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Full text of "Annual report of the School Committee of the City of Charlestown"

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ANNUAL KEPORT 



OF THF, 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



OF THE 



U^ ^f €|(irf05f#»tt,. 



TOGETHER WITH THE 



Report of tie SDperintenileit of Piiic Scliools, 



FOR THE YEAR 1869. 




BOSTON : 
ARTHUR W. LOCKE & CO., PRINTERS, 120 MILK STREET. 

1870. 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE. 



1869. 

EUGENE L. NORTON, Mayor, ex-officio. 

ANDREW J. BAILEY, Pres. of the Common Council, ex-officio. 

WARD 1. — William JPeirce, A. E. Cutter, James F. Hunnewell, 
Geo. A. Hamilton, Wm. R. Bradford, J. W. Raiid. 

WARD 2. — John Sanborn, Andrew J. Locke, Nahum Chapin, 

M. H. Merriam, Wm. Raymond, Washington Lithgow. 

t 
WARD 3. — Geo. W. Gardner, Wm. H. Finney, Charles F. Smith , 

Geo. H. Harden, John Turner, Chas. E. Daniels. 

1870. 

WM. H. KENT, Mayor, ex-officio. _ - 

J AS. ADAMS, Jr. President of the Common Council, eoc-officio. 

WARD 1. — William Peirce, A. E. Cutter, James F. Hunnewell, 
Geo. A. Hamilton, Wm R. Bradford, Willard Rice. 

WARD 2. — John Sanborn, Na^um Chapin, M. H. Merriam, 
Wm. Raymond, Washington Lithgow, S. S. Blanchard. 

WARD 3. — Geo. W. Gardner, Wm. H. Finney, Chas. F. Smith, 
John Turner, Charles E. Daniels, A. J. Bailey. 



CITY OF CHARLESTOWN. 



In School Committee, September 16, 1869. 
Messrs Gardner, Finney and Cutter were appointed a Com- 
mittee to prepare the Annual Report. 

Attest: F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



In School Committee, December 30, 1869. 
Mr. Finney submitted the Annual Report of the School 
Committee which was accepted ; and it was ordered that eight hun- 
dred copies be printed for distribution. 

Attest : F. A. DOWNING, 

Secretary. 



REPORT. 



The School Committee of Charlestown present the 
following Annual Report for 1869 : 

ORGANIZATION OF THE BOARD. 

In accordance with the rules, and the custom of pre- 
vious years, the Board was organized at the first meeting 
in January, as follows : 

For President Geo. W. Gardner. 

For Secretary F. A. Downing. 

For Treasurer W. H. Finney. 

For Messenger Abijah Blanchard. 

At the second meeting in January the President ap- 
pointed the sub-Committees on the various schools, and 
also the following 

STANDING COMMITTEES. 

On Finance. — A. J. Locke, Wm. Peirce, Chas. E. Daniels. 
On Boohs. — Wm. H. Finney, Jas. F. Hunnewell, Geo. A. Hamilton. 
On Printing. — Wm. R. Bradford, Nalium Chapin, J. W. Rand. 
On Fuel. — John Sanborn, Wm. Raymond. 



6 

On School Houses. — A. J. Bailey, M. H. Mei*riam, Nahum Cliapin, 

Geo. A. Hamilton, Chas, F. Smith. 
On Music. — Chas. F. Smith, JoI?h Turner, Washington Lithgow. 
On Examination of Teachers. — Geo. W. Gardner, A. E. Cutter, 

Wm. H. Finney, C. F. Smith, Geo. H. Harden, A. J. Locke, 

M. H. Merriam. 
On Evenmg Schools. — M. H. Merriam, Wm. H. Finney, Geo. H. 

Marden, A. E. Cutter, Nahum Chapin. 



At subsequent meetings, several changes were made 
in relation to the future organization of the Board and 
the method of appointing Standing Committees. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The following table shows the amount of general ex- 
penses under direction of the School Committee, from 
March 1, 1869, and the amount appropriated therefor 
by the City Council for the year ending Feb. 28, 1870. 

Expended. Appropriated. 

For Salaries of Teachers, Messenger, 

Secretary and Treasurer $56,124 82 $76,225* 

Salary of Superintendent 1,875 00 2,500 

Support of Evening Schools 130 66 1,200 

Purchase of Pianos . . .*. 2,500 00 2,500 

Incidental Expenses 12,400 21 13,150 

Total $73,030 69 $95,575 

*The sum appropriated for salaries -will be increased by the amount to be 
received from the State School Fund. 



It is probable that the expenses for the remainder of 
the financial year for each of the items in the above 
table, with the exception of " Incidental Expenses," 
will come within the appropriations. 

The amount expended thus far for " Incidentals" has 
been largely increased beyond the expectations of the 
Board at the commencement of the year, by reason of 
its assuming the cost of new seats, desks &c., in the 
room in the City Hall, which has been fitted up for the 
use of a portion of the High School, and in various 
otrhe schools, which should have properly been charged 
to the account of Alterations and Repairs under the 
direction of the City Government. The Committee on 
City Property having however exhausted the amount of 
their appropriations in making needful repairs and in the 
proper care of the school buildings, it was thought best 
to have the cost of these seats, &c,, charged to the 
school appropriations. 

The following is the account of the Treasurer in rela- 
tion to the condition of the Trust Fund. The principal 
of this fund consists of two City notes amounting to 
$5,600, the interest on which is applicable for the 
support of schools. 



8 

Wm. H. Finney, Treasurer^ 

In account with the Trustees of Gharlestown Free Schqols. 
1869. Dr. 

To Balance from old acct $511 17 

Cash reed, for 12 mos. int. on note of $5000 300 00 

" " " " " " " $600 36 00 

" " " tuition of non-resident pupils 27 00 

" " " sale of old table 8 00 

Total $882 17 

1869. Cr. 

By Cash paid H. B. & W. O. Chamberlain $ 58 00 

" " A. E. Cutter •• 21140 

" " Lawrence, Wilde & Hull 80 00 

Balance to new account 532 77 

Total $882 17 

Charlestown, December 30, 1869. — "We, the undersigned, hereby 
certify that we have examined the above account, and find the items 
therein contained properly vouched for, and the balance as above 
stated $532 77, of which amount $400 is on deposit in the Charles- 
town Five Cents Savings Bank, upon which interest has accrued 
from April, 1867. 

ANDREW J. LOCKE, -j „. 

/ jfmance 

C. E. DANIELS, [ Commitiee. 

WILLIAM PEIRCE, ) 



SALARIES OF TEACHERS. 

The Committee after due consideration, fixed the sa- 
laries to be paid to the several teachers as follows : 

Principal of High School $2,500 00 

Sub-Master " " 1,600 00 

First Assistant " " 825 00 

Second " " " 675 00 

Third and Fourth Assistants 575 00 

Principals of Grammar Schools, each 1,800 00 

Sub-Masters " " " 1 ,400 00 

Head-Assistants " " " 650 00 

Assistants " " " 1st year. 500 00 

" '< " " 2nd " 550 00 

Teachers of Intermediate Schools, each 575 00 

" " Primary " 1st year, each 500 00 

". " " " 2nd " " 550 00 

Music Teacher 1,000 00 

The above Schedule shows an advance in some cases 
over the salaries for 1868. Notwithstanding this advance 
it will be found that the teachers of this city are not so 
well paid for their services, on the average, as those of 
the cities in the immediate neighborhood. There is no 
reason known to the Committee why this city should 
not pay as much compensation to her school teachers as 
most other cities and towns in this vicinity. Many 
teachers have been called away during the past year 
by offers of higher salaries than they were receiving 
here. If it is considered desirable to retain faithful 

2 



10 

and. competent teachers ; if the theory is correct that 
it requires special preparation and study for the pro- 
fession of teaching ; it will be necessary in self-de- 
fence, if for iQo higher motive, to offer sufficient com- 
pensation to retain our best teachers, and induce the 
highest talent to seek our schools. 

MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. 

The Committee have held during the year twenty-two 
meetings, at which the general subject of education, and 
various details connected with the management and 
progress of the schools, have received full consideration. 
But the number of meetings of the Board by no means 
indicates the amount of labor performed by its members. 
There have been frequent meetings of the various Stand- 
ing Committees, on subjects involving a good deal 
of time and thought. The general supervision of the 
schools, the consideration of applications for situations 
as teachers, the examinations, the investigation of com- 
plaints from teachers, parents, and scholars, together 
with many other similar duties, consume much time, re- 
quire much thought, and render the office of a member of 
the School Committee an exceedingly onerous one to 
such as strive to faithfully perform its duties. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The Course of Study adopted by the Board in 1867, 
was deemed an experiment — it was not claimed that it 



11 

was perfect, or that it would fit each mdividual scholar ; 
neither was it expected that it could be immediately 
conformed to in all the classes in the various schools, 
inasmuch as it was based upon a general advance along 
the whole line, commencing with the Primary Schools. 
The change of some of the text books since the adoption 
of this Course, and the experience gained in the practi- 
cal workings of the system, have rendered it necessary 
to make some modifications. 

Early in the year a special Committee was appointed, 
consisting of the Chairmen of the High and Grammar 
Schools, to revise the Course of Study, and make their 
report to the Board. This Committee gave consi- 
derable attention to the subject and reported at the 
last meeting in 1869. 

The report was ordered to be printed for the use of 
the Board, and will be presented for its consideration 
at an early meeting. 

A Course of Study has been termed a ' necessary evil." 
It is certainly an "evil" if it causes the teacher to lose 
his individuality, puts him in a tread-mill and confines 
his teaching to hearing recitations of the text contained 
within a certain number of pages in a book. On the 
other hand, it is " necessary" that there should be some 
degree of uniformity in the several schools of the same 
grade in the city. The Committee do not believe that 
a proper arrangement of studies will necessarily pro- 
duce the evils mentioned ; and it is hardly needful for 



12 

the Committee to say, that they do not desire the tread- 
mill system of teaching, or to repress the individuality of 
the teacher. They do however expect the attainment 
of certain results, and a general conformity on the part 
of teachers to the spirit as well as the letter of the 
Course of Instruction. 

The Committee desire, in this connection, to recognize 
the importance of the cultivation of habits of study, and 
concentration of mind by the pupils, and at the same 
time to express their disapproval of undue pressure 
upon the scholars, and requiring them to perform long 
tasks out of school. The high pressure " cramming" 
system is an unhealthy one — it may produce ap- 
parently brilliant scholars — but the knowledge gained 
is often superficial, and at the expense of physical vigor, 
and of true development and symmetry of mind. 

Some complaint has been made by parents the past 
year of this undue pressure upon the children in their 
studies. In some instances these complaints have been 
well founded, and steps have been taken to remedy 
the evil. In other cases, it has been found that the 
listlessness of mind and languor of body have been 
caused by other influences than overwork in school. 
Parents who allow their children to be frequently de- 
prived of needed rest by attendance at dancing schools, 
evening parties and theatres, should be debarred from 
making complaint of overwork and pressure of their 
children at school. 



