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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OP THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN, 



DECEMBER, 1856. 




CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 

1857. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The School Committee in conformity with the require- 
ments of law and custom, submit the following as their 
Annual Report. 

The condition of the Schools is on the whole, favora- 
ble ; and if during the coming season the City Council 
provide, as it is now understood will be the case, a new 
Grammar School-house, and better accommodations for 
some of the Primary Schools, there can be no doubt 
that our institutions of instruction, will at the end of 
another year, maintain fully the reputation which they 
have heretofore enjoyed, and it is hoped that they will 
compare favorably with the Schools in other cities and 
towns in the Commonwealth. 

The general feeling in our community is believed to 
be in favor of the most liberal appropriations for pur- 
poses of instruction, and City Councils and School 
Committees will fail to meet the expectations and de- 
mands of those who place them in authority and entrust 
this precious interest to their charge, unless they pro- 
vide fully for the comfort and the thorough instruction of 
every child whose home is within the limits of our city. 

At the commencement of the present financial year, 



4 

the City Council complied with the request of this 
Board, and appropriated the sum of thirty-three thou- 
sand dollars for the support of schools. We were then 
of opinion that we could get through with the year with 
that amount of money, which was the aggregate of the 
expenses, as estimated by us at the time. Our estimate 
was based upon the expenses of the previous year, with 
such additions as it occurred to us at the time would be 
necessary ; but we did not calculate for an advance in 
the salaries of the teachers, which we have since found 
it necessary to make. Soon after the Appropriation Bill 
had passed the City Council, the salaries of the teach- 
ers in the neighboring cities were raised by votes of 
their School Committees ; and this fact, taken in con- 
nection with the increased expenses of living, induced 
us to raise the salaries of most of our teachers, which 
we did by vote of the Board, after carefully weighing 
our obligation to keep within the bounds of the appro- 
priation, and also our obligation to be just to the schools 
and the teachers. The crowded condition of the Gram- 
mar Schools, and the necessity for providing for the 
surplus scholars outside of the School-houses, has also 
occasioned expense which we did not anticipate when 
our estimate was made up, and we fear that at the close 
of the year our expenses will be found to exceed the 
appropriation. But we confidently express our opinion 
that no money has been unnecessarily expended, and if 
any additional provision for school expenditures has to 
be made by the City Council, it will be for actual ad- 
vantage received by the city ; and if any fault is charge- 
able to the School Committee, it must be the fault of 
mis-judgment in their estimates, and not of carelessness 
or extravagance in the actual expenses of the schools. 



At the close of the term ending October 31, 1866, 
the Schools were as follows : 
27 Primaries, with 27 teachers, 1854 scholars. 
1 Intermediate, 1 " 67 " 

8 Grammar, 35 " 1771 " 

1 High, 4 " 137 



37 schools, 67 teachers, 3829 scholars. 

We present herewith statistics of these schools, with 
necessary and interesting information concerning them. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 
The semi-annual examinations of the Primary Schools 
have been made by the Sub- Committees and reports 
made to the Board. With a few exceptions, they have 
been represented as in good condition. Some of the 
teachers have more experience, tact and fitness for their 
occupation than others, and some of the schools are 
very highly spoken of. The teachers generally are rep- 
resented to be faithful, and in most cases successful. — 
The Sub- Committees make mention of various things 
essential to the welfare and success of these schools, 
such as patience and perseverance, devotion to their 
work and pleasing manners on the part of teachers. — 
They dwell upon the importance of regularity in the 
attendance of the scholars, and the healthful and cheer- 
ing influence of a lively and manifest interest on the 
part of parents. During the past year, a change has 
been made in the districts, and one of the Schools, 
No. 4, has been discontinued. 















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Primary Schools. 












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2 s 






Ss 






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Teachers Names. 


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6 


n 


3 


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o o 
Z o 


Suh-Committes. 


'l 1 


Elizabeth N. Lane, 


115 


57 


58 


91 


45 


46 


57 


75 


10 


David Foster. 


|2 


M. B. Skilton, 


79 


40 


39 


64 


34 


30 


53 


64 


2 


Frank A. Hall. 


1 3 


Hannah H. Sampson 


90 


43 


47 


67 


36 


31 


49 


51 


6 


" " 


1 4 


Ellen Hichborn, 


61 


32 


29 


56 


30 


26 


48 


50 


12 


George B. Neal. 


|5 


Lizzie Deblois, 


84 


42 


42 


67 


35 


32 


52 


64 


7 


ti 11 


1 6 


Frances Hichborn, 


58 


32 


26 


48 


25 


23 


35 


47 


12 


Edwin F. Adams. 1 


1 7 


Susan L. Sawyer, 


80 


33 


47 


65 


30 


35 


54 


58 


8 


<1 U 1 


1 8 


Alice S. Wiley, 


50 


22 


28 


45 


20 


25 


39 


42 


13 


Isaac W.Blanchard. 


