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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



OF THE 



®itg of WJxitUttiiwu., 



DECEMBER, 1865. 




BOSTON : 
PRESS OF ARTHUR W. LOCKE, 143 MILK STREET. 

1866. ' 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



In School Committee, December 27, 1865. 
Rev. Mr. Miles presented the Annual Report of the Board, 
which was accepted ; and it was voted that the usual number of 
copies be printed for distribution. 

Attest: F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The School Committee of Charlestown respectfully 
submit the following as their Annual Report. 

It is very gratifying to the Committee to be able 
to represent to their fellow citizens, that, our Free 
Schools, by the blessing of God, have enjoyed a large 
measure of prosperity during the past year, and, that 
they are, at the present time, all things considered, 
without doubt in a more promising condition than 
they have presented at the close of any year since 
they were established. Our teachers are not all 
possessed of the same gifts and qualifications. But 
with scarcely an exception they deserve to be. and 
they are, commended by us for their fidelity, enter- 
prise and efficiency. We are justified in saying of 
them as a body, both of the male and the female 
teachers, that they entertain enlarged conceptions of 
their profession and that they are striving conscien- 
tiously with patience and enthusiasm to fulfill its great 



6 

demands. We trust all the patrons of our schools 
are properly mindful of the fact that the teacher's 
calling is an arduous one, and a calling attended with 
trials, and that while we ought to require them to 
come up to a high standard, we ought, also, to ap- 
preciate their labors and difficulties, and give to them 
our sympathy and co-operation. An "eye servant" is 
not worthy of the name teacher. We, the guardians 
of the schools, have been remiss in the discharge of 
our duties, if there are any persons of that descrip- 
tion in our schools. We do not believe there are, 
and yet, we are sure, more frequent visits to the 
schools by parents and friends, would contribute much 
to the encouragement and success of the teachers, 
and to the general welfare of the schools. 

The Committee record the expression of their 
profound gratitude to the All- Wise Disposer of events 
for the fulfillment of the hope expressed in their last 
Annual Report, that before the close of another year 
the effusion of blood might cease, and peace, estab- 
lished in righteousness and freedom, might bless the 
land. Of the heroic young men who, at their country's 
call, promptly sprung to the scenes of conflict and 
peril, and nobly performed their part in crushing 
rebellion, a large number were those who had recently 
been pupils in our public schools. Many of them 
were graduates of our High School. At least one- 
third of the members of one company had been 
connected with the High School. Hence, as seemed 



proper, when the survivors of these companies returned 
with victory emblazoned upon their banners, the 
schools participated in the ceremonies of welcome, 
and the children, by their floral contributions and 
merry songs, added not a little to the pleasure of the 
occasions. The Committee congratulate all the friends 
of our public schools upon the triumphant overthrow 
of a rebellion, which, if it had been successful, would 
have numbered among its evil consequences the 
destruction of these institutions. We can but notice 
with high satisfaction the fact, that one effect of the 
terrible conflict through which we have passed has 
been to display in the clearest light the excellence of 
our common school system. Had the general intelli- 
gence, the freedom of thought, the independence of 
judgment and action which are the legitimate fruits 
of these institutions, existed at the South, the masses 
of the people of that section of our country could 
not have been made the dupes of a few unscrupulous, 
ambitious men, and by them been driven into a course 
of conduct most disastrous to their own interests. 
Our recent experience as a nation has given new 
significance and force to that injunction of the " Father 
of our Country " : " Promote, then, as an object of 
primary importance, institutions for the general diffu- 
sion of knowledge. In proportion as the structure of 
government gives force to public opinion, it is essen- 
tial that public opinion should be enlightened." 



TRUST FUND, APPROPRIATIONS, &c. 

The balance of the income of the Trust Fund 
in the hands of the Treasurer at the be- 
ginning of the municipal year, was . $767 82 

Income received during the present year, 441 00 



Total, . . . . . $1208 82 
Expended for Cyclopaedias, Maps, Charts, 

Chemicals, Apparatus, and repairs of same, 244 74 



Balance on hand at close of the year, $964 08 

This fund was given many years ago, by certain 
benevolent citizens, " to be expended by the School 
Committee at their discretion, in the purchase of 
books for libraries, maps, apparatus, &c, or for some 
convenience or ornament to make the school-room 
more attractive or useful to the children." It amounts 
to $5600, and is invested in two city notes at 6 per 
cent, interest. It was intended that all the income 
should be expended as it became due, and not that 
it should be allowed to increase, and be invested, as a 
considerable portion of it has been for several years past. 

We trust that our succeessors in office will not 
pursue the course thus adopted, but will spend the 
whole of the income from year to year for the pur- 
poses above specified according to the wishes of the 
benevolent donors. 



The appropriations for the " Support of schools " for 
the fiscal year ending Feb. 28, 1866, are as follows, viz : 

To be expended by the School Committee — 

For salaries of Secretary, Messen- 
ger, and Teachers, . $47,475 00 

Also the City's share of the State 

School Fund for the year 1865, 1,426 36 

$48,901 36 

For incidental expenses, . . . 5,950 00 
Total, $54,851 36 

To be expended by City Council — 
For alteration and repairs of School 

Houses, .... $5,000 
For Fuel and Labor on same, . 5,000 
For introducing Mystic Water into 

the Schools (special), . . 2,300 
Alteration of Building on Common 

St., and fitting up for six Primary 

Schools (special), . . . 3,200 

15,500 00 



Total, $70,351 36 

The School Committee have thus far expended of 
the amount appropriated for salaries and incidental 
expenses, $41,168 99 ; leaving a balance unexpended 
of $13,682 37, which it is thought will be sufficient 
to pay the salaries of the teachers for the next quar- 



10 

ter, amounting to about $12,000, and leave enough 
to meet the probable incidental expenses for the 
remainder of the financial year. 

