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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN, 



DECEMBER 1855. 




CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 

1856. 



SCHOOL REPORT, 



The School Committee submit the following as their 
annual report of the condition of the several public 
schools in the city ; and they are happy to congratu- 
late their fellow-citizens upon a general state of pros- 
perity in this department of the public interest. 

In making up their appropriations at the commence- 
ment of the present financial year, the City Council 
granted the sum of $30,600 for the support of schools; 
and in managing and providing for the various schools 
under their charge, the committee have remembered 
and been guided by the amount of means thus placed 
at their disposal. The sum allowed was a liberal one; 
but in a growing city like ours, large and increasing 
appropriations will have to be made every year, and 
prudence and careful management will hardly then keep 
the expenses within the limit of the allowance. 

At the close of the term ending October 31, 1855, 
the schools to be provided for were as follows : 
28 Primary, with 28 teachers and 1908 scholars, 
1 Intermediate, 1 teacher and 60 '' 
8 Grrammar, 32 teachers and 1688 " 

1 High, 4 " and 124 

38 schools, 65 " 3,780 " 



The committee have been deeply sensible of the great 
fesponsibility resting upon them, not only as the ser- 
vants of the city, but as the guardians of so large a 
number of children in so important a matter as their 
education. They have given their time and services 
cheerfully, and have only regretted their inability to be 
inore attentive to the interests of the children and the 
encouragement of the teachers; and they have no doubt 
that future boards will as cheerfully, and perhaps more 
faithfully, attend to the duties of their office. They 
are, however, strongly impressed with the belief that 
the interests of the schools would be promoted, by the 
employment of a person whose whole time would be 
devoted to their superintendence and management. A 
faithful officer of this kind, it is believed, by frequent 
and careful examinations of each school, and by com- 
parisons of the different schools, would exert a good 
influence on the teachers, and keep up such an accu- 
rate understanding between them and the committee, 
as would result in real advantage to the schools. 

The attention of the city government has been re- 
peatedly called to this subject in the reports of the 
school committee, and we would again recommend that 
measures be taken and means provided for the estab- 
lishment of the office of Superintendent of Schools. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

We present the following statistics of these schools, 
at the close of the Winter and Summer Terms, and we 
regret that the inequahty in the numbers of the scholars 
in each school has not been regulated^ by a change in 
the districts, the necessity for which is so apparent ; 
and while we repeat the reason given in the last an- 



nual report, that other duties seemed to be more impe- 
rative, as our excuse for neglecting to make this change, 
we would respectfully suggest to the next board that 
their early attention to the matter will promote the in- 
terest of the schools and the comfort of the teachers. 

The semi-annual examinations of the Primary Schools 
have been made by the sub-committees, and reports 
made to the Board of their condition. In some cases 
want of tact and care have been found to exist, but gen- 
erally the teachers are reported to be competent and 
faithful, and the schools in a satisfactory and prosper- 
ous condition. 

So important are these Primary Schools, and so vital 
to the character and education of the children are the 
habits here formed, that the influence of the teachers 
not only in imparting information, but upon the tempers 
and dispositions of those under their charge, cannot be 
too carefully watched ; for on no consideration should 
the young mind be exposed to the example of indolence, 
carelessness or indifference. To be interested in child- 
ren no less than in education, to be patient and conde- 
scending as well as earnest and decided, are essential 
qualifications in the primary school teacher; and it 
is gratifying to add, that we have many teachers 
possessing these qualifications. We are also glad to be 
able to say, that at the examinations, many of the pa- 
rents were present, evincing an interest in the schools , 
a matter of the most decided importance, stimulating 
and encouraging to both scholars and teachers. 



Primary Schools. 



Teachers Names. 



Wiiit. Term, ending April 1855' 



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Names op 

Sub-Committes. 



Mary J. Brown, 
M. B Skilton, 
Hannah H.Sampson 
Ellen Hichborn, 
Elizabeth Deblois, 
Frances Hichborn, 
Susan L. Sawyer, 
Juliu M. Ranstead, 
Martha S. Lothrop, 
Frances E. Smith, 
Joanna S. Putnam, 
Pauline B. Neale, 
C. W. Trowbridge, 
Sarah E. Smith, 
Jane E. Rugg, 
Abby E. Hinckley, 
E. H. Rodenburgb, 
Elenora Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress, 
ElizabethC. Hunting, 
Mary F. Wyman, 
Frances AI. Lane, 
Helen G. Turner, 
Susan T. Croswell, 
H M. Sanborn, 
Louisa A Pratt, 
Mary M. Decoster, 
Mary J. Underwood. 



