(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

rF 



"£. 



eW 



• * 6345. 55 



* 




V.2 



^ 




ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OP THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



DECEMBER, 1859, 







CHABLESTOWN : 
PRINTED BY WILLIAM W. WHEILDON. 

1860. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofsc1859char 



SCHOOL REPORT, 



The School Committee of the City of Charlestown, 
as required by law, respectfully submit the following 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

The appropriation by the City Council of $44,100, 
will, we are happy to believe, be sufficient to meet 
all the expenses of the schools for the present financial 
year ; and what will have been gained by the efforts of 
efficient and faithful teachers, to instruct, encourage, 
and advise the children entrusted to their charge, and 
to guide them into paths of duty and usefulness, will, 
we hope, be an adequate return for the very liberal 
provision made for the purpose. We base our opinion 
that the appropriation will cover the expenses, upon 
the present condition of things, which may be seen in 
the following statement : 



The unexpended balance of the school 


appropriation at this time is 


$11,626.05 


The remaining Roll for 




Teachers, 


9,087.50 


Sweepers, 


504.50 


Rent, 


18.75 




filO 7*1 







leaving a balance of $2,015.30 

for other expenses, which will be fully sufficient. 

The condition of the school-houses we report to be as 
follows : The High and the Grammar School build- 
ings are all in good condition and well furnished. The 
alterations made in the Bunker Hill School, the present 
season, were such as were needed to make it a comfort- 
able and well-arranged building, which it now is. The 
Grammar Schools are all well filled, but we do not see 
why the present accommodations will not be sufficient 
for another year at least. The number of scholars has 
increased since the last report ; but making allowance 
for a gradual increase, we think the building of another 
Grammar School-house can be postponed beyond the 
time for which the next annual city appropriation wil* 
have to be made. Some of the Grammar school-rooms 
are not so well ventilated as they should be, and more 
attention should be given to the very important matter 
of ventilation in all our school-houses. We desire to 
call special attention to the condition of some of the 
Primary school-rooms : and to urge with a great de- 
gree of earnestness, that an appropriation be made for 
building several Primary School-houses early in the 
coming year. The location of the house occupied by 



School No. 1, near the Bunker Hill School-house, is 
unfavorable, and the room incommodious. The room 
in Elm street, occupied by School No. 5, is anything 
but what it should be. The room hired for the use 
of School No. 7, is a poor one for the purpose, and is 
made doubly so by the fact that it cannot be controlled 
by the Committee. School No. 28 occupies what is 
known as the Edgeworth Chapel, and must be provided 
with a new room, as notice has been given that the 
Chapel must be vacated at once, the owner contempla- 
ting its removal and the erection of new buildings on 
its site. The rooms occupied by Nos. 19, 25 and 28, 
are such as no honest Sub- Committee can refrain from 
unfavorable allusions to in every report which they make 
upon the condition of the schools. The time has really 
come when an expenditure for new Primary School- 
houses should be made ; and when it is plainly the duty 
of the School Committee to report the impossibility of 
getting along without it. Early in the present year 
the City Council was appealed to on this subject, but 
action upon it was postponed till another year. We 
now call attention to this report, and hope the matter 
will soon be in the hands of a Committee who in con- 
nection with a Committee from this Board, can select 
locations and have the buildings commenced without 
delay. 

The subject of compensation for the education of 
children residing in the Navy Yard, or in other towns, 
has often been discussed in the Board, and was early in 
the present season referred to a Committee, who made 
the following report, which was duly accepted, and in- 
structions given to the Treasurer accordingly : — 



EEPORT OF THE COMMITTEE. 

From the opinion of the Justices of the Supreme 
Judicial Court, given to the House of Representatives 
in 1841, (1 Metcalf's Reports 580) and from Chapter 
154 of the Statutes of 1836, Chapter 132 of the Stat- 
utes of 1857, and Chapter 78 of the Statutes of 1855, 
the law of the Commonwealth appears to be as follows : 

1. Persons residing within the precincts of the Navy- 
Yard are not entitled to send their children to the pub- 
lic schools of the city. Consequently the Board have the 
right to require payment for the tuition of such scholars 
who do attend any of the public schools in the city. 

2. Children, whose fathers are deceased, are entitled 
to attend school in the city or town where their guar- 
dians reside. 

3. When scholars take up a temporary residence in 
a city or town where their fathers or guardians do not 
reside, for the purpose of attending the public school 
therein, they may be permitted by the School Commit- 
tee to attend such school, and their parents or guar- 
dians are liable to pay for their tuition a sum equal to 
the average expense per scholar of the school during the 
period of their attendance. But when the attending the 
school is not the sole purpose of their temporary residence, 
they have the right to attend school without charge. 

4. Arrangements may be made between School Com- 
mittees of adjoining towns for those scholars who live 
remote from the school in their own town, and in such 
cases the Committee may pay from their school appro- 
priation for the tuition of those scholars in the adjoin- 
ing town. 

The Committee report the following scale of prices to 
be generally adopted : 

For the High School, Forty Dollars a year. 

" Grammar Schools, Eighteen Dollars a year 
' ' Primaries, Eight Dollars, or at the same rate 
for a fractional part of a year. 