13 
DUTIES OF PARENTS TO THE SCHOOLS. 

The efficiency of our schools would be much in- 
creased by a more general co-operation and sympathy 
of parents with the teachers. Frequent visits should 
be made — the acquaintance of the teachers should be 
formed. By this means much friction would be avoided 
in the manasrement of schools. In this connection the 
Committee pr^^sent the following extract from a report 
of the Trustees of 1841, the suggestions being as ap- 
plicable now as they were twenty-eight years ago : 

" Let the parents be arrayed against the teacher 
and but little hope can be entertained of progress ; let 
them act with him, and it is a great step towards it 
Many are the ways in which this co-operation can be 
rendered. Parents can prevent absences ; they can 
enjoin confidence on the part of the scholars towards 
the teacher ; they can encourage pupils in their 
lessons ; they can promote a love of school duties ; 
they can insist upon entire obedience of their children 
to the rules of the school ; they can visit the school- 
rooms ; and they can at least practice the negative 
duty of refraining from the injustice of judging the 
teacher on the sole testimony of their children." 

The Committee would also quote the words of the 
Superintendent in his Second Semi- Annual Report, as 
follows : — '• One of the greatest hindrances to success 
in the work of education is the seeming indifference of 
parents." 



14 

Another duty of parents is to " stand up" for the 
schools. It is in no spirit of egotism or self-compla- 
cency, that the Committee express their belief that the 
schools of this city were never in better condition than 
they are now, and that they will compare favorably 
with those of most cities in the land. It is also the 
belief of the Committee that our schools are far su- 
perior to most private schools. Moreover, the public 
schools are not designed for any particular class of 
society — they are intended for the rich as well as the 
poor. Is it not then a duty which parents owe to their 
children and to the community, to avail themselves of the 
advantages of our public schools, rather than to send 
their children to private institutions ? 

EVENING SCHOOLS. 

The following abstract of the Report of the Com- 
mittee on Evening Schools is presented : 

The work of providing instruction for those who 
have been deprived of the advantages of our Com- 
mon Schools, although not among the legal require- 
ments of School Committees, is nevertheless within 
the scope of their duties as conservators of public 
instruction. The Board of School Committee, late 
in the year 1868 appointed a Committee, and asked 
for the appropriation of money, for the experiment of es- 
tablishing free evening schools in the winter of 1868-9. 
Six schools, four for males and two for females, employ- 



15 

ing twelve teacliers, were organized in the last week 
of December 1868, and continued for sixteen semi- 
weekly sessions. About three hundred scholars were 
enrolled ; but after substantial work succeeded the tem- 
porary excitement of novelty, the attendance was reduced 
to about one hundred and seventy-five. The schools 
became interesting, and notable progress was being 
made when they were necessarily suspended. The ex- 
periment seemed a successful one, and the Committee 
who had immediate charge of the work, recommended 
a repetition for the next winter. Accordingly the same 
Committee was appointed, and an adequate appropri- 
ation was made. Six schools were organized on the 1st 
of November 1869, but the number of pupils did not 
seem to warrant the Committee in continuing so many, 
and the number of schools has since been reduced to 
four — two for males and two for females. The number 
of pupils is about one hundred and twenty, most of 
whom have manifested great earnestness and interest in 
their studies. 

Due regard for the public welfare should ensure the 
continuance of these schools. 

SCHOOL ACCOMMODATIONS. 

The Committee are happy to announce, that in ac- 
cordance with the request of the Board, the City Coun- 
cil have adopted plans for tKe remodelling and enlarge- 
ment of the High School building. The thanks of the 



16 

community are due the City Government for their liberal 
and intelligent action in relation to this subject. 

While gratefully acknowledging what has been done 
for the accommodation of the High School, it is incum- 
bent upon the Committee, to point out the requirements 
for therelief of two of the Grammar Schools. 

Frequent requests have been made within a few years 
for better accommodations for the Harvard and Winthrop 
Grammar Schools. The Committee of the City Council, 
to whom the subject of a new school-house for the Har- 
vard School was referred in 1868, reported that a neces- 
sity for better accommodations existed,- but referred the 
matter to the next City Government. The matter has 
slumbered in the City Council ever since until recently, 
when the Committee on City Property reported ad- 
versely, giving as a reason, the statement that there are 
at present more seats than scholars in the Grammar 
Schools. The School Committee do not make complaint 
of a lack of seats — but of the location and unhealth- 
fulness of many of them. The Committee would re- 
peat, that the health of both teachers and scholars, and 
the attainment of needful results in instruction, require 
the erection of at least one new Grammar School-house 
the coming year, to relieve both the Harvard and Win- 
throp Schools. 

In regard to the matter of empty seats, it should be 
said that the schools are classified, not only in this city 
but throughout the State, in such a mannet as to require 



17 • 

pupils of equal attainments to occupy the same room 
and to be subject to one teacher. Without discuss- 
ing the subject of grading at this time, it is sufficient 
to remark, that under this system, which is almost uni- 
versally recognized as the true principle, it is not always 
possible to utilize every seat in a school. The greatest 
pressure for room exists in the lower classes, and it is 
evident that these scholars can not be transferred to 
empty seats in the rooms of the higher classes. 

Moreover, about 150 seats in the Winthrop School 
are utterly unfit in their present location for the accom- 
modation of scholars — they are situated in the basement 
and in rooms with little or no ventilation, — and both 
scholars and teachers are subject to many inconveniences 
and annoyances which sadly interfere with rapid progress 
and proper discipline. In regard to the Harvard School, 
the remarks above in relation to utilizing the vacant 
seats particularly apply, as a large proportion of the 
scholars " drop out" of school before reaching the 
higher classes. 

The building itself is in poor condition, and it would 
hardly be economy to spend , the amount necessary to 
make it tenantable without entirely remodelling and en- 
larging it. The internal arrangement of the building is 
bad — the rooms are small and inconvenient — not one 
of them is possessed of proper ventilation. It would 
seem that nothing need be said at this time in favor of 
pure air as a necessity to health, and a proper condition 

3 



18 

of mind to study : — and yet this subject is often entirely 
ignored in considering the wants of public schools. In 
consequence of the want of yards, and of thfe location 
of what should be OM^houses almost within the build- 
ing, the atmosphere in the entries, stairways, and even 
in the school-rooms during the greater part of the 
warm season is exceedingly foul and offensive. The 
playgrounds are the streets, thus subjecting the school, 
as well as the residents in the vicinity, to many annoy- 
ances and inconveniences. The school also suffers for 
want of a hall for general exercises and the practice of 
music. 

Some of the Primary Schools also require increased 
and improved accommodations, and the report of the Su- 
perintendent on this subject is concurred in By the 
Board. * 

The Committee have left the work of preparing a de- 
tailed report on the condition and requirements of the 
various schools, to the Superintendent. His report will 
be presented with this, and the attention of the citi- 
zens is invited to its statements, suggestions and recom- 
mendations. 

Eespectfully submitted on behalf of the Board. 

GEO. W. GARDNER, ^ 

WM. H. FINNEY, V Committee. 

A. E. CUTTER, ) 

Charlestown, December, 1869. 



REPORT 

OF THE 

Superintendent of Schools. 



To the School Committee of Charlestown : 

Gentlemen, — In accordance with your vote passed 
several months since, I present but one Report for the 
year 1869. This will cover the ground that would have 
been occupied by the sixth and seventh of the semi- 
annual series. 

The events of the year furnish occasion for expressions 
of gratitude to Him who is the source of all good. Our 
teachers and pupils have been generally favored with 
health, and the schools have been highly prosperous. 

With pleasui^ I commend the teachers for their 
ability and faithfulness. While very few deserve cri- 
ticism, many* are laboring with a spirit of sacrifice 
which, if not worthy of a better cause, is certainly stimu- 
lated by hopes of higher rewards than those which 
spring from the salaries they receive. 

Having made several hundred visits to the school 
rooms, and spent nearly four months in formally ex- 
amining classes, and availed myself of other means of 



20 

information respecting our schools, I can but regard 
them as a source of honorable prtde to our citizens. 
Though neither perfect, nor moving constantly with 
equal steps toward perfection, they are in a state of vi- 
gorous and healthful prosperity. 

SCHOOL STATISTICS. 

Accurate Statistics are valuable as indicating facts or 
general laws, and it might be expected that in educational 
documents the highest degree of correctness would 
be found. But vagueness and uncertainty are quite as 
likely to be met with there as elsewhere. In the school 
reports of a great city, the number of- pupils is placed 
at a figure but little less than one fourth of the entire 
population : this seems to indicate a remarkable de- 
gree of attention to education. A close examination, 
however, shows that there are no school districts in that 
city, that promotions are made semi-annually, that chil- 
dren attend where they please and may belong to half 
a dozen schools in a year, and the total number is the 
sum of all the names registered. The numerous and 
elaborately prepared tables of statistics, published by 
State Boards of Education, 'are rarely free from defects. 
If we look to them for information respecting the 
" number of scholars of all ages in the public schools," 
" the per cent, of attendance," " the aggregate length of 
the schools," " the number of children between 5 and. 15 
years of age in each town ," or "the comparative per- 



21 

centage of taxable property appropriated for the support 
of schools," we can obtain only approximate results. If 
we inquire concerning the number of Grammar Schools 
in the State, or respecting the number of pupils that 
annually complete the Grammar or High School course 
of study in the different cities and towns, we gain little 
or no light. 

If we attempt to compare the schools of similar cities 
or towns, we find such a want of uniformity of method 
in reporting facts, that it is quite impossible to arrive at 
a satisfactory result. 

To obviate in part these defects, an outline for a sta. 
tistical report was adopted by the Convention of New 
England Superintendents of Public Schools, held in Bos- 
ton, in May last, and was published in the October num- 
ber of the Massachusetts Teacher. If that form is 
followed by the gentlemen who gave it their approval, 
the public will be better informed in future than they 
have been heretofore, in regard to the relative standing 
of schools in our cities and chief towns. Its principal 
features will be adopted in this report. 

GROWTH OF CHARLESTOWN. 

Population in 1840, 11,484 

" " 1850, 17,216 

." " 1855, 21,742 

" " 1860, 25,063 

" " 1865, 26,398 

" " 1869, (estimated) 29,000 

These statistics do not include the Navy Yard or State Prison. 



22 

Number of persons in this city between 5 and 15 
years of age, on the first day of May in each year, from 



to ISby: 








1857, . . 


. . 4,838 


1864, . 


. . 5,798 


1858, . 


. . 4,243 


1865, . 


. . . 4,951 


1859, . 


. . 4,302 


1866, . 


. . 5,181 


1860, . 


. . 4,194 


. 1867, . 


. . 5,697 


1861, . 


. . 4,496 


1868, . 


. . . 5,824 


1862, . 


. . 4,946 


1869, . 


. , 5,929 


1863, . 


. . . 5,028 







Whole Number of School Buildings, ... 20 

One of these is occupied by the High School, five by Grammar 
Schools, and fourteen by Primary Schools. 

VALUE OF SCHOOL PROPERTY. 



