, Marietta G. 














39 78 


39 78 


Andrews, M. G. and C M. 














7 14 


7 14 


Andrews, Ellen L. 














90 78 




Andrews, Charles C. . 












1 53 




1 53 


Andrews, William L. 












1 53 




1 53 


Andrews, Jane 














22 44 


22 44 


Andrews, Theodore F. 














90 78 




Annis, Augustus K. . 














46 92 


46 92 


Appell, Sarah A. 














91 80 




Ardini, Stephen A. 














36 72 


36 72 


Arentzen, Christiana, heirs 














41 82 


39 78 


Armour, Sarah A. 














46 92 


46 92 


Armstrong, David W. 












51 


51 00 


51 51 


Arnold, Ellen W. 














51 00 




Arnold, Henry F. 














75 4S 




Aronson, Mary 














3 06 


3 06 


Ash, Agnes A. 














6 12 


6 12 


Astley, Harry E. 














33 66 




Atkinson, Ida M. 














71 40 




Atwood, Charles F. . 












3 06 






Babb, Sarah E. ■ . ... 




9 18 




Badger, Clara E. 










255 00 


255 00 


Baessler, Henry ■ . 










33 66 


33 66 


Bain, Alexander T. • 










35 70 




Bain, Alexander T. and Margaret T. M. 










6 12 


6 12 


Baker, Frank H. 








3 06 


82 62 


85 68 


Balkam, Stephen B., heirs . 










246 84 




Baptist Church Society 










91 80 




Barden, Elizabeth A., heirs 










85 68 





142 
Resident Tax-Paters 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Barme, Anna J. . 




$31 62 




Barrett, John F. 










30 60 


$30 60 


Barrett, Michael W. . 










54 06 


46 92 


Barrett, Margaret V. 




, . 






48 96 


48 96 


Barrett, Edward L. . 










76 50 




Barritt, Kathcrine 










55 OS 




Barritt, William H. . 








$4 08 






Barry, Patrick and Catherine 










38 76 




Barry, Nora 










37 74 




Barry, Margaret 










7 14 




Bartholomew, Myron H. 










140 76 


140 76 


Bartholomew, Eva L. 










82 62 




Bartlett, Edwin E. E. 










9 18 


9 18 


Bartlett, Alma A. 










46 92 


46 92 


Bartlett, Elizabeth E. heirs 










36 72 


36 72 


Bass, Lizzie L. . 










102 00 




Batchelder, Walter G. 








15 20 




15 20 


Bates. Emma M. 










638 52 


638 52 


Bates, Henry N. 








5 10 






Bates, Charles L. 










53 04 




Bates, Margaret 










53 04 


53 04 


Battle, Catherine C. . 










15 30 


15 30 


Baxter, Edward H. . 








8 06 




3 06 


Baxter, Louise H. 










123 -2 


123 42 


Bean, Sarah E. . 










85 68 


85 68 


Beatey, Annie J., heirs 










214 20 


214 20 


Beatey, Charles J. 








5 10 




5 10 


Beatey, Robert W. 










69 36 




Beausang, Rosanna . 










27 54 




Beausang, Patrick 










30 60 




Becker, Charles, heirs 










89 76 


89 76 


Becker, John . 








24 48 






Becker, Ceila M. 










224 40 




Beebe, Robert O. 










133 62 




J'.eebe & Courage 








6 12 




6 12 


Benari, Bennett 








40 80 




40 80 


Bent, George W. 








1 02 






Bent, Catherine, heirs, 










163 20 




Bentley, Robert L. 








14 £8 




14 28 


Benton, Jesse S. 










64 26 




Benton, Mary A. 








4 08 






Berry, Louisa M. 










43 86 




Bessey, Ada F. 










4b 92. 


46 92 


Bessey, Edward S. 








6 12 




6 12 


Bessey, Jane 










4 08 


4 08 


Bickford, Lomella A. 










132 60 


132 60 


Bicklord, Leroy M. . 








15 30 


120 36 




Bickmore, Albion P. . 








4 08 




4 08 


Bickmore, Elizabeth C. 










28 56 


28 56 


Bidwell, Lawson B. . 








76 50 


171 36 




Bith r, Annie L. 










79 56 




Bither, Edwin D. 










12 24 




Black, James I. 










22 44 




Blackey, Sarah S. 










58 14 




B'aisdell, Albert J. . 










63 24 


63 24 


Blaisdell, Albert J. and Arthur L. 


Bartlc 


tt, estate 






16 32 


16 32 


Blackmer, Hannah H. 










74 46 


63 24 


Blanchard, John C, Jr. 








20J40 


102 00 




Bleakie, Robert 








8 16 


1351 50 




Bleakie, Robert Co. . 








824|16 


2270 52 




Bleakney, Robert L. . 








10 20 




10 20 


B'.odgett, Anna E., heirs 










71 40 


71 40 


Bloom, Julius, heirs . 










75 48 




Bloom, Andrew R. 








4 08 




4 08 



143 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Bloom, Anna L. S. 

Bodflsh, William H. 

Bodwell, William P. 

Boland, Michael C. 

Bolles, James G. 

Bolles, Emily F. 

Bolton, Eliza J. 

Bond, John R. 

Bonnell, John D. 

Bonney, Peter J. 

Baufford, Angelina T. 

Bowen, Daniel S., heir 

B wen, Mary E. 

Bowie, Frank E. 

Boyd, FUs. F. . 

Boyd, Joseph H. 

Boylsn, Stephen 

Boynton, Charles A. 

Boynton. Sarah J. DeV. 

Bradford, Sophia I. 

Bradlev, Kate E. 

Brady,' William J, 

Brady, John 

Brady, John, 2d 

Bragan, Thomas P. 

Bragan, >arah 

Brainard, Amos H. 

Breingan, Alison 

Biennan, Patrick 

Bresnahan, Hannah 

Brewer, Evins J. 

Brewer, Esther A. 

Brewer, George N. M. 

Bridge, Sam W. 

Bridgman, Annie E. 

Bridgman, Alfred F. 

Brigham, Helen A., heirs 

Brigham, Franklin D. 

Briggs, Elizabeth M. 

Brink, Kostant . 

Brooks, Annie M. 

Brooks, Bridget . 

Brostrom, Andreas J., heirs 

Brown, Walter H. 

Brown, Emily M. 

Brown, Bartlett J. 

Brown, James R., heira 

Brown, John Adams . 

Brown, Augusta E. . 

Brown, Jean R. 

Bruce, Miss Anetta 

Brunette, John and Virginia 

Bryant, Walter C. 

Bryant, Charles H. 

Bryant, Helen A. 

Bruce, Alexander 

Buchan. Mary F. 

Buck, Laura A. 

Buckler, Mary E. 

Bullard, Susan A . 

Ballard, Mary A. 

Bullard, Frances E. 

Bullard, Lucy B. and Martha G. Stockwell 

Bullard, Clifford H 



Per- 
sonal. 



$7 14 



6 12 



20 40 
4 OS 



20 40 



17 34 
1 53 



3 06 



2 04 
6 12 



Real 
Estate. 



66 30 

62 22 

60 18 

55 OS 

167 28 

28 56 
71 40 
83 64 
75 48 

64 26 
59 16 

65 28 
79 56 

29 58 
59 16 

4 08 
81 60 
51 00 
64 26 

73 44 
22 44 

63 24 
9 18 

676 26 
75 48 
34 68 
93 84 
39 7 
7 14 

31 62 

228 48 

92 82 

126 48 

106 08 
36 72 

46 92 
6 12 

59 16 

9 18 

42 84 

67 32 

47 94 
54 06 

120 36 
51 00 
63 24 

32 64 
20 40 

89 76 
38 76 
53 04 
5i 04 
57 12 

74 46 
186 66 

16 32 
78 54 



Unpaid. 



7 14 
55 08 

167 28 
28 56 

83 64 
75 48 



65 28 
29 58 



e 12 

22 44 

63 24 

9 18 



34 68 

93 84 



20 40 

228 48 
92 82 

126 48 
17 34 

38 25 



9 18 
32 64 
67 32 



120 36 

3 06 

53 04 
74 46 
16 32 



144 
Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued.) 



Bullavd, William E., trustee 
Bullarn, Edward N. . 

Bullard. Isaac ...... 

Billiard, John D. . . . . . 

Bullard, Kate P 

Bunton, Henry S. . 

Bunton, Henry S., trustee for R. and J. S. Bleakie, C 

F. Alhn and B. F. Radiord 
Bunton, Henry Si, trustee for R. and J. S. Bleakie 

and C. P. Allen ..... 
Bunton, Henry S., trustee for Robert Bleakie . 
Bunton, Henry S., trustee for R. and J S. Bleakie 
Burger, Anton B. 
Burgees, Ada, heirs . 
Burke, John J. . 
Burke, Mary E. . , 

Burke, Thomas F. 

Burke, Thomas P., 2d, and Margaret 
Burke, Join 
Burke, Mar in J. 
Burke, John H. 
Burns, Timothy, heirs 
Burn.-, Dennis . 
Burns, James M. 
Burns, Catherine 
Burnr, C ithcrine C. . 
Burns, Michael . 
Burns, Jules M. 
Burns, Annie C. and Eliza R. 
Burse h, Mary M. 
Bursch Oscar . 
Butler, Mary A. 
Butler, Anme J. 



Cady, Charles H. 
Caffln, Ruth P. . 
Cafliu, Frank H. 
Ciin, R. Ellsworth 
Caldwell, Alexander . 
Caller, Alma A., heirs 
Caller, Joseph . 
Cameron, Jane L. 
Campbell, Carrie 
Campbell, Agnes 
Campbell, William 
Canavan, Alice 
Cane, Edmund . 
Canon, Lizzie G. 
Carberry, John W., trustee 
Carlton, Clara M. 
Carpenter, Abbie H. . 
Carr, Allen P. . 
Carrington, Frances C. 
Carroll, Hannah M. . 
Carroll, Phillip W. . 
Carter, Austin F. 
Carter, Elizabeth B.'s heirs 
Carter, J. B., estate, trustee 
Case, Wilbert J. 
Cashman, Ellen F. 
Cass, John M. . 
Chaddock, James C. 



Per- 
sonal. 



Real 
Estate. 



$10 20 



1 53 

7 65 



40 80 



$35 70 
16 32 
232 56 
482 46 
128 01 
136 68 

387 60 

133 62 

1028 16 

3988 20 

5 61 

88 74 

37 74 

36 72 

45 90 

45 90 



46 92 


60 18 


63 24 


153 00 


40 80 


29 58 


40 80 


38 76 


102 00 


7 11 


91 80 


210 12 


134 64 


55 08 


39 78 


73 44 


34 68 


26 52 


37 74 


49 98 


39 78 


35 70 


93 84 


147 90 


44 88 


27 54 


48 96 


183 60 


49 98 


38 76 


60 18 


99 96 


51 00 


43 86 


55 08 


71 40 


57 12 


136 68 


42 84 


37 74 






145 
Resident Tax-Paters 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 

sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 








$31 62 




Chadbourne. John B. 






Chaffee, Mary M. 












76 50 




Chaisson, Robert 












22 44 


$22 44 


Chamberlain, Helen A. 












74 46 




Chandler, Emeline N. 












76 50 




Chandler, Julia S. 












54 06 


54 06 


Oiapmnn, Anna S. 












186 66 


186 66 


Chapman, Mary 












48 96 


48 96 


Chapman, Henry K. . 












14 28 


14 28 


Chase, Lizzie B. 












61 20 


61 20 


Cheever, Hattie N. 












39 78 




Cherrington, Robert E. 


. 










42 84 


42 84 


Chick, Charles G. 










$10 20 


98 94 




Chick, Chas. G., trustee for Ruth S 


. Blake 








114 24 




Chick, Chas. G., trustee for Curtis 


estate 








55 08 




Childs, Alexander G. . 








30 60 




30 60 


Child-, Elizabeth S. . 












68 34 


68 34 


Chisholm, Ellen 












57 12 


57 12 


Chisholm, Colin . , 










5 10 




5 10 


Chisholm, James W. . 












33 66 


12 66 


Chittick, James J. 










3 06 






Christy, Annie F. 












31 62 




Church, Emma J. 












89 76 


89 76 


Clan. y. John P. 












7 14 




Clapp, Eugene R. 












42 84 




Clapp, A liert C. and Louisa A. 












32 64 


32 64 


Clark, Mary 












41 82 




Clark, Thomas A. 












62 22 


62 22 


Clark, Arthur F. 












226 44 




Clark, Rose L. . 












30 60 


30 60 


Clark, Eugene H. 










3 06 


68 34 


71 40 


Clark, Ida E. . 












7 14 




Clark, Norman W. 












106 08 




Clary, Mary 










2 04 


40 80 




Cleveland, Alden T. . 












38 76 




Cleveland, Ella C. . , 












18 36 




Clough, Octavia N. 




• 








69 36 




Cobb, Mary J. . 












61 20 




Coes, Charies S. 












79 56 




Cogan, Andrew 












47 94 




Cogan, Thomas 












121 38 




Cohen, Almeda W. 












46 92 




Cohen, Mark E. . . . 












7 14 




Colby, Martha H. . . . 












99 96 




Coleman, Elizabeth S. 










2 04 


122 40 


122 40 


Collins, Annie B. . . . 












91 80 




Collins, James .... 










J 


23 46 




Collins, Mary .... 












30 60 




Collins, Patrick D. 












162 18 




Collins, H. A. & Co. . 










81 60 






Coffin, Seth A 










13 26 




13 26 


Collins, Julia .... 












53 04 


53 04 


Concanuon. Margaret E.'s heirs 












34 68 


34 68 


Conley, John T>. 












55 OS 


55 08 


Conl-y, Michael's heirs or devisees 












65 28 




Conley, Mrs. James . 












30 60 




Conley, Stephen's heirs or devisees 












48 96 


48 96 


Conn, Etta E. . 












67 32 


67 32 


Connick, Ann .... 












48 96 




Connolly, Michael's heirs or devise 


38 










120 30 


120 36 


Connollj', Mary . . 












31 62 




Conners, Timothy and Mary 












47 94 




Conroy, Patrick 












48 96 




Cook, Emily A. ... 












57 12 





10 



146 
Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Cook, Jacob . . -. 




$120 36 




Cook, Frank J. . 












51 00 


51 00 


Cook, Luetta J. 










$4 08 




4 08 


Cooke, Herbert L. 










23 46 






Cooper, Louisa E. 
Corbett, Alexander W. 












104 04 


104 04 










4 08 




4 08 


Corbett, Ellen E. 












54 06 




Corbett, Jeremiah, 










3 06 






Corbett, Margaret 












42 84 




Corbett, John . 












41 82 




Corrigan, Bridget 












103 02 


103 02 


Corrigan, Thomas H. 












61 20 




Coirigan, Thomas' heirs or 


devisees 










728 28 


114 24 


Corrigan, Rose . 












84 66 


84 66 


Corson, Clara P. 












55 08 




Corthell, James R. 












96 90 




Costello, Alexander . 












28 56 




Costello, James 












46 ^2 


46 92 


Cotter, John 










12 24 


71 40 




Cotter, James E. 










73 44 


237 66 




Cotter, Henry and Timothy G. 










237 66 


237 66 


Cougrhlin, John F., Bridget E. and Mary 


A. 








61 20 




Coullnhan, CharlottJ A. 










14 28 


14 28 


Coullahan, Margaret . 
Courtney, Elizabeth B. 












74 46 


74 46 












66 30 




Courtney, Frank F. . 










6 12 






Coven ey, Mary . 












296 82 


177 48 


Coveney, Augusta E. . 












55 08 




Covenev, Jamc- s S. 










22 44 


1912 50 


1936 94 


Covert, "Ellen M. 












43 86 


43 86 


C wen, Wm. C. and Matilda 












55 08 




Cowperthwaite, Thiiza A. 












68 34 


68 34 


Cox, John W. . f 












51 00 


51 00 


Cox, Hugh 












39 78 




Cox, Nellie and Lizzie A. 












33 66 




Cox. Thomas F. 


• 










38 76 




Crawford, John 












37 74 


37 74 


Cremin, Jeremiah 












87 72 




Cremin, Cornelius 












35 70 




Cromwall, Peter J. 










3 06 


41 82 


44 88 


Crosby, John . 










12 24 




12 24 


Cross, Edward W. 












76 50 




Crowley, Mary A. 












59 16 


10 20 


Crowley, John O'C. . 










7 14 




7 14 


Crowley, John A. 










20 40 


8 16 




Crumett, Lucy T. 












32 64 


32 64 


Crumett, Charles H. . 










2 04 


277 44 


279 48 


Crumpler, Arthur 
Cull, Catherine C. 












66 30 


66 30 












14 28 


14 28 


Cull, Elizabeth . 












71 40 


71 40 


Cullen, Marietta G. 












38 76 




Cullen, Thomas H. 












32 64 




Cullen, Matthew A. . 










5 10 


64 26 


69 36 


Cullen, Michael and Bridget 












26 52 


26 52 


Cummings, Bridget . 












31 62 




Cundall, Phoebe A. 












46 92 


46 92 


Cunningham, Joseph . 












51 00 




•Cunningham, Mary 












6 12 




Curley, Sabina . 












22 44 




Curran, Stephen 












51 00 




Currier, Charles H. 










102 00 




102 00 


Currier, Azelia's heirs 












21 42 


21 42 


Curten, John 












51 00 


51 00 


•Curtis, J. Langdon 










6 12 


59 16 





H7 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Curtis, Joseph N. . . • . 




$91 8& 




Curran, Morgan . . . . . . • 




57 12 




D 






""":: 


Dadley, James ....... 




106 08 




Dahl, Ole M. . 














U 28 




Daley, Bartholomew 














52 02 


$52 02 


Daley, Daniel F. 














82 62 




Dame, Abby F. T. 














41 82 


41 82 


Damourant, Volante 














69 36 


69 36 


Damon, Nancy . 














. 44 88 




Darling, F. W. & Co. 














306 00 




Darling, Anna E. 














178 50 




Darling, Willis A. 














263 16 


263 16 


Davenport, Albert 












$12 24 


98 94 




Davenport, A.andC.l 


3. ! 












4 08 




Davenport, Warren J 














9 18 


9 18 


Davis, Alonzo . 












10 20 


298 86 




Davis, John P. . 














35 70 




Davis, Arris H. 














42 84 




Davis, David L. 














167 28 




Davis, Willard S 














46 92 




Davis, Marietta S. 














63 24 




Davis, Emma L. 














^5 80 




Day, Ruth A. . 














71 40 




Deagle, William C. 














54 06 


54 06 


Dean, Al xis C. 












20 40 




20 40 


Dean, Ellen C. . 














102 00 


102 00 


Dean, Helen M. T. 














6 12 




Dean, Henry M. 












24 48 


5 10 




Dean, HubeitT. 














100 98 


100 98 


Dedham & Hyde Pari 


Gas Co. 










510 00 


71 40 




Dentremoi t, Matilda 














46 92 




Dennette, Fred 














99 96 




Devlin, Mary A. 














30 60 


30 60 


Devoe, Catherine A. 














20 40 


20 40 


Dierkes. Joseiih 














67 32 




Doane, Clara J. . 














3 9 06 


309 06 


Doane, James A. 












4 08 


45 90 


49 98 


Dockhaw, Chloe D. 














108 12 


68 12 


Dodge, Bertha H. 














79 56 




Dotige, Frederick W. 












4 OS 


57 12 




Doherty, Patrick J. 














64 26 




Dolan, Catherine A. 














24 43 




Dolan, Thomas P. 














31 62 




Dolan, Bridget's heirs 


or devisees, 












132 60 




Donlan, Hannah 














71 40 


71 40 


Donnelly, Thomas H, 














41 82 




Donnelly, Margaret E 














7 14 




Donohoe, John . 














51 00 




Donohoe, Bridget A.'s heirs. 












106 08 


9 38 


Dooley, Catherine's heirs 












38 76 


38 76 


Dorr, Mary E.'s heirs 












30 60 


30 60 


Dowley, Augusta L. 












175 44 




Dowley, George B. 










30 60 






Dowley, Emma R. 












71 40 




Downs, William E. 












63 24 


63 24 


Downey, Rose . \ 












238 68 


238 68 


Downey, Michael's heirs 












66 30 


66 30 


D©wney, Bridget 












37 74 


37 74 


Downie, Kate C. 












55 08 


55 08 


Downing, Alfred 










96 90 


134 64 




Downing, Belinda 










51 00 


70 38 




- . ..... 







148 

Eesident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



Downing, Elizabeth C. 

Draper, Frank O. 

Drink w iter, Joseph W. 

Druuimey, John J. 

Dugga-n, James and Kate 

Duggan, Ann's heirs . 

Dunbar, Alonzo 

Dunbar. Hannah J. 

Dunkerley, Margaret M. 

Dunn, Lizzie 

Dunn, Bartholomew . 

Dunn, John O. and Ida M. . 

Durant, Mary J. 

Durell, James MeD. . . 

Durning, Mary E. 

Dyer, Quincy's heirs or devisees, 

Dyer, Laura E. 

Dyer, Edward Q. 

Dyer, Agnes P. 



E 



Earle, Benjamin M., Jr. 
Eames, Anna M. 
Easton Ida F. . 
Edenborg, John 
Edge, Maude A. 
Edwards, Sarah 
Elliot, Margaret B. 
Ell ot, John F. 
Elliot, Albert E. 
Elliott, John H. 
Elliott, Irene G. 
Elliott, Arthur W. 
Elliott, Mary C. 
Ellis, Joseph D. 
Ellis, Hattie E. 
Ellis, E'len J. . 
Elwell, Josephine M. 
Elwell, Russell T. 
Emerson, Luther O. 
Emerson, Fannie B. 
English, William T. 
Enneking, John J. 
Estabrook, Eliza G. 
Estes, Edward F. and 
Estes, Gardner F. 
Evans, Emily F. 
EweU, Florence A. 



Wm.N. Eustis 



Per- 
sonal. 



$12 75 



2 04 



F 



Fairbairn, Draxanna 
Fairbairn, William U 
Fairbairn, Win. U. and Chas 
Fairbanks, Caroline O. 
Fairmount Mfg. Co. 
Falconer, Mary A. 
Fallon, Peter . 
Fallon, Joseph L. 
vFallon, Thomas F. 
Fallon, Bridget 
Fallon, Margaret F. 
Fardy, Kate L. . 



71 40 



4 59 



24 48 
36 72 



N. 



36 72 



61 20 



Real 
Estate. 



$61 20 

44 88 
49 98 
15 30 
24 48 

47 94 
42 84 
35 70 

48 96 
24 48 
54 06 

102 00 

40 80 

8 16 

78 54 

57 12 



54 06 


89 76 


42 84 


61 20 


77 52 


32 64 


59 16 


59 16 


99 96 


110 16 


91 80 


124 44 


59 16 


74 46 


9 18 


157 08 


112 20 


221 34 


146 88 


103 02 


142 80 


567 12 


87 72 


47 94 



87 72 
51 00 
77 52 


67 32 

214 20 
7 14 


13 26 
80 58 
59 16 



149 
Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



G. 



Fardy, Wilfred 
Farnsworth, Nellie B 
JFarnsworth, Charles L 
Farnsworth, John A. 
Farnsworth, Florence 
Farrell, Joseph E. 
Partington, Laura A. 
Faulkner, Mary C. 
Faunce, Josephine 
Faunce, Thomas E. 
Feehan, Hannah 
Feeney, John 
Felch, Sarah A. 
Fellows, George M. 
Fellow-^, Leslie H. 
Fellows, Margaret I. 
Fellows, Horace E. 
Fellows, Edward S. 
Fennell, Louisa A. 
Fenn r, Dora E. 
Fennessey, John L. 
Fennessey, William A 
Fenne -sey, Mary D. E 
Fenno, Mary L. 
Fenno, Arinie R. 
Fenno, William's heirs 
Fenno, Frederick W. 
Fenton, Mary J.'s heirs 
Fernald, Florence J, 
Fernald, Johan a S. 
Fields, Joseph G. 
Fifleld, Frank I. 
Finn, Thomas . 
Firstain, Minnie 
Firth, Isabella . 
Firth, Ab'-aham, Jr. 
Firth, Elizabeth E. 
Fish, Charles D. 
Fisher, Andrew 
Fisher, Lydia M. 
Fisher, Sophia . 
Fisher, George 
Fisher, Elizabeth D. 
Fisk, H. C. and P. A.'s 
Fiske, Mary 
Fitton, Lucy B. 
Fitton.John 
First Presbyterian Church 
Fitzgerald, Peter J. 
Fitzgera.d, Sarah J. 
Five Associates 
Flaherty, Bogei J. 
Flanders, Chloe S. 
Fogg, S. Elizabeth 
Foley, Honora . 
Foley, James • 
Foley, Michael J. 
Follett & Corrigan 
Forsyth, Neil M. 
Foster, William B. 
Foster, Alice G. 
Foster, Sarah E. 
Foster, Alfred . 
Foster, Alfred (continued) 



heirs 



of 



Hyde Park 



Per- 
sonal. 



$ 51 
26 52 

74 46 



1 02 



3 06 

8 67 



6 12 



30 60 



10 20 



Real 

Estate. 



$164 22 
165 24 
130 56 
130 56 
57 12 
34 68 

72 42 
62 22 

39 78 
133 62 

57 12 

10 20 
102 00 

32 64 
59 16 

SI 60 
34 68 

48 96 
46 92 

5 10 

45 90 
234 60 
108 12 
163 20 

40 80 
9 18 

12 24 
51 00 
39 78 

55 08 
32 64 
27 54 
38 76 
34 68 

11 22 
59 16 

56 10 

73 44 

64 26 
31 62 
118 32 

193 80 

46 92 

49 98 
55 08 

156 06 
97 92 

748 6S 
53 04 

47 94 
47 94 

41 82 
75 48 
53 04 

42 84 
121 38 
108 12 

194 82 
618 12 
264 18 



Unpaid. 



$ 51 
164 22 
191 76 

130 56 
100 56 

131 58 
34 68 



39 78 
134 64 



13 26 
32 64 



48 96 
46 92 



45 90 



12 24 
f-1 00 



27 54 
38 76 
34 68 
11 22 
59 16 



36 72 
49 98 
55 08 



748 68 
53 04 
47 94 
47 94 
41 82 

53 04 
10 20 



108 12 



150 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal* 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Foster, Alfred and George S. Lee, trustee 




$28 56 




Powle, Frances A. . 








41 82 




Fox, Catherine F. 










$10 20 


55 08 


65 28 


Fox, Catherine . 












18 36 


18 36 


Fradenburg, Sarah A. 












34 68 


24 48 


Fradenburg, Sarah D. 












2 04 


2 04 


Fradenburg, Allen M. 










22 95 




22 95 


freeman, Sarah A. 












37 74 




French, Amanda M. . 












90 78 


90 78 


French, Lemuel B. and Caroline A 












51 00 




French, Alice G. 












69 36 




Friede, Charles 










4 08 






Friend, Flora L. 












38 76 


38 76 


Frost, Andrew T. 










30 60 




30 60 


Fuller, Sadie M. 












27 54 


27 54 


Fulton, James . 












51 00 


51 00 


Fury, Ellen M. . 












71 40 




Fury, Thomas F. 


., 










7 U 




Fyler, W. E. 










5 10 




5 10 


V3T 

Gallagher, John J. and Nellie M. McCarthy 




46 92 


46 92 


Galligan, Andrew .... 








41 82 




Galligan, Matthew, SB 










22 44 






Galloupe, Mabel E. 












153 00 


153 00 


Gallup, Marian L. 












68 34 




Galvin, Thomas 












57 12 




Gardello, Antonio 










5 10 


27 54 




Garity, Margaret F. . 












2 04 


2 04 


Gately, John 












34 68 




Gaynor, John and Annie 












40 80 




George, Edie M. 












51 00 




George, Frank L. 










2 04 


22 44 




Gellewitz, Morris . . • 










26 52 




26 52 


Gerry, Otis P. . 


i 










65 28 




Gibbons, Mary J. 












30 60 


30 60 


Gibbons, Patrick H. . 












37 74 




Gibney, Ann 












32 64 


32 64 


Geishecker, Andrew M. . • 












42 84 


42 84 


Giles, Alfred E. 










167 28 


130 56 




Giles, Jason 










30 60 






Giles, Dephina 












138 72 




Gilgnff, David . 










IS 36 






Gilmartin, Patrick 










2 04 


78 54 




Gilmartin, William 












32 64 




Gilson, John's heirs or devisees, . 












65 28 


15 28 


Gleason, F. W. & Co. 










20 40 




20 40 


Gleason, Herman P. . 












55 08 


55 08 


Gleason, Mary I. 


• 










73 44 




Gleason, Nellie G. . . . 












59 16 




Googins, Laura A. . . ■ 












45 90 


45 90 


Googius, Edward 0. . 












61 20 




Googns, Mark and Sara L. . - 












94 86 




Gorman, Harriet B. . . ■ 












53 04 




Gorman, Cyrus 












53 04 




Gorman, Cyrus . . . 












44 88 




Gorml v, William . . ■ 










19 38 


19 38 


Goss, EilaE.. . ... 










104 04 


104 04 


Goss, Carrie C. . . . . 








■ 


54 06 


54 06 


Goss, Daniel J. 










13 26 






Goss, Josiah . . . . 












57 12 




Gould, Mary L., heirs 












20 40 




Gould, Henry H., heirs 












69 36 





i5i 
Resident Tax-Paters 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


1 Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Gould, Jennie M. ..... . 




$ 39 78 




Gould, William F. 














4 08 


$ 4 08 


Grandberg, Henry 












$ S 16 




8 16 


Graham, Franklin C. 












64 26 






Graham, Lilla C. 














213 18 




Grant, Geor e W. 














61 20 


61 20 


Grant, Francis-E. 














46 92 




Grant, Hugh 














20 40 


20 40 


Grant, Annie M. 














30 60 


30 60 


Gray, Eobert 












24 48 




24 48 


Gray, Alexander H. 














7 14 




Gray, Margaret M. 














53 04 




Gray, William A. 












18 36 


b7 72 




Gray, Fiank E. 












14 28 






Gray, Margaret L. 














67 32 




Greeley, John H. 














99 96 


69 96 


Greeley, John D.'s heirs 












61 20 


61 20 


Greenlaw, Amelia S. . 












164 22 




Greenwood, Lucy S.'s heirs . 












73 44 




Greenwood, Georgianna 












46 92 




Greenwood, Helen A. 












92 82 




Greenwood, Frank 












149 94 




Grew. Henry S. 










1366 80 






Grew, Jane N. . 










204 00 






Grew, Edward W. 










102 00 






Grew, Henry's estate . 










15 30 


3352 74 




Gridley, George F. . 












124 44 




Griffin, Fannie M. 












57 12 


57 12 


Griffin, Sarah . 












37 74 


37 74 


Griffin, John W. • . 












69 36 




Griffin, Sarah F. 












22 44 




Griffiths, Charles T. . 










10 20 




10 20 


Griffiths, Charles T. and Martha S 












15 30 


15 30 


Guariglia, Generoso . 










6 12 




6 J2 


Guerin, Ethel K. . 












44 88 




Guernsey, Mary A. . 












55 OS 


55 08 


Gunn, Dennis . . 










2 04 


31 62 


33 66 


Gunn, Elizabeth 












53 04 


53 04 


Gwilliam, Edward J. . 












95 88 


95 88 


H 








Haigh, George S.and Bertha S., trustees 




39 78 




Haigh.JohnA. .... H 






1 53 


28 56 


30 09 


Haldeu, John . 














140 76 




Halden, Lydia C. 














76 50 




Hale, Elvira F. 














122 40 




Haley, Charles . 












2 04 


1437 18 


1439 22 


Hall, August 














20 40 


20 40 


Hall, Caleb 












2 55 


23 46 


26 01 


Hall, Sarah C. . 














59 16 


59 16 


Hall, LunyB. . 














7 14 




Hall, Fred A. . 












3 06 




3 06 


Hall, Maria E. . 














104 04 


104 04 


Hall, Herbert E. 














49 98 


49 98 


Hall, George 














61 20 




Ham, Cora M. . 














9 18 




Hamblin, Carrie L. 














61 20 


61 20 


Hamblin, Benjamin L 














419 22 


419 22 


Hamblin, Howard M. 












793 56 




Hambuigher, Cnarles F. 












147 90 


147 90 


Hamilton, Charles 












70 38 




Hammett, Mary L. 












69 36 




Hammett, Edward A. TV . 












12 24 





152 
Resident Tax-Payers 



{Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Hammond, Joseph W. ..... 




$109 14 




Hanchett, George W. . . H 












89 76 




Hankerd, Eilmund 












88 74 


$88 74 


Hanlou, Daniel J. 










$3 06 






Hanlon, Sarah F. 












87 72 




Hannal'ord, Harry 












42 84 




Hanscom, H. Abby 












12 24 


12 24 


Hansen, . M-nry E. 










5 61 




5 61 


Harding-, George M. . . 












102 00 




Harding, Bartlett H.'s heirs 












130 56 




Hargraves, Joseph N. 












34 68 


34 68 


Hargraves, Alice E. . 












2 04 


2 04 


Harlow, Mary E. 












285 6' 




Harlow, William H. . . 










456 96 


1097 52 




Hani man, Oren O. . 












46 92 




Harris, Mrs. Julius 










24 48 




24 48 


H.-irris, Edward S. 












95 88 




Hart, Bridget M.'s heirs 












21 42 


21 42 


Hart, Ell. n C. . 












71 40 


71 40 


Hartwell, Francis W. . 












68 34 


68 34 


Harwood, Henry V. . 












63 24 




Haskell, Elmer "W.'s heirs . 












6 12 


6 12 


Haskell, George R. 












53 04 


53 04 


Haskell, Gideon H. 










105 06 


453 90 




Haskell, Maria's heirs 












61 20 




Haskell, John . 












58 14 




Haslam, Frank H. P. . 












48 96 


12 96 


Haslam, Blanche M. . 












38 76 


38 76 


Hathaway, Edward S. 












51 00 


51 00 


Haven, George E. 
Hawes, Charles E. 












85 68 














39 78 




Hawes, Emily R. . 












51 00 




Hayes, Jamts B. 












79 56 




Hayes, James B. and John . 












19 38 




Hayes, James . 










3 06 


165 24 


169 3) 


Hayes, James and Paul Hunt 












5 10 


5 10 


Haynes, Annie L. 












91 80 




Hayward, Arthur F. . 










10 20 




10 20 


Hayward, Maggie M. . 












67 32 


67 32 


Hayward, Edward S. . 












164 22 




Hazard, Elsie M. . » 












116 28 


116 28 


Healey, Patrick J. 












44 83 


44 88 


Heaps", Abby J. 












75 48 




Hedtler, James . 












43 86 


43 86 


Hefler, Hannah J. 












38 76 




Heideloff, Charles 












20 4o 




Hern hill, Paul 












38 76 


38 76 


Henderson, Mary 












153 00 




Henderson, Frank 










4 08 


37 74 




Henderson, Elizabeth's heirs 












25 50 




Henderson, William R. 












7 14 




Hennessey, Michael . . 












30 60 




Henshaw, Annie M. . 












44 8S 


44 88 


Hentz, Georgianna L. 












132 60 


31 60 


Heustis, Josephine E. and Mary A 


. Thor 


ipson 








141 78 


141 78 


Hevaughan, Mary A. . 












32 64 


22 44 


Heydacker, Louis' heirs 












43 86 




Higbee. Celia S. 












51 00 


51 00 


Higgins, Antoinette N. 












208 08 


68 08 


Higgins, Henry M.'s heirs . 