G. WASHINGTON WARREN, 
JAMES ADAMS. 



In the Primary and Intermediate, and in several of 
the Grammar Schools, some attention has always been 
given to Vocal Music ; and the Committee are unani- 
mously of opinion, that the time taken for this purpose 
has been well employed. It has served to make the 
schools moie united, and to strengthen the attachment 
of the children to their teachers : it has promoted good 
feeling generally, and so influenced the minds of teach- 
ers and pupils, that the other duties of the day and 
school have been performed with better relish and more 
certain benefit. Firm in this conviction, the Commit- 
tee have thought it proper, since the middle of Septem- 
ber last, to employ a music teacher, to visit the several 
Grammar Schools, where his services were needed, and 
to give such instructions at stated times," as would tend 
to produce harmony of sound, that its influence in pro- 
ducing harmony of soul might not be lost upon the 
school ; and we have no doubt that perseverance in this 
plan will be of great service not only to the scholars, 
but to the teachers, who will do well always to bear in 
mind that they have hearts as well as heads, to deal 
with and educate. The expense of this instruction in 
singing has, so far, been paid out of the private funds 
of the Board ; but the coming year we think it should 
be made an item in the appropriation asked of the City 
Council for the support of schools. 

The evil of Truancy^ is a matter requiring the joint 
influence and authority of the teachers and the regu- 
larly appointed officers to carry into effect a City Ordi- 
nance on that subject. The teacher's duty is chiefly 
with first offences, and must necessarily be confined to 
appeals to the parents and children, prompted by their 



8 

good feelings, and a desire to save the children from 
the influence of bad example and association. But 
they must not so interest themselves in the manage- 
ment of truants as to interfere with their duties towards 
those who are regularly at school to claim their proper 
attention. For this reason, the complaint of a teacher 
to the truant officers, should, we think, always receive 
prompt attention, and no time should be lost in the 
commitment to a secure and proper place of reforma- 
tion, of such children as are proved to be disorderly 
and idle, and who cannot be at large without exerting 
a very baneful influence upon others. The provisions 
of the law on this subject are ample, and we wish we 
could add that they are properly enforced ; but the 
number of idle and vicious children about our streets, 
is evidence too strong of inefficiency or neglect some- 
where. 

The memorial presented by the Board of School Com- 
mittee to the City Council, in 1858, asking for the 
passage of an ordinance requiring the appointment of a 
Superintendent of Public Schools, and giving authority 
to establish a salary for said office, did not meet with 
favor ; and no such ordinance has been passed. The 
School Committee have so often urged the expediency 
of this measure, that it seems unnecessary, in this re- 
port, to repeat the arguments which have been made 
in its favor ; it may, however, be well to state the sim- 
ple fact, that this Board has seen no reason to differ in 
judgment with its predecessors, and that the members 
unanimously agree in recommending the subject to the 
careful consideration and early attention of the next 
City Council. 



RETURNS, 

UAL EXAMINATIONS 1 

THE | 


i 






Term ending April, 


1859. 






Term 


ending Nov. 


1859. 


i 

3. 


o 

XI . 
t/j S 






6 

H 






_B 
O 
0) 


B 


a5 
cm 


S) 


XI 

03 


c5 

XI . 

° £ 






e 

o 






a 


B 


00 


to 


73 2 

Xi 1 

Si 1 


SCHOOL 

AT THE SEMI-ANN 
OF 


3 

S 
| 


2^ 

X) XI 

iff 

1 


ca 


3 




« 


3 


B E 

"$ 

a xj 
bo 

> 
< 


a 
1 


o 
O 


o 
>^ 

B 
P 


.- ^ 
>1 
° 1 

XI 

a 

a 
2 


§ to 
• | 


pq 


3 


C3 
XI 


pq 


3 


1 § 

bn 

si 

> 
< 

196 


1 


CD 

© 

> 
O 


a 
P 


_ 1 
-- — i 

-° ! 
s 1 

2 ] 
31 J 


i High School, - 


_ 


177 


62 


115 


1521 54 


98 


159 


152 


113 


39 


44 


213 


78 


135 


192 


66 


126 


192 


44 


! Bunker Hill School, - 


4S1 


250 


231 


438| 224 


214 


375 


381 


5 


433 


26 


553 


295 


258 


449 


239 


210 


386 


404 






17 5 


! Warren School, 




388 


205 


183 


317 167 


150 


306 


316 


2 


315 


33 


422 


224 


198 


345 


185 


160 


994 


327 


3I 3421 22 \ 


! Winthrop School, 


- No. I. 


182 


107 


7o 


175| 94 


81 


169 


155 


1 


174 


12 


246 132 


114 


214 


107 


107 


186 


197 


l| 213| 24 i 


i 


No. 2. 


3ia 


156 


163 


254| 123 


131 


217 


239 


4 


250 


11 


262] 122 


140 


205 


95 


110 


191 


189 


3| 2021 24 j 


j Harvard School, 


- No. 1. 


223 


115 


108 


205| 103 


102 


171 


181 


10 


195 


32 


250 124 


126 


190 


95 


95 


160 


166 


91 181 33 j 


! 


No. 2. 


245 


139 


106 


201 


107 


94 164 


166 2 


199 | 20 


236 124 


112 


167 


86 


81 


143| 


138 


5 162 27 
11 490| 46 
58 5 j 


J Prescott School, 




591 


324 


267 


490 


275 


215, 465 


482 26 


4tJ4| 29 


636 341 


295 


501 


263 


238 


4331 


445 


i Intermediate do. 