The salaries of Teachers for the year are as fol- 
lows, viz. : 



Principal of High School, 


. $2,000 00 


Sub-Master " 


. 1,400 00 


1st Assistant " 


700 00 


2d " 


525 00 


3d " " 


450 00 


4th " " 


400 00 


Principals of Grammar School, ea 


3h, . 1,400 00 


Sub-Master ' 


1,200 00 


Sub-Mistress ' 


600 00 


Head Assistants " ' 


500 00 


Assistants " ' 


400 00 


a a i 


375 00 


a a. i 


350 00 


Teachers of Intermediate Schools, ' 


450 00 


" Primary Schools, ' 


400 00 


a a i 


375 00 


u a i 


350 00 


" Music, . 


. 1,000 00 



The salary of the Teacher of Music includes the 
rent of nine pianos, which are furnished and kept in 
order by him, for the use of the High and Grammar 
Schools. 



11 

At the last regular meeting of the present Board 
of School Committee, petitions signed by nearly all 
the Teachers were received, asking that their salaries 
might be increased somewhat in proportion to the 
increased cost of living at the present time. 

It being too late in the year for this Board to act 
upon the subject with deliberation, the several petitions 
were referred to the next Board of School Committee. 
In view of the valuable services rendered to the city 
by the teachers, and of the greatly increased cost of all 
the necessaries, not to say luxuries, of life, we earnestly 
hope that our successors in office will give the subject 
their earliest and most careful attention, and that they 
will, consistently with their best judgment, make such 
liberal additions to the salaries as shall be both a 
credit to the city, and an encouragement to the teachers 
to renewed energy and perseverance in the noble 
work assigned them. 



12 



SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The number of children seeking admission to our 
schools, particularly the Primary and the Grammar 
Schools, increases from year to year, and there is a 
necessity almost yearly for enlarging school accom- 
modations and organizing new schools. During the 
summer vacation, the building on Winthrop square, 
which had been occupied both as a school and an 
engine house, having been vacated by the engine 
company, was entirely remodeled and so arranged as 
to accommodate six instead of four primary schools. 
The city owes a debt of gratitude to its Committee, 
under whose direction the work was done, as, also, 
to the various mechanics who performed the work. 
The building now may be fitly* termed a model school 
house, being furnished with appliances for ventilation 
and warming of the most approved kind, and no pains 
having been spared to make it complete in all its 
appointments. The building was finished early in 
September, and two new primary schools, formed from 
the four schools previously in the building, and the 
Bow street schools, were then organized and located 
there. The demand for enlarged grammar school 
accommodations in the Bunker Hill district is urgent 
and ought to, and doubtless will, receive the immediate 
attention of the City Council. The grammar school 
house in that district is poorly adapted to its purposes, 



13 

and in the judgment of the present Board of School 
Committee, it will be wise to convert it into a primary 
school building and to erect a new grammar school 
house. 

VOCAL MUSIC. 

Vocal Music has now taken its place as an indis- 
pensable and highly important, at the same time that 
it is one of the most pleasing and ornamental branches 
of education taught in our schools. We are happy 
to say, this department of instruction is still in the 
charge of the accomplished teacher, Mr. William H. 
Goodwin, and is conducted by him with great efficiency 
and success. The proficiency of the pupils in learning 
the rudiments of the science of music, and in gaining 
the ability to sing with correctness and expression, 
has been very gratifying. By permission of the Com- 
mittee, Mr. Goodwin has been assisted the past year 
by Mr. Charles E. Whiting. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

These now number thirty-three, and constitute a 
very interesting and important part of our educational 
system. Many of the teachers in charge of these 
schools have long been in the service, and the ability, 
tact, fidelity and acceptableness with which they dis- 
charge their duties are so well known as to obviate 
the necessity for any commendation from us at this 



14 

time. It gives us pleasure to say, that the semi- 
annual reports of the sub-committees of the schools 
of this grade with great uniformity represent the 
teachers as worthy of praise, and the schools to be 
in a satisfactory condition. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

The condition of these schools is indicated by the 
following extracts from the semi-annual reports of 
their sub-committees. 

Of No. 1, Mr. Adams, in his first report, says: 
" This school maintains the high position awarded it 
in previous reports." His July report, also, bears 
testimony to the excellent condition of the school. 

Of No. 2, Mr. Smith, in his February report, speaks 
as follows: "This school passed a very fair exami- 
nation. The pupils are under good discipline, and 
the only obstacle to the progress of the school is 
truancy." In his July report, he says : " The affairs 
of this school have been conducted in a very able 
manner during the past term and the teacher richly 
merits the confidence and encouragement of the Board. 
The room in which this school is held is again reported 
as unfit for the purpose. It would seem that a school 
which performs so important a part in our system as 
this one, is worthy of better accommodations." 



15 



HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

JOSEPH B. MORSE, Principal. 

HEAD ASSISTANTS. 

MAETHA BLOOD, ABBY B. EISKE. 

ASSISTANTS. 

ANN E. WESTON, MARY A. SPINNEY, 

PANNIE B. HALL, LOIS A. RANKIN. 

SUSAN H. WILLIAMS, Vacancy. 

Siib-Oommittee . 

