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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



OF THE 



$itg 0I MMUfttttwn, 



DECEMBER, 1863. 




BOSTON: 
PRINTED BY LOCKE & WILDER, 143 MILK STREET 

186 4. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The School Committee of the City of Charlestown 
make the following Report of their doings, and the 
condition of the Public Schools during the past year. 

Conforming to the usual custom, the Board, at its 
first meeting, appointed a Committee on Finance, and 
instructed it to report an estimate of the amount of 
money which would be required for the Support 
of Schools, during the present financial year. The 
committee reported the sum of $47,200, which was 
accepted; and the City Council were asked for an 
appropriation to correspond with the estimate. The 
appropriation when made was $45,500, and the City's 
proportion of the School Fund, to be received from 
the State, which this year was $1,013.93, and which 
added to the $45,500, makes $46,513.93, provided by 
the City Council for the support of Schools. 

The expenditures will considerably exceed the sum 
appropriated, the committee having done much more 
than they expected to be called upon to do in re- 
pairs of School Houses, and having recently increased 
the salaries of the Teachers; a measure which the 
enhanced prices of every article of living, and the ex- 



traordinary expenses occasioned by the war seemed 
to render just and necessary. The committee regret 
that they have been obliged to authorize expendi- 
tures beyond the sum appropriated, but it has seemed 
to be unavoidable. They have been repeatedly ap- 
pealed to by petitions from the Teachers, for an in- 
crease in their salaries, and have delayed to grant 
them longer perhaps than they ought to have done, 
with the facts and the reasons given for the appli- 
cation being admitted and acknowledged to be good 
and sufficient; and they have no misgivings in regard 
to the increase which they have voted, except that 
under the peculiar circumstances of the case, it is too 
small. The repairs on the School Houses have chiefly 
been such as in our last Report we said would be re- 
quired, and which with a proper regard to economy, 
no less than the comfort of the Schools, could not 
longer be put off. We might perhaps have been less 
thorough, and in this way lessened the balance which 
will be against us ; but then we should have been liable 
to the charge of waste, which is as bad at least as 
as that of extravagance, and certainly much harder 
to bear than that of having done things well, although 
without full authority. Besides, when making our es- 
timate we supposed that much which has been done 
by our committee would have been done by the Com- 
mittee on City Property, and the cost charged to an- 
other appropriation. The increase in the salaries 
which will apply to the last half of the financial year 
is shown by the following statement : — 



Principal of the High School from $1,400, per annum to $1,500 



Sub-Master " " " _ " 


900, 


cc 


cc cc 


900 


1st Assistant " " " " 


600, 


cc 


cc cc 


650 


2d, " " « " " 


450, 


(( 


cc cc 


475 


3d, " " " " " 


375, 


cc 


cc cc 


400 


4th, » " " " " 


325, 


cc 


cc cc 


350 


Principals of Grammar Schools each 


1,200, 


cc 


cc cc 


1,300 


Sub-Masters of " '' " 


800, 


cc 


cc cc 


900 


Assistants of " " " 


325, 


cc 


cc cc 


350 


cc cc cc cc cc 


300, 


cc 


cc cc 


325 


cc CC CC K cc 


275, 


cc 


cc cc 


300 


Teachers of the Intermediate " 


350, 


u 


cc cc 


375 


u cc u p r i mai y Schools " 


325, 


cc 


cc cc 


350 


cc cc cc cc cc a 


300, 


cc 


cc cc 


325 


a a cc u a u 


275, 


cc 


cc cc 


300 


The amount expended for Repairs of School Houses: 




High School, 






$1,204.91 




Bunker Hill 


School, 




620.07 




Warren 


u 




757.58 




Prescott 


cc 




128.43 




Winthrop 


cc 




539.28 




Harvard 


cc 




37.04 




Primaries and Intermediate 


1,085.24 





$4,372.55 

The High and the Grammar School Houses are 
now in very good condition, except that improvement 
in the ventilation is as much as ever needed, and we 
still feel that some better and cheaper arrangement 
for heating could be substituted for the stoves now 
in use in several of these large buildings. We call 
attention to the fact that all the Grammar Schools 
are inconveniently full, and we recommend to the 
City Council the selection of a proper lot of land, 
and that the preliminary steps should be taken towards 
the erection of a new Grammar School House. The 



6 

most pressing need, however, is that of another build- 
ing for the accomodation of several new Primary 
Schools, and the better accomodation of two of those 
already established; and our judgement is, that a brick 
building, located somwehere between Austin and Mil- 
ler Streets, and west of Main Street, should be erected 
as early in the spring as possible. 

MUSIC. 

Instruction in Music in the High and Grammar 
Schools during the past year, has been under the 
charge of Mr. W. H. Goodwin, and the committee 
have been well satisfied with his services. He devotes 
two hours in each week to each of the schools. On 
Mondays and Thursdays at 11 o'clock he is at the 
Winthrop School, and at 2 o'clock at the Prescott ; 
on Tuesdays and Fridays at 9 o'clock at the Harvard, 
and at 11 o'clock at the Bunker Hill and on Wed- 
nesdays and Saturdays at 9 o'clock at the High School, 
and 11 o'clock at the Warren School. All the chil- 
dren have an opportunity to learn the rudiments and 
cultivate a taste for music, and pleasant — and we 
think profitable — hours are passed in this way. 

Exhibitions of the classes in music have been given 
at the City Hall, and the parents of the children in 
each of the schools have had, or will have, an oppor- 
tunity to listen to some of the songs which have 
been practiced and learned, and to form a judgment 



in regard to the thoroughness of their instruction, the 
interest which they take in the study, and the influ- 
ence which it will be likely to have on their dispo- 
sition and characters. The exhibitions which have 
already taken place, have been very fully attended, 
and in our loyal community it was not strange that 
the evidence that the audience were "moved by con- 
cord of sweet sounds " was full and satisfactory. 

