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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

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ANNUAL REPORT 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE ' 

y-3 



U It 62-73. 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



FOUETH AND FIFTH SEMI-ANNUAL EEPOETS 



SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOLS, 



FOR THE YEAR 1868. 




BOSTON: 
ARTHUR W. LOCKE & CO., PRINTERS, 120 MILK STREET. 

1869. 




CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



In School Committee, December 30, 1868. 
Rev. Mr. Gardner, presented the Annual Report of the Board, 
which was accepted ; and it was voted that five hundred copies 
be printed for distribution. 

Attest: F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



REPORT. 



The School Committee of Charlestown respectfully 
submit the following as their Annual Report for the 
year 18 68 : 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

The Mayor of the City and the President of the 
Common Council, having been constituted by special 
action of the Legislature, members of the School Com- 
mittee, eoo qfficiis, took their places in the Board at its 
first meeting in January. The Board, as thus con- 
stituted of twenty members, proceeded to organization 
as follows : 

For President Geo. W. G-ardner. 

For Secretary F. A. Downing. 

For Treasurer W. H. Finney. 

For Messenger Abijah Blanchard. 

At the second meeting in January, the President 
announced the sub-Committees on the different schools 
as they are given in connection with the Reports on the 
several schools ; also, the following 



STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — A. J. Locke, Edwin B. Haskell, Jas. F. South- 
worth. 

On Books. — "William H. Finney, O. F. Safford, Jas. F. Hunne- 
well. 

On Printing. — Abram E. Cutter, Geo. H. Marden, Wm. R. 
Bradford. 

On Fuel. — John Sanborn, George H. Yeaton. 

On School Houses. — Charles H. Bigelow, Matthew H. Mer- 
riam, Charles F. Smith, George A. Hamilton, Stacy Baxter. 

On Music. — Charles H. Bigelow, Nahum Cliapin, Stacy Baxter. 

On Examination of Teachers. — G. W. Gardner, A. E. Cutter, 
W. H. Finney, Geo. H. Marden, A. J. Locke, O. F. Safford. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Appropriation for Financial Year ending February 28, 1869, to be 
expended under the direction of School Committee, 

For salaries of Teachers, Messenger, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer (in addition to 
amount to be received from the State) $72,175 
Less amount transferred for support of 

Evening Schools 1,000 

$71,175 

Salary of Superintendent 2,000 

Incidental Expenses 13,400 

Support of Evening Schools 1,000 

$87,575 
Add estimated amount to be received from 

the State 1,490 

$89,065 



Expended. 

For Teachers' Salaries, for nine 

months, to Dec. 1 $49,982 01 

Salaries of Officers of School 
Committee for one year, 

to Jan. 1 950 00 

$50,882 01 

Salary of Superintendent, 

nine months. 1,500 00 

Incidentals, including re- 
pairs of School houses, 
care of same, School fur- 
niture, Books, Station- 
ery, Printing, Rent, &c. 12,787 06 65,169 07 



Amount unexpended $23,895 93 

SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 

In the performance of their duty, as required by the 
Statutes of the Commonwealth, after due consideration 
and careful comparison with the salaries paid in neigh- 
boring cities, the Committee fixed the salaries to be paid 
to the several teachers as follows, viz. : 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Principal $2,500 00 

Sub-Master 1 ,600 00 

First Assistant 825 00 

Second " 675 00 

Third " 550 00 

Fourth " 550 00 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Principals, each 1 ,800 00 

Sub-Master of the Winthrop School 1 ,400 00 

Sub-Masters of the Bunker Hill, Prescott, Warren, and 

Harvard Schools, after Sept. 1, each, at the rate per 

annum of 1,200 00 

Sub-Mistresses at the Bunker Hill, Prescott, and Warren 

Schools, until Sept. 1, each, at the rate per annum of. 700 00 

Head Assistants, each 625 00 

Second Head Assistant at the Harvard School, until Sept. 

1, at the rate per annum of 625 00 

Assistant Teachers. First Year's Service, each 475 00 

Second " " " . ." 500 00 

Third " ' ; " 525 00 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

First Year's Service, each 475 00 

Second " " " 500 00 

Third " " " , 525 00 



Teacher of Music 1,300 00 

Intermediate School Teachers, each 550 00 

The Committee, in fixing the salaries as above, and 
in making an advance, in the case of some of the female 
teachers, have taken into account two things : first, the 
high cost of living; and second, the desirableness of 
retaining the services of successful and experienced 
teachers. 



All wages are high. Teaching ought to be, at least, 
as remunerative as other callings ; and more so, as it 
requires special preparation and a higher order of talent. 
The demand is so great at the present time for expe- 
rienced and successful teachers, that notwithstanding 
the large number of candidates for the teacher's office, 
it is impossible to retain our best teachers, without pay- 
ing them what their services will command elsewhere ; 
and we constantly suffer, as it is, by the superior induce- 
ments offered in the higher salaries paid by our neigh- 
boring city of Boston. 

THE PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The system of grading in these schools having proved 
successful where previously tried, has been extended to 
all the schools. In some districts there are three grades, 
in others, two, according to the convenience of the build- 
ings. The Committee are satisfied that better results 
have been secured by the introduction of the system, as 
is proved by the admissions to the Grammar Schools. 
The several Primary Schools have also been arranged 
into six districts, and each district put under the care of 
a joint sub-Committee, after the manner of the Gram- 
mar Schools. This was thought preferable to having 
each school under the sole care of one member of the 
Committee, as before. 

The six Primary School Districts are composed as 
follows : 



10 

7, 8, 9. 



No. 


1. 


Primaries — No. 1, 2, 3, 


4, 5, 


6, 


7 


No. 


2. 


" No. 10, 11, 12, 


13. 






No. 


3. 


« No. 14, 15, 16, 


17, 18, 


38. 




No. 


4. 


" No. 19, 20, 21, 


22, 23, 


24. 




No. 


5. 


" No. 25, 26, 27, 


28, 29, 


30, 


31 


No. 


6. 


" No. 32, 33, 34, 


35, 36, 


37. 





Our Primary Schools as now districted, graded, and 
taught, are, as a whole, doing well. They have become 
systematized and more homogeneous, and give a better 
preparation for the Grammar Schools than ever before. 
These results are largely due to the untiring labors of 
the Superintendent, and his wise counsels in the Board. 

THE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 

The two intermediate schools, as formerly existing, 
have been accommodated in the new Grammar School 
Buildings. No. 1, in the Warren Building, and No. 2, 
in the Bunker Hill Building. They have thus been 
brought under the general care of the Grammar masters. 
This is an improvement. The number of scholars 
naturally falling into these schools — too old for the 
Primary Schools, and not far enough advanced for the 
Grammar Schools, — being largely increased, it was 
found necessary, during the past autumn, to form a new 
Intermediate School, and to occupy again the room 
formerly occupied for this purpose on Winthrop Street. 
The lines were somewhat changed, and the schools re- 
numbered, so that now Intermediate School No. 1 occu- 



11 

pies a room in the Bunker Hill Building, No. 2, in the 
Warren Building, and No. 3, the room on Winthrop 
Street. 

Mrs. Small has been put in charge of the New Inter- 
mediate. 

These schools are not in strictness intermediate in 
their grade, since scholars go from the Primary Schools 
direct to the Grammar ; but they are designed for such 
scholars as for various reasons do not find a proper place 
elsewhere. Many of these scholars have recently come 
from the country, where they have had fewer advan- 
tages, and are of such an age as to be able to advance 
faster than the young children in the Primary Schools, 
and sooner be prepared for admission to the Grammar 
School. These schools are properly ungraded schools. 
They are of special utility, both to the scholars in them, 
in advancing them faster or slower, according to their 
ability, and also to the Primary Schools, in removing 
from them scholars who could not well be classed, and 
who would hinder the general working of a thoroughly 
graded system. 

THE GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

Our Grammar Schools have been re-organized on the 
plan of a Master and a sub-Master for each. 

The sub-Masters took their places at the beginning of 
the present school year in September. 



12 

This change was not made without due consideration 
and advisement on the part of the Board. Nor was it 
made because the ladies occupying the positions of sub- 
Mistresses, were not filling their places well, — to entire 
acceptance. But it was generally thought that in mixed 
Grammar Schools as large as ours had grown to be, 
more than one man is needed for proper control, and 
more than one masculine mind should make itself felt 
in the instructions given. It is no disparagement to 
woman that she cannot do man's proper work, or his 
quota of a joint work. If the school, as is generally 
conceded, is a substitute for the original divine institu- 
tion of the family, in the instruction and government of 
children, and if, for the time, the teacher stands in loco 
parentis, then in all our larger schools, children of both 
sexes ought to come under the influence of both men 
and women in their instruction. As it was, not more 
than an eighth part of the scholars in our public schools 
ever came under the instruction of a master. This was 
thought to be a defect and the change was made. 

An examination for the positions of sub-Master in the 
schools was held in July. About twenty candidates 
were present. The examination was rigid and impar- 
tial. The candidates standing highest in the results of 
this examination — taking experience and success in 
teaching into the account — were recommended for the 
several positions, and were elected by the Board. These 
were— Mr. Henry F. Sears, a graduate of Amherst 



13 

College and Principal of the High School in Holliston, 
to the Bunker Hill School. Mr. S. G. Stone, a graduate 
of Amherst College and Principal of the High School at 
Needham, to the Warren School. Mr. Frank W. 
Lewis, a graduate of Dartmouth College and Principal 
of the High School in East Randolph, to the Prescott 
School, and Mr. Otis L. Bonney, Principal of a Gram- 
mar School in Lexington, to the Harvard School. 

The several Grammar Schools are becoming more 
and more alike in their methods and results. Of course 
each will retain its individuality according to the indi- 
viduality of its head and government. It ought to be 
so. No two of us are alike, and no two schools will be. 
But in the directions in which the Board has been aim- 
ing for the past two years, under the lead of the Super- 
intendent, who has had his eye on all, and been able to 
suggest to one what he has found of excellence in 
another, the Grammar Schools of the City have been 
rising to a more nearly uniform standard of excellence, 
and more homogeneity of instruction and government. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL. 

Efforts have been made, which have proved in a 
measure successful, to popularize this School, to bring 
it into a more vital connection with the whole people, 
by adapting its instruction to the practical wants of that 
large class of scholars who are not looking forward to a 
professional, but to a business life. The English and 



14 

Commercial course of instruction was fairly inaugurated 
at the beginning of the present school year. A large 
class of over one hundred entered the School from the 
several Grammar Schools. The per cent, of admis- 
sions on the first examination was very large, and quite 
a number, though not a majority, have chosen the shorter 
English and Commercial course of study. 

The High School Building is becoming too strait for 
its occupants. The recitation rooms are very small and 
illy ventilated. Besides, there is not desk room on the 
two floors for all the scholars. The Board have the 
matter of enlarging and improving the facilities of the 
building now under advisement, and without doubt, an 
appropriation will be asked for of the next City Govern- 
ment for this object. 

FREE EVENING SCHOOLS. 

In accordance with a recommendation of the Super- 
intendent in November, a committee was appointed to 
consider the propriety of establishing free evening 
schools in the city, for the benefit of a large class of 
persons — young men and women — who cannot attend 
the regular day schools, but who are desirous of instruc- 
tion in the common and practical branches of education. 
This committee subsequently reported favorably to the 
project, and arrangements have been made accordingly 
by opening such schools in different parts of the city. 



15 

These schools have begun well, and there is every 
prospect of making them a success. 

It remains simply to notice an event that has affected 
all our schools, in the sudden death of our much-beloved 
and highly-esteemed Music Teacher, Mr. Wm. H. Good- 
win. The schools have met with a great loss. They 
are bereaved. For many years, Mr. Goodwin had filled 
the office of Instructor in Music for the High and Gram- 
mar Schools, and with much satisfaction to all concerned. 
At the first meeting of the Board, after his death, the 
following action was had : 

In School Committee, Dec. 17, 1868. 

On motion of Mr. Peirce, — 

Ordered, That the following memorial be entered upon the records 
of this Board : 

The School Committee, in session this evening, hereby express 
their estimate of the worth of Mr. William H. Goodwin, late Teacher 
of Music in the Public Schools of this city. 