) 9 


IVIary J. Emerson, 


51 


29 


22 


45 


26 


19 


39 


43 


12 


" " 


JIO 


Louisa A. Pratt, 


97 


45 


52 


67 


32 


35 


42 


55 


8 


William B. Morris, 


?H 


Joanna S. Putnam, 


78 


3i 


45 


68 


41 


27 


55 


60 


13 


4. 11 


)12 


P.ul.ne B.Neal, 


64 


37 


27 


52 


32 


20 


44 


47 


6 


George E. Eiiis. 


,113 


C VV. Trowbridge, 


100 


56 


44 


7b 


41 


35 


56 


66 


7 


Anthony S.Morss. ' 


114 


Sarah E. Smith, 


88 


52 


3fl 


67 


38 


29 


52 


63 


8 


11 11 1 


il5 


Ellen M. Rugg, 


90 


35 


55 


80 


31 


49 


67 


74 


6 


George E. Ellis. ' 


116 


Abby E. Hinckley, 


82 


48 34 


73 


41 


32 


54 


55 


7 


James G. Fuller. 


117 


E. H. Rodenburgh, 


80 


44 


36 


65 


34 


31 


49 


53 


9 


John Sanborn. 


118 


Elenora Butts, 


88 


43 


45 


64 


25 


39 


52 


60 


9 


11 11 


19 


Louisa W. Huntress, 


94 


47 


47 


75 


44 


31 


58 


65 


4 


" " 


\\iO 


ElizabethC. Hunting, 


65 


33 


32 


60 


30 


30 


34 


42 


3 


William B. Morris. 


;i2i 


F. E. Kverett. 


85 


48 


37 


82 


47 


35 


55 


63 


12 


George P. Kettell, 


122 


Frances M. Lane, 


8:i 


45 


38 


75 


40 


35 


52 


63 


12 


11 11 


23 


Helen G.Turner, 


59 


31 


28 


51 


27 


24 


43 


45 


6 


David Foster. , 


124 


Susan T. Croswell, 


64 


33 


31 


51 


22 


29 


40 


44 


5 


James G. Fuller. , 


125 


Adaline M. Smith, 


71 


38 


33 


68 


38 


30 


48 


58 


7 


0. C. Everett. 


1-27 


ath. M. Kimball, 


84 


42 


42 


70 


38 


32 


48 


62 


6 


Isaac W.Blanchard. 


128 


Mary M. Decoster, 


80 


38 


42 


70 


30 


40 


4! 


5- 


8 


O. C. Everett. 


29 


Mary J. Underwood. 


77 


46 


31 


70 


41 


29 


45 


62 


4 


Frank A. Hall. 




2197 


11-24 


1073 


1832 


953 


879 


1366 


1587 


220 


.| 


ri \ 


|Sun 


1. Tei 


m, er 


iding 


Oct. 1856.| 


ill Primary Schools. 






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Teachers Names. 


Location 






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a 


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I 3 














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TT. 






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Elizabeth N.Lane, NearB. H.S. H 


ouse, 


131 


62 


69 


85 


38 


47 


67 


68 


17 


i2 


M. B. Skilton, 


VIead street. 




78 


42 


36 


69 


38 


31 


52 


60 


2 


'3 


Hannah H. Sampson, 


Ward Room No 


.3, 


95 


49 


46 


6b 


33 


35 


54 


64 


8 


?4 


Discontinued. 
























16 


I^izzie Deblois, 


Elm street, 




150 


68 


82 


80 


37 


43 


56 


60 


4 


1 6 


Frances Hichborn, 


Vledford street. 




106 


53 


53 


76 


41 


35 


50 


70 


16 


' 7 


Susan L. Sawyer, 


3oylston Chape 


I, 


99 


51 


48 


66 


36 


30 


52 (;o 


9 


1 8 


Alice 8. Wiley, 


Cross street. 




96 


61 


45 


69 


38 


31 


52 


66 


13 


1 9 


Mary J. Emerson, 


" " 




103 


51 


49 


C6 


33 


33 


49 


60 


14 I 


I'lO 


Louisa A. Pratt, 


Common street 




115 


4!) 


66 


68 


27 


41 


41 


54 


3 


?11 


Joanna S. Putnam 


«i 11 




86 


45 


41 


73 


40 


33 


60 


66 


6 


)12 


Pauline B. Neal, 


Bow street, 




108 


64 


44 


59 


28 


31 


45 


51 


12 


|I13 


C. W. Trowbridge, 


" 




117 


66 


51 


76 


39 


37 


67 


71 


6 


'<-) 


Sarah E. Smith, 


" 




126 


61 


65 


(;2 


29 


33 


50 


62 


9'! 


)15 


Ellen M. Rugg, 


" 




J 25 


57 


68 


51 


27 


24 


45 


40 


4 1 


16 


Abbv E. Hinckley, 


Common street, 




97 


51 


46 


71 


36 


35 


51 


53 


6 


hi 


E. H. Rodenburgh, 


B.H. street, at E 


oint. 


85 


39 


46 


70 


32 


3« 


68 


60 


8 


18 


Elenora Butts, 


.' 11 




95 


43 


52 


58 


26 


32 


51 


52 


7 


Jl9 Louisa VV. Huntress,] 


Moulton street. 