200 94 


200 94 


Higgins, Cornelius J. 












71 40 




Higgins, Jennie M. . 












31 68 




Higgins, John . 












31 62 


31 62 


Higgins, Margaret 












40 80 





i53 
Resident Tax-Payers- 



(Continued.) 



Highland, Alice 

Hill, Sarah J. . 

Hill, Fred R. . 

Hill, Warren S. 

Hiller, LucyE. . 

Hilton, Orissa P. 

Hines, Orin M. 

Hitchcock, Alice D. 

Hodgdon, Flora J. 

Ho'ises, Ella A. 

Hoilgi s, Hattie B. 

Hodgkins, Luther D. 

Hodgk nson, John and Thomas. J. 

Hoilgkinson, T!>omas J. 

Hodgkinson, John 

Hodgson, Gertrude R. 

Hoeffling, Anton's heirs 

Hoga , John 

floran, Gullie T. 

Holm 1-3, Mary A. 

Holmes, Alvin D. 

Holmes, M ndana D. 

Holmes, Louisa (J. 

Holmes, Thomas C. 

Holt, Charles F. 

Holtham, Clara A. 

Holway, William H. 

Holzer, Uliich . 

Homans, (Tank B. 

Hood, Georgianna 

Hood, John 

Hoogs, Hannah M. 

Hope, James D. 

Hopkirk, Jane 

Home, Ernest's heirs 

florr, Sarah E. 

House, Charles A. 

House, Nettie F. B. 

Houston, Joseph J. 

Houston, Thomas J. 

Houston, Agnes T. 

Hovey, Solomon's heirs 

Howard, Mary C. 

Howard, Loea P. 

Howard, Lizzie A.. 

Howe, Kittie M. 

Howe, Eugenia A. 

Howes, Alfred E. 

Howes, Churles' heirs or devisees 

Howes, Mary A. P. 

Hudson, Maria . 

Hudson, John W. 

Hudson, Mary . 

Huestis, A lie* M. 

Huggan, Thomas 

Huggins, Charles E. 

Hughes, Thomas J. 

Hughes, Rose E. 

Hhghes. Stephen L. 

Hukin, Emily R. 

Hull, Mary I. . 

Hultberg, Anna S. 

Humphrey, Jennie B. 

Humphrey, Edward I. 



Per- 
sonal, 



6 12 



18 36 
2 04 



12 24 



51 
3 06 



18 36 



20 40 
10 20 



Real 

Estate. 



$93 84 
141 78 

63 24 
120 3« 

57 12 
110 16 

44 88 
183 60 

75 48 
5S 14 
63 24 

46 92 
44 88 
67 32 
53 04 

76 50 
27 54 

118 32 

42 84 

230 52 

51 00 

30 60 

3 06 

103 02 

17 34 

77 52 
135 66 
157 08 

30 t0 
118 32 
144 84 
67 32 
30 60 
24 48 
85 68 

89 76 
81 60 
57 12 
76 50 
97 92 
61 20 
81 60 
53 04 

106 08 
69 36 

102 00 
73 44 
40 80 

47 94 
57 12 
44 88 
15 30 
47 94 

132 60 
60 18 
10 20 
53 04 
40 80 
42 84 

132 60 
63 24 



Unpaid. 



$120 36 
57 12 



75 48 
58 14 
63 24 

46 92 



76 50 

118 32 
42 84 

230 52 
12 24 



17 34 



14 28 



4 08 
89 76 



53 04 
10 20 



73 44 

40 80 



44 88 



132 60 
60 18 
10 20 



42 84 



154 
Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Hunt, Ira J. and Gertrude ..... 




$66 30 


$ 66 30 


Hunt, Kerin 








24 48 


24 48 


Hurley, Dennis and Mary . 








15 30 


15 30 


Hurley, Dennis 






$6 12 


63 24 


69 36 


Hurst, Mary 








63 24 




Hurter, Jennie F. 








183 60 




Hurter, George C.'s heirs 








70 38 




Hutchins, Ella E. 








39 78 


39 78 


Hutchinson, Eliza G. . 








134 64 


134 64 


Hutchinson, Elizabeth 








42 84 




Hyde Pari Savings Bank 








786 42 




Hyde Park Electric Light Co. 






1836 00 


774 18 




Hyde Park Water Co. 






4467 60 


887 40 




Hyde Park First Congregational Church . 






10 i 00 




Hyde Park First Cong. Church Society . 






204 00 




Hyde Park Associates, Allen, Bates & Whiting 


trustees 




325 38 




Hyde Park Co-operative Bank 






115 26 




Hyde Park Ice Co. 






24 48 




24 48- 


Hyde Park Cycle Co. . 






5 10 




5 10' 


Hyde Park Cash Grocery Co. 






16 32 




16 32 


Hj de Park Tallow Co. 






4 08 






Haney, Kate. . 








72 42 




I 

Irving, Lucy A . 

J 
Jackson, James W. ...... 




64 26 


39 26- 




43 86 




Ja kson, Margaret 










75 48 




Jackson, Grace M. 










111 18 




Jackson, Thomas E. 










55 08 




Jacob?, Mary D. 










66 30 




Jacobson, Carl M. 










44 88 




James, Mary 










64 26 




Jank, Robert C. 










37 74 




Jefferds, Lewis S. B. 










69 36 




Jeffers, George . 










173 40 




Jenkins, Eliza B. 










76 50 




Jenkins, Howard 










10 20 




Jenkins, Bridget 










34 68 


34 68 ; 


Jenney, Charles F. 








10 20 


169 32 




Jenney, Edwin C. 










306 00 


306 00 


Jtnney, Elvira F. 








137 70 


137 70 


Jenney, C. F. and E. C. 








6 12 




Jenney, Edwin C, Charles F. and Lora P. 






161 16 


161 16 


Jennings, Cha*. E. T. and Etta A. 






54 06 




Jigger, John W . 






91 80 


91 80 


Johnson, Elizabeth A 










20 40 


20 40 


Johnson, Ellen J. 










38 76 




Johnson, John . 








16 32 


175 44 


191 76. 


Jones, Antoinette C. 










16 32 




Jones, John H. . 










71 40 


71 40 


Jones, Mary A. 










81 60 




Jones, Jessie P. 










7 14 




Jones, Thomas 










27 54 




Jones, Annie C. 










71 40 


71 40 


Jones, Edward D. 








2 04 




2 04 


Jordan, Patrick J. 










34 68 




Jordan, Ellen . 










43 86 


43 86 


Jordan, Mary A. 










24 48 


24 48 


Jordan, James B. 








2 04 




2 04 


Jordan, John C. 








4 08 


82 62 


86 70 



155 
Resident Tax-Paters-— (Continued.) 



Joubert, Prances A. . 
Joubert, Didier Z. 
Juergens, Johanna 
Juergens, Frederick . 
Julian, Wm. H. and Mary A 



K 



Karnan, Robert W. 

Katzman, Elizabeth . 

Kallenber;*, Carl A. - 

Kazar, John H. 

Kazar, Jessie; I. 

Keane, Margaret's heirs 

Keane, William E. 

Keane, Jeremiah J. 

Kearney, John's heirs 

Keating, Edward J. and;Theresa E. 

Keete, John A. 6 

Keegan. Mary . 

Keene. Charles W. 

Keezer, John A. 

Keiley, Mary . 

Keith, Louisa . 

Ke leher, Hugh 

Kelleher, Timothy P. 

Keiley, Mary A. 

Kendall, Matilda H. . 

Kendall, Henry C. 

Kendall, Addie M. 

Keiley, Morgan and Maria 

Kennedy, Fr» derick J. 

Kennedy, F. J. & Co. . 

Kennedy, John . 

Kennedy, Hannah 

Kennedy, Mary 

Kennedy, Daniel S. 

Kenyon, Ralph G. 

Kiggen, Michael 

Kiggen, Joseph H. 

Kiggen, John's heirs . 

Killam, Horace W. 

Killilea, John J. 

Kilroy, Mary E. 

Kimball, Ellen . 

King, Catherine's heirs 

King, George D. 

Kingston, Thomas 

Kirwan, William 

Kivlin, Bartholomew B. 

Knapp, William H. . 

Knight, L. Angie . . 

Knowles, EllaE. 

Kollock, Arthur C. . 

Kollock. William B. . 

Kollock, Edward D. . • 

Krug, Eiiz ibeth 

Kuhn, Clara E. 

Kunkle, Frank . 

Kunklc, Vietoria E. . 

Kunkle, Frank, and Patrick Murphy 

Knight, Adelbert C. . 

Ketch um, George C. . 



Per- 
sonal. 



$81 60 



40 80 



306 00 


22 44 


408 
4 08 


4 08 


10 20 


4 08 


2 04 


16 32 



Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


$129 54 




45 90 




22 44 




8 16 




27 54 






$81 60 


27 54 




47 94 




63 24 




55 08 




29 58 


29 58 


33 66 


33 66 


60 18 




48 96 


48 96 


32 64 


32 64 



79 56 


37 74 


11 22 


2 04 


117 48 


30 60 


4 08 


26 52 


238 68 


56 10 


51 00 


73 44 


S72 10 


30 60 


69 36 


55 08 


44 88 


564 06 


25 50 


38 76 


62 22 


7 14 


37 74 


34 68 


48 96 


41 82 


48 96 


81 60 


93 8l 


30 60 


16 32 


65 28 


22 44 


105 06 


29 58 


27 54 


54 06 


49 98 



79 5© 
37 74 



40 80 
2 04 



30 60 
4 08 



51 00; 



44 88' 



25 50 



7 14 



3 06. 
31 62 



156 
Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Ii 

Lagner, Elinor ...... 




$30 60 




Lake, Martha S. 










69 36 




Lally, Michael .... 










12 24 




Lambert, Charles' heirs and Margaret 










30 60 


$ 30 60 


Lambert, John . 










67 32 


55 08 


Lanahan, Robert's heirs 










25 50 




Landt, Henry .... 








$3 06 


59 16 




Lane, Ann's estate, John Stack, trustee 










29 58 


29 58 


Lane, Harriet L. ... 










68 34 




Lane, Emma L. 










65 28 




Lapham, Elizabeth 










48 96 




Laughlin, James 










42 84 


42 84 


Laughiin, Garrett .... 










32 64 




Lauppe, Charles F. . 








- 


73 44 




Lawrence, Catherine . 










39 78 




Lawson, James D.'s heirs 










88 74 




Leadbenter, Charlotte 










29 58 


29 58 


Leason, Frederick A. . . • 








3 06 




3 06 


Lee, Bridget .... 










76 50 




Leeds, Catherine F. . 










78 54 


78 54 


Leighton, Henry H. . 










53 04 


53 04 


Leonard, Alice .... 










21 42 




Lermon, A.dolph 








10 20 




10 20 


Leseur, Horatio's heirs, Maple street 










121 38 




Leseur, Benjamin F.'s heirs 










114 24 




I eslie, laa M. -. 










65 88 




Leufgren, Oscar J. 










28 56 


28 56 


Levin, Nathan .... 








6 12 




6 12 


Levin, Annie . 








24 48 




24 48 


Lewis, Charles, tax title 










55 08 




Lewis, Ellen D. . . . 










428 40 




Lewis, Edzabeth T. . 










136 68 




Lewis, David W. 








20 40 






Libby, Samuel W. 










26 52 




Lincoln, John C, heirs or devisees of 










204 00 


204 00 


Leseur, Horatio's heirs, Pine street 










70 38 




Lindgren, Swan J. . 








3 06 


42 84 


45 90 


Lindgren, Olot' P. 








4 08 


130 56 


134 64 


Lindgren, Alice . • . 










40 80 


40 80 


Lingham, Charles T. . 










35 70 




Lindsay, Edgar . 
Little, Everett A. . 










40 80 


40 80 










38 76 


38 76 


Lockhart, Bertha M. . 










36 72 


36 72 


Lookwood James F. . 










63 24 




Loftus. Julia . . 










53 04 




Logan, Thomas H. . 










6 12 




Looby, Johanna, and Mary Ennis . 










55 08 




Lovejoy, John S. . . , 








27 54 






Lovejoy, Grace M. . 










110 16 




Lovejoy, Alfred L. . . 








6 12 






Lovejoy, Lizzie C. 










143 82 




Lovcland, Helen H. . 










95 88 




Lovering, Flora 










81 60 




Lowd, Francis F. 










69 36 




Lucey, Julia E. ... 










40 80 




Lufkin, Mary E. 










58 14 


47 94 


Lothrop, Frances E. . 










71 40 




Lugton, Alexander H. 










46 92 


46 92 


Lugton, Eliza B. 










61 20 




Lynch, Margaret 










66 30 




Lynch, Bridget A. 










24 48 




Lyon, Maude N. 










107 10 


107 10 



l S7 
Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Lyon, Emerson W. ..... 




$136 68 


$136 68 


Lyons, James E. . . . 




31 62 




Lyons, Mary E. ...... 




27 54 


27 54 


M 








Macsregor, Archibald ..... 




106 08 


106 08 


Mackintosh, Lucy A. . 












39 78 




Mackintosh, John S. . 










$8 16 


103 02 




Mackintosh, Etta M . 












45 90 




Mackintosh, Alice B. . 










6 12 






Macomuer, Amos' heirs 












23 46 




Mahoney, Dennis W. . 










21 93 


18.» 72 


211 65 


Mahoney, Bridget's heirs 












33 66 


33 66 


Mahoney, John W. 










4 08 




4 08 


Mahoney, William 










36 72 






Mahoney, Louise T. . 












69 36 




Malley, "Luke and Catherine 












44 88 




Man lell, Henry C. 












121 38 




Manley, George H. 












47 94 


47 94 


Man!ey, Mary A. 












7 14 




Mann, Catherine V. 












30 60 


30 60 


Mannion, Patrick 












42 84 




Marchetti & Co. 










10 20 




10 20 


Margolius, Gedalia 










17 34 




17 34 


Marks, Cecelia . 












91 80 




Marr, Adeline M. 












309 06 




Marshall, Mary H. 












44 88 




Martin, Elizabeth F. . 












82 62 


82 62 


Martin, Robert B. 










3 06 






Mason, Mary E. . 












37 74 


37 74 


Mathias, Jane T. 












15 30 


15 30 


Math us, Franz . 












52 02 




Maurer, Augusta 










4 08 


62 22 




Maxim, Jane 












215 22 




May, Hannah Alice 












49 9S 


49 98 


Maynard, William M. 










10 20 






Mc^Alfee, John W. and Sarah M. . 










46 92 


16 92 


McAndrew, Patrick, and Catherine McGi 


ath 








56 10 




McAlpine, Lemuel . . 










2 04 




McArthur, Edward S. • 












5 10 




McAskill, Kenneth's heirs 












40 80 




McAuliife, Bridget 












28 56 




Masters, Lotten 












56 10 




McAvoy, Mary E. 












70 3S 




McBournie, Lotan R. . 












54 06 




McBride, Edw. W. and John 


M. '. 








10 20 


81 60 


91 80 


McCarter, John G. 












18 36 




McCarter, Sarah J. G. 












57 12 




McCarthy, Mary's heirs 












34 68 




McCarthy, Michael 












32 b4 


32 64 


McConnell, John T. 












79 5ti 


79 56 


McCoy, Mary J. 












38 76 




McCrillis, Clarence H. 












76 50 




McDermott, Joanna . 












75 48 


75 48 


McDermott, Margaret 












25 50 




McDermott, John 












28 56 




McDonald, William I. 












44 S8 


44 88 


McDonald, David A. . 












53 04 




McDonald, Alex. N. . 












53 04 


53 04 


McDonald, Charles E. 












6 12 




McDonough, John's heirs 












95 88 


95 88 


McDonough, Rose A. 












53 04 


53 04 


McDonough, Mary C. . 












48 96 





158 
Resident Tax-Payers— (Continued.) 





NAMES. 










Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


JMcDonouarh, James ...... 




$105 06 




McDonough, Patrick J. 














5 10 




McDonough, Peter 














63 24 


$63 24 


McDonough, Thomas J. 












$10 20 


28 56 


38 76 


McDougaid, John C. . 














61 20 




McGill cudy, John's heirs 














29 58 


29 58 


McGinley, Joseph B. . 














55 08 




McGowan, Andrew 














21 42 




McGowan, Thomas 














38 76 




McGrath, Mary E. 














21 42 


21 42 


McGrath, James 












2 04 


12 24 


14 28 


McGrath, Honora J. . 














73 44 


73 44 


McGregor, Frank P. . 












30 60 






McGuire, John J. 














6 12 




Mclnnes, William 














36 72 




Mclntyre, Warren F. 














65 28 


65 28 


Mclntyre, William F. . 














66 30 




McKay, John A. 














60 18 


60 18 


McKetn, Lena D. 














46 92 


46 92 


McKendry, Susan M. . 














65 28 




McKenna, John II. 's heirs 














220 32 




McKenna, Mary A. 














79 56 




JMcKennay, James, 2nd. 














26 52 




McKenna, James 














7 14 


7 14 


McKenna, Thomas 














33 66 


33 66 


McKenna, Elizabeth . 














23 46 




M^Kinney, William G. 














32 64 




.McLean, Alexander's heirs 














46 92 


46 92 


McLean, J hn S. 














112 20 


112 20 


McLellan, Elizabeth . 














42 84 




McLeod, Mary J. 














77 52 


77 52 


McLeod, Roderick J. . 












4 08 




4 08 


McMahon, John W. 












3 06 




3 06 


JVIcMahon, Mary E. 














40 80 


40 80 


McMahon, Margaret . 














81 60 


81 60 


McMahon, Joseph W. . 














60 18 




McManus, Katherine F. 












* 


39 78 


39 78 


McPherson, Alexander D. 














51 00 


51«00 


McWhinney, Robert F. 














2 04 




Meagher, John A. 










« 




45 90 




Meiggs, Clarence U. 
















184 62 




Melia, Bridget . 
















43 86 




Meister, Caroline A. 
















34 68 




"Melville, Anna M. 
















91 80 




Melzard, Louise C. 
















55 08 


55 08 


Mercer, Eniily J. 
















53 04 


53 04 


Mercer, Thomas 
















68 34 


68 34 


Merrill. Lena D. 
















57 12 


57 12 


Merrow, Susan A. 
















116 28 


116 28 


Methodist Church Society 














72 42 


72 42 


Middleton, Catherine J. 














184 62 




Miles, George . 












28 56 




28 56 


Miles Eva E. ■ 
















97 92 


97 92 


Miller, Annie . 
















121 38 


111 18 


Miller, Peter's heirs 
















34 68 


34 68 


Miller, Mary E. 














3 06 


142 80 




Ttfillett, Edward P. 
















44 88 


44 88 


Milliken, Elizabeth 
















30 60 




Mills, Joseph W. 














15 30 




15 30 


Milne, John 
















77 52 




Milne, John, per prop 














7 14 






Miner & Crumett 
















42 84 


42 84 


Mitchell, Abbie E. 
















81 60 


81 60 


Mitchell, George A. and Susan E. 












136 68 





*59 
Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



Mitchell, Sarah L. 
Moriiich, Wm/F.A. 
Mogan, John J. 
Monahan, John H. 
Monahan, William J 
Monahan, Mary J. 
Mooar, Caroline H. 
Mooar, Jarnes F. 
Moitedo, Joseph 
Moran, Mary E. 
Moir, Florence L. 
Morhoff, Lena . 
Morlcy, Frank A. 
Morris, Mary . 
Morrissey, Annie 
Morriss y, John and Mary 
Morrison, Alice G. 
Morrison, Chas. F. 
Morrison, Mary E. 
Morrison, Wm.J. 
Morrison, Chas. F. et als. 
Morrison, Michael and Brid 
Morse, George W 
Morse, Theodora E. 
Mortenson, Tena 
Morton, Sarah N. 
Moseley, Caroline M. 
Moseley, Samuel R. 
Mo wry", William A. 
Moylan, Michael F.'s heirs 
Mugford, Fred F. 
Mulcahy, Isabella 
Mulcahy, Michaei 

Mulkein, Annie 

Mullen, Flora E. 

Mullen, Ann 

Mullen, Susan, Guardian 

Mulvey, Jane's heirs 

Mungau, Patrick 

Murphy, Hannah 

Murphy, Mary A. E.'s heirs 

Murray, Bridget 

Murray, Elizal eth 

Murray, Daniel A. 

Murray, Wm. M. 

Myers, Samuel 

Myers, Samuel, 2d 

Miner, Henry B. 

Miner, Maud M. 

Mclver, John . 



et 



Per- 
sonal. 



N 



Nason, Joseph L. 
Naugrhman, John 
Naylor, Signa J. 
Neal, Wallace I. 
Neilson, David B. 
Ness, Mary 
Newbegin, Jas. H. 
Newcomb, Geo K. 
Newell, Stillman E. 
Newell, Susan E. 
Newman, Hattie A. 



$6 63 
7 14 



3 06 



23 46 



2 04 



30 60 



2 55 

3 06 



2 04 

3 06 
20 40 

3 06 
2 55 

4 OS 



Real 
Estate. 



$79 56 
58 11 
40 80 

36 72 

37 74 
61 20 

151 98 
63 24 

135 66 
27 54 
56 10 
51 00 

32 64 

37 74 
34 68 
31 62 

37 74 
79 56 
34 6S 

300 90 
81 60 
39 78 
58 14 

38 76 
51 00 

102 00 

89 76 
48 96 
36 72 
145 86 

41 82 
28 56 
18 36 

48 96 

49 98 
41 82 

26 52 
109 14 

39 7S 
46 92 
34 68 

. 75 48 
60 IS 
183 60 

27 54 
34 68 



Unpaid. 



$36 72 
37 74 
61 20 



6 12 


31 62 


42 84 


23 46 


61 20 


28 56 


55 08 


43 86 


51 00 


37 74 



37 74 



61 20 
79 56 
34 68 

81 60 
41 82 

38 76 
51 00 



145 86 
2 55 

44 88 
28 56 



46 92 



34 68 



55 08 
37 74 



i6o 
Resident Tax-Paiers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Newton, Sarah F.'s heirs ..... 




$106 08 




Nichols, Minuie 














60 18 


$60 18 


Nielson, Anton . 














4t) 80 


40 80 


No le, Mary H. 














59 16 




Noble, Mark E. 












$40 80 






Nightingale, Mary C. . 
Nolan, Ann 














38 76 


38 76 














26 52 




Noonan, Matthew 














24 48 


24 48 


Norlinsr, Charles G.'s heirs 














40 80 




Norfolk Supply Co. 












12 24 




12 24 


Norris, Edwin S. 














55 08 




Norris, George H. 














61 20 




Norris, William H. and Harry A. 












277 44 


277 44 


Norris, William H. . , 












489 60 


489 60 


Norris, Nettie B. 












66 30 


66 30 


Norris, Clai ence G. 












2 04 




2 04 


Norton, Susan M. 














58 14 




Norton, Mary 














93 84 




Norton, Fannie A. 














74 46 




Norton, Frank S. 














72 42 




Norwood, William E. 














95 88 




Noyes, Martha H.'s heirs 














69 36 




Noyes, Maria H. 














111 18 




Noyes, Annie T. 














8 16 




Nuhn, William J. 














58 14 




Norton, Frank S. and Lucy F. Crumett . 








21 42 




O'Brien, Catherine ....... 




42 84 


42 84 


O'Brien, John's heirs . 














168 30 


168 30 


O'Brkn, Catherine E. 














228 48 




O'Brien, Alice . 














66 30 




O.'Brieu, Lawrence S. 














31 62 




OiConnell, Mary A. 














216 24 




OiConnell, Daniel 














102 00 


102 00 


OiConner, Patrick 














28 56 




OiDonnell, Mary E. . 














56 10 


56 10 


0>Donnell, Margaret E. 














37 74 


37 74 


O.Flaherty, Martin 














26 52 




O, Grady, Delia A. 














10 20 


10 20 


O.Hallo an, Mary E. . 














25 50 


25 53 


O.Hern, Mary M. 














58 14 




OjRouke, James 














42 54 




O Rouke, Patrick 














43 86 


43 86 


O'Toole, Michael 














92 82 




Ollive, James F.. 














34 68 




Olson, Martin . 














39 78 


39 78 


Orcutt, Fred S. H. . 














42 84 


42 84 


Ormsbee, Pricilla 














58 14 




Ormsbee, William W. 














10 20 




Ott, Katherine . 














47 94 




Outlaw, Amanda 














30 60 




Page, Mary E. . 




8 16 


61 20 




Page, Mary E., admx. BJK 












16 32 






Pagington, Mary A. . 














78 54 


18 34 


Pagington, Thomas 














33 66 


33 66 


Pasington, John S. 














31 62 




Paine, Francis M. 














67 32 


67 32 


Paine, John A. . 












2 04 


59 16 


61 20 


Paine, Mary E. 














144 84 


44 84 



i6i 
Resident Tax-Payers. 



( Concluded. ) 



Paine, Charles F. 

Palmer, Catherine F. . 

Palmer, Charles E. 

Palmer, Charles E. and Maria A. Waters 

Park hurst, Frederick A. 

Parks, Albert L. 

Partridge, Charles C. . 

Payson, Cordelia A. . 

Peabody, Ephraim's heirs 

Peabody, Mary J. and Mary D. 

Peabody, Mary J. 

Peabody, George M. . 

Pearce, Alice C. J. 

Peare, Cora A. . 

Peare, Geo. H. & Co. . 

Peck, Minnie E. 

Peck, Harriet A. 

Peirce, Catherine's heirs 

Pepper, Mary H. 

Pera, Lorenzo and Nora Johnson 

Perkins, Hannah S. 

Perkins, David 

Perkins, David, tax title 

Perry, Oria J. and Minnie A 

Perry, Mary H. 

Perry, Charles Ervin . 

Perry, Peter 

Perry, Matilda M. 

Perry, Charles E. & Co. 

Peterson, Annie C.'s heirs 

Pfoiifer, George W. . 

Phelps, Adeline P. 

Phillips, Mary V. 

Phipps Daniel W. 

Pickett, Eliza D. 

Pierce, Emma C. 

Pierce, George B. 

Pierce, Elizabeth V. . 

Pierce, John Ei dy 

Pineault, Joseph 

Pineo, James C. 

Pingree, Calista 

Pinkham, Win. F. 

Plummer, Wilmot H. . 

Pommer, Robeit E. . 

Pommer, Louisa A. . 

Poole, Mary E. . 

Poole, William . 

Porter, Ira C. . 

Porter, Samuel F. 

Pothecary, Harry 

Pothecary, Patience's heirs 

Powers, Wilbur H. 

Pratt, Harriet E. 

Prescott, Grace H.'s heirs 

Preston, William D. . 

Preston, Fannie H. 

Pring, James F. 

Pring, Mary E. . 

Pring, Johanna . 

Probert, Richard 

Putnam, Hannah A. . 

Putnam, Sidney C.'s heirs 

Peterso , Louii-a 

Pollock, Susan T. 



Per- 
sonal. 



$3 06 
3 06 
1 53 



3 06 



76 50 



10 20 
5 10 



30 60 



4 08 



81 60 



Real 
Estate. 



$89 76 
54 06 

14 28 

141 78 
67 32 

99 96 
42 84 

291 72 
45 90 

178 50 

82 62 
124 44 

31 62 
61 20 
58 14 
30 60 

26 52 

142 80 
416 16 

3 06 
91 80 
51 00 
44 88 

126 48 

38 76 

89 76 
77 52 
85 68 

143 82 

57 12 

90 78 
49 98 
67 32 

89 76 

27 54 

90 78 

91 80 
35 70 

4 08 
255 00 

10 20 

40 80 

65 28 

51 00 

124 44 

143 82 

112 20 

218 28 

44 88 

58 14 
143 82 

85 68 

110 16 
57 12 

83 64 
161 16 

56 10 
12 24 



Unpaid. 



$89 76 



14 28 

67 32 
1 53 

89 76 
42 84 



82 62 



3 06 
31 62 



58 14 



51 00 

44 88 



89^76 
36J72 
85 68 



67 32 



4 08- 
100 00- 



143 82- 
112 20 



34 68 
58 14 



56 10 



l62 

Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


k 








Quealey, William . . . 




$60 18 




Quinlan, John . . . . 


$28 56 


222 36 




Quiim, Jai 


nes . . .... 

B 




29 58 




Radell, Emma Ii. . . . . . ' 






159 12 




Ralford, . 


^.nna M. 
















277 44 


$277 44 


Radford, 1 


''rank H. . 
















89 76 




Raeder, C 


ara E. 
















153 00 




Rafter. Jo 


hnC. 
















71 40 




Rafter, M 


ary M. 
















57 12 


57 12 


Rafter, Jo 


tin James 
















36 72 


36 72 


Rafter, Ri 


ith H. 
















20 40 




Ratter, M 


iria 














2 04 


61 20 


63 24 


Rand, Sar 


ah A.'s estat 


e 














19 38 




Rausch, A 


lice G. 
















59 16 


59 16 


Rausch, G 


eorsre H. 














\ 


10 20 


10 2 


Ray, John G. 














6 12 


310 08 




Ray, John G., Jr. 














3 06 






Rand, Rar.hael P. 
















46 92 




Reardon, Ellen . 
















21 42 




Reagan, Mary . 
















36 72 




Renton, Ralph J. 














6 12 






Reynolds, Lucy S. 
















181 56 


181 56 


Reynolds, Mabel L. 
















9 18 


9 18 


Reynolds, Ella F. 
















10 20 




Rhodes, Marion 
















62 22 




Rice, Emerson, . 














20 40 






Rice, Sarah W. . 
















83 64 




Rich Brothers, F. B. & 


F. A. 












61 20 


109 14 




Rich, Bertna J. . 
















24 48 




Rich, Frank B. . 
















66 30 




Rich, Herbert T. 














10 20 






Richardson, John 














4 08 


44 88 


48 96 


Richardson, Elizabeth A. 














54 06 




Richardson, George L. 














81 60 




Richardson & Rafter, E. C. Jenney, trustee 








42 84 


42 84 


Richardson & Hatter, E. C. Jenney, trustee 








20 40 


20 40 


Riley, Joseph, 1st 








23 46 




Riley, Joseph, 2d, and Bridget 












24 48 




Riley, Thomas and Julia 












65 28 


65 28 


Riley, Nancy D. , 














53 04 




Riley, Mary A. . 














82 62 




Rimmer, Agnes E. 














54 fc> 


54 06 


Risk, Thomas H. 














90 78 


90 78 


Risk, Mary J. . 














189 72 


189 72 


Ring, Harriet G. 














10 20 




Ritchie, John 














85 68 




Ritchie, Harriet N. 














57 12 




Ritchie, Margaret 














42 84 




Roach, Henry J. 












4 08 




4 08 


Roach, Rosie A. 














7 14 


7 14 


Roberts, Edith E. 














71 40 




Roberts, Henry M. 














21 42 




Roberts, Elizabeth 














87 72 




Robinson, Henry B. . 














56 10 


56 10 


Robinson, Freda 














67 32 


67 32 


Robinson, Julia F. 














262 14 




Robinson, John T. & Co. 












4 8 00 


528 36 


936 36 


Robinson, George E. . 














81 60 


81 60 


Robinson, John 














24 48 





163 
Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Rockwood, Estella C. . 




$71 40 


$71 40 


Rockwood, Anna L. . 










59 16 




Rogers, William N. . . . . 










48 96 


48 96 


Rogers, Margaret (H. P. ave.) 










65 28 


65 28 


Rogers, Catherine G. . 










44 88 


44 88 


Rogers, James R. 










42 84 


42 84 


Rogers, Hugh E. 










46 92 




Rogers, Margaret (94 Water) 










65 28 


65 28 


Rogers, Johanna 










56 10 


56 10 


Rogers, Frederick J. . 








$4 08 


63 24 




Rogers, Arthur T. and Nellie A. . 










9 18 


9 18 


Rogers, Arthur T. 










56 10 


56 10 


Rogers, Eliza T. . . . 










116 28 




Rogers, Viola M. 
Rollins, Fred E. 










49 98 


49 98 










59 16 


59 16 


Roman, John ... 










108 12 


108 12 


Roman, Elizabeth . 










73 44 


73 44 


Roome, B. Elizabeth . 










46 92 




Rooney, Patrick 










48 96 


48 96 


Rooney, Edward D. . 










51 00 


51 00 


Rooney. Catherine, heirs or devisees 










516 12 


236 12 


Rooney, Patrick M. . 








3 06 


32 64 




Rooney, Patrick J. 's heirs 










34 68 


34 68 


Rooney, Alice F. - 










316 20 


316 20 


Rooney, Patrick H. . 








3 06 




3 06 


Ross, Aanes T. . 










95 88 




RowelCAda C. . 










42 84 


42 84 


Rudolph, Agnes C. 










51 00 


51 00 


Rud , Julius .... 










23 46 




Ruiter, Myrtle 8. 










54 06 


54 06 


Ruiter, James R. 










54 06 


54 06 


Runnells, L' vi A.'s heirs 










59 16 


59 16 


Russo, Raffelo 










33 66 




Ryan, James F. and Bridget 










44 88 




Ryan, Bridget, trustee 










7 14 




Ryan, Isaac L. . 










71 40 


71 40 


Ryan, Jane .... 










25 50 




Ryder, Margaret A.J. 

q 










44 88 




Sampson, Arch R. ..... 


3 06 




3 06 


Sam d son, Margaret E. 










377 40 




Samuels, Isaac B.'s heirs 










53 04 


53 04 


Sanborn, Mary .... 










35 70 


35 70 


Sanborn, John W. 










34 68 




Sanborn, Mary J. 










57 12 




Sanborn, Melvin 










38 76 




Sanderson, Anna M. . 










61 20 




Sanford, Mary A. and Clara F. 










58 14 




Sanger, Sarah J. 










137 70 




Sargent, Louis H. 










53 04 


53 04 


Sargent, Gilbert L. 










61 20 


61 20 


Savage, Eben D. 








27 54 


10 20 


37 74 


Savage, Mary E, . . 










74 46 


74 46 


Savage, John C. 








4 08 


83 64 


87 72 


Savage, Henrietta L. . 










61 20 




Savage, Marv . . 










10 20 




Sawtelle, G orge W.'s heirs 










7 14 




Sawtelle, Mary M. . 










44 88 




Sawyer, Edwin W. 










61 20 




Sawyer, Daniel's heirs . ' 










57 12 




Sayer, William H. 


, 






57 12 




Savage, Mary .... 








36 72 





1 64 
Resident Tax-Paters — {Continued.) 



Schmalz, Josephine 

Schmitt, Jennie L. 

Schell, Ellen A. 

Schultz, Gustav A . 

Schofield, Hannah 

Schwaibe, Max 

Schwartz en berg, Wilhelmina 

Scott. Jairus H. 

Scott, Jane W. . 

Scott, Leila A. . 

Scott, Robert, Jr. 

Scott, James D. 

Scrivens, Hannah L. . 

Scrivens, Walter G. . 

Scully, Mary E.'s heirs 

Sears, Harriet A. 

Sears, Susan A. . 

Sears, Elizabeth B. 

Seymour, Thomas 

Shaughnessey, Edward 

Shaughnessey, Edward 

Shaw, Mary 

Shea, William . 

She eh an, Mary E. 

Sheehan, Patrick J. 

Sheehan, John F. 

Sheparr), Asenath A. 

Shepherd, Peter 

Sheridan, James E. 

Sherman, Andrew L, 

Simmons, James 

Simmons, Bridget A. 

Simpson, Dana P. 

Slafter, Theodore S. and Anna R. Countr 

Sheridan, John . 

Slafter, Theodore S. 