ABRAM E. CUTTER, JAMES ADAMS, 

WILLIAM PEIRCE. 

The first Report of the Sub-Committee speaks of 
this school as follows : 

" There has been a marked improvement in Read- 
ing. The lectures of Prof. Bailey, and the introduction 
of a new series of readers, seems to have secured more 
attention to this important branch of education. More 
life and spirit were evinced, and more expression given. 
The Spelling, also, was most excellent. The result 
of the examination in written Arithmetic was creditable 
throughout. The lowest average of correct answers 
in any class was 70 per cent., and the highest 93 per 
cent. The average of all the classes taken together 
was 84 per cent. These figures do not vary materially 
from the account kept by the Principal. The exami- 
nation in Grammar showed much proficiency on the 



16 

part of the scholars, and the effects of good teaching 
and drill on the part of the teachers. The order of 
the school is good, and the discipline rigorous and 
salutary. 

" On the day preceding Washington's Birth-day, 
public exercises were held in the school building. 
The readings, recitations, singing and calisthenic exer- 
cises were continued through the afternoon. There 
was a good attendance of the parents and friends of 
the scholars. 

" The subject of ventilation forces itself upon the 
attention of your Committee on every visit to the 
school rooms in our city, and it is, without doubt, 
that, to the neglect of this important matter the ill 
health and weary appearance of our teachers are in 
a great degree to be attributed." 

In their last Report, the Committee say : 

" Such proficiency was evinced by the scholars, and 
application by the teachers, that your Committee report 
the school to be in a good thriving condition. Since 
the promotion of pupils from the primary schools, the 
lower divisions have been much crowded." 



17 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

Teachers . 

ALFRED P. GAGE, Principal. 
MARY A. DAVIS, Head Assistant. 

ASSISTANTS. 

PHEBE A. KNIGHT, MARTHA B. STEVENS, 

MARY S. THOMAS, C. E. C. GOODSPEED, 

JUDITH C. WALKER, LYDIA S. JONES. 

ABBY F.. CROCKER, 3 vacancies. 

Suto-Ooimmitrtee. 

CHARLES F. SMITH, EDWIN B. HASKELL, 

JEROME B. MORSE, JOHN A. DAY. 

From the Committee's first Report, we take the 
following : 

" Each division of ' this school was thoroughly 
examined by bringing together, wherever possible, 
the corresponding classes of parallel divisions, and 
we feel justified in reporting that the scholars of this 
school are receiving as thorough and faithful instruc- 
tion as those of any other in the city." 

The Principal, in his semi-annual Report, says: 

" We have followed the Duntonian system of Pen- 
manship, as introduced by Prof. Harrison, and through 
his suggestions and our own efforts we feel that our 
writing has reached a higher standard than ever 
before attained." 



18 

The Committee report truancy as more prevalent 
in this school than elsewhere, thirty- two cases from a 
single room having been entered upon the " Truant 
List" and reported to the police. 

In their September Report, the Committee speak 
as follows : 

" This school is in a prosperous condition. The 
teachers are all faithful and efficient, and the utmost 
harmony and good feeling prevail. The school is, 
at the present time, filled to its utmost capacity. One 
hundred and thirty pupils from the Primary Schools 
applied for admission, and many well qualified for 
promotion were sent back, it being impossible to 
accommodate them. Mr. Sanders having been granted 
leave of absence, the school is now in charge of Mr. 
A. P. Gage, and we have confidence in his ability to 
administer its affairs in a satisfactory manner." 



19 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

WILLIAM BAXTER, Principal. 
MARY G. PRICHARD, Head Assistant. 

ASSISTANTS. 

SARAH M. CHANDLER, MARIA T. SAVAGE, 

HARRIET A. T. DADLEY, ANNIE M. SWAN, 

HANNAH M. SAWYER, MARTHA M. KENRICK, 

ABBY L. SWAN, MARIETTA BAILEY, 

ELLEN C. DICKINSON, LYDIA A. SEARS, 

ANNA P. CRANE. 

SSiifo-Oowiniiiytee. 

GEORGE H. MARDEN, GEORGE W. GARDNER, 

GEORGE H. YEATON, EDMUND BRADFORD. 

The result of their February examination the Com- 
mittee give in the following language : 

" In many of the divisions the recitations were 
excellent — the spelling in some cases amounting to 
100 per cent, correct answers. The general deport- 
ment of the school was good. This is worthy of 
notice and praise, especially since, from the long 
absence of the Principal on account of sickness, it 
might be supposed the attention to discipline and 
study would be relaxed. All the teachers are devoted 
to their work, and alive to the importance of the 
trust confided to them. The evidence of this was 
manifested by the proficiency of the scholars in their 



20 

studies, and the high state of discipline maintained. 
One hundred and eight scholars were admitted from 
the Primary schools. The school now consists of one 
first division, three second divisions, three third divis- 
ions, and five fourth divisions. One of the divisions 
occupies a basement room that is damp and unfit for 
a school room at certain seasons of the year. Another 
division is obliged to occupy the hall, and to use 
settees for seats. Something should be done to remedy 
this state of things." 

In July, the Committee report that they made a 
thorough examination, and found the teachers faithful 
and earnest in their work, aud the scholars attentive 
to their studies. " There has been a marked improve- 
ment in the Reading and Spelling. There are sixty 
scholars in the hall, who are not provided with desks, 
and consequently do not enjoy the same advantages 
for writing as those in the other rooms. We recom- 
mend that the hall be fitted up for two school rooms, 
and the attic finished for a hall. Mr. Baxter, the 
Principal, having recovered from his late illness, enters 
upon his duties with renewed vigor, and we have 
reason to believe this school will continue to main- 
tain a high rank." 