114 


52 


62 


73 


35 


38 


61 


64 


2 


m 


Elizabeth C. Hunting, 


Soley street, 




140 


64 


76 


78 


40 


38 


431 59i 


2 


>21 


P. E. Everett, 


Bartlctt street, 




11! 


63 


51 


63 


36 


27 


50 


52 


4 1 


J22 


Frances M. Lane, 


" " 




107 


72 


35 


60 


35 


25 


50 


55 


4 


«3 


Helen G. Turner, 


Haverhill street 


, 


74 


36 


38 


64 


32 


32 


44 


63 


3 


«4 


Susan T. Cromwell, (IJommon street, 




100 


52 


48 


63 


28 


35 


48 


60 


7 


;25 


Adaline M. Smith, 


Ward Room, M 


k2, 


74 


38 


36 


7(1 


36 


34 46 


58 


8 


?27 


Dath. M. Kimball, 


Junker-Hill, 


100 


54 


46 


75 


37 


38 46 1 60 ! 


11 


)28 


Mary M. Decoster, 


idgpworth Chaj 


^el, 80 


35 


45 


66 


32 


34 


68 


69 


5 


>.-9 


Mary J. Underwood, 


Ward Room No 


3 85 


43 


42 


75 


41 


34 


49 


67 


8\ 


L 


'^''.'-v.x^'^^x^w.-wrw^ 




2800 


1414 


I3S6 


1854 


930 


,BL 


1395 


1573^1Q5J 



£ « ^ ^ g^S 
CD i^ 5' »= Sod 

i I i i^?^ 

t: CO ^ OT I ffi!^ 

^ ^ OT n £g 

CD tr' O g^ , J— £- 

CO o o £- 

o ^r^ o ^ ■ I ■ 

O I , ,111 

o p p o p p p p 

K) i-i TO _^ K) _^ K> ^ 
tri O <l CX) ^ I- ' tC Or ^^ i-t 

*» •-' ^^ o o o i 00 63 ^^ cj< 

I— I CO ui c» •"-} a> 4^ CO o CT> 

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o^ojomoitohscoco 



SCHOOL RETUENS, 

AT THE SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS. 



High, Grammar, and Intermediate Schools. 



Whole Number of Scholars 
for the Term. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



Number at its close. 



Boys. 



Girls. 



>fc>.tO~-?63COCO>-'tn*^0 

OOCnOOOOOlCOWWOlCD 



Average attendance. 



tntooocoo^i-'<35>*^'£> 



Present at Examination. 



^^l-'l-'^o'^oo^l-'^^^^^-l 



Number of visits of School 
Committee. 



CD 



CO 

B' 



OO 

05 



oo^ooo^^^^^^^-'^5t-' 

000--JOIU1COOOCOO*' 
b3l-'OtntO*>-03i-' CO GO 



Whole number of Scholars 
for the Term. 



Boys. 



Girls. 






itkK>i-'*»i-»C0OOC»tn 
i^OO) -J tS O O 00 --t ga 



totoocoot-'O-^oooo 



Number at its close. 



Boys. 



Girlp. 



^^^-.^0l-i^3^-»l-*l-'^-' 

lt^OOOOOOD»->CI?Mi(^OJ 
O O 1^ 00 ^ O O Ol »Oi-» 



^^^-l^o^^^^^-ll--l-»^-» 

UTtacoMOiwooit^cnoo 

CnMi^POOiUtpk^O-^IOGO 



Averaare attendance. 



Present at Examination. 



Number of visits of School 
Committee. 



CD 

§ 

CD 

h- '• 

B 

o 



OO 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

TEACHER, 

MISS ANN NOWELL. 

SUB-COMMITTEE, 

JOHN SANBORN, 
ANTHONY S. MORSS, 
GEORGE P. KETTELL. 

Under the care of its faithful and efficient teacher, 
the Intermediate School answers weU the purpose for 
which it was established ; and many good scholars have 
been sent from it to the Grammar Schools. The class 
of children which compose this school, is such, that 
energy and patience to an unusual degree are requisite 
for success in its government. Children too old for the 
Primary and not qualified for the Grammar Schools, 
are sent here, and the neglected and uncared-for, those 
who fail entirely of good home influence, to be found 
in aU communities, are placed here to receive their first 
ideas of order and instruction. The same facts, how- 
ever, which make the task of the teacher arduous and 
difficult, also affi)rd increased encouragement and satis- 
faction if she is successful — and this seems to be well 
understood by Miss Nowell. The Committee close their 
last report upon this School with the remark that its 
condition is satisfactory in the highest degree, and the 
teacher is entitled to full commendation for her faithful- 
ness and efficiency. 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOLS. 



No. 2. 
WM. H. SANDERS, Principal. 
MARTHA A. BIGELOW, 1st Asst. 
PHCEBE A. KNIGHTS, 2d do. 



No. 1. 
McLAURIN F. COOK, Principal. 
ANNIE M. LUND, 1st Assistant. 
CAROLINE PHIPPS, 2d do. 

