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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



CITY OF GHAELESTO¥/N, 



DECEMBER, 1861. 




CHARLESTOWN : 

PRINTED BY CALEB RAND & CO. 

1862. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The School Committee of the City of Charlestown, 
in compliance with the Statute which requires it, 
make the following Report of their doings, and of 
the condition of the Public Schools under their 
charge during the past year. 

APPROPPJATIOX AND EXPENDITURE. 

At the commencement of the year, we made an es- 
timate of the amount which would be required for 
the support of the Schools, and asked the City Coun- 
cil for ^46,000, which was granted, in an appropria- 
tion of ^45.200, and the amount to be received from 
the State as the City's proportion of the income of the 
School Fund. This amount, which has since been 
received, is ^817 83, making a total of ^6 017 83. 
The appropriation was a liberal one, but we have 
not forgotten that the responsibility of its judicious 
expenditure rested wholly upon us ; and our aim has 
been to provide every thing mecessary for the proper 
management of the Schools, and to avoid every thing 
like waste or extravagance. The expenditures up to 
this time amount to ^33,402 45, which leaves a bal- 
ance of 12.615 38. Our estimate of the expenses for 
the remainder of the financial year is considerably 



less than this sum ; and we hope to have an unex- 
pended balance at that time, (March 1,) as great at 
least as last year, when ^1.959 11 was left to the 
credit of the School appropriation. 

CONDITION OF THE SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Before another winter, we think that the High 
School should be furnished with furnaces and hot-air 
pipes. An examination made during the summer 
vacation, shows that this change in the manner of 
heating the building can be made without difficulty, 
and at a reasonable expense ; and when it is effected, 
some contrivance for the better ventilation of the 
rooms, should be adopted and put in operation. The 
Grammar School Houses are in good condition, but 
they are not capacious enough to accommodate all the 
scholars, nor can they be enlarged sufficiently to ac- 
complish that object, without great expense, and then 
not to good advantage. We cannot judge what 
change the present troubles in ihe country may make 
in the population of our city, but if they should not 
check its increase, we think the building of another 
Grammar School House must soon be looked upon as 
a necessity. The new brick Primary School House in 
Mead Street, has been occupied since February, and 
that in Moulton Street, since March last ; and if we 
except a defect in the working of the furnace in the 
Mead Street building, our expectations in regard to 
them have been fully realized. The wooden building 
removed from Mead Street has been placed upon a 
fine lot of land hired for the purpose in Charles St., 
and it is now occupied by Primary School No. 1. 
This building is a good one, and it was originally 



framed and constructed so that it could be raised up, 
and another room built under it. As the lot of land 
referred to, is large enough for the accommodation of 
two schools, and another Primary School will have to 
be established in this vicinity soon, the alterations in 
this building should be made without much delay. 
We still think it would be well to dispose of the old 
building on Elm Street, and to provide another room 
for the school occupying it. We should also say that 
the Furniture in some of the Primary Schools is 
rather ancient, and should be exchanged for a more 
suitable article. Intermediate School No. 2 has 
been removed from the basement of the Prescott 
School-house, to a room in the Ward Room building, 
on Main Street. The Sub-Committee on that School 
represents the room at present occupied, as unfit, and 
thinks another, somewhere in the vicinity, should be 
provided with as little delay as possible. 

TRUANCY. 

The increase in the number of day policemen in the 
city, has operated favorably in checking the evil of 
truancy, and in protecting the schools from the bad 
influence of vagrant and neglected children ; and if 
the place assigned, at the Aims-House was really an 
" institution of instruction, house of reform, or a suit- 
able situation for the commitment of truants," as re- 
quired by the Statutes, we think this serious trouble 
could be pretty eflectually controlled in our city. Its 
territory is so limited, that its high-ways and its by- 
ways could be visited every day by the truant offi- 
cers, and with vigilance in the discharge of their 
duties, but little chance would be left for truants and 



mischief-makers among the children of our communi- 
ty. In many, we hope in most cases, constant watch- 
fulness on the part of these officers, with advice and 
admonition to parents and children, would accomplish 
the object : but some cases would require the author- 
ity of the Truant Justice ; and with such, the duty 
of the policeman is finished when his complaint is 
made and his evidence given. Then the duty of the 
Justice is completed by ordering the commitment of 
the ofiender to the '■^institution of reform,''' which the 
Statute says is to be provided by the City Council. 
But the City Council has provided no such place ; and 
by this omission, has virtually denied its obligation 
to care for neglected or vicious children, or to protect 
others against their hurtful influence ; and so upon it, 
rests the whole responsibility, of exposing our schools 
and our families to the influence of truancy and the 
evils which grow out of it. Now we think that the 
truant law contemplates the reform and elevation, of 
those who are growing up in ignorance and pursuing 
paths of wickedness ; and that " a suitable situation 
for their commitment," can only be a place where ar- 
rangements have been faithfully made for their 
restraint, instruction and employment. And if the 
providing of such a. place, with teachers and officers 
qualified for the performance of their duties, should 
add somewhat to the annual expenses of the city, it 
would add much more to the comfort of tax payers, 
and the security of property ; and it would certainly 
lighten the hearts, and strengthen the hands, of pa- 
rents and teachers. We have so often referred to 
this subject of the care of truant children, that we 
fear our present remarks will be but little heeded ; 



nevertheless, until we have waked up an interest in the 
subject, in the minds of the parties under whose 
charge this class of children have been placed by the 
law, our appeals in this direction must be continued* 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The eommittee chosen just before the close of the 
last year to arrange the Primary School districts, made 
a report early this year, which was accepted by the 
Board, and its recommendations carried into effect. 
Two new schools were established, and placed under 
the charge of Miss F. B. Hall and Miss E. W. Yeaton, 
making the whole number of Primary Schools twenty- 
nine instead of twenty-seven, as last year ; and now, 
some of the schools in Ward Three are so full that 
another will have to be established immediately. Dur- 
ing the year the changes of teachers in these schools 
have been as follows : — Miss M. J. Smith has been 
elected to No. 3, Miss H. H. Sampson, the former 
teacher, having resigned on the 2d of May. Miss M. 
J. Hale was, on the 20th of June elected teacher of 
No. 5, in place of Miss Deblois. On the 5th of Sep- 
tember Miss Helen P. Chalk resigned from School 
No. 9, and her place has since been filled by the elec- 
tion of Miss Ellen T. Knight. Miss E. P. Brower has 
been elected to No. 16, Miss A. E. Hinckley having 
resigned on the 5th of September. 