Small, Nellie A. 

Smalling, William E. 

Smith, Mary E. 

Smith, Fredericka 

Smith, Herbert L. 

Smith, Mary S. D. 

Smith, Reliance G. 

Smith, Jennie M. 

Smith, Mary's heirs 

Smith, Mary A. 

Smith, Lucy A. 

Smiton, George 

Smolansky, Annie 

Snow, Lavinia's heirs 

Snow, George H. 

Soley & Smith . 

Soule, Albion, M. M. 

Soule, Mary Leach 

S parrel 1, William P. 

Spear, Charles F. 

Speed, Leila M. 

Spencer James N. 

Spencer, Charles H. 

Sreenan, Patrick 

Stack, John 

Stack, John 

Stack, Matthew H. 

Stack, Thomas . 



yman 



Per. 
sonal. 



40 80 
2 04 



20 40 



11 22 

14 28 



12 24 

8 16 

27 54 

6 12 



16 32 

2 04 



10 20 



5 10 



Real 


Estate. 


$27 54 


30 60 


73 44 


38 76 


42 84 


23 46 


55 08 


207 06 


65 28 


46 92 


143 82 


38 76 


36 72 


47 94 


52 02 


63 24 


57 12 


57 12 


66 30 


33 66 


47 94 


40 80 


90 78 


69 36 


15 30 


63 24 


65 28 


186 66 


28 56 


43 86 


6 12 


132 60 


48 96 


30 60 


87 72 


48 96 


44 88 


63 24 


26 52 


59 16 


65 28 


44 88 


62 2-2 


40 80 


20 40 


161 16 


89 76 


58 14 


44 88 


48 96 


41 82 


98 94 


43 86 


42 84 



i6 5 
Resident Tax-Paters 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Stack, Charles F. ..... 


$3 06 


$69 36 




Stackpole, Eunice 










38 76 




Stanberry, Richard, Jr. 










24 48 




Stanford, Catherine E. 












73 44 


$73 44 


Spencer, Timothy 












10 20 




Stanlev, Arthur 










6 12 


105 06 




Stanley, Edward E. . 












128 52 




Stark, Ann M., heirs or devisees 










91 80 


91 80 


Stevens, Elvira C. C.'s heirs 










63 24 




Stevens, Mary M. 










53 04 




Stevens, Perley E. 










49 98 


49 98 


Stevens, Annie M. 










104 04 


104 04 


Steward, Ellen A. 










57 12 




Stewart, Oswald and Annie 










110 16 




Stewart, Malcolm 










57 12 


57 12 


Stickney, Emma O. 










43 86 


43 86 


Stinson, Alvah L. 










149 94 




Stockbridtie, Arthur B. 










75 48 


75 48 


Stockford, Hugh J. . 










175 44 




Stocking:, Mary M. 










155 04 


155 04 


Stone, Franklin's heirs 










61 20 




Stone, Mary A.'s heirs 










73 44 




Stone, Elma A. 










71 40 




Storer, Emma A. 










41 82 




Story, Arthur W.'s heirs 










28 56 


28 56 


Story, Alice A. 










8 16 


8 16 


Strachan, Betsey 










6 12 




Strachan, Douglas 










9 18 




Straw, Antoinette McK. 










69 36 


69 36 


Stuart, Win. J. and Elizabeth G. 










177 48 




Stuck, Julius J. 








5 10 


157 08 




Sullivan, Rachel F. 










30 60 


30 60 


Sullivan, Mary 








2 55 


37 74 




Sullivan, Lawrence E.'s heirs and 


Catherine T 








30 60 




Sumner, Henrietta C. 










65 28 


65 28 


Sumner, William F.'s heirs . 










59 16 




Swallow, Adeline E. . 










67 32 




Swan, Grace M. 










81 60 


81 60 


Swanstroni, August . 










39 78 


39 7S 


Sweeney, Jane 










88 74 




Sweeney, Thomas W. 








2.55 


91 80 




Sween v, Thomas P. . 








5 10 




5 10 


Swift, Sarah S. . 


, 








42 84 




Swinton, Jennie S. . 

T 










126 48 




Tacey, George ....... 


2 04 






Tacey, Mary 










107 10 




Taylor, Prince H.'s heirs 










43 86 




Taylor, Daniel T.'s heirs 










63 24 




Taylor, Charlotte A. . 










59 16 




Terry, Henry B. and Abbie A. 




. 




104 04 




Terry, Henry B. 








162 18 




Terry, Henry B., trustee for Wm. and Eliz. A. Carberry 




200 94 


200 94 


Terry, Henry B., trustee for William Carberry 




31 62 




Thayer, Frank ....... 


13 26 






Thomas, William H. . 








11 73 




11 73 


Thompson, Mrs. H. A. B. 










64 26 


24 06 


Thompson, Arthur E. 










71 40 




Thompson, John B. 










24 48 


24 48 


Thompson, Howard S. 










83 64 


83 64 


Thowkill, Joseph 
Ticknor, Sheridan F. . 










6 12 












63 24 





i66 
Resident Tax-Payers- 



(Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 

sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Tilden, James A. . . . . . . 


$20 40 


$44 88 




Tihien, Ann E.'s heirs 












108 12 




Tileston, Arthur G. 










19 38 






Tileston, Annetta 

Tilton, Josiah N. . . 












88 74 


$88 74 












28 56 




Tilton, Mary A. 












62 22 




Timson, Miunie B. 












98 94 




Tirrell, Frederick N. . 










20 40 


433 50 




Tobin, Thomas D. 










6 12 




6 12 


Tobin, Mary J,". 












46 92 


46 92 


Tomlinson, Robert J. 










51 00 




51 00 


Tooker, William H. . 












184 62 




Toole, Martin . 












38 76 


38 7d 


Tourtelotte, Ellis C. and Emma S. 












65 28 


65 28 


Tower, Adeline B. 












88 74 




Tower, Clement B., Jr. 










6 12 






Towns, Elizabeth 












56 10 




Trefrey, Elizabeth D. 












71 40 




Treffrey, William F. 










3 06 






Tripp, Abel W. 












40 80 




Tucker, Charles H. 












111 18 




Towle, Peter F. 












41 82 


41 82 


Tucker, Ella A. 












57 12 




Tuckerman, John H. . 












42 84 




Turner, Maria L. 












6 12 


6 12. 


Turner, John J. 












35 70 


35 70. 


Tuttle, William U. 










3 06 






Tuttle, Anna M.'s heirs 












136 68 




Tuttle, Samuel A. 










11 22 


67 32 




Tyler, Charles H. . . 












22 44 


22 44 


Tyler, Harriet B.'s heirs 












155 04 




Tvler Grain and Coal Co. 










65 28 






Tyler, Merion M. . 












58 14 


58 14 


U 








Underbill, Lizzie S. . . . . 




51 00 




Underbill, Merrill 










1 02 


55 08 


56 10 


Underhill, Lois A. 












6 12 


6 12 


Upbam, Mary . 












59 16 


59 16 


Upham, L. Frank 












47 94 


47 94 


V 








Van Slyck, Susan P. . 




48 96 


48 96 


Vincent, Henry . 












42 84 


42 84 


VincinDas, Dominick . 












44 88 




Vivian, Roxanna 












60 18 


60 18 


Vose, Amelia B. 












221 34 




Vose, Mary E. and Sarah M. 












104 04 




Vose, Sarah M. . 












40 80 




Vietze, Charles F. . . - 












24 48 




Vi.es, Frank T. 










55 08 




W 








Wade, George H. . . . . . 


15 30 






Waldron, Charles E. . . 












118 18 


111 18 


Wal^ron, Hi; am E. B. 












98 94 




Walker, Lucretia R. . 












57 12 




Wallace, Hannah 












65 28 




Wallace, Richard T. and Ellen A. . 












32 64 




Walsh, William P. 












28 56 




Walstab, Henrietta 












43 86 


43 86 



167 
Resident Tax-Papers — (Continued.) 



Walter, Louisa T. 

Ward, William D. 

Ward, Mary S. . 

Ward, Rowland 

Ward, Charlotte 

Ward, Amy B. . 

Warren, Peter E. 

Washburn, E'iza G. 

Washburn, Andrew . 

Wasserboebr, Henry P. 

Waters, Thomas S. 

Waters, Maria A. 

Waters, Margaret and Nancy T. S 

Waters, Rose E. 

Watson, Susan's heirs 

Waverly Club, 

Webb, Peter J. 

Webb, George E. 

Webber and Wilson, . 

Weuster, Irving C. 

Webster. Prank B. 

Webster, Frank Blake Co. 

Weeks, Flora B. 

Weeks, Harriet C. 

Weil, Belle 

Welch, Mary (Marron) guard 

Welch, Mary 

Welch, Ann'ie E. 

Welch. Stephen 

Weld, Theodore D., estate, W. J. Stuart 

Wells, Sarah A. 

Wentworth, Eliza J. . 

Wetherbee, Annie A. 

Wetherbee, John H. . 

Wheeler, Sarah O. 

Wheeler, Alden D. 

Wheeler, George William 

Wheeler, Martha W. . 

Wheeler, William J. W. 

Whitaker, Daniel's heirs 

White, John 

White, Alvin C. and H. E. B 

White, Carrie L. V. . 

Whiting, George E. . 

Whitney, Kate G. 

Whittemore, Melinda C.'s heirs 

Whittemore, Esther M. and Ethel 

Wheeler, Kate L. 

Whittemore, Esther M. 

Whittier, George T. . 

Whittier, Sarah A. 

Whorf, George C.'s heirs 

Wigglesworth, Stephen N. 

WigU'y, Mary . 

Wild, Laura 

Wilkinson, Jemima 

Willard, Henry L. 

Willard, Addie M. 

Willard, George C. 

Williams, Rinaldo 

Williams, Susan 

Williams, John C. 

Williams, William H. 

Williariis, Frances E. . 



et als. 



Waldron 



E 



trustees 



Per- Real 
sonal. Estate. 



$51 00 
8 16 



20 40 



15 30 



16 32 



3 06 



87 72 



20 40 



2 04 



$122 40 

102 00 

79 56 
64 26 

29 5s 
201 96 

91 80 
51 00 
105 06 
35 70 
60 18 
26 52 

74 76 
53 04 

38 76 
163 20 

30 60 
85 68 

39 78 
35 70 

193 80 
23 46 
4 08 

21 42 

22 44 
163 20 

57 12 
69 36 
82 62 

69 36 
13 26 



Unpaid. 



38 76 


42 84 


63 24 


38 76 


20 40 


95 88 


538 56 


59 16 


57 12 


64 26 


46 92 


4 08 


78 54 


20 40 


67 32 


60 18 


17 34 


114 24 


47 94 


40 80 


89 76 


78 54 


113 22 


53 04 


91 80 


58 14 



$8 16 
79 56 
64 26 

201 96 



51 00 
105 06 
35 70 
60 18 
26 52 

74 76 
5* 04 
38 76 

30 60 
85 68 



23 46 
4 08 

21 42 

22 44 
163 20 

69 36 



06 



59 16 
57 12 
64 26 



42 32 

60 18 



47 94 



2 04 
113 22 



91 80 



1 68 
Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Williams, Annie C. ... 


$2 04 


$22 44 


$24 48 


Williams, Frances A. 














77 52 




Williamson, Margaret J. 














52 02 




Wilson, Johanna O. . 












9 18 


42 84 


42 84 


Winchenbaugh, Lester P. 














118 32 


118 32 


Winchenbaugh, L. P. & F.C 














16 32 


16 32 


Wirth, Wilhelmina C. 














48 96 




Wolfe, Ananias' heirs, 














42 84 


32 64 


Wolfe, Marck . 












6 12 


25 50 


31 62 


Wolfe, Jennie . 














53 04 


53 04 


Wood, Hannah's heirs 














43 86 




Wood, -loseph A. 














12 24 




Wood, Louise M. 














112 20 


62 20 


Wood, Rachel P.'s heirs 














52 02 


52 02 


Woo , Margaret 














42 84 




Wood, Robert F. 












4 OS 




4 08 


Wood, Nellie 














6 12 




Wood, Charles L. 












4 08 




4 08 


Wood, Harrie S. 














122 40 




Woodworth, Thomas H. 














150 96 




Woodworth, Freeman 














3 06 


3 06 


Woollard, Leonora R. 














44 88 


44 88 


Worrick, Laban's heirs 














65 28 




Wright, Richard W. . 














318 24 




Wright, Hattie V. 








% 






40 80 


40 80 


Wyman, Ferdinand A. 












61 20 


151 98 


213 18 


Wyman, Mary A. 














54 06 




Wyman, Eliza H. 














41 82 


41 82 


- L 

Young, James B. ..... 




.38 76 




Young, William A. ..... 




95 84 




Youngren, Carl . . . . 




33 66 




Zalenski, Vincent 












1 53 




1 53 






NON-RESIDENT TAX-PAYERS. 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


A 

Abbott, William D. 


Houghton, Me. . 




$8 16 




Adams Express Co. 


Boston 


$12 24 






Aileloff MelkerCo. . 


Boston 




25 50 


$25 50 


Akin, Juliette . . 


Boston 




57 12 




Alexander, Mercy L. 


Boston 




4 08 




Allston Co-operative Bank 


Aliston, Mass. 




62 22 




American Tool & Machii.e Co. . 


Boston 


1020 00 


2239 92 




American Radiator Co. 


Boston 




183 60 




Aiuos, Virginia A. . 


Boston 




222 36 




Amsden, Franklin D. . . 


Brookline . 




4 08 


4 08 


Andrews, Mary A. . 


Boston 




8 16 




Archibald, Lewis E. . . 


Truro, N. H. 




2 04 


2 04 


Arnold, S.«-ah H.'s heirs . 

B 
Babcock, Lemuel H. and E'Mth . 


Nantucket. 




44 88 




New York City . 




31 62 




Babcock, Francis L. 


Dedham 




8 16 


8 16 


Babcock, William W. and Joseph 










Unrig, trustee 


Boston 




14 28 


14 28 


Badger, Mary C.'s heirs . 


Boston 




51 00 




Baker, Charles H. . . 


Boston 




44 88 


44 88 


Baker, William F. . 


Norwood . 




12 24 




Baker, A. S. and N. G. Nickerson 


Boston and Quincy 




744 60 


744 60 


Baker, Adelia S., ux Daniel H. . 


Boston 




14 28 


14 28 


Balcom, Laura A. . 


Gilmanton, N. H. 




14 28 




Ball, Charles E. . . . • 


Boston 




52 02 




Bangs, Louisa G. . . . 


Charlestown, Mass. 




4 08 


4 (18 


Barnwell, John . . . 


Valley Falls, R. I. 




20 40 




Barrett, Sarah E. . 


E. Foxboro 




9 18 




Barry, Thomas F. . 


Boston . . . 




5 10 




Bartlett, Charles L. 


Boston 




96 90 


96 90 


Bartlett, Amos F . 


Claremont, N. H. 




17 34 




Bartlett, Jonathan B. L. . 


Boston 




22 44 


22 44 


Bass River Savings Bank 


So. Yarmouth, Ms. 




97 92 




Batho, Harriet C. . 


Boston 




44 88 




Bean, Aaron H.'s heirs . 


Roxbury . 




36 72 




Beck, Ellen W. ux D. H. . 


Dorchester, Mass. 




7 14 


7 14 


Becker-Brainarcl Milling Machine 










Co. . . . 


Maine 


2776 44 


1460 64 




Beckwith, Clinton, and John V* 










Quackenbush . . 


Herkimer. N. Y. . 




10 20 




Beers, Emma S. . . . 


Natick, Mass. 




52 02 


52 02 


Bell, John 


Dedham 




2 04 




Bellis, Lucy L. 


Waltham . 




12 24 


12 24 


Bennett, Robert 


Med ford . 




7 14 


7 14 


Bennett, Braman A. 


So. Weymouth 




8 16 




Bennett, Amelia . . . ■ 


Chelsea 




3 06 




Berry, Sarah A. . . . 


New Bedford 




8 16 




Berry, Jane .... 


Somerville 




41 82 


41 82 


Bigelow, Fred C, Jr. 






43 86 


43 86 


Blacker, J. E., estate, and Otis A. 










Shepard . . . 


Boston 




60 18 




B'ackstone, Edwin IT. 


Boston 




39 78 


39 78 


Blackwood, Alexander . 


Boston 




12 24 


12 24 


Blake, Percy M. . . 


Newton, Mass. 




26 52 


26 52 


Blasdale, Henry 


Arlington, Mass. 




105 06 




Bleakie, John S., estate . 


Boston 




70 38 




Bohnson, Frank C. . . . 


Brooklyn, N. Y. . 




3 06 


3 06 


Boland, John 


Dedham 




5 10 


5 10 


Boston Blower Co. . . . 


Boston 


306 00 


431 46 




Bosworth, Hiram E., heirs 


Boston 




89 76 


30 60 



170 
Non-Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES, 


RESIDENCE. 




Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Bowker, Emma E. 


Waltham 




$28 56 


$28 56 


Bowman, William L. 


Dorcbester . 






2 04 




Bo wron, William L. . , 


New York, N. Y. 






U 68 




Boyce, Eli J. 


Boston 






18 36 


18 36. 


Boyden, Erastus E. 


Walpole . 






7 14 




Brack ett, Grace W. 


Watertown 






18 36 




Bradlee, Nellie M., heirs . 


Milton . . 






51 




Bradley, Edmund . 


Boston 






10 20 


10 20) 


Brady, Henry J. . 


Boston 






2 04 




Br'.mdeis, Louis D. . 


Boston 






113 22 




Brockton Street Railway Co. 


Brockton . 






276 22 




Brooks, Alfred L.l . 


Fitchburg 






55 08 




Brown, Isaac J. 


Boston 






709 92 




Brown, John A. 


Lowell 






34 68 




Brown, Joseph D. . 


Dorchester 






69 36 




Brown, Joseph 


Boston 






2 04 


2 04 


Brown, John F., et als, trustees . 


Boston 






44 88 




Brown, Edward I., estate 


Boston 






736 44 




Brunet, Mary C. . 


Boston 






3 06 


3 06 


Bryant, Louisa M. . 


Somerville 






17 34 


17 34 


Bryant, Edward D. 


Somerville 






7 14 


7 14 


Buckley, Cornelius, Ditson & Smith, 












trustees, .... 


Boston 






89 76 




Buckley, John W. . 


Boston 






60 18 


60 18 


Buuter, Louisa A. 


Newton 






5 10 




Burns, B.N. 


Cambridge 




100 98 






Broderiek, William 0. 


Boston 






58 14 


58 14 


Burke, Patrick . . . 


Boston 






4 08 


4 08 


Burr, Elizabeth A. . 


Atlantic 






92 82 


92 82 


Burt, John 1L, heirs 


Milton 






64 26 




Buss, Mary C. . . . 


Winthrop . 






10 20 




Butler, George H., heirs . 


Northampton 






6 12 




Buzzell, James 0., heirs . 

C 
Cahoon, Zillah E. . 


Portland, Me. 






5 10 




Unknown . 




42 S4 


42 84 


Caldwell, Emily L. 


Roxbury . 






306 00 


306 00 


Callahan, Daniel E. . . 


Norwood . 






2 04 




CapiLianco, Damiano 


Boston 




3 06 




3 06 


Carlton, Isabel F. . 


East Sandwich 






61 20 


61 20 


Carroll, Kate A. . 


Boston 






6 12 




Ca roll, Patrick J. . 


Boston 






2 04 




Carpenter, Anna V., trustee 


Boston 






550 80 


550 80 


Carpenter, Fiank M. 


Everett 






35 70 


28 56 


Carbon, Walter P. . 


Mediord . 






2 04 


2 04 


Carter, Clarence H., John C. Ken- 










nedy and Frances L. Coolidge, 










trustees .... 


Boston 




67 32 




Carter, Frederick O. 


Boston 






7 14 




Cass, Fr tncis W., heirs or devisees 


Boston 






43 83 


43 83 


Carnes, Frank A. . 


Brookline . 






4 08 


4 08 


Cassidv, William F. 


Boston 






8 16 




<;aulfield, Bridget . 


Boston 






5 10 




Caton, Daniel W. . . . . 


Foxboro 






30 60 




Chabot, Rebecca M. 


Boston 






8 16 


8 16 


Channell, Carlton J. 


Boston 






2 04 




Chase, Francis A. . 


Roxbury . 






69 36 




Chesebro, Albert S. 


Hyde Park 






10 iiO 




Chestnut, David, heirs or devisees 


Milton 






18 36 


18 36 


Chisholm, Peter A. 


Gloucester 






4 08 




Church, Elliot B. . 


Boston 






48 96 




Churchill, Joseph R. 


Dorchester 






73 44 




Churchill, Chauncy S. 


Dedham . 






130 56 





i7i 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 





NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per. 

sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Clapp, Lois M. 


Stongliton . 




$587 52 


$587 52 


Clapp, Hattie F. 


Stoughton . 




273 36 


273 36 


Clapp, Fred D. . 


S tough ton . 




77 52 


77 52 


Clark, Margaret K. 


Brookline . 




108 12 


108 12 


Clark, David O. . . . 


Hingham . 




4 08 


4 08 


Clark, Eleanor A„ heirs or deVisees 


Boston 




183 60 




Clarke, Marcus, heirs or devisees 


Unknown . 




77 52 




Clasby, John 


Boston 




3 06 


3 06 


Clasby, John J. . . . 


Boston . . 




3 06 




Claxton, Sarah E. L. . . 


Boston 




114 24 


114 24 


Cleary, Peter A. . 


Boston 




70 38 


70 38 


Cleaves, William H. 


Quincy 




3 06 




Clifton Mfg. Co. . 


Boston 


$61 20 


97 92 


159 12 


Cobb, Roscoe A. 


Brookline . 




7 14 




Cobb, Frank I. . 


Winthrop . 




3 06 




Cobb, Sylvanus H. . 


Washington, D.C. 




70 38 


70 38 


Cobe, Alden .... 


Bosti n . . 


51 00 






Codman, Henrv, heirs or devisees 


Dorchester 




4 08 




Coffey, William J. . . . 


Boston 




134 64 


134 U 


Cohen, Abraham . 


Boston 




13 26 




Colburn, Ralph D. . 


Hollicton . 




42 84 




Col burn, E. C, Mary E. G. and Ann 










F. Hodgdon 


Derlham 




26 52 




Cole, Mary Ann 


Boston 




2 04 


2 04- 


Conant, Albert 


Bostou 




53 04 




Conley, Elizabeth A. 


Unknown . 




63 24 




Connelly, Martin J., heirs or devi- 










sees .... 


Roxbury . 




3 06 




Connelly, John 


Boston 




3 06 




Connors, Daniel and Mary 


Boston 




8 16 




Converse, Benjamin B. 


Boston 




38 76 




Converse, B. B. an i H. E. B. 


Boston 




40 80 




Cooper, Theresa . ... 


Boston, 




14 28 


14 28 


Cooper, Carrie 


Boston 




3 06 


3 06 


Corcoran, William J., estate 


S. Boston . 




12 24 




Cotter, Annie C. . 


Boston 




5 10 




Cotton, Charlotte H. and Henry H. 


Boston 




32 64 




Corson, Julian G. . 


Boston 




4 08 




Countryman, Anna R. 


Rockland, 111 




132 60 


132 60 


Coyne, Sarah 


S. Boston . 




2 04 




Crabtree, JKatherine M. . 


New Bedford 




64 26 


64 26 


Crocker, Henry E. . 


New York, N. Y. 




20 40 




Crowell, Albert 


Boston 




15 30 




Crummet, Newton B., Jr. 


Dedham 




10 20 


10 20 


Cumtnings, Anna Park . 


Farmington, Conn 




58 14 




Cuinmings, Annie C. and Mary J. 


Unknown . 




81 60 


81 60 


Cunane, William, heirs or devisees 


So. Groveland . 




18 36 


18 36 


Curry, Joseph T. . 


Cambridge 




30 60 




Curtis, Hazen . . . 


Boston 




3 06 




Curtis, Alonzo P., trustee 


Newton 




204 00 




Curtis, Joseph H. . 
D 
Dahl, Masen H. 


Boston 




53 04 




Boston 




20 40 


20 40 


Daley, Eugene 0. . . 


Newton 




4 08 




Daley, Julia F. . 


Boston 




6 12 


6 12 


Danforth, Charlotte E. 


Newton 




65 28 




Dangel, Julius and Jennie Biloski 


Boston 




83 64 




Darling, Marj M., heirs or devisees 


Toledo, O . 




59 16 


59 16- 


Dary, George A., trustee . 


Boston 




61 20 




Davenport, Stearns G. 


Framingham 




106 08 




Davis, Mary E. . 


Everett 




51 00 




Davis, Charles S. . 


Newton, 




7 14 





172 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Davis, Fred N. 


Everett 




$52 02 


$52 G2 


Davis, Alvan L. . 


N.-w Jersey 






71 40 




Davis, Alvan L. and Sidney L. . 


New Jersey 






12 24 




Davis, Hariiet S. . . . . 


Cambridge 






199 92 




DeLue, George B. . 


Boston " . 






11 22 


11 22 


DeMers, Grace M. . 


Boston 






2 04 




Derry, Charles T. . 


Sharon 






34 68 




Dickinson, Mary Lowe . 


New York City 






61 20 




Dillaway, W. E. L. 


Boston 






381 48 




Dilling, Susan P. . 


Boston 






3 06 


3 06 


Dimmock, Susan C. 


Boston 






8 16 




Diraock, Ehvin H. . 


Boston 






8 16 




Dodge, Albeit 


Gloucester 




$59 16 


167 28 




Dodge, Herbert W. 


Saumtersville 






3 06 




Doherty, Bridget . 


Boston 






3 06 




Doherty, Dennis 


Boston 






2 04 




Donaher, Miss Bridget . 


M lton 






60 18 




Dooley. James F. . 


Boston 






71 40 


71 40 


Dorchester 2nd Church 


Durohester 






29 58 




Dorgan, Edward . 


Canton 






73 44 


17 44 


Downey, John M. . 


Boston 






17 34 




Doyle, Joseph 


Roxbury . 






4 08 


4 08 


Drake, Clifford S. . 


Boston 






71 40 


65 28 


Driscoll, Sarah A. . 


Boston 






8 16 


8 16 


Dugan, Annie . . 


Boston 






2 04 




Dunn, James F. . 


Dedham 






8 16 




Dunning, Henry M. 


Brookline 1 . 






120 36 




Dyer, Mary J. and Carrie E., estate, 
E 

Eaton, Luther A.'s heirs . 


St. Joseph, Mo. 






71 40 




Dedham . 




106 08 




Eastman, Josiah's heirs . 


Boston 






61 20 




Eflie, Carmelia, ux Michael 


Boston 






7 14 




Eintracht Lodge, No. 19 . 


Boston 






23 46 


23 46 


Elliott, Lida M. . 


Boston 






9 18 


9 18 


Ellis, Samuel, heirs or devisees 


Boston 






61 20 


61 20 


Elwell, Miles T. 


Belfast, Me. 






53 04 


53 04 


Emmanuel, C. ... 


Hyde Park 




3 06 




3 06 


Ensign, Elbert V. . 


Leominster 






70 38 




Envoy Associates . 


Boston 






29 58 




Esrigge. Frank r. . 


Newton 






6 12 




Estabrook, Marcus M. 


Boston 






9 18 




Evans, Julia F. 


Holyoke . 






83 64 




Everett, .John . . . 


Canton 






177 48 




Everett, Elizabeth M. B.'s heirs 


Canton , 






45 90 




Everson, Henrietta C. 


Providence 






10 20 




Everson, E. W. & Co. 
Fagan, Thomas 


Providence 




10 20 






Boston 




4 08 




Farrington, Willis and F. A. Butt- 










rick, trustees . . 


Lowell 




79 56 




Farwell, James E., estate 


Boston 






10 20 


10 20 


Feeley, Mary Jane . 


Roxbury . 






2 04 




Fellows Athenaeum, trustees of 


Roxbury . 






46 92 




Fellows, Ada R., ux H. G. 


New York City 






91 80 




Ferris, Lynde R. and D. Blakely 












Hoar, trustees 


Boston 






98 94 




Field, Thomas G.'s heirs . 


S. Kingston, N.H 






26 52 




Fisher, George A . . 


Boston 






6 12 




Fisher, Harriet A. . 


Boston 






9 18 


9 18 


Flagg, Charles P. . 


Brookline . 






163 20 





173 



Non-Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate 


Unpaid. 


Flagg, S. S., N.Y. & N. E. R.R. Co., 










lessee .... 


Boston 




$489 60 




Flanigan, Ella C. . 


Cambridge 






84 66 




Fleischman & Co. . 


Boston 




$10 20 






Folsom, Alblna D. . 


Ch lsea 






55 08 




Forbes, Alice 


Boston 






6 12 


$6 12 


Forbush, Clara F. . 


Boston 






42 84 




Forbes, J. Malcom . 


Milton 






42 84 




For<*, Horace N. 


Boston 






4 08 




Foster, Susan 8. . . . 


Roxbury . , 






3 06 




Foster, John C. J. . 


Roxbury . 






7 14 




Foster, Evelyn M . 


Milton 






11 22 




Foster, George M . 


Dorchester 






3 06 




Fowle, George W. . . 


Jamaica Plain 






63 24 




Fox, Mary A . 


Milton 






42 84 


42 84 


Frampton, Amelia . . . 


Calais, Me. 






12 24 


12 24 


Frampton, Robert L. . 


Calais, Me. 






105 06 


105 06 


Freeman, Charles T. . . 


Boston 






97 92 




Frost, Fannie M. . . . 


E. Tilton.N. H. 






79 56 




Frost, Lois F. 


Med ford . 






2 04 




Furdon, Margaret . 

Q 

Gafneld, Thomas . 


Dedham . 






38 76 




Norwell . . 




14 28 




Gage, *athaniel P. and G. E. Davis, 










trustees .... 


Unknown . 




31 62 




Gallagher, Daniel F. 


Lynn . 






17 34 




Gallup, Henrietta . 


Winthrop . 






63 24 


63 24 


Gardiner, Alice A. . 


Dorchester 






3 06 




Gardiner, Charles A. . . 


Boston 






10 20 


10 20 


Gargan, Thomas J., trustee 


Boston 






2 04 




Gary, Frank E. H., trustee 


Boston 






122 40 




Gateley, Edward . 


Newton 






339 66 




Gay. Daisy E. . . . 


Farmington, Me 






57 12 




Gibbons, John, heirs or devisees 


Sharon 






33 66 


33 66 


Gilcreas, George I. .- 
Giles, Charles E. . 


Boston 






9 18 


9 18 


Somerville 






66 30 


66 30 


Gill, Dominick 


Dedham . 






4 08 


4 08 


Gillette, Sanford E. 


Danversport 






3 06 




Girdler, John L. 


Los Angeles, Cal 






40 80 




Glover & Willcomb 


Boston 




389 64 


1050 60 




Goldsmith, Emma F. 


Boston 






53 04 


53 04 


Goldsmith, Benjamin H. 


Boston 






12 24 




Goldsmith, Isaac N. 


Boston 






2 04 




Goo. Ihue, Frank S. 


Boston 






46 92 




Goodwin, Edward L., adm. estate of 












H. W. Sisco 


Unknown . 






14 28 




Gordon, Walter D. 


Milton . 






7 14 




Gordon, Stella B. . 


Milton 






7 14 




Gorham. Mathew J. 


Seattle, Wash. T. 






5 10 


5 10 


Gould Wire Cord Co. 


Boston 




122 40 


184 84 


267 24 


Gould, Lizzie L. . 


Maiden 






15 30 




Gould, George L. . 


Maiden 






10 20 




Gould, Kate P. 


Chelsea 






59 16 




Graf, Emil . 


Boston 






2 04 




Graham, Florence A. 


Worcester 






63 24 


63 24 


Granlee, James F. . 


Boston 






7 14 




Gray, E. E. & Co 


Boston 




16 32 






Granstrom, Andrew 


Boston 






10 20 




Gray, Thomas H. & Co. . 


Boston 




183 60 


265 20 




Greenhood, Mary, heirs or devisees 


Dedham . 






113 20 




Greenhood, Hannah 


Dedham . 






25 50 




Greenslitt, Lizzie L. 


Boston 






15 30 


15 30 



174 



Non-Resident Tax- Paters — [Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate 


Unpaid. 


"Greenwood, Albert, heirsor devisees 


E. Jordan, Mich. 




$107 10 


$107 10 


Griffin, Theodore H. 


Newton 






33 66 


33 66 


Grimes, Thomas B. 


Boston 






15 30 




-Guild, Thomas E., tr stee 


Boston 






30 60 


30 60 


Gunn, John and Sarah 


Whitinsville 






12 24 




Gunn, John .... 


Wnitinsville 






12 24 




Gunn, Benjamin 


Boston 






14 28 




Gurney, Ansel F„ heirs or devisees 


Bostjn 






75 48 




H 

Hall, Charles F. 


Boston 




79 56 




Hall, Wallace L. . 


Boston 






24 48 




Hamblin, Maria G. 


Roslin *ale . 






35 70 




Hammond, James B. 


New York City 






55 08 




•Handy, Seth N. . . . 


Cotuit 






8 16 




Hannum.T.W. 


Hartford, Conn. 






10 20 




Hapgood, Salome N. 
Hardy, Louis 


Boston 






20 40 




Beverly Farms 






5 10 


5 10 


Hannon, William E. 


Lexington 






102 00 




Harmon, Jennie May 


Lynn 






4 08 




Harraden, Elbridge G. 


So. Bos'on 






27 54 




Hartshorn, James A. 


Norwood . 






2 04 


2 04 


Hartwell, Abbie L. 


Bedford . 






77 52 


77 52 


Harvel!, Elisha T., trustee for C. F. 












S. and Anna H. Weld . 


Rockland . 






179 52 


179 52 


Harvey, C. C. & Co. 


Boston 




$10 20 






Hassam, Roswell H. 


Manchester, N. H 






85 68 




Hattinger, Marie . 


•Jamaica Plain 






8 16 




Hawes, Isabella 


Boston 






6 12 




Hawkins, James T. 


Norwood . 






32 64 


32 64 


Hawkins, Maude A. 


Norwood . 






95 88 


95 88 


Hayden, Ada T. . 


Milton 






138 72 


28 56 


Hayden, John E. V. 


Milton 






84 66 


84 66 


vHaynes, C. 0., heirs or devisees 


Dedham 






3 06 




Hay ward, Eliza A. . , 


Unknown . 






55 08 




Hayward, Henry W. 


Temple, N. H. 






26 52 




Healey, A. Augustus 


Brooklyn, N. Y. 






95 88 


95 88 


Heffern, Mary 


Boston 






2 04 




Hemenway, Augustus . . 
Hennessey, William J. 


Canton 






377 40 




Boston 






70 38 


70 38 


Henry, David . . . 


Boston 






27 54 




Hickey, Edward J., trustee 


Melrose 






39 78 




Higgins, Florinda B. 


Northfield . 






119 34 




Hill, Helen F. 


Dedham . 






90 78 




Hill, Charles E. . . . 


Boston 






44 88 


44 88 


Hilton, Arthur G. . 


Boston 






53 04 


53 04 


Hodges, Samuel 


Boston 






6 12 




-Hodgkins, Annie M. 


Wakefield" 






61 20 


61 20 


Hogardt, Eliza 


E. Boston . 






6 12 


6 12 


Hodges, Jos. F., heirs or devisees 


New York C'ty 






46 92 




Holmes, Clarissa 


Provincetown 






75 48 


75 48 


Holmes, Margaret R. 