"We bear our warmest testimony to the singular purity and integ- 
rity of his character, his courteous and kindly bearing, the high pro- 
priety and honor which governed his life, and the many other admir- 
able traits which mark the true gentlemen and Christian. He was 
endeared to each of us as a personal friend, and we each feel a per- 
sonal bereavement in his death. 

In his relation to the Schools of the City, we know he was 
respected and beloved by teachers and scholars, and as the Committee, 
we certify to his enthusiasm, patience, skill, and success, in the 
important sphere which he filled, and we are sure it will be difficult 
to find a successor, who will combine the ability to continue the 



16 

acceptable service with the superior musical education and personal 
excellence of Mr. Goodwin. 

The Board direct that a copy of this notice be sent to the wife and 
family of our dear friend and fellow-'laborer, with the expression of 
our deepest sympathy in the severe affliction which they have 
experienced. 

The Superintendent will give a detailed report of the 
present condition and the internal workings of the sev- 
eral schools, as he has been able to gather information 
from personal visitation, and from the reports of the 
several sub-committees. 

Thus we hope to make a satisfactory exhibit to the 
citizens of the work done by the Committee, and the 
care we have had of the great trust committed to our 
hands. 

All of which is respectfully submitted for the Com- 
mittee. 

GEO. W. GARDNER, 

President, 

Charlestown, Dec. 10, 1868. 



17 



William H. Finney, Treasurer, 

In account with the Trustees of Gharlestown Free Schools 

1868. Dr. 

Jan. Balance $609 12 

" Six months' interest on note of $5,000 150 00 

Mch. One year's tuition of W. Hopun 18 00 

July. Six months' interest on note of $5,000 150 00 

" One year's " " " " $600 36 00 

Total $963 12 

1868. Cr. 

Feb. 21. Paid Mary A. Davis $50 00 

Mch. 26. " H. B. and W. O. Chamberlain 9 00 

April 16. " A. E. Cutter 132 50 

June 8. «' Malvina B. Skilton 100 00 

July " A. E. Cutter 103 50 

Nov. " H. B. and W. O. Chamberlain 17 75 

" " William Beals 20 00 

" " Amos Brown 19 20 

Dec. 31. Balance 51117 

Total $963 12 

Charlestown, January 5, 1869. 
We, the undersigned, hereby certify that we have examined the 
above account, and find the same correct, and the balance, $511.17, 
as above stated ; of Avhich balance, $400 is on deposit in the Charles- 
town Five Cents Savings Bank, upon which interest has accrued 
from April, 1867. 

A. J. LOCKE, ^ 

WM. PEIRCE, [ c F ™Zle. 

JAS. F. SOUTHWORTH, ) 



FOURTH SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT 



Superintendent of Public Schools. 



To the School Committee of Charlestown : 

Gentlemen, — Agreeably to your regulations, I pre- 
sent the following as my Fourth Semi-annual Report. 

It gives me pleasure to speak of the schools of this 
city in terms of commendation. Though not yet exhibit- 
ing that symmetry of organization and completeness of 
culture which are desirable, they give the clearest evi- 
dence of vigorous and healthful progress. A spirit of 
improvement pervades every grade, and I might say 
every school. 

I cordially commend the teachers for their ability and 
faithfulness. Of course, among so many, some must 
fall below their associates in learning, tact, or applica- 
tion : nevertheless, as a body, they deserve the confi- 
dence and the cordial support of the School Committee 
and of the public. I have found most of them ready to 
carry out cheerfully and earnestly the plans adopted by 
the Board to facilitate the work of education ; and if, 
as might have been expected, a few have, at times, 



19 

appeared reluctant to deviate from a beaten path, or to 
widen the sphere of their activities, by the introduction 
of new measures, the cause may doubtless be found in 
a natural attachment to processes frequently tried, or to 
peculiar opinions respecting the methods and aims of 
education. 

PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The changes made in these schools during the autumn 
by re-districting the city, proved a temporary hindrance 
to the pupils. It seems almost impossible, except in 
the case of regular promotion, for children to change 
schools, without suffering loss. They may use the same 
text-books ; yet there is something in their own misap- 
prehensions, or in those of the new teachers, which, for 
a time, operates unfavorably. 

For several months, sickness prevailed to an unusual 
extent. In many instances, one-fifth or one-third, and 
in a few one-half, of the pupils were absent for weeks 
in succession. This resulted in diminishing the aver- 
age attendance, and in preventing that progress which 
would otherwise have been realized. 

Nevertheless, a most encouraging advancement has 
been made in all the branches of study. 

In printing common letters, in making script letters, 
the Roman numerals, and the Arabic characters, the 
pupils exhibit a good degree of skill. A majority of 
those in the first classes write their names very legibly, 
and some quite elegantly. 



20 

< In the months of January and February I examined 
all these schools. Many pupils wrote numbers as high 
as tens of thousands very correctly, and readily per- 
formed examples in Addition involving numbers of 
four or five figures each. 

In all that belongs to slate-work, and to the sounds 
of the letters, these scholars are fully equal to those 
that entered the Grammar Schools in July, 1866. 

Reading has received a good degree of attention, 
and, in five or six schools, it is taught with admirable 
success. Several teachers might gain useful hints in 
respect to conducting this exercise and some others, by 
visiting more frequently the best conducted schools in 
this city and in others. 

Worcester's Speller was added to the text-books in 
these schools during the fall term ; and the indications 
are very decided that it will prove to be a great benefit. 

There is one branch which has not heretofore received 
that attention in our Primary Schools which its impor- 
tance demands. I refer to Music. I doubt not the 
teachers in these schools are doing all they can, under 
the circumstances, to cultivate the musical tastes of 
their pupils ; yet there is evidently a great chance for 
improvement. A few of the teachers cannot sing ; 
some, who are gifted with the powers of song, have 
had but little training ; and those who have had fair 
opportunities for a musical education have no guide 
but their own taste, so that the children are receiving 



21 

great diversity of instruction, and many are iorming 
habits which it will be difficult for them to modify 
when they enter the Grammar Schools. It is a matter 
of no little moment, that the first lessons be correctly 
given. There is, perhaps, time enough spent in musi- 
cal exercises ; but in some schools no instruction is 
given ; and in others the teaching is very imperfect. 
The defect might be remedied by the use of some ele- 
mentary work on music, as Mason's Musical Charts. 

To insure complete success, it will be necessary to 
provide instruction for the teachers. This could be 
done at trifling expense ; and it should be wholly with- 
out cost to them. Experiments in other cities have 
proved that a few lessons given on the basis of Mason's 
Charts, will render essential service, even to those who 
are not naturally singers, in conducting the exercises 
of their schools. 

In the Primary Schools of New York and Boston, 
music is taught by special teachers ; and in the schools 
of the latter place by note. 

I trust this subject will receive the early attention of 
the Committee on Music. 

GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

The course of study in these schools is divided into 
six parts, each part occupying one year : consequently, 
there are six classes in a school ; and, when a class is 
too large to be accommodated in one room, it is sub 



22 

divided into two or more divisions, according to the 
number of pupils it contains. 

The number in the different classes, at the close of 
the term in February, was as follows : first classes, 
137 ; second classes, 219 ; third classes, 391 ; fourth 
classes, 527 ; fifth classes, 582 ; sixth classes, 853. 
Total membership, 2,712. In the sixth classes, there 
are fourteen divisions : in the Bunker Hill, five ; in the 
Warren and Winthrop, three each ; and in the Pres- 
cott and Harvard, two each. Several causes have ope- 
rated to make the fifth and sixth classes very large. 
One arises from the fact, that many of the pupils 
annually admitted to these schools have had a very 
limited preparation for their new and more difficult 
studies, and consequently have failed to receive pro- 
motion. Prior to the adoption of the classified course 
of study last autumn, the course in some of the Gram- 
mar Schools had been extended, so as to comprise 
seven years. Now the pupils that would, under the 
old regime, be reported as in the sixth and seventh 
classes, are reckoned as members of the sixth. 

In all the schools, the pupils are farther advanced 
than they have usually been at the corresponding period 
of the year. In a few cases the improvement is but 
slight ; in many, it is decidedly marked. Prior to the 
last two or three years, scholars were rarely required 
to write numbers till their third year in the Gram- 
mar Schools ; now all the fifth classes are ciphering 



23 

quite successfully, and so are nearly all the divisions of 
the sixth classes. 

During the recent semi-annual examination, I exam- 
ined each of the thirty divisions in these schools in one 
branch or more. The process was conducted orally 
and by written questions. The sixth classes, number- 
ing eight hundred and fifty-three scholars were ex- 
amined in the tables, in notation by Roman and Ara- 
bic characters, and in Addition and Subtraction. The 
per cent, obtained by the different divisions ranged from 
thirty-one to eighty. This difference resulted in part 
from causes already indicated. In future there will 
doubtless be greater uniformity. 

The fifth classes, numbering about six hundred schol- 
ars, acquitted themselves very creditably. They were 
examined by questions respecting the principles which 
they had studied, and by means of appropriate exam- 
ples in all the fundamental rules. Considerable diver- 
sity in attainments was exhibited here, though less than 
in the class below. This diversity will gradually dis- 
appear as the classes are brought into harmony with 
the programme adopted by the Board. 

All the classes were examined by myself or the sub- 
committees, and they manifested a good degree of 
familiarity with the topics they had studied. " They 
had evidently received thorough instruction. 

The reading, as witnessed by myself and as reported 
by the committees, appears to be fully up to the usual 
standard. 



24 

It is but simple justice for me to remark, that any 
deficiencies which I have indicated are not deficiencies 
of the present as compared with the past, but of the 
present as compared with a newly-authorized standard. 

Penmanship has received the customary share of 
attention and to a casual observer, who passes hastily 
through the schools, the attainments of the pupils might 
be entirely satisfactory. He would find great careful- 
ness and accuracy aimed at in the lower classes, and a 
high degree of excellency actually achieved by the 
higher. He would probably say, " The system is com- 
plete, and the skill of the advanced pupils admirable." 
All this is true ; yet a closer inspection would lead him 
to modify his favorable conclusion. What are the facts \ 
In some of the schools, only three or four numbers of 
Payson, Dunton and Scribner's Series have been used in 
the entire course. Owing to the slow rate of progress, 
pupils have been kept in the First Book from one to 
two years, and as long in the Second ; and scholars who 
have failed to receive regular promotions have spent 
four years in those two books. Consequently many 
children have completed their studies without receiving 
instruction in making the loop letters or capitals. 
Much greater progress should be made in this branch 
than has been heretofore : altogether too much time 
has been wasted in the dull formality of counting. The 
programme recently adopted requires the writing of one 
book each year. This will be a real improvement over 



25 

the old method ; but it may be well questioned whether 
two books should not be written annually, instead of 
one. A further improvement, and a very desirable one, 
would be made by introducing No. VII., which is a book 
of business forms, into the second and third classes. This 
would give to many youth practical knowledge of great 
value. 

The study of history is attended with less satisfactory 
results than either of the other principal branches. The 
text-book, Quackenbos' " United States," is altogether 
too diffuse. In order to obviate the difficulty arising 
from the size of the work, it has been the practice, for 
several years, to omit a large number of sections relat- 
ing to the settlement of the country, and to close the 
study at the constitutional period. Hence, as the his- 
tory of the United States is not resumed in the High 
School, the pupils in our public schools receive no 
instruction in regard to the administration of the national 
government. 

To secure to the scholars the highest benefit, they 
should have a text-book embracing the whole history of 
our country, yet giving that history so much in outline, 
and with such brevity, that they can master the whole 
work. 

DISTRIBUTION OF LABOR. 

It is one thing to provide an adequate corps of teach- 
ers for a Grammar School, and another, equally impor- 



26 

tant, to distribute the labors of those teachers along the 
line of effort so as to achieve the highest educational 
result. It seems to me that the wisest and most eco- 
nomical distribution has not yet been made. Our forces 
have not been applied so as to reach and effectually 
control the greatest number of minds and hearts. 