No. 1 


108 


54 


54 


53 


26 


27 45 


49 


53| 5 


74 30 


44 


58 


23 


35! 32! 


45 


do. do. 


No. 2. 


61 


37 


24 


58 36 


22 39 


47 


6. 11 


111! 58 

1 


53 


70 


43 


27' 48' 


54j 


7 ° 8 1 


L_„„ 




2775 


1 1449 


1326 


2343J1209 


1 134)21 10 


217o| 163 


21S0, 223 


3003(1528 


1475 


2391 


1202 


1 189|2069| 


21571 


180 2211| 237 , 



ll 


Primary Schools. 


LOCATION OF 








Term ending Apri 


1, 1859. J 
























PRIMARY 


Z I 

i - 






si 


















h 


Teachers Names. 


SCHOOL-HOUSES. 


1 


i 


°H 


1 




M 


•F 


1 


i 


; r- 


" °F3 j 1 


\< 


1 




^ 






k'o 






l £ 


£ l 








a l^'= ) 


\ 1 


Elizabeth N. Lane, 


Near B. H. S. House, 


101 


4ft 


no 


87 


W 


49 65 


66 


39 


371 | 




'i 4 


\ a 


Malvina B. Skilton, 


Mead street. 


hi 


31 


9,9 


6f 


3(1 


2Si 41 


44 


Sf 


21 \ 




12 ( 


\ ' 


Hannah H. Sampson, 


Adjoi'g WM Room 3, 


108 


60 


63 


6U 


33 


36 42 


SB 


» 


30 1 






\ h 




Elm St., near llijrh. 


72 


3b' 


Xti 


65 


30 


35 47 


64 








8 ( 




Frances Hichborn, 


Hertford street, 


75 


34 


41 


68 


:u 


34 50 


63 


3? 


30 ( 








Susan L. Sawyer, 


Boylston Chapel, 


66 


■23 


38 


65 


•>,?. 


23! 41! 45 


HR 






\ H 




Cross street, 


H-r, 


39 


43 


liS 


«« 


33 




m 


25 67 1 




1 :« 


Helen B. Chalk, 




83 


44 


39 


73 


39 


34 




61 


31 


3(1 






11 I 






Common street, 


82 


»?. 


Ml 




311 


43 




58 


?,+ 










(ll 






75 


41 


34 


70 


40 


811 




511 


»> 










1 12 


Pauline B. Neale, 


Bow street, 


71 


35 


36 


fin 


31 


m 




S-i 


?9 










\\:i 


O. W. Trowbridge, 




98 


45 


53 




3ti 


41 




66 


31 




°7 " 






Sarah E. Smith, 




U5 


40 


h!> 


74 


32 


43 




69 


S3 




H 




(16 






as 


Ml 


48 


117 


41 


26 




51 


26 










U' ; 




Common street, 


85 


+7 


3K 




43 


33 




58 


33 












Sophronta Worthnn, 


B. H. street, at Point 


84 


37 


47 


73 


28 


45 




61 










5 ) 








95 


55 


40 


83 


4-9 


33 




69 


40 








« 






Muulton street, 


«a 


m 


4+ 


73 


Hi 


36 




65 














Soley street, 


»l 


33 


48 


no 


33 


87 




17 
















Sullivan street, 


83 


41 


42 


it 


36 


36 




60 




30 






*)'| 








»n 


hfl 


40 


pi 


4'i 


40 














"(' 






Haverhill street, 


<>7 


34 


33 


53 


'£! 


ve, 






















V0 


a» 


47 


fifi 




41 




















Adjoi'irW'd Room 2, 


79 


41 


33 


77 


40 


37 


















Mary A. Eaton, 


Aims-House, 


17 












10 „ 












V*' 


Catb. M. Kimball, 


Bunkor-Hill streot, 


91 


54 


37 


81 


«H 








81 











Edgeworlh street, 


81 


44 


37 


67 


38 
















Ward Room .Vo. 3, 


89 


47 


42 


73 


12 


31 




39 


26 


73 




I ! 
































— — — ~„ 




2257 


1110 


1147 


1910 


961 


919 


1333'l573' 


779! 


794 


1839 


11 


165 ' 



I Primary Schools, 



Teachers Names 



zabuth N. Lane, 
Ivini B Skilton, 
nnali II. Sampson 
izle Oehlois, 
limes Hichhorn, 

00 s''WiIoy"' 
len B. Chalk, 
ui.™ A. Pratt. 



Sara 


1 E. Smith, 


Eliza 


R. Hamilton 


Abhy E. Hinckley, 


Soph 


ronia Worther 


Lydi 


t M. Butts, 




a W. Honire 


Matilda Oilman. 


Fran 


es E. Kverct 


Fran 


es M.Lane, 


Hole 


1 G. Turner, 


Susa 


T. Croswell 


Artel 


ne Jl. Smith, 


Cath 


M Kimball, 


Jane 


J. Loring, 


Pame 


ia E. Delano 



Term ending November, 1859. 