So. Walpole 






31 62 




•Holmes, Frank W. . 


Boston 






57 12 




Howe, Elizabeth H. 


Milton 






8 16 




Howes, Eliza 


Quincy 






73 44 




Hub ard, William H. 


Roxbury . 






5 10 




Hugo, Jennie . * 


Boston 






24 48 


24 48 


Hunt, Paul .... 


Milton 






264 18 




Hunt, Paul, Construction Co. 


Milton 




55 08 




55 08 


Hunt, Wallaces. . 


Canton 




12 24 






-Huntington, Harriet M. . 


Hyde Park 






91 80 




Hussey, Peter M. . 


Neponset . 






64 26 





175 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — {Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 

• 


J 

Jackson, Caroline, heirs or devisees 


Dorchester 




$96 90 




Jaquith, Andrew, heirs or i evisees 


Beverly 




55 08 


$55 08 


-Jenkins, Arthur H. 


Campello . 




76 50 




Jenney, Mary F. . 


So. Boston 




6 12 




Jennings, Mabel B. 


Waterbury, Conn. 




87 72 




Jennison, Charles S. 


New London, Conn 




65 2b 




Jewell, Albert L. . 


Boston . 




21 42 


21 42 


Johnson, Albion H., 


Roslindale 




4 08 




Johnson, John M. . 


Boston , 




13 26 




.J«hnson, Jane A. . 


Mattapan . 




2 04 




Jones, Aaron T. ... 


E. Douglass 




60 18 




Jones, Susan T., heirs or devisees 


Mattapan . 




' 42 84 


42 84 


Jones, Charles H., Jr., trustee . 


Charlestown 




35 70 




Jones, Lewis 


Boston 




7 14 




Joy, Mary Kinsley 


Bridgewater 




5 10 




Judd, Mary E. 

K 

Kaulback, Rosa 


New York City . 




81 60 


81 60 


Boston 




2 04 




Kaulback, Joshua L. 


Boston 






5 10 




Keay, Freeman L. 


Boston . ' . 






7 14 




Keenan, Mary T. . 


Boston 






7 14 




JEeene, Nahum, heirs or devisees 


Tied ham 






20 40 




Keith, Constance S. 


Boston 






6 12 




Kelle, Frank H. . . 


Boston 






5 10 


5 10 


Kelley, John P. 


Dedham 






45 90 


45 90 


Kelley, Neil .... 


Charlestown 






3 06 




Kenne yjEmilvR. . . 


Boston 






3 06 




JKenney, Mary F. . 


Roxbury . 






5 10 




Kenyon, Thomas . 


Boston 




306 00 


321 30 




Kibler, Philemene . . . 


Roslindale 






81 60 


81 60 


Kibler, Louis 


Roslindale 






59 16 


59 16 


JLil am, Charles W. 


Boston 






7 14 




Kimball, George A. . . . 


Cambridgeport 






65 28 


65 28 


King, Catherine T. . . 


Dedham 






36 72 




Kellogg, Henrv 


Jamaica Plain 






29 58 




King, Alfreu W. . 


Boston 






2 04 


2 04 


King, Florence H. . . .' 


Boston 






2 04 


2 04 


Klous, Seman 


Boston 




561 00 


734 40 




Knowlton, Frederick W. . 


Foxcroft, Me. , 






10 20 




Knowlton, Frederick W. and Henry 












A. Carle .... 


Foxcroft, Me. 






23 46 




Koelble, Catherine . 
L 
Lake, Elmer 0. 


Roslindale . 






2 04 


2 04 


Vermont . 




98 94 




Lancaster, Edward M. 


Boston 






61 20 


61 20 


Lanthier, Alexander 


Boston 






2 04 




Lantz, Walter W. . 


Boston 






4 08 


4 08 


Larsson, Peter 


Dedham 






32 64 




Lavers, Laura E. . . . 


Roxbury 






4 08 




Leatherbee, Andrew F. . . 


Boston 






94 86 




Lee, Anna S. 


Boston 






171 36 




Lee, George W. estate, trustee . 


Boston 






36 72 


36 72 


Lee, George S., trustee for Norfolk 










& Suffolk Real Estate Co. 


Boston . . 




1512 66 




Leaver, Oliver A., executor of will 










of Susanna H. Kimball 


Somerville 




8 16 




Leslie, Georgianna S., C. E. Perry, 










lessee .... 


Milton 




168 30 





176 



Non-Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


^Unpaid. 


Leslie, Georgianna 8. 


Milton 




$12 24 




Leonard. Katherine M. . 


So. Boston 




193 80 


$193 80 


Leveen, Bertha 


Chel'ea 




6 12 


6 12 


Lewis, Madeline S. 


Maiden . . - 




77 52 


77 52 


Lincoln, Elhridce and Margaret G. 


Worcester . 




95 88 


95 88 


Lindsay, Mary B. . 


Roxbury . 




29 58 




Lindg.trd, James . 


Everett 




7 14 


7 14 


Litchfield, Charles A. 


Norwell 




75 48 




Litchfield, Henry, admr. . 


Plymouth . 




54 06 


. 54 06 


Litchfield, Roland . 


Boston 




7 14 




Litchfield, Everett S. 


Brookline . 




53 04 


53 04 


Little, James L., estate . 


Boston 




111 18 




Lockbart, Maggie F. 
Loder, Susan J. 


Boston 




3 06 




Thetford, Vt. 




142 80 




Loney Annie T. . 


Boston 




2 04 




Look, Jeremiah P. 


New Vineland, Me. 




2 04 




Lord, Ella S. 


Dorchester 




4 08 


4 08 


Lotts. Mary S. . . . 
Loud, Emily V. . . 


B ston 




19 38 


19 38 


Weymouth 




107 10 




Loud, Martha B. 


Weymouth 




120 36 




Loud, John J., et als. 


Weymouth 




296 82 




Ludlow, Albert 


Boston 




128 52 


48 96 


Lukes, Grace Adams 


Jamaica Plain 




119 34 




Lyford, Byley 


Claremont, N. H. 




82 62 


82 62 


Lynch, William 


Roxbury . 




12 24 


12 24 


Lynch, Catherine E. 


Dedham . 




48 96 


48 96 


Lyons, Thomas H. . 
M 
MacCorrey, Charles E. S. 


Boston 




2 04 




Boston 




52 02 




Mackintosh, James 


Pom fret, Conn. . 




169 32 




Mackrille, Harriet . 


New Haven, Ct. . 




35 70 


35 70 


Macy, William F. . 


Boston 




38 76 


38 76 


Maddigan. Thomas H. and Mary J. 


Boston 




58 14 




Maddigan, Thomas H. . 


Boston 




54 06 




Magee, Frank, 


Winchendon 




30 60 




Mahy, Mary A. and John T. 


Boston 




2 04 


2 04 


Maloney, Jiimes P. 


Cambridge 




6 12 




Manchaug Company 


Providence, R. I. 


2113 44 


2392 92 




Manley, Mary E. . 


Revere 




40 80 


40 80 


Mann, Frank E. . 


Milford . 




56 10 


56 10 


Marsden, Ellen 


Randolph . 




65 28 


65 28 


Mass. Baptist Charitable Society 


Boston 




59 16 




Marcy, Elizabeth . ... 


Unknown . 




7 14 




Martin, Albert E. . 


Boston 




4 08 




Martin, Fernand A. 


Boston 




4 08 




Mathews, William A. 


Boston 




52 02 


52 02 


Mathews, William A., trustee . 


Boston 




282 54 


282 54 


Maynard, George H. 


Waltham . 




81 60 




McAskill, Annie 


Attleboro . 




32 64 


32 64 


McCall, Bridget 


Boston 




2 04 




McCarthy, Julia A. 


Boston 




16 32 


16 32 


McCullough, David 
McDonald, James H. 


Jamaica Plain 




2 04 




Boston 




6 12 




McDonald, William 


Boston 




18 36 


18 36 


McDuflie, Henry C. 


Claremont, N H. 




2 04 




McFarland, James and Charles. 


Wollaston . 




7 14 




McFarland, James B.'s heirs. . 


Woburn 




32 64 




McGrath, Emma A.'s heirs 


Boston 




4 08 




McGrath, Frederick 


Boston 




18 36 




McGuinness, Jane's heirs 


Boston 




14 28 


14 28 


McHugh, John 


Roxbury . 




4.08 




Mclntyre, Harriet F. 


Newton" . 




66 30 


66 30 



177 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


MeKelvey, Frank . 


Beachmont 




$5 10 


$5 10 


McKenna, Frank . 


Dei 1 ham 






6 12 




McLaughlin, Daniel 


Boston 






3 06 




McLaughlin, W. T. & Co. 
McLiod, Geoige C. 


Jamaica Plain 




$7 14 






Wollaston . 






8 16 


8 16 


McLt-O'i, Bessie 


So. Pines, N. C. 






8 16 


8 16 


McMahon, Ellen 


Boston 






46 92 




McMillan, Barbara, A. McMillan, 












Guardian .... 


Boston 






54 06 




McPherson, Daniel C. 


Boston 






7 14 


7 14 


McQuaid, Catherine 


Boston 






3 06 




McShane, Annie J. 


Everett 






2 04 


2 04 


McSorley, Michael . 


Dedhain 






30 60 




McSorley, Eleanor J. 


Dedhain 






61 20 




McSwain, Ewen 


Milton 






65 28 




Mertz, Mattie E. . 


Boston 






77 52 




Meyer, Augustus and Josephine 


Roxbury > . 






4 08 


4 OS 


Millar, Alexander . 


Plainfieid.N. J. 






77 52 




Miller, Henry 


Dedham . 






24 48 




Miller, William J. . 


Jamaica Plain 






5 10 




Miller, Sarah J. 


Roxbury . 






42 84 




Miller, Susan's heirs 


Boston " 






48 96 


48 96 


Miller, Kate 


Boston 






2 04 


2 04 


Milne, George 


Boston 






3 06 




Mitchell, Marcus R. 


Rockland, Me. 






2 04 




Mitchell, Guy W. . 


Roslindale 






128 52 


75 48 


Monahan, James' heirs . 


Worcester 






43 86 




Moody, Benjamin A. 


Boston 






4 08 




Moore, Rebecca H. 


Roxbury . 






5 10 




Moo e, Hannah 


Milton 






14 28 




Morgan, Daniel 


Roslindale 






2 04 




Moriarty, William H. 


Boston 






42 84 




Montague, Daniel F. 


Boston 






157 08 


157 08 


Moriefl, Kate A. . 


Sharon 






95 88 




Morrell, Thomas B. 


Boston 






59 16 




Morrill, Mabel E. . 


Boston 






5 10 


5 10 


Morris, Frank W. . 


Boston 






2 04 


2 04 


Morris, Arthur 


Boston 






6 12 




Morrison, Elisha R.'s heirs 


Nova Scotia 






9 18 


9 IS 


Morrison, Ida A . . 


Roslindale 






44 S8 




Morrison, Gerald M. 


Roslindale 






7 14 




Morse, E. J. W.'s heirs 


No. Easton 






7 14 




Morse, George W. . 


Newtonville 






80 58 


4 08, 


Morse, Clara R. . 


Newtonville 






351 90 




Morse, Robert M. and Elizabeth H. 






• 






Howe .... 


Unknown 






2 04 




Morton, Henry G. . 


Boston 






2 04 




Morton, Joseph's heirs 


Milton , 






71 40 




Mosher, Mattie F. . 


Boston 






3 06 


3 06 


Moulton, Edward E. 


Jamaica Plain 






240 72 


240 72 


Moulton, George V. 


Boston 






3 06 


3 06 


Hoy Ian, Patrick 


So. Boston 






9 18 


9 IS 


Moynahan, J. G. S. 


Boston 






4 08 


4 08 


Moyse, E'lward H. 


Albany, N. Y. 






4 08 




Mulvey, Annie J. . 


Boston 






2 04 




Munroe, C. W.'s heirs 


E. Cambridge 






12 24 




Murdock. William E. 


Boston 






138 72 




Munroe, Jane 


Boston 






2 04 




Murphy, Alice — ' . 


Boston 






2 04 




Murray, Rachael 


New York City . 






2 04 


2 04 


Myers, Rachael, Sarah, Rebecca 










and Louise 


Boston 




30 60 


. 30 60 



12 



i 7 8 
Non-Resident Tax-Paters — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


N 
Nelson, E. B. & Co. 


Hyde Park 


$46 92 






Nesson, Israel 


Cambridge 




$53 04 


$53 04 


Newton, Susan E. . 


Unknown 




87 72 




New York & New England R.R. Co., 










N. Y., N. H. & H. R.R. Co, .lessees, 






521 22 




New York & New England R.R. Co., 










N. Y., N. H & H. R.R. Co., lessees, 






1876 80 




New England Trotting Horse 










Breeders' Association . 






779 28 




New York, New Haven and Hart- 










ford R.R. Co. . 




816 00 


• 143 82 




New England Telephone and Tel- 










egraph Co. 




285 60 






Nichols, Elizabeth E. 


Grimes' Hill, S.I. 




155 04 




Niles, Lonville V. . 


Somerville 




63 32 




Nolan, James 


So. Boston . 




2 04 




Norcross, William C. and A. A. 










Elston, trustees . 


Boston 




4 08 


4 08 


Nourse, George H. . 


West Roxbury . 




32 64 




Noyes, Somerby N. 


W. Newbury " 




26 52 




Noyes, Francis W. 


W. Newbury 




133 62 


74 46 


Norris, Prank E- • 

O 
Old Colony R.R. Co., N. Y., N. H. 


Boston 


40 80 


373 32 


414 12 










& H. R.R. Co., lessees . 






5126 52 




Old Colony R.R. Co., lessees of B. 










& P. R.R. Co. . 




10 20 


8149 80 




O'Connor, Margaret 




Boston 




3 06 




O'Htarn, Daniel 




Brookline . 




2 04 




Osgood, Mary H. . 




Brattleboro, Vt. . 




86 70 




Osgood, Mary A. . 




Boston 




27 54 




Oxton, Maria 




Milton 




73 44 




O'Connor, Kate 




Unknown . 




115 26 




Page, James H. 


Boston 




25 50 




Page, Kate C. 




Bostou 




46 92 


46 92 


Page, Charles J. 




Boston 




5 10 


5 10 


Paine, Martha A. E. 




Mansfield . 




5 10 


5 10 


Parker, Benjamin W. 




Brookline . 




81 60 




Parker, Maynard W. 




Pittsfield . 




8 16 




Parker, Samuel D. . 




Milton 




100 98 




Parker, Edmund M. 




Cambridge 




10 20 




Parkin, Robert 




Boston 




38 76 




Parsons, Fannie M. 




Amherst, N. H. . 




749 70 


749 70 


Partridge, Cornelia A. 




Boston 




306 00 


306 00 


Partridge, Helen D. 




Peabody . 




84 66 




Penning, John 




Boston 




2 04 




Penny, John J., Jr. 




Newton 




4 08 




People's Cre.lit Co. 




Boston 


20 40 




20 40 


Perry, Arthur L. 




Milton 


25 50 






Perry, Isaiah F. 




Roxbury . 




3 06 




Peterson, Augusta A. 




Boston 




11 22 


11 22 


Pettee, Otis T. 




Newton U.Falls. 




10 20 




Park, Elizabeth's heirs 




Woburn 




4 08 


4 08 


Pevey, Franklin M.'s heir 


s 


Wilton, N. H. 




41 82 


41 82 


Pfaff, Anna . 




Boston 




65 28 


65 28 


Philbrick, William B. 




Boston 




31 62 




Philbrick, Emma C. 




Boston 




11 22 





179 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



Pierce, Marv A. 

Pierce, Frank H. . 

Pike, Albert L. 

Pinkham, Walter S. 

Pinkhaii, W. S., etals., trustees 

Readville Homestead Assoc 
Piper, Abby F. 
Piper, Sarah M. . . 

Plummer, Ellen A. 
Polack, Isaac L. 
Pollard, Catherine L. 
Pollard, George F. 
Poore, Mary L. 
Poore, Mary C. 
Pope Robinson Co. 
Powderly, Patrick 
Powers, Arthur F. . 
Powers, James H. . 
Pratt, La ban 
Pratt, Isaac, Jr., estate 
Prescott, Henry Elden 
Prescott, John W., heirs or devi 
Price, Josenh R. 
Prior, Alfred M., et als. . 
Provident Co-operative Bank 

Q, 

Quigley, Mary A. . 

Quigle'y, Mary J.'s heirs or devisees 

Quincy Savings Bank 



Rand, Hnttie F. 

Randall, John F. . 

Randall, CnarlesE. 

Randolph, Annie F. 

Raymond, Artemas S. 

Raymond, Mary, ux. A. S 

Raymond, Carrie W. 

Raymond, Carrie VV and Mary E 

Rayner, Martha A.'s heirs or de 1 

Reddic, Isaac 

Reddy, Thomas F. . 

Real Estate and Building Co., 

Frances W. Eldredge 
Real Estate and Building Co., 

Alva W. Dwight . 
Reed, Horace 
Reutman, Charles . 
Rhodes, Wallace M. 
Rice, George M., estate 
Rice, AVilliam B. . 
Rich, Melissa E. 
Rich, Harriet L. 
Richards, William R. and Elsie B. 
Richards, Fannie M. 
Richardson, Thomas S 
Richardson, Alonzo H., Jr 
Richards -n, Nellie L. 
Ridley, Edith H. . 
Riga, Elida S. 
Roberts, Sarah A. E. 



RESIDENCE. 



Dorchester 
Boston 
Boston 
Boston 



Maiden 

Newton, 
Cambridge 
Brookline . 
Brookline . 
Boston 
Chelmsford 

Boston 

Dorchester 

Unknown 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Unknown 

Boston 

Chelsea 



Boston 
Boston 
Quincy 



Somerville 

Biidgewater 

Lowell 

Boston 

Dedham 

Dedham 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Charlestown 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Whitman . 

W. Hoboken, N. 

Boston 

Quincy 

Quincy 

Dorchester 

Dighton 

Boston 

Dedham 

Mattapati . 

Mansfield . 

Unknown 

Philadelphia, Pa 

Springfield 

Boston 



Per- 


Real 


sonal. 


Estate. 




$40 80 




150 96 




244 80 




77 52 




684 42 




61 20 




90 78 




26 52 




2 04 




43 86 




53 04 




12 24 




74 44 


408 00 


418 20 




2 04 




4 08 




6 12 




81 60 




160 14 




41 82 




42 84 




91 80 




20 40 




52 02 




4 08 




6 12 




299 88 




59 16 




2 04 




51 00 




4 08 


155 04 


754 80 




87 72 




35 70 




25 50 




51 00 




1 02 




186 66 




27 54 




25 50 




67 32 




5 10 




67 32 




179 52 




58 14 




3 06 




87 72 




457 98 




39 78 




38 76 




112 20 




52 02 




43 86 




6 12 




106 08 



Unpaid. 



$40 80 



77 52 



61 20 

26 52 

2 04 

43 86 

53 04 



4 08 

160 14 
42 84 



6 12 

299 88 



59 16 
51 00 



51 00 

1 02 

186 66 



67 32 



3 06 

457 98 
39 78 
38 76 



6 12 

106 08 



i8o 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per 

sonal . 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Roberts, Francis R. 


Boston 




$26 52 


$26 52 


Robinson, William O. 


Moultonboro, N. H. 




44 88 




Robinson, Georsre A. 


Milton 




104 04 




Rodgers, Mary E. . 


California 






56 10 


56 10 


Rogers, Abraham T. 


Boston 






36 72 


36 72 


Rogers, Maud E. . 


Winchesti r 






6 12 




Rogers, Harlow H., tax title 


Brooklini- 






135 66 


56 10 


Rogers, D. W. C. and Sophia J. 


Rutland, Vt. 






67 32 




Rom. Catholic Archbishop of Bost'n 


Boston 






197 88 




Rogers, Goi ham and E. F. Reynolds 












trustees . . . 


Boston 






52 02 




Ronabl, Rose M. . 


Boston 






11 22 


11 22 


Rooney, Katherine H. 


West R ixbury 






209 10 




Rooney, John A. . 


West Roxbury 






41 82 




Rooney, Elizabeth . 


Unknown . 






3 06 


3 06 


Roon' } T , Janu-s C. . 


Brookline . 






260 10 


26 • 10 


Ross, .Joseph 


Ipswich 






6 12 


6 12 


Ross, Jane M. . . . 


Somerville 






194 82 




Rowel), Henry A.'s heirs 


Unknown . 






57 12 


57 12 


Rowley, Maggie B. 


E. Wulpole 






2 04 


2 04 


Rude, Severin 


Unknown 






34 68 


34 68 


Ruggles, Henry E. 


Franklin . 






55 08 


55 08 


Russell, Francis G. 


S. Boston . 






61 20 


61 20 


Russell. Lizzie C. . 


Unknown . 






54 06 


54 06 


Ryan, William B.'s heirs . 


Boston 






142 80 


142 80 


S 

Safety Fund National Bank 


Fitchburg . 




61 20 




Safford, Nathaniel M. 


Milton 






93 84 




Sale, Ephraim's heirs or deyisees 


Boston 






17 34 




Sander, Charles J. . 


Brookline . < 






6 12 




San ton 1, Oliver S. . 


Wellesley . 






230 52 




Sawtelle, Willard H. & Frank W. 


Dedham . 






177 48 




Sawtelle, F. W. & Co. 


Dtdham 




$84 66 






Sawyer, Samuel R. . , 


Boston 






4 OS 


4 08 


Scaife, Helen A. . 


Boston 






16 32 




Schw.ibe, Mary L. . 


Boston 






7 14 




Schroater, FredericK 


Jamaica Plain 






28 56 


28 56 


Scott, Lydia E. 


Roxbury . 






119 34 




Scrivens, Joseph 


Woburn 






32 64 




Scrivens, Emily M. 


Woburu 






46 92 




Sears, Francis P. . 


Waltham . 






12 24 




Seaver, Jacob W. . 


Boston 






9 18 




Severance, Granville S.'s heirs . 


Roslindale 






24 48 




Severance, Carrie L. 


Brandon, Vt. 






37 74 




Sharp, W.C 


Dorchester 






2 01 




Sharp, J. C.'s heirs 


Dorchester 






2 04 




Shaugbnessey, James C. . 


Nahant 






5 10 




Shepard, Otis A. . 


Brookline . 






32 64 




Shepard, John 


Boston 






2H5 80 




Shurtleff, Sarah A. . 


Boston 






32 64 




Sibley, Ella A. 


Boston 






114 24 


114 24 


Silva, Frank M. . . . 


Providence, R. I. 






4 OS 




Silver, Samuel C. . 


Boston . , 






18 36 




Simonds, Annie M. 


Cambridge 






15 30 




Simmonds. Walter E. 


Quincy 






10 20 




Sinclair, George B. 


Boston 






34 68 


34 68 


Singer Mfg. Co. 


Boston 




4 OS 






Skinner, Frederick 


Boston 






16 32 




81a Iter, Charles S.'s heirs 


Brownsville, Vt. 






52 02 


52 02 


Slater, Mabel Hunt 


Milton 






443 70 


443 70 


Smith, Orlando A.'s heirs 


New York City . 






6 12 




Smith, Maria A. . 


Barre 






86 70 




Smith, Lucy E. . 


Boston 






60 48 





181 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — (Continued.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 
sonal. 


Real 

Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Smith, John and Ann 


Beverly 




$38 76 




Smith, Ann .... 


Beverly 






25 50 




Smith, Clarence B. 


Boston 






63 24 




Smith, Charles F. . 


Boston 






83 64 




Smith, G. Edward . 


Boston 






57 12 




Snow, Annie C. . 


Dorchester 






7 14 


$7 14 


Soley, Sarah J. 


Chelsea 






66 30 




Somes, Samuel S. . 


Brockton . 






166 26 




Sorell, Arthur C. F. 


Newton 






19 38 


19 38 


Soule, Sadie L. . . . 


Hyde Park 






119 34 




Sorenson, Bertha S. 


Hyde Park 






53 04 




Spencer, Walter A. 


Boston 






10 20 


10 20 


Spitted, Audrey C. . 


SharpsDurg, Pa. 






2 04 




Spiller, Josie C. 


Wellesley . 






62 j2 


62 22 


Sprague, Henry B. & G. R. Nugent 


Boston 






20 40 




Springer, George H. 


Boston 






45 90 




Springfield. Nathaniel's heirs . 


Boston 






6 12 


6 12 


Sproule, Nettie E. . 


Ev reit 






20 40 


20 40 


Stafford, The George W. Co. 


New Jersey 




$408 00 


673 20 


1081 20 


Stanley, Phoebe 


Roslindale 






12 24 




Stanley, James' heirs 


Roslindale 






6 12 




Stanwood, Mary L. 


W. Newbury 






26 52 




Stark, John II. 's heirs 


Boston 






6 12 




Stark, Frederick J. 


Boston 






10 20 




Start, Mary E. . . . 


Boston 






30 60 




Stetson, Ellen F. . 


Boston 






21 42 




Stevens, Charle-.' heirs 


Marlboro . 






86 70 




Stewait, Walter H. 


Boston 






69 36 




Stocker, Frederick, Adm. 








28 56 


28 56 


Stoddard, Granville M. . 


Dedham . 






44 88 


44 88 


Stoddard, Hatherly A. 


Salem 






57 12 


57 12 


Stoddard, Arthur C. & F. A. House 


Boston 






22 44 


22 44 


Stone, Minnie C. . 


Boston 






2 04 




Stone, Harry R. . 


Boston 




81 60 




81 60 


Story, William H. . 


Boston 






58 14 




Stoughton Co-operative Bank . 


Stoughton . 






95 88 




Strongman, Harry W. 


Dorchester 






2 04 


2 04 


Streeler, Catherine W. 


Unknown . 






46 92 


46 92 


Strout, Erastus B. and Martin. V. B. 


Chelsea 






94 86 




Stuart, Elizabeth . 


Boston 






44 88 




Stubbi-, Salome A. . 


Lewiston, Me. 






2 04 




Sturtevant, B. F. Co. 


Boston 






4080 00 




Sullivan, Margaret . 


So. Boston 






6 12 


6 12 


Suffolk Co operative Bank 


Boston 






93 84 




Swift, Emily H. . . . 


Eyerett 






25 50 


25 50 


Sullivan, Michael F., John, Jennie, 












and John J. Donovan 


Boston 






18 36 


18 36 


Swift, Leslie W. . 


Boston 






46 92 


46 92 


Swanoon, Sarah 


Boston 






2 04 




Sumner, Sally R., heirs or devisees 






387 60 


387 60 


Sumner, Sally R., heirs or devisees 

T 
Talhot, Dudley 






514 08 


514 08 


Boston 




22 44 




Tarbeli, Anna T. . 


Dedham . 






58 14 




Tarrant, George M. 


Ayer Junction 






34 68 


34 68 


Tarrant, Mar v A. . 


Ayer Junction 






60 18 




Tasker, Eli B. & Aimer S. Prescott 


Boston 






220 32 




Taylor, George W. . 


Boston 






119 34 




Taylor, Frank S. & Chas. A. Brew- 












ster, trustees 


Boston 






91 80 




Taylor, Jessie 


Boston 






10 20 




Taylor, George W. . 


Boston 






16 32 


16 32 



I 82 
Non-Resident Tax-Payers — ( Continued.) 



Taylor, Frederick N. 
Tewksbury, Francis S. 
Thayer, Augusta H. 
Thayer, Louise T. C. . i 
Thayer, John E. aD(i Bayard 
Thompson, W. N. and C. S. 
Thompson, Mary A. 
Thompson, Edwin J. 
Thurston, Philander's heirs 
Thyng, Albion D. . 
Tibbetts, Ernest C.'s heirs 
Tileston & Hollingsworth Co., 
Tilley, Charles M. . 
Tirrell, George E. . 
Tirrell, Caroline 
Topham, Francis H. 
Todd, Henry, Jr., trustee 
Towan, William P. 
Tower, Annie F. & Annie F. Tar 
Tower, Isaac H.'s heirs 
Townsend, Orlando C. 
Townst nd, B. J. and D. N 
Townsend & Kelley 
Traiton, Nathaniel H. 
Trangott, Sarah H. 
Trevathan, William 
Tripp, Emily A. 
Trotter, Virginia . 
Tucker, Frank W. . 
Tucker, James 
Tucker, Mary T. 
Turnbull, Flora 
Turner, Charles A. 
Turner, William H.'s heirs 
Turner, Edward C. 
Twitchell, Charles M. A 
Tyler, Henry H. 
Tyndale, Thomas H. 



bell 



U 



Utley, Joseph 



Van Ulm, Hyman 
Van Ulm, John 
Vantrinot, Emile J 
Veazie, Emma F. 
Vinal, Henry L. 
Vose, Ellen F. 
Vose, Hattie M. 
Vose, Jessie . 
Vose, Joshua's heirs 

W 

Wade, John R. 
Wadsworth, Kellie B. 
Walker, Clifton E. 
Walker, Martha A. 
Walker, Dennis G. 
Walsh, John R. 
Walter, Theodore A. 



RESIDENCE. 



Boston 

N. Dumbarton ,N.H 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Brockton . 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Enfield 

Braintree. 

Mansfield . 

Boston 

San Antonio, Tex 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Unknown . 

Dedham 

Dedham . 

Boston 

Somerville 

Boston 

Boston 

Brockton . 

Boston 

Hyde Park 

Dorchester 

Boston 

Milton 

Milton 

P. E. Island 

Boston 

Peterboro, N. H 

Arlington . 

Somerville 

Auburndale 

Weymouth 



Roxbury 



Boston 

Boston 

Dedham 

Quincy 

Scituate 

Milton 

Milton 

Milton 

Milton 



Quincy 

Boston 

Dedham . 

Cambridge 

Templeton 

Somerville 



Per- 


Real 


sonal. 


Estate. 




$4 08 




65 28 




85 68 




7 14 




24 48 




3 06 




7 14 




7 14 




46 92 




6 12 




30 60 


4080 00 


4373 76 




77 52 




72 42 




42 84 




8 16 




3 06 




18 36 




68 34 




81 60 




6 12 




55 08 




155 04 




2 04 




9 14 




2 04 




81 60 




311 10 




8 16 




114 24 




173 40 




2 04 




30 60 




91 80 




92 82 




83 64 




84 66 




141 78 




7 14 




4 08 




2 04 




65 28 




■ 55 08 




55 08 




21 42 




21 42 




22 44 




183 60 




62 22 




72 42 




10 20 




20 40 




191 76 




23 46 




78 54 



i83 



Non-Resident Tax-Payers — {Concluded.) 



NAMES. 


RESIDENCE. 


Per- 

sonal. 


Real 
Estate. 


Unpaid. 


Ward, Hannah L 's heirs 


Bosten 




$72 42 


$72 42 


Wardrop, George W. 
Ware, Horace E. . 


Boston 






57 12 


57 12 


Milton 






74 46 




Wares, Phoebe D. . 


Dorchester 






7 14 




Warren, Wm. H. . 


Med ford . 






16 32 




Warren, Edwin F. 


Boston 






3 06 




Warren, Mary E.'s heirs . 


Newton 






99 96 


99 96 


Washburn, Geo. F. 


Westwood 






116 28 




Watson, Paul Barron 


Boston 






10 20 




Way, Granville C. 


BrooKline . 






734 40 




Webber, Cushing's heirs . 


Boston 






122 40 


122 40 


Webster, Stephen's heirs . 


Boston 






10 20 




Webster, Andrew G. and Arthur 












Reed, trustees 


Boston 






84 66 




Weed, Alonzo R. . 


Newton 






102 00 




Welch, Patrick 


Dorchester 






95 88 




Wells, Fannie B. . 


Dorchester 






8 16 


8 16 


Welsh, Willard (tax titles) 


Boston 






343 74 


289 68 


Wentworth, Sarah J. 


Chelsea 






17 34 


17 34 


Weston, Minnie 


Dux bury . 






11 32 




Wheaton, Georgie A. 


Boston 






2 04 


2 04 


Wheeler, Arthur C. 


Concord. N. H. . 






73 44 


73 44 


Whitcher (Barstow) & Wells. • 


Mass. and Montana 




146 88 




Whitcher, Martin L.'s heirs 


Mass. and Montana 




536 52 




White, Charles G. . 


Milton 




16 32 




White, Katherine S. 


Boston 






14 28 




White, Georgianna 


Cambridge 






57 12 


57 12 


White, Edward F. . 


E. Boston 






52 02 




White, Howard 


Beaver City, Neb 






8 16 


8 16 


White, John D.'s heirs 


Boston 






16 32 


16 32 


White Sewing Mach. Co. . 


Boston 




$4 08 






Whitford, George H. 


Waltham . 






6 12 




Whiting, Sarah Morse 


Milton 






67 32 


67 32 


Whiting, Alvan's heirs 


Hudson, Mass. 






8 16 




Whitney, Nathan . 


Bennington, N. B 


. 




9 18 




Whittemore, Addie M. 


Boston 






71 40 


71 40 


Whittier, Isabella L. & Harriet C. 


Boston 






251 94 




Whittier, Albert R. 


Boston ' . 






569 16 




Wiggin, Mary E. . 
Wilder, Fannie L. 


Durham, N. H. 






53 04 


53 04 


Newton, N. H. 






16 32 




Willett, Joseph 


Needham . 






93 84 




Williams, Mary M. 


Milton 






37 74 




Winterson, Frank . 


Boston 






2 04 




Wolcott, J. Huntington's heirs . 


Milton 






131 58 




Wollaston Co-operative Bank . 


Wollaston 






33 66 


33 66 


Wood, Frank . . . 


Boston 






28 56 




Wood, Alfred 


Cambridgep ^rt 
Jamaica Plain 






45 90 




Wunderlich, Gustav 






72 42 




Wyman, Isaac C. . . . 

Y 
Young, Orron 


Salem 






96 90 




Cambridge 




15 30 




Young, Emily W. and Isabel 


Newton 




91 80 


91 80 


Yuilli, David Alison 

Z 
Zeigler, Alfred - ;. 


Winchester 




82 62 


82 62 


Boston 




83 64 


83 64 


ZirHstas, Joseph] . 


Boston 




18 36 





THIRTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



FOR THE 



SCHOOL YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1904. 




HYDE PARK: 
Hyde Park Gazette Press 
, 1904- 



13 



SCHOOL BOARD. 



ELLA F. BOYD, 
313 Hyde Park Avenue, Term expires 1904. 

SAMUEL T. ELLIOTT, 
947 Hyde Park Avenue, Term expires 1904. 

ALVIN D. HOLMES, 

62 Maple Street, Term expires 1904. 

FRANK F. COURTNEY, 
32 Dell Avenue, Term expires 1905. 

EDWARD S. FELLOWS, 
208 West River Street, Term expires 1905. 



GILBERT BALKAM, 

113 Central Avenue, Term expires 1905. 

CHARLES G. CHICK, 
212 West River Street, Term expires 1906. 

FRED J. HUTCHINSON', 

114 East River Street, Term expires 1906. 

WILBUR H. POWERS, 
4 Pond Street, Term expires 1906. 



ORGANIZATION. 

WILBUR H. POWERS, Chairman. 
EDWARD S. FELLOWS, Secretary. 



FRANK O. DRAPER, Superintendent. 

Residence 17 Albion Street. Office, High School Building. 

office hours: 

School days, 1 to 2. Monday evenings, 7 to 8. 



SUB-COMMITTEES. 



ACCOUNTS. 



S. T. Elliott, C G. Chick, E. S. Fellows, W. H. Powers, 
A. D. Holmes. 

RULES AND REGULATIONS. 