To train the first class of thirty or forty, two accom- 
plished teachers, a gentleman and a lady, are usually 
employed ; while the training of fifty or sixty pupils in 
a lower or middle class is left almost wholly to the good 
judgment and fidelity of one lady teacher. Is it said 
that in the first class the final and finishing touches are 
given to the education of the young? I reply that 
this is a capital mistake. More scholars finish their 
education (their schooling) in the second, third, or 
fourth class, than in the first. The fact is, not more 
than six or eight in a hundred of those who enter the 
Grammar Schools in our principal cities finish their 
education in the first class. Most of those who enter 
that class go through it, and subsequently pursue 
their studies for a greater or less period in schools of a 
higher grade. The mass of the young complete their 
studies in the middle classes of the Grammar Schools, 
and never come under the direct moulding influence 
of the principals. • 

The grand desideratum of Grammar Schools, as it 
appears to me, is the presence, practical experience, 
and personal influence, of the principals in the middle 



27 

and lower classes. Here, so far as the schools are 
concerned, the finishing touches are given to the char- 
acter and education of the great majority of the young. 
Here youth begins to emerge into manhood and woman 
hood ; here the will asserts its independence, and habits 
become fixed for life. To conduct the young through 
this critical and perilous period demands the highest 
wisdom and the most controlling authority. Could the 
details of school-work be so arranged, that the prin- 
cipals could spend a larger portion of time in the lower 
classes in illustrating their methods of teaching and 
governing, it would give inspiration for study, and 
greater symmetry and completeness to the culture of 
the schools. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

The value and importance of this school need not be 
discussed in the presence of this Board. Its course of 
study is comprehensive ; its instruction, generally, 
thorough ; its discipline, admirable ; and a spirit of 
progress seems to actuate teachers and pupils. 

The boys have, for some time, been practising mili- 
tary tactics ; and, encouraged by their teachers, they 
have petitioned the Board to introduce military drill 
into the school. We cannot doubt that their request 
will be granted, and that every means will be furnished 
to give them encouragement in this enterprise. 



28 

The enthusiasm which has prompted to this move- 
ment will, we trust, lead to others of equal and even 
greater importance. 

The modifications made in the studies and management 
of the school within the year or two past have enlarged its 
sphere of usefulness, and given it a stronger hold on pub- 
lic favor, Other improvements, however, are needed. 

The department of Natural Science is quite too limited; 
the facilities for illustration are altogether too meagre. 
I found the teacher of Astronomy, a few days since, 
attempting to explain to her class the method of finding 
a star, or of pointing out its true position ; and as the 
city does not furnish a proper instrument for the 
purpose, she called into requisition an antiquated 
umbrella. Thanks to her tact, some light was thrown 
upon the subject. 

There is great need, in the study of this science, of a 
good telescope. If the teacher wishes to give her 
scholars a better view of the sun, moon, or stars, than 
the naked eye can furnish, she is obliged to take them 
over to Boston and search up a telescope in the street 
or on the Common, and pay so much per head for those 
who take a look at a distant orb. It would eminently 
become some of the live business-men, the merchant- 
princes, of our city, to make a donation of a good tele- 
scope to this school. But, if they fail to do so, one 
should be purchased at public expense. Such an instru- 
ment would add new attractions to the school, and aug- 
ment its power for good. 



29 

I have received from the teacher of Chemistry a list 
of deficiencies in his department ; but the great want 
here is a suitable Laboratory furnished with all the 
requisite means for the illustration of this most useful 
and interesting study. 

To provide for present and future wants, the building 
should be enlarged and considerably altered. The reci- 
tation rooms are small, ill-ventilated, unhealthy. The 
hall is not sufficiently commodious for public occasions, 
and the condition of the Grammar Schools renders it 
morally certain that it will soon be necessary to increase 
the number of sittings. The basement should be ex- 
cavated and finished in a manner suitable for a gym- 
nasium, and supplied with apparatus requisite for the 
physical training of young men. A portion of this 
space might be used as a Laboratory, and the main 
room occupied as a drill-room. 

All the conveniences desired could be obtained by 
adding fifteen or twenty feet to the building. 

The heating of this building should receive immediate 
attention. The time has come when a regard for good 
taste and health demands the removal of the numerous 
stoves now in use. By the present method, the rooms 
are kept dusty, and in some of them the atmosphere is 
often badly affected with gas. The wisdom of the 
Board will readily suggest the kind of apparatus which 
will secure a proper degree of heat and suitable 
ventilation. 



30 



TEACHERS LIBRARY. 



Every person conversant with the business of teach 
ing is aware that habitual attention to the details of 
public instruction tends to contract the sphere of 
thought, and to prevent mental growth. This is true 
in the case of most who are not looking forward to a 
style of public life which requires liberal study and 
comprehensive views of facts and principles, and par- 
ticularly in the case of all who give but little attention 
to any books except those which they use in the school- 
room. After a few years, such teachers lose their 
freshness. Their instructions are wanting in novelty 
and vivacity. 

To counteract this tendency, and to secure a more 
general education for our youth, you have adopted a 
course of studies which requires oral instruction in 
various customs, arts, trades, and sciences. All this 
work is new to most of our teachers. Some of them 
have no habit of speaking consecutively in public on 
any subject, and many of them have not the means to 
procure that variety of works which it is desirable for 
them to read and to consult in preparing themselves for 
their new duties. 

This difficulty, I think, may be obviated in a great 
measure by the formation of a Teachers' Library. 



31 

To do this there would be very little occasion to 
draw from the public funds. The teachers would, I 
apprehend, readily co-operate in its establishment, and 
annually contribute for its support. 

But little more will be required of the School Com- 
mittee than to countenance the enterprise, and provide 
a suitable place for the books. 

No such library of any real account exists in the 
Eastern States. Yet in this country, and in Europe, 
many books have been published which are adapted to 
interest teachers, to open to them a new mental life, 
and give them fresh thoughts for the duties of the 
school-room. 

I am confident the members of this Committee will 
esteem it a pleasure to place Charlestown first, or at 
least prominent, among American cities, in furnishing 
suitable books for the benefit of public teachers. 

PREPARATION OF TEACHERS. 

The necessity of supplying public schools with trained 
teachers has been so frequently discussed by School 
Committees, and by educators of various grades, that it 
is now generally conceded by intelligent people. No 
effort of mine is required to illustrate its importance to 
this Board. All agree that thoroughly qualified teach- 
ers, and those only, should be employed ; yet, strange 
as it may appear, to the question, " What means shall be 



32 

adopted to secure the right preparation of teachers % " 
very little attention has been given. 

Teaching should be made a profession ; for it is both 
a science and an art. Those who engage in its sacred 
duties need systematic training in the critical knowledge 
of the rudimental and common branches, and familiarity 
with literature and general studies. To these attain- 
ments should be added breadth of character, a spirit 
of generous enterprise, and a thorough knowledge of the 
best methods of teaching. But how shall these and 
kindred qualifications be obtained \ The High Schools, 
Academies, and Colleges utterly fail to give any specific 
instruction in the art of teaching. All that these schools 
aim to accomplish is, to furnish the young with sufficient 
education to commence preparing themselves for some 
particular vocation ; but they do not attempt to confer 
the necessary qualifications. After passing through 
these schools, young men must study for the learned 
professions, — Divinity, Law, Medicine, Public Instruc- 
tion. Schools in abundance have been established for 
students in the first three professions, but not for those 
in the last. In this Commonwealth there are annually 
employed about 7,760 teachers in 4,840 schools. To 
furnish all these teachers, four Normal Schools have 
been established. The design is good ; but the means 
are inadequate. These four schools graduate about 
one hundred and fifty students per annum. Some, of 
course, will be found to have mistaken their calling ; 



33 

some soon fail in health ; and others go to distant parts 
of the country, or engage in business. Consequently, 
the number remaining to prosecute the work of teach- 
ing is wholly inadequate to meet the wants of the 
Public Schools. 

There are two ways in which something can be ac- 
complished in this city to promote the object under con- 
sideration. 

One is, to form a Normal Department in the High 
School. Such an arrangement would afford great assist- 
ance to our young ladies who desire to teach ; but it 
would necessarily be limited in its operations, and defec- 
tive in results. The other, and as I believe the only 
effectual means, is the establishment of an independent 
Training School for such persons as have taken the 
regular high-school course of study. By this means, 
both breadth and accuracy of preparation might be 
secured. I will not attempt to develop the plan for 
such a school, 01 to specify the studies which should 
be pursued. The details can be readily arranged when 
the time comes for action. I am sure that such a 
movement as this would meet the approbation of the 
intelligent citizens of Charlestown; and I hope it may 
claim the early attention of this Board. 
teachers' meetings. 

During the period embraced in this Report, two meet- 
ings of the teachers have been held. 

At the first meeting, an address was given by the 

5 



34 

Superintendent on the course of study adopted by the 
Board last autumn. At the second, remarks were made 
by the Superintendent on various matters pertaining to 
the management of public schools, and a very interesting 
lecture was given on drawing by W. N. Bartholomew 
of Boston. Mr. Bartholomew gave many valuable sug- 
gestions in regard to drawing, showing its importance 
and the method of conducting the exercise. His re- 
marks were aptly illustrated by examples on the black- 
board, and the teachers gave him a cordial vote of 
thanks for his instructive address. 

CONCLUSION. 

In conclusion, I wish to tender my thanks to the 
members of this Committee for the personal kind- 
ness with which they have treated me, for the readi- 
ness with which they have considered whatever recom- 
mendations I have had the honor to present, and for 
their co-operation in executing the measures which 
have been adopted for the improvement of our schools. 

I wish also to express again my high regard for the 
teachers in this city as a body, and my entire confi- 
dence in their ability and fidelity. Their toils are 
imperfectly appreciated, and very moderately rewarded. 
In their hands are the destinies of our children, and 
they merit the social and moral support of all intelligent 

citizens. 

Respectfully submitted. 

/. H. TWOMBLY, 

April, 1868. Superintendent of Public Schools. 



FIFTH SEMI-ANNUAL BEPORT 



Superintendent of Public Schools. 



To the School Committee of Charlestown : 

Gentlemen, — In conformity with your Regulations, 
I present my Fifth Semi-annual Report. 

STATISTICS. 

Population of Charlestown, in 1855, . . . ' . 21,742 
" " in 1865, .... 26,398 

" " in 1868, estimated, . . 28,000 

These statistics do riot include the Navy Yard or 
the State Prison. 

Whole Number op School-houses, .... 20 

One of these is occupied by the High School, five by Grammar 
and Intermediate Schools, and fourteen by Primary Schools. 

VALUE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY. 

High School Building, Monument Square, . . . $30,000 

Bunker Hill Grammar School-house, Baldwin Street, . 85,000 

Warren Grammar School-house, Summer Street, . . 97,000 
Prescott Grammar School-house, Elm Street, . . . 45,000 
Winthrop Grammar School-house, \Jorner Lexington and 

Bunker Hill Streets, 30,000 



36 



Harvard Grammar School-house, Harvard Street, . $25,000 

Primary School-house, Haverhill Street, . . . 2,500 

« " (v *Cor. Bunker Hill & Charles Streets, 20,000 

" " Mead Street, .... 15,000 

» " Sullivan Street, .... 2,500 

" " Cross Street, .... 2,400 

Two Primary School-houses, Medford Street, . . 1,800 

Primary School-house, Bunker Hill Street, . . . 1,500 

« " '; Moulton Street, .... 15,000 

" " » Common Street, . . . 20,000 

" " Soley Street, .... 1,000 

" " Bow Street, .... 5,000 

Two Primary School-houses, Kichmond Street, . . 6,000 



School-houses and lots, 
Apparatus, Libraries, Globes, Maps, &c, 

Total value, 



$404,700 
5,000 

$409,700 



SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 



High School, 

Bunker Hill School, 
Warren School, 
Prescott School, 
Winthrop School, . 
Harvard School, 

36 Primary Schools, 



Number of Seats. 


Average Cost 


200 


$150 


200 




777 




777 




553 




525 




400 




3032 


93 


2016 


46 



5248 



45 
2 



Whole number of seats, 
Whole number of schools, ....... 