With a few exceptions, the Primary Schools are in 
a very good condition. From some of the reports we 
take such remarks as the following : " discipline un- 
satisfactory — -the teacher lacks energy, &c." But gen- 
erally the teachers are commended for their ability and 
faithfulness. In many instances they are spoken of 



8 

as having the affection of their pupils, and the entire 
confidence of parents and committee ; a remark, which, 
when warranted by the facts in the case, is full of 
meaning, and covers the whole ground of favorable 
notice. For the entire confidence of the committee 
can hardly be secured without good discipline and 
thorough instruction: the confidence of parents can 
be deserved only, where gentle manners and pure ex- 
ample, are reflecting their influence upon their chil- 
dren ; and the hearts of children can only be reached 
by those who understand and love them. It is impos- 
sible to over estimate the value of Primary Schools ; 
and a really faithful and efficient Primary School teach- 
er, is one of the most useful persons in the field of ed- 
ucation. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

Since their establishment, these schools have always 
been looked upon as very important, and as deserving 
the interest and encouragement of all who believe in 
the value and importance of general education. They 
are designed as especial blessings, to children who 
have suffered from neglect, or who have been so cir- 
cumstanced as to fail of the care and instruction which 
most children, in this vicinity, enjoy ; and they have 
been the means of helping into the current of educa- 
tion, a large number of those who were drifting about 
with but a poor chance of finding it themselves, and 
but little hope of avoiding the troubles and dangers 
which their failure to do so, must occasion. We say 
again of them, therefore, that they are very important 
schools ; and for no better purpose can the public 
money be spent, or the public interest be excited, than 



for their support and encouragement. Of School No. 1 , 
the Spring report speaks as follows : " The result of 
the examination shows that, by assiduous endeavors, 
the teacher has been as successful as could reasonably 
be expected." In December, the committee say: 
" Many of the scholars read finely, and most of them 
intelligibly, and with good spirit, indicating that the 
teacher had been careful and critical in her instruc- 
tions ; there were but few errors in the exercise of 
spelling, and the questions in arithmetic were, in gen- 
eral, promptly and correctly answered. We commend 
the teacher to the continued confidence of the Board." 
School No. 2, is reported upon in the Spring as fol- 
lows : " The teacher possesses the faculty of arousing 
the ambition of her pupils, and stimulating them to 
persistent efforts for improvement. Her success dur- 
ing the brief period she has been employed in our 
schools, has been highly gratifying. She assumed the 
care of this school at the commencement of the term 
just passed, and has fitted thirty-one pupils for the 
grammar schools during the time. Observation of the 
working of the school, has convinced us that some of 
the primary school teachers are too much inclined to 
neglect their dull and sluggish-minded pupils ; sever- 
al cases might be mentioned, of children, who, after 
spending four years in a primary school, have been 
sent to the Intermediate, unable to read the simplest 
sentences intelligibly, or even to distinguish all the 
letters of the alphabet ; and yet, with a little extra 
care and attention, have in a short time made very 
good progress. In December, the report says : " The 
school continues to maintain an excellent reputation ; 
forty-one pupils have been promoted during the term." 

2 



10 



HARVARD SCHOOLS. 



TEACHERS. 



ISo. 1. 
C. S. CARTEE, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ANNE E. WESTON, 
MARTHA BLOOD, 
SARAH E. ARCHER. 



m. 2. 

JOSEPH B. MORSE, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ELIZABETH SWORDS, 
CAROLINE S. CROZIER, 
HANNAH J. BLISS. 



Sub-Committee—WM.. W. WHEILDON, 
B. F. BROWN, 
NATHAN A. TUFTS. 

The committee make the following remarks con- 
cerning these Schools, in their Spring report : " So 
far as we have been able to judge, from frequent visits, 
and the examination in April, the good character of 
these schools is fully maintained, and the teachers are 
disposed to discharge their duties in a faithful man- 
ner. The instruction in arithmetic and grammar, in 
the upper division of School No. 1, appeared to have 
been rather too superficial. The pupils were far 
enough advanced in these studies, but did not seem to 
understand them as well as we could desire, a defect, 
which, we hope to see remedied hereafter. The third 
division of the school appeared particularly well. 
School No. 2, passed a very satisfactory examination. 
The exercises held under a vote of the Board, on the 
22d of February, the anniversary of the birth-day of 
Washington, were of an exceedingly interesting char- 
acter, and, we believe, made an impression upon the 
scholars, and we cannot but express the hope that the 
observance of that day, as thus inaugurated, will be 
hereafter continued, for, in addition to the appropri- 
ateness of the principal exercise, some of the most in- 
teresting facts and events in the history of the coun- 



11 

try are presented or suggested to the pupils, in a man- 
ner to impress them upon their memories." The 
committee further report " that the recent modifica- 
tion decided by the Board, in regard to exhibitions, is 
commended to them by the experience of the late ex- 
hibition in these schools. The exercises on these 
occasions were much more select and suitable than 
they have been heretofore, and they afforded a better 
opportunity to judge of the capacity and progress 
of the scholars, particularly those in the upper divis- 
ions." 