The committee have no question as regards the 
value of this study in our schools, and the present 
arrangement with Mr. Goodwin is, we believe, an 
excellent appropriation of the time taken up by his 
instruction. At the rehearsals an exhibition of calis- 
thenics practised in some of them was given, which 
elicited much applause; and it is believed that a little 
time devoted to this kind of physical exercise is not 
misspent. In the Primary and Intermediate Schools 
the children are taught to sing, as they always have 
been, by the teachers; and every time they join in 
their little familiar songs they furnish abundant 
evidence of the value of the exercise, and its good 
effect upon their minds and hearts. 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

On the 25th of July, Miss Frances Hichborn, teach- 
er of No. 6, resigned, and on the 23d of the same 
month Miss M. C. Sawyer was transferred from No. 
15 to fill her place, since which time Miss C. M. W. 



8 

Tilden has had charge of No. 15, who on the 18th 
of December was elected as a permanent teacher. 

In May, a new school was formed in Ward 3, and 
placed under the charge of Miss H. M. Fame, who 
was elected on the 5th of November. On the 3d of 
December the resignation of Miss F. E. Everett was 
received. These comprise all the changes which have 
taken place during the year. Many of the schools 
are over-crowded with scholars, and there is a press- 
ing need of several new rooms to remedy this in- 
convenience. Better accommodations ought to be fur- 
nished for the school in Elm Street, and that in the 
Harvard Chapel. The schools are reported to be hi 
good condition, and most of the teachers are posses- 
sed of such qualifications as will be likely to keep 
them so. There are a few still who fail to present 
such results as should entitle them to full confidence 
and favor. With many of the teachers, the remarks 
in the reports are highly commendatory, as the fol- 
lowing extracts will show. " She has instilled her 
own promptness and energy into her scholars almost 
without exception, and it is a pleasure always to call 
upon her in her school." " The standard of this school 
is high, the pupils are thoroughly trained in what- 
ever the teacher undertakes to instruct them." "We 
were forcibly impressed with the kindness, prudence 
and tact of this faithful teacher, and congratulate 
both parents and children in view of the benefits con- 
ferred by her." "The school has all the cheerful- 



9 

fulness of the nursery, and yet good order and disci- 
pline prevail." "The teacher and the pupils always 
seem to be in earnest hi their employment." " She 
is accomplished, conscientious, and diligent, and her 
works praise her." The Sub-Committee on the schools 
referred to in our last annual report, in which the 
experiment of grading was being tried, speak of it 
as very successful, and recommend the general adop- 
tion of the plan when circumstances will permit. 



10 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

The reports in relation to these schools represent 
them as follows : Of No. 1, in March, the Committee 
says " The teacher has the school fully under her con- 
trol, and is an energetic, faithful worker, and ought 
to be relieved from the superabundant numbers now 
thronging her room." In July he says, "There has 
been an entire transformation in the character of this 
school during the past year. The large, rude boys 
complained of in previous reports, have been gradu- 
ally worked out of the school, many of them into the 
Grammar Schools." The examination exercises were 
exceedingly prompt and vivacious, reflecting great 
credit upon the teacher and indicating a high degree 
of interest and attention on the part of the schol- 
ars, twenty-seven of whom were sent up to the 
Grammar Schools. Of No. 2, the committee in his 
first report says, "Miss Pilsbury, who presided over 
its affairs so ably for two years, resigned on the first 
of December, and Miss Walker was appointed in her 
place. The School has felt the change, but the new 
teacher is a good one, and the pupils are making 
progress under her instruction." 

In his second report the Committee says, " The 
School maintains its efficiency and usefulness. Twelve 
of the First Class have been thoroughly drilled through 
fifty pages of Colburn's Arithmetic, and will undoubt- 



11 

edly be able to enter the Grammar Schools one class 
in advance of the Primarians. The work of the In- 
termediate Schools is such as cannot be done so 
well anywhere else, and it is a matter of regret that 
no better accommodations can be furnished for this 
School than the poorly ventilated rear room in the 
Ward Room building in Ward 3. From these reports 
it will be seen that a more careful examination into 
the subject has confirmed the usefulness of this class 
of schools, and with the reforms and changes that 
have been made, they should be continued and not 
abolished, as we were questioning in our last report 
whether it might not be well to do. 



12 



WARREN SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

George Swan, Principal. Wm. Baxter, Sub-Master. 

Assistants. 
Mart A. Osgood, Julia A. Worcester, 

Maria Brown, V. A. M. L. Dadley, 

Margaret Veazie, Henrietta J. Merrill. 

Mary J. Fuller, 

Sub- Committee. 

George B. Neal, Henry C. Graves, 

Thomas Doane. 

In their first semi-annual report, the Committee say, 
" The first division, under the charge of the Princi- 
pal, assisted by one of the female teachers, was ex- 
amined by Mr. Graves very carefully, who reports 
that he is well satisfied with the result ; that he is 
pleased to find that the pupils are taught to think 
for themselves upon the subjects treated upon in their 
lessons, and that when a question is put which is not 
found in the books, they are prompt to make a 
correct reply. The second division, examined by the 
Chairman, and under the charge of the Sub-Master, 
showed a very remarkable improvement in all respects, 
since the last examination. The teacher has been 
faithful, zealous and successful with his division since 
he took charge of it at the end of the summer vaca- 
tion, after his recovery from a long and severe ill- 
ness. The parallel divisions in the school were ex- 



13 

amined by placing together the corresponding classes 
in each division, and putting questions alternately to 
a pupil in one, and then to a pupil in the other. — 
This, we believe, will have a good effect upon both 
teachers and scholars, as it will excite a spirit of 
rivalry between them to excel each other. All the 
divisions were found to be in a very good condition. 
It is our opinion the Committee add, that the Primary 
divisions would appear better than they generally do, 
were the pupils better prepared in the Primary Schools ; 
and we would recommend the adoption of the rule of 
the Boston School Committee, that the Principals of 
Grammar Schools be required to visit and examine 
those scholars in the Primary Schools, who are soon 
to be promoted into their respective schools. On the 
whole, the condition of the school is very satisfactory, 
and each teacher is deserving of the favorable consid- 
eration of the Board. In their second report, the 
Committee say, " From what we have seen of the 
school during the past term, we are happy to report 
it in all its departments, in a very satisfactory condi- 
tion. The teachers, although not all equally qualiffed 
to teach, yet for the manner in which they endeavor 
to discharge then duties, and their general good 
success, are entitled to the approval and confidence of 
the Board. 



