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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE, 



JANUARY, 1867. 




BOSTON: 

ARTHUR W. LOCKE & CO., PRINTERS, 143 MILK STREET. 

1867. 



/ 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



In School Committee, January 3, 1867. 
Eev. Mr. Gardner presented the Annual Report of the Board, 
which was accepted ; and it was voted that five hundred copies 
be printed for distribution. 

Attest : F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



The School Committee of Charlestown respectfully 
submit the following as their Annual Report for the 
year ending January 5, 1867. 

Our Public Schools are by far the gravest of all 
our public interests. By the instruction given in 
them they affect every family, and by the taxation 
for their support they affect every pocket. As guar- 
dians of this public trust we call attention to the 
following items : 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

At the first meeting in January, the Board was 
organized by the choice of Rev Geo. W. Gardner 
for President, F. A. Downing for Secretary, W H. 
Finney for Treasurer, and Abijah Blanchard for 
Messenger. 

Several vacancies, caused by resignation, were 
subsequently filled by election in convention with the 
Board of Mayor and Aldermen. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Trust Fund.— Principal, . . . |5,600 00 
Income in Treasurer's hands at the begin- 
ning of the year, .... 964 08 
Income received during the year, . . 387 39 



Total income, . . . $1,351 47 
Expended for sundries as per Treasurer's acct. 250 89 



Balance on hand, . . $1,100 58 

Appropriation for support of Schools for fiscal year 
ending February 28, 1867. 

For Salaries, $56,000 00 

State School Fund, .... 

Incidentals, ..... 10,034 00 



Total, . . . . $66,034 00 

And City's proportion of School Fund. 

Expenditures to January 1, as per report 

of Treasurer, .... 50,849 47 



Balance, .... $15,184 53 
To which is to be added the City's proportion of the 
School Fund. 



mmammmm — "^M^^^^I^^^^H^^HBSHW 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 



In view of the greatly increased cost of living, 
the salaries of most of the teachers have been raised, 
and now stand as follows, viz. : 



Principal of High School, 

Sub-Master 

1st Assistant 

2nd 

3rd 

4th 



$2,000 per annum. 
1,400 
765 
575 
475 
475 
Principals of the Grammar Schools, 1,600 
Sub-Master of Winthrop School, 1,400 
Sub-Master of Prescott School, 1,000 

Sub-Mistress of Warren School, 700 

Head Assts. of Grammar Schools, 600 

1st Year. 2d Year. 3d Year. 

Asst. Teachers in Grammar Schools, 425 |450 |475 



Teachers of Intermediate Schools, 

Teachers of Primary Schools, 
Teacher of Music, 



500 per annum. 

1st Year. 2d Year. Sd Year. 

400 1425 1450 
1,400 per annum. 



This increase in salary was regarded by the Com- 
mittee as a positive demand of justice to a band of 
hard-working and efficient teachers ; also as a matter 
of necessity, in order to retain the best talent in 
our service. 



8 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS. 

The demand for such an officer, felt and urged 
by this Board for years, has been met by the action 
of the City Council in the following Ordinance : 



An Ordinance establishing the Office of Superintendent of Schools. 

Be it ordained hy the City Council of the City of Charlestown, as 
follows : 

Section 1. The School Committee are authorized to choose 
a Superintendent of Schools, whose term of office shall expire on 
the last day of February in each year, and they shall have 
authority to define his duties and to remove him from office at 
any time, provided that a majority of all the members of the 
Committee shall vote therefor. Any vacancy occurring in the 
office of Superintendent may be filled by the Committee at any time. 

Section 2. The salary of said Superintendent shall be at 
the rate of two thousand dollars per year. 

Section 3. This Ordinance shall take effect on its passage. 

In Common Council, March 19, 1866. 
Passed to be ordained, and sent up for concurrence. 

Edwin B. Haskell, President. 

In Board of Mayor and Aldermen, March 19, 1866. 
Passed to be ordained, in concurrence. 

Charles Robinson, Jr., Mayor. 

A true copy — Attest : 

Daniel Williams, City Clerk. 



In accordance with the provisions of this order, 
the Board of School Committee made choice of Rev. 
J. H. TwoMBLY as Superintendent of Schools for the 
year ending February 28, 1867. 



)P 



Mr. TwoMBLY is a gentleman well and favorably 
known in this commun'ty for his excellent qualities 
of mind and heart, as well as for his experience in 
educational matters, and his general executive ability. 
He has entered vigorously upon his work, and good 
results are already visible in the schools, and many 
more will, we trust, become visible in the line of 
his duties. 

His first semi-annual Report — already published, 
and now embodied in this Report of the Board, — is 
an able paper, to which the Board would call special 
attention. To him the President is indebted for 
valuable assistance in making up this Report, especially 
for statistical matter, and for all that pertains directly 
to the reports of the several Grammar, Intermediate, 
and Primary Schools. 

To define the relation of this officer to the School 
Board, and his duties to the schools, the Board have 
adopted the following special rules and regulations : 

Chapter IV. — Duties of the Superinttndent of Schools. 

Section 1. The Superintendent of Public Schools shall be 
elected annually, by ballot, at the first meeting of the Board in 
February ; to enter upon the duties of his office on the first day 
of March next following. 

Section 2. He shall devote himself to the study of Public 
Education, and keep himself acquainted with the progress made 
in other places, in order to suggest appropriate means for the 
advancement of the public schools in this city ; and shall see that 
the regulations of the Committee in regard to the schools are 
promptly carried into effect. 

Section 3. lie shall visit the schools as often as his other 



10 

duties will permit ; and each school at least once in every quarter. 
He shall advise the teachers on the best methods of instruction 
and discipline ; and for the better illustration of such methods, 
shall hold stated meetings of the Primary and Intermediate School 
Teachers once in each quarter, and have authority, for this pur- 
pose, to dismiss the Pinmary and Intermediate Schools at such 
times as he shall deem advisable, not exceeding one-half day in 
each quarter. He shall also hold stated meetings of the Gram- 
mar School Teachers once in each quarter, and shall have 
authority to dismiss the Grammar Schools not exceeding one-half 
day in each quarter, for that purpose. 

Section 4. He shall render such aid and communicate svich 
information to the Committee, or the various sub-Committees, as 
they may require of him ; and, with the assistance of the sub- 
Committees, he shall make the stated semi-annual examinations 
of the schools. He shall endeavor to secure uniformity in the 
examinations of schools of the same grade, and in the various 
reports, records, etc., used in the Public Schools. 

Section 5. He shall consult with the different bodies who 
have the control of the building and altering of school houses, 
and communicate such information on the subject as he may 
possess ; and he shall suggest such plans for building and altering 
school houses as he may consider best for the health and con- 
venience of the teachers and pupils, and most economical for the 
city ; and he shall advise with those through whom, directly or 
indirectly, the school appropriations are expended, that there may 
result more efficiency and economy in such expenditures. 

Section 6. He shall attend the meetings of the Board, 
except when the subject of his own election is under consideration ; 
and shall have the same rights and privileges as a member of 
the School Committee, except the right to vote. 

Section 7. He shall make a semi-annual report to the Board 
in July and February, in writing, giving such facts and sugges- 
tions relating to the condition of the schools, and the increase of 
their efficiency, as he may deem advisable. He shall also assist 
the President in preparing the Annual Report of the School 
Committee, under the direction of the Board. 

Section 8. He shall keep a record of the names, ages, and 
residences of persons who make applications for situations as 
teachers, with such remarks and suggestions respecting them as 



11 

he may deem important for the iuformation of the Committee ; 
which record shall at any time be open to the inspection of any 
member of this Board. And he shall pei-form snch other dnties 
as the School Committee shall from time to time direct. 



SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Better accommodations for the Bunker Hill Gram- 
mar School have for years been demanded. In fact, 
the crowded condition of nearly all our schools has 
been, and still is to some extent, a matter calling 
for action. " Room, room," is the imperative demand 
of the oncoming generations. Next after the family, 
this demand is made of the school. "■ Let me in," 
is the constant cry at the school room door. This 
cry the teacher must heed, and the public must pro- 
vide for. Hence it is well, in a constantly increasing 
community like our own, to look beyond the present, 
m providing school accommodations. In rearing a 
substantial school edifice, that is to stand, accidents 
aside, when we are all dead, the question to be con- 
sidered is not "what will meet the wants of this 
school now?" but " what will meet the wants of this 
school ten, twenty years from now I " Provision is 
inseparable from a wise forecast. Accordingly we 
have been glad to see one school house erecting the 
past year too large for the present demand. 