80 1 4; 



91 54 I 37 791 



3852|1291|1261|1M1|1006 9S8 1460 1622 



25 89 
361 81 

30 79 



Sub-Committees } 



Primary Schools- 



II Henry C. Qrnve 

" Ilnnrv C. Grave 

Wm. P. Conant. 

Hall. 

Timothy T. Sawyer. 

William N. Laoe. 

Calvin C. Sompso 



10 



A I., 



do 



- Cutter. 

1 John K. Fuller. 
Wames Adamn. 

6 Abram E. Cutter. 
12 Edwin F. Adams. 

1 Wm. W. Whoildon 

5 Nathan A. Tufts. 

7|Geor S e B. Noal. 

KJohnSanbon 



10 J 



do. 

5 H~. K. Frothlugbai 
do. do. 

(L-nrgr Johnson. 
QeorKe B. Neal. 
G. Wash. Warren 

Hall. 

John K. Fuller. 
Nathan A. Tufts. 



9 

At the close of the term ending October 31, the 
schools, teachers and scholars numbered as follows : 

28 Primaries, with 28 teachers, 1944 scholars. 

2 Intermediate, 2 " 128 

7 Grammar, 44 " 2071 " 

1 High, 6 " 192 « 



38 schools, 80 teachers, 4335 scholars. 

The required and important information concerning 
them is given in the following tables of statistics : 



10 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

Since the last report teachers have resigned in Nos. 
12, 15, 17 and 18, and others have been appointed in 
their places. There are now twenty -eight Primary 
Schools. Favorable reports upon them have been made 
by most of the Sub- Committees, and we are happy to 
know that most of the teachers are efficient and faith- 
ful. To some the finger of warning should perhaps be 
pointed ; and there may be those not blessed with the 
tact to govern and instruct young children ; for it re- 
quires tact, intelligence and good judgment, to control 
and give proper direction to young minds. The per- 
son who undertakes the management of fifty or sixty 
children, from five to eight years old, ought to feel a 
great degree of responsibility, and to consider carefully 
as she pursues her work whether she is calculated to 
mould the material placed in her hands into that goodly 
shape without which it may be wasted and useless. The 
manners and dispositions of young children, how much 
they may be influenced by the manners and dispositions 
of their school teachers ! and what lasting injury not 
only to the scholars but to community even, may be the 
result of the unsuccessful government of only a Primary 
School ! We think that too much care can hardly be 
bestowed upon these schools. The foundation of all 
that is proposed to be done in the future is laid here. 
Who can calculate the value of a good impression, or 
measure the mischief of a bad one, made upon the mind 



11 

of a child when it is unguarded by any judgment of its 
own ! We repeat, then, that too much attention can- 
not be given to our Primary Schools, and nothing should 
deter us, in the future, from providing discriminating 
teachers, and comfortable accommodations for the chil- 
dren composing them. And here we take occasion to 
say, that some of the school rooms are entirely unfit for 
the purpose, and discreditable to the city ; and it is for 
this reason, that in another part of our report, we urge 
upon the City Council the necessity of an expenditure 
for new Primary School rooms as early in the present 
year as possible. 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

We have at the present time two of these schools, 
and another will soon be needed. Closer attention, and 
greater pains on the part of the teacher are requisite 
for the instruction and management of the class of chil- 
dren attending the Intermediate Schools, and the num- 
ber of scholars at the close of the term ending in No- 
vember would make three schools of 43 members each, 
allowing nothing for increase, which has been very 
considerable during this year. We are more than ever 
satisfied of the value of such schools. They are de- 
manded by every consideration which enters into the 
idea of public instruction ; and on some accounts, not 
only to the children who compose them, but to the com- 
munity, are perhaps the most valuable of all our schools. 
In their reports the Sub- Committees speak of this as "a 
hard field of labor," but they bear witness to the fitness 



12 

of the teachers, whose industry and devotion to their 
duties, are worthy of all praise. Many well qualified 
scholars have been promoted to the Grammar Schools, 
and constant effort has been made to advance all the 
pupils in their studies, and to give them good ideas of 
duty generally. 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. 

WILLIAM H. SANDERS, Principal. 
L. A. DARLING, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANT TEACHERS. 



CAROLINE M PHIPPS, 
PHCEBE A. KNIGHTS. 
MARY S. THOMAS. 



ANNIE M. LUND, 
MARTHA A. BIGELOW, 
CAROLINE E. BIGELOW, 

Sub-Committee— NATHAN A. TUFTS, 
HENRY C. GRAVES, 
WILLIAM H. CONANT. 
GEORGE JOHNSON. 

In their report in May, the Committee say : " We 
have devoted much time in visiting, and to the exami- 
nation of the school in its several departments ; each 
scholar having had a thorough examination in the sev- 
eral branches of study pursued. We report the school 
in a highly satisfactory condition, both as to disci- 
pline and progress in learning. The Principal exhibits 
marked energy in controlling the school, and tact in 
infusing into the minds of his pupils a love for learning, 
and his general influence is salutary. The Sub-Master 
is assiduous in the discharge of his duties. The alter- 
ations in the arrangement of the school rooms, which 
have been authorized by the City Council, will not only 
greatly aid in promoting discipline, but allow the Sub- 
Master more time for teaching in his appropriate divis- 



13 



ion, and enable him to bring his many good qualifica- 
tions for teaching into more vigorous exercise. The 
good results attained in this school could not have been 
reached without the prompt, efficient, and zealous co- 
operation of the Female Assistants in the performance 
of their arduous duties. They have been very faithful, 
and it must be gratifying to them to know that they 
have been so successful." 

