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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

4^*-*-^ 



&.6. 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN, 



DECEMBER, 1854. 




CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 

1855. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



In compliance with the requisitions of law, the 
School Committee respectfully submit the following 
Keport : 

The educational department of the City of Charles- 
town consisted, on the 31st of October last, of the fol- 
lowing, viz : — 

A School Committee of thirteen members, four elect- 
ed by the voters of each Ward, and the Mayor, who is 
ex officio, a member, and also Chairman. 
1 High School, with 4 teachers and 118 scholars. 
8 Grammar Schools, " 30 " 1567 

1 Intermediate " " 1 " 58 

28 Primary " " 28 " 2048 



38 Schools, 63 teachers, 3791 scholars. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS 
The following tables contain the statistics of the 
Primary Schools at the close of the winter and summer 
terms : — 



!'J 


Primary Schools. 


Wint. Term, ending April 1854| 


"""' ~1 


1 o 

1 .a 


o S 






li 




^ ^ ^ o -^1 


, 


1 o 
6 


Tsachers Names- 


o £ 
^1 




iS 


Z^ 


o 

ra 


i |i il rs 

< ^y Z o 


Names of ' 

Sab-Committees- 


T 


Mary J. Brown, 


108 


54 


54 


74 


36 


38 


46 


61 


3 


F C. SewaJl. 


1 2 


M. B. Skilton, 


70 


38 


32 


65 


36 


29 


50 


58 


2 


Hiram P. Remick. 


'i '••■ 


Hannah H. Sampson, 


96 


50 


46 


78 


42 


36 


51 


55 


6 




': 4 


Charlotte M. Moore, 


96 


56 


40 


82 


45 


37 


64 


60 


12 


L W. Blanchard. i 


' 5 


Charlotte Poole, 


76 


45 


31 


65 


38 


27 


51 


61 


7 




', 6 


Mary L. Everett, 


85 


49 


36 


85 


39 1 


46 


55 


57 


5 


SGeo. W. Bartlett. i 


> 7 


Susan L. Sawyer, 


68 


32 


36 


64 281 


36 


45 


57 


4 


William Flint. i 


5 8 


Julia M. Ranstead, 


65 


33 


32 


58 


27 


31 


50 


57 


12 


Geo.W. Bartlett. ' 


5 9 


Martha S. Lothrop, 


56 


29 


27 


50 


26 


24 


39 


49 


13 




'ilO 


Frances E. Smith, 


94 


54 


40 


78 


44 


34 


51 701 


3 


Wm. I. BudingtonJ 

tt <« 1 


Ml 


Joanna S. Putnam, 


86 


45 


41 


72 


38 


34 


58 


66 


5 


M2 


Elizabeth A. Lord, 


82 


45 


37 


76 


47 


29 


51 


68 


4 


O. C. Everett, ' 


.13 


Oath. W.Trowbridge, 


77 


41 


36 


61 


34 


27 


44 


50 


8 


Nathan A. Tufts. ' 


!il4 


Sarah B. Smith, 


96 


50 


46 


78 


40 


38 


S3 


67 


6 




il5 


Jane E. Kugg, 


115 


51 


64 


90 


42 


48 


70 


81 


7 


0. C. Everett. ' 


16 


Abby E. Hinckley, 


94 


56 


38 


75 


45 


30 


49 


59 


3 


James Fogg. 


17 


E. H. Rodenburgh, 


74 


37 


37 


66 


34 


32 


52 


54 


8 


George Cutler. ' 


18 


Ellenora Butts, 


105 


44 


61 


76 


31 


45 


48 


68 


8 


<i* it 1 


19 


Louisa W. Huntress, 


76 


36 


40 


68 


32 


36 


48 


53 


3 


<( (C < 


i30 


ElizabetliC. Hunting, 


80 


36 


44 


70 


33 


37 


29 


55 


4 


William Flint. 