14 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Teachers . 

B. F. S. Griffin, Principal, Caleb Murdock, Sub-Master. 

Assistants. 

Mary L. Sheffield, Mary F. Goldthwait, 

Sophia W. Page, Emily B. Brown, 

Sarah H. Woodman, Eliza A. White, 

Abby M. Clark, Olive E. Fairbanks, 

Arabella P. Moulton, Vacancy. 

Sub- Committee. 
Benjamin F. Brown, James Lee, Jr., 

James B. Miles, Arthur W. Tufts. 

In March, the Committee report upon the school 
as follows : "Its general condition during the last half 
year has been prosperous. The teachers, for 'the 
most part, have been zealous and earnest in their 
work, and thorough in their instruction, and the dis- 
cipline has been good. The recent examination was 
of the most thorough character, and will result in 
much good to the school. The parallel divisions were 
brought together for examination, and great disparity 
in what was accomplished was found in some of them, 
although what had been attempted had been the same. 
In Arithmetic, the first division appeared particularly 
well, as did also several of the lower divisions, the 
pupils being made to understand that principles are 
to be discovered through the study of examples, and 
that rules are but the expression of principles. — 



15 

A few divisions fell below the expectations of the 
Committee, but one only to that degree that de- 
served censure : the percentage of correct answers 
being 38/3, while the corresponding divisions answered 
92 ^ . In Geography, Grammar, History and Spelling, 
the examining committee express themselves as well 
pleased. The penmanship is better than at the previ- 
ous examination, and in some of the divisions marked 
improvement has been made. The teachers are not 
careful enough in their instruction in penmanship, and 
many of them are decidedly careless in regard to the 
position and manner of holding the pens of their 
pupils. No system of instruction can be successful 
where the will of the Principal is not cheerfully ex- 
ecuted by his subordinates, and we have, after much 
difficulty, succeeded in impressing this upon the minds 
of the female assistants. Truancy and irregularity of 
attendance have received special attention on the part 
of the Committee and teachers, and a new plan of 
looking after these cases promises good results. — 
The teachers are now required to go themselves 
to make inquiries of the parents in relation to ab- 
sentees, instead of sending scholars as heretofore. — 
In their second semi-annual report the committee 
say, "Although the school is not in all respects all 
that we could wish, yet we feel confident that it 
was never in a better condition, and that it will 
compare favorably with any other school of the 
same grade. We believe all the teachers have en- 



16 

deavored to perform their duties faithfully and con- 
scientiously, and are deserving of favorable mention 
at our hands." 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

Joseph T. Swan, Principal. 

Assistants. 

Sakah M. Chandler, Ellen C. Dickenson, 

H. A. T. Dadley, Mart G. Prichard, 

Hannah M. Sawyer, Emma L. "Whiting, 

Abby L. Swan, Frances M. Clark, 

Josephine M. Flint, Maria T. Savage. 

Amy E. Bradford, Vacancy. 

Sub- Committee. 
Andrew J, Locke, Timothy T. Sawyer, 

Henry Lyon, William B. Long. 

George H. Yeaton. 

The Sub-Committee in March report as follows ; — 
"After the examination which has just taken place, 
we are happy in being able to state that the gen- 
eral condition of the school is such as to warrant us 
in speaking of it in terms of commendation. In some 
studies, peculiar excellence and proficiency was man- 
ifested by some of the pupils ; and considering the 
large number of scholars connected with the school, 
a laudable ambition for progress and improvement 
was plain to be seen. Some of the divisions have 
suffered somewhat during the past six months by the 



17 

temporary absence of their teachers on account of 
illness, notwithstanding the care taken by us in the 
appointment of substitutes. The school has four 
parallel fourth divisions, three parallel third divisions, 
three parallel second divisions, and one first division ; 
each under the charge of a female teacher, with the 
exception of the first, which is instructed by the 
Principal assisted by a female teacher. In their sec- 
ond report, the Committee say, " The teachers seem 
to vie with each other in their efforts to promote the 
interest of the school, and secure for it a good rep- 
utation. One hundred and thirty-nine new scholars 
were admitted to the school during the last week 
previous to the August vacation, and twenty left for 
the High School, but two of the applicants for that 
school having failed of admission. The teacher of 
the division in the room in the basement of the 
building, labors under great disadvantage in conse- 
quence of a large per centage of absences, there being 
daily eight or ten more than in the corresponding di- 
visions in the rooms above. There is, we think, a 
well-founded prejudice against the occupancy of this 
room as a school room by a large number of parents 
residing in the district. They think it is damp and 
unhealthy during a portion of the year, and the sick- 
ness of their children is often attributed to this cause. 
The number of children residing in the district is so 
large, that we have been obliged to form a new di- 
vision, and to occupy the hall, which should be re- 
served for other purposes, for its accommodation. 



18 



HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

Joseph B. Morse, Principal. 
Assistants. 
Ann E. Weston, Abby B. Fiske, 

Sarah E. Archer, Lucy L. Burgess, 

Martha Blood, Martha M. Pillsbury, 

Elizabeth Swords, Vacancy. 

Sub- Committee. 

Nathan A. Tufts, James Adams, 

Abram E. Cuter. 