21 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

B. F. S. GRIFFIN, Principal. 
CALEB MURDOCH, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS. 

SOPHIA W. PAGE, EMILY B. BROWN, 

ABBY M. CLARKE, ELLEN M. RUGG, 

ARABELLA P. MOULTON, SARAH J. W. McKAY, 

MARY F. GOLDTHWAITE, HARRIET E. FRYE, 

AUGUSTA A. BROWN. 

Snlb-Commlttee. 

BENJAMIN F. BROWN, JAMES F. HUNNEWELL, 

SAMUEL H. HURD. 

In the first Report, the Committee say : 
" Every department of this school was thoroughly 
examined both by written and oral questions. The 
school has suffered much the past term from 
the frequent change of teachers, and an amount 
of absence on the part of. the pupils caused by the 
prevalence in the district of several epidemics, reducing 
the per centage of attendance in some of the divisions 
from ten to twenty per cent, per week. Good order 
is maintained, and the teachers are earnestly endea- 
voring to accomplish all that can be reasonably expected 
of them." They report the examination in Reading 
as good, in Spelling good, save in a few classes ; in 



22 

History " unsatisfactory, in consequence of the scholars 
having committed to memory the contents of the book, 
rather than the leading ideas." " The examinations in 
Geography and Grammar were, on the whole, credit- 
able. In Arithmetic, both written and mental, they 
were in the main satisfactory. In Colburn's Arith- 
metic, Mr. Griffin's, Mr. Murdock's and Miss Moul- 
ton's classes are deserving of high praise. The 
scholars are not confined to the text books. Thorough- 
ness in teaching Arithmetic is one of the leading 
characteristics of this school. The improvement in 
Writing in some of the divisions has been remarkable, 
while in all the divisions the progress has been much 
greater than before the present system was introduced. 
Music still receives its accustomed share of attention, 
the teacher being both thorough and systematic." 

From the second Report of the Committee we 
extract the following: 

" The school is in an excellent condition. It is 
presided over by an able and experienced master. In 
most of the divisions, the Committee notice with 
satisfaction the admirable order, the thoroughness of 
instruction, the quiet deportment of the scholars, and 
the pleasant relations existing between them and their 
teachers. The teachers are, for the most part, well 
qualified and faithful, and have met with gratifying 
success." 



23 



WAEREN SCHOOL. 

Teacliars. 

GEOEGE SWAN, Principal. 
LETITIA H. MUSSEY, Sub-Mistress. 
ANNIE M. TURNER, Head Assistant. 

ASSISTANTS. 

MARY A. OSGOOD, JULIA WORCESTER, 

MARIA BROWN, V. A. M. L. DADLEY, 

MARGARET VEAZIE, HENRIETTA J. MERRILL. 

Sub-Committee. 

GEORGE B. NEAL, WILLIAM B. LONG, 

W. R. BRADFORD. 

In their first Report, the Committee say: 
" During the past term there have been no changes 
in our corps of teachers, and we are glad to report 
there have been but few absences on the part of the 
teachers, so that the general progress of the school 
has been steady and without interruption. The former 
good character of the school has been well sustained ; 
the Assistant Teachers all strive to co-operate with the 
Principal in all his endeavors to promote the welfare 
of the pupils, and to elevate the standard of scholar- 
ship among them, although with different degrees of 
success. The Principal is himself hard working, 
efficient, and entirely devoted to his work. We cheer- 



24 

fully recommend all the teachers as entitled to continued 
confidence. The examination was a thorough and 
careful one. The result, on the whole, was very 
satisfactory, although there was still room for improve- 
ment. The average number of correct answers was 
very good, so far as the answers were given to ques- 
tions contained in the text-books. But when questions 
taken from some other sources were put, many of the 
scholars who had given a large per centage of correct 
answers in the former case, failed most signally in the 
latter. It is evident the scholars learn their lessons 
too much by rote, or artificially, and relying too 
confidently on their memory, do not exercise suffi- 
ciently their reasoning and thinking faculties." 

In their last Report, the Committee say, that owing 
to the resignation of one efficient member of the 
Committee, and the pressing duties of another, the 
labor of examination devolved upon a single member, 
and hence the examination was not as systematic and 
complete as they could have wished it to be. They 
report the school to be in a very satisfactory condition. 



25 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Teachers . 

CALEB EMEEY, Principal. 
JOHN G. ADAMS, Sub-Master. 

ASSISTANTS. 

CATHARINE WHITNEY, FRANCES S. LOTHROP, 
FRANCES M. READ, JOSEPHINE M. FLINT. 

SuT>-Ooim.m.lfrtee. 

JAMES B. MILES, JAMES ADAMS, 

GEORGE W. GARDNER, SAMUEL H. HURD 

EDWIN B. HASKELL. 

A thorough, examination of all the classes in the 
High School was made by the Sub-Committee during 
the time prescribed by the rules of the Board. In 
the same manner as at previous examinations, the 
work was shared by the different members of the 
Sub-Committee. The classes in Mathematics were 
examined by Mr. Haskell, who reports that " nearly 
all the classes have but just commenced with their 
respective studies. Two classes continued the study 
of Arithmetic from their admission to the school at 
the beginning of the term until December, when they 
took up Algebra. They did nothing in Arithmetic, 
except to review that in which they were supposed 
to be thorough when they were promoted from the 
Grammar Schools, and at the time of the examination 



26 

they had not, of course, made much progress in 
Algebra. I think it would have been more profitable 
for these classes if they had been put into Algebra 
at the beginnning of the term. I found four classes 
in Algebra, of just about the same grade, all having 
begun that study at the same time ; but this includes 
two classes which are exceptional. One class only 
was examined in Geometry, and that in only twenty 
propositions. To that extent it was in a satisfactory 
state. I would suggest that scholars should finish the 
study of Arithmetic in the Grammar Schools." 