High School Building, Monument Square, . . . $30,000 

New lot for use of High School, . . , . . 8,300 

Bunker Hill Grammar School-house, Baldwin Street, . 88,000 

Warren Grammar School-house, Summer Street, . . 97,000 

Prescott Grammar School-house, Elm Street, . . 45,000 
Winthrop Grammar School-house, corner Lexington and 

Bunker Hill Streets, 30,000 

Harvard Grammar School-house, Harvard Street, . . 25,000 

Primary School-house, Haverhill Street, . . . 2,500 

" " cor. Bunker Hill & Charles Streets, 20,000 

" " Mead Street, .... 15,000 

" " Sullivan Street, .... 2,500 

" " Cross Street, .... 2,400 

Two Primary School-houses, Medford Street, . . . 1,800 

Primary School-house, Bunker Hill Street, . . . 1,500 

" " Moulton Street, . . . . 15,000 



23 



" ' " Common Street, 

"^ " Soley Street, 

" " Bow Street, 

Two Primary School-houses, Richmond Street^ 

School-houses and lots, 
Pianos, Apparatus, Libraries, Globes, Maps, &c., 

Total value, . 



20,000 
1,000 
5,000 
6,000 

$416,000 
8,500 

$424,500 



Table showing the number of sittings in all the grades 
of schools, also the number of pupils and teachers on 
the 31st of October, 1869. 





Number of Sittings. 


No. of Pupils. 
Oct. 31st, 1869. 


No 
Oct 


Teachers 
31st, 1869 


High School, 


. 200 


257 




7 


5 G-rammar Schools, 


. 3017 


2665 




61 


38 Primary Schools, 


. 2128 


2118 




88 


2 Intermediate 
Schools, 


I 112 


137 




2 


Total . • . 


. 5457 


5177 




108 



The Intermediate Schools are located in Engine-houses. 
Whole number of sittings in school buildings, 5345. 



SCHOOL ATTENDANCE. 

Number of different scholars for the year ending July 17, 1869, 

about, 5,500 

Average number belonging, 4,988 

High School, 202 

Grammar .Schools, 2,602 

Intermediate Schools, 165 

Primary Schools, 2,019 



24 

Average attendance, c • 4,473 

High School, 191 

Grammar Schools, 2,428 

Intermediate Schools^ 135 

Primary Schools, 1 ,71 9 

Per cent of attendance in all the schools, 90 

" " in the Grammar Schools, 94 

Number of children between 5 and 15 years of age, habitually absent 

from the Public Schoools, about 1,300 

Number of children admitted to the Grammar Schools, 532 

In March, 199 

In September, 333 

Average age of scholars admitted to Grammar Schools, 9 years and 
4 months. 

From the Primary Schools, 400 

" " Intermediate " 132 

Many of the pupils admitted from the Intermediate Schools came 
to this city from the country, where their educational advantages had 
been very small ; and more than one half of them were from 11 to 
15 years of age. 
Average number of pupils belonging to the schools on the 

31st of October, 1857-58-59, 4,182 

Average number on the 31st of October, 1867-68-69, 5,144 

Increase in ten years, 962 

A comparison of the average attendance for the same years 

shows a gain of 966 

Number of scholars per teacher for the average num- 
ber of pupils in school. 

Oct. 31st, 1859. Oct. 31st, 1869. 

High School, 32 ...... 37 

Grammar Schools, ... 47 44 



25 

Intermediate Schools, . . 64 64 

Primary, " ... 69 56 

In all the Schools, . . . , 54 48 

The increase in the number of pupils for the past 
two years has been f ery small. 

The following table, which gives the number of births 
in this city for thirteen successive years, indicates the 
cause of the limited increase. 

Births in 1857, 834 

1858, 833 

1859, 738 

1860, .750 

1861, 756 

1862, 675 

1863, 621 

1864, 672 

1865, 583 

1866, « 605 

1867, 60S, 

1868, 725 

1869, 648 

The " Vital Statistics" of other cities reveal the fact 
that during the war there was a diminution of the num- 
ber of births » 

FINANCES. 

Valuation of the city, 1869, $25,698,500 

Whole amount of taxes assessed,. 421,230 80 

Number of Polls taxed, 7,674 GO 



26 

Sum appropriated for support of schools, 1869-70, . . . $95,475 00 
Cost of tuition in all the schools for the average num- 
ber of pupils belonging, for the year 1868-69, 13 96 

In the High School, 33 29 

" Grammar Schools, 1 6 45 

" Intermediate" 8 12 

" Primary " 9 33 

SCHOOL BUILDINGS. 

The school-houses in this city have been greatly im- 
proved within a few years. Two noble and costly build- 
ings have been erected, and some others, previously in 
use, considerably modified, so that most of our schools 
are n ow conveniently and pleasantly situated. Special 
attention has been given to heating^ to ventilation, and to 
the cleanliness of rooms and yards. In these and other 
particulars much has been accomplished during the pres- 
ent year. The committees having these matters in 
charge have labored with a wise liberality to make the 
school-houses convenient and attractive. 

Walker's Steam Heating Apparatus has been placed 
in the Bunker Hill Grammar School building, and so 
arranged as to heat that building and the Bunker Hill 
Primary School building. This system of heating is ex- 
cellent ; and the method of ventilation adopted in con- 
nection with it works admirably. 

The ventilation of the Primary school-houses is gen- 
erally good ; and most of the rooms were white- 
washed, painted, or papered in the summer vacation. 



27 

Two rooms in the Bunker Hill Primary School build- 
ing have been furnished with desks, and are now occu- 
pied. 

The expense for repairs and improvements for the 
year amount to nearly five thousand and five hundred 
dollars. This sum includes about one thousand dollars 
spent in repairing numerous damages occasioned by the 
September gale. 

While we congratulate our citizens upon the im- 
proved condition of the school-houses, it is proper to 
name some defects in order that they may be avoided in 
the erection of other buildings. 

The rooms occupied by the Primary Schools are gen- 
erally too small. Many of them are only 19 by 24 feet. 
In such rooms it is impossible to perform the educational 
work, that might be accomplished in rooms of suitable 
dimensions. They should not be less than 25 by 30 
feet. Then the desks might be so far removed from 
each other as greatly to diminish the temptation to whis- 
per and communicate ; many children could work at 
the blackboards at the same time, and necessary phy- 
sical exercises could be conveniently and properly 
conducted. The general lack of room is a serious dis- 
advantage. The buildings on Mead and Moulton streets 
are in many respects models ; they are substantial and 
sufiiciently elegant for the purpose for which they are 
employed ; but the rooms are quite too small. In the 
erection of other buildings, these might be • copied in 
style and general arrangement but not in dimensions. 



28 

Another fault is found in the location of the build- 
ings. Many are placed at the corners of streets ; and 
in not a few of them teachers and pupils are greatly 
^jannoyed, in the warm season of the year, by the noise 
arising from incessant travel. 

Much as has been accomplished in furnishing school 
accommodations, great improvements are still needed. 

The necessity for providing additional sittings, and 
conveniences for the High School is apparent to all who 
are acquainted with its condition. This subject was 
presented for your consideration, in my report for the 
term ending July, 1868, and has received your careful 
attention and favorable action ; and the City Council to 
which you referred the subject has, after mature delib- 
eration, passed an order authorizing the enlargement 
of the present building. Plans have been prepared by 
a skilful architect which, if finally carried out, will give 
us a building that in respect to elegance will suit the 
demands of public taste, and will furnish superior ac- 
commodations. 

It will contain three large study rooms, eight recitation 
rooms, and two play rooms. An obvious reason for 
enlargement is found in the membership of the school. It 
has now two hundred and fifty-seven pupils, and only two 
hundred seats. There is no probability that, with a fair 
management of all the schools, its number of pupils will 
diminish ; while there are valid reasons to hope that there 
will be a steady increase. 



29 

There is another reason for enlargement. This 
school has for a long time needed greatly increased 
facilities to teach the natural sciences. It is not possible 
under existing circumstances to give proper instruction 
■in chemistry, natural philosophy, natural history, botany, 
mineralogy, or astronomy. More room and more 
apparatus are needed. 

Better accommodations should be furnished for the 
Winthrop and Harvard Schools. It is not easy to decide 
which of these schools should receive the first attention. 
True economy would hasten to relieve both. The 
rooms in the basement of the Winthrop are dark, damp, 
and unhealthy ; the recitation rooms on the upper floors 
are small, poorly seated, and destitute of ventilation. 

The halls or study rooms are in mild weather ex- 
posed to the noise and dust of' the streets; and through 
the entire year the excercises in them are interrupted, 
several times a day, by the filing in and out of the lower 
classes.. This is an evil that cannot be fully appreciated 
except by those whose teaching is thus hourly disturbed. 

The rooms in the Harvard are all small, and as poorly 
ventilated as they can be. One half of them are in- 
sufiiciently lighted, and the classes occupying them are 
exposed to constant interruptions by scholars passing 
through from the corridors to the rooms in the rear. 
The partitions between the rooms are thin, consisting of 
single slides made of half-inch boards, consequently 
when four classes are earnestly engaged in recitation at 



30 

the same time, as frequently happens, the " confusion 
of tongues" naturally carries one back to the scenes of 
Babel. Besides this the number and character of the 
rooms are such as to interfere with the proper classifica- 
tion of the pupils. 

Generally, the Primary Schools are well accommodated; 
but some of those at the Point are crowded to overflow- 
ing, having over eighty pupils each. 

Efforts have been made to procure a room for the 
accommodation of a portion of these children, but none 
has been found. Efficient measures for relief should 
be immediately adopted. 



31 



PRIMARY SCHOOLS. 

The following table exhibits the organization of the Primary 

Schools : — 

District No. 1. 

Teacher. Location. 



Sch'l 



Helen G. Turner Haverhill Street 

Effie G. Hazcn cor. Charles & Bunker Hill Sta. 

Elizabeth B. Norton " " 

LiUa Barnard " " 

Mary H. Humphrey " " 

Ella Worth " " 

Rose J. Prescott " " 

Sarah A. Atwood " " 

Josie S. Chase " " 



District "No. 2. 



10 M. Josephine Smith Mead Street 

11 E. W. Yeaton " " 

12 Abby P. E-ichardson " " .... 

13 Melissa J. Conley " " 

District "No. 

14 Jennie D. Smith Sullivan Street.... 

15 Frances M. Lane " '* 

. 16 Ellen Hadley Medford " 

38 Carrie Osgood " " 

17 Mary A. Blanchard Cross " 

18 Almira Delano " " 



Committee. 



William H. Finney, 
John Turner, 
George H. Marden. 



Charles E. Daniels, 
A. J. Locke. 



William Pierce, 

■ Charles F. Smith, 

Wm. Raymond. 



District liTo. 4, 

Martha W. Yeaton Bunker Hill Street 1 

Mary P. Swain " " 

Persis M. Whittemore. Moulton Street 

Fannie B. Butts " " 

Louisa W. Huntress. .. . " " 

Carrie C. Smith '. . . . " " 

District No. 5. 

Louisa A. Pratt Common Street 

E. A. Prichard 

E. R. Brovrer 

C.C.Brower 

Evelina F. Nelson 

EffieA. Kettell 

Matilda Gilman Soley 

District Wo. 6, 

E. M. Armstead Bow Street ' 

Elizabeth F. Doane " " 

Sarah E. Smith " " 

C. M. W. Tilden " " ,, .. 

Carrie A. Rea Richmond Street. 

