(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 06298 253 1 



rF 



eM 



„ *6345.55 




V.2 



t 



3- 1 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://www.archive.org/details/annualreportofsc1860char 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OP THE 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



DECEMBER, 1860. 




CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED BY WILLIAM W. WHEILDON. 

1861. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The School Committee of the City of Charlestown, 
make the following report of their doings, and of the 
condition of the several public schools under their 
charge during the past year : 

NEW SCHOOL-HOUSES. 

One of the first acts of the Committee, after its or- 
ganization, at the commencement of the year, was the 
appointment of a Sub- Committee to petition the City 
Council for the erection of two new Primary School- 
houses. The petition was presented and referred to 
the Committee on City Property, with instructions to 
confer with the School Committee in regard to locations, 
plans of buildings, &c, the result of which coriference 
was the selection of a lot of land on Mead street, and 
another on Moulton street, on which have been erected 
two brick buildings, each to accommodate four primary 
schools, and a description of which we give, as follows : 
The school-house on Mead street is built upon a lot of 
land about sixty-seven feet by ninety feet, and it is set 
back twenty feet from the line of the street. This 



gives a spacious front yard, which is enclosed with an 
iron fence set upon a stone foundation, and paved all 
over with brick. The passage from the front yard to 
those in the rear, and the walks in the back yards are 
also paved with brick. The back yards are enclosed 
with planed board fences seven feet high, and each of 
them is provided with a good well and pump, and 
everything which the comfort and convenience of the 
scholars will require. The building is of brick, with 
vaulted walls sixteen inches thick, and is fifty- eight 
feet long by thirty feet wide, and two stories, of eleven 
feet each, high. Each story is divided into two school 
rooms, 28 feet long by 19 feet 6 inches wide, and two 
clothes rooms, 7 feet by 10 feet, entered only through 
the school rooms, and suitable halls. The stairways 
are made with an easy rise in two runs, with a platform 
landing at one -half the height. The rooms are each 
lighted with six windows placed on opposite sides to 
give a good and rapid ventilation. All the rooms and 
entries are finished entirely with hard pine, well oiled 
and varnished, and fitted up with proper platforms, 
blackboards, hooks, &c. Each of the rooms will be 
furnished with fifty-eight seats and desks, similar in 
style to those in the Grammar Schools, but of a new 
and much improved pattern. The building is heated 
by one of Bryent's hot air furnaces of the largest size. 
The cellar is well drained and cemented. The build- 
ing on Moulton street is of the same general plan as 
that on Mead street, but it is heated with a "McGregor" 
instead of a "Bryent" furnace. The lot of land is 62 
feet by 110 feet, and the school-house is set back from 
the street — the front yard being enclosed with an iron 



fence, and the rear with wooden fences, as in Mead 
street. The buildings are well proportioned and sub- 
stantial, and every way creditable to the contractor, 
Mr. J. B. Wilson, and to the city. The cost of the 
one on Mead street, with the lot, $9,028.43 ; of that 
on Moulton street, $10,395.00 ; cost of furniture, 
$650 for each building. 

CONDITION OF SCHOOL-HOUSES, &c. 
The upper story of the High Sohool house was fur- 
nished early in the year, with settees, desks, &c, and 
with the exception of some defect in the ventilation, 
and the manner of heating, the condition of things 
about the building is all that could be desired. We 
are decidedly of the opinion that it will not only add 
much to the comfort of the school, but will be for the 
interest of the city to dispense with the stoves now in 
use, and arrange for warming the rooms with a furnace 
and hot air pipes ; and at the same time, with small 
expense, the defective ventilation may be remedied. 
The Grammar School-houses are in good condition, 
and have been carefully looked after by the Committee 
on City Property during the year. Some of the Gram - 
mar Schools are at times much crowded, a difficulty 
which must ere long be obviated by additional school 
accommodations. An alteration of the Bunker Hill 
School-house may be made by the addition of another 
story ; and the Winthrop School building, which is very 
badly arranged inside, may be so altered, we think, as 
to better accommodate a much larger number of schol- 
ars. The manner of warming the Grammar School- 
houses would be much improved by the use of furnaces ; 



and the saving of fuel, and the cost of putting up and 
taking down and repairs of stoves, would soon pay the 
expense of the alteration. We hope before another 
winter that these changes will be made. When the 
Primary School districts are re- arranged, and the new 
buildings occupied, most of the schools will be well 
provided for. Since the destruction, by fire, of the 
little school-house on Charles street, School No. 1 has 
occupied a very unsuitable room in the third story of a 
store on Main, near Cambridge street ; and we have sug- 
gested to the Committee on City Property, that the 
removal of the building now occupied by School No. 2, 
to some favorable lot of land on the Neck, would rem- 
edy this difficulty. It would be well, too, we think, to 
dispose of the old building on Elm street, and provide 
a more suitable one for that school. The old building 
in the rear of the Gun-house, on Bunker Hill street, is 
hardly creditable to the city. The location is a fine and 
healthy one, and a small expenditure on the building 
during the coming year, would be wise, in our judgment. 
These improvements, with a change of furniture in a few 
of the Primary School-houses, would require but a 
moderate addition to the city expenses for the coming 
year,' and we hope will be thought of when the annual 
appropriations are being made up. 

SCHOOL APPROPRIATIONS AND EXPENDI- 
TURE. 

The estimate of the Board, of the amount which 
would be required for the support of the schools, the 
present financial year, was Forty-six Thousand Dollars. 
($46,000) ; which sum was appropriated by the City 



Council. The amount already expended, is $32,934.91, 
leaving a balance of $13,065.09, which will certainly 
more than cover the expenses for the remainder of the 
year. If our estimate of the additional expenses is 
reliable, we think there will be an unexpended balance 
of more than $2000, to the credit of the School appro- 
priation on the 1st of March, 1861, and we shall be 
very glad if it proves so, for we have appreciated the 
liberality of the City Council, and have endeavored so 
to expend the money placed at our disposal as to justify 
the confidence reposed in us. 

TRUANCY— ABSENCE FROM SCHOOL. 