■21 


Mary F. VVyman, 


88 


45 


43 


70 


34 


36 


54 


61 


14 


Reuben Curtis. , 


122 


Frances M. Lane, 


79 


40 


39 


72 


35 


37 


49 


59 


10 




123 


Mary A. Osgood, 


65 


29 


36 


56 


24 


32 


39 


34 


3 


F. C. Sewall. 


124 


Susan T. Croswell, 


72 


44 


28 


51 


28 


23 


33 


34 


3 


James Fogg. , 
Hiram Hutchins. 


125 


H. JL Sanborn, 


102 


55 


47 


86 


53 


33 


52 


60 


6 


26 


Helen G. Turner, 


35 


18 


17 


24 


12 


J 2 


25 


24 


4 


F. C. Sewall. 


3' 


Louisa A. Pratt, 


143 


72 


71 


84 


44 


40 


50 


60 


8 


Reuben Curtis 


28 


Mary M. Decoster, 


66 


36 


32 


63 


SC. 


27 


40 


45 


8 


Hiram Hutching. 


,29 


Mary J. Underwood. 


66 


33 


33 


62 


32 


30 


33 


4D 


6 


Hiram P. Remick. 




2417 1 1253 j 1164 


1999 


1035 


964 


1379 1 


1626 


185| 




' J ' 






iSum.Tsrm, ending Oct. 1854. 


1 i 


1 5 


Primary Scliools. 




li 












o o 




»" 

?: 


1 ° 


Teachers Names. 


Location 




o " 


o' 


5 


II 

3 

z 


>> 

o 


5 






:i 








$£ 










< 


> 


1 1 


Marv J. Brown, 


NearB. H.S. « 


ouse. 


124 


6C 


64 


88 i 46 


42 


60 


77 


~3 


2 


M. B. Skillon, i 


Mead street. 




78 


41 


37 


73 


3c 


38 


51 


63 


6 


3 


Hannah H. Sampson,' 


Ward Room Nc 


.3, 


109 


54 


5r 


79 


40 


39 


51 


64 


10 


1 4 


Ellen Hichborn, 


War. School-H 


ouse, 


112 


60 


.^2 


87 


44 


43 


48 


85 


7 


1 6 


Charlotte Poole, 


Elm street. 




82 


51 


31 


66 


41 


25 


55 


54 


11 


'i ^ 


Frances Hichborn, 


Elm street. 




99 


53 


46 


76 


38 


38 


44 


60 


b: 


'i ''' 


Susan L. Sawyer, 


Boylston Chape 


1, 


82 


32 


50 


69 


28 


41 


51 


64 




1 8 


Julia M. Ranstead, 


Cross street, 




76 


33 


43 


5" 


27 


28 


47 


47 


r 


( 9 


Martha S. Lothrop, 


ti !t 




59 


32 


27 


54 


31 


23 


43 


47 


14 


no 


Frances E. Smith, 


Common stree 


, 


115 


56 


69 


90 


48 


42 


59 


72 


3 


(11 


Joanna S. Putnam 


" " 




88 


4S 


43 


75 


39 


36 


59 


57 




112 


Paulino B. Neale, 


Bow street, 




86 


47 


39 


62 


37 


26 


49 


57 


8i 


113 


Cath. W.Trowbridge, 


" 




79 


42 


37 


68 


38 


30 


50 


59 


11 


Il4 


Sarah E. Smith, 


" 




94 


54 


4( 


80 


42 


38 


58 


69 


a 


115 


Jane E. Rugg, 


" 




115 


5£ 


60 


98 


44 


54 


73 


84 


& 


m 


A. E. Hinckley, 


Common street 


, 


98 


5c 


43 


62 


82 


30 


46 


46 


2 


117 


E. H. Rodenburgh, 


B.H. street, at 


Point 


83 


44 


39 


70 


37 


33 


55 


56 


2 


18 


Ellonora Butts, 


" " 




IOC 


4£ 


51 


76 


38 


38 


53 


60 


5 


19'Louisa W. Huntress, 


Moulton street 


} 


9" 