C. G. Chick, F. F. Courtney, E. S. Fellows, S. T. Elliott, 
Gilbert Balkam. 

COURSE OF STUDY, TEXT-BOOKS AND SUPPLIES. 

F. F. Courtney, Mrs. E. F. Boyd, F. J. Hutchinson, 
A. D. Holmes, Gilbert Balkam. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING AND MILITARY DRILL. 

A. D. Holmes, F. J. Hutchinson, W. H. Powers. 

TRUANCY. 

C. G. Chick, Mrs. E. F. Boyd, F. F. Courtney. 



LOCAL COMMITTEES. 



High School. — F. J. Hutchinson, W. H. Powers, C. G. Cbick. 

Damon. — S. T. Elliott, E. S. Fellows. 

Hemenway. — S. T. Elliott. 

Grew.— Mrs. E. F. Boyd, E. S. Fellows. 

Greenwood.— F. F. Courtney, A. D. Holmes. 

Trescott. — F. J. Hutchinson, S. T. Elliott. 

Amos Webster. — E. S. Fellows, Mrs. E. F. Boyd. 

Butler. — Mrs. E. F. Boyd. 

Fairmount. — C. G. Chick, E. S. Fellows. 

Weld. —A. D. Holmes. 

Vacation Industrial. —Mrs. E. F. Boyd, G. Balkam. 

Evening. — F. F. Courtney, F. J. Hutchinson. 



SCHOOL CALENDAR, 1903-4. 



FIKST TERM. 
Begins Monday, Sept. 7th; ends Friday, Dec. I8tli. — 15 weeks. 

SECOND TERM. 

Begins Monday, January 4th ; ends Friday, April 1st. — 13 weeks- 

THIRD TERM. 

Begins Monday, April 11th; ends Friday, June 24th. — 11 weeks, 

CHRISTMAS VACATION. 

Begins Monday, Dec. 21st; ends Friday, Jan. 1st. — 2 weeks. 

SPRING VACATION: 
Begins Monday, April 4th ; ends Friday, April 8th. — 1 week. 

HOLIDAYS. 

September 7th and 8th, November 26th and 27th, February 22d; 
April 1st, April 19th and May 30th. 



REPORT OF THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park: — 

In March of this financial year we adopted the plan of pre- 
senting original bills to the Town Treasurer as vouchers for 
money paid instead of presenting, as heretofore, orders of the 
School Committee, so that receipted bills are now on file with 
the Town Treasurer instead of with this board, as formerly. 

The School Board recognizes the necessity of economy 
under present conditions, and is endeavoring to avoid un- 
necessary expenses of any kind. A committee of thirty-five, 
made up of certain town officials and others interested in re- 
ducing the tax rate, appointed a sub-committee of five to 
examine into the expenditures of the school department and 
estimate the necessary expenses for the ensuing year. The 
School Committee, believing that good citizenship is best 
developed by a judicious economy, and desiring to co-operate 
with a movement intended to promote the welfare of our 
town, gave this committee of thirty-five and its sub-committee 
all the information in its possession and assisted them in 
every way. The sub-committee prepared and submitted to 
the committee of thirty-five a written report and favored this 
board with a copy. This report was accepted and adopted 
as the recommendation of the committee of thirty-five. 
Their estimate compels frugality in all departments, the clos- 
ing of one school-room, at least, dividing the pupils among 
other teachers, requiring teachers to have more than one 
grade in a room in more cases than at present, and dispenses 
with the industrial school altogether. The intention is to 
work a reform in all departments of our town government. 
No claim is made by this committee of thirty-five that the 



192 



school board has not been economical in its administration, 
but they feel that parents, pupils and teachers should be 
willing to work together for the public weal, to reduce rather 
than increase their demands, to treat our schools as a just 
man treats his family, and cut according to our cloth. We 
place our recommendations on this basis. 

There have been numerous requests for increase of salaries, 
some of them having merit, but we do not lecommend any 
increase in the present schedule of salaries for the ensuing 
year. 

Year before last, we favored the putting in of toilet arrange- 
ments at the Grew School and connecting the same with the 
sewer, and last year we made the same recommendation re- 
lating to the Fairmount School. Appropriations were made 
and the work was done. The four schools not thus provided 
for at the time the work was commenced on the Grew School 
doubtless all needed immediate attention, but the policy of 
the school board was to spread the expense over several 
years in order to avoid as much as possible an undue in- 
crease in the tax nite. We, tnerelore, recommend that toilet 
arrangements be put. in the Greenwood School, that the same 
be connected with the sewer, and that the expense be met by 
appropriating the sum of $2,000 from the amount of fines 
collected from defendants in criminal cases, and by taking 
the balance out of school incidentals. This is exactly the 
course pursued in relation to the Grew School. 

We expect an increase in the number of school children, and 
naturally that would require more teachers, but we will try 
to get along with the present number, and simply ask the 
teachers to do a little more work for the same pay. 

Our evening school is doing good work and reaches a de- 
serving class. The attendance is on the increase and causes 
an addition to the estimated expense. The industrial 
school, also, did good work this year, but as the committee 
of thirty-five citizens says, "The present financial condition 



193 

of the town does not seem to warrant its continuance," we 
make no mention of an appropriation for it. 

It may be interesting to note that the appropriation re- 
quired to meet the maturing bonds and notes issued in pay- 
ment for school buildings and furnishings is $2,000 less this 
year than last. 

In order that our citizens may all know definitely, and 
before the appropriation meeting, the opinion of the school 
board relating to appropriations for school purposes, we have 
decided to depart from our usual custom and place our 
recommendations in our annual report. 

We recommend that the town raise by taxation the present 
year for current school expenses the sum of $52,200 divided 
as follows : 

Salaries and fuel, $42,500 00 

Incidentals, 5,000 00 

Text-books and supplies, 3'5°° °° 

Evening schools, 1,200 00 

152,200 00 

The number of pupils in the graduating class of the High 
School is thirty-eight, and the number of pupils in the class 
which entered last fall is one hundred and twelve. If the 
class which enters next fall should number one hundred and 
fifteen or more, which is reasonable to expect, the increase 
may require a new teacher in spite of all our attempts at 
economy. 

Hyde Park is fortunate in having a corps of teachers in its 
public schools well equipped for their work, thoroughly inter- 
ested in the welfare and education of the pupils under their 
charge, and willing to go beyond a technical course of study 
and the hours required for school purposes to inspire our 
youth with an ambition to develop themselves and become 
good citizens. 

Much care is used in the selection of teachers, and those 
believed to be best qualified are chosen. It is true that 



i 9 4 

nearly every year sees some departures to more fruitful fields 
where the salary, if not the opportunity for usefulness, is 
larger. We cannot afford to become the rivals of some of 
our more wealthy neighbors, but we are always able to fill the 
places of the departed with new teachers of equal merit, it 
may be younger and fresher from the Normal school or 
college but full of the enthusiam of youth and the purpose to 
prove themselves worthy. 

Our schools are in excellent condition, and those most 
familiar with them are emphatic in their praise. In recent 
years a larger proportion than formerly are taking the high 
school course. This is doubtless natural, as both parents 
and pupils recognize the fact that competition in business or 
professional life is, at the present time, very sharp ; that girls 
are becoming more and more the rivals of the boys along 
these lines ; that education, if properly applied, helps to 
secure positions, opens new fields of usefulness to both sexes* 
and gives social standing. A new high school building and 
other local conditions may have emphasized this tendency. 

It seems wise to give our youth the best opportunities. 
In thus helping them, we are helping our town, and may con- 
tinue to attract to our beautiful hillsides a law-abiding and 
home-loving people. 

Extravagance is always wrong, economy is always wise, 
but we think it suicidal economy to decrease our educational 
facilities. Rather let us be able to say to the parents whose 
lives centre in their children, — Live in Hyde Park where the 
public schools will thoroughly fit your children for their life 
work, for the college or for the professional school. 

WILBUR H. POWERS, Chairman, 

For the School Committee. 

Read and adopted as the Report of the School Committee at the 
regular meeting of the Committee held January 25, 1904. 






SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT. 



To the School Committee of the Town of Hyde Park : 
My sixth annual report as Superintendent of the Hyde 

Park public schools is herewith respectfully submitted. 

Following is a summary of statistics, the membership and 

attendance based upon the returns for the school year last 

completed, ending June 30, 1903. 

GENERAL STATEMENT. 

SCHOOLHOUSES. 

No. I. High school, twenty rooms, Everett street 

(twelve occupied as class and recitation rooms) 

" 2. Damon school, eight rooms, Readville street 

(four occupied) 

3. Hemenway school, one room, Wolcott street 

4. Grew school, eleven rooms, Gordon avenue 
(nine occupied) 

5. Greenwood school, nine rooms, Metropolitan avenue 
(eight occupied) 

6. Amos Webster school, four rooms, Hilton street 

7. Trescott school, four rooms, Rosemont street 
(two occupied) 

8. Butler school, one room, East River street 
(used for special purposes) 

9. Fairmount school, nine rooms, Williams avenue 
(eight occupied) 

o. Weld school, two rooms. Highland street 

(one occupied) 



Number of schoolrooms occupied, 

Number of school buildings, .... 

Number containing high school department, 

Number containing eighth (highest grammar) grade, 

Number containing primary grades only, 

Number used for special purposes, 



49 
10 
1 
4 
4 
1 



196 



TEACHERS. 

Supervisors of special subjects, 

Number of teachers regularly employed 

Men teaching in day schools, 

Women teaching in day schools, 

Men teaching in evening schools 

Women teaching in evening schools, 

Men teaching in vacation schools 

Women teaching in vacation schools, 

Number of day school teachers who have attended 

Number of college graduates, . 

Number who have attended normal school, . 

Number of norrnai scliool graduates, 

Number who have attended training school, 

Number of training school graduates, 



college 



2 
60 

7 
42 

3 

5 
1. 
2 

H 
11 
22 
16 

9 
6 



SCHOOL CENSUS. 

Population of Hyde Park (census of 1900), . . . I 3> 2 44 

Total number of persons 5 to 15, . . . . 2 >336 

boys ,5 to 15, . . 1,172 

girls 5 to 15. . . . . . 1,164 

" persons 7 to 14, . . . . I 1 7 f ->5 

" boys 7 to 14, . . . • 824 

" girls 7 to 14, . . . . . 881 

persons in Hyde Park private schools, . 5 

" persons in Hyde Park parochial school, . . 742 

" persons in schools out of town, . . 9 

" male illiterate minors over 14 years of age, . 1 

" female " " " o 



MEMBERSHIP AND ATTENDANCE. 

Total number of pupils registered, .... 2,105 

" " " excluding re-enrollments, I >97 1 

Average membership, ...... 1,582 

Average attendance, ...... 1,468 

Per cent, of attendance, . . . . . . 92 8 

Number of pupils between 5 and 15 years of age, . . . i>7 2 9 

" more than 15 " . . 269 

" between 7 and 14 " . . i> 1 75 

" less than 7 " . 412 

" more than 14 " . 378 



197 

In presenting a brief review of some of the results of five 
years' school work under supervision, I desire at the outset 
to express my sense of obligation to those public-spirited 
citizens who have made progress possible by sustaining the 
hand of the superintendent of schools in public and, what 
may be quite as essential, in private, when the welfare of the 
children, for whom alone the schools are established and 
maintained, demanded radical changes or action which clashed 
with private interests. The opposite course either defeats 
entirely the ends of supervision or needlessly delays their 
accomplishment. , 

In 1901-02, the latest year for which comparative figures 
are available, Hyde Park appropriated $4.21 to the support of 
public schools for each thousand dollars of valuation. Two 
hundred and twenty-six of the towns and cities of Massachu- 
setts appropriated a still greater proportion of their taxable 
property for public education. This great annual expenditure 
is justifiable only upon the ground of the vital importance of 
providing the best possible education for the future citizens 
of the Commonwealth. The wisdom of the investment is 
dependent upon the quality of the product just as absolutely 
as in any other financial investment. Unfortunately, the 
daily and yearly output resulting from the school work of our 
sixteen hundred children is not readily measured as to either 
quantity or quality. Evidently its value is directly depend- 
ent upon the efficiency of the efforts of our half-hundred 
teachers to hold each pupil to the most productive activity 
every day and all the day. Experience has shown, further, 
that a system of schools will fall far short of the best possible 
results, and that as a consequence the money invested in 
them will be largely spent in vain, unless the direction of the 
educational work is placed in the hands of a superintendent 
whose recommendations are, in the main, endorsed by the 
school committee and to whom is entrusted the execution of 
the details of administration. 



198 

The results of five years of supervision in Hyde Park 
are, I believe, apparent to all who know our schools at first 
hand. The first superintendent in any town meets innumer- 
able difficulties which yield only to patient endeavor through 
a considerable period. It is a genuine pleasure to acknowl- 
edge the constantly increasing co-operation on the part of 
committee, teachers and parents, which in so short a time has 
made it passible to place our schools upon their present foot- 
ing with no necessity for a backward step and with a most 
encouraging outlook for the future. 

Five years ago, while there was no disposition to depreci- 
ate the work of faithful and efficient teachers, there was a 
very general demand on the part of parents and others inter- 
ested in the schools for increased efficiency. That .this 
demand for better schools has been met is shown, among 
other indications, by the fact that the number of Hyde Park 
pupils in private (not parochial) schools and in schools out 
of town, as reported in the 1903 census, is fourteen, while the 
number reported in 1898 was one hundred fifteen. 

Naturally there was great diversity of opinion as to the 
lines along which improvement should proceed. There was 
substantial agreement that the work of the high school 
should be broadened and brought into line with the best 
suburban secondary schools. The earnest advocates of public 
kindergartens were numerous and their arguments were 
based upon sound ideas of education. The need of effective 
courses in free-hand drawing under a supervisor was wideiy 
felt. The advantages of adding to the elementary courses 
such high school subjects as Latin, French, algebra, and 
geometry were urged. Nature study under the forms of 
geology and botany was felt by many to be essential to 
modern school work throughout the grades ; sewing, cooking, 
and carpentry work were advocated upon excellent grounds. 
The desirability of each of these and of other proposed addi- 
tions to and improvements upon the existing courses, con- 
sidered in itself, was undeniable ; but, in view of all the 




199 

conditions, revolutionary measures were out of the question 
and were not undertaken. 

The enlargement of the scope of the high school work was 
imperative and measures were taken at once to bring this 
about. An expected and wholly desirable result of this 
action is the very great increase in the membership of the 
school. The average membership for the fall term of 1897 
was 182, while for the corresponding term of 1903 it was 300. 
In the former year, with the limited courses then open to 
pupils, eight teachers carried the work easily and were con- 
sidered adequate for a considerable increase in membership. 
With the present membership and courses twelve teachers 
do not allow a daily program providing for the longer re- 
citation periods which are desirable for the best results. 
This remarkable increase in the membership of our high 
school is, from every point of view, desirable. But it was 
foreseen that it would render necessary the erection of a new 
and much larger high school building. Again, the annual 
expense for each high school pupil is much greater than for 
each pupil in the lower grades. This is unavoidable and is 
necessarily true everywhere; but it follows that, other condi- 
tions being equal, the per capita cost for the maintenance of 
public schools is relatively high in towns having a proportion- 
ately large number of pupils in the high school. For this 
reason it has not seemed wise, during the period of rapid 
growth of the high school, to recommend extensions of the 
elementary school work which would materially increase the 
cost of maintenance. The question of the establishment of 
a system of kindergartens and of courses in manual training 
and domestic science is mainly a question of cost. There is 
no serious question as to their value in communities where 
they have been given a fair trial. 

A conservative course has been pursued. Without in- 
creasing the number of teachers or the number of years spent 
in the elementary schools, the youngest children of the lowest 
primary grade who are too mature to do first grade work and 



200 

would otherwise remain more than a year in that grade, have 
been placed in a sub-primary class by themselves. In two of 
the grammar school buildings they have a separate room, 
and in all cases the teachers having them in charge adapt the 
work to the needs of this sub-primary class as far as pos- 
sible, so that in a good measure they have the kindergarten 
spirit and to some extent the kindergarten employments. 

Wood working and other forms of manual training pre- 
suppose a thorough course in elementary drawing and some 
knowledge of design. Five years ago there was practically 
no work in drawing in our schools. The present work under 
a supervisor is comprehensive, is based upon right principles, 
and is steadily improving in efficiency as pupils reach the 
higher grades with more adequate preparation for advanced 
work. Each year the manual training idea is more effectively 
embodied in the work, without adding materially to its cost, 
by the employment of cardboard construction, and our pres- 
ent grammar classes would be well prepared for intelligent 
and profitable carpentry work if the financial resources of the 
town warranted the added expense of special equipment and 
instruction and the extension of the elementary course by 
inserting a ninth grade between the present highest grammar 
class and the high school. A ninth grade would also make 
room for Latin, algebra, geometry, physics, and more ad- 
vanced work in history and civics. But it is true that such 
extension of the grammar school work would be more im- 
peratively needed if comparatively few of our grammar school 
graduates entered the high school. With an eight years' 
course it may fairly be questioned how far the addition of 
new subjects of study can be carried without undue sacrifice 
of thoroughness. Certainly, the older subjects should be well 
taught before extended experiments are made in the new ; 
and during the past five years the main effort in the elemen- 
tary schools has been directed toward increased proficiency 
in the familiar school subjects, and, most important of all, al- 
though most difficult to secure by direct means, toward a 



201 

more general high professional standard on the part of the 
teachers and, as a consequence, better school spirit on the 
part of the pupils and better educational results. Intelligent 
individualism has been encouraged on the part of both teacher 
and taught. A dead level of uniformity has not been sought 
in the name of system. A teacher's best work is his own. 
It is not the product of imitation and it is rendered impossible 
by imposing unnecessary limitations and iestiaints. Effec- 
tive supervision is neither nagging nor constant interference. 
It is quite as essential to let well alone as to set wrong 
right. 

In dealing with the elementary course of study, it was felt 
that in the past undue emphasis had been laid upon the 
formal side of arithmetic, geography, grammar, and primary 
reading. A change of text books in these subjects was re- 
commended and the recommendation was adopted by the 
Committee for all grades using text books in geography, for 
grades below the seventh in grammar and for grades below 
the sixth in arithmetic. The new texts present excellent 
arrangements of subject matter and form a good basis for a 
progressive course of study. In geography, the learner's 
attention is directed to the rational element which underlies 
and explains the facts of location. He not only learns some- 
thing of the present condition of the earth's surface, but is 
led to look upon this as the result of formative processes 
which are still at work and may be observed about him. The 
details of names and places and statistical information are 
easily forgotten and may be recovered as they are needed 
from reference books ; but the more general ideas of rela- 
tion and causation, when once apprehended, are a much more 
permanent possession, are of wider utility, and are less likely 
to be gained in after life. The new geography is a useful 
form of nature study. It is a study of the earth as well as of 
maps and classified lists of cities and productions. 

In arithmetic, the children are introduced early to such 
subjects as common and decimal fractions and percentage 

14 



202 

through problems that are within their ability to solve, and 
all the subjects of arithmetic when once encountered are 
constantly reviewed with problems of increasing difficulty. 
In the higher grades all subjects are finally and thouroughly 
reviewed in such a way as to impress the underlying general 
principles and to secure an intelligent grasp of the reasons 
for the rules in accordance with which the processes are per- 
formed. In connection with the teaching of arithmetic, 
practice is given in the use of the literal notation and the 
equation is used in the solution of problems. In the study of 
mensuration, elementary geometrical ideas are gained. 

English grammar is taught throughout the grades and in- 
struction in the correct use of language is made a part of 
recitations in all subjects. In the first grade, the children 
learn at once the use of Mr., Mrs., and Miss by writing from 
copy their own names and the names of parents and teachers. 
They also learn the use of the capitals I and O, the use of the 
capital at the beginning of names of persons, school, and 
town, at the beginning of a sentence, and used as an initial 
in a name. They also learn to use the period with initials, 
and to distinguish simple sentences as statement or question 
with the use of period or question mark. In the second 
grade, the pupils begin to distinguish between the names of 
persons, animals, and objects talked of and their actions, as a 
basis for notions of subject and predicate. They learn the 
use of capitals to begin names of persons, places, streets, 
days of the week, and months ; the punctuation of dates ; ab- 
breviations with the use of the period ; and are taught such 
expressions as "It is I," "I saw," "I did," " May I," with 
the correction of "aint," "hadn't ought," as occasion arises 
in oral language, As occasion requires, they are taught the 
proper forms of verbs with singular and plural subjects and 
the present and past of irregular verbs. From the third to 
the sixth grades, inclusive, sentences, their kinds and parts, 
the parts of speech, and the rules which govern correct 
speech, are studied from the standpoint of language itself. 



203 

In the seventh and eighth grades, the pupils' knowledge of 
technical grammar is reviewed and extended. 

The preceding brief review of certain features of the work 
of the past five years will at least suggest answers to ques- 
tions which are sometimes asked in regard to the work of the 
schools. In the main, the ground has been cleared and ex- 
cellent work is being accomplished. Some changes are 
needed in our courses of study ; for example, the formal 
adoption of a method of primary reading which will more 
nearly represent the best work now done in our schools and 
in progressive schools everywhere. The extension of the 
elementary courses along lines previously suggested must 
await the time when additional appropriations for that pur- 
pose are forthcoming. Meanwhile, intensive work is needed 
all along the line, and the earnest efforts of all concerned will 
be demanded for some time to come to ensure a continuance 
of healthful and real progress on conservative lines. 

During the past year, the interest of two Hyde Park socie- 
ties in the schools has been expressed in a most acceptable 
manner. November 21st, the Current Events Club, to whom 
we were indebted last year for casts of a large section of the 
Parthenon frieze and of the Westminster bust of Longfellow 
for the decoration of the High School assembly hall, gave a 
reception to the teachers of our schools in the rooms of the 
Y. M, C. A. building. December 14th, the Hyde Park Edu- 
cation Society gave, in Waverley Hall, an illustrated lecture 
and devoted the proceeds to the purchase of a stereopticon 
for the High School. These empathic expressions of good 
will toward our public schools and their teachers is character- 
istic of the attitude of the townspeople, and cannot fail to act 
as an incentive to all who share the responsibilities of public 
education. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FRANK O. DRAPER, 

Superintendent. 



APPENDIX. 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC. 



Mr. Frank O. Draper, Supt. of Schools : 

Dear Sir, — The past six years has marked a steady 
growth in Music in our Public Schools. 

The Tone work shows improvement, and pupils enjoy 
singing in a musical way. 

Harsh and disagreeable vocal effort is rarely heard in 
the class room. 

Sight reading receives its share of attention, and 
children as they reach the upper grades readily sing new 
music. 

Some attention has been given to Theory and written 
work. The test papers by the pupils during the past year 
have shown careful attention to detail, besides neatness 
and accuracy. Melodic composition has been attempted, 
but development on this line is necessarily handicapped 
through lack of time. 

The discipline was never stronger than to-day, and in 
place of indifference to music, eagerness to render lessons 
well animates the schools throughout the town. This 
condition is due, without exception, to the splendid co- 
operation of the teachers. 

For the suggestions and many helps during the year, I 
desire to express my thanks to you, Mr. Draper, and to 
the school committee my appreciation of their generous 
support. 

Yours respectfully, 

B. HAROLD HAMBLIN. 

Supervisor of Music. 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF DRAWING. 



Mr. Frank O. Draper, Superintendent of Schools : 

Dear Sir, — The work in drawing has been continued 
on the lines of previous years, but more time has been 
given to the mechanical and constructive part. President 
Eliot recently remarked, " Any kind of manual training is 
worth more than nine-tenths of all the work in the public 
schools that comes under the head of arithmetic." 

Many models have been made of cardboard of the arts 
and crafts furniture. In the upper grades, boys have 
taken working drawings of this furniture and with a jack- 
knife and cigar box made the object from wood. 

Progress made in the work of the primary grades was well 
shown at the Hemenway School. Mr. Wellington, the 
janitor, made a house of two rooms, complete with its 
windows, doors, chimney, etc., and the three lower grades 
furnished it, one as a bedroom and the other as a 
parlor. A scheme of color for each room was chosen. 
The wall papers were designed and painted, the furniture 
measured, cut and pasted designs made for portieres, 
table covers, sofa cushions, etc. On one floor was a rug 
woven on their hand looms of raffia, the other was made 
of wool. 

Another day has been given to the High School, mak- 
ing my visit to the grammar grades once in three weeks 
instead of once in two. Work has not suffered from this 
arrangement except where there have been new teachers 
with no experience in drawing. 

The extra time at the High School is showing good re- 
sults, the work being much in advance of previous years. 



209 

One pupil with no other instruction has made $70 since 
last May designing lace work. Her first commision was 
for designs of $600 worth of lace, — a responsible order, but 
she proved successful and now regularly designs that lace- 
maker's patterns. 

Each year, more and more, the pupils are showing the 
results of their training, in applying the principles of art 
and design to home work. 

Respectfully yours, 

ALICE T. BOARDMAN. 

Supervisor of Drawing. 



REPORT OF HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. 



Mr Frank O. Draper, Superintendent of Schools : 

Dear Sir, — In accordance with your request, I submit 
herewith my fifth annual report of the High School, for 
the year 1903. 

The enrollment in December was 316. The member- 
ship was 300. The membership by classes was as follows : 



1 st year, 


"5 


2d year, 


74 


3d year, 


65 


4U1 year, 


3S 


Post-graduates, 


8 



Total, 300 

The resignation of Mr. Edwin Palmer in June leit us 
without a military iustructor, and it was decided to appoint 
a young man who could assist in the academical work, 
accordingly Mr. Charles W. French of Somerville was 
appointed. The beginning of the second year of the 
Commercial Course necessitated an assistant, and Miss Ida 



2IO 

M. Wetherbee of Hyde Park was chosen. In October 
Miss Bessie L. Nichols resigned to care for the family of 
a deceased sister, and in November, Miss Margaret R. 
Brooks of Holyoke was elected to succeed Miss Nina E. 
Titus in the Commercial Course, as Miss Titus had 
accepted an appointment in the Dorchester High School. 

Several times in past reports we have spoken of the 
needs of library facilities and books. The furnishing of 
the new building supplied the former and a generous ap- 
propiation by the Committee has partially supplied the 
latter ; but annual additions are necessary in order to de- 
velop the various departments, and make this important 
side of our work effective. The appropriation this year 
was spent for an up-to-date Encyclopedia, History, and 
English books. The library is open to the pupils, under 
the direction of a teacher, each school hour in the week, 
and the teachers are beginning to do regular library work 
in their classes. It will take several years, however, to 
place this work on a firm basis. 

As it was necessary to give two courses in Physics while 
we were in temporary quarters in the Grew School build- 
ing, the Physical Laboratory in the new high school 
building was not furnished the first year. During the 
summer vacation benches were built around the room for 
individual work, and three large tables were placed in the 
center of the room for class experiments. All of these 
were well equipped with gas and electric outlets. A 
Wardian Case was constructed for the Botany Classes, 
and a number of valuable pieces of apparatus procured for 
the Physical and Chemical courses have made these lines 
much more objective and thus of greater value to the 
pupils. 

Entrance requirement for College have caused much 
warm discussion between the secondary schools and the 



211 

Colleges, in which the Colleges, instead of adapting them- 
selves to conditions, have acted in a most arbitrary manner. 
It was left for the Middle States, under the leadership of 
some of her less selfish and more thoughtful men, to pre- 
pare the way for uniform entrance requirements by giving 
examinations which when passed would admit to any in- 
stitution in that'section. This placed the schools which 
fitted for those institutions in a position to interpret their 
courses in a much broader and enlightened spirit. In 
imitation of the Middle States a meeting of the higher in- 
stitutions of the New England States was called, and an 
organization called the " New England College Entrance 
Certificate Board" was formed. Each secondary school 
in New England was then notified that after January, 1904, 
no pupils would be received from any school by certificate, 
unless such school had received the certificate right from 
the Board. In accordance with this notification this school 
at once made a request for the certificate right. In Octo- 
ber of this year, after our course of study, daily program, 
and methods of work had been thoroughly investigated, 
the right was granted for three years, to be renewed at the 
end of that time at the pleasure of the Board. In other 
words, the granting of this privilege in the future depends 
upon the character of the work done by our pupils in the 
different institutions. More than ever shall we be obliged 
to insist upon certain standards for certificates. We are 
now permitted to issue certificates for Amherst College, 
Boston University, Bowdoin College, Brown University, 
Dartmouth College, Mount Holyoke College, Smith Col- 
lege, Tufts College, University of Maine, Wellesley 
College, and Wesleyan University. 

In most of the schools having any considerable art col- 
lection the alumni have been the donors, thus renewing 
and showing in a practical manner their continued interest 



212 

in the school. This school is no exception. In June the 
Battalion of 1902 presented a fine plaster cast of the Niobe 
Group, and in the early autumn the Battalion of 1896 
completed the frieze in the Assembly Hall with Assyrian 
slabs representing scenes in the reign of the great king 
Asshurbanipal, who reigned about 850 B. C. It had been 
proposed that the graduating classes adorn the class rooms, 
and that the large halls and corridors be supplied through 
miscellaneous gifts. In accordance with this plan the class 
of 1903 chose Room 22, and placed therein a picture of the 
Roman Forum, a picture of the Castle of San Angelo, and 
a bust of Julius Caesar. It is hoped that something will 
be added each year. The last of November the Educational 
Society voted to purchase a stereopticon for the school. 
In order to add to funds already on hand a stereopticon 
lecture was given in Waverley Hall by Chaplain Tribou 
of the Charlestown Navy Yard. The endeavor was so 
successful that the school is now in possession of a single 
lantern of the best make. 

Thanking you, Sir, and the Committee for their hearty 
and generous support, I remain. 

Respectfully yours, 

M. S. GETCHELL, 

Principal. 



REPORT OF EVENING SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. 

Mr. Frank O. Draper, Supt. of Schools : 

Dear Sir — In response to your request I submit the fol- 
lowing report of the Evening School for year beginning 
November 2, 1903 : 



The enrollment is as follows : 
English Department, 
Business Department, 
Drafting Department, 



t3S 

55 
33 



213 

Average Attendance : 

English Department, 55 

Business Department, 30 

Drafting Department, 19 

Average Age : 

English Department, 22 

Business Department, 19 

Drafting Department, 22 

The school was continued during the Christmas vacation, 
as it was thought this would keep up the interest, but owing 
to the severe winter weather, the attendance dropped off for 
a while, but has shown much improvement since. 

There are quite a number of scholars who attended the 
school last year and are making good progress in their 
studies. 

In the business department the students who took up 
bookkeeping were obliged to buy their text-books, and this 
has proved very beneficial, as it enables them to study during 
the spare time out of school. 

The Drafting Department is in charge Mr. W. W. Lewis 
and is carried on the same lines as last year, beginning with 
the use of instruments, geometrical problems and principles 
of projection ; after this, drawing from objects. Most of the 
work has been Machine Drawings. 

The other classes have the same teachers as last year and 
continued along the same lines. 

Yours very truly, 

B. M. CHITTICK, 

Principal. 

SEWING SCHOOL REPORT. 

To the Committee on Industeial School : 

Gentlemen — The Summer Sewing School of 1903 opened 

July 7, with an unusally large attendance. 

The total enrollment for the term was one hundred and 

twenty-nine, with an average daily attendance of forty-seven, 



214 

It was necessary to refuse admittance to several applicants, 
as the classes were too large to accommodate them. 

The pupils were graded and four classes were formed, each 
class attending twice a week. The work was similar in char- 
acter to that of previous years, although more time was spent 
in the making of useful articles and less on the samplers, 
particularly in the higher grades. 

The school closed August 13, with an exhibition of the 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NELLIE M. HOWES, 

Instructor. 



BASKETRY SCHOOL REPORT. 

To the Committee on Industrial School : 

Gentlemen — In connection with the Summer School a 
class in Basketry was formed July 7, 1903. 

One hundred and thirty pupils were enrolled during the 
term, with an a/erage daily attendance of forty-eight. Several 
had to be refused admittance, as the classes, at the time of 
their application, were too large to accommodate them. 

The pupils displayed much enthusiasm about the work, 
many desiring to attend more sessions than could be per- 
mitted. 

The school closed August 13, with an exhibition of the 
work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARGARET E. BERTRAM. 

Instructor. 






215 

CARPENTRY SCHOOL REPORT. 

To the Committee of Industrial School : 

The school opened July 7th with an enrollment of seventy- 
two boys of average age of twelve years. 

Average attendance each day twenty-seven. Closed 
August 20th. 

There were eighty-five applications. 

Respectfully submitted, 

GEORGE E. NOYES. 



TRUANT OFFICER'S REPORT. 

Mr. Frank O. Draper, Supt. of Schools : 

Dear Sir — Please find below an account of my services 
as Truant Officer, for nine months ending Dec. 31, 1903 : 

Total number cases investigated, 80 

" truants, 17 

" prosecuted, 2 

" committed, 2 

" absent with parents' permission, 7 

" absent on account of sickness, 13 

" " lack of clothing, 7 

" " removal from town, 6 

" " from other causes, 7 

" transfer cards investigated, 21 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM F. DODGE, 

Truant Officer, 



"ffacta non verba." 



(iradaatincr Exercises; 
The High School 

j-iyd^ par^, /T|assaef?uset:t5 

Tuesday, June 23d, 1903 
WAVERLY OPERA HOUSE 



. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES. 

i. Selection, " Hiawatha " .... N. Moret 

Grew School Orchestra, 

George M. Dickinson, Director 

2. Invocation, .... Rev. Samuel G. Babcock 

Essay, — John Milton, Prince of Poets. 

Helen Arabella Newell. 

4. Masse Solennelle, — Parti, . . . Eduardo Marzo 

(a) Kyrie. 

(b) Gloria. 

(c) Qui Tollis. 

5. Class History, 

George Herbert Hoyt. i / 

6. Essay, — The Boy Governor of Massachusetts, 

Brida May Holmes. 

7. Masse Solennelle, — Part II, 

{d) Credo. 
(e) Sanctus. 
(/) Agnus Dei. 

8. Class Prophecy, 

Edith Lillian Webster. 

3. Essay, — What Arbitration Has Done for the United States. 
Chauncey Worcester Waldron. 

10. Presentation of Diplomas, 

Wilbur H. Powers, Chairman of School Board. 

15 



218 



ii. Class Ode 

Classmates, we are now assembled, 

And in sweet strains let us tell 
Of our sorrow at departing 

From the school we've loved so well. 
We have studied long togeher, 

Through the days of High School life, 
And though often trouble met us, 

We were victors in the strife. 



f Words by Patience Esther McKenna 
\ Music by Annie Lueen Caffin 

But no longer will the union, 

Which we've fostered in these years 
Be as compact aud unbroken, 

For its goal it quickly nears : 
Though hereafter we may wander 

Far from school and classmates fair, 
Still we'll ne'er forget each other 

And the friendship that we share. 



Now, farewell to our companions, 

Farewell to our loved High School, 
And the teachers who have helped us 

In the practice of good rules. 
May we profit by their teachings, 

And in future let us be 
Kach a strong and worthy member 

Of the class of nineteen three. 



Thomas 



12. March, " Nahant," ..... 

Grew School Orchestra. 

Solists : Brida May Holmes, Carrie Lunt Strout, Edith Lillian Webster, 

John Clement Bradley. 

Accompanist : Helen Elizabeth Courtney. 