In December, the committee say : " We have made 
the customary semi-annual examination of the several 
divisions of these schools, and have a favorable report 
to make concerning them. The examinations of the 
first and second divisions were uncommonly thorough, 
and every scholar had an opportunity of exhibiting 
before the committee the progress made in the studies 
of the school. Of the Principals, and their several 
Assistants, all of whom have been long in the service 
of the city, we have to say, that they are patient, faith- 
ful and indefatigable in the discharge of their respec- 
tive duties." 



12 



BUNKER-HILL SCHOOL. 

TEACBERS. 

WM. H. SANDERS, Principal. L. A. DARLING, Sub-Master. 



ASSISTANTS- 



CAROLINE PHIPPS, 
PHOEBE A. KNIGHT, 
MARY S. THOMAS. 



ANNIE M. LUND, 
MARTHA A. BIGELOW, 
CAROLINE E. BIGELOW, 

Sub- Committee— KE^'SCY E. GRAVES, 
WILLIAM FINNEY, 
MARK F. WARREN, 
A. L. PAINE. 

In May, the committee report as follows : " This 
school has maintained its good reputation for the last 
half year. The examinations were conducted in a 
thorough manner, and were well sustained by most 
of the pupils. We find no reason to detract from pre- 
vious commendations of the Principal — his division 
showed correct and patient drilling. We are gratified 
to mention the improved condition of the Sub-Master's 
division ; he is showing himself faithful and increas- 
ingly efiicient in his method of teaching. The divis- 
ions in charge of the female teachers, are generally 
making good progress. In one of these divisions, we 
found an illustration of the loss occasioned to pupils, 
by irregularity of attendance ; to the questions pro- 
posed by the committee, correct answers were given, 
except by six or seven boys, who had been often ab- 
sent — under faithful teaching, these delinquents are 
easily detected. We feel obliged to notice a lack of 
interest, or of well directed effort, on the part of one 
of the teachers, which we believe she has power to 
remedy, and we confidently look for improvement ac- 
cording to the hints already given. We still urge the 
necessity of a hall for general exercises, and we hope 
the proper authorities will soon provide one." 



13 

In December, the committee say : " The school, in 
the main, is in a prosperous condition. We think 
there is in this, as in most of our grammar schools, a 
want of more comprehensive instruction, such as shall 
include the most important things to be learned in 
every branch of study. The examinations disclose 
the fact that very essential matters are often omitted. 
We think it important that the instruction in every 
study should be as complete as possible, from the fact 
that only a small number of pupils receive the advan- 
tages of schools of a higher grade. We report the 
pupils under the care of the Principal as industrious, 
and as making thorough work of what they undertake. 
In the next division, they had not advanced as rapidly 
as seemed desirable, especially in the important study 
of arithmetic. They had evidently been in the habit 
of doing things too much by rote. The other divis- 
ions are making good progress. The school is under 
good discipline, and the teachers are faithful." 



14 



WARREN SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. 

GEORGE SWAN, Principal. WILLIAM BAXTER, Sub-Master. 
ASSISTANTS. 



MARY A. OSGOOD, 
MARIA BROWN, 
MARY J. FULLER. 



MARGARET VEAZIE, 
REBECCA M. PERKINS, 
JULIA A. WORCESTER. 



SM^)-Com»^^■«ee— GEORGE B. NEAL, 
HERBERT CURTIS, 
CHARLES T. SMITH. 

From the May report, we take the following : " The 
condition of this school, since the date of the last re- 
port, has continued to be very satisfactory, both as 
regards discipline and progress. The usual public 
exhibition was dispensed with, much to the gratifica- 
tion of the teachers and the benefit of the pupils. 
The want of a suitable Exhibition Hall for this school 
would be a sufiScient reason for such a course ; but 
the reasons which influenced the Board in making 
the change, and which are given in the last Annual 
Report, are stronger than this, of defect in the build- 
ing. The examination of the different classes was 
conducted in the usual manner by the sub-committee 
of this school, assisted by one member of the sub- 
committee of the Bunker-Hill School, and although, 
on account of important business engagements on the 
part of some members of the committee, the examina- 
tion of some of the classes was not as complete as 
could be desired, yet enough was done to prove that 
all the teachers had been faithful, and were devoted 
to their duties ; and that their pupils, with few 
exceptions, were making good progress in their 
studies." 



15 

In December, the committee remark : " The condi- 
tion of the school, as a whole, is exceedingly satisfac- 
tory, and- all the teachers, for their ability and general 
♦ success in their labors, are entitled to the full confi- 
dence of the Board, and the approbation of the parents 
and friends of the pupils. The examination of the 
class under the charge of the Principal, was conduct- 
ed by a member of the sub-committee of the Harvard 
School, in presence of another member of that com- 
mittee, and the chairman of the committee on this 
school. This was done, in order that a comparison 
of this class with the highest classes in the other 
grammar schools might be made, as these gentlemen 
were intending to visit all the other schools for the 
same purpose. The readiness and general accuracy 
displayed by the pupils in their answers to the ques- 
tions proposed, gave great pleasure and satisfaction to 
the examining committee. The other classes in the 
school were faithfully examined, and were found to 
have accomplished all that could reasonably be ex- 
pected of them." 

The new furnaces which have recently been set in 
the basement of the building, are working well, and 
there can be no question now, that they will thorough- 
ly warm the building, and at less expense than the 
stoves which were formerly used. 



16 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 



TEACHERS. 



m. 1. 

B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Princi^Ml. 

ASSISTANTS, 

SOPHIA W. PAGE, 
ISABELLA P. MOULTON, 
ANN M. HOBBS, 
MARY F. GOLDTHWAIT. 



No. 2. 

SAM'L S. WILLSON, Principal. 

ASSISTANTS. 