In March the Committee remark, "A detailed re- 
port of the summer examination was not made owing 
to circumstances connected with the new system of 
organization adopted by the Board, leaving the pres- 
ent committee to perform the duty. We beg leave to 
say, that in effecting the change referred to, the com- 
mittee regretted that one of the Principals of the school, 
— Dr. Cartee, — of much experience and of liberal 
culture, should be set aside. The Principal under the 
new system has given much care and attention to the 
several divisions, and the school now presents a unity 
of instruction adapted to the several grades of schol- 
ars. In our examinations of the school, we discover 
evidence of zeal and adaptedness on the part of the 
teachers, and good order and studious habits on the 
part of the pupils. The Principal, in addition to the 
instruction and oversight of his own division, extends 



19 

his care to the whole school ; marking the attainments 
and delinquencies of scholars and teachers, and good 
results are manifest from his frequent and thorough 
examinations of the several divisions. The first divi- 
sion is under the partial instruction of a female assist- 
ant, and the whole care devolves upon her when the 
Principal is engaged with other divisions of the school. 
We have been pleased with the manner in which this 
teacher performs her duties, and commend her to the 
Board as devoted and successful. The Principal is 
careful in his drill in his own division, and his influ- 
ence in elevating the standard of instruction in the 
other divisions is acknowledged. His success in pre- 
paring scholars for the High School is an evidence 
of the thoroughness of his instruction. 

The teacher of the next division of the school, has 
been for a long time favorably known to the Board, 
every committee on the school having commended her 
for her faithful and efficient teaching, and her kind 
and decided mode of discipline. Parallel divi- 
sions No. 2 were examined in close connection and 
comparison. The result was favorable to both teach- 
ers. Parallel divisions No. 3 were also examined 
together in the same room, both teachers being pres- 
ent, with an equally good result, and this remark will 
apply as well to parallel divisions No. 4 examined in 
the same way. The musical rehearsals at the City 
Hall have had a good influence in inspiring the schol- 
ars with a desire to learn the rudiments of music, and 



20 

much more attention is given to this study than for- 
merly. In their second report, the committee, after 
giving a detailed statement of the examination of the 
classes in every study, showing highly satisfactory re- 
sults, remark: "On the whole we were much pleased 
with the results of the examination, and we think it 
compared favorably with, and in some respects exceeded, 
any previous one. The day on which it took place was 
• very hot and sultry one; but the order, neverthe- 
less, was throughout the examination good. 



21 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

William H. Sanders, Principal. 
Assistants. 

Phebe A. Knight, Maria T. Delano, 

Mart S. Thomas, Mary A. Davis, 

Judith C, "Walker, Martha B. Stevens, 

Abbt F. Crocker, Celia E. C. Goodspeed, 

Sarah J. Mills, Vacancy. 

Sub- Committee, 

Charles F. Smith, William H. Finney, 

George H. Marden. 

The Committee report in March as follows : " The 
condition of this school is in some respects better 
than at the last examination. The system of parallel 
divisions which has been in operation since last Sep- 
tember, is working well. It has demonstrated what 
was before pretty evident, that we have in this school 
some able teachers, and some whose usefulness is 
much impaired. Length of service does not increase 
the efficiency of one, who at the start, has no natural 
faculty for teachhig ; and it is absurd to expect such 
a teacher to keep a division parallel to one under 
the charge of a teacher whose whole heart is in 
her work, and whose mind is ever busy, devising ex- 
pedients for awakening the interest and increasing 
the knowledge of her pupils. The recent examina- 
tion was very thorough, and conducted by bringing 



22 

together the classes of parallel divisions. The most 
prominent fault is, want of thoroughness, and neglect 
of small, but none the less important matters, such 
as punctuation, the proper use of capital letters, and 
constant drill of the multiplication and other tables. 
There are five teachers now engaged in this school 
who have received their appointments since the last 
report was rendered. All of these teachers, though 
meeting with different degrees of success, are dili- 
gent, and earnestly laboring to increase the efficiency 
of the school, by cheerfully and uncomplainingly car- 
rying out the directions of the Committee and Prin- 
cipal, which is higher praise than we can accord to 
some who have been longer in the service." In 
their second report the Committee say, "Consider- 
ing the difficulties under which the school has suf- 
fered during the last three months of the term by 
reason of bitter quarrels among some of the teachers, 
and the changes made by the Board in consequence 
thereof, the result of the recent examination was 
quite satisfactory. Since the last report, we have 
had occasion to bring before the Board the opinions 
which the various Sub-Committees serving on this 
school for the past ten years, have left on record, 
concerning the Principal and his administration of 
school affairs. With the high praise which they 
award him, we see no cause to differ. The recita- 
tions of his division during the examination were 
unusually fine. In Arithmetic, the members of his 



23 

first class were examined over the larger portion fo 
the book, and bnt two or three failures occurred in 
the oral questions. The principles which underlie 
the rules for square and cube root were illustrated 
by means of blocks, in a very clear and entertaining 
manner, showing a perfect appreciation in the minds 
of the pupils, of the reasons for each step in the 
operation of extracting the root. The Principal makes 
clear and logical thinkers of his pupils, instead of 
mere memorizers ; and it is only necessary to visit 
his room and listen to his searching analysis of the 
lessons under consideration, to be convinced of the 
superiority of his style over that practised in some 
of the schools. At the last examination of candidates 
for admission to the High School, thirteen of the four- 
teen applicants from this school were admitted. The 
Principal's assistant is a thorough scholar, and her 
methods of teaching are all that could be desired. 
The second division, until recently under the charge 
of Miss Bigelow, passed a good examination. It is 
now under the charge of a lady of large experience, 
wholly devoted to her calling, who will undoubtedly 
make good the place of her predecessor. The first 
two parallel divisions have been for the past year 
under the charge of Miss Lund and Miss Crocker. 
It is no faint praise to the latter to say, that she 
has been able to keep her division parallel to that 
of so able and energetic a teacher as Miss Lund. 
Both divisions were under the complete control of 



24 

the teachers, and gave evidence of thorough and 
faithful training. The other divisions are not so sat- 
isfactory. In May, one of the teachers then in charge 
was obliged, by ill health, to ask for leave of .ab- 
sence, and under her successor, the division did not 
maintain its former standing, and in the other paral- 
lel divisions a marked difference was found, especial- 
ly in the two lowest. This was owing, undoubtedly, 
to the continued ill health of one of the teachers, 
which on several occasions obliged her to be absent 
from school for two or three weeks at a time. One 
hundred and thirty-five Primarians passed a satisfac- 
tory examination and' were admitted, so that the 
school is now filled to its utmost capacity. 