Increase during the year, (one Primary and one Intermediate), 

All the schools are located in school buildings, 
except Intermediate, No. 1, which occupies a room 
in the Engine House, on Winthrop Street. 



37 



Number of children in this city, May 1, 1868, between 

5 and 15 years of age, ..... 5,824 
Number of children of the school age, habitually absent from 

the Public Schools, about ...... 1,000 

This estimate does not include those who are en- 
rolled and are temporarily absent. 

In September, 390 children were admitted to the 

. clL 9( 

Grammar Schools, and their averagerwas 8 years and 

10 months. 

Average age of pupils admitted to the High School, 
14 years and 9 months. 

Average time spent by these pupils in the Grammar 
Schools, 5 years, 10^ months. 

Whole number of teachers in the Public Schools at 
the close of the year 1868, 105. In the High School, 
6 ; in the Grammar Schools, 60 ; in the Intermediate, 
3 ; in the Primary, 36. 

Number of persons in this city, between 5 'and 15 
years of age, on the first day of May in each year, 
from 1857 to 1868: — 



1857, 
1858, 
1859, 
1860, 
1861, 
1862, 
1863, 
1864, 
1865, 
1866, 
1867, 
1868, 



4,838 
4,243 
4,302 
4,194 
4,496 
4,946 
5,028 
5,798 
4,951 
5,181 
5,679 
5,824 



38 



It is very apparent, from these figures, that the school 
census has not always been taken with sufficient care. 
It is a difficult task, but it is a work which should be 
done systematically and thoroughly. 

Eatio of attendance upon Public Schools to the whole 
number of children between 5 and 15, in the cities of 
this State, for the year 1866-7 : — 



New Bedford, 

Charlestown, 

Chelsea, 

Lowell, 

Boston, 

"Worcester, 

Roxbury, 

Lynn, 

Springfield, 

Cambridge, 

Taunton, 

Newburyport, 

Lawrence, 

Fall River, 

Salem, . 



.87 
.82 
.79 
.74 
.74 
.72 
.70 
.68 
.68 
.67 
.65 
.60 
.52 
.51 
.47 



CONDITION OF SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

The people of this city may justly take pride in the 
improvements which have been made in the edifices 
now occupied by the Public Schools. All who were 
familiar with the damp basements, vestries, and shop 
chambers into which many of the children were 
crowded, two or three years ago, must feel grateful 
to the public officers and to the liberal-minded citi- 
zens through whose influence the change has been 



39 

wrought. Much credit is due to the efficient Commit- 
tee on School-houses, under whose direction a great 
many improvements have been made during the year. 
A detailed account of the expenses incurred by that 
Committee will appear in the Annual Report of the 
City Council. 

The Primary Schools are generally well located, and 
the rooms which they occupy are suitable for the pur- 
poses of instruction. They are all supplied with desks 
and chairs of the most approved patterns, and, with 
few exceptions, With blackboards and all ordinary con- 
veniences for teaching. 

There is a sink for every room, and the Mystic water 
is often found to be a great civilizer. The ventilation 
in some of these buildings is excellent; in a few, it 
is very poor. 

Three of the Grammar School buildings — the Bunker 
Hill, Warren, and Prescott — are of the largest size, and 
are constructed upon the most approved plans. Each 
has a commodious hall, and the one in the Warren 
School is lighted with gas. These halls are of great 
use. They afford accommodations for assembling the 
pupils for the opening exercises of the schools, and 
likewise on special and public occasions. During 
the summer vacation, a stairway was made in the 
Bunker Hill building, leading from the frout entry to 
the girls' play-room in the basement. This is a great 
convenience. 



40 

All these buildings have large play-rooms in their 
basements; and their yards are of good size and al- 
ways in excellent order. 

The arrangement of the Winthrop and Harvard 
buildings is bad, and their location, if possible, worse. 
They stand upon frequented streets ; and, during all the 
period of pleasant weather, the exercises of the classes 
are daily interfered with by the noise from without. 
Neither of them has a play-room, and the latter has 
no yard. The pupils are obliged to play in the streets, 
where they are frequently annoyed by teams, and, in 
turn, are often a great annoyance to the public. 

The Board has already taken action in regard to 
these buildings; and a request has been made to the 
City Council to erect, in some central place, an edifice 
of sufficient magnitude to accommodate both schools. 
Should valid objections be found to the building of so 
large a structure, it is to be hoped that measures will 
be immediately taken to erect a commodious house for 
one of the schools. This should not be regarded as a 
public expense, but as a means of utilizing the money 
annually paid for school purposes. The annual cost 
of carrying on a first-class Grammar School is from 
$10,000 to $12,000; and to spend this money under 
circumstances which preclude the possibility of secur- 
ing appropriate results is the sheerest waste. 



41 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

There are now thirty-six Primary Schools, which 
is an increase of one over the number reported last 
year. 

Early in the summer, the School-house near the 
summit of Bunker Hill was removed to Medford street; 
and since the opening of the term, in September, it has 
been occupied by a school under the charge of Miss 
Carrie E. Osgood. By transfers, resignations, and so 
forth, many changes have been made in the list of 
teachers. Mrs. Small has been transferred from No. 
2, to Intermediate School, No. 1; and Misses Malvina 
B. Skilton, C. W. Trowbridge, Susan E*. Etheridge, 
H. C. Easterbrook, Fannie H. Marden, and Emma C. 
Jones have resigned. Misses Effie G. Hazen, Eliza- 
beth B. Norton, Ella Worth, Abbie P. Richardson, 
Carrie C. Smith, and Persis M. Whittemore have been 
duly elected by the Board ; and Misses Mary H. 
Humphrey, Lilla Barnard, Carrie E. Osgood, and Mary 
P. Swain are teaching as candidates. 

On the occasion of the resignation of Miss Skilton 
and Miss Trowbridge, the Board passed resolutions 
highly complimentary to those ladies. The former 
had been connected with the schools of this city about 
thirty years, and the latter nearly half of that time. 
In view of the very extended period of Miss Skilton's 

6 



42 

services, and the meagre salary she received for many 
years, the Board unanimously voted her an honorary 
allowance of one hundred dollars. 

During the winter, the Teachers sent a request to 
the School Committee for permission to close the 
afternoon session of the schools at 4 o'clock, through 
the entire year, The subject was discussed in all its 
bearings, and the request was finally granted. Thus 
far no material effect has resulted from the change. 
The teachers, pupils, and people seem to be satisfied 
with the arrangement. 

The educational status of the Primary Schools is 
highly satisfactory. In what may be termed the inci- 
dentals of education, they have made very great im- 
provement. Teachers and scholars have readily united 
to make their rooms cheerful and attractive. It may 
seem a little thing to hang a picture on the walls of a 
school room, yet that picture, if worthy of its position, 
will be a power for culture, an incentive to personal 
neatness. Contrast two rooms. 

In one, the walls are bare, begrimed, unsightly. 
The benches are rude, the floor dirty ; the scholars 
unwashed, ragged. Who would williagly send a 
child to such a place 1 ? 

In the other, there is an air of refinement. Flowers 
bloom in the windows, and upon the walls hang ele- 
gant engravings picturing forth scenes of lively inter- 
est to every child. The furniture is tasteful, the floor 



43 

habitually clean ; the children are cleanly and tidily 
dressed. This is a fit place for the development of 
intellect and taste ; for the moulding of character. 
Such school rooms as this may be found in our city. 

These schools have been but little more than a year 
on the new course of study, but they have made excel- 
lent progress. In no branch do they fall below their 
status of three years ago ; while in several they are 
far in advance of their position at that time. 

The changes which have been made in their organi- 
zation, and in the studies pursued, have greatly in- 
creased their efficiency. 

In the former state of things, when the schools were 
ungraded and the studies not classified, very little atten- 
tion was given to the middle and lowest classes. The 
first class was usually called up to read, and to show 
their skill in the tables; and, if the performance was 
satisfactory, the school was supposed to be doing its 
proper work. Now, the attention of teachers and of 
committees is directed to different classes. The third, 
fourth, and fifth classes have their parts to perform ; 
and, as in several schools, one or the other of these 
is the advanced class, according to the method of grad- 
ing, it is particularly cared for, and is instructed with 
special reference to exhibiting the work of the school. 
In brief, the points of interest towards which the at- 
tention of teachers is turned, and likewise the facili- 
ties for instruction, have been greatly multiplied. As 



44 

a consequence, higher results are secured. In draw- 
ing, printing, making script letters, and in performing 
examples in the fundamental rules of arithmetic, a 
positive and cheering advance has been made. Yet 
the children have not been crowded, nor overtasked by 
mental labor. Their time has been more fully and 
more judiciously employed than it was formerly. 

The July examination of primarians for admission to 
the Grammar Schools was far more comprehensive and 
rigid than usual. It embraced all the primary studies, 
except geography ; and an average of seventy-five per 
cent, was fixed upon as the standard. Many applicants 
failed; but in some instances whole classes, numbering 
thirty or forty scholars, were successful. 

Most of the teachers in these schools are endeav- 
oring to blend pleasure with labor. They devise 
plans to give their scholars, occasionally, " a good 
time," as well as an abundance of study. To do 
this, they avail themselves of the holidays to provide 
pleasant entertainments. This course is certainly com- 
mendable. 

Very few people, we apprehend, realize how much 
self-denial is required of children who are confined in 
school ten months in a year. Their young hearts are 
full of buoyancy, and it is no easy task for them to 
turn away from the .flowers and singing birds of spring, 
the gleaming sunshine of summer, and the glittering 
ice-fields and glassy highways of winter, to shut 



45 

themselves within unattractive walls, and study dry 
subjects, as a matter of duty. 

The more we can throw the sunshine of a genial 
life into the schools, the more varied and the richer 
will be the fruits of culture. 

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 



School. 



No. 1, 
«• 2, 
" 8 



Teacher. 



Lucy M. Small 
Sarah M.Ginn. 
A. R. Stearns. 



Location. 



Winthrop Street. 

Warren Grammar School Building. 

Bunker Hill Gram. School Building. 



Committee. 



W. Peirce. 
A. E. Cutter. 
Geo. H. Yeaton. 



These schools are designed for scholars that are too 
old to associate profitably with Primary School chil- 
dren, and that are not qualified to enter the 'Grammar 
Schools. They are by no means " Dunce Schools," for 
they generally contain some of the most industrious and 
successful scholars in the city. The teachers of these 
Schools are favorably known; and they are laboring 
with their customary industry, tact, and success. Dur- 
ing the past year fifty-three were prepared for the 
Grammar Schools by Miss Ginn, and thirty-nine by 
Miss Stearns. About two-fifths of the pupils belong 
to families that have but recently moved to the city, 
and as they have had but scanty privileges for edu- 
cation in the country, they naturally fall into these 
schools. ' 



46 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

Teachers. — Alfred P. Gage, Principal ; H. F. Sears, Sub-Master ; 
Abby F. Crocker, Head Asst". ; Mary L. Coombs, S. F. Drake, Clara 
S. Nye, C. A. W". Towle, Harriet E. Marcy, Angelina M. Knowles, 
Mary A. Thomas, Ella M. Hill, Lydia S. Jones, Martha B. Stevens, 
Ida O. Hurd. 

Sub- Committee. — Wm. H. Finney, George H. Yeaton, William R. 

Bradford. 

PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Teachers. — George T. Littlefield, Principal ; F. W. Lewis, Sub- 
Master ; Mary G. Prichard, Head Asst. ; Martha M. Kenrick, 
Mary C. Sawyer, Ellen C. Dickinson, Lydia A. Sears, Marietta 
Baily, Georgianna T. Sawyer, Frances C. Craigen, Elizabeth J. 
Farnsworth. 

Committee,— -Geo. H. Marden, Geo. H. Hamilton, Stacy Baxter. 

WARREN SCHOOL. 

Teachers. — Geo. Swan, Principal ; Samuel G. Stone, Sub-Master ; 
Sarah M. Chandler, Head Asst. ; Margaret W. Veazie, Henrietta J. 
Merrill, Frances L. Dodge, Maria L. Bolan, V. A. M. L. Dadley, 
Georgiana Hamlin, Nellie A. Pratt, Alice Hall, Maria L. Savage, 
Abbie E. Holt. 