The substantial, beautiful and very commodious 
house designed for the Bunker Hill School is nearly 
completed. It was hoped it might be dedicated by 



12 

the present Board ; but as it has not yet come into 
our hands, we must refer that matter to our success- 
ors. This house is built in a most substantial manner, 
on the most approved plans, and is designed to 
accommodate eight hundred scholars. It is an orna- 
ment to the city. A more minute description of the 
house, its appliances and arrangements, will find a 
legitimate place in the next Annual Report of this 
Board. 

Early in the season, just after the foundations 
had been laid for the new house in the Bunker Hill 
district, the Warren School house was destroyed by 
fire. The question of building thus became compli- 
cated. The Committee on City Property immediately 
submitted to this Board the following interrogatories, 
asking an answer to each, Yes or No : 

1. " Will not the btnldini^ of a Grammar School House of 
fom'teen rooms, on the site of the Warren School, provide the 
needful accommodalions for Grammar School scholars the present 
year ? " Voted by School Committee to answer No. 

2. " Will not the transfer of scholars from the Primary to 
the Grammar Schools, in September, relieve the Grammar Schools 
for this year?" Voted to answer No. 

3. "Will the building of a Grammar School House on Bald- 
win Sti'eet, with sixteen rooms, relieve the crowded state of the 
Grammar Schools, and accommodate the Warren School scholars ? " 
Voted to answer No. 

4. Will the School Committee recommend the repairing of 
the Warren School House without enlargement or alteration ? " 
Voted to answer No. 

5. " Arc th3 School Committee in favor of buildimj both the 



13 

Warren School House and the School House on Baldwin Street 
during the present year ? " Voted to answer Yes. 

6. " If in favor of building only one, which one ? " Not 
acted upon, being involved in the preceding propositions. 

According'ly the new house at the Neck was not 
abandoned, and nothing was done toward repairing 
the Warren House ; and this Committee are not 
apprised that any steps have been taken toward its 
rebuihling on an enlarged and improved jDlan, further 
than the purchase of land to enlarge the lot. The 
school has suffered, and still is suffering, great 
inconvenience and positive detriment. The demand 
for the immediate rebuilding of the Warren School 
House, on the old site, is imperative. Situated in 
the centre of the city, in such relation to other schools 
that, with sufficient accommodations, it could relieve 
the pressure already felt in them, and withal crown- 
ing the hill, this Board is persuaded that out of the 
blackened ruins of the old house, there ought to 
arise during the coming year a new, substantial and 
commodious building, not inferior to the best in its 
working arrangements, and in its adornings worthy 
of its location and its name. 

Though something may be done in this direction, 
it will be impossible to accommodate the scholars of 
this school in the new building on Baldwin Street. 
It would be a severity worthy of the loudest remon- 
strance to compel young children from the vicinity 
of the Monument grounds to go so far ; and no 



14 

redistricting of the city can be made that would 
admit the scholars of the Warren School, resident in 
the vicinity of the other Grammar Schools, into those 
schools, since they are all over-full at present. The 
AVarren School House must be rebuilt. 

Of the Primary Schools, some are well housed, 
some are poorly housed, and some are houseless. It 
is designed to remodel the old Bunker Hill building 
into Primary School rooms. This will meet a large 
demand in the upper part of the city. Eight good 
rooms can thus be secured, without using the basement, 
which should always be avoided if possible. Basement 
school rooms are, in more respects than one, sug- 
gestive of tombs. 

With the new house on Baldwin Street, the 
Warren House rebuilt, the old Bunker Hill building 
thus remodelled, and two new primary buildings for 
the schools in Austin and Elm Streets, our schools 
will be very well accommodated, until it shall become 
necessary to rebuild the Harvard School Houes, not 
many years hence. 

EMPLOYMENT OF TEACHERS. 

With few exceptions, we believe our teachers are 
able and successful. Some of them have had large 
experience, and their places could be refilled with 
difficulty. The constant aim should be to obtain and 
to retain the very best teaching talent. It is often 



15 

easier to lose a good teacher by the attraction of 
more lucrative and eligible positions, than to find 
another fitted for the place. On the other hand, it 
is often easier to find a good teacher than to get 
rid of an indifferent one. We must have a care — 
first, as to who go into our schools as teachers : 
secondly, who go out. 

For a few years, teachers have been employed in 
our schools without any formal examination. It was 
thought that the several sub-Committees would not 
be likely to employ any one whose literary qualifica- 
tions were so much in doubt as to require an 
examination. This rather loose way of procedure 
has wrought some evils. Favoritism has to some 
extent ruled action, and the substitute system, by 
which teachers have largely obtained their situations, 
has come to be controlled, in many cases, more by 
the disabled or retiring teacher than by the sub- 
Committee. 

We have scores of written applications for teach- 
ers' positions now on file. Many of these are from 
young ladies, residents of our own city, and graduates 
of our High School. Many of them have ranked 
high as scholars, and would make efficient teachers. 
Other things being equal, these have the first claim 
upon us. 

The question has arisen in the Board, How can 
we, from these many applicants, make more intelli- 
gent and judicious selections ? How can we discover 



16 

the best teaching talent ? The Board has taken 
action looking to an answer of this question. At 
our meeting December 20th it was 

Ordered, That a committee, consisting of the Chairman of 
the Committee on the High School and the Chairmen of the 
several sub-Committees on the Grammar Schools, be appointed 
for the examination of teachers, and that the Superintendent be 
the Secretary of that Committee. 

Ordered, That quarterly public examinations of teachers be 
held by the above Committee, and that hereafter no person shall 
be elected as teacher in the schools of this city who has not been 
duly examined and licensed by the above Committee. 

A competitory examination will discover true 
worth. A discerning board of examiners could readily 
select from fifty candidates the ten best qualified 
for service. 



UNIFORMITY AND CLASSIFICATION. 

It has been felt that there is too little uniformity 
in our several schools, in regard to courses of study, 
ranking, methods of examination, and the like. 
Scholars going from one school to another of the 
same grade have hardly been able, in some cases, to 
find their ^Droper places. Especially has each Gram- 
mar School had too much of a separate and individual 
character. There should be a uniform classification 
in all our schools of the same grade. Then one 
school could be compared with another, and each 
afi'ord a stimulus to others to excel. To this end 



Bi!!'*?'9^S^S!Sir'""'*"" 



17 

the Superintendent is looking, and we hope all sub- 
Committees and teachers will aid him in bringing 
it about. 

COMPAEATIVE EXAMINATIONS. 

By vote of the Board, a comparative written 
examination of the two upper classes in the several 
Grammar Schools was held in July, under the direc- 
tion of the Superintendent. The results of this 
examination will be seen in the following tables. 
The general average per cent, of correct answers, in 
the several branches, is given after the name of 
each school. 

i^'IRS^' CLASSES. 

Spelling. Grain. Oeog. Arith. History. 

Bunker Hill 71f 81f 77^ 89f- 89f 

Harvard 76 Sl^^ 72y6-j- 83-jSj- 97 

Warren 69f 87^ 71| 91 j% 81^5^ 

Prescott 71ff 78f^ 75^^ 88^ 89|f 

Winthrop 74f 82yV 80^0 83f 76 

SECOND CLASSES. 



Bunker Hill 71 J^ 88| 82| 75f 80^ 

Harvard 69yL 73443 78f | 76^-^ 86^^ 

Warren 66^^ 81J-r 852^ 88|f 82f 

Prescott 73| 72^ 771 883I3 84^- 

Winthrop 68f 83^^ 87y2^ 72^ 81| 

In regard to these examinations, the Superintendent 

in his report to the Board well remarks : "In order 

to make them fair tests of public schools, they should 

be held in all the classes of each school. Moreover, 

3 



18 

it will be found necessary, I apprehend, for the sub- 
Committees to make all the promotions, so that each 
teacher shall be furnished with scholars that come 
up to a prescribed standard, and no scholar be 
deprived of merited advancement." In a word, there 
must be uniformity. 

By direction of the Board, the Superintendent 
collated the several papers of the candidates for 
admission to the High School, in the several branches. 
As this was of the nature of a comparative examina- 
tion, the result may be given here. The general 
average per cent, is given in the table below ; also 
the number present at the examination from each school: 















Three last 




Number. 


Arith. 


Gram. 


History. 


Geog. 


combined. 


Bunker Hill. 


... 6 


76f 


66-1 


^^-h 


90f 


77if 


Harvard . . . . 