25 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

Charles E. Stetson, Prinaipal, John G-. Adams, Sub-Master. 

Assistants. 
Katharine Whitney, Mart Curtis, 

Frances M. Read, Harriett E. Lovett. 

Sub- Committee. 
Timothy T. Sawyer, Henry Lyon, 

James B. Miles, Henry C. Graves, 

Nathan A. Tufts. 

In their first report the Sub-Committee remark, 
" The result of the examination is given in the ac- 
companying statement by members of the Commit- 
tee, in regard to the condition of the classes whose 
recitations were heard by them. The general condi- 
tion of the school is good. The teachers are indus- 
trious and faithful in the performance of their duties, 
and the Committee have had to consider only the 
question, whether the tact, efficiency and influence of 
each, were equal to the requirements of his or her 
position. A teacher may be devoted and persever- 
ing, and yet fail to interest the pupils, or to accom- 
plish what is necessary to gain the confidence of 
parents, or to give satisfaction to the Committee. 
Good scholarship and excellence of character should 
always be appreciated, but they will not alone insure 
success ; and their influence will be much weakened 
if they are not united with a proper knowledge of 



26 



human nature, and the faculty of conforming some- 
what to the condition of things about us. Ease of 
manner with readiness and clearness of explanation 
are very essential qualifications ; and if these are 
lacking, full success can "hardly be expected. These 
remarks we have thought it proper to make at this 
time, as qualifying to the statement that the general 
condition of the school is good, and the teachers in- 
dustrious and faithful. The Principal and all the fe- 
male assistants, with the exception of the newly ap- 
pointed one, have heretofore been reported decidedly 
successful, and we have no different judgment to 
give now. The newly appointed female assistant, 
it will be observed, is spoken of in high praise by 
the member of the Committee who examined her 
division." Mr. Miles reports upon the classes ex- 
amined by him as follows: "I examined the classes 
pursuing classical studies, both in the department of 
the Principal and the Sub-Master. These comprise, 
in the Principal's department, two classes in Virgil 
and one class in the ' Anabasis of Xenophon,' and in 
Mr. Warren's department, two classes in Latin and 
one class in Greek ; and it gives me pleasure to say, 
a large majority of the pupils in these several classes 
acquitted themselves well. 

The recitations of some of them were characterized 
by marked excellence. The more advanced scholars 
under the instruction of the Principal, including those 
preparing to enter college at the next commencement, 



27 

gave evidence of a commendable appreciation of the 
advantages enjoyed, and of close, diligent and faith- 
ful application. In their translations, it seemed to 
be the endeavor to combine precision, literalness and 
elegance. They also had evidently attended with 
much accuracy and thoroughness to Syntax, and nice 
grammatical points, so that, on the whole, their ex- 
amination was satisfactory, inasmuch as it showed 
their habits and methods of study to be correct, and 
such as to give promise of progressive advancement 
in the future ; and it was at once a valuable testi- 
mony to their own fidelity, and that of their instruct- 
or. Of the pupils under the instruction of the Sub- 
Master, I would say, the performances of the most 
of the members of the first division in Latin, as also 
the class in Greek, were in many respects excellent, 
while those of a number of the members of the sec- 
ond division in Latin were defective in nearly all 
respects. The pupils of the first division, almost 
without exception, were able to render the Latin 
with more than common promptness and accuracy ; 
but they did not show a sufficient degree of famili- 
arity with the rudiments and minutiae of the Gram- 
mar. This want of familiar knowledge of grammati- 
cal principles and rules was the prominent defect in 
the examination of both classes in Latin. The class 
in Greek in this division is composed of beginners, 
and they seem to be starting well." 

Dr. Lyon reports as follows : "I examined the first 



28 

assistant's classes in French, History and Physiology, 
and fonnd them proficient in their several studies. 
I have been much pleased whenever I have been 
present at the recitations of the classes, with the ev- 
ident conscientious devotion of the teacher, and the 
apparent respect and confidence of her pupils. I also 
examined several classes in the second assistant's di- 
vision, in French, History and Rhetoric, all of which 
appeared to me to have been well drilled and in- 
structed, and to have made creditable progress. The 
teacher is an excellent one, but has labored under 
the disadvantage of not being in good health. The 
third assistant does an immense amount of labor in 
her efforts to initiate her pupils into the rudiments 
of Latin and French. She is thorough and de- 
voted. The material upon which she has to work, 
the lower classes, does not offer the best field for 
display, and the result of her labors does not appear 
to be satisfactory to herself. I think, however, that 
due allowance being made, her classes showed well 
at the examination. She is an able and faithful 
teacher. 

Mr. Tufts, who examined several classes under the 
instruction of the third and fourth assistants, in Read- 
ing, History and Arithmetic, was well satisfied with 
the condition of the classes, and reports the fourth 
assistant as able, devoted to her work, and deservedly 
popular with the scholars. 