Fannie A. Foster " " ■ 



John Sanborn, 
■ Washington Llthgow, 
Nahum Chapin. 



James F. Hunnewell 
> M. H. Merriam, 
J. W. Rand. 



A. E. Cutter, 
■ Geo. A. Hamilton, 
William R. Bradford- 



<» 



82 

Two schools have been formed during the year, and 
located in the buildino: at the corner of Charles and 
Bunker Hill Streets. One, organized in the spring and 
composed of pupils of the lowest grade, was placed un- 
der the charge of Miss Sarah A. Atwood; the other, con- 
sisting of pupils from the higher classes, was opened at 
the beginning of the fall term, and placed under the care 
of Miss Mary A. Humphrey. Miss Josie S. Chase was 
appointed to fill the vacancy occasioned by the transfer 
of Miss Humphrey. In November Miss Mary E. Taylor 
tendered her resignation as teacher of school No 30, and 
Miss Effie A Kettell was appointed to fill the vacancy. 

All these schools are graded but two, Nos. 1 and 31. 
The method of grading has been dictated, in part, by the 
structure of the buildings. In some schools there are 
three classes, in others two. The graded system is op- 
perating well. 

The plan of making semi-annual promotions adopted 
by the Board two years ago has been partially tested, 
and will doubtless prove a saving of time to many chil- 
dren. 

The questions used in the examination for promotions 
to the Grammar Schools, in March, were prepared by 
myself, and the examinations were conducted by the 
principals of those schools, aided by their assistants. 
The result was entirely satisfactory. 

The examination for promotion in September was ar- 
ranged and conducted as the one in March, and was very 



33 

comprehensive, including all the subjects studied in the 
Primary Schools. 

The standard fixed upon was an average of seventy 
per cent, of correct ansvvers. This was not regarded 
as absolute, for some branches are of less importance 
than others ; still it served as a useful guide. The age 
and circumstances of pupils were considered in settling 
doubtful cases. Very few however were admitted who 
did not obtain the required per cent. 

This examination gave evidence of a want of attention 
in some of the Primary Schools to reading and the tables 
of abstract numbers. In reading, the examiners made 
the selection of pieces and marked at their discretion. 
The failures occurred to a large extent in schools com- 
posed of pupils whose home life is not favorable to 
rapid progress in knowledge, and who had been for a 
year or two under teachers of limited experience. Yet 
those who were admitted obtained an average in this 
branch of seventy-seven per cent, and more than one 
half ranged from eighty to one hundred per cent. 

The Primary Schools were never in as good condition 
as they are now : they were never before as fully, and, 
I think, never as accurately taught as they are now. 
Some of them are models of excellence, and are 
exerting a favorable influence upon other schools. 
Others, compared with the standard to which we wish 
to bring them, are in some particulars deficient. There 
is a want of that controlling influence which a teacher 



S4 

should exert, a lack of genial sympathy and of that 
inspiration which animates children to the performance 
of duty, or a failure properly to improve the time. 
Experience, observation, and careful stjjidy may remedy 
these defects. 

Nearly all the rooms occupied by these schools have 
been more or less ornamented by teachers and pupils, 
and some of them are quite attractive. Walls hung 
with pictures, and windows decorated with plants and 
flowers, give cheerfulness to teachers and scholars and 
help to blend true pleasure with duty. 

One difiiculty met with in these schools arises from 
the fact that many children have so few opportunities 
for home culture. They hear but little correct conver- 
sation, little or no good reading, and are very scantily 
supplied with suitable reading matter. Having care- 
fully considered the subject, I recommend that the 
schools having advanced classes, be supplied with a few 
carefully selected and appropriate books to be loaned 
to pupils as rewards for good conduct or good lessons. 
These books should be read at home, or at school after 
all the required study has been accomplished. The cost 
of books would be trifling, and an experiment in one or 
two schools would test the propriety of the measure. 

■ INTEEMEDIATE SCHOOLS. 



School. 


Teacher. 


LocatioTi. 


Committee. 


No.l. 


Lucy M. Small. 


WiNTHKOP St. 


W. Peikce. 


No. 2. 


Anna K. Steakns. 


Main St. 


John Turner. 



35 

There were three* schools of this grade at the opening 
of the year, but, in consequence of the reduction of 
their membership by promotions to the Grammar Schools 
in March, one of them was suspended, and the teacher, 
Miss Ginn, was transferred to the Warren Grammar 
School. Later in the season there was a large influx of 
pupils, and Miss Jennie E.Toby was employed as assist- 
ant in No. 2, during June and July. The schools have 
been very full for several weeks past, and efi"orts have 
been made, without success, to procure increased accom- 
modations. 

The children in these schools are from nine to fifteen 
years of age. 

The teachers are laboring with unremitting assiduity, 
and with marked success. 

One hundred and thirty-two scholars have been sent to 
the Grammar Schools during -the year. 

In respect to scholarship these schools are primary, 
and they are in no sense intermediate, * 



36 



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS. 

BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

Committee. — William H. Finney, Charles E, Daniels, John Turner. 

Teachers. — Alfred P. G-age, Principal ; H. F. Sears, Sub-master ; 
Abby'F. Crocker, Head Asst. ; Mary L. Coombs, Mary A. Eaton, 
Edith Howe, G-eorgie A. Smith, Emma S. Randlet, Mary S. 
Thomas, Nancy W. Chandler, AngeliaM. Knowles, Lydia S. Jones, 
Martha B. Stevens, Ida 0. Hurd. 

PRESCOTT SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Geo. H. Mar den, Geo. A. Hamilton, Washington 
Lithgow. 

Teachers. — George T. Littlefield, Principal ; F. W. Lewis, 
Sub-Master ; Mary G. Prichard, Head Asst. ; Martha M. Kenrick, 
Mary C. Sawyer, Elizabeth J. Farnsworth, Julia C. Powers, Ellen 
C. Dickinson, Lydia A. Sears, Georgianna T. Sawyer, Frances C. 
Cragin. . . 

WARREN SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Charles F. ^paith, Abram E. Cutter, William 
Peirce, William Raymond. 

Teachers. — Geo. Swan, Principal ; Ebenezer B. Gay, Sub-Mas- 
ter ; Sarah M. Chandler, Head Asst. ; Margaret W. Veazie, Hen-, 
rietta J. Merrill, Frances L. Dodge, Maria L. Bolan, V. A. M. L. 
Dadley, Elizabeth Swords, Georgianna Hamlin, Nellie A. Pratt, 
Alice Hall, Maria L. Savage, Abbie E. Holt. 

WINTHROP SCHOOL. 

Committee. — Andrew J. Locke, John Sanborn, Nahum Chapin. 

Teachers. — B. F. S. Griffin, Principal; Caleb Murdock "and 
W. B. Atwood, Sub-Masters ; Mary A. E. Sanborn, Head Asst. ; 
Harriet E. Frye, Bial W. Willard, A. P. Mouhon, Mary F. Goldth- 
waite, Abby M. Clarke, Josephine A. Lees, Jennie E. Toby, Elsie 
A. Woodward. 



37 

HARVARD SCHOOL. 

Committee. — M. H. Merriam, J. F. Hunnewcll, William R. 
Bradford, J. W. Rand. 

Teachers. — Warren E, Eaton, Principal ; Darius Hadley, Sub- 
Master ; Abbie B. Fiske, Head Asst. ; Ann E. Weston, Lois A. 
Rankin, Fannie B. Hall, Fidelia L. Howland, Susan H. Williams, 
Emma F. Thomas. 



CHANGE. OF TEACHERS DURING THE YEAR 1869. 

BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 

RESIGNED. APPOINTED. 

ELLA M. HLLL, NANCY W. CHANDLER, 

CLARA S. NYE, MARY 0. BABCOCK, 

C. A. W. TOWLE, MARY A. EATON, 

HARRIET A. MARCY. EDITH L. HOWE, 

EMMA S. RANDLETT. 

PEESCOTT SCHOOL. 

MARIETTA BAILEY, JULIA C. POWERS. 

WAKREN SCHOOL. 

SAMUEL G. STONE, EBENEZER B. GAY, 

SARAH M. GINN. ELIZABETH SWORDS. 

WINtHROP SCHOOL. 

MARIA A. HOLT, E. R. STONE, 

H. V. RICHARDSON, JENNIE E. TOBY, 

W. B. ATWOOD. 

HARVARD SCHOOL. 

LUCY S. BURGESS, FIDiy^IA L. HOWLAND, 

OTIS L. BONNEY. DARIUS HADLEY. 



38 

* 

In consequence of failing health, Mr. Griffin, who 
had for many years conducted the Winthrop School 
with prudence and energy, retired, near the close of 
the summer term, from the active duties of his position. 
Not realizing material recovery from his illness he 
presented his resignation to the Board in November, 
which was accepted, " to take effect on the 1st of 
March next." To continue to Mr Grffin the honors 
and income of his position for six months, was a just 
compliment to his fidelity. ^ 

Since the^ opening of the fall term, the Winthrop 
School has been under the charge of Mr. Caleb Mur- 
dock, and is in every respect prosperous. 

The general management and progress of the Gram- 
mar Schools are highly satisfactory. The government 
is good — for the most kind, energetic, and elevating. 
Yet the rod is in favor with many teachers and is 
frequently employed to secure obedience and industry ; 
but its use is controlled by such mildness and prudence 
that I rarely hear a complaint respecting corporal 
punishment. Two or three years ago such complaints 
were quite common, and I sometimes saw marks which 
indicated haste and needless severity. The practice of 
making a monthly report to the Superintendent of 
all cases of punishment, has induced greater caution 
in the use of the rod. Still it is too frequently resorted 
to now, and nothing will insure its general disuse but 
an increase of the moral forces of the schools, and correct 



39 

government at home. It cannot be abolished by law 
without detriment to public order ; yet every possible 
means should be employed to quicken the consciences 
of children and stimulate their better aspirations, so 
as to elevate them above the necessity of applying 
physical force. 

In the methods of instruction there has been good 
improvement, though enough of routine may yet be 
found. The skill and experience of the principals are 

« 

annually becoming more effective in the lower classes. 
This is essential to success ; and when the right distri- 
bution of labor and talents is made in these schools, 
better results will be achieved than have yet been wit- 
nessed. Every class should feel the moulding influence 
of him who presides over the school. 

In each Grammar School there are six classes ; and 
when a class is too large to be instructed by a single 
teacher, it is divided into two or more divisions, accord- 
ing to the number of pupils it contains. 

All the classes are examined monthly by the teachers, 
and twice a year by the principals who make the results 
of their investigations the bases of promotions. These 
examinations are conducted by means of written ques- 
tions and are productive of much good. They awaken 
ambition and make teachers and pupils watchful for 
difficulties to be mastered, and success to be gained, 
and thus make instruction and scholarship more com- 
prehensive and accurate. 