Dr. Hurd examined all the classes in French, the 
classes in Chemistry and Physiology, and Miss Read's 
Latin, and makes the following statements : 

" In French, the higher classes did well. The 
advantages fos learning French are certainly excellent, 
as regards pronunciation, text-books, and ' manner of 
instruction. The second classes were in two instances 
so poorly prepared that reviews will be necessary. 
The exercise books of all were wonderfully neat and 
correct. In Physiology, the classes appeared well. 
They manifested a readiness of understanding and 
answering questions which would seem to warrant 
the use of a more advanced text-book, if such could 
be procured. The one now employed is exceedingly 
elementary. The answers in Chemistry indicated an 
interest in the study and diligence on the part of the 
teacher. The class in Caesar appeared to advantage. 
They were well drilled in Latin Grammar." 



27 

Mr. Adams states the results of that part of the 
examination conducted by him, as follows : 

" Miss Whitney's class in English Literature made 
a fine recitation, reading the several passages with 
good taste, and indicating an intimate acquaintance 
with the several authors. The Reading of the 1st 
Junior Class in the 6th Reader was very good, and 
the Spelling correct. Miss Flint's class in the Con- 
stitution of the United States have thoroughly mastered 
it in all its details. I think too much time is spent 
on this book, and the memory of the pupils too 
strongly taxed. Ought not this subject to receive its 
proper attention iji the Grammar Schools, in connec- 
tion with the History of .the United States % " 

Rev. Mr. Gardner reports as follows, of the classes 
examined by him: 

" The senior class in Homer did very finely ■ — gave 
evidence of thorough teaching and good application 
to study. The first middle class in Caesar did very 
well generally ; one or two failures. Translation good 
— showed a commendable interest in the study of 
•Latin. Second middle class in Latin : first division of 
the class did well ; second division, in part well." 

All the remaining classes were examined by the 
Chairman. These classes were as follows : 

The second College class in Xenophon's Anabasis. 
This class consists of five members, the most of whom 
acquitted themselves very creditably, translating with 
facility and correctness any passage assigned to them 



28 

from the portion of the book they had read, and 
showing a good degree of familiarity with Greek 
roots and forms, and the principles of the Grammar 
generally. It was evident the instruction they are 
receiving is careful and thorough. 

The senior class in Virgil. This is a large and 
interesting and, taken as a whole, a very good class. 
The examination was well sustained by a large ma- 
jority of the members. Some of them, however, by 
reason of diffidence or want of perfect self-possession, 
did not do themselves full justice at the examination. 
I am satisfied, from opportunities I have had of hear- 
ing the recitations of this class at other times, that 
the members of it, with hardly an exception, are 
faithful and studious, and are making excellent progress 
in the knowledge of Latin. Their translations show 
a cultivated taste and a good degree of knowledge of 
J;he idioms of the language. Not the least commenda- 
tion deserved by this class is their manifest appreciation 
of the privileges they enjoy, and their evident desire 
for improvement. 

The junior class in Hanson's Latin Narratives, 
taught by Miss Curtis. The upper divisions of this 
class appeared very well, several of the scholars 
making correct recitations, a large number good, a 
few moderate, and fewer still poor. In the third 
division the average was not high. 

The senior class in Natural Philosophy, taught by 
Miss Whitney. This class passed a very satisfactory 



29 

examination, showing that they had not confined 
themselves merely to what is taught in their text- 
hook, but through the guidance of their accomplished 
and successful teacher, had learned to think and 
investigate for themselves. 

A class beginning Greek, under the instruction of 
Mr. Adams. There are four lads in this class, all of 
whom did excellently. I was much pleased with the 
mode in which they are being started in the study 
of Greek. 

Two classes in Rhetoric and English Literature. 
These examinations were fair ; but a more earnest appli- 
cation to these important branches would be gratifying. 

A class in Physical Geography, taught by Miss 
Flint. The recitations of the members of this class 
were all good. 

In addition to the examinations made by the Sub- 
Committee, the Principal, as required by the rule of; 
the Board, has made such examinations of the whole 
school as he has been able to make in connection 
with his own recitations. 

Exercises in honor of the memory of " the Father 
of our Country " were held in the hall of the High 
School building on February 21st. These exercises 
consisted of Declamation, Reading and Singing by the 
pupils, and appropriate addresses by' several gentlemen 
and members of the Committee. The extracts de- 
claimed and read were judiciously selected from the 



30 

various tributes that have heen paid to the character 
and virtues of Washington, and the pupils acquitted 
themselves with great credit. It was especially observ- 
able that great improvement had been made in reading. 
A large number of the parents of the scholars and 
friends of the school were present, and the occasion 
was not only one of entertainment, but, also, of great 
profit to the scholars. It can hardly be that the 
impressions made upon their minds by such exercises 
will not be lasting, and that from them they will fail 
to learn that education comprises something more than 
mere intellectual culture. 