Arthur Huguenin Armstrong 
Mabel Josephine Blood 
John Clement Bradley 
Annie Lueen Caffin 
Alexander Stewart Carberry 
LeSeur Thornton Collins 
Ellen Bernadette Corbett 
Anna Cotter 

Helen Elizabeth Courtney 
Laura Keene Darling 
Florence Eliza Davenport 
Rose Anna Downey 
Elsie Morris Downie 
Gertrude Sophia Dunbar 
Mary Eliot 

Webster Brewer Evans 
Nellie May Farnsworth 
Grace Hartshorne Faulkner 
Willard Charles French 
Margaret Agnes Gaynor 
Louis Cardell Gerry 
Brida May Holmes 



GRADUATES 

Minna Blake Hope 
George Herbert Hoyt 
Milton Emery MacGregor 
Raymond Edward McDonald 
Frank Sanderson McGregor 
Helen Claire Mclntyre 
Patience Esther McKenna 
Marjorie Stockbridge Mitchell 
Mary Josephine Mulcahy 
Helen Josephine Murray 
Helen Arabella Newell 
Emily Martha Nunn 
John Philip Olson 
Effie Idora O'Neil 
Mabelle Rebecca Owen 
Flora Mabel Smith 
Helen Leighton Straw 
Carrie Lunt Strout 
Stanford D. Tappan 
Mabel Edna Tourtellotte 
Chauncey Worcester Waldrcn 
Edith Lillian Webster 



GRADUATING EXERCISES 



Damon Grammar School 

HYDE PARK, MASS. 

Jutne 24, Nineteen Hundred and Three 

AT 2 P.M. 



PROGRAM OF EXERCISES. 

School. 

Harry Clark. 

Harry Stewart. 

Ralph Tripp. 

Mary Bond. 

Josephine Caraher. 

Earl Fenner. 
Sidney Mathews. 



Loving Forever, 

Boy Wanted, 

Silk, ... 

Beautiful Summer Song, 

The Chambered Nautilus, 

Our Government, 

Harmonica Solo, 

The General's Client, 

Coal, 

Catharine Estabrook. 
The Review of the Grand Army, 

Walter Stewart. 
Lorely, ------ 

School. 
Presentation of Diplomas, 

Dr. S. T. Elliott, Member of School Board. 

GRADUATES. 
Mary Ellen Bond Margaret Elizabeth Hartnett 

George D wight Cabot Orison Willard Lawrence 

Josephine Katherine Caraher Sidney Arthur Matthews 

Harry Otis Clark Basil Walter Sprague 

Catharine Mary Estabrook Harry Campbell Stewart 

Earl Sanders Fenner Walter Preston Stewart 

Ralph Wright Tripp 



Money 

Waterman 

Composition 

Post 

Holmes 

Composition 

Selected 

Anon 

Composition 

A 71 OK 

Silcher 



GRADUATING EXERCISES 

OF THE 

GREW SCHOOL 

Wednesday Afternoon, June 24. 1903 
AT 2 O'CLOCK 



Assisted by Members of the Original Grew Schoool Orchestra. 

Mr. Geo. E. M. Dickinson, Director. 

Violins — Mr. Arthur Stockbridge, Misses Edna Simmons, Ella Rollins, Amy 
Rollins, Helen Burgess. 

Clarionet — Mr. Howard Orcutt. 
Double Bass — Miss Bertha Simmons. 
Drums and Traps — Mr. Alexander Carberry. 



PROGRAMME. 

Selection. 

Orchestra. 

Salutatory — (Original). 

Edith Lenhart- 

Declamation — "The Critical Condition of Labor," . . Harrison 

James Ash. 
Recitation — "The Wolves." 

Frances Church. 
Selection. 

Orchestra. 

Hamlet's Soliloquy, ..... Shakespeare 

Masters Anderson, Becker, Benton, Currier, Devine, Firth, Harlow, 

Jordan, Saunders, Tucker, Waldron. 

Song, "The Lost Chord," ..... Lewis 

Graduates and Grade VII. 
Declamation — "What is Minority," .... Gough 

James Ardini. 
Recitation — "Aunt Eleanor's Hero." 

Lena Lewis. 
Solo — "The Resurrection." 

William Broadbent. 
Declamation — "Monopolies and Combinations," . . Holt 

Herbert Firth. 



221 

Declamation — "After Election," .... Bigeloiu 

John Rooney. 
Selection. 

Orchestra. 
A Visit to the State House — (Original). 

Misses Burton, Carberry, Currier, Farnsworth, Ford, Gray, 
Humphrey, Lewis, MacAdam, Wheaton. 

Recitation — "Ramon." 

Alice Cowan. 
Valedictory. 

Edythe Wyman. 
Seclection. 

Orchestra. 
Award of Diplomas. 

Chorus — "Loving Forever," 

Graduates and Grade VII. 



GRADUATES. 



Carl Anderson 
James Augustus Ardini 
Thomas James Ash 
John Becker, Jr. 
Ralph Irving Benton 
William Douglass Broadbent 
Louisa Sereven Burton 
Elizabeth Muriel Carberry 
Emma Frances Church 
Alice EHeanor Cowen 
Elsie Lyle Currier 
George Robert Currier 
John Robert T. Devine 
Grace Morrill Farnsworth 
Herbert Abraham Firth 

Edythe Geor 



Hattie Butler Ford 
Enid Louise Gray 
Robert Bleakie Harlow 
Evelyn Miller Humphrey 
John Milton Jordan 
Albert Paisly Judson 
Edith Rose Lenhart 
Evelyn Alma Lewis 
Lena Starr Lewis 
Linda Brainard McAdam 
John Dolan Rooney 
Ernest Hardwicke Saunders 
Albert Chester Tucker 
Maurice Edmund Waldron 
Augusta Elnora Wheaton 
gia Wyman 



Graduation Exercises 

OF THE 

GREENWOOD SCHOOL 

Wednesday Afternoon, June 24, 1903 

Ait 2 o'clock.* 

IN THE SCHOOL HALL. 



GREENWOOD SCHOOL ORCHESTRA. 

First Violins — Misses Carle, Bryce arid Richardson. 

Second Violins — Masters French and Caffin. 

Piano — Master Mclntire. 

Cornet —Master Wright. 

Drums and Cymbals — Masters Fleming-. 



PROGRAMME. 

Selection — "Hiawatha."' 

Greenwood School Orchestra. 
Composition — "Admiral Farragut," 

Robert Maxwell Bain. 



Original 
Hall 
Original 



Declamation — "The Dignity of Labor," 

Alexander Bryce, Jr. 
Composition — "A Trusty Boy," - 

Eva Constance Lemon. 

Chorus — "The Lost Chord." 

Seventh and Eighth Classes. 
Composition — "Hyde Park," ----- Original 

Blanche Isabelle Richardson. 

Recitation — "King John and the Abbott of Canterbury," Old Ballad 

Katherine Margaret Fox. 

Composition — "Charles M. Schwab," - Original 

Bernard Charles Hoefer. 
Violin Solo — "Evening Song," 

Harriet Stella Pommer. 
Composition — "Methods of Keeping Time, Past and Present," Original 

Harold McKenzie Hill. 



223 



Recitation — "Trouble in the Amen Corner," 

Marjorie Page Ticknor. 

Composition — "Greek Mythology," - 

Mabel Mowry Brown. 

Recitation — "The Legend of the Organ Builder," 
Susie Belle Hammond. 

Chorus — "Loving Forever." 

Seventh and Eighth Classes. 

Composition — "Electricity and Its Uses," 

Frank Ernest Hodges. 

Declamation — "Educate the Masses," 

Robert Sawyer Jigger. 
Selection — "Sporting Maid." 

Greenwood School Orchestra. 
Presentation of Diplomas. 

Chorus — "America," - - - - 

Classes and Audience. 



Harbaugh 

Original 

Dorr 

Original 
Phillips 

Smith 



GRADUATES. 



Edith Margaret Anderson 
Robert Maxwell Bain 
Lillian Gertrude Bigelow 
Sophora Louise Bliss 
Mabel Mowry Brown 
Alexander Bryce, Jr. 
Vera Lauretta Carle 
Richard Des Moines Chandler 
Bessie May Covert 
Lerov Lentell Dowley 
Edwin Lawrence Dyer 
George L. T. Fleming 
Katherine Agnes Fox 
Susie Belle Hammond 
Harold McKenzie Hill 
Frank Ernest Hodges 
Bernard Charles Hoefer 
Robert Sawyer Jigger 
Harry Albert Knapp 
Eva Constance Lemon 
Elizabeth Lindsay 

George 



Henry Wallingford Lord 
Alice May McDougald 
Frances Mary Mclntyre 
Clifford Elmer May 
Fred Edwin Miller 
Katherine Agnes Mogan 
Margaret Victoria Morris 
Etta May Mullen 
Chester Lyman Nason 
Mary Farwell Pierce 
Harriet Stella Pommer 
Anna Gertrude Rausch 
Blanch Isabelle Richardson 
Alexander Forbes Strachan 
Edward Howard Thompson 
Marjorie Page Ticknor 
Lily Pinkham Watson 
Lucius Byron Weymouth 
Nella Whitney 
Angelique Regina Zelus 
Josephine Agnes Zelus 
Wesley Lockhart 



FAIRMOUNT GRAMMAR SCHOOL, 

HYDE PARK 



Graduating Exercises 



OF THE 



Class of '03 

FAIRMOUNT SCHOOL HALL 
Wednesday Afternoon, June 24, 1903 

AT 2 O'CLOCK 



Instrumental Music by the Fairmount School Orchestra, 

Misses G. Snellgrove, Proctor, Bowie and M. Ruddiman. 
Masters Wasserboehr, Elliott, Proctor and Hamilton. 
Accompanist — Miss Campbell 



PROGRAMME. 

Recitation — "The Light on Deadman's Bar," - - Selected 

Georgia Scott Heustis. 

Declamation — "True Liberty," - - - F. W, Robertson 

Alan Malcolm Maclntire. 

Chorus — "The Lost Chord," - Arthur Sullivan 

Grades VII and VIII. 
A Story — "Adelaide's Deceit," .... Original 

Mabel Agnes Hamilton. 
Recitation — "Jane Jones," - - - . - - Bon King 

Maud Louise Bartlett. 
Vocal Solo — "When the Flowing Tide Comes In," Harrison Millard 

Norman Mac" Lain Scott. 
Recitation — "An Every-Day Girl," - - yosephine Pollard 

Margretta Snellgrove . 
Chorus — "Tyrolese Folk Song," F. W. Kuken 

Grade VIII. 



225 



Recitation— "The Money Value of School," - 

Grace Lillian Campbell. 
Recitation — "Waterways from the Great Lakes," 
Donald Magrath Emerson. 
Recitation — "The Egg Problem," 

Harvey Paul Wasserboehr, Jr. 
Song — "Upborn on Wings," - 

Special Chorus from Grade VIII. 
Composition — "Abraham Lincoln," - 

Alice Maud Viles. 
Recitation — "Tne Drummer's Dream." 

Elizabeth Vose Pierce. 
Chorus — "Loving Forever," - 

Grades VII and VIII. 

Recitation — "Memory Gems," 

Grade VIII. 

Recitation — "Driving a Hen," 

Janetta Snellgrove. 
Violin Solo — "Les Puritaines," 

Harvey Paul Wasserboehr, Jr. 

Recitation — "Katie Lee and Willie Gray," 

Milfred Sanford Rogers. 
Presentation of Diplomas. 
Chorus — "America," - - - - . 



Arranged 

Arranged 

Arranged 

German 

Original 

Anon 

Money 

Selected 

Kate Thor?i 

Arr Chas. Dancla 

A?io?i 

Rev. S. F- Smith 



GRADUATES. 



Maud Louise Bartlett 
Grace Lillian Campbell 
Florence Newton Damon 
Leroy Warren Elliot 
Donald Magrath Emerson 
Sarah Louise Hall 
Mabel Agnes Hamilton 
George Andrew Hoist 
Ruth Hope 
Georgia Scott Heustis 
Catherine Elizabeth Keane 
Paul Lermon 
Katherine Ruth Leseur 
Alan Malcolm Maclntire 



Lucretia Valeria Mayo 
Mildred Charletta Perry 
Elizabeth Vose Pierce 
Joseph William Proctor 
Mildred Sanford Rogers 
Arthur Francis Rogers 
Herbert Walter Scott 
Norman McLain Scott 
Harriet Anna Schmalz 
Janetta Snellgrove 
Margretta Snellgrove 
Ray Century Van Arsdale 
Alice Maud Viles 
Harvey Paul Wasserboehr, Jr. 



SCHOOL STATISTICS. 



HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS. 

Principal: Merle S. Getchell — History, Latin. 
Science : — Emerson Eice. 

Mathematics : — Mary C. Howard. 

Latin and German: — Ruby P. Bridgman. 
English : — Mary E. Houston. 

Greek and History : — Edith L. Bishop. 
English and Latin:— Louise T. Wood. 
French and Mathematics : — Alice M. Twigg. 

English and History : — Sadie E. McCready. 

French, Latin and Drill : — Charles W. French. 
Commercial Studies ;— Margaret R. Brooks. 

Commercial Studies : — Ida M. Wetherbee. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 


a 

CD 

S 


u 

a 


■r. u 
■- oj 


6 

bOC 

£s 


<o 

« a 

Q OS 
CB~ 

p 


>> 

w a 


© 

t. a 

OJ 

.O. CO 

p-= 



a . 

■9 a 


IN 

P OJ 
U m 

•g'a 

S CO 

|5 




S 


s 


< 


Ph< 


fcfc 


!zi 


izi 


Sept. 8, 1902 -June 26, 1903. 


321 


290.4 


279.I 


96.I 


997 


SO 


204 


177 


Sept. 7, 1903 -Dec. 24, 1903. 


316 


299.8 


292.6 


97.6 


99.6 


154 


239 


241 



227 



SCHOOL STATISTICS.— {Continued.) 



Sept. 8, 

1902, 

to June 26, 

1903. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



a 




09 


. 


tA 


a 




bC? 1 


sea 


B a 


B g 






e3 S 


cS :3 


t&r3 


®s 




3 




£a 
.5-2 


P-4 * 






a 


a 


B 


03 


«H 













O 


O 


fc 



GRADE 

VIII., VII. 
VI., V. 

iv., in. 
n.-s. 



VIII. 

VII. 

VI. 

v. 

IV. 

in. 

11. 

1. 

s. 



VIII. 

VII. 

VII. 

VI. 

v. 

IV. 

III., II. 

I., s. 



v., IV. 

III. 

II. 

I., s. 



III., II. 

I., s. 



DAMON. 

Frank S. King, Prin.. 
Elizabeth de Senancour 
Charlotte L. Wilbur.. 
Gertrude M. Webster . 

HEMENWAY. 

Dora F. Hastings 



Frank H. Dean, Prin 
Mabel J. Sedgwick . 
Margaret E Bertram 
Alice B. Farnsworth 
Nellie M. Howes . •• 
Agnes J. Campbell . 
Lillian G. Albee . .. 

Jennie F. Ellis 

Bessie C. Sparrell • • 



GREENWOOD. 

D. G. Thompson, Prin. 

Adah I. Childs 

Louise M. Foss 

Helen M. Gidney 

Anna E. Haley 

Bertha J. Rich 

Helen Balkam 

Harriet F. Packard . . . 

AMOS WEBSTER. 

Lillie J. Davis, Prin .. 
Gertrude S. Mitchell.. 
Marion E. Gray 

E. Gertrude Plummer. 

TRESCOTT. 

Helen P. Cleaves, Prin. 
Elsie M. Burgess 



35 
52 

46 

44 



39 



3 2 

5 1 
56 
46 

53 
4 1 

54 
57 
63 



289 



30.4 
38.2 
50.6 
38.6 
46.0 

32-5 
42.6 
38.0 
41.0 



48 


44.9 


41 


35-8 


39 


3«-9 


59 


49.4 


53 


51.0 


54 


42.7 


41 


35-2 


59 


33-5 


46 


37-9 


3 1 


285 


39 


29.0 


53 


37-o 


57 


45-i 


62 


43-6 



29.8 

43- o 

37 5 
30.6 



27. 1 



28.2 
36.S 
47.0 
35 8 
43-0 
3°-3 
389 
35-o 
33o 



41.9 
33 -o 

30 5 

47-7 
48.0 

4i-3 
31-9 

2S.7 



35-7 
26 7 
27.0 
36.0 



41.0 
35'6 



92 7 

93 -o 

90.7 

88.3 



93 



9 2 -5 
94.0 
92.8 
92.8 
93° 
93 1 
90.9 

93 -o 

799 



93-3 
937 
82.4 

95-i 
9 2 -5 
91.7 
yo 8 
856 



93-8 
940 
91.0 

87.0 



90.4 
940 



98.6 
99 -o 
98.7 
94.9 



99.6 



990 
99.0 
99.0 
99.0 
99.0 
94.4 
94.0 
98.0 
98.0 



996 
99 7 
997 
99.0 
99.2 
97-3 
98. 5 
994 



99 9 
99.8 
99.6 
99.8 



99.4 
98-5 



11 

13 
12 

14 



27 
20 
21 
11 
14 
23 
37 
30 
24 



24 

28 

33 

20 

22 

aS 

*I4 



38 
20 
20 

i7 



21 
l 9 



228 



SCHOOL STATISTICS— {Concluded) 



Sept. 8, 

1902, 

to June 26, 

1903. 



NAMES OF TEACHERS. 



a 


a 

9A 


6 
a 


« a 




bcco 


6ta 

oS o3 


OJ'C 





qjsfi 


Sfl 






^ 2 


^S 


ft, 03 


W 


g 


eS 


4H 
O 


33 


30-5 


29.I 


95-4 


47 


45 


43-2 


96.1 


48 


3«.a 


37° 


93-0 


63 


43-4 


39 9 


91 


56 


47 


46.7 


94.0 


54 


45 


42.0 


95-o 


41 


33 9 


3i-9 


94-5 


41 


22.0 


20 5 


93-1 


33 


35-2 


31.2 


S8.0 



sA 


"3 







03 


OQ 


3 


03 


O 


•w 


a 


O 


P 


a 














fc 



GRADE. 

VIII. 

VII. 

VI. 

V., III. 

IV. 

III., II. 
I. 

s. 



FAIRMOUNT. 

A.W. Armstrong, Prin. 

Sarah L. Gile .'. 

Nettie T. Mellen 

Grace M. Stanley. 

Susie A. Coggeshall .. 
Jennie S. Hammond .. 
Helen O. Thompson.. 
Nettie L. Ballou 

WELD.' 

Mary E. Merrow 



97.2 





99 9 


2 


990 





99 9 





99.8 





99.0 





99 9 





93-9 


1 


99.0 






9 
17 
10 
10 

9 
o 

30 

25 



3 1 



THIRTIETH ANNUAL REPORT 



TRUSTEES 



Hyde Park Public Library 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY ji, 1904. 




HYDE PARK: 

Hyde Park Gazette Press. 

1904. 



16 



ORGANIZATION. 



TRUSTEES. 

HENRY B. MINER, Chairman. 

EDWAKD S. HAYWARD, Secretary. 
JAMES B. CORTHELL. G. FRED GRIDLEY. 

FREDERICK L. JOHNSON. AMOS H. BRAINARD. 

CHARLES G. CHICK. JOHN W. GRIFFIN. 

CHARLES F. JENNEY. 



LIBRARIAN. 

ELIZABETH AINSWORTH. 



ASSISTANTS. 

NELLIE A. STONE. GERTRUDE L. ADAMS. 



REPORT OF THE TRUSTEES OF THE 
PUBLIC LIBRARY. 



The Trustees, in presenting their annual report, are glad 
to be able to congratulate the citizens on the continued 
prosperity and increasing usefulness of the Library whose 
interests we all have so much at heart. 

The most notable event in our history the past year has 
been the purchase and deposit of a large number of books 
in the Stetson Library at Read vi lie, thus practically estab- 
lishing a branch library there. For several years arrange- 
ments existed by which card-holders could order books at 
Readville and have them delivered by express at the library 
there once a week. These books were returned in the same 
way. For a time this plan worked satisfactorily, but the 
long interval which necessarily elapsed between the order- 
ing of a book and its being received gradually led more 
and more people either to go without books altogether or to 
come to the Central Library for them. 

Early in the present year, after several conferences, the 
following resolution was passed by the trustees. 

" Voted : That a branch library be established in the 
Phillips Brooks Memorial Reading Room at Readville, the 
same to be in the custody of the directors of said reading- 
room ; the entire expense of maintaining the same, except 
the transportation of books, to be paid by said directors." 

In accordance with this resolution, under regulations 
which are satisfactory to the directors of that reading-room 
and to ourselves, we have been able to serve that flourish- 
ing section of the town much better than ever before, and 



232 

at an expense very small when compared with the service 
rendered. 

Through the active co-operation of many of the teachers, 
the library has been able to do more for the public schools 
than in any previous year. 

The bi-monthly bulletins of the books added to the 
Library have been continued, and we would call your 
attention to the classified list of all the books purchased 
during the year, which forms a part of this Report. 

The Librarian's Report shows the details of the year's 
work. Since 1897 the circulation has nearly doubled, and 
the price of books has considerably advanced, while the 
dog- tax, which was formerly sufficient for the purchase of 
books, has not increased in a corresponding ratio. The 
trustees have therefore been obliged to devote to that pur- 
pose a larger amount of the current expense fund each 
year. 

For the trustees, 

HENRY B. MINER, 

Chairman. 



LIBRARIAN'S REPORT. 



To the Board of Trustees : 

Gentlemen — There has been no marked difference in the 
work of this year as compared with the previous one. The 
circulation at the Central Library has increased 2,788 over 
that of 1902. The Branch Library started at Readville in 
June has had a circulation of 1,172, making a total circula- 
tion of 68,060, which is double the circulation in 1894. 

On December 5th we issued 492 books for home use, the 
largest number ever issued in one day in the history of the 
Library. The number of borrowers has increased 525. 



233 

Through the Library Art Clnb, the following collections 
of pictures were exhibited : colored views of Switzerland ; 
views of Japan ; views of Rome ; the Helen-Taylor prints ; 
views of Paris ; views of Arizona ; French artists ; yachts ; 
Albreoht Durer. 

We wish to thank those residents of Hyde Park who 
have continued to send magazines for use in the Readiug 
Room. 

Hibbet's Journal, Cassier's Magazine, Good Housekeep- 
ing, and Amateur Work have been added to the list of 
periodicals. 

The circulation of books from the young people's depart- 
ment has shown an increase of nearly 2,000. The librarian 
in this department is doing good work in her efforts to 
interest the young people in the best literature. The artistic 
paper covers which come on the new books are being 
arranged in sets to loan to teachers in the public schools 
for use in design work. We are now taking two copies 
of "Birds and Nature." From one of these copies the 
colored plates are to be cut and mounted, with the descrip- 
tive text pasted on the back as far as practicable, and loaned 
to teachers for use in the schools. We are also to have 
Chapman's colored bird plates to loan for the same use. 

We wish to express our gratification that more of the 
teachers are using the Library for school purposes and are 
interesting themselves in the children's reading. 

The local papers as heretofore, have very kindly printed 
lists of new books, and notices of picture exhibits. 

We wish to complete our file of the St. Nicholas. Many 
of the volumes from 1874 to 1896 are worn out. If any of 
our townspeople having one or more of these volumes are 
willing to donate them to the Library, we should be very 
grateful. Even when our file is complete, we can not have 
too many duplicates of these valuable magazines. 



234 



CENTRAL LIBRARY. 

The Library has been open 305 days. 

Total circulation, 66,888 

Magazines issued, 2,907 

Largest daily use, 492 

Smallest daily use, 70 

Average daily use, 219 

Average monthly use, 5,574 

Class per cent, of circulation: Fiction, 79.8; 
biography, 2.4; history, 2.3; travels, 2.3; 
miscellaneous, 13.2. 

Beport for Beadville. 



Number of books issued, 


1,172 


Number of borrowers, 


88 


Class per cent, of circulation. 




Fiction, 


81.6 


Miscellaneous, 


18.4 


ACCESSIONS. 




Added by purchase, 


956 


Added by gift, 


91 


Added by magazines bound, 


78 


By lost and worn-out books replaced, 


116 



Total, 1,241 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH AINSWORTH, 

Librarian. 



ACCESSIONS TO THE LIBRARY IN 1903. 



GENERAL WORKS. 

Appleton's Annual Cyclopedia. 1902. Ref. 

Atlantic monthly, v. 90, 91. 051-A 

Century, v. 64, 65. 051-C 

Chatterbox. 1902. J051-C3 

Chautauquan. v. 29. 35, 36. 051-Cl 

Cosmopolitan, v. 33, 34. 051-C2 

Eorum. v. 33. 051-R 

Harper's monthly magazine, v. 105, 106. 051-H 
Kroeger, A. B. Guide to the study and use of reference books. Ref. 

Lippincott's magazine, v. 70, 71. 051-Ll 

Littell's living age. v. 202-206, 208, 210, 212, 213, 217, 219. 051-L 

New England magazine, v. 25, 26, 27. 051-N 

North American review, v. 174, 175, 176. 051 -Nl 

Review of reviews, v. 26, 27. 051-Rl 

St. Nicholas, v. 2, 23, 24-27, 29. J051-S 

Scribner's magazine, v. 32, 33. 051-S2 

United States. Library of Congress. Report of the librarian 

of Congress for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1902. 027. 5-U 

Williams, H., ed. Book of curious facts. iRef. 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION. 

Abbott, L. The other room ; a study of immortality. 218-A 

Baldwin, J. Old Greek stories. J292-B1 

Baldwin, J. M. Development and evolution. 150-B2 

Bible. Apocrypha. The apocryphal New Testament. 229-B 

Bompiani, S. V. Short history of the Italian Waldenses. 284-B2 

Burt, M. , and Ragazin, Z. Herakles the hero of Thebes and 

other heroes of the myth. J292-B 

Coe, G. A. The religion of a mature mind. 204-C4 

Cooper, J., and Maclean, A. J. The Testament of our Lord; 
translated into English from the Syriac, with introduc- 
tion and notes. 229. C 
Dresser, H. W. Man and the divine order. 240-D.7 
Elkinton, J. The Doukhobors; their history in Russia, and 

their migration to Canada. 289-E 



236 

EXPOSITOR'S BIBLE. 

(Commentary without text.) 

Dodds, M. Book of Genesis. 222 l-D 

Chadwick, G- A Book of Exodus. in 222. l-D 

Kellogg, S. H. Book of Leviticus. 222 1-K 

Watson, B A. Book of Numbers. in 222. 1-K 

Harper, A- Book of Deuteronomy. 222. 1-H 

Blaikie, w. G- Book of Joshua. in 2221-H 

Watson, K. A. Judges and Euth. 222. 3-W 

Blaikie, W. G. Books of Samuel. 222. 4-B 

Farrar, F. W. Books of Kings. 222.5-F 

Bennett, W. H. Books of Chronicles. in222.3-W 

Adeney, W. F. Ezra, Nehemiah, and Esther. 222. 7- A 

Watson, E. A. Book of Job. in 222 7-A 

Maclaren, A. Psalms. 2 v. 223.2-M 

Horton, E. F. Book of Proverbs. in 223.2-M 

1 Cox, S Book of Ecclesiastes, with a new translation. 223. 8-C 
Adeney, W. F. Song of Solomon and the Lamentations of 

Jeremiah. in 222. 8-C 

Smith, G. A. Book of Isaiah. 224 l-S 
Ball, C. J. Prophecies of Jeremiah with a sketch of his life 

and times. 224. 2-B 

Skinner, J. Book of Ezekiel. 224. 4-S 

Farrar, F. W. Book of Daniel. in 2244-S 
Smith. G. A. Book of the twelve prophets, commonly called 

the minor. 224. 9-S 

Gibson, J. M. Gospel of St. Matthew. 226.2-G 

Chadwick, G A. Gospel according to St. Mark. 226. 3-C 

Burton, H. Gospel according to St. Luke. in 226. 3-C 

Dodds, M. Gospel of St. John. 226. 5-D 

Stokes, G. T. Acts of the Apostles. 226. 6-S 

Moule, H. C. G. Epistle of St. Paul to the Eomans. 227. 1-M 

Dodds, M. First epistle to the Corinthians. in 227. 1-M 

Denney, J. Second epistle to the Corinthians. 227. 3-D 

Findlay, G- G. Epistle to the Galatians. in 227. 3-D 

Epistle to the Ephesians. 227.5-F 

Eainy, E- Epistle to the Philippians. in 227.5-F 
Maclaren, A. Epistles of St Paul to the Colossians and 

Philemon. 227. 7-M 

Denney, J. Epistle to the Thessalonians. in 227-7-M 

Plummer, A- Epistles to Timothy and Titus. 227-8-P 

Edwards, T. C Epistle to the Hebrews. in 227-8-P 
Plummer, A. General Epistles of St. James and St. Jude. 227. 9-P 



237 

Lumby, JR. Epistles of St. Peter. in 227.9-P 

Alexander, W. Epistles of St. John. 227.9. A 

Milligan, W. Book of Revelation. in 227.9-A 

Fisher, G- P. Grounds of theistic and Christian belief. 239-F.l 

History of the Christian church. 270-F 2 

Gladden, W Practice of immortality. 237-G 

Who wrote the Bible ? 220-G 

Gordon, G. A- Witness to immortality in literature, philos- 
ophy, and life. 237-Gl 
Hale, E. E. How to live. 170-H3 
Hillis, 1ST D- Quest of happiness. 171-Hl 
Hilty, K. Happiness ; essays on the meaning of life. 171-H2 
Hudson, T. J. Law of mental medicine. 134-H 
Iugalese, R. History and power of mind. 133-1 
James, W- Principles of psychology. 2 v. 150-J.l 
The will to believe, and other essays in popular philos- 
ophy. 104-J 
Judd, C- H. Genetic psychology for teachers. 150-Ji 
Paine, L. L. Critical history of the evolution of trinitarian- 

ism and its outcome in the new christology. 231-P 

The ethnic trinities and their relations to the Christian 

trinity. 290-P 

Parish, E. Hallucinations and illusions. 133-P2 

Patrick, J. N". Psychology for teachers. 150-P1 

Van Dyke, H. Joy and power. 252-Yl 

The poetry of the Psalms. 223. 2-T 

Wagner, C The better way. 170-W3.1 



SOCIOLOGY. 
Betts, L W- Leaven in a great city. 331-B3 

Birdsall, K. N , ed. How to make money; eighty novel and 
practical suggestions for untrained women's work, 
based on actual experience. 396-B3 

Brooks, J. G. Social unrest. 331.B4 

Bulflnch, T. Legends of Charlemagne. 398-B.l 

Chubb, P. Teaching of English in the elemetary and second- 
ary schools. 371-C1 
Darron, C. S- Resist not evil. 343-Dl 
Dewey, D. R. Financial history of the United States. 336-Dl 
Dewitt, D M- Impeachment and trial of Andrew Johnson, 

seventeenth president of the United States. 343-D 

Du Bois, W- E. B. Souls of black folk. 326-D1 

Ely, R. T. The coming city. 304-El 



238 

Forbes, C B. Elizabeth's charm string; stories of famous 

legends. J398-F4 

Foster, J. W. American diplomacy in the orient. 327-F-l 

Ghent, W- J. Our benevolent feudalism. 304:G5 

Gilder, J. B , comp. The American idea as expounded by 

American statesmen. 320-G3 

Greenidge, A. H. J. Roman public life. 342 Gl 

Hammurabi, king of Babylonia. The oldest code of laws in 

the world ; the code promulgated by Hammurabi, king 

of Babylon, B.C. 2285-2242 ; tr. by C. H W. Johns. 340.3-H 

Harrison, E. Study of child-nature from the kindergarten 

standpoint. 372-H2 

Hepburn, A. B. History of coinage and currency in the 
United States, and the perennial contest for sound 
money. 332-H3 

Holbrook, F. Book of nature myths. J398-H2 

Holls, F. W. The peace conference at the Hague. 341-H 

Laughlin, L. The principles of money. 332-L 

Lee, J. Constructive and preventive philanthropy. 331-L2 

Lindsay. M. Mother stories. 372-L 

Lovett, E. The making of a girl. 396-L 

Massachusetts. General Court. Acts and resolves. 1903. Ref. 

Index to the revised statutes of Massachuetts. Ref. 

Montague, G. Rise and progress of the Standard Oil comp- 
any. 338-M 
Mosher, R. B., Comp. Executive register of the United 

States, 1789-1902. 353-M2 

Poulsson, E. In the child's world. 372-Pl 

Riis, J. A. Peril and preservation of the home. 331-R1.3 

Ship of state. By those at the helm. J353-S 

Smith, G. Commonwealth or empire. 321-S 

United States. Bureau of Education. Report, 1900-1901, 

1902, v.l. Ref. 

Census office. 12th census. Census reports, llv. Ref. 

Van Yorst, Mrs. B. and Van Vorst, M. The woman who 

toils. 331-V 

Woods, R. A, ed. Americans in process, a settlement study ; 

North and West Ends, Boston. 331-W4.1 



SCIENCE. 
Alexander, J. Conquest of the air; the romance of aerial 

navigation. 533-A 

Babcock, C. A. Bird day; how to prepare for it. J598-B5 



239 

Earle, A. M. Sun-dials and roses of yesterday. 529-E 

Eckstorm, F. H. The woodpeckers. J598-E1 

Edison, T. A. Telegraphy self-taught. 537-E 

Eliot, I. M., and Soule, C. G. Caterpillars and their moths. 595-El 
Heilprin, A. Mont Pelee and the tragedy of Martinique. 551-H3 
Herrick, F. H. Home life of wild birds ; a new method of the 

study and photography of birds. 598-H2 

Hooper, W- L., and Wells, K. T. Electrical problems for en- 
gineering students. 537-H3 
Huxley, T. B. Advance of science in the last half century. 509-H 
Jordan, D. S. and Kellogg, V. L. Animal life. 590-Jl 
Jordan, D. S., ed. True tales of birds and beasts. J590-JT1 
Keeler, HL- Our northern shrubs and how to identify 

them. 582-K1.1 

Keyser, L. S- Birds of the Bockies; with a complete check 

list of Colorado birds. 598-Kl 

Lucas, F. A. Animals before man in North America ; their 

lives and times. 566-L 

Miller, H. M. [O. T. Miller-] True bird stories from my note- 
books. J598-M3.7 
Kecomb, S- Astronomy for everybody. 520-N 
Popular science monthly, v. 61, 62 505-P 
Potter, Mrs. G. S- Song of the cardinal. 598-Pi 
Boot, A- 1. A. B. C. of bee culture 595-B 
Sargent, F. L. Corn plants ; their uses and ways of life. J583-S 
Sergi, G- The Mediteranean race; a study of the origin of 

European peoples. 572-S2 

Shaler, N S- Story of our continent. J551-S1.2 

Sloane, T. O'C Electricity simplified. 537-S1.2 

Smithsonian institution. Annual report of the Board of 

Begents. 1901. Bef. 

Proceedings of the United States national museum, v. 25. Bef. 