40 

The questions proposed on such occasions are usually 
of a more practical character than those ordinarily given 
out, and consequently tend to connect the daily studies 
with the business of life. 

The usual semi-annual examinations were made by 
myself and the sub-committees. In conducting the 
examination in the winter I generally used written ques- 
tions, and endeavored to perform my work so as fairly 
to test the attainments made by the pupils, to ascertain 
the comparative progress of parallel divisions, and to 
indicate to teachers the desirableness of making uniform 
progress in corresponding classes. I made a record of 
the results obtained in the several classes which I 
examined, but they had pursued their studies under such 
a diversity of circumstances, that a publication of the 
record would do injustice to many teachers and pupils. 

At the summer examination special attention was 
paid to the first classes, as they were about to graduate. 
Sets of questions were prepared by myself in the differ- 
ent branches pursued, and the examination was con- 
ducted in the presence of the respective sub-committees, 
who decided upon the claims of each pupil to the 
honors of graduation. • In the other classes I made 
the examination in geography and grammar ; and to 
some extent in arithmetic. The results obtained were 
in most cases good. A few divisions exhibited a Avant 
of enthusiasm on the part of the teachers, and vague- 
ness of apprehension on the part of the scholars. 



41 

The schools were found to be working much more 
than they were the previous year. 

The graduating exercises were occasions of peculiar 
interest to the scholars and their numerous friends. 
The attendant crowds exceeded the capacities of the 
halls where the exercises were held, and in some 
instances visitors could not find standing room. The 
performances of the pupils reflected much credit upon 
themselves and their teachers. . 



NAMES OF aRADUATES. 



BUNKER HILL SCHOOL. 



Albee, Eunice H. 
Brooks, Lizzie G. 
Baker, Sarah 
Bean, Nellie M. 
Costellow, Carrie E. 
Frost, Sarah L. 
Fuller, Abby F. 
Hitchings, Anna 
Hannon, Ellen J. 
Hall, Ida J. 
Learnard, Marietta E. 
M'Carthy, Katie C. 
Porter, Fannie G, 
Skilton, Ida M. 
Tarbox, Ida C. 
Wentworth, Ella L. 



Butler, Edw. B. 
Bijnce, Geo. C. 



Furbush, William D. 
Fox, Edw. H. 
Fenderson, John S, 
Gardner, GuyH. 
Lowe, Chas. F. 
M'Carthy, Eugene 
Magoun, Chas. J. 
Orne, Chas. W, 
Orne, Edward A. 
Eeed, Frank 
Stevens, Edward J. 
Sawyer, Edward M. 
Stone, Eichard 
Turner, Charles A. 
Trowbridge, Joseph H. 
Wetherbee, John H. 
White, Frank C. 
Watts, Lawrence H. 
Woofflndale, Charles S. 



42 



HARVARD SCHOOL 



Childs, Carrie E. 
Frost, Martha R. 
Gary, Cally E. 
O'Conner, Nellie M. 
Prescott, Mary H. 
Swain, Hattie M. 
Turner, Hattie E. 
Whitehouse, Alice E. 
Walker, Fannie W. 



Canen, Geo. C 
Dinneen, Wm. J, 
Hunt, EUery J. 
Lyman, James F. 
Murphy, John R. 
O'Connor, John J. 
Seymour, Frank G. 
Toomey, Thomas F. 
Raymond, Richard 



WINTHROP SCHOOL. 



Baldwin, C. Maria 
Boswojth, Emma J. 
Butterfield, Ella 
Brown, Tillie P. 
Barkman, Lucretia F. 
Courtney, Eraelia L. 
Flowers, Olive 
Hodgkins, Carrie L. 
Hemity, l^ary F. 
Johnson, Eliza J. 
Kerille, Addie B. 
Martin, Rosetta T. 
Miskelly, Nora B. 
Mann, Mary E. 



Story, Martha A. 
Stark, Eva M. 
Woffindale, E. W. 

Colby, Wm. M. 
Crowley, Daniel J. 
Gerry, W. J. 
Hatch, Edw. O. 
Marshall, Ernest E. 
Norton, Chas. H. 
Preston, George H. 
Taylor, Nathaniel O. 
Wills, Willie F. 



Bailey, Ada 
Bowker, Emma 
Bowker, Carrie 
Byram, Ida 
Burns, Eliza 
Coll, Mattie 
Coll, Ella 
Felton, Abbie 
Hardy, Roswell 
Hale, Frank 
Hall, Moses 
Hanson, Wm. 
Hams, Eva 
Johnson, Ida 
Knight, Abbie 
Lyon, James 



WARREN SCHOOL, 



Martin, Mary 
Olmstead, Emma 
Priest, Emma 
Picker, Ella 
Pierce, Hattie 
Smith, Ella 
Squire, Isabella 
Smith, Anna 
Studley, Nellie 
Whitcomb, Ella 

M'Auliffe, Daniel 
Morse, Henry 
Pierce, Ernest 
Parkman, Wm. 
Roberts, Walker 



43 



WARREN SCHOOL Continued. 



Linnell, Alice 
Locke, Annie L. 
M'Gaw, Lizzie 
Manning, Catherine 



Sewell, Arthur 
Simonds, Frod. 
White, Lawrence 



PRESCOTT SCHOOL, 



Blandin, Ella F. 
Blandin, Mary H. 
Braley, Gertrude W. 
Brewer, Harriet E. 
Corcoran, Mary A. 
De Costa, Lizzie 
Essam, Mary E. 
Harmon, Hattie 
Haskins, Deet L. 
Hatch, Hattie F. 
Hayden, Hattie C. 
Heaton, Eva M. 
Holbrook, Josephine H. 
Kidder, Carrie N. 
M'Gowan, Katie E. 
Moody, Mary A. 
Murphy, Lilly E. 
Norton, Dora F. 
Orne, Mary E. 
Plaisted, Eva S. 
Reed, Ella 



Richards, Clara A. 
Summers, Sarah B. 

Barnes, John A. 
Barnicoat, William H. 
Dadman, Hari-y E. 
Elliot, Charles C. 
Faunce, William R. 
Fish, Howard W, 
Foster, Robert G. 
Gabriel, George W. 
Gill, William R. 
Huntley, Arthur J. 
Jenkins, George H. 
Mayers, William F. 
Paine, Jaazaniah G. 
Stetefeld, William 
Stevens, Wendell L. 
Vose, Frank 
Williams, Arthur F. 



The practice of giving familiar lectures, commenced 
two years ago, has been continued through the past 
year with much success. Many addresses have been 
delivered, on practical subjects, by members of the 
Committee, the Superintendent, and influential citizens. 
These addresses, delivered with much regularity at the 
Prescott School, and occasionally at the Bunker Hill, 
Warren, and Winthrop, have interested the pupils and 
opened to them new fields of thought and information. 



44 

With but little difficulty arrangements might be made 

for semi-monthly lectures in each school. This method 

t 
of oral teaching would greatly profit the children, and 

awaken in the public mind a deeper interest in the 
cause of education. 

Should algebra, rhetoric, natural philosophy, &c., be 
introduced as regular studies into Grammar Schools'? 
I recently sent to the Superintendents of schools in the 
principal cities in this country, a circular containing 
this among many inquiries. About thirty gentlemen 
of high standing as educators have replied ; and, with- 
out exception, they answer in the negative, and most 
of them 'with emphasis. They were, also, generally 
agreed in the opinion that these and similar branches 
should be presented orally to the pupils, so that they 
may obtain some knowledge of their elementary prin- 
ciples. Ample provision has been made for this in the 
course of study ; and, whenever that is properly carried 
out, the demands of the case will be fully met. 



45 



HIGH SCHOOL. 

Oommiti'tee. 

GEOEGE W. GAEDNER, ABEAM E. CUTTEE, 

GEOEGE A. HAMILTON, JAMES E. HUNNEWELL, 

ANDEEW J. BAILEY. 

Teachers. 

CAtiEB EMERY, Pkincipal. 
JOHN G. ADAMS, NATHAN W. LITTLEFIELD, Sub-Masters. 

ASSISTANTS. 

CATHARINE WHITNEY, SOPHIA E. FAULKNER, 

DOEA C. CHAMBERLAIN, PAULINE S. DOWNES. 

At the close of the summer term, Miss Mary Lorette 
Furber, who had been in the school one year and had 
won a very high reputation as a teacher, tendered her 
resignation. Miss Pauline S. Uownes has been ap- 
pointed to take her place, and is giving good evidence 
of her fitness for the position. 

At the opening of the fall term it was found neces- 
sary, in consequence of the increase of pupils, to 
appoint an additional sub-master, and the committee 
made choice of Mr. Nathan "W, Littlefield, valedictorian 
of the class of ' 69 at Dartmouth College. His success 
vindicates the wisdom of their selection. 

This school is in a state of gratifying prosperity. 

It was thoroughly examined by the sub-committee 
in February, and was found to be in all respects in 
good ctndition. 



r7""j 46 

In July a written examination in the principal 
studies was held under the direction of the Superin- 
tendent. As this was the first written examination of 
the school, and was designed to affect the promotion of 
the scholars as well as to test their attainments, it was 
regarded by them with no little interest. Its announce- 
ment was followed by a greatly increased application 
to study. The result of the examination was highly 
creditable to teachers and pupils. 

The senior class, consisting of six boys and seventeen 
girls, graduated on the 16th of July. A large and 
appreciative audience witnessed the exercises, and by 
their attention and other appropriate means expressed 
their cordial approval. 

The regular order of exercises was interrupted by a 
very pleasant episode, the hanging of a large and beau- 
tiful engraving representing the passage of the Delaware 
by Washington. The picture was the gift of the gra- 
duating class ; and it is hoped it may soon be accom- 
panied by other specimens of art equally spirited and 
appropriate. 

NAMES OF GRADUATES. 

Marietta F. Allen, Emma F. Hanson, 

Lucy M. Archer, Emma L, Hintz, 

Clarabell Bacheller, Ella S. M'Kay, 

Ellen S. Brown, Lucy M'Near, 

Kate S. Childs, Emma S. Randlett, 

Eva F. Gulliver, Sylvia A. Richards* 



47 



Helen G. Roberts, 
Geogianna F. Rockwell, 
Emma Stearns, 
Virginia C. Walker, 
Mattie E. Witherell, 



Oliver H. Everett, 
Lyman B. Fisk, 
Frederic P. Forster, 
Gideon F. Haynes, 
Lewis G. Smith, 



Joseph W. "Warren, 

Five members of the class were fitted for college, and 
four enterea Harvard University. 

The examination of candidates for admission to this 
school was held on Tuesday, the 13th of July, and was 
attended by one hundred and fifty pupils, eighty-eight 
girls and sixty-two boys. One hundred and thirty-four 
reached the standard fixed by the Board. Some who 
failed ranked very low, and this seriously afiected the 
general standing • 4 

Average p^* cent, obtained by all the candidates. 

Arithmetic, 

Girls, .... 58 . 
Boys, .... 68 . 
Girls and Boys, 62 . 

At the opening of the fall term, one hundred and 
twenty-seven pupils entered the junior class, all of whom 
are now members of the school. 