The public examination of the school took place 



29 

on the 20th of July, and was attended by a large 
number of the parents of the scholars and friends of 
the school. Each of the teachers conducted the ex- 
amination of his or her classes, interrupted only by 
occasional questions from members of the Committee, 
asked to test the accuracy and thoroughness of the 
pupils' instruction. The exhibition was that of the 
usual business of the school, and those who were 
present had an opportunity to hear a recitation or 
review in every branch taught, and to observe the 
manner of each teacher in conducting the recitation. 
The Committee felt proud of the school on the occa- 
sion, and they are glad to believe that its appearance 
was only an evidence of industry and faithfulness on 
the part of the teachers during the whole term. — 
The number of the graduating class this year, was 
seventeen ; fifteen girls and two boys, to each of 
whom a diploma was presented, as fully deserved ; 
the teachers being of opinion that no. better class has 
ever left the school. The two boys had been fitted 
for college, and were subsequently admitted to Har- 
vard ; one of them without conditions. 



During the year which is now closing, we think 
that something has been accomplished in the way of 
improvement in the schools, and on the whole, we 



30 



feel safe in saying that they are in better condition 
than they were a year ago. We hope, too, that they 
will compare favorably with the Public Schools in the 
neighboring cities and towns. The change in the 
system made last year, and which placed all the 
Grammar Schools under a single head, is thought to 
have worked well, and the responsibility thrown upon 
the Principals has, for the time at least, created a new 
interest, and increased the energy and efficiency of 
all the teachers. The reports upon the schools seem 
to indicate a more strict, and we hope healthier dis- 
cipline, and unless it shall appear that there is an 
unseen influence which is opposed to harmony, and 
that generous good feeling which is so valuable 
among teachers, we may conclude that the discipline 
has been improved. It takes time, however, to de- 
termine the real influence of changes, and what seems 
to be a gain, will sometimes prove otherwise. We 
hope, however, that what has been done with a view 
to increase the usefulness of the teachers, and the 
value of the schools, will prove to have been done 
wisely and well. 

We close our report with a few general remarks, 
the result of our observation in regard to the needs 
of our schools. For the Primaries, kind hearted and 
truthful persons, whose manners are unexceptionable 
and whose example of habits and temper can always 
be patterned after with safety by the children, should 
alone be selected for teachers. The books used in 



31 



these schools are of very little consequence compared 
with the charm and influence of the teachers, whose 
ability to teach what is contained in the books forms 
the least part of their duty. But few of the schol- 
ars fail to accomplish what is expected of the books, 
while many, we fear, leave school in much ignorance of 
those better things which depend upon the character 
and example of the teachers. And the same remarks 
will apply as well to the teachers of the Grammar 
and High Schools ; although as we advance some- 
thing more is wanted in the way of attainment and 
excellence in the knowledge of the world and of 
books. But what we do not accomplish, has more 
to do with the want of forbearance and patience, and 
a wholly reliable character in the teacher, than the 
want of excellence in the school books, or of atten- 
tion and study in the scholar ; and the record of cor- 
poral punishment, if it was kept as it should be, in 
conformity with the rule fixed by the Board, would, 
we believe, prove the correctness of this statement. 

One great trouble with our Grammar Schools grows 
out of the idea that the work to be done in them is 
to prepare scholars for the High School, instead of 
thorough and complete instruction in the important 
studies assigned to them. Parents and teachers, we 
fear, have come to think that this is the only object 
of the Grammar Schools, and the test of the merits 
of our Grammar-School teachers is in the number of 
their scholar admitted to the High school at the 



32 

annual examination of candidates. And this is the 
reason why all the pupils in our Grammar Schools 
aim at admission to the High School, even though 
they have no intention of remaining, and have made 
up their minds to engage in some trade or business 
within a few months of their admission. We think 
the importance of the studies pursued in the Gram- 
mar Schools can hardly be overstated, and their value 
is intrinsic. It is not to fit scholars for the High 
School, that our Grammar Schools are maintained, 
but to give our children an opportunity to become 
thoroughly acquainted with those important studies 
which will be absolutely essential in the management 
of practical affairs, and which form the basis of all 
true education. Latterly, too, it has been observed 
that but very little attention is given to Penmanship, 
a most important art, the study of which it will not 
do to neglect or slight in our schools. The subject 
of Penmanship is now in the hands of a Committee 
of the Board, who are to report some plan for its 
more uniform and complete instruction. Authority 
also has been given to employ a teacher of Penman- 
ship, a few hours in each week, in the High School. 
The Course of study in the High School remains 
the same as it was when we made our last report. 
But the question whether its usefulness would not be 
increased by a change, is frequently raised by the 
parents of the pupils, and in the Board ; and during 
the past year there has been a good deal of discus- 



33 

sion upon it. The Sub-Committee of the school have 
now under consideration, the subject contained in the 
following order, passed by the Board some time 
since. 

Ordered — That the Committee on the High School 
be directed to consider what measures can be adopted 
so to divide the school into departments as to enable 
the pupils to pursue either the study of the Classics 
or of the advanced " English branches," at the option 
of the parents. 

So far as inquiry has been made, it has been 
found that experienced teachers are divided on the 
subject, although they all attach great importance to 
the study of Latin. The majority of those who have 
been consulted, are quite decided in their judgment 
that the change would not be desirable, and the ex- 
periments which have several times, since the estab- 
lishment of the school, been tried to accomplish the 
object proposed by the order, have entirely failed. 
The reason of the failure has been, that but a very 
small number of the parents, when asked if they 
desired to have their children leave off the study of 
Latin, have answered in the affirmative, and in most 
cases the scholars who were anxious to be relieved 
from the study of Latin, were those who would be 
equally anxious to be relieved from the whole list of 
studies. 