109 
80 

102 
72 

105 
79 
86 
5fi 
60 

110 
84 
80 
79 

102 

lOOJ 

101 
75 

109 
8t) 
74 
9 

70 
55 
71 
94 

118 
80 



2402 1200 1202 2001 1020 990 1390 1645 191 



A. B. Shedd. 

H. K. Frothingham. 

C. C. Sampson. 

William Flint. 

Isaac W.Blanchard. 

James Adams. 

George E. Eliis. 
Nathan A. Tufts. 

George E. Ellis. 
James G. Fuller. 
John Sanborn. 



James G. Fuller. 
Reuben Curtis. 

-V.B. Shedd. 
James G. Fuller. 
O. V. Everett. 
Reuben Curtis 
(J. C. Everett. 
H. K. Frothingham 



ill Primary Schools. 



Teachers Names. 



I Sum. Term, ending Oct. 1855.1 



Location. 



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Elizabeth N. Lane, 
M. B. Skilton, 
Hannah II. Sampson 
Ellen Hichborn, 
Lizzie Deblois, 
Frances Hichborn, 
Susan L. Sawver, 
.'Mice S. VViloy, 
.Mary J. Emerson, 
l.oui.^a A. Pratt, 
Joanna S- Putnam 
Pauline U. Nealo, 
C. VV. Trowbridge, 
Sarah E. Smith, 
Ellen M. Rugg, 
Abby E. Hinckley, 

E. H. Rodenburgb, 
Elenora Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress. 
Elizabeth C. Hunting 

F. E. Everett, . 
Frances M. Lane, 
Helen G. Turner, 
Susan T. Cro-well, 
AJalinn M. Smith, 
Cath. M. Kimball, 
Mary M. Uecoster, 
Mary J. Underwood, 



Near B. M.S. House 

Alead street. 
Ward Room No. 3, 
War. Scliool-IIouse, 
Elm street. 
Elm street, 
BoyLston Chapel, 
Cross street. 

Common street, 

Bow street, 



Common street, 

B. H.street, at Point. 

Moulton street, 
Soiey street, 
Bartlett street, 

Haverhill street. 
Common street, I 

Ward Room, No. 2, 
Hunker-Hill, ' 

Edgeworth Chapel, 
Ward Room No. 3 



63 
51) 
39 
47 
631 12 
50; 9 



The following table contains statistics of the 
mediate, Grammar and High Schools, viz. 



Inter- 





J High School- 
j Bunker Hill, 
do. - - 
Warren Schoo 

Wiiithrop Scho 

Harvard Schoo 

Intermediate S 


SCHOOL RETURNS, 
AT THE SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS 


C5 vT' O s, 1 i ' 

o , 

p o o o o o o o 
1 ^^ t-i p _fc- K> h- lo ^ 


High;Grammar, and Inlermediate Schools- 


to 


^5^^^^^oK)^^>-'^^^ 

<ioo-~ico>fi-ooa50ooi-' 
oo-^ioscncoootocotooi 


Whole Number of Scholars 
for the Term. 


) 

CD 1 

B ■: 

CD 1 
P 1 

1' ; 

" i' 
i-j ' 
1— '• 
I—" 1 

1— ' 

OO 1 

en |i 


tnojcncocooococootn 
oo^sm-JCDOlOo^^O'^-* 


Boys. 


O 


^^t^^^CnOO^OOCOCDOi 

oimi-'co»-jcoi-'-^--}oi 


Girls. 


00 

o 


l-'^^^^^3^^^^l-'H-^- 

OSOOCO^^OiOCOOitnO 
OCO^OCDt-iOit^iC".-^ 


Number at its close. 


00 


*^oole>.^-^^o►--^ooo^ 

O^OOOCOS-^iOWO 


Boys. 


00 
1 o 


N3OCOt300^i->00^0' 

o^^-J^^cooIOJJ^H-^ 


Girls. 


1 Ol 
1 00 


^_l^^^|-*^^^2l-'l-l 
>b.oo>— co-^ioomwco 
oco^^^^ooo'^^050^ 


Average attendance. 