In their fall report, the Committee give a descrip- 
tion of the alteration in the school rooms, as follows : 
"During the August vacation, a much needed improve- 
ment for the accommodation of this school was made 
by the city, in the re-arrangement of the rooms so as 
to give each division a separate apartment. The parti- 
tions in the upper rooms can be raised at pleasure, so 
that the school can have the benefit of one room when 
needed for exhibition, or for instruction in singing, or 
for uniting in the opening exercises of every day. — ■ 
New desks and seats have been provided in all the 
rooms, and the house is now in fine order." They give 
the result of their examination of the school in express- 
in^ their opinion that the teachers all continue to be 
faithful and heartily devoted to their work, and that 
the general condition of things is creditable to all con= 
cerned. 



14 



HARVARD SCHOOLS. 

TEACHERS. 



No. 1 
C. SOULE CARTE E, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ANN E. WES TON, 
MARTHA BLOOD. 
SARAH E. ARCHER. 



No. 2. 
JOSEPH B. MORSE, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ELIZABETH SWORDS, 
CAROLINE S. CROZIER, 
HANNAH J. BLISS. 



Sub-Committee— WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 
EDWIN F. ADAMS, 
NATHAN A. TUFTS. 

"The Sub- Committee on the Harvard Schools, Nos. 1 
and 2, attended the regular semi-annual examinations 
in April, as usual, and went as carefully through all 
the divisions as their time and convenience would per- 
mit. In general terms they have to express their sat- 
isfaction with the condition of the schools, and their 
opinion that the teachers are faithful to their engage- 
ments and endeavoring to do all that they are able to do 
for the advancement of their scholars. In the more 
essential branches of study the Committee found the 
several divisions of the schools ranking as high as they 
had reason to expect. In our public schools, of course, 
very little attention can be given beyond the rudi- 
ments of education, and in these, it is the wish of the 
Committee, and the object of the teachers, to make 
their pupils as familiar as practicable, in the time to be 
devoted to the purpose. The Committee were particu- 
larly gratified with the Reading and Spelling in School 
No. 1, in both of which exercises the first division of 
this school exhibited a commendable proficiency. As a 
large proportion of the scholars in the first divisions of 



15 

these schools have been rapidly advanced from the lower 
divisions, some of them almost from necessity, the Com- 
mittee did not expect to find them quite as well drilled 
and instructed as though they had been in those divis- 
ions for the usual time. It is sufficient to say, that 
they bore, in both schools, a very creditable examina- 
tion. The exhibitions which followed on the 19th of 
April, were largely attended by parents and friends of 
the school, and were both interesting and satisfactory." 
The November report speaks of School No. 1, as fol- 
lows : "We have been gratified in our frequent visits by 
the good discipline and neatness which prevail in its 
several departments, and the apparent interest and 
faithfulness of the teachers. At the semi-annual ex- 
amination the condition of the school was satisfactory, 
and we were especially pleased with the readiness and 
proficiency of the classes in the firstjlivision, under the 
immediate instruction of the Principal. The school, 
which was quite full at the commencement of the term, 
is now not entirely full in either of its divisions. Its 
condition is alike creditable to the teachers and the 
city." Of School No. 2, they say: "We have fre- 
quently visited this school during the past term, and 
held as usual the customary examinations of its classes. 
We are prepared to say, that these examinations have 
been highly creditable to the teachers, and satisfactory 
to us. The school has been, especially in its upper 
divisions, less full during the term than was expected 
at its commencement, and it is apparent that these di- 
visions have profitted by that circumstance." 



16 



WARREN SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. 

GEORGE SWAN, Principal. 
WILLIAM BAXTER, Sub-Master. 



MARGARET VEAZIE, 
REBECCA M. PERKINS, 
JULIA A. WORCESTER. 



MARY A. OSGOOD, 

MARIA BROWN, 

MARY J. FULLER, 

Sub- Committee— GEORGE B. NEAL, 

CALVIN C. SAMPSON, 
WILLIAM N. LANE, 
H. K. FROTHINGHAM. 

In May, the Committee remark that "The condition 
and progress of the school, during the past term, has 
been most satisfactory in every respect, and without 
exception all the teachers, for their faithfulness, dili- 
gence and constant devotion to the best interests of the 
classes under their charge, as well as the general wel- 
fare of the school, merit the cordial approbation of the 
Committee. The orderly conduct of the pupils, both 
in the school rooms and at recess, has often been the 
subject of remark by those who have visited the school ; 
and for this essential characteristic of a well governed 
school, much credit should be awarded to the efficient 
Principal." The Committee speak particularly of the 
care given to the exercise of writing, and add, "an ex- 
amination of the writing books is sufficient to show that 
the instruction in Penmanship is unusually thorough 
and successful." " The pleasant and agreeable exer- 
cise of Singing has been continued through the term, 
under the tuition of the Principal, with such good re- 
sults, that the Warren School has become famous for 
its excellent vocal music, and many strangers have 
been attracted thither on that account." From the 
examination, which was thorough, the Committee were 



17 

satisfied that the school was accomplishing the purpose 
for which it was established. After the fall examina- 
tion, the Committee report : "This examination proves 
that the teachers have discharged their duties with 
faithfulness, and with the promotion of the best inter- 
ests of the school, and the proper training and disci- 
pline of their pupils ever in view." 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. 

