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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

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ANNUAL REPORT 



0? THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OP THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. ^S 

DECEMBER, 1858. 




CHARLESTOWN : 
PRINTED BY WILLIAM W. WHEILDON. 

1859. 



Y .*■•' 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



In conformity to custom, and to comply with the 
requirements of law, the School Committee hax^e pre- 
pared and submit the following 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

• 

At the commencement of the financial year, at the 
request of the Committee on Finance of the City Coun- 
cil, the Board made an estimate, from the best infor- 
mation which they possessed, of the amount of money 
which would be requisite for the support of schools for 
the year. The City Council were desirous that the gen- 
eral appropriation bill for city expenses, should be as 
small as possible, and the Board was urged to keep its 
wants as low as would be consistent with the proper 
management of the schools. To conform to this re- 
quest, and what seemed to be the general wish, viz. to 
prevent extravagance or lavishness in the city expenses, 
the Board instructed its Finance Committee to make a 
very careful estimate, and if possible prepare such a 
statement as would be likely to cover all expenses. — 



This statement was prepared, and after discussion, ap- 
proved by the Board and presented to the City Council, 
who granted the aggregate of the sums asked for, to 
wit : 40,755 dollars. And it was our earnest hope and 
belief that we should get through the year without ex- 
ceeding this amount. But, after the spring examina- 
tions, the number of scholars who presented themselves 
at the Intermediate School, the Grammar Schools, 
and the High School, was so unexpectedly large, 
that it became necessary to ask the committee on 
Public Property for additional accommodations, and to 
employ several new teachers. This was altogether an 
extra expense, but it could not be avoided ; and now, 
at the close of the year, we can calculate exactly how 
much it has increased the amount required for teacher's 
salaries over the estimate made for that purpose at the 
commencement of the year. We present the following 
statement, which will show the condition of the appro- 
priation at the present time, the amount of the next 
pay-roll, and why it overruns the balance of the appro- 
priation. 

The amount remaining to the credit of the 
appropriation " For Teachers' Salaries" 
at this time, is $7,471.89 

Amount of the next pay-roll will be 8,930.94 



Deficiency, $1,459.05 

for which provision will have to be made by the City 
Council. This deficiency has occurred, not from any 
increase of the salaries over the last year — nonfe having 
been made — ^but for the pay of extra teachers, which 
the unexpected increase in the number of scholars re- 



ferred to, has made it absolutely necessary to employ. 

These teachers have been — 

( )ne extra female assistant in Warren School, 300 

One " " " B. H. " 291.65 

Two " " " Winthrop " 565.70 

One " " " Interm'ate " 106.75 

One " " " High " 224.24 



.,488.34 



From which deduct the difference between 
the salaries of teachers resigned during 
the year and those newly appointed, viz. 29.29 



and il leaves this amount, $1,459.05 

the same as the difference between the pay-roll and the 
balance of the appropriation. The other items of ex- 
pense the Board hope will be met by the amount of the 
appropriation. Some of them are overrun, such as 
books furnished poor children, but to others ihere is a 
balance remaining, and altogether we hope to make the 
two ends meet. To do this, however, it will be neces- 
sary for the City Council to transfer from the School 
appropriation to some other, an amount paid for work 
done on the Prescott School-House, before the com- 
mencement of the present financial year — an amount 
which never should have been charged to the appropri- 
ation "For Support of Schools," based as that was 
upon a statement, embracing each item of the expenses 
which the School Committee thought it proper for them 
to provide for; a statement cut down to the very lowest 
figure to meet the wishes of the Committee of Finance 
of the City Council. The Board have only to add, to 



6 

what they have thought proper to say in relation to 
the expenses of the schools, that they have endeavored, 
all through the year, to get along with as little ex- 
pense as possible ; and looking the ground all over, 
they see no reason to be dissatisfied with the expenses 
which they have authorised. They think they are con- 
sistent with the idea with which they started, to be 
economical rather than lavish, and to manage the 
schools as they would manage their own affairs. 

The attention of the Committee on Public Property 
has been called several times to the importance of an 
alteration in the doors of several of the large school- 
houses : so that they shall swing out instead of in, as 
they do now. And we again give it as our opinion, 
that this change is essential to the safety of the chil- 
dren and teachers who occupy these buildings ; indeed, 
with the instances of injury and loss of life which must 
be fresh in the minds of the gentlemen composing that 
committee, we are wholly unable to account for their 
neglect to attend to this matter, and can hardly see 
how they could escape the most unpleasant reflections, 
if any serious injury should happen to any one on ac- 
count of this defect in the doors of our school-houses. 