From Bunker Hill School, 12 boys, 8 girls, Total 20 

" 29 
» *5 
" 22 
" 15 
" 6 



Geography. 


Grammar. 


History 


77 . 


. 66 . 


. 77 


82 . 


. 71 . 


. 87 


79 . 


. 68 . 


. 81 



" Prescott 


a 


13 


" Warren, 


u 


12 


" Winthrop, 


(( 


8 


'• Harvard, 


li 


7 


" Private schools. 


3 



8 


girls, 


16 


(( 


23 


(( 


14 


<( 


8 


(( 


3 


u 



5& 



72 



127 



48 

Average time spent by these pupils iu the Grammar 
Schools was 5 years and 11 J months; this is about 
one month more than the average time spent in the 
Grammar Schools by the class of '68. 

To accommodate the large increase of scholars, two 
rooms on the upper floor of the City Hall were fur- 
nished with desks, and have been occupi^^ since the 
beginning of the term by the second middle class, under 
the charge of Mr. Adams and Miss Faulkner. This 
arrangement, though the best that could be made, is 
attended with many inconveniences, interferes with the 
regular work of the school, and is very objectionable to 
many parents. 

Military drill, which gave so much interest to the boys 
last year, has been suspended for want of a suitable 
place for the exercise. This is no light ifiisfortune. 

The girls have been regularly trained in gymnastics, 
and have derived from them pleasure and profit. 

Since the opening of the fall term, the practice of 
making a monthly written examination has been intro- 
duced, and is exerting a favorable influence. It in- 
duces application and thoroughness. 

The High School includes three courses ; the regular 
High School Course, the College Course, and the English 
an& Commercial Course. The first and second are four 
years in length ; the last, three. 

Each course is complete and thorough. The last 
affords ample opportunities for young people to obtain a 



49 

good English education ; and it is greatly to be regretted 
that there are not more of our youth who avail them- 
selves of its advantages. There are nearly three thou- 
sand persons in this city from fifteen to twenty years of 
age, and doubtless many of these ought to be connected 
with this school. Pressure of business or poverty may 
be urged for non-attendance, but a failure to appreciate 
the worth ot education is a potent cause. Should the 
pulpit, the press, and the schools speak properly 
concerning the value of education, hundreds of children 
would remain for a longer period at the fountains of 
knowledge. 

This school, in regard to organization and studies, is 
up to the highest limit indicated by the statute which 
authorizes its support ; and, in respect to variety and 
thoroughness of instruction, stands among the first of 
its grade in the country. All its teachers are fully qual- 
ified for the positions they hold. The varied experi- 
ence of its Principal, acquired in this and other, schools, 
insures fullness and accuracy in teaching, and eminently 
fits him for the training of youth. 

In its organization and range of studies, the school 
stands far higher now than it did in the early years 
of its history. During its first decade, its course of 
instruction was limited to three years ; since then it 
■has occupied four. Two years ago a thorough English 
course was established. 



50 

It is often remarked that scholars remain in this school 
but a short time, and there is too much truth in the 
statement ; but the same may be said of pupils in the 
Grammar Schools. A comparison of the classes in the 
High School with the classes in the Grammar Schools 
shows that the advantage, in respect to permanence, is 
decidedly in favor of the former. 



Table showing the number, average age, &c., of 
scholars admitted to the High School from 1848 to 1869. 







No. admitted. 1 


Average Age. INo. graduated. 






Boys. 1 


Girls. Boya, 1 Girls, 
y. m. 1 y. m. 


Boys. 


Girls. 


Per cent. 
Graduated. 


Class 


of 1848. 


40 


48 


14 7 


15 3 


2 


14 


18 




1849. 


26 


30 


13 10 


14 6 





9 


16 




1850. 


34 


25 


13 8 


14 5 


8 


12 


84 




1851. 


22 


18 


14 


14 9 


2 


5 


17 




1852. 


30 


36 


14 2 


14 4 


12 


11 


35 




1853. 


22 


32 


13 9 


14 5 


8 


13 


39 




1854. 


28 


40 


14 8 


14 4 


5 


19 


35 




1855. 


35 


41 


14 3 


14 11 


7 


14 


28 




1856. 


36 


42 


14 3 


14 8 


8 


15 


29 




1857. 


38 


66 


14 6 


14 8 


6 


10 


15 




1858. 


39 


57 


14 7 


14 4 


9 


19 


29 




1859. 


39 


43 


14 5 


14 8 


3 


14 


21 




1860. 


14 


27 


14 9 


14 9 


1 


11 


29 




1861. 


32 


59 


14 3 


14 9 


4 


20 


26 




1862. 


26 


48 


14 3 


14 9 


3 


21 


32 




1863. 


25 


51 


14 6 


14 9 


6 


20 


34 




1864. 


29 


34 


14 6 


14 4 


6 


14 


32 




1865. 


29 


47 


14 7 


14 11 


6 


17 


30 




1866. 


26 


38 


14 4 


15 1 


6 


17 


36 




1867. 


33 


34 


14 6 


15 1 










1868. 


47 


52 


14 6 


14 11 






' 




1869. 


54 


72 


14 7 


14 9 









From the foregoing table it appears that there has 
been great uniformity in respect to the age of pupils 



51 

admitted to* this school. Of the twenty-two classes 
admitted, the youngest was received in 1850, and the 
oldest, in 1867. In two classes — those of '48 and 
'60 — the boys were older than the boys of the class of 
'69 ; in three, of the same age ; ij;i sixteen, younger. In 
six classes the girls were older than the girls in the class 
of '69 ; in five, of the same age ; in ten, younger. 
Pupils generally enter schools of this grade under fifteen 
years of age. If much younger than fifteen, they^are 
not sufficiently developed in intellect to pursue success- 
fully the studies prescribed ; if much older, they will 
not remain to pursue them. 

The membership of this school has increased consider- 
ably during the last two years. This result arises from 
several causes. The school has been made more attrac- 
tive to our youth than it was a few years ago ; and the 
baseless prejudice against it has greatly diminished. 
Moreover the advantages of protracting the period of 
• study have been presented to pupils in the Grammar 
Schools, and this has induced some to enter the High 
School. These are the principal causes of growth. 

If the right influence is exerted in the lower grades 
of schools, if children are taught to appreciate that cul- 
ture which is one of the essentials to happiness and 
success in life ; and if the High School fully meets the 
wants of our youth and is sustained by public sentiment 
as it should be, it will scarcely be able, even with the 
anticipated enlargement of its building, to accommodate 
its increasing numbers. 



52 

Names of Scholars belonging to the High School at 
the close of the year 1869. 



SENIOR CLASS 



Bradford, Oscar H. 
Cutter, Olin W. 
Forster, Horace O. 
Gibson, Charles G. 
Graves, Frank N. 
Priest, Henry P. 
Southworth, Robert A. 
Stevens, Edwin P. 
. Twombly, Wm. L. D. 
White, George W. 

Beddoe, Hattie E. 
Bennet, Sarah M. 
Bent, Helen M. 
Blanchard, Abbie L. 
Blanchard, Lizzie 
Blanchard, Mary W. 



Brown, Lizzie F. 
Conway, Mary F. 
Field, Sarah E. 
Flanders, Carrie A. 
Hill, Lizzie C. 
Howe, Delia S. 
Lams on, Fanny M. 
M'Gowan, Mary E. 
Moore, Ada A. 
Palmer, Ida E. 
Potter, Annie L. 
Prescott, Susie J. 
Stone, Mary E. 
Ritner, Ella 
Sturtevant, Lizzie F. 
Swan, Louisa T. 



FIRST MIDDLE CLASS. 



Benn, John M. 
Emery, Charles B. 
Gilman, Frank P. 
Merrick, Wm. O. 
Studley, John H. 
Tufts, Frederic 
Warren, Edgar B. 
Wyman, Howard 

Blanchard, Hattie E. 
Burcham, Harriet L. 
Cutler, Eliza T. 
Denvir, Annie E. 
Duchemin, Clara W. 



Maloney, Annie T. 
Metcalf, Emma T. 
Page, Sarah G. 
Patch, Ella F. 
Peterson, Izora A. 
Robie, Susan A. 
Talpey, Emma C. 
Todd, Mary E. 
Toppan, Lizzie J. 
Wiley, Abbie H. 
Gerry, Sarah F. 
Harding, Grace H. 
Hatch, Alice S. 



SECOND MIDDLE CLASS 



Ballou, Frank O. 
Bolan. Joel C. 
Coburn, Arthur B. 
Dadmaun, John G. B. 



Atwood, Abbie E. A. 
Bickford, Hattie , 
Burroughs, Bella M. 
Carlton, Emma F. 



53 



SECOND MIDDLE CLASS— Continued. 



Davis, Simon 
Delano, Henry C. 
Dodge, Frank A. 
Dodge, Walter W. 
Dow, Clarence 
Flanders, Charles A. 
Hall, Benj. F. 
Henry, Wm. L. 
Hook, Charles P. 
Howes, Albert C. 
Manning, Mark S. 
McNally, John J. 
Merrick, Edward C. 
Mills, Arthur L. 
Morse, Wm. K. 
O'Meara, Stephen F. 
Pickthall, Edward 
Pierce, Thomas M. 
Pitts, Frank A. 
Pope, Frank J. 
Kobertson, Arthur R. 
Sawyer, George O. Jr. 
Smith, James O. 
Stevens, Milon F. 
Swain, George W. 
Swallow, George N. 
Swan, George A. 
Webber, Edward H. 
White, Edwin M. 
Whitney, George A. 
Whitney, William A. 



Childs, Mary S. 
Copeland, Hattie A. 
Crozier, Annie M. 
Cutler, Flora 
Delany, Mary E. 
Doane, Helen 
Emery, Marcia 
Evans, Georgianna M. 
Ferrin, Fanny A. 
Fitzgerald, Georgia 
Gale, Ada J. 
Haley, Margaret T. 
Hamilton, Louise H. 
Hardy, Carrie A, 
Harmon, Lizzie J. 
Home, Julia E. 
Horton, Emma M. 
Hutchins, Emma 
Jones, Hattie M. 
Leonard, Emma J. 
Parker, Olive C. 
Peterson, Ella A. 
Potter, Ella M. 
Ramsey, Helen E. 
Robinson, Ida A. 
Simpson, Carrie 
Simpson, Lydia A. 
Stone, Nellie C. 
Tennant, Lydia E. 
Warren, Geogianna H. 
Whitman, AlmiraL. 
• Wiley.fldaR. 
York, Dora. 



JUNIOR CLASS. 



Barnes, John A. 
Barnicoat, Wm. H. 
Bunce, George C. 
Butler, Edward B. 
Burckes, James H. 
Carven, George C. 
Colby, Willie M. 
Crowley, Daniel J. 



Albee, Eunice H. 
Bailey, Ada J. 
Baldwin, Carrie M. 
Bateman, Lucretia F. 
Bean, Nellie M. 
Blandin, Ella F. 
Blandin, Mary H. 
Bowker, Carrie L. 