Sub- Committee— [. W. BLANCHARD, 
DAVID FOSTER, 
FRANK A. HALL. 

The Sub-Committee, in May, report to the Board 
as follows : ' ' The examination was an exceedingly 
pleasant one, and the result highly gratifying to us. 
The several classes in School No. 1, manifested a clear 
and practical knowledge of their studies, and so testi- 
fied to the faithfulness and thoroughness of their teach- 
ers. School No. 2 was subjected to a thorough and 
extended examination, every scholar in the first division 
coming under the special supervision of the Committee. 
The faithful and well-directed exertions of the Principal 
and Assistants have placed this school in a position of 
excellence and proficiency not before attained. To 
exhibit the highest standard of success and advance- 
ment has been the aim of the teachers of the Bunker 
Hill Schools, and this end we think they have fully and 
fairly accomplished." In November, after expressing 
their regret at the resignation of the Principal of No. 1, 
(Mr. Cook,) whose labors have always given satisfac- 
tion, the Committee report as follows : "It was then 
proposed to introduce the one Principal or single- 
headed system; to unite the schools, appoint two 
additional female teachers, and place the whole under 
the charge of the Principal of School No. 2." A Com- 



10 

mittee was appointed by the Board to take the subject 
into consideration, and after due deliberation they re- 
ported in favor of the change. Miss Mehitable Foster 
and Miss Caroline E. Bigelow were then elected as 
assistant teachers, and entered upon their duties. The 
school united consists of 376 pupils, arranged in seven 
divisions of two classes each. The 1st, 2d, 4th and 7th 
divisions, numbering in all 193, occupy the lower room, 
and the 3d, 5th and 6th, in all 182, the upper room. 
The Committee are confident that the operation of the 
new system has thus far been favorable. They recom- 
mend that such alterations be made in the building as 
will give each division a room by itself. They also 
recommend an addition to the salary of the Principal, 
and they close their report with an expression of their 
judgment, that all the teachers are faithful and fully 
competent for the work in which they are engaged. 

HARVARD SCHOOLS. 



No. 2. 
JOSEPH B. MORSE, Principal. 
ELIZABETH SWORDS, 1st Asst. 
CAROLINE S. CROZIER, 2d do. 
HANNAH E. KNIGHTS. 3d do. 



No. 1. 
e. SOULE CARTEE, Principal. 
ANN E. WESTON, 1st Assistant. 
S. M. CHANDLER, 2d do. 
MARTHA BLOOD, 3d do. 
JOSEPHINE E. MISKELLY, 4th. 

Sub- Commitiee— WILLIAM B. MORRIS, 
ANTHONY S. MORSS, 
EDWIN F. ADAMS. 

In their May report, the Sub-Committee remark : 
«*We are happy to be able to state that both these 
schools continue to sustain the high reputation which 
they have hitherto borne. The examinations were 
conducted as on previous occasions, alternately, the 
Committee passing from each division of one school 
to the corresponding division of the other, that 
they might be the better enabled to judge of 



11 

their relative merits. No important difference was 
observed to exist between the two schools. In both 
the result of the examinations proved, that the teachers 
had been faithful, and that the pupils had made com- 
mendable progress in their studies. Proper discipline 
and good order are maintained in both schools. The 
Committee allude to the crowded state of the fifth 
division of School No. 2, and to the fact that it occu- 
pies a small, badly ventilated room in the basement 
story of the building. Considerations of health alone, 
without reference to the great inconvenience, demand 
that better accommodations should be provided with 
the least possible delay. In November, the Committee 
report the order and discipline as continuing to be good 
in both schools. "With School No. 2, they were par- 
ticularly well pleased. The examination of the division 
under the care of the Principal, was in all respects sat- 
isfactory. The scholars manifested an interest and pro- 
ficiency in their studies alike creditable to their industry 
and to the faithfulness of their teacher. In Geography 
and Grammar they were found to be very thoroughly 
instructed. In Reading, their style was natural and 
easy, and in the no less important but often neglected 
branch of Spelling, they acquitted themselves with great 
credit. The other divisions of the school were exam- 
ined with very satisfactory results. In Harvard, No. 1, 
the first division, like the corresponding division in 
No. 2, was examined by the whole Committee. The 
discipline was found to be good ; the scholars diligent 
and attentive ; and the teacher earnest in his endeavor 
faithfully to discharge his duty. The examination was 
very creditable and satisfactory, but the Committee 
would suggest as an improvement that greater atten- 



12 ^ 

tion should be bestowed upon the more elementary 
branches, such as Reading and Spelling, which have 
perhaps been made to yield too much to studies of a 
more advanced character. The other divisions of this 
school were found to be in a satisfactory condition." 

WINTHROP SCHOOLS. 



No. 1. 
B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal. 
SOPHIA W. PAGE, 1st Assistant. 
SARAH A. RUSSELL, 2d do. 
SARAH A. ODELL, 3d do. 