Committee. — Charles F. Smith, Abram E. Cutter, William Peirce. 

WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Teachers. — B. F. S. Griffin, Principal; Caleb Murdock, Sub- 
Master ; Mary A. Sanborn, Head Asst. ; Abby M. Clark, A. P. 
Moulton, Mary F. Goldthwaite, Harriet E. Frye, Elsie A. Wood- 
ward, H. V. Richardson, Josephine A. Lees, B. W. Willard, 
Maria A. Holt. 

Committee. — Andrew J. Locke, M. H. Merriam, John Sanborn, 
Nahum Chapin. 



47 

HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Teachers. — Warren E. Eaton, Principal ; Otis L. Bonney, Sub- 
Master; Abbie B. Fisk, Head Asst. ; Ann E. Weston, Susan H. 
Williams, Fannie B. Hall, Lois A. Rankin, Lucy L. Burgess, 
Emma F. Thomas. 

Committee. — Oscar F. Safford, Charles H. Bigelow, James F. 
Southworth, Jas. F. Hunnewell. 



CHANGE OF TEACHERS DURING THE YEAR. 

BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 
Resigned. ■ Elected. 

Mary A. Davis, Henry F. Sears, 

Bernice A. Demeritt, Mary L. Coombs, 

Mary F. Jaquith, Clara S. Nye, 

Eldora A. Pickering, Ella M. Hill. 
Emeline B. Tyler. 

WARREN SCHOOL. 

Christiana Rounds, , Samuel G. Stone, 

Annie M. Ford, (Miss Turner). Sarah M. Chandler. 

PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 
Sarah M. Chandler, Frank W. Lewis. 

WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Sophia W. Page, Bial W. Willard, 

Sarah L. Frye. Mary A. Sanborn. 

HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Martha Blood, Otis L. Bonney, 

Helen A. Porter. Emma L. Thomas. 



48 

Late in March last, Miss Mary A. Osgood, who had 
been for many years a faithful and popular Teacher in 
the Warren School, passed away to her final reward. 
She was devoted to her work, and beloved by her 
pupils. Her constitution, which had been somewhat 
impaired by protracted labors in the school-room, 
yielded, at length, to the assaults of the insidious 
destroyer, consumption. 

In consequence of a painful casualty, the Principal 
of the Warren School was absent during the summer 
term, and the management of the school devolved upon 
Miss Rounds and Mrs. Ford. They were efficiently 
aided by the other regular teachers, and by Miss Eliza- 
beth Swords who was temporarily employed in teaching 
the first class. The school made excellent progress, 
and the teachers, by their wise and energetic manage- 
ment, won the approbation of the Board and of the 
patrons of the school. 

The order passed by the Board, in May last, estab- 
lishing the office of sub-Master in the Bunker Hill, 
Warren, Prescott, and Harvard Schools, went into 
practical operation in September. 

There are obvious advantages in having more than 
one male teacher in a mixed school of five or six hun- 
dred pupils, and it is hoped this change will be bene- 
ficial to the cause of education. Its full value, how- 
ever, can be known only by the results which may be 
produced. 



49 

It is very moderate commendation of the Grammar 
Schools of this city to say that they are in a highly pros- 
perous condition. They are conducted with energy ; 
their organization is more complete and symmetrical 
than ever before, and their discipline has considerably 
improved. 

In some, moral suasion has largely taken the place 
of the rod ; yet there are in most occasional instances 
of needless punishment. Burdened with many cares, 
teachers sometimes become hasty; and some, perhaps, 
are defective in their views of school government. 
Still there is abundant evidence that whipping is prac- 
tised less than it was a year or two since. We believe 
the moral tone of the schools has been elevated. 

Physical Culture. — Daily, and usually twice a day, 
the pupils are called for a few minutes, three or five, 
from the routine of study to calisthenics. These exer- 
cises inspirit children and give them symmetry of form 
and gracefulness of attitude. 

The Principal of the Bunker Hill School, assisted by 
his pupils, has fitted up a very good gymnasium in one 
of the basement rooms ; and the boys, who have gene- 
rously contributed to purchase the apparatus, show by 
various exercises that they design to come out of school 
with physical energy that shall fit them for the sternest 
duties of life. 

Physical training has never received that attention in 
the schools of New England which it deserves. The 



50 

gymnasium at the Bunker Hill School is probably the 
only one in a Grammar School building in the Eastern 
States. 

Declamation is practised weekly. The exercise oc- 
curs on the forenoons of Wednesday and Saturday, and 
is always of interest to the scholars. At some of the 
schools, and particularly at the Bunker Hill, visitors 
attend in considerable numbers. Sometimes fifty or 
sixty are present to witness the performances of the 
young orators ; and the hour that is spent in reading 
and speaking is one of the most profitable of the whole 
week. 

In all the schools there is music in connection with 
public speaking, and it is generally furnished by the 
pupils. In the Bunker Hill and Warren Schools, 
there are bands composed of boys that discourse ex- 
cellent music to entertain their school-mates and visit- 
ing friends. 

Compositions are written in all the schools. In the 
lowest classes, little or nothing is attempted beyond 
forming simple sentences containing familiar words an- 
nounced by the teacher; and, in the advanced classes, 
the exercises are of an elementary character. Some 
children, however, naturally gifted with power to think 
and to arrange their thoughts, write very pleasing de- 
scriptions of scenes which they have witnessed. 

A great gain has been made : the scholars are occa- 
sionally required to express their thoughts on paper ; 



51 

and the habit which they are now forming will be of 
untold service to them in future years. 

Map drawing is attended to by all the scholars in 
geography ; and many of the maps, prepared by 
scholars in the higher classes, exhibit refined taste 
and much artistic skill. This practice fixes in the 
mind the outlines of countries, seas, lakes ; gives an 
accurate perception of the relative position of different 
bodies of land and water ; directs the attention to the 
varieties of light and shade ; and thus while it gives 
skill to the hand cultivates the imagination and stores 
the mind with clearly defined and useful knowledge. 

Linear drawing was introduced, by vote of the Board, 
more than a year since ; but owing to various causes, 
and mainly to the pressure of other studies, very little 
was accomplished prior to the summer vacation. Since 
then a good beginning has been made. 

Oral Teaching. — The great world of fact and of 
thought is seldom made to throw its inspiring influ- 
ence into public schools. Too many teachers are con- 
tent with asking questions and hearing the dull answers 
which children may give. They rarely bestir them- 
selves to bring refreshing truths, awakening thoughts, 
to their classes. A great reform is demanded: and I am 
sure it has already commenced in our schools. Many 
teachers appear to be more industrious in communicat- 
ing knowledge in connection with their daily recita- 
tions ; and, in two or three Grammar Schools the 



52 

custom of giving brief lectures is beginning to prevail. 
Teachers occasionally speak on assigned topics ; and at 
the Prescott School members of the Committee have 
rendered important aid by giving brief addresses on 
well-chosen subjects. It is to be hoped the lecture 
method of teaching will be adopted in all our schools, 
and that practical business men may be induced to 
give the young the benefits of their ripe and valu- 
able experience. It is a great misfortune to the chil- 
dren of cities, that they are so completely excluded 
from all departments of business. They grow up on 
the side-walk and in the school-room. The practical 
pursuits of life they are almost totally ignorant of; 
and one of the best means of interesting them in the 
live, stirring world, seems to be to employ the active 
men of the age to give them instruction in the affairs 
of business. In every city there are men of education, 
intimately acquainted with the various departments of 
trade, who would consent to speak to the children of 
the Public Schools, particularly to those of the higher 
classes, on practical subjects. The time may come 
when labor of some kind will be connected with city 
schools, so that children can have an opportunity of 
attending to various kinds of handicraft. 

To make oral teaching profitable in the highest 
degree, cabinets of minerals or museums should be 
formed in every school. Specimens of stones, metals, 
plants, trees, flowers, and animals might be gathered 



53 

from different parts of the world, which would be full 
of interest to the children, and suggestive of valuable 
thoughts to the teachers. 

In the Winthrop School, the Principal has adopted 
the habit of requiring the pupils to read or to state 
from memory any important facts which they may find 
in the daily papers or books. This exercise which oc- 
curs weekly is both interesting and profitable. Every 
pupil, for the moment, becomes a teacher. 

Penmanship. — Within a few months, a thorough 
change has been made in the method of teaching 
this branch. The pupils are writing much more 
rapidly than they did a year or two since, and there 
is good reason to expect great improvement in results. 

Early in September, Mr. O. H. Bowler was author- 
ized to introduce the Spencerian system into the Bunker 
Hill School, as an experiment. I have no wish to de- 
cide upon the comparative merits of the two systems of 
penmanship now in use in our schools ; but it is certain 
that Mr. Bowler's method of teaching is very successful. 

Instruction was given in book-keeping, during the 
spring term, to the first classes in' all the schools but 
one. The introduction of this study into the Grammar 
Schools indicates the progress that is now making in 
practical education. 

In the regular studies, the pupils are making good 
progress. All the classes were formally and thorough- 
ly examined in February and July. 



54 

In order to secure uniformity in the examination of 
candidates for graduation in July, lists of questions 
were prepared in arithmetic, geography, grammar and 
history. These questions served as a common basis, 
while the sub-committees who conducted the examina- 
tion and awarded the coveted honors, extended their 
inquiries in every branch, as they saw fit. 

The graduating exercises at the several schools were 
attended by large crowds of people, and the perform- 
ances of the scholars were highly creditable to them- 
selves and to their teachers, and gave great satisfaction 
to those who witnessed them. 

NAMES OF GRADUATES. 

BUNKEK HILL SCHOOL. 

Ballou, Frank O. Webster, Edgar H. 

Burckes, James II. 

Bolan, Joel C. Butler, Sarah E. 

Dadmun, John G. B. Keyes, Margaret 

Pitts, Frank A. Macolief, Susan A. 

Pickthall, Edward Peterson, Ella A. 

Simonds, Edwin A. Simpson, Lydia A. 

PKESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Barron, Frank T. Currant, Rebecca F. 

Bradford, Frank A. Cutler, Louise M. 

Coburn, Arthur B. . Douglass, Ida C. 

Dodge, Frank A. Davis, Ada F. x 

Elliott, George E. Harmon, Lizzie J. 

Howes, Albert C. Leonard, Emma I. 

Lewis, Herbert W. Lowe, Flora F. 

Melcher, Charles L. Plummer, Mary J. 

Plaisted, William H. Smith, Ella T. 

Pope, Frank J. Willey, Ida R. 

Sawyer, George O. Waters, Katie E. 



55 



PRESCOTT 

Stevens, Milan F. 
Webber, Edward H. 
Wood, Frank L. 

WINTHEOP 
Bo-wen, Frank W. 
Cummins, Thomas J. 
Delano, Henry C. 
Dodge, Walter W. 
Dow, Clarence 
Harding, Elvin W. 
Hook, Charles P. 
Swain, George W. 
Williams, James F. 
Wills, Michael H. 

Atwood, Abbie E. 
Delaney, Mary E. 
Evans, Georgiana M. 

WARREN 
Davis, Simon 
Hadley, John H. C. 
Hall, Benjamin T. 
Henry, William S. 
Holland, Alfred H. 
Kenyon, Frederic 
Linnehan, John M. 
Manning, Mark S. 
Pickering, Frederic A. 
Robertson, Arthur R. 
Rooks, Julius R. 
Swallow, George N. 
Swan, George A. 
White, Edwin M. 
Whiting, George A. 

HARVARD 

Carlton, Emma S. 
Childs, Mary L. 
Copeland, Hattie S. 
Daley, Joanna 
Donovan, Nora 
Emery, Marcia 
Haley, Margaret T. 
Keating, Minnie 
Robinson, Ida A. 



SCHOOL. 

Winslow, Nellie M. 
York, Isadora. 

SCHOOL. 