...11 


74tV 


63t¥^ 


85X5 


70J-a 


73Mi 


Warren 


...15 


m 


64H 


83 


in 


7.H^f 


Prescott . . . . 


...29 


63ff 


58x^5 


82/e 


74M 


71fff 


Winthrop . . . 


...10 


841 


76f4 


88^ 


86 


83it 



GENERAL EXERCISES IN SCHOOLS. 

Music is humanizing, refining and almost indis- 
pensable in all our social relations. The school is 
eminently a social institution. Singing is an expression 
of its social life. Let the children sing. This branch 
has been taught efficiently, as in former years, by Mr. 
W. H. Goodwin. 

Vocal culture is an indispensable part of a practi- 
cal education. Children should be trained vocally 
before they are taught grammar. By vote of the 



iiiii^i rtititf tt> l-'i>»»fc1»nh<MilTiiVT^I#^^^^ 



19 

Board, henceforth vocal gymnastics and declamation 
will be required in the High School, and in the two 
upper classes of the Grammar Schools, 

During the present winter, a course of lessons in 
vocal gymnastics, paid for from the private funds of 
the Board, open to all the teachers of the Public 
Schools, has been given by Mr. Stacy Baxter, 
whose reputation as an elocutionist is deservedly 
high. Those teachers who have with fidelity attended 
upon and followed up these instructions, have received 
great benefit, and better fitted themselves to carry 
out, in their instructions, the wishes of the Board in 
this direction. 

DISCIPLINE. 

In the main the discipline of the schools is good. 
Order is maintained and study secured. In regard 
to some of the means used, there is, in some schools, 
a wide margin for improvement. 

This Board does not favor the indiscriminate use 
of the rod for punishment. It has been well said, in 
regard to whipping, " the minimum of punishment is 
the maximum of excellence." That is the best disci- 
plinarian who finds it least often necessary to use 
the rod. It is questionable whether scholars should 
ever be whipped for failures in recitation — certainly 
not indiscriminately. An idle, roguish boy may fail, 
and deserve the rod ; but on that account no arbitrary 



20 

rule should be made which will keep tender-hearted, 
well-meaning, studious children — who have been 
taught to look upon a whipping as the highest dis- 
grace — in constant fear and trembling lest ability 
or memory may fail them. It is to be hoped that 
teachers will whip only as a last^ not as a firsts 
resort, and that in every case the teacher will com- 
ply with the rules of this Board, in keeping a record 
of the facts in the case Downright disobedience and 
flagrant ofi'ence may demand the rod ; but minor 
faults, and especially moral off"ences, are better treated 
by moral means. 

Scholars should not be habitually kept after school 
as a punishment for poor lessons. It is requiring 
too much of the teacher and too much of the child. 
Six hours a day is enough for either of them to be 
in the school-room. It is hoped that teachers will 
conform to the rules of the Board in this regard also. 
It is better to pass by a failure, now and then, than 
to create a dislike to study, and an aversion to all 
learning, by making it a task and a punishment. 

The reports of the condition of the several Pri- 
mary, Intermediate, and Grammar Schools, as they 
have come under the supervision of their respective 
sub-Committees and the Superintendent, will be given, 
as prepared by that officer 



nv 



21 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 




22 

These schools are, for the most part, m a very 
good condition. The teachers, though differing widely 
from each other in respect to natural tact, experience, 
and acquirements, are all faithful to their important 
trusts, and are striving to win honorable success. 
Several of them exhibit a high degree of ability to 
govern children, and to awaken in them an ardent 
love for the exercises of the school-room, and, what 
is far better, for their individual improvement. 

Geniality of spirit and kind attentions are always 
effective in stimulating and directing the higher affec- 
tions of children, and therefore should never be over- 
looked by those who instruct them. It is not enough 
for teachers to mean well, and cherish high resolves to 
make their pupils jirogress. The rod of correction may 
be required at times, and a strong and well-balanced 
will continually ; but children are won to noble 
achievements by manifested sympathy, and appeals to 
their consciences and hopes, rather than by oppro- 
brious appellations and threats. Harsh expressions 
soon lose their power to stimulate or to restrain, but 
an earnest hope or a good purpose may gather 
strength with each passing day, and lead a child 
forward to repeated successes. Fortunate are those 
teachers who know how to call into exercise the 
better natures of the young, and to infuse into their 
hearts an honorable ambition to accomplish the true 
ends of human life. 

Great improvement has been made in the attractive- 



BiiiMtfn ivihi 1 'iihi'BiamtfZah 



23 

ness of several of the school-rooms during the past 
year. In some mstances, teachers have procured 
pictures at their ow^n expense ; in others, the scholars 
and their friends have furnished them. Flow^ers, 
pictures, and, in short, all works of taste, though not 
of the highest order, interest and please the young, 
and exert a salutary influence upon their moral 
natures. It is to be hoped that the time will speedily 
come, when all the places, where children are con- 
vened for study, will display that neatness and elegance 
which belong to true culture. 

A few of the teachers in these schools have vol- 
untarily given some attention to Oral Teaching and 
Object Lessons. A fully developed system of public 
education, will specifically provide for each of these, 
and but little can be accomplished in either, unless 
the schools are properly graded. 

The Committee express, with pleasure, their con- 
fidence in the qualifications and fidelity of the ladies 
having charge of the Primary Schools, and solicit for 
them the active co-operation and sympathy of those 
parents whose children they instruct. By expressing 
to their children a lively personal interest in the great 
objects of education, by commending their teachers to 
them in kind and respectful terms, and by visitations 
to the school-rooms, parents can do much to facilitate 
the work of instruction. 

Deaths of Teachers. — Two deaths have occurred 
among the teachers of the Primary Schools during 



24 

the past year. Miss Pamelia A. Delano, teacher of 
Primary School, No. 29, died in the month of April, 
of consumption. Miss Delano was a graduate of the 
Charlestown schools, and had been in the service of 
the city about nine years. She faithfully and success- 
fully performed her varied duties as instructress, and 
was greatly beloved by her pupils. 

Miss Mary E. E-ice was educated in the public 
schools of this city, and had taught Primary School 
No. 32, a little more than a year. Miss Rice exhibited 
more than ordinary zeal in the labors of the school- 
room, and by her fidelity, and particularly by her 
kindness to the children, won their esteem, and 
inspired them with a good degree of interest in their 
studies. She died on the 24th of November, after a 
very brief and painful illness. The week of her death 
had been appointed as the time for her marriage and 
removal to one of our Western cities. Her anticipated 
bridal day was, to her many friends and acquaintances, 
a day of deep sorrow and mourning. 



wmmm 



25 



INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

iVo. Teacher. Location. Suh-Committee. 

1. — Sarah M. Ginn, Winthrop Street, William Pierce. 
2. — Mary A. Smith, Main Street, George H. Yeaton. 

These schools are designed for the accommoda- 
tion of children who are too old to be profitably 
associated with primarians, and whose attainments will 
not admit them to the Grammar Schools. Objections 
are often made to schools of this character as need- 
less appendages to our educational system. But we 
think an enlightened consideration of the difficulties 
arising from the presence of one hundred and fifty 
or two hundred children of this class, in the twenty 
or more Primary Schools, which they would be 
required to attend under the ordinary mode of dis- 
tricting the city, will convince any person that it is the 
part of wisdom to provide separate schools for them. 

The present arrangement will seldom, if ever, 
necessitate the employment of additional teachers, and 
it affords peculiar facilities for those children, whose 
early education has been neglected, to make up, in a 
measure, what they have lost. 

The propriety of establishing and continuing these 
schools is fully justified, we think, by their results. 

The teacher of School No. 1 is a lady of tact and 
energy, and seems fully worthy to be the successor 
of Miss Miles, who won for herself and for that 



26 

school so high a reputation. The Committee says, in 
his report for the term ending July 21st, " Miss Ginn, 
the new teacher of Intermediate No. 1, has been 
very successful, and the school has never appeared 
better than it does at the present time. Twenty girls 
and ten boys were admitted to the Grammar Schools." 
School No. 2 is conducted in a very energetic 
and successful manner. The Committee for this school 
speaks of it, in his first report, in terms of honorable 
commendation, and in his second, says, " This school 
is in excellent condition, and has one of the best of 
teachers." 



^ 



27 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

Teaoliers. 

ALEEED P. GAGE, Principal. MARY A. DAVIS, Head Assistant. 

Assistants. 