No. 2. 
SAMUEL S. WILLSON, Principal. 
JULIA A. BRIDGES, 1st Assistant. 
AGNES E. CASWELL, 2d do. 
E. A. RICHARDSON, 3d do. 



Sub- Committee— JAMES G. FULLER, 
JOHN SANBORN, 
GEORGE E. ELLIS. 

In May, the Committee report upon these schools as 
follows : "In the examination we confined ourselves 
principally to the text books, and most of the answers 
to the questions proposed were given correctly and with 
promptness. The Principal of School No. 1 has various 
methods of imparting his instruction, teaching much 
outside of the text books, by doing which he interests 
his scholars in their studies, and makes his own labors 
more successful. The Principal of No. 2 also labors 
faithfully and successfully. There is a marked im- 
provement in his school since the last examination." 
The Assistants are reported as being all faithful and 
competent, and the Committee close their report with 
the remark : "With the general condition of both 
schools we were well satisfied." They entertain an 
opinion, which they think the last examination of can- 
didates for the High School confirms, that in all our 
schools, in those studies which depend upon the mem- 
ory, the scholars are much more thorough than in those 
depending on the reasoning powers, and they express 
an opinion that too great a proportion of the time is 



13 

spent in the study of History and Geography. This, 
however, they lay to the charge of the Board rather 
than to the teachers of the schools. In November, the 
Committee say : "The several divisions of .this school 
were examined by the different members of the Sub- 
Committee, who concur in reporting them both as to 
discipline and progress in a satisfactory condition. The 
essential branches of Reading, Spelling, and Arithmetic 
appear to have been well attended to. Out of one hun- 
dred and fifty words given out, but three were spelled 
incorrectly, and most of the examples in Arithmetic 
were not only readily performed, but by their explana- 
tions the pupils demonstrated that they had been well 
taught." Thoroughness was manifest in all the branch- 
es, and the teachers were represented as possessing 
ability, and as faithfully devoted to the improvement 
of the morals and understanding of those under their 
charge. The school has suffered some from repletion, 
but this in a measure has been obviated in the occupa- 
tion by a part of the scholars of the Ward Room in the 
lower part of the building. 

WARREN SCHOOLS. 



No. 1. 
GEORGE SWAN, Principal. 
MARY A. OSGOOD, 1st Assistant., 
MARGARET VEAZIE, 2d do. 
MARIA BROWN, 3d do. 



No. 2. 
JOSEPH T. SWAN, Principal. 
ELLEN FOSTER, 1st Assistant. 
MARY M. MAYHEW, 2d do. 
ANN J. CHANDLER, 3d do. 
H. A. T. DADLEY, 4th do. 



Sub- Committee— OLIYKR C. EVERETT, 
GEORGE B. NEAL, 
GEORGE P. KETTELL. 

In May, the Sub-Committee report as follows : "The 
first division of School No. 1 was examined by us, and 
gave good evidence of the teacher's earnestness and 
fidelity ; but owing to the changes which have taken 



14 

place in the last six months and the severe illness of 
the Principal, for several weeks, the appearance of the 
division was not quite equal to what it had been in for- 
mer years.',' The Committee speak of the good order 
and regular attendance, and the high tone of feeling 
which pervades the whole school ; of the lively interest 
manifested by the pupils, and the charming influence 
of music, and they add, "it is evident that the care of 
the Principal has not been confined to his own division, 
but that he has had a direct oversight of the whole 
school. The lower divisions of the school have been 
altogether too large, and their rank has been main- 
tained only by the unusual and unremitted exertions of 
the assistant teachers. The whole school is suffering 
from its crowded condition, and deterioration and dis- 
couragement must be looked for unless this difficulty is 
soon remedied." Concerning School No. 2, they re- 
port: "It gives us great pleasure to speak of the whole 
school as maintaining its good name, notwithstanding 
its crowded condition and the frequent change of teach- 
ers. On the last account the second division has not 
been fairly presented for two years. The Committee 
bear cheerful testimony to the earnestness of the teach- 
ers in their work, and to the consequent thoroughness 
of the pupils as far as they have advanced." They add : 
"We could wish, however, that the scholars were trained 
to rely less upon their books and memory and more upon 
their own judgment." The school met with a great 
loss in the death of the first assistant teacher, Miss Jane 
Rugg. "Her close application and conscientious fidelity 
to every claim of her office, her great anxiety to keep up 
the reputation of the school, undoubtedly hastened the 
lurking disease which eventually took her away in the 



15 

midst of her usefulness." She was a faithful and devo- 
ted teacher, and was much beloved by her pupils and her 
associates. In November, the Committee say of school 
No. 1: "Of the whole School it may be said that it 
has been marked by the earnest interest of the teach- 
ers, and by the punctuality, good order and improve- 
ment of the pupils. Singing has been regularly prac- 
tised, and its good influence seen in the quiet and moral 
character of the whole School. We wish that music 
might be introduced into all our Grammar Schools." 
Of School No. 2, they say : "We were well pleased 
and satisfied with the recitations and good behavior of 
the scholars, and of the interest and faithfulness mani- 
fested by the teachers." They refer again to the mode 
of recitation in both schools, which they think would 
be improved if the pupils were not so much confined to 
their manuals. They also refer again to the crowded 
condition of the schools, and to the need of a new 
building for the accommodation of the surplus scholars 
in the Grammar Schools. 