Ferrin, Fannie E. 
Gale, Addie J. 
Hatch, Addie P. 
Hutchins, Emma 
Home, Julia E. 
Horton, Emma M. 
Murphy, Maggie 
Murphy, Mary J. 
Pewtress, Lizzie 
Potter, Ellen M. 
Stone, Clara H. 
Tennant, Lydiaetta 
Warren, Georgiana H. 

SCHOOL. 

Beal, Marietta M. 
Bickford, Harriet A. 
Burnett, Lucy M. 
Burroughs, Isabell M. 
Crozier, Annie M. 
Gardner, Abbie G. 
Fitzgerald, Georgie 
Hardy, Carrie A. 
Jones, Harriet M. 
Parker, Oliver C. 
Ramsey, Helen E. 
Simpson, Carrie 
Whitman, Louisa A. 



SCHOOL. 

Ayres, David J. 
Flanders, Charles H. 
Harris, George 
O'Meara, Stephen 
Morse, William R. 
Mills, Arthur L. 
McNally, John J. 
Pierce, Thomas L. 
Willard, Edmund S. 



56 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Sub-Committee. 

GEORGE W GARDNER, GEORGE A. HAMILTON, 

ABRAM E. CUTTER, JAMES F. HUNNEWELL, 

STACY BAXTER. 

Teachers. 

CALEB EMERY, Principal. JOHN G. ADAMS, Sub-Master. 

Assistant Teachers. 
CATHARINE WHITNEY, MARY LORETTE EURBER, 

DORA C. CHAMBERLAIN, SOPHIA E. FAULKNER. 

The following extract is made from the Semi-annual 
Report of the sub-Committee : J^ / 

" The School was thoroughly examined in S\jpte\rr\er, and, as a 
whole, sustained itself well in comparison with former years. Over 
thirty classes were examined in the Ancient and Modern Languages, 
in the Mathematics, in Natural Sciences, in Belle Lettres, and in 
Morals. The Committee will not this year specify particular studies, 
as in some past years, but will say that in all departments there was 
evidence of sound and thorough teaching and commendable profi- 
ciency in study. The school was ■ never in a better condition than 
during the past year. The older and tried Teachers have added 
to their already high reputations, and the new Teachers have taken 
high rank." 

The annual examination of candidates for admission 
to this school took place on Tuesday, the 21st of July. 
Fifty-four boys and fifty-three girls were present. 
Twenty questions were submitted to them in Arith- 
metic ; and in Geography, Grammar, and History, ten 
each. 



57 

One girl and one boy were perfect in arithmetic; and 
two girls and one boy, in grammar. All the boys were 
successful but one, and all the girls but six. 



PER CENT. OF CORRECT ANSWERS. 





Arithmetic. 


Geography. 


Grammar. 


History. 


Girls, ..... 


69 


56 


81 


60 


Boys, .... 


74 


67 


77 


76 


Girls and Boys, 


71 


62 


79 


68 



Near the close of last year, Miss Frances M. Heed, 
who had occupied the position of Second Assistant for 
a number oiVyears, found it necessary, on account of 
continued ill health, to resign her position. Her long 
and favorable connection with the school caused much 
regret at her resignation. She left us universally be- 
loved and esteemed — both for her personal character 
as a woman, and her ability as a teacher. 
■ Her place has been filled by the election of Miss 
Dora C. Chamberlain, formerly a teacher in the Nor- 
mal School at Westfield. 

In May, Miss Annie E. Carr resigned her position in 
the school, and her place was not filled till the begin- 
ning of the present school year, in September. 

At the close of the year, in July, Miss Josephine M. 
Flint, who had for a number of years been a successful 
teacher in the School, resigned her place, — thus mak- 



58 

ing two vacancies to be filled at the beginning of Sep- 
tember. To these positions Miss M. L. Furber, a gradu- 
ate of the Normal School at Salem, and Miss S. E. Faulk- 
ner, a graduate of the Normal School at Framingham, 
have been elected. We have now an efficient working 
force in all departments of the school. The fall term 
of this School opened with the brightest prospects. 
One hundred were added to its number, and fifteen 
extra seats were required to accommodate the pupils. 

The boys have been organized into two companies, and 
fully armed and equipped for the purposes of military 
drill. 

The daily exercises by the girls in calisthenics, under 
the direction of Miss Furber, are conducted with grace- 
fulness and energy. 

All the scholars are successfully taught in drawing 
by Miss Faulkner and Miss Furber. 

The necessity of increasing the accommodations for 
this school was presented to the Board, by the Superin- 
tendent, in his Fourth Semi-annual Report. The sub- 
ject has been favorably considered by the Board, and a 
plan for the enlargement of the building, prepared by 
the Committee on School-houses, has been referred to 
the City Council. 

The condition of the higher classes in the Grammar 
Schools warrants the belief that fifty additional seats 
will be wanted in this school next year. Under these 
circumstances, it may be expected the city will promptly 
and liberally furnish means to enlarge the building 



59 



MEMBERS OF THE HIGH SCHOOL AT THE CLOSE OF 
THE YEAR 18G8. 



Allen, Marietta F. 
Archer, Lucy 
Bacheller, Clarabel 
Brown, Ellena S. 
Child's, Catherine S 
Gulliver, Eva F. 
Hanson, Emma T. 
Hintz, Emma L. 
McKay, Ella S. 
McNear, Lucy C. 
Pippy^Elinore S. 
Randlett, Emma S. 
Richards, Sylvia A. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

Roberts, Helen G-. 
Rockwell, Georgie F. 
Stearns, Emma J. 
Walker, Virginia C. 
Witherell, Martha E. 
Yeaton, Amelia F. 

Everett, Oliver H. 
Fisk, Lyman B. 
Forster, Frederic P. 
Haynes, Gideon F. 
Smith, Louis G. 
Warren, Joseph W. 



FIRST 
Adams, Ella F. 
Beddoe, Hattie E. 
Bennett, Sarah M. 
Bent, Helen M. 
Blanchard, Abbie L. 
Blanchard, Lizzie 
Blanchard, Mary H. 
Brown, Lillie F. 
Conway, Mary F. 
Cummings, Elinor R. 
Field, Sarah E. 
Flanders, Carrie A. 
Hill, Lizzie C. 
Hobbs, Minnie B. 
Lamson, Fannie M. 
McGowan, Mary E. 
Moore, Ada A. 
Palmer, Ida E. 
Potter, Anna L. 



MIDDLE CLASS. 

Prescott, Susie J. 
Ritner, Emma 
Stone, Mary E. 
Sturtevant, Lizzie F. 
Swan, Louisa F. 
Worcester, Josie S. 

Bradford, Oscar H. 
Cutter, Olin W. 
Forster, Horace W. 
Gibson, Charles G. 
Graves, Frank N. 
Mills, Charles C. 
Murdock, Samuel B. 
Priest, Henry P. 
Southworth, Robert A. 
Stevens, Edwin P. 
Twombly, William L. B. 
White, George W., Jr. 



60 



SECOND 
Blanchard, Hattie E. 
Burcham, Harriet L. 
Cutler, Eliza T. 
Denvir, Annie E. 
Duchexnin, Clara W. 
Felton, Emily F. 
Eurbush, Emma F. 
Gerry, Sarah F. 
Harding, Grace H. 
Hatch, Alice S. 
Maloney, Annie T. 
Medcalf, Emma F. 
Page, Sarah G. 
Patch, Ella F. 
Peterson, Izora A. 
Itobie, Susan A. 
Stevens, Georgians 
Shattuck, Lelia 
Talfrey, Emma C. 
Todd, Mary E. 
Toppan, Lizzie J. 
Wellington, M. Isabella 



MIDDLE CLASS. 

Wiley, Abbie H. 

Anderson, James A. 
Benn, John M. 
Bridge, Josiah G. 
Bryant, Thomas W. 
Emery, Charles B. 
Fuller, Henry A. 
Gilman, Frank P. 
Green, Forest D. 
Harris, Horace J. 
Hyland, John 
Kimball, George E. 
Lane, Charles R. 
Merrick, William O. 
Studley, John H. 
Spaulding, John F. 
Tufts, Fred 
Wentworth, G. A. 
Woodman, Warren H. 
Wyman, Howard 
Warren, Edgar B. 



Atwood, Abbie E. 
Bickford, Hattie A. 
Burroughs, Belle M. 
Childs, Mary S. 
Crozier, Annie U. 
Copeland, Hattie A. 
Carlton, Emma F. 
Cutler, Maria L. 
Cutter, Flora 
Davis, Florence A. 
Delaney, Mary E. 
Doane, Helen 
Emery, Marcia 
Evans, Georgiana M. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 

Ferrier, Fannie A. 
Fitzgerald, Georgie 
Gale, Ada J. 
Gardner, Abbie G. 
Haley, Margaret T. 
Hamilton, Louize H. 
Hardy, Carrie A. 
Harmon, Lizzie J. 
Hatch, Addie P. 
Home, Julia E. 
Horton, Emma M. 
Howland, Alice W. 
Hutchins, Emma 
Jones, Hattie M. 



61 



JUNIOR 

Keating, Minnie C. 
Keyes, Margaret 
Leonard, Emma J. 
Macolief, Susan A. 
Murphy, Margaret L. 
Murphy, Mary F. 
Parker, Olive C. 
Peterson, Ella A. 
Pewtress, Lizzie 
Plummer, Mary S. 
Potter, Ella M. 
Ramsay, Helen E. 
Robinson, Ida A. 
Simpson, Carrie 
Simpson, Lydia A. 
Stone, Nellie C. 
Tennant, Lydia E. 
"Warren, Georgiana H. 
"Waters, Kate E. 
Willey, Ida R. 
Whitman, Almira L. 
"Woodman, Aurelia P. 
York, Dora 

Bolan, Joel C. 
Burckes, James H. 
Ballou, Frank O. 
Bradford, Frank A. 
Coburn, Arthur B. 
Dadman, John G. 
Davis, Simon 
Delano, Henry C. 
Dodge, Frank A. 
Dodge, Walter W. 
Dow, Clarence 



CLASS 



t 

Flanders, Charles A. 
Hadley, John H. C. 
Hall, Benj. F. 
Henry, Wm. L. 
Holland, Alfred II. 
Howes, Albert C. 
Hook, Charles P. 
Lewis, Herbert "W. 
McNally, John J. 
Manning, Mark S. 
Melcher, Charles L. 
Merrick, Edward C. 
Mills, Arthur L. 
Morse, William R. 
O'Meara, Stephen F. 
Pickering, Frederic A. 
Pickthall, Edward 
Pierce, Thomas M. 
Pitts, Frank A. 
Pope, Frank J. 
Robertson, Arthur R. 
Rooks, Julius R. 
Sawyer, George O., Jr. 
Smith, James O. 
Stevens, Milton F. 
Swain, George W. 
Swallow, George N. 
Swan, George A. 
Webber, Edward H. 
White, Edward M. 
"Whiting, George A. 
"Whiting, William A. 
Williams, James F. 
Wills, Michael H. 



62 



EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS. 

Several examinations of female teachers have been 
held during the year, and the following individuals 
have been approved by the Committee : — 



Sarah A. Atwood, 
♦Maria Bolan, 
*Lilla Barnard, 
Ella L. Burbank, 
*Dora C. Chamberlain, 
Emily Clough, 
Eliza L. Darling, 
* Sophia E. Faulkner, 
♦M. Lorette Furber, 
Jannie E. Gilmore, 
♦Ella M. Hill, 
♦Ida 0. Hurd, 



Clara T. Jacobs, 
Effie A. Kettell, 
Abby F. Nye, 
♦Clara S. Nye, 
Josephine P. Raymond, 
Anna M. Reilley, 
♦Mary A. E. Sanborn, 
♦Carrie C. Smith, 
Jennie Smith, 
♦Ella Worth, 
Mary A. "Wyman. 



TEXT BOOKS. 

Guyot's Elementary and Intermediate Geographies, 
and Anderson's Grammar School History of the United 
States, were introduced into the Grammar Schools at 
the commencement of the fall term. These works 
have peculiar merits, and are, on the whole, giving 
excellent satisfaction to the teachers and members of 
the School Committee. 



* Teaching in this city. 



63 



MORAL EDUCATION. 