Many of the parents have an erroneous idea in 
regard to the time taken up by the study of Latin in 



34 

the school, and seem to think that it is made the 
principal study; when the fact is, that the English 
branches occupy about five-sixths of the time. It 
has also been supposed that it was on account of 
Latin that so few boys graduate, but this hardly 
needs refutation. When we consider the fact that in 
schools instituted especially for study for a particular 
end, such as West Point, Boston Latin, Boston High, 
&c, the number of graduates is small compared with 
that of those admitted ; we cannot be much surprised 
that the number who leave a school like this, estab- 
lished to give a good general education, and where but 
very few have any particular aim on entering, is very 
large; and especially if we give any thought to the 
ages of the boys, and the necessity which so many 
of them must feel of earning a living and getting 
started in life. In considering the order, however, 
the committee have determined to do everything which 
will enable them to judge fairly, whether any changes 
can be made in the management of the school, or 
the arrangement of the studies, to remedy defects or 
increase its usefulness ; their aim being to promote 
the true interest of the children who attend it, 
and as far as is consistent with the objects of the 
institution, to gratify the wishes and conform to the 
tastes and circumstances of those who contribute to 
its support. And with this view they have author- 
ized the Principal to visit several High Schools where 
the course of study varies from ours, to make such 



35 

enquiries and examination as will enable him to de 
cide what changes, if any, can be made. 

We are still of opinion that the interest of the 
schools would be promoted if the City Council would 
pass an ordinance establishing the office of Superin- 
tendent of Schools ; and we believe a proper person 
could be found to fill the office. An educated man, 
a practical teacher, with some business knowledge, 
set about the work of scrutinizing and improving our 
schools, would find enough to occupy his attention, 
and tax his skill ; and if faithful in his examina- 
tions and advice, there can be no doubt the work of 
educating our children would be more thoroughly 
done than it is now. He could wake up a new in- 
terest among the teachers, and by comparisons of 
one school with another, keep alive and active the 
feeling of responsibility which is so essential in deal- 
ing with children. With such an officer, the labor 
of the School Committee would not, perhaps, be 
much lightened, but their work would be systemat- 
ized, and their services made much more valuable. 
We really hope that the City Council will allow the 
experiment to be tried, and give a favorable response 
to this last appeal for the establishment of the office 
of Superintendent of Schools. 

By order of the Committee, 

TIMOTHY T. SAWYER, President. 
Charlestown, December, 1863. 




Bunker Hill School 
Warren School 
Wrathrop School, 
Harvard School, 

Prescott School, 

Intermediate School, No 
do do No 



— 1 








Term ending February, 18 


13. 


) 










Term 


ending August, isfls 


§ Primary Scoools. location op 








J = 














g, • ■/> v (Prunarv Schools.: a . 






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i, 


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SUB-COMMITTEES 


* ( PRI MARY 

!■ ! TEACHERS NAMES. | scnoot-noii.E S . 
£1 




n 


I 


|j 


I 


° 


5 | 


1 1 


a 


~ 


\\ 


" " 


° | TEACHERS NAMES. 


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1 





= ': 


1 





<! 


jj 


■~ 


3 


il 


«JS 


a^ 


OF 

Primary Schools. 


1 Ellon M. Crafts, [Charles Street, 


125 


.,'.i 


(1(1 


88 


l.i 


Ill 


,n 


o3 


28 


■T. 


88 




8 S Ellen M. Crafts. 


124 


11;' 


.VI 


75 


40 


■'li 


OS 


01 


8b 


■': 


75 




9 Wm. B. Long, 


2 Elizabeth W \ eaton Mead 


10'J 


Gl 


48 


05 


40 


2-'. 


59 


00 


38 


■,-. 


05 




j Elizabeth W Yeaton 


88 


52 


30 


SO 


45 


85 


59 


42 


23 


19 


80 




G.William H. Finney, 


3 M. Josephine Smith 


Mead 


S3 


51 


32 


Cb 


42 


24 


61 


39 


29 


in 


fib 






84 


47 


37 


07 


39 


?,8 


50 


70 


40 


30 


07 




7 Thomas Doane, 


4 Malvina B. Skilton, 


Mead 


b9 


31i 


53 


Ti 


33 


44 


07 


bO 


24 


-il 






5 Malvina B. Skilton, 


09 


39 


30 


09 


30 


39 


53 


05 


37 


28 


69 




5, Thomas Doane, 


5 Martha 11. Hale, 


Elm 


77 


35 


42 


59 


2/ 


32 


49 


bl 






59 




10 Martha R. Hale, 


87 


40 


47 


84 


37 


47 


02 


70 


33 


37 


84 




3 Charles F. Smith. 


Frances Hichborn, 


Medford " 


si 


39 


45 


70 


30 


40 


bo 


55 


28 


oj 






4 C. M. W. Tilden, 


107 


07 


40 


90 


50 


40 


05 


72 


39 


33 


90 




G Henry C. Graves. 


7 Mary A. Foster, 


Bovlston Chapel 


72 


38 


34 


03 


31 


32 


49 


54 




30 


00 


R 


3) Mary A. Foster, 71 


So 


30 


54 


.->,. 


28 


52 


50 


24 


20 


52 


2 


2 Henry Lyon, 


8 Alice S. Wiley, 


Cross Street, 


7o 


31 


44 


71 


30 


41 


oO 


40 




25 


71 




2 Alice S. Wiley, 91 


43 


4b 


SO 


38 


42. 


53 


58 


28 


30 


SO 




2 ! Abram E. Cutter. 


9 Ellen T. Knight, 


Cross " 


79 


44 


3d 


07 


30 


31 


52 






SI 


07 




3 Ellen T. Knight, 1 93 


51 


42 


73 


39 


34 


52 


62 


31 


31 


78 




2Abram E. Cutter. 