54 



Dadmun, Harry E. 
Elliot, Charles C. 
Eaunce, Wm. R. 
Fox, Edward H. 
Gabriel, George "W. 
Gardner, Guy H. 
Gerry, Wm. J. 
Green, Eli G. 
Greenleaf, Eobert "W. 
Hale, Frank C. 
Hall, Moses C. 
Henderson, George A. 
Hanson, Wm. H. 
Hardy, Roswell B. 
Hatch, Edward O. 
Huntley, Arthur T. 
Jenkins, George H. 
Lyman, James V. 
Lyon, James E. ' 
McAuliffe, Daniel 
Marshall, Ernest C. 
Mayers, Wm. F. 
Murphy, John R. 
Norton, Charles H. 
O'Connor, John C. 
Orne, Edward A. 
Paine, Jaazaniah G. 
Parkinson, Wm. 
Pierce, Ernest R. 
Preston, George W. 
Raymond, Richard 
Reed, Frank 
Roberts, Walter H. 
Seymour, Frank G. 
Sewall, Arthur W. 
Simonds, Fred. M. 
Spicer, Vibe 
Stevens, Wendell P. 
Stone, Richard H. 
Trowbridge, Joseph 
Turner, Charles 
Twomey, Thomas F. 
White, Frank H. 
Williams, Arthur F. 
Woofindale, Charles S. 
Vose, Frank 



Bowker, Emma J. 
Bosworth, Emma J. 
Bradford, Alice S. 
Brooks, Lizzie G. 
Brown, Tillie P. 
Byrnes, Eliza G. 
Byram, Ida L. 
Butterfield, Ella F. 
Childs, Carrie 
Coll, Madalena F. 
Coll, Marietta J. 
Corcoran, Mary A. 
Courtenay, Emily L. 
De Costa, Lizzie 
Essam, Mary E. 
Felton, Abby M. 
Flowers, Mary O. 
Frost, Martha R, 
Frost, Sarah L. 
Gary, CallyE. 
Hall, Ida J. 
Harmon, Hattie C. 
Harris, Eva 
Haskins, Deett L. 
Hatch, Hattie 
Hayden, Hattie C. 
Heaton, Eva M. 
Hemity, Mary T. 
Hodgkins, Carrie B. 
Holbrook, Josephine H. 
Johnston, Eliza J. 
Knight, Abbie T. 
Learned, Marietta E. 
Linnell, Alice J. 
Littlefield, Sarah C. 
Locke, Annie L. 
McGaw, Lizzie C. 
Mann, Mary E. 
Martin, Mary E. 
Martin, Rosetta T. 
Miskelly, Leonora B. 
Moody, Mary E. 
Norton, Dora T. 
O'Connor, Nelly 
Olmstead, Emma C. 



65 



Orne, Mary E. 
Parkhust, Ellen L. 
Pierce, Hattie E. 
Plaisted, Eva S. 
Poor, Emma C. 
Priest, Emma C. » 
Skilton, Ida M. 
Smith, Anna C. 
Smith, Ella T. 
Squire, Isabella M. 



Studlej, Nellie B, 
Summers, Sarah B. 
Swain, Hattie M. 
Trowbridge, Mary A. 
Turner, Hattie E. 
Walker, Fannie W. 
Wentworth, Ella L. 
Whitcomb, Ella F. 
Whitehouse, Alice E. 



MUSIC. 



Music in the Higli and Grammar Schools has been 
successfully taught by Mr. James M. Mason. Mr. 
Mason conducts the exercises with an earnestness and 
skill which interest the pupils and stimulate their at- 
tention to this important branch of education. Many 
children, however, seem to regard the musical exercise 
as a mere pastime, and are reluctant to make those 
efforts necessary to secure real improvement. This 
indifference would be greatly diminished by keeping 
a record of the attainments of the scholars in this, as 
in other branches. , 

Eight new pianofortes have been placed in these 
schools, and the result shows that good instrumcDts 
are more economical than poor ones. 



56 

DRAWING. 

To a limited extent, this useful branch is taught in 
every school in the city. In the Primary Schools the 
work is necessarily very simple and elementary. 

Bartholomew's Drawing Books are used in the High 
and Grammar Schools ; and the pupils in the former, 
and in the higher classes of the latter, are making fair 
progress. 

The teachers were not familiar with this art at the 
time it was introduced, otherwise far better results 
would have been secured, than we are now permitted to 
witness. In order to aid them in this part of their duty, 
I have made an arrangement with the publishers of Mr. 
Bartholomew's works to give the teachers in the High 
and Grammar Schools a course of gratuitous lessons ; 
and Mr. Albert F. Hall, the successful teacher of draw- 
ing in the Institute of Technology in Boston, is now 
performing that service. A successful beginning has 
been made ; and it would be good economy on the 
part of the Board to supplement the instruction already 
provided for, by another course of lessons. 

As the present course is gratuitous the attendance 
is voluntary, and some of the teachers appear quite 
indifferent to the opportunity afforded them. 

TRUANCY. 

One of the most persistent and troublesome evils that 
beset our schools is truancy. Various expedients have 



57 

been adopted to abate this evil, but no city can boast of 
having found a perfect cure. 

Early in the^pring, Mr. S. P. WHite and Mr. Charles 
S. Wooffindale were appointed truant officers ; and their 
services have been abundant, judiciously directed, and 
successful. Still the evil exists. There are truants in 
the Grammar, Intermediate, and Primary Schools. A 
prolific source of truancy is found in the inefficiency or 
viciousness of home influence. The parents of some of 
these ofl"enders are intemperate ; and some utter whole- 
sale falsehoods to screen their wayward children. 

In October, the truant officers presented to the School 
Board a report respecting the proper treatment of in- 
corrigible truants. The report received the favorable 
consideration of the Board, and was immediately sent to 
the City Council. 

After mentioning several methods of dealing with 
truants they say, " Chelsea sends her hardened truants 
away. Connected with the almshouse and farm in 
Lowell is a Eeform School controlled and supported by 
that city. The boys are well fed, comfortably and 
neatly clothed, attend school the greater part of the 
year, aid in carrying on the farm^ and seem to be sur- 
rounded with influences which, if they do not work a 
complete reformation, essentially change them for the 
better. Chelsea pays Lowell for the maintenance of 
each of these truants the sum of two dollars a week ; 
and as far as we can leam the officers of Chelsea 



58 , 

consider it an excellent arrangement, botli as it regards 
economy and the reformation of the children sent there. 
Indeed it seemed to us so excellent Sid * practicable 
a method that we have hastened to call to it the atten- 
tion of your honorable body. And if it appear worthy 
of consideration, we pray that it may receive your 
earliest attention. Lawrence has already made arrange- 
ments with Lowell to send her truants there, and Lynn 
is moving in that direction. You will see, therefore, 
that should the project seem to yourselves and the 
City Council desirable, how necessary it will be that 
steps be taken immediately to perfect the arrangement." 
The recommendation of the truant officers cannot fail 
to receive the prompt and favorable attention of the 
City Council. 



59 



EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS. 

Three public written examinations of teachers have 
been held. The first, of gentlemen, April 7, for the 
vacant sub-mastership in the Warren Grammar School. 
Twenty-six candidates were present, many of whom 
acquitted themselves very honorably. Mr. E. B. Gay 
received the appointment. 

Certificates were not given. 

The second and third, of female teachers, one in May, 
the other in November. 



The following persons obtained the required per cent 
May, 



Mary C. Babcock, 
Mary E. Barstow, 
Etta H. Barstow, 
Addie M. Barstow, 
Nancy Chandler, 
Mary S. Charles, 
Mary S. Dand, 
Mary A. Dunnels, 
Ida A. Emerson, 
Sarah M. Foster, 
Edith L. Howe, 
Abbie E. Holt, 
Emma M. Hoyt, 
Fidelia L. Howland, 
Abbie F. Jaquith, 
Lydia Mendum, 
. Helen M. Newhall, 
Jennie A. Norris, 
Julia C. Powers, 
EUen M. Parker, 



May, Ellen E. Pratt, 

" Jennie E. Tobey, 

" Lucy B. Wiggin, 

" Susan F. Drake, 

Nov. Evantia S. Chesley, 

" Josie S. Chase, 

" Mary A. Eaton, 

" Sarah F. Farrer, 

" Emma L. B. Hintz, 

" C. D. Hayden, 

" L. C. McNear, 

" . N. M. Nute, 

" Carrie E. Osgood, 

" E. S. Eandlett. 

" Mary F. Richards, 

" Addie Sanderson, 

" Georgie A. Smith, 

" Hattie C. Thompson, 

" F. E. Washburn, 

" Mary B. Howland. 



60 



PREPARATION OF TEACHERS. 

The supervisors of public edueation are solicitous 
to procure thoroughly competent teachers, yet they 
make very little provision to aid them in preparing 
for their professional duties. The Normal Schools 
are utterly incapable of supplying the numerous de- 
mands made upon them. But' few teachers, com- 
paratively, graduate from them and the professional 
life of most of those vs^ho do is brief. Consequently 
the cities and large towns are beginning to rely 
upon themselves. Boston has a Normal School and 
a Training School ; and Worcester, Springfield, and 
Woburn have recently established Training Schools 
which are operating very successfully. There is need of 
a preparatory school in this city. It is not dealing fSlrly 
and honorably by the children in our schools, to appoint 
for them teachers who have had neither experience in 
teaching, nor training for their duties. Pupils in 
Public Schools do not learn to teach, by plodding over 
lessons which they design only to recite, yet it appears 
to be thought by many people that young ladies who go 
through these schools are entitled, by that fact, to po- 
sitions as teachers. This is a mischievous notion which 
frequently gives great trouble to committees. 

I have already twice presented to the Board the sub- 
ject of establishing a Training School in this city, and I 
hope it may receive early attention. 



61 

The cheapest and easiest method of accomplishing 
this object would be to locate the school in one of the 
Primary School buildings. 

The following account of the Training School in 
"Woburn will be of interest in this connection. 

" The school was established in July, 1866. A 
school building was selected in the centre of the town, 
with aliout two hundred pupils divided into four Schools 
— two Primary and two Intermediate, the latter cor- 
responding in grade to the first two years in the Boston 
Grammar Schools. They are in two distinct depart- 
ments, with a principal for each department. 

The requisites for admission into the Training School 
are 1st. Candidates must be residents of Woburn; 2d. 
They must be graduates of the High School, or of a 
school of a similar grade ; 3d. It is expected (though 
not made a condition,) that all will teach in the public 
schools of the town. 

They are obliged to remain in the school one year, 
unless needed as teachers elsewhere. They are on pro- 
bation thirteen weeks, receiving no pay. If approved 
then, they continue, at two dollars a week, during the 
remainder of the year. On admission they enter on 
their work of discipline and instruction, under the eye 
of the principal, and are gradually intrusted with the 
work till the entire control of a room is given to them. 
The number so employed should be small, in order to 
secure the best results. 



62 

Thus the teachers in training have the same kind of 
material to work upon that they will find elsewhere, 
while the principal is at hand to point out mistakes, give 
instruction, &c. At the end of a year so spent, the 
graduate comes to her work with confidence. She is no 
longer a raw recruit but a veteran. 