The subject of Truancy is one to which the Commit- 
tee would call special attention. There are always to 
be found, in every school district, idle, mischievous, 
truant children, whose bad example is exceedingly per- 
nicious. Boys, and girls too, who are under no control 
of their parents, and whose influence for evil can only 
be checked by a strict enforcement of the Truant Law. 
Interference in such cases, by the legal authorities, is 
demanded both by a true regard for the welfare of such 



unfortunate, neglected children, and for the protection 
of those better cared for, but who are exposed to their 
harmful influence. The good order of society and the 
welfare of the schools depend, in a measure, upon the 
certainty with which the ordinance in relation to truan- 
cy is executed. Heretofore, the Committee are sorry 
to say, for reasons which they do not presume to judge 
of, notwithstanding the annual appointment of a Justice 
and other officers specially to enforce the Truant Law, 
but little interest seems to have been given to the sub- 
ject; complaints have only occasionally received at- 
tention, and the evils of truancy have not been checked. 
We are glad, however, to know, that His Honor the 
Mayor, has recently given such directions in regard to 
the matter as will be likely to render more effective the 
city ordinance referred to, and lessen the evil which it 
was intended to reach. We appeal to all connected in 
any way with its execution, to assist in giving the 
schools the full advantage of a properly enforced Truant 
Law. 

The number of schools, teachers and scholars, at the 
close of the term ending October 31, was as follows : 
28 Primaries, with 28 teachers, 2028 scholars. 
1 Intermediate, 1 " 80 " 

7 Grammar, 43 " 1991 " 

1 High, 6 « 179 



37 schools, 79 teachers, 4279 scholars, 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Teachersj have resigned in Nos. 17 and 18, since the 
last report, and others have been appointed in their 
places, and we have again to notice the fact that the 
rooms occupied by Schools Nos. 1, 5, 19, 27 and 29, 
are unfit for the purpose for which they are used. 

From the reports of the Sub-Committees, it would 
appear that most of the Primary Schools are under the 
care of industrious and capable teachers. That among 
them are those who realize that their work is of a very 
important character, and that its effects will be felt 
through the whole lives of the children under their care ; 
who feel that they are in a measure responsible for the 
health and the manners, as well as the intellectual de- 
velopment of their pupils ; who are influenced duly by 
differences in the temperament and tendencies of the 
children, and by the home influence which they know 
to be exerted upon them ; aiming all the time to coun- 
teract bad influences and to take advantage of good, 
and so to bring out and establish, as far as possible, 
the real qualities of mind and heart of which each child 
is possessed : such teachers as understand childhood 
and love children, and who can impart patieace, and 
application and knowledge, because they have a^stock 
of such qualities to draw from. To enable them to 
employ competent and efficient persons, the School Com- 
mittee heretofore have advocated and recommended an 
increase in the salaries of the Primary School Teachers ; 
and now that they are fixed at a liberal point, there 



9 

caii be no justification for retaining the services of those 
who cannot come up to a standard which shall insure 
good care, good example and good instruction, for all 
the children who attend the Primary Schools. And 
with good Primary School teachers, and the co-opera- 
tion of parents in sending their children regularly to 
school, in encouraging them in habits of cleanliness and 
order and activity, we can look into the future with hope, 
and be more than ever satisfied that we shall be fully 
repaid for the care and expense we bestow upon our 
children. 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL. 

TEACHER, 

MISS ANN NO WELL. 

ASSISTANT, 

ELIZABETH R. BROWER. 

SUB-COMMITTEE, 

JOHN SANBORN, 
WILLIAM FOSDICK, 
JAMES G. FOSTER. 

This school is answering the purpose for which it was 
established, and since the appointment of the present 
principal teacher, the semi-annual reports from the Sub ■ 
Committees have always borne testimony to her skill 
and faithfulness. The rapid progress made by many 
of the pupils whose education before entering the school 
had been entirely neglected, has been in many cases 
surprising ; an instance is given in the May report, of 
an Italian lad who was qualified and entered the Gram- 
mar School; who six months before could not speak a 
word of English. In their December report, the Corri- 
mittee say, " we haye examined the school and found 



10 

twenty -four pupils prepared to enter the Grammar 
Schools to which they have been promoted. We found 
also that all the classes were making satisfactory pro- 
gress and that the discipline continues to be excellent." 
They call attention to the crowded state of the school, 
and represent the rooms as insufficiently ventilated, and 
as a larger number have come in since the examination 
than have left, they urge immediate action on the part 
of the Board to establish another Intermediate School 
in another part of the city. 



WARREN SCHOOL. 

GEORGE SWAN, Principal. 
WILLIAM BAXTER, Sub-Master. 



ASSISTANTS, 

MARGARET VKAZIE, 
RKBECCA M. PERKINS, 
JULIA A. WORCESTER. 



MARY A. OSGOOD, 
MARIA BROWN, 
MARY J. FULLER, 

Sub-Committec^GEOnCrF. ?>. NEAL, 

CALVIN C. SAMPSON, 

WILLIAM N. LANE. 