44 


5S 


72 


36 


37 


56 


60 




120 


Elizabeth C. Hunting, 


Solev street, 




9C 


34 


56 


80 


40 


40 


42 


64 


3 


121 


Mary F.Wyman, 


Bart'lett street 




le- 


54 


50 


80 


39 


41 


62 


64 


18 


122 


Frances M. Lane, 


(( (1 




ge 


4c 


47 


80 


35 


45 


54 


69 


11 


123 


Helen G. Turner, 


Haverhill stree 


t> 


5S 


26 


30 


59 


27 


25 


38 


44 




124 


Susan T. Croswell, 


Common street 


, 


67 


37 


30 


69 


34 


25 


40 


36 


1 


25 


H. M. Sanborn, 


Ward Room, N 


0.2, 


95 


60 


35 


79 


49 


30 


60 


67 


S'l 


27 


Louisa A. Pratt, 


Bunker-Hill, 




130 


60 


70 


98 


38 


60 


66 


72 


6 


28 


Mary M. Decoster, 


Ward Room N 


0.2, 


65 


31 


34 


60 


31 


29 


40 


47 


6' 


129 


Mary J. Underwood, 


Ward Room Nc 


.3. 


68 


34 


34 


59 


28 


31 


39 


42 


6 


!i^ 


J-« •-i-»-J-i.»-u»lJ-urTj-u»- 


-^ 




2543 


1288 


1265 


2048 


1042 


1006 


1449 


1686 


181 



During the present year one of the Primary Schools 
(No. 26) has been discontinued ; this school was connect- 
ed with the Alms-house, and was composed almost exclu- 
sively of the children of foreigners, who were removed 
to the State Alms-house, at Tewksbury, in May last. 

The statistics of the 28 schools remaining, indicate 
an average number in each school of 73 scholars, an 
average attendance at the examination in October of 
60 scholars, an average attendance during the summer 
term of 52 scholars, and the whole number connected 
with them about the same as last year. Many of these 
schools are very large, while others are of moderate 
size ; there is great need of an entirely new districting 
of the city ; this work has been repeatedly attempted, 
but was found so much of a task in connection with the 
more imperative labors of the Committee, that it was 
abondoned. 

The semi-annual examinations have been duly made 
and the reports indicate the different degrees of excel- 
lence to which the several schools have attained ; the 
circumstances connected with different schools are so 
varied as to render it difficult and perhaps unjust to 
judge of the faithfulness of a teacher by the proficiency 
of the pupils. In many of the schools there is scarcely 
any change of scholars during a term, thus enabling the 
teacher to exhibit the perfected fruit of her labors at its 
close ; others are situated in sections of the city where 
the population is ever changing, and the worn and anx- 
ious teacher instead of concentrating her energies npon 
a single school, absolutely has passing through her 
hands during a term, pupils enough to form two entire 
schools. The Primary Schools generally are in a fav- 
orable condition, and are doing the pioneer work of 
education among our children. The worth of these 
schools is generally appreciated by our citizens, as is 
forcibly illustrated by the fact, that there are only five 
or six private schools for young children, containing in 
all only about one hundred scholars. 

The following table contains statistics of the Inter- 
mediate, Grammar and High Schools : 





High School- 
Bunker Hill, 
1 do. - - 
Warren Schoo 

Winthrop Schr 

Harvard Schoc 

Intermediate S 


SCHOOL RETURNS, 
AT THE SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS- ! 


1 O 1 . ,111 

' op o o o o o o 


High, Grammar, and Intermediate Schools. 


o 
o 


^ Ui J^ OT 00 31 00 00 O 00 


Whole Number of Scholars 
for the Term. 


O 1 

B i[ 
^ 'I 

> 

oo ; 

^ ! 


1 CO 

1 ^ 

1 ''^ 


*. O-i CO (O W OO — O O OJ 

^^^^^ooo^^oootoo 


Boys. 


fOO>— OOOtOi— OOCD.^ 
O OJ CJ" OO CO K3 CT 00 00 CO 


Girls. 




l-'^^^^l-'^■3>-'^'-' 

CnCO»OOCOOCOJi»33Sl 
a54i.Mit>.00--lClh30CO 


Number at its close. 