The annual public examination of the High School 
was held at the hall of the High School building, on 
Friday, July 21st, and was conducted much after the 
same manner as in previous years. The programme 
•of exercises was happily arranged, presenting a pleasing 
variety of recitations, declamations, compositions, sing- 
ing and reading. The recitations were conducted 
mainly by the teachers, each teacher hearing one or 
more than one recitation during the day. The por- 
tions of the studies upon which the pupils were 
examined, however, were in most cases indicated by 
the Committee, and questions were freely propounded 
by them. Thus an opportunity was afforded to the 
teachers of showing their methods in the class-room, 
and of giving to the Committee and the visitors 
present the means of judging, to a greater or less 



81 

extent, of their qualifications to instruct, and of the 
facility with which they communicate instruction. It 
gives the Committee great pleasure to report, that the 
examination, as a whole, was of a high order, fully 
sustaining the reputation which the High School has 
enjoyed. Although all the pupils were not equally 
prompt and explicit and full in their answers, yet 
each exercise could, without exaggeration, be pro- 
nounced a success, and, while we marked many 
performances as being peculiarly excellent, there were 
none which deserved to be characterized as failures. 
In a word, gratifying evidence was afforded that the 
teachers, without exception, have, during the past 
year, discharged their duties with fidelity, and have 
labored assiduously to meet the demands of their 
vocation, not only as respects the intellectual culture 
of the pupils, but also their conduct and morals. 

We are very happy to say the pupils, with very 
few exceptions, in their application to study, their 
punctuality and constancy of attendance and their 
general deportment, have met the high expectations 
rightly entertained in regard to them. Especially 
pleasing is the apparent cheerfulness with which they 
fulfill the wishes of their teachers, and comply with 
the regulations of the school ; so that the discipline and 
order of the school, which are excellent, are not com- 
pulsory so much as spontaneous. This characteristic of 
the school is well expressed by a remark recently made 
to me by the Principal : " The school governs itself." 



32 

And if it is true in political economy, that " that gov- 
ernment is best which governs least," we may infer our 
High School, ought to be classed among model gov- 
ernments. 

At the conclusion of the examination, diplomas were 
awarded to the members of the graduating class — 
twenty-one in number, seventeen misses and four lads. 
Three of the boys have entered College, all of them 
without conditions. As indicative of the interest of our 
citizens in the cause of education and the welfare of the 
High School, it gives us pleasure to say that an unusu- 
ally large number of the parents and friends of the 
scholars were present at the examination, and evidently 
attended with much interest to and enjoyed the various 
exercises. Remarks were made by his Honor Mayor 
Robinson, several members of the School Committee, 
and other gentlemen. The inequality in the number 
of the girls and boys in the graduating class, was 
remarked upon by the Mayor and other speakers, and 
the opinion was expressed that this inequality indicated 
something wrong somewhere. The fact that all the 
boys from the school that had offered themselves for 
admission to our first Colleges had been admitted to 
those Colleges without conditions, taken in connection 
with the impressions made by the examination, did not 
allow the belief that the fault is in the school. It must 
be that the advantages afforded by the school are not 
sufficiently appreciated by the citizens. We trust this 
wrong will soon cease to exist, and while we would wish 



33 

no diminution, but rather an increase of the number of 
young ladies in the graduating class, we hope in the 
future a much larger number of the lads of our city 
will avail themselves of the rich advantages of our 
High School. 

The Sub-Committee take great pleasure in repre- 
senting to the Board that the general condition of 
the High School is excellent. The discipline is steady, 
firm, and at the same time mild. The deportment of 
the pupils is orderly and decorous, the moral atmos- 
phere of the school healthful, and the teachers, without 
exception, are worthy of the continued confidence of 
the Board. 



34 



CONCLUSION. 

In closing our Report, and passing over to our suc- 
cessors in office the trust confided to us by our fellow- 
citizens, we advert with peculiar pleasure to the fact that 
Charlestown was the very first place in the country that 
made an appropriation for public schools. Charles- 
town is justly entitled to the honor of having originated 
that system of popular education which has become the 
pride and glory of so many States of the Union, and is 
destined to become the pride and glory of the whole 
land ; indeed, whose benign and ennobling influences 
will, we believe, eventually bless all lands. The first 
settlers of this peninsula were among the most intelli- 
gent and the wisest men of their time. They consti- 
tuted the Church and the School, the foundation stones 
of all social, civil and political institutions. In their 
estimation, intelligence, virtue and religion were abso- 
lutely essential to the welfare of the people. In 
organizing society here they gave to religious institu- 
tions the place of prime importance. But they did, by 
no means, hold to the doctrine that " Ignorance is the 
mother of devotion " ; and hence they at once provided 
liberally the facilities for education. They established 
the school and the college, and affixed to them the seal, 
Christo et ecclesice, regarding education as essential to 
the prosperity of morality and religion. The progress 



35 

t 

of civilization and enlightenment since their day has illus- 
trated the wisdom of their course. Washington gives it 
his weighty sanction when he calls religion and morality 
"the great pillars of human happiness," the "firmest 
props of the duties of men and citizens." The most en- 
lightened patriots that our country has known in all its 
history, those who at the present time are most effi- 
ciently promoting its welfare, approve of the course of 
our revered ancestors, and regard religion and intelli- 
gence as the very life and soul of our civilization, the 
security and glory of our Republic. It has been and 
still is true, that, in the endeavor to plant educational 
and Christian institutions of the New England type in 
all sections of our great country, "religious zeal is 
perpetually warmed by the fires of patriotism." Favored 
with such an ancestry, it is not strange that the people 
of Charlestown, in their successive generations, have 
been distinguished for their interest in the cause of 
popular education and for the generous provision they 
have made for the support of Public Schools. Let the 
present inhabitants of this place of historic and heroic 
renown, be inspired with such an enthusiasm in the 
same great cause as will honor the memory of those 
into whose labors we have entered. It is a fine ex- 
pression of Macaulay : " A people which takes no pride 
in the noble achievements of remote ancestors will never 
achieve anything worthy to be remembered with pride 
by remote descendants." It becomes us to remember 
that towns and cities, not only in New England but 