ABBY E. CROCKER, LYDIA S. JONES, 

BERNICE A. DbMERITT, MARY E. JAQUITH, 

H. LIZZIE DEERING, MARTHA B. STEVENS, 

ELDORA A. PICKERING, CELIA C. GOODSPEED, 

MAKY S. THOMAS, VACANCY. 

Sub-Committee. 

W. H. FINNEY, CHARLES E. SMITH, 

JOHN A. DAY, CHARLES H. BIGELOW. 

The sub-Committee, in their second Report, say : 
" Although we were unable to devote as much 
time to the examination in July as was given in 
February, yet from frequent observation of the work- 
ing of the school, and from the report of a thorough 
examination by the Principal, we are able to state 
with confidence that there has been general improve- 
ment, and that the school has reached a standard 
of excellence never before attained during our expe- 
rience as sub-Committee. This favorable condition 
is, of course, mainly, if not entirely, due to the 
faithfulness and ability of the teachers ; and we are 
happy to bear testimony to the fidelity of all, and the 
success of most of them. While we cheerfully give 



28 

our testimony to the fidelitij of all the teachers, we 
have made a qualification in regard to their success. 
They are all hard-working, but it appears to us that 
in some of the classes a great part of the work is 
misapplied. In our last report, we referred to the 
rote system of teaching, as pursued in a few classes 
of this and other schools. The Principal has made 
an earnest effort for improvement in this respect, in 
those classes in w^hich this method formerly prevailed. 
His efforts have been in a degree effective, but the 
work is not yet completed. There are classes in 
which there ought to be, and must be, further 
improvement before we can say the mechanical system 
of instruction is abolished. Teachers, in order to be 
successful, must get the hard thinking out of their 
pupils, and not be satisfied with their own ' talking 
and telling.' This want of intelligent teaching and 
intelligent study, produces a general stupor among 
the pupils which will not only be shown in their 
recitations, but in their general appearance in the 
school-room ; there will be, perhaps, nothing very 
much out of order, and nothing very much in order." 

The Committee then discuss, at some length, the 
classification of the school, and the merits of the 
teachers ; but we pass over their remarks on these 
topics, and quote the following items : 

" Much attention has been given to Penmanship, 
and there is a very creditable progress shown through- 
out the school in this important art. At the close of 



29 

the term, a gold pen was presented by one of the 
teachers to the schohir in each of the eleven rooms, 
who had made the most improvement during the year. 
" Our remarks in relation to the rote system of 
teaching may be applied, to some extent, to the study 
of Arithmetic, in a few of the classes. Nearly all the 
questions in the examination by the Principal were 
prepared by himself. They were not puzzling, yet 
their performance would require a pretty thorough 
understanding of the subjects taught. The result in 
Mental Arithmetic, particularly in some classes, showed 
not that the classes had not been thoroughly drilled 
on the examples in the text-book, but that the con- 
stant and exclusive use of the book for years had so 
habituated them to it, that similar examples, not 
contained in the book, seemed like mountains — 
utter impossibilities. Considerable more ground has 
been passed over in some of the lower classes this year 
than formerly ; and it is designed that a still further 
advance shall be made next year. Too much time has 
been thrown away on this study — not so many weeks 
need be spent, as months have been, in learning to 
write numbers. On the whole, we are gratified with 
the present results in Arithmetic, as compared with 
those of the past, and the prospective results as 
compared with the present. 

" The attendance during the year has been much 
better than formerly. There have been fewer cases 
of truancy, and, with the full co-operation of the 



3a 

truant officers, we have no doubt that the practice 
can be almost entirely broken up." 



HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

JOSEPH B. MOESE, Principal. MARTHA BLOOD, ^ 

ABBIE B. FISKE, \ ^^"'^ Assistants. 

Assistants. 

ANNA E. WESTON, FANNIE B. HALL, 

LOIS A. RANKIN, ROSE PRESCOTT, 

LUCY L. BURGESS, HELEN A. PORTER, 

SUSAN H. WILLIAMS. 

Sub-Coinmittee. 

ABRAM E. CUTTER, WILLIAM PIERCE, 

J. E. RANKIN. 

The examination of this school, in February, was 
conducted according to the usual custom, and the 
results were, on the whole, very satisfactory to the 
Committee. The Chairman of the sub-Committee, in 
the second Report of the school, says: 

" The semi-annual examination of the Harvard 
School was held within the prescribed time in the 
month of July. The first and second classes were 
examined by printed questions, strictly in accordance 
with the method agreed upon by the Board for all 
the Grammar Schools, and directly under the instruc- 
tions of the Superintendent. The other classes of the 
school were examined by the Committee, in all their 
studies. The scholars manifested a commendable 



|«1WJ ■■ 



31 

degree of proficiency in each, and the teachers, faith- 
fulness and industry in their labors. 

" The school has labored under great disadvantage 
on account of being over-crowded in the lower classes. 
It was found necessary to form another division, which 
was placed in the basement recitation room. The 
room is very small, and wholly unfit for the purpose, 
but was the only one to be found at the time. 

" One important matter, which it may be proper to 
allude to at this time, is the great want of attention, 
in our Primary Schools, to writing figures upon the 
slates and blackboards. At the last examination of 
candidates for admission to the Harvard School, a 
great deficiency was found in this particular, except 
on the part of scholars from a single school. No. 
32, taught by Miss Mary E. Rice. Her pupils could 
all make figures plainly and readily on the black- 
board, and her efforts in this direction merit special 
notice. 

Oral Instruction. — " Mr. Pierce, in his examina- 
tion of a part of the studies, finds a lack of Oral 
Teaching^ and a disposition on the part of some of 
the teachers to confine their instruction too much to 
the text-books. It must be acknowledged that this 
fault is apparent in all our schools. It is desirable 
that our teachers should endeavor to inculcate prin- 
ciples, and not allow their scholars to follow implicitly 
the methods laid down in their manuals. Great ad- 



32 

vantage is gained by varying the questions, and 
illustrating a study by examples drawn from every 
day life, from matters outside of the books. A method 
worked out in the scholar's own mind, and expressed 
in the scholar's own language, if not the shortest or 
easiest, is worth more to him, if he understands 
the principles involved, than any method laid down 
in the text-book." 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL, 



Teachers. 



WILLIAM BAXTEE, Principal. WARREN E. EATON, Sub-Master. 

MARY G. PRICHARD, Head Assistant. 

Assistants. 
SARAH M. CHANDLER, LYDIA A. SEARS, 

HARRIET A. T. DADLEY, MARIETTA BAILEY, 

MARTHA M. KENRICK, GEORGIANA HAMLEN, 

MARY C. SAWYER, MARIA T. SAVAGE, 

ELLEN C. DICKERSON, GEORGIANA T. SAWYER. 

Sii.t>-CoMiin.ittee. 

GEORGE H. MARDEN, GEORGE H. YEATON, 

CHARLES N. SMITH, MOSES H. SARGENT 

The first Report of the Committee says : 
" The Committee made a thorough and systematic 
examination of the school during the month of Feb- 
ruary, and, on the whole, found it to be in a highly 
satisfactory condition. 

" Much and constant use of Oral Instruction is 
made by the teachers, and particularly, in Geography 



■P 



33 

— explanation, discussion, and illustration being the 
rule rather than the exception. 

" Owing to the exertions of our really efficient 
truant officer, truancy is now unknown in the Pres- 
cott School. 

" The attendance during the term has been unusu- 
ally regular, the average for four months being ninety- 
seven per cent. This is owing, in a great measure, 
to the energy and perseverance of the Principal and 
teachers, who have visited the homes of the children, 
and ascertained, for themselves, the causes of absence. 
They have endeavored to impress upon the minds of 
the parents the importance of regular attendance, and 
the result shows how well they have succeeded in 
accomplishing their purpose. 

" There has been a marked decrease in corporal 
punishment, from month to month, and the Principal 
is convinced that a still further decrease will be made 
during the next term." 

Quotations from the second Report : — " The school 
has never been in as good condition since Mr. Baxter 
has had charge of it, as at the present time. There 
has been a greater degree of improvement, both in 
the quantity and quality of the teaching, than in any 
corresponding term. 

" Of the eleven female teachers, nine were educated 
in the public schools of Charlestown, and none of 
these have failed in comparison with other teachers, 
even of experience, taken from other towns or States. 



34 

When such results are accomplished by teachers who 
have been educated in our city, it speaks well, both 
for the character of the people and the schools, and 
shows conclusively that our young ladies are not 
inferior in talent or education, to those coming from 
other places." 