10 Louisa A. Pratt, 


Common " 


100 


49 


ol 


(ii 


33 


34 


52 






27 


07 




3 j Louisa A. Pratt, j 93 


40 


47 


88 


44 


44 


02 


77 


39 


38 


SS 




4 George B.Neal, 


1 1 Joanna S. Putnam, 


Common " 


75 


41 


34 


GO 


82 


2b 


48 


40 


25 


"1 


OO 






3b 


31 


59 


30 


99 


49 


48 


24 


2+ 


59 




4 James B. Miles, 


12 Ellen M. Armstead, 


Bow- 


110 


45 


71 


ss 


32 


50 


07 


74 


29 


45 


88 




2 Ellen M. Armstead, 109 


40 


09 


90 


32 


5 b 


05 


75 


28 


+7 


90 




2 Arthur W. Tufts. 


13 C. W. Trowbridge, 


Bow 


102 


48 


54 


84 


30 


4b 


OV 


G2 


32 


.'in 


84 




4 C. W. Trowbridge, 107 


19 


58 


98 


47 


40 


05 


; 1 


37 


34 


93 




3lArthur W. Tufts. 


It Sarah E. Smith, 


Bow " 


104 


SI 


53 


83 


4( 


37 


00 


72 


34 


in 


S3 




7 Sarah E. Smith, 123 


59 


04 


105 


51 


54 


82 


.17 


44 


43 


105 




8 Nathan A. Tufts, 


15 Mary C. Sawyer, Bow 


12.. 


(13 


02 


87 


50 


37 


65 


01 






87 




b Mary C. Sawyer, 130 


72 


04 


lill 


51 


.-,11 


04 


7 2 


38 


34 


101 




5 Timothy T. Sawyer, 


16 Elizabeth R. Brower Common " 


75 


37 


38 


02 


21 


33 


4b 






30 


GO 




7 J Elizabeth R. Brower 1 13 


53 


00 


87 


41 


4fi 


04 


05 


81 


34 


87 




4 Benjamin F. Brown, 


17 Susan E.Etheridge, Moulton " 


85 


• 45 


40 


.' 


40 


30 


61 


57 


30 


07 


70 




4 Susan E. Etheridge; 92 


54 


3b 


78 


45 


33 


59 


07 


37 


30 


78 




3 George H. Yeaton, 


ISLydiaM. Butts, 


Moulton 


88 


4b 


40 


.: 


3h 


35 


53 


oO 


29 


"7 


73 




4 Lydia M. Butts, 89 


49 


40 


70 


41 


«9 


57 


57 


8.5 


251 


70 




3 George H. Yeaton, 


19 Louisa W. Huntress 


Moulton •' 


10» 


53 


55 


85 


44 


41 


bb 


43 


20 


?3 


85 




4 Louisa W. Huntress 109 


112 


47 


91 


48 


43 


05 


70 


87 


33 


91 




2 James Lee, Jr., 


20 Matilda Gilman, 


Soley 


81 


43 


::« 


5(i 


30 


21 


4 b 


50 


30 


-1; 


50 




Matilda Gilman, 101 


49 


52 


fib 


35 


31 


49 


(10 


34 


26 


00 




1 James Adams, 


21 Frances E. Everett. 


Sullivan " 


75 


47 


2b 


88 


44 


24 


54 


oO 






08 




8 Frances E. Everett,! 80 


lb 


32 


70 


41 


29 


55 


20 


11 


9 


7ll 




5 George H. Marden, 


22 Frances M. Lane, 


Sullivan '• 


88 


55 


::: 


71 


45 


21 


OO 


58 


38 


9,0 


71 






01 


40 


95 


53 


42 


Ofi 


24 


111 


8 


95 




GGeorge H. Marden. 


23 Helen G. Turner, 


Haverhill " 


117 


50 


4, 


82 


4 


3b 


08 


G4 


30 


S8 


8« 




7 Helen G. Turner, ! 10G 


50 


50 


70 


38 


38 


GO 


60 


35 


25 


70 




5 George B. Neal, 


2-lCath. C. Brower, 


Common " 


9b 


45 


..1 


73 


37 


81 


at 






.,, 


73 




8 Cath. C. Brower, 84 


44 


an 


08 


37 


31 


59 


59 


811 


29 


OS 




3 Benjamin E. Brown, 


25 Adaline M. Smith, 


B Hill 


64 


33 


31 


5( 


20 


24 


43 


40 


24 


•>■> 


50 




3 Adaline M. Smith, 80 


47 


33 


09 


41 


28 


57 


57 


81 


20 


09 




4 Andrew J. Locke, 


215 Fannie B. Hall, B.Hill 


113 


51) 


57 


92 


47 


47 


m 


02 




80 


90 




3 Fannie B. Hall, ! 100 


49 


51 


85 


40 


45 


57 


01 


811 


31 


85 




7 Andrew J. Locke, 


27 Susan V. Moore, IB Hill 


92 


4b 


41 


71 


31 


lib 


47 


ou 


31 


9,9 


71 




G Susan V. Moore, | 90 


42 


48 


S? 


40 


42 


lill 


04 


31 


33 


S3 




4 William B. Long, 


28 Jane B. Loring, ;Moulton " 


07 


40 


27 


03 


:;> 




41 


40 


2 b 


1° 


03 




1 Jane B. I.oring, 97 


00 


31 


80 


4b 


32 


52 


07 


45 


22 


80 




1 James Lee, Jr., 


23Pamelia E. Delano, Mead 


101 


o7 


43 


7. 


1 


33 


52 


OO 




23 


77 


| SJPameliaE. Delano, 104 


52 


52 


88 


42 


40 


00 


04 


85 


29 


88 




3 William H. Einney, 


30 Main 
























Harriet M. Fame, 56 


2b 


30 


65 


32 


83 


40 


63 


2-1 


211 


05 




16 Charles F. Smith. 




2H4J 


i;:n 


12'J.s 


21 19 1 


in.,- 


1008 


1587 


159.1 


849 


711 


2ii91 


3| 1471 J2S57 


1499 


1858 


287,- 


1227 


1151 


1772 


lb2b 


905 


863 


2376 


3 


1-Soj 





























































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