We are sorry that we have reason to make another 
appeal to the City Council and to the officers appointed 
to carry into effect the ordinance in relation to Truants 
and absentees from school. But we should fall short of 
our duty did we not reiterate what we have expressed 
in previous reports, that too little interest is taken in 
this subject, and but little if any effort is made to en- 
force the law. The ordinance was passed for the pur- 
pose of accomplishing something towards the cure of 
the evil of Truancy, and the City Alms-house was as- 
signed as the "institution of instruction, house of 
reformation or suitable situation" required by the law 
of the Commonwealth, for the commitment of truants 
and absentees from school ; and sometimes when com- 
plaints are made, they are sentenced and taken by the 
duly appointed truant officer to this place, but no pro- 
per provision for their care and instruction while there 
has ever yet been made. They have been allowed to 



run away with impunity, and so loosely has the whole 
affair been managed, that instead of checking or lessen- 
ing the evil, it has rather had the effect to aggravate 
and increase it. Truancy is a great evil, and we should 
all be alive to the fact that a few idle, neglected, mis- 
chievous children can greatly disturb any community. 
The interest of all our children and the happiness of all 
our parents, the comfort and usefulness of teachers, the 
proper care of our schools, the quiet and security of our 
people generally, all demand that the utmost vigilance 
should be used in counteracting the evil influence which 
neglectful parents, and neglected children, are continu- 
ally exerting, and besides we should never disregard or 
be remiss in the duty which we owe to these unfortu- 
nate children themselves — to care for, to instruct and 
to protect them from the dangers and troubles which 
beset and surround them. We earnestly hope that 
greater interest will be manifested in this matter here- 
after, and that when we refer again to the City Ordi- 
nance in relation to Truants, it will be to speak of it 
as a faithfully executed and efficient law. And here, 
as this report is intended for general circulation, we 
desire to add a word or two which we hope will meet 
the eyes of all parents who have children in the schools ; 
and if any of them have not realized it before, we trust 
they will not fail to understand the truth of our remark, 
that constant attendance is indispensable to the success 
of the scholar and the interest of the school, while fre- 
quent absence for slight causes, is the step towards the 
greater evil of utter dislike of school and truancy. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

During the past year the changes of teachers in these 
schools have been as follows : — In May, Miss Lane, 
who had charge of No. 1, resigned, and Miss Ellen M. 
Crafts was appointed to fill the vacancy. In Septem- 
ber, Miss Sampson, by vote of the Board, was granted 
leave of absence for six months, and Miss M. J. Smith 
was placed in charge of her school (No. 3) until her 
return. On the 23d of October, the Board received 
the resignation of Miss Susan L. Sawyer, the teacher of 
School No. 7, to take effect at the end of the term. Miss 
Sawyer had been employed in the schools as a teacher, 
for a very long time, and a vote of thanks for her faith- 
ful and efficient services, offered by the Sub-Committee 
on her school, was passed unanimously by the Board. 
Her place has since been filled by the election of Miss 
M. A. Foster. Miss Mary A. Pillsbury, who was 
elected on the 21st of June to fill a vacancy in No. 27, 
has since been transferred to the Intermediate School 
No. 2, and Miss Susan V. Moore has been elected to 
fill the vacancy occasioned by this change. 

No alterations have been made during the year in the 
Primary School Districts, notwithstanding some of the 
schools have been very full, and in one or two instances 
altogether too large for the care of the teachers. This 
inconvenience has been suffered and submitted to, by 
the Committee and teachers, while the new Primary 
School buildings were being erected, with the expecta- 
tion that a new arrangement of all the districts would 
be made as soon as they were ready for occupation. 
The new buildings are now nearly completed, and a 



10 

Committee has been appointed to re-arrange the dis- 
tricts, so that comfortable accommodations for schools 
of reasonable size, will soon be the condition of the Pri- 
mary department of our school system. 

The semi- annual examination of the Primary Schools 
nave generally warranted favorable reports. Many of 
the teachers are admirably fitted for their work, and 
most of them have given evidence of fidelity and effi- 
ciency. "They secure good order without any direct 
effort at governing — vary the exercises of the school 
with great tact and skill, so as to keep the children 
employed without wearying them, and win their confi- 
dence and love by uniform kindness and attention. — 
They look carefully after the manners and habits of 
their pupils, and are patient in explaining their studies 
and duties." These are some of the excellencies of 
many of the Primary School teachers, which have at- 
tracted the attention of the Sub -Committees, and have 
been mentioned in their reports to the Board. With 
so many schools as we have in the city it can hardly be 
expected that all of them will be kept up to a proper 
standard of discipline and instruction, or that all the 
teachers will manifest that decided interest in children 
which is requisite for successful labor. Yet it should 
always be the aim of the Committee to secure such a 
state of things, and wherever there is evidence of unfit- 
ness or lack of adaptability, however unpleasant the 
task, the work of reform must be accomplished. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 
We continue to think highly of these schools, and to 
rate them second to none in importance, not only to 



11 

the scholars who enjoy their advantages, but to the 
community. The class of children who attend them, 
need more than any other, the protection and interest of 
the public, and they should always be carefully and 
faithfully dealt with. We are happy to present very 
favorable extracts from the reports of the Sub-Commit- 
tee on both schools. Of No. 1, in May, the Committee 
remark: — " We have visited this school frequently 
since our appointment, and always with pleasure and 
satisfaction. The teacher maintains fully her high 
character. She is patient and thorough in her instruc- 
tion ; good order always prevails ; the scholars are con- 
tented and happy, and make rapid progress. Twenty- 
four of them were sent up to the Grammar Schools 
after the last examination, and they were fully quali- 
fied for the promotion." In November, they add : — 
" We are more than ever convinced that this teacher is 
fitly placed in charge of the class of children who are 
under her care and instruction. Twenty-one pupils 
were found qualified to enter the Grammar Schools at 
the examination in October." Concerning School No. 2, 
the Committee report in May as follows : — ; 'The teacher 
appears much attached to the scholars and shows an 
earnest desire to do her whole duty ; and under her 
energetic and judicious management we are confident 
the school will continue to maintain its well-earned 
reputation." The report in November, alludes to the 
resignation of Miss Trowbridge and to the appointment 
of Miss Pillsbury, who had but recently entered upon 
her duties, but whose experience and success heretofore 
as a teacher warrant the expectation that she will make 
good the place of her predecessor. 



12 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

WILLIAM H. SANDERS, Principal, 
L. A. DARLING, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS. 



CAROLINE PHIPP3. 
PHCEBE A. KNIGHTS, 

MARY S. THOMAS. 



ANNIE M. LUND, 
MARTHA A. BIGELOW, 
CAROLINE E. BIGELOW, 

Sub-Committee— HENRY C. GRAVES, 
HORACE B. WILBER, 
HERBERT CURTIS, 
SAMUEL M. POOK. 