H. K. FROTHINGHAJ\L 

In presenting their semi-annual report in May, the 
Sub-Committee express themselves as "happy in being 
able to say of the school, that it is in a highly satisfac- 
tory condition, both as it regards the faithfulness and 
efficiency of the teachers and the orderly and studious 
habits of the pupils." They add : " The two schools 
formerly known as Warren No. 1 and 2, after the trans- 
fer of Mr. Joseph T. Swan to the Prescott School, were 
organized as one school, with a principal teacher, a 
sub-master and six assistants to manage it. At the 
same time changes were niade in the School Districts, 



11 

the effect of which was felt in this as well as the other 
schools. The general order and discipline were seri- 
ously disturbed and progress retarded for a time, but 
we can report now, that the evils necessarily attendant 
upon such radical changes have not been so great as we 
anticipated they would be. By the active and constant 
exertions of the teachers, in a very short time order 
was restored, and everything systematically arranged, 
so that now the school is making satisfactory progress. 
The substitution of modern desks and chairs, for the 
old-fashioned pine seats and forms, has made a very 
great improvement in the appearance of the rooms and 
added much to the comfort of the scholars. The ex- 
amination of the school was conducted by the Commit- 
tee, and the result was highly gratifying. A good deal 
of time was occupied with the divisions under the 
charge of the new sub -master, who is every way wor- 
thy of the trust reposed in him." In December they 
say : " Having seen the practical working of the new 
system — the consolidation of two schools into one — for 
nearly a year, we are prepared to report favorably con- 
cerning it, and to give a decided opinion that the school 
has been improved by the change." The November 
examination, was conducted as usual by the Committee, 
and they say of it : "As the result of this examination 
we are happy to report that the pupils are making 
rapid and sure progress. They are taught not alone to 
repeat the words of their lessons, but to understand and 
apply the meaning in such a manner that whatever 
knowledge they may acquire in school may be of prac- 
tical use to them in after life." 



n 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

WILLIAM H. SANDERS, Principal. 
L. A. DARLING, Sub-Master. 



ASSISTANTS. 



PHCEBE A. KNIGHTS, 
CAROLINE E. BIGELOW- 
MARY S. THOMAS. 



ANNIE M. LUND, 
MARTHA A. BIGELOW, 
CAROLINE M. PHIPPS, 

Sub-Committee-^CRARLE'S> D. LINCOLN, 

WILLIAM FOSDICK, 

SAMUEL T. TAPLEY, 

THOMAS J. ELIOTT. 

The Sub-Committee report concerning this school 
as follows : "We have examined it as thoroughly and 
faithfully as our business engagements would admit. — ' 
The several classes were heard in each of the studies 
pursued by them, the higher divisions by the whole 
Committee together, and the lower divisions by some 
one of them acting alone. The school severally was 
found to be in as good condition as could be expected 
after the changes of districts and classes which had so 
I'ecently taken place. The pupils in this school seem 
to be Well instructed, to be taught ideas and not words 
merely. All the teachers are indefatigable in their en- 
deavors to make the children understand what they are 
studying, and to avoid instructing mechanically and by 
rote. There was a lack of proficiency in reading and 
spelling on the part of some of the advanced classes, 
which we were sorry to observe. This was accounted 
for by the fact that an undue proportion of labor and 
time had been bestowed upon other branches as being 
more important ; and it was to be particularly regret- 
ted, as unusually fine classes in Reading are graduated 
from some of the Primary Schools in the Bunker Hill 
District. The exercises in Arithmetic, Geography and 



13 

Grammar, were highly gratifying and satisfactory ; and 
in History as much so as could be expected from the 
dry and uninteresting text-book used in the school. — 
The new Sub-Master has secured the respect and affec- 
tion of his pupils, and his earnest efforts, thorough edu- 
cation, and love of his work, give sure promise of suc- 
cess." The Committee call attention again to the 
inconvenient and old-fashioned furniture with which 
this school is provided, and make an earnest appeal for 
an appropriation, by the City Council, for the purchase 
of modern desks and chairs, such as are used in all the • 
other Grammar Schools. 



WINTHROP SCHOOLS. 



No. 1. 
B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

SOPHIA W. PAGE, 

H. AUGUSTA ADAMS, 

SARAH A. ODELL. 



No. 2. 
SAMUEL S. WILLSON, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

NANCY W. CASWELL, 
ELLEN A. RICHARDSON, 
ELIZABETH B. M. KNOX, 
ABBY M. CLARK. 

Sub-Conimittee—G. WASHINGTON WARREN, 
JOHN SANBORN, 
JAMES G. FOSTER. 

From the May report we extract the following : 
"Every division of the school has been examined in all 
its studies by one of the Committee. In comparing 
the results of our labors we find that both divisions of 
the school have made satisfactory progress. They ap- 
pear to be under good discipline ; the teachers are 
faithful and devoted to the interests of their charge ; 
and the different divisions evinced a marked improve- 
ment. The exhibitions in both schools were of a high 



14 

order, and attracted great attention and interest. The 
exercises in Reading and Declamation were exceedingly 
well performed. The Singing was pronounced by com- 
petent judges to be very good ; and we were happy to 
find that this exercise had not been neglected, as we 
consider it an important one. An unusually large num- 
ber of scholars were promoted to the High School, the 
whole of the first division in School No. 1, having com_- 
pleted the course of studies required for admission to 
that school, and nearly all of them were admitted." 
In December the Committee report : " The higher 
classes in each of these schools were examined in Read- 
ing, Orthography, Grammar, History, Arithmetic and 
Geography. Questions were for the most part put to 
scholars by the Committee ; in all cases the parts of 
the text-books were selected by them. The answers 
were generally given with great promptness and cor- 
rectness. Both schools have exhibited proofs of profi- 
ciency during the past term, and punctuality, order and 
good discipline have been maintained in them." 