NANCY M. CASWELL, 
ELLA A. RICHARDSON, 
SARAH H. WOODMAN, 
ABBY M. CLARK, 
AMELIA R. HAMILTON. 



Sub- CommiWee— HENRY LYON, 

JOHN SANBORN, 
JAMES R. MILES. 

" The several divisions of the school were subjected 
to a thorough, discriminative examination during the 
time prescribed by the rules of the Board. As here- 
tofore, the examination of corresponding divisions was 
made by the same members of the committee. The 
pupils under the care of the Principals gave evidence 
of having been well drilled in the prescribed studies. 
They were soon after examined for admission to the 
High School, and the result was far from complimen- 
tary to their proficiency in the required studies. We 
are unable to harmonize these results, apparently so 
inconsistent one with the other. The intermediate 
divisions were found to be, on the whole, in a satis- 
factory condition. The pupils had made good pro- 
gress in their several studies, and the teachers had 
evidently worked energetically to produce this result. 
We speak in general terms. Faults and defects in 
method and manner of teaching, &c., have been ad- 
verted to, and admonition and advice applied in cases 
which seemed to require it. What we have said of 
the intermediate divisions, will also apply to the lower 
divisions, except the one kept outside the original 



17 

school-rooms, which was not found in so satisfactory 
a condition. It must be borne in mind, however, that 
the Winthrop Schools have been inconveniently 
crowded with pupils since the last examination, and 
the lower divisions have suffered most. At the pre- 
sent time there are more pupils than can be accom- 
modated, and some provision must be made at once to 
relieve them." 

In December, the committee report : " The schools 
are found to be in a fair average condition. After the 
admission of ' primarians,' in the Spring, both schools 
had more pupils than seats, and we were authorized 
to provide accommodations for the surplus pupils. 
This was done, by fitting up the room in the base- 
ment of the building lately occupied by a primary 
school, and about twenty pupils were taken from each 
school, and placed under the charge of a new teacher. 
This room is not suitable for permanent use ; it is ill 
shaped, and so situated that it cannot be kept warm 
in winter or cool in summer, or well ventilated at any 
season. Several of the other rooms in the Winthrop 
School building are poorly adapted to the use which 
is made of them. 

The subject of providing increased accommodations 
for the pupils in the Grammar School district, by 
alterations in the interior arrangement of the school 
house, and by an enlargement of the building, has had 
consideration by the committee, but they have not 
been able to devise any feasible plan for carrying out 
that object. The building is poorly adapted for alter- 
ations ; it is long and narrow, and the lot of ground 
upon which it is located is none too large for present 
accommodations ; and as all the grammar schools in 
3 



18 

the city are larger than can be accommodated by the 
present provision of rooms and seats, and a new school 
house must soon be built, we think it would be un- 
wise to recommend any large expenditure for altera- 
tions in the Winthrop School building. We must 
submit to inconvenience, and get along with such ac- 
commodations as we have, hoping that the state of 
affairs may soon be such as to warrant the erection of 
another large and conveniently arranged Grammar 
School House. 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 



TEACHEES. 



JOSEPH T. SWAN, Principal. 

STACY BAXTER, Principal of 2d Division. 



ASSISTANTS. 



SARAH M. CHANDLER, 
MARY J. BROWN, 
H. A. T. DADLEY, 
HANNAH M. SAWYER, 



ABBY L. SWAN, 
JOSEPHINE M. FLINT, 
FRANCES M. CLARK, 
AMY E. BRADFORD, 



Sub-Commiftee—JAM.'ES ADAMS, 

GUSTAVUS V. HALL. 
ABRAM E. CUTTER, 
TIMOTHY T. SAWYER. 

The committee report in May, as follows ; " The 
school was examined during the time required by the 
regulations of the Board. The eight rooms under the 
care of female teachers were divided between the sev- 
eral members of the committee, each member exam- 
ining two divisions. All the teachers, it is believed, 
have been faithful and successful in their labors, and 
the scholars are making good progress in their studies. 
All the members of the committee were present, at 
the examination of the upper classes, under the mas- 



19 

ters. The first division appeared well, and the teach- 
er continues to get a good deal of work out of his 
scholars. The other division passed a good examina- 
tion, and afforded evidence of the peculiar fitness of its 
teacher for his work. His recitations were managed 
with vigor, and his pupils were interested and enliv- 
ened by his judicious oral instruction. In accord- 
ance Avith a vote of the Board, the school has been 
arranged in two parallel divisions. The supervision 
of the rooms under the care of Misses Brown, Swan, 
Sawyer and Clark, has been given to Mr. Swan ; and 
those under Misses Chandler, Dadley, Flint and Brad- 
ford, to Mr. Baxter. Under this arrangement, we 
think the discipline and success of the whole school 
will be improved and accomplished." 

In December, the committee say : " There has been 
no material change in the Prescott School since its 
examination in April. At its recent examination, it 
was found that the number of scholars generally in 
attendance, was fully equal to the whole number of 
seats in all the rooms. Consequently, when the pro- 
motions are made from the Primary Schools, it will 
be necessary to furnish another room with desks and 
seats. The teachers in the school are laborious and 
faithful, and in several of the rooms the pupils were 
found to have made a high degree of progress in their 
studies, indicating peculiar adaptation and success in 
the labors of their teachers. Good order and neatness 
prevail throughout the building and its appurten- 
ances." 