00 


|y^05^^^-'00ll0H-4i.0JO 

OOl^^OlOOOO-^COKfi.^ 


Present at Examination. 






Number of visits of School 
Committee. 






00 


oo^5oo^^^^^^^^>->l-l 
oo^^<J^^lfe.coooo!»al 


Whole number of Scholars 
for the Term. 


1-^ J 

CO 1 
1— '• 

a 
en? 

O 

OO 1 
or 




i-i 1-1 1-1 i-> 1— i-> 
woi*^tntaoocococooi 


Boys. 


to 


^^^^^^^^o^^fi.h-cooo 
coco^cn^^Olook-tnoo 


Girls. 


00 
-J! 


^^^-^^K>^^^^l-ll-l^ 

OSVtO500tOh-i|-i00>e».N3 
OCOOi-»CCiCOOO*i.>J:».i;i. 


Number at its close. 


CO 


l-l 1-1 !_. h- l-l 

iti.tococoooooo^ie!» 

C0OW05C00l*i.05C0<l 


Boys. 


03 


1-1 1-i 1-1 )-l 1^ 
--a505if^woi-ico<i'^ 
^co^cnooo*>,oo>— -^ 


Girls. 


en 

00 


l-iH-N3>-i^t3l-ii-i>-i 

WC005 — ooooo4i.^^^s 
•vl«^otn>-'^^o•<J^oo^ 


Average attendance. 


CO 


^^l_l^^l-l^-^^,-.l_l^ 
cn^^^^i.cocDoooo»^^^^ 

Ol^^tOI-'OOtSOO'CO 


Present at Examination. 


t3 

CO 


^^^o^^^sco^-^^^^^^ 

a>oo*»i-i^ooorf^co 


Number of visits of School 
Committee. j 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

Teacher— MISS ANN NOW ELL, 
Sub-Committee— H. K. FROTHINGHAM, 
A. B. SHEDD, 
DAVID FOSTER. 

This school answers well the purpose for which it was 
established, and under the excellent discipline and in- 
struction of its teacher, a class of children who cannot 
be provided for in the primary or grammar schools, are 
making the most gratifying progress. Another school 
of the kind is much needed in the upper part of the 
city, and the committee would suggest that in making 
up the appropriations for another year, an amount sufl&- 
cient for the purpose should be added to the allowance 
for schools. The sub-committee on the school in their 
last report remark : "If as has been said, this school 
was established as an experiment, it has proved a more 
successful one than even its warmest friends anticipated. 
It has afforded great relief to the upper divisions of the 
Primary, and the lower divisions of the Gramimar 
Schools, by taking those who are too old for the one, 
and too backward for the other, and giving them that 
attention and instruction peculiarly adapted to their 
wants." The committee add: "We need another 
school of the same kind, and we call the attention of the 
Board to the subject, that measures may be taken to 
secure so desirable an end." 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. No 2. 



WM. H. SAUNDERS, Principal. 
MARTHA A. BIGELOVV, 1st Assl. 
PHOEBE A. KNIGHTS, 2d do. 



McLAURIN F. COOK, Principal 
ANNIE M. LUND, 1st Assistanl. 
CAROLINE PHIPPS, 2d do. 

Sub- Committee— I. VV. BLANCH ARD, 

A. B. SHEDD, 

H. K. FROTHINGHAM. 

The sub -committee on these schools in reporting 
to the Board upon their condition in May, use the fol- 
lowing language : " Our visits to the schools have 
been frequent ; and on all occasions, gratifying de- 
monstrations were afforded of the proficiency and pro- 
gress of the scholars, and of zealous and faithful labor 
on the part of the teachers." A small number only 
from these schools having been admitted to the High 
School, they refer to the examination of the candidates, 
and "injustice to the teachers remark upon disturbing 
causes during the winter, which prevented the usual 
careful study and review pursued prior to that exami- 
nation. A severe sickness prevailed in the district, on 
account of which many of the scholars were detained at 
home, and the Principal of No. 2, was obliged to be 
absent for several weeks." In closing their report, 
they state, that they "feel fully warranted in again pre- 
senting the schools as excelling in good discipline and 
thorough and practical training in the elementary 
branches of education." In their November report 
they say : "A steady progress has been made during 
the last six months, and we have no reason to alter the 
favorable opinion heretofore expressed." The assistant 
teachers are highly commended for their ability, faith- 
fulness and patience ; but the committee are very decided 
in the expression of their opinion, that the employment 
of another assistant in each division is necessary to 
develope the real strength and c£|.pacity of the schools. 