HARVARD SCHOOLS. 



No. 2. 
JOSEPH B. iMORSE, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ELTZABETH SWORDS, 
CAROLINE S. CROZIER, 
JOSEPHINE MISKELLY. 



No. 1 
C. SOULE CARTEE, Principal 

ASSISTANTS. 

ANN E. VVESrON, 
MARTHA BLOOD. 
SARAH E. ARCHER. 

Sub-Committee— WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 
EDWIN F. ADAMS, 
JAMES ADAMS. 

The Sub-Committee report in May, as follows: "We 
have attended and held the customary examination of 
the several divisions of School No. 1, and find them all 



in a good condition of progress. The school was much 
disturbed by the operation of re -districting the city, 
and so numerous were the changes that the course of 
studies was considerably impeded." In December they 
say : "We were a good deal pleased with this school, 
and the first division, under the immediate charge of 
the principal, appeared uncommonly well. The exam- 
ination before the whole Committee was quite satisfac- 
tory. We may not only reasonably commend the 
Eeading and the Spelling, but all the studies generally ; 
and we are satisfied that the oral instruction of the 
teacher, outside the books of study, tends to create the 
habit of thoughtfulness in the scholars, which greatly 
enhances the benefit of their studies. The other divi- 
sions of the school were found to be in good condition, 
and the teachers qualified and faithful." Of School 
No. 2, they remark, in May, as follows: " The condi- 
tion of the school is good, in its several divisions, al- 
though the course of studies has been greatly disturbed 
by changes in the districts. The Principal and all his 
assistants are regarded by us as faithful and devoted to 
their duties." In December they say : " The first 
division was examined by the whole Committee, and 
considering the interruption of the school last year, and 
the material to be developed, considerable progress has 
been made in the improvement of the scholars. The 
Principal appears to be faithful and indefatigable, and 
will no doubt advance his scholars very rapidly before 
the next examination. The advantages which the sev- 
eral divisions of this school and that of Harvard No. 1, 
enjoy, in having separate rooms for their study and re- 
citations, ought to be niade to appear in the advance- 



16 

merit of the scholars. The lower divisions of this school 
were examined by the Committee, and found to be in 
a favorable condition, with Mthful teachers. 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

JOSEPH T. SWAN, Principal. 
GUILFORD D. BIGELOW, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS. 

SARAH M. CHANDLER, I ABBY L. SWAN. , 

MARY JANE BROWN, | JOSEPHINE M. FLINT, 

H. A. T. DADLEY, I FRANCES M. CLARK, 

HANNAH M, SAWYER, | ELLEN M. WHEELER. 

Sub -Committee— TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, 
JAMES B. MILES. 
ABRAM E CUrTER, 
GEORGE E. ELLIS. 

The spring examination of this school took place be- 
tween the 5th and 19th of April, some member of the 
Committee being present some part of each day during 
that time. Its condition was very satisfactory, taking 
into consideration the fact that it had recently been 
organized and was an experiment upon a new system, 
the working of which could hardly be determined in so 
short a time as had elapsed since the occupation of the 
building. The building, the Committee have no doubt, 
is perfectly adapted to the system, and everything about 
it seems to be answering the expectations of those who 
planned and constructed it ; so that if any failure oc- 
curs, it will be chargeable to defects in the new sys- 
tem, or to lack of capacity and tact on the part of the 
teachers, and not to the want of adaptation or the con- 
dition of the school-house. The Committee are happy 
in this report to say that everything seemed to be 
going on in a systematic way. The order was excel- 



17 

lent, and such as woald insure proper care of the build ■ 
ing and appurtenances ; in this respect, if there is any 
danger, it will be that too much attention will be given 
to it. Order, however, is the first law, and that being 
fully established, the time of the principal teacher will 
no doubt be appropriated in forwarding all the interests 
of the school, his success heretofore being a guarantee 
for the future, and of his attention to the development 
of the intellect of his pupils, as well as to the formation 
of habits of order and regularity. The new Sub-Mas- 
ter is evidently well qualified for his situation, and the 
appearance of his division was such as to indicate a true 
interest in his work and full capacity for its perform- 
ance. Concerning the female assistants, the committee 
remark as follows : "Several of them had been success- 
ful teachers in other schools in this city, before the 
opening of this, and they continue to give ' satisfaction 
---their pupils being well governed and instructed.— 
The new teachers are all attentive to their duties, and 
are striving hard to adapt themselves to the labor which 
they have undertaken ; but the school is hardly yet 
started, and it is too early, in the opinion of the com- 
mittee, to form a proper judgment of what their success 
will be. The school having been so recently organ- 
ized, and the arrangement of the scholars being so 
different from the other schools, the committee made it 
their chief object in this examination to ascertain the 
condition of each of the divisions, so that they could 
understand by subsequent examinations what progress 
was being made by the scholars, and form a correct 
judgment of the merits of each teacher : and except in 
a general remark that most of the divisions appeared 