A good character is a vital force, the value of whose 
influence cannot be estimated by human arithmetic ; 
while knowledge may not bless its possessor or the 
public. The better susceptibilities of the moral nature 
must be aroused and cultivated — the young heart must 
be illuminated by truth, and strengthened by high 
resolves. This work the public schools are in a 
measure performing, but in a country like ours, where 
denominationalism is jealous of its rights, they are 
greatly limited in their sphere of action and in the 
means which they employ. They never can fully take 
the place of the church or of the family, yet in many 
respects they must supplement the labors of both. 
Despite the abundance of religious instruction and the 
elevating influence of home culture, there is in every 
community, and, especially in every growing city, a 
dangerous element — a mass of youth of vicious or 
idle habits. Many of these have completely broken 
away from the restraints of home, religion, and pub- 
lic education, and are ready for the commission of 
crime, if they see in their evil deeds a prospect of 
gratifying their unbridled passions. 

It appears from the recent " Report of the Board 
of Education of New Haven," that the number of 
juvenile offenders, under seventeen years of age, ar- 



64 

rested in that city ^during the last three years, was 
as follows : — 

In 1866, " . 196 

" 1867, 204 

" 1868, 216 

The number of crimes specified was forty-seven ; 
most of which were against " property and person," 
" and among them theft, personal assault, burglary, 
fighting, trespass, malicious mischief, &c, were con- 
spicuous." Dark as this picture is, a deep shadow 
is thrown over it by the fact that many of the 616 
offenders were connected with the public schools, and 
seventy or more were girls. 

No record has been kept to show the number of 
juvenile offenders in this city, but we think it is some- 
what less than it is in New Haven. Still we have cause 
for solicitude rather than rejoicing. The monthly re- 
ports which the teachers make to me show that there 
is much waywardness among the youth of our schools. 
In addition to the offences committed against the pecu- 
liar laws of the school-room, we find the following : 
" habitual laziness, willful disobedience, truancy, vul- 
garity, profanity, lying, fighting, stealing, forgery." 

The grosser offences are rarely committed except by 
the pupils in the Grammar Schools, and only by a few 
of these. But vice is infectious, and wrong example 
propagates itself with fearful rapidity. Consequently 
there is necessity for vigorously repressing the wrong 



65 

and strengthening the right. One incendiary, at large, 
fills a city with dread, makes sleep a weariness, and 
places property at discount. Crime grows : the petty 
thief becomes a burglar ; the burglar, an assassin. 
The forger of an excuse for absence becomes a forger 
of notes and checks ; and, if skilful, if well educated, 
his "irregularities" may send dismay into the hearts of 
the shrewdest bankers. 

The home influence of some of these pupils is ex 
ceedingly unfavorable. Indifference to study, disrespect 
for school regulations, and falsehood and truancy, are 
sometimes fostered in children by their parents. We 
would not attempt to prescribe any peculiar style 
of family life ; yet we can, nay, we must, recognize 
the fact that judicious and constant efforts are re- 
quired in the schools to counteract the baneful in- 
fluence of a certain class of homes. In those places 
where every kindly feeling and noble aspiration 
should be cherished, where virtue and childish inno- 
cence should be guarded with ceaseless care, youth 
are in peril ! 

The street life of a city must not be forgotten. Its 
influence, like the noxious miasma, is diffusive. Youth- 
ful mischief finds here a convenient theatre for display, 
and children fresh from the sanctities of the purest 
homes are liable to be poisoned by the moral atmos- 
phere which they breathe. 

The popular vices of society are well known. The 

8 



66 

tricks of ordinary trade, the cheats of commerce and of 
politics, the reckless and dishonest speculations of 
many who wish to be deemed respectable, open profli- 
gacy that flings inherited fortunes to the winds, and 
inebriety that mocks the dignity of man and brutalizes 
the finest sensibilities of the soul, need no discussion 
in a report like this ; but they are perils from which 
we should protect our children, as we would shield them 
from the plague. 

A wound inflicted upon the body may be healed by 
the restorative processes of nature, but a character once 
tarnished seldom regains its lustre. If we contemplate 
for a moment the struggles of a youth through the trials 
of boyhood, along the treacherous paths of early man- 
hood, and amid the sharp conflicts of public life, we 
may form a tolerable estimate of the value of a charac- 
ter embracing the higher virtues, and animated by a 
lively and intelligent faith in truth, humanity, and God. 
The advantage to the individual, and, through the indi- 
vidual, to society and the State, springing from right 
culture, indicates the position moral teaching should 
hold in a system of public education. Society has an 
interest in this matter whose magnitude cannot be ex- 
pressed by the limited standards of value known to the 
market, or compassed by the ordinary range of thought. 
Government by the people, by all the people, is impos- 
sible, except upon the conditton of general education 
which shall be moral as well as intellectual. On this 



67 

point the voice of history is emphatic. In every age, 
a growing waywardness of the young has preluded 
national debasement. In all the great crises which 
have marked the history of nations, moral integrity, 
rather than intellectual acuteness, has proved the safe- 
guard of public interests. Wisdom teaches us to heed 
the voice of the ages. 

Should our schools only send forth youth with mental 
faculties sharpened for shrewd and vigorous activities, 
and with ambition burning for power and posts of 
honor, and with vicious morals, they might justly be 
regarded as sources of pestilence and ruin. 

The value of a man to society springs mainly from 
his virtue, for out of true virtue comes every social 
good. While, therefore, a jealous watchfulness is 
exercised relative to the mental culture of the young, 
their moral development should be the object of the 
highest solicitude. 



*t> j 



Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. TWOMBLY, 

Superintendent of Public Schools. 



December, 1868. 



68 

ihigkh: school 

GEADUATES. 



Barker, Arabella W. 
Blood, Martha 
Delano, Pamelia E. 
Draper, Lucy A. 
Draper, Anna E. 



Bates. Lizzie P. 
Bigelow, Martha A. 
Chandler, Eliza A. 
Crozier, Caroline S. 

Archer, Sarah E. 
Caswell, Agnes E. 
Carrigil, Lydia P. 
Everett, Frances E. 
Hall, Laura E. 
Knight, Phebe A. 
Lothrop, Martha 
Moulton, Abby 

Bates, Linnie G. 
Bigelow, Caroline E. 



Cook, Cornelia A. 
Dadley, Harriet A. T. 
Fuller, Mary Jane 
Gilmore, Lucy A. 
Hartshorne, Helen W. 
Perkins, Rebecca M. 
Pook, Jemima D. 
Preble, Elizabeth E. 



1851. 
Hunt, Olive C. 
King, Susan E. 
Knight, Sarah J. 
Marr, Helen 
McKay, Eliza J. 

1852. 
Foster, Ellen 
Gulliver, Sarah E. 
Lund, Annie M. 
Lewis, Ann A. 

1853. 
Miskelly, Josephine E. 
Pratt, Maria A. 
Tillson, Elizabeth M. 
Underbill, Anna E. 
Wingate Abbie A. 

Bradford, Joseph M. 
Dusseault, Edward, Jr. 

1854. 
Foster, Mehitable 
Lothrop, Mary F. 

1855. 
Sewall, Josephine 
Studley, Mary E. 
"Worcester, Julia A. 

Abbott, Henry H. 
Blood, George W. 
Devens, Richard 
Flint, Alden S. 



Moulton, Emily A. 
Phipps, Abby A. 
Veazie, Margaret 

McMahan, Lawrence S. 
Prescott, Edward. 

Norton, Julie 
Smith, Adaline M. 



Forster, George H. 
Hastings, Francis 
Parker, Edward, Jr. 
Parsons, John E. 
Ranlett, David D. 
Sewall, Charles H. 



Smith, Hariette Marie 
Pasco, Samuel 

Frothingham, Francis E. 
Frothingham, John B. 
Gay, George F. 
Hobart, John L. 
Plaisted, George O. 
Sawtell, James A. 
Warren, Lucius H. 
Underhill, Elihu T. 



69 



Brackett, Caroline A. 
Bradford, Amy A. 
Brooks, Sarah 
Brown, Maria 
Flint, Josephine M. 
Harrold, Susan P. 
Hopkins, Mary J. 
Lane, Ellen W. 

Bailey, Mary A. 
Banfield, Abbie F. 
Boyd, Georgianna 
Brown, Ellen A. 
Burnett, Charlotte E. 
Byrnes, Constance W. 
Caswell, Nancy M. 
Clark, Abbie M. 



Blanchard, Catharine A. 
Carr, Carrie 
Chapman, Sarah E. 
Childs, Julia E. 
Curtis, Mary 
Goldthwait, Mary F. 
Patterson, Louisa 
Peirce, Ellen B. 
Peirce, Kate B. 

Bancroft, Mary A. 
Browne, Emily B. 
Clark, Sarah H. 
Curtis, Fanny 
Hall, Sarah H. 
Huntley, Ella M. 
Kimball, Harriet F. 



1856. 
Lewis, Hannah M. 
Lovett, Harriett E. 
Phipps, Sarah C. 
Sawyer, Hannah M. 
Swords, Emily F. 
Tappan, Ellen E. 
Whittier, Harriet F. 

18 5-7. 
Hamilton, Elizabeth M. 
Hill, Sarah C. 
Hunt, Susan B. 
James. O. Theresa, 
Sawyer, Marie J. 
Smith, Maria J. 
Spinney, Laura A. 
Swan, Abby L. 

1858. 
No Graduates. 

1859. 
Sawyer, Mary C. 
Whitney, Mary H. G. 
Woodman, Sarah H. 
White, Evelina 
Willey, Clara E. 
Yeaton, Elizabeth W. 

Bailey, Andrew J. 
Buchanan, Boberdeau 

1860. 
Knight, Ellen T. 
Knight, Charlena 
Lake, Orilla A. 
Lamson, Susan H. 
McKay, Mary M. 
Putnam, Helen M. 
Sawyer, Mary C. 



Bowman, Selwin Z. 
Carr, George E. 
Everett, Edward F. 
Fisher, John W. 
Frothingham, Thomas G. 
Hubbard, William G. 
Ranlett, S. Alonzo 



Todd, Sarah D. 
Wheeler, Ellen M. 

Damon, Curtis 
Edmands, A. W. 
Gilmore, Kelsey M. 
Stinson, Frank F. 



Cushing, Stephen, Jr. 
Gould, Arthur F. 
Huntington, Samuel E. 
Hutchins, Edgar A. 
Hobart, Albert W. 
Merrill, Alfred 
Sewall, Moses B., Jr. 



Smith, Julia A. 
Watts, Martha F. 

Barnes, Horace F. 
Gammell, Sereno D. 
Knight, Frank 
Lee, James H. 



70 



Lockwood, Frederick 
Poor, Edward H. 
Priest, John T. 

Butts, Prances B. 
Carr, Anna E. 
Childs, Esther S. 
Coffin, Martha A. 
Dadley, Victoria A. M. L 
Delano, Amelia D. 
Gary, Helen S. 
Getchell, Abby V. 
Grubb, Augusta 

Bailey, Elizabeth B. 
Bailey, Emma F. 
Briggs, Mellissa E. 
Brown, Sarah E. 
Cutter, Caroline A. 
Downing, Susan E. 
Prothingham, Mary C. 
Johnson, Hattie E. 



Baker, Mary E. 
Blanchard, Abbie H. 
Delano, Almira 
Gardner, Emily S. 
Hill, Mary E. 
Hodgkins, Lydia C. 

Bradford, Sarah P. 
Blanchard, Ellen P. 
Clapp, Margaritta 
Prothingham, Margaret S, 
Gary, Pannie H. 



1860. 
Sampson, Chandler 
Stone, Phineas J., Jr. 
Whitman, James H. 

1861. 
Hayward, Augusta S. 
Knight, Lauretta P. 
McDonald, Harriet J. 
Peverley, Julia 
Prichard, Mary G. 
Sewall, Helen J. 
Simonds, Lucy J. 
Stone, Mary G. 
Tilden, Charlotte M. W. 