GO 

,1 OT 

w 

1 ^ 

1 '^ 
1 "^ 


•^(COClCiOlGlOlClro 


Boys. 


l-iOOOOOO — ^Ol^CO 
l£) K> 00 00 00 fO CO ^ .t^ ^» 


Girls. 


4- 


OiOlOOl^CO^hOi-^ 
OO ^J Oi C CO O J^ OO O ^) 


Average attendance. 


1 O 


.f^Oli-'OO^COOOOOOOOi 

*>. oi o -> CO ^^ 4^ 03 *» CO 


Present at Examination. 


CO 


^^^^oo^ — o5^^^^^^ i 
^co^^oo^-aico-'l;»■ 1 


Number of visits of School 
Committee. 




to 10 (o (o (o lo !-• ^^ ^ 

^ 00 00 CO oo o;i SI ^) o 03 


Whole number of Scholars 
for the Term. 


1 
o 


1 OT 


4:. 4- £.. Oi 4-. »0 OJ CO O O-i 
CO 00 CT Ot 3j C C-i C3 A>. ^) 


Boys. 


1 s 

1, Oi 


>0 CO OJ .£^ CD 00 tS 00 CO -J 

coKiCifOfOcn^^^i. 


Girls. 


r ^ 

' to 


»o ro to ►- >o »o >-» >— ^ 
o^o>o^ao^c.c*-c;"- 

00 <3> Ul O -! Cn CO CO C?: 00 


Number at its close. 


^ 1 


o 

I 00 


coo^^ooco^oooQocl 

Ol Cl to C5 Ji. CO l-i O 4^ K3 


Boys. 


B 1 

crq 
O 

O 1 

\—i 

OO 1 

en 

1 


00 


lO O O KJ 30 C OO Oi 00 SI 
CO— 00J-WC300COfOO> 


Girls, 


-5 

1 <?5 


cocncooscjioooocotn — 

CJi^CO — CJiOOCOOCi 


Average attendance. 


o 


4^MCO00CJl00CO*.*-i-4 
tO<>OOOCOCOh34^CnOO 


Present at Examination. 


00 


^oocoi- — «h- — h- 1 Number of visits of School 
coc;,oooooco^oco| Commitlee. 


i 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

MISS ANN NOWELL, - - - Teacher. 

Committee— O. C. EVERETT, 

HIRAM HUTCHINS, 
KEUBEN CURTIS. 

This school, since its establishment until about the 
first of May last, was under the care of Miss Pauline 
B. Neale, but her health and strength were not suffi- 
cient for so arduous a task, and she has been transfer- 
red to Primary School No. 12, in place of Miss E. A. 
Lord, resigned. This school has since that time been 
taught by Miss Ann NoweU. The Committee in their 
Nov. report state, that the examination gave them great 
satisfaction ; the order of the school was complete, and 
evinced the high reputation of the teacher as a kind 
and efficient disciplinarian. The Committee add, "Such 
is the success of this school among that class of children 
gathered in, that if another teacher equally competent 
could be found, we should recommend the establishment 
of another Intermediate School, for the benefit of a large 
class that might be collected in the upper parts of the 
city, where there are many in Primary Schools, and 
more in the streets, who would be benefitted, if brought 
under the influence of such a teacher." 



BUNKER-HILL SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. No. 2. 



WM. H. SAN DEES, Principal. 
MARTHA A. BIGELOW, 1st Asst. 
PHOEBE A. KNIGHTS, 2iid " 



McLAURIN F. COOK, Principal. 
AN ME iM. LUND. Isl Assistant 
CAROLINE PHIPPS, 2nd " 

Sub- Committee— l^kkC W. BLANCHARD, 
FREEMAN C. SEWALL, 
HIRAM P. REMICK. 

In regard to these schools, the Sub- Committee in 
their report of May last state, that * 'Messrs. Sanders 
and Cook have proved themselves worthy successors to 
those who as former Principals of these schools have 
done so much to build up their fair fame and reputation, 
and they have no hesitation in saying that their posi- 



8 

tion at the present time is one of much promise." In 
November the Sub-Committee say, "in the present con- 
dition and prospects of these schools they find much 
thjit is hopeful and encouraging ; it is believed that the 
teachers are ever on the alert to take advantage of 
every measure for their prosperity and advancement, 
and it is their earnest wish and desire to carry them to 
the highest point of attainment." 