20 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

TEACHERS. 
CHAS. E. STETSON, Principal. GEO. W. WARREN, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS 
KATHERINE WHITNEY, I MARY CURTIS, 

FRANCES M. READ, | HELEN F. WEST 

Sub- Committee— TIMOTBY T. SAWYER, 

WILLIAM W. WHEILDON, 
HENRY LYON, 
JAMES B. MILES, 
HENRY C. GRAVES, 

From the report of the committee in May, we ex- 
tract the following : " The school is, in our opinion, 
in good condition ; and the teachers have successfully 
labored to keep it up to its former standing. The 
Public Examination, which took place on the 24th of 
April, was a very interesting occasion, and the opinion 
was very general among those who attended it, that 
it was much more satisfactory than the Public Exhi- 
bitions have been heretofore. Every scholar in the 
school was heard in some recitation ; and each teach- 
er conducted the examination of his or her classes. 
But very little time had been taken up in preparation 
for the occasion ; not enough to interrupt or interfere 
with the usual exercises and business of the school. 
The declamation by several of the scholars was un- 
usually good ; the pieces selected were appropriate, 
and they were spoken with intelligence and spirit. 
A few members of the graduating class expressed dis- 
appointment and regret that the exhibition had been 
dispensed with, but generally the change was approved 
of, and we are decidedly of opinion that the experi- 
ment should be persevered in. The Graduating Class 
of this year numbered twenty-six, and diplomas were 
presented to all but two of them." 



21 

The report in December, speaks of the School as 
follows : " It is still in excellent condition, and all 
the teachers are performing their duties creditably to 
themselves and profitably to their pupils and the city. 
The new Sub-Master entered upon his duties imme- 
diately after his election (September 12th,) and the 
good judgment of the Board in selecting him has been 
fully sustained by his success. He has unquestioned 
ability, and he enjoys the respect and confidence of 
both teachers and scholars." The condition of the 
classes will be seen by the reports of the different 
members of the committee who examined them. The 
result of Mr. Miles's examination is stated by him as 
follows : " The classes assigned to me, were those in 
Latin and Greek, which are under the instruction of 
the Principal ; and one class in Latin, which had been 
but a few weeks taught by Miss Eeed. Of the mode 
in which the examination was conducted, I would say, 
each individual member of the several classes was 
called upon to read and render a somewhat extended 
passage, and was also questioned freely in respect to 
the principles of grammar, the composition and deri- 
vation of words, and historical, geographical and bio- 
graphical references. The passages read were chosen 
at random from the entire portions of the several 
studies that had been pursued, and the pupils received 
no previous notice of th(3 particular passages they 
would be called upon to translate. This course was 
adopted for the purpose of ascertaining whether the 
scholars had studied with simple reference to their 
daily recitations, or had so familiarized their knowl- 
edge as to have it at command wherever it might be 
called for. It gives me pleasure to say, the results of 



22 

the examination were generally satisfactory. They 
gave evidence of the industry and fidelity of the Prin- 
cipal, and showed that the instruction, in this depart- 
ment, is to a gratifying extent, nice, thorough, dis- 
criminating, comprehensive, and that it had not failed 
to be appreciated and improved by a large majority of 
the pupils. Considerable diversity was noticed in the 
character of the recitations, in regard to neatness, fin- 
ish and general excellence. While the most of them 
were quite good, only a few were poor or decidedly 
bad. In some of the pupils was discoverable the 
genuine scholar's enthusiasm, which is ever the pro- 
mise and pledge that the goal of superior scholarship 
will be reached in due time." 

Mr. Wheildon says, in his report : " I attended at 
the High School on four different days, and examined, 
as far as I was able in the time appropriated, two of 
Miss Whitney's classes in Rhetoric ; two of Miss 
Reed's classes in Rhetoric ; Miss Whitney's class on 
the Constitution of the United States, and two of Miss 
Reed's classes in the History of the United States ; 
and I may say in general terms, of all of them, that I 
was much gratified with the evidence lurnished of the 
proficiency of the teachers. The classes in Rhetoric 
showed themselves fully acquainted with that branch 
of study, as explained and illustrated in the text-book, 
with as clear an idea of its principles and rules as the 
book itself affords. The class on the Constitution of 
the United States is to be commended in the same 
terms, and I was equally surprised and gratified to 
find, in nearly all the members of the class, a very 
good general understanding of the provisions of the 
great fundamental law of the nation, and the various 



23 

modes of action of the general government under it. 
With a few practical explanations and illustrations, 
which I was only too happy to be able to give them, 
and which they were glad to receive, I felt sure that 
mainly by their own study and the instructions of 
their teacher, they all had a better idea of the princi- 
ples and workings of our government than a large 
portion of those who enjoy that great right of free- 
men — the elective franchise. Miss Eeed's classes in 
History were quite perfect in all their answers, and 
gave evidence of industry and application on their 
part, and fidelity on the part of the teacher." 

Mr. Graves remarks as follows : " I have examin- 
ed the following classes in the High School : the Ju- 
nior Class, 77 pupils, in Arithmetic ; the 2d Middle 
Class, 25 pupils, in Latin and Algebra ; the 1st Mid- 
dle Class, 20 pupils, in Geometry. The 1st Middle 
Class, under Miss Reed's tuition, had studied the first 
three books of Geometry, and were evidently thorough- 
ly instructed, not only in the method of demonstration, 
but also in the principles involved. The 2d Middle 
Class, under the Sub-Master, Mr. Warren, appeared to 
great advantage in the Algebra examination. The pu- 
pils had advanced from the beginning of the book, as 
far as Quadratic Equations, and had done their work 
well. The mathematical training of this class, under 
Mr. Warren, has been highly successful. The exam- 
ination of the same class, in Latin, showed a greater 
variety than in the Mathematics. Some of the pupils 
showed fine proficiency, and others had apprehended 
the language as thus far pursued, but indifierently 
well, while a few failed almost entirely. They had 
been confined to the study of twenty fables in the 



24 

Reader. The method of teaching is very thorough ; 
calculated, in fact forcing the scholar to think clearly 
and independently. The Junior Class, in these divis- 
ions, was examined in Arithmetic as far as the Cube 
Root. The majority of this large class have done a 
thorough work in this study. There are very few 
sluggish or indifferent ones here, and those that are 
of this description find it next to impossible to remain 
in the class without some considerable efibrt." 