JOSEPH T. SWAN, Principal. 
STACY BAXTER, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS. 

SARAH M. CHANDLER, I ABBY L. SWAN, 

MARY JANE BROWN, JOSEPHINE M.' FLINT, 

H. A. T. DADLEY, FRANCES M. CLARK, 

HANNAH M. SAWYER, ELLEN M. WHEELER. 

Sub-Committee— JAMES ADAMS. 

A BR AM E. CUTTER, 
GUSTAVUS V. HALL, 
TIMOTHY T. SAWYER. 

In May, the Sub-Committee on this school report as 
follows : " The semi-annual examination of the Pres- 
cott School in all its departments was made in its pro- 
per season. A difference in the capacity and experi- 
ence of the several teachers was indicated by their, 
various degrees of success ; yet as a whole, the recita- 
tions were satisfactory to the Committee. From nearly 
the commencement of the year, the Principal of the 
School has been, not only in ill health himself, but has 
been afflicted by the severe sickness of several members 
of his family, and recently by the death of his wife and 



18 

youngest child. These sad bereavements have borne 
heavily upon his spirits and rendered it necessary for 
him to be out of school for many weeks. He is now 
absent from the city with the remaining members of 
his family, endeavoring to recruit his health and renew 
his courage. From this absence of the Principal, it is 
natural that some disarrangement of the school should 
result ; and it has been particularly noticeable in the 
relations of the several teachers to each other — questions 
as to their individual right having arisen and been the 
cause of some trouble ; but we are of opinion that no 
permanent evil is likely to ensue. In the examination 
of the records of corporal punishment made by several 
of the teachers we were impressed with the opinion that 
Section 14 of the School Regulations has not been pro- 
perly studied and observed. No better order was found, 
and no better recitations were heard, in rooms where 
the rod appeared to be the governing power, than in 
that where milder measures were generally adopted, and 
the rod used as authorised only by this Board in the 
rule referred to." In November, the Committee re- 
mark : "Early in the last term the school fell into a 
disturbed and unsatisfactory condition. Not only the 
Principal, but the First Assistant Female Teacher were 
compelled by sickness to be absent for several months. 
The Sub-Master was unfortunate in his temporary ad- 
ministration of the affairs of the school, and failed to 
secure the respect and confidence of the Assistant 
Teachers and the scholars ; several complaints from 
parents, of undue austerity in the discipline of their 
children, were made, one of which was formally brought 
before the entire Sub- Committee, who were constrained 



19 

by a sense of duty to withhold their approval of the 
course pursued by the teacher, upon which he tendered 
his resignation. We were, however, very fortunate in 
obtaining the services of Mr. Stacy Baxter, who has 
since been elected by the Board as successor to the for- 
mer Sub -Master. We regret that the salary paid him. 
is not more in accordance vvith his worth and with his 
previous position as a successful Principal of one of our 
Grammar Schools. We have recently made a thorough 
examination of each of the divisions, and can report the 
state of things generally about the school as entirely 
changed since last spring. The Principal has returned 
with his health restored, and there seems to be a preva- 
lence of good feeling, and unity of action among the 
teachers. The influence for good upon the whole school 
is very apparent. In the ability and tact of the Assist- 
ant Teachers, there is still a marked difference ; but 
they are all doing very well. The promotions from the 
Primary Schools have nearly filled all the ten rooms, 
and on several days more than five hundred scholars 
were present, and we now hope and expect that this 
school, so favored in the convenient and well-arranged 
building which it occupies, and the honored name 
which it bears, will stand before the community as one 
of its beautiful ornaments, indicating the true progress 
of New England civilization." 



20 



WINTHROP SCHOOLS. 



TEACHERS. 



No. 1. 
B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

SOPHIA W. PAGE, 

H. AUGUSTA ADAMS, 

SA.RAH A. ODELL. 



No. 2 
SAMUEL S. WILLSON, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

NANCY W. CASWELL, 
ELLEN A. RICHARDSON, 
ELIZABETH B. M. KNOX, 
ABBY M. CLARK. 

Sub-Committee— G. WASHINGTON WARREN, 
HENRY LYON, 
JOHN K. FULLER, 
JOHN SANBORN. - 

"The examinations of Winthrop Schools, Nos. 1 and 
2, were conducted on different days during the week 
ending April 20th. From the result of these examina- 
tions and from the visits of the members of the Com- 
mittee during the term, they report both schools to be 
in excellent condition of discipline and study. A large 
number of scholars from both divisions of the school 
were admitted to the High School. All the teachers 
of the two schools are deemed by the Committee to be 
assiduous and faithful in their labors. In both schools 
particular attention is paid to music, with great benefit 
and success. The exhibitions of both schools gave great 
satisfaction to the large number of visitors who were 
pleased to attend them." 



21 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. 

Principal, A. M. GAY. 

Sub-Master, CHARLES E. STETSON. 

ASSISTANT TEACHERS. 

KATHARINE WHITNEY, I SARAH A. GRIFFIN, 

FRANCES M. READ, MARY CURTIS. 