IQ 



WARREN SCHOOLS, 

No. 1. No. 2. 

GEORGE SWAN, Principal. JOSEPH P. SWAN, Principal, 

MARY A. OSGOOD, 1st Asst. JANE P. RUGG, 1st Assistant. 

MARGARET VEAZIE, 2d do. MARY M. MAYHEW, 2d do. 

MARIA BROWN, 3d do. ANN J. CHANDLER, 3d do. 

Sub- Committee— OUYER C. EVERETT, 
CALVIN C. SAMPSON, 
DAVID FOSTER. 

The committee on these schools in their May report, 
remark as follows : "They continue to maintain their 
well-earned reputation. Both schools have suffered 
from changes among their teachers during the past two 
years. They have also labored under disadvantage, in 
consequence of the large attendance without proper 
accommodations; the lower divisions, especially are 
crowded, and the recitation rooms are coinpletely over- 
run — so that it is impossible to give each scholar the 
time and attention which are necessary to insure thor- 
oughness of instruction." In November, the commit- 
tee speak of the principals and other teachers, in terms 
of high commendation. They say "they have given 
unwearied attention to the arduous duties of their ofh- 
ces, and the result of their devotedness is shown in the 
general thoroughness of the exercises, the regular and 
large average attendance of the pupils, in the good order 
of the building, and in the prevailing satisfaction of the 
parents." The committee express gratification with 
the attention given to Penmanship and Music, and 
with the decided interest manifested by the scholars in 
all their studies. "The severe illness of several of the 
teachers, and the crowded condition of the pupils, have 
operated to the disadvantage of the schools; and the 
committee urge upon the Board the necessity of provi- 
ding further accommodations for a portion of the schol- 
ars;" they also suggest the expediency of dividing 



B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal 
SOPHIA W. PAGE. 1st Assistant. 
SARAH A. RUSSELL, 2d do. 
SARAH ODELL, 3d do. 



11 

the large rooms by partitions similar to those in the 
Harvard School building. 

WINTHROP SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. No. 2. 

SAMUEL S WILLSON, Principal. 
JULIA A. BRIDGES, 1st Assistant. 
AGNES E. CASWELL, 2d do. 
E. A. RICHARDSON, 3d do. 
R. M. PERKINS, 4th do. 
Sub- Committee— JAMES G. FULLER, 
JOHN SANBORN, 
GEORGE E. ELLIS. 

In May, the Sub- Committee report upon these 
schools as follows: "The fourth division of School 
No. 1, was found to be in a very good condition. The 
teacher possesses energy of character, and combines 
with her experience, diligence and patience ; and her 
good influence ' is plainly to be seen among her pupils. 
The third division was not in a satisfactoty condition ; 
but under the care of the newly-appointed teacher, the 
committee think it will soon regain its former standing. 
The second division shew faithfulness on the part of the 
teacher, and the recitations were quite satisfactory." 
Of the first division, they report: "competency and 
industry on the part of the teachers, and close appli- 
cation on the part of the scholars, are evident from its 
appearance." Of School No. 2, they say : "The third 
and fourth divisions appeared to be in good condition, 
but the upper divisions were not so satisfactory." In 
November, the Committee say of SchooLNo. 1 : "It is 
at present supplied with a good corps of teachers, all 
of whom are capable and faithful. Their labors har- 
monize, and all their efforts are directed to the promo- 
tion of the best interests of the school." School No* 2, 
they add, "is materially improved since the last exam^ 



12 

ination. All the teachers labor faithfully, but owing to 
a difference in tact and experience, with somewhat dif- 
ferent results." "After the summer vacation, incon- 
sequence of the crowded condition of the schools, 
twenty-five scholars from No. 1, and forty-five from 
No. 2, were placed under the charge of a new assistant, 
in the Ward Room, in the same building ; and there 
are still seventy- two more scholars than desks. This 
fact taken in connection with the rapid growth of this 
part of the city, render it certain that further accommo- 
dations will have to be provided ; and the committee 
believing that consolidation rather than division, is the 
true policy for Grammar Schools, as it admits of better 
classification, recommend an enlargement of the Win- 
throp School building, so as to accommodate eight 
hundred pupils. 

HARVARD SCHOOLS. 