In their May report, the Committee say: — "We 
have endeavored to give a careful and thorough exami- 
nation to each department of the school. Sufficient 
time has elapsed since the changes in the building were 
made to enable us to judge of the benefits resulting. 
There is a marked improvement through the entire 
school, especially in the discipline and order. Some of 
the divisions may be considered as models in these 
particulars. Division No. 1, has always satisfied the 
Committee, both as to discipline and thorough mental 
training. Almost every pupil could give a rationale of 
recitation with clearness and ease ; and where analysis 
can best be applied, as in Arithmetic and Grammar, 
that has been the course pursued. We are entirely 
convinced of the faithfulness and ability of the teacher. 
His manner of instructing is calculated to give charac- 
ter to his pupils and to develope quick and accurate 
thinking and mental power. The second division has 
some excellent scholars, and showed considerable disci- 
pline of mind. The Sub -Master exhibits a commenda- 
ble knowledge of the improved methods of instruction. 
Each one of the assistant teachers now employed in the 
school, is believed to be faithful and well adapted to the 



position she occupies. While there are some things of 
lesser importance, we would correct, in general we are 
unanimous in commending the course of instruction in 
each of these divisions. In some of the classes the 
Reading was excellent ; while in each division and every 
recitation, the pupils showed a promptness and clearness 
of perception, which made it a positive pleasure to con- 
duct the examinations. The good effect of instruction 
in Music was very evident. The exhibition was largely 
attended, and afforded evident gratification. We doubt, 
however, the practical utility of school exhibitions as at 
present conducted. An exhibition of what the scholars 
can do in the various branches of study taught in the 
schools, would be far more useful, and we believe more 
satisfactory to the majority of parents." In November 
the Committee remark : " Each pupil in division No. 1 
was carefully questioned in all the studies pursued dur- 
ing the half year, and the rank estimated according to 
the standard commonly employed in the school — five 
being the perfect mark. In deportment there were no 
failures. To each of the scholars test questions were 
given, selected at random from the text books. Of 28 
pupils examined, one made no mistake, eight were 
marked fractionally between 4 1-2 and 5, thirteen 4 to 
4 1-2, four between 3 and 4, two between 2 and 3. 
The average percentage of recitation was 66 plus. This 
examination shows just what the pupils can do when 
thrown entirely upon their own responsibility. The 
instructor, as in previous reports, we recommend as 
efficient and faithful. 

"The same course of examination was adopted in 
the second division, under the charge of the Sub- 



14 

Master. We express our gratification at the decided 
improvement made during the term, both in govern- 
ment and the mode of instructing. In this division 
one pupil was marked nearly perfect, two between 4 1-2 
and 5, sixteen ranged from 4 to 4 1-2, fifteen from 3 to 4, 
two from 2 to 3. The number examined was 39 minus. 
PeFcentage of scholarship, including deportment, 60. 
We are confident this average is much better than that 
of last spring's examination ; and can therefore recom- 
mend the teacher with greater confidence to the Board. 
Division No. 3 showed the great amount of patient drill 
bestowed upon it, and the general readiness- of answer 
in all the lessons, and the good order which prevailed. 
Division No. 4 seemed a model for thorough discipline 
and accurate instruction. Division No. 5 appears not 
to have fallen behind in rank that of former examina- 
tions. No. 6 is also in good condition. The teacher 
of No. 7 is qualifying herself constantly in that which 
is wanting in young teachers, namely, experience, and 
we pronounce her faithful in her position. No. 8 is 
the largest and most fluctuating division in the school. 
It is often overcrowded with scholars, especially directly 
after the promotions from the Primary Schools. The 
Committee are of opinion that it will be necessary, ere 
long, to re -arrange the school and form a new division; 
to accomplish which the building will have to be en- 
larged by the addition of another story, which may be 
finished as one room. A hall of this character is needed 
for singing and other general exercises." 



HARVARD SCHOOLS. 

TEACIIKKS. 



No. 2. 
JOSEPH B. MORSE, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ELIZABETH SWORDS, 
CAROLINE S. CROZIER, 
HANNAH J. BLISS. 



No. 1. 
C. SOULE CARTEE, Principal 

ASSISTANTS. 

ANN E. WES PON, 
MARTHA BLOOD. 
SARAH E. ARCHER. 

Sub-Comrnittee-r WILLI AM W. WHEILDON, 
EDWIN F. ADAMS, 
G. WASHINGTON WARREN. 

We extract the following from the reports of the Sub- 
committee : — "The several divisions of School No. 1 
were examined by different members of the Committee, 
and were found to have made the usual progress in 
their studies. The pupils were quite ready to answer 
the questions put to them, and to perform such exerci- 
ses in Arithmetic and Grammar as are customarily re- 
quired. In Reading and Spelling, the first division 
exhibited commendable proficiency. The school was 
neat and orderly, and it always gives evidence of being 
under good discipline. School No. 2 was examined 
early in April, and was entirely satisfactory. The first 
division was small, and has had for some time the whole 
attention of the Principal, the good results of which 
were apparent in the examination. The teachers ap- 
pear to be in all respects faithful to the trusts reposed 
in them." "The examination in November, found 
School No. 1 in all its departments in a satisfactory 
condition. The Principal is a careful and conscien- 
tious teacher, who always manifests a deep interest in 
the success of his scholars. He has methods of instruc- 
tion peculiar to himself, and in his hands they are pro- 
motive of good results. The assistant teachers in this 
school have been long in their present places, and. are 



still entitled to the confidence and commendation of the 
Committee. They keep up the system heretofore prac- 
ticed and continued, and we believe do all that can be 
done for the advancement of the scholars. Of School 
No. 2, we have nothing particular to say, except that 
in its several divisions it appeared to be in as good con- 
dition as at any former period ; and the teachers con- 
tinue to be attentive and faithful." 

WARREN SCHOOL. 



GEORGE SWAN, Principal. 
WILLIAM BAXTER, Sub-Master, 



MARY A. OSGOOD, 
MARIA BROWN, 
MARY J. FULLER, 



MARGARET VEAZIE, 
REBECCA M. PERKINS, 
JULIA A. WORCESTER. 



Sab-Committee— GEORGE B. NEAL, 

CALVIN C. SAMPSON, 
HENRY K. FROTHINGHAM, 

CHARLES F. SMITH. 