SUB-COMMITTEE. 

G. WASHINGTON WARREN, 
WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 
NATHAN A. TUFTS, 
HENRY LYON. 

In May, the Sub-Comuiittee report : " The exami- 
nation occupied the different members of the Committee 
the principal portion of two weeks. Nearly fifty differ- 
ent classes were presented for examination. The exer- 
cises proved to the Committee that the pupils were 
instructed in a thorough as well as a familiar manner ; 
and that great pains were taken to make them under- 
stand the subject of their studies. It was ascertained 
that only a few pupils were disqualified for promotion, 
and in these cases with a little extra exertion it is hoped 
and believed the scholars will be able to rejoin their 
former classes. Six of the pupils admitted the present 
year, and six from the other classes, have expressed 
the desire of their parents that they should be allowed 
to attend to an English course. These applications and 
a wish somewhat generally expressed by the communi- 
ty, have determined the Committee to recommend that 
authority be given to establish an independent or par- 
allel course of English study to occupy about three 
years, and be substantially the same as the course pre- 
scribed for the English High School in Boston." 



22 

In November, the Committee say : "The Committee 
believe that these periodical examinations, occupying 
as they do about two months every year, show the im- 
portance of having a Superintendent of the Schools, who 
could assist the Committee in this duty. In fact, a 
Superintendent devoting his whole time to the interests 
of the schools, visiting some one more every day, and 
callin2; the attention of the Committee to such matter 
as might require it, would render the means of instruc- 
tion which are so amply provided by the city more use- 
ful and available. The High School still maintains the 
position which our community have assigned to it. The 
classification, the arrangement of studies, and the sys- 
tem of instruction pursued are as well adapted to the 
wants of the school as they can well be considering the 
number of scholars and the variety of studies pursued. 
The average attendance of the scholars is remarkable, 
being ninety-seven per cent, during the term." 



23 



GENERAL REMARKS. 

It needs no argument to prove, that any amount of 
money that can be spent advantageously, and wisely, 
for the education and real benefit of the children of 
Massachusetts, is cheerfully appropriated by her citi- 
zens ; and that in almost every town and city within 
her borders, liberality and generosity are shown in the 
provisions made for educational purposes. Good school- 
houses are provided, teachers are well paid, and School 
Committees are continually spurred to duty, by the 
ever prevailing sentiment, that the common school is 
the most precious of all public interests, and that as 
much is entrusted to them in its management much 
will be expected in return. 

The profession of the teacher, the nobleness of which 
has been so much remarked upon, needs but the industry 
and persevering interest of those who follow it, to ren- 
der it most honorable. Rightly viewed, it has more in 
it to encourage and stimulate to exertion than any 
other piofession ; for from faithful effort is sure to come 
that which will be a certain source of pride and satis- 
faction in the future — the building up of character and 
fame on foundations laid by the teacher's skill. Do 
our teachers realize this fact, and enter into their work 
as if they felt and were influenced by its greatness 
and importance ? Do they love it, and see in it a 
noble calling, worthy of their continued and never- 
failing attention ? Do they know the vast influence 
which they can exert upon the present and the future 



24 

by the management and guidance of the many minds 
placed under their control ? Do they think sufficiently 
of the future to be made up of the children of to-day ? 
and if conscious of that future, are they of the present, 
and of their duty every day to encourage, to make 
cheerful, hopeful and useful, the children who are with 
them, and looking up to them for influences in this 
direction ? It seems sometimes as if teachers could see 
nothing but drudgery in their profession, and were 
blind to the interesting and blessed influences with 
which they are surrounded, and the pleasant path of 
duty which is open before them. They chafe and fret 
at the activity and playfulness of childhood, puzzle over 
the reasons for what they call perversity, and shut their 
eyes to the great fact ever before them, of the constant 
progress and growth of good, the continued reaching 
out for healthier and freer development. Childhood 
must develope into manhood, and like the plants in 
their growth, it will have light and air and nourish- 
ment if they can be found : the root and the branches 
are seeking for what will give strength ; and faith in 
this fact, will alone fit the teacher to perform his part 
in giving direction and force to this development. 
Faith in the capabilities of children, and in their gen- 
eral tendency to do right, and watchfulness of what is 
mischievous and wrong, only to understand its cause, 
and if possible to bend the peculiarities and power which 
are behind it, to good uses. How can common schools 
be improved ? is the question always in the minds of 
those who are interested and working for that end.— 
And after so much has been said, and with truth 
too, about the difficulty of managing children, their 



25 

tendency to mischief and wrong, their evil home in- 
fluences, "the hard material which teachers have to 
deal with," — why may it not be well, for once, to turn 
attention to the teachers, to see if virtue cannot be 
found in a word of suggestion to them: To see if their 
estimate of their own calling is not below the standard 
requisite for the most efficient labor and success. We 
think there can be no doubt of the truth, that much is 
lost to our schools by forgetfulness of the real meaning of 
education, and of the dignity, importance and responsi- 
bility involved in the acceptance and occupancy of a 
teacher's post. We are almost prepared to believe that 
the whole matter of progress and improvement in the 
common schools of Massachusetts, is in the hands of the 
teachers. We have made these remarks, not because 
they are particularly applicable to our own schools, but 
as generally applicable to all schools, and as worthy of 
careful thought and consideration. 