16 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal, A. M. GAY. 

1st Assistant, C. E. STETSON. 

1st Female Assistant, Mrs P. G. BATES 

2d do. do. Miss F. REED. 

SUB-COMMITTEE. 

GEORGE E. ELLIS, 

0. C. EVERETT; 
WM. B. MORRIS, 

1. W. BLANCHARD. 

The Sub- Committee in presenting their semi-annual 
Report in May, reminded themselves that our citizens 
entertain great expectations and set a very high stand- 
ard for measuring the success of the institution. From 
the throngs which attend upon its annual exhibitions, 
and the interest connected with the admission and the 
graduating of each successive class, it is evident like- 
wise that what were vague and undefined expectations 
from the School during the first few years of its trial, 
are steadily becoming more definite in their shape. It 
is properly claimed that the advantages of an advanced 
education there afforded to pupils of both sexes who 
have passed through our Grammar Schools shall show 
some of their appropriate results. These are to be 
looked for, first, within the walls of the school itself, in 
the interest, the zeal and the kindled ambition of the 
pupils, and in the proper pride of the teachers in ad- 
vancing the work entrusted to them, and second, in 
satisfactory evidence given to the parents that the in- 
struction which their children receive is suited to the 
desirable and the practical uses of life. In both these 
directions the Committee are happy in being able to 
pronounce the school successful. Marks of progress 
appear, the aim is set higher, experience is improved 
upon, there has come to be a spirit in the institution 



17 

which communicates itself to all who are attached to it ; 
the instractors are heartily and zealously engaged in its 
honorable distinction, and if our community were now 
deprived of it, the vacancy caused by its loss would be 
some test of the place which it now has in our affections 
and hopes. 

The Committee devoted three days previous to the 
Exhibition to a thorough examination of each of the 
classes in all the branches of study, and were gratified 
with the proficiency and industry of which they saw 
the tokens : observing nothing to call forth criticism or 
censure. 

The courses of study are arranged with as direct re- 
ference as the necessary qualifications of the pupils will 
admit to the objects which they have in view in life. 
The Principal of the school has recently engaged the 
attention of some of the pupils in committing to memory 
a few of the choicest pieces of English Literature, por- 
tions of which are tien recited and analysed, to show 
their grammatical structure, to explain their local or 
historical allusions, and to develope their beauties. 
Very particular attention is also paid to the study of 
Physical Greography and of the sciences which illustrate 
it. Pains are taken to have the pupils understand the 
processes and facts of such sciences, and when they 
recite from the Text Books they are encouraged to use 
their own modes of expression. Much improvement is 
made by a more frequent recourse to the valuable ap- 
paratus in possession of the institution. On the whole 
the Committee report most favorably upon the condition 
and conduct of the school. 

The report in November is as follows : "The school 
was examined during the last week in October. The 



18 

pupils were disposed into twenty eight classes, accord- 
ing to the subjects and arrangements of their studies. 
Evidence was abundantly offered to the Committee of 
the peculiar adaptation of the teachers of this school to 
their of&ce, of their devotion to their work, and of their 
pride in the good appearance of their pupils. Among 
the qualifications of good instructors ought to be num- 
bered that of a willingness to identify their own repu- 
tation with their schools, and a consequent sense of 
obligation to lead their pupils on year by year through 
the influence of personal sympathy and interest as well 
as by the routine of hearing lessons. That teachers 
may feel this pride and exercise this influence, their 
services must be so estimated and rewarded as to satisfy 
them to remain year after year where they are, without 
looking for a change of place for the sake of a more 
adequate remuneration. 

" A very favorable token of the increased success of 
the school in answering the designs of its friends, is in- 
dicated in the lact that fewer pupils have broken off 
their connection with it this year than in any previous 
year. Their own ambition is thus proved to be aroused, 
and they seem better to appreciate the value of the 
privileges which the liberality of the city places within 
their reach. The system of instruction has, with the 
help of past experience, been so regulated with refer- 
ence to the wishes of parents and the ability or the aims 
of the pupils, that we have no change to suggest, and 
can only express our earnest wish that an increase of 
the same prosperity which the school now enjoys may 
attend it for the future. 

"Many hours were devoted by the Committee to the 
work of examination, which was relieved of tediousness 



19 

by the variety and the interest of the subjects in which 
the different classes offered to test their proficiency. 
Of some of the branches of study our only reasonable 
expectation will be that they may excite and exercise 
the minds of the pupils to a fuller and a more practi- 
cally useful pursuit of them in after life. It is only in 
a somewhat generous use of language that such young 
students can be said to be instructed in foreign tongues 
and in high philosophy. 