In May, the Sub- Committee remark as follows : — 
" Since the date of our last report, we have visited this 
school often. It has also had frequent visits from other 
members of the Board, and from teachers of schools in 
other cities, who have expressed themselves highly 
pleased with the order of the school and the proficiency 
and readiness of the pupils. Not the least attractive 
part of the exercises has been the Yocal Music, which, 
under the efficient training and instruction of the Prin- 
cipal, has been brought to a greater degree of perfec- 
tion than is generally attained in a public school. The 
semi-annual examination was conducted as usual by 
the Committee, who are happy to bear witness to the 
continued zeal, and faithfulness of the teachers, which 
was clearly shown in the condition of the school and the 



17 

advancement of the pupils in their studies. The ex- 
hibition was a pleasant occasion, and was very largely 
attended by the parents and friends of the children. 
We are of opinion that too much valuable time is 
expended, both by teachers and pupils, in preparation 
for these exhibitions, and that for a long time before, 
and several days after they take place, the school is in 
such a state of excitement, that little, if any progress 
is made in the studies ; and that all this is allowed for 
a single afternoon's entertainment. ' ' From the Novem- 
ber report, we extract the following: — "We have dur- 
ing the past six months made frequent visits to the 
school, and have heard recitations from the several 
classes in the various studies pursued by them, in order 
to form a correct judgment of the progress of the class- 
es, and of the individuals composing them. We have 
also at different times in the day made short calls, to 
observe the appearance of the teachers and scholars 
while in working order. From these visits as well as 
from the semi-annual examinations, we have made up 
our minds that the progress of the pupils has been good, 
and that the parents as well as the Committee have 
reason to be gratified at the condition of the school." 



18 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 



TKACHERS. 



No. I. 
B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal 

ASSISTANTS. 

SOPHIA W. PAGE, 

H. AUGUSTA ADAMS. 

SARAH A. ODELL. 



No. 2. 
SAMUELS. WILLSON, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

NANCY M. CASWELL, 
ABBY M. CLARK. 
ANN M. HOBBS, 
AMELIA R. HAMILTON. 

Sub- Committee— HENRY LYON, 

JOHN SANBORN, 
JAMES B. MILES. 

In May, the Committee report as follows : — " Suffi- 
cient time was given to the examination, which was 
conducted entirely by ourselves, to allow of a pretty 
thorough scrutiny of each class. Corresponding classes 
in both schools were examined as near as could be to 
each other, with a view of judging in regard to their 
relative advancement and the relative merits of the 
teachers. In general we report the school in a healthy 
condition. While decided differences were found to 
exist in the character of the instruction and training 
under the different teachers, nothing was found which 
appeared to us to call for special mention to the Board. 
We found some of the teachers making greater efforts 
than others, and some more successful than others, and 
we shall endeavor by admonition and friendly counsel, 
to stimulate the backward and correct the faulty, with 
the hope and expectation of decidedly good results." 

The Committee say that in their opinion a Superin- 
tendent of Schools is greatly needed. That Sub- 
Committees can at best become but very imperfectly 
acquainted with the schools under their charge. They 



19 

cannot devote time enough to them, and some one who 
has the time, and whose business it should be to visit 
and look after all the schools, should be employed by 
the city, and paid for his services. 

In November, the Committee say: — "Our examina- 
tion of the school has been as thorough as the limited 
time at our disposal would allow, and the result afford- 
ed, on the whole, about the usual amount of satisfac- 
tion. As is generally the case, some classes acquitted 
themselves finely, while others did but tolerably well. 
We have made this difference the subject of special 
attention at the school, the effects of which, we have 
no doubt, will be seen in the improved condition of 
things at future examinations." They allude again to 
the great need of a Superintendent of Schools, and say 
they "are more than ever convinced that in such a 
place as Charlestown it is a real want." "In the 
Winthrop. School there are ten divisions, and each di- 
vision has at least two classes, no one of which pursues 
less than five studies, including Reading, Spelling and 
Writing, and to suppose that the Sub- Committee can 
become very much acquainted with all these classes 
during the brief and infrequent visits which are made in 
term time, or that in the time provided in the School 
Regulations for the semi-annual examinations, they can 
form a correct judgment of the character and ability of 
the teacher, or of the standing of the school, is absurd. 
A Superintendent of Schools could examine thoroughly, 
and make comparisons between the different divisions, 
which would be of real service." 



20 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. . 

JOSEPH T. SWAN, Principal. 
STACY BAXTER, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ABBY L. SWAN, 
JOSEPHINE M. FLINT, 
FRANCES M. CLARK, 
AMY E. BRADFORD. 



SARAH M. CHANDLER, 
MARY JANE BROWN, 
H. A. T. DADLEY, 
HANNAH M. SAWYER, 

Sub-Committee— JAMES ADAMS, 

ABRAM E- CUTTER, 
GUSTAVUS V. HALL, 
TIMOTHY T. SAWYER. 

In May, the Committee remark : — "The general con- 
dition of this school has not much changed since oar 
last report. The teachers are faithful, and worthy of 
the confidence of the scholars, their parents and the 
Committee. The Board having concluded to reduce 
the number of teachers to ten, the Principal has to take 
the whole charge of the classes in one room ; and it 
will be expedient, we think, to relieve him from the 
responsibility and labor of superintending a part of the 
lower divisions, and to place them under the care of the 
Sub-Master. Indeed, an arrangement of this kind 
seems to be absolutely necessary ; and we are of opinion 
that if two equal and separate divisions can be formed, 
it will be for the comfort and advantage of the whole 
school. As this school is located near large tracts 
of open and unoccupied land, which afford peculiar 
facilities for the congregation of vagrant and truant 
boys during school hours, who at times disturb the 
school, and tempt the scholars to wrong doing, the 
question is often suggested, Why cannot the laws be 
enforced and the evils of Truancy be met and removed 1 
And the only answer that we can get to this question, 
is the unsatisfactory one, that the city makes no provi- 



21 

sion for the payment of the officers they appoint to look 
up unruly and truant children, but only proposes in the 
terms of the law t<* pay them in fees for as many as be- 
come so notorious and bad as to be brought before the 
magistrate. This is surely wrong, and the good of our 
community requires the employment of officers to follow 
up exposed and tempted children, and to deal properly 
with truancy in every stage, from the first offence to 
the inveterate habit." 

In November, the Committee report: — "We have 
examined the several divisions and classes of the school, 
and find no marked change since the Spring report. 
With one exception the same teachers have been em- 
ployed, and with about their usual success. The new 
teacher is trying hard to interest her pupils, and in the 
opinion of the member of the Committee having partic- 
ular oversight of her room, with a good degree of suc- 
cess. In a former report a suggestion was made in 
relation to a division of the work of superintendence of 
the lower divisions, between the Principal and Sub- 
Master. We are now decidedly of opinion that this. 
change should be made. The school is very large, hav- 
ing 515 pupils on its roll, and it is impossible for a 
teacher having special care of one of the higher . divis- 
ions to give that attention to all the other divisions 
which they need. And we see no reason why there 
should not be parallel divisions throughout the school, 
culminating in two parallel first divisions from which 
promotions can be made to the High School. We 
commend this subject to the early attention of the new 
Sub-Committee." 