Dr. Lyon reports as follows : " I have attended to 
the duty assigned me, by examining classes of Miss 
West, in Anatomy and Physiology ; Miss Curtis, in 
the rudiments of Latin and French ; Miss Read, in 
French ; and Miss Whitney, in French and Philoso- 
phy. The pupils in Miss West's classes answered 
promptly such questions as were put to them, and 
showed clearly that the teacher must have labored 
assiduously to explain the principles taught, and the 
advantages to be gained by an acquaintance with them. 
The school is deficient in the apparatus and models 
accessary to teach Anatomy and Physiology ; these, 
and a good set of colored plates representing the body 
and its organs, should be provided, in order that the 
lessons of the text-books may be properly impressed 
and enforced upon the minds of the pupils. For, to 
teach Anatomy and Physiology without the bones and 
apparatus, such as models, plates, &c., is like teach- 
ing Chemistry without ex;hibiting chemical substances, 
or Botany without the examination of plants. Miss 
Curtis's class, in the rudiments of Latin and French, 
gave evidence of having been well drilled. There are 
several pupils in her division who appear to be gain- 
ing nothing by the study of either Latin or French — 



25 

they belong to the class which we have always had 
in the school, who never make any considerable pro- 
gress in either of these languages. Some pupils, either 
through natural constitution of mind, want of tact, or 
from other causes, never make any headway in these 
studies. They may be equal to their fellows in all 
sports and in some studies ; but they manifest no 
capacity for the studies in question. What shall 
be done with them 1 They are a drag upon their 
class. Shall the whole continue to suffer on account 
of the inefficiency of the few 1 Cannot some means 
be devised by which such pupils may be put upon 
more congenial studies 1 Or must they worry on for 
a longer or shorter period, as heretofore, and then 
drop from the school 1 Miss Reed's and Miss Whit- 
ney's classes in French had made good progress, and 
appear to have had careful instruction. Several of 
Miss Whitney's pupils showed much clearness in turn- 
ing French into English, and English into French. 
I am satisfied that one can get, at our High School, a 
good foundation in this language. If we could afford 
it, I should be much in favor of employing a native 
French teacher for such advanced pupils as might 
wish to pursue the study of the language beyond what 
we can now teach with our present corps of teachers ; 
and for the special purpose, also, of enabling them to 
acquire a correct tone and accent in the pronunciation 
of the language." 



26 



At the close of the term ending November, 1861, 
the Schools, Teachers and Scholars numbered as 
follows : 



29 Primaries. 


29 Teachers. 


2092 


Scholars. 


2 Intermediate. 


2 


152 


(. 


7 Grammar. 


45 


2237 


u 


1 High. 


6 
82 Teachers. 


150 


li 


39 Schools. 


4631 


Scholars. 



Calculating the expenses of the year at ^44.000, 
the cost per scholar will be ^^9.46. 

The following tables will afford other important 
information concerning the schools. 



SCHOOL RETURNS, AT THE SEmI-ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS, 



figl!, (iriiiniiutr itnlJ Intermediate 



SCH©©ItiS. 



High School, ------ 

Bunker-Hill School, - - - 

Warren School, - - - - - 

Winthrop School, No. 1, 

do. No. 2, 

Harvard School, No. 1, 

do. No. 2, 

Prescott School, - . . - - 

Intermediate School, No. 1, 

do. No. 2. 



Teiin cndim; April, <% r7 



143 

528 
400 
306 
284 
224 
227 
602 
60 
91 



2865 



40 103 

287 241 
198 202 



165 
138 
127 
109 
306 
30 
40 



141 

146 

97 

118 

296 

30 

51 



1440,1425 



128 

453 

359 

253 

252 

191 

172 

541 

55 

71 

24". 5 



Term eiidiiig rHovembcr, 18C1. 



34 


94 j 130 


242 


211 399 


183 


176i 334 


133 


120 220 


122 


130 215 


104 


87j 164 


81 


91| 157 


276 


265 


479 


26 


29 


33 


30 


41 


49 


1231 


1244 


2180 



hi 






122 

4 

6 

5 

11 

11 



6 
524 
342 
248 
241 
180 
167 
530 
55 
71 



33 I 
18| 
26 j 
39 I 
31 j 
26; 
30 
13 
5 
10 
"231 



177 
572 
431 
308 
306 
216 
252 
669 
108 
110 



55 122 
290 282 



208 
160 
149 
119 
124 
346 
58 
60 



223 

148; 

1571 

97 

128 

323j 

50 

50 



50 


lou 


226 


223 


179 


185 


124 


103 


128 


135 


92 


68 


105 


104 


302 


263 


38 


34 


50 


30 







161 
383 
320 
201 
213 
142 
164 
491 
50 
60 



3149 1509 1580 2539 129-1 1245 2185 2279 181 



W 



149 
399 
337. 
221 1 
233 
138 
179: 
510 
5l| 
62 




Primary Schools. 



rEACHEKS NAMES, 



Location of 
PKIMAET 



endlMS April, 1861. 



11 Ellen M. Crafts, 
2i Malvina B. Skilton, 
3 Maria J. Smith — sub. 
4 

5 Lizzie Deblois, 

6 Frances Hichborn, 

7 Mary A. Foster, 

8 Alice S. Wiley, 

9 Helen R. Chalk, 
lOi Louisa A. Pratt, 

11 Joanna S. Putnam, 
121 Ellen M. Armstead, 

13 C. W. Trowbridge, 

14 Sarah E. Smith, 

15 E. R. Hamilton, 

16 E. R. Brower— sub. 

17 Sophronia Worthen, 

18 Lydia M. Butts, 

19 L. W. Huntress, 

20 Matilda Oilman, 

21 F. E. Everett, 

22 Frances M. Lane, 

23 Helen G. Turner, 
24j C. C. Brower, 

2-5 A. M. Smith, 
26j 

27 Susan V. Moore, 

28 Jane B. Loring, 

29 Pamelia E. Delano, 



Mead 

Mead " 

Elm 

Medford " 
Boylston Chapel 
Cross Street, 
Cross " 

Common " 
(^^ommon ** 



IBow 
Bow 

Common * 

Mo^llton * 

Moulton • 

Moulton ' 
Soley 

Sullivan ' 

Sullivan ' 

Haverhill ' 

Common ' 

Bunk. Hill ' 

Moulton ' 

Bunk. Hill ' 

Moulton ' 
Mead 



34! 