18 

well, they have nothing to say concerning the studies 
of the school, presuming that in this first report, the 
Board can expect only to hear, that the Prescott 
School is well started and under good discipline. The 
exhibition of the school took place on the 20th of April, 
and was attended by a large number of the parents and 
other persons. Each diidsion had its exhibition in its 
own room, and afterwards the upper divisions were ex- 
hibited in the hall. The exercises were all interesting, 
and the occasion was a pleasing one to all present." — 
From the December report we extract the following : 
"The school has improved a good deal since the exam- 
ination in the spring. In several of the rooms a decided 
change has taken place, the correct deportment and in- 
telligence of the pupils affording ample evidence of 
capability and industry on the part of the teachers. 
All the divisions appeared very well. The committee 
are of opinion that there is need of a better understand- 
ing in regard to the duties of some of the teachers in 
the higher classes ; and it has needed the experience 
of the past year to determine several matters connected 
with the duties of the Principal — such as, how far he 
is to be responsible for the order in all the rooms — 
what recitations he shall hear — and what assistance he 
shall receive from the Sub-Master. The arrangement 
of the school is so different from any of the other 
schools in the city, and the district being an entirely 
new one, made up of parts of others, and of scholars 
who had been under very different influences, that labor 
and judgment, as well as time, have been requisite to 
get things into good working order ; and if the teachers 
have manifested a good deal of anxiety and perplex- 



19 

ity the while, it has not been wiihout cause. Time, 
however, must be the regulator of such cifficulties, an.l 
with the duties of the teachers more clearly defined (the 
first thing which should claim the attention of a new 
committee,) the school will no doubt be greatly im- 
proved, and the advantages of the arrangement of sep- 
arate rooms for each division, be made apparent and 
certain." 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal, A. M. GAY. 

Sub-Master, CHARLES E. STETSON. 

ASSISTANT TEACHERS. 

Mrs. P. G. BATES, FRANCES M. READ, 

SARAH A. GRIFFIN, MARY CURTIS. 

SUB-COMMITTEE. 

GEORGE E ELLIS, 
WILLIAM W. VVHEILDON. 
G. WASHINGTON WARREN, 
TIMOTHY T. SAWYER 

The Sub Committee on this School, report in May, 
"That they attended to their prescribed duty in its 
examination during the week commencing Monday, 
April 5. The number of pupils examined in one or more 
of the various branches of study was one hundred and 
fifty, including the graduates of this year. The result 
was on the whole quite satisfactory. A few of the 
scholars — who showed themselves most apt for re- 
ceiving and making the best improvement of the emi- 
nent advantages they enjoy — gave proof of a very 
remarkable proficiency in the most difficult branches of 
their education. The majority exhibited fidelity and 
success, and the exceptions were quite rare to the per- 



20 

feet satisfaction enjoyed by the Committee in examining 
all the scholars. 

"The tokens of an increasing attachment to the 
school, and of a fuller appreciation of their advantages 
on the part of the pupils were very gratifying as they 
were exhibited in connection with this formal visit of 
the Committee. There is now a spirit of fellowship or 
privilege felt by the graduates of this institution, and 
passing from them to those who are members of it from 
year to year, which is found to furnish an honorable 
impulse in its favor among our citizens and their chil- 
dren. 

"The only suggestion which the Committee have to 
make in view of any defect, or any existing arrange- 
ment in the conduct of the school, has reference to an 
improved classification of the branches of study to 
adapt them to the capacities of the scholars, and to the 
objects which they have in view after completing their 
course here. The Committee entertain some doubts 
about the expediency of so far modifying the required 
course of study for all the scholars as to allow a large 
range of elective branches. Farther experience may 
suggest a change in this respect, for which we are not 
now prepared." 

In December, they report "that they attended to the 
examination of the school during the week beginning 
November 15. The duty of the Committee is an ardu- 
ous one on account of the number of the classes and the 
variety of the studies pursued. With the general ap- 
pearance of the school they were highly gratified. — ■ 
Abundant evidence was afforded of the devotion of the 
teachers to their several duties and of their joint efforts 



21 

in mutually helping each other to make the institution 
effective for the purposes for which it was established 
by the city. 

"A cause of great embarrassment is found by the 
teachers in the frequent expression of a desire on the 
part of the parents of some of the pupils, that the regu- 
lar course of studies should be modified in reference to 
the abilities or the preferences of single scholars. This 
is in most cases impossible. The number of the classes 
is now a severe exaction on the instructors, and any 
addition to it would make it impossible for them to 
carry on their duties in the school. 