22 



VOCAL MUSIC. 
The experiment of making Vocal Music one of the 
regular studies in the Grammar Schools, which the 
granting of our request for an appropriation by the 
City Council, has enabled us to try, has proved success- 
ful. And the Sub-Committee of this Board, having 
the matter in charge, speak of it as follows:— "The 
progress made by the scholars is of a highly gratifying 
character. The teacher employed has a happy faculty 
of imparting to children an elementary knowledge of 
rhythm and melody. The time devoted to this study 
is two hours per week in each school, and although 
some children cannot learn to sing well, all may derive 
benefit, physically and morally, from the introduction of 
this delightful change in the routine of duty." 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal— CHARLES E. STETSON. 
Sub-Master, J. M. FAIRFIELD. 

ASSISTANT TEACHERS. 

KATHARINE WHITNEY, I MARY CURTIS, 

FRANCES M. READ, HELEN F. WEST. 

SUB-COMMITTEE. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, 
G. WASHINGTON WARREN, 
WILLIAM W. WHEILDOxNT, 
JAMES ADAMS, 
HENRY LYON. 

The report in May speaks of the school as follows : — 
"The teachers continue to maintain good reputations, 
and are pursuing their duties faithfully. This opinion 
is expressed as the result of the examinations. The 
general" aspect of each of the divisions, the quiet and 
happy appearance of the scholars, their respectful man- 



ner towards their teachers and towards each other, their 
willing attention to their studies and their manifest 
interest in the character and progress of the school, 
afforded conclusive evidence that a healthy influence 
had been exerted, and that tact and judgment had 
been successfully exercised by the directing minds in 
the school. With so large a number of scholars, it is 
of course to be expected that some will fail to make the 
best use of their advantages, and that others will be 
unequal to the mental requirements of the school ; and 
so fall behind in their classes, or be unprepared for ad- 
vancement. Such cases were found to be few, and were 
disposed of after consultation with the Principal, in the 
manner thought to be most promotive of the interest 
of all concerned in them. And in this connection we 
would remark that the experiment authorized by the 
Committee of last year, of allowing some scholars to 
deviate from the studies required by the rules of the 
Board, has failed to show such results as to warrant its 
continuance. The teachers are unanimously of the 
opinion, that each of the scholars in each class should 
be required to pursue all the studies of the class ; and 
that confusion in the school, and injury to the scholars 
has been uniformly the result when special privileges 
have been granted. It may be that the course of stu- 
dies now required by the rules of the Board, can be 
changed to advantage. But this should only be after 
careful investigation and deliberation by a Committee, 
and not because of requests made by parents, and based, 
as is generally the case, on the wish of their children 
to be relieved from studies not particularly interesting 
or pleasing to them. 



24 

"The exhibition of the school took place on the 19th 
of April. It was as as successful, we think, as any of 
the previous exhibitions, and on some accounts an im- 
provement upon them — less time being taken up by it, 
and some things deemed by many persons to be objec- 
tionable being omitted entirely. The Committee be- 
lieve that there is a growing opinion among our peo- 
ple that these exhibitions had better be discontinued. 
Those who know how much time is taken in prepara- 
tion for them, which could certainly be more profitably 
employed, are decidedly of this opinion. And those 
who judge from what takes place on the day of exhibi- 
tion, and compare the interest and enjoyment of the 
occasion, with the disappointment and dissatisfaction 
which grows out of the necessity for limiting the num- 
ber of tickets of admission, are also generally disposed 
to doubt at least their utility and the good policy of 
continuing them. The Committee, understanding both 
the amount of time misappropriated, and the impossi- 
bility of distributing satisfactorily, the number of tick- 
ets warranted by the capacity of the largest hall in the 
city, are very glad to fall in with the adverse opinion, 
and they recommend such a change in the rules of the 
Board as will dispense with the annual exhibition of the 
High School, and substitute therefor public days, at 
the School-House, at such times as the Sub- Committee 
may deem to be convenient and advantageous." 

In November, the Committee allude to the resigna- 
tion of Mr. Gay, the former Principal, which took place 
on the 19th of September, unexpectedly, and on very 
short notice, and they add, "under the circumstances 
we were obliged to make the best arrangement we could 



for the school. Mr. Stetson, the Sub-Master, (who was 
on the 4th of October elected Principal,) was at once 
placed in charge of Mr. Gay's classes, and entrusted 
with the management of the school, and an additional 
female assistant (Miss West) was temporarily appointed 
by the Committee. This arrangement was continued 
until October 26, when Mr, J. M. Fairfield, the newly 
elected Sub-Master, entered upon his duties. Since 
that time the Board have elected Miss West as a per- 
manent teacher, and the school is now amply supplied 
with instructors." The Committee add : — "It will be 
seen from the foregoing, that the school has labored 
under great disadvantages during the greater part of 
last term. With his mind on the formation of a private 
school which he has since established, it is hardly to be 
supposed that the former Principal kept up fully his in- 
terest in this, during that part of the term in which he 
remained in charge ; while with the changes which were 
made necessary by his resignation, and the increased 
care thrown upon the new Principal, it would be unrea- 
sonable to expect that everything would go on as 
smoothly, and as much progress be made, as if the case 
were otherwise. Yet the Committee believe that the 
new Principal, with his assistants, by extra attention 
and labor, have succeeded in overcoming these difficul- 
ties and in keeping up the character and standing of 
the school. In its examination we were assisted by 
Mr. Miles and Mr. Graves, of the School Board — the 
former of whom, by request, gave particular attention 
to the classes under the immediate instruction of the 
Principal, and the latter rendered good service in the 
examination of classes in Geometry and Trench. The 



26 

result of their labors is given in written communica- 
tions annexed to and making part of our report. The 
other classes examined by us, were generally found to 
be in as good condition as heretofore. The order of 
the school is fully maintained, and so far it seems to be 
as skillfully disciplined under the new arrangement as 
the old. The new Principal has entered upon his duties 
with great interest and zeal, and the new Sub-Master 
stands well with the teachers and scholars, and bids fair 
to be an acceptable and successful teacher. Mr. Graves 
in his communication speaks of the classes examined by 
him as follows : — "The class in Geometry were begin- 
ners, but had evidently been thoroughly drilled in the 
principles of the science which they had discussed, and 
I was abundantly satisfied with the recitation. The 
two classes in French gave evidence of faithful and 
accurate instruction. I was especially pleased with 
the thorough manner in which . the recitation was con- 
ducted by the first assistant teacher. I think the classes 
seemed to labor under the disadvantage of too frequent 
change of teachers, having had four different ones since 
commencing the language. Another fact which it ap- 
peared to me acted against a rapid and thorough pro- 
gress was, that only two recitations were heard per 
week. French requires much practice viva voce to 
familiarize the pupils with the pronunciation, and I 
would suggest that the recitations should follow more 
immediately each other, and if no more time during 
the term can be given to the study, for a portion of the 
term there should be at least four recitations per week, 
which, it seems to me, would more than double the 
amount of actual knowledge acquired." From the 