WARREN SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. No. .2. 

GEORGE SWAN, Principal. I JOSEPH T. SWAN, Principal. 

MARY A. OSGOOD, 1st Asst. | CHARLOTTEM.MOORE,lstAsst. 
MARGARET VEAZIE, 2nd •' I MARY M. MAYHEW, 2nd " 
MARIA BROWN, 3rd " | ANN J. CHANDLER, 3rd " 

Sub- Committee— GEORGE W. BARTLETT, 
OLIVER C. EVERETT, 
REUBEN CURTIS. 

These are undoubtedly model schools ; the Sub- 
Committee in May last state, "that all the different de- 
partments of these schools are under faithful and compe- 
tent teachers, good order and discipline prevail through- 
out ; their present flourishing condition may be justly 
attributed to the thorough and practical manner of 
teaching, for which these schools have gained so much 
distinction." 

The November report says, "the appearance of these 
schools durinor the last examination warrants the belief 

O 

that the teachers have performed the arduous duties 
which devolved on them, with fidelity and success. — 
The various classes gave undoubted evidence of close 
application to study, and excellent training." The 
present crowded state of these schools renders it neces- 
sary that further accommodations should be provided as 
soon as practicable. 



9 
WINTHROP SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. No. 2. 



SAMUELS. WILLSON, Principal. 
JULIA A. BRIDGES, 1st Asst. 
MARY ALDEN, 2nd " 

E. A. RICHARDSON, 3rd « 



B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal. 
SOPHIA W. PAGE, 1st Assistant 
R. S, RICHARDSON, 2nd " 
ANNA DELANO, 3rd " 

Sub- Committee— Um AM HUTCHINS, 
WM. I. BUDINGTON, 
GEORGE CUTLER. 

These schools were reported by the Sub- Committee, 
in May last, as in a flourishing condition and occupying 
a position in advance of that previously attained. In 
November the Committee say, "that sufficient time was 
spent in the recent examinations of these schools to en- 
able them to judge somewhat accurately of their pre- 
sent condition, and the progress of the pupils since the 
last examination ; the questions were not confined to 
the text books, but were so shaped as to draw out and 
develope the minds of the pupils ; the examinations of 
all the divisions were eminently satisfactory." There 
is also great complaint of want of proper accommoda- 
tions in these schools. 



HARVARD SCHOOLS. 



No. 1. No. 2. 



JOSEPH- B. MORSE, Principal. 
ELIZABETH SWORDS, 1st Asst. 
CAROLINE CROZIER, 2nd " 
H. J. KNIGHTS, 3rd <« 



CORNELIUS S. CARTEE, Prin. 
ANN E. WESTON. 1st Assistant 
SARAH S. STOCKMAN, 2nd " 
SARAH E. ARCHER, 3rd " 

Sub- Committee— JAMES FOGG, 

WILLIAM FLINT, 
NATHAN A. TUFTS. 

May Report. The Sub- Committee on these schools 
are gratified in being able to report favorably upon their 
present condition. The oldest in the city and among 
the first founded in the State, they have well sustained 
their long established reputation and are now deemed 
in no respect behind any, either in or out of the city. — 
At the same time, in common with all others we have 
observed, they have some faults : too little time and at- 
tention, we believe, are given to train the youthful 



10 

mind to think, to reason, and to judge for itself ; too 
much in storing it with words and facts, &c. To reme- 
dy the evil we would recommend that more attention 
be given to the studies of Grammar and Arithmetic. 
The study of Geography and History, important as are 
a general knowledge and comprehension of these branch- 
es, may be carried too far, may become too minute and 
occupy time which might be much more profitably em- 
ployed, &c. We have been led into these thoughts, 
partly by the deficiency in mathematical skill evinced 
in the examination of these schools, but especially by 
the more manifest deficiency in all the schools as ex- 
hibited in the results of the .examination of candidates 
for the High School. 