" It is to be allowed that the standard set by our cit- 
izens for this school is a very exacting one: and that 
their expectations of visible benefits and striking results 
from the rich opportunities which it offers are increased 
by every occasion that brings its quiet workings before 
the notice of the community. Our citizens have come 
to be as proud of it as our Commonwealth is of its col- 
leges. We may expect too much of it, and may forget 
that some allowances are to be made for the youth of 
most of its pupils, and for the difficulties necessarily 
attending the pursuit of so many subjects of advanced 
study in the few hours given daily to the school. With 
the commencement of the present term, and by the re- 
quest of the Principal, the Committee sanctioned the 
introduction of a course of instructive lectures on a vari- 
ety of topics, to be delivered once a fortnight by com- 
petent gentlemen who were willing kindly to give their 
services. The scholars are required to write abstracts 
of the lectures, and seem pleased to do so as an evidence 
of their own appreciation of the favor. 

"The Committee have yielded to the almost unani- 
mous request of the scholars and their parents, to have 
but one session of the school during the months of De- 
cember, January and February. By the arrangement 



20 

which has been made, scarce any less time is to be spent 
through a week in the exercises of the school than was 
given to them before." 

GENERAL REMARKS. 

After offering this summary and abstract, as such a 
statement of the condition of our schools as is required 
by our statutes and as is expected by our citizens, we 
add a few remarks of a more general character. It can 
hardly be necessary for us to lavish terms of praise, or 
to enter into the details of criticism, upon the present 
standing or operation of our school system. We refrain 
from eulogy because the work will secure its own praise 
unclaimed, if it deserves praise. We also decline to 
institute any comparison between the condition, the 
standing and the results of either or of all the schools in 
this city with those of any other city, or with them- 
selves in previous years. Our citizens, with that natu- 
ral thrift and prudence characteristic of our communities, 
are apt to mark with special interest the steadily in- 
creasing expenses of our educational system. Doubt- 
less our schools and their supervisors may be held bound 
to show that the necessary cost, and still more, the real 
advantages of these institutions, increase at least as 
largely and as steadily as do the amounts appropriated 
from year to year for their support. We, of course, be- 
lieve this to be the fact. There is, however, one ele- 
ment in such calculations which may not always receive 
a fair regard. While the residents of a city may be 
taxed, whether moderately or largely, for the schools 
within their limits, they may not always avail them- 
selves of those schools, but have recourse to private 
instruction for the education of their own chiklren; and 



21 

so whatever the amount imposed by tax, the payment 
of it by such parents does not seem to secure an equiv- 
alent to them. One test, therefore, for deciding the 
relative expense to various cities and communities of 
maintaining the public school system, would be to learn 
what proportion of all those who are receiving an edu- 
cation in each place receive it from public or from pri- 
vate teachers. The Committee would be understood as 
giving only their own impression, — not the result of 
actual inquiry to be positively affirmed, — when they as- 
sert, that at least as large, if nor a larger proportion of 
the children of our own citizens receive their whole 
education at the public schools, as can be found in any 
other town or city to be equally independent of pri- 
vate instruction. Private schools have not generally 
been successful here. We would persuade ourselves that 
this fact, which of itself might be of a doubtful charac- 
ter in indicating our interest in education, is fairly to 
be ascribed to the sufficiency and excellence of the pro- 
vision made by the public. 

It is always to be remembered that the work of edu- 
cation is but an experiment made by human wisdom, 
under its partial and improving knowledge, upon a 
large variety and a wide diversity of human mjnds and 
characters. Indeed, our methods and theories of edu- 
cation are but experiments subject to that great, chief 
experiment of developing, training and instructing 
the intellect in young persons. We may not expect 
that the greatest and best of all works shall be other 
than one of the most difficult works also. The partial 
success of the workings of our great school system 
should be considered a fair offset to the difficulties 
against which it is manifestly won. The members of 



22 

the Committee in their visits to the schools, if not 
already well informed on the point, would be sure to 
be forcibly reminded that a teacher's task is always an 
arduous one, and is often more than doubled in its diffi- 
culty by the hard materials on which it is spent. The 
old heathen fable, that Minerva — the Goddess of Learn- 
ing — sprang to the birth, fully furnished and equipped 
with all her brilliant armor, is not to be verified, ex- 
cept by contraries, in our Christian schools even in the 
nineteenth century. Most unhappily, children — like 
their parents only about other matters — do not always 
know what is good for them, and so are not always 
easily engaged upon their daily school tasks. Their 
inattention and dullness are visitations upon the temper, 
and exactions upon the time of their instructors. 

We are also in the habit of taking for granted, per- 
haps too readil/, that all, or even the large majority of 
children are capable of being educated according to our 
modern standard for a good substantial education in the 
common branches of Grammar, Arithmetic, Geography, 
and History. Experience teaches that large allowances 
must be made for mental peculiarities and mental defi- 
ciencies, as well as for infirmities of the physical con- 
stitution in young persons. Our noble statute provision 
that all children shall enjoy the opportunities of educa- 
tion must not be interpreted as involving the condition 
that all shall show the full advantage of those opportu- 
nities. 