27 



communication from Mr. Miles we take the following : 
"I examined four classes in Latin and one class in 
Greek. I determined to occupy ample time and to 
make the examination so extensive and thorough as to 
satisfy myself in regard to the character of the instruc- 
tion and the diligence and application of the pupils. I 
am happy to say the result was, with hardly an excep- 
tion, highly gratifying. The Senior class, composed of 
about an equal number of Misses and Lads, read to me 
from the iEneid of Virgil, and rendered the Latin with 
a good degree of neatness and precision. In regard to 
the principles of Grammar, to which I give great pro- 
minence, I questioned the class somewhat freely, and 
was gratified with the evidences that they had given 
a commendable attention to these. This class is about 
to take up the subject of " Scanning," when the im- 
portant departments of Ortheopy and Prosody will be 
made matters of especial study. 

"Next in order came the College Class, which I care- 
fully examined in Caesar's Commentaries and Felton's 
Greek Reader. This class is in the first stage of pre- 
paration for College, and expect to enter one year from 
the next Commencement. It gave me great pleasure 
to find they had been taught upon the principle, that it 
is better to accomplish a little thoroughly and well, 
rather than go over a great deal of ground imperfectly. 
The class showed an unusual familiarity with those parts 
of the Greek Grammar to which they have attended. 
I regret there are in the School, no scholars who are to 
enter College the coming year. I also examined two 
large and interesting classes of beginners in Latin — one 
class in Latin Reader, the other in Latin Lessons. — 



28 

Both of these classes seem to be mastering, successfully 
the rudiments of Latin, and give good promise for the 
future." 



At the close of the term ending October 31, the 
schools, teachers and scholars numbered as follows : 
27 Primaries, with 27 teachers, 1986 scholars. 
2 Intermediate, 2 " 120 

7 Grammar, 44 " 2172 

1 High, 6 " 142 " 



37 schools, 79 teachers, 4420 scholars. 

The following tables will afford the required infor- 
mation concerning them : 



riOKS J 


j| 




Term ending April, 18GC 


. 






Term ending Nov. 


j 

1860. 


t3 ft 


a 




















§ 






a 






tfl 










c5 






S 






.1° 








1 i 


D3 a * 


,3 


■« S 






H 






-a 


a 


CO 


to 


02 


GO B 






H 






3 

-a 


a 


a) 


en 


m \ 


SCHOOL 

E SEMI-ANN 
OP 


a 

a 
a 


2^ 
25 -a 






l£ 






1h 


a 
1 


° 


c3 


£■3 


oh 
1 SP 






&5 






1h 




i 


£" S 


a 


3 


& 


m 


3 


^ 


M 


5 


< 


(5 

169 


O 

153 


a 
,6 


a 

a 
2 

34 


J3 

174 


pq 
59 


3 

115 


142 


40 


3 
102 


< 
145 


142 


6 
119 


S3 

23 


1 
z 1 

25 5 


$ High School, - 


. . 


1S7 


65 


122 


169 


59 


lHll 161 


{ Bunker Hill School. - 


538 


293 


245 


466 2511 2151 417 


40b 


6 


460 


17 


551 


291 


260 


455 


242 


213 


401 


410 


4 


451 


19 2 


j Warren School, 


. . 


401, 


214 


192 


371 180 191 331 


347 


3 


368 


35 


428 


211 


21/ 


3(11 


191 


179 


323 


326 


4 


366 


22 \ 


Winthrop School, 


-No. 1. 


••II 


, 124 


116 


1981 10l| 97| 176 


183 


20 


178 


44 


273 


144 


129 


240 


125 


llo 


194 


216 


4 


236 


19 


No. 2. 


230 


1 15! 115 


199| 961 103 1691 173 


1 


192 


25 


320 


164 


lob 


233 


120 


113 


198 


226 


9 


224 


35 \ 


j Harvard School, 


- No. 1. 


284 


150 131 


23SI 125 113 212| 218 




2361 28 


236 


131 


10a 


18a 


10a 


81) 


144 


16(1 


16 


1611 


28 6 


5 


No. 2. 


9,80 


1 131, 149 


223 124j 99 199 1 CJ '~ 


6 


217 | 34 


263 


130 


133 


174 


82 


92 


146 


103 


6 


168 20 j 


j Presco't School, 




587 


1 307', 2S0 


538| 280J 258 480 481 


31 


507| 13 


612 


313 


299 615 


273 


242{ 4 i4 


442 


14 


501 11 i 


5 Intermediate do. 


No. r. 


;■ 


31 ;:9 


57 281 29 1 42 48 




57' 10 


72 


37 


35 1 62 


31 


31! 33 


44 




62 10 


do. do. 


No. 2. 


90 


1 47 1 43 


1 601 321 281 46 1 50 
1 1 I 1 1 




60! 12 


82 


40 


42l 58 

1 


30 


28! 42 


52 




5SI 11 \ 


j 




2912 


| 1477, 1435 


J2519'il276[1243|22S6|2267 


228 


2291,252 


3011 


1520|1491(2434|1239 


1195J2070 


2171 


167 


225s| 200 f 





Primill'V fl.elioiils. 


LOCATION OP 








Ter 


m ending April, 1860 






























\ 6 1 Teacnsis Names. 


PRIMARY 

SCHOOL-HOUSES. 


as 


1 


i 


u 


a 


3 


il 


|| 


i. 


1 


»f 


»! 


. -J j 


V* 


1 










i"S 






<" 


£ a 








3 




1 1 


Eh/.atieth N. Lane, 


Near B. H. S. House, 


95 


1. 


60J 


81 


40 


41 


62 


<■; 


32 


35 


81 




10 1 




Malrina B. Skillon, 


Mead street, 




37 


4I 1 


72 


34 


38 


53 


68 


33 


35 






8 j 


1 : ' 


Hannah 11. Sampson, 


Ward lt«i..m No- 


6!) 