WARREN SCHOOL. 



Teachers. 



GEOEGE SWAN, Principal. CHEISTIANA ROUNDS, Sub-Mistress. 

ANNIE M. TURNER, Read Assistant. 

Assistants. 

MARY A. OSGOOD, JULIA A. WORCESTER, ^ 

MARIA BROWN, V. A. M. L. DADLEY, 

MARGARET VEAZIE, HENRIETTA J. MERRILL. 

SuTb-Committee . 

EDWIN B. HASKELL, WILLIAM R. BRADFORD, 

STACY BAXTER. 

In their first Report, the Committee say: 
" The school was thoroughly examined by the 
sub-Committee in February. In the first and second 
classes, the examination in Arithmetic, Grammar, 
History, Geography, and Spelling was by written 
questions involving the principles passed over during 
the term. The result was very satisfactory. 

" This school continues to hold its high rank 
among the Grammar Schools of this city. The teachers 
are working harmoniously together, possessing the 
respect and esteem of the scholars, and the confidence 



^mtimmmmm 



35 

of the sub-Committee. The relations between the 
teachers and pupils in this school are, indeed, pecu- 
liarly pleasant, owing partly to the character of the 
teachers, and partly to the character of a majority of 
the scholars ; and a high state of discipline is shown 
to be compatible with kindness and harmony, while 
both contribute to success in the real work of the 
school." 

The second Report of the Committee gives a some- 
what extended account of the misfortunes suffered by 
this school during the spring and summer, in conse- 
quence of the destruction of its building by fire. As 
this subject has been frequently brought before the 
public, and will be considered in another part of the 
Annual Report, it is needless to dwell upon it, at 
length, in this connection. To describe fully the 
changes which have been made in the location of the 
classes, the numerous places which they have occupied, 
and the consequent disadvantages to the school, would 
be no inconsiderable task. It is suificient to remark 
that the scholarship of the pupils has been injured, 
and the health of many of them, and of nearly all 
of the teachers, has been seriously affected. 



Reading. — At the February examination of this 
school, Mr. Stacy Baxter examined all the classes 
in Reading, and gave a report upon that subject of 



36 

such general importance, that we deem it worthy of 
publication and careful perusal. Mr. Baxter says : 

I have listened to the reading of all the scholars of the 
several divisions of the Warren School, and can express myself 
well pleased vrith the effort, on the part of both teachers and pupils, 
to do well in this department. The children speak so as to be heard 
without difficulty, and read with a fair intellectual appreciation of the 
subject matter, and in some cases with tones expressive of true feel- 
ing. My impression is that the reading in this school will compare 
favorably with that in the other schools of the city. As elsewhere 
and always, there is a large margin for improvement. 

In the matter of expression, I think it would not be difficult for 
the teachers to show, with a little encouragement, a good degree of 
progress in a comparatively short time. The most that is needed is 
that they express as much feeling in their reading to the scholars as 
they manifest in common conversation upon different subjects. Chil- 
dren very readily catch the different tones which indicate varied 
feelings, and, if encouraged, will make them. 

But our young teachers dwell too much in the intellect or in the 
region of anxiety while teaching reading — they are the Marthas, 
" careful and troubled about many things," while, of necessity, they 
neglect " the one thing needful " — a true expression. For how can 
a teacher, in this condition of mind, talk of the beautiful, the sub- 
lime, the mysterious, the tender, the pathetic ? all of which may 
occur in one paragraph of a reading lesson. The children that read 
with some force do it in a kind of scolding tone. This arises in part, 
of course, from the natural temperament of the child, but full as 
much, I think, from the manner in which they are corrected, when 
they omit a word, mispronounce, or fail to emphasize. In the 
correction, the teacher repeats the emphatic word, with the addi- 
tional emphasis of a tone which says " you are at fault." Children 
are imitative, and of course they repeat the tone given them, and 
whether the word to be emphasized be beautiful, lovely, fearful, 
heavenly, devilish, majestic, pretty or ugly, it receives the same kind 
of emphasis. The child utters it with a tone which says, "Haven't 
I told you repeatedly that that is the word to be emphasized ? " 

It would be a good plan for the teacher to read to her class, 
occasionally, some interesting story or stirring piece of poetry, not 



37 

found in the text-book. If the selections are interesting in them- 
selves, and are read with a proper expression, the very tones of the 
teacher w^ill secure attention and preserve order, w^hile the ear and 
the heart of the child will be cultivated. 

The spoken English language contains upwards of forty distinct 
elements, represented to the eye by twenty-six characters. Some 
of the sounds are very grateful to the ear ; and all of them together 
make the " music of our language." But the sound becomes dis- 
cordant when given in a wrong connection ; and a word becomes 
unmusical when one of its elements is omitted, however well the 
remainder may be enunciated. 

It seems to me that the young ladies, who are expecting to enter 
upon the duties of teachers in the introductory schools, should not 
leave the High School without a thorough knowledge of the elements 
of the language, and some idea of a good method of communicating 
them to the children. Then let the requirement for admission to the 
Grammar Schools be as definite in regard to this matter as in 
Arithmetic. Say they shall be able to give all the vowel sounds of 
the language that are clearly defined in Worcester's Key — if that 
be the standard — that they shaU be able to give any sound of a, e, 
i, o, u, by the marking, and be able to name any vowel sound when 
they hear it uttered alone or in a word. And this can be as easily 
done as the requisite amount of Addition and Multiplication can be 
accomplished ; for the principal vowel sounds, to a cultivated ear, 
are just as definite as 3 times 3 are 9 ; and they can be as easily 
acquired as a knowledge of the Multiplication table. 



38 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Teachers. 

B. F. S. GEIFFIN, Principal. CALEB MUEDOCK, Sub-Master. 

SOPHIA W. PAGE, Head Assistant. 

Assistants. 

HAERIET E. FEYE, A. M. CLAEKE, 
E. A. WOODWAED, 



A. P. MOULTON, MAETHAETT LEES, 

M. F. GOLDTHWAIT, SAEAH E. FEYE. 

Suto-Comniittee . 

. B. F. BEOWN, SAMUEL H. HUED, 

DAVID M. BALFOUE. 

From the first Report of the Committee, we make 
the following extracts : 

" This school still pursues its course on the high 
plane where its emulation, a judicious administration, 
and an excellent corps of teachers have placed it ; 
and at no time has it been in so good condition in 
all respects as it is to-day. 

" There is one great draw-back to the prosperity 
of this school, and we doubt not the same holds true 
in relation to the other schools, viz., irregularity of 
attendance. In relation to this matter. Dr. Hurd, in 
his report to the sub-Committee, says, ' The absences 
on the part of the scholars demand our especial 
attention. Invariably the excuse for a poor appearance 
at examination, or at the daily recitation is, he or she 
is absent from school a great deal. This, in one-half 
the cases at least, might be avoided, if parents and 
scholars appreciated the privileges of our schools.' " 



39 

From data presented by the Committee, it appears 
that in the five months preceding the first of February 
last, the pupils in this school, numbering less than 
six hundred, had lost over eleven thousand half days, 
or nearly one-tenth of the school days in that period. 
The Committee remark — "We cannot but ask, with 
earnestness. Is there a real cause for anything like 
this great number of absences, and, v^^hatever may be 
the cause, can the great evil be remedied? That 
the teachers have been faithful in sending to the 
houses, and, in many doubtful cases, going themselves, 
to ascertain the causes of absence, we know to be the 
uniform practice. The cases of truancy during this 
period have been unusually few, and, in a large ma- 
jority of the cases of absence, the scholars were at 
home by direction of their parents, either on account 
of illness, or to render needed services of some kind." 

The Report for the term ending in July says : 

" The examination just concluded has been highly 
satisfactory to the Committee, evincing an interest on 
the part of teachers and scholars exceeding that of 
any previous term in our experience. 

" The discipline of the school has assumed a milder 
form than formerly. The teachers have not been 
encouraged to spare the rod when to do so would 
spoil the child ; but when there is a frequent resort 
to corporal correction, it is regarded as evidence of 
incapacity in the teacher." 



40 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Teaehers. 

CALEB EMERY, Principal. JOHN G. ADAMS, Sul-Master, 

Assistants. 
KATHARINE WHITNEY, ANNIE E. CARR, 

FRANCES M. REED, JOSEPHINE M. FLINT. 

Sixl>-Ooiiiiiiit"tee. 