No. 1. No. 2. 



CORNELIUS 5. CARTEE, Prin. 
ANN E. WESTON, 1st Assistant. 
SARAH S. STOCKMAN, 2d do. 
MARV F. WYMAN, 3d do. 



JOSEPH B. MORSE, Principal. 
ELIZABETH SWOUDS, 1st Asst. 
CAROLINE S. CROZIER, 2d do. 
HANNAH E KNIGHTS, 3d do. 
JOSEPHINE iMISKELLY, 4th do. 



Sub- Committee— NATHAN A. TUFTS, 
JAMES ADAMS, 
EDWIN F. ADAMS. 

In May, the sub-committee report as follows : "We 
are happy to be able to say that both schools are in a 
most excellent condition. The examination in each 
school, and in all the divisions, was thorough and pro- 
tracted, and evinced the faithfulness of the teachers 
and the diligence of the pupils. We can find at this 
time no cause of complaint in the general appearance 
and scholarship of the schools." The committee add : 
"We desire to make one general remark. It is in re- 



13 

gard to discipline. Though the same end may be ac- 
complished, it may be by different means ; these means 
having untold influence upon the future moral and 
social well-being of those subjected to them. Kind- 
ness and gentleness, the charms of virtue, and the ad- 
vantages of knowledge, avail more with the youthful 
mind, and fit it better for the trials of life than the iron 
rule of sternness and severity. ' If it be possible live 
peaceably with all men,' should be the motto of the 
teacher in the school as well as the Christian in the 
world. We hope that this spirit may characterise the 
teachers of all our schools." In November, the com- 
mittee make a very favorable report of the condition of 
both schools. They say : "The teachers and scholars 
appear to have a laudable ambition to excel in the 
various branches of study. In examining the schools, 
we spent the same time in each, giving both alternately 
a hearing, and turning from one division in one school 
to the relative division in the other, in order to make a 
fresh and just comparison of their respective merits. — 
The examination of both schools was critical and thor- 
ough in every branch taught ; and we are happy to say, 
that in the principal branches, both schools have at- 
tained a good degree of perfectness. In some former 
examinations Harvard No. 1, would occasionally run 
behind No. 2, in some branches ; now is seen an equal 
proficiency, so that both schools run about an equal 
race." 



14 
HIGH SCHOOL. 

JPrincipal, A. M. GAY. 

1st Assistant, C. E. STETSON. 

1st Female Assistant, Mrs P. G. BATE^. 

2d do. do. Miss H. M. SMITH. 

Sub^dommittee— GEORGE E. ELLIS. 
JAMES ADAMS, 
OLIVER C. EVERETT, 
ISAAC W. BLANCHARD. 

In May J the gub-committee report : "We are happy 
to express our unqualified satisfaction with the condi- 
tion, the discipline, and the standard of proficiency iii 
the institution. This we do, not as a matter of course^ 
but as the result of a scrutinizing inquiry, and of a, 
fair estimate of what the school has accomplished.—^ 
While we may still discern deficiencies in the method 
there putsued, they are such as are incident to all pro- 
cesses until a long and varied experience has conformed 
thesm to the best practical plans. The imperfections 
which we should be g'lad to remedy relate almost en - 
tirely to the course of study now pursued^ taken in con- 
nection with the period of time over which it is distrib- 
uted. Parents are anxious that the studies of the 
school should be made to bear more directly upon the 
actual interests and business of life. The desire is rea- 
sonable, and we ought always to have it in view, and 
to direct our measures in reference to its full gratifica- 
tion. The committee are of opinion that the course of 
study should be extended over four years, and will soon 
submit a plan based upon such a projected change." 

In November, the committee say : "Besides making 
frequent visits to the school in the course of the term, 
we devoted three days of the last week of it, to a thor- 
ough examination of all the classes. Our general judg- 
ment upon the result is an approving one ; in some 