37 


32 


60 


31 


29 


46 


49 


26 


23 


60 






5 


I.i/.zi,: Dcblois, 


Elnr street, 


78 




42 


63 


29 


34 


45 


51 


23 


28 


63 




5 ( 




Prances Hichhorn, 


Mi-dlord street, 


66 


35 


.31 


S3 


30 


23 


40 


45 


22 


; 23 


53 




6 ' 


| 


Susan L. Sawvur, 


liuylston Chapel, 


65 


35 


30 


56 


32 


24 


38 40 




'"" 


-i 






Alice S. Wilc'v, 




76 


39 


37 




37 


35 


53 61 


31 










{ : 


Helen R. Chalk, 




87 


49 


38 




40 


36 


52 


0.' 


29 




76 






11" 


Eouisa A. Pratt, 




92 


40 


52 


72 




40 


51 


64 


30 


34 






i < 


11 


Joanna S. Putnam 






4a 


3:i 


60 


35 


25 


46 


54 


32 


22 


60 




5 5 




Ellen M. Armstead, 


Bow street., 


65 


34 


31 


61 


31 


30 


37 


44 






61 




4 i 




0. VV. Troivhri.lj.., 




84 


30 


48 




32 


44 


58 


63 


25 


38 


76 








Sarah E. Smith, 




91 


40 


61 




.14 


40 


66 


68 


31 


37 


74 








Eliza'h R. Hamilton, 




79 


43 


36 


62 




27 


46 


53 


26 


25 


62 








Abby 13. llinekloy, 


Common street, 


98 


51 


47 


S3 


45 


38 




55 


28 




S3 




5 j 




Sophronia Worthon, 


0. H. street, at Point. 


80 


39 


41 




34 


411 


52 


58 


24 


34 


7-1 






IS 


l.r.h.i 51. Units, 




so 


47 


42 


76 


39 


37 


56 


66 


24 


42 








19 Louisa W. Huntress, 


Moulton street, 


87 


45 


4-2 


78 


43 




58 


117 


36 


31 


78 






iOl.M.ililtla. Oilman. 


Soloy street, 


70 


41 


29 


63 


32 


21 


38 


47 


2^ 


19 


52 


1 






Prances E. Everett, 


Sullivan street, 


89 


49 


40 


85 


45 


40 


64 


68 


4(1 


28 


85 








Frames M. Lane, 




S3 


41 


40 


78 


40 


38 


51 


65 




35 


78 








Helen G. Turn !r, 


Haverhill street, 


70 


37 


33 


58 


29 


29 


38 


54 


29 




51 


7 


4 j 




Catharine C. Broker, 


Common street, 


74 


40 


34 


69 


37 


32 


■ 44 


56 


29 


27 


69 








Atlaline M. Smith, 


Adjoi'tiWd Room 2, 
Alms-Houso, 


83 


42 


41 


71 


35 


36 


49 


GO 


31 


29 


71 




4 1 




Catli. M. Kimball, 


Bunker-Hill street, 


101 


56 


45 


90 


52 


38 


50 


60 


36 


24 


90 


1 9 ! 


:j': 


Jane B. I.oriile;, 


Eilirowonh street, 


83 




45 


80 


47 


33 


55 




36 


26 


80 


1 j ) 




I'amolia E. Dolano, 


Ward Room .\'o. 3, 


73 


43 


36 


67 


33 


3) 


48 59 


2S 


31 


67 


1 U \ 








2187 


1120 


1067 


1900 


9S3 


917 


\::::: 1572 


789 7S3 


;■?: 


8 ii74 I 



f 




Term ending November, I860. 


\ 
1 


j! 


Primary Schools 






\ 


















v 




a . 






Z = 






a 




f" '" « 


. 


Sub-Committees I 


t- 


Teachers Hames 


^ 


!' 


5 


f£ 


^ [ 3 


<i 


-K 


d 




51 


i 
Primary Schools. 1 


r 




2 f ~ 






Zz 


I 


< 




\fs\l° 


■X" 


1 


? I| Ellen M. Cruris, 


Si 


47 


37 7i 


36| 36, 51 


34 


22 


12 72 




11 'Tin, ,tl,v T. Saivjer .5 


J 2 M ilyina B pulton, 


79 
85 


40 


1 


70 




56 

50 


28 

27 


28 
23 


7 
71 


] 


s Henry c. Graves. 1 




87 


42 


45 


69 


33 31 16 


55 


25 


311 


68 


1 






91 


50 


41 


10 


35l 301 15 


5(1 


29 




66 








91 


56 






40| 27 


15 


57 


36 21 










Sli 


42 


4-1 


71 


31 




54 




23 27 


71 




10 1 do ' do. ' 1 




100 


50 


56 


85 


45 


10 


59 




40 


Mi 






12 Gustavus V. Hull. ( 




96 


42 


51 


09 


31 


38 


56 


63 


::o 


.33 


69 




2 Ahrom E Cutter, j 




SI 


46 


35 


70 


41 


29 


60 59 


35 


24 


70 




6 James 1!. Miles. 


! 12 Ellen M. Annstead, 


105 


53 




72 


37 




49 




34 


31 






6 James Ada,,,,.. i 


5I3C. VV. Trowl,rid»e. 


813 


42 


44 


67 


34 


:; 




67 


34 


33 








) 14 Sarah E. Smith, 


109 


57 


52 


78 


43 


:;:. 


61 


66 


33 


33 






S Edwin F.' Adams'. 


SI5 Eliza'h It. Hamilton 


1 "1 


58 


51 


61 


33 


::: 


42 


■u 




2!) 


06 




5 |W,n. VV. Wll lildon 


IS v.le. 1;. Hinckley, 


IIS 


66 


52 


86 


61 


Si 


56 


69 


39 


30 


SO 




5 Henry Lyon. J 




Ml 


43 


4'.: 


07 


31 


■ '■ 


50 


61 


28 


33 


67 




5 '(iioree 11. Ncal. f 


llhiuik^flnn'tress 


96 
92 


49 
43 


•17 
49 


73 
78 


39 
41 


34 
37 


5S 
59 


61 


31 


28 
24 


7S 




7 JohnSanhorri. ) 
4 ! do. do ) 




so 


4i 1 


34 


56 1 31 




-16 


51 




28 


56 




1-Jl'Pmni-os E. Kverott. 


104 


6.1 


41 


83| 51 




07 


721 43 


29 


S3 




4 


II. K. Frothinghum. 


jaa Frances M.Lane, 


110 




54 


90 


45 




66 


05 36 


30 


90 




4 




(_>:] Helen G. Turner. 