November Report. The 1st, 2nd, and 4th divi- 
sions of Harvard School, No. 1, owing to its very 
crowded state, and also to a change of two of its 
teachers during the past season, "did not fully main- 
tain the high position possessed at a former examina- 
tion." "The 3d Division is in a prosperous condition. 
Miss Stockman maintains good discipline and proves 
herself an efficient and successful teacher." 

"This school should be relieved of its superabundant 
numbers. Dr. Cartee is making every effort for the 
highest advancement of the school, and could he be 
relieved of a portion of his pupils, the good effects 
would be seen in the more rapid progress of the schol- 
ars, particularly in those studies requiring the personal 
instruction of the Master." 

Harvard School, No. 2. The examination in most 
of the divisions was highly satisfactory, showing inde- 
fatigable efforts on the part of the teachers and a con- 
siderable effort on the part of the scholars, which the 
Committee think must result in thorough scholarship in 
the several branches taught. 



11 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

A. M. GAY. Principal, I Mrs P. G. BATES, Assistant, 

C. E. STETSON, Sub-Master. | Miss H. M. SMITH, 2d Assistant. 

Sub-Co,nmUtee—OUYER C. EVERETT, 
WM. I. BUDINGTON, 
WILLIAM FLL\'J\ 
ISAAC W. BLANCHARD. 

The Sub- Committee in May last, stated "that the 
excellent order and high character of the school has 
been maintained, and secured the warmest approba- 
tion, not only of the Committee at the examination, but 
of the large number of friends and visitors at the exhi- 
bition. 

"It is to be regretted, that so few of those who en- 
tered together, have been allowed to remain and regu- 
larly graduate from the institution. We cannot but 
think that it is a great mistake on the part of many 
parents, to remove their children before they have 
secured all the advantages which a school of such high 
order and reputation really affords." 

On Nov. 1st, the Committee report that "the exam- 
ination continued three days, the exercises gave very 
good satisfaction, clearly ro.anifesting that the scholars 
generally were well acquainted with what they had 
studied. We may confidently say that the instruction 
was never more thorough, or the attainments of the 
pupils greater. The whole appearance of the school 
indicated a deep interest on the part of the teachers 
and their scholars. 

"Public exhibitions of Declamation and Reading have 
been lately introduced, once in five or six weeks. — 
These, it was thought, might be highly advantageous 
to the scholars, by giving them more confidence, and 
exciting them to greater effort in these exercises ; while 
the parents and friends would have an object to visit the 
school, to see its means and opportunities, to be made 
acquainted with its teachers, and to witness the im- 
provement of those in whom they feel so deep an 
interest. It is hoped that these occasions will be more 
generally improved, and thus increased interest will be 



12 

kept alive in this institution, which may be regarded as 
one of the most valuable in our community. May it 
long be preserved, and by its happy influence on its 
members may it induce other communities to open to 
their daughters as well as their sons the advantages of 
an extended system of public instruction." 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

There is no department of our municipal affairs which 
requires more constant care and attention than that of the 
education of our children and youth ; while there are new 
developments from year to year in the world of science 
and of art, it is hardly to be supposed that no further 
improvement is to be made in the means and appliances 
for training the human mind The system of education 
generally, which is in operation here at the present 
time, has been sanctioned by those among us of large 
experience and observation; and improvements have 
been introduced from time to time, but the main fea- 
tures of the plan have been retained. The question 
has often presented itself to those who have been par- 
ticularly connected with the management of our schools 
— By what means can our excellent systen of public 
instruction be made more efficacious to the moral and 
intellectual improvement of all the children of our city ? 

When it is realized that there are more than four 
thousand children in the city between the ages of four 
and sixteen years — that there are 38 Public Schools to 
be looked after and provided with teachers, fuel, &c. — 
that there are 63 teachers to be examined and con- 
sulted, and twice at least in each year all these schools 
are to be examined — and that all this work is to be 
done by thirteen men who have business of their own 
besides, it must be evident that the supervisory power 
is not commensurate to the magnitude of the work. 