36 

scattered over a large extent of our country, are nobly 
vying with each other in efforts to elevate their schools 
to the highest degree of excellence. They are availing 
'themselves of the results of the experience of the older 
towns and cities in regard to the construction of school 
buildings, the methods of conducting schools, and all 
that pertains to education, and are making laudable 
efforts to improve upon these results. Let us, in this 
home of free schools, not forget, that, if we would main- 
tain the honorable position which this place has enjoyed 
in the past, we must put forth untiring and earnest 
efforts for the improvement of our schools. The schools 
of Charlestown must not, in any respect, be allowed to 
take a place second to those of any city in the land. 
The Committee enjoin upon the children and youth of 
our city a thoughtful appreciation and diligent improve- 
ment of the rich advantages afforded them by the 
schools, and we urge them to consider that with them 
rests, in an important degree, the responsibility of pre- 
serving the good name of these institutions. Let them 
cherish a jealous regard for the reputation of the schools, 
as well as for their own reputation, and shun every 
species of vice, and cheerfully contribute their part 
towards raising the schools to which they belong up to 
the highest standard of excellence. We are confident 
that our teachers will feel that they are not to be 
excelled by any members of their profession in enter- 
prise and in devotion to their work ; and that the 
intelligent, public spirited citizens of this place will 



\ 



37 

continue to foster, and in all possible ways promote the 
prosperity and usefulness of our public schools. 

May the blessing of God crown the united efforts of 
school committee, parents, teachers and pupils with 
success, and our free schools be perpetuated as the 
fountains of intelligence, virtue, patriotism and religion. 

By order of the Committee, 

JAMES B. MILES, 

President. 

Charlestown, December, 1865. 



SCHOOL RETURNS AT THE SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS. 



HIGH, GRAMMAR AND INTERMED IATE 
SCHOOLS. 



Term ending February, 1865. 



S3 „ 






2 o 



High School 16^ 52 

Bunker Hill School 746 366 

Warren School 437 209 

Winthrop School 389 286 

Harvard School , 491 254 

Prescott School 712 358 

Intermediate School, No. 1 | 90 4o 

Intermediate School, No. 2 95 49 



112 
380 
228, 
303 
237 
354 
45 
46 



152 
588 
377 
511 
418 
634 
69 
72 



49 
291 
182 
234 
214 
311 
37 
35 



o 



■Jj cS 






oj .a 

0) B 



Term ending August, 1865. 



1^5 



103 154 150 126 26 

297, 508 530! 4 584 

195; 345 357; 377 

277: 438: 470 20 491 

204 366 374 9 409 

323J 568 f 566 20 614 

321 47 61 69 

371 40 51 i 72 



14 
38 
32 
42 
36 
46 
4 
9 



l> 3 



150 
707 

394 
551 

484J 

668 

94 

97 



49 
355 
191 
272 
243 
320 
52 
40 



a 



u fl 




CU u 




,q <u 




BH 




2 <w 
Go 


03 

>> 


2 = 


o 

Iffl 


^ 




c3 





'O 



o>.S 
to e 
oj B I 

Sh cS 



io be 



33241619 1705 282113531468 2466 2559 179 2642 221 3145 15221623 2399 11291270 2239 2102 1602239 169 



101 
352 
203 
279 
241 
348 
42 
57 



126 
483 
327 
414 
354 
565 
54 
76 



*s a 



31 95 134 123; 113] 13 

239 244 447 404! 18 465 

155 172, 322 298! 2 325 

198 216: 390 389! 4 410 

173! 181 320 285| 16 338 

272| 293 535 506, 7 558 

24-| 30 41 ! 44- 54 

37! 39 50 53 76 



26 
15 
47 
28 
39 



§ Primary Schools. 



TEACHERS NAMES. 



Location of Pri- 
mary School 
Houses. 



1 Ellen M. Crafts, Charles Street, 

2 Eliz. W. Yeaton, Mead 

3 M. Josephine Smith, Mead 
4;MaIvina B. Skilton, Mead 
5 Mary E. Hale, Elm 
G Mary C. Sawyer, jMedford 
7JMary A. Foster, ;Boylston Chapel 
SJsabel Washburn, Cross Street, 
9JEUen T. Knight, Cross " 

lOLouisa A. Pratt, Common " 

11 Joanna S. Putnam, Common " 

12;Ellen M. Armstead, Bow " 

13 C. W. Trowbridge, Bow " 

14 Sarah E. Smith, Bow " 

15 C. M. W. Tilden, Bow 

1G|E. R. Brower, Common " 

17 Susan E. Etheridge, Moulton " 

18 Lydia M. Butts, Moulton " 
19|LouisaW. Huntress, Moulton " 

20 Matilda Gilman, Soley " 

21 Lucy J. Simonds, Sullivan " 

22 Frances M. Lane, Sullivan " 
23jHelen G. Turner, Haverhill " 
24: C. C. Brower, Common " 

25 Martha Yeaton, ;B. Hill " 

26 H. C. Easterbrook, B. Hill " 

27 Susan V. Moore, B. Hill " 

28 Anna R. Stearns, 'Moulton " 
29Pamelia E. Delano, Mead " 

30 Harriet M. Fame, Main " 

31 Carrie A. Ilea. 'Austin " 



rp erm ending February. 1865. 