16 

respects it may be highly commended ; in no single par- 
ticular have we cause of complaint or censure. The 
order of the school has been well preserved, considering 
the interruptions caused by the vacations which came 
in the summer term ; the average attendance has been 
remarkably large. The variety of studies pursued in 
the school continues to cause some embarrassment to 
the committee, as there are occasional complaints from 
parents that their children are overtasked, accompanied 
with requests that they may be discharged from one or 
another of the regular exercises. While intending to 
give a fair hearing to such suggestions, we do not al- 
ways see. reason to yield to these requests, or to admit 
the grounds on which they are advanced. We believe 
that if the teachers, as they are desired to do, will ac- 
company the recitations with considerable oral expla- 
nation and instruction, and if the pupil will have in 
view the advantages of a close and cheerful pursuit of 
their studies, their tasks will be lightened and made so 
inviting as to be divested of all that is irksome or severe. 
While we were gratified with all the recitations made 
before us, we would express a peculiar satisfaction with 
the appearance and exercises of the classes in Natural 
Philosophy and Physiology. The apparatus used in 
explaining the text book in the former study, was put 
to service by the pupils themselves, in the presence of 
the committee, and it was evident that the actual object 
of scientific processes, and the visible effects produced 
by them, at once infused the life of reality into abstrac- 
tions which are difi&cult of comprehension by young 
minds." 

The committee express their full satisfaction with 
i-he ability and fidelity of the teachers, and by their 



16 

whole report, confirin and strengthen the general belief 
that the High School is an honor to the city, worthy of 
all the interest which has been taken in its establishment 
and support. 

At a meeting of the Board, on the 17th of May, the 
snb-committee submitted the plan referred to in their 
semi-annual report, for a change in the course of study 
in the High School. The whole report has already 
been printed with the catalogue of the teachers and 
pupils in the school ; but as that publication did not 
have a general circulation, we deem it advisable to 
republish the following extracts from it : 

"It is now proposed that the appointed course of 
study shall be distributed over four years, leaving it to 
the members of the two higher classes who are already 
in the school to go on and graduate within the term 
defined when they entered, or to remain and improve 
the opportunities of the new course, according to the 
wishes of their parents. The first two years of the new 
course will offer the same method and materials of 
study to all pupils alike. At the close of the second 
year, an opportunity will be offered to the pupils to 
choose between two courses for the two remaining 
years, according to the purpose which they may have 
in view in graduating. As so small a proportion of all 
the yearly graduates of both sexes desire to be prepared 
for college, it would be wholly unreasonable to- dispose 
the arrangements of the school with exclusive reference to 
them. As so large a proportion of the graduates wish for 
information and a training which will fit them, more or 
less thoroughly, for some of the practical tasks of young 
persons, in this busy age, their most reasonable expec- 
tations are entitled to a paramount regard. This dis- 



17 

tinction. furnishes the rule by which two different cour- 
ses of instruction will be arranged for the second and 
the first classes during the third and fourth years of their 
pupilage. Only those boys who wish to be prepared 
for college will receive instruction in the Greek lan- 
guage. That they may have the more time for this 
study, they will not be admitted into the classes in the 
French language, as a knowledge of this is not required 
of a candidate for college, and as colleges offer the 
means for acquiring French with the best facilities. — 
All the other members of the -echool will be required to 
study Latin in their first year, and French and .Latin 
in their second and third years ; and in their fourth year 
they may give up either one of these languages, at their 
option, for the sake of greater advances in the other. 
The studies of the third and fourth years Will be em- 
phatically designed for the preparation of pupils of both 
sexes for the practical tasks of life ; for book-keeping, 
for mercantile and mechanical pursuits, for the scientific 
employments of the chemist, the engineer, the surveyor, 
the constructor, and for the office of teaching. , If the 
present instructors of the school should lack time or 
facility for imparting a knowledge of book-keeping, a 
competent teacher should be provided for a class in the 
fourth year. An effort ought to be made by means of 
the best text-book, by oral instruction and experiments, 
hot only to teach, but to interest the minds of the pupils 
in the science of chemistry, the principles of mechan- 
ics, the processes of working raw materials, the metals, 
cotton, wool, and linen, and the arts of construction, 
so that book-learning may be made intelligible and 
more practically useful. The Constitution of our coun- 
try and some of the more simple principles of political 



18 

economy, will be found to have the place that belongs 
to them in the course of study. 