13 

Our schools need to be visited (not merely called 
upon,) much oftener ; comparisons to be instituted 
between them, each teacher's system of instruction 
observed, its excellencies approved, its objectionable 
features condemned, and thus an intimate acquaintance 
with each school would be formed, alike beneficial to 
teachers and scholars. It has been the opinion of 
many persons in whose judgment the community has 
often placed confidence, that the best condition of our 
schools could not be realized without the employment 
of an intelligent, educated, practical man, whose whole 
time should be spent in visiting the schools and carry- 
ing out the details of a general plan adopted by the 
School Committee. 

It is not proposed by this agency to relieve the 
School Committee of the responsibility of a thorough 
annual examination of the schools, or of their general 
supervision, but by exemption from the minuter details 
of duties now performed, to give more time for a gen- 
eral and comparative examination of them. 

It is to be feared that the moral and religious educa- 
tion of the young, in the community at large, has been 
much neglected of late, or that the temptations to vice 
have been greatly multiplied. The large proportion of 
juvenile criminals in our punitive institutions fully jus- 
tifies this remark; out of 485 convicts in the State 
Prison in this city, 150 are not over 20 years of age ! 
while the Reform School, at Westboro' , for boys, is con- 
stantly filled to its utmost capacity. 

The subject of truancy and vagrancy has not yet re- 
ceived that attention from the municipal corporations of 
our Commonwealth which its importance demands.- — 
Laws fully sufi&cient to meet the emergencies of the 
case have been enacted, and it now remains for the 
cities and towns to give life and activity to those laws. 

By a census taken by the authority of the School 
Committee, on the first of May last, it was found that 
there were in this city 3,785 children between the ages 
of 5 and 15 years. It also appears by the returns from 
the several Public Schools, and from information ob- 



14 

tained from the several Private Schools, that there were 
in all the schools in this city, on the 30th of April last, 
3,400 children between the ages of 5 and 15 years. 
By deducting the number of children in the schools 
from the whole number found, there appears to be 385 
children between the ages of 5 and 15 years not con- 
nected with any school. Many of these are undoubt- 
edly old enough to be earning something for themselves 
or their parents and are properly employed ; but un- 
doubtedly a large proportion of them are wandering 
about the city idling away their time, and many of 
them committing petty larcenies from day to day. 
Here is the point to interpose municipal authority, and 
thereby save many of these children from lives of crime 
and vshame, and from deaths of ignominy. 

Under the provisions of an act passed May 3, 1850, 
entitled "An Act concerning Truant Children and 
Absentees from School," the City Council passed an 
Ordinance, elected a magistrate, appointed suitable 
ofi&cers to carry the provisions of the law into effect, 
and selected the Alms-house as a place of instruction 
and reformation ; but all these arrangements were en- 
tirely useless because the Alms-house was nearly filled 
with State paupers, and no proper separate accommoda- 
tions could be made without the erection of another 
building ; the few boys, therefore, who were sentenced 
under the law, immediately ran away. But there is 
now abundant room at the Alms-house for an estab- 
lishment such as is contemplated by the law, and only 
a small amount of money will be necessary to make the 
building safe and comfortable. This improvement is 
urgently demanded, and would probably do more to 
clear our streets and wharves of truants and vagrants 
than any amount of mere moral suasion, as they would 
prefer going to school rather than to the House of 
Keformation. 

There is an urgent call from the Harvard, Winthrop 
and Warren Schools, for additional accommodations, 
there being now two hundred scholars in these schools 
not provided with proper seats. The subject received 



15 

some attention from the City Council the early part of 
the present municipal year, but the appropriations for 
schools not being sufficient, the improvement of the 
Winthrop School-house was postponed to another season. 
We have thus attempted by implication, to answer 
the question proposed at the commencement of these 
remarks, and we firmly believe, that if additional super- 
visory power be ordained by the City Council, and the 
provisions of the Truant Act vigorously carried out, 
and the various religious societies fully realize their 
obligations to furnish Sabbath School instruction to all 
the children of our city, their moral and intellectual 
improvement would be permanently promoted. 

By order of the Committee. 

JAMES ADAMS, Chairman. 

Charlestown, Dec, 1854,