"Two boys from the school entered College at the 
last Commencement, and there is quite a promising 
class of pupils now in preparation to be offered for ad- 
mission next year. 

"It is believed that the measures recently instituted 
by the School Committee to raise the standard in the 
Grammar Schools for admission to the High School will 
have a very beneficial influence upon the latter, riere- 
to fore the first year of study for each new class has ne- 
cessarily required a mingling of the more appropriate 
branches of the High School course, with a review or 
a completion of the simpler and elementary branches of 
a Grammar School course, and even then some scholars 
have begun the study of Latin and Algebra who would 
have spent their time much more profitably in the study 
of English and Arithmetic. 

"The Committee have heard fewer complaints during 
the last term than ever before from pupils and their 
parents, about the alleged excessive length and number 
of their set tasks. From personal inquiry in several 



22 



cases, the Committee have assured themselves that the 
teachers do not exact too much of such pupils as have 
a taste and aptitude for High School studies. We have 
also noticed that the discipline and the standard of the 
school are such as to excite very strongly the ambition 
of the scholars, and consequently to demand of the less 
facile ones considerable effort to sustain a good rank on 
the scale. It is here that a public High School has 
an eminent advantage over a private school in which the 
same branches of study are pursued. 

The Committee were compelled at this Examination 
to announce to the scholars the resignation of their 
highly esteemed and most faithful teacher, Mrs. Bates. 
It is with much rfegret on our part that we lose for the 
future the services of that excellent lady. For eight 
years she has discharged her arduous duties to the full- 
est acceptance of the teachers associated with her, and 
of the Committee, and of the scholars and their parents. 
Her place is now filled by Miss Katharine Whitney, 
whose services we hope to secure permanently." 





















































.A 






























! 


d . 

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2^ - 


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Term ending April, 


1858. 








Term 


ending Nov. 1858. 
















































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-ANNUAL 
or THE 


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80 


5 

139 


179 


61 


3 

118 


< 

193 


177 


5 

130 


49 


z; 
47 


lljgli School, - 




160 


58 


102 


149 


53 


96 


153 


1.39 


118 


31 


34 


Huiik^i IIiU Scliou 


, • 


m, 


laa 


206 357 


175 


182 


320 


325 


1 


356 


23 


496 


246 


250 


397 


195 


202 


329 


325 


4 


493 


20 


Warren St;liool, 




387 


197 


190 SCO 


185 


176 


332 


318 


7 


353 


34 


386 


193 


193 


317 


158 


159 


281 


284 




312 


34 


Wiiilhrop Scliool, 


No. I. 


251 


133 


118 177 


100 


77 


207 


170 


2 


175 


24 


202 


112 


90 


170 


82 


88 


150 


167 


.> 


168 


11 




No. 2. 


085 


304 


281 240 


135 


105 


218 


209 


12 


228 


30 


322 


150 


172 


241 


119 


122 


189 


192 




241 


11 


Harvard School, 


No. 1. 


27fi 


16" 


108 183 


108 


75 


172 


161 


4 


179 


30 


224 


128 


96 


172 


96 


76 


151 


143 


9 


163 


?7 




No. 2. 


412 


2181 


194 199 


100 


99 


180 


184 


5 


194 


22 


284 


156 


128 


213 


119 


94 


183 


186 




211 


25 


Prcsco't Scliool. 




56.5 


291 


274 512 


267 


245 


455 


425 


16 


496 


39 


596 


309 


287 


482 


250 


232 


432 


408 


4 


478 


18 


liilunnedialo Scliool. 


113 


65 


48 71 j 41 


30 


52 






7, 


9 


110 


en 


48 


80 


50 


30 


52 


67 


80 


6 






3154 


1633 


1521 2248 1164 


1084 


2089 


1988 


16512083 


245 


2809 


1436 


1433 


2251 


1130 


1121 


1960 


1949 


156 2195 


199} 



.1 


1 




Term endirio- AdHI. 1858 




I Primary Schools. 


LOCATION OF 










a i 








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li 






So 


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= . 


S. . 


:i2 


i Teachers Names- 


SC.'IOOI.-IIOUSES. 


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m 


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m 


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11 


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ss 


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III 




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, Su-iiii 1. . , . . , , 1 1;,.> i,hiii i.'litiiml, 


lio 


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UK 


23 4-.i 42 


22 


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111 




41 


72 


411 


32 60 ; r.-. 


34 






1. 


:i Ildn« K. rii.ilk, 




87 


■i;. 


43 


so 


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37 .'in 


fiS 


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r, 


ly 


1 


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111 l..iiii»a A. I'r.ill, 


Commo'i 3lrcot, 


ll« 


311 


(l:( 


111) 


3J 


6« 


r,s 




27 


4i 


nil 






U JounimS. Pulimii, 




.^0 


4il 


H.S 


nil 


HV 


32 


,■..1 




■."il 


H7 






a 


12 Paiiliii- H. .\..|il,-, 


Bow.lrcol, 


(10 


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;•!> 


V.7 


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44 




21 


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lOfi 


hi 


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74 


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41 


:.(i 




17 


■}'.! 