- H 



42 

48 
33 

38 ! 
31 
40, 
38 

28! 
4.-. 
42 
28 
47 
34 
40 



90 


4!) 


109 


*5 


85 


38 


94 


51 


103 


51; 


84 


47 


91 


47 


90 


48 


65 


32 


78 


36 


74 


44 


95 


54 


90 


52 


130 


85 


83 


42 


89 


37 


104 

2G23 


49 
1351 



< 



36 

35 

32 

34 

27 38 

33 23 



28, 
31 
26 
24 : 



55 57 
52 40 



o S 



37 
37 
35; 
30 36 
23 34 
40 32 
30, 37 
35 34 
38 36 



42 
46 
49, 

48 
47 
45 
57 



45 

48 
54 
52 
56 
51 
61! 
50 56 
44 48' 



24| 21 
28 20 



25, 
31, 
30 



4/ 
33 


40 
36 


38 


32 


34 


37 


28 


21 


44 


36 


43 


32 


31 


27 


31 


33 


34 


25 


42 


34 


45 


28 


54 


32 


41 


35 


26 


40 


38 


33 


1100 


1009 



48' 
44 
55| 
51 
57 



52 
63 

64 
71 
62 



44 


37 


23 


54 


62 


34 


57 


51 


24 


35 


39 


25 


56 


66 


40 


58 


57 


35 



20 31 
31! 30 

28 28 
19 29 
24 28 
35 28 
33 31 
39 32 
32 30 
14 
28 
27 
L4 
26 

■>9 



do 



Primary Schools. 



TEACHERS NAMES. 



23 


25 


58 


24 


26 


64 


26 


20 


59 


35 


20 


76 


34 


29 


73 


32 


25 


86 


34 


25 


76 


16 


28 


66 


34 


24 


71 


1 896 


776 


2109 



4' 

\ 

i 

6 
3 
5 : 

10| 

10 
2 
4 
8 

10 
7 
9 
2 
6 
8 
6 
4 
6 
8 
4 
2 
7 
6 
2 
6 
3 
2 

14 
170 



Ellen M. Crafts, 
Eliz. W. Yeaton, 
M. Josephine Smith, 
Malvina B. Skilton, 
Mary E. Hale, 
Mary C. Sawyer, 
Mary A. Foster, 
Isabel Washburn, 
Ellen T. Knight, 
Louisa A. Pratt, 
Joanna S. Putnam, 
Ellen M. Armstead, 
C. W. Trowbridge, 
Sarah E. Smith, 
C. M. W. Tilden, 
E- R- Brower, 
Susan E. Etheridge, 
Lydia M. Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress, 
Matilda Gilman, 
(Lucy J. Simonds, 
Frances M. Lane, 
[Helen G. Turner, 
C. C. Brower, 
Martha Yeaton, 
|H. C. Easterbrook, 
Susan V. Moore, 
Anna R. Stearns, 
Pamelia E. Delano, 
Harriet M. Farrie, 
Carrie A. Rea, 



Term ending August, 1865. 



S g 

0,0 1 



77 

91 

115 

85 

91 

102 

152 



45 
45 
35 
45 
35 
45 
40 
39 
-17 
37 
34 
59 
40 
47 
58 
79 
97| 43 
96 52 
86 39 
65| 38 



96j 50 

981 55 

82| 38 

85 43 

63 J 35 

66 36 

9lj 48 

106 59 

110, 53 

90 36 

95! 45 



n E i 
O o 



■«ss 

< 



2* * 







3 







a 




*j «j 


J22 




.M -~ 


.3 




<h <* 


> s 


Q 


S ° 


5 




S - 


■a 
a 


d" 




P 


fc 



SUB-COMMITTEE OF 
PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 



30 35 

25 34 

23 20 

33, 34 

23 49 



33 31 

34 28 



31 


35 


4:; 


32 


29 


37 


23 


22 


31 


30 


40 


33 


30 


31 


33 


23 


39 


34 


35 


32 



49 
27 
35 

38 



69 

77 
64 
75 
72 
82 
78 
65 
48 
7;; 
87 
90 
78 
71 
83 
95 
86 
85 
80 
5:1 
92 
94 
72 
1\) 
69 
89 

83; 

95 

90 
81j 
80' 



Win. B. Long, 
John A. Day, 
J. B. Morse, 
J. B. Morse, 
Chas. F. Smith, 
E. B. Haskell, 

A. E. Cutter, 
Win. Pierce, 
Wm. Pierce, 
;Edmund Bradford, 
[ Jas. B. Miles, 
Jas. F. Hunnewell, 
Jas. F. Hunnewell, 
[A. E. Cutter, 
jjames Adams, 

JGeo. H. Yeaton, 
,Geo. H. Yeaton, 
Wm. R. Bradford, 
Samuel H. Hurd, 
Geo. H. Marden, 
Geo. H. Marden, 
Geo. B. Neal, 

B. F. Brown, 
,Geo. B. Neal, 
;Geo. W. Gardner, 
John A. Day, 
[Win. R. Bradford, 
Jerome B. Morse, 
Edmund Bradford, 
Wm. B. Long. 



2789 1400 1389 2443 1209 1234 1881 1573 793 7802441 2 148 



-. 







. . ■