GEO. W. GARDNER, C. N. SMITH, 

J. E. RANKIN, S. H. HURD, 

M. H. SARGENT. 

Examination in February. — The Committee ar- 
ranged to examine the several classes in a uniform 
manner, using the same scale of marking as the 
teachers use in ordinary recitations — from 5 to — 
5 being perfect, one failure detracting 1, &c. In this 
way about thirty classes were examined, each scholar 
marked, and then the average of the class taken. 
For convenience, the several branches of study may 
be classed under four heads, viz. : — 1. Languages. 
2. Mathematics. 3. Natural Sciences. 4. Belle Lettres. 
The average marking of most of the classes is given 
below, with very brief extracts from the reports of 
the several examinations : 

I. Languages. — 1. Greek. We examined three 
classes. These were : The first College class in 
Homer, taught by Mr. Emery ; the average mark was 
4 3-4. The second College class, in Xenophon's Anaba- 
sis, also taught by Mr. Emery; average mark 4 2-5. 



41 

The third College class in Greek Grammar, taught 
by Mr. Adams ; average mark, 4 1-2. These classes 
" all did well," " some passages of Homer finely 
rendered." 

2. Latin. The Senior class in Virgil, taught by Mr. 
Emery, averaged 4 1-2 ; " did very well in the main." 
The first Middle class in Caesar, first division, taught by 
Mr. Emery, averaged 4 1-4 ; " seemed acquainted with 
all they should know at this stage of study." Second 
division, taught by Miss Reed, averaged 2 1-4 ; " lack 
of familiarity with the Grammar ; " " rendering free 
and tolerably ready," * The second Middle class in 
Hanson's Latin Prose Book, taught by Mr. Adams, 
averaged 3 3-4 ; " some did very well, others passably, 
others poorly." The Junior class in Latin Grammar, 
taught by Miss Lothrop, averaged in the three divisions 
as follows: first division, 5; second division, 4 7-10; 
third division, 4 1-3; — "most admirably taught;" 
" never fallen to the lot of the examiner to witness 
better proficiency than in the two first divisions of 
this class." 

3. French. The several classes in French were 
examined by Dr. Hurd, who speaks well of them : 
" pronunciation very accurate ; " " rendering easy ; 
general proficiency good." 

n. Mathematics. — 1. Geometry. Two classes, 
taught by Miss Reed, averaged respectively 3 1-2 and 3. 

* It is to be borne in mind that the divisions of classes are made accord- 
ing to rank in recitation. 



42 

" Not quite up to my expectations ; " "seemed to have 
been properly trained by the teacher." 

2. Advanced Algebra, taught by Mr. Adams, averaged 
4 1-2. " Most of the class did well ; a few did very 
poorly, reducing the general average." 

8. Junior Class in Algebra, — three divisions. First 
division, taught by Miss Lothrop, averaged 5 ; second 
division, taught by Miss Lothrop, averaged 4 20-23 ; 
third division, taught by Miss Reed, averaged 3 9-10. 
" Speaks for itself." 

III. Natural Sciences. — 1. Natural Philosophy, 
taught by Miss Whitney, " did well." 

2. Astronomy, taught by Miss Whitney, averaged 
4 1-2. " The many questions not found in the text- 
book, added interest to the examination." 

3. Physiology, taught by Miss Whitney, " did quite 
well ; " " need more facilities for its study." Now 
have a fine skeleton, purchased during the year. 

IV. Belle Lettres. — 1. Rhetoric, two divisions, 
taught by Miss Flint ; averaged, respectively, 4 3-4 
and 4'. " Appeared admirably." 

2. English Literature, taught by Miss Whitney, 
averaged 4 1-2. " Teacher has a rare way of inter- 
esting a class in general knowledge." 

" As a whole, the High School is doing its work 
well. The discipline seems to be perfect. In his 
quiet and kind, yet firm and decided way, the Prin- 
cipal is 'master of the situation.'" 



43 



ANNUAL EXAMINATION AND EXHIBITION WITH THE 
GRADUATING EXERCISES IN JULY. 

The day was intensely warm. The classes that 
recited did very well. The Declamations of the young 
men were very creditable. If less shoAvy than some 
in preceding years, their selections were judicious and 
well rendered. 

The Compositions of the young ladies who grad- 
uated were all of them good — some of them very 
fine. It was queried whether all the young ladies 
who graduate with the honors of the school should 
not be expected to have a graduating exercise. The 
ladies' graduating class numbered twenty-four. 

The College class of lads was small, but promising. 
Diplomas were presented to the gradating class by 
the President of the Board, and a brief address, full 
of pith, and adapted to the occasion, was given by 
the Superintendent of Schools. 

Graduates of 1866. 

Miss Mary P. Swain, Miss Willielmina F. Leonard, 

" Emma F. Thomas, " Abby O. Varney, 

" Georgiana P. Langmaid, " Carrie M. Arnold, 

" Rnth A. Stone, " Elizabeth Willson, 

" Annie M. Swords, " Anna P. Smith, 

" Sarah H. Adams, " Emma B. Tyler, 

" Elizabeth Norton, " Elizabeth Anderson, 

" Hannah E. Monlton, " Susanna F. Simonds, 

" Mary A. Tuttle, " Mary E. Morse, 

" Emma K. Tufts, Mast. Charles W. Kettell, 

" Matilda Frothingham, " James Murphy, 

" Abby E. Linscott, " Frank E. Sweetser. 



44 



CHANGES IN THE COUESE OF STUDY. 

In accordance with the recommendation of the 
sub-Committee on the High School, and of the Su- 
perintendent, in his first semi-annual Report, (see 
page 16,) the Board has taken action to the following 
effect, viz. : 

1. Allowing boys, not designing to remain in the 
school during the whole four years, by special request 
of parent or guardian, to substitute, at the beginning 
of the course, English studies for the Latin language ; 
and, 2nd, allowing boys preparing for College to 
enter the High School for the special study of Latin, 
before they have completed the course in the Gram- 
mar Schools, with proper guarantees that the Grammar 
School course shall be subsequently finished. 

These provisions were designed to meet a popular 
demand. Some boys can attend the High School only 
one or two years. It is better for them to enjoy the 
advantages of the school for that time in English 
studies than not to be in it at all, and it is better 
to pursue only English if the classics can be begun 
only so soon to be abandoned 

Again, lads who are to be fitted for College, 
should begin the study of Latin early. A boy of ten 
years will learn Latin more readily than English 
Grammar. To meet this want the above provision 
was made. Two young lads, each ten years of age, 
are now pursuing Latin with the Junior class, ranking 



45 

according to their mark in that branch alone, in con 
nection with such general exercises as they may take. 

GENERAL INFORMATION IN REGARD TO THE HIGH 

SCHOOL. 

1. Admission. Scholars are admitted from the 
Grammar Schools only at the annual examination in 
July. Others are admitted at the discretion of the 
sub-Committee by personal examination. 

2. The sessions of the school are from 9 o'clock 
till 2, throughout the year, with a recess from 11 J 
o'clock till 12. 

3. The annual examination for admission occurs 
July 16, 1867. The annual exhibition, with graduating 
exercises, occurs July 19, 1867. 

4. Course of Study — General Department. Junior 
Class — 1. Physiology ; Physical Geography. 2. Al- 
gebra. 3. Harkness' Introductory Latin Book. Head- 
ing, Spelling and Penmanship, Wednesday and Saturday. 

Second Middle Class — 1. Physical Geography 
finished ; Ancient History. 2. Algebra finished ; Arith- 
metic reviewed; Chemistry. 3. Harkness' Latin Gram- 
mar ; Hanson's Latin Prose Book. French, Rhetoric, 
Reading and Spelling, Wednesday and Saturday. 

First Middle Class — 1. Geometry; Botany. 2. 
Latin Prose Book, through 4th Book of Csesar, and 
Cicero's Orations against Cataline. 3. Ancient History; 
Constitutional Text Book ; Natural Philosophy. French, 



46 

lihetoric, Reading and Spelling, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday. 

Senior Class — 1. French Grammar; " Le Clos 
Pommier ; " Collot's Dramatic Reader. 2. Natural Phi- 
losophy finished ; Astronomy. 3. French Division: 
Noel et Chapsal's Grammaire Fran^aise ; " The New 
Year," into French. Latin Division : Six Books of 
Virgil's ^neid. Reading and English Literature, 
Wednesday and Saturday . English Composition, and 
(by the boys) Declamation, through the Course. 

Classical Deimrtment. Junior Class — The studies 
of the general Course. 