74 


11 


1-1 Siinili E. .'<iiiilli, 


" 


ItlH 


■IJ 


M! 


K(l 


32 


41' 


m 






34 






15 Elliin M. Riijs, 




111 


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44 


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31 


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34 


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1 


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IBlAliliv K. Iliii.-klcf, 




III; 




47 


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31i 


hi; 




Wl 


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6 


17 K. ir. Ui>,l,.iiliiirs, 


B. II. siroet III i'niiit. 


s.i 


■l.'i 


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HI 


37 




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26 


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fit! 




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S7 


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40! (.S 


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63 




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IMi.ulUliislru.'l, 


Ml 


4-> 


47 71 


H.i 


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HI 




33 


,16 


74 




5 


all.Malililn Cihiian, 


Si.lcy Klriiol, 


lllii 


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26 


74 







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111 


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ilavcrliill slrcol, 






1)0 


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31 


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fi3 


31 


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Common «troot, 


7.i 


:)2 


41 


III) 


l!4 


Jii; 


42 




17 


32 






4 


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Ailnliiio M. Simlh, 


Adiol'KVV'il Room 3, 


«H 


.'17 


■« 


no 


H4 


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23 








6 


211 


Mary Eaton, 


.Mm«-ll0U9e 


21 


in 


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11 


7 


4 


15 ■ 13 


111 


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Colli. M. Kimliull, ' IliMik.T-Ilill Btrcot, 


UK 




47 


7.S 


42 


3fi 


611 lil 


31 


311 






28 


Jano 0. I.orin;, ; Eilgowortli Mrnel, 


71 


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lis 


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l'arne!i« A. I)r..lnii,., j VVarJ Kooiii .\o. 3, 


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30 


44 40 


24 


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~»^w^„„„,„^,™„„^,^,..,,„„„„ 


™ 


1200 


IIW 




9411 


nba 


1376 1483 


760 


723 


IrUl 11 llM i 



■ 








Term 


end 


ng November, 


18.58. 1 1 


II 


Primary .Schools. 
























ra ■ 






^ 




. o, I'o 


r- 








i i 




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Teachers Names- 


zS 


i 


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1 


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1 


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Suh-Committeefl. 






s'- 




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0" 


5 


^ 






110 


49 


81 82 


40 


62 58 


81 


37 


44. 92 






Samuel T. Tapley, 




73 


39 


34 


68 


37 


31 50 


.69 


31 


29' CS 




6 




IIU 


.1^ 




72 


31 


38 49 


66 


20 


29, 72 




1? 




■Ijl- '• 'i-r^ 


98 


■ib 


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3(i 


45 63 


64 


31 


34 81 




11 


William N. Lane 


7s,',."::,y''' ';,", 


80 


4'i 
44 


.31 


i.y 

6S 


34 


24 


4-2 


45 


2i 
24 


30 09 
21 ,58 




9 
13 


Timothy T. Sawyer. 








40 




37 




62 




2b 


24| 70 


2 


1,' 
























2( 


22I 72 


2 










114 


47 


111 


111 


30 


4'i 


41 


.16 


'24 


,33 


76 
















4' 


lO 


41 




..1 


1.3 


31 


2t 


■(9 




OlJamcs B. Miles. 


'■^ 








HM 


(ill 




3i 


4i 


55 


26 


211 


64 


■/. 








106 




64 


77 


J4 


4o 


ol 




31 


411 


77 








Surah E. Sinitli, 




40 


69 




311 




48 




■>9 


■r.i 


.0 






lo 


Ell.m M. Rnsc, 


101 


53 


48 


72 


3rf 


34 


. ;.ii 


67 


31 


26 


T>, 




SGeorgo E. Elli,. 




Alil.y E. Hinoklov, 


109 


hi) 


61 




42 








31 


3(1 


U 






Si.iilironin WorUioii, 


100 


41 


69 


'|4 


27 


4; 


61 


61 


V3 


28 


73 


1 




Iv-* 












4V 


31 


49 




4(1 


v.7 


8(1 






m 




R9 


4l 


4-<! 


lU 


34 


36 


67 


67 


33 


34 


70 






J..I 




96 




4/ 


(i-. 


2K 


40 


60 




!>K 


24 


68 






■!0 


Francc-1 M. Lane, 


108 


62 


.I'l 


R(l 


40 


46 

411 


69 
66 


63 


3< 

■39 


38 
24 


83 
80 




8 
i| 


H. K. Frothingl.am. 


i.l 




90 




42 


68 


;i.T 


33 






26 


SP 


68 






Samuul T. Tapley. 














22 


42 






16 


211 


64 






J. J 




8-i 


41 


41 


81 


411 


41 


54 




29 


3.1 


81 




r. 












19 


21 


14 


7 


18 




in 


6 


'21 








1' 




ISIS 




.54 82 


44 


881 71 




311 












Jam; B. Loring, 


82 


43 


.39 70 


3'. 