Stone, W-, and Cram, W. E. American animals, a popular 
guide to the mammals of North America, north of 
Mexico, with intimate biographies of the more familiar 
species. 599-S 

Trevert, E. Experimental electricity. 537-T31 

Talbot, E. S- Degeneracy; its causes, signs, and results. 575-T1 
Woglom, G. T. Parakites; a treatise on the making and 
flying of tailless kites for scientific purposes and for 
pleasure. 533 2- W 

Warner, W- B., and Swasey, A. A few astronomical instru- 
ments. 535-W 
Tittell, K. A., ritter von. History of geology and palaeontol- 
ogy to the end of the nineteenth century. 550-Z 



240 

USEFUL ARTS. 
Carter, M. E. Millionaire households, and their domestic 

economy, with hints upon fine living. 647-C 

Cresee, F. A. Practical pointers for patentees, containing 

valuable information and advice on the sale of patents. 608-C 
Derr, L., ed. Cyclopedia of engineering; a complete manual 

of steam and machine-shop practice. 4 vols. Bef, 

Greinshaw, E. Shop kinks. 621-Gl 

Hiscox, G. D. Gas, gasoline, and oil engines. 10th. ed. 

rev. 621.4-H1 

Homans, J. E. Self-propelled vehicles ; a practical treatise on 

the theory, construction, operation, care and manage- 
ment of all forms of automobiles. 621.4-H2 
Hurst, G- H- The painter's laboratory guide; a handbook on 

paints, colours and varnishes for students- 667-H.l 

Keen, A, ed. With a saucepan over the sea; quaint and 

delicious recipes from the kitchens of foreign countries. 

641-K1 
Massachusetts. Metropolitan water and sewerage board. 

First annual report , Eef 

Thompson, Sir H. Diet in relation to age and activity ; with 

hints concerning habits conducive to longevity. 613-T2 

Torrey, B. Instructions in practical shorthand. 653-T 

Upham, A. A. Fifty lessons in woodworking. J694-U 



FINE ARTS. 



Addison, J- de W. Arts of the Pitti palace, with a short 
history of the building of the palace, its owners, and an 
appreciation of its treasures. 759-Al 

Baker, H. The collegiate church of Stratford-on-Avon, and 
other buildings of interest in the town and neighbour- 
hood. 726-B2 
Bartlett, F. W- Mechanical drawing. 744-B 
Beard, D- C. American boy's handybook- J790-B11 
Binns, C. F. Story of the potter; being a popular account of 
the rise and progress of the principal manufactures of 
pottery and porcelain in all parts of the world. 738-B1 
Brown, G- E., ed. Finishing the negative; a handbook of all 
the processes between fixing and printing, with a special 
chapter on films. 770-Bl 
Butler, H. C Scotland's ruined abbeys. 726-B1 
Cadness, H. Decorative brush work and elemetary design. 745-C 



241 

Crane, W. Line and Form. 740-C1 

Cross, A. K. Color study. 740-Cl 

Light and shade, with chapters on charcoal, pencil and 

brush drawing. 741-C2 

Mechanical drawing. 744-C 

Day, L. F. Anatomy of pattern. 745-Dl.l 

Lettering in ornament ; an inquiry into the decorative 

use of lettering, past, present, and possible. 745-Dl 

Dearborn, N". S. American text-book for lettering. 745-Dl 

Dick, W- B Games of patience; soltaire with cards. 2 v. 795-D 
Edminster, C- F. Architectural drawing. 744-E 

Ely, H. E- Woman's hardy garden. 716-E2 

Fetherson, F. C. Guide to pyrography. 767-F 

Foster, E F. Encyclopedia of games. 4th ed. 793-F1 

Fuchs, O- Handbook on linear perspective, shadows, and 

reflections. " 742-F 

Gilchrist, J. G- An itinerary of the English cathedrals; rev. 

and ed., with an introduction on cathedral architecture, 

by T. Perkins. 726-G 

Grove, G- Beethoven and his nine symphonies. 785-G 

Hartmann, S- History of American art. 709-H2 

Hatton, E. G. Text-book of elementary design. 3d ed. 745-H 

Hicks, I. P. Architectural drawing for mechanics. 744-H 

Jackson, F. G. Lessons in decorative design. 745- J 1 

Knapp, E. S. Eaphia and reed weaving, including also card- 
board and paper construction. 745-K 
Lanteri, E. Modelling ; a guide for teachers and students. 731-L 
Lavignac, A- Musical education. 780-Ll.l 
Lawson, T. W. Lawson's history of the America's cup; by 

W. M. Thompson and T. W. Lawson. Eef. 

Lehmann, L. How to sing. 784-L 

Leland, C. G. Manual of wood carving; rev- by J. J. Holt- 

zapffel. 736-L 

Mason, D. G. From Greig to Brahms; studies of some 

modern composers and their art. 780-M3 

Moore, A. W. For every music lover; a series of practical essays 

on music. 780-M4 

Perrot, G., and Chipiez, C. History of art in ancient Egypt. 

2 r. 709-P 

History of art in Persia. 709-P1 

History of art in Pbrygia, India, Caria, and Lycia. 709-P.2 

History of art in Sardinia, Judea, Syria, and Asia Minor. 

2 v. 709-P.3 



242 

Potter, M. K. Art of the Vatican; being a brief history of the 

palace, and an account of the principal art treasures within 

its walls. 708-P 

Upton, G. P. Musical pastels. 780-U 

Van Dyke, J. C. The meaning of pictures. 750-V.l 

Waldstein, C. Art in the nineteeth century. 704-W1 

Ward, J. Progressive design for students. 745-W1 

Warnuin, R. N, Analysis of ornament. 740-W 

White, M. Book of games. 12th ed. 793-W 

White, M., and White, S. Book of children's parties. 793-W. 1 



LITERATURE. 
Aldrich, T. B. Ponkapog papers. 814-A1 

Aristotle. Athenian constitution; tr., with introduction and notes, 

by F. G. Kenyon. 888-A2 

Baldwin, J., comp. Harper's school speaker. J808-B9 

Bates, A. Talks on writing English ; second series. 808-B6 

Bates, K. L., and Coman, K. English history told by English 

poets. 821-B13 

Brooks, S. A. Robert Browning ; a critical essay. 821-B9.2 

Burroughs, J. Literary values and other papers. 814-B10 

Carleton, W. City ballads. 811-C5.3 

City festivals. 811-C5.4 

Farm ballads. 811-C5.5 

Farm festivals. 811-C5.6 

Farm legends. 811-C5.7 

Capp, E. From Homer to Theocritus ; a manual of Greek litera- 
ture. 880-C 
Coolie, G. W., ed. Poets of transcendentalism; an anthology, 

with introductory essay and biographical notes. 811-C12 

Dickens, C. Poems and verses of Charles Dickens, with bio- 
graphical notes. 821-D2 
Dunbar, P. L. When Malindy sings. 811-D4.4 
Everyman ; a moral play. 822-E 
Freytag, G. Technique of the drama; an exposition of dramatic 

composition and art. , 808. 2-F 

Genung, J. F. Practical elements of rhetoric with illustrative 

examples. 808-G2 

Holbrook, F. Hiawatha primer. J808-H9 

Howells, W. D. Literature and life. 8H-H6.2 

Jiriczek, O. L. Northern hero legends. 839-J 

Longfellow, H. W. Song of Hiawatha. J811-L2.9 

Lorimer, H. L. Letters from a self-made merchant to his son. 817-L2 



243 

Maclean, M. Literature of the Celts; its history and romance. ' 820-M4 
Matthews, J. B., cornp. Poems of American patriotism. 38O8-M8 
Murray, H. Flower legends for children. ' J808-M9 
Perry, B, Study of prose fiction. 823-PT 
Pollard, A. W., ed. English miracle play?, moralities, and inter- 
ludes. 822-P2' 
Poulsson, E. Through the farm-yard gate. J808-P3 
Punch. An evening with Punch. 827-P.l 
Riggs, K. D., and Smith, N. A., comp. Golden numbers. ' ' J808-R6 
Sears, L. American literature in the colonial -aud national 

periods. 810-S1 

Shute, H. A. The real diary of a real boy. 817-S2 

Sill, E. R. Hermione and other poems. 811-S10.1 

Hermitage and later poems. 811-S10 2 

Poems. 821-S10 

Prose of Edward Rowland Sill. 814-S6 

Thoreau, H. D. Early spring in Massachusetts; ed. by H. G. 0. 

Blake. 814-T.5 

Miscellanies. 814-T.6' 

Torrey, B. Clerk of the woods. 814.5-T.5 

Trent, W. P. History of American literature. 1607-1865. 810-T1.1 

Whiting, L. Boston days. 810-W3 

Life radiant. 814-W6.3 

Wiener, L. Anthology of Russian literature from the earliest 

period to the present time. v. 1. 891-W1 

Wit and humor of American statesmen. 817-W1 

Woodbridge, E. The drama; its law and its technique. 808. 2-W 

Wright, J. H., ed. Masterpieces of Greek literature. 880. 8-W 



GEOGRAPHY. 

Kiepert, H. Manual of ancient geography. 911-K 
Tarr, R. S., and McMurray, F. M. Europe and other conti- 
nents. • J910-T2.2 

Home geography, and the earth as a whole. J910-T2.1 

North America. J910-T2 

DESCRIPTION AND TRAVEL INCLUDING ARCHEOLOGY. 

Bacon, E. M. Literary pilgrimages in New England. 917. 4-B 

Baedeker, K. Greece. 914.95-B1 

Barton, W. E. The old world in the new century ; being the narra- 
tive of a tour of the Mediterranean, Egypt, and the Holy 

Land. 910-B9 

Bruno, G. Le tour de la France. J914.4-F-B 

•Carruth, F. W. Fictional rambles in and about Boston. 917.44-C1 



244 

Desmond, H. W., and Croly, H. Stately homes- in America from 

colonial times to the present day. 917.3-D1 

DeWindt, H. Finland as it is. 914.71-D 

Gardner, E. A. Ancient Athens. 913-G1 

Greater America. J917.3-G 

Gulick, C. B. Life of the ancient Greeks with special reference to 

Athens. 913-G2 

Headland, I. T. Our little Chinese cousin. J915.1-H1 

Hilprecht, H. V. Explorations in Bible lands during the nine- 
teenth century. 913-H1 
Horton, G. In Argolis. 914.95-H1.1 
Husted, M. H. Stories of Indian children. 917.01-H 
Jackson, Mrs. H. M. F. H. Glimpses of California and the 

missions. 917.94-J 

Janvier, T. A. Christmas Kalends of Provence. 914.4-J2 

Johnson, G. Land of Heather. 914. 1-J 

Kennan, G. Tragedy of Pelee; a narrative of personal experi- 
ence and observation in Martinique. 917.29 Kl 
Lewis, M., and Clark, W. History of the expedition to the sources 
of the Missouri, across the Rocky mountains to the Pacific 
in 1804 6. 917.9-L2 
Lumholtz, C. Unknown Mexico; a record of five years' explora- 
tion among the tribes of the western Sierra Madre; in the 
Tierra Caliente of Tepic and Jalisco; and among the Taras- 
cos of Michoacan. 2 v. 917.2-L1 
Macmillan, H. Reviera. 3rd ed. 914.5-M.l 
Mau, A. Pompeii, its life and art. 913. M7 
Morley, M. W. Down North and up along. 917.16-M 
Nichols, F. H. Through hidden Shensi. 915. 1-N 
Perry, W. S. Egypt, the land of the temple builders. 913-P2 
Schwatka, F. Children of the cold. 919.8-S1.1 
Shaw, E. R. Big people and little people of other lands. 910-S8 
Shoemaker, M. M. The great Siberian railway from St. Peters- 
burg to Pekin. 915.7-S1 
Spender, A. E. Two winters in Norway, including an expedition 

the Lapps. 914.8-Sl 

Toward the rising sun. J915-T1 

United States. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Atlas of the Pillip- 

pine Islands. Ref. 

Wade, M. H. Our little Italian cousin. J914 5-W1 

Our little Norwegian cousin. J914.81-W 

Our little Siamese cousin. J915.9-W 

Our little Swiss cousin. J914.94-W 

Williams, E. R., jr. Hill towns of Italy. 914.5-W2 






245 

HISTORY. 

Bacon, E, M. The Hudson river; historical, legendary, pictur- 
esque. 974. 7-B 
Barry, W. Papal monarchy from St. Gregory the Great to Boni- 
face VIII. 590-1303. 945-B 
Bedford, J. Home life under the Stuarts, 1603-1649; by Elizabeth 

Godfrey [pseud.] 942-B6 

Bostoc Transit commission. Reports, 1901-1903. 974.46-B2 

Botsford, G. W. Ancient history for beginners. 930-B1 

Brandes, G. Poland; a study of the land, people, and literature. 

943. 8-B 
Brown, M. S., ed. Epoch-making papers in United States 

history. J973-B6 

Coffin, C. C. Freedom triumphant. J973.7-C1 6 

Redeeming the republic. J973.7-C1.5 

Romance of old New England roof-trees. 974-C 

Davids, T. W. R. Buddhist India. [Story of the nations.] 934-D 

DeWet, C. R. Three years' war. 968-D1 

Eastman, C. A. Indian boyhood. 970.1-E1 

Fitchburg, Mass., old records; comp. by W. A. Davis, v 5. 974.43-F 
Freese, J. W. Historic houses and spots in Cambridge, Mass., 

and near-by towns. 974.44-F 

Garrison, G. P. Texas.- [American Commonwealths.] 976. 4-G 

Getchell, M. S. Study of mediaeval history by the library method. 

940-G4 
Griffis, W. E. Young people's history of Holland. J949.2-G.1 

Hale, E. E. Memories of a hundred years. 2 v. 973-H2.1 

Hart, A. B., and Chapman, A. B. How our grandfathers lived. 

[Source-readers in American history.] J973-H3.3 

Hart, A. B., and Hazard, B. E. Colonial children. [Source- 
readers in American history.] J973.2-H 
Hart, A. B., and Hill, M. Camps and firesides of the revolution. 

[Source-readers in American history.] J973.3-H 

Hart, A. B., ed. Romance of the civil war. [Source-readers in 

American history.] J973.7-H7 

Hazelton, G. C. The national capitol; its architecture, art, and 

history. 975. 3-H 

Howe, M. A. de W. Boston, the place and the people. 974.46-H1 

Jackson, C. C, lady. Old Paris; its court and literary salons. 

2 v. 944-J.l 

Johonnot, J., ed. Ten great events in history. J908-J 

Kaler, J. O. Boys of '98. J973.8-K 

Lamed, J. N., ed. Literature of American history. Ref. 

Lodge, H. C. Fighting frigate and other essays and addresses. 904-L1.1 

17 



246 



Lovell, I. Stories in stone from the Roman Forum. J937-L2 

Lutzon, F. H. H. V., graf von. Story of Prague. [Mediaeval 

towns.] • 943. 7-L 

McCarthy, J. Reign of Queen Anne. 2 v. 942-M4 3 

Massachusetts. Andersonville mouninent commission. Report. 973.7-M9 

General Court. Massachusetts soldiers and sailors of the 

revolutionary war. v. 11. Ref. 

Record of the dedication of the monument on Dorchester 

Heights, South Boston. 974.46-M.l 

Montgomery, D. H. Leading facts of English history. 942-M9 

Leading facts of French history. 944-M7 

Mowry, W. A. Territorial growth of the United States. 973-M6.1 

Parker, Sir G., and Bryan, C. G. Old Quebec, the fortress of New 

France, • 971. 4-P 

Poole, S. L. Mediaeval India under Mohammedan rule. [Story of 

the nations.] 954-P 

Sexton, E. M. Stories of California. J979.4 S 

Smith, Mrs. A. M. Annals of Westmiuster Abbey. 942-S6 

Tiffany, N. M. From colony to commonwealth; revolutionary 

days in Boston. 

Pilgrims and Puritans. 

United States. Navy department. Official records of the union 
and conferate navies in the war of the rebellion, v. 14, 15. 
Van Middeldyk, R. A. History of Puerto Rico from the Spanish 
discovery to the American occupation. Ed. by M. G. Brum- 
baugh. [Expansion of the republic series.] 972.95 V 
Wiel, A. J. L. Story of Verona. [Mediasval towns.] 945-W.l 
Wilson, D. M. Where American independence began. 974.47-W1 



J973.3-T1 
J974.4-T 



Ref. 



GENEALOGY. 

Vital records of Alford, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Barre, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Becket, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Bedford, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Hinsdale, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Lee, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Leicester, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Lexington, Mass., to the year 1898 
Vital records of Maiden, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Medfield, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Milbury, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Montgomery, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Peliiam, Mass., to the year 1850 
Vital records of Peru, Mass., to the year 1850 



Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 
Ref 



247 

Vital records of Princeton, Mass., to the year 1850 . Ref 

Vital records of Southbofough, Mass., to the year 1850 Ref 

Vital records of Sudbury, Mass., to the year 1850 , Ref 

Vital records of Topsfleld, Mass., to the year 1850 Ref 

Vital records of Tyringham, Mass., to the year 1850 Ref 

Vital records of Walpole, Mass., to the year 1850 .'.. Ref 

Vital records of Westborough, Mass., to the year 1850 Ref 

BIOGRAPHY. 

COLLECTED. 

Bridgman, A M. Souvenir of Massachusetts legislators, 1902 920-B18 
Bryce, J. Studies in contemporary biography 920 B17 

Clark, A. M. L. The Alcotts in Harvard, Mass., 920-Cll 

Duncan, P. M. Heroes of science; botanists, zoologists, and 

geologists. 920-D10 

Garnett, W. Heroes of science ; physicists 920-G6 

Halsey, F. W. Women authors of our day ih their homes 920-H16.1 

Hamm, M. A. Builders of the republic; some great Americans 

who have aided in the making of the nation 920-H17.1 

Hubert, P. G. Inventors. [Men of achievement. ] J920-H18 

Lamb's biographical dictionary of the United States, v. 5. Ref. 

McCarthy, J. British political portraits 920-M17 

Macomber, H. E. Stories of great inventors. J920-M18 

Mowry, W. A. American heroes and heroism [ America's great 

men and their deeds. ] -'- J920-M19 

Trumbull, H. C. Old time student volunteers 920-T10 

Wilson, J. G., ed. Presidents of the United States, 1789-1902. &20-W2.1 
Winslow, H. M. Literary Boston of today 920- Wi3 

INDIVIDUAL. 

Adams. Life in a New England town, 1787-1788 Diary of John 
Quincy Adams while a student in the office of Theophilus 
Parsons at Newburyport B-A2141.3 

Allen. Ethan Allen of Green mountain fame, a hero of the revo- 
lution ; by C. W. Brown - B-A4255 

Boone. Daniel Boone ; by R. G. Thwaites - B-B724.1 

Bridgman. Laura Bridgman, Dr. Howe's famous pupil, and 

what he taught her; by M. H, Elliott and F, H. Hall. B-.B8525 

Brown. Captain John Brown of Harper's. Ferry ; a preliminary 

incident to the great civil war of America; ,by J.,Newtou B-B878.2 

Browning, Robert Browning ; by G. K. Chesterton [ English men 

, of letters.] . c , : - .■■- '-'■ B-B8855 3 

Carnegie. Andrew Carnegie, the man and his work ; by B. Alder- 
son . ■.■ ; *!,-*' ' ■ B-C2895 



248 

Cervantes. Saavedra Miguel de Cervantes ; by E. H. "Watts B-C4196 
Champlain. Samuel de Champlain ; by H. D. Sedgwick. B-C4536 

Channing. William Ellery Channing; by J. W. Chadwick B-C458.1 

Cheney. Reminiscences of Ednah Dow Cheney; an autobiogra- 
phy B-C5185 
Child. Letters of Lydia Maria Child B-C5365 
Crabbe. [Life of] Crabbe ; by A. Ainger [English men of 

letters.] B-C8835 

Cuyler, T. L. Recollections of a long life B-C9935 

Euclid. Euclid, his life and system ; by T. Smith. [ World's 

epoch-makers.] B-E863 

Gainsborough. Thomas Gainsborough; by Mrs N. R. E. M. 

Bell. [ Bell's miniature series of painters.] B-G1438 

Giotto. Giotto; by F. M. Perkins. [Great masters in painting 

and sculptor.] B-G5115 

Gladstone. Life of William Ewart Gladston ; by J. Morley. 3v. B-G543.5 
Gougb. John B. Gough, the apostle of cold water; by C. Martyn. 

[ American reformers.] B-G692.1 

Greeley. Horace Greeley ; by W. A. Linn. [Historic lives.] B-G794.3 
Harte. Life of Bret Harte; by T. E. Pemberton. B-H3275 

Hunt. Life of Leigh Hunt; by C. Monkhouse. B-H9415.1 

Keller. Story of my life ; by Helen Keller. B-K297 

Kruger. Memoirs of Paul Kruger. B-K945 

Landseer. Sir Edwin Landseer ; by J. A. Manson. [Makers of 

British art] B-L2638.1 

LeConte. Autobiography of Joseph LeConte; edited by "W. D. 

Armes. B-L4668 

Leo XIII. Life of Leo XIII; by B. O'Reilly. B-L5763.1 

Lespinasse. Letters of Mile, de Lespinasse. B-L6375 

Lincoln. Short life of Abraham Lincoln condensed from Nicolay 

and Hay's Abraham Lincoln; by J. G. Nicolay. B-L736.19 

Mill. Life of John StuartJMill; by W. L. Courtney. B-M645.1 

Morris. William Morris ; Jpoet, craftsman, socialist; by E. L. 

Cary. B-M8778 

Murillo. Murillo; a collection of fifteen pictures and portrait 'of 

the painter, with introduction and interpretation; by E. M. 

Hurll. [Riverside art series.] B-M9773 

Palmer. Services in memory of Alice Freeman Palmer held by 

her friends and associates in Appleton chapel, Harvard 

University, January thirty-first, 1903; edited by G. H. 

Palmer. B-P1732 

Parker. Life of Joseph Parker, D. D., pastor of City Temple, 

London; by W. Adamson. B-P2415 

Pascal. Pascal and the Port Royalists ; by W. Clark. [World's 

epoch-makers.] B-P2783 



249 

Plant. Henry Bradley Plant; by G. H. Smith. B-P7135 

Renan. Life of Ernest Renan ; by F. Espiuasse. [Great 

writers.] B-R393.1 

Reynolds. Sir Joshua Reynolds ; by E. D'E. Keeling:. [Makers 

of British art.] B-R4635.1 

Richardson. Samuel Richardson ; by A. Dobson. [Englishmen 

of letters.] B-R525 

Schiller. Life of Frederich Schiller; by H. W. Nevinson. [Great 

•writers. J B-S3345 

Schopenhauer. Life of Arthur Schopenhauer; by W. Wallace. 

[Great writers.] B-S3738 

Scott. Memoirs of Sir Walter Scott; by J. G. LoclAart. or. 

Cambridge edition. B-S431.2 

Scott. The giant of three wars. Life of General Winfield Scott; 

by J. Barnes. JB-S1315 

Stanton. Eighty years and more. Reminiscences of Elizabeth 

Cady Stanton. B-S7925 

Stevenson. Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson; edited by S. 

Colvin. 2v. B-S8481.3 

Stoddart. Recollections of a player ; by J. H. Stoddart. B-S8697 

Taine. Life and letters of Hippolyte Taine. B-T1345 

Tennyson. Alfred Tennyson; by Sir Alfred Lyall. [English men 

of letters.] B-T312.3 

Thoreau. Thoreau, the poet naturalist; by W. E. Channing. 

Edited by F. B. Sanborn. B-T-4S8.3 

Victoria. In the days of Queen Victoria; by E. Tappan. [Makers 

of England.] JB-V6455.4 

Queen Victoria; by S. L. Lee. B-V6455.3 

Waddington. Letters of a diplomat's wife, 1833-1900; by M. K. 

Waddington. B-W11S5 

Wolcott. Roger Wolcott, by W. Lawrence. B-W8515.1 

FICTION. 

Adams, A. Log of a cowboy. A2113 

Agnus, 0. Sarah Tuldon. A2745 

Alden, I. M. Judge Burnham's daughters. A358.9 

Allen, J. L. Mettle of the pasture. A-127.6 

Altsheler, J. A. Before the dawn. A469.5 

Avery, M. L., ed. Virginia girl in the civil war. A9465 

Babcock, W. H. Kent Fort Manor. B1125.1 

Bacheller, I. Darrell of the Blessed Isles. B1215.3 

Banks, N. H. Round Anvil Rock. B21S3.1 

Barbour, R. H. Weatherby's inning. JB2395.4 

Barnes, J. With the flag in the channel. JB261.3 



250 



Barr, A. E. Black shilling. B268.32 

Thyra Varrick. B268.31 

Barr, R. Over the border. B2685.10 

Bedford. The winding road; by E. Godfrey, pseud. B4115 

Bell, J. J. Wee Nacgreegor. B433 

Blanchard, A.E. Gentle pioneer. JB639.21 

Loyal lass. JB639.18 

Mistress May. JB639.19 

Two Maryland girls. JB639.20 

Boyesen, H. H. Boyhood in Norway. JB791.4 

Brady, C. T. The bishop; short stories. B8125.10 

The Southerners. B8125 9 

Brereton, F. S. Foes of the Red Cockade. JB8415 

Brooks, A. Dorothy's playmates. JB8725 5 

Randy and her friends. • JB8725 3 

Randy and Prue. JB8725 4 

Brooks, G. Romances of colonial days. B8732 

Brooks, H. Without a warrant. B8733.1 

Brown, A. Judgment. B877.5 

— — The Mannerings. B877.4 

Brown, A. R. Millionaire's sou. . B8771 

Brown, W. G. Gentleman of the South. B8817 

Bullen, F. T. A whaleman's wife. B9363.2 

Burnham, C. L. Jewel. B966.15 

Right princess. B966.14 

Butterwortb, H. Boys of Greenway court. jB988.ll 

Brother Jonathan. JB988.12 

In the days of Massasoit. JB988.10 

Carling, J. R. Shadow of the czar. C2825 
Cervantes, S. M. de. Don Quixote; an abridged edition judi- 
ciously curtailed for young people. JC419.1 
Chambers, R. W. Maids of Paradise. C446.6 
Clark, H. H. Boy life in the United States navy. JC5932 
Clemens, S. L. The prince and the pauper ; by Mark Twain, pseud. 

JC625 8 

Coffin, C. C. Winning his way. JC675.2 

Comstock, H. T. Cedric the SaxoD. JC7395.1 

Tower or throne; romance of the girlhood of Elizabeth. JC7395 

Connolly, J. B. Out of Gloucester. C7526 

Conrad, J. Youth. C7545 

Cook, G. 0. Roderick Taliaferro. C7713 

Couch, A. T. Adventures of Harry Revel. C853.5 

Hetty Wesley. C853.6 

Crawford, F. M. Heart of Rome. C899.33 



251 



Crockett, S. R. Flower-c-the corn. C938.25 

Darling, M. G. Girl of this century. JD22I.2 
Daskara, J. I)., now Mrs. Selden Bacon. Madness of Philip; 

short stories. D2295.2 

Middle-aged love stories. D2295.4 

Whom the gods destroyed ; short stories. D2295.3 

Davis, R. H. Bar sinister. D2635.ll 

Deland, M. Dr. Lavendar's people. D337.7 

Delano, F. J. Polly State. JD3375 
Dickens, C. Story of little Nell. [Famous children of literature.] 

JD548 22 
Dickerson, F. M. Mary had a little lamb; the true story of the 

real Mary and the real lamb. D5495 

Dix, B. M. Little captive lad. JD619.2 
Doffed coronet; by the author of " Martyrdom of an empress." M3885 

Douglas, A.M. Little girl in old St. Louis. JD733.43 

Sherburne quest. D733.42 

Doyle, A. C. Adventures of Gerard. D754.23 

Dudley, A. T. Following the ball. D8475 

Dunn, B. A. Raiding with Morgan. JD922.4 

Dye, E. E. Conquest. D9955 

Ebers, G. An Egyptian princess. E16.13 

Eggleston, G. C. Master of Warlock. E295.7 

Ewing, Mrs. J. H. Old-fashioned fairy talcs. JE955.10 

Flower, E. The spoilsmen. F6445 

Ford, P. L. Checked love affair; the Cortelyou feud. F7115.6 

Ford, S. Horses niue; stories of harness and saddle. JF7118 

Forman, J. M. Journey's end. F7245 
Foster, M. G. Heart of the doctor ; a story of the Italian 

quarter. F756 

Fox. J., Jr. Little sheperd of Kingdom Come. F792.1 

French, A. Sir Marrok ; a tale of the days of King Arthur. JF8735.2 

Garland, H. Hesper. G233.7 

Gilbert, Mrs. R. M. Giannetta. JG4657 

Girls of Banshee castle. JG4657.1 

Gilson, R. R. In the morning glow; short stories. G4896 

Goodloe, A. C. Calvert of Strathore. G6525.1 

Gordon, C. W. Glengarry school days; by R. Connor, pseud. C7528.3- 

Gordon, H. R. Tecumseh, chief ofthe Shawauoes. G6632. 

Goss, W. L. Jack Alden. JG677.14 

Tom Clifton. G677.2 

Grinnell, G. B. Jack, the young ranchman. G8685.1 

Haggard, H. R. Pearl-maiden. H145.18 

Hall, R. Boys of Scrooby. JH178.3 



252 



Hamilton, K. W. Parson's proxy. H2185 

Hardy, A. S. His daughter first. H268.3 

Harris, J. C. Gabriel Tolliver ; a story of reconstruction. H314.13 

Harte, F. B. Argonauts of North Liberty. H327.26 

Barker's luck ; [short stories.] H327.27 

Condensed novels ; second series. H327.5 

Drift from two shores; [short stories.] 11327.28 

Flip; Found at Blazing Star. H327.29 

In a hollow of the hills. H327.31 

In the Carquinez woods. H327.30 

Mrs. Skagg's husbands and other sketches. P327.25 

Phyllis of the Sierras; Drift from Redwood camp. H327.32 

Story of a mine. H327.33 

Tales of the Argonauts and other sketches. H327 34 

Thankful Blossom. H327.35 

Trent's trust and other stories. H327.38 

Twins of Table mountain and other stories. H327.36 

Waif of the plains. H327.37 

Henderson, C. H. John Percyfie'ld, the anatomy of cheerfulness. H4962 

Henty, G A. With the allies to Pekin. H527.74 

Houghton, L. S. Cruise of the Mystery. H8384 

Hughes, R. Lakerim athletic club. JH8943.1 

Humphrey, Z. Uncle Charley. H9269 

Hyde, M. C. Christmas at Tappan sea. H9945.1 

Ide, Mrs. F. O. [Ruth Ogdeu.] Loyal little red-coat. 1195 3 

Isham. F. S. Under the rose. 1785 

Jackson, G. E. Three Graces. JJ125.3 

Jackson, M. D. Daughter of the pit. J135 

Jacobs, J., ed. More English fairy tales. JJ174.1 

James, H. Better sort. J27518 

Johnson, S. Rasselas, prince of Abyssinia. J69 

Johnston, A. F. Giant scissors. JJ725.3 

Little colonel. j.1725.4 

Little colonel at boarding school. JJ725.5 

Little colonel's hero. JJ725.2 

Kaler, J. 0. With Warren at Bunker Hill. JK14.31 

With Washington at Monmouth. JK14.32 

King, C. An Apache princess. K52.28 

Daughter of the Sioux. K52.27 

Kingsley, F. M. Needle's eye. K5553 

— - Transfiguration of Miss Philura. K5553.1 

Kirk, E. O. Good-bye, proud world. K59.16 

Krause, L. F. Honor D'Everell; by B. Yechton, pseud. K89.5 

La Motte Fouque, F. H. K., baron. Undine. JL2356.1 



253 



Lang, A., ed. Crimson fairy book. JL269.13 
L-i Rame, L., de. Bimbie; stories for children; by Ouida, 

pseud. JL3185.1 

Le Gallienne, It. Old country house. L496 3 
Leishton, R. Olaf the glorious; a story of the Viking age. JL5295.2 

Liljencrantz, O. T. The ward of King Canute. L7285.1 

Lincoln, Mrs. J. G. Marjorie's quest. L7374 3 

Lloyd, N. A drone and a dreamer. L7935 

London, Jack. Call of the wild. LS473.1 

Lorimer, G. C. Master of millions. L8725 
Lothrop, H. M. S. Five little Peppers at school; by M. Sidney. 

pseud. JL8825.13 

McCarthy, J. H. Marjorie. M1231.1 

MacGowan, A. The last word. M1465 

Major, C. Forest hearth. M234 3 

Manteuffel, M. Z. Von Violetta; tr. by Mrs, Wister. M2925 

Martin, G. M. Emy Lou; her book and heart. M381 

Martineau, H. The peasant and the prince. JM3855.3 

Mason, A. E. W. Four feathers. M398.3 

Merwin, S. The whip hand. M5763.3 

Mitchell, J. A. Amos Judd. M6795.1 

Mitchell, S. W. A comedy of conscience. M681.9 

Mnnn, C. 0. The hermit. M9665.5 

Munroe, K. Canoemates. JM968.24 

Dorymates. JM968.25 

Raftmates. M968.23 

Nash, H. A. Polly's secret. JN2493 

Nicholls, J. H. Bayou Triste. JN6145 

Norris, F. The pit. N855.2 

Oppanheim, E. P. Prince of sinners. 0625 

Overton, G. Anne Carmel. 0966.1 

Palmer, F, The vagabond P1738 

Peake, E. E. Pride of the Tellfair. P3575.1 
People of the whirlpool; from the experience book of a com- 

mutor's wife. G2185.1 

Poe, E. A. Best tales of Edgar Allan Poe. P7435 

Pyle, II. Men of iron. JP996.5 

Pyle, K. In the green forest. P9965.1 
Rabelais, F. Three good giants. Judiciously compiled for young 

people. JR1145 

Ray, A. C. Ursula's freshman. JR263.7 

Raynor, E. Handicapped among the free. R275.3 

Reed, H. L. Brenda's bargain. JR324 4 

Reed, M. Lavender and old lace. R3253 



254 



Rice, A. H. Lovey Mary. 
Richards, L. E. Golden windows. 

Green satin gown ; short stories. 

Riggs, Mrs. K. D. [ Wiggin.] Rebecca of Sunnybrook farm 
Riis, J. A. Children of the tenements. 
Robinsou, E. Little Puritan pioneer. 

Puritan knight errant. 

Rohlfs, A. K. G. The Filigree ball. 

Sangster, M. Janet Ward. 

Scancllin. C. Hans the Eskimo. 

Scott, H. S. [H. S. Merriman.] Barlash of the guard. 

Scudder, H. E., ed. The children's book. 

Seton, E. T. Lobo, Rag and Vixen. 

Two little savages. 

Smith, F. H. Colonel Carter's Christmas. 

Stevenson, B. E. The heritage. 

Stoddard, W. 0. Running the Cuban blockade. 

Spy of Yorktown. 

Stoker, B. Mystery of the sea. 

Stowe, H. B. Story of little Eva; edited by F. L. 

[Famous children of literature.] 
Stuart, R. M. Napoleon Jackson. 
Sweetser, K. D. Micky of the alley; short stories. 
Sweet, S. Captain Polly. 

Sweet, S. Pennyroyal and mint; short stories. 
Tasrgart, M. A. At Aunt Auna's. 

The Wyndham girls. 

Tarkington, B. Cherry. 
Thompson, A. E. Brave heart Elizabeth. 
Thurston, K. C. The circle. 
Tiddman, L. E. Celia's conquest. 
Tiernan, Mrs. F. C. F. Weighed in 

pseud. 
Tilton, D., pseud. On Satan's mount. 
Tomlinson, E. T. Cruising on the St. Lawrence. 
Trumbull, A. E. Life's common way. 
Waller, M. E. A daughter of the rich. 
Watson, J. Our neighbors; short stories; by Ian Maclaren, 

pseud. 
Webster, J. When Patty went to college. 
Wells, C. Eight girls and a dog. 
Wetmore, C. H. Incaland. 
Weyman, S. The long night. 
Wharton, E. Sanctuary. 