The extracts we have given from the reports of the 
Sub-Committees are intended to show the condition of 
our schools, and we are happy to add that we believe 
they will compare favorably with other schools in the 
neighborhood. The generous appropriation made by 
the City Council, and the favor which it has received, 
show conclusively that there is no lack of encourage- 
ment on the part of the parents of the children, so far 
as willingness to be taxed is concerned ; indeed it has 
always been the case in Charlestown, that all classes of 
her citizens have favored liberal expenditures for 
schools. An incident which took place some years ago, 
and which it may not be out of place to relate, will 
give a very good idea of the state of feeling with 
4 



26 



which applications for school appropriations have been 
met. An individual, whose journey through life had 
not always been by the pleasantest paths, was a uniform 
attendant at all town meetings, and almost as uni- 
formly an opposer of all new projects. He was more- 
over a speech-maker, and not unfrequently his remarks 
were characterised by severity and much distrust of the 
motives of those who favored increased expenditure of 
money for any purpose. On one occasion, the School 
Committee, to carry out some proposed improvement, 
had applied to the Finance Committee of the town for a 
considerable increase in the annual appropriation for 
the support of schools ; and feeling sure that the report, 
which was favorable to the application, when presented 
at the meeting, would meet with decided opposition 
from one person at least, and apprehensive that as the 
increase over the previous year was large, it might fail of 
acceptance, they had in a quiet way rallied as many as 
possible of those who would be sure to favor the meas- 
ure. The report was read, and as anticipated the old 
gentleman was on his feet in an instant. "I notice," 
said he, "that a very considerable addition is asked for. 
by the School Committee. Well ! the money is to 
be spent for the benefit of the children. Our schools 
can't be too good! The School Committee should 
never be cramped for want of means ! and to make 
everything sure, I propose an addition of two hun- 
dred dollars to the appropriation." The proposal was 
unanimously agreed to, and the report accepted. But 
willingness to be taxed is not all that is needed of the 
parents. There is a kind of encouragement which is 
too seldom extended to the schools. It is that which 



27 

grows out of immediate interest in the business of the 
school room, and which tells upon the deportment and 
the industry of the scholars. We call it properly, 
home influence, and it is the influence which keeps up 
the connection between the home and the school, and 
which while it gladdens the heart of the faithful teach- 
er, at the same time materially increases his responsi- 
bility. The child who takes with it to school the evi- 
dences of parental care and interest in its education, 
takes with it, as a general rule, a guarantee of fairness 
and attention on the part of the teachers ; and the 
teacher, if he fails of general inspiration in the duties 
of his calling, will be reminded of the necessity for care 
and thoroughness, by the neatness, good manners, and 
intelligence of the child well cared for at home. 

In closing this report, we think it proper to say that 
at the present time there is one great want with our 
schools, and if we include in it the Committee, the 
teachers and the parents, and add that it consists in a 
lack of life — a need of more energy and spirit, — we think 
we shall have stated about what is the true condition of 
things. We surrender our charge into the hands of 
the new Committee, advising them of where we have 
failed and where they may improve. 

By order of the Committee. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, President. 

Charlestown, December, 1859. 



28 



GEO. B. NEAL, TREASURER, IN ACCOUNT WITH 
TRUSTEES OF CHARLESTOWN FREE SCHOOLS. 

Dr. 

1859. Jan. 1, Tt Balance as per former account, . . . 658.60 

" 5, Received of City Treasurer interest on $5000 note, 150.00 

May 3, " " " $600 " 36.00 

July 19, <" » " $5000 " 150.00 



Cr. 



March 15. 


April 


.22. 


May 


7, 


May 


20, 


July 


1, 


July 


12, 


July 


23, 


Sept. 


14, 


Oct. 


17, 


Nov. 


15, 


Dec. 


31, 


Dec. 


31, 


Dec. 


31, 



$994.60 

By paid L. A. Elliott & Co. Cyclopaedia, 

No. 5, . . . • 3.50 
» E. P. Dutton& Co., outline maps, 25.00 
" J. B. & C. Wilson, case for High. 

School 57.56 

" Wm. Cumston, rent of Piano, 

High School, . • . 11.33 
" Smith, Knight & Tappan, diplo- 
mas, . 9.75 
Elliott & White, Cyclopasdia No. 6, 3.50 
E. S. Ritchie, bill, . . 13.31 
" Mary Curtis, on account of salary, 12.50 
Elliott & White, Cyclopasdia No. 7, 3.50 
" Mary Curtis, on account of salary, 12.50 
" S. D. Bassett,one quarter to date, 150.00 
« Geo. Swan, rent of two Pianos, 20.00 
" W. W. Wheildon, bill for printing, 26.50 

348.95 

Balance on hand,. ...... $645.65 



$994.60 



GEORGE B. NEAL, Treasurer. 
Charlestown, January 1, 1860. 



We the undersigned hereby certify that we have examined the within 
account and have compared the several items thereof with their respective 
vouchers, and find the balance on hand to be six hundred and forty -five 
65-100 dollars, ($645.65,) 

W. W. WHEILDON. } 
GUSTAVUS V. HALL, I Committee. 
JOHN SANBORN, J 

Charlestown, Jan, 7, 1860. 



'