"Considerate persons will no't fail to remind them- 
selves, that all these advantages offered to the pupils 
will require ability and devotion from the teachers, and 
employ laboriously all the hours they are engaged to 
give to their exacting tasks. The teachers must be al- 
lowed to regulate the method of study, the arrange- 
ment of the classes and the order of recitations. They 
have a great deal of service to distribute over a few 
hours daily. When the course of study reaches that 
point at which a choice is submitted to the pupils for 
one or another aim in their subsequent pursuits, they 
will be requested to make the choice, under the advice 
or sanction of their parents ; and it must be understood 
that changes cannot be made afterwards merely to gra- 
tify caprice or a fickle mind. There must be classifica- 
tion and careful arrangement of hours with their duties, 
to secure the felicitous working of the plan proposed ; 
and an hour which belongs to a class cannot be bestowed 
upon an individual. It is not consistent with the pros- 
perity of the school, with justice to the teachers, nor 
with the rights of the pupils in general, that the order 
and classification of the school should be disturbed to 
gratify the wishes of a parent or a scholar in any vari- 
ation from the appointed course." 

GENERAL REMARKS. 
We have thus given the substance of the reports of 
the sub -committees of the Grammar and High Schools, 
and it is gratifying to be able to present them in 
so healthy and encouraging a condition. 



19 

The uniform interest manifested by all classes of our 
citizens in the welfare of the schools, and the cheerful- 
ness with which they have always acquiesced in appro- 
priations for their support, have not only been a source 
of pride and satisfaction to every true friend of the city, 
but evidence of a sincere and earnest attachment to 
the principles of a free government. And we call at- 
tention to new wants, with entire confidence that they 
will as soon as kpown be provided for. An addition to 
the Winthrop School building large enough to accom- 
modate the surplus scholars in all the Grammar Schools, 
the establishment of another Intermediate School, and 
the employment of additional teachers in the Bunker 
Hill School, are matters which we are united in recom ■ 
mending as absolutely necessary, and the appointment 
of a Superintendent of Schools, the Board by nearly an 
unanimous vote have decided to be expedient. 

For the enlargement of the Winthrop School-house 
an appropriation was made at the commencement of 
the present season ; but although it was larger than the 
amount asked for by the School Committee, it was found 
to be insufficient. The committee, in asking for the 
appropriation, were governed by the opinion of a me- 
chanic as to the probable cost of the alteration, but an 
accurate estimate made after the appropriation bill had 
passed the City Council, rendered it certain that a mis- 
take had been made, and that a much larger sum would 
be required. For this reason the committee, perhaps 
by a mistaken policy, determined to postpone the im-. 
provement for another year. 

Acting upon the suggestion contained in the last 
Annual Report, the City Council early in the season, 
passed an ordinance concerning truant children, which 
ordinance was duly approved by the Court of Common 
Pleas, as required by the statute. The proper of&cers 
to carry it into effect were appointed, and a place pro- 
vided at the alms-house for the commitment and secu- 
rity of persons convicted under the law. Twenty-one 
boys have been sentenced for truancy, but the necessity 
for restraint and confinement has not lessened the obli- 



20 

gation for instruction, and twice in a day they have had 
the advantages of a school under the care of a competent 
teacher. Six of these boys, for sufficient reason, have 
been pardoned by the magistrate who sentenced them, 
who has shown his interest in the welfare of the unfor- 
tunates, by visiting the institution, and making a per- 
sonal examination of the arrangements for their security 
and care. It is believed that the effect of this truant 
law will be very salutary, and that while it will admon- 
ish and forewarn wayward children and neglectful par- 
ents, it will relieve the schools and the community of a 
great cause of annoyance and trouble. 

Our schools have been established and are kept up, 
for the purpose of developing the mental energies of 
of our children, and giving ihem such habits of thought 
and action, as will conduce to their own happiness in 
after life, and secure their good influence upon the so- 
ciety of which they will be members. The permanence 
of liberal institutions depends upon the intelligence 
and virtue of those who enjoy them ; and habits of 
order, industry, perseverance and friendship, no less 
than intellectual attainment, are the fruits which we 
desire to reap from our schools. The teachers, then, it 
is plain, should not only be skilled in intellectual cul- 
ture, but possess sound characters and warm hearts ; 
and the responsibility rests upon the committee to be 
certain that such example and influence exists in each 
school. Then comes the responsibility of parents, to 
encourage faithful teachers by a manifestation of their 
interest in the welfare of the schools, and to aid them 
with that wholesome home influence, without which the 
result of their labors is uncertain ; with which, they are 
in most cases sure of success. 

We commend the schools and their interests to the 
faithfulness of all whose influence can be exerted for 
their advantage. 

By order of tlie committee. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, Chairman. 

Charlestown, Dec. 20, 1855. 






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