R489.1 

JR516.24 

JR516.2S 

R569.10 

R5725 

JR6592.5 

jR659?.4 

R738.10 

S226.> 

JS2832 

S427.15 

JS436.6 

JT4695.2 

JT4695.3 

S647.8 

S8473.1 

JS869.22 

JS869.23 

S8745 

Knowles. 

JS892.14 

S9325.6 

JS9745 

JS975.4 

S975.5 

JT1255.2 

T1255.1 

T1878.3- 

JT4675.2 

T5457 

JT5585 

the balance; by C. Reicl, 

T563.4 

T5815.1 

T659.24 

T868.4 

JW1985 



W339.5 

JW3797 

JW453.2 

JW5415.1 

W549.16 

W5535.4 



255 

White, E. O. Lesley Chilton. W583.8 

White, S. E. Conjuror's house. W5883.1 

Whitson, J. H. Barbara; a woman of the west. W6235 

Wilkins, M. E. Six trees ; short stories. W685.15 

Wind in the rose-bush ; short stories of the supernatural. W685.16 

Willard, J. F. Rise of Ruderick Clowd. W6935 

Willey, G. F. Soltaire. W7145 

Williams, F. C. The captain. W7233 

Williamson, C. N., ed. Lightning conductor. W7295 

Wilson, W. R. A. Rose of Normandy. W7545 

Wright, M. 0. Dogtown. JW952.2 

IN FRENCH. 

Bazin, R. Tache d'encre. F-B3635.1 

Terre qui meurt. F-B3635 

Coppee. Contes en prose. F-C7855 

Erckmann, E., and Chatrian, A. Madame Therese. F-E556 

Hugo, V. Les miserables. 5 v. F-H895 

Merimee, P. Carmen. F-M5615 

Saintaine, J. X. B. Picciola. F-S1575 

Thibault, A. F. [A.France.] Livre de mon ami. F-T425g 

Viand, L. M. J. [Pierre Lati.] Pecheur d'Islande. F-V623.1 

IN GERMAN. 

Behrens, B. [W. Heimburg.] Ein armes madchen, das fraulein 

pathe. G-B421 

Mamsell unnutz. G-B421.1 

Burstenbinder, E. [E. Werner.] Die alpenfee. G-B972.2 

Gebannt und erlost. G-B972.3 

Vineta. G-B972.4 

Hillern, W. von. Aus eigener kraft. G-H6525 

Ein sklave der freiheit. G-H6525.1 

John, E. [E. Marlitt.] Eulenhaus. G-J65.2 

Das heideprinzeaschen. G-J65.3 

Im schillingshof. G-J65.4 

Raabe, W. Der hungerpastor. G-R1115 

Books marked by a j are specially suited for young people. 



PUBLIC LIBRARY FUND. 



TREASURER'S STATEMENT. 

Balance from old account, $1,272 31 

Interest on Savings Bank deposits, 51 68 
Received from Elizabeth Ainsworth, Librarian, 

for sundries, 107 00 



Balance, January 31, 1904, deposited in the Hyde 
Park Savings Bank, 



$1,430 99 



HENRY S. BUNTON, 

Town Treasurer. 






We the undersigned, Auditors of Hyde Park, Mass., hereby certify 
that we have examined the statement of the Treasurer, Mr. Henry S. 
Bunton, in account with the Hyde Park Public Library, and find the same 
to be correct. 

PREDERIC C. STONE, 
WILLIAM J. DOWNEY, 
FREDERICK A. KATZMAN, 
Auditors of the Town of Hyde Park, Mass. 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



Board of Sewer Commissioners 



TOWN OF HYDE PARK 



YEAR ENDING JANUARY 31, 1904. 




HYDE PARK: 

Hyde Park Gazette Press. 

1904. 






ORGANIZATION. 



DAVID PEKKLNS, Chairman. 
WILLIAM U. EAIKBAIKN. CHAKLES HALEY. 



KICHAED M. JOHNSON, Clerk. 
GEOKGE A. SMITH, Engineer. 






GEOKGE A. KIMBALL, Consulting Engineer. 



BOARD OF SEWER COMMISSIONERS' 
REPORT. 



To the Citizens of Hyde Park : 

Your Board of Sewer Commissioners beg to submit the 
following report of the work done by this department during 
the year ending January 31, 1904. 

The organization of the department, with the exception 
of the engineer, remains the same as last year, as shown on 
the preceding page : Mr. A. D. Nickerson, who had been 
employed by the Board as its engineer since 1897 and who 
previously had charge of construction under Percy M. 
Blake, resigned his position on May 1, to engage in work 
elsewhere. Mr. George A. Smith was appointed engineer 
to the Board on the same date. 

Under the supervision of your Board there has been ex- 
pended for the year ending January 31, 1904, $12,113.40 
as per vouchers on file and exhibited in Table No. 1 an- 
nexed to this report. The outstanding liabilities amount 
to $130.06. 

There is due from the Board of Health for pipe sold 
them $69.50, and from Street Department $27.50. 

Sewer assessments have been computed and bills amount- 
ing to $4,654.76 have been duly rendered upon the com- 
pletion of sewer in each street. The value of stock on 
hand is $1,694.23, as shown in Table No. 2 annexed to 
this report. 

Your Board reports in its eighth annual report the con- 
struction of 3,710 feet of sewer. The details of such con- 
struction are shown in the following table. 



260 



Sewers constructed in 1903 



STREET. 


FROM. 


TO. 


SIZE 


L'gth 
ft. 


Av. 

. cut 

ft. 


W. River c t. 


Linwood St. 


Sta. 3-42.4 


8 in. 


151 


8.5 


Wolcott Sq. 


Hyde Park Ave. 


Prescott St. 


8 in. 


241 


10.8 


Prescott St. 


Wolcott Sq. 


Sta. 3-14. 


8 in. 


314 


10.0 


Readville St. 


Knight St. 


Milton St. 


f-20in. 
■j 10 in. 
L 8 in. 


2696 


12.0 


Damon St. 


Sta. 5-04. 


Readville St. 


20 in. 


48 


16.0 


Oak PI. 


Business St. 


end. 


6 in. 


260 


7.5 




Total, 






3710 feet. 




Equals, 






70 miles. 




Previously repoi 


ted, 




17.23 


" 



Total length of sewers constructed to date, 17.93 miles. 

The sewers in West River street, Prescott street, and 
Wolcott square were built on petition of the abutters ; 
Readville and Damon streets were built by request of the 
Board of Selectmen in order to have the sewer in Readville 
street constructed ahead of the proposed improvements to 
the roadway. 

On October 6 a petition was received from the Board of 
Health requesting the construction of sewers in the follow- 
ing streets, viz: — Mason street, Oak place, Rosa street 
and Reddy avenue. This Board voted to construct sewers 
in Mason street and Oak place and a contract was awarded 
to P. H. Rooney. Rosa street and Reddy avenue were 
postponed for further consideration. As these streets 
(Mason street and Oak place) are private ways, it was 
necessary to file a taking of an easement in each and serve 
notice on each of the abutters. The sewer in Oak place 
was completed in December. Mason street will be begun 
as soon as the weather permits. 

Claims for damages for drainage of five wells on Read- 
ville street and vicinity were received by this Board. Four 
of. them were settled by furnishing water connections and 
one by furnishing water connections and paying water rates 
to April 1, 1904. 



26 1 

Contracts for pipe were awarded to W. H. Harlow. 

The entire system has been flushed once during the 
season and portions of it twice. 

In October a stoppage was discovered in the 20-in. sewer 
in Hyde Park avenue, near the Loom Works. Investiga- 
tion showed it to be caused by the discharge of sand from 
the drainage system of the Geo. W. Stafford Co. The 
sand came from the pickling tank in the foundry, which was 
connected with their drainage system without the knowledge 
or consent of this Board. As the pickle used on the cast- 
ings contains aconsiderable amount of vitriol, its discharge 
into the town sewer was considered highly objectionable, on 
account of the corrosive action of the acid upon the cement 
joints and the glazing on the pipe and particularly upon the 
iron pipe under Mother Brook. Complying with the request 
of this Board, the Geo. W. Stafford Co. have constructed 
a settling basin on the line of the discharge from the pick- 
ling tank, and an attempt is being made to neutralize the 
acid by the use of marble chips. 

Work has been continued on the sewer assessment record 
plans and profiles. These plans are completed for the 
Central district, also for the Fairmount and Sunnyside dis- 
tricts and a portion of the Readville district. They will be 
brought up to date during the present winter. 

Tabular statements are submitted herewith showing value 
of stock on hand, also cost of sewers constructed as per 
contracts for labor and material. 

HOUSE CONNECTIONS. 

One hundred and three house connections were made 
during the year ending January 31, 1904, with an aggregate 
length of 5,421 feet. The total number to date is 713; 
total length 35,748 feet, or 6.8 miles. 

18 



262 

The total number of persons using the sewer is estimated 
at 5,850. The estimated number of inhabitants within the 
sewered district is 10,800. 

The work has been done under the direct supervision of 
this Board, as heretofore, at an average cost of about sixty 
cents per foot. 

One stoppage in house connections was reported during 
the year. 

There is due this department on account of connection 
made for W. C. Bramwell, at 94 Arlington street, a balance 
of $6.45. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DAVID PERKINS, 
WILLIAM U. FAIRBAIRN, 
CHARLES HALEY, 
Board of Sewer Commissioners of the Town of Hyde Park. 

Feb. 1, 1904. 



263 



$2 85 


5 00 


30 


10 00 


60 


50 00 



" 


9. 


926. 


Mar. 


27. 


927. 


» 


23. 


928. 


Apr. 


1. 


928. 


Mar. 


2. 


930. 


Apr. 


14. 


931. 



$151 60 



TABLE NO. 1. 

LIST OF BILLS AND AMOUNTS PAID. 

Voucher 
1903. No. 
Mar. 2. 921. A. D. Nickerson, services as engineer, 1 mo., 

Feb. 1903, $150 00 

cash paid for typewriting annual report, 1 60 

922. K. M. Johnson, paid Dedham and Hyde Park 
Gas and Electric Light Co. 
Paid W. F. Dodge, care of room 1 mo. 

" Adams Express Co., express, 
For care of house connections, 1 mo. 
" car fares, 
" service as clerk 1 mo. 

68 75 
" 3. 923. Ferdinand A. Wyman, paid for services in 

settlement of suit vs. Am. Security Co. 50 00 

Apr. 1. 924. A. D. Nickerson, services as engineer, 150 00 

Paid for stationery and postage, 55 

" " towel supply 3 mo., 3 00 

153 55 

41 7. 925. "R. M. Johnson, services as clerk 1 mo., $50 00 

Paid S. R. Moseiey, ior printing circulars, 2 50 

" Corson Ex. Co., for exp. on sundries, 40 

" Dedham Gas Co. for gas supply 1 mo., 51 

" W. F. Dodge, for care of room 1 mo,, 5 00 

Care of house connections 1 mo., 10 00 

Paid^W. H. Harlow, for carting manhole 

covers. 70 

69 11 

Frost & Adams Co., misc. supplies, 4 70 

Philip W. Carroll, for 45 copies sewer com. 

report, 14 50 

P. H. Rooney, for flushing sewers Mar. 7 and 14. 3 00 

Hyde Park Water Co., water for flushing in 

Loring street, 10 95 

Hobbs & Warren Co., stationery, 7 68 

P. Rooney, final payment on Grant st. sewer 

contract, 30 81 

" 14. 932. H. A. Hanscom Co,, final payment on con- 
tracts " A" and " B," sections Nos. 9 and 

10, and 2 and 13, 86 24 

May 1. 933. A. D. Nickerson, services as eng. for Apr., 

1903, 150 00 

Cashjpaid for car fares, 1 25 

151 25 



264 



Voucher 
1903. No. 
Apr. 1. 934. Hyde Park Water Co. 

For water for flushing in Gordon ave. 
" " W. Glenwood ave. 

•« 8. 935. The Forbes Lith. M. Co., 40 sewerage loan 

bonds, 
" 23. 936. The Boston Herald Co., advertising, 
" 28. 937. Geo. W. Lockwood, for services rendered, 
" 30. 938. W. H. Hariow, for pipe and fittings, 

Apr. 18. 18 ft. 8 in. pipe at 50—56 p. ct. 3 96 

1 8x8 T 2 25-58 " 95 
3 " 5 in. pipe 20 

21. 96 " 8 in. " 50—56 " 21 12 

2 8x8 T 1 89 
" 24. 99 " 8 in. " 50—56 " 21 78 

8x8 T 2 25-58 " 95 

8 in. " (3 ft.) 50-56" 168 30 



$11 86 




14 60 


$26 46 






60 00 




6 00 




5 00 



99 
1 

28. 765 
50 
36 



Apr. 



27. 
1902. 



1. 941. 
5. 942. 
943 



50-56 " 

2 25-58 " 

(3 ft.) 50-56 " 

5 in. stoppers 4 17 

8x5 T (2 ft.) 2 26 81 00 

85 17—58 p.C 

May 2. 939. Geo. A. Smith, services as eng., 2 ds. in Apr. 
car fares, 

" 5. 940, R. M. Johnson, services as clerk 1 mo-, 

care of house connections 1 mo., 
paid A. Fisher, daily paper 3 mos. 
" W. F. Dodge, janitor, 1 mo. 

P. H. Eooney, amt. paid on acct. work done 

in Milton St., Sec. 9, 
P. H. Rooney, amt. paid on acct. work done 

in W. River St., Sec. 6, 
Patrick Rooney, 

July 16. labor 2 men and horse flushing 

sewers, 
Oct. 2. labor 2 men and horse filling 

manhole, 
July 16. " self and man at loom fac- 
tory, 
July 17. " 2 men and horse fishing 

sewers, 
July 18. 1 man half day washing hose, 

" 29. 2 men digging trench on Sanford 

ave. 
July 30. 2 " labor, 

" 31. 1 man, " 
P. Rooney, " 

Sept. 27. Digging drain near river on 

West st. 
Sept. 29. Man on drain, 
Oct. 10. 4 men % day laying pipe and 

filling on West st. 
Oct. 11. 4 men y 2 day on West st. 

'• " Putting pipe under drain near 

Butler school. 



35 77 

10 00 
20 

50 00 

10 00 

1 50 

5 CO 



5 00 
5 00 
2 00 

5 00 

1 00 

4 00 
6 00 

2 00 

1 00 

2 00 

2 00 

4 00 
4 00 

1 50 



254 
10 



20 



228 
326 



! 



44 50 



265 



Voucher 
1903. No. 
May 29. 944. P. 



H. Rooney, amt. paid on acct. contract on ) 
section 9 Prescott st. 1 






June 



11. 945. Storey, Thorndyke, Palmer & Thayer, Feb. 16 
to Apr. 30 — Examination of documents re- 
lating to the issue of $40,000 4 per cent. 
Hyde Park Sewer Loan, act of '98 — and 
opinion approving legality of the bonds, 
2. 946. R. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 1 mo. 

Am't paid W. P. Dodge, for care of room, 
" A. Raymond, for carriage hire, 
" Boston Advertiser for adv. sewer 

loan, 
" Frost & Adams Co., for black 

prints, 
" R.M. Johnson, for care of house 
connections, 



$50 00 
5 00 
2 00 

8 00 

68 

10 00 



July 



947. 



948. 
949. 



Geo. A. Smith, services as engineer, 1 mo. 
car fares, 
paid for stationery, 
postage stamps, 



Robert Rogers, 4 ds. work as transitman a't $3 
Frank P. McGregor, 

June 21, publishing prosposals for construc- 
tion of sewers in Readville street, 2 00 
July 3, printing 100 copies of specification 

books for proposals, 74 40 



" 1. 950. Geo. A. Smith, services as engineer, 1 mo. 
paid for towel supply, 3 mo. 
" car fares, 
" postage, 
" note book and ink. 

June 19. 951. Frost & Adams Co., 

June 19, 1 roll M't'd Leonine, -25 p.c. 
Jane 10, 2 blue prints & postage, 

" 11. 952, Hyde Park Water Co., for flushing sewers June 
5 and 6, 126 minutes at 400 gals, a 
minute (50,400 gals.) at 10c, 
attendance 11 hours at 40c, 

Apr. 28. 953. P. H. Rooney, for lowering manhole covers 

on Apr. 22, '03 West River sireet and 

Hyde Park ave. at Readville, 

July 1, June 5, '03, 2 men and horse flushing sewers, 

8 hours at 65c, 

June 6, '03, 2 men and horse flushing sewers, 

4 hours at 65c, 
June 29, '03, 2 men and horse flushing sewers, 
raising manhole covers, on Harvard ave, 



6 20 
5 20 
2 60 
5 75 



$273 97 



35 00 



75 68 



25 00 




2 40 




1 60 




12 







129 12 


55 


12 00 



76 40 



129 23 



9 44 



19 75 



266 



Voucher 
1903. No. 
June 30. 954. R. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 1 mo. $50 00 

care of house connections, 10 00 

amount paid S. R. Moseley, 

for printing, 1 50 

amt. paid W. F. Dodge, janitor, 
1 mo. 5 00 



July 10. 955. P. H. Rooney, paid on acct. reserve of con- 
tracts on Prescott.W. River and Milton sts. 
Aug. 4. 956. 

W. H. Harlow, for pipe, 

July 21, 813 ft. 10 in. (3 ft.) at 75c. -56 p.c. 268 29 

19 10x5 T, 340 -58 p.c, 27 14 



July 22, 636 ft. 10 in. pipe at 75 -56 p.c. 
" 22, 156 ft. 20 in. pipe, 225 -56 p.c. 
" 22, 4 20x5 T's at $10.13, 
" 22, 28 10x5 T's at $3.40, 
" 22, 25 5x5 T's at $1.13, 



154 44 



295 43 



40 52 

95 20 

28 25 

22, 94 5 in. stoppers at 18.33 per 100, 7 83 



58 per cent. 
July 22, 50 ft. 5 in. pipe at lie. 



171 80 
99 64 



72 16 



Julyl 31. 957. 



Aug. 



Aug. 
Sept. 



R. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 1 mo. 

" care of house connections, 
paid W. F. Bodge, for care of room, 1 mo. 
" Adams Express Co., for express charge 

on card box, 
" Spalding Print Paper Co., 5 Vandyke 

prints, 
" Frost & Adams Co., 1 50 ft. tape for 
engineer, 



958. Geo. A. Smith, for services as engineer, 1 mo. 
paid for car fares, 

" postage and express, 



226 60 
5 50 


50 00 

10 00 

5 00 



25 



2 00 



2 08 



1. 959. T. J. Gunning, for services as inspector, 

7. 960. C. E. Trumbull Co., for amount paid on acct. 

contract for sewer in Readville street, 
1. 961. E. G. Hartford, services as inspector, 26 days 

at $2.50, 
" 962. T. J. Gunning, services as inspector, 26 days 

at $3.50, 
" 963. Geo. A. Smith, services as engineer, 1 mo. 

paid for car fares, 
" note book, 



$66 80 



177.30 



737 41 



125 00 


Ut7 OG 


2 10 




42 






127 52 
49 00 






489 57 




65 00 




91 00 


125 00 




2 60 




25 





127 85 



267 



Voucher 
1903. No. 
" " 964. R. M. Johnson, services, clerk of board, 
paid W. F. Dodge, care of room, 
services for care of house connections, 

Aug. 17. 965. W. H. Harlow, 507 ft. 10 in. pipe 75c. -56 p.c. 
48 10x5 T's at $3.40-58 p.c. 

" 29. 966. P. H. Rooney, labor, 5 men and horse, 9 hours 
levelling bunches on Easton ave., Aug. 26, 
Aug. 31. 965. 

W. H. Harlow, 

Aug. 3, 100 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 30 00 
1 6 x 6 T, 1 35 

31 35 -57 p.c. 

" 12, 100 ft. 8 in. pipe at 50c. -57 p.c. 
" 14,100 ft. 6 in. " 30c. 
10 ft. 5 in. " 25c. 



17, 100 ft. 5 in. pipe at 25c. 
19, 2 ft. 18 in. " 1.70 
" 100 ft. 5 in. " 25c. 



$50 00 




5 00 




10 00 







$65 00 


167 31 




68 55 







235 86 




11 50 



13 49 
21-'50 



30 00 




2 50 




32 50 -57 p.c. 


13 98 




10 75 


3 40 


25 00 





28 40 



12 22 



20, 30 ft. 5 in. " 25c. 

1 10x6 Y 
" 86 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 



7 50 
3 40 
25 80 



36 70 



15 79 



24, 120 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 
" 51ft. 5 in. " 25c. 



36 00 
12 75 



28, 130 ft. 6 in. 

29, 51ft. 5 in. 



30c. -57 p.c. 
25c. " 



20 97 

16 77 

5 49 



Sept, 1. 967. C. E. Trumbull Co., paid on acct. contract for 
sewer in Readville street, Estimate No. 2, 
Section 8, 

Aug. 21. 968. Library Bureau, July 27, '03, 1 oak case, shell only, 3 50 

Aug. 21, '03, 2 trays from 22 case, 3 50 



19 35 



:. — 969. 
W. H. Harlow. 

Sept. 2, 150 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 
" 4, 4 ft. 8 in. " 50c. 
!' >, 10x6 Y 


-57 


p.c. 


2 00 

3 40 






5 40 


-57 p.C 


" 8, 200 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 
1 1-8 bend 


60 00 
1 10 





2 33 



61 10 -57 p.c. 26 28 



130 96 

2,046 67 

7 00 



268 

Voucher 

1903. No. 

Sept. — 969. 

W. H. Harlow. 

Sept. 9, Carting manholes and frames, 

" 10, 200 it. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 60 00 

" 16, 100 ft. 6 in. " 30c. 
" 18,100 ft. 5 in. " 25c. 
" 21, 166 ft. 10 in. " 75c. 
72 ft. 5 in. " 25c. 







$ 1 05 


57 


p.c. 


25 80 
12 90 

10 75 


56 


p.p.. 


54 78 


57 


p.c. 


7 74 



160 98 
2 per cent, on $124 50 2 49 

$158 49 

Oct. 1. 970. W. F. Dodge, services to Oct. 1, 1903, 5 00 

" " 971. Samuel R. Moseley- 

Apr. 7, '03, printing 500 envelopes, 1 50 

200 circulars, payments, 1 50 

June 27, '03, advertising proposals— to build sewers, 2 00 

July 1, '03, printing 1000 bond letter heads, 5 00 

1000 packet " 3 50 

" 14, '03, printing 500 notices, copying ink, 2 00 



972. R. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 1 mo., 50 00 

Paid Library Bureau for cards and guides, 75 ' 

" Towel Supply, July 5 to Oct. 5, '03, 3 00 

For services on house connections, 1 mo., 10 00 



973. Geo. A. Smith, services as engineer, 1 mo., 125 00 

Paid for car fares, 2 65 

" document files, 1 25 



John Donohue. 
Oct. 17, labor, 2 men 3 hours, 
pipe and fittings, 

John Donohue. 
Oct. 17, pipe and fittings, 

labor 2 1-2 hours, 2 men, 

Milton Street. 
Oct. 17, labor 3 1-2 hours, 2 men, 
pipe and fittings, 



3 31 


1 88 


2 25 


5 09 


3 55 


1 88 


2 63 


5 05 



5 19 



7 34 



5 43 



15 50 



63 75 



128 90 



*' " 974. T. J. Gunning, for services as inspector, 11 days 

at $3.50, 38 50 

" " 975. E. G. Hartford, for services as inspector, 4 days 

at $2.50, 10 00 

" " 976. C. E. Trumbull Co., amt. paid on acct. of contract 

for sewer in Readville street, final est. Oct. 1st, 1694 97 

Oct. 23. 977. W.E. Smalling, damages to O'Flaherty, 
Oct. 17, pipe and fiittngs, 

" labor, 2 men 2 1-2 hours, 



25 64 



269 



12 50 


13 


1 25 


23 20 


1 25 


10 00 


1 25 



125 00 
35 
14 
08 



50 00 


5 00 


3 30 


10 00 


35 


3 50 


1 58 


3 00 



Voucher 
1903. No. 
Oct. 31. 978. 

P. H. Rooney, flushing sewers, 

Oct. 23, labor, 2 men and horse, 1-2 day, $2 75 

" 26, " 2 " " 5 50 

" 27, " 2 " '« 1-2 day, 2 75 

" 29, «' 2 " 5 50 

" 30, " 2 «' " 5 50 

" 31, '• 2 " " 1-2 day, 2 75 

Nov. 2. 979. Geo. A. Smith, services, engineer, 1 mo. 
paid lor car fares, 
•' postage, 
file, 

' 3. 980. R. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 

paid W. F. Dodge, janitor, services 1 mo. 
" S. R. Moseley, for stationery & printing, 
" R. M. Johnson, for care of house connec- 
tions, 
" Frost & Adams, 3 prints, 
" Waldo Bros., 1 20-in. rim and cover, 
" Q. E. Dyer, for rope and twine for 

use in sewer, 
" A. Fisher, daily paper, 5 mo. 

" 12. 981. C. E. Trumbull Co., paid on account, 
Dec. 1. 982. Hyde Park Water Co., 

For introduction of town water on premises of, 
Mary A.Crowley, 105 Milton street, 
Oct. 16, 25 ft. connection at 50c. 
Elbow, 
inside stop and waste cock, 

John Donohue, 116 Readville street, 
Oct. 9, 58 ft. connection at 40c. 
inside stop and waste cock, 

John Donohue, 6 Chesterfield street, 
Oct. 9, service connection, 

inside stop and waste cock, 

Martin O'Flaherty, Waterloo street, 

Oct. 14, for use of water from Oct. 14th, 

w 

" " 983. Hyde Park Water Co., 

For flushing sewers in Hyde Park Ave., near Loom Works, 
Oct. 23, for attendance 2 hrs, hydrant 2 hrs., 

" 26, " 7 " "5 " 

420 minutes at 400 gals, per minute, 
168,000 gals, at 10c. special, 16 80 

attendance 9 hrs. at 40c. 3 '60 

20 40 

Nov. 3, for flushing sewers, Oct. 26, 27, 29, 30 and 31, 
Hydrant 269 minutes at 400 gals. 
107,600 gals, at 10c. special, 10 76 

attendance 24 hrs. at 40c. 9 60 

20 36 



13 88 



24 45 



11 25 



2 78 



$24 75 



125 57 



76 73 
1,000 00 



52 36 



40 76 



270 



Voucher 
1903. No. 
Nov. 9. 984. Boston Bank Note Co., 1 draft book 1 00 drafts, 
Dec. 1. 985. B. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 1 mo., 
paid W. F. Dodge, janitor, 
for services, care of house connections, 

" " 986. Geo. A. Smith, for services as engineer, 1 mo., 
paid for car fare, 
" postage, 

" " 987. Tirrell, Adams & Tirrell, legal services, Milan 

case, 
" " 988. E. C. Jenney, legal services, Milan case, 
" 14. 989. Frank P. McGregor, printing and binding 
easement blanks, 
Dec. 31. 990. 
W. H. Harlow, 

Dec. 23, 100 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 30 00 

6 6x5 T's at $1.35, 8 10 

100 ft. 5 in. pipe at 25c. 25 00 



Dec. 29, 100 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c. 
4 6x5 T's at $1.35, 
100 ft. 5 in. pipe at 25c. 



57 p.c. 

30 00 

5 40 

25 00 

57 p.c. 



63 10 
35 96 



60 40 
34 42 



1904. 
Jan. 



1. 991. R. M. Johnson, services as clerk, 1 mo., 
services care of house connections, 
paid express charge on cards, 
" car fares to Boston, 
" W. F. Dodge, for janiior service, 1 mo. 
Dec. 11, paid Frost & Adams, bill for prints, 
Jan. 1, '04, paid Hobbs & Warren Co's. bill for 

stationery, 
Jan. 4, '04, paid New England Towel Supply 

for towels, 3 mo., 
Jan. 1, '04, paid Dedham & Hyde Park Electric 
Light Co., for gas and eiectric light, 1 mo. 

5. 992. Geo. A. Smith, services as engineer, 1 mo., 
paid for car fares, 
" postage, 

" brush and litmus paper, 
" filing plans and takings, 

" 993. Patrick H. Booney, final payment on con- 
tract for sewers in Milton, West River 
and Prescott streets, 



50 00 

5 00 

10 00 

125 00 
40 
10 



27 14 



25 98 



50 pO 

10 00 

15 

40 

5 00 

70 



3 00 


16 


125 00 


30 


140 


50 


3 00 



12 00 



65 00 



125 50 



15 00 
125 00 



16 00 



53 12 



72 39 



130 20 



30 00 



$50 00 


80 


1 50 


10 


85 


5 00 


10 00 



271 

Voucher 
1904. No. 
Jan. 1. 994. Patrick F. Rooney, am't paid on acct. con- 
tract for sewer in Oak place, 
Feb. 2. 995. R. M. Johnson, services as clerk of board, 1 mo., 
paid for car fares to Boston and Dedbam, 
" A. Fisher, for daily paper, 
" H. C. Dimond & Co., year date stamp, 
" Dedham Gas & Electric Light Co., 

500 cu. ft. at $1.60, 
" W. F. Dodge, care of room, 1 mo., 
For care of house connections, 1 mo., 

Jan. . 22. 996. Chas. F. Jenney, for professional services relative 
to sewer in Milton street; consultations as to 
abatements and land takings; laying sewers in 

1903. private streets, etc., 
Oct. 14. 997. Hyde Park Water Co., 

1904. Service connection for Martin O'Flaherty, 

Feb. 2. 998. Geo. A. Smith, services as engineer, 1 mo., 125 00 

Paid for car fares, 20 

" express charge, 50 



Jan. 999. \V. H. Harlow, 

34 ft. 6 in. pipe at 30c, less 57 p.c. 
Rent of pipe yard, 1 yr., 1908, 



Jan. 23. 1000. 



Frost & Adams Co., 

1 roll Leonine paper, 

2 bottles ink, at 25c., 



4 39 


50 00 


7 13 


50 



Jan. 1. 1001. J. E. Cotter, for legal services, Dec, 1901, to May 26, 
1903, in cases of Rooney vs. Hyde Park, et al. 
Interviews with E. C. Jenney, Esq., counsel for 
plaintiff, and W, I. Badger, Esq., counsel for 
John Cavanagh. Examination of law as to dis- 
continuance of way, etc. 



$289 05 



68 25 



66 00 
50 90 



125 70 



54 39 



7 63 



250 00 



$12,113 40 



RECEIPTS FROM SALES OF MATERIAL AND SUPERVISION OF 
HOUSE CONNECTIONS. 

Balance on hand from last account, $191 02 
Received from sale of pipe and supervision of house 

connections, 355 45 

On hand, 546 47 

Due this Department on acct. house connections, 16 45 
Due this Department from Geo. W. Stafford Co-, tor 

cleaning out sewer in Hyde Park avenue, 36 15 



$599 70 



272 

TABLE NO. 2. 

VALUE OF STOCK ON HAND. ' 

Sewer pipe, $785 73 

Flush gates, 51 00 

Manhole frames and covers, 82 50 

Flushing hose and clean out rods, 125 00 

Office furniture and engineering instruments, 650 00 

Due from Board of Health for pipe, $69 50 

" Street Department for pipe, 27 50 97 00 



TABLE NO. 3. 



$1,694 23 



$1,791 23 



COST OF CONSTRUCTION, AS PER CONTRACTS FOR LABOR AND 
MATERIAL. 
Paid P. H. Rooney, 
" C. E. Trumbull Co., 



Less reserved— 

On Contract P. H. Rooney, 
" " C. E. Trumbull Co. 



Paid balance due on contract for Grant street, 
" •■*" " " " H. A. Hanscomb Co. 



Paid for pipes and fittings, 
" " land damages, fees, engineering, etc., 
" " supplies, salaries, maintenance, etc., 

Total for the year, 





$1,397 82 




5,289 01 




$6,686 83 


$72 26 




57 80 







130 06 




$6,556 77 


$30 81 




86 24 







117 05 




$6,673 82 




1,625 15 




2,505 40 




1,309 03 




$12,113 40 



AUDITORS' REPORT. 



We have examined the vouchers and accounts of the 
Selectmen, Treasurer, Tax Collector, School Committee, 
Overseers of the Poor, Board of Health, Sewer Commis- 
sioners, and Cemetery Commissioners, and find them to be 
correct. 

We have examined also the accounts of George R. Lover- 
ing, collector pro tern, appointed by the Selectmen to close 
the accounts of our former tax collector, George Sanford, 
deceased, and find them to be correct. 

During the early part of the year the School Committee 
adopted the single voucher system as advocated by the 
Auditors in their report of last year. 

We are glad to report that since last July the Board of 
Health also have adopted the same system, so that in both 
departments payments are made by the Town Treasurer upon 
presentation of the original bill, properly approved, which 
original voucher remains with the Town Treasurer. 

We are glad to report also that the Board of Health are 
to abolish their petty cash account and all revenue received 
by the department is to be turned over to the Town Treas- 
urer when received. 

The Board of Sewer Commissioners alone continue under 
the old system, and is the one remaining department which 
has a cash account or fund of its own. This fund is derived 
from sewer inspection fees, and is applied and used in the 
regular work of the department. We affirm again that the 
revenue of any department is the revenue of the town and 
should be turned over to the Town Treasurer. 



274 

We believe that the best interests of the town demand 
that the citizens keep close scrutiny upon appropriations 
and expenditures. We believe that the most feasible way 
to do this is through preferably one Auditor who shall audit 
all bills before payment and keep a balance sheet showing 
the condition of the various appropriations at all times dur- 
ing the year. We suggest, therefore, that the citizens con- 
sider the advisability of makiug a change in the Town By- 
laws, whereby it shall be obligatory upon all the various 
departments of the town to submit all bills and orders to an 
Auditor for his approval if correct, after an approval by the 
department making the expenditure, and before payment by 
the Town Treasurer. We appreciate that the system advo- 
cated would make very considerable demands upon such an 
Auditor's time, adding, as it would, to the already large 
amount of work devolving upon three Auditors, the addi- 
tional duties suggested. We believe, however, that the 
town would be the gainer thereby and that the change would 
effect a decided advance in the auditing of town accounts. 

Respectfully submitted, 

FREDERIC C. STONE, 
WILLIAM J. DOWNEY, 
FREDERICK G. KATZMAN, 

Auditors of the Town of Hyde Park. 
March 7, 1904. 



INDEX. 



Appropriations and Expenditures, 




138 


Assessors' Report, 


. 


94 


Auditors' Eeport, .... 


. 


273 


Board of Health, 


. 


83 


Cemetery Commissioners, 


• 


61 


Collector's Report, 




133 


Detailed Statement of Expenditures, 


. 


103 


Eire Alarm Boxes, 


. 


48 


Jury List, ..... 


• 


32 


Officers of Town, 


. 


3 


Overseers of the Poor, 


. 


80 


Park Commissioners, 


. 


64 


Public Library, .... 


. 


229 


Report of Superintendent of Streeis, 


. 


58 


" Inspector of Buildings, 


. 


65 


Chief of Police, 


. 


53 


" Fire Department, 


. 


45 


" Advisory Committee, 


• 


24 


" Sub-Committee of Advisory Committee, . 


95 


School Committee, 


. 


185 


Selectmen's Report, 


. 


5 


Sewer Commissioners, . 


. 


257 


Synopsis of Town Clerk's Report of Town 


Meetings, 


34 


Tax Payers, Resident, . 


. 


141 


" Non-Resident, 


e • 


169 


Town Clerk's Report, . . . 


• m 


67 


Town Debt, ..... 


• * 


139 


Tree Warden, .... 


• • • 


66 


Treasurer's Report, . . 


• ♦ 


i 136 



.