93 41| o2i 56 

76 36 40 52 

40, 281 



89 42 
67 



36 61 

34 72 

25I 58 

42 68 

40 73 

41 60 
34 73 

43 69 
3-5 66 

44 83 
39 61 
34 81 
36l 68 
38i 62 
47 81 



29 



41 42 
35I 32 
39i 40 



32: 29 
34! 38 
36l 22 
40 28 



83 42, 41 
64 31| 33 
57 33: 24 

25; 24 
22- 18 
23 20 
33 20 
331 30 
30 



67 

60 34 
60i 26 



rjmary Schools. 



■•^ACHEES NAMES, 



illcn M. Crafts, 
ilizabeth W.Yeaton 
iCaria J. Smith, 
ialvina B. Skilton, 
Jlartha R. Hale, 
.ranees Hichborn, 

[ary A. Foster, 
ilice S. Wilev, 
iUen T. Knight, 
iouisa A. Pratt, 
Joanna S. Putnam, 
,llen M. Armstead, 
;. W. Trowbridge, 
iarah E. Smith, 
J. R. Hamilton, 
^■. R. Brower, 
y Worthen, 
jydia M. Butts, 
^uisa W. Huntress 
latilda Oilman, 
Frances E. Everett, 
^ranees M. Lane, 
jlelen G. Turner, 

. C. Brower, 
;daline M. Smith, 
^anny B. Hall, 
'usan y, Moore, 
-Tine B. Loring, 

amelia E. Delano, 



33 56 

29 41 

36 54 

40 50 



STJB-OOMMITTEES 



Primary Schools. 



84. 
65. 
77. 
70 1 
7.5'. 
43 
70'. 
65. 
69. 
65. 
53'.. 
74' 
71| 
105 
71 
72' 
67 
74 
76 
73 



2786 1403|1383l2092'l046 10461159611729 8541875 2067 4l273 



9,Mark F. Warren, 
22;Nathan A. Tufts. 
12 William H. Finney, 

5 Alphonso L. Paine, 
27|Charles F. Smith, 

8|Henrv C. Graves, 

6 Gustivus V. Hall, 
10 Abram E. Cutter, 
14|Abram E. Cutter, 

2 George B. Neal, 
2|James B. Miles, 
6jJames Adams, 
4jJames Adams, 

lOiNathan A. Tufts, 
5;Wm. W. Wheildon, 
4:Henry Lyon, 
4 John Sanborn, 

7 John Sanborn, 
7'Benjamin F. Brown, 
9Tiraothy T. Sawyer, 

17!Herbert Curtis, 
15jHerbert Curtis, 
6'Mark F. Warren, 

3 George B. Neal, 
7,Benj. F. Brown, 
9]James Lee, Jr. 

I61A. L Paine, 
10 James Lee, Jr. 
17 Wm. H. Finney, 



27 



The foregoing Reports give the result of the exam- 
ination of the several Grammar and the High Schools, 
which, on the whole, are represented to be in good 
condition. The visits of the members of the commit- 
tee have been as frequent, we think, as could reason- 
ably be expected ; and their interest in the schools 
has no doubt been as great as is usual with similar 
committees in other places. They receive no compen- 
sation for their services, and many of them have not 
even children attending the schools ; nevertheless, 
their duties have always been cheerfully performed, 
and the meetings of the Board have been fully attend- 
ed. But every day's experience convinces us that more 
attention is needed than can possibly be given to the 
schools by the members of the School Committee, and 
we are more and more convinced, that, in addition to 
the oversight and care which is now exercised by them, 
the services of a School Superintendent are needed. 
Early in the? year, the attention of the City Council 
was again called to this subject by us, and as the 
Mayor, in his iVddress, had recommended the passage 
of an Ordinance authorizing such an officer to be em- 
ployed, we had strong hopes that this very desirable 
object would be accomplished, and that we could, in 
this report, refer to the appointment and employment, 
rather than to the need of such an officer. But in 
this we have been disappointed. We are glad, how- 
ever, to know that the Committee on Public Instruc- 
tion, of the City Council, at the last meeting of the 
Council, reported " An Ordinance for the appoint- 
ment of a Superintendent of Schools," and that it was 
referred, with a recommendation for its adoption, to 



28 

the next City Council ; and we trust that the mem- 
bers of that body will give the subject very early and 
careful consideration, and be convinced of the neces- 
sity for favorable action on the report and recommen- 
dation referred to. And as a help to such a decision, 
we refer them, not only to the appeals which have so 
frequently been made by the School Committee of our 
own City, but to the closing remarks in the Report of 
the School Committee of a neighboring City, whose 
wants are similar to ours, and which we quote as for- 
cible and to the point : — " Finally, the efficiency of 
our school system, and the unity of its working, would 
be very materially aided by a more special oversight 
of our schools than they now enjoy. No one member 
of this Board, — with the limited time he can devote 
to this service, however familiar he may be with the 
condition of individual schools, — can have more than 
a general knowledge of the numerous school divisions 
committed to our care ; many of which, particularly 
the Primary Schools, often have only a superficial ex- 
amination, or are reported to this Board in such gen- 
eral terms as to give but little idea of their condition. 
Some of them are seldom visited ; inexperienced teach- 
ers are often left to conduct their schools, in almost 
entire ignorance of the systems of instruction pursued 
in the others — systems, perhaps, as various as the 
schools are numerous ; and thus the pupils coming to 
our Grammar Schools are variously qualified. There 
is needed, therefore, some one so familiar with all our 
schools, as to know their individual condition ; who 
shall be able to contrast and compare school with 
school ; who shall know, from month to month, the 
studies pursued and the work done in each ; who shall 