The advantages secured to the town by this school are 
substantially as follows : — 

"1. It furnishes the schools with trained teachers — supplying a 
want that has been deeply felt, and imparting to the school system a 
symmetry and completeness never before possessed. 

" 2. It increases the permanency of teachers by taking away all 
inducements for entering the profession for a short time ; for it is 
improbable that any one will give her services for a year unless she 
intends to continue in the work for a considerable period. 

" 3 It increases the percentage of successful teachers, as compared 
with those who fail, and thereby saves much time and money now 
wasted through inexperience. Of those who have graduated from 
the Training School up to the present time, 93 per cent, have 
succeeded. 

"4. Not only do these advantages result but they are attended 
with an actual saving of expense. The annual cost of the four 
schools in the Training School is less than that of any four similar 
schools in the town. 

" The advantage of such a^school in furnishing trained substitutes 
to fill temporary vacancies ; the facility it affords of introducing new 
methods of instruction ; its tendency to bring about greater uniformity 
of discipline and instruction in the various schools, will readily 
suggest themselves." 



63 



IMPROVEMENT OF THE SCHOOLS. 

A glance at the schools as they were four years 
ago, will aid in showing what has been done for their 
improvement. There was at that time no authorized 
arrangement of studies for the Primary or Grammar 
Schools ; and there was no rule or vote of the School 
Board to indicate how long scholars should remain in 
either grade, or how much they should be required to 
accomplish in a year. Many thousands of dollars were 
paid for instruction, but no plan existed to secure uni- 
formity or system in the labor for which the money 
was paid. The studies had never been classified ; and 
each school was comparatively independent. 

Many of the Primary Schools were crowded to 
excess : several occupied rooms wholly unfit for educa- 
tional purposes ; only four were graded, and not more 
than six were fairly supplied with the incidental requi- 
sites for teaching. In but few was definite attention 
given to printing, writing, or the use of figures. 

In the Grammar Schools there was a great want of 
uniformity. In some of them the course of study, 
as reported to me by the principals, if it could be called 
a course, comprised six years ; in others, seven. Each 
principal regulated the studi/ and progress of his classes 
at his discretion. Pupils usually spent two years before 
taking up written arithmetic, and many of them left 
school before going through the simple rules. No 



64 

instruction was given in declamation, written composi 
tion, map drawing, or writing letters or business 
papers. 

In respect to the High. School, there was a general 
complaint that it did not meet the wants of the people. 
Strong and very injurious prejudices against it widely 
prevailed. To remedy these and similar defects in our 
schools, to utilize in the highest degree the money 
paid for instruction, and to secure to our youth the best 
educational results, much has been accomplished. 

All the Primary Schools but two have been graded ; 
twenty have been supplied with desks and chairs ; and 
every one furnished with the ordinary requisites for 
teaching. The instruction in these schools has been- 
systematized and considerably extended. 

All the children are taught to print ; and those in 
the first classes write, with a pencil, a fair hand, 
and readily perform simple examples in addition, 
subtraction, and multiplication in written arithmetic. 
The standard for admission to the Grammar Schools 
has been raised, and candidates are much better fitted 
for the studies of those schools than they were a few 
years ago. 

The studies of the Grammar Schools have been sys- 
tematically arranged, and parallel classes are advancing 
with nearly equal steps. Physical culture receives daily 
attention ; declamation, written composition, and draw- 
ing, have been introduced into all the classes ; letters 



65 

and the simple forms of business papers are written by 
the higher classes, and book-keeping is now studied by 
the first classes. 

For three years past diplomas have been given to 
pupils that have finished the course of study in these 
schools, and the influence of this measure has been 
salutary. Instead of beginning written arithmetic in 
the third year, as formerly, children now learn the use 
of figures in the Primary Schools, and, during their first 
two years in the Grammar Schools, they obtain a fair 
knowledge of the fundamental rules, and of United 
States Money. The method of conducting writing has 
been greatly improved. Pupils are now trained in 
writing the capital and loop letters in the first two 
years ; formerly, in some of the schools, they spent 
four years without making either. 

The Grammar Schools are, emphatically, the schools 
of the people, and should deal justly and generously 
by the children of the poor. This cannot be done by 
extending the course of study in these schools, for it is 
beyond the reach of three-fourths of the children now, 
but by giving the short-time pupils the instruction they 
need for an early entrance upon the practical duties of 
life. This can be accomplished without injury to 
sound scholarship ; and the measures you have adopted, if 
properly carried out, will do much towards securing this 
most desirable object. Itis a mistake, it is morally wrong, 
to adapt the school system, chiefly to the convenience of 
the few who have time and means at their command 



66 

The higher classes in the Grammar Schools are con- 
siderably larger, and much farther advanced in their 
studies than they were a few years ago : and there is 
no good reason why they may not be still larger in the 
future. These schools may, without undue pressure or 
deterioration in scholarship annually graduate from one 
hundred and fifty to ttvo hundred pupils. 

Calisthenics, military drill, and drawing have been 
introduced into the High School. This school has been 
greatly improved by the establishment of a course of 
English studies ; and, when suitable arrangements are 
made for teaching the sciences, the educational wants 
of our young people will be amply provided for. 

As a result of the various measures adopted, the 
labors of teachers and pupils have been more deiSnitely 
and judiciously directed, the schools have been brought 
into greater harmony with the best conducted schools 
of other cities, and valuable results have been obtained 
in every department of our work. 

The changes which have been introduced have added 
very little if anything to the tasks of the pupils. 
Drawing is an aid to penmanship, composition to gram- 
mar ; and judicious physical exercises develop the bodily 
and mental energies. 

The somewhat prevalent notion that pupils in our 
public schools are required to perform an excess of 
brain work is baseless. That some physically feeble 
children study more than their health allows is quite 



67 

possible, but the remedy for such is very simple : they 
can fall back to a class where the task is lighter. 
Should the fevv over-worked children in any of our 
cities be classed according to their physical strength, 
their offended parents would immediately express their 
indignation. The difficulty is, ambitious fathers and 
mothers want their delicate children to stand at the 
head of their respective classes ; and, to enable them 
to do this, the progress of the classes must be so slow 
that such pupils may not be over-taxed. 

That children in all our cities .suffer for want of 
physical culture is readily admitted. To remedy this 
defect in our schools much has been accomplished ; and 
much more is required. 

In conclusion, gentlemen, I tender to you my thanks 
for your personal and official kindness. The recom- 
mendations which I have thought proper to make, you 
have duly considered, and, with very few exceptions, 
adopted. As a reward for your numerous and trying 
labors, you have the satisfaction of knowing that you 
have contributed much to advance the interests of 
education, and to prepare the youth of this city for 
the responsibilties of active life. Our schools are doing 
well ; and they will, I trust, be far more prosperous in 
the future than they are at present. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. H. TWOMBLY, Sup't of Public Schools. 

Decembeb 30, 1870. 






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STATISTICS of PRIMAl^ SCHOOLS for ISHi). 



] 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

38 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 

31 

32 

33 

34 

35 

36 

37 



Term 



TKACHEKS NAMfi^ 



Helen G. Turner, 
Effie G. Hazen, 
Eliz. B. Norton, 
Lilla Barnard, 
Mary H. Humphrey, 
Ella Worth, 
Rose J. Prescott, 
S. A. Atwood, 



Al. Josephine Siiiiih, 
Eliz. W. Yeaton, 
Abbie P. Richardson, 
Melissa J. A. Conley, 



Jennie D. Smith, 
Frances M. Lane, 
KUen Hadley, 
Carrie E. Osgood, 
M. A. Blanchard, 
Vlmira Delano, 



Martha Yeaton, 
Mary P. Swain, 
P. M. Whittemore, 
Frances B. Butts, 
Louisa W. Huntress, 
Carrie E. Smith, 



Louisa A. Pratt, 
E. A. Prichard, 
E. R. Brower, 
C C. Brower, 
Mary E. Taylor, 
Evalena F. Nelson, 
M. Gilman. 



S, E. Smith, 
L. M. Armstead, 
Ellen M. Armstead, 
CM W. Tilden, 
Carrie A. Rea, 
Fannie A. Foster, 



Location of Pri- 
mary School 
Houses. 



Haverhill Street. 
Cor.Chas.&B.H.Sts, 
do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

Mead Street, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Sullivan Street, 

do. do. 

Medford Street, 

do. do. 

Cross Street, 

do. do. 
Bunker Hill Street, 

do. do. 

Moulton Street, 
do. du, 

do. do. 

do. do. 

Common Street, 
do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

do. do. 

Soley Street, 
Bow Street, 
do. 
do. 
do. 
Richmond Street, 
do. do. 




COMMITTEES ON 

PRIMARY SCHOOL 

DISTRICTS. 



Wm. H. Finney, 
John Turner, 
George H. Marden. 



Chas. E. Daniels, 
A. J. Locke. 



William Peirce, 
Chas. F. Smith, 
Wm. Raymond. 



John Sanborn, 
W. Lithgow, 
Nahum Chapin. 



James F. Hunnewell, 
M. H. Merriam, 
J. W. Rand. 



A. E. Cutter, 
Geo. A. Hamilton, 
Wm. R. Bradford. 



ORDER OF EXERCISES, 



AT THE 



D E T:> I C A T I C) N 



HIGH SCHOOL HOUSE, 



CHAR LEST OWN 

DECEIVtBiilR 14, 187-0. 



PROGRAMME. 



MUSIC. 



]. KEADTNG Selections from the Scriptures, Rev. C. E. Grinnet.l. 



2. PRAYER, Rev. H. W. Warren. 



MUSIC. 



3. STATPjMENT hy George B. Neal, E,S(j., CliairniHii of Comniittee on City 
Proi)erty, on passing tlie Keys to the Mayor, Cliairman ex-offlcio of 
the School Committee. 



4. ADDRESS of his Honor, Mayor Kext. on receiving the Keys and ])assing 
them to the Chairman of the High School Committee. 



.5. ADDRESS of Rev. Dr. Gardner, Chairman of the Higli School Committee 

on receiving the Keys and passing them to the Principal of the High 

School. 



G. ADDRESS by OALicii Kmkiiv, Ks(J., rriiKdpal of tlie Hii^li Scliool, on rocoiviiiK 

tlio Keys. 

M IT S T C . 

7. DEDICATroX ODK. by A. E. CcTTEn. 



DEDICATION ODE. 

There, valor's mouumental pile, 

Here, Academic Hall ; 
Pit .structures for ]iistori(' Iiill, 

And worthy coronal. 

Where swarthy Mars roU'd his black cloud, 

And lighted it with flame. 
Sweet peace is found, and temple raised 

To mild Minerva's name. 

There, as at Freedom's holy shrine, 

Be pilgrim homage paid ; 
Here, scholars scan the classic lino, 

The lofty Iliad. 

For meet it is, in scholar's mind. 

Call it not base alloy. 
To mingle thoughts of Bunker Hill 

With Homer's Siege of Troy. 

Then, side by side thus proudly stand ; 

Due honor give each one ; 
This, dedicate to life's great aim. 

And that, to great deeds done. 



S. SHORT ADDRESSES by the Superintendent and others. 



MUSIC.