Third Class — 1 . Hadley's Greek Grammar ; Whi- 
ton's Greek Lessons. 2. Hanson's Latin Prose Book, 
through 1st Book of Csesar. 3. Algebra finished; 
Arithmetic reviewed ; Ancient History. Ancient Geog- 
raphy, Reading and Spelling, Wednesday and Saturday. 

Second Class — 1. Xenophon's Anabasis; Greek 
Grammar. 2. Latin, through 4th Book of Caesar, and 
Cicero's Orations against Cataline. 3. Geometry. 
Latin and Greek Composition, and Sallust, and Cicero 
continued, Wednesday and Saturday. 

Senior Class — 1. The Anabasis finished; Homer, 
3 Books of the Iliad. 2. Virgil finished. 3. Cicero's 
Select Orations finished. Latin and Greek Composi- 
tion ; Algebra and Geometry reviewed, Wednesday and 
Saturday. English Composition and Declamation 
through the Course. 



47 

5. Text Books. Physiology, Cutter's First Book; 
Algebra, Geenleaf's Elementary ; Arithmetic, Green- 
leafs National ; Geometry, Greenleaf's ; Physical 
Geography, Warren's ; History, Worcester's ; Constitu- 
tional Text Book, Sheppard's ; Chemistry, Porter's ; 
Botany, Gray's ; Natural Philosophy, Quackenbos' ; 
Astronomy, Brocklesby's ; French, Magill's French 
Grammar, Noel et Chapsal's Grammaire Frangaise, Le 
Clos Pommier, Collet's Dramatic Eeader, " The New 
Year " for translation into French ; Latin, Harkness' 
Introductory Latin Book, Harkness' Latin Grammar, 
Hanson's Latin Prose Book, Arnold's Latin Prose Com- 
position, and Frieze's Virgil ; Greek, Hadley's Gram- 
mar, Whiton's Greek Lessons, Xenophon's Anaba- 
sis, and Owen's Homer's Iliad; Quackenbos' Rhetoric ; 
Reading, Hillard's Sixth Reader ; Spelling, Worcester's 
Speller ; Penmanship, Payson, Dunton and Scribner's 
National System of Penmanship. 



CONCLUSION. 

With this exhibit, the Committee would commend 
the various Public Schools of the city, with their 
teachers, to the regard and confidence of an appre- 
ciating public. Our school system is rooted in the 
hearts of the people. No system of human invention 
will work without some friction, and of course this 
will not. But we must go forward. Retrogression 



48 

will not be thought of. Society owes to every child 
the opportunity for such complete mental furnishing 
as shall fit him to be an intelligent citizen, and a 
worker for the common weal. 

All of which is respectfully submitted, in behalf 
of the Board. 

GEO. W. GARDNER, President. 

Gharlestown, December^ 1866. 



William H. Finney, Treasurer, 

In Account with the Trustees of Charlestown Free Schools. 

1866. Dk. 

Jan. 18. To cash received of Geo. B. Neal, former Treasurer, $964 08 

" of City Treas. int. on Note $5000 6 mos. to 1st inst. 150 00 

May " " " " 600 1 yr. to 1st May, 36 00 

" " " 5000 6 mos. to July 1, 150 00 

" Charlestown Five Cents Savings B'k, int. to Oct. 17, 51 39 

$1351 47 

1866. Cr. 

Feb. 28. By cash paid Carter, Bust & Co. Chemicals for High School, $14 15 

" " Stowell&Co. " " 3 68 

Mch. 24, " " C. G. Cooke, Books for High School, 45 36 

" " Widdifield .fe Co. Microscope for High School, 75 00 

June 30, " " " Berlin Lamp for High School, 10 00 

Sept. 5, " " Nath'l Shattuck, Repairs, &c., Prescott School, 29 56 

21, " " Codman & Shurtleflf, Skeleton for High School, 60 75 

" " Stowell & Co., Chemicals for High School, 10 89 

Nov. 16, " " C. Carleton, Ribbon for High School, 1 50 

Dec. 30, Balance, 1100 58 



$1351 47 

Charlestown, January 7, 1867. 

We, the undersigned, a Committee appointed by the School Committee to 

audit the Treasurer's accounts, hereby certify that we have examined the 

above account, and find the items therein contained properly vouched for, 

and the balance as above stated $1100 58. 

ABRAM E. CUTTER, ) Auditing 
WM. PIERCE, 5 Committee. 



■^ni 



SCHOOL RETURNS AT THE SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMINATIONS.-1866. 



• 






«& INT 
30LS. 






lAT 




Term ending February, 1866. 


Term ending August, 1866. 


HIGH, GRAMMAR 

SCH( 


ERMED 


1^ 
E 1^ 

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WirrV, Sr.yinr.1 












167 
666 
431 
596 
533 
745 


5li 116 
339 327 


158 49 109 152 


1521 189 191 


6, 
50 
28' 
54 
32j 
34' 

4 


159 
613 
380 
548 
506 
636 
99 


50 109 122 
305; 308 434 
185! 195 309 
268 280 393 


i 30 
224 
156 
185 
186 
269 
36 


92 13 
210 47 
153 31 
208 39 
186 36 
263; 52 
46! 6 
34I 5 


3 120 

5 444 


1071 

1R 


15 
418 
307 
391 
359 
511 
82 
70 


4 
47 
35 
44 
27 
36 
14 

9 


"*8" -^^ 

Bunker 

Warren 

Winthro 

Harvard 

Prescott 


Hill School . . 












5581 286 2721 528 528' 18 


540 
364 
492 
444; 
568 
86 


School 












208 223 365 181 184 345: 349' 1 
283 313' 497 234 263! 418 449 5 


5 276 91 












! 


377 
9 337 

i\ 525 

3; 64 


2 
13 
21 


School 










. 


281 252 
356 389 


457 226 231 394 419 13 


252 254' 372 

317 319, 532 

44 48' 82 














596 297 2991 582 


580 28 

75 


Wa^a. S/iVinnl lVr> 1 










115 


58 


57 


86 


46 40 


55 


Intermediate School, I 


^0. 5 


> 








88 


40 


48 


80 


36 44 


50 


60 


80: 


7| 


93 


, 43 50 70 


36 


9; 53 










r 
C 




1341 


1616 


1725 


2797 


1355 1442 


2524 


2612i 204 


2593 


215' 


3027 


11464 1563 2314 1122 


1192 2338 2196 


161 


2153 


216 


— 


Primary Schools. 


Location of Pri- 


Term ending February,, 1866. | 


Primary Schools. 


Term ending August, 1866. 


o 
o 








li 






a 


+^ C 






II 1^ 


o . 


■2 « 






•s « 


; 


I 






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^ 







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i 


teachers' namks. 


mary School 
Houses. 


as 


o 


3 


o o 

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3 






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3 


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teachers' names. 









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in « 


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a 
P 


■Si 


SUB-COMMITTEE ON 
PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 


1 


Lucy M. Small, 


Charles Street, 


88 


43 


45 


65 


31 


34 


57 


60 


31 


29 


65 




6 


Lucy M. Small, 


90 


4b 


44 


72 


35 ■ 


37 





71 59 


30 


29 


72 




3 


Chas. H. Bigelow, 


9, 


Eliz. W. Yeaton, 


Mead " 


88 


44 


44 


79 


39 


40 


61 


67 


35 


32 


79 




2 


Eliz. W. Yeaton, 


105 


61 


54 


62 


28 


34 


66 74 


35 


39 


62 




7 


John A. Day, 


3 


M. Josephine Smith, 


Mead ' ' 


70 


31 


39 


54 


25 


29 


39 


42 


21 


21 


54 




4 


M. Josephine Smith, 


78 


36 


42 


55 


27 


28 


49 50 


28 


22 


55 




8 


John A. Day, 


4 


Malvina B. Skilton, 


Mead " 


68 


33 


35 


63 


30 


33 


51 


58 


29 


29 


63 




2 


Malvina B. Skilton, 


79 


39 


40 


70 


33 


37 


55 52 


27 


25 


70 




5 


Wm. H. Finney, 


5 


Jennie D. Smith, 


Elm 


64 


27 


37 


53 


20 


33 


45 


50 


20 


30 


53 




4 


Jennie D. Smith, 


73 


31 


42 


64 


23 


41 


5 


2 44 


21 


23 


63 


1 


8 


Stacy Baxter, 


6 


Ellen Hadley, 


Medford " 