29 

be able to point out defects where they exist, and to 
show their remedy, and be equally observant of the 
excellences any where manifest, in our own schools or 
elsewhere, and secure their imitation ; who shall be 
able to encourage the inexperienced teacher, and to 
give counsel as to the best mode of securing order, 
" punctuality, cleanliness, and love of study ; who shall 
be deeply interested in the schools he visits, and be 
able to interest and benefit them by suggestive re- 
marks and questions respecting their studies ; who 
shall be able to secure uniformity — to see that the 
Primary are aiming at some common standard of 
preparation for the Grammar Schools, and that some 
common standard of promotion is there observed — 
and who can keep this Board constantly posted in re- 
spect to the condition of each school. Also, in look- 
ing after our school buildings and grounds, in pro- 
viding by timely repairs against needless decay, in 
guarding against wasteful extravagance, and in the 
economical supply of the various wants of our schools, 
the time of a suitable person could be very advanta- 
geously employed, — there having been found else- 
where a great economy of expense in such supervi- 
sion." 

The Semi-Annual Reports represent the Schools as 
being in a satisfactory condition ; but the word satis- 
factory is, of course, used in a qualified sense. As a 
general thing, the teachers are faithful in their duties, 
so far as attention to the prescribed studies is concern- 
ed, and the discipline of the schools is very well kept 
up. But there is much difference in the management 
and influence of the several teachers ; and the obliga- 
tions and responsibilities of their situations and their 



30 

profession, seem to be variously estimated and appre- 
ciated by them. The real object of general education 
appears sometimes to be but imperfectly understood 
by those who are employed and paid to promote it. 
To teach Reading, Writing, Grammar, and Arithme- 
tic, are of course essential, and they are required by 
the School Regulations ; but to encourage by precept 
and example, good manners, good temper, neatness, 
frankness, fairness and truthfulness, are not always, 
we fear, remembered as among the requirements of 
the Statutes, and the lessons which will tell the most 
upon the future character and prosperity of the Com- 
monwealth, its cities and towns. Corporal punishment, 
which is allowed in certain cases by the Board, con- 
ditioned that a record of its infliction shall always be 
kept by the teacher, is doubtless too often made to 
take the place of good advice and good example ; and 
the frequency of its infliction has, we fear, a damag- 
ing influence upon both teachers and pupils. On this 
subject we have had many inquiries and some com- 
plaints ; and cautions and suggestions, such as seemed 
to be needful, have been given to the teachers. We 
do not forget the perplexities and annoyances which 
are always arising in school government. We know 
how the patience is tried, and the temper put to the 
test ; and we recognize the fact that the authority of the 
teacher must he fully maintained. But at the same 
time we appreciate and understand the feeling which 
seems to be general among parents, that in all ordi- 
nary cases some other corrective would be better than 
the infliction of bodily pain. And with this opinion 
we feel that all thoughtful teachers should coincide ; 
and in their efforts for improvement in school govern- 



31 

ment^ for that is the point which we have in view in 
making these remarks, that they should pursue such 
a course as will exercise and strengthen the higher 
rather than the lower emotions and tendencies of the 
children under their charge. And in this work the 
parents must co-operate, if success is to be the result. 
Corporal punishment and bad example must be dis- 
continued in the homes of the children ; for it is al- 
most always with those whose parents are severe and 
careless, that the necessity for severity seems to exist 
in the schools. To reach the highest good — to send 
out from our schools children instructed not only in 
the ordinary branches of school study, but in the im- 
portance of self respect, and respect to the rights and 
feelings of others, the united effort of parents and 
teachers will be requisite. Substantial character, and 
real excellence, can be formed only by the cultivation 
of the higher and finer faculties and feelings, and on 
this foundation must rest our faith in the advantages 
to be derived from general education. 

By order of the Committee, 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, President. 

Charlestown, December, 1861. 



32 



George B. Neal, Treasurer^ in account with Trustees 

of Charlestown Free Schools. 
Db. 

1861. Jan. 1. To Balance brought forward, 956.55 

" 25. Interest of City Treasurer, on $5000 Note, 150.00 

July 29. " " " $5000 Note, 150.00 

" " " " « $600 Note, 36.00 

$1,292.55 

Ce. 

1861. Jan. 18. By paid Elliott & White, Cyclopaedia No. 11, 3.50 
April 27. " as follows, gratuity, as per vote 

passed April 18, 1861 : — 

Joanna S. Putnam, 25.00 

Susan L. Sawyer, 25.00 

Sarah E. Smith, 25.00 

Mai Vina B. Skilton, 25.00 

Juoe 12. " Elliott & White, Cyclopaedia, No. 12, 3.50 
Oct. 28. " " " " No. 13, 3.50 

110.50 

Balance, in Savings Bank, 800.00 

" Cash, , 382.05 

$1,292.55 



GEORGE B. NEAL, Treasurer. 
Charlestown, December 20, 1861. 



We, the undersigned, a Committee appointed by the Board of 
Trustees for the purpose, have examined the within account, and 
the vouchers therefor, and find the same correctly entered and 
cast; the balance on hand being $1,182 05 — $800 of this sum 
being a deposit in the Charlestown Five Cents Savings Bank, up- 
on which interest has accrued from the different dates of deposit. 

WM. W. WHEILDON, ) ^ ... 
JOHN SANBORN, ^ committee. 

Charlestown, Jan. 15, 1862.