18G2. 
Johnson, Sarah H. 
Langmaid, Mary A. 
Little, Annie E. 
Littlefield, Augusta A. 
Merrill, Henrietta 
Smith, Mary L. 
Swan, Anna M. 
Todd, Georgianna 

1863. 
Huntington, Anna W. 
Lewis, Sarah E. 
Mullikin, Susan R. 
Osgood, Ellen S. 
Richardson, Abby P. 
Rice, Lizzie G. 

1864. 
Hanlen, Georgianna 
Holmes, Mary E. 
Kenrick, Martha M. 
Sampson, Olive H. 
Shaw, Ella J. 



Wiley, John C 



Todd, Charlotte 
Williams, Martha 

Adams, Sydney E. 
Brower, Henry, Jr. 
Sampson, Prank G. 
Tufts, Nathan F. 



Thayer, Mary J. 
Turner, Hannah M. 

Brown, Edwin C. 
Kettell, George A. 
Lawrie, Charles F. 
McDonald, James P. 
Preston, William H. 
Weston, Henry C. 

Stetson, Susan C. 

Cutter, Leonard F. 
Leverett, George "V. 
Parker, James O. 



Weston, Nancy E. 
Sweetser, Isaac H. 



71 



Farnsworth, Jane E. 
Hall, Eliza S. 
Hall, Susan H. 
Hunt, Susan E. 
Hintz, Jennie E. 
Hurd, Ida O. 
Jones, Emma C. 
Keefe, Anastasia M. 
Manning, Emma C. 

Adams, Sarah H. 
Aanold, Carrie M. 
Anderson, Lizzie L. 
Frotlringham, Matilda 
Langmaid, Georgianna P. 
Leonard, Wilhelmina E. 
Linscott, Abby E. 
Moulton, Hannah E. 

Bolan, Maria L. 
Butler, Cora E. 
Carlton, J. Annie 
Doughty, Elora H. 
Elanders, Ellen E. 
Goodwin, Georgiana E. 
Greene, Emma H. 
Holt, Lelia N. 
Humphrey, Mary H. 

Bond, Elmira J. 
Burroughs, Emma A. 
Coburn, Annie C. 
Condin, Margaret 
Dana, Mary S. 
Eliott, Lucy C. 
Hooper, Grace 



1865. 
Osgood, Mary A. 
Sprague, Annie S. 
Stone, Ruth A. 
Tilden, Laura E. 
Tuck, Mary E. 
Tyler, Maria L. 
Underhill, Emma G. 
Willis, Emma F. 
Whittemore, Persis M. 

1866. 
Morse, Mary E. 
Norton, Lizzzie B. 
Simonds, Susie F. 
Smith, Anna P. 
Swain, Mary P. 
Swords, Annie M. 
Thomas, Emma F. 
Tufts, Emma K. 

1867. 
Hunnewell, Addie D. 
Magoun, Isabella E. 
Mayers, Laura A. 
Murphy, Mary A. S. 
Parkinson, Ella F. 
Parsons, Hannie B. 
Reilly, Anna M. 
Robinson, Emma F. 
Sawyer, Julia F. 

1868. 
Knight, Martha D. 
Linscott, Annabell 
Osgood, Elizabeth H. 
Pippy, Mary C. 
Trull, Annette F. 
Welch, Carrie F. 
Worth, Ella 



Witherell, Nancy K. 
Woodman, Caroline E. 
Yeaton, Mary R. 

Childs, Nathaniel 
Coburn, Edwin R. 
Locke, Warren A. 
Swan, Alfred S. 



Tuttle, Mary A. 
Tyler, Emma B. 
Varney, Abby O. 
Willson, Lizzie 

Kettell, Charles W.. 
Murphy, James 
Sweetser, Frank E. 

White, Nannie H. 

Beard, James F. 
Bradford, William 
Hutchins, Constantine F. 
Mahew, Wilmot M. 
Pickering, James W. 
Wellington, J. Frank 



Chase, Charles W. 
Clausen, Albert C. 
Currier, Otis H. 
Harmon, Benjamin F. 
Locke, Bradford H. 
Rand, Alfred 



SCHOOL RETURNS AT THE SEMI-ANNUAL EXAMIANTIONS-1868. 



Term E nding February 29, 1868. 

S ! 



HIGH, GRAMMAR & INTERMEDIATE 1 1 

SCHOOLS. IS J I 



O i> 



0) o 

o g 



•S I gr§ c 



! 31 60: 107 1581 58j 100: 1521 153 

High School | 16V 404! 404 6311 3191 312 632! 598 

Bunker Hill School , 80!, g 2 5; 350 627: 294; 333 552 560 

Warren School ...I 67;, « 336 : 31G 523 2 73 250! 469 484 



"Wiuthrop School 

Harvard School 

Prescott School 

Intermediate School, No. 1, 
Intermediate School, No. 2, 



65 J>! 375! 345J 4261 217 

72, l' 343 343! 513 251 

68 V 53 46 ! 77! 44 

9 || 59, 44 ■_ 76 41 

10 1) 1955 1955 3031 1497 

1 



391! 



209, 


456 


404 


262; 


552 


462 


33 


53 


60 


35' 


55 


56 






135 
18 



10 bo 

1-1 a 



.-< a i f 5 



Term Ending August 31, 186b. 



a o 



23 
613 

9| 618 
4| 519| 
9 417 



21 



492 
77 
76 



1534 29212777 196 2835 



159| 591 100! 141] 531 88 
691] 345 346 515 255 260 
713, -334! 379 550 257: 293 



592 248 344 

455 234 221 

547: 278; 269 

88 48| 40 

114! 56! 58 



507| 234^ 273 417 492 
373 192! 18lj 352 845 



447 
63 
•74 



305 1 3359 16021757 26701287,1383 '2545 2541; 202 2468 




2223 225 431 434 
37i 26! 50! 49 
37| 37| 56! 52 



° j Primary Schools. 



TEACHERS NAMES. 



District No. 1. 
Helen G. Turner, 
Lucy M. Small, 

15. W. Yeaton, 

Lizzie M. Tate, 
Frances A. Harden. 
Mary E. Tuck, 
Hose J. Prescott. 

District No. 2. 

M. Josephine Smith. 
Malvina B. Skilton, 
A. P. Richardson, 
M. J. A. Conley. 

District No. 3. 



Location of Pri- 
mary School 
Houses. 



Term Kndinp; Pel 1 



ruary 29th, 1868. 



fc'o 



14 Jennie D. Smith, 

15 Frances M. Lane, 

16 Ellen Hadley, 
M. A. Blanchard, 
Alrnira Delano. 



District No. 4. 

Martha Yeaton, 
H. C. Easterbrook, 
Susan E. Etheridge, 
Frances B. Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress 
Carrie C. Smith. 

District No. 5. 



25 Louisa A. Pratt, 

26 E. A. Prichard, 

27 E. It. Brower, 

28 C. C. Brower, 

29 Emma C. Jones, 

30 Mary E. Taylor, 

31 Matilda Gilman. 

District No. 6. 

32 Ellen M. Armstead, 
33'C. W. Trowbridge, 
34|Sarah E. Smith, 

35 C. M. W. Tilden, 
36|Carrie A. Rea, 
37|Fannie A. Foster. 



Haverhill Street, 
Cor. Charles ) 
& B. II. Sts. ) 



Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 



do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 
do. 



Mead Street, 
Mead " 
Mead " 
Mead " 



Sullivan Street, 
Sullivan " 
Medford " 
Cross " 

Cross " 



Bunker Hill St. 
Bunker Hill " 
Moulton " 

Moulton " 

Moulton " 

Moulton " 



Common Street, 
Common " 
Common " 
Common " 
Common " 
Common " 



Soley 



Bow Sjtreet, 
Bow " 
Bow " 
Bow " 
Richmond Street. 
Richmond " 



76 



65 39 



109 

60 
150 
96 



63 
10, 
9,' 
99 

88 
112 



100 
104 
10(1 
70 
85 
90 
86 



10S 
151 
90 
96 
123 
118 



82j 40 



41 



(26 1700 



54 
94 
41 
45 
52 
57 
1626 



53 



54 
57 
64 
59 
59 
_53 
2048 



55 26 



28 
20 
37 
29 
31 
20 
1059 



989 



42 
47 
25 
37 
37 
45 
1536 



24 
20 
15 
22 
23 
24 
838 



3 


5 




10 


62 


i 


25 


58 




25 


57 




13 


54 




26 


55 




9 


02 




25 


44 


3 


26 


55 




19 


55 




21 


55 


1 


S3 


56 




26 


66 




28 


70 




22 


60 




26 


66 




26 


66 




25 


60 




15 


73 




20 


55 




15 


77 




28 


82 




25 


53 




15 


55 




15 


48 




13 


55 




19 


58 




12 


42 




16 


40 




15 


51 


1 


18 


54 




27 


57 




10 


64 




15 


59 




14 


59 




21 


53 




698 


2042 


6 



459 



Primary Schools. 



TEACHERS NAMES. 



District No. 1". 

Helen G. Turner, 

Lucy M. Small, 

E. W. Yeaton, 
Lizzie M. Tate, 
Frances A. Marden, 
Mary E. Tuck, 
Rose J. Prescott. 

District No. 2. 

M. Josephine Smith. 
Mary H. Humphrey. 
Abbie P. Richardson. 
M. J. A. Conley. 

District No. 3. 

Jennie D. Smith, 
Frances M. Lane, 
Ellen Hadley, 
M. Anna Blanchard, 
Almira Delano. 

District No. 4. 

Martha Yeaton, 
H. C. Easterbrook, 
Susan E. Etheridge, 
Frances B. Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress. 
Carrie C.Smith. 

District No. 5. 

Louisa. A. Pratt, 
E. A. Prichard, 
E. R. Brower, 
C. C. Brower, 
Emma C. Jones, 
Mary E. Taylor, 
Matilda Gilman. 

District No. 6. 

Ellen M. Armstead, 
C. W. Trowbridge, 
Sarah E. Smith, 
C. M. W. Tilden, 
[Carrie A. Rea, 
Fannie A. Foster. 



Term Ending August 31st, 1868. 



81 33 



7 J 



60 
110 

70 

80 
102 

74 



65 



63 

60 
91 
85 
88 
58 
2646 



34 



£ o 



-f 



30 
26 
49 
40 
44 
33 
1334 131212226 



25 
24 
41 
38 
30 
30 
1124 



34 

34 

' 37 

38 

23 

1102 



52 
54 
40 
46 
60 
59 

52 

45 
53 
48 
39 
49 
43 



46 
50 

50 
52 
60 
44> 44 

17501784 



15 



20 
30 

re 

• 23 
32 
29 



22 

22 
31 
26 
30 

2S 
"917! 86 





» 




<3 . 










z 


lO C3 








a, o 




> 




O 


22 


67 


23 


57 


22 


51 


17 


59 


36 


77 


19 


76 


27 


73 


20 


58 


20 


69 


33 


78 


30 


' 55 



31 


72 


27 


67 


25 


73 


27 


75 


28 


. 62 


32 


59 


24 


63 


22 


55 


23 


62 


2.i< 


. 81 


30 


67 


23 


55 



20 


50- 


28 


66 


26 


57 


14 


43 


23 


67 


18 


49 


24 


- 52 


28 


58 


19 


75 


26 


75 


30 


6S 


10 


53 1 


67 


2224! 



SUB-COMMITTEES ON 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

DISTRICTS. 



Geo. H. Yeaton. 



5:Wm. R. Bradford. 
OChas. H. Bigelow. 
6 Geo. W. Gardner. 
14 
8 



14 

5 Wm. Peirce. 
13 Win. H. Finney. 



11 



3Chas. F. Smith. 

3 Geo. H. Ma'rden. 
11 A. J. Locke. 
11 



10 



John Sanborn. 
M. H. Merriam. 
Nahum Chapin. 



Jas. F. Southworth. 
O. F. Safford. 
Jas. F. Hunnewell. 



Abram E. Cutter. 
Geo. A. Hamilton. 
10 Stacy Baxter. 

7 



11 
5 

308 



The whole number during the Term ending February, 186 



8, is unusually large, in consequence of re-districting. 



F. A. DOWNING, (e. e.) 

Secretary School Committee.