74 


35 


39 


62 


27 


35 


49 


42 


20 


22 


62 




3 


Ellen Hadley, 


81 


39 


42 


69 


34 


35 


53 46 


22 


24 


69 




2 


Stacy Baxter, 


7 


Mary A. Foster, 


Boylston Chapel 


71 


34 


37 


50 


26 


24 


46 


47 


25 


22 


50 




1 


Mary A. Foster, 


72 


3(J 


42 


62 


27 


35 


50 44 


24 


20 


62 




4 


A. E. Cutter, 


8 


Isabel Washburn, 


Cross Street, 


74 


34 


40 


66 


31 


35 


53 


48 


27 


21 


66 




17 


M. A. Blanchard, 


78 


4iJ 


36 


66 


30 


36 


56 56 


29 


27 


^3^ 




12 


Wm. Pierce, 


9 


Almira Delano, 


Cross " 


84 


46 


38 


76 


42 


34 


57 


60 


35 


25 


75 


1 


17 


Almira Delano, 


84 


47 


37 


79 


40 


39 


62 53 


31 


22 


79 




14 


Wm. Pierce, 


10 


Louisa A. Pratt, 


Common " 


88 


43 


45 


65 


33 


32 


51 


54 


31 


23 


65 




6 


Louisa A. Pratt, 


84 


41 


43 


62 


31 


31 


52 51 


27 


24 


62 




6 


David M. Balfour, 


11 


J. S. Putnam, 


Common " 


70 


34 


36 


63 


31 


32 


50 


46 


28 


18 


63 




12 


E. A. Prichard, 


86 


4'ii 


43 


76 


40 


36 


52 49 


26 


23 


76 




11 


David M. Balfour, 


12 


Ellen M. Armstead, 


Bow 


111 


56 


55 


59 


28 


31 


44 


53 


25 


28 


59 




5 


Ellen M. Armstead, 


75 


Si 


39 


68 


30 


38 


47 51 


25 


26 


68 




7 


J. E. Rankin, 


13 


C. W. Trowbridge, 


Bow 


83 


40 


43 


69 


32 


37 


47 


49 


23 


26 


69 




8 


C. W. Trowbridge, 


79 


37 


42 


73 


33 


40 


51 54 


28 


26 


73 




10 


J. E. Rankin, 


14 


Sarah E. Smith, 


Bow " 


84 


40 


44 


74 


33 


41 


56 


58 


28 


30 


74 




1 


Sarah E. Smith, 


82 


3t 


) 46 


61 


25 


36 


53 50 


21 


29 


61 




8 


A. E. Cutter, 


15 


C. M. W. Tilden, 


Bow " 


92 


49 


43 


52 


28 


24 


42 


43 


22 


21 


52 




5 


C. M. W. Tilden, 


78 


4- 


31 


64 


40 


24 


4 


2 43 


29 


14 


64 




8 


Moses H. Sargent, 


16 


E. R. Brewer, 


Common " 


70 


38 


32 


63 


36 


27 


45 


51 


30 


21 


63 




9 


E. R. Brower, 


95 


5] 


44 


68 


36 


32 


50 54 


32 


22 


68 




5 


B. F. Brown, 


17 


Susan E. Etheridge, 


Moulton " 


91 


33 


58 


69 


24 


45 


53 


45 


18 


27 


69 




5 


Susan E. Etheridge, 


88 


St 


) 53 


68 


26 


42 


53 60 


24 


36 


68 




6 


Geo. H. Yeaton, 


18 


Fannie B. Butts, 


Moulton " 


80 


46 


34 


64 


37 


27 


48 


49 


32 


17 


64 




5 


Fannie B. Butts, 


82 


Ai 


5 39 


72 


37 


35 


48 61 


31 


30 


72 




4 


Geo. H. Yeaton, 


19 


Louisa W.Huntress, 


Moulton " 


85 


42 


43 


73 


35 


38 


59 


57 


28 


29 


73 




5 


Louisa W.Huntress, 


87 


41 


) 42 


78 


39 


39 


6 


2 68 


33 


35 


78 




6 


Wm. R. Bradford, 


20 


Matilda Gilraan, 


Soley " 


57 


34 


23 


56 


33 


23 


47 


33 


19 


14 


56 




7 


Matilda Gilman, 


71 


4t 


5 28 


61 


38 


23 


45 52 


34 


18 


*-'! 




3 


Sam'l H. Hurd, 


21 


Lucy J. Simonds, 


Sullivan " 


96 


55 


41 


87 


48 


39 


60 


68 


35 


33 


87 




6 


Lucy J. Simonds, 


105 


5( 


) 55 


90 


42 


48 


64 57 


27 


30 


90 




8 


Geo. H. Marden, 


22 


Frances M. Lane, 


Sullivan " 


98 


52 


46 


90 


48 


42 


63 


67 


38 


29 


90 




5 


Frances M. Lane, 


115 


6^ 


t 51 


100 


.}0 


45 


68 72 


35 


37 


100 




6 


Geo. H. Marden, 


23 


Helen G. Turner. 


Haverhill " 


71 


26 


45 


65 


25 


40 


50 


56 


27 


29 


65 




3 


Helen G. Turner, 


90 


3> 


i 52 


75 


32 


43 


60 54 


26 


28 


75 




7 


Chas. F. Smith, 


24 


C. C. Brower, 


Common " 


72 


41 


31 


52 


22 


30 


42 


39 


20 


19 


52 




7 


C. C. Brower, 


62 


2i 


i Si 


56 


27 


29 


45 49 


24 


25 


56 




7 


B. F. Brown, 


25 


Martha Yeaton, 


B. Hill 


66 


37 


29 


59 


35 


24 


51 


51 


30 


21 


59 




5 


Martha Yeaton, 


66 


S{ 


5 30 


68 


37 


31 


58 67 


38 


29 


68 




8 


C. N. Smith, 


26 


H. C. Easterbrook, 


B. Hill 


100 


44 


56 


76 


34 


42 


54 


61 


25 


36 


74 


2 


6 


H. C. Easterbrook, 


101 


53| 48 


89 


46 


43 


54 64 


34 


30 


89 




9 


C. N. Smith, 


27 


Lizzie M. Tate, 


B. Hill 


106 


51 


55 


88 


45 


43 


63 


73 


43 


30 


88 




3 


Lizzie M. Tate, 


88 


4' 


J 41 


81 


42 


39 


66 68 


37 


31 


81 




4 


Chas. H. Bigelow, 


28 


Anna R. Stearns, 


Moulton " 


86 


47 


39 


73 


40 


33 


62 


68 


38 


30 


73 




4 


Anna R. Stearns, 


107 


6, 


I 45 


84 


43 


41 


7 


3 73 


37 


36 


84 




6 


Wm. R. Bradford, 


29 


M. J. A. Conley, 


Mead " 


88 


43 


45 


62 


32 


3C 


49 


59 


30 


29 


62 




6 


M. J. A. Conlev, 


87 


4 


i 45 


55 


28 


27 


56 50 


23 


27 


55 




10 


Wm. H. Finney, 


30 


Fannie A. Marden, 


Main " 


79 


37 


42 


64 


29 


3.1 


50 


54 


29 


25 


64 




4 


Fannie A. Marden, 


105 


4* 


i 57 


69 


35 


34 


61 68 


34 


34 


69 




5 


Chas. F. Smith, 


31 


Carrie A. Rea, 


Austin ' ' 


92 


47 


45 


65 


85 


3f 


40 


57 


30 


27 


65 




11 


Carrie A. Rea, 


81 


4( 


) 41 


61 


30 


31 


44 44 


25 


19 


61 




6 


Moses H. Sargent, 


32 


Mary E. Rice, 


Common •' 


65 


32 


33 


60 


31 


91 


40 


33 


20 


13 


60 




10 


Mary E. Rice, 


69 


2 


J: 45 


58 


24 


34 


56 50 


20 


30 


58 




7 


Edwin B. Haskell, 


33 


Mary E. Taylor. 


Common " 


68 


35 


33 


57 


32 


21 


46 


46 


24 


22 


57 




9 


IMary E. Taylor. 


77 


4 


■ 30 


61 


37 


24 


4 


7 49 


20 


29 


61 




8 


Edwin B. Haskell. 








2279 


1329 


1450 


2173 


1077 


1096ll670 


1744 


916 


828 


2170 


3 


203 




2800 


139 


ri403 


22971130 


1167 


18C 


)7 1836 


937 


899 22961 1 1228 





CHARLESTOWN, January 3, 1867. 



F. A. DOWNING, (e. e.), 

Secretary School Committee, 



R 2 '< wfi«