33 16 




34 


31 70 




c 












62 77 


36 


42 47 




29 


S3 77 




Wiciiarlea D. Lincoln. 





.-~. 


26011 


1276 


1334 2028 


972 


1056 1426 


1612 


813 


799 2021 


7 


232! 



20 



ZO 



SUPERINTENDENT OF THE SCHOOLS. 



The School Committee have presented a memorial to 
the City Council asking for the passage of an ordinance 
requiring the appointment of a Superintendent of the 
Public Schools, and giving authority to establish a 
salary for said office. It was not without full delibera- 
tion in the Board, proceeding upon a previous agitation 
of the subject for several years, and clearly founded on 
their own experience, that the members unanimously 
coincided as to the expediency of the proposed measure. 
The members of the Board, like their fellow citizens 
around them engaged in the active business of life, can 
give but a limited portion of their time to the oversight 
of the schools Such of their duties as can be dis- 
charged by a regular attendance on their semi-monthly 
meetings and by listening to the calls made at their 
doors in connection with the daily interests of the 
schools and the applications of candidates as teachers, 
require as much time as most of them have free for 
such uses. It is at the semi-annual examinations of 
the schools provided for in the rules of the Board, that 
the Committee feel thai the service required of them 
demands more of time and attention than they are able 
to give. These examinations which ought to be pa- 
tient, thorough, and deliberate, in order to fulfil their 
purpose, are almost always performed in a perfunctory 
way, hurried, superficial, and imperfect. Nor can the 



24 

sub-committees judge how well the appearance of a 
schogl at its examination represents its actual condi- 
tion. The knowledge of the real state of a school, of 
the fidelity and ability of its teachers, and of the profi- 
ciency of its pupils can be attained only by the constant 
supervision of a competent person, visiting it at all 
hours unexpectedly, and watching its progress from one 
of his visits to another. And only when all the schools 
are thus subjected to the oversight of a single officer 
can we know the real working of our school system, 
or, in fact, have anything like a school system. The 
state of each one of the schools as regards discipline 
and proficiency, ought to be compared with that of all 
its kindred institutions in this and in other cities. For 
these purposes we need a School Superintendent. The 
schools are suffering and the interests of the city in 
them are suffering too, for the want of one. The Com- 
mittee believe that the expense to the city treasury of 
such an officer would be morq than balanced by the 
savings he would effect by looking carefully after the 
buildings and the incidental outlays for fuel, books, &c. 



In concluding their Report, the Committee might be 
expected to express their judgment upon the present 
position and relative success of our school system. — 
They could do this either in general terms or by enter- 
ing into details. But more space than we feel at lib- 
erty to occupy would be necessary for an intelligible and 
adequate statement of the views in v/hich all of us might 
coincide upon this subject. The simple truth is that 
the system of public school education in this Common- 



25 



wealth must always be regarded as an extended exper- 
iment, improvements in which will be suggested from 
year to year by a careful comparison of the experience 
of a vast number of joint laborers in the work, and the 
great aim of which will be pursued with a higher stan- 
dard always in view. From the great outlay of time, 
labor and wisdom spent upon this cause we certainly 
ought to expect some appreciable results. When we 
consider that from the hundreds of committee rooms in 
villages, towns and cities up through teachers' associa- 
tions and educational conventions, to the State Board 
and the debates of the Legislature, we are continually 
discussing the best means for advancing this high cause, 
we may see reason to decide that one of the most en- 
couraging signs for the future is really to be found in a 
good tempered and not despondent dissatisfaction with 
the present state of things. 

By order of the Committee. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, President. 

Charlestown, December, 1858. 



26 



GEO. B. NEAL, TREASURER, IN ACCOUNT WITH 
TRUSTEES OP CHARLESTOWN FREE SCHOOLS. 

Dr. 

1858. Jan. 1, To Balance brought forward, .... 366.65 

" Interest of City Treasurer on $5000 note, . 150.00 

May 13, A. E. Cutter, Cash for Diplomas, High School, 16.00 

Aug. 13, Interest of City Treasurer on $5000 note, . 150.00 

Dec. 6, Interest of City Treasurer on $600 note, . 36.00 

$718.65 



1858. Jan. 2. By paid Wm. W. Wheildon, bill for sundries, . 14.05 

M. E. Studley, refunded for Diploma, 1.00 

Geo. E. Ellis, " 1.00 

April 1, L. A. Elliott, No. 1, American Cyclopsedia, 3.50 

May 1, " No. 2, " " 3.50 

" Hallett & Cumston, rent of Piano, . 6.50 

May 13, Smith, Knight & Tappan, Diplomas, . 7.60 

Sept. 20, L. A. Elliott, No. 3, American Cyclopaedia, 3.50 

Dec. 14, " No. 4, " " 3.50 

20, Wm. W. Wheildon, printing High School 

Programmes, &c., 16.00 

29, Balance on hand 658.60 



$718.66 



GEORGE B. NEAL, Treasurer. 
Charlestown, Dec. 29, 1868. 



•f^t 



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