The Committee have nothing to suggest to you on 
their own behalf of the nature of asking sympathy or 
consideration for their own labors, or for averting any 
censure that may be visited on their measures. We 
may safely affirm, that with whatever degree of interest 



23 

any member of the Committee regards the honor or the 
trust reposed in him before he does any of his real offi- 
cial work, he cannot pursue the routine of duties which 
it requires without being made aware alike of its exac- 
tions and of its importance. Our own experience jus- 
tifies our assertion that each visit we have made to our 
respective schools and each hour we have spent in lis- 
tening to their exercises, has largely increased our in- 
terest in their work, our pride in their good appearance, 
and our desire for their improvement. 

The recent session of the State Association of Teach- 
ers in this city, was an occasion of much satisfaction to 
ourselves, and as we believe, from their hearty acknowl- 
edgements, to them also. Very many of the members 
of the Convention were invited to the homes of our cit- 
izens, and invited them in return to attend upon the 
addresses and debates. An opportunity was thus afford- 
ed to us to increase and deepen our respect and sym- 
pathy for the assembled representatives of that noble 
work the glory of which our Commonwealth leads off 
in her early and continued and lavish patronage of edu- 
cation. What the Commonwealth first did in the days 
of hardship and effort, and when all her voters scarce 
equalled in number the present population of one of her 
smallest towns, her numerous and opulent municipali- 
ties must now vie with each other in doing in a spirit 
worthy of their parentage. 

By order^^of the Committee. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, President. 

Charlestown, Dec. 20, 1856. 



24 

TRUSTEES OF THE SCHOOLS. 
1§47 to 1§5T. 

1847. Henry K. FrotMngliam, Joseph F. Tufts, N. Y. Calbertson, 
John Sanborn, James Miskelly, Edward Thorndike, George A. 
Parker, Seth J. Thomas, Greorge Farrar, J. W. Bemis, Thomas 
Greenleaf. 

1848. James Adams, George A. Parker, Lemuel Gulliver, 
Henry K. Frothingham, Seth J. Thomas, George P. Sanger, Joseph 

F. Tufts, Edward Thorndike, Charles W. Moore, James Miskelly, 
N. Y. Culbertson. 

1849. James Adams, Henry K. Frothingham, Lemuel Gulliver, 
Charles TV. Moore, George P. Sanger, Joseph F. Tufts, William 
Tufts, Edward Thorndike, N. Y. Culbertson, James Miskelly. 

1850. Hemy K. Frothingham, George P. Sanger, Henry Lyon, 
William Tufts, George Cutler, James G. Fuller, Andrew K. Hunt, 
C. Soule Cartee, Charles W. Moore, Isaac W. Blanchard, William 
Sawyer. 

1851. Richard Frothingham, Jr., ea; officio, President; Eliab 
P. Mackintire, Seth J. Thomas, James Adams, William Tufts, 
James G. Fuller, William Sawyer, Edward Thorndike, John San- 
born, Charles W. Moore, Andrew K. Hunt, Charles D. Lincoln, 
Charles B. Rogers. 

1852. Richard Frothixgham, Jr., ex officio, President ; James 
Adams, Nathan Merrill, William Tufts, Oliver C. Everett, James 

G. Fuller, John Sanborn, Edward Thorndike, William Williams, 
Andrew K. Hunt, Lemuel Gulliver, George Bradford, Charles D. 
Lincoln. 

1853. Richard Frothingham, Jr.. ez officio, President; Nathan 
Merrill, Oliver C. Everett, James Fogg, James G. Fuller, Edward 
Thorndike, Warren Rand, Isaac W. Blanchard, Abraham B. Shedd, 
Solomon Hovey, James Adams, William Williams, John Sanborn. 

1854. James Adams, ex officio, President; James Fogg, Wil- 
liam Flint, Oliver C. Everett, William I. Budington, Hiram Hutch- 
ins, George Bartlett, George Cutler, Isaac W. Blanchard, Hiram 
P. Remick, Freeman C. Sewall, Reuben Curtis, Nathan A. Tufts. 

1855. Timothy T. Sawyer, ex officio, President; James Adams, 
George E. Ellis, Oliver C. Everett, James G. Fuller, John Sanborn, 
Calvin C. Sampson, Abraham B. Shedd, Isaac W. Blanchard, Wil- 
liam Flint, Nathan A. Tufts, Henry K. Frothingham. 

1856. Timothy T. Sawyer, ex officio, President ; William B. 
Morris, Anthony S. Morss, Oliver C. Everett, James G. Fuller, John 
Sanborn, George B. Neal, David Foster, George P. Kettell, Isaac 
W. Blanchard, Edwin F. Adams, George E. Ellis, Franklin A. Hall. 

1857. Timothy T. Sawyer, ex officio. President ; George E. 
Ellis, William B. Morris, William W. Wheildon, AJjram E. Cutter,. 
John Sanborn, George B, Neal, Hiram Hutchins, Andi'ew J. Locke, 
David Foster, Luke K. Bowers, William N. Lane, Franklin E. 
Bradshaw.