85 


45 


40 


08 


34 


34 




61 


31 


30 


68 




6 


Horace B. Wilbur. 


ji| Catharine C.Browor, 


101 


57 


44 




40 


31 




55 


29 


21 i 


74 






leoiae E. Neal. { 


■2 S I Adeline M. Smith, 


85 


39 


46 


92 


41 


51 


60 


73 


32 


■11 


97 




23 


i. Wash. VV'arreo. j 


126 






























lO-iSusan V. Moore, 


120 


59 


ill! 84 


41 


43 


77 


65 


31 


34 S4 




10 


Charles F. Smith ! 


1-28 Jane 1!. l.orin;, 




30 


321 65 


■:. 




!■; 


61 


30 


81 65 




'' 


1. Wash Warren. S 


■29 Pameiia E. Delano, 


95 


44 


51 76 


35 


41 


■is 


61 


28 


33 76 




8 


.-harlcs P. Smith, j 


I 1-2539 


122 


I217| 198s 


1031 


^i 


14171596 133:il 703 l l!!84 


JL 


202 





20 



It will be seen by reading the foregoing reports on 
the High and Grammar schools, that there are several 
subjects of importance and interest referred to, and re- 
commended with some decision and emphasis. The 
Public Exhibitions of the Schools, which for a long time 
heretofore have been authorized and encouraged, and 
which have called together large companies of the 
parents and friends of the children and teachers, 
are thought now to be of no practical utility. They 
are made up of exercises and representations, which 
are well enough for amusement and recreation, and 
which children will be very apt to spend a good deal 
of time about, but which time should not be taken from 
school hours. Heretofore we have thought that per- 
haps the gain in interest in the school, would compen- 
sate for the loss of time which has been taken in pre- 
paration for, and recovery from the excitement of the 
exhibition, but more careful reflection upon, and inquiry 
into the matter, has convinced us that neither teachers 
or scholars are paid for their trouble, and that the 
pleasure of those who witness the exhibitions would be 
very much lessened, if they understood that the time 
taken in preparation was so considerable as really to 
interrupt the course of study, and retard seriously the 
progress of the school. We are inclined, therefore, to 
recommend a discontinuance of these exhibitions, and a 
substitution of public examinations, on public days, 
when visitors will be expected , when they can hear the 
recitations and witness and listen to the usual exercises 
of the school, and so form a fair judgment of how the 



30 

children are employed, of the course of instruction, and 
of the manners and influence of the teachers over the 
children entrusted to their care. 

These remarks are intended to apply to the Grammar 
and High School exhibitions; but in the latter .case 
there is an additional reason for the discontinuance of 
the exhibition, which is referred to in the report on 
the school, and which we will repeat in the remark, 
that until a more spacious and convenient public hall 
than any now within the limits of the city shall be pro- 
vided, it will be impossible to have a satisfactory public 
exhibition of the Pligh. School. 

Another matter referred to in the semi-annual re- 
ports, is that much talked of subject — a Superintendent 
of the Schools. The appointment of such an officer 
depends upon the passage of an ordinance by the City 
Council, authorizing it to be done. Without such an or- 
dinance, the School Committee have no warrant, under 
the law, however much they may believe in its import- 
ance, to appoint or pay for the services of a School 
Superintendent. They can only appeal to the City 
Council ; and this they have done by presenting, early 
in the year (February 13,) a memorial, referring to pre- 
vious memorials, and setting forth some additional rea- 
sons why their request should be granted. The action 
upon the application of this year, so far as we have 
been able to learn, was a reference of the subject to 
the appropriate Joint Committee of the City Council, 
who have finished up their official year without making 
a report. So much has been said in previous reports 
on this subject, that it will be, perhaps, inexpedient 
and useless to enlarge upon it in this ; nevertheless we 



31 

shall venture again to ask for a careful examination of 
the subject, and to express our unanimous judgment 
that the ordinance should be passed, a Superintendent 
appointed, and the experiment be fairly tried. 

Our judgment is, that school privileges are afforded 
for our children, because that is the best use of so much 
of their time. Substantial and tasteful school-houses, 
neatly furnished, are provided, because the mind can 
be best developed and exercised, when the body is 
comfortable .and the senses calm. And what is accom- 
plished in the schools must be done by diligent and 
patient application to study. We know that children 
need physical exercise, amusement, and contact with 
the world, and that these are no less important than 
study and restraint ; but we firmly believe that habits 
of industry, and application, are essential to the proper 
enjoyment and use of time. And the school-room is 
not the place to effect much in the way of physical ex- 
ercise and developement, or to cultivate and gratify the 
lighter part of our natures. Employment for the mind 
and constant industry in that direction, should be the 
duty and desire for school hours. Freedom from re- 
straint, activity and mirth, for hours of recreation. 
The cultivation of the affections — a generous friend- 
ship and an unselfish spirit, is an unceasing demand, at 
home, in school and in the world. That they may 
understand, be happy, and be useful, is what we aim 
at, and mean, by the education of our children. 

By order of the Committee. 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, President. 
Charlestown, December, 1860. 



32 



GEO. B. NEAL, TREASURER, IN ACCOUNT WITH 
TRUSTEES OF CHARLESTOWN FREE SCHOOLS. 

Dr. 

1860. Jan. 1, To Balance brought forward, 645.65 

«'« 3, Interest on $5000 note, 6 mos. of City Treasurer, 150.00 

" 3, Tuition of sundry non-residents, ... ... 11.15 

May 11, Interest on $600 note, one year, of City Treasurer, 36.00 

July 3, « $5000 note, six months, " 150.00 



Cr, 



Jan. 24. By paid Elliott & White, Cyclopaedia No. 8, 3.50 



April 22, 

May 7, 

« 14, 

«* 14, 

Oct. 31, 



Mary Curtis, on acct. of salary, 12.50 
Elliott & White, Cyclopaedia No. 9. 3.50 
E. S. Ritchie, repairing apparatus, 75 
Smith, Knight & Tappan, diplomas, 12.50 
Elliott & White Cyclopedia No. 10, 3.50 



36.25 

Balance in hands of Treasurer, $956.55 



992,80 



GEORGE B. NEAL, Treasurer. 
Charlestown, Deeember 27, 1860. 



We the undersigned hereby certify that we have examined the above 
account, and have compared the several items thereof with their respective 
vouchers, and find the balance on hand to be nine hundred and fifty-six 
55 100 dollars, ($956.55.) 

W. W. WHEILDON, ■) 
GUSTAVUS V. HALL, I Committee. 
JOHN SANBORN, J 

Charlestown, Jan. 7, 1861.